WorldWideScience

Sample records for weathered feldspar surfaces

  1. Formation of halloysite from feldspar: Low temperature, artificial weathering versus natural weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Walter E.

    1969-01-01

    Weathering products formed on surfaces of both potassium and plagioclase feldspar (An70), which were continuously leached in a Soxhlet extraction apparatus for 140 days with 7.21 of distilled water per day at a temperature of approximately 78°C, are morphologically identical to natural products developed on potassium feldspars weathered under conditions of good drainage in the humid tropics. The new products, which first appear as tiny bumps on the feldspar surface, start to develop mainly at exposed edges but also at apparently random sites on flat cleavage surfaces. As weathering continues, the bumps grow outward from the feldspar surface to form tapered projections, which then develop into wide-based thin films or sheets. The thin sheets of many projections merge laterally to form one continuous flame-shaped sheet. The sheets formed on potassium feldspars may then roll to form tubes that are inclined at a high angle to the feldspar surface. Etch pits of triangular outline on the artificially weathered potassium feldspars serve as sites for development of continuous, non-rolled, hollow tubes. It is inferred from its morphology that this weathering product is halloysite or its primitive form. The product of naturally weathered potassium feldspars is halloysite . 4H2O.The flame-shaped films or sheets formed on artificially weathered plagioclase feldspar do not develop into hollow tubes, but instead give rise to a platy mineral that is most probably boehmite. These plates form within the flame-shaped films, and with continued weathering are released as the film deteriorates. There is no indication from this experiment that platy pseudohexagonal kaolinite forms from any of these minerals under the initial stage of weathering.

  2. Differential rates of feldspar weathering in granitic regoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A.F.; Bullen, T.D.; Schulz, M.S.; Blum, A.E.; Huntington, T.G.; Peters, N.E.

    2001-01-01

    Differential rates of plagioclase and K-feldspar weathering commonly observed in bedrock and soil environments are examined in terms of chemical kinetic and solubility controls and hydrologic permeability. For the Panola regolith, in the Georgia Piedmont Province of southeastern United States, petrographic observations, coupled with elemental balances and 87Sr/86Sr ratios, indicate that plagioclase is being converted to kaolinite at depths > 6 m in the granitic bedrock. K-feldspar remains pristine in the bedrock but subsequently weathers to kaolinite at the overlying saprolite. In contrast, both plagioclase and K-feldspar remain stable in granitic bedrocks elsewhere in Piedmont Province, such as Davis Run, Virginia, where feldspars weather concurrently in an overlying thick saprolite sequence. Kinetic rate constants, mineral surface areas, and secondary hydraulic conductivities are fitted to feldspar losses with depth in the Panola and Davis Run regoliths using a time-depth computer spreadsheet model. The primary hydraulic conductivities, describing the rates of meteoric water penetration into the pristine granites, are assumed to be equal to the propagation rates of weathering fronts, which, based on cosmogenic isotope dating, are 7 m/106 yr for the Panola regolith and 4 m/106 yr for the Davis Run regolith. Best fits in the calculations indicate that the kinetic rate constants for plagioclase in both regoliths are factors of two to three times faster than K-feldspar, which is in agreement with experimental findings. However, the range for plagioclase and K-feldspar rates (kr = 1.5 x 10-17 to 2.8 x 10-16 mol m-2 s-1) is three to four orders of magnitude lower than for that for experimental feldspar dissolution rates and are among the slowest yet recorded for natural feldspar weathering. Such slow rates are attributed to the relatively old geomorphic ages of the Panola and Davis Run regoliths, implying that mineral surface reactivity decreases significantly with

  3. Atmospheric weathering and silica-coated feldspar: analogy with zeolite molecular sieves, granite weathering, soil formation, ornamental slabs, and ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J V

    1998-03-31

    Feldspar surfaces respond to chemical, biological, and mechanical weathering. The simplest termination is hydroxyl (OH), which interacts with any adsorption layer. Acid leaching of alkalis and aluminum generated a silica-rich, nanometers-thick skin on certain feldspars. Natural K, Na-feldspars develop fragile surfaces as etch pits expand into micrometer honeycombs, possibly colonized by lichens. Most crystals have various irregular coats. Based on surface-catalytic processes in molecular sieve zeolites, I proposed that some natural feldspars lose weakly bonded Al-OH (aluminol) to yield surfaces terminated by strongly bonded Si-OH (silanol). This might explain why some old feldspar-bearing rocks weather slower than predicted from brief laboratory dissolution. Lack of an Al-OH infrared frequency from a feldspar surface is consistent with such a silanol-dominated surface. Raman spectra of altered patches on acid-leached albite correspond with amorphous silica rather than hydroxylated silica-feldspar, but natural feldspar may respond differently. The crystal structure of H-exchanged feldspar provides atomic positions for computer modeling of complex ideas for silica-terminated feldspar surfaces. Natural weathering also depends on swings of temperature and hydration, plus transport of particles, molecules, and ionic complexes by rain and wind. Soil formation might be enhanced by crushing granitic outcrops to generate new Al-rich surfaces favorable for chemical and biological weathering. Ornamental slabs used by architects and monumental masons might last longer by minimizing mechanical abrasion during sawing and polishing and by silicifying the surface. Silica-terminated feldspar might be a promising ceramic surface.

  4. Strontium and argon isotopes in naturally weathered biotites, muscovites and feldspars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauer, N.

    1981-01-01

    A Rb-Sr and K-Ar isotopical study on progressively weathered biotites, muscovites and feldspars from plutonic and eruptive rocks shows that their continental weathering is a complex phenomenon controlled by environmental conditions. During weathering of biotites, the K-Ar couple often mimics the Rb-Sr couple. The radiogenic Sr and Ar isotopes are systematically leached out, but the behaviour of the elemental Rb, K, Sr and Ar depends upon the environment. In contrast, the Sr and Ar balances of muscovites are maintained, even during very intensive weathering. In mixtures of feldspars, the common Sr seems to be leached out preferentially to the radiogenic isotope, while the K-Ar balance is maintained. (Auth.)

  5. Biochemical evolution. I. Polymerization on internal, organophilic silica surfaces of dealuminated zeolites and feldspars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph V.

    1998-01-01

    Catalysis at mineral surfaces might generate replicating biopolymers from simple chemicals supplied by meteorites, volcanic gases, and photochemical gas reactions. Many ideas are implausible in detail because the proposed mineral surfaces strongly prefer water and other ionic species to organic ones. The molecular sieve silicalite (Union Carbide; = Al-free Mobil ZSM-5 zeolite) has a three-dimensional, 10-ring channel system whose electrically neutral Si-O surface strongly adsorbs organic species over water. Three -O-Si tetrahedral bonds lie in the surface, and the fourth Si-O points inwards. In contrast, the outward Si-OH of simple quartz and feldspar crystals generates their ionic organophobicity. The ZSM-5-type zeolite mutinaite occurs in Antarctica with boggsite and tschernichite (Al-analog of Mobil Beta). Archean mutinaite might have become de-aluminated toward silicalite during hot/cold/wet/dry cycles. Catalytic activity of silicalite increases linearly with Al-OH substitution for Si, and Al atoms tend to avoid each other. Adjacent organophilic and catalytic Al-OH regions in nanometer channels might have scavenged organic species for catalytic assembly into specific polymers protected from prompt photochemical destruction. Polymer migration along weathered silicic surfaces of micrometer-wide channels of feldspars might have led to assembly of replicating catalytic biomolecules and perhaps primitive cellular organisms. Silica-rich volcanic glasses should have been abundant on the early Earth, ready for crystallization into zeolites and feldspars, as in present continental basins. Abundant chert from weakly metamorphosed Archaean rocks might retain microscopic clues to the proposed mineral adsorbent/catalysts. Other framework silicas are possible, including ones with laevo/dextro one-dimensional channels. Organic molecules, transition-metal ions, and P occur inside modern feldspars. PMID:9520372

  6. Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Surface Weather Observation Collection consists primarily of hourly, synoptic, daily, and monthly forms submitted to the archive by the National Weather Service...

  7. Land Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is the international standard code format for hourly surface weather observations. The acronym roughly translates from French as Aviation Routine Weather...

  8. Surface studies of feldspar dissolution using surface replication combined with electron microscopic and spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, P C [Petro-Canada, Calgary, Alberta; Sanipelli, G G

    1982-04-01

    The replica of a microcline cleavage surface was examined before and at various stages of interaction with water and acid solutions at 70/sup 0/C, as part of basic geochemical research for the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program to investigate the feasibility of disposal of these wastes in repositories mined in crystalline rocks. The objective of the report presented was to investigate the mechanism for Al and Si removal during incongruent dissolution of feldspars and its effect on dissolution rate. It was found that phase transformation, like dissolution occured preferentially along crystal defects on the surfaces of the feldspars. Secondary minerals always occured as discrete particles occupying only a very small fraction of the total parent surface, and hence, their presence would not affect the bulk composition or, in this regard, the overall dissolution rate of the feldspars by the formation of diffusion barriers.

  9. Surface Weather, Signal Service and Weather Bureau

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Weather, Signal Service and Weather Bureau (SWSSWB) Records primarily created by the United States Army Signal Service from 1819 until the paid and voluntary...

  10. Uruguay - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface weather observation forms for 26 stations in Uruguay. Period of record 1896-2005, with two to eight observations per day. Files created through a...

  11. Surface Weather Observations Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Weather Observation 1001 Forms is a set of historical manuscript records for the period 1893-1948. The collection includes two very similar form types: Form...

  12. Salinity-Dependent Adhesion Response Properties of Aluminosilicate (K-Feldspar) Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Bärbel; Ceccato, Marcel; Andersson, Martin Peter

    2017-01-01

    is composed predominantly of quartz with some clay, but feldspar grains are often also present. While the wettability of quartz and clay surfaces has been thoroughly investigated, little is known about the adhesion properties of feldspar. We explored the interaction of model oil compounds, molecules...... in well sorted sandstone. Adhesion forces, measured with the chemical force mapping (CFM) mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM), showed a low salinity effect on the fresh feldspar surfaces. Adhesion force, measured with -COO(H)-functionalized tips, was 60% lower in artificial low salinity seawater (LS......, ∼1500 ppm total dissolved solids) than in the high salinity solution, artificial seawater (HS, ASW, ∼35 600 ppm). Adhesion with the -CH3 tips was as much as 30% lower in LS than in HS. Density functional theory calculations indicated that the low salinity response resulted from expansion of the electric...

  13. Surface Weather Observations Hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard hourly observations taken at Weather Bureau/National Weather Service offices and airports throughout the United States. Hourly observations began during the...

  14. Mexico - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Mexican Surface Daily Observations taken at 94 observatories located throughout Mexico, beginning in 1872 and going up through 1981. The data resided on paper...

  15. Feldspar, Infrared Stimulated Luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars.......This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars....

  16. Morphological evolution of dissolving feldspar particles with anisotropic surface kinetics and implications for dissolution rate normalization and grain size dependence: A kinetic modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Lüttge, Andreas

    2009-11-01

    With previous two-dimensional (2D) simulations based on surface-specific feldspar dissolution succeeding in relating the macroscopic feldspar kinetics to the molecular-scale surface reactions of Si and Al atoms ( Zhang and Lüttge, 2008, 2009), we extended our modeling effort to three-dimensional (3D) feldspar particle dissolution simulations. Bearing on the same theoretical basis, the 3D feldspar particle dissolution simulations have verified the anisotropic surface kinetics observed in the 2D surface-specific simulations. The combined effect of saturation state, pH, and temperature on the surface kinetics anisotropy has been subsequently evaluated, found offering diverse options for morphological evolution of dissolving feldspar nanoparticles with varying grain sizes and starting shapes. Among the three primary faces on the simulated feldspar surface, the (1 0 0) face has the biggest dissolution rate across an extensively wide saturation state range and thus acquires a higher percentage of the surface area upon dissolution. The slowest dissolution occurs to either (0 0 1) or (0 1 0) faces depending on the bond energies of Si-(O)-Si ( ΦSi-O-Si/ kT) and Al-(O)-Si ( ΦAl-O-Si/ kT). When the ratio of ΦSi-O-Si/ kT to ΦAl-O-Si/ kT changes from 6:3 to 7:5, the dissolution rates of three primary faces change from the trend of (1 0 0) > (0 1 0) > (0 0 1) to the trend of (1 0 0) > (0 0 1) > (0 1 0). The rate difference between faces becomes more distinct and accordingly edge rounding becomes more significant. Feldspar nanoparticles also experience an increasing degree of edge rounding from far-from-equilibrium to close-to-equilibrium. Furthermore, we assessed the connection between the continuous morphological modification and the variation in the bulk dissolution rate during the dissolution of a single feldspar particle. Different normalization treatments equivalent to the commonly used mass, cube assumption, sphere assumption, geometric surface area, and reactive

  17. Mechanism and kinetics of mineral weathering under acid conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anbeek, C.

    1994-01-01

    This study deals with the relationships between crystal structure, grain diameter, surface morphology and dissolution kinetics for feldspar and quartz under acid conditions.

    Intensively ground samples from large, naturally weathered mineral fragments are frequently used in

  18. Surface characterization of weathered wood using a laser scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, M.; Lemaster, R.L.; Dost, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the existing methods to assess the effect of weathering on wood surfaces have some drawbacks that limit their use to specific tasks. The amount of surface erosion is often used as a measure for the weathering action. The application of a laser scanning system to reproduce surface profiles and to measure weathering erosion was tested on various samples and was found to be a very useful and superior alternative to existing methods. Further improvements of the system used can be made by refinements of the calibration procedures and by more comprehensive profile analyses. (author)

  19. ANALYSES OF ROCK SURFACE COLOUR CHANGES DUE TO WEATHERING

    OpenAIRE

    GOKAY, Mehmet Kemal

    2018-01-01

    Description parameters of rock masses and minerals include their colours as well. Colours appear in daylight for surfaced rock masses are changing slightly due to weathering layers which have been covering its surface gradually. Healthy human eyes can manage to differentiate visible light spectrum to identify colours of substances including rock masses. Then visible blackish colours of magnetite minerals, reddish colours of Terra- Rosa soils, greenish colours of weathered copper ore, pure whi...

  20. ANALYSES OF ROCK SURFACE COLOUR CHANGES DUE TO WEATHERING

    OpenAIRE

    GÖKAY, Mehmet Kemal

    2018-01-01

    Description parameters of rock masses and minerals include their colours as well. Colours appear in daylight for surfaced rock masses are changing slightly due to weathering layers which have been covering its surface gradually. Healthy human eyes can manage to differentiate visible spectrum to identify the colours of substance including rock masses. Then visible blackish colours of magnetite minerals, reddish colours of Terra- Rosa soils, greenish colours of weathered copper ore, pure white ...

  1. Asian Dust Weather Categorization with Satellite and Surface Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tang-Huang; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Huang, Shih-Jen

    2011-01-01

    This study categorizes various dust weather types by means of satellite remote sensing over central Asia. Airborne dust particles can be identified by satellite remote sensing because of the different optical properties exhibited by coarse and fine particles (i.e. varying particle sizes). If a correlation can be established between the retrieved aerosol optical properties and surface visibility, the intensity of dust weather can be more effectively and consistently discerned using satellite rather than surface observations. In this article, datasets consisting of collocated products from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aqua and surface measurements are analysed. The results indicate an exponential relationship between the surface visibility and the satellite-retrieved aerosol optical depth, which is subsequently used to categorize the dust weather. The satellite-derived spatial frequency distributions in the dust weather types are consistent with China s weather station reports during 2003, indicating that dust weather classification using satellite data is highly feasible. Although the period during the springtime from 2004 to 2007 may be not sufficient for statistical significance, our results reveal an increasing tendency in both intensity and frequency of dust weather over central Asia during this time period.

  2. History of surface weather observations in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebrich, Christopher A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, the history of surface weather observations in the United States is reviewed. Local weather observations were first documented in the 17th Century along the East Coast. For many years, the progression of a weather observation from an initial reading to dissemination remained a slow and laborious process. The number of observers remained small and unorganized until agencies including the Surgeon General, Army, and General Land Office began to request regular observations at satellite locations in the 1800s. The Smithsonian was responsible for first organizing a large "network" of volunteer weather observers across the nation. These observers became the foundation for today's Cooperative Observer network. As applications of weather data continued to grow and users required the data with an ever-decreasing latency, automated weather networks saw rapid growth in the later part of the 20th century. Today, the number of weather observations across the U.S. totals in the tens of thousands due largely to privately-owned weather networks and amateur weather observers who submit observations over the internet.

  3. What classic greywacke (litharenite) can reveal about feldspar diagenesis: An example from Permian Rotliegend sandstone in Hessen, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Nicolaas; Felder, Marita; Bär, Kristian; Götz, Annette E.

    2015-08-01

    unconformities and surface weathering or dissolution in near-surface aquifers.

  4. Modeling Apple Surface Temperature Dynamics Based on Weather Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The exposure of fruit surfaces to direct sunlight during the summer months can result in sunburn damage. Losses due to sunburn damage are a major economic problem when marketing fresh apples. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a model for simulating fruit surface temperature (FST dynamics based on energy balance and measured weather data. A series of weather data (air temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed was recorded for seven hours between 11:00–18:00 for two months at fifteen minute intervals. To validate the model, the FSTs of “Fuji” apples were monitored using an infrared camera in a natural orchard environment. The FST dynamics were measured using a series of thermal images. For the apples that were completely exposed to the sun, the RMSE of the model for estimating FST was less than 2.0 °C. A sensitivity analysis of the emissivity of the apple surface and the conductance of the fruit surface to water vapour showed that accurate estimations of the apple surface emissivity were important for the model. The validation results showed that the model was capable of accurately describing the thermal performances of apples under different solar radiation intensities. Thus, this model could be used to more accurately estimate the FST relative to estimates that only consider the air temperature. In addition, this model provides useful information for sunburn protection management.

  5. Modeling apple surface temperature dynamics based on weather data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Peters, Troy; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Jingjin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-10-27

    The exposure of fruit surfaces to direct sunlight during the summer months can result in sunburn damage. Losses due to sunburn damage are a major economic problem when marketing fresh apples. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a model for simulating fruit surface temperature (FST) dynamics based on energy balance and measured weather data. A series of weather data (air temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed) was recorded for seven hours between 11:00-18:00 for two months at fifteen minute intervals. To validate the model, the FSTs of "Fuji" apples were monitored using an infrared camera in a natural orchard environment. The FST dynamics were measured using a series of thermal images. For the apples that were completely exposed to the sun, the RMSE of the model for estimating FST was less than 2.0 °C. A sensitivity analysis of the emissivity of the apple surface and the conductance of the fruit surface to water vapour showed that accurate estimations of the apple surface emissivity were important for the model. The validation results showed that the model was capable of accurately describing the thermal performances of apples under different solar radiation intensities. Thus, this model could be used to more accurately estimate the FST relative to estimates that only consider the air temperature. In addition, this model provides useful information for sunburn protection management.

  6. Weathering and decontamination of radioactivity deposited on asphalt surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warming, L.

    1982-12-01

    Longlived fission products might be deposited in the environment after a serious reactor accident. At Risoe we have studied how danish weather conditions and fire hosing influence the decontamination of Rubidium 86 (representing Cesium 134 and 137) Barium-Lanthanum 140 and Ruthenium 103 deposited on asphalt surfaces. Measurements have been done at different types of roads and during all seasons including winter with snow and ice cover of the roads. The results from the first five experiments were used for calculating doses to the population in the land contamination (RISO-R-462). (author)

  7. Burkholderia susongensis sp. nov., a mineral-weathering bacterium isolated from weathered rock surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jia-Yu; Zang, Sheng-Gang; Sheng, Xia-Fang; He, Lin-Yan; Huang, Zhi; Wang, Qi

    2015-03-01

    A novel type of mineral-weathering bacterium was isolated from the weathered surface of rock (mica schist) collected from Susong (Anhui, China). Cells of strain L226(T) were Gram-stain-negative. The strain grew optimally at 30 °C, with 1 % (w/v) NaCl and at pH 7.0 in trypticase soy broth. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene phylogeny, strain L226(T) was shown to belong to the genus Burkholderia and the closest phylogenetic relatives were Burkholderia sprentiae WSM5005(T) (98.3 %), Burkholderia acidipaludis NBRC 101816(T) (98.2 %), Burkholderia tuberum STM678(T) (97.2 %) and Burkholderia diazotrophica JPY461(T) (97.1 %). The DNA G+C content was 63.5 mol% and the respiratory quinone was Q-8. The major fatty acids were C16 : 0, C17 : 0 cyclo and C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c. The polar lipid profile of strain L226(T) consisted of a mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, unknown lipids and unidentified aminophospholipids. Based on the low level of DNA-DNA relatedness (ranging from 25.8 % to 34.4 %) to the tested type strains of species of the genus Burkholderia and unique phenotypic characteristics, it is suggested that strain L226(T) represents a novel species of the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia susongensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is L226(T) ( = CCTCC AB2014142(T) = JCM 30231(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  8. New insights into the oleate flotation response of feldspar particles of different sizes: Anisotropic adsorption model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Longhua; Tian, Jia; Wu, Houqin; Deng, Wei; Yang, Yaohui; Sun, Wei; Gao, Zhiyong; Hu, Yuehua

    2017-11-01

    The anisotropic adsorption of sodium oleate (NaOL) on feldspar surfaces was investigated to elucidate the different flotation properties of feldspar particles of four different size ranges. Microflotation experiments showed that the feldspar flotation recovery of particles with sizes spanning different ranges decreased in the order 0-19>19-38>45-75>38-45μm. Zeta potential and FTIR measurements showed that NaOL was chemically adsorbed on the Al sites of the feldspar surface. The anisotropic surface energies and broken bond densities estimated by density functional theory calculations showed that, although feldspar mostly exposed (010) and (001) surfaces, only the (001) surfaces contained the Al sites needed for NaOL adsorption. The interaction energies calculated by molecular dynamics simulations confirmed the more favorable NaOL adsorption on (001) than (010) surfaces, which may represent the main cause for the anisotropic NaOL adsorption on feldspar particles of different sizes. SEM measurements showed that the main exposed surfaces on coarse and fine feldspar particles were the side (010) and basal (001) ones, respectively. A higher fraction of Al-rich (001) surfaces is exposed on fine feldspar particles, resulting in better floatability compared with coarse particles. XPS and adsorption measurements confirmed that the Al content on the feldspar surface varied with the particle size, explaining the different NaOL flotation of feldspar particles of different sizes. Therefore, the present results suggest that coarsely ground ore should be used for the separation of feldspar gangue minerals. Further improvements in the flotation separation of feldspar from associated valuable minerals can be achieved through selective comminution or grinding processes favoring the exposure of (010) surfaces. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Thermal Expansion Of Feldspars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, G. L.; Medford, A.; Conlon, M.

    2009-12-01

    Hovis and others (1) investigated the thermal expansion of natural and synthetic AlSi3 feldspars and demonstrated that the coefficient of thermal expansion (α) decreases significantly, and linearly, with increasing room-temperature volume (VRT). In all such feldspars, therefore, chemical expansion limits thermal expansion. The scope of this work now has been broadened to include plagioclase and Ba-K feldspar crystalline solutions. X-ray powder diffraction data have been collected between room temperature and 925 °C on six plagioclase specimens ranging in composition from anorthite to oligoclase. When combined with thermal expansion data for albite (2,3,4) a steep linear trend of α as a function of VRT emerges, reflecting how small changes in composition dramatically affect expansion behavior. The thermal expansion data for five synthetic Ba-K feldspars ranging in composition from 20 to 100 mole percent celsian, combined with data for pure K-feldspar (3,4), show α-VRT relationships similar in nature to the plagioclase series, but with a slope and intercept different from the latter. Taken as a group all Al2Si2 feldspars, including anorthite and celsian from the present study along with Sr- (5) and Pb-feldspar (6) from other workers, show very limited thermal expansion that, unlike AlSi3 feldspars, has little dependence on the divalent-ion (or M-) site occupant. This apparently is due to the necessitated alternation of Al and Si in the tetrahedral sites of these minerals (7), which in turn locks the tetrahedral framework and makes the M-site occupant nearly irrelevant to expansion behavior. Indeed, in feldspar series with coupled chemical substitution it is the change away from a 1:1 Al:Si ratio that gives feldspars greater freedom to expand. Overall, the relationships among α, chemical composition, and room-temperature volume provide useful predictive tools for estimating feldspar thermal expansion and give insight into the controls of expansion behavior in

  10. All-weather Land Surface Temperature Estimation from Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J.; Zhang, X.

    2017-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing, including the thermal infrared (TIR) and passive microwave (MW), provides the possibility to observe LST at large scales. For better modeling the land surface processes with high temporal resolutions, all-weather LST from satellite data is desirable. However, estimation of all-weather LST faces great challenges. On the one hand, TIR remote sensing is limited to clear-sky situations; this drawback reduces its usefulness under cloudy conditions considerably, especially in regions with frequent and/or permanent clouds. On the other hand, MW remote sensing suffers from much greater thermal sampling depth (TSD) and coarser spatial resolution than TIR; thus, MW LST is generally lower than TIR LST, especially at daytime. Two case studies addressing the challenges mentioned previously are presented here. The first study is for the development of a novel thermal sampling depth correction method (TSDC) to estimate the MW LST over barren land; this second study is for the development of a feasible method to merge the TIR and MW LSTs by addressing the coarse resolution of the latter one. In the first study, the core of the TSDC method is a new formulation of the passive microwave radiation balance equation, which allows linking bulk MW radiation to the soil temperature at a specific depth, i.e. the representative temperature: this temperature is then converted to LST through an adapted soil heat conduction equation. The TSDC method is applied to the 6.9 GHz channel in vertical polarization of AMSR-E. Evaluation shows that LST estimated by the TSDC method agrees well with the MODIS LST. Validation is based on in-situ LSTs measured at the Gobabeb site in western Namibia. The results demonstrate the high accuracy of the TSDC method: it yields a root-mean squared error (RMSE) of 2 K and ignorable systematic error over barren land. In the second study, the method consists of two core processes: (1) estimation of MW LST from MW brightness temperature and (2

  11. Chemical weathering of a marine terrace chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California I: Interpreting rates and controls based on soil concentration-depth profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A.F.; Schulz, M.S.; Vivit, D.V.; Blum, A.E.; Stonestrom, David A.; Anderson, S.P.

    2008-01-01

    The spatial and temporal changes in element and mineral concentrations in regolith profiles in a chronosequence developed on marine terraces along coastal California are interpreted in terms of chemical weathering rates and processes. In regoliths up to 15 m deep and 226 kyrs old, quartz-normalized mass transfer coefficients indicate non-stoichiometric preferential release of Sr > Ca > Na from plagioclase along with lesser amounts of K, Rb and Ba derived from K-feldspar. Smectite weathering results in the loss of Mg and concurrent incorporation of Al and Fe into secondary kaolinite and Fe-oxides in shallow argillic horizons. Elemental losses from weathering of the Santa Cruz terraces fall within the range of those for other marine terraces along the Pacific Coast of North America. Residual amounts of plagioclase and K-feldspar decrease with terrace depth and increasing age. The gradient of the weathering profile bs is defined by the ratio of the weathering rate, R to the velocity at which the profile penetrates into the protolith. A spreadsheet calculator further refines profile geometries, demonstrating that the non-linear regions at low residual feldspar concentrations at shallow depth are dominated by exponential changes in mineral surface-to-volume ratios and at high residual feldspar concentrations, at greater depth, by the approach to thermodynamic saturation. These parameters are of secondary importance to the fluid flux qh, which in thermodynamically saturated pore water, controls the weathering velocity and mineral losses from the profiles. Long-term fluid fluxes required to reproduce the feldspar weathering profiles are in agreement with contemporary values based on solute Cl balances (qh = 0.025-0.17 m yr-1). During saturation-controlled and solute-limited weathering, the greater loss of plagioclase relative to K-feldspar is dependent on the large difference in their respective solubilities instead of the small difference between their respective

  12. Mercury's Weather-Beaten Surface: Understanding Mercury in the Context of Lunar and Asteroid Space Weathering Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominque, Deborah L.; Chapman, Clark R.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Benna, Mehdi; Slavin, James A.; Orlando, Thomas M.; Schriver, David; hide

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the composition of Mercury's crust is key to comprehending the formation of the planet. The regolith, derived from the crustal bedrock, has been altered via a set of space weathering processes. These processes are the same set of mechanisms that work to form Mercury's exosphere, and are moderated by the local space environment and the presence of an intrinsic planetary magnetic field. The alterations need to be understood in order to determine the initial crustal compositions. The complex interrelationships between Mercury's exospheric processes, the space environment, and surface composition are examined and reviewed. The processes are examined in the context of our understanding of these same processes on the lunar and asteroid regoliths. Keywords: Mercury (planet) Space weathering Surface processes Exosphere Surface composition Space environment 3

  13. Surface characterization of weathered wood-plastic composites produced from modified wood flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    James S. Fabiyi; Armando G. McDonald; Nicole M. Stark

    2007-01-01

    The effects of weathering on the surface properties of wood-plastic composites (WPC) were examined. High-density polyethylene (HDPE) based WPCs made from modified wood flour (untreated, extractives free, and holocellulose (delignified) fibers) were subjected to accelerated (xenon-arc) weathering. Colorimetry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy were employed to...

  14. Effect of processing method on surface and weathering characteristics of wood-flour/HDPE composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole M. Stark; Laurent M. Matuana; Craig M. Clemons

    2004-01-01

    Wood-plastic lumber is promoted as a low maintenance high-durability product. When exposed to accelerated weathering, however, wood-plastic composites may experience a color change and/or loss in mechanical properties. Different methods of manufacturing wood-plastic composites lead to different surface characteristics, which can influence weathering, In this study, 50...

  15. Weather Radar Adjustment Using Runoff from Urban Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahm, Malte; Rasmussen, Michael Robdrup

    2017-01-01

    Weather radar data used for urban drainage applications are traditionally adjusted to point ground references, e.g., rain gauges. However, the available rain gauge density for the adjustment is often low, which may lead to significant representativeness errors. Yet, in many urban catchments, rain...

  16. Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data on a 1-km Grid for North America, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides Daymet output data as mosaicked gridded estimates of daily weather parameters for North America, including daily continuous surfaces...

  17. Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data on a 1-km Grid for North America, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides Daymet output data as mosaicked gridded estimates of daily weather parameters for North America, including continuous surfaces of day length,...

  18. Developing Effective Separation of Feldspar and Quartz While Recycling Tailwater by HF Pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiqing Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of hydrofluoric acid (HF pretreatment on flotation of feldspar and quartz using dodecylamine (DDA as collector was investigated by micro-flotation, zeta potential, pyrene fluorescence spectroscopy, attenuated total reflection flourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR, scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and bench scale flotation. The micro-flotation tests revealed that there was little difference in the flotation of feldspar and quartz at pH 2, using H2SO4 as pH regulator. After HF pretreatment, the floatability of feldspar significantly increased while the floatability of quartz showed no change. HF pretreatment resulted in leaching of SiO2 and enrichment of Na, K and Al on the feldspar surface. Consequently, the negative surface charge of feldspar increased at pH 2, which allowed for the flotation separation of the feasible minerals. This took place via an increased electrostatic adsorption between DDA and Na, K, Al on the feldspar surface, which effectively increased its hydrophobicity and as a result, improved the floatability of feldspar. An alternative process which exhibited effective separation of quartz and feldspar while recycling the tailwater from the flotation was proposed.

  19. Structural analysis of heat-treated birch (Betule papyrifera) surface during artificial weathering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xianai; Kocaefe, Duygu; Kocaefe, Yasar; Boluk, Yaman; Krause, Cornélia

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Investigate detailed structural changes of heat-treated wood due to weathering. ► Identify connection between physical structural changes and chemical degradation. ► Study effect of heat treatment conditions on weathering degradation process. - Abstract: Effect of artificial weathering on the surface structural changes of birch (Betule papyrifera) wood, heat-treated to different temperatures, was studied using the fluorescence microscopy and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Changes in the chemical structure of wood components were analyzed by FTIR in order to understand the mechanism of degradation taking place due to heat treatment and artificial weathering. The results are compared with those of the untreated (kiln-dried) birch. The SEM analysis results show that the effect of weathering on the cell wall of the untreated birch surface is more than that of heat-treated samples. The FTIR spectroscopy results indicate that lignin is the most sensitive component of heat-treated birch to the weathering degradation process. Elimination of the amorphous and highly crystallised cellulose is observed for both heat-treated and untreated wood during weathering. It is also observed that heat treatment increases the lignin and crystallised cellulose contents, which to some extent protects heat-treated birch against degradation due to weathering.

  20. Mercury's Weather-Beaten Surface: Understanding Mercury in the Context of Lunar and Asteroidal Space Weathering Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingue, Deborah L.; Chapman, Clark. R.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Benna, Mehdi; Slavin, James A.; Schriver, David; Travnicek, Pavel M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Mercury's regolith, derived from the crustal bedrock, has been altered by a set of space weathering processes. Before we can interpret crustal composition, it is necessary to understand the nature of these surface alterations. The processes that space weather the surface are the same as those that form Mercury's exosphere (micrometeoroid flux and solar wind interactions) and are moderated by the local space environment and the presence of a global magnetic field. To comprehend how space weathering acts on Mercury's regolith, an understanding is needed of how contributing processes act as an interactive system. As no direct information (e.g., from returned samples) is available about how the system of space weathering affects Mercury's regolith, we use as a basis for comparison the current understanding of these same processes on lunar and asteroidal regoliths as well as laboratory simulations. These comparisons suggest that Mercury's regolith is overturned more frequently (though the characteristic surface time for a grain is unknown even relative to the lunar case), more than an order of magnitude more melt and vapor per unit time and unit area is produced by impact processes than on the Moon (creating a higher glass content via grain coatings and agglutinates), the degree of surface irradiation is comparable to or greater than that on the Moon, and photon irradiation is up to an order of magnitude greater (creating amorphous grain rims, chemically reducing the upper layers of grains to produce nanometer scale particles of metallic iron, and depleting surface grains in volatile elements and alkali metals). The processes that chemically reduce the surface and produce nanometer-scale particles on Mercury are suggested to be more effective than similar processes on the Moon. Estimated abundances of nanometer-scale particles can account for Mercury's dark surface relative to that of the Moon without requiring macroscopic grains of opaque minerals. The presence of

  1. INDICATION OF INSENSITIVITY OF PLANETARY WEATHERING BEHAVIOR AND HABITABLE ZONE TO SURFACE LAND FRACTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbot, Dorian S.; Ciesla, Fred J.; Cowan, Nicolas B.

    2012-01-01

    It is likely that unambiguous habitable zone terrestrial planets of unknown water content will soon be discovered. Water content helps determine surface land fraction, which influences planetary weathering behavior. This is important because the silicate-weathering feedback determines the width of the habitable zone in space and time. Here a low-order model of weathering and climate, useful for gaining qualitative understanding, is developed to examine climate evolution for planets of various land-ocean fractions. It is pointed out that, if seafloor weathering does not depend directly on surface temperature, there can be no weathering-climate feedback on a waterworld. This would dramatically narrow the habitable zone of a waterworld. Results from our model indicate that weathering behavior does not depend strongly on land fraction for partially ocean-covered planets. This is powerful because it suggests that previous habitable zone theory is robust to changes in land fraction, as long as there is some land. Finally, a mechanism is proposed for a waterworld to prevent complete water loss during a moist greenhouse through rapid weathering of exposed continents. This process is named a 'waterworld self-arrest', and it implies that waterworlds can go through a moist greenhouse stage and end up as planets like Earth with partial ocean coverage. This work stresses the importance of surface and geologic effects, in addition to the usual incident stellar flux, for habitability.

  2. INDICATION OF INSENSITIVITY OF PLANETARY WEATHERING BEHAVIOR AND HABITABLE ZONE TO SURFACE LAND FRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbot, Dorian S.; Ciesla, Fred J. [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Cowan, Nicolas B., E-mail: abbot@uchicago.edu [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2131 Tech Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    It is likely that unambiguous habitable zone terrestrial planets of unknown water content will soon be discovered. Water content helps determine surface land fraction, which influences planetary weathering behavior. This is important because the silicate-weathering feedback determines the width of the habitable zone in space and time. Here a low-order model of weathering and climate, useful for gaining qualitative understanding, is developed to examine climate evolution for planets of various land-ocean fractions. It is pointed out that, if seafloor weathering does not depend directly on surface temperature, there can be no weathering-climate feedback on a waterworld. This would dramatically narrow the habitable zone of a waterworld. Results from our model indicate that weathering behavior does not depend strongly on land fraction for partially ocean-covered planets. This is powerful because it suggests that previous habitable zone theory is robust to changes in land fraction, as long as there is some land. Finally, a mechanism is proposed for a waterworld to prevent complete water loss during a moist greenhouse through rapid weathering of exposed continents. This process is named a 'waterworld self-arrest', and it implies that waterworlds can go through a moist greenhouse stage and end up as planets like Earth with partial ocean coverage. This work stresses the importance of surface and geologic effects, in addition to the usual incident stellar flux, for habitability.

  3. On the dual nature of lichen-induced rock surface weathering in contrasting micro-environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Joana; Gonçalves, João; Oliveira, Cláudia; Favero-Longo, Sergio E; Paz-Bermúdez, Graciela; Almeida, Rubim; Prieto, Beatriz

    2016-10-01

    Contradictory evidence from biogeomorphological studies has increased the debate on the extent of lichen contribution to differential rock surface weathering in both natural and cultural settings. This study, undertaken in Côa Valley Archaeological Park, aimed at evaluating the effect of rock surface orientation on the weathering ability of dominant lichens. Hyphal penetration and oxalate formation at the lichen-rock interface were evaluated as proxies of physical and chemical weathering, respectively. A new protocol of pixel-based supervised image classification for the analysis of periodic acid-Schiff stained cross-sections of colonized schist revealed that hyphal spread of individual species was not influenced by surface orientation. However, hyphal spread was significantly higher in species dominant on northwest facing surfaces. An apparently opposite effect was noticed in terms of calcium oxalate accumulation at the lichen-rock interface; it was detected by Raman spectroscopy and complementary X-ray microdiffraction on southeast facing surfaces only. These results suggest that lichen-induced physical weathering may be most severe on northwest facing surfaces by means of an indirect effect of surface orientation on species abundance, and thus dependent on the species, whereas lichen-induced chemical weathering is apparently higher on southeast facing surfaces and dependent on micro-environmental conditions, giving only weak support to the hypothesis that lichens are responsible for the currently observed pattern of rock-art distribution in Côa Valley. Assumptions about the drivers of open-air rock-art distribution patterns elsewhere should also consider the micro-environmental controls of lichen-induced weathering, to avoid biased measures of lichen contribution to rock-art deterioration. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  4. A Coupled Surface Nudging Scheme for use in Retrospective Weather and Climate Simulations for Environmental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    A surface analysis nudging scheme coupling atmospheric and land surface thermodynamic parameters has been implemented into WRF v3.8 (latest version) for use with retrospective weather and climate simulations, as well as for applications in air quality, hydrology, and ecosystem mo...

  5. Weathering of the New Albany Shale, Kentucky, USA: I. Weathering zones defined by mineralogy and major-element composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, M.L.W.; Breit, G.N.

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of chemical and mineralogical changes induced by weathering is valuable information when considering the supply of nutrients and toxic elements from rocks. Here minerals that release and fix major elements during progressive weathering of a bed of Devonian New Albany Shale in eastern Kentucky are documented. Samples were collected from unweathered core (parent shale) and across an outcrop excavated into a hillside 40 year prior to sampling. Quantitative X-ray diffraction mineralogical data record progressive shale alteration across the outcrop. Mineral compositional changes reflect subtle alteration processes such as incongruent dissolution and cation exchange. Altered primary minerals include K-feldspars, plagioclase, calcite, pyrite, and chlorite. Secondary minerals include jarosite, gypsum, goethite, amorphous Fe(III) oxides and Fe(II)-Al sulfate salt (efflorescence). The mineralogy in weathered shale defines four weathered intervals on the outcrop-Zones A-C and soil. Alteration of the weakly weathered shale (Zone A) is attributed to the 40-a exposure of the shale. In this zone, pyrite oxidization produces acid that dissolves calcite and attacks chlorite, forming gypsum, jarosite, and minor efflorescent salt. The pre-excavation, active weathering front (Zone B) is where complete pyrite oxidation and alteration of feldspar and organic matter result in increased permeability. Acidic weathering solutions seep through the permeable shale and evaporate on the surface forming abundant efflorescent salt, jarosite and minor goethite. Intensely weathered shale (Zone C) is depleted in feldspars, chlorite, gypsum, jarosite and efflorescent salts, but has retained much of its primary quartz, illite and illite-smectite. Goethite and amorphous FE(III) oxides increase due to hydrolysis of jarosite. Enhanced permeability in this zone is due to a 14% loss of the original mass in parent shale. Denudation rates suggest that characteristics of Zone C

  6. Observational study of atmospheric surface layer and coastal weather in northern Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Dhrubajyoti; Sadr, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric surface layer is the interaction medium between atmosphere and Earth's surface. Better understanding of its turbulence nature is essential in characterizing the local weather, climate variability and modeling of turbulent exchange processes. The importance of Middle East region, with its unique geographical, economical and weather condition is well recognized. However, high quality micrometeorological observational studies are rare in this region. Here we show experimental results from micrometeorological observations from an experimental site in the coastal region of Qatar during August-December 2015. Measurements of winds are obtained from three sonic anemometers installed on a 9 m tower placed at Al Ghariyah beach in northern Qatar (26.08 °N, 51.36 °E). Different surface layer characteristics is analyzed and compared with earlier studies in equivalent weather conditions. Monthly statistics of wind speed, wind direction, temperature, humidity and heat index are made from concurrent observations from sonic anemometer and weather station to explore variations with surface layer characteristics. The results also highlights potential impact of sea breeze circulation on local weather and atmospheric turbulence. The observed daily maximum temperature and heat index during morning period may be related to sea breeze circulations. Along with the operational micrometeorological observation system, a camera system and ultrasonic wave measurement system are installed recently in the site to study coastline development and nearshore wave dynamics. Overall, the complete observational set up is going to provide new insights about nearshore wind dynamics and wind-wave interaction in Qatar.

  7. Weathering behavior of mine tailings and waste rock: A surface investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domvile, S.J.; Li, M.G.; Sollner, D.D.; Nesbitt, W.

    1994-01-01

    A study focusing on the ion movement in the near surface of sulfide minerals was conducted to better understand the weathering mechanisms of mine waste materials. Tailings and waste rock samples from Canadian mines were subjected to controlled weathering studies using various chemical leachants. Leachates were analyzed for various parameters, and petrographic analyses were conducted on the solid residues. Laboratory oxidation studies of pure pyrrhotite and arsenopyrite were carried out using the surface techniques X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The data derived from the weathering study and the surface techniques were correlated to determine mechanisms of oxidation. Several results were observed during the project: ferric iron constitutes one third of the iron present in pyrrhotite, sulfide oxidation is initiated when rock is blasted, sulfide sulfur is oxidized to di- and poly-sulfides prior to forming sulfates, and significantly more sulfate is produced upon exposure to aqueous environments than to air alone

  8. The natural weathering of staurolite: crystal-surface textures, relative stability, and the rate-determining step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Velbel; Charles L. Basso; Michael J. Zieg

    1996-01-01

    Mineral surface-textures on naturally weathered crystals of staurolite [monoclinic, pseudo-orthorhombic; Fe4Al18Si8O46(OH)2] indicate that staurolite weathering is generally interface-limited. Etch pits on naturally weathered staurolites are disk-shaped,...

  9. Principles of Thermal Expansion in Feldspars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, Guy; Medford, Aaron; Conlon, Maricate; Tether, Allison; Romanoski, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    Following the recent thermal expansion work of Hovis et al. (1) on AlSi3 feldspars, we have investigated the thermal expansion of plagioclase, Ba-K, and Ca-K feldspar crystalline solutions. X-ray powder diffraction data were collected between room temperature and 925 °C on six natural plagioclase specimens ranging in composition from anorthite to oligoclase, the K-exchanged equivalents of these plagioclase specimens, and five synthetic Ba-K feldspars with compositions ranging from 25 to 99 mol % BaAl2Si2O8. The resulting thermal expansion coefficients (α) for volume have been combined with earlier results for end-member Na- and K-feldspars (2,3). Unlike AlSi3 feldspars, Al2Si2 feldspars, including anorthite and celsian from the present study plus Sr- and Pb-feldspar from other workers (4,5), show essentially constant and very limited thermal expansion, regardless of divalent cation size. In the context of structures where the Lowenstein rule (6) requires Al and Si to alternate among tetrahedra, the proximity of bridging Al-O-Si oxygen ions to divalent neighbors (ranging from 0 to 2) produces short Ca-O (or Ba-O) bonds (7,8) that apparently are the result of local charge-balance requirements (9). Gibbs et al. (10) suggest that short bonds such as these have a partially covalent character. This in turn stiffens the structure. Thus, for feldspar series with coupled substitution the change away from a purely divalent M-site occupant gives the substituting (less strongly bonded) monovalent cations increasingly greater influence on thermal expansion. Overall, then, thermal expansion in the feldspar system is well represented on a plot of α against room-temperature volume, where one sees a quadrilateral bounded by data for (A) AlSi3 feldspars whose expansion behavior is controlled largely by the size of the monovalent alkali-site occupant, (B) Al2Si2 feldspars whose expansion is uniformly limited by partially-covalent bonds between divalent M-site occupants and

  10. Integrating weather and geotechnical monitoring data for assessing the stability of large scale surface mining operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steiakakis Chrysanthos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The geotechnical challenges for safe slope design in large scale surface mining operations are enormous. Sometimes one degree of slope inclination can significantly reduce the overburden to ore ratio and therefore dramatically improve the economics of the operation, while large scale slope failures may have a significant impact on human lives. Furthermore, adverse weather conditions, such as high precipitation rates, may unfavorably affect the already delicate balance between operations and safety. Geotechnical, weather and production parameters should be systematically monitored and evaluated in order to safely operate such pits. Appropriate data management, processing and storage are critical to ensure timely and informed decisions.

  11. Efficacy of Hydrophobic Coatings in Protecting Oak Wood Surfaces during Accelerated Weathering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Pánek

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The durability of transparent coatings applied to an oak wood exterior is relatively low due to its anatomic structure and chemical composition. Enhancement of the protection of oak wood against weathering using transparent hydrophobic coatings is presented in this study. Oak wood surfaces were modified using UV-stabilizers, hindered amine light stabilizer (HALS, and ZnO and TiO2 nanoparticles before the application of a commercial hydrophobic topcoat. A transparent oil-based coating was used as a control coating system. The artificial weathering test lasted 6 weeks and colour, gloss, and contact angle changes were regularly evaluated during this period. The changes in the microscopic structure were studied with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The results proved limited durability against weathering of both tested hydrophobic coatings. The formation of micro-cracks causing the leaching of degraded wood compounds and discolouration of oak wood were observed after 1 or 3 weeks of the weathering test. Until then, an oil-based coating film had protected the wood sufficiently, but after 6 weeks the wood was fully defoliated to its non-homogenous thickness, which was caused by the presence of large oak vessels, and by the effects of specific oak tannins. Using transparent hydrophobic coatings can prolong the service life of the exteriors of wood products by decreasing their moisture content. Without proper construction protection against rainwater, the hydrophobic coating itself cannot guarantee the preservation of the natural appearance of wood exteriors.

  12. Probing luminescence centers in Na rich feldspar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Amit Kumar; Lapp, Torben; Kook, Myung Ho

    2016-01-01

    our understanding of the luminescence mechanisms and recombination sites, in a sample of Na rich plagioclase feldspar (oligoclase). Both the UV and violet–blue emissions show resonant excitations arising from a distribution of energy levels. We propose, contrary to the general understanding...

  13. Kinetics of infrared stimulated luminescence from feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank; Sohbati, Reza; Guralnik, Benny

    2015-01-01

    thermal and optical, of the infrared stimulated luminescence signal from feldspar. Based on the application of this model, it is concluded that different infra-red stimulated luminescence emissions (UV, blue, yellow and far-red) follow the same kinetics, and, therefore, involve participation of the same...

  14. Thermo-optical properties of optically stimulated luminescence in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Johnsen, O.

    1995-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence processes in feldspars are subject to competing thermal enhancement and quenching processes: this article describes the thermal enhancement effects for orthoclase, albite and plagioclase feldspars. It is demonstrated that certain lattice vibrational modes can be ...

  15. Improving weather predictability by including land-surface model parameter uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Rene; Dutra, Emanuel; Pappenberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    The land surface forms an important component of Earth system models and interacts nonlinearly with other parts such as ocean and atmosphere. To capture the complex and heterogenous hydrology of the land surface, land surface models include a large number of parameters impacting the coupling to other components of the Earth system model. Focusing on ECMWF's land-surface model HTESSEL we present in this study a comprehensive parameter sensitivity evaluation using multiple observational datasets in Europe. We select 6 poorly constrained effective parameters (surface runoff effective depth, skin conductivity, minimum stomatal resistance, maximum interception, soil moisture stress function shape, total soil depth) and explore their sensitivity to model outputs such as soil moisture, evapotranspiration and runoff using uncoupled simulations and coupled seasonal forecasts. Additionally we investigate the possibility to construct ensembles from the multiple land surface parameters. In the uncoupled runs we find that minimum stomatal resistance and total soil depth have the most influence on model performance. Forecast skill scores are moreover sensitive to the same parameters as HTESSEL performance in the uncoupled analysis. We demonstrate the robustness of our findings by comparing multiple best performing parameter sets and multiple randomly chosen parameter sets. We find better temperature and precipitation forecast skill with the best-performing parameter perturbations demonstrating representativeness of model performance across uncoupled (and hence less computationally demanding) and coupled settings. Finally, we construct ensemble forecasts from ensemble members derived with different best-performing parameterizations of HTESSEL. This incorporation of parameter uncertainty in the ensemble generation yields an increase in forecast skill, even beyond the skill of the default system. Orth, R., E. Dutra, and F. Pappenberger, 2016: Improving weather predictability by

  16. Mars weathering analogs - Secondary mineralization in Antarctic basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkley, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Alkalic basalt samples from Ross Island, Antarctica, are evaluated as terrestrial analogs to weathered surface materials on Mars. Secondary alteration in the rocks is limited to pneumatolytic oxidation of igneous minerals and glass, rare groundmass clay and zeolite mineralization, and hydrothermal minerals coating fractures and vesicle surfaces. Hydrothermal mineral assemblages consist mainly of K-feldspar, zeolites (phillipsite and chabazite), calcite, and anhydrite. Low alteration rates are attributed to cold and dry environmental factors common to both Antarctica and Mars. It is noted that mechanical weathering (aeolian abrasion) of Martian equivalents to present Antarctic basalts would yield minor hydrothermal minerals and local surface fines composed of primary igneous minerals and glass but would produce few hydrous products, such as palagonite, clay or micas. It is thought that leaching of hydrothermal vein minerals by migrating fluids and redeposition in duricrust deposits may represent an alternate process for incorporating secondary minerals of volcanic origin into Martian surface fines.

  17. Radioluminescence dating: the IR emission of feldspar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilles, Thomas.; Habermann, Jan

    2000-01-01

    A new luminescence reader for radioluminescence (RL) measurements is presented. The system allows detection of RL emissions in the near infrared region (IR). Basic bleaching properties of the IR-RL emission of feldspars are investigated. Sunlight-bleaching experiments as a test for sensitivity changes are presented. IR-bleaching experiments were carried out to obtain information about the underlying physical processes of the IR-RL emission

  18. The Influence of Runoff and Surface Hydrology on Titan's Weather and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulk, S.; Lora, J. M.; Mitchell, J.; Moon, S.

    2017-12-01

    Titan's surface liquid distribution has been shown by general circulation models (GCMs) to greatly influence the hydrological cycle, producing characteristic weather and seasonal climate patterns. Simulations from the Titan Atmospheric Model (TAM) with imposed polar methane "wetlands" reservoirs realistically produce observed cloud features and temperature profiles of Titan's atmosphere, whereas "aquaplanet" simulations with a global methane ocean are not as successful. In addition, wetlands simulations, unlike aquaplanet simulations, demonstrate strong correlations between extreme rainfall behavior and observed geomorphic features, indicating the influential role of precipitation in shaping Titan's surface. The wetlands configuration is, in part, motivated by Titan's large-scale topography featuring low-latitude highlands and high-latitude lowlands, with the implication being that methane may concentrate in the high-latitude lowlands by way of runoff and subsurface flow of a global or regional methane table. However, the extent to which topography controls the surface liquid distribution and thus impacts the global hydrological cycle by driving surface and subsurface flow is unclear. Here we present TAM simulations wherein the imposed wetlands reservoirs are replaced by a surface runoff scheme that allows surface liquid to self-consistently redistribute under the influence of topography. We discuss the impact of surface runoff on the surface liquid distribution over seasonal timescales and compare the resulting hydrological cycle to observed cloud and surface features, as well as to the hydrological cycles of the TAM wetlands and aquaplanet simulations. While still idealized, this more realistic representation of Titan's hydrology provides new insight into the complex interaction between Titan's atmosphere and surface, demonstrates the influence of surface runoff on Titan's global climate, and lays the groundwork for further surface hydrology developments in Titan

  19. Kiglapait Feldspar States 5 to Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, S. A.

    2017-12-01

    The 1305 Ga Kiglapait Intrusion of coastal Labrador records the crystallization of troctolite through olivine gabbro to magnetite- and apatite-bearing rocks to monoclinic sanidine- mesoperthite-ferrosyenite below an inverted stratigraphy of a thin Upper Border Zone. The crystallization history was about 1 Ma. ¶The evolutionary history of Kiglapait feldspars in an 8.4 km thick magma chamber runs from plagioclase An70 at 5 kbar and 1250°C, cooling through to ferrosyenite with mesoperthite and two feldspars at 3 kbar and 1,000°C. The residual magma encountered the binodal solvus and finished crystallizing as an azeotrope with plagioclase (Or 21, An 15) and sanidine (Or 52, An 8) in liquid (Xor = 1/3; An 11). Cooling in the subsolidus brought the feldspars to compositions An15-Or 3, An0-Or 80-85 at 800-730°C. Metastable mesoperthite on the coherent solvus in various stages of late equilibration persists in the local assemblages. Arrested to complete feldspar symplectites suggest the local presence of a vapor phase. ¶Splits of the final Or-rich feldspar were found by mass spectrometry to have a dominant quantity of Rb and 87Sr/86Sr along with % amounts of Ba; in contrast, the plag fraction has very low Rb and 87Sr/86Sr. The estimated timing of the isotopic segregation was plausibly continuous with major-element fractionation or perhaps at the moment(s) of exsolution. ¶The cooling record of the solidified intrusion at 3 kbar is shown by 40Ar/39Ar data to have been rapid, reaching an ambient temperature near 240°C within the first 20 Ma, compared to the ambient country-rock temperature before intrusion of 350°C. The difference suggests a late uplift of the region after the Kiglapait magmatism. ¶Contributions from Y. Yu, T. Krogh, M. Hamilton, D. Lindsley, D. DePaolo, M. Jercinovic and S.R. Hart are especially acknowledged.

  20. Feldspar 40Ar/39Ar dating of ICDP PALEOVAN cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Jonathan Franz; Sudo, Masafumi; Stockhecke, Mona; Oberhänsli, Roland

    2017-11-01

    Volcaniclastic fall deposits in ICDP drilling cores from Lake Van, Turkey, contain sodium-rich sanidine and calcium-rich anorthoclase, which both comprise a variety of textural zoning and inclusions. An age model records the lake's history and is based on climate-stratigraphic correlations, tephrostratigraphy, paleomagnetics, and earlier 40Ar/39Ar analyses (Stockhecke et al., 2014b). Results from total fusion and stepwise heating 40Ar/39Ar analyses presented in this study allow for the comparison of radiometric constraints from texturally diversified feldspar and the multi-proxy lacustrine age model and vice versa. This study has investigated several grain-size fractions of feldspar from 13 volcaniclastic units. The feldspars show textural features that are visible in cathodoluminescence (CL) or back-scattered electron (BSE) images and can be subdivided into three dominant zoning-types: (1) compositional zoning, (2) round pseudo-oscillatory zoning and (3) resorbed and patchy zoning (Ginibre et al., 2004). Round pseudo-oscillatory zoning records a sensitive alternation of Fe and Ca that also reflects resorption processes. This is only visible in CL images. Compositional zoning reflects anticorrelated anorthite and orthoclase contents and is visible in BSE. Eleven inverse isochron ages from total fusion and three from stepwise heating analyses fit the age model. Four experiments resulted in older inverse isochron ages that do not concur with the model within 2σ uncertainties and that deviate from 1 ka to 17 ka minimum. C- and R-type zoning are interpreted as representing growth in magma chamber cupolas, as wall mushes, or in narrow conduits. Persistent compositions of PO-type crystals and abundant surfaces recording dissolution features correspond to formation within a magma chamber. C-type zoning and R-type zoning have revealed an irregular incorporation of melt and fluid inclusions. These two types of zoning in feldspar are interpreted as preferentially

  1. Constraining storm-scale forecasts of deep convective initiation with surface weather observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaus, Luke

    Successfully forecasting when and where individual convective storms will form remains an elusive goal for short-term numerical weather prediction. In this dissertation, the convective initiation (CI) challenge is considered as a problem of insufficiently resolved initial conditions and dense surface weather observations are explored as a possible solution. To better quantify convective-scale surface variability in numerical simulations of discrete convective initiation, idealized ensemble simulations of a variety of environments where CI occurs in response to boundary-layer processes are examined. Coherent features 1-2 hours prior to CI are found in all surface fields examined. While some features were broadly expected, such as positive temperature anomalies and convergent winds, negative temperature anomalies due to cloud shadowing are the largest surface anomaly seen prior to CI. Based on these simulations, several hypotheses about the required characteristics of a surface observing network to constrain CI forecasts are developed. Principally, these suggest that observation spacings of less than 4---5 km would be required, based on correlation length scales. Furthermore, it is anticipated that 2-m temperature and 10-m wind observations would likely be more relevant for effectively constraining variability than surface pressure or 2-m moisture observations based on the magnitudes of observed anomalies relative to observation error. These hypotheses are tested with a series of observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) using a single CI-capable environment. The OSSE results largely confirm the hypotheses, and with 4-km and particularly 1-km surface observation spacing, skillful forecasts of CI are possible, but only within two hours of CI time. Several facets of convective-scale assimilation, including the need for properly-calibrated localization and problems from non-Gaussian ensemble estimates of the cloud field are discussed. Finally, the characteristics

  2. Thermal quenching of luminescence processes in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Duller, G.A.T.

    1995-01-01

    , which display very different behaviour. The first involves the internal transitions of common transition metal ions. The second is typical of centres not displaying excited states within the band gap that are likely to arise from direct recombination between the conduction band and the ground state......The technique of optically stimulated luminescence has important uses in the dose evaluation of irradiated feldspars. The luminescence process involves the eviction of electrons from donor traps, charge transfer through the conduction band, and recombination at acceptor sites; each...

