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Sample records for weddell leptonychotes weddellii

  1. Perfluoroalkyl substances detected in the world's southernmost marine mammal, the Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routti, Heli; Krafft, Bjørn A; Herzke, Dorte; Eisert, Regina; Oftedal, Olav

    2015-02-01

    This study investigates concentrations of 18 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in blood plasma of adult lactating Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) (n = 10) from McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA) was detected in all samples at concentrations ranging from 0.08 to 0.23 ng/ml. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA) and perfluorotridecanoate (PFTriDA) were sporadically detected, while the remaining compounds were below the limit of detection. This is the first report of detectible concentrations of PFASs in an endemic Antarctic marine mammal species. We suggest that the pollutants have been subjected to long range atmospheric transportation and/or derive from a local source. A review of these and published data indicate that perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs) dominate in biotic PFAS patterns in species feeding south of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), whereas PFOS was the major PFAS detected in species feeding predominantly north of the current.

  2. Assessment of legacy and emerging persistent organic pollutants in Weddell seal tissue (Leptonychotes weddellii) near McMurdo Sound, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumble, Stephen J; Robinson, Eleanor M; Noren, Shawn R; Usenko, Sascha; Davis, Jay; Kanatous, Shane B

    2012-11-15

    Muscle samples were collected from pup, juvenile and adult Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) near McMurdo Sound, Antarctica during the austral summer of 2006. Blubber samples were collected from juvenile and adult seals. Samples were analyzed for emerging and legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including current and historic-use organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Of the 41 target analytes, 28 contaminants were recovered from the Weddell seal blubber, in this order of prevalence: p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, trans-nonachlor, mirex, cis-nonachlor, PCB 153, PCB 138, dieldrin, heptachlor epoxide, nonachlor III, PCB 187, oxychlordane, cis-chlordane, PCB 118, PBDE 47, PCB 156, PCB 149, PCB 180, PCB 101, PCB 170, PCB 105, o,p'-DDT, PCB 99, trans-chlordane, PCB 157, PCB 167, PCB 189, and PCB 114. Fewer POPs were found in the muscle samples, but were similar in the order of prevalence to that of the blubber: p,p'-DDE, o,p'-DDT, trans-nonachlor, nonachlor III, oxychlordane, p,p'-DDT, dieldrin, mirex, cis-nonachlor, PCB 138, and PCB 105. Besides differences in toxicant concentrations reported between the muscle and blubber, we found differences in POP levels according to age class and suggest that differences in blubber storage and/or mobilization of lipids result in age class differences in POPs. To our knowledge, such ontogenetic associations are novel. Importantly, data from this study suggest that p,p'-DDT is becoming less prevalent temporally, resulting in an increased proportion of its metabolite p,p'-DDE in the tissues of this top predator. In addition, this study is among the first to identify a PBDE congener in Weddell seals near the McMurdo Station. This may provide evidence of increased PBDE transport and encroachment in Antarctic wildlife.

  3. Assessment of legacy and emerging persistent organic pollutants in Weddell seal tissue (Leptonychotes weddellii) near McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumble, Stephen J.; Robinson, Eleanor M. [Baylor University, One Bear Place 97388, Waco, TX 76798-7388 (United States); Noren, Shawn R. [Institute of Marine Science, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Usenko, Sascha, E-mail: Sascha_Usenko@baylor.edu [Baylor University, One Bear Place 97388, Waco, TX 76798-7388 (United States); Davis, Jay [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Western Washington Fish and Wildlife Office, Lacey, WA 98503 (United States); Kanatous, Shane B. [Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1878 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Muscle samples were collected from pup, juvenile and adult Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) near McMurdo Sound, Antarctica during the austral summer of 2006. Blubber samples were collected from juvenile and adult seals. Samples were analyzed for emerging and legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including current and historic-use organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Of the 41 target analytes, 28 contaminants were recovered from the Weddell seal blubber, in this order of prevalence: p,p Prime -DDE, p,p Prime -DDT, trans-nonachlor, mirex, cis-nonachlor, PCB 153, PCB 138, dieldrin, heptachlor epoxide, nonachlor III, PCB 187, oxychlordane, cis-chlordane, PCB 118, PBDE 47, PCB 156, PCB 149, PCB 180, PCB 101, PCB 170, PCB 105, o,p Prime -DDT, PCB 99, trans-chlordane, PCB 157, PCB 167, PCB 189, and PCB 114. Fewer POPs were found in the muscle samples, but were similar in the order of prevalence to that of the blubber: p,p Prime -DDE, o,p Prime -DDT, trans-nonachlor, nonachlor III, oxychlordane, p,p Prime -DDT, dieldrin, mirex, cis-nonachlor, PCB 138, and PCB 105. Besides differences in toxicant concentrations reported between the muscle and blubber, we found differences in POP levels according to age class and suggest that differences in blubber storage and/or mobilization of lipids result in age class differences in POPs. To our knowledge, such ontogenetic associations are novel. Importantly, data from this study suggest that p,p Prime -DDT is becoming less prevalent temporally, resulting in an increased proportion of its metabolite p,p Prime -DDE in the tissues of this top predator. In addition, this study is among the first to identify a PBDE congener in Weddell seals near the McMurdo Station. This may provide evidence of increased PBDE transport and encroachment in Antarctic wildlife. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PBDE measuring in Weddell seal blubber. Black

  4. Brucella antibody seroprevalence in Antarctic seals (Arctocephalus gazella, Leptonychotes weddellii and Mirounga leonina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Silje-Kristin; Nymo, Ingebjørg Helena; Forcada, Jaume; Hall, Ailsa; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-09-03

    Brucellosis is a worldwide infectious zoonotic disease caused by Gram-negative bacteria of the genus Brucella, and Brucella infections in marine mammals were first reported in 1994. A serosurvey investigating the presence of anti-Brucella antibodies in 3 Antarctic pinniped species was undertaken with a protein A/G indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) and the Rose Bengal test (RBT). Serum samples from 33 Weddell seals Leptonychotes weddelli were analysed, and antibodies were detected in 8 individuals (24.2%) with the iELISA and in 21 (65.6%) with the RBT. We tested 48 southern elephant seal Mirounga leonina sera and detected antibodies in 2 animals (4.7%) with both the iELISA and the RBT. None of the 21 Antarctic fur seals Arctocephalus gazella was found positive. This is the first report of anti-Brucella antibodies in southern elephant seals. The potential impact of Brucella infection in pinnipeds in Antarctica is not known, but Brucella spp. are known to cause abortion in terrestrial species and cetaceans. Our findings suggest that Brucella infection in pinnipeds is present in the Antarctic, but to date B. pinnipedialis has not been isolated from any Antarctic pinniped species, leaving the confirmation of infection pending.

  5. Field use of ultrasonography to characterize the reproductive tract and early pregnancy in a phocid, the Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shero, Michelle R; Adams, Gregg P; Burns, Jennifer M

    2015-12-01

    The utility of transrectal ultrasonography was tested in a field setting to characterize the reproductive tract and detect early pregnancy (embryonic vesicles body, ovaries with follicles and corpora lutea) using a 5-10 MHz linear-array probe with a 70 cm-long extension. A single pregnancy was detected in 14 of 17 seals (82.4%) as a circular or guitar-pick shaped nonechogenic (black) vesicle with a clearly visible echogenic border within the lumen of the uterus. The stage of embryonic development (ostensibly the gestational age) varied markedly among individuals, ranging from a vesicle with no embryo proper to a large fetus with an ocular orbit, nose/mouth, limb buds, spinal column, umbilical cord, and prominent vasculature. Two of the pregnant seals were re-examined 3-6 days after the initial examination to obtain longitudinal growth rates. Images of one or both ovaries were obtained in nine and seven of the 19 examinations, respectively. Numerous ovarian follicles (3 to 12 mm diameter) were detected and animals typically had a single well-perfused corpus luteum (determined by Doppler color-flow) ipsilateral to the uterine horn containing the pregnancy. We conclude that real-time transrectal ultrasonography is an effective tool for characterizing reproductive events in phocids including ovarian dynamics, and for elucidating the nature of embryonic diapause.

  6. Chemical immobilization of adult female Weddell seals with tiletamine and zolazepam: effects of age, condition and stage of lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harcourt Robert G

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemical immobilization of Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii has previously been, for the most part, problematic and this has been mainly attributed to the type of immobilizing agent used. In addition to individual sensitivity, physiological status may play an important role. We investigated the use of the intravenous administration of a 1:1 mixture of tiletamine and zolazepam (Telazol® to immobilize adult females at different points during a physiologically demanding 5–6 week lactation period. We also compared performance between IV and IM injection of the same mixture. Results The tiletamine:zolazepam mixture administered intravenously was an effective method for immobilization with no fatalities or pronounced apnoeas in 106 procedures; however, there was a 25 % (one animal in four mortality rate with intramuscular administration. Induction time was slightly longer for females at the end of lactation (54.9 ± 2.3 seconds than at post-parturition (48.2 ± 2.9 seconds. In addition, the number of previous captures had a positive effect on induction time. There was no evidence for effects due to age, condition (total body lipid, stage of lactation or number of captures on recovery time. Conclusion We suggest that intravenous administration of tiletamine and zolazepam is an effective and safe immobilizing agent for female Weddell seals. Although individual traits could not explain variation in recovery time, we suggest careful monitoring of recovery times during longitudinal studies (> 2 captures. We show that physiological pressures do not substantially affect response to chemical immobilization with this mixture; however, consideration must be taken for differences that may exist for immobilization of adult males and juveniles. Nevertheless, we recommend a mass-specific dose of 0.50 – 0.65 mg/kg for future procedures with adult female Weddell seals and a starting dose of 0.50 mg/kg for other age classes and other

  7. Environmental correlates of temporary emigration for female Weddell seals and consequences for recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Glenn E.; Rotella, Jay J.; Garrott, Robert A.; Kendall, William

    2014-01-01

    In colonial-breeding species, prebreeders often emigrate temporarily from natal reproductive colonies then subsequently return for one or more years before producing young. Variation in attendance–nonattendance patterns can have implications for subsequent recruitment. We used open robust-design multistate models and 28 years of encounter data for prebreeding female Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii [Lesson]) to evaluate hypotheses about (1) the relationships of temporary emigration (TE) probabilities to environmental and population size covariates and (2) motivations for attendance and consequences of nonattendance for subsequent probability of recruitment to the breeding population. TE probabilities were density dependent (βˆBPOP = 0.66,  = 0.17; estimated effects [β] and standard errors of population size in the previous year) and increased when the fast-ice edge was distant from the breeding colonies (βˆDIST = 0.75,  = 0.04; estimated effects and standard errors of distance to the sea-ice edge in the current year on TE probability in the current year) and were strongly age and state dependent. These results suggest that trade-offs between potential benefits and costs of colony attendance vary annually and might influence motivation to attend colonies. Recruitment probabilities were greatest for seals that consistently attended colonies in two or more years (e.g.,  = 0.56, SD = 0.17) and lowest for seals that never or inconsistently attended prior to recruitment (e.g.,  = 0.32, SD = 0.15), where denotes the mean recruitment probability (over all years) for 10-year-old seals for the specified prebreeder state. In colonial-breeding seabirds, repeated colony attendance increases subsequent probability of recruitment to the adult breeding population; our results suggest similar implications for a marine mammal and are consistent with the hypothesis that prebreeders were motivated to attend reproductive colonies to gain reproductive skills or

  8. An evaluation of density-dependent and density-independent influences on population growth rates in Weddell seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotella, J.J.; Link, W.A.; Nichols, J.D.; Hadley, G.L.; Garrott, R.A.; Proffitt, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    Much of the existing literature that evaluates the roles of density-dependent and density-independent factors on population dynamics has been called into question in recent years because measurement errors were not properly dealt with in analyses. Using state-space models to account for measurement errors, we evaluated a set of competing models for a 22-year time series of mark-resight estimates of abundance for a breeding population of female Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) studied in Erebus Bay, Antarctica. We tested for evidence of direct density dependence in growth rates and evaluated whether equilibrium population size was related to seasonal sea-ice extent and the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI). We found strong evidence of negative density dependence in annual growth rates for a population whose estimated size ranged from 438 to 623 females during the study. Based on Bayes factors, a density-dependence-only model was favored over models that also included en! vironmental covariates. According to the favored model, the population had a stationary distribution with a mean of 497 females (SD = 60.5), an expected growth rate of 1.10 (95% credible interval 1.08-1.15) when population size was 441 females, and a rate of 0.90 (95% credible interval 0.87-0.93) for a population of 553 females. A model including effects of SOI did receive some support and indicated a positive relationship between SOI and population size. However, effects of SOI were not large, and including the effect did not greatly reduce our estimate of process variation. We speculate that direct density dependence occurred because rates of adult survival, breeding, and temporary emigration were affected by limitations on per capita food resources and space for parturition and pup-rearing. To improve understanding of the relative roles of various demographic components and their associated vital rates to population growth rate, mark-recapture methods can be applied that incorporate both

  9. Isolation and characterization of Campylobacter spp. from Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) at Deception Island, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Peña, F J; Pérez-Boto, D; Jiménez, C; San Miguel, E; Echeita, A; Rengifo-Herrera, C; García-Párraga, D; Ortega-Mora, L M; Pedraza-Díaz, S

    2010-09-01

    The presence of Campylobacter spp. was investigated in 41 Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) and 9 Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) at Deception Island, Antarctica. Infections were encountered in six Antarctic fur seals. The isolates, the first reported from marine mammals in the Antarctic region, were identified as Campylobacter insulaenigrae and Campylobacter lari.

  10. Running, swimming and diving modifies neuroprotecting globins in the mammalian brain

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The vulnerability of the human brain to injury following just a few minutes of oxygen deprivation with submergence contrasts markedly with diving mammals, such as Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii), which can remain underwater for more than 90 min while exhibiting no neurological or behavioural impairment. This response occurs despite exposure to blood oxygen levels concomitant with human unconsciousness. To determine whether such aquatic lifestyles result in unique adaptations for avoid...

  11. AWI Moored ULS Data, Weddell Sea (1990-1998)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of moored Upward Looking Sonar (ULS) data from 14 stations in the Weddell Sea. Parameters in the processed data files are water pressure,...

  12. Time variable bottom water outflow in the Northwestern Weddell Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzow, Torsten; Rohardt, Gerd

    2015-04-01

    The Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) has shown widespread warming in recent decades, with implications for sea level rise and global heat uptake. Anomalously warm AABW has recently been reported to have reached the Brazil basin in the South Atlantic, while the warming further south partly seems to have come to a halt. The Weddell Sea represents the primary source of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) formation in the Southern Ocean. More than 60% of the AABW are supplied by Weddell Sea Deep Water, of which Weddell Sea Bottom Water (WSBW) is the main source. WSBW descends down the continental slope along the western margin of the Weddell Sea as a northward flowing plume, thereby entraining warmer ambient waters. The plume has been observed using moored current meters and temperature sensors between 1989 and 1998 and between 2005 and 2012 near the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, complemented by repeated cross-slope CTD sections along the mooring array. In this study we extend the WSBW volume transport and temperature time series of Fahrbach et al. (2001) originally covering the 1989-1998 interval by the more recent period. We will report on both seasonal to inter-annual variability and possible longer-term trends in both volume transport and temperature of WSBW. The results will be discussed in the context of changes in the source areas of WSBW, such as the breakup of parts of the Larsen Ice Shelf on the eastern Arctic Peninsula, possibly fueling the formation dense water on the shelf.

  13. Wind-driven export of Weddell Sea slope water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, A. J. S.; Meredith, M. P.; Abrahamsen, E. P.; Morales Maqueda, M. A.; Jones, D. C.; Naveira Garabato, A. C.

    2016-10-01

    The export of waters from the Weddell Gyre to lower latitudes is an integral component of the southern subpolar contribution to the three-dimensional oceanic circulation. Here we use more than 20 years of repeat hydrographic data on the continental slope on the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula and 5 years of bottom lander data on the slope at 1000 m to show the intermittent presence of a relatively cold, fresh, westward flowing current. This is often bottom-intensified between 600 and 2000 dbar with velocities of over 20 cm s-1, transporting an average of 1.5 ± 1.5 Sv. By comparison with hydrography on the continental slope within the Weddell Sea and modeled tracer release experiments we show that this slope current is an extension of the Antarctic Slope Current that has crossed the South Scotia Ridge west of Orkney Plateau. On monthly to interannual time scales the density of the slope current is negatively correlated (r > 0.6 with a significance of over 95%) with eastward wind stress over the northern Weddell Sea, but lagging it by 6-13 months. This relationship holds in both the high temporal resolution bottom lander time series and the 20+ year annual hydrographic occupations and agrees with Weddell Sea export variability observed further east. We compare several alternative hypotheses for this wind stress/export relationship and find that it is most consistent with wind-driven acceleration of the gyre boundary current, possibly modulated by eddy dynamics, and represents a mechanism by which climatic perturbations can be rapidly transmitted as fluctuations in the supply of intermediate-level waters to lower latitudes.

  14. Deep-sea Hexactinellida (Porifera) of the Weddell Sea

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    Janussen, Dorte; Tabachnick, Konstantin R.; Tendal, Ole S.

    2004-07-01

    New Hexactinellida from the deep Weddel Sea are described. This moderately diverse hexactinellid fauna includes 14 species belonging to 12 genera, of which five species and one subgenus are new to science: Periphragella antarctica n. sp., Holascus pseudostellatus n. sp., Caulophacus (Caulophacus) discohexactinus n. sp., C. ( Caulodiscus) brandti n. sp., C. ( Oxydiscus) weddelli n. sp., and C. ( Oxydiscus) n. subgen. So far, 20 hexactinellid species have been reported from the deep Weddell Sea, 15 are known from the northern part and 10 only from here, while 10 came from the southern area, and five of these only from there. However, this apparent high "endemism" of Antarctic hexactinellid sponges is most likely the result of severe undersampling of the deep-sea fauna. We find no reason to believe that a division between an oceanic and a more continental group of species exists. The current poor database indicates that a substantial part of the deep hexactinellid fauna of the Weddell Sea is shared with other deep-sea regions, but it does not indicate a special biogeographic relationship with any other ocean.

  15. Integrating chemistry, biophysics and physiology in the evolution of mammalian Myoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasmeh, Pouria

    of mutations in Mb on the aerobic dive limits (ADL) of Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii). We show that wild-type Mb traits are only superior under specific physiological conditions that critically prolong the ADL, action radius, and fitness of the seals. Third, we deal with the observation of higher...... folding stabilities (i.e., ΔGfolding) of cetacean Mbs compared to their terrestrial counterparts. Using ancestral sequence reconstruction, maximum likelihood and Bayesian tests to describe the evolution of cetacean Mbs, and experimentally calibrated computation of stability effects of mutations (i...... a general protein phenotype such as folding stability, that was shown as an example to be positively selected in cetacean Mbs in the iv third part of this thesis, affects the rate of protein evolution. Using a model that combines explicit evolution of Mb sequences, folding stability, and application...

  16. On the freshening of the northwestern Weddell Sea continental shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. Hellmer

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed hydrographic data from the northwestern Weddell Sea continental shelf of the three austral winters 1989, 1997, and 2006 and two summers following the last winter cruise. During summer a thermal front exists at ~64° S separating cold southern waters from warm northern waters that have similar characteristics as the deep waters of the central basin of the Bransfield Strait. In winter, the whole continental shelf exhibits southern characteristics with high Neon (Ne concentrations, indicating a significant input of glacial melt water. The comparison of the winter data from the shallow shelf off the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, spanning a period of 17 yr, shows a salinity decrease of 0.09 for the whole water column, which has a residence time of <1 yr. We interpret this freshening as being caused by a combination of reduced salt input due to a southward sea ice retreat and higher precipitation during the late 20th century on the western Weddell Sea continental shelf. However, less salinification might also result from a delicate interplay between enhanced salt input due to sea ice formation in coastal areas formerly occupied by Larsen A and B ice shelves and increased Larsen C ice loss.

  17. East Weddell Sea echinoids from the JR275 expedition

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    Thomas Saucède

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Information regarding the echinoids in this dataset is based on the Agassiz Trawl (AGT and epibenthic sledge (EBS samples collected during the British Antarctic Survey cruise JR275 on the RRS James Clark Ross in the austral summer 2012. A total of 56 (1 at the South Orkneys and 55 in the Eastern Weddell Sea Agassiz Trawl and 18 (2 at the South Orkneys and 16 in the Eastern Weddell Sea epibenthic sledge deployments were performed at depths ranging from ~280 to ~2060 m. This presents a unique collection for the Antarctic benthic biodiversity assessment of an important group of benthic invertebrates. In total 487 specimens belonging to six families, 15 genera, and 22 morphospecies were collected. The species richness per station varied between one and six. Total species richness represents 27% of the 82 echinoid species ever recorded in the Southern Ocean (David et al. 2005b, Pierrat et al. 2012, Saucède et al. 2014. The Cidaridae (sub-family Ctenocidarinae and Schizasteridae are the two most speciose families in the dataset. They comprise seven and nine species respectively. This is illustrative of the overall pattern of echinoid diversity in the Southern Ocean where 65% of Antarctic species belong to the families Schizasteridae and Cidaridae (Pierrat et al. 2012.

  18. On the freshening of the northwestern Weddell Sea continental shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. Hellmer

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We analysed hydrographic data from the northwestern Weddell Sea continental shelf of three austral winters (1989, 1997 and 2006 and two summers following the last winter cruise. During summer a thermal front exists at ~64° S separating cold southern waters from warm northern waters that have similar characteristics as the deep waters of the central basin of the Bransfield Strait. In winter, the whole continental shelf exhibits southern characteristics with high Neon (Ne concentrations, indicating a significant input of glacial melt water. The comparison of the winter data at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, spanning a period of 17 years, shows a salinity decrease of 0.09 for the whole water column. We interpret this freshening as a reduction in salt input to the water masses being advected northward on the western Weddell Sea continental shelf. Possible causes for the reduced winter salinification are a southward retreat of the summer sea ice edge together with more precipitation in this sector. However, the latter might have happened in conjunction with an increase in ice shelf mass loss, counteracting an enhanced salt input due to sea ice formation in coastal areas formerly occupied by Larsen A and B ice shelves.

  19. Benthic community productivity in the Magellan Region and in the Weddell Sea

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    Thomas Brey

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Our comparison of macrobenthic biomass, production and productivity of the Magellan region (14 - 349 m water depth and the Weddell Sea (132 - 548 m water depth is based on multi box corer samples collected in both areas. Biomass is slightly but not significantly lower in the Magellan region (7.3 g C m-2 than in the Weddell Sea (12.0 g C m-2. Annual production and P/B ratio are higher in the Magellan region (5.1 g C m-2 y-1, 0.7 y-1 as compared to the Weddell Sea (3.6 g C m-2 y-1, 0.3 y-1. In the Magellan region, Mollusca, Polychaeta and Arthropoda dominate benthic production, whereas in the Weddell Sea Polychaeta, Porifera and Echinodermata are the most productive taxa.

  20. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Weddell Sea - 1978, SDLS CD-ROM vol 17

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1978 in the Weddell Sea and Queen Maud Land, Antarctica, by the Bundesanstalt fur...

  1. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Weddell Sea - 1978, SDLS CD-ROM vol 19

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1978 in the Weddell Sea and Queen Maud Land, Antarctica, by the Bundesanstalt fur...

  2. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Weddell Sea - 1978, SDLS CD-ROM vol 18

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1978 in the Weddell Sea and Queen Maud Land, Antarctica, by the Bundesanstalt fur...

  3. Atmospheric Response to Weddell Sea Open-Ocean Polynya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodos, Travis [United States Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO (United States); Weijer, Wilbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-02

    The atmospheric conditions associated with the rare Weddell Sea open ocean polynya are investigated. The polynya has not been seen since 1976, so data on the event is scarce. The CESM high resolution model is used to investigate multiple atmospheric variables. We analyze three years of polynyas, which are also compared to three years without a polynya. The surface temperature, sensible heat flux, latent heat flux, humidity, average wind speed, precipitation, longwave flux, and shortwave flux all increased over the polynya. The sensible heat flux had a higher magnitude than the latent heat flux because conduction and convection were the primary drivers of heat flux. A combination of increased latent heat flux and humidity led to an increase in precipitation. Increased longwave downwelling flux over the polynya indicated the presence of clouds over the polynya. Lastly, the sea level pressure was consistently lower over the polynya because of the presence of a thermal low generated by thermally driven convective updrafts.

  4. A geomorphological seabed classification for the Weddell Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerosch, Kerstin; Kuhn, Gerhard; Krajnik, Ingo; Scharf, Frauke Katharina; Dorschel, Boris

    2016-06-01

    Sea floor morphology plays an important role in many scientific disciplines such as ecology, hydrology and sedimentology since geomorphic features can act as physical controls for e.g. species distribution, oceanographically flow-path estimations or sedimentation processes. In this study, we provide a terrain analysis of the Weddell Sea based on the 500 m × 500 m resolution bathymetry data provided by the mapping project IBCSO. Seventeen seabed classes are recognized at the sea floor based on a fine and broad scale Benthic Positioning Index calculation highlighting the diversity of the glacially carved shelf. Beside the morphology, slope, aspect, terrain rugosity and hillshade were calculated and supplied to the data archive PANGAEA. Applying zonal statistics to the geomorphic features identified unambiguously the shelf edge of the Weddell Sea with a width of 45-70 km and a mean depth of about 1200 m ranging from 270 m to 4300 m. A complex morphology of troughs, flat ridges, pinnacles, steep slopes, seamounts, outcrops, and narrow ridges, structures with approx. 5-7 km width, build an approx. 40-70 km long swath along the shelf edge. The study shows where scarps and depressions control the connection between shelf and abyssal and where high and low declination within the scarps e.g. occur. For evaluation purpose, 428 grain size samples were added to the seabed class map. The mean values of mud, sand and gravel of those samples falling into a single seabed class was calculated, respectively, and assigned to a sediment texture class according to a common sediment classification scheme.

  5. Iodine emissions from the sea ice of the Weddell Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Atkinson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Iodine compounds were measured above, below and within the sea ice of the Weddell Sea during a cruise in 2009, to elucidate the mechanism of local enhancement and volatilisation of iodine. I2 mixing ratios of up to 12.4 pptv were measured 10 m above the sea ice, and up to 31 pptv was observed above surface snow on the nearby Brunt Ice Shelf – large amounts. Atmospheric IO of up to 7 pptv was measured from the ship, and the average sum of HOI and ICl was 1.9 pptv. These measurements confirm the Weddell Sea as an iodine hotspot. Average atmospheric concentrations of CH3I, C2H5I, CH2ICl, 2-C3H7I, CH2IBr and 1-C3H7I were each 0.2 pptv or less. On the Brunt Ice Shelf, enhanced concentrations of CH3I and C2H5I (up to 0.5 and 1 pptv, respectively were observed in firn air, with a diurnal profile that suggests the snow may be a source. In the sea ice brine, iodocarbons concentrations were over 10 times those of the sea water below. The sum of iodide + iodate was depleted in sea ice samples, suggesting some missing iodine chemistry. Flux calculations suggest I2 dominates the iodine atom flux to the atmosphere, but models cannot reconcile the observations and suggest either a missing iodine source or other deficiencies in our understanding of iodine chemistry. The observation of new particle formation, consistent with the model predictions, strongly suggests an iodine source. This combined study of iodine compounds is the first of its kind in this unique region of sea ice rich in biology and rich in iodine chemistry.

  6. Iodine emissions from the sea ice of the Weddell Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Atkinson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Iodine compounds were measured above, below and within the sea ice of the Weddell Sea during a cruise in 2009, to make progress in elucidating the mechanism of local enhancement and volatilisation of iodine. I2 mixing ratios of up to 12.4 pptv were measured 10 m above the sea ice, and up to 31 pptv was observed above surface snow on the nearby Brunt Ice Shelf – large amounts. Atmospheric IO of up to 7 pptv was measured from the ship, and the average sum of HOI and ICl was 1.9 pptv. These measurements confirm the Weddell Sea as an iodine hotspot. Average atmospheric concentrations of CH3I, C2H5I, CH2ICl, 2-C3H7I, CH2IBr and 1-C3H7I were each 0.2 pptv or less. On the Brunt Ice Shelf, enhanced concentrations of CH3I and C2H5I (up to 0.5 and 1 pptv respectively were observed in firn air, with a diurnal profile that suggests the snow may be a source. In the sea ice brine, iodocarbons concentrations were over 10 times those of the sea water below. The sum of iodide + iodate was depleted in sea ice samples, suggesting some missing iodine chemistry. Flux calculations suggest I2 dominates the iodine atom flux to the atmosphere, but models cannot reconcile the observations and suggest either a missing iodine source or other deficiencies in our understanding of iodine chemistry. The observation of new particle formation, consistent with the model predictions, strongly suggests an iodine source. This combined study of iodine compounds is the first of its kind in this unique region of sea ice rich in biology and rich in iodine chemistry.

  7. Sighting surveys from a ship and a helicopter in the Weddell Sea in 2006/07 and 2008/09

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kock, K.H.; Herr, H.; Scheidat, M.; Braeger, S.; Lehnert, K.; Lehnert, L.S.; Verdaat, J.P.; Williams, R.; Siebert, U.; Boebel, O.

    2010-01-01

    Helicopter and shipboard surveys were conducted for cetaceans in the Weddell Sea from the German research vessel ‘Polarstern’. The first survey in 2006/07 started south of South Africa, went to Neumayer Station in Atka Bay (70°29.6’ S/07°57.6’ W), crossed the Weddell Sea from Neumayer to south of El

  8. Assessment of the structure and variability of Weddell Sea water masses in distinct ocean reanalysis products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Dotto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We assessed and evaluated the performance of five ocean reanalysis in reproducing essential hydrographic properties and their associated temporal variability for the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. The products used in this assessment were ECMWF ORAS4, CFSR, MyOcean UR025.4, ECCO2 and SODA. The present study focuses on the Weddell Sea deep layer, which is composed of the following three main water masses: Warm Deep Water (WDW, Weddell Sea Deep Water (WSDW and Weddell Sea Bottom Water (WSBW. Moreover, all the ocean reanalysis products analyzed showed limited capabilities in representing the surface water masses in the Weddell Sea. The MyOcean UR025.4 product provided the most accurate representation of the structure of the Weddell Sea water masses when compared to observations. The CFSR and ECCO2 products were not able to represent the WSBW throughout the simulation period. The expected WDW warming was only reproduced by the SODA product, while the ECCO2 product was able to represent the WSDW's hydrographic properties trends. All of these ocean reanalysis systems were able to represent the decrease in the WSBW's density. Our results also showed that a simple increase in horizontal resolution does not necessarily imply better representation of the deep layers. Rather, it is needed to observe the physics involved in each model and their parameterizations because the Southern Ocean suffers from the lack of in situ data, and it is biased by summer observations. The choice of the reanalysis product should be made carefully, taking into account the performance, the parameters of interest, and the type of physical processes to be evaluated.

  9. Coupling a thermodynamically active ice shelf to a regional simulation of the Weddell Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Meccia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A thermodynamically interactive ice shelf cavity parameterization is coupled to the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS and is applied to the Southern Ocean domain with enhanced resolution in the Weddell Sea. This implementation is tested in order to assess its degree of improvement to the hydrography (and circulation of the Weddell Sea. Results show that the inclusion of ice shelf cavities in the model is feasible and somewhat realistic (considering the lack of under-ice observations for validation. Ice shelf–ocean interactions are an important process to be considered in order to obtain realistic hydrographic values under the ice shelf. The model framework presented in this work is a promising tool for analyzing the Southern Ocean's response to future climate change scenarios.

  10. Comparing ice discharge through West Antarctic Gateways: Weddell vs. Amundsen Sea warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Martin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Future changes in Antarctic ice discharge will be largely controlled by the fate of the floating ice shelves, which exert a back-stress onto Antarctica's marine outlet glaciers. Ice loss in response to warming of the Amundsen Sea has been observed and investigated as a potential trigger for the marine ice-sheet instability. Recent observations and simulations suggest that the Amundsen Sea Sector might already be unstable which would have strong implications for global sea-level rise. At the same time, regional ocean projections show much stronger warm-water intrusion into ice-shelf cavities in the Weddell Sea compared to the observed Amundsen warming. Here we present results of numerical ice sheet modelling with the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM which show that idealized, step-function type ocean warming in the Weddell Sea leads to more immediate ice discharge with a higher sensitivity to small warming levels than the same warming in the Amundsen Sea. This is consistent with the specific combination of bedrock and ice topography in the Weddell Sea Sector which results in an ice sheet close to floatation. In response to even slight ocean warming, ice loss increases rapidly, peaks and declines within one century. While the cumulative ice loss in the Amundsen Sea Sector is of similar magnitude after five centuries of continued warming, ice loss increases at a slower pace and only for significantly higher warming levels. Although there is more marine ice stored above sea level in close vicinity of the grounding line compared to the Weddell Sea Sector, the ice sheet is farther from floatation and the grounding line initially retreats more slowly.

  11. On the relation between organic and inorganic carbon in the Weddell Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedborg, Margareta; Hoppema, Mario; Skoog, Annelie

    1998-11-01

    Carbon cycling in the Weddell Sea was investigated during the ANT X/7 cruise with `FS Polarstern' December 1992-January 1993. Samples were taken on a cross section from Kapp Norvegia to Joinville Island, and on a section from the Larsen Ice Shelf to the northeast. The following quantities were measured: total carbon dioxide (TCO 2), fluorescence from humic substances and total organic carbon. The distribution of TCO 2 was strongly positively correlated to the time elapsed since the various water masses were last ventilated. In general, humic substance fluorescence was positively correlated with TCO 2, with the exception of the productive part of the western Weddell Sea, where the correlation was negative in the surface mixed layer. The increased fluorescence at the surface is suggested to be a result of biological production. The distribution of total organic carbon showed less structure, since this quantity includes a particulate component, which is subject to dispersion processes different from those of the dissolved components TCO 2 and humic substances. The mean total organic carbon concentration below the surface mixed layer was 50 μmol l -1. At some stations, a steep TOC maximum around 2000 m depth was observed. This was interpreted to result from mass sinking of phytoplankton blooms. Total organic carbon had a maximum in surface water, and at some stations also a second subsurface maximum. In the Warm Deep Water (WDW), TCO 2 and fluorescence had their maximum values, while total organic carbon tended to be low. In low productivity surface water in the eastern part of the Kapp Norvegia-Joinville Island section, the lowest flourescence was found. Surface water is eventually formed from Warm Deep Water, which had the highest fluorescence values, and therefore it is concluded that humic substances were removed in situ from surface water. In the central area of the Weddell Sea, TCO 2 and fluorescence showed the highest Warm Deep Water maxima, while total organic

  12. New model for Jurassic microcontinent movement and Gondwana breakup in the Weddell Sea region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Tom; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Leat, Philip

    2017-04-01

    The breakup of the Gondwana supercontinent changed the face of our planet. Precursors of supercontinental breakup are widely recognised in the Weddell Sea region in the Jurassic. These include the Karoo/Ferrar Large Igneous Province that extends from South Africa to East Antarctica and significant continental rifting and associated translation of microcontinental blocks in the Weddell Sea Embayment region. However, significant controversy surrounds the pre-breakup position, extent, timing and driving mechanism of inferred microcontinental movement. In particular geological and paleomagnetic data suggest >1000 km of translation and 90 degree rotation of the Haag-Ellsworth Whitmore block (HEW) away from East Antarctica. In contrast, some geophysical interpretations suggest little or no Jurassic or subsequent HEW block movement. Here we present a simpler tectonic model for the Weddell Sea Rift System and HEW movement, derived from our new compilation of airborne geophysical data, satellite magnetic data and potential field modelling (Jordan et al., 2016- Gondwana Res.). Based on the amount of inferred Jurassic crustal extension and pattern of magnetic anomalies we propose that the HEW was translated 500 km towards the Paleo-Pacific margin of Gondwana, possibly in response to a process of slab roll-back that led to distributed back-arc extension in the Weddell Sea Rift System. Widespread magmatism in the region was likely influenced by the presence of one or more mantle plumes impinging beneath the stretching lithosphere. A second phase of continental extension is inferred to have occurred between 180 and 165 Ma (prior to seafloor spreading) and is more closely associated with Gondwana breakup. This second phase over-printed the northern part of the older back arc system. We find no geophysical evidence indicating more than 30 degrees of syn-extensional HEW rotation during Jurassic rifting in the southern Weddell Sea Rift System. Instead, we propose the majority ( 60

  13. Contrasting responses to a climate regime change by sympatric, ice-dependent predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, Jane L; van den Hoff, John; Wienecke, Barbara; Hindell, Mark; Miller, Karen J

    2016-03-15

    Models that predict changes in the abundance and distribution of fauna under future climate change scenarios often assume that ecological niche and habitat availability are the major determinants of species' responses to climate change. However, individual species may have very different capacities to adapt to environmental change, as determined by intrinsic factors such as their dispersal ability, genetic diversity, generation time and rate of evolution. These intrinsic factors are usually excluded from forecasts of species' abundance and distribution changes. We aimed to determine the importance of these factors by comparing the impact of the most recent climate regime change, the late Pleistocene glacial-interglacial transition, on two sympatric, ice-dependent meso-predators, the emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) and Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii). We reconstructed the population trend of emperor penguins and Weddell seals in East Antarctica over the past 75,000 years using mitochondrial DNA sequences and an extended Bayesian skyline plot method. We also assessed patterns of contemporary population structure and genetic diversity. Despite their overlapping distributions and shared dependence on sea ice, our genetic data revealed very different responses to climate warming between these species. The emperor penguin population grew rapidly following the glacial-interglacial transition, but the size of the Weddell seal population did not change. The expansion of emperor penguin numbers during the warm Holocene may have been facilitated by their higher dispersal ability and gene flow among colonies, and fine-scale differences in preferred foraging locations. The vastly different climate change responses of two sympatric ice-dependent predators suggests that differing adaptive capacities and/or fine-scale niche differences can play a major role in species' climate change responses, and that adaptive capacity should be considered alongside niche and

  14. A dynamically consistent analysis of circulation and transports in the southwestern Weddell Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yaremchuk

    Full Text Available An inverse model is applied for the analysis of hydrographic and current meter data collected on the repeat WOCE section SR4 in the Weddell Sea in 1989–1992. The section crosses the Weddell Sea cyclonic gyre from Kapp Norvegia to the northern end of the Antarctic Peninsula. The concepts of geostrophy, conservation of planetary vorticity and hydrostatics are combined with advective balances of active and passive properties to provide a dynamically consistent circulation pattern. Our variational assimilation scheme allows the calculation of three-dimensional velocities in the section plane. Current speeds are small except along the coasts where they reach up to 12 cm/s. We diagnose a gyre transport of 34 Sverdrup which is associated with a poleward heat transport of 28×1012 W corresponding to an average heat flux of 15 Wm–2 in the Weddell Sea south of the transect. This exceeds the estimated local flux on the transect of 2 Wm–2. As the transect is located mostly in the open ocean, we conclude that the shelf areas contribute significantly to the ocean-atmosphere exchange and are consequently key areas for the contribution of the Weddell Sea to global ocean ventilation. Conversion of water masses occuring south of the section transform 6.6±1.1 Sv of the inflowing warm deep water into approximately equal amounts of Weddell Sea deep water and Weddell Sea bottom water. The volume transport of surface water equals in the in- and outflow. This means that almost all newly formed surface water is involved in the deep and bottom water formation. Comparison with the results obtained by pure velocity interpolation combined with a hydrographic data subset indicates major differences in the derived salt transports and the water mass conversion of the surface water. The differences can be explained by deviations in the structure of the upper ocean currents to which shelf areas contribute significantly. Additionally a

  15. Morphodynamics of the structural barrier between the Scotia Sea and the Weddell Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatova, Ekaterina; Dubinin, Evgeny

    2014-05-01

    The study area Scotia Sea lies between Antarctica and South America near the Falkland Islands. The structural barrier between the Scotia Sea and the Weddell See represent region with heterogeneous crust and dissected (may be rough) topography. The major part of this barrier is the South Scotia Ridge, which devided South Scotia Sea and North-West Weddell Sea. Intense deep processes in this area reflect general geodynamic settings of the South Atlantic region. The main processes are strike slip zones and different faults activation, they formed relief`s contrast as we know at present. There are fault blocks forming the ridge, abyssal plain of the small spreading basins, microcontinental blocks, volcanic Island arc and deep oceanic trenches. However the major type of the relief in the study region can be characterize as tectonical. Thus Structural barrier between the Scotia and Weddell Seas is a complex system of uplifts and depressions. The occurrence of which is associated with a variety of processes occurring at the boundary of the Scotia and Antarctic plates. We present in this study analysis of the topography and the geodynamic situation of the area, and show the results of analogue experimental modeling. Compound heterogeneous structure of the barrier between Scotia Sea and Weddell Sea involves Bransfield and Phillip Straits, small basins with ocean crust formed as a result of rotation of microblocks (Powell, Jane, Protector), small pull-apart basins along south boundary of Scotia Plate, South Orkney microcontinent, rises Bruce, Discovery, Pirie, Jane, Irizar. Moreover evolution of the East Scotia Ridge has had an influence on the morphology of the study region. Bottom topography, distribution of gravity and magnetic anomalies fields show heterogeneity of the crust in the study area. As a result of complicated structure of this region there are a lot of evolutional versions especially for Central Scotia Sea and South Scotia Sea. Analogue modeling includes two

  16. Sea ice draft in the Weddell Sea, measured by upward looking sonars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Behrendt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The presented database contains time-referenced sea ice draft values from upward looking sonar (ULS measurements in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. The sea ice draft data can be used to infer the thickness of the ice. They were collected during the period 1990–2008. In total, the database includes measurements from 13 locations in the Weddell Sea and was generated from more than 3.7 million measurements of sea ice draft. The files contain uncorrected raw drafts, corrected drafts and the basic parameters measured by the ULS. The measurement principle, the data processing procedure and the quality control are described in detail. To account for the unknown speed of sound in the water column above the ULS, two correction methods were applied to the draft data. The first method is based on defining a reference level from the identification of open water leads. The second method uses a model of sound speed in the oceanic mixed layer and is applied to ice draft in austral winter. Both methods are discussed and their accuracy is estimated. Finally, selected results of the processing are presented. The data can be downloaded from doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.785565.

  17. Sea ice draft in the Weddell Sea, measured by upward looking sonars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Behrendt

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The presented database contains time-referenced sea ice draft values from upward looking sonar (ULS measurements in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. The sea ice draft data can be used to infer the thickness of the ice. They were collected during the period 1990–2008. In total, the database includes measurements from 13 locations in the Weddell Sea and was generated from more than 3.7 million measurements of sea ice draft. The files contain uncorrected raw drafts, corrected drafts from two different methods and the basic parameters measured by the ULS. The measurement principle, the data processing procedure and the quality control are described in detail. To account for the unknown speed of sound in the water column above the ULS, two correction methods were applied to the data. The first method is based on defining a reference level from the identification of open water leads. The second method uses a model of sound speed in the oceanic mixed layer and is applied to ice draft in austral winter. Both methods are discussed and their accuracy is estimated. Finally, selected results of the processing are presented. The data can be downloaded under http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.785565.

  18. Impact of the Antarctic bottom water formation on the Weddell Gyre and its northward propagation characteristics in GFDL CM2.1 model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liping; Delworth, Thomas L.

    2016-08-01

    The impact of Antarctic bottom water (AABW) formation on the Weddell Gyre and its northward propagation characteristics are studied using a 4000 year long control run of the GFDL CM2.1 model as well as sensitivity experiments. In the control run, the AABW cell and Weddell Gyre are highly correlated when the AABW cell leads the Weddell Gyre by several years, with an enhanced AABW cell corresponding to a strengthened Weddell Gyre and vice versa. An additional sensitivity experiment shows that the response of the Weddell Gyre to AABW cell changes is primarily attributed to interactions between the AABW outflow and ocean topography, instead of the surface wind stress curl and freshwater anomalies. As the AABW flows northward, it encounters topography with steep slopes that induce strong downwelling and negative bottom vortex stretching. The anomalous negative bottom vortex stretching induces a cyclonic barotropic stream function over the Weddell Sea, thus leading to an enhanced Weddell Gyre. The AABW cell variations in the control run have significant meridional coherence in density space. Using passive dye tracers, it is found that the slow propagation of AABW cell anomalies south of 35°S corresponds to the slow tracer advection time scale. The dye tracers escape the Weddell Sea through the western limb of the Weddell Gyre and then go northwestward to the Argentine Basin through South Sandwich Trench and Georgia Basin. This slow advection by deep ocean currents determines the AABW cell propagation speed south of 35°S. North of 35°S the propagation speed is determined both by advection in the deep western boundary current and through Kelvin waves.

  19. Fluxes of dissolved aluminum and manganese to the Weddell Sea and indications for manganese co-limitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middag, Rob; de Baar, Hein J. W.; Klunder, Maarten B.; Laan, Patrick

    The trace metals aluminum (Al) and manganese (Mn) were studied in the Weddell Sea in March 2008. Concentrations of dissolved Al ([Al]) were slightly elevated (0.23-0.35 nmol L-1) in the surface layer compared to the subsurface minimum (0.07-0.21 nmol L-1) observed in the winter water. Atmospheric

  20. Three new species of deep-sea Gromia (Protista, Rhizaria) from the bathyal and abyssal Weddell Sea, Antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothe, Nina; Gooday, Andrew J.; Cedhagen, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    We describe three new species of the genus Gromia from bathyal and abyssal depths in the Weddell Sea. The new species are characterized by a combination of morphological and molecular criteria. All three species possess a distinct oral capsule and a layer of ‘honeycomb membranes’, which form the ...

  1. Fluxes of dissolved aluminum and manganese to the Weddell Sea and indications for manganese co-limitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middag, R.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Klunder, M.B.; Laan, P.

    2013-01-01

    The trace metals aluminum (Al) and manganese (Mn) were studied in the Weddell Sea in March 2008. Concentrations of dissolved Al ([Al]) were slightly elevated (0.23-0.35 nmol L-1) in the surface layer compared to the subsurface minimum (0.07-0.21 nmol L-1) observed in the winter water. Atmospheric

  2. Exercise at depth alters bradycardia and incidence of cardiac anomalies in deep-diving marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Terrie M; Fuiman, Lee A; Kendall, Traci; Berry, Patrick; Richter, Beau; Noren, Shawn R; Thometz, Nicole; Shattock, Michael J; Farrell, Edward; Stamper, Andy M; Davis, Randall W

    2015-01-16

    Unlike their terrestrial ancestors, marine mammals routinely confront extreme physiological and physical challenges while breath-holding and pursuing prey at depth. To determine how cetaceans and pinnipeds accomplish deep-sea chases, we deployed animal-borne instruments that recorded high-resolution electrocardiograms, behaviour and flipper accelerations of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) diving from the surface to >200 m. Here we report that both exercise and depth alter the bradycardia associated with the dive response, with the greatest impacts at depths inducing lung collapse. Unexpectedly, cardiac arrhythmias occurred in >73% of deep, aerobic dives, which we attribute to the interplay between sympathetic and parasympathetic drivers for exercise and diving, respectively. Such marked cardiac variability alters the common view of a stereotypic 'dive reflex' in diving mammals. It also suggests the persistence of ancestral terrestrial traits in cardiac function that may help explain the unique sensitivity of some deep-diving marine mammals to anthropogenic disturbances.

  3. Noble gas tracers of ventilation during deep-water formation in the Weddell Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, D. P.; Khatiwala, S.; Heimbach, P.

    2016-05-01

    To explore the dynamics and implications of incomplete air-sea equilibration during the formation of abyssal water masses, we simulated noble gases in the Estimating the Circulation & Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) global ocean state estimate. A novel computation approach utilizing a matrix-free Newton-Krylov (MFNK) scheme was applied to quickly compute the periodic seasonal solutions for noble gas tracers. MFNK allows for quick computation of a cyclo-stationary solution for tracers (i.e., a spun-up, repeating seasonal cycle), which would otherwise be computationally infeasible due to the long time scale of dynamic adjustment of the abyssal ocean (1000’s of years). A suite of experiments isolates individual processes, including atmospheric pressure effects, the solubility pump and air-sea bubble fluxes. In addition to these modeled processes, a volumetric contribution of 0.28 ± 0.07% of glacial melt water is required to reconcile deep-water observations in the Weddell Sea. Another primary finding of our work is that the saturation anomaly of heavy noble gases in model simulations is in excess of two-fold more negative than is suggested from Weddell Sea observations. This result suggests that model water masses are insufficiently ventilated prior to subduction and thus there is insufficient communication between atmosphere and ocean at high latitudes. The discrepancy between noble gas observations and ECCO simulations highlights that important inadequacies remain in how we model high-latitude ventilation with large implications for the oceanic uptake and storage of carbon.

  4. An evolutionary perspective on reproductive individual heterogeneity in a marine vertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambert, Thierry; Rotella, Jay J; Garrott, Robert A

    2014-09-01

    Although the quantification of individual heterogeneity in wild populations' vital rates has recently attracted growing interest among ecologists, the investigation of its evolutionary consequences remains limited, mainly because of the difficulties in assessing fitness and heritability from field studies on free-ranging animals. In the presence of individual variability, evaluation of fitness consequences can notably be complicated by the existence of trade-offs among different vital rates. In this study, to further assess the evolutionary significance of previously quantified levels of individual heterogeneity in female Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii Lesson) reproductive rates (Chambert et al. ), we investigated how several life-history characteristics of female offspring were related to their mother's reproductive rate, as well as to other maternal traits (age and experience) and environmental conditions at birth. The probability and age of first reproduction (recruitment) of female offspring was not related to their mother's reproductive rate, suggesting the absence of a maternal trade-off between the number and quality of offspring a female produces. Evidence of a positive, but relatively weak, relationship between the reproductive rates of a mother and her female offspring was found, suggesting some degree of heritability in this trait. Using a simulation approach based on these statistical findings, we showed that substantial differences in the number of grandchildren, produced through female progeny, can be expected among females with different reproductive rates. Despite the presence of substantial stochastic variability, due to environmental fluctuations and other unidentified mechanisms, and in the light of the fact that the metrics obtained do not provide a full measure of real fitness, our results do suggest that the individual reproductive variability found in female Weddell seals could potentially have important fitness consequences.

  5. Effect of UV-B irradiance on the ATP content of microorganisms of the Weddell Sea (Antartica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vosjan, J.H.; Nieuwland, G. (Netherlands Inst. for Sea Research, Den Burg (Netherlands)); Doehler, G. (Frankfurt Universitaet (Federal Republic of Germany). Botanisches Institut)

    1990-06-01

    The effect of UV-B irradiation on the ATP content of natural assemblages of planktonic microorganisms in the upper 30-m water layer of the Weddell Sea (Antartica) was studied. After five hours of irradiation with UV (290-320 nm) of 1.35 W.m{sup -2} a 75% decrease in the ATP content of the microorganisms was observed. (author). 11 refs.; 3 figs.

  6. Objective mapping of Argo data in the Weddell Gyre: a gridded dataset of upper ocean water properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Reeve

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Weddell Gyre plays a crucial role in the modification of climate by advecting heat poleward to the Antarctic ice shelves and by regulating the density of water masses that feed the lowest limb of the global ocean overturning circulation. However, our understanding of Weddell Gyre water mass properties is limited to regions of data availability, primarily along the Prime Meridian. The aim of this paper is to provide a dataset of the upper water column properties of the entire Weddell Gyre. Objective mapping was applied to Argo float data in order to produce spatially gridded, time composite maps of temperature and salinity for fixed pressure levels ranging from 50 to 2000 dbar, as well as temperature, salinity and pressure at the level of the sub-surface temperature maximum. While the data are currently too limited to incorporate time into the gridded structure, the data are extensive enough to produce maps of the entire region across three time composite periods (2002–2005, 2006–2009 and 2010–2013, which can be used to determine how representative conclusions drawn from data collected along general RV transect lines are on a gyre scale perspective. The work presented here represents the technical prerequisite in addressing climatological research questions in forthcoming studies. These data sets are available in netCDF format at doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.842876.

