WorldWideScience

Sample records for weakened immune systems

  1. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carinii) pneumonia Pneumonia - cytomegalovirus Pneumonia Viral pneumonia Walking pneumonia Causes People whose immune system is not working well ... people. They are also more vulnerable to regular causes of pneumonia , which can affect anyone. Your immune system may ...

  2. Weakened Immune System and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Healthcare Professionals Weakened Immune System and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... up to age 26 years Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  3. Medications that Weaken Your Immune System and Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients Medications that Weaken Your Immune System Outbreaks Rhizopus Investigation CDC at Work Global Fungal Diseases Cryptococcal ... January 25, 2017 Content source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic ...

  4. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Counselors Kidney Stones Brain and Nervous System Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System Print A A ... put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  5. Immune System (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Immune System KidsHealth > For Parents > Immune System Print A A ... lead to illness and infection. About the Immune System The immune system is the body's defense against ...

  6. Immune System Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Special Needs Glasses and Contact Lenses Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System Print A A A How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About KidsHealth ...

  7. Our Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our Immune System A story for children with primary immunodeficiency diseases Written by Sara LeBien IMMUNE DEFICIENCY FOUNDATION A note from ... are immune deficient to better understand their immune system. What is a “ B-cell, ” a “ T-cell, ” ...

  8. Immune System and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It helps ... to find and destroy them. If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be ...

  9. The signal of ill-defined CPT weakening entanglement in the $B_d$ system

    OpenAIRE

    Bernabeu, Jose; Botella, Francisco J.; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Nebot, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of quantum gravity fluctuations (space-time foam), the CPT operator may be ill-defined. Its perturbative treatment leads to a modification of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlation of the neutral meson system by adding an Entanglement-weakening term of the wrong exchange symmetry, the $\\omega$-effect. In the current paper we identify how to probe the complex $\\omega$ in the entangled $B_d$-system using Flavour(f)-CP(g) eigenstate decay channels: the connection between the Int...

  10. The signal of ill-defined CPT weakening entanglement in the Bd system

    OpenAIRE

    Bernabéu, José; Botella, Francisco J.; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Nebot, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    In the presence of quantum-gravity fluctuations (space-time foam), the CPT operator may be ill-defined. Its perturbative treatment leads to a modification of the Einstein–Podolsky–Rosen correlation of the neutral meson system by adding an entanglement-weakening term of the wrong exchange symmetry, the ω -effect. In the current paper we identify how to probe the complex ω in the entangled Bd -system using the flavour ( f )–CP( g ) eigenstate decay channels: the connection between the intensiti...

  11. The Immune System Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Kirsten A.; Gibbs, Melissa A.; Friedman, Erich J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a card game that helps introductory biology students understand the basics of the immune response to pathogens. Students simulate the steps of the immune response with cards that represent the pathogens and the cells and molecules mobilized by the immune system. In the process, they learn the similarities and differences between the…

  12. Benzo[a]pyrene exposure under future ocean acidification scenarios weakens the immune responses of blood clam, Tegillarca granosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wenhao; Zha, Shanjie; Wang, Yichen; Shi, Wei; Xiao, Guoqiang; Chai, Xueliang; Wu, Hongxi; Liu, Guangxu

    2017-04-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are known to converge into the ocean and accumulate in the sediment, posing great threats to marine organisms such as the sessile bottom burrowing bivalves. However, the immune toxicity of POPs, such as B[a]P, under future ocean acidification scenarios remains poorly understood to date. Therefore, in the present study, the impacts of B[a]P exposure on the immune responses of a bivalve species, Tegillarca granosa, under present and future ocean acidification scenarios were investigated. Results obtained revealed an increased immune toxicity of B[a]P under future ocean acidification scenarios in terms of reduced THC, altered haemocyte composition, and hampered phagocytosis, which may attribute to the synergetic effects of B[a]P and ocean acidification. In addition, the gene expressions of pathogen pattern recognition receptors (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR6), pathway mediators (TRAF6, TAK1, TAB2, IKKα and Myd88), and effectors (NF-ĸB) of the important immune related pathways were significantly down-regulated upon exposure to B[a]P under future ocean acidification scenarios. Results of the present study suggested an increased immune toxicity of B[a]P under future ocean acidification scenarios, which will significantly hamper the immune responses of T. granosa and subsequently render individuals more susceptible to pathogens challenges. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Immune system simulation online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Lund, Ole; Castiglione, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The recognition of antigenic peptides is a major event of an immune response. In current mesoscopic-scale simulators of the immune system, this crucial step has been modeled in a very approximated way. RESULTS: We have equipped an agent-based model of the immune system with immuno......-informatics methods to allow the simulation of the cardinal events of the antigenic recognition, going from single peptides to whole proteomes. The recognition process accounts for B cell-epitopes prediction through Parker-scale affinity estimation, class I and II HLA peptide prediction and binding through position...... simulation. AVAILABILITY: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/C-ImmSim-10.1/ CONTACT: f.castiglione@iac.cnr.it...