  3. Integrating weather and geotechnical monitoring data for assessing the stability of large scale surface mining operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiakakis, Chrysanthos; Agioutantis, Zacharias; Apostolou, Evangelia; Papavgeri, Georgia; Tripolitsiotis, Achilles

    2016-01-01

    The geotechnical challenges for safe slope design in large scale surface mining operations are enormous. Sometimes one degree of slope inclination can significantly reduce the overburden to ore ratio and therefore dramatically improve the economics of the operation, while large scale slope failures may have a significant impact on human lives. Furthermore, adverse weather conditions, such as high precipitation rates, may unfavorably affect the already delicate balance between operations and safety. Geotechnical, weather and production parameters should be systematically monitored and evaluated in order to safely operate such pits. Appropriate data management, processing and storage are critical to ensure timely and informed decisions. This paper presents an integrated data management system which was developed over a number of years as well as the advantages through a specific application. The presented case study illustrates how the high production slopes of a mine that exceed depths of 100-120 m were successfully mined with an average displacement rate of 10- 20 mm/day, approaching an almost slow to moderate landslide velocity. Monitoring data of the past four years are included in the database and can be analyzed to produce valuable results. Time-series data correlations of movements, precipitation records, etc. are evaluated and presented in this case study. The results can be used to successfully manage mine operations and ensure the safety of the mine and the workforce.

  4. Surface Temperature Variation Prediction Model Using Real-Time Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, M.; Vant-Hull, B.; Nazari, R.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2015-12-01

    Combination of climate change and urbanization are heating up cities and putting the lives of millions of people in danger. More than half of the world's total population resides in cities and urban centers. Cities are experiencing urban Heat Island (UHI) effect. Hotter days are associated with serious health impacts, heart attaches and respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Densely populated cities like Manhattan, New York can be affected by UHI impact much more than less populated cities. Even though many studies have been focused on the impact of UHI and temperature changes between urban and rural air temperature, not many look at the temperature variations within a city. These studies mostly use remote sensing data or typical measurements collected by local meteorological station networks. Local meteorological measurements only have local coverage and cannot be used to study the impact of UHI in a city and remote sensing data such as MODIS, LANDSAT and ASTER have with very low resolution which cannot be used for the purpose of this study. Therefore, predicting surface temperature in urban cities using weather data can be useful.Three months of Field campaign in Manhattan were used to measure spatial and temporal temperature variations within an urban setting by placing 10 fixed sensors deployed to measure temperature, relative humidity and sunlight. Fixed instrument shelters containing relative humidity, temperature and illumination sensors were mounted on lampposts in ten different locations in Manhattan (Vant-Hull et al, 2014). The shelters were fixed 3-4 meters above the ground for the period of three months from June 23 to September 20th of 2013 making measurements with the interval of 3 minutes. These high resolution temperature measurements and three months of weather data were used to predict temperature variability from weather forecasts. This study shows that the amplitude of spatial and temporal variation in temperature for each day can be predicted

  5. Nonlinear estimation of weathering rate parameters for uranium in surface soil near a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.; Rope, S.K.; Shleien, B.; Voilleque, P.G.

    1999-01-01

    A dynamic mass-balance model has been calibrated by a nonlinear parameter estimation method, using time-series measurements of uranium in surface soil near the former Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) near Fernald, Ohio, USA. The time-series data, taken at six locations near the site boundary since 1971, show a statistically significant downtrend of above-background uranium concentration in surface soil for all six locations. The dynamic model is based on first-order kinetics in a surface-soil compartment 10 cm in depth. Median estimates of weathering rate coefficients for insoluble uranium in this soil compartment range from about 0.065-0.14 year -1 , corresponding to mean transit times of about 7-15 years, depending on the location sampled. The model, calibrated by methods similar to those discussed in this paper, has been used to simulate surface soil kinetics of uranium for a dose reconstruction study. It was also applied, along with other data, to make confirmatory estimates of airborne releases of uranium from the FMPC between 1951 and 1988. Two soil-column models (one diffusive and one advective, the latter similar to a catenary first-order kinetic box model) were calibrated to profile data taken at one of the six locations in 1976. The temporal predictions of the advective model approximate the trend of the time series data for that location. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. Quantifying widespread aqueous surface weathering on Mars: The plateaus south of Coprates Chasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizeau, D.; Quantin-Nataf, C.; Carter, J.; Flahaut, J.; Thollot, P.; Lozac'h, L.; Millot, C.

    2018-03-01

    Pedogenesis has been previously proposed on the plateaus around Coprates Chasma, Valles Marineris to explain the presence of widespread clay sequences with Al-clays and possible hydrated silica over Fe/Mg-clays on the surface of the plateaus (Le Deit et al., 2012; Carter et al., 2015). We use previous observations together with new MRO targeted observations and DEMs to constrain the extent and thickness of the plateau clay unit: the Al-clay unit is less than 3 m thick, likely ∼1 m, while the Fe/Mg-clays underneath are few tens of meters thick. We also refine the age of alteration by retrieving crater retention ages of the altered plateau and of later deposits: the observed clay sequence was created by surface pedogenesis between model ages of 4.1 Ga and 3.75 Ga. Using a leaching model from Zolotov and Mironenko (2016), we estimate the quantity of atmospheric precipitations needed to create such a clay sequence, that strongly depends on the chemistry of the precipitating fluid. A few hundreds of meters of cumulated precipitations of highly acidic fluids could explain the observed clay sequence, consistent with estimates based on late Noachian valley erosion for example (Rosenberg and Head, 2015). We show finally that the maximum quantity of sulfates potentially formed during this surface weathering event can only contribute minimally to the volume of sulfates deposited in Valles Marineris.

  7. Effect of ageing of K-feldspar on its ice nucleating efficiency in immersion, deposition and contact freezing modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckhaus, Andreas; Bachmann, Felix; Hoffmann, Nadine; Koch, Michael; Kiselev, Alexei; Leisner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Recently K-feldspar was identified as one of the most active atmospheric ice nucleating particles (INP) of mineral origin [1]. Seeking the explanation to this phenomena we have conducted extensive experimental investigation of the ice nucleating efficiency of K-feldspar in three heterogeneous freezing modes. The immersion freezing of K-feldspar was investigated with the cold stage using arrays of nanoliter-size droplets containing aqueous suspension of polydisperse feldspar particles. For contact freezing, the charged droplets of supercooled water were suspended in the laminar flow of the DMA-selected feldspar-containing particles, allowing for determination of freezing probability on a single particle-droplet contact [2]. The nucleation and growth of ice via vapor deposition on the crystalline surfaces of macroscopic feldspar particles have been investigated in the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) under humidified nitrogen atmosphere. The ice nucleation experiments were supplemented with measurements of effective surface area of feldspar particles and ion chromatography (IC) analysis of the leached framework cations (K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+). In this contribution we focus on the role of surface chemistry influencing the IN efficiency of K-feldspar, in particular the connection between the degree of surface hydroxylation and its ability to induce local structural ordering in the interfacial layer in water molecules (as suggested by recent modeling efforts). We mimic the natural process of feldspar ageing by suspending it in water or weak aqueous solution of carbonic acid for different time periods, from minutes to months, and present its freezing efficiency as a function of time. Our immersion freezing experiments show that ageing have a nonlinear effect on the freezing behavior of feldspar within the investigated temperature range (-40°C to -10°C). On the other hand, deposition nucleation of ice observed in the ESEM reveals clear different pattern

  8. Luminescence and ESR properties of Brazilian feldspars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitencourt, J.F.S.; Silva, D.M.; Silva, P.H.; Kinoshita, A.; Munita, C.S.; Tatumi, S.H.

    2006-01-01

    The IRSL and TL responses of three different feldspar crystals have been analysed. TL measurements were taken in the ultraviolet UV (290-370nm) and the visible VIS (340-610nm) regions of the spectrum. For the UV region and for a natural sample, peaks were observed at 283, 287 and 310 deg. C for grey, white and pink crystals, respectively. For samples irradiated after prior preheating, it was noted that TL peaks occurred at about 200 deg. C for all the samples; irradiation with high doses above 500Gy induced the formation of one additional peak at 170 deg. C. The VIS region results were similar to those for the UV. ESR experiments have been developed to verify the influence of radiation and heat treatments on the centres and preliminary results showed great variation in the intensities of [TiO 4 ] - , Al-O - -Al and Fe 3+ centres

  9. X-ray diffraction analysis of rust layer on a weathering steel bridge with surface treatment using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Masato; Hara, Shuichi; Kamimura, Takayuki; Miyuki, Hideaki; Sato, Masugu

    2007-01-01

    We have examined the structure of rust layer formed on a weathering steel bridge, to which the surface treatment, employing the effect of Cr 2 (SO 4 ) 3 sophisticatedly designed to form the protective goethite (α-FeOOH) rust layer which contains a certain amount of Cr, Cr-goethite, was applied in 1996, using X-ray diffraction at SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. It was shown that the formation of α-FeOOH was promoted and/or crystal growth of γ-FeOOH was suppressed by the surface treatment. The increase in the protective ability index (PAI) of the rust layer indicates that the protective goethite was predominantly formed under the effect of the surface treatment. In conclusion, it can be said that the surface treatment worked well to promote the formation of the protective goethite rust layer on the weathering steel bridge during the 10-year exposure. (author)

  10. Near-Real Time Satellite-Retrieved Cloud and Surface Properties for Weather and Aviation Safety Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnis, P.; Smith, W., Jr.; Bedka, K. M.; Nguyen, L.; Palikonda, R.; Hong, G.; Trepte, Q.; Chee, T.; Scarino, B. R.; Spangenberg, D.; Sun-Mack, S.; Fleeger, C.; Ayers, J. K.; Chang, F. L.; Heck, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud properties determined from satellite imager radiances provide a valuable source of information for nowcasting and weather forecasting. In recent years, it has been shown that assimilation of cloud top temperature, optical depth, and total water path can increase the accuracies of weather analyses and forecasts. Aircraft icing conditions can be accurately diagnosed in near-real time (NRT) retrievals of cloud effective particle size, phase, and water path, providing valuable data for pilots. NRT retrievals of surface skin temperature can also be assimilated in numerical weather prediction models to provide more accurate representations of solar heating and longwave cooling at the surface, where convective initiation. These and other applications are being exploited more frequently as the value of NRT cloud data become recognized. At NASA Langley, cloud properties and surface skin temperature are being retrieved in near-real time globally from both geostationary (GEO) and low-earth orbiting (LEO) satellite imagers for weather model assimilation and nowcasting for hazards such as aircraft icing. Cloud data from GEO satellites over North America are disseminated through NCEP, while those data and global LEO and GEO retrievals are disseminated from a Langley website. This paper presents an overview of the various available datasets, provides examples of their application, and discusses the use of the various datasets downstream. Future challenges and areas of improvement are also presented.

  11. Near-Real Time Satellite-Retrieved Cloud and Surface Properties for Weather and Aviation Safety Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnis, Patrick; Smith, William L., Jr.; Bedka, Kristopher M.; Nguyen, Louis; Palikonda, Rabindra; Hong, Gang; Trepte, Qing Z.; Chee, Thad; Scarino, Benjamin; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Cloud properties determined from satellite imager radiances provide a valuable source of information for nowcasting and weather forecasting. In recent years, it has been shown that assimilation of cloud top temperature, optical depth, and total water path can increase the accuracies of weather analyses and forecasts. Aircraft icing conditions can be accurately diagnosed in near-­-real time (NRT) retrievals of cloud effective particle size, phase, and water path, providing valuable data for pilots. NRT retrievals of surface skin temperature can also be assimilated in numerical weather prediction models to provide more accurate representations of solar heating and longwave cooling at the surface, where convective initiation. These and other applications are being exploited more frequently as the value of NRT cloud data become recognized. At NASA Langley, cloud properties and surface skin temperature are being retrieved in near-­-real time globally from both geostationary (GEO) and low-­-earth orbiting (LEO) satellite imagers for weather model assimilation and nowcasting for hazards such as aircraft icing. Cloud data from GEO satellites over North America are disseminated through NCEP, while those data and global LEO and GEO retrievals are disseminated from a Langley website. This paper presents an overview of the various available datasets, provides examples of their application, and discusses the use of the various datasets downstream. Future challenges and areas of improvement are also presented.

  12. Autogenous Tumbling Media Assessment to Clean Weathered Surfaces of Waste-Rock Particles from a Basalt Quarry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baran Tufan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the optimum feed composition in autogenous tumbling of basalt waste-rock particles to clean their weathered surface was determined. The weathered surfaces of basalt are generally cut out consequent to extraction of basalt columns in quarry operations. The inefficiently cut out portions of basalt cause formation of huge quarry waste dumps causing visual pollution on roadsides. Mixtures of different particle size fractions of basalt waste-rock particles were experimented to achieve the optimum feed material composition. The minimum loss of commercially available basalt particles and maximum clear surface was intended. The results were compared with respect to weight loss (% and reflectance values of used and generated samples.

  13. Luminescence characterization of a sodium rich feldspar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correcher, V.; Sanchez M, L.; Garcia G, J.; Rivera, T.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on the radioluminescence (RL) and thermoluminescence (TL) properties of a sodium rich feldspar ((Na,K)[AlSi 3 O 8 ]) with a mean molecular composition of orthoclase (Or) and albite (Ab) of Or 1 Ab 99 . Despite the complexity of the luminescence signals of the sample, it is possible to determine six different emission bands at about 300, 380, 420, 460, 550 and 680 nm. The 300 nm emission can be associated to structural defects related to the recombination process in which the Na + ion diffusion-limited is involved. The UV-blue emission band at (i) 380 nm is characteristic of mineral phases containing SiO 4 tetrahedral and could be related to intrinsic defects in the lattice, (ii) the 420 nm band could be associated to the presence of Cu (II) ions placed next to the hole traps or the recombination on a centre formed from a hole-oxygen atom adjacent to two Al atoms (Al-O-Al) and (iii) the 460 nm waveband could be due to the presence of Ti 4+ . The green and red emissions are respectively associated to the presence of Mn 2+ and Fe 3+ ions. The ratio between the relative intensities, peaked at 290 (the more intense waveband) and 550 nm is about 10:1 in both TL and RL; this fact indicates that the efficiency of recombination centres does no changes regardless on the type of the process. (Author)

  14. Problems at the Leading Edge of Space Weathering as Revealed by TEM Combined with Surface Science Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C. A.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    Both transmission electron micros-copy (TEM) and surface analysis techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were instrumen-tal in making the first characterizations of material generated by space weathering in lunar samples [1,2]. Without them, the nature of nanophase metallic Fe (npFe0) correlated with the surface of lunar regolith grains would have taken much longer to become rec-ognized and understood. Our groups at JSC and UVa have been using both techniques in a cross-correlated way to investigate how the solar wind contributes to space weathering [e.g., 3]. These efforts have identified a number of ongoing problems and knowledge gaps. Key insights made by UVa group leader Raul Barag-iola during this work are gratefully remembered.

  15. Sorption of cesium and uranium to Feldspar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijland, G.C.; Pennders, R.M.J.

    1990-07-01

    Within safety assessment studies, for nuclear waste disposal in deep geologic formations, calculation for the migration of radionuclides through the geosphere are often carried out with models taking sorption into account. In the past 8 years the insight grew that other physico-chemical processes, besides sorption, could affect migration behaviour. While the currently used transport models were being improved taking either linear or non-linear sorption into account, the coupling of geochemical and transport models came into scope. In spite of these developments models which are still based on the sorption theory are frequently applied in studying migration behaviour of radionuclides. This is caused by the necessity of making preliminary pronouncements, while coupled models are still in stage of development and thermodynamic data are very limited available. Therefore one has to obtain insight in the reliability of the models based on the sorption theory. within the sorption database there is a lack of knowledge about mineralogy, composition of the fluid and the experimental conditions underlying the data. Therefore the Expert Group on geochemical Modelling supported by the Finnish proposal in order to obtain insight in the possible deviation of the sorption coefficients that can be estimated from experiments performed with standard samples, fluid composition and experimental conditions. Nine laboratories from OECD membership countries took part in this intercalibration study. In the framework of the Dutch safety assessment studies the Dutch National Institute of Public health and Environmental protection (RIVM) has decided to participate in this exercise. In this report the results are presented of sorption experiments for cesium and natural Uranium to Feldspar. (H.W.). 4 refs.; 1 fig.; 7 tabs

  16. Lead-isotope inhomogeneity in Precambrian igneous K-feldspars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, K.R.; Silver, L.T.

    1977-01-01

    Stepwise PB-removal experiments, using both vacuum volatilization and HF-leaching techniques, on acid-washed K-feldspar concentrates from Precambrian igneous rocks show that all contain some unsupported radiogenic Pb. Two types of radiogenic Pb were recognised. One has a 'normal' isotopic composition, with relative abundances of 206 Pb, 207 Pb and 208 Pb consistent with the age and U-Th contents of the rocks. The other type of unsupported radiogenic lead in the feldspars is apparently pure 206 Pb, derived from long-term migration and accumulation of radioactive daughter(s) of 238 U. This 'pure' 206 Pb lead occupies different sites from the 'normal' radiogenic lead, and tends to show a release maximum during vacuum volatilization at about 1150 0 C. The usefulness of stepwise vacuum volatilization may be limited by the tendency of a small amount of radiogenic lead to concentrate in the least volatile fraction. Stepwise partial HF attacks appear to give at least as good separation of radiogenic from original feldspar lead, and are recommended as a routine procedure for isotopic analyses of Precambrian feldspars. The fact that most of the five K-feldspars examined contained unsupported radiogenic lead implies that caution must be used in applying total-sample lead analyses of Precambrian feldspars to problems of lead-isotope evolution in crustal rocks. (author)

  17. Can cathodoluminescence of feldspar be used as provenance indicator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholonek, Christiane; Augustsson, Carita

    2016-05-01

    We have studied feldspar from crystalline rocks for its textural and spectral cathodoluminescence (CL) characteristics with the aim to reveal their provenance potential. We analyzed ca. 60 rock samples of plutonic, volcanic, metamorphic, and pegmatitic origin from different continents and of 16 Ma to 2 Ga age for their feldspar CL textures and ca. 1200 feldspar crystals from these rocks for their CL color spectra. Among the analyzed rocks, igneous feldspar is most commonly zoned, whereby oscillatory zoning can be confirmed to be typical for volcanic plagioclase. The volcanic plagioclase also less commonly contains twin lamellae that are visible in CL light than crystals from other rock types. Alkali feldspar, particularly from igneous and pegmatitic rocks, was noted to be most affected by alteration features, visible as dark spots, lines and irregular areas. The size of all textural features of up to ca. 150 μm, in combination with possible alteration in both the source area and the sedimentary system, makes the CL textures of feldspar possible to use for qualitative provenance research only. We observed alkali feldspar mostly to luminesce in a bluish color and sometimes in red, and plagioclase in green to yellow. The corresponding CL spectra are dominated by three apparent intensity peaks at 440-520 nm (mainly blue), 540-620 nm (mainly green) and 680-740 nm (red to infrared). A dominance of the peak in the green wavelength interval over the blue one for plagioclase makes CL particularly useful for the differentiation of plagioclase from alkali feldspar. An apparent peak position in red to infrared at < 710 nm for plagioclase mainly is present in mafic rocks. Present-day coastal sand from Peru containing feldspar with the red to infrared peak position mainly exceeding 725 nm for northern Peruvian sand and a larger variety for sand from southern Peru illustrates a discriminative effect of different source areas. We conclude that the provenance application

  18. Ground and surface water developmental toxicity at a municipal landfill--Description and weather-related variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, M.A.; Rao, M.; Dumont, J.N.; Hull, M.; Jones, T.; Bantle, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Contaminated groundwater poses a significant health hazard and may also impact wildlife such as amphibians when it surfaces. Using FETAX (Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus), the developmental toxicity of ground and surface water samples near a closed municipal landfill at Norman, OK, were evaluated. The groundwater samples were taken from a network of wells in a shallow, unconfined aquifer downgradient from the landfill. Surface water samples were obtained from a pond and small stream adjacent to the landfill. Surface water samples from a reference site in similar habitat were also analyzed. Groundwater samples were highly toxic in the area near the landfill, indicating a plume of toxicants. Surface water samples from the landfill site demonstrated elevated developmental toxicity. This toxicity was temporally variable and was significantly correlated with weather conditions during the 3 days prior to sampling. Mortality was negatively correlated with cumulative rain and relative humidity. Mortality was positively correlated with solar radiation and net radiation. No significant correlations were observed between mortality and weather parameters for days 4–7 preceding sampling.

  19. Restoring surface fire stabilizes forest carbon under extreme fire weather in the Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Krofcheck; Matthew D. Hurteau; Robert M. Scheller; E. Louise Loudermilk

    2017-01-01

    Climate change in the western United States has increased the frequency of extreme fire weather events and is projected to increase the area burned by wildfire in the coming decades. This changing fire regime, coupled with increased high-severity fire risk from a legacy of fire exclusion, could destabilize forest carbon (C), decrease net ecosystem exchange (...

  20. Frost Monitoring and Forecasting Using MODIS Land Surface Temperature Data and a Numerical Weather Prediction Model Forecasts for Eastern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabuchanga, Eric; Flores, Africa; Malaso, Susan; Mungai, John; Sakwa, Vincent; Shaka, Ayub; Limaye, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Frost is a major challenge across Eastern Africa, severely impacting agricultural farms. Frost damages have wide ranging economic implications on tea and coffee farms, which represent a major economic sector. Early monitoring and forecasting will enable farmers to take preventive actions to minimize the losses. Although clearly important, timely information on when to protect crops from freezing is relatively limited. MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) data, derived from NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, and 72-hr weather forecasts from the Kenya Meteorological Service's operational Weather Research Forecast model are enabling the Regional Center for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD) and the Tea Research Foundation of Kenya to provide timely information to farmers in the region. This presentation will highlight an ongoing collaboration among the Kenya Meteorological Service, RCMRD, and the Tea Research Foundation of Kenya to identify frost events and provide farmers with potential frost forecasts in Eastern Africa.

  1. Complex Diffusion Mechanisms for Li in Feldspar: Re-thinking Li-in-Plag Geospeedometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holycross, M.; Watson, E. B.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, the lithium isotope system has been applied to model processes in a wide variety of terrestrial environments. In igneous settings, Li diffusion gradients have been frequently used to time heating episodes. Lithium partitioning behavior during decompression or cooling events drives Li transfer between phases, but the extent of Li exchange may be limited by its diffusion rate in geologic materials. Lithium is an exceptionally fast diffuser in silicate media, making it uniquely suited to record short-lived volcanic phenomena. The Li-in-plagioclase geospeedometer is often used to time explosive eruptions by applying laboratory-calibrated Li diffusion coefficients to model concentration profiles in magmatic feldspar samples. To quantify Li transport in natural scenarios, experimental measurements are needed that account for changing temperature and oxygen fugacity as well as different feldspar compositions and crystallographic orientation. Ambient pressure experiments were run at RPI to diffuse Li from a powdered spodumene source into polished sanidine, albite, oligoclase or anorthite crystals over the temperature range 500-950 ºC. The resulting 7Li concentration gradients developed in the mineral specimens were evaluated using laser ablation ICP-MS. The new data show that Li diffusion in all feldspar compositions simultaneously operates by both a "fast" and "slow" diffusion mechanism. Fast path diffusivities are similar to those found by Giletti and Shanahan [1997] for Li diffusion in plagioclase and are typically 10 to 20 times greater than slow path diffusivities. Lithium concentration gradients in the feldspar experiments plot in the shape of two superimposed error function curves with the slow diffusion regime in the near-surface of the crystal. Lithium diffusion is most sluggish in sanidine and is significantly faster in the plagioclase feldspars. It is still unclear what diffusion mechanism operates in nature, but the new measurements may impact

  2. Evaluating the Impacts of NASA/SPoRT Daily Greenness Vegetation Fraction on Land Surface Model and Numerical Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jordan R.; Case, Jonathan L.; Molthan, Andrew L.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center develops new products and techniques that can be used in operational meteorology. The majority of these products are derived from NASA polar-orbiting satellite imagery from the Earth Observing System (EOS) platforms. One such product is a Greenness Vegetation Fraction (GVF) dataset, which is produced from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data aboard the NASA EOS Aqua and Terra satellites. NASA SPoRT began generating daily real-time GVF composites at 1-km resolution over the Continental United States (CONUS) on 1 June 2010. The purpose of this study is to compare the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) climatology GVF product (currently used in operational weather models) to the SPoRT-MODIS GVF during June to October 2010. The NASA Land Information System (LIS) was employed to study the impacts of the new SPoRT-MODIS GVF dataset on land surface models apart from a full numerical weather prediction (NWP) model. For the 2010 warm season, the SPoRT GVF in the western portion of the CONUS was generally higher than the NCEP climatology. The eastern CONUS GVF had variations both above and below the climatology during the period of study. These variations in GVF led to direct impacts on the rates of heating and evaporation from the land surface. The second phase of the project is to examine the impacts of the SPoRT GVF dataset on NWP using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Two separate WRF model simulations were made for individual severe weather case days using the NCEP GVF (control) and SPoRT GVF (experimental), with all other model parameters remaining the same. Based on the sensitivity results in these case studies, regions with higher GVF in the SPoRT model runs had higher evapotranspiration and lower direct surface heating, which typically resulted in lower (higher) predicted 2-m temperatures (2-m dewpoint temperatures). The opposite was true

  3. Evaluating the Impacts of NASA/SPoRT Daily Greenness Vegetation Fraction on Land Surface Model and Numerical Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jordan R.; Case, Jonathan L.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Kumar, Sujay V.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed a Greenness Vegetation Fraction (GVF) dataset, which is updated daily using swaths of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data aboard the NASA EOS Aqua and Terra satellites. NASA SPoRT began generating daily real-time GVF composites at 1-km resolution over the Continental United States (CONUS) on 1 June 2010. The purpose of this study is to compare the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) climatology GVF product (currently used in operational weather models) to the SPoRT-MODIS GVF during June to October 2010. The NASA Land Information System (LIS) was employed to study the impacts of the SPoRT-MODIS GVF dataset on a land surface model (LSM) apart from a full numerical weather prediction (NWP) model. For the 2010 warm season, the SPoRT GVF in the western portion of the CONUS was generally higher than the NCEP climatology. The eastern CONUS GVF had variations both above and below the climatology during the period of study. These variations in GVF led to direct impacts on the rates of heating and evaporation from the land surface. In the West, higher latent heat fluxes prevailed, which enhanced the rates of evapotranspiration and soil moisture depletion in the LSM. By late Summer and Autumn, both the average sensible and latent heat fluxes increased in the West as a result of the more rapid soil drying and higher coverage of GVF. The impacts of the SPoRT GVF dataset on NWP was also examined for a single severe weather case study using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Two separate coupled LIS/WRF model simulations were made for the 17 July 2010 severe weather event in the Upper Midwest using the NCEP and SPoRT GVFs, with all other model parameters remaining the same. Based on the sensitivity results, regions with higher GVF in the SPoRT model runs had higher evapotranspiration and

  4. Understanding the ice nucleation characteristics of feldspars suspended in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anand; Marcolli, Claudia; Kaufmann, Lukas; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Chemical) and 5 wt% lanolin (Fluka Chemical) is emulsified with a rotor-stator homogenizer for 40 s at a rotation frequency of 7000 rpm. 4 - 10 mg of this mixture is pipetted in an aluminum pan (closed hermetically), placed in the DSC and subjected to three freezing cycles. The first and the third freezing cycles are executed at a cooling rate of 10 K/min to control the stability of the sample. The second freezing cycle is executed at a 1 K/min cooling rate and is used for evaluation. Freezing temperatures are obtained by evaluating the onset of the freezing signal in the DSC curve and plotted against water activity. Results Based on Koop et al. (2000), a general decreasing trend in ice nucleation efficiency of the mineral samples with increasing solute concentrations is expected. Interestingly, feldspars (microcline, sanidine, plagioclase) in very dilute solutions of ammonia and ammonium salts (water activity close to one) show an increase in ice nucleation efficiency of 4 to 6 K compared to that in pure water. Similar trends but less pronounced are observed for kaolinite while quartz shows barely any effect. Therefore, there seem to be specific interactions between the feldspar surface and ammonia and/or ammonium ions which result in an increase in freezing temperatures at low solute concentrations. The surface ion exchange seems to be secondary for this effect since it is also present in ammonia solution. We hypothesize that ammonia adsorbs on the aluminol/silanol groups present on feldspar (viz. aluminosilicate surface) surfaces (Nash and Marshall, 1957; Belchinskaya et al., 2013). Hence allowing one of the N-H bonds to stick outwards from the surface, facing towards the bulk water and providing a favorable template for ice to grow. The current study gives an insight into the ice nucleation behavior of aluminosilicate minerals when present in conjunction with chemical species, eg. ammonium/sulfates, which is of high atmospheric relevance. References Koop et al., (2000

  5. Woodbridge RAF United Kingdom. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-07

    GLOcAL CLIMATOLOY 4PANCH uoAFETAC CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY AIP WEATHER SERVIC[/PAC 6 !� .0ODB8RI)E RAF UK _"_-_ " ___ .-8’ PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF...OSIVATIONWS A USAF ETAC 0. . -14.5(OL A) owvo I wv s op wpwm i -- GLOCAL CLIMATOLOGY RRANCH AT CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITYA’.P WEATHr SERVICE/MAC 7 .951

  6. Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO), Edwards AFB, Lancaster, California (Revised)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-02-09

    EARSONT -P-rCENTAGF FI’ UEN(Y r-F u-ckJR~NCE- OF WEATHER CONDITI2NS FRUW HOURLY JBSERVATIONS HOURS THUNDER- PAIN FREEZING SNOW 1 O1 SMOKE DUST X OF...o..,s o, L.,s ,o ., MI, oSSOUI 99 .. polg ?’ 10.1100ok Qooa.9 o . ol911- 4-’ . . . .- I >1k - -v ---. ---- - -- -- 2 ~ GL0l3t.L CLIMATOUurf’ BRA"C

  7. Incirlik AB, Adana, Turkey. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A through F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-15

    WEATHER SERVICE/MAC 130 INCIALIK Al TURKEY/ADANA 67-74 AE2 09010 STATION STATION NAME YEARS HOUNS 4L. S. T.1 T-.WET SULS TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F...TURKy/ADANA 6_ _6 JUt_ STAT.ON STATIC. NiAME ER A E OT’*N’[R IR OT -! T..p. WET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTALTOA , r 2! 1. S /o 7 .. . 6 . .i

  8. Williams AFB, Arizona Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-21

    N;I 1-L 9AL CLIMATOLOGY BRANCH ~.w~ .’ ETAC LJS. H A~(I EATV UMDT 2 f wEATHER SERVICE/MAC SEE FIRST HUMDIT 2 114 1 LLIAMS AFB AZ 69-70,73-80 JUL...4622 USAPETAC ’ol 0-87-5(01.A) , I roFql CL,-RAL CLIMATOLOGY BRANCH EATV 2 AFETAC SRVIE/ACATIVE UUTO HUMIDITY SEE FIRST PAGE Z Cl)4 AILLIAMS AFS AZ

  9. Weather types across the Caribbean basin and their relationship with rainfall and sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moron, Vincent; Gouirand, Isabelle; Taylor, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Eight weather types (WTs) are computed over 98.75°W-56.25°W, 8.75°N-31.25°N using cluster analysis of daily low-level (925 hPa) winds and outgoing longwave radiation, without removing the mean annual cycle, by a k-means algorithm from 1979 to 2013. The WTs can be firstly interpreted as snapshots of the annual cycle with a clear distinction between 5 "wintertime" and 3 "summertime" WTs, which account together for 70 % of the total mean annual rainfall across the studied domain. The wintertime WTs occur mostly from late November to late April and are characterized by varying intensity and location of the North Atlantic subtropical high (NASH) and transient synoptic troughs along the northern edge of the domain. Large-scale subsidence dominates the whole basin but rainfall can occur over sections of the basin, especially on the windward shores of the troughs associated with the synoptic waves. The transition between wintertime and summertime WTs is rather abrupt, especially in May. One summertime WT (WT 4) is prevalent in summer, and almost exclusive around late July. It is characterized by strong NASH, fast Caribbean low level jet and rainfall mostly concentrated over the Caribbean Islands, the Florida Peninsula, the whole Central America and the tropical Eastern Pacific. The two remaining summertime WTs display widespread rainfall respectively from Central America to Bermuda (WT 5) and over the Eastern Caribbean (WT 6). Both WTs combine reduced regional scale subsidence and weaker Caribbean low-level jet relatively to WT 4. The relationships between WT frequency and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events are broadly linear. Warm central and eastern ENSO events are associated with more WT 4 (less WT 5-6) during boreal summer and autumn (0) while this relationship is reversed during boreal summer (+1) for central events only. In boreal winter, the largest anomalies are observed for two WTs consistent with negative (WT 2) and positive (WT 8) phases of the

  10. Differentiating pedogenesis from diagenesis in early terrestrial paleoweathering surfaces formed on granitic composition parent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driese, S.G.; Medaris, L.G.; Ren, M.; Runkel, Anthony C.; Langford, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    Unconformable surfaces separating Precambrian crystalline basement and overlying Proterozoic to Cambrian sedimentary rocks provide an exceptional opportunity to examine the role of primitive soil ecosystems in weathering and resultant formation of saprolite (weathered rock retaining rock structure) and regolith (weathered rock without rock structure), but many appear to have been affected by burial diagenesis and hydrothermal fluid flow, leading some researchers to discount their suitability for such studies. We examine one modern weathering profile (Cecil series), four Cambrian paleoweathering profiles from the North American craton (Squaw Creek, Franklin Mountains, Core SQ-8, and Core 4), one Neoproterozoic profile (Sheigra), and one late Paleoproterozoic profile (Baraboo), to test the hypothesis that these paleoweathering profiles do provide evidence of primitive terrestrial weathering despite their diagenetic and hydrothermal overprinting, especially additions of potassium. We employ an integrated approach using (1) detailed thin-section investigations to identify characteristic pedogenic features associated with saprolitization and formation of well-drained regoliths, (2) electron microprobe analysis to identify specific weathered and new mineral phases, and (3) geochemical mass balance techniques to characterize volume changes during weathering and elemental gains and losses of major and minor elements relative to the inferred parent materials. There is strong pedogenic evidence of paleoweathering, such as clay illuviation, sepic-plasmic fabrics, redoximorphic features, and dissolution and alteration of feldspars and mafic minerals to kaolinite, gibbsite, and Fe oxides, as well as geochemical evidence, such as whole-rock losses of Na, Ca, Mg, Si, Sr, Fe, and Mn greater than in modern profiles. Evidence of diagenesis includes net additions of K, Ba, and Rb determined through geochemical mass balance, K-feldspar overgrowths in overlying sandstone sections, and

  11. FTIR measurements of OH in deformed quartz and feldspars of the South Tibetan Detachment, Greater Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezek, L.; Law, R. D.; Jessup, M. J.; Searle, M. P.; Kronenberg, A. K.

    2017-12-01

    OH absorption bands due to water in deformed quartz and feldspar grains of mylonites from the low-angle Lhotse Detachment (of the South Tibetan Detachment System, Rongbuk Valley north of Mount Everest) have been measured by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy. Previous microstructural studies have shown that these rocks deformed by dislocation creep at high temperature conditions in the middle crust (lower - middle amphibolite facies), and oxygen isotope studies suggest significant influx of meteoric water. OH absorption bands at 3400 cm-1 of quartz mylonites from the footwall of the Lhotse Detachment Fault are large, with the character of the molecular water band due to fluid inclusions in milky quartz. Mean water contents depend on structural position relative to the core of the Lhotse Detachment, from 1000 ppm (OH/106 Si) at 420 m below the fault to 11,350 (+/-1095) ppm near its center. The gradient in OH content shown by quartz grains implies influx of meteoric water along the Lhotse Detachment from the Tibetan Plateau ground surface to middle crustal depths, and significant fluid penetration into the extruding Himalayan slab by intergranular, permeable fluid flow processes. Feldspars of individual samples have comparable water contents to those of quartz and some are wetter. Large water contents of quartz and feldspar may have contributed to continued deformation and strain localization on the South Tibetan Detachment System. Dislocation creep in quartz is facilitated by water in laboratory experiments, and the water contents of the Lhotse fault rocks are similar to (and even larger than) water contents of quartz experimentally deformed during water weakening. Water contents of feldspars are comparable to those of plagioclase aggregates deformed experimentally by dislocation and diffusion creep under wet conditions.

  12. Different Multifractal Scaling of the 0 cm Average Ground Surface Temperature of Four Representative Weather Stations over China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The temporal scaling properties of the daily 0 cm average ground surface temperature (AGST records obtained from four selected sites over China are investigated using multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA method. Results show that the AGST records at all four locations exhibit strong persistence features and different scaling behaviors. The differences of the generalized Hurst exponents are very different for the AGST series of each site reflecting the different scaling behaviors of the fluctuation. Furthermore, the strengths of multifractal spectrum are different for different weather stations and indicate that the multifractal behaviors vary from station to station over China.

  13. Assessment of bleaching of K-feldspar grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jiafu; Li Shenghua; Tso, M-Y.W.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the difference in the bleaching rate between IRSL and TL signals, a new method of assessing the bleaching of sedimentary feldspar is proposed. All measurements for De and the bleaching factor (normalized ratio of IRSL to TL) are carried out on the same grain. K-feldspar grains from two sediments, a marine and an alluvium, from Hong Kong were tested. Their bleaching factors indicate that bleaching of the marine sediment was not uniform, whereas the latter was relatively homogeneous. Furthermore, the relatively well-bleached grains in each sample were identified

  14. OSL-thermochronometry of feldspar from the KTB borehole, Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guralnik, Benny; Jain, Mayank; Herman, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    a new thermochronometer based on the infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) from feldspar, and validate the extrapolation of its response to artificial radiation and heat in the laboratory to natural environmental conditions. Specifically, we present a new detailed Na-feldspar IRSL thermochronology...... the current geothermal gradient, or (ii) inverted into a geothermal palaeogradient of 29±2 °C km−1, integrating natural thermal conditions over the last ∼65 ka. The demonstrated ability to invert a depth–luminescence dataset into a meaningful geothermal palaeogradient opens new venues for reconstructing...

  15. Selfridge ANGB, Michigan. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-20

    umuwuommuwrU(@m~l 77 Li ’AL CLIMATOLOY FRANCH -~~iTAC- A’. 4EATHER SERVICE/MAC WEATHER CONDITIONS .’..377 3,ELFRIDGE ANG8 MI 69-70,74-81 FEB STATION STATION NAME...I TABULM~IOX CEILING) > 1800 a 1500 9. 2t 1200 *1 ~000 2t 700 a:600_ _ 2t 400 9. 2t 300 z 00 98. ECANFLE # 1 food ceiling values Independently of...iii I.2 41,01- . AL CLIMATOLOGY FRANCH ,2;TAC SKY COVER A

  16. Mineralogical Control on Microbial Diversity in a Weathered Granite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, D.; Clipson, N.; McDermott, F.

    2003-12-01

    Mineral transformation reactions and the behaviour of metals in rock and soils are affected not only by physicochemical parameters but also by biological factors, particularly by microbial activity. Microbes inhabit a wide range of niches in surface and subsurface environments, with mineral-microbe interactions being generally poorly understood. The focus of this study is to elucidate the role of microbial activity in the weathering of common silicate minerals in granitic rocks. A site in the Wicklow Mountains (Ireland) has been identified that consists of an outcrop surface of Caledonian (ca. 400 million years old) pegmatitic granite from which large intact crystals of variably weathered muscovite, plagioclase, K-feldspar and quartz were sampled, together with whole-rock granite. Culture-based microbial approaches have been widely used to profile microbial communities, particularly from copiotrophic environments, but it is now well established that for oligotrophic environments such as those that would be expected on weathering faces, perhaps less than 1% of microbial diversity can be profiled by cultural means. A number of culture-independent molecular based approaches have been developed to profile microbial diversity and community structure. These rely on successfully isolating environmental DNA from a given environment, followed by the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify the typically small quantities of extracted DNA. Amplified DNA can then be analysed using cloning based approaches as well as community fingerprinting systems such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) and ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA). Community DNA was extracted and the intergenic spacer region (ITS) between small (16S) and large (23S) bacterial subunit rRNA genes was amplified. RISA fragments were then electrophoresed on a non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel. Banding patterns suggest that

  17. Weathering and vegetation controls on nickel isotope fractionation in surface ultramafic environments (Albania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrade, Nicolas; Cloquet, Christophe; Echevarria, Guillaume; Sterckeman, Thibault; Deng, Tenghaobo; Tang, YeTao; Morel, Jean-Louis

    2015-08-01

    The dissolved nickel (Ni) isotopic composition of rivers and oceans presents an apparent paradox. Even though rivers represent a major source of Ni in the oceans, seawater is more enriched in the heavier isotopes than river-water. Additional sources or processes must therefore be invoked to account for the isotopic budget of dissolved Ni in seawater. Weathering of continental rocks is thought to play a major role in determining the magnitude and sign of isotopic fractionation of metals between a rock and the dissolved product. We present a study of Ni isotopes in the rock-soil-plant systems of several ultramafic environments. The results reveal key insights into the magnitude and the control of isotopic fractionation during the weathering of continental ultramafic rocks. This study introduces new constraints on the influence of vegetation during the weathering process, which should be taken into account in interpretations of the variability of Ni isotopes in rivers. The study area is located in a temperate climate zone within the ophiolitic belt area of Albania. The serpentinized peridotites sampled present a narrow range of heavy Ni isotopic compositions (δ60Ni = 0.25 ± 0.16 ‰, 2SD n = 2). At two locations, horizons within two soil profiles affected by different degrees of weathering all presented light isotopic compositions compared to the parent rock (Δ60Nisoil-rock up to - 0.63 ‰). This suggests that the soil pool takes up the light isotopes, while the heavier isotopes remain in the dissolved phase. By combining elemental and mineralogical analyses with the isotope compositions determined for the soils, the extent of fractionation was found to be controlled by the secondary minerals formed in the soil. The types of vegetation growing on ultramafic-derived soils are highly adapted and include both Ni-hyperaccumulating species, which can accumulate several percent per weight of Ni, and non-accumulating species. Whole-plant isotopic compositions were found

  18. On the sensitivity of numerical weather prediction to remotely sensed marine surface wind data - A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cane, M. A.; Cardone, V. J.; Halem, M.; Halberstam, I.

    1981-01-01

    The reported investigation has the objective to assess the potential impact on numerical weather prediction (NWP) of remotely sensed surface wind data. Other investigations conducted with similar objectives have not been satisfactory in connection with a use of procedures providing an unrealistic distribution of initial errors. In the current study, care has been taken to duplicate the actual distribution of information in the conventional observing system, thus shifting the emphasis from accuracy of the data to the data coverage. It is pointed out that this is an important consideration in assessing satellite observing systems since experience with sounder data has shown that improvements in forecasts due to satellite-derived information is due less to a general error reduction than to the ability to fill data-sparse regions. The reported study concentrates on the evaluation of the observing system simulation experimental design and on the assessment of the potential of remotely sensed marine surface wind data.

  19. Time-resolved luminescence from feldspars: New insight into fading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsukamoto, S.; Denby, P.M.; Murray, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared optically stimulated luminescence (IR-OSL) signals of K- and Na-feldspar samples extracted from sediments were measured in UV, blue and red detection windows, using a fast photon counter and pulsed IR stimulation (lambda = 875 nm). We observe that the relative contribution ...

  20. Eielson AFB, Alaska. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-22

    PERCENTACE FREQUENCY Of WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 7- 2650 EIELSON AF6 AK 73-8? *pp ALL WEATHER ISO -1 700 (KNEED I .3 4.6 7. 10...HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 7 265C EIELSON AFB AX 73-82 DEC mn~y.. .y.rm,Io u ii. n~lu Sr.m ALL kEATHER ISO -1700 CLAm -- IL.S T.) SPEED i( MEA (KNTS) 1 - 3...fis r, i- &hS.2? q i- 7 &S2 kL%- &.S-2. fq 7Sf..7:p U8000 7Z.1 73. 73. 73. 73. ?6 73. 73. 38?8le 73.8 73.8 73.8 73.81 73., 27000 ’ ,i. L.bi~2~~ 800 I 8t

  1. [Energy related studies utilizing K-feldspar thermochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In our second year of current funding cycle, we have investigated the Ar diffusion properties and microstructures of K-feldspars and the application of domain theory to natural K-feldspars. We completed a combined TEM and argon diffusion study of the effect of laboratory heat treatment on the microstructure and kinetic properties of K-feldspar. We conclude in companion papers that, with one minor exception, no observable change in the diffusion behavior occurs during laboratory extraction procedures until significant fusion occurs at about 1100 degrees C. The effect that is observed involves a correlation between the homogenization of cryptoperthite lamelle and the apparent increase in retentivity of about 5% of the argon in the K-feldspar under study. We can explain this effect of both as an artifact of the experiment or the loss of a diffusion boundary. Experiments are being considered to resolve this question. Refinements have been made to our experimental protocol that appears that greatly enhance the retrieval of multi-activation energies from K-feldspars. We have applied the multi-domain model to a variety of natural environments (Valles Caldera, Red River fault, Appalachian basin) with some surprising results. Detailed 40 Ar/ 39 Ar coverage of the Red River shear zone, thought to be responsible for the accommodation of a significant fraction of the Indo-Asian convergence, strongly suggests that our technique can precisely date both the termination of ductile strike-slip motion and the initiation of normal faulting. Work has continued on improving our numerical codes for calculating thermal histories and the development of computer based graphing tools has significantly increased our productivity

  2. A Stabilizing Feedback Between Cloud Radiative Effects and Greenland Surface Melt: Verification From Multi-year Automatic Weather Station Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zender, C. S.; Wang, W.; van As, D.

    2017-12-01

    Clouds have strong impacts on Greenland's surface melt through the interaction with the dry atmosphere and reflective surfaces. However, their effects are uncertain due to the lack of in situ observations. To better quantify cloud radiative effects (CRE) in Greenland, we analyze and interpret multi-year radiation measurements from 30 automatic weather stations encompassing a broad range of climatological and topographical conditions. During melt season, clouds warm surface over most of Greenland, meaning the longwave greenhouse effect outweighs the shortwave shading effect; on the other hand, the spatial variability of net (longwave and shortwave) CRE is dominated by shortwave CRE and in turn by surface albedo, which controls the potential absorption of solar radiation when clouds are absent. The net warming effect decreases with shortwave CRE from high to low altitudes and from north to south (Fig. 1). The spatial correlation between albedo and net CRE is strong (r=0.93, palbedo determines the net CRE seasonal trend, which decreases from May to July and increases afterwards. On an hourly timescale, we find two distinct radiative states in Greenland (Fig. 2). The clear state is characterized by clear-sky conditions or thin clouds, when albedo and solar zenith angle (SZA) weakly correlates with CRE. The cloudy state is characterized by opaque clouds, when the combination of albedo and SZA strongly correlates with CRE (r=0.85, palbedo and solar zenith angle, explains the majority of the CRE variation in spatial distribution, seasonal trend in the ablation zone, and in hourly variability in the cloudy radiative state. Clouds warm the brighter and colder surfaces of Greenland, enhance snow melt, and tend to lower the albedo. Clouds cool the darker and warmer surfaces, inhibiting snow melt, which increases albedo, and thus stabilizes surface melt. This stabilizing mechanism may also occur over sea ice, helping to forestall surface melt as the Arctic becomes dimmer.

  3. Beale AFB, Marysville, California Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-19

    GLOCAL CLIMATOLO0Y BRANCH USAFETAC SURFACE WINDS A14 4EATHFk SERVICE/MAC PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) " ;F...930 F £ USAFETAC 0-8.S (OL.A) PSEVWOUS EDITIONS 0 THIs PONM AS O Nso~ITI - V--. .1 I j GLOCAL CLIMATOLOGY BRANCH uS AFETAC SURFACE WINDS ATR W EATHER

  4. Structures of the K- and Na-components of two-phase feldspar from Primorskii Krai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organova, N.I.; Marsii, I.M.; Zakharov, N.D.; Nasedkin, V.V.; Borisovskii, S.B.; Rozhdestvenskaya, I.V.; Ivanova, T.I.

    1999-01-01

    The structures of two components of the decomposed solid solution of an alkali feldspar are refined. These structures exhibit at least two specific features: (1) the complete phase separation into pure K and pure Na phases and (2) an anomalous distribution of Al atoms over four crystallographically independent positions of silicon-aluminum tetrahedra in the Na-component (different from its usual distribution). To explain the results obtained, the ideas of synergetics are invoked (the geological history of the specimen includes a powerful explosion, which threw out the material from the volcano to the Earth's surface)

  5. Laboratory fading rates of various luminescence signals from feldspar-rich sediment extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Murray, A.S.; Jain, Mayank

    2008-01-01

    Feldspar as a retrospective dosimeter is receiving more and more attention because of its useful luminescence properties; in particular the dose response curve extends to significantly higher doses than quartz. However, feldspars have one major disadvantage; both the thermoluminescence (TL...

  6. Climatic aridity over India 11,000 years ago: Evidence from feldspar distribution in shelf sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hashimi, N.H.; Nair, R.R.

    Feldspars and quartz contents of sand and silt fractions of forty three samples from the western continental shelf of India were determined by the X-ray diffraction method. The results indicate that the feldspar content in the relict (9000...

  7. Solar Atmosphere to Earth's Surface: Long Lead Time dB/dt Predictions with the Space Weather Modeling Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welling, D. T.; Manchester, W.; Savani, N.; Sokolov, I.; van der Holst, B.; Jin, M.; Toth, G.; Liemohn, M. W.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2017-12-01

    The future of space weather prediction depends on the community's ability to predict L1 values from observations of the solar atmosphere, which can yield hours of lead time. While both empirical and physics-based L1 forecast methods exist, it is not yet known if this nascent capability can translate to skilled dB/dt forecasts at the Earth's surface. This paper shows results for the first forecast-quality, solar-atmosphere-to-Earth's-surface dB/dt predictions. Two methods are used to predict solar wind and IMF conditions at L1 for several real-world coronal mass ejection events. The first method is an empirical and observationally based system to estimate the plasma characteristics. The magnetic field predictions are based on the Bz4Cast system which assumes that the CME has a cylindrical flux rope geometry locally around Earth's trajectory. The remaining plasma parameters of density, temperature and velocity are estimated from white-light coronagraphs via a variety of triangulation methods and forward based modelling. The second is a first-principles-based approach that combines the Eruptive Event Generator using Gibson-Low configuration (EEGGL) model with the Alfven Wave Solar Model (AWSoM). EEGGL specifies parameters for the Gibson-Low flux rope such that it erupts, driving a CME in the coronal model that reproduces coronagraph observations and propagates to 1AU. The resulting solar wind predictions are used to drive the operational Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) for geospace. Following the configuration used by NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center, this setup couples the BATS-R-US global magnetohydromagnetic model to the Rice Convection Model (RCM) ring current model and a height-integrated ionosphere electrodynamics model. The long lead time predictions of dB/dt are compared to model results that are driven by L1 solar wind observations. Both are compared to real-world observations from surface magnetometers at a variety of geomagnetic latitudes

  8. Large surface scintillators as base of impact point detectors and their application in Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Sindulfo; Medina, José; Gómez-Herrero, Raul; José Blanco, Juan; García-Tejedor, Ignacio; García-Población, Oscar; Díaz-Romeral, Gonzalo

    2016-04-01

    The use of a pile of two 100 cm x 100 cm x 5 cm BC-400 organic scintillators is proposed as ground-based cosmic ray detector able to provide directional information on the incident muons. The challenge is to get in real time the muon impact point on the scintillator and its arrival direction using as few Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) as possible. The instrument is based on the dependence of attenuation of light with the traversed distance in each scintillator. For the time being, four photomultiplier tubes gather the light through the lateral faces (100 cm x 5 cm) of the scintillator. Several experiments have already been carried out. The results show how data contain information about the muon trajectory through the scintillator. This information can be extracted using the pulse heights collected by the PMTs working in coincidence mode. Reliability and accuracy of results strongly depend on the number of PMTs used and mainly on their appropriate geometrical arrangement with regard to the scintillator. In order to determine the optimal position and the minimum number of PMTs required, a Montecarlo simulation code has been developed. Preliminary experimental and simulation results are presented and the potential of the system for space weather monitoring is discussed.

  9. ClimoBase: Rouse Canadian Surface Observations of Weather, Climate, and Hydrological Variables, 1984-1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ClimoBase is a collection of surface climate measurements collected in Northern Canada by Dr. Wayne Rouse between 1984 and 1998 in three locations: Churchill,...

  10. Improving Weather Research and Forecasting Model Initial Conditions via Surface Pressure Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    ADDRESS(ES) US Army Research Laboratory ATTN: RDRL- CIE -M 2800 Powder Mill Road Adelphi, MD 20783-1138 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER...air radii of influence to account for the smaller error correlation length scales at the surface. However, the surface observations are limited to a...analysis will only account for errors in the first guess due to errors in the meteorological features (e.g., the strength of an area of high pressure

  11. Comparative study of pulsed laser cleaning applied to weathered marble surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, P., E-mail: mportcal@upo.es [Department of Physical, Chemical and Natural Systems, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, 41013 Seville (Spain); Antúnez, V.; Ortiz, R.; Martín, J.M. [Department of Physical, Chemical and Natural Systems, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, 41013 Seville (Spain); Gómez, M.A. [Instituto Andaluz de Patrimonio Histórico, Camino de los Descubrimientos s/n, 41092 Seville (Spain); Hortal, A.R.; Martínez-Haya, B. [Department of Physical, Chemical and Natural Systems, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, 41013 Seville (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    The removal of unwanted matter from surface stones is a demanding task in the conservation of cultural heritage. This paper investigates the effectiveness of near-infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses for the cleaning of surface deposits, iron oxide stains and different types of graffiti (black, red and green sprays and markers, and black cutting-edge ink) on dolomitic white marble. The performance of the laser techniques is compared to common cleaning methods on the same samples, namely pressurized water and chemical treatments. The degree of cleaning achieved with each technique is assessed by means of colorimetric measurements and X-ray microfluorescence. Eventual morphological changes induced on the marble substrate are monitored with optical and electronic microscopy. It is found that UV pulsed laser ablation at 266 nm manages to clean all the stains except the cutting-edge ink, although some degree of surface erosion is produced. The IR laser pulses at 1064 nm can remove surface deposits and black spray acceptably, but a yellowing is observed on the stone surface after treatment. An economic evaluation shows that pulsed laser cleaning techniques are advantageous for the rapid cleaning of small or inaccessible surface areas, although their extensive application becomes expensive due to the long operating times required.

  12. Comparative study of pulsed laser cleaning applied to weathered marble surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, P.; Antúnez, V.; Ortiz, R.; Martín, J.M.; Gómez, M.A.; Hortal, A.R.; Martínez-Haya, B.

    2013-01-01

    The removal of unwanted matter from surface stones is a demanding task in the conservation of cultural heritage. This paper investigates the effectiveness of near-infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses for the cleaning of surface deposits, iron oxide stains and different types of graffiti (black, red and green sprays and markers, and black cutting-edge ink) on dolomitic white marble. The performance of the laser techniques is compared to common cleaning methods on the same samples, namely pressurized water and chemical treatments. The degree of cleaning achieved with each technique is assessed by means of colorimetric measurements and X-ray microfluorescence. Eventual morphological changes induced on the marble substrate are monitored with optical and electronic microscopy. It is found that UV pulsed laser ablation at 266 nm manages to clean all the stains except the cutting-edge ink, although some degree of surface erosion is produced. The IR laser pulses at 1064 nm can remove surface deposits and black spray acceptably, but a yellowing is observed on the stone surface after treatment. An economic evaluation shows that pulsed laser cleaning techniques are advantageous for the rapid cleaning of small or inaccessible surface areas, although their extensive application becomes expensive due to the long operating times required.

  13. Comparative study of pulsed laser cleaning applied to weathered marble surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, P.; Antúnez, V.; Ortiz, R.; Martín, J. M.; Gómez, M. A.; Hortal, A. R.; Martínez-Haya, B.

    2013-10-01

    The removal of unwanted matter from surface stones is a demanding task in the conservation of cultural heritage. This paper investigates the effectiveness of near-infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses for the cleaning of surface deposits, iron oxide stains and different types of graffiti (black, red and green sprays and markers, and black cutting-edge ink) on dolomitic white marble. The performance of the laser techniques is compared to common cleaning methods on the same samples, namely pressurized water and chemical treatments. The degree of cleaning achieved with each technique is assessed by means of colorimetric measurements and X-ray microfluorescence. Eventual morphological changes induced on the marble substrate are monitored with optical and electronic microscopy. It is found that UV pulsed laser ablation at 266 nm manages to clean all the stains except the cutting-edge ink, although some degree of surface erosion is produced. The IR laser pulses at 1064 nm can remove surface deposits and black spray acceptably, but a yellowing is observed on the stone surface after treatment. An economic evaluation shows that pulsed laser cleaning techniques are advantageous for the rapid cleaning of small or inaccessible surface areas, although their extensive application becomes expensive due to the long operating times required.