  7. Elephant overflows: Multi-annual variability in Weddell Sea Deep Water driven by surface forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, Andrew; Meredith, Michael; Abrahamsen, Povl; Naviera-Garabato, Alberto; Ángel Morales Maqueda, Miguel; Polzin, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    The volume of the deepest and densest water mass in Drake Passage, Lower Weddell Sea Deep Water (LWSDW), is shown to have been decreasing over the last 20 years of observations, with an associated reduction in density driven by freshening. Superimposed on this long term trend is a multi-annual oscillation with a period of 3-5 years. This variability only appears in Drake Passage; observations in the east of the Scotia Sea show a similar long term trend, but with no apparent multi-annual variability. Clues as to the source of this variability may be found on the continental slope at approximately 1000 m immediately north of Elephant Island on the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. Here there is an intermittent westward flowing cold/fresh slope current whose volume and properties are strongly correlated with the LWSDW multi-annual variability, although leading the LWSDW by around one year. As the slope current and LWSDW are separated from each other both geographically and in water mass characteristics, their co-variability implies that they are responding to a common forcing, while the lag between deep LWSDW and shallow slope current provides information on the timescale of this response. A newly available high resolution temperature and salinity multi-year time series from the Elephant Island slope at 1000 m is compared with reanalysis and model derived surface fluxes, sea ice extent and wind stress. We find that there are strong positive relationships between the surface wind stress and heat flux over the shelf at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula and the properties of the slope current at 1000 m on seasonal to annual timescales. We use tracer release experiments in the Southern Ocean State Estimate (SOSE) model to investigate the lag between the slope current and LWSDW timeseries and hypothesise that the observed multi-annual variability in both water masses is driven by surface forcing over the shelf and the overflow of modified water from the slope in

  8. Seasonal resonance of diurnal coastal trapped waves in the southern Weddell Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semper, Stefanie; Darelius, Elin

    2017-01-01

    The summer enhancement of diurnal tidal currents at the shelf break in the southern Weddell Sea is studied using velocity measurements from 29 moorings during the period 1968 to 2014. Kinetic energy associated with diurnal tidal frequencies is largest at the shelf break and decreases rapidly with distance from it. The diurnal tidal energy increases from austral winter to summer by, on average, 50 %. The austral summer enhancement is observed in all deployments. The observations are compared to results from an idealised numerical solution of the properties of coastal trapped waves (CTWs) for a given bathymetry, stratification and an along-slope current. The frequency at which the dispersion curve for mode 1 CTWs displays a maximum (i.e. where the group velocity is zero and resonance is possible) is found within or near the diurnal frequency band, and it is sensitive to the stratification in the upper part of the water column and to the background current. The maximum of the dispersion curve is shifted towards higher frequencies, above the diurnal band, for weak stratification and a strong background current (i.e. austral winter-like conditions) and towards lower frequencies for strong upper-layer stratification and a weak background current (austral summer). The seasonal evolution of hydrography and currents in the region is inferred from available mooring data and conductivity-temperature-depth profiles. Near-resonance of diurnal tidal CTWs during austral summer can explain the observed seasonality in tidal currents.

  9. Diversity and distribution of Porifera in the bathyal and abyssal Weddell Sea and adjacent areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janussen, Dorte; Tendal, Ole Secher

    2007-08-01

    During the ANDEEP I-III expeditions, we obtained a rich and highly diverse sponge collection from the deep Weddell Sea. All the three Poriferan classes, Calcarea, Demospongiae and Hexactinellida, were well represented. Among this material, we have identified a total of 76 species from 47 genera and 30 families. Of these, 17 species (22%) are new to science and 37 (49%) new for the Southern Ocean. Particularly remarkable is the considerable depth of the boundary between bathyal and abyssal sponge faunas. Both Demospongiae and Hexactinellida show a strong shift in their taxonomic composition from a typical shelf assemblage to a more cosmopolitan deep-sea fauna at around 2500 m. Within the Demospongiae, the families Polymastiidae and Cladorhizidae (carnivorous sponges) are particularly abundant and very diverse. The Calcarea are recorded for the first time from the Antarctic deep sea. The type of sampling gear used, especially the epibenthic sledge, was an important factor for the successful collection of deep-sea sponges during the ANDEEP campaigns.

  10. Pressure-volume characteristics of aortas of harbor and Weddell seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode, E A; Elsner, R; Peterson, T M; Campbell, K B; Spangler, W

    1986-07-01

    The mechanical properties of the radially enlarged proximal segment of the aorta of diving marine mammals was studied on 15 excised aortas of harbor seals and five aortas of Weddell seals. This was done by recording static pressure-volume relationships for the whole thoracic aorta, the aortic bulb, and the descending thoracic aorta and passive length-tension measurements of aortic strips. Aortic bulb volume distensibility was found to be much greater than that of the descending thoracic aorta or of an equivalent aortic segment of terrestrial mammals. The consequences were that the total potential energy and volume that may be stored within the aortic bulb is very large, with a capacity for storage of the stroke work of more than two normal heart beats and a volume of more than three times normal stroke volume. The aortic bulb has an average radius and wall thickness twice that of the descending aorta, but at any level of distension the wall stress (g/cm2) is the same throughout. The static mechanical properties of aortic strips from the bulb and descending thoracic aortas were not markedly different, so that the differences in the pressure-volume relationships are explained by differences in geometry of the two sections. The expanded aortic bulb functions through energy and volume storage actions and through uncoupling actions to maintain arterial pressures and stroke volume at near predive levels during a dive.

  11. On the forcing mechanisms of mesocyclones in the eastern Weddell Sea region, Antarctica: Process studies using a mesoscale numerical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Klein

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Development mechanisms of Antarctic mesocyclones in the eastern Weddell Sea area are examined by means of simulations with a mesoscale model using different idealized initial conditions. In one of the experiments, a mesocyclone develops over an area of open water close to the coast of the Antarctic continent. The forcing mechanisms of this mesocyclogenesis are investigated by means of sensitivity studies in which certain physical processes and the relevance of the surface conditions topography, sea surface temperature and sea ice coverage are examined. The sensitivity experiments show that the simulated mesocyclone is forced by an interaction of several forcing mechanisms at different stages of the development rather than by a single mechanism. The topography of the eastern Weddell Sea region and the summertime coastal polynia are shown to be of great importance for the mesocyclogenesis. A suitable synoptic-scale flow is necessary to support the katabatic flow over the sloped ice sheet, and to enhance the generation of cyclonic vorticity due to vertical stretching for the initial mesocyclogenesis. The diabatic process of the convergence of the sensible and latent heat fluxes in the boundary layer over the coastal polynia then becomes the dominant forcing mechanism for the further development of the mesocyclone.

  12. Sea ice characteristics between the middle Weddell Sea and the Prydz Bay, Antarctica during the austral summer of 2003

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Shulin; KANG Jiancheng; ZHOU Shangzhe; LI Zhijun

    2005-01-01

    The antarctic sea ice was investigated upon five occasions between January 4 and February 15, 2003. The investigations included: (1)estimation of sea ice distribution by ship-based observations between the middle Weddell Sea and the Prydz Bay; (2) estimation of sea ice distribution by aerial photography in the Prydz Bay; (3) direct measurements of fast ice thickness and snow cover, as well as ice core sampling in Nella Fjord; (4) estimation of melting sea ice distribution near the Zhongshan Station; and (5) observation of sea ice early freeze near the Zhongshan Station. On average, sea ice covered 14.4% of the study area. The highest sea ice concentration (80%)was observed in the Weddell Sea. First-year ice was dominant (99.7%~99.8%). Sea ice distributions in the Prydz Bay were more variable due to complex inshore topography, proximity of the Larsemann Hills, and/or grounded icebergs. The average thickness of landfast ice in Nella Fjord was 169.5 cm. Wind-blown snow redistribution plays an important role in affecting the ice thickness in Nella Fjord. Preliminary freezing of sea ice near the Zhongshan Station follows the first two phases of the pancake cycle.

  13. Factors controlling phytoplankton ice-edge blooms in the marginal ice-zone of the northwestern Weddell Sea during sea ice retreat 1988 : field observations and mathematical modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancelot, Christiane; Mathot, Sylvie; Veth, Cornelis; Baar, Hein de

    1993-01-01

    The factors controlling phytoplankton bloom development in the marginal ice zone of the northwestern Weddell Sea were investigated during the EPOS (Leg 2) expedition (1988). Measurements were made of physical and chemical processes and biological activities associated with the process of ice-melting

  14. ABUNDANCE OF CRYPTOPHYCEAE AND CHLOROPHYLL B-CONTAINING ORGANISMS IN THE WEDDELL-SCOTIA CONFLUENCE AREA IN THE SPRING OF 1988

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUMA, AGJ; GIESKES, WWC; THOMSEN, HA

    1992-01-01

    During a cruise in the Weddell-Scotia Confluence area (EPOS Leg 2: November-January 1988/1989) nanophytoplankton composition was determined by employing taxon-specific pigment measurements with HPLC. The biomass of the most important components was estimated by using specific pigment ratios measured

  15. Annual uptake of atmospheric CO2 by the Weddell Sea derived from a surface layer balance, including estimations of entrainment and new production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoppema, Mario; Fahrbach, Eberhard; Stoll, Michel H.C.; Baar, Hein J.W. de

    1999-01-01

    Data from two cruises, one in April/May 1996 and one in December/January 1993, covering the same wide area in the offshore Weddell Sea, were used to derive the annual extent of entrainment and the capacity of the biological pump. The former property was obtained with the help of dissolved oxygen dat

  16. Factors controlling phytoplankton ice-edge blooms in the marginal ice-zone of the northwestern Weddell Sea during sea ice retreat 1988 : field observations and mathematical modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancelot, Christiane; Mathot, Sylvie; Veth, Cornelis; Baar, Hein de

    1993-01-01

    The factors controlling phytoplankton bloom development in the marginal ice zone of the northwestern Weddell Sea were investigated during the EPOS (Leg 2) expedition (1988). Measurements were made of physical and chemical processes and biological activities associated with the process of ice-melting

  17. Asteroids, ophiuroids and holothurians from the southeastern Weddell Sea (Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Gutt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Until the early 1980s, the composition and distribution of the asteroid (starfish, ophiuroid (brittle star and holothurian (sea cucumber bottom fauna of the southeastern Weddell Sea was virtually unknown. This southernmost part of the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean is a typical high-latitude Antarctic region located in the circumpolar permanent pack-ice zone. It became accessible for large-scale scientific surveys only through the availability of modern ice-breaking research vessels, such as the German RV “Polarstern”. Here, we describe a dataset of the faunal composition and abundance of starfish, brittle star and sea cucumber assemblages in this area, based on collections from trawl catches carried out during three “Polarstern” cruises in 1983, 1984 and 1985. The set comprises a total of 4,509 records of abundances of 35 asteroid species (with a total of 2,089 specimens and 38 ophiuroid species (with a total of 18,484 specimens from 34 stations, as well as of 66 holothurian species (with a total of 20,918 specimens from 59 stations including zero-abundances (absences. A synthesizing zoogeographical community analysis confirms the presence of three distinct assemblages of asteroids, ophiuroids, and holothurians with highest species richness on the eastern shelf. Overall, starfishes, brittle stars and sea cucumbers were present at all sites investigated in the study area but composition and abundance of asterozoan (asteroids and ophiuroids together and holothurian fauna varied considerably. A synthesizing zoogeographical community analysis confirms the presence of three distinct assemblages of asteroids, ophiuroids, and holothurians with highest species richness on the eastern shelf. In the case of asterozoans, water depth and latitude seemed to be the most important drivers of assemblage distribution and composition. One of the holothurian assemblages was part of the rich macrozoobenthic community dominated by a diverse and

  18. A rapid transition from ice covered CO2-rich waters to a biologically mediated CO2 sink in the eastern Weddell Gyre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Geibert

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW, locally called Warm Deep Water (WDW, enters the Weddell Gyre in the southeast, roughly at 25° E to 30° E. In December~2002 and January 2003} we studied the effect of entrainment of WDW on the fugacity of carbon dioxide (fCO2 and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in Weddell Sea surface waters. Ultimately the fCO2 difference across the sea surface drives CO2 air-sea fluxes. Deep CTD sections and surface transects of fCO2 were made along the Prime Meridian, a northwest-southeast section, and along 17° E to 23° E during cruise ANT XX/2 on FS Polarstern. Upward movement and entrainment of WDW into the winter mixed layer had significantly increased DIC and fCO2 below the sea ice along 0° W and 17° E to 23° E, notably in the southern Weddell Gyre. Nonetheless, the ice cover largely prevented outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere. During and upon melting of the ice, biological activity rapidly reduced surface water fCO2 by up to 100 μatm, thus creating a sink for atmospheric CO2. Despite the tendency of the surfacing WDW to cause CO2 supersaturation, the Weddell Gyre may well be a CO2 sink on an annual basis due to this effective mechanism involving ice cover and ensuing biological fCO2 reduction. Dissolution of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 in melting sea ice may also play a role in this rapid reduction of surface water fCO2. The CO2 source tendency deriving from the upward movement of "pre-industrial" CDW is declining, as atmospheric CO2 levels continue to increase, and thus the CO2 sink of the Weddell Gyre will continue to increase as well (provided the upward movement of WDW does not change significantly.

  19. Sustained observations in the Weddell Sea spanning more than 20 years show gradual increase of the deep water heat content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strass, Volker; Rohardt, Gerd; Hoppema, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Beginning in 1989, Eberhard Fahrbach established and maintained until his premature death an observational programme in the Weddell Sea, which outstandingly contributed to alleviate the grave problem of undersampling of the Southern Ocean. Continuation of his legacy by the Alfred-Wegener-Institut has yielded a time series that now extends into 2013, hence covers almost 24 years. Here we analyse this data set for long-term changes of the heat content in the deep Weddell Sea. We exclusively evaluate the calibrated temperature records obtained with ship-lowered CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth sonde) casts at repeated hydrographic stations and along repeated sections. Using this approach we avoid introducing potential temperature offsets that can result from combination of different measurement technologies and potential biases resultant from differences in geographic positions. Our results show that the deep water masses below 700 m gradually warmed over the past two decades by 0.001 - 0.004 K a-1. Superimposed inter-annual to multi-annual variations appear as largely uncorrelated horizontally across the Weddell Gyre. The long-term (21 - 24 years) trends of increasing temperatures in different depth layers below 700 m at all stations and sections can be approximated by linear regression that explains between 27 and 91 % of the variance, where the coefficients of correlation tend to increase with depth. No significant trends are found in the top 700 m. The heating rate of the water masses below 700 m is estimated to 0.79 ± 0.14 W m-2, which is more than twice as high as determined for the global deep ocean in general. Our results hence corroborate the view that Southern Ocean processes make an above-average contribution to the deep ocean warming, and so add to bring global estimates of the deep ocean heating rate and of the net energy flux into the Earth's climate system at the top of the atmosphere of 0.5 - 1 W m-2 closer in line with each other. Thus they help

  20. Climatología de la variabilidad espacial de la concentración de hielo en los mares de Bellingshausen, Amundsen y Weddell Climatology of sea ice concentration spatial variability over Bellingshausen, Amundsen and Weddell Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa H. Compagnucci

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se han obtenido los patrones espaciales más frecuentes de los campos de anomalías de concentración de hielo marino (ACHM en los mares de Amundsen, Bellingshausen y Weddell a partir de los valores medios mensuales de concentración de hielo marino provistos por la NASA Goddard Space Flight Center derivados del Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer y Special Sensor Microwave/Imager para el período 1979 al 2000. Haciendo uso de la técnica de análisis de Componentes Principales (CPs en modo-T rotadas Varimax, se obtienen seis CPs. Por lo tanto, se obtienen un total de 12 patrones con seis en modo directo (ACHM del mismo signo que la CP y seis en inverso (ACHM de signo opuesto a la CP, que clasifican el 95,5% de los campos mensuales. Tres CPs describen los casos más frecuentes de inviernoprimavera (período con mayor concentración y expansión del hielo marino y tres CPs corresponden a verano-otoño (menor concentración y retracción del campo de hielo. La primera y segunda CP representan situaciones de invierno y primavera. La segunda componente está rotada 30° en sentido horario con respecto a la primer componente y ambas presentan anomalías dipolares entre los mares a ambos lados de la península Antártica. Estas dos componentes presentan una recurrencia de aproximadamente 4 años en los que alternativamente el exterior del mar de Weddell tiene condiciones de hielo marino sobre lo normal cuando en el norte del mar de Amundsen las anomalías son negativas y viceversa. La condición más frecuente y con una recurrencia anual de verano-otoño (3ºCP también es bipolar pero entre el interior del Weddell y la región del Amundsen-Bellingshausen costera por ser la región donde se presenta el hielo en esaépoca del año. Las componentes 4º, 5º y 6º refieren a condiciones de ACHM diferentes y no descriptas en la literatura. Por otra parte, las CPs de verano-otoño, fundamentales para la navegación ant

  1. Physical and chemical data collected using bottle casts from the GENERAL SAN MARTIN in the Scotia Sea and Weddell Sea from 14 December 1963 to 11 January 1964 (NODC Accession 0000791)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and chemical data were collected using bottle casts in the Scotia Sea and Weddell Sea from the GENERAL SAN MARTIN. Data were collected from 14 December 1963...

  2. Low post-glacial rebound rates in the Weddell Sea due to Late Holocene ice-sheet readvance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Sarah L.; Hindmarsh, Richard C. A.; Whitehouse, Pippa; Bentley, Michael J.; King, Matt

    2014-05-01

    The Holocene deglaciation of West Antarctica resulted in widespread ice surface lowering. While many ice-sheet reconstructions generally assume a monotone Holocene retreat for the West Antarctica Ice sheet (WAIS) [Ivins et al., 2013; Peltier, 2004; Whitehouse et al., 2012], an increasing number of glaciological observations infer it is readvancing, following retreat behind the present-day margin[Siegert et al., 2013]. We will show that a readvance in the Weddell Sea region can reconcile two outstanding problems: (i) the present-day widespread occurrence of seemingly stable ice-streams grounded on beds that deepen inland in apparent contradiction to theory [Schoof, 2007]; and (ii) the inability of models of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) to match present-day uplift rates [Whitehouse et al., 2012]. Combining a suite of ice loading histories that include a readvance with a model of GIA provides significant improvements to predictions of present-day uplift rates, and we are able to reproduce previously unexplained observations of subsidence in the southern sector of the Weddell Sea. We hypothesize that retreat behind present grounding lines occurred when the bed was lower, and isostatic recovery led to shallowing, ice sheet re-grounding and readvance. We will conclude that some sections of the current WAIS grounding line that are theoretically unstable, may be advancing and that the volume change of the WAIS may have been more complex in the Late Holocene than previously posited. This revised Holocene ice-loading history would have important implications for the GIA correction applied to Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data, likely resulting in a reduction in the GIA correction and a smaller estimate of present-day ice mass loss within the Weddell Sea region of the WAIS. Ivins, E. R., T. S. James, J. Wahr, E. J. O. Schrama, F. W. Landerer, and K. M. Simon (2013), Antarctic contribution to sea level rise observed by GRACE with improved GIA correction

  3. Acoustic insights into the zooplankton dynamics of the eastern Weddell Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisewski, Boris; Strass, Volker H.

    2016-05-01

    The success of any efforts to determine the effects of climate change on marine ecosystems depends on understanding in the first instance the natural variations, which contemporarily occur on the interannual and shorter time scales. Here we present results on the environmental controls of zooplankton distribution patterns and behaviour in the eastern Weddell Sea, Southern Ocean. Zooplankton abundance and vertical migration are derived from the mean volume backscattering strength (MVBS) and the vertical velocity measured by moored acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs), which were deployed simultaneously at 64°S, 66.5°S and 69°S along the Greenwich Meridian from February, 2005, until March, 2008. While these time series span a period of full three years they resolve hourly changes. A highly persistent behavioural pattern found at all three mooring locations is the synchronous diel vertical migration (DVM) of two distinct groups of zooplankton that migrate between a deep residence depth during daytime and a shallow depth during nighttime. The DVM was closely coupled to the astronomical daylight cycles. However, while the DVM was symmetric around local noon, the annual modulation of the DVM was clearly asymmetric around winter solstice or summer solstice, respectively, at all three mooring sites. DVM at our observation sites persisted throughout winter, even at the highest latitude exposed to the polar night. Since the magnitude as well as the relative rate of change of illumination is minimal at this time, we propose that the ultimate causes of DVM separated from the light-mediated proximal cue that coordinates it. In all three years, a marked change in the migration behaviour occurred in late spring (late October/early November), when DVM ceased. The complete suspension of DVM after early November is possibly caused by the combination of two factors: (1) increased availability of food in the surface mixed layer provided by the phytoplankton spring bloom, and

  4. A rapid transition from ice covered CO2–rich waters to a biologically mediated CO2 sink in the eastern Weddell Gyre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Geibert

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW, locally called Warm Deep Water (WDW, enters the Weddell Gyre in the southeast, roughly at 25° E to 30° E. In December 2002 and January 2003 we studied the effect of entrainment of WDW on the fugacity of carbon dioxide (fCO2 and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in Weddell Sea surface waters. Ultimately the fCO2 difference across the sea surface drives air-sea fluxes of CO2. Deep CTD sections and surface transects of fCO2 were made along the Prime Meridian, a northwest-southeast section, and along 17° E to 23° E during cruise ANT XX/2 on FS Polarstern. Upward movement and entrainment of WDW into the winter mixed layer had significantly increased DIC and fCO2 below the sea ice along 0° W and 17° E to 23° E, notably in the southern Weddell Gyre. Nonetheless, the ice cover largely prevented outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere. During and upon melting of the ice, biological activity rapidly reduced surface water fCO2 by up to 100 μatm, thus creating a sink for atmospheric CO2. Despite the tendency of the surfacing WDW to cause CO2 supersaturation, the Weddell Gyre may well be a CO2 sink on an annual basis due to this effective mechanism involving ice cover and ensuing biological fCO2 reduction. Dissolution of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 in melting sea ice may play a minor role in this rapid reduction of surface water fCO2.

  5. Effects of hydrographic variability on the spatial, seasonal and diel diving patterns of southern elephant seals in the eastern Weddell Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Biuw

    Full Text Available Weddell Sea hydrography and circulation is driven by influx of Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW from the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC at its eastern margin. Entrainment and upwelling of this high-nutrient, oxygen-depleted water mass within the Weddell Gyre also supports the mesopelagic ecosystem within the gyre and the rich benthic community along the Antarctic shelf. We used Conductivity-Temperature-Depth Satellite Relay Data Loggers (CTD-SRDLs to examine the importance of hydrographic variability, ice cover and season on the movements and diving behavior of southern elephant seals in the eastern Weddell Sea region during their overwinter feeding trips from Bouvetøya. We developed a model describing diving depth as a function of local time of day to account for diel variation in diving behavior. Seals feeding in pelagic ice-free waters during the summer months displayed clear diel variation, with daytime dives reaching 500-1500 m and night-time targeting of the subsurface temperature and salinity maxima characteristic of CDW around 150-300 meters. This pattern was especially clear in the Weddell Cold and Warm Regimes within the gyre, occurred in the ACC, but was absent at the Dronning Maud Land shelf region where seals fed benthically. Diel variation was almost absent in pelagic feeding areas covered by winter sea ice, where seals targeted deep layers around 500-700 meters. Thus, elephant seals appear to switch between feeding strategies when moving between oceanic regimes or in response to seasonal environmental conditions. While they are on the shelf, they exploit the locally-rich benthic ecosystem, while diel patterns in pelagic waters in summer are probably a response to strong vertical migration patterns within the copepod-based pelagic food web. Behavioral flexibility that permits such switching between different feeding strategies may have important consequences regarding the potential for southern elephant seals to adapt to

  6. Factors controlling phytoplankton ice-edge blooms in the marginal ice-zone of the northwestern Weddell Sea during sea ice retreat 1988: field observations and mathematical modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Lancelot, Christiane; Mathot, Sylvie; Veth, Cornelis; de Baar, Hein

    1993-01-01

    The factors controlling phytoplankton bloom development in the marginal ice zone of the northwestern Weddell Sea were investigated during the EPOS (Leg 2) expedition (1988). Measurements were made of physical and chemical processes and biological activities associated with the process of ice-melting and their controlling variables particularly light limitation mediated by vertical stability and ice-cover, trace metal deficiency and grazing pressure. The combined observations and process studi...

  7. Seabed images from Southern Ocean shelf regions off the northern Antarctic Peninsula and in the southeastern Weddell Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepenburg, Dieter; Buschmann, Alexander; Driemel, Amelie; Grobe, Hannes; Gutt, Julian; Schumacher, Stefanie; Segelken-Voigt, Alexandra; Sieger, Rainer

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances in underwater imaging technology allow for the gathering of invaluable scientific information on seafloor ecosystems, such as direct in situ views of seabed habitats and quantitative data on the composition, diversity, abundance, and distribution of epibenthic fauna. The imaging approach has been extensively used within the research project DynAMo (Dynamics of Antarctic Marine Shelf Ecosystems) at the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research Bremerhaven (AWI), which aimed to comparatively assess the pace and quality of the dynamics of Southern Ocean benthos. Within this framework, epibenthic spatial distribution patterns have been comparatively investigated in two regions in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean: the shelf areas off the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, representing a region with above-average warming of surface waters and sea-ice reduction, and the shelves of the eastern Weddell Sea as an example of a stable high-Antarctic marine environment that is not (yet) affected by climate change. The AWI Ocean Floor Observation System (OFOS) was used to collect seabed imagery during two cruises of the German research vessel Polarstern, ANT-XXIX/3 (PS81) to the Antarctic Peninsula from January to March 2013 and ANT-XXXI/2 (PS96) to the Weddell Sea from December 2015 to February 2016. Here, we report on the image and data collections gathered during these cruises. During PS81, OFOS was successfully deployed at a total of 31 stations at water depths between 29 and 784 m. At most stations, series of 500 to 530 pictures ( > 15 000 in total, each depicting a seabed area of approximately 3.45 m2 or 2.3 × 1.5 m) were taken along transects approximately 3.7 km in length. During PS96, OFOS was used at a total of 13 stations at water depths between 200 and 754 m, yielding series of 110 to 293 photos (2670 in total) along transects 0.9 to 2.6 km in length. All seabed images taken during the two cruises

  8. Upper limits for chlorophylla changes with brine volume in sea ice during the austral spring in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhijun; LI Runling; WANG Zipan; HAAS Christian; DIECKMANN Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    During the winter and spring of 2006, we investigated the sea ice physics and marine biology in the northwest Weddell Sea, Antarctica aboard R/VPolarstern. We determined the texture of each ice core and 71 ice crystal thin sections from 27 ice cores. We analyzed 393 ice cores, their temperatures, 348 block density and salinity samples, and 311 chlorophylla (Chla) and phaeophytin samples along the cruise route during the investigation. Based on the vertical distributions of 302 groups of data for the ice porosity and Chla content in the ice at the same position, we obtained new evidence that ice physical parameters influence the Chla content in ice. We collected snow and ice thickness data, and established the effects of the snow and ice thickness on the Chla blooms under the ice, as well as the relationships between the activity of ice algae cells and the brine volume in ice according to the principle of environmental control of the ecological balance. We determined the upper limits for Chla in the brine volume of granular and columnar ice in the Antarctica, thereby demonstrating the effects of ice crystals on brine drainage, and the contributions of the physical properties of sea ice to Chla blooms near the ice bottom and on the ice-water interface in the austral spring. Moreover, we found that the physical properties of sea ice affect ice algae and they are key control elements that modulate marine phytoplankton blooms in the ice-covered waters around Antarctica.

  9. Reconstructing the Last Glacial Maximum ice sheet in the Weddell Sea embayment, Antarctica, using numerical modelling constrained by field evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Brocq, A. M.; Bentley, M. J.; Hubbard, A.; Fogwill, C. J.; Sugden, D. E.; Whitehouse, P. L.

    2011-09-01

    The Weddell Sea Embayment (WSE) sector of the Antarctic ice sheet has been suggested as a potential source for a period of rapid sea-level rise - Meltwater Pulse 1a, a 20 m rise in ˜500 years. Previous modelling attempts have predicted an extensive grounding line advance in the WSE, to the continental shelf break, leading to a large equivalent sea-level contribution for the sector. A range of recent field evidence suggests that the ice sheet elevation change in the WSE at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is less than previously thought. This paper describes and discusses an ice flow modelling derived reconstruction of the LGM ice sheet in the WSE, constrained by the recent field evidence. The ice flow model reconstructions suggest that an ice sheet consistent with the field evidence does not support grounding line advance to the continental shelf break. A range of modelled ice sheet surfaces are instead produced, with different grounding line locations derived from a novel grounding line advance scheme. The ice sheet reconstructions which best fit the field constraints lead to a range of equivalent eustatic sea-level estimates between approximately 1.4 and 3 m for this sector. This paper describes the modelling procedure in detail, considers the assumptions and limitations associated with the modelling approach, and how the uncertainty may impact on the eustatic sea-level equivalent results for the WSE.

  10. Biogeochemistry of a low-activity cold seep in the Larsen B area, western Weddell Sea, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gutt

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available First videographic indication of an Antarctic cold seep ecosystem was recently obtained from the collapsed Larsen B ice shelf, western Weddell Sea (Domack et al., 2005. Within the framework of the R/V Polarstern expedition ANTXXIII-8, we revisited this area for geochemical, microbiological and further videographical examinations. During two dives with ROV Cherokee (MARUM, Bremen, several bivalve shell agglomerations of the seep-associated, chemosynthetic clam Calyptogena sp. were found in the trough of the Crane and Evans glacier. The absence of living clam specimens indicates that the flux of sulphide and hence the seepage activity is diminished at present. This impression was further substantiated by our geochemical observations. Concentrations of thermogenic methane were moderately elevated with 2 μM in surface sediments of a clam patch, increasing up to 9 μM at a sediment depth of about 1 m in the bottom sections of the sediment cores. This correlated with a moderate decrease in sulphate from about 28 mM at the surface down to 23.4 mM, an increase in sulphide to up to 1.43 mM and elevated rates of the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM of up to 600 pmol cm−3 d−1 at about 1 m below the seafloor. Molecular analyses indicate that methanotrophic archaea related to ANME-3 are the most likely candidates mediating AOM in sediments of the Larsen B seep.

  11. Characteristics and distribution patterns of snow and meteoric ice in the Weddell Sea and their contribution to the mass balance of sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajo Eicken

    Full Text Available Based on snow- and ice-thickness measurements at >11 000 points augmented by snow- and icecore studies during 4 expeditions from 1986 - 92 in the Weddell Sea, we describe characteristics and distribution patterns of snow and meteoric ice and assess their importance for the mass balance of sea ice. For first-year ice (FY in the central and eastern Weddell Sea, mean snow depth amounts to 0.16 m (mean ice thickness 0.75 m compared to 0.53 m (mean ice thickness 1.70 m for second-year ice (SY in the northwestern Weddell Sea. Ridged ice retains a thicker snow cover than level ice, with ice thickness and snow depth negatively correlated for the latter, most likely due to aeolian redistribution. During the different expeditions, 8, 15, 17 and 40% of all drill holes exhibited negative freeboard. As a result of flooding and brine seepage into the snow pack, snow salinities averaged 4‰. Through 18O measurements the distribution of meteoric ice (i.e. precipitation in the sea-ice cover was assessed. Roughly 4% of the total ice thickness consist of meteoric ice (FY 3%, SY 5%. With a mean density of 290 kg/m3, the snow cover itself contributes 8% to total ice mass (7% FY, 11% SY. Analysis of 18O in snow indicates a local maximum in accumulation in the 65 to 75°S latitude zone. Hydrogen peroxide in the snow has proven useful as a temporal tracer and for identification of second-year floes. Drawing on accumulation data from stations at the Weddell Sea coast, it becomes clear that the onset of ice growth is important for the evolution of ice thickness and the interaction between ice and snow. Loss of snow to leads due to wind drift may be considerable, yet is reduced owing to metamorphic processes in the snow column. This is confirmed by a comparison of accumulation data from coastal stations and from snow depths over sea ice. Temporal and spatial accumulation patterns of snow are shown to be important in controlling

  12. Transferencia de lípidos del seston durante una floración algal de flagelados desde la superficie hasta el bentos en el mar de Weddell

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Sergio; Isla, Enrique; Martínez-García, Alfredo; Moraleda, Núria; Gili, Josep María; Rosell-Melé, Antoni; Arntz, Wolf E.; Gerdes,Dieter

    2013-01-01

    [ES] Se estudió en el mar de Weddell la concentración de lípidos totales y ácidos grasos en una floración algal de flagelados durante un periodo comprendido entre finales de primavera y principios de verano. Estos dos indicadores (lípidos y ácidos grasos), se consideraron adecuados para describir la calidad de la materia orgánica depositada desde la superficie al fondo (aguas cercanas al bentos marino). Los resultados mostraron un patrón diferenciado entre el principio (11 al 15 de Diciembre)...

  13. ICESat Observations of Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Sea-Ice Freeboard and Estimated Thickness in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica (2003-2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Donghui; Robbins, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Sea-ice freeboard heights for 17 ICESat campaign periods from 2003 to 2009 are derived from ICESat data. Freeboard is combined with snow depth from Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) data and nominal densities of snow, water and sea ice, to estimate sea-ice thickness. Sea-ice freeboard and thickness distributions show clear seasonal variations that reflect the yearly cycle of growth and decay of the Weddell Sea (Antarctica) pack ice. During October-November, sea ice grows to its seasonal maximum both in area and thickness; the mean freeboards are 0.33-0.41 m and the mean thicknesses are 2.10-2.59 m. During February-March, thinner sea ice melts away and the sea-ice pack is mainly distributed in the west Weddell Sea; the mean freeboards are 0.35-0.46 m and the mean thicknesses are 1.48-1.94 m. During May-June, the mean freeboards and thicknesses are 0.26-0.29 m and 1.32-1.37 m, respectively. The 6 year trends in sea-ice extent and volume are (0.023+/-0.051) x 10(exp 6)sq km/a (0.45%/a) and (0.007+/-1.0.092) x 10(exp 3)cu km/a (0.08%/a); however, the large standard deviations indicate that these positive trends are not statistically significant.

  14. Elements for a revision and notes on bionomy of the Cumacea (Crustacea: Peracarida) of the Weddell Sea (Antarctica). : Material collected by the Expedition ANTARKTIS-VIII/5 of R.V. “Polarstern” 1989/90

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrescu, I.; Wittmann, K.J.

    2003-01-01

    Among 26 species of Antarctic Cumacea sampled during the southern summer 1989/90 from benthic habitats in the Weddell Sea, four are described as new to science: Campylaspis ledoyeri spec. nov., Hemilamprops bacescui spec. nov., Paralamprops racovitzai spec. nov., and Leptostylis weddelli spec. nov.

  15. Evaluating the demographic buffering hypothesis with vital rates estimated for Weddell seals from 30years of mark-recapture data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotella, J.J.; Link, W.A.; Chambert, T.; Stauffer, G.E.; Garrott, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    1.Life-history theory predicts that those vital rates that make larger contributions to population growth rate ought to be more strongly buffered against environmental variability than are those that are less important. Despite the importance of the theory for predicting demographic responses to changes in the environment, it is not yet known how pervasive demographic buffering is in animal populations because the validity of most existing studies has been called into question because of methodological deficiencies. 2.We tested for demographic buffering in the southern-most breeding mammal population in the world using data collected from 5558 known-age female Weddell seals over 30years. We first estimated all vital rates simultaneously with mark-recapture analysis and then estimated process variance and covariance in those rates using a hierarchical Bayesian approach. We next calculated the population growth rate's sensitivity to changes in each of the vital rates and tested for evidence of demographic buffering by comparing properly scaled values of sensitivity and process variance in vital rates. 3.We found evidence of positive process covariance between vital rates, which indicates that all vital rates are affected in the same direction by changes in annual environment. Despite the positive correlations, we found strong evidence that demographic buffering occurred through reductions in variation in the vital rates to which population growth rate was most sensitive. Process variation in vital rates was inversely related to sensitivity measures such that variation was greatest in breeding probabilities, intermediate for survival rates of young animals and lowest for survival rates of older animals. 4.Our work contributes to a small but growing set of studies that have used rigorous methods on long-term, detailed data to investigate demographic responses to environmental variation. The information from these studies improves our understanding of life

  16. Comparison of analytical and predictive methods for water, protein, fat, sugar, and gross energy in marine mammal milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oftedal, O T; Eisert, R; Barrell, G K

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian milks may differ greatly in composition from cow milk, and these differences may affect the performance of analytical methods. High-fat, high-protein milks with a preponderance of oligosaccharides, such as those produced by many marine mammals, present a particular challenge. We compared the performance of several methods against reference procedures using Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) milk of highly varied composition (by reference methods: 27-63% water, 24-62% fat, 8-12% crude protein, 0.5-1.8% sugar). A microdrying step preparatory to carbon-hydrogen-nitrogen (CHN) gas analysis slightly underestimated water content and had a higher repeatability relative standard deviation (RSDr) than did reference oven drying at 100°C. Compared with a reference macro-Kjeldahl protein procedure, the CHN (or Dumas) combustion method had a somewhat higher RSDr (1.56 vs. 0.60%) but correlation between methods was high (0.992), means were not different (CHN: 17.2±0.46% dry matter basis; Kjeldahl 17.3±0.49% dry matter basis), there were no significant proportional or constant errors, and predictive performance was high. A carbon stoichiometric procedure based on CHN analysis failed to adequately predict fat (reference: Röse-Gottlieb method) or total sugar (reference: phenol-sulfuric acid method). Gross energy content, calculated from energetic factors and results from reference methods for fat, protein, and total sugar, accurately predicted gross energy as measured by bomb calorimetry. We conclude that the CHN (Dumas) combustion method and calculation of gross energy are acceptable analytical approaches for marine mammal milk, but fat and sugar require separate analysis by appropriate analytic methods and cannot be adequately estimated by carbon stoichiometry. Some other alternative methods-low-temperature drying for water determination; Bradford, Lowry, and biuret methods for protein; the Folch and the Bligh and Dyer methods for fat; and enzymatic and reducing

  17. Reconstructing the contribution of the Weddell Sea sector, Antarctica, to sea level rise since the last glacial maximum, using numerical modelling constrained by field evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Brocq, A.; Bentley, M.; Hubbard, A.; Fogwill, C.; Sugden, D.

    2008-12-01

    A numerical ice sheet model constrained by recent field evidence is employed to reconstruct the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) ice sheet in the Weddell Sea Embayment (WSE). Previous modelling attempts have predicted an extensive grounding line advance (to the continental shelf break) in the WSE, leading to a large equivalent sea level contribution for the sector. The sector has therefore been considered as a potential source for a period of rapid sea level rise (MWP1a, 20 m rise in ~500 years). Recent field evidence suggests that the elevation change in the Ellsworth mountains at the LGM is lower than previously thought (~400 m). The numerical model applied in this paper suggests that a 400 m thicker ice sheet at the LGM does not support such an extensive grounding line advance. A range of ice sheet surfaces, resulting from different grounding line locations, lead to an equivalent sea level estimate of 1 - 3 m for this sector. It is therefore unlikely that the sector made a significant contribution to sea level rise since the LGM, and in particular to MWP1a. The reduced ice sheet size also has implications for the correction of GRACE data, from which Antarctic mass balance calculations have been derived.

  18. Occurrence of microbial indicators and Clostridium perfringens in wastewater, water column samples, sediments, drinking water, and Weddell seal feces collected at McMurdo Station, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisle, John T; Smith, James J; Edwards, Diane D; McFeters, Gordon A

    2004-12-01

    McMurdo Station, Antarctica, has discharged untreated sewage into McMurdo Sound for decades. Previous studies delineated the impacted area, which included the drinking water intake, by using total coliform and Clostridium perfringens concentrations. The estimation of risk to humans in contact with the impacted and potable waters may be greater than presumed, as these microbial indicators may not be the most appropriate for this environment. To address these concerns, concentrations of these and additional indicators (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, coliphage, and enteroviruses) in the untreated wastewater, water column, and sediments of the impacted area and drinking water treatment facility and distribution system at McMurdo Station were determined. Fecal samples from Weddell seals in this area were also collected and analyzed for indicators. All drinking water samples were negative for indicators except for a single total coliform-positive sample. Total coliforms were present in water column samples at higher concentrations than other indicators. Fecal coliform and enterococcus concentrations were similar to each other and greater than those of other indicators in sediment samples closer to the discharge site. C. perfringens concentrations were higher in sediments at greater distances from the discharge site. Seal fecal samples contained concentrations of fecal coliforms, E. coli, enterococci, and C. perfringens similar to those found in untreated sewage. All samples were negative for enteroviruses. A wastewater treatment facility at McMurdo Station has started operation, and these data provide a baseline data set for monitoring the recovery of the impacted area. The contribution of seal feces to indicator concentrations in this area should be considered.

  19. The infauna of three widely distributed sponge species (Hexactinellida and Demospongiae) from the deep Ekström Shelf in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersken, Daniel; Göcke, Christian; Brandt, Angelika; Lejzerowicz, Franck; Schwabe, Enrico; Anna Seefeldt, Meike; Veit-Köhler, Gritta; Janussen, Dorte

    2014-10-01

    Due to their high abundance and large body size sponges have a central position in Antarctic zoobenthos, where they form the most extensive sponge grounds of the world. Though research on Antarctic benthos communities is quite established, research on sponge-associated infauna communities is scarce. We analyzed associated infauna of fifteen individuals of the sponge species Mycale (Oxymycale) acerata Kirkpatrick, 1907 (Demospongiae: Mycalina), Rossella antarctica Carter, 1872 and R. racovitzae Topsent, 1901 (both Hexactinellida: Lyssacinosida). Samples were collected from the deep Ekström Shelf at 602 m in the South-Eastern Weddell Sea, Antarctica, during the ANT XXIV-2 (SYSTCO I) expedition of RV Polarstern. The number of species, α- and β-diversity and the significantly different species composition of infauna communities related to sponge species were calculated, the latter via cluster analysis. The sponge-associated infauna consisted of five phyla: Foraminifera, Nematoda, Polychaeta, Mollusca and Arthropoda. In total 11,463 infaunal specimens were extracted and we found at least 76 associated species. Highest values of α-diversity were calculated for a sample of R. antarctica with a Shannon-Index of 1.84 and Simpson-Index of 0.72 respectively. Our results of the cluster-analysis show significant differences between infauna communities and a unique species composition for single sponge species. Polychaetes of the genus Syllis Lamarck, 1818 were numerous in M. acerata and genera like Pionosyllis Malmgren, 1867 and Cirratulus Lamarck, 1801 were numerous in R. antarctica. Individuals of the amphipod species Seba cf. dubia Schellenberg, 1926 were often found in R. antarctica and R. racovitzae while Colomastix fissilingua Schellenberg, 1926 was frequent in samples of M. acerata. Molluscs were present in M. acerata and R. antarctica but absent in R. racovitzae.

  20. Ocean tides in the Weddell Sea: New observations on the Filchner-Ronne and Larsen C ice shelves and model validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matt A.; Padman, Laurie; Nicholls, Keith; Clarke, Peter J.; Gudmundsson, G. Hilmar; Kulessa, Bernd; Shepherd, Andrew

    2011-06-01

    Ocean tides under the large Weddell Sea ice shelves are among the least well observed on Earth. Here we present new, spatially extensive observations of the vertical tidal motion of the Filchner-Ronne and Larsen C ice shelves using Global Positioning System (GPS) data spanning a few weeks to years. We pay particular attention to the major tidal constituents (M2, S2, O1, K1) as well as important GRACE aliasing periods (K2 and S1). We compare the estimated constituents with recent global and regional tide models and find that no single model is the most accurate across all constituents or ice shelves. The root-sum-square errors are 7-8 cm (CATS2008a and TPXO7.2) and 11-12 cm (GOT4.7 and FES2004) with the energetic M2 (RMSE = 4-8 cm) and S2 (4-5 cm) generally dominating these statistics. The FES2004 K1 is particularly inaccurate near the Larsen C Ice Shelf, with errors approaching 20 cm, meaning that GRACE Release 4 estimates of mass change in the northern Antarctic Peninsula will be biased. We find tidal energy at 3, 4, 5, 6 and, weakly, at 7 cycles per day at all of our sites. The largest amplitudes within these bands are at M4, MO3 and SP3 and approach 30 mm, although significant spatial variations exist. We show that they generally do not appear to originate in areas of reduced water column in ice shelf grounding zones. Comparing model estimates with our M4, MS4 and MN4 values shows that models do not accurately represent these terms.

  1. Whole water column distribution and carbon isotopic composition of bulk particulate organic carbon, cholesterol and brassicasterol from the Cape Basin to the northern Weddell Gyre in the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-J. Cavagna

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The combination of concentrations and δ13C signatures of Particulate Organic Carbon (POC and sterols provides a powerful approach to study ecological and environmental changes both in the modern and ancient ocean, but its application has so far been restricted to the surface area. We applied this tool to study the biogeochemical changes in the modern ocean water column during the BONUS-GoodHope survey (Feb–Mar 2008 from Cape Basin to the northern part of the Weddell Gyre. Cholesterol and brassicasterol were chosen as ideal biomarkers of the heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon pools, respectively, because of their ubiquitous and relatively refractory nature.

    We document depth distributions of concentrations (relative to bulk POC and δ13C signatures of cholesterol and brassicasterol from the Cape Basin to the northern Weddell Gyre combined with CO2 aq. surface concentration variation. While relationships between surface water CO2 aq. and δ13C of bulk POC and biomarkers have been previously established for surface waters, our data show that these remain valid in deeper waters, suggesting that δ13C signatures of certain biomarkers could be developed as proxies for surface water CO2 aq. Our data suggest a key role of zooplankton fecal aggregates in carbon export for this part of the Southern Ocean. We observed a general increase in sterol δ13C signatures with depth, which is likely related to a combination of particle size effects, selective feeding on larger cells by zooplankton, and growth rate related effects Additionally, in the southern part of the transect south of the Polar Front (PF, the release of sea-ice algae is hypothesized to influence the isotopic signature of sterols in the open ocean. Overall, combined use of δ13C and concentrations measurements of both bulk organic C and specific sterol markers throughout the water

  2. The effect of biological activity, CaCO3 mineral dynamics, and CO2 degassing in the inorganic carbon cycle in sea ice in late winter-early spring in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, S.; Kennedy, H.; Norman, L.; Kennedy, D. P.; Dieckmann, G. S.; Thomas, D. N.

    A large-scale geographical study of the ice pack in the seasonal ice zone of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica, took place from September to October 2006. Sea ice brines with a salinity greater than 58 and temperature lower than -3.6°C were sampled from 22 ice stations. The brines had large deficits in total alkalinity and in the concentrations of the major dissolved macronutrients (total dissolved inorganic carbon, nitrate, and soluble reactive phosphorus) relative to their concentrations in the surface oceanic water and conservative behavior during seawater freezing. The concentration deficits were related to the dissolved inorganic carbon-consuming processes of photosynthesis, CaCO3 precipitation, and CO2 degassing. The largest concentration deficits in total dissolved inorganic carbon were found to be associated with CaCO3 precipitation and CO2 degassing, because the magnitude of the photosynthesis-induced concentration deficit in total dissolved inorganic carbon is controlled by the size of the inorganic nutrient pool, which can be limited in sea ice by its openness to exchange with the surrounding oceanic water.

  3. Feições oceanográficas observadas no noroeste do Mar de Weddell e no Estreito de Bransfield (Antártica), a partir de relações entre o retroespalhamento SAR e medições de espessura do gelo marinho

    OpenAIRE

    Vagner da Silva Duarte

    2014-01-01

    A quase inacessibilidade de grandes partes do Oceano Austral torna o conhecimento da espessura do gelo marinho limitado. Esta informação é essencial para a determinação do balanço de massa deste componente da criosfera. Na transição do inverno para a primavera de 2006, uma equipe de pesquisadores, coletou uma série de perfis de espessura de gelo marinho no norte e noroeste do mar de Weddell. Eles estavam a bordo do navio de pesquisa alemão Polarstern do Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zent...

  4. Seal Lungs Collapse during Free Diving: Evidence from Arterial Nitrogen Tensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falke, Konrad J.; Hill, Roger D.; Qvist, Jesper; Schneider, Robert C.; Guppy, Michael; Liggins, Graham C.; Hochachka, Peter W.; Elliott, Richard E.; Zapol, Warren M.

    1985-08-01

    Arterial blood nitrogen tensions of free-diving Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddelli) were measured by attaching a microprocessor-controlled blood pump and drawing samples at depth to determine how these marine mammals dive to great depths and ascend rapidly without developing decompression sickness. Forty-seven samples of arterial blood were obtained from four Weddell seals during free dives lasting up to 23 minutes to depths of 230 meters beneath the sea ice of McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Peak arterial blood nitrogen tensions of between 2000 and 2500 millimeters of mercury were recorded at depths of 40 to 80 meters during descent, indicating that the seal's lung collapses by 25 to 50 meters. Then arterial blood nitrogen tensions slowly decreased to about 1500 millimeters of mercury at the surface. In a single dive, alveolar collapse and redistribution of blood nitrogen allow the seal to avoid nitrogen narcosis and decompression sickness.

  5. Polonium-210 and lead-210 in the Southern Polar Ocean: Naturally occurring tracers of biological and hydrographical processes in the surface waters of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the Weddell Sea; Polonium-210 und Blei-210 im Suedpolarmeer: Natuerliche Tracer fuer biologische und hydrographische Prozesse im Oberflaechenwasser des Antarktischen Zirkumpolarstroms und des Weddellmeeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, J.

    1997-11-01

    In this thesis the distribution of {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb in the upper 600 m of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the Weddell Sea was investigated along north-south transects in austral spring and autumn. {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb can serve as sensitive tracers for the special hydrographic conditions of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the Weddell Sea as well as for biological processes during phytoplankton blooms. The {sup 210}Po/{sup 210}Pb disequilibrium was used as a tracer for particle export. This tracer integrates export on a timescale of 276 days because of the 138 day half-life of {sup 210}Po and complements the {sup 234}Th/{sup 238}U disequilibrium as another tracer for plankton production and export on a shorter timescale of several weeks. (orig.) [Deutsch] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde die Verteilung von Blei-210 und seinem Enkelnuklid Polonium-210 im Antarktischen Zirkumpolarstrom und im Weddellmeer bis 600 m Tiefe in mehreren meridionalen Transekten im australen Fruehjahr und Herbst waehrend der `Polarstern`-Expeditionen ANT-X/6 und ANT-XI/4 untersucht. Die Verteilung von {sup 210}Pb und {sup 210}Po wird von mehreren Faktoren beeinflusst, sowohl durch die Advektion von Wassermassen im Antarktischen Zirkumpolarstrom und im Weddellmeer als auch von biologischen Prozessen z.B. innerhalb einer Planktonbluete. Bevor die Verteilungsmuster von {sup 210}Pb und {sup 210}Po jedoch als Tracer fuer einen Prozess genutzt werden koennen, muss der Effekt der einzelnen Faktoren auf die Verteilung betrachtet werden. (orig.)

  6. Cadmium, copper and iron in the Scotia Sea, Weddell Sea and Weddell/Scotia Confluence (Antarctica)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolting, R.F.; Baar, H.J.W. de; Bennekom, A.J. van; Masson, A.

    1991-01-01

    Until recently, little was known about trace metals in the Southern Ocean. Vertical profiles and surface water sections along 49°W exhibit Cd concentrations of 0.2–0.8 nM, increasing with depth, as for phosphate. A linear relationship between Cd and phosphate exists as in other oceans; however, the

  7. The Inaugural SHALDRIL Expedition to the Weddell Sea, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. Wise,

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In 1994, a group of scientists began discussing a number of important scientific questions that could be addressed by drilling a series of short cores on the Antarctic continental shelf. The group adopted the name SHALDRIL, for SHALlow DRILling, and soon learned that the technology for high-quality sampling of the upper few hundred metersof the stratigraphic column was still lacking.After more than a decade of discussion and several years of detailed planning, SHALDRIL sailed from Punta Arenas, Chile, in March 2005. The objectives of this first SHALDRIL cruise are to demonstrate the feasibility of drilling from an icebreaker platform into the Antarctic continental shelf and to obtain cores from three different sedimentary sequences that previously have not been sampled.The principal objective of SHALDRIL originally was to monitor technological developments in shallow drilling from conventional icebreaking research vessels. In 2000, the SHALDRIL steering committee learned about new and improved drilling systems that can core through gravelly glacial deposits in water depths of several hundred meters and to subbottom depths of a few hundred meters(SHALDRIL Steering Committee, 2001. These systems can be operated from the icebreaking research vessel Nathaniel B. Palmer (Fig. 1; thus, the long-term project has now entered the next phase of testing this proven drilling technology aboard a U. S. Antarctic Program vessel.

  8. Sea Ice Observations from the Winter Weddell Gyre Study - 󈨝

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    n 1740 hours 660 335, SY.0’ 52 98 W 10i nioisi, ,iozbihiy pouit loi dapiLAonJsi i t laolih hijo hsii guiii6 itiiiowgh Uptsn 0 dti 50 v5-Irt ~ shin i1...C7.~~~~~~.l PA z 3; %VCWo= mi’ (~2~ ~ 4 3 .--~s -. = r ,w .* 9 IV22 ira P, a zrs v4.-z~.~ ,, k* I *--,t~r~o - iwe a.* oWa - fo - lu v CD ((L-t3 IIm V

  9. Arterial Windkessels in marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadwick, R E; Gosline, J M

    1995-01-01

    In marine mammals, the aortic arch is enlarged relative to the descending aorta to varying degrees in different species. The ratio of maximal diameter of the arch to that of the thoracic aorta is about 2.3 in the harbour seal (Phoca vitulina), 3.6 in the Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddelli) and 3.2 in the fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus), compared with only 1.4 in the dog. This anatomical specialisation probably provides increased volume capacitance in the arterial circulation as an adaptation to diving bradycardia. Data on the morphometric and mechanical properties of aortic tissues from seals and fin whale are compared. In the harbour seal, more than 80% of the volume change in the entire thoracic aorta that results from a pressure pulse occurs in the bulbous arch, and this is more than 90% in the Weddell seal and fin whale. The enhanced capacitance of the arch in the harbour seal is primarily due to its larger diameter, as the relative wall thickness and elasticity of the arch and thoracic aorta are the same. A similar situation appears to exist in the larger Weddell seal, although extrapolation of the pressure-volume curves suggests that the arch might be somewhat less stiff than the thoracic aorta. In addition to being greatly expanded, the aortic arch of the fin whale is also much more distensible than the relatively thin-walled and much stiffer descending aorta. At the estimated mean blood pressure, the elastic modulus of this vessel is 12 MPa, or 30 times that of the aortic arch. The major haemodynamic consequence of this type of arterial modification is that the aortic arch acts as a Windkessel, i.e. the capacitance of the aorta is increased significantly close to the heart, leading to a reduced characteristic impedance and probably reduced pulsatility in the descending aorta. In the extreme case of the whale, the arterial capacitance is shifted entirely to the arch, and the impedance change at the entrance to the thoracic aorta is so high that this

  10. Spatial characterization of the meltwater field from icebergs in the Weddell Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helly, John J; Kaufmann, Ronald S; Vernet, Maria; Stephenson, Gordon R

    2011-04-05

    We describe the results from a spatial cyberinfrastructure developed to characterize the meltwater field around individual icebergs and integrate the results with regional- and global-scale data. During the course of the cyberinfrastructure development, it became clear that we were also building an integrated sampling planning capability across multidisciplinary teams that provided greater agility in allocating expedition resources resulting in new scientific insights. The cyberinfrastructure-enabled method is a complement to the conventional methods of hydrographic sampling in which the ship provides a static platform on a station-by-station basis. We adapted a sea-floor mapping method to more rapidly characterize the sea surface geophysically and biologically. By jointly analyzing the multisource, continuously sampled biological, chemical, and physical parameters, using Global Positioning System time as the data fusion key, this surface-mapping method enables us to examine the relationship between the meltwater field of the iceberg to the larger-scale marine ecosystem of the Southern Ocean. Through geospatial data fusion, we are able to combine very fine-scale maps of dynamic processes with more synoptic but lower-resolution data from satellite systems. Our results illustrate the importance of spatial cyberinfrastructure in the overall scientific enterprise and identify key interfaces and sources of error that require improved controls for the development of future Earth observing systems as we move into an era of peta- and exascale, data-intensive computing.

