WorldWideScience

Sample records for weather modification effects

  1. Postulated weather modification effects of large energy releases

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Scott, B.C.; Orgill, M.M.; Renne, D.S.; Hubbard, J.E.; McGinnis, K.A.

    1977-02-01

    Postulated impacts of large energy releases were examined in the light of existing technical information. The magnitudes of direct atmospheric modifications were estimated, and the ecological and economic implications of the modifications were explored. Energy releases from energy centers (10 to 40 power plants at a single site) and individual power plant clusters (1 to 4 power plants) were considered. In the atmosphere the energy will exist initially as increased temperature (sensible heat), moisture (latent heat), and air motion (kinetic energy). Addition of energy could result in increased cloudiness and fog, and changed precipitation patterns. A framework for economic analysis of the impacts of the postulated atmospheric modifications was established on the basis of costs and benefits. Willingness-to-pay was selected as the appropriate measure for valuing each impact. The primary and secondary atmospheric modifications may affect recreation, transportation, and aesthetics as well as agriculture and forestry. Economic values can be placed on some of the effects. However, the willingness of people to pay to gain benefits and avoid damages in many cases can only be determined through extensive surveys. The economic consequences of a given energy release would be highly site specific.

  2. Postulated weather modification effects of large energy releases

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Scott, B.C.; Orgill, M.M.; Renne, D.S.; Hubbard, J.E.; McGinnis, K.A.

    1977-02-01

    Postulated impacts of large energy releases were examined in the light of existing technical information. The magnitudes of direct atmospheric modifications were estimated, and the ecological and economic implications of the modifications were explored. Energy releases from energy centers (10 to 40 power plants at a single site) and individual power plant clusters (1 to 4 power plants) were considered. In the atmosphere the energy will exist initially as increased temperature (sensible heat), moisture (latent heat), and air motion (kinetic energy). Addition of energy could result in increased cloudiness and fog, and changed precipitation patterns. A framework for economic analysis of the impacts of the postulated atmospheric modifications was established on the basis of costs and benefits. Willingness-to-pay was selected as the appropriate measure for valuing each impact. The primary and secondary atmospheric modifications may affect recreation, transportation, and aesthetics as well as agriculture and forestry. Economic values can be placed on some of the effects. However, the willingness of people to pay to gain benefits and avoid damages in many cases can only be determined through extensive surveys. The economic consequences of a given energy release would be highly site specific

  3. A status report on weather modification research in the Dakotas

    Smith, Paul L.; Orville, Harold D.; Boe, Bruce A.; Stith, Jeffrey L.

    An overview of the status of weather modification research in North and South Dakota (USA) is presented. The operational North Dakota Cloud Modification Projects has, since 1976, been seeding summer convective clouds for the dual objectives of hail suppression and rainfall enhancement. Research being carried out as part of a Federal/State cooperative program, in coordination with the operational activities, has included physical and statistical evaluation studies as well as numerical cloud modeling investigations. The statistical analyses provide some indications that the intended seeding effects are being obtained. The physical studies involve aircraft and radar observations and emphasize tracer experiments to study the transport and dispersion of seeding agents and the activation of ice nuclei. The modeling studies simulate the experiments and aid in investigation of the process involved and the effects of seeding. The 1989 North Dakota Thunderstorm Project, a major field study emphasizing physical and numerical modeling studies, is described briefly.

  4. Space Weather- Physics and Effects

    Bothmer, Volker

    2007-01-01

    This book is a state-of-the-art review on the physics of space weather and on space weather impacts on human technology, including manned spaceflight. With contributions from a team of international experts, this comprehensive work covers all aspects of space weather physical processes, and all known aspects of space hazards from humans, both in space and on Earth. Space Weather - Physics and Effects provides the first comprehensive, scientific background of space storms caused by the sun and its impact on geospace focuses on weather issues that have become vital for the development of nationwide technological infrastructures explains magnetic storms on Earth, including the effects of EUV radiation on the atmosphere is an invaluable aid in establishing real-time weather forecasts details the threat that solar effects might have on modern telecommunication systems, including national power grid systems, aircraft and manned spaceflight.

  5. Inadvertent weather modification urban areas - lessons for global climate change

    Changnon, S A [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (USA)

    1992-05-01

    Large metropolitan areas in North America, home to 65% of the USA's population, have created major changes in their climates over the past 150 years. The rate and amount of the urban climate change approximate those being predicted globally using climate models. Knowledge of urban weather and climate modification holds lessons for the global climate change issue. First, adjustments to urban climate changes can provide guidance for adjusting to global change. A second lesson relates to the difficulty but underscores the necessity of providing scientifically credible proof of change within the noise of natural climatic variability. The evolution of understanding about how urban conditions influence weather reveals several unexpected outcomes, particularly relating to precipitation changes. These suggest that similar future surprises can be expected in a changed global climate, a third lesson. In-depth studies of how urban climate changes affected the hydrologic cycle, the regional economy, and human activities were difficult because of data problems, lack of impact methodology, and necessity for multidisciplinary investigations. Similar impact studies for global climate change will require diverse scientific talents and funding commitments adequate to measure the complexity of impacts and human adjustments. Understanding the processes whereby urban areas and other human activities have altered the atmosphere and changed clouds and precipitation regionally appears highly relevant to the global climate-change issue. Scientific and governmental policy development needs to recognize an old axiom that became evident in the studies of inadvertent urban and regional climate change and their behavioural implications: Think globally but act locally. Global climate change is an international issue, and the atmosphere must be treated globally. But the impacts and the will to act and adjust will occur regionally.

  6. Inadvertent weather modification urban areas - lessons for global climate change

    Changnon, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Large metropolitan areas in North America, home to 65% of the USA's population, have created major changes in their climates over the past 150 years. The rate and amount of the urban climate change approximate those being predicted globally using climate models. Knowledge of urban weather and climate modification holds lessons for the global climate change issue. First, adjustments to urban climate changes can provide guidance for adjusting to global change. A second lesson relates to the difficulty but underscores the necessity of providing scientifically credible proof of change within the noise of natural climatic variability. The evolution of understanding about how urban conditions influence weather reveals several unexpected outcomes, particularly relating to precipitation changes. These suggest that similar future surprises can be expected in a changed global climate, a third lesson. In-depth studies of how urban climate changes affected the hydrologic cycle, the regional economy, and human activities were difficult because of data problems, lack of impact methodology, and necessity for multidisciplinary investigations. Similar impact studies for global climate change will require diverse scientific talents and funding commitments adequate to measure the complexity of impacts and human adjustments. Understanding the processes whereby urban areas and other human activities have altered the atmosphere and changed clouds and precipitation regionally appears highly relevant to the global climate-change issue. Scientific and governmental policy development needs to recognize an old axiom that became evident in the studies of inadvertent urban and regional climate change and their behavioural implications: Think globally but act locally. Global climate change is an international issue, and the atmosphere must be treated globally. But the impacts and the will to act and adjust will occur regionally

  7. Government and technological innovation - Weather modification as a case in point.

    Lambright, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    The principal technology on which all forms of intentional, local weather modification ultimately rest is that of cloud seeding. There are three primary milestones in the evolution of such a new technology including invention, development, and introduction to society on an operational basis. It is shown that government has been deeply involved in each of the first two phases of weather modification's evolution. The agencies involved include the military agencies, the Weather Bureau, the National Science Foundation, and the Bureau of Reclamation. It is pointed out that weather modification will require some unusually flexible and open administrative devices if it is to advance in the public interest.

  8. Areal variation and chemical modification of weathered shale infiltration characteristics

    Luxmoore, R.J.; Spalding, B.P.; Munro, I.M.

    1981-01-01

    Spatial variability of infiltration into a weathered shale subsoil was evaluated at a site proximal to one used for shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Double-ring infiltometers were installed at 48 locations on a 2- by 2-m grid after the removal of 1 to 2 m of soil (Litz-Sequoia association, Typic Hapludults). Infiltration rates were measured before and during the 0- to 20- and 239- to 259-day periods following treatment with solutions of NaOH, KOH, NaF, NaAlO 2 , and Na 2 SiO 3 at rates of 151 equivalents/m 2 . None of these chemical treatments significantly altered infiltration rate, indicating that chemical modification of soil exchange properties may be achieved without inducing hydrologic disturbance in these subsoils. A semivariogram analysis of infiltration data showed that areal variability was random; any spatial patterning must therefore occur at a smaller scale than 2 m

  9. Powernext weather, benchmark indices for effective weather risk management

    2006-01-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Energy, an estimated 25% of the GNP is affected by weather-related events. The variations in temperature - even small ones - can also have long-lasting effects on the operational results of a company. Among other, the Energy supply sector is sensitive to weather risks: a milder or harsher than usual winter leads to a decrease or increase of energy consumption. The price of electricity on power trading facilities like Powernext is especially sensitive to odd changes in temperatures. Powernext and Meteo-France (the French meteorological agency) have joined expertise in order to promote the use of weather indices in term of decision making or underlying of hedging tools to energy actors, end users from any other sector of activity and specialists of the weather risk hedging. The Powernext Weather indices are made from information collected by Meteo-France's main observation network according to the norms of international meteorology, in areas carefully selected. The gross data are submitted to a thorough review allowing the correction of abnormalities and the reconstitution of missing data. Each index is fashioned to take into account the economic activity in the various regions of the country as represented by each region's population. This demographic information represents a fair approximation of the weight of the regional economic activity. This document presents the Powernext/Meteo France partnership for the elaboration of efficient weather-related risk management indices. (J.S.)

  10. The greenhouse effect and extreme weather

    Groenaas, Sigbjoern; Kvamstoe, Nils Gunnar

    2002-01-01

    The article asserts that an anthropogenic global warming is occurring. This greenhouse effect is expected to cause more occurrences of extreme weather. It is extremely difficult, however, to relate specific weather catastrophes to global warming with certainty, since such extreme weather conditions are rare historically. The subject is controversial. The article also discusses the public debate and the risk of floods

  11. Climate control: United States weather modification in the cold war and beyond.

    Harper, Kristine C

    2008-03-01

    Rainmaking, hail busting, fog lifting, snowpack enhancing, lightning suppressing, hurricane snuffing...weather control. At the lunatic fringe of scientific discussion in the early twentieth century--and the subject of newspaper articles with tones ranging from skeptical titters to awestruck wonder--weather modification research became more serious after World War II. In the United States, the 'seeds' of silver iodide and dry ice purported to enhance rainfall and bust hailstorms soon became seeds of controversy from which sprouted attempts by federal, state and local government to control the controllers and exploit 'designer weather' for their own purposes.

  12. Space weather effects and commerical airlines

    Jones, J.; Bentley, R.; Hunter, R.; Taylor, G.; Thomas, D.

    Space Weather (SW) phenomena can effect many areas of commercial airline operations including avionics, communications and GPS navigation systems. Of particular importance at present is the recently introduced EU legislation requiring the monitoring of aircrew radiation exposure, including any variations at aircraft altitudes due to solar activity. The Mullard Space Science Laboratory is collaborating with Virgin Atlantic Airways, the Civil Aviation Authority and the National Physical Laboratory on a 3- year project to monitor the levels of cosmic radiation on long-haul flights. The study will determine whether computer models currently used to predict radiation exposure of aircrew are adequate. It also aims to determine whether solar or geomagnetic activity can cause significant modifications to the doses. This presentation will begin by showing some of the preliminary results obtained so far. As an example, we present a comparison of flight doses measured following the 14t h July 2000 X - class flare that was accompanied by a major Solar Particle Event (SPE). The results highlight the importance of a range of external factors that can strongly influence how SPEs may effect the measured dose at aircraft altitudes. At present, any SPE contributions in the airlines' dose records can only be poorly estimated retrospectively. Ideally, it would be better to try to avoid operating during these possibly significant radiation - enhancing events by utilising SW information (alerts, warnings, etc.). However, doing so poses many difficult operational problems for such a heavily regulated international industry, in terms of safety, security and procedures. Therefore, the use of timely SW information, which is still very unreliable, in a similar manner to terrestrial weather will require agreement from the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) and International Air Transport Association (IATA) to Air Traffic Control and Aviation Regulatory Authority's. This

  13. 76 FR 18723 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Weather Modification Activities Reports

    2011-04-05

    ...) of Public Law 92-205 requires that persons who engage in weather modification activities (e.g., cloud... Forms 17-4 and 17-4A. Type of Review: Regular submission. Affected Public: Business or other for-profit...

  14. It Started in a GE Freezer: Basic Precipitation Research Triggers the Business of Weather Modification

    Harper, K.

    2015-12-01

    At the end of World War II, Nobel Prize-winning chemist Irving Langmuir and his team at the General Electric Research Laboratory in Schenectady, New York, were doing advanced research on cloaking smokes and aircraft icing for the US military. Trying to determine why some clouds precipitated while others did not, Langmuir concluded that non-precipitating clouds were lacking "ice nuclei" that would gather up cloud droplets until they became large enough to fall out of the cloud. If they could find an artificial substitute, it would be possible to modify clouds and the weather. Dry ice particles did the trick, military funding followed, and cloud busting commenced. But a handful of entrepreneurial meteorologists saw a different purpose: enhancing precipitation and preventing hail damage. The commercialization of weather modification was underway, with cloud seeding enhancing rainfall east of the Cascades, in the Desert Southwest, and even in the watersheds serving New York City. Hail busting took off in the Dakotas, and snowpack enhancement got a boost in Montana. Basic cloud physics research very quickly became commercial weather modification, fulfilling a postwar desire to use science and technology to control nature and creating an opening for meteorologists to provide a variety of specialized services to businesses whose profits depend on the weather.

  15. Modification of radiation effects

    Lindenbaum, A.

    1975-01-01

    Results are reported from studies on the tissue distribution of 239 Pu and 241 Am in mice and beagle dogs and the effectiveness of various therapeutic treatments for decorporation. In dogs injected with monomeric Pu the value of a regimen of early and prolonged treatment with DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) for minimizing the Pu burden in the soft tissues and skeleton was demonstrated. These results have immediate implication for DTPA treatment in man. New studies in mice verified the action of pyran copolymer antiviral agents in enhancing the effectiveness of DTPA for removal of polymeric Pu from the liver. Recent application of autoradiographic procedures for quantitatively comparing short- and long-term localization of monomeric and polymeric 239 Pu in dog liver showed that there is no net translocation of monomeric Pu within the liver between 6 and 90 days following injection. One of the molecular studies presently underway aims at synthesis of a variety of DTPA esters. The diethyl ester has already been prepared and tested for toxicity in mice. These compounds are designed to bring DTPA into contact with plutonium deposits unavailable to the action of ionic DTPA. (U.S.)

  16. Space weather effects on ground based technology

    Clark, T.

    Space weather can affect a variety of forms of ground-based technology, usually as a result of either the direct effects of the varying geomagnetic field, or as a result of the induced electric field that accompanies such variations. Technologies affected directly by geomagnetic variations include magnetic measurements made d ringu geophysical surveys, and navigation relying on the geomagnetic field as a direction reference, a method that is particularly common in the surveying of well-bores in the oil industry. The most obvious technology affected by induced electric fields during magnetic storms is electric power transmission, where the example of the blackout in Quebec during the March 1989 magnetic storm is widely known. Additionally, space weather effects must be taken into account in the design of active cathodic protection systems on pipelines to protect them against corrosion. Long-distance telecommunication cables may also have to be designed to cope with space weather related effects. This paper reviews the effects of space weather in these different areas of ground-based technology, and provides examples of how mitigation against hazards may be achieved. (The paper does not include the effects of space weather on radio communication or satellite navigation systems).

  17. Effect of weather on football attendances

    Cairns, J A

    1984-01-01

    On the premise that weather should have an effect on spectator attendance at sports events in outdoor settings (a topic which has received surprisingly little formalized study), the author examined the record of home attendances for three football teams in Scotland. In general, it was found that the greater the rainfall on the day of the match the lower the attendance. Dividing spectators into different groups, it was further found that an additional hour of sunshine was associated 162 more adults attending Aberdeen matches, while high temperatures appeared to increase juvenile attendance (by 57 for ever 1 deg. C. rise in temperature). Weather disruption of football games is attended by a number of costs, both direct and indirect. Quantifying the impact of weather can shed substantial light on the problem of scheduling for the season. For example, since certain periods are, on average, wetter than others, rescheduling to drier periods might encourage greater attendance.

  18. Explaining the road accident risk: weather effects.

    Bergel-Hayat, Ruth; Debbarh, Mohammed; Antoniou, Constantinos; Yannis, George

    2013-11-01

    This research aims to highlight the link between weather conditions and road accident risk at an aggregate level and on a monthly basis, in order to improve road safety monitoring at a national level. It is based on some case studies carried out in Work Package 7 on "Data analysis and synthesis" of the EU-FP6 project "SafetyNet-Building the European Road Safety Observatory", which illustrate the use of weather variables for analysing changes in the number of road injury accidents. Time series analysis models with explanatory variables that measure the weather quantitatively were used and applied to aggregate datasets of injury accidents for France, the Netherlands and the Athens region, over periods of more than 20 years. The main results reveal significant correlations on a monthly basis between weather variables and the aggregate number of injury accidents, but the magnitude and even the sign of these correlations vary according to the type of road (motorways, rural roads or urban roads). Moreover, in the case of the interurban network in France, it appears that the rainfall effect is mainly direct on motorways--exposure being unchanged, and partly indirect on main roads--as a result of changes in exposure. Additional results obtained on a daily basis for the Athens region indicate that capturing the within-the-month variability of the weather variables and including it in a monthly model highlights the effects of extreme weather. Such findings are consistent with previous results obtained for France using a similar approach, with the exception of the negative correlation between precipitation and the number of injury accidents found for the Athens region, which is further investigated. The outlook for the approach and its added value are discussed in the conclusion. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Changes in fire weather distributions: effects on predicted fire behavior

    Lucy A. Salazar; Larry S. Bradshaw

    1984-01-01

    Data that represent average worst fire weather for a particular area are used to index daily fire danger; however, they do not account for different locations or diurnal weather changes that significantly affect fire behavior potential. To study the effects that selected changes in weather databases have on computed fire behavior parameters, weather data for the...

  20. Space weather effects on communications

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    In the 150 years since the advent of the first electrical communication system - the electrical telegraph - the diversity of communications technologies that are embedded within space-affected environments have vastly increased. The increasing sophistication of these communications technologies, and how their installation and operations may relate to the environments in which they are embedded, requires ever more sophisticated understanding of natural physical phenomena. At the same time, the business environment for most present-day communications technologies that are affected by space phenomena is very dynamic. The commercial and national security deployment and use of these technologies do not wait for optimum knowledge of possible environmental effects to be acquired before new technological embodiments are created, implemented, and marketed. Indeed, those companies that might foolishly seek perfectionist understanding of natural effects can be left behind by the marketplace. A well-considered balance is needed between seeking ever deeper understanding of physical phenomena and implementing `engineering' solutions to current crises. The research community must try to understand, and operate in, this dynamic environment.

  1. Synoptic weather types and aeroallergens modify the effect of air pollution on hospitalisations for asthma hospitalisations in Canadian cities

    Hebbern, Christopher; Cakmak, Sabit

    2015-01-01

    Pollution levels and the effect of air pollution on human health can be modified by synoptic weather type and aeroallergens. We investigated the effect modification of aeroallergens on the association between CO, O 3 , NO 2 , SO 2 , PM 10 , PM 2.5 and asthma hospitalisation rates in seven synoptic weather types. We developed single air pollutant models, adjusted for the effect of aeroallergens and stratified by synoptic weather type, and pooled relative risk estimates for asthma hospitalisation in ten Canadian cities. Aeroallergens significantly modified the relative risk in 19 pollutant-weather type combinations, reducing the size and variance for each single pollutant model. However, aeroallergens did not significantly modify relative risk for any pollutant in the DT or MT weather types, or for PM 10 in any weather type. Thus, there is a modifying effect of aeroallergens on the association between CO, O 3 , NO 2 , SO 2 , PM 2.5 and asthma hospitalisations that differs under specific synoptic weather types. - Highlights: • We model effect modification of aeroallergens on air pollutant–asthma association. • The air pollutant association was modelled in seven synoptic weather types. • Aeroallergens modify CO, O 3 , NO 2 , SO 2 , and PM 2.5 effect on asthma hospitalisations. • Synoptic weather types modify the air pollutant and asthma association. - We identify a modifying effect of aeroallergens on the relationship between air pollutants and hospitalisation rates for asthma, that differs under specific synoptic weather types

  2. Effects of intraday weather changes on asset returns and volatilities

    Hyein Shim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing the intraday dataset on weather and market information with the use of the extended GJR-GARCH framework, this study explores in depth the weather effects on the asset returns and volatilities of the Korean stock and derivatives markets. Our intraday analyses contribute to the existing literature by going beyond the attempt of prior studies to capture the weather effects using the average daily observations alone. The empirical results document a modest presence of the weather effect on the returns and volatilities, though the significance of its impact is found to vary across different market conditions and indices. We also find that the return and volatility respond asymmetrically to extremely good and bad weather conditions. The intraday analyses show that the weather effect on the returns and volatilities is more statistically significant at the beginning of the working day or the lunch break, indicating the intraday weather effects on the financial market.

  3. Powernext weather, benchmark indices for effective weather risk management; Powernext Weather, des indices de reference pour gerer le risque meteo

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Energy, an estimated 25% of the GNP is affected by weather-related events. The variations in temperature - even small ones - can also have long-lasting effects on the operational results of a company. Among other, the Energy supply sector is sensitive to weather risks: a milder or harsher than usual winter leads to a decrease or increase of energy consumption. The price of electricity on power trading facilities like Powernext is especially sensitive to odd changes in temperatures. Powernext and Meteo-France (the French meteorological agency) have joined expertise in order to promote the use of weather indices in term of decision making or underlying of hedging tools to energy actors, end users from any other sector of activity and specialists of the weather risk hedging. The Powernext Weather indices are made from information collected by Meteo-France's main observation network according to the norms of international meteorology, in areas carefully selected. The gross data are submitted to a thorough review allowing the correction of abnormalities and the reconstitution of missing data. Each index is fashioned to take into account the economic activity in the various regions of the country as represented by each region's population. This demographic information represents a fair approximation of the weight of the regional economic activity. This document presents the Powernext/Meteo France partnership for the elaboration of efficient weather-related risk management indices. (J.S.)

  4. Effects of Weather on Tourism and its Moderation

    Park, J. H.; Kim, S.; Lee, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    Tourism is weather sensitive industry (Gómez Martín, 2005). As climate change has been intensifying, the concerns about negative effects of weather on tourism also have been increasing. This study attempted to find ways that mitigate the negative effects from weather on tourism, by analyzing a path of the effects of weather on intention to revisit and its moderation. The data of the study were collected by a self-recording online questionnaire survey of South Korean domestic tourists during August 2015, and 2,412 samples were gathered. A path model of effects of weather on intention to revisit that including moderating effects from physical attraction satisfaction and service satisfaction was ran. Season was controlled in the path model. The model fit was adequate (CMIN/DF=2.372(p=.000), CFI=.974, RMSEA=.024, SRMR=0.040), and the Model Comparison, which assumes that the base model to be correct with season constrained model, showed that there was a seasonal differences in the model ( DF=24, CMIN=32.430, P=.117). By the analysis, it was figured out that weather and weather expectation affected weather satisfaction, and the weather satisfaction affected intention to revisit (spring/fall: .167**, summer: .104**, and winter: .114**). Meanwhile physical attraction satisfaction (.200**), and service satisfaction (.210**) of tourism positively moderated weather satisfaction in summer, and weather satisfaction positively moderated physical attraction (.238**) satisfaction and service satisfaction (.339**). In other words, in summer, dissatisfaction from hot weather was moderated by satisfaction from physical attractions and services, and in spring/fall, comfort weather conditions promoted tourists to accept tourism experience and be satisfied from attractions and services positively. Based on the result, it was expected that if industries focus on offering the good attractions and services based on weather conditions, there would be positive effects to alleviate tourists

  5. Human and Environmental Dangers Posed by Ongoing Global Tropospheric Aerosolized Particulates for Weather Modification.

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2016-01-01

    U.S. military perception of nuclear warfare led to countless unethical nuclear experiments performed on unsuspecting individuals without their informed consent. As evidenced here, subsequent perception of weather warfare has led to exposing millions of unsuspecting individuals to toxic coal fly ash with no public disclosure, no informed consent, and no health warnings. Three methods were used: (1) comparison of eight elements analyzed in rainwater samples, thought to have leached from aerosolized coal fly ash, with corresponding coal fly ash laboratory leachate; (2) comparison of 14 elements analyzed in air filter dust with corresponding elements in coal fly ash; and (3) comparison of 23 elements analyzed in fibrous mesh found after snow melted with corresponding elements in coal fly ash. The rainwater element ratios show that the aerial particulate matter has essentially the same water-leach characteristics as coal fly ash. The air filter dust element ratios occur in the same range of compositions as coal fly ash, as do element ratios in fibrous mesh found on grass after snow melted. The fibrous mesh provides an inferred direct connection with the aerosolizing jet aircraft via coal fly ash association with the jet combustion environment. Strong evidence for the correctness of the hypothesis: coal fly ash is likely the aerosolized particulate emplaced in the troposphere for geoengineering, weather modification, and/or climate alteration purposes. The documented public health associations for ≤2.5 μm particulate pollution are also applicable to aerosolized coal fly ash. The ability of coal fly ash to release aluminum in a chemically mobile form upon exposure to water or body moisture has potentially grave human and environmental consequences over a broad spectrum, including implications for neurological diseases and biota debilitation. The ability of coal fly ash to release heavy metals and radioactive elements upon exposure to body moisture has potentially

  6. [Effect of weather on odontogenic abscesses].

    Nissen, G; Schmidseder, R

    1978-11-01

    An increased frequency of odontogenous abcesses was observed on certain days in the course of routine clinical practice. We therefore investigated the possibility of a statistically significant weather-related odontogenous soft-tissue purulence originating from chronic apical periodontitis. Medical reports of patients treated between 1970 and 1977 were used. Our study indicated that the frequency of odontogenous abcesses was significantly higher with cyclonic weather conditions, i.e., weather with low barometric pressure.

  7. Effects of weathering on impregnated charcoal performance

    Deitz, V.R.

    1977-10-01

    Commercial activated charcoals have been exposed to known contaminants under controlled laboratory conditions and also to large volumes of outdoor air and each sample then evaluated for methyl iodide penetration. There is strong evidence that the interaction of water vapor and the charcoal is a significant factor in the degradation of the charcoals when the relative humidity is 70% and greater. The laboratory air mixtures studied were water vapor, water vapor and sulfur dioxide, water vapor and ozone, and water vapor and carbon monoxide. The charcoal in each of the four 0.5-in. layers making up the 2-in. test bed was degraded by the contaminants, but the first layer was influenced most. For the same charcoal the cumulative effect during one, two, and three months of weathering with outdoor air led to a progressive increase in methyl iodide penetration. The experimentation is being extended to additional commercial charcoals and to additional contaminant species in the laboratory experiments

  8. Chemical Modifications of Starch: Microwave Effect

    Lewicka, Kamila; Siemion, Przemysław; Kurcok, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents basic methods of starch chemical modification, the effect of microwave radiation on the modification process, and the physicochemical properties of starch. It has been shown that the modifications contribute to improvement of the material performance and likewise to significant improvement of its mechanical properties. As a result, more and more extensive use of starch is possible in various industries. In addition, methods of oxidized starch and starch esters preparation ...

  9. Modern and prospective technologies for weather modification activities: Developing a framework for integrating autonomous unmanned aircraft systems

    DeFelice, T. P.; Axisa, Duncan

    2017-09-01

    This paper builds upon the processes and framework already established for identifying, integrating and testing an unmanned aircraft system (UAS) with sensing technology for use in rainfall enhancement cloud seeding programs to carry out operational activities or to monitor and evaluate seeding operations. We describe the development and assessment methodologies of an autonomous and adaptive UAS platform that utilizes in-situ real time data to sense, target and implement seeding. The development of a UAS platform that utilizes remote and in-situ real-time data to sense, target and implement seeding deployed with a companion UAS ensures optimal, safe, secure, cost-effective seeding operations, and the dataset to quantify the results of seeding. It also sets the path for an innovative, paradigm shifting approach for enhancing precipitation independent of seeding mode. UAS technology is improving and their application in weather modification must be explored to lay the foundation for future implementation. The broader significance lies in evolving improved technology and automating cloud seeding operations that lowers the cloud seeding operational footprint and optimizes their effectiveness and efficiency, while providing the temporal and spatial sensitivities to overcome the predictability or sparseness of environmental parameters needed to identify conditions suitable for seeding, and how such might be implemented. The dataset from the featured approach will contain data from concurrent Eulerian and Lagrangian perspectives over sub-cloud scales that will facilitate the development of cloud seeding decision support tools.

  10. Chemical Modifications of Starch: Microwave Effect

    Kamila Lewicka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents basic methods of starch chemical modification, the effect of microwave radiation on the modification process, and the physicochemical properties of starch. It has been shown that the modifications contribute to improvement of the material performance and likewise to significant improvement of its mechanical properties. As a result, more and more extensive use of starch is possible in various industries. In addition, methods of oxidized starch and starch esters preparation are discussed. Properties of microwave radiation and its impact on starch (with particular regard to modifications described in literature are characterized.

  11. Debye screening modifications in ponderomotive effects

    Sodha, M.S.; Subbarao, D.

    1979-01-01

    The effective Debye screening length is shown to be increased in the presence of a high-power electromagnetic wave. The consequent modifications in ponderomotive redistributive effects and strong violations of charge neutrality have been shown to be in agreement with recent laser-plasma experiments

  12. Effect of toss and weather on County Cricket Championship outcomes.

    Forrest, David; Dorsey, Ron

    2008-01-01

    The principal competition in English professional cricket has become more competitive with the introduction of hierarchical divisions linked by promotion and relegation. Using regression analysis, we examine the effect on league points when teams suffer different degrees of weather disruption over the season and different amounts of luck in winning the toss for choice of first innings. The results are used to illustrate the sensitivity of championship, promotion, and relegation outcomes to such matters of chance and revised league tables are produced after applying adjustments to account for the influence of weather and toss. Policy recommendations are presented on how the influence of weather and toss might be lessened in future seasons.

  13. The effect of natural weathering on the chemical and isotopic composition of biotites

    Clauer, N.; Bonnot-Courtois, C.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of progressive natural weathering on the isotopic (Rb-Sr, K-Ar, deltaD, delta 18 O) and chemical (REE, H 2 O + ) compositions of biotite has been studied on a suite of migmatitic biotites from the Chad Republic. During the early stages of weathering the Rb-Sr system is strongly affected, the hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions change markedly, the minerals are depleted in light REE, the water content increases by a factor of two, and the K-Ar system is relatively little disturbed. During intensive weathering the K-Ar system is more strongly disturbed than the Rb-Sr system. Most of the isotopic and chemical modifications take place under nonequilibrium conditions and occur before newly formed kaolinite and/or smectite can be detected. These observations suggest that (a) 'protominerals' may form within the biotite structure during the initial period of weathering, and (b) only when chemical equilibrium is approached in the weathering profile are new minerals able to form. (author)

  14. The Determination of Feasible Control Variables for Geoengineering and Weather Modification Based on the Theory of Sensitivity in Dynamical Systems

    Sergei A. Soldatenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical cybernetics allows for exploring weather and climate modification (geoengineering as an optimal control problem in which the Earth’s climate system is considered as a control system and the role of controller is given to human operators. In mathematical models used in climate studies control actions that manipulate the weather and climate can be expressed via variations in model parameters that act as controls. In this paper, we propose the “instability-sensitivity” approach that allows for determining feasible control variables in geoengineering. The method is based on the sensitivity analysis of mathematical models that describe various types of natural instability phenomena. The applicability of this technique is illustrated by a model of atmospheric baroclinic instability since this physical mechanism plays a significant role in the general circulation of the atmosphere and, consequently, in climate formation. The growth rate of baroclinic unstable waves is taken as an indicator of control manipulations. The information obtained via calculated sensitivity coefficients is very beneficial for assessing the physical feasibility of methods of control of the large-scale atmospheric dynamics and for designing optimal control systems for climatic processes. It also provides insight into potential future changes in baroclinic waves, as a result of a changing climate.

  15. Keys to success: Ten case studies of effective weatherization programs

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Kolb, J.O.; White, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinney, L.F.; Wilson, T. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    1993-11-01

    In 1990, DOE initiated a nationwide evaluation of its Weatherization Program, with assistance from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and an advisory group of 40 weatherization professionals, program managers, and researchers. The evaluation is comprised of three impact studies covering the Program`s major market segments: Single-family homes, mobile homes, and dwellings in small (2 to 4-unit) multifamily buildings (the Single-Family Study), Single-family homes heated primarily with fuel oil (the Fuel-Oil Study), and Dwellings in buildings with five or more units (the Multifamily Study). The Single-Family Study, the subject of this report, is a critical part of this coordinated evaluation effort. Its focus on single-family dwellings, mobile homes, and dwellings in small multifamily buildings covers 83% of the income-eligible population and 96% of the dwellings weatherized during Program Year 1989. The first phase of the Single-Family Study involved the analysis of a massive data base of information collected from 368 local weatherization agencies and 543 electric and gas utilities. This analysis resulted in energy-saving and cost-effectiveness estimates for the Weatherization Program and the identification of a set of ten high-performing agencies located throughout the country. The second phase, which is the subject of this report, involves a ``process`` evaluation of these ten high performers, aimed at identifying those weatherization practices that explain their documented success.

  16. Cold weather effects on Dresden Unit 1

    Anagnostopoulos, H. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Morris, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Dresden Unit 1 is in the final stages of a decommissioning effort directed at preparing the unit to enter a SAFSTOR status. Following an extended sub-zero cold wave, about 55,000 gallons of water were discovered in the lowest elevation of the spherical reactor enclosure. Cold weather had caused the freezing and breaking of several service water lines that had not been completely isolated. Two days later, at a regularly scheduled decommissioning meeting, the event was communicated to the decommissioning team, who quickly recognized the potential for freezing of a 42 inches diameter Fuel Transfer Tube that connects the sphere to the Spent Fuel Pool. The team directed that the pool gates between the adjacent Spent Fuel Pool and the Fuel Transfer Pool be installed, and a portable source of heat was installed on the Fuel Transfer Tube. It was later determined that, with the fuel pool gates removed, and with a worst case freeze break at the 502 elevation on the Fuel Transfer Tube (in the Sphere), the fuel in the Spent Fuel Pool could be uncovered to a level 3 below the top of active fuel.

  17. On P values and effect modification.

    Mayer, Martin

    2017-12-01

    A crucial element of evidence-based healthcare is the sound understanding and use of statistics. As part of instilling sound statistical knowledge and practice, it seems useful to highlight instances of unsound statistical reasoning or practice, not merely in captious or vitriolic spirit, but rather, to use such error as a springboard for edification by giving tangibility to the concepts at hand and highlighting the importance of avoiding such error. This article aims to provide an instructive overview of two key statistical concepts: effect modification and P values. A recent article published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology on side effects related to statin therapy offers a notable example of errors in understanding effect modification and P values, and although not so critical as to entirely invalidate the article, the errors still demand considerable scrutiny and correction. In doing so, this article serves as an instructive overview of the statistical concepts of effect modification and P values. Judicious handling of statistics is imperative to avoid muddying their utility. This article contributes to the body of literature aiming to improve the use of statistics, which in turn will help facilitate evidence appraisal, synthesis, translation, and application.

  18. Synoptic weather types and aeroallergens modify the effect of air pollution on hospitalisations for asthma hospitalisations in Canadian cities.

    Hebbern, Christopher; Cakmak, Sabit

    2015-09-01

    Pollution levels and the effect of air pollution on human health can be modified by synoptic weather type and aeroallergens. We investigated the effect modification of aeroallergens on the association between CO, O3, NO2, SO2, PM10, PM2.5 and asthma hospitalisation rates in seven synoptic weather types. We developed single air pollutant models, adjusted for the effect of aeroallergens and stratified by synoptic weather type, and pooled relative risk estimates for asthma hospitalisation in ten Canadian cities. Aeroallergens significantly modified the relative risk in 19 pollutant-weather type combinations, reducing the size and variance for each single pollutant model. However, aeroallergens did not significantly modify relative risk for any pollutant in the DT or MT weather types, or for PM10 in any weather type. Thus, there is a modifying effect of aeroallergens on the association between CO, O3, NO2, SO2, PM2.5 and asthma hospitalisations that differs under specific synoptic weather types. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Using ISCCP Weather States to Decompose Cloud Radiative Effects

    Oreopoulos, L.; Rossow, W. B.

    2012-01-01

    The presentation will examine the shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) cloud radiative effect CRE (aka "cloud radiative forcing") at the top-of-the-atmosphere and surface of ISCCP weather states (aka "cloud regimes") in three distinct geographical zones, one tropical and two mid-latitude. Our goal is to understand and quantify the contribution of the different cloud regimes to the planetary radiation budget. In the tropics we find that the three most convectively active states are the ones with largest SW, LW and net TOA CRE contributions to the overall daytime tropical CRE budget. They account for 59%, 71% and 55% of the total CRE, respectively. The boundary layer-dominated weather states account for only 34% of the total SW CRE and 41% of the total net CRE, so to focus only on them in cloud feedback studies may be imprudent. We also find that in both the northern and southern midlatitude zones only two weather states, the first and third most convectively active with large amounts of nimbostratus-type clouds, contribute ",40% to both the SW and net TOA CRE budgets, highlighting the fact that cloud regimes associated with frontal systems are not only important for weather (precipitation) but also for climate (radiation budget). While all cloud regimes in all geographical zones have a slightly larger SFC than TOA SW CRE, implying cooling of the surface and slight warming of the atmosphere, their LW radiative effects are more subtle: in the tropics the weather states with plentiful high clouds warm the atmosphere while those with copious amounts of low clouds cool the atmosphere. In both midlatitude zones only the weather states with peak cloud fractions at levels above 440 mbar warm the atmosphere while all the rest cool it. These results make the connection of the contrasting CRE effects to the atmospheric dynamics more explicit - "storms" tend to warm the atmosphere whereas fair weather clouds cool it, suggesting a positive feedback of clouds on weather systems. The

  20. The weathering effect in natural environment on kenaf blast and unsaturated polyester composite

    Mohammed, M.; Rozyanty, A. R.; Beta, B. O.; Adam, T.; Osman, A. F.; Salem, I. A. S.; Dahham, O. S.; Al-Samarrai, M. N.; Mohammed, A. M.

    2017-10-01

    A Kenaf composite was prepared by using hand lay-up process. The effect of weather on mechanical, morphology and thermal properties of kenaf composite were studied. Tensile strength of kenaf compositewas found to be 60MPa. Unfortunately, tensile strength of thecomposite starts to decrease after the first weathering month through to the weathering periods with constant reduction of tensile, at the end of the wreathing period., almost 85% the composite mechanical behaviour is lost. From the mechanical properties result obtained it clearly seen that natural fiber and their composites are not able to stand environmental condition because they have poor wettability, incompatibility with some polymeric matrices and high moisture absorption. Due to the high moisture absorption properties, there are formations of void in interfacial adhesion between fiber and matrix which can reduce the mechanical properties of composite such as flexural strength or flexural modulus this clearly supported by SEM results. Fortunately some modification can do towards improving the mechanical properties and it is good enough to achieve the high performance of the composite with proper system formulation during the modification processand the result of reinforced kenaffiber will be presented in our next publication.

  1. The effect of inclement weather on trauma orthopaedic workload.

    Cashman, J P

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Climate change models predict increasing frequency of extreme weather. One of the challenges hospitals face is how to make sure they have adequate staffing at various times of the year. AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of this severe inclement weather on hospital admissions, operative workload and cost in the Irish setting. We hypothesised that there is a direct relationship between cold weather and workload in a regional orthopaedic trauma unit. METHODS: Trauma orthopaedic workload in a regional trauma unit was examined over 2 months between December 2009 and January 2010. This corresponded with a period of severe inclement weather. RESULTS: We identified a direct correlation between the drop in temperature and increase in workload, with a corresponding increase in demand on resources. CONCLUSIONS: Significant cost savings could be made if these injuries were prevented. While the information contained in this study is important in the context of resource planning and staffing of hospital trauma units, it also highlights the vulnerability of the Irish population to wintery weather.

  2. Effects of weather and tailings properties on tailings drying times

    Gantzer, C.; Fasking, T.; Costello, M.; Greenwood, J. [Barr Engineering, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation presented the results of a study conducted to determine the effects of weather and tailings properties on tailings drying times. Weather conditions have a significant impact the potential evaporation (PE) and actual evaporation (AE) of oil sands tailings. A 2-stage drying of slurry at a constant PE was conducted to determine the shrinkage limit of untreated mature fine tailings (MFT). An evaporation and seepage model was used to determine maximum first-stage drying rates. Measurements were also taken in a wind tunnel. Potential evaporation rates were calculated and evaporative water losses from the MFT were determined. Estimated drying times were presented. Results of the approach were compared with field measurements conducted in a previous study. Results of the study showed that evaporative water loss rates for May through August were limited by the properties of the tailings. Water loss rates were limited by weather for other months in the year-long study. tabs., figs.

  3. On nutrients and trace metals: Effects from Enhanced Weathering

    Amann, T.; Hartmann, J.

    2015-12-01

    The application of rock flour on suitable land ("Enhanced Weathering") is one proposed strategy to reduce the increase of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. At the same time it is an old and established method to add fertiliser and influence soil properties. Investigations of this method focused on the impact on the carbonate system, as well as on engineering aspects of a large-scale application, but potential side effects were never discussed quantitatively. We analysed about 120,000 geochemically characterised volcanic rock samples from the literature. Applying basic statistics, theoretical release rates of nutrients and potential contaminants by Enhanced Weathering were evaluated for typical rock types. Applied rock material can contain significant amounts of essential or beneficial nutrients (potassium, phosphorus, micronutrients). Their release can partly cover the demand of major crops like wheat, rice or corn, thereby increasing crop yield on degraded soils. However, the concentrations of considered elements are variable within a specific rock type, depending on the geological setting. High heavy metal concentrations are found in (ultra-) basic rocks, the class with the highest CO2 drawdown potential. More acidic rocks contain less or no critical amounts, but sequester less CO2. Findings show that the rock selection determines the capability to supply significant amounts of nutrients, which could partly substitute industrial mineral fertiliser usage. At the same time, the release of harmful trace element has to be considered. Through careful selection of regionally available rocks, benefits could be maximised and drawbacks reduced. The deployment of Enhanced Weathering to sequester CO2 and to ameliorate soils necessitates an ecosystem management, considering the release and fate of weathered elements in plants, soils and water. Cropland with degraded soils would benefit while having a net negative CO2 effect, while other carbon dioxide removal strategies, like

  4. Localized Electron Trap Modification as a Result of Space Weather Exposure in Highly Disordered Insulating Materials

    2017-03-06

    produced by Trek Inc. Trek probe model 370 is capable of -3 to 3kV and has an extremely fast, 50µs/kV response to changing surface potentials. Trek probe...This motor can move a Trek 370 surface potential probe (± 3 kV range) and a Faraday cup mounted at opposite ends of a propeller-shaped bracket...Spacecraft Charging, in Reference Publication, 1995, NASA . 35. Horowitz, G., Organic field-effect transistors, Advanced Materials, 1998, 10(5), pp. 365

  5. Weather Effects on Crop Diseases in Eastern Germany

    Conradt, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Since the 1970s there are several long-term monitoring programmes for plant diseases and pests in Germany. Within the framework of a national research project, some otherwise confidential databases comprising 77 111 samples from numerous sites accross Eastern Germany could be accessed and analysed. The pest data covered leaf rust (Puccinia triticina) and powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis) in winter wheat, aphids (Aphididae, four genera) on wheat and other cereal crops, late blight (Phytophthora infestans) in potatoes, and pollen beetles (Brassicogethes aeneus) on rape. These data were complemented by daily weather observations from the German Weather Service (DWD). In a first step, Pearson correlations between weather variables and pest frequencies were calculated for seasonal time periods of different start months and durations and ordered into so-called correlograms. This revealed principal weather effects on disease spread - e. g. that wind is favourable for mildew throughout the year or that rape pollen beetles like it warm, but not during wintertime. Secondly, the pest frequency samples were found to resemble gamma distributions, and a generalised linear model was fitted to describe their parameter shift depending on end-of-winter temperatures for aphids on cereals. The method clearly shows potential for systematic pest risk assessments regarding climate change.

  6. Tribological effects of polymer surface modification through plastic

    Tribological effects of polymer surface modification through plastic deformation. K O Low K J Wong ... In this regard, a surface modification technique through plastic deformation has been implemented. ... Bulletin of Materials Science | News.

  7. Potential weather modification caused by waste heat release from large dry cooling towers

    Lee, J.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical model of a cooling tower plume is employed to study the possible atmospheric effects of thermal plumes from natural draft dry cooling towers. Calculations are performed for both single and multiple towers, each of which can dissipate the waste heat from a nominal 1000 MWe power generating unit, and the results are compared with those for wet cooling towers associated with plants of the same generating capacity. Dry cooling tower plumes are found to have a higher potential for inducing convective clouds than wet cooling tower plumes, under most summertime meteorological conditions. This is due to the fact that both the sensible heat and momentum fluxes from a dry tower in summer are approximately one order of magnitude larger than those from a wet cooling tower

  8. Visualization and quantification of weathering effects on capillary water uptake of natural building stones by using neutron imaging

    Raneri, Simona; Barone, Germana; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Rabot, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Building stones are frequently subjected to very intense degradation due to salt crystallization, often responsible for strong modifications of their pore network. These effects have a great influence on the mechanical properties and durability of the materials, and on the penetration of water. Therefore, the quantification and visualization of water absorption into the pore network of degraded stones could provide useful information to better understand the weathering process. In this study, neutron radiography has been used (1) to monitor and visualize in two dimensions the capillary water uptake in a Sicilian calcarenite widely used as building and replace stone (namely Sabucina stone) and (2) to quantify the water content distribution, as a function of time and weathering degree. Additionally, traditional experiments based on gravimetric methods have been performed, following the standard recommendations. Results demonstrated a change in the physical properties of Sabucina stones with the intensification of the degradation process, with severe effects on the capillary imbibition dynamics. The water penetration depth at the end of the experiment was substantially higher in the fresh than in the weathered stones. The water absorption kinetics was faster in the weathered samples, and the amount of water absorbed increased with the number of weathering cycles. Good agreement between classical and neutron imaging data has also been evidenced. However, neutron radiography has allowed retrieving additional spatial information on the water absorption process, and to better understand how salt weathering affects the petrophysical properties of the studied stone and how it influences then the stone response against water. (orig.)

  9. Visualization and quantification of weathering effects on capillary water uptake of natural building stones by using neutron imaging

    Raneri, Simona; Barone, Germana; Mazzoleni, Paolo [University of Catania, Department of Biological, Geological and Environment Sciences, Catania (Italy); Rabot, Eva [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin (CNRS/CEA), Gif-Sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-11-15

    Building stones are frequently subjected to very intense degradation due to salt crystallization, often responsible for strong modifications of their pore network. These effects have a great influence on the mechanical properties and durability of the materials, and on the penetration of water. Therefore, the quantification and visualization of water absorption into the pore network of degraded stones could provide useful information to better understand the weathering process. In this study, neutron radiography has been used (1) to monitor and visualize in two dimensions the capillary water uptake in a Sicilian calcarenite widely used as building and replace stone (namely Sabucina stone) and (2) to quantify the water content distribution, as a function of time and weathering degree. Additionally, traditional experiments based on gravimetric methods have been performed, following the standard recommendations. Results demonstrated a change in the physical properties of Sabucina stones with the intensification of the degradation process, with severe effects on the capillary imbibition dynamics. The water penetration depth at the end of the experiment was substantially higher in the fresh than in the weathered stones. The water absorption kinetics was faster in the weathered samples, and the amount of water absorbed increased with the number of weathering cycles. Good agreement between classical and neutron imaging data has also been evidenced. However, neutron radiography has allowed retrieving additional spatial information on the water absorption process, and to better understand how salt weathering affects the petrophysical properties of the studied stone and how it influences then the stone response against water. (orig.)

  10. Space Weather Effects Produced by the Ring Current Particles

    Ganushkina, Natalia; Jaynes, Allison; Liemohn, Michael

    2017-11-01

    One of the definitions of space weather describes it as the time-varying space environment that may be hazardous to technological systems in space and/or on the ground and/or endanger human health or life. The ring current has its contributions to space weather effects, both in terms of particles, ions and electrons, which constitute it, and magnetic and electric fields produced and modified by it at the ground and in space. We address the main aspects of the space weather effects from the ring current starting with brief review of ring current discovery and physical processes and the Dst-index and predictions of the ring current and storm occurrence based on it. Special attention is paid to the effects on satellites produced by the ring current electrons. The ring current is responsible for several processes in the other inner magnetosphere populations, such as the plasmasphere and radiation belts which is also described. Finally, we discuss the ring current influence on the ionosphere and the generation of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC).

  11. Space weather effects measured in atmospheric radiation on aircraft

    Tobiska, W. K.; Bouwer, D.; Bailey, J. J.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, K.; Wieman, S. R.; Atwell, W.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Rice, D.; Schunk, R. W.; Bell, L. D.; Mertens, C. J.; Xu, X.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Wiley, S.; Teets, E.; Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.; Jones, J. B. L.; Crowley, G.; Azeem, S. I.; Halford, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the domains that are affected by space weather, the coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Since 2013 Space Environment Technologies (SET) has been conducting observations of the atmospheric radiation environment at aviation altitudes using a small fleet of six instruments. The objective of this work is to improve radiation risk management in air traffic operations. Under the auspices of the Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) and Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX) projects our team is making dose rate measurements on multiple aircraft flying global routes. Over 174 ARMAS and USEWX flights have successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs), Solar Energetic Protons (SEPs), and outer radiation belt energetic electrons. The real-time radiation exposure is measured as an absorbed dose rate in silicon and then computed as an ambient dose equivalent rate for reporting dose relevant to radiative-sensitive organs and tissue in units of microsieverts per hour. ARMAS total ionizing absorbed dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time, processed on the ground into ambient dose equivalent rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users. Dose rates from flight altitudes up to 56,700 ft. are shown for flights across the planet under a variety of space weather conditions. We discuss several space weather

  12. Feedbacks between air pollution and weather, Part 1: Effects on weather

    Makar, P. A.; Gong, W.; Milbrandt, J.; Hogrefe, C.; Zhang, Y.; Curci, G.; Žabkar, R.; Im, U.; Balzarini, A.; Baró, R.; Bianconi, R.; Cheung, P.; Forkel, R.; Gravel, S.; Hirtl, M.; Honzak, L.; Hou, A.; Jiménez-Guerrero, P.; Langer, M.; Moran, M. D.; Pabla, B.; Pérez, J. L.; Pirovano, G.; San José, R.; Tuccella, P.; Werhahn, J.; Zhang, J.; Galmarini, S.

    2015-08-01

    The meteorological predictions of fully coupled air-quality models running in ;feedback; versus ;no-feedback; simulations were compared against each other and observations as part of Phase 2 of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative. In the ;no-feedback; mode, the aerosol direct and indirect effects were disabled, with the models reverting to either climatologies of aerosol properties, or a no-aerosol weather simulation. In the ;feedback; mode, the model-generated aerosols were allowed to modify the radiative transfer and/or cloud formation parameterizations of the respective models. Annual simulations with and without feedbacks were conducted on domains over North America for the years 2006 and 2010, and over Europe for the year 2010. The incorporation of feedbacks was found to result in systematic changes to forecast predictions of meteorological variables, both in time and space, with the largest impacts occurring in the summer and near large sources of pollution. Models incorporating only the aerosol direct effect predicted feedback-induced reductions in temperature, surface downward and upward shortwave radiation, precipitation and PBL height, and increased upward shortwave radiation, in both Europe and North America. The feedback response of models incorporating both the aerosol direct and indirect effects varied across models, suggesting the details of implementation of the indirect effect have a large impact on model results, and hence should be a focus for future research. The feedback response of models incorporating both direct and indirect effects was also consistently larger in magnitude to that of models incorporating the direct effect alone, implying that the indirect effect may be the dominant process. Comparisons across modelling platforms suggested that direct and indirect effect feedbacks may often act in competition: the sign of residual changes associated with feedbacks often changed between those models incorporating the

  13. Effects of Weathering on TIR Spectra and Rock Classification

    McDowell, M. L.; Hamilton, V. E.; Riley, D.

    2006-03-01

    Changes in mineralogy due to weathering are detectable in the TIR and cause misclassification of rock types. We survey samples over a range of lithologies and attempt to provide a method of correction for rock identification from weathered spectra.

  14. Cool and dry weather enhances the effects of air pollution on emergency IHD hospital admissions.

    Qiu, Hong; Yu, Ignatius Tak-Sun; Wang, Xiaorong; Tian, Linwei; Tse, Lap Ah; Wong, Tze Wai

    2013-09-20

    Associations between ambient pollution and cardiovascular morbidity including ischemic heart disease (IHD) have been confirmed. Weather factors such as temperature, season and relative humidity (RH) may modify the effects of pollution. We conducted this study to examine the effects of air pollution on emergency IHD hospital admissions varied across seasons and RH levels, and to explore the possible joint modification of weather factors on pollution effects. Daily time series of air pollution concentrations, mean temperature and RH were collected from IHD hospital admissions from 1998 to 2007 in Hong Kong. We used generalized additive Poisson models with interaction term to estimate the pollution effects varied across seasons and RH levels, after adjusting for time trends, weather conditions, and influenza outbreaks. An increase in the detrimental effects of air pollution in cool season and on low humidity days was observed. In the cool and dry season, a 10 μg/m(3) increment of lag03 exposure was associated with an increase of emergency IHD admissions by 1.82% (95% CI: 1.24-2.40%), 3.89% (95% CI: 3.08-4.70%), and 2.19% (95% CI: 1.33-3.06%) for particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3), respectively. The effects of pollutants decreased greatly and lost statistical significance in the warm and humid season. We found season and RH jointly modified the associations between ambient pollution and IHD admissions, resulting in increased IHD admissions in the cool and dry season and reduced admissions in the warm and humid season. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Modification of input datasets for the Ensemble Streamflow Prediction based on large scale climatic indices and weather generator

    Šípek, Václav; Daňhelka, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 528, September (2015), s. 720-733 ISSN 0022-1694 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : seasonal forecasting * ESP * large-scale climate * weather generator Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 3.043, year: 2015

  16. The effect of different weather data sets and their resolution on climate-based daylight modelling

    Iversen, A; Svendsen, Svend; Nielsen, Toke Rammer

    2013-01-01

    Climate-based daylight modelling is based on the available weather data, which means that the weather data used as input to the daylight simulations are of great importance. In this paper, the effect on the outcome of the daylight simulations of using one weather data file rather than another...

  17. Effects of corpuscular radiation on weather and climate

    Bucha, V.

    1989-01-01

    There is no doubt that the antropogenic effect play an important role in the effects of corpuscular radiation on weather and climate. The task, however, is to distinguish between antropogenic effect in the atmosphere due to human activities and natural climatic fluctuations influencing biological systems. The increase in global temperature during the past 100 years is in relatively good coincidence with the increase in geomagnetic (corpuscular) activity. It is concluded that it could have been the increase in temperature on the Northern Hemisphere, due to the processes occurring in the auroral oval under enhanced corpuscular radiation which led to an increased atmospheric concentration of CO2 in the past. Both processes, i.e., antropogenic and solar activity effects, should be therefore intensively studied due to their important role for elucidating the past and present global change mainly in temperature, climate and biological systems

  18. Effectiveness of Weather Derivatives as a Risk Management Tool in Food Retail: The Case of Croatia

    Ivana Štulec

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-catastrophic weather risk is gaining importance as climate change becomes more pronounced and economic crisis forces companies to strengthen their cost control. Recent literature proposes weather derivatives as flexible weather risk mitigating tools. Only a handful of studies analysed the feasibility of weather derivatives in industries other than agriculture and energy. The purpose of this paper is to review available weather risk management solutions in retail, present weather derivatives as non-catastrophic weather risk management tools, empirically demonstrate the process of designing weather derivatives and assess their effectiveness as risk mitigating tools in retail. Empirical analysis is performed on beverage sales in 60 large food stores in Croatia, and performance of monthly temperature put options during the summer season is examined. For weather sensitivity analysis of sales, the method of panel regression was used. Results show that weather has a statistically significant effect on beverage sales and that weather derivatives prove to be effective in beverage sales uncertainty reduction. Their effectiveness differs between covered periods and cities.

  19. Modification of REE distribution of ordinary chondrites from Atacama (Chile) and Lut (Iran) hot deserts: Insights into the chemical weathering of meteorites

    Pourkhorsandi, Hamed; D'Orazio, Massimo; Rochette, Pierre; Valenzuela, Millarca; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Mirnejad, Hassan; Sutter, Brad; Hutzler, Aurore; Aboulahris, Maria

    2017-09-01

    The behavior of rare earth elements (REEs) during hot desert weathering of meteorites is investigated. Ordinary chondrites (OCs) from Atacama (Chile) and Lut (Iran) deserts show different variations in REE composition during this process. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) data reveal that hot desert OCs tend to show elevated light REE concentrations, relative to OC falls. Chondrites from Atacama are by far the most enriched in REEs and this enrichment is not necessarily related to their degree of weathering. Positive Ce anomaly of fresh chondrites from Atacama and the successive formation of a negative Ce anomaly with the addition of trivalent REEs are similar to the process reported from Antarctic eucrites. In addition to REEs, Sr and Ba also show different concentrations when comparing OCs from different hot deserts. The stability of Atacama surfaces and the associated old terrestrial ages of meteorites from this region give the samples the necessary time to interact with the terrestrial environment and to be chemically modified. Higher REE contents and LREE-enriched composition are evidence of contamination by terrestrial soil. Despite their low degrees of weathering, special care must be taken into account while working on the REE composition of Atacama meteorites for cosmochemistry applications. In contrast, chondrites from the Lut desert show lower degrees of REE modification, despite significant weathering signed by Sr content. This is explained by the relatively rapid weathering rate of the meteorites occurring in the Lut desert, which hampers the penetration of terrestrial material by forming voluminous Fe oxide/oxyhydroxides shortly after the meteorite fall.

  20. Assessment of lifestyle modification measures and their effect on ...

    Background: life style modification measures are essential in glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. This study compared the effect of lifestyle modification measures on adult type 2 diabetes patients who were on hypoglycemic and lifestyle measures and those on hypoglycemic alone. Aim and Objectives: The aim of the study ...

  1. Weather effects on the success of longleaf pine cone crops

    Daniel J. Leduc; Shi-Jean Susana Sung; Dale G. Brockway; Mary Anne Sword Sayer

    2016-01-01

    We used National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration weather data and historical records of cone crops from across the South to relate weather conditions to the yield of cones in 10 longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) stands. Seed development in this species occurs over a three-year time period and weather conditions during any part of this...

  2. Modification of input datasets for the Ensemble Streamflow Prediction based on large scale climatic indices and weather generator

    Šípek, Václav; Daňhelka, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 528, September (2015), s. 720-733 ISSN 0022-1694 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : sea sonal forecasting * ESP * large-scale climate * weather generator Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 3.043, year: 2015

  3. Expanded BPA residential weatherization program: summary of regional health effects

    Sandusky, W.F.; Thor, P.W.; Alton, C.C.; Mellinger, P.J.; Cross, F.T.

    1984-11-01

    The Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Expanded Residential Weatherization Program has been completed, printed, and distributed. This document incorporates numerous revisions based on both oral and written comments received during the public comment of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). The estimates of regional health effects were revised to incorporate results of the second Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey (PNWRES). The FEIS now expresses the estimated regional health effects in terms of incidence of cancers per 100,000 people exposed, which allows comparison to be made to the annual average risk of fatality by other causes. The estimates of regional health effects are also compared to health effects resulting from supplying and operating a conventional coal plant at a power level equal to the amount of energy saved from installation of additional tightening measures. Numerical results for the estimated health effects described above are provided. A summary of the comments received on the DEIS is also provided, along with estimated health effects associated with the Environmentally Preferred and BPA Preferred Alternatives to the Proposed Action. 8 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  4. Hedging effectiveness of weather index-based insurance in China

    Pelka, N.; Musshoff, O.; Finger, R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose - Maize production in China is exposed to pronounced yield risks, in particular weather risk, which is one of the most important and least controllable sources of risk in agriculture. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the extent to which weather index-based insurance can contribute to

  5. Revisiting the effects of hydrodynamic sorting and sedimentary recycling on chemical weathering indices

    Guo, Yulong; Yang, Shouye; Su, Ni; Li, Chao; Yin, Ping; Wang, Zhongbo

    2018-04-01

    Although the proxies based on elemental geochemistry of siliciclastic sediments have been well developed to indicate the intensity of chemical weathering in various catchments, their geological indications and limitations, and especially how the differentiation of minerals and sediment grain size influences the applications of these proxies needs more clarification. This paper investigates the interactive effects of weathering, hydraulic sorting and sedimentary recycling on river sediment chemistry, and further validates the application of various weathering indices by measuring mineralogical and geochemical compositions of bank sediments and suspended particulate matters (SPMs) from five rivers in East China bearing various sizes, geologic settings and climatic regimes. For a specific river, the silicate weathering intensity registered in the fine SPMs is systematically stronger than that in the coarse-grained bank sediments. Most of the weathering indices not only reflect the integrated weathering history of various catchments but also depend on hydraulic sorting effect during sediment transport and depositional processes. The correlation between CIA (chemical index of alteration) and WIP (weathering index of Parker) offers an approach to predict the weathering trends of the fine SPMs, coarse bank sediments and recycled sediments under the influence of quartz dilution. To minimize the effects of hydrodynamic sorting and sedimentary recycling, we suggest that the fine sediments (e.g. SPMs and <2 μm fraction of bank sediments) in rivers can better reflect the average of present-day weathering crust in catchments and the weathered terrigenous materials into marginal seas and oceans.

  6. Weather effects on the returns and volatility of the Shanghai stock market

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Jiang, Zhuhua; Lee, Yeonjeong; Yoon, Seong-Min

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the weather effects on returns as well as volatility in the Shanghai stock market. In order to analyze the influence of the opening of B-share market to domestic investors, it is assumed that domestic investors are more sensitive to the Shanghai local weather than foreign investors. In doing so, extreme weather condition dummies are generated by using the 21-day and 31-day moving average and its standard deviation. Empirical analysis provides two key results regarding weather effects. First, the weather effect exists in the A-share returns, but does not exist in the B-share returns over the whole period. In addition, the post-opening period shows the strong weather effect on B-share returns only, indicating that the market openness to domestic investors results in the weather effect. Second, the weather effect has a strong influence on the volatility of both A- and B-share returns. Similar to the case of returns, the weather effect on volatility is explained by the openness of B-share market.

  7. Effect of weatherization on radon levels in Maine dwellings

    Hess, C.T.; Hill, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    A study of radon concentration in the air of 30 Maine dwellings was performed before and after weatherization during November 1982-May 1983. The average radon (.75 pCi/1) was lower than a group of houses in a previous study in October 1980-May 1981 (3.1 pCi/1). The after-weatherization levels show an increase over the before-weatherization levels. Trailers were found to have lower radon concentrations than houses. The maximum value measured was 3.2 pCi/1 before and 6.2 pCi/1 after correction for season of exposure. 13 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  8. Space weather biological and systems effects for suborbital flights

    2008-10-31

    The Aerospace Corporation was tasked to assess the impacts of space weather on both RLVs and ELVs operating at suborbital altitudes from launch sites located in the low (equatorial regions), middle, and high latitudes. The present report presents a b...

  9. Effect of Bacillus subtilis on Granite Weathering: A Laboratory Experiment

    Song, W.; Ogawa, N.; Oguchi, C. T.; Hatta, T.; Matsukura, Y.

    2006-12-01

    We performed a comparative experiment to investigate how the ubiquitous soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis weathers granite and which granite-forming minerals weather more rapidly via biological processes. Batch type experiments (granite specimen in a 500 ml solution including NaCl, glucose, yeast extract and bacteria Bacillus subtilis at 27°E C) were carried out for 30 days. Granite surfaces were observed by SEM before and after the experiment. Bacillus subtilis had a strong influence on granite weathering by forming pits. There were 2.4 times as many pits and micropores were 2.3 times wider in granite exposed to Bacillus subtilis when compared with bacteria-free samples. Bacillus subtilis appear to preferentially select an optimum place to adhere to the mineral and dissolve essential elements from the mineral to live. Plagioclase was more vulnerable to bacterial weathering than biotite among the granite composing minerals.

  10. Isolating weather effects from seasonal activity patterns of a temperate North American Colubrid

    Andrew D. George; Frank R. III Thompson; John. Faaborg

    2015-01-01

    Forecasting the effects of climate change on threatened ecosystems and species will require an understanding of how weather influences processes that drive population dynamics. We have evaluated weather effects on activity patterns of western ratsnakes, a widespread predator of birds and small mammals in eastern North America. From 2010-2013 we radio-tracked 53...

  11. Effects of aluminium surface morphology and chemical modification on wettability

    Rahimi, Maral; Fojan, Peter; Gurevich, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    -life aluminium surfaces of different morphology: unpolished aluminium, polished aluminium, and aluminium foil, were subjected to surface modification procedures which involved the formation of a layer of hydrophilic hyperbranched polyethyleneglycol via in situ polymerization, molecular vapour deposition...... of a monolayer of fluorinated silane, and a combination of those. The effect of these surface modification techniques on roughness and wettability of the aluminium surfaces was elucidated by ellipsometry, contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy. We demonstrated that by employing different types...

  12. The effect of weather and its changes on emotional state - individual characteristics that make us vulnerable

    Spasova, Z.

