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Sample records for week randomised controlled

  1. TIPIT: A randomised controlled trial of thyroxine in preterm infants under 28 weeks' gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Suresh

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infants born at extreme prematurity (below 28 weeks' gestation are at high risk of developmental disability. A major risk factor for disability is having a low level of thyroid hormone which is recognised to be a frequent phenomenon in these infants. At present it is unclear whether low levels of thyroid hormone are a cause of disability, or a consequence of concurrent adversity. Methods We propose an explanatory multi-centre double blind randomised controlled trial of thyroid hormone supplementation in babies born below 28 weeks' gestation. All infants will receive either levothyroxine or placebo until 32 weeks' corrected gestational age. The primary outcome will be brain growth. This will be assessed by the width of the sub-arachnoid space measured using cranial ultrasound and head circumference at 36 weeks' corrected gestational. The secondary outcomes will be (a thyroid hormone concentrations measured at increasing postnatal age, (b status of the hypothalamic pituitary axis, (c auxological data between birth and 36 weeks' corrected gestational age, (d thyroid gland volume, (e volumes of brain structures (measured by magnetic resonance imaging, (f determination of the extent of myelination and white matter integrity (measured by diffusion weighted MRI and brain vessel morphology (measured by magnetic resonance angiography at expected date of delivery and (g markers of morbidity including duration of mechanical ventilation and chronic lung disease. We will also examine how activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis modulates the effects of thyroid supplementation. This will contribute to decisions about which confounding variables to assess in large-scale studies. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN89493983

  2. Effects of a one week multidisciplinary inpatient self-management programme for patients with fibromyalgia: a randomised controlled trial

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    Hamnes Bente

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-management programmes (SMP are recommended for patients with fibromyalgia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effects of a one week multidisciplinary inpatient self-management programme on psychological distress, skills as a consumer of health services, self-efficacy, and functional and symptomatic consequences of fibromyalgia (FM. Methods A randomised controlled two-armed, assessor-blinded trial with three-week follow-up to evaluate SMP. Primary outcomes were the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-20 and the Effective Musculoskeletal Consumer Scale (EC-17, while secondary outcomes included the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ and Self-efficacy scales for pain, function and symptoms (ASES. Results 150 patients with FM were randomised to one week one SMP (n = 75 or to a waiting list control group (n = 75. Of these, 58 participants in the treatment group and 60 in the control group completed the study. At three weeks’ follow up there was a significant difference in EC-17 (0-100 in favour of the treatment group (mean difference 4.26, 95 CI 0.8 to 7.7, p = 0.02. There were no differences between the groups for any of the other outcomes. Conclusion This study shows that in patients with FM the SMP had no effect on psychological distress, functional and symptomatic consequences and self-efficacy, except for a small short-term effect on skills and behaviour that are important for managing and participating in health care (EC-17. Clinical Trials.gov Id: NCT01035125. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov Id: NCT01035125

  3. Effectiveness of a once per week delivery of a family-based childhood obesity intervention: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

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    Khanal, S; Welsby, D; Lloyd, B; Innes-Hughes, C; Lukeis, S; Rissel, C

    2016-12-01

    The effectiveness of once per week (OPW) delivery of a family-based childhood obesity programme was compared with twice per week (TPW) delivery in achieving health and behavioural outcomes at a population level and in improving programme attendance. Both programmes were delivered over 10-weeks, and the contact hours in the OPW and TPW programmes were 20 and 35-h, respectively. A cluster-randomised controlled trial with stratification by local health district was conducted. Height, weight and global self esteem of participants and parent-reported diet and physical activity were measured at programme commencement and completion and at 6-month follow-up. Attendance was defined as the proportion of total sessions attended. There were no differences between the OPW and TPW arms in changes from pre-programme baseline for body mass index (BMI) z-score and other health and behaviourial measures at programme completion and at follow-up, except for the increase in physical activity outside of the programme at programme completion (OPW, 3.5 h/week; TPW, 1.9 h/week; p = 0.03). OPW and TPW participants attended 71.2% and 69.2% of the total sessions, respectively. Attendance was the only contributing factor to a positive BMI z-score outcome (β = -2.45, p family-based childhood obesity programme can be delivered OPW with no compromise to health or behavioural outcomes compared with TPW. Higher attendance, as a proportion of available sessions, leads to better outcomes for children. © 2015 World Obesity Federation.

  4. A 10-Week Multimodal Nutrition Education Intervention Improves Dietary Intake among University Students: Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial

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    Mohd Razif Shahril

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of implementing multimodal nutrition education intervention (NEI to improve dietary intake among university students. The design of study used was cluster randomised controlled design at four public universities in East Coast of Malaysia. A total of 417 university students participated in the study. They were randomly selected and assigned into two arms, that is, intervention group (IG or control group (CG according to their cluster. The IG received 10-week multimodal intervention using three modes (conventional lecture, brochures, and text messages while CG did not receive any intervention. Dietary intake was assessed before and after intervention and outcomes reported as nutrient intakes as well as average daily servings of food intake. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA and adjusted effect size were used to determine difference in dietary changes between groups and time. Results showed that, compared to CG, participants in IG significantly improved their dietary intake by increasing their energy intake, carbohydrate, calcium, vitamin C and thiamine, fruits and 100% fruit juice, fish, egg, milk, and dairy products while at the same time significantly decreased their processed food intake. In conclusion, multimodal NEI focusing on healthy eating promotion is an effective approach to improve dietary intakes among university students.

  5. Saxagliptin is non-inferior to glipizide in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled on metformin alone: a 52-week randomised controlled trial

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    Gause-Nilsson, Ingrid; Göke, Burkhard; Gallwitz, Baptist; Eriksson, Johan; Hellqvist, Asa

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Assess the efficacy and safety of saxagliptin vs. glipizide, as add-on therapy to metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and inadequate glycaemic control on metformin alone. Methods and patients: A total of 858 patients (age ?18 years; glycated haemoglobin [HbA1c] >6.5?10.0%; on stable metformin doses ?1500mg/day) were randomised 1:1 to saxagliptin 5mg/day or glipizide up-titrated as needed from 5?20mg/day for 52 weeks. The primary objective wa...

  6. Saxagliptin is non-inferior to glipizide in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled on metformin alone: a 52-week randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Gause-Nilsson, Ingrid; Göke, Burkhard; Gallwitz, Baptist; Eriksson, Johan; Hellqvist, Asa

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Assess the efficacy and safety of saxagliptin vs. glipizide, as add-on therapy to metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and inadequate glycaemic control on metformin alone. Methods and patients: A total of 858 patients (age ?18 years; glycated haemoglobin [HbA1c] >6.5?10.0%; on stable metformin doses ?1500mg/day) were randomised 1:1 to saxagliptin 5mg/day or glipizide up-titrated as needed from 5?20mg/day for 52 weeks. The primary objective wa...

  7. Commercial weight loss diets meet nutrient requirements in free living adults over 8 weeks: A randomised controlled weight loss trial

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    Macdonald Ian

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To investigate the effect of commercial weight loss programmes on macronutrient composition and micronutrient adequacy over a 2 month period. Design Adults were randomly allocated to follow the Slim Fast Plan, Weight Watchers Pure Points Programme, Dr Atkins' New Diet Revolution, or Rosemary Conley's "Eat Yourself Slim" Diet & Fitness Plan. Setting A multi-centre randomised controlled trial. Subjects 293 adults, mean age 40.3 years and a mean BMI 31.7 (range 27–38 were allocated to follow one of the four diets or control group. Subjects completed a 7-day food and activity diary at baseline (prior to randomisation and after 2 months. Diet records were analysed for nutrient composition using WinDiets (research version. Results A significant shift in the macronutrient composition of the diet with concurrent alteration of the micronutrient profile was apparent with all diets. There was no evidence to suggest micronutrient deficiency in subjects on any of the dietary regimens. However, those sub-groups with higher needs for specific micronutrients, such as folate, iron or calcium may benefit from tailored dietary advice. Conclusion The diets tested all resulted in considerable macronutrient change and resulted in an energy deficit indicating dietary compliance. Health professionals and those working in community and public health should be reassured of the nutritional adequacy of the diets tested. Trial Registration Number NCT00327821

  8. A 12-week low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet improves metabolic health outcomes over a control diet in a randomised controlled trial with overweight defence force personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, Caryn; McPhee, Julia; Harris, Nigel; Williden, Micalla; Prendergast, Kate; Schofield, Grant

    2017-07-12

    Overweight, obesity, and poor health is becoming a global concern for defence force personnel. Conventional nutrition guidelines are being questioned for their efficacy in achieving optimal body composition and long-term health. This study compared the effects of a 12-week low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet with a conventional, high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet on weight reduction and metabolic health outcomes in at-risk New Zealand Defence Force personnel. In this randomised controlled trial, 41 overweight personnel were assigned to intervention and control groups. Weight, waist circumference, fasting lipids, and glycaemic control were assessed at baseline and at 12 weeks. Within-group change scores were analysed using the t statistic and interpreted using a p resistance; moderate, likely beneficial effects for HDL cholesterol, triglyceride:HDLc ratio and HbA1c; and a small, likely harmful effect for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. This dietary approach shows promise for short-term weight loss and improved metabolic health outcomes conditions compared with mainstream recommendations. It should be offered to defence force personnel at least as a viable alternative means to manage their weight and health.

  9. Randomised controlled trial of a 12 week yoga intervention on negative affective states, cardiovascular and cognitive function in post-cardiac rehabilitation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Alan; Kiat, Hosen; Denniss, A Robert; Cheema, Birinder S; Bensoussan, Alan; Machliss, Bianca; Colagiuri, Ben; Chang, Dennis

    2014-10-24

    Negative affective states such as anxiety, depression and stress are significant risk factors for cardiovascular disease, particularly in cardiac and post-cardiac rehabilitation populations.Yoga is a balanced practice of physical exercise, breathing control and meditation that can reduce psychosocial symptoms as well as improve cardiovascular and cognitive function. It has the potential to positively affect multiple disease pathways and may prove to be a practical adjunct to cardiac rehabilitation in further reducing cardiac risk factors as well as improving self-efficacy and post-cardiac rehabilitation adherence to healthy lifestyle behaviours. This is a parallel arm, multi-centre, randomised controlled trial that will assess the outcomes of post- phase 2 cardiac rehabilitation patients assigned to a yoga intervention in comparison to a no-treatment wait-list control group. Participants randomised to the yoga group will engage in a 12 week yoga program comprising of two group based sessions and one self-administered home session each week. Group based sessions will be led by an experienced yoga instructor. This will involve teaching beginner students a hatha yoga sequence that incorporates asana (poses and postures), pranayama (breathing control) and meditation. The primary outcomes of this study are negative affective states of anxiety, depression and stress assessed using the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale. Secondary outcomes include measures of quality of life, and cardiovascular and cognitive function. The cardiovascular outcomes will include blood pressure, heart rate, heart rate variability, pulse wave velocity, carotid intima media thickness measurements, lipid/glucose profiles and C-reactive protein assays. Assessments will be conducted prior to (week 0), mid-way through (week 6) and following the intervention period (week 12) as well as at a four week follow-up (week 16). This study will determine the effect of yoga practice on negative affective states

  10. TIPIT: A randomised controlled trial of thyroxine in preterm infants under 28 weeks gestation: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Angiography protocol

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    Tietze Anna

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infants born at extreme prematurity are at high risk of developmental disability. A major risk factor for disability is having a low level of thyroid hormone described as hypothyroxinaemia, which is recognised to be a frequent phenomenon in these infants. Derangements of critical thyroid function during the sensitive window in prematurity when early development occurs, may have a range of long term effects for brain development. Further research in preterm infants using neuroimaging techniques will increase our understanding of the specificity of the effects of hypothyroxinaemia on the developing foetal brain. This is an explanatory double blinded randomised controlled trial which is aimed to assess the effect of thyroid hormone supplementation on brain size, key brain structures, extent of myelination, white matter integrity and vessel morphology, somatic growth and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Methods The study is a multi-centred double blinded randomised controlled trial of thyroid hormone supplementation in babies born below 28 weeks' gestation. All infants will receive either levothyroxine or placebo until 32 weeks corrected gestational age. The primary outcomes will be width of the sub-arachnoid space measured using cranial ultrasound and head circumference at 36 weeks corrected gestational age. The secondary outcomes will be thyroid hormone concentrations, the hypothalamic pituitary axis status and auxological data between birth and expected date of delivery; thyroid gland volume, brain size, volumes of key brain structures, extent of myelination and brain vessel morphology at expected date of delivery and markers of morbidity which include duration of mechanical ventilation and/or oxygen requirement and chronic lung disease. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN89493983

  11. Treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee with a topical diclofenac solution: a randomised controlled, 6-week trial [ISRCTN53366886

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    Thomas Lisa M

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Topical NSAIDs have been proven to relieve the symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA in short-term studies (2 weeks. To justify its chronic use, efficacy of a topical NSAID over a longer term of study should be demonstrated. The efficacy and safety of a topical diclofenac solution over a 6-week treatment course in symptomatic primary OA of the knee was investigated. Methods 216 men and women, age 40–85 years, with radiologically confirmed primary OA of the knee and a flare of pain at baseline following discontinuation of prior therapy were enrolled into this double-blind study. Participants applied either a topical diclofenac solution (Pennsaid® or vehicle control solution (carrier with no diclofenac; 40 drops 4 times daily directly to the painful knee(s, without massage, for 6 weeks. Pre-planned primary efficacy outcome measures included the core continuous variables pain relief and improved physical function measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC LK3.1 OA Index, and improved patient global assessment (PGA. Secondary efficacy measure was reduced stiffness. Safety assessments included adverse events and vital signs. Results The topical diclofenac group had a significantly greater mean change in score (final minus baseline compared to the vehicle control group for pain (-5.2 vs. -3.3, p = 0.003, physical function (-13.4 vs. -6.9, p = 0.001, PGA (-1.3 vs. -0.7, p = 0.0001 and stiffness (-1.8 vs. -0.9, p = 0.002. The mean difference between treatment arms (95% confidence interval [CI] was 1.9 (0.7 to 3.2, 6.5 (2.5 to 10.5, 0.6 (0.2 to 0.9, and 0.9 (0.3 to 1.4, respectively. Safety analyses showed that topical diclofenac caused skin irritation, mostly minor local skin dryness, in 42/107 (39%, leading to discontinuation of treatment in 5/107 (5% participants. Conclusion This topical diclofenac solution demonstrated relief at 6 weeks of the symptoms of primary osteoarthritis of the knee.

  12. Study protocol: a pragmatic randomised controlled trial of a 12-week physical activity and nutritional education program for overweight Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

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    Cargo Margaret

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have a higher prevalence and incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes than non-Indigenous Australian women. Physical inactivity is a key modifiable risk factor for obesity and evidence shows that even modest reductions in waist circumference (WC have significant health benefits. Trialing physical activity programs in difficult-to-reach high risk groups, especially urban Indigenous Australians poses distinct implementation challenges. Methods/Design The trial objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of a structured 12-week physical activity group program with nutritional advice. The design is a pragmatic randomised controlled trial. This study protocol describes the implementation and evaluation of the program. Participants are randomised into either an intervention or waitlisted group. The waitlisted group have a 12 month waiting period before commencing the 12-week program. Participant data is collected at baseline, 12, 24 and 52 weeks. Participants are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, aged 18-64 years with a waist circumference greater than 80 centimetres residing in Adelaide. The primary outcome measure is WC change immediately post program from baseline. Secondary outcomes include short term and long term changes in WC, weight, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, insulin, insulin resistance (calculated HOMA, haemoglobin A1C (HbA1C, triglycerides and C-reactive protein (CRP. Behavioural and psychosocial surveys are administered to assess physical activity, dietary intake and the participant's motivation, self-efficacy and perceived social support for physical activity. Qualitative interviews focusing on participants' motivation, enablers and barriers to healthy eating and physical activity will be undertaken. Implementation fidelity and participation are also assessed. Discussion The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women's Fitness Program (WFP is designed

  13. The effectiveness of exercise training in lowering blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials of 4 weeks or longer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, J A; Silagy, C A; Finucane, P; Withers, R T; Hamdorf, P A; Andrews, G R

    1997-10-01

    To identify the features of an optimal exercise programme in terms of type of exercise, intensity and frequency that would maximise the training induced decrease in blood pressure (BP). Trials were identified by a systematic search of Medline, Embase and Science Citation Index (SCI), previous review articles and the references of relevant trials, from 1980 until 1996, including only English language studies. The inclusion criteria were limited to randomised controlled trials of aerobic or resistance exercise training conducted over a minimum of 4 weeks where systolic and diastolic BP was measured. A total of 29 studies (1533 hypertensive and normotensive participants) were included, 26 used aerobic exercise training, two trials used resistance training and one study had both resistance and aerobic training groups. Aerobic exercise training reduced systolic BP by 4.7 mm Hg (95% CI: 4.4, 5.0) and diastolic BP by 3.1 mm Hg (95% CI: 3.0, 3.3) as compared to a non-exercising control group, however, significant heterogeneity was observed between trials in the analysis. The BP reduction seen with aerobic exercise training was independent of the intensity of exercise and the number of exercise sessions per week. The evidence for the effect of resistance exercise training was inconclusive. Aerobic exercise training had a small but clinically significant effect in reducing systolic and diastolic BP. Increasing exercise intensity above 70% VO2 max or increasing exercise frequency to more than three sessions per week did not have any additional impact on reducing BP.

  14. The effect of weekly text-message communication on treatment completion among patients with latent tuberculosis infection: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (WelTel LTBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kop, Mia L; Memetovic, Jasmina; Patel, Anik; Marra, Fawziah; Sadatsafavi, Mohsen; Hajek, Jan; Smillie, Kirsten; Thabane, Lehana; Taylor, Darlene; Johnston, James; Lester, Richard T

    2014-04-09

    Interventions to improve adherence to treatment for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are necessary to improve treatment completion rates and optimise tuberculosis (TB) control efforts. The high prevalence of cell phone use presents opportunities to develop innovative ways to engage patients in care. A randomised controlled trial (RCT), WelTel Kenya1, demonstrated that weekly text messages improved antiretroviral adherence and clinical outcomes among patients initiating HIV treatment. The aim of this study is to determine whether the WelTel intervention can improve treatment completion among patients with LTBI and to evaluate the intervention's cost-effectiveness. This open, two-site, parallel RCT (WelTel LTBI) will be conducted at TB clinics in Vancouver and New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada. Over 2 years, we aim to recruit 350 individuals initiating a 9-month isoniazid regimen. Participants will be randomly allocated to an intervention or control (standard care) arm in a 1:1 ratio. Intervention arm participants will receive a weekly text-message 'check-in' to which they will be asked to respond within 48 h. A TB clinician will follow-up instances of non-response and problems that are identified. Participants will be followed until treatment completion (up to 12 months) or discontinuation. The primary outcome is self-reported treatment completion (taking ≥80% of doses within 12 months). Secondary outcomes include daily adherence (percentage of days participants used medication as prescribed) and time to treatment completion. Patient satisfaction with the intervention will be evaluated, and the intervention's cost-effectiveness will be analysed through decision-analytic modelling. Ethical approval has been obtained from the University of British Columbia. This trial will test the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the WelTel intervention to improve treatment completion among patients with LTBI. Trial results and economic evaluation will help inform

  15. EXTUBATE: A randomised controlled trial of nasal biphasic positive airway pressure vs. nasal continuous positive airway pressure following extubation in infants less than 30 weeks' gestation: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

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    Victor Suresh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory distress syndrome remains a significant problem among premature infants. Mechanical ventilation through an endotracheal tube remains the mainstay of respiratory support but may be associated with lung injury and the development of chronic lung disease of prematurity. Efforts are needed to reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation in favour of less invasive forms of respiratory support and to improve rates of successful extubation. Non-invasive respiratory support has been demonstrated to be less injurious to the premature lung. Standard practice is to use nasal continuous positive airway pressure (n-CPAP following extubation to support the baby's breathing. Many clinicians also use nasal biphasic positive airway pressure (n-BiPAP in efforts to improve rates of successful extubation. However, there is currently no evidence that this confers any advantage over conventional nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Methods We propose an unblinded multi-centre randomised trial comparing n-CPAP with n-BiPAP in babies born before 30 weeks' gestation and less than two weeks old. Babies with congenital abnormalities and severe intra-ventricular haemorrhage will be excluded. 540 babies admitted to neonatal centres in England will be randomised at the time of first extubation attempt. The primary aim of this study is to compare the rate of extubation failure within 48 hours following the first attempt at extubation. The secondary aims are to compare the effect of n-BiPAP and n-CPAP on the following outcomes: 1. Maintenance of successful extubation for 7 days post extubation 2. Oxygen requirement at 28 days of age and at 36 weeks' corrected gestational age 3. Total days on ventilator, n-CPAP/n-BiPAP 4. Number of ventilator days following first extubation attempt 5. pH and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the first post extubation blood gas 6. Duration of hospital stay 7. Rate of abdominal distension requiring

  16. Use of weekly, low dose, high frequency ultrasound for hard to heal venous leg ulcers: the VenUS III randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Judith M; Kang'ombe, Arthur R; Soares, Marta O; Chuang, Ling-Hsiang; Worthy, Gill; Bland, J Martin; Iglesias, Cynthia; Cullum, Nicky; Torgerson, David; Nelson, E Andrea

    2011-03-08

    To assess the clinical effectiveness of weekly delivery of low dose, high frequency therapeutic ultrasound in conjunction with standard care for hard to heal venous leg ulcers. Multicentre, pragmatic, two arm randomised controlled trial. Community and district nurse led services, community leg ulcer clinics, and hospital outpatient leg ulcer clinics in 12 urban and rural settings (11 in the United Kingdom and one in the Republic of Ireland). 337 patients with at least one venous leg ulcer of >6 months' duration or >5 cm(2) area and an ankle brachial pressure index of ≥ 0.8. Weekly administration of low dose, high frequency ultrasound therapy (0.5 W/cm(2), 1 MHz, pulsed pattern of 1:4) for up to 12 weeks plus standard care compared with standard care alone. Primary outcome was time to healing of the largest eligible leg ulcer. Secondary outcomes were proportion of patients healed by 12 months, percentage and absolute change in ulcer size, proportion of time participants were ulcer-free, health related quality of life, and adverse events. The two groups showed no significant difference in the time to healing of the reference leg ulcer (log rank test, P=0.61). After adjustment for baseline ulcer area, baseline ulcer duration, use of compression bandaging, and study centre, there was still no evidence of a difference in time to healing (hazard ratio 0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.70 to 1.40), P=0.97). The median time to healing of the reference leg ulcer was inestimable. There was no significant difference between groups in the proportion of participants with all ulcers healed by 12 months (72/168 in ultrasound group v 78/169 in standard care group, P=0.39 for Fisher's exact test) nor in the change in ulcer size at four weeks by treatment group (model estimate 0.05 (95% CI -0.09 to 0.19)). There was no difference in time to complete healing of all ulcers (log rank test, P=0.61), with median time to healing of 328 days (95% CI 235 to inestimable) with standard care

  17. Efficacy and safety of darunavir-ritonavir compared with that of lopinavir-ritonavir at 48 weeks in treatment-experienced, HIV-infected patients in TITAN: a randomised controlled phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madruga, José Valdez; Berger, Daniel; McMurchie, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The protease inhibitor darunavir has been shown to be efficacious in highly treatment-experienced patients with HIV infection, but needs to be assessed in patients with a broader range of treatment experience. We did a randomised, controlled, phase III trial (TITAN) to compare 48-week....... The primary endpoint was non-inferiority (95% CI lower limit for the difference in treatment response -12% or greater) for HIV RNA of less than 400 copies per mL in plasma at week 48 (per-protocol analysis). TITAN (TMC114-C214) is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00110877. FINDINGS: Of 595...

  18. Effects of Four-Week Supplementation with a Multi-Vitamin/Mineral Preparation on Mood and Blood Biomarkers in Young Adults: A Randomised, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David J; Cox, Katherine H M; Peters, Riccarda; Pipingas, Andrew; Scholey, Andrew B

    2015-10-30

    This study explored the effects of four-week multi-vitamin and mineral (MVM) supplementation on mood and neurocognitive function in healthy, young adults. Fifty-eight healthy adults, 18-40 years of age (M = 25.82 years, SD = 4.87) participated in this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, in which mood and blood biomarkers were assessed at baseline and after four weeks of supplementation. Compared to placebo, MVM supplementation was associated with significantly lowered homocysteine and increased blood B-vitamin levels (p vitamins and lowered homocysteine in healthy young adults.

  19. Effects of Resveratrol on Cognitive Performance, Mood and Cerebrovascular Function in Post-Menopausal Women; A 14-Week Randomised Placebo-Controlled Intervention Trial

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    Hamish M. Evans

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested whether chronic supplementation with resveratrol (a phytoestrogen could improve cerebrovascular function, cognition and mood in post-menopausal women. Eighty post-menopausal women aged 45–85 years were randomised to take trans-resveratrol or placebo for 14 weeks and the effects on cognitive performance, cerebral blood flow velocity and pulsatility index (a measure of arterial stiffness in the middle cerebral artery (using transcranial Doppler ultrasound, and cerebrovascular responsiveness (CVR to both cognitive testing and hypercapnia were assessed. Mood questionnaires were also administered. Compared to placebo, resveratrol elicited 17% increases in CVR to both hypercapnic (p = 0.010 and cognitive stimuli (p = 0.002. Significant improvements were observed in the performance of cognitive tasks in the domain of verbal memory (p = 0.041 and in overall cognitive performance (p = 0.020, which correlated with the increase in CVR (r = 0.327; p = 0.048. Mood tended to improve in multiple measures, although not significantly. These results indicate that regular consumption of a modest dose of resveratrol can enhance both cerebrovascular function and cognition in post-menopausal women, potentially reducing their heightened risk of accelerated cognitive decline and offering a promising therapeutic treatment for menopause-related cognitive decline.

  20. Effects of Four-Week Supplementation with a Multi-Vitamin/Mineral Preparation on Mood and Blood Biomarkers in Young Adults: A Randomised, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. White

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the effects of four-week multi-vitamin and mineral (MVM supplementation on mood and neurocognitive function in healthy, young adults. Fifty-eight healthy adults, 18–40 years of age (M = 25.82 years, SD = 4.87 participated in this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, in which mood and blood biomarkers were assessed at baseline and after four weeks of supplementation. Compared to placebo, MVM supplementation was associated with significantly lowered homocysteine and increased blood B-vitamin levels (p < 0.01. MVM treatment was also associated with significantly improved mood, as measured by reduced scores on the “depression-dejection” subscale of the Profile of Mood States (p = 0.018. These findings suggest that the four weeks of MVM supplementation may have beneficial effects on mood, underpinned by elevated B-vitamins and lowered homocysteine in healthy young adults.

  1. Induction of labour versus expectant monitoring for gestational hypertension or mild pre-eclampsia between 34 and 37 weeks' gestation (HYPITAT-II: a multicentre, open-label randomised controlled trial

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    Sporken Jan M J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gestational hypertension (GH and pre-eclampsia (PE can result in severe complications such as eclampsia, placental abruption, syndrome of Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes and Low Platelets (HELLP and ultimately even neonatal or maternal death. We recently showed that in women with GH or mild PE at term induction of labour reduces both high risk situations for mothers as well as the caesarean section rate. In view of this knowledge, one can raise the question whether women with severe hypertension, pre-eclampsia or deterioration chronic hypertension between 34 and 37 weeks of gestation should be delivered or monitored expectantly. Induction of labour might prevent maternal complications. However, induction of labour in late pre-term pregnancy might increase neonatal morbidity and mortality compared with delivery at term. Methods/Design Pregnant women with severe gestational hypertension, mild pre-eclampsia or deteriorating chronic hypertension at a gestational age between 34+0 and 36+6 weeks will be asked to participate in a multi-centre randomised controlled trial. Women will be randomised to either induction of labour or expectant monitoring. In the expectant monitoring arm, women will be induced only when the maternal or fetal condition detoriates or at 37+0 weeks of gestation. The primary outcome measure is a composite endpoint of maternal mortality, severe maternal complications (eclampsia, HELLP syndrome, pulmonary oedema and thromboembolic disease and progression to severe pre-eclampsia. Secondary outcomes measures are respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, neonatal morbidity and mortality, caesarean section and vaginal instrumental delivery rates, maternal quality of life and costs. Analysis will be intention to treat. The power calculation is based on an expectant reduction of the maternal composite endpoint from 5% to 1% for an expected increase in neonatal RDS from 1% at 37 weeks to 10% at 34 weeks. This implies that

  2. RANDOMISED CONTROL STUDY OF USE OF PROGESTERONE V / S PLACEBO FOR MANAGEMENT OF SYMPTOMATIC PLACENTA PREVIA BEFORE 34 WEEKS OF GESTATION IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibram

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTI ON: APH complicates 3 - 5% of pregnancies and is a leading cause of perinatal and maternal mortality worldwide. Progesterone is essential in maintenance of pregnancy and helps in prolongation of pregnancy. Different trials have been done to show the efficacy and safety of progesterone in prevention of preterm birth but study related to use in expectant management of symptomatic placenta previa is very limited. AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study is to determine the effectiveness of intramascular 17 alpha hydroxy progesterone Caproate therapies vs. placebo in conservative management of patient with symptomatic placenta previa before 34 weeks of gestation. MATERIALS AND METHOD S: It is a randomized control study with 100 pregnant women attending Obstetric deptt. a t Nilratan Sircar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata with symptomatic placenta previa having episode of warning haemorrhage before 34 weeks of gestation and fulfilling inclusion criteria were enrolled for the study in a two year period from January 2013 to December 2014. Statistical analysis was performed using student t - test and chai - square test where appropriate. RESULTS AND ANALYSIS: In our study prolongation of pregnancy in progesterone receiving group is statistically significant (p - value<0.001, significant difference were also found in gestational age at delivery ( p value of 0.0288, birth - weight (p - value of 0.0470. CON CLUSION: In this study use of 17 alpha hydroxy progesterone in expectant management of symptomatic placenta previa tends to be beneficial than placebo.

  3. Control week at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    From 19 to 23 May, the IT-CO Group will be organising the first "Poster forum" at CERN on the theme of process control. Process control lies at the heart of numerous conferences across the world in which CERN takes an active part. Many posters have been produced, and these deserve to be presented to everybody in order to give value to, share and derive maximum benefit from the software, tools and methods developed and used at CERN in this field. This initiative will also allow each group, section and member of the personnel to present their work to others at the Laboratory. The forum will take place from 19 to 23 May in the main hall of Building 500, leading to Restaurant No. 1, on the Meyrin site. To stimulate discussions and exchanges, the authors will be in attendance by their posters on Thursday 22 May between 12 noon and 2.00 p.m. Interested? If you wish to take part and present your work, please contact mathias.philippe.dutou...

  4. Effects of 12 weeks' treatment with a proton pump inhibitor on insulin secretion, glucose metabolism and markers of cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomised double-blind prospective placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hove, K D; Brøns, C; Færch, K; Lund, S S; Petersen, J S; Karlsen, A E; Rossing, P; Rehfeld, J F; Vaag, A

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that proton pump inhibitor treatment may increase insulin secretion and improve glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetes. In a randomised double-blind prospective placebo-controlled 2 × 2 factorial study, we examined the effect of esomeprazole on insulin secretion, HbA(1c) and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes. Forty-one patients with type 2 diabetes using dietary control or oral glucose-lowering treatment were randomised to receive add-on esomeprazole 40 mg (n = 20) or placebo (n = 21) for 12 weeks. Randomisation was carried out prior to inclusion on the basis of a computer-generated random-number list. The allocation sequence was concealed in sealed envelopes from the researcher enrolling and assessing participants. The study was undertaken at Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark. The primary outcome was change in AUC for insulin levels during a meal test. Secondary outcomes were the levels of HbA(1c) and biochemical markers of cardiovascular risk, including lipids, coagulation factors, inflammation markers, markers of endothelial function and 24 h ambulatory BP measurements. Forty-one participants were analysed. In the esomeprazole-treated group the AUC for insulin did not change (before vs after treatment: 28,049 ± 17,659 vs 27,270 ± 32,004 pmol/l × min (p = 0.838). In the placebo group AUC for insulin decreased from 27,392 ± 14,348 pmol/l × min to 22,938 ± 11,936 pmol/l × min (p = 0.002). Esomeprazole treatment (n = 20) caused a ninefold increase in the AUC for gastrin. HbA(1c) increased from 7.0 ± 0.6% (53 ± 5 mmol/mol) to 7.3 ± 0.8% (56 ± 6 mmol/mol) in the esomeprazole-treated group and from 7.0 ± 0.6% (53 ± 5 mmol/mol) to 7.4 ± 0.8% (57 ± 6 mmol/mol) in the placebo group (n = 21) (p for difference in change >0.05). Except for BP, there were no differences between the groups in the markers of cardiovascular risk (p > 0.05). Monitoring of 24 h ambulatory BP showed a significant decrease in daytime systolic

  5. Iron concentration in breast milk normalised within one week of a single high-dose infusion of iron isomaltoside in randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Charlotte; Thomsen, Lars Lykke; Nørgaard, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    at a mean daily dose of 70.5mg. We included 65 women with sufficient breast milk three days after inclusion - 30 from the intravenous iron group and 35 from the oral iron group - and collected breast milk and maternal blood samples three days and one week after allocation. RESULTS: The mean (± standard...

  6. Four Weeks of Inspiratory Muscle Training Improves Self-Paced Walking Performance in Overweight and Obese Adults: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Edwards

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine whether a programme of inspiratory muscle training (IMT improves accumulative distance of self-paced walking in overweight and obese adults. Methods. A total of 15 overweight and obese adults were randomized into experimental (EXP: =8 and placebo (PLA: =7 groups. Lung function, inspiratory muscle performance, 6-minute walking test, and predicted ̇VO2 max were assessed prior to and following the 4-week IMT intervention. Both groups performed 30 inspiratory breaths, twice daily using a proprietary inspiratory resistance device set to 55% of baseline maximal effort (EXP, or performing the same inspiratory training procedure at the minimum resistive setting (PLA. Results. Lung function was unchanged in both groups after-training; however inspiratory muscle strength was significantly improved in EXP (19±25.2 cm H2O gain; <0.01 but did not significantly change in PLA. Additionally, the posttraining distance covered in the 6-minute walking test was significantly extended for EXP (62.5±37.7 m gain; <0.01, but not for PLA. A positive association was observed between the change (% of performance gain in the 6-minute walking test and body mass index (=0.736; <0.05 for EXP. Conclusion. The present study suggests that IMT provides a practical, minimally intrusive intervention to significantly augment both inspiratory muscle performance and walking distance covered by overweight and obese adults in a clinically relevant 6-minute walk test. This indicates that IMT may provide a useful priming (preparatory strategy prior to entry in a physical training programme for overweight and obese adults.

  7. Effects of vitamin D2-fortified bread v. supplementation with vitamin D2 or D3 on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D metabolites: an 8-week randomised-controlled trial in young adult Finnish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itkonen, Suvi T.; Skaffari, Essi; Saaristo, Pilvi

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for food-based solutions for preventing vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D3 (D3) is mainly used in fortified food products, although the production of vitamin D2 (D2) is more cost-effective, and thus may hold opportunities. We investigated the bioavailability of D2 from UV......-irradiated yeast present in bread in an 8-week randomised-controlled trial in healthy 20–37-year-old women (n 33) in Helsinki (60°N) during winter (February–April) 2014. Four study groups were given different study products (placebo pill and regular bread=0 µg D2 or D3/d; D2 supplement and regular bread=25 µg D2/d......; D3 supplement and regular bread=25 µg D3/d; and placebo pill and D2-biofortified bread=25 µg D2/d). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 (S-25(OH)D2) and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (S-25(OH)D3) concentrations were measured at baseline, midpoint and end point. The mean baseline total serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D...

  8. Supported employment: randomised controlled trial*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Louise M.; Heslin, Margaret; Leese, Morven; McCrone, Paul; Rice, Christopher; Jarrett, Manuela; Spokes, Terry; Huxley, Peter; Thornicroft, Graham

    2010-01-01

    Background There is evidence from North American trials that supported employment using the individual placement and support (IPS) model is effective in helping individuals with severe mental illness gain competitive employment. There have been few trials in other parts of the world. Aims To investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of IPS in the UK. Method Individuals with severe mental illness in South London were randomised to IPS or local traditional vocational services (treatment as usual) (ISRCTN96677673). Results Two hundred and nineteen participants were randomised, and 90% assessed 1 year later. There were no significant differences between the treatment as usual and intervention groups in obtaining competitive employment (13% in the intervention group and 7% in controls; risk ratio 1.35, 95% CI 0.95–1.93, P = 0.15), nor in secondary outcomes. Conclusions There was no evidence that IPS was of significant benefit in achieving competitive employment for individuals in South London at 1-year follow-up, which may reflect suboptimal implementation. Implementation of IPS can be challenging in the UK context where IPS is not structurally integrated with mental health services, and economic disincentives may lead to lower levels of motivation in individuals with severe mental illness and psychiatric professionals. PMID:20435968

  9. Bimatoprost 0.03%/timolol 0.5% preservative-free ophthalmic solution versus bimatoprost 0.03%/timolol 0.5% ophthalmic solution (Ganfort) for glaucoma or ocular hypertension: a 12-week randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ivan; Gil Pina, Rafael; Lanzagorta-Aresti, Aitor; Schiffman, Rhett M; Liu, Charlie; Bejanian, Marina

    2014-07-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of single-dose bimatoprost 0.03%/timolol 0.5% preservative-free (PF) ophthalmic solution with bimatoprost 0.03%/timolol 0.5% ophthalmic solution in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. In this multicentre, randomised, parallel-group study, patients were randomised to bimatoprost/timolol PF or bimatoprost/timolol once daily in the morning for 12 weeks. Primary efficacy endpoints, reflecting differing regional regulatory requirements, included change from baseline in worse eye intraocular pressure (IOP) in the per-protocol population at week 12, and the average eye IOP at weeks 2, 6 and 12 in the intent-to-treat population. 561 patients were randomised (278 to bimatoprost/timolol PF; 283 to bimatoprost/timolol); 96.3% completed the study. Both treatment groups showed statistically and clinically significant mean decreases from baseline in worse eye IOP and in average eye IOP at all follow-up time points (p<0.001). Bimatoprost/timolol PF met all pre-established criteria for non-inferiority and equivalence to bimatoprost/timolol. Ocular adverse events were similar between treatment groups, with conjunctival hyperaemia being the most frequent. Most were mild or moderate in severity. Bimatoprost/timolol PF demonstrated non-inferiority and equivalence in IOP lowering compared with bimatoprost/timolol, with no significant differences in safety and tolerability. NCT01177098. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Efficacy of certolizumab pegol on signs and symptoms of axial spondyloarthritis including ankylosing spondylitis: 24-week results of a double-blind randomised placebo-controlled Phase 3 study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landewé, R; Braun, J; Deodhar, A; Dougados, M; Maksymowych, W P; Mease, P J; Reveille, J D; Rudwaleit, M; van der Heijde, D; Stach, C; Hoepken, B; Fichtner, A; Coteur, G; de Longueville, M; Sieper, J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of certolizumab pegol (CZP) after 24 weeks in RAPID-axSpA (NCT01087762), an ongoing Phase 3 trial in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), including patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and non-radiographic axSpA (nr-axSpA). Methods Patients with active axSpA were randomised 1:1:1 to placebo, CZP 200 mg every 2 weeks (Q2W) or CZP 400 mg every 4 weeks (Q4W). In total 325 patients were randomised. Primary endpoint was ASAS20 (Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society 20) response at week 12. Secondary outcomes included change from baseline in Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI) linear. Results Baseline disease activity was similar between AS and nr-axSpA. At week 12, ASAS20 response rates were significantly higher in CZP 200 mg Q2W and CZP 400 mg Q4W arms versus placebo (57.7 and 63.6 vs 38.3, p≤0.004). At week 24, combined CZP arms showed significant (p<0.001) differences in change from baseline versus placebo in BASFI (−2.28 vs −0.40), BASDAI (−3.05 vs −1.05), and BASMI (−0.52 vs −0.07). Improvements were observed as early as week 1. Similar improvements were reported with CZP versus placebo in both AS and nr-axSpA subpopulations. Adverse events were reported in 70.4% vs 62.6%, and serious adverse events in 4.7% vs 4.7% of All CZP versus placebo groups. No deaths or malignancies were reported. Conclusions CZP rapidly reduced the signs and symptoms of axSpA, with no new safety signals observed compared to the safety profile of CZP in RA. Similar improvements were observed across CZP dosing regimens, and in AS and nr-axSpA patients. PMID:24013647

  11. Effects of vitamin D2-fortified bread v. supplementation with vitamin D2 or D3 on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D metabolites: an 8-week randomised-controlled trial in young adult Finnish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itkonen, Suvi T; Skaffari, Essi; Saaristo, Pilvi; Saarnio, Elisa M; Erkkola, Maijaliisa; Jakobsen, Jette; Cashman, Kevin D; Lamberg-Allardt, Christel

    2016-04-14

    There is a need for food-based solutions for preventing vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D3 (D3) is mainly used in fortified food products, although the production of vitamin D2 (D2) is more cost-effective, and thus may hold opportunities. We investigated the bioavailability of D2 from UV-irradiated yeast present in bread in an 8-week randomised-controlled trial in healthy 20-37-year-old women (n 33) in Helsinki (60°N) during winter (February-April) 2014. Four study groups were given different study products (placebo pill and regular bread=0 µg D2 or D3/d; D2 supplement and regular bread=25 µg D2/d; D3 supplement and regular bread=25 µg D3/d; and placebo pill and D2-biofortified bread=25 µg D2/d). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 (S-25(OH)D2) and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (S-25(OH)D3) concentrations were measured at baseline, midpoint and end point. The mean baseline total serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (S-25(OH)D=S-25(OH)D2+S-25(OH)D3) concentration was 65·1 nmol/l. In repeated-measures ANCOVA (adjusted for baseline S-25(OH)D as total/D2/D3), D2-bread did not affect total S-25(OH)D (P=0·707) or S-25(OH)D3 (P=0·490), but increased S-25(OH)D2 compared with placebo (PD2 supplement was more effective than bread in increasing S-25(OH)D2 (PD2 and D3 supplementation increased total S-25(OH)D compared with placebo (P=0·030 and P=0·001, respectively), but D2 supplementation resulted in lower S-25(OH)D3 (PD2 from UV-irradiated yeast in bread was not bioavailable in humans. Our results support the evidence that D2 is less potent in increasing total S-25(OH)D concentrations than D3, also indicating a decrease in the percentage contribution of S-25(OH)D3 to the total vitamin D pool.

  12. Probiotics in the prevention of eczema: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Stephen J; Jordan, Sue; Storey, Melanie; Catherine A Thornton; Gravenor, Michael B.; Garaiova, Iveta; Plummer, Susan F; Wang, Duolao; Morgan, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate a multistrain, high-dose probiotic in the prevention of eczema. Design A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group trial. Settings Antenatal clinics, research clinic, children at home. Patients Pregnant women and their infants. Interventions Women from 36 weeks gestation and their infants to age 6 months received daily either the probiotic (Lactobacillus salivarius CUL61, Lactobacillus paracasei CUL08, Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis CUL34 a...

  13. Is voice therapy an effective treatment for dysphonia? A randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    MacKenzie, K.; Millar, A; Wilson, J. A.; Sellars, C.; Deary, I. J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the overall efficacy of voice therapy for dysphonia. DESIGN: Single blind randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Outpatient clinic in a teaching hospital. Participants: 204 outpatients aged 17-87 with a primary symptom of persistent hoarseness for at least two months. INTERVENTIONS: After baseline assessments, patients were randomised to six weeks of either voice therapy or no treatment. Assessments were repeated at six weeks on the 145 (71%) patients who continued to thi...

  14. Razors versus clippers. A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tracy; Tanner, Judith

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this randomised controlled trial was to determine if patients showed a preference for preoperative hair removal with razors or clippers and to identify if one method was associated with more trauma or postoperative infections. The trial took place in a day surgery unit with patients who were having a range of surgical procedures including hernias and varicose veins. This study was sponsored by an award from the NATN/3M Clinical Fellowship.

  15. Financial incentives for smoking cessation in pregnancy: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappin, David; Bauld, Linda; Purves, David; Boyd, Kathleen; Sinclair, Lesley; MacAskill, Susan; McKell, Jennifer; Friel, Brenda; McConnachie, Alex; de Caestecker, Linda; Tannahill, Carol; Radley, Andrew; Coleman, Tim

    2015-01-27

    To assess the efficacy of a financial incentive added to routine specialist pregnancy stop smoking services versus routine care to help pregnant smokers quit. Phase II therapeutic exploratory single centre, individually randomised controlled parallel group superiority trial. One large health board area with a materially deprived, inner city population in the west of Scotland, United Kingdom. 612 self reported pregnant smokers in NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde who were English speaking, at least 16 years of age, less than 24 weeks pregnant, and had an exhaled carbon monoxide breath test result of 7 ppm or more. 306 women were randomised to incentives and 306 to control. The control group received routine care, which was the offer of a face to face appointment to discuss smoking and cessation and, for those who attended and set a quit date, the offer of free nicotine replacement therapy for 10 weeks provided by pharmacy services, and four, weekly support phone calls. The intervention group received routine care plus the offer of up to £400 of shopping vouchers: £50 for attending a face to face appointment and setting a quit date; then another £50 if at four weeks' post-quit date exhaled carbon monoxide confirmed quitting; a further £100 was provided for continued validated abstinence of exhaled carbon monoxide after 12 weeks; a final £200 voucher was provided for validated abstinence of exhaled carbon monoxide at 34-38 weeks' gestation. The primary outcome was cotinine verified cessation at 34-38 weeks' gestation through saliva (incentives were documented. Significantly more smokers in the incentives group than control group stopped smoking: 69 (22.5%) versus 26 (8.6%). The relative risk of not smoking at the end of pregnancy was 2.63 (95% confidence interval 1.73 to 4.01) Pincentives need to be offered to achieve one extra quitter in late pregnancy) was 7.2 (95% confidence interval 5.1 to 12.2). The mean birth weight was 3140 g (SD 600 g) in the incentives group

  16. Randomised controlled trials: important but overrated?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boylan, J F

    2012-02-01

    Practising physicians individualise treatments, hoping to achieve optimal outcomes by tackling relevant patient variables. The randomised controlled trial (RCT) is universally accepted as the best means of comparison. Yet doctors sometimes wonder if particular patients might benefit more from treatments that fared worse in the RCT comparisons. Such clinicians may even feel ostracised by their peers for stepping outside treatments based on RCTs and guidelines. Are RCTs the only acceptable evaluations of how patient care can be assessed and delivered? In this controversy we explore the interpretation of RCT data for practising clinicians facing individualised patient choices. First, critical care anaesthetists John Boylan and Brian Kavanagh emphasise the dangers of bias and show how Bayesian approaches utilise prior probabilities to improve posterior (combined) probability estimates. Secondly, Jane Armitage, of the Clinical Trial Service Unit in Oxford, argues why RCTs remain essential and explores how the quality of randomisation can be improved through systematic reviews and by avoiding selective reporting.

  17. Melatonin for chronic whiplash syndrome with delayed melatonin onset randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringen, S. van; Jansen, T.; Smits, M.G.; Nagtegaal, J.E.; Coenen, A.M.L.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the influence of melatonin in patients with chronic whiplash syndrome and delayed melatonin onset. Design: Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial. One-week baseline was followed by a 4-week treatment period with either melatonin or placebo. In the ba

  18. A 12-Week Exercise Program for Pregnant Women with Obesity to Improve Physical Activity Levels: An Open Randomised Preliminary Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle Bisson

    Full Text Available To evaluate whether a 12-week supervised exercise program promotes an active lifestyle throughout pregnancy in pregnant women with obesity.In this preliminary randomised trial, pregnant women (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2 were allocated to either standard care or supervised training, from 15 to 27 weeks of gestation. Physical activity was measured by accelerometry at 14, 28 and 36 weeks, while fitness (oxygen consumption (VO2 at the anaerobic threshold, nutrition (caloric intake and macronutrients percentage and anthropometry were assessed at 14 and 28 weeks of gestation. Analyses were performed using repeated measures ANOVA.A total of fifty (50 women were randomised, 25 in each group. There was no time-group interaction for time spent at moderate and vigorous activity (pinteraction = 0.064, but the exercise group's levels were higher than controls' at all times (pgroup effect = 0.014. A significant time-group interaction was found for daily physical activity (p = 0.023; similar at baseline ((22.0 ± 6.7 vs 21.8 ± 7.3 x 10(4 counts/day the exercise group had higher levels than the control group following the intervention ((22.8 ± 8.3 vs 19.2 ± 4.5 x 10(4 counts/day, p = 0.020 and at 36 weeks of gestation ((19.2 ± 1.5 vs 14.9 ± 1.5 x 10(4 counts/day, p = 0.034. Exercisers also gained less weight than controls during the intervention period despite similar nutritional intakes (difference in weight change = -0.1 kg/week, 95% CI -0.2; -0.02, p = 0.016 and improved cardiorespiratory fitness (difference in fitness change = 8.1%, 95% CI 0.7; 9.5, p = 0.041.Compared with standard care, a supervised exercise program allows pregnant women with obesity to maintain fitness, limit weight gain and attenuate the decrease in physical activity levels observed in late pregnancy.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01610323.

  19. Improvements in productivity at paid work and within the household, and increased participation in daily activities after 24 weeks of certolizumab pegol treatment of patients with psoriatic arthritis: results of a phase 3 double-blind randomised placebo-controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, A; Gladman, D; van der Heijde, D; Purcaru, O; Mease, P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of certolizumab pegol (CZP) on productivity outside and within the home, and on participation in family, social and leisure activities in adult patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods RAPID-PsA (NCT01087788) is a phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. 409 patients with active PsA were randomised 1:1:1 to placebo, CZP 200 mg every 2 weeks (Q2W) or CZP 400 mg every 4 weeks (Q4W). The arthritis-specific Work Productivity Survey (WPS) assessed the impact of PsA on paid work and household productivity, and participation in social activities during the preceding month. WPS responses were compared between treatment arms using a non-parametric bootstrap-t method. Results At baseline, 56.6%, 60.1% and 61.5% of placebo, CZP 200 mg Q2W and CZP 400 mg Q4W patients were employed. By week 24, employed CZP patients reported an average of 1.0–1.8 and 3.0–3.9 fewer days of absenteeism and presenteeism, respectively, per month compared with 1.0 and 0.3 fewer days for placebo patients (p<0.05). Within the home, by week 24, CZP patients reported an average of 3.0–3.5 household work days gained per month versus 1.0 day for placebo (p<0.05). CZP patients also reported fewer days with reduced household productivity or days lost for participation in family, social and leisure activities. Improvements with CZP were seen as early as week 4 and continued to week 24. Conclusions CZP treatment significantly improved productivity at paid work and within the home, and resulted in greater participation in social activities for PsA patients. Trial registration number NCT01087788. PMID:24942382

  20. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of telephone-based support versus usual care for treatment of pressure ulcers in people with spinal cord injury in low-income and middle-income countries: study protocol for a 12-week randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Mohit; Harvey, Lisa Anne; Hayes, Alison Joy; Chhabra, Harvinder Singh; Glinsky, Joanne Valentina; Cameron, Ian Douglas; Lavrencic, Lucija; Arumugam, Narkeesh; Hossain, Sohrab; Bedi, Parneet Kaur

    2015-07-28

    Pressure ulcers are a common and severe complication of spinal cord injury, particularly in low-income and middle-income countries where people often need to manage pressure ulcers alone and at home. Telephone-based support may help people in these situations to manage their pressure ulcers. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of telephone-based support to help people with spinal cord injury manage pressure ulcers at home in India and Bangladesh. A multicentre (3 sites), prospective, assessor-blinded, parallel, randomised controlled trial will be undertaken. 120 participants with pressure ulcers on the sacrum, ischial tuberosity or greater trochanter of the femur secondary to spinal cord injury will be randomly assigned to a Control or Intervention group. Participants in the Control group will receive usual community care. That is, they will manage their pressure ulcers on their own at home but will be free to access whatever healthcare support they can. Participants in the Intervention group will also manage their pressure ulcers at home and will also be free to access whatever healthcare support they can, but in addition they will receive weekly telephone-based support and advice for 12 weeks (15-25 min/week). The primary outcome is the size of the pressure ulcer at 12 weeks. 13 secondary outcomes will be measured reflecting other aspects of pressure ulcer resolution, depression, quality of life, participation and satisfaction with healthcare provision. An economic evaluation will be run in parallel and will include a cost-effectiveness and a cost-utility analysis. Ethical approval was obtained from the Institutional Ethics Committee at each site. The results of this study will be disseminated through publications and presented at national and international conferences. ACTRN12613001225707. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  1. The Hawthorne Effect: a randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Haselen Robbert

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 'Hawthorne Effect' may be an important factor affecting the generalisability of clinical research to routine practice, but has been little studied. Hawthorne Effects have been reported in previous clinical trials in dementia but to our knowledge, no attempt has been made to quantify them. Our aim was to compare minimal follow-up to intensive follow-up in participants in a placebo controlled trial of Ginkgo biloba for treating mild-moderate dementia. Methods Participants in a dementia trial were randomised to intensive follow-up (with comprehensive assessment visits at baseline and two, four and six months post randomisation or minimal follow-up (with an abbreviated assessment at baseline and a full assessment at six months. Our primary outcomes were cognitive functioning (ADAS-Cog and participant and carer-rated quality of life (QOL-AD. Results We recruited 176 participants, mainly through general practices. The main analysis was based on Intention to treat (ITT, with available data. In the ANCOVA model with baseline score as a co-variate, follow-up group had a significant effect on outcome at six months on the ADAS-Cog score (n = 140; mean difference = -2.018; 95%CI -3.914, -0.121; p = 0.037 favouring the intensive follow-up group, and on participant-rated quality of life score (n = 142; mean difference = -1.382; 95%CI -2.642, -0.122; p = 0.032 favouring minimal follow-up group. There was no significant difference on carer quality of life. Conclusion We found that more intensive follow-up of individuals in a placebo-controlled clinical trial of Ginkgo biloba for treating mild-moderate dementia resulted in a better outcome than minimal follow-up, as measured by their cognitive functioning. Trial registration Current controlled trials: ISRCTN45577048

  2. Does antenatal pelvic floor muscle training affect the outcome of labour? A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agur, Wael; Steggles, Pippin; Waterfield, Malcolm; Freeman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    It is thought that antenatal pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) might produce a strong pelvic floor resulting in prolonged labour, whilst some believe it produces well-controlled muscles that facilitate rotation of the foetal head and shortens the duration of labour. This secondary analysis (of a previously published randomised controlled trial) assesses the labour and delivery details of 268 primigravidae who were originally randomised at approximately 20 weeks gestation to supervised PFMT or a control group. Between the two groups, there was no difference in the duration of the second stage of labour or in the need for instrumental delivery. PFMT does not appear to facilitate or obstruct labour.

  3. Stress debriefing after childbirth: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Susan R; Henderson, Jenni; Evans, Sharon F; Hagan, Ronald

    2003-06-02

    To test whether critical incident stress debriefing after childbirth reduces the incidence of postnatal psychological disorders. Randomised single-blind controlled trial stratified for parity and delivery mode. Two large maternity hospitals in Perth. 1745 women who delivered healthy term infants between April 1996 and December 1997 (875 allocated to intervention and 870 to control group). An individual, standardised debriefing session based on the principles of critical incident stress debriefing carried out within 72 hours of delivery. Diagnosis of stress disorders or depression in the 12 months postpartum, using structured psychological interview and criteria of the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edition. Follow-up information was available for 1730 women (99.1%), 482 of whom underwent psychological interview. There were no significant differences between control and intervention groups in scores on Impact of Events or Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scales at 2, 6 or 12 months postpartum, or in proportions of women who met diagnostic criteria for a stress disorder (intervention, 0.6% v control, 0.8%; P = 0.58) or major or minor depression (intervention, 17.8% v control, 18.2%; relative risk [95% CI], 0.99 [0.87-1.11]) during the postpartum year. Nor were there differences in median time to onset of depression (intervention, 6 [interquartile range, 4-9] weeks v control, 4 [3-8] weeks; P = 0.84), or duration of depression (intervention, 24 [12-46] weeks v control, 22 [10-52] weeks; P = 0.98). There is a high prevalence of depression in women during the first year after childbirth. A session of midwife-led, critical incident stress debriefing was not effective in preventing postnatal psychological disorders, but had no adverse effects.

  4. FAST CP: protocol of a randomised controlled trial of the efficacy of a 12-week combined Functional Anaerobic and Strength Training programme on muscle properties and mechanical gait deficiencies in adolescents and young adults with spastic-type cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Jarred G; Lichtwark, Glen A; Boyd, Roslyn N; Barber, Lee A

    2015-06-26

    Individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) have muscles that are smaller, weaker and more resistant to stretch compared to typically developing people. Progressive resistance training leads to increases in muscle size and strength. In CP, the benefits of resistance training alone may not transfer to improve other activities such as walking; however, the transfer of strength improvements to improved mobility may be enhanced by performing training that involves specific functional tasks or motor skills. This study aims to determine the efficacy of combined functional anaerobic and strength training in (1) influencing muscle strength, structure and function and (2) to determine if any changes in muscle strength and structure following training impact on walking ability and gross motor functional capacity and performance in the short (following 3 months of training) and medium terms (a further 3 months post-training). 40 adolescents and young adults with CP will be recruited to undertake a 12-week training programme. The training programme will consist of 3 × 75 min sessions per week, made up of 5 lower limb resistance exercises and 2-3 functional anaerobic exercises per session. The calf muscles will be specifically targeted, as they are the most commonly impacted muscles in CP and are a key muscle group involved in walking. If, as we believe, muscle properties change following combined strength and functional training, there may be long-term benefits of this type of training in slowing the deterioration of muscle function in people with spastic-type CP. Ethical approval has been obtained from the ethics committees at The University of Queensland (2014000066) and Children's Health Queensland (HREC/15/QRCH/30). The findings will be disseminated by publications in peer-reviewed journals, conferences and local research organisations' media. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12614001217695). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission

  5. FAST CP: protocol of a randomised controlled trial of the efficacy of a 12-week combined Functional Anaerobic and Strength Training programme on muscle properties and mechanical gait deficiencies in adolescents and young adults with spastic-type cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Jarred G; Lichtwark, Glen A; Boyd, Roslyn N; Barber, Lee A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) have muscles that are smaller, weaker and more resistant to stretch compared to typically developing people. Progressive resistance training leads to increases in muscle size and strength. In CP, the benefits of resistance training alone may not transfer to improve other activities such as walking; however, the transfer of strength improvements to improved mobility may be enhanced by performing training that involves specific functional tasks or motor skills. This study aims to determine the efficacy of combined functional anaerobic and strength training in (1) influencing muscle strength, structure and function and (2) to determine if any changes in muscle strength and structure following training impact on walking ability and gross motor functional capacity and performance in the short (following 3 months of training) and medium terms (a further 3 months post-training). Methods and analysis 40 adolescents and young adults with CP will be recruited to undertake a 12-week training programme. The training programme will consist of 3×75 min sessions per week, made up of 5 lower limb resistance exercises and 2–3 functional anaerobic exercises per session. The calf muscles will be specifically targeted, as they are the most commonly impacted muscles in CP and are a key muscle group involved in walking. If, as we believe, muscle properties change following combined strength and functional training, there may be long-term benefits of this type of training in slowing the deterioration of muscle function in people with spastic-type CP. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the ethics committees at The University of Queensland (2014000066) and Children's Health Queensland (HREC/15/QRCH/30). The findings will be disseminated by publications in peer-reviewed journals, conferences and local research organisations’ media. Trial registration number Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials

  6. Increasing recruitment to randomised trials: a review of randomised controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torgerson David J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor recruitment to randomised controlled trials (RCTs is a widespread and important problem. With poor recruitment being such an important issue with respect to the conduct of randomised trials, a systematic review of controlled trials on recruitment methods was undertaken in order to identify strategies that are effective. Methods We searched the register of trials in Cochrane library from 1996 to end of 2004. We also searched Web of Science for 2004. Additional trials were identified from personal knowledge. Included studies had to use random allocation and participants had to be allocated to different methods of recruitment to a 'real' randomised trial. Trials that randomised participants to 'mock' trials and trials of recruitment to non-randomised studies (e.g., case control studies were excluded. Information on the study design, intervention and control, and number of patients recruited was extracted by the 2 authors. Results We identified 14 papers describing 20 different interventions. Effective interventions included: telephone reminders; questionnaire inclusion; monetary incentives; using an 'open' rather than placebo design; and making trial materials culturally sensitive. Conclusion Few trials have been undertaken to test interventions to improve trial recruitment. There is an urgent need for more RCTs of recruitment strategies.

  7. Timing of birth for women with a twin pregnancy at term: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haslam Ross R

    2010-10-01

    is a protocol for a randomised trial, the findings of which will contribute information about the optimal time of birth for women with an uncomplicated multiple pregnancy at and beyond 37 weeks gestation. Clinical Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN15761056

  8. Neurodynamic treatment did not improve pain and disability at two weeks in patients with chronic nerve-related leg pain: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Ferreira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Question: In people with nerve-related leg pain, does adding neurodynamic treatment to advice to remain active improve leg pain, disability, low back pain, function, global perceived effect and location of symptoms? Design: Randomised trial with concealed allocation and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants: Sixty participants with nerve-related leg pain recruited from the community. Interventions: The experimental group received four sessions of neurodynamic treatment. Both groups received advice to remain active. Outcome measures: Leg pain and low back pain (0, none, to 10, worst, Oswestry Disability Index (0, none, to 100, worst, Patient-Specific Functional Scale (0, unable to perform, to 30, able to perform, global perceived effect (–5 to 5 and location of symptoms were measured at 2 and 4 weeks after randomisation. Continuous outcomes were analysed by linear mixed models. Location of symptoms was assessed by relative risk (95% CI. Results: At 2 weeks, the experimental group did not have significantly greater improvement than the control group in leg pain (MD –1.1, 95% CI –2.3 to 0.1 or disability (MD –3.3, 95% CI –9.6 to 2.9. At 4 weeks, the experimental group experienced a significantly greater reduction in leg pain (MD –2.4, 95% CI –3.6 to –1.2 and low back pain (MD –1.5, 95% CI –2.8 to –0.2. The experimental group also improved significantly more in function at 2 weeks (MD 5.2, 95% CI 2.2 to 8.2 and 4 weeks (MD 4.7, 95% CI 1.7 to 7.8, as well as global perceived effect at 2 weeks (MD 2.5, 95% CI 1.6 to 3.5 and 4 weeks (MD 2.9, 95% CI 1.9 to 3.9. No significant between-group differences occurred in disability at 4 weeks and location of symptoms. Conclusion: Adding neurodynamic treatment to advice to remain active did not improve leg pain and disability at 2 weeks. Trial registration: NCT01954199. [Ferreira G, Stieven F, Araujo F, Wiebusch M, Rosa C, Plentz R, et al. (2016 Neurodynamic treatment did not improve

  9. Testing the activitystat hypothesis: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomersall Sjaan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activitystat hypothesis proposes that when physical activity or energy expenditure is increased or decreased in one domain, there will be a compensatory change in another domain to maintain an overall, stable level of physical activity or energy expenditure. To date, there has been no experimental study primarily designed to test the activitystat hypothesis in adults. The aim of this trial is to determine the effect of two different imposed exercise loads on total daily energy expenditure and physical activity levels. Methods This study will be a randomised, multi-arm, parallel controlled trial. Insufficiently active adults (as determined by the Active Australia survey aged 18–60 years old will be recruited for this study (n=146. Participants must also satisfy the Sports Medicine Australia Pre-Exercise Screening System and must weigh less than 150 kg. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of three groups using a computer-generated allocation sequence. Participants in the Moderate exercise group will receive an additional 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week for six weeks, and those in the Extensive exercise group will receive an additional 300 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week for six weeks. Exercise targets will be accumulated through both group and individual exercise sessions monitored by heart rate telemetry. Control participants will not be given any instructions regarding lifestyle. The primary outcome measures are activity energy expenditure (doubly labeled water and physical activity (accelerometry. Secondary measures will include resting metabolic rate via indirect calorimetry, use of time, maximal oxygen consumption and several anthropometric and physiological measures. Outcome measures will be conducted at baseline (zero weeks, mid- and end-intervention (three and six weeks with three (12 weeks and six month (24 week follow-up. All assessors will be

  10. Is the randomised controlled trial the best?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is taken out of the analysis, or to the exaggeration of effect; in a large study, for ... randomisation was 64 years; yet most often hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is ... in labour, and not the aggressive syntocinon augmentation, in the highly ...

  11. Conductive Education as a Method of Stroke Rehabilitation: A Single Blinded Randomised Controlled Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Bek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Conductive Education for stroke survivors has shown promise but randomised evidence is unavailable. This study assessed the feasibility of a definitive randomised controlled trial to evaluate efficacy. Methods. Adult stroke survivors were recruited through local community notices. Those completing the baseline assessment were randomised using an online program and group allocation was independent. Intervention group participants received 10 weekly 1.5-hour sessions of Conductive Education at the National Institute of Conductive Education in Birmingham, UK. The control group participants attended two group meetings. The study evaluated the feasibility of recruitment procedures, delivery of the intervention, retention of participants, and appropriateness of outcome measures and data collection methods. Independent assessments included the Barthel Index, the Stroke Impact Scale, the Timed Up and Go test, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results. Eighty-two patients were enrolled; 77 completed the baseline assessment (46 men, mean age 62.1 yrs. and were randomised. 70 commenced the intervention (n=37 or an equivalent waiting period (n=33. 32/37 completed the 10-week training and 32/33 the waiting period. There were no missing items from completed questionnaires and no adverse events. Discussion. Recruitment, intervention, and assessment methods worked well. Transport issues for intervention and assessment appointments require review. Conclusion. A definitive trial is feasible. This trial is registered with ISRCTN84064492.

  12. A randomised study of the effects of supplemental exercise sessions after a 7-week chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rehabilitation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan René; Rasmussen, Mathilde; Buch, Tove Fedder;

    2012-01-01

    Background: Several studies have suggested that the effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) rehabilitation programs tend to attenuate with time. We aimed to investigate the effects of supplemental exercise sessions following an initial 7-week COPD rehabilitation program with regard...... to exercise capacity and disease-specific quality of life (QoL). Methods: We performed a 7-week COPD rehabilitation program in 140 COPD patients. Patients (n = 118) who completed the initial program were randomised for additional six supervised supplemental exercise sessions or three follow-up examinations...... in the intervention group. However, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in the observed changes in QoL or ESWT at any time point. Conclusions: In conclusion, a program of six supplemental exercise sessions following the initial 7-week COPD rehabilitation program did not have any...

  13. Acupuncture for dry eye: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Ae-Ran

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dry eye is usually managed by conventional medical interventions such as artificial tears, anti-inflammatory drugs and surgical treatment. However, since dry eye is one of the most frequent ophthalmologic disorders, safer and more effective methods for its treatment are necessary, especially for vulnerable patients. Acupuncture has been widely used to treat patients with dry eye. Our aim is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for this condition. Methods/Design A randomised, patient-assessor blinded, sham (non-acupuncture point, shallow acupuncture controlled study was established. Participants allocated to verum acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups will be treated three times weekly for three weeks for a total of nine sessions per participant. Seventeen points (GV23; bilateral BL2, GB4, TE23, Ex1 (Taiyang, ST1 and GB20; and left SP3, LU9, LU10 and HT8 for men, right for women have been selected for the verum acupuncture; for the sham acupuncture, points have been selected that do not coincide with a classical acupuncture point and that are located close to the verum points, except in the case of the rim of the eye. Ocular surface disease index, tear film breakup time, the Schirmer I test, medication quantification scale and general assessment of improvement will be used as outcome variables for evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture. Safety will also be assessed at every visit. Primary and secondary outcomes will be assessed four weeks after screening. All statistical analyses will be performed using analysis of covariance. Discussion The results of this trial will be used as a basis for clarifying the efficacy of acupuncture for dry eye. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00969280.

  14. Influence of reported study design characteristics on intervention effect estimates from randomised controlled trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savović, J; Jones, He; Altman, Dg

    2012-01-01

    The design of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) should incorporate characteristics (such as concealment of randomised allocation and blinding of participants and personnel) that avoid biases resulting from lack of comparability of the intervention and control groups. Empirical evidence suggests...

  15. Diamorphine for pain relief in labour : a randomised controlled trial comparing intramuscular injection and patient-controlled analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Rhona J; Hillan, Edith; Clark, Diana; Gilmour, Harper

    2004-10-01

    To compare the efficacy of diamorphine administered by a patient-controlled pump (patient-controlled analgesia) with intramuscular administration for pain relief in labour. Randomised controlled trial. The South Glasgow University Hospitals NHS Trust. Primigravidae and multigravidae in labour at term (37-42 weeks). Women were randomised in labour to the study (patient-controlled analgesia) or control group (intramuscular). Randomisation was achieved through a random permuted block design stratified by parity. Study group women were given a loading dose of 1.2 mg diamorphine intravenously and then attached to the pump. Control group women received intramuscular diamorphine as per hospital protocol. Participants were also given 3 mg of buccal Stemetil. Data were collected throughout labour and at six postnatal weeks. Analgesia requirements during labour and women's satisfaction with the method of pain relief. Women in the study group (patient-controlled analgesia) used significantly less diamorphine than women in the control group (intramuscular) but were significantly more likely to state that they were very dissatisfied with their use of diamorphine and were significantly more likely to opt out of the trial before the birth of the baby. The majority of women in both groups used other analgesia concurrent with diamorphine such as Entonox, aromatherapy or TENS. Patient-controlled analgesia administration of diamorphine for the relief of pain in labour offers no significant advantages over intramuscular administration. The results also suggest that diamorphine is a poor analgesic for labour pain irrespective of the mode of administration.

  16. Yoga in schizophrenia : a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vancampfort, D.; Vansteelandt, K.; Scheewe, T.; Probst, M.; Knapen, J.; De Herdt, A.; De Hert, M.