  11. Calcareous sponges from abyssal and bathyal depths in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Hans Tore; Janussen, Dorte; Tendal, Ole S.

    2011-03-01

    Calcareous sponges have traditionally been regarded as shallow-water organisms, a persistent myth created by Hentschel (1925), partly supported by the problematic question of calcareous skeletal secretion under high partial CO 2-pressure below the CCD in the abyss. Up to now, only few species world-wide of the sponge class Calcarea have been described from depths below 2000 m. By far, the largest number of records of Antarctic Calcarea is known from shelf areas between 50 and 400 m depth. They have only been sporadically recorded on the lower shelf and the upper slope from depths between 570 and 850 m. From abyssal depths in the Antarctic there are no previous records of calcareous sponges. It was therefore a big surprise when the first true deep-sea Calcarea from the Antarctic were collected at depths between 1120 and 4400 m during the ANDEEP I, II and III expeditions ( Janussen et al., 2006). To date, five calcareous sponge species have been found, including three species new to science. The three new species belong to the genera Ascaltis, Clathrina and Leucetta. Although calcareous sponges are rare in the Antarctic deep sea, they seem to constitute a constant component of the fauna. Antarctic Calcarea shows all the characteristics of need for revision and further collection and investigation. Still, many new species are likely to be discovered in the Antarctic deep-sea.

  12. Biomarkers of bentho-pelagic coupling in antarctica: a spatio-temporal comparison in the weddell sea

    OpenAIRE

    Elias Piera, Francyne

    2015-01-01

    La Antártida es una masa de tierra y hielo rodeada por un mar con una plataforma continental profunda, caracterizado por temperaturas bajas y bastante constantes. La estacionalidad de luz y la capa de hielo son los responsables del aumento de la producción primaria de fitoplancton en primavera-verano y del flujo vertical de materia orgánica particulada (MOP), compuesto por fitoplancton fresco, excrementos del zooplancton y detritus. Los suspensivoros, así como otros organismos sésiles y vágil...

  13. Glacial geomorphology of the northwestern Weddell Sea, eastern Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf: Shifting ice flow patterns during deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Jennifer M.; Wellner, Julia S.; Domack, Eugene; Lavoie, Caroline; Yoo, Kyu-Cheul

    2017-03-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum, grounded ice from the expanded Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet extended across the continental shelf. Grounded and flowing ice created a distinctive array of glacial geomorphic features on the sea floor, which were then exposed as the ice sheet retreated. The recent disintegration of the northern parts of the Larsen Ice Shelf (Larsen A and B) have permitted acquisition of marine geophysical data in previously inaccessible and unmapped areas. We present a reconstruction of the evolving ice-flow path and ice sheet geometry of the eastern Antarctic Peninsula, with particular focus paid to newly surveyed areas that shed light on the dynamics of a marine-terminating glacial geomorphic environment, where ice shelves play a major role in grounding line stability. Shifting flow directions were mapped in several areas, including across the Seal Nunataks, which divide Larsen A and B, and offshore of Larsen C, indicating flow reorientation that reflects the changing ice sheet geometry as retreat neared the modern coastline. The measured flow indicators in this area reveal comparatively high elongation ratios (> 20), indicating rapid ice flow. Evidence of possible previous ice-shelf collapses are noted near the shelf break, further illustrating the critical, protective effect that ice shelves impart to marine-terminating glacial environments. Modern ice retreat is governed in part by reorganization of flow patterns accompanying grounding line movement; such reorganizations happened in the past and can aid understanding of modern processes.

  14. Direct observation of increasing CO2 in the Weddell Gyre along the Prime Meridian during 1973-2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heuven, Steven M. A. C.; Hoppema, Mario; Huhn, Oliver; Slagter, Hans A.; de Baar, Hein J. W.

    2011-01-01

    The World Ocean takes up a large portion of the anthropogenic CO2 emitted into the atmosphere. Determining the resulting increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (C-T, expressed in mu mol kg(-1)) is challenging, particularly in the sub-surface and deep Southern Ocean where the time rate of change of

  15. Direct observation of increasing CO2 in the Weddell Gyre along the Prime Meridian during 1973-2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heuven, Steven M. A. C.; Hoppema, Mario; Huhn, Oliver; Slagter, Hans A.; de Baar, Hein J. W.

    2011-01-01

    The World Ocean takes up a large portion of the anthropogenic CO2 emitted into the atmosphere. Determining the resulting increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (C-T, expressed in mu mol kg(-1)) is challenging, particularly in the sub-surface and deep Southern Ocean where the time rate of change of C

  16. Potential climate change effects on the habitat of antarctic krill in the weddell quadrant of the southern ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeon L Hill

    Full Text Available Antarctic krill is a cold water species, an increasingly important fishery resource and a major prey item for many fish, birds and mammals in the Southern Ocean. The fishery and the summer foraging sites of many of these predators are concentrated between 0° and 90°W. Parts of this quadrant have experienced recent localised sea surface warming of up to 0.2°C per decade, and projections suggest that further widespread warming of 0.27° to 1.08°C will occur by the late 21(st century. We assessed the potential influence of this projected warming on Antarctic krill habitat with a statistical model that links growth to temperature and chlorophyll concentration. The results divide the quadrant into two zones: a band around the Antarctic Circumpolar Current in which habitat quality is particularly vulnerable to warming, and a southern area which is relatively insensitive. Our analysis suggests that the direct effects of warming could reduce the area of growth habitat by up to 20%. The reduction in growth habitat within the range of predators, such as Antarctic fur seals, that forage from breeding sites on South Georgia could be up to 55%, and the habitat's ability to support Antarctic krill biomass production within this range could be reduced by up to 68%. Sensitivity analysis suggests that the effects of a 50% change in summer chlorophyll concentration could be more significant than the direct effects of warming. A reduction in primary production could lead to further habitat degradation but, even if chlorophyll increased by 50%, projected warming would still cause some degradation of the habitat accessible to predators. While there is considerable uncertainty in these projections, they suggest that future climate change could have a significant negative effect on Antarctic krill growth habitat and, consequently, on Southern Ocean biodiversity and ecosystem services.

  17. Uplift rates from a new high-density GPS network in Palmer Land indicate significant late Holocene ice loss in the southwestern Weddell Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolstencroft, M.; King, M.A.; Whitehouse, P.L.; Bentley, M.J.; Nield, G.A.; King, E.C.; McMillan, M.; Shepherd, A.; Barletta, V.; Bordoni, A.; Riva, R.E.M.; Didova, O.; Gunter, B.C.

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of ongoing ice-mass loss and associated melt water contribution to sea-level change from regions such as West Antarctica is dependent on a combination of remote sensing methods. A key method, the measurement of changes in Earth's gravity via the GRACE satellite mission, requires a po

  18. Uplift rates from a new high-density GPS network in Palmer Land indicate significant late Holocene ice loss in the southwestern Weddell Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolstencroft, Martin; King, Matt A.; Whitehouse, Pippa L

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of ongoing ice-mass loss and associated melt water contribution to sea-level change from regions such as West Antarctica is dependent on a combination of remote sensing methods. A key method, the measurement of changes in Earth's gravity via the GRACE satellite mission, requires...... understanding of ice history in this region. A sufficiently complete history of past ice-load change is required for glacial isostatic adjustment models to accurately predict the spatial variation of ongoing solid Earth deformation, once the independently-constrained effects of present-day ice mass loss have...... a potentially large correction to account for the isostatic response of the solid Earth to ice-load changes since the Last Glacial Maximum. In this study, we combine glacial isostatic adjustment modelling with a new GPS dataset of solid Earth deformation for the southern Antarctic Peninsula to test the current...

  19. High-throughput sequencing of fecal DNA to identify insects consumed by wild Weddell's saddleback tamarins (Saguinus weddelli, Cebidae, Primates) in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallott, E K; Malhi, R S; Garber, P A

    2015-03-01

    The genus Saguinus represents a successful radiation of over 20 species of small-bodied New World monkeys. Studies of the tamarin diet indicate that insects and small vertebrates account for ∼16-45% of total feeding and foraging time, and represent an important source of lipids, protein, and metabolizable energy. Although tamarins are reported to commonly consume large-bodied insects such as grasshoppers and walking sticks (Orthoptera), little is known concerning the degree to which smaller or less easily identifiable arthropod prey comprises an important component of their diet. To better understand tamarin arthropod feeding behavior, fecal samples from 20 wild Bolivian saddleback tamarins (members of five groups) were collected over a 3 week period in June 2012, and analyzed for the presence of arthropod DNA. DNA was extracted using a Qiagen stool extraction kit, and universal insect primers were created and used to amplify a ∼280 bp section of the COI mitochondrial gene. Amplicons were sequenced on the Roche 454 sequencing platform using high-throughput sequencing techniques. An analysis of these samples indicated the presence of 43 taxa of arthropods including 10 orders, 15 families, and 12 identified genera. Many of these taxa had not been previously identified in the tamarin diet. These results highlight molecular analysis of fecal DNA as an important research tool for identifying anthropod feeding patterns in primates, and reveal broad diversity in the taxa, foraging microhabitats, and size of arthropods consumed by tamarin monkeys.

  20. Das Radionuklid Tritium im Ozean: essverfahren und Verteilung von Tritium im Sudatlantik und im Weddellmeer = The radionuclide Tritium in the ocean : measurements and distribution of tritium in the South Atlantic and the Weddell Sea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sultenfuss, J

    1998-01-01

    In this thesis the parameter of a system for routine measurements of oceanic tritium samples by 3He-ingrowth-method are described and the potential of the so obtained data for oceanographic purposes...

  1. Descriptions of two new species in the genus Macrostylis Sars, 1864 (Isopoda, Asellota, Macrostylidae from the Weddell Sea (Southern Ocean, with a synonymisation of the genus Desmostylis Brandt, 1992 with Macrostylis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Riehl

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Descriptions of Macrostylis antennamagna sp. n. and Macrostylis uniformis sp. n. are presented with notes on intraspecific variability and sexual dimorphism. Macrostylis uniformis sp. n. showes differences to Macrostylis antennamagna sp. n. in the length of the antenna 2, the shape of the pleotelson and length of uropods. The genus Desmostylis Brandt, 1992 (formerly including the two species Desmostylis obscurus Brandt, 1992 and Desmostylis gerdesi Brandt, 2002 is synonymised with the genus Macrostylis. Based on type material additional remarks and additions to the original descriptions are provided for both species. Results lead to following nomenclatorial changes: Macrostylis obscurus (Brandt, 1992, comb. n. and Macrostylis gerdesi (Brandt, 2002, comb. n. A setal nomenclature is proposed and the diagnosis for the family is revised.

  2. Physical profile data from XTD and XCTD casts in the Southern Ocean from the R/V XUE LONG from 28 December 2001 to 11 March 2002 (NODC Accession 0000734)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical profile data were collected from XTD and XCTD casts in the Southeast Indian Ocean and Weddell Gyre from the R/V XUE LONG. Data were collected by...

  3. Comparative account of benthic community at two different locations in the continental Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Dhargalkar, V.K.

    Data on faunal communities, abundance and biomass were collected from seven stations in the Queen Maud Land shelf, Lazarev Sea, East Antarctica and three stations in Atca Ice Port, Weddell Sea, West Antarctica. The sampling depth ranged from 70...

  4. Paepalanthus rectifolius, a new name in Eriocaulaceae (Poales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Echternacht

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Syngonanthus weddellii var. gracilis Moldenke (1973 was described very briefly based on a single collection. A careful analysis reveals that this variety has dimerous flowers, free petals of the pistillate flower and bifid stigmatic branches. It is therefore misplaced in Syngonanthus Ruhland (1900. We transfer it to Paepalanthus Mart. (1834 at the species level, as it is distinct from morphologically similar species: Paepalanthus flaccidus (Bong. Koern. (1863, Paepalanthus trichophyllus (Bong. Koern. (1863, and Paepalanthus strictus Koern. (1863. The epithet gracilis is no longer available, hence, we have coined the name Paepalanthus rectifolius. We also provide a full description, illustrations, a distribution map, and pertinent comments.

  5. Meridional circulation across the Antarctic Circumpolar Current serves as a double 231Pa and 230Th trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutgers van der Loeff, Michiel; Venchiarutti, Celia; Stimac, Ingrid; van Ooijen, Jan; Huhn, Oliver; Rohardt, Gerd; Strass, Volker

    2016-12-01

    Upwelling of Circumpolar Deep Water in the Weddell Gyre and low scavenging rates south of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) cause an accumulation of particle reactive nuclides in the Weddell Gyre. A ventilation/reversible scavenging model that successfully described the accumulation of 230Th in this area was tested with other particle reactive nuclides and failed to adequately describe the depth-distributions of 231Pa and 210Pb. We present here a modified model that includes a nutrient-like accumulation south of the Antarctic Polar Front in an upper meridional circulation cell, as well as transport to a deep circulation cell in the Weddell Gyre by scavenging and subsequent release at depth. The model also explains depletion of 231Pa and 230Th in Weddell Sea Bottom Water (WSBW) by ventilation of newly formed deep water on a timescale of 10 years, but this water mass is too dense to leave the Weddell Gyre. In order to quantify the processes responsible for the 231Pa- and 230Th-composition of newly formed Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) we present a mass balance of 231Pa and 230Th in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean based on new data from the GEOTRACES program. The ACC receives 6.0 ± 1.5 ×106 dpms-1 of 230Th from the Weddell Sea, similar in magnitude to the net input of 4.2 ± 3.0 ×106 dpms-1 from the north. For 231Pa, the relative contribution from the Weddell Sea is much smaller, only 0.3 ± 0.1 ×106, compared to 2.7 ± 1.4 ×106 dpms-1 from the north. Weddell Sea Deep Water (WSDW) leaving the Weddell Gyre northward to form AABW is exposed in the ACC to resuspended opal-rich sediments that act as efficient scavengers with a Th/Pa fractionation factor F ≤ 1. Hydrothermal inputs may provide additional removal with low F. Scavenging in the full meridional circulation across the opal-rich ACC thus acts as a double 231Pa and 230Th trap that preconditions newly formed AABW.

  6. Coccolithophorids in polar waters: Pappomonas spp. revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Østergaard, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    virgulosa HOL (= Balaniger balticus phase). A new species, Pappomonas garrisonii sp. nov. is described to accommodate Antarctic material from the Wed-dell Sea. While ftting into the Pappomonas generic concept, the species adds new dimensions to the overall appearance of the coccolith armour of the cell...

  7. Typification of Debregeasia longifolia and the status of Missiessya (Urticaceae: Boehmerieae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib; Wilmot-Dear, Christine Melanie; Monro, Alex

    2013-01-01

    , Jacobs 8058 (K), is designated to secure current usage. The confusing nomenclatural history of Missiessya in relation to Debregeasia is reviewed: “Missiessya” was invalidly published by Gaudichaud in 1847–1848; Weddell validly published it as an illegitimate superfluous name in 1854 and later (1857...

  8. Sympagic occurrence of Eusirid and Lysianassoid amphipods under Antarctic pack ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krapp, R.H.; Berge, J.; Florentino De Souza Silva, A.P.; Gulliksen, B.; Werner, I.

    2008-01-01

    During three Antarctic expeditions (2004, ANT XXI-4 and XXII-2; 2006, ANT XXIII-6) with the German research icebreaker R/V Polarstern, six different amphipod species were recorded under the pack ice of the Weddell Sea and the Lazarev Sea. These cruises covered Austral autumn (April), summer (Decembe

  9. Low Level (Sub Threshold), Large Spot Laser Irradiations of the Foveas of Macaca Mulatta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    1068. 1978. Glees, P. Spoerri, P. E. Tubular structures microtubuli and synaptic ribbon in monkey’s retinal receptors. Annales de Anatomia , 25 : 159...153 - 155. 1976. Hogan, M. J., Alvarado, J. A., Weddell, J. E. Histology of the human eye. An atlas and textbook. W. B. Saunders Co. 1971. S om61. Hori

  10. Behaviour of nickel, copper, zinc and cadmium in the upper 300 m of a transect in the Southern Ocean (57°-62°S, 49°W)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolting, R.F.; Baar, H.J.W. de

    1994-01-01

    The distributions of Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd in relation to phosphate, nitrate and silicate in the upper 300 m of a transect in the Southern Ocean were studied. This transect covers the Scotia Sea, the Confluence and the Weddell Sea. These three watermasses are clearly separated by their temperature and s

  11. Phytoplankton and pigment patterns across frontal zones in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwe, Maria A.; Kattner, Gerhard; van Oijen, Tim; de Jong, Jeroen T. M.; de Baar, Hein J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton distribution and concentrations of macronutrients and iron were studied in the Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ) and the eastern Weddell Gyre of the Southern Ocean, during austral autumn. HPLC analysis of algal pigments was combined with microscopy observations to assess algal distribution. Pat

  12. Two new species of calcareous sponges (Porifera: Calcarea) from the deep Antarctic Eckstrom Shelf and a revised list of species found in Antarctic waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapp, Hans Tore; Göcke, Christian; Tendal, Ole Secher;

    2013-01-01

    The paper reports on two new species of calcareous sponges (Porifera, Calcarea) from the Antarctic Weddell Sea, Clathrina brandtae sp. nov. and Leucetta delicata sp. nov., collected at 600 m depth during the ANT XXIV/2-SYSTCO expedition in January 2008. The new species are described based...

  13. Impact of the blue mussel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, P.; Riegman, R.; van der Meer, J.

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of carbon within the Weddell Gyre and its exchanges across the gyre boundaries are investigated with three recent full-depth oceanographic sections enclosing this climatically important region. The combination of carbon measurements with ocean circulation transport estimates from a

  14. Austral Summer Sea Ice Melt Revealed in Antarctic ERS-1/2 and NSCAT Scatterometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkwater, M.; Liu, X.

    1999-01-01

    The first in-situ field observations of Antarcic austral summer sea-ice melt were made in the Bellingshausen Sea by Arctowski (1908) on Belgica in 1899, and later by Wordie (1921) during the ill-fated drift of Endurance in the Weddell Sea from 1914-1916.

  15. Physiological Monitoring in Diving Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    currently developing two different units, one based upon the succesful construction of an oximeter used in Weddel seals ( Guyton , Stanek et al. 1995), and...responses to NGO concerns. This should be of value to the US Navy Marine Mammal Program. REFERENCES Guyton , G. P., K. S. Stanek, R. C. Schneider, P

  16. THE IMPACT OF PHYTOPLANKTON ON SPECTRAL WATER TRANSPARENCY IN THE SOUTHERN-OCEAN - IMPLICATIONS FOR PRIMARY PRODUCTIVITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TILZER, MM; GIESKES, WW; HEUSEL, R; FENTON, N

    1994-01-01

    Spectral water transparency in the Northern Weddell Sea was studied during Austral spring. The depth of the 1-% surface irradiance level (''euphotic depth'') varied between 35 and 109 m and was strongly influenced by phytoplankton biomass. Secchi depths were non-linearly related to euphotic depth. I

  17. Austral Summer Sea Ice Melt Revealed in Antarctic ERS-1/2 and NSCAT Scatterometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkwater, M.; Liu, X.

    1999-01-01

    The first in-situ field observations of Antarcic austral summer sea-ice melt were made in the Bellingshausen Sea by Arctowski (1908) on Belgica in 1899, and later by Wordie (1921) during the ill-fated drift of Endurance in the Weddell Sea from 1914-1916.

  18. Adaptation of psychrophilic and psychrotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria to permanently cold marine environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksen, MF; Jørgensen, BB

    1996-01-01

    The potential for sulfate reduction at low temperatures was examined in two different cold marine sediments, Mariager Fjord (Denmark), which is permanently cold (3 to 6 degrees C) but surrounded by seasonally warmer environments, and the Weddell Sea (Antarctica), which is permanently below 0 degr...

  19. Contourite systems in the region of the southern São Paulo Plateau escarpment, South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, D. G.; Murdmaa, I. O.; Ivanova, E. V.; Levchenko, O. V.; Yutsis, V. V.; Frantseva, T. N.

    2013-07-01

    Seismoacoustic investigations with a high-resolution parametric echo-sounder "SES 2000 deep" carried out on cruises 33, 35, and 37 of the R/V Akademik Ioffe revealed several erosional-depositional contourite systems on the São Paulo Plateau escarpment and its toe in the South Atlantic. Two contourite terraces related to interfaces between different water masses are observable on the escarpment. These terraces presumably reflect the activity of internal waves and turbulent eddies. The São Paulo contourite channel and genetically related drift are traceable along the escarpment toe. Changes in planktonic foraminiferal assemblages in Core AI-2563 retrieved from the summit of the São Paulo contourite drift suggest a shallowing of the Weddell Sea Deep Water mass during glacial times. It is established that the contour current of the Weddell Sea Deep Water and Lower Circumpolar Water considerably affect the formation of contourite depositional systems on the escarpment and its toe.

  20. Expedition invites research opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Long Lines Expedition for Hydrographic stations will be made along the Greenwich meridian from 7°N to 35°S, with a port stop at Capetown, South Africa, then southward to Antarctica and westward through the Scotia Sea, ending at Punta Arenas, Chile. The work will begin in the fall of 1983 and finish early in 1984. Surface to bottom measurements of temperature, salinity, oxygen, and nutrients will be made at approximately 110 km intervals. The purpose of the expedition is to collect data to study the general circulation of the eastern South Atlantic Ocean, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the eastern extension of the Weddell Gyre, the flow of deep water from the Weddell Sea that extends northward east of the South Sandwich Ridge, and the regional oceanography of the Scotia Sea.

  1. The presence of Plio-Pleistocene Paleolama sp. (Artiodactyla: camelidae of the southern coast of Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nous présentons un spécimen du genre Palaeolama qui correspond au registre le plus ancien du genre sur le territoire péruvien ainsi que l’un des plus anciens en Amérique du Sud. La morphologie et la taille des éléments découverts sont comparables aux formes sudaméricaines P. (Hemiauchenia paradoxa ainsi qu’aux formes les plus petites de P. (Palaeolama weddellii. Ce spécimen provient des dépôts marins littoraux d’Atiquipa (côte sud-péruvienne. La présence du mollusque bivalve Chlamys vidali à la base de la section ainsi que de faluns coquilliers actuels, présents au niveau des terrasses marines les plus hautes qui terminent la section, correspondrait à un âge de 2 millions d’années. Cette date est légèrement supérieure ou égale aux registres les plus anciens de P. (Palaeolama en Amérique du Nord. Cette découverte confirme que les Lamini étaient présents dans les écosystèmes andins avant l’Holocène Se presenta el registro más antiguo del género Palaeolama en el territorio peruano y uno de los más antiguos de Sudamérica. La forma y tamaño del material conservado es comparable con las formas sudamericanas P. (Hemiauchenia paradoxa y los especímenes más pequeños de P. (Palaeolama weddellii. Procede de los depósitos marinos litorales innominados de Atiquipa, en la costa sur del Perú. La ocurrencia del molusco bivalvo extinto Chlamys vidali en la base de la sección y la coquina de moluscos actuales presentes en la terraza marina más alta que termina dicha sección, indicaría una edad aproximada de 2 millones de años. Esta edad es ligeramente mayor o igual a los registros más antiguos de P. (Palaeolama en Norteamérica. El presente reporte confirma que los Lamini no fueron ajenos a los ecosistemas andinos antes del Holoceno. We report the oldest record of the genus Palaeolama in Peru its constitutes one of the oldest records for the genus in South America. The shape and size of the fossil material is

  2. Two new records of the rare shrimp parasite Zonophryxus quinquedens Barnard, 1913 (Crustacea, Isopoda, Dajidea): ecological and phylogenetic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Raupach, M. J.; Thatje, S

    2006-01-01

    The rare dajid, Zonophryxus quinquedens represents the only known isopod parasiting on shrimps in Antarctic waters. In contrast to the Bopyridae, which typically live in the gill cavity of their crab host, dajid isopods are normally attached to the carapace of the parasited shrimp. Four specimens of Z. quinquedens Barnard, 1913 were collected in the eastern and western Weddell Sea, Antarctica, during the expeditions ANT XXI/2 in 2003/2004 and ANT XXII/3 in 2005. Molecular phylogenetic analyse...

  3. Multidecadal freshening and lightening in the deep waters of the Bransfield Strait, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotto, Tiago S.; Kerr, Rodrigo; Mata, Mauricio M.; Garcia, Carlos A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The deep waters of the Bransfield Strait receive considerable amounts of water from the Weddell Sea continental shelf. The restricted connections to the surrounding ocean and relatively easier access makes the Bransfield Strait an important proxy region for monitoring changes in the dense Weddell Sea shelf water masses, which are an important precursor of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). Long-term hydrographic data from the period 1960s-2010s showed freshening and lightening of the deep water masses of the Bransfield Strait, which was likely caused by large freshwater inputs originating from the western shelf of the Weddell Sea. The rates of freshening and lightening were -0.0010 ± 0.0005 yr-1 and -0.0016 ± 0.0014 kg m-3 yr-1 for the central basin, respectively, and -0.0010 ± 0.0006 yr-1 and -0.0029 ± 0.0013 kg m-3 yr-1 for the eastern basin, respectively. The deep waters showed a high degree of interannual thermohaline variability, which appeared to be caused by changes in the proportions of source water mass mixing between the years. Statistically significant negative correlations between salinity/neutral density fields and the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) were observed (-0.56 and -0.62 for the central basin, respectively, and -0.58 and -0.68 for the eastern basin, respectively) between 1980 and 2014. During SAM positive phases, communication between the Weddell Sea and the Bransfield Strait is reduced, which leads to less saline and lighter water masses in the Bransfield Strait; however, the opposite trends are observed during SAM negative phases.

  4. In situ primary production in young Antarctic sea ice

    OpenAIRE

    Mock, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    An in situ incubation technique used successfully to measure the photosynthetic carbon assimilation of internal algal assemblages within thick multiyear Arctic sea ice was developed and improved to measure the photosynthetic carbon assimilation within young sea ice only 50 cm thick (Eastern Weddell Sea, Antarctica). The new device enabled some of the first precise measurements of in situ photosynthetic carbon assimilation in newly formed Antarctic sea ice.

  5. Water mass modification over the continental shelf north of Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholls, Keith W.; L. Padman; Schröder, Michael; Woodgate, R. A.; Jenkins, Adrian; Østerhus, Svein

    2003-01-01

    We use new data from the southern Weddell Sea continental shelf to describe water mass conversion processes in a formation region for cold and dense precursors of Antarctic Bottom Water. The cruises took place in early 1995, 1998, and 1999, and the time series obtained from moored instruments were up to 30 months in length, starting in 1995. We obtained new bathymetric data that greatly improve our definition of the Ronne Depression, which is now shown to be limited to the sout...

  6. Influence of the Southern Annular Mode on the sea ice-ocean system: the role of the thermal and mechanical forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lefebvre

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The global sea ice-ocean model ORCA2-LIM is used to investigate the impact of the thermal and mechanical forcing associated to the Southern Annular Mode (SAM on the Antarctic sea ice-ocean system. To do so, the model is driven by idealized forcings based on regressions of the wind stress and the air temperature to SAM. The wind-stress component strongly affects the overall patterns of the ocean circulation with a northward surface drift, a downwelling at about 45° S and an upwelling in the vicinity of the Antarctic continent when SAM is positive. On the other hand, the thermal forcing has a negligible effect on the ocean currents. For sea ice, both the wind-stress (mechanical and the air temperature (thermal components have a significant impact. The mechanical part induces a decrease of the sea ice thickness close to the continent and a sharp decrease of the mean sea ice thickness in the Weddell sector. In general, the sea ice area also diminishes, with a maximum decrease in the Weddell Sea. On the contrary, the thermal part tends to increase the ice concentration in all sectors except in the Weddell Sea, where the ice area shrinks. This thermal effect is the strongest in autumn and in winter due to the larger temperature differences associated with SAM during these seasons. The sum of the thermal and mechaninal effects gives a dipole response of sea ice to the SAM, with a decrease of the ice area in the Weddell Sea and around the Antarctic Peninsula and an increase in the Ross and Amundsen Seas during high SAM years. This is in good agreement with the observed response of the ice cover to SAM.

  7. Marine mammals and Emperor penguins: a few applications of the Krogh principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooyman, Gerald

    2015-01-15

    The diving physiology of aquatic animals at sea began 50 years ago with studies of the Weddell seal. Even today with the advancements in marine recording and tracking technology, only a few species are suitable for investigation. The first experiments were in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. In this paper are examples of what was learned in Antarctica and elsewhere. Some methods employed relied on willingness of Weddell seals and emperor penguins to dive under sea ice. Diving depth and duration were obtained with a time depth recorder. Some dives were longer than an hour and as deep as 600 m. From arterial blood samples, lactate and nitrogen concentrations were obtained. These results showed how Weddell seals manage their oxygen stores, that they become reliant on a positive contribution of anaerobic metabolism during a dive duration of more than 20 min, and that nitrogen blood gases remain so low that lung collapse must occur at about 25 to 50 m. This nitrogen level was similar to that determined in elephant seals during forcible submersion with compression to depths greater than 100 m. These results led to further questions about diving mammal's terminal airway structure in the lungs. Much of the strengthening of the airways is not for avoiding the "bends," by enhancing lung collapse at depth, but for reducing the resistance to high flow rates during expiration. The most exceptional examples are the small whales that maintain high expiratory flow rates throughout the entire vital capacity, which represents about 90% of their total lung capacity.

  8. New early winter f{sub CO{sub 2}} data reveal continuous uptake of CO{sub 2} by the Wedde Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoll, M.H.C.; Baar, H.J.W. De [Netherlands Inst. for Sea Research, Den Burg (Netherlands); Hoppema, M. [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Tracer Oceanography; Fahrbach, E. [Alfred-Wegener-Institut fuer Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremerhaven (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    The Antarctic Ocean has been thought to be unimportant for the uptake of CO{sub 2} since upwelling of CO{sub 2}-enriched deep waters would favour outgassing. Here we present the first direct f{sub CO{sub 2}} measurements obtained in early winter under the ice which, combined with estimated entrainment rates, show that the Weddell Sea, an area of intense upwelling manifested by the doming structure of the cyclonic gyre, has the capability to be almost continuously a sink for atmospheric CO{sub 2}. A flux, effective after the ice cover disappears, is estimated to be -0.74 {+-} 0.7 mmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}. Combined with a flux estimate in late autumn (- 2.0 mmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}) integrated over the area of the central Weddell Gyre, a carbon uptake of 0.24 x 10{sup 13} g C y{sup -1} ({approx} 2.4 x 10{sup -3} GtC y{sup -1} being {approx} 1 per mille of global uptake) is computed, which is about a third of the strength of the biological pump of the Weddell Sea 48 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  9. Spatial distribution of the iron supply to phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean: a model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lancelot

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An upgraded version of the biogeochemical model SWAMCO is coupled to the ocean-sea-ice model NEMO-LIM to explore processes governing the spatial distribution of the iron supply to phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean. The 3-D NEMO-LIM-SWAMCO model is implemented in the ocean domain south of latitude 30° S and runs are performed over September 1989–December 2000. Model scenarios include potential iron sources (atmospheric deposition, iceberg calving/melting and continental sediments as well as iron storage within sea ice, all formulated based on a literature review. When all these processes are included, the simulated iron profiles and phytoplankton bloom distributions show satisfactory agreement with observations. Analyses of simulations and sensitivity tests point to the key role played by continental sediments as a primary source for iron. Iceberg calving and melting contribute by up to 25% of Chl-a simulated in areas influenced by icebergs while atmospheric deposition has little effect at high latitudes. Activating sea ice-ocean iron exchanges redistribute iron geographically. Stored in the ice during winter formation, iron is then transported due to ice motion and is released and made available to phytoplankton during summer melt, in the vicinity of the marginal ice zones. Transient iron storage and transport associated with sea ice dynamics stimulate summer phytoplankton blooming (up to 3 mg Chl-a m-3 in the Weddell Sea and off East Antarctica but not in the Ross, Bellingshausen and Amundsen Seas. This contrasted feature results from the simulated variable content of iron in sea ice and release of melting ice showing higher ice-ocean iron fluxes in the continental shelves of the Weddell and Ross Seas than in the Eastern Weddell Sea and the Bellingshausen-Amundsen Seas. This study confirms that iron sources and transport in the Southern Ocean likely provide important mechanisms in the geographical development of

  10. Spatial distribution of the iron supply to phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean: a model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lancelot

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available An upgraded version of the biogeochemical model SWAMCO is coupled to the ocean-sea-ice model NEMO-LIM to explore processes governing the spatial distribution of the iron supply to phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean. The 3-D NEMO-LIM-SWAMCO model is implemented in the ocean domain south of latitude 30° S and runs are performed over September 1989–December 2000. Model scenarios include potential iron sources (atmospheric deposition, iceberg calving and continental sediments as well as iron storage within sea ice, all formulated based on a literature review. When all these processes are included, the simulated iron profiles and phytoplankton bloom distributions show satisfactory agreement with observations. Analysis of simulations points to the key role played by continental sediments as a primary source for iron. Iceberg calving and melting contribute by up to 25% of Chl a simulated in areas under influence of icebergs while atmospheric deposition has little effect at high latitudes. Activating sea ice-ocean iron exchanges redistribute iron geographically. Stored in the ice during winter formation, iron is then transported due to ice motion and is released and made available to phytoplankton during summer melt, in the vicinity of the marginal ice zones. Transient iron storage and transport associated with sea ice dynamics stimulate summer phytoplankton blooming (up to 3 mg Chl a m−3 in the Weddell Sea and off East Antarctica but not in the Ross, Bellingshausen and Amundsen Seas. This contrasted feature results from the simulated variable content of iron in sea ice and release of melting ice showing higher ice-ocean iron fluxes in the continental shelves of the Weddell and Ross Seas than in the Eastern Weddell Sea and the Bellingshausen-Amundsen Seas. This study confirms that iron sources and transport in the Southern Ocean likely provide important mechanisms in the geographical development of phytoplankton blooms and

  11. Ice-shelf – ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica from oxygen isotope ratio measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. W. Nicholls

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Melt water from the floating ice shelves at the margins of the southeastern Weddell Sea makes a significant contribution to the fresh water budget of the region. In February 2005 a multi-institution team conducted an oceanographic campaign at Fimbul Ice Shelf on the Greenwich Meridian as part of the Autosub Under Ice programme. This included a mission of the autonomous submarine Autosub 25 km into the cavity beneath Fimbul Ice Shelf, and a number of ship-based hydrographic sections on the continental shelf and adjacent to the ice shelf front. The measurements reveal two significant sources of glacial melt water at Fimbul Ice Shelf: the main cavity under the ice shelf and an ice tongue that protrudes from the main ice front and out over the continental slope into deep water. Glacial melt water is concentrated in a 200 m thick Ice Shelf Water (ISW layer below the base of the ice shelf at 150–200 m, with a maximum glacial melt concentration of up to 1.16%. Some glacial melt is found throughout the water column, and much of this is from sources other than Fimbul Ice Shelf. However, at least 0.2% of the water in the ISW layer cannot be accounted for by other processes and must have been contributed by the ice shelf. Just downstream of Fimbul Ice Shelf we observe locally created ISW mixing out across the continental slope. The ISW formed here is much less dense than that formed in the southwest Weddell Sea, and will ultimately contribute a freshening (and reduction in δ18O to the upper 100–150 m of the water column in the southeast Weddell Sea.

  12. Atmosphere-surface interactions over polar oceans and heterogeneous surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vihma, T.

    1995-12-31

    Processes of interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and the planetary surface have been studied with special emphasis on polar ocean surfaces: the open ocean, leads, polynyas and sea ice. The local exchange of momentum, heat and moisture has been studied experimentally both in the Weddell Sea and in the Greenland Sea. Exchange processes over heterogeneous surfaces are addressed by modelling studies. Over a homogeneous surface, the local turbulent fluxes can be reasonably well estimated using an iterative flux-profile scheme based on the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. In the Greenland Sea, the near-surface air temperature and the generally small turbulent fluxes over the open ocean were affected by the sea surface temperature fronts. Over the sea ice cover in the Weddell Sea, the turbulent sensible heat flux was generally downwards, and together with an upward oceanic heat flux through the ice it compensated the heat loss from the surface via long-wave radiation. The wind dominated on time scales of days, while the current became important on longer time scales. The drift dynamics showed apparent spatial differences between the eastern and western regions, as well as between the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the rest of the Weddell Sea. Inertial motion was present in regions of low ice concentration. The surface heterogeneity, arising e.g. from roughness or temperature distribution, poses a problem for the parameterization of surface exchange processes in large-scale models. In the case of neutral flow over a heterogeneous terrain, an effective roughness length can be used to parameterize the roughness effects

  13. Potential seaways across West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, David G.; Barnes, David K. A.; Fretwell, Peter T.; Bingham, Robert G.

    2011-10-01

    The West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) has long been considered vulnerable to rapid retreat and today parts are rapidly losing ice. Projection of future change in WAIS is, however, hampered by our poor understanding of past changes, especially during interglacial periods that could be analogs for the future, but which undoubtedly provide an opportunity for testing predictive models. We consider how ice-loss would open seaways across WAIS; these would likely alter Southern Ocean circulation and climate, and would broadly define the de-glacial state, but they may also have left evidence of their existence in the coastal seas they once connected. We show the most likely routes for such seaways, and that a direct seaway between Weddell and Ross seas, which did not pass through the Amundsen Sea sector, is unlikely. Continued ice-loss at present rates would open seaways between Amundsen and Weddell seas (A-W), and Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas (A-B), in around one thousand years. This timescale indicates potential future vulnerability, but also suggests seaways may have opened in recent interglacial periods. We attempt to test this hypothesis using contemporary bryozoan species assemblages around Antarctica, concluding that anomalously high similarity in assemblages in the Weddell and Amundsen seas supports recent migration through A-W. Other authors have suggested opening of seaways last occurred during Marine Isotope Stage 7a (209 ka BP), but we conclude that opening could have occurred in MIS 5e (100 ka BP) when Antarctica was warmer than present and likely contributed to global sea levels higher than today.

  14. Ice-shelf – ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica from oxygen isotope ratio measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. W. Nicholls

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Melt water from the floating ice shelves at the margins of the southeastern Weddell Sea makes a significant contribution to the fresh water budget of the region. In February 2005 a multi-institution team conducted an oceanographic campaign at Fimbul Ice Shelf on the Greenwich Meridian as part of the Autosub Under Ice programme. This included a mission of the autonomous submarine Autosub 25 km into the cavity beneath Fimbul Ice Shelf, and a number of ship-based hydrographic sections on the continental shelf and adjacent to the ice shelf front. The measurements reveal two significant sources of glacial melt water at Fimbul Ice Shelf: the main cavity under the ice shelf and an ice tongue, Trolltunga, that protrudes from the main ice front and out over the continental slope into deep water. Glacial melt water is concentrated in a 200 m thick Ice Shelf Water (ISW layer below the base of the ice shelf at 150–200 m, with a maximum glacial melt concentration of up to 1.16%. Some glacial melt is found throughout the water column, and much of this is from sources other than Fimbul Ice Shelf. However, at least 0.2% of the water in the ISW layer cannot be accounted for by other processes and must have been contributed by the ice shelf. Just downstream of Fimbul Ice Shelf we observe locally created ISW mixing out across the continental slope. The ISW formed here is much less dense than that formed in the southwest Weddell Sea, and will ultimately contribute a freshening (and reduction in δ18O to the upper 100–150 m of the water column in the southeast Weddell Sea.

  15. Southern Ocean forcing of the North Atlantic at multi-centennial time scales in the Kiel Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Torge; Park, Wonsun; Latif, Mojib

    2015-04-01

    Internal multi-centennial variability of open ocean deep convection in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean impacts the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in the Kiel Climate Model. The northward extent of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) strongly depends on the state of Weddell Sea deep convection. The retreat of AABW results in an enhanced meridional density gradient that drives an increase in the strength and vertical extent of the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) cell. This shows, for instance, as a peak in AMOC strength at 30°N about a century after Weddell Sea deep convection has ceased. The stronger southward flow of NADW is compensated by an expansion of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre and an acceleration of the North Atlantic Current, indicating greater deep water formation. Contractions of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre enable warm water anomalies, which evolved in response to deep convection events in the Southern Ocean, to penetrate farther to the north, eventually weakening the AMOC and closing a quasi-centennial cycle. Gyre contractions are accompanied by increases in sea level of up to 20 cm/century in some areas of the North Atlantic. In the Southern Ocean itself, the heat loss during the convective regime results in a sea surface height decrease on the order of 10 cm/century, with a maximum of 30 cm/century in the Weddell Sea. Hence, the impact of the Southern Ocean Centennial Variability (SOCV) on regional as well as North Atlantic sea level is of the same order of magnitude as the rise of global average sea level during the 20th century, which amounts to about 15-20 cm. This suggests that internal variability on a centennial time scale cannot be neglected a priori in assessments of 20th and 21st century AMOC and regional sea level change.

  16. Using high-resolution satellite imagery to engage students in classroom experiences which meld research, the nature of science, and inquiry-based instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennycook, J.; LaRue, M.; Herried, B.; Morin, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    Recognizing the need to bridge the gap between scientific research and the classroom, we have developed an exciting activity which engages students in grades 5-12 using high-resolution satellite imagery to observe Weddell seal populations in Antarctica. Going beyond the scope of the textbook, students experience the challenge researchers face in counting and monitoring animal populations in the field. The activity is presented in a non-expert, non-technical exercise enriched for students, with background information, tutorials, and satellite imagery included. Teachers instruct their class in how to use satellite imagery analysis techniques to collect data on seal populations in the McMurdo Sound region of the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Students participate in this inquiry-based, open-ended exercise to evaluate changes in the seal population within and between seasons. The activity meets the New Generation Science Standards (NGSS) through inquiry-based, real-world application and supports seven Performance Expectations (PE) for grade 5-12. In addition, it offers students a glimpse into the work of a field biologist, promoting interest in entering the STEM career pipeline. As every new Antarctica season unfolds, new imagery will be uploaded to the website allowing each year of students to add their counts to a growing long-term dataset for the classroom. The activity files provide 1) a tutorial in how to use the images to count the populations, 2) background information about Weddell seals in the McMurdo Sound region of the Ross Sea for the students and the teachers, and 3) collections of satellite imagery for spatial and temporal analysis of population fluctuations. Teachers can find all activity files to conduct the activity, including student instructions, on the Polar Geospatial Center's website (http://z.umn.edu/seals). Satellite image, Big Razorback Island, Antarctica Weddell seals,Tent Island, Antarctica

  17. Environmental responses of the Northeast Antarctic Peninsula to the Holocene climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, Loïc.; Crosta, Xavier; Leventer, Amy; Schmidt, Sabine; Etourneau, Johan; Domack, Eugene; Massé, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we present a unique high-resolution Holocene record of oceanographic and climatic change based on analyses of diatom assemblages combined with biomarker data from a sediment core collected from the Vega Drift, eastern Antarctic Peninsula (EAP). These data add to the climate framework already established by high-resolution marine sedimentary records from the Palmer Deep, western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP). Heavy sea ice conditions and reduced primary productivity were observed prior to 7.4 ka B.P. in relation with the proximity of the glacial ice melt and calving. Subsequent Holocene oceanographic conditions were controlled by the interactions between the Westerlies-Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC)-Weddell Gyre dynamics. A warm period characterized by short seasonal sea ice duration associated with a southern shift of both ACC and Westerlies field persisted until 5 ka B.P. This warm episode was then followed by climate deterioration during the middle-to-late Holocene (5 to 1.9 ka B.P.) with a gradual increase in annual sea ice duration triggered by the expansion of the Weddell Gyre and a strong oceanic connection from the EAP to the WAP. Increase of benthic diatom species during this period was indicative of more summer/autumn storms, which was consistent with changes in synoptic atmospheric circulation and the establishment of low- to high-latitude teleconnections. Finally, the multicentennial scale variability of the Weddell Gyre intensity and storm frequency during the late Holocene appeared to be associated with the increased El Niño-Southern Oscillation frequency.

  18. Feeding grounds of the eastern South Pacific humpback whale population include the South Orkney Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Dalla Rosa, Luciano; Félix, Fernando; Stevick, Peter T.; Secchi,Eduardo R; Allen, Judith M; Chater, Kim; Martin, Anthony R.; Basso, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on two photo-identified humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) that were sighted in different years in the proximity of the South Orkney Islands, at the boundary between the Scotia and Weddell seas (60o54.5’S – 46o40.4’W and 60o42.6’S – 45o33’W). One of the whales had been previously sighted off Ecuador, a breeding ground for the eastern South Pacific population. The other whale was subsequently resighted in Bransfield Strait, off the western Antarctic Peninsula, a well-d...

  19. Atmospheric Forcing of Ocean Convection in the Labrador Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    www.weather.nps.navy.mil/~guestps/labsea LONG-TERM GOAL My long-term goal is to improve our ability to model and predict dynamic and thermodynamic ocean processes...should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of...the Weddell Sea. I teach a course on Polar Meteorology to US Navy officers every year and plan to write the first textbook on this topic. I am

  20. Modeling the impact of Australian Plate drift on Southern Hemisphere climate and environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Botao; ZHAO Ping; JIAN Zhimin; HE Jinhai

    2005-01-01

    Using a global atmosphere-ocean coupled model with the present-day and 14 MaB.P. oceanic topography respectively, two experiments are implemented to investigate the effect of different locations of Australian Plate on the atmospheric circulation in middle-high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. The results show that when Australian Plate lay south at 14 MaB.P., both anticyclone circulations in the subtropical oceans and cyclone circulation around 60°-70°S are strengthened. Subtropical highs and circumpolar low pressure appear stronger, which results in much stronger Antarctic Oscillation and shorter period of Antarctic Oscillation Index (AOI) at 14 MaB.P. The rainfall and the surface air temperature also change correspondingly. The precipitation decreases around 40°S and increases around 60°-70°S, and the surface air temperature rises in high latitudes of the South Pacific and descends over the Weddell Sea and its north side. Besides, due to the changes of the temperatures and winds, Antarctic sea ice coverage also changes with its increasing in the Ross Sea and its west regions and decreasing in the Weddell Sea.

  1. Population distribution, structure and growth condition of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba Dana) during the austral summer in the Southern Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yongqiang; SUN Song; LI Chaolun; TAO Zhencheng

    2014-01-01

    Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba Dana) was collected using a High Speed Collector and an Isaac-Kidd midwater trawl (IKMT) net during the austral summer of 2007/2008 and 2008/2009 in the circumpolar and Prydz Bay regions of the Southern Ocean, respectively. Combined with the simultaneous recording of environmental factors, spatial distribution, population structure and growth condition of E. superba were studied. The abundance of E. superba in the Weddell Sea was higher than in Prydz Bay. However, the abundance of E. superba in both the Weddell Sea and Prydz Bay was lower than figures reported in previous krill surveys for the same time period. With respect to the total study area, E. superba displayed a normal growing state during the two expeditions. E. superba grew relatively poorly in some stations, which may be due to the late retreat of sea ice or lower chlorophyll a concentrations. The number of juvenile E. superba collected using the High Speed Collector was proportionally greater in stations located at the edge of the sea ice, while adults dominated in long-term non-ice regions. This phenomenon reflects the different distribution pattern between juvenile and adult krill. The population structure of E. superba differed between sea regions, which may affect recruitment.

  2. Sea salt aerosol from blowing snow on sea ice - modeling vs observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Frey, Markus; Norris, Sarah; Brooks, Ian; Anderson, Philip; Jones, Anna; wolff, Eric; Legrand, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Blowing snow over sea ice, through a subsequent sublimation process of salt-containing blown snow particles, has been hypothesized as a significant sea salt aerosol (SSA) source in high latitudes. This mechanism has been strongly supported by a winter cruise in the Weddell Sea (during June-August 2013). The newly collected data, including both physical and chemical components, provide a unique way to test and validate the parameterisation used for describing the SSA production from blowing snow events. With updates to some key parameters such as snow salinity in a global Chemistry-transport model pTOMCAT, simulated SSA concentrations can be well compared with measured SSA data. In this presentation, I will report modeled SSA number density against collected data on board of Polarstern ship during the Weddell Sea cruise, as well as modeled SSA massive concentrations against those measured at both coastal sites such as Alert in the North and Dumont d'Urville (DDU) in the South and central Antarctic sites such as Concordia and Kohnen stations. Model experiments indicated that open ocean-sourced SSA could not explain the observed winter SSA peaks seen in most polar sites, while with sea ice-sourced SSA in the model, the winter peaks can be well improved indicating the importance of sea ice-sourced SSA as a significant contributor to the salts (Na+, Cl-) recorded in the ice core.

  3. Relationship between Antarctic sea ice and the climate in summer of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Lijuan; Lu Longhua; Bian Lingen

    2006-01-01

    The variations of sea ice are different in different regions in Antarctica,thus have different impacts on local atmospheric circulation and global climatic system. The relationships between the sea ice in Ross Sea and Weddell Sea regions and the synoptic climate in summer of China are investigated in this paper via diagnostic analysis methods by using global sea ice concentration gridded data covering Jan. 1968through Dec. 2002 obtained from Hadley Center, combined with Geopotential Height on 500hPa and 100hPa over North Hemisphere and monthly precipitation and air temperatures data covering the corresponding period over 160 meteorological stations in China obtained from CMA (China Meteorological Administration). Results disclose that both these two regions are of indicative meanings to the climate in summer of China. The Ross Sea Region is the key sea ice region to the precipitation in Northeast China in summer. More sea ice in this region in September will result in less precipitation in Northeast China in the following June. Weddell Sea Region is the key sea ice region to the air temperature in Northeast China in summer. More sea ice in this region in September will contribute to lower air temperature in Northeast China in the following June.

  4. Spatial-temporal characters of Antarctic sea ice variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Lijuan; Lu Longhua; Bian Lingen

    2004-01-01

    Using sea ice concentration dataset covering the period of 1968-2002 obtained from the Hadley Center of UK, this paper investigates characters of Antarctic sea ice variations .The finding demonstrates that the change of mean sea-ice extent is almost consistent with that of sea-ice area, so sea-ice extent can be chosen to go on this research. The maximum and the minimum of Antarctic sea ice appear in September and February respectively. The maximum and the maximal variation of sea ice appear in Weddell Sea and Ross Sea, while the minimum and the minimal variation of sea-ice appear in Antarctic Peninsula. In recent 35 years, as a whole, Antarctic sea ice decreased distinctly. Moreover, there are 5 subdivision characteristic regions considering their different variations. Hereinto, the sea-ice extent of Weddell Sea and Ross Sea regions extends and area increases, while the sea-ice extent of the other three regions contracts and area decreases. They are all of obvious 2-4 years and 5-7 years significant oscillation periods. It is of significance for further understanding the sea-ice-air interaction in Antarctica region and discussing the relationship between sea-ice variation and atmospheric circulation.

  5. Fatty Acid use in Diving Mammals: More than Merely Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Trumble

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diving mammals, are under extreme pressure to conserve oxygen as well as produce adequate energy through aerobic pathways during breath-hold diving. Typically a major source of energy, lipids participate in structural and regulatory roles and have an important influence on the physiological functions of an organism. At the stochiometric level, the metabolism of PUFAs (polyunsaturated fatty acids utilizes less oxygen than metabolizing either MUFAs (monounsaturated fatty acids or SFAs (saturated fatty acids and yields fewer ATP per same length fatty acid. However, there is evidence that indicates the cellular metabolic rate is directly correlated to the lipid composition of the membranes such that the greater the PUFA concentration in the membranes the greater the metabolic rate. These findings appear to be incompatible with diving mammals that ingest and metabolize high levels of unsaturated fatty acids while relying on stored oxygen. Growing evidence from birds to mammals including recent evidence in Weddell seals also indicates that at the whole animal level the utilization of PUFAs to fuel their metabolism actually conserves oxygen. In this paper, we make an initial attempt to ascertain the beneficial adaptations or limitations of lipids constituents and potential trade-offs in diving mammals. We discuss how changes in Antarctic climate are predicted to have numerous different environmental effects; such potential shifts in the availability of certain prey species or even changes in the lipid composition (increased SFA of numerous fish species with increasing water temperatures and how this may impact the diving ability of Weddell seals.