    2011-03-01

    Given the proven effects of weather on the human organism, an attempt to examine its effects on a psychological and emotional level has been made. Emotions affect the bio tone, working ability, and concentration; hence their significance in various domains of economic life such as health care, education, transportation, and tourism. The present pilot study was conducted in Sofia, Bulgaria over a period of eight months, using five psychological methods: Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Test for Self-assessment of the emotional state, Test for evaluation of moods and Test ''Self-confidence-Activity-Mood''. The Fiodorov-Chubukov's complex-climatic method was used to characterize meteorological conditions in order to include a maximal number of meteorological elements in the analysis. Sixteen weather types are defined depending on the meteorological elements values according to this method. Abrupt weather changes from one day to another, defined by the same method, were also considered. The results obtained by t-test showed that the different categories of weather led to changes in the emotional status, which indicates a character either positive or negative for the organism. The abrupt weather changes, according to expectations, have negative effects on human emotions - but only when a transition to the cloudy weather or weather type, classified as ''unfavorable'', has been realized. The relationship between weather and human emotions is rather complicated since it depends on individual characteristics of people. One of these individual psychological characteristics, marked by the dimension ''neuroticism'', has a strong effect on emotional reactions in different weather conditions. Emotionally stable individuals are more ''resistant'' to the weather influence on their emotions, while those who are emotionally unstable have a stronger dependence on the impacts of weather.

  13. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Weathering and its effects on uranium redistribution

    Isobe, H.; Ohnuki, T.; Yanase, N.; Sato, T.; Kimura, H.; Sekine, K.; Nagano, T.; Klessa, D.A.; Conoley, C.; Nakashima, S.; Ewing, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    In the vicinity of the uranium ore deposit at Koongarra, quartz-chlorite schist, the ore host rock, has been subjected to weathering. Although quartz is resistant to weathering, chlorite has been altered to clays and iron minerals. The chlorite weathering and the uranium association with the weathered minerals are the main topics of this study. In order to clarify the weathering of chlorite and its effects on the redistribution of uranium, the processes, mechanisms, and kinetics of the chlorite weathering, and the uranium concentrations in minerals were examined by various methods: X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, transmission electron microscopy, autoradiography, visible spectroscopy, alpha and gamma spectrometry. The observed results were compared to those calculated, based on two different models developed for the present study. Water-rock interactions have resulted in the weathering of chlorite and precipitation and sorption of uranyl from the groundwaters with the weathering products. It is concluded that the chlorite weathering affects the uranium retardation factor, and thus uranium redistribution at Koongarra. 55 refs., 20 tabs., 120 figs

  14. Modification of radiation sensitivity: the oxygen effect

    Quintiliani, M.

    1979-01-01

    Four fundamental aspects of the oxygen effect in radiobiology are reviewed, with emphasis on single cell systems: (1) Radiosensitivity in relation to oxygen concentration. In many biological systems, this relationship is remarkably well represented by the well-known Howard-Flanders/Alper formula. Often, however, the degree of uncertainty associated with the estimation of the value of K in the formula is fairly high. Recent data on V79-753B cells indicate a biphasic influence of oxygen concentration on radiosensitivity that cannot be described in terms of the Howard-Flanders/Alper model. (2) The oxygen effect in relation to survival level. The influence of very low oxygen concentrations on the shoulder of the survival curves of irradiated cells is still controversial. Also, the oxygen dependence of repair processes for sublethal and potentially lethal damage need to be better defined. (3) Time-scale of the oxygen effect. All the experimental data obtained with the use of fast techniques indicate that the time scale of the oxygen effect is consistent with that of free radical reactions. This appears to be compatible with the hypothesis that oxygen acts by fixation of a radiation-induced reversible damage. The existence of two types of damage with different rates of decay is suggested, both in bacterial and mammalian cells. (4) Molecular mechanisms of the oxygen effect. In spite of the very large literature on this subject, the identification of the detailed molecular mechanisms of the oxygen effect must still be considered goals for future research

  15. Space Weather Effects on Current and Future Electric Power Systems

    Munoz, D.; Dutta, O.; Tandoi, C.; Brandauer, W.; Mohamed, A.; Damas, M. C.

    2016-12-01

    This work addresses the effects of Geomagnetic Disturbances (GMDs) on the present bulk power system as well as the future smart grid, and discusses the mitigation of these geomagnetic impacts, so as to reduce the vulnerabilities of the electric power network to large space weather events. Solar storm characterized by electromagnetic radiation generates geo-electric fields that result in the flow of Geomagnetically Induced Currents (GICs) through the transmission lines, followed by transformers and the ground. As the ground conductivity and the power network topology significantly vary with the region, it becomes imperative to estimate of the magnitude of GICs for different places. In this paper, the magnitude of GIC has been calculated for New York State (NYS) with the help of extensive modelling of the whole NYS electricity transmission network using real data. Although GIC affects only high voltage levels, e.g. above 300 kV, the presence of coastline in NYS makes the low voltage transmission lines also susceptible to GIC. Besides this, the encroachment of technologies pertaining to smart grid implementation, such as Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs), Microgrids, Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS), and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) have been analyzed for GMD impacts. Inaccurate PMU results due to scintillation of GPS signals that are affected by electromagnetic interference of solar storm, presence of renewable energy resources in coastal areas that are more vulnerable to GMD, the ability of FACTS devices to either block or pave new path for GICs and so on, shed some light on impacts of GMD on smart grid technologies.

  16. Extreme weather-year sequences have nonadditive effects on environmental nitrogen losses.

    Iqbal, Javed; Necpalova, Magdalena; Archontoulis, Sotirios V; Anex, Robert P; Bourguignon, Marie; Herzmann, Daryl; Mitchell, David C; Sawyer, John E; Zhu, Qing; Castellano, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of extreme weather years, characterized by abnormal precipitation and temperature, are increasing. In isolation, these years have disproportionately large effects on environmental N losses. However, the sequence of extreme weather years (e.g., wet-dry vs. dry-wet) may affect cumulative N losses. We calibrated and validated the DAYCENT ecosystem process model with a comprehensive set of biogeophysical measurements from a corn-soybean rotation managed at three N fertilizer inputs with and without a winter cover crop in Iowa, USA. Our objectives were to determine: (i) how 2-year sequences of extreme weather affect 2-year cumulative N losses across the crop rotation, and (ii) if N fertilizer management and the inclusion of a winter cover crop between corn and soybean mitigate the effect of extreme weather on N losses. Using historical weather (1951-2013), we created nine 2-year scenarios with all possible combinations of the driest ("dry"), wettest ("wet"), and average ("normal") weather years. We analyzed the effects of these scenarios following several consecutive years of relatively normal weather. Compared with the normal-normal 2-year weather scenario, 2-year extreme weather scenarios affected 2-year cumulative NO 3 - leaching (range: -93 to +290%) more than N 2 O emissions (range: -49 to +18%). The 2-year weather scenarios had nonadditive effects on N losses: compared with the normal-normal scenario, the dry-wet sequence decreased 2-year cumulative N 2 O emissions while the wet-dry sequence increased 2-year cumulative N 2 O emissions. Although dry weather decreased NO 3 - leaching and N 2 O emissions in isolation, 2-year cumulative N losses from the wet-dry scenario were greater than the dry-wet scenario. Cover crops reduced the effects of extreme weather on NO 3 - leaching but had a lesser effect on N 2 O emissions. As the frequency of extreme weather is expected to increase, these data suggest that the sequence of interannual weather

  17. EFFECT OF ARTIFICIAL WEATHERING ON WOOD LAMINATES COLOR TREATED WITH TWO FINISHING PRODUCTS

    Thais Jacob Mendes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Weathering is one of the main reasons for the degradation of wood, especially its color. The application of finishes minimizes these effects. This study aimed to monitor the effect of artificial weathering on wood veneer of the species cumaru (Dipteryx odorata and pau marfim (Balfourodendron riedelianum with two finishes, the marine varnish and Cetol, with monitoring using a spectrophotometer. The samples were subjected to cycles of exposure to weathering for 20, 40, 52, 76, 124, 226, 430, 838 and 960 hours. The colorimetric parameters (L*, a*, b*, C and h* were measured before treatment, after application of the products and during the weathering time intervals. The application of finishes darkened veneer of cumaru wood and pau marfim in nature. However, in higher weathering times, both species returned to a lighter color, and even became lighter than the natural wood. The use of Cetol was more efficient, giving greater stability in the conservation of wood color of the species studied.

  18. Characterizing Space Weather Effects in the Post-DMSP Era

    Groves, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather generally refers to heliophysical phenomena or events that produce a negative impact on manmade systems. While many space weather events originate with impulsive disturbances on the sun, others result from complex internal interactions in the ionosphere-thermosphere system. The reliance of mankind on satellite-based services continues to increase rapidly, yet the global capacity for sensing space weather in the ionosphere seems headed towards decline. A number of recent ionospheric-focused space-based missions are either presently, or soon-to-be, no longer available, and the end of the multi-decade Defense Meteorological Satellite Program is now in sight. The challenge facing the space weather community is how to maintain or increase sensing capabilities in an operational environment constrained by a decreasing numbers of sensors. The upcoming launch of COSMIC-2 in 2016/2018 represents the most significant new capability planned for the future. GNSS RO data has some benefit for background ionospheric models, particularly over regions where ground-based GNSS TEC measurements are unavailable, but the space weather community has a dire need to leverage such missions for far more knowledge of the ionosphere, and specifically for information related to space weather impacts. Meanwhile, the number of ground-based GNSS sensors worldwide has increased substantially, yet progress instrumenting some vastly undersampled regions, such as Africa, remains slow. In fact, the recent loss of support for many existing ground stations in such areas under the former Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) program may actually result in a decrease in such sensing sites over the next 1-2 years, abruptly reversing a positive trend established over the last decade. Here we present potential solutions to the challenges these developments pose to the space weather enterprise. Specific topics include modeling advances required to detect and accurately characterize

  19. Meteorological effects of heat and moisture releases from large power stations (precipitation modification)

    Patrinos, A.A.N.; Eissenberg, D.M.

    1978-01-01

    The Bowen Electric Generating Plant (Plant Bowen) in Northwest Georgia has been chosen as a test site to investigate the atmospheric effects of cooling towers. This 3,200-MWe coal-fired power plant uses four natural-draft cooling towers and is the largest of U.S. power plants having cooling towers as the sole cooling method. Results are reported from both climatological and field studies. Extensive use has been made of the U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) data accumulated over several decades in Northwest Georgia. Apart from providing preliminary indications of precipitation modification effects, these data have aided in the general understanding of the climatology in the vicinity of Plant Bowen and have paved the way for the field studies currently underway. These field studies, employing a dense network of rain gauges and windsets, are expected to provide the statistical data base necessary to estimate the plant's effect (if any) on precipitation

  20. Disparity modifications and the emotional effects of stereoscopic images

    Kawai, Takashi; Atsuta, Daiki; Tomiyama, Yuya; Kim, Sanghyun; Morikawa, Hiroyuki; Mitsuya, Reiko; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a study that focuses on disparity changes in emotional scenes of stereoscopic (3D) images, in which an examination of the effects on pleasant and arousal was carried out by adding binocular disparity to 2D images that evoke specific emotions, and applying disparity modification based on the disparity analysis of famous 3D movies. From the results of the experiment, for pleasant, a significant difference was found only for the main effect of the emotions. On the other hand, for arousal, there was a trend of increasing the evaluation values in the order 2D condition, 3D condition and 3D condition applied the disparity modification for happiness, surprise, and fear. This suggests the possibility that binocular disparity and the modification affect arousal.

  1. Using billing and weather data to separate thermostat from insulation effects

    Fels, M F; Goldberg, M L

    1984-05-01

    A simple methodology, which uses aggregate utility sales data to measure and decompose residential conservation trends, is demonstrated. The data base is the aggregate natural gas consumption of the nearly one million houses in New Jersey which use gas for heating. The conservation index resulting from the analysis is normalized annual consumption, which adjusts per-household consumption to typical weather conditions. To smooth erratic year-to-year changes, four-year composite analyses are moved forward in time over the period 1970-82. Dramatic decreases in consumption, totaling 26% since the oil embargo, are evident. A decomposition of the results for the four years following the embargo suggests that over half of this conservation effect is due to changes in interior temperatures, with the policy implication that thermostat setbacks have played a far greater conservation role than have either structural change through retrofitting or modifications in appliance usage. In more recent years, for which the overall reduction in energy usage is lower, the dominant conservation role appears to have shifted to reductions in temperature-independent, base-level consumption by water heaters and appliances, while the effects of retrofitting remain relatively small.

  2. Geographically varying effects of weather on tobacco consumption: implications for health marketing initiatives.

    Govind, Rahul; Garg, Nitika; Sun, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Weather and its fluctuations have been found to influence the consumption of negative hedonic goods. However, such findings are of limited use to health marketers who cannot control the weather, and hence, its effects. The current research utilizes data obtained at the zip-code level to study geographical variations in the effect of weather on tobacco consumption across the entire continental United States. The results allow health marketers to identify areas that will be most responsive to marketing efforts aimed at curtailing negative hedonic consumption and thus implement more effective, region-specific initiatives.

  3. The impact of cold spells on mortality and effect modification by cold spell characteristics

    Wang, Lijun; Liu, Tao; Hu, Mengjue; Zeng, Weilin; Zhang, Yonghui; Rutherford, Shannon; Lin, Hualiang; Xiao, Jianpeng; Yin, Peng; Liu, Jiangmei; Chu, Cordia; Tong, Shilu; Ma, Wenjun; Zhou, Maigeng

    2016-12-01

    In China, the health impact of cold weather has received little attention, which limits our understanding of the health impacts of climate change. We collected daily mortality and meteorological data in 66 communities across China from 2006 to 2011. Within each community, we estimated the effect of cold spell exposure on mortality using a Distributed Lag Nonlinear Model (DLNM). We also examined the modification effect of cold spell characteristics (intensity, duration, and timing) and individual-specific factors (causes of death, age, gender and education). Meta-analysis method was finally used to estimate the overall effects. The overall cumulative excess risk (CER) of non-accidental mortality during cold spell days was 28.2% (95% CI: 21.4%, 35.3%) compared with non-cold spell days. There was a significant increase in mortality when the cold spell duration and intensity increased or occurred earlier in the season. Cold spell effects and effect modification by cold spell characteristics were more pronounced in south China. The elderly, people with low education level and those with respiratory diseases were generally more vulnerable to cold spells. Cold spells statistically significantly increase mortality risk in China, with greater effects in southern China. This effect is modified by cold spell characteristics and individual-level factors.

  4. Interactive effects of prey and weather on golden eagle reproduction

    Steenhof, Karen; Kochert, Michael N.; McDonald, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    1. The reproduction of the golden eagle Aquila chrysaetos was studied in southwestern Idaho for 23 years, and the relationship between eagle reproduction and jackrabbit Lepus californicus abundance, weather factors, and their interactions, was modelled using general linear models. Backward elimination procedures were used to arrive at parsimonious models.2. The number of golden eagle pairs occupying nesting territories each year showed a significant decline through time that was unrelated to either annual rabbit abundance or winter severity. However, eagle hatching dates were significantly related to both winter severity and jackrabbit abundance. Eagles hatched earlier when jackrabbits were abundant, and they hatched later after severe winters.3. Jackrabbit abundance influenced the proportion of pairs that laid eggs, the proportion of pairs that were successful, mean brood size at fledging, and the number of young fledged per pair. Weather interacted with prey to influence eagle reproductive rates.4. Both jackrabbit abundance and winter severity were important in predicting the percentage of eagle pairs that laid eggs. Percentage laying was related positively to jackrabbit abundance and inversely related to winter severity.5. The variables most useful in predicting percentage of laying pairs successful were rabbit abundance and the number of extremely hot days during brood-rearing. The number of hot days and rabbit abundance were also significant in a model predicting eagle brood size at fledging. Both success and brood size were positively related to jackrabbit abundance and inversely related to the frequency of hot days in spring.6. Eagle reproduction was limited by rabbit abundance during approximately twothirds of the years studied. Weather influenced how severely eagle reproduction declined in those years.7. This study demonstrates that prey and weather can interact to limit a large raptor population's productivity. Smaller raptors could be affected more

  5. Effects of Cognitive Bias Modification Training via Smartphones

    Ranming Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Negative cognitive biases have been linked to anxiety and mood problems. Accumulated data from laboratory studies show that positive and negative interpretation styles with accompanying changes in mood can be induced through cognitive bias modification (CBM paradigms. Despite the therapeutic potential of positive training effects, few studies have explored training paradigms administered via smartphones. The current study aimed to compare the effectiveness of three different types of training programmes (cognitive bias modification-attention, CBM-A; cognitive bias modification-interpretation, CBM-I; attention and interpretation modification, AIM administered via smart-phones by using a control condition (CC.Methods:Seventy-six undergraduate participants with high social anxiety (Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, LSAS ≥ 30 were randomly assigned to four groups: CBM-A (n = 20, CBM-I (n = 20, AIM (n = 16, and CC (n = 20.Results: The results showed that the effects of CBM training, CBM-I training, or AIM training vs. CC for attention yielded no significant differences in dot-probe attention bias scores. The CBM-I group showed significantly less threat interpretation and more benign interpretation than the CC group on interpretation bias scores.Conclusions: The present results supported the feasibility of delivering CBM-I via smartphones, but the effectiveness of CBM-A and AIM training via smartphones was limited.

  6. Numerical simulation of baseflow modification due to effects of ...

    Numerical simulation of baseflow modification due to effects of sediment yield. ... Physically-based mathematical modelling affords the opportunity to look at this kind of interaction, which should be simulated by deterministic responses of both water and fluvial processes. In addition to simulating the streamflow and ...

  7. Effects of Cognitive Bias Modification Training via Smartphones

    Ranming Yang; Ranming Yang; Lixia Cui; Feng Li; Jing Xiao; Qin Zhang; Tian P. S. Oei; Tian P. S. Oei

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Negative cognitive biases have been linked to anxiety and mood problems. Accumulated data from laboratory studies show that positive and negative interpretation styles with accompanying changes in mood can be induced through cognitive bias modification (CBM) paradigms. Despite the therapeutic potential of positive training effects, few studies have explored training paradigms administered via smartphones. The current study aimed to compare the effectiveness of three...

  8. Long term effects on potential repository sites: the alteration of the Lower Oxford Clay during weathering

    Milowdowski, A.E.; Bloodworth, A.J.; Wilmot, R.D.

    1985-09-01

    The report is one of a short series describing work carried out to investigate the long-term effects of various geological processes on the performance of both shallow and deep repositories for low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. This paper deals with the alteration as a result of weathering of the Lower Oxford Clay, a potential host rock for shallow disposal of wastes. A description of the Lower Oxford Clay is given, along with the weathering of argillaceous rocks. Investigations of the weathering at the Elstow Storage Depot are described, as well as the implications for radioactive waste disposal. (U.K.)

  9. Weather Effects on Mobile Social Interactions: A Case Study of Mobile Phone Users in Lisbon, Portugal

    Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Leong, Tuck W.; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Olivier, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The effect of weather on social interactions has been explored through the analysis of a large mobile phone use dataset. Time spent on phone calls, numbers of connected social ties, and tie strength were used as proxies for social interactions; while weather conditions were characterized in terms of temperature, relative humidity, air pressure, and wind speed. Our results are based on the analysis of a full calendar year of data for 22,696 mobile phone users (53.2 million call logs) in Lisbon, Portugal. The results suggest that different weather parameters have correlations to the level and character of social interactions. We found that although weather did not show much influence upon people's average call duration, the likelihood of longer calls was found to increase during periods of colder weather. During periods of weather that were generally considered to be uncomfortable (i.e., very cold/warm, very low/high air pressure, and windy), people were found to be more likely to communicate with fewer social ties. Despite this tendency, we found that people are more likely to maintain their connections with those they have strong ties with much more than those of weak ties. This study sheds new light on the influence of weather conditions on social relationships and how mobile phone data can be used to investigate the influence of environmental factors on social dynamics. PMID:23071523

  10. Weather effects on mobile social interactions: a case study of mobile phone users in Lisbon, Portugal.

    Santi Phithakkitnukoon

    Full Text Available The effect of weather on social interactions has been explored through the analysis of a large mobile phone use dataset. Time spent on phone calls, numbers of connected social ties, and tie strength were used as proxies for social interactions; while weather conditions were characterized in terms of temperature, relative humidity, air pressure, and wind speed. Our results are based on the analysis of a full calendar year of data for 22,696 mobile phone users (53.2 million call logs in Lisbon, Portugal. The results suggest that different weather parameters have correlations to the level and character of social interactions. We found that although weather did not show much influence upon people's average call duration, the likelihood of longer calls was found to increase during periods of colder weather. During periods of weather that were generally considered to be uncomfortable (i.e., very cold/warm, very low/high air pressure, and windy, people were found to be more likely to communicate with fewer social ties. Despite this tendency, we found that people are more likely to maintain their connections with those they have strong ties with much more than those of weak ties. This study sheds new light on the influence of weather conditions on social relationships and how mobile phone data can be used to investigate the influence of environmental factors on social dynamics.

  11. Space Weather Effects in the Earth's Radiation Belts

    Baker, D. N.; Erickson, P. J.; Fennell, J. F.; Foster, J. C.; Jaynes, A. N.; Verronen, P. T.

    2018-02-01

    The first major scientific discovery of the Space Age was that the Earth is enshrouded in toroids, or belts, of very high-energy magnetically trapped charged particles. Early observations of the radiation environment clearly indicated that the Van Allen belts could be delineated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. The energy distribution, spatial extent and particle species makeup of the Van Allen belts has been subsequently explored by several space missions. Recent observations by the NASA dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission have revealed many novel properties of the radiation belts, especially for electrons at highly relativistic and ultra-relativistic kinetic energies. In this review we summarize the space weather impacts of the radiation belts. We demonstrate that many remarkable features of energetic particle changes are driven by strong solar and solar wind forcings. Recent comprehensive data show broadly and in many ways how high energy particles are accelerated, transported, and lost in the magnetosphere due to interplanetary shock wave interactions, coronal mass ejection impacts, and high-speed solar wind streams. We also discuss how radiation belt particles are intimately tied to other parts of the geospace system through atmosphere, ionosphere, and plasmasphere coupling. The new data have in many ways rewritten the textbooks about the radiation belts as a key space weather threat to human technological systems.

  12. Effects of aluminium surface morphology and chemical modification on wettability

    Rahimi, M., E-mail: mar@sbi.aau.dk [Department of Energy and Environment, Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University, A.C. Meyers Vænge 15, 2450 København SV (Denmark); Fojan, P.; Gurevich, L. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, Skjernvej 4, DK-9220 Aalborg East (Denmark); Afshari, A. [Department of Energy and Environment, Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University, A.C. Meyers Vænge 15, 2450 København SV (Denmark)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Successful surface modification procedures on aluminium samples were performed involving formation of the layer of hydrophilic hyperbranched polyethyleneglycol (PEG) via in situ polymerization, molecular vapour deposition of a monolayer of fluorinated silane, and a combination of those. • The groups of surfaces with hydrophobic behavior were found to follow the Wenzel model. • A transition from Cassie–Baxter's to Wenzel's regime was observed due to changing of the surface roughness upon mechanical polishing in aluminium samples. - Abstract: Aluminium alloys are some of the predominant metals in industrial applications such as production of heat exchangers, heat pumps. They have high heat conductivity coupled with a low specific weight. In cold working conditions, there is a risk of frost formation on the surface of aluminium in the presence of water vapour, which can lead to the deterioration of equipment performance. This work addresses the methods of surface modification of aluminium and their effect of the underlying surface morphology and wettability, which are the important parameters for frost formation. Three groups of real-life aluminium surfaces of different morphology: unpolished aluminium, polished aluminium, and aluminium foil, were subjected to surface modification procedures which involved the formation of a layer of hydrophilic hyperbranched polyethyleneglycol via in situ polymerization, molecular vapour deposition of a monolayer of fluorinated silane, and a combination of those. The effect of these surface modification techniques on roughness and wettability of the aluminium surfaces was elucidated by ellipsometry, contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy. We demonstrated that by employing different types of surface modifications the contact angle of water droplets on aluminium samples can be varied from 12° to more than 120°. A crossover from Cassie–Baxter to Wenzel regime upon changing the surface

  13. EFFECTS OF WEATHER-INDEX INSURANCE: THE CASE OF SMALLHOLDER MAIZE FARMERS IN NORTHERN GHANA

    Bashiru Haruna

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the effect of weather-index insurance on intensity of fertilizer use and yields among 230 smallholder maize farmers in Northern Region of Ghana. Out of the total sample of selected farmers, about 35% purchased the insurance. Using an endogenous treatment regression model, the study showed that weather-index insurance purchase increased the intensity of fertilizer use but did not have a significant effect on maize yield. Past experience of crop failure due to drought, livestock ownership as well as the total area of land owned explained weather-index insurance purchase in the study area. Based on the results of this study, the Government of Ghana can use weather-index insurance as a policy tool to increase the use of fertilizer by smallholder maize farmers.

  14. The roles of weather modification technology in mitigation of the peat fires during a period of dry season in Bengkalis, Indonesia

    Sandhyavitri, A.; Perdana, M. A.; Sutikno, S.; Widodo, F. H.

    2018-02-01

    The annual peat fire disasters have suffered human life, deteriorated peat land ecosystems, and caused severe economic losses in Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei, and Singapore during a period of 2014-2016. The objective of this study is to investigate to what extent the weather modification technology (WMT) may play its roles in increasing the precipitation rates in order to mitigate the peat fires disaster in Bengkalis, Riau Province, Indonesia. The study obtained the precipitation rates data from the tropical rainfall measuring mission (TRMM) satellite during the period of 2014, 2015 and 2016. The data then statistically analyzed using the Grads software package. While the process of WMT at the designated research location was evaluated together between the Artificial Rain Unit of BPPT (Agency for the Assessment and Application Technology), and the Engineering Faculty, University of Riau, 2016. The research showed that the WMT increased the rainfall rates during the dry season within the study area by 8% (520.7 mm to 557 mm) in the 3 months period (July 14 -October 6, 2016), and reducing significantly hotspots by 88.6% from 6.725 in 2014 to 770 in 2016. Hence, it confirmed that the application of technical WMT procedures may increase precipitation rates and reduce the number of hot spots in Bengkalis.

  15. Concept for an International Standard related to Space Weather Effects on Space Systems

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Tomky, Alyssa

    There is great interest in developing an international standard related to space weather in order to specify the tools and parameters needed for space systems operations. In particular, a standard is important for satellite operators who may not be familiar with space weather. In addition, there are others who participate in space systems operations that would also benefit from such a document. For example, the developers of software systems that provide LEO satellite orbit determination, radio communication availability for scintillation events (GEO-to-ground L and UHF bands), GPS uncertainties, and the radiation environment from ground-to-space for commercial space tourism. These groups require recent historical data, current epoch specification, and forecast of space weather events into their automated or manual systems. Other examples are national government agencies that rely on space weather data provided by their organizations such as those represented in the International Space Environment Service (ISES) group of 14 national agencies. Designers, manufacturers, and launchers of space systems require real-time, operational space weather parameters that can be measured, monitored, or built into automated systems. Thus, a broad scope for the document will provide a useful international standard product to a variety of engineering and science domains. The structure of the document should contain a well-defined scope, consensus space weather terms and definitions, and internationally accepted descriptions of the main elements of space weather, its sources, and its effects upon space systems. Appendices will be useful for describing expanded material such as guidelines on how to use the standard, how to obtain specific space weather parameters, and short but detailed descriptions such as when best to use some parameters and not others; appendices provide a path for easily updating the standard since the domain of space weather is rapidly changing with new advances

  16. Modification of carcinogenic and antitumor radiation effects (biomedical aspects)

    Vilenchik, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    In the book the data on modification of carcinogenic radiation effects by physiologicaly active compounds (caffeine, hormones, promoters and others) as well as on potentiation of antitumor radiation effects by means of hyperthermia are systematized. It is shown that as a basis of synergetic (superadditive) carcinogenic or antitumor radiation effects combined with other factor can be the inhibiting effects of the latter on the reparation process of radiation-induced DNA injuries. The results of experimental investigations and the data on quantitative analysis can be used as a theoretical basis for improvement of the ways and means of the prophylaxis of tumor diseases as well as for increasing the efficiency of radiotherapy

  17. Modification of radiation effect by sodium fluoride in Tradescantia

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.; Guminska, M.; Huczkowski, J.; Kuternozinska, W.

    1988-01-01

    Frequency of somatic mutations in the Tradescantia stamen hairs served as a measure of biological effect of gamma irradiation with single and split doses and of modifications caused by sodium fluoride. It was found that treatment of plants with fluoride before irradiation affects considerably radiation-induced mutations. The changed peak mutation frequency in plants treated with fluoride suggests that it vitally influences the repair processes of DNA and possibly modifies the mutation spectrum. 14 refs., 3 figs. (author)

  18. The effects of weathering on the physical and mechanical properties of igneous and metamorphic saprolites

    Rocchi, Irene; Coop, M. R.; Maccarini, M.

    2017-01-01

    The present paper presents three extensive datasets of laboratory testing on weathered geomaterials, which are emblematic of soil types widely found worldwide. The overall dataset includes soils originating from igneous and metamorphic rocks, either coarse or fine grained and having either felsic...... or mafic minerals. In particular, the data are interpreted to highlight the effects that weathering has on the physical and mechanical properties of these natural geomaterials comparing them with published data with the aim to provide a general framework of interpretation that takes into account...... this geological process and links soil mechanics to engineering geology. Generally, weathering induces a reduction in the grain size, both due to physical actions (e.g. opening of grain contacts) and to the chemical decomposition of minerals resulting in the formation of clay minerals. As weathering proceeds...

  19. The effects of synoptic weather on influenza infection incidences: a retrospective study utilizing digital disease surveillance

    Zhao, Naizhuo; Cao, Guofeng; Vanos, Jennifer K.; Vecellio, Daniel J.

    2018-01-01

    The environmental drivers and mechanisms of influenza dynamics remain unclear. The recent development of influenza surveillance-particularly the emergence of digital epidemiology-provides an opportunity to further understand this puzzle as an area within applied human biometeorology. This paper investigates the short-term weather effects on human influenza activity at a synoptic scale during cold seasons. Using 10 years (2005-2014) of municipal level influenza surveillance data (an adjustment of the Google Flu Trends estimation from the Centers for Disease Control's virologic surveillance data) and daily spatial synoptic classification weather types, we explore and compare the effects of weather exposure on the influenza infection incidences in 79 cities across the USA. We find that during the cold seasons the presence of the polar [i.e., dry polar (DP) and moist polar (MP)] weather types is significantly associated with increasing influenza likelihood in 62 and 68% of the studied cities, respectively, while the presence of tropical [i.e., dry tropical (DT) and moist tropical (MT)] weather types is associated with a significantly decreasing occurrence of influenza in 56 and 43% of the cities, respectively. The MP and the DP weather types exhibit similar close positive correlations with influenza infection incidences, indicating that both cold-dry and cold-moist air provide favorable conditions for the occurrence of influenza in the cold seasons. Additionally, when tropical weather types are present, the humid (MT) and the dry (DT) weather types have similar strong impacts to inhibit the occurrence of influenza. These findings suggest that temperature is a more dominating atmospheric factor than moisture that impacts the occurrences of influenza in cold seasons.

  20. Effect of solar wind plasma parameters on space weather

    Rathore, Balveer S.; Gupta, Dinesh C.; Kaushik, Subhash C.

    2015-01-01

    Today's challenge for space weather research is to quantitatively predict the dynamics of the magnetosphere from measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. Correlative studies between geomagnetic storms (GMSs) and the various interplanetary (IP) field/plasma parameters have been performed to search for the causes of geomagnetic activity and develop models for predicting the occurrence of GMSs, which are important for space weather predictions. We find a possible relation between GMSs and solar wind and IMF parameters in three different situations and also derived the linear relation for all parameters in three situations. On the basis of the present statistical study, we develop an empirical model. With the help of this model, we can predict all categories of GMSs. This model is based on the following fact: the total IMF B total can be used to trigger an alarm for GMSs, when sudden changes in total magnetic field B total occur. This is the first alarm condition for a storm's arrival. It is observed in the present study that the southward B z component of the IMF is an important factor for describing GMSs. A result of the paper is that the magnitude of B z is maximum neither during the initial phase (at the instant of the IP shock) nor during the main phase (at the instant of Disturbance storm time (Dst) minimum). It is seen in this study that there is a time delay between the maximum value of southward B z and the Dst minimum, and this time delay can be used in the prediction of the intensity of a magnetic storm two-three hours before the main phase of a GMS. A linear relation has been derived between the maximum value of the southward component of B z and the Dst, which is Dst = (−0.06) + (7.65) B z +t. Some auxiliary conditions should be fulfilled with this, for example the speed of the solar wind should, on average, be 350 km s −1 to 750 km s −1 , plasma β should be low and, most importantly, plasma temperature

  1. The Effects of Natural Weathering on Color Stability of Impregnated and Varnished Wood Materials

    Turkay Turkoglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate effects of natural weathering on color stability of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. and Oriental beech (Fagus orientalis L. impregnated with some chemicals [tanalith-E (TN-E, adolit-KD5 (AD-KD5, and chromated copper arsenate (CCA] and then varnished [synthetic varnish (SV and polyurethane varnish (PV]. While applying varnish increased lightness, impregnation decreased lightness of the wood specimens before natural weathering. Natural weathering caused greenish, bluish, and dark color tones of the wood surface. Total color change was increased with increasing exposure times in natural weathering. Untreated (control wood specimens exhibited higher color changes than the other wood specimens in all the stages of natural weathering. The total color changes of untreated Oriental beech specimens were less than untreated Scots pine specimens. The color stability of impregnated and varnished wood specimens gave better results than untreated and solely varnished wood specimens after natural weathering. The best color stability was obtained from both Oriental beech and Scots pine wood impregnated with TN-E before PV coating.

  2. Effects of space weather on high-latitude ground systems

    Pirjola, Risto

    Geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) in technological systems, such as power grids, pipelines, cables and railways, are a ground manifestation of space weather. The first GIC observations were already made in early telegraph equipment more than 150 years ago. In power networks, GIC may saturate transformers with possible harmful consequences extending even to a collapse of the whole system or to permanent damage of transformers. In pipelines, GIC and the associated pipe-to-soil voltages may enhance corrosion or disturb surveys associated with corrosion control. GIC are driven by the geoelectric field induced by a geomagnetic variation at the Earth’s surface. The electric and magnetic fields are primarily produced by ionospheric currents and secondarily affected by the ground conductivity. Of great importance is the auroral electrojet with other rapidly varying currents indicating that GIC are a particular high-latitude problem. In this paper, we summarize the GIC research done in Finland during about 25 years, and discuss the calculation of GIC in a given network. Special attention is paid to modelling a power system. It is shown that, when considering GIC at a site, it is usually sufficient to take account for a smaller grid in the vicinity of the particular site. Modelling GIC also provides a basis for developing forecasting and warning methods of GIC.

  3. The effectiveness of workplace dietary modification interventions: a systematic review.

    Geaney, F; Kelly, C; Greiner, B A; Harrington, J M; Perry, I J; Beirne, P

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of workplace dietary modification interventions alone or in combination with nutrition education on employees' dietary behaviour, health status, self-efficacy, perceived health, determinants of food choice, nutrition knowledge, co-worker support, job satisfaction, economic cost and food-purchasing patterns. Data sources included PubMed, Medline, Embase, Psych Info., Web of Knowledge and Cochrane Library (November 2011). This review was guided by the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement. Studies were randomised controlled trials and controlled studies. Interventions were implemented for at least three months. Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias tool measured potential biases. Heterogeneity precluded meta-analysis. Results were presented in a narrative summary. Six studies conducted in Brazil, the USA, Netherlands and Belgium met the inclusion criteria. Four studies reported small increases in fruit and vegetable consumption (≤half serving/day). These studies involved workplace dietary modifications and three incorporated nutrition education. Other outcomes reported included health status, co-worker support, job satisfaction, perceived health, self-efficacy and food-purchasing patterns. All studies had methodological limitations that weakened confidence in the results. Limited evidence suggests that workplace dietary modification interventions alone and in combination with nutrition education increase fruit and vegetable intakes. These interventions should be developed with recommended guidelines, workplace characteristics, long-term follow-up and objective outcomes for diet, health and cost. © 2013.

  4. Microscopic mechanism of amino silicone oil modification and modification effect with different amino group contents based on molecular dynamics simulation

    He, Liping; Li, Wenjun; Chen, Dachuan; Yuan, Jianmin; Lu, Gang; Zhou, Dianwu

    2018-05-01

    The microscopic mechanism of amino silicone oil (ASO) modification of natural fiber was investigated for the first time using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation at the atomic and molecular levels. The MD simulation results indicated that the ASO molecular interacted with the cellulose molecular within the natural fiber, mainly by intermolecular forces of Nsbnd Hsbnd O and Osbnd Hsbnd N hydrogen bonds and the molecular chain of ASO absorbed onto the natural fiber in a selective orientation, i.e., the hydrophobic alkyl groups (sbnd CnH2n+1) project outward and the polar amino groups (sbnd NH2) point to the surface of natural fiber. Consequently, the ASO modification changed the surface characteristic of natural fiber from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. Furthermore, the modification effects of the ASO modification layer with different amino group contents (m:n ratio) were also evaluated in this study by calculating the binding energy between the ASO modifier and natural fiber, and the cohesive energy density and free volume of the ASO modification layer. The results showed that the binding energy reached a maximum when the m:n ratio of ASO was of 8:4, suggesting that a good bonding strength was achieved at this m:n ratio. It was also found that the cohesive energy density enhanced with the increase in the amino group content, and the higher the cohesive energy density, the easier the formation of the ASO modification layer. However, the fraction free volume decreased with the increase in the amino group content. This is good for improving the water-proof property of natural fiber. The present work can provide an effective method for predicting the modification effects and designing the optimized m:n ratio of ASO modification.

  5. Effects of Atmospheric Refraction on an Airborne Weather Radar Detection and Correction Method

    Lei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of atmospheric refraction, affected by temperature, atmospheric pressure, and humidity, on airborne weather radar beam paths. Using three types of typical atmospheric background sounding data, we established a simulation model for an actual transmission path and a fitted correction path of an airborne weather radar beam during airplane take-offs and landings based on initial flight parameters and X-band airborne phased-array weather radar parameters. Errors in an ideal electromagnetic beam propagation path are much greater than those of a fitted path when atmospheric refraction is not considered. The rates of change in the atmospheric refraction index differ with weather conditions and the radar detection angles differ during airplane take-off and landing. Therefore, the airborne radar detection path must be revised in real time according to the specific sounding data and flight parameters. However, an error analysis indicates that a direct linear-fitting method produces significant errors in a negatively refractive atmosphere; a piecewise-fitting method can be adopted to revise the paths according to the actual atmospheric structure. This study provides researchers and practitioners in the aeronautics and astronautics field with updated information regarding the effect of atmospheric refraction on airborne weather radar detection and correction methods.

  6. Seasonality in trauma admissions - Are daylight and weather variables better predictors than general cyclic effects?

    Røislien, Jo; Søvik, Signe; Eken, Torsten

    2018-01-01

    Trauma is a leading global cause of death, and predicting the burden of trauma admissions is vital for good planning of trauma care. Seasonality in trauma admissions has been found in several studies. Seasonal fluctuations in daylight hours, temperature and weather affect social and cultural practices but also individual neuroendocrine rhythms that may ultimately modify behaviour and potentially predispose to trauma. The aim of the present study was to explore to what extent the observed seasonality in daily trauma admissions could be explained by changes in daylight and weather variables throughout the year. Retrospective registry study on trauma admissions in the 10-year period 2001-2010 at Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Norway, where the amount of daylight varies from less than 6 hours to almost 19 hours per day throughout the year. Daily number of admissions was analysed by fitting non-linear Poisson time series regression models, simultaneously adjusting for several layers of temporal patterns, including a non-linear long-term trend and both seasonal and weekly cyclic effects. Five daylight and weather variables were explored, including hours of daylight and amount of precipitation. Models were compared using Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC). A regression model including daylight and weather variables significantly outperformed a traditional seasonality model in terms of AIC. A cyclic week effect was significant in all models. Daylight and weather variables are better predictors of seasonality in daily trauma admissions than mere information on day-of-year.

  7. Seasonality in trauma admissions – Are daylight and weather variables better predictors than general cyclic effects?

    Søvik, Signe; Eken, Torsten

    2018-01-01

    Background Trauma is a leading global cause of death, and predicting the burden of trauma admissions is vital for good planning of trauma care. Seasonality in trauma admissions has been found in several studies. Seasonal fluctuations in daylight hours, temperature and weather affect social and cultural practices but also individual neuroendocrine rhythms that may ultimately modify behaviour and potentially predispose to trauma. The aim of the present study was to explore to what extent the observed seasonality in daily trauma admissions could be explained by changes in daylight and weather variables throughout the year. Methods Retrospective registry study on trauma admissions in the 10-year period 2001–2010 at Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Norway, where the amount of daylight varies from less than 6 hours to almost 19 hours per day throughout the year. Daily number of admissions was analysed by fitting non-linear Poisson time series regression models, simultaneously adjusting for several layers of temporal patterns, including a non-linear long-term trend and both seasonal and weekly cyclic effects. Five daylight and weather variables were explored, including hours of daylight and amount of precipitation. Models were compared using Akaike’s Information Criterion (AIC). Results A regression model including daylight and weather variables significantly outperformed a traditional seasonality model in terms of AIC. A cyclic week effect was significant in all models. Conclusion Daylight and weather variables are better predictors of seasonality in daily trauma admissions than mere information on day-of-year. PMID:29425210

  8. Effect of Reprocessing and Accelerated Weathering on Impact-Modified Recycled Blend

    Ramesh, V.; Mohanty, Smita; Biswal, Manoranjan; Nayak, Sanjay K.

    2015-12-01

    Recovery of recycled polycarbonate, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, high-impact polystyrene, and its blends from waste electrical and electronic equipment plastics products properties were enhanced by the addition of virgin polycarbonate and impact modifier. The optimized blend formulation was processed through five cycles, at processing temperature, 220-240 °C and accelerated weathering up to 700 h. Moreover, the effect of reprocessing and accelerated weathering in the physical properties of the modified blends was investigated by mechanical, thermal, rheological, and morphological studies. The results show that in each reprocessing cycle, the tensile strength and impact strength decreased significantly and the similar behavior has been observed from accelerated weathering. Subsequently, the viscosity decreases and this decrease becomes the effect of thermal and photo-oxidative degradation. This can be correlated with FTIR analysis.

  9. The Effects of Weather Factors on Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in Beijing

    Dong, Weihua; Li, Xian'En; Yang, Peng; Liao, Hua; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Quanyi

    2016-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) are increasing in Beijing, China. Previous studies have indicated an association between incidents of HFMD and weather factors. However, the seasonal influence of these factors on the disease is not yet understood, and their relationship with the enterovirus 71 (EV71) and Coxsackie virus A16 (CV-A16) viruses are not well documented. We analysed 84,502 HFMD cases from 2008 to 2011 in Beijing to explore the seasonal influence of weather factors (average temperature [AT], average relative humidity [ARH], total precipitation [TP] and average wind speed [AWS]) on incidents of HFMD by using a geographically weighted regression (GWR) model. The results indicated that weather factors differ significantly in their influence on HFMD depending on the season. AT had the greatest effect among the four weather factors, and while the influence of AT and AWS was greater in the summer than in the winter, the influence of TP was positive in the summer and negative in the winter. ARH was negatively correlated with HFMD. Also, we observed more EV71-associated cases than CV-A16 but there is no convincing evidence to show significant differences between the influences of the weather factors on EV71 and CV-A16.

  10. Effect of Aminosilane Modification on Nanocrystalline Cellulose Properties

    Nurul Hanisah Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of renewable nanomaterials, like nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC, has recently been widely studied by many researchers. NCC has many benefits such as high aspect ratio, biodegradability, and high number of hydroxyl groups which offer great opportunities for modification. In this study, the NCC derived from empty fruit bunches (EFB was modified with aminosilane, 3-(2-aminoethylaminopropyl-dimethoxymethylsilane (AEAPDMS, and the characterization was performed to investigate the potential as carbon dioxide (CO2 capture. Modification of NCC with AEAPDMS was carried out in water/ethanol solvent (80/20 (v/v with a ratio of NCC to aminosilane of 1 : 1, 1 : 2, 1 : 3, and 1 : 4 w/w%. The effects of AEAPDMS on NCC were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, elemental analysis (CHNS, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The existence of AEAPDMS onto NCC was confirmed by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy as the new peaks of NH2 were bending and wagging, and Si-CH3 appeared. The thermal stability of NCC increased after modification due to the interaction with AEAPDMS. The elemental analysis result showed that the nitrogen content increased with an enhancement ratio of the modifiers. The XRD indicated that the crystallinity decreased while the rod-like geometry of NCC was maintained after amorphous AEAPDMS grafted on the NCC. Since AEAPDMS can be grafted on the NCC, the sample is applicable as CO2 capture.

  11. Weather conditions may worsen symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis patients: the possible effect of temperature.

    Abasolo, Lydia; Tobías, Aurelio; Leon, Leticia; Carmona, Loreto; Fernandez-Rueda, Jose Luis; Rodriguez, Ana Belen; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Benjamin; Jover, Juan Angel

    2013-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) complain that weather conditions aggravate their symptoms. We investigated the short-term effects of weather conditions on worsening of RA and determined possible seasonal fluctuations. We conducted a case-crossover study in Madrid, Spain. Daily cases of RA flares were collected from the emergency room of a tertiary level hospital between 2004 and 2007. 245 RA patients who visited the emergency room 306 times due to RA related complaints as the main diagnostic reason were included in the study. Patients from 50 to 65 years old were 16% more likely to present a flare with lower mean temperatures. Our results support the belief that weather influences rheumatic pain in middle aged patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Weathering effects on materials from historical stained glass windows

    García-Heras, M.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A selection of materials (stained glasses, lead cames, support elements and putty from historical stained glass windows of different periods (13th-19th centuries have been studied. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-ray diffraction were used as characterization techniques. Degradation of historical stained glass windows is due to the particular chemical composition oftlie materials used for their production: stained glasses, lead network, metallic support elements and refilling putty. However, the presence of a given chemical composition is not the only factor involved in the degradation process. It is necessary the occurrence of other external factors that contribute to the development and progress of alteration problems in the materials mentioned above. The presence of gaseous pollution in the air produces a negative interaction with the surface of the stained glass windows materials. Firstly, the stained glasses and the grisailles begin a dealkalinisation process and a silica gel layer is formed during the early contact between the glasses and the wet environment. After that, insoluble salt deposits and corrosion crusts are formed as a consequence of a deeper chemical attack which results in a depolymerisation of the glass network. The lead cames and the metallic support elements are also altered by weathering. Such materials are oxidized and both pits and crusts appear on their surfaces. The transport of ions and other substances from the corrosion crusts of the metallic elements gives rise new deposits upon the stained glasses, which could intensify their own degradation processes. The putty experiments a noticeable shrinkage and cracking. Likewise, adverse environmental conditions favour the transport of putty substances towards the other materials of the stained glass window, thereby increasing the crusts thickness and adding elements that contribute to the total alteration of the

  13. Season and weather effects on travel-related mood and travel satisfaction

    Ettema, Dick; Friman, Margareta; Olsson, Lars E.; Gärling, Tommy

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the effects of season and weather on mood (valence and activation) and travel satisfaction (measured by the Satisfaction with Travel Scale). Analyses are presented of 562 time-sampled morning commutes to work made by 363 randomly sampled people in three different Swedish cities

  14. Bayesian inference on the effect of density dependence and weather on a guanaco population from Chile

    Zubillaga, Maria; Skewes, Oscar; Soto, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that drive population dynamics is fundamental for management of wild populations. The guanaco (Lama guanicoe) is one of two wild camelid species in South America. We evaluated the effects of density dependence and weather variables on population regulation based...

  15. Approaches to evaluating weathering effects on release of engineered nanomaterials from solid matrices

    Increased production and use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) over the past decade has increased the potential for the transport and release of these materials into the environment. Here we present results of two separate studies designed to simulate the effects of weathering o...

  16. The effect of inclement weather on ankle fracture management in an Irish trauma unit.

    O'Neill, B J

    2013-09-01

    Ireland is unfamiliar with extreme weather conditions. Such conditions occurred in winter 2009-2010 and 2010-2011, with much of the country being affected by snow and ice. We reviewed the effect that these conditions had on the treatment of ankle fractures in our trauma unit.

  17. Effects of Bias Modification Training in Binge Eating Disorder.

    Schmitz, Florian; Svaldi, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    Food-related attentional biases have been identified as maintaining factors in binge eating disorder (BED) as they can trigger a binge episode. Bias modification training may reduce symptoms, as it has been shown to be successful in other appetitive disorders. The aim of this study was to assess and modify food-related biases in BED. It was tested whether biases could be increased and decreased by means of a modified dot-probe paradigm, how long such bias modification persisted, and whether this affected subjective food craving. Participants were randomly assigned to a bias enhancement (attend to food stimulus) group or to a bias reduction (avoid food stimulus) group. Food-related attentional bias was found to be successfully reduced in the bias-reduction group, and effects persisted briefly. Additionally, subjective craving for food was influenced by the intervention, and possible mechanisms are discussed. Given these promising initial results, future research should investigate boundary conditions of the experimental intervention to understand how it could complement treatment of BED. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Effects of Weather and Heliophysical Conditions on Emergency Ambulance Calls for Elevated Arterial Blood Pressure

    Jone Vencloviene

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that weather and space weather conditions were associated with the exacerbation of essential hypertension. The study was conducted during 2009–2010 in the city of Kaunas, Lithuania. We analyzed 13,475 cards from emergency ambulance calls (EACs, in which the conditions for the emergency calls were made coded I.10–I.15. The Kaunas Weather Station provided daily records of air temperature (T, wind speed (WS, relative humidity, and barometric pressure (BP. We evaluated the associations between daily weather variables and daily number of EACs by applying a multivariate Poisson regression. Unfavorable heliophysical conditions (two days after the active-stormy geomagnetic field or the days with solar WS > 600 km/s increased the daily number of elevated arterial blood pressure (EABP by 12% (RR = 1.12; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.04–1.21; and WS ≥ 3.5 knots during days of T < 1.5 °C and T ≥ 12.5 °C by 8% (RR = 1.08; CI 1.04–1.12. An increase of T by 10 °C and an elevation of BP two days after by 10 hPa were associated with a decrease in RR by 3%. An additional effect of T was detected during days of T ≥ 17.5 °C only in females. Women and patients with grade III arterial hypertension at the time of the ambulance call were more sensitive to weather conditions. These results may help in the understanding of the population’s sensitivity to different weather conditions.

  19. Investigation of time and weather effects on crash types using full Bayesian multivariate Poisson lognormal models.

    El-Basyouny, Karim; Barua, Sudip; Islam, Md Tazul

    2014-12-01

    Previous research shows that various weather elements have significant effects on crash occurrence and risk; however, little is known about how these elements affect different crash types. Consequently, this study investigates the impact of weather elements and sudden extreme snow or rain weather changes on crash type. Multivariate models were used for seven crash types using five years of daily weather and crash data collected for the entire City of Edmonton. In addition, the yearly trend and random variation of parameters across the years were analyzed by using four different modeling formulations. The proposed models were estimated in a full Bayesian context via Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation. The multivariate Poisson lognormal model with yearly varying coefficients provided the best fit for the data according to Deviance Information Criteria. Overall, results showed that temperature and snowfall were statistically significant with intuitive signs (crashes decrease with increasing temperature; crashes increase as snowfall intensity increases) for all crash types, while rainfall was mostly insignificant. Previous snow showed mixed results, being statistically significant and positively related to certain crash types, while negatively related or insignificant in other cases. Maximum wind gust speed was found mostly insignificant with a few exceptions that were positively related to crash type. Major snow or rain events following a dry weather condition were highly significant and positively related to three crash types: Follow-Too-Close, Stop-Sign-Violation, and Ran-Off-Road crashes. The day-of-the-week dummy variables were statistically significant, indicating a possible weekly variation in exposure. Transportation authorities might use the above results to improve road safety by providing drivers with information regarding the risk of certain crash types for a particular weather condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Recent Climate Change on Hourly Weather Data for HVAC Design: A Case Study of Osaka

    Jihui Yuan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The current design weather data used for heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC design in Japan was created using an old data period. New design weather data should be created to reflect recent local climate change. Based on our previous proposal of creating design weather data with two weather indices (dry-bulb temperature and enthalpy for HVAC design, design weather data for Osaka was created using more recently-measured weather data (period: 2001~2015 from the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA in this study. The effect of recent climate change on the design weather data created with eight proposed methods was found. It showed the change in weather elements for cooling design clearly trends to warmer and drier weather, with more solar radiation and lower enthalpy, while the trends in heating design are less clear, mainly showing higher enthalpy. Furthermore, the difference in the peak load for the heating and cooling designs using the new and old design weather data was compared. The comparison showed that the minimum difference in peak load for the heating design was found using the mean daily dry-bulb temperature as the first and second indices; for the cooling design, the minimum difference in peak load was found using mean daily enthalpy as both the first and second indices.

  1. Cosmic rays and space weather: effects on global climate change

    L. I. Dorman; L. I. Dorman

    2012-01-01

    We consider possible effects of cosmic rays and some other space factors on the Earth's climate change. It is well known that the system of internal and external factors formatting the climate is very unstable; decreasing planetary temperature leads to an increase of snow surface, and decrease of the total solar energy input into the system decreases the planetary temperature even more, etc. From this it follows that even energetically small factors may have a big influence ...

  2. Time-lagged effects of weather on plant demography: drought and Astragalus scaphoides.

    Tenhumberg, Brigitte; Crone, Elizabeth E; Ramula, Satu; Tyre, Andrew J

    2018-04-01

    Temperature and precipitation determine the conditions where plant species can occur. Despite their significance, to date, surprisingly few demographic field studies have considered the effects of abiotic drivers. This is problematic because anticipating the effect of global climate change on plant population viability requires understanding how weather variables affect population dynamics. One possible reason for omitting the effect of weather variables in demographic studies is the difficulty in detecting tight associations between vital rates and environmental drivers. In this paper, we applied Functional Linear Models (FLMs) to long-term demographic data of the perennial wildflower, Astragalus scaphoides, and explored sensitivity of the results to reduced amounts of data. We compared models of the effect of average temperature, total precipitation, or an integrated measure of drought intensity (standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index, SPEI), on plant vital rates. We found that transitions to flowering and recruitment in year t were highest if winter/spring of year t was wet (positive effect of SPEI). Counterintuitively, if the preceding spring of year t - 1 was wet, flowering probabilities were decreased (negative effect of SPEI). Survival of vegetative plants from t - 1 to t was also negatively affected by wet weather in the spring of year t - 1 and, for large plants, even wet weather in the spring of t - 2 had a negative effect. We assessed the integrated effect of all vital rates on life history performance by fitting FLMs to the asymptotic growth rate, log(λt). Log(λt) was highest if dry conditions in year t - 1 were followed by wet conditions in the year t. Overall, the positive effects of wet years exceeded their negative effects, suggesting that increasing frequency of drought conditions would reduce population viability of A. scaphoides. The drought signal weakened when reducing the number of monitoring years. Substituting space for time

  3. A new look at the decomposition of agricultural productivity growth incorporating weather effects.

    Njuki, Eric; Bravo-Ureta, Boris E; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2018-01-01

    Random fluctuations in temperature and precipitation have substantial impacts on agricultural output. However, the contribution of these changing configurations in weather to total factor productivity (TFP) growth has not been addressed explicitly in econometric analyses. Thus, the key objective of this study is to quantify and to investigate the role of changing weather patterns in explaining yearly fluctuations in TFP. For this purpose, we define TFP to be a measure of total output divided by a measure of total input. We estimate a stochastic production frontier model using U.S. state-level agricultural data incorporating growing season temperature and precipitation, and intra-annual standard deviations of temperature and precipitation for the period 1960-2004. We use the estimated parameters of the model to compute a TFP index that has good axiomatic properties. We then decompose TFP growth in each state into weather effects, technological progress, technical efficiency, and scale-mix efficiency changes. This approach improves our understanding of the role of different components of TFP in agricultural productivity growth. We find that annual TFP growth averaged 1.56% between 1960 and 2004. Moreover, we observe substantial heterogeneity in weather effects across states and over time.

  4. Ceramic modifications of porous titanium: effects on macrophage activation.

    Scislowska-Czarnecka, A; Menaszek, E; Szaraniec, B; Kolaczkowska, E

    2012-12-01

    Porous titanium is one of the most widely used implant materials because of its mechanical properties, however, it is also characterised by low bioactivity. To improve the above parameter we prepared three modifications of the porous (30 wt%) titanium (Ti) surface by covering it with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA), bioglass (BG) and calcium silicate (CS). Subsequently we tested the impact of the modifications on macrophages directing the inflammatory response that might compromise the implant bioactivity. In the study we investigated the in vitro effects of the materials on murine cell line RAW 264.7 macrophage adherence, morphology and activation (production/release of metalloproteinase MMP-9 and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines). CS Ti decreased the macrophage adherence and up-regulated the release of several pro-inflammatory mediators, including TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12. Also HA Ti reduced the cell adherence but other parameters were generally not increased, except of TNF-α. In contrast, BG Ti improved macrophage adherence and either decreased production of multiple mediators (MMP-9, TNF-α, IFN-γ, MCP-1) or did not change it in comparison to the porous titanium. We can conclude that analyzing the effects on the inflammatory response initiated by macrophages in vitro, calcium silicate did not improve the biological properties of the porous titanium. The improved bioactivity of titanium was, however, achieved by the application of the hydroxyapatite and bioglass layers. The present in vitro results suggest that these materials, HA Ti and especially BG Ti, may be suitable for in vivo application and thus justify their further investigation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cosmic rays and space weather: effects on global climate change

    L. I. Dorman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider possible effects of cosmic rays and some other space factors on the Earth's climate change. It is well known that the system of internal and external factors formatting the climate is very unstable; decreasing planetary temperature leads to an increase of snow surface, and decrease of the total solar energy input into the system decreases the planetary temperature even more, etc. From this it follows that even energetically small factors may have a big influence on climate change. In our opinion, the most important of these factors are cosmic rays and cosmic dust through their influence on clouds, and thus, on climate.

  6. Soiling, Cleaning, and Weathering Effects on Aircraft Polyurethane Topcoats

    1988-03-01

    contact angle indicates a decrease in the surface energy of the coating (10), thus indicating a change in the surface chemistry . This effect is...A. Voet, CARBON BLACK: PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY , AND ELASTOMER REINFORCEMENT, Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, 1976. 8 * NADC 88031-60 0 II- 0 00 00 z 0 >0...1 Attn: K. Silberger 20846 S. Normandie Ave. Torrance, CA 90502 Ciba-Geigy Corp ............................................................... 1I * Antn: R. Varron Ardsley, NY 10502 iii0~~A1111[1l,31W W

  7. Cosmic rays and space weather. Effects on global climate change

    Dorman, L.I.; Israel Space Agency; Russian Academy of Sciences

    2012-01-01

    We consider possible effects of cosmic rays and some other space factors on the Earth's climate change. It is well known that the system of internal and external factors formatting the climate is very unstable; decreasing planetary temperature leads to an increase of snow surface, and decrease of the total solar energy input into the system decreases the planetary temperature even more, etc. From this it follows that even energetically small factors may have a big influence on climate change. In our opinion, the most important of these factors are cosmic rays and cosmic dust through their influence on clouds, and thus, on climate. (orig.)

  8. The effect of natural weathering on irradiated polyethylene films

    Khoylou, F.; Hassan Pour, S.

    2002-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the extensive used plastics in outdoor uses. Outdoor durability of PE in modem agriculture is very important because of large scale food production. UV radiations contained in solar spectrum are the main cause of degradation in outdoor uses of plastics. So, light stabilization of PE has made considerable progress since the early years of its outdoor use. Radiation crosslinking of PE films for improving UV stability is one of the new research fields. In this work,the effect of UV stabilizers on the chemical and mechanical stability of PE have been compared with UV stabilizers and radiation crosslinking together. For this reason two low density polyethylene films were prepared.One film contained 3% of photostabilizers and antioxidant,and the other film was free of additives. The films were irradiated by EB at doses of 30-300 kGy, these crosslinked PE films were exposed to the outdoor condition for 2 years. Determination of the gel content shows that significant crosslinking yields are obtained at high doses. Effect of crosslinking and outdoor exposure on the degradation of stabilized and unstabilized PE films have been studied by FTIR. Data of FTIR show that outdoor degradation of unstabilized PE promote rapidly after irradiation and cause to distortion of samples after 4 months. While, stabilized PE samples show low changes during 2 years outdoor exposure. Mechanical properties of stabilized and unstabilized crosslinked PE films are also presented in this paper. (Author)

  9. Radionuclide decay effects on waste glass corrosion and weathering

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The release of glass components into solution, including radionuclides, may be influenced by the presence of radiolytically produced nitric acid, carboxylic acid, and transient water dissociation products such as ·OH and O 2 - . Under batch test conditions, glass corrosion has been shown to increase up to a maximum of three-to five-fold in irradiated tests relative to nonirradiated tests, while in other studies the presence of radiolytic products has actually decreased glass corrosion rates. Bicarbonate groundwaters will buffer against pH decreases and changes in corrosion rates. Under high surface area-to-solution volume (S/V) conditions, the bicarbonate buffering reservoir may be quickly overwhelmed by radiolytic acids that are concentrated in the thin films of water contacting the samples. Glass reaction rates have been shown to increase up to 10-to-15-fold due to radiation exposure under high S/V conditions. Radiation damage to solid glass materials results in bond damage and atomic displacements. This type of damage has been shown to increase the release rates of glass components up to four-fold during subsequent corrosion tests, although under actual disposal conditions, glass annealing processes may negate the solid radiation damage effects

  10. Prospective analysis of ambiental and weather effects on conform displaying of fireworks

    Jitea Ciprian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research on theoretical and practical relating to establishing and analysis of effects of ambiental and weather effects on conform displaying of fireworks used to organizing fireworks. Scientific research highlighted in this article was conducted in the project no. PN 16 43 03 04, study conducted through Nucleu program entitled -„ Research on the influence of microclimate factors on parameters of the products, while testing the functioning of pyrotechnic articles”.

  11. The Effect of Methylation and Anti-Oxidant on Discoloration of Weathered Wood Plastic Composites

    Peivand Darabi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As the outdoor application of Wood Plastic Composites (WPCs become more widespread, the resistance of these products against weathering, particularly ultraviolet (UV light becomes more important. When WPCs are exposed to outdoor ultraviolet light, rain, snow and atmosphere pollution, they will be degraded which can be indicated by color fade. To investigate the effects of methylation and Anti-Oxidant separately and together on discoloration of weathered wood plastic composites, composites of poplar wood flour and high density polyethylene.Were made according to the ASTMD 2565, samples were placed in Atlas Xenon apparatus for 250 and 2000 hours. Discoloration and FT-IR spectra of the samples were measured and compared. The results have shown that methylation in short term and long term can relatively reduce the discoloration of weathered samples and also in short term can hinder the photodegradation. FT-IR spectra showed that, in long term, neither of the treatments could protect lignin from irradiation within wood flour. But methylation limited the depth of penetration of weathering. The Antioxidant did not have an influence on color change in a long period of time, but was able to relatively decrease it in short term.

  12. Effects of weathering on performance of intumescent coatings for structure fire protection in the wildland-urban interface

    Bahrani, Babak

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of weathering on the performance of intumescent fire-retardant coatings on wooden products. The weathering effects included primary (solar irradiation, moisture, and temperature) and secondary (environmental contaminants) parameters at various time intervals. Wildland urban interface (WUI) fires have been an increasing threat to lives and properties. Existing solutions to mitigate the damages caused by WUI fires include protecting the structures from ignition and minimizing the fire spread from one structure to another. These solutions can be divided into two general categories: active fire protection systems and passive fire protection systems. Passive systems are either using pre-applied wetting agents (water, gel, or foam) or adding an extra layer (composite wraps or coatings). Fire-retardant coating treatment methods can be divided into impregnated (penetrant) and intumescent categories. Intumescent coatings are easy to apply, economical, and have a better appearance in comparison to other passive fire protection methods, and are the main focus of this study. There have been limited studies conducted on the application of intumescent coatings on wooden structures and their performance after long-term weathering exposure. The main concerns of weathering effects are: 1) the reduction of ignition resistance of the coating layer after weathering; and 2) the fire properties of coatings after weathering since coatings might contribute as a combustible fuel and assist the fire growth after ignition. Three intumescent coatings were selected and exposed to natural weathering conditions in three different time intervals. Two types of tests were performed on the specimens: a combustibility test consisted of a bench-scale performance evaluation using a Cone Calorimeter, and a thermal decomposition test using Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) method (also known

  13. The influence of weather conditions on road safety : an assessment of the effect of precipitation and temperature.

    Bijleveld, F.D. & Churchill, T.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of changes in extreme weather conditions is often identified as a cause of fluctuations in road safety and the resulting numbers of crashes and casualties. This report focuses on an analysis of the aggregate, accumulated effect of weather conditions (precipitation and temperature) on

  14. Effect of radiation-induced modification in fluoroelastomer

    Zen, Heloisa Augusto; Lugao, Ademar Benevolo

    2013-01-01

    Polymers exposed to ionizing irradiation, even at low doses, often undergo structural changes accompanied by molecular crosslinking and chain scission (degradation) reactions. The general effect of the radiation on polymers is determined by the ratio of crosslinking to chain scission events. This ratio depends on parameters such as chemical structure, physical state, radicals stability and mobility, irradiation rate and irradiation atmosphere. The radiation process is a large used technique to promote modification in their structures to apply them in different areas and is well known for its merits and potential in modifying the chemical and the physical properties of polymeric materials without cause drastic changes in their inherent properties, depend on the dose irradiated. In this study was used fluoroelastomer with 70% - fluor that having excellent thermal, chemical and mechanical properties. Vulcanized and non-vulcanized samples of this material were submitted to gamma radiation under air atmosphere in order to observe the effect of atmosphere in the polymer matrix. The irradiated doses were 5, 10 and 20kGy, at room temperature. The characterization was made by scanning electron microscope (SEM), infrared spectroscopy using attenuate reflectance (ATR-IR) and X-ray diffraction. The results demonstrated which was expected, the degradation reactions were observed. (author)

  15. No evidence of the effect of extreme weather events on annual occurrence of four groups of ectothermic species.

    Agnieszka H Malinowska

    Full Text Available Weather extremes may have strong effects on biodiversity, as known from theoretical and modelling studies. Predicted negative effects of increased weather variation are found only for a few species, mostly plants and birds in empirical studies. Therefore, we investigated correlations between weather variability and patterns in occupancy, local colonisations and local extinctions (metapopulation metrics across four groups of ectotherms: Odonata, Orthoptera, Lepidoptera, and Reptilia. We analysed data of 134 species on a 1×1 km-grid base, collected in the last 20 years from the Netherlands, combining standardised data and opportunistic data. We applied dynamic site-occupancy models and used the results as input for analyses of (i trends in distribution patterns, (ii the effect of temperature on colonisation and persistence probability, and (iii the effect of years with extreme weather on all the three metapopulation metrics. All groups, except butterflies, showed more positive than negative trends in metapopulation metrics. We did not find evidence that the probability of colonisation or persistence increases with temperature nor that extreme weather events are reflected in higher extinction risks. We could not prove that weather extremes have visible and consistent negative effects on ectothermic species in temperate northern hemisphere. These findings do not confirm the general prediction that increased weather variability imperils biodiversity. We conclude that weather extremes might not be ecologically relevant for the majority of species. Populations might be buffered against weather variation (e.g. by habitat heterogeneity, or other factors might be masking the effects (e.g. availability and quality of habitat. Consequently, we postulate that weather extremes have less, or different, impact in real world metapopulations than theory and models suggest.