  14. Measurement of the dose in quartz in the presence of feldspar contamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallinga, J.; Murray, A.S.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    2002-01-01

    To allow the determination of the dose in quartz in the presence of feldspar contamination. the quartz-to-feldspar optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ratio needs to be maximised. Experiments were carried Out to find the optimum procedure to bleach the feldspar by exposure to infrared light...

  15. Plattsburgh, AFB, New York. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-24

    GLOCAL CLIMATOLOGY 3RANCH LSAFETAC SURFACE WINDS 410 wrATHER SERVICE/MAC PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND...oeux1I, . .p 4. A i € * GLOcAL CLIMATCLOGY RANCH L’AFETAC CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY AIP ’-EATHFR SRVlCE/MAC 72(7Z_ PLATTSBURSH AFS NV 74-97 *A

  16. Site characterization summary report for dry weather surface water sampling upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report describes activities associated with conducting dry weather surface water sampling of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This activity is a portion of the work to be performed at UEFPC Operable Unit (OU) 1 [now known as the UEFPC Characterization Area (CA)], as described in the RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak- Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee and in the Response to Comments and Recommendations on RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Volume 1, Operable Unit 1. Because these documents contained sensitive information, they were labeled as unclassified controlled nuclear information and as such are not readily available for public review. To address this issue the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published an unclassified, nonsensitive version of the initial plan, text and appendixes, of this Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) Plan in early 1994. These documents describe a program for collecting four rounds of wet weather and dry weather surface water samples and one round of sediment samples from UEFPC. They provide the strategy for the overall sample collection program including dry weather sampling, wet weather sampling, and sediment sampling. Figure 1.1 is a schematic flowchart of the overall sampling strategy and other associated activities. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPJP) was prepared to specifically address four rounds of dry weather surface water sampling and one round of sediment sampling. For a variety of reasons, sediment sampling has not been conducted and has been deferred to the UEFPC CA Remedial Investigation (RI), as has wet weather sampling.

  17. Bleaching of the thermoluminescence of feldspars by sunlight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, G.B.; Prescott, J.R.; Hutton, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    Feldspars are an important component of materials used for thermoluminescence (TL) and photoluminescence (PL) dating of sediments; and successful dating implies a knowledge of the degree of re-setting by exposure to sunlight of the stored luminescence energy. We have studied the bleaching by full sunlight of the TL of six alkali feldspars of representative composition and of one oligoclase. The high potassium and high sodium feldspars are the brightest, and are also the least easily bleached, whereas those of intermediate (K-Na) composition bleach quickly. On a time scale of upwards of 16 h, all samples would have bleached enough for them to be useful for TL dating. A search was made for individual glow curve peaks that bleach particularly quickly (and are thus similar to the well-known 325 o C peak used in the TL dating of quartz). In the samples studied, there was only one glow curve peak that was selectively susceptible to bleaching: the 280 o C peak in oligoclase. (author)

  18. Isochron measurements of naturally irradiated K-feldspar grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bo; Li Shenghua; Wintle, Ann G.; Zhao Hui

    2007-01-01

    The equivalent doses of K-feldspar grains in a range of grain sizes from 90 to 250μm diameter were measured using a single-aliquot regenerative-dose protocol for the infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals for two samples of desert sand. The equivalent doses for each sample were compared with that for the 125-150μm grains of quartz from the same samples. The results suggested that the K-feldspar equivalent doses were underestimated because of anomalous fading. Measurements of the decay of the IRSL signals following laboratory irradiation for these two samples, and an additional one from a previously published isochron study, showed anomalous fading during the period of laboratory storage. The decay rate was about 3% per decade for all samples and was independent of the grain size used. Using plots of equivalent doses for K-feldspars as a function of their calculated internal dose rate, and the quartz equivalent dose as a function of grain size, it was concluded that the IRSL signal derived from the internal dose rate had not faded over the 13,000 years that had elapsed since the grains were deposited

  19. Stoneware tile manufacturing using rice straw ash as feldspar replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvaro Guzman, A.; John Torres, L.; Martha Cedeno, V.; Silvio Delvasto, A.; Vicente Amigo, B.; Enrique Sanchez, V.

    2013-01-01

    In this research are presented the results of using rice straw ash (RSA) in low proportions as substitute of feldspar for manufacturing stoneware tiles. Specimens of semidry triaxial mixtures, where feldspar was substituted for different percentages (25 % and 50 %) of RSA, were prepared by uniaxial pressing, followed by drying and sintering. Physical and mechanical properties of sintered bodies were evaluated. Porcelain stoneware tile specimens C0 and CF25 reached bending strength and water absorption values were in accordance with standard ISO 13006 (Annex G, BIa) ( ≥ 35 MPa and ≤ 0.5 %, respectively). However, in porcelain stoneware tile specimens CF50 due to bloating phenomenon was not possible obtain commercial tiles in accordance with standard ISO 13006. By using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) needles of primary and secondary mullite were identified in a vitreous phase; and by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) mullite and quartz phases were identified. It was concluded that feldspar can be substituted positively by RSA in stoneware tile pastes. (Author)

  20. Burlington IAP, Vermont. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-23

    34~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~A .... . ... .. . .. ... ... . . .. . .. ........ . . . . . . .. ’_L ’,AL CLIŘATOLOGY FRANCH 7AC SURFACE WINDS S A T,-.ŕ SERVICM/MAC...72 C USAP ETAC 0-1-5n (a.. A) ..vWW... 1394""S "IS FOOD ~~ ADS 00OLI *L ,AL CLIMATOLOGY BRANCH uSAFETAC CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY A7. EATHER SERVICE/MAC

  1. Clark AFB, Philippines. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    34---- . - - 0 -- Web S Lr’: L ’LT tTnLOGY 9 PANCH𔃼, ETA C SURFACE WINDS * EAT S VI C /~E PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND...CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY Alp *.ATH’P Srv~cr/V , c 9E’-7- LLAPK AFFP 73-8’ Ncv * PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE ALL FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 50a... NCV PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE 7.i -7l1. (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) % Sl8l,Tl $IATiTE MILES >10 :6 t5 >4 3 >2 -2 6 ’ !c - I 𔄀 4F~,’ 4 9.7 49.8

  2. North America Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Maps contains a surface analysis comprised of plotted weather station observations, isobars indicating low and high-pressure...

  3. Luminescence from potassium feldspars stimulated by infrared and green light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments are reported which investigate stimulated luminescence from potassium feldspar. The aim is to provide a basic phenomenological description of the response of the material to stimulation by heat, infrared radiation (875 DELTA 80 nm) and a green light wavelength band from 5 15...... to 560 nm. Two conclusions are drawn: firstly it is suggested that the majority of the trapped charge responsible for the infrared stimulated luminescence signal does not give rise to a thermoluminescence signal, and secondly that a large traction of the two optically stimulated luminescence signals...

  4. Statistical relationship between surface PM10 concentration and aerosol optical depth over the Sahel as a function of weather type, using neural network methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahi, H.; Marticorena, B.; Thiria, S.; Chatenet, B.; Schmechtig, C.; Rajot, J. L.; Crepon, M.

    2013-12-01

    work aims at assessing the capability of passive remote-sensed measurements such as aerosol optical depth (AOD) to monitor the surface dust concentration during the dry season in the Sahel region (West Africa). We processed continuous measurements of AODs and surface concentrations for the period (2006-2010) in Banizoumbou (Niger) and Cinzana (Mali). In order to account for the influence of meteorological condition on the relationship between PM10 surface concentration and AOD, we decomposed the mesoscale meteorological fields surrounding the stations into five weather types having similar 3-dimensional atmospheric characteristics. This classification was obtained by a clustering method based on nonlinear artificial neural networks, the so-called self-organizing map. The weather types were identified by processing tridimensional fields of meridional and zonal winds and air temperature obtained from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model output centered on each measurement station. Five similar weather types have been identified at the two stations. Three of them are associated with the Harmattan flux; the other two correspond to northward inflow of the monsoon flow at the beginning or the end of the dry season. An improved relationship has been found between the surface PM10 concentrations and the AOD by using a dedicated statistical relationship for each weather type. The performances of the statistical inversion computed on the test data sets show satisfactory skills for most of the classes, much better than a linear regression. This should permit the inversion of the mineral dust concentration from AODs derived from satellite observations over the Sahel.

  5. Cockpit weather information needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective is to develop an advanced pilot weather interface for the flight deck and to measure its utilization and effectiveness in pilot reroute decision processes, weather situation awareness, and weather monitoring. Identical graphical weather displays for the dispatcher, air traffic control (ATC), and pilot crew should also enhance the dialogue capabilities for reroute decisions. By utilizing a broadcast data link for surface observations, forecasts, radar summaries, lightning strikes, and weather alerts, onboard weather computing facilities construct graphical displays, historical weather displays, color textual displays, and other tools to assist the pilot crew. Since the weather data is continually being received and stored by the airborne system, the pilot crew has instantaneous access to the latest information. This information is color coded to distinguish degrees of category for surface observations, ceiling and visibilities, and ground radar summaries. Automatic weather monitoring and pilot crew alerting is accomplished by the airborne computing facilities. When a new weather information is received, the displays are instantaneously changed to reflect the new information. Also, when a new surface or special observation for the intended destination is received, the pilot crew is informed so that information can be studied at the pilot's discretion. The pilot crew is also immediately alerted when a severe weather notice, AIRMET or SIGMET, is received. The cockpit weather display shares a multicolor eight inch cathode ray tube and overlaid touch panel with a pilot crew data link interface. Touch sensitive buttons and areas are used for pilot selection of graphical and data link displays. Time critical ATC messages are presented in a small window that overlays other displays so that immediate pilot alerting and action can be taken. Predeparture and reroute clearances are displayed on the graphical weather system so pilot review of weather along

  6. To the problem of paleodosimetrical information stability in alkali feldspars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huett, Galina; Jaek, Ivar

    1997-01-01

    The stability of holes of the centres of recombination in alkali feldspars, extracted from sediments, is studied. For the emission centres with 410 and 570 nm the energy of activation of thermal quenching is obtained (> 2 eV). Problems of fading and difference between thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), as well as bleach abilities, are discussed. Values of thermal activation energy (> 2 eV) obtained for two different emission bands (410 and 570 nm) in alkali feldspars prove the upper limit of dating (c 10 5 years). The absence of a permanent channel of fading is supported by experimental data. Differences in bleach ability, as well as in residuals of TL and OSL response dating signals, are explained within the frame of the proposed model of identity of defects responsible for those signals. It is supposed that better bleach ability of the OSL signal is connected with optical selection of more transparent grains (or more easily bleach able centres). The applicability of the orange band of emission (570 nm) for dating is recommended for future study

  7. An Initial Assessment of the Impact of CYGNSS Ocean Surface Wind Assimilation on Navy Global and Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, N. L.; Tsu, J.; Swadley, S. D.

    2017-12-01

    We assess the impact of assimilation of CYclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) ocean surface winds observations into the NAVGEM[i] global and COAMPS®[ii] mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems. Both NAVGEM and COAMPS® used the NRL 4DVar assimilation system NAVDAS-AR[iii]. Long term monitoring of the NAVGEM Forecast Sensitivity Observation Impact (FSOI) indicates that the forecast error reduction for ocean surface wind vectors (ASCAT and WindSat) are significantly larger than for SSMIS wind speed observations. These differences are larger than can be explained by simply two pieces of information (for wind vectors) versus one (wind speed). To help understand these results, we conducted a series of Observing System Experiments (OSEs) to compare the assimilation of ASCAT wind vectors with the equivalent (computed) ASCAT wind speed observations. We found that wind vector assimilation was typically 3 times more effective at reducing the NAVGEM forecast error, with a higher percentage of beneficial observations. These results suggested that 4DVar, in the absence of an additional nonlinear outer loop, has limited ability to modify the analysis wind direction. We examined several strategies for assimilating CYGNSS ocean surface wind speed observations. In the first approach, we assimilated CYGNSS as wind speed observations, following the same methodology used for SSMIS winds. The next two approaches converted CYGNSS wind speed to wind vectors, using NAVGEM sea level pressure fields (following Holton, 1979), and using NAVGEM 10-m wind fields with the AER Variational Analysis Method. Finally, we compared these methods to CYGNSS wind speed assimilation using multiple outer loops with NAVGEM Hybrid 4DVar. Results support the earlier studies suggesting that NAVDAS-AR wind speed assimilation is sub-optimal. We present detailed results from multi-month NAVGEM assimilation runs along with case studies using COAMPS®. Comparisons include the fit of

  8. K-Ar dating: incomplete extraction of radiogenic argon from alkali feldspar - a comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baksi, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    In a recent paper, McDowell (1983) discussed the difficulties involved in obtaining accurate K-Ar ages on alkali feldspar samples. These difficulties primarily stem from the fact that the feldspars melt at high temperatures and lack structural volatiles which could flush out all of the 40 Ar* from the viscous melt at temperatures below 1600 0 C. Evidently, if feldspar samples could be satisfactorily melted at lower temperatures by the use of a suitable flux, complete release of 40 Ar* should occur. McDowell (1983) also commented on the lack of a suitable feldspar standard sample for argon dating work. This comment will briefly address these two problems. (Auth.)

  9. Effects of Climate on Co-evolution of Weathering Profiles and Hillscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. S.; Rajaram, H.; Anderson, S. P.

    2017-12-01

    Considerable debate revolves around the relative importance of rock type, tectonics, and climate in creating the architecture of the critical zone. It has recently been proposed that differences in the depths and patterns of weathering between landscapes in Colorado's Front Range and South Carolina's piedmont can be attributed to the state of stress in the rock imposed by the magnitude and orientation the regional stresses with respect to the ridgelines (St. Claire et al., 2016). We argue for the importance of the climate, and in particular, in temperate regions, the amount of recharge. We employ numerical models of hillslope evolution between bounding erosional channels, in which the degree of rock weathering governs the rate of transformation of rock to soil. As the water table drapes between the stream channels, fresh rock is brought into the weathering zone at a rate governed by the rate of incision of the channels. We track the chemical weathering of rock, represented by alteration of feldspar to clays, which in turn requires calculation of the concentration of reactive species in the water along hydrologic flow paths. We present results from analytic solutions to the flow field in which travel times can be efficiently assessed. Below the water table, flow paths are hyperbolic, taking on considerable lateral components as they veer toward the bounding channels that serve as drains to the hillslope. We find that if water is far from equilibrium with respect to weatherable minerals at the water table, as occurs in wet, slowly-eroding landscapes, deep weathering can occur well below the water table to levels approximating the base of the bounding channels. In dry climates, on the other hand, the weathering zone is limited to a shallow surface - parallel layer. These models capture the essence of the observed differences in depth to fresh rock in both wet and dry climates without appeal to the state of stress in the rock.

  10. Stability of IRSL signals from sedimentary K-feldspar samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Murray, A.S.; Jain, Mayank

    2011-01-01

    for potassium-rich sedimentary feldspars. We show that the natural post-IR IRSL (pIRIR) signal from a 3.6 Ma old sample is in apparent saturation on a laboratory generated dose response curve, i.e. it does not show detectable fading in nature although a low fading rate is observed on laboratory time scales. We...... be explained in terms of either a single- or multiple-trap model. We present evidence that may suggest that at least part of pIRIR signal is derived from a high temperature trap (∼550°C thermoluminescence (TL) peak), although again the data can also be explained in terms of a single-trap model. Finally, we...

  11. Developing a numerical simulation for fading in feldspar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, A.; Greilich, S.; Jain, M.; Murray, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Most models describing anomalous fading in feldspars are based on analytical solutions. As an alternative approach we present an entirely numerical model based on statistical sampling that simulates stepwise the charge creation/trapping and recombination in a given phosphor. We assume the number density of electrons and holes at any time to be equal, although the model is not bound to that assumption. The model is flexible enough to be used on any combination of geological and laboratory timescales and for any defined configuration of defects. Using this approach we observed reorganization of nearest-neighbor distances with time. The best agreement with experimental data is achieved if we assume the crystal to consist of small subvolumes (nanocrystals) only within which charge carriers are allowed to recombine.

  12. Thermoluminescence of annealed and shock-loaded feldspar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmetz, C.P.

    1988-01-01

    Samples of oligoclase and bytownite were shock-loaded to a variety of pressures, and annealed for a variety of temperatures and times. The effect of Mrad doses of gamma-rays on oligoclase TL were also studied. After these treatments, thermoluminescence (TL) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were made to: (1) determine the effects of shock on terrestrial feldspar and compare with variations in the TL emission of ordinary chondrites (OCs); (2) determine if disordering in feldspar was responsible for any related changes in TL properties of OCs; (3) determine if the combined effect of shock plus annealing causes the changes in TL properties; (4) see if radiation damage from cosmic ray exposure plays a role in the TL variations; (5) examine the implications of this work to the thermal and shock histories of OCs. The lightly shock-loaded and annealed oligoclase samples have a dominant peak temperature of 120-140 C, identical to type 3.3-3.5 OCs. The heavily shocked samples dominant peak is at 230C, similar to type > 3.5 OCs . While the heavily annealed/disordered oligoclase samples have a peak at 280C, this peak is rarely observed in OCs. Radiation damage from Mrad doses of gamma-rays produced no change in peak temperature, but facilitated the shift to higher peak temperatures. The TL sensitivity of the shocked samples decreased by a factor of 25. Samples annealed at low temperatures (438-533C) showed a factor of 2 decrease in TL, but at the highest temperatures, the TL was a factor of 8 higher

  13. Dating Last Interglacial Coastal Systems Using New Feldspar Luminescence Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamothe, M.

    2017-12-01

    The recent explosion in new luminescence dating technologies offers new opportunities to explore Quaternary marine coastal facies and landforms. However, tectonic and climatic processes controlling the development of Pleistocene coastal lithosomes are commonly obscured by their poorly constrained geological age. Luminescence dating of feldspar probes one order of magnitude deeper into geological time than radiocarbon and more than 5 times the current age range of quartz optically-stimulated luminescence, routinely used in luminescence dating. However, feldspar luminescence stimulated by infrared photons (eg IRSL) is hampered by anomalous fading. Successful correction methods developed by us over the last 15 years did produce sound chronologies but the fading-corrected ages carried large uncertainties. New approaches initiated by other laboratories, mainly in Europe, have isolated high temperature post-IRSL luminescence as this signal seems to be only slightly affected by fading. However, the gain in stability seems to be lessened due to bleachibility issues, generating age overestimations. We developed a novel protocol known as post-isothermal IRSL dating (Pit-IR) that focuses on a dual system of luminescence signals, probing low (50C) and medium (225C) temperature IRSL signals following isothermal treatments of various intensities. These protocols have been tested on Last interglacial coastal sediments in strikingly different GIA contexts along the Atlantic coastal areas of SE USA as well as from Morocco, Brazil and LIG sites in the Mediterranean basin. A systematic analysis of these results would suggest that a) falling-stages sequences are more commonly preserved as the OSL/IRSL ages are preferentially dating from the end of the MIS5e high stand and b) MIS5a marine sediments may be detectable away from areas generally thought to be affected by peripheral bulge collapse.

  14. Feldspar basalts in lunar soil and the nature of the lunar continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, A. M.; Ridley, W. I.; Harmon, R. S.; Warner, J.; Brett, R.; Jakes, P.; Brown, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    It is found that 25% on the Apollo-14 glasses have the same composition as the glasses in two samples taken from the Luna-16 column. The compositions are equivalent to feldspar basalt and anorthosite gabbro, and are similar to the feldspar basalts identified from Surveyor-7 analysis for lunar continents.

  15. Full analysis of feldspar texture and crystal structure by combining X-ray and electron techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balic Zunic, Tonci; Piazolo, Sandra; Katerinopoulou, Anna

    2013-01-01

    identification plus crystal structure refinement of all components in a feldspar intergrowth. This procedure was applied to perthitic intergrowths in feldspars from two different pegmatites in the Larvik plutonic complex in the southern part of the Oslo region, Norway. It revealed that the two starting high...

  16. Bio-beneficiation of kaolin and feldspar and its effect on fired

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Presence of iron compounds as impurities in kaolin and feldspar, impart reddish colour to ceramic products manufactured using these minerals. The quality of kaolin and feldspar was enriched mainly through iron removal by biological methods. Bacteria isolated from kaolin of Indian origin were used for bioleaching.

  17. Increase in Ice Nucleation Efficiency of Feldspars, Kaolinite and Mica in Dilute NH3 and NH4+-containing Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B.; Krieger, U. K.; Peter, T.

    2017-12-01

    Semivolatile species present in the atmosphere are prone to adhere to mineral dust particle surfaces during long range transport, and could potentially change the particle surface properties and its ice nucleation (IN) efficiency. Immersion freezing experiments were performed with microcline (K-feldspar), known to be highly IN active, suspended in aqueous solutions of ammonia, (NH4)2SO4, NH4HSO4, NH4NO3, NH4Cl, Na2SO4, H2SO4, K2SO4 and KCl to investigate the effect of solutes on the IN efficiency. Freezing of emulsified droplets investigated with a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) showed that the heterogeneous ice nucleation temperatures deviate from the water activity-based IN theory, describing heterogeneous ice nucleation temperatures as a function of solution water activity by a constant offset with respect to the ice melting point curve (Zobrist et al. 2008). IN temperatures enhanced up to 4.5 K were observed for very dilute NH3 and NH4+-containing solutions while a decrease was observed as the concentration was further increased. For all solutes with cations other than NH4+, the IN efficiency decreased. An increase of the IN efficiency in very dilute NH3 and NH4+-containing solutions followed by a decrease with increasing concentration was also observed for sanidine (K-feldspar) and andesine (Na/Ca-feldspar). This is an important indication towards specific chemical interactions between solutes and the feldspar surface which is not captured by the water activity-based IN theory. A similar trend is present but less pronounced in case of kaolinite and mica, while quartz is barely affected. We hypothesize that the hydrogen bonding of NH3 molecules with surface -OH groups could be the reason for the enhanced freezing temperatures in dilute ammonia and ammonium containing solutions as they could form an ice-like overlayer providing hydrogen bonding groups for ice to nucleate on top of it. This implies to possibilities of enhanced IN efficiency, especially

  18. Application of Cathodoluminescence to The Study of Feldspars: Imaging and Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Rute; Couto, Helena

    2017-12-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) studies were carried out on polished thin sections of different feldspar samples (from migmatites, granites, aplite-pegmatites and granitic aggregates) using a hot cathode CL equipment HC3-LM coupled to an optical microscope and to a spectrometer (SpectraPro 2300i and a CCD Pixis 400B detector and the software Winspec32) from the Faculty of Sciences of University of Porto. The system was operated at 14kV and a filament current of 0.18 mA. The samples were coated with a thin gold film using a Cressington 108 Auto device. Luminescence images were acquired during the CL analysis with an adapted digital video-camera (KAPPA PS 40C-285 (DX) with dual stage Peltier cooling) and an acquisition time between 351ms and 3,52s. The CL study, including imaging and spectrometry, proved to be an important tool to complement the feldspar petrography as it contributes to the identification of features not observed under optical microscope. The application of the Cathodoluminescence to feldspar allows distinguishing between potassic feldspar and plagioclase, differentiating generations of feldspar and displaying internal zoning and growth areas, among other. The spectrometry complements the CL imaging. It allows obtaining a qualitative level of emission intensity, which permits the interpretation of the nature of this luminescence in each feldspar. Bands shown in the spectra are related to the existing activator elements. In the present study, it was found an association of each feldspar to different spectra and respective colour. The plagioclases exhibit yellow or green luminescence. The activator element is Mn2+, showing a broad emission band between 550 - 570 nm specially detected on this type of feldspars, due to the replacement of K+ for Mn2+. The potassium feldspars have more or less intense blue colour associated with various activators elements: the activator element is Cu2+ showing a broad emission band between 420±5 nm. This emission band can be

  19. Wacky Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabarre, Amy; Gulino, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    What do a leaf blower, water hose, fan, and ice cubes have in common? Ask the students who participated in an integrative science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (I-STEM) education unit, "Wacky Weather," and they will tell say "fun and severe weather"--words one might not have expected! The purpose of the unit…

  20. Weather Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, L. Reed, Sr.; Demanche, Edna L.; Klemm, E. Barbara; Kyselka, Will; Phillips, Edwin A.; Pottenger, Francis M.; Yamamoto, Karen N.; Young, Donald B.

    This booklet presents some activities to measure various weather phenomena. Directions for constructing a weather station are included. Instruments including rain gauges, thermometers, wind vanes, wind speed devices, humidity devices, barometers, atmospheric observations, a dustfall jar, sticky-tape can, detection of gases in the air, and pH of…

  1. Kimpo-iap K-14, Seoul, Korea. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-10-30

    PTAC , O .10. 5 (O L- ),t ’puv m oso i t~ i ru oe4, , o wixe " DATA PROCESSING BRANCH USAF ETAC W AHRCNIIN AIR WEATHER SERVtCE/MAC W AHRC N IIN...18 19 - 20 21 22 23 24 25. 26 27. 28 29. 30 *31 O.B. WeB . Dry BulbWe, BAIbTDe-wP.n?. 92/ 91 Ct I l ’___ ____ _ _._ 1 _l’.-v ___ QO/ 87 , 913

  2. Weathering behaviour of overburden-coal ash blending in relation to overburden management for acid mine drainage prevention in coal surface mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautama, R.S.; Kusuma, G.J.; Lestari, I.; Anggana, R.P.

    2010-01-01

    Potentially acid forming (PAF) materials are encapsulated with non-acid forming materials (NAF) in order to prevent acid mine drainage (AMD) in surface coal mines. NAF compaction techniques with fly and bottom ashes from coal-fired power plants are used in mines with limited amounts of NAF materials. This study investigated the weathering behaviour of blended overburden and coal combustion ash in laboratory conditions. Free draining column leach tests were conducted on different blending schemes. The weathering process was simulated by spraying the samples with de-ionized water once per day. The leachates were then analyzed using X-ray diffraction and fluorescence analyses in order to identify the mineral composition of the samples over a 14 week period. Results of the study indicated that the weathering process plays a significant role in controlling infiltration rates, and may increase the capability of capping materials to prevent infiltration into PAF materials. Fly- and bottom-ash additions improved the performance of the encapsulation materials. 3 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs.

  3. Initializing numerical weather prediction models with satellite-derived surface soil moisture: Data assimilation experiments with ECMWF's Integrated Forecast System and the TMI soil moisture data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drusch, M.

    2007-02-01

    Satellite-derived surface soil moisture data sets are readily available and have been used successfully in hydrological applications. In many operational numerical weather prediction systems the initial soil moisture conditions are analyzed from the modeled background and 2 m temperature and relative humidity. This approach has proven its efficiency to improve surface latent and sensible heat fluxes and consequently the forecast on large geographical domains. However, since soil moisture is not always related to screen level variables, model errors and uncertainties in the forcing data can accumulate in root zone soil moisture. Remotely sensed surface soil moisture is directly linked to the model's uppermost soil layer and therefore is a stronger constraint for the soil moisture analysis. For this study, three data assimilation experiments with the Integrated Forecast System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) have been performed for the 2-month period of June and July 2002: a control run based on the operational soil moisture analysis, an open loop run with freely evolving soil moisture, and an experimental run incorporating TMI (TRMM Microwave Imager) derived soil moisture over the southern United States. In this experimental run the satellite-derived soil moisture product is introduced through a nudging scheme using 6-hourly increments. Apart from the soil moisture analysis, the system setup reflects the operational forecast configuration including the atmospheric 4D-Var analysis. Soil moisture analyzed in the nudging experiment is the most accurate estimate when compared against in situ observations from the Oklahoma Mesonet. The corresponding forecast for 2 m temperature and relative humidity is almost as accurate as in the control experiment. Furthermore, it is shown that the soil moisture analysis influences local weather parameters including the planetary boundary layer height and cloud coverage.

  4. Updated global soil map for the Weather Research and Forecasting model and soil moisture initialization for the Noah land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    DY, C. Y.; Fung, J. C. H.

    2016-08-01

    A meteorological model requires accurate initial conditions and boundary conditions to obtain realistic numerical weather predictions. The land surface controls the surface heat and moisture exchanges, which can be determined by the physical properties of the soil and soil state variables, subsequently exerting an effect on the boundary layer meteorology. The initial and boundary conditions of soil moisture are currently obtained via National Centers for Environmental Prediction FNL (Final) Operational Global Analysis data, which are collected operationally in 1° by 1° resolutions every 6 h. Another input to the model is the soil map generated by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations - United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (FAO-UNESCO) soil database, which combines several soil surveys from around the world. Both soil moisture from the FNL analysis data and the default soil map lack accuracy and feature coarse resolutions, particularly for certain areas of China. In this study, we update the global soil map with data from Beijing Normal University in 1 km by 1 km grids and propose an alternative method of soil moisture initialization. Simulations of the Weather Research and Forecasting model show that spinning-up the soil moisture improves near-surface temperature and relative humidity prediction using different types of soil moisture initialization. Explanations of that improvement and improvement of the planetary boundary layer height in performing process analysis are provided.

  5. A statistical-dynamical scheme for reconstructing ocean forcing in the Atlantic. Part I: weather regimes as predictors for ocean surface variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassou, Christophe; Minvielle, Marie; Terray, Laurent [CERFACS/CNRS, Climate Modelling and Global Change Team, Toulouse (France); Perigaud, Claire [JPL-NASA, Ocean Science Element, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2011-01-15

    The links between the observed variability of the surface ocean variables estimated from reanalysis and the overlying atmosphere decomposed in classes of large-scale atmospheric circulation via clustering are investigated over the Atlantic from 1958 to 2002. Daily 500 hPa geopotential height and 1,000 hPa wind anomaly maps are classified following a weather-typing approach to describe the North Atlantic and tropical Atlantic atmospheric dynamics, respectively. The algorithm yields patterns that correspond in the extratropics to the well-known North Atlantic-Europe weather regimes (NAE-WR) accounting for the barotropic dynamics, and in the tropics to wind classes (T-WC) representing the alteration of the trades. 10-m wind and 2-m temperature (T2) anomaly composites derived from regime/wind class occurrence are indicative of strong relationships between daily large-scale atmospheric circulation and ocean surface over the entire Atlantic basin. High temporal correlation values are obtained basin-wide at low frequency between the observed fields and their reconstruction by multiple linear regressions with the frequencies of occurrence of both NAE-WR and T-WC used as sole predictors. Additional multiple linear regressions also emphasize the importance of accounting for the strength of the daily anomalous atmospheric circulation estimated by the combined distances to all regimes centroids in order to reproduce the daily to interannual variability of the Atlantic ocean. We show that for most of the North Atlantic basin the occurrence of NAE-WR generally sets the sign of the ocean surface anomaly for a given day, and that the inter-regime distances are valuable predictors for the magnitude of that anomaly. Finally, we provide evidence that a large fraction of the low-frequency trends in the Atlantic observed at the surface over the last 50 years can be traced back, except for T2, to changes in occurrence of tropical and extratropical weather classes. All together, our

  6. Development of a New Data Tool for Computing Launch and Landing Availability with Respect to Surface Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, K. Lee; Altino, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch has a long history of expertise in the modeling and computation of statistical launch availabilities with respect to weather conditions. Their existing data analysis product, the Atmospheric Parametric Risk Assessment (APRA) tool, computes launch availability given an input set of vehicle hardware and/or operational weather constraints by calculating the climatological probability of exceeding the specified constraint limits, APRA has been used extensively to provide the Space Shuttle program the ability to estimate impacts that various proposed design modifications would have to overall launch availability. The model accounts for both seasonal and diurnal variability at a single geographic location and provides output probabilities for a single arbitrary launch attempt. Recently, the Shuttle program has shown interest in having additional capabilities added to the APRA model, including analysis of humidity parameters, inclusion of landing site weather to produce landing availability, and concurrent analysis of multiple sites, to assist in operational landing site selection. In addition, the Constellation program has also expressed interest in the APRA tool, and has requested several additional capabilities to address some Constellation-specific issues, both in the specification and verification of design requirements and in the development of operations concepts. The combined scope of the requested capability enhancements suggests an evolution of the model beyond a simple revision process. Development has begun for a new data analysis tool that will satisfy the requests of both programs. This new tool, Probabilities of Atmospheric Conditions and Environmental Risk (PACER), will provide greater flexibility and significantly enhanced functionality compared to the currently existing tool.

  7. Single-grain dating of young sediments using the pIRIR signal from feldspar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Tony; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Jain, Mayank

    2012-01-01

    In this article we test for the first time the potential of single-grains of K-rich feldspar to date well-bleached and poorly bleached sediments using a post-IR IRSL (pIRIR) protocol. We measure natural dose distributions using K-rich feldspars from four coastal samples applying the pIRIR protocol.......5%.The analysis of the well-bleached samples shows that only the brightest 30% of the grains give pIRIR single-grain ages in agreement with the age control; this effect may arise from the suggested correlation between blue emission and potassium content of individual grains. Comparison of single......-grain quartz and feldspar dose distributions from the poorly bleached samples shows that quartz is relatively better bleached; nevertheless, selection of a reliable ‘minimum’ feldspar dose was achieved using two different statistical models....

  8. Further investigations into pulsed optically stimulated luminescence from feldspars using blue and green light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank; Kalchgruber, R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate characteristics of luminescence signals resulting from pulsed optical stimulation of feldspars and thereby to understand the underlying processes giving rise to the signal. Fourteen different feldspar specimens were investigated using time-resolved opti......The purpose of this paper is to investigate characteristics of luminescence signals resulting from pulsed optical stimulation of feldspars and thereby to understand the underlying processes giving rise to the signal. Fourteen different feldspar specimens were investigated using time...... suggests that the TR-OSL signal decay is governed by the recombination process and not by the excited state lifetime. Furthermore data from the TR-OSL signal dependence on stimulation time and preheat temperature suggest that the recombination process may not be a sum of exponentials, although the model...... cannot be rejected definitively....

  9. Some evidence of uranium in volcanic feldspar rocks in the state of Sonora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquina M, O. E. [Uranio Mexicano, Mexico City

    1983-05-15

    Description is given of four projects of exploration and survey for uranium associated with tertiary volcanic feldspar rocks importantly dispersed in the State of Sonora and being carried out by Uranium Mexicano.

  10. Optically stimulated luminescence characteristics of natural and doped quartz and alkali feldspars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huett, G.; Jaek, I.; Brodski, L. [Institute of Geology at Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia); Vasilchenko, V. [Institute of Experimental Physics and Technology of Tartu University, Tartu (Estonia)

    1999-05-01

    Natural alkali feldspars and quartz were doped by Tl and Cu by thermodiffusion and electrodiffusion technology. As a result of doping, intensive UV emission bands were created. The OSL stimulation spectra of irradiated natural and doped quartz and alkali feldspars were measured in the span of 400-1300 nm using UV emission of Tl at 280 nm and of Cu at 380 nm. One-trap centre conception was confirmed for high-temperature palaeodosimetrical TL peaks and OSL stimulation spectrum bands: for alkali feldspars at 880 and 420 nm and visible region of the spectrum for quartz. A thermooptical mechanism of the optical depopulation of the corresponding trap is confirmed in alkali feldspars, but there is no evidence for processes of this kind in quartz. An analogy between the physical background of OSL properties of both minerals is discussed.

  11. Optically stimulated luminescence characteristics of natural and doped quartz and alkali feldspars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huett, G.; Jaek, I.; Brodski, L.; Vasilchenko, V.

    1999-01-01

    Natural alkali feldspars and quartz were doped by Tl and Cu by thermodiffusion and electrodiffusion technology. As a result of doping, intensive UV emission bands were created. The OSL stimulation spectra of irradiated natural and doped quartz and alkali feldspars were measured in the span of 400-1300 nm using UV emission of Tl at 280 nm and of Cu at 380 nm. One-trap centre conception was confirmed for high-temperature palaeodosimetrical TL peaks and OSL stimulation spectrum bands: for alkali feldspars at 880 and 420 nm and visible region of the spectrum for quartz. A thermooptical mechanism of the optical depopulation of the corresponding trap is confirmed in alkali feldspars, but there is no evidence for processes of this kind in quartz. An analogy between the physical background of OSL properties of both minerals is discussed

  12. Evaluation of The Use of Bentonite, Kaolin and Feldspar For Immobilizing The Uranium Radionuclide Slugdewaste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayitno

    2006-01-01

    The experimental investigation on the mixture of bentonite, kaolin, feldspar, sludge waste and with the ratio of bentonite, kaolin, feldspar for evaluating its effectiveness has been done. Experimentally, this investigation is the preliminary study of the use of bentonite, kaolin, feldspar as a material for the immobilization of sludge waste containing material element especially uranium. This investigation was conducted by mixing waste (2,5; 5; 7.5; 10; 12.5 and 15 %) of total weight sludge waste and bentonite, kaolin, feldspar with of 800, 900 and 1000 o C temperature. The obtained the process condition in which the uranium fraction immobilized could be kept in the limit of safety standard for the sludge waste. Therefore, it could be concluded that the addition of hay ash as an additive in the formation of block monolith tend to minimize the leached sludge waste in the leaching media. (author)

  13. Paleodosimetrical properties of sodium alkali feldspars and problems of luminescence dating of sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huett, Galina; Jaek, Ivar

    1996-01-01

    Emission spectra of natural alkali feldspars extracted from sediments are studied using a CCD-camera based high sensitivity spectrometer. Applying a semiconductor laser (860± 1 nm), two dominant emission bands, blue (410 nm) and orange (570 nm), are revealed in infrared optically stimulated luminescence (IROSL) spectra for the most of the sediments from Scandinavian sections. Luminescence and dosimetric al properties of the hole traps, the induced orange emission band typical of sodium alkali feldspars are studied. As a result, high light bleach ability but low stability of the dosimetric al information lit sodium alkali feldspars are established. Problems of luminescence dating of sediments based on the mixture of potassium-sodium alkali feldspars are discussed. (author)

  14. Micro-mapping Meteorite Surfaces on Mars using Microscopic Imager Mosaics — A Tool for Unraveling Weathering History at Meridiani Planum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, J. W.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Golombek, M. P.; Johnson, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Meteorites found on Mars provide valuable insights into martian surface processes. During the course of Mars Exploration Rover (MER) extended missions, Spirit and Opportunity have identified 17 confirmed and candidate meteorites on Mars, most of which are irons. The iron meteorites exhibit morphologies and coatings that communicate complex post-fall exposure histories relevant to an understanding of climate near the martian equator [1-4]. Both chemical and mechanical weathering effects are represented. Among the more significant of these are: 1) cm-scale hollowing, 2) surficial rounding, 3) mass excavation/dissolution and removal, 4) differential etching of kamacite plates and taenite lamellae, revealing Widmanstätten patterns, 5) discontinuous iron oxide coatings, and 6) the effects of cavernous weathering, which often penetrate to rock interiors. Determining the nature, magnitude, and timing of each process and its associated features is a complex problem that will be aided by laboratory experiments, image processing, and careful surface evaluation. Because some features appear to superpose others in ways analogous to stratigraphic relationships, Microscopic Imager (MI) mosaics are useful for sketching "geologic maps" of meteorite surfaces. Employing the techniques of conventional planetary mapping [5], each map was drafted manually using full-resolution MI mosaics and Adobe Photoshop software. Units were selected to represent the oxide coating, dust-coated surfaces, sand-coated surfaces, taenite lamellae, and uncoated metal. Also included are areas in shadow, and regions of blooming caused by specular reflection of metal. Regmaglypt rim crests are presented as lineations. As with stratigraphic relationships, noting embayments and other cross-cutting relationships assists with establishing the relative timing for observed weathering effects. In addition to suggesting alternating sequences of wind and water exposure [1], patterns in oxide coating occurrence show

  15. Deformation of quartz and feldspar at mid-crustal depths in an extensional normal fault (Viveiro Fault, NW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Sánchez, M. A.; Llana-Fúnez, S.; Marcos, A.; Martínez, F. J.

    2012-04-01

    Metamorphic reactions, deformation mechanism and chemical changes during mylonitization and ultramylonitization of granite affected by a crustal-scale shear zone are investigated using microstructural observations and quantitative analysis. The Vivero Fault (VF) is a large extensional shear zone (>140Km) in NW of Iberia that follows the main Variscan trend dipping 60° toward the West. The movement accumulated during its tectonic history affects the major lithostratigraphic sequence of Palaeozoic and Neoproterozoic rocks and the metamorphic facies developed during Variscan orogenesis. Staurolite, and locally, andalucite plus biotite grew in the hangingwall during the development of VF, overprinted the previous regional Variscan greenschist facies metamorphism. Andalusite growth took place during the intrusion of syntectonic granitic bodies, such as the deformed granite studied here. The Penedo Gordo granite is coarse-grained two-mica biotite-rich granite intruding the VF and its hangingwall. This granite developed a localized deformation consisting of a set of narrow zones (mm to metric scales) heterogeneously distributed subsequently to its intrusion. Based on pseudosections for representative hangingwall pelites hosting the granite and the inferred metamorphic evolution, the shear zone that outcrops at present-day erosion surface was previously active at 14,7-17 km depth (390-450 MPa). Temperature estimates during deformation reach at least the range 500-600° C, implying a local gradient of 35±6°C/km. Microstructures in the mylonites are characterized by bulging (BLG) to subgrain rotation (SGR) recristallization in quartz with the increasing of deformation. Albitisation, flame-perthite and tartan twining are common in K-feldspar at the early stage of deformation. The inferred dominant deformation mechanisms are: i) intracrystalline plasticity in quartz, ii) cataclasis with syntectonic crystallisation of very fine albite-oligoclase and micas in K-feldspar, and

  16. Use of rice straw ash as substitute of feldspar in triaxial porcelain

    OpenAIRE

    Guzmán, Álvaro; Delvasto, Silvio; Sánchez, Enrique; Amigó Borrás, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    [EN] The substitution of raw materials for processing high energy consumption materials by agricultural and agro-industrial wastes causes a positive impacts on the environment preservation. One of these residues is rice straw, which according to FAO estimation, its annual production is about 600 million tons. In this research was studied the use of rice straw ash (RSA) as substitute of the use of feldspar in the whiteware production. Clay-feldspar-quartz porcelains are referred to...

  17. Quantitative analysis of time-resolved infrared stimulated luminescence in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared-stimulated luminescence (TR-IRSL) from feldspar samples is of importance in the field of luminescence dating, since it provides information on the luminescence mechanism in these materials. In this paper we present new analytical equations which can be used to analyze TR-IR....... The equations are applied to experimental TR-IRSL data of natural feldspars, and good agreement is found between experimental and modeling results....

  18. Hydrothermal alteration of plagioclase and growth of secondary feldspar in the Hengill Volcanic Centre, SW Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, D.; Grönvold, K.; Oskarsson, N.; Gunnlaugsson, E.

    2002-05-01

    Dissolution of igneous feldspar and the formation and occurrence of secondary feldspar in tholeiitic basalts from the Hengill volcanic centre, in SW Iceland was studied by microprobe analysis of cuttings from two ca. 2000 m deep geothermal wells. Well NG-7 in Nesjavellir represents a geothermal system in a rift zone where the intensity of young, insignificantly altered intrusions increases with depth. Well KhG-1 in Kolviðarhóll represents the margin of a rift zone where the intensity of intrusives is lower and the intensity of alteration higher. This marginal well represents altered basaltic crust in an early retrograde state. The secondary plagioclase in both wells is mainly oligoclase, occurring in association with K-feldspar and chlorite±actinolite. The texture of this assemblage depends on the lithology and intensity of alteration. In Nesjavellir (NG-7) the composition of secondary albite-oligoclase is correlated with the host-rock composition. This connection is not apparent in more intensely altered samples from Kolviðarhóll (KhG-1). The influence of temperature on composition of secondary Na-feldspar is unclear in both wells although Ca is expected to increase with temperature. Any temperature dependence may be suppressed by the influence of rock composition in Nesjavellir and by retrograde conditions at Kolviðarhóll. The absence of clear compositional gradients between igneous plagioclase and secondary feldspar and between Na-feldspar and K-feldspar suggests that secondary feldspars formed by dissolution precipitation reactions.

  19. [Study on the fine structure of K-feldspar of Qichun granite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Deng-Wen; Hong, Han-Lie; Fan, Kan; Wang, Chao-Wen; Yin, Ke

    2013-03-01

    Fine structure of K-feldspar from the Qichun granite was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry methods to understand the evolution of the granitic magmatism and its correlation to molybdenite mineralization. The XRD results showed that K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has higher ordering index and triclinicity and is namely microcline with triclinic symmetry. K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively lower ordering index and has widening [131] peak and is locally triclinic ordering. K-feldspar of the late cretaceous granite has lowest ordering index and sharp [131] peak and is honiogeneously monoclinic. The FTIR results showed that the IR spectra of the Qichun K-feldspar are similar to that of orthoclase reported by Farmer (1974). The 640 cm-1 absorption band increases while the 540 cm-' absorption band decreases with increase in K-feldspar ordering index, also, the 1,010 cm-1 absorption band separates into 1,010 and 1,046 cm-1 absorption bands, with a change in the band shape from widening to sharp outline. The ICP-MS results suggested that K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively higher metal elements and rare earth elements, and the granite exhibits better mineralization background, K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has markedly lower Sr and Ba, indicating that the alteration fluid originated from the granitic magmatism, and hence, potassic alteration is a good indicator for molybdenite exploration.

  20. Feldspar dissolution rates in the Topopah Spring Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, C.R.; Helean, K.B.; Marshall, B.D.; Brady, P.V.

    2009-01-01

    Two different field-based methods are used here to calculate feldspar dissolution rates in the Topopah Spring Tuff, the host rock for the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The center of the tuff is a high silica rhyolite, consisting largely of alkali feldspar (???60 wt%) and quartz polymorphs (???35 wt%) that formed by devitrification of rhyolitic glass as the tuff cooled. First, the abundance of secondary aluminosilicates is used to estimate the cumulative amount of feldspar dissolution over the history of the tuff, and an ambient dissolution rate is calculated by using the estimated thermal history. Second, the feldspar dissolution rate is calculated by using measured Sr isotope compositions for the pore water and rock. Pore waters display systematic changes in Sr isotopic composition with depth that are caused by feldspar dissolution. The range in dissolution rates determined from secondary mineral abundances varies from 10-16 to 10-17 mol s-1 kg tuff-1 with the largest uncertainty being the effect of the early thermal history of the tuff. Dissolution rates based on pore water Sr isotopic data were calculated by treating percolation flux parametrically, and vary from 10-15 to 10-16 mol s-1 kg tuff-1 for percolation fluxes of 15 mm a-1 and 1 mm a-1, respectively. Reconciling the rates from the two methods requires that percolation fluxes at the sampled locations be a few mm a-1 or less. The calculated feldspar dissolution rates are low relative to other measured field-based feldspar dissolution rates, possibly due to the age (12.8 Ma) of the unsaturated system at Yucca Mountain; because oxidizing and organic-poor conditions limit biological activity; and/or because elevated silica concentrations in the pore waters (???50 mg L-1) may inhibit feldspar dissolution. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fort Huachuca, Libby AAF, Arizona. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-22

    AAF AZ 61-70 APP STATION STATIOq NA&W YEARS UNCT PAGE 1 0900-1100 MsI" IL. S. T.) T..p.WET &ULD TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTAL I TTL "/ 0 1-2 53 -6 I 9...PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY P2 AP WEATHER SERVICE/"AC 722730 FT MUACI4UCA/LhSU VLAF AZ 6-0JUL 19 PAGE 1 c90o-11jo WET WULM TUMPERATUItE DEPRESION (P) _____TOTAL...STATIO’ STATION NAME YEARS MO.T. PAGE 1 09S0-11anHO0URS L. S. T.) WET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTAL TOTAL ( (Fl 0 1-2 3.4 5.6 It7.8 10 11112 13

  2. Weathering and weathering rates of natural stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Erhard M.

    1987-06-01

    Physical and chemical weathering were studied as separate processes in the past. Recent research, however, shows that most processes are physicochemical in nature. The rates at which calcite and silica weather by dissolution are dependent on the regional and local climatic environment. The weathering of silicate rocks leaves discolored margins and rinds, a function of the rocks' permeability and of the climatic parameters. Salt action, the greatest disruptive factor, is complex and not yet fully understood in all its phases, but some of the causes of disruption are crystallization pressure, hydration pressure, and hygroscopic attraction of excess moisture. The decay of marble is complex, an interaction between disolution, crack-corrosion, and expansion-contraction cycies triggered by the release of residual stresses. Thin spalls of granites commonly found near the street level of buildings are generally caused by a combination of stress relief and salt action. To study and determine weathering rates of a variety of commercial stones, the National Bureau of Standards erected a Stone Exposure Test Wall in 1948. Of the many types of stone represented, only a few fossiliferous limestones permit a valid measurement of surface reduction in a polluted urban environment.

  3. Weather forecast

    CERN Document Server

    Courtier, P

    1994-02-07

    Weather prediction is performed using the numerical model of the atmosphere evolution.The evolution equations are derived from the Navier Stokes equation for the adiabatic part but the are very much complicated by the change of phase of water, the radiation porocess and the boundary layer.The technique used operationally is described. Weather prediction is an initial value problem and accurate initial conditions need to be specified. Due to the small number of observations available (105 ) as compared to the dimension of the model state variable (107),the problem is largely underdetermined. Techniques of optimal control and inverse problems are used and have been adapted to the large dimension of our problem. our problem.The at mosphere is a chaotic system; the implication for weather prediction is discussed. Ensemble prediction is used operationally and the technique for generating initial conditions which lead to a numerical divergence of the subsequent forecasts is described.

  4. Selective detection of Fe and Mn species at mineral surfaces in weathered granite by conversion electron yield X-ray absorption fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itai, Takaaki; Takahashi, Yoshio; Uruga, Tomoya; Tanida, Hajime; Iida, Atsuo

    2008-01-01

    A new method for the speciation of Fe and Mn at mineral surfaces is proposed using X-ray absorption fine structure in conversion electron yield mode (CEY-XAFS). This method generally reflects information on the species at the sub-μm scale from the particle surface due to the limited escape depth of the inelastic Auger electron. The surface sensitivity of this method was assessed by experiments on two samples of granite showing different degrees of weathering. The XANES spectra of the Fe-K and Mn-K edge clearly gave different information for CEY and fluorescence (FL) modes. These XANES spectra of Fe and Mn show a good fit upon application of least-squares fitting using ferrihydrite/MnO 2 and biotite as the end members. The XANES spectra collected by CEY mode provided more selective information on the secondary phases which are probably present at the mineral surfaces. In particular, CEY-XANES spectra of Mn indicated the presence of Mn oxide in unweathered granite despite a very small contribution of Mn oxide being indicated by FL-XANES and selective chemical-extraction analyses. Manganese oxide could not be detected by micro-beam XANES (beam size: 5 x 5 μm 2 ) in unweathered granite, suggesting that Mn oxide thinly and ubiquitously coats mineral surface at a sub-μm scale. This information is important, since Mn oxide can be the host for various trace elements. CEY-XAFS can prove to be a powerful tool as a highly sensitive surface speciation method. Combination of CEY and FL-XAFS will help identify minor phases that form at mineral surfaces, but identification of Fe and Mn oxides at mineral surfaces is critical to understand the migration of trace elements in water-rock interaction

  5. Selective detection of Fe and Mn species at mineral surfaces in weathered granite by conversion electron yield X-ray absorption fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itai, Takaaki [Department of Earth and Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)], E-mail: itai-epss@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Takahashi, Yoshio [Department of Earth and Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Uruga, Tomoya; Tanida, Hajime [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Iida, Atsuo [Photon Factory, National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, O-ho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan)

    2008-09-15

    A new method for the speciation of Fe and Mn at mineral surfaces is proposed using X-ray absorption fine structure in conversion electron yield mode (CEY-XAFS). This method generally reflects information on the species at the sub-{mu}m scale from the particle surface due to the limited escape depth of the inelastic Auger electron. The surface sensitivity of this method was assessed by experiments on two samples of granite showing different degrees of weathering. The XANES spectra of the Fe-K and Mn-K edge clearly gave different information for CEY and fluorescence (FL) modes. These XANES spectra of Fe and Mn show a good fit upon application of least-squares fitting using ferrihydrite/MnO{sub 2} and biotite as the end members. The XANES spectra collected by CEY mode provided more selective information on the secondary phases which are probably present at the mineral surfaces. In particular, CEY-XANES spectra of Mn indicated the presence of Mn oxide in unweathered granite despite a very small contribution of Mn oxide being indicated by FL-XANES and selective chemical-extraction analyses. Manganese oxide could not be detected by micro-beam XANES (beam size: 5 x 5 {mu}m{sup 2}) in unweathered granite, suggesting that Mn oxide thinly and ubiquitously coats mineral surface at a sub-{mu}m scale. This information is important, since Mn oxide can be the host for various trace elements. CEY-XAFS can prove to be a powerful tool as a highly sensitive surface speciation method. Combination of CEY and FL-XAFS will help identify minor phases that form at mineral surfaces, but identification of Fe and Mn oxides at mineral surfaces is critical to understand the migration of trace elements in water-rock interaction.

  6. ClimoBase: Rouse Canadian Surface Observations of Weather, Climate, and Hydrological Variables, 1984-1998, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ClimoBase is a collection of surface climate measurements collected in Northern Canada by Dr. Wayne Rouse between 1984 and 1998 in three locations: Churchill,...

  7. Weathering rind formation in buried terrace cobbles during periods of up to 300ka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, H.; Metcalfe, R.; Nishimoto, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Katsuta, N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Weathering rinds in sandstone and basalt cobbles buried for up to 300 ka have been investigated. → The aim was to determine the formation process and elemental mass balances during rind development. → Elemental mass balances across the rinds were determined by using open system mass balance (τ i,j ) calculations. → The formation rates are slower than the tropical areas due to the lower rainfall in the studied area. - Abstract: Weathering rinds formed in Mesozoic sandstone and basalt cobbles buried in terrace deposits for up to 300 ka have been investigated. The aim was to determine the formation process and elemental mass balances during rind development. The ages of terraces distributed in the western part of Fukui prefecture, central Japan have been determined as 50 ka, 120 ka and 300 ka based on a tephro-stratigraphic method. Detailed investigations across the weathering rinds, consisting of microscopic observations, porosity measurements, and mineralogical and geochemical analyses using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), secondary X-ray analytical microscopy (SXAM), scanning electron microanalyser (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) have been carried out. The results revealed that the Fe concentrations in the weathering rind of a basalt cobble slightly decreased from the cobble's surface (rim) towards the unweathered core. In contrast, in a sandstone cobble formed under the same environmental conditions over the same period of time there is an Fe-rich layer at some distance below the cobble's surface. Elemental mass balances across the rinds were determined by using open system mass balance (τ i,j ) calculations and show that the Fe was precipitated as Fe-oxyhydroxides in the basalt cobbles, although Fe was slightly removed from the rims. In sandstone cobbles, on the other hand, Fe migrated along a Fe concentration gradient by diffusion and precipitated as Fe-oxyhydroxide minerals to form the weathering rinds

  8. IRSL dating of K-feldspars: Modelling natural dose response curves to deal with anomalous fading and trap competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kars, Romee H.; Wallinga, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We recently proposed a model that reconstructs the natural dose response curve for K-rich feldspars, using laboratory fading measurements and dose response as input parameters. The model is based on the relationship between recombination centre density and trap lifetime. In this study we test the working of the model by comparing modelled feldspar ages with known quartz OSL ages of the same samples and with anomalous fading-corrected feldspar ages. The modelled feldspar ages are in good agreement with quartz OSL ages and corrected feldspar ages, opening possibilities for future use of the model on samples without independent age constraints. Furthermore, we investigate the effects of trap competition on the build-up of IRSL signal using two new variations of the model. Results show that incorporating trap competition into the model reduces the agreement between feldspar IRSL ages and quartz OSL ages.

  9. Sorption of environmentally relevant radionuclides (U(VI), Np(V)) and lanthanides (Nd(III)) on feldspar and mica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Constanze

    2015-11-05

    A safe storage of radioactive waste in repositories is an important task to protect humans and the environment from radio- and chemotoxicity. Long-term safety assessments predict the behavior of potential environmental contaminants like the actinides plutonium, uranium, or neptunium, in the near and far field of repositories. For such safety assessments, it is necessary to know the migration behavior of the contaminants in the environment, which is mainly dependent on the aquatic speciation, the solubility product of relevant solid phases, and the retardation due to sorption on surrounding minerals. Thus, an investigation of sorption processes of contaminants onto different minerals as well as the derivation of mineral specific surface complexation model (SCM) parameters is of great importance. Feldspar and mica are widely distributed in nature. They occur as components of granite, which is considered as a potential host rock for a repository in Germany, and in numerous other rocks, and thus also in the far field of nearly all repositories. However, their sorption behavior with actinides has only been scarcely investigated until now. In order to better characterize these systems and subsequently to integrate these minerals into the long-term safety assessments, this work focuses on the investigation of the sorption behavior of U(VI), Np(V), and Nd(III) as analogue for An(III) onto the minerals orthoclase and muscovite, representing feldspars and mica, respectively. All investigations were performed under conditions relevant to the far field of a repository. In addition to the extensive characterization of the minerals, batch sorption experiments, spectroscopic investigations, and surface complexation modeling were performed to elucidate the uptake and speciation of actinides on the mineral surfaces. In addition, the influence of microorganisms naturally occurring on the mineral surfaces and the effect of Ca{sup 2+} on U(VI) uptake on the minerals was studied. The

  10. Sorption of environmentally relevant radionuclides (U(VI), Np(V)) and lanthanides (Nd(III)) on feldspar and mica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, Constanze

    2015-01-01

    A safe storage of radioactive waste in repositories is an important task to protect humans and the environment from radio- and chemotoxicity. Long-term safety assessments predict the behavior of potential environmental contaminants like the actinides plutonium, uranium, or neptunium, in the near and far field of repositories. For such safety assessments, it is necessary to know the migration behavior of the contaminants in the environment, which is mainly dependent on the aquatic speciation, the solubility product of relevant solid phases, and the retardation due to sorption on surrounding minerals. Thus, an investigation of sorption processes of contaminants onto different minerals as well as the derivation of mineral specific surface complexation model (SCM) parameters is of great importance. Feldspar and mica are widely distributed in nature. They occur as components of granite, which is considered as a potential host rock for a repository in Germany, and in numerous other rocks, and thus also in the far field of nearly all repositories. However, their sorption behavior with actinides has only been scarcely investigated until now. In order to better characterize these systems and subsequently to integrate these minerals into the long-term safety assessments, this work focuses on the investigation of the sorption behavior of U(VI), Np(V), and Nd(III) as analogue for An(III) onto the minerals orthoclase and muscovite, representing feldspars and mica, respectively. All investigations were performed under conditions relevant to the far field of a repository. In addition to the extensive characterization of the minerals, batch sorption experiments, spectroscopic investigations, and surface complexation modeling were performed to elucidate the uptake and speciation of actinides on the mineral surfaces. In addition, the influence of microorganisms naturally occurring on the mineral surfaces and the effect of Ca 2+ on U(VI) uptake on the minerals was studied. The

  11. Use of rice straw ash as substitute of feldspar in triaxial porcelain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvaro Guzman, A.; Silverio Delvasto, A.; Enrique Sanchez, V.; Vicente Amigo, B.