    2012-01-01

    Vancampfort D, Vansteelandt K, Scheewe T, Probst M, Knapen J, De Herdt A, De Hert M. Yoga in schizophrenia: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Objective: The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of yoga as a complementary treatment on general psychopa

  17. Yoga in schizophrenia : a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vancampfort, D.; Vansteelandt, K.; Scheewe, T.; Probst, M.; Knapen, J.; De Herdt, A.; De Hert, M.

    2012-01-01

    Vancampfort D, Vansteelandt K, Scheewe T, Probst M, Knapen J, De Herdt A, De Hert M. Yoga in schizophrenia: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Objective: The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of yoga as a complementary treatment on general psychopa

  18. The effect of orthodontic referral guidelines: A randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Conboy, Frances; O'Brien, K.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To develop and evaluate the effectiveness of referral guidelines for the referral of orthodontic patients to consultant and specialist practijioner orthodontists. Design Single centre randomised controlled trial with random allocation of referral guidelines for orthodontic treatment to general dental practitioners. Setting Hospital orthodontic departments and specialist orthodontic practices in Manchester and Stockport. Subjects General dental practitioners and the patients they ref...

  19. Structured risk assessment and violence in acute psychiatric wards: randomised controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abderhalden, Christoph; Needham, Ian; Dassen, Theo; Halfens, Ruud; Haug, Hans-Joachim; Fischer, Joachim E

    2008-01-01

    .... To assess whether such risk assessments decrease the incidence of violence and coercion. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted with 14 acute psychiatric admission wards as the units of randomisation, including a preference arm...

  20. Topical glyceryl trinitrate treatment of chronic patellar tendinopathy : a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steunebrink, Mirjam; Zwerver, Johannes; Brandsema, Ruben; Groenenboom, Petra; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Weir, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess if continuous topical glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) treatment improves outcome in patients with chronic patellar tendinopathy when compared with eccentric training alone. Methods Randomised double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial comparing a 12-week programme of using a GTN

  1. Topical glyceryl trinitrate treatment of chronic patellar tendinopathy : a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steunebrink, Mirjam; Zwerver, Johannes; Brandsema, Ruben; Groenenboom, Petra; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Weir, Adam

    Objectives To assess if continuous topical glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) treatment improves outcome in patients with chronic patellar tendinopathy when compared with eccentric training alone. Methods Randomised double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial comparing a 12-week programme of using a GTN

  2. Managing Injuries of the Neck Trial (MINT: design of a randomised controlled trial of treatments for whiplash associated disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson Esther M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A substantial proportion of patients with whiplash injuries develop chronic symptoms. However, the best treatment of acute injuries to prevent long-term problems is uncertain. A stepped care treatment pathway has been proposed, in which patients are given advice and education at their initial visit to the emergency department (ED, followed by review at three weeks and physiotherapy for those with persisting symptoms. MINT is a two-stage randomised controlled trial to evaluate two components of such a pathway: 1. use of The Whiplash Book versus usual advice when patients first attend the emergency department; 2. referral to physiotherapy versus reinforcement of advice for patients with continuing symptoms at three weeks. Methods Evaluation of the Whiplash Book versus usual advice uses a cluster randomised design in emergency departments of eight NHS Trusts. Eligible patients are identified by clinicians in participating emergency departments and are sent a study questionnaire within a week of their ED attendance. Three thousand participants will be included. Patients with persisting symptoms three weeks after their ED attendance are eligible to join an individually randomised study of physiotherapy versus reinforcement of the advice given in ED. Six hundred participants will be randomised. Follow-up is at 4, 8 and 12 months after their ED attendance. Primary outcome is the Neck Disability Index (NDI, and secondary outcomes include quality of life and time to return to work and normal activities. An economic evaluation is being carried out. Conclusion This paper describes the protocol and operational aspects of a complex intervention trial based in NHS emergency and physiotherapy departments, evaluating two components of a stepped-care approach to the treatment of whiplash injuries. The trial uses two randomisations, with the first stage being cluster randomised and the second individually randomised.

  3. Dry needling and exercise for chronic whiplash - a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvlis Tina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic whiplash is a common and costly problem. Sensory hypersensitivity is a feature of chronic whiplash that is associated with poor responsiveness to physical treatments such as exercise. Modalities such as dry-needling have shown some capacity to modulate sensory hypersensitivity, suggesting that when combined with advice and exercise, such an approach may be more effective in the management of chronic whiplash. The primary aim of this project is to investigate the effectiveness of dry-needling, advice and exercise for chronic whiplash. Method/Design A double-blind randomised controlled trial will be conducted. 120 participants with chronic whiplash, grade II will be randomised to receive either 1 dry-needling, advice and exercise or 2 sham dry-needling, advice and exercise. All participants will receive an educational booklet on whiplash. Participants who are randomised to Group 1 will receive 6 treatments of combined dry-needling and exercise delivered in the first 3 weeks of the 6 week program, and 4 treatments of exercise only in the last 3 weeks of the program. Participants randomised to Group 2 will receive an identical protocol, except that a sham dry-needling technique will be used instead of dry-needling. The primary outcome measures are the Neck Disability Index (NDI and participants' perceived recovery. Outcomes will be measured at 6, 12, 24 and 52 weeks after randomization by an assessor who is blind to the group allocation of the participants. In parallel, an economic analysis will be conducted. Discussion This trial will utilise high quality trial methodologies in accordance with CONSORT guidelines. The successful completion of this trial will provide evidence of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a combined treatment approach for the management of chronic whiplash. Trial registration ACTRN12609000470291

  4. Physiotherapy Post Lumbar Discectomy: Prospective Feasibility and Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Rushton

    Full Text Available To evaluate: acceptability and feasibility of trial procedures; distribution of scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ, planned primary outcome; and efficient working of trial components.A feasibility and external pilot randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN33808269, assigned 10/12/2012 was conducted across 2 UK secondary care outpatient physiotherapy departments associated with regional spinal surgery centres.Consecutive consenting patients aged >18 years; post primary, single level, lumbar discectomy.Participants were randomised to either 1:1 physiotherapy outpatient management including patient leaflet, or patient leaflet alone.Blinded assessments were made at 4 weeks post surgery (baseline and 12 weeks post baseline (proposed primary end point. Secondary outcomes included: Global Perceived Effect, back/leg pain, straight leg raise, return to work/function, quality of life, fear avoidance, range of movement, medication, re-operation.At discharge, 110 (44% eligible patients gave consent to be contacted. 59 (54% patients were recruited. Loss to follow up was 39% at 12 weeks, with one site contributing 83% losses. Mean (SD RMDQ was 10.07 (5.58 leaflet and 10.52 (5.94 physiotherapy/leaflet at baseline; and 5.37 (4.91 leaflet and 5.53 (4.49 physiotherapy/leaflet at 12 weeks. 5.1% zero scores at 12 weeks illustrated no floor effect. Sensitivity to change was assessed at 12 weeks with mean (SD change -4.53 (6.41, 95%CI -7.61 to -1.44 for leaflet; and -6.18 (5.59, 95%CI -9.01 to -3.30 for physiotherapy/leaflet. RMDQ mean difference (95%CI between change from baseline to twelve weeks was 1.65(-2.46 to 5.75. Mean difference (95%CI between groups at 12 weeks was -0.16 (-3.36 to 3.04. Participant adherence with treatment was good. No adverse events were reported.Both interventions were acceptable, and it is promising that they both demonstrated a trend in reducing disability in this population. A randomised controlled trial, using a

  5. Wordless intervention for people with epilepsy and learning disabilities (WIELD): a randomised controlled feasibility trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoni, Silvana E; Gates, Bob; Parkes, Georgina; Wellsted, David; Barton, Garry; Ring, Howard; Khoo, Mary Ellen; Monji-Patel, Deela; Friedli, Karin; Zia, Asif; Irvine, Lisa; Durand, Marie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility of a full-scale randomised controlled trial of a picture booklet to improve quality of life for people with epilepsy and learning disabilities. Trial design A randomised controlled feasibility trial. Randomisation was not blinded and was conducted using a centralised secure database and a blocked 1:1 allocation ratio. Setting Epilepsy clinics in 1 English National Health Service (NHS) Trust. Participants Patients with learning disabilities and epilepsy who had: a seizure within the past 12 months, meaningful communication and a carer with sufficient proficiency in English. Intervention Participants in the intervention group used a picture booklet with a trained researcher, and a carer present. These participants kept the booklet, and were asked to use it at least twice more over 20 weeks. The control group received treatment as usual, and were provided with a booklet at the end of the study. Outcome measures 7 feasibility criteria were used relating to recruitment, data collection, attrition, potential effect on epilepsy-related quality of life (Epilepsy and Learning Disabilities Quality of Life Scale, ELDQOL) at 4-week, 12-week and 20-week follow-ups, feasibility of methodology, acceptability of the intervention and potential to calculate cost-effectiveness. Outcome The recruitment rate of eligible patients was 34% and the target of 40 participants was reached. There was minimal missing data and attrition. An intention-to-treat analysis was performed; data from the outcome measures suggest a benefit from the intervention on the ELDQOL behaviour and mood subscales at 4 and 20 weeks follow-up. The booklet and study methods were positively received, and no adverse events were reported. There was a positive indication of the potential for a cost-effectiveness analysis. Conclusions All feasibility criteria were fully or partially met, therefore confirming feasibility of a definitive trial. Trial registration number ISRCTN

  6. Professional kinesiology practice for chronic low back pain: single-blind, randomised controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eardley, S; Brien, S; Little, P; Prescott, P; Lewith, G

    2013-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is a highly prevalent condition with no definitive treatment. Professional Kinesiology Practice (PKP) is a little known complementary medicine technique using non-standard muscle testing; no previous effectiveness studies have been performed. This is an exploratory, pragmatic single-blind, 3-arm randomised sham-controlled pilot study with waiting list control (WLC) in private practice UK (2007-2009). 70 participants scoring ≥4 on the Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) were randomised to real or sham PKP receiving 1 treatment weekly for 5 weeks or a WLC. WLC's were re-randomised to real or sham after 6 weeks. The main outcome was a change in RMDQ from baseline to end of 5 weeks of real or sham PKP. With an effect size of 0.7 real treatment was significantly different to sham (mean difference RMDQ score = -2.9, p = 0.04, 95% CI -5.8 to -0.1). Compared to WLC, real and sham groups had significant RMDQ improvements (real -9.0, p < 0.01, 95% CI -12.1 to -5.8; effect size 2.1; sham -6.1, p < 0.01, 95% CI -9.1 to -3.1; effect size 1.4). Practitioner empathy (CARE) and patient enablement (PEI) did not predict outcome; holistic health beliefs (CAMBI) did, though. The sham treatment appeared credible; patients did not guess treatment allocation. 3 patients reported minor adverse reactions. Real treatment was significantly different from sham demonstrating a moderate specific effect of PKP; both were better than WLC indicating a substantial non-specific and contextual treatment effect. A larger definitive study would be appropriate with nested qualitative work to help understand the mechanisms involved in PKP.

  7. Randomised clinical trial to evaluate changes in dentine tubule occlusion following 4 weeks use of an occluding toothpaste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Joon; Parkinson, Charles P; Davies, Maria; Claydon, Nicholas C A; West, Nicola X

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether a silicone impression material could precisely replicate dentine tubule changes following 4 weeks toothbrushing with occluding or non-occluding toothpaste and whether changes reflected hypersensitivity clinical assessment. This was a single site, examiner blind, parallel, two treatment arm, randomised clinical trial. Participants were healthy, ≥18, with ≥1 sensitive tooth with exposed dentine, Schiff sensitivity score ≥2, and patent tubules with dentine occlusion score 4-5 as determined by scanning electron microscopy of replica impressions. Nine participants received Sensodyne® Rapid Relief (occluding toothpaste) and 10 Crest® Decay Prevention (non-occluding toothpaste), and were re-evaluated for sensitivity and occlusion score after two timed minutes and 4 weeks twice-daily home brushing. Occlusion scores did not correlate significantly with pain scores, but correlations were positive and impressions showed characteristic dentine tubule patency and occlusion. After 4 weeks, thermal VAS was significantly lower than baseline for the non-occluding toothpaste; all other pain scores were significantly lower for both treatments. Dentine occlusion scores also decreased after 4 weeks of either treatment, but did not achieve significance (p = 0.0625). Both toothpastes reduced clinical sensitivity and increased tubule occlusion. It is hypothesised that during impression, taking some material may have sheared off and occluded tubules resulting in false positives. This study has demonstrated that a silicone impression material can accurately replicate the dentine surface to demonstrate dentine tubular occlusion and patency; however, although the association between occlusion and pain score was positive, this technique needs to be refined before use in future studies.

  8. Internet based self-help therapy versus waitlist control group for persons with anxiety disorders: A randomised feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Morten Munthe; Lindschou, Jane; Gluud, Christian

    ) FearFighter or B) waitlist control group. Participants are persons with a diagnosis of social phobia, agora phobia, phobia or panic disorder. The intervention with FearFighter is a nine step cognitive behavioural self-help therapy program delivered over the internet over nine weeks. Participants...... mental disorders, national authorities call for more evidence based on randomised clinical trials. Objective: To investigate if persons with an anxiety disorder treated in the IBT program FearFighter will improve and recover. Method: A randomised feasibility study with 64 participants allocated to A...

  9. A randomised controlled trial of complete denture impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, T P; Craddock, H L; Gray, J C; Pavitt, S H; Hulme, C; Godfrey, M; Fernandez, C; Navarro-Coy, N; Dillon, S; Wright, J; Brown, S; Dukanovic, G; Brunton, P A

    2014-08-01

    There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Dental Institute, UK. Each patient received two sets of dentures; made using either alginate or silicone impressions. Randomisations determined the order of assessment and order of impressions. The primary outcome was patient blinded preference for unadjusted dentures. Secondary outcomes were patient preference for the adjusted dentures, rating of comfort, stability and chewing efficiency, experience of each impression, and an OHIP-EDENT questionnaire. Seventy-eight (91.8%) patients completed the primary assessment. 53(67.9%) patients preferred dentures made from silicone impressions while 14(17.9%) preferred alginate impressions. 4(5.1%) patients found both dentures equally satisfactory and 7 (9.0%) found both equally unsatisfactory. There was a 50% difference in preference rates (in favour of silicone) (95%CI 32.7-67.3%, pUnilever Hatton Award of the International Assocation for Dental Research, Capetown, South Africa, June 2014. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Exercise therapy for Stress-related mental disorder, a randomised controlled trial in primary care

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    Donker Marieke

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background to investigate whether a structured physical exercise programme (PEP improves the recovery of general health in patients suffering from Stress-related Mental Disorder (SMD. Method Study design: randomised open trial in general practice. Patients from two regions in the Netherlands were included between September 2003 and December 2005, and followed up for 12 weeks. Intervention: the patients were referred to a physical therapist for instruction in and monitoring of physical exercise of an intermediate intensity. Following the Dutch Guidelines for Healthy Physical Exercise, the patients were instructed to exercise at least five times a week, for at least 30 minutes per day. Control group: usual care from the GP Outcome Primary: improvement of general health after 6 weeks according to the 'general health' dimension of the Short-Form 36. Secondary: total days off work, percentage that resumed work after 6 and 12 weeks, change in distress score and change in remaining SF36 dimensions after 6 and 12 weeks. Results out of 102 randomised patients (mean age 43, 60 (59% female, 70 (68% completed the trial, of whom 31 were in the intervention group. After 6 weeks, the mean (SD general health score was 54.6 (22.1 for the intervention group and 57.5 (19.2 for the controls. The corresponding effect size (Cohen's d with 95% confidence interval from analysis of covariance was -0.06 (-0.41, 0.30 indicating no effect on general health. No significant effects of the intervention were detected for any secondary outcome parameter either. Conclusion Notwithstanding the relatively high drop-out rate, our results suggest that referral to a physical therapist for structured physical exercise is not likely to be very effective in improving recovery from SMD. Trial registry Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN15609105

  11. Efficacy and safety of indacaterol 150 μg once-daily in COPD: a double-blind, randomised, 12-week study

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    Piggott Simon

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indacaterol is a novel, once-daily (o.d. inhaled, long-acting β2-agonist in development for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. This 12-week, double-blind study compared the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of indacaterol to that of placebo in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. Methods Efficacy variables included 24-h trough FEV1 (mean of 23 h 10 min and 23 h 45 min post-dose at Week 12 (primary endpoint and after Day 1, and the percentage of COPD days with poor control (i.e., worsening symptoms. Safety was assessed by adverse events (AEs, mean serum potassium and blood glucose, QTc (Fridericia, and vital signs. Results Patients were randomised (n = 416, mean age 63 years to receive either indacaterol 150 μg o.d. (n = 211 or placebo (n = 205 via a single-dose dry-powder inhaler; 87.5% completed the study. Trough FEV1 (LSM ± SEM at Week 12 was 1.48 ± 0.018 L for indacaterol and 1.35 ± 0.019 L for placebo, a clinically relevant difference of 130 ± 24 mL (p 1 after one dose was significantly higher with indacaterol than placebo (p 1 than placebo, both on Day 1 and at Week 12, with indacaterol-placebo differences (LSM ± SEM of 190 ± 28 (p 1 (between 5 min and 4 h, 5 min and 1 h, and 1 and 4 h post-dose at Week 12 were all significantly greater with indacaterol than placebo (p 500 ms. Conclusions Indacaterol 150 μg o.d. provided clinically significant and sustained bronchodilation, reduced rescue medication use, and had a safety and tolerability profile similar to placebo. Trial registration NCT00624286

  12. Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of pivagabine in neurasthenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, G; Cagnin, A; Mancia, D; Caffarra, P; Avanzi, S; Copelli, S; Ciappina, C; Lo Presti, F; Spilimbergo, P G; D'Antonio, E; Di Costanzo, E; Matrango, M; Pastres, P; Urbani, P P; Signorino, M; Simoncelli, M; Provinciali, L; Regnicolo, L; Albano, C; Roccatagliata, G; Rubino, V; Cultrera, S; Fracassi, M

    1997-11-01

    One hundred and eighteen patients with neurasthenia, as defined by ICD 10 (International Classification of Diseases), participated in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of pivagabine (4-[(2,2-dimethyl-1-oxopropyl)amino]butanoic acid, CAS 69542-93-4, Tonerg). Pivagabine 1800 mg/d was administered orally for four weeks. At the end of the trial, active medication was significantly superior to placebo on the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) improvement of illness scale. In addition, pivagabine treatment reduced the physical and mental fatigability of patients, and increased their sense of well-being.

  13. Improving community ambulation after hip fracture: protocol for a randomised, controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwig, D; Mangione, KK; Baumgarten, M; Terrin, M; Fortinsky, R; Kenny, AM; Gruber-Baldini, AL; Beamer, B; Tosteson, ANA; Shardell, M; Magder, L; Binder, E; Koval, K; Resnick, B; Craik, RL; Magaziner, J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction After a hip fracture in older persons, significant disability often remains; dependency in functional activities commonly persists beyond 3 months after surgery. Endurance, dynamic balance, quadriceps strength, and function are compromised, and contribute to an inability to walk independently in the community. In the United States, people aged 65 years and older are eligible to receive Medicare funding for physiotherapy for a limited time after a hip fracture. A goal of outpatient physiotherapy is independent and safe household ambulation 2 to 3 months after surgery. Current Medicare-reimbursed post-hip-fracture rehabilitation fails to return many patients to pre-fracture levels of function. Interventions delivered in the home after usual hip fracture physiotherapy has ended could promote higher levels of functional independence in these frail and older adult patients. Primary objective To evaluate the effect of a specific multicomponent physiotherapy intervention (PUSH), compared with a non-specific multi-component control physiotherapy intervention (PULSE), on the ability to ambulate independently in the community 16 weeks after randomisation. Design Parallel, two-group randomised multicentre trial of 210 older adults with a hip fracture assessed at baseline and 16 weeks after randomisation, and at 40 weeks after randomisation for a subset of approximately 150 participants. Participants and setting A total of 210 hip fracture patients are being enrolled at three clinical sites and randomised up to 26 weeks after admission. Study inclusion criteria are: closed, non-pathologic, minimal trauma hip fracture with surgical fixation; aged ≥ 60 years at the time of randomisation; community residing at the time of fracture and randomisation; ambulating without human assistance 2 months prior to fracture; and being unable to walk at least 300 m in 6 minutes at baseline. Participants are ineligible if the interventions are deemed to be unsafe or unfeasible

  14. A randomised controlled trial linking mental health inpatients to community smoking cessation supports: A study protocol

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    Clancy Richard

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental health inpatients smoke at higher rates than the general population and are disproportionately affected by tobacco dependence. Despite the advent of smoke free policies within mental health hospitals, limited systems are in place to support a cessation attempt post hospitalisation, and international evidence suggests that most smokers return to pre-admission smoking levels following discharge. This protocol describes a randomised controlled trial that will test the feasibility, acceptability and efficacy of linking inpatient smoking care with ongoing community cessation support for smokers with a mental illness. Methods/Design This study will be conducted as a randomised controlled trial. 200 smokers with an acute mental illness will be recruited from a large inpatient mental health facility. Participants will complete a baseline survey and will be randomised to either a multimodal smoking cessation intervention or provided with hospital smoking care only. Randomisation will be stratified by diagnosis (psychotic, non-psychotic. Intervention participants will be provided with a brief motivational interview in the inpatient setting and options of ongoing smoking cessation support post discharge: nicotine replacement therapy (NRT; referral to Quitline; smoking cessation groups; and fortnightly telephone support. Outcome data, including cigarettes smoked per day, quit attempts, and self-reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence (validated by exhaled carbon monoxide, will be collected via blind interview at one week, two months, four months and six months post discharge. Process information will also be collected, including the use of cessation supports and cost of the intervention. Discussion This study will provide comprehensive data on the potential of an integrated, multimodal smoking cessation intervention for persons with an acute mental illness, linking inpatient with community cessation support. Trial Registration

  15. Probiotics in the prevention of eczema: a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Stephen J; Jordan, Sue; Storey, Melanie; Thornton, Catherine A; Gravenor, Michael B; Garaiova, Iveta; Plummer, Susan F; Wang, Duolao; Morgan, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate a multistrain, high-dose probiotic in the prevention of eczema. Design A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group trial. Settings Antenatal clinics, research clinic, children at home. Patients Pregnant women and their infants. Interventions Women from 36 weeks gestation and their infants to age 6 months received daily either the probiotic (Lactobacillus salivarius CUL61, Lactobacillus paracasei CUL08, Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis CUL34 and Bifidobacterium bifidum CUL20; total of 1010 organisms/day) or matching placebo. Main outcome measure Diagnosed eczema at age 2 years. Infants were followed up by questionnaire. Clinical examination and skin prick tests to common allergens were done at 6 months and 2 years. Results The cumulative frequency of diagnosed eczema at 2 years was similar in the probiotic (73/214, 34.1%) and placebo arms (72/222, 32.4%; OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.72 to 1.6). Among the secondary outcomes, the cumulative frequency of skin prick sensitivity at 2 years was reduced in the probiotic (18/171; 10.5%) compared with the placebo arm (32/173; 18.5%; OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.98). The statistically significant differences between the arms were mainly in sensitisation to cow's milk and hen's egg proteins at 6 months. Atopic eczema occurred in 9/171 (5.3%) children in the probiotic arm and 21/173 (12.1%) in the placebo arm (OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.91). Conclusions The study did not provide evidence that the probiotic either prevented eczema during the study or reduced its severity. However, the probiotic seemed to prevent atopic sensitisation to common food allergens and so reduce the incidence of atopic eczema in early childhood. Trial registration Number ISRCTN26287422. PMID:24947281

  16. Randomised controlled trial of qigong in the treatment of mild essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, B M Y; Lo, J L F; Fong, D Y T; Chan, M Y; Wong, S H T; Wong, V C W; Lam, K S L; Lau, C P; Karlberg, J P E

    2005-09-01

    Exercise and relaxation decrease blood pressure. Qigong is a traditional Chinese exercise consisting of breathing and gentle movements. We conducted a randomised controlled trial to study the effect of Guolin qigong on blood pressure. In all, 88 patients with mild essential hypertension were recruited from the community and randomised to Goulin qigong or conventional exercise for 16 weeks. The main outcome measurements were blood pressure, health status (SF-36 scores), Beck Anxiety and Depression Inventory scores. In the qigong group, blood pressure decreased significantly from 146.3+/-7.8/93.0+/-4.1 mmHg at baseline to 135.5+/-10.0/87.1+/-7.7 mmHg at week 16. In the exercise group, blood pressure also decreased significantly from 140.9+/-10.9/93.1+/-3.5 mmHg to 129.7+/-11.1/86.0+/-7.0 mmHg. Heart rate, weight, BMI, waist circumference, total cholesterol, renin and 24 h urinary albumin excretion significantly decreased in both groups after 16 weeks. General health, bodily pain, social functioning and depression also improved in both groups. No significant differences between qigong and conventional exercise were found. In conclusion, Guolin qigong and conventional exercise have similar effects on blood pressure in patients with mild hypertension. While no additional benefits were identified, it is nevertheless an alternative to conventional exercise in the nondrug treatment of hypertension.

  17. The Home-Based Older People's Exercise (HOPE trial: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

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    Forster Anne

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frailty is common in older age, and is associated with important adverse health outcomes including increased risk of disability and admission to hospital or long-term care. Exercise interventions for frail older people have the potential to reduce the risk of these adverse outcomes by increasing muscle strength and improving mobility. Methods/Design The Home-Based Older People's Exercise (HOPE trial is a two arm, assessor blind pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT to assess the effectiveness of a 12 week exercise intervention (the HOPE programme designed to improve the mobility and functional abilities of frail older people living at home, compared with usual care. The primary outcome is the timed-up-and-go test (TUGT, measured at baseline and 14 weeks post-randomisation. Secondary outcomes include the Barthel Index of activities of daily living (ADL, EuroQol Group 5-Dimension Self-Report Questionnaire (EQ-5D quality of life measure and the geriatric depression scale (GDS, measured at baseline and 14 weeks post-randomisation. We will record baseline frailty using the Edmonton Frail Scale (EFS, record falls and document muscle/joint pain. We will test the feasibility of collection of data to identify therapy resources required for delivery of the intervention. Discussion The HOPE trial will explore and evaluate a home-based exercise intervention for frail older people. Although previous RCTs have used operationalised, non-validated methods of measuring frailty, the HOPE trial is, to our knowledge, the first RCT of an exercise intervention for frail older people that includes a validated method of frailty assessment at baseline. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN57066881

  18. Task-Specific Balance Training Improves the Sensory Organisation of Balance Control in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Shirley S.M.; Guo, X.; Liu, Karen P.Y.; Ki, W.Y.; Louie, Lobo H.T.; Chung, Raymond C.K.; Macfarlane, Duncan J

    2016-01-01

    Sensory organisation of balance control is compromised in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). A randomised controlled trial involving 88 children with DCD was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a task-specific balance training (functional-movement training, FMT) programme in improving balance deficits in a DCD population. The DCD participants were randomly assigned to either a FMT group or a control group. The FMT group received two training sessions/ week for 3 months...

  19. A randomised trial of a 5 week, manual based, self-management programme for hypertension delivered in a cardiac patient club in Shanghai

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    Lewin Robert J

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Shanghai there are 1.2 million people with hypertension, many of whom have difficulty in affording medical treatment. Community based, anti-hypertensive clubs have been created to provide health education but education alone is often ineffective. Lifestyle change programmes have shown some potential for reducing blood pressure but in previous trials have required specialist staff and extensive contact. We have previously demonstrated that self-management programmes delivered by health professionals, such as a nurse who has had short training in self-management techniques can change health behaviour and reduce symptoms. This study was designed to evaluate the benefits of a simple, cognitive-behavioural, self-management programme for hypertension based around a hypertension manual and delivered in the setting of a community anti-hypertensive club in Shanghai. Method The method was a pragmatic randomised controlled trial with an intention-to-treat analysis. Adult patients with mild-to-moderate primary hypertension, waiting to join a neighbourhood anti-hypertension club, were randomised to the self-management programme or to an information only control procedure. They attended the group treatment sessions on 4 occasions over 5 weeks for education combined with goal setting for lifestyle change and an introduction to exercise. The main outcome measures were: changes in blood pressure; blood total cholesterol; diet; activity level and health related quality of life 1 month and 4 months after the end of treatment. Results A total of 140 adults with mild-to-moderate primary hypertension took part. All of the main outcomes showed beneficial changes. Four months after the end of treatment the mean blood pressure differences between groups were systolic 10.15 mm Hg (P Conclusion Patients with mild-to-moderate primary hypertension attending a 5 week, group and manual based, cognitive-behavioural self-management programme, delivered

  20. A Randomised Controlled Trial of complete denture impression materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, T.P.; Craddock, H.L.; Gray, J.C.; Pavitt, S.H.; Hulme, C.; Godfrey, M.; Fernandez, C.; Navarro-Coy, N.; Dillon, S.; Wright, J.; Brown, S.; Dukanovic, G.; Brunton, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Methods Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Dental Institute, UK. Each patient received two sets of dentures; made using either alginate or silicone impressions. Randomisations determined the order of assessment and order of impressions. The primary outcome was patient blinded preference for unadjusted dentures. Secondary outcomes were patient preference for the adjusted dentures, rating of comfort, stability and chewing efficiency, experience of each impression, and an OHIP-EDENT questionnaire. Results Seventy-eight (91.8%) patients completed the primary assessment. 53(67.9%) patients preferred dentures made from silicone impressions while 14(17.9%) preferred alginate impressions. 4(5.1%) patients found both dentures equally satisfactory and 7 (9.0%) found both equally unsatisfactory. There was a 50% difference in preference rates (in favour of silicone) (95%CI 32.7–67.3%, p silicone impressions were preferred by patients. Clinical significance Given the strength of the clinical findings within this paper, dentists should consider choosing silicone rather than alginate as their material of choice for secondary impressions for complete dentures. Trial Registration: ISRCTN 01528038.

 This article forms part of a project for which the author (TPH) won the Senior Clinical Unilever Hatton Award of the International Assocation for Dental Research, Capetown, South Africa, June 2014. PMID:24995473

  1. Improving health-related fitness in adolescents: the CrossFit Teens™ randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eather, Narelle; Morgan, Philip James; Lubans, David Revalds

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the preliminary efficacy and feasibility of the CrossFit Teens™ resistance training programme for improving health-related fitness and resistance training skill competency in adolescents. This assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial was conducted in one secondary school in the Hunter Region, Australia, from July to September 2013. Ninety-six (96) students (age = 15.4 (.5) years, 51.5% female) were randomised into intervention (n = 51) or control (n = 45) conditions for 8-weeks (60 min twice per week). Waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), BMI-Z score (primary outcomes), cardiorespiratory fitness (shuttle run test), muscular fitness (standing jump, push-up, handgrip, curl-up test), flexibility (sit and reach) and resistance training skill competency were measured at baseline and immediate post-intervention. Feasibility measures of recruitment, retention, adherence and satisfaction were assessed. Significant group-by-time intervention effects were found for waist circumference [-3.1 cm, P CrossFit Teens™ is a feasible and efficacious programme for improving health-related fitness in adolescents.

  2. Choosing a control intervention for a randomised clinical trial

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    Djulbegovic Benjamin

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomised controlled clinical trials are performed to resolve uncertainty concerning comparator interventions. Appropriate acknowledgment of uncertainty enables the concurrent achievement of two goals : the acquisition of valuable scientific knowledge and an optimum treatment choice for the patient-participant. The ethical recruitment of patients requires the presence of clinical equipoise. This involves the appropriate choice of a control intervention, particularly when unapproved drugs or innovative interventions are being evaluated. Discussion We argue that the choice of a control intervention should be supported by a systematic review of the relevant literature and, where necessary, solicitation of the informed beliefs of clinical experts through formal surveys and publication of the proposed trial's protocol. Summary When clinical equipoise is present, physicians may confidently propose trial enrollment to their eligible patients as an act of therapeutic beneficence.

  3. Aquatic therapy for boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD): an external pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hind, Daniel; Parkin, James; Whitworth, Victoria; Rex, Saleema; Young, Tracey; Hampson, Lisa; Sheehan, Jennie; Maguire, Chin; Cantrill, Hannah; Scott, Elaine; Epps, Heather; Main, Marion; Geary, Michelle; McMurchie, Heather; Pallant, Lindsey; Woods, Daniel; Freeman, Jennifer; Lee, Ellen; Eagle, Michelle; Willis, Tracey; Muntoni, Francesco; Baxter, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Standard treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) includes regular physiotherapy. There are no data to show whether adding aquatic therapy (AT) to land-based exercises helps maintain motor function. We assessed the feasibility of recruiting and collecting data from boys with DMD in a parallel-group pilot randomised trial (primary objective), also assessing how intervention and trial procedures work. Ambulant boys with DMD aged 7-16 years established on steroids, with North Star Ambulatory Assessment (NSAA) score ≥8, who were able to complete a 10-m walk test without aids or assistance, were randomly allocated (1:1) to 6 months of either optimised land-based exercises 4 to 6 days/week, defined by local community physiotherapists, or the same 4 days/week plus AT 2 days/week. Those unable to commit to a programme, with >20% variation between NSAA scores 4 weeks apart, or contraindications to AT were excluded. The main outcome measures included feasibility of recruiting 40 participants in 6 months from six UK centres, clinical outcomes including NSAA, independent assessment of treatment optimisation, participant/therapist views on acceptability of intervention and research protocols, value of information (VoI) analysis and cost-impact analysis. Over 6 months, 348 boys were screened: most lived too far from centres or were enrolled in other trials; 12 (30% of the targets) were randomised to AT (n = 8) or control (n = 4). The mean change in NSAA at 6 months was -5.5 (SD 7.8) in the control arm and -2.8 (SD 4.1) in the AT arm. Harms included fatigue in two boys, pain in one. Physiotherapists and parents valued AT but believed it should be delivered in community settings. Randomisation was unattractive to families, who had already decided that AT was useful and who often preferred to enrol in drug studies. The AT prescription was considered to be optimised for three boys, with other boys given programmes that were too extensive and insufficiently

  4. Self Management Activation Randomised Trial for Prostatitis (SMART-P: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

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    Rochester Mark

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic prostatitis otherwise known as chronic pelvic pain syndrome is a common urological diagnosis that causes many men significant morbidity and has a detrimental effect on their quality of life. Standard treatment with antibiotics and simple analgesia are often ineffective and many patients are managed by the chronic pain services. Cognitive behavioural therapy has been shown to be helpful in the management of many chronic diseases and has recently been proposed as an effective treatment for chronic prostatitis. Furthermore, a self management programme administered to groups of men with lower urinary tract symptoms has been shown to be more effective than standard treatments including surgery. Therefore, we have developed a cognitive behavioural therapy programme specifically for men with chronic prostatitis. This novel treatment approach will be compared to conventional therapy in the pain clinic such as atypical analgesia and local anaesthetic injections in the context of a randomised controlled trial. Methods/Design Men will be recruited from general urology outpatient clinics following the exclusion of other diagnoses that could be responsible for their symptoms. Men will be randomised to attend either a self management healthcare and education programme or to pain clinic referral alone. The self management programme will be administered by a clinical psychologist to small groups of men over six consecutive weekly sessions each lasting two hours. Patients will be taught techniques of problem-solving and goal-setting and will learn coping mechanisms and how to modify catastrophic cognition. The primary outcome will be change from baseline in the National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index, a validated instrument for the assessment of men with chronic prostatitis. Secondary outcomes include generic quality of life scores and analgesic and drug usage. Outcomes will be assessed at 2, 6 and 12 months

  5. Self Management Activation Randomised Trial for Prostatitis (SMART-P): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochester, Mark; Armitage, James; Sanders, Mark; Christmas, Paula

    2011-09-26

    Chronic prostatitis otherwise known as chronic pelvic pain syndrome is a common urological diagnosis that causes many men significant morbidity and has a detrimental effect on their quality of life. Standard treatment with antibiotics and simple analgesia are often ineffective and many patients are managed by the chronic pain services.Cognitive behavioural therapy has been shown to be helpful in the management of many chronic diseases and has recently been proposed as an effective treatment for chronic prostatitis. Furthermore, a self management programme administered to groups of men with lower urinary tract symptoms has been shown to be more effective than standard treatments including surgery.Therefore, we have developed a cognitive behavioural therapy programme specifically for men with chronic prostatitis. This novel treatment approach will be compared to conventional therapy in the pain clinic such as atypical analgesia and local anaesthetic injections in the context of a randomised controlled trial. Men will be recruited from general urology outpatient clinics following the exclusion of other diagnoses that could be responsible for their symptoms. Men will be randomised to attend either a self management healthcare and education programme or to pain clinic referral alone. The self management programme will be administered by a clinical psychologist to small groups of men over six consecutive weekly sessions each lasting two hours. Patients will be taught techniques of problem-solving and goal-setting and will learn coping mechanisms and how to modify catastrophic cognition.The primary outcome will be change from baseline in the National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index, a validated instrument for the assessment of men with chronic prostatitis. Secondary outcomes include generic quality of life scores and analgesic and drug usage. Outcomes will be assessed at 2, 6 and 12 months. If this group administered self management programme is

  6. Replicability of sight word training and phonics training in poor readers: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G McArthur

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance of effective treatments for children with reading impairment, paired with growing concern about the lack of scientific replication in psychological science, the aim of this study was to replicate a quasi-randomised trial of sight word and phonics training using a randomised controlled trial (RCT design. One group of poor readers (N = 41 did 8 weeks of phonics training (i.e., phonological decoding and then 8 weeks of sight word training (i.e., whole-word recognition. A second group did the reverse order of training. Sight word and phonics training each had a large and significant valid treatment effect on trained irregular words and word reading fluency. In addition, combined sight word and phonics training had a moderate and significant valid treatment effect on nonword reading accuracy and fluency. These findings demonstrate the reliability of both phonics and sight word training in treating poor readers in an era where the importance of scientific reliability is under close scrutiny.

  7. Pneumatic retinopexy versus scleral buckling: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, A; Fulcher, T; Datta, V; Acheson, R

    1996-01-01

    Pneumatic retinopexy (PR) is a technique for repairing certain retinal detachments which is easier to perform than conventional sceral buckling (SB) surgery but has comparable results. We performed a prospective, randomised, controlled trial to determine for ourselves whether PR is a safe and acceptable procedure. Twenty patients presenting consecutively with retinal detachments which fulfilled the selection criteria were randomised to have their detachments repaired by either PR or SB, ten patients in each group. The suitable patients had a single retinal break or small group of breaks of not greater than one clock hour in size, situated within the superior eight clock hours of retina. Patients with significant proliferative vitreoretinopathy or other fundus disorders were excluded. All patients in the PR group had local anaesthesia while all those in the SB group had general anaesthesia. Successful reattachment of the retina was achieved with one or more procedures in 90 percent of the PR group and in 100 percent of the SB group. We feel that narrowing the selection criteria for PR may further improve the success rate.

  8. Fistula Plug in Fistulising Ano-Perineal Crohn's Disease: a Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senéjoux, A; Siproudhis, L; Abramowitz, L; Munoz-Bongrand, N; Desseaux, K; Bouguen, G; Bourreille, A; Dewit, O; Stefanescu, C; Vernier, G; Louis, E; Grimaud, J C; Godart, B; Savoye, G; Hebuterne, X; Bauer, P; Nachury, M; Laharie, D; Chevret, S; Bouhnik, Y

    2016-02-01

    Anal fistula plug [AFP] is a bioabsorbable bioprosthesis used in ano-perineal fistula treatment. We aimed to assess efficacy and safety of AFP in fistulising ano-perineal Crohn's disease [FAP-CD]. In a multicentre, open-label, randomised controlled trial we compared seton removal alone [control group] with AFP insertion [AFP group] in 106 Crohn's disease patients with non- or mildly active disease having at least one ano-perineal fistula tract drained for more than 1 month. Patients with abscess [collection ≥ 3mm on magnetic resonance imaging or recto-vaginal fistulas were excluded. Randomisation was stratified in simple or complex fistulas according to AGA classification. Primary end point was fistula closure at Week 12. In all, 54 patients were randomised to AFP group [control group 52]. Median fistula duration was 23 [10-53] months. Median Crohn's Disease Activity Index at baseline was 81 [45-135]. Fistula closure at Week 12 was achieved in 31.5% patients in the AFP group and in 23.1 % in the control group (relative risk [RR] stratified on AGA classification: 1.31; 95% confidence interval: 0.59-4.02; p = 0.19). No interaction in treatment effect with complexity stratum was found; 33.3% of patients with complex fistula and 30.8% of patients with simple fistula closed the tracts after AFP, as compared with 15.4% and 25.6% in controls, respectively [RR of success = 2.17 in complex fistula vs RR = 1.20 in simple fistula; p = 0.45]. Concerning safety, at Week 12, 17 patients developed at least one adverse event in the AFP group vs 8 in the controls [p = 0.07]. AFP is not more effective than seton removal alone to achieve FAP-CD closure. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Robot Assisted Training for the Upper Limb after Stroke (RATULS): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Helen; Shaw, Lisa; Bosomworth, Helen; Aird, Lydia; Alvarado, Natasha; Andole, Sreeman; Cohen, David L; Dawson, Jesse; Eyre, Janet; Finch, Tracy; Ford, Gary A; Hislop, Jennifer; Hogg, Steven; Howel, Denise; Hughes, Niall; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Price, Christopher; Rochester, Lynn; Stamp, Elaine; Ternent, Laura; Turner, Duncan; Vale, Luke; Warburton, Elizabeth; van Wijck, Frederike; Wilkes, Scott

    2017-07-20

    Loss of arm function is a common and distressing consequence of stroke. We describe the protocol for a pragmatic, multicentre randomised controlled trial to determine whether robot-assisted training improves upper limb function following stroke. Study design: a pragmatic, three-arm, multicentre randomised controlled trial, economic analysis and process evaluation. NHS stroke services. adults with acute or chronic first-ever stroke (1 week to 5 years post stroke) causing moderate to severe upper limb functional limitation. Randomisation groups: 1. Robot-assisted training using the InMotion robotic gym system for 45 min, three times/week for 12 weeks 2. Enhanced upper limb therapy for 45 min, three times/week for 12 weeks 3. Usual NHS care in accordance with local clinical practice Randomisation: individual participant randomisation stratified by centre, time since stroke, and severity of upper limb impairment. upper limb function measured by the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) at 3 months post randomisation. upper limb impairment (Fugl-Meyer Test), activities of daily living (Barthel ADL Index), quality of life (Stroke Impact Scale, EQ-5D-5L), resource use, cost per quality-adjusted life year and adverse events, at 3 and 6 months. Blinding: outcomes are undertaken by blinded assessors. Economic analysis: micro-costing and economic evaluation of interventions compared to usual NHS care. A within-trial analysis, with an economic model will be used to extrapolate longer-term costs and outcomes. Process evaluation: semi-structured interviews with participants and professionals to seek their views and experiences of the rehabilitation that they have received or provided, and factors affecting the implementation of the trial. allowing for 10% attrition, 720 participants provide 80% power to detect a 15% difference in successful outcome between each of the treatment pairs. Successful outcome definition: baseline ARAT 0-7 must improve by 3 or more points; baseline

  10. A prospective, randomised comparative study of weekly versus biweekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft in the management of diabetic foot ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelen, Charles M; Serena, Thomas E; Snyder, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if weekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft reduce time to heal more effectively than biweekly application for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. This was an institutional review board-approved, registered, prospective, randomised, comparative, non-blinded, single-centre clinical trial. Patients with non-infected ulcers of ≥ 4 weeks duration were included for the study. They were randomised to receive weekly or biweekly application of allograft in addition to a non-adherent, moist dressing with compressive wrapping. All wounds were offloaded. The primary study outcome was mean time to healing. Overall, during the 12-week study period, 92·5% (37/40) ulcers completely healed. Mean time to complete healing was 4·1 ± 2·9 versus 2·4 ± 1·8 weeks (P = 0·039) in the biweekly versus weekly groups, respectively. Complete healing occurred in 50% versus 90% by 4 weeks in the biweekly and weekly groups, respectively (P = 0·014). Number of grafts applied to healed wounds was similar at 2·4 ± 1·5 and 2·3 ± 1·8 for biweekly versus weekly groups, respectively (P = 0·841). These results validate previous studies showing that the allograft is an effective treatment for diabetic ulcers and show that wounds treated with weekly application heal more rapidly than with biweekly application. More rapid healing may decrease clinical operational costs and prevent long-term medical complications. PMID:24618401

  11. Efficacy and safety of indacaterol 150 μg once-daily in COPD: a double-blind, randomised, 12-week study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Indacaterol is a novel, once-daily (o.d.) inhaled, long-acting β2-agonist in development for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This 12-week, double-blind study compared the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of indacaterol to that of placebo in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. Methods Efficacy variables included 24-h trough FEV1 (mean of 23 h 10 min and 23 h 45 min post-dose) at Week 12 (primary endpoint) and after Day 1, and the percentage of COPD days with poor control (i.e., worsening symptoms). Safety was assessed by adverse events (AEs), mean serum potassium and blood glucose, QTc (Fridericia), and vital signs. Results Patients were randomised (n = 416, mean age 63 years) to receive either indacaterol 150 μg o.d. (n = 211) or placebo (n = 205) via a single-dose dry-powder inhaler; 87.5% completed the study. Trough FEV1 (LSM ± SEM) at Week 12 was 1.48 ± 0.018 L for indacaterol and 1.35 ± 0.019 L for placebo, a clinically relevant difference of 130 ± 24 mL (p indacaterol than placebo (p Indacaterol demonstrated significantly higher peak FEV1 than placebo, both on Day 1 and at Week 12, with indacaterol-placebo differences (LSM ± SEM) of 190 ± 28 (p indacaterol than placebo (p Indacaterol significantly reduced the percentage of days of poor control versus placebo by 22.5% (p indacaterol 49.3%, placebo 46.8%), with the most common AEs being COPD worsening (indacaterol 8.5%, placebo 12.2%) and cough (indacaterol 6.2%, placebo 7.3%). One patient died in the placebo group. Serum potassium and blood glucose levels did not differ significantly between the two groups, and no patient had QTc >500 ms. Conclusions Indacaterol 150 μg o.d. provided clinically significant and sustained bronchodilation, reduced rescue medication use, and had a safety and tolerability profile similar to placebo. Trial registration NCT00624286 PMID:20211002

  12. Low intensity, long-term outpatient rehabilitation in COPD: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumann Hans

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most pulmonary rehabilitation programmes currently involve 2–3 sessions per week as recommended by international guidelines. We aimed to investigate whether relevant improvements in physical capabilities and quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD could be achieved by a long-term, low intensity, once weekly rehabilitation programme using limited resources. Methods 100 patients with moderate to severe COPD were randomised to a continuous outpatient interdisciplinary rehabilitation programme or standard care. Physiotherapy-led supervised outpatient training sessions were performed once weekly in addition to educational elements. Outcome measures at baseline and after 26 weeks were 6-minute-walk-test, cycle ergometry, and health-related quality of life. Results 37 patients in the training group and 44 patients in the control group completed the study. After 26 weeks there were clinically significant differences between the groups for 6 minute-walk-distance (+59 m, 95% CI 28–89 m, maximum work load (+7.4 Watt, 95% CI 0.5-13.4 Watt and St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire score (−5 points, 95% CI −10 to −1 points. Total staff costs of the programme per participant were ≤ €625. Conclusion Clinically meaningful improvements in physical capabilities and health-related quality of life may be achieved using long-term pulmonary rehabilitation programmes of lower intensity than currently recommended. Trial registration: clinicaltrials.gov NCT01195402.

  13. Children, parents, and pets exercising together (CPET randomised controlled trial: study rationale, design, and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yam Philippa S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Objectively measured physical activity is low in British children, and declines as childhood progresses. Observational studies suggest that dog-walking might be a useful approach to physical activity promotion in children and adults, but there are no published public health interventions based on dog-walking with children. The Children, Parents, and Pets Exercising Together Study aims to develop and evaluate a theory driven, generalisable, family-based, dog walking intervention for 9-11 year olds. Methods/design The Children, Parents, and Pets Exercising Together Study is an exploratory, assessor-blinded, randomised controlled trial as defined in the UK MRC Framework on the development and evaluation of complex interventions in public health. The trial will follow CONSORT guidance. Approximately 40 dog-owning families will be allocated randomly in a ratio of 1.5:1 to receive a simple behavioural intervention lasting for 10 weeks or to a 'waiting list' control group. The primary outcome is change in objectively measured child physical activity using Actigraph accelerometry. Secondary outcomes in the child, included in part to shape a future more definitive randomised controlled trial, are: total time spent sedentary and patterning of sedentary behaviour (Actigraph accelerometry; body composition and bone health from dual energy x-ray absorptiometry; body weight, height and BMI; and finally, health-related quality of life using the PedsQL. Secondary outcomes in parents and dogs are: changes in body weight; changes in Actigraph accelerometry measured physical activity and sedentary behaviour. Process evaluation will consist of assessment of simultaneous child, parent, and dog accelerometry data and brief interviews with participating families. Discussion The Children, Parents, and Pets Exercising Together trial should be the first randomised controlled study to establish and evaluate an intervention aimed at dog-based physical

  14. Hypotensive effects of hawthorn for patients with diabetes taking prescription drugs: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ann F; Marakis, Georgios; Simpson, Eleanor; Hope, Jessica L; Robinson, Paul A; Hassanein, Mohamed; Simpson, Hugh C R

    2006-06-01

    Hawthorn (Crataegus laevigata) leaves, flowers and berries are used by herbal practitioners in the UK to treat hypertension in conjunction with prescribed drugs. Small-scale human studies support this approach. To investigate the effects of hawthorn for hypertension in patients with type 2 diabetes taking prescribed drugs. Randomised controlled trial. General practices in Reading, UK. Patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 79) were randomised to daily 1200 mg hawthorn extract (n = 39) or placebo (n = 40) for 16 weeks. At baseline and outcome a wellbeing questionnaire was completed and blood pressure and fasting blood samples taken. A food frequency questionnaire estimated nutrient intake. Hypotensive drugs were used by 71% of the study population with a mean intake of 4.4 hypoglycaemic and/or hypotensive drugs. Fat intake was lower and sugar intake higher than recommendations, and low micronutrient intake was prevalent. There was a significant group difference in mean diastolic blood pressure reductions (P = 0.035): the hawthorn group showed greater reductions (baseline: 85.6 mmHg, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 83.3 to 87.8; outcome: 83.0 mmHg, 95% CI = 80.5 to 85.7) than the placebo group (baseline: 84.5 mmHg, 95% CI = 82 to 87; outcome: 85.0 mmHg, 95% CI = 82.2 to 87.8). There was no group difference in systolic blood pressure reduction from baseline (3.6 and 0.8 mmHg for hawthorn and placebo groups, respectively; P = 0.329). Although mean fat intake met current recommendations, mean sugar intake was higher and there were indications of potential multiple micronutrient deficiencies. No herb-drug interaction was found and minor health complaints were reduced from baseline in both groups. This is the first randomised controlled trial to demonstrate a hypotensive effect of hawthorn in patients with diabetes taking medication.

  15. Reported challenges in nurse-led randomised controlled trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang Vedelø, Tina; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    , nursing research, nursing, research, challenges, barriers, nurse's role, nurse attitude, attitude of health personnel. Findings: The literature on reported challenges and barriers between 1999 and 2009 showed that the most often experienced problems were (i) sufficient patient recruitment, (ii......Aims: The purpose of this integrative literature review was to explore and discuss the methodological challenges nurse researchers report after conducting nurse-led randomised controlled trials in clinical hospital settings. Our research questions were (i) what are the most commonly experienced...... and the clinical nursing staff. Two lessons learned from this integrative review can be highlighted. First, we recommend researchers openly to share their experiences of barriers and challenges. They should describe factors that may have inhibited the desired outcome. Second, efforts to improve the collaboration...

  16. Randomised controlled trial of genetic amniocentesis in 4606 low-risk women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabor, A; Philip, J; Madsen, Mette

    1986-01-01

    Outcome of pregnancy after amniocentesis was studied in a randomised controlled trial of 4606 women, age-range 25-34 years, without known risk of genetic disease. Spontaneous abortion rate was 1.7% in the study group after amniocentesis and 0.7% in the control group after ultrasound (relative risk...... 2.3). In the study group, increased levels of maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein before amniocentesis, perforation of the placenta during amniocentesis, and withdrawal of discoloured amniotic fluid were associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortion. In the first six weeks after...... amniocentesis/ultrasound scan, amniotic fluid leakage occurred more often in the study group but there was no difference in the rate of vaginal bleeding. Frequency of postural malformations in the infants in the two groups was the same. In the study group, respiratory distress syndrome was diagnosed more often...

  17. Patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil versus epidural analgesia in labour : randomised multicentre equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, Liv M; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W; Franssen, Maureen T; Papatsonis, Dimitri N; Hajenius, Petra J; Hollmann, Markus W; Woiski, Mallory D; Porath, Martina; van den Berg, Hans J; van Beek, Erik; Borchert, Odette W H M; Schuitemaker, Nico; Sikkema, J Marko; Kuipers, A H M; Logtenberg, Sabine L M; van der Salm, Paulien C M; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Lopriore, Enrico; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; le Cessie, Saskia; van Lith, Jan M; Struys, Michel M; Mol, Ben Willem J; Dahan, Albert; Middeldorp, Johanna M; Oude Rengerink, K

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine women's satisfaction with pain relief using patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil compared with epidural analgesia during labour. DESIGN: Multicentre randomised controlled equivalence trial. SETTING: 15 hospitals in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Women with an interm

  18. Labour pain with remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia : a randomised equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logtenberg, Slm; Oude Rengerink, K; Verhoeven, C J; Freeman, L M; van den Akker, Esa; Godfried, M B; van Beek, E; Borchert, Owhm; Schuitemaker, N; van Woerkens, Ecsm; Hostijn, I; Middeldorp, J M; van der Post, J A; Mol, B W

    OBJECTIVE: To distinguish satisfaction with pain relief using remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia (RPCA) compared with epidural analgesia (EA) in low-risk labouring women. DESIGN: Randomised controlled equivalence trial. SETTING: Eighteen midwifery practices and six hospitals in the

  19. Statistical issues in randomised controlled trials: a narrative synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolaji Emmanuel Egbewale

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Randomised controlled trials (RCT s are gold standard in the evaluation of treatment efficacy in medical investigations, only if well designed and implemented. Till date, distorted views and misapplications of statistical procedures involved in RCTs are still in practice. Hence, clarification of concepts and acceptable practices related to certain statistical issues involved in the design, conduct and reporting of randomised controlled trials is needed. This narrative synthesis aimed at providing succinct but clear information on the concepts and practices of selected statistical issues in RCT s to inform correct applications. The use of tests of significance is no longer acceptable as means to compare baseline similarity between treatment groups and in determining which covariate(s should be included in the model for adjustment. Distribution of baseline attributes simply presented in tabular form is however, rather preferred. Regarding covariate selection, such approach that makes use of information on the degree of correlation between the covariate(s and the outcome variable is more in tandem with statistical principle(s than that based on tests of significance. Stratification and minimisation are not alternatives to covariate adjusted analysis; in fact they establish the need for one. Intention-to-treat is the preferred approach for the evaluation of primary outcome measures and researchers have responsibility to report whether or not the procedure was followed. A major use of results from subgroup analysis is to generate hypothesis for future clinical trials. Since RCT s are gold standard in the comparison of medical interventions, researchers cannot afford the practices of distorted allocation or statistical procedures in this all important experimental design method.

  20. Statistical issues in randomised controlled trials: a narrative synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bolaji; Emmanuel; Egbewale

    2015-01-01

    Randomised controlled trials(RCTs) are gold standard in the evaluation of treatment efficacy in medical investigations, only if well designed and implemented. Till date, distorted views and misapplications of statistical procedures involved in RCTs are still in practice. Hence, clarification of concepts and acceptable practices related to certain statistical issues involved in the design, conduct and reporting of randomised controlled trials is needed. This narrative synthesis aimed at providing succinct but clear information on the concepts and practices of selected statistical issues in RCTs to inform correct applications. The use of tests of significance is no longer acceptable as means to compare baseline similarity between treatment groups and in determining which covariate(s) should be included in the model for adjustment. Distribution of baseline attributes simply presented in tabular form is however, rather preferred. Regarding covariate selection, such approach that makes use of information on the degree of correlation between the covariate(s) and the outcome variable is more in tandem with statistical principle(s) than that based on tests of significance. Stratification and minimisation are not alternatives to covariate adjusted analysis; in fact they establish the need for one. Intention-totreat is the preferred approach for the evaluation of primary outcome measures and researchers have responsibility to report whether or not the procedure was followed. A major use of results from subgroup analysis is to generate hypothesis for future clinical trials. Since RCTs are gold standard in the comparison of medical interventions, researchers cannot afford the practices of distorted allocation or statistical procedures in this all important experimental design method.

  1. Prolonged conservative care versus early surgery in patients with sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation : two year results of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peul, W.C.; Hout, van den W.B.; Brand, R.; Thomeer, R.T.W.M.; Koes, B.W.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects of early lumbar disc surgery compared with prolonged conservative care for patients with sciatica over two years of follow-up. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Nine Dutch hospitals. Participants: 283 patients with 6-12 weeks of sciatica. Interventions

  2. Prolonged conservative care versus early surgery in patients with sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation: Two year results of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.C. Peul (Wilco); W.B. van den Hout (Wilbert); R. Brand (René); R.T.W.M. Thomeer (Raph); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To evaluate the effects of early lumbar disc surgery compared with prolonged conservative care for patients with sciatica over two years of follow-up. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Nine Dutch hospitals. Participants: 283 patients with 6-12 weeks of sciatica. I

  3. Prolonged conservative care versus early surgery in patients with sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation: two year results of a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peul, W.C.; Hout, W.B. van den; Brand, R.; Thomeer, R.T.; Koes, B.W.; Eekhof, J.A.H.; Tans, J.T.; Houwelingen, H.C. van; Nuyten, M.; Bergman, P.; Holtkamp, G.; Dukker, S.; Mast, A.; Smakman, L.; Waanders, C.; Polak, P.; Nieborg, A.; Walchenbach, R.; Rossum, J. van; Schutte, P.J.; Verheul, G.A.; Dalman, J.A.; Wurzer, J.A.; Sven, J.W.; Kloet, A.; Merkies, I.S.; Dulken, H. van; Lambrechts, P.C.; Keunen, R.W.; Hoffmann, C.; Haan, J.; Groen, R.; Kuiters, R.R.; Roos, R.A.C.; Voormolen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of early lumbar disc surgery compared with prolonged conservative care for patients with sciatica over two years of follow-up. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Nine Dutch hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: 283 patients with 6-12 weeks of sciatica. INTERVENTIONS

  4. A randomised control trial of experiential learning to promote physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Philip A; Tully, Mark A; Cupples, Margaret E; Gilliland, Andrew E; Gormley, Gerard J

    2013-09-01

    The paucity of training in physical activity (PA) promotion in UK medical schools is a barrier to health professionals' promotion of PA to their patients. Doctors who are more physically active are more likely to counsel patients in this regard. We used a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to examine the effect of an intervention which engaged students in goal-setting, using pedometer step counts, on their PA behaviour and intentions to promote PA in future practice. We invited fourth-year medical students to participate in the study during their four-week placement in primary care. Following baseline pedometer measurement of daily step counts for one week, students were randomly allocated to intervention (individual step count goal-setting) or control groups. Using pedometers, both groups monitored their PA during the following week. Intentions to promote PA were assessed using a questionnaire based on the theory of planned behaviour at baseline, four weeks and nine weeks. Focus groups explored the students' experiences of PA measurement, goalsetting for behaviour change and health promotion teaching. One-hundred and thirty-six students participated (70 intervention; 66 control). The mean change in daily step count was greater ( P =0.001) in the intervention group (1245, 95% CI 762 to 1727) than in the control group (-65, 95% CI -644 to 573). Scores for perceived behavioural control over PA counselling increased in both groups, with a trend for higher scores in the intervention group. Intervention group students described how experience of personal PA behaviour change gave insights into barriers patients may face and improved their confidence in PA counselling. Medical students' personal experience of goal setting in increasing PA appears to lead to a more positive perception of their ability to deliver effective PA promotion in future practice. Inclusion of this learning experience within the undergraduate curriculum may improve doctors' skills in health promotion.

  5. Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) for posttraumatic stress disorder versus waitlist control: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Adrian R; Jill M. Newby; Smith, Jessica; Andrews, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Background This randomised controlled trial (RCT) with two parallel arms will evaluate the efficacy of an internet-delivered six-lesson 10-week cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) intervention for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It will also investigate the association between changes in PTSD symptoms, intolerance of uncertainty (IU) and emotion regulation. Methods/Design Patients with PTSD will be recruited via the research arm of a not-for-profit clinical and research unit in Austral...

  6. Treatment of acute diverticulitis laparoscopic lavage vs. resection (DILALA: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg Jacob

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perforated diverticulitis is a condition associated with substantial morbidity. Recently published reports suggest that laparoscopic lavage has fewer complications and shorter hospital stay. So far no randomised study has published any results. Methods DILALA is a Scandinavian, randomised trial, comparing laparoscopic lavage (LL to the traditional Hartmann's Procedure (HP. Primary endpoint is the number of re-operations within 12 months. Secondary endpoints consist of mortality, quality of life (QoL, re-admission, health economy assessment and permanent stoma. Patients are included when surgery is required. A laparoscopy is performed and if Hinchey grade III is diagnosed the patient is included and randomised 1:1, to either LL or HP. Patients undergoing LL receive > 3L of saline intraperitoneally, placement of pelvic drain and continued antibiotics. Follow-up is scheduled 6-12 weeks, 6 months and 12 months. A QoL-form is filled out on discharge, 6- and 12 months. Inclusion is set to 80 patients (40+40. Discussion HP is associated with a high rate of complication. Not only does the primary operation entail complications, but also subsequent surgery is associated with a high morbidity. Thus the combined risk of treatment for the patient is high. The aim of the DILALA trial is to evaluate if laparoscopic lavage is a safe, minimally invasive method for patients with perforated diverticulitis Hinchey grade III, resulting in fewer re-operations, decreased morbidity, mortality, costs and increased quality of life. Trial registration British registry (ISRCTN for clinical trials ISRCTN82208287http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN82208287

  7. Pragmatic randomised controlled trial of group psychoeducation versus group support in the maintenance of bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-didactically delivered curriculum based group psychoeducation has been shown to be more effective than both group support in a specialist mood disorder centre in Spain (with effects lasting up to five years, and treatment as usual in Australia. It is unclear whether the specific content and form of group psychoeducation is effective or the chance to meet and work collaboratively with other peers. The main objective of this trial is to determine whether curriculum based group psychoeducation is more clinically and cost effective than unstructured peer group support. Methods/design Single blind two centre cluster randomised controlled trial of 21 sessions group psychoeducation versus 21 sessions group peer support in adults with bipolar 1 or 2 disorder, not in current episode but relapsed in the previous two years. Individual randomisation is to either group at each site. The groups are carefully matched for the number and type of therapists, length and frequency of the interventions and overall aim of the groups but differ in content and style of delivery. The primary outcome is time to next bipolar episode with measures of the therapeutic process, barriers and drivers to the effective delivery of the interventions and economic analysis. Follow up is for 96 weeks after randomisation. Discussion The trial has features of both an efficacy and an effectiveness trial design. For generalisability in England it is set in routine public mental health practice with a high degree of expert patient involvement. Trial Registration ISRCTN62761948 Funding National Institute for Health Research, England.

  8. Effectiveness of a smartphone app in increasing physical activity amongst male adults: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Tim; Eslambolchilar, Parisa; Rettie, Ruth; Stride, Chris; Walton, Simon; van Woerden, Hugo C

    2016-09-02

    Smartphones are ideal for promoting physical activity in those with little intrinsic motivation for exercise. This study tested three hypotheses: H1 - receipt of social feedback generates higher step-counts than receipt of no feedback; H2 - receipt of social feedback generates higher step-counts than only receiving feedback on one's own walking; H3 - receipt of feedback on one's own walking generates higher step-counts than no feedback (H3). A parallel group randomised controlled trial measured the impact of feedback on steps-counts. Healthy male participants (n = 165) aged 18-40 were given phones pre-installed with an app that recorded steps continuously, without the need for user activation. Participants carried these with them as their main phones for a two-week run-in and six-week trial. Randomisation was to three groups: no feedback (control); personal feedback on step-counts; group feedback comparing step-counts against those taken by others in their group. The primary outcome measure, steps per day, was assessed using longitudinal multilevel regression analysis. Control variables included attitude to physical activity and perceived barriers to physical activity. Fifty-five participants were allocated to each group; 152 completed the study and were included in the analysis: n = 49, no feedback; n = 53, individual feedback; n = 50, individual and social feedback. The study provided support for H1 and H3 but not H2. Receipt of either form of feedback explained 7.7 % of between-subject variability in step-count (F = 6.626, p smartphone apps that provide step-counts can increase physical activity in young to early-middle-aged men but the provision of social feedback has no apparent incremental impact. This approach may be particularly suitable for inactive people with low levels of physical activity; it should now be tested with this population.

  9. Evaluation of sit-stand workstations in an office setting: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E F Graves, Lee; C Murphy, Rebecca; Shepherd, Sam O; Cabot, Josephine; Hopkins, Nicola D

    2015-11-19

    Excessive sitting time is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity independent of physical activity. This aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a sit-stand workstation on sitting time, and vascular, metabolic and musculoskeletal outcomes in office workers, and to investigate workstation acceptability and feasibility. A two-arm, parallel-group, individually randomised controlled trial was conducted in one organisation. Participants were asymptomatic full-time office workers aged ≥18 years. Each participant in the intervention arm had a sit-stand workstation installed on their workplace desk for 8 weeks. Participants in the control arm received no intervention. The primary outcome was workplace sitting time, assessed at 0, 4 and 8 weeks by an ecological momentary assessment diary. Secondary behavioural, cardiometabolic and musculoskeletal outcomes were assessed. Acceptability and feasibility were assessed via questionnaire and interview. ANCOVA and magnitude-based inferences examined intervention effects relative to controls at 4 and 8 weeks. Participants and researchers were not blind to group allocation. Forty-seven participants were randomised (intervention n = 26; control n = 21). Relative to the control group at 8 weeks, the intervention group had a beneficial decrease in sitting time (-80.2 min/8-h workday (95 % CI = -129.0, -31.4); p = 0.002), increase in standing time (72.9 min/8-h workday (21.2, 124.6); p = 0.007) and decrease in total cholesterol (-0.40 mmol/L  (-0.79, -0.003); p = 0.049). No harmful changes in musculoskeletal discomfort/pain were observed relative to controls, and beneficial changes in flow-mediated dilation and diastolic blood pressure were observed. Most participants self-reported that the workstation was easy to use and their work-related productivity did not decrease when using the device. Factors that negatively influenced workstation use were workstation design

  10. Functional exercise after total hip replacement (FEATHER a randomised control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaghan Brenda

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolonged physical impairments in range of movement, postural stability and walking speed are commonly reported following total hip replacement (THR. It is unclear from the current body of evidence what kind of exercises should be performed to maximize patient function and quality of life. Methods/design This will be a single blind multi centre randomized control trial with two arms. Seventy subjects post primary total hip arthroplasty will be randomized into either an experimental group (n=35, or to a control group (n=35. The experimental group will attend a functional exercise class twice weekly for a six week period from week 12 to week 18 post surgery. The functional exercise group will follow a circuit based functional exercise class supervised by a chartered Physiotherapist. The control group will receive usual care. The principal investigator (BM will perform blinded outcome assessments on all patients using validated measures for pain, stiffness, and function using the Western Ontario and Mc Master Universities Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC. This is the primary outcome measurement tool. Secondary outcome measurements include Quality of life (SF-36, 6 min walk test, Visual Analogue Scale, and the Berg Balance score. The WOMAC score will be collated on day five post surgery and repeated at week twelve and week eighteen. All other measurements will be taken at week 12 and repeated at week eighteen. In addition a blinded radiologist will measure gluteus medius cross sectional area using real time ultrasound for all subjects at week 12 and at week 18 to determine if the functional exercise programme has any effect on muscle size. Discussion This randomised controlled trial will add to the body of evidence on the relationship between muscle size, functional ability, balance, quality of life and time post surgery in patients following total hip arthroplasty. The CONSORT guidelines will be followed to throughout. Ethical

  11. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation versus tolterodine for overactive bladder in women: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preyer, Oliver; Umek, Wolfgang; Laml, Thomas; Bjelic-Radisic, Vesna; Gabriel, Boris; Mittlboeck, Martina; Hanzal, Engelbert

    2015-08-01

    We performed a randomised controlled trial of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) versus tolterodine for treating treatment naïve women with overactive bladder (OAB). 36 patients with symptoms of OAB were randomised to 3 months of treatment with weekly PTNS or tolterodine (2mg bid p.o.). The primary outcome measure was the difference of micturitions per 24h. The secondary outcome measure was the impact on quality of life (QoL) measured with a visual analogue scale (VAS) between baseline and after 3 months of therapy. Micturition frequencies did not decline significantly (p=0.13) over time and there were no significant treatment differences (p=0.96). QoL was significantly dependent from its level at baseline (p=0.002) and showed improvement over time compared to baseline measurements but no significant differences between both treatment groups (p=0.07). Incontinence episodes per 24h depended significantly on the level at baseline (p=0.0001) and declined significantly (p=0.03) during 3 months of therapy in both therapy groups. However no significant treatment differences on the reduction of incontinence episodes in 24h could be shown between both therapy groups (p=0.89). PTNS had fewer side effects than tolterodine (p=0.04). PTNS and tolterodine were both effective in reducing incontinence episodes and improving QoL in patients with OAB but not micturition frequencies. PTNS had fewer side effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Water-based exercise in COPD with physical comorbidities: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Renae J; McKeough, Zoe J; McKenzie, David K; Alison, Jennifer A

    2013-06-01

    Land-based exercise is often difficult for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who have coexisting obesity or musculoskeletal or neurological conditions. This randomised controlled trial aimed to determine the effectiveness of water-based exercise training in improving exercise capacity and quality of life compared to land-based exercise training and control (no exercise) in people with COPD and physical comorbidities. Participants referred to pulmonary rehabilitation were randomly allocated to a water-based exercise, land-based exercise or the control group. The two exercise groups trained for 8 weeks, completing three sessions per week. 45 out of 53 participants (mean ± SD age 72 ± 9 years; forced expiratory volume in 1 s 59 ± 15% predicted) completed the study. Compared to controls, water-based exercise training significantly increased 6-min walking distance, incremental and endurance shuttle walk distances, and improved Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRDQ) dyspnoea and fatigue. Compared to land-based exercise training, water-based exercise training significantly increased incremental shuttle walk distance (mean difference 39 m, 95% CI 5-72 m), endurance shuttle walk distance (mean difference 228 m, 95% CI 19-438 m) and improved CRDQ fatigue. Water-based exercise training was significantly more effective than land-based exercise training and control in increasing peak and endurance exercise capacity and improving aspects of quality of life in people with COPD and physical comorbidities.