  16. The effect of substrate modification on microbial growth on surfaces

    Brown, Angela Ann

    1998-01-01

    The principle aim of the program was to produce a novel, non-leaching antimicrobial surface for commercial development and future use in the liquid food packaging industry. Antimicrobial surfaces which exist presently have been produced to combat the growth of prokaryotic organisms and usually function as slow release systems. A system which could inhibit eukaryotic growth without contaminating the surrounding 'environment' with the inhibitor was considered of great commercial importance. The remit of this study was concerned with creating a surface which could control the growth of eukaryotic organisms found in fruit juice with particular interest in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Putative antimicrobial surfaces were created by the chemical modification of the test substrate polymers; nylon and ethylvinyl alcohol (EVOH). Surfaces were chemically modified by the covalent coupling of antimicrobial agents known to be active against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as ascertained by the screening process determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of agents in the desired test medium. During the study it was found that a number of surfaces did appear to inhibit yeast growth in fruit juice, however on further investigation the apparent inhibitory effect was discovered to be the result of un-bound material free in the test medium. On removing the possibility of any un-bound material present on the test surface, by a series of surface washings, the inhibitory effect on yeast growth was eliminated. Of the agents tested only one appeared to have an inhibitory effect which could be attributed to a true antimicrobial surface effect, Amical 48. As there is little known about this agent in the literature, its affect on yeast growth was examined and in particular a proposal for the mode of action on yeast is discussed, providing a plausible explanation for the inhibitory effect observed when this agent is covalently immobilised onto nylon. (author)

  17. The Effect of Seasonal Weather Variation on the Dynamics of the Plague Disease

    Rigobert C. Ngeleja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Plague is a historic disease which is also known to be the most devastating disease that ever occurred in human history, caused by gram-negative bacteria known as Yersinia pestis. The disease is mostly affected by variations of weather conditions as it disturbs the normal behavior of main plague disease transmission agents, namely, human beings, rodents, fleas, and pathogens, in the environment. This in turn changes the way they interact with each other and ultimately leads to a periodic transmission of plague disease. In this paper, we formulate a periodic epidemic model system by incorporating seasonal transmission rate in order to study the effect of seasonal weather variation on the dynamics of plague disease. We compute the basic reproduction number of a proposed model. We then use numerical simulation to illustrate the effect of different weather dependent parameters on the basic reproduction number. We are able to deduce that infection rate, progression rates from primary forms of plague disease to more severe forms of plague disease, and the infectious flea abundance affect, to a large extent, the number of bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague infective agents. We recommend that it is more reasonable to consider these factors that have been shown to have a significant effect on RT for effective control strategies.

  18. A Transmission Electron Microscope Investigation of Space Weathering Effects in Hayabusa Samples

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Berger, Eve L.

    2014-01-01

    The Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa successfully returned the first direct samples of the regolith from the surface of an asteroid. The Hayabusa samples thus present a special opportunity to directly investigate the evolution of asteroidal surfaces, from the development of the regolith to the study of the more complex effects of space weathering. Here we describe the mineralogy, microstructure and composition of three Hayabusa mission particles using transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques

  19. Including the Effect of Shielding in Prediction of Weather Window for Offshore Lifting Operations

    Olsen, Camilla Waldum

    2015-01-01

    The offshore industry is constantly seeking to operate in more extreme conditions. DeepOcean is a subsea service company, where offshore lifts is a part of every day operations. To remain competitive, it is important to reduce operational downtime, where time spent waiting on weather is one of the main contributors. The main goal of this thesis is to investigate how shielding effects influence the operational limit for offshore lifting operations at different heading angles. Common practice i...

  20. Effect of surface modification and hybridization on dynamic ...

    Epoxy; Roystonea regia; glass; surface modification; hybridization; dynamic mechanical ... other advantages such as light weight, low cost, high specific ... ful technique to study the mechanical behaviour of mate- ... The test reveals response.

  1. An Experimental Evaluation of the Weathering Effects on Mine Shaft Lining Materials

    W. Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many shaft collapses are related to the deterioration and failure of the masonry shaft lining materials. In modern mine shaft, concrete is widely used to provide support. To analyse shafts stability, the properties of the lining need to be well defined. The behaviour of masonry and concrete can be considerably affected by long-term exposure to harsh mine water. This paper presents a study which focuses on the weathering effects of mine water on lining materials (brick, mortar, and concrete. To reproduce the weathering process, samples were placed into solutions of potable water, artificial mine water, and a more aggressive mine-water solution for just less than one year. Four phases of laboratory tests were conducted throughout the time period to assess the degradation of mechanical properties of the lining materials. Particular attention is given to the degradation of material strength and stiffness. Results indicate that the harsh acidic mine water has pronounced detrimental effects on the strength and stiffness of mortar. The weathering process is shown to have the most significant effect on the stiffness of concrete and mortar. It is also shown that the use of mass loss as an index for evaluation of mechanical properties may not be appropriate.

  2. Technical evaluation report, AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel Symposium on Effects of Adverse Weather on Aerodynamics

    Reinmann, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting on Effects of Adverse Weather on Aerodynamics was to provide an update of the stae-of-the-art with respect to the prediction, simulation, and measurement of the effects of icing, anti-icing fluids, and various precipitation on the aerodynamic characteristics of flight vehicles. Sessions were devoted to introductory and survey papers and icing certification issues, to analytical and experimental simulation of ice frost contamination and its effects of aerodynamics, and to the effects of heavy rain and deicing/anti-icing fluids.

  3. Copper leaching of MSWI bottom ash co-disposed with refuse: effect of short-term accelerated weathering.

    Su, Lianghu; Guo, Guangzhai; Shi, Xinlong; Zuo, Minyu; Niu, Dongjie; Zhao, Aihua; Zhao, Youcai

    2013-06-01

    Co-disposal of refuse with municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash (IBA) either multi-layered as landfill cover or mixed with refuse could pose additional risk to the environment because of enhanced leaching of heavy metals, especially Cu. This study applied short-term accelerated weathering to IBA, and monitored the mineralogical and chemical properties of IBA during the weathering process. Cu extractability of the weathered IBA was then evaluated using standard leaching protocols (i.e. SPLP and TCLP) and co-disposal leaching procedure. The results showed that weathering had little or no beneficial effect on Cu leaching in SPLP and TCLP, which can be explained by the adsorption and complexation of Cu with DOM. However, the Cu leaching of weathered IBA was reduced significantly when situated in fresh simulated landfill leachate. This was attributed to weakening Cu complexation with fulvic acid or hydrophilic fractions and/or intensifying Cu absorption to neoformed hydr(oxide) minerals in weathered IBA. The amount of total leaching Cu and Cu in free or labile complex fraction (the fraction with the highest mobility and bio-toxicity) of the 408-h weathered IBA were remarkably decreased by 86.3% and 97.6% in the 15-day co-disposal leaching test. Accelerated weathering of IBA may be an effective pretreatment method to decrease Cu leaching prior to its co-disposal with refuse. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of Met-Ocean Condition Forecasting Uncertainties on Weather Window Predictions for Offshore Operations

    Gintautas, Tomas; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2017-01-01

    The article briefly presents a novel methodology of weather window estimation for offshore operations and mainly focuses on effects of met-ocean condition forecasting uncertainties on weather window predictions when using the proposed methodology. It is demonstrated that the proposed methodology...... to include stochastic variables, representing met-ocean forecasting uncertainties and the results of such modification are given in terms of predicted weather windows for a selected test case....

  5. Tweetin’ in the Rain: Exploring Societal-scale Effects of Weather on Mood

    Hannak, Aniko; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann; Anderson, Eric

    2012-01-01

    There has been significant recent interest in using the aggregate sentiment from social media sites to understand and predict real-world phenomena. However, the data from social media sites also offers a unique and—so far—unexplored opportunity to study the impact of external factors on aggregate...... sentiment, at the scale of a society. Using a Twitterspecific sentiment extraction methodology, we the explore patterns of sentiment present in a corpus of over 1.5 billion tweets. We focus primarily on the effect of the weather and time on aggregate sentiment, evaluating how clearly the wellknown...... individual patterns translate into population-wide patterns. Using machine learning techniques on the Twitter corpus correlated with the weather at the time and location of the tweets, we find that aggregate sentiment follows distinct climate, temporal, and seasonal patterns....

  6. A Preliminary Assessment of Daily Weather Conditions in Nuclear Site for Development of Effective Emergency Plan

    Han, Seok Jung; Ahn, Kwang Il

    2012-01-01

    A radiological emergency preparedness for nuclear sites is recognized as an important measure against anticipated severe accidents with environmental releases of radioactive materials. While there are many individual means in the emergency preparedness for nuclear accidents, one of most important means is to make a decision of evacuation or shelter of the public residents with the emergency plan zone (EPZ) of a nuclear site. In order to prepare an effective strategy for the evacuation as a basis of the emergency preparedness, it may need the understanding of atmospheric dispersion characteristics of radiation releases to the environment, mainly depending upon the weather conditions of a radiation releases location, i.e., a nuclear site. As a preliminary study for the development of an effective emergency plan, the basic features of the weather conditions of a specific site were investigated. A main interest of this study is to identify whether or not the site weather conditions have specific features helpful for a decision making of evacuation of the public residents

  7. Effect of Weathering Time on the Physical - Mechanical Properties and Color Change in Wood Flour/HDPE Composite

    Behzad Kord

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to investigate the effect of weathering time on the physical and mechanical properties and color change in composite made of wood flour and high density polyethylene (HDPE. For this purpose, wood flour and polyethylene at a weight ratio of 60:40 with coupling agent were compounded in an internal mixer, and the samples were made in injection molding. Then, the weathering process by ultraviolet irradiation and water spray was done on the samples at different times of 250, 500, 1000 and 2000 hours in accelerated weathering apparatus. Finally, the physical and mechanical properties and color measurement of samples were tested, and compared with control samples. Results indicated that the flexural strength, flexural modulus, tensile strength and tensile modulus decreased with an increase in weathering time; however, the water absorption increased. Also, the yellowness of wood plastic samples decreased with an increase in weathering time and due to the lightness and color change increased.

  8. Preparing Middle School Teachers to Use Science Models Effectively when Teaching about Weather and Climate Topics

    Yarker, M. B.; Stanier, C. O.; Forbes, C.; Park, S.

    2012-12-01

    According to the National Science Education Standards (NSES), teachers are encouraged to use science models in the classroom as a way to aid in the understanding of the nature of the scientific process. This is of particular importance to the atmospheric science community because climate and weather models are very important when it comes to understanding current and future behaviors of our atmosphere. Although familiar with weather forecasts on television and the Internet, most people do not understand the process of using computer models to generate weather and climate forecasts. As a result, the public often misunderstands claims scientists make about their daily weather as well as the state of climate change. Therefore, it makes sense that recent research in science education indicates that scientific models and modeling should be a topic covered in K-12 classrooms as part of a comprehensive science curriculum. The purpose of this research study is to describe how three middle school teachers use science models to teach about topics in climate and weather, as well as the challenges they face incorporating models effectively into the classroom. Participants in this study took part in a week long professional development designed to orient them towards appropriate use of science models for a unit on weather, climate, and energy concepts. The course design was based on empirically tested features of effective professional development for science teachers and was aimed at teaching content to the teachers while simultaneously orienting them towards effective use of science models in the classroom in a way that both aids in learning about the content knowledge as well as how models are used in scientific inquiry. Results indicate that teachers perceive models to be physical representations that can be used as evidence to convince students that the teacher's conception of the concept is correct. Additionally, teachers tended to use them as ways to explain an idea to

  9. Effect of tooth profile modification on wear in internal gears

    Tunalioglu, M. S.; Tuc, B.

    2018-05-01

    Internal gears are often used in the automotive industry when two gears are required to rotate in the same direction. Tooth shapes, slippage speeds at the beginning and end of meshing are different according to the external gears. Manufacturing of internal gears is more difficult than external gears. Thus, it is necessary to determine the working conditions and wear behavior of internal gears carefully. The profile modification method in terms of strength and surface tension of the gear mechanism are performed in order to increase the load-carrying capability. In this study, profile modification method was performed in the internal gears to reduce the wear on the teeth. For this purpose, the wear of the internal gears was theoretically investigated by adapting the Archard wear equation to the internal gears. Closed circuit power circulation system was designed and manufactured to experimentally investigate the wear in internal gears. With this system, wear tests of gears made of St 50 material without profile modification and different profile modifications were made and the results were compared. Experimental study was performed in the same loading and cycle time conditions to validate the theoretical results and it was seen that the results are compatible. According to the experimental results, it is seen that in the internal gears, when profile modification done the wear is decreased in the teeth tip region.

  10. The effect of natural weathering on the mechanical, morphological and thermal properties of high impact polystyrene (HIPS)

    Sahin, Tuelin; Sinmazcelik, Tamer; Sahin, Senol

    2007-01-01

    The effect of natural weathering on the mechanical, morphological and thermal properties on the high impact polystyrene (HIPS) and cold drawn HIPS are investigated. After natural weathering period of 8760 h, under known meteorological parameters, the changes in mechanical properties are investigated by using tensile, instrumented impact and hardness tests. Thermo-mechanical properties are characterized by using thermomechanical analysis (TMA) and melt flow index (MFI). Fractured surfaces of the materials are investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Natural weathering effects on fracture mechanisms are discussed by means of fractographical analysis. Remarkable morphological changes were observed especially at the surface of the material. This results in dramatic loss in mechanical properties

  11. Realistic natural atmospheric phenomena and weather effects for interactive virtual environments

    McLoughlin, Leigh

    Clouds and the weather are important aspects of any natural outdoor scene, but existing dynamic techniques within computer graphics only offer the simplest of cloud representations. The problem that this work looks to address is how to provide a means of simulating clouds and weather features such as precipitation, that are suitable for virtual environments. Techniques for cloud simulation are available within the area of meteorology, but numerical weather prediction systems are computationally expensive, give more numerical accuracy than we require for graphics and are restricted to the laws of physics. Within computer graphics, we often need to direct and adjust physical features or to bend reality to meet artistic goals, which is a key difference between the subjects of computer graphics and physical science. Pure physically-based simulations, however, evolve their solutions according to pre-set rules and are notoriously difficult to control. The challenge then is for the solution to be computationally lightweight and able to be directed in some measure while at the same time producing believable results. This work presents a lightweight physically-based cloud simulation scheme that simulates the dynamic properties of cloud formation and weather effects. The system simulates water vapour, cloud water, cloud ice, rain, snow and hail. The water model incorporates control parameters and the cloud model uses an arbitrary vertical temperature profile, with a tool described to allow the user to define this. The result of this work is that clouds can now be simulated in near real-time complete with precipitation. The temperature profile and tool then provide a means of directing the resulting formation..

  12. Modelling weather effects for impact analysis of residential time-of-use electricity pricing

    Miller, Reid; Golab, Lukasz; Rosenberg, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Analyzing the impact of pricing policies such as time-of-use (TOU) is challenging in the presence of confounding factors such as weather. Motivated by a lack of consensus and model selection details in prior work, we present a methodology for modelling the effect of weather on residential electricity demand. The best model is selected according to explanatory power, out-of-sample prediction accuracy, goodness of fit and interpretability. We then evaluate the effect of mandatory TOU pricing in a local distribution company in southwestern Ontario, Canada. We use a smart meter dataset of over 20,000 households which is particularly suited to our analysis: it contains data from the summer before and after the implementation of TOU pricing in November 2011, and all customers transitioned from tiered rates to TOU rates at the same time. We find that during the summer rate season, TOU pricing results in electricity conservation across all price periods. The average demand change during on-peak and mid-peak periods is −2.6% and −2.4% respectively. Changes during off-peak periods are not statistically significant. These TOU pricing effects are less pronounced compared to previous studies, underscoring the need for clear, reproducible impact analyses which include full details about the model selection process. - Highlights: • We study models for the effect of weather on residential electricity demand. • We evaluate the effect of mandatory TOU pricing in a local distribution company in Ontario, Canada. • We find the effect of TOU pricing to be less pronounced compared to previous studies.

  13. Assessment of Slope Stability of Various Cut Slopes with Effects of Weathering by Using Slope Stability Probability Classification (SSPC)

    Ersöz, Timur; Topal, Tamer

    2017-04-01

    Rocks containing pore spaces, fractures, joints, bedding planes and faults are prone to weathering due to temperature differences, wetting-drying, chemistry of solutions absorbed, and other physical and chemical agents. Especially cut slopes are very sensitive to weathering activities because of disturbed rock mass and topographical condition by excavation. During and right after an excavation process of a cut slope, weathering and erosion may act on this newly exposed rock material. These acting on the material may degrade and change its properties and the stability of the cut slope in its engineering lifetime. In this study, the effect of physical and chemical weathering agents on shear strength parameters of the rocks are investigated in order to observe the differences between weathered and unweathered rocks. Also, slope stability assessment of cut slopes affected by these weathering agents which may disturb the parameters like strength, cohesion, internal friction angle, unit weight, water absorption and porosity are studied. In order to compare the condition of the rock materials and analyze the slope stability, the parameters of weathered and fresh rock materials are found with in-situ tests such as Schmidt hammer and laboratory tests like uniaxial compressive strength, point load and direct shear. Moreover, slake durability and methylene blue tests are applied to investigate the response of the rock to weathering and presence of clays in rock materials, respectively. In addition to these studies, both rock strength parameters and any kind of failure mechanism are determined by probabilistic approach with the help of SSPC system. With these observations, the performances of the weathered and fresh zones of the cut slopes are evaluated and 2-D slope stability analysis are modeled with further recommendations for the cut slopes. Keywords: 2-D Modeling, Rock Strength, Slope Stability, SSPC, Weathering

  14. Olivine weathering in soil, and its effects on growth and nutrient uptake in Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.: a pot experiment.

    Hein F M ten Berge

    Full Text Available Mineral carbonation of basic silicate minerals regulates atmospheric CO(2 on geological time scales by locking up carbon. Mining and spreading onto the earth's surface of fast-weathering silicates, such as olivine, has been proposed to speed up this natural CO(2 sequestration ('enhanced weathering'. While agriculture may offer an existing infrastructure, weathering rate and impacts on soil and plant are largely unknown. Our objectives were to assess weathering of olivine in soil, and its effects on plant growth and nutrient uptake. In a pot experiment with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L., weathering during 32 weeks was inferred from bioavailability of magnesium (Mg in soil and plant. Olivine doses were equivalent to 1630 (OLIV1, 8150, 40700 and 204000 (OLIV4 kg ha(-1. Alternatively, the soluble Mg salt kieserite was applied for reference. Olivine increased plant growth (+15.6% and plant K concentration (+16.5% in OLIV4. At all doses, olivine increased bioavailability of Mg and Ni in soil, as well as uptake of Mg, Si and Ni in plants. Olivine suppressed Ca uptake. Weathering estimated from a Mg balance was equivalent to 240 kg ha(-1 (14.8% of dose, OLIV1 to 2240 kg ha(-1 (1.1%, OLIV4. This corresponds to gross CO(2 sequestration of 290 to 2690 kg ha(-1 (29 10(3 to 269 10(3 kg km(-2. Alternatively, weathering estimated from similarity with kieserite treatments ranged from 13% to 58% for OLIV1. The Olsen model for olivine carbonation predicted 4.0% to 9.0% weathering for our case, independent of olivine dose. Our % values observed at high doses were smaller than this, suggesting negative feedbacks in soil. Yet, weathering appears fast enough to support the 'enhanced weathering' concept. In agriculture, olivine doses must remain within limits to avoid imbalances in plant nutrition, notably at low Ca availability; and to avoid Ni accumulation in soil and crop.

  15. Effect of Progesterone Therapy versus Diet Modification on ...

    progesterone therapy) compared to Group A (diet modification) (54% [154/281] and 62.98% [177/281] vs. 89.76% [614/684] and 91.08% [623/684], respectively) (P = 0.04 and 0.03, respectively). Straining during defecation and manual maneuvers ...

  16. Imaging the neural effects of cognitive bias modification training

    Wiers, C.E.; Wiers, R.W.

    Cognitive bias modification (CBM) was first developed as an experimental tool to examine the causal role of cognitive biases, and later developed into complementary interventions in experimental psychopathology research. CBM involves the "re-training" of implicit biases by means of multiple trials

  17. The effects of radionuclides in the atmosphere on weather, climate and environment

    Jager, D. de.

    1992-10-01

    A literature study on the effects of the released radionuclides in the atmosphere on weather, climate and environment are reported. In this report a science outlook of these effects is presented. The emissions generated by the electricity are the central issue. For the global effects the released krypton-85 (half-life time 10,78 years) which are caused by reprocessing factories would take an important role, but for local effects the releasing of short-living isotopes as xenon-133 and xenon-135 produced by nuclear reactors and radon-222 produced by mining activities must be taken into account. The production, emission and distribution of these related important isotopes are discussed, just like air-electric circuits (global), the chemistry of the atmosphere (local) and the consequences of it for the weather, climate and environment on earth. Radionuclides could affect on the development of the thunderstorm, rainfall, cloud formation, air dampness, acid- and aerosol formations and also indirect, for example, for the greenhouse effect and acid rainfall. (author). 133 refs., 22 figs., 11 tabs

  18. Effects of Space Weathering on Reflectance Spectra of Ureilites: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    Goodrich, C. A.; Gillis-Davis, J.; Cloutis, E.; Applin, D.; Hibbits, C.; Klima, R.; Christoffersen, R.; Fries, M.; Decker, S.

    2017-07-01

    Space weathering and spectral studies of three ureilitic samples show that space weathering causes significant changes in UV-VIS-IR spectra and Raman spectra. Changes due to amorphization of carbon could disguise ureilitic asteroids as CC-like.

  19. Analysis of Automated Aircraft Conflict Resolution and Weather Avoidance

    Love, John F.; Chan, William N.; Lee, Chu Han

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of using trajectory-based automation to resolve both aircraft and weather constraints for near-term air traffic management decision making. The auto resolution algorithm developed and tested at NASA-Ames to resolve aircraft to aircraft conflicts has been modified to mitigate convective weather constraints. Modifications include adding information about the size of a gap between weather constraints to the routing solution. Routes that traverse gaps that are smaller than a specific size are not used. An evaluation of the performance of the modified autoresolver to resolve both conflicts with aircraft and weather was performed. Integration with the Center-TRACON Traffic Management System was completed to evaluate the effect of weather routing on schedule delays.

  20. Effect of posttranslational modifications on enzyme function and assembly

    Ryšlavá, H.; Doubnerová, V.; Kavan, Daniel; Vaněk, O.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 92, OCT 2013 (2013), s. 80-109 ISSN 1874-3919 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/10/1040; GA ČR GA303/09/0477; GA ČR GD305/09/H008; GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/11/0394 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Enzyme * Posttranslational modification * Structure Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.929, year: 2013

  1. Ionospheric effects during severe space weather events seen in ionospheric service data products

    Jakowski, Norbert; Danielides, Michael; Mayer, Christoph; Borries, Claudia

    Space weather effects are closely related to complex perturbation processes in the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere systems, initiated by enhanced solar energy input. To understand and model complex space weather processes, different views on the same subject are helpful. One of the ionosphere key parameters is the Total Electron Content (TEC) which provides a first or-der approximation of the ionospheric range error in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) applications. Additionally, horizontal gradients and time rate of change of TEC are important for estimating the perturbation degree of the ionosphere. TEC maps can effectively be gener-ated using ground based GNSS measurements from global receiver networks. Whereas ground based GNSS measurements provide good horizontal resolution, space based radio occultation measurements can complete the view by providing information on the vertical plasma density distribution. The combination of ground based TEC and vertical sounding measurements pro-vide essential information on the shape of the vertical electron density profile by computing the equivalent slab thickness at the ionosonde station site. Since radio beacon measurements at 150/400 MHz are well suited to trace the horizontal structure of Travelling Ionospheric Dis-turbances (TIDs), these data products essentially complete GNSS based TEC mapping results. Radio scintillation data products, characterising small scale irregularities in the ionosphere, are useful to estimate the continuity and availability of transionospheric radio signals. The different data products are addressed while discussing severe space weather events in the ionosphere e.g. events in October/November 2003. The complementary view of different near real time service data products is helpful to better understand the complex dynamics of ionospheric perturbation processes and to forecast the development of parameters customers are interested in.

  2. Effects of silicate weathering on water chemistry in forested, upland, felsic terrane of the USA

    Stauffer, R.E.; Wittchen, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    The authors use data from the US EPA National Surface Water Survey (NSWS), the USGS Bench-Mark Station monitoring program, and the National Acid Deposition Program (NADP) to evaluate the role of weathering in supplying base cations to surface waters in forested, upland, felsic terrane of the northeastern, northcentral, and northwestern (Idaho batholith) US. Multivariate regression reveals differential effects of discharge on individual base cations and silica, but no secular trend in the Ca/Na denudation rate over 24 yr (1965-1988) for the Wild River catchment in the White Mountains. Because the turn-over time for Na in the soil-exchange complex is only ca. 1.5 yr, the long-term behavior of the ratios Ca/Na and Si/Na in waters leaving this catchment indicates that weathering is compensating for base cation export. In every subregion, Ca and Mg concentrations in lakes are statistically linked to nonmarine Na, but the median Ca/Na ratio is greater than the ratio in local plagioclase. The authors attribute this inequality to nonstoichiometric weathering of calcium in juvenile (formerly glaciated) terrane, not to leaching of exchangeable cations by So 4 because intraregional and cross-regional statistical analysis reveals no effect of atmospherically derived sulfate ion. The median base cation denudation rates (meq m -2 yr -1 ) for these American lake regions are: Maine granites (108); western Adirondack felsic gneiss (85); Vermilion batholith (42); Idaho batholith (52). The regional rates are high enough to compensate for present wet deposition of acidifying anions except in some vulnerable lake watersheds in the western Adirondacks

  3. Modification of genetic effects of gamma radiation by laser radiation

    Khotyljova, L.V.; Khokhlova, S.A.; Khokhlov, I.V.

    1988-01-01

    Full text: Mutants obtained by means of ionizing radiation and chemical mutagens often show low viability and productivity that makes their use in plant breeding difficult. Methods reducing the destructive mutagen action on important functions of plant organism and increasing quality and practical value of induced mutants would be interesting. We believe that one method for increasing efficiency of experimental mutagenesis in plants is the application of laser radiation as a modificator of genetic effects of ionizing radiation and chemical mutagens. Combined exposure of wheat seedlings to a gamma radiation dose of 2 kR and to laser radiation with the wave length of 632.8 nm (power density - 20 mVt/cm 2 , exposure - 30 min.) resulted in reducing the chromosomal aberration percentage from 30.5% in the gamma version to 16.3% in the combined treatment version. A radiosensibilizing effect was observed at additional exposure of gamma irradiated wheat seeds to laser light with the wave length of 441.6 nm where chromosomal aberration percentage increased from 22% in the gamma-irradiation version to 31% in the combined treatment version. By laser radiation it is also possible to normalize mitotic cell activity suppressed by gamma irradiation. Additional seedling irradiation with the light of helium-neon laser (632.8 nm) resulted in recovery of mitotic cell activity from 21% to 62% and increasing the average content of DNA per nucleus by 10%. The influence of only laser radiation on plant variability was also studied and it was shown that irradiation of wheat seeds and seedlings with pulsed and continuous laser light of visible spectrum resulted in phenotypically altered forms in M 2 . Their frequencies was dependent upon power density, dose and radiation wave length. Number of altered forms increased in going from long-wave to short-wave spectrum region. In comparing efficiency of different laser types of pulsed and continuous exposure (dose - 180 J/cm 2 ) 2% of altered

  4. Effect of weather and time on trauma events determined using emergency medical service registry data.

    Lin, Li-Wei; Lin, Hsiao-Yu; Hsu, Chien-Yeh; Rau, Hsiao-Hsien; Chen, Ping-Ling

    2015-09-01

    Trauma admissions are associated with weather and temporal factors; however, previous study results regarding these factors are contradictory. We hypothesised that weather and temporal factors have different effects on specific trauma events in an emergency medical service (EMS) system. EMS data from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2010, were obtained from the fire department of Taipei City and associated with the local weather data. EMS trauma events were categorised into total trauma, traffic accidents (TAs), motorbike accidents (MBAs), and falls. Hourly data on trauma patients were analysed using the zero-inflated Poisson model. The hourly incidence of total trauma increased with the magnitude of precipitation (incidence rate ratio [IRR]=1.06, 1.09, and 1.11 in light, moderate, and heavy rain, respectively), and this effect was more prominent in fall patients than in patients with other injuries (IRR=1.07, 1.21, and 1.32). However, the hourly incidence of TAs and MBAs was associated only with light rain (IRR=1.11 and 1.06, respectively). An hour of sunshine exposure was associated with an increase in the hourly incidence of all groups, and higher temperatures were associated with an increased hourly incidence of total trauma, TAs, and MBAs, but not falls. The hourly incidence of falls increased only in late fall and winter. Compared with the hourly incidence between 3 am and 7 am, the hourly incidence of all groups plateaued between 7 am and 11 pm and declined from 11 pm to 3 am. During the plateau period, 2 peaks in the incidence of TAs (IRR=5.03 and 5.07, respectively) and MBAs (IRR=5.81 and 5.51, respectively) were observed during 7-11 am and 3-7 pm. The hourly incidence of total trauma, TAs, and MBAs plateaued during workdays, peaked on Fridays, declined on Saturdays, and troughed on Sundays. The incidence of falls increased only on Mondays (IRR=1.09). Weather and temporal factors had different impacts on the incidence of traffic-related accidents and falls

  5. Stability studies of plasma modification effects of polylactide and polycaprolactone surface layers

    Moraczewski, Krzysztof, E-mail: kmm@ukw.edu.pl [Kazimierz Wielki University, Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Stepczyńska, Magdalena [Kazimierz Wielki University, Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Malinowski, Rafał [Institute for Engineering of Polymer Materials and Dyes, Marii Skłodowskiej-Curie 55, 87‐100 Toruń (Poland); Rytlewski, Piotr; Jagodziński, Bartłomiej; Żenkiewicz, Marian [Kazimierz Wielki University, Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland)

    2016-07-30

    Highlights: • Plasma modification affects surface roughness, wettability and surface energy. • Polylactide and polycaprolactone aging causes decay of the modification effects. • Changes in the surface characteristic and wettability deterioration were observed. • The decay occurs due to migration of low molecular weight molecules to the surface. • Plasma modification effect lasts longer in the case of polycaprolactone. - Abstract: The article presents results of research on the stability of oxygen plasma modification effects of polylactide and polycaprolactone surface layers. The modified samples were aged for three, six or nine weeks. The studies were carried out using scanning electron microscopy, goniometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Studies have shown that the plasma modification has significant impact on the geometric structure and chemical composition of the surface, wettability and surface energy of tested polymers. The modification effects are not permanent. It has been observed that over time the effects of plasma modification fade. Studies have shown that modifying effect lasts longer in the case of polycaprolactone.

  6. Detection of freeze-thaw weathering effect using X-ray micro computed tomography

    Park, J.; Hyun, C.; Park, H.

    2011-12-01

    Physical weathering caused by repeated freeze-thaw action of water inside rock pores or cracks was artificially simulated in laboratory. The tests were conducted on three rock types, i.e. diorite, basalt, and tuff, which are the major rock types around King Sejong Station of Korea located in Barton Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica. The temperature of freeze-thaw cycle was also set with simulated the air temperature of the station, i.e. the maximum temperature was + 10 °C and the minimum temperature was - 20 °C. Three cylindrical specimens composed of one for each rock type with 24.6 mm diameter and 14.5 ~ 17.7 mm length were prepared, and 2 mm diameter and 7 mm shallow depth hole was drilled on the center of the specimens. To exaggerate the effect of the freeze-thaw weathering, all tests were conducted under completely saturated condition. 50 cycles of the freeze-thaw test was carried, and X-ray micro computed tomography (CT) images of each rock specimen were obtained after every 10 cycles. Using X-ray micro CT images, 3D structure was rendered and pore and crack structures were extracted. The changes of porosity, absorption rate and pore and crack structure were detected. Porosity of all specimens was decreased linearly and absorption rate of all specimens was increased linearly as weathering processes; the pore connection and crack propagation was detected in 3D rendering pore and crack structure. The change of tuff specimen is the most remarkable among three rock types used in the research, because of its relatively high initial absorption rate and low strength. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) grant funded by the Korea government(MEST) (No. 2011-0027520).

  7. Reproducibility of Carbon and Water Cycle by an Ecosystem Process Based Model Using a Weather Generator and Effect of Temporal Concentration of Precipitation on Model Outputs

    Miyauchi, T.; Machimura, T.

    2014-12-01

    GCM is generally used to produce input weather data for the simulation of carbon and water cycle by ecosystem process based models under climate change however its temporal resolution is sometimes incompatible to requirement. A weather generator (WG) is used for temporal downscaling of input weather data for models, where the effect of WG algorithms on reproducibility of ecosystem model outputs must be assessed. In this study simulated carbon and water cycle by Biome-BGC model using weather data measured and generated by CLIMGEN weather generator were compared. The measured weather data (daily precipitation, maximum, minimum air temperature) at a few sites for 30 years was collected from NNDC Online weather data. The generated weather data was produced by CLIMGEN parameterized using the measured weather data. NPP, heterotrophic respiration (HR), NEE and water outflow were simulated by Biome-BGC using measured and generated weather data. In the case of deciduous broad leaf forest in Lushi, Henan Province, China, 30 years average monthly NPP by WG was 10% larger than that by measured weather in the growing season. HR by WG was larger than that by measured weather in all months by 15% in average. NEE by WG was more negative in winter and was close to that by measured weather in summer. These differences in carbon cycle were because the soil water content by WG was larger than that by measured weather. The difference between monthly water outflow by WG and by measured weather was large and variable, and annual outflow by WG was 50% of that by measured weather. The inconsistency in carbon and water cycle by WG and measured weather was suggested be affected by the difference in temporal concentration of precipitation, which was assessed.

  8. Precipitation effects on microbial pollution in a river: lag structures and seasonal effect modification.

    Andreas Tornevi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The river Göta Älv is a source of freshwater for 0.7 million swedes. The river is subject to contamination from sewer systems discharge and runoff from agricultural lands. Climate models projects an increase in precipitation and heavy rainfall in this region. This study aimed to determine how daily rainfall causes variation in indicators of pathogen loads, to increase knowledge of variations in river water quality and discuss implications for risk management. METHODS: Data covering 7 years of daily monitoring of river water turbidity and concentrations of E. coli, Clostridium and coliforms were obtained, and their short-term variations in relation with precipitation were analyzed with time series regression and non-linear distributed lag models. We studied how precipitation effects varied with season and compared different weather stations for predictive ability. RESULTS: Generally, the lowest raw water quality occurs 2 days after rainfall, with poor raw water quality continuing for several more days. A rainfall event of >15 mm/24-h (local 95 percentile was associated with a three-fold higher concentration of E. coli and 30% higher turbidity levels (lag 2. Rainfall was associated with exponential increases in concentrations of indicator bacteria while the effect on turbidity attenuated with very heavy rainfall. Clear associations were also observed between consecutive days of wet weather and decreased water quality. The precipitation effect on increased levels of indicator bacteria was significant in all seasons. CONCLUSIONS: Rainfall elevates microbial risks year-round in this river and freshwater source and acts as the main driver of varying water quality. Heavy rainfall appears to be a better predictor of fecal pollution than water turbidity. An increase of wet weather and extreme events with climate change will lower river water quality even more, indicating greater challenges for drinking water producers, and suggesting better

  9. Effects of weather conditions, light conditions, and road lighting on vehicle speed.

    Jägerbrand, Annika K; Sjöbergh, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Light conditions are known to affect the number of vehicle accidents and fatalities but the relationship between light conditions and vehicle speed is not fully understood. This study examined whether vehicle speed on roads is higher in daylight and under road lighting than in darkness, and determined the combined effects of light conditions, posted speed limit and weather conditions on driving speed. The vehicle speed of passenger cars in different light conditions (daylight, twilight, darkness, artificial light) and different weather conditions (clear weather, rain, snow) was determined using traffic and weather data collected on an hourly basis for approximately 2 years (1 September 2012-31 May 2014) at 25 locations in Sweden (17 with road lighting and eight without). In total, the data included almost 60 million vehicle passes. The data were cleaned by removing June, July, and August, which have different traffic patterns than the rest of the year. Only data from the periods 10:00 A.M.-04:00 P.M. and 06:00 P.M.-10:00 P.M. were used, to remove traffic during rush hour and at night. Multivariate adaptive regression splines was used to evaluate the overall influence of independent variables on vehicle speed and nonparametric statistical testing was applied to test for speed differences between dark-daylight, dark-twilight, and twilight-daylight, on roads with and without road lighting. The results show that vehicle speed in general depends on several independent variables. Analyses of vehicle speed and speed differences between daylight, twilight and darkness, with and without road lighting, did not reveal any differences attributable to light conditions. However, vehicle speed decreased due to rain or snow and the decrease was higher on roads without road lighting than on roads with lighting. These results suggest that the strong association between traffic accidents and darkness or low light conditions could be explained by drivers failing to adjust their

  10. Weather and road capacity

    Jensen, Thomas Christian

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents estimations of the effect of bad weather on the observed speed on a Danish highway section; Køge Bugt Motorvejen. The paper concludes that weather, primarily precipitation and snow, has a clear negative effect on speed when the road is not in hypercongestion mode. Furthermore...

  11. Urban weather data and building models for the inclusion of the urban heat island effect in building performance simulation.

    Palme, M; Inostroza, L; Villacreses, G; Lobato, A; Carrasco, C

    2017-10-01

    This data article presents files supporting calculation for urban heat island (UHI) inclusion in building performance simulation (BPS). Methodology is used in the research article "From urban climate to energy consumption. Enhancing building performance simulation by including the urban heat island effect" (Palme et al., 2017) [1]. In this research, a Geographical Information System (GIS) study is done in order to statistically represent the most important urban scenarios of four South-American cities (Guayaquil, Lima, Antofagasta and Valparaíso). Then, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is done to obtain reference Urban Tissues Categories (UTC) to be used in urban weather simulation. The urban weather files are generated by using the Urban Weather Generator (UWG) software (version 4.1 beta). Finally, BPS is run out with the Transient System Simulation (TRNSYS) software (version 17). In this data paper, four sets of data are presented: 1) PCA data (excel) to explain how to group different urban samples in representative UTC; 2) UWG data (text) to reproduce the Urban Weather Generation for the UTC used in the four cities (4 UTC in Lima, Guayaquil, Antofagasta and 5 UTC in Valparaíso); 3) weather data (text) with the resulting rural and urban weather; 4) BPS models (text) data containing the TRNSYS models (four building models).

  12. The effect of weather on mood, productivity, and frequency of emotional crisis in a temperate continental climate

    Barnston, A. G.

    1988-06-01

    A group of 62 mostly university student subjects kept structured diaries of their feelings and their productivity for six weeks in Illinois in early autumn. During the same period, daily frequency of telephone calls to a crisis intervention service in the same community was monitored, and complete daily weather data for the vicinity were provided by a local meteorological research facility. Major findings are as follows. The weather appears to influence mood and productivity, but only to a smallextent compared with the aggregate of all other controlling factors. Males show a relatively stronger effect than females. Psychologically troubled people generally appear to be more affected by weather than university students. The students and the crisis intervention service clients with “mild” problems tend to be stressed more when the weather is unstable, cloudy, warm and humid, and least stressed during sunny, dry, cool weather with rising barometric pressure. The crisis service clients with “severe” problems react oppositely to these two weather types. The meaning of these and other results and the strengths and weaknesses of this study's design are discussed.

  13. Post-translational modification of osteopontin: Effects on in vitro hydroxyapatite formation and growth

    Boskey, Adele L.; Christensen, Brian Søndergaard; Taleb, Hayat

    2012-01-01

    The manuscript tests the hypothesis that posttranslational modification of the SIBLING family of proteins in general and osteopontin in particular modify the abilities of these proteins to regulate in vitro hydroxyapatite (HA) formation. Osteopontin has diverse effects on hydroxyapatite (HA...

  14. Effects of Harbor Modification on Crescent City, California's Tsunami Vulnerability

    Dengler, Lori; Uslu, Burak

    2011-06-01

    More damaging tsunamis have impacted Crescent City, California in historic times than any other location on the West Coast of the USA. Crescent City's harbor has undergone significant modification since the early 20th century, including construction of several breakwaters, dredging, and a 200 × 300 m2 small boat basin. In 2006, a M w 8.3 earthquake in the Kuril Islands generated a moderate Pacific-wide tsunami. Crescent City recorded the highest amplitudes of any tide gauge in the Pacific and was the only location to experience structural damage. Strong currents damaged docks and boats within the small boat basin, causing more than US 20 million in damage and replacement costs. We examine how modifications to Crescent City's harbor may have affected its vulnerability to moderate tsunamis such as the 2006 event. A bathymetric grid of the basin was constructed based on US Army Corps of Engineers soundings in 1964 and 1965 before the construction of the small boat basin. The method of splitting tsunamis was used to estimate tsunami water heights and current velocities at several locations in the harbor using both the 1964-1965 grid and the 2006 bathymetric grid for the 2006 Kuril event and a similar-sized source along the Sanriku coast of Japan. Model velocity outputs are compared for the two different bathymetries at the tide gauge location and at six additional computational sites in the harbor. The largest difference between the two grids is at the small boat basin entrance, where the 2006 bathymetry produces currents over three times the strength of the currents produced by the 1965 bathymetry. Peak currents from a Sanriku event are comparable to those produced by the 2006 event, and within the boat basin may have been higher. The modifications of the harbor, and in particular the addition of the small boat basin, appear to have contributed to the high current velocities and resulting damage in 2006 and help to explain why the 1933 M w 8.4-8.7 Sanriku tsunami

  15. Effective modification of particle surface properties using ultrasonic water mist

    Genina, Natalja; Räikkönen, Heikki; Heinämäki, Jyrki

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to design a new technique to modify particle surface properties and, through that, to improve flowability of poorly flowing drug thiamine hydrochloride and pharmaceutical sugar lactose monohydrate of two different grades. The powdered particles were supplied...... properties. It was found that rapid exposition of pharmaceutical materials by water mist resulted in the improvement of powder technical properties. The evident changes in flowability of coarser lactose were obviously due to smoothing of particle surface and decreasing in the level of fines with very slight...... increment in particle size. The changes in thiamine powder flow were mainly due to narrowing in particle size distribution where the tendency for better flow of finer lactose was related to surface and size modifications. The aqueous mist application did not cause any alteration of the crystal structures...

  16. Immediate effects of a distal gait modification during stair descent in individuals with patellofemoral pain.

    Aliberti, Sandra; Mezêncio, Bruno; Amadio, Alberto Carlos; Serrão, Julio Cerca; Mochizuki, Luis

    2018-05-23

    Knee pain during stair managing is a common complaint among individuals with PFP and can negatively affect their activities of daily living. Gait modification programs can be used to decrease patellofemoral pain. Immediate effects of a stair descent distal gait modification session that intended to emphasize forefoot landing during stair descent are described in this study. To analyze the immediate effects of a distal gait modification session on lower extremity movements and intensity of pain in women with patellofemoral pain during stair descent. Nonrandomized controlled trial. Sixteen women with patellofemoral pain were allocated into two groups: (1) Gait Modification Group (n = 8); and 2) Control Group (n = 8). The intensity of pain (visual analog scale) and kinematics of knee, ankle, and forefoot (multi-segmental foot model) during stair descent were assessed before and after the intervention. After the gait modification session, there was an increase of forefoot eversion and ankle plantarflexion as well as a decrease of knee flexion. An immediate decrease in patellofemoral pain intensity during stair descent was also observed. The distal gait modification session changed the lower extremity kinetic chain strategy of movement, increasing foot and ankle movement contribution and decreasing knee contribution to the task. An immediate decrease in patellofemoral pain intensity during stair descent was also observed. To emphasize forefoot landing may be a useful intervention to immediately relieve pain in patients with patellofemoral pain during stair descent. Clinical studies are needed to verify the gait modification session effects in medium and long terms.

  17. The effect of habitat modification on plant-pollinator network

    Aminatun, Tien; Putra, Nugroho Susetya

    2017-08-01

    The research aimed to determine; (1) the mutualism interaction pattern of plant-pollinator on several habitat modifications; and (2) the habitat modification which showed the most stable pattern of interaction. The study was conducted in one planting season with 20 plots which each plot had 2x2 m2 width and 2 m spacing among plots, and each plot was planted with the same variety of tomato plants, i.e. "intan". Nitrogen manipulation treatment was conducted with four kinds of fertilizers, i.e. NPK (code PU), compost (code PKM), vermicompost (code PC), and manure (code PK). Each treatment had 5 plot replications. We observed the growth of tomato plants, weed and arthropod populationstwo weekly while pollinator visitation twice a week during tomato plant flowering with counting population and visitation frequence of each pollinator on each sample of tomato plants. The nectar of tomato plant flower of each treatment was tested in laboratory to see its reducing sugar and sucrose. Oganic matter and nitrogen of the soil samples of each treatment were tested in laboratory in the beginning and the end of this research. We analized the plant-pollinator network with bipartite program in R-statistics, and the abiotic and other biotic factors with descriptive analysis. The results of the research were; (1) the mutualism interaction pattern of plant-pollinator network of four treatments were varied, and (2) The pattern of plant-pollinator network of NPK fertilizer treatment showed the more stable interaction based on analysis of interaction evenness, Shannon diversity, frequency and longevity of pollinator visitation.

  18. The effect of airborne particles and weather conditions on pediatric respiratory infections in Cordoba, Argentine

    Amarillo, Ana C.; Carreras, Hebe A.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effect of estimated PM 10 on respiratory infections in children from Cordoba, Argentine as well as the influence of weather factors, socio-economic conditions and education. We analyzed upper and lower respiratory infections and applied a time-series analysis with a quasi-Poisson distribution link function. To control for seasonally varying factors we fitted cubic smoothing splines of date. We also examined community-specific parameters and differences in susceptibility by sex. We found a significant association between particles and respiratory infections. This relationship was affected by mean temperature, atmospheric pressure and wind speed. These effects were stronger in fall, winter and spring for upper respiratory infections while for lower respiratory infections the association was significant only during spring. Low socio-economic conditions and low education levels increased the risk of respiratory infections. These findings add useful information to understand the influence of airborne particles on children health in developing countries. - Highlights: ► Few information is available on children respiratory health from developing countries. ► We modeled the association between PM 10 and children's respiratory infections. ► We checked the influence of weather factors, socio-economic conditions, education and sex. ► Temperature, pressure and wind speed modified the effect of particles. ► Low socio-economic conditions and low education levels increased the risk of infections. - The concentration of airborne particles as well as low socio-economic conditions and low education levels are significant risk factors for upper and lower respiratory infections in children from Cordoba, Argentine.

  19. Effectiveness of National Weather Service heat alerts in preventing mortality in 20 US cities.

    Weinberger, Kate R; Zanobetti, Antonella; Schwartz, Joel; Wellenius, Gregory A

    2018-04-09

    Extreme heat is a well-documented public health threat. The US National Weather Service (NWS) issues heat advisories and warnings (collectively, "heat alerts") in advance of forecast extreme heat events. The effectiveness of these alerts in preventing deaths remains largely unknown. To quantify the change in mortality rates associated with heat alerts in 20 US cities between 2001 and 2006. Because NWS heat alerts are issued based on forecast weather and these forecasts are imperfect, in any given location there exists a set of days of similar observed heat index in which heat alerts have been issued for some days but not others. We used a case-crossover design and conditional logistic regression to compare mortality rates on days with versus without heat alerts among such eligible days, adjusting for maximum daily heat index and temporal factors. We combined city-specific estimates into a summary measure using standard random-effects meta-analytic techniques. Overall, NWS heat alerts were not associated with lower mortality rates (percent change in rate: -0.5% [95% CI: -2.8, 1.9]). In Philadelphia, heat alerts were associated with a 4.4% (95% CI: -8.3, -0.3) lower mortality rate or an estimated 45.1 (95% empirical CI: 3.1, 84.1) deaths averted per year if this association is assumed to be causal. No statistically significant beneficial association was observed in other individual cities. Our results suggest that between 2001 and 2006, NWS heat alerts were not associated with lower mortality in most cities studied, potentially missing a valuable opportunity to avert a substantial number of heat-related deaths. These results highlight the need to better link alerts to effective communication and intervention strategies to reduce heat-related mortality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Weather and emotional state

    Spasova, Z.

    2010-09-01

    Introduction Given the proven effects of weather on the human organism, an attempt to examine its effects on a psychic and emotional level has been made. Emotions affect the bio-tonus, working ability and concentration, hence their significance in various domains of economic life, such as health care, education, transportation, tourism, etc. Data and methods The research has been made in Sofia City within a period of 8 months, using 5 psychological methods (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Test for Self-assessment of the emotional state (developed by Wessman and Ricks), Test for evaluation of moods and Test "Self-confidence - Activity - Mood" (developed by the specialists from the Military Academy in Saint Petersburg). The Fiodorov-Chubukov's complex-climatic method was used to characterize meteorological conditions because of the purpose to include in the analysis a maximal number of meteorological elements. 16 weather types are defined in dependence of the meteorological elements values according to this method. Abrupt weather changes from one day to another, defined by the same method, were considered as well. Results and discussions The results obtained by t-test show that the different categories of weather lead to changes in the emotional status, which indicates a character either positive or negative for the organism. The abrupt weather changes, according to expectations, have negative effect on human emotions but only when a transition to the cloudy weather or weather type, classified as "unfavourable" has been realized. The relationship between weather and human emotions is rather complicated since it depends on individual characteristics of people. One of these individual psychological characteristics, marked by the dimension "neuroticism", has a strong effect on emotional reactions in different weather conditions. Emotionally stable individuals are more "protected" to the weather influence on their emotions

  1. Synoptic Traveling Weather Systems on Mars: Effects of Radiatively-Active Water Ice Clouds

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery; Kahre, Melinda; Haberle, Robert; Urata, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols on Mars are critical in determining the nature of its thermal structure, its large-scale circulation, and hence the overall climate of the planet. We conduct multi-annual simulations with the latest version of the NASA Ames Mars global climate model (GCM), gcm2.3+, that includes a modernized radiative-transfer package and complex water-ice cloud microphysics package which permit radiative effects and interactions of suspended atmospheric aerosols (e.g., water ice clouds, water vapor, dust, and mutual interactions) to influence the net diabatic heating. Results indicate that radiatively active water ice clouds profoundly affect the seasonal and annual mean climate. The mean thermal structure and balanced circulation patterns are strongly modified near the surface and aloft. Warming of the subtropical atmosphere at altitude and cooling of the high latitude atmosphere at low levels takes place, which increases the mean pole-to-equator temperature contrast (i.e., "baroclinicity"). With radiatively active water ice clouds (RAC) compared to radiatively inert water ice clouds (nonRAC), significant changes in the intensity of the mean state and forced stationary Rossby modes occur, both of which affect the vigor and intensity of traveling, synoptic period weather systems.Such weather systems not only act as key agents in the transport of heat and momentum beyond the extent of the Hadley circulation, but also the transport of trace species such as water vapor, water ice-clouds, dust and others. The northern hemisphere (NH) forced Rossby waves and resultant wave train are augmented in the RAC case: the modes are more intense and the wave train is shifted equatorward. Significant changes also occur within the subtropics and tropics. The Rossby wave train sets up, combined with the traveling synoptic period weather systems (i.e., cyclones and anticyclones), the geographic extent of storm zones (or storm tracks) within the NH. A variety of circulation

  2. Monitoring Effective Doses Received By Air Crews With A Space Weather Application

    Lantos, P.

    To fulfil new requirements of the European Community concerning monitoring of effective doses received by air crews, the French Aviation Authority has developed an operational system called Sievert. The SIEVERT system is analysed as an exam- ple of Space Weather application. One of its characteristics is to calculate the dose received on-board each flight on the basis of the specific and detailled flight given by companies. Operational models will be used. As input to the models, the system needs monitoring of galactic cosmic rays and of solar flare particles. The French neu- tron monitors located in Kerguelen Islands (South Indian Ocean) and Terre Adélie (Antarctica) will be used for this purpose. Particular attention will be devoted to evo- lution of the system in conjunction with new measurements available in the frame of a permanent validation process.

  3. Tales of future weather

    Hazeleger, W.; Van den Hurk, B.J.J.M.; Min, E.; Van Oldenborgh, G.J.; Petersen, A.C.; Stainforth, D.A.; Vasileiadou, E.; Smith, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Society is vulnerable to extreme weather events and, by extension, to human impacts on future events. As climate changes weather patterns will change. The search is on for more effective methodologies to aid decision-makers both in mitigation to avoid climate change and in adaptation to changes. The

  4. Climate-change effects on soils: Accelerated weathering, soil carbon and elemental cycling

    Qafoku, Nikolla

    2015-04-01

    Climate change [i.e., high atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations (≥400 ppm); increasing air temperatures (2-4°C or greater); significant and/or abrupt changes in daily, seasonal, and inter-annual temperature; changes in the wet/dry cycles; intensive rainfall and/or heavy storms; extended periods of drought; extreme frost; heat waves and increased fire frequency] is and will significantly affect soil properties and fertility, water resources, food quantity and quality, and environmental quality. Biotic processes that consume atmospheric CO2, and create organic carbon (C) that is either reprocessed to CO2 or stored in soils are the subject of active current investigations, with great concern over the influence of climate change. In addition, abiotic C cycling and its influence on the inorganic C pool in soils is a fundamental global process in which acidic atmospheric CO2 participates in the weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals, ultimately delivering bicarbonate and Ca2+ or other cations that precipitate in the form of carbonates in soils or are transported to the rivers, lakes, and oceans. Soil responses to climate change will be complex, and there are many uncertainties and unresolved issues. The objective of the review is to initiate and further stimulate a discussion about some important and challenging aspects of climate-change effects on soils, such as accelerated weathering of soil minerals and resulting C and elemental fluxes in and out of soils, soil/geo-engineering methods used to increase C sequestration in soils, soil organic matter (SOM) protection, transformation and mineralization, and SOM temperature sensitivity. This review reports recent discoveries, identifies key research needs, and highlights opportunities offered by the climate-change effects on soils.

  5. Effect of hydrothermal modification on the structure of REY zeolite studied by PAS

    Zhu Jun; Wang Shaojie

    2003-01-01

    The effect of temperature of the hydrothermal modification on the structure of Rare-earth Y zeolite (REY) was studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy. We measured the positron lifetime spectrum as a function of the temperature (300-800 degree C) of one hour hydrothermal modification for the REY zeolite after through pre-heated dehydration at 150 degree C. All lifetime spectra could be resolved into five components. The fifth lifetime component and its intensity were found to be related to the size and number of the secondary pores. The experimental results showed that the secondary pore in REY zeolite was produced by hydrothermal modification in some temperature range, and the largest size and the greatest quantity of the secondary pores were observed in the sample treated at 500 degree C for 1 hour. The effect of hydrothermal modification on REY zeolite without pre-heated dehydration was also discussed

  6. Moderating Effects of Weather-Related Factors on a Physical Activity Intervention.

    Welch, Whitney A; Spring, Bonnie; Phillips, Siobhan M; Siddique, Juned

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify whether weather-related factors moderate the effect of a physical activity (PA) intervention. Participants (N=204, 77% female, mean age 33 [SD=11] years, mean BMI 28.2 [SD=7.1]) from the Make Better Choices 1 trial, enrolled April 2005 to April 2008, were randomized to one of two treatment conditions: (1) increase moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) treatment group, or (2) decrease sedentary behavior control group. Participants wore an accelerometer for 5 weeks: a 2-week baseline assessment followed by a 3-week intervention. Accelerometer data were used to estimate minutes/day of MVPA. Average daily temperature, day length, and precipitation were obtained from the National Climatic Data Center and combined with the accelerometer data. Linear mixed effects models were used to determine whether these weather-related factors moderated the effect of the intervention on MVPA. Separate models were fit for season, daily average temperature, and day length. There was a significant moderating effect of season on MVPA such that the PA intervention, as compared with control, increased MVPA 10.4 minutes more in the summer than in the winter (95% CI=1.1, 19.6, p=0.029). There was a significant moderating effect of daily temperature such that every 10°F increase in temperature was associated with an additional 1.5 minutes/day increase in the difference in MVPA increase between the two intervention conditions (95% CI=0.1, 2.9, p=0.015). There was a significant moderating effect of day length such that every additional hour of daylight was associated with a 2.23-minute increase in the PA intervention's impact on increasing MVPA (95% CI=0.8, 3.7, p=0.002). Day length and temperature had a significant moderating effect on change in MVPA during a PA intervention such that the intervention was less effective on colder days and on shorter days, independently. These results suggest that strategies to overcome environmental barriers

  7. Modification of genetic effect of gamma irradiation by electric current

    Grigor'eva, N.N.; Shakhbazov, V.G.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of direct electric current of different value and polarity on genetic sequences of γ-irradiation of Vicia faba seedlings has been studied. The previously found modifying effect of direct electric current is confirmed. The extent and character of this effect depend on the value and polarity of current as well as time between irradiation and electric effects. Current effect modes having no effect on irradiated seedlings protecting cells from injury and the modes aggravating radiation effect have been found. At certain modes the effects of direct electric current on irradiated seedlings changes in the rearrangement spectrum are observed, particularly the number of bridges is increased

  8. Geography and Weather: Mountain Meterology.

    Mogil, H. Michael; Collins, H. Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Provided are 26 ideas to help children explore the effects of mountains on the weather. Weather conditions in Nepal and Colorado are considered separately. Nine additional sources of information are listed. (CW)

  9. Cockpit weather information needs

    Scanlon, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective is to develop an advanced pilot weather interface for the flight deck and to measure its utilization and effectiveness in pilot reroute decision processes, weather situation awareness, and weather monitoring. Identical graphical weather displays for the dispatcher, air traffic control (ATC), and pilot crew should also enhance the dialogue capabilities for reroute decisions. By utilizing a broadcast data link for surface observations, forecasts, radar summaries, lightning strikes, and weather alerts, onboard weather computing facilities construct graphical displays, historical weather displays, color textual displays, and other tools to assist the pilot crew. Since the weather data is continually being received and stored by the airborne system, the pilot crew has instantaneous access to the latest information. This information is color coded to distinguish degrees of category for surface observations, ceiling and visibilities, and ground radar summaries. Automatic weather monitoring and pilot crew alerting is accomplished by the airborne computing facilities. When a new weather information is received, the displays are instantaneously changed to reflect the new information. Also, when a new surface or special observation for the intended destination is received, the pilot crew is informed so that information can be studied at the pilot's discretion. The pilot crew is also immediately alerted when a severe weather notice, AIRMET or SIGMET, is received. The cockpit weather display shares a multicolor eight inch cathode ray tube and overlaid touch panel with a pilot crew data link interface. Touch sensitive buttons and areas are used for pilot selection of graphical and data link displays. Time critical ATC messages are presented in a small window that overlays other displays so that immediate pilot alerting and action can be taken. Predeparture and reroute clearances are displayed on the graphical weather system so pilot review of weather along

  10. Weather Effects on the Patterns of People's Everyday Activities: A Study Using GPS Traces of Mobile Phone Users

    Leong, Tuck W.; Sekimoto, Yoshihide; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the effects that the weather has on people's everyday activity patterns. Temperature, rainfall, and wind speed were used as weather parameters. People's daily activity patterns were inferred, such as place visited, the time this took place, the duration of the visit, based on the GPS location traces of their mobile phones overlaid upon Yellow Pages information. Our analysis of 31,855 mobile phone users allowed us to infer that people were more likely to stay longer at eateries or food outlets, and (to a lesser degree) at retail or shopping areas when the weather is very cold or when conditions are calm (non-windy). When compared to people's regular activity patterns, certain weather conditions affected people's movements and activities noticeably at different times of the day. On cold days, people's activities were found to be more diverse especially after 10AM, showing greatest variations between 2PM and 6PM. A similar trend is observed between 10AM and midnight on rainy days, with people's activities found to be most diverse on days with heaviest rainfalls or on days when the wind speed was stronger than 4 km/h, especially between 10AM–1AM. Finally, we observed that different geographical areas of a large metropolis were impacted differently by the weather. Using data of urban infrastructure to characterize areas, we found strong correlations between weather conditions upon people's accessibility to trains. This study sheds new light on the influence of weather conditions on human behavior, in particular the choice of daily activities and how mobile phone data can be used to investigate the influence of environmental factors on urban dynamics. PMID:24367481

  11. Effect of processing method on surface and weathering characteristics of wood-flour/HDPE composites

    Nicole M. Stark; Laurent M. Matuana; Craig M. Clemons

    2004-01-01

    Wood-plastic lumber is promoted as a low maintenance high-durability product. When exposed to accelerated weathering, however, wood-plastic composites may experience a color change and/or loss in mechanical properties. Different methods of manufacturing wood-plastic composites lead to different surface characteristics, which can influence weathering, In this study, 50...

  12. Effect of processing method on accelerated weathering of wood-flour/HDPE composites

    Nicole M. Stark; Laurent M. Matuana; Craig M. Clemons

    2003-01-01

    Wood-plastic lumber is promoted as a low maintenance high-durability product. When exposed to accelerated weathering, however, wood-plastic composites may experience a color change and/or loss in mechanical properties. Different methods of manufacturing wood-plastic composites lead to different surface characteristics, which can influence weathering, In this study, 50...

  13. Effects of weather conditions on emergency ambulance calls for acute coronary syndromes

    Vencloviene, Jone; Babarskiene, Ruta; Dobozinskas, Paulius; Siurkaite, Viktorija

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between weather conditions and daily emergency ambulance calls for acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The study included data on 3631 patients who called the ambulance for chest pain and were admitted to the department of cardiology as patients with ACS. We investigated the effect of daily air temperature ( T), barometric pressure (BP), relative humidity, and wind speed (WS) to detect the risk areas for low and high daily volume (DV) of emergency calls. We used the classification and regression tree method as well as cluster analysis. The clusters were created by applying the k-means cluster algorithm using the standardized daily weather variables. The analysis was performed separately during cold (October-April) and warm (May-September) seasons. During the cold period, the greatest DV was observed on days of low T during the 3-day sequence, on cold and windy days, and on days of low BP and high WS during the 3-day sequence; low DV was associated with high BP and decreased WS on the previous day. During June-September, a lower DV was associated with low BP, windless days, and high BP and low WS during the 3-day sequence. During the warm period, the greatest DV was associated with increased BP and changing WS during the 3-day sequence. These results suggest that daily T, BP, and WS on the day of the ambulance call and on the two previous days may be prognostic variables for the risk of ACS.

  14. Effect of mycorrhizal fungi on the phytoextraction of weathered p,p-DDE by Cucurbita pepo.

    White, Jason C; Ross, Daniel W; Gent, Martin P N; Eitzer, Brian D; Mattina, Maryjane Incorvia

    2006-10-11

    Field experiments were conducted to assess the impact of inoculation with mycorrhizal fungi on the accumulation of weathered p,p'-DDE from soil by three cultivars of zucchini (Cucurbita pepo spp. pepo cv Costata Romanesco, Goldrush, Raven). Three commercially available mycorrhizal products (BioVam, Myco-Vam, INVAM) were inoculated into the root system of the zucchini seedlings at planting. In agreement with our previous findings, plants not inoculated with fungi accumulated large but variable amounts of contaminant, with root bioconcentration factors (BCFs, ratio of p,p'-DDE, on a dry weight basis, in the root to that in the soil) ranging from 10 to 48 and stem BCFs ranging from 5.5 to 11. The total amount of contaminant phytoextracted during the 62 day growing season ranged from 0.72-2.9%. The effect of fungal inoculation on the release of weathered p,p'-DDE from soil and on the subsequent uptake of the parent compound by zucchini appeared to vary at the cultivar level. For Goldrush, fungal inoculation generally decreased tissue BCFs but because of slightly larger biomass, did not significantly impact the percent contaminant phytoextracted. Alternatively, for Costata, BioVam and Myco-Vam generally enhanced p,p'-DDE accumulation from soil, and increased the amount of contaminant phytoextracted by up to 34%. For Raven, BioVam reduced contaminant uptake whereas Myco-Vam and INVAM increased contaminant phytoextraction by 53 and 60%, respectively. The data show that fungal inoculation may significantly increase the remedial potential of C. pepo ssp. pepo. The apparent cultivar specific response to mycorrhizal inoculation is unexpected and the subject of ongoing investigation.