    2013-01-01

    The substitution of raw materials for processing high energy consumption materials by agricultural and agro-industrial wastes causes a positive impacts on the environment preservation. One of these residues is rice straw, which according to FAO estimation, its annual production is about 600 million tons. In this research was studied the use of rice straw ash as substitute of the use of feldspar in the white ware production. Clay-feldspar-quartz porcelains are referred to as triaxial white ware. Specimens of semidry triaxial mixtures, where feldspar was substituted for different percentages of CTA, were prepared by uniaxial pressing, followed by drying and sintering. Physical and mechanical properties of sintered bodies were evaluated. The porosity and the compressive strength of the fired pieces do increase with additions of up to 75% of CTA in substitution of feldspar. Their mineralogical phases were determined by DRX and SEM; grains of quartz, and needles of primary and secondary mullite were identified in a vitreous phase. It was concluded that feldspar can be substituted positively by CTA in white ware pastes. (Author) 22 refs.

  12. OSL, TL and IRSL emission spectra of sedimentary quartz and feldspar samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomax, Johanna; Mittelstraß, Dirk; Kreutzer, Sebastian; Fuchs, Markus

    2015-01-01

    This contribution presents a variety of different luminescence emission spectra from sedimentary feldspar and quartz samples under various stimulation modes. These are green stimulated quartz (OSL-) spectra, quartz TL spectra, feldspar IRSL and post-IR IRSL spectra. A focus was set at recording OSL and IRSL spectra at elevated stimulation temperatures such as routinely applied in luminescence dating. This was to test whether optical stimulation at elevated temperatures results in a shift of emission peaks. For OSL emissions of quartz, this has so far not been tested. In case of feldspar emissions, post-IR IRSL conditions, hence IRSL emissions at a low temperature, directly followed by high temperature post-IRSL emissions, are explicitly investigated. All spectra were recorded using a new system incorporated into a Lexsyg luminescence reader. Thus, this study, besides presenting new spectral data, also serves as a feasibility study for this new device. It is shown that (a) the new device is capable of automatically measuring different sorts of spectra, also at elevated temperatures, (b) known thermally and optically stimulated peak emissions of quartz and feldspar are confirmed, (c) obtained IRSL and OSL spectra indicate that there is no significant relation between peak emission and stimulation temperature. - Highlights: • We have measured OSL, IRSL and TL emission spectra of sedimentary quartz and feldspar samples. • Spectral analyses were performed at elevated stimulation temperatures. • Emission spectra show very little variation with stimulation temperatures.

  13. Sensitivity of Turbine-Height Wind Speeds to Parameters in Planetary Boundary-Layer and Surface-Layer Schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ben; Qian, Yun; Berg, Larry K.; Ma, Po-Lun; Wharton, Sonia; Bulaevskaya, Vera; Yan, Huiping; Hou, Zhangshuan; Shaw, William J.

    2017-01-01

    We evaluate the sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds to 26 parameters within the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) planetary boundary-layer scheme and MM5 surface-layer scheme of the Weather Research and Forecasting model over an area of complex terrain. An efficient sampling algorithm and generalized linear model are used to explore the multiple-dimensional parameter space and quantify the parametric sensitivity of simulated turbine-height wind speeds. The results indicate that most of the variability in the ensemble simulations is due to parameters related to the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), Prandtl number, turbulent length scales, surface roughness, and the von Kármán constant. The parameter associated with the TKE dissipation rate is found to be most important, and a larger dissipation rate produces larger hub-height wind speeds. A larger Prandtl number results in smaller nighttime wind speeds. Increasing surface roughness reduces the frequencies of both extremely weak and strong airflows, implying a reduction in the variability of wind speed. All of the above parameters significantly affect the vertical profiles of wind speed and the magnitude of wind shear. The relative contributions of individual parameters are found to be dependent on both the terrain slope and atmospheric stability.

  14. Field Exploration and Life Detection Sampling for Planetary Analogue Research (FELDSPAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, D.; Stockton, A. M.; Amador, E. S.; Cable, M. L.; Cantrell, T.; Chaudry, N.; Cullen, T.; Duca, Z. A.; Jacobsen, M. B.; Kirby, J.; McCaig, H. C.; Murukesan, G.; Rennie, V.; Rader, E.; Schwieterman, E. W.; Stevens, A. H.; Sutton, S. A.; Tan, G.; Yin, C.; Cullen, D.; Geppert, W.

    2017-12-01

    Extraterrestrial studies are typically conducted on mg samples from cm-scale features, while landing sites are selected based on m to km-scale features. It is therefore critical to understand spatial distribution of organic molecules over scales from cm to the km, particularly in geological features that appear homogenous at m to km scales. This is addressed by FELDSPAR, a NASA-funded project that conducts field operations analogous to Mars sample return in its science, operations, and technology [1]. Here, we present recent findings from a 2016 and a 2017 campaign to multiple Martian analogue sites in Iceland. Icelandic volcanic regions are Mars analogues due to desiccation, low nutrient availability, temperature extremes [2], and are relatively young and isolated from anthropogenic contamination [3]. Operationally, many Icelandic analogue sites are remote enough to require that field expeditions address several sampling constraints that are also faced by robotic exploration [1, 2]. Four field sites were evaluated in this study. The Fimmvörðuháls lava field was formed by a basaltic effusive eruption associated with the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. Mælifellssandur is a recently deglaciated plain to the north of the Myrdalsjökull glacier. Holuhraun is a basaltic spatter and cinder cone formed by 2014 fissure eruptions just north of the Vatnajökull glacier. Dyngjusandur is a plain kept barren by repeated aeolian mechanical weathering. Samples were collected in nested triangular grids from 10 cm to the 1 km scale. We obtained overhead imagery at 1 m to 200 m elevation to create digital elevation models. In-field reflectance spectroscopy was obtained with an ASD spectrometer and chemical composition was measured by a Bruker handheld XRF. All sites chosen were homogeneous in apparent color, morphology, moisture, grain size, and reflectance spectra at all scales greater than 10 cm. Field lab ATP assays were conducted to monitor microbial habitation, and home

  15. Metasomatic alkali-feldspar syenites (episyenites) of the Proterozoic Suomenniemi rapakivi granite complex, southeastern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suikkanen, E.; Rämö, O. T.

    2017-12-01

    Peralkaline to marginally metaluminous alkali-feldspar syenites and quartz alkali-feldspar syenites are hosted by subalkaline, ferroan rapakivi granites in the 1644 Ma Suomenniemi complex of southeastern Finland. These alkali syenites form NW-oriented dikes and small (fingerprints are, within error, identical to those of the subalkaline granites of the complex. We propose that the Suomenniemi alkali-feldspar syenites are episyenites, formed as the result of pervasive local metasomatism of the subalkaline granites caused by high-temperature oxidizing peralkaline fluids. The process led to major geochemical changes, e.g., addition of Na, Al and Fe3 +, depletion of Si and Fe2 +, and partial to complete recrystallization of the granites along fluid pathways.

  16. Iron removal on feldspar by using Averrhoa bilimbii as bioleaching agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Muhammad; Aji, Bramantyo B.; Supriyatna, Yayat Iman; Bahfie, Fathan

    2017-01-01

    Investigation of Averrhoa bilimbii as bioleaching agent was carried out. Parameters of leaching duration, acid concentration, and temperature were performed in iron removal process. Feldspar with sized 149 µm was diluted in 30 ml acid solution in order to reduce its iron content. The experimental results showed a good technical feasibility of the process which iron oxide content of feldspar was decreased from 2.24% to 0.29%. The lowest iron concentration remained was obtained after 5 hours of leaching treatment at 60 °C, and concentrated (100 vol%) Averrhoa bilimbii extract as bioleaching agent. SEM characterizations were carried out on the feldspar before and after the leaching treatment. The result shows that there were no significant effect of leaching process on the ore morphology.

  17. Understanding optically stimulated charge movement in quartz and feldspar using time-resolved measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina

    . Although, results are only presented for some quartz and feldspar samples, they were found to be very similar within the each group during the course of this work.Thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from quartz and feldspar are widely used in accident dosimetry...... stimulation energy. The thesis first delves into three main methodological developments, namely (i) research and development of the equipment for TR-OSL measurements, (ii) finding the best method for multiple-exponential analysis of a TR-OSL curve, and (iii) optimisation of the pulsing configuration...... of the equipment for TR-OSL measurements, (ii) finding the best method for multiple-exponential analysis of a TR-OSL curve, and (iii) optimisation of the pulsing configuration for the best separation of quartz OSL from a mixed quarts-feldspar sample. It then proceeds to study the different charge transport...

  18. Identifying well-bleached quartz using the different bleaching rates of quartz and feldspar luminescence signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, A.S.; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Masuda, N.

    2012-01-01

    When dating older sedimentary deposits using quartz, there are no unambiguous methods for identifying the presence of incomplete bleaching. Current statistical analysis of dose distributions depends entirely on the assumption that incomplete bleaching and mixing are the main causes of any excess...... dispersion in the distribution; the only existing way to test this assumption is using independent age control. Here we suggest a new approach to this question, based on the differential bleaching rates of quartz and feldspar luminescence signals. We first present data that confirm the differences...... in relative bleaching rates of quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and feldspar luminescence stimulated at 50 °C by infrared light (IR50) and feldspar luminescence stimulated at 290 °C by infrared light after a stimulation at 50 °C (pIRIR290), and use recently deposited samples to determine...

  19. Prince George Apt, British Columbia, Canada, Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-11-02

    A4 .4 __~~ ! LA CAL -_-_ TOTAL NUMBER Of OBSERVATIONS USAFETAC 0-8-5 (01) 1 S~ PF Ots E- dIONS OA T1,11 FORASt*5 OBSc,.Tr A TI Tt, !,/, SURFACE WINDS 2...USAFETAC OM 0 8-5 (OUI) Tous DIONS OFI , lOOM ATE OTSO)LEI NNW aY VARBIL -i S t I T A ,,,/ SURFACE WINDS 2 E AT E1 E I1. F/ A C PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY...3 2. 2 >1 >1, -- 5 16 _ 1 0 NO CELIN ,4.11 4’s. 44.b 44, 5 44.7 441,7 44#44.7 44.7 44. 44 . 44. 44.9 44.’ 4 .. 4.So 18000 -,9 4 4-. q -4-9 . 50,U Sn

  20. Investigating Surface Bias Errors in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model using a Geographic Information System (GIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Computational and Information Sciences Directorate Battlefield Environment Division (ATTN: RDRL- CIE -M) White Sands Missile Range, NM 88002-5501 8. PERFORMING...meteorological parameters, which became our focus. We found that elevation accounts for a significant portion of the variance in the model error. The...found that elevation accounts for a significant portion of the variance in the model error of surface temperature and relative humidity predictions

  1. Optimising the separation of quartz and feldspar optically stimulated luminescence using pulsed excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankjaergaard, C.; Jain, M.; Thomsen, K.J.; Murray, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    In luminescence dating, the two most commonly used natural minerals, quartz and feldspar, are exposed to different dose rates in the natural environment, and so record different doses. The luminescence signals also have different stabilities. For accurate dosimetry, the signals from these two minerals must be separated, either by physical separation of the mineral grains, or by instrumental separation of the luminescence signals. The luminescence signals from quartz and feldspar have different luminescence lifetimes under pulsed optical stimulation. This difference in lifetime can be used to discriminate between the two signals from a mixed quartz-feldspar sample. The purpose of this study is to identify optimum measurement conditions for the best separation of quartz OSL from that of feldspar in a mixed sample using pulsed stimulation and time-resolved OSL. We integrate the signal from 5 μs after the LEDs are switched off until just before the LEDs are switched on again, with the pulse on-time equal to the pulse off-time of 50 μs. By using only the initial interval of the pulsed OSL decay curve (equivalent to 0.2 s of CW-OSL using blue light at 50 mW cm -2 ) we find that the quartz to feldspar pulsed OSL intensity ratio is at a maximum. By using these parameters with an additional infrared (IR) stimulation at 175 o C before measurement (to further reduce the feldspar signal intensity), we obtain a factor of 25 enhancement in signal separation compared to that from a conventional prior-IR CW measurement. This ratio can be further improved if the counting window in the pulse off-time is restricted to detect between 20 and 50 μs instead of the entire off-period.

  2. Natural radioactivity and Rare Earth elements in feldspar samples, Central Eastern desert, Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walley El-Dine, Nadia, E-mail: nadia_walley5@hotmail.co [Department of physics, Faculty of girls for Art, Science and Education, Ain Shams University, Heliopolis, Cairo (Egypt); El-Shershaby, Amal [Department of physics, Faculty of girls for Art, Science and Education, Ain Shams University, Heliopolis, Cairo (Egypt); Afifi, Sofia [Nuclear Materials Authority (Egypt); Sroor, Amany; Samir, Eman [Department of physics, Faculty of girls for Art, Science and Education, Ain Shams University, Heliopolis, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-05-15

    The pegmatite bodies of the Eastern Desert of Egypt are widely distributed especially along the Marsa-Alam-Idfu road. The Abu Dob area covers about 150 km{sup 2} of the Arabian Nubian shield at the central part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Most of the pegmatite is zoned; the zonation starts with milky quartz at the core followed by alkali feldspar at the margins. The feldspars vary in color from rose to milky and in composition from K-feldspar to Na-feldspar, sometimes interactions of both types are encountered. Thirteen feldspar samples were collected from different locations in the Abu Dob area for measuring the natural radioactivity of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K using an HPGe detector. The variation in concentration of radionuclides for the area under investigation can be classified into regions of high, medium and low natural radioactivity. The average concentration in BqKg{sup -1} has been observed to be from 9.5 to 183675.7 BqKg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U, between 6.1 and 94,314.2 BqKg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th and from 0 to 7894.6 BqKg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K. Radium equivalent activities (Ra{sub eq}), dose rate (D{sub R}) and external hazard (H{sub ex}) have also been determined. In the present work, the concentration of rare earth elements are measured for two feldspar samples using two techniques, Environmental Scanning Electron microscope XIL 30 ESEM, Philips, and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The existence of rare earth elements in this area are very high and can be used in different important industries.

  3. Natural radioactivity and Rare Earth elements in feldspar samples, Central Eastern desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walley El-Dine, Nadia; El-Shershaby, Amal; Afifi, Sofia; Sroor, Amany; Samir, Eman

    2011-01-01

    The pegmatite bodies of the Eastern Desert of Egypt are widely distributed especially along the Marsa-Alam-Idfu road. The Abu Dob area covers about 150 km 2 of the Arabian Nubian shield at the central part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Most of the pegmatite is zoned; the zonation starts with milky quartz at the core followed by alkali feldspar at the margins. The feldspars vary in color from rose to milky and in composition from K-feldspar to Na-feldspar, sometimes interactions of both types are encountered. Thirteen feldspar samples were collected from different locations in the Abu Dob area for measuring the natural radioactivity of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K using an HPGe detector. The variation in concentration of radionuclides for the area under investigation can be classified into regions of high, medium and low natural radioactivity. The average concentration in BqKg -1 has been observed to be from 9.5 to 183675.7 BqKg -1 for 238 U, between 6.1 and 94,314.2 BqKg -1 for 232 Th and from 0 to 7894.6 BqKg -1 for 40 K. Radium equivalent activities (Ra eq ), dose rate (D R ) and external hazard (H ex ) have also been determined. In the present work, the concentration of rare earth elements are measured for two feldspar samples using two techniques, Environmental Scanning Electron microscope XIL 30 ESEM, Philips, and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The existence of rare earth elements in this area are very high and can be used in different important industries.

  4. User's Guide, software for reduction and analysis of daily weather and surface-water data: Tools for time series analysis of precipitation, temperature, and streamflow data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereford, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The software described here is used to process and analyze daily weather and surface-water data. The programs are refinements of earlier versions that include minor corrections and routines to calculate frequencies above a threshold on an annual or seasonal basis. Earlier versions of this software were used successfully to analyze historical precipitation patterns of the Mojave Desert and the southern Colorado Plateau regions, ecosystem response to climate variation, and variation of sediment-runoff frequency related to climate (Hereford and others, 2003; 2004; in press; Griffiths and others, 2006). The main program described here (Day_Cli_Ann_v5.3) uses daily data to develop a time series of various statistics for a user specified accounting period such as a year or season. The statistics include averages and totals, but the emphasis is on the frequency of occurrence in days of relatively rare weather or runoff events. These statistics are indices of climate variation; for a discussion of climate indices, see the Climate Research Unit website of the University of East Anglia (http://www.cru.uea.ac.uk/projects/stardex/) and the Climate Change Indices web site (http://cccma.seos.uvic.ca/ETCCDMI/indices.html). Specifically, the indices computed with this software are the frequency of high intensity 24-hour rainfall, unusually warm temperature, and unusually high runoff. These rare, or extreme events, are those greater than the 90th percentile of precipitation, streamflow, or temperature computed for the period of record of weather or gaging stations. If they cluster in time over several decades, extreme events may produce detectable change in the physical landscape and ecosystem of a given region. Although the software has been tested on a variety of data, as with any software, the user should carefully evaluate the results with their data. The programs were designed for the range of precipitation, temperature, and streamflow measurements expected in the semiarid

  5. National Weather Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GIS International Weather Cooperative Observers Storm Spotters Tsunami Facts and Figures National Water Center WEATHER SAFETY NOAA Weather Radio StormReady Heat Lightning Hurricanes Thunderstorms Tornadoes Rip Currents Floods Winter Weather ...

  6. Electrons in feldspar I: On the wavefunction of electrons trapped at simple lattice defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, H.R.J.; Wallinga, J.; Murray, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to make an initial consideration of the physical properties of electrons trapped at classic hydrogenic lattice defects in feldspar. We are particularly interested to determine the radial extent of the electron wavefunctions in the ground and excited states. It is sh......The purpose of this article is to make an initial consideration of the physical properties of electrons trapped at classic hydrogenic lattice defects in feldspar. We are particularly interested to determine the radial extent of the electron wavefunctions in the ground and excited states...

  7. Determination of potassium in feldspars by beta counting using a GM multicounter system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boetter-Jensen, L; Mejdahl, V

    1985-01-01

    A gas flow multicounter system developed at Risoe National laboratory for low-level beta counting applications was adopted for measuring potassium in feldspars extracted from archaeological and geological materials, in connection with TL dating work. A guard counter reduces the background by using an anticoincidence technique. Calibration was accomplished by measuring KCl and a feldspar standard. A potassium content of 1% yields a net beta count rate (background subtracted) of about 40 c.p.h.; the background is around 15 c.p.h. The precision in repeated measurements is better than 2% and the estimated accuracy is about 3%.

  8. On the shape of continuous wave infrared stimulated luminescence signals from feldspars: A case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagonis, V.; Jain, Mayank; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    2014-01-01

    The continuous-wave IRSL (CW-IRSL) signals from feldspars are known to decay in a non-exponential manner, and their exact mathematical description is of great importance in dosimetric and dating studies. This paper investigates the possibility of fitting experimental CW-IRSL curves from a variety...... to guide future modeling work on luminescence processes in feldspars. Small statistical differences were found between K-rich and Na-rich fractions of the same sample. However, the experimental data shows that the parameters depend on the irradiation dose, but do not depend on the time elapsed after...

  9. Bangor International/Dow AFB, Maine. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-06

    temporary site at ground GM1-1l RO-2 Surfac level in ramp area. 6 Apr 60 Located approx 200 ft from corner Same RO-2A 13 ft of old rnwy 33 taxiway and...USAF STAC . 0-14-S( OL A) ............ . . .T... ..O . PORN ... 17- GLCPAL CLIMATOLOGY 9RANCH ArETAC CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY Alq WEATHEk SERVICL/4AC S...13.1 i ?6 6.. 5918 USAFETAC PORN 0.9.5 (OL.-) PFVIOUS EDITIONS OF TnIS FORM AIRE ORSOLTE Jut 64 GLCRAL CLIMAT0L.i Y 1 ANCH AFE T AC SKYCO E A>4 4ATHER

  10. Luminescence at the end of the tunnelling - Investigating charge transfer mechanisms and luminescence dating methods for feldspar minerals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kars, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis comprises analyses of mineral physics with an application in geology and archeology. The thesis contributes to the development of feldspar luminescence dating methods in order to extend the applicable age range of feldspar luminescence dating in the Quaternary (last 2.6 Ma). The research

  11. Application of pulsed OSL to the separation of the luminescence components from a mixed quartz/feldspar sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denby, P.M.; Botter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.; Thomsen, K.J.; Moska, P.

    2006-01-01

    It is known that the pulsed optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) characteristics of quartz and feldspars are very different. These differences can be used to preferentially discriminate against the feldspar signal in mixed quartz-bar feldspar mineral assemblages, or in separated quartz contaminated with a feldspar signal. We have developed instrumentation for the study of high-speed pulse stimulated OSL. Our system uses the standard blue/IR LED stimulation unit of a Riso reader (allowing stimulation pulses down to 1-2μs duration) and can thus be applied to the routine analysis of samples. Using this stimulation source, and high-speed photon timing, the OSL yield can be monitored throughout the pulsing cycle and subsequent OSL decay. It is found that the total photon yield per unit stimulation power in pulsed mode is, for quartz, twice and, for feldspar, nearly four times, that in continuous wave mode. Observation of this OSL signal, between stimulation pulses, is seen to be characteristic of the mineral being examined, and has been used to preferentially discriminate against feldspar contamination in a mixed quartz/feldspar sample. Simple implementation of this technique by gating the counting period, so that counts are only accumulated during a windowed period, reduces the feldspar signal to 1.6% of its original value relative to that of the quartz

  12. Beneficiation of feldspar ore for application in the ceramic industry: Influence of composition on the physical characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Gaied

    2015-03-01

    Experimental studies indicate that an acceptable concentrate for industrial application can be obtained from these rocks. The feldspar yield was used to evaluate the process efficiency. Besides, the cone shrinkage, water absorption, degree of vitrification, mechanical properties (flexural strength and dielectric behaviour were used to monitor the quality of the recovered feldspars.

  13. Testing feldspar luminescence dating of young archaeological heated materials using potshards from Pella (Tell Tabqat Fahl) in the Jordan valley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khasswneh, Sahar Al; Murray, Andrew Sean; Bourke, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Recent developments in the use of more stable feldspar signals in the luminescence dating of sediments offer the possibility of obtaining accurate feldspar luminescence ages for ceramic artefacts; this is especially interesting in locations which do not provide suitable quartz extracts. Here we e...

  14. Quantitative analysis of time-resolved infrared stimulated luminescence in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared-stimulated luminescence (TR-IRSL) from feldspar samples is of importance in the field of luminescence dating, since it provides information on the luminescence mechanism in these materials. In this paper we present new analytical equations which can be used to analyze TR-IR...

  15. Determining the K-content of single-grains of feldspar for luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smedley, R.K.; Duller, G.A.T.; Pearce, N.J.G.; Roberts, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Feldspars form a solid-solution series whereby the K-content may range from 0 to 14%. LA-ICP-MS measurements for density-separated single-grains of feldspar yielded realistic concentrations of K within the range of those naturally occurring, and also highlighted the difficulty in isolating the pure end members during density-separation. No direct relationship was found between the thermal stability of the infrared-stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signal and measured K-content of individual grains. However, the brightest IRSL and post-IR IRSL signals originated from grains with ∼12% K-content. All grains giving a measurable signal had K-content between 6 and 13%, therefore it is suggested that an internal K-content of 10 ± 2% can be assumed for routine single-grain dating of density-separated K-feldspars. - Highlights: ► Measure range of K for single-grains of density separated feldspar using LA-ICP-MS. ► Single-grain thermal stability and brightness do not directly relate to K-content. ► Brightest 3 grains measured ∼12% K and provided the majority of the IRSL signals.

  16. Dynamics of the deep red Fe3+ photoluminescence emission in feldspar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Amit Kumar; Jain, Mayank

    2018-01-01

    be exploited for site discrimination within a complex feldspar sample. The radiative relaxation in Fe3+ (4T1 → 6A1) is shown to be a dynamic process depending on whether the ion is excited using resonant or non-resonant transition. We suggest that during resonant excitation, the excited state of Fe3+ undergoes...

  17. Validating post IR-IRSL dating on K-feldspars through comparison with quartz OSL ages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kars, R.H.; Busschers, F.S.; Wallinga, J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments have opened up the possibilities of using potassium feldspar for dating Pleistocene sediments; a stable (less-fading) part of the infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signal can be selected by largely depleting the unstable part of the IR signal, using a combination of thermal

  18. Determination of Potassium in Feldspars by Beta Counting Using a GM Multicounter System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, Lars; Mejdahl, V.

    1985-01-01

    A gas flow multicounter system developed at Riso National Laboratory for low-level beta counting applications was adopted for measuring potassium in feldspars extracted from archaeological and geological materials, in connection with TL dating work. A guard counter reduces the background by using...

  19. Red-IR stimulated luminescence in K-feldspar: Single or multiple trap origin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Thalbitzer; Jain, Mayank; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We investigate on the origins of the infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals in 3 potassium feldspars based on IR-red spectroscopy (700–1050 nm) using a fiber-coupled tunable Ti:Sapphire laser, in combination with different thermal and optical (pre)treatments of the samples. We also...

  20. Limits to depletion of blue-green light stimulated luminescence in feldspars: Implications for quartz dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, M.; Singhvi, A.K.

    2001-01-01

    stimulation curve of otherwise pure quartz. In this study, the functional relationship between the infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL) and BGSL of feldspars, (1) at different preheats, and (2) with IR bleaching at different stimulation temperatures and durations, is examined. The results suggest two trap...

  1. Radiation-induced growth and isothermal decay of infrared-stimulated luminescence from feldspar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guralnik, Benny; Li, Bo; Jain, Mayank

    2015-01-01

    the growth and decay of laboratory-regenerated luminescence signals. Here we review a selection of common models describing the response of infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) of feldspar to constant radiation and temperature as administered in the laboratory. We use this opportunity to introduce...

  2. Dependence of (anomalous) fading of infra-red stimulated luminescence on trap occupancy in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morthekai, P.; Jain, Mayank; Gach, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Dose dependency of anomalous fading of infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL) from feldspars has been investigated using radiations of different ionisation qualities. The rate of fading of the IRSL signal after proton irradiation (9.4–30%/decade) is on an average almost twice compared...

  3. Testing the application of quartz and feldspar luminescence dating to MIS 5 Japanese marine deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiel, Christine; Tsukamoto, Sumiko; Tokuyasu, Kayoko

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of both quartz and feldspar luminescence dating was tested on twenty-five samples from a marine succession now forming a coastal cliff at Oga Peninsula, Honshu Island, Japan. The quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signal shows thermal instability and linear modulated...

  4. Mechanical behavior of alumina and alumina-feldspar based ceramics in an acetic acid (4%) environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpf, Aisha S.G.; Bergmann, Carlos P.; Vicenzi, Juliane; Fetter, Rebecca; Mundstock, Karina S.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanical properties of alumina-feldspar based ceramics when exposed to an aggressive environment (acetic acid 4%). Alumina ceramics containing different concentrations of feldspar (0%, 1%, 5%, 10%, or 40%) were sintered at either 1300, 1600, or 1700 o C. Flaws (of width 0%, 30%, or 50%) were introduced into the specimens using a saw. Half of these ceramic bodies were exposed to acetic acid. Their flexural strength, K IC , and porosity were measured and the fractured samples were evaluated using scanning electronic- and optical microscopy. It was found that in the ceramic bodies sintered at 1600 o C, feldspar content up to 10% improved flexural strength and K IC, and reduced porosities. Generally, it was found that acetic acid had a weakening effect on the flexural strength of samples sintered at 1700 o C but a beneficial effect on K IC of ceramics sintered at 1600 o C. It was concluded that alumina-based ceramics with feldspar content up to 10% and sintered at higher temperatures would perform better in an aggressive environment similar to oral cavity.

  5. Understanding optically stimulated charge movement in quartz and feldspar using time-resolved measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankjaergaard, C.

    2010-02-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from quartz and feldspar are widely used in accident dosimetry and luminescence dating. In order to improve already existing methods or to develop new methods towards extending the current limits of the technique, it is important to understand the charge movement within these materials. Earlier studies have primarily focussed on examination of the trap behaviour; however, this only tells half of the story as OSL is a combination of charge stimulation and recombination. By using time-resolved OSL (TR-OSL), one can directly examine the recombination route(s), and thus obtain insight into the other half of the process involved in luminescence emission. This thesis studies the TR-OSL and optically stimulated phosphorescence signals from quartz and feldspars spanning several orders of magnitude in time (few ns to the seconds time scale) in order to identify various charge transport mechanisms in the different time regimes. The techniques employed are time-resolved OSL, continuous-wave OSL, TL, optically stimulated exo-electron (OSE) emission and time-resolved OSE. These different techniques are used in combination with variable thermal or optical stimulation energy. The thesis first delves into three main methodological developments, namely (i) research and development of the equipment for TR-OSL measurements, (ii) finding the best method for multiple-exponential analysis of a TR-OSL curve, and (iii) optimisation of the pulsing configuration for the best separation of quartz OSL from a mixed quarts-feldspar sample. It then proceeds to study the different charge transport mechanisms subsequent to an optical stimulation pulse in quartz and feldspars. The results obtained for quartz conclude that the main lifetime component in quartz represents an excited state lifetime of the recombination centre, and the more slowly decaying components on the millisecond to seconds time scale arise from charge recycling

  6. Understanding optically stimulated charge movement in quartz and feldspar using time-resolved measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankjaergaard, C.

    2010-02-15

    Thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from quartz and feldspar are widely used in accident dosimetry and luminescence dating. In order to improve already existing methods or to develop new methods towards extending the current limits of the technique, it is important to understand the charge movement within these materials. Earlier studies have primarily focussed on examination of the trap behaviour; however, this only tells half of the story as OSL is a combination of charge stimulation and recombination. By using time-resolved OSL (TR-OSL), one can directly examine the recombination route(s), and thus obtain insight into the other half of the process involved in luminescence emission. This thesis studies the TR-OSL and optically stimulated phosphorescence signals from quartz and feldspars spanning several orders of magnitude in time (few ns to the seconds time scale) in order to identify various charge transport mechanisms in the different time regimes. The techniques employed are time-resolved OSL, continuous-wave OSL, TL, optically stimulated exo-electron (OSE) emission and time-resolved OSE. These different techniques are used in combination with variable thermal or optical stimulation energy. The thesis first delves into three main methodological developments, namely (i) research and development of the equipment for TR-OSL measurements, (ii) finding the best method for multiple-exponential analysis of a TR-OSL curve, and (iii) optimisation of the pulsing configuration for the best separation of quartz OSL from a mixed quarts-feldspar sample. It then proceeds to study the different charge transport mechanisms subsequent to an optical stimulation pulse in quartz and feldspars. The results obtained for quartz conclude that the main lifetime component in quartz represents an excited state lifetime of the recombination centre, and the more slowly decaying components on the millisecond to seconds time scale arise from charge recycling

  7. Experimental weathering rates of aluminium silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudbrandsson, Snorri

    2013-01-01

    The chemical weathering of primary rocks and minerals in natural systems has a major impact on soil development and its composition. Chemical weathering is driven to a large extent by mineral dissolution. Through mineral dissolution, elements are released into groundwater and can readily react to precipitate secondary minerals such as clays, zeolites, and carbonates. Carbonates form from divalent cations (e.g. Ca, Fe and Mg) and CO 2 , and kaolin clay and gibbsite formation is attributed to the weathering of aluminium-rich minerals, most notably the feldspars. The CarbFix Project in Hellisheidi (SW-Iceland) aims to use natural weathering processes to form carbonate minerals by the re-injection of CO 2 from a geothermal power plant back into surrounding basaltic rocks. This process is driven by the dissolution of basaltic rocks, rich in divalent cations, which can combine with injected CO 2 to form and precipitate carbonates. This thesis focuses on the dissolution behaviour of Stapafell crystalline basalt, which consists of three major phases (plagioclase, pyroxene, and olivine) and is rich in divalent cations. Steady-state element release rates from crystalline basalt at far-from-equilibrium conditions were measured at pH from 2 to 11 and temperatures from 5 to 75 C in mixed-flow reactors. Steady-state Si and Ca release rates exhibit a U-shaped variation with pH, where rates decrease with increasing pH at acid condition but increase with increasing pH at alkaline conditions. Silicon release rates from crystalline basalt are comparable to Si release rates from basaltic glass of the same chemical composition at low pH and temperatures ≥25 C but slower at alkaline pH and temperatures ≥50 C. In contrast, Mg and Fe release rates decrease continuously with increasing pH at all temperatures. This behaviour is interpreted to stem from the contrasting dissolution behaviours of the three major minerals comprising the basalt: plagioclase, pyroxene, and olivine. Element

  8. Mathematical characterization of continuous wave infrared stimulated luminescence signals (CW-IRSL) from feldspars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagonis, V.; Phan, Huy; Goodnow, Rebecca; Rosenfeld, Sara; Morthekai, P.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous-wave infrared stimulated luminescence signals (CW-IRSL) from feldspars have been the subject of many experimental studies, due to their importance in luminescence dating and dosimetry. Accurate mathematical characterization of the shape of these CW-IRSL signals in feldspars is of practical and theoretical importance, especially in connection with “anomalous fading” of luminescence signals in dating studies. These signals are known to decay in a non-exponential manner and their exact mathematical shape as a function of stimulation time is an open research question. At long stimulation times the IRSL decay has been shown experimentally to follow a power law of decay, and previous researchers have attempted to fit the overall shape of these signals empirically using the well known Becquerel function (or compressed hyperbola decay law). This paper investigates the possibility of fitting CW-IRSL curves using either the Becquerel decay law, or a recently developed analytical equation based on localized electronic recombination of donor–acceptor pairs in luminescent materials. It is shown that both mathematical approaches can give excellent fits to experimental CW-IRSL curves, and the precision of the fitting process is studied by analyzing a series of curves measured using a single aliquot of a feldspar sample. Both fitting equations are solutions of differential equations involving numerically similar time dependent recombination probabilities k(t). It is concluded that both fitting equations provide approximately equivalent mathematical descriptions of the CW-IRSL curves in feldspars, and can be used as mathematical representations of the shape of CW-IRSL signals. - Highlights: • Feldspar CW-IRSL curves fitted using Becquerel decay law and new analytical equation. • Both mathematical approaches give excellent fits to experimental CW-IRSL curves. • Series of experimental CW-IRSL curves analyzed using both fitting expressions. • The time

  9. On the effect of optical and isothermal treatments on luminescence signals from feldspars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Polymeris, George; Kitis, George

    2015-01-01

    During luminescence dosimetry and luminescence dating applications it is often necessary to precondition the geological samples by applying a thermal or optical treatment before measuring the luminescence signal. In luminescence applications using apatites or feldspars, measurement of continuous-wave infrared or optically stimulated signals (CW-IRSL and CW-OSL) are customarily preceded by either an isothermal heating of the samples at a fixed temperature for a short time interval, or alternatively by optically bleaching the samples using light from LEDs with the appropriate wavelength. This paper presents new analytical equations which can be used to describe these commonly employed double experimental procedures. The equations are based on a recently published model which assumes that tunneling processes are taking place in random distributions of donor–acceptor pairs. The concentration of charge carriers during the CW-IRSL or CW-OSL experiment is expressed in terms of the parameters of the preceding thermal or optical bleaching procedure, and depends also on the distribution of distances between electron and hole pairs. The analytical equations in this paper are compared with experimental data from a feldspar sample which undergoes an isothermal procedure followed by measurement of the CW-IRSL signal. Additional comparisons with experiment are provided using a feldspar sample which undergoes an infrared bleaching process, followed by measurement of the CW-OSL signal. These results and conditions under which the equations can be used are discussed within the framework of the model. - Highlights: • CW-IRSL and CW-OSL measurements are preceded by heating or optical bleaching. • New analytical equations are derived to describe these double experimental procedures. • Equations are compared with data from a feldspar sample following isothermal procedure. • Equations are compared with data from a feldspar sample following optical bleaching.

  10. Precipitable water and surface humidity over global oceans from special sensor microwave imager and European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. T.; Tang, Wenqing; Wentz, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    Global fields of precipitable water W from the special sensor microwave imager were compared with those from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model. They agree over most ocean areas; both data sets capture the two annual cycles examined and the interannual anomalies during an ENSO episode. They show significant differences in the dry air masses over the eastern tropical-subtropical oceans, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere. In these regions, comparisons with radiosonde data indicate that overestimation by the ECMWF model accounts for a large part of the differences. As a check on the W differences, surface-level specific humidity Q derived from W, using a statistical relation, was compared with Q from the ECMWF model. The differences in Q were found to be consistent with the differences in W, indirectly validating the Q-W relation. In both W and Q, SSMI was able to discern clearly the equatorial extension of the tongues of dry air in the eastern tropical ocean, while both ECMWF and climatological fields have reduced spatial gradients and weaker intensity.

  11. Assessing the Impact of Surface and Upper-Air Observations on the Forecast Skill of the ACCESS Numerical Weather Prediction Model over Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Soldatenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology’s in situ observations (land and sea surface observations, upper air observations by radiosondes, pilot balloons, wind profilers, and aircraft observations on the short-term forecast skill provided by the ACCESS (Australian Community Climate and Earth-System Simulator global numerical weather prediction (NWP system is evaluated using an adjoint-based method. This technique makes use of the adjoint perturbation forecast model utilized within the 4D-Var assimilation system, and is able to calculate the individual impact of each assimilated observation in a cycling NWP system. The results obtained show that synoptic observations account for about 60% of the 24-h forecast error reduction, with the remainder accounted for by aircraft (12.8%, radiosondes (10.5%, wind profilers (3.9%, pilot balloons (2.8%, buoys (1.7% and ships (1.2%. In contrast, the largest impact per observation is from buoys and aircraft. Overall, all observation types have a positive impact on the 24-h forecast skill. Such results help to support the decision-making process regarding the evolution of the observing network, particularly at the national level. Consequently, this 4D-Var-based approach has great potential as a tool to assist the design and running of an efficient and effective observing network.

  12. Today's Weather.

    OpenAIRE

    Clay, Allyson

    1990-01-01

    Allyson Clay’s "Traces of a City in the Spaces Between Some People" is a series of twenty diptychs contrasting fabricated faux finishing with expressionist painting and text. The fabricated paint applications evoke city surfaces like concrete and granite; they also evoke modernist painting.  Unlike modernist painting, however, the faux surfaces are decorative and mechanically painted. The choice to have the surfaces fabricated serves to disrupt the egoism of modern abstraction and the im...

  13. The use of fair-weather cases from the ACT-America Summer 2016 field campaign to better constrain regional biogenic CO2 surface fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, B. J.; Davis, K. J.; DiGangi, J. P.; Feng, S.; Hoffman, K.; Jacobson, A. R.; Lauvaux, T.; McGill, M. J.; Miles, N.; Pal, S.; Pauly, R.; Richardson, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America) study is a multi-year NASA-funded project designed to increase our understanding of regional-scale greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes over North America through aircraft, satellite, and tower-based observations. This is being accomplished through a series of field campaigns that cover three focus regions (Mid-Atlantic, Gulf Coast, and Midwest), and all four seasons (summer, winter, fall, and spring), as well as a variety of meteorological conditions. While constraints on GHG fluxes can be derived on the global scale (through remote-site concentration measurements and global flux inversion models) and the local scale (through eddy-covariance flux tower measurements), observational constraints on the intermediate scales are not as readily available. Biogenic CO2 fluxes are particularly challenging because of their strong seasonal and diurnal cycles and large spatial variability. During the summer 2016 ACT field campaign, fair weather days were targeted for special flight patterns designed to estimate surface fluxes at scales on the order of 105 km2 using a modified mass-balance approach. For some onshore flow cases in the Gulf Coast, atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flight transects were performed both inland and offshore when it could be reasonably inferred that the homogeneous Gulf air provided the background GHG field for the inland transect. On other days, two-day flight sequences were performed, where the second-day location of the flight patterns was designed to encompass the air mass that was sampled on the first day. With these flight patterns, the average regional flux can be estimated from the ABL CO2 concentration change. Direct measurements of ABL depth from both aircraft profiles and high-resolution airborne lidar will be used, while winds and free-tropospheric CO2 can be determined from model output and in situ aircraft observations. Here we will present examples of this flux estimation for both Gulf

  14. Detrital K-feldspar thermochronology of the Nanaimo Group: Characterization of Basement and Extraregional Basin Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isava, V.; Grove, M.; Mahoney, J. B.; Kimbrough, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    The Late Cretaceous-Early Paleogene Nanaimo Group covers the contact between Triassic basement Wrangellia terrane and the Jurassic-Cretaceous Coast Plutonic Complex (CPC) in southern British Columbia. Prior detrital zircon U-Pb and Hf studies indicate a change in sediment source for the Nanaimo basin, from the primitive CPC in Santonian-Early Campanian time to an isotopically evolved continental extraregional source during the late Campanian/Maastrictian. Two notably different areas have been proposed as potential source regions: (1) the Idaho/Boulder batholith and Belt Supergroup, and (2) the Mojave/Salinia segment of structurally disrupted late Cretaceous southern California margin. Single crystal 40Ar/39Ar laser fusion of ca. 100-200 grains apiece from seven detrital K-feldspar samples from Santonian-Maastrichtian strata of the northern Nanaimo Group constrain the history of the sediments' source regions. The two oldest samples, from the K-feldspar poor Comox and Extension Fms., display a monotonic increasing distribution of cooling ages 80-125 Ma that reflects shallow erosion of the CPC. In contrast, Late Campanian strata of the Cedar District and De Courcy Fms. exhibit a more pronounced cluster of cooling ages 80-95 Ma as well as a greater proportion of Jurassic ages that represent progressively deeper erosion of the CPC. Evidence for an extraregional sediment source appears abruptly in the Geoffrey Fm. by 72 Ma, matching the time of local-to-extraregional shift indicated in detrital zircon U-Pb studies. Over 90% of the detrital K-feldspars from these arkosic sandstones yield cooling ages of 70-80 Ma, with sparse older ages associated with the CPC. Samples from the successively younger Spray and Gabriola Fms. also yield >90% K-feldspar ages younger than 80 Ma and exhibit age maxima of 68 Ma and 65 Ma, respectively. These results are distinct from detrital zircon U-Pb and K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar ages of the southern Sierra Nevada, Mojave/Salina, and northern

  15. The importance of accurate glacier albedo for estimates of surface mass balance on Vatnajökull: evaluating the surface energy budget in a regional climate model with automatic weather station observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen Schmidt, Louise; Aðalgeirsdóttir, Guðfinna; Guðmundsson, Sverrir; Langen, Peter L.; Pálsson, Finnur; Mottram, Ruth; Gascoin, Simon; Björnsson, Helgi

    2017-07-01

    A simulation of the surface climate of Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland, carried out with the regional climate model HIRHAM5 for the period 1980-2014, is used to estimate the evolution of the glacier surface mass balance (SMB). This simulation uses a new snow albedo parameterization that allows albedo to exponentially decay with time and is surface temperature dependent. The albedo scheme utilizes a new background map of the ice albedo created from observed MODIS data. The simulation is evaluated against observed daily values of weather parameters from five automatic weather stations (AWSs) from the period 2001-2014, as well as in situ SMB measurements from the period 1995-2014. The model agrees well with observations at the AWS sites, albeit with a general underestimation of the net radiation. This is due to an underestimation of the incoming radiation and a general overestimation of the albedo. The average modelled albedo is overestimated in the ablation zone, which we attribute to an overestimation of the thickness of the snow layer and not taking the surface darkening from dirt and volcanic ash deposition during dust storms and volcanic eruptions into account. A comparison with the specific summer, winter, and net mass balance for the whole of Vatnajökull (1995-2014) shows a good overall fit during the summer, with a small mass balance underestimation of 0.04 m w.e. on average, whereas the winter mass balance is overestimated by on average 0.5 m w.e. due to too large precipitation at the highest areas of the ice cap. A simple correction of the accumulation at the highest points of the glacier reduces this to 0.15 m w.e. Here, we use HIRHAM5 to simulate the evolution of the SMB of Vatnajökull for the period 1981-2014 and show that the model provides a reasonable representation of the SMB for this period. However, a major source of uncertainty in the representation of the SMB is the representation of the albedo, and processes currently not accounted for in RCMs

  16. The importance of accurate glacier albedo for estimates of surface mass balance on Vatnajökull: evaluating the surface energy budget in a regional climate model with automatic weather station observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Schmidt

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A simulation of the surface climate of Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland, carried out with the regional climate model HIRHAM5 for the period 1980–2014, is used to estimate the evolution of the glacier surface mass balance (SMB. This simulation uses a new snow albedo parameterization that allows albedo to exponentially decay with time and is surface temperature dependent. The albedo scheme utilizes a new background map of the ice albedo created from observed MODIS data. The simulation is evaluated against observed daily values of weather parameters from five automatic weather stations (AWSs from the period 2001–2014, as well as in situ SMB measurements from the period 1995–2014. The model agrees well with observations at the AWS sites, albeit with a general underestimation of the net radiation. This is due to an underestimation of the incoming radiation and a general overestimation of the albedo. The average modelled albedo is overestimated in the ablation zone, which we attribute to an overestimation of the thickness of the snow layer and not taking the surface darkening from dirt and volcanic ash deposition during dust storms and volcanic eruptions into account. A comparison with the specific summer, winter, and net mass balance for the whole of Vatnajökull (1995–2014 shows a good overall fit during the summer, with a small mass balance underestimation of 0.04 m w.e. on average, whereas the winter mass balance is overestimated by on average 0.5 m w.e. due to too large precipitation at the highest areas of the ice cap. A simple correction of the accumulation at the highest points of the glacier reduces this to 0.15 m w.e. Here, we use HIRHAM5 to simulate the evolution of the SMB of Vatnajökull for the period 1981–2014 and show that the model provides a reasonable representation of the SMB for this period. However, a major source of uncertainty in the representation of the SMB is the representation of the albedo, and processes

  17. Structure-dependent interactions between alkali feldspars and organic compounds: implications for reactions in geologic carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Min, Yujia; Jun, Young-Shin

    2013-01-02

    Organic compounds in deep saline aquifers may change supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2))-induced geochemical processes by attacking specific components in a mineral's crystal structure. Here we investigate effects of acetate and oxalate on alkali feldspar-brine interactions in a simulated geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) environment at 100 atm of CO(2) and 90 °C. We show that both organics enhance the net extent of feldspar's dissolution, with oxalate showing a more prominent effect than acetate. Further, we demonstrate that the increased reactivity of Al-O-Si linkages due to the presence of oxalate results in the promotion of both Al and Si release from feldspars. As a consequence, the degree of Al-Si order may affect the effect of oxalate on feldspar dissolution: a promotion of ~500% in terms of cumulative Si concentration was observed after 75 h of dissolution for sanidine (a highly disordered feldspar) owing to oxalate, while the corresponding increase for albite (a highly ordered feldspar) was ~90%. These results provide new insights into the dependence of feldspar dissolution kinetics on the crystallographic properties of the mineral under GCS conditions.

  18. Monthly Weather Review

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Supplements to the Monthly Weather Review publication. The Weather Bureau published the Monthly weather review Supplement irregularly from 1914 to 1949. The...

  19. Weathering and landscape evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkington, Alice V.; Phillips, Jonathan D.; Campbell, Sean W.

    2005-04-01

    In recognition of the fundamental control exerted by weathering on landscape evolution and topographic development, the 35th Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium was convened under the theme of Weathering and Landscape Evolution. The papers and posters presented at the conference imparted the state-of-the-art in weathering geomorphology, tackled the issue of scale linkage in geomorphic studies and offered a vehicle for interdisciplinary communication on research into weathering and landscape evolution. The papers included in this special issue are encapsulated here under the general themes of weathering mantles, weathering and relative dating, weathering and denudation, weathering processes and controls and the 'big picture'.

  20. Further investigations into pulsed optically stimulated luminescence from feldspars using blue and green light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankjaergaard, C.; Jain, M.; Kalchgruber, R.; Lapp, T.; Klein, D.; McKeever, S.W.S.; Murray, A.S.; Morthekai, P.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate characteristics of luminescence signals resulting from pulsed optical stimulation of feldspars and thereby to understand the underlying processes giving rise to the signal. Fourteen different feldspar specimens were investigated using time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence (TR-OSL), and these signals can be mathematically described as a sum of 4 exponential components (a, b, c, d). The slowest component, d, increases with the duration of the light pulse as expected from the exponential model. The stimulation temperature dependence experiment suggests that the TR-OSL signal decay is governed by the recombination process and not by the excited state lifetime. Furthermore data from the TR-OSL signal dependence on stimulation time and preheat temperature suggest that the recombination process may not be a sum of exponentials, although the model cannot be rejected definitively.

  1. Na-rich feldspar as a luminescence dosimeter in infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza; Murray, Andrew; Jain, Mayank

    2013-01-01

    on geological origin and erosion history, but the dosimetry of K-rich feldspar grains extracted from rocks is complicated because the internal dose rate is very dependent on the original feldspar grain size. The in situ grain size information is lost during the crushing process used to separate the grains...... settings for which independent age control is available. The blue and yellow luminescence emissions are measured for IR stimulation at 50 °C (IR50), and post-IR IR stimulation at 290 °C (pIRIR290). Thermal stability experiments imply that the corresponding signals in both emissions have comparable thermal...... stabilities and that all signals have similar recombination kinetics and are thermally stable over geological timescales. The IR50 doses measured using blue and yellow emissions are similar to or lower than quartz doses while pIRIR290 blue doses are higher than those from yellow emission and quartz doses...

  2. Microfluidic Leaching of Soil Minerals: Release of K+ from K Feldspar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciceri, Davide; Allanore, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    The rate of K+ leaching from soil minerals such as K-feldspar is believed to be too slow to provide agronomic benefit. Currently, theories and methods available to interpret kinetics of mineral processes in soil fail to consider its microfluidic nature. In this study, we measure the leaching rate of K+ ions from a K-feldspar-bearing rock (syenite) in a microfluidic environment, and demonstrate that at the spatial and temporal scales experienced by crop roots, K+ is available at a faster rate than that measured with conventional apparatuses. We present a device to investigate kinetics of mineral leaching at an unprecedented simultaneous resolution of space (~101-102 μm), time (~101-102 min) and fluid volume (~100-101 mL). Results obtained from such a device challenge the notion that silicate minerals cannot be used as alternative fertilizers for tropical soils. PMID:26485160

  3. Quantitative analysis of time-resolved infrared stimulated luminescence in feldspars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagonis, Vasilis, E-mail: vpagonis@mcdaniel.edu [McDaniel College, Physics Department, Westminster, MD 21157 (United States); Ankjærgaard, Christina [Soil Geography and Landscape Group & Netherlands Centre for Luminescence dating, Wageningen University, PO Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Jain, Mayank [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Risø Campus, Roskilde (Denmark); Chithambo, Makaiko L. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, PO BOX 94, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa)

    2016-09-15

    Time-resolved infrared-stimulated luminescence (TR-IRSL) from feldspar samples is of importance in the field of luminescence dating, since it provides information on the luminescence mechanism in these materials. In this paper we present new analytical equations which can be used to analyze TR-IRSL signals, both during and after short infrared stimulation pulses. The equations are developed using a recently proposed kinetic model, which describes localized electronic recombination via tunneling between trapped electrons and recombination centers in luminescent materials. Recombination is assumed to take place from the excited state of the trapped electron to the nearest-neighbor center within a random distribution of luminescence recombination centers. Different possibilities are examined within the model, depending on the relative importance of electron de-excitation and recombination. The equations are applied to experimental TR-IRSL data of natural feldspars, and good agreement is found between experimental and modeling results.

  4. Potassium self-diffusion in a K-rich single-crystal alkali feldspar

    CERN Document Server

    Hergemöller, Fabian; Deicher, Manfred; Wolf, Herbert; Brenner, Florian; Hutter, Herbert; Abart, Rainer; Stolwijk, Nicolaas A.

    The paper reports potassium diffusion measurements performed on gem-quality single-crystal alkali feldspar in the temperature range from 1169 to 1021 K. Natural sanidine from Volkesfeld, Germany was implanted with {}^{43}K at the ISOLDE/CERN radioactive ion-beam facility normal to the (001) crystallographic plane. Diffusion coefficients are well described by the Arrhenius equation with an activation energy of 2.4 eV and a pre-exponential factor of 5×10^{-6}m^{2}/s, which is more than three orders of magnitude lower than the {}^{22}Na diffusivity in the same feldspar and the same crystallographic direction. State-of-the-art considerations including ionic conductivity data on the same crystal and Monte Carlo simulations of diffusion in random binary alloy structures point to a correlated motion of K and Na through the interstitialcy mechanism.

  5. Ice nucleation activity of silicates and aluminosilicates in pure water and aqueous solutions - Part 1: The K-feldspar microcline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anand; Marcolli, Claudia; Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Potassium-containing feldspars (K-feldspars) have been considered as key mineral dusts for ice nucleation (IN) in mixed-phase clouds. To investigate the effect of solutes on their IN efficiency, we performed immersion freezing experiments with the K-feldspar microcline, which is highly IN active. Freezing of emulsified droplets with microcline suspended in aqueous solutions of NH3, (NH4)2SO4, NH4HSO4, NH4NO3, NH4Cl, Na2SO4, H2SO4, K2SO4 and KCl, with solute concentrations corresponding to water activities aw = 0.9-1.0, were investigated by means of a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The measured heterogeneous IN onset temperatures, Thet(aw), deviate strongly from ThetΔawhet(aw), the values calculated from the water-activity-based approach (where ThetΔawhet(aw) = Tmelt(aw + Δawhet) with a constant offset Δawhet with respect to the ice melting point curve). Surprisingly, for very dilute solutions of NH3 and NH4+ salts (molalities ≲1 mol kg-1 corresponding to aw ≳ 0.96), we find IN temperatures raised by up to 4.5 K above the onset freezing temperature of microcline in pure water (Thet(aw = 1)) and 5.5 K above ThetΔawhet(aw), revealing NH3 and NH4+ to significantly enhance the IN of the microcline surface. Conversely, more concentrated NH3 and NH4+ solutions show a depression of the onset temperature below ThetΔawhet(aw) by as much as 13.5 K caused by a decline in IN ability accompanied with a reduction in the volume fraction of water frozen heterogeneously. All salt solutions not containing NH4+ as cation exhibit nucleation temperatures Thet(aw) NH4+). However, the presence of a similar increase in IN efficiency in dilute ammonia solutions indicates that the cation exchange cannot explain the increase in IN temperatures. Instead, we hypothesize that NH3 molecules hydrogen bonded on the microcline surface form an ice-like overlayer, which provides hydrogen bonding favorable for ice to nucleate on, thus enhancing both the freezing temperatures and the

  6. Bleaching of the thermoluminescence of feldspars by selected wavelengths present in sunlight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, G.B.; Prescott, J.R.; Hutton, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    Feldspars occur in many sediments, and dating them by thermoluminescence (TL) requires a knowledge of how efficiently sunlight bleaches these minerals. The relative bleaching efficiencies of various wavelengths have been investigated for four alkali feldspars and an oligoclase, using the natural TL of the samples and the artificial TL induced by laboratory irradiation, bleached by wavelengths in the range 322-550 nm. Ultraviolet wavelengths are more efficient than the longer wavelengths at bleaching all the glow-curve peaks and are responsible for most of the phototransfer from high-temperature peaks to low-temperature peaks. Some feldspars show an initial increase in TL intensity with bleaching. Two sanidines of similar bulk composition but different TL glow curves show different dependences on bleaching wavelength. In a sodic sanidine with a dominant 240 o C peak the energy required to bleach to 50% was a thousand times greater at 550 nm than at 322 nm. In contrast, another sanidine with a complex glow curve between 150 and 450 o C showed a much slower change in the 330 o C peak with wavelength - a factor of 10 between 322 and 550 nm - with a region between 400 and 500 nm which was almost independent of wavelength. This behaviour is explained by competing mechanisms of phototransfer and bleaching which depend on wavelength in different ways. (author)

  7. Possible reasons for anomalous fading in alkali feldspars used for luminescence dating of Quaternary deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaek, Ivar

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available According to many publications, alkali feldspars are characterized by specific athermal (anomalous fading of their thermoluminescence and optically-stimulated luminescence. This phenomenon is manifested as spontaneous decline in luminescence intensity over relatively long (months and years time after laboratory irradiation, possibly due to tunnelling of electrons from lattice defects and impurities acting as dosimetric traps. It can hamper reliable luminescent dating of Quaternary deposits on the basis of feldspar extractions due to possible unpredictable underestimation of the ages. In this paper we present some experimental results related to the manifestation of the phenomenon. It is found that, in general case, the assumed long-term anomalous fading cannot be connected to electron tunnelling from the deep dosimetric traps. At the same time, some decrease in the dosimetric luminescence signal observable in just irradiated feldspar samples can really be caused by tunnelling. However, the probability of this process quickly goes down, already within some days after irradiation. Interpretation of some other short- and long-term anomalous fading-like effects requires involvement of radiation- and thermo-induced ionic processes.