  6. Aerobic dive limit. What is it and is it always used appropriately?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Patrick J

    2006-09-01

    The original definition of aerobic dive limit (ADL) was the dive duration after which there is an increase in post-dive concentration of lactate in the blood of Weddell seals freely diving in the field. The only other species in which such measurements have been made is the emperor penguin. For all other species, aerobic dive limit has been calculated (cADL) by dividing usable oxygen stores with an estimation of the rate of oxygen consumption during diving. Unfortunately, cADL is often referred to as the aerobic dive limit, implying that it is equivalent to that determined from the measurement of post-dive blood lactate concentration. However, this is not so, as at cADL all of the usable oxygen would have been consumed, whereas Weddell seals and emperor penguins can dive for at least 2-3 times longer than their ADL. Thus, at ADL, there is still some usable oxygen remaining in the stores. It is suggested that to avoid continued confusion between these two terms, the former is called diving lactate threshold (DLT), as it is somewhat analogous to the lactate threshold in exercising terrestrial vertebrates. Possible explanations of how some species routinely dive beyond their cADL are also discussed.

  7. Estimating the extent of Antarctic summer sea ice during the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinburgh, Tom; Day, Jonathan J.

    2016-11-01

    In stark contrast to the sharp decline in Arctic sea ice, there has been a steady increase in ice extent around Antarctica during the last three decades, especially in the Weddell and Ross seas. In general, climate models do not to capture this trend and a lack of information about sea ice coverage in the pre-satellite period limits our ability to quantify the sensitivity of sea ice to climate change and robustly validate climate models. However, evidence of the presence and nature of sea ice was often recorded during early Antarctic exploration, though these sources have not previously been explored or exploited until now. We have analysed observations of the summer sea ice edge from the ship logbooks of explorers such as Robert Falcon Scott, Ernest Shackleton and their contemporaries during the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration (1897-1917), and in this study we compare these to satellite observations from the period 1989-2014, offering insight into the ice conditions of this period, from direct observations, for the first time. This comparison shows that the summer sea ice edge was between 1.0 and 1.7° further north in the Weddell Sea during this period but that ice conditions were surprisingly comparable to the present day in other sectors.

  8. Southern Ocean deep convection in global climate models: A driver for variability of subpolar gyres and Drake Passage transport on decadal timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Erik; Rickard, Graham; Morgenstern, Olaf; Martin, Torge; Osprey, Annette; Joshi, Manoj

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the individual and joint decadal variability of Southern Ocean state quantities, such as the strength of the Ross and Weddell Gyres, Drake Passage transport, and sea ice area, using the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research UK Chemistry and Aerosols (NIWA-UKCA) model and CMIP5 models. Variability in these quantities is stimulated by strong deep reaching convective events in the Southern Ocean, which produce an Antarctic Bottom Water-like water mass and affect the large-scale meridional density structure in the Southern Ocean. An increase in the (near) surface stratification, due to freshwater forcing, can be a precondition for subsequent strong convection activity. The combination of enhanced-gyre driven sea ice and freshwater export, as well as ongoing subsurface heat accumulation, lead to a time lag between changes in oceanic freshwater and heat content. This causes an ongoing weakening of the stratification until sudden strong mixing events emerge and the heat is released to the atmosphere. We find that strong convection reduces sea ice cover, weakens the subpolar gyres, increases the meridional density gradient and subsequently results in a positive Drake Passage transport anomaly. Results of available CMIP5 models confirm that variability in sea ice, Drake Passage transport, and the Weddell Gyre strength is enhanced if models show strong open ocean convective events. Consistent relationships between convection, sea ice, Drake Passage transport, and Ross Gyre strength variability are evident in most models, whether or not they host open ocean convection.

  9. Widespread Antarctic glaciation during the Late Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Andrew; Riley, Teal R.; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Rittner, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Marine sedimentary rocks drilled on the southeastern margin of the South Orkney microcontinent in Antarctica (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 113 Site 696) were deposited between ∼36.5 Ma to 33.6 Ma, across the Eocene-Oligocene climate transition. The recovered rocks contain abundant grains exhibiting mechanical features diagnostic of iceberg-rafted debris. Sand provenance based on a multi-proxy approach that included petrographic analysis of over 275,000 grains, detrital zircon geochronology and apatite thermochronometry rule out local sources (Antarctic Peninsula or the South Orkney Islands) for the material. Instead the ice-transported grains show a clear provenance from the southern Weddell Sea region, extending from the Ellsworth-Whitmore Mountains of West Antarctica to the coastal region of Dronning Maud Land in East Antarctica. This study provides the first evidence for a continuity of widespread glacier calving along the coastline of the southern Weddell Sea embayment at least 2.5 million yrs before the prominent oxygen isotope event at 34-33.5 Ma that is considered to mark the onset of widespread glaciation of the Antarctic continent.

  10. ANT XXIV/2 (SYSTCO) Hexactinellida (Porifera) and bathymetric traits of Antarctic glass sponges (incorporating ANDEEP-material); including an emendation of the rediscovered genus Lonchiphora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göcke, Christian; Janussen, Dorte

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we present the hexactinellid sponges sampled in the Weddell-Sea during the ANT 24-2 SYSTCO expedition (30.10.2007-31.01.2008) on the RV Polarstern. All deep-sea stations sampled during this expedition showed comparably modest sponge colonization, with Hexactinellida and Demospongiae occurring in similar numbers of species and individuals. The hexactinellids sampled represent three abyssal species and six species from the deep shelf. Among the deep-sea glass sponges one species new to science was found, Lonchiphora antartica sp. nov., belonging to a poorly known genus, so far represented by only a single specimen known from the Sagami Bay, Japan. Herein we give the first detailed emended diagnosis of the genus and a description of the new species representing the genus as its first well-known specimen. Ecological analysis shows three clearly differentiated associations of hexactinellid sponges in the Antarctic Ocean, which replace each other with increasing depths. Sponge communities on the shelf are dominated by Rossella spp., those on the continental slope and in the lower bathyal mostly by Bathydorus spinosus, and the abyssal associations by Caulophacus spp. No distinct geographical distribution pattern of the Weddell-Sea Hexactinellida could be observed, apart from those caused by their bathyal ranges.

  11. Viruses and Protists Induced-mortality of Prokaryotes around the Antarctic Peninsula during the Austral Summer

    KAUST Repository

    Vaque, Dolors

    2017-03-27

    During the Austral summer 2009 we studied three areas surrounding the Antarctic Peninsula: the Bellingshausen Sea, the Bransfield Strait and the Weddell Sea. We aimed to investigate, whether viruses or protists were the main agents inducing prokaryotic mortality rates, and the sensitivity to temperature of prokaryotic heterotrophic production and mortality based on the activation energy (Ea) for each process. Seawater samples were taken at seven depths (0.1-100 m) to quantify viruses, prokaryotes and protists abundances, and heterotrophic prokaryotic production (PHP). Viral lytic production, lysogeny, and mortality rates of prokaryotes due to viruses and protists were estimated at surface (0.1-1 m) and at the Deep Fluorescence Maximum (DFM, 12-55 m) at eight representative stations of the three areas. The average viral lytic production ranged from 1.0 +/- 0.3 x 10(7) viruses ml(-1) d(-1) in the Bellingshausen Sea to1.3 +/- 0.7 x 10(7) viruses ml(-1) d(-1) in the Bransfield Strait, while lysogeny, when detectable, recorded the lowest value in the Bellingshausen Sea (0.05 +/- 0.05 x 10(7) viruses ml(-1) d(-1)) and the highest in the Weddell Sea (4.3 +/- 3.5 x 10(7) viruses ml(-1) d(-1)). Average mortality rates due to viruses ranged from 9.7 +/- 6.1 x 10(4) cells ml(-1) d(-1) in the Weddell Sea to 14.3 +/- 4.0 x 10(4) cells ml(-1) d(-1) in the Bellingshausen Sea, and were higher than averaged grazing rates in the Weddell Sea (5.9 +/- 1.1 x 10(4) cells ml(-1) d(-1)) and in the Bellingshausen Sea (6.8 +/- 0.9 x 10(4) cells ml-1 d(-1)). The highest impact on prokaryotes by viruses and main differences between viral and protists activities were observed in surface samples: 17.8 +/- 6.8 x 10(4) cells ml(-1) d(-1) and 6.5 +/- 3.9 x 10(4) cells ml(-1) d(-1) in the Weddell Sea; 22.1 +/- 9.6 x 10(4) cells ml(-1) d(-1) and 11.6 +/- 1.4 x 10(4) cells ml(-1) d(-1) in the Bransfield Strait; and 16.1 +/- 5.7 x 10(4) cells ml(-1) d(-1) and 7.9 +/- 2.6 x 10(4) cells ml(-1) d(-1) in

  12. Could a new ice core offer an insight into the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet during the last interglacial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvaney, R.; Hindmarsh, R. C.

    2013-12-01

    Vaughan et al., in their 2011 paper 'Potential Seaways across West Antarctica' (Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 12, Q10004, doi:10.1029/2011GC003688), offer the intriguing prospect that substantial ice loss from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet during the previous interglacial period might have resulted in the opening of a seaway between the Weddell Sea and the Amundsen Sea. One of their potential seaways passes between the south western corner of the present Ronne Ice Shelf and the Pine Island Bay, through what is currently the course of the Rutford Ice Stream, between the Ellsworth Mountains and the Fletcher Promontory. To investigate whether this seaway could have existed (and to recover a paleoclimate and ice sheet history from the Weddell Sea), a team from the British Antarctic Survey and the Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l'Environnement drilled an ice core from a close to a topographic dome in the ice surface on the Fletcher Promontory in January 2012, reaching the bedrock at 654.3m depth from the surface. The site was selected to penetrate directly through the centre of a Raymond cupola observed in internal radar reflections from the ice sheet, with the intention that this would ensure we obtained the oldest ice available from the Fletcher Promontory. The basal ice sheet temperature measured was -18°C, implying the oldest ice would not have melted away from the base, while the configuration of the Raymond cupola in the radar horizons suggested stability in the ice dome topography during the majority of the Holocene. Our hypothesis is that chemical analysis of the ice core will reveal whether the site was ever relatively close to open sea water or ice shelf in the Rutford channel 20 km distant, rather than the current 700 km distance to sea ice/open water in either the Weddell Sea or the Amundsen Sea. While we do not yet have the chemistry data to test this hypothesis, in this poster we will discuss whether there is in reality any potential local

  13. Distributions of dissolved trace metals (Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, Ag in the southeastern Atlantic and the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boye

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive synoptic datasets (surface water down to 4000 m of dissolved cadmium (Cd, copper (Cu, manganese (Mn, lead (Pb and silver (Ag are presented along a section between 34° S and 57° S in the southeastern Atlantic Ocean and the Southern Ocean to the south off South Africa. The vertical distributions of Cu, Ag, and of Cd display nutrient-like profiles similar to silicic acid, and phosphate, respectively. The distribution of Mn shows a subsurface maximum in the oxygen minimum zone, whereas Pb concentrations are rather invariable with depth. Dry deposition of aerosols is thought to be an important source of Pb to surface waters close to South Africa, and dry deposition and snowfall may have been significant sources of Cu and Mn at the higher latitudes. Furthermore, the advection of water-masses enriched in trace metals following contact with continental margins appeared to be an important source of trace elements to the surface, intermediate and deep waters in the southeastern Atlantic Ocean and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Hydrothermal inputs appeared to have formed a source of trace metals to the deep waters over the Bouvet Triple Junction ridge crest, as suggested by relatively enhanced dissolved Mn concentrations. The biological utilization of Cu and Ag was proportional to that of silicic acid across the section, suggesting that diatoms formed an important control over the removal of Cu and Ag from surface waters. However uptake by dino- and nano-flagelattes may have influenced the distribution of Cu and Ag in the surface waters of the subtropical Atlantic domain. Cadmium correlated strongly with phosphate (P, yielding lower Cd/P ratios in the subtropical surface waters where phosphate concentrations were below 0.95 μM. The greater depletion of Cd relative to P observed in the Weddell Gyre compared to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current could be due to increase Cd-uptake induced by iron-limiting conditions in these High

  14. Benthic myodocopid Ostracoda (Philomedidae) from the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavtur, Vladimir G; Keyser, Dietmar

    2016-07-25

    This study is based on the material of myodocopid ostracodes of the family Philomedidae collected by the Russian Antarctic Polar Expeditions (1963-2007) and the Germany Expeditions on R/V "Polarstern" (1990-2002) from the continental shelf and upper slope near the Mawson and Davis stations, the Weddell Seas, the region of the South Shetland Islands near the Russian Polar station "Molodezhnaya" and adjacent waters. Eight philomedid species belonging to two genera were identified in these collections. Scleroconcha tuberculata sp. nov. is described and figured as a new species. Additional descriptions and figures for the species S. gallardoi Kornicker, 1971, Philomedes assimilis Brady, 1907, P. charcoti Daday, 1908, P. heptatrix Kornicker, 1975, P. rotunda Skogsberg, 1920, P. orbicularis Brady, 1907 and P. tetrathrix Kornicker, 1975 are given. Keys for all species of the mentioned genera known from the Southern Ocean are presented. A list of sampling stations and species collected is provided in the Appendix 1.

  15. Feeding grounds of the eastern South Pacific humpback whale population include the South Orkney Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Dalla Rosa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on two photo-identified humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae that were sighted in different years in the proximity of the South Orkney Islands, at the boundary between the Scotia and Weddell seas (60°54.5'S—46°40.4'W and 60°42.6'S—45°33'W. One of the whales had been previously sighted off Ecuador, a breeding ground for the eastern South Pacific population. The other whale was subsequently resighted in Bransfield Strait, off the western Antarctic Peninsula, a well-documented feeding ground for the same population. These matches give support to a hypothesis that the area south of the South Orkney Islands is occupied by whales from the eastern South Pacific breeding stock. Consequently, we propose 40°W as a new longitudinal boundary between the feeding grounds associated with the eastern South Pacific and western South Atlantic breeding stocks.

  16. Observed vulnerability of Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf to wind-driven inflow of warm deep water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darelius, E.; Fer, I.; Nicholls, K. W.

    2016-08-01

    The average rate of melting at the base of the large Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf in the southern Weddell Sea is currently low, but projected to increase dramatically within the next century. In a model study, melt rates increase as changing ice conditions cause a redirection of a coastal current, bringing warm water of open ocean origin through the Filchner Depression and into the Filchner Ice Shelf cavity. Here we present observations from near Filchner Ice Shelf and from the Filchner Depression, which show that pulses of warm water already arrive as far south as the ice front. This southward heat transport follows the eastern flank of the Filchner Depression and is found to be directly linked to the strength of a wind-driven coastal current. Our observations emphasize the potential sensitivity of Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf melt rates to changes in wind forcing.

  17. An Overview of Laryngeal Muscle Single Fiber Electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertorini, Tulio E; Sharaf, Aboubakar G

    2015-08-01

    Needle electromyography is an important tool in the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases and has also been applied successfully in the evaluation of the vocal cord paralysis. Laryngeal electromyography, initially described by Weddell, is used to determine the cause of vocal cord paralysis and to differentiate organic from nonorganic causes of speech disorders. This test allows the diagnosis of lower motor neuron and nerve paralysis as well as myopathies. Laryngeal electromyography also helps to determine the prognosis of paralysis caused by traumatic injury of the laryngeal nerves and is used for guidance during botulinum toxin injection in spasmodic dysphonias. Single fiber electromyography is used to diagnose abnormalities of neuromuscular transmission and is applied in the study the architecture of the motor unit in muscles. This article reviews the techniques of laryngeal muscles single fiber electromyography, provides limited informative data, and discusses its potential value in the evaluation of patients with dysphonia.

  18. Antarctic pack ice algal distribution: Floe-scale spatial variability and predictability from physical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiners, K. M.; Arndt, S.; Bestley, S.; Krumpen, T.; Ricker, R.; Milnes, M.; Newbery, K.; Freier, U.; Jarman, S.; King, R.; Proud, R.; Kawaguchi, S.; Meyer, B.

    2017-07-01

    Antarctic pack ice serves as habitat for microalgae which contribute to Southern Ocean primary production and serve as important food source for pelagic herbivores. Ice algal biomass is highly patchy and remains severely undersampled by classical methods such as spatially restricted ice coring surveys. Here we provide an unprecedented view of ice algal biomass distribution, mapped (as chlorophyll a) in a 100 m by 100 m area of a Weddell Sea pack ice floe, using under-ice irradiance measurements taken with an instrumented remotely operated vehicle. We identified significant correlations (p < 0.001) between algal biomass and concomitant in situ surface measurements of snow depth, ice thickness, and estimated sea ice freeboard levels using a statistical model. The model's explanatory power (r2 = 0.30) indicates that these parameters alone may provide a first basis for spatial prediction of ice algal biomass, but parameterization of additional determinants is needed to inform more robust upscaling efforts.

  19. Multibranch Antarctic Seismic Data Library facilitates research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Alan K.

    In 1991, investigators from 11 nations involved in Antarctic multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection research sought a way to keep the Antarctic Treaty's promise of open access to data, and in the process to encourage Earth-science research using seismic data. The Antarctic Seismic Data Library System for Cooperative Research (SDLS) was the solution, and is now a recommendation of the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Parties (ATCP). Today—at 12 branches spanning the world—researchers can access over 68,000 km of marine MCS data to use for cooperative research.More than 150,000 km of MCS data have been accumulated since 1976 by 13 countries on nearly 70 cruises. The majority of data now in the library cover the Ross Sea, Wilkes Land, and Prydz Bay sectors of the Antarctic margin, with smaller amounts from the Weddell Sea and the Antarctic Peninsula.

  20. The Southern Ocean deep sea: first insights into biodiversity and biogeography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, A.; Brix, S.; Brökeland, W.

    2007-01-01

    environmental features, including a very deep continental shelf2 and a weakly stratified water column, and are the source for much of the deep water in the world ocean. These features suggest that deep-sea faunas around the Antarctic may be related both to adjacent shelf communities and to those in other oceans......Shallow marine benthic communities around Antarctica show high levels of endemism, gigantism, slow growth, longevity and late maturity, as well as adaptive radiations that have generated considerable biodiversity in some taxa1. The deeper parts of the Southern Ocean exhibit some unique....... Unlike shallow-water Antarctic benthic communities, however, little is known about life in this vast deep-sea region2,3. Here, we report new data from recent sampling expeditions in the deep Weddell Sea and adjacent areas (748–6,348 m water depth) that reveal high levels of new biodiversity; for example...

  1. History of views on the relative positions of Antarctica and South America: A 100-year tango between Patagonia and the Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.

    2007-01-01

    Discussion of continental drift around Antarctica began nearly 100 years ago. While the Gondwana connections of Antarctica to Africa and Australia have been well defined for decades, the relative pre-drift positions of the Antarctic Peninsula and Patagonia continue to be subjects of controversy. Certainly older figures, which showed a paleo-position of the Peninsula crossing over continental crust of the Falkland Plateau or even South Africa or Patagonia, are out of consideration now. But contradictory opinions remain over the relative paleo-position of the Peninsula as a more or less straight prolongation of the Patagonian Andes, versus a position parallel to Patagonia along the Pacific coast. Geological reasons are found for both opinions, but geophysical observations on the adjacent ocean floors, particularly the evolution of the Weddell Sea crust, speak for the last-mentioned reconstruction.

  2. Projected changes of Antarctic krill habitat by the end of the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñones, Andrea; Fedorov, Alexey V.

    2016-08-01

    Climate change is rapidly shaping the living environment of the most abundant keystone species of the Antarctic marine food web, Antarctic krill. Projected future changes for the krill habitat include a sustained increase in ocean temperature and changes in sea ice and chlorophyll a. Here we investigate how these factors affect the early life history of krill and identify the regions around Antarctica where the impact will be greatest. Our tool is a temperature-dependent krill growth model forced by data from comprehensive greenhouse warming simulations. We find that by the year 2100 localized regions along the western Weddell Sea, isolated areas of the Indian Antarctic , and the Amundsen/Bellingshausen Sea will support successful spawning habitats for krill. The failure of potentially successful spawning will have a strong impact on the already declining adult populations with consequences for the Antarctic marine food web, having both ecological and commercial ramifications.

  3. Improving constraints on sources and distributions of sea salt aerosols in polar regions with in situ and CALIOP observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Jaegle, L.

    2016-12-01

    Sea salt aerosols (SSA) are generated via air bubble bursting at the ocean surface, as well as by wind mobilization of saline snow and frost flowers over sea-ice covered areas. However, the relative magnitude of these sources remains poorly constrained in polar regions. We implement a blowing snow and a frost flower emission scheme in the GEOS-Chem global 3D chemical transport model, which we constrain with in situ observations of SSA mass concentrations at 5 polar sites. We find that the observed SSA concentrations are often overestimated during summer, when the polar ocean is characterized by cold sea surface temperatures and low salinities. We also find that inclusion of blowing snow or frost flower emissions increases the simulated SSA mass concentrations by factors of 2-10 during winter, which is necessary to simulate the observed wintertime SSA levels. The inclusion of blowing snow (frost flowers) increases submicron SSA emissions by a factor of 2-3 (by 20-50%) in polar regions. We find that SSA emissions from blowing snow are largest in regions where persistent strong winds occur over sea ice (East of Greenland, central Arctic, offshore of northern Alaska, the Ross Sea and the Weddell Sea), while emissions from frost flowers are largest where cold air temperatures, open leads and mild winds are co-located (Canadian Arctic Archipelago and coastal regions of Siberia, the Weddell Sea and the Ross Sea). Given the expected different locations of these two sea ice source types, we will use in situ and CALIOP observations of aerosol extinction over the Arctic and Antarctic to further constrain relative contributions of blowing snow and frost flowers, as well as to optimize the parameterization of SSA emissions over the cold waters of polar oceans.

  4. Sources and input mechanisms of hafnium and neodymium in surface waters of the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichel, Torben; Frank, Martin; Rickli, Jörg; Hathorne, Ed C.; Haley, Brian A.; Jeandel, Catherine; Pradoux, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    Radiogenic isotopes of hafnium (Hf) and neodymium (Nd) are powerful tracers for water mass transport and trace metal cycling in the present and past oceans. However, due to the scarcity of available data the processes governing their distribution are not well understood. Here we present the first combined dissolved Hf and Nd isotope and concentration data from surface waters of the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. The samples were collected along the Zero Meridian, in the Weddell Sea and in the Drake Passage during RV Polarstern expeditions ANTXXIV/3 and ANTXXIII/3 in the frame of the International Polar Year (IPY) and the GEOTRACES program. The general distribution of Hf and Nd concentrations in the region is similar. However, at the northernmost station located 200 km southwest of Cape Town a pronounced increase of the Nd concentration is observed, whereas the Hf concentration is minimal, suggesting much less Hf than Nd is released by the weathering of the South African Archean cratonic rocks. From the southern part of the Subtropical Front (STF) to the Polar Front (PF) Hf and Nd show the lowest concentrations (data show significant increases to ɛHf = 6.1 and ɛNd = -4.0 documenting exchange of seawater Nd and Hf with the Antarctic Peninsula. In the open Southern Ocean the Nd isotope compositions are relatively homogeneous (ɛNd ˜ -8 to -8.5) towards the STF, within the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, in the Weddell Gyre, and the Drake Passage. The Hf isotope compositions in the entire study area only show a small range between ɛHf = + 6.1 and +2.8 support Hf to be more readily released from young mafic rocks compared to old continental ones. The Nd isotope composition ranges from ɛNd = -18.9 to -4.0 showing Nd isotopes to be a sensitive tracer for the provenance of weathering inputs into surface waters of the Southern Ocean.

  5. Metatranscriptomes reveal functional variation in diatom communities from the Antarctic Peninsula

    KAUST Repository

    Pearson, Gareth A

    2015-04-14

    Functional genomics of diatom-dominated communities fromthe Antarctic Peninsula was studied using comparative metatranscriptomics. Samples obtained from diatom-rich communities in the Bransfield Strait, the western Weddell Sea and sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea/Wilkins Ice Shelf yielded more than 500K pyrosequencing reads that were combined to produce a global metatranscriptome assembly. Multi-gene phylogenies recovered three distinct communities, and diatom-assigned contigs further indicated little read-sharing between communities, validating an assembly-based annotation and analysis approach. Although functional analysis recovered a core of abundant shared annotations that were expressed across the three diatom communities, over 40% of annotations (but accounting for <10% of sequences) were community-specific. The two pelagic communities differed in their expression of N-metabolism and acquisition genes, which was almost absent in post-bloom conditions in the Weddell Sea community, while enrichment of transporters for ammonia and urea in Bransfield Strait diatoms suggests a physiological stance towards acquisition of reduced N-sources. The depletion of carbohydrate and energy metabolism pathways in sea ice relative to pelagic communities, together with increased light energy dissipation (via LHCSR proteins), photorespiration, and NO3 - uptake and utilization all pointed to irradiance stress and/or inorganic carbon limitation within sea ice. Ice-binding proteins and cold-shock transcription factors were also enriched in sea ice diatoms. Surprisingly, the abundance of gene transcripts for the translational machinery tracked decreasing environmental temperature across only a 4 °C range, possibly reflecting constraints on translational efficiency and protein production in cold environments. © 2015 International Society for Microbial Ecology All rights reserved.

  6. Characteristics of the meltwater field from a large Antarctic iceberg using δ18O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helly, John J.; Vernet, Maria; Murray, Alison E.; Stephenson, Gordon R.

    2015-03-01

    Large tabular icebergs represent a disruptive influence on a stable water column when drifting in the open ocean. This is a study of one iceberg, C18A, encountered in the Powell Basin in the Weddell Sea in March 2009, formed from iceberg C18 (76×7 km) originating from the Ross Ice Shelf in May 2002. C18A was lunate in shape with longest dimensions of 31 km×7 km×184 m. The meltwater field from C18A was characterized using δ18O from water samples collected near C18A (Near-field, 0.4-2 km) and contrasted with a Far-field comprised of samples from an Away site (19 km from C18A), a Control site (70 km away), and a region populated with small icebergs (Iceberg Alley, 175 km away). The in-sample fractions of meteoric water were calculated relative δ18O in iceberg ice and Weddell Deep Water and converted to meteoric water height (m) and a percentage within 100 m depth bins. The Near-field and Far-field difference from surface to 200 m was 0.51±0.28%. The concentration of meteoric water dropped to approximately half that value below 200 m, approximate keel depth of the iceberg, although detectable to 600 m. From surface to 600 m, the overall difference was statistically significant (Pvolume astern of the iceberg (0.16 km3d-1) as a continuous source of meteoric water.

  7. Multimillennium changes in dissolved oxygen under global warming: results from an AOGCM and offline ocean biogeochemical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, A.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Shigemitsu, M.; Oka, A.; Takahashi, K.; Ohgaito, R.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Long-term oceanic oxygen change due to global warming is still unclear; most future projections (such as CMIP5) are only performed until 2100. Indeed, few previous studies using conceptual models project oxygen change in the next thousands of years, showing persistent global oxygen reduction by about 30% in the next 2000 years, even after atmospheric carbon dioxide stops rising. Yet, these models cannot sufficiently represent the ocean circulation change: the key driver of oxygen change. Moreover, considering serious effect oxygen reduction has on marine life and biogeochemical cycling, long-term oxygen change should be projected for higher validity. Therefore, we used a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) and an offline ocean biogeochemical model, investigating realistic long-term changes in oceanic oxygen concentration and ocean circulation. We integrated these models for 2000 years under atmospheric CO2 doubling and quadrupling. After global oxygen reduction in the first 500 years, oxygen concentration in deep ocean globally recovers and overshoots, despite surface oxygen decrease and weaker Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea recovers and overshoots, after initial cessation. Thus, enhanced deep convection and associated Antarctic Bottom Water supply oxygen-rich surface waters to deep ocean, resulting global deep ocean oxygenation. We conclude that the change in ocean circulation in the Southern Ocean potentially drives millennial-scale oxygenation in the deep ocean; contrary to past reported long-term oxygen reduction and general expectation. In presentation, we will discuss the mechanism of response of deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea and show the volume changes of hypoxic waters.

  8. Slope and deep-sea abundance across scales: Southern Ocean isopods show how complex the deep sea can be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Stefanie; Barnes, David K. A.; Brandt, Angelika

    2007-08-01

    How animals are distributed in the world's largest surface environment, the deep sea, is poorly understood. The ANDEEP (ANtarctic benthic DEEP-sea biodiversity, colonisation history and recent community patterns) III cruise probed richness and abundance of one group, peracarid crustaceans (isopods, amphipods, cumaceans, tanaidaceans, mysidaceans), as a model of deep-sea fauna across Southern Ocean (SO) sites. Analysis of samples from the ANDEEP cruises reveals SO isopods to be highly abundant, rich and endemic as many other taxa in the region are known to be. Samples taken across three spatial scales include sites tens, hundreds and thousands of kilometers apart, sites stretching from the Southern Cape Basin (South Atlantic) to continental Antarctica and including depths from 1030 to 5000 m. Across these spatial scales we investigated ecological success (abundance) of peracarids at order, family, and species levels. Remarkably no significant relationship was found between abundance and spatial scale at any taxonomic level. That is, the variability in abundance at major regional scale is no different to that across just tens of kilometres. Most taxa were represented in only a few samples, but we suggest most inhabitants of the deep Weddell Sea environment to be very patchy rather than rare. Separate plots of family, genus, and species abundance by sample number revealed this to be true—nearly all genera and species are an order of magnitude more abundant than 'background' levels in just one or two samples. Our isopod and amphipod samples reveal the Atlantic sector of the SO, one of the most dynamic and important regions influencing the global deep-sea environment, to be highly complex. Our study suggests that, at least with regard to the study taxa and area, the typical comparisons of regions that are made by ecologists miss the scale at which crucial ecological variability happens. Even without ice scours creating topographical complexity (as on the shelf) the

  9. Ionospheric total electron content: Spatial patterns of variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lean, J. L.; Meier, R. R.; Picone, J. M.; Sassi, F.; Emmert, J. T.; Richards, P. G.

    2016-10-01

    The distinctive spatial patterns of the ionosphere's total electron content (TEC) response to solar, seasonal, diurnal, and geomagnetic influences are determined across the globe using a new statistical model constructed from 2-hourly TEC observations from 1998 to 2015. The model combines representations of the physical solar EUV photon and geomagnetic activity drivers with solar-modulated sinusoidal parameterizations of four seasonal cycles and solar-modulated and seasonally modulated parameterizations of three diurnal cycles. The average absolute residual of the data-model differences is 2.1 total electron content unit, 1 TECU = 1016 el m-2 (TECU) (9%) and the root-mean-square error is 3.5 TECU (15%). Solar and geomagnetic variability, the semiannual oscillation and the diurnal and semidiurnal oscillations all impact TEC most at low magnetic latitudes where TEC itself maximizes, with differing degrees of longitudinal inhomogeneity. In contrast, the annual oscillation manifests primarily in the Southern Hemisphere with maximum amplitude over midlatitude South America, extending to higher southern latitudes in the vicinity of the Weddell Sea. Nighttime TEC levels in the vicinity of the Weddell Sea exceed daytime levels every year in Southern Hemisphere summer as a consequence of the modulation of the diurnal oscillations by the seasonal oscillations. The anomaly, which is present at all phases of the solar cycle, commences sooner and ends later under solar minimum conditions. The model minus data residuals maximize at tropical magnetic latitudes in four geographical regions similar to the ionosphere pattern generated by lower atmospheric meteorology. Enhanced residuals at northern midlatitudes during winter are consistent with an influence of atmospheric gravity waves.

  10. Sources and fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Antarctic and Southern Ocean atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrerizo, Ana; Galbán-Malagón, Cristóbal; Del Vento, Sabino; Dachs, Jordi

    2014-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a geochemically relevant family of semivolatile compounds originating from fossil fuels, biomass burning, and their incomplete combustion, as well as biogenic sources. Even though PAHs are ubiquitous in the environment, there are no previous studies of their occurrence in the Southern Ocean and Antarctic atmosphere. Here we show the gas and aerosol phase PAHs concentrations obtained from three sampling cruises in the Southern Ocean (Weddell, Bellingshausen, and South Scotia Seas), and two sampling campaigns at Livingston Island (Southern Shetlands). This study shows an important variability of the atmospheric concentrations with higher concentrations in the South Scotia and northern Weddell Seas than in the Bellingshausen Sea. The assessment of the gas-particle partitioning of PAHs suggests that aerosol elemental carbon contribution is modest due to its low concentrations. Over the ocean, the atmospheric concentrations do not show a temperature dependence, which is consistent with an important role of long-range atmospheric transport of PAHs. Conversely, over land at Livingston Island, the PAHs gas phase concentrations increase when the temperature increases, consistently with the presence of local diffusive sources. The use of fugacity samplers allowed the determination of the air-soil and air-snow fugacity ratios of PAHs showing that there is a significant volatilization of lighter molecular weight PAHs from soil and snow during the austral summer. The higher volatilization, observed in correspondence of sites where the organic matter content in soil is higher, suggests that there may be a biogenic source of some PAHs. The volatilization of PAHs from soil and snow is sufficient to support the atmospheric occurrence of PAHs over land but may have a modest regional influence on the atmospheric occurrence of PAHs over the Southern Ocean.

  11. Antarctic sea ice variability and trends, 1979–2010

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    D. J. Cavalieri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In sharp contrast to the decreasing sea ice coverage of the Arctic, in the Antarctic the sea ice cover has, on average, expanded since the late 1970s. More specifically, satellite passive-microwave data for the period November 1978–December 2010 reveal an overall positive trend in ice extents of 17 100 ± 2300 km2 yr−1. Much of the increase, at 13 700 ± 1500 km2 yr−1, has occurred in the region of the Ross Sea, with lesser contributions from the Weddell Sea and Indian Ocean. One region, that of the Bellingshausen/Amundsen Seas, has (like the Arctic instead experienced significant sea ice decreases, with an overall ice extent trend of −8200 ± 1200 km2 yr−1. When examined through the annual cycle over the 32-yr period 1979–2010, the Southern Hemisphere sea ice cover as a whole experienced positive ice extent trends in every month, ranging in magnitude from a low of 9100 ± 6300 km2 yr−1 in February to a high of 24 700 ± 10 000 km2 yr−1 in May. The Ross Sea and Indian Ocean also had positive trends in each month, while the Bellingshausen/Amundsen Seas had negative trends in each month, and the Weddell Sea and western Pacific Ocean had a mixture of positive and negative trends. Comparing ice-area results to ice-extent results, in each case the ice-area trend has the same sign as the ice-extent trend, but the magnitudes of the two trends differ, and in some cases these differences allow inferences about the corresponding changes in sea ice concentrations. The strong pattern of decreasing ice coverage in the Bellingshausen/Amundsen Seas region and increasing ice coverage in the Ross Sea region is suggestive of changes in atmospheric circulation. This is a key topic for future research.

  12. Antarctic Sea Ice Variability and Trends, 1979-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, C. L.; Cavalieri, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    In sharp contrast to the decreasing sea ice coverage of the Arctic, in the Antarctic the sea ice cover has, on average, expanded since the late 1970s. More specifically, satellite passive-microwave data for the period November 1978 - December 2010 reveal an overall positive trend in ice extents of 17,100 +/- 2,300 square km/yr. Much of the increase, at 13,700 +/- 1,500 square km/yr, has occurred in the region of the Ross Sea, with lesser contributions from the Weddell Sea and Indian Ocean. One region, that of the Bellingshausen/Amundsen Seas, has, like the Arctic, instead experienced significant sea ice decreases, with an overall ice extent trend of -8,200 +/- 1,200 square km/yr. When examined through the annual cycle over the 32-year period 1979-2010, the Southern Hemisphere sea ice cover as a whole experienced positive ice extent trends in every month, ranging in magnitude from a low of 9,100 +/- 6,300 square km/yr in February to a high of 24,700 +/- 10,000 square km/yr in May. The Ross Sea and Indian Ocean also had positive trends in each month, while the Bellingshausen/Amundsen Seas had negative trends in each month, and the Weddell Sea and Western Pacific Ocean had a mixture of positive and negative trends. Comparing ice-area results to ice-extent results, in each case the ice-area trend has the same sign as the ice-extent trend, but differences in the magnitudes of the two trends identify regions with overall increasing ice concentrations and others with overall decreasing ice concentrations. The strong pattern of decreasing ice coverage in the Bellingshausen/Amundsen Seas region and increasing ice coverage in the Ross Sea region is suggestive of changes in atmospheric circulation. This is a key topic for future research.

  13. Antarctic sea ice variability and trends, 1979–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Cavalieri

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In sharp contrast to the decreasing sea ice coverage of the Arctic, in the Antarctic the sea ice cover has, on average, expanded since the late 1970s. More specifically, satellite passive-microwave data for the period November 1978–December 2010 reveal an overall positive trend in ice extents of 17 100 ± 2300 km2 yr−1. Much of the increase, at 13 700 ± 1500 km2 yr−1, has occurred in the region of the Ross Sea, with lesser contributions from the Weddell Sea and Indian Ocean. One region, that of the Bellingshausen/Amundsen Seas, has, like the Arctic, instead experienced significant sea ice decreases, with an overall ice extent trend of −8200 ± 1200 km2 yr−1. When examined through the annual cycle over the 32-yr period 1979–2010, the Southern Hemisphere sea ice cover as a whole experienced positive ice extent trends in every month, ranging in magnitude from a low of 9100 ± 6300 km2 yr−1 in February to a high of 24 700 ± 10 000 km2 yr−1 in May. The Ross Sea and Indian Ocean also had positive trends in each month, while the Bellingshausen/Amundsen Seas had negative trends in each month, and the Weddell Sea and Western Pacific Ocean had a mixture of positive and negative trends. Comparing ice-area results to ice-extent results, in each case the ice-area trend has the same sign as the ice-extent trend, but differences in the magnitudes of the two trends identify regions with overall increasing ice concentrations and others with overall decreasing ice concentrations. The strong pattern of decreasing ice coverage in the Bellingshausen/Amundsen Seas region and increasing ice coverage in the Ross Sea region is suggestive of changes in atmospheric circulation. This is a key topic for future research.

  14. Deglacial history of the Pensacola Mountains, Antarctica from glacial geomorphology and cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, M. J.; Hein, A. S.; Sugden, D. E.; Whitehouse, P. L.; Shanks, R.; Xu, S.; Freeman, S. P. H. T.

    2017-02-01

    The retreat history of the Antarctic Ice Sheet is important for understanding rapid deglaciation, as well as to constrain numerical ice sheet models and ice loading models required for glacial isostatic adjustment modelling. There is particular debate about the extent of grounded ice in the Weddell Sea embayment at the Last Glacial Maximum, and its subsequent deglacial history. Here we provide a new dataset of geomorphological observations and cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure ages of erratic samples that constrain the deglacial history of the Pensacola Mountains, adjacent to the present day Foundation Ice Stream and Academy Glacier in the southern Weddell Sea embayment. We show there is evidence of at least two glaciations, the first of which was relatively old and warm-based, and a more recent cold-based glaciation. During the most recent glaciation ice thickened by at least 450 m in the Williams Hills and at least 380 m on Mt Bragg. Progressive thinning from these sites was well underway by 10 ka BP and ice reached present levels by 2.5 ka BP, and is broadly similar to the relatively modest thinning histories in the southern Ellsworth Mountains. The thinning history is consistent with, but does not mandate, a Late Holocene retreat of the grounding line to a smaller-than-present configuration, as has been recently hypothesized based on ice sheet and glacial isostatic modelling. The data also show that clasts with complex exposure histories are pervasive and that clast recycling is highly site-dependent. These new data provide constraints on a reconstruction of the retreat history of the formerly-expanded Foundation Ice Stream, derived using a numerical flowband model.

  15. The oceanic tides in the South Atlantic Ocean

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    M. L. Genco

    Full Text Available The finite element ocean tide model of Le Provost and Vincent (1986 has been applied to the simulation of the M2 and K1 components over the South Atlantic Ocean. The discretisation of the domain, of the order of 200 km over the deep ocean, is refined down to 15 km along the coasts, such refinement enables wave propagation and damping over the continental shelves to be correctly solved. The marine boundary conditions, from Dakar to Natal, through the Drake passage and from South Africa to Antarctica, are deduced from in situ data and from Schwiderski's solution and then optimised following a procedure previously developed by the authors. The solutions presented are in very good agreement with in situ data: the root mean square deviations from a standard subset of 13 pelagic stations are 1.4 cm for M2 and 0.45 cm for K1, which is significantly better overall than solutions published to date in the literature. Zooms of the M2 solution are presented for the Falkland Archipelago, the Weddell Sea and the Patagonian Shelf. The first zoom allows detailing of the tidal structure around the Falklands and its interpretation in terms of a stationary trapped Kelvin wave system. The second zoom, over the Weddell Sea, reveals for the first time what must be the tidal signal under the permanent ice shelf and gives a solution over that sea which is generally in agreement with observations. The third zoom is over the complex Patagonian Shelf. This zoom illustrates the ability of the model to simulate the tides, even over this area, with a surprising level of realism, following purely hydrodynamic modelling procedures, within a global ocean tide model. Maps of maximum associated tidal currents are also given, as a first illustration of a by-product of these simulations.

  16. Spatiotemporal variations in the surface velocities of Antarctic Peninsula glaciers

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    J. Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Velocity is an important parameter for the estimation of glacier mass balance, which directly signals the response of glaciers to climate change. Antarctic ice sheet movement and the associated spatiotemporal velocity variations are of great significance to global sea level rise. In this study, we estimate Antarctic Peninsula glacier velocities using the co-registration of optically sensed images and correlation (hereafter referred to as COSI-Corr based on moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer Level 1B data (hereafter referred to as MODIS L1B. The results show that the glaciers of Graham Land and the Larsen Ice Shelf have substantially different velocity features. The Graham Land glaciers primarily flow from the peninsula ridge towards the Weddell Sea and Bellingshausen Sea on the east and west sides, respectively. There are very large velocity variations among the different ice streams, with a minimum of −1 and a maximum of 1500 m a−1 (with an average of 100–150 m a−1. Over the period 2000–2012, the glaciers of Graham Land accelerated in the south but slowed down in the north. In contrast, the Larsen Ice Shelf flows in a relatively uniform direction, mainly towards the northeast into the Weddell Sea. Its average velocity is 750–800 m a−1 and the maximum is > 1500 m a−1. During the period 2000–2012, the Larsen Ice Shelf experienced significant acceleration. The use of COSI-Corr based on MODIS L1B data is suitable for glacier velocity monitoring on the Antarctic Peninsula over long time series and large spatial scales. This method is clearly advantageous for analysing macro-scale spatiotemporal variations in glacier movement.

  17. Marine bacterioplankton biomass, activity and community structure in the vicinity of Antarctic icebergs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Alison E.; Peng, Vivian; Tyler, Charlotte; Wagh, Protima

    2011-06-01

    We studied marine bacterioplankton in the Scotia Sea in June 2008 and in the northwest Weddell Sea in March to mid April 2009 in waters proximal to three free-drifting icebergs (SS-1, A-43k, and C-18a), in a region with a high density of smaller icebergs (iceberg alley), and at stations that were upstream of the iceberg trajectories designated as far-field reference sites that were between 16-75 km away. Hydrographic parameters were used to define water masses in which comparisons between bacterioplankton-associated characteristics (abundance, leucine incorporation into protein, aminopeptidase activities and community structure) within and between water masses could be made. Early winter Scotia Sea bacterioplankton had low levels of cells and low heterotrophic production rates in the upper 50 m. Influences of the icebergs on bacterioplankton at this time of year were minimal, if not deleterious, as we found lower levels of heterotrophic production near A-43k in comparison to stations >16 km away. Additionally, the results point to small but significant differences in cell abundance, heterotrophic production, and community structure between the two icebergs studied. These icebergs differed greatly in size and the findings suggest that the larger iceberg had a greater effect. In the NW Weddell Sea in March-mid April bacterioplankton were twice as abundant and had heterotrophic productions rates that were 8-fold higher than what we determined in the Scotia Sea, though levels were still quite low, which is typical for autumn. We did not detect direct iceberg-related influences on the bacterioplankton characteristics studied here. Clues to understanding bacterioplankton responses may lie in the details of community structure, as there were some significant differences in community structure in the winter water and underlying upper circumpolar deep-water masses between stations occupied close to C-18a and at stations 18 km away (i.e. Polaribacter and Pelagibacter

  18. Description of the biogeochemical features of the subtropical southeastern Atlantic and the Southern Ocean south off South Africa during the austral summer of the International Polar Year

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    F. A. C. Le Moigne

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Meridional and vertical distributions of several biogeochemical parameters were studied along a section in the southeastern Atlantic and the Southern Ocean south of South Africa during the austral summer 2008 of the International Polar Year to characterize the biogeochemical provinces and to assess the seasonal net diatom production. Based on analyses of macro-nutrients, ammonium (NH4, chlorophyll a, (chl a phaeopigments, biogenic silica (BSi, particulate inorganic carbon (PIC, and particulate organic carbon and nitrogen (POC and PON, respectively four biogeochemical domains were distinguished along the section: the subtropical Atlantic, the confluence zone of the subtropical and subantarctic domains, the Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC and the north-eastern branch of the Weddell Gyre. The subtropical region displayed extremely low nutrient concentrations featuring oligotrophic conditions, and sub-surface maxima of chl a and phaeopigments never exceeded, 0.5 μg l−1 and 0.25 μg l−1 respectively. The anticyclonic and cyclonic eddies crossed in the Cape Basin were characterized by a deepening and a rise, respectively, of the nutrients isolines. Mesoscale eddies can bring episodic pulse of nutrients into the photic zone. The confluence zone of the subtropical domain and the northern side of the ACC within the subantarctic domain displayed remnant nitrate and phosphate levels, whereas silicate concentrations kept to extremely low levels. In this area chl a level of 0.4–0.5 μg l−1 distributed homogenously within the mixed layer, and POC and PON accumulated to values up to 10 μM and 1.5 μM, respectively; still indicative of biomass accumulation along the confluence zone during the late productive period. In the ACC domain, the Polar Frontal Zone was marked by a postbloom of diatoms that extended beyond the Polar Front (PF during this

  19. Airborne radar surveys of snow depth over Antarctic sea ice during Operation IceBridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzer, B.; Gomez-Garcia, D.; Leuschen, C.; Paden, J. D.; Gogineni, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    Over the last decade, multiple satellite-based laser and radar altimeters, optimized for polar observations, have been launched with one of the major objectives being the determination of global sea ice thickness and distribution [5, 6]. Estimation of sea-ice thickness from these altimeters relies on freeboard measurements and the presence of snow cover on sea ice affects this estimate. Current means of estimating the snow depth rely on daily precipitation products and/or data from passive microwave sensors [2, 7]. Even a small uncertainty in the snow depth leads to a large uncertainty in the sea-ice thickness estimate. To improve the accuracy of the sea-ice thickness estimates and provide validation for measurements from satellite-based sensors, the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets deploys the Snow Radar as a part of NASA Operation IceBridge. The Snow Radar is an ultra-wideband, frequency-modulated, continuous-wave radar capable of resolving snow depth on sea ice from 5 cm to more than 2 meters from long-range, airborne platforms [4]. This paper will discuss the algorithm used to directly extract snow depth estimates exclusively using the Snow Radar data set by tracking both the air-snow and snow-ice interfaces. Prior work in this regard used data from a laser altimeter for tracking the air-snow interface or worked under the assumption that the return from the snow-ice interface was greater than that from the air-snow interface due to a larger dielectric contrast, which is not true for thick or higher loss snow cover [1, 3]. This paper will also present snow depth estimates from Snow Radar data during the NASA Operation IceBridge 2010-2011 Antarctic campaigns. In 2010, three sea ice flights were flown, two in the Weddell Sea and one in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas. All three flight lines were repeated in 2011, allowing an annual comparison of snow depth. In 2011, a repeat pass of an earlier flight in the Weddell Sea was flown, allowing for a

  20. Using high-resolution satellite imagery to assess populations of animals in the Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRue, Michelle Ann

    The Southern Ocean is one of the most rapidly-changing ecosystems on the planet due to the effects of climate change and commercial fishing for ecologically-important krill and fish. It is imperative that populations of indicator species, such as penguins and seals, be monitored at regional- to global scales to decouple the effects of climate and anthropogenic changes for appropriate ecosystem-based management of the Southern Ocean. Remotely monitoring populations through high-resolution satellite imagery is currently the only feasible way to gain information about population trends of penguins and seals in Antarctica. In my first chapter, I review the literature where high-resolution satellite imagery has been used to assess populations of animals in polar regions. Building on this literature, my second chapter focuses on estimating changes in abundance in the Weddell seal population in Erebus Bay. I found a strong correlation between ground and satellite counts, and this finding provides an alternate method for assessing populations of Weddell seals in areas where less is known about population status. My third chapter explores how size of the guano stain of Adelie penguins can be used to predict population size. Using high-resolution imagery and ground counts, I built a model to estimate the breeding population of Adelie penguins using a supervised classification to estimate guano size. These results suggest that the size of guano stain is an accurate predictor of population size, and can be applied to estimate remote Adelie penguin colonies. In my fourth chapter, I use air photos, satellite imagery, climate and mark-resight data to determine that climate change has positively impacted the population of Adelie penguins at Beaufort Island through a habitat release that ultimately affected the dynamics within the southern Ross Sea metapopulation. Finally, for my fifth chapter I combined the literature with observations from aerial surveys and satellite imagery to

  1. Physical and biogeochemical controls on the variability in surface pH and calcium carbonate saturation states in the Atlantic sectors of the Arctic and Southern Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, Eithne; Clarke, Jennifer S.; Humphreys, Matthew P.; Ribas-Ribas, Mariana; Esposito, Mario; Rérolle, Victoire M. C.; Schlosser, C.; Thorpe, Sally E.; Tyrrell, Toby; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2016-05-01

    Polar oceans are particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification due to their low temperatures and reduced buffering capacity, and are expected to experience extensive low pH conditions and reduced carbonate mineral saturations states (Ω) in the near future. However, the impact of anthropogenic CO2 on pH and Ω will vary regionally between and across the Arctic and Southern Oceans. Here we investigate the carbonate chemistry in the Atlantic sector of two polar oceans, the Nordic Seas and Barents Sea in the Arctic Ocean, and the Scotia and Weddell Seas in the Southern Ocean, to determine the physical and biogeochemical processes that control surface pH and Ω. High-resolution observations showed large gradients in surface pH (0.10-0.30) and aragonite saturation state (Ωar) (0.2-1.0) over small spatial scales, and these were particularly strong in sea-ice covered areas (up to 0.45 in pH and 2.0 in Ωar). In the Arctic, sea-ice melt facilitated bloom initiation in light-limited and iron replete (dFe>0.2 nM) regions, such as the Fram Strait, resulting in high pH (8.45) and Ωar (3.0) along the sea-ice edge. In contrast, accumulation of dissolved inorganic carbon derived from organic carbon mineralisation under the ice resulted in low pH (8.05) and Ωar (1.1) in areas where thick ice persisted. In the Southern Ocean, sea-ice retreat resulted in bloom formation only where terrestrial inputs supplied sufficient iron (dFe>0.2 nM), such as in the vicinity of the South Sandwich Islands where enhanced pH (8.3) and Ωar (2.3) were primarily due to biological production. In contrast, in the adjacent Weddell Sea, weak biological uptake of CO2 due to low iron concentrations (dFe<0.2 nM) resulted in low pH (8.1) and Ωar (1.6). The large spatial variability in both polar oceans highlights the need for spatially resolved surface data of carbonate chemistry variables but also nutrients (including iron) in order to accurately elucidate the large gradients experienced by marine

  2. Processes controlling the Si-isotopic composition in the Southern Ocean and application for paleoceanography

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    F. Fripiat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Southern Ocean biogeochemical processes have an impact on global marine primary production and global elemental cycling, e.g. by likely controlling glacial-interglacial pCO2 variation. In this context, the natural silicon isotopic composition (δ30Si of sedimentary biogenic silica has been used to reconstruct past Si-consumption:supply ratios in the surface waters. We present a new dataset in the Southern Ocean from a IPY-GEOTRACES transect (Bonus-GoodHope which includes for the first time summer δ30Si signatures of suspended biogenic silica (i for the whole water column at three stations and (ii in the mixed layer at seven stations from the subtropical zone up to the Weddell Gyre. In general, the isotopic composition of biogenic opal exported to depth was comparable to the opal leaving the mixed layer and did not seem to be affected by any diagenetic processes during settling, even if an effect of biogenic silica dissolution cannot be ruled out in the northern part of the Weddell Gyre. We develop a mechanistic understanding of the processes involved in the modern Si-isotopic balance, by implementing a mixed layer model. We observe that the accumulated biogenic silica (sensu Rayleigh distillation should satisfactorily describe the δ30Si composition of biogenic silica exported out of the mixed layer, within the limit of the current analytical precision on the δ30Si. The failures of previous models (Rayleigh and steady state become apparent especially at the end of the productive period in the mixed layer, when biogenic silica production and export are low. This results from (1 a higher biogenic silica dissolution:production ratio imposing a lower net fractionation factor and (2 a higher Si-supply:Si-uptake ratio supplying light Si-isotopes into the mixed layer. The latter effect is especially expressed when the summer mixed layer becomes strongly Si-depleted, together with a large

  3. Processes controlling the Si-isotopic composition in the Southern Ocean and application for paleoceanography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fripiat

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Southern Ocean biogeochemical processes have an impact on global marine primary production and global elemental cycling, e.g. by likely controlling glacial-interglacial pCO2 variation. The natural silicon isotopic composition (δ30Si of sedimentary biogenic silica has been used to reconstruct past Si-consumption:supply ratio in the surface waters. We present a new dataset in the Southern Ocean which includes for the first time summer δ30Si signatures of suspended biogenic silica (i for the whole water column at three stations and (ii in the mixed layer at seven stations from the sub-tropical zone up to the Weddell Gyre.