  15. High potential for weathering and climate effects of non-vascular vegetation in the Late Ordovician

    Porada, Philipp; Lenton, Tim; Pohl, Alexandre; Weber, Bettina; Mander, Luke; Donnadieu, Yannick; Beer, Christian; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kleidon, Axel

    2017-04-01

    Early non-vascular vegetation in the Late Ordovician may have strongly increased chemical weathering rates of surface rocks at the global scale. This could have led to a drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and, consequently, a decrease in global temperature and an interval of glaciations. Under current climatic conditions, usually field or laboratory experiments are used to quantify enhancement of chemical weathering rates by non-vascular vegetation. However, these experiments are constrained to a small spatial scale and a limited number of species. This complicates the extrapolation to the global scale, even more so for the geological past, where physiological properties of non-vascular vegetation may have differed from current species. Here we present a spatially explicit modelling approach to simulate large-scale chemical weathering by non-vascular vegetation in the Late Ordovician. For this purpose, we use a process-based model of lichens and bryophytes, since these organisms are probably the closest living analogue to Late Ordovician vegetation. The model explicitly represents multiple physiological strategies, which enables the simulated vegetation to adapt to Ordovician climatic conditions. We estimate productivity of Ordovician vegetation with the model, and relate it to chemical weathering by assuming that the organisms dissolve rocks to extract phosphorus for the production of new biomass. Thereby we account for limits on weathering due to reduced supply of unweathered rock material in shallow regions, as well as decreased transport capacity of runoff for dissolved weathered material in dry areas. We simulate a potential global weathering flux of 2.8 km3 (rock) per year, which we define as volume of primary minerals affected by chemical transformation. Our estimate is around 3 times larger than today's global chemical weathering flux. Furthermore, chemical weathering rates simulated by our model are highly sensitive to atmospheric CO2 concentration, which implies

  16. Wacky Weather

    Sabarre, Amy; Gulino, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    What do a leaf blower, water hose, fan, and ice cubes have in common? Ask the students who participated in an integrative science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (I-STEM) education unit, "Wacky Weather," and they will tell say "fun and severe weather"--words one might not have expected! The purpose of the unit…

  17. Weather Instruments.

    Brantley, L. Reed, Sr.; Demanche, Edna L.; Klemm, E. Barbara; Kyselka, Will; Phillips, Edwin A.; Pottenger, Francis M.; Yamamoto, Karen N.; Young, Donald B.

    This booklet presents some activities to measure various weather phenomena. Directions for constructing a weather station are included. Instruments including rain gauges, thermometers, wind vanes, wind speed devices, humidity devices, barometers, atmospheric observations, a dustfall jar, sticky-tape can, detection of gases in the air, and pH of…

  18. Effects of structural modification on reliability of nanoscale nitride HEMTs

    Gaddipati, Vamsi Mohan

    AlGaN based nanoscale high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) are the next generation of transistor technology that features the unique combination of higher power, wider bandwidth, low noise, higher efficiency, and temperature/radiation hardness than conventional AlGaAs and Si based technologies. However, as evidenced by recent stress tests, reliability of these devices (characterized by a gradual decrease in the output current/power leading to failure of the device in just tens of hours of operation) remains a major concern. Although, in these tests, physical damages were clearly visible in the device, the root cause and nature of these damages have not yet been fully assessed experimentally. Therefore, a comprehensive theoretical study of the physical mechanisms responsible for degradation of AlGaN HEMTs is essential before these devices are deployed in targeted applications. The main objective of the proposed research is to computationally investigate how degradation of state-of-the-art nanoscale AlGaN HEMTs is governed by an intricate and dynamical coupling of thermo-electromechanical processes at different length (atoms-to-transistor) and time (femtosecondto- hours) scales while operating in high voltage, large mechanical, and high temperature/radiation stresses. This work centers around a novel hypotheses as follows: High voltage applied to AlGaN HEMT causes excessive internal heat dissipation, which triggers gate metal diffusion into the semiconducting barrier layer and structural modifications (defect ii formation) leading to diminished polarization induced charge density and output current. Since the dynamical system to be studied is complex, chaotic (where the evolution rule is guided by atomicity of the underlying material), and involve coupled physical processes, an in-house multiscale simulator (QuADS 3-D) has been employed and augmented, where material parameters are obtained atomistically using firstprinciples, structural relaxation and defect

  19. Effect of weather factors on the incidence and development of pink bollworm on flowers of advance cotton genotypes

    Khaliq, A.; Subhani, M.N.; Hassan, S.W.; Afzal, M.

    2008-01-01

    Ten advance genotypes of cotton Viz. BH-121, NIAB KRISHMA, DNH-137, VH-142, VH-142 BH-125, MNH-635, SLH-267, FNH-245, CRIS-467 and CRIS-82 were used to determine the effect of different weather factors on the incidence and development of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossyiella) infestation at Nuclear institute for Agriculture and Biology (NIAB) Faisalabad. Trials were laid out using Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with four replications. Finally data were subjected to statistical analysis and for correlation studies between weather factors and pink bollworm. Temperature and relative humidity and rainfall affected negatively for the infestation of pink bollworm on flowers in advance genotypes of cotton. (author)

  20. Effect of Weather Variability on Seasonal Influenza Among Different Age Groups in Queensland, Australia: A Bayesian Spatiotemporal Analysis.

    Huang, Xiaodong; Mengersen, Kerrie; Milinovich, Gabriel; Hu, Wenbiao

    2017-06-01

    The effects of weather variability on seasonal influenza among different age groups remain unclear. The comparative study aims to explore the differences in the associations between weather variability and seasonal influenza, and growth rates of seasonal influenza epidemics among different age groups in Queensland, Australia. Three Bayesian spatiotemporal conditional autoregressive models were fitted at the postal area level to quantify the relationships between seasonal influenza and monthly minimum temperature (MIT), monthly vapor pressure, school calendar pattern, and Index of Relative Socio-Economic Advantage and Disadvantage for 3 age groups (Weather variability appears to be more influential on seasonal influenza transmission in younger (0-14) age groups. The growth rates of influenza at postal area level were relatively small for older (≥65) age groups in Queensland, Australia. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Matrix effects in applying mono- and polyclonal ELISA systems to the analysis of weathered oils in contaminated soil.

    Pollard, S J T; Farmer, J G; Knight, D M; Young, P J

    2002-01-01

    Commercial mono- and polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) systems were applied to the on-site analysis of weathered hydrocarbon-contaminated soils at a former integrated steelworks. Comparisons were made between concentrations of solvent extractable matter (SEM) determined gravimetrically by Soxhlet (dichloromethane) extraction and those estimated immunologically by ELISA determination over a concentration range of 2000-330,000 mg SEM/kg soil dry weight. Both ELISA systems tinder-reported for the more weathered soil samples. Results suggest this is due to matrix effects in the sample rather than any inherent bias in the ELISA systems and it is concluded that, for weathered hydrocarbons typical of steelworks and coke production sites, the use of ELISA requires careful consideration as a field technique. Consideration of the target analyte relative to the composition of the hydrocarbon waste encountered appears critical.

  2. Weathering effects on tensile and stress rupture strength of glass fiber reinforced vinylester and epoxy thermoset pipes

    Nizamuddin, Syed

    Glass fiber reinforced vinylester (GFRE) and epoxy (GFRE) pipes have been used for more than three decades to mitigate corrosion problems in oil fields, chemical and industrial plants. In these services, both GFRV and GFRE pipes are exposed to various environmental conditions. Long-term mechanical durability of these pipes after exposure to environmental conditions, which include natural weathering exposure to seasonal temperature variation, sea water, humidity and other corrosive fluids like crude oil, should be well known. Although extensive research has been undertaken, several major issues pertaining to the performance of these pipes under a number of environmental conditions still remain unresolved. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effects of natural weathering, combined natural weathering with seawater and crude oil exposure, for time periods ranging from 3 to 36 months respectively, on the tensile and stress rupture behavior of GFRV and GFRE pipes. Ring specimens are machined from GFRV and GFRE pipes and tested before and after exposure to different weathering conditions prevalent in the eastern region (Dhahran) of Saudi Arabia and present under service conditions. The natural weathering and combined natural weathering with crude oil exposure of GFRV specimens revealed increased tensile strength even after 36 months of exposure when compared with that of the as received samples. However, the combined natural weathering with seawater exposure of GFRV samples revealed better tensile behavior till 24 months of exposure, and after 36 months their tensile strength was seen to be below that of the as received GFRV samples. The stress rupture behavior of natural weather exposed GFRV samples showed an improvement after 12 months of exposure and it decreased after 24 and 36 months of exposure when compared with the as received GFRV samples. The combined natural weathering with crude oil and seawater exposure of GFRV sample revealed improved

  3. Effects Of Physical And Chemical Modifications On The Disintegrant ...

    Regardless of the mode of incorporation, Tacca starch was most efficient in effecting the disintegration of the tablets and releasing their riboflavin contents in its unmodified form. In this regard, pregelatinized Tacca starch was more effective as a disintegrant than the acid hydrolysed form of the starch. Generally, fastest ...

  4. Effect of weather data aggregation on regional crop simulation for different crops, production conditions, and response variables

    Zhao, Gang; Hoffmann, Holger; Bussel, Van L.G.J.; Enders, Andreas; Specka, Xenia; Sosa, Carmen; Yeluripati, Jagadeesh; Tao, Fulu; Constantin, Julie; Raynal, Helene; Teixeira, Edmar; Grosz, Balázs; Doro, Luca; Zhao, Zhigan; Nendel, Claas; Kiese, Ralf; Eckersten, Henrik; Haas, Edwin; Vanuytrecht, Eline; Wang, Enli; Kuhnert, Matthias; Trombi, Giacomo; Moriondo, Marco; Bindi, Marco; Lewan, Elisabet; Bach, Michaela; Kersebaum, Kurt Christian; Rötter, Reimund; Roggero, Pier Paolo; Wallach, Daniel; Cammarano, Davide; Asseng, Senthold; Krauss, Gunther; Siebert, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the weather data aggregation effect (DAE) on the simulation of cropping systems for different crops, response variables, and production conditions. Using 13 processbased crop models and the ensemble mean, we simulated 30 yr continuous cropping systems for 2 crops (winter wheat and

  5. Modification of the isotope effect due to pair breaking

    Carbotte, J.P.; Greeson, M.; Perez-Gonzalez, A.

    1991-01-01

    We have calculated the effect of pair breaking on the isotope-effect coefficient (β) of a superconductor. We find that, as the pair-breaking scattering rate is increased, β also increases in absolute value. Values of β much larger than the canonical value of 1/2 can easily be achieved even in models where the electron-phonon interaction contributes only a very small amount to the value of the intrinsic critical temperature

  6. Surface modification effects on defect-related photoluminescence in colloidal CdS quantum dots.

    Lee, TaeGi; Shimura, Kunio; Kim, DaeGwi

    2018-05-03

    We investigated the effects of surface modification on the defect-related photoluminescence (PL) band in colloidal CdS quantum dots (QDs). A size-selective photoetching process and a surface modification technique with a Cd(OH)2 layer enabled the preparation of size-controlled CdS QDs with high PL efficiency. The Stokes shift of the defect-related PL band before and after the surface modification was ∼1.0 eV and ∼0.63 eV, respectively. This difference in the Stokes shifts suggests that the origin of the defect-related PL band was changed by the surface modification. Analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the surface of the CdS QDs before and after the surface modification was S rich and Cd rich, respectively. These results suggest that Cd-vacancy acceptors and S-vacancy donors affect PL processes in CdS QDs before and after the surface modification, respectively.

  7. The Effect of Weather Events on Truck Traffic Patterns Using Fixed and Mobile Traffic Sensors

    2017-12-20

    Connected vehicle applications related to road weather management and enabling systems are being designed to collect and take advantage of connected vehicle data and information transmissions to increase situational awareness, improve roadway levels ...

  8. Effects of surface atomistic modification on mechanical properties of gold nanowires

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Xu, Yuanjie; Wang, Gang-Feng; Gu, Yuantong; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Molecular dynamics simulations of surface modification effect of Au nanowires. • Surface modification can greatly affect the mechanical properties of nanowires. • Core–shell model is used to elucidate the effect of residual surface stress. - Abstract: Modulation of the physical and mechanical properties of nanowires is a challenging issue for their technological applications. In this paper, we investigate the effects of surface modification on the mechanical properties of gold nanowires by performing molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that by modifying a small density of silver atoms to the surface of a gold nanowire, the residual surface stress state can be altered, rendering a great improvement of its plastic yield strength. This finding is in good agreement with experimental measurements. The underlying physical mechanisms are analyzed by a core–shell nanowire model. The results are helpful for the design and optimization of advanced nanomaterial with superior mechanical properties

  9. 78 FR 20137 - Probable Economic Effect of Certain Modifications to the North American Free Trade Agreement...

    2013-04-03

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. TA-103-027] Probable Economic Effect of Certain... investigation No. TA-103-027, Probable Economic Effect of Certain Modifications to the North American Free Trade... reached agreement in principle with representatives of the governments of Canada and Mexico on proposed...

  10. Effect of Progesterone Therapy versus Diet Modification on ...

    2016 Journal of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow. 82. Effect of ... stools is a common cause of painful defecation and fecal ... This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons ... constipation in pregnant women compared with placebo.

  11. Effect of surface modification and hybridization on dynamic ...

    Storage and loss modulus values increased after treatments with simultaneous decrease in tan values. Roystonea regia and glass fibres were used together with varying proportions as reinforcement in epoxy matrix to study the hybridization effect on dynamic mechanical properties. Storage and loss modulus values ...

  12. The effects of beta-endorphin: state change modification.

    Veening, Jan G; Barendregt, Henk P

    2015-01-29

    Beta-endorphin (β-END) is an opioid neuropeptide which has an important role in the development of hypotheses concerning the non-synaptic or paracrine communication of brain messages. This kind of communication between neurons has been designated volume transmission (VT) to differentiate it clearly from synaptic communication. VT occurs over short as well as long distances via the extracellular space in the brain, as well as via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flowing through the ventricular spaces inside the brain and the arachnoid space surrounding the central nervous system (CNS). To understand how β-END can have specific behavioral effects, we use the notion behavioral state, inspired by the concept of machine state, coming from Turing (Proc London Math Soc, Series 2,42:230-265, 1937). In section 1.4 the sequential organization of male rat behavior is explained showing that an animal is not free to switch into another state at any given moment. Funneling-constraints restrict the number of possible behavioral transitions in specific phases while at other moments in the sequence the transition to other behavioral states is almost completely open. The effects of β-END on behaviors like food intake and sexual behavior, and the mechanisms involved in reward, meditation and pain control are discussed in detail. The effects on the sequential organization of behavior and on state transitions dominate the description of these effects.

  13. Winter weather demand considerations.

    2015-04-01

    Winter weather has varied effects on travel behavior. Using 418 survey responses from the Northern Virginia : commuting area of Washington, D.C. and binary logit models, this study examines travel related changes under : different types of winter wea...

  14. Can conservation agriculture improve phosphorus (P) availability in weathered soils? Effects of tillage and residue management on soil P status after 9 years in a Kenyan Oxisol

    Margenot, Andrew; Paul, B.K.; Pulleman, M.M.; Parikh, Sanjai; Fonte, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    The widespread promotion of conservation agriculture (CA) in regions with weathered soils prone to phosphorus (P) deficiency merits explicit consideration of its effect on P availability. A long-term CA field trial located on an acid, weathered soil in western Kenya was evaluated for effects of

  15. Forest bat population dynamics over 14 years at a climate refuge: Effects of timber harvesting and weather extremes.

    Law, Bradley S; Chidel, Mark; Law, Peter R

    2018-01-01

    Long-term data are needed to explore the interaction of weather extremes with habitat alteration; in particular, can 'refugia' buffer population dynamics against climate change and are they robust to disturbances such as timber harvesting. Because forest bats are good indicators of ecosystem health, we used 14 years (1999-2012) of mark-recapture data from a suite of small tree-hollow roosting bats to estimate survival, abundance and body condition in harvested and unharvested forest and over extreme El Niño and La Niña weather events in southeastern Australia. Trapping was replicated within an experimental forest, located in a climate refuge, with different timber harvesting treatments. We trapped foraging bats and banded 3043 with a 32% retrap rate. Mark-recapture analyses allowed for dependence of survival on time, species, sex, logging treatment and for transients. A large portion of the population remained resident, with a maximum time to recapture of nine years. The effect of logging history (unlogged vs 16-30 years post-logging regrowth) on apparent survival was minor and species specific, with no detectable effect for two species, a positive effect for one and negative for the other. There was no effect of logging history on abundance or body condition for any of these species. Apparent survival of residents was not strongly influenced by weather variation (except for the smallest species), unlike previous studies outside of refugia. Despite annual variation in abundance and body condition across the 14 years of the study, no relationship with extreme weather was evident. The location of our study area in a climate refuge potentially buffered bat population dynamics from extreme weather. These results support the value of climate refugia in mitigating climate change impacts, though the lack of an external control highlights the need for further studies on the functioning of climate refugia. Relatively stable population dynamics were not compromised by

  16. Analysis of the Effect of Prevailing Weather Conditions on the Occurrence of Grain Dust Explosions.

    Sanghi, Achint; Ambrose, R P Kingsly

    2016-07-27

    Grain dust explosions have been occurring in the U.S. for the past twenty years. In the past ten years, there have been an average of ten explosions a year, resulting in nine fatalities and 93 injuries. In more than half of these cases, the ignition source remains unidentified. The effect of ambient humidity on the likelihood of a dust explosion has been discussed for many years. However, no investigation into a possible link between the two has been carried out. In this study, we analyzed local weather data and grain dust explosions during the period 2006 to 2014 to measure potential relationships between the two events. The 84 analyzed explosions do not show any trend with regard to prevailing temperatures, or relative or absolute humidity. In addition, the ignition source could not be identified in 54 of the incidents. The majority of grain dust explosion incidents occurred at grain elevator facilities, where the dust generation potential was high compared with grain processing industries. Copyright© by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers.

  17. An Analysis of 20 Years of Space Weathering Effects on the Boeing 376 Spacecraft

    Frith, James; Anz-Meador, Phillip; Cowardin, Heather; Buckalew, Brent; Lederer, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The Boeing HS-376 spin stabilized spacecraft was a popular design that was launched continuously into geosynchronous orbit starting in 1980, with the last launch occurring in 2003. Over 50 of the HS-376 buses were produced to fulfill a variety of different communication missions for countries all over the world. The design of the bus is easily approximated as a telescoping cylinder that is covered with solar cells and an Earth-facing antenna that is despun at the top of the cylinder. The similarity in design and the number of spacecraft launched over a long period of time make the HS-376 a prime target for studying the effects of solar weathering on solar panels as a function of time. A selection of primarily non-operational HS-376 spacecraft launched over a 20-year time period were observed using the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope on Mauna Kea and multi-band, near-infrared photometry produced. Each spacecraft was observed for an entire night cycling through ZYJHK filters and time-varying colors produced to compare near-infrared color as a function of launch date. The resulting analysis shown here may help in the future to set launch date constraints on the parent object of unidentified debris objects or other unknown spacecraft.

  18. Cosmic rays and other space weather effects influenced on satellite operation, technologies, biosphere and people health

    Lev, Dorman

    2016-07-01

    Satellite anomalies (or malfunctions), including total distortion of electronics and loose of some satellites cost for Insurance Companies billions dollars per year. During especially active periods the probability of big satellite anomalies and their loosing increased very much. Now, when a great number of civil and military satellites are continuously worked for our practice life, the problem of satellite anomalies became very important. Many years ago about half of satellite anomalies were caused by technical reasons (for example, for Russian satellites Kosmos), but with time with increasing of production quality, this part became smaller and smaller. The other part, which now is dominated, caused by different space weather effects (energetic particles of CR and generated/trapped in the magnetosphere, and so on). We consider only satellite anomalies not caused by technical reasons: the total number of such anomalies about 6000 events, and separately for high and low altitude orbit satellites (5000 and about 800 events, correspondingly for high and low altitude satellites). No relation was found between low and high altitude satellite anomalies. Daily numbers of satellite anomalies, averaged by a superposed epoch method around sudden storm commencements and solar proton event onsets for high (>1500 km) and low (railway operation (possible, through induction currents), catastrophes in long-distance electric power lines and transformators, and in other ground technologies.

  19. Effects of Space Weather on Geosynchronous Electromagnetic Spacecraft Perturbations Using Statistical Fluxes

    Hughes, J.; Schaub, H.

    2017-12-01

    Spacecraft can charge to very negative voltages at GEO due to interactions with the space plasma. This can cause arcing which can damage spacecraft electronics or solar panels. Recently, it has been suggested that spacecraft charging may lead to orbital perturbations which change the orbits of lightweight uncontrolled debris orbits significantly. The motions of High Area to Mass Ratio objects are not well explained with just perturbations from Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP) and earth, moon, and sun gravity. A charged spacecraft will experience a Lorentz force as the spacecraft moves relative to Earth's magnetic field, as well as a Lorentz torque and eddy current torques if the object is rotating. Prior work assuming a constant "worst case" voltage has shown that Lorentz and eddy torques can cause quite large orbital changes by rotating the object to experience more or less SRP. For some objects, including or neglecting these electromagnetic torques can lead to differences of thousands of kilometers after only two orbits. This paper will further investigate the effects of electromagnetic perturbations by using a charging model that uses measured flux distributions to better simulate natural charging. This differs from prior work which used a constant voltage or Maxwellian distributions. This is done to a calm space weather case of Kp = 2 and a stormy case where Kp = 8. Preliminary analysis suggests that electrostatics will still cause large orbital changes even with the more realistic charging model.

  20. Study on modification of radiation effects in mammalian fetuses

    Nakajima, Kiyoto; Kawamata, Akitoshi; Goto, Toshifumi (Asahi Univ., Hozumi, Gifu (Japan). School of Dentistry) (and others)

    1990-10-01

    In searches for the potential application of mouse whole-embryo culture, combined effects of x radiation and cadmium or hyperthermia were examined with cultures of 8-day and 11-day mouse embryos. Combination of x radiation and cadmium had synergistic action on both in vitro and in vivo teratogenesis of mouse embryos. When irradiation was given 30 minutes before and after the administration of cadmium in 11-day mouse embryos, interaction factor values for cleft palate were 8.53 and 9.09, respectively. This revealed that the order of giving radiation and cadmium was independent of synergistic action. When low doses of radiation was combined with non-teratogenic hyperthermia, synergistic action occurred in vitro. This was more noticeable when combined with lower doses of x radiation. Low doses of x radiation are of great concern to human embryos or fetuses who may sustain potential exposures to them. (N.K.) 96 refs.

  1. Study on modification of radiation effects in mammalian fetuses

    Nakajima, Kiyoto; Kawamata, Akitoshi; Goto, Toshifumi

    1990-01-01

    In searches for the potential application of mouse whole-embryo culture, combined effects of x radiation and cadmium or hyperthermia were examined with cultures of 8-day and 11-day mouse embryos. Combination of x radiation and cadmium had synergistic action on both in vitro and in vivo teratogenesis of mouse embryos. When irradiation was given 30 minutes before and after the administration of cadmium in 11-day mouse embryos, interaction factor values for cleft palate were 8.53 and 9.09, respectively. This revealed that the order of giving radiation and cadmium was independent of synergistic action. When low doses of radiation was combined with non-teratogenic hyperthermia, synergistic action occurred in vitro. This was more noticeable when combined with lower doses of x radiation. Low doses of x radiation are of great concern to human embryos or fetuses who may sustain potential exposures to them. (N.K.) 96 refs

  2. Effect of Surface Modification and Macrophage Phenotype on Particle Internalization

    Wang, Daniel [Iowa State University; Phan, Ngoc [Iowa State University; Isely, Christopher [Iowa State University; Bruene, Lucas [Iowa State University; Bratlie, Kaitlin M [Ames Laboratory

    2014-11-10

    Material properties play a key role in the cellular internalization of polymeric particles. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of material characteristics such as water contact angle, zeta potential, melting temperature, and alternative activation of complement on particle internalization for pro-inflammatory, pro-angiogenic, and naïve macrophages by using biopolymers (~600 nm), functionalized with 13 different molecules. Understanding how material parameters influence particle internalization for different macrophage phenotypes is important for targeted delivery to specific cell populations. Here, we demonstrate that material parameters affect the alternative pathway of complement activation as well as particle internalization for different macrophage phenotypes. Here, we show that the quantitative structure–activity relationship method (QSAR) previously used to predict physiochemical properties of materials can be applied to targeting different macrophage phenotypes. These findings demonstrated that targeted drug delivery to macrophages could be achieved by exploiting material parameters.

  3. Effects of Climate on Co-evolution of Weathering Profiles and Hillscapes

    Anderson, R. S.; Rajaram, H.; Anderson, S. P.

    2017-12-01

    Considerable debate revolves around the relative importance of rock type, tectonics, and climate in creating the architecture of the critical zone. It has recently been proposed that differences in the depths and patterns of weathering between landscapes in Colorado's Front Range and South Carolina's piedmont can be attributed to the state of stress in the rock imposed by the magnitude and orientation the regional stresses with respect to the ridgelines (St. Claire et al., 2016). We argue for the importance of the climate, and in particular, in temperate regions, the amount of recharge. We employ numerical models of hillslope evolution between bounding erosional channels, in which the degree of rock weathering governs the rate of transformation of rock to soil. As the water table drapes between the stream channels, fresh rock is brought into the weathering zone at a rate governed by the rate of incision of the channels. We track the chemical weathering of rock, represented by alteration of feldspar to clays, which in turn requires calculation of the concentration of reactive species in the water along hydrologic flow paths. We present results from analytic solutions to the flow field in which travel times can be efficiently assessed. Below the water table, flow paths are hyperbolic, taking on considerable lateral components as they veer toward the bounding channels that serve as drains to the hillslope. We find that if water is far from equilibrium with respect to weatherable minerals at the water table, as occurs in wet, slowly-eroding landscapes, deep weathering can occur well below the water table to levels approximating the base of the bounding channels. In dry climates, on the other hand, the weathering zone is limited to a shallow surface - parallel layer. These models capture the essence of the observed differences in depth to fresh rock in both wet and dry climates without appeal to the state of stress in the rock.

  4. Effect of modification substrate on the microstructure of hydroxyapatite coating

    Realpe-Jaramillo, J; Morales-Morales, J A; González-Sánchez, J A; Cabanzo, R; Mejía-Ospino, E; Rodríguez-Pereira, J

    2017-01-01

    Bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings were fabricated by a precipitation, sol-gel and dip-coating method. The effects of the aging time and the base used to adjust pH and substrate materials on the phases and microstructures of HA coatings were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy FESEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy EDS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy XPS, and the vibrations of the phosphate groups were determined by Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that all the films were composed of the phases of TiO 2 and HA. With coated titanium substrate with TiO 2 , the crystallinity of the HA coating increases, the structure became more compact and the Ca/P ratio increased because of the loss of P in the films. The addition of sodium hydroxide (adjusting the pH level to about 10) can increase the HA content in the coating. XPS and EDS results for steel substrate and titanium showed poor calcium content as obtained with a Ca/P ratio of 1.38 and 1.58, respectively, composition is similar to that of natural apatite. However, spectroscopic results suggest the presence of a mixture of hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate. The different substrate materials have a high influence on the microstructure of the separated double films. However, hydroxyapatite nanopowders coatings were obtained using a simple method, with potential biomedical applications. (paper)

  5. Effect of modification substrate on the microstructure of hydroxyapatite coating

    Realpe-Jaramillo, J.; Morales-Morales, J. A.; González-Sánchez, J. A.; Cabanzo, R.; Mejía-Ospino, E.; Rodríguez-Pereira, J.

    2017-01-01

    Bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings were fabricated by a precipitation, sol-gel and dip-coating method. The effects of the aging time and the base used to adjust pH and substrate materials on the phases and microstructures of HA coatings were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy FESEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy EDS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy XPS, and the vibrations of the phosphate groups were determined by Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that all the films were composed of the phases of TiO2 and HA. With coated titanium substrate with TiO2, the crystallinity of the HA coating increases, the structure became more compact and the Ca/P ratio increased because of the loss of P in the films. The addition of sodium hydroxide (adjusting the pH level to about 10) can increase the HA content in the coating. XPS and EDS results for steel substrate and titanium showed poor calcium content as obtained with a Ca/P ratio of 1.38 and 1.58, respectively, composition is similar to that of natural apatite. However, spectroscopic results suggest the presence of a mixture of hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate. The different substrate materials have a high influence on the microstructure of the separated double films. However, hydroxyapatite nanopowders coatings were obtained using a simple method, with potential biomedical applications.

  6. Phase-dependent space weathering effects and spectroscopic identification of retained helium in a lunar soil grain

    Burgess, K. D.; Stroud, R. M.

    2018-03-01

    The solar wind is an important driver of space weathering on airless bodies. Over time, solar wind exposure alters the physical, chemical, and optical properties of exposed materials and can also impart a significant amount of helium into the surfaces of these bodies. However, common materials on the surface of the Moon, such as glass, crystalline silicates, and oxides, have highly variable responses to solar wind irradiation. We used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to examine the morphology and chemistry of a single grain of lunar soil that includes silicate glass, chromite and ilmenite, all present and exposed along the same surface. The exposure of the silicate glass and oxides to the same space weathering conditions allows for direct comparisons of the responses of natural materials to the complex lunar surface environment. The silicate glass shows minimal effects of solar wind irradiation, whereas both the chromite and ilmenite exhibit defect-rich rims that currently contain trapped helium. Only the weathered rim in ilmenite is rich in nanophase metallic iron (npFe0) and larger vesicles that retain helium at a range of internal pressures. The multiple exposed surfaces of the single grain of ilmenite demonstrate strong crystallographic controls of planar defects and non-spherical npFe0. The direct spectroscopic identification of helium in the vesicles and planar defects in the oxides provides additional evidence of the central role of solar wind irradiation in the formation of some common space weathering features.

  7. Basis for paleoenvironmental interpretation of magnetic properties of sediment from Upper Klamath Lake (Oregon): Effects of weathering and mineralogical sorting

    Rosenbaum, J.G.; Reynolds, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of magnetic properties enable reconstruction of environmental conditions that affected magnetic minerals incorporated in sediments from Upper Klamath Lake. Analyses of stream sediment samples from throughout the catchment of Upper Klamath Lake show that alteration of Fe-oxide minerals during subaerial chemical weathering of basic volcanic rocks has significantly changed magnetic properties of surficial deposits. Titanomagnetite, which is abundant both as phenocrysts and as microcrystals in fresh volcanic rocks, is progressively destroyed during weathering. Because fine-grained magnetite is readily altered due to large surface-to-volume ratios, weathering causes an increase in average magnetic grain size as well as reduction in the quantity of titanomagnetite both absolutely and relative to hematite. Hydrodynamic mineralogical sorting also produces differences in magnetic properties among rock and mineral grains of differing sizes. Importantly, removal of coarse silicate and Fe-oxide grains by sorting concentrated extremely fine-grained magnetite in the resulting sediment. The effects of weathering and sorting of minerals cannot be completely separated. These processes combine to produce the magnetic properties of a non-glacial lithic component of Upper Klamath Lake sediments, which is characterized by relatively low magnetite content and coarse magnetic grain size. Hydrodynamic sorting alone causes significant differences between the magnetic properties of glacial flour in lake sediments and of fresh volcanic rocks in the catchment. In comparison to source volcanic rocks, glacial flour in the lake sediment is highly enriched in extremely fine-grained magnetite.

  8. Effects of weather and heliophysical conditions on emergency ambulance calls for elevated arterial blood pressure.

    Vencloviene, Jone; Babarskiene, Ruta M; Dobozinskas, Paulius; Sakalyte, Gintare; Lopatiene, Kristina; Mikelionis, Nerijus

    2015-02-27

    We hypothesized that weather and space weather conditions were associated with the exacerbation of essential hypertension. The study was conducted during 2009-2010 in the city of Kaunas, Lithuania. We analyzed 13,475 cards from emergency ambulance calls (EACs), in which the conditions for the emergency calls were made coded I.10-I.15. The Kaunas Weather Station provided daily records of air temperature (T), wind speed (WS), relative humidity, and barometric pressure (BP). We evaluated the associations between daily weather variables and daily number of EACs by applying a multivariate Poisson regression. Unfavorable heliophysical conditions (two days after the active-stormy geomagnetic field or the days with solar WS>600 km/s) increased the daily number of elevated arterial blood pressure (EABP) by 12% (RR=1.12; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.21); and WS≥3.5 knots during days of Tweather conditions. These results may help in the understanding of the population's sensitivity to different weather conditions.

  9. Plausible Effect of Weather on Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation with a Coupled General Circulation Model

    Liu, Zedong; Wan, Xiuquan

    2018-04-01

    The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is a vital component of the global ocean circulation and the heat engine of the climate system. Through the use of a coupled general circulation model, this study examines the role of synoptic systems on the AMOC and presents evidence that internally generated high-frequency, synoptic-scale weather variability in the atmosphere could play a significant role in maintaining the overall strength and variability of the AMOC, thereby affecting climate variability and change. Results of a novel coupling technique show that the strength and variability of the AMOC are greatly reduced once the synoptic weather variability is suppressed in the coupled model. The strength and variability of the AMOC are closely linked to deep convection events at high latitudes, which could be strongly affected by the weather variability. Our results imply that synoptic weather systems are important in driving the AMOC and its variability. Thus, interactions between atmospheric weather variability and AMOC may be an important feedback mechanism of the global climate system and need to be taken into consideration in future climate change studies.

  10. The effect of weather on morphometric traits of juvenile cliff swallows

    Roche, Erin A.; Brown, Mary Bomberger; Brown, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Episodes of food deprivation may change how nestling birds allocate energy to the growth of skeletal and feather morphological traits during development. Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) are colonial, insectivorous birds that regularly experience brief periods of severe weather-induced food deprivation during the nesting season which may affect offspring development. We investigated how annual variation in timing of rearing and weather were associated with length of wing and tail, skeletal traits, and body mass in juvenile cliff swallows reared in southwestern Nebraska during 2001–2006. As predicted under conditions of food deprivation, nestling skeletal and feather measurements were generally smaller in cooler years. However, variability explained by weather was small, suggesting that morphometric traits of juvenile cliff swallows were not highly sensitive to weather conditions experienced during this study. Measurements of juvenile morphological traits were positively correlated with measurements taken as adults, meaning that any variation among juveniles in response to rearing conditions showed evidence of persisting into a bird’s first breeding season. Our results show that body size in this species is phenotypically plastic and influenced, in part, by weather variables.

  11. Economic Effects of Precipitation Enhancement in the Corn Belt.

    Gapcia, Philip; Changnon, Stanley; Pinar, Musa

    1990-01-01

    Policy formulation in weather modification requires an understanding of the economic effects from altered weather. The focus of this study is to provide insight into the beneficiaries of a functioning weather modification technology when applied at various spatial and temporal levels. An econometric model which links the corn/scybean production to U.S. cattle, hog and poultry sectors is used to determine the effects of precipitation enhancement in the U.S. Corn Belt, a humid climatic region. A regional supply formulation permits assessment of weather modification on production, prices, revenues to producers, and savings in consumers expenditures on meat. The results provide insight into the distribution of economic effects, emphasize the importance of careful planning in the use of weather modification technology, and provide useful information on the roles of local, state, and federal governments in the support of weather modification.

  12. Effect of Reaction Conditions on the Surface Modification of Cellulose Nanofibrils with Aminopropyl Triethoxysilane

    Eduardo Robles

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nine different surface modifications of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (ATS by using three different solvent systems (water, ethanol, and a mixture of both were investigated. The effect of reaction conditions, such as silane to cellulose ratio and solvent type were evaluated to determine their contribution to the extent of the silane modification. Nanofibril properties were evaluated by infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, surface free energy, thermogravimetry, 13C and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance, and electronic microscopy. The influence of the solvent in the solvolysis of the silane was reflected in the presence or absence of ethoxy groups in the silane. On the other hand, whereas the surface modification was increased directly proportionally to silane ratio on the reaction, the aggregation of nanofibrils was also increased, which can play a negative role in certain applications. The increment of silane modification also had substantial repercussions on the crystallinity of the nanofibrils by the addition of amorphous components to the crystalline unit; moreover, silane surface modifications enhanced the hydrophobic character of the nanofibrils.

  13. Combinatory Effects of Texture and Aroma Modification on Taste Perception of Model Gels

    Knoop, J.E.; Sala, G.; Smit, G.; Stieger, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effects of texture modification and aroma-induced sweetness enhancement were systematically investigated in apple-flavored semi-solid Na-caseinate gels. Gels containing apple juice as a basic flavor were developed differing in stiffness, brittleness and serum release (texture

  14. Effects of inbreeding and genetic modification on Aedes aegypti larval competition and adult energy reserves

    Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Kormaksson, M.; Harrington, L.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background - Genetic modification of mosquitoes offers a promising strategy for the prevention and control of mosquito-borne diseases. For such a strategy to be effective, it is critically important that engineered strains are competitive enough to serve their intended function in population

  15. Effects of Lexical Modification on Incidental Vocabulary Acquisition of Iranian EFL Students

    Negari, Giti Mousapour; Rouhi, Mahdieh

    2012-01-01

    The present article reports on the results of a study designed to investigate the effects of two types of lexical modification i.e., lexical simplification and elaboration, on incidental vocabulary acquisition of Iranian EFL learners.To this end, four versions of experimental texts containing 20 target words were created: baseline and simplified…

  16. The effects of linguistic modification on ESL students' comprehension of nursing course test items.

    Bosher, Susan; Bowles, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    Recent research has indicated that language may be a source of construct-irrelevant variance for non-native speakers of English, or English as a second language (ESL) students, when they take exams. As a result, exams may not accurately measure knowledge of nursing content. One accommodation often used to level the playing field for ESL students is linguistic modification, a process by which the reading load of test items is reduced while the content and integrity of the item are maintained. Research on the effects of linguistic modification has been conducted on examinees in the K-12 population, but is just beginning in other areas. This study describes the collaborative process by which items from a pathophysiology exam were linguistically modified and subsequently evaluated for comprehensibility by ESL students. Findings indicate that in a majority of cases, modification improved examinees' comprehension of test items. Implications for test item writing and future research are discussed.

  17. Are stock market returns related to the weather effects? Empirical evidence from Taiwan

    Chang, Tsangyao; Nieh, Chien-Chung; Yang, Ming Jing; Yang, Tse-Yu

    2006-05-01

    In this study, we employ a recently developed econometric technique of the threshold model with the GJR-GARCH process on error terms to investigate the relationships between weather factors and stock market returns in Taiwan using daily data for the period of 1 July 1997-22 October 2003. The major weather factors studied include temperature, humidity, and cloud cover. Our empirical evidence shows that temperature and cloud cover are two important weather factors that affect the stock returns in Taiwan. Our empirical findings further support the previous arguments that advocate the inclusion of economically neutral behavioral variables in asset pricing models. These results also have significant implications for individual investors and financial institutions planning to invest in the Taiwan stock market.

  18. Effects of Space Weathering on Reflectance Spectra of Ureilites: First Studies

    Goodrich, C. A.; Gillis-Davis, J.; Cloutis, E.; Applin, D.; Takir, D.; Hibbitts, C.; Christoffersen, R.; Fries, M.; Klima, R.; Decker, S.

    2018-01-01

    Ureilites are differentiated meteorites (ultramafic rocks interpreted to be mantle residues) that contain as much carbon as the most carbon-rich carbonaceous chondrites (CCs). Reflectance spectra of ureilites are similar to those of some CCs. Hence, ureilitic asteroids may accidentally be categorized as primitive because their spectra could resemble those of C-complex asteroids, which are thought to be CC-like. We began spectral studies of progressively laser-weathered ureilites with the goals of predicting UV-VIS-IR spectra of ureilitic asteroids, and identifying features that could distinguish differentiated from primitive dark asteroids. Space weathering has not previously been studied for ureilites, and, based on space weathering studies of CCs and other C-rich materials, it could significantly alter their reflectance spectra.

  19. Feedbacks between air pollution and weather, part 2: Effects on chemistry

    Makar, P. A.; Gong, W.; Hogrefe, C.; Zhang, Y.; Curci, G.; Žabkar, R.; Milbrandt, J.; Im, U.; Balzarini, A.; Baró, R.; Bianconi, R.; Cheung, P.; Forkel, R.; Gravel, S.; Hirtl, M.; Honzak, L.; Hou, A.; Jiménez-Guerrero, P.; Langer, M.; Moran, M. D.; Pabla, B.; Pérez, J. L.; Pirovano, G.; San José, R.; Tuccella, P.; Werhahn, J.; Zhang, J.; Galmarini, S.

    2015-08-01

    Fully-coupled air-quality models running in ;feedback; and ;no-feedback; configurations were compared against each other and observation network data as part of Phase 2 of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative. In the ;no-feedback; mode, interactions between meteorology and chemistry through the aerosol direct and indirect effects were disabled, with the models reverting to climatologies of aerosol properties, or a no-aerosol weather simulation, while in the ;feedback; mode, the model-generated aerosols were allowed to modify the models' radiative transfer and/or cloud formation processes. Annual simulations with and without feedbacks were conducted for domains in North America for the years 2006 and 2010, and for Europe for the year 2010. Comparisons against observations via annual statistics show model-to-model variation in performance is greater than the within-model variation associated with feedbacks. However, during the summer and during intense emission events such as the Russian forest fires of 2010, feedbacks have a significant impact on the chemical predictions of the models. The aerosol indirect effect was usually found to dominate feedbacks compared to the direct effect. The impacts of direct and indirect effects were often shown to be in competition, for predictions of ozone, particulate matter and other species. Feedbacks were shown to result in local and regional shifts of ozone-forming chemical regime, between NOx- and VOC-limited environments. Feedbacks were shown to have a substantial influence on biogenic hydrocarbon emissions and concentrations: North American simulations incorporating both feedbacks resulted in summer average isoprene concentration decreases of up to 10%, while European direct effect simulations during the Russian forest fire period resulted in grid average isoprene changes of -5 to +12.5%. The atmospheric transport and chemistry of large emitting sources such as plumes from forest fires and large cities

  20. Use of a Data-Linked Weather Information Display and Effects on Pilot Navigation Decision Making in a Piloted Simulation Study

    Yuchnovicz, Daniel E.; Novacek, Paul F.; Burgess, Malcolm A.; Heck, Michael L.; Stokes, Alan F.

    2001-01-01

    This study provides recommendations to the FAA and to prospective manufacturers based on an exploration of the effects of data link weather displays upon pilot decision performance. An experiment was conducted with twenty-four current instrument rated pilots who were divided into two equal groups and presented with a challenging but realistic flight scenario involving weather containing significant embedded convective activity. All flights were flown in a full-mission simulation facility within instrument meteorological conditions. The inflight weather display depicted NexRad images, graphical METARs and textual METARs. The objective was to investigate the potential for misuse of a weather display, and incorporate recommendations for the design and use of these displays. The primary conclusion of the study found that the inflight weather display did not improve weather avoidance decision making. Some of the reasons to support this finding include: the pilot's inability to easily perceive their proximity to the storms, increased workload and difficulty in deciphering METAR textual data. The compelling nature of a graphical weather display caused many pilots to reduce their reliance on corroborating weather information from other sources. Minor changes to the weather display could improve the ability of a pilot to make better decisions on hazard avoidance.

  1. THE EFFECT OF EDUCATION USING MODIFICATION MODULE TOWARDS NUTRITIONAL INTAKE DURING PREGNANCY IN KENDARI, INDONESIA

    Kartini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Energy metabolism speeds up during pregnancy that requires pregnant women to have extra amount of nutritions. Provision of education on nutrition during pregnancy is an effort to prevent and tackle malnutrition. Aim: This study aimed to determine the effect of education using modification module towards nutritional intake during pregnancy in Kendari, Indonesia Methods: This was Quasi Experimental study with pre-post design. There were 4 groups in this study, which were: 1 The group that received educational intervention using a modification module from the MHC book of the Department of Health, 2 The group that received educational intervention using MHC book of the Department of Health, 3 The group that only used modification modules from MHC book of the Department of Health, and 4 The group that only used the MHC book of Department of Health. The intervention was given for 6 months. Seventy eight of 4-months pregnant women were selected in this study. Data were collected by using 24 hours food recall instrument, and questionnaire adopted from Child and Maternal Nutrition Survey’s Questionnaire of Faculty of Public Health, Hasanuddin University. Data were analyzed by using Wilcoxon test and Kruskal Wallis test. Results: Results showed there was an effect of education by using the module modifications to the intake of nutritions during pregnancy. Increased nutrient intake was higher in pregnant women using a module class modifications. Conclusion: Education affects nutritional intake of pregnant women. Changes in nutritional intake was higher in group 1 (education modules with modifications, compared with the education group MCH handbook. It is suggested that mothers should improve the nutrition during pregnancy for the better growth of the fetus, composition and metabolic changes in the mother's body.

  2. Weather forecast

    Courtier, P

    1994-02-07

    Weather prediction is performed using the numerical model of the atmosphere evolution.The evolution equations are derived from the Navier Stokes equation for the adiabatic part but the are very much complicated by the change of phase of water, the radiation porocess and the boundary layer.The technique used operationally is described. Weather prediction is an initial value problem and accurate initial conditions need to be specified. Due to the small number of observations available (105 ) as compared to the dimension of the model state variable (107),the problem is largely underdetermined. Techniques of optimal control and inverse problems are used and have been adapted to the large dimension of our problem. our problem.The at mosphere is a chaotic system; the implication for weather prediction is discussed. Ensemble prediction is used operationally and the technique for generating initial conditions which lead to a numerical divergence of the subsequent forecasts is described.

  3. Weather swap as an instrument for weather risk management in wheat production

    Marković Todor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A special type of weather derivatives are weather forwards and they exists mostly in the form of weather swaps. Hedging effectiveness in wheat production with and without weather swap was analyzed in this paper using stochastic dominance. The results show that the effect of risk reduction is significant using weather swap, but geographical- basis risk and production-related basis risk are important factor that reduce the utility of weather derivatives.

  4. Assessment and prevention of acute health effects of weather conditions in Europe, the PHEWE project: background, objectives, design

    Anderson Hugh

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The project "Assessment and prevention of acute health effects of weather conditions in Europe" (PHEWE had the aim of assessing the association between weather conditions and acute health effects, during both warm and cold seasons in 16 European cities with widely differing climatic conditions and to provide information for public health policies. Methods The PHEWE project was a three-year pan-European collaboration between epidemiologists, meteorologists and experts in public health. Meteorological, air pollution and mortality data from 16 cities and hospital admission data from 12 cities were available from 1990 to 2000. The short-term effect on mortality/morbidity was evaluated through city-specific and pooled time series analysis. The interaction between weather and air pollutants was evaluated and health impact assessments were performed to quantify the effect on the different populations. A heat/health watch warning system to predict oppressive weather conditions and alert the population was developed in a subgroup of cities and information on existing prevention policies and of adaptive strategies was gathered. Results Main results were presented in a symposium at the conference of the International Society of Environmental Epidemiology in Paris on September 6th 2006 and will be published as scientific articles. The present article introduces the project and includes a description of the database and the framework of the applied methodology. Conclusion The PHEWE project offers the opportunity to investigate the relationship between temperature and mortality in 16 European cities, representing a wide range of climatic, socio-demographic and cultural characteristics; the use of a standardized methodology allows for direct comparison between cities.

  5. Training for Effective National Weather Service (NWS) Communication in Chat and Conference Calls

    Pearce, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Staff of the National Weather Service Offices should be able to understand interpersonal communication and public relations in order to better serve their mission to "protect lives and property" as well as work with their internal and external partners (NWS Internet Services Team). Two technologies have been developed to assist the integration of…

  6. Thermodynamic Study on the Effects of Minor Constituents on Cold Weather Performance of Biodiesel

    Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel made from vegetable oils, animal fats and other lipid feedstocks. Fuel properties and performance of biodiesel during cold weather are influenced by factors related to its feedstock, namely fatty acid composition and trace concentrations of monoacylglycerols,...

  7. Release of Aged Contaminants from weathered sediments: Effects of sorbate speciation on scaling of reactive transport

    Chorover, Jon [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Perdrial, Nico [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Mueller, Karl [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Strepka, Caleb [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); O' Day, Peggy [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Rivera, Nelson [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chang, Hyun-Shik [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Steefel, Carl [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Thompson, Aaron [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2012-08-14

    Hanford sediments impacted by hyperalkaline high level radioactive waste have undergone incongruent silicate mineral weathering concurrent with contaminant uptake (Chorover et al., 2008). In this project, we studied the impact of background pore water (BPW) on strontium, cesium and iodine desorption and transport in Hanford sediments that were experimentally weathered by contact with simulated hyperalkaline tank waste leachate (STWL) solutions. Using those lab-weathered Hanford sediments (HS) and model precipitates formed during nucleation from homogeneous STWL solutions (HN), we (i) provided thorough characterization of reaction products over a matrix of field-relevant gradients in contaminant concentration, PCO2, and reaction time; (ii) improved molecular-scale understanding of how sorbate speciation controls contaminant desorption from weathered sediments upon removal of caustic sources; and (iii) developed a mechanistic, predictive model of meso- to field-scale contaminant reactive transport under these conditions. Below, we provide some detailed descriptions of our results from this three year study, recently completed following a one-year no cost extension.

  8. Release of aged contaminants from weathered sediments: Effects of sorbate speciation on scaling of reactive transport

    Chorover, Jon; Perdrial, Nico; Mueller, Karl; Strepka, Caleb; O’Day, Peggy; Rivera, Nelson; Um, Wooyong; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Steefel, Carl; Thompson, Aaron

    2012-11-05

    Hanford sediments impacted by hyperalkaline high level radioactive waste have undergone incongruent silicate mineral weathering concurrent with contaminant uptake. In this project, we studied the impact of background pore water (BPW) on strontium, cesium and iodine desorption and transport in Hanford sediments that were experimentally weathered by contact with simulated hyperalkaline tank waste leachate (STWL) solutions. Using those lab-weathered Hanford sediments (HS) and model precipitates formed during nucleation from homogeneous STWL solutions (HN), we (i) provided thorough characterization of reaction products over a matrix of field-relevant gradients in contaminant concentration, partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and reaction time; (ii) improved molecular-scale understanding of how sorbate speciation controls contaminant desorption from weathered sediments upon removal of caustic sources; and (iii) developed a mechanistic, predictive model of meso- to field-scale contaminant reactive transport under these conditions. In this final report, we provide detailed descriptions of our results from this three-year study, completed in 2012 following a one-year no cost extension.

  9. Weather effects in rheumatoid arthritis: from controversy to concensus. A review

    Patberg, Wiebe R.; Rasker, Johannes J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review and evaluate the evidence for the widespread view that signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are influenced, or even caused, by the weather. METHODS: A literature search from 1985 to April 2003 was performed using the PubMed database of the US National Library of

  10. Weather effects in rheumatoid arthritis : From controversy to consensus. A review

    Patberg, WR; Rasker, JJ

    Objective. To review and evaluate the evidence for the widespread view that signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are influenced, or even caused, by the weather. Methods. A literature search from 1985 to April 2003 was performed using the PubMed database of the US National Library of

  11. [Effect of antecedent dry weather period on urban storm runoff pollution load].

    Li, Li-qing; Yin, Cheng-qing; Kong, Ling-li; He, Qing-ci

    2007-10-01

    Twelve storm events were surveyed at Shilipu catchment in Wuhan City through three-year monitoring regime. The flow discharges, total suspended solids (TSS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) in runoff were measured to study the mechanism of urban stormwater runoff pollution. The relationship between the event pollution load and the antecedent dry weather period was identified to discuss the influence of the urban surface sanitation management, operation of sewer pipe maintenance and rainfall characteristics on the urban stormwater runoff pollution. It was found that the antecedent dry weather period and runoff amount were the important determining factors in the generation of urban stormwater runoff pollution. The event pollution load was positively correlated to the antecedent dry weather period between two rainfall events (R2 = 0.95, p pollution loads. The best regression equation to estimate pollution load for storm events was developed based on the antecedent dry weather period and runoff depth. Source control including improving urban street sweeping activities and operation of sewer pipe maintenance should be made to reduce the amount of available pollutant over the dry days. It is important alternative to control urban stormwater runoff pollution for Hanyang District.

  12. Temporal, seasonal and weather effects on cycle volume: an ecological study

    Tin Tin Sandar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cycling has the potential to provide health, environmental and economic benefits but the level of cycling is very low in New Zealand and many other countries. Adverse weather is often cited as a reason why people do not cycle. This study investigated temporal and seasonal variability in cycle volume and its association with weather in Auckland, New Zealand's largest city. Methods Two datasets were used: automated cycle count data collected on Tamaki Drive in Auckland by using ZELT Inductive Loop Eco-counters and weather data (gust speed, rain, temperature, sunshine duration available online from the National Climate Database. Analyses were undertaken using data collected over one year (1 January to 31 December 2009. Normalised cycle volumes were used in correlation and regression analyses to accommodate differences by hour of the day and day of the week and holiday. Results In 2009, 220,043 bicycles were recorded at the site. There were significant differences in mean hourly cycle volumes by hour of the day, day type and month of the year (p p Conclusions There are temporal and seasonal variations in cycle volume in Auckland and weather significantly influences hour-to-hour and day-to-day variations in cycle volume. Our findings will help inform future cycling promotion activities in Auckland.

  13. Uncertainty Forecasts Improve Weather-Related Decisions and Attenuate the Effects of Forecast Error

    Joslyn, Susan L.; LeClerc, Jared E.

    2012-01-01

    Although uncertainty is inherent in weather forecasts, explicit numeric uncertainty estimates are rarely included in public forecasts for fear that they will be misunderstood. Of particular concern are situations in which precautionary action is required at low probabilities, often the case with severe events. At present, a categorical weather…

  14. Effect of phase change materials on indoor thermal environment under different weather conditions and over a long time

    Ling, Haoshu; Chen, Chao; Wei, Shen; Guan, Yong; Ma, Caiwen; Xie, Guangya; Li, Na; Chen, Ziguang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Indicators evaluating the performance of PCMs in greenhouses are introduced. • Real equivalent specific heat capacity of PCMs is embedded in a numerical model. • Real behaviour of PCMs has been monitored over a long time. • Efficiency of PCMs walls are compared for sunny and cloudy days. • Heat storage and release amounts of PCMs walls have been calculated. - Abstract: To evaluate the effect of phase change materials (PCMs) on the indoor thermal environment of greenhouses under different weather conditions and over a long time in the heating season, a study was carried out using both experimental method and numerical method. The study was conducted in a typical greenhouse located in Beijing, China, and important parameters have been monitored continuously for 61 days, including indoor air temperature, outdoor air temperature, solar radiation, surface temperature of greenhouse envelopes and soil temperature. Based on these parameters, a number of indicators, namely, operative temperature, daily effective accumulative temperature, irradiated surface temperature of the north wall, average temperature of PCMs, and daily heat storage and release, have been used to evaluate the performance of PCMs in greenhouses. All indicators have provided consistent results that confirm the positive effect of PCMs on improving the indoor thermal environment of greenhouses over a long time. Additionally, the paper has demonstrated that a sunny weather could help to promote the efficiency of PCMs, comparing to a cloudy weather

  15. Evaluation of the NOAA CAREERS Weather Camp's Effectiveness in Promoting Atmospheric Science amongst High School Students

    Olgin, J. G.; Fitzgerald, R. M.; Morris, V. R.

    2013-12-01

    The NOAA Center for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) sponsors the Channeling Atmospheric Research into Educational Experiences Reaching Students program (CAREERS); a program that manages a network of weather camps for students in secondary education with particular focus on increasing access for students from traditionally underrepresented backgrounds. Hosted by a college or university, the primary mission goals of the program are to engage students in discussions, lectures and interactive projects to better learn and comprehend a suite of atmospheric science disciplines (i.e. weather forecasting, environmental modeling, atmospheric data acquisition), and guide talented students towards higher education to pursue careers in atmospheric science primarily, or toward other STEM field professions. The need to evaluate and analyze the program's efficacy is crucial for continued growth and sustainability. Therefore a means to identify and measure the success of the program's initiatives will be addressed. Two Hispanic serving institutions, the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and the University of Puerto Rico in Mayaguez (UPRM), both hosted the CAREER weather camps during the summers of 2012 and 2013, and provide the basis of this initial analysis. Participants performed entrance surveys of their knowledge of atmospheric science prior to the course. They were then re-evaluated through exit surveys over the topics covered during the weather camp. These data will be analyzed to correlate which program activities worked best in increasing participant awareness (i.e. geology tours of the local area, discussion on local climate variations, geophysical and geochemical demonstrations), and comprehension of atmospheric science. A comparison between the two universities on their uniqueness in program design and execution will also highlight those activities that best progressed CAREERS' program goals. Results from this analysis, along with possible new strategies for improved

  16. Dissolution of multi-component LNAPL gasolines: The effects of weathering and composition

    Lekmine, Greg; Bastow, Trevor P.; Johnston, Colin D.; Davis, Greg B.

    2014-05-01

    The composition of light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) gasoline and other petroleum products changes profoundly over their life once released into aquifers. However limited attention has been given to how such changes affect key parameters such as the activity coefficients which control partitioning of components of petroleum fuel into groundwater and are used to predict long-term risk from fuel releases. Laboratory experiments were conducted on a range of fresh, weathered and synthetic gasoline mixtures designed to mimic the expected changes in composition in an aquifer. Weathered gasoline created under controlled evaporation and water washing, and naturally weathered gasoline, were investigated. Equilibrium concentrations in water and molar fractions in the gasoline mixtures were compared with equilibrium concentrations predicted by Raoult's law assuming ideal behaviour of the solutions. The experiments carried out allowed the relative sensitivity of the activity coefficients of key risk drivers such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) compounds to be quantified with respect to the presence of other types of compounds and where the source LNAPL had undergone different types of weathering. Results differed for the mixtures examined but in some cases higher than predicted dissolved equilibrium concentrations showed non-ideal behaviour for toluene, benzene and xylenes. Comparison of the activity coefficients showed that the naturally weathered gasoline and a 50% evaporated unleaded gasoline present a similar range of values varying between 1.0 and 1.2, suggesting close to ideal partitioning between the LNAPL and water. The fresh and water-washed gasoline had higher values for the activity coefficient, from 1.2 to 1.4, indicating non-ideal partitioning. Results from synthetic mixtures demonstrated that these differences could be due to the different molar fractions of the nC5 and nC6 aliphatic hydrocarbons acting on the molecular interactions

  17. EFFECT OF ACCELERATED WEATHERING ON TENSILE PROPERTIES OF KENAF REINFORCED HIGH-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE COMPOSITES

    Umar A.H.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Umar A.H1, Zainudin E.S1,2 and Sapuan S.M.1,21Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing EngineeringFaculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra MalaysiaSelangor, Malaysia.2Biocomposite LaboratoryInstitute of Tropical Forestry and Forest Product (INTROPUniversiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia.Email: umarhanan@yahoo.com ABSTRACTIn this study, a high-density polyethylene composite reinforced with kenaf (Hibiscus Cannabinus L. bast fibres (K-HDPE was fabricated and tested for durability with regard to weather elements. The material consists of 40% (by weight fibres and 60% matrix. Other additives, such as ultraviolet (UV stabiliser and maleic anhydride grafted polyethylene (MaPE as a coupling agent were added to the composite material. The biocomposite was subjected to 1000 hours (h of accelerated weathering tests, which consisted of heat, moisture and UV light, intended to imitate the outdoor environment. The tensile properties of the K-HDPE composite were recorded after 0, 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 h of exposure to the accelerated weathering. Compared with neat high-density polyethylene (HDPE, the K-HDPE composite has 22.7% lower tensile strength when produced but displays a less rapid rate of strength deterioration under weathering (After 1000 h of exposure the tensile strength of K-HDPE drops 29.4%, whereas, for neat HDPE, it falls rapidly by 36%. Due to better stiffness, the Young’s modulus of the K-HDPE composite is much higher than that of neat HDPE. The fibres on the surface of the K-HDPE composite gradually start to whiten after 200 h of exposure and become completely white after 600 h of exposure. For neat HDPE, micro-cracking on the surface can be observed after 200 h of exposure and the stress-strain curve obtained from the tensile test indicates its increase in brittleness proportional to the amount of weathering time.

  18. Challenges in developing methods for quantifying the effects of weather and climate on water-associated diseases: A systematic review.

    Lo Iacono, Giovanni; Armstrong, Ben; Fleming, Lora E; Elson, Richard; Kovats, Sari; Vardoulakis, Sotiris; Nichols, Gordon L

    2017-06-01

    Infectious diseases attributable to unsafe water supply, sanitation and hygiene (e.g. Cholera, Leptospirosis, Giardiasis) remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in low-income countries. Climate and weather factors are known to affect the transmission and distribution of infectious diseases and statistical and mathematical modelling are continuously developing to investigate the impact of weather and climate on water-associated diseases. There have been little critical analyses of the methodological approaches. Our objective is to review and summarize statistical and modelling methods used to investigate the effects of weather and climate on infectious diseases associated with water, in order to identify limitations and knowledge gaps in developing of new methods. We conducted a systematic review of English-language papers published from 2000 to 2015. Search terms included concepts related to water-associated diseases, weather and climate, statistical, epidemiological and modelling methods. We found 102 full text papers that met our criteria and were included in the analysis. The most commonly used methods were grouped in two clusters: process-based models (PBM) and time series and spatial epidemiology (TS-SE). In general, PBM methods were employed when the bio-physical mechanism of the pathogen under study was relatively well known (e.g. Vibrio cholerae); TS-SE tended to be used when the specific environmental mechanisms were unclear (e.g. Campylobacter). Important data and methodological challenges emerged, with implications for surveillance and control of water-associated infections. The most common limitations comprised: non-inclusion of key factors (e.g. biological mechanism, demographic heterogeneity, human behavior), reporting bias, poor data quality, and collinearity in exposures. Furthermore, the methods often did not distinguish among the multiple sources of time-lags (e.g. patient physiology, reporting bias, healthcare access

  19. Strategies for Effective Implementation of Science Models into 6-9 Grade Classrooms on Climate, Weather, and Energy Topics

    Yarker, M. B.; Stanier, C. O.; Forbes, C.; Park, S.

    2011-12-01

    As atmospheric scientists, we depend on Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. We use them to predict weather patterns, to understand external forcing on the atmosphere, and as evidence to make claims about atmospheric phenomenon. Therefore, it is important that we adequately prepare atmospheric science students to use computer models. However, the public should also be aware of what models are in order to understand scientific claims about atmospheric issues, such as climate change. Although familiar with weather forecasts on television and the Internet, the general public does not understand the process of using computer models to generate a weather and climate forecasts. As a result, the public often misunderstands claims scientists make about their daily weather as well as the state of climate change. Since computer models are the best method we have to forecast the future of our climate, scientific models and modeling should be a topic covered in K-12 classrooms as part of a comprehensive science curriculum. According to the National Science Education Standards, teachers are encouraged to science models into the classroom as a way to aid in the understanding of the nature of science. However, there is very little description of what constitutes a science model, so the term is often associated with scale models. Therefore, teachers often use drawings or scale representations of physical entities, such as DNA, the solar system, or bacteria. In other words, models used in classrooms are often used as visual representations, but the purpose of science models is often overlooked. The implementation of a model-based curriculum in the science classroom can be an effective way to prepare students to think critically, problem solve, and make informed decisions as a contributing member of society. However, there are few resources available to help teachers implement science models into the science curriculum effectively. Therefore, this research project looks at

  20. Challenges in developing methods for quantifying the effects of weather and climate on water-associated diseases: A systematic review.

    Giovanni Lo Iacono

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases attributable to unsafe water supply, sanitation and hygiene (e.g. Cholera, Leptospirosis, Giardiasis remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in low-income countries. Climate and weather factors are known to affect the transmission and distribution of infectious diseases and statistical and mathematical modelling are continuously developing to investigate the impact of weather and climate on water-associated diseases. There have been little critical analyses of the methodological approaches. Our objective is to review and summarize statistical and modelling methods used to investigate the effects of weather and climate on infectious diseases associated with water, in order to identify limitations and knowledge gaps in developing of new methods. We conducted a systematic review of English-language papers published from 2000 to 2015. Search terms included concepts related to water-associated diseases, weather and climate, statistical, epidemiological and modelling methods. We found 102 full text papers that met our criteria and were included in the analysis. The most commonly used methods were grouped in two clusters: process-based models (PBM and time series and spatial epidemiology (TS-SE. In general, PBM methods were employed when the bio-physical mechanism of the pathogen under study was relatively well known (e.g. Vibrio cholerae; TS-SE tended to be used when the specific environmental mechanisms were unclear (e.g. Campylobacter. Important data and methodological challenges emerged, with implications for surveillance and control of water-associated infections. The most common limitations comprised: non-inclusion of key factors (e.g. biological mechanism, demographic heterogeneity, human behavior, reporting bias, poor data quality, and collinearity in exposures. Furthermore, the methods often did not distinguish among the multiple sources of time-lags (e.g. patient physiology, reporting bias

  1. Aerosol-Cloud Interactions During Puijo Cloud Experiments - The effects of weather and local sources

    Komppula, Mika; Portin, Harri; Leskinen, Ari; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Brus, David; Neitola, Kimmo; Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Kortelainen, Aki; Hao, Liqing; Miettinen, Pasi; Jaatinen, Antti; Ahmad, Irshad; Lihavainen, Heikki; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.

    2013-04-01

    The Puijo measurement station has provided continuous data on aerosol-cloud interactions since 2006. The station is located on top of the Puijo observation tower (306 m a.s.l, 224 m above the surrounding lake level) in Kuopio, Finland. The top of the tower is covered by cloud about 15 % of the time, offering perfect conditions for studying aerosol-cloud interactions. With a twin-inlet setup (total and interstitial inlets) we are able to separate the activated particles from the interstitial (non-activated) particles. The continuous twin-inlet measurements include aerosol size distribution, scattering and absorption. In addition cloud droplet number and size distribution are measured continuously with weather parameters. During the campaigns the twin-inlet system was additionally equipped with aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP-2). This way we were able to define the differences in chemical composition of the activated and non-activated particles. Potential cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in different supersaturations were measured with two CCN counters (CCNC). The other CCNC was operated with a Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA) to obtain size selected CCN spectra. Other additional measurements included Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) for particle hygroscopicity. Additionally the valuable vertical wind profiles (updraft velocities) are available from Halo Doppler lidar during the 2011 campaign. Cloud properties (droplet number and effective radius) from MODIS instrument onboard Terra and Aqua satellites were retrieved and compared with the measured values. This work summarizes the two latest intensive campaigns, Puijo Cloud Experiments (PuCE) 2010 & 2011. We study especially the effect of the local sources on the cloud activation behaviour of the aerosol particles. The main local sources include a paper mill, a heating plant, traffic and residential areas. The sources can be categorized and identified

  2. Assessment of the Space Weather Effect on Human Health in the Arctic Zone Using the Example of Tiksi Settlement

    Alena A. Strekalovskaya

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the space weather effect on the well-being and health of people with cardiovascular pathology in Arctic conditions, we carried out the processing and analysis of space weather parameters and the electronic database of patients with cardiovascular diseases at the Central District Hospital in Tiksi settlement (the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia (RS(Y. Patients visited the polyclinic or requested an ambulance because their health had deteriorated. As a result of our research, we found some conjunctions of trends in the change in geomagnetic disturbances (Kp-index and the number of patients' visits to medical institutions for arterial hypertension (AH in 2015, 2016 and 2017. It can therefore be concluded that geomagnetic disturbances have an impact on the cardiovascular system of a person living at high latitudes.