  8. Peculiar Feldspar And Quartz Inclusions Within Zircons From Anorthosites, North Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliwa, H. A.; Dawoud, M. I.; Khalaf, I. M.; Negendank, J. F.; Itaya, T.

    2004-12-01

    Zircons from three anorthosite outcrops along Wadi Dib area, north Eastern Desert of Egypt contain abundant and conspicuous inclusions of quartz, feldspar, amphibole and apatite. These anorthosites, as (50-100m thick) layers, represent the top of mafic-ultramafic intrusions exhibiting rhythmic layering visible by reputation of melanocratic and leucocratic layers. Field and microscopic studies exhibit that these anorthosites were affected by the action of residual magmatic solutions associated with the late stage crystallization of the younger granites, which modified their mineralogical composition. They are composed totally of plagioclase with subordinate amount of clinoenstatite, augite, amphibole, biotite, K-feldspar, and quartz. Accessories are magnetite, ilmenite, apatite and zircon. The abundance and the mode of occurrence of K-feldspar, quartz, and biotite with apatite and zircon among the megacrysts suggest their formation is ascribed to the interaction with the residual solutions. The microprobe data exhibit difference between feldspar and amphiboles contained herein zircons and those as anorthosite mineral constituents. The genetic relationship between zircons and their inclusions suggests later growth of zircons than inclusions and most probably at the final stage of rock modification. Zircons are magmatic and found in the interstitial feldspar and quartz among plagioclase megacrysts in aggregates or as individual grains. The microscopic and SEM images investigation exhibit that most zircons are subhedral to euhedral equant and prismatic crystals. Most zircons have same range of crystal morphologies and internal growth structures with predominance of prism /{100/} and pyramid /{101/} and occasionally prism /{110/} and pyramid /{111/}. No evidences for poly-faceted grains, inherited cores or later overgrowths were detected. CL images distinguished zircons with visible core-rim structures and others with regular and continuous growth zones contained herein

  9. A study of the depth of weathering and its relationship to the mechanical properties of near-surface rocks in the Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stierman, D.J.; Healy, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Weathered granite extends 70 m deep at Hi Vista in the arid central Mojave Desert of southern California. The low strength of this granite is due to the alteration of biotite and chlorite montmorillonite. Deep weathering probably occurs in most granites, although we cannot rule out some anomalous mechanisms at Hi Vista. Geophysical instruments set in these slightly altered rocks are limited by the unstable behavior of the rocks. Thus, tectonic signals from instruments placed in shallow boreholes give vague results. Geophysical measurements of these weathered rocks resemble measurements of granitic rocks near major faults. The rheology of the rocks in which instruments are placed limits the useful sensitivity of the instruments. ?? 1985 Birkha??user Verlag.

  10. Beneficiation of feldspar ore for application in the ceramic industry: Influence of composition on the physical characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Gaied, M.E.; Gallala, W.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, physical and physicochemical experiments were carried out to improve the quality of feldspar ore in Sidi Aïch massive, located in the Gafsa region of south-western Tunisia. After determination of the mineralogical and the chemical composition, flotation methods were applied. In this study, non-hydrofluoric acid flotation methods used in feldspar-quartz separation were compared with each other and with the conventional HF/amine method. The results showed that conventional HF/ami...

  11. Alkali feldspar syenites with shoshonitic affinities from Chhotaudepur area: Implication for mantle metasomatism in the Deccan large igneous province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.R. Hari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Two petrologically distinct alkali feldspar syenite bodies (AFS-1 and AFS-2 from Chhotaudepur area, Deccan Large Igneous Province are reported in the present work. AFS-1 is characterized by hypidiomorphic texture and consists of feldspar (Or55Ab43 to Or25Ab71, ferro-pargasite/ferro-pargasite hornblende, hastingsite, pyroxene (Wo47, En5, Fs46, magnetite and biotite. AFS-2 exhibits panidiomorphic texture with euhedral pyroxene (Wo47-50, En22-39, Fs12–31 set in a groundmass matrix of alkali feldspar (Or99Ab0.77 to Or1.33Ab98, titanite and magnetite. In comparison to AFS-1, higher elemental concentrations of Ba, Sr and ∑REE are observed in AFS-2. The average peralkaline index of the alkali feldspar syenites is ∼1 indicating their alkaline nature. Variation discrimination diagrams involving major and trace elements and their ratios demonstrate that these alkali feldspar syenites have a shoshonite affinity but emplaced in a within-plate and rifting environment. No evidence of crustal contamination is perceptible in the multi-element primitive mantle normalized diagram as well as in terms of trace elemental ratios. The enrichment of incompatible elements in the alkali feldspar syenites suggests the involvement of mantle metasomatism in their genesis.

  12. WRF-Fire: coupled weather-wildland fire modeling with the weather research and forecasting model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice L. Coen; Marques Cameron; John Michalakes; Edward G. Patton; Philip J. Riggan; Kara M. Yedinak

    2012-01-01

    A wildland fire behavior module (WRF-Fire) was integrated into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) public domain numerical weather prediction model. The fire module is a surface fire behavior model that is two-way coupled with the atmospheric model. Near-surface winds from the atmospheric model are interpolated to a finer fire grid and used, with fuel properties...

  13. An evaluation of the impact of aerosol particles on weather forecasts from a biomass burning aerosol event over the Midwestern United States: observational-based analysis of surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A major continental-scale biomass burning smoke event from 28–30 June 2015, spanning central Canada through the eastern seaboard of the United States, resulted in unforecasted drops in daytime high surface temperatures on the order of 2–5  °C in the upper Midwest. This event, with strong smoke gradients and largely cloud-free conditions, provides a natural laboratory to study how aerosol radiative effects may influence numerical weather prediction (NWP forecast outcomes. Here, we describe the nature of this smoke event and evaluate the differences in observed near-surface air temperatures between Bismarck (clear and Grand Forks (overcast smoke, to evaluate to what degree solar radiation forcing from a smoke plume introduces daytime surface cooling, and how this affects model bias in forecasts and analyses. For this event, mid-visible (550 nm smoke aerosol optical thickness (AOT, τ reached values above 5. A direct surface cooling efficiency of −1.5 °C per unit AOT (at 550 nm, τ550 was found. A further analysis of European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF, National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP, United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO near-surface air temperature forecasts for up to 54 h as a function of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Dark Target AOT data across more than 400 surface stations, also indicated the presence of the daytime aerosol direct cooling effect, but suggested a smaller aerosol direct surface cooling efficiency with magnitude on the order of −0.25 to −1.0 °C per unit τ550. In addition, using observations from the surface stations, uncertainties in near-surface air temperatures from ECMWF, NCEP, and UKMO model runs are estimated. This study further suggests that significant daily changes in τ550 above 1, at which the smoke-aerosol-induced direct surface cooling effect could be comparable in magnitude with model uncertainties, are rare events

  14. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station Port of Albany weather/hydro by Hudson River Environmental Conditions Observing System (HRECOS) and assembled by Mid-Atlantic Regional Association Coastal Ocean Observing System (MARACOOS) in the Hudson River from 2011-01-04 to 2017-07-31 (NCEI Accession 0163364)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163364 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected at Port of Albany weather/hydro, a fixed station in the Hudson River. These...

  15. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station Schodack Island hydro/weather by Hudson River Environmental Conditions Observing System (HRECOS) and assembled by Mid-Atlantic Regional Association Coastal Ocean Observing System (MARACOOS) in the Hudson River from 2008-04-25 to 2017-05-31 (NCEI Accession 0163416)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163416 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected at Schodack Island hydro/weather, a fixed station in the Hudson River. These...

  16. Comparison of the properties of various optically stimulated luminescence signals from potassium feldspar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Xiao; Zhang Jiafu; Zhou Liping

    2012-01-01

    Various optically stimulated luminescence signals from K-feldspar have been used to determine the equivalent doses of sediment samples. Understanding the properties of these optical signals is critical to evaluate their applicability and limitations to optical dating. In this paper, some properties of IRSL, post-IR OSL and post-IR IRSL signals (detected in the UV region using U-340 filters) from a museum sample of K-feldspar were investigated by analyzing the relationships between optical and TL signals, and the effect of optical bleaching and heating on optical signals. The trap parameters of the different optical signals were calculated using the pulse annealing method. The results show that this sample exhibits two regenerated TL peaks at ∼140 and ∼330 °C. Corresponding to the low temperature TL peak, the OSL and post-IR OSL signals appear to be more associated with lower temperature TL than the IRSL signal measured at 50 °C. Corresponding to the high temperature TL peak, the post-IR IRSL signals mainly originate from the more thermally stable traps associated with the high temperature TL, compared with the IRSL and post-IR OSL signals. However, the post-IR IRSL 225°C signal is shown to be hard to be bleached by blue light and simulated sunlight, compared with the IRSL 50°C and low temperature post-IR IRSL signals. The implication for optical dating is that the elevated temperature post-IR IRSL signals can be preferentially applied over other signals from K-feldspar, but it is desirable that the effectiveness of the pre-depositional zeroing of these signals is assessed.

  17. OSL and IRSL characteristics of quartz and feldspar from southern California, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, Michael J.; Roder, Belinda J.; Stang, Dallon M.; Rhodes, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    Southern California comprises of a wide range of diverse landscapes and environments, from high mountains with glacial and periglacial sediments to deserts with large sand dunes, extensive alluvial fans and ephemeral playas. Highly active tectonic processes has exposed ancient (c. 2 Ga) plutonic and metamorphic basement from deep within the crust, while similar Palaeozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks are also common. A rich array of volcanic lithologies extending into the late Quaternary complement many thick sedimentary sequences that formed in equally diverse ancient environments typical of an accreting active continental margin. In some locations, notably in the Coachella Valley close to Palm Springs and the Salton Sea, low OSL sensitivity and poor characteristics restrict the application of the quartz SAR protocol to date late Pleistocene and Holocene fluvial sediments. In other locations such as the Malibu coastline, high sensitivity of the quartz OSL signal is observed, despite local source rocks being dominated by volcanic lithologies. Problems of poor quartz characteristics, along with uncertainty in predicting quartz OSL behavior for future dating campaigns poses a significant problem for projects, in particular for neotectonic contexts. While K-feldspar has been used extensively to date eolian and fluvial sediments in southern California, little information regarding signal stability is available. We explore the characteristics of both quartz and feldspar sub-samples from eolian, fluvial, lacustrine environments, in order to help develop mineral selection criteria for optical dating applications and clarify these issues. The importance of radiation quenching in quartz grains recently eroded from bedrock and the role of fires in enhancing OSL sensitivity are considered. The relative bleachability of quartz and feldspar fractions, along with thermal stability considerations is discussed. A simple test for quartz OSL signal contamination based on thermal

  18. Time-resolved infrared stimulated luminescence signals in feldspars: Analysis based on exponential and stretched exponential functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagonis, V.; Morthekai, P.; Singhvi, A.K.; Thomas, J.; Balaram, V.; Kitis, G.; Chen, R.

    2012-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared-stimulated luminescence (TR-IRSL) signals from feldspar samples have been the subject of several recent experimental studies. These signals are of importance in the field of luminescence dating, since they exhibit smaller fading effects than the commonly employed continuous-wave infrared signals (CW-IRSL). This paper presents a semi-empirical analysis of TR-IRSL data from feldspar samples, by using a linear combination of exponential and stretched exponential (SE) functions. The best possible estimates of the five parameters in this semi-empirical approach are obtained using five popular commercially available software packages, and by employing a variety of global optimization techniques. The results from all types of software and from the different fitting algorithms were found to be in close agreement with each other, indicating that a global optimum solution has likely been reached during the fitting process. Four complete sets of TR-IRSL data on well-characterized natural feldspars were fitted by using such a linear combination of exponential and SE functions. The dependence of the extracted fitting parameters on the stimulation temperature is discussed within the context of a recently proposed model of luminescence processes in feldspar. Three of the four feldspar samples studied in this paper are K-rich, and these exhibited different behavior at higher stimulation temperatures, than the fourth sample which was a Na-rich feldspar. The new method of analysis proposed in this paper can help isolate mathematically the more thermally stable components, and hence could lead to better dating applications in these materials. - Highlights: ► TR-IRSL from four feldspars were analyzed using exponential and stretched exponential functions. ► A variety of global optimization techniques give good agreement. ► Na-rich sample behavior is different from the three K-rich samples. ► Experimental data are fitted for stimulation temperatures

  19. Oster pluton (Central Karelia) - the ancient massif of two-feldspar granites of Baltic Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A.V.; Rizvanova, N.G.

    2000-01-01

    Geochronological study of two-feldspar granites forming the Oster pluton in the Central Karelia was performed using the methods of U-Pb- and Sm-Nd-dating. U-Pb isotope data for zircons from granite of the Oster pluton correspond to the age of 2876±21 mln. years, whereas Sm-Nd isotope data obtained for three samples of the garnet correspond to the age varying from 3.0 to 3.5 bln. years. The ancient age of granites of the Oster pluton is explained by the presence of a sufficiently powerful crust in the region by that moment [ru

  20. Optical dating using feldspar from Quaternary alluvial and colluvial sediments from SE Brazilian Plateau, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatumi, Sonia H.; Peixoto, Maria Naise O.; Moura, Josilda R.S.; Mello, Claudio L.; Carmo, Isabela O.; Kowata, Emilia A.; Yee, Marcio; Brito, Silvio Luiz M.; Gozzi, Giuiliano; Kassab, Luciana R.P.

    2003-01-01

    Opticallly stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating has been applied to a wide variety of materials such as loess, sand dunes, colluvium, alluvium, volcanic products, etc., helping geologic geomorphologic studies. OSL dating results using feldspar crystals extracted from alluvial and colluvial deposits of SE Brazilian Plateau will be presented in this work. The methodology used is based on the regeneration method, with multiple aliquot protocol. A total of 23 sample ages were obtained spanning 6.5-97.2 kyr. Results of radioactive contents and comparison with radiocarbon ages will be discussed

  1. Modeling of the shape of infrared stimulated luminescence signals in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Jain, Mayank; Murray, Andrew S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new empirical model describing infrared (IR) stimulation phenomena in feldspars. In the model electrons from the ground state of an electron trap are raised by infrared optical stimulation to the excited state, and subsequently recombine with a nearest-neighbor hole via...... corresponds to a fast rate of recombination processes taking place along the infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) curves. The subsequent decay of the simulated IRSL signal is characterized by a much slower recombination rate, which can be described by a power-law type of equation.Several simulations...

  2. Weathering of rock 'Ginger'

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    One of the more unusual rocks at the site is Ginger, located southeast of the lander. Parts of it have the reddest color of any material in view, whereas its rounded lobes are gray and relatively unweathered. These color differences are brought out in the inset, enhanced at the upper right. In the false color image at the lower right, the shape of the visible-wavelength spectrum (related to the abundance of weathered ferric iron minerals) is indicated by the hue of the rocks. Blue indicates relatively unweathered rocks. Typical soils and drift, which are heavily weathered, are shown in green and flesh tones. The very red color in the creases in the rock surface correspond to a crust of ferric minerals. The origin of the rock is uncertain; the ferric crust may have grown underneath the rock, or it may cement pebbles together into a conglomerate. Ginger will be a target of future super-resolution studies to better constrain its origin.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  3. Adverse Weather Evokes Nostalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilburg, Wijnand A P; Sedikides, Constantine; Wildschut, Tim

    2018-03-01

    Four studies examined the link between adverse weather and the palliative role of nostalgia. We proposed and tested that (a) adverse weather evokes nostalgia (Hypothesis 1); (b) adverse weather causes distress, which predicts elevated nostalgia (Hypothesis 2); (c) preventing nostalgia exacerbates weather-induced distress (Hypothesis 3); and (d) weather-evoked nostalgia confers psychological benefits (Hypothesis 4). In Study 1, participants listened to recordings of wind, thunder, rain, and neutral sounds. Adverse weather evoked nostalgia. In Study 2, participants kept a 10-day diary recording weather conditions, distress, and nostalgia. We also obtained meteorological data. Adverse weather perceptions were positively correlated with distress, which predicted higher nostalgia. Also, adverse natural weather was associated with corresponding weather perceptions, which predicted elevated nostalgia. (Results were mixed for rain.) In Study 3, preventing nostalgia (via cognitive load) increased weather-evoked distress. In Study 4, weather-evoked nostalgia was positively associated with psychological benefits. The findings pioneer the relevance of nostalgia as source of comfort in adverse weather.

  4. WEATHER INDEX- THE BASIS OF WEATHER DERIVATIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botos Horia Mircea

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper approaches the subject of Weather Derivatives, more exactly their basic element the weather index. The weather index has two forms, the Heating Degree Day (HDD and the Cooling Degree Day (CDD. We will try to explain their origin, use and the relationship between the two forms of the index. In our research we started from the analysis of the weather derivatives and what they are based on. After finding out about weather index, we were interested in understanding exactly how they work and how they influence the value of the contract. On the national level the research in the field is scares, but foreign materials available. The study for this paper was based firstly on reading about Weather Derivative, and then going in the meteorogical field and determining the way by which the indices were determined. After this, we went to the field with interest in the indices, such as the energy and gas industries, and figured out how they determined the weather index. For the examples we obtained data from the weather index database, and calculated the value for the period. The study is made on a period of five years, in 8 cities of the European Union. The result of this research is that we can now understand better the importance of the way the indices work and how they influence the value of the Weather Derivatives. This research has an implication on the field of insurance, because of the fact that weather derivative are at the convergence point of the stock markets and the insurance market. The originality of the paper comes from the personal touch given to the theoretical aspect and through the analysis of the HDD and CDD index in order to show their general behaviour and relationship.

  5. Contemporary Trends in Land Surface Phenologies from the Aral Basin Suggest Weather- or Irrigation-Driven Changes in GPP not Land Cover Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C. K.; de Beurs, K.; Henebry, G. M.

    2009-12-01

    The transformation of the Aral Sea into the Aral Lakes is a startling example of anthropogenic environmental degradation. However, ongoing impacts of hydrologic modification and climatic change are occurring throughout the nearly 2 million km2 Aral Basin (AB), thus requiring synoptic, basin-wide monitoring of environmental trends. The MODIS 500m global land cover (LC) product is a potential source of such information in a data-sparse region like the AB. However, we find that it is particularly unstable in this arid/semi-arid region. For example, 25% of AB pixels change LC class between 2001 and 2005 versions of the global LC using the IGBP LC scheme. Here we present an alternate analysis of environmental trends in the AB using MODIS data at the same spatial resolution, but incorporating temporal information embedded within contemporary land surface phenologies (LSPs), in contrast to temporally delimited LC. NDVI time series from 2001-2008 were derived from 500m MODIS NBAR data (16-d composites every 8 d; MCD43A4). Focusing on the period from 1 March to 1 October, each pixel time series was comprised of 27 NDVI values per year (or 216 composites in total). Trend analysis using the nonparametric Seasonal Kendall test revealed a number of spatially coherent hotspots of highly significant (p<0.01) positive and negative trends in NDVI dynamics over the 2001-2008 interval. Relative to the 2001 and 2005 LC classifications, positive trends tended to coincide with the following transitions between IGBP classes: open shrub → closed shrub; grassland → {open shrub, cropland}; {open shrub, cropland/natural vegetation mix} → cropland. These findings suggest that apparent LC change events might be false-positives caused by weather-driven increases in GPP. In turn, negative trends were largely coincident with putative LC change to grassland from mostly woody classes: {closed shrub, open shrub, woody savanna, savanna, snow/ice, barren} → grassland. Here, potential false

  6. Mariners Weather Log

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Mariners Weather Log (MWL) is a publication containing articles, news and information about marine weather events and phenomena, worldwide environmental impact...

  7. National Convective Weather Diagnostic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current convective hazards identified by the National Convective Weather Detection algorithm. The National Convective Weather Diagnostic (NCWD) is an automatically...

  8. Pilot Weather Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aviation weather reports relayed from pilots to FAA air traffic controllers or National Weather Service personnel. Elements include sky cover, turbulence, wind...

  9. Winter Weather Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severe winter weather can lead to health and safety challenges. You may have to cope with Cold related health problems, including ... there are no guarantees of safety during winter weather emergencies, you can take actions to protect yourself. ...

  10. Weather Radar Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  11. Daily Weather Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These daily weather records were compiled from a subset of stations in the Global Historical Climatological Network (GHCN)-Daily dataset. A weather record is...

  12. Radar Weather Observation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radar Weather Observation is a set of archived historical manuscripts stored on microfiche. The primary source of these radar weather observations manuscript records...

  13. Internet Weather Source

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Weather Service (NWS) National Telecommunications Gateway provides weather, hydrologic, and climate forecasts and warnings for the United States, its...

  14. Natural Weathering Exposure Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corps of Engineers' Treat Island Natural Weathering Exposure Station is a long-term natural weathering facility used to study concrete durability. Located on the...

  15. Space Weather in Operation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The “Space Weather in Operations” effort will provide on-demand and near-real time space weather event information to the Data Access Toolkit (DAT), which is the...

  16. Correlation of basic TL, OSL and IRSL properties of ten K-feldspar samples of various origins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfampa, I.K. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Polymeris, G.S. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Ankara University, 06100 Besevler, Ankara (Turkey); Pagonis, V. [McDaniel College, Physics Department, Westminster, MD 21157 (United States); Theodosoglou, E. [Department of Mineralogy-Petrology-Economic Geology, School of Geology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Tsirliganis, N.C. [Laboratory of Radiation Applications and Archaeological Dating, Department of Archaeometry and Physicochemical Measurements, ‘Athena’ R.& I.C., Kimmeria University Campus, GR67100 Xanthi (Greece); Kitis, G., E-mail: gkitis@auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • OSL and IRSL bleaching behavior of ten K-feldspar samples is presented. • OSL and IRSL decay curves were component resolved using tunneling model. • The growth of integrated OSL and IRSL signals versus time was described by new expression based on tunneling model. • Correlation between TL, OSL and IRSL signals and of all properties with K-feldspar structure was discussed. - Abstract: Feldspars stand among the most widely used minerals in dosimetric methods of dating using thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Having very good dosimetric properties, they can in principle contribute to the dating of every site of archaeological and geological interest. The present work studies basic properties of ten naturally occurring K-feldspar samples belonging to three feldspar species, namely sanidine, orthoclase and microcline. The basic properties studied are (a) the influence of blue light and infrared stimulation on the thermoluminescence glow-curves, (b) the growth of OSL, IRSL, residual TL and TL-loss as a function of OSL and IRSL bleaching time and (c) the correlation between the OSL and IRSL signals and the energy levels responsible for the TL glow-curve. All experimental data were fitted using analytical expressions derived from a recently developed tunneling recombination model. The results show that the analytical expressions provide excellent fits to all experimental results, thus verifying the tunneling recombination mechanism in these materials and providing valuable information about the concentrations of luminescence centers.

  17. IR-RF dating of sand-sized K-feldspar extracts: A test of accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Jain, Mayank; Murray, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we use a recently developed radioluminescence (RL) attachment to the Risø TL/OSL reader to test the InfraRed-RadioFluorescence (IR-RF) dating method applied to K-feldspar rich extracts from our known-age archive samples. We present experiments to characterise the instrument performa......In this paper we use a recently developed radioluminescence (RL) attachment to the Risø TL/OSL reader to test the InfraRed-RadioFluorescence (IR-RF) dating method applied to K-feldspar rich extracts from our known-age archive samples. We present experiments to characterise the instrument...... performance and to test the reproducibility of IR-RF measurements. These experiments illustrate the high sensitivity and dose rate of our RL system, the negligible influence of the turntable movement on IR-RF signals and the effectiveness of the built in 395 nm LED at bleaching IR-RF signals. We measure IR......-RF ages on a set of samples with independent age control using a robust analytical method, which is able to detect any possible sensitivity change. Our IR-RF ages do not agree well with the independent age control; the ages of the younger samples (20–45 ka) are significantly over-estimated while the ages...

  18. Comparative study of ice nucleating efficiency of K-feldspar in immersion and deposition freezing modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiron, T.; Hoffmann, N.; Peckhaus, A.; Kiselev, A. A.; Leisner, T.; Flossmann, A. I.

    2016-12-01

    One of the main challenges in understanding the evolution of Earth's climate resides in the understanding the role of ice nucleation on the development of tropospheric clouds as well as its initiation. K-feldspar is known to be a very active ice nucleating particle and this study focuses on the characterization of its activity in two heterogeneous nucleation modes, immersion and deposition freezing.We use a newly built humidity-controlled cold stage allowing the simultaneous observation of up to 2000 identical 0.6-nanoliter droplets containing suspension of mineral dust particles. The droplets are first cooled down to observe immersion freezing, the obtained ice crystals are then evaporated and finally, the residual particles are exposed to the water vapor supersaturated with respect to ice.The ice nucleation abilities for the individual residual particles are then compared for the different freezing modes and correlation between immersion ice nuclei and deposition ice nuclei is investigated.Based on the electron microscopy analysis of the residual particles, we discuss the possible relationship between the ice nucleation properties of feldspar and its microstructure. Finally, we discuss the atmospheric implications of our experimental results, using DESCAM, a 1.5D bin-resolved microphysics model.

  19. Cold-Weather Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Cold-Weather Sports KidsHealth / For Teens / Cold-Weather Sports What's in this article? What to Do? Classes ... weather. What better time to be outdoors? Winter sports can help you burn calories, increase your cardiovascular ...

  20. Corrosion processes on weathering steel railway bridge in Prague

    OpenAIRE

    Urban, Viktor; Křivý, Vít; Buchta, Vojtěch

    2016-01-01

    This contribution deals with experimental corrosion tests carried out on the weathering steel railway bridge in Prague. The basic specific property of the weathering steel is an ability to create in favourable environment a protective patina layer on its surface. Since 1968 weathering steel is used under the name “Atmofix” in the Czech Republic and can be used as a standard structural material without any corrosion protection. The weathering steel Atmofix is mostly used for bridge structures ...

  1. Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program reduces energy costs for low-income households by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes, while ensuring their health and safety.

  2. Geochemical and mineralogical study of selected weathered samples from Olkiluoto site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, A.

    2009-02-01

    Optical microscopy, chemical analyses and X-ray diffraction method were used to study the influence of weathering from 11 drill core samples from shallow depths (< 25 m). The samples, 4 to 22 cm in length were drilled from Olkiluoto study site, Eurajoki, and they represent the common rock types of local bedrock: mica gneiss, tonalitic and granodioritic gneiss. Two of the samples were macroscopically unweathered and 9 of them were remarkably altered. The alteration was shown as porosity, the abundance of chlorite instead of biotite and pink, unclear feldspars. Many samples also contained red-brown hematite and fractures, some of them coated with secondary minerals, even clay. Microscopically the most visible feature of weathering was the total alteration of plagioclase and cordierite to sericite. In many samples also biotite was richly altered to chlorite and opaque minerals. Microfractures were common and they were filled by hematite, kaolinite and fine-grained muscovite (sericite). Hematite was, in some cases, also largely replacing the weathered minerals, feldspars and cordierite. Chemical alteration was not clear, because the alteration of main minerals have produced secondary minerals with almost the same chemical composition without any reasonable depleting or enrichment of certain elements. X-ray diffraction determination of samples proved, that often plagioclase was replaced by mica and biotite by chlorite. In some cases the samples contained products of chemical weathering, kaolinite and smectite. (orig.)

  3. Experimental early crystallization of K-feldspar in granitic systems. Implications on the origin of magmatic fabrics in granitic rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz-Alvarado, J.

    2017-07-01

    One of the most outstanding characteristics of some granodioritic to granitic rocks is the presence of K-feldspar megacrysts. For instance, granodiorites and monzogranites of the Spanish Central System batholith present variable amounts of large (up to 10cm in length) euhedral K-feldspar crystals. The porphyritic textures, the euhedral shape, the alignment of plagioclase and biotite inclusions and the magmatic fabrics point to a magmatic origin for these megacrysts. This work presents a phase equilibria study in a high-K2O granodioritic system. A series of experiments were conducted with a granodioritic composition (GEMbiot) to study the crystallization sequence at the emplacement conditions in the Gredos massif, i.e. 4 H2O wt.% and 0.4GPa. Experimental results show that orthopiroxene is the liquidus phase at 1010ºC, which reacts with the H2O-rich melt to stabilize biotite between 980 and 940ºC. Plagioclase crystallizes at around 910ºC, and K-feldspar crystallizes in the matrix between 750 and 700ºC when the crystal fraction is around 0.5. However, at 850 ºC, a pelite-doped experiment shows euhedral K-feldspar (≈5vol%) in both the reactive xenolith domain together with cordierite and the granodioritic domain, where the K2O wt.% rise from 4.5 in the normal experiment to 5.9 in the doped experiment. These results suggest that the bulk-assimilation process promotes the bulk and heterogeneous K2O enrichment in a huge granodioritic magma volume, which triggers an early crystallization of K-feldspar megacrysts. Because of this early crystallization of the megacrysts, the magmatic foliations defined by K-feldspar megacrysts are formed during and after the emplacement processes and are highly influenced by tectonic kinematics.

  4. Application of pulsed OSL to the separation of the luminescence components from a mixed quartz/feldspar sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denby, Phil M.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    with a feldspar signal. We have developed instrumentation for the study of high-speed pulse stimulated OSL. Our system uses the standard blue/IR LED stimulation unit of a Riso reader (allowing stimulation pulses down to 1-2 mu s duration) and can thus be applied to the routine analysis of samples. Using...... that counts are only accumulated during a windowed period, reduces the feldspar signal to 1.6% of its original value relative to that of the quartz. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  5. Cave breakdown by vadose weathering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osborne R. Armstrong L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Vadose weathering is a significant mechanism for initiating breakdown in caves. Vadose weathering of ore bodies, mineral veins, palaeokarst deposits, non-carbonate keystones and impure, altered or fractured bedrock, which is intersected by caves, will frequently result in breakdown. Breakdown is an active, ongoing process. Breakdown occurs throughout the vadose zone, and is not restricted to large diameter passages, or to cave ceilings. The surfaces of disarticulated blocks are commonly coated, rather than having fresh broken faces, and blocks continue to disintegrate after separating from the bedrock. Not only gypsum, but also hydromagnesite and aragonite are responsible for crystal wedging. It is impossible to study or identify potential breakdown foci by surface surveys alone, in-cave observation and mapping are essential.

  6. Accumulated phenocrysts and origin of feldspar porphyry in the Chanho area, western Yunnan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xing-Wang; Jiang, Neng; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Bao-Lin; Liang, Guang-He; Mao, Qian; Li, Jin-Xiang; Du, Shi-Jun; Ma, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Yong; Qin, Ke-Zhang

    2009-12-01

    The No. 1 feldspar porphyry in the Chanho area, western Yunnan, China is characterized by the development of deformed glomeroporphyritic aggregates (GA) that contain diagnostic gravity settling textures. These textures include interlocking curved grain boundaries caused by compaction, bent twins, and arch-like structures. The GAs are accumulated phenocrysts (AP) and antecrysts. The unstable textural configurations such as extensive penetrative microfractures that are restricted within the AP and fractured cores of zircon grains, all suggest that the GAs are transported fragments of fractured cumulates that formed in a pre-emplacement magma chamber rather than form in situ at the current intrusion site. Compositions of minerals and melt as represented by different mineral aggregates formed at various stages of the magmatic process and their relations to the composition of porphyry bodies in the Chanho area indicate that the porphyritic melt for the No. 1 feldspar porphyry experienced two stages of melt mixing. Pulses of potassic melt flowed into a pre-emplacement magma chamber and mixed with crystallizing dioritic magma containing phenocrysts resulted in the first hybrid alkaline granitic melt. The mixing caused denser phenocrysts to settle and aggregate to form cumulates. Secondly, new dioritic melt was injected into the magma chamber and was mixed with the previously formed hybrid alkaline granitic melt to produce syenitic melt. Geochron data, including U-Pb age of zircon and 39Ar/ 40Ar age of hornblende and oligoclase phenocrysts, indicate that hornblende and oligoclase phenocrysts, as well as the core of zircon grains, were antecrysts that formed in a number of crystallization events between 36.3 and 32.78 Ma. Gravity settling of phenocrysts took place at about 33.1 to 32.78 Ma and melts with deformed GAs were transported upwards and emplaced into the current site at 32 Ma. Results of this research indicate that the No. 1 feldspar porphyry was a shallow

  7. Chemical Weathering on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, Mikhail

    2018-01-01

    Chemical and phase compositions of Venus's surface could reflect history of gas- and fluid-rock interactions, recent and past climate changes, and a loss of water from the Earth's sister planet. The concept of chemical weathering on Venus through gas-solid type reactions has been established in 1960s after the discovery of hot and dense CO2-rich atmosphere inferred from Earth-based and Mariner 2 radio emission data. Initial works suggested carbonation, hydration, and oxidation of exposed igneous rocks and a control (buffering) of atmospheric gases by solid-gas type chemical equilibria in the near-surface lithosphere. Calcite, quartz, wollastonite, amphiboles, and Fe oxides were considered likely secondary minerals. Since the late 1970s, measurements of trace gases in the sub-cloud atmosphere by Pioneer Venus and Venera entry probes and Earth-based infrared spectroscopy doubted the likelihood of hydration and carbonation. The H2O gas content appeared to be low to allow a stable existence of hydrated and a majority of OH-bearing minerals. The concentration of SO2 was too high to allow the stability of calcite and Ca-rich silicates with respect to sulfatization to CaSO4. In 1980s, the supposed ongoing consumption of atmospheric SO2 to sulfates gained support by the detection of an elevated bulk S content at Venera and Vega landing sites. The induced composition of the near-surface atmosphere implied oxidation of ferrous minerals to magnetite and hematite, consistent with the infrared reflectance of surface materials. The likelihood of sulfatization and oxidation has been illustrated in modeling experiments at simulated Venus conditions. Venus's surface morphology suggests that hot surface rocks and fines of mainly mafic composition contacted atmospheric gases during several hundreds of millions years since a global volcanic resurfacing. Some exposed materials could have reacted at higher and lower temperatures in a presence of diverse gases at different altitudinal

  8. Timing of the deglaciation in southern Patagonia: Testing the applicability of K-Feldspar IRSL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomdin, Robin; Murray, Andrew S.; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    2012-01-01

    need evaluation against an absolute chronology. The aim of this project is to investigate the applicability of OSL dating to sediments from southern Patagonia; in particular, we examine the dating potential of K-feldspar IRSL signals. Samples were collected from landforms interpreted as being deposited...... to our individual dose estimates based on the over-dispersion (OD) observed in laboratory gamma dose recovery experiments (22% for small aliquots and 18% for single grains). Then the possible effects of incomplete bleaching and differential fading are examined. For our natural samples we observe...... environmental ODs between 30 and 130% and mean residual doses between ∼30 and 80 Gy. Minimum age models are used to identify the part of the dose population that is most likely to have been well-bleached and results from these models are compared. The models give ages that are consistent with each other...

  9. Pre-treatment of desalination feed seawater by Jordanian Tripoli, Pozzolana and Feldspar: batch experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AIMAN E. AL-RAWAJFEH

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, composites of layered double hydroxide (LDH with three Jordanian natural raw materials: Tripoli (T, Pozzolana (P and Feldspar (F were prepared by co-precipitation and have been used for feed seawater pre-treatment. The data reveals that percent adsorption decreased with increase in initial concentration, but the actual amount of adsorbed ions per unit mass of LDH/T-P-F increased with increase in metal ion concentrations. The values of ΔG were negative and within 21 to 26 kJ/mol, while the values of and ΔS were positive, with ΔH within the range of 0.1 to 25 kJ/mol. The values of ΔH, ΔS and ΔG indicate the favorability of physisorption and show that the LDH/T-P-F composites have a considerable potential as adsorbents for the removal of ions from seawater.

  10. Photoionization of radiation-induced traps in quartz and alkali feldspars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütt, G; Jaek, I; Vasilchenko, V

    2001-01-01

    For the optimization of luminescence dating and dosimetry techniques on the basis of the optically stimulated luminescence, the stimulation spectra of quartz and alkali feldspars were measured in the spectral region of 250-1100 nm using optically stimulated afterglow. Optically stimulated luminescence in all studied spectral regions is induced by the same kind of deep traps, that produce thermoluminescence in the regions of palaeodosimetric peaks for both minerals. The mechanism for photoionization of deep traps was proposed as being due to delocalization of the excited state of the corresponding lattice defects. The excited state overlaps the zone states; i.e. is situated in the conduction band. Because of the high quantum yield of deep electron trap ionization in the UV spectral region, the present aim was to study the possibility of using UV-stimulation for palaeodose reconstruction.

  11. Photoionization of radiation-induced traps in quartz and alkali feldspars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huett, G.; Jaek, I.; Vasilchenko, V.

    2001-01-01

    For the optimization of luminescence dating and dosimetry techniques on the basis of the optically stimulated luminescence, the stimulation spectra of quartz and alkali feldspars were measured in the spectral region of 250-1100 nm using optically stimulated afterglow. Optically stimulated luminescence in all studied spectral regions is induced by the same kind of deep traps, that produce thermoluminescence in the regions of palaeodosimetric peaks for both minerals. The mechanism for photoionization of deep traps was proposed as being due to delocalization of the excited state of the corresponding lattice defects. The excited state overlaps the zone states; i.e. is situated in the conduction band. Because of the high quantum yield of deep electron trap ionization in the UV spectral region, the present aim was to study the possibility of using UV-stimulation for palaeodose reconstruction

  12. Photoionization of radiation-induced traps in quartz and alkali feldspars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huett, G. E-mail: hutt@pdos.gi.ee; Jaek, I.; Vasilchenko, V

    2001-01-15

    For the optimization of luminescence dating and dosimetry techniques on the basis of the optically stimulated luminescence, the stimulation spectra of quartz and alkali feldspars were measured in the spectral region of 250-1100 nm using optically stimulated afterglow. Optically stimulated luminescence in all studied spectral regions is induced by the same kind of deep traps, that produce thermoluminescence in the regions of palaeodosimetric peaks for both minerals. The mechanism for photoionization of deep traps was proposed as being due to delocalization of the excited state of the corresponding lattice defects. The excited state overlaps the zone states; i.e. is situated in the conduction band. Because of the high quantum yield of deep electron trap ionization in the UV spectral region, the present aim was to study the possibility of using UV-stimulation for palaeodose reconstruction.

  13. Partial replacement of the feldspar waste of flat glass ceramics for masses in white

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porto, V.S.; Araujo, A.M.B.; Morais, C.R.S.; Cavalcanti, M.S.L.

    2012-01-01

    In all the industrial production process requires the consumption of raw materials exaggerated the traditional scarcity of incurring the same. To reverse this situation, one of the possible actions is the search for alternative technologies that aim to replace these materials by waste that exhibit similar characteristics. This study aims to verify the possibility of partially replacing feldspar by waste flat glass ceramic mass for white, since this type of waste, when subjected to high temperatures can act as a flux. For this research, initially the raw materials were characterized using the techniques of energy dispersive spectroscopy X-ray (EDX) and X-ray diffraction. Then, test pieces were prepared to be burned at temperatures between 1000 and 1250 ° C, which were submitted to tests of porosity to absorb water. The results are within the standards required by the standards established for ceramic products, which confirms the feasibility of such waste to act as a flux in ceramic white masses. (author)

  14. The dependence of orange-red IRSL decay curves of potassium feldspars on sample temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattahi, Morteza

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the effects of stimulation temperature on the infrared stimulated orange-red (600-650 nm) luminescence emission (orange-red infrared simulated luminescence (IRSL)) in potassium feldspar. Investigations explore the relationship between initial (0-2 s), integral (0-100 s), net initial (0-2 s less background over 2 s), net integral (0-100 s less background over 100 s) and last 2 s of the orange-red IRSL signals obtained for 100 s versus stimulation temperature (20-460 degree sign C) on both unpreheated and preheated samples. In the potassium feldspar sample examined, competition effects, including thermal enhancement, depletion and possibly quenching affect the orange-red IRSL signals measured. Observed effects (e.g., thermal enhancement, thermal activation energy and the decay rate) over the temperature range 20-120 degree sign C may be explained by tunnelling luminescence processes, IR transitions to the conduction band following excitations from ground state of electron trap by acquiring thermal energy from the lattice and or the random-walk band-tail model. Preheating prior to orange-red IRSL and Thermoluminescence (TL) measurements provides evidence that there are both shallow and deep traps responsible for low- and high-temperature orange-red IRSL and TL peaks. The effects of both preheating and IR bleaching on the orange-red thermally stimulated luminescence (red emission during thermoluminescence, RTL) provide evidence that bleached RTL traps have no significant contribution in the production of orange-red IRSL signals

  15. Fabrication and characterization of low temperature co-fired cordierite glass–ceramics from potassium feldspar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianfang; Li, Zhen; Huang, Yanqiu; Li, Fei; Yang, Qiuran

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Low cost cordierite glass–ceramics were fabricated from potassium feldspar. • The glass–ceramics could be highly densified below 950 °C. • The glass–ceramics exhibit extraordinary properties. • The glass–ceramics can be used as LTCC substrates. • The excess SiO 2 improved the microstructure and properties of the glass–ceramics. -- Abstract: Cordierite glass–ceramics for low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrates were fabricated successfully using potassium feldspar as the main raw material. The sintering and crystallization behaviors of the glass–ceramics were investigated by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The results indicated that the glass–ceramics could be highly densified at 850 °C and the cordierite was the main crystalline phase precipitated from the glasses in the temperature range between 900 and 925 °C. The study also evaluated the physical properties including dielectric properties, thermal expansion and flexural strength of the glass–ceramics. The glass–ceramics showed low dielectric constants in the range of 6–8 and low dielectric losses in the range of 0.0025–0.01. The coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) are between 4.32 and 5.48 × 10 −6 K −1 and flexural strength of the glass–ceramics are 90–130 MPa. All of those qualify the glass–ceramics for further research to be used as potential LTCC substrates in the multilayer electronic substrate field. Additionally, the excess SiO 2 acted as a great role in improving the sinterability of the glasses, and the microstructure and dielectric properties of the relevant glass–ceramics

  16. Yellow stimulated luminescence from potassium feldspar: Observations on its suitability for dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauer, T.; Krbetschek, M.; Mauz, B.; Frechen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Yellow stimulated luminescence (Y-OSL) is the light detected from potassium-rich feldspars at 410 nm under stimulation by a yellow light source emitting 590 nm. The investigation of this study aimed at understanding basic luminescence physics of Y-OSL in order to assess the suitability of the technique for dating. The Y-OSL signal properties tested were signal intensity, thermal assistance, thermal stability, sensitivity to daylight and the suitability of a single aliquot regenerative (SAR) protocol to be employed for equivalent dose (D e ) estimation. D e measurements were conducted on samples of Holocene, last glacial and Tertiary age. The tests were undertaken on sedimentary feldspar separates extracted from aeolian, fluvial and coastal deposits. Results from experiments show that the signal intensity increases by measuring Y-OSL at elevated temperature suggesting thermal assistance characteristics similar to infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). The yellow stimulated signal remains unaffected by preheat temperatures up to ∼200 °C suggesting higher thermal stability than the IRSL signal. The Y-OSL signal is less light sensitive than the IRSL signal and D e residuals obtained from modern samples are up to 7 Gy indicating suitability of the technique for ‘older’ and well-bleached sediments. The dose recovery tests successfully recovered the given dose if the specific light sensitivity of Y-OSL is taken into account. For every sample Y-OSL D e values obtained by a single aliquot regenerative dose protocol (SAR) are higher than those obtained by an IRSL SAR approach. From these results we infer high thermal stability and a minimal anomalous fading of the Y-OSL signal. We conclude that Y-OSL has a high potential to date Quaternary sediments that were sufficiently bleached in nature.

  17. Space Weather Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Weather Computational Laboratory is a Unix and PC based modeling and simulation facility devoted to research analysis of naturally occurring electrically...

  18. Study of sensitivity change of OSL signals from quartz and feldspars as a function of preheat temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungner, H.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1994-01-01

    and as a result, the equivalent dose (ED) would be underestimated. A study of sensitivity changes in feldspars and quartz was carried out with emphasis on the effect of preheat and annealing on the OSL signal. Measurement results obtained are presented, and possible elimination of errors in dating caused...

  19. Infrared stimulated luminescence dating of an Eemian (MIS 5e) site in Denmark using K-feldspar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Huot, Sebastian; Murray, Andrew S.

    2011-01-01

    Infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating of K-feldspars may be an alternative to quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating when the quartz OSL signal is too close to saturation or when the quartz luminescence characteristics are unsuitable. In this paper, Eemian (MIS 5e) coastal...

  20. The release of iron-bearing minerals and dissolution of feldspars by heterotrophic bacteria of Bacillus species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štyriaková, I.; Štyriak, I.; Galko, I.; Hradil, David; Bezdička, Petr

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 1 (2003), s. 20-26 ISSN 0862-5468 Grant - others:AV SR(SK) 2/2107/22; GA SR(SK) 73/2000 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : bioleaching * feldspars * Bacillus Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.449, year: 2003

  1. Electrons in feldspar II: A consideration of the influence of conduction band-tail states on luminescence processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, H.R.J.; Ozanyan, K.B.; Wallinga, J.

    2002-01-01

    consider what influence the band tails have on the luminescence properties of feldspar, where electrons travel through the sample prior to recombination. The work highlights the dominant role that 0.04-0.05-eV phonons play in both the luminescence excitation and emission processes of these materials...

  2. Exchange of Na+ and K+ between water vapor and feldspar phases at high temperature and low vapor pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, R.O.

    1976-01-01

    In order to determine whether gas (steam) containing a small amount of dissolved alkali chloride is effective in promoting base exchange of Na+ and K+ among alkali feldspars and coexisting brine or brine plus solid salt, experiments were carried out at 400-700??C and steam densities ranging down to less than 0.05. For bulk compositions rich in potassium, the low pressure results are close to previous high-pressure results in composition of the fluid and coexisting solid phase. However, when the bulk composition is more sodic, alkali feldspars are relatively richer in potassium at low pressure than at high pressure. This behaviour corresponds to enrichment of potassium in the gas phase relative to coexisting brine and precipitation of solid NaCl when the brine plus gas composition becomes moderately sodic. The gas phase is very effective in promoting base exchange between coexisting alkali feldspars at high temperature and low water pressure. This suggests that those igneous rocks which contain coexisting alkali feldspars out of chemical equilibrium either remained very dry during the high-temperature part of their cooling history or that the pore fluid was a gas containing very little potassium relative to sodium. ?? 1976.

  3. Weather and emotional state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasova, Z.

    2010-09-01

    Introduction Given the proven effects of weather on the human organism, an attempt to examine its effects on a psychic and emotional level has been made. Emotions affect the bio-tonus, working ability and concentration, hence their significance in various domains of economic life, such as health care, education, transportation, tourism, etc. Data and methods The research has been made in Sofia City within a period of 8 months, using 5 psychological methods (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Test for Self-assessment of the emotional state (developed by Wessman and Ricks), Test for evaluation of moods and Test "Self-confidence - Activity - Mood" (developed by the specialists from the Military Academy in Saint Petersburg). The Fiodorov-Chubukov's complex-climatic method was used to characterize meteorological conditions because of the purpose to include in the analysis a maximal number of meteorological elements. 16 weather types are defined in dependence of the meteorological elements values according to this method. Abrupt weather changes from one day to another, defined by the same method, were considered as well. Results and discussions The results obtained by t-test show that the different categories of weather lead to changes in the emotional status, which indicates a character either positive or negative for the organism. The abrupt weather changes, according to expectations, have negative effect on human emotions but only when a transition to the cloudy weather or weather type, classified as "unfavourable" has been realized. The relationship between weather and human emotions is rather complicated since it depends on individual characteristics of people. One of these individual psychological characteristics, marked by the dimension "neuroticism", has a strong effect on emotional reactions in different weather conditions. Emotionally stable individuals are more "protected" to the weather influence on their emotions

  4. Luminescence characteristics of quartz and feldspar from tectonically uplifted terraces in Kashmir Basin, Jammu and Kashmir, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaiswal, Manoj K.; Bhat, M.I.; Bali, B.S.; Ahmad, Shabir; Chen, Y.G.

    2009-01-01

    The Kashmir Valley or the Jhelum basin is an intermontane-basin in NW Himalaya bounded by the Pir Panjal Range in the south and southwest and the Great Himalayan Range in the north and northeast. The valley is marked by active major thrust boundaries in its south and southwestern parts. Remote sensing studies and morphometric analysis suggest neo-tectonic activities and the formation of tectonic terraces due to uplift on the major thrust boundaries in NW Himalayas. The quartz from freshly eroded mountain belts is usually found to show very poor luminescence sensitivity and thus not suitable for optical dating. Similar problems occurred with the quartz from the Srinagar Basin. Due to this, feldspar was selected as a natural dose meter for dating tectonically uplifted terraces in an active and dynamic belt of the NW Himalayas. We report here for the first time the luminescence characteristics of quartz and feldspar minerals from the study area. However, feldspar also shows poor luminescence sensitivity, although enough to perform optical dating. Athermal fading was observed in all the feldspar samples, which was corrected using 'g' values; a large scatter was found in the g values, probably due to intermixing of feldspar grains from varying source rock types and also due to poor luminescence sensitivity. An average g value correction to the mean paleodose was found to agree if compared with the thermo-luminescence date of loess deposit dated earlier. The ages show that the terrace formation started taking place at ∼100 ka in the southwestern part of the Jhelum basin and continued with pulses at 50 ka and 11 ka towards the northwestern part.

  5. Fabulous Weather Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Candice; Mogil, H. Michael

    2007-01-01

    Each year, first graders at Kensington Parkwood Elementary School in Kensington, Maryland, look forward to Fabulous Weather Day. Students learn how meteorologists collect data about the weather, how they study wind, temperature, precipitation, basic types/characteristics of clouds, and how they forecast. The project helps the students grow in…

  6. Designing a Weather Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The collection and analysis of weather data is crucial to the location of alternate energy systems like solar and wind. This article presents a design challenge that gives students a chance to design a weather station to collect data in advance of a large wind turbine installation. Data analysis is a crucial part of any science or engineering…

  7. KSC Weather and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Launa; Huddleston, Lisa; Smith, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    This briefing outlines the history of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Weather organization, past research sponsored or performed, current organization, responsibilities, and activities, the evolution of weather support, future technologies, and an update on the status of the buoys located offshore of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and KSC.

  8. Weather and road capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Christian

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents estimations of the effect of bad weather on the observed speed on a Danish highway section; Køge Bugt Motorvejen. The paper concludes that weather, primarily precipitation and snow, has a clear negative effect on speed when the road is not in hypercongestion mode. Furthermore...

  9. Tales of future weather

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazeleger, W.; Van den Hurk, B.J.J.M.; Min, E.; Van Oldenborgh, G.J.; Petersen, A.C.; Stainforth, D.A.; Vasileiadou, E.; Smith, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Society is vulnerable to extreme weather events and, by extension, to human impacts on future events. As climate changes weather patterns will change. The search is on for more effective methodologies to aid decision-makers both in mitigation to avoid climate change and in adaptation to changes. The

  10. Topographic imprint on chemical weathering in deeply weathered soil-mantled landscapes (southern Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacker, Veerle; Schoonejans, Jerome; Ameijeiras-Marino, Yolanda; Opfergelt, Sophie; Minella, Jean

    2017-04-01

    The regolith mantle is defined as the thin layer of unconsolidated material overlaying bedrock that contributes to shape the Earth's surface. The development of the regolith mantle in a landscape is the result of in-situ weathering, atmospheric input and downhill transport of weathering products. Bedrock weathering - the physical and chemical transformations of rock to soil - contributes to the vertical development of the regolith layer through downward propagation of the weathering front. Lateral transport of soil particles, aggregates and solutes by diffusive and concentrated particle and solute fluxes result in lateral redistribution of weathering products over the hillslope. In this study, we aim to expand the empirical basis on long-term soil evolution at the landscape scale through a detailed study of soil weathering in subtropical soils. Spatial variability in chemical mass fluxes and weathering intensity were studied along two toposequences with similar climate, lithology and vegetation but different slope morphology. This allowed us to isolate the topographic imprint on chemical weathering and soil development. The toposequences have convexo-concave slope morphology, and eight regolith profiles were analysed involving the flat upslope, steep midslope and flat toeslope part. Our data show a clear topographic imprint on soil development. Along hillslope, the chemical weathering intensity of the regolith profiles increases with distance from the crest. In contrast to the upslope positions, the soils in the basal concavities develop on in-situ and transported regolith. While the chemical weathering extent on the slope convexities (the upslope profiles) is similar for the steep and gentle toposequence, there is a clear difference in the rate of increase of the chemical weathering extent with distance from the crest. The increase of chemical weathering extent along hillslope is highest for the steep toposequence, suggesting that topography enhances soil particle

  11. Fair weather atmospheric electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R G

    2011-01-01

    Not long after Franklin's iconic studies, an atmospheric electric field was discovered in 'fair weather' regions, well away from thunderstorms. The origin of the fair weather field was sought by Lord Kelvin, through development of electrostatic instrumentation and early data logging techniques, but was ultimately explained through the global circuit model of C.T.R. Wilson. In Wilson's model, charge exchanged by disturbed weather electrifies the ionosphere, and returns via a small vertical current density in fair weather regions. New insights into the relevance of fair weather atmospheric electricity to terrestrial and planetary atmospheres are now emerging. For example, there is a possible role of the global circuit current density in atmospheric processes, such as cloud formation. Beyond natural atmospheric processes, a novel practical application is the use of early atmospheric electrostatic investigations to provide quantitative information on past urban air pollution.

  12. Surface weathering and changes in components of microplastics from estuarine beaches%滨海河口潮滩中微塑料的表面风化和成分变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周倩; 章海波; 周阳; 代振飞; 李远; 付传城; 涂晨; 王文海; 骆永明

    2018-01-01

    .Here,we examine typical estuarine sediments from Shandong Province,east China,that are influenced by intensive human activity.The microplastics are separated from the sediments using an apparatus of continuous flow and floating separation.The microplastics samples are processed to determine the types,morphology and changing composition of microplastics present using a range of advanced microscopic and microanalytical methods.The aim is to understand the weathering and subsequent surface changes in the microplastics under the environmental conditions of estuarine sediments.Optical microscope and scanning electron microscope-energy spectrum (SEM-EDS) analysis shows that foams and pellets,together with fragments,fibers and films,are present in the estuarine sediments.The five shape types of microplastics had different weathering surface morphologies compared to the corresponding large plastic debris from the same sampling sites and to the corresponding commercial plastic products.The surfaces of the commercial products are smooth.The surfaces of plastic debris appear to be slightly broken and aged while the surface of microplastics from the same sites show many more microholes,cracks or protuberances.This indicates that the surfaces of microplastics on the estuarine beaches have been strongly weathered.Scratches,creases,microholes,cracks,either concave or convex and of various shapes and sizes were found on the surfaces of microplastics from the coastal environment,possibly due to mechanical friction,chemical oxidation and/or biological attack.Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT-IR) was used to find oxygen-containing functional groups such as carboxylic acids,aldehydes and esters or ketones on the microplastic surfaces from the tidal flats on the basis of polymer component analysis.The two selected shape types,namely foams and fragments from soft plastic woven bags,had different infrared spectra than their corresponding large plastic debris

  13. Ice nucleation activity of silicates and aluminosilicates in pure water and aqueous solutions – Part 1: The K-feldspar microcline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kumar

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Potassium-containing feldspars (K-feldspars have been considered as key mineral dusts for ice nucleation (IN in mixed-phase clouds. To investigate the effect of solutes on their IN efficiency, we performed immersion freezing experiments with the K-feldspar microcline, which is highly IN active. Freezing of emulsified droplets with microcline suspended in aqueous solutions of NH3, (NH42SO4, NH4HSO4, NH4NO3, NH4Cl, Na2SO4, H2SO4, K2SO4 and KCl, with solute concentrations corresponding to water activities aw  =  0.9–1.0, were investigated by means of a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC. The measured heterogeneous IN onset temperatures, Thet(aw, deviate strongly from ThetΔawhet(aw, the values calculated from the water-activity-based approach (where ThetΔawhet(aw = Tmelt(aw + Δawhet with a constant offset Δawhet with respect to the ice melting point curve. Surprisingly, for very dilute solutions of NH3 and NH4+ salts (molalities ≲1 mol kg−1 corresponding to aw ≳ 0.96, we find IN temperatures raised by up to 4.5 K above the onset freezing temperature of microcline in pure water (Thet(aw = 1 and 5.5 K above ThetΔawhet(aw, revealing NH3 and NH4+ to significantly enhance the IN of the microcline surface. Conversely, more concentrated NH3 and NH4+ solutions show a depression of the onset temperature below ThetΔawhet(aw by as much as 13.5 K caused by a decline in IN ability accompanied with a reduction in the volume fraction of water frozen heterogeneously. All salt solutions not containing NH4+ as cation exhibit nucleation temperatures Thet(aw < ThetΔawhet(aw even at very small solute concentrations. In all these cases, the heterogeneous freezing peak displays a decrease as solute concentration increases. This deviation from Δawhet  =  const. indicates specific chemical interactions between particular solutes and the microcline surface not captured by the water-activity-based approach. One

  14. Changing spatial patterns of evapotranspiration and deep drainage in response to the interactions among impervious surface arrangement, soil characteristics, and weather on a residential parcel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voter, C. B.; Steven, L. I.