  13. Effect of bottles, cups, and dummies on breast feeding in preterm infants: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Carmel T; Ryan, Philip; Crowther, Caroline A; McPhee, Andrew J; Paterson, Susan; Hiller, Janet E

    2004-07-24

    To determine the effect of artificial teats (bottle and dummy) and cups on breast feeding in preterm infants. Randomised controlled trial. Two large tertiary hospitals, 54 peripheral hospitals. 319 preterm infants (born at 23-33 weeks' gestation) randomly assigned to one of four groups: cup/no dummy (n = 89), cup/dummy (n = 72), bottle/no dummy (n = 73), bottle/dummy (n = 85). Women with singleton or twin infants Dummies do not affect breast feeding in preterm infants. Cup feeding significantly increases the likelihood that the baby will be fully breast fed at discharge home, but has no effect on any breast feeding and increases the length of hospital stay.

  14. Reading and language intervention for children at risk of dyslexia: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Fiona J; Hulme, Charles; Grainger, Katy; Hardwick, Samantha J; Miles, Jeremy N V; Snowling, Margaret J

    2014-11-01

    Intervention studies for children at risk of dyslexia have typically been delivered preschool, and show short-term effects on letter knowledge and phoneme awareness, with little transfer to literacy. This randomised controlled trial evaluated the effectiveness of a reading and language intervention for 6-year-old children identified by research criteria as being at risk of dyslexia (n = 56), and their school-identified peers (n = 89). An Experimental group received two 9-week blocks of daily intervention delivered by trained teaching assistants; the Control group received 9 weeks of typical classroom instruction, followed by 9 weeks of intervention. Following mixed effects regression models and path analyses, small-to-moderate effects were shown on letter knowledge, phoneme awareness and taught vocabulary. However, these were fragile and short lived, and there was no reliable effect on the primary outcome of word-level reading. This new intervention was theoretically motivated and based on previous successful interventions, yet failed to show reliable effects on language and literacy measures following a rigorous evaluation. We suggest that the intervention may have been too short to yield improvements in oral language; and that literacy instruction in and beyond the classroom may have weakened training effects. We argue that reporting of null results makes an important contribution in terms of raising standards both of trial reporting and educational practice. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  15. Study protocol: follow-up home visits with nutrition: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck Anne Marie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geriatric patients are at high risk of re-admission after discharge. Pre-existing nutritional risk amongst these patients is of primary concern, with former nutritional intervention studies being largely ineffective. None of these studies has included individual dietary counselling by a registered dietician or has considered competing medical conditions in the participants. A former randomised study has shown that comprehensive discharge follow-up in geriatric patients homes by general practitioners and district nurses was effective in reducing the re-admission risk in the intervention group compared to the control group. That study did not include a nutritional intervention. The purpose of this study is to assess the combined benefits of an intervention consisting of discharge follow-up in geriatric patients' home by a general practitioner and a registered dietician. Methods/design This single-blind randomised controlled study, will recruit 160 hospitalised geriatric medical patients (65+ y at nutritional risk. Participants will be randomly allocated to receive in their homes, either 12 weeks individualised nutritional counselling by a registered dietician complemented with follow-up by general practitioners or a 12 weeks follow-up by general practitioners alone. Discussion This trial is the first of its kind to provide individual nutritional intervention combined with follow-up by general practitioner as an intervention to reduce risk of re-admission after discharge among geriatric medical patients. The results will hopefully help to guide the development of more effective rehabilitation programs following hospital admissions, which may ultimately lead to reduced health care costs, and improvement in mobility, independence and quality of life for geriatric patients at nutritional risk. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov 2010 NCT01249716

  16. Effects of interpretive front-of-pack nutrition labels on food purchases: protocol for the Starlight randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, Ekaterina; Neal, Bruce; Rayner, Mike; Swinburn, Boyd; Eyles, Helen; Jiang, Yannan; Michie, Jo; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona

    2014-09-18

    Interpretive front-of-pack nutrition labels are better understood than non-interpretive labels. However, robust evidence on the effects of such labels on consumer food purchases in the real-world is lacking. Our aim is to assess the effects of two interpretive front-of-pack nutrition labels, compared with a non-interpretive label, on the healthiness of consumer food purchases. A five-week (1-week baseline and 4-week intervention) three-arm parallel randomised controlled trial will be conducted using a bespoke smartphone application, which will administer study questionnaires and deliver intervention (Multiple Traffic Light and Health Star Rating) and control (Nutrition Information Panel) labels. To view their allocated nutrition label, participants scan the barcode of packaged food products using their smartphone camera. The assigned label is displayed instantly on the smartphone screen.1500 eligible participants (New Zealand adult smartphone owners who shop in a supermarket at least once a week and are main household shoppers) will be randomised in a 1:1:1 ratio to one of the three nutrition label formats, using computer-generated randomisation sequences. Randomisation will be stratified by ethnicity and interest in healthy eating. Food and beverage purchase data will be collected continuously throughout the study via hard copy till receipts and electronic grocery purchase lists recorded and transmitted using the smartphone application. The primary outcome will be healthiness of food purchases in each trial arm, assessed as mean Food Standards Australia New Zealand nutrient profiling score criterion score for all food and beverages purchased over the intervention period. Secondary outcomes will include saturated fat, sugar, sodium and energy content of food purchases; food expenditure; labelling profile of food purchases (i.e. mean number of Health Star Rating stars and proportion of red, green and amber traffic lights); nutrient profiling score over time and by

  17. Promotion of physical activity and fitness in sedentary patients with Parkinson's disease : randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nimwegen, Marlies; Speelman, Arlene D.; Overeem, Sebastiaan; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Smulders, Katrijn; Dontje, Manon L.; Borm, George F.; Backx, Frank J. G.; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Munneke, Marten

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether a multifaceted behavioural change programme increases physical activities in patients with Parkinson's disease. Design Multicentre randomised controlled trial. Setting 32 community hospitals in the Netherlands, collaborating in a nationwide network (ParkinsonNet). Parti

  18. Promotion of physical activity and fitness in sedentary patients with Parkinson's disease : randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nimwegen, Marlies; Speelman, Arlene D.; Overeem, Sebastiaan; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Smulders, Katrijn; Dontje, Manon L.; Borm, George F.; Backx, Frank J. G.; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Munneke, Marten

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether a multifaceted behavioural change programme increases physical activities in patients with Parkinson's disease. Design Multicentre randomised controlled trial. Setting 32 community hospitals in the Netherlands, collaborating in a nationwide network (ParkinsonNet). Parti

  19. [Effects of a stepwise approach to behavioural problems in dementia: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, M.J.; Francke, A.L.; Steen, J.T. van der; Scherder, E.J.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Kovach, C.R.; Achterberg, W.P.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether implementation of a stepwise multidisciplinary intervention ('STA OP!' ['STAND UP!']) is effective in reducing behavioural problems and depressive symptoms in nursing home residents with advanced dementia. DESIGN: Cluster randomised controlled trial. METHOD: We

  20. Representation of people with intellectual disabilities in randomised controlled trials on antipsychotic treatment for behavioural problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheifes, A.; Stolker, J.J.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Egberts, A.C.G.; Heerdink, E.R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Behavioural problems are common in people with intellectual disability (ID) and are often treated with antipsychotics. Aim To establish the frequency and characteristics of people with ID included in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on antipsychotic treatment for behavioural problems

  1. Rizatriptan vs. ibuprofen in migraine: a randomised placebo-controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee; Yadav, Rama Kant

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of rizatriptan and ibuprofen in migraine. The study was a randomised placebo-controlled trial in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Migraine patients with

  2. Supervised exercise therapy versus usual care for patellofemoral pain syndrome : an open label randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Linschoten, R.; van Middelkoop, M.; Berger, M. Y.; Heintjes, E. M.; Verhaar, J. A. N.; Willemsen, S. P.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of supervised exercise therapy compared with usual care with respect to recovery, pain, and function in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Design Open label randomised controlled trial. Setting General practice and sport physician practice. Participants

  3. Supervised exercise therapy versus usual care for patellofemoral pain syndrome : an open label randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Linschoten, R.; van Middelkoop, M.; Berger, M. Y.; Heintjes, E. M.; Verhaar, J. A. N.; Willemsen, S. P.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of supervised exercise therapy compared with usual care with respect to recovery, pain, and function in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Design Open label randomised controlled trial. Setting General practice and sport physician practice. Participants

  4. Impact of industry collaboration on randomised controlled trials in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Anne; Yang, Annie; Roper, Nitin; Whitaker, Evans; Korenstein, Deborah

    2017-02-01

    Industry funders can simply provide money or collaborate in trial design, analysis or reporting of clinical trials. Our aim was to assess the impact of industry collaboration on trial methodology and results of randomised controlled trials (RCT). We searched PubMed for oncology RCTs published May 2013 to December 2015 in peer-reviewed journals with impact factor > 5 requiring reporting of funder role. Two authors extracted methodologic (primary end-point; blinding of the patient, clinician and outcomes assessor; and analysis) and outcome data. We used descriptive statistics and two-sided Fisher exact tests to compare characteristics of trials with collaboration, with industry funding only, and without industry funding. We included 224 trials. Compared to those without industry funding, trials with collaboration used more placebo control (RR 3·59, 95% CI [1·88-6·83], p industry collaboration were more likely to use some high-quality methods than those without industry funding, with similar rates of positive results. Our findings suggest that collaboration is not associated with trial outcomes and that mandatory disclosure of funder roles may mitigate bias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of souvenaid on functional brain network organisation in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease: a randomised controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanneke de Waal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Synaptic loss is a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Disturbed organisation of large-scale functional brain networks in AD might reflect synaptic loss and disrupted neuronal communication. The medical food Souvenaid, containing the specific nutrient combination Fortasyn Connect, is designed to enhance synapse formation and function and has been shown to improve memory performance in patients with mild AD in two randomised controlled trials. OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of Souvenaid compared to control product on brain activity-based networks, as a derivative of underlying synaptic function, in patients with mild AD. DESIGN: A 24-week randomised, controlled, double-blind, parallel-group, multi-country study. PARTICIPANTS: 179 drug-naïve mild AD patients who participated in the Souvenir II study. INTERVENTION: Patients were randomised 1∶1 to receive Souvenaid or an iso-caloric control product once daily for 24 weeks. OUTCOME: In a secondary analysis of the Souvenir II study, electroencephalography (EEG brain networks were constructed and graph theory was used to quantify complex brain structure. Local brain network connectivity (normalised clustering coefficient gamma and global network integration (normalised characteristic path length lambda were compared between study groups, and related to memory performance. RESULTS: THE NETWORK MEASURES IN THE BETA BAND WERE SIGNIFICANTLY DIFFERENT BETWEEN GROUPS: they decreased in the control group, but remained relatively unchanged in the active group. No consistent relationship was found between these network measures and memory performance. CONCLUSIONS: The current results suggest that Souvenaid preserves the organisation of brain networks in patients with mild AD within 24 weeks, hypothetically counteracting the progressive network disruption over time in AD. The results strengthen the hypothesis that Souvenaid affects synaptic integrity and function. Secondly, we conclude

  6. Wound healing with honey - a randomised controlled trial

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gold Mining and Westonaria Gold Mining from September. 1995 to July 1996 ... glycol20%, starch copolymer 2% and water 78%. ... Table I. Wound types randomised by block for treatment with honey or IntraSite Gel (withdrawn from analysis)*.

  7. Chinese Obstetrics & Gynecology journal club: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Ilene K; Dodson, William C; Kunselman, Allen R; Kuang, Hongying; Han, Feng-Juan; Legro, Richard S; Wu, Xiao-Ke

    2016-01-28

    To assess whether a journal club model could improve comprehension and written and spoken medical English in a population of Chinese medical professionals. The study population consisted of 52 medical professionals who were residents or postgraduate master or PhD students in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine, China. After a three-part baseline examination to assess medical English comprehension, participants were randomised to either (1) an intensive journal club treatment arm or (2) a self-study group. At the conclusion of the 8-week intervention participants (n=52) were re-tested with new questions. The primary outcome was the change in score on a multiple choice examination. Secondary outcomes included change in scores on written and oral examinations which were modelled on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Both groups had improved scores on the multiple choice examination without a statistically significant difference between them (90% power). However, there was a statistically significant difference between the groups in mean improvement in scores for both written (95% CI 1.1 to 5.0; p=0.003) and spoken English (95% CI 0.06 to 3.7; p=0.04) favouring the journal club intervention. Interacting with colleagues and an English-speaking facilitator in a journal club improved both written and spoken medical English in Chinese medical professionals. Journal clubs may be suitable for use as a self-sustainable teaching model to improve fluency in medical English in foreign medical professionals. NCT01844609. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Protocol to evaluate the impact of yoga supplementation on cognitive function in schizophrenia: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Triptish; Mazumdar, Sati; Mishra, Nagendra Narayan; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit Laxmikant; Deshpande, Smita Neelkanth

    2014-10-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a chronic illness that is treated symptomatically. Cognitive dysfunction is a core feature of SZ that is relatively intractable to pharmacotherapy. Yoga can improve cognitive function among healthy individuals. A recent open trial indicated significant benefits of yoga training (YT) in conjunction with conventional pharmacotherapy among patients with SZ. To describe the protocol for an ongoing randomised controlled trial designed to test whether the reported beneficial effects of YT on cognitive function among SZ patients can be replicated. Secondarily, the effects of YT on daily functioning living skills are evaluated. Consenting patients with SZ receive routine clinical treatment and are randomised to adjunctive YT, adjunctive physical exercise (PE) or treatment as usual (proposed N = 234 total, N = 78 in each group). The trial involves YT or PE 5 days a week and lasts 3 weeks. Participants are evaluated thrice over 6 months. Cognitive functions measured by Trail Making Test, University of Pennsylvania Neurocognitive Computerised Battery were primary outcome measures while clinical severity and daily functioning measured by Independent Living Skills Survey were secondary outcome measures. A total of 309 participants have been randomised as of 31 August 2013, which exceeded beyond 294 proposed after attrition. Once participants begin YT or PE they generally complete the protocol. No injuries have been reported. Short term YT is feasible and acceptable to Indian SZ patients. If beneficial effects of YT are detected, it will provide a novel adjunctive cognitive remediation strategy for SZ patients.

  9. The effects of improving sleep on mental health (OASIS): a randomised controlled trial with mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel; Sheaves, Bryony; Goodwin, Guy M; Yu, Ly-Mee; Nickless, Alecia; Harrison, Paul J; Emsley, Richard; Luik, Annemarie I; Foster, Russell G; Wadekar, Vanashree; Hinds, Christopher; Gumley, Andrew; Jones, Ray; Lightman, Stafford; Jones, Steve; Bentall, Richard; Kinderman, Peter; Rowse, Georgina; Brugha, Traolach; Blagrove, Mark; Gregory, Alice M; Fleming, Leanne; Walklet, Elaine; Glazebrook, Cris; Davies, E Bethan; Hollis, Chris; Haddock, Gillian; John, Bev; Coulson, Mark; Fowler, David; Pugh, Katherine; Cape, John; Moseley, Peter; Brown, Gary; Hughes, Claire; Obonsawin, Marc; Coker, Sian; Watkins, Edward; Schwannauer, Matthias; MacMahon, Kenneth; Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Espie, Colin A

    2017-10-01

    Sleep difficulties might be a contributory causal factor in the occurrence of mental health problems. If this is true, improving sleep should benefit psychological health. We aimed to determine whether treating insomnia leads to a reduction in paranoia and hallucinations. We did this single-blind, randomised controlled trial (OASIS) at 26 UK universities. University students with insomnia were randomly assigned (1:1) with simple randomisation to receive digital cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for insomnia or usual care, and the research team were masked to the treatment. Online assessments took place at weeks 0, 3, 10 (end of therapy), and 22. The primary outcome measures were for insomnia, paranoia, and hallucinatory experiences. We did intention-to-treat analyses. The trial is registered with the ISRCTN registry, number ISRCTN61272251. Between March 5, 2015, and Feb 17, 2016, we randomly assigned 3755 participants to receive digital CBT for insomnia (n=1891) or usual practice (n=1864). Compared with usual practice, the sleep intervention at 10 weeks reduced insomnia (adjusted difference 4·78, 95% CI 4·29 to 5·26, Cohen's d=1·11; p<0·0001), paranoia (-2·22, -2·98 to -1·45, Cohen's d=0·19; p<0·0001), and hallucinations (-1·58, -1·98 to -1·18, Cohen's d=0·24; p<0·0001). Insomnia was a mediator of change in paranoia and hallucinations. No adverse events were reported. To our knowledge, this is the largest randomised controlled trial of a psychological intervention for a mental health problem. It provides strong evidence that insomnia is a causal factor in the occurrence of psychotic experiences and other mental health problems. Whether the results generalise beyond a student population requires testing. The treatment of disrupted sleep might require a higher priority in mental health provision. Wellcome Trust. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY 4.0 license. Published by

  10. The chronic kidney disease Water Intake Trial (WIT): results from the pilot randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, William F; Sontrop, Jessica M; Huang, Shih-Han; Gallo, Kerri; Moist, Louise; House, Andrew A; Weir, Matthew A; Garg, Amit X

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Increased water intake may benefit kidney function. Prior to initiating a larger randomised controlled trial (RCT), we examined the safety and feasibility of asking adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to increase their water intake. Design, setting, participants and measurements Beginning in October 2012, we randomly assigned 29 adults with stage 3 CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 30–60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and albuminuria) to one of the two groups of water intake: hydration (n=18) or standard (n=11). We asked the hydration group to increase their water intake by 1.0–1.5 L/day (in addition to usual intake, depending on sex and weight) for 6 weeks, while the control group carried on with their usual intake. Participants collected a 24 h urine sample at baseline and at 2 and 6 weeks after randomisation. Our primary outcome was the between-group difference in change in 24 h urine volume from baseline to 6 weeks. Results (63%)of participants were men, 81% were Caucasians and the average age was 61 years (SD 14 years). The average baseline eGFR was 40 mL/min/1.73 m2 (SD 11 mL/min/1.73 m2); the median albumin to creatinine ratio was 19 mg/mmol (IQR 6–74 mg/mmol). Between baseline and 6-week follow-up, the hydration group's average 24 h urine volume increased by 0.7 L/day (from 2.3 to 3.0 L/day) and the control group's 24 h urine decreased by 0.3 L/day (from 2.0 to 1.7 L/day; between-group difference in change: 0.9 L/day (95% CI 0.4 to 1.5; p=0.002)). We found no significant changes in urine, serum osmolality or electrolyte concentrations, or eGFR. No serious adverse events or changes in quality of life were reported. Conclusions A pilot RCT indicates adults with stage 3 CKD can successfully and safely increase water intake by up to 0.7 L/day in addition to usual fluid intake. Trial registration Registered with Clinical Trials—government identifier NCT01753466. PMID:24362012

  11. Study protocol of a multicentre randomised controlled trial of self-help cognitive behaviour therapy for working women with menopausal symptoms (MENOS@Work).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Myra S; Hardy, Claire; Norton, Sam; Griffiths, Amanda

    2016-10-01

    Hot flushes and night sweats (HFNS) - the main symptoms of the menopause transition - can reduce quality of life and are particularly difficult to manage at work. A cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) intervention has been developed specifically for HFNS that is theoretically based and shown to reduce significantly the impact of HFNS in several randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Self-help CBT has been found to be as effective as group CBT for these symptoms, but these interventions are not widely available in the workplace. This paper describes the protocol of an RCT aiming to assess the efficacy of CBT for menopausal symptoms implemented in the workplace, with a nested qualitative study to examine acceptability and feasibility. One hundred menopausal working women, aged 45-60 years, experiencing bothersome HFNS for two months will be recruited from several (2-10) large organisations into a multicentre randomised controlled trial. Women will be randomly assigned to either treatment (a self-help CBT intervention lasting 4 weeks) or to a no treatment-wait control condition (NTWC), following a screening interview, consent, and completion of a baseline questionnaire. All participants will complete follow-up questionnaires at 6 weeks and 20 weeks post-randomisation. The primary outcome is the rating of HFNS; secondary measures include HFNS frequency, mood, quality of life, attitudes to menopause, HFNS beliefs and behaviours, work absence and presenteeism, job satisfaction, job stress, job performance, disclosure to managers and turnover intention. Adherence, acceptability and feasibility will be assessed at 20 weeks post-randomisation in questionnaires and qualitative interviews. Upon trial completion, the control group will also be offered the intervention. This is the first randomised controlled trial of a self-management intervention tailored for working women who have troublesome menopausal symptoms. Clin.Gov NCT02623374. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  12. Prenatal vitamin d supplementation and child respiratory health: a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T Goldring

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Observational studies suggest high prenatal vitamin D intake may be associated with reduced childhood wheezing. We examined the effect of prenatal vitamin D on childhood wheezing in an interventional study. METHODS: We randomised 180 pregnant women at 27 weeks gestation to either no vitamin D, 800 IU ergocalciferol daily until delivery or single oral bolus of 200,000 IU cholecalciferol, in an ethnically stratified, randomised controlled trial. Supplementation improved but did not optimise vitamin D status. Researchers blind to allocation assessed offspring at 3 years. Primary outcome was any history of wheeze assessed by validated questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included atopy, respiratory infection, impulse oscillometry and exhaled nitric oxide. Primary analyses used logistic and linear regression. RESULTS: We evaluated 158 of 180 (88% offspring at age 3 years for the primary outcome. Atopy was assessed by skin test for 95 children (53%, serum IgE for 86 (48%, exhaled nitric oxide for 62 (34% and impulse oscillometry of acceptable quality for 51 (28%. We found no difference between supplemented and control groups in risk of wheeze [no vitamin D: 14/50 (28%; any vitamin D: 26/108 (24% (risk ratio 0.86; 95% confidence interval 0.49, 1.50; P = 0.69]. There was no significant difference in atopy, eczema risk, lung function or exhaled nitric oxide between supplemented groups and controls. CONCLUSION: Prenatal vitamin D supplementation in late pregnancy that had a modest effect on cord blood vitamin D level, was not associated with decreased wheezing in offspring at age three years. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN68645785.

  13. Falls and mobility in Parkinson's disease: protocol for a randomised controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Anna T

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although physical therapy and falls prevention education are argued to reduce falls and disability in people with idiopathic Parkinson's disease, this has not yet been confirmed with a large scale randomised controlled clinical trial. The study will investigate the effects on falls, mobility and quality of life of (i movement strategy training combined with falls prevention education, (ii progressive resistance strength training combined with falls prevention education, (iii a generic life-skills social program (control group. Methods/Design People with idiopathic Parkinson's disease who live at home will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of three groups. Each person shall receive therapy in an out-patient setting in groups of 3-4. Each group shall be scheduled to meet once per week for 2 hours for 8 consecutive weeks. All participants will also have a structured 2 hour home practice program for each week during the 8 week intervention phase. Assessments will occur before therapy, after the 8 week therapy program, and at 3 and 12 months after the intervention. A falls calendar will be kept by each participant for 12 months after outpatient therapy. Consistent with the recommendations of the Prevention of Falls Network Europe group, three falls variables will be used as the primary outcome measures: the number of fallers, the number of multiple fallers and the falls rate. In addition to quantifying falls, we shall measure mobility, activity limitations and quality of life as secondary outcomes. Discussion This study has the potential to determine whether outpatient movement strategy training combined with falls prevention education or progressive resistance strength training combined with falls prevention education are effective for reducing falls and improving mobility and life quality in people with Parkinson's disease who live at home. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR

  14. Effects on quality of life, anti-cancer responses, breast conserving surgery and survival with neoadjuvant docetaxel: a randomised study of sequential weekly versus three-weekly docetaxel following neoadjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide in women with primary breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiseman Janice

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Weekly docetaxel has occasionally been used in the neoadjuvant to downstage breast cancer to reduce toxicity and possibly enhance quality of life. However, no studies have compared the standard three weekly regimen to the weekly regimen in terms of quality of life. The primary aim of our study was to compare the effects on QoL of weekly versus 3-weekly sequential neoadjuvant docetaxel. Secondary aims were to determine the clinical and pathological responses, incidence of Breast Conserving Surgery (BCS, Disease Free Survival (DFS and Overall Survival (OS. Methods Eighty-nine patients receiving four cycles of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide were randomised to receive twelve cycles of weekly docetaxel (33 mg/m2 or four cycles of 3-weekly docetaxel (100 mg/m2. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast and psychosocial questionnaires were completed. Results At a median follow-up of 71.5 months, there was no difference in the Trial Outcome Index scores between treatment groups. During weekly docetaxel, patients experienced less constipation, nail problems, neuropathy, tiredness, distress, depressed mood, and unhappiness. There were no differences in overall clinical response (93% vs. 90%, pathological complete response (20% vs. 27%, and breast-conserving surgery (BCS rates (49% vs. 42%. Disease-free survival and overall survival were similar between treatment groups. Conclusions Weekly docetaxel is well-tolerated and has less distressing side-effects, without compromising therapeutic responses, Breast Conserving Surgery (BCS or survival outcomes in the neoadjuvant setting. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN09184069

  15. PLUTO trial protocol: percutaneous shunting for lower urinary tract obstruction randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilby, Mark; Khan, Khalid; Morris, Katie; Daniels, Jane; Gray, Richard; Magill, Laura; Martin, Bill; Thompson, Peter; Alfirevic, Zarko; Kenny, Simon; Bower, Sarah; Sturgiss, Stephen; Anumba, Dilly; Mason, Gerald; Tydeman, Graham; Soothill, Peter; Brackley, Karen; Loughna, Pamela; Cameron, Alan; Kumar, Sailesh; Bullen, Phil

    2007-07-01

    The primary objective is to determine whether intrauterine vesicoamniotic shunting for fetal bladder outflow obstruction, compared with conservative, noninterventional care, improves prenatal and perinatal mortality and renal function. The secondary objectives are to determine if shunting for fetal bladder outflow obstruction improves perinatal morbidity, to determine if improvement in outcomes is related to prognostic assessment at diagnosis and, if possible, derive a prognostic risk index and to determine the safety and long-term efficacy of shunting. A multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT). Fetal medicine units. Pregnant women with singleton, male fetus with isolated lower urinary tract obstruction (LUTO). Following ultrasound diagnosis of LUTO in a male fetus and exclusion of other structural and chromosomal anomalies, participation in the trial will be discussed with the mother and written information given. Consent for participation in the trial will be taken and the mother randomised via the internet to either insertion of a vesicoamniotic shunt or expectant management. During pregnancy, both groups will be followed with regular ultrasound scans looking at viability, renal measurements and amniotic fluid volume. Following delivery, babies will be followed up by paediatric nephrologists/urologists at 4-6 weeks, 12 months and 3 and 5 years to assess renal function via serum creatinine, renal ultrasound and need for dialysis/transplant. The main outcome measures will be perinatal mortality rates and renal function at 4-6 weeks and 12 months measured via serum creatinine, renal ultrasound and need for dialysis/transplant. Wellbeing of Women. ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE: September 2010. TRIAL ALGORITHM: [flowchart: see text].

  16. Changes in body weight and food choice in those attempting smoking cessation: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Wilma S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fear of weight gain is a barrier to smoking cessation and significant cause of relapse for many people. The provision of nutritional advice as part of a smoking cessation programme may assist some in smoking cessation and perhaps limit weight gain. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a structured programme of dietary advice on weight change and food choice, in adults attempting smoking cessation. Methods Cluster randomised controlled design. Classes randomised to intervention commenced a 24-week intervention, focussed on improving food choice and minimising weight gain. Classes randomised to control received “usual care”. Results Twenty-seven classes in Greater Glasgow were randomised between January and August 2008. Analysis, including those who continued to smoke, showed that actual weight gain and percentage weight gain was similar in both groups. Examination of data for those successful at giving up smoking showed greater mean weight gain in intervention subjects (3.9 (SD 3.1 vs. 2.7 (SD 3.7 kg. Between group differences were not significant (p = 0.23, 95% CI −0.9 to 3.5. In comparison to baseline improved consumption of fruit and vegetables and breakfast cereal were reported in the intervention group. A higher percentage of control participants continued smoking (74% vs. 66%. Conclusions The intervention was not successful at minimising weight gain in comparison to control but was successful in facilitating some sustained improvements in the dietary habits of intervention participants. Improved quit rates in the intervention group suggest that continued contact with advisors may have reduced anxieties regarding weight gain and encouraged cessation despite weight gain. Research should continue in this area as evidence suggests that the negative effects of obesity could outweigh the health benefits achieved through reductions in smoking prevalence. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials

  17. Internet-Supported Physical Exercise Training for Persons with Multiple Sclerosis-A Randomised, Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallner, Alexander; Streber, René; Hentschke, Christian; Morgott, Marc; Geidl, Wolfgang; Mäurer, Mathias; Pfeifer, Klaus

    2016-09-30

    Physical exercise is effective in improving functional outcomes in persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). We evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of internet-based exercise training (e-training) for pwMS on health-related quality of life (HrQoL). Secondary outcomes were muscle strength, aerobic capacity, lung function, physical activity, and fatigue. This is a randomised, controlled trial with a wait-list control group. Data were collected at baseline, after three and six months, and analysed using a hybrid linear model. One-hundred twenty-six pwMS participated in the home-based aerobic (1×/week) and strength training (2×/week) intervention that was supervised and documented via an internet-platform. The intervention group received e-training for six months, and the control group received e-training after a three months waiting period. Significant differences between the groups were only observed for muscle strength (knee flexion (effect size ES = 0.3, p = 0.003), knee extension (ES = 0.24, p = 0.015)), peak expiratory flow (ES = 0.2, p = 0.039), and sports activity (ES = 0.33, p = 0.001) after three months. E-training had no effect on HrQoL but did on muscle strength, lung function, and physical activity. It is a promising and feasible approach to facilitate large-scale, yet individual, training support.

  18. A lifestyle intervention for primary care patients with depression and anxiety: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Adrienne; Deane, Frank P; Williams, Peter

    2015-12-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a diet and exercise lifestyle intervention on mental health outcomes for patients currently being treated for depression and/or anxiety in primary care. Patients (n=119) referred by general practitioners to the 12-week randomised controlled trial were assigned to either an intervention of six visits to a dual qualified dietitian/exercise physiologist (DEP) where motivational interviewing and activity scheduling were used to engage patients in individually-tailored lifestyle change (focussed on diet and physical activity), or an attention control with scheduled telephone contact. Assessments conducted at baseline (n=94) and 12 weeks (n=60) were analysed with an intent-to-treat approach using linear mixed modelling. Significant improvement was found for both groups on Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) scores, measures of nutrient intake and total Australian modified Healthy Eating Index (Aust-HEI) scores. Significant differences between groups over time were found only for iron intake and body mass index. Patients participating in individual consultations with a dietitian were more likely to maintain or improve diet quality than those participating in an attention control. This study provides initial evidence to support the role of dietitians in the management of patients with depression and/or anxiety.

  19. Internet-Supported Physical Exercise Training for Persons with Multiple Sclerosis—A Randomised, Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Tallner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical exercise is effective in improving functional outcomes in persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS. We evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of internet-based exercise training (e-training for pwMS on health-related quality of life (HrQoL. Secondary outcomes were muscle strength, aerobic capacity, lung function, physical activity, and fatigue. This is a randomised, controlled trial with a wait-list control group. Data were collected at baseline, after three and six months, and analysed using a hybrid linear model. One-hundred twenty-six pwMS participated in the home-based aerobic (1×/week and strength training (2×/week intervention that was supervised and documented via an internet-platform. The intervention group received e-training for six months, and the control group received e-training after a three months waiting period. Significant differences between the groups were only observed for muscle strength (knee flexion (effect size ES = 0.3, p = 0.003, knee extension (ES = 0.24, p = 0.015, peak expiratory flow (ES = 0.2, p = 0.039, and sports activity (ES = 0.33, p = 0.001 after three months. E-training had no effect on HrQoL but did on muscle strength, lung function, and physical activity. It is a promising and feasible approach to facilitate large-scale, yet individual, training support.

  20. Should desperate volunteers be included in randomised controlled trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmark, P; Mason, S

    2006-09-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) sometimes recruit participants who are desperate to receive the experimental treatment. This paper defends the practice against three arguments that suggest it is unethical first, desperate volunteers are not in equipoise. Second clinicians, entering patients onto trials are disavowing their therapeutic obligation to deliver the best treatment; they are following trial protocols rather than delivering individualised care. Research is not treatment; its ethical justification is different. Consent is crucial. Third, desperate volunteers do not give proper consent: effectively, they are coerced. This paper responds by advocating a notion of equipoise based on expert knowledge and widely shared values. Where such collective, expert equipoise exists there is a prima facie case for an RCT. Next the paper argues that trial entry does not involve clinicians disavowing their therapeutic obligation; individualised care based on insufficient evidence is not in patients best interest. Finally, it argues that where equipoise exists it is acceptable to limit access to experimental agents; desperate volunteers are not coerced because their desperation does not translate into a right to receive what they desire.

  1. Cost-effectiveness analyses for mirtazapine and sertraline in dementia: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Renee; Knapp, Martin; Hellier, Jennifer; Dewey, Michael; Ballard, Clive; Baldwin, Robert; Bentham, Peter; Burns, Alistair; Fox, Chris; Holmes, Clive; Katona, Cornelius; Lawton, Claire; Lindesay, James; Livingston, Gill; McCrae, Niall; Moniz-Cook, Esme; Murray, Joanna; Nurock, Shirley; O'Brien, John; Poppe, Michaela; Thomas, Alan; Walwyn, Rebecca; Wilson, Kenneth; Banerjee, Sube

    2013-02-01

    Depression is a common and costly comorbidity in dementia. There are very few data on the cost-effectiveness of antidepressants for depression in dementia and their effects on carer outcomes. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of sertraline and mirtazapine compared with placebo for depression in dementia. A pragmatic, multicentre, randomised placebo-controlled trial with a parallel cost-effectiveness analysis (trial registration: ISRCTN88882979 and EudraCT 2006-000105-38). The primary cost-effectiveness analysis compared differences in treatment costs for patients receiving sertraline, mirtazapine or placebo with differences in effectiveness measured by the primary outcome, total Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) score, over two time periods: 0-13 weeks and 0-39 weeks. The secondary evaluation was a cost-utility analysis using quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) computed from the Euro-Qual (EQ-5D) and societal weights over those same periods. There were 339 participants randomised and 326 with costs data (111 placebo, 107 sertraline, 108 mirtazapine). For the primary outcome, decrease in depression, mirtazapine and sertraline were not cost-effective compared with placebo. However, examining secondary outcomes, the time spent by unpaid carers caring for participants in the mirtazapine group was almost half that for patients receiving placebo (6.74 v. 12.27 hours per week) or sertraline (6.74 v. 12.32 hours per week). Informal care costs over 39 weeks were £1510 and £1522 less for the mirtazapine group compared with placebo and sertraline respectively. In terms of reducing depression, mirtazapine and sertraline were not cost-effective for treating depression in dementia. However, mirtazapine does appear likely to have been cost-effective if costing includes the impact on unpaid carers and with quality of life included in the outcome. Unpaid (family) carer costs were lower with mirtazapine than sertraline or placebo. This may have been mediated via the

  2. Acupuncture for persistent allergic rhinitis: a multi-centre, randomised, controlled trial protocol

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    Kang Kyung-Won

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergic rhinitis is one of the most common health complaints worldwide. Complementary and alternative medical approaches have been employed to relieve allergic rhinitis symptoms and to avoid the side effects of conventional medication. Acupuncture has been widely used to treat patients with allergic rhinitis, but the available evidence of its effectiveness is insufficient. Our objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture in patients in Korea and China with persistent allergic rhinitis compared to sham acupuncture treatment or waitlist control. Methods This study consists of a multi-centre (two centres in Korea and two centres in China, randomised, controlled trial with three parallel arms (active acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and waitlist group. The active acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups will receive real or sham acupuncture treatment, respectively, three times per week for a total of 12 sessions over four weeks. Post-treatment follow-up will be performed a month later to complement these 12 acupuncture sessions. Participants in the waitlist group will not receive real or sham acupuncture treatments during this period but will only be required to keep recording their symptoms in a daily diary. After four weeks, the same treatment given to the active acupuncture group will be provided to the waitlist group. Discussion This trial will provide evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for persistent allergic rhinitis. The primary outcome between groups is a change in the self-reported total nasal symptom score (i.e., nasal obstruction, rhinorrhea, sneezing, and itching from baseline at the fourth week. Secondary outcome measures include the Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire score and total non-nasal symptom score (i.e., headache, itching, pain, eye-dropping. The quantity of conventional relief medication used during the follow-up period is another secondary outcome measure. Trial

  3. Cardiac rehabilitation adapted to transient ischaemic attack and stroke (CRAFTS: a randomised controlled trial

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    Blake Catherine

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary Heart Disease and Cerebrovascular Disease share many predisposing, modifiable risk factors (hypertension, abnormal blood lipids and lipoproteins, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, obesity and diabetes mellitus. Lifestyle interventions and pharmacological therapy are recognised as the cornerstones of secondary prevention. Cochrane review has proven the benefits of programmes incorporating exercise and lifestyle counselling in the cardiac disease population. A Cochrane review highlighted as priority, the need to establish feasibility and efficacy of exercise based interventions for Cerebrovascular Disease. Methods A single blind randomised controlled trial is proposed to examine a primary care cardiac rehabilitation programme for adults post transient ischemic attack (TIA and stroke in effecting a positive change in the primary outcome measures of cardiac risk scores derived from Blood Pressure, lipid profile, smoking and diabetic status and lifestyle factors of habitual smoking, exercise and healthy eating participation. Secondary outcomes of interest include health related quality of life as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Stroke Specific Quality of Life scale and WONCA COOP Functional Health Status charts and cardiovascular fitness as measured by a sub-maximal fitness test. A total of 144 patients, over 18 years of age with confirmed diagnosis of ischaemic stroke or TIA, will be recruited from Dublin community stroke services and two tertiary T.I.A clinics. Exclusion criteria will include oxygen dependence, unstable cardiac conditions, uncontrolled diabetes, major medical conditions, claudication, febrile illness, pregnancy or cognitive impairment. Participants will be block-statified, randomly allocated to one of two groups using a pre-prepared computer generated randomisation schedule. Both groups will receive a two hour education class on risk reduction post stroke. The

  4. Internet-based stress management for distressed managers: results from a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson Asplund, Robert; Dagöö, Jesper; Fjellström, Ida; Niemi, Linnea; Hansson, Katja; Zeraati, Forough; Ziuzina, Masha; Geraedts, Anna; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard

    2017-08-30

    The aim of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) was to evaluate the efficacy of a guided internet-based stress management intervention (iSMI) among distressed managers compared with a attention control group (AC) with full access to treatment-as-usual. A total sample of 117 distressed managers, mainly employed in the healthcare, IT, communication and educational sector, were randomised to either iSMI (n=59) or an AC group (n=58). The iSMI consisted of eight modules including cognitive behavioural stress management and positive management techniques. Participants received a minimal and weekly guidance from a psychologist or master-level psychology student focusing on support, feedback and adherence to the intervention. Self-report data were assessed at pre, post and 6 months after the intervention. The primary outcome was perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale-14). The secondary outcomes included mental and work-related health outcomes. Participants in the iSMI intervention reported significantly less symptoms of perceived stress (d=0.74, 95% CI 0.30 to 1.19) and burnout (d=0.95, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.37) compared with controls, at postassessment. Significant medium-to-large effect sizes were also found for depression, insomnia and job satisfaction. Long-term effects (6 months) were seen on the mental health outcomes. This is one of the first studies showing that iSMIs can be an effective, accessible and potentially time-effective approach of reducing stress and other mental-related and work-related health symptoms among distressed managers. Future studies are needed addressing distressed managers and the potential of indirect effects on employee stress and satisfaction at work. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Nordic Walking improves daily physical activities in COPD: a randomised controlled trial

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    Breyer Marie-Kathrin

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with COPD progressive dyspnoea leads to a sedentary lifestyle. To date, no studies exist investigating the effects of Nordic Walking in patients with COPD. Therefore, the aim was to determine the feasibility of Nordic Walking in COPD patients at different disease stages. Furthermore we aimed to determine the short- and long-term effects of Nordic Walking on COPD patients' daily physical activity pattern as well as on patients exercise capacity. Methods Sixty COPD patients were randomised to either Nordic Walking or to a control group. Patients of the Nordic Walking group (n = 30; age: 62 ± 9 years; FEV1: 48 ± 19% predicted underwent a three-month outdoor Nordic Walking exercise program consisting of one hour walking at 75% of their initial maximum heart rate three times per week, whereas controls had no exercise intervention. Primary endpoint: daily physical activities (measured by a validated tri-axial accelerometer; secondary endpoint: functional exercise capacity (measured by the six-minute walking distance; 6MWD. Assessment time points in both groups: baseline, after three, six and nine months. Results After three month training period, in the Nordic Walking group time spent walking and standing as well as intensity of walking increased (Δ walking time: +14.9 ± 1.9 min/day; Δ standing time: +129 ± 26 min/day; Δ movement intensity: +0.40 ± 0.14 m/s2 while time spent sitting decreased (Δ sitting time: -128 ± 15 min/day compared to baseline (all: p Conclusions Nordic Walking is a feasible, simple and effective physical training modality in COPD. In addition, Nordic Walking has proven to positively impact the daily physical activity pattern of COPD patients under short- and long-term observation. Clinical trial registration Nordic Walking improves daily physical activities in COPD: a randomised controlled trial - ISRCTN31525632

  6. Evaluating the effectiveness of a smartphone app to reduce excessive alcohol consumption: protocol for a factorial randomised control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, Claire; Crane, David; Michie, Susan; West, Robert; Brown, Jamie

    2016-07-08

    Excessive alcohol consumption is a leading cause of death and morbidity worldwide and interventions to help people reduce their consumption are needed. Interventions delivered by smartphone apps have the potential to help harmful and hazardous drinkers reduce their consumption of alcohol. However, there has been little evaluation of the effectiveness of existing smartphone interventions. A systematic review, amongst other methodologies, identified promising modular content that could be delivered by an app: self-monitoring and feedback; action planning; normative feedback; cognitive bias re-training; and identity change. This protocol reports a factorial randomised controlled trial to assess the comparative potential of these five intervention modules to reduce excessive alcohol consumption. A between-subject factorial randomised controlled trial. Hazardous and harmful drinkers aged 18 or over who are making a serious attempt to reduce their drinking will be randomised to one of 32 (2(5)) experimental conditions after downloading the 'Drink Less' app. Participants complete baseline measures on downloading the app and are contacted after 1-month with a follow-up questionnaire. The primary outcome measure is change in past week consumption of alcohol. Secondary outcome measures are change in AUDIT score, app usage data and usability ratings for the app. A factorial between-subjects ANOVA will be conducted to assess main and interactive effects of the five intervention modules for the primary and secondary outcome measures. This study will establish the extent to which the five intervention modules offered in this app can help reduce hazardous and harmful drinking. This is the first step in optimising and understanding what component parts of an app could help to reduce excessive alcohol consumption. The findings from this study will be used to inform the content of a future integrated treatment app and evaluated against a minimal control in a definitive randomised

  7. Year-round influenza immunisation during pregnancy in Nepal: a phase 4, randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff, Mark C; Katz, Joanne; Englund, Janet A; Khatry, Subarna K; Shrestha, Laxman; Kuypers, Jane; Stewart, Laveta; Mullany, Luke C; Chu, Helen Y; LeClerq, Steven C; Kozuki, Naoko; McNeal, Monica; Reedy, Adriana M; Tielsch, James M

    2017-09-01

    Influenza immunisation during pregnancy is recommended but not widely implemented in some low-income regions. We assessed the safety and efficacy in mothers and infants of year-round maternal influenza immunisation in Nepal, where influenza viruses circulate throughout the year. In this phase 4, randomised, placebo-controlled trial, we enrolled two consecutive sequential annual cohorts of pregnant women from the Sarlahi district in southern Nepal. We randomised mothers 1:1 to receive seasonally recommended trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine or saline placebo in blocks of eight, stratified by gestational age at enrolment (17-25 weeks vs 26-34 weeks). Women were eligible if they were married, 15-40 years of age, 17-34 weeks' gestation at enrolment, and had not previously received any influenza vaccine that season. We collected serum samples before and after immunisation, and cord blood from a subset of women and infants. Staff masked to allocation made home visits every week from enrolment to 6 months after delivery. Midnasal swabs for respiratory virus PCR testing were collected during maternal acute febrile respiratory infections, and from infants with any respiratory symptom. We assessed vaccine immunogenicity, safety, and three primary outcomes: the incidence of maternal influenza-like illness in pregnancy and 0-180 days postpartum, the incidence of low birthweight (Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy of manual therapy treatments for people with cervicogenic dizziness and pain: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

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    Reid Susan A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervicogenic dizziness is a disabling condition characterised by postural unsteadiness that is aggravated by cervical spine movements and associated with a painful and/or stiff neck. Two manual therapy treatments (Mulligan’s Sustained Natural Apophyseal Glides (SNAGs and Maitland’s passive joint mobilisations are used by physiotherapists to treat this condition but there is little evidence from randomised controlled trials to support their use. The aim of this study is to conduct a randomised controlled trial to compare these two forms of manual therapy (Mulligan glides and Maitland mobilisations to each other and to a placebo in reducing symptoms of cervicogenic dizziness in the longer term and to conduct an economic evaluation of the interventions. Methods Participants with symptoms of dizziness described as imbalance, together with a painful and/or stiff neck will be recruited via media releases, advertisements and mail-outs to medical practitioners in the Hunter region of NSW, Australia. Potential participants will be screened by a physiotherapist and a neurologist to rule out other causes of their dizziness. Once diagnosed with cervciogenic dizziness, 90 participants will be randomly allocated to one of three groups: Maitland mobilisations plus range-of-motion exercises, Mulligan SNAGs plus self-SNAG exercises or placebo. Participants will receive two to six treatments over six weeks. The trial will have unblinded treatment but blinded outcome assessments. Assessments will occur at baseline, post-treatment, six weeks, 12 weeks, six months and 12 months post treatment. The primary outcome will be intensity of dizziness. Other outcome measures will be frequency of dizziness, disability, intensity of cervical pain, cervical range of motion, balance, head repositioning, adverse effects and treatment satisfaction. Economic outcomes will also be collected. Discussion This paper describes the methods for a randomised

  9. Pressure and pain In Systemic sclerosis/Scleroderma - an evaluation of a simple intervention (PISCES: randomised controlled trial protocol

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    Alcacer-Pitarch Begonya

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot problems associated with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc/Scleroderma have been reported to be both common and disabling. There are only limited data describing specifically, the mechanical changes occurring in the foot in SSc. A pilot project conducted in preparation for this trial confirmed the previous reports of foot related impairment and reduced foot function in people with SSc and demonstrated a link to mechanical etiologies. To-date there have been no formal studies of interventions directed at the foot problems experienced by people with Systemic Sclerosis. The primary aim of this trial is to evaluate whether foot pain and foot-related health status in people with Systemic Sclerosis can be improved through the provision of a simple pressure-relieving insole. Methods The proposed trial is a pragmatic, multicenter, randomised controlled clinical trial following a completed pilot study. In four participating centres, 140 consenting patients with SSc and plantar foot pain will be randomised to receive either a commercially available pressure relieving and thermally insulating insole, or a sham insole with no cushioning or thermal properties. The primary end point is a reduction in pain measured using the Foot Function Index Pain subscale, 12 weeks after the start of intervention. Participants will complete the primary outcome measure (Foot Function Index pain sub-scale prior to randomisation and at 12 weeks post randomisation. Secondary outcomes include participant reported pain and disability as derived from the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Questionnaire and plantar pressures with and without the insoles in situ. Discussion This trial protocol proposes a rigorous and potentially significant evaluation of a simple and readily provided therapeutic approach which, if effective, could be of a great benefit for this group of patients. Trial registration number ISRCTN: ISRCTN02824122

  10. Early intensive hand rehabilitation after spinal cord injury ("Hands On": a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

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    Hsueh Ya-Seng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of hand function is one of the most devastating consequences of spinal cord injury. Intensive hand training provided on an instrumented exercise workstation in conjunction with functional electrical stimulation may enhance neural recovery and hand function. The aim of this trial is to compare usual care with an 8-week program of intensive hand training and functional electrical stimulation. Methods/design A multicentre randomised controlled trial will be undertaken. Seventy-eight participants with recent tetraplegia (C2 to T1 motor complete or incomplete undergoing inpatient rehabilitation will be recruited from seven spinal cord injury units in Australia and New Zealand and will be randomised to a control or experimental group. Control participants will receive usual care. Experimental participants will receive usual care and an 8-week program of intensive unilateral hand training using an instrumented exercise workstation and functional electrical stimulation. Participants will drive the functional electrical stimulation of their target hands via a behind-the-ear bluetooth device, which is sensitive to tooth clicks. The bluetooth device will enable the use of various manipulanda to practice functional activities embedded within computer-based games and activities. Training will be provided for one hour, 5 days per week, during the 8-week intervention period. The primary outcome is the Action Research Arm Test. Secondary outcomes include measurements of strength, sensation, function, quality of life and cost effectiveness. All outcomes will be taken at baseline, 8 weeks, 6 months and 12 months by assessors blinded to group allocation. Recruitment commenced in December 2009. Discussion The results of this trial will determine the effectiveness of an 8-week program of intensive hand training with functional electrical stimulation. Trial registration NCT01086930 (12th March 2010 ACTRN12609000695202 (12th August 2009

  11. A Mediterranean Diet to Improve Cardiovascular and Cognitive Health: Protocol for a Randomised Controlled Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Alexandra T; Davis, Courtney R; Dyer, Kathryn A; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Woodman, Richard J; Keage, Hannah A D; Murphy, Karen J

    2017-02-16

    The Mediterranean diet has demonstrated efficacy for improving cardiovascular and cognitive health. However, a traditional Mediterranean diet delivers fewer serves of dairy and less dietary calcium than is currently recommended in Australia, which may limit long-term sustainability. The present study aims to evaluate whether a Mediterranean diet with adequate dairy and calcium can improve cardiovascular and cognitive function in an at-risk population, and thereby reduce risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cognitive decline. A randomised, controlled, parallel, crossover design trial will compare a Mediterranean diet supplemented with dairy foods against a low-fat control diet. Forty participants with systolic blood pressure above 120 mmHg and at least two other risk factors of CVD will undertake each dietary intervention for eight weeks, with an eight-week washout period between interventions. Systolic blood pressure will be the primary measure of interest. Secondary outcomes will include measures of cardiometabolic health, dietary compliance, cognitive function, assessed using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB), psychological well-being and dementia risk. This research will provide empirical evidence as to whether the Mediterranean diet can be modified to provide recommended dairy and calcium intakes while continuing to deliver positive effects for cardiovascular and cognitive health. The findings will hold relevance for the field of preventative healthcare and may contribute to revisions of national dietary guidelines.

  12. Acupuncture for the Treatment of Oculomotor Paralysis: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

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    Jia-Qi Bi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study consisted of a single centre randomised controlled trial with two parallel arms: an acupuncture group (n=20 with 27 affected eyes and a sham group (n=20 with 23 affected eyes. Participants in the acupuncture group received acupuncture treatment once daily, three times weekly for four weeks. Participants assigned to the control group received sham acupuncture, the same protocol as that used for the acupuncture group but without insertion of needles into the skin. The primary outcome measure was the cervical range of motion (CROM score. Secondary outcome measures were the palpebral fissure size, response rate, and adverse events. All 40 participants completed the study. In the comparison of acupuncture and sham acupuncture, a significant difference was observed between acupuncture and sham acupuncture in CROM score (21.37±15.16 and 32.21±19.54, resp. (P<0.05 and palpebral fissure size (7.19±2.94 and 5.41±2.45, resp. (P<0.05. Response rate was also significantly different in the acupuncture group (P<0.05. No adverse events were reported in both groups in this study. In summary, it was demonstrated that acupuncture had a feasibility positive effect on oculomotor paralysis.

  13. A Mediterranean Diet to Improve Cardiovascular and Cognitive Health: Protocol for a Randomised Controlled Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Alexandra T.; Davis, Courtney R.; Dyer, Kathryn A.; Hodgson, Jonathan M.; Woodman, Richard J.; Keage, Hannah A. D.; Murphy, Karen J.

    2017-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet has demonstrated efficacy for improving cardiovascular and cognitive health. However, a traditional Mediterranean diet delivers fewer serves of dairy and less dietary calcium than is currently recommended in Australia, which may limit long-term sustainability. The present study aims to evaluate whether a Mediterranean diet with adequate dairy and calcium can improve cardiovascular and cognitive function in an at-risk population, and thereby reduce risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cognitive decline. A randomised, controlled, parallel, crossover design trial will compare a Mediterranean diet supplemented with dairy foods against a low-fat control diet. Forty participants with systolic blood pressure above 120 mmHg and at least two other risk factors of CVD will undertake each dietary intervention for eight weeks, with an eight-week washout period between interventions. Systolic blood pressure will be the primary measure of interest. Secondary outcomes will include measures of cardiometabolic health, dietary compliance, cognitive function, assessed using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB), psychological well-being and dementia risk. This research will provide empirical evidence as to whether the Mediterranean diet can be modified to provide recommended dairy and calcium intakes while continuing to deliver positive effects for cardiovascular and cognitive health. The findings will hold relevance for the field of preventative healthcare and may contribute to revisions of national dietary guidelines. PMID:28212320

  14. Assessing a cognitive music training for older participants: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasutti, Michele; Mangiacotti, Anthony

    2017-04-12

    In a randomised controlled trial, we investigated whether a cognitive training based on rhythm-music and music improvisation exercises had positive effects on executive functions in older participants. Thirty-five residents in a guest home with mild-moderate cognitive impairment and healthy ageing were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 18) featuring cognitive music training composed of 12 bi-weekly 70-min sessions, and a control group (n = 17) attended 12 bi-weekly 45-min sessions of gymnastic activities offered by the institute. A neuropsychological test battery was administered at baseline and at the end of treatment, including the Mini-Mental State Examination, verbal fluency test, Trail Making Test A, attentional matrices test and clock-drawing test. Pre-test and post-test comparison showed a significant improvement for the experimental group reflected in the Mini-Mental State Examination (F(1,33) = 13.906; p cognitive protocol based on music-rhythmic exercises and music improvisation exercises is associated with improved cognitive functions in older people with mild-moderate cognitive impairment regardless of the individual's degree of cognitive reserve. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. A multifaceted workplace intervention for low back pain in nurses' aides: a pragmatic stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Charlotte Diana Nørregaard; Holtermann, Andreas; Bay, Hans; Søgaard, Karen; Birk Jørgensen, Marie

    2015-09-01

    This study established the effectiveness of a workplace multifaceted intervention consisting of participatory ergonomics, physical training, and cognitive-behavioural training (CBT) for low back pain (LBP). Between November 2012 and May 2014, we conducted a pragmatic stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial with 594 workers from eldercare workplaces (nursing homes and home care) randomised to 4 successive time periods, 3 months apart. The intervention lasted 12 weeks and consisted of 19 sessions in total (physical training [12 sessions], CBT [2 sessions], and participatory ergonomics [5 sessions]). Low back pain was the outcome and was measured as days, intensity (worst pain on a 0-10 numeric rank scale), and bothersomeness (days) by monthly text messages. Linear mixed models were used to estimate the intervention effect. Analyses were performed according to intention to treat, including all eligible randomised participants, and were adjusted for baseline values of the outcome. The linear mixed models yielded significant effects on LBP days of -0.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], -1.19 to -0.38), LBP intensity of -0.4 (95% CI, -0.60 to -0.26), and bothersomeness days of -0.5 (95% CI, -0.85 to -0.13) after the intervention compared with the control group. This study shows that a multifaceted intervention consisting of participatory ergonomics, physical training, and CBT can reduce LBP among workers in eldercare. Thus, multifaceted interventions may be relevant for improving LBP in a working population.

  16. Exercise and Manual therapy Arthritis Research Trial (EMPART) for osteoarthritis of the hip: A Multicentre Randomised Controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    French, Helen P

    2012-10-16

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of exercise therapy (ET) compared to ET with adjunctive manual therapy (ET+MT) for people with hip osteoarthritis (OA). A secondary aim was to identify if immediate commencement of ET or ET+MT was more beneficial than a 9 week waiting period for either intervention. DESIGN: Assessor-blind randomised controlled trial with 9 and 18 week follow-ups. SETTING: Four academic teaching hospitals, Dublin, Ireland. PARTICIPANTS: 131 patients with hip OA recruited from general practitioners, rheumatologists, orthopaedic surgeons, and other hospital consultants were randomised to one of three groups: ET (n=45), ET+MT (n=43) and wait-list control (n=43). INTERVENTIONS: Participants in both ET and ET+ MT groups received up to 8 treatments over 8 weeks. Control group participants were re-randomised into either ET or ET+MT group after 9 week follow-up. Their data were pooled with original treatment group data: ET (n=66) and ET+MT (n=65). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was the WOMAC physical function (PF) subscale. Secondary outcomes included physical performance, pain, hip range of motion (HROM), anxiety\\/depression, quality of life, medication usage, patient-perceived change and patient satisfaction. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in WOMAC PF between ET (n=66) and ET+MT (n=65) groups at 9 weeks (mean diff 0.09 (95% CI -4.41, 5.25)) or at 18 weeks (mean diff 0.42 (95% CI -3.98, 6.83)), or other outcomes, except \\'patient satisfaction with outcome\\' which was higher in the ET+MT group (p=0.02). Improvements in WOMAC, HROM and patient-perceived change occurred in both treatment groups compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: Self-reported function, HROM and patient-perceived improvement occurred after an 8 week programme of ET for patients with hip OA MT as an adjunct provided no further benefit, except for higher patient satisfaction.

  17. Treatment of psoriatic arthritis in a phase 3 randomised, placebo-controlled trial with apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Arthur; Mease, Philip J; Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Adebajo, Adewale O; Wollenhaupt, Jürgen; Gladman, Dafna D; Lespessailles, Eric; Hall, Stephen; Hochfeld, Marla; Hu, ChiaChi; Hough, Douglas; Stevens, Randall M; Schett, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, regulates inflammatory mediators. Psoriatic Arthritis Long-term Assessment of Clinical Efficacy 1 (PALACE 1) compared apremilast with placebo in patients with active psoriatic arthritis despite prior traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) and/or biologic therapy. Methods In the 24-week, placebo-controlled phase of PALACE 1, patients (N=504) were randomised (1:1:1) to placebo, apremilast 20 mg twice a day (BID) or apremilast 30 mg BID. At week 16, patients without ≥20% reduction in swollen and tender joint counts were required to be re-randomised equally to either apremilast dose if initially randomised to placebo or remained on their initial apremilast dose. Patients on background concurrent DMARDs continued stable doses (methotrexate, leflunomide and/or sulfasalazine). Primary outcome was the proportion of patients achieving 20% improvement in modified American College of Rheumatology response criteria (ACR20) at week 16. Results At week 16, significantly more apremilast 20 mg BID (31%) and 30 mg BID (40%) patients achieved ACR20 versus placebo (19%) (p<0.001). Significant improvements in key secondary measures (physical function, psoriasis) were evident with both apremilast doses versus placebo. Across outcome measures, the 30-mg group generally had higher and more consistent response rates, although statistical comparison was not conducted. The most common adverse events were gastrointestinal and generally occurred early, were self-limiting and infrequently led to discontinuation. No imbalance in major adverse cardiac events, serious or opportunistic infections, malignancies or laboratory abnormalities was observed. Conclusions Apremilast was effective in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, improving signs and symptoms and physical function. Apremilast demonstrated an acceptable safety profile and was generally well tolerated. Clinical trial registration number NCT

  18. Effects of a training program after surgically treated ankle fracture: a prospective randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekdahl Charlotte S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite conflicting results after surgically treated ankle fractures few studies have evaluated the effects of different types of training programs performed after plaster removal. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a 12-week standardised but individually suited training program (training group versus usual care (control group after plaster removal in adults with surgically treated ankle fractures. Methods In total, 110 men and women, 18-64 years of age, with surgically treated ankle fracture were included and randomised to either a 12-week training program or to a control group. Six and twelve months after the injury the subjects were examined by the same physiotherapist who was blinded to the treatment group. The main outcome measure was the Olerud-Molander Ankle Score (OMAS which rates symptoms and subjectively scored function. Secondary outcome measures were: quality of life (SF-36, timed walking tests, ankle mobility tests, muscle strength tests and radiological status. Results 52 patients were randomised to the training group and 58 to the control group. Five patients dropped out before the six-month follow-up resulting in 50 patients in the training group and 55 in the control group. Nine patients dropped out between the six- and twelve-month follow-up resulting in 48 patients in both groups. When analysing the results in a mixed model analysis on repeated measures including interaction between age-group and treatment effect the training group demonstrated significantly improved results compared to the control group in subjects younger than 40 years of age regarding OMAS (p = 0.028, muscle strength in the plantar flexors (p = 0.029 and dorsiflexors (p = 0.030. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that when adjusting for interaction between age-group and treatment effect the training model employed in this study was superior to usual care in patients under the age of 40. However, as only three

  19. Getting the balance right: a randomised controlled trial of physiotherapy and Exercise Interventions for ambulatory people with multiple sclerosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coote, Susan

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: People with Multiple Sclerosis have a life long need for physiotherapy and exercise interventions due to the progressive nature of the disease and their greater risk of the complications of inactivity. The Multiple Sclerosis Society of Ireland run physiotherapy, yoga and exercise classes for their members, however there is little evidence to suggest which form of physical activity optimises outcome for people with the many and varied impairments associated with MS. METHODS AND DESIGN: This is a multi-centre, single blind, block randomised, controlled trial. Participants will be recruited via the ten regional offices of MS Ireland. Telephone screening will establish eligibility and stratification according to the mobility section of the Guys Neurological Disability Scale. Once a block of people of the same strand in the same geographical region have given consent, participants will be randomised. Strand A will concern individuals with MS who walk independently or use one stick to walk outside. Participants will be randomised to yoga, physiotherapy led exercise class, fitness instructor led exercise class or to a control group who don\\'t change their exercise habits.Strand B will concern individuals with MS who walk with bilateral support or a rollator, they may use a wheelchair for longer distance outdoors. Participants will be randomised to 1:1 Physiotherapist led intervention, group intervention led by Physiotherapist, group yoga intervention or a control group who don\\'t change their exercise habits. Participants will be assessed by physiotherapist who is blind to the group allocation at week 1, week 12 (following 10 weeks intervention or control), and at 12 week follow up. The primary outcome measure for both strands is the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale. Secondary outcomes are Modified Fatigue Impact Scale, 6 Minute Walk test, and muscle strength measured with hand held dynamometry. Strand B will also use Berg Balance Test and the Modified

  20. Getting the Balance Right: A randomised controlled trial of physiotherapy and Exercise Interventions for ambulatory people with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larkin Aidan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with Multiple Sclerosis have a life long need for physiotherapy and exercise interventions due to the progressive nature of the disease and their greater risk of the complications of inactivity. The Multiple Sclerosis Society of Ireland run physiotherapy, yoga and exercise classes for their members, however there is little evidence to suggest which form of physical activity optimises outcome for people with the many and varied impairments associated with MS. Methods and design This is a multi-centre, single blind, block randomised, controlled trial. Participants will be recruited via the ten regional offices of MS Ireland. Telephone screening will establish eligibility and stratification according to the mobility section of the Guys Neurological Disability Scale. Once a block of people of the same strand in the same geographical region have given consent, participants will be randomised. Strand A will concern individuals with MS who walk independently or use one stick to walk outside. Participants will be randomised to yoga, physiotherapy led exercise class, fitness instructor led exercise class or to a control group who don't change their exercise habits. Strand B will concern individuals with MS who walk with bilateral support or a rollator, they may use a wheelchair for longer distance outdoors. Participants will be randomised to 1:1 Physiotherapist led intervention, group intervention led by Physiotherapist, group yoga intervention or a control group who don't change their exercise habits. Participants will be assessed by physiotherapist who is blind to the group allocation at week 1, week 12 (following 10 weeks intervention or control, and at 12 week follow up. The primary outcome measure for both strands is the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale. Secondary outcomes are Modified Fatigue Impact Scale, 6 Minute Walk test, and muscle strength measured with hand held dynamometry. Strand B will also use Berg Balance Test

  1. Targeted physiotherapy for patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis: A protocol for a randomised, single-blind controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schache Anthony G

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The patellofemoral joint (PFJ is one compartment of the knee that is frequently affected by osteoarthritis (OA and is a potent source of OA symptoms. However, there is a dearth of evidence for compartment-specific treatments for PFJ OA. Therefore, this project aims to evaluate whether a physiotherapy treatment, targeted to the PFJ, results in greater improvements in pain and physical function than a physiotherapy education intervention in people with symptomatic and radiographic PFJ OA. Methods 90 people with PFJ OA (PFJ-specific history, signs and symptoms and radiographic evidence of PFJ OA will be recruited from the community and randomly allocated into one of two treatments. A randomised controlled trial adhering to CONSORT guidelines will evaluate the efficacy of physiotherapy (8 individual sessions over 12 weeks, as well as a home exercise program 4 times/week compared to a physiotherapist-delivered OA education control treatment (8 individual sessions over 12 weeks. Physiotherapy treatment will consist of (i quadriceps muscle retraining; (ii quadriceps and hip muscle strengthening; (iii patellar taping; (iv manual PFJ and soft tissue mobilisation; and (v OA education. Resistance and dosage of exercises will be tailored to the participant's functional level and clinical state. Primary outcomes will be evaluated by a blinded examiner at baseline, 12 weeks and 9 months using validated and reliable pain, physical function and perceived global effect scales. All analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis using linear mixed regression models, including respective baseline scores as a covariate, subjects as a random effect, treatment condition as a fixed factor and the covariate by treatment interaction. Conclusion This RCT is targeting PFJ OA, an important sub-group of knee OA patients, with a specifically designed conservative intervention. The project's outcome will influence PFJ OA rehabilitation, with the

  2. The effect of azithromycin in adults with stable neutrophilic COPD: a double blind randomised, placebo controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie L Simpson

    Full Text Available Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is a progressive airway disease characterised by neutrophilic airway inflammation or bronchitis. Neutrophilic bronchitis is associated with both bacterial colonisation and lung function decline and is common in exacerbations of COPD. Despite current available therapies to control inflammation, neutrophilic bronchitis remains common. This study tested the hypothesis that azithromycin treatment, as an add-on to standard medication, would significantly reduce airway neutrophil and neutrophils chemokine (CXCL8 levels, as well as bacterial load. We conducted a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in COPD participants with stable neutrophilic bronchitis.Eligible participants (n = 30 were randomised to azithromycin 250 mg daily or placebo for 12 weeks in addition to their standard respiratory medications. Sputum was induced at screening, randomisation and monthly for a 12 week treatment period and processed for differential cell counts, CXCL8 and neutrophil elastase assessment. Quantitative bacteriology was assessed in sputum samples at randomisation and the end of treatment visit. Severe exacerbations where symptoms increased requiring unscheduled treatment were recorded during the 12 week treatment period and for 14 weeks following treatment. A sub-group of participants underwent chest computed tomography scans (n = 15.Nine participants with neutrophilic bronchitis had a potentially pathogenic bacteria isolated and the median total bacterial load of all participants was 5.22×107 cfu/mL. Azithromycin treatment resulted in a non-significant reduction in sputum neutrophil proportion, CXCL8 levels and bacterial load. The mean severe exacerbation rate was 0.33 per person per 26 weeks in the azithromycin group compared to 0.93 exacerbations per person in the placebo group (incidence rate ratio (95%CI: 0.37 (0.11,1.21, p = 0.062. For participants who underwent chest CT scans, no

  3. A pilot randomised controlled trial of negative pressure wound therapy to treat grade III/IV pressure ulcers [ISRCTN69032034

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is widely promoted as a treatment for full thickness wounds; however, there is a lack of high-quality research evidence regarding its clinical and cost effectiveness. A trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III/IV pressure ulcers would be worthwhile but premature without assessing whether such a trial is feasible. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial was to assess the feasibility of conducting a future full trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III and IV pressure ulcers and to pilot all aspects of the trial. Methods This was a two-centre (acute and community), pilot randomised controlled trial. Eligible participants were randomised to receive either NPWT or standard care (SC) (spun hydrocolloid, alginate or foam dressings). Outcome measures were time to healing of the reference pressure ulcer, recruitment rates, frequency of treatment visits, resources used and duration of follow-up. Results Three hundred and twelve patients were screened for eligibility into this trial over a 12-month recruitment period and 12/312 participants (3.8%) were randomised: 6 to NPWT and 6 to SC. Only one reference pressure ulcer healed (NPWT group) during follow-up (time to healing 79 days). The mean number of treatment visits per week was 3.1 (NPWT) and 5.7 (SC); 6/6 NPWT and 1/6 SC participants withdrew from their allocated trial treatment. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.8 (NPWT) and 5.0 (SC) months. Conclusions This pilot trial yielded vital information for the planning of a future full study including projected recruitment rate, required duration of follow-up and extent of research nurse support required. Data were also used to inform the cost-effectiveness and value of information analyses, which were conducted alongside the pilot trial. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN69032034. PMID:22839453

  4. A pilot randomised controlled trial of negative pressure wound therapy to treat grade III/IV pressure ulcers [ISRCTN69032034

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashby Rebecca L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT is widely promoted as a treatment for full thickness wounds; however, there is a lack of high-quality research evidence regarding its clinical and cost effectiveness. A trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III/IV pressure ulcers would be worthwhile but premature without assessing whether such a trial is feasible. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial was to assess the feasibility of conducting a future full trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III and IV pressure ulcers and to pilot all aspects of the trial. Methods This was a two-centre (acute and community, pilot randomised controlled trial. Eligible participants were randomised to receive either NPWT or standard care (SC (spun hydrocolloid, alginate or foam dressings. Outcome measures were time to healing of the reference pressure ulcer, recruitment rates, frequency of treatment visits, resources used and duration of follow-up. Results Three hundred and twelve patients were screened for eligibility into this trial over a 12-month recruitment period and 12/312 participants (3.8% were randomised: 6 to NPWT and 6 to SC. Only one reference pressure ulcer healed (NPWT group during follow-up (time to healing 79 days. The mean number of treatment visits per week was 3.1 (NPWT and 5.7 (SC; 6/6 NPWT and 1/6 SC participants withdrew from their allocated trial treatment. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.8 (NPWT and 5.0 (SC months. Conclusions This pilot trial yielded vital information for the planning of a future full study including projected recruitment rate, required duration of follow-up and extent of research nurse support required. Data were also used to inform the cost-effectiveness and value of information analyses, which were conducted alongside the pilot trial. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN69032034.