  3. Modification effect of Ni-38 wt.%Si on Al-12 wt.%Si alloy

    Wu Yuying; Liu Xiangfa; Jiang Binggang; Huang Chuanzhen

    2009-01-01

    Modification effect of Ni-38 wt.%Si on the Al-12 wt.%Si alloy has been studied by differential scanning calorimeter, torsional oscillation viscometer and liquid X-ray diffraction experiments. It is found that there is a modification effect of Ni-38 wt.%Si on Al-12 wt.%Si alloy, i.e. primary Si can precipitate in the microstructure of Al-12 wt.%Si alloy when Ni and Si added in the form of Ni-38 wt.%Si, but not separately. Ni-38 wt.%Si alloy brings 'genetic materials' into the Al-Si melt, which makes the melt to form more ordering structure, promotes the primary Si precipitated. Moreover, the addition of Ni-38 wt.%Si, which decreases the solidification supercooling degree of Al-12 wt.%Si alloy, is identical to the effect of heterogeneous nuclei.

  4. Modification effect of Ni-38 wt.%Si on Al-12 wt.%Si alloy

    Wu Yuying [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Ji' nan 250061 (China)], E-mail: wyy532001@163.com; Liu Xiangfa [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Ji' nan 250061 (China); Shandong Binzhou Bohai Piston Co., Ltd., Binzhou 256602, Shandong (China); Jiang Binggang [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Ji' nan 250061 (China); Huang Chuanzhen [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2009-05-27

    Modification effect of Ni-38 wt.%Si on the Al-12 wt.%Si alloy has been studied by differential scanning calorimeter, torsional oscillation viscometer and liquid X-ray diffraction experiments. It is found that there is a modification effect of Ni-38 wt.%Si on Al-12 wt.%Si alloy, i.e. primary Si can precipitate in the microstructure of Al-12 wt.%Si alloy when Ni and Si added in the form of Ni-38 wt.%Si, but not separately. Ni-38 wt.%Si alloy brings 'genetic materials' into the Al-Si melt, which makes the melt to form more ordering structure, promotes the primary Si precipitated. Moreover, the addition of Ni-38 wt.%Si, which decreases the solidification supercooling degree of Al-12 wt.%Si alloy, is identical to the effect of heterogeneous nuclei.

  5. Modification of the genetic effect of gamma irradiation by electric current

    Grigor'eva, N.N.; Shakhbazov, V.G.

    1985-01-01

    The authors study the effect of direct current of varying strength and polarity on the genetic damage due to gamma irradiation of Vicia faba seedlings. The modificational effect of direct current observed earlier is confirmed here. The extent and nature of this effect depends on the strength and polarity of the current as well as interval between irradiation and exposure to the electric field. Conditions having no effect on the irradiated seedlings, those protecting the cells from damage and enhancing the irradiation effect, are identified

  6. The effect of weather uncertainty on the financial risk of green electricity producers under various renewable policies

    Nagl, Stephan

    2013-06-15

    In recent years, many countries have implemented policies to incentivize renewable power generation. In this paper, we analyze the variance in profits of renewable-based electricity producers due to weather uncertainty under a 'feed-in tariff' policy, a 'fixed bonus' incentive and a 'renewable quota' obligation. In a first step, we discuss the price effects of fluctuations in the feed-in from renewables and their impact on the risk for green electricity producers. In a second step, we numerically solve the problem by applying a spatial stochastic equilibrium model to the European electricity market. The simulation results allow us to discuss the variance in profits under the different renewable support mechanisms and how different technologies are affected by weather uncertainty. The analysis suggests that wind producers benefit from market integration, whereas producers from biomass and solar plants face a larger variance in profits. Furthermore, the simulation indicates that highly volatile green certificate prices occur when introducing a renewable quota obligation without the option of banking and borrowing. Thus, all renewable producers face a higher variance in profits, as the price effect of weather uncertainty on green certificates overcompensates the negatively correlated fluctuations in production and prices.

  7. Weather daily variation in winter and its effect on behavior and affective states in day-care children

    Ciucci, Enrica; Calussi, Pamela; Menesini, Ersilia; Mattei, Alessandra; Petralli, Martina; Orlandini, Simone

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed to analyze the impact of winter weather conditions on young children's behavior and affective states by examining a group of 61 children attending day-care centers in Florence (Italy). Participants were 33 males, 28 females and their 11 teachers. The mean age of the children at the beginning of the observation period was 24.1 months. The day-care teachers observed the children's behavioral and emotional states during the morning before their sleeping time and filled in a questionnaire for each baby five times over a winter period of 3 weeks. Air temperature, relative humidity, air pressure and solar radiation data were collected every 15 min from a weather station located in the city center of Florence. At the same time, air temperature and relative humidity data were collected in the classroom and in the garden of each day-care center. We used multilevel linear models to evaluate the extent to which children's emotional and behavioral states could be predicted by weather conditions, controlling for child characteristics (gender and age). The data showed that relative humidity and solar radiation were the main predictors of the children's emotional and behavioral states. The outdoor humidity had a significant positive effect on frustration, sadness and aggression; solar radiation had a significant negative effect only on sadness, suggesting that a sunny winter day makes children more cheerful. The results are discussed in term of implications for parents and teachers to improve children's ecological environment.

  8. The effect of halloysite modification combined with in situ matrix modifications on the structure and properties of polypropylene/halloysite nanocomposites

    V. Khunova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of various modifications/intercalations of halloysite and the combination of these modifications with in situ PP matrix modification was investigated with respect to the structure and properties of the polypropylene/halloysite nanocomposites. Hexadecyl-tri-methyl-ammonium-bromide (HEDA, 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane and urea were used as the intercalators/modifiers. The best intercalation was found for urea, although an unexpected insignificant impact on the mechanical properties also resulted as a consequence of the urea polarity and the significant decrease in PP crystallinity. However, the simultaneous application of 4,4!-diphenylmethylene dimaleinimide (DBMI brought about an increase in the mechanical behavior by increasing the halloysite/PP affinity as a result of in situ matrix modification. This effect was further supported by coupling between the PP and halloysite (HNT in the system containing urea-intercalated HNT. This can be explained by the occurrence of a urea-supported reaction between the imide ring of DBMI and the OH groups of the HNT, which resulted in the best mechanical behaviors achieved in this study.

  9. Effectiveness of participatory adolescent strategic health action (PASHA for lifestyle modification among adolescents

    Asha P Shetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lifestyle modification is one of the methods to promote healthy lifestyle among adolescents. In this study, the researcher planned to develop, implement and evaluate a need based Participatory Adolescent Strategic Health Action (PASHA for lifestyle modification among selected adolescents. Materials and Methods: An evaluative approach with Quasi experimental one group pretest post test design (time series was adopted. Sample constituted 103 adolescents, aged 12-17 years studying in high schools and pre university colleges of Udupi district selected based on convenient sampling. Data was gathered using reliable and valid tools. Results: The mean combined preventive health lifestyle score among all adolescents increased from 75.65-81.56. Similarly the number of adolescents with healthy lifestyle score also increased from 28.2-53.4% after practicing for 180 days. Analysis of all the components of lifestyle showed that the adolescents had adopted healthy lifestyle practices in all the components of lifestyle. The number of adolescents with combined health status score also showed an increase from 31.1-54.4% after implementing PASHA practice. Analysis of reported outcome among subjects indicated that PASHA was motivating to improve their lifestyle practices. Conclusion: PASHA was found to be effective in lifestyle modification of adolescents. It is reiterated that when lifestyle modification is to be done, a strategy to improve self directedness and self efficacy should be adopted.

  10. Effect of different chemical modification of carbon nanotubes for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media

    Dumitru, Anca; Mamlouk, M.; Scott, K.

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of oxygen on chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) electrodes in 1 M KOH solution has been studied using the rotating ring disc electrode (RDE). The surface modification of CNTs has been estimated by XPS and Raman spectroscopy. The effect of different oxygen functionalities on the surface of carbon nanotube for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is considered in terms of the number of electrons (n) involved. Electrochemical studies indicate that in the case of the modification of CNTs with citric acid and diazonium salts the n values were close to two in the measured potential range, and the electrochemical reduction is limited to the production of peroxide as the final product. In the case of the modification of carbon nanotubes with peroxymonosulphuric acid, in the measured potential range, the n value is close to 4 indicating the four-electron pathway for the ORR. By correlating ORR measurements with the XPS analysis, we propose that the increase in electrocatalytic activity towards the ORR, for CNT can be attributed to the increase in C-O groups on the surface of CNTs after modification with peroxymonosulphuric acid

  11. Targeting Antibodies to Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors by Pyrene Hydrazide Modification of Heavy Chain Carbohydrates

    Steingrimur Stefansson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNT-FET studies have used immobilized antibodies as the ligand binding moiety. However, antibodies are not optimal for CNT-FET detection due to their large size and charge. Their size can prevent ligands from reaching within the Debye length of the CNTs and a layer of charged antibodies on the circuits can drown out any ligand signal. In an attempt to minimize the antibody footprint on CNT-FETs, we examined whether pyrene hydrazide modification of antibody carbohydrates could reduce the concentration required to functionalize CNT circuits. The carbohydrates are almost exclusively on the antibody Fc region and this site-specific modification could mediate uniform antibody orientation on the CNTs. We compared the hydrazide modification of anti-E. coli O157:H7 polyclonal antibodies to pyrenebutanoic acid succinimidyl ester-coated CNTs and carbodiimide-mediated antibody CNT attachment. Our results show that the pyrene hydrazide modification was superior to those methods with respect to bacteria detection and less than 1 nM labeled antibody was required to functionalize the circuits.

  12. Effect of Dynamic Composite Refinement and Modification on Microstructure of A356 Aluminum Alloy

    WANG Zheng-jun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To make up for the inadequacy of Sr modification,Al-5Ti-1B-1RE master alloy refiner was prepared,then were used together with Al-10Sr master alloy for dynamic composite refinement and modification of A356 alloy.The A356 alloy microstructure of modification was studied and compared with the theoretical calculating results.The results show that the melt is fiercely stirred and vibrated by the JJ-1 laboratory electric stirrer;the refining effect of α-Al phase is excellent;the coarse and needle-like eutectic Si phase transforms into tiny,widely dispersed spherical particles and well-distributed at the grain boundaries.And mechanical property of the A356 alloy increases obviously.The grain size control study results are consistent with Johnson-Mehl equation theory.At the same time,the contents of gases of the A356 alloy are significantly reduced,which can not be achieved by Sr alone.Quantitative calculating results of degassing mechanism are consistent with the approximate calculating equations of thermodynamics and Stokes Law.

  13. The effects of surface modification on carbon felt electrodes for use in vanadium redox flow batteries

    Kim, Ki Jae; Kim, Young-Jun; Kim, Jae-Hun; Park, Min-Sik

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► We observed the physical and chemical changes on the surface of carbon felts after various surface modifications. ► The surface area and chemistry of functional groups formed on the surface of carbon felt are critical to determine the kinetics of the redox reactions of vanadium ions. ► By incorporation of the surface modifications into the electrode preparation, the electrochemical activity of carbon felts could be notably enhanced. - Abstract: The surface of carbon felt electrodes has been modified for improving energy efficiency of vanadium redox flow batteries. For comparative purposes, the effects of various surface modifications such as mild oxidation, plasma treatment, and gamma-ray irradiation on the electrochemical properties of carbon felt electrodes were investigated at optimized conditions. The cell energy efficiency was improved from 68 to 75% after the mild oxidation of the carbon felt at 500 °C for 5 h. This efficiency improvement could be attributed to the increased surface area of the carbon felt electrode and the formation of functional groups on its surface as a result of the modification. On the basis of various structural and electrochemical characterizations, a relationship between the surface nature and electrochemical activity of the carbon felt electrodes is discussed.

  14. Forest bat population dynamics over 14 years at a climate refuge: Effects of timber harvesting and weather extremes.

    Bradley S Law

    Full Text Available Long-term data are needed to explore the interaction of weather extremes with habitat alteration; in particular, can 'refugia' buffer population dynamics against climate change and are they robust to disturbances such as timber harvesting. Because forest bats are good indicators of ecosystem health, we used 14 years (1999-2012 of mark-recapture data from a suite of small tree-hollow roosting bats to estimate survival, abundance and body condition in harvested and unharvested forest and over extreme El Niño and La Niña weather events in southeastern Australia. Trapping was replicated within an experimental forest, located in a climate refuge, with different timber harvesting treatments. We trapped foraging bats and banded 3043 with a 32% retrap rate. Mark-recapture analyses allowed for dependence of survival on time, species, sex, logging treatment and for transients. A large portion of the population remained resident, with a maximum time to recapture of nine years. The effect of logging history (unlogged vs 16-30 years post-logging regrowth on apparent survival was minor and species specific, with no detectable effect for two species, a positive effect for one and negative for the other. There was no effect of logging history on abundance or body condition for any of these species. Apparent survival of residents was not strongly influenced by weather variation (except for the smallest species, unlike previous studies outside of refugia. Despite annual variation in abundance and body condition across the 14 years of the study, no relationship with extreme weather was evident. The location of our study area in a climate refuge potentially buffered bat population dynamics from extreme weather. These results support the value of climate refugia in mitigating climate change impacts, though the lack of an external control highlights the need for further studies on the functioning of climate refugia. Relatively stable population dynamics were not

  15. The Equatorial Scintillations and Space Weather Effects on its Generation during Geomagnetic Storms

    Biktash, Lilia

    Great diversity of the ionospheric phenomena leads to a variety of irregularity types with spatial size from many thousands of kilometers to few centimeters and lifetimes from days to fractions of second. Since the ionosphere strongly influences the propagation of radio waves, signal distortions caused by these irregularities affect short-wave transmissions on Earth, transiono-spheric satellite communications and navigation. In this work the solar wind and the equatorial ionosphere parameters, Kp, Dst, AU, AL indices characterized contribution of different mag-netospheric and ionospheric currents to the H-component of geomagnetic field are examined to test the space weather effect on the generation of ionospheric irregularities producing VLF scintillations. According to the results of the current statistical studies, one can predict scintil-lations from Aarons' criteria using the Dst index, which mainly depicts the magnetospheric ring current field. To amplify Aarons' criteria or to propose new criteria for predicting scintillation characteristics is the question. In the present phase of the experimental investigations of elec-tron density irregularities in the ionosphere new ways are opened up because observations in the interaction between the solar wind -magnetosphere -ionosphere during magnetic storms have progressed greatly. We have examined scintillation relation to magnetospheric and ionospheric currents and show that the factor, which presents during magnetic storms to fully inhibit scin-tillation, is the positive Bz-component of the IMF. During the positive Bz IMF F layer cannot raise altitude where scintillations are formed. The auroral indices and Kp do better for the prediction of the ionospheric scintillations at the equator. The interplanetary magnetic field data and models can be used to explain the relationship between the equatorial ionospheric parameters, h'F, foF2, and the equatorial geomagnetic variations with the polar ionosphere cur-rents and

  16. Carbon nanotubes toxicology and effects on metabolism and immunological modification in vitro and in vivo

    Chiaretti, M; Mazzanti, G; Mastrangelo, S; Di Sotto, A; Bosco, S; Porta, N; Deriu, G; Bellucci, S; Balasubramanian, C; De Bellis, G; Micciulla, F; Tiberia, A; Cucina, A; Le Foche, F; Carru, G A; Masciangelo, R; Chiaretti, A M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research is focused on the biological effects of multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on three different human cell types, laboratory animals in vivo, and immunological effects. Large numbers of researchers are directly involved in the handling of nanostructured materials such as MWCNTs and nanoparticles. It is important to assess the potential health risks related to their daily exposure to carbon nanotubes. The administration of sterilized nanosamples has been performed on laboratory animals, in both acute and chronic administration, and the pathological effects on the parenchymal tissues have been investigated. We studied the serum immunological modifications after intraperitoneal administration of the MWCNTs. We did not observe any antigenic reaction; the screening of ANA, anti-ENA, anti-cardiolipin, C-ANCA and P-ANCA was negative. No quantitative modification of immunoglobulins was observed, hence no modification of humoral immunity was documented. We also studied the effects of MWCNTs on the proliferation of three different cell types. MCF-7 showed a significant inhibition of proliferation for all conditions studied, whereas hSMCs demonstrated a reduction of cell growth only for the highest MWCNTs concentrations after 72 h. Also, no growth modification was observed in the Caco-2 cell line. We observed that a low quantity of MWCNTs does not provoke any inflammatory reaction. However, for future medical applications, it is important to realize prosthesis based on MWCNTs, through studying the corresponding implantation effects. Moreover, it has to be emphasized that this investigation does not address, at the moment, the carcinogenicity of MWCNTs, which requires a detailed follow-up investigation on the specific topic. In view of the subsequent and more extensive use of MWCNTs, especially in applications where carbon nanotubes are injected into the human body for drug delivery, as a contrast agent carrying entities for MRI, or as the basic

  17. Carbon nanotubes toxicology and effects on metabolism and immunological modification in vitro and in vivo

    Chiaretti, M.; Mazzanti, G.; Bosco, S.; Bellucci, S.; Cucina, A.; LeFoche, F.; Carru, G. A.; Mastrangelo, S.; Di Sotto, A.; Masciangelo, R.; Chiaretti, A. M.; Balasubramanian, C.; DeBellis, G.; Micciulla, F.; Porta, N.; Deriu, G.; Tiberia, A.

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this research is focused on the biological effects of multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on three different human cell types, laboratory animals in vivo, and immunological effects. Large numbers of researchers are directly involved in the handling of nanostructured materials such as MWCNTs and nanoparticles. It is important to assess the potential health risks related to their daily exposure to carbon nanotubes. The administration of sterilized nanosamples has been performed on laboratory animals, in both acute and chronic administration, and the pathological effects on the parenchymal tissues have been investigated. We studied the serum immunological modifications after intraperitoneal administration of the MWCNTs. We did not observe any antigenic reaction; the screening of ANA, anti-ENA, anti-cardiolipin, C-ANCA and P-ANCA was negative. No quantitative modification of immunoglobulins was observed, hence no modification of humoral immunity was documented. We also studied the effects of MWCNTs on the proliferation of three different cell types. MCF-7 showed a significant inhibition of proliferation for all conditions studied, whereas hSMCs demonstrated a reduction of cell growth only for the highest MWCNTs concentrations after 72 h. Also, no growth modification was observed in the Caco-2 cell line. We observed that a low quantity of MWCNTs does not provoke any inflammatory reaction. However, for future medical applications, it is important to realize prosthesis based on MWCNTs, through studying the corresponding implantation effects. Moreover, it has to be emphasized that this investigation does not address, at the moment, the carcinogenicity of MWCNTs, which requires a detailed follow-up investigation on the specific topic. In view of the subsequent and more extensive use of MWCNTs, especially in applications where carbon nanotubes are injected into the human body for drug delivery, as a contrast agent carrying entities for MRI, or as the basic

  18. Parameters of electromagnetic weather in near-terrestrial space determining the effects on biosystems

    Oraevskij, V.N.; Golyshev, S.A.; Levitin, A.E.; Breus, T.K.; Ivanova, S.V.; Komarov, F.I.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1995-01-01

    Space and time distribution of the electric and magnetic fields and current systems in the near terrestrial space (electromagnetic weather) were studied in connection with ambulance calls in Moscow, Russia, related to the cardia-vascular diseases. The some examples of the correlations between the solar activity parameters and geomagnetic variations and the events of the extreme number of ambulance calls were presented. 4 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Effect of weather on temporal pain patterns in patients with temporomandibular disorders and migraine.

    Cioffi, I; Farella, M; Chiodini, P; Ammendola, L; Capuozzo, R; Klain, C; Vollaro, S; Michelotti, A

    2017-05-01

    Patients with masticatory muscle pain and migraine typically report that the intensity of pain fluctuates over time and is affected by weather changes. Weather variables, such as ambient temperature and humidity, may vary significantly depending on whether the individual is outdoor or indoor. It is, therefore, important to assess these variables at the individual level using portable monitors, during everyday life. This study aimed to determine and compare the temporal patterns of pain in individuals affected with facial and head pain and to investigate its relation with weather changes. Eleven patients (27·3 ± 7·4 years) with chronic masticatory muscle pain (MP) and twenty (33·1 ± 8·7 years) with migraine headache (MH) were asked to report their current pain level on a visual analogue scale (VAS) every hour over fourteen consecutive days. The VAS scores were collected using portable data-loggers, which were also used to record temperature, atmospheric pressure and relative humidity. VAS scores varied markedly over time in both groups. Pain VAS scores fluctuate less in the MP group than in the MH group, but their mean, minimum and maximum values were higher than those of migraine patients (all P < 0·05). Pain scores <2 cm were more common in the MH than in the MP group (P < 0·001). Perceived intensity of pain was negatively associated with atmospheric pressure in the MP group and positively associated with temperature and atmospheric in the MH group. Our results reveal that patients with masticatory muscle pain and patients with migraine present typical temporal pain patterns that are influenced in a different way by weather changes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Effect modification, interaction and mediation: an overview of theoretical insights for clinical investigators

    Corraini P

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Priscila Corraini,1 Morten Olsen,1 Lars Pedersen,1 Olaf M Dekkers,1,2 Jan P Vandenbroucke1–3 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands; 3Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK Abstract: We revisited the three interrelated epidemiological concepts of effect modification, interaction and mediation for clinical investigators and examined their applicability when using research databases. The standard methods that are available to assess interaction, effect modification and mediation are explained and exemplified. For each concept, we first give a simple “best-case” example from a randomized controlled trial, followed by a structurally similar example from an observational study using research databases. Our explanation of the examples is based on recent theoretical developments and insights in the context of large health care databases. Terminology is sometimes ambiguous for what constitutes effect modification and interaction. The strong assumptions underlying the assessment of interaction, and particularly mediation, require clinicians and epidemiologists to take extra care when conducting observational studies in the context of health care databases. These strong assumptions may limit the applicability of interaction and mediation assessments, at least until the biases and limitations of these assessments when using large research databases are clarified. Keywords: methods, epidemiology, effect modifiers, stratified analyses, health care administrative claims

  1. Effects of Si as alloying element on corrosion resistance of weathering steel

    Mejía Gómez, J.A.; Antonissen, J.; Palacio, C.A.; De Grave, E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Weathering steels with different concentrations of Si as alloying element were exposed to laboratory atmospheric conditions. ► The iron oxides formed as corrosion products were characterized and analyzed by XRD, TEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy. ► Silicon affects the corrosion resistance of weathering steels. ► Silicon promotes the formation of goethite as corrosion product with small particle size. - Abstract: The corrosion resistance in saline conditions of weathering steel with different concentrations of Si (1, 2 and 3 wt.%) exposed to dip dry tests (simulating wet/dry cycles of atmospheric corrosion) was studied by weight loss, X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the steels exhibit better corrosion performance with increasing Si concentration. The formation of Fe-oxides such as goethite, lepidocrocite and magnetite was observed. Superparamagnetic goethite is the dominant phase in the rust developed on the Si steels, indicating that Si favors the formation of goethite with small particle size.

  2. Effect of bentonite modification on hardness and mechanical properties of natural rubber nanocomposites

    Santiago, Denise Ester O.; Pajarito, Bryan B.; Mangaccat, Winna Faye F.; Tigue, Maelyn Rose M.; Tipton, Monica T.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of sodium activation, ion-exchange with tertiary amine salt, surface treatment with non-ionic surfactant, and wet grinding of bentonite on hardness and mechanical properties of natural rubber nanocomposites (NRN) was studied using full factorial design of experiment. Results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) show increase in basal spacing d of bentonite due to modification, while attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) confirm the organic modification of bentonite. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) shows that the main effect of surface treatment increases the hardness and decreases the tensile modulus of the NRN. The surface treatment and wet grinding of bentonite decrease the tensile stresses at 100, 200 and 300% strain of NRN. Sodium activation and ion-exchange negatively affect the compressive properties, while surface treatment significantly improves the compressive properties of NRN.

  3. Effect of bentonite modification on hardness and mechanical properties of natural rubber nanocomposites

    Santiago, Denise Ester O.; Pajarito, Bryan B.; Mangaccat, Winna Faye F.; Tigue, Maelyn Rose M.; Tipton, Monica T.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of sodium activation, ion-exchange with tertiary amine salt, surface treatment with non-ionic surfactant, and wet grinding of bentonite on hardness and mechanical properties of natural rubber nanocomposites (NRN) was studied using full factorial design of experiment. Results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) show increase in basal spacing d of bentonite due to modification, while attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) confirm the organic modification of bentonite. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) shows that the main effect of surface treatment increases the hardness and decreases the tensile modulus of the NRN. The surface treatment and wet grinding of bentonite decrease the tensile stresses at 100, 200 and 300% strain of NRN. Sodium activation and ion-exchange negatively affect the compressive properties, while surface treatment significantly improves the compressive properties of NRN.

  4. Effects of erbium modification on the microstructure and mechanical properties of A356 aluminum alloys

    Shi, Z.M., E-mail: shizm@imut.edu.cn; Wang, Q.; Zhao, G.; Zhang, R.Y.

    2015-02-25

    The effects of erbium (Er) modification on the microstructure and mechanical properties of A356 aluminum alloys were investigated using optical microscope, X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscope and mechanical testing. Experimental results show that additions of Er refined the α-Al grains and eutectic Si phases in its as-cast state; the addition of 0.3 wt% of Er has the best effects on them. The Fe-containing Al{sub 3}Er phases were introduced by the modifications; by a T6 treatment, the eutectic Si phases were further sphereodized; the large Al{sub 3}Er and β-Al{sub 5}FeSi phases were changed into fine particles and short rods; which enhanced the hardness of the alloys. The highest strength and elongation were obtained for the 0.3 wt% of Er-modified and T6-treated A356 alloy.

  5. Effect of bentonite modification on hardness and mechanical properties of natural rubber nanocomposites

    Santiago, Denise Ester O. [Polymer Research Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 Philippines (Philippines); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of the Philippines, Los Baños, College, Laguna 4031 Philippines (Philippines); Pajarito, Bryan B.; Mangaccat, Winna Faye F.; Tigue, Maelyn Rose M.; Tipton, Monica T. [Polymer Research Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 Philippines (Philippines)

    2016-05-18

    The effect of sodium activation, ion-exchange with tertiary amine salt, surface treatment with non-ionic surfactant, and wet grinding of bentonite on hardness and mechanical properties of natural rubber nanocomposites (NRN) was studied using full factorial design of experiment. Results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) show increase in basal spacing d of bentonite due to modification, while attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) confirm the organic modification of bentonite. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) shows that the main effect of surface treatment increases the hardness and decreases the tensile modulus of the NRN. The surface treatment and wet grinding of bentonite decrease the tensile stresses at 100, 200 and 300% strain of NRN. Sodium activation and ion-exchange negatively affect the compressive properties, while surface treatment significantly improves the compressive properties of NRN.

  6. Integration of Weather Avoidance and Traffic Separation

    Consiglio, Maria C.; Chamberlain, James P.; Wilson, Sara R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a dynamic convective weather avoidance concept that compensates for weather motion uncertainties; the integration of this weather avoidance concept into a prototype 4-D trajectory-based Airborne Separation Assurance System (ASAS) application; and test results from a batch (non-piloted) simulation of the integrated application with high traffic densities and a dynamic convective weather model. The weather model can simulate a number of pseudo-random hazardous weather patterns, such as slow- or fast-moving cells and opening or closing weather gaps, and also allows for modeling of onboard weather radar limitations in range and azimuth. The weather avoidance concept employs nested "core" and "avoid" polygons around convective weather cells, and the simulations assess the effectiveness of various avoid polygon sizes in the presence of different weather patterns, using traffic scenarios representing approximately two times the current traffic density in en-route airspace. Results from the simulation experiment show that the weather avoidance concept is effective over a wide range of weather patterns and cell speeds. Avoid polygons that are only 2-3 miles larger than their core polygons are sufficient to account for weather uncertainties in almost all cases, and traffic separation performance does not appear to degrade with the addition of weather polygon avoidance. Additional "lessons learned" from the batch simulation study are discussed in the paper, along with insights for improving the weather avoidance concept. Introduction

  7. Effect of surface modification on carbon fiber and its reinforced phenolic matrix composite

    Yuan Hua [Key Laboratory for Liquid phase chemical oxidation Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Carbon Fibre Engineering Research Center, Faculty of Materials Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Wang Chengguo, E-mail: sduwangchg@gmail.com [Carbon Fibre Engineering Research Center, Faculty of Materials Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhang Shan; Lin Xue [Carbon Fibre Engineering Research Center, Faculty of Materials Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We used very simple and effective modification method to treat PAN-based carbon fiber by liquid oxidation and coupling agent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon fiber surface functional groups were analyzed by LRS and XPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper treatment of carbon fiber can prove an effective way to increase composite's performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon fiber surface modifications by oxidation and APS could strengthen fiber activity and enlarge surface area as well as its roughness. - Abstract: In this work, polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fiber were chemically modified with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, KClO{sub 3} and silane coupling agent ({gamma}-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APS), and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic matrix composites were prepared. The structural and surface characteristics of the carbon fiber were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), laser Raman scattering (LRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Single fiber mechanical properties, specific surface area, composite impact properties and interfacial shear strength (ILSS) were researched to indicate the effects of surface modification on fibers and the interaction between modified fiber surface and phenolic matrix. The results showed that carbon fiber surface modification by oxidation and APS can strengthen fiber surface chemical activity and enlarge the fiber surface area as well as its roughness. When carbon fiber (CF) is oxidized treatment, the oxygen content as well as the O/C ratio will be obviously increased. Oxygen functional groups increase with oxidation time increasing. Carbon fiber treated with APS will make C-O-R content increase and O-C=O content decrease due to surface reaction. Proper treatment of carbon fiber with acid and silane coupling agent prove an effective way to increase the interfacial adhesion and improve the mechanical and outdoor

  8. Effect of surface modification on carbon fiber and its reinforced phenolic matrix composite

    Yuan Hua; Wang Chengguo; Zhang Shan; Lin Xue

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We used very simple and effective modification method to treat PAN-based carbon fiber by liquid oxidation and coupling agent. ► Carbon fiber surface functional groups were analyzed by LRS and XPS. ► Proper treatment of carbon fiber can prove an effective way to increase composite's performance. ► Carbon fiber surface modifications by oxidation and APS could strengthen fiber activity and enlarge surface area as well as its roughness. - Abstract: In this work, polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fiber were chemically modified with H 2 SO 4 , KClO 3 and silane coupling agent (γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APS), and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic matrix composites were prepared. The structural and surface characteristics of the carbon fiber were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), laser Raman scattering (LRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Single fiber mechanical properties, specific surface area, composite impact properties and interfacial shear strength (ILSS) were researched to indicate the effects of surface modification on fibers and the interaction between modified fiber surface and phenolic matrix. The results showed that carbon fiber surface modification by oxidation and APS can strengthen fiber surface chemical activity and enlarge the fiber surface area as well as its roughness. When carbon fiber (CF) is oxidized treatment, the oxygen content as well as the O/C ratio will be obviously increased. Oxygen functional groups increase with oxidation time increasing. Carbon fiber treated with APS will make C-O-R content increase and O-C=O content decrease due to surface reaction. Proper treatment of carbon fiber with acid and silane coupling agent prove an effective way to increase the interfacial adhesion and improve the mechanical and outdoor performance of the resulting fiber/resin composites.

  9. Municipalities' Preparedness for Weather Hazards and Response to Weather Warnings.

    Mehiriz, Kaddour; Gosselin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The study of the management of weather-related disaster risks by municipalities has attracted little attention even though these organizations play a key role in protecting the population from extreme meteorological conditions. This article contributes to filling this gap with new evidence on the level and determinants of Quebec municipalities' preparedness for weather hazards and response to related weather warnings. Using survey data from municipal emergency management coordinators and secondary data on the financial and demographic characteristics of municipalities, the study shows that most Quebec municipalities are sufficiently prepared for weather hazards and undertake measures to protect the population when informed of imminent extreme weather events. Significant differences between municipalities were noted though. Specifically, the level of preparedness was positively correlated with the municipalities' capacity and population support for weather-related disaster management policies. In addition, the risk of weather-related disasters increases the preparedness level through its effect on population support. We also found that the response to weather warnings depended on the risk of weather-related disasters, the preparedness level and the quality of weather warnings. These results highlight areas for improvement in the context of increasing frequency and/or severity of such events with current climate change.

  10. Effects on physicochemical characteristics of yoghurt and ice cream with fatty acid modification and cholesterol removal

    Nadeem, M.; Ullah, R.; Arif, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of fatty acid modification and cholesterol removal on physico-chemical characteristics of yoghurt and ice cream. Fatty acid profile of milk fat was modified by feeding calcium salts of soybean oil fatty acids to cows and cholesterol was removed by b-cyclodextrin b-cyclodextrin removed 76% and 60% cholesterol from yoghurt and ice cream. Modification of fatty acid composition did not have a significant effect on a-tocopherol content; while b-cyclodextrin treated milk had substantially lower a-tocopherol content. The concentration of a-tocopherol in control and b-cyclodextrin treated yoghurt was 45.62, 32.73 mg/g and 210.34, 185.56 mg/g for ice cream, respectively. Fatty acid modification and cholesterol removal significantly decreased the overrun in ice cream (P<0.05), with no effect on sensory characteristics of yoghurt and ice cream. These results evidenced that milk with higher content of unsaturated fatty acids and low cholesterol can be used in the formulation of yoghurt and ice cream with improved health benefits and suitable sensory features. (author)

  11. [Effects of a coaching program on comprehensive lifestyle modification for women with gestational diabetes mellitus].

    Ko, Jung Mi; Lee, Jong Kyung

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of using a Coaching Program on Comprehensive Lifestyle Modification with pregnant women who have gestational diabetes. The research design for this study was a non-equivalent control group quasi-experimental study. Pregnant women with gestational diabetes were recruited from D women's hospital located in Gyeonggi Province from April to October, 2013. Participants in this study were 34 for the control group and 34 for the experimental group. The experimental group participated in the Coaching Program on Comprehensive Lifestyle Modification. The program consisted of education, small group coaching and telephone coaching over 4weeks. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS 21.0 program. There were significant improvements in self-care behavior, and decreases in depression, fasting blood sugar and HbA1C in the experimental group compared to the control group. However, no significant differences were found between the two groups for knowledge of gestational diabetes mellitus. The Coaching Program on Comprehensive Lifestyle Modification used in this study was found to be effective in improving self-care behavior and reducing depression, fasting blood sugar and HbA1C, and is recommended for use in clinical practice as an effective nursing intervention for pregnant women with gestational diabetes.

  12. Anomalous effects of radioactive decay rates and capacitance values measured inside a modified Faraday cage: Correlations with space weather

    Scholkmann, F.; Milián-Sánchez, V.; Mocholí-Salcedo, A.; Milián, C.; Kolombet, V. A.; Verdú, G.

    2017-03-01

    Recently we reported (Milián-Sánchez V. et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods A, 828 (2016) 210) our experimental results involving 226Ra decay rate and capacitance measurements inside a modified Faraday cage. Our measurements exhibited anomalous effects of unknown origin. In this letter we report new results regarding our investigation into the origins of the observed effects. We report preliminary findings of a correlation analysis between the radioactive decay rates and capacitance time series and space weather related variables (geomagnetic field disturbances and cosmic-ray neutron counts). A significant correlation was observed for specific data sets. The results are presented and possible implications for future work discussed.

  13. Using a Six Sigma Fishbone Analysis Approach To Evaluate the Effect of Extreme Weather Events on Salmonella Positives in Young Chicken Slaughter Establishments.

    Linville, John W; Schumann, Douglas; Aston, Christopher; Defibaugh-Chavez, Stephanie; Seebohm, Scott; Touhey, Lucy

    2016-12-01

    A six sigma fishbone analysis approach was used to develop a machine learning model in SAS, Version 9.4, by using stepwise linear regression. The model evaluated the effect of a wide variety of variables, including slaughter establishment operational measures, normal (30-year average) weather, and extreme weather events on the rate of Salmonella -positive carcasses in young chicken slaughter establishments. Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) verification carcass sampling data, as well as corresponding data from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, from September 2011 through April 2015, were included in the model. The results of the modeling show that in addition to basic establishment operations, normal weather patterns, differences from normal and disaster events, including time lag weather and disaster variables, played a role in explaining the Salmonella percent positive that varied by slaughter volume quartile. Findings show that weather and disaster events should be considered as explanatory variables when assessing pathogen-related prevalence analysis or research and slaughter operational controls. The apparent significance of time lag weather variables suggested that at least some of the impact on Salmonella rates occurred after the weather events, which may offer opportunities for FSIS or the poultry industry to implement interventions to mitigate those effects.

  14. National Weather Service

    ... GIS International Weather Cooperative Observers Storm Spotters Tsunami Facts and Figures National Water Center WEATHER SAFETY NOAA Weather Radio StormReady Heat Lightning Hurricanes Thunderstorms Tornadoes Rip Currents Floods Winter Weather ...

  15. Effect of dietary behaviour modification on anthropometric indices and eating behaviour in obese adolescent girls.

    Sabet Sarvestani, Raheleh; Jamalfard, Mohammad Hoseein; Kargar, Marziye; Kaveh, Mohammad Hoseein; Tabatabaee, Hamid Reza

    2009-08-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to evaluate the effects of behaviour modification on anthropometric indices and to explore if behaviour modification could improve eating behaviour in adolescents. Obesity is currently the most important nutritional disease of children and adolescents. To date, several attempts to achieve weight loss in children have been made, but little is known about their effects on improving eating behaviours. Sixty obese adolescent girls participated in a behaviour modification program which was held for 16 weeks in 2007. The participants were randomly selected from two different schools and were assigned to an experimental and control group (30 participants each). Anthropometric indices and eating behaviours were assessed before and after the program. Eating behaviour was assessed using the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire. There were statistically significant differences in changes in body weight (-2.75 kg vs. 0.62 kg), body mass index (-1.07 kg/m(2) vs. 0.24 kg/m(2)) and arm circumference (-2.31 cm vs. 0.5 cm) in the experimental group in contrast to controls (P behaviour, emotional eating (0.63, 0.17), external eating (0.99, 0.05) and restrained eating (0.72, 0.03) in the experimental vs. the control group respectively (P < 0.001). Nurses, more than other healthcare professionals, can address obesity in adolescents and they should not concentrate solely on weight reduction, but also encourage children to acquire a healthy lifestyle.

  16. Plant Sterols: Chemical and Enzymatic Structural Modifications and Effects on Their Cholesterol-Lowering Activity.

    He, Wen-Sen; Zhu, Hanyue; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2018-03-28

    Plant sterols have attracted increasing attention due to their excellent cholesterol-lowering activity. However, free plant sterols have some characteristics of low oil solubility, water insolubility, high melting point, and low bioavailability, which greatly limit their application in foods. Numerous studies have been undertaken to modify their chemical structures to improve their chemical and physical properties in meeting the needs of various applications. The present review is to summarize the literature and update the progress on structural modifications of plant sterols in the following aspects: (i) synthesis of plant sterol esters by esterification and transesterification with hydrophobic fatty acids and triacylglycerols to improve their oil solubility, (ii) synthesis of plant sterol derivatives by coupling with various hydrophilic moieties to enhance their water solubility, and (iii) mechanisms by which plant sterols reduce plasma cholesterol and the effect of structural modifications on plasma cholesterol-lowering activity of plant sterols.

  17. Effect of thermal modification on the physical properties of juvenile and mature woods of Eucalyptus grandis

    Fred Willians Calonego

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of thermal treatment on the physical properties of juvenile and mature woods of Eucalyptus grandis. Boards were taken from 30-year-old E. grandis trees. The boards were thermally modified at 180 °C in the Laboratory of Wood Drying and Preservation at UNESP, Botucatu, Sao Paulo state, Brazil. The results showed that thermal modification caused: (1 decrease of 6.8% in the density at 0% equilibrium moisture content of mature wood; (2 significant decreases of 14.7% and 35.6% in the maximum volumetric swellings of juvenile and mature woods, respectively; (3 significant decreases of 13.7% and 21.3% in the equilibrium moisture content of juvenile and mature woods, respectively. The influence of thermal modification in juvenile wood was lower than in mature wood and caused greater uniformity in the physical variations between these types of wood in E. grandis.

  18. Extratropical Weather Systems on Mars: Radiatively-Active Water Ice Effects

    Hollingsworth, J. L.; Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Urata, R. A.; Montmessin, F.

    2017-01-01

    Extratropical, large-scale weather disturbances, namely transient, synoptic-period,baroclinic barotropic eddies - or - low- (high-) pressure cyclones (anticyclones), are components fundamental to global circulation patterns for rapidly rotating, differentially heated, shallow atmospheres such as Earth and Mars. Such "wave-like" disturbances that arise via (geophysical) fluid shear instability develop, mature and decay, and travel west-to-east in the middle and high latitudes within terrestrial-like planetary atmospheres. These disturbances serve as critical agents in the transport of heat and momentum between low and high latitudes of the planet. Moreover, they transport trace species within the atmosphere (e.g., water vapor/ice, other aerosols (dust), chemical species, etc). Between early autumn through early spring, middle and high latitudes on Mars exhibit strong equator-to-pole mean temperature contrasts (i.e., "baroclinicity"). Data collected during the Viking era and observations from both the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) indicate that such strong baroclinicity supports vigorous, large-scale eastward traveling weather systems [Banfield et al., 2004; Barnes et al., 1993]. A good example of traveling weather systems, frontal wave activity and sequestered dust activity from MGS/MOC image analyses is provided in Figure 1 (cf. Wang et al. [2005]). Utilizing an upgraded and evolving version of the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) Mars global climate model, investigated here are key dynamical and physical aspects of simulated northern hemisphere (NH) large-scale extratropica lweather systems,with and without radiatively-active water ice clouds. Mars Climate Model:

  19. Effects of weather factors on dengue fever incidence and implications for interventions in Cambodia

    Youngjo Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue viruses and their mosquito vectors are sensitive to their environment. Temperature, rainfall and humidity have well-defined roles in the transmission cycle. Therefore changes in these conditions may contribute to increasing incidence. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between weather factors and dengue incidence in three provinces in Cambodia, in order to strengthen the evidence basis of dengue control strategies in this high-burden country. Methods We developed negative binomial models using monthly average maximum, minimum, mean temperatures and monthly cumulative rainfall over the period from January 1998 to December 2012. We adopted piecewise linear functions to estimate the incidence rate ratio (IRR between dengue incidence and weather factors for simplicity in interpreting the coefficients. We estimated the values of parameters below cut-points defined in terms of the results of sensitivity tests over a 0-3 month lagged period. Results Mean temperature was significantly associated with dengue incidence in all three provinces, but incidence did not correlate well with maximum temperature in Banteay Meanchey, nor with minimum temperature in Kampong Thom at a lag of three months in the negative binomial model. The monthly cumulative rainfall influence on the dengue incidence was significant in all three provinces, but not consistently over a 0-3 month lagged period. Rainfall significantly affected the dengue incidence at a lag of 0 to 3 months in Siem Reap, but it did not have an impact at a lag of 2 to 3 months in Banteay Meanchey, nor at a lag of 2 months in Kampong Thom. Conclusions The association between dengue incidence and weather factors also apparently varies by locality, suggesting that a prospective dengue early warning system would likely be best implemented at a local or regional scale, rather than nation-wide in Cambodia. Such spatial down-scaling would also enable dengue control

  20. Structual Effects of Cytidine 2^' Ribose Modifications as Determined by Irmpd Action Spectroscopy

    Hamlow, Lucas; He, Chenchen; Fan, Lin; Wu, Ranran; Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M. T.; Berden, Giel; Oomens, J.

    2015-06-01

    Modified nucleosides, both naturally occurring and synthetic play an important role in understanding and manipulating RNA and DNA. Naturally occurring modified nucleosides are commonly found in functionally important regions of RNA and also affect antibiotic resistance or sensitivity. Synthetic modifications of nucleosides such as fluorinated and arabinosyl nucleosides have found uses as anti-virals and chemotherapy agents. Understanding the effect that modifications have on structure and glycosidic bond stability may lend insight into the functions of these modified nucleosides. Modifications such as the naturally occurring 2^'-O-methylation and the synthetic 2^'-fluorination are believed to help stabilize the nucleoside through the glycosidic bond stability and intramolecular hydrogen bonding. Changing the sugar from ribose to arabinose alters the stereochemistry at the 2^' position and thus shifts the 3D orientation of the 2^'-hydroxyl group, which also affects intramolecular hydrogen bonding and glycosidic bond stability. The structures of 2^'-deoxy-2^'-fluorocytidine, 2^'-O-methylcytidine and cytosine arabinoside are examined in the current work by measuring the infrared spectra in the IR fingerprint region using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy. The structures accessed in the experiments were determined via comparison of the measured IRMPD action spectra to the theoretical linear IR spectra determined by density functional theory and molecular modeling for the stable low-energy structures. Although glycosidic bond stability cannot be quantitatively determined from this data, complementary TCID studies will establish the effect of these modifications. Comparison of these modified nucleosides with their RNA and DNA analogues will help elucidate differences in their intrinsic chemistry.

  1. Probing ion-specific effects on aqueous acetate solutions: Ion pairing versus water structure modifications.

    Petit, Tristan; Lange, Kathrin M; Conrad, Gerrit; Yamamoto, Kenji; Schwanke, Christoph; Hodeck, Kai F; Dantz, Marcus; Brandenburg, Tim; Suljoti, Edlira; Aziz, Emad F

    2014-05-01

    The effect of monovalent cations (Li(+), K(+), NH4 (+), Na(+)) on the water structure in aqueous chloride and acetate solutions was characterized by oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) of a liquid microjet. We show ion- and counterion dependent effects on the emission spectra of the oxygen K-edge, which we attribute to modifications of the hydrogen bond network of water. For acetates, ion pairing with carboxylates was also probed selectively by XAS and RIXS. We correlate our experimental results to speciation data and to the salting-out properties of the cations.

  2. Effect of carbonic anhydrase on silicate weathering and carbonate formation at present day CO₂ concentrations compared to primordial values.

    Xiao, Leilei; Lian, Bin; Hao, Jianchao; Liu, Congqiang; Wang, Shijie

    2015-01-13

    It is widely recognized that carbonic anhydrase (CA) participates in silicate weathering and carbonate formation. Nevertheless, it is still not known if the magnitude of the effect produced by CA on surface rock evolution changes or not. In this work, CA gene expression from Bacillus mucilaginosus and the effects of recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation under different conditions are explored. Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR was used to explore the correlation between CA gene expression and sufficiency or deficiency in calcium and CO₂ concentration. The results show that the expression of CA genes is negatively correlated with both CO₂ concentration and ease of obtaining soluble calcium. A pure form of the protein of interest (CA) is obtained by cloning, heterologous expression, and purification. The results from tests of the recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation at different levels of CO₂ concentration show that the magnitudes of the effects of CA and CO₂ concentration are negatively correlated. These results suggest that the effects of microbial CA in relation to silicate weathering and carbonate formation may have increased importance at the modern atmospheric CO₂ concentration compared to 3 billion years ago.

  3. Effect of carbonic anhydrase on silicate weathering and carbonate formation at present day CO2 concentrations compared to primordial values

    Xiao, Leilei; Lian, Bin; Hao, Jianchao; Liu, Congqiang; Wang, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    It is widely recognized that carbonic anhydrase (CA) participates in silicate weathering and carbonate formation. Nevertheless, it is still not known if the magnitude of the effect produced by CA on surface rock evolution changes or not. In this work, CA gene expression from Bacillus mucilaginosus and the effects of recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation under different conditions are explored. Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR was used to explore the correlation between CA gene expression and sufficiency or deficiency in calcium and CO2 concentration. The results show that the expression of CA genes is negatively correlated with both CO2 concentration and ease of obtaining soluble calcium. A pure form of the protein of interest (CA) is obtained by cloning, heterologous expression, and purification. The results from tests of the recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation at different levels of CO2 concentration show that the magnitudes of the effects of CA and CO2 concentration are negatively correlated. These results suggest that the effects of microbial CA in relation to silicate weathering and carbonate formation may have increased importance at the modern atmospheric CO2 concentration compared to 3 billion years ago. PMID:25583135

  4. Effect of the weather in the aging of asphalts by XRD

    Cardoso, Edson da R.; Braz, Delson; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: ecardoso@lin.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Motta, Laura M.G. da, E-mail: Laura@coc.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Construcao Civil/Geotecnia; Barroso, Regina C., E-mail: cely@uerj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2009-07-01

    Asphalt is a sticky, black and highly viscous liquid or semi-solid that is presented in most crude petroleum and in some natural deposits. As is well known, asphalt has been the preferential choice in pavement construction since excellent utility of pavement, however, as other organic substances, it is also subjected to aging phenomena evolving with time. Asphalt aging is one of the principal factors causing deterioration of asphalt pavements. The photodegradation of asphalts must be considered in the study of the performance of asphalt pavement, especially in geographical regions where high solar radiation intensity occurs. It has an important influence in asphalt aging in tropical places as Brazil. Many methods have been applied to simulate aging of bitumen. It was just a simulation but not real aging asphalt. In this study we submitted the asphalt to the weather as sun and rain. Periodically, during 430 days, the XRD profiles were done and the results analyzed. The scattering measurements were carried out in 0-20 reflection geometry using a powder diffractometer Shimadzu XRD-6000. Scans were typically done from 8 deg to 28 deg every 0.05 deg. The parameters FWHM and peak centroid were analyzed. From 0 until 180 days the aging was faster. The peaks were marked and analyzed with the pass of time. The crystallinity of asphalt increase with weather exposition. Some angles of profiles changed the position indicating change of atomics plans. (author)

  5. Some effects of adverse weather conditions on performance of airplane antiskid braking systems

    Horne, W. B.; Mccarty, J. L.; Tanner, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The performance of current antiskid braking systems operating under adverse weather conditions was analyzed in an effort to both identify the causes of locked-wheel skids which sometimes occur when the runway is slippery and to find possible solutions to this operational problem. This analysis was made possible by the quantitative test data provided by recently completed landing research programs using fully instrumented flight test airplanes and was further supported by tests performed at the Langley aircraft landing loads and traction facility. The antiskid system logic for brake control and for both touchdown and locked-wheel protection is described and its response behavior in adverse weather is discussed in detail with the aid of available data. The analysis indicates that the operational performance of the antiskid logic circuits is highly dependent upon wheel spin-up acceleration and can be adversely affected by certain pilot braking inputs when accelerations are low. Normal antiskid performance is assured if the tire-to-runway traction is sufficient to provide high wheel spin-up accelerations or if the system is provided a continuous, accurate ground speed reference. The design of antiskid systems is complicated by the necessity for tradeoffs between tire braking and cornering capabilities, both of which are necessary to provide safe operations in the presence of cross winds, particularly under slippery runway conditions.

  6. Effect of the weather in the aging of asphalts by XRD

    Cardoso, Edson da R.; Braz, Delson; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Motta, Laura M.G. da; Barroso, Regina C.

    2009-01-01

    Asphalt is a sticky, black and highly viscous liquid or semi-solid that is presented in most crude petroleum and in some natural deposits. As is well known, asphalt has been the preferential choice in pavement construction since excellent utility of pavement, however, as other organic substances, it is also subjected to aging phenomena evolving with time. Asphalt aging is one of the principal factors causing deterioration of asphalt pavements. The photodegradation of asphalts must be considered in the study of the performance of asphalt pavement, especially in geographical regions where high solar radiation intensity occurs. It has an important influence in asphalt aging in tropical places as Brazil. Many methods have been applied to simulate aging of bitumen. It was just a simulation but not real aging asphalt. In this study we submitted the asphalt to the weather as sun and rain. Periodically, during 430 days, the XRD profiles were done and the results analyzed. The scattering measurements were carried out in 0-20 reflection geometry using a powder diffractometer Shimadzu XRD-6000. Scans were typically done from 8 deg to 28 deg every 0.05 deg. The parameters FWHM and peak centroid were analyzed. From 0 until 180 days the aging was faster. The peaks were marked and analyzed with the pass of time. The crystallinity of asphalt increase with weather exposition. Some angles of profiles changed the position indicating change of atomics plans. (author)

  7. Space Weather effects on airline communications in the high latitude regions

    Honary, Farideh

    2014-05-01

    Efficient air traffic management depends on reliable communications between aircraft and the air traffic control centres at all times. At high latitudes, and especially on polar routing, VHF ground infrastructure does not exist and the aircraft have to rely on HF radio for communications. HF relies on reflections from the ionosphere to achieve long distance communications. Unfortunately the high latitude ionosphere is affected by space weather events. During such events HF radio communication can be severely disrupted and aircraft are forced to use longer low latitude routes with consequent increased flight time, fuel consumption and cost. This presentation describes a new research programme at the University of Lancaster in collaboration with the University of Leicester, Solar Metrics Ltd and Natural Resources Canada for the development of a nowcasting and forecasting HF communications tool designed for the particular needs of civilian airlines. This project funded by EPSRC will access a wide variety of solar and interplanetary measurements to derive a complete picture of space weather disturbances affecting radio absorption and reflection

  8. Effects of Shear Fracture on In-depth Profile Modification of Weak Gels

    Li Xianjie; Song Xinwang; Yue Xiang'an; Hou Jirui; Fang Lichun; Zhang Huazhen

    2007-01-01

    Two sand packs were filled with fine glass beads and quartz sand respectively. The characteristics of crosslinked polymer flowing through the sand packs as well as the influence of shear fracture of porous media on the in-depth profile modification of the weak gel generated from the crosslinked polymer were investigated. The results indicated that under the dynamic condition crosslinking reaction happened in both sand packs,and the weak gels in these two cases became small gel particles after water flooding. The differences were:the dynamic gelation time in the quartz sand pack was longer than that in the glass bead pack. Residual resistance factor (FRR) caused by the weak gel in the quartz sand pack was smaller than that in the glass bead pack. The weak gel became gel particles after being scoured by subsequent flood water. A weak gel with uniform apparent viscosity and sealing characteristics was generated in every part of the glass bead pack,which could not only move deeply into the sand pack but also seal the high capacity channels again when it reached the deep part. The weak gel performed in-depth profile modification in the glass bead pack,while in the quartz sand pack,the weak gel was concentrated with 100 cm from the entrance of the sand pack. When propelled by the subsequent flood water,the weak gel could move towards the deep part of the sand pack but then became tiny gel particles and could not effectively seal the high capacity channels there. The in-depth profile modification of the weak gel was very weak in the quartz sand pack. It was the shear fracture of porous media that mainly affected the properties and weakened the in-depth profile modification of the weak gel.

  9. Differential effects of cocaine on histone posttranslational modifications in identified populations of striatal neurons.

    Jordi, Emmanuelle; Heiman, Myriam; Marion-Poll, Lucile; Guermonprez, Pierre; Cheng, Shuk Kei; Nairn, Angus C; Greengard, Paul; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2013-06-04

    Drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, induce changes in gene expression and epigenetic marks including alterations in histone posttranslational modifications in striatal neurons. These changes are thought to participate in physiological memory mechanisms and to be critical for long-term behavioral alterations. However, the striatum is composed of multiple cell types, including two distinct populations of medium-sized spiny neurons, and little is known concerning the cell-type specificity of epigenetic modifications. To address this question we used bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice, which express EGFP fused to the N-terminus of the large subunit ribosomal protein L10a driven by the D1 or D2 dopamine receptor (D1R, D2R) promoter, respectively. Fluorescence in nucleoli was used to sort nuclei from D1R- or D2R-expressing neurons and to quantify by flow cytometry the cocaine-induced changes in histone acetylation and methylation specifically in these two types of nuclei. The two populations of medium-sized spiny neurons displayed different patterns of histone modifications 15 min or 24 h after a single injection of cocaine or 24 h after seven daily injections. In particular, acetylation of histone 3 on Lys 14 and of histone 4 on Lys 5 and 12, and methylation of histone 3 on Lys 9 exhibited distinct and persistent changes in the two cell types. Our data provide insights into the differential epigenetic responses to cocaine in D1R- and D2R-positive neurons and their potential regulation, which may participate in the persistent effects of cocaine in these neurons. The method described should have general utility for studying nuclear modifications in different types of neuronal or nonneuronal cell types.

  10. The effect of lifestyle modification on physical fitness and work ability in different workstyles.

    Ohta, Masanori; Okufuji, Tatsuya; Matsushima, Yasuyuki; Ikeda, Masaharu

    2004-12-01

    It is generally considered that physical fitness is affected by daily life activities including leisure time activity and working time activity. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of different levels of physical activity at work on physical fitness, analyze the effects of 12-week lifestyle modification outside of working hours on physical fitness, work satisfaction and subjective symptoms, and to consider the role of lifestyle modification in occupational health. Lifestyle modification, consisting of aerobic exercise and diet counseling, was conducted for 12 weeks. The data before and after the intervention from 49 male workers were obtained. Physical fitness such as exercise endurance, flexibility, agility, balance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, and muscular power was measured before and after the intervention. The subjects were asked to fill out questionnaires about their work activities, subjective complaints, and work satisfaction. Subjects were divided into active work group (n = 14) and sedentary work group (n = 35) for analysis according to their work activities. As for differences in physical fitness due to different levels of physical activity, the active work group had superior exercise endurance and balance compared to the sedentary work group. In addition, the sedentary work group tended to experience greater fatigue than the active work group. In the active work group, flexibility and muscular strength were significantly increased with lifestyle modification and, in the sedentary work group, exercise endurance, flexibility and muscular endurance were significantly improved while balance also showed a tendency to improve. In the sedentary work group, lifestyle modification resulted in reduced fatigue and stiff neck as well as an increased work satisfaction. In the active work group, no change was observed in complaints or work satisfaction, but improved physical fitness led to a reduction in subjective complaints and an

  11. Differential effects of garcinol and curcumin on histone and p53 modifications in tumour cells

    Collins Hilary M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-translational modifications (PTMs of histones and other proteins are perturbed in tumours. For example, reduced levels of acetylated H4K16 and trimethylated H4K20 are associated with high tumour grade and poor survival in breast cancer. Drug-like molecules that can reprogram selected histone PTMs in tumour cells are therefore of interest as potential cancer chemopreventive agents. In this study we assessed the effects of the phytocompounds garcinol and curcumin on histone and p53 modification in cancer cells, focussing on the breast tumour cell line MCF7. Methods Cell viability/proliferation assays, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry, immunodetection of specific histone and p53 acetylation marks, western blotting, siRNA and RT-qPCR. Results Although treatment with curcumin, garcinol or the garcinol derivative LTK-14 hampered MCF7 cell proliferation, differential effects of these compounds on histone modifications were observed. Garcinol treatment resulted in a strong reduction in H3K18 acetylation, which is required for S phase progression. Similar effects of garcinol on H3K18 acetylation were observed in the osteosarcoma cells lines U2OS and SaOS2. In contrast, global levels of acetylated H4K16 and trimethylated H4K20 in MCF7 cells were elevated after garcinol treatment. This was accompanied by upregulation of DNA damage signalling markers such as γH2A.X, H3K56Ac, p53 and TIP60. In contrast, exposure of MCF7 cells to curcumin resulted in increased global levels of acetylated H3K18 and H4K16, and was less effective in inducing DNA damage markers. In addition to its effects on histone modifications, garcinol was found to block CBP/p300-mediated acetylation of the C-terminal activation domain of p53, but resulted in enhanced acetylation of p53K120, and accumulation of p53 in the cytoplasmic compartment. Finally, we show that the elevation of H4K20Me3 levels by garcinol correlated with increased expression of SUV420H2

  12. Differential effects of garcinol and curcumin on histone and p53 modifications in tumour cells

    Collins, Hilary M; Kundu, Tapas K; Heery, David M; Abdelghany, Magdy K; Messmer, Marie; Yue, Baigong; Deeves, Sian E; Kindle, Karin B; Mantelingu, Kempegowda; Aslam, Akhmed; Winkler, G Sebastiaan

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones and other proteins are perturbed in tumours. For example, reduced levels of acetylated H4K16 and trimethylated H4K20 are associated with high tumour grade and poor survival in breast cancer. Drug-like molecules that can reprogram selected histone PTMs in tumour cells are therefore of interest as potential cancer chemopreventive agents. In this study we assessed the effects of the phytocompounds garcinol and curcumin on histone and p53 modification in cancer cells, focussing on the breast tumour cell line MCF7. Cell viability/proliferation assays, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry, immunodetection of specific histone and p53 acetylation marks, western blotting, siRNA and RT-qPCR. Although treatment with curcumin, garcinol or the garcinol derivative LTK-14 hampered MCF7 cell proliferation, differential effects of these compounds on histone modifications were observed. Garcinol treatment resulted in a strong reduction in H3K18 acetylation, which is required for S phase progression. Similar effects of garcinol on H3K18 acetylation were observed in the osteosarcoma cells lines U2OS and SaOS2. In contrast, global levels of acetylated H4K16 and trimethylated H4K20 in MCF7 cells were elevated after garcinol treatment. This was accompanied by upregulation of DNA damage signalling markers such as γH2A.X, H3K56Ac, p53 and TIP60. In contrast, exposure of MCF7 cells to curcumin resulted in increased global levels of acetylated H3K18 and H4K16, and was less effective in inducing DNA damage markers. In addition to its effects on histone modifications, garcinol was found to block CBP/p300-mediated acetylation of the C-terminal activation domain of p53, but resulted in enhanced acetylation of p53K120, and accumulation of p53 in the cytoplasmic compartment. Finally, we show that the elevation of H4K20Me3 levels by garcinol correlated with increased expression of SUV420H2, and was prevented by siRNA targeting of SUV420H2. In

  13. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure or hydrophobic modification on thermal stability of xanthine oxidase.

    Halalipour, Ali; Duff, Michael R; Howell, Elizabeth E; Reyes-De-Corcuera, José I

    2017-08-01

    The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on the kinetics of thermal inactivation of xanthine oxidase (XOx) from bovine milk was studied. Inactivation of XOx followed pseudo-first-order kinetics at 0.1-300MPa and 55.0-70.0°C. High pressure up to at least 300MPa stabilized XOx at all the studied temperatures. The highest stabilization effect of HHP on XOx was at 200-300MPa at 55.0 and 58.6°C, and at 250-300MPa at 62.3-70.0°C. The stability of XOx increased 9.5 times at 300MPa and 70.0°C compared to atmospheric pressure at the same temperature. The activation energy of inactivation of XOx decreased with pressure and was 1.9 times less at 300MPa (97.0±8.2kJmol -1 ) than at 0.1MPa (181.7±12.1kJmol -1 ). High pressure decreased the dependence of the rate constant of inactivation to temperature effects compared to atmospheric pressure. The stabilizing effect of HHP on XOx was highest at 70.0°C where the activation volume of inactivation of XOx was 28.9±2.9cm 3 mol -1 . A second approach to try to increase XOx stability involved hydrophobic modification using aniline or benzoate. However, the thermal stability of XOx remained unaffected after 8-14 modifications of carboxyl side groups per XOx monomer with aniline, or 12-17 modifications of amino side groups per XOx monomer with benzoate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of soil-rock system on speleothems weathering in Bailong Cave, Yunnan Province, China*

    Wang, Jing; Song, Lin-hua

    2005-01-01

    Bailong Cave with its well-developed Middle Triassic calcareous dolomite’s system was opened as a show cave for visitors in 1988. The speleothem scenery has been strongly weathered as white powder on the outer layers. Study of the cave winds, permeability of soil-rock system and the chemical compositions of the dripping water indicated: (1) The cave dimension structure distinctively affects the cave winds, which were stronger at narrow places. (2) Based on the different soil grain size distribution, clay was the highest in composition in the soil. The response sense of dripping water to the rainwater percolation was slow. The density of joints and other openings in dolomite make the dolomite as mesh seepage body forming piles of thin and high columns and stalactites. (3) Study of 9 dripping water samples by HYDROWIN computer program showed that the major mineral in the water was dolomite. PMID:15682505

  15. Weathering Effect on {sup 99}Tc Leachability from Cementitious Waste Form

    Um, Wooyong [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    The mass transfer of contaminants from the solid phase to the waste form pore water, and subsequently out of the solid waste form, is directly related to the number and size distribution of pores as well as the microstructure of the waste form. Because permeability and porosity are controlled by pore aperture size, pore volume, and pore distribution, it is important to have some indication of how these characteristics change in the waste form during weathering. Knowledge of changes in these key parameters can be used to develop predictive models that estimate diffusivity or permeability of radioactive contaminants can be used to develop predictive models that estimate diffusivity or permeability of radioactive contaminants from waste forms for long-term performance assessment. It is known that dissolution or precipitation of amorphous/crystalline phases within waste forms alters their pore structure and controls the transport of contaminants our of waste forms. One very important precipitate is calcite, which is formed as a result of carbonation reactions in cement and other high-alkalinity waste forms. Enhanced oxidation can also increase Tc leachability from the waste form. To account for these changes, weathering experiments were conducted in advance to increase our understating of the long-term Tc leachability, especially out of the cementitious waste form. Pore structure analysis was characterized using both N{sub 2} absorption analysis and XMT techniques, and the results show that cementitious waste form is a relatively highly-porous material compared to other waste forms studied in this task, Detailed characterization of Cast Stone chunks and monolith specimens indicate that carbonation reactions can change the Cast Stone pore structure, which in turn may correlate with Tc leachability. Short carbonation reaction times for the Cast Stone causes pore volume and surface area increases, while the average pore diameter decreases. Based on the changes in pore

  16. Soil modification by invasive plants: Effects on native and invasive species of mixed-grass prairies

    Jordan, N.R.; Larson, D.L.; Huerd, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    Invasive plants are capable of modifying attributes of soil to facilitate further invasion by conspecifics and other invasive species. We assessed this capability in three important plant invaders of grasslands in the Great Plains region of North America: leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula), smooth brome (Bromus inermis) and crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum). In a glasshouse, these three invasives or a group of native species were grown separately through three cycles of growth and soil conditioning in both steam-pasteurized and non-pasteurized soils, after which we assessed seedling growth in these soils. Two of the three invasive species, Bromus and Agropyron, exhibited significant self-facilitation via soil modification. Bromus and Agropyron also had significant facilitative effects on other invasives via soil modification, while Euphorbia had significant antagonistic effects on the other invasives. Both Agropyron and Euphorbia consistently suppressed growth of two of three native forbs, while three native grasses were generally less affected. Almost all intra- and interspecific effects of invasive soil conditioning were dependent upon presence of soil biota from field sites where these species were successful invaders. Overall, these results suggest that that invasive modification of soil microbiota can facilitate plant invasion directly or via 'cross-facilitation' of other invasive species, and moreover has potential to impede restoration of native communities after removal of an invasive species. However, certain native species that are relatively insensitive to altered soil biota (as we observed in the case of the forb Linum lewisii and the native grasses), may be valuable as 'nurse'species in restoration efforts. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  17. Effect of the UV modification of α-crystallin on its ability to suppress nonspecific aggregation

    Ellozy, A.R.; Ceger, Patricia; Wang, R.H.; Dillon, James

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that structural modifications of α-crystallin during lens aging decrease it's effectiveness as a molecular chaperone. Some of these post-translational modifications have been linked to UV radiation, and this study was undertaken to investigate the effect of UV irradiation on the ability of α-crystallin to suppress nonspecific aggregation. The effect of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) was also investigated as a model for its glucoside (3-HKG), a main lens chromophore that has been linked to photochemical changes in the human lens. Alpha- and γ-crystallin solutions (1 mg/mL, 1:0.125 wt/wt) were photolyzed (transmission above 295nm) for various time intervals. Thermal denaturation of γ-crystallin with or without α-crystallin was carried out at 70 o C and increases in light scattering were measured at 360 nm. We found that (1) irradiation of γ-crystallin increased its susceptibility to heat-induced scattering. The addition of α-crystallin protects it against thermal denaturation, although its ability to do so decreases the longer γ-crystallin is irradiated and (2) irradiation of α-crystallin decreases its ability to suppress nonspecific aggregation and the presence of 3-HK during irradiation decreases its further. Our results indicate that post-translational modifications of α-crystallin due to UV irradiation affect the sites and mechanisms by which it interacts with γ-crystallin. The kinetics of γ-crystallin unfolding during thermal denaturation were also analyzed. We found that a simple two state model applied for nonirradiated γ-crystallin. This model does not hold when γ-crystallin is irradiated in the prescence or absence of α-crystallin. In these cases, two step or multistep mechanisms are more likely. (Author)

  18. Effects of electron-transfer chemical modification on the electrical characteristics of graphene

    Fan Xiaoyan; Tanigaki, Katsumi; Nouchi, Ryo; Yin Lichang

    2010-01-01

    Because of the large reactivity of single layer graphene to electron-transfer chemistries, 4-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate is employed to modify the electrical properties of graphene field-effect transistors. After modification, the transfer characteristics of chemically modified graphene show a reduction in the minimum conductivity, electron-hole mobility asymmetry, a decrease in the electron/hole mobility, and a positive shift of the charge neutrality point with broadening of the minimum conductivity region. These phenomena are attributed to a dediazoniation reaction and the adsorbates on the graphene surface.