    2015-12-01

    The introduction impervious surfaces in urban areas is a key driver of hydrologic change. It is now well understood that the amount of "effective" impervious area directly connected to the storm sewer network is a better indicator of hydrologic behavior than the total amount of impervious area. Most studies in urban hydrology have focused on the relationship between impervious connectivity and stormwater runoff or other surface water flows, with the result that the effect on subsurface flow is not as well understood. In the field, we observe differences in soil moisture availability that are dependent on proximity to impervious features and significant from a root water uptake perspective, which indicates that parcel-scale subsurface and plant water fluxes may also be sensitive to fine-scaled heterogeneity in impervious surface arrangement and connectivity. We use ParFlow with CLM, a watershed model with fully integrated variably-saturated subsurface flow, overland flow, and land-surface processes, to explore the extent to which soil moisture, evapotranspiration, and deep drainage vary under various impervious surface arrangement and soil condition scenarios, as well as under a range of precipitation regimes. We investigate the effect of several impervious surface and soil characteristics, including general lot layout, downspout disconnect, and direction of driveway/sidewalk slope, and soil compaction. We show that that some impervious connectivity schemes transfer more water from impervious areas to pervious ones and promote localized recharge by developing well-defined, fast-moving wetting fronts that are able to penetrate the root zone. Enhanced infiltration is translated more directly to recharge in normal to wet years but partitioned more often to transpiration in dry years, leading to a nonlinear relationship among precipitation, runoff and recharge.

  15. Sun, weather, and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, J.R.; Goldberg, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The general field of sun-weather/climate relationships that is, apparent weather and climate responses to solar activity is introduced and theoretical and experimental suggestions for further research to identify and investigate the unknown casual mechanisms are provided. Topics of discussion include: (1) solar-related correlation factors and energy sources; (2) long-term climate trends; (3) short-term meteorological correlations; (4) miscellaneous obscuring influences; (5) physical processes and mechanisms; (6) recapitulation of sun-weather relationships; and (7) guidelines for experiments. 300 references

  16. Testing the potential of an elevated temperature IRSL signal from K-feldspar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Murray, A.S.; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    2009-01-01

    on laboratory tests (recycling ratio, recuperation, dose recovery) we show that our SAR protocol is suitable for these samples. The observed post-IR IR fading rates (mean g2days = 1.62 ± 0.06%/decade, n = 24; assuming logarithmic fading) are significantly lower than those measured at 50 °C (mean g2days = 3...... the conventional IRSL signal stimulated at 50 °C and detected in the blue–violet region of the spectrum. One of these was the post-IR IR signal in which first an IR bleach is carried out at a low temperature (e.g. 100 s at 50 °C) and a remaining IRSL signal is measured at an elevated temperature (100 s at 225 °C......; detection in the blue–violet region). It is the latter signal that is of interest in this paper. We test such a post-IR IR dating protocol on K-feldspar extracts from a variety of locations and depositional environments and compare the results with those from the conventional IR at 50 °C protocol. Based...

  17. Influence of feldspar containing lithium in the sintering of triaxial ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Camila Felippe de; Strecker, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the properties of a ceramic material based on a triaxial mass composed of clay, quartz and 15 to 30% feldspar, albite or spodumene, has been investigated. Specimen were prepared by uniaxial pressing under 28.5MPa and sintering at temperatures of 1000, 1100 and 1200 deg C, for 1h. The samples were characterized by their linear shrinkage, apparent porosity, apparent density and flexural strength, as well as analysis of the microstructure. The best results were obtained for samples prepared with 30% spodumene and sintered at 1200 deg C, with a shrinkage of 6.4%, density of 2.01g/cm 3 , porosity of 14.3% and flexural strength of 13.4MPa, while samples prepared with albite exhibited shrinkage of 5.8%, density of 1.9g/cm 3 , porosity of 18.9% and strength of 9.8MPa. Therefore, by the substitution of albite by spodumene in the ceramic triaxial mass, lower sintering temperatures may be employed, thus reducing production costs by the lesser energy consumption. (author)(

  18. IR-RF dating of sand-sized K-feldspar extracts: A test of accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buylaert, J.-P.; Jain, M.; Murray, A.S.; Thomsen, K.J.; Lapp, T.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we use a recently developed radioluminescence (RL) attachment to the Risø TL/OSL reader to test the InfraRed-RadioFluorescence (IR-RF) dating method applied to K-feldspar rich extracts from our known-age archive samples. We present experiments to characterise the instrument performance and to test the reproducibility of IR-RF measurements. These experiments illustrate the high sensitivity and dose rate of our RL system, the negligible influence of the turntable movement on IR-RF signals and the effectiveness of the built in 395 nm LED at bleaching IR-RF signals. We measure IR-RF ages on a set of samples with independent age control using a robust analytical method, which is able to detect any possible sensitivity change. Our IR-RF ages do not agree well with the independent age control; the ages of the younger samples (20–45 ka) are significantly over-estimated while the ages of the older samples (∼130 ka) are significantly under-estimated. Experiments are undertaken to investigate this disagreement and our results indicate that they can most likely be explained by 1) the difficulty of defining the correct bleaching level prior to regeneration measurements, 2) signal instability, 3) sensitivity changes between the additive dose and regenerative dose measurements, or a combination of these three factors.

  19. Weather Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Science Communications International (SCI), formerly General Science Corporation, has developed several commercial products based upon experience acquired as a NASA Contractor. Among them are METPRO, a meteorological data acquisition and processing system, which has been widely used, RISKPRO, an environmental assessment system, and MAPPRO, a geographic information system. METPRO software is used to collect weather data from satellites, ground-based observation systems and radio weather broadcasts to generate weather maps, enabling potential disaster areas to receive advance warning. GSC's initial work for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center resulted in METPAK, a weather satellite data analysis system. METPAK led to the commercial METPRO system. The company also provides data to other government agencies, U.S. embassies and foreign countries.

  20. Oil Rig Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather observations taken at offshore platforms along the United States coastlines. The majority are located in oil-rich areas of the Gulf of Mexico, Gulf of...

  1. Waste glass weathering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.

    1994-01-01

    The weathering of glass is reviewed by examining processes that affect the reaction of commercial, historical, natural, and nuclear waste glass under conditions of contact with humid air and slowly dripping water, which may lead to immersion in nearly static solution. Radionuclide release data from weathered glass under conditions that may exist in an unsaturated environment are presented and compared to release under standard leaching conditions. While the comparison between the release under weathering and leaching conditions is not exact, due to variability of reaction in humid air, evidence is presented of radionuclide release under a variety of conditions. These results suggest that both the amount and form of radionuclide release can be affected by the weathering of glass

  2. Cape Kennedy Weather Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitized data taken from original weather observations taken at Cape Kennedy Air Force Station, Florida. Elements recorded are wind speed and direction,...

  3. Winter weather demand considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Winter weather has varied effects on travel behavior. Using 418 survey responses from the Northern Virginia : commuting area of Washington, D.C. and binary logit models, this study examines travel related changes under : different types of winter wea...

  4. NOAA Weather Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    del tiempo incluido. Si eres quieres ser avisado de las advertencias y relojes de día o de noche, un Weather Radio relojes son independientes o basadas en el Condado (parroquia basados en Luisiana), aunque

  5. Space Weather Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of space weather datasets from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and from the World Data Service for Geophysics,...

  6. Daily Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Several different government offices have published the Daily weather maps over its history. The publication has also gone by different names over time. The U.S....

  7. Winter Weather: Indoor Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Extreme Heat Older Adults (Aged 65+) Infants and Children Chronic Medical Conditions Low Income Athletes Outdoor Workers Pets Hot Weather Tips Warning Signs and Symptoms FAQs Social Media How to Stay Cool Missouri Cooling Centers Extreme ...

  8. Winter Weather: Outdoor Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Extreme Heat Older Adults (Aged 65+) Infants and Children Chronic Medical Conditions Low Income Athletes Outdoor Workers Pets Hot Weather Tips Warning Signs and Symptoms FAQs Social Media How to Stay Cool Missouri Cooling Centers Extreme ...

  9. Winter Weather Checklists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Extreme Heat Older Adults (Aged 65+) Infants and Children Chronic Medical Conditions Low Income Athletes Outdoor Workers Pets Hot Weather Tips Warning Signs and Symptoms FAQs Social Media How to Stay Cool Missouri Cooling Centers Extreme ...

  10. Winter Weather: Frostbite

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Extreme Heat Older Adults (Aged 65+) Infants and Children Chronic Medical Conditions Low Income Athletes Outdoor Workers Pets Hot Weather Tips Warning Signs and Symptoms FAQs Social Media How to Stay Cool Missouri Cooling Centers Extreme ...

  11. Mineralogical, micromorphological and geochemical transformations in the initial steps of the weathering process of charnockite from the Caparaó Range, southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Caroline Cibele Vieira; Varajão, Angélica Fortes Drummond Chicarino; Varajão, César Augusto Chicarino; Boulangé, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM-EDS) and Electron Probe micro-analyser (EPMA) and Wavelength-Dispersive Spectroscopy (WDS) were conducted on charnockite from the Caparaó Suite and its alteration cortex to determine the mineralogical, micromorphological and geochemical transformations resulting from the weathering process. The hydrolysis of the charnockite occurred in different stages, in accordance with the order of stability of the minerals with respect to weathering: andesine/orthopyroxene, pargasite and alkali feldspar. The rock modifications had begun with the formation of a layer of incipient alteration due to the percolation of weathering solutions first in the pressure relief fractures and then in cleavage and mineral edges. The iron exuded from ferromagnesian minerals precipitated in the intermineral and intramineral discontinuities. The layer of incipient alteration evolves into an inner cortex where the plagioclase changes into gibbsite by direct alitisation, the ferromagnesian minerals initiate the formation of goethitic boxworks with kaolinitic cores, and the alkali feldspar initiates indirect transformation into gibbsite, forming an intermediate phase of illite and kaolinite. In the outer cortex, mostly traces of alkali feldspar remain, and they are surrounded by goethite and gibbsite as alteromorphics, characterising the formation of the isalteritic horizon that occurs along the slope and explains the bauxitization process at the Caparaó Range, SE Brazil.

  12. Detecting Weather Radar Clutter by Information Fusion With Satellite Images and Numerical Weather Prediction Model Output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøvith, Thomas; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2006-01-01

    A method for detecting clutter in weather radar images by information fusion is presented. Radar data, satellite images, and output from a numerical weather prediction model are combined and the radar echoes are classified using supervised classification. The presented method uses indirect...... information on precipitation in the atmosphere from Meteosat-8 multispectral images and near-surface temperature estimates from the DMI-HIRLAM-S05 numerical weather prediction model. Alternatively, an operational nowcasting product called 'Precipitating Clouds' based on Meteosat-8 input is used. A scale...

  13. Development of cataclastic foliation in deformation bands in feldspar-rich conglomerates of the Rio do Peixe Basin, NE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicchio, Matheus A.; Nogueira, Francisco C. C.; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Souza, Jorge A. B.; Carvalho, Bruno R. B. M.; Bezerra, Francisco H. R.

    2018-02-01

    In this work we describe the deformation mechanisms and processes that occurred during the evolution of cataclastic deformation bands developed in the feldspar-rich conglomerates of the Rio do Peixe Basin, NE Brazil. We studied bands with different deformation intensities, ranging from single cm-thick tabular bands to more evolved clustering zones. The chemical identification of cataclastic material within deformation bands was performed using compositional mapping in SEM images, EDX and XRD analyses. Deformation processes were identified by microstructural analysis and by the quantification of comminution intensity, performed using digital image processing. The deformation bands are internally non homogeneous and developed during five evolutionary stages: (1) moderate grain size reduction, grain rotation and grain border comminution; (2) intense grain size reduction with preferential feldspar fragmentation; (3) formation of subparallel C-type slip zones; (4) formation of S-type structures, generating S-C-like fabric; and (5) formation of C‧-type slip zones, generating well-developed foliation that resembles S-C-C‧-type structures in a ductile environment. Such deformation fabric is mostly imparted by the preferential alignment of intensely comminuted feldspar fragments along thin slip zones developed within deformation bands. These processes were purely mechanical (i.e., grain crushing and reorientation). No clays or fluids were involved in such processes.

  14. Directable weathering of concave rock using curvature estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael D; Farley, McKay; Butler, Joseph; Beardall, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    We address the problem of directable weathering of exposed concave rock for use in computer-generated animation or games. Previous weathering models that admit concave surfaces are computationally inefficient and difficult to control. In nature, the spheroidal and cavernous weathering rates depend on the surface curvature. Spheroidal weathering is fastest in areas with large positive mean curvature and cavernous weathering is fastest in areas with large negative mean curvature. We simulate both processes using an approximation of mean curvature on a voxel grid. Both weathering rates are also influenced by rock durability. The user controls rock durability by editing a durability graph before and during weathering simulation. Simulations of rockfall and colluvium deposition further improve realism. The profile of the final weathered rock matches the shape of the durability graph up to the effects of weathering and colluvium deposition. We demonstrate the top-down directability and visual plausibility of the resulting model through a series of screenshots and rendered images. The results include the weathering of a cube into a sphere and of a sheltered inside corner into a cavern as predicted by the underlying geomorphological models.

  15. Report on the intercomparison run F-1 U and K(Th) in feldspar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The present report deals with a recent intercomparison on the determination of uranium, thorium and potassium in potassium feldspar, carried out in 1976-77 and involving the participation of 20 institutes who returned a total of 196 individual results on three elements. Analytical techniques employed by the participating institutes included gamma spectrometry, emission spectroscopy, atomic absorption, X-ray fluorescence, fluorimetry and neutron activation. Each of these techniques has its own particular weakness: The basic principles of gamma-spectrometric technique for the determination of U, Th and K are well known. It is, however, difficult to determine the low concentrations of radioactive nuclides which can be found in geological materials due to systematic errors arising from non-equilibration of decay chains in the samples and from other sources including calibration. Determination of uranium in geological materials by non-destructive neutron activation analysis also has some problems. Elements such as Th, Ta, Pt, Ru, Zn and Ba when irradiated in a nuclear reactor with thermal and epithermal neutrons yield radioactive isotopes, the gamma rays of which interfere with those used in uranium determination. Detection limits for three elements U, Th and K for thermal neutron activation have been reported as 0.7, 1.0 and 10 ppb respectively, however, this seems over-optimistic to expect in real-life situations. Measurement of delayed neutrons and fission track methods for uranium and thorium also have interference problems. Fluorimetry is a suitable method for uranium at low concentrations (down to 0.1 ppm) but one has to take care to overcome quenching by removing, or at least diluting, interfering elements. The determination of some important elements in geochemical samples is often difficult because of their small concentration as well as of the presence of interfering matrix elements in the samples. Some systematic differences seem to exist between the methods

  16. Chemical Zoning of Feldspars in Lunar Granitoids: Implications for the Origins of Lunar Silicic Magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, R. D; Simon, J. I.; Alexander, C.M. O'D.; Wang, J.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z..

    2014-01-01

    Fine-scale chemical and textural measurements of alkali and plagioclase feldspars in the Apollo granitoids (ex. Fig. 1) can be used to address their petrologic origin(s). Recent findings suggest that these granitoids may hold clues of global importance, rather than of only local significance for small-scale fractionation. Observations of morphological features that resemble silicic domes on the unsampled portion of the Moon suggest that local, sizable net-works of high-silica melt (>65 wt % SiO2) were present during crust-formation. Remote sensing data from these regions suggest high concentrations of Si and heat-producing elements (K, U, and Th). To help under-stand the role of high-silica melts in the chemical differentiation of the Moon, three questions must be answered: (1) when were these magmas generated?, (2) what was the source material?, and (3) were these magmas produced from internal differentiation. or impact melting and crystallization? Here we focus on #3. It is difficult to produce high-silica melts solely by fractional crystallization. Partial melting of preexisting crust may therefore also have been important and pos-sibly the primary mechanism that produced the silicic magmas on the Moon. Experimental studies demonstrate that partial melting of gabbroic rock under mildly hydrated conditions can produce high-silica compositions and it has been suggested by that partial melting by basaltic underplating is the mechanism by which high-silica melts were produced on the Moon. TEM and SIMS analyses, coordinated with isotopic dating and tracer studies, can help test whether the minerals in the Apollo granitoids formed in a plutonic setting or were the result of impact-induced partial melting. We analyzed granitoid clasts from 3 Apollo samples: polymict breccia 12013,141, crystalline-matrix breccia 14303,353, and breccia 15405,78

  17. Effect of infiltrated water on rheology of plagioclase feldspar under lower crustal condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, M.; Muto, J.; Koizumi, S.; Nagahama, H.

    2016-12-01

    Fluids in the deep crust have an important role in deformation of lithosphere and seismicity. In this study, we performed deformation experiments to reveal rheological properties of plagioclase feldspars as a main constituent of crustal materials with infilitrated water. Axial compression tests on synthetic polycrystalline anorthite (An) were performed in a Griggs-type deformation apparatus at temparature of 900 °C, strain rates of roughly about 10-5 s-1 and various confining pressures of 0.8-1.4 GPa. Distilled water was added on samples before tests. Times for infiltration of water into samples were changed to investigate the variation of strength associated with diffusion of water. Strengths of wet An tended to decrease with infiltration time or strain magnitude. If other conditions such as temperature, time and strain being the same, strengths increase with confining pressures. Recovered samples show that deformation was concentrated in the lower part of samples. Differential stresses were significantly lower than predicted values by a previous flow law for wet An obtained by low pressure gas apparatus ( 0.4 GPa, Rybacki et al., 2006). This implies that the effect of water on mechanical behavior in higher pressure might be larger than those predicted by lower pressure experiments. Ideal water concentration and strength profile of internal of samples were estimated by one-dimensional model of grain boundary diffusion. Estimated strength of internal part of samples was significant higher than measured stresses. There is possibility that cataclastic flow partially occurred in samples. In addition, deformation-enhanced fluid flow probably occurred. In conclusion, strength of wet An depends on water infiltration time, strain magnitude and confining pressure. The results suggest that the strength of fluid-rich regions in the lower crust becomes lower than that predicted by previous studies.

  18. 44/40Ca and 87Sr/86Sr isotopes as tracers of silicate weathering in small catchments of the Massif Central, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Négrel, Philippe; Guerrot, Catherine; Millot, Romain; Petelet-Giraud, Emmanuelle; Bullen, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    We present calcium stable isotope and strontium radiogenic isotope data for soils and sediments developed on volcanic and igneous rocks forming small catchments in the Massif Central (France). Measurements of 44/40Ca isotope ratios (44/40Ca measured by the double spike method on TIMS and normalized to the value for seawater Ca in delta units) in rocks, sediments and soils from silicate catchments (e.g. granite and basalts) together with 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios permit an examination of the relationships of these isotope systematics during weathering of silicate rocks. We have analysed the granite, weathered granite (arene) and saprolite, sediment and soil overlying the granite on one hand and the basanite, sediment and soil overlying the basanite on the other. The main bedrock in the volcanic zone (e.g. Allanche catchment) is 11 to 2.5 Ma basanite (nephelinitic to leucitic basalts) having SiO2 between 41-45 wt. %, Na2O + K2O bank have 87Sr/86Sr ratios greater than that of the arene with values increasing in the sediment from the surface down to soil. The 87Sr/86Sr vs. Rb/Sr variation observed in the volcanic area likewise confirms the weathering of low 87Sr/86Sr, low Rb/Sr phases in the bedrock, and there is a linear increase in 87Sr/86Sr and Rb/Sr ratios from those in the sediment up to the values observed in the soils. In the volcanic area, the basanite bedrock has 44/40Ca = -0.94 ± 0.05‰ (n = 7), while the soils and sediments have 44/40Ca of -0.75 to -1.13‰ and -0.79 to -1.01‰, respectively. These results suggest that Ca isotopes are not strongly fractionated during weathering of the basalt. The granite whole-rock has 44/40Ca of -1.29‰, while the soil and sediments have 44/40Ca of -1.93 to -2.07‰ and -1.98 to -2.81‰, respectively, with values decreasing as the Ca content decreases. The 44/40Ca ratios of arene, soil and sediment are similar to or less than that of K- feldspar, reflecting complete loss of the relatively heavy Ca from plagioclase and

  19. Casebook on application for weather

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    This book introduces the excellent cases on application using weather at the industry, research center and public office. It lists the names and application cases in 2008 and 2009, which includes research on decease in risk by weather in the industry by Sam sung institute of safety and environment, service on weather information for people by KT, application with weather information in the flight by Korean air, use on weather information for prevention of disasters by Masan city hall, upgrade for business with weather marketing, center for river forecast in NOAA and the case using weather management for high profit margins.

  20. Introduction to CAUSES: Description of Weather and Climate Models and Their Near-Surface Temperature Errors in 5 day Hindcasts Near the Southern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcrette, C. J.; Van Weverberg, K.; Ma, H.-Y.; Ahlgrimm, M.; Bazile, E.; Berg, L. K.; Cheng, A.; Cheruy, F.; Cole, J.; Forbes, R.; Gustafson, W. I.; Huang, M.; Lee, W.-S.; Liu, Y.; Mellul, L.; Merryfield, W. J.; Qian, Y.; Roehrig, R.; Wang, Y.-C.; Xie, S.; Xu, K.-M.; Zhang, C.; Klein, S.; Petch, J.

    2018-03-01

    We introduce the Clouds Above the United States and Errors at the Surface (CAUSES) project with its aim of better understanding the physical processes leading to warm screen temperature biases over the American Midwest in many numerical models. In this first of four companion papers, 11 different models, from nine institutes, perform a series of 5 day hindcasts, each initialized from reanalyses. After describing the common experimental protocol and detailing each model configuration, a gridded temperature data set is derived from observations and used to show that all the models have a warm bias over parts of the Midwest. Additionally, a strong diurnal cycle in the screen temperature bias is found in most models. In some models the bias is largest around midday, while in others it is largest during the night. At the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, the model biases are shown to extend several kilometers into the atmosphere. Finally, to provide context for the companion papers, in which observations from the SGP site are used to evaluate the different processes contributing to errors there, it is shown that there are numerous locations across the Midwest where the diurnal cycle of the error is highly correlated with the diurnal cycle of the error at SGP. This suggests that conclusions drawn from detailed evaluation of models using instruments located at SGP will be representative of errors that are prevalent over a larger spatial scale.

  1. Iron isotopic fractionation during continental weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantle, Matthew S.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2003-10-01

    The biological activity on continents and the oxygen content of the atmosphere determine the chemical pathways through which Fe is processed at the Earth's surface. Experiments have shown that the relevant chemical pathways fractionate Fe isotopes. Measurements of soils, streams, and deep-sea clay indicate that the {sup 56}Fe/{sup 54}Fe ratio ({delta}{sup 56}Fe relative to igneous rocks) varies from +1{per_thousand} for weathering residues like soils and clays, to -3{per_thousand} for dissolved Fe in streams. These measurements confirm that weathering processes produce substantial fractionation of Fe isotopes in the modern oxidizing Earth surface environment. The results imply that biologically-mediated processes, which preferentially mobilize light Fe isotopes, are critical to Fe chemistry in weathering environments, and that the {delta}{sup 56}Fe of marine dissolved Fe should be variable and negative. Diagenetic reduction of Fe in marine sediments may also be a significant component of the global Fe isotope cycle. Iron isotopes provide a tracer for the influence of biological activity and oxygen in weathering processes through Earth history. Iron isotopic fractionation during weathering may have been smaller or absent in an oxygen-poor environment such as that of the early Precambrian Earth.

  2. Sorption of Eu(III) at feldspar/water interface. Effects of pH, organic matter, counter ions, and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ping; Liang, Jianjun; Fan, Qiaohui [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China). Key Lab. of Petroleum Resources Research; Wu, Hanyu [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China). Key Lab. of Petroleum Resources Research; Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Lab.; Yin, Zhuoxin; Pan, Duoqiang; Wu, Wangsuo [Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Lab.; Xu, Di [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China). State Key Lab. of Lake Science and Environment

    2017-07-01

    The sorption of Eu(III) on potassium feldspar (K-feldspar) was studied under various physicochemical conditions such as pH, temperature, counter ions and organic matter. The results showed that the sorption of Eu(III) on K-feldspar significantly increased with the increase of pH, and high Eu(III) concentration can inhibit such immobility to some extent. The presence of humic acid (HA) can increase the sorption of Eu(III) on K-feldspar in low pH range; while inhibit to a large extent under alkaline conditions. It is very interesting that at pH ∝6.5, high ionic strength can promote the sorption of Eu(III) on K-feldspar in the presence of HA. In contrast, Eu(III) sorption was restricted obviously by NaCl in the absence of HA. The sorption procedure was involved with ion exchange and/or outer-sphere complexation as well as inner-sphere complexation. The presence of F{sup -} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} dramatically enhanced Eu(III) sorption on K-feldspar, whereas both SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} had negative effects on Eu(III) sorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated that Eu(III) tended to form hydrolysates at high initial concentration (3 x 10{sup -4} mol/L) and high temperature (338 K).

  3. Weather derivatives: Business hedge instrument from weather risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Bojan S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the late 1990s, a new financial market was developed - a market for weather derivatives, so that the risk managers could hedge their exposure to weather risk. After a rather slow start, the weather derivatives market had started to grow rapidly. Risk managers could no longer blame poor financial results on the weather. Weather risk could now be removed by hedging procedure. This paper will explain briefly what the weather derivatives are and will point out at some of the motives for use of derivatives. Thereafter we will look at the history of the weather risk market, how the weather derivatives market has developed in recent years and also who are the current and potential players in the weather derivatives market.

  4. Impact of weathering on slope stability in soft rock mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Miščević

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Weathering of soft rocks is usually considered as an important factor in various fields such as geology, engineering geology, mineralogy, soil and rock mechanics, and geomorphology. The problem of stability over time should be considered for slopes excavated in soft rocks, in case they are not protected against weathering processes. In addition to disintegration of material on slope surface, the weathering also results in shear strength reduction in the interior of the slope. Principal processes in association with weathering are discussed with the examples of marl hosted on flysch formations near Split, Croatia.

  5. Weather In Some Islands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王良华

    2007-01-01

    There are four seasons in a year. When spring comes, the weather is mild(温和的). Summer comes after spring. Summer is the hottest season of the year. Autumn follows summer. It is the best season of the year. Winter is the coldest season of the year. Some islands(岛) have their own particular(特别的) seasons because their weather is very much affected(影响) by the oceans(海洋) around them. In Britain, winter is not very cold and summer is not very hot.

  6. Geochemical interpretation of the Precambrian basement and overlying Cambrian sandstone on Bornholm, Denmark: Implications for the weathering history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Lingli; Friis, Henrik; Yang, Tian

    2017-01-01

    show a depletion of major elements in the following order: Na N Ca N Mg N Si; Al and Ti are immobile and stay constant; K shows sample dependent enrichment or depletion; Fe is slightly enriched. The Cambrian sandstone overlying the basement in the Borggård borehole, assigned to the Gadeby Member...... but lost most of the plagioclase. The LSF has a comparable weathering history (CIA = 63–73), but the plagioclase is better preserved (PIA = 65–78). The significant variation of weathering rates of plagioclase and K-feldspar in the basement granite and the provenance of sandstone from the Borggård borehole...... are likely due to the different permeability developed within the internal crystal structures, a Ca- rich plagioclase original composition of the plagioclase, and the occurrence of weathering in a very humid climate. K metasomatism occurred in the basement granite and sandstone in both the Borggård and the G...

  7. Tibetan tectonics from 40Ar/39Ar analysis of a single K-feldspar sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, F.M.; Lovera, O.M.; Harrison, T.M.; Copeland, P.

    1991-01-01

    40 Ar/ 39 Ar data on an alkali feldspar sample from the Quxu pluton, Gangdese batholith, southern Tibet, allow a detailed assessment of unroofing and uplift history between 35 and 18 Ma. The 39 Ar Arrhenius plot for this sample shows departures from a linear relationship between the effective diffusion parameter, log(D/r 2 ), and reciprocal temperature, which we interpret to be the result of a distribution of distinct diffusion-domain sizes. We use an alternative way of plotting the Arrhenius data that exhibits domain size versus cumulative % 39 Ar released during step heating. The 40 Ar/ 39 Ar age spectrum of the sample has features, such as local age plateaus, that are most easily explained in terms of the distinctive closure age of particular domains. The fact that the same distribution of diffusion-domain sizes explains both the Arrhenius data and the age spectrum is an indication that the diffusion properties operating in the laboratory are those of the sample while it was in its natural environment. Modelling of the age spectrum with a distribution of domain sizes results in the recovery of a continuous cooling-history segment rather than a single time-temperature datum. We demonstrate the robustness of the cooling-curve determination by showing the large misfits to the age spectrum that arise from relatively small changes in the cooling history. The best-fit cooling curve for the Quxu sample shows a decreasing rate of cooling in the time interval 35-18 Ma, followed by a very rapid cooling beginning at about 18 Ma. We have used a thermal model for the conductive cooling of an unroofing pluton to estimate the rate of unroofing required to explain the Quxu cooling curve, and find that in the 35-20 Ma time interval, the primary control of the thermal evolution is the conductive loss of magmatic heat with little or no unroofing (unroofing rates of approximately 0.05 mm/yr) followed by a brief period (<5 Ma) of very rapid unroofing with rates of order 2 mm

  8. Dress for the Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen, Nicole J.; Smetana, Lara K.

    2010-01-01

    "If someone were traveling to our area for the first time during this time of year, what would you tell them to bring to wear? Why?" This question was used to engage students in a guided-inquiry unit about how climate differs from weather. In this lesson, students explored local and national data sets to give "travelers" advice…

  9. Climate, weather, and hops

    Science.gov (United States)

    As climate and weather become more variable, hop growers face increased uncertainty in making decisions about their crop. Given the unprecedented nature of these changes, growers may no longer have enough information and intuitive understanding to adequately assess the situation and evaluate their m...

  10. Weather and Flight Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Scott

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews some of the weather hazards involved with flight testing. Some of the hazards reviewed are: turbulence, icing, thunderstorms and winds and windshear. Maps, pictures, satellite pictures of the meteorological phenomena and graphs are included. Also included are pictures of damaged aircraft.

  11. Weatherization Works: Weatherization Assistance Program Close-Up Fact Sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The United States demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes

  12. Filling material for a buried cavity in a collapse area using light-weighted foam and active feldspar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jin Woo; Lee, Ju-hyoung; Kim, Sung-Wook; Choi, Eun-Kyeong

    2017-04-01

    Concrete which is generally used as filling material for a buried cavity has very high strength but significantly high self-load is considered its disadvantage. If it is used as filling material, the second collapse due to additional load, causing irreversible damage. If light-weighted foam and active feldspar are used to solve this problem, the second collapse can be prevented by reducing of self-load of filling material. In this study, the specimen was produced by mixing light-weighted foam, active feldspar and cement, and changes in the density, unconfined compressive strength and hydraulic conductivity were analyzed. Using the light-weighted foam could enable the adjustment of density of specimen between 0.5 g/cm3 and 1.7 g/cm3, and if the mixing ratio of the light-weighted foam increases, the specimen has more pores and smaller range of cross-sectional area. It is confirmed that it has direct correlation with the density, and if the specimen has more pores, the density of the specimen is lowered. The density of the specimen influences the unconfined compressive strength and the hydraulic conductivity, and it was also confirmed that the unconfined compressive strength could be adjusted between 0.6 MPa and 8 MPa and the hydraulic conductivity could be adjusted between 10-9cm/sec and 10-3cm/sec. These results indicated that we can adjust unconfined compressive strength and hydraulic conductivity of filling materials by changing the mixing amount of lightweight-weighted foam according to the requirements of the field condition. Keywords: filling material, buried cavity, light-weighted foam, feldspar Acknowledgement This research was supported by a Grant from a Strategic Research Project (Horizontal Drilling and Stabilization Technologies for Urban Search and Rescue (US&R) Operation) funded by the Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology.

  13. Combining infrared- and green-laser stimulation sources in single-grain luminescence measurements of feldspar and quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    A system designed for measurement of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from individual sand-sized mineral grains has been constructed. Previously, this system was equipped only with a green laser emitting at 532 run, but now an infrared (IR) laser at 830 run has been added. It is now...... possible to interchangeably use the two laser sources for optical stimulation. This is especially valuable for the measurement of feldspars. The power density using the IR laser at the grain is similar to500 W cm(-2), and stimulation for 1 s reduces the OSL signal to near background level. Initial results...

  14. Investigations of the post-IR IRSL protocol applied to single K-feldspar grains from fluvial sediment samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nian, Xiaomei; Bailey, Richard M.; Zhou, Liping

    2012-01-01

    The post-IR IRSL protocol with single K-feldspar grains was applied to three samples taken from a fluvial sedimentary sequence at the archaeological site of the Dali Man, Shaanxi Province, China. K-feldspar coarse grains were extracted for measurement. Approximately 30–40% of the grains were sufficiently bright to measure, and after application of rejection criteria based on signal strength, recuperation, recycling ratio and saturation dose, ∼10–15% of the grains were used for D e calculation. The relationship of signal decay rate and form of D e (t) with the recovery dose were investigated. The dose recovery ratios of the samples after initial bleaching with the four different light sources were within uncertainties of unity. No anomalous fading was observed. The over-dispersion of the recovered dose and D e values were similar, suggesting neither incomplete resetting of the post-IR IRSL signals nor spatially heterogeneous dose rates significantly affected the natural dose estimates. The values of D e obtained with the single K-feldspar grain post-IR IRSL protocol were in the range ∼400–490 Gy. Combining all of the measured single-grain signals for each of the individual samples (into a ‘synthetic single aliquot’) increased the D e estimates to the range ∼700–900 Gy, suggesting that the grains screened-out by the rejection criteria may have the potential to cause palaeodose over-estimation, although this finding requires a more extensive investigation. Thermally transferred signals were found in the single K-feldspar grains post-IR IRSL protocol, and the proportion of thermally transferred signal to test-dose OSL signal (stimulation at 290 °C) from the natural dose was higher than from regenerative doses, and the proportion was grain- and dose-dependent. As such, TT-post-IR IRSL signals at 290 °C have the potential to cause dose underestimation, although this may be reduced by using larger test-dose irradiations. Our study demonstrates

  15. Synthetic weather generator SYNTOR: Implementing improvements in precipitation generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infrequent high precipitation events produce a disproportionally large amount of the annual surface runoff, soil erosion, nutrient movement, and watershed sediment yield. Numerical simulation of these watershed processes often lack sufficiently long weather data records to adequately capture the sto...

  16. Severe Weather Data Inventory (SWDI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Severe Weather Data Inventory (SWDI) is an integrated database of severe weather records for the United States. SWDI enables a user to search through a variety...

  17. Geography and Weather: Mountain Meterology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogil, H. Michael; Collins, H. Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Provided are 26 ideas to help children explore the effects of mountains on the weather. Weather conditions in Nepal and Colorado are considered separately. Nine additional sources of information are listed. (CW)

  18. Surface Weather Observation 1001 Forms (Keyed)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In order to fill in the observation gap prior to the time when commercial aviation began in the U.S., The NCDC Climate Data Modernization Program (CDMP) retrieved...

  19. NCDC Surface Weather Records Inventory - 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Alphabetic listing by state of all the aviation, synoptic, supplementary airways, and similar observations on file at NCDC from the beginning of the record through...

  20. Hydration of dicalcium silicate and diffusion through neo-formed calcium-silicate-hydrates at weathered surfaces control the long-term leaching behaviour of basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steelmaking slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Douglas I; Bray, Andrew W; Udoma, Gideon; Hobson, Andrew J; Mayes, William M; Rogerson, Mike; Burke, Ian T

    2018-04-01

    Alkalinity generation and toxic trace metal (such as vanadium) leaching from basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel slag particles must be properly understood and managed by pre-conditioning if beneficial reuse of slag is to be maximised. Water leaching under aerated conditions was investigated using fresh BOF slag at three different particle sizes (0.5-1.0, 2-5 and 10 × 10 × 20 mm blocks) and a 6-month pre-weathered block. There were several distinct leaching stages observed over time associated with different phases controlling the solution chemistry: (1) free-lime (CaO) dissolution (days 0-2); (2) dicalcium silicate (Ca 2 SiO 4 ) dissolution (days 2-14) and (3) Ca-Si-H and CaCO 3 formation and subsequent dissolution (days 14-73). Experiments with the smallest size fraction resulted in the highest Ca, Si and V concentrations, highlighting the role of surface area in controlling initial leaching. After ~2 weeks, the solution Ca/Si ratio (0.7-0.9) evolved to equal those found within a Ca-Si-H phase that replaced dicalcium silicate and free-lime phases in a 30- to 150-μm altered surface region. V release was a two-stage process; initially, V was released by dicalcium silicate dissolution, but V also isomorphically substituted for Si into the neo-formed Ca-Si-H in the alteration zone. Therefore, on longer timescales, the release of V to solution was primarily controlled by considerably slower Ca-Si-H dissolution rates, which decreased the rate of V release by an order of magnitude. Overall, the results indicate that the BOF slag leaching mechanism evolves from a situation initially dominated by rapid hydration and dissolution of primary dicalcium silicate/free-lime phases, to a slow diffusion limited process controlled by the solubility of secondary Ca-Si-H and CaCO 3 phases that replace and cover more reactive primary slag phases at particle surfaces.

  1. Central American Flying Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    CEILING; VISIBILITY; WIND, PRECIPITATIDNc’--." HAZE, SMOKE, TEMPORALE ; MOUNTAIN WAVE; MILITARY METEOROLOGY. 4k- / ’A. bstract; Asummary of~ing weather...1 The " Temporale " ....................................1 Mountain Waves ......................I...............1 Severe Thunderstorms...charts. The for any part of Central America lies in having: Tactical Pilota.e Chart series , produced by the Df -.nse Mapping Agency, is * A good, basic

  2. World Weather Extremes. Revision,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    Ext r-,ncs, Weekl Weather and Crop Bull, Vol. 43, No. 9, pp. 6-8, 27 Feb 56. 21A. ntoli, La Piu Alta Temperatura del Mondo," [The HiLhest Temperi... Temperatura in Libia", Boll Soc Geogr Ita’iana, ser. 8, Vol. 7, pp. 59-71, 1954. 23J. Gentilli, "Libyan Climate", Geograph Rev, V0 l. 45, No. 2, p. 269 S" Apr

  3. A comparative study of the luminescence characteristics of polymineral fine grains and coarse-grained K-, and Na-rich feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsukamoto, Sumiko; Jain, Mayank; Murray, Andrew S.

    2012-01-01

    for K-feldspar samples, when a preheat temperature of 250 °C for 60 s is used. After preheating to a higher temperature (320 °C for 60 s) all samples show a TL reduction around 410 °C in the blue detection window. Pulse annealing experiments for IRSL and pIRIR signals for preheats between 320 °C and 500...... °C indicate that the signal stabilities are similar among the different feldspar types, when a higher preheat temperature (>320 °C) is used. Thermal activation energies for IRSL and pIRIR signals are largest in K-feldspar and smallest in polymineral fine grains, in both blue and UV detection windows...... for both fast time-resolved (TR) and continuous wave (CW) signals. These results suggest that IRSL and pIRIR signals in polymineral fine grains originate mainly from Na-feldspar grains; these signals are less thermally stable than those from K-feldspar, but a more stable signal (presumably from K...

  4. Rare earth element geochemistry of feldspars: examples from Fe-oxide Cu-Au systems in the Olympic Cu-Au Province, South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontonikas-Charos, Alkis; Ciobanu, Cristiana L.; Cook, Nigel J.; Ehrig, Kathy; Krneta, Sasha; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.

    2018-04-01

    Rare earth element (REE) fractionation trends in feldspars are reported from Olympic Dam (including Wirrda Well and Phillip's Ridge) and Cape Donington (Port Lincoln), for comparison with two other igneous-hydrothermal terranes within the eastern Gawler Craton: Moonta-Wallaroo and Hillside. The case studies were selected as they represent 1590 Ma Hiltaba Suite and/or 1845 - 1810 Ma Donington Suite granites, and, aside from Cape Donington, are associated with Mesoproterozoic iron-oxide copper gold (IOCG)-type mineralization. Both plagioclase and alkali feldspar were analyzed within selected samples with the purpose of constraining and linking changes in REE concentrations and fractionation trends in feldspars to local and whole-rock textures and geochemistry. Two unique, reproducible fractionation trends were obtained for igneous plagioclase and alkali feldspars, distinguished from one another by light rare earth element enrichment, Eu-anomalies and degrees of fractionation (e.g. La/Lu slopes). Results for hydrothermal albite and K-feldspar indicate that REE concentrations and fractionation trends are generally inherited from igneous predecessors, however in some instances, significant amounts of REE appear to have been lost to the fluid. These results may have critical implications for the formation of world-class IOCG systems, in which widespread alkali metasomatism plays a key role by altering the physical and chemical properties of the host rocks during early stages of IOCG formation, as well as trapping trace elements (including REE).

  5. Use of rice straw ash as substitute of feldspar in triaxial porcelain; Cenizas del tamo de arroz como substituto del feldespato en la fabricacion de ceramica blanca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvaro Guzman, A.; Silverio Delvasto, A.; Enrique Sanchez, V.; Vicente Amigo, B.

    2013-02-01

    The substitution of raw materials for processing high energy consumption materials by agricultural and agro-industrial wastes causes a positive impacts on the environment preservation. One of these residues is rice straw, which according to FAO estimation, its annual production is about 600 million tons. In this research was studied the use of rice straw ash as substitute of the use of feldspar in the white ware production. Clay-feldspar-quartz porcelains are referred to as triaxial white ware. Specimens of semidry triaxial mixtures, where feldspar was substituted for different percentages of CTA, were prepared by uniaxial pressing, followed by drying and sintering. Physical and mechanical properties of sintered bodies were evaluated. The porosity and the compressive strength of the fired pieces do increase with additions of up to 75% of CTA in substitution of feldspar. Their mineralogical phases were determined by DRX and SEM; grains of quartz, and needles of primary and secondary mullite were identified in a vitreous phase. It was concluded that feldspar can be substituted positively by CTA in white ware pastes. (Author) 22 refs.

  6. Influence of diopside: feldspar ratio in ceramic reactions assessed by quantitative phase analysis (X-ray diffraction - Rietveld method)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmickas, L.; Andrade, F.R.D.; Szabo, G.A.J.; Motta, J.F.M.; Cabral Junior, M.

    2013-01-01

    White ceramics were produced with raw mixtures prepared with varying proportions of diopside-rich rock (0 to 20 wt.%) and potassic feldspar (40 to 20 wt.%), and fixed proportions of kaolinite (40 wt.%) and quartz (20 wt.%), fired in a temperature range from 1170 to 1210 deg C. The phases identified in the experimental ceramics were quartz, anorthite, mullite and glass, and their relative mass proportions were determined by X-ray diffraction (Rietveld method). The addition of diopside as a partial substitute for potassic feldspar causes the formation of a calcium silicate, analogous of the natural anorthite (CaSi 2 Al 2 O 8 ) in the ceramics, with proportional reduction in its glass and mullite contents. Water absorption and porosity of the ceramic bodies clearly decrease with increasing firing temperature, while the effect of the raw mixture composition on the physical and mechanical properties of the ceramics is less evident. Diopside-rich rock has low iron content (1.5 wt.% Fe 2 O 3 ) and, therefore, promotes white burning. (author)

  7. Luminescence dating of the PASADO core 5022-1D from Laguna Potrok Aike (Argentina) using IRSL signals from feldspar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Murray, A.S.; Gebhardt, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    We have measured and tested a luminescence chronology for the PASADO core 5022-1D from the maar lake of Laguna Potrok Aike. Because of unsuitable quartz OSL characteristics, sand-sized K-feldspar extracts were chosen as a dosimeter and the dose was measured using a post-IR IRSL (pIRIR290......) measurement protocol. Using this approach we were able to access a stable signal and thus avoid the ubiquitous problem of feldspar signal instability. Extensive laboratory tests show that the chosen pIRIR290 protocol is applicable to these samples. We also developed a new criterion based on known relative...... or stratigraphy; the resulting age–depth profile is self-consistent, increases smoothly with depth and is in agreement with independent age control based on volcanic ash layers (Reclús, Mt Burney and Hudson tephras) at the top and middle of the core. Our new luminescence chronology suggests that the 5022-1D core...

  8. Influence of diopside: feldspar ratio in ceramic reactions assessed by quantitative phase analysis (X-ray diffraction - Rietveld method)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmickas, L.; Andrade, F.R.D.; Szabo, G.A.J. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IGc/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Mineralogia e Geotecnia; Motta, J.F.M.; Cabral Junior, M., E-mail: lukuzmickas@gmail.com, E-mail: dias@usp.br, E-mail: gajszabo@usp.b, E-mail: motta.jf@gmail.com, E-mail: marsis@ipt.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Secao de Recursos Minerais e Tecnologia Ceramica

    2013-04-15

    White ceramics were produced with raw mixtures prepared with varying proportions of diopside-rich rock (0 to 20 wt.%) and potassic feldspar (40 to 20 wt.%), and fixed proportions of kaolinite (40 wt.%) and quartz (20 wt.%), fired in a temperature range from 1170 to 1210 deg C. The phases identified in the experimental ceramics were quartz, anorthite, mullite and glass, and their relative mass proportions were determined by X-ray diffraction (Rietveld method). The addition of diopside as a partial substitute for potassic feldspar causes the formation of a calcium silicate, analogous of the natural anorthite (CaSi{sub 2}Al{sub 2}O{sub 8}) in the ceramics, with proportional reduction in its glass and mullite contents. Water absorption and porosity of the ceramic bodies clearly decrease with increasing firing temperature, while the effect of the raw mixture composition on the physical and mechanical properties of the ceramics is less evident. Diopside-rich rock has low iron content (1.5 wt.% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and, therefore, promotes white burning. (author)

  9. Origin of K-feldspar megacrystals from Monte das Gameleiras granite, Rio Grande do Norte/Paraiba, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindo, A.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Monte das Gameleiras granitic batholith is located at the boundary between Rio Grande do Norte and Paraiba States in northeastern Brazil. Two main types of granitic rocks have been identified in this batholith. Dioritic inclusions occur in both of them. The predominating type is an extremely porphyritic syenogranite, which is intruded by a fine-grained monzogranite. K-feldspar megacrysts are found in both porphyritic granite and dioritic inclusions. The megacrysts long axes average around 4 cm, reaching up to 9 or 10 cm. The megacrysts are euhedral, zoned, and, sometimes, they show rapakivi texture. Flow textures and tuillage are common, but irregularly distributed. The K-feldspar megacrysts contain inclusions of plagioclase, biotite, quartz, hornblende, sphene, and apatite. These inclusions are concentrically arranged and parallel to the megacrysts zones. The included minerals are generally smaller than the same minerals in the groundmass. Microprobe analyses and X-ray difraction studies show that the megacrysts of both facies are similar in composition, containing around 90% of orthoclase. Taking into account the textural and compositional aspects, it is concluded that the megacrysts of porphyritic granite and dioritic inclusions are phenocrysts and not porphyroblasts. (author) [pt

  10. Effects of glacial/post-glacial weathering compared with hydrothermal alteration - implications for matrix diffusion. Results from drillcore studies in porphyritic quartz monzodiorite from Aespoe SE Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landstroem, Ove; Tullborg, Eva-Lena

    2001-08-01

    slight dissolution of these minerals. Quartz and K-feldspar have remained almost unaltered. Besides the thin weathered surface rim, slight alteration of plagioclase and increase in porosity is indicated in the 2-3 cm zone below the surface. Decrease of U and Cs concentrations in this zone is then interpreted as being due to leaching/diffusion processes, confined to the Weichselian glaciation (< 100 ka). The 234U/238U is close to unity indicating bulk leaching of U under oxic conditions. The deposition of U in Ya 1192 and leaching of U from BAS 1 are coeval to quaternary glacial, interstadial and interglacial periods during which the hydrogeological and geochemical conditions changed significantly. A main question in performance assessment is whether oxygenated glacial meltwater can penetrate to repository depth (500 m) and modify the redox conditions. The bedrock surface at BAS 1 has certainly been in contact with glacial meltwater as well as meteoric water, resulting in oxidation/ alteration of pyrite, oxidation/mobilisation of U, and probably also desorption/ mobilisation of Cs. In contrast, no signs of oxygenated glacial meltwater influence were found in the YA 1192 core (170 m depth). In fact, the absence of Fe oxyhydroxide but presence of fresh pyrite in the fracture filling and the altered zone at YA 1192 as well as deposition of U are contradictory to interactions with oxidising glacial meltwater from the late glaciations

  11. WEATHERING PROCESS IN EOCENE FLYSCH IN REGION OF SPLIT (CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Miščević

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The Eocene flysh in the region of Split (Dalmatia, Croatia is char¬acterized by the presence of layers with different characteristics. It mainly includes thin-layered marls, clayey marls, calcareous marls, clastic lay¬ered limestones, calcarenites and breccias. Those parts that can be de¬scribed as the soft rocks or hard clays by the mechanical means, exposed to weathering reduce the durability within "an engineering time scale". The paper deals with the factors that influence the weathering process. The analyzed weathering is a combination of processes acting simulta¬neously. Most of these processes depend on the change of the water con¬tent, thus the weathering process mainly develops when a material is subjected to the wetting-drying process, On the base of these results form of degradation process is modeled. The weathering process can be main¬ly described as physical weathering combined with chemical weathering on the free surfaces and on the cracks walls. Erosion as a result of weath¬ering, is the dominant geomorphic process on analyzed flysch terrain. According to the analysis, as the most appropriate due to the characteris¬tics the tests are chosen as index properties. Some of these tests are modified in order to adapt them to the determined characteristics of ma¬terials from flysch layers. The correlations between the measured values are used as the basis for the classification proposal of the analyzed mate¬rial, according to its resistance to weathering processes. Roughly, three main groups of samples are recognizable: the first one with carbonate content more then 90% is not weathered at the engineers time scale; the second group with carbonate content from 75% to 90% include samples susceptible to weathering in engineers time scale; the third group with carbonate content less then 75% include samples in which the weather¬ing occurs immediately after the exposition to the weathering factors.

  12. NWS Weather Fatality, Injury and Damage Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weather Awareness Floods, Wind Chill, Tornadoes, Heat... Education Weather Terms, Teachers, Statistics government web resources and services. Natural Hazard Statistics Statistics U.S. Summaries 78-Year List of Severe Weather Fatalities Preliminary Hazardous Weather Statistics for 2017 Now

  13. Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... English Español Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma? KidsHealth / For Parents / Can the Weather Affect My ... Asthma? Print Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma? Yes. Weather conditions can bring on asthma symptoms. ...

  14. Space Weather Services of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, K.; Hong, S.; Jangsuk, C.; Dong Kyu, K.; Jinyee, C.; Yeongoh, C.

    2016-12-01

    The Korean Space Weather Center (KSWC) of the National Radio Research Agency (RRA) is a government agency which is the official source of space weather information for Korean Government and the primary action agency of emergency measure to severe space weather condition. KSWC's main role is providing alerts, watches, and forecasts in order to minimize the space weather impacts on both of public and commercial sectors of satellites, aviation, communications, navigations, power grids, and etc. KSWC is also in charge of monitoring the space weather condition and conducting research and development for its main role of space weather operation in Korea. In this study, we will present KSWC's recent efforts on development of application-oriented space weather research products and services on user needs, and introduce new international collaborative projects, such as IPS-Driven Enlil model, DREAM model estimating electron in satellite orbit, global network of DSCOVR and STEREO satellites tracking, and ARMAS (Automated Radiation Measurement for Aviation Safety).

  15. Municipalities' Preparedness for Weather Hazards and Response to Weather Warnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehiriz, Kaddour; Gosselin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The study of the management of weather-related disaster risks by municipalities has attracted little attention even though these organizations play a key role in protecting the population from extreme meteorological conditions. This article contributes to filling this gap with new evidence on the level and determinants of Quebec municipalities' preparedness for weather hazards and response to related weather warnings. Using survey data from municipal emergency management coordinators and secondary data on the financial and demographic characteristics of municipalities, the study shows that most Quebec municipalities are sufficiently prepared for weather hazards and undertake measures to protect the population when informed of imminent extreme weather events. Significant differences between municipalities were noted though. Specifically, the level of preparedness was positively correlated with the municipalities' capacity and population support for weather-related disaster management policies. In addition, the risk of weather-related disasters increases the preparedness level through its effect on population support. We also found that the response to weather warnings depended on the risk of weather-related disasters, the preparedness level and the quality of weather warnings. These results highlight areas for improvement in the context of increasing frequency and/or severity of such events with current climate change.

  16. Does Silicate Weathering of Loess Affect Atmospheric CO2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S. P.

    2002-12-01

    Weathering of glacial loess may be a significant, yet unrecognized, component of the carbon cycle. Glaciers produce fine-grained sediment, exposing vast amounts of mineral surface area to weathering processes, yet silicate mineral weathering rates at glacier beds and of glacial till are not high. Thus, despite the tremendous potential for glaciers to influence global weathering rates and atmospheric CO2 levels, this effect has not been demonstrated. Loess, comprised of silt-clay sizes, may be the key glacial deposit in which silicate weathering rates are high. Loess is transported by wind off braid plains of rivers, and deposited broadly (order 100 km from the source) in vegetated areas. Both the fine grain size, and hence large mineral surface area, and presence of vegetation should render loess deposits highly susceptible to silicate weathering. These deposits effectively extend the geochemical impact of glaciation in time and space, and bring rock flour into conditions conducive to chemical weathering. A simple 1-d model of silicate weathering fluxes from a soil profile demonstrates the potential of loess deposition to enhance CO2 consumption. At each time step, computed mineral dissolution (using anorthite and field-based rate constants) modifies the size of mineral grains within the soil. In the case of a stable soil surface, this results in a gradual decline in weathering fluxes and CO2 consumption through time, as finer grain sizes dissolve away. Computed weathering fluxes for a typical loess, with an initial mean grain size of 25 μm, are an order of magnitude greater than fluxes from a non-loess soil that differs only in having a mean grain size of 320 μm. High weathering fluxes are maintained through time if loess is continually deposited. Deposition rates as low as 0.01 mm/yr (one loess grain thickness per year) can lead to a doubling of CO2 consumption rates within 5 ka. These results suggest that even modest loess deposition rates can significantly

  17. Detecting weather radar clutter using satellite-based nowcasting products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas B.S.; Gill, Rashpal S.; Overgaard, Søren

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents the initial results from experiments with detection of weather radar clutter by information fusion with satellite based nowcasting products. Previous studies using information fusion of weather radar data and first generation Meteosat imagery have shown promising results...... for the detecting and removal of clutter. Naturally, the improved spatio-temporal resolution of the Meteosat Second Generation sensors, coupled with its increased number of spectral bands, is expected to yield even better detection accuracies. Weather radar data from three C-band Doppler weather radars...... Application Facility' of EUMETSAT and is based on multispectral images from the SEVIRI sensor of the Meteosat-8 platform. Of special interest is the 'Precipitating Clouds' product, which uses the spectral information coupled with surface temperatures from Numerical Weather Predictions to assign probabilities...

  18. Weathering of radionuclides deposited in inhabited areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roed, J.; Andersson, K.G.; Togawa, O.

    1996-01-01

    When determining the long-term consequences of an accidental deposition of radionuclides from a nuclear power plant in an inhabited area it is essential to be able to predict the migration with time of the deposited radiocaesium. Through the years that have passed since the Chernobyl accident occurred in 1986, the weathering effects on deposited radiocaesium on different types of surface in urban, suburban and industrial areas have been followed through six measurement campaigns to the Gaevle area of Sweden. The weathering effects after the Chernobyl accident were also investigated in towns in the Ukraine and in Russia. The radiocaesium level on asphalt and concrete pavements was found to decrease rather rapidly. It was found that the weathering effects over the first decade could be described by a double exponential function. Similar analytical functions were derived for the other urban surfaces. However, the weathering half-lives of radiocaesium on walls and roofs of buildings were found to be much longer. Even in urban centres, the largest contribution to the dose-rate immediately after deposition often comes from the open grassed areas and areas of soil. As the dose-rate from such surfaces usually decreases slowly, depending on the soil type, the relative importance of these surfaces will often increase with time. After a decade, the dose-rate from horizontal pavements will decrease by a factor of 10 or more, but the dose-rate from an area of soil or a roof may only be halved. Correspondingly, the dose-rate from a wall decreases by only 10-20 %. (author)

  19. The Weather in Richmond

    OpenAIRE

    Harless, William Edwin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The Weather in Richmond is a short documentary about the Oilers, the football team at Richmond High School in downtown Richmond, California, as they struggle in 2012 with the legacy of winning no games, with the exception of a forfeit, in two years. The video documents the city of Richmond’s poverty and violence, but it also is an account of the city’s cultural diversity, of the city’s industrial history and of the hopes of some of the people who grow up there. The...

  20. Combating bad weather

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta

    2015-01-01

    Every year lives and properties are lost in road accidents. About one-fourth of these accidents are due to low vision in foggy weather. At present, there is no algorithm that is specifically designed for the removal of fog from videos. Application of a single-image fog removal algorithm over each video frame is a time-consuming and costly affair. It is demonstrated that with the intelligent use of temporal redundancy, fog removal algorithms designed for a single image can be extended to the real-time video application. Results confirm that the presented framework used for the extension of the

  1. Weather Balloon Ascent Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The physics of a weather balloon is analyzed. The surprising aspect of the motion of these balloons is that they ascend to great altitudes (typically 35 km) at a more or less constant rate. Such behavior is not surprising near the ground—say for a helium-filled party balloon rising from street level to the top of the Empire State building—but it is unexpected for a balloon that rises to altitudes where the air is rarefied. We show from elementary physical laws why the ascent rate is approximately constant.