    In general, the biogenic silica isotopic composition at depth reflected a mixed layer origin and seemed not affected by any diagenetic effect in the water column, even if in the northern part of the Weddell Gyre an effect of biogenic silica dissolution cannot be ruled out.

    We develop a mechanistic understanding of the processes involved in the modern Si-isotopic balance, by implementing a mixed layer model. We observe that the accumulated biogenic silica (sensu Rayleigh should satisfactorily describe the δ30Si composition of biogenic silica exported out of the mixed layer, within the limit of the current analytical precision on the δ30Si. The failures of previous models (Rayleigh and steady state become apparent especially at the end of the productive period in the mixed layer, when biogenic silica production is low. This results from: (1 a higher biogenic silica dissolution:production ratio imposing a lower net fractionation factor and (2 a higher Si-supply:Si-uptake ratio supplying light Si-isotopes into the mixed layer. The latter effect is especially expressed when the summer mixed layer becomes strongly Si-depleted together with a large vertical silicic acid gradient.

  4. The atmospheric HCHO budget at coastal East and West Antarctica: Impact of photochemical productions and snow emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Michel; Preunkert, Susanne; Pépy, Guillaume; Jourdain, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    HCHO year-round records are now available at three coastal Antarctic sites, Neumayer and Halley in the Weddell Sea region and Dumont d'Urville in Terre Adélie, revealing a similar seasonal pattern with winter minima and summer maxima. However, absolute values significantly differ from site to site, during summer and winter. Monthly summer means exceed 450 pptv at NM, whereas a HCHO maximum of 130 pptv is observed at HA. Summer HCHO levels at DDU are similar to those at HA although higher levels were expected in relation with a methane oxidation being promoted by a 5 times higher level of OH at DDU than at HA. On the other hand, to match observations at NM and HA, snow emissions have to be considered whereas photochemical HCHO sources and sinks alone seem to explain observations at DDU. With the aim to draw a more comprehensive picture of the HCHO budget at coastal Antarctica we reexamine and discuss the three records using 0-D and 2-D calculations. In summer, the gas phase photochemistry is at all sites dominated by the CH4 oxidation, well before the oxidation of DMS and light alkenes. The CH4 oxidation chemistry is some three times more efficient in producing HCHO at DDU than at the two other sites because of more rich oxidant air masses coming from the Antarctic plateau reach DDU. The halogen chemistry, even being more important in relation with much sea-ice at HA and NM than at DDU, remains a weak HCHO sink. HCHO snow emissions represent an important contribution at the two Weddell Sea sites whereas they contribute only weakly at DDU. Although they are probably of similar strength around the three sites, the far thinner atmospheric boundary layer at HA (and even more at NM) compared to DDU permit an efficient accumulation of HCHO emitted by this surface source. In addition these coastal Antarctic data sets will be opposed to HCHO mixing ratios and snow fluxes obtained at inland Antarctica (Dome C) within the framework of the OPALE (Oxidant Production over

  5. Atmospheric and Oceanic Response to Southern Ocean Deep Convection Oscillations on Decadal to Centennial Time Scales in Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T.; Reintges, A.; Park, W.; Latif, M.

    2014-12-01

    Many current coupled global climate models simulate open ocean deep convection in the Southern Ocean as a recurring event with time scales ranging from a few years to centennial (de Lavergne et al., 2014, Nat. Clim. Ch.). The only observation of such event, however, was the occurrence of the Weddell Polynya in the mid-1970s, an open water area of 350 000 km2 within the Antarctic sea ice in three consecutive winters. Both the wide range of modeled frequency of occurrence and the absence of deep convection in the Weddell Sea highlights the lack of understanding concerning the phenomenon. Nevertheless, simulations indicate that atmospheric and oceanic responses to the cessation of deep convection in the Southern Ocean include a strengthening of the low-level atmospheric circulation over the Southern Ocean (increasing SAM index) and a reduction in the export of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), potentially masking the regional effects of global warming (Latif et al., 2013, J. Clim.; Martin et al., 2014, Deep Sea Res. II). It is thus of great importance to enhance our understanding of Southern Ocean deep convection and clarify the associated time scales. In two multi-millennial simulations with the Kiel Climate Model (KCM, ECHAM5 T31 atmosphere & NEMO-LIM2 ~2˚ ocean) we showed that the deep convection is driven by strong oceanic warming at mid-depth periodically overriding the stabilizing effects of precipitation and ice melt (Martin et al., 2013, Clim. Dyn.). Sea ice thickness also affects location and duration of the deep convection. A new control simulation, in which, amongst others, the atmosphere grid resolution is changed to T42 (~2.8˚), yields a faster deep convection flip-flop with a period of 80-100 years and a weaker but still significant global climate response similar to CMIP5 simulations. While model physics seem to affect the time scale and intensity of the phenomenon, the driving mechanism is a rather robust feature. Finally, we compare the atmospheric and

  6. Biogenic sulphur emissions and inferred non-sea-salt-sulphate cloud condensation nuclei in and around Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dowd, Colin D.; Lowe, Jason A.; Smith, Michael H.; Davison, Brian; Hewitt, C. Nicholas; Harrison, Roy M.

    1997-06-01

    Accumulation mode aerosol properties and biogenic sulphur emissions over the South Atlantic and Antarctic Oceans are examined. Two contrasting air masses, polar and maritime, each possessing distinct aerosol properties, were encountered during the summer months. By examining aerosol volatile properties, polar air masses arriving from the Antarctic continent were shown to consist primarily Of H2SO4 in the accumulation mode size range, with inferred NH+4 to SO=4 molar ratios close to zero. By comparison, air masses of temperate maritime origin were significantly neutralized with molar ratios of ≈1. These results suggest a deficit of ammonia in polar air masses compared with that in maritime air masses. Dimethyl sulphide (DMS) exhibited no correlation with its putative aerosol oxidation products, although spatial coherence in atmospheric concentrations of DMS, methane sulphonic acid (MSA), and non-sea-salt (nss)-sulphate mass was observed. Volatility analysis, used to infer nss-sulphate cloud condensation nuclei (nss-sCCN) active at a supersaturation of ≈0.2%, indicates that nss-sCCN mass and number concentration were best correlated with MSA mass (r≈0.63). Aerosol volatility identified the presence of MSA in submicron non-sea-salt aerosol; however, its contribution to the aerosol mass was small relative to the contribution of sulphuric acid and ammonium bisulphate/sulphate aerosol. The marine sulphur cycle appears strongly coupled to the sea-salt cycle with, typically, 80-90% of nss-sulphate thought to be internally mixed with sea-salt aerosol. During the austral Summer of 1992/1993, a period of strong biological productivity in the Weddell Sea and sub-Antarctic Ocean, particularly during ice-melt, the cruise-average DMS flux of 61 μg m-2 d-1 corresponded to a very modest average nss-sCCN concentration of 21 cm-3. Observed peak values of DMS flux and inferred nss-CCN concentrations during the cruise were 477 μg m-2 d-1 and 64 cm-3, respectively. Events of new

  7. Modelos de cinemática de placas para Antártida durante la ruptura de Gondwana: una revisión

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    M.E. Ghidella

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available La historia de apertura del mar de Weddell y del Oc éano Atlántico Sur es crítica para comprender la ruptura de Gondwana y la evolución geológica de Antártida desde el Jurásico temprano. La dispersión de los fragmentos gondwánicos es importante para entender la circulación oceánica del pasado, descifrar la historia de las cuencas sedimentarias ubicadas al Este de la Península Antártica y establecer posibles rutas de dispersión de flora y fauna entre los continentes australes. Desafortunadamente, la tectónica del mar de Weddell es difícil de resolver debido a la escasez de datos y a su inherente complejidad. Aunque se ha alcanzado un progreso muy grande el los últimos 20 años, con nuevos datos aeromagnéticos marinos y mapas de gravedad derivada de altimetría satelital, todavía hay varios modelos en consideración que difieren en edades corticales y esquemas de apertura. En este trabajo se presenta una revisión de cuatro de esos modelos. Utilizando polos de rotación, isócronas sintéticas y líneas de flujo, se ha procedido hacia atrás en el tiempo comenzando en la anomalía magnética 34 (83,5 millones de años, porque la misma está relativamente bien definida en los océanos, y se presentan mapas de edades de corteza que muestran la trayectoria estimada del punto triple Sudamérica - Antártida - África para cada modelo. Asimismo se muestran gráficos de las reconstrucciones en cuatro épocas elegidas para todos los modelos usando la misma proyección y escala para facilitar la comparación. La variedad de suposiciones simplificadoras que debieron hacerse en cada modelo, recurriendo a fragmentación de placas para considerar las numerosas cuencas de syn-rift y períodos de extensión, son fuertes indicadores de que la tectónica de placas rígidas es un modelo demasiado simple para el presente problema.

  8. The signature analysis of summer Antarctic sea-ice distribution by ship-based sea-ice observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the Chinese 19th National Antarctic Research Expedition,we carried out ship-based Antarctic sea-ice observa-tion on icebreaker Xue Long using Antarctic sea-ice process and climate (ASPeCt) criteria during austral summer.Sea-ice distribution data were obtained along nearly 6,500 km of the ship’s track.The measurement parameters included sea-ice thickness,sea-ice concentration,snow thickness,and floe size.Analysis showed the presence of the large spatial varia-tions of the observed sea-ice characteristics.Sea-ice concentration varied between 0 and 80 percent and reached its peak value in Weddell Sea because of the specific dynamical process affecting in summer sea-ice melting.There are large areas of open water along the study section.Sea ice and the upper snow thickness of the section varied between 10 cm and 210 cm and 2 cm and 80 cm,respectively,and each reaches its peak values near Amery ice shelf.The floe size varied from less than 10 cm and the maximum of more than 2,000 km along the section.

  9. Modelos de cinemática de placas para Antártida durante la ruptura de Gondwana: una revisión Plate kinematic models for Antactica during Gondwana break-up: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Ghidella

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available La historia de apertura del mar de Weddell y del Oc éano Atlántico Sur es crítica para comprender la ruptura de Gondwana y la evolución geológica de Antártida desde el Jurásico temprano. La dispersión de los fragmentos gondwánicos es importante para entender la circulación oceánica del pasado, descifrar la historia de las cuencas sedimentarias ubicadas al Este de la Península Antártica y establecer posibles rutas de dispersión de flora y fauna entre los continentes australes. Desafortunadamente, la tectónica del mar de Weddell es difícil de resolver debido a la escasez de datos y a su inherente complejidad. Aunque se ha alcanzado un progreso muy grande el los últimos 20 años, con nuevos datos aeromagnéticos marinos y mapas de gravedad derivada de altimetría satelital, todavía hay varios modelos en consideración que difieren en edades corticales y esquemas de apertura. En este trabajo se presenta una revisión de cuatro de esos modelos. Utilizando polos de rotación, isócronas sintéticas y líneas de flujo, se ha procedido hacia atrás en el tiempo comenzando en la anomalía magnética 34 (83,5 millones de años, porque la misma está relativamente bien definida en los océanos, y se presentan mapas de edades de corteza que muestran la trayectoria estimada del punto triple Sudamérica - Antártida - África para cada modelo. Asimismo se muestran gráficos de las reconstrucciones en cuatro épocas elegidas para todos los modelos usando la misma proyección y escala para facilitar la comparación. La variedad de suposiciones simplificadoras que debieron hacerse en cada modelo, recurriendo a fragmentación de placas para considerar las numerosas cuencas de syn-rift y períodos de extensión, son fuertes indicadores de que la tectónica de placas rígidas es un modelo demasiado simple para el presente problema.The opening history of both the Weddell Sea and South Atlantic Ocean is critical to understand the break-up of

  10. Bellingshausen Sea ice extent recorded in an Antarctic Peninsula ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stacy E.; Parkinson, Claire L.; Mosley-Thompson, Ellen

    2016-12-01

    Annual net accumulation (An) from the Bruce Plateau (BP) ice core retrieved from the Antarctic Peninsula exhibits a notable relationship with sea ice extent (SIE) in the Bellingshausen Sea. Over the satellite era, both BP An and Bellingshausen SIE are influenced by large-scale climatic factors such as the Amundsen Sea Low, Southern Annular Mode, and Southern Oscillation. In addition to the direct response of BP An to Bellingshausen SIE (e.g., more open water as a moisture source), these large-scale climate phenomena also link the BP and the Bellingshausen Sea indirectly such that they exhibit similar responses (e.g., northerly wind anomalies advect warm, moist air to the Antarctic Peninsula and neighboring Bellingshausen Sea, which reduces SIE and increases An). Comparison with a time series of fast ice at South Orkney Islands reveals a relationship between BP An and sea ice in the northern Weddell Sea that is relatively consistent over the twentieth century, except when it is modulated by atmospheric wave patterns described by the Trans-Polar Index. The trend of increasing accumulation on the Bruce Plateau since 1970 agrees with other climate records and reconstructions in the region and suggests that the current rate of sea ice loss in the Bellingshausen Sea is unrivaled in the twentieth century.

  11. Risk maps for Antarctic krill under projected Southern Ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, S.; Ishida, A.; King, R.; Raymond, B.; Waller, N.; Constable, A.; Nicol, S.; Wakita, M.; Ishimatsu, A.

    2013-09-01

    Marine ecosystems of the Southern Ocean are particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification. Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba; hereafter krill) is the key pelagic species of the region and its largest fishery resource. There is therefore concern about the combined effects of climate change, ocean acidification and an expanding fishery on krill and ultimately, their dependent predators--whales, seals and penguins. However, little is known about the sensitivity of krill to ocean acidification. Juvenile and adult krill are already exposed to variable seawater carbonate chemistry because they occupy a range of habitats and migrate both vertically and horizontally on a daily and seasonal basis. Moreover, krill eggs sink from the surface to hatch at 700-1,000m (ref. ), where the carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) in sea water is already greater than it is in the atmosphere. Krill eggs sink passively and so cannot avoid these conditions. Here we describe the sensitivity of krill egg hatch rates to increased CO2, and present a circumpolar risk map of krill hatching success under projected pCO2 levels. We find that important krill habitats of the Weddell Sea and the Haakon VII Sea to the east are likely to become high-risk areas for krill recruitment within a century. Furthermore, unless CO2 emissions are mitigated, the Southern Ocean krill population could collapse by 2300 with dire consequences for the entire ecosystem.

  12. Too much of a good thing: sea ice extent may have forced emperor penguins into refugia during the last glacial maximum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, Jane L; Clucas, Gemma V; Kooyman, Gerald; Wienecke, Barbara; Rogers, Alex D; Trathan, Philip N; Hart, Tom; Miller, Karen J

    2015-06-01

    The relationship between population structure and demographic history is critical to understanding microevolution and for predicting the resilience of species to environmental change. Using mitochondrial DNA from extant colonies and radiocarbon-dated subfossils, we present the first microevolutionary analysis of emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) and show their population trends throughout the last glacial maximum (LGM, 19.5-16 kya) and during the subsequent period of warming and sea ice retreat. We found evidence for three mitochondrial clades within emperor penguins, suggesting that they were isolated within three glacial refugia during the LGM. One of these clades has remained largely isolated within the Ross Sea, while the two other clades have intermixed around the coast of Antarctica from Adélie Land to the Weddell Sea. The differentiation of the Ross Sea population has been preserved despite rapid population growth and opportunities for migration. Low effective population sizes during the LGM, followed by a rapid expansion around the beginning of the Holocene, suggest that an optimum set of sea ice conditions exist for emperor penguins, corresponding to available foraging area. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Uncertainty in projections of Southern Ocean carbon uptake and acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovenduski, Nicole; Hauri, Claudine

    2017-04-01

    We investigate projections of carbon uptake and the associated acidification of the Southern Ocean over 2006-2080 using output from two ensembles of the Community Earth System Model run under business as usual (RCP8.5) and mitigation (RCP4.5) emission scenarios. On basin-wide and regional scales we observe a rapid onset of aragonite undersaturation in surface waters by mid-century that may be detrimental to calcareous organisms. An analysis of variance reveals that the speed of transition from supersaturation to undersaturation is driven almost entirely by emission scenario, as internal variability in saturation depth across ensemble members is small. Regional differences are observed in the timing and magnitude of aragonite saturation state changes. In the Patagonian Shelf region, undersaturation of the top 200m of the water column is observed by 2080 regardless of emission scenario. Whereas, in the Weddell Sea, saturation state is significantly different between the two emission scenarios by 2080, and undersaturation of the surface waters is "avoidable" if we follow RCP4.5, rather than RCP8.5.

  14. Oceanic response to changes in the WAIS and astronomical forcing during the MIS31 superinterglacial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justino, Flavio; Lindemann, Douglas; Kucharski, Fred; Wilson, Aaron; Bromwich, David; Stordal, Frode

    2017-09-01

    Marine Isotope Stage 31 (MIS31, between 1085 and 1055 ka) was characterized by higher extratropical air temperatures and a substantial recession of polar glaciers compared to today. Paleoreconstructions and model simulations have increased the understanding of the MIS31 interval, but questions remain regarding the role of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans in modifying the climate associated with the variations in Earth's orbital parameters. Multi-century coupled climate simulations, with the astronomical configuration of the MIS31 and modified West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) topography, show an increase in the thermohaline flux and northward oceanic heat transport (OHT) in the Pacific Ocean. These oceanic changes are driven by anomalous atmospheric circulation and increased surface salinity in concert with a stronger meridional overturning circulation (MOC). The intensified northward OHT is responsible for up to 85 % of the global OHT anomalies and contributes to the overall reduction in sea ice in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) due to Earth's astronomical configuration. The relative contributions of the Atlantic Ocean to global OHT and MOC anomalies are minor compared to those of the Pacific. However, sea ice changes are remarkable, highlighted by decreased (increased) cover in the Ross (Weddell) Sea but widespread reductions in sea ice across the NH.

  15. H[sub 2]O[sub 2] in the marine troposphere and seawater of the Atlantic Ocean (48[degrees]N-63[degrees]S)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.; Schrems, O. (Alfred-Wegener-Inst. for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany))

    1993-01-22

    Concentrations of H[sub 2]O[sub 2] in gas phase and seawater have been measured in pristine regions of the Atlantic Ocean during the RV Polarstern expedition ANT X-1 from 11/15/91 to 01/02/92. A broad maximum of gaseous H[sub 2]O[sub 2] mixing ratio in the troposphere was found between the tropic of cancer and the tropic of capricornus with peak values around 1.8 ppbv. The observed ratio of organic peroxides/total amount of peroxides was 0.2-0.35, in contrast to the remarkably lower ratio of 0.05-0.35, in contrast to the remarkably lower ratio of 0.05-0.10 measured in the continental troposphere by other groups. In the Atlantic surface seawater the H[sub 2]O[sub 2] concentrations were determined to be around 0.1 [mu]mol/L, decreasing with increasing water depth to a value below the detection limit at approximately 100 m. The authors observed low H[sub 2]O[sub 2] concentrations ([approx]0.03 [mu]mol/L) in surface water in coastal shelf regions and the partly ice covered Weddell Sea. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Thick and deformed Antarctic sea ice mapped with autonomous underwater vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G.; Maksym, T.; Wilkinson, J.; Kunz, C.; Murphy, C.; Kimball, P.; Singh, H.

    2015-01-01

    Satellites have documented trends in Antarctic sea-ice extent and its variability for decades, but estimating sea-ice thickness in the Antarctic from remote sensing data remains challenging. In situ observations needed for validation of remote sensing data and sea-ice models are limited; most have been restricted to a few point measurements on selected ice floes, or to visual shipboard estimates. Here we present three-dimensional (3D) floe-scale maps of sea-ice draft for ten floes, compiled from two springtime expeditions by an autonomous underwater vehicle to the near-coastal regions of the Weddell, Bellingshausen, and Wilkes Land sectors of Antarctica. Mean drafts range from 1.4 to 5.5 m, with maxima up to 16 m. We also find that, on average, 76% of the ice volume is deformed ice. Our surveys indicate that the floes are much thicker and more deformed than reported by most drilling and ship-based measurements of Antarctic sea ice. We suggest that thick ice in the near-coastal and interior pack may be under-represented in existing in situ assessments of Antarctic sea ice and hence, on average, Antarctic sea ice may be thicker than previously thought.

  17. Cryptic speciation and the circumpolarity debate: A case study on endemic Southern Ocean octopuses using the COI barcode of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allcock, A. Louise; Barratt, Iain; Eléaume, Marc; Linse, Katrin; Norman, Mark D.; Smith, Peter J.; Steinke, Dirk; Stevens, Darren W.; Strugnell, Jan M.

    2011-03-01

    Three hundred and fifty specimens of the endemic Southern Ocean octopus genus Pareledone, were sequenced for the barcoding gene COI. Geographic coverage comprised the South Shetland Islands, the Ross Sea, Adélie Land, George V Land, the Weddell Sea, under the site of the former Larsen B ice shelf, Prydz Bay, the South Orkney Islands and the Amundsen Sea. The greatest number of specimens was captured at the three first-mentioned localities. At least 11 species were represented in the samples and the analyses revealed cryptic species. Six species were found to have extended distributions. Circumpolarity is supported for at least one species. Evidence is presented for a barrier to gene flow to the west of the Antarctic Peninsula, with haplotypes of P. aequipapillae becoming progressively more diverse in a clockwise direction from the South Shetland Islands to the Amundsen Sea. This pattern is akin to that seen in ring species, although we suggest that comparatively warm bottom water acts as a physical barrier preventing completion of the ring.

  18. The microwave emissivity variability of snow covered first-year sea ice from late winter to early summer: a model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Willmes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Satellite observations of microwave brightness temperatures between 19 GHz and 85 GHz are the main data source for operational sea-ice monitoring. However, the sea ice microwave emissivity is subject to pronounced seasonal variations and shows significant hemispheric contrasts that mainly arise from differences in the rate and strength of snow metamorphism and melt. We use the thermodynamic snow model SNTHERM and the microwave emission model MEMLS to identify the contribution of regional patterns in atmospheric energy fluxes to surface emissivity variations on Arctic and Antarctic sea ice between 2000 and 2009. The obtained emissivity data reveal a pronounced seasonal cycle with a large regional variability. The emissivity variability increases from winter to early summer and is more pronounced in the Antarctic. In the pre-melt period (January–May, July–November the variations in surface microwave emissivity due to diurnal, regional and inter-annual variability of atmospheric forcing reach up to 3.4%, 4.3%, and 9.7% for 19 GHz, 37 GHz and 85 GHz channels, respectively. Small but significant emissivity trends can be observed in the Weddell Sea during November and December as well as in Fram Strait during February. The obtained emissivity data lend themselves for an assessment of sea-ice concentration and snow-depth algorithm accuracies.

  19. Antarctic ice sheet discharge driven by atmosphere-ocean feedbacks at the Last Glacial Termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogwill, C. J.; Turney, C. S. M.; Golledge, N. R.; Etheridge, D. M.; Rubino, M.; Thornton, D. P.; Baker, A.; Woodward, J.; Winter, K.; van Ommen, T. D.; Moy, A. D.; Curran, M. A. J.; Davies, S. M.; Weber, M. E.; Bird, M. I.; Munksgaard, N. C.; Menviel, L.; Rootes, C. M.; Ellis, B.; Millman, H.; Vohra, J.; Rivera, A.; Cooper, A.

    2017-01-01

    Reconstructing the dynamic response of the Antarctic ice sheets to warming during the Last Glacial Termination (LGT; 18,000–11,650 yrs ago) allows us to disentangle ice-climate feedbacks that are key to improving future projections. Whilst the sequence of events during this period is reasonably well-known, relatively poor chronological control has precluded precise alignment of ice, atmospheric and marine records, making it difficult to assess relationships between Antarctic ice-sheet (AIS) dynamics, climate change and sea level. Here we present results from a highly-resolved ‘horizontal ice core’ from the Weddell Sea Embayment, which records millennial-scale AIS dynamics across this extensive region. Counterintuitively, we find AIS mass-loss across the full duration of the Antarctic Cold Reversal (ACR; 14,600–12,700 yrs ago), with stabilisation during the subsequent millennia of atmospheric warming. Earth-system and ice-sheet modelling suggests these contrasting trends were likely Antarctic-wide, sustained by feedbacks amplified by the delivery of Circumpolar Deep Water onto the continental shelf. Given the anti-phase relationship between inter-hemispheric climate trends across the LGT our findings demonstrate that Southern Ocean-AIS feedbacks were controlled by global atmospheric teleconnections. With increasing stratification of the Southern Ocean and intensification of mid-latitude westerly winds today, such teleconnections could amplify AIS mass loss and accelerate global sea-level rise.

  20. Shallow marine sedimentation within an active margin basin, James Ross Island, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrie, Duncan

    1989-06-01

    The Santa Marta Formation exposed on northern James Ross Island, Antarctica, represents shallow marine shelf sedimentation within an active margin basin. The formation is approximately 1000 m thick, is of uppermost Santonian to Campanian age and represents part of a 5000-6000 m thick sedimentary sequence forming the Larsen Basin. The Larsen Basin represents either a back-arc basin, or a half-graben basin, developed on the extending margin of the Weddell Sea. Twelve sedimentary facies have been recognised, which can be subdivided into two groups: those which are controlled by shelf processes and those which are related to active arc volcanism. Background shelf processes include fair-weather suspension sedimentation, storm sands and rare tidal current reworking. Active arc processes include direct settling of airfall detritus and rapid resedimentation of volcaniclastic detritus by sandy debris-flows and both high- and low-concentration turbidity currents. In addition sheet conglomerates represent debris flows that evolved from syn-sedimentary slumps. Two facies associations representing a mid to outer shelf and an inner shelf depositional setting respectively can be distinguished, with an apparent regression in the ?mid to late Campanian.

  1. Why are there few seedlings beneath the myrmecophyte Triplaris americana?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrea-Alcázar, Daniel M.; Simonetti, Javier A.

    2007-07-01

    We compared the relative importance of chemical alellopathy, pruning behaviour of resident ants and other non-related agents to ant-plant mutualism for seedling establishment beneath Triplaris americana L. (Polygonaceae), a myrmecophyte plant. We also included a preliminary analysis of effects of fragmentation on these ecological processes. Seeds and seedlings of Theobroma cacao L. (Sterculiaceae) were used as the target species in all experiments. Leaf-tissue extracts of the myrmecophyte plant did not inhibit germination of cacao seeds. Resident Pseudomyrmex triplarinus Weddell (Pseudomyrmecinae) ants did not remove seeds under the canopy of their host plants. The main seed consumer was the leaf-cutting ant Atta sexdens L. (Myrmicinae). Leaves of cacao seedlings were partially or totally pruned by Pseudomyrmex ants mainly in forest fragments studied. We offer evidence pointing to the possibility that the absence of seedlings beneath Triplaris may result from effects of both ant species. We discuss the benefits of pruning behaviour for the resident ant colony and the effects of ant-ant interactions on seedling establishment beneath this ant-plant system.

  2. Biodiversity and biogeography of Antarctic and sub-Antarctic mollusca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linse, Katrin; Griffiths, Huw J.; Barnes, David K. A.; Clarke, Andrew

    2006-04-01

    For many decades molluscan data have been critical to the establishment of the concept of a global-scale increase in species richness from the poles to the equator. Low polar diversity is key to this latitudinal cline in diversity. Here we investigate richness patterns in the two largest classes of molluscs at both local and regional scales throughout the Southern Ocean. We show that biodiversity is very patchy in the Southern Ocean (at the 1000-km scale) and test the validity of historical biogeographic sub-regions and provinces. We used multivariate analysis of biodiversity patterns at species, genus and family levels to define richness hotspots within the Southern Ocean and transition areas. This process identified the following distinct sub-regions in the Southern Ocean: Antarctic Peninsula, Weddell Sea, East Antarctic—Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctic—Enderby Land, East Antarctic—Wilkes Land, Ross Sea, and the independent Scotia arc and sub Antarctic islands. Patterns of endemism were very different between the bivalves and gastropods. On the basis of distributional ranges and radiation centres of evolutionarily successful families and genera we define three biogeographic provinces in the Southern Ocean: (1) the continental high Antarctic province excluding the Antarctic Peninsula, (2) the Scotia Sea province including the Antarctic Peninsula, and (3) the sub Antarctic province comprising the islands in the vicinity of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

  3. H2O2 in time marine troposphere and seawater of the Atlantic Ocean (48 deg N - 63 deg S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Rolf; Schrems, Otto

    1993-01-01

    Concentrations of H2O2 in gas phase and seawater have been measured in pristine regions of the Atlantic Ocean during the RV Polarstern expedition ANT X-1 from 11/15/91 to 01/02/02. A broad maximum of gaseous H2O2 mixing ratio in the troposphere was found between the tropic of cancer and the tropic of capricornus with peak values around 1.8 ppbv. The observed ratio of organic peroxides/total amount of peroxides was 0.2-0.35, in contrast to the remarkably lower ratio of 0.05-0.10 measured in the continental troposphere by other groups. In the Atlantic surface seawater the H2O2 concentrations were determined to be around 0.1 micromol/L, decreasing with increasing water depth to a value below the detection limit at approximately 100 m. We observed low H2O2 concentrations (about 0.03 micromol/L) in surface water in coastal shelf regions and in the partly ice covered Weddell Sea.

  4. Environmental extremes versus ecological extremes: impact of a massive iceberg on the population dynamics of a high-level Antarctic marine predator†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambert, Thierry; Rotella, Jay J.; Garrott, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Extreme events have been suggested to play a disproportionate role in shaping ecological processes, but our understanding of the types of environmental conditions that elicit extreme consequences in natural ecosystems is limited. Here, we investigated the impact of a massive iceberg on the dynamics of a population of Weddell seals. Reproductive rates of females were reduced, but survival appeared unaffected. We also found suggestive evidence for a prolonged shift towards higher variability in reproductive rates. The annual number of females attending colonies showed unusual swings during the iceberg period, a pattern that was apparently the consequence of changes in sea-ice conditions. In contrast to the dramatic effects that were recorded in nearby populations of emperor penguins, our results suggest that this unusual environmental event did not have an extreme impact on the population of seals in the short-term, as they managed to avoid survival costs and were able to rapidly re-achieve high levels of reproduction by the end of the perturbation. Nevertheless, population projections suggest that even this modest impact on reproductive rates could negatively affect the population in the long run if such events were to occur more frequently, as is predicted by models of climate change. PMID:23015628

  5. Incorporating Phaeocystis into a Southern Ocean ecosystem model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanlin; Moore, J. Keith

    2011-01-01

    Phaeocystis antarctica is an important phytoplankton species in the Southern Ocean. We incorporated P. antarctica into the biogeochemical elemental cycling ocean model to study Southern Ocean ecosystem dynamics and biogeochemistry. The optimum values of ecological parameters for Phaeocystis were sought through synthesizing laboratory and field observations, and the model output was evaluated with observed chlorophyll a, carbon biomass, and nutrient distributions. Several factors have been proposed to control Southern Ocean ecosystem structure, including light adaptation, iron uptake capability, and loss processes. Optimum simulation results were obtained when P. antarctica had a relatively high α (P-I curve initial slope) value and a higher half-saturation constant for iron uptake than other phytoplankton. Simulation results suggested that P. antarctica had a competitive advantage under low irradiance levels, especially in the Ross Sea and Weddell Sea. However, the distributions of P. antarctica and diatoms were also strongly influenced by iron availability. Although grazing rates had an influence on total biomass, our simulations did not show a strong influence of grazing pressure in the competition between P. antarctica and diatoms. However, limited observations and the relative simplicity of zooplankton in our model suggest further research is needed. Overall, P. antarctica contributed ˜13% of annual primary production and ˜19% of sinking carbon export in the Southern Ocean (>40°S) in our best case simulation. At higher latitudes (>60°S) P. antarctica accounts for ˜23% of annual primary production and ˜30% of sinking carbon export.

  6. Seaonal Sea Ice as a source of organo-halogens during Polar night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Katarina; Granfors, Anna; Ahnoff, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The release of bromine from snow and sea ice surfaces has mainly been attributed to the reaction of hypobromous acid with bromide at acidic conditions to form Br2. Little attention has been given to the role of volatile halogenated organic compounds (organo-halogens) in the formation of reactive halogen species in the atmosphere during bromine explosion events. The load of organo-halogens was studied during a winter expedition to the Weddell Sea in June to August 2013. These compounds are emitted from the different compartments of the cryosphere to the atmosphere where they are photolysed to BrO and IO, which are involved in the degradation of ozone. We will present results that show the importance of organo-halogens formed during polar winter. In newly formed ice, in contrast to summer sea ice, the concentration of organo-bromine was found at levels as high as nM. These high concentrations were reflected both in frost flowers and in the sea-snow interface. Moreover, air measurements revealed high loads of organo-bromine over the sea ice. The situation was similar for iodinated compounds. Interestingly, the precursers of IO, mainly diiodomethane, could be measured in sea ice and snow, most probably due to the low light levels.

  7. Composition and abundance of epibenthic-sledge catches in the South Polar Front of the Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, A.; Havermans, C.; Janussen, D.; Jörger, K. M.; Meyer-Löbbecke, A.; Schnurr, S.; Schüller, M.; Schwabe, E.; Brandão, S. N.; Würzberg, L.

    2014-10-01

    An epibenthic sledge (EBS) was deployed at seven different deep-sea stations along the South Polar Front of the Atlantic in order to explore the composition and abundance of macrofaunal organisms and to identify the most abundant taxa in this transition zone to the Southern Ocean. In total 3,130 specimens were sampled by means of the EBS on board of RV Polarstern during the expedition ANT-XXVIII/3 in the austral summer of 2012. Benthic and suprabenthic Crustacea occurred to be most frequent in the samples. Among those, copepods were by far most numerous, with 1,585 specimens followed by the peracarid taxa Isopoda (236 ind.), Amphipoda (103 ind.), Tanaidacea (78 ind.) and Cumacea (50 ind.). Annelida were represented by a high number of specimens belonging to different polychaete taxa (404 ind.). The molluscan fauna was clearly dominated by Bivalvia (255 ind.), followed in numbers of specimens by Gastropoda (47 ind.). The deep-sea benthos sampled along the Southern Polar Front occurred in surprisingly low abundances, contrasting the largely high surface productivity of the area. Numbers of specimens across different macrofaunal taxa and especially of peracarid crustaceans underscored by far those from South Ocean sites at higher latitudes in the Weddell Sea.

  8. Escherichia coli out in the cold: Dissemination of human-derived bacteria into the Antarctic microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Michelle L; Samuel, Angelingifta; Smith, James J; Stark, Jonathon S; Gillings, Michael R; Gordon, David M

    2016-08-01

    Discharge of untreated sewage into Antarctic environments presents a risk of introducing non-native microorganisms, but until now, adverse consequences have not been conclusively identified. Here we show that sewage disposal introduces human derived Escherichia coli carrying mobile genetic elements and virulence traits with the potential to affect the diversity and evolution of native Antarctic microbial communities. We compared E. coli recovered from environmental and animal sources in Antarctica to a reference collection of E. coli from humans and non-Antarctic animals. The distribution of phylogenetic groups and frequency of 11 virulence factors amongst the Antarctic isolates were characteristic of E. coli strains more commonly associated with humans. The rapidly emerging E. coli ST131 and ST95 clones were found amongst the Antarctic isolates, and ST95 was the predominant E. coli recovered from Weddell seals. Class 1 integrons were found in 15% of the Antarctic E. coli with 4 of 5 identified gene cassette arrays containing antibiotic resistance genes matching those common in clinical contexts. Disposing untreated sewage into the Antarctic environment does disseminate non-native microorganisms, but the extent of this impact and implications for Antarctic ecosystem health are, as yet, poorly understood.

  9. Evidence for the former existence of a thicker ice sheet on the Vestfjella nunataks in western Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lintinen, P.

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Vestfjella (73-74°S, 13-16°W is a 130 km long nunatak range in western Dronning Maud Land in East Antarctica, and its northern and southern ends are situated close to the present ice sheet grounding-line. Striations and lodgement till on nunatak Basen indicate that the northernmost Vestfjella nunataks were formerly covered by a thicker Antarctic ice sheet. Striations on the summit ridge of nunatak Plogen indicate that the minimum change in ice thickness has been 700 m at the present ice sheet grounding-line. The relatively uniform oldest striation direction on different nunatak summits and the altitude of Plogen, which is less than 200 m lower than the highest Vestfjella summits, indicates that the whole of Vestfjella may have been covered by an ice sheet. Oxidation of till surface stones and an increased clay fraction in the upper part of the till layer were the only indications of soil formation on Basen. The unweathered nature of the Basen lodgement till indicate a relatively young age for deglaciation. This conclusion is also supported by age determinations and sedimentological data obtained from Weddell Sea sediments by Norwegian researchers, suggesting that a grounded ice sheet extended to the shelf edge at around 21 ka B.P. However the age of the glaciation which covered Basen and Plogen and the subsequent deglaciation is not based on precise dates and therefore the late Wisconsinan/Weichselian age is only a working hypothesis.

  10. Analysis of the projected regional sea-ice changes in the Southern Ocean during the twenty-first century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefebvre, W.; Goosse, H. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Institut d' Astronomie et de Geophysique Georges Lemaitre, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2008-01-15

    Using the set of simulations performed with atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) for the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR4), the projected regional distribution of sea ice for the twenty-first century has been investigated. Averaged over all those model simulations, the current climate is reasonably well reproduced. However, this averaging procedure hides the errors from individual models. Over the twentieth century, the multimodel average simulates a larger sea-ice concentration decrease around the Antarctic Peninsula compared to other regions, which is in qualitative agreement with observations. This is likely related to the positive trend in the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) index over the twentieth century, in both observations and in the multimodel average. Despite the simulated positive future trend in SAM, such a regional feature around the Antarctic Peninsula is absent in the projected sea-ice change for the end of the twenty-first century. The maximum decrease is indeed located over the central Weddell Sea and the Amundsen-Bellingshausen Seas. In most models, changes in the oceanic currents could play a role in the regional distribution of the sea ice, especially in the Ross Sea, where stronger southward currents could be responsible for a smaller sea-ice decrease during the twenty-first century. Finally, changes in the mixed layer depth can be found in some models, inducing locally strong changes in the sea-ice concentration. (orig.)

  11. Ice-flow reorganization in West Antarctica 2.5 kyr ago dated using radar-derived englacial flow velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingslake, Jonathan; Martín, Carlos; Arthern, Robert J.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; King, Edward C.

    2016-09-01

    We date a recent ice-flow reorganization of an ice divide in the Weddell Sea Sector, West Antarctica, using a novel combination of inverse methods and ice-penetrating radars. We invert for two-dimensional ice flow within an ice divide from data collected with a phase-sensitive ice-penetrating radar while accounting for the effect of firn on radar propagation and ice flow. By comparing isochronal layers simulated using radar-derived flow velocities with internal layers observed with an impulse radar, we show that the divide's internal structure is not in a steady state but underwent a disturbance, potentially implying a regional ice-flow reorganization, 2.5 (1.8-2.9) kyr B.P. Our data are consistent with slow ice flow in this location before the reorganization and the ice divide subsequently remaining stationary. These findings increase our knowledge of the glacial history of a region that lacks dated constraints on late-Holocene ice-sheet retreat and provides a key target for models that reconstruct and predict ice-sheet behavior.

  12. Assessment of C-band compact polarimetry SAR for sea ice classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xi; ZHANG Jie; LIU Meijie; MENG Junmin

    2016-01-01

    0HH 0V V 0 HV The C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from the Bohai Sea of China, the Labrador Sea in the Arctic and the Weddell Sea in the Antarctic are used to analyze and discuss the sea ice full polarimetric information reconstruction ability under compact polarimetric modes. The type of compact polarimetric mode which has the highest reconstructed accuracy is analyzed, along with the performance impact of the reconstructed pseudo quad-pol SAR data on the sea ice detection and sea ice classification. According to the assessment and analysis, it is recommended to adopt the CTLR mode for reconstructing the polarimetric parameters , ,H andα, while for reconstructing the polarimetric parameters ,ρH-V,λ1 andλ2, it is recommended to use the π/4 mode. Moreover, it is recommended to use the π/4 mode in studying the action effects between the electromagnetic waves and sea ice, but it is recommended to use the CTLR mode for studying the sea ice classification.

  13. Anti-inflammatory activity in selected Antarctic benthic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eMoles

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic benthos was prospected in search for anti-inflammatory activity in polar benthic invertebrates, in two different geographical areas: deep-bottoms of the Eastern Weddell Sea and shallow-waters of the South Shetland Islands. A total of 36 benthic algae and invertebrate species were selected to perform solubility tests in order to test them for anti-inflammatory activity. From these, ethanol extracts of ten species from five different phyla resulted suitable to be studied in cell macrophage cultures (RAW 264.7. Cytotoxicity (MTT method and production of inflammatory mediators (prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4, interleukin-1 were determined at three extract concentrations (50, 125, 250 g/mL. Bioassays resulted in four different species showing anti-inflammatory activity corresponding to three sponges: Mycale (Oxymycale acerata, Isodictya erinacea, and I. toxophila; and one hemichordate: Cephalodiscus sp. These results show that Antarctic sessile invertebrates may have great value as a source of lead compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications.

  14. Estimating the recharge properties of the deep ocean using noble gases and helium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loose, Brice; Jenkins, William J.; Moriarty, Roisin; Brown, Peter; Jullion, Loic; Naveira Garabato, Alberto C.; Torres Valdes, Sinhue; Hoppema, Mario; Ballentine, Chris; Meredith, Michael P.

    2016-08-01

    The distribution of noble gases and helium isotopes in the dense shelf waters of Antarctica reflects the boundary conditions near the ocean surface: air-sea exchange, sea ice formation, and subsurface ice melt. We use a nonlinear least squares solution to determine the value of the recharge temperature and salinity, as well as the excess air injection and glacial meltwater content throughout the water column and in the precursor to Antarctic Bottom Water. The noble gas-derived recharge temperature and salinity in the Weddell Gyre are -1.95°C and 34.95 psu near 5500 m; these cold, salty recharge values are a result of surface cooling as well as brine rejection during sea ice formation in Antarctic polynyas. In comparison, the global value for deep water recharge temperature is -0.44°C at 5500 m, which is 1.5°C warmer than the southern hemisphere deep water recharge temperature, reflecting a distinct contribution from the north Atlantic. The contrast between northern and southern hemisphere recharge properties highlights the impact of sea ice formation on setting the gas properties in southern sourced deep water. Below 1000 m, glacial meltwater averages 3.5‰ by volume and represents greater than 50% of the excess neon and argon found in the water column. These results indicate glacial melt has a nonnegligible impact on the atmospheric gas content of Antarctic Bottom Water.

  15. Episodic Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous intraplate compression in Central Patagonia during Gondwana breakup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, César; Gianni, Guido; Echaurren, Andrés; Kingler, Federico Lince; Folguera, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    From Lower Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous, several intraplate compression events affected discrete sectors of Central Patagonia, under a general context of crustal extension associated with Gondwana breakup. This was demonstrated by means of 2D and 3D seismic and borehole data, which show partial inversion of Lower and Middle Jurassic extensional structures of the Chubut and Cañadón Asfalto basins, during the earliest stages of breakup. A comparison with surrounding areas in Patagonia, where similar Jurassic intraplate compression was described, allowed the discrimination of three discrete pulses of subtle compression (C1: ∼188-185 Ma; C2: ∼170-163; C3: ∼157-136? Ma). Interestingly, episodic intraplate compressional events are closely followed by high flux magmatic events linked to the westward expansion of the Karoo-Ferrar thermal anomaly, which impacted on the lithosphere of southwest Gondwana in Lower Jurassic. In addition, we determined the approximate direction of the main compressive strain (σ1) compatible with other Jurassic intraplate belts of South America. These observations led us to propose a linkage between a thermo mechanically weakened continental crust due to LIPs activity, changes in plate motions and ridge-push forces generated by the opening of the Weddell Sea, in order to explain intraplate shortening, interrupted while Karoo LIPs magmatic invigoration took place.

  16. Correlation of Ice-Rafted Detritus in South Atlantic Sediments with Climate Proxies in Polar Ice over the Last Glacial Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L. Kanfoush

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous study identified 6–7 millennial-scale episodes of South Atlantic ice-rafted sediment deposition (SA events during the glaciation. Questions remain, however, regarding their origin, significance for sea-ice and/or Antarctic ice-sheet dynamics, and relationship to climate. Here I correlate sediment core (TTN057–21 SA events to Greenland and Antarctic ice using two independent methods, stable isotopes and geomagnetic paleointensity, placing SA events in the context of polar climate change in both hemispheres. Marine isotopic stage (MIS 3 SA events generally coincided with Greenland interstadials and with cooling following Antarctic warm events (A1-A4. This anti-phase behavior is best illustrated when SA0 coincided with both the Antarctic Cold Reversal and Bolling-Allerod warming in Greenland. Moreover, SA events coincide with sea-level rises during the deglaciation (mwp1A and MIS 3 (30.4, 38.3, 43.7, 51.5 ka, implying unpinning of grounded Weddell Sea region ice masses discharged debris-laden bergs that had a chilling effect on South Atlantic surface temperatures.

  17. The Lost Seal: A Scientific Children's Book from the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network Schoolyard Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S.

    2006-12-01

    A true story about an encounter between LTER scientists and a young Weddell seal in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica has inspired a new children's book, The Lost Seal. Written by Diane McKnight, professor of environmental engineering at the University of Colorado and fellow of the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR), the book is an engaging introduction to Antarctica and the Dry Valleys. McKnight tells the story of the seal in the context of the harsh Dry Valleys environment and the LTER scientific work taking place there. The book includes information about hydrology, limnology, and microbial ecology. Artwork by professional illustrator Dorothy Emerling connects young readers with the environment and wildlife of Antarctica, while artwork from children in Australia, England, New Zealand, and the United States emphasizes the international nature of interest in the Antarctic. The Lost Seal has been published in time for the International Polar Year and is the second book in the NSF-supported LTER children's book series. The Lost Seal is at the center of many outreach activities: classroom activities in four countries; a colorful children's book distributed to schools and sold in national parks; a teacher's edition of the book; curriculum development in Boulder, Colorado schools; an educational web site (www.mcmlter.org/lostseal); and workshops for scientists on how to create scientific children's literature. This session will describe the various outreach activities and show how lessons learned from publication of The Lost Seal might apply to other IPY outreach efforts.

  18. Ship-borne wind LIDAR measurements in the Arctic and Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentek, Rolf; Heinemann, Günther; Kohnemann, Svenja

    2017-04-01

    During the two cruises of RV Polarstern (Alfred Wegener Institute, Germany) a wind LIDAR was installed on the upper deck of the ship. The measurements in the Arctic were taken over two weeks (June 2014) in the Fram Strait and in the Antarctic over six weeks (December/January 2015/2016) in the Weddell Sea. Measurements included horizontal and vertical scan programs that allow for the computation of different wind profiles. Since the LIDAR was not motion-stabilized, motion correction was done during post processing. Depending on weather condition data up to 1 km (and in single cases up to 2 km) height was collected. An evaluation of the derived vertical wind profiles was done by comparing them to on board surface measurements and radio soundings. The RMSD of wind speed between the LIDAR and the radiosonde measurements was found as 0.7 - 1.2 m/s depending on data selection and height. Overall, the wind LIDAR is an excellent tool for the measurement of wind profiles with high spatial (10m) and temporal resolution (15min).

  19. Coccolithophorids in polar waters: Wigwamma spp. revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Østergaard, Jette B.; Heldal, Mikal

    2013-01-01

    A contingent of weakly calcified coccolithophorid genera and species were described from polar regions almost 40 years ago. In the interim period a few additional findings have been reported enlarging the realm of some of the species. The genus Wigwamma is revisited here with the purpose of provi......A contingent of weakly calcified coccolithophorid genera and species were described from polar regions almost 40 years ago. In the interim period a few additional findings have been reported enlarging the realm of some of the species. The genus Wigwamma is revisited here with the purpose...... of providing, based on additional sampling from both polar regions, an update on species morphology, life history events and biogeography that can serve as a reference for the future. A new genus, Pseudowigwamma gen. nov. is described to accommodate Wigwamma scenozonion, a species which critically deviates...... from a core group of five Wigwamma species in terms of coccolith morphology and life history events. Wigwamma armatura sp. nov. is described on the basis of material from the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. While fitting nicely into the Wigwamma generic concept, the species adds new dimensions to the overall...

  20. Weddellian marine/coastal vertebrates diversity from a basal horizon (Ypresian, Eocene of the Cucullaea I Allomember, La Meseta formation, Seymour (Marambio Island, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo A. Reguero

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The La Meseta Formation crops out in Seymour/Marambio Island, Weddell Sea, northeast of the Antarctic Peninsula and contains one of the world's most diverse assemblages of Weddellian marine/coastal verte-brates of Early Eocene (Ypresian age. The La Meseta Formation is composed of poorly consolidated, marine sandstones and siltstones which were deposited in a coastal, deltaic and/or estuarine environment. It includes marine invertebrates and vertebrates as well as terrestrial vertebrates and plants. The highly fossiliferous basal horizon (Cucullaeashell bed, Telm 4 of Sadler 1988 of the CucullaeaI Allomember is a laterally extensive shell bed with sandy matrix. The fish remains, including 35 species from 26 families, of the Ypresian Cucullaeabed represent one of the most abundant and diverse fossil vertebrate faunas yet recorded in southern latitudes. Stratigraphic distribution and phylogenetic relationships of the Weddellian sphenisciforms are consistent with a first radiation of this group in the Early Eocene. The first inquestionable archaeocete from Antarctica is recorded in this unit and is referred to a new taxon.

  1. A Southern Ocean mode of multidecadal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bars, D.; Viebahn, J. P.; Dijkstra, H. A.

    2016-03-01

    A 250 year simulation of a strongly eddying global version of the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) model reveals a new mode of intrinsic multidecadal variability, the Southern Ocean Mode (SOM), with a period of 40-50 year. The peak-to-peak difference in the global ocean heat content within a multidecadal cycle is up to 60 ZJ. This change results from surface heat flux variations in the South Atlantic and propagation of temperature anomalies along the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and into the Weddell gyre around 30°E. The temperature anomalies propagate as deep as 5000 m along the isopycnals between 50°S and 30°S and induce multidecadal changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. A positive feedback loop between the generation of eddies through baroclinic instability and the dynamics of the mean circulation is essential for the existence of the SOM. The dominant physics appears similar to that responsible for variability found in a three-layer quasi-geostrophic eddy-resolving model. This combined with the fact that the SOM is not found in a noneddying version of the same global POP model further suggests that eddy processes are crucial for its existence and/or excitation.

  2. Impacts of marine instability across the East Antarctic Ice Sheet on Southern Ocean dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Steven; Fogwill, Christopher; Turney, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Recent observations and modelling studies have demonstrated the potential for rapid and substantial retreat of large sectors of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). This has major implications for ocean circulation and global sea level. Here we examine the effects of increasing meltwater from the Wilkes Basin, one of the major marine-based sectors of the EAIS, on Southern Ocean dynamics. Climate model simulations reveal that the meltwater flux rapidly stratifies surface waters, leading to a dramatic decrease in the rate of Antarctic Bottom Water formation. The surface ocean cools but, critically, the Southern Ocean warms by more than 1oC at depth. This warming is accompanied by a Southern Oceanwide "domino effect", whereby the warming signal propagates westward with depth. Our results suggest that melting of one sector of the EAIS could result in accelerated warming across other sectors, including the Weddell Sea sector of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Thus, localised melting of the EAIS could potentially destabilise the wider Antarctic Ice Sheet.

  3. Ice Flows: A Game-based Learning approach to Science Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Brocq, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Game-based learning allows people to become immersed in an environment, and learn how the system functions and responds to change through playing a game. Science and gaming share a similar characteristic: they both involve learning and understanding the rules of the environment you are in, in order to achieve your objective. I will share experiences of developing and using the educational game "Ice Flows" for science communication. The game tasks the player with getting a penguin to its destination, through controlling the size of the ice sheet via ocean temperature and snowfall. Therefore, the game aims to educate the user about the environmental controls on the behaviour of the ice sheet, whilst they are enjoying playing a game with penguins. The game was funded by a NERC Large Grant entitled "Ice shelves in a warming world: Filchner Ice Shelf system, Antarctica", so uses data from the Weddell Sea sector of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet to generate unique levels. The game will be easily expandable to other regions of Antarctica and beyond, with the ultimate aim of giving a full understanding to the user of different ice flow regimes across the planet.