  19. Effects of electron-transfer chemical modification on the electrical characteristics of graphene

    Fan Xiaoyan; Tanigaki, Katsumi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Nouchi, Ryo [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Yin Lichang, E-mail: nouchi@sspns.phys.tohoku.ac.jp [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2010-11-26

    Because of the large reactivity of single layer graphene to electron-transfer chemistries, 4-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate is employed to modify the electrical properties of graphene field-effect transistors. After modification, the transfer characteristics of chemically modified graphene show a reduction in the minimum conductivity, electron-hole mobility asymmetry, a decrease in the electron/hole mobility, and a positive shift of the charge neutrality point with broadening of the minimum conductivity region. These phenomena are attributed to a dediazoniation reaction and the adsorbates on the graphene surface.

  20. Magnetoresistive sensors for measurements of DNA hybridization kinetics - effect of TINA modifications

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Dufva, Martin; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2017-01-01

    We present the use of magnetoresistive sensors integrated in a microfluidic system for real-time studies of the hybridization kinetics of DNA labeled with magnetic nanoparticles to an array of surface-tethered probes. The nanoparticles were magnetized by the magnetic field from the sensor current....... A local negative reference ensured that only the specific binding signal was measured. Analysis of the real-time hybridization using a two-compartment model yielded both the association and dissociation constants kon, and koff. The effect of probe modifications with ortho-Twisted Intercalating Nucleic...

  1. Evaluating the effects of terrestrial ecosystems, climate and carbon dioxide on weathering over geological time: a global-scale process-based approach

    Taylor, Lyla L.; Banwart, Steve A.; Valdes, Paul J.; Leake, Jonathan R.; Beerling, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Global weathering of calcium and magnesium silicate rocks provides the long-term sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on a timescale of millions of years by causing precipitation of calcium carbonates on the seafloor. Catchment-scale field studies consistently indicate that vegetation increases silicate rock weathering, but incorporating the effects of trees and fungal symbionts into geochemical carbon cycle models has relied upon simple empirical scaling functions. Here, we describe the development and application of a process-based approach to deriving quantitative estimates of weathering by plant roots, associated symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi and climate. Our approach accounts for the influence of terrestrial primary productivity via nutrient uptake on soil chemistry and mineral weathering, driven by simulations using a dynamic global vegetation model coupled to an ocean–atmosphere general circulation model of the Earth's climate. The strategy is successfully validated against observations of weathering in watersheds around the world, indicating that it may have some utility when extrapolated into the past. When applied to a suite of six global simulations from 215 to 50 Ma, we find significantly larger effects over the past 220 Myr relative to the present day. Vegetation and mycorrhizal fungi enhanced climate-driven weathering by a factor of up to 2. Overall, we demonstrate a more realistic process-based treatment of plant fungal–geosphere interactions at the global scale, which constitutes a first step towards developing ‘next-generation’ geochemical models. PMID:22232768

  2. The Effects of Heat Advection on UK Weather and Climate Observations in the Vicinity of Small Urbanized Areas

    Bassett, Richard; Cai, Xiaoming; Chapman, Lee; Heaviside, Clare; Thornes, John E.

    2017-10-01

    Weather and climate networks traditionally follow rigorous siting guidelines, with individual stations located away from frost hollows, trees or urban areas. However, the diverse nature of the UK landscape suggests that the feasibility of siting stations that are truly representative of regional climate and free from distorting local effects is increasingly difficult. Whilst the urban heat island is a well-studied phenomenon and usually accounted for, the effect of warm urban air advected downwind is rarely considered, particularly at rural stations adjacent to urban areas. Until recently, urban heat advection (UHA) was viewed as an urban boundary-layer process through the formation of an urban plume that rises above the surface as it is advected. However, these dynamic UHA effects are shown to also have an impact on surface observations. Results show a significant difference in temperatures anomalies (p careful interpretation of long-term temperature data taken near small urban areas.

  3. Effect of doping on the modification of polycrystalline silicon by spontaneous reduction of diazonium salts

    Girard, A.; Coulon, N. [UMR-CNRS 6164, Institut d’Electronique et de Télécommunications de Rennes, Université de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Cardinaud, C. [UMR-CNRS 6502, Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, Université de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP32229, F-44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Mohammed-Brahim, T. [UMR-CNRS 6164, Institut d’Electronique et de Télécommunications de Rennes, Université de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Geneste, F., E-mail: Florence.Geneste@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR-CNRS 6226, Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, Equipe MaCSE, Université de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes cedex (France)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Spontaneous grafting of aryl diazonium salts on polycrystalline silicon surfaces. • Effect of the nature and level of doping on the efficiency of the functionalization. • The grafting process was more efficient on PolySi substrates than on monosilicon. • Influence of the crystal structure and grain boundaries on the modification procedure. • Role of the reducing power of the substrate on the grafting procedure. - Abstract: The chemical modification of doped polycrystalline silicon materials (N+, N++ and P++) and silicon (1 0 0) and (1 1 1) used as references is investigated by spontaneous reduction of diazonium salts. The effectiveness of the grafting process on all polySi surfaces is shown by AFM and XPS analyses. The effect of substrate doping on the efficiency of the electrografting process is compared by using the thicknesses of the deposited organic films. For a better accuracy, two methods are used to estimate the thicknesses: XPS and the coupling of a O{sub 2} plasma etching with AFM measurement. Structural characteristics of the poly-Si films were investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction to find a correlation between the structure of the material and its reactivity. Different parameters that could have an impact on the efficiency of the grafting procedure are discussed. The observed differences between differently doped silicon surfaces is rather limited, this is in agreement with the radical character of the reacting species.

  4. Effect of doping on the modification of polycrystalline silicon by spontaneous reduction of diazonium salts

    Girard, A.; Coulon, N.; Cardinaud, C.; Mohammed-Brahim, T.; Geneste, F.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Spontaneous grafting of aryl diazonium salts on polycrystalline silicon surfaces. • Effect of the nature and level of doping on the efficiency of the functionalization. • The grafting process was more efficient on PolySi substrates than on monosilicon. • Influence of the crystal structure and grain boundaries on the modification procedure. • Role of the reducing power of the substrate on the grafting procedure. - Abstract: The chemical modification of doped polycrystalline silicon materials (N+, N++ and P++) and silicon (1 0 0) and (1 1 1) used as references is investigated by spontaneous reduction of diazonium salts. The effectiveness of the grafting process on all polySi surfaces is shown by AFM and XPS analyses. The effect of substrate doping on the efficiency of the electrografting process is compared by using the thicknesses of the deposited organic films. For a better accuracy, two methods are used to estimate the thicknesses: XPS and the coupling of a O 2 plasma etching with AFM measurement. Structural characteristics of the poly-Si films were investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction to find a correlation between the structure of the material and its reactivity. Different parameters that could have an impact on the efficiency of the grafting procedure are discussed. The observed differences between differently doped silicon surfaces is rather limited, this is in agreement with the radical character of the reacting species

  5. Effect of Water Glass Modification on Its Viscosity and Wettability of Quartz Grains

    A. Kmita

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to develop a modifier for water glass. The method of thermal generation of metal oxide nanoparticleswas adapted and used in the research. Nanoparticles of ZnO from the thermal decomposition of basic zinc carbonate were used. A methodfor the modifier introduction was developed, and the effect of modifier content and organic solvent type on the physico-chemicalproperties of binder (viscosity and quartz wettability was determined. Binder viscosity was examined from the flow curves plotted with the help of a RHEOTEST 2 rotational rheometer equipped with proper software. Quartz wettability was determined examining timerelated changes in the value of the contact angle in a quartz-binder system, until full stabilisation of the angle value has been achieved.Binder modification was carried out on sodium water glass designated as R"145". The water glass modifiers were suspensions of ZnOnanoparticles in propanol and methanol at a fixed concentration of c = 0.3 M and with the size of nanoparticles comprised in a range of. Water glass modification with the suspensions of ZnO nanoparticles in methanol and propanol showed the effect ofmodifier on the water glass viscosity and quartz wettability. This effect depends on the type of alcohol used. The ZnO suspension inpropanol (alcohol with a longer hydrocarbon chain affects more strongly the viscosity of binder and quartz wettability than the methanol suspension.

  6. Effect of Water Glass Modification on Its Viscosity and Wettability of Quartz Grains

    Kmita A.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to develop a modifier for water glass. The method of thermal generation of metal oxide nanoparticles was adapted and used in the research. Nanoparticles of ZnO from the thermal decomposition of basic zinc carbonate were used. A method for the modifier introduction was developed, and the effect of modifier content and organic solvent type on the physico-chemical properties of binder (viscosity and quartz wettability was determined. Binder viscosity was examined from the flow curves plotted with the help of a RHEOTEST 2 rotational rheometer equipped with proper software. Quartz wettability was determined examining timerelated changes in the value of the contact angle in a quartz-binder system, until full stabilisation of the angle value has been achieved. Binder modification was carried out on sodium water glass designated as R"145". The water glass modifiers were suspensions of ZnO nanoparticles in propanol and methanol at a fixed concentration of c = 0.3 M and with the size of nanoparticles comprised in a range of . Water glass modification with the suspensions of ZnO nanoparticles in methanol and propanol showed the effect of modifier on the water glass viscosity and quartz wettability. This effect depends on the type of alcohol used. The ZnO suspension in propanol (alcohol with a longer hydrocarbon chain affects more strongly the viscosity of binder and quartz wettability than the methanol suspension

  7. The effects of landscape modifications on the long-term persistence of animal populations.

    Jacob Nabe-Nielsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effects of landscape modifications on the long-term persistence of wild animal populations is of crucial importance to wildlife managers and conservation biologists, but obtaining experimental evidence using real landscapes is usually impossible. To circumvent this problem we used individual-based models (IBMs of interacting animals in experimental modifications of a real Danish landscape. The models incorporate as much as possible of the behaviour and ecology of four species with contrasting life-history characteristics: skylark (Alauda arvensis, vole (Microtus agrestis, a ground beetle (Bembidion lampros and a linyphiid spider (Erigone atra. This allows us to quantify the population implications of experimental modifications of landscape configuration and composition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Starting with a real agricultural landscape, we progressively reduced landscape complexity by (i homogenizing habitat patch shapes, (ii randomizing the locations of the patches, and (iii randomizing the size of the patches. The first two steps increased landscape fragmentation. We assessed the effects of these manipulations on the long-term persistence of animal populations by measuring equilibrium population sizes and time to recovery after disturbance. Patch rearrangement and the presence of corridors had a large effect on the population dynamics of species whose local success depends on the surrounding terrain. Landscape modifications that reduced population sizes increased recovery times in the short-dispersing species, making small populations vulnerable to increasing disturbance. The species that were most strongly affected by large disturbances fluctuated little in population sizes in years when no perturbations took place. SIGNIFICANCE: Traditional approaches to the management and conservation of populations use either classical methods of population analysis, which fail to adequately account for the spatial configurations

  8. Effects of flooding on phosphorus and iron mobilization in highly weathered soils: Short-term effects and mechanisms

    Maranguit, Deejay

    2017-04-01

    The strong affinity of phosphorus (P) to iron (Fe) oxides and hydroxides in highly weathered tropical soils limits P availability and therefore plant productivity. In flooded soils, however, P fixed by Fe oxides and hydroxides can be released and transformed to a more available form because of Fe3+ reduction to Fe2+. These P dynamics in flooded soils are well documented for rice paddies. Such effects are much less studied in other land-use types under the influence of seasonal flooding, especially in the tropics during heavy monsoon rains. The aim of this study was to investigate the mobilization of P during flooding leading to anaerobic conditions in topsoil and subsoil horizons depending on land-use type. Samples were collected in highly weathered soils from four replicate sites under natural rainforest, jungle rubber, rubber and oil palm plantations in Sumatra, Indonesia. Topsoil and subsoil were taken to ensure a wide range of soil organic matter (SOM) and P contents. Soils were incubated under anaerobic, flooded conditions at 30 ± 1 oC for 60 days. Our results confirmed the hypothesis that soil flooding mobilizes P and increases P availability. Two distinct and opposite phases, however, were observed upon flooding. During the first three weeks of flooding, the dissolved P (DP) concentration peaked, simultaneously with a peak of dissolved Fe2+ (DFe2+) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the soil solution. After three weeks, P availability in soils decreased, although Fe-P and available P did not reach initial, pre-flooding levels. Accordingly, Fe dissolution and P mobilization were reversible processes. Furthermore, land-use type influenced the impacts of flooding on P and Fe forms mainly in the topsoil, where P dissolution and availability were generally higher under forest and, to a lesser extent, under jungle rubber. A positive correlation between DOC and DFe2+ (R2 = 0.42) in topsoil indicates that the intensity of microbially-mediated Fe3+ reduction is

  9. Effects of the Nanostructured Fe-V-Nb Modificators on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Si-Mn Steel

    Tiebao Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanostructured Fe-V-Nb master alloy was prepared in vacuum rapid quenching furnace and then was added in the steel melts as modificators before casting. Next, the effects of the nanostructured Fe-V-Nb modificators on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the steel were studied. The results show that the grain size of the steel has been effectively refined, which is mainly because the dispersed nanoscale particles can produce more nucleation sites during the solidification of the liquid steel. Tensile properties and fracture morphology reveal that the yield strength and toughness of the steel modified by nanostructured Fe-V-Nb modificators are better than that of the microalloyed steel. TEM analysis shows that vanadium and niobium in the modificators exist in the form of (V, Nb C which effectively increases the nucleation rate and leads to better mechanical properties of the steel.

  10. Flight Deck Weather Avoidance Decision Support: Implementation and Evaluation

    Wu, Shu-Chieh; Luna, Rocio; Johnson, Walter W.

    2013-01-01

    Weather related disruptions account for seventy percent of the delays in the National Airspace System (NAS). A key component in the weather plan of the Next Generation of Air Transportation System (NextGen) is to assimilate observed weather information and probabilistic forecasts into the decision process of flight crews and air traffic controllers. In this research we explore supporting flight crew weather decision making through the development of a flight deck predicted weather display system that utilizes weather predictions generated by ground-based radar. This system integrates and presents this weather information, together with in-flight trajectory modification tools, within a cockpit display of traffic information (CDTI) prototype. that the CDTI features 2D and perspective 3D visualization models of weather. The weather forecast products that we implemented were the Corridor Integrated Weather System (CIWS) and the Convective Weather Avoidance Model (CWAM), both developed by MIT Lincoln Lab. We evaluated the use of CIWS and CWAM for flight deck weather avoidance in two part-task experiments. Experiment 1 compared pilots' en route weather avoidance performance in four weather information conditions that differed in the type and amount of predicted forecast (CIWS current weather only, CIWS current and historical weather, CIWS current and forecast weather, CIWS current and forecast weather and CWAM predictions). Experiment 2 compared the use of perspective 3D and 21/2D presentations of weather for flight deck weather avoidance. Results showed that pilots could take advantage of longer range predicted weather forecasts in performing en route weather avoidance but more research will be needed to determine what combinations of information are optimal and how best to present them.

  11. Effect of photochemical smog associated with synoptic weather patterns on cardiovascular and respiratory hospital admissions in metropolitan Taipei.

    Lai, Li-Wei

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the relationship between photochemical smog (PS) (hourly ozone conc. >100 ppb), PS-related diseases, and the synoptic weather patterns during 2005-2009 in metropolitan Taipei. The results show that compared to respiratory ailments (ICD code 460-519) and asthma (ICD code 493), cardiovascular ailments (ICD code 390-459) were more clearly influenced by PS events. On the PS event day, the number of admissions of babies, children, and adults increased by 0.04 [95% CI 0.01-0.06], 0.03 [95% CI 0.00-0.07], and 1.12 [95% CI 0.36-1.89] (P < 0.05), respectively. The investigation showed that more than 70% of the PS events were associated primarily with the peripheral circulation of typhoons, Pacific pressure, and discrete Pacific pressure. PS events are a threat to public health. To avoid the ill effects of air pollution, residents should be informed about the daily weather patterns and air quality.

  12. Effects of Fire Suppression Agents and Weathering in the Analysis of Fire Debris by HS-MS eNose

    Barbara Falatová

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In arson attacks the detection of ignitable liquid residues (ILRs at fire scenes provides key evidence since ignitable liquids, such as gasoline, are commonly used to initiate the fire. In most forensic laboratories gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is employed for the analysis of ILRs. When a fire occurs, suppression agents are used to extinguish the fire and, before the scene is investigated, the samples at the scene are subjected to a variety of processes such as weathering, which can significantly modify the chemical composition and thus lead to erroneous conclusions. In order to avoid this possibility, the application of chemometric tools that help the analyst to extract useful information from data is very advantageous. The study described here concerned the application of a headspace-mass spectrometry electronic nose (HS-MS eNose combined with chemometric tools to determine the presence/absence of gasoline in weathered fire debris samples. The effect of applying two suppression agents (Cafoam Aquafoam AF-6 and Pyro-chem PK-80 Powder and delays in the sampling time (from 0 to 48 h were studied. It was found that, although the suppression systems affect the mass spectra, the HS-MS eNose in combination with suitable pattern recognition chemometric tools, such as linear discriminant analysis, is able to identify the presence of gasoline in any of the studied situations (100% correct classification.

  13. Effect of inclusions modified by rare earth elements (Ce, La) on localized marine corrosion in Q460NH weathering steel

    Liu, Chao; Revilla, Reynier I.; Liu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Dawei; Li, Xiaogang; Terryn, Herman

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •The initial stages of the pitting corrosion of Q460NH steel in a marine environment was studied. •Two different types of inclusions formed in the Q460NH steel after adding rare earth. •Both types of inclusions showed a lower Volta potential than the matrix. •Pitting corrosion was induced by the dissolution of inclusions rather than the matrix. •Inclusions containing (RE)AlO 3 dissolved completely as a result of the acidic solution formed in the pits. -- Abstract: In this work the initial stages of the pitting corrosion in Q460NH weathering steel in a marine environment was studied. To elucidate the effects of inclusions modified by rare earth (RE) elements on pitting corrosion, field emission-scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometry (FE-SEM-EDS) analyses, scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) tests, and a series of immersion tests were conducted. Two main types of inclusions were formed in the steel, and different pit morphologies were observed. The pitting corrosion was initiated by the dissolution of (RE) 2 O 2 S-(RE)xSy in both types of inclusions due to the lower potential of this phase compared to the matrix, which indicated that the inclusions in the Q460NH weathering steel had a lower pitting corrosion resistance than the matrix.

  14. The influence of thermal inertia on Mars' seasonal pressure variation and the effect of the weather component

    Wood, S. E.; Paige, D. A.

    Using a Leighton-Murray type diurnal and seasonal Mars thermal model, we found that it is possible to reproduce the seasonal variation in daily-averaged pressures (approximately 680-890 Pa) measured by Viking Lander 1 (VL1), during years without global dust storms, with a standard deviation of less than 5 Pa. In this simple model, surface CO2, frost condensation, and sublimation rates at each latitude are determined by the net effects of radiation, latent heat, and heat conduction in subsurface soil layers. An inherent assumption of our model is that the seasonal pressure variation is due entirely to the exchange of mass between the atmosphere and polar caps. However, the results of recent Mars GCM modeling have made it clear that there is a significant dynamical contribution to the seasonal pressure variation. This 'weather' component is primarily due to large-scale changes in atmospheric circulation, and its magnitude depends somewhat on the dust content of the atmosphere. The overall form of the theoretical weather component at the location of VL1, as calculated by the AMES GCM, remains the same over the typical range of Mars dust opacities.

  15. Erosion risk in the northern Gulf of Mexico - the effects of climate and weather

    Wahl, Thomas; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Long, Joseph W.

    2016-04-01

    Oceanographic variables such as mean sea level, tides, storm surges, and waves are drivers of erosion, and they act on different time scales ranging from hours (associated with weather) to seasonal and decadal variations and trends (associated with climate). Here we explore how the related sea-state conditions affect the erosion risk in the northern Gulf of Mexico for past and future climate scenarios. From the climate perspective we find that long-term trends in the relevant variables have caused an increase of ~30% in the erosion risk since the 1980s; at least half of this increase was due to changes in the wave climate. In the next decades, sea level rise will likely become the dominating driver and may, in combination with ongoing changes in the wave climate (and depending on the emission scenario), escalate the erosion risk by up to 300% over the next 30 years. We also find significant changes in the seasonal cycles of sea level and significant wave height, which have in combination caused a considerable increase of the erosion risk in summer and decrease in winter (superimposed onto the long-term trends). The influence of weather is assessed with a copula-based multivariate sea storm model in a Monte-Carlo framework; i.e. we simulate hundreds of thousands of artificial but physically consistent sea-state conditions to quantify how different our understanding of the present day erosion risk would be if we had seen more or less extreme combinations of the different sea-state parameters over the last three decades. We find, for example, that total water levels (tide + surge + wave run-up) associated with 100-year return periods may be underestimated by up to 30% and that the average number of impact hours - when total water levels exceeded the height of the dune toe (collision) or dune crest (overwash) - could have been up to 50% higher than what we inferred based on the actually observed oceanographic conditions. Assessing erosion risk in such a probabilistic

  16. The Effectiveness of Cognitive Bias Modification Interventions for Substance Addictions: A Meta-Analysis

    Cristea, Ioana; Kok, Robin; Cuijpers, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Cognitive bias modification (CBM) interventions, presumably targeting automatic processes, are considered particularly promising for addictions. We conducted a meta-analysis examining randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of CBM for substance addiction outcomes. Methods Studies...... were identified through systematic searches in bibliographical databases. We included RCTs of CBM interventions, alone or in combination with other treatments, for any type of addiction. We examined trial risk of bias, publication bias and possible moderators. Effects sizes were computed for post......-test and follow-up, using a random-effects model. We grouped outcome measures and reported results for addiction (all related measures), craving and cognitive bias. Results We identified 25 trials, 18 for alcohol problems, and 7 for smoking. At post-test, there was no significant effect of CBM for addiction, g...

  17. Silane surface modification effects on the electromagnetic properties of phosphatized iron-based SMCs

    Fan, Liang-Fang; Hsiang, Hsing-I.; Hung, Jia-Jing

    2018-03-01

    It is difficult to achieve homogeneous phosphatized iron powder dispersion in organic resins during the preparation of soft magnetic composites (SMCs). Inhomogeneous iron powder mixing in organic resins generally leads to the formation of micro-structural defects in SMCs and hence causes the magnetic properties to become worse. Phosphatized iron powder dispersion in organic resins can be improved by coating the phosphatized iron powder surfaces with a coupling agent. This study investigated the (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES) surface modification effects on the electromagnetic properties of phosphatized iron-based soft magnetic composites (SMCs). The results showed that the phosphatized iron powder surface can be modified using APTES to improve the phosphatized iron powder and epoxy resin compatibility and hence enhance phosphate iron powder epoxy mixing. The tensile strength, initial permeability, rated current under DC-bias superposition and magnetic loss in SMCs prepared using phosphatized iron powders can be effectively improved using APTES surface modification, which provides a promising candidate for power chip inductor applications.

  18. Anti-Zeno-effect recovery and Lamb-shift modification in modified vacuum

    Wang Dawei; Wang Ligang; Li Zhenghong; Zhu Shiyao

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the modification of the free vacuum on the quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno effects, as well as the Lamb (energy) shift of a multilevel atom, is studied. A unitary transformation method has been used to include the counter-rotating terms and to obtain the ground state of the whole Hamiltonian. The anti-Zeno effect is recovered if the modified density of states (DOS) has a dip near the transition frequency. The modification of DOS by a dip or a peak will change the Lamb shift compared with that in the free vacuum. Together with our unitary transformation method, there are three different methods to obtain the change in the Lamb shift. Using our method we investigate the change in the Lamb shift and obtain a formula for the change, which is the same as obtained with the method of Louisell [Quantum Statistical Properties of Radiation (Wiley, New York, 1973)] but different from the method of Cohen-Tannoudji et al. [Atom-Photon Interactions: Basic Processes and Applications (Wiley, New York, 1992), pp. 317 and 417]. The correctness of the Lamb shift formulas obtained by the three methods can be easily testified experimentally.

  19. Boundary condition effect on response modification factor of X-braced steel frames

    Walid A. Attia

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Design of the structures to resist seismic force depends on the theory of dissipation in elastic energy that already exists in response modification factor “R-factor”. The main problem in codes gives a constant value for R-factor, since change in boundary conditions of building change in behavior of braced steel frame structures and that effects on R-factor. This study is an attempt to assess overstrength, ductility and response modification factor of X-braced steel frame under change in boundary conditions, as change in the direction of strong axis of column and connection support type of column besides variation in storey and bays numbers to be 21 frames and each frame has 8 different boundary conditions as sum of 168 cases for analysis. These frames were analyzed by using nonlinear static “pushover” analysis. As results of this study change in support type and direction of strong axis of column give large change in value of R-factor; the minimum value was 4.37 and maximum value 10.97. Minimum value is close to code value that’s mean the code is more conservative in suggesting of R-factor and gives a large factor of safety. Change in the location of bracing gives change in value of R-factor for all boundary conditions. Change in direction of strong axis of columns and support type didn’t give change in value of fundamental period, all boundary conditions. Keywords: Response modification factor, Ductility reduction factor, Overstrength factor, Boundary conditions, Brace frame, Nonlinear static analysis “Pushover”

  20. Synergistic effects of an extreme weather event and habitat fragmentation on a specialised insect herbivore.

    Piessens, Katrien; Adriaens, Dries; Jacquemyn, Hans; Honnay, Olivier

    2009-02-01

    Habitat fragmentation is considered to be one of the main causes of population decline and species extinction worldwide. Furthermore, habitat fragmentation can decrease the ability of populations to resist and to recover from environmental disturbances such as extreme weather events, which are expected to occur at an increasing rate as a result of climate change. In this study, we investigated how calcareous grassland fragmentation affected the impact of the climatically extreme summer of 2003 on egg deposition rates, population size variation and survival of the blue butterfly Cupido minimus, a specialist herbivore of Anthyllis vulneraria. Immediately after the 2003 summer heat wave, populations of the host plant declined in size; this was paralleled with decreases in population size of the herbivore and altered egg deposition rates. In 2006 at the end of the monitoring period, however, most A. vulneraria populations had recovered and only one population went extinct. In contrast, several butterfly populations had gone extinct between 2003 and 2006. Extinction probability was significantly related to initial population size, with small populations having a higher risk of extinction than large populations. These results support the prediction that species of higher trophic levels are more susceptible to extinction due to habitat fragmentation and severe disturbances.

  1. Effect of long-term electrodialytic soil remediation on Pb removal and soil weathering

    Skibsted, Gry; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Elektorowicz, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Weathering of soil minerals during long-term electrochemical soil remediation was evaluated for two different soils: an industrially Pb contaminated soil with high carbonate content and an unpolluted soil with low carbonate content. A constant current of 5 mA was applied for 842 days, and sampling...... was made 22 times during the treatment. The overall qualitative mineral composition was unaffected by electrodialysis, except for calcite removal which was complete. However, dissolution and removal of Al, Fe, Si, Mg, Ca and Pb from the soil during the treatment exceeded the fraction extractable by...... digestion in 7 M HNO3, and provided evidence of enhanced mineral dissolution induced by the current. Nevertheless, the total dissolved Si and Al only constituted 0.2-0.3 % and 1.1-3.5 % of the total content, while the Pb overall removal from the contaminated soil was only 8.1 %. An observed reduction in the...

  2. Surface Weather, Signal Service and Weather Bureau

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Weather, Signal Service and Weather Bureau (SWSSWB) Records primarily created by the United States Army Signal Service from 1819 until the paid and voluntary...

  3. Skin effect modifications of the Resistive Wall Mode dynamics in tokamaks

    Villone, Fabio, E-mail: villone@unicas.it [Ass. Euratom/ENEA/CREATE, DIEI, Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Via Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino, FR (Italy); Pustovitov, Vladimir D. [Institute of Tokamak Physics, National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Pl. Kurchatova 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-22

    We present the first evidence of the skin-effect modification of the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) dynamics in a tokamak. The computations are performed with the CarMa code, using its unique ability of treating volumetric 3D conducting structures. The results prove that conventional thin-wall models and codes, assuming the thin equivalent wall located on the inner side of a real (thick) wall, may fail to get accurate estimates of RWM growth rates, since the inclusion of the skin effect makes the growth rates always larger than otherwise. The difference is noticeable even for the conventional slow RWMs and becomes substantial for faster modes. Some possible equivalent thin-wall modeling approaches are also discussed.

  4. Probing ion-specific effects on aqueous acetate solutions: Ion pairing versus water structure modifications

    Tristan Petit

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of monovalent cations (Li+, K+, NH4+, Na+ on the water structure in aqueous chloride and acetate solutions was characterized by oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS, X-ray emission spectroscopy, and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS of a liquid microjet. We show ion- and counterion dependent effects on the emission spectra of the oxygen K-edge, which we attribute to modifications of the hydrogen bond network of water. For acetates, ion pairing with carboxylates was also probed selectively by XAS and RIXS. We correlate our experimental results to speciation data and to the salting-out properties of the cations.

  5. Effects of Nb Modification and Cooling Rate on the Microstructure in an Ultrahigh Carbon Steel

    Hecht, Matthew D.; Webler, Bryan A.; Picard, Yoosuf N.

    2018-06-01

    In this study, two different melting methods were used to investigate effects of Nb modification on microstructure in ultrahigh carbon steel (UHCS). Nb-free and Nb-modified UHCS samples were produced by melting and resolidifying an industrially produced base UHCS with and without addition of Nb powder. Microstructure was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron dispersive spectroscopy. Equilibrium computations of phase fractions and compositions were utilized to help describe microstructural changes caused by the Nb additions. Nb combined with C to form NbC structures before and during austenite solidification, reducing the effective amount of carbon available for the other phases. Cementite network spacing in the Nb-free samples was controlled by the cooling rate during solidification (faster cooling led to a more refined network). Network spacing in the Nb-modified UHCS could be enlarged by NbC structures that formed cooperatively with austenite.

  6. Effects of compositional modifications on the sensitization behavior of Fe-Cr-Mn steels

    Edgemon, G.L.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Bell, G.E.C.

    1992-01-01

    Fe-Cr-Mn steels may possibly be used in conjuction with aqueous blankets or coolants in a fusion device. Therefore, standard chemical immersion (modified Strauss) tests were conducted to characterize the effects of compositional modifications on the thermal sensitization behavior of these steels. A good correlation among weight losses, intergranular corrosion, and cracking was found. The most effective means of decreasing their susceptibility was through reduction of the carbon concentration of these steels to 0.1%, but the sensitization resistance of Fe-Cr-Mn-0.1 C compositions was still inferior to type 304L and other similar stainless steels. Alloying additions that form stable carbides did not have a very significant influence on the sensitization behavior. (orig.)

  7. Examining the controlling factors on Southern Ocean clouds and their radiative effects in the context of midlatitude weather systems

    Kelleher, M. K.; Grise, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    Clouds and their associated radiative effects are one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the present generation of global climate models. One region where model biases are especially large is over the Southern Ocean, where many models systematically underestimate the climatological shortwave cloud radiative effects (CRE) and/or misrepresent the relationship between shortwave CRE and atmospheric dynamics. Previous research has shown that two "cloud controlling factors", estimated inversion strength (EIS) and mid-tropospheric vertical velocity, are helpful in explaining the relationship between CRE and atmospheric dynamics on monthly timescales. For example, when the Southern Hemisphere midlatitude jet shifts poleward on monthly timescales, the high clouds and their associated longwave CRE shift poleward with the jet, consistent with a poleward shift of the storm track and the attendant vertical velocity anomalies. However, the observed changes in shortwave CRE with a poleward jet shift are small due to a trade-off between the competing effects of opposing EIS and vertical velocity anomalies. This study extends these previous findings to examine the relationship between Southern Ocean cloud controlling factors and CRE on daily timescales. On a daily timescale, the relationship of EIS and vertical velocity with CRE is more complex, due in part to the presence of transient weather systems. Composites of EIS, vertical velocity, longwave CRE, and shortwave CRE around extratropical cyclones and anticyclones are constructed to examine how the CRE anomalies vary in different sectors of midlatitude weather systems and the role that EIS and vertical velocity play in determining those anomalies. The relationships between the cloud controlling factors and CRE on daily timescales provide key insight into the underlying physical processes responsible for the relationships between midlatitude cloud controlling factors and CRE previously documented on monthly timescales.

  8. Quantifying the VNIR Effects of Nanophase Iron Generated through the Space Weathering of Silicates: Reconciling Modeled Data with Laboratory Observations

    Legett, C., IV; Glotch, T. D.; Lucey, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Space weathering is a diverse set of processes that occur on the surfaces of airless bodies due to exposure to the space environment. One of the effects of space weathering is the generation of nanophase iron particles in glassy rims on mineral grains due to sputtering of iron-bearing minerals. These particles have a size-dependent effect on visible and near infrared (VNIR) reflectance spectra with smaller diameter particles (behavior), while larger particles (> 300 nm) darken without reddening. Between these two sizes, a gradual shift between these two behaviors occurs. In this work, we present results from the Multiple Sphere T-Matrix (MSTM) scattering model in combination with Hapke theory to explore the particle size and iron content parameter spaces with respect to VNIR (700-1700 nm) spectral slope. Previous work has shown that the MSTM-Hapke hybrid model offers improvements over Mie-Hapke models. Virtual particles are constructed out of an arbitrary number of spheres, and each sphere is assigned a refractive index and extinction coefficient for each wavelength of interest. The model then directly solves Maxwell's Equations at every wave-particle interface to predict the scattering, extinction and absorption efficiencies. These are then put into a simplified Hapke bidirectional reflectance model that yields a predicted reflectance. Preliminary results show an area of maximum slopes for iron particle diameters planned to better refine the extent of this region. Companion laboratory work using mixtures of powdered aerogel and nanophase iron particles provides a point of comparison to modeling efforts. The effects on reflectance and emissivity values due to particle size in a nearly ideal scatterer (aerogel) are also observed with comparisons to model data.

  9. Monthly Weather Review

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Supplements to the Monthly Weather Review publication. The Weather Bureau published the Monthly weather review Supplement irregularly from 1914 to 1949. The...

  10. Does attention redirection contribute to the effectiveness of attention bias modification on social anxiety?

    Yao, Nisha; Yu, Hongyu; Qian, Mingyi; Li, Songwei

    2015-12-01

    Attention bias modification (ABM) is designed to modify threat-related attention bias and thus alleviate anxiety. The current research examined whether consistently directing attention towards targeted goals per se contributes to ABM efficacy. We randomly assigned 68 non-clinical college students with elevated social anxiety to non-valence-specific attend-to-geometrics (AGC), attention modification (AMC), or attention control (ACC) conditions. We assessed subjective, behavioral, and physiological reactivity to a speech task and self-reported social anxiety symptoms. After training, participants in the AMC exhibited an attention avoidance from threat, and those in the AGC responded more rapidly toward targeted geometrics. There was a significant pre- to post-reduction in subjective speech distress across groups, but behavioral and physiological reactivity to speech, as well as self-report social anxiety symptoms, remained unchanged. These results lead to questions concerning effectiveness of ABM training for reducing social anxiety. Further examination of the current ABM protocol is required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of selenylation modification on immune-enhancing activity of garlic polysaccharide.

    Shulei Qiu

    Full Text Available The garlic polysaccharide was modified by HNO3-Na2SeO3 method according to orthogonal design L9(3(4 to obtain nine selenizing garlic polysaccharides, sGPS1-sGPS9. Their effects on chicken peripheral lymphocytes proliferation in vitro were compared by MTT assay. The results showed that sGPSs could significantly promote lymphocytes proliferation, sGPS3, sGPS5 and sGPS6 presented stronger efficacy. In vivo experiment, 14-day-old chickens were injected respectively with sGPS3, sGPS5 and sGPS6 when they were vaccinated with ND vaccine taking unmodified GPS as control. The results showed that three sGPSs could significantly promote lymphocyte proliferation, enhance serum antibody titer, IFN-γ and IL-2 contents. These results indicated that selenylation modification could significantly enhance the immune-enhancing activity of GPS, sGPS6 possessed the best efficacy and could be as a candidate drug of immunoenhancer. Its optimal modification conditions were 400 mg of sodium selenite for 500 mg of GPS, reaction temperature of 70°C and reaction time of 6 h.

  12. Effects of La and Ce Addition on the Modification of Al-Si Based Alloys

    Emad M. Elgallad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the effects of the addition of rare earth metals (mainly lanthanum and cerium on the eutectic Si characteristics in Al-Si based alloys. Based on the solidification curves and microstructural examination of the corresponding alloys, it was found that addition of La or Ce increases the alloy melting temperature and the Al-Si eutectic temperature, with an Al-Si recalescence of 2-3°C, and the appearance of post-α-Al peaks attributed to precipitation of rare earth intermetallics. Addition of La or Ce to Al-(7–13% Si causes only partial modification of the eutectic Si particles. Lanthanum has a high affinity to react with Sr, which weakens the modification efficiency of the latter. Cerium, however, has a high affinity for Ti, forming a large amount of sludge. Due to the large difference in the length of the eutectic Si particles in the same sample, the normal use of standard deviation in this case is meaningless.

  13. Effect of pH on Physicochemical Properties of Cassava Starch Modification Using Ozone

    Pudjihastuti Isti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, starch modification is carried out in order to change the native properties into the better ones, such as high stability, brightness, and better texture. The objectives of this study are to investigate the effect of pH on carboxyl content, swelling power, and water solubility of starch. This research was divided into two main stages, i.e. starch modification by ozone oxidation and analysis. The physicochemical properties of modified cassava starch were investigated under various reaction pH of 7-10 and the reaction time between 0-240 minutes. Reaction condition at pH 10 provided the higher value of carboxyl content and water solubility, but the lower of swelling power. This increase in solubility indicates that the modified oxidation starch readily dissolves in water, due to its small size granules and high amylose content. The significant changes of both parameters were achieved in the first 120 minutes of ozone reaction times. The graphic pattern of water solubility was in contrast with swelling power.

  14. Space weather effects on airline communications in the high latitude regions

    Stocker, Alan; Siddle, Dave; Warrington, Mike; Honary, Farideh; Zaalov, Nikolay; Homam, Mariyam; Boteler, David; Danskin, Donald; de Franceschi, Georgiana; Ascaneus, Svend

    2013-04-01

    In the polar regions, ground-based VHF facilities for air-traffic control are lacking (and non-existent on the Russian side of the pole) and satellite communication systems either not available or expensive to retrofit to current aircraft and hence there remains a need for HF communication systems. Unfortunately, at these latitudes space weather can significantly affect the propagation of HF radio signals and the forecasting techniques currently employed by the airline industry are somewhat crude. In this paper, a new project that aims to provide forecasting of HF propagation characteristics for use by civilian airlines operating over polar routes will be described and preliminary results presented. Previous work in this area [e.g. Stocker et al., 2007] has focussed on taking HF signal measurements (e.g. SNR, delay and Doppler spread, and direction of arrival) on a limited number of propagation paths and developing an ionospheric model that incorporates high latitude features (e.g. polar patches and arcs) which, when combined with raytracing, allows the broad characteristics of the observations to be reproduced [Warrington et al., 2012]. The new project will greatly extend this work and consists of a number of stages. Firstly, HF measurements from an extensive network of purpose built transmitters and receivers spanning the Arctic regions will be collected and analysed. In order to test a wide variety of scenarios, the propagation paths will have different characteristics, e.g. different lengths and covering different parts of the northern ionosphere (i.e. polar cap paths where both terminals are in the polar cap, trans-auroral paths, and sub-auroral paths) and observations will be taken at a range of HF frequencies for a period covering the current (so far weak) solar maximum and part of the declining phase. Simultaneously, high latitude absorption measurements utilising the Global Riometer Array (GLORIA) will be collected and analysed. Next, the observations of

  15. Transient Response Dynamic Module Modifications to Include Static and Kinetic Friction Effects

    Misel, J. E.; Nenno, S. B.; Takahashi, D.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology that supports forced transient response dynamic solutions when both static and kinetic friction effects are included in a structural system model is described. Modifications that support this type of nonlinear transient response solution are summarized for the transient response dynamics (TRD) NASTRAN module. An overview of specific modifications for the NASTRAN processing subroutines, INITL, TRD1C, and TRD1D, are described with further details regarding inspection of nonlinear input definitions to define the type of nonlinear solution required, along with additional initialization requirements and specific calculation subroutines to successfully solve the transient response problem. The extension of the basic NASTRAN nonlinear methodology is presented through several stages of development to the point where constraint equations and residual flexibility effects are introduced into the finite difference Newmark-Beta recurrsion formulas. Particular emphasis is placed on cost effective solutions for large finite element models such as the Space Shuttle with friction degrees of freedom between the orbiter and payloads mounted in the cargo bay. An alteration to the dynamic finite difference equations of motion is discussed, which allows one to include friction effects at reasonable cost for large structural systems such as the Space Shuttle. Data are presented to indicate the possible impact of transient friction loads to the payload designer for the Space Shuttle. Transient response solution data are also included, which compare solutions without friction forces and those with friction forces for payloads mounted in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. These data indicate that payload components can be sensitive to friction induced loads.

  16. Appalachian mine soil morphology and properties: Effects of weathering and mining method

    Haering, K.C.; Daniels, W.L.; Galbraith, J.M. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2004-08-01

    Surface coal mining and reclamation methods in the Appalachians have changed dramatically since the passage of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) of 1977 and subsequent improvements in mining and reclamation technology. In this study, 30 pre-SMCRA mine soil profiles (4-20 yr old) were examined and sampled in 1980 and compared with 20 mine soil profiles (8-13 yr old) described in the same area in 2002 after it had been completely remined by modern deep cut methods. Mine soils in both sampling years had high rock fragment content (42-81%), relatively well-developed A horizons, and generally exhibited A-C or A-AC-C horizonation. Although six Bw horizons were described in 1980, only two met all requirements for cambic horizons. The 1980 mine soils developed in overburden dominated by oxidized, preweathered material due to relatively shallow mining cuts. The 1980 mine soils had lower rock fragment content, finer textures, lower pH, and tended to be more heterogeneous in horizonation, morphology, and texture than soils observed in 2002, which had formed primarily in unweathered overburden from deeper cuts. Half the pedons sampled in both years had densic materials within 70 cm of the surface. Four poorly to very poorly drained soil profiles were described in each sampling year containing distinct hydric soil indicators in surface horizons. While older pre-SMCRA mine soils do have many properties in common with newer mine soils, their properties are highly influenced by the fact that they generally have formed in more weathered overburden from higher in the geologic column. Overall, Appalachian mine soils are much more complex in subsoil morphology than commonly assumed, and differential compaction greatly complicates their internal drainage and limits their overall productivity potential.

  17. The effect of wet-dry weathering on the rate of bedrock river channel erosion by saltating gravel

    Inoue, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Satomi; Nelson, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the bedrock erosion rate E because of collisions of saltating bedload can be expressed by E = βqb(1-Pc), where qb is the sediment transport rate, Pc is the extent of alluvial cover, and β is the abrasion coefficient. However, the dependence of the abrasion coefficient on the physical characteristics of the bedrock material is poorly known, and in particular, the effects of wet-dry weathering on the saltation-abrasion bedrock incision has not been specifically characterized. Observation suggests that the typical wet-dry cycling of exposed bedrock in river beds gives rise to cracks and voids that are likely to alter the incision rate of the material when subjected to impacts of moving sediment. In this study, flume experiments are performed to develop an understanding of how wet-dry cycling affects the rock tensile strength and the bedrock erosion rate. To represent the physical effects of weathering, boring cores taken from natural bedrock channel are exposed to artificial wet-dry cycles. The experimental results suggest the following: (1) the abrasion coefficient for fresh bedrock is estimated by β = 1.0 × 10− 4σT− 2(d/ksb)0.5, where σT is the tensile strength, d is the diameter of colliding gravel, and ksb is the hydraulic roughness height of bedrock; (2) the tensile strength of the bedrock decreases exponentially as a result of repeated wet-dry cycles, σT/σT0 = exp (-CTNWa0/σT0), where σT0 is the initial tensile strength, Wa0 is the initial normalized rate of water absorption., N is the number of wet-dry cycles, and CT is a constant; (3) the erosion rate of fresh bedrock depends on the inverse of the square of tensile strength, but the erosion rate of weathered bedrock depends on the − 1.5 power of tensile strength.

  18. Reducing prediction uncertainty of weather controlled systems

    Doeswijk, T.G.

    2007-01-01

    In closed agricultural systems the weather acts both as a disturbance and as a resource. By using weather forecasts in control strategies the effects of disturbances can be minimized whereas the resources can be utilized. In this situation weather forecast uncertainty and model based control are

  19. Weathering and landscape evolution

    Turkington, Alice V.; Phillips, Jonathan D.; Campbell, Sean W.

    2005-04-01

    In recognition of the fundamental control exerted by weathering on landscape evolution and topographic development, the 35th Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium was convened under the theme of Weathering and Landscape Evolution. The papers and posters presented at the conference imparted the state-of-the-art in weathering geomorphology, tackled the issue of scale linkage in geomorphic studies and offered a vehicle for interdisciplinary communication on research into weathering and landscape evolution. The papers included in this special issue are encapsulated here under the general themes of weathering mantles, weathering and relative dating, weathering and denudation, weathering processes and controls and the 'big picture'.

  20. Posttranslational modifications of Rab proteins cause effective displacement of GDP dissociation inhibitor.

    Oesterlin, Lena K; Goody, Roger S; Itzen, Aymelt

    2012-04-10

    Intracellular vesicular trafficking is regulated by approximately 60 members of the Rab subfamily of small Ras-like GDP/GTP binding proteins. Rab proteins cycle between inactive and active states as well as between cytosolic and membrane bound forms. Membrane extraction/delivery and cytosolic distribution of Rabs is mediated by interaction with the protein GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) that binds to prenylated inactive (GDP-bound) Rab proteins. Because the Rab:GDP:GDI complex is of high affinity, the question arises of how GDI can be displaced efficiently from Rab protein in order to allow the necessary recruitment of the Rab to its specific target membrane. While there is strong evidence that DrrA, as a bacterially encoded GDP/GTP exchange factor, contributes to this event, we show here that posttranslational modifications of Rabs can also modulate the affinity for GDI and thus cause effective displacement of GDI from Rab:GDI complexes. These activities have been found associated with the phosphocholination and adenylylation activities of the enzymes AnkX and DrrA/SidM, respectively, from the pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila. Both modifications occur after spontaneous dissociation of Rab:GDI complexes within their natural equilibrium. Therefore, the effective GDI displacement that is observed is caused by inhibition of reformation of Rab:GDI complexes. Interestingly, in contrast to adenylylation by DrrA, AnkX can covalently modify inactive Rabs with high catalytic efficiency even when GDP is bound to the GTPase and hence can inhibit binding of GDI to Rab:GDP complexes. We therefore speculate that human cells could employ similar mechanisms in the absence of infection to effectively displace Rabs from GDI.

  1. Weathering of natural uranyl oxide hydrates: Schoepite polytypes and dehydration effects

    Finch, R.J.; Miller, M.L.; Ewing, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    Partial dehydration of schoepite, UO 3 x2H 2 O, is reported to produce three discrete schoepite polytypes with characteristic unit cell parameters, but this has not been confirmed. The loss of structural water from the schoepite interlayer results in progressive modification to the structure; expansion parallel to schoepite cleavage planes, and extensive fracturing. Dehydration of schoepite commences at grain boundaries and progresses inward until the entire grain is converted to dehydrated schoepite, UO 3 x0.8H 2 O. The volume decrease associated with dehydration results in expanded grain boundaries. These gaps can provide pathways for the access of groundwater, and uranyl silicates and uranyl carbonates have precipitated within these gaps, replacing both schoepite and dehydrated schoepite. Schoepite, however, is not observed to re-precipitate where in contact with dehydrated schoepite. Thus, while the formation of schoepite early during the corrosion of uraninite may be favored, schoepite is not a long-term solubility limiting phase for oxidized uranium in natural ground waters containing dissolved silica or carbonate. (orig.)

  2. Effect modification of the association between temperature variability and daily cardiovascular mortality by air pollutants in three Chinese cities.

    Luo, Kai; Li, Runkui; Wang, Zongshuang; Zhang, Ruiming; Xu, Qun

    2017-11-01

    There is limited evidence showing the mortality effects of temperature variability (TV) on cardiovascular diseases. The joint effects between TV and air pollutants are also less well-established. This study aims to assess the effect modification of TV-cardiovascular mortality by air pollutants in three Chinese cities (Beijing, Nanjing and Chengdu). Data of daily mortality, air pollutants and meteorological factors from 2008 to 2011 was collected from each city. TV was calculated as the standard deviation of daily maximum and minimum temperatures over exposure days. The city-specific effect estimates of TV on cardiovascular mortality were calculated using a quasi-Poisson regression model, adjusting for potential confounders (e.g., seasonality and temperature). An interaction term of TV and a three-level air pollutants stratum indicator was included in the models. Effect modifications by air pollutants were assessed by comparing the estimates of TV's effect between pollutant stratums and calculating the corresponding 95% confidential interval of the differences. Multivariate meta-analysis was conducted to obtain the pooled estimates. The data showed that TV was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular mortality, especially for longer TV exposure days (0-8 days, TV08). This association was still observed after adjusting for air pollutants on current day or the previous two days. Stronger estimates were observed in females, but no significant difference between males and females was detected, indicating the absence of evidence of effect modification by gender. Estimates of TV-cardiovascular mortality varied across two season periods (warm and cool season) and age groups, but the evidence of effect modification by age and seasons was absent. Regarding the effect modification of TV-cardiovascular mortality association by air pollutants, a significant effect modification was identified for PM 10, but not for NO 2 and SO 2 in the whole population for all TV

  3. Does napping enhance the effects of Cognitive Bias Modification-Appraisal training? An experimental study.

    Woud, Marcella L; Cwik, Jan C; Blackwell, Simon E; Kleim, Birgit; Holmes, Emily A; Adolph, Dirk; Zhang, Hui; Margraf, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is characterised by dysfunctional appraisals of the trauma and its consequences including one's own symptoms. Experimental studies have shown that Cognitive Bias Modification-Appraisal (CBM-App) training can reduce dysfunctional interpretations and analog trauma symptoms. One important question is how to enhance the effects of CBM-App. Following work suggesting that sleep has beneficial effects on consolidation processes and can thus improve learning, the present study investigated whether a brief period of sleep (i.e., a nap) enhances the effects of CBM-App. All participants watched a stressful movie as an analogue trauma induction. After that, participants received either positive or negative CBM-App training. Within each training, half of the participants then had a 90-minute nap or watched a neutral movie. Results showed that the CBM training induced training-congruent appraisals. Sleep did not enhance this effect. Participants who slept, however, experienced fewer intrusive memories of the analogue trauma, but this effect was independent of the CBM condition. These results provide valuable information about the effects of sleep during a 90-minute nap period on encoding of analogue trauma and emotional learning in the context of appraisal, and highlight the importance of sleep as a focus for continued research.

  4. Does napping enhance the effects of Cognitive Bias Modification-Appraisal training? An experimental study.

    Marcella L Woud

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD is characterised by dysfunctional appraisals of the trauma and its consequences including one's own symptoms. Experimental studies have shown that Cognitive Bias Modification-Appraisal (CBM-App training can reduce dysfunctional interpretations and analog trauma symptoms. One important question is how to enhance the effects of CBM-App. Following work suggesting that sleep has beneficial effects on consolidation processes and can thus improve learning, the present study investigated whether a brief period of sleep (i.e., a nap enhances the effects of CBM-App. All participants watched a stressful movie as an analogue trauma induction. After that, participants received either positive or negative CBM-App training. Within each training, half of the participants then had a 90-minute nap or watched a neutral movie. Results showed that the CBM training induced training-congruent appraisals. Sleep did not enhance this effect. Participants who slept, however, experienced fewer intrusive memories of the analogue trauma, but this effect was independent of the CBM condition. These results provide valuable information about the effects of sleep during a 90-minute nap period on encoding of analogue trauma and emotional learning in the context of appraisal, and highlight the importance of sleep as a focus for continued research.

  5. Effects of Wood Roughness, Light Pigments, and Water Repellent on the Color Stability of Painted Spruce Subjected to Natural and Accelerated Weathering

    Ladislav Reinprecht

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the color stability of painted Norway spruce (Picea abies samples subjected to natural and accelerated weathering, using Duncan’s tests and correlation analyses. The following effects were studied: (1 the different initial roughness of the wood; (2 use of transparent or lightly-pigmented top-coat layers; and (3 the presence of the final water-repellent layer. Natural weathering at a 45° slope in an industrial zone lasted 104 weeks, whereas accelerated weathering in Xenotest with 0.55 W/m2 UV irradiation at 340 nm and sprayed water lasted 12 weeks. The color stability of painted spruce, measured in a CIE-L*a*b* system, was not, in the majority of cases, significantly affected by the initial roughness of the wood, the type of top-coat (WoodCare UV or PerlColor layer, or presence of the final water repellent (AquaStop layer. The light pine or larch pigments in the top-coat layers had positive color stabilizing effects. In their presence, the darkening (-L* and total color differences (E* of the painted samples dropped ca. 2.5 times during exterior weathering and ca. 5 times during Xenotest weathering. Samples painted with transparent coatings turned a reddish shade (+a* during the Xenotest, while those exposed to the exterior absorbed dirt and became more blue (-b*.

  6. Effect of Mediterranean Diet in Diabetes Control and Cardiovascular Risk Modification: A Systematic Review

    Dana eSleiman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the past few years, there has been a worldwide significant increase in the incidence of type II diabetes (T2DM with both increase in morbidity and mortality. Controlling diabetes through life style modifications, including diet and exercise has always been the cornerstone in diabetes management. As a matter of fact, a number of studies addressed the potential protective role of Mediterranean diet in diabetic patients. Increasing evidence suggests that the Mediterranean diet could be of benefit in diseases associated with chronic inflammation, including metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity as well as atherosclerosis, cancer, pulmonary diseases, and cognition disorders. Methods: A systematic review was conducted on the effect of Mediterranean diet in diabetes control and cardiovascular risk modification as well as the possible mechanism through which this diet might exhibit its beneficial role. We did a comprehensive search of multiple electronic databases such as Medline, Google Scholars, PubMed, and the Cochrane central register data until May 2014. We included cross-sectional, prospective and controlled clinical trials that looked at the associations between Mediterranean diet and indices of diabetes control such HbA1c, fasting glucose, and HOMA, in addition to cardiovascular and peripheral vascular outcomes.Outcome/Conclusion: Most of the studies showed favorable effects of Mediterranean diet on glycemic control and CVD, although a certain degree of controversy remains regarding some issues, such as obesity. Important methodological differences and limitations in the studies make it difficult to compare results, thus further longer term studies are needed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of the Mediterranean diet along with the possibility of explaining its mechanism.

  7. Tribocorrosion studies of metallic biomaterials: The effect of plasma nitriding and DLC surface modifications.

    Zhao, Guo-Hua; Aune, Ragnhild E; Espallargas, Nuria

    2016-10-01

    The medical grade pure titanium, stainless steel and CoCrMo alloy have been utilized as biomaterials for load-bearing orthopedic prosthesis. The conventional surgery metals suffer from a combined effect of wear and corrosion once they are implanted, which may significantly accelerate the material degradation process. In this work, the tribocorrosion performance of the metallic biomaterials with different surface modifications was studied in the simulated body fluid for the purpose of investigating the effect of the surface treatments on the tribocorrosion performance and eventually finding the most suitable implantation materials. The metals were subjected to surface modifications by plasma nitriding in different treatment temperatures or physical vapor deposition (PVD) to produce diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating, respectively. The dry wear and tribocorrosion properties of the samples were evaluated by using a reciprocating ball-on-disc tribometer equipped with an electrochemical cell. Prior to the tribocorrosion tests, their electrochemical behavior was measured by the potentiodynamic polarization in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution at room temperature. Both stainless steel and CoCrMo after low temperature nitriding kept their passive nature by forming an expanded austenite phase. The DLC coated samples presented the low anodic corrosion current due to the chemical inertness of the carbon layer. During the tribocorrosion tests at open circuit potential, the untreated and low temperature nitrided samples exhibited significant potential drop towards the cathodic direction, which was a result of the worn out of the passive film. Galvanic coupling was established between the depassivated (worn) area and the still passive (unworn) area, making the materials suffered from wear-accelerated corrosion. The DLC coating performed as a solid lubricant in both dry wear and tribocorrosion tests, and the resulting wear after the tests was almost negligible. Copyright

  8. Compendium of cost-effectiveness evaluations of modifications for dose reduction at nuclear power plants

    Baum, J.W.; Matthews, G.R.

    1985-12-01

    This report summarizes available information on cost effectiveness of engineering modifications potentially valuable for dose reduction at nuclear power plants. Data were gathered from several US utilities, published literature, equipment and service suppliers, and recent technical meetings. Five simplified econometric models were employed to evaluate data and arrive at a value for cost effectiveness expressed in either (a) dollars/rem, or (b) total dollar savings calculated using a nominal value of $1000/rem. Models employed were: a basic model with no consideration given to the time value of money; two models in which discounting was used to evaluate costs and savings in terms of present values; and two models in which income taxes and revenue requirements were considered. Results from different models varied by as much as a factor of 10, and were generally lowest for the basic model and highest for the before-tax revenue requirements model. Results for 151 evaluations employing different assumptions concerning number of plants per site and outage impacts were tabulated in order of decreasing cost effectiveness. Twenty-five evaluations were identified as exceptionally cost effective since both costs and dose were saved. Forty evaluations indicated highly cost-effective changes based on costs below $1000/rem saved using results of the present-worth model that included discounting of future dose savings

  9. Effect of multiple-feedstock strategy on the economic and environmental performance of thermochemical ethanol production under extreme weather conditions

    Kou, Nannan; Zhao, Fu

    2011-01-01

    Current US transportation sector mainly relies on liquid hydrocarbons derived from petroleum and about 60% of the petroleum consumed is from areas where supply may be disturbed by regional instability. This has led to serious concerns on energy security and global warming. To address these issues, numerous alternative energy carriers have been proposed. Among them, second generation biofuel is one of the most promising technologies. Gasification-based thermochemical conversion will bring flexibility to both feedstock and production sides of a plant, thus presents an attractive technical route to address both the energy security and global warming concerns. In this paper, thermochemical ethanol production using multiple-feedstock (corn stover, municipal solid waste, and wood chips) is simulated using Aspen Plus and compared with the single-feedstock scenario, in terms of economic performances, life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and survivability under extreme weather conditions. For a hypothetical facility in southwest Indiana it is found that multiple-feedstock strategy improves the net present value by 18% compared to single-feedstock strategy. This margin is increased to 57% when effects of extreme weather conditions on feedstock supply are considered. Moreover, multiple-feedstock fuel plant has no potential risk of bankruptcy during the payback period, while single-feedstock fuel plant has a 75% chance of bankruptcy. Although the multiple-feedstock strategy has 26% more GHG emission per liter of ethanol produced than the single-feedstock strategy, the trend is reversed if feedstock supply disruption is taken into account. Thus the idea of multiple-feedstock strategy is proposed to the future thermo chemical biofuel plants.

  10. Intense atmospheric pollution modifies weather: a~case of mixed biomass burning with fossil fuel combustion pollution in the eastern China

    A. J. Ding; C. B. Fu; X. Q. Yang; J. N. Sun; T. Petäjä; V.-M. Kerminen; T. Wang; Y. N. Xie; E. Herrmann; L. F. Zheng; W. Nie; X. L. Wei; M. Kulmala

    2013-01-01

    The influence of air pollutants, particularly aerosols, on regional and global climate is widely investigated, but only a very limited number of studies reports their impacts on everyday weather. In this work, we present for the first time direct (observational) evidence of a clear effect how a mixed atmospheric pollution changes the weather with a substantial modification in air temperature and rainfall. By using comprehensive measurements in Nanjing, China, we found that mixed agricultural ...

  11. The effects of size and surface modification of amorphous silica particles on biodistribution and liver metabolism in mice

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Ji, Cai; Jin, Tingting; Fan, Xiaohui

    2015-05-01

    Engineered nanoparticles, with unconventional properties, are promising platforms for biomedical applications. Since they may interact with a wide variety of biomolecules, it is critical to understand the impact of the physicochemical properties of engineered nanoparticles on biological systems. In this study, the effects of particle size and surface modification alone or in combination of amorphous silica particles (SPs) on biological responses were determined using a suite of general toxicological assessments and metabonomics analysis in mice model. Our results suggested that amino or carboxyl surface modification mitigated the liver toxicity of plain-surface SPs. 30 nm SPs with amino surface modification were found to be the most toxic SPs among all the surface-modified SP treatments at the same dosage. When treatment dose was increased, submicro-sized SPs with amino or carboxyl surface modification also induced liver toxicity. Biodistribution studies suggested that 70 nm SPs were mainly accumulated in liver and spleen regardless of surface modifications. Interestingly, these two organs exhibited different uptake trends. Furthermore, metabonomics studies indicated that surface modification plays a more dominant role to affect the liver metabolism than particle size.

  12. The effects of size and surface modification of amorphous silica particles on biodistribution and liver metabolism in mice

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Ji, Cai; Jin, Tingting; Fan, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles, with unconventional properties, are promising platforms for biomedical applications. Since they may interact with a wide variety of biomolecules, it is critical to understand the impact of the physicochemical properties of engineered nanoparticles on biological systems. In this study, the effects of particle size and surface modification alone or in combination of amorphous silica particles (SPs) on biological responses were determined using a suite of general toxicological assessments and metabonomics analysis in mice model. Our results suggested that amino or carboxyl surface modification mitigated the liver toxicity of plain-surface SPs. 30 nm SPs with amino surface modification were found to be the most toxic SPs among all the surface-modified SP treatments at the same dosage. When treatment dose was increased, submicro-sized SPs with amino or carboxyl surface modification also induced liver toxicity. Biodistribution studies suggested that 70 nm SPs were mainly accumulated in liver and spleen regardless of surface modifications. Interestingly, these two organs exhibited different uptake trends. Furthermore, metabonomics studies indicated that surface modification plays a more dominant role to affect the liver metabolism than particle size. (paper)

  13. General Relativity Theory Explains the Shnoll Effect and Makes Possible Forecasting Earthquakes and Weather Cataclysms (Letters to Progress in Physics

    Rabounski D.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Shnoll effect manifests itself in the fine structure of the noise registered in very sta- ble processes, where the magnitude of signal and the average noise remain unchanged. It is found in the periodic fluctuation of the fine structure of the noise according to the cosmic cycles connected with stars, the Sun, and the Moon. Th e Shnoll effect is ex- plained herein, employing the framework of General Relativity, as the twin / entangled synchronization states of the observer’s reference frame. The states are repeated while the observer travels, in common with the Earth, through the c osmic grid of the geodesic synchronization paths that connect his local reference fra me with the reference frames of other cosmic bodies. These synchronization periods matc h the periods that are man- ifested due to the Shnoll e ff ect, regardless of which process produces the noise. These synchronization periods are expected to exist in the noise o f natural processes of any type (physics, biology, social, etc. as well as in such arti ficial processes as computer- software random-number generation. This conclusion accor ds with what was registered according the Shnoll effect. The theory not only explains the Shnoll effect but also al- lows for forecasting fluctuations in the stock exchange mark et, fluctuations of weather, earthquakes, and other cataclysms.