  5. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of tropisetron in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiraishi Tetsuya

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive deficits in schizophrenia are associated with psychosocial deficits that are primarily responsible for the poor long-term outcome of this disease. Auditory sensory gating P50 deficits are correlated with neuropsychological deficits in attention, one of the principal cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia. Our studies suggest that the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR agonist tropisetron might be a potential therapeutic drug for cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Therefore, it is of particular interest to investigate the effects of tropisetron on the cognitive deficits in patients with schizophrenia. Methods A randomised, placebo-controlled trial of tropisetron in patients with schizophrenia was performed. A total of 40 patients with chronic schizophrenia who had taken risperidone (2 to 6 mg/day were enrolled. Subjects were randomly assigned to a fixed titration of tropisetron (n = 20, 10 mg/day or placebo (n = 20 in an 8-week double-blind trial. Auditory sensory gating P50 deficits and Quality of Life Scale (QLS, Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB, and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS scores were measured. Results In all, 33 patients completed the trial. Tropisetron was well tolerated. Administration of tropisetron, but not placebo, significantly improved auditory sensory gating P50 deficits in non-smoking patients with schizophrenia. The score on the rapid visual information processing (sustained visual attention task of CANTAB was significantly improved by tropisetron treatment. Total and subscale scores of PANSS were not changed by this trial. QLS scores in the all patients, but not non-smoking patients, were significantly improved by tropisetron trial. Conclusions This first randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial supports the safety and efficacy of adjunctive tropisetron for treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

  6. Evaluation of Lay Support in Pregnant women with Social risk (ELSIPS: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenyon Sara

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal, neonatal and child health outcomes are worse in families from black and ethnic minority groups and disadvantaged backgrounds. There is little evidence on whether lay support improves maternal and infant outcomes among women with complex social needs within a disadvantaged multi-ethnic population in the United Kingdom (UK. Method/Design The aim of this study is to evaluate a lay Pregnancy Outreach Worker (POW service for nulliparous women identified as having social risk within a maternity service that is systematically assessing social risks alongside the usual obstetric and medical risks. The study design is a randomised controlled trial (RCT in nulliparous women assessed as having social risk comparing standard maternity care with the addition of referral to the POW support service. The POWs work alongside community midwifery teams and offer individualised support to women to encourage engagement with services (health and social care from randomisation (before 28 weeks gestation until 6 weeks after birth. The primary outcomes have been chosen on the basis that they are linked to maternal and infant health. The two primary outcomes are engagement with antenatal care, assessed by the number of antenatal visits; and maternal depression, assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale at 8-12 weeks after birth. Secondary outcomes include maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality, routine child health assessments, including immunisation uptake and breastfeeding at 6 weeks. Other psychological outcomes (self efficacy and mother-to-infant bonding will also be collected using validated tools. A sample size of 1316 will provide 90% power (at the 5% significance level to detect increased engagement with antenatal services of 1.5 visits and a reduction of 1.5 in the average EPDS score for women with two or more social risk factors, with power in excess of this for women with any social risk factor. Analysis will

  7. Cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts (verrucae): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockayne, Sarah; Hewitt, Catherine; Hicks, Kate; Jayakody, Shalmini; Kang'ombe, Arthur Ricky; Stamuli, Eugena; Turner, Gwen; Thomas, Kim; Curran, Mike; Denby, Gary; Hashmi, Farina; McIntosh, Caroline; McLarnon, Nichola; Torgerson, David; Watt, Ian

    2011-06-07

    To compare the clinical effectiveness of cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts. A multicentre, open, two arm randomised controlled trial. University podiatry school clinics, NHS podiatry clinics, and primary care in England, Scotland, and Ireland. 240 patients aged 12 years and over, with a plantar wart that in the opinion of the healthcare professional was suitable for treatment with both cryotherapy and salicylic acid. Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen delivered by a healthcare professional, up to four treatments two to three weeks apart. Patient self treatment with 50% salicylic acid (Verrugon) daily up to a maximum of eight weeks. Complete clearance of all plantar warts at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes were (a) complete clearance of all plantar warts at 12 weeks controlling for age, whether the wart had been treated previously, and type of wart, (b) patient self reported clearance of plantar warts at six months, (c) time to clearance of plantar wart, (d) number of plantar warts at 12 weeks, and (e) patient satisfaction with the treatment. There was no evidence of a difference between the salicylic acid and cryotherapy groups in the proportions of participants with complete clearance of all plantar warts at 12 weeks (17/119 (14%) v 15/110 (14%), difference 0.65% (95% CI -8.33 to 9.63), P=0.89). The results did not change when the analysis was repeated but with adjustment for age, whether the wart had been treated previously, and type of plantar wart or for patients' preferences at baseline. There was no evidence of a difference between the salicylic acid and cryotherapy groups in self reported clearance of plantar warts at six months (29/95 (31%) v 33/98 (34%), difference -3.15% (-16.31 to 10.02), P=0.64) or in time to clearance (hazard ratio 0.80 (95% CI 0.51 to 1.25), P=0.33). There was also no evidence of a difference in the number of plantar warts at 12 weeks (incident rate ratio 1.08 (0.81 to 1.43), P=0.62). Salicylic acid and

  8. Subgroup analyses in randomised controlled trials: cohort study on trial protocols and journal publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasenda, Benjamin; Schandelmaier, Stefan; Sun, Xin; von Elm, Erik; You, John; Blümle, Anette; Tomonaga, Yuki; Saccilotto, Ramon; Amstutz, Alain; Bengough, Theresa; Meerpohl, Joerg J; Stegert, Mihaela; Olu, Kelechi K; Tikkinen, Kari A O; Neumann, Ignacio; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; Faulhaber, Markus; Mulla, Sohail M; Mertz, Dominik; Akl, Elie A; Bassler, Dirk; Busse, Jason W; Ferreira-González, Ignacio; Lamontagne, Francois; Nordmann, Alain; Gloy, Viktoria; Raatz, Heike; Moja, Lorenzo; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ebrahim, Shanil; Vandvik, Per O; Johnston, Bradley C; Walter, Martin A; Burnand, Bernard; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Hemkens, Lars G; Bucher, Heiner C; Guyatt, Gordon H; Briel, Matthias

    2014-07-16

    To investigate the planning of subgroup analyses in protocols of randomised controlled trials and the agreement with corresponding full journal publications. Cohort of protocols of randomised controlled trial and subsequent full journal publications. Six research ethics committees in Switzerland, Germany, and Canada. 894 protocols of randomised controlled trial involving patients approved by participating research ethics committees between 2000 and 2003 and 515 subsequent full journal publications. Of 894 protocols of randomised controlled trials, 252 (28.2%) included one or more planned subgroup analyses. Of those, 17 (6.7%) provided a clear hypothesis for at least one subgroup analysis, 10 (4.0%) anticipated the direction of a subgroup effect, and 87 (34.5%) planned a statistical test for interaction. Industry sponsored trials more often planned subgroup analyses compared with investigator sponsored trials (195/551 (35.4%) v 57/343 (16.6%), P<0.001). Of 515 identified journal publications, 246 (47.8%) reported at least one subgroup analysis. In 81 (32.9%) of the 246 publications reporting subgroup analyses, authors stated that subgroup analyses were prespecified, but this was not supported by 28 (34.6%) corresponding protocols. In 86 publications, authors claimed a subgroup effect, but only 36 (41.9%) corresponding protocols reported a planned subgroup analysis. Subgroup analyses are insufficiently described in the protocols of randomised controlled trials submitted to research ethics committees, and investigators rarely specify the anticipated direction of subgroup effects. More than one third of statements in publications of randomised controlled trials about subgroup prespecification had no documentation in the corresponding protocols. Definitive judgments regarding credibility of claimed subgroup effects are not possible without access to protocols and analysis plans of randomised controlled trials. © The DISCO study group 2014.

  9. Non-specific effects of standard measles vaccine at 4.5 and 9 months of age on childhood mortality: randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaby, Peter; Martins, Cecilia; Garly, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    of age (current policy). Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting The Bandim Health Project, Guinea-Bissau, which maintains a health and demographic surveillance system in an urban area. Participants 6648 children aged 4.5 months of age who had received three doses of diphtheria......-tetanus-pertussis vaccine at least four weeks before enrolment. A large proportion of the children (80%) had previously taken part in randomised trials of neonatal vitamin A supplementation. Intervention Children were randomised to receive Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccine at 4.5 and 9 months of age (group A), no vaccine...... tested the hypothesis that the beneficial effect was stronger in the 4.5 to 9 months age group, in girls, and in the dry season, but the study was not powered to test whether effects differed significantly between subgroups. Results In the intention to treat analysis of mortality between 4.5 and 36...

  10. Effect of yoga on cognitive functions in climacteric syndrome: a randomised control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattha, R; Nagarathna, R; Padmalatha, V; Nagendra, H R

    2008-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of an integrated approach of yoga therapy (IAYT) on cognitive abilities in climacteric syndrome. A randomised control study wherein the participants were divided into experimental and control groups. Fourteen centres of Swami Vivekananda Yoga Research Foundation, Bangalore, India. One hundred and eight perimenopausal women between 40 and 55 years with follicle-stimulating hormone level equal to or greater than 15 miu/ml. One hundred and twenty perimenopausal women were randomly allotted into the yoga and the control groups. The yoga group practised a module comprising breathing practices, sun salutation and cyclic meditation, whereas the control group practised a set of simple physical exercises, under supervision (1 hour/day, 5 days/week for 8 weeks). Assessments were made by vasomotor symptom checklist, six-letter cancellation test (SLCT) for attention and concentration and Punit Govil Intelligence Memory Scale (PGIMS) with ten subtests. The Wilcoxon test showed significant (P yoga group, with a trend of significant difference between groups at P = 0.06 on Mann-Whitney test in night sweats. There was no change within or between groups in the control group. The SLCT score and the PGIMS showed significant improvement in eight of ten subtests in the yoga group and six of ten subtests in the control group. The yoga group performed significantly better (P yoga therapy can improve hot flushes and night sweats. It also can improve cognitive functions such as remote memory, mental balance, attention and concentration, delayed and immediate recall, verbal retention and recognition tests.

  11. A randomised controlled trial of a lifestyle behavioural intervention for patients with low back pain, who are overweight or obese: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda; Wiggers, John; O'Brien, Kate M; Wolfenden, Luke; Yoong, Serene; Campbell, Elizabeth; Robson, Emma; McAuley, James; Haskins, Robin; Kamper, Steven J; Williams, Christopher M

    2016-02-11

    Low back pain is a highly prevalent condition with a significant global burden. Management of lifestyle factors such as overweight and obesity may improve low back pain patient outcomes. Currently there are no randomised controlled trials that have been conducted to assess the effectiveness of lifestyle behavioural interventions in managing low back pain. The aim of this trial is to determine if a telephone-based lifestyle behavioural intervention is effective in reducing pain intensity in overweight or obese patients with low back pain, compared to usual care. A randomised controlled trial will be conducted with patients waiting for an outpatient consultation with an orthopaedic surgeon at a public tertiary referral hospital within New South Wales, Australia for chronic low back pain. Patients will be randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to receive a lifestyle behavioural intervention (intervention group) or continue with usual care (control group). After baseline data collection, patients in the intervention group will receive a clinical consultation followed by a 6-month telephone-based lifestyle behavioural intervention (10 individually tailored sessions over a 6-month period) and patients in the control group will continue with usual care. Participants will be followed for 26 weeks and asked to undertake three self-reported questionnaires at baseline (pre-randomisation), week 6 and 26 post randomisation to collect primary and secondary outcome data. The study requires a sample of 80 participants per group to detect a 1.5 point difference in pain intensity (primary outcome) 26 weeks post randomisation. The primary outcome, pain intensity, will be measured using a 0-10 numerical rating scale. The study will provide robust evidence regarding the effectiveness of a lifestyle behavioural intervention in reducing pain intensity in overweight or obese patients with low back pain and inform management of these patients. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry

  12. Radiotherapy for Graves' orbitopathy : randomised placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, MP; van Kempen-Harteveld, ML; Garcia, MBG; Koppeschaar, HPF; Tick, L; Terwee, CB

    2000-01-01

    Background The best treatment (steroids, irradiation, or both) for moderately severe Graves' orbitopathy, a self-limiting disease is not known. We tested the efficacy of external beam irradiation compared with sham-irradiation. Methods In a double-blind randomised clinical trial, 30 patients with

  13. Radiotherapy for Graves' orbitopathy : randomised placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, MP; van Kempen-Harteveld, ML; Garcia, MBG; Koppeschaar, HPF; Tick, L; Terwee, CB

    2000-01-01

    Background The best treatment (steroids, irradiation, or both) for moderately severe Graves' orbitopathy, a self-limiting disease is not known. We tested the efficacy of external beam irradiation compared with sham-irradiation. Methods In a double-blind randomised clinical trial, 30 patients with mo

  14. A prospective, randomised, controlled clinical trial to evaluate the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... reactivity to carbon dioxide and autoregulation.1,2 ... Capnography [end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2)]. ... The patients were randomised into two groups using a random ... 67% N2O in oxygen in group A, and 33% oxygen in air in group B,.

  15. Exercise augmentation compared to usual care for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Randomised Controlled Trial (The REAP study: Randomised Exercise Augmentation for PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Ploeg Hidde P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physical wellbeing of people with mental health conditions can often be overlooked in order to treat the primary mental health condition as a priority. Exercise however, can potentially improve both the primary psychiatric condition as well as physical measures that indicate risk of other conditions such as diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Evidence supports the role of exercise as an important component of treatment for depression and anxiety, yet no randomised controlled trials (RCT's have been conducted to evaluate the use of exercise in the treatment of people with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. This RCT will investigate the effects of structured, progressive exercise on PTSD symptoms, functional ability, body composition, physical activity levels, sleep patterns and medication usage. Methods and design Eighty participants with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV diagnosis of PTSD will be recruited. Participants will have no contraindications to exercise and will be cognitively able to provide consent to participate in the study. The primary outcome measures will be PTSD symptoms, measured through the PTSD Checklist Civilian (PCL-C scale. Secondary outcome measures will assess depression and anxiety, mobility and strength, body composition, physical activity levels, sleep patterns and medication usage. All outcomes will be assessed by a health or exercise professional masked to group allocation at baseline and 12 weeks after randomisation. The intervention will be a 12 week individualised program, primarily involving resistance exercises with the use of exercise bands. A walking component will also be incorporated. Participants will complete one supervised session per week, and will be asked to perform at least two other non-supervised exercise sessions per week. Both intervention and control groups will receive all usual non-exercise interventions including psychotherapy

  16. Applicability and generalisability of published results of randomised controlled trials and non-randomised studies evaluating four orthopaedic procedures: methodological systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pibouleau, Leslie; Boutron, Isabelle; Reeves, Barnaby C; Nizard, Rémy; Ravaud, Philippe

    2009-11-17

    To compare the reporting of essential applicability data from randomised controlled trials and non-randomised studies evaluating four new orthopaedic surgical procedures. Medline and the Cochrane central register of controlled trials. All articles of comparative studies assessing total hip or knee arthroplasty carried out by a minimally invasive approach or computer assisted navigation system. Items judged to be essential for interpreting the applicability of findings about such procedures were identified by a survey of a sample of orthopaedic surgeons (77 of 512 completed the survey). Reports were evaluated for data describing these "essential" items and the number of centres and surgeons involved in the trials. When data on the number of centres and surgeons were not reported, the corresponding author of the selected trials was contacted. Results 84 articles were identified (38 randomised controlled trials, 46 non-randomised studies). The median percentage (interquartile range) of essential items reported for non-randomised studies compared with randomised controlled trials was 38% (25-63%) versus 44% (38-45%) for items about patients, 71% (43-86%) versus 71% (57-86%) for items considered essential for all interventions, and 38% (25-50%) versus 50% (25-50%) for items about the context of care. More than 80% of both study types were single centre studies, with one or two participating surgeons. The reporting of data related to the applicability of results was poor in published articles of both non-randomised studies and randomised controlled trials and did not differ by study design. The applicability of results from the trials and studies was similar in terms of number of centres and surgeons involved and the reproducibility of the intervention.

  17. Sham device v inert pill: randomised controlled trial of two placebo treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptchuk, Ted J; Stason, William B; Davis, Roger B; Legedza, Anna R T; Schnyer, Rosa N; Kerr, Catherine E; Stone, David A; Nam, Bong Hyun; Kirsch, Irving; Goldman, Rose H

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether a sham device (a validated sham acupuncture needle) has a greater placebo effect than an inert pill in patients with persistent arm pain. Design A single blind randomised controlled trial created from the two week placebo run-in periods for two nested trials that compared acupuncture and amitriptyline with their respective placebo controls. Comparison of participants who remained on placebo continued beyond the run-in period to the end of the study. Setting Academic medical centre. Participants 270 adults with arm pain due to repetitive use that had lasted at least three months despite treatment and who scored ≥3 on a 10 point pain scale. Interventions Acupuncture with sham device twice a week for six weeks or placebo pill once a day for eight weeks. Main outcomemeasures Arm pain measured on a 10 point pain scale. Secondary outcomes were symptoms measured by the Levine symptom severity scale, function measured by Pransky's upper extremity function scale, and grip strength. Results Pain decreased during the two week placebo run-in period in both the sham device and placebo pill groups, but changes were not different between the groups (-0.14, 95% confidence interval -0.52 to 0.25, P = 0.49). Changes in severity scores for arm symptoms and grip strength were similar between groups, but arm function improved more in the placebo pill group (2.0, 0.06 to 3.92, P = 0.04). Longitudinal regression analyses that followed participants throughout the treatment period showed significantly greater downward slopes per week on the 10 point arm pain scale in the sham device group than in the placebo pill group (-0.33 (-0.40 to -0.26) v -0.15 (-0.21 to -0.09), P = 0.0001) and on the symptom severity scale (-0.07 (-0.09 to -0.05) v -0.05 (-0.06 to -0.03), P = 0.02). Differences were not significant, however, on the function scale or for grip strength. Reported adverse effects were different in the two groups. Conclusions The sham device had greater

  18. Randomised, Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Echinacea Supplementation in Air Travellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tiralongo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify whether a standardised Echinacea formulation is effective in the prevention of respiratory and other symptoms associated with long-haul flights. Methods. 175 adults participated in a randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled trial travelling back from Australia to America, Europe, or Africa for a period of 1–5 weeks on commercial flights via economy class. Participants took Echinacea (root extract, standardised to 4.4 mg alkylamides or placebo tablets. Participants were surveyed before, immediately after travel, and at 4 weeks after travel regarding upper respiratory symptoms and travel-related quality of life. Results. Respiratory symptoms for both groups increased significantly during travel (P<0.0005. However, the Echinacea group had borderline significantly lower respiratory symptom scores compared to placebo (P=0.05 during travel. Conclusions. Supplementation with standardised Echinacea tablets, if taken before and during travel, may have preventive effects against the development of respiratory symptoms during travel involving long-haul flights.

  19. Vojta therapy and neurodevelopmental treatment in children with infantile postural asymmetry: a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Michael Wilhelm; Landenberger, Margarete; Jung, Tatjana; Lindenthal, Thorsten; Philippi, Heike

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Physical therapy is an acknowledged and frequently applied method for infantile postural asymmetry. However, there is not yet sufficient evidence for its effectiveness. [Subjects and Methods] In a randomised controlled trial, the effect of Vojta therapy versus Neurodevelopmental treatment is assessed in infants with postural asymmetry. 65 infants with postural asymmetry were recruited. 37 infants aged six to eight weeks (mean 7.38) were found to be eligible and randomly assigned to two groups, with 19 receiving Vojta and 18 Neurodevelopmental treatment. Using a standardised and blinded video-based assessment, we documented restriction in head rotation and convexity of the spine in prone and supine position before and after therapy. A reduction of at least four points (range of scale 20 points) in postural asymmetry was regarded as a clinically relevant change. [Results] On average a four-point reduction was achieved in both groups within eight weeks. A mean difference (pre-post) between the groups of −2.96 points in favour of Vojta therapy was observed. [Conclusion] While both Neurodevelopmental treatment and Vojta are effective in the treatment of infantile postural asymmetry and comparably well applied by the parents, therapeutic effectiveness is significant greater within the Vojta group. PMID:28265162

  20. A randomised controlled trial of a smoking cessation intervention delivered by dental hygienists: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins William

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco use continues to be a global public health problem. Helping patients to quit is part of the preventive role of all health professionals. There is now increasing interest in the role that the dental team can play in helping their patients to quit smoking. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of undertaking a randomised controlled smoking cessation intervention, utilising dental hygienists to deliver tobacco cessation advice to a cohort of periodontal patients. Methods One hundred and eighteen patients who attended consultant clinics in an outpatient dental hospital department (Periodontology were recruited into a trial. Data were available for 116 participants, 59 intervention and 57 control, and were analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. The intervention group received smoking cessation advice based on the 5As (ask, advise, assess, assist, arrange follow-up and were offered nicotine replacement therapy (NRT, whereas the control group received 'usual care'. Outcome measures included self-reported smoking cessation, verified by salivary cotinine measurement and CO measurements. Self-reported measures in those trial participants who did not quit included number and length of quit attempts and reduction in smoking. Results At 3 months, 9/59 (15% of the intervention group had quit compared to 5/57 (9% of the controls. At 6 months, 6/59 (10% of the intervention group quit compared to 3/57 (5% of the controls. At one year, there were 4/59 (7% intervention quitters, compared to 2/59 (4% control quitters. In participants who described themselves as smokers, at 3 and 6 months, a statistically higher percentage of intervention participants reported that they had had a quit attempt of at least one week in the preceding 3 months (37% and 47%, for the intervention group respectively, compared with 18% and 16% for the control group. Conclusion This study has shown the potential that trained dental hygienists

  1. Effectiveness of progressive resistance strength training versus traditional balance exercise in improving balance among the elderly - a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua, Abraham M; D'Souza, Vivian; Unnikrishnan, B; Mithra, Prasanna; Kamath, Asha; Acharya, Vishak; Venugopal, Anand

    2014-03-01

    Falls are important health issues among the elderly people. Most falls in elderly result from abnormal balance control mechanisms. Balance and muscle force generation are directly related, and are associated with age related muscular changes. Studies addressing fall prevention have focused on various group and individualised strength training. However, evidence on strengthening of key muscles necessary for maintaining balance and postural control is lacking. To evaluate the effectiveness of individualised progressive resistance strength training (PRT) programme in improving balance for forward limits of stability in elderly with balance impairment, compared to traditional balance exercise (TBE), and combination of both (COMBI). This randomised controlled trial included three groups; 18 subjects in each aged ≥ 65 years, from the elderly care centres of Mangalore city in Southern India (between June 2008 and December 2012). Block randomisation technique was used and allocation concealment was done using sequentially arranged sealed opaque envelopes. The TBE group received 8 component traditional balance exercise; 4 times a week for 6 months. The PRT group received resistance training for the key muscles of lower extremities, using DeLormes and Watkins protocol. The COMBI group received PRT and TBE alternately (2 days of PRT and 2 days of TBE per week). Functional reach test (FRT) was used for measurement of forward limits of stability. The data was analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15. For functional reach, PRT group had steady progression from baseline to 6 months (pelderly aged ≥65 years.

  2. Ciprofloxacin DPI: a randomised, placebo-controlled, phase IIb efficacy and safety study on cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorkin, Henry L; Staab, Doris; Operschall, Elisabeth; Alder, Jeff; Criollo, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of infective bronchitis involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a cornerstone of care in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This phase IIb, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study assessed the efficacy and safety of ciprofloxacin dry powder for inhalation (DPI) in this population. Patients with CF, ≥12 years of age (N=286), were randomised to ciprofloxacin DPI (32.5 mg (n=93) or 48.75 mg (n=93)), or corresponding placebo (32.5 mg, n=65; 48.75 mg, n=35) twice daily for 28 days. The primary objective was the change in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) from baseline (day 0) to end of treatment (day 29) in the intent-to-treat population for ciprofloxacin DPI compared with the corresponding placebo group. The primary effectiveness objective was not met; there were no significant differences in change in FEV1 between ciprofloxacin DPI and the corresponding placebo group for either dose (p=0.154). However, in pooled analyses, FEV1 decline from baseline to treatment end was significantly lower with ciprofloxacin DPI than with placebo (pooled data; p=0.02). Ciprofloxacin DPI showed positive effects on sputum bacterial load and quality of life, but these effects were not maintained at the 4-week follow-up. Ciprofloxacin DPI was well tolerated and there were no significant differences in type/incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events by treatment group (p=0.115). Further investigations are needed to determine the full scope of the beneficial effects of ciprofloxacin DPI for patients with CF. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00645788; EudraCT 2008-008314-40.

  3. A randomised controlled trial of tiotropium in adolescents with severe symptomatic asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Vandewalker, Mark; Moroni-Zentgraf, Petra; Verri, Daniela; Unseld, Anna; Engel, Michael; Boner, Attilio L.

    2017-01-01

    We present results from the first phase III trial of once-daily tiotropium add-on to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) plus one or more controller therapies in adolescents with severe symptomatic asthma. In this double-blind, parallel-group trial (NCT01277523), 392 patients aged 12–17 years were randomised to receive once-daily tiotropium 5 µg or 2.5 µg, or placebo, as an add-on to ICS plus other controller therapies over 12 weeks. The primary and key secondary end-points were change from baseline (response) in peak forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) within 3 h post-dosing (FEV1(0–3h)) and trough FEV1, respectively, after 12 weeks of treatment. Tiotropium 5 µg provided numerical improvements in peak FEV1(0–3h) response, compared with placebo (90 mL; p=0.104), and significant improvements were observed with tiotropium 2.5 µg (111 mL; p=0.046). Numerical improvements in trough FEV1 response and asthma control were observed with both tiotropium doses, compared with placebo. The safety and tolerability of tiotropium were comparable with those of placebo. Once-daily tiotropium Respimat add-on to ICS plus one or more controller therapies in adolescents with severe symptomatic asthma was well tolerated. The primary end-point of efficacy was not met, although positive trends for improvements in lung function and asthma control were observed. PMID:27811070

  4. Telemonitoring in fasting individuals with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus during Ramadan: A prospective, randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Yang; Wong, Chee Piau; Tan, Christina San San; Nasir, Nazrila Hairizan; Lee, Shaun Wen Huey

    2017-08-31

    We determined the impact of a remote blood glucose telemonitoring program with feedback in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients fasting during Ramadan compared to conventional self-monitoring method. A twelve-week cluster randomised study, with 85 participants who wish to fast for at least 15 days during Ramadan was conducted. Self-measurement and transmission of blood glucose results were performed six times daily during Ramadan. Results were transmitted to a secure website for review with feedback from case manager if necessary. The control group received usual care. The main outcome was the number of participants experiencing hypoglycaemia during Ramadan and at the end of the study. During Ramadan, the number of participants reporting hypoglycaemia was significantly lower in the telemonitoring group [Odds ratio (OR): 0.186, 95% confidence interval: 0.04-0.936; p = 0.04]. Similarly, the proportion of participants reporting symptomatic hypoglycaemia at the end of the study was significantly lower in the telemonitoring group (OR: 0.257, 95% CI: 0.07-0.89; p = 0.03). A reduction of 1.07% in glycated haemoglobin levels was observed in the telemonitoring group compared to 0.24% in the control group (p telemonitoring was a useful adjunct to reduce the risk of hypoglycaemia during Ramadan with no deterioration in glycaemic control.

  5. Effectiveness of a smartphone application to promote physical activity in primary care: the SMART MOVE randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Liam G; Hayes, Patrick S; Casey, Monica; Glynn, Fergus; Alvarez-Iglesias, Alberto; Newell, John; OLaighin, Gearóid; Heaney, David; O'Donnell, Martin; Murphy, Andrew W

    2014-07-01

    Physical inactivity is a major, potentially modifiable, risk factor for cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other chronic diseases. Effective, simple, and generalisable interventions that will increase physical activity in populations are needed. To evaluate the effectiveness of a smartphone application (app) to increase physical activity in primary care. An 8-week, open-label, randomised controlled trial in rural, primary care in the west of Ireland. Android smartphone users >16 years of age were recruited. All participants were provided with similar physical activity goals and information on the benefits of exercise. The intervention group was provided with a smartphone app and detailed instructions on how to use it to achieve these goals. The primary outcome was change in physical activity, as measured by a daily step count between baseline and follow-up. A total of 139 patients were referred by their primary care health professional or self-referred. In total, 37 (27%) were screened out and 12 (9%) declined to participate, leaving 90 (65%) patients who were randomised. Of these, 78 provided baseline data (intervention = 37; control = 41) and 77 provided outcome data (intervention = 37; control = 40). The mean daily step count at baseline for intervention and control groups was 4365 and 5138 steps per day respectively. After adjusting, there was evidence of a significant treatment effect (P = 0.009); the difference in mean improvement in daily step count from week 1 to week 8 inclusive was 1029 (95% confidence interval 214 to 1843) steps per day, favouring the intervention. Improvements in physical activity in the intervention group were sustained until the end of the trial. A simple smartphone app significantly increased physical activity over 8 weeks in a primary care population. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  6. Functional changes in adipose tissue in a randomised controlled trial of physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjögren Per

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A sedentary lifestyle predisposes to cardiometabolic diseases. Lifestyle changes such as increased physical activity improve a range of cardiometabolic risk factors. The objective of this study was to examine whether functional changes in adipose tissue were related to these improvements. Methods Seventy-three sedentary, overweight (mean BMI 29.9 ± 3.2 kg/m2 and abdominally obese, but otherwise healthy men and women (67.6 ± 0.5 years from a randomised controlled trial of physical activity on prescription over a 6-month period were included (control n = 43, intervention n = 30. Detailed examinations were carried out at baseline and at follow-up, including fasting blood samples, a comprehensive questionnaire and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies for fatty acid composition analysis (n = 73 and quantification of mRNA expression levels of 13 candidate genes (n = 51, including adiponectin, leptin and inflammatory cytokines. Results At follow-up, the intervention group had a greater increase in exercise time (+137 min/week and a greater decrease in body fat mass (−1.5 kg compared to the control subjects (changes of 0 min/week and −0.5 kg respectively. Circulating concentrations of adiponectin were unchanged, but those of leptin decreased significantly more in the intervention group (−1.8 vs −1.1 ng/mL for intervention vs control, P P P  Conclusions After a 6-month period of increased physical activity in overweight elderly individuals, circulating leptin concentrations decreased despite increased levels of leptin mRNA in adipose tissue. Otherwise, only minor changes occurred in adipose tissue, although several improvements in metabolic parameters accompanied the modest increase in physical activity.

  7. Singing teaching as a therapy for chronic respiratory disease - a randomised controlled trial and qualitative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Julia L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite optimal pharmacological therapy and pulmonary rehabilitation, patients with COPD continue to be breathless. There is a need to develop additional strategies to alleviate symptoms. Learning to sing requires control of breathing and posture and might have benefits that translate into daily life. Methods To test this hypothesis we performed a randomised controlled trial, comparing a six week course of twice weekly singing classes to usual care, in 28 COPD patients. The experience of singing was assessed in a qualitative fashion, through interviews with a psychologist. In addition, we surveyed patients with chronic respiratory conditions who participated in a series of open singing workshops. Results In the RCT, the physical component score of the SF36 improved in the singers (n = 15 compared to the controls (n = 13; +7.5(14.6 vs. -3.8(8.4 p = 0.02. Singers also had a significant fall in HAD anxiety score; -1.1(2.7 vs. +0.8(1.7 p = 0.03. Singing did not improve single breath counting, breath hold time or shuttle walk distance. In the qualitative element, 8 patients from the singing group were interviewed. Positive effects on physical sensation, general well-being, community/social support and achievement/efficacy emerged as common themes. 150 participants in open workshops completed a questionnaire. 96% rated the workshops as "very enjoyable" and 98% thought the workshop had taught them something about breathing in a different way. 81% of attendees felt a "marked physical difference" after the workshop. Conclusion Singing classes can improve quality of life measures and anxiety and are viewed as a very positive experience by patients with respiratory disease; no adverse consequences of participation were observed. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials - ISRCTN17544114.

  8. Effects of circuit training as alternative to usual physiotherapy after stroke: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Port, Ingrid G L; Wevers, Lotte E G; Lindeman, Eline; Kwakkel, Gert

    2012-05-10

    To analyse the effect of task oriented circuit training compared with usual physiotherapy in terms of self reported walking competency for patients with stroke discharged from a rehabilitation centre to their own home. Randomised controlled trial with follow-up to 24 weeks. Multicentre trial in nine outpatient rehabilitation centres in the Netherlands Patients with stroke who were able to walk a minimum of 10 m without physical assistance and were discharged from inpatient rehabilitation to an outpatient rehabilitation clinic. Patients were randomly allocated to circuit training or usual physiotherapy, after stratification by rehabilitation centre, with an online randomisation procedure. Patients in the intervention group received circuit training in 90 minute sessions twice a week for 12 weeks. The training included eight different workstations in a gym and was intended to improve performance in tasks relating to walking competency. The control group received usual outpatient physiotherapy. The primary outcome was the mobility domain of the stroke impact scale (SIS, version 3.0). Secondary outcomes were standing balance, self reported abilities, gait speed, walking distance, stair climbing, instrumental activities of daily living, fatigue, anxiety, and depression. Differences between groups were analysed according to the intention to treat principle. All outcomes were assessed by blinded observers in a repeated measurement design lasting 24 weeks. 126 patients were included in the circuit training group and 124 in the usual care group (control), with data from 125 and 117, respectively, available for analysis. One patient from the circuit training group and seven from the control group dropped out. Circuit training was a safe intervention, and no serious adverse events were reported. There were no significant differences between groups for the stroke impact scale mobility domain (β=0.05 (SE 0.68), P=0.943) at 12 weeks. Circuit training was associated with

  9. Comparative effectiveness of Pilates and yoga group exercise interventions for chronic mechanical neck pain: quasi-randomised parallel controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunleavy, K; Kava, K; Goldberg, A; Malek, M H; Talley, S A; Tutag-Lehr, V; Hildreth, J

    2016-09-01

    To determine the effectiveness of Pilates and yoga group exercise interventions for individuals with chronic neck pain (CNP). Quasi-randomised parallel controlled study. Community, university and private practice settings in four locations. Fifty-six individuals with CNP scoring ≥3/10 on the numeric pain rating scale for >3 months (controls n=17, Pilates n=20, yoga n=19). Exercise participants completed 12 small-group sessions with modifications and progressions supervised by a physiotherapist. The primary outcome measure was the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Secondary outcomes were pain ratings, range of movement and postural measurements collected at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks. Follow-up was performed 6 weeks after completion of the exercise classes (Week 18). NDI decreased significantly in the Pilates {baseline: 11.1 [standard deviation (SD) 4.3] vs Week 12: 6.8 (SD 4.3); mean difference -4.3 (95% confidence interval -1.64 to -6.7); PPilates and yoga group exercise interventions with appropriate modifications and supervision were safe and equally effective for decreasing disability and pain compared with the control group for individuals with mild-to-moderate CNP. Physiotherapists may consider including these approaches in a plan of care. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01999283. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Analgesic efficacy of TENS therapy in patients with gonarthrosis. A prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschiel, B; Kager, H; Pipam, W; Weichart, K; Likar, R

    2010-09-01

    The goal of the study was to substantiate the influence of TENS on pain development and medication needs of patients with proven gonarthrosis and chronic pain. The study included a 3-week stimulation period and 2-week observation period after the end of stimulation. Patients (at least 20 per group) were assigned to either an active treatment group or placebo group in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. For the active treatment group the TENS therapy device with HAN stimulation (alternating phase of stimulation) was used (TENStem eco).Total length of time: 30 min at least two times a day. The length of therapy was 3 weeks (therapy), followed by an observation period of 2 weeks (follow-up). The total length of the study was 5 weeks, whereby at the beginning and at the end of weeks 1, 3 and 5 the SF-36, WOMAC score and Lysholm score were documented; the pain score was documented daily. There are no significant demographic differences between the groups. In the active treatment group there was clear relief in pain intensity in the morning, midday and evening over the 3-week period of therapy. The Lysholm score in the active treatment group was 53.4 at the beginning, 90 after 1 week, 94.5 after the third week and 91 by the fifth week (significant difference). There were no side effects. TENS therapy with HAN stimulation resulted in pain relief in patients with gonarthrosis during the therapy period with TENS, but the pain relief did not last beyond the end of the TENS therapy. There was an improvement in the Lysholm score and the WOMAC score during the therapy. This improvement remained over the following 2-week period of observation without further TENS therapy. TENS therapy is a simple and effective method to treat gonarthrosis with very few side effects.

  11. Prolonged conservative care versus early surgery in patients with sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation: two year results of a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Peul, Wilco; Hout, Wilbert; Brand, René; Thomeer, Raph; Koes, Bart

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects of early lumbar disc surgery compared with prolonged conservative care for patients with sciatica over two years of follow-up. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Nine Dutch hospitals. Participants: 283 patients with 6-12 weeks of sciatica. Interventions: Early surgery or an intended six months of continued conservative treatment, with delayed surgery if needed. Main outcome measures: Scores from Roland disability questionnaire for sciatica, visua...

  12. Effects of music therapy on drug therapy of adult psychiatric outpatients: A pilot randomised controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Degli Stefani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Framed in the patients’ engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27 with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia, F25 (schizoaffective disorders, F31 (bipolar affective disorder, F32 (depressive episode and F60 (specific personality disorders were randomised to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of two hours or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilisers and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage relative to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilisers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusions: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care is effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discuss the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centred perspective were also discussed.

  13. Efficacy of acupunture in patients with chronic neck pain--a randomised, sham controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Nilay; Ozcan, Emel; Sezen, Kasim; Karatas, Omer; Issever, Halim

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of electroacupuncture and sham acupuncture in the treatment of patients with chronic neck pain. 31 patients with chronic neck pain were included in a randomised, controlled trial. Electric stimulation was given for 30 minutes at low frequency (1-4Hz), pulse width of 200 micros, interrupted wave form. Of the 29 patients who completed the therapy, 13 were assigned to conventional acupuncture and 16 to sham acupuncture groups, receiving 3 sessions a week for a total of 10 sessions, each lasting for 30 minutes. Patients were evaluated before and after therapy and 3 months later by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the bodily pain subscale of the Short Form Health Survey-36 scale. The treating physician was different from the evaluating physician who, like the patient, was blinded. VAS scores in both groups significantly reduced after therapy and at 3 months post-therapy, but the difference between groups was not significant. In respect of bodily pain, there was a significant improvement in the acupuncture group after therapy (P<0.01). Stimulation of conventional acupuncture points was not generally superior to needling ofnonspecific points on the neck, and both treatments were associated with improvement of symptoms. Needles inserted into the neck are likely to be an inappropriate sham control for acupuncture.

  14. Recovery of chronically lame dairy cows following treatment for claw horn lesions: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, H J; Remnant, J G; Bollard, N J; Burrows, A; Whay, H R; Bell, N J; Mason, C; Huxley, J N

    2016-01-30

    A positively controlled, randomised controlled trial (RCT) was undertaken to test recovery of cows with claw horn lesions resulting in lameness of greater than two weeks duration. Cows on seven commercial farms were mobility scored fortnightly and selected by lameness severity and chronicity. Study cows all received a therapeutic trim then random allocation of: no further treatment (trim only (TRM)), plastic shoe (TS) or plastic shoe and NSAID (TSN). Recovery was assessed by mobility score at 42 (±4) days post treatment by an observer blind to treatment group. Multivariable analysis showed no significant effect of treatment with an almost identical, low response rate to treatment across all groups (Percentage non-lame at outcome: TRM--15 per cent, TS--15 per cent, TSN--16 per cent). When compared with results of a similar RCT on acutely lame cows, where response rates to treatment were substantially higher, it can be concluded that any delay in treatment is likely to reduce the rate of recovery, suggesting early identification and treatment is key. Thirty-eight per cent of animals treated in this study were lame on the contralateral limb at outcome suggesting that both hindlimbs should be examined and a preventive or if necessary a therapeutic foot trim performed when lameness is identified particularly if the duration of lameness is unknown.

  15. Comparison of propranolol and pregabalin for prophylaxis of childhood migraine: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshandeh Bali, MohammadKazem; Rahbarimanesh, Ali Akbar; Sadeghi, Manelie; Sedighi, Mostafa; Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Ghofrani, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Migraine involves 5-10% of children and adolescents. Thirty percent of children with severe migraine attacks have school absence and reduced quality of life that need preventive therapy. The purpose of this randomised control trial study is to compare the effectiveness, safety and the tolerability of pregabalin toward Propranolol in migraine prophylaxis of children. From May 2011 to October 2012, 99 children 3-15 years referred to the neurology clinic of Mofid Children's Hospital with a diagnosis of migraine enrolled the study. Patients randomly divided into two groups (A&B). We treated children of group A with capsule of pregabalin as children of group B with tablet of propranolol for at least 8 weeks. In this study, 99 patients were examined that 91 children reached the last stage. The group A consistsed of 46 patients, 12(26.1%) girls, 34 (73.9%) boys and the group B consisted of 45 patients, 14(31.1%) girls, 31 (68.9%) boys. Basis of age, gender, headache onset, headache frequency, migraine type, triggering and relieving factors there was no significant difference among these groups (P>0.05). After 4 and 8 weeks of Pregabalin usage monthly headache frequency decreased to 2.2±4.5 and 1.76±6.2 respectively. Propranolol reduced monthly headache frequency up to 3.73±6.11 and 3.34±5.95 later 4 and 8 weeks respectively. There was a significant difference between these two groups according to headache frequency reduction (P=0.04). Pregabalin efficacy in reducing the frequency and duration of pediatric migraine headache is considerable in comparison with propranolol.

  16. Comparison of propranolol and pregabalin for prophylaxis of childhood migraine: a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MohammadKazem Bakhshandeh Bali

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Migraine involves 5-10% of children and adolescents. Thirty percent of children with severe migraine attacks have school absence and reduced quality of life that need preventive therapy. The purpose of this randomised control trial study is to compare the effectiveness, safety and the tolerability of pregabalin toward Propranolol in migraine prophylaxis of children. From May 2011 to October 2012, 99 children 3-15 years referred to the neurology clinic of Mofid Children's Hospital with a diagnosis of migraine enrolled the study. Patients randomly divided into two groups (A&B. We treated children of group A with capsule of pregabalin as children of group B with tablet of propranolol for at least 8 weeks. In this study, 99 patients were examined that 91 children reached the last stage. The group A consistsed of 46 patients, 12(26.1% girls, 34 (73.9% boys and the group B consisted of 45 patients, 14(31.1% girls, 31 (68.9% boys. Basis of age, gender, headache onset, headache frequency, migraine type, triggering and relieving factors there was no significant difference among these groups (P>0.05. After 4 and 8 weeks of Pregabalin usage monthly headache frequency decreased to 2.2±4.5 and 1.76±6.2 respectively. Propranolol reduced monthly headache frequency up to 3.73±6.11 and 3.34±5.95 later 4 and 8 weeks respectively. There was a significant difference between these two groups according to headache frequency reduction (P=0.04. Pregabalin efficacy in reducing the frequency and duration of pediatric migraine headache is considerable in comparison with propranolol.

  17. Do early quadriceps exercises affect the outcome of ACL reconstruction? A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Triston; Williams, Marie T; Chipchase, Lucy S

    2005-01-01

    A prospective, blinded, randomised controlled trial investigated the effectiveness of quadriceps exercises following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A treatment group (Quadriceps exercise group) performed straight leg raises and isometric quadriceps contractions throughout the first two postoperative weeks, and a second group (No quadriceps exercise group) did not. A battery of outcome measures assessed subjects postoperatively at day one, two weeks, and one, three and six months. A total of 103 patients (Quadriceps exercise n = 48, No quadriceps exercise n = 55) commenced the study with 91 subjects available at final follow up (Quadriceps exercise n = 47, No quadriceps exercise n = 44). Performance of quadriceps exercises significantly improved a number of knee flexion and extension range of motion measurements (p = 0.01 to 0.04). No significant differences were found between the two groups at any postoperative period for quadriceps lag (p = 0.36), functional hop testing (p = 0.49 to 0.51), isokinetic quadriceps strength (p = 0.70 to 0.72), the majority of numerical analogue scores (p = 0.1 to 0.94) and Cincinnati scores (p = 0.10 to 0.84). Subjects performing quadriceps exercises reported significantly higher pain scores with exercise on the first postoperative day (p = 0.02). At six months postoperatively, the Quadriceps exercise subjects reported significantly more favourable Cincinnati scores for symptoms (p = 0.005) and problems with sport (p = 0.05). While average knee laxity was not significantly different between treatment groups over time (p = 0.27 to 0.94), quadriceps exercise performance was associated with a significantly lower incidence of abnormal knee laxity. Isometric quadriceps exercises and straight leg raises can be safely prescribed during the first two postoperative weeks and confer advantages for faster recovery of knee range of motion and stability. It remains to be proven whether the magnitude of differences between groups is

  18. Screening and brief interventions for hazardous and harmful alcohol use in probation services: a cluster randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myles Judy

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large number of randomised controlled trials in health settings have consistently reported positive effects of brief intervention in terms of reductions in alcohol use. However, although alcohol misuse is common amongst offenders, there is limited evidence of alcohol brief interventions in the criminal justice field. This factorial pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial with Offender Managers (OMs as the unit of randomisation will evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different models of screening to identify hazardous and harmful drinkers in probation and different intensities of brief intervention to reduce excessive drinking in probation clients. Methods and design Ninety-six OMs from 9 probation areas across 3 English regions (the North East Region (n = 4 and London and the South East Regions (n = 5 will be recruited. OMs will be randomly allocated to one of three intervention conditions: a client information leaflet control condition (n = 32 OMs; 5-minute simple structured advice (n = 32 OMs and 20-minute brief lifestyle counselling delivered by an Alcohol Health Worker (n = 32 OMs. Randomisation will be stratified by probation area. To test the relative effectiveness of different screening methods all OMs will be randomised to either the Modified Single Item Screening Questionnaire (M-SASQ or the Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST. There will be a minimum of 480 clients recruited into the trial. There will be an intention to treat analysis of study outcomes at 6 and 12 months post intervention. Analysis will include client measures (screening result, weekly alcohol consumption, alcohol-related problems, re-offending, public service use and quality of life and implementation measures from OMs (the extent of screening and brief intervention beyond the minimum recruitment threshold will provide data on acceptability and feasibility of different models of brief intervention. We will also examine the

  19. Dark chocolate or tomato extract for prehypertension: a randomised controlled trial

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    Frank Oliver R

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flavanol-rich chocolate and lycopene-rich tomato extract have attracted interest as potential alternative treatment options for hypertension, a known risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Treatment of prehypertension (SBP 120–139/DBP 80–89 mmHg may forestall progression to hypertension. However, there has been only limited research into non-pharmacological treatment options for prehypertension. We investigated the effect of dark chocolate or tomato extract on blood pressure, and their acceptability as an ongoing treatment option in a prehypertensive population. Methods Our trial consisted of two phases: a randomised controlled three-group-parallel trial over 12 weeks (phase 1 followed by a crossover of the two active treatment arms over an additional 12-week period (phase 2. Group 1 received a 50 g daily dose of dark chocolate with 70% cocoa containing 750 mg polyphenols, group 2 were allocated one tomato extract capsule containing 15 mg lycopene per day, and group 3 received one placebo capsule daily over 8 weeks followed by a 4-week washout period. In phase 2 the active treatment groups were crossed over to receive the alternative treatment. Median blood pressure, weight, and abdominal circumference were measured 4-weekly, and other characteristics including physical activity, general health, energy, mood, and acceptability of treatment were assessed by questionnaire at 0, 8 and 20 weeks. We analysed changes over time using a linear mixed model, and one time point differences using Kruskal-Wallis, Fisher's-Exact, or t-tests. Results Thirty-six prehypertensive healthy adult volunteers completed the 6-month trial. Blood pressure changes over time within groups and between groups were not significant and independent of treatment. Weight and other characteristics did not change significantly during the trial. However, a marked difference in acceptability between the two treatment forms (chocolate or

  20. Effect of exercise training on C reactive protein: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised and non-randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedewa, Michael V; Hathaway, Elizabeth D; Ward-Ritacco, Christie L

    2017-04-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of chronic systemic inflammation frequently used in cardiovascular disease risk assessment. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to provide a quantitative estimate of the magnitude of change in CRP following participation in physical exercise interventions. All studies included in the meta-analysis were peer reviewed and published in English. Human participants were assigned to a non-exercise comparison group or exercise training group, with the intervention lasting ≥2 weeks. CRP levels were measured at baseline, during and/or after completion of the exercise training programme. Random-effects models were used to aggregate a mean effect size (ES), 95% CIs and potential moderators. 83 randomised and non-randomised controlled trials met the inclusion criteria and resulted in 143 effects (n=3769). The mean ES of 0.26 (95% CI 0.18 to 0.34, pexercise training. A decrease in body mass index (BMI; β=1.20, SE=0.25, pExercise training led to a greater reduction in CRP when accompanied by a decrease in BMI (ES=0.38, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.50); however, a significant improvement in CRP occurred in the absence of weight loss (ES=0.19, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.28; both pexercise training is associated with a decrease in CRP levels regardless of the age or sex of the individual; however, greater improvements in CRP level occur with a decrease in BMI or %Fat. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Cancer-related fatigue management: evaluation of a patient education program with a large-scale randomised controlled trial, the PEPs fatigue study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourmaud, A; Anota, A; Moncharmont, C; Tinquaut, F; Oriol, M; Trillet-Lenoir, V; Bajard, A; Parnalland, S; Rotonda, C; Bonnetain, F; Pérol, D; Chauvin, F

    2017-03-28

    To assess the efficacy of a patient educational program built according to guidelines that aims at reducing cancer-related fatigue (CRF). Randomised controlled trial, multicentre, comparing a patient education program, vs the standard of care. Patients were adult cancer outpatients with any tumour site. The primary outcome was fatigue severity assessed with a visual analogical scale (VAS), between the day of randomisation and week 7. Secondary outcomes were fatigue assessed with other scales, health-related quality of life, anxiety and depression. The time to fatigue severity deterioration was assessed. Analyses were performed in a modified intent-to-treat way, that is, including all patients with at least one baseline and 1 week 7 score. A total of 212 patients were included. Fatigue severity assessment was made on 79 patients in the experimental group and 65 in the control group. Between randomisation and week 7, the fatigue (VAS) improved by 0.96 (2.85) points in the experimental group vs 1.63 (2.63) points in the control group (P=0.15). No differences with the secondary outcomes were highlighted between two groups. No other factors were found to be associated with fatigue severity deterioration. Despite rigorous methodology, this study failed to highlight the program efficacy in fatigue reduction for cancer patients. Other assessment tools should be developed to measure the effect of the program on CRF and behaviour. The implementation of the program should also be explored in order to identify its mechanisms and longer-term impact.

  2. Effectiveness of topiramate for tobacco dependence in patients with depression; a randomised, controlled trial

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    Alda Marta

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco dependence management is a multi-component intervention that includes pharmacological treatments such as Nicotine Substitution Therapy (NST or bupropion, and psychological therapy. There are some preliminary reports on topiramate efficacy for tobacco dependence. The aim of this study is to determine whether topiramate is as effective as the standard NST treatment for tobacco cessation at 1-year follow-up in patients with depression. Method/design Design: A randomised, controlled trial involving two groups, one of which is the control group consisting of patients on the standard pharmacological treatment for tobacco cessation (NST and the other is the intervention group consisting of patients on topiramate as pharmacological treatment. Setting: 29 primary care health centres in the city of Zaragoza, Spain. Sample: 180 patients, aged 18–65 years, diagnosed with major depression, smoke more than 20 cigarettes/day, who have voluntarily asked for tobacco cessation therapy. Intervention: A multi-component programme for tobacco cessation is offered to all of the patients in the study. This programme is made up of pharmacological therapy + group cognitive-behavioural therapy. Pharmacological therapy consists of NST for the control group and topiramate (200 mg/day for the intervention group. Psychological therapy is made up of 16 sessions of manualised group therapy. Measurements: Cessation will be assessed by patient self-declared abstinence, expired air carbon monoxide levels, and cotinine levels in saliva. Questionnaires on tobacco dependence, anxiety, depression, impulsiveness and self-efficacy will be administered. The interviewers will not know which group the patient belongs to (blind. The assessments will be carried out at baseline, D (cessation day -1, D+1, weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 13, and months 4, 5, 6, 8, 10 and 12. Main variables: Tobacco cessation rates and tobacco dependence. Analysis: The analysis will

  3. Effects of a short outpatient rehabilitation treatment on disability of multiple sclerosis patients--a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Francesco; Ciancio, Maria Rita; Cacopardo, Manuela; Reggio, Ester; Fiorilla, Teresa; Palermo, Filippo; Reggio, Arturo; Thompson, Alan J

    2003-07-01

    It is well known that neurorehabilitation can reduce disability or improve handicap of people with multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a short period (6 weeks) of a tailored, individualised outpatient rehabilitation program in people with progressive MS. A randomised-controlled trial was undertaken in patients with primary and secondary progressive MS referred to the Centro Sclerosi Multipla of Catania. One hundred and eleven patients were assessed at baseline and at 12 weeks with validated measures of disability (Functional Independence Measure (FIM)) and impairment (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Functional Systems Scale). Of the 111, 58 were randomly assigned to the treatment group and 53 to the control group. All patients had been previously trained in a home exercise program. Both groups were well matched for age, sex, disease duration and severity, disability and quality of life (Short Form-36). At the end of 6 weeks patients allocated to the rehabilitation treatment group showed significant improvement in their level of disability compared with the control group,while the level of impairment did not change. Thirty-two patients of the treatment group and four of the control group improved on the FIM by two or more steps at 12 weeks (pMS patients, without changing their impairment and confirms the effectiveness of rehabilitation in people with MS.

  4. Study protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial in general practice investigating the effectiveness of acupuncture against migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbrera-Iboleón Justo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine is a chronic neurologic disease that can severely affect the patient's quality of life. Although in recent years many randomised studies have been carried out to investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for migraine, it remains a controversial issue. Our aim is to determine whether acupuncture, applied under real conditions of clinical practice in the area of primary healthcare, is more effective than conventional treatment. Methods/Design The design consists of a pragmatic multi-centre, three-armed randomised controlled trial, complemented with an economic evaluation of the results achieved, comparing the effectiveness of verum acupuncture with sham acupuncture, and with a control group receiving normal care only. Patients eligible for inclusion will be those presenting in general practice with migraine and for whom their General Practitioner (GP is considering referral for acupuncture. Sampling will be by consecutive selection, and by randomised allocation to the three branches of the study, in a centralised way following a 1:1:1 distribution (verum acupuncture; sham acupuncture; conventional treatment. Secondly, one patient in three will be randomly selected from each of the acupuncture (verum or sham groups for a brain perfusion study (by single photon emission tomography. The treatment with verum acupuncture will consist of 8 treatment sessions, once a week, at points selected individually by the acupuncturist. The sham acupuncture group will receive 8 sessions, one per week, with treatment being applied at non-acupuncture points in the dorsal and lumbar regions, using the minimal puncture technique. The control group will be given conventional treatment, as will the other two groups. Discussion This trial will contribute to available evidence on acupuncture for the treatment of migraine. The primary endpoint is the difference in the number of days with migraine among the three groups, between

  5. Group therapy for adolescents with repeated self harm: randomised controlled trial with economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J M; Wood, A J; Kerfoot, M J; Trainor, G; Roberts, C; Rothwell, J; Woodham, A; Ayodeji, E; Barrett, B; Byford, S; Harrington, R

    2011-04-01

    To examine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of group therapy for self harm in young people. Two arm, single (assessor) blinded parallel randomised allocation trial of a group therapy intervention in addition to routine care, compared with routine care alone. Randomisation was by minimisation controlling for baseline frequency of self harm, presence of conduct disorder, depressive disorder, and severity of psychosocial stress. Adolescents aged 12-17 years with at least two past episodes of self harm within the previous 12 months. Exclusion criteria were: not speaking English, low weight anorexia nervosa, acute psychosis, substantial learning difficulties (defined by need for specialist school), current containment in secure care. Setting Eight child and adolescent mental health services in the northwest UK. Manual based developmental group therapy programme specifically designed for adolescents who harm themselves, with an acute phase over six weekly sessions followed by a booster phase of weekly groups as long as needed. Details of routine care were gathered from participating centres. Primary outcome was frequency of subsequent repeated episodes of self harm. Secondary outcomes were severity of subsequent self harm, mood disorder, suicidal ideation, and global functioning. Total costs of health, social care, education, and criminal justice sector services, plus family related costs and productivity losses, were recorded. 183 adolescents were allocated to each arm (total n = 366). Loss to follow-up was low (self harm, proportional odds ratio of group therapy versus routine care adjusting for relevant baseline variables was 0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.68 to 1.44, P = 0.95) at 6 months and 0.88 (0.59 to 1.33, P = 0.52) at 1 year. For severity of subsequent self harm the equivalent odds ratios were 0.81 (0.54 to 1.20, P = 0.29) at 6 months and 0.94 (0.63 to 1.40, P = 0.75) at 1 year. Total 1 year costs were higher in the group therapy arm (£21,781) than

  6. Self-hypnosis for intrapartum pain management in pregnant nulliparous women: a randomised controlled trial of clinical effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downe, S; Finlayson, K; Melvin, C; Spiby, H; Ali, S; Diggle, P; Gyte, G; Hinder, S; Miller, V; Slade, P; Trepel, D; Weeks, A; Whorwell, P; Williamson, M

    2015-08-01

    (Primary) To establish the effect of antenatal group self-hypnosis for nulliparous women on intra-partum epidural use. Multi-method randomised control trial (RCT). Three NHS Trusts. Nulliparous women not planning elective caesarean, without medication for hypertension and without psychological illness. Randomisation at 28-32 weeks' gestation to usual care, or to usual care plus brief self-hypnosis training (two × 90-minute groups at around 32 and 35 weeks' gestation; daily audio self-hypnosis CD). Follow up at 2 and 6 weeks postnatal. Primary: epidural analgesia. Secondary: associated clinical and psychological outcomes; cost analysis. Six hundred and eighty women were randomised. There was no statistically significant difference in epidural use: 27.9% (intervention), 30.3% (control), odds ratio (OR) 0.89 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.64-1.24], or in 27 of 29 pre-specified secondary clinical and psychological outcomes. Women in the intervention group had lower actual than anticipated levels of fear and anxiety between baseline and 2 weeks post natal (anxiety: mean difference -0.72, 95% CI -1.16 to -0.28, P = 0.001); fear (mean difference -0.62, 95% CI -1.08 to -0.16, P = 0.009) [Correction added on 7 July 2015, after first online publication: 'Mean difference' replaced 'Odds ratio (OR)' in the preceding sentence.]. Postnatal response rates were 67% overall at 2 weeks. The additional cost in the intervention arm per woman was £4.83 (CI -£257.93 to £267.59). Allocation to two-third-trimester group self-hypnosis training sessions did not significantly reduce intra-partum epidural analgesia use or a range of other clinical and psychological variables. The impact of women's anxiety and fear about childbirth needs further investigation. © 2015 The Authors. BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  7. PROspective MEmory Training to improve HEart failUre Self-care (PROMETHEUS): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jan; Rendell, Peter G; Ski, Chantal F; Kure, Christina E; McLennan, Skye N; Rose, Nathan S; Prior, David L; Thompson, David R

    2015-04-29

    Cognitive impairment is seen in up to three quarters of heart failure (HF) patients and has a significant negative impact on patients' health outcomes. Prospective memory, which is defined as memory to carry out future intentions, is important for functional independence in older adults and involves application of multiple cognitive processes that are often impaired in HF patients. The objective of this study is to examine the effects of prospective memory training on patients' engagement in HF self-care and health outcomes, carer strain and quality of life. The proposed study is a randomised, controlled trial in which 200 patients diagnosed with HF, and their carers will be recruited from 3 major hospitals across Melbourne. Eligible patients with HF will be randomised to receive either: 1) The Virtual Week Training Program - a computerised prospective memory (PM) training program (intervention) or 2) non-adaptive computer-based word puzzles (active control). HF patients' baseline cognitive function will be compared to a healthy control group (n = 60) living independently in the community. Patients will undergo a comprehensive assessment of PM, neuropsychological functioning, self-care, physical, and emotional functioning. Assessments will take place at baseline, 4 weeks and 12 months following intervention. Carers will complete measures assessing quality of life, strain, perceived control in the management of the patients' HF symptoms, and ratings of the patients' level of engagement in HF self-care behaviours. If the Virtual Week Training Program is effective in improving: 1) prospective memory; 2) self-care behaviours, and 3) wellbeing in HF patients, this study will enhance our understanding of impaired cognitive processes in HF and potentially is a mechanism to reduce healthcare costs. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry #366376; 27 May 2014. https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=366376&isClinicalTrial=False .

  8. Randomised controlled trial of prophylactic antibiotic treatment for the prevention of endophthalmitis after open globe injury at Groote Schuur Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Toit, N; Mustak, S; Cook, C

    2017-07-01

    Most post-traumatic acute infectious endophthalmitis occur within a week of open globe trauma, necessitating early antibiotic prophylaxis. There are few randomised studies that demonstrate the benefits of prophylactic antibiotics. This randomised controlled non-inferiority trial was aimed at determining the incidence of post-traumatic endophthalmitis using established intravenous/oral prophylaxis and comparing this to the incidence using oral antibiotics only. All adult patients admitted with open globe injury were included. Those with proven endophthalmitis, high-risk features, who underwent primary evisceration and those allergic to the trial antibiotics were excluded. Patients were randomised to receive either intravenous cefazolin and oral ciprofloxacin or oral ciprofloxacin and oral cefuroxime for 3 days from admission. Acute endophthalmitis was the primary outcome. Patients completed the study if they were followed up for 6 weeks post injury. Three hundred patients were enrolled, with 150 in each arm. There were 99 exclusions. Seven patients developed endophthalmitis despite prophylaxis-2.0% (three cases) in the intravenous and oral arm, compared with 2.7% (four cases) in the oral-only arm-this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.703). The incidence of endophthalmitis with prophylaxis was 2-3%. Selected patients with open globe injuries (without high-risk features) may receive either intravenous cefazolin and oral ciprofloxacin, or oral cefuroxime and oral ciprofloxacin as prophylaxis against acute endophthalmitis-the latter regimen has the advantage of shortening patients' hospital stays and reducing costs. Non-inferiority study-design limitations should be taken into account, however. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Behavioural activation versus mindfulness-based guided self-help treatment administered through a smartphone application: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Kien Hoa; Trüschel, Anna; Jarl, Linnea; Magnusson, Susanna; Windahl, Tove; Johansson, Robert; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard

    2014-01-09

    Evaluating and comparing the effectiveness of two smartphone-delivered treatments: one based on behavioural activation (BA) and other on mindfulness. Parallel randomised controlled, open, trial. Participants were allocated using an online randomisation tool, handled by an independent person who was separate from the staff conducting the study. General community, with recruitment nationally through mass media and advertisements. 40 participants diagnosed with major depressive disorder received a BA treatment, and 41 participants received a mindfulness treatment. 9 participants were lost at the post-treatment. An 8-week long behaviour programme administered via a smartphone application. Mindfulness: An 8-week long mindfulness programme, administered via a smartphone application. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire Depression Scale (PHQ-9). 81 participants were randomised (mean age 36.0 years (SD=10.8)) and analysed. Results showed no significant interaction effects of group and time on any of the outcome measures either from pretreatment to post-treatment or from pretreatment to the 6-month follow-up. Subgroup analyses showed that the BA treatment was more effective than the mindfulness treatment among participants with higher initial severity of depression from pretreatment to the 6-month follow-up (PHQ-9: F (1, 362.1)=5.2, p<0.05). In contrast, the mindfulness treatment worked better than the BA treatment among participants with lower initial severity from pretreatment to the 6-month follow-up (PHQ-9: F (1, 69.3)=7.7, p<0.01); BDI-II: (F(1, 53.60)=6.25, p<0.05). The two interventions did not differ significantly from one another. For participants with higher severity of depression, the treatment based on BA was superior to the treatment based on mindfulness. For participants with lower initial severity, the treatment based on mindfulness worked significantly better than the treatment based on BA. Clinical Trials

  10. A single blinded randomised controlled pilot trial of prism adaptation for improving self-care in stroke patients with neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Ailie J; O'Leary, Kelly; Gabb, Judith; Woodward, Rebecca; Gilchrist, Iain D

    2010-04-01

    Prism adaptation has been shown to alleviate the symptoms of unilateral spatial neglect following stroke in single case and small group studies. The purposes of this single blinded pilot randomised controlled trial were to determine the feasibility of delivering prism adaptation treatment in a clinically valid sample and to assess its impact on self-care. Thirty seven right hemisphere stroke patients with unilateral spatial neglect were randomised into either prism adaptation (using 10 dioptre, 6 degree prisms) or sham treatment (using plain glasses) groups. Treatment was delivered each weekday for two weeks. Pointing accuracy, without vision of the finger, was recorded each day before treatment. Outcome was measured, by blinded assessors, four days and eight weeks after the end of treatment using the Catherine Bergego Scale (CBS) and the conventional neuropsychological tests from the Behavioural Inattention Test (BIT). Thirty four patients received treatment: 16 with prisms, 18 sham. Mean compliance was 99% and 97%, respectively. Over the treatment days only the prism treated group showed increased leftward bias in open loop pointing to targets on a touch screen. However, despite the group level changes in pointing behaviour no overall effect of the treatment on self-care or BIT were found.

  11. ROLE OF CELECOXIB IN BENIGN BREAST DISEASE: RANDOMISED CONTROL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumen Das

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Benign Breast Disease (BBD, commonest cause of morbidity in females due to breast diseases, still offers therapeutic challenge. Several drug therapies (with Evening Primrose Oil, Danazol etc have been tried, but none made gold standard. Reports on effect of Cox-2 inhibitors are scarce. This randomized control trial aims at determination of effect of Cox- inhibitors (Celecoxib in BBD in comparison to Evening Primrose Oil (EPO . Celecoxib showed better reduction in lump size (in 80% than EPO group (in 50%. Pain reduction was excellent in COX -2 groups as compared to EPO group. Recurrence rate was also lower in Celecoxib group at 10 weeks. Side effects were almost nil in both the groups. Celecoxib is better than EPO in the management of BBD. Short course therapy with COX-2 inhibitors gives good pain relief, greater reduction in lump size, low recurrence with minimum side effects.

  12. A randomised controlled trial of intravenous zoledronic acid in malignant pleural disease: a proof of principle pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia O Clive

    Full Text Available Animal studies have shown Zoledronic Acid (ZA may diminish pleural fluid accumulation and tumour bulk in malignant pleural disease (MPD. We performed a pilot study to evaluate its effects in humans.We undertook a single centre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in adults with MPD. Patients were randomised (1:1 to receive 2 doses of intravenous ZA or placebo, 3 weeks apart and were followed-up for 6 weeks. The co-primary outcomes were change in Visual Analogue Scale (VAS score measured breathlessness during trial follow-up and change in the initial area under the curve (iAUC on thoracic Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI from randomisation to week 5. Multiple secondary endpoints were also evaluated.Between January 2010 and May 2013, 30 patients were enrolled, 24 randomised and 4 withdrew after randomisation (1 withdrew consent; 3 had a clinical decline. At baseline, the ZA group were more breathless, had more advanced disease on radiology and worse quality of life than the placebo group. There was no significant difference between the groups with regards change in breathlessness (Adjusted mean difference (AMD 4.16 (95%CI -4.7 to 13.0 or change in DCE-MRI iAUC (AMD -15.4 (95%CI -58.1 to 27.3. Two of nine (22% in the ZA arm had a >10% improvement by modified RECIST (vs 0/11 who received placebo. There was no significant difference in quality of life measured by the QLQ-C30 score (global QOL: AMD -4.1 (-13.0 to 4.9, side effects or serious adverse event rates.This is the first human study to evaluate ZA in MPD. The study is limited by small numbers and imbalanced baseline characteristics. Although no convincing treatment effect was identified, potential benefits for specific subgroups of patients cannot be excluded. This study provides important information regarding the feasibility of future trials to evaluate the effects of ZA further.UK Clinical Research Network ID 8877 ISRCTN17030426 www.isrctn.com.