  4. Impacts of the north and tropical Atlantic Ocean on the Antarctic Peninsula and sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xichen; Holland, David M; Gerber, Edwin P; Yoo, Changhyun

    2014-01-23

    In recent decades, Antarctica has experienced pronounced climate changes. The Antarctic Peninsula exhibited the strongest warming of any region on the planet, causing rapid changes in land ice. Additionally, in contrast to the sea-ice decline over the Arctic, Antarctic sea ice has not declined, but has instead undergone a perplexing redistribution. Antarctic climate is influenced by, among other factors, changes in radiative forcing and remote Pacific climate variability, but none explains the observed Antarctic Peninsula warming or the sea-ice redistribution in austral winter. However, in the north and tropical Atlantic Ocean, the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (a leading mode of sea surface temperature variability) has been overlooked in this context. Here we show that sea surface warming related to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation reduces the surface pressure in the Amundsen Sea and contributes to the observed dipole-like sea-ice redistribution between the Ross and Amundsen-Bellingshausen-Weddell seas and to the Antarctic Peninsula warming. Support for these findings comes from analysis of observational and reanalysis data, and independently from both comprehensive and idealized atmospheric model simulations. We suggest that the north and tropical Atlantic is important for projections of future climate change in Antarctica, and has the potential to affect the global thermohaline circulation and sea-level change.

  5. A paleomagnetic study of the Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete, F.; Arriagada, C.; Roperch, P.

    2009-05-01

    In the Paleozoic, South America, South Africa and Antarctica were part of Gondwana. The Weddell Sea began to form at about 146 Ma, after rifting between the Antarctic Peninsula and southernmost South America. Much uncertainty still exists about the geometrical fit and subsequent drift history between Patagonia and Antarctica. Geophysical and geological data which describe the tectonic history are sparsely distributed and often of poor quality. During the last two years we have collected more than 1000 paleomagnetic samples from 70 sites at several localities (King George Island, Robert Island, Yankee Bay, Half Moon Island, Byers Peninsula and Snow Island) from the South Shetland Islands and Anderson Island in the northern tip of Antarctic Peninsula. Our main objective was to provide first-order constraints on latitudinal displacements and the amount of tectonic rotations as an essential test of published tectonic models. Paleomagnetic results were obtained from 50 sites. All samples from sites in volcanic and intrusive rocks have well-defined univectorial magnetizations. Unfortunately, all sites in late Paleozoic sediments have been remagnetized and the magnetizations are often unstable upon thermal demagnetization. Cretaceous and Cenozoic units display very little apparent polar wander. Results from intrusive rocks of expected Jurassic age do not confirm the expected relative rotation betwen the Antarctic Peninsula and East Antarctica. Further radiometric dating are needed to confirm the age of these units.

  6. Impacts of marine instability across the East Antarctic Ice Sheet on Southern Ocean dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Steven J.; Fogwill, Christopher J.; Turney, Christian S. M.

    2016-09-01

    Recent observations and modelling studies have demonstrated the potential for rapid and substantial retreat of large sectors of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). This has major implications for ocean circulation and global sea level. Here we examine the effects of increasing meltwater from the Wilkes Basin, one of the major marine-based sectors of the EAIS, on Southern Ocean dynamics. Climate model simulations reveal that the meltwater flux rapidly stratifies surface waters, leading to a dramatic decrease in the rate of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) formation. The surface ocean cools but, critically, the Southern Ocean warms by more than 1 °C at depth. This warming is accompanied by a Southern Ocean-wide "domino effect", whereby the warming signal propagates westward with depth. Our results suggest that melting of one sector of the EAIS could result in accelerated warming across other sectors, including the Weddell Sea sector of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Thus, localised melting of the EAIS could potentially destabilise the wider Antarctic Ice Sheet.

  7. Observations of asexual reproductive strategies in Antarctic hexactinellid sponges from ROV video records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixidó, Núria; Gili, Josep-Maria; Uriz, María-J.; Gutt, Julian; Arntz, Wolf E.

    2006-04-01

    Hexactinellid sponges are one of the structuring taxa of benthic communities on the Weddell Sea shelf (Antarctica). However, little is known about their reproduction patterns (larval development, release, settlement, and recruitment), particularly in relation to sexual and asexual processes in sponge populations. Video stations obtained during several expeditions covering a wide depth range and different areas recorded a high frequency of asexual reproductive strategies (ARS) (bipartition and budding) among hexactinellids. Analysis of seabed video strips between 108 and 256 m depth, representing an area of 1400 m 2, showed that about 28% of these sponges exhibited ARS. The Rossella nuda type dominated most of the video stations and exhibited the highest proportion of budding (35%). This proportion increased with the size class. Size class >20 cm exhibited in all the stations a mean value of 8.3±0.7 (SE) for primary and of 2.5±0.2 (SE) for secondary propagules per sponge, respectively. Results from a shallow station (Stn 059, 117 m depth) showed the highest relative abundance of R. nuda type and budding (>20 cm ˜72%, 10-20 cm ˜60%, 5-10 cm ˜12%, and asexual reproduction in hexactinellid sponges may be more frequent than has been thought before and it may greatly influence the genetic structure of populations.

  8. The vocal monotony of monogamy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jeanette

    2003-04-01

    There are four phocids in waters around Antarctica: Weddell, leopard, crabeater, and Ross seals. These four species provide a unique opportunity to examine underwater vocal behavior in species sharing the same ecosystem. Some species live in pack ice, others in factice, but all are restricted to the Antarctic or sub-Antarctic islands. All breed and produce vocalizations under water. Social systems range from polygyny in large breeding colonies, to serial monogamy, to solitary species. The type of mating system influences the number of underwater vocalizations in the repertoire, with monogamous seals producing only a single call, polygynous species producing up to 35 calls, and solitary species an intermediate number of about 10 calls. Breeding occurs during the austral spring and each species carves-out an acoustic niche for communicating, with species using different frequency ranges, temporal patterns, and amplitude changes to convey their species-specific calls and presumably reduce acoustic competition. Some species exhibit geographic variations in their vocalizations around the continent, which may reflect discrete breeding populations. Some seals become silent during a vulnerable time of predation by killer whales, perhaps to avoid detection. Overall, vocalizations of these seals exhibit adaptive characteristics that reflect the co-evolution among species in the same ecosystem.

  9. Chemical Atmosphere-Snow-Sea Ice Interactions: defining future research in the field, lab and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The air-snow-sea ice system plays an important role in the global cycling of nitrogen, halogens, trace metals or carbon, including greenhouse gases (e.g. CO2 air-sea flux), and therefore influences also climate. Its impact on atmospheric composition is illustrated for example by dramatic ozone and mercury depletion events which occur within or close to the sea ice zone (SIZ) mostly during polar spring and are catalysed by halogens released from SIZ ice, snow or aerosol. Recent field campaigns in the high Arctic (e.g. BROMEX, OASIS) and Antarctic (Weddell sea cruises) highlight the importance of snow on sea ice as a chemical reservoir and reactor, even during polar night. However, many processes, participating chemical species and their interactions are still poorly understood and/or lack any representation in current models. Furthermore, recent lab studies provide a lot of detail on the chemical environment and processes but need to be integrated much better to improve our understanding of a rapidly changing natural environment. During a 3-day workshop held in Cambridge/UK in October 2013 more than 60 scientists from 15 countries who work on the physics, chemistry or biology of the atmosphere-snow-sea ice system discussed research status and challenges, which need to be addressed in the near future. In this presentation I will give a summary of the main research questions identified during this workshop as well as ways forward to answer them through a community-based interdisciplinary approach.

  10. Millennial-scale projection of oceanic oxygen change due to global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Akitomo; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Shigemitsu, Masahito; Oka, Akira; Takahashi, Kunio; Ohgaito, Rumi; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Global warming is expected to globally decrease ocean oxygen concentrations by sea surface warming and ocean circulation change. Oxygen reduction is expected to persist for a thousand years or more, even after atmospheric carbon dioxide stops rising. However, long-term changes in ocean oxygen and circulation are still unclear. Here we simulate multimillennium changes in ocean circulation and oxygen under doubling and quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide, using GCM (MIROC) and an offline biogeochemical model. In the first 500 years, global oxygen concentration decreases, consistent with previous studies. Thereafter, however, the oxygen concentration in the deep ocean globally recovers and overshoots at the end of the simulations, despite surface oxygen decrease and weaker AMOC. This is because, after the initial cessation, the recovery and overshooting of deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea enhance ventilation and supply oxygen-rich surface waters to deep ocean. Another contributor to deep ocean oxygenation is seawater warming, which reduces the export production and shifts the organic matter remineralization to the upper water column. Our results indicate that the change in ocean circulation in the Southern Ocean potentially drives millennial-scale oxygenation in deep ocean, which is opposite to the centennial-scale global oxygen reduction and general expectation.

  11. Isolation of novel psychrophilic bacteria from Arctic sea ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of culturable psychrophilic bacteria associated with sea ice from the high latitude regions of Canadian Basin and Chukchi Sea, Arctic, was investigated. A total of 34 psychropilic strains were isolated using three methods of (Ⅰ) dilution plating (at 4 ℃), (Ⅱ) bath culturing (at -1 ℃) and dilution plating, and (Ⅲ) cold shock (-20 ℃ for 24 h), bath culturing and dilution plating under aerobic conditions. Sea-ice samples were exposed to -20 ℃ for 24 h that might reduce the number of common microorganisms and encourage outgrowth of psychrophilic strains. This process might be able to be introduced to isolation psychrophilic bacteria from other environmental samples in future study. 16S rDNA nearly full-length sequence analysis revealed that psychrophilic strains felled in two phylogenetic divisions, γ-proteobacteria (in the genera Colwellia、Marinobacter、Shewanella、Glaciecola、Marinomonas and Pseudoalteromonas) and Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides (Flavobacterium and Psychroflexus). Fifteen of bacterial isolates quite likely represented novel species (16S rDNA sequence similarity below 98%). One of strains (BSi20002) from Canadian Basin showed 100% sequence similarity to that of Marinobacter sp. ANT8277 isolated from the Antarctic Weddell sea ice, suggesting bacteria may have a bipolar distribution at the species level.

  12. Assessment of the ECCO2 reanalysis on the representation of Antarctic Bottom Water properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Azaneu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the ability of the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean – Phase II (ECCO2 reanalysis to represent the hydrographic properties and variability of the Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW in the Southern Ocean. We used a twenty-year observational database to perform comparisons of hydrographic properties and reanalysis data for the same time period (1992–2011. In addition, we evaluated four case studies based on current meter data and the AABW volume transport estimates previously reported in the literature. The main Southern Ocean oceanographic features, as well as the characteristic shape of the regional potential temperature–salinity (θ–S diagrams, are adequately represented by the reanalysis. However, the opening of an oceanic polynya in the Weddell Sea Sector, which has been clearly visible since 2005, contributed to an unrealistic representation of the hydrographic properties of the Southern Ocean primarily after 2004. In this sense, our analyses focused on the period that was identified as more reliable (1992–2004. In general, the reanalysis data showed surface waters that were warmer, saltier, and denser than observations, which may have resulted from the absence of Ice Shelf Water and from the overestimation of sea ice concentrations that limit oceanic heat loss during austral winters. Intermediate waters were generally colder, fresher, and denser than observations, whereas deep waters were warmer and less dense. These differences in deep water properties were partially a result of the inability to reproduce the densest AABW variety by reanalysis for most of the analyzed period and also because of the model's relatively coarse vertical resolution. Despite differences in absolute values, the upper AABW limit (γn ≥ 28.27 kg m−3 and AABW occupied area were well represented in the WOCE repeat sections SR2 and SR4 for the studied periods. In section WOCE SR3, however, the estimates from the differences were

  13. Gondwana breakup via double-saloon-door rifting and seafloor spreading in a backarc basin during subduction rollback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. K.

    2007-12-01

    A model has been developed where two arc-parallel rifts propagate in opposite directions from an initial central location during backarc seafloor spreading and subduction rollback. The resultant geometry causes pairs of terranes to simultaneously rotate clockwise and counterclockwise like the motion of double-saloon-doors about their hinges. As movement proceeds and the two terranes rotate, a gap begins to extend between them, where a third rift initiates and propagates in the opposite direction to subduction rollback. Observations from the Oligocene to Recent Western Mediterranean, the Miocene to Recent Carpathians, the Miocene to Recent Aegean and the Oligocene to Recent Caribbean point to a two-stage process. Initially, pairs of terranes comprising a pre-existing retro-arc fold thrust belt and magmatic arc rotate about poles and accrete to adjacent continents. Terrane docking reduces the width of the subduction zone, leading to a second phase during which subduction to strike-slip transitions initiate. The clockwise rotated terrane is caught up in a dextral strike-slip zone, whereas the counterclockwise rotated terrane is entrained in a sinistral strike-slip fault system. The likely driving force is a pair of rotational torques caused by slab sinking and rollback of a curved subduction hingeline. By analogy with the above model, a revised five-stage Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous Gondwana dispersal model is proposed in which three plates always separate about a single triple rift or triple junction in the Weddell Sea area. Seven features are considered diagnostic of double-saloon-door rifting and seafloor spreading: earliest movement involves clockwise and counterclockwise rotations of the Falkland Islands Block and the Ellsworth Whitmore Terrane respectively; terranes comprise areas of a pre-existing retro-arc fold thrust belt (the Permo-Triassic Gondwanide Orogeny) attached to an accretionary wedge/magmatic arc; the Falklands Islands Block is initially

  14. Application of remotely piloted aircraft systems in observing the atmospheric boundary layer over Antarctic sea ice in winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius O. Jonassen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to explore the potential of combining measurements from fixed- and rotary-wing remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS to complement data sets from radio soundings as well as ship and sea-ice-based instrumentation for atmospheric boundary layer (ABL profiling. This study represents a proof-of-concept of RPAS observations in the Antarctic sea-ice zone. We present first results from the RV Polarstern Antarctic winter expedition in the Weddell Sea in June–August 2013, during which three RPAS were operated to measure temperature, humidity and wind; a fixed-wing small unmanned meteorological observer (SUMO, a fixed-wing meteorological mini-aerial vehicle, and an advanced mission and operation research quadcopter. A total of 86 RPAS flights showed a strongly varying ABL structure ranging from slightly unstable temperature stratification near the surface to conditions with strong surface-based temperature inversions. The RPAS observations supplement the regular upper air soundings and standard meteorological measurements made during the campaign. The SUMO and quadcopter temperature profiles agree very well and, excluding cases with strong temperature inversions, 70% of the variance in the difference between the SUMO and quadcopter temperature profiles can be explained by natural, temporal, temperature fluctuations. Strong temperature inversions cause the largest differences, which are induced by SUMO's high climb rates and slow sensor response. Under such conditions, the quadcopter, with its slower climb rate and faster sensor, is very useful in obtaining accurate temperature profiles in the lowest 100 m above the sea ice.

  15. Células de Circulação Meridional Durante os Eventos Extremos de Gelo Marinho Antártico

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    Camila Bertoletti Carpenedo

    Full Text Available Resumo Como a borda do gelo marinho antártico está localizada em uma região muito sensível, sob a Frente Polar Antártica, existe um grande potencial da variabilidade do gelo marinho afetar a circulação atmosférica. Assim, o objetivo deste estudo foi investigar as possíveis relações entre os eventos extremos de gelo marinho antártico e as células de circulação meridional no Pacífico Sudeste, região onde há intensa variabilidade em várias escalas de tempo. Os resultados mostram que quando há eventos extremos de expansão de gelo marinho no setor do mar de Ross, existe um resfriamento da TSM, que resulta em uma atmosfera adjacente fria, aumentando os gradientes térmicos entre a borda do gelo marinho e a região de mar aberto. Os gradientes de pressão são fortalecidos, fortalecendo o cinturão circumpolar de baixas pressões e o jato polar. Assim, existe um fortalecimento do ramo ascendente da célula de Ferrel sobre o Oceano Austral, enquanto há enfraquecimento nas latitudes médias, por conservação de massa. Observamos o padrão oposto em eventos extremos de retração de gelo marinho no setor do mar de Ross e expansão no setor do mar de Weddell.

  16. Erosional and depositional contourite features at the transition between the western Scotia Sea and southern South Atlantic Ocean: links with regional water-mass circulation since the Middle Miocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Lara F.; Hernández-Molina, F. Javier; Esteban, Federico D.; Tassone, Alejandro; Piola, Alberto R.; Maldonado, Andrés; Preu, Benedict; Violante, Roberto A.; Lodolo, Emanuele

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterise the morpho-sedimentary features and main stratigraphic stacking pattern off the Tierra del Fuego continental margin, the north-western sector of the Scotia Sea abyssal plain (Yaghan Basin) and the Malvinas/Falkland depression, based on single- and multi-channel seismic profiles. Distinct contourite features were identified within the sedimentary record from the Middle Miocene onwards. Each major drift developed in a water depth range coincident with a particular water mass, contourite terraces on top of some of these drifts being associated with interfaces between water masses. Two major palaeoceanographic changes were identified. One took place in the Middle Miocene with the onset of Antarctic Intermediate Water flow and the enhancement of Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) flow, coevally with the onset of Weddell Sea Deep Water flow in the Scotia Sea. Another palaeoceanographic change occurred on the abyssal plain of the Yaghan Basin in the Late Miocene as a consequence of the onset of Southeast Pacific Deep Water flow and its complex interaction with the lower branch of the CDW. Interestingly, these two periods of change in bottom currents are coincident with regional tectonic episodes, as well as climate and Antarctic ice sheet oscillations. The results convincingly demonstrate that the identification of contourite features on the present-day seafloor and within the sedimentary record is the key for decoding the circulation of water masses in the past. Nevertheless, further detailed studies, especially the recovery of drill cores, are necessary to establish a more robust chronology of the evolutionary stages at the transition between the western Scotia Sea and the southern South Atlantic Ocean.

  17. Explicit representation and parametrised impacts of under ice shelf seas in the z∗ coordinate ocean model NEMO 3.6

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    P. Mathiot

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ice-shelf–ocean interactions are a major source of freshwater on the Antarctic continental shelf and have a strong impact on ocean properties, ocean circulation and sea ice. However, climate models based on the ocean–sea ice model NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean currently do not include these interactions in any detail. The capability of explicitly simulating the circulation beneath ice shelves is introduced in the non-linear free surface model NEMO. Its implementation into the NEMO framework and its assessment in an idealised and realistic circum-Antarctic configuration is described in this study. Compared with the current prescription of ice shelf melting (i.e. at the surface, inclusion of open sub-ice-shelf cavities leads to a decrease in sea ice thickness along the coast, a weakening of the ocean stratification on the shelf, a decrease in salinity of high-salinity shelf water on the Ross and Weddell sea shelves and an increase in the strength of the gyres that circulate within the over-deepened basins on the West Antarctic continental shelf. Mimicking the overturning circulation under the ice shelves by introducing a prescribed meltwater flux over the depth range of the ice shelf base, rather than at the surface, is also assessed. It yields similar improvements in the simulated ocean properties and circulation over the Antarctic continental shelf to those from the explicit ice shelf cavity representation. With the ice shelf cavities opened, the widely used three equation ice shelf melting formulation, which enables an interactive computation of melting, is tested. Comparison with observational estimates of ice shelf melting indicates realistic results for most ice shelves. However, melting rates for the Amery, Getz and George VI ice shelves are considerably overestimated.

  18. Water column distribution and carbon isotopic signal of cholesterol, brassicasterol and particulate organic carbon in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

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    A.-J. Cavagna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The combination of concentrations and δ13C signatures of Particulate Organic Carbon (POC and sterols provides a powerful approach to study ecological and environmental changes in both the modern and ancient ocean. We applied this tool to study the biogeochemical changes in the modern ocean water column during the BONUS-GoodHope survey (February–March 2008 from Cape Basin to the northern part of the Weddell Gyre. Cholesterol and brassicasterol were chosen as ideal biomarkers of the heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon pools, respectively, because of their ubiquitous and relatively refractory nature. We document depth distributions of concentrations (relative to bulk POC and δ13C signatures of cholesterol and brassicasterol combined with CO2 aq. surface concentration variation. While the relationship between CO2 aq. and δ13C of bulk POC and biomarkers have been reported by others for the surface water, our data show that this persists in mesopelagic and deep waters, suggesting that δ13C signatures of certain biomarkers in the water column could be applied as proxies for surface water CO2 aq. We observed a general increase in sterol δ13C signatures with depth, which is likely related to a combination of particle size effects, selective feeding on larger cells by zooplankton, and growth rate related effects. Our data suggest a key role of zooplankton fecal aggregates in carbon export for this part of the Southern Ocean (SO. Additionally, in the southern part of the transect south of the Polar Front (PF, the release of sea-ice algae during the ice demise in the Seasonal Ice Zone (SIZ is hypothesized to influence the isotopic signature of sterols in the open ocean. Overall, the combined use of δ13C values and concentrations measurements of both bulk organic C and specific sterols throughout the water column offers the promising potential to explore the recent history of plankton and the fate of organic matter in the SO.

  19. Seasonal and Interannual Fast-Ice Variability from MODIS Surface-Temperature Anomalies, and its Link to External Forcings in Atka Bay, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S.; Hoppmann, M.; Willmes, S.; Heinemann, G.

    2016-12-01

    Around Antarctica, sea ice is regularly attached to coastal features. These regions of mostly seasonal fast ice interact with the atmosphere, ocean and coastal ecosystem in a variety of ways. The growth and breakup cycles may depend on different factors, such as water- and air temperatures, wind conditions, tides, ocean swell, the passage of icebergs and the presence of nearby polynyas. However, a detailed understanding about the interaction between these factors and the fast-ice cycle is missing. In order to better understand the linkages between general fast-ice evolution and external forcing factors, we present results from an observational case study performed on the seasonal fast-ice cover of Atka Bay, eastern Weddell Sea. The ice conditions in this region are critical for the supply of the German wintering station Neumayer III. Moreover, the fast ice at Atka Bay hosts a unique ecosystem based on the presence of a sub-ice platelet layer and a large emperor penguin colony. While some qualitative characterizations on the seasonal fast-ice cycle in this region exist, no proper quantification was carried out to date. The backbone of this work is a new algorithm, which yields the first continuous time series of open-water fractions from Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface temperatures. The open-water fractions are derived from a range of running multi-day median temperature composites, utilizing the thermal footprint of warm open water and thin ice in contrast to cold pack-ice/ice-shelf areas. This unique, and manually validated dataset allows us to monitor changes in fast-ice extent on a near daily basis, for a period of 14 years (2002-2015). In a second step, we combine these results with iceberg observations, data from the meteorological observatory, and auxiliary satellite data in order to identify the main factors governing fast-ice formation and break-up.

  20. Meteorology and oceanography of the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean—a review of German achievements from the last decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmer, Hartmut H.; Rhein, Monika; Heinemann, Günther; Abalichin, Janna; Abouchami, Wafa; Baars, Oliver; Cubasch, Ulrich; Dethloff, Klaus; Ebner, Lars; Fahrbach, Eberhard; Frank, Martin; Gollan, Gereon; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Grieger, Jens; Gryanik, Vladimir M.; Gryschka, Micha; Hauck, Judith; Hoppema, Mario; Huhn, Oliver; Kanzow, Torsten; Koch, Boris P.; König-Langlo, Gert; Langematz, Ulrike; Leckebusch, Gregor C.; Lüpkes, Christof; Paul, Stephan; Rinke, Annette; Rost, Bjoern; van der Loeff, Michiel Rutgers; Schröder, Michael; Seckmeyer, Gunther; Stichel, Torben; Strass, Volker; Timmermann, Ralph; Trimborn, Scarlett; Ulbrich, Uwe; Venchiarutti, Celia; Wacker, Ulrike; Willmes, Sascha; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    in the ocean with special emphasis on the Weddell Sea.

  1. First insights into the biodiversity and biogeography of the Southern Ocean deep sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Angelika; Gooday, Andrew J; Brandão, Simone N; Brix, Saskia; Brökeland, Wiebke; Cedhagen, Tomas; Choudhury, Madhumita; Cornelius, Nils; Danis, Bruno; De Mesel, Ilse; Diaz, Robert J; Gillan, David C; Ebbe, Brigitte; Howe, John A; Janussen, Dorte; Kaiser, Stefanie; Linse, Katrin; Malyutina, Marina; Pawlowski, Jan; Raupach, Michael; Vanreusel, Ann

    2007-05-17

    Shallow marine benthic communities around Antarctica show high levels of endemism, gigantism, slow growth, longevity and late maturity, as well as adaptive radiations that have generated considerable biodiversity in some taxa. The deeper parts of the Southern Ocean exhibit some unique environmental features, including a very deep continental shelf and a weakly stratified water column, and are the source for much of the deep water in the world ocean. These features suggest that deep-sea faunas around the Antarctic may be related both to adjacent shelf communities and to those in other oceans. Unlike shallow-water Antarctic benthic communities, however, little is known about life in this vast deep-sea region. Here, we report new data from recent sampling expeditions in the deep Weddell Sea and adjacent areas (748-6,348 m water depth) that reveal high levels of new biodiversity; for example, 674 isopods species, of which 585 were new to science. Bathymetric and biogeographic trends varied between taxa. In groups such as the isopods and polychaetes, slope assemblages included species that have invaded from the shelf. In other taxa, the shelf and slope assemblages were more distinct. Abyssal faunas tended to have stronger links to other oceans, particularly the Atlantic, but mainly in taxa with good dispersal capabilities, such as the Foraminifera. The isopods, ostracods and nematodes, which are poor dispersers, include many species currently known only from the Southern Ocean. Our findings challenge suggestions that deep-sea diversity is depressed in the Southern Ocean and provide a basis for exploring the evolutionary significance of the varied biogeographic patterns observed in this remote environment.

  2. Diversity and abundance of deep-sea Isopoda along the Southern Polar Front: Results from the SYSTCO I and II expeditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Löbbecke, A.; Brandt, A.; Brix, S.

    2014-10-01

    For the investigation of the diversity and composition of deep-sea Isopoda in the Polar Front of the Southern Ocean two expeditions were performed, ANtartic benthic DEEP-sea biodiversity: colonization history and recent community patterns-SYSTem COupling (ANDEEP-SYSTCO I, 2007/2008) and SYSTCO II (2012). Samples were taken in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Polar Front (52°S) within a depth range between 2752 and 4327 m using an epibenthic sledge. From nine stations, located in four different geographic areas, a total of 107 species from 476 specimens were identified, 99% belonged to the suborder Asellota. Haploniscidae was the most dominant family in terms of abundance, followed by Munnopsidae and Desmosomatidae. However, Munnopsidae were the most diverse followed by Desmosomatidae and Haploniscidae. The majority of species (53%) did not occur frequently indicating a patchy distribution; only one species, Haploniscus spinifer Hansen, 1916, was found at almost all stations comprising more than 10% of all sampled specimens. Isopod abundance was generally low in the Polar Front compared to other regions of the Southern Ocean, like the Weddell Sea. Diversity strongly varied between stations even within the same sampling area, it was highest around a depth of 3000 m with 48 species found at station 13-16 at 0°E. Surface chl a concentration, received from satellite images as a measure for food supply, was compared with isopod abundance and diversity, however, no clear pattern could be observed. Analysis of the species composition of Isopoda revealed in general terms that deep-sea stations within the same depth range build one cluster. Also the sampling year, the geographic area or salinity turned out to be possible factors affecting species composition. The deep-sea area along the Southern Polar Front is characterized by low numbers of specimens but shelters a relatively high level of isopod diversity with species also known from other regions of the Atlantic.

  3. Biogeochemical and microbial variation across 5500 km of Antarctic surface sediment implicates organic matter as a driver of benthic community structure

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    Deric R Learman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Western Antarctica, one of the fastest warming locations on Earth, is a unique environment that is underexplored with regards to biodiversity. Although pelagic microbial communities in the Southern Ocean and coastal Antarctic waters have been well studied, there are fewer investigations of benthic communities and most have a focused geographic range. We sampled surface sediment from 24 sites across a 5,500 km region of Western Antarctica (covering the Ross Sea to the Weddell Sea to examine relationships between microbial communities and sediment geochemistry. Sequencing of the 16S and 18S rRNA genes showed microbial communities in sediments from the Antarctic Peninsula (AP and Western Antarctica (WA, including the Ross, Amundsen, and Bellingshausen Seas, could be distinguished by correlations with organic matter concentrations and stable isotope fractionation (total organic carbon; TOC, nitrogen, and δ13C. Overall, samples from the AP were higher in nutrient content (TOC, nitrogen, and NH4+ and communities in these samples had higher relative abundances of operational taxonomic units (OTUs classified as the diatom, Chaetoceros, a marine cercozoan and four OTUs classified as Cytophaga or Flavobacteria. As these OTUs were strongly correlated with TOC, the data suggests the diatoms could be a source of organic matter and the Bacteroidetes and cercozoan are grazers that consume the organic matter. Additionally, samples from WA have lower nutrients and were dominated by Thaumarchaeota, which could be related to their known ability to thrive as lithotrophs. This study documents the largest analysis of benthic microbial communities to date in the Southern Ocean, representing almost half the continental shoreline of Antarctica, and documents trophic interactions and coupling of pelagic and benthic communities. Our results indicate potential modifications in carbon sequestration processes related to change in community composition, identifying a

  4. Arctic Sea Salt Aerosol from Blowing Snow and Sea Ice Surfaces - a Missing Natural Source in Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, M. M.; Norris, S. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Nishimura, K.; Jones, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric particles in the polar regions consist mostly of sea salt aerosol (SSA). SSA plays an important role in regional climate change through influencing the surface energy balance either directly or indirectly via cloud formation. SSA irradiated by sunlight also releases very reactive halogen radicals, which control concentrations of ozone, a pollutant and greenhouse gas. However, models under-predict SSA concentrations in the Arctic during winter pointing to a missing source. It has been recently suggested that salty blowing snow above sea ice, which is evaporating, to be that source as it may produce more SSA than equivalent areas of open ocean. Participation in the 'Norwegian Young Sea Ice Cruise (N-ICE 2015)' on board the research vessel `Lance' allowed to test this hypothesis in the Arctic sea ice zone during winter. Measurements were carried out from the ship frozen into the pack ice North of 80º N during February to March 2015. Observations at ground level (0.1-2 m) and from the ship's crows nest (30 m) included number concentrations and size spectra of SSA (diameter range 0.3-10 μm) as well as snow particles (diameter range 50-500 μm). During and after blowing snow events significant SSA production was observed. In the aerosol and snow phase sulfate is fractionated with respect to sea water, which confirms sea ice surfaces and salty snow, and not the open ocean, to be the dominant source of airborne SSA. Aerosol shows depletion in bromide with respect to sea water, especially after sunrise, indicating photochemically driven release of bromine. We discuss the SSA source strength from blowing snow in light of environmental conditions (wind speed, atmospheric turbulence, temperature and snow salinity) and recommend improved model parameterisations to estimate regional aerosol production. N-ICE 2015 results are then compared to a similar study carried out previously in the Weddell Sea during the Antarctic winter.

  5. Circumpolar dataset of sequenced specimens of Promachocrinus kerguelensis (Echinodermata, Crinoidea

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    Lenaïg G. Hemery

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This circumpolar dataset of the comatulid (Echinodermata: Crinoidea Promachocrinus kerguelensis (Carpenter, 1888 from the Southern Ocean, documents biodiversity associated with the specimens sequenced in Hemery et al. (2012. The aim of Hemery et al. (2012 paper was to use phylogeographic and phylogenetic tools to assess the genetic diversity, demographic history and evolutionary relationships of this very common and abundant comatulid, in the context of the glacial history of the Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic shelves (Thatje et al. 2005, 2008. Over one thousand three hundred specimens (1307 used in this study were collected during seventeen cruises from 1996 to 2010, in eight regions of the Southern Ocean: Kerguelen Plateau, Davis Sea, Dumont d’Urville Sea, Ross Sea, Amundsen Sea, West Antarctic Peninsula, East Weddell Sea and Scotia Arc including the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula and the Bransfield Strait. We give here the metadata of this dataset, which lists sampling sources (cruise ID, ship name, sampling date, sampling gear, sampling sites (station, geographic coordinates, depth and genetic data (phylogroup, haplotype, sequence ID for each of the 1307 specimens. The identification of the specimens was controlled by an expert taxonomist specialist of crinoids (Marc Eléaume, Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Paris and all the COI sequences were matched against those available on the Barcode of Life Data System (BOLD: http://www.boldsystems.org/index.php/IDS_OpenIdEngine. This dataset can be used by studies dealing with, among other interests, Antarctic and/or crinoid diversity (species richness, distribution patterns, biogeography or habitat / ecological niche modeling. This dataset is accessible through the GBIF network at http://ipt.biodiversity.aq/resource.do?r=proke.

  6. The internal structure of the Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica from ice-penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Edward; De Rydt, Jan; Gudmundsson, Hilmar

    2016-04-01

    The Brunt Ice Shelf is a small feature on the Coats Land Coast of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. It is unusual among Antarctic ice shelves because the ice crossing the grounding line from the ice sheet retains no structural integrity, so the ice shelf comprises icebergs of continental ice cemented together by sea ice, with the whole blanketed by in-situ snowfall. The size and distribution of the icebergs is governed by the thickness profile along the grounding line. Where bedrock troughs discharge thick ice to the ice shelf, the icebergs are large and remain close together with little intervening sea ice. Where bedrock ridges mean the ice crossing the grounding line is thin, the icebergs are small and widely-scattered with large areas of sea ice between them. To better understand the internal structure of the Brunt Ice Shelf and how this might affect the flow dynamics we conducted ice-penetrating radar surveys during December 2015 and January 2016. Three different ground-based radar systems were used, operating at centre frequencies of 400, 50 and 10 MHz respectively. The 400 MHz system gave detailed firn structure and accumulation profiles as well as time-lapse profiles of the active propagation of a crevasse. The 50 MHz system provided intermediate-level detail of iceberg distribution and thickness as well as information on the degree of salt water infiltration into the accumulating snow pack. The 10 MHz system used a high-power transmitter in an attempt to measure ice thickness beneath salt-impregnated ice. In this poster we will present example data from each of the three radar systems which will demonstrate the variability of the internal structure of the ice shelf. We will also present preliminary correlations between the internal structure and the surface topography from satellite data.

  7. The impact of multidecadal Atlantic meridional overturning circulation variations on the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liping; Delworth, Thomas L.; Zeng, Fanrong

    2017-03-01

    The impact of multidecadal variations of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) on the Southern Ocean (SO) is investigated in the current paper using a coupled ocean-atmosphere model. We find that the AMOC can influence the SO via fast atmosphere teleconnections and subsequent ocean adjustments. A stronger than normal AMOC induces an anomalous warm SST over the North Atlantic, which leads to a warming of the Northern Hemisphere troposphere extending into the tropics. This induces an increased equator-to-pole temperature gradient in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) upper troposphere and lower stratosphere due to an amplified tropical upper tropospheric warming as a result of increased latent heat release. This altered gradients leads to a poleward displacement of the SH westerly jet. The wind change over the SO then cools the SST at high latitudes by anomalous northward Ekman transports. The wind change also weakens the Antarctic bottom water (AABW) cell through changes in surface heat flux forcing. The poleward shifted westerly wind decreases the long term mean easterly winds over the Weddell Sea, thereby reducing the turbulent heat flux loss, decreasing surface density and therefore leading to a weakening of the AABW cell. The weakened AABW cell produces a temperature dipole in the SO, with a warm anomaly in the subsurface and a cold anomaly in the surface that corresponds to an increase of Antarctic sea ice. Opposite conditions occur for a weaker than normal AMOC. Our study here suggests that efforts to attribute the recent observed SO variability to various factors should take into consideration not only local process but also remote forcing from the North Atlantic.

  8. Longitudinal variation in the ionosphere-plasmasphere system at the minimum of solar and geomagnetic activity: Investigation of temporal and latitudinal dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, Maxim V.; Klimenko, Vladimir V.; Zakharenkova, Irina E.; Vesnin, Artem M.; Cherniak, Iurii V.; Galkin, Ivan A.

    2016-12-01

    We use the Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP) as the first-principle calculation of the physical system state, the quick-run ionospheric electron density model (NeQuick) as the climatology background, and the International Reference Ionosphere-based Real-Time Assimilative Model for a global view of the ionospheric weather during a quiet period of the December 2009 solstice. The model computations are compared to the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) radio occultation profiles, CHAMP and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment in situ densities, and GPS total electron content (TEC). It is shown that the plasma density in the ionosphere is generally larger in the American/Atlantic longitudinal sector at any local time. The high-latitude density enhancements are visible in the GSM TIP output at different altitudes but are not reproduced by the NeQuick empirical model. Given that observational data confirm an existence of the high-latitude areas where ionospheric densities are elevated in the altitude range between 300 and 480 km, we conclude that the NmF2 maximum in the GSM TIP output can be trusted. Indeed, such high-latitude NmF2, ionospheric electron content, and TEC maxima in the American longitude sector form on the proper places as shown by the GSM TIP data, COSMIC and GPS observations. According to our results, the high-latitude maximum of NmF2 (1) manifests itself only when the integration over LT or UT of the global maps for 22 December 2009 includes nighttime, i.e., supporting an argument of its close association with the Weddell Sea Anomaly, and (2) also appears in the Ne distribution at altitudes above the F2 peak.

  9. Electric field measurements from Halley, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Keri; Harrison, R. Giles

    2016-04-01

    Antarctica is a unique location for the study of atmospheric electricity. Not only is it one of the most pollutant free places on Earth, but its proximity to the south magnetic pole means that it is an ideal location to study the effects of solar variability on the atmospheric electric field. This is due to the reduced shielding effect of the geomagnetic field at the poles which leads to a greater flux of incoming Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) as well as an increased probability of energetic particle precipitation from SEPs and relativistic electrons. To investigate such effects, two electric field mills of different design were installed at the British Antarctic Survey Halley base in February 2015 (75. 58 degrees south, 26.66 degrees west). Halley is situated on the Brunt Ice Shelf in the south east of the Weddell Sea and has snow cover all year round. Preliminary analysis has focused on selection of fair weather criteria using wind speed and visibility measurements which are vital to assess the effects of falling snow, blowing snow and freezing fog on the electric field measurements. When the effects of such adverse weather conditions are removed clear evidence of the characteristic Carnegie Curve diurnal cycle exists in the Halley electric field measurements (with a mean value of 50V/m and showing a 40% peak to peak variation in comparison to the 34% variation in the Carnegie data). Since the Carnegie Curve represents the variation in thunderstorm activity across the Earth, its presence in the Halley data confirms the presence of the global atmospheric electric circuit signal at Halley. The work presented here will discuss the details of the Halley electric field dataset, including the variability in the fair weather measurements, with a particular focus on magnetic field fluctuations.

  10. A network of autonomous surface ozone monitors in Antarctica: technical description and first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J.-B. Bauguitte

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A suite of 10 autonomous ozone monitoring units, each powered using renewable energy, was developed and built to study surface ozone in Antarctica during the International Polar Year (2007–2009. The monitoring systems were deployed in a network around the Weddell Sea sector of coastal Antarctica with a transect up onto the Antarctic Plateau. The aim was to measure for a full year, thus gaining a much-improved broader view of boundary layer ozone seasonality at different locations as well as of factors affecting the budget of surface ozone in Antarctica. Ozone mixing ratios were measured based on UV photometry using a modified version of the commercial 2B Technologies Inc. Model 202 instrument. All but one of the autonomous units measured successfully within its predefined duty cycle throughout the year, with some differences in performance dependent on power availability and ambient temperature. Mean data recovery after removal of outliers was on average 70% (range 44–83% and precision varied between 1.5 and 8 ppbv, thus was sufficiently good to resolve year-round the main ozone features of scientific interest. We conclude that, with adequate power, and noting a minor communication problem, our units would be able to operate successfully at ambient temperatures down to −60 °C. Systems such as the one described in this paper, or derivatives of it, could therefore be deployed either as local or regional networks elsewhere in the Arctic or Antarctic. Here we present technical information and first results from the experiment.

  11. Using fluorescence to characterize dissolved organic matter in Antarctic sea ice brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stedmon, Colin A.; Thomas, David N.; Papadimitriou, Stathys; Granskog, Mats A.; Dieckmann, Gerhard S.

    2011-09-01

    Sea ice plays a dynamic role in the air-sea exchange of CO2. In addition to abiotic inorganic carbon fluxes, an active microbial community produces and remineralizes organic carbon, which can accumulate in sea ice brines as dissolved organic matter (DOM). In this study, the characteristics of DOM fluorescence in Antarctic sea ice brines from the western Weddell Sea were investigated. Two humic-like components were identified, which were identical to those previously found to accumulate in the deep ocean and represent refractory material. Three amino-acid-like signals were found, one of which was unique to the brines and another that was spectrally very similar to tryptophan and found both in seawater and in brine samples. The tryptophan-like fluorescence in the brines exhibited intensities higher than could be explained by conservative behavior during the freezing of seawater. Its fluorescence was correlated with the accumulation of nitrogen-rich DOM to concentrations up to 900 μmol L-1 as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and, thus, potentially represented proteins released by ice organisms. A second, nitrogen-poor DOM fraction also accumulated in the brines to concentrations up to 200 μmol L-1 but was not correlated with any of the fluorescence signals identified. Because of the high C:N ratio and lack of fluorescence, this material is thought to represent extracellular polymeric substances, which consist primarily of polysaccharides. The clear grouping of the DOM pool into either proteinaceous or carbohydrate-dominated material indicates that the production and accumulation of these two subpools of DOM in sea ice brines is, to some extent, decoupled.

  12. Effects of acute ocean acidification on spatially-diverse polar pelagic foodwebs: Insights from on-deck microcosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarling, G. A.; Peck, V.; Ward, P.; Ensor, N. S.; Achterberg, E.; Tynan, E.; Poulton, A. J.; Mitchell, E.; Zubkov, M. V.

    2016-05-01

    The polar oceans are experiencing some of the largest levels of ocean acidification (OA) resulting from the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2). Our understanding of the impacts this is having on polar marine communities is mainly derived from studies of single species in laboratory conditions, while the consequences for food web interactions remain largely unknown. This study carried out experimental manipulations of natural pelagic communities at different high latitude sites in both the northern (Nordic Seas) and southern hemispheres (Scotia and Weddell Seas). The aim of this study was to identify more generic responses and achieve greater experimental reproducibility through implementing a series of short term (4 d), multilevel (3 treatment) carbonate chemistry manipulation experiments on unfiltered natural surface-ocean communities, including grazing copepods. The experiments were successfully executed at six different sites, covering a diverse range of environmental conditions and differing plankton community compositions. The study identified the interaction between copepods and dinoflagellate cell abundance to be significantly altered by elevated levels of dissolved CO2 (pCO2), with dinoflagellates decreasing relative to ambient conditions across all six experiments. A similar pattern was not observed in any other major phytoplankton group. The patterns indicate that copepods show a stronger preference for dinoflagellates when in elevated pCO2 conditions, demonstrating that changes in food quality and altered grazing selectivity may be a major consequence of ocean acidification. The study also found that transparent exopolymeric particles (TEP) generally increased when pCO2 levels were elevated, but the response was dependent on the exact set of environmental conditions. Bacteria and nannoplankton showed a neutral response to elevated pCO2 and there was no significant relationship between changes in bacterial or nannoplankton abundance and that of

  13. A colostrum trypsin inhibitor gene expressed in the Cape fur seal mammary gland during lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharo, Elizabeth A; Cane, Kylie N; McCoey, Julia; Buckle, Ashley M; Oosthuizen, W H; Guinet, Christophe; Arnould, John P Y

    2016-03-01

    The colostrum trypsin inhibitor (CTI) gene and transcript were cloned from the Cape fur seal mammary gland and CTI identified by in silico analysis of the Pacific walrus and polar bear genomes (Order Carnivora), and in marine and terrestrial mammals of the Orders Cetartiodactyla (yak, whales, camel) and Perissodactyla (white rhinoceros). Unexpectedly, Weddell seal CTI was predicted to be a pseudogene. Cape fur seal CTI was expressed in the mammary gland of a pregnant multiparous seal, but not in a seal in its first pregnancy. While bovine CTI is expressed for 24-48 h postpartum (pp) and secreted in colostrum only, Cape fur seal CTI was detected for at least 2-3 months pp while the mother was suckling its young on-shore. Furthermore, CTI was expressed in the mammary gland of only one of the lactating seals that was foraging at-sea. The expression of β-casein (CSN2) and β-lactoglobulin II (LGB2), but not CTI in the second lactating seal foraging at-sea suggested that CTI may be intermittently expressed during lactation. Cape fur seal and walrus CTI encode putative small, secreted, N-glycosylated proteins with a single Kunitz/bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) domain indicative of serine protease inhibition. Mature Cape fur seal CTI shares 92% sequence identity with Pacific walrus CTI, but only 35% identity with BPTI. Structural homology modelling of Cape fur seal CTI and Pacific walrus trypsin based on the model of the second Kunitz domain of human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and porcine trypsin (Protein Data Bank: 1TFX) confirmed that CTI inhibits trypsin in a canonical fashion. Therefore, pinniped CTI may be critical for preventing the proteolytic degradation of immunoglobulins that are passively transferred from mother to young via colostrum and milk.

  14. Thermohaline structure and water masses in the north of Antarctic Peninsula from data collected in situ by southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina

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    Ilana E. K. C. Wainer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Western Antarctic Peninsula is rapidly warming and exhibits high indices of biodiversity concentrated mostly along its continental shelf. This region has great importance due to the the mixing caused by the interaction of waters from Weddell Sea (MW, Bransfield Strait (EB and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (CCA transmits thermohaline characteristics and nutrients of different sites and finally connects with all the world’s oceans. However, studies focusing on the temporal variability of the region’s oceanographic conditions that finally determine the water mass formation are sparse due to the logistical difficulties of conducting oceanographic surveys and traditional monitoring during the winter. For this study, variations of the thermohaline structure and water masses in the vicinity and below the sea ice in the North of the Antarctic Peninsula (AP and Scotia Sea (SS were recorded between February and November 2008 by two female southern elephant seals (SES, Mirounga leonina tagged with Conductivity–Temperature–Depth/Satellite-Relay Data Logger (CTD–SRDL. One thousand three hundred and thirty vertical profiles of temperature and salinity were collected by seals which were tagged by the MEOP-BR Project team at the Elephant Island, South Shetlands. These profiles, together with spread state diagrams allowed the identification of water masses and their variances in the ocean’s vertical structure. Among the set of identified water masses we cite: Antarctic Surface Water (AASW, Winter Water (WW, Warm Deep Water (WDW, Modified Warm Deep Water (MWDW, Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW, Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (UCDW, Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW and Ice Shelf Water (ISW. Our results show that the oceanic vertical structure undergoes changes that cannot be traditionally monitored, particularly during the Austral winter and that SES are important and modern oceanographic data collection platforms allowing for the improvement of our

  15. Ice Algae-Produced Carbon Is Critical for Overwintering of Antarctic Krill Euphausia superba

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    Doreen Kohlbach

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic krill Euphausia superba (“krill” constitute a fundamental food source for Antarctic seabirds and mammals, and a globally important fisheries resource. The future resilience of krill to climate change depends critically on the winter survival of young krill. To survive periods of extremely low production by pelagic algae during winter, krill are assumed to rely partly on carbon produced by ice algae. The true dependency on ice algae-produced carbon, however, is so far unquantified. This confounds predictions on the future resilience of krill stocks to sea ice decline. Fatty acid (FA analysis, bulk stable isotope analysis (BSIA, and compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA of diatom- and dinoflagellate-associated marker FAs were applied to quantify the dependency of overwintering larval, juvenile, and adult krill on ice algae-produced carbon (αIce during winter 2013 in the Weddell-Scotia Confluence Zone. Our results demonstrate that the majority of the carbon uptake of the overwintering larval and juvenile krill originated from ice algae (up to 88% of the carbon budget, and that the dependency on ice algal carbon decreased with ontogeny, reaching <56% of the carbon budget in adults. Spatio-temporal variability in the utilization of ice algal carbon was more pronounced in larvae and juvenile krill than in adults. Differences between αIce estimates derived from short- vs. long-term FA-specific isotopic compositions suggested that ice algae-produced carbon gained importance as the winter progressed, and might become critical at the late winter-spring transition, before the phytoplankton bloom commences. Where the sea ice season shortens, reduced availability of ice algae might possibly not be compensated by surplus phytoplankton production during wintertime. Hence, sea ice decline could seriously endanger the winter survival of recruits, and subsequently overall biomass of krill.

  16. Diversity and distribution patterns in high southern latitude sponges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel V Downey

    Full Text Available Sponges play a key role in Antarctic marine benthic community structure and dynamics and are often a dominant component of many Southern Ocean benthic communities. Understanding the drivers of sponge distribution in Antarctica enables us to understand many of general benthic biodiversity patterns in the region. The sponges of the Antarctic and neighbouring oceanographic regions were assessed for species richness and biogeographic patterns using over 8,800 distribution records. Species-rich regions include the Antarctic Peninsula, South Shetland Islands, South Georgia, Eastern Weddell Sea, Kerguelen Plateau, Falkland Islands and north New Zealand. Sampling intensity varied greatly within the study area, with sampling hotspots found at the Antarctic Peninsula, South Georgia, north New Zealand and Tierra del Fuego, with limited sampling in the Bellingshausen and Amundsen seas in the Southern Ocean. In contrast to previous studies we found that eurybathy and circumpolar distributions are important but not dominant characteristics in Antarctic sponges. Overall Antarctic sponge species endemism is ∼43%, with a higher level for the class Hexactinellida (68%. Endemism levels are lower than previous estimates, but still indicate the importance of the Polar Front in isolating the Southern Ocean fauna. Nineteen distinct sponge distribution patterns were found, ranging from regional endemics to cosmopolitan species. A single, distinct Antarctic demosponge fauna is found to encompass all areas within the Polar Front, and the sub-Antarctic regions of the Kerguelen Plateau and Macquarie Island. Biogeographical analyses indicate stronger faunal links between Antarctica and South America, with little evidence of links between Antarctica and South Africa, Southern Australia or New Zealand. We conclude that the biogeographic and species distribution patterns observed are largely driven by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the timing of past continent

  17. The Arctic as a trigger for glacial terminations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, D.G.; Pitman, W.C. III [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Columbia University, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964 (United States)

    2007-02-15

    We propose a hypothesis to explain the very abrupt terminations that end most of the glacial episodes. During the last glaciation, the buildup and southerly expansion of large continental ice-sheets in the Northern Hemisphere and extensive cover of sea ice in the N. Pacific and the N. Atlantic imposed a much more zonal climatic circulation system than exists today. We hypothesize that this, in combination with the frigid (dry) polar air led to a significant decrease in freshwater runoff into the Arctic Ocean. In addition the freshwater contribution of the fresher Pacific water was completely eliminated by the emergence of the Bering Strait (sill depth 50 m). As the Arctic freshwater input was depleted, regions of the Arctic Ocean lost surface stability and eventually overturned, bringing warmer deep water to the surface where it melted the overlying sea ice. This upwelled water was quickly cooled and sank as newly formed deep water. For sustained overturn events, such as might have occurred during the peak of very large glacial periods (i.e. the last glacial maximum), the voluminous deep water formed would eventually overflow into the Nordic Seas and North Atlantic necessitating an equally voluminous rate of return flow of warmer surface waters from the North Atlantic thus breaking down the Arctic's zonal isolation, melting the expansive NA sea ice cover and initiating oceanic heating of the atmosphere over the ice-sheets bordering the NA. We suggest that the combined effect of these overturn-induced events in concert with a Milankovitch warming cycle, was sufficient to drive the system to a termination. We elaborate on this proposed sequence of events, using the model for the formation of the Weddell Sea polynya as proposed by Martinson et al. (1981) and various, albeit sparse, data sets from the circum-Arctic region to apply and evaluate this hypothesis to the problem of glacial termination.

  18. Análisis aeromagnético de la cuenca James Ross, península Antártica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta E Ghidella

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Durante el verano austral de 1998/1999, en el marco de un proyecto internacional aerogeofísico conjunto entre el British Antarctic Survey y el Instituto Antártico Argentino, fueron recolectados datos de magnetismo y gravedad terrestres sobrevolando el archipiélago James Ross, situado en el extremo noreste de la península Antártica. En dicho archipiélago, sobre el borde occidental de la cuenca James Ross, aflora el Grupo Volcánico Isla James Ross (JRIVG de edad miocena a reciente. Basados en el análisis y modelización de las anomalías magnéticas se reveló la presencia de estructuras de origen volcánico y tectónico ocultas bajo el manto de hielo en la isla James Ross y el mar de Weddell. El monte Haddington, en la isla James Ross, está asociado con anomalías lineales de gran amplitud (200-800 nT. Se identificaron centros efusivos menores, ocultos bajo el hielo glaciar. Se detectó la presencia de dos arcos magnéticos concéntricos constituidos por una sucesión de anomalías circulares de amplitudes significativas (30-300 nT que se han interpretado como vías primarias de encauzamiento del magmatismo neógeno a través de fajas de debilidad estructural en la corteza terrestre. Costa afuera, se manifiesta un alto magnético de baja amplitud (~20-30 nT paralelo al margen de la península Antártica que se relacionó con una importante zona de fallas de rumbo detectada por sísmica de reflexión.

  19. Spatial scales of light transmission through Antarctic pack ice: Surface flooding vs. floe-size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, S.; Meiners, K.; Krumpen, T.; Ricker, R.; Nicolaus, M.