  14. Effects of sodium chloride on radiation protection and modification of gamma-ray treated rice seeds

    Wang Cailian; Zhao Kongnan; Shen Mei; Xu Gang; Chen Qiufang

    1992-11-01

    The radiation protection effect of sodium chloride on dormant and germinating rice seeds treated with gamma-rays, and modification effect of sodium chloride on mutation were studied. Results show that the radiation-damage effect on seedling growth, percentage of seedling growth, percentage of seedling growth and fertility in M 1 generation is significantly enhanced with the increasing of dose. However, the seedling growth, percentage of seedling growth and fertility can be improved if the irradiated seeds are pre-treated with sodium chloride solution having concentrations of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.20 mol/L. The difference between treated group and control group is very significant. Results also show that pre-treatment and post-treatment by sodium chloride can raise the mutation frequencies of chlorophyll deficient seedlings, especially, the mutation frequency of early heading date and height is more considerably. The conclusion is that the sodium chloride, as a radiation protection agent, combined with gamma-ray treatment could reduce the effect of radiation-damage on M 1 generation and raise the mutation frequency in M 2 generation, and this result will be helpful in rice breeding

  15. Effects of luminance contrast and its modifications on fixation behavior during free viewing of images from different categories.

    Açik, Alper; Onat, Selim; Schumann, Frank; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; König, Peter

    2009-06-01

    During viewing of natural scenes, do low-level features guide attention, and if so, does this depend on higher-level features? To answer these questions, we studied the image category dependence of low-level feature modification effects. Subjects fixated contrast-modified regions often in natural scene images, while smaller but significant effects were observed for urban scenes and faces. Surprisingly, modifications in fractal images did not influence fixations. Further analysis revealed an inverse relationship between modification effects and higher-level, phase-dependent image features. We suggest that high- and mid-level features--such as edges, symmetries, and recursive patterns--guide attention if present. However, if the scene lacks such diagnostic properties, low-level features prevail. We posit a hierarchical framework, which combines aspects of bottom-up and top-down theories and is compatible with our data.

  16. Posttranslational Modifications in Spermatozoa and Effects on Male Fertility and Sperm Viability.

    Brohi, Rahim Dad; Huo, Li-Jun

    2017-05-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex and highly regulated process. The ability of spermatozoa to perform its function depends on multiple physiological and genetic factors that are not fully understood. Notably, due to lack of transcriptional and translational activity in spermatozoa, posttranslational modifications (PTMs) play key roles in determining their viability. PTMs not only confer structural changes in the proteome of the spermatozoa cells, but also increase the diversity of the proteome and introduce specific modifications that could be translated into functional changes in the affected spermatozoa. Multiple PTMs of active proteins have been identified in the developing spermatogonia. This review summarizes a diverse range of PTMs taking place in the developing spermatozoa, and analyzes their effects on male fertility and sperm viability. In particular, we discuss how SUMOylation, ubiquitination, phosphorylation, acetylation, glycosylation, and disulphide bond formation in proteins play a role in spermatogenesis, sperm maturation, movement of maturing spermatozoa to epididymis, capacitation, hyperactivation, spermatozoa motility, subversion of immune detection by spermatozoa, sperm to egg recognition and fusion, and the fertilization process. When possible, the specific proteins involved in these processes are highlighted. We point to existing knowledge gaps in the field of proteomics, and provide suggestions for future research on sperm viability and male fertility. We discuss briefly, as an example, the observations in water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis, which provides both meat and milk, and therefore is a reliable source for energy and protein needs of human populations. In conclusions, understanding the ways in which PTMs impact mammalian fertility and reproduction is important to make significant strides for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies in the near future.

  17. Effects of Modification of Pain Protocol on Incidence of Post Operative Nausea and Vomiting.

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Snir, Nimrod; Sharfman, Zachary T; Rinehart, Joseph B; Calderon, Michael-David; Bahn, Esther; Harrington, Brian; Ahn, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    A Perioperative Surgical Home (PSH) care model applies a standardized multidisciplinary approach to patient care using evidence-based medicine to modify and improve protocols. Analysis of patient outcome measures, such as postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), allows for refinement of existing protocols to improve patient care. We aim to compare the incidence of PONV in patients who underwent primary total joint arthroplasty before and after modification of our PSH pain protocol. All total joint replacement PSH (TJR-PSH) patients who underwent primary THA (n=149) or TKA (n=212) in the study period were included. The modified protocol added a single dose of intravenous (IV) ketorolac given in the operating room and oxycodone immediate release orally instead of IV Hydromorphone in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU). The outcomes were (1) incidence of PONV and (2) average pain score in the PACU. We also examined the effect of primary anesthetic (spinal vs . GA) on these outcomes. The groups were compared using chi-square tests of proportions. The incidence of post-operative nausea in the PACU decreased significantly with the modified protocol (27.4% vs . 38.1%, p=0.0442). There was no difference in PONV based on choice of anesthetic or procedure. Average PACU pain scores did not differ significantly between the two protocols. Simple modifications to TJR-PSH multimodal pain management protocol, with decrease in IV narcotic use, resulted in a lower incidence of postoperative nausea, without compromising average PACU pain scores. This report demonstrates the need for continuous monitoring of PSH pathways and implementation of revisions as needed.

  18. Nanostructured lipid carriers used for oral delivery of oridonin: an effect of ligand modification on absorption.

    Zhou, Xiaotong; Zhang, Xingwang; Ye, Yanghuan; Zhang, Tianpeng; Wang, Huan; Ma, Zhiguo; Wu, Baojian

    2015-02-20

    Oridonin (Ori) is a natural compound with notable anti-inflammation and anti-cancer activities. However, therapeutic use of this compound is limited by its poor solubility and low bioavailability. Here a novel biotin-modified nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) was developed to enhance the bioavailability of Ori. The effect of ligand (biotin) modification on oral absorption of Ori encapsulated in NLCs was also explored. Ori-loaded NLCs (Ori-NLCs) were prepared by the melt dispersion-high pressure homogenization method. Biotin modification of Ori-NLCs was achieved by EDC and NHS in aqueous phase. The obtained biotin-decorated Ori-NLCs (Bio-Ori-NLCs) were 144.9nm in size with an entrapment efficiency of 49.54% and a drug load of 4.81%. Oral bioavailability was enhanced by use of Bio-Ori-NLCs with a relative bioavailability of 171.01%, while the value of non-modified Ori-NLCs was improved to 143.48%. Intestinal perfusion showed that Ori solution unexpectedly exhibited a moderate permeability, indicating that permeability was not a limiting factor of Ori absorption. Ori could be rapidly metabolized that was the main cause of low bioavailability. However, there was a difference in the enhancement of bioavailability between Bio-Ori-NLCs and conventional NLCs. Although severe lipolyses happened both on Bio-Ori-NLCs and non-modified NLCs, the performance of Bio-Ori-NLCs in the bioavailability improvement was more significant. Overall, Bio-Ori-NLCs can further promote the oral absorption of Ori by a ligand-mediated active transport. It may be a promising carrier for the oral delivery of Ori. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Post-translational modification of osteopontin: Effects on in vitro hydroxyapatite formation and growth

    Boskey, Adele L.; Christensen, Brian; Taleb, Hayat; Sørensen, Esben S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Thrombin-cleaved fragments of milk-osteopontin effect hydroxyapatite formation differently. ► N- and C-terminal fragments promoted hydroxyapatite formation and growth. ► A central fragment inhibited hydroxyapatite formation and growth. ► Binding to collagen or hydroxyapatite seed crystals modified these effects. -- Abstract: The manuscript tests the hypothesis that posttranslational modification of the SIBLING family of proteins in general and osteopontin in particular modify the abilities of these proteins to regulate in vitro hydroxyapatite (HA) formation. Osteopontin has diverse effects on hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral crystallite formation and growth depending on the extent of phosphorylation. We hypothesized that different regions of full-length OPN would also have distinct effects on the mineralization process. Thrombin fragmentation of milk OPN (mOPN) was used to test this hypothesis. Three fragments were tested in a de novo HA formation assay; an N-terminal fragment (aa 1–147), a central fragment (aa 148–204) denoted SKK-fragment and a C-terminal fragment (aa 205–262). Compared to intact mOPN the C- and N-terminal fragments behaved comparably, promoting HA formation and growth, but the central SKK-fragment acted as a mineralization inhibitor. In a seeded growth experiment all fragments inhibited mineral proliferation, but the SKK-fragment was the most effective inhibitor. These effects, seen in HA-formation and seeded growth assays in a gelatin gel system and in a pH-stat experiment were lost when the protein or fragments were dephosphorylated. Effects of the fully phosphorylated protein and fragments were also altered in the presence of fibrillar collagen. The diverse effects can be explained in terms of the intrinsically disordered nature of OPN and its fragments which enable them to interact with their multiple partners.

  20. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND pH OF MODIFICATION PROCESS ON THE PHYSICAL-MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MODIFIED CASSAVA STARCH

    Yudi Wicaksono

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of cassava starch for excipient in the manufacturing of the tablet has some problems, especially on physical-mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the differentness of temperature and pH in the process of modification on the physical-mechanical properties of modified cassava starch. Modifications were performed by suspending cassava starch into a solution of 3 % (w/v PVP K30. The effect of the difference of temperature was observed at temperatures of 25; 45 and 65 0C, while the effect of the difference of pH was observed at pH of 4.0; 7.0 and 12.0. The results showed that the temperature and pH did not affect the physical-mechanical properties of the modified cassava starch. Modification of cassava starch at pH and temperature of 7.0 and 45 0C was produced modified cassava starch with the most excellent solubility, while the best swelling power were formed by the modification process at pH and temperature of 7.0 and 25 0C. Overall, the most excellent compression properties of modified cassava starch resulted from the modification process at pH 12.

  1. Plasma polymerization surface modification of Carbon black and its effect in elastomers

    Mathew, T.; Datta, Rabin; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Talma, Auke; Ooij, W.J.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Surface modification of carbon black by plasma polymerization was aimed to reduce its surface energy in order to compatibilize the filler with various elastomers. A fullerenic carbon black was used for the modification process. Thermogravimetric analysis, wetting behavior with liquids of known

  2. Synoptic weather typing applied to air pollution mortality among the elderly in 10 Canadian cities.

    Vanos, Jennifer K; Cakmak, Sabit; Bristow, Corben; Brion, Vladislav; Tremblay, Neil; Martin, Sara L; Sheridan, Scott S

    2013-10-01

    Synoptic circulation patterns (large-scale weather systems) affect ambient levels of air pollution, as well as the relationship between air pollution and human health. To investigate the air pollution-mortality relationship within weather types and seasons, and to determine which combination of atmospheric conditions may pose increased health threats in the elderly age categories. The relative risk of mortality (RR) due to air pollution was examined using Poisson generalized linear models (GLMs) within specific weather types. Analysis was completed by weather type and age group (all ages, ≤64, 65-74, 75-84, ≥85 years) in ten Canadian cities from 1981 to 1999. There was significant modification of RR by weather type and age. When examining the entire population, weather type was shown to have the greatest modifying effect on the risk of dying due to ozone (O3). This effect was highest on average for the dry tropical (DT) weather type, with the all-age RR of mortality at a population weighted mean (PWM) found to be 1.055 (95% CI 1.026-1.085). All-weather type risk estimates increased with age due to exposure to carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulphur dioxide (SO2). On average, RR increased by 2.6, 3.8 and 1.5% for the respective pollutants between the ≤64 and ≥85 age categories. Conversely, mean ozone estimates remained relatively consistent with age. Elevated levels of air pollution were found to be detrimental to the health of elderly individuals for all weather types. However, the entire population was negatively effected by air pollution on the hot dry (DT) and hot humid (MT) days. We identified a significant modification of RR for mortality due to air pollution by age, which is enhanced under specific weather types. Efforts should be targeted at minimizing pollutant exposure to the elderly and/or all age groups with respect to weather type in question. Crown Copyright © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of centrifugal modification of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium on resistive wall mode stability

    Shiraishi, J.; Aiba, N.; Miyato, N.; Yagi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Toroidal rotation effects are self-consistently taken into account not only in the linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability analysis but also in the equilibrium calculation. The MHD equilibrium computation is affected by centrifugal force due to the toroidal rotation. To study the toroidal rotation effects on resistive wall modes (RWMs), a new code has been developed. The RWMaC modules, which solve the electromagnetic dynamics in vacuum and the resistive wall, have been implemented in the MINERVA code, which solves the Frieman–Rotenberg equation that describes the linear ideal MHD dynamics in a rotating plasma. It is shown that modification of MHD equilibrium by the centrifugal force significantly reduces growth rates of RWMs with fast rotation in the order of M 2  = 0.1 where M is the Mach number. Moreover, it can open a stable window which does not exist under the assumption that the rotation affects only the linear dynamics. The rotation modifies the equilibrium pressure gradient and current density profiles, which results in the change of potential energy including rotational effects. (paper)

  4. Effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference

    Zhao, Le; Li, Dayou; Wang, Zuobin; Yue, Yong; Zhang, Jinjin; Yu, Miao; Li, Siwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference. In this work, four-beam laser interference was used to pattern single crystal silicon wafers for the fabrication of surface structures, and the number of laser pulses was applied to the process in air. By controlling the parameters of laser irradiation, different shapes of silicon structures were fabricated. The results were obtained with the single laser fluence of 354 mJ/cm 2 , 495 mJ/cm 2 , and 637 mJ/cm 2 , the pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, the laser exposure pulses of 30, 100, and 300, the laser wavelength of 1064 nm, and the pulse duration of 7–9 ns. The effects of the heat transfer and the radiation of laser interference plasma on silicon wafer surfaces were investigated. The equations of heat flow and radiation effects of laser plasma of interfering patterns in a four-beam laser interference distribution were proposed to describe their impacts on silicon wafer surfaces. The experimental results have shown that the laser fluence has to be properly selected for the fabrication of well-defined surface structures in a four-beam laser interference process. Laser interference patterns can directly fabricate different shape structures for their corresponding applications

  5. Hydrogen storage of catalyst-containing activated carbon fibers and effect of surface modification

    Ikpyo Hong; Seong Young Lee; Kyung Hee Lee; Sei Min Park

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The hydrogen storage capacities of many kind of carbon nano materials have been reported with possibility and improbability. It is reported that specific surface area of carbon nano material has not a close relation to hydrogen storage capacity. This result shows that there is difference between specific surface area measured by isothermal nitrogen adsorption and direct measurement of adsorption with hydrogen and suggests that the carbon material with relatively low specific surface area can have high hydrogen storage capacity when they have effective nano pore. In this study, petroleum based isotropic pitch was hybridized with several kinds of transitional metal base organometallic compound solved with organic solvent and spun by electro-spinning method. The catalyst-dispersed ACFs were prepared and characterized and hydrogen storage capacity was measured. The effect of surface modification of ACFs by physical and chemical treatment was also investigated. Experimental: The isotropic precursor pitch prepared by nitrogen blowing from naphtha cracking bottom oil was hybridized with transitional metal based acetyl acetonates and spun by solvent electro-spinning. Tetrahydrofuran and quinoline were used as solvent with various mixing ratio. High voltage DC power generator which could adjust in the range of 0-60000 V and 2 mA maximum current was used to supply electrostatic force. At the solvent electro-spinning, solvent mixing ratio and pitch concentration, voltage and spinning distance were varied and their influences were investigated. The catalyst-dispersed electro-spun pitch fibers were thermal stabilized, carbonized and activated by conventional heat treatment for activated carbon fiber. Prepared fibers were observed by high resolution SEM and pore properties were characterized by Micromeritics ASAP2020 model physi-sorption analyzer. Hydrogen storage capacities were measured by equipment modified from Thermo Cahn TherMax 500 model high pressure

  6. Evaluating the cost-effectiveness of lifestyle modification versus metformin therapy for the prevention of diabetes in Singapore.

    May Ee Png

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Singapore, as diabetes is an increasingly important public health issue, the cost-effectiveness of pursuing lifestyle modification programs and/or alternative prevention strategies is of critical importance for policymakers. While the US Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP compared weight loss through lifestyle modification with oral treatment of diabetes drug metformin to prevent/delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in pre-diabetic subjects, no data on either the actual or potential cost effectiveness of such a program is available for East or South-east Asian populations. This study estimates the 3-year cost-effectiveness of lifestyle modification and metformin among pre-diabetic subjects from a Singapore health system and societal perspective. METHODOLOGY: Cost effectiveness was analysed from 2010-2012 using a decision-based model to estimate the rates of getting diabetes, healthcare costs and health-related quality of life. Cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY was estimated using costs relevant to the time horizon of the study from Singapore. All costs are expressed in 2012 US dollars. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The total economic cost for non-diabetic subjects from the societal perspective was US$25,867, US$28,108 and US$26,177 for placebo, lifestyle modification and metformin intervention respectively. For diabetic patients, the total economic cost from the societal perspective was US$32,921, US$35,163 and US$33,232 for placebo, lifestyle modification and metformin intervention respectively. Lifestyle modification relative to placebo is likely to be associated with an incremental cost per QALY gained at US$36,663 while that of metformin intervention is likely to be US$6,367 from a societal perspective. CONCLUSION: Based on adaptation of the DPP data to local conditions, both lifestyle modification and metformin intervention are likely to be cost-effective and worth implementing in Singapore to prevent or delay the onset of type 2

  7. Final Project Report: Release of aged contaminants from weathered sediments: Effects of sorbate speciation on scaling of reactive transport

    Jon Chorover, University of Arizona; Peggy O' €™Day, University of California, Merced; Karl Mueller, Penn State University; Wooyong Um, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Carl Steefel, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2012-10-01

    Hanford sediments impacted by hyperalkaline high level radioactive waste have undergone incongruent silicate mineral weathering concurrent with contaminant uptake. In this project, we studied the impact of background pore water (BPW) on strontium, cesium and iodine desorption and transport in Hanford sediments that were experimentally weathered by contact with simulated hyperalkaline tank waste leachate (STWL) solutions. Using those lab-weathered Hanford sediments (HS) and model precipitates formed during nucleation from homogeneous STWL solutions (HN), we (i) provided detailed characterization of reaction products over a matrix of field-relevant gradients in contaminant concentration, PCO2, and reaction time; (ii) improved molecular-scale understanding of how sorbate speciation controls contaminant desorption from weathered sediments upon removal of caustic sources; and (iii) developed a mechanistic, predictive model of meso- to field-scale contaminant reactive transport under these conditions.

  8. The Fluvial Geochemistry of the Rivers of Eastern Siberia and Implications for the Effect of Climate on Weathering

    Huh, Youngsook

    1998-01-01

    The dependence of weathering on climate (temperature and precipitation) forms the core of a negative feedback proposed to have maintained the Earth's atmospheric CO2 within habitable limits for most of...

  9. Very short-term rainfall forecasting by effectively using the ensemble outputs of numerical weather prediction models

    Wu, Ming-Chang; Lin, Gwo-Fong; Feng, Lei; Hwang, Gong-Do

    2017-04-01

    In Taiwan, heavy rainfall brought by typhoons often causes serious disasters and leads to loss of life and property. In order to reduce the impact of these disasters, accurate rainfall forecasts are always important for civil protection authorities to prepare proper measures in advance. In this study, a methodology is proposed for providing very short-term (1- to 6-h ahead) rainfall forecasts in a basin-scale area. The proposed methodology is developed based on the use of analogy reasoning approach to effectively integrate the ensemble precipitation forecasts from a numerical weather prediction system in Taiwan. To demonstrate the potential of the proposed methodology, an application to a basin-scale area (the Choshui River basin located in west-central Taiwan) during five typhoons is conducted. The results indicate that the proposed methodology yields more accurate hourly rainfall forecasts, especially the forecasts with a lead time of 1 to 3 hours. On average, improvement of the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient is about 14% due to the effective use of the ensemble forecasts through the proposed methodology. The proposed methodology is expected to be useful for providing accurate very short-term rainfall forecasts during typhoons.

  10. Effect of doping on the modification of polycrystalline silicon by spontaneous reduction of diazonium salts

    Girard, A.; Coulon, N.; Cardinaud, C.; Mohammed-Brahim, T.; Geneste, F.

    2014-09-01

    The chemical modification of doped polycrystalline silicon materials (N+, N++ and P++) and silicon (1 0 0) and (1 1 1) used as references is investigated by spontaneous reduction of diazonium salts. The effectiveness of the grafting process on all polySi surfaces is shown by AFM and XPS analyses. The effect of substrate doping on the efficiency of the electrografting process is compared by using the thicknesses of the deposited organic films. For a better accuracy, two methods are used to estimate the thicknesses: XPS and the coupling of a O2 plasma etching with AFM measurement. Structural characteristics of the poly-Si films were investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction to find a correlation between the structure of the material and its reactivity. Different parameters that could have an impact on the efficiency of the grafting procedure are discussed. The observed differences between differently doped silicon surfaces is rather limited, this is in agreement with the radical character of the reacting species.

  11. Adverse health effects due to arsenic exposure: Modification by dietary supplementation of jaggery in mice

    Singh, Nrashant; Kumar, D.; Lal, Kewal; Raisuddin, S.; Sahu, Anand P.

    2010-01-01

    Populations of villages of eastern India and Bangladesh and many other parts of the world are exposed to arsenic mainly through drinking water. Due to non-availability of safe drinking water they are compelled to depend on arsenic-contaminated water. Generally, poverty level is high in those areas and situation is compounded by the lack of proper nutrition. The hypothesis that the deleterious health effects of arsenic can be prevented by modification of dietary factors with the availability of an affordable and indigenous functional food jaggery (sugarcane juice) has been tested in the present study. Jaggery contains polyphenols, vitamin C, carotene and other biologically active components. Arsenic as sodium-m-arsenite at low (0.05 ppm) and high (5 ppm) doses was orally administered to Swiss male albino mice, alone and in combination with jaggery feeding (250 mg/mice), consecutively for 180 days. The serum levels of total antioxidant, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase were substantially reduced in arsenic-exposed groups, while supplementation of jaggery enhanced their levels in combined treatment groups. The serum levels of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and TNF-α were significantly increased in arsenic-exposed groups, while in the arsenic-exposed and jaggery supplemented groups their levels were normal. The comet assay in bone marrow cells showed the genotoxic effects of arsenic, whereas combination with jaggery feeding lessened the DNA damage. Histopathologically, the lung of arsenic-exposed mice showed the necrosis and degenerative changes in bronchiolar epithelium with emphysema and thickening of alveolar septa which was effectively antagonized by jaggery feeding. These results demonstrate that jaggery, a natural functional food, effectively antagonizes many of the adverse effects of arsenic.

  12. Effect of lycopene and β-carotene on peroxynitrite-mediated cellular modifications

    Muzandu, Kaampwe; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Sakamoto, Kentaro Q.; Shaban, Zein; El Bohi, Khlood; Kazusaka, Akio; Fujita, Shoichi

    2006-01-01

    Peroxynitrite formed by the reaction of superoxide and nitric oxide is a highly reactive species with a role in various pathological processes such as cancer, chronic inflammation, and cardiovascular and neurological diseases. In the present study, the effect of the carotenoids, lycopene and β-carotene, on peroxynitrite-mediated modifications in plasmid DNA as well as cellular DNA and proteins were investigated. In pUC18 plasmid DNA, these carotenoids strongly inhibited DNA strand breaks caused by peroxynitrite generated from 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1). SIN-1 was also used to determine effects on DNA damage and protein tyrosine nitration in Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts. SIN-1 dose-dependently increased nitration of proteins in cells above basal levels as determined by Western blotting. This nitration was inhibited in the presence of the uric acid as well as lycopene. Physiological concentrations (0.31-10 μM) of lycopene and β-carotene also had protective effects on DNA damage, as measured by the comet assay. Lycopene significantly reduced DNA damage particularly, in the median range of concentrations (2.5 μM). The protective effects of lycopene and β-carotene could be due to their scavenging of reactive oxygen (ROS) and/or nitrogen species (RNS) as they reduce the amount of intracellular ROS/RNS produced following treatment with SIN-1 by as much as 47.5% and 42.4%, respectively. The results obtained in this study suggest that carotenoids may alleviate some of the deleterious effects of peroxynitrite and possibly other reactive nitrogen species as well in vivo

  13. Adverse health effects due to arsenic exposure: modification by dietary supplementation of jaggery in mice.

    Singh, Nrashant; Kumar, D; Lal, Kewal; Raisuddin, S; Sahu, Anand P

    2010-02-01

    Populations of villages of eastern India and Bangladesh and many other parts of the world are exposed to arsenic mainly through drinking water. Due to non-availability of safe drinking water they are compelled to depend on arsenic-contaminated water. Generally, poverty level is high in those areas and situation is compounded by the lack of proper nutrition. The hypothesis that the deleterious health effects of arsenic can be prevented by modification of dietary factors with the availability of an affordable and indigenous functional food jaggery (sugarcane juice) has been tested in the present study. Jaggery contains polyphenols, vitamin C, carotene and other biologically active components. Arsenic as sodium-m-arsenite at low (0.05 ppm) and high (5 ppm) doses was orally administered to Swiss male albino mice, alone and in combination with jaggery feeding (250 mg/mice), consecutively for 180 days. The serum levels of total antioxidant, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase were substantially reduced in arsenic-exposed groups, while supplementation of jaggery enhanced their levels in combined treatment groups. The serum levels of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6 and TNF-alpha were significantly increased in arsenic-exposed groups, while in the arsenic-exposed and jaggery supplemented groups their levels were normal. The comet assay in bone marrow cells showed the genotoxic effects of arsenic, whereas combination with jaggery feeding lessened the DNA damage. Histopathologically, the lung of arsenic-exposed mice showed the necrosis and degenerative changes in bronchiolar epithelium with emphysema and thickening of alveolar septa which was effectively antagonized by jaggery feeding. These results demonstrate that jaggery, a natural functional food, effectively antagonizes many of the adverse effects of arsenic. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Investigation of the weathering effect on Rb-Sr systematics and trace element abundances in Antarctic and non-Antarctic meteorites

    Nishikawa, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Noboru; Misawa, Keiji; Okano, Osamu; Yamamoto, Koshi; Kagami, Hiroo.

    1990-01-01

    In order to examine weathering effects on chondritic meteorites in Antarctic and non-Antarctic environments, the Rb-Sr isotopic ratios and abundances of REE, Ba, Sr, Rb, and K were determined for 8H-group chondrites (Yamato-790986 [H3], Yamato-74492 [H3], Grady [H3], Brownfield [H3], Clovis (No.1) [H3], Yamato-74155 [H4], Allegan [H5] [one whole-rock and two chondrules], and Yamato-74371 [H5]), and partly for the Etter (L5) chondrite. The Allegan whole-rock shows a flat REE pattern with a large negative Eu anomaly and Sr depletion. Analyses of Rb-Sr systematics of one whole-rock and two chondrules show somewhat younger age 4.38±0.12 b.y. It is suggested that REE and Rb-Sr were redistributed during the early thermal metamorphism. Except for Allegan, most other H-chondrites (finds) show the perturbation of the Rb-Sr systematics, indicating recent loss of Rb. It was found that the weathering degree is related with the Rb-Sr disturbance in Antarctic H-chondrite. In spite of different degrees of weathering, all the Antarctic H-chondrites studied (including heavily weathered ones) show flat REE patterns normal as H-chondrite with occasional occurrence of minor Eu anomalies, indicating the tough resistance of REE in H-chondrites to the Antarctic weathering. On the other hand, non-Antarctic finds (particularly the weathered chondrites) indicate light-REE enriched patterns with a large negative Ce anomaly and extreme enrichment of Ba, suggestive of terrestrial contaminations. (author)

  15. Challenges in developing methods for quantifying the effects of weather and climate on water-associated diseases: A systematic review

    Lo Iacono, Giovanni; Armstrong, Ben; Fleming, Lora E.; Elson, Richard; Kovats, Sari; Vardoulakis, Sotiris; Nichols, Gordon L.

    2017-01-01

    Infectious diseases attributable to unsafe water supply, sanitation and hygiene (e.g. Cholera, Leptospirosis, Giardiasis) remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in low-income countries. Climate and weather factors are known to affect the transmission and distribution of infectious diseases and statistical and mathematical modelling are continuously developing to investigate the impact of weather and climate on water-associated diseases. There have been little critica...

  16. Spatial and Temporal Effects in Protein Post-translational Modification Distributions in the Developing Mouse Brain

    Edwards, Alistair V G; Edwards, Gregory J; Schwämmle, Veit

    2014-01-01

    Protein post-translational modification (PTM) is a powerful way to modify the behavior of cellular proteins and thereby cellular behavior. Multiple recent studies of evolutionary trends have shown that certain pairs of protein post-translational modifications tend to occur closer to each other than...... for observations of increasingly frequent and diverse protein modification in cell biology. In this study, we use mass spectrometry and proteomic strategies to present biological data showing spatiotemporal PTM co-localization across multiple PTM categories, which display changes over development of the brain...

  17. Effect of simulated rainfall and weathering on release of preservative elements from CCA treated wood

    Stan Lebow; R. Sam Williams; Patricia Lebow

    2003-01-01

    The release of arsenic from wood pressure-treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) can be decreased by application of wood finishes, but little is known about the types of finishes that are best suited for this purpose. This study evaluated the effects of finish water repellent content and ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the release of arsenic, copper, and chromium...

  18. Urban weather data and building models for the inclusion of the urban heat island effect in building performance simulation

    M. Palme

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This data article presents files supporting calculation for urban heat island (UHI inclusion in building performance simulation (BPS. Methodology is used in the research article “From urban climate to energy consumption. Enhancing building performance simulation by including the urban heat island effect” (Palme et al., 2017 [1]. In this research, a Geographical Information System (GIS study is done in order to statistically represent the most important urban scenarios of four South-American cities (Guayaquil, Lima, Antofagasta and Valparaíso. Then, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA is done to obtain reference Urban Tissues Categories (UTC to be used in urban weather simulation. The urban weather files are generated by using the Urban Weather Generator (UWG software (version 4.1 beta. Finally, BPS is run out with the Transient System Simulation (TRNSYS software (version 17. In this data paper, four sets of data are presented: 1 PCA data (excel to explain how to group different urban samples in representative UTC; 2 UWG data (text to reproduce the Urban Weather Generation for the UTC used in the four cities (4 UTC in Lima, Guayaquil, Antofagasta and 5 UTC in Valparaíso; 3 weather data (text with the resulting rural and urban weather; 4 BPS models (text data containing the TRNSYS models (four building models.

  19. A Stabilizing Feedback Between Cloud Radiative Effects and Greenland Surface Melt: Verification From Multi-year Automatic Weather Station Measurements

    Zender, C. S.; Wang, W.; van As, D.

    2017-12-01

    Clouds have strong impacts on Greenland's surface melt through the interaction with the dry atmosphere and reflective surfaces. However, their effects are uncertain due to the lack of in situ observations. To better quantify cloud radiative effects (CRE) in Greenland, we analyze and interpret multi-year radiation measurements from 30 automatic weather stations encompassing a broad range of climatological and topographical conditions. During melt season, clouds warm surface over most of Greenland, meaning the longwave greenhouse effect outweighs the shortwave shading effect; on the other hand, the spatial variability of net (longwave and shortwave) CRE is dominated by shortwave CRE and in turn by surface albedo, which controls the potential absorption of solar radiation when clouds are absent. The net warming effect decreases with shortwave CRE from high to low altitudes and from north to south (Fig. 1). The spatial correlation between albedo and net CRE is strong (r=0.93, palbedo determines the net CRE seasonal trend, which decreases from May to July and increases afterwards. On an hourly timescale, we find two distinct radiative states in Greenland (Fig. 2). The clear state is characterized by clear-sky conditions or thin clouds, when albedo and solar zenith angle (SZA) weakly correlates with CRE. The cloudy state is characterized by opaque clouds, when the combination of albedo and SZA strongly correlates with CRE (r=0.85, palbedo and solar zenith angle, explains the majority of the CRE variation in spatial distribution, seasonal trend in the ablation zone, and in hourly variability in the cloudy radiative state. Clouds warm the brighter and colder surfaces of Greenland, enhance snow melt, and tend to lower the albedo. Clouds cool the darker and warmer surfaces, inhibiting snow melt, which increases albedo, and thus stabilizes surface melt. This stabilizing mechanism may also occur over sea ice, helping to forestall surface melt as the Arctic becomes dimmer.

  20. The effect of artificial accelerated weathering on the mechanical properties of maxillofacial polymers PDMS and CPE.

    Eleni, P N; Krokida, M K; Polyzois, G L

    2009-06-01

    The effect of UVA-UVB irradiation on the mechanical properties of three different industrial types of polydimethylsiloxane and chlorinated polyethylene samples, used in maxillofacial prostheses, was investigated in this study. Mechanical properties and thermal analysis are commonly used to determine the structural changes and mechanical strength. An aging chamber was used in order to simulate the solar radiation and assess natural aging. Compression and tensile tests were conducted on a Zwick testing machine. Durometer Shore A hardness measurements were carried out in a CV digital Shore A durometer according to ASTM D 2240. Glass transition temperature was evaluated with a differential scanning calorimeter. Simple mathematical models were developed to correlate the measured properties with irradiation time. The effect of UVA-UVB irradiation on compressive behavior affected model parameters. Significant deterioration seems to occur due to irradiation in samples.

  1. Anode modification with formic acid: A simple and effective method to improve the power generation of microbial fuel cells

    Liu, Weifeng; Cheng, Shaoan, E-mail: shaoancheng@zju.edu.cn; Guo, Jian

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Carbon cloth anode is modified with formic acid by a simple and reliable approach. • The modification significantly enhances the power output of microbial fuel cells. • The modified anode surface favors the bacterial attachment and growth on anode. • The electron transfer rate of anode is promoted. - Abstract: The physicochemical properties of anode material directly affect the anodic biofilm formation and electron transfer, thus are critical for the power generation of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this work, carbon cloth anode was modified with formic acid to enhance the power production of MFCs. Formic acid modification of anode increased the maximum power density of a single-chamber air-cathode MFC by 38.1% (from 611.5 ± 6 mW/m{sup 2} to 877.9 ± 5 mW/m{sup 2}). The modification generated a cleaner electrode surface and a reduced content of oxygen and nitrogen groups on the anode. The surface changes facilitated bacterial growth on the anode and resulted in an optimized microbial community. Thus, the electron transfer rate on the modified anodes was enhanced remarkably, contributing to a higher power output of MFCs. Anode modification with formic acid could be an effective and simple method for improving the power generation of MFCs. The modification method holds a huge potential for large scale applications and is valuable for the scale-up and commercialization of microbial fuel cells.

  2. Milk whey protein modification by coffee-specific phenolics: effect on structural and functional properties.

    Ali, Mostafa; Homann, Thomas; Khalil, Mahmoud; Kruse, Hans-Peter; Rawel, Harshadrai

    2013-07-17

    A suitable vehicle for integration of bioactive plant constituents is proposed. It involves modification of proteins using phenolics and applying these for protection of labile constituents. It dissects the noncovalent and covalent interactions of β-lactoglobulin with coffee-specific phenolics. Alkaline and polyphenol oxidase modulated covalent reactions were compared. Tryptic digestion combined with MALDI-TOF-MS provided tentative allocation of the modification type and site in the protein, and an in silico modeling of modified β-lactoglobulin is proposed. The modification delivers proteins with enhanced antioxidative properties. Changed structural properties and differences in solubility, surface hydrophobicity, and emulsification were observed. The polyphenol oxidase modulated reaction provides a modified β-lactoglobulin with a high antioxidative power, is thermally more stable, requires less energy to unfold, and, when emulsified with lutein esters, exhibits their higher stability against UV light. Thus, adaptation of this modification provides an innovative approach for functionalizing proteins and their uses in the food industry.

  3. Effects of environmental stressors on histone modifications and their relevance to carcinogenesis: a systematic review.

    Dik, S.; Scheepers, P.T.J.; Godderis, L.

    2012-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a complex process involving both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The cellular molecular epigenetic machinery, including histone modifications, is associated with changes in gene expression induced by exposure to environmental agents. In this paper, we systematically reviewed

  4. Pallid bands in feathers and associated stable isotope signatures reveal effects of severe weather stressors on fledgling sparrows.

    Ross, Jeremy D; Kelly, Jeffrey F; Bridge, Eli S; Engel, Michael H; Reinking, Dan L; Boyle, W Alice

    2015-01-01

    = - 2.03; p = 0.042) and, in as much, suggested widespread nest losses during the storm. Severe weather events may represent major stressors to ground-nesting birds, especially for recent fledglings. We call for others to exploit opportunities to study the effects of severe weather when these rare but devastating stressors impact established field research sites.

  5. Pallid bands in feathers and associated stable isotope signatures reveal effects of severe weather stressors on fledgling sparrows

    Jeremy D. Ross

    2015-03-01

    within our sample relative to expectations from past cohorts (z = − 2.03; p = 0.042 and, in as much, suggested widespread nest losses during the storm. Severe weather events may represent major stressors to ground-nesting birds, especially for recent fledglings. We call for others to exploit opportunities to study the effects of severe weather when these rare but devastating stressors impact established field research sites.

  6. Relative effects of weight loss and dietary fat modification on serum lipid levels in the dietary treatment of obesity

    Leenen, R; van der Kooy, K; Meyboom, S; Seidell, J C; Deurenberg, P.; Weststrate, J A

    1993-01-01

    The independent effects of weight loss and dietary fat modification on serum lipids were investigated in two groups of healthy moderately obese men and women. In one group (sequential group, n = 19), a weight-stable low-fat, low-saturated-fat diet (Low-Sat) was given for 7 weeks (= dietary

  7. Effect of genetic modification of potato starch on decomposition of leaves and tubers and on fungal decomposer communities

    Hannula, S.E.; De Boer, W.; Baldrian, P.; Van Veen, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    As part of a risk evaluation of growing genetically modified crops, we investigated the effects of a genetic modification of starch quality (increased level of amylopectin) in potato tubers (Solanum Tuberosum L.) on the decomposition of tissues (tubers and leaves) as well as on the associated fungal

  8. 75 FR 11559 - Certain Combed Cotton Yarns: Effect of Modification of U.S.-Bahrain FTA Rules of Origin

    2010-03-11

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. Bahrain-FTA-103-025] Certain Combed Cotton Yarns: Effect of Modification of U.S.- Bahrain FTA Rules of Origin AGENCY: United States International Trade... to section 104 of the United States-Bahrain Free Trade Agreement (FTA) Implementation Act (19 U.S.C...

  9. The effects of a novel hostile interpretation bias modification paradigm on hostile interpretations, mood, and aggressive behavior

    AlMoghrabi, Nouran; Huijding, Jorg; Franken, Ingmar H A

    2018-01-01

    Background and objectives Cognitive theories of aggression propose that biased information processing is causally related to aggression. To test these ideas, the current study investigated the effects of a novel cognitive bias modification paradigm (CBM-I) designed to target interpretations

  10. Effects of chemical modifications on photophysics and exciton dynamics on {pi}-conjugation attenuated and metal-chelated photoconducting polymers

    Chen, L. X.; Jager, W. J. H.; Gosztola, D. J.; Niemczyk, M. P.; Wasielewski, M. R.

    2000-03-11

    Effects of two types of chemical modifications on photoconducting polymers consisting of polyphenylenevinylene (PPV) derivatives are studied by static and ultrafast transient optical spectroscopy as well as semi-empirical ZINDO calculations. The first type of modification inserts 2,2{prime}-bipyridyl-5-vinylene units (bpy V) in the PPV backbone, and the second type involves metal-chelation with the bpy sites. Photoluminescence and exciton dynamics of polymers 1 and 2 with PV:bpyV ratios of 1 and 3 were examined in solution, and compared to those of the homopolymer, poly(2,5-bis(2{prime}-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (BEH-PPV). Similar studies were carried out for several metal-chelated polymers. These results can be explained by changes in {pi}-conjugation throughout the polymer backbone. The attenuation in {pi}-conjugation by the chemical modifications transforms a conducting polymer from one-dimensional semiconductor to molecular aggregates.

  11. Effect of electric pulse modification on mircostructure and properties of Ni-rich Al-Si piston alloy

    Bing Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the properties of Ni-rich (2.5wt.% Al-Si piston alloy, electric pulse modification was applied in fabricating the Ni-rich Al-Si piston alloy in this study. The effect of electric pulse modification on the mechanical properties of the Ni-rich Al-Si piston alloy was studied using optical microscope (OM, scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, microhardness measurement and tensile strength testing. The results showed that the microstructures of Ni-rich Al-Si piston alloy treated by electric pulse modification were refined, the solid solubility of Cu, Ni, Si, etc. in α-Al matrix was improved, and furthermore, the microhardness and high-temperature tensile strength were increased by 9.41% and 17.5%, respectively. The distribution of second phases was also more uniform compared with that of a non-modified sample.

  12. A process model of voluntary travel behavior modification and effects of Travel Feedback Programs (TFPs)

    Taniguchi, Ayako

    2007-01-01

    This study tested an integrated process model of travel behavior modification. We used a model that combined the theory of planned behavior (TPB), norm activation theory (NAT), a theory of implementation intention, and theories of habit. To test the integrated model, we used panel data (n = 208) obtained before and after travel feedback programs (TFPs); the TFP is a communication program aimed at voluntary travel behavior modification, from automobile use to non-auto means of travel such as p...

  13. Effects of weather variability and air pollutants on emergency admissions for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.

    Hori, Aya; Hashizume, Masahiro; Tsuda, Yoko; Tsukahara, Teruomi; Nomiyama, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effect of ambient temperature, air pressure and air pollutants on daily emergency admissions by identifying the cause of admission for each type of stroke and cardiovascular disease using generalized linear Poisson regression models allowing for overdispersion, and controlling for seasonal and inter-annual variations, days of the week and public holidays, levels of influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses. Every 1°C decrease in mean temperature was associated with an increase in the daily number of emergency admissions by 7.83% (95% CI 2.06-13.25) for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and heart failure, by 35.57% (95% CI 15.59-59.02) for intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) and by 11.71% (95% CI 4.1-19.89) for cerebral infarction. An increase of emergency admissions due to ICH (3.25% (95% CI 0.94-5.51)), heart failure (3.56% (95% CI 1.09-5.96)) was observed at every 1 hPa decrease in air pressure from the previous days. We found stronger detrimental effect of cold on stroke than cardiovascular disease.

  14. Environmental control of drilling mud discharge through dewatering in cold weather climates: effect of ambient temperature

    Wojtanowicz, A. K. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Ye, Y. [Jianghan Petroleum Institute, Beijing, (China)

    1998-05-01

    Results of an experimental study of the effects of drilling mud temperature upon dewatering performance at various temperatures were presented. Three temperature ranges (from flowline temperature to room temperature, from room temperature to freezing point, and freeze/thaw, i.e. from -20 degrees C to 12 degrees C) were considered. Both unweighted and weighted fresh water muds and weighted salt water mud were tested using a sealed laboratory batch reactor, to prevent rapid vaporization of separated water at temperatures above 60 degrees C. Deep freezing was achieved by using ice or ice-salt baths. Net water removal was measured with a bench-top plate press under constant expression pressure of 270 kPa. Results showed that the freeze/thaw treatment process proved to be very effective, enhancing water removal by 34 to 39 per cent, and reducing waste mud volume by 64 to 72 per cent. No advantage to dewatering hot drilling mud from active systems was observed at temperatures above 21 degrees C. It was suggested that at temperatures under 21 degrees C, the waste drilling mud diverted from an active system should be dewatered when its temperature is still over 40 degrees C. to reduce the amount of chemicals needed for separation enhancement. 14 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs.

  15. NIR Color vs Launch Date: A 20-Year Analysis of Space Weathering Effects on the Boeing 376 Spacecraft

    Frith, James; Anz-Meador, Philip; Lederer, Sue; Cowardin, Heather; Buckalew, Brent

    2015-01-01

    The Boeing HS-376 spin stabilized spacecraft was a popular design that was launched continuously into geosynchronous orbit starting in 1980 with the last launch occurring in 2002. Over 50 of the HS-376 buses were produced to fulfill a variety of different communication missions for countries all over the world. The design of the bus is easily approximated as a telescoping cylinder that is covered with solar cells and an Earth facing antenna that is despun at the top of the cylinder. The similarity in design and the number of spacecraft launched over a long period of time make the HS-376 a prime target for studying the effects of solar weathering on solar panels as a function of time. A selection of primarily non-operational HS-376 spacecraft launched over a 20 year time period were observed using the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope on Mauna Kea and multi-band near-infrared photometry produced. Each spacecraft was observed for an entire night cycling through ZYJHK filters and time-varying colors produced to compare near-infrared color as a function of launch date. The resulting analysis shown here may help in the future to set launch date constraints on the parent object of unidentified debris objects or other unknown spacecraft.

  16. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON THE EFFECT OF NATURAL TROPICAL WEATHER ON INTERFACIAL BONDING PERFORMANCE OF CFRP-CONCRETE BONDING SYSTEM

    MOHD H. MOHD HASHIM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The existing reinforced concrete structures may require rehabilitation and strengthening to overcome deficiencies due to defect and environmental deterioration. Fibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP-concrete bonding systems can provide solution for the deficiencies, but the durability of the bonded joint needs to be investigated for reliable structural performance. In this research the interfacial bonding behaviour of CFRP-concrete system under tropical climate exposure is main interest. A 300 mm concrete prism was bonded with CFRP plate on its two sides and exposed for 3, 6, and 9 months to laboratory environment, continuous natural weather, and wet-dry exposure in 3.5% saltwater solution at room and 40 °C temperature. The prisms were subjected to tension and compression load under bonding test to measure the strain and determine stress distribution and shear stress transfer behaviour. The results of the bonding test showed that load transfer was fairly linear and uniform at lower load level and changed to non-linear and non- uniform at higher load level. The force transfers causes the shear stress distribution being shifted along the bonded length. The combination of climate effects may have provided better curing of the bonded joints, but longer duration of exposure may be required to weaken the bond strength. Nevertheless, CFRP-concrete bonding system was only minimally affected under the tropical climate and salt solution.

  17. The Effectiveness of Cognitive Bias Modification Interventions for Substance Addictions: A Meta-Analysis.

    Ioana A Cristea

    Full Text Available Cognitive bias modification (CBM interventions, presumably targeting automatic processes, are considered particularly promising for addictions. We conducted a meta-analysis examining randomized controlled trials (RCTs of CBM for substance addiction outcomes.Studies were identified through systematic searches in bibliographical databases. We included RCTs of CBM interventions, alone or in combination with other treatments, for any type of addiction. We examined trial risk of bias, publication bias and possible moderators. Effects sizes were computed for post-test and follow-up, using a random-effects model. We grouped outcome measures and reported results for addiction (all related measures, craving and cognitive bias.We identified 25 trials, 18 for alcohol problems, and 7 for smoking. At post-test, there was no significant effect of CBM for addiction, g = 0.08 (95% CI -0.02 to 0.18 or craving, g = 0.05 (95% CI -0.06 to 0.16, but there was a significant, moderate effect on cognitive bias, g = 0.60 (95% CI 0.39 to 0.79. Results were similar for alcohol and smoking outcomes taken separately. Follow-up addiction outcomes were reported in 7 trials, resulting in a small but significant effect of CBM, g = 0.18 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.32. Results for addiction and craving did not differ by substance type, sample type, delivery setting, bias targeted or number of sessions. Risk of bias was high or uncertain in most trials, for most criteria considered. Meta-regression analyses revealed significant inverse relationships between risk of bias and effect sizes for addiction outcomes and craving. The relationship between cognitive bias and respectively addiction ESs was not significant. There was consistent evidence of publication bias in the form of funnel plot asymmetry.Our results cast serious doubts on the clinical utility of CBM interventions for addiction problems, but sounder methodological trials are necessary before this issue can be settled. We found no

  18. Effects of single and dual physical modifications on pinhão starch.

    Pinto, Vânia Zanella; Vanier, Nathan Levien; Deon, Vinicius Gonçalves; Moomand, Khalid; El Halal, Shanise Lisie Mello; Zavareze, Elessandra da Rosa; Lim, Loong-Tak; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra

    2015-11-15

    Pinhão starch was modified by annealing (ANN), heat-moisture (HMT) or sonication (SNT) treatments. The starch was also modified by a combination of these treatments (ANN-HMT, ANN-SNT, HMT-ANN, HMT-SNT, SNT-ANN, SNT-HMT). Whole starch and debranched starch fractions were analyzed by gel-permeation chromatography. Moreover, crystallinity, morphology, swelling power, solubility, pasting and gelatinization characteristics were evaluated. Native and single ANN and SNT-treated starches exhibited a CA-type crystalline structure while other modified starches showed an A-type structure. The relative crystallinity increased in ANN-treated starches and decreased in single HMT- and SNT-treated starches. The ANN, HMT and SNT did not provide visible cracks, notches or grooves to pinhão starch granule. SNT applied as second treatment was able to increase the peak viscosity of single ANN- and HMT-treated starches. HMT used alone or in dual modifications promoted the strongest effect on gelatinization temperatures and enthalpy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effective Modification of a Nonprescription Medicines Course to Optimize Learning of Millennial Generation Students

    Bella H Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe examples of effective teaching strategies utilized within a required nonprescription therapeutics course, in order to accommodate learning characteristics of Millennials. Case Study: Instructors identified unique characteristics of Millennial generation students through literature review and focused educational workshops. These characteristics include the desire for active learning where didactic lectures make a connection to life, the incorporation of technology, and assignments that focus on team work. Course modifications were then made based on these characteristics including redesign of large group course lectures with incorporation of patient cases, inclusion of a variety of online components including the opportunity to provide course feedback, and active learning small group projects within workshop sections. Evaluation:Student evaluation of the course and instructors significantly improved after introducing changes to the course compared to previous years. Each component of the student evaluation resulted in a statistically significant change in mean score. Verbal and written evaluations indicated a very positive learning experience for students. Grade mean (3.3 vs. 3.8, p Conclusions: By identifying characteristics of Millennial generation student learners, traditional teaching methods can be modified in order to enhance retention of material and optimize their learning process. Course changes improved the learning experience for students and instructors. Instructors' willingness to evaluate generational differences and adapt teaching enhances the learning experiences in the classroom for both students and instructors.   Type: Case Study

  20. Effects of surface modification with hydroxyl terminated polydimethylsiloxane on the corrosion protection of polyurethane coating

    Jeon, Jae Hong; Shon, Min Young

    2014-01-01

    Polyurethane coating was designed to give a hydrophobic property on its surface by modifying it with hydroxyl terminated polydimethylsiloxane and then effects of surface hydrophobic tendency, water transport behavior and hence corrosion protectiveness of the modified polyurethane coating were examined using FT-IR/ATR spectroscopy, contact angle measurement and electrochemical impedance test. As results, the surface of polyurethane coating was changed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic property due primarily to a phase separation tendency between polyurethane and modifier by the modification. The phase separation tendency is more appreciable when modified by polydimethylsiloxane with higher content. Water transport behavior of the modified polyurethane coating decreased more in that with higher hydrophobic surface property. The decrease in the impedance modulus ⅠZⅠ at low frequency region in immersion test for polyurethane coatings was associated with the water transport behavior and surface hydrophobic properties of modified polyurethane coatings. The corrosion protectiveness of the modified polyurethane coated carbon steel generally increased with an increase in the modifier content, confirming that corrosion protectiveness of the modified polyurethane coating is well agreed with its water transport behavior

  1. Modification of alternative additives and their effect on the rubber properties

    Ondrušová Darina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with a targeted modification of two kinds of alternative additives - waste from glass production and natural mineral filler and explores their effect on the properties of polymeric materials. In the function of first alternative filler was used sludge from weighing the ingredients of glass batch in the glass production. The second used was natural aluminosilicate material based on zeolite (clinoptilolite. These alternative fillers have been modified in order to increase its efficiency, using the silanes: 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane, bis(triethoxysilylpropyl-tetrasulfide and 3-(triethoxysilylpropyl-methacrylate. In the case of alternative filler based on zeolite the influence of silanization conditions on the filler efficiency have been also studied. Prepared modified fillers were mixed into rubber compounds as partial replacement of commonly used filler – carbon black. The influence of prepared fillers on rheology and curing characteristics of rubber compounds and also on physical and mechanical properties of vulcanizates has been studied. Obtained results of measured characteristics of polymeric systems containing prepared alternative fillers were compared with the results obtained in the case of reference rubber compound with a commertially used filler – carbon black.

  2. Effects of genetic modifications to flax (Linum usitatissimum) on arbuscular mycorrhiza and plant performance.

    Wróbel-Kwiatkowska, Magdalena; Turnau, Katarzyna; Góralska, Katarzyna; Anielska, Teresa; Szopa, Jan

    2012-10-01

    Although arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are known for their positive effect on flax growth, the impact of genetic manipulation in this crop on arbuscular mycorrhiza and plant performance was assessed for the first time. Five types of transgenic flax that were generated to improve fiber quality and resistance to pathogens, through increased levels of either phenylpropanoids (W92.40), glycosyltransferase (GT4, GT5), or PR2 beta-1,3-glucanase (B14) or produce polyhydroxybutyrate (M50), were used. Introduced genetic modifications did not change the degree of mycorrhizal colonization as compared to parent cultivars Linola and Nike. Arbuscules were well developed in each tested transgenic type (except M50). In two lines (W92.40 and B14), a higher abundance of arbuscules was observed when compared to control, untransformed flax plants. However, in some cases (W92.40, GT4, GT5, and B14 Md), the mycorrhizal dependency for biomass production of transgenic plants was slightly lower when compared to the original cultivars. No significant influence of mycorrhiza on the photosynthetic activity of transformed lines was found, but in most cases P concentration in mycorrhizal plants remained higher than in nonmycorrhizal ones. The transformed flax lines meet the demands for better quality of fiber and higher resistance to pathogens, without significantly influencing the interaction with AMF.

  3. Ammonia modification of activated carbon to enhance carbon dioxide adsorption: Effect of pre-oxidation

    Shafeeyan, Mohammad Saleh; Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri Wan; Houshmand, Amirhossein; Arami-Niya, Arash

    2011-02-01

    A commercial granular activated carbon (GAC) was subjected to thermal treatment with ammonia for obtaining an efficient carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorbent. In general, CO2 adsorption capacity of activated carbon can be increased by introduction of basic nitrogen functionalities onto the carbon surface. In this work, the effect of oxygen surface groups before introduction of basic nitrogen functionalities to the carbon surface on CO2 adsorption capacity was investigated. For this purpose two different approaches of ammonia treatment without preliminary oxidation and amination of oxidized samples were studied. Modified carbons were characterized by elemental analysis and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) to study the impact of changes in surface chemistry and formation of specific surface groups on adsorption properties. The texture of the samples was characterized by conducting N2 adsorption/desorption at -196 °C. CO2 capture performance of the samples was investigated using a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). It was found that in both modification techniques, the presence of nitrogen functionalities on carbon surface generally increased the CO2 adsorption capacity. The results indicated that oxidation followed by high temperature ammonia treatment (800 °C) considerably enhanced the CO2 uptake at higher temperatures.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus Sortase A-Mediated Incorporation of Peptides: Effect of Peptide Modification on Incorporation.

    Silvie Hansenová Maňásková

    Full Text Available The endogenous Staphylococcus aureus sortase A (SrtA transpeptidase covalently anchors cell wall-anchored (CWA proteins equipped with a specific recognition motif (LPXTG into the peptidoglycan layer of the staphylococcal cell wall. Previous in situ experiments have shown that SrtA is also able to incorporate exogenous, fluorescently labelled, synthetic substrates equipped with the LPXTG motif (K(FITCLPETG-amide into the bacterial cell wall, albeit at high concentrations of 500 μM to 1 mM. In the present study, we have evaluated the effect of substrate modification on the incorporation efficiency. This revealed that (i by elongation of LPETG-amide with a sequence of positively charged amino acids, derived from the C-terminal domain of physiological SrtA substrates, the incorporation efficiency was increased by 20-fold at 10 μM, 100 μM and 250 μM; (ii Substituting aspartic acid (E for methionine increased the incorporation of the resulting K(FITCLPMTG-amide approximately three times at all concentrations tested; (iii conjugation of the lipid II binding antibiotic vancomycin to K(FITCLPMTG-amide resulted in the same incorporation levels as K(FITCLPETG-amide, but much more efficient at an impressive 500-fold lower substrate concentration. These newly developed synthetic substrates can potentially find broad applications in for example the in situ imaging of bacteria; the incorporation of antibody recruiting moieties; the targeted delivery and covalent incorporation of antimicrobial compounds into the bacterial cell wall.

  5. Effects of topographical and mechanical property alterations induced by oxygen plasma modification on stem cell behavior.

    Yang, Yong; Kulangara, Karina; Lam, Ruby T S; Dharmawan, Rena; Leong, Kam W

    2012-10-23

    Polymeric substrates intended for cell culture and tissue engineering are often surface-modified to facilitate cell attachment of most anchorage-dependent cell types. The modification alters the surface chemistry and possibly topography. However, scant attention has been paid to other surface property alterations. In studying oxygen plasma treatment of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), we show that oxygen plasma treatment alters the surface chemistry and, consequently, the topography and elasticity of PDMS at the nanoscale level. The elasticity factor has the predominant effect, compared with the chemical and topographical factors, on cell adhesions of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The enhanced focal adhesions favor cell spreading and osteogenesis of hMSCs. Given the prevalent use of PDMS in biomedical device construction and cell culture experiments, this study highlights the importance of understanding how oxygen plasma treatment would impact subsequent cell-substrate interactions. It helps explain inconsistency in the literature and guides preparation of PDMS-based biomedical devices in the future.

  6. Effect of sports modification on clinical outcome in children and adolescent athletes with symptomatic lumbar spondylolysis.

    El Rassi, Georges; Takemitsu, Masakazu; Glutting, Joseph; Shah, Suken A

    2013-12-01

    This cohort study aimed to report the compliance of young athletes with nonoperative treatment and to clarify the role of sports modification on clinical outcome of symptomatic spondylolysis. This study included patients with a chief complaint of low back pain participating in regular sports activity, having spondylolysis, and being treated and followed up between 1990 and 2002 in the authors' hospital. One hundred thirty-two athletes were included in this study: 78 males and 54 females. The mean age of the patients was 13 yrs (range, 7-18 yrs). Only 56 patients (42.4%) were compliant to nonoperative treatment. Eighty-six patients (65%) stopped all sports activities for at least 3 mos, and 46 patients (35%) stopped exercising for a variable period of less than 3 mos. The grading of clinical outcome after nonoperative treatment was as follows: excellent in 48 patients (36.4%), good in 74 patients (56.1), fair in 6 patients (4.5%), and poor in 4 patients (3%). The patients who stopped sports for at least 3 mos were 16.39 times more likely to have an excellent result than those who did not stop sports. Bony healing on radiographs did not correlate with clinical outcome. Timely cessation of sports activity for 3 mos is considered an effective method of nonoperative treatment for young athletes with symptomatic lumbar spondylolysis.

  7. Fresh fruit intake and asthma symptoms in young British adults: confounding or effect modification by smoking?

    Butland, B K; Strachan, D P; Anderson, H R

    1999-04-01

    Antioxidant vitamins have been postulated as a protective factor in asthma. The associations between the frequency of fresh fruit consumption in summer, and the prevalence of self-reported asthma symptoms were investigated. The analysis was based on 5,582 males and 5,770 females, born in England, Wales and Scotland between March 3-9, 1958 and aged 33 yrs at the time of survey. The 12-month period prevalence of wheeze and frequent wheeze were inversely associated with frequent intakes of fresh fruit and salad/raw vegetables and positively associated with smoking and lower social class. After adjustment for mutual confounding and sex, associations with smoking persisted, but those with social class and salad/raw vegetable consumption lost significance. The frequency of fresh fruit intake was no longer associated with wheeze after adjustment, but was inversely associated with frequent wheeze and speech-limiting attacks. The association with frequent wheeze differed significantly between smoking groups (never, former, current) and appeared to be confined to exsmokers and current smokers. These findings support postulated associations between infrequent fresh fruit consumption and the prevalence of frequent or severe asthma symptoms in adults. Associations appeared to be restricted to smokers, with effect modification as a more likely explanation of this pattern than residual confounding by smoking.

  8. Laser surface modification of electrically conductive fabrics: Material performance improvement and design effects

    Tunakova, Veronika; Hrubosova, Zuzana; Tunak, Maros; Kasparova, Marie; Mullerova, Jana

    2018-01-01

    Development of lightweight flexible materials for electromagnetic interference shielding has obtained increased attention in recent years particularly for clothing, textiles in-house use and technical applications especially in areas of aircraft, aerospace, automobiles and flexible electronics such as portable electronics and wearable devices. There are many references in the literature concerning development and investigation of electromagnetic shielding lightweight flexible materials especially textile based with different electrically conductive additives. However, only little attention is paid to designing and enhancing the properties of these special fabrics by textile finishing processes. Laser technology applied as a physical treatment method is becoming very popular and can be used in different applications to make improvement and even overcome drawbacks of some of the traditional processes. The main purpose of this study is firstly to analyze the possibilities of transferring design onto the surface of electrically conductive fabrics by laser beam and secondly to study of effect of surface modification degree on performance of conductive fabric including electromagnetic shielding ability and mechanical properties. Woven fabric made of yarns containing 10% of extremely thin stainless steel fiber was used as a conductive substrate.

  9. Birth defects risk associated with maternal sport fish consumption: potential effect modification by sex of offspring.

    Mendola, Pauline; Robinson, Luther K; Buck, Germaine M; Druschel, Charlotte M; Fitzgerald, Edward F; Sever, Lowell E; Vena, John E

    2005-02-01

    Contaminated sport fish consumption may result in exposure to various reproductive and developmental toxicants, including pesticides and other suspected endocrine disruptors. We investigated the relation between maternal sport fish meals and risk of major birth defects among infants born to members of the New York State (NYS) Angler Cohort between 1986 and 1991 (n=2237 births). Birth defects (n=125 cases) were ascertained from both newborn medical records and the NYS Congenital Malformations Registry. For sport fish meals eaten during pregnancy, the odds ratio (OR) for all major malformations combined was slightly elevated for or =2 meals/month (OR=1.51, CI=0.74, 3.09), with no meals during pregnancy as the reference category. Higher ORs were consistently observed among male offspring compared with females. For > or =2 meals/month, the risk for males was significantly elevated (males: OR=3.01, CI: 1.2, 7.5; females: OR=0.73, CI: 0.2, 2.4). Exposure during pregnancy and effect modification by infants sex could be important considerations for future studies of birth outcomes associated with endocrine disruptors.

  10. Birth defects risk associated with maternal sport fish consumption: potential effect modification by sex of offspring

    Mendola, Pauline; Robinson, L.K.; Buck, G.M.; Druschel, C.M.; Fitzgerald, E.F.; Sever, L.E.; Vena, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    Contaminated sport fish consumption may result in exposure to various reproductive and developmental toxicants, including pesticides and other suspected endocrine disruptors. We investigated the relation between maternal sport fish meals and risk of major birth defects among infants born to members of the New York State (NYS) Angler Cohort between 1986 and 1991 (n=2237 births). Birth defects (n=125 cases) were ascertained from both newborn medical records and the NYS Congenital Malformations Registry. For sport fish meals eaten during pregnancy, the odds ratio (OR) for all major malformations combined was slightly elevated for ≤1 meal/month (OR=1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.84, 1.89) and ≥2 meals/month (OR=1.51, CI=0.74, 3.09), with no meals during pregnancy as the reference category. Higher ORs were consistently observed among male offspring compared with females. For ≥2 meals/month, the risk for males was significantly elevated (males: OR=3.01, CI: 1.2, 7.5; females: OR=0.73, CI: 0.2, 2.4). Exposure during pregnancy and effect modification by infants sex could be important considerations for future studies of birth outcomes associated with endocrine disruptors

  11. Effectiveness of a behavior modification program for older people with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes.

    Ounnapiruk, Liwan; Wirojratana, Virapun; Meehatchai, Nitaya; Turale, Sue

    2014-06-01

    This quasi-experimental study examined the effectiveness of a behavior modification program for diabetic control in Thai elders with uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes. Purposive sampling was used to select 30 elders from one community as an intervention group, and 30 from a neighboring community as a control group. The intervention group participated in a program of 12 weeks' duration involving activities related to group counseling, group discussion, and an empowerment process that enhanced appropriate consumption of healthy diet, medication taking, and exercise. Data were collected by interviews using a questionnaire to assess knowledge of diabetes, perceived self-efficacy, and diabetes control behavior, including fasting blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin, were examined at the baseline and three months thereafter. At program completion, the intervention group had significantly higher scores of knowledge, self-efficacy, and health behaviors than those in the control group, but blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin were not significantly different. Although nurses can use aspects of this program to benefit elders with diabetes who require support and education, further research is required to provide improved health outcomes such as better glycemic control. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Hypercholesterolemia in Renal Transplant Recipients; contributing Factors, Effect of Dietary Modification and Fluvastatin Therapy

    Rahed Awad

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypercholesterolemia which frequently follows renal transplantation, places kidney graft recipients at an increased risk for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. We attempt in this study to determine the prevalence, and evaluate severity and treatment of hypercholesterolemia in kidney transplant recipients. We studied 78 renal transplant patients with a mean age of 42.1 years and mean transplant duration of 6.2 years (range from six months to 8.5 years. They were on triple immunosuppressive therapy and had serum creatinine level of less than 160µmol/L. Thirty-one patients (39.8% were found to have blood cholesterol levels > 6.4 mmol/L. Significant positive correlation was found between hypercholesterolemia and cyclosporine blood levels above 200 ng/ml (p< 0.0009. Furthermore, proteinuria positively correlated with hypercholesterolemia (p< 0.0006. There was no significant correlation between cholesterol blood level and the patient age, sex, presence of diabetes, prednisolone, dose, or treatment with C.-blockers and diuretics. Dietary modification was not effective in reducing the blood cholesterol level in our patients, so we used fluvastatin in a dose of 20 to 40 mg daily for a period of three months. This drug was effective in lowering the mean cholesterol blood levels from 7.1 to 5.2 mmol/L (p< 0.005. One out of 19-electromyogram studies showed abnormal pattern. We did not notice change in the levels of creatinine phosphokinase, serum creatinine or lover enzymes. In conclusion, hyper-cholesterolemia is common in stable renal transplant patients. The presence of proteinuria and the high level of blood cyclosporine are significantly associated with hypercholesterolemia. Low-dose fluvastatin was well-tolerated and effective cholesterol lowering treatment.