  2. Late Quaternary cooling rate constrained by multiple IRSL thermochronometers of potassium feldspars for granites from Kongur Shan, Chinese Pamir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jintang; Chen, Jie; Valla, Pierre; Herman, Frédéric

    2015-04-01

    The Kongur Shan (East Pamir), located at the northwestern Tibetan Plateau, is one of the most active orogens on Earth, where both tectonic processes along major active faults and climatic forcing (extensive glaciers coverage) are contributing to the regional landscape evolution. The exhumation rates since late Miocene was constrained to be ~6.5 - 4.2 mm/yr. However, it is still debated whether the exhumation rate accelerated since the Quaternary, of which the climate was featured by the cyclic glaciations with periods of 100 ka and 40 ka. In this study, we tried to employ luminescence thermochronology, which is a still in developing method, to resolve the impact of glacial cycles on exhumation rate. Our study site is located ~10 km to the east of the active Kongur normal fault, along the major valley of Gez river. We sampled three granite rocks from a sub-horizontal tunnel across the granite massif; one was from the entrance of the tunnel, and other two samples were from inside of the tunnel, where the measured ambient temperature is as high as 60-70 ° C. The distances of these samples are within 2 km. Four types of IRSL signals extracted from potassium feldspars (K-feldspars) were measured for each individual sample, and the results of isothermal decay experiments indicated these signals were of different thermal stabilities. Therefore, they may serve as four thermochronometers with different closure temperature. We employ these multiple thermochronometers together for each single sample to constrain their cooling rates. Our preliminary results, which are based on the simplified luminescence model of K-feldspars, suggest that the averaged cooling rate of the last 200 ka is as high as 1.4 oC/ka, which corresponds to an exhumation rate of ~ 2.3 to 0.9 cm/yr with the geothermal gradient assumed to be 60 to 150 oC/km. It seems to imply that the glacial cycles during the Quaternary substantially accelerated the exhumation rate of granite massif of Kongur Shan.

  3. Detection and attribution of extreme weather disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggel, Christian; Stone, Dáithí; Hansen, Gerrit

    2014-05-01

    Single disasters related to extreme weather events have caused loss and damage on the order of up to tens of billions US dollars over the past years. Recent disasters fueled the debate about whether and to what extent these events are related to climate change. In international climate negotiations disaster loss and damage is now high on the agenda, and related policy mechanisms have been discussed or are being implemented. In view of funding allocation and effective risk reduction strategies detection and attribution to climate change of extreme weather events and disasters is a key issue. Different avenues have so far been taken to address detection and attribution in this context. Physical climate sciences have developed approaches, among others, where variables that are reasonably sampled over climatically relevant time periods and related to the meteorological characteristics of the extreme event are examined. Trends in these variables (e.g. air or sea surface temperatures) are compared between observations and climate simulations with and without anthropogenic forcing. Generally, progress has been made in recent years in attribution of changes in the chance of some single extreme weather events to anthropogenic climate change but there remain important challenges. A different line of research is primarily concerned with losses related to the extreme weather events over time, using disaster databases. A growing consensus is that the increase in asset values and in exposure are main drivers of the strong increase of economic losses over the past several decades, and only a limited number of studies have found trends consistent with expectations from climate change. Here we propose a better integration of existing lines of research in detection and attribution of extreme weather events and disasters by applying a risk framework. Risk is thereby defined as a function of the probability of occurrence of an extreme weather event, and the associated consequences

  4. NASA Space Weather Center Services: Potential for Space Weather Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yihua; Kuznetsova, Masha; Pulkkinen, Antti; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Chulaki, A.; Lee, H.; Hesse, M.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Space Weather Center's primary objective is to provide the latest space weather information and forecasting for NASA's robotic missions and its partners and to bring space weather knowledge to the public. At the same time, the tools and services it possesses can be invaluable for research purposes. Here we show how our archive and real-time modeling of space weather events can aid research in a variety of ways, with different classification criteria. We will list and discuss major CME events, major geomagnetic storms, and major SEP events that occurred during the years 2010 - 2012. Highlights of major tools/resources will be provided.

  5. Vodcasting Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins Petersen, Carolyn; Erickson, P. J.; Needles, M.

    2009-01-01

    The topic of space weather is the subject of a series of vodcasts (video podcasts) produced by MIT Haystack Observatory (Westford, MA) and Loch Ness Productions (Groton, MA). This paper discusses the production and distribution of the series via Webcast, Youtube, and other avenues. It also presents preliminary evaluation of the effectiveness and outreach of the project through feedback from both formal and information education venues. The vodcast series is linked to the NASA Living With a Star Targeted Research and Technology project award "Multi-Instrument Investigation of Inner-Magnetospheric/Ionosphere Disturbances.” It is being carried out by Principal Investigator Dr. John Foster, under the auspices of NASA Grant # NNX06AB86G. The research involves using ionospheric total electron content (TEC) observations to study the location, extent, and duration of perturbations within stormtime ionospheric electric fields at mid- to low latitudes. It combines ground-based global positioning system (GPS) TEC data, incoherent scatter radar measurements of the mid-latitude ionospheric state, and DMSP satellite observations to characterize conditions which lead to severe low-latitude ionospheric perturbations. Each vodcast episode covers a certain aspect of space weather and the research program.

  6. Weatherization Apprenticeship Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Eric J

    2012-12-18

    Weatherization improvement services will be provided to Native people by Native people. The proposed project will recruit, train and hire two full-time weatherization technicians who will improve the energy efficiency of homes of Alaska Natives/American Indians residing in the Indian areas, within the Cook Inlet Region of Alaska. The Region includes Anchorage as well as 8 small tribal villages: The Native Villages of Eklutna, Knik, Chickaloon, Seldovia, Ninilchik, Kenaitze, Salamatof, and Tyonek. This project will be a partnership between three entities, with Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC) as the lead agency: CITCA's Employment and Training Services Department, Cook Inlet Housing Authority and Alaska Works Partnership. Additionally, six of the eight tribal villages within the Cook Inlet Region of Alaska have agreed to work with the project in order to improve the energy efficiency of their tribally owned buildings and homes. The remaining three villages will be invited to participate in the establishment of an intertribal consortium through this project. Tribal homes and buildings within Anchorage fall under Cook Inlet Region, Inc. (CIRI) tribal authority.

  7. Solar weather monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Hochedez

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Space Weather nowcasting and forecasting require solar observations because geoeffective disturbances can arise from three types of solar phenomena: coronal mass ejections (CMEs, flares and coronal holes. For each, we discuss their definition and review their precursors in terms of remote sensing and in-situ observations. The objectives of Space Weather require some specific instrumental features, which we list using the experience gained from the daily operations of the Solar Influences Data analysis Centre (SIDC at the Royal Observatory of Belgium. Nowcasting requires real-time monitoring to assess quickly and reliably the severity of any potentially geoeffective solar event. Both research and forecasting could incorporate more observations in order to feed case studies and data assimilation respectively. Numerical models will result in better predictions of geomagnetic storms and solar energetic particle (SEP events. We review the data types available to monitor solar activity and interplanetary conditions. They come from space missions and ground observatories and range from sequences of dopplergrams, magnetograms, white-light, chromospheric, coronal, coronagraphic and radio images, to irradiance and in-situ time-series. Their role is summarized together with indications about current and future solar monitoring instruments.

  8. Space Weather- Physics and Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Bothmer, Volker

    2007-01-01

    This book is a state-of-the-art review on the physics of space weather and on space weather impacts on human technology, including manned spaceflight. With contributions from a team of international experts, this comprehensive work covers all aspects of space weather physical processes, and all known aspects of space hazards from humans, both in space and on Earth. Space Weather - Physics and Effects provides the first comprehensive, scientific background of space storms caused by the sun and its impact on geospace focuses on weather issues that have become vital for the development of nationwide technological infrastructures explains magnetic storms on Earth, including the effects of EUV radiation on the atmosphere is an invaluable aid in establishing real-time weather forecasts details the threat that solar effects might have on modern telecommunication systems, including national power grid systems, aircraft and manned spaceflight.

  9. Oxygen mobility in alkali feldspars; Etude de la mobilite de l'oxygene dans les feldspaths alcalins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merigoux, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-03-15

    The oxygen mobility is shown from oxygen atoms exchange between potassic and sodic feldspars and 18 oxygen enriched water. Exchanges are carried out in autoclaves between 400 and 800 deg. C under a water pressure between 300 and 800 bars. The oxygen is extracted from silicate by a ClF{sub 3} attack. Two distinct mechanisms may be found. The first one is auto-diffusion; for adularia we have: D = 9.10{sup -7} exp(-32000/RT) (cm{sup 2}.s{sup -1}), for albite: D 4.5.10{sup -5} exp(-37000/RT) (cm{sup 2}.s{sup -1}). The second one, more rapid, is associated with alkali atoms exchanges. These results are applied to the order-disorder problem in feldspars and to the oxygen geochemistry. (author) [French] La mobilite de l'oxygene est mise en evidence a partir d'echanges d'atomes d'oxygene entre des feldspaths potassiques et sodiques en presence d'une eau enrichie en oxygene 18. Les echanges sont effectues en autoclave entre 400 et 800 deg. C sous des pressions de vapeur d'eau comprises entre 300 et 800 bars. L'oxygene est extrait du silicate par attaque au ClF{sub 3}. Deux mecanismes, bien distincts, peuvent se rencontrer. Le premier correspond a l'autodiffusion de l'oxygene; dans le domaine etudie on trouve pour l'adulaire: D = 9,10{sup -7} exp(-32000/RT) (cm{sup 2}.s{sup -1}), et pour l'albite: D 4,5.10{sup -5} exp(-37000/RT) (cm{sup 2}.s{sup -1}). Le second, beaucoup plus rapide, est associe a l'echange des atomes alcalins avec la solution. Ces resultats sont appliques au probleme du passage ordre-desordre dans les feldspaths et a la geochimie de l'oxygene. (auteur)

  10. Artificial changes of weather conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozin, I.D.; Vasil'ev, I.V.; Fedulina, I.N.; Zakizhan, Z.Z.; Khalimov, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    Unfavorable weather conditions have undesirable ecological consequences, causes remarkable economical damage. In the paper authors consider physical factors and technical methods of influence on cloud formation. (author)

  11. Synoptic weather types associated with critical fire weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark J. Schroeder; Monte Glovinsky; Virgil F. Hendricks; Frank C. Hood; Melvin K. Hull; Henry L. Jacobson; Robert Kirkpatrick; Daniel W. Krueger; Lester P. Mallory; Albert G. Oeztel; Robert H. Reese; Leo A. Sergius; Charles E. Syverson

    1964-01-01

    Recognizing that weather is an important factor in the spread of both urban and wildland fires, a study was made of the synoptic weather patterns and types which produce strong winds, low relative humidities, high temperatures, and lack of rainfall--the conditions conducive to rapid fire spread. Such historic fires as the San Francisco fire of 1906, the Berkeley fire...

  12. Re ‘Luminescence dating of K-feldspar from sediments: a protocol without anomalous fading correction’ by Bo Li and Sheng-Hua Li

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Murray, Andrew; Jain, Mayank

    2012-01-01

    Have recently proposed a new measurement procedure (MET-pIRIR) for luminescence dating using feldspar; they argue that this procedure reduces anomalous fading to negligible levels, and that it is a significant improvement over existing protocols (pIRIR290). Here we compare the measured equivalent...

  13. Assessment of the potential hazard represented by natural raw materials containing mineral fibres -The case of the feldspar from Orani, Sardinia (Italy)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gualtieri, A. F.; Gandolfi, N. B.; Pollastri, S.; Rinaldi, R.; Sala, O.; Martinelli, G.; Bacci, T.; Paoli, F.; Viani, Alberto; Vigliaturo, R.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 350, May (2018), s. 76-87 ISSN 0304-3894 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : feldspar * tremolite * Rietveld * SEM * EMPA Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Mineralogy Impact factor: 6.065, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304389418300888

  14. Terminal weather information management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alfred T.

    1990-01-01

    Since the mid-1960's, microburst/windshear events have caused at least 30 aircraft accidents and incidents and have killed more than 600 people in the United States alone. This study evaluated alternative means of alerting an airline crew to the presence of microburst/windshear events in the terminal area. Of particular interest was the relative effectiveness of conventional and data link ground-to-air transmissions of ground-based radar and low-level windshear sensing information on microburst/windshear avoidance. The Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator located at Ames Research Center was employed in a line oriented simulation of a scheduled round-trip airline flight from Salt Lake City to Denver Stapleton Airport. Actual weather en route and in the terminal area was simulated using recorded data. The microburst/windshear incident of July 11, 1988 was re-created for the Denver area operations. Six experienced airline crews currently flying scheduled routes were employed as test subjects for each of three groups: (1) A baseline group which received alerts via conventional air traffic control (ATC) tower transmissions; (2) An experimental group which received alerts/events displayed visually and aurally in the cockpit six miles (approx. 2 min.) from the microburst event; and (3) An additional experimental group received displayed alerts/events 23 linear miles (approx. 7 min.) from the microburst event. Analyses of crew communications and decision times showed a marked improvement in both situation awareness and decision-making with visually displayed ground-based radar information. Substantial reductions in the variability of decision times among crews in the visual display groups were also found. These findings suggest that crew performance will be enhanced and individual differences among crews due to differences in training and prior experience are significantly reduced by providing real-time, graphic display of terminal weather hazards.

  15. Future development of IR thermovision weather satellite equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listratov, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    The self radiation of the surface being viewed is used for image synthesis in IR thermovision equipment. The installation of such equipment aboard weather satellites makes it possible to obtain cloud cover pictures of the earth's surface in a complete orbit, regardless of the illumination conditions, and also provides quantitative information on the underlying surface temperature and cloud top height. Such equipment is used successfully aboard the Soviet satellites of the Meteor system, and experimentally on the American satellites of the Nimbus series. With regard to surface resolution, the present-day IR weather satellite equipment is inferior to the television equipment. This is due primarily to the comparatively low detectivity of the IR detectors used. While IR equipment has several fundamental advantages in comparison with the conventional television equipment, the problem arises of determining the possibility for future development of weather satellite IR thermovision equipment. Criteria are examined for evaluating the quality of IR.

  16. Surface Prognostic Charts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Prognostic Charts are historical surface prognostic (forecast) charts created by the United States Weather Bureau. They include fronts, isobars, cloud, and...

  17. Integrated Surface Dataset (Global)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Surface (ISD) Dataset (ISD) is composed of worldwide surface weather observations from over 35,000 stations, though the best spatial coverage is...

  18. Structural morphology of alkali feldspars and zircon and oriented intergrowths causing asterism in gemstones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woensdregt, C.F.

    1990-01-01

    Crystalline material grown in aqueous solutions or from vapour phase is often bounded by plane crystal faces. The surface configuration of such faces, that is controlled by the internal crystal structure, can be derived by the Hartman-Perdok theory with atomic precision. The crystal faces can be

  19. WIRE: Weather Intelligence for Renewable Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimo, A.; Cattin, R.; Calpini, B.

    2010-09-01

    Renewable energies such as wind and solar energy will play an important, even decisive role in order to mitigate and adapt to the projected dramatic consequences to our society and environment due to climate change. Due to shrinking fossil resources, the transition to more and more renewable energy shares is unavoidable. But, as wind and solar energy are strongly dependent on highly variable weather processes, increased penetration rates will also lead to strong fluctuations in the electricity grid which need to be balanced. Proper and specific forecasting of ‘energy weather' is a key component for this. Therefore, it is today appropriate to scientifically address the requirements to provide the best possible specific weather information for forecasting the energy production of wind and solar power plants within the next minutes up to several days. Towards such aims, Weather Intelligence will first include developing dedicated post-processing algorithms coupled with weather prediction models and with past and/or online measurement data especially remote sensing observations. Second, it will contribute to investigate the difficult relationship between the highly intermittent weather dependent power production and concurrent capacities such as transport and distribution of this energy to the end users. Selecting, resp. developing surface-based and satellite remote sensing techniques well adapted to supply relevant information to the specific post-processing algorithms for solar and wind energy production short-term forecasts is a major task with big potential. It will lead to improved energy forecasts and help to increase the efficiency of the renewable energy productions while contributing to improve the management and presumably the design of the energy grids. The second goal will raise new challenges as this will require first from the energy producers and distributors definitions of the requested input data and new technologies dedicated to the management of

  20. Post-Palaeozoic evolution of weathered landsurfaces in Uganda by tectonically controlled deep weathering and stripping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R. G.; Howard, K. W. F.

    1998-11-01

    A model for the evolution of weathered landsurfaces in Uganda is developed using available geotectonic, climatic, sedimentological and chronological data. The model demonstrates the pivotal role of tectonic uplift in inducing cycles of stripping, and tectonic quiescence for cycles of deep weathering. It is able to account for the development of key landforms, such as inselbergs and duricrust-capped plateaux, which previous hypotheses of landscape evolution that are based on climatic or eustatic controls are unable to explain. Development of the Ugandan landscape is traced back to the Permian. Following late Palaeozoic glaciation, a trend towards warmer and more humid climates through the Mesozoic enabled deep weathering of the Jurassic/mid-Cretaceous surface in Uganda during a period of prolonged tectonic quiescence. Uplift associated with the opening South Atlantic Ocean terminated this cycle and instigated a cycle of stripping between the mid-Cretaceous and early Miocene. Deep weathering on the succeeding Miocene to recent (African) surface has occurred from Miocene to present but has been interrupted in the areas adjacent to the western rift where development of a new drainage base level has prompted cycles of stripping in the Miocene and Pleistocene.

  1. The Challenge of Weather Prediction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 3. The Challenge of Weather Prediction Old and Modern Ways of Weather Forecasting. B N Goswami. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 3 March 1997 pp 8-15. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Regional-seasonal weather forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abarbanel, H.; Foley, H.; MacDonald, G.; Rothaus, O.; Rudermann, M.; Vesecky, J.

    1980-08-01

    In the interest of allocating heating fuels optimally, the state-of-the-art for seasonal weather forecasting is reviewed. A model using an enormous data base of past weather data is contemplated to improve seasonal forecasts, but present skills do not make that practicable. 90 references. (PSB)

  3. Weatherization Assistance Program Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2018-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program reduces energy costs for low-income households by increasing the energy e ciency of their homes, while ensuring their health and safety. The Program supports 8,500 jobs and provides weatherization services to approximately 35,000 homes every year using DOE funds.

  4. Now, Here's the Weather Forecast...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mathew

    2013-01-01

    The Met Office has a long history of weather forecasting, creating tailored weather forecasts for customers across the world. Based in Exeter, the Met Office is also home to the Met Office Hadley Centre, a world-leading centre for the study of climate change and its potential impacts. Climate information from the Met Office Hadley Centre is used…

  5. Designing a better weather display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Colin; Plumlee, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The variables most commonly displayed on weather maps are atmospheric pressure, wind speed and direction, and surface temperature. But they are usually shown separately, not together on a single map. As a design exercise, we set the goal of finding out if it is possible to show all three variables (two 2D scalar fields and a 2D vector field) simultaneously such that values can be accurately read using keys for all variables, a reasonable level of detail is shown, and important meteorological features stand out clearly. Our solution involves employing three perceptual "channels", a color channel, a texture channel, and a motion channel in order to perceptually separate the variables and make them independently readable. We conducted an experiment to evaluate our new design both against a conventional solution, and against a glyph-based solution. The evaluation tested the abilities of novice subjects both to read values using a key, and to see meteorological patterns in the data. Our new scheme was superior especially in the representation of wind patterns using the motion channel, and it also performed well enough in the representation of pressure using the texture channel to suggest it as a viable design alternative.

  6. Artificial weathering of granite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Hermo, B.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes a series of artificial weathering tests run on granite designed to: simulate the action of weathering agents on buildings and identify the underlying mechanisms, determine the salt resistance of different types of rock; evaluate consolidation and water-repellent treatment durability; and confirm hypotheses about the origin of salts such as gypsum that are often found in granite buildings. Salt crystallization tests were also conducted, using sodium chloride, sodium sulphate, calcium sulphate and seawater solutions. One of these tests was conducted in a chamber specifically designed to simulate salt spray weathering and another in an SO2 chamber to ascertain whether granite is subject to sulphation. The test results are analyzed and discussed, along with the shortcomings of each type of trial as a method for simulating the decay observed in monuments. The effect of factors such as wet-dry conditions, type of saline solution and the position of the planes of weakness on the type of decay is also addressed.En este trabajo se hace una síntesis de varios ensayos de alteración artificial realizados con rocas graníticas. Estos ensayos tenían distintos objetivos: reproducir las formas de alteración encontradas en los edificios para llegar a conocer los mecanismos que las generan, determinar la resistencia de las diferentes rocas a la acción de las sales, evaluar la durabilidad de tratamientos de consolidación e hidrofugación y constatar hipótesis acerca del origen de algunas sales, como el yeso, que aparecen frecuentemente en edificios graníticos. En los ensayos de cristalización de sales se utilizaron disoluciones de cloruro de sodio, sulfato de sodio, sulfato de calcio y agua de mar. Uno de estos ensayos se llevó a cabo en una cámara especialmente diseñada para reproducir la alteración por aerosol marino y otro se realizó en una cámara de SO2, con el objeto de comprobar si en rocas graníticas se puede producir

  7. Reconstruction of Historical Weather by Assimilating Old Weather Diary Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neluwala, P.; Yoshimura, K.; Toride, K.; Hirano, J.; Ichino, M.; Okazaki, A.

    2017-12-01

    Climate can control not only human life style but also other living beings. It is important to investigate historical climate to understand the current and future climates. Information about daily weather can give a better understanding of past life on earth. Long-term weather influences crop calendar as well as the development of civilizations. Unfortunately, existing reconstructed daily weather data are limited to 1850s due to the availability of instrumental data. The climate data prior to that are derived from proxy materials (e.g., tree-ring width, ice core isotopes, etc.) which are either in annual or decadal scale. However, there are many historical documents which contain information about weather such as personal diaries. In Japan, around 20 diaries in average during the 16th - 19th centuries have been collected and converted into a digitized form. As such, diary data exist in many other countries. This study aims to reconstruct historical daily weather during the 18th and 19th centuries using personal daily diaries which have analogue weather descriptions such as `cloudy' or `sunny'. A recent study has shown the possibility of assimilating coarse weather data using idealized experiments. We further extend this study by assimilating modern weather descriptions similar to diary data in recent periods. The Global Spectral model (GSM) of National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) is used to reconstruct weather with the Local Ensemble Kalman filter (LETKF). Descriptive data are first converted to model variables such as total cloud cover (TCC), solar radiation and precipitation using empirical relationships. Those variables are then assimilated on a daily basis after adding random errors to consider the uncertainty of actual diary data. The assimilation of downward short wave solar radiation using weather descriptions improves RMSE from 64.3 w/m2 to 33.0 w/m2 and correlation coefficient (R) from 0.5 to 0.8 compared with the case without any

  8. Crystallization Kinetics of Barium and Strontium Aluminosilicate Glasses of Feldspar Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    1994-01-01

    Crystallization kinetics of BaO.Al2O3.2SiO2 (BAS) and SrO.Al2O3.2SiO2 (SAS) glasses in bulk and powder forms have been studied by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The crystal growth activation energies were evaluated to be 473 and 451 kJ/mol for bulk samples and 560 and 534 kJ/mol for powder specimens in BAS and SAS glasses, respectively. Development of crystalline phases on thermal treatments of glasses at various temperatures has been followed by powder x-ray diffraction. Powder samples crystallized at lower temperatures than the bulk and the crystallization temperature was lower for SAS glass than BAS. Crystallization in both glasses appeared to be surface nucleated. The high temperature phase hexacelsian, MAl2Si2O8 (M = Ba or Sr), crystallized first by nucleating preferentially on the glass surface. Also, monoclinic celsian does not nucleate directly in the glass, but is formed at higher temperatures from the transformation of the metastable hexagonal phase. In SAS the transformation to monoclinic celsian occurred rapidly after 1 h at 1100 C. In contrast, in BAS this transformation is sluggish and difficult and did not go to completion even after 10 h heat treatment at 1400 C. The crystal growth morphologies in the glasses have been observed by optical microscopy. Some of the physical properties of the two glasses are also reported.

  9. The History of a Plutonic-Volcanic System Determined from Compositional and Mineral Inclusion Mapping of Alkali Feldspar Megacrysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfanti, S. A. D.; Gualda, G. A. R.

    2017-12-01

    Alkali-feldspar megacrysts (2-20 cm long) occur in many granitic rocks, providing extensive records of crystallization within magma bodies. We will use megacrysts from Yosemite National Park's Tuolumne Intrusive Suite to determine if and how megacrysts record recharge and eruption. Preliminary work has focused on 4 crystals. Based on BSE patterns, crystals can be divided into 3 zones: (1) the core, which represents the crystal's first growth and sometimes displays some resorption; (2) the interior, including a series of sub-zones that correspond to different growth periods; and (3) the rim, or outermost growth stage. Common BSE patterns include decreasing brightness from the inner portion of a growth period outward, increasing brightness towards either side of a boundary, and periods of constant brightness, for a full or partial period. Most mineral inclusions appear as single crystals ( 10-25%) or as groups of 2-4 crystals ( 60-75%). Large clusters of 10 or more individuals are less common ( 5-15%), and clusters of >20 crystals are rare ( 1-3%). Most crystals (85-95%) occur on growth boundaries or within the core. Magnetite is common in the more central parts of the interior zone, appearing only occasionally in the core and towards the rim. Accessories, amphibole, and biotite are more evenly distributed within the megacryst. Biotite and titanite grains large enough to display habit appear to be within 20 degrees of parallel with zone boundaries. Most other inclusions are small or not elongated enough to display clear alignment. The total volume of inclusions (excluding quartz and plagioclase, which have X-ray attenuation very similar to that of alkali feldspar) does not exceed 1% of megacryst volume. Plagioclase seems to be at least equal in volume to all other inclusions combined, but as noted above, its exact volume is currently indiscernible. Magnetite makes up about 1/6 of inclusion volume, zircon 1/3, and all others the remaining half. We will complement our

  10. Oxygen mobility in alkali feldspars; Etude de la mobilite de l'oxygene dans les feldspaths alcalins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merigoux, H. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-03-15

    The oxygen mobility is shown from oxygen atoms exchange between potassic and sodic feldspars and 18 oxygen enriched water. Exchanges are carried out in autoclaves between 400 and 800 deg. C under a water pressure between 300 and 800 bars. The oxygen is extracted from silicate by a ClF{sub 3} attack. Two distinct mechanisms may be found. The first one is auto-diffusion; for adularia we have: D = 9.10{sup -7} exp(-32000/RT) (cm{sup 2}.s{sup -1}), for albite: D 4.5.10{sup -5} exp(-37000/RT) (cm{sup 2}.s{sup -1}). The second one, more rapid, is associated with alkali atoms exchanges. These results are applied to the order-disorder problem in feldspars and to the oxygen geochemistry. (author) [French] La mobilite de l'oxygene est mise en evidence a partir d'echanges d'atomes d'oxygene entre des feldspaths potassiques et sodiques en presence d'une eau enrichie en oxygene 18. Les echanges sont effectues en autoclave entre 400 et 800 deg. C sous des pressions de vapeur d'eau comprises entre 300 et 800 bars. L'oxygene est extrait du silicate par attaque au ClF{sub 3}. Deux mecanismes, bien distincts, peuvent se rencontrer. Le premier correspond a l'autodiffusion de l'oxygene; dans le domaine etudie on trouve pour l'adulaire: D = 9,10{sup -7} exp(-32000/RT) (cm{sup 2}.s{sup -1}), et pour l'albite: D 4,5.10{sup -5} exp(-37000/RT) (cm{sup 2}.s{sup -1}). Le second, beaucoup plus rapide, est associe a l'echange des atomes alcalins avec la solution. Ces resultats sont appliques au probleme du passage ordre-desordre dans les feldspaths et a la geochimie de l'oxygene. (auteur)

  11. Effect of Bacillus subtilis on Granite Weathering: A Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Ogawa, N.; Oguchi, C. T.; Hatta, T.; Matsukura, Y.

    2006-12-01

    We performed a comparative experiment to investigate how the ubiquitous soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis weathers granite and which granite-forming minerals weather more rapidly via biological processes. Batch type experiments (granite specimen in a 500 ml solution including NaCl, glucose, yeast extract and bacteria Bacillus subtilis at 27°E C) were carried out for 30 days. Granite surfaces were observed by SEM before and after the experiment. Bacillus subtilis had a strong influence on granite weathering by forming pits. There were 2.4 times as many pits and micropores were 2.3 times wider in granite exposed to Bacillus subtilis when compared with bacteria-free samples. Bacillus subtilis appear to preferentially select an optimum place to adhere to the mineral and dissolve essential elements from the mineral to live. Plagioclase was more vulnerable to bacterial weathering than biotite among the granite composing minerals.

  12. Powernext weather, benchmark indices for effective weather risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Energy, an estimated 25% of the GNP is affected by weather-related events. The variations in temperature - even small ones - can also have long-lasting effects on the operational results of a company. Among other, the Energy supply sector is sensitive to weather risks: a milder or harsher than usual winter leads to a decrease or increase of energy consumption. The price of electricity on power trading facilities like Powernext is especially sensitive to odd changes in temperatures. Powernext and Meteo-France (the French meteorological agency) have joined expertise in order to promote the use of weather indices in term of decision making or underlying of hedging tools to energy actors, end users from any other sector of activity and specialists of the weather risk hedging. The Powernext Weather indices are made from information collected by Meteo-France's main observation network according to the norms of international meteorology, in areas carefully selected. The gross data are submitted to a thorough review allowing the correction of abnormalities and the reconstitution of missing data. Each index is fashioned to take into account the economic activity in the various regions of the country as represented by each region's population. This demographic information represents a fair approximation of the weight of the regional economic activity. This document presents the Powernext/Meteo France partnership for the elaboration of efficient weather-related risk management indices. (J.S.)

  13. How Cities Make Their Own Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall

    2004-01-01

    Urbanization is one of the extreme cases of land use change. Most of world's population has moved to urban areas. Although currently only 1.2% of the land is considered urban, the spatial coverage and density of cities are expected to rapidly increase in d e near future. It is estimated that by the year 2025, 60% of the world's population will live in cities. Human activity in urban environments also alters weather and climate processes. However, our understanding of urbanization on the total Earth-weather-climate system is incomplete. Recent literature continues to provide evidence that anomalies in precipitation exist over and downwind of major cities. Current and future research efforts are actively seeking to verify these literature findings and understand potential cause-effect relationships. The novelty of this study is that it utilizes rainfall data from multiple satellite data sources (e.g. TRMM precipitation radar, TRMM-geosynchronous-rain gauge merged product, and SSM/I) and ground-based measurements to identify spatial anomalies and temporal trends in precipitation for cities around the world. We will also present results from experiments using a regional atmospheric-land surface modeling system. Early results will be presented and placed within the context of weather prediction, climate assessment, and societal applications.

  14. How the Emitted Size Distribution and Mixing State of Feldspar Affect Ice Nucleating Particles in a Global Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlwitz, J. P.; Fridlind, A. M.; Knopf, D. A.; Miller, R. L.; Pérez García-Pando, C.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of aerosol particles on ice nucleation and, in turn, the formation of ice and mixed phase clouds is recognized as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate prediction. We apply an improved dust mineral specific aerosol module in the NASA GISS Earth System ModelE, which takes into account soil aggregates and their fragmentation at emission as well as the emission of large particles. We calculate ice nucleating particle concentrations from K-feldspar abundance for an active site parameterization for a range of activation temperatures and external and internal mixing assumption. We find that the globally averaged INP concentration is reduced by a factor of two to three, compared to a simple assumption on the size distribution of emitted dust minerals. The decrease can amount to a factor of five in some geographical regions. The results vary little between external and internal mixing and different activation temperatures, except for the coldest temperatures. In the sectional size distribution, the size range 2-4 μm contributes the largest INP number.

  15. Luminescence of quartz and feldspar fingerprints provenance and correlates with the source area denudation in the Amazon River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawakuchi, A. O.; Jain, M.; Mineli, T. D.; Nogueira, L.; Bertassoli, D. J.; Häggi, C.; Sawakuchi, H. O.; Pupim, F. N.; Grohmann, C. H.; Chiessi, C. M.; Zabel, M.; Mulitza, S.; Mazoca, C. E. M.; Cunha, D. F.

    2018-06-01

    The Amazon region hosts the world's largest watershed spanning from high elevation Andean terrains to lowland cratonic shield areas in tropical South America. This study explores variations in optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals in suspended silt and riverbed sands retrieved from major Amazon rivers. These rivers drain Pre-Cambrian to Cenozoic source rocks in areas with contrasting denudation rates. In contrast to the previous studies, we do not observe an increase in the OSL sensitivity of quartz with transport distance; for example, Tapajós and Xingu Rivers show more sensitive quartz than Solimões and Madeira Rivers, even though the latter have a significantly larger catchment area and longer sediment transport distance. Interestingly, high sensitivity quartz is observed in rivers draining relatively stable Central Brazil and Guiana shield areas (denudation rate ξ = 0.04 mmyr-1), while low sensitivity quartz occurs in less stable Andean terrains (ξ = 0.24 mmyr-1). An apparent linear correlation between quartz OSL sensitivity and denudation rate suggests that OSL sensitivity may be used as a proxy for erosion rates in the Amazon basin. Furthermore, luminescence sensitivity measured in sand or silt arises from the same mineral components (quartz and feldspar) and clearly discriminates between Andean and shield sediments, avoiding the grain size bias in provenance analysis. These results have implications for using luminescence sensitivity as a proxy for Andean and shield contributions in the stratigraphic record, providing a new tool to reconstruct past drainage configurations within the Amazon basin.

  16. How the Emitted Size Distribution and Mixing State of Feldspar Affect Ice Nucleating Particles in a Global Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlwitz, Jan P.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Miller, Ron L.; García-Pando, Carlos Perez

    2017-01-01

    The effect of aerosol particles on ice nucleation and, in turn, the formation of ice and mixed phase clouds is recognized as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate prediction. We apply an improved dust mineral specific aerosol module in the NASA GISS Earth System ModelE, which takes into account soil aggregates and their fragmentation at emission as well as the emission of large particles. We calculate ice nucleating particle concentrations from K-feldspar abundance for an active site parameterization for a range of activation temperatures and external and internal mixing assumption. We find that the globally averaged INP concentration is reduced by a factor of two to three, compared to a simple assumption on the size distribution of emitted dust minerals. The decrease can amount to a factor of five in some geographical regions. The results vary little between external and internal mixing and different activation temperatures, except for the coldest temperatures. In the sectional size distribution, the size range 24 micrometer contributes the largest INP number.

  17. Geology and mineralization of the Jabalat alkali-feldspar granite, northern Asir region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Tayyar, Jaffar; Jackson, Norman J.; Al-Yazidi, Saeed

    The Jabalat post-tectonic granite pluton is composed of albite- and oligoclase-bearing, low-calcium, F-, Sn- and Rb-rich subsolvus granites. These granites display evidence of late-magmatic, granitophile- and metallic-element specialization, resulting ultimately in the development of post-magmatic, metalliferous hydrothermal systems characterized by a Mo sbnd Sn sbnd Cu sbnd Pb sbnd Zn sbnd Bi sbnd Ag sbnd F signature. Two main types of mineralization are present within the pluton and its environs: (1) weakly mineralized felsic and aplitic dikes and veins enhanced in Mo, Bi, Ag, Pb and Cu; and (2) pyrite—molybdenite—chalcopyrite-bearing quartz and quartz—feldspar veins rich in Mo, Sn, Bi, Cu, Zn and Ag. A satellite stock, 3 km north of the main intrusion, is composed of fine-grained, miarolitic, muscovite—albite—microcline (microperthite) granite. The flanks of this intrusion and adjacent dioritic rocks are greisenized and highly enriched in Sn, Bi and Ag. Quartz veins which transect the satellite stock contain molybdenite and stannite.

  18. Meteorological Automatic Weather Station (MAWS) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdridge, Donna J [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kyrouac, Jenni A [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Meteorological Automatic Weather Station (MAWS) is a surface meteorological station, manufactured by Vaisala, Inc., dedicated to the balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS), providing surface measurements of the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere and the wind speed and direction for each radiosonde profile. These data are automatically provided to the BBSS during the launch procedure and included in the radiosonde profile as the surface measurements of record for the sounding. The MAWS core set of measurements is: Barometric Pressure (hPa), Temperature (°C), Relative Humidity (%), Arithmetic-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), and Vector-Averaged Wind Direction (deg). The sensors that collect the core variables are mounted at the standard heights defined for each variable.

  19. Cold Weather and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cold Weather and Cardiovascular Disease Updated:Sep 16,2015 Th is winter ... and procedures related to heart disease and stroke. Cardiovascular Conditions • Conditions Home • Arrhythmia and Atrial Fibrillation • Cardiac ...

  20. Detection of Weather Radar Clutter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøvith, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    classification and use a range of different techniques and input data. The first method uses external information from multispectral satellite images to detect clutter. The information in the visual, near-infrared, and infrared parts of the spectrum can be used to distinguish between cloud and cloud-free areas......Weather radars provide valuable information on precipitation in the atmosphere but due to the way radars work, not only precipitation is observed by the weather radar. Weather radar clutter, echoes from non-precipitating targets, occur frequently in the data, resulting in lowered data quality....... Especially in the application of weather radar data in quantitative precipitation estimation and forecasting a high data quality is important. Clutter detection is one of the key components in achieving this goal. This thesis presents three methods for detection of clutter. The methods use supervised...

  1. KZHU Center Weather Advisory (CWA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CWA is an aviation weather warning for conditions meeting or approaching national in-flight advisory (AIRMET, SIGMET or SIGMET for convection) criteria. CWAs are...

  2. Practical Weathering for Geology Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, A. Peter

    1990-01-01

    The design and data management of an activity to study weathering by increasing the rate of mineral dissolution in a microwave oven is described. Data analysis in terms of parabolic and first-order kinetics is discussed. (CW)

  3. Northern Hemisphere Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Daily Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Part I consists of plotted and analyzed daily maps of sea-level and 500-mb maps for 0300, 0400, 1200, 1230, 1300, and 1500...

  4. The Challenge of Weather Prediction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    around the sun. If weather is also governed by physical laws, why ... radiate according to Planck's law (higher the temperature of the black body ..... First law of thermodynamics. Relates ... (Third Edition) Charles E Merrill Publishing. Company.

  5. Winter Weather Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Extreme Heat Older Adults (Aged 65+) Infants and Children Chronic Medical Conditions Low Income Athletes Outdoor Workers Pets Hot Weather Tips Warning Signs and Symptoms FAQs Social Media How to Stay Cool Missouri Cooling Centers Extreme ...

  6. KZOA Center Weather Advisory (CWA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CWA is an aviation weather warning for conditions meeting or approaching national in-flight advisory (AIRMET, SIGMET or SIGMET for convection) criteria. CWAs are...

  7. KZJX Center Weather Advisory (CWA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CWA is an aviation weather warning for conditions meeting or approaching national in-flight advisory (AIRMET, SIGMET or SIGMET for convection) criteria. CWAs are...

  8. KZBW Center Weather Advisory (CWA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CWA is an aviation weather warning for conditions meeting or approaching national in-flight advisory (AIRMET, SIGMET or SIGMET for convection) criteria. CWAs are...

  9. KZFW Center Weather Advisory (CWA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CWA is an aviation weather warning for conditions meeting or approaching national in-flight advisory (AIRMET, SIGMET or SIGMET for convection) criteria. CWAs are...

  10. KZSE Center Weather Advisory (CWA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CWA is an aviation weather warning for conditions meeting or approaching national in-flight advisory (AIRMET, SIGMET or SIGMET for convection) criteria. CWAs are...

  11. KZME Center Weather Advisory (CWA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CWA is an aviation weather warning for conditions meeting or approaching national in-flight advisory (AIRMET, SIGMET or SIGMET for convection) criteria. CWAs are...

  12. KZDV Center Weather Advisory (CWA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CWA is an aviation weather warning for conditions meeting or approaching national in-flight advisory (AIRMET, SIGMET or SIGMET for convection) criteria. CWAs are...

  13. KZNY Center Weather Advisory (CWA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CWA is an aviation weather warning for conditions meeting or approaching national in-flight advisory (AIRMET, SIGMET or SIGMET for convection) criteria. CWAs are...

  14. KZDC Center Weather Advisory (CWA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CWA is an aviation weather warning for conditions meeting or approaching national in-flight advisory (AIRMET, SIGMET or SIGMET for convection) criteria. CWAs are...

  15. KZAU Center Weather Advisory (CWA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CWA is an aviation weather warning for conditions meeting or approaching national in-flight advisory (AIRMET, SIGMET or SIGMET for convection) criteria. CWAs are...

  16. US Weather Bureau Storm Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Bureau and US Army Corps and other reports of storms from 1886-1955. Hourly precipitation from recording rain gauges captured during heavy rain, snow,...

  17. A reactive transport model for Marcellus shale weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Peyman; Li, Li; Jin, Lixin; Williams, Jennifer Z.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2017-11-01

    Shale formations account for 25% of the land surface globally and contribute a large proportion of the natural gas used in the United States. One of the most productive shale-gas formations is the Marcellus, a black shale that is rich in organic matter and pyrite. As a first step toward understanding how Marcellus shale interacts with water in the surface or deep subsurface, we developed a reactive transport model to simulate shale weathering under ambient temperature and pressure conditions, constrained by soil and water chemistry data. The simulation was carried out for 10,000 years since deglaciation, assuming bedrock weathering and soil genesis began after the last glacial maximum. Results indicate weathering was initiated by pyrite dissolution for the first 1000 years, leading to low pH and enhanced dissolution of chlorite and precipitation of iron hydroxides. After pyrite depletion, chlorite dissolved slowly, primarily facilitated by the presence of CO2 and organic acids, forming vermiculite as a secondary mineral. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the most important controls on weathering include the presence of reactive gases (CO2 and O2), specific surface area, and flow velocity of infiltrating meteoric water. The soil chemistry and mineralogy data could not be reproduced without including the reactive gases. For example, pyrite remained in the soil even after 10,000 years if O2 was not continuously present in the soil column; likewise, chlorite remained abundant and porosity remained small if CO2 was not present in the soil gas. The field observations were only simulated successfully when the modeled specific surface areas of the reactive minerals were 1-3 orders of magnitude smaller than surface area values measured for powdered minerals. Small surface areas could be consistent with the lack of accessibility of some fluids to mineral surfaces due to surface coatings. In addition, some mineral surface is likely interacting only with equilibrated pore

  18. Post-IR IRSL290 dating of K-rich feldspar sand grains in a wind-dominated system on Sardinia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreucci, S.; Sechi, D.; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter

    2017-01-01

    The reliability of a post-IR elevated temperature IRSL (290 °C; pIRIR290) is tested on wind-blown, sand-sized (180–250 μm) K-rich feldspar grains. The pIRIR290 ages were compared with quartz SAR-OSL data, other independent age controls and historical information. Three study areas along the coast....... The pIRIR290 ages indicate an offset up to ∼1000 years. We can conclude that the pIRIR290 method on sand-sized K-feldspar grains shows great promise for samples at or beyond the quartz OSL age limit but should not be applied to Late Holocene or modern deposits....

  19. Plagioclase-mantled K-feldspar in the Carboniferous porphyritic microgranite of Altenberg-Frauenstein, Eastern Erzgebirge/Krusné Hory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Müller

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Upper Carboniferous porphyritic microgranite of Altenberg-Frauenstein, formerly known as Granitporphyr (Dalmer 1896 and here abbreviated as GP, forms a 36 km long and up to 18 km wide complex of ring dykes related to the Teplice-Altenberg caldera in the German–Czech border region of the Eastern Erzgebirge/Krusné Hory. The microgranites are characterized by the occurrence of plagioclase-mantled K-feldspar phenocrysts. The microgranite varieties representtwo main stages of intrusion evolved from acid (GP I to intermediaterocks (GP II within the intrusion. The most acid rock (GP Icum occurs as enclaves in GP I and GP II and is interpreted as a cumulate of K-feldspar and quartz phenocrysts. The porphyritic microgranites show field, textural and geochemical evidence suggesting that some of them have formed as a result of interaction between felsic and mafic magmas. Mixing features are abundant in the porphyriticquartz-feldspar-hornblende microgranite (GP II interpreted as a hybrid rock. They are less discrete in the early phase (GP I and not obvious in the acid enclaves (GP Icum. This trend seems to reflect a continuous deflation of the magma chamber from the top to the bottom. According to the definition of rapakivi granites after Haapala and Rämö (1992, the porphyritic microgranite of Altenberg-Frauenstein may be considered as rapakivi granite although ovoid alkali feldspar megacrysts typical of classical rapakivi granites are not recorded.However, due to its Carboniferous age and being the only known granitewith rapakivi texture in the German–Czech part of the Variscan belt, the microgranite of Altenberg-Frauenstein is exceptional.

  20. Origin of felsic granulite microstructure by heterogeneous decomposition of alkali feldspar and extreme weakening of orogenic lower crust during the Variscan orogeny

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Franěk, J.; Schulmann, K.; Lexa, O.; Ulrich, Stanislav; Štípská, P.; Haloda, J.; Týcová, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2011), s. 103-130 ISSN 0263-4929 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/0539 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA205/05/2187 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : felsic granulites * Moldanubian domain * quantitative microstructural analysis * quartz and feldspar rheology * Variscan belt Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 2.990, year: 2011

  1. Weathering kinetics of thin wood veneers assessed with near infrared spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Sandak, Anna; Sandak, Jakub; Burud, Ingunn; Gobakken, Lone Ross

    2016-01-01

    Wooden elements may be subjected to mechanical, environmental or biological alterations during their service life. The most susceptible parts of wood structural members are the exposed surfaces since they are subjected to ageing, weathering and/or decay. Knowledge of the influence of weathering factors and polymer degradation mechanisms is essential for understanding the weathering process of wood. The goal of this study was to investigate the degradation of thin wooden samples exposed to sho...

  2. Cationic polyelectrolyte induced separation of some inorganic contaminants and their mixture (zirconium silicate, kaolin, K-feldspar, zinc oxide) as well as of the paraffin oil from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimici, Luminita

    2016-03-15

    The flocculation efficiency of a cationic polyelectrolyte with quaternary ammonium salt groups in the backbone, namely PCA5 was evaluated on zirconium silicate (kreutzonit), kaolin, K- feldspar and zinc oxide (ZnO) suspensions prepared either with each pollutant or with their mixture. The effect of several parameters such as settling time, polymer dose and the pollutant type on the separation efficacy was evaluated and followed by optical density and zeta potential measurements. Except for ZnO, the interactions between PCA5 and suspended particles led to low residual turbidity values (around 4% for kreutzonit, 5% for kaolin and 8% for K-feldspar) as well as to the reduction of flocs settling time (from 1200 min to 30 min and 120 min in case of kaolinit and K-feldspar, respectively), that meant a high efficiency in their separation. The negative value of the zeta potential and flocs size measurements, at the optimum polymer dose, point to contribution from charge patch mechanism for the particles flocculation. A good efficiency of PCA5 in separation of paraffin oil (a minimum residual turbidity of 9.8%) has been also found. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Stoneware tile manufacturing using rice straw ash as feldspar replacement; Fabricacion de gres porcelanico empleando ceniza de tamo de arroz en sustitucion del feldespato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvaro Guzman, A.; John Torres, L.; Martha Cedeno, V.; Silvio Delvasto, A.; Vicente Amigo, B.; Enrique Sanchez, V.

    2013-07-01

    In this research are presented the results of using rice straw ash (RSA) in low proportions as substitute of feldspar for manufacturing stoneware tiles. Specimens of semidry triaxial mixtures, where feldspar was substituted for different percentages (25 % and 50 %) of RSA, were prepared by uniaxial pressing, followed by drying and sintering. Physical and mechanical properties of sintered bodies were evaluated. Porcelain stoneware tile specimens C0 and CF25 reached bending strength and water absorption values were in accordance with standard ISO 13006 (Annex G, BIa) ( {>=} 35 MPa and {<=} 0.5 %, respectively). However, in porcelain stoneware tile specimens CF50 due to bloating phenomenon was not possible obtain commercial tiles in accordance with standard ISO 13006. By using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) needles of primary and secondary mullite were identified in a vitreous phase; and by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) mullite and quartz phases were identified. It was concluded that feldspar can be substituted positively by RSA in stoneware tile pastes. (Author)

  4. Space weathering of small Koronis family members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Cristina A.; Rivkin, Andrew S.; Trilling, David E.; Enga, Marie-therese; Grier, Jennifer A.

    2011-03-01

    The space weathering process and its implications for the relationships between S- and Q-type asteroids and ordinary chondrite meteorites is an often debated topic in asteroid science. Q-type asteroids have been shown to display the best spectral match to ordinary chondrites (McFadden, L.A., Gaffey, M.J., McCord, T.B. [1985]. Science 229, 160-163). While the Q-types and ordinary chondrites share some spectral features with S-type asteroids, the S-types have significantly redder spectral slopes than the Q-types in visible and near-infrared wavelengths. This reddening of spectral slope is attributed to the effects of space weathering on the observed surface composition. The analysis by Binzel et al. (Binzel, R.P., Rivkin, A.S., Stuart, J.S., Harris, A.W., Bus, S.J., Burbine, T.H. [2004]. Icarus 170, 259-294) provided a missing link between the Q- and S-type bodies in near-Earth space by showing a reddening of spectral slope in objects from 0.1 to 5 km that corresponded to a transition from Q-type to S-type asteroid spectra, implying that size, and therefore surface age, is related to the relationship between S- and Q-types. The existence of Q-type asteroids in the main-belt was not confirmed until Mothé-Diniz and Nesvorny (Mothé-Diniz, T., Nesvorny, D. [2008]. Astron. Astrophys. 486, L9-L12) found them in young S-type clusters. The young age of these families suggest that the unweathered surface could date to the formation of the family. This leads to the question of whether older S-type main-belt families can contain Q-type objects and display evidence of a transition from Q- to S-type. To answer this question we have carried out a photometric survey of the Koronis family using the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope. This provides a unique opportunity to compare the effects of the space weathering process on potentially ordinary chondrite-like bodies within a population of identical initial conditions. We find a trend in spectral slope for objects 1-5 km that shows the

  5. Integration of Weather Avoidance and Traffic Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, Maria C.; Chamberlain, James P.; Wilson, Sara R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a dynamic convective weather avoidance concept that compensates for weather motion uncertainties; the integration of this weather avoidance concept into a prototype 4-D trajectory-based Airborne Separation Assurance System (ASAS) application; and test results from a batch (non-piloted) simulation of the integrated application with high traffic densities and a dynamic convective weather model. The weather model can simulate a number of pseudo-random hazardous weather patterns, such as slow- or fast-moving cells and opening or closing weather gaps, and also allows for modeling of onboard weather radar limitations in range and azimuth. The weather avoidance concept employs nested "core" and "avoid" polygons around convective weather cells, and the simulations assess the effectiveness of various avoid polygon sizes in the presence of different weather patterns, using traffic scenarios representing approximately two times the current traffic density in en-route airspace. Results from the simulation experiment show that the weather avoidance concept is effective over a wide range of weather patterns and cell speeds. Avoid polygons that are only 2-3 miles larger than their core polygons are sufficient to account for weather uncertainties in almost all cases, and traffic separation performance does not appear to degrade with the addition of weather polygon avoidance. Additional "lessons learned" from the batch simulation study are discussed in the paper, along with insights for improving the weather avoidance concept. Introduction

  6. Climate Prediction - NOAA's National Weather Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statistical Models... MOS Prod GFS-LAMP Prod Climate Past Weather Predictions Weather Safety Weather Radio National Weather Service on FaceBook NWS on Facebook NWS Director Home > Climate > Predictions Climate Prediction Long range forecasts across the U.S. Climate Prediction Web Sites Climate Prediction

  7. Climate Central World Weather Attribution (WWA) project: Real-time extreme weather event attribution analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, Karsten; Otto, Friederike; Uhe, Peter; Allen, Myles; Cullen, Heidi

    2015-04-01

    Extreme weather detection and attribution analysis has emerged as a core theme in climate science over the last decade or so. By using a combination of observational data and climate models it is possible to identify the role of climate change in certain types of extreme weather events such as sea level rise and its contribution to storm surges, extreme heat events and droughts or heavy rainfall and flood events. These analyses are usually carried out after an extreme event has occurred when reanalysis and observational data become available. The Climate Central WWA project will exploit the increasing forecast skill of seasonal forecast prediction systems such as the UK MetOffice GloSea5 (Global seasonal forecasting system) ensemble forecasting method. This way, the current weather can be fed into climate models to simulate large ensembles of possible weather scenarios before an event has fully emerged yet. This effort runs along parallel and intersecting tracks of science and communications that involve research, message development and testing, staged socialization of attribution science with key audiences, and dissemination. The method we employ uses a very large ensemble of simulations of regional climate models to run two different analyses: one to represent the current climate as it was observed, and one to represent the same events in the world that might have been without human-induced climate change. For the weather "as observed" experiment, the atmospheric model uses observed sea surface temperature (SST) data from GloSea5 (currently) and present-day atmospheric gas concentrations to simulate weather events that are possible given the observed climate conditions. The weather in the "world that might have been" experiments is obtained by removing the anthropogenic forcing from the observed SSTs, thereby simulating a counterfactual world without human activity. The anthropogenic forcing is obtained by comparing the CMIP5 historical and natural simulations

  8. Geochemical behavior under tropical weathering of the Barama-Mazaruni greenstone belt at Omai gold mine, Guiana Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voicu, G. [Universite du Quebec a Montreal (Canada). Dept. des Sciences de la Terre et de l' Atmosphere; Omai Gold Mines, Georgetown (Guyana); Bardoux, M. [Universite du Quebec a Montreal (Canada). Dept. des Sciences de la Terre et de l' Atmosphere

    2002-07-01

    Mineralogical, petrographical, and geochemical studies of the weathering profile have been carried out at Omai Au mine, Guyana. The area is underlain by felsic to mafic volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Barama-Mazaruni Supergroup, part of the Paleoproterozoic greenstone belts of the Guiana Shield. Tropical rainy climate has favoured extensive lateritization processes and formation of a deeply weathered regolith. The top of the weathering profile consists of lateritic gravel or is masked by the Pleistocene continental-deltaic Berbice Formation. Mineralogical composition of regolith consists mainly of kaolinite, goethite and quark, and subordinately sericite, feldspar, hematite, pyrite, smectite, heavy minerals, and uncommon mineral phases (nacrite, ephesite, corrensite, guyanaite). A specific feature of the weathering profile at Omai is the preservation of fresh hydrothermal pyrite in the saprolith horizon. Chemical changes during the weathering processes depend on various physicochemical and structural parameters. Consequently, the depth should not be the principal criterion for comparison purposes of the geochemical behavior within the weathering profile, but rather an index that measures the degree of supergene alteration that has affected each analyzed sample, independently of the depth of sampling. Thus, the mineralogical index of alteration (MIA) can provide more accurate information about the behavior of major and trace elements in regolith as opposed to unweathered bedrock. It can also aid in establishing a quantitative relationship between intensity of weathering and mobility (leaching or accumulation) of each element in each analyzed sample. At Omai, some major and trace elements that are commonly considered as immobile (ex: TiO{sub 2}, Zr, etc.) during weathering could become mobile in several rock types and cannot be used to calculate the mass and volume balance. In addition, due to higher ''immobile element'' ratios, the

  9. A Meteorological Supersite for Aviation and Cold Weather Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gultepe, Ismail; Agelin-Chaab, M.; Komar, J.; Elfstrom, G.; Boudala, F.; Zhou, B.

    2018-05-01

    The goal of this study is to better understand atmospheric boundary layer processes and parameters, and to evaluate physical processes for aviation applications using data from a supersite observing site. Various meteorological sensors, including a weather and environmental unmanned aerial vehicle (WE-UAV), and a fog and snow tower (FSOS) observations are part of the project. The PanAm University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) Meteorological Supersite (PUMS) observations are being collected from April 2015 to date. The FSOS tower gathers observations related to rain, snow, fog, and visibility, aerosols, solar radiation, and wind and turbulence, as well as surface and sky temperature. The FSOSs are located at three locations at about 450-800 m away from the PUMS supersite. The WE-UAV measurements representing aerosol, wind speed and direction, as well as temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) are provided during clear weather conditions. Other measurements at the PUMS site include cloud backscattering profiles from CL51 ceilometer, MWR observations of liquid water content (LWC), T, and RH, and Microwave Rain Radar (MRR) reflectivity profile, as well as the present weather type, snow water depth, icing rate, 3D-ultrasonic wind and turbulence, and conventional meteorological observations from compact weather stations, e.g., WXTs. The results based on important weather event studies, representing fog, snow, rain, blowing snow, wind gust, planetary boundary layer (PBL) wind research for UAV, and icing conditions are given. The microphysical parameterizations and analysis processes for each event are provided, but the results should not be generalized for all weather events and be used cautiously. Results suggested that integrated observing systems based on data from a supersite as well as satellite sites can provide better information applicable to aviation meteorology, including PBL weather research, validation of numerical weather model predictions, and

  10. Platinum-group elements in the cores of potassium feldspar spherules from the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary at Caravaca (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palomo, I.

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available The abundant spherules present in the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary layer at Caravaca are diagenetically transformed to potassium feldspar. Before our study no possible relicts of the precursor material had been reported. but in this paper we describe the presence of cores in these spherules that could represent a relict of the «unknown precursor». These cores are made up of C mixed with Si. Mg. AL Cr. Ca among other elements. Laser Ablation System analysis also reveals an enrichment in pe;E could suggest an extraterrestrial origin for this material. PI. Pd and Ir do not show a chondritic ratio: however. asevere modification of their concentration could be expected during the early diagenetic processes.Las esférulas existentes en la lámina de sedimento del tránsito Cretácico-Terciario de la sección de Caravaca han sido transformadas diagenéticamente a feldespato potásico. En este trabajo se describe la existencia de núcleos encontrados en el interior de las esférulas. los cuales' pueden representar relictos del material precursor. Dichos núcleos están constituidos por C. Si. Mg, AL Cr y Ca entre otros elementos. Se pone de relieve, por vez primera, su notable enriquecimiento en elementos del grupo del platino, cuyas relaciones no condríticas pueden ser debidas a la existencia de importantes modificaciones en su concentración inicial causadas por los procesos diagenéticos y por la existencia de materia orgánica.