  13. Exercise for health for early postmenopausal women: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikainen, Tuula-Maria; Kukkonen-Harjula, Katriina; Miilunpalo, Seppo

    2004-01-01

    Women who pass menopause face many changes that may lead to loss of health-related fitness (HRF), especially if sedentary. Many exercise recommendations are also relevant for early postmenopausal women; however, these may not meet their specific needs because the recommendations are based mainly on studies on men. We conducted a systematic review for randomised, controlled exercise trials on postmenopausal women (aged 50 to 65 years) on components of HRF. HRF consists of morphological fitness (body composition and bone strength), musculoskeletal fitness (muscle strength and endurance, flexibility), motor fitness (postural control), cardiorespiratory fitness (maximal aerobic power, blood pressure) and metabolic fitness (lipid and carbohydrate metabolism). The outcome variables chosen were: bodyweight; proportion of body fat of total bodyweight (F%); bone mineral density (BMD); bone mineral content (BMC); various tests on muscle performance, flexibility, balance and coordination; maximal oxygen consumption (V-dotO(2max)); resting blood pressure (BP); total cholesterol (TC); high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol; low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol; triglycerides; blood glucose and insulin. The feasibility of the exercise programme was assessed from drop-out, attendance and injury rates. Twenty-eight randomised controlled trials with 2646 participants were assessed. In total, 18 studies reported on the effects of exercise on bodyweight and F%, 16 on BMD or BMC, 11 on muscular strength or endurance, five on flexibility, six on balance or coordination, 18 on V-dotO(2max), seven on BP, nine on lipids and two studies on glucose an one on insulin. Based on these studies, early postmenopausal women could benefit from 30 minutes of daily moderate walking in one to three bouts combined with a resistance training programme twice a week. For a sedentary person, walking is feasible and can be incorporated into everyday life. A feasible way to start resistance training is to

  14. Randomised controlled trial evaluation of Tweet2Quit: a social network quit-smoking intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechmann, Cornelia; Delucchi, Kevin; Lakon, Cynthia M; Prochaska, Judith J

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated a novel Twitter-delivered intervention for smoking cessation, Tweet2Quit, which sends daily, automated communications to small, private, self-help groups to encourage high-quality, online, peer-to-peer discussions. A 2-group randomised controlled trial assessed the net benefit of adding a Tweet2Quit support group to a usual care control condition of nicotine patches and a cessation website. Participants were 160 smokers (4 cohorts of 40/cohort), aged 18-59 years, who intended to quit smoking, used Facebook daily, texted weekly, and had mobile phones with unlimited texting. All participants received 56 days of nicotine patches, emails with links to the smokefree.gov cessation website, and instructions to set a quit date within 7 days. Additionally, Tweet2Quit participants were enrolled in 20-person, 100-day Twitter groups, and received daily discussion topics via Twitter, and daily engagement feedback via text. The primary outcome was sustained abstinence at 7, 30 and 60 days post-quit date. Participants (mean age 35.7 years, 26.3% male, 31.2% college degree, 88.7% Caucasian) averaged 18.0 (SD=8.2) cigarettes per day and 16.8 (SD=9.8) years of smoking. Participants randomised to Tweet2Quit averaged 58.8 tweets/participant and the average tweeting duration was 47.4 days/participant. Tweet2Quit doubled sustained abstinence out to 60 days follow-up (40.0%, 26/65) versus control (20.0%, 14/70), OR=2.67, CI 1.19 to 5.99, p=0.017. Tweeting via phone predicted tweet volume, and tweet volume predicted sustained abstinence (p<0.001). The daily autocommunications caused tweeting spikes accounting for 24.0% of tweets. Tweet2Quit was engaging and doubled sustained abstinence. Its low cost and scalability makes it viable as a global cessation treatment. NCT01602536. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. A cluster randomised controlled effectiveness trial evaluating perinatal home visiting among South African mothers/infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus

    Full Text Available Interventions are needed to reduce poor perinatal health. We trained community health workers (CHWs as home visitors to address maternal/infant risks.In a cluster randomised controlled trial in Cape Town townships, neighbourhoods were randomised within matched pairs to 1 the control, healthcare at clinics (n = 12 neighbourhoods; n = 594 women, or 2 a home visiting intervention by CBW trained in cognitive-behavioural strategies to address health risks (by the Philani Maternal, Child Health and Nutrition Programme, in addition to clinic care (n = 12 neighbourhoods; n = 644 women. Participants were assessed during pregnancy (2% refusal and 92% were reassessed at two weeks post-birth, 88% at six months and 84% at 18 months later. We analysed 32 measures of maternal/infant well-being over the 18 month follow-up period using longitudinal random effects regressions. A binomial test for correlated outcomes evaluated overall effectiveness over time. The 18 month post-birth assessment outcomes also were examined alone and as a function of the number of home visits received.Benefits were found on 7 of 32 measures of outcomes, resulting in significant overall benefits for the intervention compared to the control when using the binomial test (p = 0.008; nevertheless, no effects were observed when only the 18 month outcomes were analyzed. Benefits on individual outcomes were related to the number of home visits received. Among women living with HIV, intervention mothers were more likely to implement the PMTCT regimens, use condoms during all sexual episodes (OR = 1.25; p = 0.014, have infants with healthy weight-for-age measurements (OR = 1.42; p = 0.045, height-for-age measurements (OR = 1.13, p<0.001, breastfeed exclusively for six months (OR = 3.59; p<0.001, and breastfeed longer (OR = 3.08; p<0.001. Number of visits was positively associated with infant birth weight ≥2500 grams (OR = 1.07; p = 0

  16. The HOPE social media intervention for global HIV prevention in Peru: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sean D; Cumberland, William G; Nianogo, Roch; Menacho, Luis A; Galea, Jerome T; Coates, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Social media technologies offer new approaches to HIV prevention and promotion of testing. We examined the efficacy of the Harnessing Online Peer Education (HOPE) social media intervention to increase HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Peru. In this cluster randomised controlled trial, Peruvian MSM from Greater Lima (including Callao) who had sex with a man in the past 12 months, were 18 years of age or older, were HIV negative or serostatus unknown, and had a Facebook account or were willing to create one (N=556) were randomly assigned (1:1) by concealed allocation to join intervention or control groups on Facebook for 12 weeks. For the intervention, Peruvian MSM were trained and assigned to be HIV prevention mentors (peer-leaders) to participants in Facebook groups. The interventions period lasted 12 weeks. Participants in control groups received an enhanced standard of care, including standard offline HIV prevention available in Peru and participation in Facebook groups (without peer leaders) that provided study updates and HIV testing information. After accepting a request to join the groups, continued participation was voluntary. Participants also completed questionnaires on HIV risk behaviours and social media use at baseline and 12 week follow-up. The primary outcome was the number of participants who received a free HIV test at a local community clinic. The facebook groups were analysed as clusters to account for intracluster correlations. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01701206. Of 49 peer-leaders recruited, 34 completed training and were assigned at random to the intervention Facebook groups. Between March 19, 2012, and June 11, 2012, and Sept 26, 2012, and Dec 19, 2012, 556 participants were randomly assigned to intervention groups (N=278) or control groups (N=278); we analyse data for 252 and 246. 43 participants (17%) in the intervention group and 16 (7%) in the control groups got tested for HIV (adjusted

  17. Upper limb children action-observation training (UP-CAT): a randomised controlled trial in Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Rehabilitation for children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (HCP) aimed to improve function of the impaired upper limb (UL) uses a wide range of intervention programs. A new rehabilitative approach, called Action-Observation Therapy, based on the recent discovery of mirror neurons, has been used in adult stroke but not in children. The purpose of the present study is to design a randomised controlled trial (RCT) for evaluating the efficacy of Action-Observation Therapy in improving UL activity in children with HCP. Methods/Design The trial is designed according to CONSORT Statement. It is a randomised, evaluator-blinded, match-pair group trial. Children with HCP will be randomised within pairs to either experimental or control group. The experimental group will perform an Action-Observation Therapy, called UP-CAT (Upper Limb-Children Action-Observation Training) in which they will watch video sequences showing goal-directed actions, chosen according to children UL functional level, combined with motor training with their hemiplegic UL. The control group will perform the same tailored actions after watching computer games. A careful revision of psychometric properties of UL outcome measures for children with hemiplegia was performed. Assisting Hand Assessment was chosen as primary measure and, based on its calculation power, a sample size of 12 matched pairs was established. Moreover, Melbourne and ABILHAND-Kids were included as secondary measures. The time line of assessments will be T0 (in the week preceding the onset of the treatment), T1 and T2 (in the week after the end of the treatment and 8 weeks later, respectively). A further assessment will be performed at T3 (24 weeks after T1), to evaluate the retention of effects. In a subgroup of children enrolled in both groups functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, exploring the mirror system and sensory-motor function, will be performed at T0, T1 and T2. Discussion The paper aims to describe the

  18. Upper limb children action-observation training (UP-CAT: a randomised controlled trial in Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagi Laura

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rehabilitation for children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (HCP aimed to improve function of the impaired upper limb (UL uses a wide range of intervention programs. A new rehabilitative approach, called Action-Observation Therapy, based on the recent discovery of mirror neurons, has been used in adult stroke but not in children. The purpose of the present study is to design a randomised controlled trial (RCT for evaluating the efficacy of Action-Observation Therapy in improving UL activity in children with HCP. Methods/Design The trial is designed according to CONSORT Statement. It is a randomised, evaluator-blinded, match-pair group trial. Children with HCP will be randomised within pairs to either experimental or control group. The experimental group will perform an Action-Observation Therapy, called UP-CAT (Upper Limb-Children Action-Observation Training in which they will watch video sequences showing goal-directed actions, chosen according to children UL functional level, combined with motor training with their hemiplegic UL. The control group will perform the same tailored actions after watching computer games. A careful revision of psychometric properties of UL outcome measures for children with hemiplegia was performed. Assisting Hand Assessment was chosen as primary measure and, based on its calculation power, a sample size of 12 matched pairs was established. Moreover, Melbourne and ABILHAND-Kids were included as secondary measures. The time line of assessments will be T0 (in the week preceding the onset of the treatment, T1 and T2 (in the week after the end of the treatment and 8 weeks later, respectively. A further assessment will be performed at T3 (24 weeks after T1, to evaluate the retention of effects. In a subgroup of children enrolled in both groups functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, exploring the mirror system and sensory-motor function, will be performed at T0, T1 and T2. Discussion The paper aims to

  19. Upper limb children action-observation training (UP-CAT): a randomised controlled trial in hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgandurra, Giuseppina; Ferrari, Adriano; Cossu, Giuseppe; Guzzetta, Andrea; Biagi, Laura; Tosetti, Michela; Fogassi, Leonardo; Cioni, Giovanni

    2011-06-28

    Rehabilitation for children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (HCP) aimed to improve function of the impaired upper limb (UL) uses a wide range of intervention programs. A new rehabilitative approach, called Action-Observation Therapy, based on the recent discovery of mirror neurons, has been used in adult stroke but not in children. The purpose of the present study is to design a randomised controlled trial (RCT) for evaluating the efficacy of Action-Observation Therapy in improving UL activity in children with HCP. The trial is designed according to CONSORT Statement. It is a randomised, evaluator-blinded, match-pair group trial. Children with HCP will be randomised within pairs to either experimental or control group. The experimental group will perform an Action-Observation Therapy, called UP-CAT (Upper Limb-Children Action-Observation Training) in which they will watch video sequences showing goal-directed actions, chosen according to children UL functional level, combined with motor training with their hemiplegic UL. The control group will perform the same tailored actions after watching computer games. A careful revision of psychometric properties of UL outcome measures for children with hemiplegia was performed. Assisting Hand Assessment was chosen as primary measure and, based on its calculation power, a sample size of 12 matched pairs was established. Moreover, Melbourne and ABILHAND-Kids were included as secondary measures. The time line of assessments will be T0 (in the week preceding the onset of the treatment), T1 and T2 (in the week after the end of the treatment and 8 weeks later, respectively). A further assessment will be performed at T3 (24 weeks after T1), to evaluate the retention of effects. In a subgroup of children enrolled in both groups functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, exploring the mirror system and sensory-motor function, will be performed at T0, T1 and T2. The paper aims to describe the methodology of a RCT for evaluating the

  20. Computerised attention training for children with intellectual and developmental disabilities: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Hannah E; Gray, Kylie M; Ellis, Kirsten; Taffe, John; Cornish, Kim M

    2016-12-01

    Children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) experience heightened attention difficulties which have been linked to poorer cognitive, academic and social outcomes. Although, increasing research has focused on the potential of computerised cognitive training in reducing attention problems, limited studies have assessed whether this intervention could be utilised for those with IDD. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a computerised attention training programme in children with IDD. In a double-blind randomised controlled trial, children (n = 76; IQ attention training condition or a nonadaptive control condition. Both conditions were completed at home over a 5-week period and consisted of 25 sessions, each of 20-min duration. Outcome measures (baseline, posttraining and 3-month follow-up) assessed core attention skills (selective attention, sustained attention and attentional control) and inattentive/hyperactive behaviour. Children in the attention training condition showed greater improvement in selective attention performance compared to children in the control condition (SMD = 0.24, 95% CI 0.02, 0.45). These improvements were maintained 3 months after training had ceased (SMD = 0.26, 95% CI 0.04, 0.48). The attention training programme was not effective in promoting improvements in sustained attention, attentional control or inattentive/hyperactive behaviours. The findings suggest that attention training may enhance some aspects of attention (selective attention) in children with IDD, but the small to medium effect sizes indicate that further refinement of the training programme is needed to promote larger, more global improvements. © 2016 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  1. Sample bias from different recruitment strategies in a randomised controlled trial for alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Kirsten C; Teesson, Maree; Sannibale, Claudia; Haber, Paul S

    2009-05-01

    Participants may be recruited from diverse sources for randomised controlled trials (RCT) of treatments for alcohol dependence. A mixed recruitment strategy might facilitate recruitment and increase generalisability at the expense of introducing systematic selection bias. The current study aims to compare the effects of recruitment method on socio-demographics, baseline illness characteristics, treatment retention and treatment outcome measures. A secondary analysis from a previous 12 week RCT of naltrexone, acamprosate and placebo for alcohol dependence was conducted. Participants (n = 169) were obtained via four channels of recruitment including in-patient and outpatient referral, live media and print media solicitation. Baseline parameters, retention in treatment and treatment outcomes were compared in these groups. Relative to in-patient subjects, those recruited via live and print media had significantly lower scores on taking steps, less in-patient rehabilitation admissions and less previous abstinence before entering the trial. Subjects recruited via print media had significantly lower scores of alcohol dependence relative to all other modes recruitment. There were no differences between recruitment strategies on treatment retention or compliance. At outcome, no significant effect of recruitment method was detected. These results suggest that different recruitment methods may be sourcing subjects with different baseline characteristics of illness. Nonetheless, these differences did not significantly impact on treatment retention or outcome, suggesting that in this population it was appropriate to recruit subjects from mixed sources.

  2. A randomised phase II trial of weekly high-dose 5-fluorouracil with and without folinic acid and cisplatin in patients with advanced biliary tract carcinoma: results of the 40955 EORTC trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ducreux, M.; Cutsem, E. van; Laethem, J. van; Gress, T.M.; Jeziorski, K.; Rougier, P.; Wagener, T.; Anak, O.; Baron, B.; Nordlinger, B.

    2005-01-01

    Previous small phase II trials have demonstrated that the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and cisplatin(CDDP) could have clinical activity in metastatic biliary tract cancer. This randomised phase II trial was designed to assess the activity and safety of a high-dose infusional weekly 5FU alone

  3. A randomised phase II trial of weekly high-dose 5-fluorouracil with and without folinic acid and cisplatin in patients with advanced biliary tract carcinoma : results of the 40955 EORTC trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ducreux, M; van Cutsem, E; van Laethern, JL; Gress, TM; Jeziorski, K; Rougier, P; Wagener, T; Anak, O; Baron, B; Nordlinger, B

    2005-01-01

    Previous small phase II trials have demonstrated that the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and cisplatin(CDDP) could have clinical activity in metastatic biliary tract cancer. This randomised phase II trial was designed to assess the activity and safety of a high-dose infusional weekly 5FU alone

  4. Randomised controlled trial of magnetic-resonance pelvimetry in breech presentation at term

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, AJ; Mantingh, A; Serlier, EK; Kroon, G; Mooyaart, EL; Huisjes, HJ

    1997-01-01

    Background Pelvimetry is widely used in women with breech presentation at term to select those for whom planned vaginal delivery is appropriate. However, its clinical value has never been established, We evaluated pelvimetry in a randomised controlled trial. The main outcome measures were the electi

  5. Psychosocial consequences in the Danish randomised controlled lung cancer screening trial (DLCST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    F. Rasmussen, Jakob; Siersma, V.; H. Pedersen, J.

    2015-01-01

    on Airway Symptoms, Stigmatisation, Introvert, and Harm of Smoking. Results: 4104 participants were randomised to the DLCST and the COS-LC completion rates for the CT group and the control group were 95.5% and 73.6%, respectively. There was a significant increase in negative psychosocial consequences from...

  6. Timing of insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system : a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Pahh; Geomini, Pmaj; Herman, M C; Veersema, S; Bongers, M Y

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to assess whether patient-perceived pain during the insertion of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) depends on the timing during the menstrual cycle. DESIGN: A stratified two-armed non-inferiority randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Large

  7. Maximising the impact of qualitative research in feasibility studies for randomised controlled trials: guidance for researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O’Cathain, A.; Hoddinott, P.; Lewin, S.; Thomas, K.J.; Young, B.; Adamson, J.; Jansen, J.F.M.; Mills, N.; Moore, G.; Donovan, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Feasibility studies are increasingly undertaken in preparation for randomised controlled trials in order to explore uncertainties and enable trialists to optimise the intervention or the conduct of the trial. Qualitative research can be used to examine and address key uncertainties prior to a full t

  8. Prophylactic antibiotic regimens in tumour surgery (PARITY) A PILOT MULTICENTRE RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghert, M.; Bhandari, M.; Deheshi, B.; Guyatt, G.; Holt, G.; O'Shea, T.; Randall, R. L.; Thabane, L.; Wunder, J.; Evaniew, N.; McKay, P.; Schneider, P.; Turcotte, R.; Madden, K.; Scott, T.; Sprague, S.; Simunovic, N.; Swinton, M.; Racano, A.; Heels-Ansdell, D.; Buckingham, L.; Rose, P.; Brigman, B.; Pullenayegum, E.; Ghert, M.; Evaniew, N.; Mckay, P.; Schneider, P.; Sobhi, G.; Chan, R.; Biljan, M.; Ferguson, P.; Wunder, J.; Griffin, A.; Mantas, I.; Wylie, A.; Han, A.; Grewal, G.; Turcotte, R.; Goulding, K.; Dandachli, F.; Matte, G.; Werier, J.; Abdelbary, H.; Paquin, K.; Cosgrove, H.; Dugal, A-M.; Fetzer, S.; Aikens, W.; Clarkson, P.; Wang, B.; Kondo, L.; Yip, J.; Isler, M.; Mottard, S.; Barry, J.; St Yves, H.; Quach, M.; Assayag, H.; Daoust, K.; Goyette, K.; Projean, D.; Dion, N.; Arteau, A.; Turmel, S.; Bertrand, A.; Gagnon, N.; Labbe, V.; Holt, G.; Halpern, J.; Schwartz, H.; Atkinson, A.; Daniels, J.; Moore, M. S.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Wagner, K.; Patel, H.; Jolin, H.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Allar, B.; Naqvi, M.; Bennett, J.; Albuquerque, S.; Randall, R. L.; Jones, K.; Crabtree, S.; Davis, R.; Sorenson, S.; Healey, J. H.; Galle, J.; O'Neill, G.; Del Corral, B.; Lopez, S.; Galli Serra, M.; Parizzia, W.; Podrzaj, A.; Foa Torres, M.; Clayer, M.; Chai, Y.; Slobodian, P.; Balach, T.; Coyle, K.; LaCasse, R.; Abraham, J.; Morrison, T.; Angelos, M.; Sailor, L.; Sadaka, R.; Miller, B.; Milhem, M.; McCurdy, N.; Kain, J.; Nohr, J.; Johnson, K.; Merriss, A.; Cheng, E.; Luke, D. G.; Scharschmidt, T. J.; Crist, M. K.; Dimeo, A.; Marmon, L.; Reimer, N.; Monson, D.; Oskouei, S.; Lomba, C.; Rogers, S.; Avedian, R.; Jordan, L.; Chinn, S.; Hamilton, M.; Ghert, M.; Evaniew, N.; McKay, P.; Schneider, P.; Sobhi, G.; Chan, R.; Bil-Jan, M.; Ferguson, P.; Wunder, J.; Griffin, A.; Mantas, I.; Wylie, A.; Han, A.; Grewal, G.; Turcotte, R.; Goulding, K.; Dandachli, F.; Matte, G.; Werier, J.; Abdelbary, H.; Paquin, K.; Cosgrove, H.; Dugal, A-M.; Fetzer, S.; Aikens, W.; Clarkson, P.; Wang, B.; Kondo, L.; Yip, J.; Isler, M.; Mottard, S.; Barry, J.; Yves, H. St.; Quach, M.; Assayag, H.; Daoust, K.; Goyette, Kristine; Projean, D.; Dion, N.; Arteau, A.; Turmel, S.; Bertrand, A.; Gagnon, N.; Labbe, V.; Holt, G.; Halpern, J.; Schwartz, H.; Atkinson, A.; Daniels, J.; Moore, M. S.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Wagner, K.; Patel, H.; Jolin, H.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Allar, B.; Naqvi, M.; Bennett, J.; Albuquerque, S.; Randall, R. L.; Jones, K.; Crabtree, S.; Davis, R.; Sorenson, S.; Healey, J. H.; Galle, J.; O'Neill, G.; Del Corral, B.; Lopez, S.; Galli Serra, M.; Parizzia, W.; Podrzaj, A.; Foa Torres, M.; Clayer, M.; Tran, N.; Slobodian, P.; Balach, T.; Coyle, K.; LaCasse, R.; Abraham, J.; Morrison, T.; Angelos, M.; Sailor, L.; Sadaka, R.; Miller, B.; Milhem, M.; McCurdy, N.; Kain, J.; Nohr, J.; Johnson, K.; Merriss, A.; Cheng, E.; Luke, D. G.; Scharschmidt, T. J.; Crist, M. K.; Dimeo, A.; Marmon, L.; Reimer, N.; Monson, D.; Oskouei, S.; Lomba, C.; Rogers, S.; Geller, D.; Hoang, B.; Tingling, J.; Solorzano, C.; Avedian, R.; Jordan, L.; Chinn, S.; Hamilton, M.; Puloski, S.; Monument, M.; Carcary, K.; Cameron, C.; Aboulafia, A.; Loo-Mis, M.; Bosley, J.; Bonvegna, R.; Kassa, M.; Damron, T.; Craig, T.; Reale, M.; Goodman, H. J.; Culbertson, M. Deza; Caruso, P.; Garling, E.; Schwab, J.; Fiore, A.; Phukan, R.; Park, C.; Joshi, L.; Aboulafia, A.; Wallace, M.; Flack, J.; Vaughan, K.; Avergas, A.; Brady, M.; Brown, S.; Schadie, N.; Battersby, R.; Weiss, K.; Goodman, M.; Heyl, A.; Yeschke, C. A.; Sumic, P.; Dudgeon, M.; Prosser, R.; Korenoski, C.; DiCaprio, M.; Palmer, B.; Cioppa, E.; Schaeffer, T. M.; Paul, P.; Toreson, J.; Cummings, J.; Schwartz, L.; Zahner, B.; Morris, C.; Laljani, V.; Mesko, N.; Joyce, M.; Lietman, S.; Wustrack, R.; O'Donnell, R.; Stevenson, C.; Carmody, E.; Tyler, W.; McIntyre, A.; Spiguel, A.; Scarborough, M.; Gibbs, C. P.; Steshyn, J.; Nunn, B.; Rosenthal, H.; Haynes, K.; Leddy, L.; Walton, Z.; Doung, Y-C.; Hayden, J.; Velez, R.; Aguirre, M.; Perez, M.; Barrera, S.; Garca Lopez, A.; Grimer, R.; Dunn, K.; Virdee, H.; Rankin, K.; Beckingsale, T.; Gerrand, C.; Campbell, I.; Allen, M.; Khan, S. Alam; Bakshi, S.; Rastogi, S.; Poudel, R.; Kumar, V. Sampath; Rai, A.; Baptista, A. M.; de Camargo, O. P.; Marais, L.; Rodseth, R.; Ferreira, N.; Rajah, C.; Gumede, S.; Gortzak, Y.; Sternheim, A.; Bickels, J.; Kolander, Y.; Lev, S.; Hettwer, W.; Petersen, M. M.; Grum-Schwensen, T.; Jutte, P.; Ploegmakers, J. J. W.; Stevens, M.; Mahendra, A.; Gupta, S.; Bergovec, M.; Leithner, A.; Funovics, P.; Dijkstra, P. D. S.; Van De Sande, M.; Hoogenstraaten, A.; Leijerzapf, N.; Steadman, P.; Steadman, P.; Boffano, M.; Piana, R.; Marone, S.; Albertini, U.; Boux, E.; Maiello, A.; Repsa, L.; Zile, S.; Aston, W.; Pollock, R.; Cool, P.; Gibbons, M.; Whit-Well, D.; Cosker, T.; Hemingway, J.; Porter, D.; Patton, S.; Navia, J.; Betancur, A. F.; Laitenen, M.; Pakarinen, K.; Nieminen, J.; Yla-Mononen, S.; Rautiainen, S.; Fiorenza, F.

    Objective Clinical studies of patients with bone sarcomas have been challenged by insufficient numbers at individual centres to draw valid conclusions. Our objective was to assess the feasibility of conducting a definitive multi-centre randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine whether a

  9. Prophylactic antibiotic regimens in tumour surgery (PARITY) A PILOT MULTICENTRE RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghert, M.; Bhandari, M.; Deheshi, B.; Guyatt, G.; Holt, G.; O'Shea, T.; Randall, R. L.; Thabane, L.; Wunder, J.; Evaniew, N.; McKay, P.; Schneider, P.; Turcotte, R.; Madden, K.; Scott, T.; Sprague, S.; Simunovic, N.; Swinton, M.; Racano, A.; Heels-Ansdell, D.; Buckingham, L.; Rose, P.; Brigman, B.; Pullenayegum, E.; Ghert, M.; Evaniew, N.; Mckay, P.; Schneider, P.; Sobhi, G.; Chan, R.; Biljan, M.; Ferguson, P.; Wunder, J.; Griffin, A.; Mantas, I.; Wylie, A.; Han, A.; Grewal, G.; Turcotte, R.; Goulding, K.; Dandachli, F.; Matte, G.; Werier, J.; Abdelbary, H.; Paquin, K.; Cosgrove, H.; Dugal, A-M.; Fetzer, S.; Aikens, W.; Clarkson, P.; Wang, B.; Kondo, L.; Yip, J.; Isler, M.; Mottard, S.; Barry, J.; St Yves, H.; Quach, M.; Assayag, H.; Daoust, K.; Goyette, K.; Projean, D.; Dion, N.; Arteau, A.; Turmel, S.; Bertrand, A.; Gagnon, N.; Labbe, V.; Holt, G.; Halpern, J.; Schwartz, H.; Atkinson, A.; Daniels, J.; Moore, M. S.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Wagner, K.; Patel, H.; Jolin, H.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Allar, B.; Naqvi, M.; Bennett, J.; Albuquerque, S.; Randall, R. L.; Jones, K.; Crabtree, S.; Davis, R.; Sorenson, S.; Healey, J. H.; Galle, J.; O'Neill, G.; Del Corral, B.; Lopez, S.; Galli Serra, M.; Parizzia, W.; Podrzaj, A.; Foa Torres, M.; Clayer, M.; Chai, Y.; Slobodian, P.; Balach, T.; Coyle, K.; LaCasse, R.; Abraham, J.; Morrison, T.; Angelos, M.; Sailor, L.; Sadaka, R.; Miller, B.; Milhem, M.; McCurdy, N.; Kain, J.; Nohr, J.; Johnson, K.; Merriss, A.; Cheng, E.; Luke, D. G.; Scharschmidt, T. J.; Crist, M. K.; Dimeo, A.; Marmon, L.; Reimer, N.; Monson, D.; Oskouei, S.; Lomba, C.; Rogers, S.; Avedian, R.; Jordan, L.; Chinn, S.; Hamilton, M.; Ghert, M.; Evaniew, N.; McKay, P.; Schneider, P.; Sobhi, G.; Chan, R.; Bil-Jan, M.; Ferguson, P.; Wunder, J.; Griffin, A.; Mantas, I.; Wylie, A.; Han, A.; Grewal, G.; Turcotte, R.; Goulding, K.; Dandachli, F.; Matte, G.; Werier, J.; Abdelbary, H.; Paquin, K.; Cosgrove, H.; Dugal, A-M.; Fetzer, S.; Aikens, W.; Clarkson, P.; Wang, B.; Kondo, L.; Yip, J.; Isler, M.; Mottard, S.; Barry, J.; Yves, H. St.; Quach, M.; Assayag, H.; Daoust, K.; Goyette, Kristine; Projean, D.; Dion, N.; Arteau, A.; Turmel, S.; Bertrand, A.; Gagnon, N.; Labbe, V.; Holt, G.; Halpern, J.; Schwartz, H.; Atkinson, A.; Daniels, J.; Moore, M. S.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Wagner, K.; Patel, H.; Jolin, H.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Allar, B.; Naqvi, M.; Bennett, J.; Albuquerque, S.; Randall, R. L.; Jones, K.; Crabtree, S.; Davis, R.; Sorenson, S.; Healey, J. H.; Galle, J.; O'Neill, G.; Del Corral, B.; Lopez, S.; Galli Serra, M.; Parizzia, W.; Podrzaj, A.; Foa Torres, M.; Clayer, M.; Tran, N.; Slobodian, P.; Balach, T.; Coyle, K.; LaCasse, R.; Abraham, J.; Morrison, T.; Angelos, M.; Sailor, L.; Sadaka, R.; Miller, B.; Milhem, M.; McCurdy, N.; Kain, J.; Nohr, J.; Johnson, K.; Merriss, A.; Cheng, E.; Luke, D. G.; Scharschmidt, T. J.; Crist, M. K.; Dimeo, A.; Marmon, L.; Reimer, N.; Monson, D.; Oskouei, S.; Lomba, C.; Rogers, S.; Geller, D.; Hoang, B.; Tingling, J.; Solorzano, C.; Avedian, R.; Jordan, L.; Chinn, S.; Hamilton, M.; Puloski, S.; Monument, M.; Carcary, K.; Cameron, C.; Aboulafia, A.; Loo-Mis, M.; Bosley, J.; Bonvegna, R.; Kassa, M.; Damron, T.; Craig, T.; Reale, M.; Goodman, H. J.; Culbertson, M. Deza; Caruso, P.; Garling, E.; Schwab, J.; Fiore, A.; Phukan, R.; Park, C.; Joshi, L.; Aboulafia, A.; Wallace, M.; Flack, J.; Vaughan, K.; Avergas, A.; Brady, M.; Brown, S.; Schadie, N.; Battersby, R.; Weiss, K.; Goodman, M.; Heyl, A.; Yeschke, C. A.; Sumic, P.; Dudgeon, M.; Prosser, R.; Korenoski, C.; DiCaprio, M.; Palmer, B.; Cioppa, E.; Schaeffer, T. M.; Paul, P.; Toreson, J.; Cummings, J.; Schwartz, L.; Zahner, B.; Morris, C.; Laljani, V.; Mesko, N.; Joyce, M.; Lietman, S.; Wustrack, R.; O'Donnell, R.; Stevenson, C.; Carmody, E.; Tyler, W.; McIntyre, A.; Spiguel, A.; Scarborough, M.; Gibbs, C. P.; Steshyn, J.; Nunn, B.; Rosenthal, H.; Haynes, K.; Leddy, L.; Walton, Z.; Doung, Y-C.; Hayden, J.; Velez, R.; Aguirre, M.; Perez, M.; Barrera, S.; Garca Lopez, A.; Grimer, R.; Dunn, K.; Virdee, H.; Rankin, K.; Beckingsale, T.; Gerrand, C.; Campbell, I.; Allen, M.; Khan, S. Alam; Bakshi, S.; Rastogi, S.; Poudel, R.; Kumar, V. Sampath; Rai, A.; Baptista, A. M.; de Camargo, O. P.; Marais, L.; Rodseth, R.; Ferreira, N.; Rajah, C.; Gumede, S.; Gortzak, Y.; Sternheim, A.; Bickels, J.; Kolander, Y.; Lev, S.; Hettwer, W.; Petersen, M. M.; Grum-Schwensen, T.; Jutte, P.; Ploegmakers, J. J. W.; Stevens, M.; Mahendra, A.; Gupta, S.; Bergovec, M.; Leithner, A.; Funovics, P.; Dijkstra, P. D. S.; Van De Sande, M.; Hoogenstraaten, A.; Leijerzapf, N.; Steadman, P.; Steadman, P.; Boffano, M.; Piana, R.; Marone, S.; Albertini, U.; Boux, E.; Maiello, A.; Repsa, L.; Zile, S.; Aston, W.; Pollock, R.; Cool, P.; Gibbons, M.; Whit-Well, D.; Cosker, T.; Hemingway, J.; Porter, D.; Patton, S.; Navia, J.; Betancur, A. F.; Laitenen, M.; Pakarinen, K.; Nieminen, J.; Yla-Mononen, S.; Rautiainen, S.; Fiorenza, F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Clinical studies of patients with bone sarcomas have been challenged by insufficient numbers at individual centres to draw valid conclusions. Our objective was to assess the feasibility of conducting a definitive multi-centre randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine whether a five-da

  10. Stress in Fathers of Moderately and Late Preterm Infants: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravn, Ingrid Helen; Lindemann, Rolf; Smeby, Nina Aarhus; Bunch, Eli Haugen; Sandvik, Leiv; Smith, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The atypical behaviour of preterm infants can elicit stress in fathers and influence their ability to perceive and interpret infants' cues. This study investigated whether fathers of moderately and late preterm infants were more stressed than fathers of term infants. In a randomised controlled trial, we also studied the effect of the Mother-Infant…

  11. Comparison of Bobath based and movement science based treatment for stroke: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    van Vliet, P. M.; Lincoln, N; Foxall, A

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Bobath based (BB) and movement science based (MSB) physiotherapy interventions are widely used for patients after stroke. There is little evidence to suggest which is most effective. This single-blind randomised controlled trial evaluated the effect of these treatments on movement abilities and functional independence.

  12. Hysteroscopy before in-vitro fertilisation (inSIGHT) : A multicentre, randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Janine G.; Kasius, Jenneke C.; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Koks, Carolien A M; van Golde, Ronald; Nap, Annemiek W.; Scheffer, Gabrielle J.; Manger, Petra A P; Hoek, Annemieke; Schoot, Benedictus C.; van Heusden, Arne M.; Kuchenbecker, Walter K H; Perquin, Denise A M; Fleischer, Kathrin; Kaaijk, Eugenie M.; Sluijmer, Alexander; Friederich, Jaap; Dykgraaf, Ramon H M; van Hooff, Marcel; Louwe, Leonie A.; Kwee, Janet; de Koning, Corry H.; Janssen, Ineke C A H; Mol, Femke; Mol, Ben W J; Broekmans, Frank J M; Torrance, Helen L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hysteroscopy is often done in infertile women starting in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) to improve their chance of having a baby. However, no data are available from randomised controlled trials to support this practice. We aimed to assess whether routine hysteroscopy before the first IVF tr

  13. Hysteroscopy before in-vitro fertilisation (inSIGHT) : a multicentre, randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Janine G.; Kasius, Jenneke C.; Eijkemans, Marinus J. C.; Koks, Carolien A. M.; van Golde, Ronald; Nap, Annemiek W.; Scheffer, Gabrielle J.; Manger, Petra A. P.; Hoek, Annemieke; Schoot, Benedictus C.; van Heusden, Arne M.; Kuchenbecker, Walter K. H.; Perquin, Denise A. M.; Fleischer, Kathrin; Kaaijk, Eugenie M.; Sluijmer, Alexander; Friederich, Jaap; Dykgraaf, Ramon H. M.; van Hooff, Marcel; Louwe, Leonie A.; Kwee, Janet; de Koning, Corry H.; Janssen, Ineke C. A. H.; Mol, Femke; Mol, Ben W. J.; Broekmans, Frank J. M.; Torrance, Helen L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hysteroscopy is often done in infertile women starting in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) to improve their chance of having a baby. However, no data are available from randomised controlled trials to support this practice. We aimed to assess whether routine hysteroscopy before the first IVF tre

  14. Skills Training to Avoid Inadvertent Plagiarism: Results from a Randomised Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Fiona J.; Wright, Jill D.; Newton, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism continues to be a concern within academic institutions. The current study utilised a randomised control trial of 137 new entry tertiary students to assess the efficacy of a scalable short training session on paraphrasing, patch writing and plagiarism. The results indicate that the training significantly enhanced students' overall…

  15. The significance of clinical experience on learning outcome from resuscitation training-a randomised controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Lind; Lippert, Freddy; Hesselfeldt, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    and retention of learning. Materials and methods: This was a prospective single blinded randomised controlled study of the learning outcome from a standard ALS course on a volunteer sample of the entire cohort of newly graduated doctors from Copenhagen University. The outcome measurement was ALS...... a small but statistically significant impact on the retention of learning, but not on the immediate learning outcome....

  16. Initiation of home mechanical ventilation at home : A randomised controlled trial of efficacy, feasibility and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, A; Kerstjens, H A M; Prins, S C L; Vermeulen, K M; Wijkstra, P J

    Introduction: Home mechanical ventilation (HMV) in the Netherlands is normally initiated in hospital, but this is expensive and often a burden for the patient. In this randomised controlled study we investigated whether initiation of HMV at home in patients with chronic respiratory failure is

  17. Initiation of home mechanical ventilation at home: A randomised controlled trial of efficacy, feasibility and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, A.; Kerstjens, H.A.M.; Prins, S.C.L.; Vermeulen, K.M.; Wijkstra, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Home mechanical ventilation (HMV) in the Netherlands is normally initiated in hospital, but this is expensive and often a burden for the patient. In this randomised controlled study we investigated whether initiation of HMV at home in patients with chronic respiratory failure is

  18. Initiation of home mechanical ventilation at home : A randomised controlled trial of efficacy, feasibility and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, A; Kerstjens, H A M; Prins, S C L; Vermeulen, K M; Wijkstra, P J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Home mechanical ventilation (HMV) in the Netherlands is normally initiated in hospital, but this is expensive and often a burden for the patient. In this randomised controlled study we investigated whether initiation of HMV at home in patients with chronic respiratory failure is non-in

  19. Delayed cord clamping in South African neonates with expected low birthweight : a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemersma, Sybrich; Heistein, Julia; Ruijne, Roos; Lopez, Gustavo; van Lobenstein, Jeroen; van Rheenen, Patrick

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate safety and haematological effects of delayed cord clamping (DCC) in infants with expected low birthweight born in a resource-poor setting. METHODS: Randomised controlled trial involving pregnant women in early labour ≥18 years with intrapartum symphysal-fundal height ≤32 cm.

  20. Helmet therapy in infants with positional skull deformation: randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, R.M. van; Vlimmeren, L.A. van; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, C.G.M.; Ploeg, C.P.B. van der; Ijzerman, M.J.; Boere-Boonekamp, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the effectiveness of helmet therapy for positional skull deformation compared with the natural course of the condition in infants aged 5-6 months.Design Pragmatic, single blinded, randomised controlled trial (HEADS, HElmet therapy Assessment in Deformed Skulls) nested in a pro

  1. The gait and balance of patients with diabetes can be improved: a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allet, L.; Armand, S.; Bie, R.A. de; Golay, A.; Monnin, D.; Aminian, K.; Staal, J.B.; Bruin, E.D. de

    2010-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Gait characteristics and balance are altered in diabetic patients. Little is known about possible treatment strategies. This study evaluates the effect of a specific training programme on gait and balance of diabetic patients. METHODS: This was a randomised controlled trial (n=71) w

  2. Implementing Randomised Control Trials in Open and Distance Learning: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herodotou, Christothea; Heiser, Sarah; Rienties, Bart

    2017-01-01

    Randomised control trials (RCTs) are an evidence-based research approach which has not yet been adopted and widely used in open and distance education to inform educational policy and practice. Despite the challenges entailed in their application, RCTs hold the power to robustly evaluate the effects of educational interventions in distance…

  3. Low quality of reporting adverse drug reactions in paediatric randomised controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Tjalling W; van Roon, Eric N

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Randomised controlled trials (RCT) offer an opportunity to learn about frequency and character of adverse drug reactions. To improve the quality of reporting adverse effects, the Consort group published recommendations. The authors studied the application of these recommendations in RCTs

  4. Supervised exercise therapy versus usual care for patellofemoral pain syndrome: an open label randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Linschoten (Robbart); M. van Middelkoop (Marienke); M.Y. Berger (Marjolein); E.M. Heintjes (Edith); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); S.P. Willemsen (Sten); B.W. Koes (Bart); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of supervised exercise therapy compared with usual care with respect to recovery, pain, and function in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. DESIGN: Open label randomised controlled trial. SETTING: General practice and sport physician practic

  5. Helmet therapy in infants with positional skull deformation: randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, R.M. van; Vlimmeren, L.A. van; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, C.G.; Ploeg, C.P. van der; IJzerman, M.J.; Boere-Boonekamp, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of helmet therapy for positional skull deformation compared with the natural course of the condition in infants aged 5-6 months. DESIGN: Pragmatic, single blinded, randomised controlled trial (HEADS, HElmet therapy Assessment in Deformed Skulls) nested in a

  6. Helmet therapy in infants with positional skull deformation: randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van Renske M.; Vlimmeren, van Leo A.; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina G.M.; Ploeg, van der Catharina P.B.; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the effectiveness of helmet therapy for positional skull deformation compared with the natural course of the condition in infants aged 5-6 months. Design Pragmatic, single blinded, randomised controlled trial (HEADS, HElmet therapy Assessment in Deformed Skulls) nested in a p

  7. Randomised controlled trial of topical kanuka honey for the treatment of rosacea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braithwaite, Irene; Hunt, Anna; Riley, Judith; Fingleton, James; Kocks, Janwillem; Corin, Andrew; Helm, Colin; Sheahan, Davitt; Tofield, Christopher; Montgomery, Barney; Holliday, Mark; Weatherall, Mark; Beasley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of topical 90% medical-grade kanuka honey and 10% glycerine (Honevo) as a treatment for rosacea. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial with blinded assessment of primary outcome variable. SETTING: Outpatient primary healthcare population from 5 New Zealand sites.

  8. Skills Training to Avoid Inadvertent Plagiarism: Results from a Randomised Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Fiona J.; Wright, Jill D.; Newton, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism continues to be a concern within academic institutions. The current study utilised a randomised control trial of 137 new entry tertiary students to assess the efficacy of a scalable short training session on paraphrasing, patch writing and plagiarism. The results indicate that the training significantly enhanced students' overall…

  9. Recruitment and retention in a multicentre randomised controlled trial in Bell's palsy: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daly Fergus

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is notoriously difficult to recruit patients to randomised controlled trials in primary care. This is particularly true when the disease process under investigation occurs relatively infrequently and must be investigated during a brief time window. Bell's palsy, an acute unilateral paralysis of the facial nerve is just such a relatively rare condition. In this case study we describe the organisational issues presented in setting up a large randomised controlled trial of the management of Bell's palsy across primary and secondary care in Scotland and how we managed to successfully recruit and retain patients presenting in the community. Methods Where possible we used existing evidence on recruitment strategies to maximise recruitment and retention. We consider that the key issues in the success of this study were; the fact that the research was seen as clinically important by the clinicians who had initial responsibility for recruitment; employing an experienced trial co-ordinator and dedicated researchers willing to recruit participants seven days per week and to visit them at home at a time convenient to them, hence reducing missed patients and ensuring they were retained in the study; national visibility and repeated publicity at a local level delivered by locally based principal investigators well known to their primary care community; encouraging recruitment by payment to practices and reducing the workload of the referring doctors by providing immediate access to specialist care; good collaboration between primary and secondary care and basing local investigators in the otolarnygology trial centres Results Although the recruitment rate did not meet our initial expectations, enhanced retention meant that we exceeded our planned target of recruiting 550 patients within the planned time-scale. Conclusion While difficult, recruitment to and retention within multi-centre trials from primary care can be successfully

  10. Acupuncture in acute herpes zoster pain therapy (ACUZoster – design and protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfab Florian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute herpes zoster is a prevalent condition. One of its major symptoms is pain, which can highly influence patient's quality of life. Pain therapy is limited. Acupuncture is supposed to soften neuropathic pain conditions and might therefore act as a therapeutic alternative. Objective of the present study is to investigate whether a 4 week semi-standardised acupuncture is non-inferior to sham laser acupuncture and the anticonvulsive drug gabapentine in the treatment of pain associated with herpes zoster. Methods/Design Three-armed, randomised, placebo-controlled trial with a total follow-up time of 6 months. Up to estimated 336 patients (interim analyses with acute herpes zoster pain (VAS > 30 mm will be randomised to one of three groups (a semi-standardised acupuncture (168 patients; (b gabapentine with individualised dosage between 900–3600 mg/d (84 patients; (c sham laser acupuncture. Intervention takes place over 4 weeks, all patients will receive analgesic therapy (non-opioid analgesics: metamizol or paracetamol and opioids: tramadol or morphine. Therapy phase includes 4 weeks in which group (a and (c consist of 12 sessions per patient, (b visits depend on patients needs. Main outcome measure is to assess the alteration of pain intensity before and 1 week after treatment sessions (visual analogue scale VAS 0–100 mm. Secondary outcome measure are: alteration of pain intensity and frequency of pain attacks; alteration of different aspects of pain evaluated by standardised pain questionnaires (NPI, PDI, SES; effects on quality of life (SF 36; analgesic demand; alteration of sensoric perception by systematic quantitative sensory testing (QST; incidence of postherpetic neuralgia; side effects and cost effectiveness. Credibility of treatments will be assessed. Discussion This study is the first large-scale randomised placebo controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture compared to gabapentine and sham treatment

  11. Quarter-dose quadruple combination therapy for initial treatment of hypertension: placebo-controlled, crossover, randomised trial and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Clara K; Thakkar, Jay; Bennett, Alex; Hillis, Graham; Burke, Michael; Usherwood, Tim; Vo, Kha; Rogers, Kris; Atkins, Emily; Webster, Ruth; Chou, Michael; Dehbi, Hakim-Moulay; Salam, Abdul; Patel, Anushka; Neal, Bruce; Peiris, David; Krum, Henry; Chalmers, John; Nelson, Mark; Reid, Christopher M; Woodward, Mark; Hilmer, Sarah; Thom, Simon; Rodgers, Anthony

    2017-03-11

    Globally, most patients with hypertension are treated with monotherapy, and control rates are poor because monotherapy only reduces blood pressure by around 9/5 mm Hg on average. There is a pressing need for blood pressure-control strategies with improved efficacy and tolerability. We aimed to assess whether ultra-low-dose combination therapy could meet these needs. We did a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial of a quadpill-a single capsule containing four blood pressure-lowering drugs each at quarter-dose (irbesartan 37·5 mg, amlodipine 1·25 mg, hydrochlorothiazide 6·25 mg, and atenolol 12·5 mg). Participants with untreated hypertension were enrolled from four centres in the community of western Sydney, NSW, Australia, mainly by general practitioners. Participants were randomly allocated by computer to either the quadpill or matching placebo for 4 weeks; this treatment was followed by a 2-week washout, then the other study treatment was administered for 4 weeks. Study staff and participants were unaware of treatment allocations, and masking was achieved by use of identical opaque capsules. The primary outcome was placebo-corrected 24-h systolic ambulatory blood pressure reduction after 4 weeks and analysis was by intention to treat. We also did a systematic review of trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of quarter-standard-dose blood pressure-lowering therapy against placebo. This trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, number ACTRN12614001057673. The trial ended after 1 year and this report presents the final analysis. Between November, 2014, and December, 2015, 55 patients were screened for our randomised trial, of whom 21 underwent randomisation. Mean age of participants was 58 years (SD 11) and mean baseline office and 24-h systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels were 154 (14)/90 (11) mm Hg and 140 (9)/87 (8) mm Hg, respectively. One individual declined participation after

  12. The clinical and cost-effectiveness of brief advice for excessive alcohol consumption among people attending sexual health clinics: a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Mike J; Sanatinia, Rahil; Barrett, Barbara; Byford, Sarah; Dean, Madeleine; Green, John; Jones, Rachael; Leurent, Baptiste; Sweeting, Michael J; Touquet, Robin; Greene, Linda; Tyrer, Peter; Ward, Helen; Lingford-Hughes, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of brief advice for excessive alcohol consumption among people who attend sexual health clinics. Methods Two-arm, parallel group, assessor blind, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial. 802 people aged 19 years or over who attended one of three sexual health clinics and were drinking excessively were randomised to either brief advice or control treatment. Brief advice consisted of feedback on alcohol and health, written information and an offer of an appointment with an Alcohol Health Worker. Control participants received a leaflet on health and lifestyle. The primary outcome was mean weekly alcohol consumption during the previous 90 days measured 6 months after randomisation. The main secondary outcome was unprotected sex during this period. Results Among the 402 randomised to brief advice, 397 (99%) received it. The adjusted mean difference in alcohol consumption at 6 months was −2.33 units per week (95% CI −4.69 to 0.03, p=0.053) among those in the active compared to the control arm of the trial. Unprotected sex was reported by 154 (53%) of those who received brief advice, and 178 (59%) controls (adjusted OR=0.89, 95% CI 0.63 to 1.25, p=0.496). There were no significant differences in costs between study groups at 6 months. Conclusions Introduction of universal screening and brief advice for excessive alcohol use among people attending sexual health clinics does not result in clinically important reductions in alcohol consumption or provide a cost-effective use of resources. Trial registration number Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 99963322. PMID:24936090

  13. Individual music therapy for managing neuropsychiatric symptoms for people with dementia and their carers: a cluster randomised controlled feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ming Hung; Flowerdew, Rosamund; Parker, Michael; Fachner, Jörg; Odell-Miller, Helen

    2015-07-18

    Previous research highlights the importance of staff involvement in psychosocial interventions targeting neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia. Music therapy has shown potential effects, but it is not clear how this intervention can be programmed to involve care staff within the delivery of patients' care. This study reports initial feasibility and outcomes from a five month music therapy programme including weekly individual active music therapy for people with dementia and weekly post-therapy video presentations for their carers in care homes. 17 care home residents and 10 care staff were randomised to the music therapy intervention group or standard care control group. The cluster randomised, controlled trial included baseline, 3-month, 5-month and post-intervention 7-month measures of residents' symptoms and well-being. Carer-resident interactions were also assessed. Feasibility was based on carers' feedback through semi-structured interviews, programme evaluations and track records of the study. The music therapy programme appeared to be a practicable and acceptable intervention for care home residents and staff in managing dementia symptoms. Recruitment and retention data indicated feasibility but also challenges. Preliminary outcomes indicated differences in symptoms (13.42, 95 % CI: [4.78 to 22.07; p = 0.006]) and in levels of wellbeing (-0.74, 95 % CI: [-1.15 to -0.33; p = 0.003]) between the two groups, indicating that residents receiving music therapy improved. Staff in the intervention group reported enhanced caregiving techniques as a result of the programme. The data supports the value of developing a music therapy programme involving weekly active individual music therapy sessions and music therapist-carer communication. The intervention is feasible with modifications in a more rigorous evaluation of a larger sample size. Clinicaltrials.gov, number NCT01744600.

  14. A randomised controlled trial of a cognitive behavioural intervention for women who have menopausal symptoms following breast cancer treatment (MENOS 1: Trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellier Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a group cognitive behavioural intervention to alleviate menopausal symptoms (hot flushes and night sweats in women who have had breast cancer treatment. Hot flushes and night sweats are highly prevalent but challenging to treat in this population. Cognitive behaviour therapy has been found to reduce these symptoms in well women and results of an exploratory trial suggest that it might be effective for breast cancer patients. Two hypotheses are tested: Compared to usual care, group cognitive behavioural therapy will: 1. Significantly reduce the problem rating and frequency of hot flushes and nights sweats after six weeks of treatment and at six months post-randomisation. 2. Improve mood and quality of life after six weeks of treatment and at six months post-randomisation. Methods/Design Ninety-six women who have completed their main treatment for breast cancer and who have been experiencing problematic hot flushes and night sweats for over two months are recruited into the trial from oncology and breast clinics in South East London. They are randomised to either six weekly group cognitive behavioural therapy (Group CBT sessions or to usual care. Group CBT includes information and discussion about hot flushes and night sweats in the context of breast cancer, monitoring and modifying precipitants, relaxation and paced respiration, stress management, cognitive therapy for unhelpful thoughts and beliefs, managing sleep and night sweats and maintaining changes. Prior to randomisation women attend a clinical interview, undergo 24-hour sternal skin conductance monitoring, and complete questionnaire measures of hot flushes and night sweats, mood, quality of life, hot flush beliefs and behaviours, optimism and somatic amplification. Post-treatment measures (sternal skin conductance and questionnaires are collected six to eight weeks later and follow-up measures (questionnaires and a use

  15. Safety and efficacy of pitolisant on cataplexy in patients with narcolepsy: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szakacs, Zoltan; Dauvilliers, Yves; Mikhaylov, Vladimir; Poverennova, Irina; Krylov, Sergei; Jankovic, Slavko; Sonka, Karel; Lehert, Philippe; Lecomte, Isabelle; Lecomte, Jeanne-Marie; Schwartz, Jean-Charles

    2017-03-01

    Histaminergic neurons are crucial to maintain wakefulness, but their role in cataplexy is unknown. We assessed the safety and efficacy of pitolisant, a histamine H3 receptor inverse agonist, for treatment of cataplexy in patients with narcolepsy. For this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial we recruited patients with narcolepsy from 16 sleep centres in nine countries (Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Macedonia, Poland, Russia, Serbia, Turkey, and Ukraine). Patients were eligible if they were aged 18 years or older, diagnosed with narcolepsy with cataplexy according to version two of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders criteria, experienced at least three cataplexies per week, and had excessive daytime sleepiness (defined as an Epworth Sleepiness Scale score ≥12). We used a computer-generated sequence via an interactive web response system to randomly assign patients to receive either pitolisant or placebo once per day (1:1 ratio). Randomisation was done in blocks of four. Participants and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. Treatment lasted for 7 weeks: 3 weeks of flexible dosing decided by investigators according to efficacy and tolerance (5 mg, 10 mg, or 20 mg oral pitolisant), followed by 4 weeks of stable dosing (5 mg, 10 mg, 20 mg, or 40 mg). The primary endpoint was the change in the average number of cataplexy attacks per week as recorded in patient diaries (weekly cataplexy rate [WCR]) between the 2 weeks of baseline and the 4 weeks of stable dosing period. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01800045. The trial was done between April 19, 2013, and Jan 28, 2015. We screened 117 patients, 106 of whom were randomly assigned to treatment (54 to pitolisant and 52 to placebo) and, after dropout, 54 patients from the pitolisant group and 51 from the placebo group were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. The WCR during the stable dosing period

  16. Randomised controlled trial of a new palliative care service: Compliance, recruitment and completeness of follow-up

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    Saleem Tariq

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Palliative care has been proposed for progressive non-cancer conditions but there have been few evaluations of service developments. We analysed recruitment, compliance and follow-up data of a fast track (or wait list control randomised controlled trial of a new palliative care service – a design not previously used to assess palliative care. Methods/Design An innovative palliative care service (comprising a consultant in palliative medicine, a clinical nurse specialist, an administrator and a psychosocial worker was delivered to people severely affected by multiple sclerosis (MS, and their carers, in southeast London. Our design followed the MRC Framework for the Evaluation of Complex Interventions. In phase II we conducted randomised controlled trial, of immediate referral to the service (fast-track versus a 12-week wait (standard best practice. Main outcome measures were: compliance (the extent the trial protocol was adhered to, recruitment (target 50 patients, attrition and missing data rates; trial outcomes were Palliative Care Outcome Scale and MS Impact Scale. Results 69 patients were referred, 52 entered the trial (26 randomised to each arm, 5 refused consent and 12 were excluded from the trial for other reasons, usually illness or urgent needs, achieving our target numbers. 25/26 fast track and 21/26 standard best practice patients completed the trial, resulting in 217/225 (96% of possible interviews completed, 87% of which took place in the patient's home. Main reasons for failure to interview and/or attrition were death or illness. There were three deaths in the standard best practice group and one in the fast-track group during the trial. At baseline there were no differences between groups. Missing data for individual questionnaire items were small (median 0, mean 1–5 items out of 56+ items per interview, not associated with any patient or carer characteristics or with individual questionnaires, but were

  17. Promoting physical activity in sedentary elderly Malays with type 2 diabetes: a protocol for randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazlina, Shariff-Ghazali; Browning, Colette Joy; Yasin, Shajahan

    2012-01-01

    Like many countries Malaysia is facing an increase in the number of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus diabetes (T2DM) and modifiable lifestyle factors such as sedentary behaviour are important drivers of this increase. The level of physical activity is low among elderly Malay people. In Malaysia, strategies to promote physical activity in elderly Malay people with T2DM are not well documented in the research literature. This paper discusses an intervention to increase physical activity in elderly Malay people with T2DM. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of personalised feedback alone and in combination with peer support in promoting and maintaining physical activity in comparison with usual care. A three-arm randomised controlled trial will be conducted among sedentary Malay adults aged 60 years and above with T2DM attending an urban primary healthcare clinic in Malaysia. The participants will be randomised into three groups for a 12-week intervention with a follow-up at 24 and 36 weeks to assess adherence. The primary outcome of this study is pedometer-determined physical activity. Glycaemic and blood pressure control, body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness, balance, lipid profile, health-related quality of life, psychological well-being, social support and self-efficacy for exercise are the secondary measures. Linear mixed models will be used to determine the effect of the intervention over time and between groups. ETHICAL AND DISSEMINATION: The Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee and the Malaysian Ministry of Health's Medical Research Ethics Committee approved this protocol. The findings of this study will be presented at international conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. This study protocol has been registered with the Malaysian National Medical Research Registry and with the Current Controlled Trial Ltd (http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN71447000/).

  18. Randomised Controlled Trial to determine the appropriate time to initiate peritoneal dialysis after insertion of catheter to minimise complications (Timely PD study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fassett Robert G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most appropriate time to initiate dialysis after surgical insertion of Tenckhoff catheters is not clear in the literature. There is the possibility of peritoneal dialysis (PD complications such as leakage and infection if dialysis is started too soon after insertion. However, much morbidity and expense could be saved by reducing dependency on haemodialysis (HD by earlier initiation of PD post catheter insertion. Previous studies are observational and mostly compare immediate with delayed use. The primary objective is to determine the safest and shortest time interval between surgical placement of a Tenckhoff catheter and starting PD. Methods/Design This is a randomised controlled trial of patients who will start PD after insertion of Tenckhoff catheter at Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH or Rockhampton Base Hospital (RBH who meet the inclusion criteria. Patients will be stratified by site and diabetic status. The patients will be randomised to one of three treatment groups. Group 1 will start PD one week after Tenckhoff catheter insertion, group 2 at two weeks and group 3 at four weeks. Nurses and physicians will be blinded to the randomised allocation. The primary end point is the complication rate (leaks and infection after initiation of PD. Discussion The study will determine the most appropriate time to initiate PD after placement of a Tenckhoff catheter. Trial Registration ACTRN12610000076077

  19. A randomised controlled trial of Silirum vaccine for control of paratuberculosis in farmed red deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, L A; Wilson, P R; Heuer, C; Mackintosh, C G

    2013-12-07

    A randomised controlled trial to assess the efficacy of Silirum vaccine in control of paratuberculosis in young farmed deer was carried out in 2008-2009 in six New Zealand herds with a history of clinical disease. Vaccination with Silirum was carried out in four-month-old deer, and vaccinates (n=1671) and controls (n=1664) were weighed at vaccination and at 8 and 12 months old, when faecal samples were collected from 125 vaccinates and 123 controls on five farms. Deer were slaughtered between 11 and 20 months of age, and the incidence of gross visceral lymph node (VLN) pathology typical of paratuberculosis in deer, that is, enlarged and/or granulomatous VLN, was recorded. Clinical disease was confirmed in 18 controls and seven vaccinates, representing a vaccine efficacy estimate of 60 per cent (95% CI 3 per cent to 83 per cent, P=0.04). Forty-seven percent (95% CI 38 per cent to 56 per cent) of faecal samples from vaccinates and 55 per cent (95% CI 46 per cent to 64 per cent) from controls were Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis positive (P=0.5). Average daily liveweight gain did not differ between the cohorts. At slaughter, 1.4 per cent of vaccinates and 4.5 per cent of controls had VLN pathology, RR=0.32 (95% CI 0.19 to 0.54, Pvaccination with Silirum may be useful as an aid to control losses associated with clinical paratuberculosis in young deer.

  20. Increasing participation of cancer patients in randomised controlled trials: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stirk Lisa

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are many barriers to patient participation in randomised controlled trials of cancer treatments. To increase participation in trials, strategies need to be identified to overcome these barriers. Our aim was to assess the effectiveness of interventions to overcome barriers to patient participation in randomised controlled trials (RCTs of cancer treatments. Methods A systematic review was conducted. Published and unpublished studies in any language were searched for in fifteen electronic databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO, from inception to the end of 2004. Studies of any interventions to improve cancer patient participation in RCTs, which reported the change in recruitment rates, were eligible for inclusion. RCTs and non-randomised controlled trials as well as before and after studies reporting baseline rates specific to the population being investigated were included. Data were extracted by one reviewer into structured summary tables and checked for accuracy by a second reviewer. Each included study was assessed against a checklist for methodological quality by one reviewer and checked by a second reviewer. A narrative synthesis was conducted. Results Eight studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria: three RCTs, two non-randomised controlled trials and three observational studies. Six of the studies had an intervention that had some relevance to the UK. There was no robust evidence that any of the interventions investigated led to an increase in cancer patient participation in RCTs, though one good quality RCT found that urologists and nurses were equally effective at recruiting participants to a treatment trial for prostate cancer. Although there was no evidence of an effect in any of the studies, the evidence was not of sufficient quality to be able to conclude that these interventions therefore do not work. Conclusion There is not a strong evidence-base for interventions that

  1. Use of qualitative methods alongside randomised controlled trials of complex healthcare interventions: methodological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Simon; Glenton, Claire; Oxman, Andrew D

    2009-09-10

    To examine the use of qualitative approaches alongside randomised trials of complex healthcare interventions. Review of randomised controlled trials of interventions to change professional practice or the organisation of care. Systematic sample of 100 trials published in English from the register of the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Review Group. Published and unpublished qualitative studies linked to the randomised controlled trials were identified through database searches and contact with authors. Data were extracted from each study by two reviewers using a standard form. We extracted data describing the randomised controlled trials and qualitative studies, the quality of these studies, and how, if at all, the qualitative and quantitative findings were combined. A narrative synthesis of the findings was done. 30 of the 100 trials had associated qualitative work and 19 of these were published studies. 14 qualitative studies were done before the trial, nine during the trial, and four after the trial. 13 studies reported an explicit theoretical basis and 11 specified their methodological approach. Approaches to sampling and data analysis were poorly described. For most cases (n=20) we found no indication of integration of qualitative and quantitative findings at the level of either analysis or interpretation. The quality of the qualitative studies was highly variable. Qualitative studies alongside randomised controlled trials remain uncommon, even where relatively complex interventions are being evaluated. Most of the qualitative studies were carried out before or during the trials with few studies used to explain trial results. The findings of the qualitative studies seemed to be poorly integrated with those of the trials and often had major methodological shortcomings.

  2. Randomised controlled trial examining the effect of exercise in people with rheumatoid arthritis taking anti-TNFα therapy medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veale Douglas J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substantial progress has been made in the medical management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA over the past decade with the introduction of biologic therapies, including anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFα therapy medications. However, individuals with RA taking anti-TNFα medication continue to experience physical, psychological and functional consequences, which could potentially benefit from rehabilitation. There is evidence that therapeutic exercise should be included as an intervention for people with RA, but to date there is little evidence of the benefits of therapeutic exercise for people with RA on anti-TNFα therapy medication. A protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled three-armed study which aims to examine the effect of dynamic group exercise therapy on land or in water for people with RA taking anti-TNFα therapy medication is described. Methods/Design Six hundred and eighteen individuals with RA, on anti-TNFα therapy medication, will be randomised into one of 3 groups: a land-based exercise group; a water-based exercise group or a control group. The land and water-based groups will exercise for one hour, twice a week for eight weeks. The control group will receive no intervention and will be asked not to alter their exercise habits for the duration of the study. The primary outcome measure, the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI which measures functional ability, and secondary measures of pain, fatigue and quality of life, will be assessed at baseline, eight and 24 weeks by an independent assessor unaware of group allocation. Changes in outcome from 0 to 8 weeks and 0 to 24 weeks in the 'land-based exercise group versus control group' and the 'water-based exercise group versus control group' will be examined. Analysis will be conducted on an intention to treat basis. Discussion This trial will evaluate the effectiveness of group exercise therapy on land or in water

  3. TREC-SAVE: a randomised trial comparing mechanical restraints with use of seclusion for aggressive or violent seriously mentally ill people: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

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    Ferreira Marco AV

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thousands of people whose aggression is thought due to serious mental illness are secluded or restrained every day. Without fair testing these techniques will continue to be used outside of a rigorous evidence base. With such coercive treatment this leaves all concerned vulnerable to abuse and criticism. This paper presents the protocol for a randomised trial comparing seclusion with restraints for people with serious mental illnesses. Methods/Design Setting-General psychiatric wards of a large psychiatric hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Participants-Anyone aggressive or violent suspected or known to have serious mental illness for whom restriction is felt to be indicated by nursing and medical staff, but also for whom they are unsure whether seclusion or restraint would be indicated. Interventions-The standard care of either strong cotton banding to edge of bed with medications as indicated and close observation or the other standard care of use of a minimally furnished seclusion room but with open but barred windows onto the nursing station. Outcomes-time to restrictions lifted, early change of treatment, additional episodes, adverse effects/events, satisfaction with care during episode. Duration-2 weeks. Identifier: ISRCTN 49454276 http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN49454276

  4. Outcomes and costs of primary care surveillance and intervention for overweight or obese children: the LEAP 2 randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, Melissa; Baur, Louise A; Gerner, Bibi; Gibbons, Kay; Gold, Lisa; Gunn, Jane; Levickis, Penny; McCallum, Zoë; Naughton, Geraldine; Sanci, Lena; Ukoumunne, Obioha C

    2009-09-03

    To determine whether ascertainment of childhood obesity by surveillance followed by structured secondary prevention in primary care improved outcomes in overweight or mildly obese children. Randomised controlled trial nested within a baseline cross sectional survey of body mass index (BMI). Randomisation and outcomes measurement, but not participants, were blinded to group assignment. 45 family practices (66 general practitioners) in Melbourne, Australia. 3958 children visiting their general practitioner in May 2005-July 2006 were surveyed for BMI. Of these, 258 children aged 5 years 0 months up to their 10th birthday who were overweight or obese by International Obesity Taskforce criteria were randomised to intervention (n=139) or control (n=119) groups. Children who were very obese (UK BMI z score >or=3.0) were excluded. Four standard consultations over 12 weeks targeting change in nutrition, physical activity, and sedentary behaviour, supported by purpose designed family materials. Main outcomes measures Primary measure was BMI at 6 and 12 months after randomisation. Secondary measures were mean activity count/min by 7-day accelerometry, nutrition score from 4-day abbreviated food frequency diary, and child health related quality of life. Differences were adjusted for socioeconomic status, age, sex, and baseline BMI. Of 781 eligible children, 258 (33%) entered the trial; attrition was 3.1% at 6 months and 6.2% at 12 months. Adjusted mean differences (intervention - control) at 6 and 12 months were, for BMI, -0.12 (95% CI -0.40 to 0.15, P=0.4) and -0.11 (-0.45 to 0.22, P=0.5); for physical activity in counts/min, 24 (-4 to 52, P=0.09) and 11 (-26 to 49, P=0.6); and, for nutrition score, 0.2 (-0.03 to 0.4, P=0.1) and 0.1 (-0.1 to 0.4, P=0.2). There was no evidence of harm to the child. Costs to the healthcare system were significantly higher in the intervention arm. Primary care screening followed by brief counselling did not improve BMI, physical activity, or

  5. Reducing the time before consulting with symptoms of lung cancer: a randomised controlled trial in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah; Fielding, Shona; Murchie, Peter; Johnston, Marie; Wyke, Sally; Powell, Rachael; Devereux, Graham; Nicolson, Marianne; Macleod, Una; Wilson, Phil; Ritchie, Lewis; Lee, Amanda J; Campbell, Neil C

    2013-01-01

    Most individuals with lung cancer have symptoms for several months before presenting to their GP. Earlier consulting may improve survival. To evaluate whether a theory-based primary care intervention increased timely consulting of individuals with symptoms of lung cancer. Open randomised controlled trial comparing intervention with usual care in two general practices in north-east Scotland. Smokers and ex-smokers aged ≥55 years were randomised to receive a behavioural intervention or usual care. The intervention comprised a single nurse consultation at participants' general practice and a self-help manual. The main outcomes were consultations within target times for individuals with new chest symptoms (≤3 days haemoptysis, ≤3 weeks other symptoms) in the year after the intervention commenced, and intentions about consulting with chest symptoms at 1 and 6 months. Two hundred and twelve participants were randomised and 206 completed the trial. The consultation rate for new chest symptoms in the intervention group was 1.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.92 to 1.53; P = 0.18) times higher than in the usual-care group and the proportion of consultations within the target time was 1.11 (95% CI = 0.41 to 3.03; P = 0.83) times higher. One month after the intervention commenced, the intervention group reported intending to consult with chest symptoms 31 days (95% CI = 7 to 54; P = 0.012) earlier than the usual care group, and at 6 months this was 25 days (95% CI = 1.5 to 48; P = 0.037) earlier. Behavioural intervention in primary care shortened the time individuals at high risk of lung disease intended to take before consulting with new chest symptoms (the secondary outcome of the study), but increases in consultation rates and the proportions of consultations within target times were not statistically significant.