    2016-12-01

    Snow on sea ice plays a crucial role for interactions between the ocean and atmosphere within the climate system of polar regions. Antarctic sea ice is covered with snow during most of the year. The snow contributes substantially to the sea-ice mass budget as the heavy snow loads can depress the ice below water level causing flooding. Refreezing of the snow and seawater mixture results in snow-ice formation on the ice surface. The snow cover determines also the amount of light being reflected, absorbed, and transmitted into the upper ocean, determining the surface energy budget of ice-covered oceans. The amount of light penetrating through sea ice into the upper ocean is of critical importance for the timing and amount of bottom sea-ice melt, biogeochemical processes and under-ice ecosystems. Here, we present results of several recent observations in the Weddell Sea measuring solar radiation under Antarctic sea ice with instrumented Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV). The combination of under-ice optical measurements with simultaneous characterization of surface properties, such as sea-ice thickness and snow depth, allows the identification of key processes controlling the spatial distribution of the under-ice light. Thus, our results show how the distinction between flooded and non-flooded sea-ice regimes dominates the spatial scales of under-ice light variability for areas smaller than 100-by-100m. In contrast, the variability on larger scales seems to be controlled by the floe-size distribution and the associated lateral incidence of light. These results are related to recent studies on the spatial variability of Arctic under-ice light fields focusing on the distinctly differing dominant surface properties between the northern (e.g. summer melt ponds) and southern (e.g. year-round snow cover, surface flooding) hemisphere sea-ice cover.

  20. Insights about the structure and evolution of the Scotia Arc from a new magnetic data compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos, Yasmina M.; Catalán, Manuel; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Maldonado, Andrés; Bohoyo, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Analysis of a new regional compilation of magnetic anomalies from marine, aeromagnetic and satellite data reveals the main structural/tectonic elements of the Scotia Arc. The most relevant magnetic anomaly in the continental crust, the Pacific Margin Anomaly (PMA), is related to composite magmatic arc batholiths. It was emplaced by subduction processes along the Pacific continental margin of the Antarctic Peninsula and can be followed within the continental blocks of the South Scotia Ridge and South America. Four representative magnetic profiles also show the structure in depth, and allow us to characterize the main crustal elements of the region. The new compilation and models improve our knowledge of the Scotia Arc's development. The PMA is seen to have a roughly W-E orientation, decreasing in intensity eastwards from the Pacific Margin of the Antarctic Peninsula, and extending towards the South Scotia Ridge to Discovery Bank and even to Herdman Bank. However, the identification of the PMA in the North Scotia Ridge is uncertain, since the magnetic anomalies and the modeled profiles do not support the presence of an important batholithic body. This setting can be attributed to the kinematics of subduction, almost orthogonal to the Pacific margin of the Antarctic Peninsula and oblique along the South American margin. Based on the new magnetic anomaly map, magnetic modeling, and the continuity of the PMA along the Antarctic Peninsula and South Scotia Ridge, we propose a reconstruction of the initial distribution of the main continental blocks in the initial stages during the Cretaceous. The anomalies identified in the northern Scotia Sea are probably related to local basic and/or intermediate igneous rocks intruded in pull-apart basins that developed in the South America-Antarctica plate boundary deformation zone during the initial stages of South Atlantic Ocean and Weddell Sea spreading.

  1. The biodiversity of the deep Southern Ocean benthos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, A; De Broyer, C; De Mesel, I; Ellingsen, K E; Gooday, A J; Hilbig, B; Linse, K; Thomson, M R A; Tyler, P A

    2007-01-29

    Our knowledge of the biodiversity of the Southern Ocean (SO) deep benthos is scarce. In this review, we describe the general biodiversity patterns of meio-, macro- and megafaunal taxa, based on historical and recent expeditions, and against the background of the geological events and phylogenetic relationships that have influenced the biodiversity and evolution of the investigated taxa. The relationship of the fauna to environmental parameters, such as water depth, sediment type, food availability and carbonate solubility, as well as species interrelationships, probably have shaped present-day biodiversity patterns as much as evolution. However, different taxa exhibit different large-scale biodiversity and biogeographic patterns. Moreover, there is rarely any clear relationship of biodiversity pattern with depth, latitude or environmental parameters, such as sediment composition or grain size. Similarities and differences between the SO biodiversity and biodiversity of global oceans are outlined. The high percentage (often more than 90%) of new species in almost all taxa, as well as the high degree of endemism of many groups, may reflect undersampling of the area, and it is likely to decrease as more information is gathered about SO deep-sea biodiversity by future expeditions. Indeed, among certain taxa such as the Foraminifera, close links at the species level are already apparent between deep Weddell Sea faunas and those from similar depths in the North Atlantic and Arctic. With regard to the vertical zonation from the shelf edge into deep water, biodiversity patterns among some taxa in the SO might differ from those in other deep-sea areas, due to the deep Antarctic shelf and the evolution of eurybathy in many species, as well as to deep-water production that can fuel the SO deep sea with freshly produced organic matter derived not only from phytoplankton, but also from ice algae.

  2. Incorporation of iron and organic matter into young Antarctic sea ice during its initial growth stages

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    Julie Janssens

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study reports concentrations of iron (Fe and organic matter in young Antarctic pack ice and during its initial growth stages in situ. Although the importance of sea ice as an Fe reservoir for oceanic waters of the Southern Ocean has been clearly established, the processes leading to the enrichment of Fe in sea ice have yet to be investigated and quantified. We conducted two in situ sea-ice growth experiments during a winter cruise in the Weddell Sea. Our aim was to improve the understanding of the processes responsible for the accumulation of dissolved Fe (DFe and particulate Fe (PFe in sea ice, and of particulate organic carbon and nitrogen, dissolved organic carbon, extracellular polymeric substances, inorganic macro-nutrients (silicic acid, nitrate and nitrite, phosphate and ammonium, chlorophyll a and bacteria. Enrichment indices, calculated for natural young ice and ice newly formed in situ, indicate that during Antarctic winter all of the measured forms of particulate matter were enriched in sea ice compared to underlying seawater, and that enrichment started from the initial stages of sea-ice formation. Some dissolved material (DFe and ammonium was also enriched in the ice but at lower enrichment indices than the particulate phase, suggesting that size is a key factor for the incorporation of impurities in sea ice. Low chlorophyll a concentrations and the fit of the macro-nutrients (with the exception of ammonium with their theoretical dilution lines indicated low biological activity in the ice. From these and additional results we conclude that physical processes are the dominant mechanisms leading to the enrichment of DFe, PFe, organic matter and bacteria in young sea ice, and that PFe and DFe are decoupled during sea-ice formation. Our study thus provides unique quantitative insight into the initial incorporation of impurities, in particular DFe and PFe, into Antarctic sea ice.

  3. Antarctic tides from GRACE satellite accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, D. N.; Killett, B.; Watkins, M. M.; Yuan, D.-N.

    2016-05-01

    The extended length of the GRACE data time series (now 13.5 years) provides the unique opportunity to estimate global mass variations due to ocean tides at large (˜300 km) spatial scales. State-of-the-art global tide models rely heavily on satellite altimetry data, which are sparse for latitudes higher than 66°. Thus, the performance of the models is typically worse at higher latitudes. GRACE data, alternately, extend to polar latitudes and therefore provide information for both model validation and improvement at the higher latitudes. In this work, 11 years of GRACE inter-satellite range-acceleration measurements are inverted to solve for corrections to the amplitudes and phases of the major solar and lunar ocean tidal constituents (M2, K1, S2, and O1) from the GOT4.7 ocean tide model at latitudes south of 50°S. Two independent inversion and regularization methods are employed and compared against one another. Uncertainty estimates are derived by subtracting two independent solutions, each spanning a unique 5.5 years of data. Features above the noise floor in the derived solutions likely represent errors in GOT4.7. We find the GOT4.7 amplitudes to be generally too small for M2 and K1, and too large for S2 and O1, and to spatially correlate with geographic regions where GOT4.7 predicts the largest tidal amplitudes. In particular, we find GOT4.7 errors to be dominant over the Patagonia shelf (M2), the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf (M2 and S2), the Ross Ice Shelf (S2), and the Weddell and Ross Seas (K1 and O1).

  4. Arctic and Antarctic sea ice and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreira, S.

    2014-12-01

    Principal Components Analysis in T-Mode Varimax rotated was performed on Antarctic and Arctic monthly sea ice concentration anomalies (SICA) fields for the period 1979-2014, in order to investigate which are the main spatial characteristics of sea ice and its relationship with atmospheric circulation. This analysis provides 5 patterns of sea ice for inter-spring period and 3 patterns for summer-autumn for Antarctica (69,2% of the total variance) and 3 different patterns for summer-autumn and 3 for winter-spring season for the Arctic Ocean (67,8% of the total variance).Each of these patterns has a positive and negative phase. We used the Monthly Polar Gridded Sea Ice Concentrations database derived from satellite information generated by NASA Team algorithm. To understand the links between the SICA and climate trends, we extracted the mean pressure and, temperature field patterns for the months with high loadings (positive or negative) of the sea ice patterns that gave distinct atmospheric structures associated with each one. For Antarctica, the first SICA spatial winter-spring pattern in positive phase shows a negative SICA centre over the Drake Passage and north region of Bellingshausen and Weddell Seas together with another negative SICA centre over the East Indian Ocean. Strong positive centres over the rest of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans basins and the Amundsen Sea are also presented. A strong negative pressure anomaly covers most of the Antarctic Continent centered over the Bellingshausen Sea accompanied by three positive pressure anomalies in middle-latitudes. During recent years, the Arctic showed persistent associations of sea-ice and climate patterns principally during summer. Our strongest summer-autumn pattern in negative phase showed a marked reduction on SICA over western Arctic, primarily linked to an overall increase in Arctic atmospheric temperature most pronounced over the Beaufort, Chukchi and East Siberian Seas, and a positive anomaly of

  5. Geographic structure in the Southern Ocean circumpolar brittle star Ophionotus victoriae (Ophiuridae) revealed from mtDNA and single-nucleotide polymorphism data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaska, Matthew P; Sands, Chester J; Santos, Scott R; Mahon, Andrew R; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2017-01-01

    Marine systems have traditionally been thought of as "open" with few barriers to gene flow. In particular, many marine organisms in the Southern Ocean purportedly possess circumpolar distributions that have rarely been well verified. Here, we use the highly abundant and endemic Southern Ocean brittle star Ophionotus victoriae to examine genetic structure and determine whether barriers to gene flow have existed around the Antarctic continent. Ophionotus victoriae possesses feeding planktotrophic larvae with presumed high dispersal capability, but a previous study revealed genetic structure along the Antarctic Peninsula. To test the extent of genetic differentiation within O. victoriae, we sampled from the Ross Sea through the eastern Weddell Sea. Whereas two mitochondrial DNA markers (16S rDNA and COI) were employed to allow comparison to earlier work, a 2b-RAD single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) approach allowed sampling of loci across the genome. Mitochondrial data from 414 individuals suggested three major lineages, but 2b-RAD data generated 1,999 biallelic loci that identified four geographically distinct groups from 89 samples. Given the greater resolution by SNP data, O. victoriae can be divided into geographically distinct populations likely representing multiple species. Specific historical scenarios that explain current population structure were examined with approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) analyses. Although the Bransfield Strait region shows high diversity possibly due to mixing, our results suggest that within the recent past, dispersal processes due to strong currents such as the Antarctic Circumpolar Current have not overcome genetic subdivision presumably due to historical isolation, questioning the idea of large open circumpolar populations in the Southern Ocean.

  6. Sensitivity of the recent increase in Antarctic sea ice in ocean models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellsson, Joakim; Holland, Paul; Marshall, Gareth; Coward, Andrew; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Bacon, Sheldon; Megann, Alexis; Ridley, Jeff

    2015-04-01

    We study the recent increase in Antarctic sea ice using a coupled ocean--sea ice model forced by atmospheric reanalysis. We investigate the impact on sea ice from both model parameters (e.g. vertical mixing and eddy parameterisation) as well as external forcing (e.g. precipitation and melt water from the Antarctic continent). We use the NEMO ocean model coupled to the CICE sea-ice model at 1 degree horizontal resolution forced with ERA-Interim reanalysis. The results will have impacts for our understanding of the Southern Ocean, its sea ice and their representation in future coupled climate-model studies, e.g. CMIP6. Since the dawn of the satellite era there has been a slow increase in Antarctic sea ice with pronounced spatial structure. The reason for this increase is not yet fully understood and very few climate-model simulations reproduce the observed mean state and/or increase. By varying model parameters and external forcing, we determine that obtaining a realistic sea ice cover requires a complex balance of horizontal and vertical mixing as well as fresh water input. The surface fresh water balance impacts the vertical salinity gradient and thus vertical fluxes of heat and salt. Underestimation of precipitation or melt water results in deep convection in the open ocean and the opening of large polynyas in the Weddell and Ross sea. The presence of polynyas reduces the sea ice extent. The depth of the mixed layer has a large impact on the sea ice seasonal cycle. The summer mixed layer must be sufficiently deep to prevent SST from becoming too high but not so deep as to mix up heat and salt from below. In winter, a deep mixed layer lets brine rejected from sea ice mix down to depths below that of the summer mixed layer thus maintaining a necessary stratification.

  7. Explicit representation and parametrised impacts of under ice shelf seas in the z∗ coordinate ocean model NEMO 3.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiot, Pierre; Jenkins, Adrian; Harris, Christopher; Madec, Gurvan

    2017-07-01

    Ice-shelf-ocean interactions are a major source of freshwater on the Antarctic continental shelf and have a strong impact on ocean properties, ocean circulation and sea ice. However, climate models based on the ocean-sea ice model NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) currently do not include these interactions in any detail. The capability of explicitly simulating the circulation beneath ice shelves is introduced in the non-linear free surface model NEMO. Its implementation into the NEMO framework and its assessment in an idealised and realistic circum-Antarctic configuration is described in this study. Compared with the current prescription of ice shelf melting (i.e. at the surface), inclusion of open sub-ice-shelf cavities leads to a decrease in sea ice thickness along the coast, a weakening of the ocean stratification on the shelf, a decrease in salinity of high-salinity shelf water on the Ross and Weddell sea shelves and an increase in the strength of the gyres that circulate within the over-deepened basins on the West Antarctic continental shelf. Mimicking the overturning circulation under the ice shelves by introducing a prescribed meltwater flux over the depth range of the ice shelf base, rather than at the surface, is also assessed. It yields similar improvements in the simulated ocean properties and circulation over the Antarctic continental shelf to those from the explicit ice shelf cavity representation. With the ice shelf cavities opened, the widely used three equation ice shelf melting formulation, which enables an interactive computation of melting, is tested. Comparison with observational estimates of ice shelf melting indicates realistic results for most ice shelves. However, melting rates for the Amery, Getz and George VI ice shelves are considerably overestimated.

  8. Birth dates vary with fixed and dynamic maternal features, offspring sex, and extreme climatic events in a high-latitude marine mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotella, Jay J; Paterson, J Terrill; Garrott, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Reproductive synchrony tends to be widespread in diverse species of plants and animals, especially at higher latitudes. However, for long-lived mammals, birth dates for different individuals can vary by weeks within a population. A mother's birth timing can reveal useful information about her reproductive abilities and have important implications for the characteristics and survival of her offspring. Despite this, our current knowledge of factors associated with variation in birth dates is modest. We used long-term data for known-age Weddell seals in Antarctica and a Bayesian hierarchical modeling approach to study how birth dates varied with fixed and temporally varying features of mothers, whether sex allocation varied with birth timing, and annual variation in birth dates. Based on birth dates for 4465 pups born to 1117 mothers aged 4-31, we found that diverse features of mothers were associated with variation in birth dates. Maternal identity was the most important among these. Unlike most studies, which have reported that birth dates occur earlier as mothers age, we found that birth dates progressively occurred earlier in the year in the early part of a mother's reproductive life, reached a minimum at age 16, and then occurred later at later ages. Birth dates were positively related to a mother's age at primiparity and recent reproductive effort. The earliest birth dates were for pups born to prime-age mothers who did not reproduce in the previous year but began reproduction early in life, suggesting that females in the best condition gave birth earlier than others. If so, our finding that male pups tended to be born earlier than females provides support for the Trivers-Willard sex-allocation model. Average birth dates were quite consistent across years, except for 2 years that had notable delays and occurred during the period when massive icebergs were present and disrupted the ecosystem.

  9. Meteorology and oceanography of the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean—a review of German achievements from the last decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmer, Hartmut H.; Rhein, Monika; Heinemann, Günther; Abalichin, Janna; Abouchami, Wafa; Baars, Oliver; Cubasch, Ulrich; Dethloff, Klaus; Ebner, Lars; Fahrbach, Eberhard; Frank, Martin; Gollan, Gereon; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Grieger, Jens; Gryanik, Vladimir M.; Gryschka, Micha; Hauck, Judith; Hoppema, Mario; Huhn, Oliver; Kanzow, Torsten; Koch, Boris P.; König-Langlo, Gert; Langematz, Ulrike; Leckebusch, Gregor C.; Lüpkes, Christof; Paul, Stephan; Rinke, Annette; Rost, Bjoern; van der Loeff, Michiel Rutgers; Schröder, Michael; Seckmeyer, Gunther; Stichel, Torben; Strass, Volker; Timmermann, Ralph; Trimborn, Scarlett; Ulbrich, Uwe; Venchiarutti, Celia; Wacker, Ulrike; Willmes, Sascha; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter

    2016-11-01

    in the ocean with special emphasis on the Weddell Sea.

  10. Effects of UV on photosynthesis of Antarctic phytoplankton: models and their application to coastal and pelagic assemblages Efecto de la radiación UV sobre la fotosíntesis de fitoplancton antártico: modelos y su aplicación a ensambles costeros y pelágicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRICK J. NEALE

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available We have characterized the photosynthetic response to ultraviolet radiation (UV of natural phytoplankton assemblages in Antarctic (Southern Ocean waters. Biological weighting functions (BWFs and exposure response curves for inhibition of photosynthesis by UV were measured during spring-time ozone depletion (October-November. Two different models were developed to relate photosynthesis to UV exposure. A model that is a function of the duration of exposure (BWF H applied to assemblages in the well-mixed open waters of the Weddell-Scotia Confluence (WSC, 60° S, 50° W, since responses were a function of cumulative exposure and recovery rates were slow. These assemblages had a variable but generally high sensitivity to UV. A steady-state model (BWF E applied in the shallow waters near the Antarctic Peninsula (Palmer Station, 64° S, 64° W, where inhibition was a function of irradiance (reciprocity failed, and recovery was rapid. Using information on the time-dependence of photosynthesis in assemblages with active repair, inferences were drawn on the relative contribution of damage and recovery processes to the UV weights. BWFs for Palmer phytoplankton sampled during periods of pack-ice cover had both higher damage and higher repair than BWFs for WSC assemblages. BWFs for Palmer phytoplankton sampled during open water periods had about the same damage weights as Weddell-Scotia assemblages but had a higher repair rate. Solar exposures of more than 10 min were predicted to have generally less effect on Palmer phytoplankton than the WSC phytoplanktonSe caracterizó la respuesta fotosintética a radiación ultravioleta (RUV en poblaciones naturales de fitoplancton del Océano Antártico. Se midieron las funciones espectrales de peso biológico (BWFs y curvas de inhibición de fotosíntesis en respuesta a la exposición de RUV durante la temporada de mayor disminución de la capa de ozono (octubre-noviembre. Se desarrollaron dos modelos distintos que

  11. Wintertime enhancements of sea salt aerosol in polar regions consistent with a sea ice source from blowing snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiayue; Jaeglé, Lyatt

    2017-03-01

    Sea salt aerosols (SSA) are generated via air bubbles bursting at the ocean surface as well as by wind mobilization of saline snow and frost flowers over sea-ice-covered areas. The relative magnitude of these sources remains poorly constrained over polar regions, affecting our ability to predict their impact on halogen chemistry, cloud formation, and climate. We implement a blowing snow and a frost flower emission scheme in the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model, which we validate against multiyear (2001-2008) in situ observations of SSA mass concentrations at three sites in the Arctic, two sites in coastal Antarctica, and from the 2008 ICEALOT cruise in the Arctic. A simulation including only open ocean emissions underestimates SSA mass concentrations by factors of 2-10 during winter-spring for all ground-based and ship-based observations. When blowing snow emissions are added, the model is able to reproduce observed wintertime SSA concentrations, with the model bias decreasing from a range of -80 to -34 % for the open ocean simulation to -2 to +9 % for the simulation with blowing snow emissions. We find that the frost flower parameterization cannot fully explain the high wintertime concentrations and displays a seasonal cycle decreasing too rapidly in early spring. Furthermore, the high day-to-day variability of observed SSA is better reproduced by the blowing snow parameterization. Over the Arctic (> 60° N) (Antarctic, > 60° S), we calculate that submicron SSA emissions from blowing snow account for 1.0 Tg yr-1 (2.5 Tg yr-1), while frost flower emissions lead to 0.21 Tg yr-1 (0.25 Tg yr-1) compared to 0.78 Tg yr-1 (1.0 Tg yr-1) from the open ocean. Blowing snow emissions are largest in regions where persistent strong winds occur over sea ice (east of Greenland, over the central Arctic, Beaufort Sea, and the Ross and Weddell seas). In contrast, frost flower emissions are largest where cold air temperatures and open leads are co-located (over the Canadian

  12. Last Glacial - Holocene climate variability in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wenshen; Esper, Oliver; Gersonde, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Bouvet Island area, probably related to enhanced cold-water export by the Weddell Gyre from the developing cavity under the West Antarctic Ice Shelf. The cooling also suggests a northward shift of the Southern Westerly Wind, at least its southern boundary.

  13. High-accuracy determination of iron in seawater by isotope dilution multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-MC-ICP-MS) using nitrilotriacetic acid chelating resin for pre-concentration and matrix separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong, Jeroen de [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Departement des Sciences de la Terre et de l' Environnement (DSTE), Unite Isotopes: Petrologie et Environnement - IPE CP 160/02, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: jdejong@ulb.ac.be; Schoemann, Veronique [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Ecologie des Systemes Aquatiques (ESA) CP 221, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Lannuzel, Delphine [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Departement des Sciences de la Terre et de l' Environnement (DSTE), Laboratoire d' Oceanographie Chimique et Geochimie des Eaux - LOCGE CP 208, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Tison, Jean-Louis [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Departement des Sciences de la Terre et de l' Environnement (DSTE), Laboratoire de Glaciologie - GLACIOL CP 160/03, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Mattielli, Nadine [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Departement des Sciences de la Terre et de l' Environnement (DSTE), Unite Isotopes: Petrologie et Environnement - IPE CP 160/02, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-08-15

    In the present paper we describe a robust and simple method to measure dissolved iron (DFe) concentrations in seawater down to <0.1 nmol L{sup -1} level, by isotope dilution multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-MC-ICP-MS) using a {sup 54}Fe spike and measuring the {sup 57}Fe/{sup 54}Fe ratio. The method provides for a pre-concentration step (100:1) by micro-columns filled with the resin NTA Superflow of 50 mL seawater samples acidified to pH 1.9. NTA Superflow is demonstrated to quantitatively extract Fe from acidified seawater samples at this pH. Blanks are kept low (grand mean 0.045 {+-} 0.020 nmol L{sup -1}, n = 21, 3x S.D. limit of detection per session 0.020-0.069 nmol L{sup -1} range), as no buffer is required to adjust the sample pH for optimal extraction, and no other reagents are needed than ultrapure nitric acid, 12 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and acidified (pH 1.9) ultra-high purity (UHP) water. We measured SAFe (sampling and analysis of Fe) reference seawater samples Surface-1 (0.097 {+-} 0.043 nmol L{sup -1}) and Deep-2 (0.91 {+-} 0.17 nmol L{sup -1}) and obtained results that were in excellent agreement with their DFe consensus values: 0.118 {+-} 0.028 nmol L{sup -1} (n = 7) for Surface-1 and 0.932 {+-} 0.059 nmol L{sup -1} (n = 9) for Deep-2. We also present a vertical DFe profile from the western Weddell Sea collected during the Ice Station Polarstern (ISPOL) ice drift experiment (ANT XXII-2, RV Polarstern) in November 2004-January 2005. The profile shows near-surface DFe concentrations of {approx}0.6 nmol L{sup -1} and bottom water enrichment up to 23 nmol L{sup -1} DFe.

  14. Revisiting ODP Site 690 to Assess the Responses of Marine Carbonate Chemistry to the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, D. C.; Zachos, J. C.; Bralower, T. J.; Schellenberg, S. A.

    2004-12-01

    increased carbonate sedimentation within the Weddell Sea region. The remarkable sequence of oceanic changes preserved in the Site 690 PETM record is consistent with the hypothesis that both marine carbonate chemistry and continental weathering acted as negative feedbacks to curb PETM warmth.

  15. Crustal structure across the Filchner Ronne Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, U.; Jokat, W.

    2012-04-01

    documented by the high lower crustal velocity might have already starting during Jurassic times and terminated most likely with the opening of the Weddell Sea more in the north. Yet, it is not clear if in the central part of FRS already thick oceanic crust is found, or if the data still represent highly extended and intruded continental crust. Here, our P-wave model differs from previously published models. Based on the seismic velocities a density model was derived and fitted to the existing ship- and airborne gravity data. Finally, the seismic and gravity data were combined with aeromagnetic data.

  16. Rich and rare—First insights into species diversity and abundance of Antarctic abyssal Gastropoda (Mollusca)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Enrico; Michael Bohn, Jens; Engl, Winfried; Linse, Katrin; Schrödl, Michael

    2007-08-01

    The abyssal depths of the polar oceans are thought to be low in diversity compared with the shallower polar shelves and temperate and tropical deep-sea basins. Our recent study on the gastropod fauna of the deep Southern Ocean gives evidence of the existence of a rich gastropod assemblage at abyssal depths. During the ANDEEP I and II expeditions to the southern Drake Passage, Northwestern Weddell Sea, and South Sandwich Trench, gastropods were collected by bottom and Agassiz trawls, epibenthic sledge, and multicorer, at 40 stations in depths between 127 and 5194 m. On the whole, 473 specimens, corresponding to 93 species of 36 families, were obtained. Of those, 414 specimens were caught below 750 m depth and refer to 84 (90%) benthic species of 32 (89%) families. Most families were represented by a single species only. The numerically dominant families were Skeneidae and Buccinidae (with 10 and 11 species, respectively), Eulimidae and Trochidae (with 9 species each), and Turridae (6 species). Thirty-Seven benthic deep-sea species (44%) were represented by a single specimen, and another 20 species (24%) were found at a single station, suggesting that more than two thirds of Antarctic deep-sea gastropod species are very rare or have a very scattered distribution. Of the 27 species occurring at two or more deep-sea stations, 14 were collected with different gear. Approximately half of the deep-water species are new to science or have been recently described. The present investigation increases the total number of recorded benthic Antarctic deep-sea gastropods (below 750 m) from 115 to 177. The previously known depth ranges have been extended, often considerably, for 31 species. The collected deep-sea gastropods comprise both eurybathic shelf species (29%) and apparently true deep-sea species (58%); some of the latter may belong to a so far unknown Antarctic abyssal fauna. Geographical ranges of the collected Antarctic benthic deep-sea gastropod species appear limited

  17. Seasonal evolution of the upper-ocean adjacent to the South Orkney Islands, Southern Ocean: Results from a “lazy biological mooring”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Michael P.; Nicholls, Keith W.; Renfrew, Ian A.; Boehme, Lars; Biuw, Martin; Fedak, Mike

    2011-07-01

    A serendipitous >8-month time series of hydrographic properties was obtained from the vicinity of the South Orkney Islands, Southern Ocean, by tagging a southern elephant seal ( Mirounga leonina) on Signy Island with a Conductivity-Temperature-Depth/Satellite-Relay Data Logger (CTD-SRDL) in March 2007. Such a time series (including data from the austral autumn and winter) would have been extremely difficult to obtain via other means, and it illustrates with unprecedented temporal resolution the seasonal progression of upper-ocean water mass properties and stratification at this location. Sea ice production values of around 0.15-0.4 m month -1 for April to July were inferred from the progression of salinity, with significant levels still in September (around 0.2 m month -1). However, these values presume that advective processes have negligible effect on the salinity changes observed locally; this presumption is seen to be inappropriate in this case, and it is argued that the ice production rates inferred are better considered as "smeared averages" for the region of the northwestern Weddell Sea upstream from the South Orkneys. The impact of such advective effects is illustrated by contrasting the observed hydrographic series with the output of a one-dimensional model of the upper-ocean forced with local fluxes. It is found that the difference in magnitude between local (modelled) and regional (inferred) ice production is significant, with estimates differing by around a factor of two. A halo of markedly low sea ice concentration around the South Orkneys during the austral winter offers at least a partial explanation for this, since it enabled stronger atmosphere/ocean fluxes to persist and hence stronger ice production to prevail locally compared with the upstream region. The year of data collection was an El Niño year, and it is well-established that this phenomenon can impact strongly on the surface ocean and ice field in this sector of the Southern Ocean, thus

  18. In situ δ13C measurements in planktic foraminiferal shells from the PETM: New constraints on the CIE magnitude preserved in the marine record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozdon, R.; Kelly, D.; Valley, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    only ~2.5‰, is actually ~5‰ and highly congruous with the CIE magnitude seen in terrestrial records. Moreover, a CIE of comparable magnitude (~5‰) has been reproduced in the high-latitude (Weddell Sea) Site 690 PETM record using the same in situ analytical approach. These results indicate that the addition of modest amounts of diagenetic carbonate can attenuate the magnitude of the CIE when the whole foraminiferal shell is analyzed by conventional analytical approaches. Therefore, we conclude that diagenetic overprinting on foraminiferal shells is a viable explanation for the discrepant magnitudes seen between terrestrial and marine CIE records.

  19. Rocas Verdes Ophiolite Complexes in the Southernmost Andes: Remnants of the Mafic Igneous Floor of a Back-arc Basin that Rifted the South American Continental Crust in the Late Jurrassic and Early Cretaceous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, C. R.

    2001-12-01

    the Weddell Sea during the break-up of southern Gondwana. Closure, uplift and deformation of the Rocas Verdes basin took place before the mid-Cretaceous as a result of flattening of subduction due to either ridge subduction or a global increase in plate convergence rates. Shoshonites, which erupted along shear zones on the eastern and northern margin of the Rocas Verdes basin, are the earliest documented post-extensional magmatic rocks and were generated by the processes that lead to the closure of the basin.

  20. Revealing past environmental changes on the Antarctic Peninsula by analyzing high resolution sedimentary records from Lake Esmeralda, Vega Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Píšková, Anna; Nývlt, Daniel; Roman, Matěj; Lirio, Juan Manuel; Kopalová, Kateřina

    2017-04-01

    Topographically and climatically, the environment of the Antarctic Peninsula (AP) differs significantly from Continental Antarctica. The AP forms an unbroken chain of rugged, alpine topography, which forms a climatic barrier separating the warmer Bellingshausen Sea on the western coast from the colder Weddell Sea on the east. The AP has experienced one of the highest temperature increases on Earth in the second half of the 20th century as a response to the ongoing global warming (Turner et al., 2005). However, the last decade was colder and a significant decrease in air temperature was detected especially in the north-eastern part of the AP (Turner et al., 2016; Oliva et al., 2017). The extreme sensitivity of the area to climate change represents exceptional potential for AP palaeoclimatic records either from marine, lacustrine, or ice cores. We have analysed several sedimentary cores from yet unstudied Lake Esmeralda, which was formed as a result of the last deglaciation during the Pleistocene/Holocene transition. We here focus on the longest (177 cm) core that could record environmental changes of the past millennia. In order to describe both inorganic and organic components of the sediment we used a combination of the following methods: XRF, XRD, magnetic susceptibility measurement, chemical analysis for determination of cation exchange capacity, grain size analysis, geochemical analysis (TIC, TOC, TS), high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and diatom community analysis. This combination of methods gave us an insight in the past environmental changes in the lake catchment as well as in the lake body. More specifically it enabled us to define periods of enhanced weathering and to distinguish colder and warmer phases. The preliminary results will be completed with age-depth model resulting in a high resolution multi-proxy record that will contribute to a better, more detailed picture of the past climatic and environmental changes in the north-eastern AP

  1. A glimpse beneath Antarctic sea ice: observation of platelet-layer thickness and ice-volume fraction with multifrequency EM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppmann, Mario; Hunkeler, Priska A.; Hendricks, Stefan; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Gerdes, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    In Antarctica, ice crystals (platelets) form and grow in supercooled waters below ice shelves. These platelets rise, accumulate beneath nearby sea ice, and subsequently form a several meter thick, porous sub-ice platelet layer. This special ice type is a unique habitat, influences sea-ice mass and energy balance, and its volume can be interpreted as an indicator of the health of an ice shelf. Although progress has been made in determining and understanding its spatio-temporal variability based on point measurements, an investigation of this phenomenon on a larger scale remains a challenge due to logistical constraints and a lack of suitable methodology. In the present study, we applied a lateral constrained Marquardt-Levenberg inversion to a unique multi-frequency electromagnetic (EM) induction sounding dataset obtained on the ice-shelf influenced fast-ice regime of Atka Bay, eastern Weddell Sea. We adapted the inversion algorithm to incorporate a sensor specific signal bias, and confirmed the reliability of the algorithm by performing a sensitivity study using synthetic data. We inverted the field data for sea-ice and platelet-layer thickness and electrical conductivity, and calculated ice-volume fractions within the platelet layer using Archie's Law. The thickness results agreed well with drillhole validation datasets within the uncertainty range, and the ice-volume fraction yielded results comparable to other studies. Both parameters together enable an estimation of the total ice volume within the platelet layer, which was found to be comparable to the volume of landfast sea ice in this region, and corresponded to more than a quarter of the annual basal melt volume of the nearby Ekström Ice Shelf. Our findings show that multi-frequency EM induction sounding is a suitable approach to efficiently map sea-ice and platelet-layer properties, with important implications for research into ocean/ice-shelf/sea-ice interactions. However, a successful application of this

  2. Dynamics and Mass Balance of Riiser-Larsen Ice Shelf, Antarctica, and its Drainage Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, S.; Oelke, C.; Kleiner, T.; Lange, M. A.; Baessler, M.; Dietrich, R.

    2006-12-01

    A coupled finite difference ice sheet/ice shelf model is used to investigate the flow regime of Riiser-Larsen ice shelf, Eastern Weddell Sea, Antarctica, and its drainage area. The model takes into account higher order terms that are neglected in the popular shallow ice approximation. The modeled region has a total area of roughly 130 · 103 km2. The model grid consists of 2.5 km × 2.5 km cells horizontally, and of 10 sigma layers vertically. As input data for the simulation, a new DEM is derived mainly from recent ICESat/GLAS laser-altimetry data. In the ice sheet part of the modeled area, ice thickness data are taken from the BEDMAP data set. For the ice shelf, the thickness distribution is computed from the DEM by assuming isostatic equilibrium. For this purpose, vertical density variations inside the ice shelf are derived by comparison of GLAS altimetry data with airborne RES ice thickness measurements from the EPICA mission. The modeled ice flow velocity is compared with interferometrically derived surface flow velocities from ERS-SAR scenes of the ice sheet and with published in-situ measurements of the ice shelf. In order to minimize the difference between modeled and measured velocities, the boundary conditions and free parameters of the flow model are adjusted. The boundary condition at the ice-rock interface turns out to play a crucial role in optimizing the agreement. Thus, the basal sliding velocity of the ice body is calculated from the basal temperature and the basal shear stress following a widely used relation originally proposed by Weertman, and by adjusting its parameters. In the ice shelf, the viscosity of the ice is used as a tuning parameter and is adjusted to maximize the agreement with in-situ measurements. From the result of the simulation with an optimal set of parameters a mass flow over the grounding line of roughly 2 · 1013 kg yr-1 is derived. The comparison with published surface accumulation data suggests a stable mass balance for

  3. Silicon pool dynamics and biogenic silica export in the Southern Ocean, inferred from Si-isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fripiat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Water column silicon isotopic signatures (δ30Si of silicic acid (Si(OH4 in the Southern Ocean were measured along a meridional transect from South Africa (Subtropical Zone down to 57° S (northern Weddell Gyre. These data are the first reported for a summer transect across the whole Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC. δ30Si variations are large in the upper 1000 m, reflecting the effect of the silica pump superimposed upon meridional transfer across the ACC: the transport of Antarctic surface waters northward by a net Ekman drift and their convergence and mixing with warmer upper-ocean Si-depleted waters to the north. Using Si isotopic signatures, we determined different mixing interfaces between ACC water masses: the Antarctic Surface Water (AASW, the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW, and the thermoclines in the low latitude areas. The residual silicic acid concentrations of end-members control the δ30Si alteration of the mixing products. With the exception of AASW, all mixing interfaces have a highly Si-depleted mixed layer end-member. These processes deplete the silicic acid AASW concentration across the different interfaces northward without significantly changing the AASW δ30Si. By comparing our new results with a previous study in the Australian sector we show that during the circumpolar transport of the ACC eastward, there is a slight but significant Si-isotopic lightening of the silicic acid pools from the Atlantic to the Australian sectors. This results either from the dissolution of biogenic silica in the deeper layers and/or from an isopycnal mixing with the deep water masses in the different oceanic basins: North Atlantic Deep Water in the Atlantic, and Indian Ocean deep water in the Indo-Australian sector. This eastward lightening is further transmitted to the subsurface waters, representing mixing interfaces between the surface and deeper layers.

    Using the Si

  4. The Surface Mass Balance of the Antarctic Peninsula at 5.5 km horizontal resolution, as simulated by a regional atmospheric climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wessem, M.; Reijmer, C.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Ligtenberg, S.; Scambos, T. A.; Barrand, N. E.; Van De Berg, W. J.; Thomas, E. R.; Wuite, J.; van Meijgaard, E.; Turner, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Antarctic Peninsula (AP) is one of the most rapidly changing regions on earth, but limited detailed information is available about AP climate due to a lack of observational data. Here, we present a high-resolution (5.5 km) estimate of the surface mass balance (SMB) for the AP, from 1979 to 2014, calculated by the regional atmospheric climate model RACMO2.3, that is specifically adapted for use over the polar regions. Next to this, a firn densification model is used to calculate the processes in the snowpack, such as firn compaction and meltwater percolation, refreezing, and runoff. A comparison with the few available in-situ observations shows that the AP SMB is well modeled, but that discrepancies remain that are mainly related to the highly variable AP topography compared to the model resolution. Integrated over an ice sheet area of 4.1 105 km2, the climatological (1979-2014) SMB of the AP amounts to 351 Gt y-1 (with interannual variability = 58 Gt y-1), which mostly consists of snowfall (363 ± 56 Gt y-1). The other SMB components, sublimation, drifting snow erosion and meltwater runoff, are small (11, 0.5 and 4 Gt y-1, respectively). The AP mountains act as an important climate barrier, leading to distinct differences between the climate of the western AP (WAP) and the eastern AP (EAP). For instance, 77% of all AP snowfall falls over the WAP, where strong orographic forcing leads to snowfall rates >4 m w.e. y-1 on the northwestern slopes, while snowfall rates are <400 mm w.e. y-1 over the EAP ice shelves. These results, and further investigations of this sharp west-to-east climate distinction, clearly highlight the different forcing mechanisms of the SMB over the WAP and the EAP: over the WAP most snowfall is orographically induced, while over the EAP it is generated by depressions over the Weddell Sea. Furthermore, no significant trends are found in any of the SMB components, except for a slight decrease in snowmelt.

  5. Inter-annual variability of surface ozone at coastal (Dumont d'Urville, 2004-2014) and inland (Concordia, 2007-2014) sites in East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Michel; Preunkert, Susanne; Savarino, Joël; Frey, Markus M.; Kukui, Alexandre; Helmig, Detlev; Jourdain, Bruno; Jones, Anna E.; Weller, Rolf; Brough, Neil; Gallée, Hubert

    2016-07-01

    Surface ozone has been measured since 2004 at the coastal East Antarctic site of Dumont d'Urville (DDU), and since 2007 at the Concordia station located on the high East Antarctic plateau. This paper discusses long-term changes, seasonal and diurnal cycles, as well as inter-annual summer variability observed at these two East Antarctic sites. At Concordia, near-surface ozone data were complemented by balloon soundings and compared to similar measurements done at the South Pole. The DDU record is compared to those obtained at the coastal site of Syowa, also located in East Antarctica, as well as the coastal sites of Neumayer and Halley, both located on the coast of the Weddell Sea in West Antarctica. Surface ozone mixing ratios exhibit very similar seasonal cycles at Concordia and the South Pole. However, in summer the diurnal cycle of ozone is different at the two sites with a drop of ozone in the afternoon at Concordia but not at the South Pole. The vertical distribution of ozone above the snow surface also differs. When present, the ozone-rich layer located near the ground is better mixed and deeper at Concordia (up to 400 m) than at the South Pole during sunlight hours. These differences are related to different solar radiation and wind regimes encountered at these two inland sites. DDU appears to be the coastal site where the impact of the late winter/spring bromine chemistry is the weakest, but where the impact of elevated ozone levels caused by NOx snow emissions from the high Antarctic plateau is the highest. The highest impact of the bromine chemistry is seen at Halley and Neumayer, and to a lesser extent at Syowa. These three sites are only weakly impacted by the NOx chemistry and the net ozone production occurring on the high Antarctic plateau. The differences in late winter/spring are attributed to the abundance of sea ice offshore from the sites, whereas those in summer are related to the topography of East Antarctica that promotes the katabatic flow

  6. Silicon pool dynamics and biogenic silica export in the Southern Ocean inferred from Si-isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fripiat

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Silicon isotopic signatures (δ30Si of water column silicic acid (Si(OH4 were measured in the Southern Ocean, along a meridional transect from South Africa (Subtropical Zone down to 57° S (northern Weddell Gyre. This provides the first reported data of a summer transect across the whole Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC. δ30Si variations are large in the upper 1000 m, reflecting the effect of the silica pump superimposed upon meridional water transfer across the ACC: the transport of Antarctic surface waters northward by a net Ekman drift and their convergence and mixing with warmer upper-ocean Si-depleted waters to the north. Using Si isotopic signatures, we determine different mixing interfaces: the Antarctic Surface Water (AASW, the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW, and thermoclines in the low latitude areas. The residual silicic acid concentrations of end-members control the δ30Si alteration of the mixing products and with the exception of AASW, all mixing interfaces have a highly Si-depleted mixed layer end-member. These processes deplete the silicic acid AASW concentration northward, across the different interfaces, without significantly changing the AASW δ30Si composition. By comparing our new results with a previous study in the Australian sector we show that during the circumpolar transport of the ACC eastward, the δ30Si composition of the silicic acid pools is getting slightly, but significantly lighter from the Atlantic to the Australian sectors. This results either from the dissolution of biogenic silica in the deeper layers and/or from an isopycnal mixing with the deep water masses in the different oceanic basins: North Atlantic Deep Water in the Atlantic, and Indian Ocean deep water in the Indo-Australian sector. This isotopic trend is further transmitted to the subsurface waters, representing mixing interfaces between the surface and deeper layers.

  7. Tectonics of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, W.

    1967-01-01

    Antarctica consists of large and wholly continental east Antarctica and smaller west Antarctica which would form large and small islands, even after isostatic rebound, if its ice cap were melted. Most of east Antarctica is a Precambrian Shield, in much of which charnockites are characteristic. The high Transantarctic Mountains, along the Ross and Weddell Seas, largely follow a geosyncline of Upper Precambrian sedimentary rocks that were deformed, metamorphosed and intruded by granitic rocks during Late Cambrian or Early Ordovician time. The rocks of the orogen were peneplained, then covered by thin and mostly continental Devonian-Jurassic sediments, which were intruded by Jurassic diabase sheets and overlain by plateau-forming tholeiites. Late Cenozoic doming and block-faulting have raised the present high mountains. Northeastern Victoria Land, the end of the Transantarctic Mountains south of New Zealand, preserves part of a Middle Paleozoic orogen. Clastic strata laid unconformably upon the Lower Paleozoic plutonic complex were metamorphosed at low grade, highly deformed and intruded by Late Devonian or Early Carboniferous granodiorites. The overlying Triassic continental sedimentary rocks have been broadly folded and normal-faulted. Interior west Antarctica is composed of miogeosynclinal clastic and subordinate carbonate rocks which span the Paleozoic Era and which were deformed, metamorphosed at generally low grade, and intruded by granitic rocks during Early Mesozoic time and possibly during other times also. Patterns of orogenic belts, if systematic, cannot yet be defined; but fragmentation and rotation of crustal blocks by oroclinal folding and strike-slip faulting can be suggested. The Ellsworth Mountains, for example, consist of Cambrian-Permian metasedimentary rocks that strike northward toward the noncorrelative and latitudinally striking Mesozoic terrane of the Antarctic Peninsula in one direction and southward toward that of the Lower Paleozoic: terrane

  8. New insights into the tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Malvinas Basin, offshore of the southernmost Argentinean continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baristeas, N.; Anka, Z.; di Primio, R.; Rodriguez, J. F.; Marchal, D.; Dominguez, F.

    2013-09-01

    A detailed tectono-stratigraphic analysis of the Malvinas Basin was achieved by the interpretation of around 65,000 km of 2D seismic reflection profiles. Five main seismo-stratigraphic units and their sub-units, informally named units U1 to U5 a/b, bound by major unconformities were identified and correlated with the Mesozoic to Cenozoic main tectonic phases of the basin. Unit U1 (Pre-168 Ma) represents the seismic basement. Unit U2 (168-150.5 Ma, syn rift phase) thickens and deepens southwards. Units U1 and U2 are affected by several syn-rift normal faults that exhibit a main NE-SW strike direction in the south of the basin and a NW-SE strike direction in the centre of the basin. This suggests that the Malvinas Basin may have developed initially as a rift basin with two different extensional directions: (1) a NW-SE directed extension probably linked with the opening of the Weddell Sea (Early Mid-Jurassic), and (2) a NE-SW directed extension most likely linked with the Jurassic back-arc extension of Gondwana and probably later with the onset of the opening of the South Atlantic during Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous time. Unit U3 (150.5-68 Ma, sag phase) is mainly an aggradational wedge-shaped unit. Unit U4 (68-42.5 Ma, transtensional foredeep phase) overlies unconformable unit U3. It deepens in the south because of an N-S/NW-SE directed extensional regime. Accumulation rates decrease during units U2, U3, and U4 from 4.84, to 1.23 to 0.8 km3/Ma × 103. Units U5a and U5b (42.5-5.5 and 5.5-0 Ma, transpressional foredeep phase) finally represent a change from aggradation to progradation sedimentary pattern and to a left-lateral transpressional regime in the south. The sediment supply was considerably higher than before and a thick sedimentary wedge has been deposited until today. Accumulations rates increased in units U5a and U5b from 2.28 to 8.91 km3/Ma × 103.

  9. Modelled and observed sea surface fCO{sub 2} in the southern ocean: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louanchi, Ferial; Poisson, Alain; Schauer, Bernard; Ruiz-Pino, D.P. [UPMC-CNRS, Paris (France). Lab. de Physique et Chemie Marines; Hoppema, Mario [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Tracer Oceanography; Bakker, D.C.E. [CNRS/ORSTOM/UPMC, Paris (France). Lab. d`Oceanographie Dynamique et de Climatologie; Stoll, M.H.C.; De Baar, H.J.W. [Netherlands Inst. for Sea Research, Texel (Netherlands); Wolf-Gladrow, D. [Alfred Wegener Inst. for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    The results of an existing one-dimensional diagnostic model that calculates the fugacity of CO{sub 2} (fCO{sub 2}) in the surface layer of the southern ocean were compared with in situ observations from different ocean sectors and seasons. Our model is based on the translation of monthly variations of constraints fields into surface water fCO{sub 2} variations, and was used to assess the CO{sub 2} uptake of the southern ocean. In situ observations are useful to verify the model results and were here applied to improve the estimation of the CO{sub 2} uptake of the southern ocean south of 50 deg S. The model reproduces the fCO{sub 2} distribution in both Pacific and Indian sectors of the southern ocean satisfactorily, the mean deviation being only 5 {mu}atm. This discrepancy requires only a minor modification of the CO{sub 2} uptake calculated by the model for that area. By contrast, the model strongly underestimates the fCO{sub 2} levels in early spring and early winter in the Weddell gyre. This indicates that the CO{sub 2} uptake by the Atlantic sector of the southern ocean as calculated by the model, amounting to 0.47 GtC yr{sup -1}, should be reduced, possibly by about half of this value. The reason for this mismatch lies in the use of climatological physical constraints by the model, that do not sufficiently well describe reality. Partly, the mismatch is also caused by a difference of seasonal stage between the model which reflects climatological conditions and the real ocean which is affected by interannual variability. Based on this study it is concluded that the CO{sub 2} uptake of the southern ocean south of 50 deg S is likely to lie somewhere between 0.6 and 0.7 GtC yr{sup -1} for the 1990s, which is a high value compared to estimates from other investigations 48 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  10. The 6 and 130 kyr BP climates as simulated by an updated version of LOVECLIM1.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutre, M.-F.; Fichefet, T.; Goosse, H.; Barriat, P.-Y.; Sallaz-Damaz, Y.; Timmermann, A.; Laurian, A.; Barthélemy, A.

    2012-04-01

    New modules are included in LOVECLIM1.2 (Goosse et al, 2010). First, a modified atmospheric balance equation is implemented. It links the computed changes of the atmospheric streamfunction with the geopotential height at each level (ABEL) by representing the effect of divergent winds on the streamfunction (Timmermann, 2011, personnal communication). Second, a parameterisation of katabatic winds is implemented (KATA). Their impact on the Antarctic sea ice is represented through constant corrections applied to the ice transport in the vicinity of the coast (Barthelemy, 2011). Third, an empirical diagnostic cloud scheme, based on the ERA-40 reanalysis data (Uppala et al., 2005), is introduced in LOVECLIM to address cloud feedbacks (Timmermann, 2011, personnal communication) (CLOU). This modified version of LOVECLIM has been tested under pre-industrial, mid-holocene (6 kyr BP) and last interglacial (130 kyr BP) forcing conditions. Two setups were used and compared to LOVECLIM1.2, i.e. AK01, which includes both ABEL and KATA, and AK02, which also includes CLOU. First, AK01 and AK02 simulated climates are compared to the LOVECLIM1.2 one. Both AK01 and AK02 induce a global annual mean cooling of 0.4C for the pre-industrial period, and of 0.3C at 6 kyr and at 130 kyr BP. In summer (JJAS) the cooling is mostly located over continents and tropical areas. There is also a strong cooling off Antarctica in the Weddell Sea, while the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean experiences a warming. In both cases (AK01 and AK02), summer precipitation is reduced in equatorial regions (mostly over the Indian and Pacific Oceans) and enhanced in tropical regions, especially over North Africa. Second, the simulated Holocene (6 kyr BP) and pre-industrial (present) climate are compared. On global annual mean, the surface temperature is 0.3C higher at 6 kyr BP than at present. The warming in summer (JJAS) is the largest in the high northern latitudes, especially over Greenland and North America

  11. Seasonal-to-Interannual Variability in Antarctic Sea-Ice Dynamics, and Its Impact on Surface Fluxes and Water Mass Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.

    1999-01-01

    Strong seasonal and interannual signals in Antarctic bottom-water outflow remain unexplained yet are highly correlated with anomalies in net sea-ice growth in coastal polynyas. The mechanisms responsible for driving salination and replenishment and rejuvenation of the dense shelf "source" waters likely also generate pulses of bottom water outflow. The objective of this research is to investigate time-scales of variability in the dynamics of sea-ice in the Southern Ocean in order to determine the primary sites for production of dense shelf waters. We are using a merged satellite/buoy sea-ice motion data set for the period 1978-present day to compute the dynamics of opening and closing of coastal polynyas over the continental shelf. The Ocean Circulation and Climate Advanced Model (OCCAM) ocean general circulation model with coupled sea-ice dynamics is presently forced using National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) data to simulate fluxes and the salination impact of the ocean shelf regions. This work is relevant in the context of measuring the influence of polar sea-ice dynamics upon polar ocean characteristics, and thereby upon global thermohaline ocean circulation. Interannual variability in simulated net freezing rate in the Southern Weddell Sea is shown for the period 1986-1993. There is a pronounced maximum of ice production in 1988 and minimum in 1991 in response to anomalies in equatorward meridional wind velocity. This follows a similar approximate 8-year interannual cycle in Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and satellite-derived ice-edge anomalies reported elsewhere as the "Antarctic Circumpolar Wave." The amplitude of interannual fluctuations in annual net ice production are about 40% of the mean value, implying significant interannual variance in brine rejection and upper ocean heat loss. Southward anomalies in wind stress induce negative anomalies in open water production, which are observed in passive microwave satellite images. Thus, cycles of

  12. Rare earth elements and Nd isotopes tracing water mass mixing and particle-seawater interactions in the SE Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Solsona, E.; Jeandel, C.; Labatut, M.; Lacan, F.; Vance, D.; Chavagnac, V.; Pradoux, C.