  13. Air pollution and heart rate variability: effect modification by chronic lead exposure.

    Park, Sung Kyun; O'Neill, Marie S; Vokonas, Pantel S; Sparrow, David; Wright, Robert O; Coull, Brent; Nie, Huiling; Hu, Howard; Schwartz, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Outdoor air pollution and lead exposure can disturb cardiac autonomic function, but the effects of both these exposures together have not been studied. We examined whether higher cumulative lead exposures, as measured by bone lead, modified cross-sectional associations between air pollution and heart rate variability among 384 elderly men from the Normative Aging Study. We used linear regression, controlling for clinical, demographic, and environmental covariates. We found graded, significant reductions in both high-frequency and low-frequency powers of heart rate variability in relation to ozone and sulfate across the quartiles of tibia lead. Interquartile range increases in ozone and sulfate were associated respectively, with 38% decrease (95% confidence interval = -54.6% to -14.9%) and 22% decrease (-40.4% to 1.6%) in high frequency, and 38% decrease (-51.9% to -20.4%) and 12% decrease (-28.6% to 9.3%) in low frequency, in the highest quartile of tibia lead after controlling for potential confounders. We observed similar but weaker effect modification by tibia lead adjusted for education and cumulative traffic (residuals of the regression of tibia lead on education and cumulative traffic). Patella lead modified only the ozone effect on heart rate variability. People with long-term exposure to higher levels of lead may be more sensitive to cardiac autonomic dysfunction on high air pollution days. Efforts to understand how environmental exposures affect the health of an aging population should consider both current levels of pollution and history of lead exposure as susceptibility factors.

  14. Study on aerosol optical properties and radiative effect in cloudy weather in the Guangzhou region

    Deng, Tao, E-mail: tdeng@grmc.gov.cn [Institute of Tropical and Marine Meteorology/Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Regional Numerical Weather Prediction, China Meteorological Administration, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Deng, XueJiao; Li, Fei [Institute of Tropical and Marine Meteorology/Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Regional Numerical Weather Prediction, China Meteorological Administration, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Wang, ShiQiang [Zhuhai Meteorological Administration, Zhuhai 519000 (China); Wang, Gang [Haizhu Meteorological Administration, Guangzhou, 510000 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Currently, Guangzhou region was facing the problem of severe air pollution. Large amount of aerosols in the polluted air dramatically attenuated solar radiation. This study investigated the vertical optical properties of aerosols and inverted the height of boundary layer in the Guangzhou region using the lidar. Simultaneously, evaluated the impact of different types of clouds on aerosol radiation effects using the SBDART. The results showed that the height of the boundary layer and the surface visibility changed consistently, the average height of the boundary layer on the hazy days was only 61% of that on clear days. At the height of 2 km or lower, the aerosol extinction coefficient profile distribution decreased linearly along with height on clear days, but the haze days saw an exponential decrease. When there was haze, the changing of heating rate of atmosphere caused by the aerosol decreased from 3.72 K/d to 0.9 K/d below the height of 2 km, and the attenuation of net radiation flux at the ground surface was 97.7 W/m{sup 2}, and the attenuation amplitude was 11.4%; when there were high clouds, the attenuation was 125.2 W/m{sup 2} and the attenuation amplitude was 14.6%; where there were medium cloud, the attenuation was 286.4 W/m{sup 2} and the attenuation amplitude was 33.4%. Aerosol affected mainly shortwave radiation, and affected long wave radiation very slightly. - Highlights: • Large amount of aerosols dramatically attenuated solar radiation in Guangzhou region. • Investigated the aerosol extinction coefficient profile distribution and inverted the height of boundary layer using the lidar • Evaluated the impact of different types of clouds on aerosol radiation effects.

  15. Investigating the effects of in utero benzene exposure on epigenetic modifications in maternal and fetal CD-1 mice

    Philbrook, Nicola A.; Winn, Louise M.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to the ubiquitous environmental pollutant benzene is positively correlated with leukemia in adults and may be associated with childhood leukemia following in utero exposure. While numerous studies implicate oxidative stress and DNA damage as playing a role in benzene-mediated carcinogenicity, emerging evidence suggests that alterations in epigenetic regulations may be involved. The present study aimed to determine whether DNA methylation and/or various histone modifications were altered following in utero benzene exposure in CD-1 mice. Global DNA methylation and promoter-specific methylation of the tumor suppressor gene, p15, were assessed. Additionally, levels of acetylated histones H3, H4, and H3K56, as well as methylated histones H3K9 and H3K27 were assessed by Western blotting. A significant decrease in global DNA methylation of maternal bone marrow was observed following benzene exposure; however no effect on global DNA methylation was detected in fetal livers. Additionally, no effect of benzene exposure was observed on p15 promoter methylation or any measured histone modifications in both maternal bone marrow and fetal livers. These results suggest that the methodology used in the present study did not reveal alterations in DNA methylation and histone modifications following in utero exposure to benzene; however further experimentation investigating these modifications at the whole genome/epigenome level, as well as at later stages of benzene-induced carcinogenesis, are warranted. - Highlights: • Benzene exposure in pregnant mice decreased global DNA methylation in maternal bone marrow. • Benzene exposure in pregnant mice had no effect on global DNA methylation in fetal livers. • No effect of benzene exposure was observed on p15 promoter methylation. • No effect of benzene on measured histone modifications in both maternal bone marrow and fetal livers was observed.

  16. Investigating the effects of in utero benzene exposure on epigenetic modifications in maternal and fetal CD-1 mice

    Philbrook, Nicola A. [Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Graduate Program in Pharmacology and Toxicology, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L3N6 (Canada); Winn, Louise M., E-mail: winnl@queensu.ca [Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Graduate Program in Pharmacology and Toxicology, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L3N6 (Canada); School of Environmental Studies, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L3N6 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Exposure to the ubiquitous environmental pollutant benzene is positively correlated with leukemia in adults and may be associated with childhood leukemia following in utero exposure. While numerous studies implicate oxidative stress and DNA damage as playing a role in benzene-mediated carcinogenicity, emerging evidence suggests that alterations in epigenetic regulations may be involved. The present study aimed to determine whether DNA methylation and/or various histone modifications were altered following in utero benzene exposure in CD-1 mice. Global DNA methylation and promoter-specific methylation of the tumor suppressor gene, p15, were assessed. Additionally, levels of acetylated histones H3, H4, and H3K56, as well as methylated histones H3K9 and H3K27 were assessed by Western blotting. A significant decrease in global DNA methylation of maternal bone marrow was observed following benzene exposure; however no effect on global DNA methylation was detected in fetal livers. Additionally, no effect of benzene exposure was observed on p15 promoter methylation or any measured histone modifications in both maternal bone marrow and fetal livers. These results suggest that the methodology used in the present study did not reveal alterations in DNA methylation and histone modifications following in utero exposure to benzene; however further experimentation investigating these modifications at the whole genome/epigenome level, as well as at later stages of benzene-induced carcinogenesis, are warranted. - Highlights: • Benzene exposure in pregnant mice decreased global DNA methylation in maternal bone marrow. • Benzene exposure in pregnant mice had no effect on global DNA methylation in fetal livers. • No effect of benzene exposure was observed on p15 promoter methylation. • No effect of benzene on measured histone modifications in both maternal bone marrow and fetal livers was observed.

  17. Effect of surface roughness and surface modification of indium tin oxide electrode on its potential response to tryptophan

    Khan, Md. Zaved Hossain; Nakanishi, Takuya; Kuroiwa, Shigeki; Hoshi, Yoichi; Osaka, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We examine factors affecting potential response of ITO electrode to tryptophan. → Surface roughness of ITO electrode affects the stability of its rest potential. → Surface modification is effective for ITO electrode with a certain roughness. → Optimum values of work function exist for potential response of ITO to tryptophan. - Abstract: The effect of surface modification of indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode on its potential response to tryptophan was investigated for ITO substrates with different surface roughness. It was found that a small difference in surface roughness, between ∼1 and ∼2 nm of R a evaluated by atomic force microscopy, affects the rest potential of ITO electrode in the electrolyte. A slight difference in In:Sn ratio at the near surface of the ITO substrates, measured by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectrometry and Auger electron spectroscopy is remarkable, and considered to relate with surface roughness. Interestingly, successive modification of the ITO surface with aminopropylsilane and disuccinimidyl suberate, of which essentiality to the potential response to indole compounds we previously reported, improved the stability of the rest potential and enabled the electrodes to respond to tryptophan in case of specimens with R a values ranging between ∼2 and ∼3 nm but not for those with R a of ∼1 nm. It was suggested that there are optimum values of effective work function of ITO for specific potential response to tryptophan, which can be obtained by the successive modification of ITO surface.

  18. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Lifestyle Modification on Metabolic Control in Overweight Children

    Angela Shin-Yu Lien

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood obesity is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to determine the effects of lifestyle modification programs on fasting plasma glucose (FPG levels in overweight children. We queried six relevant electronic databases and manually searched for studies published before December 2016. Overweight/obese children who underwent a lifestyle modification for more than 6 months were included. A total of 3923 children from eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs were included. Compared with the control group, the lifestyle modification group had significantly lower FPG levels by 1.3 mg/dL. The mean differences were significantly decreased for both secondary outcomes; BMI z-score decreased by 0.16 units and insulin levels decreased by 2.4 mU/L. The metaregression showed that the follow-up duration was associated with FPG levels and BMI and insulin levels and half year is a suitable follow-up duration for this population. This study showed that lifestyle modification programs may be effective in reducing the FPG levels of overweight/obese children. Further high-quality RCTs with longer follow-up periods are needed to evaluate the long-term effect of this complementary approach for diabetes mellitus prevention on overweight/obese children.

  19. Accelerated differentiation of osteoblast cells on polycaprolactone scaffolds driven by a combined effect of protein coating and plasma modification

    Yildirim, Eda D; Gueceri, Selcuk; Sun, Wei [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Besunder, Robyn; Allen, Fred [Drexel University, School of Biomedical Engineering Science and Health System, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Pappas, Daphne, E-mail: edy22@drexel.ed [Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    A combined effect of protein coating and plasma modification on the quality of the osteoblast-scaffold interaction was investigated. Three-dimensional polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds were manufactured by the precision extrusion deposition (PED) system. The structural, physical, chemical and biological cues were introduced to the surface through providing 3D structure, coating with adhesive protein fibronectin and modifying the surface with oxygen-based plasma. The changes in the surface properties of PCL after those modifications were examined by contact angle goniometry, surface energy calculation, surface chemistry analysis (XPS) and surface topography measurements (AFM). The effects of modification techniques on osteoblast short-term and long-term functions were examined by cell adhesion, proliferation assays and differentiation markers, namely alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) and osteocalcin secretion. The results suggested that the physical and chemical cues introduced by plasma modification might be sufficient for improved cell adhesion, but for accelerated osteoblast differentiation the synergetic effects of structural, physical, chemical and biological cues should be introduced to the PCL surface.

  20. Effects of nuclear elastic scattering and modifications of ion-electron equilibration power on advanced-fuel burns

    Galambos, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of Nuclear Elastic Scattering (NES) of fusion products and modifications of the ion-electron equilibration power on D-T and D-based advanced-fuel fusion plasmas are presented here. The processes causing the modifications to the equilibration power included here are: (1) depletion of low-energy electrons by Coulomb collisions with the ions; and (2) magnetic field effects on the energy transfer between the ions and the electrons. Both NES and the equilibration modifications affect the flow of power to the plasma ions, which is an important factor in the analysis of advanced-fuels. A Hot Ion Mode (HIM) analysis was used to investigate the changes in the minimum ignition requirements for Cat-D and D- 3 He plasmas, due to the changes in the allowable T/sub i/T/sub e/ for ignition from NES and equilibration modifications. Both of these effects have the strongest influence on the ignition requirements for high temperature (>50 keV), low beta (<15%) plasmas, where the cyclotron radiation power loss from the electrons (which is particularly sensitive to changes in the electron temperature) is large

  1. Effects of gull predation and weather on survival of emperor goose goslings

    Schmutz, Joel A.; Manly, Bryan F.J.; Dau, Christian P.

    2001-01-01

    Numbers of emperor geese (Chen canagica) have remained depressed since the mid-1980s. Despite increases in glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus), a primary predator of goslings, little information existed to assess whether recent patterns of gosling survival have been a major factor affecting population dynamics. We used observations of known families of emperor geese to estimate rates of gosling survival during 1993-96 on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska. Survival of goslings to 30 days of age varied among years from 0.332 during 1994 to 0.708 during 1995. Survival was lowest during 1993-94, which corresponded with the years of highest frequency of disturbance of goose broods by glaucous gulls. Rainfall during early brood rearing was much higher in 1994 than other years, and this corresponded to low survival among goslings ≤5 days of age. Numbers of juveniles in families during fall staging were negatively related to rainfall during early brood rearing (n = 23 yr). Although there are no data to assess whether gosling survival in emperor geese has declined from some previous level, current survival rates of emperor goose goslings are as high as or higher than those observed in other goose species that are rapidly increasing. A proposed reduction of glaucous gull numbers by managers may not be the most effective means for increasing population growth in emperor geese.

  2. Influenza epidemics, seasonality, and the effects of cold weather on cardiac mortality

    2012-01-01

    Background More people die in the winter from cardiac disease, and there are competing hypotheses to explain this. The authors conducted a study in 48 US cities to determine how much of the seasonal pattern in cardiac deaths could be explained by influenza epidemics, whether that allowed a more parsimonious control for season than traditional spline models, and whether such control changed the short term association with temperature. Methods The authors obtained counts of daily cardiac deaths and of emergency hospital admissions of the elderly for influenza during 1992–2000. Quasi-Poisson regression models were conducted estimating the association between daily cardiac mortality, and temperature. Results Controlling for influenza admissions provided a more parsimonious model with better Generalized Cross-Validation, lower residual serial correlation, and better captured Winter peaks. The temperature-response function was not greatly affected by adjusting for influenza. The pooled estimated increase in risk for a temperature decrease from 0 to −5°C was 1.6% (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-2.1%). Influenza accounted for 2.3% of cardiac deaths over this period. Conclusions The results suggest that including epidemic data explained most of the irregular seasonal pattern (about 18% of the total seasonal variation), allowing more parsimonious models than when adjusting for seasonality only with smooth functions of time. The effect of cold temperature is not confounded by epidemics. PMID:23025494

  3. The Effects of Weather on Oilseed Rape (OSR Yield in China: Future Implications of Climate Change

    Yaqin He

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the role of climatic factors on crop yields is essential in predicting the future impact of climate change. In order to understand the influence of climatic factors on OSR, detailed farm-level panel data from 2566 farms across 67 counties of the 6 major OSR production regions in China, from the surveys conducted by the national OSR industry project between 2008 and 2013, were used to examine the contribution of changes in selected climatic variables between 2008 and 2013 to yield variation. Spatial and temporal patterns of the relationships between OSR yield, climatic factors were estimated together with the effects of farmer adaptation and management practices on yield variability. The analysis revealed that yields in the low-latitude production regions were more sensitive to temperature increases and likely to decline. Precipitation iwas the most influential factor on yield at the first two growth stages; temperature and sunshine hours were most important at the third and fourth growth stages, respectively. Labour input was the most influential management factor affecting yields compared with fertilizer and other inputs. The study concludes that projection of future climate change impacts will need inter alia to incorporate more sophisticated and detailed measures of climatic variables than simple means of temperature and precipitation, incorporating timing in relation to plant growth and yield.

  4. Adverse Weather Evokes Nostalgia.

    van Tilburg, Wijnand A P; Sedikides, Constantine; Wildschut, Tim

    2018-03-01

    Four studies examined the link between adverse weather and the palliative role of nostalgia. We proposed and tested that (a) adverse weather evokes nostalgia (Hypothesis 1); (b) adverse weather causes distress, which predicts elevated nostalgia (Hypothesis 2); (c) preventing nostalgia exacerbates weather-induced distress (Hypothesis 3); and (d) weather-evoked nostalgia confers psychological benefits (Hypothesis 4). In Study 1, participants listened to recordings of wind, thunder, rain, and neutral sounds. Adverse weather evoked nostalgia. In Study 2, participants kept a 10-day diary recording weather conditions, distress, and nostalgia. We also obtained meteorological data. Adverse weather perceptions were positively correlated with distress, which predicted higher nostalgia. Also, adverse natural weather was associated with corresponding weather perceptions, which predicted elevated nostalgia. (Results were mixed for rain.) In Study 3, preventing nostalgia (via cognitive load) increased weather-evoked distress. In Study 4, weather-evoked nostalgia was positively associated with psychological benefits. The findings pioneer the relevance of nostalgia as source of comfort in adverse weather.

  5. Weathering of hydrocarbons in mangrove sediments: testing the effects of using dispersants to treat oil spills

    Burns, K.A.; Codi, S.; Pratt, C.; Duke, N.C.

    1999-01-01

    This field study was a combined chemical and biological investigation of the relative effects of using dispersants to treat oil spills impacting mangrove habitats. The aim of the chemistry was to determine whether dispersant affected the short- or long-term composition of a medium range crude oil (Gippsland) stranded in a tropical mangrove environment in Queensland, Australia. Sediment cores from three replicate plots of each treatment (oil only and oil plus dispersant) were analyzed for total hydrocarbons and for individual molecular markers (alkanes, aromatics, triterpanes, and steranes). Sediments were collected at 2 days, then 1, 7, 13 and 22 months post-spill. Over this time, oil in the six treated plots decreased exponentially from 36.6 ± 16.5 to 1.2 ± 0.8 mg/g dry wt. There was no statistical difference in initial oil concentrations, penetration of oil to depth, or in the rates of oil dissipation between oiled or dispersed oil plots. At 13 months, alkanes were > 50% degraded, aromatics were ∼30% degraded based upon ratios of labile to resistant markers. However, there was no change in the triterpane or sterane biomarker signatures of the retained oil. This is of general forensic interest for pollution events. The predominant removal processes were evaporation (≤27%) and dissolution (≥56%), with a lag-phase of 1 month before the start of significant microbial degradation (≤17%). The most resistant fraction of the oil that remained after 7 months (the higher molecular weight hydrocarbons) correlated with the initial total organic carbon content of the soil. Removal rate in the Queensland mangroves was significantly faster than that observed in the Caribbean and was related to tidal flushing. (author)

  6. The long-term effects of space weather on satellite operations

    D. T. Welling

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Integrated lifetime radiation damage may cause spacecraft to become more susceptible to operational anomalies by changing material characteristics of electronic components. This study demonstrates and quantifies the impact of these effects by examining the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC satellite anomaly database. Energetic particle data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES is used to construct the total lifetime particle exposure a satellite has received at the epoch of an anomaly. These values are compared to the satellite's chronological age and the average exposure per year (calculated over two solar cycles. The results show that many anomalies occur on satellites that have received a total lifetime high-energy particle exposure that is disproportionate to their age. In particular, 10.8% of all events occurred on satellites that received over two times more 20 to 40 MeV proton lifetime particle exposure than predicted using an average annual mean. This number inflates to 35.2% for 40 to 80 MeV protons and 33.7% for ≥2 MeV electrons. Overall, 73.5% of all anomalies occurred on a spacecraft that had experienced greater than two times the expected particle exposure for one of the eight particle populations used in this study. Simplistically, this means that the long term radiation background exposure matters, and that if the background radiation is elevated during the satellite's lifetime, the satellite is likely to experience more anomalies than satellites that have not been exposed to the elevated environment.

  7. Weather effects on avian breeding performance and implications of climate change

    Skagen, Susan K.; Yackel Adams, Amy A.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of recent climate change on the world’s biota has manifested broadly, resulting in latitudinal range shifts, advancing dates of arrival of migrants and onset of breeding, and altered community relationships. Climate change elevates conservation concerns worldwide because it will likely exacerbate a broad range of identified threats to animal populations. In the past few decades, grassland birds have declined faster than other North American avifauna, largely due to habitat threats such as the intensification of agriculture. We examine the effects of local climatic variations on the breeding performance of a bird endemic to the shortgrass prairie, the Lark Bunting (Calamospiza melanocorys) and discuss the implications of our findings relative to future climate predictions. Clutch size, nest survival, and productivity all positively covaried with seasonal precipitation, yet relatively intense daily precipitation events temporarily depressed daily survival of nests. Nest survival was positively related to average temperatures during the breeding season. Declining summer precipitation may reduce the likelihood that Lark Buntings can maintain stable breeding populations in eastern Colorado although average temperature increases of up to 38C (within the range of this study) may ameliorate declines in survival expected with drier conditions. Historic climate variability in the Great Plains selects for a degree of vagility and opportunism rather than strong site fidelity and specific adaptation to local environments. These traits may lead to northerly shifts in distribution if climatic and habitat conditions become less favorable in the drying southern regions of the Great Plains. Distributional shifts in Lark Buntings could be constrained by future changes in land use, agricultural practices, or vegetative communities that result in further loss of shortgrass prairie habitats.

  8. WEATHER INDEX- THE BASIS OF WEATHER DERIVATIVES

    Botos Horia Mircea

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper approaches the subject of Weather Derivatives, more exactly their basic element the weather index. The weather index has two forms, the Heating Degree Day (HDD and the Cooling Degree Day (CDD. We will try to explain their origin, use and the relationship between the two forms of the index. In our research we started from the analysis of the weather derivatives and what they are based on. After finding out about weather index, we were interested in understanding exactly how they work and how they influence the value of the contract. On the national level the research in the field is scares, but foreign materials available. The study for this paper was based firstly on reading about Weather Derivative, and then going in the meteorogical field and determining the way by which the indices were determined. After this, we went to the field with interest in the indices, such as the energy and gas industries, and figured out how they determined the weather index. For the examples we obtained data from the weather index database, and calculated the value for the period. The study is made on a period of five years, in 8 cities of the European Union. The result of this research is that we can now understand better the importance of the way the indices work and how they influence the value of the Weather Derivatives. This research has an implication on the field of insurance, because of the fact that weather derivative are at the convergence point of the stock markets and the insurance market. The originality of the paper comes from the personal touch given to the theoretical aspect and through the analysis of the HDD and CDD index in order to show their general behaviour and relationship.

  9. Exploring weathering: effects of lifelong economic environment and maternal age on low birth weight, small for gestational age, and preterm birth in African-American and white women.

    Love, Catherine; David, Richard J; Rankin, Kristin M; Collins, James W

    2010-07-15

    White women experience their lowest rate of low birth weight (LBW) in their late 20s; the nadir LBW for African-American women is under 20 years with rates rising monotonically thereafter, hypothesized as due to "weathering" or deteriorating health with cumulative disadvantage. Current residential environment affects birth outcomes for all women, but little is known about the impact of early life environment. The authors linked neighborhood income to a transgenerational birth file containing infant and maternal birth data, allowing assessment of economic effects over a woman's life course. African-American women who were born in poorer neighborhoods and were still poor as mothers showed significant weathering with regard to LBW and small for gestational age (SGA) but not preterm birth (PTB). However, African-American women in upper-income areas at both time points had a steady fall in LBW and SGA rate with age, similar to the pattern seen in white women. No group of white women, even those always living in poorer neighborhoods, exhibited weathering with regard to LBW, SGA, or PTB. In contrast, the degree of weathering among African-American women is related to duration of exposure to low-income areas and disappears for those with a life residence in non-poor neighborhoods.

  10. Evaluating the effects of historical land cover change on summertime weather and climate in New Jersey

    Wichansky, Paul Stuart

    where sensible heat fluxes have increased for the present-day landscape, hence enhancing uplift in the mid-troposphere. The mesoscale circulations that developed in the present-day ensemble were also more effective at lifting available moisture to higher levels of the boundary layer, lowering dewpoints near the surface but increasing them aloft. Likewise, the sea breeze in coastal areas of NJ in the present-day ensemble had stronger uplift during the afternoon and enhanced moisture transport to higher levels.

  11. The Effects of Training Contingency Awareness During Attention Bias Modification on Learning and Stress Reactivity.

    Lazarov, Amit; Abend, Rany; Seidner, Shiran; Pine, Daniel S; Bar-Haim, Yair

    2017-09-01

    Current attention bias modification (ABM) procedures are designed to implicitly train attention away from threatening stimuli with the hope of reducing stress reactivity and anxiety symptoms. However, the mechanisms underlying effective ABM delivery are not well understood, with awareness of the training contingency suggested as one possible factor contributing to ABM efficacy. Here, 45 high-anxious participants were trained to divert attention away from threat in two ABM sessions. They were randomly assigned to one of three training protocols: an implicit protocol, comprising two standard implicit ABM training sessions; an explicit protocol, comprising two sessions with explicit instruction as to the attention training contingency; and an implicit-explicit protocol, in which participants were not informed of the training contingency in the first ABM session and informed of it at the start of the second session. We examined learning processes and stress reactivity following a stress-induction task. Results indicate that relative to implicit instructions, explicit instructions led to stronger learning during the first training session. Following rest, the explicit and implicit groups exhibited consolidation-related improvement in performance, whereas no such improvement was noted for the implicit-explicit group. Finally, although stress reactivity was reduced after training, contingency awareness did not yield a differential effect on stress reactivity measured using both self-reports and skin conductance, within and across sessions. These results suggest that explicit ABM administration leads to greater initial learning during the training protocol while not differing from standard implicit administration in terms of off-line learning and stress reactivity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Surface modification effects of fluorine-doped tin dioxide by oxygen plasma ion implantation

    Tang, Peng; Liu, Cai; Zhang, Jingquan; Wu, Lili; Li, Wei; Feng, Lianghuan; Zeng, Guanggen; Wang, Wenwu

    2018-04-01

    SnO2:F (FTO), as a kind of transparent conductive oxide (TCO), exhibits excellent transmittance and conductivity and is widely used as transparency electrodes in solar cells. It's very important to modifying the surface of FTO for it plays a critical role in CdTe solar cells. In this study, modifying effects of oxygen plasma on FTO was investigated systematically. Oxygen plasma treatment on FTO surface with ion accelerating voltage ranged from 0.4 kV to 1.6 kV has been processed. The O proportion of surface was increased after ion implantation. The Fermi level of surface measurement by XPS valance band spectra was lowered as the ion accelerating voltage increased to 1.2 kV and then raised as accelerating voltage was elevated to 1.6 kV. The work function measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy increased after ion implanting, and it was consistent with the variation of Fermi level. The change of energy band structure of FTO surface mainly originated from the surface composition variation. As FTO conduction was primarily due to oxyanion hole, the carrier was electron and its concentration was reduced while O proportion was elevated at the surface of FTO, as a result, the Fermi level lowered and the work function was enlarged. It was proved that oxygen plasma treatment is an effective method to modulate the energy band structure of the surface as well as other properties of FTO, which provides much more space for interface and surface modification and then photoelectric device performance promotion.

  13. Modification of the effect of ambient air pollution on pediatric asthma emergency visits: susceptible subpopulations

    Strickland, Matthew J; Klein, Mitchel; Flanders, W Dana; Chang, Howard H; Mulholland, James A; Tolbert, Paige E; Darrow, Lyndsey A

    2016-01-01

    Background Children may have differing susceptibility to ambient air pollution concentrations depending on various background characteristics of the children. Methods Using emergency department (ED) data linked with birth records from Atlanta, Georgia, we identified ED visits for asthma or wheeze among children aged 2–16 years from 1 January 2002 through 30 June 2010 (n=109,758). We stratified by preterm delivery, term low birth weight, maternal race, Medicaid status, maternal education, maternal smoking, delivery method, and history of a bronchiolitis ED visit. Population-weighted daily average concentrations were calculated for 1-hour maximum carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide; 8-hour maximum ozone; and 24-hour average particulate matter less than 10 microns in diameter, particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5), and the PM2.5 components sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, elemental carbon, and organic carbon, using measurements from stationary monitors. Poisson time-series models were used to estimate rate ratios for associations between three-day moving average pollutant concentrations and daily ED visit counts and to investigate effect-measure modification by the stratification factors. Results Associations between pollutant concentrations and asthma exacerbations were larger among children born preterm and among children born to African American mothers. Stratification by race and preterm status together suggested that both factors affected susceptibility. The largest estimated effect size (for an interquartile-range increase in pollution) was observed for ozone among preterm births to African American mothers: rate ratio=1.138 (95% confidence interval=1.077–1.203). In contrast, the rate ration for the ozone association among full-term births to mothers of other races was 1.025 (0.970–1.083). Conclusions Results support the hypothesis that children vary in their susceptibility to ambient air pollutants. PMID:25192402

  14. Effect of liquid environment on the titanium surface modification by laser ablation

    Ali, Nisar, E-mail: chnisarali@gmail.com [Laser Laboratories, Institute for Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Department of Basic Science and Humanities, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore, Faisalabad Campus, Faisalabad (Pakistan); Laser Laboratories, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, 1-Church Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Department of Physics, GC University, Kachehri Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Bashir, Shazia [Laser Laboratories, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, 1-Church Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Umm-i-Kalsoom [Laser Laboratories, Institute for Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Laser Laboratories, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, 1-Church Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Department of Physics, GC University, Kachehri Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Department of Basic Science and Humanities, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore, Kala Shah Kaku Campus, Lahore (Pakistan); Begum, Narjis [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore (Pakistan); Husinsky, Wolfgang [Laser Laboratories, Institute for Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Liquid assisted ablation effects on the titanium under varying number of laser pulses is investigated. • SEM analysis reveals the growth of various features like ripples, dendritic structures, pores, grains and craters. • Raman and XRD analyses shows the presence of TiO{sub 2} & TiH in both media whereas, TiC, TiCxOy are only identified in propanol. • Hardness of ablated Ti explored by Nano indentation is found to decrease with increasing number of pulses in both media. • Relationship between surface, structural and mechanical modifications is established. - Abstract: The effect of liquid environment (de-ionized water and propanol) on surface, structural and mechanical properties of femtosecond laser ablated titanium has been investigated. For this purpose, Ti: sapphire laser (800 nm, 30 fs, 1 kHz) has been employed, at a fluence of 3.6 J/cm{sup 2} in ambient environments of de-ionized water, and propanol for various number of laser pulses i.e. 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000. The surface features, chemical composition, structural analysis and mechanical properties of irradiated targets have been evaluated by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), X -ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy and Nano-hardness tester. Various features like dendritic structures, globules, porous granular morphology, cones, crater, circular ripples and thermal stress cracking are observed at the ablated area after irradiation. These features are instigated by various thermal and chemical phenomena induced by laser heating at the solid–liquid interface. Decrease in nano-hardness observed in both ambient environments is attributable to the formation of hydrides after irradiation in both media.

  15. Effect of weather on pedestrian trip count and duration: City-scale evaluations using mobile phone application data

    Anthony P. Vanky

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined the association between meteorological (weather conditions in a given locale and pedestrian trips frequency and duration, through the use of locative digital data. These associations were determined for seasonality, urban microclimate, and commuting. We analyzed GPS data from a broadly available activity tracking mobile phone application that automatically recorded 247,814 trips from 5432 unique users in Boston and 257,697 trips from 8256 users in San Francisco over a 50-week period. Generally, we observed increased air temperature and the presence of light cloud cover had a positive association with hourly trip frequency in both cities, regardless of seasonality. Temperature and weather conditions generally showed greater associations with weekend and discretionary travel, than with weekday and required travel. Weather conditions had minimal association with the duration of the trip, once the trip was initiated. The observed associations in some cases differed between the two cities. Our study illustrates the opportunity that emerging technology presents to study active transportation, and exposes new methods to wider consideration in preventive medicine. Keywords: Weather, Pedestrian activity, Walking, Weather conditions and active transportation, Microclimates, Spatial behavior, Mobile phones, Locative data, Emerging technology, Big data

  16. Dermal absorption of benzo[a]pyrene into human skin from soil: Effect of artificial weathering, concentration, and exposure duration.

    Peckham, Trevor K; Shirai, Jeffry H; Bunge, Annette L; Lowney, Yvette W; Ruby, Michael V; Kissel, John C

    2017-11-01

    In vitro assessments of 14 C-benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) absorption through human epidermis were conducted with the sub-63-μm fraction of four test soils containing different amounts of organic and black carbon. Soils were artificially weathered for eight weeks and applied to epidermis at nominal BaP concentrations of 3 and 10 mg/kg for 8 or 24 h. Experiments were also conducted at 24 h with unweathered soils and with BaP deposited onto skin from acetone at a comparable chemical load. For the weathered soils, absorption was independent of the amount of organic or black carbon, the mass in the receptor fluid was proportional to exposure duration but independent of concentration, and the mass recovered in the skin after washing was proportional to concentration and independent of exposure time. Results from the weathered and unweathered soils were similar except for the mass recovered in the washed skin, which was lower for the weathered soil only at the higher concentration. We hypothesize that chemical concentrations exceeded the BaP sorption capacity accessible within the artificial weathering timeframe for all soils tested, and that BaP mass in the washed skin was dominated by particles that were not removed by washing. Fluxes into and through skin from soils were lower by an order of magnitude than from acetone-deposited BaP.

  17. Surface Weather Observations

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Surface Weather Observation Collection consists primarily of hourly, synoptic, daily, and monthly forms submitted to the archive by the National Weather Service...

  18. Mariners Weather Log

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Mariners Weather Log (MWL) is a publication containing articles, news and information about marine weather events and phenomena, worldwide environmental impact...

  19. National Convective Weather Diagnostic

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current convective hazards identified by the National Convective Weather Detection algorithm. The National Convective Weather Diagnostic (NCWD) is an automatically...

  20. Pilot Weather Reports

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aviation weather reports relayed from pilots to FAA air traffic controllers or National Weather Service personnel. Elements include sky cover, turbulence, wind...

  1. Winter Weather Emergencies

    Severe winter weather can lead to health and safety challenges. You may have to cope with Cold related health problems, including ... there are no guarantees of safety during winter weather emergencies, you can take actions to protect yourself. ...

  2. Weather Radar Stations

    Department of Homeland Security — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  3. Daily Weather Records

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These daily weather records were compiled from a subset of stations in the Global Historical Climatological Network (GHCN)-Daily dataset. A weather record is...

  4. Surface Weather Observations Hourly

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard hourly observations taken at Weather Bureau/National Weather Service offices and airports throughout the United States. Hourly observations began during the...

  5. Radar Weather Observation

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radar Weather Observation is a set of archived historical manuscripts stored on microfiche. The primary source of these radar weather observations manuscript records...

  6. Land Surface Weather Observations

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is the international standard code format for hourly surface weather observations. The acronym roughly translates from French as Aviation Routine Weather...

  7. Internet Weather Source

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Weather Service (NWS) National Telecommunications Gateway provides weather, hydrologic, and climate forecasts and warnings for the United States, its...

  8. Natural Weathering Exposure Station

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corps of Engineers' Treat Island Natural Weathering Exposure Station is a long-term natural weathering facility used to study concrete durability. Located on the...

  9. Space Weather in Operation

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The “Space Weather in Operations” effort will provide on-demand and near-real time space weather event information to the Data Access Toolkit (DAT), which is the...

  10. Effects of combinative surface modification on the stability and conductivity of the copper particles

    Zeng, Yike; Li, Tongtong; Fu, Ming; Jiang, Shenglin; Zhang, Guangzu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A combinative method is used to improve the performance of the copper powder. • The method integrates passivation, silver-coating, and coupling agent treatment. • The stability of the copper powder has been improved after the modification. • The sheet resistance of the conductive film is reduced to 15 mΩ. -- Abstract: The specific goal of the present study is to evaluate the surface performance of the copper particles and get excellent copper powder by surface modification. This paper proposes a combinative modification method integrating passivation, silver-coated, and coupling agent. As a result, after 600 h at room temperature the copper powder has the stabilization improved and is well combined with organic matters, and the sheet resistance of the film fabricated by the copper conductive filler is reduced to 15 mΩ. The performance of the copper powder has been greatly enhanced by the combinative modification, and the cost of the copper conductive filler is decreased significantly by this method. The results indicate that the combinative surface modification method can be used for practical electronic application

  11. Effects of Ultrasonic Nanocrystal Surface Modification on the Residual Stress, Microstructure, and Corrosion Resistance of 304 Stainless Steel Welds

    Ye, Chang; Telang, Abhishek; Gill, Amrinder; Wen, Xingshuo; Mannava, Seetha R.; Qian, Dong; Vasudevan, Vijay K.

    2018-03-01

    In this study, ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM) of 304 stainless steel welds was carried out. UNSM effectively eliminates the tensile stress generated during welding and imparts beneficial compressive residual stresses. In addition, UNSM can effectively refine the grains and increase hardness in the near-surface region. Corrosion tests in boiling MgCl2 solution demonstrate that UNSM can significantly improve the corrosion resistance due to the compressive residual stresses and changes in the near-surface microstructure.

  12. Cold-Weather Sports

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Cold-Weather Sports KidsHealth / For Teens / Cold-Weather Sports What's in this article? What to Do? Classes ... weather. What better time to be outdoors? Winter sports can help you burn calories, increase your cardiovascular ...

  13. Maternal air pollution exposure and preterm birth in Wuxi, China: Effect modification by maternal age.

    Han, Yingying; Jiang, Panhua; Dong, Tianyu; Ding, Xinliang; Chen, Ting; Villanger, Gro Dehli; Aase, Heidi; Huang, Lu; Xia, Yankai

    2018-08-15

    Numerous studies have investigated prenatal air pollution and shown that air pollutants have adverse effect on birth outcomes. However, which trimester was the most sensitive and whether the effect was related to maternal age is still ambiguous. This study aims to explore the association between maternal air pollution exposure during pregnancy and preterm birth, and if this relationship is modified by maternal age. In this retrospective cohort study, we examine the causal relationship of prenatal exposure to air pollutants including particulate matters, which are less than 10 µm (PM 10 ), and ozone (O 3 ), which is one of the gaseous pollutants, on preterm birth by gestational age. A total of 6693 pregnant women were recruited from Wuxi Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital. The participants were dichotomized into child-bearing age group ( = 35 years old) in order to analyze the effect modification by maternal age. Logistic and linear regression models were performed to assess the risk for preterm birth (gestational age air pollution exposure. With adjustment for covariates, the highest level of PM 10 exposure significantly increased the risk of preterm birth by 1.42-fold (95% CI: 1.10, 1.85) compared those with the lowest level in the second trimester. Trimester-specific PM 10 exposure was positively associated with gestational age, whereas O 3 exposure was associated with gestational age in the early pregnancy. When stratified by maternal age, PM 10 exposure was significantly associated with an increased risk of preterm birth only in the advanced age group during pregnancy (OR:2.15, 95% CI: 1.13, 4.07). The results suggested that PM 10 exposure associated with preterm birth was modified by advanced maternal age (OR interaction = 2.00, 95% CI: 1.02, 3.91, P interaction = 0.032). Prenatal air pollution exposure would increase risk of preterm birth and reduced gestational age. Thus, more attention should be paid to the effects of ambient air pollution

  14. The gender effect in stroke thrombolysis: of CASES, controls, and treatment-effect modification.

    Kent, David M; Buchan, Alastair M; Hill, Michael D

    2008-09-30

    Large studies of patients with acute stroke not receiving thrombolytic therapy have repeatedly demonstrated poorer outcomes for women compared to men. An analysis of five pooled randomized controlled trials testing IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) demonstrated that rtPA benefits women more than men; the usual gender difference, apparent among controls, was totally nullified in the rtPA group. This nullification of the usual gender effect among rtPA-treated patients has not been confirmed. We analyzed baseline characteristics and functional outcomes in men vs women in the Canadian Alteplase for Stroke Effectiveness Study (CASES), a multicenter study that collected outcomes data for patients treated with rtPA in Canada to assess the safety and effectiveness of alteplase for stroke in the context of routine care. Among 1,110 patients, including 615 men and 505 women, a normal or near normal outcome at 90 days was found in 37.1% of men vs 36.0% of women (p = 0.71). This was essentially unchanged after adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics, including age >70, glucose, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, hypercholesterolemia, baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Severity, and baseline Alberta Stroke Program Early CT score (35.2% in men vs 38.2% in women, p = 0.332). Ninety-day mortality was similar between the sexes in both the adjusted and unadjusted analysis. There was no difference in 90-day outcomes in recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA)-treated men and rtPA-treated women. This is consistent with the pooled analysis of randomized controlled trials, showing greater benefit for thrombolysis in women and nullification of the usual gender difference in outcome.

  15. Effects of temperature on surface modification of W exposed to He particles

    Li, C.; Greuner, H.; Yuan, Y.; Luo, G.N.; Böswirth, B.; Fu, B.Q.; Xu, H.Y.; Jia, Y.Z.; Liu, W.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Blisters were observed on W surface under He beam heating at ∼950 °C. • He-induced blistering shows a clear grain orientation dependence. • An evolution to a coral-like structure was observed under loading at ∼2700 °C. • A texture with 〈0 0 1〉 parallel to the surface normal direction will be beneficial. - Abstract: The effect of combined heating and helium particle flux on annealed tungsten samples has been studied in the neutral beam facility GLADIS. He beams with power densities of 2.4 MW/m 2 and 9.5 MW/m 2 were used to adiabatically load the samples to peak surface temperatures from ∼950 °C (1223 K) to ∼2700 °C (2973 K). Changes in the surface morphology resulting from combined heat and the flux exposure were studied for He fluences up to 3 × 10 22 /m 2 . Typical structures for the sample loaded at ∼950 °C (1223 K) were blisters with a clear grain orientation dependence and the largest blisters formed on grains with 〈0 0 1〉 surface normal. However at higher temperatures, blistering was more easily suppressed for grains near this orientation because the growth of larger blister takes place more slowly. An evolution from a “porous structure” to a “coral-like structure” with increasing fluence was observed on the samples loaded at the highest temperature. Based on these results mechanisms for surface modification at different temperatures are discussed and a texture with 〈0 0 1〉 parallel to the normal direction of the grains is suggested to optimize the plasma facing material due to their stronger resistance to early stage blistering

  16. Experimental modification of interpretation bias about animal fear in young children: effects on cognition, avoidance behavior, anxiety vulnerability, and physiological responding.

    Lester, Kathryn J; Field, Andy P; Muris, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of experimentally modifying interpretation biases for children's cognitions, avoidance behavior, anxiety vulnerability, and physiological responding. Sixty-seven children (6-11 years) were randomly assigned to receive a positive or negative interpretation bias modification procedure to induce interpretation biases toward or away from threat about ambiguous situations involving Australian marsupials. Children rapidly learned to select outcomes of ambiguous situations, which were congruent with their assigned condition. Furthermore, following positive modification, children's threat biases about novel ambiguous situations significantly decreased, whereas threat biases significantly increased after negative modification. In response to a stress-evoking behavioral avoidance test, positive modification attenuated behavioral avoidance compared to negative modification. However, no significant effects of bias modification on anxiety vulnerability or physiological responses to this stress-evoking Behavioral Avoidance Task were observed.

  17. Effect of Behavior Modification on Outcome in Early- to Moderate-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease: A Cluster-Randomized Trial.

    Yamagata, Kunihiro; Makino, Hirofumi; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Ito, Sadayoshi; Kimura, Kenjiro; Kusano, Eiji; Shibata, Takanori; Tomita, Kimio; Narita, Ichiei; Nishino, Tomoya; Fujigaki, Yoshihide; Mitarai, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Takashi; Nakamura, Teiji; Matsuo, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    Owing to recent changes in our understanding of the underlying cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the importance of lifestyle modification for preventing the progression of kidney dysfunction and complications has become obvious. In addition, effective cooperation between general physicians (GPs) and nephrologists is essential to ensure a better care system for CKD treatment. In this cluster-randomized study, we studied the effect of behavior modification on the outcome of early- to moderate-stage CKD. Stratified open cluster-randomized trial. A total of 489 GPs belonging to 49 local medical associations (clusters) in Japan. A total of 2,379 patients (1,195 in group A (standard intervention) and 1,184 in group B (advanced intervention)) aged between 40 and 74 years, who had CKD and were under consultation with GPs. All patients were managed in accordance with the current CKD guidelines. The group B clusters received three additional interventions: patients received both educational intervention for lifestyle modification and a CKD status letter, attempting to prevent their withdrawal from treatment, and the group B GPs received data sheets to facilitate reducing the gap between target and practice. The primary outcome measures were 1) the non-adherence rate of accepting continuous medical follow-up of the patients, 2) the collaboration rate between GPs and nephrologists, and 3) the progression of CKD. The rate of discontinuous clinical visits was significantly lower in group B (16.2% in group A vs. 11.5% in group B, p = 0.01). Significantly higher referral and co-treatment rates were observed in group B (pbehavior modification of CKD patients, namely, significantly lower discontinuous clinical visits, and behavior modification of both GPs and nephrologists, namely significantly higher referral and co-treatment rates, resulting in the retardation of CKD progression, especially in patients with proteinuric Stage 3 CKD. The University Hospital Medical Information

  18. Tungstate-induced color-pattern modifications of butterfly wings are independent of stress response and ecdysteroid effect.

    Otaki, Joji M; Ogasawara, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Haruhiko

    2005-06-01

    Systemic injections of sodium tungstate, a protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) inhibitor, to pupae immediately after pupation have been shown to efficiently produce characteristic color-pattern modifications on the wings of many species of butterflies. Here we demonstrated that the tungstate-induced modification pattern was entirely different from other chemically-induced ones in a species of nymphalid butterfly Junonia (Precis) orithya. In this species, the systemic injections of tungstate produced characteristic expansion of black area and shrinkage of white area together with the move of parafocal elements toward the wing base. Overall, pattern boundaries became obscure. In contrast, an entirely different modification pattern, overall darkening of wings, was observed by the injections of stress-inducing chemicals, thapsigargin, ionomycin, or geldanamycin, to pupae under the rearing conditions for the adult summer form. On the ventral wings, this darkening was due to an increase of the proportion of peppered dark scales, which was reminiscent of the natural fall form of this species. Under the same rearing conditions, the injections of ecdysteroid, which is a well-known hormone being responsible for the seasonal polyphenism of nymphalid butterflies, yielded overall expansion of orange area especially around eyespots. Taken together, we conclude that the tungstate-induced modifications are clearly distinguishable from those of stress response and ecdysteroid effect. This conclusion then suggests that the putative PTPase signaling pathway that is sensitive to tungstate uniquely contributes to the wing-wide color-pattern development in butterflies.

  19. Modification of Knee Flexion Angle Has Patient-Specific Effects on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Risk Factors During Jump Landing.

    Favre, Julien; Clancy, Caitlin; Dowling, Ariel V; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries may be decreased through the use of intervention programs that focus on increasing the knee flexion angle during jump landing, which decreases strain on the ACL. To investigate whether intervention training designed to change the knee flexion angle during landing causes secondary changes in other known measures associated with the risk of ACL injuries and to examine the time points when these secondary measures change. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 39 healthy recreational athletes performed a volleyball block jump task in an instrumented gait laboratory. The participants first completed the jumps without any modification to their normal landing technique. They were then given oral instruction to land softly and to increase their knee flexion angle during landing. Lower body kinematics and kinetics were measured before and after the modification using an optoelectronic motion capture system. The knee flexion angle after the modification significantly increased from 11.2° to 15.2° at initial contact and from 67.8° to 100.7° at maximum flexion, and the time between initial contact and maximum flexion increased from 177.4 to 399.4 milliseconds. The flexion modification produced a substantial reduction in vertical ground-reaction force (243.1 to 187.8 %BW) with a concomitant reduction in the maximum flexion moment. Interestingly, the flexion modification only affected the abduction angle and abduction moment for the group of participants that landed in an initial adducted position before the modification and had no significant effect on the group that landed in an abducted position. Increasing the knee flexion angle during jump landing may be an effective intervention to improve knee biomechanical risk factors associated with an ACL injury. However, the fact that the flexion modification only influenced critical risk factors (the abduction angle and abduction moment) in participants who initially

  20. Effectiveness of short-term numerical weather prediction in predicting growing degree days and meteorological conditions for apple scab appearance

    Lalic, B.; Francia, M.; Eitzinger, Josef; Podrascanin, Z.; Arsenic, I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 1 (2016), s. 50-56 ISSN 1350-4827 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : venturia-inaequalis * temperature * equation * schemes * model * numerical weather prediction * disease prediction * verification * apple scab * growing degree days Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology OBOR OECD: Meteorology and atmospheric sciences Impact factor: 1.411, year: 2016

  1. Effect of mixed vs single brine composition on salt weathering in porous carbonate building stones for different environmental conditions

    Menéndez, B.; Petráňová, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 210, August (2016), s. 124-139 ISSN 0013-7952 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : salt weathering * limestone * environmental conditions * sodium chloride * sodium sulphate * calcium sulphate * salt mixture Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 2.569, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013795216301879

  2. Effect of weathering on chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood : leaching of metal salts and change in water repellency

    R. Sam Williams; Stan Lebow; Patricia Lebow

    2003-01-01

    Wood pressure-treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood preservative is commonly used for outdoor construction. Oxides of arsenic, copper, and chromium are bound in the wood by a complex series of chemical reactions, but a small percentage of these compounds are gradually released by leaching and weathering. Recent studies suggest that the release of these...

  3. Effect of Subliminal Stimulation of Symbiotic Fantasies on Behavior Modification Treatment of Obesity.

    And Others; Silverman, Lloyd H.

    1978-01-01

    Obese women were treated in behavior modification programs for overeating. Behavior programs were accompanied by subliminal stimulation and by symbiotic and control messages. The symbiotic condition gave evidence of enhancing weight loss. This finding supports the proposition that subliminal stimulation of symbiotic fantasies can enhance the…

  4. Characterization of organo-modified bentonite sorbents: The effect of modification conditions on adsorption performance

    Parolo, María E.; Pettinari, Gisela R.; Musso, Telma B.; Sánchez-Izquierdo, María P.; Fernández, Laura G.

    2014-11-01

    The organic modification of a natural bentonite was evaluated using two methods: exchanging the interlayer cations by hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and grafting with vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMS) and γ-methacryloyloxy propyl trimethoxysilane (TMSPMA) on montmorillonite surface. The physicochemical characterization of all materials was made by X-ray diffraction (XRD), IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area techniques. HDTMA cations and organosilanes were intercalated into the interlayer space of montmorillonite, as deduced from the increase of the basal spacing. IR spectroscopy, TGA and BET area give evidence of successful organic modification. The studies show a decrease in the IR absorption band intensity at 3465 cm-1 with surfactant modification, and also a decrease of mass loss due to adsorbed water observed in two samples: the organoclay and functionalized bentonites, which are evidences of a lower interlayer hydrophilicity. The efficiency of aniline removal onto natural bentonite, organobentonite and functionalized bentonites from aqueous solutions was evaluated. Aniline sorption on natural bentonite was studied using batch experiments, XRD and IR spectroscopy. The hydrophobic surface of organobentonite and functionalized bentonites increased the retention capacity for nonionic organic substances such as aniline on bentonites. The sorption properties of modified bentonite, through different modification methods, enhanced the potential industrial applications of bentonites in water decontamination.

  5. Clinical effectiveness of attentional bias modification training in abstinent alcoholic patients

    Schoenmakers, T.M.; Bruin, de M.; Lux, I.F.M.; Goertz, A.G.; Kerkhof, van D.H.A.T.; Wiers, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    A new training to decrease attentional bias (attentional bias modification training, ABM) was tested in a randomized controlled experimental study with alcohol-dependent patients as an addition to cognitive behavioral therapy. In alcohol dependence, attentional bias has been associated with severity

  6. Effect of dual modification with hydroxypropylation and cross-linking on physicochemical properties of taro starch.

    Hazarika, Bidyut Jyoti; Sit, Nandan

    2016-04-20

    Dual modification of taro starch by hydroxypropylation and cross-linking was carried out and the properties of the modified starches were investigated. Two different levels of hydroxypropylation (5 and 10%) and cross-linking (0.05 and 0.10%) were used in different sequences. The amylose contents of the starch decreased due to single and dual modification. For the dual-modified starches, the swelling, solubility and clarity was found to increase with level of hydroxypropylation and decrease with level of cross-linking. The freeze-thaw stability of the dual-modified starches was also affected by the sequence of modification. The viscosities of the cross-linked and dual-modified starches were more than native and hydroxypropylated starches. The firmness of the dual-modified starches was also higher than native and single modified starches. The dual-modified starches have benefits of both type of modifications and could be used for specific purposes e.g. food products requiring high viscosity as well as freeze-thaw stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Computer-Based Training on Procedural Modifications to Standard Functional Analyses

    Schnell, Lauren K.; Sidener, Tina M.; DeBar, Ruth M.; Vladescu, Jason C.; Kahng, SungWoo

    2018-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated methods for training decision-making when functional analysis data are undifferentiated. The current study evaluated computer-based training to teach 20 graduate students to arrange functional analysis conditions, analyze functional analysis data, and implement procedural modifications. Participants were exposed to…

  8. Maternal Behavior Modifications during Pretense and Their Long-Term Effects on Toddlers' Understanding of Pretense

    Nakamichi, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate the need to investigate the sources of toddlers' understanding of another person's pretense. The present study is a cultural and longitudinal extension of the work of Lillard and Witherington (2004), who claimed that mothers modify their behaviors during pretense and that the some of these behavior modifications help their…

  9. Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Weatherization Assistance Program

    None

    2010-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program reduces energy costs for low-income households by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes, while ensuring their health and safety.

  10. Mineral weathering experiments to explore the effects of vegetation shifts in high mountain region (Wind River Range, Wyoming, USA)

    Mavris, Christian; Furrer, Gerhard; Dahms, Dennis; Anderson, Suzanne P.; Blum, Alex; Goetze, Jens; Wells, Aaron; Egli, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Climate change influences the evolution of soil and landscape. With changing climate, both flora and fauna must adapt to new conditions. It is unknown in many respects to what extent soils will react to warming and vegetation change. The aim of this study was to identify possible consequences for soils in a dry-alpine region with respect to weathering of primary minerals and leaching of elements under expected warming climate conditions due to shifts in vegetation. To achieve this, a field empirical approach was used in combination with laboratory weathering experiments simulating several scenarios. Study sites located in Sinks Canyon and in Stough Basin of the Wind River Range, Wyoming, USA, encompass ecotones that consist of tundra, forest, or sagebrush (from moist to dry, with increasing temperature, respectively). All soils are developed on granitoid moraines. The mineralogy of the soils along the altitudinal sequence was analysed using cathodoluminescence and X-ray diffraction, and revealed clear mineral transformations: biotite and plagioclase were both weathered to smectite while plagioclase also weathered to kaolinite. Cooler, wetter, altitude-dependent conditions seemed to promote weathering of these primary minerals. To test the impact of soil solutions from different ecotones on mineral weathering, aqueous extracts from topsoils (A horizons) were reacted with subsoils (B horizons) in batch experiments. Aqueous extracts of topsoil samples were generated for all three ecotones, and these solutions were characterized. For the batch experiments, the topsoil extracts were reacted for 1800 hours with the subsoil samples of the same ecotone, or with the subsoil samples from higher altitude ecotones. Solutions collected periodically during the experiments were measured using ICP-OES and ion chromatography. Dissolved Ca, Mg and K were mainly controlled by the chemical weathering of oligoclase, K-feldspar and biotite. With increasing altitude (and consequently

  11. Sampling Modification Effects in the Subgingival Microbiome Profile of Healthy Children

    Santigli, Elisabeth; Trajanoski, Slave; Eberhard, Katharina; Klug, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    grouping by sampling modes (p = 0.914 by R2 = 0.09). Conclusion: A slight modification of sampling mode has minor effects corresponding to a natural variability in the microbiome profiles of healthy children. The inter-individual variability in subgingival microprints is greater than intra-individual differences. Statistical analyses of microbial populations should consider this baseline variability and move beyond mere quantification with input from visual analytics. Comparative results are difficult to summarize as methods for studying huge datasets are still evolving. Advanced approaches are needed for sample size calculations in clinical settings. PMID:28149291

  12. Sampling Modification Effects in the Subgingival Microbiome Profile of Healthy Children.

    Santigli, Elisabeth; Trajanoski, Slave; Eberhard, Katharina; Klug, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    sampling modes ( p = 0.914 by R 2 = 0.09). Conclusion: A slight modification of sampling mode has minor effects corresponding to a natural variability in the microbiome profiles of healthy children. The inter-individual variability in subgingival microprints is greater than intra-individual differences. Statistical analyses of microbial populations should consider this baseline variability and move beyond mere quantification with input from visual analytics. Comparative results are difficult to summarize as methods for studying huge datasets are still evolving. Advanced approaches are needed for sample size calculations in clinical settings.

  13. Characterization of organo-modified bentonite sorbents: The effect of modification conditions on adsorption performance

    Parolo, María E., E-mail: maria.parolo@fain.uncoma.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ingeniería de Procesos, Biotecnología y Energías Alternativas (PROBIEN), Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén 8300 (Argentina); Pettinari, Gisela R. [Instituto de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ingeniería de Procesos, Biotecnología y Energías Alternativas (PROBIEN), Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén 8300 (Argentina); Musso, Telma B. [Instituto de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ingeniería de Procesos, Biotecnología y Energías Alternativas (PROBIEN), Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén 8300 (Argentina); CONICET, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sánchez-Izquierdo, María P.; Fernández, Laura G. [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén 8300 (Argentina)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Modification of clay was evaluated by two methods for removing an organic substance. • Surfactant cations and organosilanes were intercalated into the interlayer space. • The hydrophobic surface of adsorbents increased the retention of organic substances. • Clay grafted with vinyltrimethoxysilane showed the highest adsorption for aniline. - Abstract: The organic modification of a natural bentonite was evaluated using two methods: exchanging the interlayer cations by hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and grafting with vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMS) and γ-methacryloyloxy propyl trimethoxysilane (TMSPMA) on montmorillonite surface. The physicochemical characterization of all materials was made by X-ray diffraction (XRD), IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area techniques. HDTMA cations and organosilanes were intercalated into the interlayer space of montmorillonite, as deduced from the increase of the basal spacing. IR spectroscopy, TGA and BET area give evidence of successful organic modification. The studies show a decrease in the IR absorption band intensity at 3465 cm{sup −1} with surfactant modification, and also a decrease of mass loss due to adsorbed water observed in two samples: the organoclay and functionalized bentonites, which are evidences of a lower interlayer hydrophilicity. The efficiency of aniline removal onto natural bentonite, organobentonite and functionalized bentonites from aqueous solutions was evaluated. Aniline sorption on natural bentonite was studied using batch experiments, XRD and IR spectroscopy. The hydrophobic surface of organobentonite and functionalized bentonites increased the retention capacity for nonionic organic substances such as aniline on bentonites. The sorption properties of modified bentonite, through different modification methods, enhanced the potential industrial applications of bentonites in water decontamination.

  14. Characterization of organo-modified bentonite sorbents: The effect of modification conditions on adsorption performance

    Parolo, María E.; Pettinari, Gisela R.; Musso, Telma B.; Sánchez-Izquierdo, María P.; Fernández, Laura G.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Modification of clay was evaluated by two methods for removing an organic substance. • Surfactant cations and organosilanes were intercalated into the interlayer space. • The hydrophobic surface of adsorbents increased the retention of organic substances. • Clay grafted with vinyltrimethoxysilane showed the highest adsorption for aniline. - Abstract: The organic modification of a natural bentonite was evaluated using two methods: exchanging the interlayer cations by hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and grafting with vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMS) and γ-methacryloyloxy propyl trimethoxysilane (TMSPMA) on montmorillonite surface. The physicochemical characterization of all materials was made by X-ray diffraction (XRD), IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area techniques. HDTMA cations and organosilanes were intercalated into the interlayer space of montmorillonite, as deduced from the increase of the basal spacing. IR spectroscopy, TGA and BET area give evidence of successful organic modification. The studies show a decrease in the IR absorption band intensity at 3465 cm −1 with surfactant modification, and also a decrease of mass loss due to adsorbed water observed in two samples: the organoclay and functionalized bentonites, which are evidences of a lower interlayer hydrophilicity. The efficiency of aniline removal onto natural bentonite, organobentonite and functionalized bentonites from aqueous solutions was evaluated. Aniline sorption on natural bentonite was studied using batch experiments, XRD and IR spectroscopy. The hydrophobic surface of organobentonite and functionalized bentonites increased the retention capacity for nonionic organic substances such as aniline on bentonites. The sorption properties of modified bentonite, through different modification methods, enhanced the potential industrial applications of bentonites in water decontamination

  15. Asymmetrical transfer effects of cognitive bias modification: Modifying attention to threat influences interpretation of emotional ambiguity, but not vice versa

    Bowler, J.O.; Hoppitt, L.; Illingworth, J.; Dalgleish, T.; Ononaiye, M.; Perez-Olivas, G.; Mackintosh, B.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives: It is well established that attention bias and interpretation bias each have a key role in the development and continuation of anxiety. How the biases may interact with one another in anxiety is, however, poorly understood. Using cognitive bias modification techniques, the present study examined whether training a more positive interpretation bias or attention bias resulted in transfer of effects to the untrained cognitive domain. Differences in anxiety reactivity t...

  16. Examination of the effect of graphitising modification of high-strength cast iron in liquid and solid-liquid states

    Kochegura, N.

    2001-01-01

    In this work, we present results of examination of the effect of the composition of graphitised in additions on the crystallisation and kinetics of the graphitisation of nodular cast iron produced by processing using a nickel-Mn master alloy. This in the experimentally used the modification agents melting on the basis of an iron-silicon melt with one of the active elements: titanium, aluminium, calcium or barium

  17. Effect of Abutment Modification and Cement Type on Retention of Cement-Retained Implant Supported Crowns

    Farzin, Mitra; Torabi, Kianoosh; Ahangari, Ahmad Hasan; Derafshi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Provisional cements are commonly used to facilitate retrievability of cement-retained fixed implant restorations; but compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abutment design and type of luting agent on the retentive strength of cement-retained implant restorations. Materials and Method: Two prefabricated abutments were attached to their corresponding analogs and embedded in an acrylic resin block. The first abutment (control group) was left intact without any modifications. The screw access channel for the first abutment was completely filled with composite resin. In the second abutment, (test group) the axial wall was partially removed to form an abutment with 3 walls. Wax models were made by CAD/CAM. Ten cast copings were fabricated for each abutment. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by Temp Bond luting agent under standardized conditions (n=20). The assemblies were stored in 100% humidity for one day at 37°C prior to testing. The cast crown was removed from the abutment using an Instron machine, and the peak removal force was recorded. Coping/abutment specimens were cleaned after testing, and the testing procedure was repeated for Dycal luting agent (n=20). Data were analyzed with two- way ANOVA (α=0.05). Results: There was no significant difference in the mean transformed retention (Ln-R) between intact abutments (4.90±0.37) and the abutments with 3 walls (4.83±0.25) using Dycal luting agent. However, in TempBond group, the mean transformed retention (Ln-R) was significantly lower in the intact abutment (3.9±0.23) compared to the abutment with 3 walls (4.13±0.33, P=0.027). Conclusion: The retention of cement-retained implant restoration can be improved by the type of temporary cement used. The retention of cast crowns cemented to implant abutments with TempBond is influenced by the wall removal. PMID:25628660

  18. Effect of abutment modification and cement type on retention of cement-retained implant supported crowns.

    Mitra Farzin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Provisional cements are commonly used to facilitate retrievability of cement-retained fixed implant restorations; but compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abutment design and type of luting agent on the retentive strength of cement-retained implant restorations.Two prefabricated abutments were attached to their corresponding analogs and embedded in an acrylic resin block. The first abutment (control group was left intact without any modifications. The screw access channel for the first abutment was completely filled with composite resin. In the second abutment, (test group the axial wall was partially removed to form an abutment with 3 walls. Wax models were made by CAD/CAM. Ten cast copings were fabricated for each abutment. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by Temp Bond luting agent under standardized conditions (n=20. The assemblies were stored in 100% humidity for one day at 37°C prior to testing. The cast crown was removed from the abutment using an Instron machine, and the peak removal force was recorded. Coping/abutment specimens were cleaned after testing, and the testing procedure was repeated for Dycal luting agent (n=20. Data were analyzed with two- way ANOVA (α=0.05.There was no significant difference in the mean transformed retention (Ln-R between intact abutments (4.90±0.37 and the abutments with 3 walls (4.83±0.25 using Dycal luting agent. However, in TempBond group, the mean transformed retention (Ln-R was significantly lower in the intact abutment (3.9±0.23 compared to the abutment with 3 walls (4.13±0.33, P=0.027.The retention of cement-retained implant restoration can be improved by the type of temporary cement used. The retention of cast crowns cemented to implant abutments with TempBond is influenced by the wall removal.

  19. Binderless briquetting of some selected South African prime coking, blend coking and weathered bituminous coals and the effect of coal properties on binderless briquetting

    Mangena, S.J. [Division of Mining Technology, CSIR, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); du Cann, V.M. [Coal and Mineral Technologies (Pty) Ltd, SABS, PO Box 73656, Lynnwood Ridge, Pretoria, 0040 (South Africa)

    2007-07-02

    The binderless briquetting of some selected South African prime coking and blend coking coals, as well as the effects of weathering on the binderless briquetting of some inertinite-rich bituminous coals, were investigated in the laboratory. Selected properties of these coals were determined and the coals were briquetted at various moisture contents and pressures. Based on the results obtained in this study, binderless briquetting was found to be most successful in the cases of the fresh, vitrinite-rich coking and blend coking coals and satisfactory in the fresh inertinite-rich Witbank coals. However, the bonding process seemed to be adversely affected by weathering. The negative impact on bonding could be ameliorated to some extent by the presence of a significant kaolinite content when the percentage ash reports in the order of more than 15% (air-dry basis). It should, however, be noted that kaolinite may reduce the water resistance of the briquettes. (author)

  20. Proteomic Investigation of Protein Profile Changes and Amino Acid Residue Level Modification in Cooked Lamb Meat: The Effect of Boiling.

    Yu, Tzer-Yang; Morton, James D; Clerens, Stefan; Dyer, Jolon M

    2015-10-21

    Hydrothermal treatment (heating in water) is a common method of general food processing and preparation. For red-meat-based foods, boiling is common; however, how the molecular level effects of this treatment correlate to the overall food properties is not yet well-understood. The effects of differing boiling times on lamb meat and the resultant cooking water were here examined through proteomic evaluation. The longer boiling time was found to result in increased protein aggregation involving particularly proteins such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, as well as truncation in proteins such as in α-actinin-2. Heat-induced protein backbone cleavage was observed adjacent to aspartic acid and asparagine residues. Side-chain modifications of amino acid residues resulting from the heating, including oxidation of phenylalanine and formation of carboxyethyllysine, were characterized in the cooked samples. Actin and myoglobin bands from the cooked meat per se remained visible on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, even after significant cooking time. These proteins were also found to be the major source of observed heat-induced modifications. This study provides new insights into molecular-level modifications occurring in lamb meat proteins during boiling and a protein chemistry basis for better understanding the effect of this common treatment on the nutritional and functional properties of red-meat-based foods.