  11. The studies and experiments on size elimination of fine-grained feldspar from Asia Mining by using Vertical Air Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siribumrungsukha, B.

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Asia Mining Company produces feldspar and supplies to both domestic and overseas industries. Ore from the mine is crushed and ground and then classified by screening. That which is coarsely sized (+40 mesh can be sold to the market, while that which is finely sized is left unsold due to the market requirement that size must be of -40+140 mesh. This research designed and constructed a Vertical Air Classifier in which the fine mineral is fed to a vertical chamber while air is blown from the bottom. The main variables are air flow rates and the length of contact between the air and the mineral (at length of 10 and 15 cm. The air is blown in by air compressor and its rate is controlled by a thin plate orifice. Experiments show that the classifier can eliminate more of the size of -140 mesh as the air flow rate increases. The % fractional recovery at the size of -140 mesh is found to decrease as the air flow rate increases. The length of contact between the air and the mineral influences the elimination and the % fractional recovery as well. When the length is shorter (at 10 cm, the elimination of the size -140 mesh is better and the % fractional recovery at the size -140 mesh in the underflow is lower. At the air flow rate of 6.42 L/S and the length of contact of 10 cm, the size of -140 mesh can be reduced from 37.11% in the feed down to 17.70% in the underflow. The results demonstrate the potential of the Vertical Air Classifier to be further developed in eliminating the size -140 mesh by connecting the classifiers in series.

  12. A subsurface Fe-silicate weathering microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napieralski, S. A.; Buss, H. L.; Roden, E. E.

    2017-12-01

    Traditional models of microbially mediated weathering of primary Fe-bearing minerals often invoke organic ligands (e.g. siderophores) used for nutrient acquisition. However, it is well known that the oxidation of Fe(II) governs the overall rate of Fe-silicate mineral dissolution. Recent work has demonstrated the ability of lithtrophic iron oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) to grow via the oxidation of structural Fe(II) in biotite as a source of metabolic energy with evidence suggesting a direct enzymatic attack on the mineral surface. This process necessitates the involvement of dedicated outer membrane proteins that interact with insoluble mineral phases in a process known as extracellular electron transfer (EET). To investigate the potential role FeOB in a terrestrial subsurface weathering system, samples were obtained from the bedrock-saprolite interface (785 cm depth) within the Rio Icacos Watershed of the Luquillo Mountains in Puerto Rico. Prior geochemical evidence suggests the flux of Fe(II) from the weathering bedrock supports a robust lithotrophic microbial community at depth. Current work confirms the activity of microorganism in situ, with a marked increase in ATP near the bedrock-saprolite interface. Regolith recovered from the interface was used as inoculum to establish enrichment cultures with powderized Fe(II)-bearing minerals serving as the sole energy source. Monitoring of the Fe(II)/Fe(total) ratio and ATP generation suggests growth of microorganisms coupled to the oxidation of mineral bound Fe(II). Analysis of 16S rRNA gene and shotgun metagenomic libraries from in situ and enrichment culture samples lends further support to FeOB involvement in the weathering process. Multiple metagenomic bins related to known FeOB, including Betaproteobacteria genera, contain homologs to model EET systems, including Cyc2 and MtoAB. Our approach combining geochemistry and metagenomics with ongoing microbiological and genomic characterization of novel isolates obtained

  13. Space Weather Research: Indian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Pant, Tarun Kumar; Choudhary, R. K.; Nandy, Dibyendu; Manoharan, P. K.

    2016-12-01

    Space weather, just like its meteorological counterpart, is of extreme importance when it comes to its impact on terrestrial near- and far-space environments. In recent years, space weather research has acquired an important place as a thrust area of research having implications both in space science and technology. The presence of satellites and other technological systems from different nations in near-Earth space necessitates that one must have a comprehensive understanding not only of the origin and evolution of space weather processes but also of their impact on technology and terrestrial upper atmosphere. To address this aspect, nations across the globe including India have been investing in research concerning Sun, solar processes and their evolution from solar interior into the interplanetary space, and their impact on Earth's magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system. In India, over the years, a substantial amount of work has been done in each of these areas by various agencies/institutions. In fact, India has been, and continues to be, at the forefront of space research and has ambitious future programs concerning these areas encompassing space weather. This review aims at providing a glimpse of this Indian perspective on space weather research to the reader and presenting an up-to-date status of the same.

  14. Weather Risk Management in Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Bobriková

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on valuation of a weather derivative with payoffs depending on temperature. We use historical data from the weather station in the Slovak town Košice to obtain unique prices of option contracts in an incomplete market. Numerical examples of prices of some contracts are presented, using the Burn analysis. We provide an example of how a weather contract can be designed to hedge the financial risk of a suboptimal temperature condition. The comparative comparison of the selected option hedging strategies has shown the best results for the producers in agricultural industries who hedges against an unfavourable weather conditions. The results of analysis proved that by buying put option or call option, the farmer establishes the highest payoff in the case of temperature decrease or increase. The Long Straddle Strategy is the most expensive but is available to the farmer who hedges against a high volatility in temperature movement. We conclude with the findings that weather derivatives could be useful tools to diminish the financial losses for agricultural industries highly dependent for temperature.

  15. Bleaching of the post-IR IRSL signal from individual grains of K-feldspar: Implications for single-grain dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smedley, R.K.; Duller, G.A.T.; Roberts, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Post-IR IRSL (pIRIR) signals from K-feldspar grains measured at elevated temperatures are increasingly being used for dating sediments. Unfortunately the pIRIR signal from K-feldspars bleaches more slowly than other signals (e.g. OSL from quartz) upon exposure to daylight, leading to concerns about residual signals remaining at deposition. However, earlier studies have not assessed whether the pIRIR signal bleaches at the same rate in all feldspar grains. In this study laboratory bleaching experiments have been conducted and for the first time the results show that the rate at which the pIRIR signal from individual K-feldspar grains bleach varies. To determine whether grain-to-grain variability in bleaching rate has a dominant control on equivalent dose (D e ) distributions determined using single grains, analysis was undertaken on three samples with independent age control from different depositional environments (two aeolian and one glaciofluvial). The D e value determined from each grain was compared with the rate at which the pIRIR 225 signal from the grain bleaches. The bleaching rate of each grain was assessed by giving a 52 Gy dose and measuring the residual D e after bleaching for an hour in a solar simulator. There is no clear relationship between the rate at which the pIRIR 225 signal of an individual grain bleaches and the magnitude of its D e . It is concluded that variability in the bleaching rate of the pIRIR 225 signal from one grain to another does not appear to be a dominant control on single grain D e distributions. - Highlights: • The bleaching rate of the pIRIR signal from single K-feldspar grains was assessed. • The pIRIR 225 signal bleaches more rapidly than the pIRIR 290 signal. • pIRIR 225 and pIRIR 290 signals reach the same level after 4–20 h of bleaching. • The bleaching rate of the pIRIR signal varies from one grain to another. • Variable pIRIR bleaching rates do not control single-grain D e distributions

  16. Wadi Ladid Al-JI,Dan Alkali Feldspar Granites and Associated Pegmatites, North Eastern Eser, Egypt:Geology,Mineralogy and Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Steet, A.A.; Ayoub, R.R.; Bakhit, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    This article deals with the geology, structure, mineralogy and radioactivity of the alkali feldspar granites at wadi Ladid al-Ji,dan, north Eastern Desert of Egypt. Geologically, the area consists mainly of alkali feldspar granites. These granites are medium to coarse grained, pink to red in colour and form numbers of moderate to relatively high elevated outcrops. These rocks are altered in some parts due to secondary processes especially along the fault zones and contacts. The area displays primary and secondary structures. Primary structures comprise layering, volcanic flows, vesicular tops of lavas and volcanic bombs. The secondary structures are represented by exfoliation, joints and faults. The granites are dissected by several sets of joints predominating in the N-S direction, dipping 84°-88° mainly to west; E-W direction, dipping 70°-75° mainly to south and NW-SE direction, dipping 80°-82° to SW direction. The majority of joints are tension ones. These tension joints are commonly filled with quartz, feldspars, epidote, iron oxides, manganese oxides and aplite. The studied area is dissected by major regional faults. Along the fault zones; the granites are marked by fault breccia and alteration features, especially silicification, hematitization, kaolinitization and chloritization. The area is cutting by faults trending mainly in N-S, NE-SW and NNW-SSE directions. The average uranium and thorium contents of the alkali feldspar granites are 12 and 23 ppm and reaches up to 36 and 37 ppm in the normal pegmatites. In the anomalous pegmatites the maximum values recorded are 91 and 72 ppm. Generally, the averages of uranium and thorium contents in the studied pegmatites are higher than that of the world and Egyptian uraniferous pegmatites. The high uranium content in alkali feldspar granites is related to the presence of some accessory minerals such as zircon, fluorite and apatite but the high uranium content in the pegmatites is related to the presence of

  17. The sensitivity of snowfall to weather states over Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norin, Lars; Devasthale, Abhay; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.

    2017-09-01

    For a high-latitude country like Sweden snowfall is an important contributor to the regional water cycle. Furthermore, snowfall impacts surface properties, affects atmospheric thermodynamics, has implications for traffic and logistics management, disaster preparedness, and also impacts climate through changes in surface albedo and turbulent heat fluxes. For Sweden it has been shown that large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns, or weather states, are important for precipitation variability. Although the link between atmospheric circulation patterns and precipitation has been investigated for rainfall there are no studies focused on the sensitivity of snowfall to weather states over Sweden.In this work we investigate the response of snowfall to eight selected weather states. These weather states consist of four dominant wind directions together with cyclonic and anticyclonic circulation patterns and enhanced positive and negative phases of the North Atlantic Oscillation. The presented analysis is based on multiple data sources, such as ground-based radar measurements, satellite observations, spatially interpolated in situ observations, and reanalysis data. The data from these sources converge to underline the sensitivity of falling snow over Sweden to the different weather states.In this paper we examine both average snowfall intensities and snowfall accumulations associated with the different weather states. It is shown that, even though the heaviest snowfall intensities occur during conditions with winds from the south-west, the largest contribution to snowfall accumulation arrives with winds from the south-east. Large differences in snowfall due to variations in the North Atlantic Oscillation are shown as well as a strong effect of cyclonic and anticyclonic circulation patterns. Satellite observations are used to reveal the vertical structures of snowfall during the different weather states.

  18. Weather Derivatives – Origin, Types and Application

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Binkowski

    2008-01-01

    The number of companies that are exposed to the revenues loss risk caused by weather variability is still increasing. The businesses that are mostly exposed to weather risk are following: energy, agriculture, constructions and transport. That situation has initiated dynamic growth of weather derivatives markets as well as the awareness of the weather risk among the market participants. Presently, the weather derivatives markets evaluate rapidly in all the mature economies: USA, Asia and Europ...

  19. Artificial Weathering of Biotite and Uranium Sorption Characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Baik, Min Hoon; Lee, Jae Kwang

    2009-01-01

    An experiment for uranium sorption onto fresh and weathered biotites was performed. After centrifugation, concentrations of uranium in the supernatants were analyzed using ICP-MS, and biotite samples were investigated using XRD and SEM. With powdered biotites (<3 mm in size), we have conducted uranium sorption experiments about fresh and weathered biotites to obtain uranium sorption amounts in various pH conditions. The uranium sorption was not high at a low pH (e.g., pH 3), but increased with increasing pH. There were lower uranium sorption by the weathered biotites than by the fresh ones, and the difference was much larger at higher pH (e.g., pH 11). The lower sorption values of uranium by the weathered biotites may be caused by a change of mineral surfaces and a chemical behavior of surrounding dissolved elements. It seems that the uranium-mineral interaction has been diminished, especially, in the weathered biotite by a destruction and dissolution of preferential sorption sites on the mineral surfaces and by the colloidal formation from dissolved elements.

  20. Typhoon impacts on chemical weathering source provenance of a High Standing Island watershed, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Kevin J.; Carey, Anne E.; You, Chen-Feng

    2017-10-01

    Chemical weathering source provenance changes associated with Typhoon Mindulle (2004) were identified for the Choshui River Watershed in west-central Taiwan using radiogenic Sr isotope (87Sr/86Sr) and major ion chemistry analysis of water samples collected before, during, and following the storm event. Storm water sampling over 72 h was conducted in 3 h intervals, allowing for novel insight into weathering regime changes in response to intense rainfall events. Chemical weathering sources were determined to be bulk silicate and disseminated carbonate minerals at the surface and silicate contributions from deep thermal waters. Loss on ignition analysis of collected rock samples indicate disseminated carbonate can compose over 25% by weight of surface mineralogy, but typically makes up ∼2-3% of watershed rock. 87Sr/86Sr and major element molar ratios indicate that Typhoon Mindulle caused a weathering regime switch from normal flow incorporating a deep thermal signature to that of a system dominated by surface weathering. The data suggest release of silicate solute rich soil pore waters during storm events, creating a greater relative contribution of silicate weathering to the solute load during periods of increased precipitation and runoff. Partial depletion of this soil solute reservoir and possible erosion enhanced carbonate weathering lead to increased importance of carbonates to the weathering regime as the storm continues. Major ion data indicate that complex mica weathering (muscovite, biotite, illite, chlorite) may represent an important silicate weathering pathway in the watershed. Deep thermal waters represent an important contribution to river solutes during normal non-storm flow conditions. Sulfuric acid sourced from pyrite weathering is likely a major weathering agent in the Choshui River watershed.

  1. Travel in adverse winter weather conditions by blind pedestrians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-31

    Winter weather creates many orientation and mobility (O&M) challenges for people who are visually impaired. Getting the cane tip stuck is one of the noticeable challenges when traveling in snow, particularly when the walking surface is covered in dee...

  2. Effect of processing method on accelerated weathering of wood-flour/HDPE composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole M. Stark; Laurent M. Matuana; Craig M. Clemons

    2003-01-01

    Wood-plastic lumber is promoted as a low maintenance high-durability product. When exposed to accelerated weathering, however, wood-plastic composites may experience a color change and/or loss in mechanical properties. Different methods of manufacturing wood-plastic composites lead to different surface characteristics, which can influence weathering, In this study, 50...

  3. Space Weather, Environment and Societies

    CERN Document Server

    Lilensten, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Our planet exists within a space environment affected by constantly changing solar atmosphere producing cosmic particles and electromagnetic waves. This "space weather" profoundly influences the performance of our technology because we primarily use two means for transmitting information and energy; namely, electromagnetic waves and electricity. On an everyday basis, we have developed methods to cope with the normal conditions. However, the sun remains a fiery star whose 'angry' outbursts can potentially destroy spacecrafts, kill astronauts, melt electricity transformers, stop trains, and generally wreak havoc with human activities. Space Weather is the developing field within astronomy that aims at predicting the sun’s violent activity and minimizing the impacts on our daily lives. Space Weather, Environment, and Societies explains why our technological societies are so dependent on solar activity and how the Sun disturbs the transmission of information and energy. Footnotes expand specific points and the ...

  4. Simulation and Data Analytics for Mobile Road Weather Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chettri, S. R.; Evans, J. D.; Tislin, D.

    2016-12-01

    Numerous algorithmic and theoretical considerations arise in simulating a vehicle-based weather observation network known as the Mobile Platform Environmental Data (MoPED). MoPED integrates sensor data from a fleet of commercial vehicles (about 600 at last count, with thousands more to come) as they travel interstate, state and local routes and metropolitan areas throughout the conterminous United States. The MoPED simulator models a fleet of anywhere between 1000-10,000 vehicles that travel a highway network encoded in a geospatial database, starting and finishing at random times and moving at randomly-varying speeds. Virtual instruments aboard these vehicles interpolate surface weather parameters (such as temperature and pressure) from the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) data series, an hourly, coast-to-coast 3km grid of weather parameters modeled by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction. Whereas real MoPED sensors have noise characteristics that lead to drop-outs, drift, or physically unrealizable values, our simulation introduces a variety of noise distributions into the parameter values inferred from HRRR (Fig. 1). Finally, the simulator collects weather readings from the National Weather Service's Automated Surface Observation System (ASOS, comprised of over 800 airports around the country) for comparison, validation, and analytical experiments. The simulator's MoPED-like weather data stream enables studies like the following: Experimenting with data analysis and calibration methods - e.g., by comparing noisy vehicle data with ASOS "ground truth" in close spatial and temporal proximity (e.g., 10km, 10 min) (Fig. 2). Inter-calibrating different vehicles' sensors when they pass near each other. Detecting spatial structure in the surface weather - such as dry lines, sudden changes in humidity that accompany severe weather - and estimating how many vehicles are needed to reliably map these structures and their motion. Detecting bottlenecks in the

  5. Space Weather Forecasting at IZMIRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidash, S. P.; Belov, A. V.; Abunina, M. A.; Abunin, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Since 1998, the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) has had an operating heliogeophysical service—the Center for Space Weather Forecasts. This center transfers the results of basic research in solar-terrestrial physics into daily forecasting of various space weather parameters for various lead times. The forecasts are promptly available to interested consumers. This article describes the center and the main types of forecasts it provides: solar and geomagnetic activity, magnetospheric electron fluxes, and probabilities of proton increases. The challenges associated with the forecasting of effects of coronal mass ejections and coronal holes are discussed. Verification data are provided for the center's forecasts.

  6. Vodcasting space weather: The Space Weather FX vodcast series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins Petersen, C.; Erickson, P. J.

    2008-06-01

    The topic of space weather is the subject of a series of nine vodcasts (video podcasts) being created by MIT Haystack Observatory (Westford, Massachusetts, USA) and Loch Ness Productions (Groton, Massachusetts, USA). This paper describes the project, its science and outreach goals, and introduces the principal participants.

  7. Modeling Silicate Weathering for Elevated CO2 and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, E. W.

    2016-12-01

    A reactive transport model (RTM) is used to assess CO2 drawdown by silicate weathering over a wide range of temperature, pCO2, and infiltration rates for basalts and granites. Although RTM's have been used extensively to model weathering of basalts and granites for present-day conditions, we extend such modeling to higher CO2 that could have existed during the Archean and Proterozoic. We also consider a wide range of surface temperatures and infiltration rates. We consider several model basalt and granite compositions. We normally impose CO2 in equilibrium with the various atmospheric ranges modeled and CO2 is delivered to the weathering zone by aqueous transport. We also consider models with fixed CO2 (aq) throughout the weathering zone as could occur in soils with partial water saturation or with plant respiration, which can strongly influence pH and mineral dissolution rates. For the modeling, we use Kinflow: a model developed at Yale that includes mineral dissolution and precipitation under kinetic control, aqueous speciation, surface erosion, dynamic porosity, permeability, and mineral surface areas via sub-grid-scale grain models, and exchange of volatiles at the surface. Most of the modeling is done in 1D, but some comparisons to 2D domains with heterogeneous permeability are made. We find that when CO2 is fixed only at the surface, the pH tends toward higher values for basalts than granites, in large part due to the presence of more divalent than monovalent cations in the primary minerals, tending to decrease rates of mineral dissolution. Weathering rates increase (as expected) with increasing CO2 and temperature. This modeling is done with the support of the Virtual Planetary Laboratory.

  8. Verification of Space Weather Forecasts using Terrestrial Weather Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, E.; Murray, S.; Pope, E.; Stephenson, D.; Sharpe, M.; Bingham, S.; Jackson, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Met Office Space Weather Operations Centre (MOSWOC) provides a range of 24/7 operational space weather forecasts, alerts, and warnings, which provide valuable information on space weather that can degrade electricity grids, radio communications, and satellite electronics. Forecasts issued include arrival times of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and probabilistic forecasts for flares, geomagnetic storm indices, and energetic particle fluxes and fluences. These forecasts are produced twice daily using a combination of output from models such as Enlil, near-real-time observations, and forecaster experience. Verification of forecasts is crucial for users, researchers, and forecasters to understand the strengths and limitations of forecasters, and to assess forecaster added value. To this end, the Met Office (in collaboration with Exeter University) has been adapting verification techniques from terrestrial weather, and has been working closely with the International Space Environment Service (ISES) to standardise verification procedures. We will present the results of part of this work, analysing forecast and observed CME arrival times, assessing skill using 2x2 contingency tables. These MOSWOC forecasts can be objectively compared to those produced by the NASA Community Coordinated Modelling Center - a useful benchmark. This approach cannot be taken for the other forecasts, as they are probabilistic and categorical (e.g., geomagnetic storm forecasts give probabilities of exceeding levels from minor to extreme). We will present appropriate verification techniques being developed to address these forecasts, such as rank probability skill score, and comparing forecasts against climatology and persistence benchmarks. As part of this, we will outline the use of discrete time Markov chains to assess and improve the performance of our geomagnetic storm forecasts. We will also discuss work to adapt a terrestrial verification visualisation system to space weather, to help

  9. Atmospheric Diabatic Heating in Different Weather States and the General Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, William B.; Zhang, Yuanchong; Tselioudis, George

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of multiple global satellite products identifies distinctive weather states of the atmosphere from the mesoscale pattern of cloud properties and quantifies the associated diabatic heating/cooling by radiative flux divergence, precipitation, and surface sensible heat flux. The results show that the forcing for the atmospheric general circulation is a very dynamic process, varying strongly at weather space-time scales, comprising relatively infrequent, strong heating events by ''stormy'' weather and more nearly continuous, weak cooling by ''fair'' weather. Such behavior undercuts the value of analyses of time-averaged energy exchanges in observations or numerical models. It is proposed that an analysis of the joint time-related variations of the global weather states and the general circulation on weather space-time scales might be used to establish useful ''feedback like'' relationships between cloud processes and the large-scale circulation.

  10. Investigating the resetting of OSL signals in rock surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza; Murray, Andrew S.; Jain, Mayank

    2011-01-01

    were insensitive. Dose recovery tests using solar simulator and IR diodes on both K-feldspar grains and solid slices taken from the inner parts of the rocks are discussed. Preheat plateau results using surface grains and slices show that significant thermal transfer in naturally bleached samples can...... be avoided by keeping preheat temperatures low. Equivalent doses from surface K-feldspar grains were highly scattered and much larger than expected (0.02 Gy to >100 Gy), while solid surface slices gave more reproducible small doses (mean = 0.17±0.02 Gy, n = 32). Neither crushing nor partial bleaching were...... factors were derived for two samples. These indicate that, for instance, bleaching at a depth of 2 mm into these samples occurs at about ∼28% of the rate at the surface. We conclude that it should be possible to derive meaningful burial doses of >1 Gy from such cobbles; younger samples would probably...

  11. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, K.; Steefel, Carl; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2009-01-01

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation, and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka Marine Terrace Chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized [White A. F., Schulz M. S., Vivit D. V., Blum A., Stonestrom D. A. and Anderson S. P. (2008) Chemical weathering of a Marine Terrace Chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California. I: interpreting the long-term controls on chemical weathering based on spatial and temporal element and mineral distributions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72 (1), 36-68] and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisserand [Hellmann R. and Tisserand D. (2006) Dissolution kinetics as a function of the Gibbs free energy of reaction: An experimental study based on albite feldspar. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 70 (2), 364-383] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [Oelkers E. H., Schott J. and Devidal J. L. (1994) The effect of aluminum, pH, and chemical affinity on the rates of aluminosilicate dissolution reactions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 58 (9), 2011-2024], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Additionally, observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at

  12. Weather swap as an instrument for weather risk management in wheat production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Todor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A special type of weather derivatives are weather forwards and they exists mostly in the form of weather swaps. Hedging effectiveness in wheat production with and without weather swap was analyzed in this paper using stochastic dominance. The results show that the effect of risk reduction is significant using weather swap, but geographical- basis risk and production-related basis risk are important factor that reduce the utility of weather derivatives.

  13. A geochemical record of the link between chemical weathering and the East Asian summer monsoon during the late Holocene preserved in lacustrine sediments from Poyang Lake, central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Wei, Gangjian; Li, Wuxian; Liu, Ying

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents relatively high-resolution geochemical records spanning the past 4000 cal yr BP obtained from the lacustrine sediments of Poyang Lake in central China. The variations in the intensity of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) are traced using the K/Na, Ti/Na, Al/K, kaolinite/illite and clay/feldspar ratios, together with the chemical index of alteration (CIA), as indicators of chemical weathering. During the last 4000 years, the proxy records of chemical weathering from Poyang Lake exhibit an overall enhanced trend, consistent with regional hydrological changes in previous independent records. Further comparisons and analyses demonstrate that regional moisture variations in central China is inversely correlated with the EASM intensity, with weak EASM generating high precipitation in central China. Our data reveal three intervals of dramatically dry climatic conditions (i.e., ca. 4000-3200 cal yr BP, ca. 2800-2400 cal yr BP, and ca. 500-200 cal yr BP). A period of weak chemical weathering, related to cold and dry climatic conditions, occurred during the Little Ice Age (LIA), whereas more intense chemical weathering, reflecting warm and humid climatic conditions, was recorded during the Medieval Warm Period (MWP). Besides, an intensification of chemical weathering in Poyang Lake during the late Holocene agrees well with strong ENSO activity, suggesting that moisture variations in central China may be predominantly driven by ENSO variability.

  14. Restoration of severely weathered wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Sam. Williams; Mark. Knaebe

    2000-01-01

    Severely weathered window units were used to test various restoration methods and pretreatments. Sanded and unsanded units were pretreated with a consolidant or water repellent preservative, finished with an oil- or latex-based paint system, and exposed outdoors near Madison, WI, for five years. Pretreatments were applied to both window sashes (stiles and rails) and...

  15. Weather delay costs to trucking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Estimates of the nations freight sector of transportation range to upwards of $600 billion of total gross domestic product with 70 percent of total value and 60 percent of total weight moving by truck. Weather-related delays can add significantly ...

  16. Synoptic weather conditions during BOBMEX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    sions when the strong wind field appeared spread over the peninsula and central India. This was also seen both in OLR and in vertical velocity fields prepared by National Centre for Medium. Range Weather Forecasting (NCMRWF). A band of low OLR (150–160watts/sqm) could be seen in the south and adjoining central ...

  17. NOAA Weather Radio - All Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-Zero All Hazards Logo Emergency Alert Description Event Codes Fact Sheet FAQ Organization Search -event information for all types of hazards: weather (e.g., tornadoes, floods), natural (e.g Management or Preparedness, civil defense, police or mayor/commissioner sets up linkages to send messages on

  18. A decade of weather extremes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coumou, Dim; Rahmstorf, Stefan

    The ostensibly large number of recent extreme weather events has triggered intensive discussions, both in- and outside the scientific community, on whether they are related to global warming. Here, we review the evidence and argue that for some types of extreme - notably heatwaves, but also

  19. Fatigue Strength of Weathering Steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kunz, Ludvík; Lukáš, Petr; Klusák, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2012), s. 18-22 ISSN 1392-1320 Grant - others:GA MPO(CZ) FT/TA5/076 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : fatigue of weathering steel * corrosion pits * fatigue notch factor Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 0.522, year: 2012

  20. Dynamic Weather Routes Architecture Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Hassan; Eshow, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic Weather Routes Architecture Overview, presents the high level software architecture of DWR, based on the CTAS software framework and the Direct-To automation tool. The document also covers external and internal data flows, required dataset, changes to the Direct-To software for DWR, collection of software statistics, and the code structure.

  1. Skywatch: The Western Weather Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Richard A.

    The western United States is a region of mountains and valleys with the world's largest ocean next door. Its weather is unique. This book discusses how water, wind, and environmental conditions combine to create the climatic conditions of the region. Included are sections describing: fronts; cyclones; precipitation; storms; tornadoes; hurricanes;…

  2. The study of water droplets electrical charging effect on spray tower scrubber efficiency for feldspar particles removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Golmohammadi

    2012-01-01

    positive chargeis higher than electric intervention with negative charge, and with the increase of water flow rate there is an increase in the collection efficiency of the inhalable and non-inhalable feldspar particles.

  3. Accelerated laboratory weathering of acrylic lens materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Thomas; Richter, Steffen; Kogler, René; Pasierb, Mike; Walby, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Flat samples from various poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) formulations were subjected to outdoor weathering in Arizona and Florida, EMMAQUA® accelerated outdoor weathering, and two accelerated laboratory weathering procedures at 3 Sun irradiance which, imitate dry (Arizona) and wet (Florida) conditions. The main mode of degradation is yellowing and not the generation of haze for any weathering procedure within the investigated radiant exposure. Higher UV absorber concentrations lead to smaller changes in optical properties and in the resulting relative concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) module efficiencies. Comparison of sample properties after various weathering procedures reveals that the influence of weathering factors other than radiant exposure depends on the sample as well.

  4. Using ISCCP Weather States to Decompose Cloud Radiative Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, L.; Rossow, W. B.

    2012-01-01

    The presentation will examine the shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) cloud radiative effect CRE (aka "cloud radiative forcing") at the top-of-the-atmosphere and surface of ISCCP weather states (aka "cloud regimes") in three distinct geographical zones, one tropical and two mid-latitude. Our goal is to understand and quantify the contribution of the different cloud regimes to the planetary radiation budget. In the tropics we find that the three most convectively active states are the ones with largest SW, LW and net TOA CRE contributions to the overall daytime tropical CRE budget. They account for 59%, 71% and 55% of the total CRE, respectively. The boundary layer-dominated weather states account for only 34% of the total SW CRE and 41% of the total net CRE, so to focus only on them in cloud feedback studies may be imprudent. We also find that in both the northern and southern midlatitude zones only two weather states, the first and third most convectively active with large amounts of nimbostratus-type clouds, contribute ",40% to both the SW and net TOA CRE budgets, highlighting the fact that cloud regimes associated with frontal systems are not only important for weather (precipitation) but also for climate (radiation budget). While all cloud regimes in all geographical zones have a slightly larger SFC than TOA SW CRE, implying cooling of the surface and slight warming of the atmosphere, their LW radiative effects are more subtle: in the tropics the weather states with plentiful high clouds warm the atmosphere while those with copious amounts of low clouds cool the atmosphere. In both midlatitude zones only the weather states with peak cloud fractions at levels above 440 mbar warm the atmosphere while all the rest cool it. These results make the connection of the contrasting CRE effects to the atmospheric dynamics more explicit - "storms" tend to warm the atmosphere whereas fair weather clouds cool it, suggesting a positive feedback of clouds on weather systems. The

  5. Geomorphology's role in the study of weathering of cultural stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Gregory A.; Meierding, Thomas C.; Paradise, Thomas R.

    2002-10-01

    Great monumental places—Petra, Giza, Angkor, Stonehenge, Tikal, Macchu Picchu, Rapa Nui, to name a few—are links to our cultural past. They evoke a sense of wonderment for their aesthetic fascination if not for their seeming permanence over both cultural and physical landscapes. However, as with natural landforms, human constructs are subject to weathering and erosion. Indeed, many of our cultural resources suffer from serious deterioration, some natural, some enhanced by human impact. Groups from the United Nations to local civic and tourism assemblies are deeply interested in maintaining and preserving such cultural resources, from simple rock art to great temples. Geomorphologists trained in interacting systems, process and response to thresholds, rates of change over time, and spatial variation of weathering processes and effects are able to offer insight into how deterioration occurs and what can be done to ameliorate the impact. Review of recent literature and case studies presented here demonstrate methodological and theoretical advances that have resulted from the study of cultural stone weathering. Because the stone was carved at a known date to a "baseline" or zero-datum level, some of the simplest methods (e.g., assessing surface weathering features or measuring surface recession in the field) provide useful data on weathering rates and processes. Such data are difficult or impossible to obtain in "natural" settings. Cultural stone weathering studies demonstrate the importance of biotic and saline weathering agents and the significance of weathering factors such as exposure (microclimate) and human impact. More sophisticated methods confirm these observations, but also reveal discrepancies between field and laboratory studies. This brings up two important caveats for conservators and geomorphologists. For the conservator, are laboratory and natural setting studies really analogous and useful for assessing stone damage? For the geomorphologist, does

  6. Caustic Waste-Soil Weathering Reactions and Their Impacts on Trace Contaminant Migration and Sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Jon Chorover; Dr. Karl T. Mueller; Dr. Peggy O'Day; R. Jeff Serne

    2006-01-01

    The principal goal of this project was to assess the molecular nature and stability of radionuclide immobilization during weathering reactions in bulk Hanford sediments and their high surface area clay mineral constituents

  7. Synoptic-scale fire weather conditions in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayasaka, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi L.; Bieniek, Peter A.

    2016-09-01

    Recent concurrent widespread fires in Alaska are evaluated to assess their associated synoptic-scale weather conditions. Several periods of high fire activity from 2003 to 2015 were identified using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) hotspot data by considering the number of daily hotspots and their continuity. Fire weather conditions during the top six periods of high fire activity in the fire years of 2004, 2005, 2009, and 2015 were analyzed using upper level (500 hPa) and near surface level (1000 hPa) atmospheric reanalysis data. The top four fire-periods occurred under similar unique high-pressure fire weather conditions related to Rossby wave breaking (RWB). Following the ignition of wildfires, fire weather conditions related to RWB events typically result in two hotspot peaks occurring before and after high-pressure systems move from south to north across Alaska. A ridge in the Gulf of Alaska resulted in southwesterly wind during the first hotspot peak. After the high-pressure system moved north under RWB conditions, the Beaufort Sea High developed and resulted in relatively strong easterly wind in Interior Alaska and a second (largest) hotspot peak during each fire period. Low-pressure-related fire weather conditions occurring under cyclogenesis in the Arctic also resulted in high fire activity under southwesterly wind with a single large hot-spot peak.

  8. Structural, K-Ar and 40Ar-39Ar age studies of adularia K-feldspars from the Lizard Complex, England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliday, A.N.; Mitchell, J.G.

    1976-01-01

    Conventional K-Ar analyses of fifteen adularia feldspars from the Lizard Complex yield ages between 181+-2 Ma and 220+-3 Ma (with one exception from Holseer Cove yielding an age of 156+-3 Ma). The feldspars are dominantly monoclinic but most contain a minor but constant proportion of triclinic material with variable triclinicity. An inverse correlation exists between triclinicity and K-Ar age interpreted as representing argon loss related to the structural state. Extrapolation of the data to zero triclinicity indicates a true age of 210-220 Ma. 40 Ar- 39 Ar stepwise degassing analyses yield plateau ages related to the K-Ar ages and not the crystallization age. The results can be explained in terms of postcrystallization Al-Si ordering resulting in argon loss from lattice sites which under normal diffusion conditions requires a range of activation energies. The Holseer Cove sample is monoclinic and an 40 Ar- 39 Ar stepheating analysis suggests a later crystallization at 160-170 Ma. Neither primary crystallization nor spontaneous ordering through time explain the origin of the triclinic adularia. It is suggested that ordering has been induced by the passage of low-temperature alkaline solutions at a subsequent point in geological time. Argon loss by ordering could explain the low ages found using both K-Ar and 40 Ar- 39 Ar stepheating methods when applied to feldspars in general. The 210-220 Ma, and 160-170 Ma hydrothermal events affected much of southwest England and are probably related to major geotectonic movements in western Europe. (Auth.)

  9. A Reactive Transport Model for Marcellus Shale Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Heidari, P.; Jin, L.; Williams, J.; Brantley, S.

    2017-12-01

    Shale formations account for 25% of the land surface globally. One of the most productive shale-gas formations is the Marcellus, a black shale that is rich in organic matter and pyrite. As a first step toward understanding how Marcellus shale interacts with water, we developed a reactive transport model to simulate shale weathering under ambient temperature and pressure conditions, constrained by soil chemistry and water data. The simulation was carried out for 10,000 years, assuming bedrock weathering and soil genesis began right after the last glacial maximum. Results indicate weathering was initiated by pyrite dissolution for the first 1,000 years, leading to low pH and enhanced dissolution of chlorite and precipitation of iron hydroxides. After pyrite depletion, chlorite dissolved slowly, primarily facilitated by the presence of CO2 and organic acids, forming vermiculite as a secondary mineral. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the most important controls on weathering include the presence of reactive gases (CO2 and O2), specific surface area, and flow velocity of infiltrating meteoric water. The soil chemistry and mineralogy data could not be reproduced without including the reactive gases. For example, pyrite remained in the soil even after 10,000 years if O2 was not continuously present in the soil column; likewise, chlorite remained abundant and porosity remained small with the presence of soil CO2. The field observations were only simulated successfully when the specific surface areas of the reactive minerals were 1-3 orders of magnitude smaller than surface area values measured for powdered minerals, reflecting the lack of accessibility of fluids to mineral surfaces and potential surface coating. An increase in the water infiltration rate enhanced weathering by removing dissolution products and maintaining far-from-equilibrium conditions. We conclude that availability of reactive surface area and transport of H2O and gases are the most important

  10. NOAA Weather and Climate Toolkit (WCT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Weather and Climate Toolkit is an application that provides simple visualization and data export of weather and climatological data archived at NCDC. The...

  11. Vehicle automation and weather : challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-25

    Adverse weather has major impacts on the safety and operations of all roads, from signalized arterials to Interstate highways. Weather affects driver behavior, vehicle performance, pavement friction, and roadway infrastructure, thereby increasing the...

  12. National Weather Service: Watch, Warning, Advisory Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    weather.gov Site Map News Organization Search for: SPC NCEP All NOAA Search by city or zip ... Fire Wx Outlooks RSS Feeds E-Mail Alerts Weather Information Storm Reports Storm Reports Dev. NWS Hazards ...

  13. Integrating Sphere-based Weathering Device

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description:In the artificial ultraviolet (UV) weathering of materials, a need exists for weathering devices that can uniformly illuminate test specimens with a high...

  14. Climate change & extreme weather vulnerability assessment framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The Federal Highway Administrations (FHWAs) Climate Change and Extreme Weather Vulnerability : Assessment Framework is a guide for transportation agencies interested in assessing their vulnerability : to climate change and extreme weather event...

  15. World War II Weather Record Transmittances

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — World War II Weather Record Transmittances are a record of the weather and meteorological data observed during World War II and transferred to the archive. It...

  16. Newspaper Clippings and Articles (Weather-related)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather-related newspaper articles and photos, almost exclusively from Baltimore, MD and nearby areas. Includes storm damage, rainfall reports, and weather's affect...

  17. Fire Danger and Fire Weather Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Weather Service (formerly Weather Bureau) and Forest Service developed a program to track meteorological conditions conducive to forest fires, resulting...

  18. Adaptive Weather Forecasting using Local Meteorological Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, T.G.; Keesman, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    In general, meteorological parameters such as temperature, rain and global radiation are important for agricultural systems. Anticipating on future conditions is most often needed in these systems. Weather forecasts then become of substantial importance. As weather forecasts are subject to

  19. SIGWX Charts - High Level Significant Weather

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — High level significant weather (SIGWX) forecasts are provided for the en-route portion of international flights. NOAA's National Weather Service Aviation Center...

  20. Weather Derivatives – Origin, Types and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Binkowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of companies that are exposed to the revenues loss risk caused by weather variability is still increasing. The businesses that are mostly exposed to weather risk are following: energy, agriculture, constructions and transport. That situation has initiated dynamic growth of weather derivatives markets as well as the awareness of the weather risk among the market participants. Presently, the weather derivatives markets evaluate rapidly in all the mature economies: USA, Asia and Europe. Constructing weather derivatives relies on qu- antifying climate factors in the form of indexes, what is quite simple task, more difficultly can be gathering precise historical data of required climate factors. Taking into consideration so far development of derivatives especially the financial derivatives based on different types of indexes financial market has at disposal wide range of different types of proved derivatives (futures, forward, options, swaps, which can be successfully utilised on the weather-driven markets both for hedging weather risk and speculating.

  1. Infrared spectral reflectances of asteroid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, H. P.; Veeder, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    This review compares the types of compositional information produced by three complementary techniques used in infrared observations of asteroid surfaces: broadband JHKL photometry, narrow band photometry, and multiplex spectroscopy. The high information content of these infrared observations permits definitive interpretations of asteroid surface compositions in terms of the major meteoritic minerals (olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar, hydrous silicates, and metallic Ni-Fe). These studies emphasize the individuality of asteroid surface compositions, the inadequacy of simple comparisons with spectra of meteorites, and the need to coordinate spectral measurements of all types to optimize diagnostic capabilities.

  2. Modern sedimentation patterns in Lake El'gygytgyn, NE Russia, derived from surface sediment and inlet streams samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wennrich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lake El'gygytgyn/NE Russia holds a continuous 3.58 Ma sediment record, which is regarded as the most long-lasting climate archive of the terrestrial Arctic. Based on multi-proxy geochemical, mineralogical, and granulometric analyses of surface sediment, inlet stream and bedrock samples, supplemented by statistical methods, major processes influencing the modern sedimentation in the lake were investigated. Grain-size parameters and chemical elements linked to the input of feldspars from acidic bedrock indicate a wind-induced two-cell current system as major driver of sediment transport and accumulation processes in Lake El'gygytgyn. The distribution of mafic rock related elements in the sediment on the lake floor can be traced back to the input of weathering products of basaltic rocks in the catchment. Obvious similarities in the spatial variability of manganese and heavy metals indicate sorption or co-precipitation of these elements with Fe and Mn hydroxides and oxides. But the similar distribution of organic matter and clay contents might also point to a fixation to organic components and clay minerals. An enrichment of mercury in the inlet streams might be indicative of neotectonic activity around the lake. The results of this study add to the fundamental knowledge of the modern lake processes of Lake El'gygytgyn and its lake-catchment interactions, and thus, yield crucial insights for the interpretation of paleo-data from this unique archive.

  3. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, K.; Steefel, C. I.; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2009-02-25

    mass removed from the weathering profile. Our analysis suggests that secondary clay precipitation is as important as aqueous transport in governing the amount of dissolution that occurs within a profile because clay minerals exert a strong control over the reaction affinity of the dissolving primary minerals. The modeling also indicates that the weathering advance rate and the total mass of mineral dissolved is controlled by the thermodynamic saturation of the primary dissolving phases plagioclase and K-feldspar, as is evident from the difference in propagation rates of the reaction fronts for the two minerals despite their very similar kinetic rate laws.

  4. Efficient Ways to Learn Weather Radar Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Yeary, M. B.; Zhang, Guifu

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. weather radar network is currently being upgraded with dual-polarization capability. Weather radar polarimetry is an interdisciplinary area of engineering and meteorology. This paper presents efficient ways to learn weather radar polarimetry through several basic and practical topics. These topics include: 1) hydrometeor scattering model…

  5. 49 CFR 195.224 - Welding: Weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Weather. 195.224 Section 195.224 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.224 Welding: Weather. Welding must be protected from weather conditions that...

  6. The greenhouse effect and extreme weather

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenaas, Sigbjoern; Kvamstoe, Nils Gunnar

    2002-01-01

    The article asserts that an anthropogenic global warming is occurring. This greenhouse effect is expected to cause more occurrences of extreme weather. It is extremely difficult, however, to relate specific weather catastrophes to global warming with certainty, since such extreme weather conditions are rare historically. The subject is controversial. The article also discusses the public debate and the risk of floods

  7. The Early Years: The Wonders of Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the wonders of winter weather, as it often inspires teachers' and students' interest in collecting weather data, especially if snow falls. Beginning weather data collection in preschool will introduce children to the concepts of making regular observations of natural phenomena, recording the observations (data),…

  8. 36 CFR 910.71 - Weather protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Weather protection. 910.71 Section 910.71 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION GENERAL... DEVELOPMENT AREA Glossary of Terms § 910.71 Weather protection. Weather protection means a seasonal or...

  9. Reducing prediction uncertainty of weather controlled systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, T.G.

    2007-01-01

    In closed agricultural systems the weather acts both as a disturbance and as a resource. By using weather forecasts in control strategies the effects of disturbances can be minimized whereas the resources can be utilized. In this situation weather forecast uncertainty and model based control are

  10. Weather, Climate and Food Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, T.

    2016-12-01

    To climatologists food security is dominated by the impacts of weather and climate on food systems. But the link between the atmosphere and food security is more complex. Extreme weather events such as tropical cyclones impact directly on agriculture, but they also impact on the logistical distribution of food and can thus disrupt the food supply chain, especially in urban areas. Drought affects human life and health as well as impacting dramatically on the sustainable development of society. It represents a pending danger for vulnerable agricultural systems that depend on the rainfall, water supply and reservoirs. Developed countries are affected, but the impact is disproportionate within the developing world. Drought, especially when it results in famine, can change the life and economic development of developing nations and stifle their development for decades. A holistic approach is required to understand the phenomena, to forecast catastrophic events such as drought and famine and to predict their societal consequences. In the Food Security recommendations of the Rio+20 Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation for Sustainable Development it states that it is important "To understand fully how to measure, assess and reduce the impacts of production on the natural environment including climate change, recognizing that different measures of impact (e.g. water, land, biodiversity, carbon and other greenhouse gases, etc) may trade-off against each other..." This talk will review the historical link between weather, climate, drought and food supplies; examine the international situation; and summarise the response of the scientific community

  11. Hydrologic applications of weather radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Jun; Habib, Emad; Andrieu, Hervé; Morin, Efrat

    2015-12-01

    By providing high-resolution quantitative precipitation information (QPI), weather radars have revolutionized hydrology in the last two decades. With the aid of GIS technology, radar-based quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE) have enabled routine high-resolution hydrologic modeling in many parts of the world. Given the ever-increasing need for higher-resolution hydrologic and water resources information for a wide range of applications, one may expect that the use of weather radar will only grow. Despite the tremendous progress, a number of significant scientific, technological and engineering challenges remain to realize its potential. New challenges are also emerging as new areas of applications are discovered, explored and pursued. The purpose of this special issue is to provide the readership with some of the latest advances, lessons learned, experiences gained, and science issues and challenges related to hydrologic applications of weather radar. The special issue features 20 contributions on various topics which reflect the increasing diversity as well as the areas of focus in radar hydrology today. The contributions may be grouped as follows:

  12. Adaptation of Mesoscale Weather Models to Local Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manobianco, John T.; Taylor, Gregory E.; Case, Jonathan L.; Dianic, Allan V.; Wheeler, Mark W.; Zack, John W.; Nutter, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    Methodologies have been developed for (1) configuring mesoscale numerical weather-prediction models for execution on high-performance computer workstations to make short-range weather forecasts for the vicinity of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) and (2) evaluating the performances of the models as configured. These methodologies have been implemented as part of a continuing effort to improve weather forecasting in support of operations of the U.S. space program. The models, methodologies, and results of the evaluations also have potential value for commercial users who could benefit from tailoring their operations and/or marketing strategies based on accurate predictions of local weather. More specifically, the purpose of developing the methodologies for configuring the models to run on computers at KSC and CCAFS is to provide accurate forecasts of winds, temperature, and such specific thunderstorm-related phenomena as lightning and precipitation. The purpose of developing the evaluation methodologies is to maximize the utility of the models by providing users with assessments of the capabilities and limitations of the models. The models used in this effort thus far include the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS), the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Eta Model ( Eta for short). The configuration of the MASS and RAMS is designed to run the models at very high spatial resolution and incorporate local data to resolve fine-scale weather features. Model preprocessors were modified to incorporate surface, ship, buoy, and rawinsonde data as well as data from local wind towers, wind profilers, and conventional or Doppler radars. The overall evaluation of the MASS, Eta, and RAMS was designed to assess the utility of these mesoscale models for satisfying the weather-forecasting needs of the U.S. space program. The evaluation methodology includes

  13. Thermal significance of potassium feldspar K-Ar ages inferred from /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar age spectrum results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, T.M.; McDougall, I. (Australian National Univ., Canberra. Research School of Earth Sciences)

    1982-10-01

    /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar age spectrum analyses of three microcline separates from the Separation Point Batholith, northwest Nelson, New Zealand, which cooled slowly through the temperature zone of partial radiogenic /sup 40/Ar accumulation are characterized by a linear age increase over the first 65 percent of gas release with the lowest ages corresponding to the time that the samples cooled below about 100/sup 0/C. The last 35 percent of /sup 39/Ar released from the microclines yields plateau ages which reflect the different bulk mineral ages, and correspond to cooling temperatures between about 130 to 160/sup 0/C. Theoretical calculations confirm the likelihood of diffusion gradients in feldspars cooling at rates =< 5/sup 0/C-Ma/sup -1/. Diffusion parameters calculated from the /sup 39/Ar release yield an activation energy, E = 28.8 +- 1.9 kcal-mol/sup -1/, and a frequency factor/grain size parameter, D/sub 0//l/sup 2/ = 5.6sub(-3.9)sup(+14) sec/sup -1/. This Arrhenius relationship corresponds to a closure temperature of 132 +- 13/sup 0/C which is very similar to the independently estimated temperature. From the observed diffusion compensation correlation, this D/sub 0//l/sup 2/ implies an average diffusion half-width of about 3 ..mu..m, similar to the half-width of the perthite lamellae in the feldspars. The results are discussed.

  14. Salt-Induced Physical Weathering of Stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiro, M.; Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C.

    2010-12-01

    Salt weathering is recognized as an important mechanism that contributes to the modeling and shaping of the earth’s surface, in a range of environments spanning from the Sahara desert to Antarctica. It also contributes to the degradation and loss of cultural heritage, particularly carved stone and historic buildings. Soluble salts have recently been suggested to contribute to the shaping of rock outcrops on Mars and are being identified in other planetary bodies such as the moons of Jupiter (Europa and IO)1. Soluble salts such as sulfates, nitrates, chlorides and carbonates of alkali and alkali earth metals can crystallize within the porous system of rocks and building stones, exerting sufficient pressure against the pore walls to fracture the substrate. This physical damage results in increased porosity, thus providing a higher surface area for salt-enhanced chemical weathering. To better understand how salt-induced physical weathering occurs, we have studied the crystallization of the particularly damaging salt, sodium sulfate2, in a model system (a sintered porous glass of controlled porosity and pore size). For this elusive task of studying sub-surface crystallization in pores, we combined a variety of instruments to identify which phases crystallized during evaporation and calculated the supersaturation and associated crystallization pressure that caused damage. The heat of crystallization was measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), providing the timing of crystallization events and phase transitions3, while the evaporation rate was recorded using thermal gravimetry (TG). These methods enabled calculation of the sodium sulfate concentration in solution at every point during evaporation. Two-dimensional X-ray diffraction (2D-XRD) performs synchrotron-like experiments in a normal lab by using a Molybdenum X-ray source (more than 5 times more penetrative than conventional Copper source). Using this method, we determined that the first phase to

  15. Parameterisation of sea and lake ice in numerical weather prediction models of the German Weather Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrii Mironov

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A bulk thermodynamic (no rheology sea-ice parameterisation scheme for use in numerical weather prediction (NWP is presented. The scheme is based on a self-similar parametric representation (assumed shape of the evolving temperature profile within the ice and on the integral heat budget of the ice slab. The scheme carries ordinary differential equations (in time for the ice surface temperature and the ice thickness. The proposed sea-ice scheme is implemented into the NWP models GME (global and COSMO (limited-area of the German Weather Service. In the present operational configuration, the horizontal distribution of the sea ice is governed by the data assimilation scheme, no fractional ice cover within the GME/COSMO grid box is considered, and the effect of snow above the ice is accounted for through an empirical temperature dependence of the ice surface albedo with respect to solar radiation. The lake ice is treated similarly to the sea ice, except that freeze-up and break-up of lakes occurs freely, independent of the data assimilation. The sea and lake ice schemes (the latter is a part of the fresh-water lake parameterisation scheme FLake show a satisfactory performance in GME and COSMO. The ice characteristics are not overly sensitive to the details of the treatment of heat transfer through the ice layer. This justifies the use of a simplified but computationally efficient bulk approach to model the ice thermodynamics in NWP, where the ice surface temperature is a major concern whereas details of the temperature distribution within the ice are of secondary importance. In contrast to the details of the heat transfer through the ice, the cloud cover is of decisive importance for the ice temperature as it controls the radiation energy budget at the ice surface. This is particularly true for winter, when the long-wave radiation dominates the surface energy budget. During summer, the surface energy budget is also sensitive to the grid-box mean ice

  16. Toward seamless weather-climate and environmental prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Gilbert

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decade or so, predicting the weather, climate and atmospheric composition has emerged as one of the most important areas of scientific endeavor. This is partly because the remarkable increase in skill of current weather forecasts has made society more and more dependent on them day to day for a whole range of decision making. And it is partly because climate change is now widely accepted and the realization is growing rapidly that it will affect every person in the world profoundly, either directly or indirectly. One of the important endeavors of our societies is to remain at the cutting-edge of modelling and predicting the evolution of the fully coupled environmental system: atmosphere (weather and composition), oceans, land surface (physical and biological), and cryosphere. This effort will provide an increasingly accurate and reliable service across all the socio-economic sectors that are vulnerable to the effects of adverse weather and climatic conditions, whether now or in the future. This emerging challenge was at the center of the World Weather Open Science Conference (Montreal, 2014).The outcomes of the conference are described in the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) book: Seamless Prediction of the Earth System: from Minutes to Months, (G. Brunet, S. Jones, P. Ruti Eds., WMO-No. 1156, 2015). It is freely available on line at the WMO website. We will discuss some of the outcomes of the conference for the WMO World Weather Research Programme (WWRP) and Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) long term goals and provide examples of seamless modelling and prediction across a range of timescales at convective and sub-kilometer scales for regional coupled forecasting applications at Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC).

  17. Biodegradation of weathered polystyrene films in seawater microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syranidou, Evdokia; Karkanorachaki, Katerina; Amorotti, Filippo; Franchini, Martina; Repouskou, Eftychia; Kaliva, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria; Kolvenbach, Boris; Fava, Fabio; Corvini, Philippe F-X; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2017-12-21

    A microcosm experiment was conducted at two phases in order to investigate the ability of indigenous consortia alone or bioaugmented to degrade weathered polystyrene (PS) films under simulated marine conditions. Viable populations were developed on PS surfaces in a time dependent way towards convergent biofilm communities, enriched with hydrocarbon and xenobiotics degradation genes. Members of Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were highly enriched in the acclimated plastic associated assemblages while the abundance of plastic associated genera was significantly increased in the acclimated indigenous communities. Both tailored consortia efficiently reduced the weight of PS films. Concerning the molecular weight distribution, a decrease in the number-average molecular weight of films subjected to microbial treatment was observed. Moreover, alteration in the intensity of functional groups was noticed with Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR) along with signs of bio-erosion on the PS surface. The results suggest that acclimated marine populations are capable of degrading weathered PS pieces.

  18. Federal Aviation Administration weather program to improve aviation safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedan, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    The implementation of the National Airspace System (NAS) will improve safety services to aviation. These services include collision avoidance, improved landing systems and better weather data acquisition and dissemination. The program to improve the quality of weather information includes the following: Radar Remote Weather Display System; Flight Service Automation System; Automatic Weather Observation System; Center Weather Processor, and Next Generation Weather Radar Development.

  19. Probability for Weather and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last 60 years, the availability of large-scale electronic computers has stimulated rapid and significant advances both in meteorology and in our understanding of the Earth System as a whole. The speed of these advances was due, in large part, to the sudden ability to explore nonlinear systems of equations. The computer allows the meteorologist to carry a physical argument to its conclusion; the time scales of weather phenomena then allow the refinement of physical theory, numerical approximation or both in light of new observations. Prior to this extension, as Charney noted, the practicing meteorologist could ignore the results of theory with good conscience. Today, neither the practicing meteorologist nor the practicing climatologist can do so, but to what extent, and in what contexts, should they place the insights of theory above quantitative simulation? And in what circumstances can one confidently estimate the probability of events in the world from model-based simulations? Despite solid advances of theory and insight made possible by the computer, the fidelity of our models of climate differs in kind from the fidelity of models of weather. While all prediction is extrapolation in time, weather resembles interpolation in state space, while climate change is fundamentally an extrapolation. The trichotomy of simulation, observation and theory which has proven essential in meteorology will remain incomplete in climate science. Operationally, the roles of probability, indeed the kinds of probability one has access too, are different in operational weather forecasting and climate services. Significant barriers to forming probability forecasts (which can be used rationally as probabilities) are identified. Monte Carlo ensembles can explore sensitivity, diversity, and (sometimes) the likely impact of measurement uncertainty and structural model error. The aims of different ensemble strategies, and fundamental differences in ensemble design to support of

  20. Modeling the influence of organic acids on soil weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Corey R.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Maher, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Biological inputs and organic matter cycling have long been regarded as important factors in the physical and chemical development of soils. In particular, the extent to which low molecular weight organic acids, such as oxalate, influence geochemical reactions has been widely studied. Although the effects of organic acids are diverse, there is strong evidence that organic acids accelerate the dissolution of some minerals. However, the influence of organic acids at the field-scale and over the timescales of soil development has not been evaluated in detail. In this study, a reactive-transport model of soil chemical weathering and pedogenic development was used to quantify the extent to which organic acid cycling controls mineral dissolution rates and long-term patterns of chemical weathering. Specifically, oxalic acid was added to simulations of soil development to investigate a well-studied chronosequence of soils near Santa Cruz, CA. The model formulation includes organic acid input, transport, decomposition, organic-metal aqueous complexation and mineral surface complexation in various combinations. Results suggest that although organic acid reactions accelerate mineral dissolution rates near the soil surface, the net response is an overall decrease in chemical weathering. Model results demonstrate the importance of organic acid input concentrations, fluid flow, decomposition and secondary mineral precipitation rates on the evolution of mineral weathering fronts. In particular, model soil profile evolution is sensitive to kaolinite precipitation and oxalate decomposition rates. The soil profile-scale modeling presented here provides insights into the influence of organic carbon cycling on soil weathering and pedogenesis and supports the need for further field-scale measurements of the flux and speciation of reactive organic compounds.