  6. Trial Protocol: Communicating DNA-based risk assessments for Crohn's disease: a randomised controlled trial assessing impact upon stopping smoking

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    Armstrong David

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimates of the risk of developing Crohn's disease (CD can be made using DNA testing for mutations in the NOD2 (CARD15 gene, family history, and smoking status. Smoking doubles the risk of CD, a risk that is reduced by stopping. CD therefore serves as a timely and novel paradigm within which to assess the utility of predictive genetic testing to motivate behaviour change to reduce the risk of disease. The aim of the study is to describe the impact upon stopping smoking of communicating a risk of developing CD that incorporates DNA analysis. We will test the following main hypothesis: Smokers who are first degree relatives (FDRs of CD probands are more likely to make smoking cessation attempts following communication of risk estimates of developing CD that incorporate DNA analysis, compared with an equivalent communication that does not incorporate DNA analysis. Methods/design A parallel groups randomised controlled trial in which smokers who are FDRs of probands with CD are randomly allocated in families to undergo one of two types of assessment of risk for developing CD based on either: i. DNA analysis, family history of CD and smoking status, or ii. Family history of CD and smoking status The primary outcome is stopping smoking for 24 hours or longer in the six months following provision of risk information. The secondary outcomes are seven-day smoking abstinence at one week and six month follow-ups. Randomisation of 470 smoking FDRs of CD probands, with 400 followed up (85%, provides 80% power to detect a difference in the primary outcome of 14% between randomised arms, at the 5% significance level. Discussion This trial provides one of the strongest tests to date of the impact of communicating DNA-based risk assessment on risk-reducing behaviour change. Specific issues regarding the choice of trial design are discussed. Trial Registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN21633644

  7. Randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of the 'Families for Health' programme to reduce obesity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Wendy; Fleming, Joanna; Kamal, Atiya; Hamborg, Thomas; Khan, Kamran A; Griffiths, Frances; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Stallard, Nigel; Petrou, Stavros; Simkiss, Douglas; Harrison, Elizabeth; Kim, Sung Wook; Thorogood, Margaret

    2017-05-01

    Evaluating effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of 'Families for Health V2' (FFH) compared with usual care (UC). Multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) (investigators blinded, families unblinded) and economic evaluation. Stratified randomisation by family; target of 120 families. Three National Health Service Primary Care Trusts in West Midlands, England. Overweight or obese (≥91st or ≥98th centile body mass index (BMI)) children aged 6-11 years and their parents/carers, recruited March 2012-February 2014. FFH; a 10-week community-based family programme addressing parenting, lifestyle change and social and emotional development. UC; usual support for childhood obesity at each site. Primary outcomes were 12-months change in children's BMI z-score and incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained (QALY). Secondary outcomes included changes in children's physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption and quality of life, parents' BMI and mental well-being, family eating/activity, parent-child relationships and parenting style. 115 families (128 children) were randomised to FFH (n=56) or UC (n=59). There was no significant difference in BMI z-score 12-months change (0.114, 95% CI -0.001 to 0.229, p=0.053; p=0.026 in favour of UC with missing value multiple imputation). One secondary outcome, change in children's waist z-score, was significantly different between groups in favour of UC (0.15, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.29). Economic evaluation showed that mean costs were significantly higher for FFH than UC (£998 vs £548, pobesity compared with UC. ISRCTN45032201. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Ultrasound guided injection of dexamethasone versus placebo for treatment of plantar fasciitis: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

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    Gilheany Mark F

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar fasciitis is the most commonly reported cause of chronic pain beneath the heel. Management of this condition commonly involves the use of corticosteroid injection in cases where less invasive treatments have failed. However, despite widespread use, only two randomised trials have tested the effect of this treatment in comparison to placebo. These trials currently offer the best available evidence by which to guide clinical practice, though both were limited by methodological issues such as insufficient statistical power. Therefore, the aim of this randomised trial is to compare the effect of ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection versus placebo for treatment of plantar fasciitis. Methods The trial will be conducted at the La Trobe University Podiatry Clinic and will recruit 80 community-dwelling participants. Diagnostic ultrasound will be used to diagnose plantar fasciitis and participants will be required to meet a range of selection criteria. Participants will be randomly allocated to one of two treatment arms: (i ultrasound-guided injection of the plantar fascia with 1 mL of 4 mg/mL dexamethasone sodium phosphate (experimental group, or (ii ultrasound-guided injection of the plantar fascia with 1 mL normal saline (control group. Blinding will be applied to participants and the investigator performing procedures, measuring outcomes and analysing data. Primary outcomes will be pain measured by the Foot Health Status Questionnaire and plantar fascia thickness measured by ultrasound at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. All data analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Conclusion This will be a randomised trial investigating the effect of dexamethasone injection on pre-specified treatment outcomes in people with plantar fasciitis. Within the parameters of this protocol, the trial findings will be used to make evidence-based recommendations regarding the use of corticosteroid injection for treatment of this

  9. Health on the web: randomised controlled trial of online screening and brief alcohol intervention delivered in a workplace setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarnie Khadjesari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alcohol misuse in England costs around £7.3 billion (US$12.2 billion annually from lost productivity and absenteeism. Delivering brief alcohol interventions to employees as part of a health check may be acceptable, particularly with online delivery which can provide privacy for this stigmatised behaviour. Research to support this approach is limited and methodologically weak. The aim was to determine the effectiveness of online screening and personalised feedback on alcohol consumption, delivered in a workplace as part of a health check. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This two-group online individually randomised controlled trial recruited employees from a UK-based private sector organisation (approx. 100,000 employees. 3,375 employees completed the online health check in the three week recruitment period. Of these, 1,330 (39% scored five or more on the AUDIT-C (indicating alcohol misuse and were randomised to receive personalised feedback on their alcohol intake, alongside feedback on other health behaviours (n = 659, or to receive feedback on all health behaviours except alcohol intake (n = 671. Participants were mostly male (75%, with a median age of 48 years and half were in managerial positions (55%. Median Body Mass Index was 26, 12% were smokers, median time undertaking moderate/vigorous physical activity a week was 173 minutes and median fruit and vegetable consumption was three portions a day. Eighty percent (n = 1,066 of participants completed follow-up questionnaires at three months. An intention to treat analysis found no difference between experimental groups for past week drinking (primary outcome (5.6% increase associated with the intervention (95% CI -4.7% to 16.9%; p = .30, AUDIT (measure of alcohol-related harm and health utility (EQ-5D. CONCLUSIONS: There was no evidence to support the use of personalised feedback within an online health check for reducing alcohol consumption among employees in this

  10. Group-based cognitive-behavioural anger management for people with mild to moderate intellectual disabilities: cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, Paul; Rose, John; Jahoda, Andrew; Kroese, Biza Stenfert; Felce, David; Cohen, David; Macmahon, Pamela; Stimpson, Aimee; Rose, Nicola; Gillespie, David; Shead, Jennifer; Lammie, Claire; Woodgate, Christopher; Townson, Julia; Nuttall, Jacqueline; Hood, Kerenza

    2013-09-01

    Many people with intellectual disabilities find it hard to control their anger and this often leads to aggression which can have serious consequences, such as exclusion from mainstream services and the need for potentially more expensive emergency placements. To evaluate the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) intervention for anger management in people with intellectual disabilities. A cluster-randomised trial of group-based 12-week CBT, which took place in day services for people with intellectual disabilities and was delivered by care staff using a treatment manual. Participants were 179 service users identified as having problems with anger control randomly assigned to either anger management or treatment as usual. Assessments were conducted before the intervention, and at 16 weeks and 10 months after randomisation (trial registration: ISRCTN37509773). The intervention had only a small, and non-significant, effect on participants' reports of anger on the Provocation Index, the primary outcome measure (mean difference 2.8, 95% CI -1.7 to 7.4 at 10 months). However, keyworker Provocation Index ratings were significantly lower in both follow-up assessments, as were service-user ratings on another self-report anger measure based on personally salient triggers. Both service users and their keyworkers reported greater usage of anger coping skills at both follow-up assessments and keyworkers and home carers reported lower levels of challenging behaviour. The intervention was effective in improving anger control by people with intellectual disabilities. It provides evidence of the effectiveness of a CBT intervention for this client group and demonstrates that the staff who work with them can be trained and supervised to deliver such an intervention with reasonable fidelity.

  11. Effect of emollient therapy on clinical outcomes in preterm neonates in Pakistan: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Rehana A; Darmstadt, Gary L; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2015-05-01

    Newborn oil massage, a traditional community practice, could potentially benefit thermoregulation and skin barrier function, and prevent serious infections, morbidity and mortality in high-risk preterm infants, but has only been evaluated in limited studies in low income settings. To assess the efficacy of topical coconut oil applications among a cohort of hospital-born preterm infants. A prospective, individually randomised controlled clinical trial. Nursery and neonatal intensive care unit at Aga Khan University Hospital, Pakistan. Of 270 eligible neonates, a consecutive cohort of 258 hospital-born preterm infants (gestational age ≥26 weeks and ≤37 weeks). Twice daily topical application of coconut oil by nurses from birth until discharge and continued thereafter by mothers at home until completion of the 28th day of life. Incidence of hospital-acquired bloodstream infections. Weight gain, skin condition and neonatal mortality. 23% of the enrolled neonates developed clinically suspected sepsis while 14% developed blood culture proven infection. The unadjusted hazard for developing hospital-acquired infection in the control group was 4.7 (95% CI 1.8 to 12.4) compared with the intervention group. After adjusting for gestational age, birth weight, duration of intubation and duration of hospitalisation for possible confounding, the hazard for hospital-acquired infection in the control group was 6.0 (95% CI 2.3 to 16) compared with the intervention group. The rate of hospital-acquired infections in the control and intervention groups was 219.1 and 39.5 per 1000 patient-days, respectively. Mean weight gain was 11.3 g/day higher (95% CI 8.1 to 14.6, peffects such as local irritation or local infection were observed among newborns receiving coconut oil applications. Topical emollient therapy was effective in maintaining skin integrity and reducing the risk of bloodstream infection in preterm infants in a tertiary hospital setting in Pakistan. The effectiveness of

  12. De Quervain's Tenosynovitis and Phonophoresis: A Randomised Controlled Trial in Pregnant Females

    OpenAIRE

    Tabinda Hasan; Mahmood Fauzi

    2015-01-01

    Background: De Quervain's tenosynovitis is a common cause of wrist pain in pregnant and postpartum females. This study provides objective evidence regarding the therapeutic efficacy of phonophoresis in treating de Quervain's disease during pregnancy. Methods: In a single blind, randomised, controlled trial (n = 50), ketoprofen phonophoresis was given to the intervention group and conventional ultrasound (US) was given to controls, coupled with thumb splint immobilisation, and supervised st...

  13. Dietary outcomes of a community based intervention for mothers of young children: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jancey, Jonine Maree; Dos Remedios Monteiro, Sarojini Maria; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S.; Howat, Peter A.; Burns, Sharyn; Andrew P. Hills; Anderson, Annie S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Unhealthy dietary behaviours are one of the key risk factors for many lifestyle-related diseases worldwide. This randomised controlled trial aimed to increase the level of fruit, vegetable and fibre intake and decrease the fat and sugar consumption of mothers with young children (0–5 years) via the playgroup setting. Methods Playgroups located in 60 neighbourhoods in Perth, Western Australia were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 249) or control group (n = 272). Those in th...

  14. Effects of improved home heating on asthma in community dwelling children: randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Howden-Chapman, Philippa; Pierse, Nevil; Nicholls, Sarah; Gillespie-Bennett, Julie; Viggers, Helen; Cunningham, Malcolm; Phipps, Robyn; Boulic, Mikael; Fjällström, Pär; Free, Sarah; Chapman, Ralph; Lloyd, Bob; Wickens, Kristin; Shields, David; Baker, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess whether non-polluting, more effective home heating (heat pump, wood pellet burner, flued gas) has a positive effect on the health of children with asthma. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Households in five communities in New Zealand. Participants 409 children aged 6-12 years with doctor diagnosed asthma. Interventions Installation of a non-polluting, more effective home heater before winter. The control group received a replacement heater at the end of the tria...

  15. Internet-based CBT for depression with and without telephone tracking in a national helpline: randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Farrer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telephone helplines are frequently and repeatedly used by individuals with chronic mental health problems and web interventions may be an effective tool for reducing depression in this population. AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness of a 6 week, web-based cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT intervention with and without proactive weekly telephone tracking in the reduction of depression in callers to a helpline service. METHOD: 155 callers to a national helpline service with moderate to high psychological distress were recruited and randomised to receive either Internet CBT plus weekly telephone follow-up; Internet CBT only; weekly telephone follow-up only; or treatment as usual. RESULTS: Depression was lower in participants in the web intervention conditions both with and without telephone tracking compared to the treatment as usual condition both at post intervention and at 6 month follow-up. Telephone tracking provided by a lay telephone counsellor did not confer any additional advantage in terms of symptom reduction or adherence. CONCLUSIONS: A web-based CBT program is effective both with and without telephone tracking for reducing depression in callers to a national helpline. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.comISRCTN93903959.

  16. Auricular acupuncture for prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension: study protocol for a pilot multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo-Hee; Jung, Hyun Jung; Kim, Tae-Hun; Lee, Seunghoon; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kang, Kyung-Won; Jung, So-Young; Kim, Ae-Ran; Park, Hyo-Ju; Shin, Mi-Suk; Shin, Kyung-Min; Jung, Hee-Jung; Lee, Seung-Deok; Hong, Kwon-Eui; Choi, Sun-Mi

    2013-09-22

    Hypertension, a worldwide public health problem, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular and kidney disease, and the medical and economic burden of hypertension is increasing. Auricular acupuncture has been used to treat various diseases, including hypertension. Several studies have shown that auricular acupuncture treatment decreases blood pressure in patients with hypertension; however, the scientific evidence is still insufficient. Therefore, we aimed to perform a randomised controlled clinical trial in patients with prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension to evaluate the effect and safety of auricular acupuncture. This on-going study is a two parallel arm, assessor-blinded, randomised controlled trial. Sixty participants with prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension will be recruited and randomly allocated into two groups in a 1:1 ratio. Participants in the auricular acupuncture group will receive auricular acupuncture treatment two times per week for 4 weeks. Participants in the usual care group will not receive any acupuncture treatment during the study period. All participants in both groups will be provided with verbal and written educational materials regarding the dietary and physical activity habits for controlling high blood pressure, and they will self-manage their lifestyle, including diet and exercise, during the study. The primary outcome is the 24-h average systolic and diastolic blood pressure, as measured with an ambulatory monitor. The secondary outcomes are the mean change in the average systolic and diastolic blood pressure during day- and night-time, the circadian rhythm of blood pressure, the mean arterial pressure, the change in blood pressure before and after auricular acupuncture treatment, the EuroQOL-5D (EQ-5D), heart rate variability (HRV), body mass index (BMI) and laboratory examination, including lipid profile and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Safety will be assessed at every visit. This pilot multicentre

  17. Mechanisms behind the superior effects of interval vs continuous training on glycaemic control in individuals with type 2 diabetes: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstoft, Kristian; Winding, Kamilla; Knudsen, Sine H; James, Noemi G; Scheel, Maria M; Olesen, Jesper; Holst, Jens J; Pedersen, Bente K; Solomon, Thomas P J

    2014-10-01

    By use of a parallel and partly crossover randomised, controlled trial design we sought to elucidate the underlying mechanisms behind the advantageous effects of interval walking training (IWT) compared with continuous walking training (CWT) on glycaemic control in individuals with type 2 diabetes. We hypothesised that IWT, more than CWT, would improve insulin sensitivity including skeletal muscle insulin signalling, insulin secretion and disposition index (DI). By simple randomisation (sequentially numbered, opaque sealed envelopes), eligible individuals (diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, no exogenous insulin treatment) were allocated to three groups: a control group (CON, n = 8), an IWT group (n = 12) and an energy expenditure-matched CWT group (n = 12). Training groups were prescribed free-living training, five sessions per week (60 min/session). A three-stage hyperglycaemic clamp, including glucose isotope tracers and skeletal muscle biopsies, was performed before and after a 4 month intervention in a hospitalised setting. No blinding was performed. The improved glycaemic control, which was only seen in the IWT group, was consistent with IWT-induced increases in insulin sensitivity index (49.8 ± 14.6%; p training with alternating intensity, and not just training volume and mean intensity, is a key determinant of changes in whole body glucose disposal in individuals with type 2 diabetes. ClinicalTrials (NCT01234155).

  18. Efficacy of manipulation for non-specific neck pain of recent onset: design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Rob D

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manipulation is a common treatment for non-specific neck pain. Neck manipulation, unlike gentler forms of manual therapy such as mobilisation, is associated with a small risk of serious neurovascular injury and can result in stroke or death. It is thought however, that neck manipulation provides better results than mobilisation where clinically indicated. There is long standing and vigorous debate both within and between the professions that use neck manipulation as well as the wider scientific community as to whether neck manipulation potentially does more harm than good. The primary aim of this study is to determine whether neck manipulation provides more rapid resolution of an episode of neck pain than mobilisation. Methods/Design 182 participants with acute and sub-acute neck pain will be recruited from physiotherapy, chiropractic and osteopathy practices in Sydney, Australia. Participants will be randomly allocated to treatment with either manipulation or mobilisation. Randomisation will occur after the treating practitioner decides that manipulation is an appropriate treatment for the individual participant. Both groups will receive at least 4 treatments over 2 weeks. The primary outcome is number of days taken to recover from the episode of neck pain. Cox regression will be used to compare survival curves for time to recovery for the manipulation and mobilisation treatment groups. Discussion This paper presents the rationale and design of a randomised controlled trial to compare the effectiveness of neck manipulation and neck mobilisation for acute and subacute neck pain.

  19. A randomised controlled double-blind clinical trial of 17-hydroxyprogesterone caproate for the prevention of preterm birth in twin gestation (PROGESTWIN): evidence for reduced neonatal morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awwad, J; Usta, I M; Ghazeeri, G; Yacoub, N; Succar, J; Hayek, S; Saasouh, W; Nassar, A H

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17OHPC) prolongs gestation beyond 37 weeks of gestation (primary outcome) and reduces neonatal morbidity (secondary outcome) in twin pregnancy. Randomised controlled double-blind clinical trial. Tertiary-care university medical centre. Unselected women with twin pregnancies. Participants received weekly injections of 250 mg 17OHPC (n = 194) or placebo (n = 94), from 16-20 to 36 weeks of gestation. Randomisation was performed using the permuted-block randomisation method. Data were analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Preterm birth (PTB) rate before 37 weeks of gestation. There were no significant differences in the average gestational age at delivery, or in the rates of PTB before 37, 32, and 28 weeks of gestation, between the two groups. The proportion of very-low-birthweight neonates (<1500 g) was significantly lower in the 17OHPC group (7.6%) compared with placebo (14.3%) (relative risk, RR 0.5; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI 0.3-0.9; P = 0.01). Progestogen-treated neonates had a significantly lower composite neonatal morbidity (19.1%) compared with placebo (30.9%) (odds ratio, OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.31-0.90; P = 0.02), with significantly lower odds for respiratory distress syndrome (14.4 versus 23.4%; OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.31-0.98; P = 0.04), retinopathy of prematurity (1.1 versus 4.6%; OR 0.21; 95% CI 0.05-0.96; P = 0.04), and culture-confirmed sepsis (3.4 versus 12.8%; OR 0.24; 95% CI 0.10-0.57; P = 0.00). Intramuscular 17OHPC therapy did not reduce PTB before 37 weeks of gestation in unselected twin pregnancies. Nonetheless, 17OHPC significantly reduced neonatal morbidity parameters and increased birthweight. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  20. A physiotherapist-delivered integrated exercise and pain coping skills training intervention for individuals with knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennell Kim L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA is a prevalent chronic musculoskeletal condition with no cure. Pain is the primary symptom and results from a complex interaction between structural changes, physical impairments and psychological factors. Much evidence supports the use of strengthening exercises to improve pain and physical function in this patient population. There is also a growing body of research examining the effects of psychologist-delivered pain coping skills training (PCST particularly in other chronic pain conditions. Though typically provided separately, there are symptom, resource and personnel advantages of exercise and PCST being delivered together by a single healthcare professional. Physiotherapists are a logical choice to be trained to deliver a PCST intervention as they already have expertise in administering exercise for knee OA and are cognisant of the need for a biopsychosocial approach to management. No studies to date have examined the effects of an integrated exercise and PCST program delivered solely by physiotherapists in this population. The primary aim of this multisite randomised controlled trial is to investigate whether an integrated 12-week PCST and exercise treatment program delivered by physiotherapists is more efficacious than either program alone in treating pain and physical function in individuals with knee OA. Methods/design This will be an assessor-blinded, 3-arm randomised controlled trial of a 12-week intervention involving 10 physiotherapy visits together with home practice. Participants with symptomatic and radiographic knee OA will be recruited from the community in two cities in Australia and randomized into one of three groups: exercise alone, PCST alone, or integrated PCST and exercise. Randomisation will be stratified by city (Melbourne or Brisbane and gender. Primary outcomes are overall average pain in the past week measured by a Visual Analogue Scale and physical function measured by

  1. A physiotherapist-delivered integrated exercise and pain coping skills training intervention for individuals with knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennell, Kim L; Ahamed, Yasmin; Bryant, Christina; Jull, Gwendolen; Hunt, Michael A; Kenardy, Justin; Forbes, Andrew; Harris, Anthony; Nicholas, Michael; Metcalf, Ben; Egerton, Thorlene; Keefe, Francis J

    2012-07-24

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic musculoskeletal condition with no cure. Pain is the primary symptom and results from a complex interaction between structural changes, physical impairments and psychological factors. Much evidence supports the use of strengthening exercises to improve pain and physical function in this patient population. There is also a growing body of research examining the effects of psychologist-delivered pain coping skills training (PCST) particularly in other chronic pain conditions. Though typically provided separately, there are symptom, resource and personnel advantages of exercise and PCST being delivered together by a single healthcare professional. Physiotherapists are a logical choice to be trained to deliver a PCST intervention as they already have expertise in administering exercise for knee OA and are cognisant of the need for a biopsychosocial approach to management. No studies to date have examined the effects of an integrated exercise and PCST program delivered solely by physiotherapists in this population. The primary aim of this multisite randomised controlled trial is to investigate whether an integrated 12-week PCST and exercise treatment program delivered by physiotherapists is more efficacious than either program alone in treating pain and physical function in individuals with knee OA. This will be an assessor-blinded, 3-arm randomised controlled trial of a 12-week intervention involving 10 physiotherapy visits together with home practice. Participants with symptomatic and radiographic knee OA will be recruited from the community in two cities in Australia and randomized into one of three groups: exercise alone, PCST alone, or integrated PCST and exercise. Randomisation will be stratified by city (Melbourne or Brisbane) and gender. Primary outcomes are overall average pain in the past week measured by a Visual Analogue Scale and physical function measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities

  2. Rehabilitation of memory following brain injury (ReMemBrIn): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    das Nair, Roshan; Lincoln, Nadina B; Ftizsimmons, Deborah; Brain, Nicola; Montgomery, Alan; Bradshaw, Lucy; Drummond, Avril; Sackley, Catherine; Newby, Gavin; Thornton, Jim; Stapleton, Sandip; Pink, Anthony

    2015-01-06

    Impairments of memory are commonly reported by people with traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Such deficits are persistent, debilitating, and can severely impact quality of life. Currently, many do not routinely receive follow-up appointments for residual memory problems following discharge. This is a multi-centre, randomised controlled trial investigating the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a group-based memory rehabilitation programme. Three hundred and twelve people with a traumatic brain injury will be randomised from four centres. Participants will be eligible if they had a traumatic brain injury more than 3 months prior to recruitment, have memory problems, are 18 to 69 years of age, are able to travel to one of our centres and attend group sessions, and are able to give informed consent. Participants will be randomised in clusters of 4 to 6 to the group rehabilitation intervention or to usual care. Intervention groups will receive 10 weekly sessions of a manualised memory rehabilitation programme, which has been developed in previous pilot studies. The intervention will include restitution strategies to retrain impaired memory functions and compensation strategies to enable participants to cope with their memory problems. All participants will receive a follow-up postal questionnaire and an assessment by a research assistant at 6 and 12 months post-randomisation. The primary outcome is the Everyday Memory Questionnaire at 6 months. Secondary outcomes include the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test-3, General Health Questionnaire-30, health related quality of life, cost-effectiveness analysis determined by the EQ-5D and a service use questionnaire, individual goal attainment, European Brain Injury Questionnaire (patient and relative versions), and the Everyday Memory Questionnaire-relative version. The primary analysis will be based on intention to treat. A mixed-model regression analysis of the Everyday Memory Questionnaire at 6 months will be used to estimate

  3. 'PhysioDirect' telephone assessment and advice services for physiotherapy: protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopper Cherida

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Providing timely access to physiotherapy has long been a problem for the National Health Service in the United Kingdom. In an attempt to improve access some physiotherapy services have introduced a new treatment pathway known as PhysioDirect. Physiotherapists offer initial assessment and advice by telephone, supported by computerised algorithms, and patients are sent written self-management and exercise advice by post. They are invited for face-to-face treatment only when necessary. Although several such services have been developed, there is no robust evidence regarding clinical and cost-effectiveness, nor the acceptability of PhysioDirect. Methods/Design This protocol describes a multi-centre pragmatic individually randomised trial, with nested qualitative research. The aim is to determine the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and acceptability of PhysioDirect compared with usual models of physiotherapy based on patients going onto a waiting list and receiving face-to-face care. PhysioDirect services will be established in four areas in England. Adult patients in these areas with musculoskeletal problems who refer themselves or are referred by a primary care practitioner for physiotherapy will be invited to participate in the trial. About 1875 consenting patients will be randomised in a 2:1 ratio to PhysioDirect or usual care. Data about outcome measures will be collected at baseline and 6 weeks and 6 months after randomisation. The primary outcome is clinical improvement at 6 months; secondary outcomes include cost, waiting times, time lost from work and usual activities, patient satisfaction and preference. The impact of PhysioDirect on patients in different age-groups and with different conditions will also be examined. Incremental cost-effectiveness will be assessed in terms of quality adjusted life years in relation to cost. Qualitative methods will be used to explore factors associated with the success or failure of

  4. Vitamin D3 Supplementation Does Not Improve Sprint Performance in Professional Rugby Players: A Randomised, Placebo-Controlled Double Blind Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbairn, Kirsty A; Ceelen, Ingrid Jm; Skeaff, C Murray; Cameron, Claire M; Perry, Tracy L

    2017-08-03

    Vitamin D insufficiency is common in athletes and may lower physical performance. Many cross-sectional studies associate vitamin D status with physical performance in athletes, however there have been few prospective randomised controlled trials with adequate statistical power to test this relationship, and none in the southern hemisphere. Thus, a prospective double blind, randomised placebo-controlled intervention trial was conducted, involving 57 professional rugby union players in New Zealand. Participants were randomised to receive 50,000 IU of cholecalciferol (equivalent to 3,570 IU/day) or placebo once every two weeks over 11-12 weeks. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations and physical performance were measured at baseline, weeks 5-6 and weeks 11-12. Mean (SD) serum 25(OH)D concentrations for all participants at baseline was 94 (18) nmol/L, with all players above 50 nmol/L. Vitamin D supplementation significantly increased serum 25(OH)D concentrations compared to placebo, with a 32 nmol/L difference between groups at 11-12 weeks (95%CI, 26 to 38; P 0.05). Performance on the weighted reverse-grip chin up was significantly higher in players receiving vitamin D compared with placebo, by 5.5 kg (95%CI, 2.0 to 8.9; P = 0.002). Despite significantly improving vitamin D status in these professional rugby union players, vitamin D supplementation had little impact on physical performance outcomes. Thus, it is unlikely that vitamin D supplementation is an ergogenic aid in this group of athletes.

  5. A randomised controlled trial of caseload midwifery care: M@NGO (Midwives @ New Group practice Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Sally K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Australia has an enviable record of safety for women in childbirth. There is nevertheless growing concern at the increasing level of intervention and consequent morbidity amongst childbearing women. Not only do interventions impact on the cost of services, they carry with them the potential for serious morbidities for mother and infant. Models of midwifery have proliferated in an attempt to offer women less fragmented hospital care. One of these models that is gaining widespread consumer, disciplinary and political support is caseload midwifery care. Caseload midwives manage the care of approximately 35-40 a year within a small Midwifery Group Practice (usually 4-6 midwives who plan their on call and leave within the Group Practice. We propose to compare the outcomes and costs of caseload midwifery care compared to standard or routine hospital care through a randomised controlled trial. Methods/design A two-arm RCT design will be used. Women will be recruited from tertiary women's hospitals in Sydney and Brisbane, Australia. Women allocated to the caseload intervention will receive care from a named caseload midwife within a Midwifery Group Practice. Control women will be allocated to standard or routine hospital care. Women allocated to standard care will receive their care from hospital rostered midwives, public hospital obstetric care and community based general medical practitioner care. All midwives will collaborate with obstetricians and other health professionals as necessary according to the woman's needs. Discussion Data will be collected at recruitment, 36 weeks antenatally, six weeks and six months postpartum by web based or postal survey. With 750 women or more in each of the intervention and control arms the study is powered (based on 80% power; alpha 0.05 to detect a difference in caesarean section rates of 29.4 to 22.9%; instrumental birth rates from 11.0% to 6.8%; and rates of admission to neonatal intensive

  6. Community based yoga classes for type 2 diabetes: an exploratory randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drincevic Desanka

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yoga is a popular therapy for diabetes but its efficacy is contested. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of researching community based yoga classes in Type 2 diabetes with a view to informing the design of a definitive, multi-centre trial Methods The study design was an exploratory randomised controlled trial with in-depth process evaluation. The setting was two multi-ethnic boroughs in London, UK; one with average and one with low mean socio-economic deprivation score. Classes were held at a sports centre or GP surgery. Participants were 59 people with Type 2 diabetes not taking insulin, recruited from general practice lists or opportunistically by general practice staff. The intervention group were offered 12 weeks of a twice-weekly 90-minute yoga class; the control group was a waiting list for the yoga classes. Both groups received advice and leaflets on healthy lifestyle and were encouraged to exercise. Primary outcome measure was HbA1c. Secondary outcome measures included attendance, weight, waist circumference, lipid levels, blood pressure, UKPDS cardiovascular risk score, diabetes-related quality of life (ADDQoL, and self-efficacy. Process measures were attendance at yoga sessions, self-reported frequency of practice between taught sessions, and qualitative data (interviews with patients and therapists, ethnographic observation of the yoga classes, and analysis of documents including minutes of meetings, correspondence, and exercise plans. Results Despite broad inclusion criteria, around two-thirds of the patients on GP diabetic registers proved ineligible, and 90% of the remainder declined to participate. Mean age of participants was 60 +/- 10 years. Attendance at yoga classes was around 50%. Nobody did the exercises regularly at home. Yoga teachers felt that most participants were unsuitable for 'standard' yoga exercises because of limited flexibility, lack of basic fitness, co-morbidity, and lack

  7. A randomised controlled trial of caseload midwifery care: M@NGO (Midwives @ New Group practice Options)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Australia has an enviable record of safety for women in childbirth. There is nevertheless growing concern at the increasing level of intervention and consequent morbidity amongst childbearing women. Not only do interventions impact on the cost of services, they carry with them the potential for serious morbidities for mother and infant. Models of midwifery have proliferated in an attempt to offer women less fragmented hospital care. One of these models that is gaining widespread consumer, disciplinary and political support is caseload midwifery care. Caseload midwives manage the care of approximately 35-40 a year within a small Midwifery Group Practice (usually 4-6 midwives who plan their on call and leave within the Group Practice.) We propose to compare the outcomes and costs of caseload midwifery care compared to standard or routine hospital care through a randomised controlled trial. Methods/design A two-arm RCT design will be used. Women will be recruited from tertiary women's hospitals in Sydney and Brisbane, Australia. Women allocated to the caseload intervention will receive care from a named caseload midwife within a Midwifery Group Practice. Control women will be allocated to standard or routine hospital care. Women allocated to standard care will receive their care from hospital rostered midwives, public hospital obstetric care and community based general medical practitioner care. All midwives will collaborate with obstetricians and other health professionals as necessary according to the woman's needs. Discussion Data will be collected at recruitment, 36 weeks antenatally, six weeks and six months postpartum by web based or postal survey. With 750 women or more in each of the intervention and control arms the study is powered (based on 80% power; alpha 0.05) to detect a difference in caesarean section rates of 29.4 to 22.9%; instrumental birth rates from 11.0% to 6.8%; and rates of admission to neonatal intensive care of all neonates from 9

  8. Do sleep hygiene measures and progressive muscle relaxation influence sleep bruxism? Report of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente López, M; van Selms, M K A; van der Zaag, J; Hamburger, H L; Lobbezoo, F

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of sleep hygiene measures combined with relaxation techniques in the management of sleep bruxism (SB) in a double-blind, parallel, controlled, randomised clinical trial design. Sixteen participants (mean ± s.d. age = 39·9 ± 10·8 years) were randomly assigned to a control group (n = 8) or to the experimental treatment group (n = 8). Participants belonging to the latter group were instructed to perform sleep hygiene measures and progressive muscle relaxation techniques for a 4-week period. Two polysomnographic recordings, including bilateral masseter electromyographic activity, were made: one prior to the treatment and the other after the treatment period. The number of bruxism episodes per hour, the number of burst per hour and the bruxism time index (i.e. the percentage of total sleep time spent bruxing) were established as outcome variables. No significant differences could be observed between the outcome measures obtained before and after the 4-week period, neither for the sleep bruxism variables nor for the sleep variables. Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that there is no effect of sleep hygiene measures together with progressive relaxation techniques on sleep bruxism or sleep over a 4-week observation period.

  9. Effectiveness of mat Pilates or equipment-based Pilates in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a protocol of a randomised controlled trial

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    da Luz Maurício Antônio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic low back pain is an expensive and difficult condition to treat. One of the interventions widely used by physiotherapists in the treatment of chronic non-specific low back pain is exercise therapy based upon the Pilates principles. Pilates exercises can be performed with or without specific equipment. These two types of Pilates exercises have never been compared on a high-quality randomised controlled trial. Methods/design This randomised controlled trial with a blinded assessor will evaluate eighty six patients of both genders with chronic low back pain, aged between 18 and 60 years, from one Brazilian private physiotherapy clinic. The patients will be randomly allocated into two groups: Mat Group will perform the exercises on the ground while the Equipment-based Group will perform the Pilates method exercises on the following equipment: Cadillac, Reformer, Ladder Barrel, and Step Chair. The general and specific disability of the patient, kinesiophobia, pain intensity and global perceived effect will be evaluated by a blinded assessor before randomisation and at six weeks and six months after randomisation. In addition, the expectation of the participants and their confidence with the treatment will be evaluated before randomisation and after the first treatment session, respectively. Discussion This will be the first study aiming to compare the effectiveness of Mat and Equipment-based Pilates exercises in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. The results may help health-care professionals in clinical decision-making and could potentially reduce the treatment costs of this condition. Trial registration Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials RBR-7tyg5j

  10. Effectiveness of mat Pilates or equipment-based Pilates in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic low back pain is an expensive and difficult condition to treat. One of the interventions widely used by physiotherapists in the treatment of chronic non-specific low back pain is exercise therapy based upon the Pilates principles. Pilates exercises can be performed with or without specific equipment. These two types of Pilates exercises have never been compared on a high-quality randomised controlled trial. Methods/design This randomised controlled trial with a blinded assessor will evaluate eighty six patients of both genders with chronic low back pain, aged between 18 and 60 years, from one Brazilian private physiotherapy clinic. The patients will be randomly allocated into two groups: Mat Group will perform the exercises on the ground while the Equipment-based Group will perform the Pilates method exercises on the following equipment: Cadillac, Reformer, Ladder Barrel, and Step Chair. The general and specific disability of the patient, kinesiophobia, pain intensity and global perceived effect will be evaluated by a blinded assessor before randomisation and at six weeks and six months after randomisation. In addition, the expectation of the participants and their confidence with the treatment will be evaluated before randomisation and after the first treatment session, respectively. Discussion This will be the first study aiming to compare the effectiveness of Mat and Equipment-based Pilates exercises in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. The results may help health-care professionals in clinical decision-making and could potentially reduce the treatment costs of this condition. Trial registration Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials RBR-7tyg5j PMID:23298183

  11. ProsCan for Men: Randomised controlled trial of a decision support intervention for men with localised prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardiner RA

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is the most common male cancer in the Western world but is highly heterogeneous in disease progression and outcomes. Consequently, the most substantial morbidity may actually arise from the adverse psychosocial impact of distress in decision-making and long term quality of life effects such as impotence. This paper presents the design of a randomised controlled trial of a decision support/psychosocial intervention for men newly diagnosed with localised prostate cancer. Methods/Design 350 men per condition (700 men in total have been recruited after diagnosis and before treatment through urology private practices and hospital outpatient clinics and randomised to 1 a tele-based nurse delivered five session decision support/psychosocial intervention or 2 a usual care control group. Two intervention sessions are delivered before treatment that address decision support, stress management and preparation for treatment. Three further sessions are provided three weeks, seven weeks and five months after treatment that focus on adjustment to cancer, problem solving and coping with treatment side effects. Participants are assessed at baseline (before treatment and 2, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months post-treatment. Outcome measures include: cancer threat appraisal; decision-related distress and bother from treatment side effects; involvement in decision making; satisfaction with health care; heath care utilisation; use of health care resources; and a return to previous activities. Discussion The study will provide recommendations about the efficacy of early decision support to facilitate adjustment after prostate cancer. As well the study will identify men diagnosed with localised prostate cancer at risk of poorer long term psychosocial adjustment. Trial Registration ACTRN012607000233426.

  12. Fusidic acid cream in the treatment of impetigo in general practice: double blind randomised placebo controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Koning (Sander); L.W.A. van Suijlekom-Smit (Lisette); J.L. Nouwen (Jan); C.M. Verduin (Cees); R.M.D. Bernsen (Roos); A.P. Oranje (Arnold); S. Thomas (Siep); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that fusidic acid would not increase the treatment effect of disinfecting with povidone-iodine alone in children with impetigo. DESIGN: Randomised placebo controlled trial. SETTING: General practices in Greater Rotterdam. PARTICIPANTS:

  13. Fusidic acid cream in the treatment of impetigo in general practice: double blind randomised placebo controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Koning (Sander); L.W.A. van Suijlekom-Smit (Lisette); J.L. Nouwen (Jan); C.M. Verduin (Cees); R.M.D. Bernsen (Roos); A.P. Oranje (Arnold); S. Thomas (Siep); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that fusidic acid would not increase the treatment effect of disinfecting with povidone-iodine alone in children with impetigo. DESIGN: Randomised placebo controlled trial. SETTING: General practices in Greater Rotterdam. PARTICIPANTS:

  14. [Probiotic prophylaxis in patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, M.G.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Buskens, E.; Boermeester, M.A.; Goor, H. van; Timmerman, H.M.; Nieuwenhuijs, V.B.; Bollen, T.L.; Ramshorst, B. van; Witteman, B.J.M.; Rosman, C.; Ploeg, R.J.; Brink, M.; Schaapherder, A.F.; Dejong, C.H.; Wahab, P.J.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Harst, E. van der; Eijck, C.H. van; Cuesta, M.A.; Akkermans, L.M.; Gooszen, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether enteral prophylaxis with probiotics in patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis prevents infectious complications. DESIGN: Multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. METHOD: A total of 296 patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis

  15. Steroids In caRdiac Surgery (SIRS) trial: acute kidney injury substudy protocol of an international randomised controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garg, Amit X; Vincent, Jessica; Cuerden, Meaghan; Parikh, Chirag; Devereaux, P J; Teoh, Kevin; Yusuf, Salim; Hildebrand, Ainslie; Lamy, Andre; Zuo, Yunxia; Sessler, Daniel I; Shah, Pallav; Abbasi, Seyed Hesameddin; Quantz, Mackenzie; Yared, Jean-Pierre; Noiseux, Nicolas; Tagarakis, Georgios; Rochon, Antoine; Pogue, Janice; Walsh, Michael; Chan, Matthew T V; Lamontagne, Francois; Salehiomran, Abbas; Whitlock, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Steroids In caRdiac Surgery trial (SIRS) is a large international randomised controlled trial of methylprednisolone or placebo in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with the use of a cardiopulmonary bypass pump...

  16. Effect of electroacupuncture on opioid consumption in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Charlie CL

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic musculoskeletal pain is common and has been increasingly managed by opioid medications, of which the long-term efficacy is unknown. Furthermore, there is evidence that long-term use of opioids is associated with reduced pain control, declining physical function and quality of life, and could hinder the goals of integrated pain management. Electroacupuncture (EA has been shown to be effective in reducing postoperative opioid consumption. Limited evidence suggests that acupuncture could assist patients with chronic pain to reduce their requirements for opioids. The proposed research aims to assess if EA is an effective adjunct therapy to standard pain and medication management in reducing opioids use by patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods In this multicentre, randomised, sham-acupuncture controlled, three-arm clinical trial, 316 patients regularly taking opioids for pain control and meeting the defined selection criteria will be recruited from pain management centres and clinics of primary care providers in Victoria, Australia. After a four-week run-in period, the participants are randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups to receive EA, sham EA or no-EA with a ratio of 2:1:1. All participants receive routine pain medication management delivered and supervised by the trial medical doctors. Twelve sessions of semi-structured EA or sham EA treatment are delivered over 10 weeks. Upon completion of the acupuncture treatment period, there is a 12-week follow-up. In total, participants are involved in the trial for 26 weeks. Outcome measures of opioid and non-opioid medication consumption, pain scores and opioid-related adverse events are documented throughout the study. Quality of life, depression, function, and attitude to pain medications are also assessed. Discussion This randomised controlled trial will determine whether EA is of significant clinical value in assisting the management of

  17. Changing cluster composition in cluster randomised controlled trials: design and analysis considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Neil; Bankart, Michael J G; Gray, Laura J; Smith, Karen L

    2014-05-24

    There are many methodological challenges in the conduct and analysis of cluster randomised controlled trials, but one that has received little attention is that of post-randomisation changes to cluster composition. To illustrate this, we focus on the issue of cluster merging, considering the impact on the design, analysis and interpretation of trial outcomes. We explored the effects of merging clusters on study power using standard methods of power calculation. We assessed the potential impacts on study findings of both homogeneous cluster merges (involving clusters randomised to the same arm of a trial) and heterogeneous merges (involving clusters randomised to different arms of a trial) by simulation. To determine the impact on bias and precision of treatment effect estimates, we applied standard methods of analysis to different populations under analysis. Cluster merging produced a systematic reduction in study power. This effect depended on the number of merges and was most pronounced when variability in cluster size was at its greatest. Simulations demonstrate that the impact on analysis was minimal when cluster merges were homogeneous, with impact on study power being balanced by a change in observed intracluster correlation coefficient (ICC). We found a decrease in study power when cluster merges were heterogeneous, and the estimate of treatment effect was attenuated. Examples of cluster merges found in previously published reports of cluster randomised trials were typically homogeneous rather than heterogeneous. Simulations demonstrated that trial findings in such cases would be unbiased. However, simulations also showed that any heterogeneous cluster merges would introduce bias that would be hard to quantify, as well as having negative impacts on the precision of estimates obtained. Further methodological development is warranted to better determine how to analyse such trials appropriately. Interim recommendations include avoidance of cluster merges where

  18. Efficacy of occupational therapy for patients with Parkinson's disease: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturkenboom, Ingrid H W M; Graff, Maud J L; Hendriks, Jan C M; Veenhuizen, Yvonne; Munneke, Marten; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W

    2014-06-01

    There is insufficient evidence to support use of occupational therapy interventions for patients with Parkinson's disease. We aimed to assess the efficacy of occupational therapy in improving daily activities of patients with Parkinson's disease. We did a multicentre, assessor-masked, randomised controlled clinical trial in ten hospitals in nine Dutch regional networks of specialised health-care professionals (ParkinsonNet), with assessment at 3 months and 6 months. Patients with Parkinson's disease with self-reported difficulties in daily activities were included, along with their primary caregivers. Patients were randomly assigned (2:1) to the intervention or control group by a computer-generated minimisation algorithm. The intervention consisted of 10 weeks of home-based occupational therapy according to national practice guidelines; control individuals received usual care with no occupational therapy. The primary outcome was self-perceived performance in daily activities at 3 months, assessed with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (score 1-10). Data were analysed using linear mixed models for repeated measures (intention-to-treat principle). Assessors monitored safety by asking patients about any unusual health events during the preceding 3 months. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01336127. Between April 14, 2011, and Nov 2, 2012, 191 patients were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=124) or the control group (n=67). 117 (94%) of 124 patients in the intervention group and 63 (94%) of 67 in the control group had a participating caregiver. At baseline, the median score on the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure was 4·3 (IQR 3·5-5·0) in the intervention group and 4·4 (3·8-5·0) in the control group. At 3 months, these scores were 5·8 (5·0-6·4) and 4·6 (4·6-6·6), respectively. The adjusted mean difference in score between groups at 3 months was in favour of the intervention group (1·2; 95% CI 0·8-1·6

  19. The effectiveness of self-help mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in a student sample: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever Taylor, Billie; Strauss, Clara; Cavanagh, Kate; Jones, Fergal

    2014-12-01

    Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) involves approximately twenty hours of therapist contact time and is not universally available. MBCT self-help (MBCT-SH) may widen access but little is known about its effectiveness. This paper presents a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of MBCT-SH for students. Eighty students were randomly assigned to an eight-week MBCT-SH condition or a wait-list control. ANOVAs showed significant group by time interactions in favour of MBCT-SH on measures of depression, anxiety, stress, satisfaction with life, mindfulness and self-compassion. Post-intervention between-group effect sizes ranged from Cohen's d = 0.22 to 1.07. Engagement with MBCT-SH was high: participants engaged in mindfulness practice a median of two to three times a week and 85% read at least half the intervention book. Only 5% of participants dropped out. This is the first published RCT of MBCT-SH and benefits were found relative to a control group. MBCT-SH has the potential to be a low-cost, readily available and highly acceptable intervention. Future research should include an active control condition and explore whether findings extend to clinical populations.

  20. Evaluation of exercise on individuals with dementia and their carers: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Claire

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Almost all of the 820,000 people in the UK with dementia will experience Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD. However, research has traditionally focused on treating cognitive symptoms, thus neglecting core clinical symptoms that often have a more profound impact on living with dementia. Recent evidence (Kales et al, 2007; Ballard et al, 2009 indicates that the popular approach to managing BPSD - prescription of anti-psychotic medication - can increase mortality and the risk of stroke in people with dementia as well as impair quality of life and accelerate cognitive decline. Consequently, there is a need to evaluate the impact that non-pharmacological interventions have on BPSD; we believe physical exercise is a particularly promising approach. Methods/Design We will carry out a pragmatic, randomised, single-blind controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of exercise (planned walking on the behavioural and psychological symptoms of individuals with dementia. We aim to recruit 146 people with dementia and their carers to be randomized into two groups; one will be trained in a structured, tailored walking programme, while the other will continue with treatment as usual. The primary outcome (BPSD will be assessed with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI along with relevant secondary outcomes at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Discussion Designing this study has been challenging both ethically and methodologically. In particular to design an intervention that is simple, measurable, safe, non-invasive and enjoyable has been testing and has required a lot of thought. Throughout the design, we have attempted to balance methodological rigour with study feasibility. We will discuss the challenges that were faced and overcome in this paper. Trial Registration ISRCTN01423159

  1. Misoprostol dose and route after mifepristone for early medical abortion: a randomised controlled noninferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hertzen, H; Huong, N T M; Piaggio, G; Bayalag, M; Cabezas, E; Fang, A H; Gemzell-Danielsson, K; Hinh, N D; Mittal, S; Ng, E H Y; Chaturachinda, K; Pinter, B; Puscasiu, L; Savardekar, L; Shenoy, S; Khomassuridge, A; Tuyet, H T D; Velasco, A; Peregoudov, A

    2010-09-01

    To compare 400 and 800 microg sublingual or vaginal misoprostol 24 hours after 200 mg mifepristone for noninferiority regarding efficacy in achieving complete abortion for pregnancy termination up to 63 days of gestation. Placebo-controlled, randomised, noninferiority factorial trial, stratified by centre and length of gestation. Misoprostol 400 or 800 microg, administered either sublingually or vaginally, with follow up after 2 and 6 weeks. Fifteen obstetrics/gynaecology departments in ten countries. Pregnant women (n = 3005) up to 63 days of gestation requesting medical abortion. Two-sided 95% CI for differences in failure of complete abortion and continuing pregnancy, with a 3% noninferiority margin, were calculated. Proportions of women with adverse effects were recorded. Complete abortion without surgical intervention (main); continuing live pregnancies, induction-to-abortion interval, adverse effects, women's perceptions (secondary). Efficacy outcomes analysed for 2962 women (98.6%): 90.5% had complete abortion after 400 microg misoprostol, 94.2% after 800 microg. Noninferiority of 400 microg misoprostol was not demonstrated for failure of complete abortion (difference: 3.7%; 95% CI 1.8-5.6%). The 400-microg dose showed higher risk of incomplete abortion (P abortion (P = 0.47, difference in sublingual minus vaginal -0.7%, 95% CI -2.6-1.2%). A similar pattern was observed for continuing pregnancies (P = 0.21). Fewer women reported adverse effects with vaginal than sublingual administration and with the 400-microg dose than the 800-microg dose. Of the women, 94% were satisfied or highly satisfied with the regimens, 53% preferred the sublingual route and 47% preferred the vaginal route. A 400-microg dose of misoprostol should not replace the 800-microg dose when administered 24 hours after 200 mg mifepristone for inducing abortion in pregnancies up to 63 days. Sublingual and vaginal misoprostol have similar efficacy, but vaginal administration is associated with

  2. Randomised placebo-controlled trial on the effectiveness of nasal salmon calcitonin in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafazal, Suhayl I; Ng, Leslie; Sell, Philip

    2007-02-01

    This is a double blind randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of nasal salmon calcitonin in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. The trial compared the outcome of salmon calcitonin nasal spray to placebo nasal spray in patients with MRI confirmed lumbar spinal stenosis. Lumbar spinal stenosis is one of the commonest conditions encountered by spine surgeons. It more frequently affects elderly patients and lumbar decompression has been used to treat the condition with variable success. Non operative measures have been investigated, but their success ranges from 15% to 43% in patients followed up for 1-5 years (Simotas in Clin Orthop 1(384):153-161, 2001). Salmon calcitonin injections have been investigated in previous trials and may have a treatment effect. Nasal salmon calcitonin has become available and if effective would have advantages over injections. Forty patients with symptoms of neurogenic claudication and MRI proven lumbar spinal stenosis were randomly assigned either nasal salmon calcitonin or placebo nasal spray to use for 4 weeks. This was followed by a 'washout' period of 6 weeks, and subsequent treatment with 6 weeks of nasal salmon calcitonin. Standard spine outcome measures including Oswestry disability index (ODI), low back outcome score, visual analogue score and shuttle walking test were administered at baseline, 4, 10 and 16 weeks. Twenty patients received nasal salmon calcitonin and twenty patients received placebo nasal spray. At 4 weeks post treatment there was no statistically significant difference in the outcome measures between the two groups. The change in ODI was a mean 1.3 points for the calcitonin group and 0.6 points for the placebo group (P = 0.51), the mean change in visual analogue score for leg pain was 10 mm in the calcitonin group and 0 mm in the placebo group (P = 0.51). There was no significant difference in walking distance between the two groups, with a mean improvement in walking distance of 21 m in the

  3. A randomised, controlled clinical study on total hip arthroplasty using 4 different bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Arne; Zerahn, Bo; Fabricius, Sandra D

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare 4 different bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA) in a randomised controlled clinical study on clinical performance. METHODS: 393 patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or avascular necrosis were included and allocated to 1 of the head-and-cup couples zirconia-on-polyethyl......PURPOSE: To compare 4 different bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA) in a randomised controlled clinical study on clinical performance. METHODS: 393 patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or avascular necrosis were included and allocated to 1 of the head-and-cup couples zirconia...... cumulated prosthesis survival percentages and 95% confidence interval after 10 years were: group A 84.6 (75.8-93.4); group B 95.0 (89.5-100); group C 93.2 (86.7-99.7); group D 66.1 (54.5-77.7). The patients' physical function was significantly improved and remained equally good in all 4 groups, however...

  4. The effectiveness of video interaction guidance in parents of premature infants: A multicenter randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tooten Anneke

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have consistently found a high incidence of neonatal medical problems, premature births and low birth weights in abused and neglected children. One of the explanations proposed for the relation between neonatal problems and adverse parenting is a possible delay or disturbance in the bonding process between the parent and infant. This hypothesis suggests that due to neonatal problems, the development of an affectionate bond between the parent and the infant is impeded. The disruption of an optimal parent-infant bond -on its turn- may predispose to distorted parent-infant interactions and thus facilitate abusive or neglectful behaviours. Video Interaction Guidance (VIG is expected to promote the bond between parents and newborns and is expected to diminish non-optimal parenting behaviour. Methods/design This study is a multi-center randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of Video Interaction Guidance in parents of premature infants. In this study 210 newborn infants with their parents will be included: n = 70 healthy term infants (>37 weeks GA, n = 70 moderate term infants (32–37 weeks GA which are recruited from maternity wards of 6 general hospitals and n = 70 extremely preterm infants or very low birth weight infants (i.e. full term infants and their parents, receiving care as usual, a control group (i.e. premature infants and their parents, receiving care as usual and an intervention group (i.e. premature infants and their parents, receiving VIG. The data will be collected during the first six months after birth using observations of parent-infant interactions, questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Primary outcomes are the quality of parental bonding and parent-infant interactive behaviour. Parental secondary outcomes are (posttraumatic stress symptoms, depression, anxiety and feelings of anger and hostility. Infant secondary outcomes are behavioral aspects such as crying

  5. A pragmatic multi-centred randomised controlled trial of yoga for chronic low back pain: Trial protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Helen; Tilbrook, Helen; Aplin, John; Chuang, Ling-Hsiang; Hewitt, Catherine; Jayakody, Shalmini; Semlyen, Anna; Soares, Marta O; Torgerson, David; Trewhela, Alison; Watt, Ian; Worthy, Gill

    2010-01-01

    A systematic review revealed three small randomised controlled trials of yoga for low back pain, all of which showed effects on back pain that favoured the yoga group. To build on these studies a larger trial, with longer term follow-up, and a number of different yoga teachers delivering the intervention is required. This study protocol describes the details of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Yoga for chronic Low Back Pain, which is...

  6. A low cost virtual reality system for home based rehabilitation of the arm following stroke: A randomised controlled feasibility trial

    OpenAIRE

    Standen, P.; Threapleton, K; Richardson, A; Connell, L; Brown, D.; Battersby, S; Platts, F; Burton, A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the feasibility of conducting a randomised controlled trial of a home-based virtual reality system for rehabilitation of the arm following stroke. Design: Two group feasibility randomised controlled trial of intervention versus usual care. Setting: Patients’ homes. Participants: Patients aged 18 or over, with residual arm dysfunction following stroke and, no longer receiving any other intensive rehabilitation. Interventions: Eight weeks’ use of a low cost home-based virtu...

  7. The haemodynamic effects of the perioperative terlipressin infusion in living donor liver transplantation: A randomised controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Nagwa Ibrahim; Ashraf Hasanin; Sabry Abd Allah; Eman Sayed; Mohamed Afifi; Khaled Yassen; Wesam Saber; Magdy Khalil

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Liver disease is usually accompanied with a decline in systemic vascular resistance (SVR). We decided to assess effects of the peri-operative terlipressin infusion on liver donor liver transplantation recipients with respect to haemodynamics and renal parameters. Methods: After Ethical Committee approval for this prospective randomised controlled study, 50 recipients were enrolled and allotted to control (n = 25) or terlipressin group (n = 25) with simple randomisation me...

  8. Cognitive Rehabilitation for Attention and Memory in people with Multiple Sclerosis: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (CRAMMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Nadina B; das Nair, Roshan; Bradshaw, Lucy; Constantinescu, Cris S; Drummond, Avril E R; Erven, Alexandra; Evans, Amy L; Fitzsimmons, Deborah; Montgomery, Alan A; Morgan, Miriam

    2015-12-08

    People with multiple sclerosis have problems with memory and attention. Cognitive rehabilitation is a structured set of therapeutic activities designed to retrain an individual's memory and other cognitive functions. Cognitive rehabilitation may be provided to teach people strategies to cope with these problems, in order to reduce the impact on everyday life. The effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation for people with multiple sclerosis has not been established. This is a multi-centre, randomised controlled trial investigating the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a group-based cognitive rehabilitation programme for attention and memory problems for people with multiple sclerosis. Four hundred people with multiple sclerosis will be randomised from at least four centres. Participants will be eligible if they have memory problems, are 18 to 69 years of age, are able to travel to attend group sessions and give informed consent. Participants will be randomised in a ratio of 6:5 to the group rehabilitation intervention plus usual care or usual care alone. Intervention groups will receive 10 weekly sessions of a manualised cognitive rehabilitation programme. The intervention will include both restitution strategies to retrain impaired attention and memory functions and compensation strategies to enable participants to cope with their cognitive problems. All participants will receive a follow-up questionnaire and an assessment by a research assistant at 6 and 12 months after randomisation. The primary outcome is the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS) Psychological subscale at 12 months. Secondary outcomes include the Everyday Memory Questionnaire, General Health Questionnaire-30, EQ-5D and a service use questionnaire from participants, and the Everyday Memory Questionnaire-relative version and Carer Strain Index from a relative or friend. The primary analysis will be based on intention to treat. A mixed-model regression analysis of the MSIS Psychological

  9. A randomised comparison of increase in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration after 4 weeks of daily oral intake of 10 microg cholecalciferol from multivitamin tablets or fish oil capsules in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holvik, Kristin; Madar, Ahmed A; Meyer, Haakon E; Lofthus, Cathrine M; Stene, Lars C

    2007-09-01

    Many types of vitamin supplements are available on the market, but little is known about whether cholecalciferol obtained from fat-containing capsules differs in bioavailability from that of solid tablets. Our objective was to test whether 4 weeks of daily supplementation with 10 mug cholecalciferol given as a fish oil capsule produces a larger increase in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s-25(OH)D) concentration compared with the same dose of cholecalciferol given as a multivitamin tablet. A total of seventy-four healthy subjects aged 19-49 years were initially included and fifty-five of these completed the study and fulfilled the inclusion criteria. After completing a self-administered questionnaire about diet and sunshine exposure and having a non-fasting venous blood sample drawn, participants were randomised to receive daily multivitamin tablets (n 28) or fish oil capsules (n 27), each containing equal doses of cholecalciferol. A second blood sample was drawn after 28 d. Mean baseline s-25(OH)D was 40.3 (sd 22.0) nmol/l in the multivitamin group and 48.5 (24.8) nmol/l in the fish oil group. When controlling for baseline s-25(OH)D, mean 4-week increase in s-25(OH)D was 35.8 (95 % CI 30.9, 40.8) nmol/l in the multivitamin group and 32.3 (95 % CI 27.3, 37.4) nmol/l in the fish oil group; the mean difference was 3.5 (95 % CI - 3.6, 10.6) nmol/l (P = 0.33). The results were unaltered by statistical adjustment for BMI, ethnic background, age and sex. We conclude that fish oil capsules and multivitamin tablets containing 10 microg cholecalciferol administered over a 4-week period produced a similar mean increase in s-25(OH)D concentration.

  10. A randomised control trial of structured interrupted generic antiretroviral therapy versus continuous therapy in HIV-infected individuals in Southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasamy, N; Flanigan, T P; Vallabhaneni, S; Cecelia, A J; Christybai, P; Balakrishnan, P; Yepthomi, T; Solomon, S; Carpenter, C C J; Mayer, K H

    2007-04-01

    This randomised control trial, conducted in Chennai, India, compared structured interrupted therapy (SIT) and continuous therapy (CT) in relation to immunologic and virologic outcomes, adverse events (AEs) and cost of therapy. ART-naïve adult HIV1-infected participants with CD4 counts 50-350 cells/mm(3), and plasma viral load (PVL)>5000 copies/mL were enrolled and placed on Indian-manufactured generic ART: zidovudine(AZT)/stavudine(d4T)+lamivudine(3TC)+efavirenz(EFV). After at least six months of continuous therapy, subjects were randomised to SIT (one-week-on/one-week-off cycles) or CT. The primary end-point was the proportion of subjects maintaining CD4>200 cells/mm(3) at six and 12 months after randomisation. Secondary end-points were effective viral suppression (PVL200 cells/mm(3). One participant on CT and two on SIT had sustained PVL>400 copies/mL. There were no serious AEs or deaths. Structured interrupted therapy cost was half of CT. Structured interrupted therapy was effective at maintaining CD4 above 200 cells/mm(3). Adverse events were comparable in both groups, with 50% reduction in cost for SIT. Further research on such strategies may benefit resource-constrained settings.

  11. Cardiovascular, Metabolic Effects and Dietary Composition of Ad-Libitum Paleolithic vs. Australian Guide to Healthy Eating Diets: A 4-Week Randomised Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genoni, Angela; Lyons-Wall, Philippa; Lo, Johnny; Devine, Amanda

    2016-05-23

    (1) BACKGROUND: The Paleolithic diet is popular in Australia, however, limited literature surrounds the dietary pattern. Our primary aim was to compare the Paleolithic diet with the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE) in terms of anthropometric, metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors, with a secondary aim to examine the macro and micronutrient composition of both dietary patterns; (2) METHODS: 39 healthy women (mean ± SD age 47 ± 13 years, BMI 27 ± 4 kg/m²) were randomised to either the Paleolithic (n = 22) or AGHE diet (n = 17) for four weeks. Three-day weighed food records, body composition and biochemistry data were collected pre and post intervention; (3) RESULTS: Significantly greater weight loss occurred in the Paleolithic group (-1.99 kg, 95% CI -2.9, -1.0), p Paleolithic group had lower intakes of carbohydrate (-14.63% of energy (E), 95% CI -19.5, -9.7), sodium (-1055 mg/day, 95% CI -1593, -518), calcium (-292 mg/day 95% CI -486.0, -99.0) and iodine (-47.9 μg/day, 95% CI -79.2, -16.5) and higher intakes of fat (9.39% of E, 95% CI 3.7, 15.1) and β-carotene (6777 μg/day 95% CI 2144, 11410) (all p Paleolithic diet induced greater changes in body composition over the short-term intervention, however, larger studies are recommended to assess the impact of the Paleolithic vs. AGHE diets on metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in healthy populations.

  12. Cardiovascular, Metabolic Effects and Dietary Composition of Ad-Libitum Paleolithic vs. Australian Guide to Healthy Eating Diets: A 4-Week Randomised Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Genoni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: The Paleolithic diet is popular in Australia, however, limited literature surrounds the dietary pattern. Our primary aim was to compare the Paleolithic diet with the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE in terms of anthropometric, metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors, with a secondary aim to examine the macro and micronutrient composition of both dietary patterns; (2 Methods: 39 healthy women (mean ± SD age 47 ± 13 years, BMI 27 ± 4 kg/m2 were randomised to either the Paleolithic (n = 22 or AGHE diet (n = 17 for four weeks. Three-day weighed food records, body composition and biochemistry data were collected pre and post intervention; (3 Results: Significantly greater weight loss occurred in the Paleolithic group (−1.99 kg, 95% CI −2.9, −1.0, p < 0.001. There were no differences in cardiovascular and metabolic markers between groups. The Paleolithic group had lower intakes of carbohydrate (−14.63% of energy (E, 95% CI −19.5, −9.7, sodium (−1055 mg/day, 95% CI −1593, −518, calcium (−292 mg/day 95% CI −486.0, −99.0 and iodine (−47.9 μg/day, 95% CI −79.2, −16.5 and higher intakes of fat (9.39% of E, 95% CI 3.7, 15.1 and β-carotene (6777 μg/day 95% CI 2144, 11410 (all p < 0.01; (4 Conclusions: The Paleolithic diet induced greater changes in body composition over the short-term intervention, however, larger studies are recommended to assess the impact of the Paleolithic vs. AGHE diets on metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in healthy populations.

  13. Does a "Level I Evidence" rating imply high quality of reporting in orthopaedic randomised controlled trials?

    OpenAIRE

    Sierevelt Inger N; Krips Rover; Struijs Peter AA; Poolman Rudolf W; Lutz Kristina H; Bhandari Mohit

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The Levels of Evidence Rating System is widely believed to categorize studies by quality, with Level I studies representing the highest quality evidence. We aimed to determine the reporting quality of Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) published in the most frequently cited general orthopaedic journals. Methods Two assessors identified orthopaedic journals that reported a level of evidence rating in their abstracts from January 2003 to December 2004 by searching the instr...

  14. Erythropoietin in traumatic brain injury: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nichol, Alistair

    2015-02-08

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Laboratory and clinical studies demonstrate a possible beneficial effect of erythropoietin in improving outcomes in the traumatic brain injury cohort. However, there are concerns regarding the association of erythropoietin and thrombosis in the critically ill. A large-scale, multi-centre, blinded, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, randomised trial is currently underway to address this hypothesis.

  15. Double blind randomised controlled trial of effect of metoprolol on myocardial ischaemia during endoscopic cholangiopancreatography.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, J.; Overgaard, H.; Andersen, M.; Rasmussen, V; Schulze, S.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the effect of metoprolol, a beta adrenergic blocking drug, on the occurrence of myocardial ischaemia during endoscopic cholangiopancreatography. DESIGN--Double blind, randomised, controlled trial. SETTING--University Hospital. SUBJECTS--38 (two groups of 19) patients scheduled for endoscopic cholangiopancreatography. INTERVENTIONS--Metoprolol 100 mg or placebo as premedication two hours before endoscopy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Heart rate, arterial oxygen saturation by c...

  16. Surgery versus prolonged conservative treatment for sciatica: 5-year results of a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lequin, Michiel B.; Verbaan, Dagmar; Jacobs, Wilco C. H.; Brand, Ronald; Gerrit J. Bouma; Vandertop, William P.; Peul, Wilco C; ,

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study describes the 5 years’ results of the Sciatica trial focused on pain, disability, (un)satisfactory recovery and predictors for unsatisfactory recovery. Design A randomised controlled trial. Setting Nine Dutch hospitals. Participants Five years’ follow-up data from 231 of 283 patients (82%) were collected. Intervention Early surgery or an intended 6 months of conservative treatment. Main outcome measures Scores from Roland disability questionnaire, visual analogue scale (V...

  17. Effect of training traditional birth attendants on neonatal mortality (Lufwanyama Neonatal Survival Project): randomised controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Christopher J.; Phiri-Mazala, Grace; Guerina, Nicholas G.; Kasimba, Joshua; Mulenga, Charity; MacLeod, William B; Waitolo, Nelson; Knapp, Anna B; Mirochnick, Mark; Mazimba, Arthur; Matthew P Fox; Sabin, Lora; Seidenberg, Philip; SIMON, Jonathon L.; Hamer, Davidson H

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether training traditional birth attendants to manage several common perinatal conditions could reduce neonatal mortality in the setting of a resource poor country with limited access to healthcare. Design Prospective, cluster randomised and controlled effectiveness study. Setting Lufwanyama, an agrarian, poorly developed district located in the Copperbelt province, Zambia. All births carried out by study birth attendants occurred at mothers’ homes, in rural village s...

  18. The Home-Based Older People's Exercise (HOPE) trial: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Forster Anne; Young John; Barber Sally; Clegg Andrew; Iliffe Steve

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Frailty is common in older age, and is associated with important adverse health outcomes including increased risk of disability and admission to hospital or long-term care. Exercise interventions for frail older people have the potential to reduce the risk of these adverse outcomes by increasing muscle strength and improving mobility. Methods/Design The Home-Based Older People's Exercise (HOPE) trial is a two arm, assessor blind pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) to a...

  19. Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landorf Karl B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar heel pain (plantar fasciitis is a common and disabling condition, which has a detrimental impact on health-related quality of life. Despite the high prevalence of plantar heel pain, the optimal treatment for this disorder remains unclear. Consequently, an alternative therapy such as dry needling is increasingly being used as an adjunctive treatment by health practitioners. Only two trials have investigated the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain, however both trials were of a low methodological quality. This manuscript describes the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. Methods Eighty community-dwelling men and woman aged over 18 years with plantar heel pain (who satisfy the inclusion and exclusion criteria will be recruited. Eligible participants with plantar heel pain will be randomised to receive either one of two interventions, (i real dry needling or (ii sham dry needling. The protocol (including needling details and treatment regimen was formulated by general consensus (using the Delphi research method using 30 experts worldwide that commonly use dry needling for plantar heel pain. Primary outcome measures will be the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire and "first step" pain as measured on a visual analogue scale. The secondary outcome measures will be health related quality of life (assessed using the Short Form-36 questionnaire - Version Two and depression, anxiety and stress (assessed using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale - short version. Primary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 2, 4, 6 and 12 weeks and secondary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. Conclusion This study is the first randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. The trial will

  20. Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Plantar heel pain (plantar fasciitis) is a common and disabling condition, which has a detrimental impact on health-related quality of life. Despite the high prevalence of plantar heel pain, the optimal treatment for this disorder remains unclear. Consequently, an alternative therapy such as dry needling is increasingly being used as an adjunctive treatment by health practitioners. Only two trials have investigated the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain, however both trials were of a low methodological quality. This manuscript describes the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. Methods Eighty community-dwelling men and woman aged over 18 years with plantar heel pain (who satisfy the inclusion and exclusion criteria) will be recruited. Eligible participants with plantar heel pain will be randomised to receive either one of two interventions, (i) real dry needling or (ii) sham dry needling. The protocol (including needling details and treatment regimen) was formulated by general consensus (using the Delphi research method) using 30 experts worldwide that commonly use dry needling for plantar heel pain. Primary outcome measures will be the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire and "first step" pain as measured on a visual analogue scale. The secondary outcome measures will be health related quality of life (assessed using the Short Form-36 questionnaire - Version Two) and depression, anxiety and stress (assessed using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale - short version). Primary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 2, 4, 6 and 12 weeks and secondary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. Conclusion This study is the first randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. The trial will be reported in

  1. A double-blind randomised controlled study comparing subacromial injection of tenoxicam or methylprednisolone in patients with subacromial impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, S; Kwong, H T; Upadhyay, P K; Parsons, N; Drew, S J; Griffin, D

    2010-01-01

    We have carried out a prospective double-blind randomised controlled trial to compare the efficacy of a single subacromial injection of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, tenoxicam, with a single injection of methylprednisolone in patients with subacromial impingement. A total of 58 patients were randomly allocated into two groups. Group A received 40 mg of methylprednisolone and group B 20 mg of tenoxicam as a subacromial injection along with lignocaine. The Constant-Murley shoulder score was used as the primary outcome measure and the Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) as secondary measures. Six weeks after injection the improvement in the Constant-Murley score was significantly greater in the methylprednisolone group (p = 0.003) than in the tenoxicam group. The improvement in the DASH score was greater in the steroid group and the difference was statistically significant and consistent two (p < 0.01), four (p < 0.01) and six weeks (p < 0.020) after the injection. The improvement in the OSS was consistently greater in the steroid group than in the tenoxicam group. Although the difference was statistically significant at two (p < 0.001) and four (p = 0.003) weeks after the injection, it was not at six weeks (p = 0.055). Subacromial injection of tenoxicam does not offer an equivalent outcome to subacromial injection of corticosteroid at six weeks. Corticosteroid is significantly better than tenoxicam for improving shoulder function in tendonitis of the rotator cuff after six weeks.