    2014-01-01

    Distributions of dissolved and particulate rare earth elements (REEs) and seawater neodymium isotopic composition (εNd) were established in samples from the BONUS GoodHope (BGH) IPY-GEOTRACES cruise in the SE Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean (36°S-13°E to 57°S-0°, Feb.-Mar. 2008). Close to the South African continent in the subtropical domain, particulate REEs show the highest concentrations and flat PAAS-normalized patterns, clearly tracing their lithogenic origin. Active cerium oxidation onto suspended particles is evidenced by the mirror-image relationship of the cerium anomaly between dissolved and particulate phases. Unradiogenic dissolved neodymium in surface waters (εNd = -17.1) traces the influence of old sedimentary material brought by the Agulhas current and rings to the Cape Basin area. A mass balance calculation suggests that the release of Nd from dissolution of lithogenic material corresponds to a remobilization of 154 × 106 T of sediment per year, i.e., 5% of the total sediment delivered to the southeast African coast annually. At open ocean stations, both dissolved and particulate REEs present negative cerium anomalies, indicating that particles have acquired a marine signature. The increasing REE concentrations with depth, and the strong linear correlations of dissolved REE with silica, indicate that surface removal and deep re-mineralisation of REEs are partially related to the biogeochemical cycle of silicate, which involves biogenic silica (diatoms). Combined with marine carbonates, these authigenic phases could explain the observed REE patterns in suspended particles, except for La. We suggest that the positive La anomalies in both phases are linked to the oceanic barium cycle and the partial dissolution of barite crystals, especially in the Polar Frontal Zone. The εNd composition behaves conservatively in intermediate and deep waters, while input processes affect the isotopic signal of subtropical surface waters and Weddell Gyre

  13. Exhumation of the Shackleton Range, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucka, Nicole; Lisker, Frank; Läufer, Andreas; Spiegel, Cornelia

    2013-04-01

    The Shackleton Range is situated between 80° - 81°S and 19° - 31°W, where it forms the continuation of the Transantarctic Mountains in the Weddell Sea sector of Antarctica. There, Precambrian igneous and metamorphic basement is overlain by (meta-) sedimentary rocks of an Early Paleozoic nappe stack and post-orogenic red beds. Nappe stacking resulted from the collision of East and West Gondwana due to the closure of the Mozambique Ocean in pan-African times. The uplift and exhumation history of the Shackleton Range has been analysed earlier based on a series of vertical fission track profiles (Schäfer, 1998; Lisker et al., 1999). Zircon ages range from ~160 to 210 Ma while apatite ages between ~95 and ~170 Ma comprise a break in slope of the altitude regression at ~110 Ma, and are accompanied by mean track lengths of 12.7 - 14.1 µm (standard deviation 1.0 - 1.4 µm). These data have been interpreted qualitatively in terms of two cooling/ exhumation stages during Jurassic and mid-Cretaceous times. However, the recognition of Jurassic volcaniclastic rocks associated with the ~180 Ma Ferrar event in the vicinity of the sample locations (Buggisch et al., 1994) challenges this exhumation concept. Moreover, new fission track proxy data (Dpar) and apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He ages between 88 and 171 Ma allow thermal history modelling of the combined thermochronological data. First tentative thermal history models suggest early Mesozoic cooling followed by (post-) Jurassic heating and final cooling since the Late Cretaceous. This scenario requires burial of the Shackleton Range region, and therefore the existence of a sedimentary basin at least during the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous, and subsequent basin inversion. The thickness of the now vanished sedimentary strata did unlikely exceed 2 - 3 km. Future work including additional apatite fission track analyses will help to quantifying geometry, depth and timing of this depocentre and evaluating potential links with the coeval

  14. Ozone and carbon monoxide at the Ushuaia GAW-WMO global station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adame, Jose; Cupeiro, Manuel; Yela, Margarita; Cuevas, Emilio; Carbajal, Gerardo

    2016-04-01

    Ozone and carbon monoxide have been investigated in the GAW-WMO station of Ushuaia (Argentina), using hourly values during five years (2010-2014). This work has been developed in the framework of HELADO (Halogens in the Antarctic atmosphere and its role in the Ozone distribution) project and under the collaboration between INTA (National Institute for Aerospace Technology - Spain), SMN (National Meteorological Service - Argentina) and AEMET (State Meteorological Agency - Spain). Meteorological features have been analyzed with in-situ observations and meteorological fields from ECMWF 0.5° as spatial resolution model. These fields have been applied to compute back trajectories with HYSPLIT model. Independently of season, mostly atmospheric flows coming from W-SW (South Pacific Ocean), theses westerlies winds are associated with low pressure systems; in addition with lower frequencies are collected winds from South (Antarctic Peninsula and Weddell Sea), polar easterlies. Hourly averages of surface (in-situ) ozone and CO levels were 20±7 and 71±45 ppb respectively, typical values of remote environments. A clear seasonal pattern has been obtained for surface ozone with monthly peaks in winter of 25 ppb and minimum in summer with 12 ppb; a similar behaviour is found for CO, 93 and 48 ppb for maximum and minimum values, respectively. A weak daily cycle has been obtained in both species, amplitude for ozone of 2-4 ppb and 13-20 ppb for CO. The seasonal levels behaviour for surface ozone is also observed in upper levels, approximately from surface up to 5 km. This result has been obtained from 139 ozone profiles launched in the studied period. Since the ozone precursors and carbon monoxide emissions are low in this area, the origin of the values observed could be in the atmospheric transport processes. As hypothesis to explain the behaviour observed, we suggest that in the warm season with solar radiation, the photochemical mechanisms are active, and the elimination

  15. Atmospheric influences on the 2016 anomaly in Antarctic seasonal sea ice decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Elisabeth; Raphael, Marilyn; Divine, Dmitry

    2017-04-01

    In contrast to the Arctic, where total sea ice extent (SIE) has been decreasing for the last three decades, Antarctic SIE has shown a small, but significant increase during the same time period. However, in 2016, the maximum Antarctic SIE was already reached in August, earlier than the normal maximum end of September, and was followed by a rapid decrease. The decay was particularly strong in November where Antarctic SIE exhibited a negative anomaly (compared to the 1981-2010 average) of almost 2 Mio. km2, which combined with reduced Arctic SIE led to a distinct minimum in global SIE. The main area of reduced SIE is situated off the coast of Eastern Dronning Maud Land (approximately 30°-90°E) in the Indian Ocean sector of the Southern Ocean and in the Pacific sector (approx. 160°E-170°W). The southern retreat of the ice edge is largest north of Enderby Land. This loss is only partly counteracted by a positive anomaly in SIE off Mary Byrd Land, east of the Ross Sea (centred at approx. 130°W) and at the northern edge of the Weddell Sea. We use NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data (mainly 500hPa geopotential height, sea level pressure and surface winds, but also air temperature and sea surface temperature (SST)) to investigate possible atmospheric influences on the observed phenomena. While SST and air temperature anomalies do not explain the reduced sea ice extent, atmospheric flow patterns hint at a mainly dynamic explanation. Although the picture is not consistent over the entire melt period, taking into account Ekman transport, distinct regional positive and negative anomalies in SIE can be explained by atmospheric dynamics. However, SIE, by definition, only refers to the area with at least 15% sea ice concentration. Sea ice concentration showed positive anomalies in November 2016 in some, but not all of the areas south of the areas of ice loss. A better spatial and temporal coverage of reliable ice thickness data is needed to assess the change in ice mass rather than

  16. Middle Eocene paleocirculation of the southwestern Atlantic Ocean, the anteroom to an ice-house world: evidence from dinoflagellates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raquel Guerstein, G.; Daners, Gloria; Palma, Elbio; Ferreira, Elizabete P.; Premaor, Eduardo; Amenábar, Cecilia R.; Belgaburo, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Middle Eocene dinoflagellate cyst organic walled assemblages from sections located in the Antarctic Peninsula, Tierra del Fuego, Santa Cruz province and south of Chile are mainly represented by endemic taxa, which are also dominant in several circum - Antarctic sites located southern 45° S. Some members of this endemic Antarctic assemblage, including especies of Enneadocysta, Deflandrea, Vozzhennikovia, and Spinidinium, have been recognised in sites along the Southwest Atlantic Ocean Shelf at Colorado (˜38° S), Punta del Este (˜36° S) and Pelotas (˜30° S) basins. Northern 30° S, at Jequitinhonha (˜17oS) and Sergipe (˜11° S) basins, there is no evidence of the endemic Antarctic members, except for Enneadocysta dictyostila, recorded in very low proportion. Based on its positive correlation with CaCO3 percentages we assume that this species is the unique member of the endemic assemblage apparently tolerant to warm surface waters. Previous research developed in the Tasman area has related the presence of endemic taxa at mid- latitudes to a strong clockwise subpolar gyre favoured by the partial continental blockage of the Tasmanian Gateways and the Drake Passage. In this work we propose that the dinoflagellate cyst distribution along the South Atlantic Ocean Shelf can be explained by a similar dynamical mechanism induced by a cyclonic subpolar gyre on the South Atlantic Ocean. The western boundary current of this gyre, starting on the west Antarctic continental slope, would follow a similar path to the present Malvinas Current on the Patagonian slope. Modelling and observational studies at the Patagonian shelf-break have shown that a cyclonic western boundary current promotes upwelling and intrusion of cold oceanic waters to the shelf and intensifies the northward shelf transport. In a similar way we hypothesize that during the Middle Eocene the western boundary current of a proto-Weddell Gyre transported the circum-antarctic waters and the endemic components

  17. Transport of Antarctic krill ( Euphausia superba) across the Scotia Sea. Part II: Krill growth and survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fach, Bettina A.; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Murphy, Eugene J.

    2006-06-01

    A time-dependent, size-structured, physiologically based krill growth model was used in conjunction with a circulation model to test the hypothesis that Antarctic krill ( Euphausia superba) populations at South Georgia are sustained by import of individuals from upstream regions. Surface phytoplankton concentrations along the simulated drifter trajectories were extracted from historical Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) measurements and sea ice biota concentrations were calculated from sea ice concentration and extent extracted along drifter trajectories from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager measurements. As additional food sources, a time series of heterotrophic food was constructed from historical data, and time series of detritus concentrations were calculated using phytoplankton concentrations extracted from CZCS measurements together with measured particulate organic carbon to chlorophyll a ratios. These food resources along specified drifter trajectories were then input to the krill growth model to determine the size and viability of krill during transport from the source region to South Georgia. The krill growth model simulations showed that no single food source can support continuous growth of krill during the 58-306 days needed for transport to South Georgia. However, under the current assumptions results indicate that combinations of food sources during the transport time enhanced krill survival, with heterotrophic food and detritus being particularly important during periods of low phytoplankton concentrations. The growth model simulations also showed that larval and juvenile krill originating along the western Antarctic Peninsula can grow to 1+ (14-36 mm) and 2+ (26-45 mm) age and size classes observed at South Georgia during the time needed for transport to this region. Krill originating in the Weddell Sea need 20 months for transport, which allows retention in a potentially high food environment, provided by sea ice, for almost 1 year. Krill then

  18. The Meteorology and Chemistry of High Nitric-Acid Episodes at the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, William; Davis, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Between 1998 and 2007, a series of field experiments carried out at the South Pole and with aircraft over a wider area revealed a very chemically active boundary layer overlying the east Antarctic ice sheet during the Austral summer. An early discovery was unexpectedly high concentrations of nitric acid (NO) at the South Pole. These were argued to be a result of the UV pholoysis of reactive nitrogen in surface and/or near-surface snow followed by subsequent confinement and non-linear HOx/NOx chemistry within a thin stable atmospheric boundary layer. The concentrations of NO also demonstrated daily, intraseasonal, as well as interannual variability as seen in the four field programs. This paper seeks to elucidate the interplay of large-to-small scale meteorology and chemistry at the South Pole that leads to highly variable NO concentrations and to examine boundary layer depth effects on NO in years when no direct measurements were available, in particular during the latest field program in 2006-2007. The importance of the South Pole is that it, unlike other high-latitude sites, has no diurnal cycle to disturb the evolution of the mostly stable boundary layer and its physics and chemistry. In the spring, as the solar elevation angle increases, nitrate photolysis rates increase. At the same time, the stratospheric vortex warms and with its breakup, the total column ozone increases leading to decreased photolysis rates. In addition, following the formation of the thermal tropopause in early spring, the tropospheric circulation over Antarctica changes dramatically, affecting the transport and dominant source regions for warm air and clouds arriving at the South Pole. The timing of the final warming ranged from early-November to mid-December for the four field experiment years. During the 30 days prior to the final increase in column ozone, as the thermal tropopause forms (~100 hPa), the winds at 300 hPa become bimodal, either along the eastern side of the Weddell Sea

  19. 南极半岛东北海域表层沉积有机质来源及其沉积环境%The source of organic matter and its sedimentary environment of the bottom surface sediment in northeast waters to Antarctic Peninsula based on the biomarker features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩喜彬; 赵军; 初凤友; 潘建明; 唐灵刚; 许冬; 边叶萍; 葛倩

    2015-01-01

    of sediment organic carbon has feature of marine aquatic or-ganisms mixed with terrigenous material input.The combination parameters of n-alkanes peak type distribution,n-alkanes main carbon peak,the saturated hydrocarbon radio of ΣC-21/ΣC+22 and (C21 +C22 )/(C28 +C29 ),sterane combination and hopance combination parameters confirm that the source of surface sediment organic matter of west part in the study area is given priority to with terrigenous higher plants,which maybe come from the Antarctic Peninsula and South Shetland Islands;conversely,the organic matter source of the east part are given priority to marine origin,the lower plankton,algae and bacteria,and the like.CPI (Carbon preference index),OEP (Odd-e-ven Predominance)and sterane C29ααα20S/(20S+20R)ratio show that the sediment organic matter of position D1-7 and D5-9 has higher evolution degree,and the sediment organic matter of position D5-2 and D2-4 has lower e-volution degree-immature,other positions between the intermediate state-low mature.The saturated hydrocarbon compositions of pristance,phytance and their ratio (Pr/Ph)show that the sedimentary environment in west part of study area is oxidation and weak reduction-environment,mainly affected by high temperature and low salt current:Bellingshausen Sea Water and nearby volcanic eruption.Oppositely,the east part sedimentary environment is re-ducing environment-strong reducing environment,which may being caused by WSBW (Weddell Sea Bottom Water) and WSDW (Weddell Sea Deep Water)with low temperature and high salt.

  20. Crustal architecture and tectonic evolution in the South Pole frontier, East Antarctica, in light of recent aerogeophysical observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraccioli, Fausto; Jordan, Tom; Forsberg, Rene; Olesen, Arne; Eagles, Graeme; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Casal, Tania

    2017-04-01

    Our knowledge of interior East Antarctica has increased significantly in recent years, aided by major aerogeophysical exploration efforts conducted by the geosciences community since the International Polar Year. Aerogeophysical and satellite imaging is helping unveil cryptic crustal provinces and this is enabling new studies of the major tectonic process that shaped East Antarctica through the supercontinent cycle (e.g. Ferraccioli et al., 2011, Nature; Aitken et al., 2014, GRL). However, the South Pole itself has remained one of the largest "poles of ignorance", as very little data have been acquired here since pioneering aerogeophysical surveys performed in the 1970's and a single more detailed US survey flown in the late 1990's from the Transantarctic Mountains to South Pole (Studinger et al., 2006, EPSL). During the 2015-2016 Antarctic campaign we flew a major aerogeophysical survey over the South Pole frontier, collecting ca 30,000 line km of new radio echo sounding, laser altimetry, airborne gravity and aeromagnetic data. The main aim of the PolarGAP project, supported by the European Space Agency was to fill in the data void in GOCE (Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer) satellite gravity south of 83.3°S. Here we present the new ice thickness, bedrock topography, and gravity and magnetic anomaly images derived from the survey and interpret them to investigate the crustal architecture and tectonic evolution of the South Pole region. The Free-air gravity and radar data reveal the form and extent of the Pensacola-Pole Subglacial Basin that stretches from the Weddell Sea to South Pole. Linear free-air gravity lows within the basin are interpreted here as a system of glacially overdeepened grabens flanked by uplifted horst blocks, including the Pensacola Mountains, Patuxent Range and the Argentine Range. The grabens are inferred to be linked to the Jurassic Transantarctic rift system, which at regional to continental-scale, is associated

  1. Hydrologic Cycle Response to the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum at Austral, High-Latitude Site 690 as Revealed by In Situ Measurements of Foraminiferal Oxygen Isotope and Mg/Ca Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozdon, R.; Kelly, D.; Fournelle, J.; Valley, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    published whole-shell δ18O records for this site; however, the mean baseline of the SIMS δ18O record is consistently ~1-2‰ lower than that of the published records. We attribute this δ18O offset to post-depositional diagenesis, which added 18O-enriched secondary calcite to planktic shells biasing conventional measurements. In the SIMS δ18O record, a minimum value of -4.4‰ is attained ~43 ka after the CIE onset. This δ18O minimum coincides with both the minimum δ13C value of the CIE and an abundance peak in warm-water immigrant taxa (morozovellids) of planktic foraminifera. Congruence of these two datasets reflects warming of sea-surface temperatures (SSTs), but the magnitude of the SST anomaly captured by complementary Mg/Ca data (~5°C) cannot account for the full magnitude of the δ18O decrease. This discrepancy is reconciled by lowering seawater δ18O to a value (-2‰) well below that computed for an ice-free world (-1.2‰). We therefore conclude that, much like in the Arctic, increased poleward moisture transport enhanced Antarctic continental runoff and reduced SSSs in the Weddell Sea region during the PETM.

  2. Formation processes of floe size distribution in the marginal ice zone (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, T.; Kohout, A.; Fraser, A.

    2013-12-01

    Since the marginal ice zone (MIZ) is the outer sea ice zone, its behavior is key to the understanding of the variability of sea ice extent associated with climate change. Especially for the melting processes in MIZ, where relatively small ice floes are dominant, floe size distribution (FSD) is an important parameter because smaller ice floes are subject to stronger lateral melting due to their larger cumulative perimeters. As the MIZ is characterized by vigorous interaction between sea ice and waves, breakup of sea ice due to flexural forcing and collisions is considered to play an essential role in the determination of FSD there. However, the available data have been very limited so far. Analysis of the observations of ice floes with a heli-borne video camera, focusing on the floe size ranging from 2 m to 100 m, in the Sea of Okhotsk, the Weddell Sea and off East Antarctica, revealed that while FSD is basically scale-invariant, a regime shift occurs at a size of about a few tens of meters, irrespective of the study region. It was also shown 1) that the floe size at which regime shift occurs slightly increases from 20 to 40 m with ice thickness, consistent with the theory of the flexural failure of sea ice; and 2) that to explain the scale invariance in FSD for smaller floes, a fragility of sea ice which is relevant to the strength of sea ice relative to waves can be a useful physical parameter to be correlated with the fractal dimension. Thus these results confirm the importance of wave-ice interaction to the formation of FSD. Based on this, a possible mechanism of the melting process was hypothesized that in the melting season sea ice extent retreats keeping the FSD relative to the ice edge nearly constant. As a next step and to confirm and further investigate this result, we planned to conduct the concurrent measurements of FSD, wave activities, and ice thickness off East Antarctica during the Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystem Experiment 2 (SIPEX2) in September to

  3. Breakup of the Larsen Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Recent Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite imagery analyzed at the University of Colorado's National Snow and Ice Data Center revealed that the northern section of the Larsen B ice shelf, a large floating ice mass on the eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula, has shattered and separated from the continent. This particular image was taken on March 5, 2002. The shattered ice formed a plume of thousands of icebergs adrift in the Weddell Sea. A total of about 3,250 square kilometers of shelf area disintegrated in a 35-day period beginning on January 31, 2002. Over the last five years, the shelf has lost a total of 5,700 square kilometers and is now about 40 percent the size of its previous minimum stable extent. Ice shelves are thick plates of ice, fed by glaciers, that float on the ocean around much of Antarctica. The Larsen B shelf was about 220 meters thick. Based on studies of ice flow and sediment thickness beneath the ice shelf, scientists believe that it existed for at least 400 years prior to this event and likely existed since the end of the last major glaciation 12,000 years ago. For reference, the area lost in this most recent event dwarfs Rhode Island (2,717 square kilometers) in size. In terms of volume, the amount of ice released in this short time is 720 billion tons--enough ice for about 12 trillion 10-kilogram bags. This is the largest single event in a series of retreats by ice shelves along the peninsula over the last 30 years. The retreats are attributed to a strong climate warming in the region. The rate of warming is approximately 0.5 degrees Celsius per decade, and the trend has been present since at least the late 1940s. Overall in the peninsula, the extent of seven ice shelves has declined by a total of about 13,500 square kilometers since 1974. This value excludes areas that would be expected to calve under stable conditions. Ted Scambos, a researcher with the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at

  4. Relation of sortable silt grain-size to deep-sea current speeds: Calibration of the 'Mud Current Meter'

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCave, I. N.; Thornalley, D. J. R.; Hall, I. R.

    2017-09-01

    Fine grain-size parameters have been used for inference of palaeoflow speeds of near-bottom currents in the deep-sea. The basic idea stems from observations of varying sediment size parameters on a continental margin with a gradient from slower flow speeds at shallower depths to faster at deeper. In the deep-sea, size-sorting occurs during deposition after benthic storm resuspension events. At flow speeds below 10-15 cm s-1 mean grain-size in the terrigenous non-cohesive 'sortable silt' range (denoted by SS bar , mean of 10-63 μm) is controlled by selective deposition, whereas above that range removal of finer material by winnowing is also argued to play a role. A calibration of the SS bar grain-size flow speed proxy based on sediment samples taken adjacent to sites of long-term current meters set within 100 m of the sea bed for more than a year is presented here. Grain-size has been measured by either Sedigraph or Coulter Counter, in some cases both, between which there is an excellent correlation for SS bar (r = 0.96). Size-speed data indicate calibration relationships with an overall sensitivity of 1.36 ± 0.19 cm s-1/μm. A calibration line comprising 12 points including 9 from the Iceland overflow region is well defined, but at least two other smaller groups (Weddell/Scotia Sea and NW Atlantic continental rise/Rockall Trough) are fitted by sub-parallel lines with a smaller constant. This suggests a possible influence of the calibre of material supplied to the site of deposition (not the initial source supply) which, if depleted in very coarse silt (31-63 μm), would limit SS bar to smaller values for a given speed than with a broader size-spectrum supply. Local calibrations, or a core-top grain-size and local flow speed, are thus necessary to infer absolute speeds from grain-size. The trend of the calibrations diverges markedly from the slope of experimental critical erosion and deposition flow speeds versus grain-size, making it unlikely that the SS bar (or

  5. What can seafloor fabric tell us about the nature of the 50 Ma plate-mantle event?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, R. D.; Matthews, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    Several different mechanisms have been proposed to account for the 50 Ma plate-mantle event, including India-Eurasia collision, the time dependence of the Reunion plume-push force, the subduction of the Izanagi-Pacific mid-ocean ridge, and transient ridge capture of the Hawaiian plume. We use a recent digital global seafloor tectonic fabric map derived from vertical gravity gradients together with magnetic anomaly identifications to analyse the geometry and timing of Late Cretaceous-Early Cenozoic fracture zone (FZ) bends. Two sets of closely spaced FZ bends in the North Atlantic, Weddell Sea and at the Southwest Indian Ridge between Antarctica and Africa produce an S-shape in the seafloor fabric. The older spreading ridge reorganisation initiated close to 70 Ma, and was completed around 55 Ma. The younger FZ bends are sharper, were initiated approximately 55-49 Ma and completed around 40-42 Ma, after which time spreading returned to its pre-S-bend azimuth. Additionally there is a distinct increase in seafloor roughness at the mid-Atlantic ridge at about 70 Ma reflecting a decrease in spreading rate. Seafloor fabric indicators of plate motion change produced at around 70 Ma coincide with emplacement of the Reunion plume and are restricted to parts of the Atlantic-Indian realm. The Pacific domain appears unaffected by the mechanism that drove plate motion changes in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans at this time. Yet, from ~55-40 Ma Pacific FZ bends and other oceanic and plate margin events are widespread. Along with formation of the younger part of the Atlantic-Indian S-bends, FZ bends and changes in FZ morphology in the northeast Pacific signify a reorientation of the Pacific-Farallon spreading ridge, a northward propagation of the Pacific-Antarctic ridge, increases in spreading rates at the Australia-Pacific ridge and a change in the direction of plate motion, with spreading terminating in the Tasman Sea. And initiation of Izu-Bonin-Mariana subduction. This

  6. Antarctic Starfish (Echinodermata, Asteroidea from the ANDEEP3 expedition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Danis

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This dataset includes information on sea stars collected during the ANDEEP3 expedition, which took place in 2005. The expedition focused on deep-sea stations in the Powell Basin and Weddell Sea.Sea stars were collected using an Agassiz trawl (3m, mesh-size 500µm, deployed in 16 stations during the ANTXXII/3 (ANDEEP3, PS72 expedition of the RV Polarstern. Sampling depth ranged from 1047 to 4931m. Trawling distance ranged from 731 to 3841m. The sampling area ranges from -41°S to -71°S (latitude and from 0 to -65°W (longitude. A complete list of stations is available from the PANGAEA data system (http://www.pangaea.de/PHP/CruiseReports.php?b=Polarstern, including a cruise report (http://epic-reports.awi.de/3694/1/PE_72.pdf.The dataset includes 50 records, with individual counts ranging from 1-10, reaching a total of 132 specimens.The andeep3-Asteroidea is a unique dataset as it covers an under-explored region of the Southern Ocean, and that very little information was available regarding Antarctic deep-sea starfish. Before this study, most of the information available focused on starfish from shallower depths than 1000m. This dataset allowed to make unique observations, such as the fact that some species were only present at very high depths (Hymenaster crucifer, Hymenaster pellucidus, Hymenaster praecoquis, Psilaster charcoti, Freyella attenuata, Freyastera tuberculata, Styrachaster chuni and Vemaster sudatlanticus were all found below -3770m, while others displayed remarkable eurybathy, with very high depths amplitudes (Bathybiaster loripes (4842m, Lysasterias adeliae (4832m, Lophaster stellans (4752m, Cheiraster planeta (4708m, Eremicaster crassus (4626m, Lophaster gaini (4560m and Ctenodiscus australis (4489m.Even if the number of records is relatively small, the data bring many new insights on the taxonomic, bathymetric and geographic distributions of Southern starfish, covering a very large sampling zone. The dataset also brings to light

  7. 南半球降水对南极海冰涛动异常的响应%RESPONSE OF SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE PRECIPITATION TO ANTARCTIC SEA ICE OSCILLATION ANOMALIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    窦挺峰; 效存德

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed the impact of Antarctic sea ice oscillation anomalies on Southern Hemisphere precipitation patterns using the global atmospheric general circulation model, NCAR/CAM3, and a climatic diagnosis method. We also conducted a preliminary investigation into the possible mechanism of action. Results showed that there was a significant response of precipitation to Antarctic sea ice oscillation anomalies, with a positive center over the Atlantic Ocean to the east of South America and a negative center over the Pacific Ocean to the west of South America. The spatial pattern was similar to the Antarctic sea ice oscillation. The results of numerical experiments indicated that sea ice oscillation anomalies can affect the middle troposphere by changing the surface heat flux which could drive the ascending branch of the Ferrel cell, strengthen or weaken the intensity of the Ferrel cell, and then influence the distribution of Southern Hemisphere precipitation. In the peripheral waters of the Amundsen-Bellingshausen Sea where sea ice concentration is lower than normal, upward heat flux could increase, making the ascending branch of the Ferrel cell abnormally strong. As a result, meridional transport would be enhanced and the descending branch strengthened, which would restrain the formation of precipitation in middle- and lower-latitude areas. In the peripheral waters of the Weddell Sea, where sea ice concentration is higher than normal, the responses of meridional transport and precipitation are almost the opposite. However, the response is much weaker at this longitude because of the land surface effect from the West Antarctic Peninsula and South America.%运用NCAR/CAM3全球大气环流模式,结合气候学诊断方法,分析了南极海冰涛动异常对南半球降水的影响,并对可能的作用机理进行了初步探讨.结果表明,南半球中纬度降水对海冰涛动异常的响应较为显著,且异常响应的空间分布与海冰涛动类似,分别

  8. Tectono-stratigraphic analysis of the Malvinas Basin, offshore the southernmost Argentinean continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baristeas, N.; Anka, Z.; di Primio, R.; Rodriguez, J. F.; Marchal, D.; Dominguez, F.

    2012-04-01

    A detailed tectono-stratigraphic analysis of the Malvinas Basin development, located offshore the Argentinean margin, was carried out. This was achieved through the interpretation of around 65,000 km of 2D seismic reflection profiles, spanning a dense grid on the shelf and the upper-slope of the basin. Five main seismo-stratigraphic units and their sub-units, informally named U1 to U5 a/b, bound by major unconformities were identified and correlated with the Mesozoic to Cenozoic main tectonic phases of the basin. U1 (Pre-168 Ma) represents the seismic basement and deepens gradually southwards. U2 (168-150.5 Ma, syn rift phase) fills regional depressions, onlapping the basement, and it thickens and deepens southwards. U1 and U2 are affected by several syn-rift normal faults, which have a main NE-SW strike direction in the south of the basin and a NW-SE strike direction in the centre of the basin. This suggests that the Malvinas Basin may have been developed initially as a rift basin with two different extensional directions. (1) a NW-SE directed extension probably linked with the opening of the Weddell Sea (Early Mid-Jurassic) and (2) a NE-SW directed extension most likely linked with the opening of the South Atlantic during Mid-Jurassic to Early Cretaceous. U3 (150.5-68 Ma, sag phase) is mainly an aggradational wedge-shaped unit. Some syn-rift faults continue into the Cretaceous. Sedimentation in this unit is mainly derived from the north and during Mid-Cretaceous also from the northeast, as documented by the presence of a southwestward prograding sedimentary fan located in the northeast of the basin. U4 (68-42.5 Ma, transtensional foredeep phase) overlies unconformly U3 and thickens to the south. Sediment input decreases dramatically during that time and only a thin sedimentary succession was deposited over the entire basin. Although a regional compressional regime is established from late Cretaceous to Cenozoic due to the Andean orogenesis, an extensional regime

  9. Phytoplankton community structure and stocks in the Southern Ocean (30-80°E) determined by CHEMTAX analysis of HPLC pigment signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Simon W.; van den Enden, Rick L.; Pearce, Imojen; Davidson, Andrew T.; Scott, Fiona J.; Westwood, Karen J.

    2010-05-01

    The geographic distribution, stocks and vertical profiles of phytoplankton of the seasonal ice zone off east Antarctica were determined during the 2005-2006 austral summer during the Baseline Research on Oceanography, Krill and the Environment-West (BROKE-West) survey. CHEMTAX analysis of HPLC pigment samples, coupled with microscopy, permitted a detailed survey along seven transects covering an extensive area between 30°E and 80°E, from 62°S to the coast. Significant differences were found in the composition and stocks of populations separated by the Southern Boundary of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (SB), as well as a small influence of the Weddell Gyre in the western sector of the 'zone south of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current' (SACCZ). Within the SACCZ, we identified a primary bloom under the ice, a secondary bloom near the ice edge, and an open-ocean deep population. The similarity of distribution patterns across all transects allowed us to generalise a hypothesized sequence for the season. The primary phytoplankton bloom, with stocks of Chl a up to 239 mg m -2, occurred about 35 days before complete disappearance of the sea ice, and contained both cells from the water column and those released from melting ice. These blooms were composed of haptophytes (in particular, colonies and gametes of Phaeocystis antarctica), diatoms and cryptophytes (or the cryptophyte symbiont-containing ciliate Myrionecta rubrum). Aggregates released by melting ice quickly sank from the upper water column and Chl a stocks declined to 56-92 mg m -2, but the bloom of diatoms and, to a lesser extent, cryptophytes continued until about 20 days after ice melt. The disappearance of sea ice coincided with a sharp increase in P. antarctica and grazing, as indicated by increasing phaeophytin a and phaeophorbide a. Chlorophyllide content suggests that the diatom bloom then senesced, probably due to iron exhaustion. Stocks rapidly declined, apparently due to grazing krill that moved

  10. The role of glacial and tectonic genesis in forming of the Antarctic Peninsula's shelf topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greku, Rudolf; Greku, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The influence of endogenous and exogenous factors on the topography of the West Antarctic shelf is shown. 1. The gravity tomography models [Atlas…] show that the non-geotectonic depressions about 300 m of depth extends to the south from the Bransfield Rift along the western and eastern shelves of the Antarctic Peninsula (AP) up to 69 °S. This is due to the glacial tectonic, which was caused by lithostatic pressure of ice mass and the corresponding deviatoric stress (as а horizontal stretching) in a period of an intense glaciation. Ice mass increases towards the south, therefore the deviatoric stretch and the width of the shelves increases also. 2. Besides such external factors, deep tomography data were taken into account. Results of tomographic modelling show the structure of the AP along its crest and along several cross sections. The AP body, as a single structure, is submerged into the lithospheres of the Pacific Ocean and the Weddell Sea to the depth of 150 km. Some layers of its deepened part are displaced concerning the AP's crest axis. The largest of these shifts are observed up to 50 km from the axis to the east at the latitude of 63°S at the depths of 6-7 km, then a shift up to 100 km to the west at 66°S at the depth of 9 km and at 67°S to the east up to 150 km at the depth of 13 km. 3. After breakup of the ice shelf to the west of the AP, the outflow of ice weight from the main ice board on the Peninsula increased. The consumption of the ice is evaluated now by the discharge of glaciers. Informative data for that are the satellite radar altimetry and interferometry. Several pairs of the ERS1/2 images of 1995-2008 were processed for the area of the Vernadsky Ukrainian Antarctic Station. These 100km x 100km images show 4 glaciers (Deloncle, Girard, Waddington and Collins) along transverse faults. The Collins glacier is the most active one. It starts at the crest of the Bruce Plateau АР at the height of 1450 m. Three smaller glaciers provide an

  11. Distribution and population structures of immature and adult Euphausia superba in the western Bransfield Strait region during the 1986-87 summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Edward

    43-47 mm the modal frequencies favored females, and within 48-55 mm males were dominant, suggesting differential survivorship. The Gerlache-Bransfield Straits and similar coastal habitats must be considered nursery areas, not only for immature krill as has been previously proposed, but also for early summer larvae. In particularly productive years, as in 1986-87, these coastal waters may become spawning localities for small adult krill before production by large adults develops farther away from the Peninsula. Immatures of <12 mm in December and ca 16-30 mm by March, comprised a subgroup of the smallest immature krill though not consistently abundant enough to be distinguished as a year class. Their distributions suggest origins and early growth outside of the study area, possibly in the Weddell Sea and coastal waters of the Bellingshausen Sea.

  12. The Satellite Passive-Microwave Record of Sea Ice in the Ross Sea Since Late 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Claire L.

    2009-01-01

    the highest rate of increase in sea ice coverage of any of five standard divisions of the Southern Ocean, although the Weddell Sea, Indian Ocean, and Western Pacific Ocean all also had sea ice increases, while only the Bellingshausen/Smundsen Seas experienced overall sea ice decreases. Overall, the Southern Ocean sea ice cover increased at an average rate of 10,800 plus or minus 2,500 square kilometers per year between November 1978 and December 2007, with every month showing positive values although with some of these values not being statistically significant. The sea ice increase since November 1978 was preceded by a sharp decrease in Southern Ocean ice coverage in the 1970's and is in marked contrast to the decrease in Arctic sea ice coverage that has occurred both in the period since November 1978 and since earlier in the 1970's. On a yearly average bases, for 1979-2007 the Southern Ocean sea ice extent increased at a rate of 1.0 plus or minus 0.4% per decade, whereas the Arctic ice extent decreased at the much greater rate of 4.0 plus or minus 0.4 percent per decade (closer to the % per decade rate of increase in the Ross Sea). Considerable research is ongoing to explain the differences.

  13. Spectroscopic characterization of Antarctic marine aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglione, Marco; Zanca, Nicola; Rinaldi, Matteo; Dall'osto, Manuel; Simo, Rafel; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Decesari, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    in the samples collected close the Weddell-Sea area, showing an enhancement of biogenic alkyl-amines (including mono-, di- and tri-methylamine) and MSA and suggesting a common source probably linked with the sea-ice cover dominating that region. As such, our results point to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) sources from precursors emitted by sea ice regions around Antarctica and call for better representation of the sea ice-ocean-atmosphere biogeochemistry in Earth system models. References: Decesari, S. et al., JGR-Atmospheres 116 (2011). Levasseur, M., Nature Geoscience, Vol. 6, September (2013). O'Dowd, C. et al., Nature 431, 676-680 (2004). Acknowledgments: The cruise was funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy through projects PEGASO (CTM2012-37615) and Bio-Nuc (CGL2013-49020-R), and by the EU though the FP7-PEOPLE-2013-IOF program (Project number 624680, MANU - Marine Aerosol NUcleations).

  14. New insights on the role of organic speciation in the biogeochemical cycle of dissolved cobalt in the southeastern Atlantic and the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bown, J.; Boye, M.; Nelson, D. M.

    2012-07-01

    The organic speciation of dissolved cobalt (DCo) was investigated in the subtropical region of the southeastern Atlantic, and in the Southern Ocean in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and the northern Weddell Gyre, between 34°25´ S and 57°33´ S along the Greenwich Meridian during the austral summer of 2008. The organic speciation of dissolved cobalt was determined by competing ligand exchange adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-AdCSV) using nioxime as a competing ligand. The concentrations of the organic ligands (L) ranged between 26 and 73 pM, and the conditional stability constants (log K'CoL) of the organic complexes of Co between 17.9 and 20.1. Most dissolved cobalt was organically complexed in the water-column (60 to >99.9%). There were clear vertical and meridional patterns in the distribution of L and the organic speciation of DCo along the section. These patterns suggest a biological source of the organic ligands in the surface waters of the subtropical domain and northern subantarctic region, potentially driven by the cyanobacteria, and a removal of the organic Co by direct or indirect biological uptake. The highest L:DCo ratio (5.81 ± 1.07 pM pM-1) observed in these surface waters reflected the combined effects of ligand production and DCo consumption. As a result of these combined effects, the calculated concentrations of inorganic Co ([Co']) were very low in the subtropical and subantarctic surface waters, generally between 10-19 and 10-17 M. In intermediate and deep waters, the South African margins can be a source of organic ligands, as it was suggested to be for DCo (Bown et al., 2011), although a significant portion of DCo (up to 15%) can be stabilized and transported as inorganic species in those DCo-enriched water-masses. Contrastingly, the distribution of L does not suggest an intense biological production of L around the Antarctic Polar Front where a diatom bloom had recently occurred. Here [Co'] can be several orders of

  15. New insights on the role of organic speciation in the biogeochemical cycle of dissolved cobalt in the southeastern Atlantic and the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bown

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The organic speciation of dissolved cobalt (DCo was investigated in the subtropical region of the southeastern Atlantic, and in the Southern Ocean in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC and the northern Weddell Gyre, between 34°25´ S and 57°33´ S along the Greenwich Meridian during the austral summer of 2008. The organic speciation of dissolved cobalt was determined by competing ligand exchange adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-AdCSV using nioxime as a competing ligand. The concentrations of the organic ligands (L ranged between 26 and 73 pM, and the conditional stability constants (log K'CoL of the organic complexes of Co between 17.9 and 20.1. Most dissolved cobalt was organically complexed in the water-column (60 to >99.9%. There were clear vertical and meridional patterns in the distribution of L and the organic speciation of DCo along the section. These patterns suggest a biological source of the organic ligands in the surface waters of the subtropical domain and northern subantarctic region, potentially driven by the cyanobacteria, and a removal of the organic Co by direct or indirect biological uptake. The highest L:DCo ratio (5.81 ± 1.07 pM pM−1 observed in these surface waters reflected the combined effects of ligand production and DCo consumption. As a result of these combined effects, the calculated concentrations of inorganic Co ([Co'] were very low in the subtropical and subantarctic surface waters, generally between 10−19 and 10−17 M. In intermediate and deep waters, the South African margins can be a source of organic ligands, as it was suggested to be for DCo (Bown et al., 2011, although a significant portion of DCo (up to 15% can be stabilized and transported as inorganic species in those DCo-enriched water-masses. Contrastingly, the distribution of L does not suggest an intense biological production of L around the Antarctic Polar Front where a diatom bloom

  16. New insights on the role of organic speciation in the biogeochemical cycle of dissolved cobalt in the southeastern Atlantic and the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bown

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The organic speciation of dissolved cobalt was investigated in the subtropical region of the southeastern Atlantic, and in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC and the northern Weddell Gyre in the Southern Ocean between 33°58′S and 57°33′S along the Greenwich Meridian during the austral summer of 2008. The organic speciation of cobalt was determined by Competing Ligand Exchange Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry (CLE-AdCSV using nioxime as a competing ligand. The conditional stability constants (log K'CoL of the organic complexes of Co ranged between 17.9 and 20.1, and the concentrations of the organic ligands (L between 26 and 73 pM. Most dissolved cobalt (DCo was organically complexed in the water-column (60 to ≥99.9 %. There were clear vertical and meridional patterns in the distribution of L and the organic speciation of DCo along the section. These patterns suggested a biological source of the organic ligands in the surface waters of the subtropical domain and northern subantarctic region, potentially driven by the cyanobacteria, and a removal of the organic Co by direct or indirect biological uptake. The highest L:DCo ratio (e.g. 5.81 ± 1.07 pM pM–1 observed in these surface waters reflected the combined effects of ligand production and consumption of DCo. As a result of these combined effects, the calculated concentrations of free, unbound Co ([Co′] in subtropical and subantarctic surface waters were very low, generally between 10–19 and 10–17 M. In intermediate and deep waters, the South African margins can be a source of organic ligands, as it was suggested to be for DCo (Bown et al., 2011, although a significant portion of DCo (up to 15 % can be stabilized and transported as inorganic species in those DCo-enriched water-masses. Contrastingly, the distribution of L did not suggest an intense biological production of L around the Antarctic Polar Front where a diatom

  17. A climatological analysis of high-precipitation events in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, and associated large-scale atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, Christoph; Martius, Olivia; Froidevaux, Paul; Reijmer, Carleen H.; Fischer, Hubertus

    2015-04-01

    South Pacific several days before the precipitation event. At the surface, a cyclone located over the Weddell Sea is the main synoptic "ingredient" for high precipitation both at Halvfarryggen and at Kohnen. Although a blocking anticyclone downstream is not a requirement for high precipitation per se, a larger share of blocking occurrences during the highest-precipitation days in DML suggests an amplification of the IVT into DML when blocking occurs. We regard the large-scale IVT as one of the most relevant factors in creating high precipitation in DML, in particular over DML's interior. However, we also find that it is important to take into account both the magnitude and the direction of the IVT. Whereas the location of Kohnen Station on the Antarctic plateau allows moisture fluxes from different directions, high moisture fluxes over Halvfarryggen with, for example, an easterly direction do not result in high precipitation in most cases due to the interaction of the moisture flux with the local orography. In other words, high precipitation at Halvfarryggen does not necessarily correspond to high IVT values, but rather corresponds to the IVT with the strongest component perpendicular to the local orography. Welker, C., O. Martius, P. Froidevaux, C. H. Reijmer, and H. Fischer (2014), A climatological analysis of high-precipitation events in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, and associated large-scale atmospheric conditions, J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 119, 11932-11954, doi:10.1002/2014JD022259.

  18. Modelling the warm interglacials: analogues of MIS1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, N.; Yin, Q. Z.; Karami, M. P.; Berger, A.

    2012-04-01

    Determining interglacial diversity, primarily as a function of duration, intensity and unique climate responses to Earth's orbital variations has become a focal point for researchers trying to better understand our current interglacial. Numerous interglacials have been espoused as Marine Isotopic Stage (MIS) 1 analogues or windows into the future of Holocene climate based on their astronomical characteristics, seasonal insolation patterns or their similarity with predicted anthropogenic warming. However, to date there has been little quantitative study of the climate of these interglacials within a physically robust framework. Here we examine the climate response to peak interglacial forcing during MIS1, 5, 9, 11 and 19 using the Community Climate System Model 3. We determine which interglacial provides the closest analogue to peak MIS1 conditions as well as the mechanisms which dominate the surface climate responses of these interglacials. Considering the differences in astronomical parameters and greenhouse gases we discount MIS5 and 9 as analogues to peak MIS1 conditions due to their significant warmth and stronger precipitation and vegetation responses. Conversely, based on seasonal and hemispheric averages of surface temperature, precipitation and sea-ice cover, MIS11 and 19 are most similar to MIS1, with MIS11 actually exhibiting a higher affinity particularly during boreal summer. This is attributed to a greater similarity in the seasonal and latitudinal distribution of insolation over middle latitude Eurasia and North America, which are the regions most sensitive to insolation change given the absence of ice-sheet dynamics in our model. Global ocean overturning circulation during MIS11 is also closer to MIS1 than circulation during MIS19 is, due predominantly to differences in Weddell Sea bottom water formation. Thus, under the assumption of present-day ice-sheets MIS11 appears to be the better climatic analogue to peak MIS1 conditions. In addition to the

  19. Late summer particulate organic carbon export and twilight zone remineralisation in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Planchon

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available During the Bonus-GoodHope (BGH expedition (Jan–Mar 2008 we studied the water column distribution of total 234Th and biogenic particulate Ba (Baxs in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. The objective was to assess the export flux of particulate organic carbon (POC from the surface to the mesopelagic twilight zone along a section between the Cape Basin and Weddell Gyre. Export production of POC was estimated from steady state and non steady state export fluxes of 234Th which were converted into POC fluxes, using the POC/234Th ratio of large (>53 μm suspended particles, collected via in-situ pumps. Deficits in 234Th activities were observed at all stations from the surface to the bottom of the mixed-layer. 234Th export fluxes from the upper 100 m ranged from 496 ± 57 dpm m−2 d−1 to 1195 ± 120 dpm m−2 d−1 for the steady state model and from 149 ± 18 dpm m−2 d−1 to 1217 ± 146 dpm m−2 d−1 for the non steady state model calculated for a time window of 15 to 22 days preceding the timing of the present cruise. The POC/234Thp ratio of large, potentially sinking particles (>53 μm, was observed to increase with latitude, from 1.9 ± 0.2 μmol dpm−1 and 1.7 ± 0.3 μmol dpm−1 in the Subtropical Zone (STZ and Subantarctic Zone (SAZ, respectively, to 3.0 ± 0.2 μmol dpm−1 in the Polar Front Zone (PFZ, 4.8 ± 1.9 μmol dpm−1 at the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front (SACCF to 4.1 ± 1.7 μmol dpm−1 in the northern Weddell Gyre, in line with an increasing contribution of larger cell diatoms. Steady state and non steady state POC export from the upper 100 m ranged from 0.9 ± 0.2 mmolC m−2 d−1 to 5.1 ± 2.1 mmolC m−2 d−1 and

  20. Tectónica jurásica en Argentina y Chile: extensión, subducción oblicua, rifting, deriva y colisiones? Jurassic tectonics in Argentina and Chile: Extension, oblique subduction, rifting, drift and collisions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantino Mpodozis

    2008-12-01

    Cordillera Andina a lo largo del Batolito Subcordillerano de corta vida (190-170 Ma y en la cuenca de intra-arco liásica asociada. El magmatismo de arco cesó en el norte de la Patagonia cerca de los 170 Ma y fue reemplazado por enormes volúmenes de riolitas y dacitas jurásicas inferiores a medias de la gran provincia ígnea de Chon Aike, producida como resultado de fusión cortical de una corteza sobrecalentada durante los estadios iniciales de la ruptura del Gondwana. El rifting inicial durante el Jurásico medio a tardío tuvo lugar en la cuenca de Cañadón Asfalto y en las cuencas de Río Genguel, Río Mayo y Río Senguerr durante el Jurásico tardío, en forma ortogonal al margen continental como consecuencia de la apertura del Mar de Weddell. El magmatismo ácido estuvo asociado con extensión generalizada y culminó con la apertura oceánica de la cuenca de Rocas Verdes. Las causas del cese del magmatismo en el Batolito Subcordillerano, el origen de la provincia ácida de Chon Aike y la rotación del frente magmático hacia el Batolito Patagónico alrededor de los 150 Ma no son todavía bien entendidas. Hipótesis que vinculan este escenario tectónico mutante a la colisión de terrenos alóctonos contra el margen pacífico de Patagonia durante el Jurásico temprano a medio deberían ser tenidas en consideración.The Jurassic history of southern South America shows a complex geologic evolution which is the result of different processes that began along the western Gondwana margin during the initial stages of Pangea breakup. Andean subduction along the Pacific continental margin began in the Early Jurassic, after a period of continental-scale extension and rifting, which peaked by the end of the Triassic in central and northern Argentina and Chile. Renewal of subduction was the result of an episode of ocean growth along a series of spreading centers between North and South America when the separation of these continents began as a consequence of the activity of the

  1. The 13th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitcheson, Paul; Beeby, Steve

    2013-12-01

    Institute of Technology, USA Ryutaro Maeda, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan Kazusuke Maenaka, University of Hyogo, Japan Paul Mitcheson, Imperial College London, UK Albert Pisano, UC San Diego, USA Susumu Sugiyama, Ritsumeikan University, Japan Yuju Suzuki, University of Tokyo, Japan Shuji Tanaka, Tohoku University, Japan Miwako Waga, Susano Berkeley LLC, Japan Peter Woias, University Freiburg IMTEK, Germany Technical Program Committee David Arnold, University of Florida, USA Seiji Aoyagi, Kansai University, Japan Skandar Basrour, Tima Laboratory, France Philippe Basset, Université Paris Est/ESIEE Paris, France Mustafa Ilker Beyaz, Antalya International University, Turkey Danick Briand, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland Steve Burrow, University of Bristol, UK Luc Fréchette, University of Sherbrooke, Canada Takayuki Fujita, University of Hyogo, Japan Florian Herrault, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA Andrew Holmes, Imperial College London, UK Hanseup Kim, University of Utah, USA Seong-Hyok Kim, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA Sejin Kwon, KAIST, South Korea Carol Livermore, Northeastern University, USA Matthew McCarthy, Drexel University, USA Jae Park, Kwangwoon University, South Korea Paul Ronney, University of Southern California, USA Nico de Rooij, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland Yuji Suzuki, University of Tokyo, Japan Shuji Tanaka, Tohoku University, Japan Luis Velasque-Garcia, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA Huib Visser, Imec Netherlands Ruud Vullers, Imec, Netherlands C Mike Waits, US Army Research Laboratory, USA Xiaohong Wang, Tsinghua University, China David Yates, Imperial College London, UK Local Organising Committee Dibin Zhu, University of Southampton, UK Alex Weddell, University of Southampton, UK Tzern Toh, Imperial College London, UK Michail Kiziroglou, Imperial College London, UK Christopher Kwan, Imperial College London, UK

  2. Late summer particulate organic carbon export and twilight zone remineralisation in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Planchon

    2013-02-01

    Front zone and the northern Weddell Gyre, while the subtropical zone as well as the vicinity of the SACCF had significant deep POC fluxes.

  3. Tectónica jurásica en Argentina y Chile: extensión, subducción oblicua, rifting, deriva y colisiones?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantino Mpodozis

    2008-12-01

    Cordillera Andina a lo largo del Batolito Subcordillerano de corta vida (190-170 Ma y en la cuenca de intra-arco liásica asociada. El magmatismo de arco cesó en el norte de la Patagonia cerca de los 170 Ma y fue reemplazado por enormes volúmenes de riolitas y dacitas jurásicas inferiores a medias de la gran provincia ígnea de Chon Aike, producida como resultado de fusión cortical de una corteza sobrecalentada durante los estadios iniciales de la ruptura del Gondwana. El rifting inicial durante el Jurásico medio a tardío tuvo lugar en la cuenca de Cañadón Asfalto y en las cuencas de Río Genguel, Río Mayo y Río Senguerr durante el Jurásico tardío, en forma ortogonal al margen continental como consecuencia de la apertura del Mar de Weddell. El magmatismo ácido estuvo asociado con extensión generalizada y culminó con la apertura oceánica de la cuenca de Rocas Verdes. Las causas del cese del magmatismo en el Batolito Subcordillerano, el origen de la provincia ácida de Chon Aike y la rotación del frente magmático hacia el Batolito Patagónico alrededor de los 150 Ma no son todavía bien entendidas. Hipótesis que vinculan este escenario tectónico mutante a la colisión de terrenos alóctonos contra el margen pacífico de Patagonia durante el Jurásico temprano a medio deberían ser tenidas en consideración.

  4. Disturbances of sensation occasioned by experimental arrest of blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Auersperg

    1949-12-01

    muscles during ischaemia, as observed by Matthews, weight discrimination and the capability of hitting targets with objects of different weights were not significantly altered, even during the painful phase of fatigue. V - A nervus digitalis volaris proprius was stimulated with A.C. current of 60 cycles at a just tolerable intensity. After three minutes of stimulation the initial paresthesias and pain had almost disappeared, and were followed by numbness and increased sensory thresholds in the field of distribution of that nerve. A few seconds after stimulation was interrupted, sensation was again normal in that field. Comparable phenomena were observed under normal conditions, in the absence of ischaemia. VI - Novocaine block of a finger in the ischaemic side did not influence "pins and needles", which appear after arrest of circulation is released. Therefore, the field of origin of the "pins and needles" does not seem to be the receptor field (Weddell and Sinclair but more probably the nerve fibers themselves (Lewis, Kugelberg. VII - As is well known, "pins and needles" are accentuated by tapping the fingers and, much less, by pressing them. Thermic and painful stimulation have no effect on these paresthesias. Tapping would probably stimulate muscle and touch receptors. On the basis of our observations and Kugelberg's physiological analysis, we are inclined to consider the nerve fibers of these receptors as the field of origin of these paresthesias. VIII - No accentuation of "pins and needles" was found by (a tapping an anesthetized finger, nor (b pressing the muscles; but (c tapping the fingers does reinforce these paresthesias, also during the phase when simple pressure has the opposite effect of extinguishing them. So, it seems that accentuation is related to specific nerve fibers, but it is only brought about when a special function is at play. Therefore, enhancement of those paresthesias is limited to the correlated function of proprioceptors and touch receptors