  2. Antidepressants for the treatment of depression in neurological disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Annabel; Rayner, Lauren; Okon-Rocha, Ewa; Evans, Alison; Valsraj, Koravangattu; Higginson, Irene J; Hotopf, Matthew

    2011-08-01

    Despite the high prevalence of depression in people with neurological disorders, no previous study has sought to summarise existing evidence on the use of antidepressants in this population. A systematic review and meta-analysis was undertaken to determine whether antidepressants are more effective than placebo in the treatment of depression in neurological disorders, and whether any benefit is associated with improvement in function. Embase, Pubmed, Psycinfo and Cochrane trial registers were searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the efficacy of antidepressant and placebo in the treatment of depression in adults with a neurological disorder. 20 RCTs were included in the review, including patients with Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, brain injury, epilepsy and stroke. Outcomes were analysed at four time points: 4-5 weeks, 6-8 weeks, 9-18 weeks and >18 weeks. The primary outcome was response to treatment at 6-8 weeks. The evidence favoured the use of antidepressants over placebo at all time points although pooled results were not statistically significant at all time points. At 6-8 weeks, antidepressant treatment was associated with a greater than twofold odds of remission (OR 2.23; 95% CI 1.54 to 3.23; number needed to treat=7). Fewer data were available for quality of life, and functional and cognitive outcomes, and there was little evidence of improvement with antidepressant treatment. Antidepressants are effective for the treatment of depression in patients with neurological disorders but the evidence for the efficacy of antidepressants in improving quality of life, and functional and cognitive outcomes is inconclusive.

  3. Randomised controlled trial of food elimination diet based on IgG antibodies for the prevention of migraine like headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamson Joy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research suggests that food intolerance may be a precipitating factor for migraine like headaches. Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of the ELISA (Enzyme Linked Immuno-Sorbent Assay Test and subsequent dietary elimination advice for the prevention of migraine like headaches. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Community based volunteers in the UK. Participants Volunteers who met the inclusion criteria for migraine like headaches and had one or more food intolerance were included in the study. Participants received either a true diet (n = 84 or a sham diet (n = 83 sheet. Participants were advised to remove the intolerant foods from their diet for 12 weeks. Main outcome measures Number of headache days over a 12 week period (item A MIDAS questionnaire. Other measures includes the total MIDAS score and total HIT-6 score. Results The results indicated a small decrease in the number of migraine like headaches over 12 weeks, although this difference was not statistically significant (IRR 1.15 95% CI 0.94 to 1.41, p = 0.18. At the 4 week assessment, use of the ELISA test with subsequent diet elimination advice significantly reduced the number of migraine like headaches (IRR 1.23 95%CI 1.01 to 1.50, p = 0.04. The disability and impact on daily life of migraines were not significantly different between the true and sham diet groups. Conclusions Use of the ELISA test with subsequent diet elimination advice did not reduce the disability or impact on daily life of migraine like headaches or the number of migraine like headaches at 12 weeks but it did significantly reduce the number of migraine like headaches at 4 weeks. Trial registration number ISRCTN: ISRTCN89559672

  4. Exercise and manual physiotherapy arthritis research trial (EMPART: a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connell Paul

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA of the hip is a major cause of functional disability and reduced quality of life. Management options aim to reduce pain and improve or maintain physical functioning. Current evidence indicates that therapeutic exercise has a beneficial but short-term effect on pain and disability, with poor long-term benefit. The optimal content, duration and type of exercise are yet to be ascertained. There has been little scientific investigation into the effectiveness of manual therapy in hip OA. Only one randomized controlled trial (RCT found greater improvements in patient-perceived improvement and physical function with manual therapy, compared to exercise therapy. Methods and design An assessor-blind multicentre RCT will be undertaken to compare the effect of a combination of manual therapy and exercise therapy, exercise therapy only, and a waiting-list control on physical function in hip OA. One hundred and fifty people with a diagnosis of hip OA will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of 3 groups: exercise therapy, exercise therapy with manual therapy and a waiting-list control. Subjects in the intervention groups will attend physiotherapy for 6–8 sessions over 8 weeks. Those in the control group will remain on the waiting list until after this time and will then be re-randomised to one of the two intervention groups. Outcome measures will include physical function (WOMAC, pain severity (numerical rating scale, patient perceived change (7-point Likert scale, quality of life (SF-36, mood (hospital anxiety and depression scale, patient satisfaction, physical activity (IPAQ and physical measures of range of motion, 50-foot walk and repeated sit-to stand tests. Discussion This RCT will compare the effectiveness of the addition of manual therapy to exercise therapy to exercise therapy only and a waiting-list control in hip OA. A high quality methodology will be used in keeping with CONSORT guidelines. The

  5. Aquatic therapy for children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a pilot feasibility randomised controlled trial and mixed-methods process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hind, Daniel; Parkin, James; Whitworth, Victoria; Rex, Saleema; Young, Tracey; Hampson, Lisa; Sheehan, Jennie; Maguire, Chin; Cantrill, Hannah; Scott, Elaine; Epps, Heather; Main, Marion; Geary, Michelle; McMurchie, Heather; Pallant, Lindsey; Woods, Daniel; Freeman, Jennifer; Lee, Ellen; Eagle, Michelle; Willis, Tracey; Muntoni, Francesco; Baxter, Peter

    2017-05-01

    % of target) were randomised to AT (n = 8) or control (n = 4). People in the AT (n = 8) and control (n = 2: attrition because of parental report) arms contributed outcome data. The mean change in NSAA score at 6 months was -5.5 [standard deviation (SD) 7.8] for LBT and -2.8 (SD 4.1) in the AT arm. One boy suffered pain and fatigue after AT, which resolved the same day. Physiotherapists and parents valued AT and believed that it should be delivered in community settings. The independent rater considered AT optimised for three out of eight children, with other children given programmes that were too extensive and insufficiently focused. The estimated NHS costs of 6-month service were between £1970 and £2734 per patient. The focus on delivery in hospitals limits generalisability. Neither a full-scale frequentist randomised controlled trial (RCT) recruiting in the UK alone nor a twice-weekly open-ended AT course delivered at tertiary centres is feasible. Further intervention development research is needed to identify how community-based pools can be accessed, and how families can link with each other and community physiotherapists to access tailored AT programmes guided by highly specialised physiotherapists. Bayesian RCTs may be feasible; otherwise, time series designs are recommended. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN41002956. This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 21, No. 27. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information.

  6. Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for depression in people with diabetes: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Lisa; Newby, Jill; Wilhelm, Kay; Smith, Jessica; Fletcher, Therese; Ma, Trevor; Finch, Adam; Campbell, Lesley; Andrews, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Depression substantially contributes to the personal burden and healthcare costs of living with diabetes mellitus (DM). Comorbid depression and DM are associated with poorer quality of life, poorer self-management and glycemic control, increased risk for DM complications and higher mortality rates, and higher health service utilization. Depression remains under-recognized and undertreated in people with DM, which may, in part, result from barriers associated with accessing face-to-face treatment. This study will examine the efficacy of an internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy programme for major depressive disorder (iCBT-MDD) in people with DM. A CONSORT 2010 compliant, registered randomised controlled trial of the intervention (iCBT-MDD) versus a treatment as usual control group will be conducted. The study will include 100 adults aged 18 years and over with a diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 DM and self-reported symptoms that satisfy MDD which will enable us to detect a statistically significant difference with a group effect size of 0.6 at a power of 80% and significance level of p=0.05. Participants will be randomised to receive the iCBT-MDD programme immediately, or to wait 10 weeks before accessing the programme. Primary outcomes will be self-reported depression severity, DM-related distress, and glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin). Secondary outcomes will be general distress and disability, generalized anxiety, lifestyle behaviours, somatization, eating habits, alcohol use, and acceptability of the iCBT programme to participants, and practicality for clinicians. Data will be analyzed with linear mixed models for each outcome measure. The Human Research Ethics Committee of St Vincent's Hospital Australia have given ethics approval (HREC/13/SVH/291). Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publication and social media channels of Australian Diabetes Consumer Representative Bodies. The trial is registered with the Australian and New Zealand

  7. Transfusion and Treatment of severe anaemia in African children (TRACT): a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpoya, Ayub; Kiguli, Sarah; Olupot-Olupot, Peter; Opoka, Robert O; Engoru, Charles; Mallewa, Macpherson; Chimalizeni, Yami; Kennedy, Neil; Kyeyune, Dorothy; Wabwire, Benjamin; M'baya, Bridon; Bates, Imelda; Urban, Britta; von Hensbroek, Michael Boele; Heyderman, Robert; Thomason, Margaret J; Uyoga, Sophie; Williams, Thomas N; Gibb, Diana M; George, Elizabeth C; Walker, A Sarah; Maitland, Kathryn

    2015-12-29

    In sub-Saharan Africa, where infectious diseases and nutritional deficiencies are common, severe anaemia is a common cause of paediatric hospital admission, yet the evidence to support current treatment recommendations is limited. To avert overuse of blood products, the World Health Organisation advocates a conservative transfusion policy and recommends iron, folate and anti-helminthics at discharge. Outcomes are unsatisfactory with high rates of in-hospital mortality (9-10%), 6-month mortality and relapse (6%). A definitive trial to establish best transfusion and treatment strategies to prevent both early and delayed mortality and relapse is warranted. TRACT is a multicentre randomised controlled trial of 3954 children aged 2 months to 12 years admitted to hospital with severe anaemia (haemoglobin anaemia in African children. The trial will compare: (i) R1: liberal transfusion (30 ml/kg whole blood) versus conservative transfusion (20 ml/kg) versus no transfusion (control). The control is only for children with uncomplicated severe anaemia (haemoglobin 4-6 g/dl); (ii) R2: post-discharge multi-vitamin multi-mineral supplementation (including folate and iron) versus routine care (folate and iron) for 3 months; (iii) R3: post-discharge cotrimoxazole prophylaxis for 3 months versus no prophylaxis. All randomisations are open. Enrolment to the trial started September 2014 and is currently ongoing. Primary outcome is cumulative mortality to 4 weeks for the transfusion strategy comparisons, and to 6 months for the nutritional support/antibiotic prophylaxis comparisons. Secondary outcomes include mortality, morbidity (haematological correction, nutritional and infectious), safety and cost-effectiveness. If confirmed by the trial, a cheap and widely available 'bundle' of effective interventions, directed at immediate and downstream consequences of severe anaemia, could lead to substantial reductions in mortality in a substantial number of African children hospitalised

  8. Stroke rehabilitation at home before and after discharge reduced disability and improved quality of life: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Østergaard, Ann; Kjær, Pia; Skerris, Anja; Skou, Christina; Christoffersen, Jane; Seest, Line Skou; Poulsen, Mai Bang; Rønholt, Finn; Overgaard, Karsten

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate if home-based rehabilitation of inpatients improved outcome compared to standard care. Interventional, randomised, safety/efficacy open-label trial. University hospital stroke unit in collaboration with three municipalities. Seventy-one eligible stroke patients (41 women) with focal neurological deficits hospitalised in a stroke unit for more than three days and in need of rehabilitation. Thirty-eight patients were randomised to home-based rehabilitation during hospitalization and for up to four weeks after discharge to replace part of usual treatment and rehabilitation services. Thirty-three control patients received treatment and rehabilitation following usual guidelines for the treatment of stroke patients. Ninety days post-stroke the modified Rankin Scale score was the primary endpoint. Other outcome measures were the modified Barthel-100 Index, Motor Assessment Scale, CT-50 Cognitive Test, EuroQol-5D, Body Mass Index and treatment-associated economy. Thirty-one intervention and 30 control patients completed the study. Patients in the intervention group achieved better modified Rankin Scale score (Intervention median = 2, IQR = 2-3; Control median = 3, IQR = 2-4; P=0.04). EuroQol-5D quality of life median scores were improved in intervention patients (Intervention median = 0.77, IQR = 0.66-0.79; Control median = 0.66, IQR = 0.56 - 0.72; P=0.03). The total amount of home-based training in minutes highly correlated with mRS, Barthel, Motor Assessment Scale and EuroQol-5D™ scores (P-values ranging from Prehabilitation reduced disability and increased quality of life. Compared to standard care, home-based stroke rehabilitation was more cost-effective. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Maximising the impact of qualitative research in feasibility studies for randomised controlled trials: guidance for researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Cathain, Alicia; Hoddinott, Pat; Lewin, Simon; Thomas, Kate J; Young, Bridget; Adamson, Joy; Jansen, Yvonne Jfm; Mills, Nicola; Moore, Graham; Donovan, Jenny L

    2015-01-01

    Feasibility studies are increasingly undertaken in preparation for randomised controlled trials in order to explore uncertainties and enable trialists to optimise the intervention or the conduct of the trial. Qualitative research can be used to examine and address key uncertainties prior to a full trial. We present guidance that researchers, research funders and reviewers may wish to consider when assessing or undertaking qualitative research within feasibility studies for randomised controlled trials. The guidance consists of 16 items within five domains: research questions, data collection, analysis, teamwork and reporting. Appropriate and well conducted qualitative research can make an important contribution to feasibility studies for randomised controlled trials. This guidance may help researchers to consider the full range of contributions that qualitative research can make in relation to their particular trial. The guidance may also help researchers and others to reflect on the utility of such qualitative research in practice, so that trial teams can decide when and how best to use these approaches in future studies.

  10. Calculating the probability of random sampling for continuous variables in submitted or published randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, J B; Dexter, F; Pandit, J J; Shafer, S L; Yentis, S M

    2015-07-01

    In a previous paper, one of the authors (JBC) used a chi-squared method to analyse the means (SD) of baseline variables, such as height or weight, from randomised controlled trials by Fujii et al., concluding that the probabilities that the reported distributions arose by chance were infinitesimally small. Subsequent testing of that chi-squared method, using simulation, suggested that the method was incorrect. This paper corrects the chi-squared method and tests its performance and the performance of Monte Carlo simulations and ANOVA to analyse the probability of random sampling. The corrected chi-squared method and ANOVA method became inaccurate when applied to means that were reported imprecisely. Monte Carlo simulations confirmed that baseline data from 158 randomised controlled trials by Fujii et al. were different to those from 329 trials published by other authors and that the distribution of Fujii et al.'s data were different to the expected distribution, both p non-random (i.e. unreliable) data in randomised controlled trials submitted to journals. © 2015 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  11. A double-blind randomised controlled investigation into the efficacy of Mirococept (APT070) for preventing ischaemia reperfusion injury in the kidney allograft (EMPIRIKAL): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassimatis, Theodoros; Qasem, Anass; Douiri, Abdel; Ryan, Elizabeth G; Rebollo-Mesa, Irene; Nichols, Laura L; Greenlaw, Roseanna; Olsburgh, Jonathon; Smith, Richard A; Sacks, Steven H; Drage, Martin

    2017-06-06

    Delayed graft function (DGF) is traditionally defined as the requirement for dialysis during the first week after transplantation. DGF is a common complication of renal transplantation, and it negatively affects short- and long-term graft outcomes. Ischaemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is a prime contributor to the development of DGF. It is well established that complement system activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of IRI. Mirococept is a highly effective complement inhibitor that can be administered ex vivo to the donor kidney just before transplantation. Preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that Mirococept inhibits inflammatory responses that follow IRI. The EMPIRIKAL trial (REC 12/LO/1334) aims to evaluate the efficacy of Mirococept in reducing the incidence of DGF in cadaveric renal transplantation. EMPIRIKAL is a multicentre double-blind randomised case-control trial designed to test the superiority of Mirococept in the prevention of DGF in cadaveric renal allografts, as compared to standard cold perfusion fluid (Soltran®). Patients will be randomised to Mirococept or placebo (Pbo) and will be enrolled in cohorts of N = 80 with a maximum number of 7 cohorts. The first cohort will be randomised to 10 mg of Mirococept or Pbo. After the completion of each cohort, an interim analysis will be carried out in order to evaluate the dose allocation for the next cohort (possible doses: 5-25 mg). Immunosuppression therapy, antibiotic and antiviral prophylaxis will be administered as per local centre protocols. The enrolment will take approximately 24 months, and patients will be followed for 12 months. The primary endpoint is DGF, defined as the requirement for dialysis during the first week after transplantation. Secondary endpoints include duration of DGF, functional DGF, renal function at 12 months, acute rejection episodes at 6 and 12 months, primary non-function and time of hospital stay on first admission and in the first year

  12. A randomised controlled trial of ion-exchange water softeners for the treatment of eczema in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim S Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies and anecdotal reports suggest a possible link between household use of hard water and atopic eczema. We sought to test whether installation of an ion-exchange water softener in the home can improve eczema in children.This was an observer-blind randomised trial involving 336 children (aged 6 months to 16 years with moderate/severe atopic eczema. All lived in hard water areas (≥200 mg/l calcium carbonate. Participants were randomised to either installation of an ion-exchange water softener plus usual eczema care, or usual eczema care alone. The primary outcome was change in eczema severity (Six Area Six Sign Atopic Dermatitis Score, SASSAD at 12 weeks, measured by research nurses who were blinded to treatment allocation. Analysis was based on the intent-to-treat population. Eczema severity improved for both groups during the trial. The mean change in SASSAD at 12 weeks was -5.0 (20% improvement for the water softener group and -5.7 (22% improvement for the usual care group (mean difference 0.66, 95% confidence interval -1.37 to 2.69, p = 0.53. No between-group differences were noted in the use of topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors.Water softeners provided no additional benefit to usual care in this study population. Small but statistically significant differences were found in some secondary outcomes as reported by parents, but it is likely that such improvements were the result of response bias, since participants were aware of their treatment allocation. A detailed report for this trial is also available at http://www.hta.ac.uk.Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN71423189 Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  13. Efficacy of a multimodal physiotherapy treatment program for hip osteoarthritis: a randomised placebo-controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forbes Andrew

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hip osteoarthritis (OA is a common condition leading to pain, disability and reduced quality of life. There is currently limited evidence to support the use of conservative, non-pharmacological treatments for hip OA. Exercise and manual therapy have both shown promise and are typically used together by physiotherapists to manage painful hip OA. The aim of this randomised controlled trial is to compare the efficacy of a physiotherapy treatment program with placebo treatment in reducing pain and improving physical function. Methods The trial will be conducted at the University of Melbourne Centre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine. 128 participants with hip pain greater or equal to 40/100 on visual analogue scale (VAS and evidence of OA on x-ray will be recruited. Treatment will be provided by eight community physiotherapists in the Melbourne metropolitan region. The active physiotherapy treatment will comprise a semi-structured program of manual therapy and exercise plus education and advice. The placebo treatment will consist of sham ultrasound and the application of non-therapeutic gel. The participants and the study assessor will be blinded to the treatment allocation. Primary outcomes will be pain measured by VAS and physical function recorded on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC immediately after the 12 week intervention. Participants will also be followed up at 36 weeks post baseline. Conclusions The trial design has important strengths of reproducibility and reflecting contemporary physiotherapy practice. The findings from this randomised trial will provide evidence for the efficacy of a physiotherapy program for painful hip OA. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry reference: ACTRN12610000439044

  14. Randomised controlled trial of improvisational music therapy's effectiveness for children with autism spectrum disorders (TIME-A: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geretsegger Monika

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has suggested that music therapy may facilitate skills in areas typically affected by autism spectrum disorders such as social interaction and communication. However, generalisability of previous findings has been restricted, as studies were limited in either methodological accuracy or the clinical relevance of their approach. The aim of this study is to determine effects of improvisational music therapy on social communication skills of children with autism spectrum disorders. An additional aim of the study is to examine if variation in dose of treatment (i.e., number of music therapy sessions per week affects outcome of therapy, and to determine cost-effectiveness. Methods/Design Children aged between 4;0 and 6;11 years who are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder will be randomly assigned to one of three conditions. Parents of all participants will receive three sessions of parent counselling (at 0, 2, and 5 months. In addition, children randomised to the two intervention groups will be offered individual, improvisational music therapy over a period of five months, either one session (low-intensity or three sessions (high-intensity per week. Generalised effects of music therapy will be measured using standardised scales completed by blinded assessors (Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, ADOS and parents (Social Responsiveness Scale, SRS before and 2, 5, and 12 months after randomisation. Cost effectiveness will be calculated as man years. A group sequential design with first interim look at N = 235 will ensure both power and efficiency. Discussion Responding to the need for more rigorously designed trials examining the effectiveness of music therapy in autism spectrum disorders, this pragmatic trial sets out to generate findings that will be well generalisable to clinical practice. Addressing the issue of dose variation, this study's results will also provide information on the relevance of session

  15. Efficacy of Coming Out Proud to reduce stigma’s impact among people with mental illness: pilot randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüsch, Nicolas; Abbruzzese, Elvira; Hagedorn, Eva; Hartenhauer, Daniel; Kaufmann, Ilias; Curschellas, Jan; Ventling, Stephanie; Zuaboni, Gianfranco; Bridler, René; Olschewski, Manfred; Kawohl, Wolfram; Rössler, Wulf; Kleim, Birgit; Corrigan, Patrick W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Facing frequent stigma and discrimination, many people with mental illness have to choose between secrecy and disclosure in different settings. Coming Out Proud (COP), a 3-week peer-led group intervention, offers support in this domain in order to reduce stigma’s negative impact. Aims To examine COP’s efficacy to reduce negative stigma-related outcomes and to promote adaptive coping styles (Current Controlled Trials number: ISRCTN43516734). Method In a pilot randomised controlled trial, 100 participants with mental illness were assigned to COP or a treatment-as-usual control condition. Outcomes included self-stigma, empowerment, stigma stress, secrecy and perceived benefits of disclosure. Results Intention-to-treat analyses found no effect of COP on self-stigma or empowerment, but positive effects on stigma stress, disclosure-related distress, secrecy and perceived benefits of disclosure. Some effects diminished during the 3-week follow-up period. Conclusions Coming Out Proud has immediate positive effects on disclosure- and stigma stress-related variables and may thus alleviate stigma’s negative impact. PMID:24434073

  16. Efficacy of Coming Out Proud to reduce stigma's impact among people with mental illness: pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüsch, Nicolas; Abbruzzese, Elvira; Hagedorn, Eva; Hartenhauer, Daniel; Kaufmann, Ilias; Curschellas, Jan; Ventling, Stephanie; Zuaboni, Gianfranco; Bridler, René; Olschewski, Manfred; Kawohl, Wolfram; Rössler, Wulf; Kleim, Birgit; Corrigan, Patrick W

    2014-01-01

    Facing frequent stigma and discrimination, many people with mental illness have to choose between secrecy and disclosure in different settings. Coming Out Proud (COP), a 3-week peer-led group intervention, offers support in this domain in order to reduce stigma's negative impact. To examine COP's efficacy to reduce negative stigma-related outcomes and to promote adaptive coping styles (Current Controlled Trials number: ISRCTN43516734). In a pilot randomised controlled trial, 100 participants with mental illness were assigned to COP or a treatment-as-usual control condition. Outcomes included self-stigma, empowerment, stigma stress, secrecy and perceived benefits of disclosure. Intention-to-treat analyses found no effect of COP on self-stigma or empowerment, but positive effects on stigma stress, disclosure-related distress, secrecy and perceived benefits of disclosure. Some effects diminished during the 3-week follow-up period. Coming Out Proud has immediate positive effects on disclosure- and stigma stress-related variables and may thus alleviate stigma's negative impact.

  17. Once-daily rupatadine improves the symptoms of chronic idiopathic urticaria: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubertret, Louis; Zalupca, Lavinia; Cristodoulo, Tania; Benea, Vasile; Medina, Iris; Fantin, Sara; Lahfa, Morad; Pérez, Iñaki; Izquierdo, Iñaki; Arnaiz, Eva

    2007-01-01

    This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, international, dose-ranging study investigated the effect of treatment with rupatadine 5, 10 and 20 mg once daily for 4 weeks on symptoms and interference with daily activities and sleep in 12-65 years-old patients with moderate-to-severe chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU). Rupatadine 10 and 20 mg significantly reduced pruritus severity by 62.05% and 71.87% respectively, from baseline, over a period of 4 weeks compared to reduction with placebo by 46.59% (p < 0.05). Linear trends were noted for reductions in mean number of wheals and interference with daily activities and sleep with rupatadine 10 and 20 mg over the 4-week treatment period. The two most frequently reported AEs were somnolence (2.90% for placebo, 4.29% for 5 mg-, 5.41% for 10 mg- and 21.43% for 20 mg-rupatadine-treated group) and headache (4.35% for placebo, 2.86% for 5 mg-, 4.05% for 10 mg- and 4.29% for 20 mg-rupatadine-treated group). These findings suggest that rupatadine 10 and 20 mg is a fast-acting, efficacious and safe treatment for the management of patients with moderate-to-severe CIU. Rupatadine decreased pruritus severity, in a dose- and time-dependent manner.

  18. REFINE (Reducing Falls in In-patient Elderly - a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sach Tracey

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls in hospitals are common, resulting in injury and anxiety to patients, and large costs to NHS organisations. More than half of all in-patient falls in elderly people in acute care settings occur at the bedside, during transfers or whilst getting up to go to the toilet. In the majority of cases these falls are unwitnessed. There is insufficient evidence underpinning the effectiveness of interventions to guide clinical staff regarding the reduction of falls in the elderly inpatient. New patient monitoring technologies have the potential to offer advances in falls prevention. Bedside sensor equipment can alert staff, not in the immediate vicinity, to a potential problem and avert a fall. However no studies utilizing this assistive technology have demonstrated a significant reduction in falls rates in a randomised controlled trial setting. Methods/Design The research design is an individual patient randomised controlled trial of bedside chair and bed pressure sensors, incorporating a radio-paging alerting mode to alert staff to patients rising from their bed or chair, across five acute elderly care wards in Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Participants will be randomised to bedside chair and bed sensors or to usual care (without the use of sensors. The primary outcome is the number of bedside in-patient falls. Discussion The REFINE study is the first randomised controlled trial of bedside pressure sensors in elderly inpatients in an acute NHS Trust. We will assess whether falls can be successfully and cost effectively reduced using this technology, and report on its acceptability to both patients and staff. Trial Registration ISRCTN trial number: ISRCTN44972300.

  19. Protocol for: Sheffield Obesity Trial (SHOT: A randomised controlled trial of exercise therapy and mental health outcomes in obese adolescents [ISRCNT83888112

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Neil P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While obesity is known to have many physiological consequences, the psychopathology of this condition has not featured prominently in the literature. Cross-sectional studies have indicated that obese children have increased odds of experiencing poor quality of life and mental health. However, very limited trial evidence has examined the efficacy of exercise therapy for enhancing mental health outcomes in obese children, and the Sheffield Obesity Trial (SHOT will provide evidence of the efficacy of supervised exercise therapy in obese young people aged 11–16 years versus usual care and an attention-control intervention. Method/design SHOT is a randomised controlled trial where obese young people are randomised to receive; (1 exercise therapy, (2 attention-control intervention (involving body-conditioning exercises and games that do not involve aerobic activity, or (3 usual care. The exercise therapy and attention-control sessions will take place three times per week for eight weeks and a six-week home programme will follow this. Ninety adolescents aged between 11–16 years referred from a children's hospital for evaluation of obesity or via community advertisements will need to complete the study. Participants will be recruited according to the following criteria: (1 clinically obese and aged 11–16 years (Body Mass Index Centile > 98th UK standard (2 no medical condition that would restrict ability to be active three times per week for eight weeks and (3 not diagnosed with insulin dependent diabetes or receiving oral steroids. Assessments of outcomes will take place at baseline, as well as four (intervention midpoint and eight weeks (end of intervention from baseline. Participants will be reassessed on outcome measures five and seven months from baseline. The primary endpoint is physical self-perceptions. Secondary outcomes include physical activity, self-perceptions, depression, affect, aerobic fitness and BMI.

  20. Homoeopathy for delayed onset muscle soreness: a randomised double blind placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, A J; Fisher, P; Smith, C; Wyllie, S E; Lewith, G T

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To pilot a model for determining whether a homoeopathic medicine is superior to placebo for delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). DESIGN: Randomised double blind placebo controlled trial. SETTING: Physiotherapy department of a homoeopathic hospital. SUBJECTS: Sixty eight healthy volunteers (average age 30; 41% men) undertook a 10 minute period of bench stepping carrying a small weight and were randomised to a homoeopathic medicine or placebo. OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean muscle soreness in the five day period after the exercise test, symptom free days, maximum soreness score, days to no soreness, days on medication. RESULTS: The difference between group means was 0.17 in favour of placebo with 95% confidence intervals +/- 0.50. Similar results were found for other outcome measures. CONCLUSION: The study did not find benefit of the homoeopathic remedy in DOMS. Bench stepping may not be an appropriate model to evaluate the effects of a treatment on DOMS because of wide variation between subject soreness scores. PMID:9429007

  1. Effects of postural specific sensorimotor training in patients with chronic low back pain: study protocol for randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskey, Michael A; Schuster-Amft, Corina; Wirth, Brigitte; de Bruin, Eling D

    2015-12-15

    Sensorimotor training (SMT) is popularly applied as a preventive or rehabilitative exercise method in various sports and rehabilitation settings. Yet, there is only low-quality evidence on its effect on pain and function. This randomised controlled trial will investigate the effects of a theory-based SMT in rehabilitation of chronic (>3 months) non-specific low back pain (CNLBP) patients. A pilot study with a parallel, single-blinded, randomised controlled design. Twenty adult patients referred to the clinic for CNLBP treatment will be included, randomised, and allocated to one of two groups. Each group will receive 9 x 30 minutes of standard physiotherapy (PT) treatment. The experimental group will receive an added 15 minutes of SMT. For SMT, proprioceptive postural exercises are performed on a labile platform with adjustable oscillation to provoke training effects on different entry levels. The active comparator group will perform 15 minutes of added sub-effective low-intensity endurance training. Outcomes are assessed on 4 time-points by a treatment blinded tester: eligibility assessment at baseline (BL) 2-4 days prior to intervention, pre-intervention assessment (T0), post-intervention assessment (T1), and at 4 weeks follow-up (FU). At BL, an additional healthy control group (n = 20) will be assessed to allow cross-sectional comparison with symptom-free participants. The main outcomes are self-reported pain (Visual Analogue Scale) and functional status (Oswestry Disability Index). For secondary analysis, postural control variables after an externally perturbed stance on a labile platform are analysed using a video-based marker tracking system and a pressure plate (sagittal joint-angle variability and centre of pressure confidence ellipse). Proprioception is measured as relative cervical joint repositioning error during a head-rotation task. Effect sizes and mixed-model MANOVA (2 groups × 4 measurements for 5 dependent variables) will be calculated

  2. Acupuncture and rehabilitation of the painful shoulder: study protocol of an ongoing multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial [ISRCTN28687220

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimenez Carmen

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the painful shoulder is one of the most common dysfunctions of the locomotor apparatus, and is frequently treated both at primary healthcare centres and by specialists, little evidence has been reported to support or refute the effectiveness of the treatments most commonly applied. According to the bibliography reviewed, physiotherapy, which is the most common action taken to alleviate this problem, has not yet been proven to be effective, because of the small size of sample groups and the lack of methodological rigor in the papers published on the subject. No reviews have been made to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating this complaint, but in recent years controlled randomised studies have been made and these demonstrate an increasing use of acupuncture to treat pathologies of the soft tissues of the shoulder. In this study, we seek to evaluate the effectiveness of physiotherapy applied jointly with acupuncture, compared with physiotherapy applied with a TENS-placebo, in the treatment of painful shoulder caused by subacromial syndrome (rotator cuff tendinitis and subacromial bursitis. Methods/design Randomised controlled multicentre study with blind evaluation by an independent observer and blind, independent analysis. A study will be made of 465 patients referred to the rehabilitation services at participating healthcare centres, belonging to the regional public health systems of Andalusia and Murcia, these patients presenting symptoms of painful shoulder and a diagnosis of subacromial syndrome (rotator cuff tendinitis and subacromial bursitis. The patients will be randomised into two groups: 1 experimental (acupuncture + physiotherapy; 2 control (TENS-placebo + physiotherapy; the administration of rescue medication will also be allowed. The treatment period will have a duration of three weeks. The main result variable will be the change produced on Constant's Shoulder Function Assessment (SFA Scale

  3. Evidence for non-random sampling in randomised, controlled trials by Yuhji Saitoh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, J B; Loadsman, J A

    2017-01-01

    A large number of randomised trials authored by Yoshitaka Fujii have been retracted, in part as a consequence of a previous analysis finding a very low probability of random sampling. Dr Yuhji Saitoh co-authored 34 of those trials and he was corresponding author for eight of them. We found a number of additional randomised, controlled trials that included baseline data, with Saitoh as corresponding author, that Fujii did not co-author. We used Monte Carlo simulations to analyse the baseline data from 32 relevant trials in total as well as an outcome (muscle twitch recovery ratios) reported in several. We also compared a series of muscle twitch recovery graphs appearing in a number of Saitoh's publications. The baseline data in 14/32 randomised, controlled trials had p sampling. Combining the continuous and categorical probabilities of the 32 included trials, we found a very low likelihood of random sampling: p = 1.27 × 10(-8) (1 in 100,000,000). The high probability of non-random sampling and the repetition of lines in multiple graphs suggest that further scrutiny of Saitoh's work is warranted. © 2016 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. Pilates based core stability training in ambulant individuals with multiple sclerosis: protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman Jennifer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with Multiple Sclerosis (MS frequently experience balance and mobility impairments, including reduced trunk stability. Pilates-based core stability training, which is aimed at improving control of the body's stabilising muscles, is popular as a form of exercise with people with MS and therapists. A replicated single case series study facilitated by the Therapists in MS Group in the United Kingdom (UK provides preliminary evidence that this approach can improve balance and mobility in ambulant people with MS; further evidence is needed to substantiate these findings to ensure that limited time, energy, finances and resources are used to best effect. This study builds upon the pilot work undertaken in the case series study by implementing a powered randomised controlled study, with the aims of: 1 Establishing the effectiveness of core stability training 2 Comparing core stability training with standardised physiotherapy exercise 3 Exploring underlying mechanisms of change associated with this intervention Methods This is a multi-centre, double blind, block randomised, controlled trial. Eligible participants will be recruited from 4 UK centres. Participants will be randomly allocated to one of three groups: Pilates based core stability training, standardised physiotherapy exercise or contract-relax relaxation sessions (placebo control. All will receive face to face training sessions over a 12 week period; together with a 15 minute daily home programme. All will be assessed by a blinded assessor before training, at the end of the 12 week programme and at 4 week follow-up. The primary outcome measure is the 10 metre timed walk. Secondary outcome measures are the MS walking Scale (MSWS-12, the Functional Reach (forwards and lateral, a 10 point Numerical Rating Scale to determine "Difficulty in carrying a drink when walking", and the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC Scale. In addition, ultrasound imaging of the

  5. Effect of virtual reality training on laparoscopic surgery: randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of virtual reality training on an actual laparoscopic operation. DESIGN: Prospective randomised controlled and blinded trial. SETTING: Seven gynaecological departments in the Zeeland region of Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 24 first and second year registrars specialising...... in gynaecology and obstetrics. INTERVENTIONS: Proficiency based virtual reality simulator training in laparoscopic salpingectomy and standard clinical education (controls). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The main outcome measure was technical performance assessed by two independent observers blinded to trainee......-14 minutes) and in the control group was 24 (20-29) minutes (Pvirtual reality simulator training. The performance level of novices...

  6. Inositol for the prevention of neural tube defects: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Nicholas D E; Leung, Kit-Yi; Gay, Victoria; Burren, Katie; Mills, Kevin; Chitty, Lyn S; Copp, Andrew J

    2016-03-28

    Although peri-conceptional folic acid (FA) supplementation can prevent a proportion of neural tube defects (NTD), there is increasing evidence that many NTD are FA non-responsive. The vitamin-like molecule inositol may offer a novel approach to preventing FA-non-responsive NTD. Inositol prevented NTD in a genetic mouse model, and was well tolerated by women in a small study of NTD recurrence. In the present study, we report the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects by Inositol (PONTI) pilot study designed to gain further experience of inositol usage in human pregnancy as a preliminary trial to a future large-scale controlled trial to evaluate efficacy of inositol in NTD prevention. Study subjects were UK women with a previous NTD pregnancy who planned to become pregnant again. Of 117 women who made contact, ninety-nine proved eligible and forty-seven agreed to be randomised (double-blind) to peri-conceptional supplementation with inositol plus FA or placebo plus FA. In total, thirty-three randomised pregnancies produced one NTD recurrence in the placebo plus FA group (n 19) and no recurrences in the inositol plus FA group (n 14). Of fifty-two women who declined randomisation, the peri-conceptional supplementation regimen and outcomes of twenty-two further pregnancies were documented. Two NTD recurred, both in women who took only FA in their next pregnancy. No adverse pregnancy events were associated with inositol supplementation. The findings of the PONTI pilot study encourage a large-scale controlled trial of inositol for NTD prevention, but indicate the need for a careful study design in view of the unwillingness of many high-risk women to be randomised.

  7. Effect of daily versus weekly home fortification with multiple micronutrient powder on haemoglobin concentration of young children in a rural area, Lao People's Democratic Republic: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kounnavong Sengchanh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple micronutrient deficiencies, in particular iron deficiency anaemia (IDA is a severe public health problem in Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR. Because of the practical difficulties encountered in improving the nutritional adequacy of traditional complementary foods and the limitations associated with the use of liquid iron supplementation for the treatment and prevention of IDA in infants and young children, recently, home-fortification with multivitamins and minerals sprinkles was recommended. This study aims to compare the effect of twice weekly versus daily supplementation with multivitamins and minerals powder (MMP on anaemia prevalence, haemoglobin concentration, and growth in infants and young children in a rural community in Lao PDR. Methods A randomized trial was conducted in six rural communities. Children aged 6 to 52 months (n = 336 were randomly assigned to a control group (n = 110 or to one of two intervention groups receiving either two sachets per week (n = 115 or a daily sachet (n = 111 of MMP for 24 weeks; 331 children completed the study. A finger prick of blood was taken at baseline, at week 12, and again at week 24 to determine haemoglobin concentration. Anthropometric measurements were taken every 4 weeks. The McNemar test was used to assess within group differences at three time points in the study subjects with anaemia and one-way ANOVA was used to assess changes in mean haemoglobin concentration in the treatment groups. Results MMP supplementation resulted in significant improvements in haemoglobin concentration and in the reduction of anaemia prevalence in the two treatment groups compared with the control group (p Conclusions MMP supplementation had positive effects in reduction of anaemia prevalence and in improving haemoglobin concentration. For severely to moderately anaemic children, daily MMP supplementation was more effective in improving haemoglobin concentration and reducing

  8. Study protocol: a randomised controlled trial of the effects of a multi-modal exercise program on cognition and physical functioning in older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan Sue

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intervention studies testing the efficacy of cardiorespiratory exercise have shown some promise in terms of improving cognitive function in later life. Recent developments suggest that a multi-modal exercise intervention that includes motor as well as physical training and requires sustained attention and concentration, may better elicit the actual potency of exercise to enhance cognitive performance. This study will test the effect of a multi-modal exercise program, for older women, on cognitive and physical functioning. Methods/design This randomised controlled trial involves community dwelling women, without cognitive impairment, aged 65–75 years. Participants are randomised to exercise intervention or non-exercise control groups, for 16 weeks. The intervention consists of twice weekly, 60 minute, exercise classes incorporating aerobic, strength, balance, flexibility, co-ordination and agility training. Primary outcomes are measures of cognitive function and secondary outcomes include physical functioning and a neurocognitive biomarker (brain derived neurotrophic factor. Measures are taken at baseline and 16 weeks later and qualitative data related to the experience and acceptability of the program are collected from a sub-sample of the intervention group. Discussion If this randomised controlled trial demonstrates that multimodal exercise (that includes motor fitness training can improve cognitive performance in later life, the benefits will be two-fold. First, an inexpensive, effective strategy will have been developed that could ameliorate the increased prevalence of age-related cognitive impairment predicted to accompany population ageing. Second, more robust evidence will have been provided about the mechanisms that link exercise to cognitive improvement allowing future research to be better focused and potentially more productive. Trial registration Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registration Number

  9. Soya products and serum lipids: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokede, Oluwabunmi A; Onabanjo, Temilola A; Yansane, Alfa; Gaziano, J Michael; Djoussé, Luc

    2015-09-28

    Soya proteins and isoflavones have been reported to exert beneficial effects on the serum lipid profile. More recently, this claim is being challenged. The objective of this study was to comprehensively examine the effects of soya consumption on the lipid profile using published trials. A detailed literature search was conducted via MEDLINE (from 2004 through February 2014), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials Register) and ClinicalTrials.gov for randomised controlled trials assessing the effects of soya on the lipid profile. The primary effect measure was the difference in means of the final measurements between the intervention and control groups. In all, thirty-five studies (fifty comparisons) were included in our analyses. Treatment duration ranged from 4 weeks to 1 year. Intake of soya products resulted in a significant reduction in serum LDL-cholesterol concentration, -4.83 (95% CI -7.34, -2.31) mg/dl, TAG, -4.92 (95% CI -7.79, -2.04) mg/dl, and total cholesterol (TC) concentrations, -5.33 (95% CI -8.35, -2.30) mg/dl. There was also a significant increase in serum HDL-cholesterol concentration, 1.40 (95% CI 0.58, 2.23) mg/dl. The I² statistic ranged from 92 to 99%, indicating significant heterogeneity. LDL reductions were more marked in hypercholesterolaemic patients, -7.47 (95% CI -11.79, -3.16) mg/dl, than in healthy subjects, -2.96 (95% CI -5.28, -0.65) mg/dl. LDL reduction was stronger when whole soya products (soya milk, soyabeans and nuts) were used as the test regimen, -11.06 (95% CI -15.74, -6.37) mg/dl, as opposed to when 'processed' soya extracts, -3.17 (95% CI -5.75, -0.58) mg/dl, were used. These data are consistent with the beneficial effects of soya proteins on serum LDL, HDL, TAG and TC concentrations. The effect was stronger in hypercholesterolaemic subjects. Whole soya foods appeared to be more beneficial than soya supplementation, whereas isoflavone supplementation had no effects on the lipid profile.

  10. Social Dancing and Incidence of Falls in Older Adults: A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafna Merom

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The prevention of falls among older people is a major public health challenge. Exercises that challenge balance are recognized as an efficacious fall prevention strategy. Given that small-scale trials have indicated that diverse dance styles can improve balance and gait of older adults, two of the strongest risk factors for falls in older people, this study aimed to determine whether social dance is effective in i reducing the number of falls and ii improving physical and cognitive fall-related risk factors.A parallel two-arm cluster randomized controlled trial was undertaken in 23 self-care retirement villages (clusters around Sydney, Australia. Eligible villages had to have an appropriate hall for dancing, house at least 60 residents, and not be currently offering dance as a village activity. Retirement villages were randomised using a computer generated randomisation method, constrained using minimisation. Eligible participants had to be a resident of the village, be able to walk at least 50 m, and agree to undergo physical and cognitive testing without cognitive impairment. Residents of intervention villages (12 clusters were offered twice weekly one-hour social dancing classes (folk or ballroom dancing over 12 mo (80 h in total. Programs were standardized across villages and were delivered by eight dance teachers. Participants in the control villages (11 clusters were advised to continue with their regular activities.falls during the 12 mo trial and Trail Making Tests.The Physiological Performance Assessment (i.e., postural sway, proprioception, reaction time, leg strength and the Short Physical Performance Battery; health-related physical and mental quality of life from the Short-Form 12 (SF-12 Survey. Data on falls were obtained from 522 of 530 (98% randomised participants (mean age 78 y, 85% women and 424 (80% attended the 12-mo reassessment, which was lower among folk dance participants (71% than ballroom dancing (82% or control

  11. Behavioural activation versus mindfulness-based guided self-help treatment administered through a smartphone application: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Ly, Kien Hoa; Trüschel, Anna; Jarl, Linnea; Magnusson, Susanna; Windahl, Tove; Johansson, Robert; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Evaluating and comparing the effectiveness of two smartphone-delivered treatments: one based on behavioural activation (BA) and other on mindfulness. DESIGN: Parallel randomised controlled, open, trial. Participants were allocated using an online randomisation tool, handled by an independent person who was separate from the staff conducting the study. SETTING: General community, with recruitment nationally through mass media and advertisements. PARTICIPANTS: 40 participants diagno...

  12. Computerised therapy for depression with clinician vs. assistant and brief vs. extended phone support: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gega Lina

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (cCBT involves standardised, automated, interactive self-help programmes delivered via a computer. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs and observational studies have shown than cCBT reduces depressive symptoms as much as face-to-face therapy and more than waiting lists or treatment as usual. cCBT’s efficacy and acceptability may be influenced by the “human” support offered as an adjunct to it, which can vary in duration and can be offered by people with different levels of training and expertise. Methods/design This is a two-by-two factorial RCT investigating the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and acceptability of cCBT supplemented with 12 weekly phone support sessions are either brief (5–10 min or extended (20–30 min and are offered by either an expert clinician or an assistant with no clinical training. Adults with non-suicidal depression in primary care can self-refer into the study by completing and posting to the research team a standardised questionnaire. Following an assessment interview, eligible referrals have access to an 8-session cCBT programme called Beating the Blues and are randomised to one of four types of support: brief-assistant, extended-assistant, brief-clinician or extended-clinician. A sample size of 35 per group (total 140 is sufficient to detect a moderate effect size with 90% power on our primary outcome measure (Work and Social Adjustment Scale; assuming a 30% attrition rate, 200 patients will be randomised. Secondary outcome measures include the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories and the PHQ-9 and GAD-7. Data on clinical outcomes, treatment usage and patient experiences are collected in three ways: by post via self-report questionnaires at week 0 (randomisation and at weeks 12 and 24 post-randomisation; electronically by the cCBT system every time patients log-in; by phone during assessments, support sessions and exit interviews. Discussion

  13. Effects of Short-Term Cognitive Remediation on Cognitive Dysfunction in Partially or Fully Remitted Individuals with Bipolar Disorder: Results of a Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsa M Demant

    Full Text Available Cognitive dysfunction is common in bipolar disorder (BD but is not sufficiently addressed by current treatments. Cognitive remediation (CR may improve cognitive function in schizophrenia but no randomised controlled trial has investigated this intervention in BD. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of CR on persistent cognitive dysfunction in BD.Patients with BD in partial remission with cognitive complaints were randomised to 12 weeks group-based CR (n=23 or standard treatment (ST (n=23. Outcomes were improved verbal memory (primary, sustained attention, executive and psychosocial function (secondary and additional measures of cognitive and psychosocial function (tertiary. Participants were assessed at baseline and weeks 12 and 26.Of the 46 randomised participants five dropped out and one was excluded after baseline. CR (n=18 had no effect on primary or secondary measures of cognitive or psychosocial function compared with ST (n=22. However, CR improved subjective sharpness at week 12, and quality of life and verbal fluency at week 26 follow-up (tertiary outcomes. Although the trial turned out to have suboptimal statistical power for the primary outcome analysis, calculation of the 95% confidence interval showed that it was highly unlikely that an increase in sample size would have rendered any beneficial effects of CR vs. ST on the verbal memory.Short-term group-based CR did not seem to improve overall cognitive or psychosocial function in individuals with BD in full or partial remission. The present findings suggest that that longer-term, more intensive and individualised CR may be necessary to improve cognition in BD.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01457235.

  14. Randomised controlled trial testing the effect of cotrimoxazole prophylaxis on morbidity and mortality outcomes in breastfed HIV-exposed uninfected infants: study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutsoudis, Anna; Daniels, Brodie; Moodley-Govender, Eshia; Ngomane, Noluthando; Zako, Linda; Spooner, Elizabeth; Kiepiela, Photini; Reddy, Shabashini; Kuhn, Louise; Ramjee, Gita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction No randomised controlled trial (RCT) has examined the efficacy of cotrimoxazole (CTX) prophylaxis in HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) infants during the breastfeeding period, in this new era of effective prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) prophylaxis. The efficacy of CTX prophylaxis has presently been demonstrated only in HIV-infected children. The absence of proven benefits in HEU breastfed infants associated with infectious diseases justifies an RCT as proposed. Herewith lies the rationale for conducting the proposed study. Methods A partially blinded RCT is proposed to evaluate the efficacy of CTX prophylaxis administered from 6 weeks of age to HEU infants receiving a PMTCT regimen. A non-inferiority design will be used, randomising 1298 infants to receive CTX or not to receive CTX. Participants will be reviewed at the following time points: 6 weeks (enrolment and randomisation), 10 weeks, 14 weeks, 4 months and monthly thereafter until 12 months of age. They will be evaluated for anthropometric growth, interval illness, CTX adherence, signs and symptoms of study drug toxicity, concomitant medication use, breastfeeding status and HIV infection status. The study will compare the incidence of grade 3 and grade 4 common childhood illnesses (focusing on pneumonia and diarrhoea) and all-cause mortality until 12 months of age. In a subset of participants, we will compare grade 3 and grade 4 haemoglobin and alanine aminotransferase results as well as investigate gut integrity. Ethics and dissemination The study has ethical approval from the University of KwaZulu-Natal Biomedical Research Ethics Committee (BFC212/13). Trial registration numbers PACTR201311000621110 and DOH-27-0614-4728; Pre-results. PMID:27406638

  15. Perineal resuturing versus expectant management following vaginal delivery complicated by a dehisced wound (PREVIEW): a pilot and feasibility randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, L; Kettle, C; Thomas, P W; Ismail, K M K

    2017-01-01

    Objective To establish the feasibility of conducting a definitive randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing the effectiveness of resuturing versus expectant management for dehisced perineal wounds. Design A multicentre pilot and feasibility RCT. Setting Ten UK maternity units from July 2011 to July 2013. Population Eligible women with a dehisced perineal wound within 2 weeks of childbirth. Methods The interventions were resuturing or expectancy. Randomisation was via web or telephone, stratified by participating centre. Blinding was not possible due to the nature of the interventions. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Outcome The primary outcome measure was wound healing at 6–8 weeks. Results The study revealed a number of feasibility issues, particularly strong patient and clinician preference for treatment options at recruiting centres and the timing of the primary outcome measure. Thirty-four women were randomised (17 in each arm). Data from 33 women were analysed on an intention-to-treat analysis to obtain preliminary estimates of effect size. There was a difference in wound healing at 2 weeks favouring resuturing (OR 20.00, 95% CI 2.04 to 196.37, p=0.004). However, by 6–8 weeks all but one wound in both groups had healed. Conclusions PREVIEW revealed a number of feasibility issues, which impacted on recruitment rate. These will have to be taken into account in the design of any future definitive study. In this feasibility study, resuturing was associated with quicker wound healing and women reported higher satisfaction rates with the outcome at 3 months. Trial registration number ISRCTN05754020. PMID:28188151

  16. Spinal manipulative therapy versus Graston Technique in the treatment of non-specific thoracic spine pain: Design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Bruce

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The one year prevalence of thoracic back pain has been estimated as 17% compared to 64% for neck pain and 67% for low back pain. At present only one randomised controlled trial has been performed assessing the efficacy of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT for thoracic spine pain. In addition no high quality trials have been performed to test the efficacy and effectiveness of Graston Technique® (GT, a soft tissue massage therapy using hand-held stainless steel instruments. The objective of this trial is to determine the efficacy of SMT and GT compared to a placebo for the treatment of non specific thoracic spine pain. Methods Eighty four eligible people with non specific thoracic pain mid back pain of six weeks or more will be randomised to one of three groups, either SMT, GT, or a placebo (de-tuned ultrasound. Each group will receive up to 10 supervised treatment sessions at the Murdoch University Chiropractic student clinic over a 4-week period. Treatment outcomes will be measured at baseline, one week after their first treatment, upon completion of the 4-week intervention period and at three, six and twelve months post randomisation. Outcome measures will include the Oswestry Back Pain Disability Index and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Intention to treat analysis will be utilised in the statistical analysis of any group treatment effects. Trial Registration This trial was registered with the Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry on the 7th February 2008. Trial number: ACTRN12608000070336

  17. Effect of tesofensine on bodyweight loss, body composition, and quality of life in obese patients: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Arne; Madsbad, Sten; Breum, Leif

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Weight-loss drugs produce an additional mean weight loss of only 3-5 kg above that of diet and placebo over 6 months, and more effective pharmacotherapy of obesity is needed. We assessed the efficacy and safety of tesofensine-an inhibitor of the presynaptic uptake of noradrenaline......, dopamine, and serotonin-in patients with obesity. METHODS: We undertook a phase II, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in five Danish obesity management centres. After a 2 week run-in phase, 203 obese patients (body-mass index 30-...

  18. Benefits of combining inspiratory muscle with 'whole muscle' training in children with cystic fibrosis: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Sosa, Elena; Gonzalez-Saiz, Laura; Groeneveld, Iris F; Villa-Asensi, José R; Barrio Gómez de Aguero, María I; Fleck, Steven J; López-Mojares, Luis M; Pérez, Margarita; Lucia, Alejandro

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study (randomised controlled trial) was to assess the effects of an 8-week combined 'whole muscle' (resistance+aerobic) and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on lung volume, inspiratory muscle strength (PImax) and cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2 peak) (primary outcomes), and dynamic muscle strength, body composition and quality of life in paediatric outpatients with CF (cystic fibrosis, secondary outcomes). We also determined the effects of a detraining period. Participants were randomly allocated with a block on gender to a control (standard therapy) or intervention group (initial n=10 (6 boys) in each group; age 10±1 and 11±1 years). The latter group performed a combined programme (IMT (2 sessions/day) and aerobic+strength exercises (3 days/week, in-hospital)) that was followed by a 4-week detraining period. All participants were evaluated at baseline, post-training and detraining. Adherence to the training programme averaged 97.5%±1.7%. There was a significant interaction (group×time) effect for PImax, VO2peak and five-repetition maximum strength (leg-press, bench-press, seated-row) (all (ptraining exerting a significant beneficial effect only in the intervention group, which was maintained after detraining for PImax and leg-press. The relatively short-term (8-week) training programme used here induced significant benefits in important health phenotypes of paediatric patients with CF. IMT is an easily applicable intervention that could be included, together with supervised exercise training in the standard care of these patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Time regained: when people stop a physical activity program, how does their time use change? A randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjaan Gomersall

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate how previously inactive adults who had participated in a structured, partly supervised 6-week exercise program restructured their time budgets when the program ended. Using a randomised controlled trial design, 129 previously inactive adults were recruited and randomly allocated to one of three groups: a Moderate or Extensive six-week physical activity intervention (150 and 300 additional minutes of exercise per week, respectively or a Control group. Additional physical activity was accumulated through both group and individual exercise sessions with a wide range of activities. Use of time and time spent in energy expenditure zones was measured using a computerised 24-h self-report recall instrument, the Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adults, and accelerometry at baseline, mid- and end-program and at 3- and 6-months follow up. At final follow up, all significant changes in time use domains had returned to within 20 minutes of baseline levels (Physical Activity 1-2 min/d, Active Transport 3-9 min/d, Self-Care 0-2 min/d, Television/Videogames 13-18 min/d in the Moderate and Extensive group, relative to Controls, respectively, p > 0.05. Similarly, all significant changes in time spent in the moderate energy expenditure zone had returned to within 1-3 min/d baseline levels (p > 0.05, however time spent in vigorous physical activity according to accelerometry estimates remained elevated, although the changes were small in magnitude (1 min/d in the Moderate and Extensive groups, relative to Controls, p = 0.01. The results of this study demonstrate strong recidivist patterns in physical activity, but also in other aspects of time use. In designing and determining the effectiveness of exercise interventions, future studies would benefit from considering the whole profile of time use, rather than focusing on individual activities,Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000248066.

  20. Patch: platelet transfusion in cerebral haemorrhage: study protocol for a multicentre, randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkgraaf Marcel G

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients suffering from intracerebral haemorrhage have a poor prognosis, especially if they are using antiplatelet therapy. Currently, no effective acute treatment option for intracerebral haemorrhage exists. Limiting the early growth of intracerebral haemorrhage volume which continues the first hours after admission seems a promising strategy. Because intracerebral haemorrhage patients who are on antiplatelet therapy have been shown to be particularly at risk of early haematoma growth, platelet transfusion may have a beneficial effect. Methods/Design The primary objective is to investigate whether platelet transfusion improves outcome in intracerebral haemorrhage patients who are on antiplatelet treatment. The PATCH study is a prospective, randomised, multi-centre study with open treatment and blind endpoint evaluation. Patients will be randomised to receive platelet transfusion within six hours or standard care. The primary endpoint is functional health after three months. The main secondary endpoints are safety of platelet transfusion and the occurrence of haematoma growth. To detect an absolute poor outcome reduction of 20%, a total of 190 patients will be included. Discussion To our knowledge this is the first randomised controlled trial of platelet transfusion for an acute haemorrhagic disease. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR1303

  1. A randomised controlled trial evaluating the effect of an individual auditory cueing device on freezing and gait speed in people with Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Deirdre

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurological disorder resulting from a degeneration of dopamine producing cells in the substantia nigra. Clinical symptoms typically affect gait pattern and motor performance. Evidence suggests that the use of individual auditory cueing devices may be used effectively for the management of gait and freezing in people with Parkinson's disease. The primary aim of the randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the effect of an individual auditory cueing device on freezing and gait speed in people with Parkinson's disease. Methods A prospective multi-centre randomised cross over design trial will be conducted. Forty-seven subjects will be randomised into either Group A or Group B, each with a control and intervention phase. Baseline measurements will be recorded using the Freezing of Gait Questionnaire as the primary outcome measure and 3 secondary outcome measures, the 10 m Walk Test, Timed "Up & Go" Test and the Modified Falls Efficacy Scale. Assessments are taken 3-times over a 3-week period. A follow-up assessment will be completed after three months. A secondary aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of such a device on the quality of life of people with Parkinson's disease using a qualitative methodology. Conclusion The Apple iPod-Shuffle™ and similar devices provide a cost effective and an innovative platform for integration of individual auditory cueing devices into clinical, social and home environments and are shown to have immediate effect on gait, with improvements in walking speed, stride length and freezing. It is evident that individual auditory cueing devices are of benefit to people with Parkinson's disease and the aim of this randomised controlled trial is to maximise the benefits by allowing the individual to use devices in both a clinical and social setting, with minimal disruption to their daily routine. Trial registration The protocol for this study is registered

  2. Wide Awake Parenting: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of a parenting program for the management of post-partum fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunning Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exhaustion and fatigue are commonly experienced by parents during the post-partum period, and can have implications for daily functioning, mental health and parenting practices. There is a need for the development of effective interventions to assist parents with the management of fatigue. This paper outlines the procedure for a randomised controlled study which aims to test the efficacy of Wide Awake Parenting, a program for the management of fatigue in the postnatal period. Methods/design Parents with an infant less than 6 months of age, and from seven Local Government Areas in Melbourne, Australia were invited to participate in this study. Parents were randomised to receive the Wide Awake Parenting program (intervention groups or usual care (control group offered by health services. The Wide Awake Parenting program provides parents with psycho-education and information about fatigue, and strategies to reduce its effects either via a self-directed method, or professionally led with a home visit and telephone support. Baseline data will be collected prior to randomisation, and further data will be collected at 2- and 6-weeks post intervention. Discussion To our knowledge this is the first randomised controlled trial of a program which compares the efficacy of a self-management approach and health professional assistance for the management of fatigue in the early post-partum period. If effective, it could offer an important, universal public health management approach to this common health concern. Trial registration number Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN12611000133932.

  3. Reflexology for the treatment of pain in people with multiple sclerosis: a double-blind randomised sham-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, C M; Smyth, S; Lowe-Strong, A S

    2009-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) results in pain and other symptoms which may be modified by conventional treatment, however, MS is still not curable. Several studies have reported positive effects of reflexology in the treatment of pain, however, no randomised controlled clinical trials for the treatment of pain have been conducted within this population. The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of reflexology on pain in and MS population. We randomly allocated 73 participants to receive either precision or sham reflexology weekly for 10 weeks. Outcome measures were taken pre-and post-treatment with follow-up at 6 and 12 weeks by a researcher blinded to group allocation. The primary outcome measure recorded pain using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). A significant (p reflexology was not superior to sham, however, both treatments offer clinically significant improvements for MS symptoms via a possible placebo effect or stimulation of reflex points in the feet using non-specific massage.

  4. The effects of an unsupervised water exercise program on low back pain and sick leave among healthy pregnant women - A randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backhausen, Mette G; Tabor, Ann; Albert, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain is highly prevalent among pregnant women, but evidence of an effective treatment are still lacking. Supervised exercise-either land or water based-has shown benefits for low back pain, but no trial has investigated the evidence of an unsupervised water exercise program...... on low back pain. We aimed to assess the effect of an unsupervised water exercise program on low back pain intensity and days spent on sick leave among healthy pregnant women. METHODS: In this randomised, controlled, parallel-group trial, 516 healthy pregnant women were randomly assigned to either...... unsupervised water exercise twice a week for a period of 12 weeks or standard prenatal care. Healthy pregnant women aged 18 years or older, with a single fetus and between 16-17 gestational weeks were eligible. The primary outcome was low back pain intensity measured by the Low Back Pain Rating scale at 32...

  5. The efficacy and tolerability of 'polypills': meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Raina Elley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To assess the blood pressure and lipid-lowering efficacy and tolerability of 'polypills' used in cardiovascular disease prevention trials. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Systematic review and meta-analysis. SEARCH STRATEGY: The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, and PubMed databases were searched for eligible trials. Study inclusion criteria: Randomised controlled trials of at least six weeks duration, which compared a 'polypill' (that included at least one anti-hypertensive and one lipid-lowering medication with a placebo (or one active component. OUTCOME MEASURES: Change from baseline in systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and total and LDL-cholesterol; discontinuation of study medication and reported adverse effects. Of 44 potentially eligible studies, six trials (including 2,218 patients without previous cardiovascular disease fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Compared with placebo, 'polypills' reduced systolic blood pressure by -9.2 mmHg (95% confidence interval (CI: -13.4, -5.0 diastolic blood pressure by -5.0 mmHg (95%CI: -7.4, -2.6, total cholesterol by -1.22 mmol/L (95%CI: -1.60, -0.84 and LDL-cholesterol by -1.02 mmol/L (95%CI: -1.37, -0.67. However, those taking a 'polypill' (vs. placebo or component were more likely to discontinue medication (20% vs 14% (Odds ratio: 1.5 (95% CI: 1.2, 1.9. There was no significant difference in reported adverse effects amongst those on a 'polypill' (36% vs. 28% (OR: 1.3 (95%CI: 0.7, 2.5. There was high statistical heterogeneity in comparisons for blood pressure and lipid-lowering but use of random-effects and quality-effects models produced very similar results. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Compared with placebo, the 'polypills' reduced blood pressure and lipids. Tolerability was lower amongst those on 'polypills' than those on placebo or one component, but differences were moderate. Effectiveness trials are needed to help clarify the status of 'polypills' in

  6. Systematic review of randomised controlled trials:Probiotics for functional constipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna; Chmielewska; Hania; Szajewska

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To systematically evaluate and update evidence on the efficacy and safety of probiotic supplementation for the treatment of constipation. METHODS:The MEDLINE,EMBASE,CINAHL,and Cochrane Library databases were searched in May 2009 for randomised controlled trials(RCTs)performed in paediatric or adult populations related to the study aim. RESULTS:We included five RCTs with a total of 377 subjects(194 in the experimental group and 183 in the control group).The participants were adults (three RCTs,n=266)and ...

  7. AExaCTT – Aerobic Exercise and Consecutive Task-specific Training for the upper limb after stroke: Protocol for a randomised controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R. Valkenborghs

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Motor function may be enhanced if aerobic exercise is paired with motor training. One potential mechanism is that aerobic exercise increases levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, which is important in neuroplasticity and involved in motor learning and motor memory consolidation. This study will examine the feasibility of a parallel-group assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial investigating whether task-specific training preceded by aerobic exercise improves upper limb function more than task-specific training alone, and determine the effect size of changes in primary outcome measures. People with upper limb motor dysfunction after stroke will be allocated to either task-specific training or aerobic exercise and consecutive task-specific training. Both groups will perform 60 hours of task-specific training over 10 weeks, comprised of 3 × 1 hour sessions per week with a therapist and 3 × 1 hours of home-based self-practice per week. The combined intervention group will also perform 30 minutes of aerobic exercise (70–85%HRmax immediately prior to the 1 hour of task-specific training with the therapist. Recruitment, adherence, retention, participant acceptability, and adverse events will be recorded. Clinical outcome measures will be performed pre-randomisation at baseline, at completion of the training program, and at 1 and 6 months follow-up. Primary clinical outcome measures will be the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT and the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT. If aerobic exercise prior to task-specific training is acceptable, and a future phase 3 randomised controlled trial seems feasible, it should be pursued to determine the efficacy of this combined intervention for people after stroke.

  8. Treatment of clozapine-associated obesity and diabetes with exenatide (CODEX) in adults with schizophrenia: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Karla; Siskind, Dan; Winckel, Karl; Hollingworth, Samantha; Kisely, Steve; Russell, Anthony W

    2015-06-01

    Clozapine causes significant metabolic disturbances including obesity and type 2 diabetes. Recent evidence that reduced glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) may contribute to aetiology of clozapine-associated metabolic dysregulation suggests a potential therapeutic role for GLP-1 agonists. This open-label, pilot randomised controlled trial evaluates the effect of exenatide in clozapine-treated obese adults who have schizophrenia, with or without poorly controlled diabetes. Sixty out-patients will be randomised to once weekly extended release exenatide or treatment as usual for 24 weeks. To evaluate the feasibility of larger studies regarding methodology, acceptability, tolerability and estimate efficacy for glycaemic control or weight loss. Secondary outcomes are psychosis severity and metabolic parameters. This is the first trial investigating GLP-1 agonists for glycaemic control and weight loss in clozapine-treated patients with either diabetes or obesity. Clozapine-associated obesity and diabetes with exenatide (CODEX) will provide proof-of-concept empirical evidence addressing whether this novel treatment is practical and worthy of further investigation. A.W.R. has received speaker honoraria and travel grants from AstraZeneca, BoehringerIngelheim, Eli Lilly, MSD, Novo Nordisk and Sanofi and has participated on advisory panels for MSD and Novo Nordisk. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence.

  9. Magnet therapy for the relief of pain and inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (CAMBRA: A randomised placebo-controlled crossover trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richmond Stewart J

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory autoimmune disease. Although disease activity may be managed effectively with prescription drugs, unproven treatments such as magnet therapy are sometimes used as an adjunct for pain control. Therapeutic devices incorporating permanent magnets are widely available and easy to use. Magnets may also be perceived as a more natural and less harmful alternative to analgesic compounds. Of interest to health service researchers is the possibility that magnet therapy might help to reduce the economic burden of managing chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Magnets are extremely cheap to manufacture and prolonged treatment involves a single cost. Despite this, good quality scientific evidence concerning the safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of magnet therapy is scarce. The primary aim of the CAMBRA trial is to investigate the effectiveness of magnet therapy for relieving pain and inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods/Design The CAMBRA trial employs a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled crossover design. Participant will each wear four devices: a commercially available magnetic wrist strap; an attenuated wrist strap; a demagnetised wrist strap; and a copper bracelet. Device will be allocated in a randomised sequence and each worn for five weeks. The four treatment phases will be separated by wash out periods lasting one week. Both participants and researchers will be blind, as far as feasible, to the allocation of experimental and control devices. In total 69 participants will be recruited from general practices within the UK. Eligible patients will have a verified diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis that is being managed using drugs, and will be experiencing chronic pain. Outcomes measured will include pain, inflammation, disease activity, physical function, medication use, affect, and health related costs. Data will be collected using questionnaires, diaries, manual

  10. Efficacy and safety of canagliflozin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled with metformin and sulphonylurea: a randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, J P H; Charpentier, G; Hollander, P; González-Gálvez, G; Mathieu, C; Vercruysse, F; Usiskin, K; Law, G; Black, S; Canovatchel, W; Meininger, G

    2013-01-01

    Aims Canagliflozin is a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase 3 study evaluated the efficacy and safety of canagliflozin as an add-on to metformin plus sulphonylurea in patients with T2DM. Methods Patients (N = 469) received canagliflozin 100 or 300 mg or placebo once daily during a 26-week core period and a 26-week extension. Prespecified primary end-point was change in HbA1c at 26 weeks. Secondary end-points included change in HbA1c at week 52 as well as proportion of patients achieving HbA1c canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg vs. placebo at week 26 (–0.85%, –1.06%, and –0.13%; p canagliflozin doses reduced FPG and body weight vs. placebo at week 26 (p canagliflozin vs. placebo; these led to few discontinuations. Increased incidence of documented, but not severe, hypoglycaemia episodes was seen with canagliflozin vs. placebo. Conclusions Canagliflozin improved glycaemic control, reduced body weight, and was generally well tolerated in T2DM patients on metformin plus sulphonylurea over 52 weeks. PMID:24118688

  11. Randomised controlled trials of veterinary homeopathy: characterising the peer-reviewed research literature for systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathie, Robert T; Hacke, Daniela; Clausen, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    Systematic review of the research evidence in veterinary homeopathy has never previously been carried out. This paper presents the search methods, together with categorised lists of retrieved records, that enable us to identify the literature that is acceptable for future systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in veterinary homeopathy. All randomised and controlled trials of homeopathic intervention (prophylaxis and/or treatment of disease, in any species except man) were appraised according to pre-specified criteria. The following databases were systematically searched from their inception up to and including March 2011: AMED; Carstens-Stiftung Homeopathic Veterinary Clinical Research (HomVetCR) database; CINAHL; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; Embase; Hom-Inform; LILACS; PubMed; Science Citation Index; Scopus. One hundred and fifty records were retrieved; 38 satisfied the acceptance criteria (substantive report of a clinical treatment or prophylaxis trial in veterinary homeopathic medicine randomised and controlled and published in a peer-reviewed journal), and were thus eligible for future planned systematic review. Approximately half of the rejected records were theses. Seven species and 27 different species-specific medical conditions were represented in the 38 papers. Similar numbers of papers reported trials of treatment and prophylaxis (n=21 and n=17 respectively) and were controlled against placebo or other than placebo (n=18, n=20 respectively). Most research focused on non-individualised homeopathy (n=35 papers) compared with individualised homeopathy (n=3). The results provide a complete and clarified view of the RCT literature in veterinary homeopathy. We will systematically review the 38 substantive peer-reviewed journal articles under the main headings: treatment trials; prophylaxis trials. Copyright © 2012 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Persistent Occiput Posterior position - OUTcomes following manual rotation (POP-OUT): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Hala; Hyett, Jon A; Kuah, Sabrina; Pardey, John; Ludlow, Joanne; Bisits, Andrew; Park, Felicity; Kowalski, David; de Vries, Bradley

    2015-03-15

    Occiput posterior position is the most common malpresentation in labour, contributes to about 18% of emergency caesarean sections and is associated with a high risk of assisted delivery. Caesarean section is now a major contributing factor to maternal mortality and morbidity following childbirth in developed countries. Obstetric intervention by forceps and ventouse delivery is associated with complications to the maternal genital tract and to the neonate, respectively. There is level 2 evidence that prophylactic manual rotation reduces the caesarean section rate and assisted vaginal delivery. But there has been no adequately powered randomised controlled trial. This is a protocol for a double-blinded, multicentre, randomised controlled clinical trial to define whether this intervention decreases the operative delivery (caesarean section, forceps or vacuum delivery) rate. Eligible participants will be (greater than or equal to) 37 weeks' with a singleton pregnancy and a cephalic presentation in the occiput posterior position on transabdominal ultrasound early in the second stage of labour. Based on a background risk of operative delivery of 68%, then for a reduction to 50%, an alpha value of 0.05 and a beta value of 0.2, 254 participants will need to be enrolled. This study has been approved by the Ethics Review Committee (RPAH Zone) of the Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, Australia, and protocol number X110410. Participants with written consent will be randomised to either prophylactic manual rotation or a sham procedure. The primary outcome will be operative delivery (defined as vacuum, forceps and/or caesarean section deliveries). Secondary outcomes will be caesarean section, significant maternal mortality/morbidity and significant perinatal mortality/morbidity. Analysis will be by intention-to-treat. Primary and secondary outcomes will be compared using a chi-squared test. A logistic regression for the primary outcome will be undertaken to account for

  13. A digital intake approach in specialized mental health care: study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Margot J; Elfeddali, Iman; Krol, David G H; Veerbeek, Marjolein A; de Beurs, Edwin; Beekman, Aartjan T F; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M

    2017-03-07

    Enhancing patient participation is becoming increasingly important in mental health care as patients use to have a dependent, inactive role and nonadherence to treatment is a regular problem. Research shows promising results of initiatives stimulating patient participation in partnership with their clinicians. However, few initiatives targeting both patients' and clinicians' behaviour have been evaluated in randomised trials (RCT). Therefore, in GGz Breburg, a specialized mental health institution, a digital intake approach was developed aimed at exploring treatment needs, expectations and preferences of patients intended to prepare patients for the intake consultations. Subsequently, patients and clinicians discuss this information during intake consultations and make shared decisions about options in treatment. The aim of this trial is to test the efficacy of this new digital intake approach facilitated by Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM), peer support and training of clinicians as compared to the intake as usual. The primary outcome is decisional conflict about choices in treatment. Secondary outcomes focus on patient participation, shared decision making, working alliance, adherence to treatment and clinical outcomes. This article presents the study protocol of a cluster-randomised controlled trial in four outpatient departments for adults with depression, anxiety and personality disorders, working in two different regions. Randomisation is done between two similar intake-teams within each department. In the four intervention teams the new intake approach is implemented. The four control teams apply the intake as usual and will implement the new approach after the completion of the study. In total 176 patients are projected to participate in the study. Data collection will be at baseline, and at two weeks and two months after the intake. This study will potentially demonstrate the efficacy of the new digital intake approach in mental health care in terms of the

  14. A comparison of two treatments for childhood apraxia of speech: methods and treatment protocol for a parallel group randomised control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Elizabeth

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood Apraxia of Speech is an impairment of speech motor planning that manifests as difficulty producing the sounds (articulation and melody (prosody of speech. These difficulties may persist through life and are detrimental to academic, social, and vocational development. A number of published single subject and case series studies of speech treatments are available. There are currently no randomised control trials or other well designed group trials available to guide clinical practice. Methods/Design A parallel group, fixed size randomised control trial will be conducted in Sydney, Australia to determine the efficacy of two treatments for Childhood Apraxia of Speech: 1 Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment and the 2 Nuffield Dyspraxia Programme – Third edition. Eligible children will be English speaking, aged 4–12 years with a diagnosis of suspected CAS, normal or adjusted hearing and vision, and no comprehension difficulties or other developmental diagnoses. At least 20 children will be randomised to receive one of the two treatments in parallel. Treatments will be delivered by trained and supervised speech pathology clinicians using operationalised manuals. Treatment will be administered in 1-hour sessions, 4 times per week for 3 weeks. The primary outcomes are speech sound and prosodic accuracy on a customised 292 item probe and the Diagnostic Evaluation of Articulation and Phonology inconsistency subtest administered prior to treatment and 1 week, 1 month and 4 months post-treatment. All post assessments will be completed by blinded assessors. Our hypotheses are: 1 treatment effects at 1 week post will be similar for both treatments, 2 maintenance of treatment effects at 1 and 4 months post will be greater for Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment than Nuffield Dyspraxia Programme treatment, and 3 generalisation of treatment effects to untrained related speech behaviours will be greater for Rapid

  15. The Women's international study of long-duration oestrogen after menopause (WISDOM: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meade Tom W

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At the time of feasibility work and final design of the trial there was no randomised control trial evidence for the long-term risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy. Observational studies had suggested that long term use of estrogen was likely to be associated, amongst other things, with reduced risks of osteoporosis and ischaemic heart disease and increased risks of breast and endometrial cancer. Concomitant use of progestogens had been shown to protect against endometrial cancer, but there were few data showing how progestogen might affect estrogen actions on other conditions. Disease specific risks from observational studies suggested that, overall, long-term HRT was likely to be beneficial. Several studies showed that mortality from all causes was lower in HRT users than in non-users. Some secondary cardiovascular prevention trials were ongoing but evidence was also required for a range of outcomes in healthy women. The WISDOM trial was designed to compare combined estrogen and progestogen versus placebo, and estrogen alone versus combined estrogen and progestogen. During the development of WISDOM the Women's Health Initiative trial was designed, funded and started in the US. Design Randomised, placebo, controlled, trial. Methods The trial was set in general practices in the UK (384, Australia (94, and New Zealand (24. In these practices 284175 women aged 50–69 years were registered with 226282 potentially eligible. We sought to randomise 22300 postmenopausal women aged 50 – 69 and treat for ten years. The interventions were: conjugated equine estrogens, 0.625 mg orally daily; conjugated equine estrogens plus medroxyprogesterone acetate 2.5/5.0 mg orally daily; matched placebo. Primary outcome measures were: major cardiovascular disease, osteoporotic fractures, breast cancer and dementia. Secondary outcomes were: other cancers, all cause death, venous thromboembolism and cerebro-vascular disease. Results

  16. Impact of a web-based tool (WebCONSORT) to improve the reporting of randomised trials: results of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopewell, Sally; Boutron, Isabelle; Altman, Douglas G; Barbour, Ginny; Moher, David; Montori, Victor; Schriger, David; Cook, Jonathan; Gerry, Stephen; Omar, Omar; Dutton, Peter; Roberts, Corran; Frangou, Eleni; Clifton, Lei; Chiocchia, Virginia; Rombach, Ines; Wartolowska, Karolina; Ravaud, Philippe

    2016-11-28

    The CONSORT Statement is an evidence-informed guideline for reporting randomised controlled trials. A number of extensions have been developed that specify additional information to report for more complex trials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of using a simple web-based tool (WebCONSORT, which incorporates a number of different CONSORT extensions) on the completeness of reporting of randomised trials published in biomedical publications. We conducted a parallel group randomised trial. Journals which endorsed the CONSORT Statement (i.e. referred to it in the Instruction to Authors) but do not actively implement it (i.e. require authors to submit a completed CONSORT checklist) were invited to participate. Authors of randomised trials were requested by the editor to use the web-based tool at the manuscript revision stage. Authors registering to use the tool were randomised (centralised computer generated) to WebCONSORT or control. In the WebCONSORT group, they had access to a tool allowing them to combine the different CONSORT extensions relevant to their trial and generate a customised checklist and flow diagram that they must submit to the editor. In the control group, authors had only access to a CONSORT flow diagram generator. Authors, journal editors, and outcome assessors were blinded to the allocation. The primary outcome was the proportion of CONSORT items (main and extensions) reported in each article post revision. A total of 46 journals actively recruited authors into the trial (25 March 2013 to 22 September 2015); 324 author manuscripts were randomised (WebCONSORT n = 166; control n = 158), of which 197 were reports of randomised trials (n = 94; n = 103). Over a third (39%; n = 127) of registered manuscripts were excluded from the analysis, mainly because the reported study was not a randomised trial. Of those included in the analysis, the most common CONSORT extensions selected were non-pharmacologic (n = 43; n

  17. Sertraline or mirtazapine for depression in dementia (HTA-SADD): a randomised, multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sube; Hellier, Jennifer; Dewey, Michael; Romeo, Renee; Ballard, Clive; Baldwin, Robert; Bentham, Peter; Fox, Chris; Holmes, Clive; Katona, Cornelius; Knapp, Martin; Lawton, Claire; Lindesay, James; Livingston, Gill; McCrae, Niall; Moniz-Cook, Esme; Murray, Joanna; Nurock, Shirley; Orrell, Martin; O'Brien, John; Poppe, Michaela; Thomas, Alan; Walwyn, Rebecca; Wilson, Kenneth; Burns, Alistair

    2011-07-30

    Depression is common in dementia but the evidence base for appropriate drug treatment is sparse and equivocal. We aimed to assess efficacy and safety of two of the most commonly prescribed drugs, sertraline and mirtazapine, compared with placebo. We undertook the parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Health Technology Assessment Study of the Use of Antidepressants for Depression in Dementia (HTA-SADD) trial in participants from old-age psychiatry services in nine centres in England. Participants were eligible if they had probable or possible Alzheimer's disease, depression (lasting ≥4 weeks), and a Cornell scale for depression in dementia (CSDD) score of 8 or more. Participants were ineligible if they were clinically critical (eg, suicide risk), contraindicated to study drugs, on antidepressants, in another trial, or had no carer. The clinical trials unit at King's College London (UK) randomly allocated participants with a computer-generated block randomisation sequence, stratified by centre, with varying block sizes, in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive sertraline (target dose 150 mg per day), mirtazapine (45 mg), or placebo (control group), all with standard care. The primary outcome was reduction in depression (CSDD score) at 13 weeks (outcomes to 39 weeks were also assessed), assessed with a mixed linear-regression model adjusted for baseline CSDD, time, and treatment centre. This study is registered, number ISRCTN88882979 and EudraCT 2006-000105-38. Decreases in depression scores at 13 weeks did not differ between 111 controls and 107 participants allocated to receive sertraline (mean difference 1·17, 95% CI -0·23 to 2·58; p=0·10) or mirtazapine (0·01, -1·37 to 1·38; p=0·99), or between participants in the mirtazapine and sertraline groups (1·16, -0·25 to 2·57; p=0·11); these findings persisted to 39 weeks. Fewer controls had adverse reactions (29 of 111 [26%]) than did participants in the sertraline group (46 of 107, 43%; p=0·010) or

  18. The feasibility of a single-blinded fast-track pragmatic randomised controlled trial of a complex intervention for breathlessness in advanced disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Booth Sara

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Breathlessness Intervention Service is a novel service for patients with intractable breathlessness regardless of aetiology. It is being evaluated using the Medical Research Council's framework for the evaluation of complex interventions. This paper describes the feasibility results of Phase II: a single-blinded fast-track pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Methods A single-blinded fast-track pragmatic randomised controlled trial was conducted for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease referred to the service. Patients were randomised to either receive the intervention immediately for an eight-week period, or receive the intervention after an eight-week period on a waiting list during which time they received standard care. Outcomes examined included: response rates to the trial; response rates to the individual questionnaires and items; comments relating to the trial functioning made during interviews with patients, carers, referrers and service providers; and, researcher fieldwork notes. Results 16 of the 20 eligible patients agreed to participate in a recruitment visit (16/20; 14 respondents went on to complete a recruitment visit/baseline interview. The majority of those who completed a recruitment visit/baseline interview completed the RCT protocol (13/14; 12 of their carers were recruited and completed the protocol. An unblinding rate of 6/25 respondents (patients and carers was identified. Missing data were minimal and only one patient was lost to follow up. The fast-track trial methodology proved feasible and acceptable. Two of the baseline/outcome measures proved unsuitable: the WHO performance scale and the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting (SEIQoL-DW. Conclusion This study adds to the evidence that fast-track randomised controlled trials are feasible and acceptable in evaluations of palliative care interventions for patients with non-malignant conditions

  19. Randomised controlled trial of the effects of physical activity feedback on awareness and behaviour in UK adults: the FAB study protocol [ISRCTN92551397

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marteau Theresa

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While there are increasing data implicating poor recognition of physical inactivity as a potential barrier to healthy behaviour change, the efficacy of feedback to promote physical activity is uncertain. Using a randomised controlled trial nested within a population-based cohort study, we plan to test three variations of physical activity feedback against a control group. Our primary objective is to assess the efficacy of physical activity feedback in promoting physical activity behaviour change. Secondary objectives are to determine the influence of feedback on physical activity awareness and cognitions, and to compare behavioural effects by type of feedback. Methods/Design We aim to recruit 500 healthy participants aged 30 to 55 years from the ongoing Fenland Study (Cambridge, UK. Following careful phenotyping during baseline measurement (anthropometric, clinical, body composition and fitness measurements, as well as questionnaires assessing self-reported and self-rated physical activity, psychosocial correlates of physical activity behaviour, diet, lifestyle and general health, participants wear a combined heart rate and movement sensor (Actiheart® for six continuous days and nights. After receipt of the physical activity data (around 2 weeks later, participants are randomly allocated to either a control group (no feedback or one of three types of personalised physical activity feedback ('simple', 'visualised' or 'contextualised', and complete repeat measures of self-rated physical activity and psychosocial correlates. Approximately five weeks after receiving feedback, all participants wear the Actiheart® for another six-day follow-up period and complete repeat questionnaires. Values at outcome, adjusted for baseline, will be compared between randomised groups. Discussion Given the randomised trial design and use of objective measure of physical activity, this study is likely to provide valuable insights into the

  20. A prospective randomised controlled study on efficacies of acupuncture and steroid in treatment of idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Fu Man; Chow, Shun Kit; Chan, Patrick Yiu Bong; Wong, Alex Kam Wah; Wan, Sambo Shuk Ying; Ng, Rebecca Ka Wah; Chan, Geoffrey; Chan, Wing Shan; Ng, Angela; Law, Chi Keung

    2009-12-01

    A randomised controlled trial was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture in comparison with steroid in treatment of idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis (Bell's palsy). A total of 119 patients attending Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic of Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital from February 2003 to December 2005 were randomly allocated to groups of acupuncture, steroid and control (conventional expectant treatment). There were 53 in the steroid group, 28 in the acupuncture group and 38 in the control group. Patients were assessed weekly by blinded assessors, using the House-Brackmann facial nerve grading system. The efficacy of treatment in three groups was compared, in terms of degree of recovery and speed of recovery. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed. Results were analysed with SPSS software. Distribution of initial grade on presentation was analysed with the Pearson chi-square test and showed uneven distribution in the three groups in the intention-to-treat analysis. The overall improvement (grade 3 or better) was 86.9% in the steroid group, 96.4% in the acupuncture group and 89.5% in the control group respectively. However, the difference in degree of recovery and speed of recovery in the three groups was not statistically significant. The efficacies of acupuncture, steroid and conventional expectant treatment (natural course of recovery) in idiopathic peripheral facial palsy (Bell's palsy) in the study were the same with respect to the degree of recovery and speed of recovery.

  1. A randomised controlled trial using the Epidrum for labour epidurals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Deighan, M

    2015-03-01

    The aim of our study was to determine if using the Epidrum to site epidurals improves success and reduces morbidity. Three hundred parturients requesting epidural analgesia for labour were enrolled. 150 subjects had their epidural sited using Epidrum and 150 using standard technique. We recorded subject demographics, operator experience, number of attempts, Accidental Dural Puncture rate, rate of failure to site epidural catheter, rate of failure of analgesia, Post Dural Puncture Headache and Epidural Blood Patch rates. Failure rate in Epidrum group was 9\\/150 (6%) vs 0 (0%) in the Control group (P = 0.003). There were four (2.66%) accidental dural punctures in the Epidrum group and none in the Control group (P = 0.060), and 2 epidurals out of 150 (1.33%) in Epidrum group were re-sited, versus 3\\/150 (2%) in the control group (P = 1.000). The results of our study do not suggest that using Epidrum improves success or reduces morbidity.

  2. A randomised controlled trial evaluating family mediated exercise (FAME therapy following stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stokes Emma

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is a leading cause of disability among adults worldwide. Evidence suggests that increased duration of exercise therapy following stroke has a positive impact on functional outcome following stroke. The main objective of this randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the impact of additional family assisted exercise therapy in people with acute stroke. Methods/Design A prospective multi-centre single blind randomised controlled trial will be conducted. Forty patients with acute stroke will be randomised into either an experimental or control group. The experimental group will receive routine therapy and additional lower limb exercise therapy in the form of family assisted exercises. The control group will receive routine therapy with no additional formal input from their family members. Participants will be assessed at baseline, post intervention and followed up at three months using a series of standardised outcome measures. A secondary aim of the project is to evaluate the impact of the family mediated exercise programme on the person with stroke and the individual(s assisting in the delivery of exercises using a qualitative methodology. The study has gained ethical approval from the Research Ethics Committees of each of the clinical sites involved in the study. Discussion This study will evaluate a structured programme of exercises that can be delivered to people with stroke by their 'family members/friends'. Given that the progressive increase in the population of older people is likely to lead to an increased prevalence of stroke in the future, it is important to reduce the burden of this illness on the individual, the family and society. Family mediated exercises can maximise the carry over outside formal physiotherapy sessions, giving patients the opportunity for informal practice. Trial Registration The protocol for this study is registered with the US NIH Clinical trials registry (NCT00666744

  3. Effects of birth ball exercise on pain and self-efficacy during childbirth: a randomised controlled trial in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gau, Meei-Ling; Chang, Ching-Yi; Tian, Shu-Hui; Lin, Kuan-Chia

    2011-12-01

    To examine the effectiveness of a birth ball exercise programme during childbirth by measuring childbirth self-efficacy and childbirth pain. In addition, it tested the mediating effects of childbirth self-efficacy on the relationship between the birth ball exercise programme and childbirth pain. Randomised controlled trial. The study was conducted from December 2008 to November 2009, at two birth units, one at a regional hospital and one at a medical centre, with 600 and 1022 annual births, respectively. One hundred and eighty-eight expectant mothers were recruited (recruitment rate: 47%) and were allocated by block randomisation into the two arms of the study, but only 48 intervention and 39 control group participants completing the trial. The birth ball exercise programme consisted of a 26-page booklet and a 19-minute videotape, with periodic follow-ups during prenatal checks. All members of the experimental group were asked to practise the exercises and positions at home for at least 20 minutes three times a week for a period of 6-8 weeks. Each woman in the experimental group was given a birth ball for use during labour and encouraged every hour to choose the most comfortable positions, movements, and exercises. Both the experimental and control groups received standard nursing and midwifery care from hospital staff nurses in all aspects of pregnancy and childbirth. When cervical dilations were four centimetres and eight centimetres, the women completed demographic and obstetrics information, the Childbirth Self-efficacy Inventory (CBSEI), and the short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ). Our study revealed that birth ball exercises provided statistically significant improvements in childbirth self-efficacy and pain. Specifically, self-efficacy had a 30-40% mediating effect on relationships between birth ball exercises and childbirth pain. Mothers in the experimental group had shorter first-stage labour duration, less epidural analgesia, and fewer

  4. Exercise for depression in care home residents: a randomised controlled trial with cost-effectiveness analysis (OPERA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, M; Lamb, S E; Eldridge, S; Sheehan, B; Slowther, A; Spencer, A; Thorogood, M; Atherton, N; Bremner, S A; Devine, A; Diaz-Ordaz, K; Ellard, D R; Potter, R; Spanjers, K; Taylor, S J C

    2013-05-01

    Many older people living in care homes (long term residential care or nursing homes) are depressed. Exercise is a promising non-drug intervention for preventing and treating depression in this population. To evaluate the impact of a 'whole-home' intervention, consisting of training for residential and nursing home staff backed up with a twice-weekly, physiotherapist-led exercise class on depressive symptoms in care home residents. A cluster randomised controlled trial with a cost-effectiveness analysis to compare (1) the prevalence of depression in intervention homes with that in control homes in all residents contributing data 12 months after homes were randomised (cross-sectional analysis); (2) the number of depressive symptoms at 6 months between intervention and control homes in residents who were depressed at pre-randomisation baseline assessment (depressed cohort comparison); and (3) the number of depressive symptoms at 12 months between intervention and control homes in all residents who were present at pre-randomisation baseline assessment (cohort comparison). Seventy-eight care homes in Coventry and Warwickshire and north-east London. Care home residents aged ≥ 65 years. Control intervention: Depression awareness training programme for care home staff. Active intervention: A 'whole-home' exercise intervention, consisting of training for care home staff backed up with a twice-weekly, physiotherapist-led exercise group. Geriatric Depression Scale-15, proxy European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), cost-effectiveness from an National Health Service perspective, peripheral fractures and death. We recruited a total of 1054 participants. Cross-sectional analysis: We obtained 595 Geriatric Depression Scale-15 scores and 724 proxy EQ-5D scores. For the cohort analyses we obtained 765 baseline Geriatric Depression Scale-15 scores and 776 proxy EQ-5D scores. Of the 781 who we assessed prior to randomisation, 765 provided a Geriatric Depression Scale-15 score

  5. The efficacy of cyclosporine A in cats with presumed atopic dermatitis: a double blind, randomised prednisolone-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisselink, Marinus A; Willemse, Ton

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of cyclosporine A (CsA) and prednisolone in feline atopic dermatitis (AD) in a randomised, controlled double blind study. Twenty-nine cats with feline AD were randomly allocated to two groups. Eleven cats were treated orally with prednisolone (1mg/kg SID) and 18 were treated with CsA (5mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. At day 0 (D0) and D28, skin lesions were graded by means of the canine atopic dermatitis extent and severity index (CADESI). Skin biopsies and intradermal allergy tests were performed at D0 and blood samples for haematology and serum biochemistry were collected at D0 and D28. During the trial the cat owners were asked to evaluate the intensity of the pruritus once weekly on a linear analog scale and to record side effects. Based on the CADESI there was no significant difference between the two groups in the amount of remission (P=0.0562) or in the number of cats that improved by >25% (P=0.0571). The effect of CsA and prednisolone on pruritus as evaluated by the owners was not significantly different (P=0.41) between the two groups. No serious side effects were observed. The conclusion was that CsA is an effective alternative to prednisolone therapy in cats with presumed atopic dermatitis.

  6. Effectiveness of personalised feedback alone or combined with peer support to improve physical activity in sedentary older Malays with type 2 diabetes: A randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shariff-Ghazali eSazlina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Regular physical activity is an important aspect of self management among older people with type 2 diabetes but many remain inactive. Interventions to improve physical activity levels have been studied but few studies have evaluated the effects of personalised feedback or peer support; and there was no study on older people of Asian heritage. Hence, this trial evaluated whether personalised feedback (PF only or combined with peer support (PS improves physical activity among older Malays with type 2 diabetes (T2DM compared to usual care only. Materials and methods: A three arm randomised controlled trial was conducted in a primary healthcare clinic in Malaysia. 69 sedentary Malays aged 60 years and older with T2DM who received usual diabetes care were randomised to PF or PS interventions or as controls for 12 weeks with follow-ups at weeks 24 and 36. Intervention groups performed unsupervised walking activity and received written feedback on physical activity. The PS group also received group and telephone contacts from trained peer mentors. The primary outcome was pedometer steps. Secondary outcomes were self-reported physical activity, cardiovascular risk factors, cardiorespiratory fitness, balance, quality of life and psychosocial wellbeing. Results: 52 (75.4% completed the 36-week study. The PS group showed greater daily pedometer readings than the PF and controls (p=0.001. The PS group also had greater improvement in weekly duration (p<0.001 and frequency (p<0.001 of moderate intensity physical activity, scores on the Physical Activity Scale for Elderly (p=0.003, six minute walk test (p<0.001 and social support from friends (p=0.032 than PF and control groups. Conclusions: The findings suggest personalised feedback combined with peer support in older Malays with T2DM improved their physical activity levels, cardiorespiratory fitness and support from friends. Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN71447000.

  7. Effectiveness of joint mobilisation after cast immobilisation for ankle fracture: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial [ACTRN012605000143628

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haas Marion

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Passive joint mobilisation is a technique frequently used by physiotherapists to reduce pain, improve joint movement and facilitate a return to activities after injury, but its use after ankle fracture is currently based on limited evidence. The primary aim of this trial is to determine if adding joint mobilisation to a standard exercise programme is effective and cost-effective after cast immobilisation for ankle fracture in adults. Methods/Design Ninety participants will be recruited from the physiotherapy departments of three teaching hospitals and randomly allocated to treatment or control groups using a concealed procedure. All participants will perform an exercise programme. Participants in the treatment group will also receive joint mobilisation twice a week for four weeks. Blinded follow-up assessments will be conducted four, 12 and 24 weeks after randomisation. The primary outcome measures will be the Lower Extremity Functional Scale and the Assessment of Quality of Life. Secondary outcomes will include measures of impairments, activity limitation and participation. Data on the use of physiotherapy services and participants' out-of-pocket costs will be collected for the cost-effective and cost-utility analyses. To test the effects of treatment, between-group differences will be examined with analysis of covariance using a regression approach. The primary conclusions will be based on the four-week follow-up data. Discussion This trial incorporates features known to minimise bias. It uses a pragmatic design to reflect clinical practice and maximise generalisability. Results from this trial will contribute to an evidence-based approach for rehabilitation after ankle fracture.

  8. Same-admission versus interval cholecystectomy for mild gallstone pancreatitis (PONCHO): a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, David W; Bouwense, Stefan A; Schepers, Nicolien J; Besselink, Marc G; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; van Brunschot, Sandra; Bakker, Olaf J; Bollen, Thomas L; Dejong, Cornelis H; van Goor, Harry; Boermeester, Marja A; Bruno, Marco J; van Eijck, Casper H; Timmer, Robin; Weusten, Bas L; Consten, Esther C; Brink, Menno A; Spanier, B W Marcel; Bilgen, Ernst Jan Spillenaar; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B; Hofker, H Sijbrand; Rosman, Camiel; Voorburg, Annet M; Bosscha, Koop; van Duijvendijk, Peter; Gerritsen, Jos J; Heisterkamp, Joos; de Hingh, Ignace H; Witteman, Ben J; Kruyt, Philip M; Scheepers, Joris J; Molenaar, I Quintus; Schaapherder, Alexander F; Manusama, Eric R; van der Waaij, Laurens A; van Unen, Jacco; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G; van Ramshorst, Bert; Gooszen, Hein G; Boerma, Djamila

    2015-09-26

    In patients with mild gallstone pancreatitis, cholecystectomy during the same hospital admission might reduce the risk of recurrent gallstone-related complications, compared with the more commonly used strategy of interval cholecystectomy. However, evidence to support same-admission cholecystectomy is poor, and concerns exist about an increased risk of cholecystectomy-related complications with this approach. In this study, we aimed to compare same-admission and interval cholecystectomy, with the hypothesis that same-admission cholecystectomy would reduce the risk of recurrent gallstone-related complications without increasing the difficulty of surgery. For this multicentre, parallel-group, assessor-masked, randomised controlled superiority trial, inpatients recovering from mild gallstone pancreatitis at 23 hospitals in the Netherlands (with hospital discharge foreseen within 48 h) were assessed for eligibility. Adult patients (aged ≥18 years) were eligible for randomisation if they had a serum C-reactive protein concentration less than 100 mg/L, no need for opioid analgesics, and could tolerate a normal oral diet. Patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class III physical status who were older than 75 years of age, all ASA class IV patients, those with chronic pancreatitis, and those with ongoing alcohol misuse were excluded. A central study coordinator randomly assigned eligible patients (1:1) by computer-based randomisation, with varying block sizes of two and four patients, to cholecystectomy within 3 days of randomisation (same-admission cholecystectomy) or to discharge and cholecystectomy 25-30 days after randomisation (interval cholecystectomy). Randomisation was stratified by centre and by whether or not endoscopic sphincterotomy had been done. Neither investigators nor participants were masked to group assignment. The primary endpoint was a composite of readmission for recurrent gallstone-related complications (pancreatitis, cholangitis

  9. Effects on muscle strength, maximal jump height, flexibility and postural sway after soccer and Zumba exercise among female hospital employees: a 9-month randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barene, Svein; Holtermann, Andreas; Oseland, Harald; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Krustrup, Peter

    2016-10-01

    This 9-month randomised controlled workplace physical activity trial investigated the effects of soccer and Zumba exercise, respectively, on muscle strength, maximal jump height, sit-and-reach flexibility and postural sway among female workers. A total of 107 female hospital employees aged 25-63 were cluster-randomised to a soccer group, a Zumba group or a control group. Training was conducted outside working hours as two to three 1-h weekly sessions the first 3 months and once a week the last 6 months. Tests were conducted at baseline, after 3 and 9 months. The soccer group improved maximal neck extension strength both after 3 (1.2 kg; P flexibility. The present study indicates that workplace-initiated soccer and Zumba exercise may be beneficial for improvement of the neck and trunk strength, which may have preventive effects with regard to future perceived muscle pain in the respective body regions. Furthermore, the Zumba group revealed positive effects on lower limb lean mass and postural sway compared to the control group.

  10. Impact of the Alexander technique on well-being: a randomised controlled trial involving older adults with visual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Michael; Sherrington, Catherine; Lo, Serigne; Auld, Robin; Keay, Lisa

    2017-02-01

    Older adults with visual loss have high rates of depression, restricted participation and reduced quality of life. We sought to measure the impact of lessons in the Alexander technique on vision-related emotional and social well-being, as secondary outcomes to a study on improving physical functioning in this population. This is a single-blind randomised controlled trial. One hundred and twenty community-dwelling adults aged 50 to 90 years with visual impairments were randomised to either 12 Alexander lessons over 12 weeks and usual care or usual care. The Perceived Visual Ability Scale, the Keele Assessment of Participation, the emotional subscale of the Impact of Vision Impairment Profile, the Positive and Negative Affect Scale and the five-item Geriatric Depression Scale were administered at baseline and three and 12 months. Participants were receiving services from Guide Dogs NSW/ACT. None of the validated questionnaires found statistically significant improvements after adjustment for baseline at three or 12 months, although the emotional subscale of the Impact of Vision Impairment approached significance in favour of the intervention group (4.54 points, 95 per cent CI: -0.14 to 9.21, p = 0.06). Depressive symptoms were prevalent and associated with greater impact of visual impairment on emotional well-being (odds ratio: 1.12, 95 per cent CI: 1.07 to 1.17, p visual impairment showed a trend toward less distress in the intervention group. Our data found that emotional distress associated with visual impairment influences depressive symptoms but contrary to expectations, the level of social support received was not significant. Additionally, gait speed is a significant predictor of depressive symptoms, suggesting that general mobility is of importance to the well-being of older adults with visual impairments. © 2017 Optometry Australia.

  11. Participatory workplace interventions can reduce sedentary time for office workers--a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Parry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Occupational sedentary behaviour is an important contributor to overall sedentary risk. There is limited evidence for effective workplace interventions to reduce occupational sedentary time and increase light activity during work hours. The purpose of the study was to determine if participatory workplace interventions could reduce total sedentary time, sustained sedentary time (bouts >30 minutes, increase the frequency of breaks in sedentary time and promote light intensity activity and moderate/vigorous activity (MVPA during work hours. METHODS: A randomised controlled trial (ANZCTR NUMBER: ACTN12612000743864 was conducted using clerical, call centre and data processing workers (n = 62, aged 25-59 years in 3 large government organisations in Perth, Australia. Three groups developed interventions with a participatory approach: 'Active office' (n = 19, 'Active Workstation' and promotion of incidental office activity; 'Traditional physical activity' (n = 14, pedometer challenge to increase activity between productive work time and 'Office ergonomics' (n = 29, computer workstation design and breaking up computer tasks. Accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X, 7 days determined sedentary time, sustained sedentary time, breaks in sedentary time, light intensity activity and MVPA on work days and during work hours were measured before and following a 12 week intervention period. RESULTS: For all participants there was a significant reduction in sedentary time on work days (-1.6%, p = 0.006 and during work hours (-1.7%, p = 0.014 and a significant increase in number of breaks/sedentary hour on work days (0.64, p = 0.005 and during work hours (0.72, p = 0.015; there was a concurrent significant increase in light activity during work hours (1.5%, p = 0.012 and MVPA on work days (0.6%, p = 0.012. CONCLUSIONS: This study explored novel ways to modify work practices to reduce occupational sedentary behaviour

  12. Participatory Workplace Interventions Can Reduce Sedentary Time for Office Workers—A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Sharon; Straker, Leon; Gilson, Nicholas D.; Smith, Anne J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Occupational sedentary behaviour is an important contributor to overall sedentary risk. There is limited evidence for effective workplace interventions to reduce occupational sedentary time and increase light activity during work hours. The purpose of the study was to determine if participatory workplace interventions could reduce total sedentary time, sustained sedentary time (bouts >30 minutes), increase the frequency of breaks in sedentary time and promote light intensity activity and moderate/vigorous activity (MVPA) during work hours. Methods A randomised controlled trial (ANZCTR number: ACTN12612000743864) was conducted using clerical, call centre and data processing workers (n = 62, aged 25–59 years) in 3 large government organisations in Perth, Australia. Three groups developed interventions with a participatory approach: ‘Active office’ (n = 19), ‘Active Workstation’ and promotion of incidental office activity; ‘Traditional physical activity’ (n = 14), pedometer challenge to increase activity between productive work time and ‘Office ergonomics’ (n = 29), computer workstation design and breaking up computer tasks. Accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X, 7 days) determined sedentary time, sustained sedentary time, breaks in sedentary time, light intensity activity and MVPA on work days and during work hours were measured before and following a 12 week intervention period. Results For all participants there was a significant reduction in sedentary time on work days (−1.6%, p = 0.006) and during work hours (−1.7%, p = 0.014) and a significant increase in number of breaks/sedentary hour on work days (0.64, p = 0.005) and during work hours (0.72, p = 0.015); there was a concurrent significant increase in light activity during work hours (1.5%, p = 0.012) and MVPA on work days (0.6%, p = 0.012). Conclusions This study explored novel ways to modify work practices to reduce occupational sedentary

  13. Participatory workplace interventions can reduce sedentary time for office workers--a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Sharon; Straker, Leon; Gilson, Nicholas D; Smith, Anne J

    2013-01-01

    Occupational sedentary behaviour is an important contributor to overall sedentary risk. There is limited evidence for effective workplace interventions to reduce occupational sedentary time and increase light activity during work hours. The purpose of the study was to determine if participatory workplace interventions could reduce total sedentary time, sustained sedentary time (bouts >30 minutes), increase the frequency of breaks in sedentary time and promote light intensity activity and moderate/vigorous activity (MVPA) during work hours. A randomised controlled trial (ANZCTR NUMBER: ACTN12612000743864) was conducted using clerical, call centre and data processing workers (n = 62, aged 25-59 years) in 3 large government organisations in Perth, Australia. Three groups developed interventions with a participatory approach: 'Active office' (n = 19), 'Active Workstation' and promotion of incidental office activity; 'Traditional physical activity' (n = 14), pedometer challenge to increase activity between productive work time and 'Office ergonomics' (n = 29), computer workstation design and breaking up computer tasks. Accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X, 7 days) determined sedentary time, sustained sedentary time, breaks in sedentary time, light intensity activity and MVPA on work days and during work hours were measured before and following a 12 week intervention period. For all participants there was a significant reduction in sedentary time on work days (-1.6%, p = 0.006) and during work hours (-1.7%, p = 0.014) and a significant increase in number of breaks/sedentary hour on work days (0.64, p = 0.005) and during work hours (0.72, p = 0.015); there was a concurrent significant increase in light activity during work hours (1.5%, p = 0.012) and MVPA on work days (0.6%, p = 0.012). This study explored novel ways to modify work practices to reduce occupational sedentary behaviour. Participatory workplace interventions can reduce

  14. Camp-based family treatment of childhood obesity: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benestad, Beate; Lekhal, Samira; Småstuen, Milada Cvancarova; Hertel, Jens Kristoffer; Halsteinli, Vidar; Ødegård, Rønnaug Astri; Hjelmesæth, Jøran

    2017-04-01

    To compare the effectiveness of a 2-year camp-based family treatment programme and an outpatient programme on obesity in two generations. Pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Rehabilitation clinic, tertiary care hospital and primary care. Families with at least one child (7-12 years) and one parent with obesity. Summer camp for 2 weeks and 4 repetition weekends or lifestyle school including 4 days family education. Behavioural techniques motivating participants to healthier lifestyle. Children: 2-year changes in body mass index (BMI) SD score (SDS). Parents: 2-year change in BMI. Main analyses: linear mixed models. Ninety children (50% girls) were included. Baseline mean (SD) age was 9.7 (1.2) years, BMI 28.7 (3.9) kg/m(2) and BMI SDS 3.46 (0.75). The summer-camp children had a lower adjusted estimated mean (95% CI) increase in BMI (-0.8 (-3.5 to -0.2) kg/m(2)), but the BMI SDS reductions did not differ significantly (-0.11 (-0.49 to 0.05)). The 2-year baseline adjusted BMI and BMI SDS did not differ significantly between summer-camp and lifestyle-school completers, BMI 29.8 (29.1 to 30.6) vs 30.7 (29.8 to 31.6) kg/m(2) and BMI SDS 2.96 (2.85 to 3.08) vs 3.11 (2.97 to 3.24), respectively. The summer-camp parents had a small reduction in BMI (-0.9 (-1.8 to -0.03) vs -0.8 (-2.1 to 0.4) in the lifestyle-school group), but the within-group changes did not differ significantly (0.3 (-1.7 to 2.2)). A 2-year family camp-based obesity treatment programme had no significant effect on BMI SDS in children with severe obesity compared with an outpatient family-based treatment programme. NCT01110096. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Effectiveness of Lactobacillus helveticus and Lactobacillus rhamnosus for the management of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea in healthy adults: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Malkanthi; Salewski, Ryan P; Christman, Mary C; Girard, Stephanie-Anne; Tompkins, Thomas A

    2016-07-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotic use can disrupt the gastrointestinal microbiota resulting in diarrhoea. Probiotics may be beneficial in managing this type of diarrhoea. The aim of this 10-week randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel study was to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus helveticus R0052 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus R0011 supplementation on antibiotic-associated diarrhoea in healthy adults. Subjects were randomised to receive 1 week of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (875 mg/125 mg) once per day, plus a daily dose of 8×109 colony-forming units of a multi-strain probiotic (n 80) or placebo (n 80). The probiotic or placebo intervention was maintained for 1 week after completion of the antibiotic. Primary study outcomes of consistency and frequency of bowel movements were not significantly different between the probiotic and placebo groups. The secondary outcomes of diarrhoea-like defecations, Gastrointestinal Symptoms Rating Scale scores, safety parameters and adverse events were not significantly different between the probiotic intervention and the placebo. A post hoc analysis on the duration of diarrhoea-like defecations showed that probiotic intervention reduced the length of these events by 1 full day (probiotic, 2·70 (sem 0·36) d; placebo, 3·71 (sem 0·36) d; P=0·037; effect size=0·52). In conclusion, this study provides novel evidence that L. helveticus R0052 and L. rhamnosus R0011 supplementation significantly reduced the duration of diarrhoea-like defecations in healthy adults receiving antibiotics.

  16. Protocol for SAMS (Support and Advice for Medication Study: A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to support patients with type 2 diabetes with adherence to medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutton Stephen

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although some interventions have been shown to improve adherence to medication for diabetes, results are not consistent. We have developed a theory-based intervention which we will evaluate in a well characterised population to test efficacy and guide future intervention development and trial design. Methods and Design The SAMS (Supported Adherence to Medication Study trial is a primary care based multi-centre randomised controlled trial among 200 patients with type 2 diabetes and an HbA1c of 7.5% or above. It is designed to evaluate the efficacy of a two-component motivational intervention based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour and volitional action planning to support medication adherence compared with standard care. The intervention is delivered by practice nurses. Nurses were trained using a workshop approach with role play and supervised using assessment of tape-recorded consultations. The trial has a two parallel groups design with an unbalanced three-to-two individual randomisation eight weeks after recruitment with twelve week follow-up. The primary outcome is medication adherence measured using an electronic medication monitor over 12 weeks and expressed as the difference between intervention and control in mean percentage of days on which the correct number of medication doses is taken. Subgroup analyses will explore impact of number of medications taken, age, HbA1c, and self-reported adherence at baseline on outcomes. The study also measures the effect of dispensing medication to trial participants packaged in the electronic medication-monitoring device compared with conventional medication packaging. This will be achieved through one-to-one randomisation at recruitment to these conditions with assessment of the difference between groups in self-report of medication adherence and change in mean HbA1c from baseline to eight weeks. Anonymised demographic data are collected on non-respondents. Central randomisation

  17. Exercise therapy, cardiorespiratory fitness and their effect on brain volumes: a randomised controlled trial in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheewe, Thomas W; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Sarkisyan, Gayane; Schnack, Hugo G; Brouwer, Rachel M; de Glint, Maria; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Backx, Frank J G; Kahn, René S; Cahn, Wiepke

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine exercise effects on global brain volume, hippocampal volume, and cortical thickness in schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. Irrespective of diagnosis and intervention, associations between brain changes and cardiorespiratory fitness improvement were examined. Sixty-three schizophrenia patients and fifty-five healthy controls participated in this randomised controlled trial. Global brain volumes, hippocampal volume, and cortical thickness were estimated from 3-Tesla MRI scans. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed with a cardiopulmonary ergometer test. Subjects were assigned exercise therapy or occupational therapy (patients) and exercise therapy or life-as-usual (healthy controls) for six months 2h weekly. Exercise therapy effects were analysed for subjects who were compliant at least 50% of sessions offered. Significantly smaller baseline cerebral (grey) matter, and larger third ventricle volumes, and thinner cortex in most areas of the brain were found in patients versus controls. Exercise therapy did not affect global brain and hippocampal volume or cortical thickness in patients and controls. Cardiorespiratory fitness improvement was related to increased cerebral matter volume and lateral and third ventricle volume decrease in patients and to thickening in the left hemisphere in large areas of the frontal, temporal and cingulate cortex irrespective of diagnosis. One to 2h of exercise therapy did not elicit significant brain volume changes in patients or controls. However, cardiorespiratory fitness improvement attenuated brain volume changes in schizophrenia patients and increased thickness in large areas of the left cortex in both schizophrenia patients and healthy controls.

  18. The informed consent process in randomised controlled trials: a nurse-led process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Pip; Gilmour, Jean

    2014-03-01

    Clinical trials are carried out with human participants to answer questions about the best way to diagnose, treat and prevent illness. Participants must give informed consent to take part in clinical trials that requires understanding of how clinical trials work and their purpose. Randomised controlled trials provide strong evidence but their complex design is difficult for both clinicians and participants to understand. Increasingly, ensuring informed consent in randomised controlled trials has become part of the clinical research nurse role. The aim of this study was to explore in depth the clinical research nurse role in the informed consent process using a qualitative descriptive approach. Three clinical research nurses were interviewed and data analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Three themes were identified to describe the process of ensuring informed consent. The first theme, Preparatory partnerships, canvassed the relationships required prior to initiation of the informed consent process. The second theme, Partnering the participant, emphasises the need for ensuring voluntariness and understanding, along with patient advocacy. The third theme, Partnership with the project, highlights the clinical research nurse contribution to the capacity of the trial to answer the research question through appropriate recruiting and follow up of participants. Gaining informed consent in randomised controlled trials was complex and required multiple partnerships. A wide variety of skills was used to protect the safety of trial participants and promote quality research. The information from this study contributes to a greater understanding of the clinical research nurse role, and suggests the informed consent process in trials can be a nurse-led one. In order to gain collegial, employer and industry recognition it is important this aspect of the nursing role is acknowledged.

  19. Educational outreach to general practitioners reduces children's asthma symptoms: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sladden Michael

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood asthma is common in Cape Town, a province of South Africa, but is underdiagnosed by general practitioners. Medications are often prescribed inappropriately, and care is episodic. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of educational outreach to general practitioners on asthma symptoms of children in their practice. Methods This is a cluster randomised trial with general practices as the unit of intervention, randomisation, and analysis. The setting is Mitchells Plain (population 300,000, a dormitory town near Cape Town. Solo general practitioners, without nurse support, operate from storefront practices. Caregiver-reported symptom data were collected for 318 eligible children (2 to 17 years with moderate to severe asthma, who were attending general practitioners in Mitchells Plain. One year post-intervention follow-up data were collected for 271 (85% of these children in all 43 practices. Practices randomised to intervention (21 received two 30-minute educational outreach visits by a trained pharmacist who left materials describing key interventions to improve asthma care. Intervention and control practices received the national childhood asthma guideline. Asthma severity was measured in a parent-completed survey administered through schools using a symptom frequency and severity scale. We compared intervention and control group children on the change in score from pre-to one-year post-intervention. Results Symptom scores declined an additional 0.84 points in the intervention vs. control group (on a nine-point scale. p = 0.03. For every 12 children with asthma exposed to a doctor allocated to the intervention, one extra child will have substantially reduced symptoms. Conclusion Educational outreach was accepted by general practitioners and was effective. It could be applied to other health care quality problems in this setting.

  20. Rotterdam Aphasia Therapy Study (RATS – 3: “The efficacy of intensive cognitive-linguistic therapy in the acute stage of aphasia”; design of a randomised controlled trial

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    Nouwens Femke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aphasia is a severely disabling condition occurring in 20 to 25% of stroke patients. Most patients with aphasia due to stroke receive speech and language therapy. Methodologically sound randomised controlled trials investigating the effect of specific interventions for patients with aphasia following stroke are scarce. The currently available evidence suggests that intensive speech and language therapy is beneficial for restoration of communication, but the optimal timing of treatment is as yet unclear. In the Rotterdam Aphasia Therapy Study-3 we aim to test the hypothesis that patients with aphasia due to stroke benefit more from early intensive cognitive-linguistic therapy than from deferred regular language therapy. Methods/design In a single blinded, multicentre, randomised controlled trial, 150 patients with first ever aphasia due to stroke will be randomised within two weeks after stroke to either early intensive cognitive-linguistic therapy (Group A or deferred regular therapy (Group B. Group A will start as soon as possible, at the latest two weeks after stroke, with a four week period of one hour a day treatment with cognitive-linguistic therapy. In Group B professional speech and language therapy is deferred for four weeks. After this period, patients will follow the conventional procedure of speech and language therapy. Participants will be tested with an extensive linguistic test battery at four weeks, three months and six months after inclusion. Primary outcome measure is the difference in score between the two treatment groups on the Amsterdam-Nijmegen Everyday Language Test, a measure of everyday verbal communication, four weeks after randomisation. Trial registration This trial is registered in the Dutch Trial Register (http://www.trialregister.nl, NTR3271.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts: economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial (EVerT trial

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    Stamuli Eugena

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar warts (verrucae are extremely common. Although many will spontaneously disappear without treatment, treatment may be sought for a variety of reasons such as discomfort. There are a number of different treatments for cutaneous warts, with salicylic acid and cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen being two of the most common forms of treatment. To date, no full economic evaluation of either salicylic acid or cryotherapy has been conducted based on the use of primary data in a pragmatic setting. This paper describes the cost-effectiveness analysis which was conducted alongside a pragmatic multicentre, randomised trial evaluating the clinical effectiveness of cryotherapy versus 50% salicylic acid of the treatment of plantar warts. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken alongside a pragmatic multicentre, randomised controlled trial assessing the clinical effectiveness of 50% salicylic acid and cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen at 12 weeks after randomisation of patients. Cost-effectiveness outcomes were expressed as the additional cost required to completely cure the plantar warts of one additional patient. A NHS perspective was taken for the analysis. Results Cryotherapy costs on average £101.17 (bias corrected and accelerated (BCA 95% CI: 85.09-117.26 more per participant over the 12 week time-frame, while there is no additional benefit, in terms of proportion of patients healed compared with salicylic acid. Conclusions Cryotherapy is more costly and no more effective than salicylic acid. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN18994246 [controlled-trials.com] and National Research Register N0484189151.

  2. CanWalk: a feasibility study with embedded randomised controlled trial pilot of a walking intervention for people with recurrent or metastatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsianakas, Vicki; Ream, Emma; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Purushotham, Arnie; Mucci, Lorelei; Green, James S A; Fewster, Jacquetta; Armes, Jo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Walking is an adaptable, inexpensive and accessible form of physical activity. However, its impact on quality of life (QoL) and symptom severity in people with advanced cancer is unknown. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a community-based walking intervention to enhance QoL in people with recurrent/metastatic cancer. Design We used a mixed-methods design comprising a 2-centre RCT and nested qualitative interviews. Participants Patients with advanced breast, prostate, gynaecological or haematological cancers randomised 1:1 between intervention and usual care. Intervention The intervention comprised Macmillan's ‘Move More’ information, a short motivational interview with a recommendation to walk for at least 30 min on alternate days and attend a volunteer-led group walk weekly. Outcomes We assessed feasibility and acceptability of the intervention and RCT by evaluating study processes (rates of recruitment, consent, retention, adherence and adverse events), and using end-of-study questionnaires and qualitative interviews. Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) assessing QoL, activity, fatigue, mood and self-efficacy were completed at baseline and 6, 12 and 24 weeks. Results We recruited 42 (38%) eligible participants. Recruitment was lower than anticipated (goal n=60), the most commonly reported reason being unable to commit to walking groups (n=19). Randomisation procedures worked well with groups evenly matched for age, sex and activity. By week 24, there was a 45% attrition rate. Most PROMs while acceptable were not sensitive to change and did not capture key benefits. Conclusions The intervention was acceptable, well tolerated and the study design was judged acceptable and feasible. Results are encouraging and demonstrate that exercise was popular and conveyed benefit to participants. Consequently, an effectiveness RCT is warranted, with some modifications to the

  3. Citicoline in the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke: an international, randomised, multicentre, placebo-controlled study (ICTUS trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávalos, Antoni; Alvarez-Sabín, José; Castillo, José; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Ferro, Jose; Martínez-Vila, Eduardo; Serena, Joaquín; Segura, Tomás; Cruz, Vitor T; Masjuan, Jaime; Cobo, Erik; Secades, Julio J

    2012-07-28

    Citicoline is approved in some countries for the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke. The drug has shown some evidence of efficacy in a pooled analysis. We sought to confirm the efficacy of citicoline in a larger trial. We undertook a randomised, placebo-controlled, sequential trial in patients with moderate-to-severe acute ischaemic stroke admitted at university hospitals in Germany, Portugal, and Spain. Using a centralised minimisation process, patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive citicoline or placebo within 24 h after the onset of symptoms (1000 mg every 12 h intravenously during the first 3 days and orally thereafter for a total of 6 weeks [2×500 mg oral tablets given every 12 h]). All study participants were masked. The primary outcome was recovery at 90 days measured by a global test combining three measures of success: National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≤1, modified Rankin score ≤1, and Barthel Index ≥95. Safety endpoints included symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage in patients treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, neurological deterioration, and mortality. This trial is registered, NCT00331890. 2298 patients were enrolled into the study from Nov 26, 2006, to Oct 27, 2011. 37 centres in Spain, 11 in Portugal, and 11 in Germany recruited patients. Of the 2298 patients who gave informed consent and underwent randomisation, 1148 were assigned to citicoline and 1150 to placebo. The trial was stopped for futility at the third interim analysis on the basis of complete data from 2078 patients. The final randomised analysis was based on data for 2298 patients: 1148 in citicoline group and 1150 in placebo group. Global recovery was similar in both groups (odds ratio 1·03, 95% CI 0·86-1·25; p=0·364). No significant differences were reported in the safety variables nor in the rate of adverse events. Under the circumstances of the ICTUS trial, citicoline is not efficacious in the treatment of moderate

  4. A perturbation-based balance training program for older adults: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

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    Peters Amy L

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research investigating exercise as a means of falls prevention in older adults has shown mixed results. Lack of specificity of the intervention may be an important factor contributing to negative results. Change-in-support (CIS balance reactions, which involve very rapid stepping or grasping movements of the limbs, play a critical role in preventing falls; hence, a training program that improves ability to execute effective CIS reactions could potentially have a profound effect in reducing risk of falling. This paper describes: 1 the development of a perturbation-based balance training program that targets specific previously-reported age-related impairments in CIS reactions, and 2 a study protocol to evaluate the efficacy of this new training program. Methods/Design The training program involves use of unpredictable, multi-directional moving-platform perturbations to evoke stepping and grasping reactions. Perturbation magnitude is gradually increased over the course of the 6-week program, and concurrent cognitive and movement tasks are included during later sessions. The program was developed in accordance with well-established principles of motor learning, such as individualisation, specificity, overload, adaptation-progression and variability. Specific goals are to reduce the frequency of multiple-step responses, reduce the frequency of collisions between the stepping foot and stance leg, and increase the speed of grasping reactions. A randomised control trial will be performed to evaluate the efficacy of the training program. A total of 30 community-dwelling older adults (age 64–80 with a recent history of instability or falling will be assigned to either the perturbation-based training or a control group (flexibility/relaxation training, using a stratified randomisation that controls for gender, age and baseline stepping/grasping performance. CIS reactions will be tested immediately before and after the six

  5. Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) for posttraumatic stress disorder versus waitlist control: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Adrian R; Newby, Jill M; Smith, Jessica; Andrews, Gavin

    2015-12-01

    This randomised controlled trial (RCT) with two parallel arms will evaluate the efficacy of an internet-delivered six-lesson 10-week cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) intervention for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It will also investigate the association between changes in PTSD symptoms, intolerance of uncertainty (IU) and emotion regulation. Patients with PTSD will be recruited via the research arm of a not-for-profit clinical and research unit in Australia and randomised to a treatment group or waitlist control group. The minimum sample size for each group (alpha 0.05, power 0.80 for a g of 0.47) was identified as 72, but 10 % more will be recruited to hedge against expected attrition. PTSD diagnosis will be determined using the PTSD module from the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview version 5.0.0. The PTSD Checklist - Civilian version (PCL-C) will be used to measure PTSD symptoms (the primary outcome measure), with the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale 12-item version (IUS-12) and the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ) used to measure intolerance of uncertainty and emotion regulation, respectively. The PCL-C will be administered to the treatment group before each lesson of the PTSD program and at 3-month follow-up. The IUS-12 and ERQ will be administered before lessons 1 and 4, at post-treatment and at 3-month follow-up. The waitlist control group will complete these measures at week 1, week 5 and week 11 of the waitlist period. PTSD program efficacy will be determined using intent-to-treat mixed models. Maintenance of gains will be assessed at 3-month follow-up. Mediation analyses using PROCESS will be used to examine the association between change in PTSD symptoms over treatment and change in each of IU and emotion regulation ability in separate analyses. The current RCT seeks to replicate previous efficacy findings of iCBT for PTSD in a formally assessed PTSD sample from the general population. Findings may point to future lines of

  6. The post hoc use of randomised controlled trials to explore drug associated cancer outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefansdottir, Gudrun; Zoungas, Sophia; Chalmers, John

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Drug-induced cancer risk is of increasing interest. Both observational studies and data from clinical trials have linked several widely used treatments to cancer. When a signal for a potential drug-cancer association is generated, substantiation is required to assess the impact...... on public health before proper regulatory action can be taken. This paper aims to discuss challenges of exploring drug-associated cancer outcomes by post-hoc analyses of Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) designed for other purposes. METHODOLOGICAL CHALLENGES TO CONSIDER: We set out to perform a post...

  7. Effectiveness of group body psychotherapy for negative symptoms of schizophrenia: multicentre randomised controlled trial †

    OpenAIRE

    Priebe, S.; Savill, M.; Wykes, T.; Bentall, R P; Reininghaus, U; Lauber, C; Bremner, S; Eldridge, S; Röhricht, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background\\ud Negative symptoms of schizophrenia have a severe impact\\ud on functional outcomes and treatment options are limited.\\ud Arts therapies are currently recommended but more\\ud evidence is required.\\ud \\ud Aims\\ud To assess body psychotherapy as a treatment for negative\\ud symptoms compared with an active control (trial registration:ISRCTN84216587).\\ud \\ud Method\\ud Schizophrenia out-patients were randomised into a\\ud 20-session body psychotherapy or Pilates group. The primary\\ud ou...

  8. A prospective randomised controlled trial of capnography vs. bronchoscopy for Blue Rhino percutaneous tracheostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, A; Venkatanath, D; Elliot, S C; Hollins, T; Nanda Kumar, C G

    2003-09-01

    A crucial step for successful percutaneous tracheostomy is the introduction of the needle and guide wire into the trachea. Capnography has recently been proposed as one way to confirm tracheal needle placement. In this randomised controlled study, we used capnography in 26 patients and bronchoscopy in 29 patients to confirm needle placement for percutaneous tracheostomy using Blue Rhino kit. The operating times and the incidence of peri-operative complications were similar for both groups. Capnography proved to be as effective as bronchoscopy in confirming correct needle placement.

  9. Second Generation Antipsychotics Improve Sexual Dysfunction in Schizophrenia: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of antipsychotic drug treatment on sexual function was investigated during a randomised trial comparing first generation antipsychotics (FGAs to (nonclozapine second generation antipsychotics (SGAs. Sexual function and quality of life were (rater-blind assessed in 42 patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia (aged 18–65 using the self-report version of the Derogatis Interview for Sexual Function (DISF-SR and the Heinrichs Quality of Life Scale (QLS, prior to, and 12 weeks following, a change in medication from an FGA drug to either an FGA or SGA drug. SGAs significantly improved sexual function compared to FGAs. Change in sexual function was associated with change in quality of life. Where impaired sexual functioning is a distressing adverse effect of treatment with an FGA agent, consideration should be given to switching to an SGA.

  10. Improving community ambulation after hip fracture: protocol for a randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Orwig

    2017-01-01

    Analysis: Analyses for all aims will be performed according to the intention-to-treat paradigm. Except for testing of the primary hypothesis, all statistical tests will be two-sided and not adjusted for multiple comparisons. The test of the primary hypothesis (comparing groups on the proportion who are community ambulators at 16 weeks after randomisation will be based on a one-sided 0.025-level hypothesis test using a procedure consisting of four interim analyses and one final analysis with critical values chosen by a Hwang-Shih-Decani alpha-spending function. Analyses will be performed to test group differences on other outcome measures and to examine the differential impac

  11. Randomised controlled trial of use by hypercholesterolaemic patients of a vegetable oil sterol-enriched fat spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, H A; Meijer, G W; Roe, L S

    2001-06-01

    Plant sterols may be a useful additive therapy in the treatment of hypercholesterolaemic patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a fat spread enriched with vegetable oil sterols on plasma lipid, lipoprotein and apolipoprotein concentrations. A randomised double blind placebo-controlled crossover trial with two consecutive periods of 8 weeks was conducted. 30 patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia treated concurrently with an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (statin) and 32 patients with type IIa primary hypercholesterolaemia with a total cholesterol concentration >6.5 mmol/l not taking lipid-lowering drug therapy were recruited from a hospital lipid clinic. The active treatment was a fortified fat spread (25 g/day) providing 2.5 g of plant sterols. The control spread was indistinguishable in taste and appearance. Comparison at the end of the two 8-week trial periods showed a statistically significant reduction in total and LDL-cholesterol with use of the fortified spread but the results were confounded by a carry-over effect, which was partly explained by changes in the background diet. Because a carry-over effect was present, further analyses were restricted to the parallel arms of the first treatment period and were conducted on an intention to treat basis. After 4 weeks, LDL-cholesterol had decreased by 0.04 mmol/l ([0.8%] 95% confidence interval -0.44-0.37 NS) in the placebo group and decreased by -0.76 mmol/l ([15.0%] 95% CI -1.03--0.48, Pvegetable oil sterols reduces LDL-cholesterol by 10-15% with no difference in response between hypercholesterolaemic patients prescribed statins and those not taking lipid-lowering drug therapy.

  12. Reactivity to smartphone-based ecological momentary assessment of depressive symptoms (MoodMonitor: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

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    Wouter van Ballegooijen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecological momentary assessment (EMA of mental health symptoms may influence the symptoms that it measures, i.e. assessment reactivity. In the field of depression, EMA reactivity has received little attention. We aim to investigate whether EMA of depressive symptoms induces assessment reactivity. Reactivity will be operationalised as an effect of EMA on depressive symptoms measured by a retrospective questionnaire, and, secondly, as a change in response rate and variance of the EMA ratings. Methods This study is a 12-week randomised controlled trial comprising three groups: group 1 carries out EMA of mood and completes a retrospective questionnaire, group 2 carries out EMA of how energetic they feel and completes a retrospective questionnaire, group 3 is the control group, which completes only the retrospective questionnaire. The retrospective questionnaire (Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale; CES-D assesses depressive symptoms and is administered at baseline, 6 weeks after baseline and 12 weeks after baseline. We aim to recruit 160 participants who experience mild to moderate depressive symptoms, defined as a Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 score of 5 to 15. This study is powered to detect a small between-groups effect, where no clinically relevant effect is defined as the effect size margin −0.25< d <0.25. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate whether self-rated EMA of depressive symptoms could induce assessment reactivity among mildly depressed individuals. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register NTR5803. Registered 12 April 2016. http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=5803 .

  13. Land- and water-based exercise intervention in women with fibromyalgia: the al-andalus physical activity randomised controlled trial

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    Carbonell-Baeza Ana

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The al-Andalus physical activity intervention study is a randomised control trial to investigate the effectiveness of a land- and water-based exercise intervention for reducing the overall impact of fibromyalgia (primary outcome, and for improving tenderness and pain-related measures, body composition, functional capacity, physical activity and sedentary behaviour, fatigue, sleep quality, health-related quality of life, and cognitive function (secondary outcomes in women with fibromyalgia. Methods/Design One hundred eighty women with fibromyalgia (age range: 35-65 years will be recruited from local associations of fibromyalgia patients in Andalucía (Southern Spain. Patients will be randomly assigned to a usual care (control group (n = 60, a water-based exercise intervention group (n = 60 or a land-based exercise intervention group (n = 60. Participants in the usual care group will receive general physical activity guidelines and participants allocated in the intervention groups will attend three non-consecutive training sessions (60 min each per week during 24 weeks. Both exercise interventions will consist of aerobic, muscular strength and flexibility exercises. We will also study the effect of a detraining period (i.e., 12 weeks with no exercise intervention on the studied variables. Discussion Our study attempts to reduce the impact of fibromyalgia and improve patients' health status by implementing two types of exercise interventions. Results from this study will help to assess the efficacy of exercise interventions for the treatment of fibromyalgia. If the interventions would be effective, this study will provide low-cost and feasible alternatives for health professionals in the management of fibromyalgia. Results from the al-Andalus physical activity intervention will help to better understand the potential of regular physical activity for improving the well-being of women with fibromyalgia. Trial registration Clinical

  14. Effect of a tart cherry juice supplement on arterial stiffness and inflammation in healthy adults: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Anthony; Mathew, Shilpa; Moore, Chris T; Russell, Jean; Robinson, Emma; Soumpasi, Vithleem; Barker, Margo E

    2014-06-01

    Tart cherries are a particularly rich source of anthocyanins. Evidence indicates that dietary intake of anthocyanins is inversely associated with arterial stiffness. We conducted an open-label randomised placebo controlled study to determine whether a tart cherry juice concentrate (Cherry Active) reduced arterial stiffness, inflammation and risk markers for cardiovascular disease in 47 healthy adults (30-50 years). Participants consumed 30 ml of cherry concentrate diluted to a volume of 250 ml with water or the same volume of an energy matched control drink daily for six weeks. Measurements were taken at baseline and at the end of the intervention. There was no effect of the intervention on arterial stiffness (P = 0.218), c-reactive protein (P = 0.220), systolic blood pressure (P = 0.163), diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.121), total cholesterol (P = 0.342) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = 0.127). At the end of the intervention, plasma antioxidant capacity (measured as the ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP)) was significantly higher in the intervention group than the control group (P = 0.012). We conclude that a tart cherry juice concentrate rich in anthocyanins has no effect on arterial stiffness, c-reactive protein and risk markers for cardiovascular disease, but evokes a minor increase in antioxidant status in healthy adults.

  15. Weekly self-monitoring and treatment adjustment benefit patients with partly controlled and uncontrolled asthma: an analysis of the SMASHING study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assendelft Willem JJ

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internet-based self-management has shown to improve asthma control and asthma related quality of life, but the improvements were only marginally clinically relevant for the group as a whole. We hypothesized that self-management guided by weekly monitoring of asthma control tailors pharmacological therapy to individual needs and improves asthma control for patients with partly controlled or uncontrolled asthma. Methods In a 1-year randomised controlled trial involving 200 adults (18-50 years with mild to moderate persistent asthma we evaluated the adherence with weekly monitoring and effect on asthma control and pharmacological treatment of a self-management algorithm based on the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ. Participants were assigned either to the Internet group (n = 101 that monitored asthma control weekly with the ACQ on the Internet and adjusted treatment using a self-management algorithm supervised by an asthma nurse specialist or to the usual care group (UC (n = 99. We analysed 3 subgroups: patients with well controlled (ACQ ≤ 0.75, partly controlled (0.75>ACQ ≤ 1.5 or uncontrolled (ACQ>1.5 asthma at baseline. Results Overall monitoring adherence was 67% (95% CI, 60% to 74%. Improvements in ACQ score after 12 months were -0.14 (p = 0.23, -0.52 (p 2-agonists between the Internet group and usual care. Conclusions Weekly self-monitoring and subsequent treatment adjustment leads to improved asthma control in patients with partly and uncontrolled asthma at baseline and tailors asthma medication to individual patients' needs. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN79864465

  16. A multi-centre randomised controlled trial of rehabilitation aimed at improving outdoor mobility for people after stroke: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan Pip A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Up to 42% of all stroke patients do not get out of the house as much as they would like. This can impede a person’s quality of life. This study is testing the clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of a new outdoor mobility rehabilitation intervention by comparing it to usual care. Methods/design This is a multi-centre parallel group individually randomised, controlled trial. At least 506 participants will be recruited through 15 primary and secondary care settings and will be eligible if they are over 18 years of age, have had a stroke and wish to get out of the house more often. Participants are being randomly allocated to either the intervention group or the control group. Intervention group participants receive up to 12 rehabilitation outdoor mobility sessions over up to four months. The main component of the intervention is repeated practice of outdoor mobility with a therapist. Control group participants are receiving the usual intervention for outdoor mobility limitations: verbal advice and provision of leaflets provided over one session. Outcome measures are being collected using postal questionnaires, travel calendars and by independent assessors. The primary outcome measure is the Social Function domain of the SF36v2 quality of life assessment six months after recruitment. The secondary outcome measures include: functional ability, mobility, the number of journeys (monthly travel diaries, satisfaction with outdoor mobility, mood, health-related quality of life, resource use of health and social care. Carer mood information is also being collected. The mean Social Function score of the SF-36v2 will be compared between treatment arms using a multiple membership form of mixed effects multiple regression analysis adjusting for centre (as a fixed effect, age and baseline Social Function score as covariates and therapist as a multiple membership random effect. Regression coefficients and 95% confidence

  17. Effectiveness of customised foot orthoses for Achilles tendinopathy: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Shannon E; Scott, Lisa A; Bonanno, Daniel R; Landorf, Karl B; Pizzari, Tania; Cook, Jill L; Menz, Hylton B

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of customised foot orthoses in chronic mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy. This was a participant-blinded, parallel-group randomised controlled trial at a single centre (La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia). One hundred and forty participants aged 18-55 years with mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy were randomised to receive eccentric calf muscle exercises with either customised foot orthoses (intervention group) or sham foot orthoses (control group). Allocation to intervention was concealed. The Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) questionnaire was completed at baseline, then at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months, with 3 months being the primary end point. Differences between groups were analysed using intention to treat with analysis of covariance. After randomisation<