  14. 21 Days head-down bed rest induces weakening of cell-mediated immunity - Some spaceflight findings confirmed in a ground-based analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Jens; Bartels, Lars Erik; Dige, Anders; Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Boehme, Gisela; Thomsen, Marianne Kragh; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik

    2012-08-01

    Several studies indicate a weakening of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and reactivation of latent herpes viruses during spaceflight. We tested the hypothesis that head-down bed rest (HDBR), a ground-based analog of spaceflight, mimics the impact of microgravity on human immunity. Seven healthy young males underwent two periods of 3 weeks HDBR in the test facility of the German Aerospace Center. As a nutritional countermeasure aimed against bone demineralisation, 90 mmol potassium bicarbonate (KHCO(3)) was administered daily in a crossover design. Blood samples were drawn on five occasions. Whole blood was stimulated with antigen i.e. Candida albicans, purified protein derivative (PPD) tuberculin, tetanus toxoid and Cytomegalovirus (CMV) (CMV-QuantiFERON). Flow cytometric analysis included CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(-)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), γδ T cells, B cells, NK cells and dendritic cells. In one of the two bed rest periods, we observed a significant decrease in production of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) following phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation, with a rapid normalization being observed after HDBR. The cytokine levels showed a V-shaped pattern that led to a relativeTh2-shift in cytokine balance. Only three individuals responded to the specific T cell antigens without showing signs of an altered response during HDBR, nor did we observe reactivation of CMV or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Of unknown significance, dietary supplementation with KHCO(3) counteracted the decrease in IL-2 levels during HDBR, while there was no impact on other immunological parameters. We conclude that discrete alterations in CMI may be induced by HDBR in selected individuals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamics of immune system vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, Sean P.

    The adaptive immune system can be viewed as a complex system, which adapts, over time, to reflect the history of infections experienced by the organism. Understanding its operation requires viewing it in terms of tradeoffs under constraints and evolutionary history. It typically displays "robust, yet fragile" behavior, meaning common tasks are robust to small changes but novel threats or changes in environment can have dire consequences. In this dissertation we use mechanistic models to study several biological processes: the immune response, the homeostasis of cells in the lymphatic system, and the process that normally prevents autoreactive cells from entering the lymphatic system. Using these models we then study the effects of these processes interacting. We show that the mechanisms that regulate the numbers of cells in the immune system, in conjunction with the immune response, can act to suppress autoreactive cells from proliferating, thus showing quantitatively how pathogenic infections can suppress autoimmune disease. We also show that over long periods of time this same effect can thin the repertoire of cells that defend against novel threats, leading to an age correlated vulnerability. This vulnerability is shown to be a consequence of system dynamics, not due to degradation of immune system components with age. Finally, modeling a specific tolerance mechanism that normally prevents autoimmune disease, in conjunction with models of the immune response and homeostasis we look at the consequences of the immune system mistakenly incorporating pathogenic molecules into its tolerizing mechanisms. The signature of this dynamic matches closely that of the dengue virus system.

  16. Diversity in the Immune System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghans, J.A.M.; Boer, R.J. de

    2000-01-01

    Diversity is one of the key characteristics of the vertebrate immune system. Lymphocyte repertoires of at least 3x10⁷ different clonotypes protect humans against infections, while avoiding unwanted immune responses against self-peptides and innocuous antigens. It is this lymphocyte diversity

  17. The immune system and hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Madhu V.; Chapleau, Mark W.; Harwani, Sailesh C; Abboud, Francois M.

    2014-01-01

    A powerful interaction between the autonomic and the immune systems plays a prominent role in the initiation and maintenance of hypertension and significantly contributes to cardiovascular pathology, end-organ damage and mortality. Studies have shown consistent association between hypertension, proinflammatory cytokines and the cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. The sympathetic nervous system, a major determinant of hypertension, innervates the bone marrow, spleen and peripheral...

  18. Oral immune therapy: targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ilan, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an altered systemic immune response leading to inflammation-mediated damage to the gut and other organs. Oral immune therapy is a method of systemic immune modulation via alteration of the gut immune system. It uses the inherit ability of the innate system of the gut to redirect the systemic innate and adaptive immune responses. Oral immune therapy is an attractive clinical approach to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. It can in...

  19. The immune system and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Madhu V; Chapleau, Mark W; Harwani, Sailesh C; Abboud, Francois M

    2014-08-01

    A powerful interaction between the autonomic and the immune systems plays a prominent role in the initiation and maintenance of hypertension and significantly contributes to cardiovascular pathology, end-organ damage and mortality. Studies have shown consistent association between hypertension, proinflammatory cytokines and the cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. The sympathetic nervous system, a major determinant of hypertension, innervates the bone marrow, spleen and peripheral lymphatic system and is proinflammatory, whereas the parasympathetic nerve activity dampens the inflammatory response through α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The neuro-immune synapse is bidirectional as cytokines may enhance the sympathetic activity through their central nervous system action that in turn increases the mobilization, migration and infiltration of immune cells in the end organs. Kidneys may be infiltrated by immune cells and mesangial cells that may originate in the bone marrow and release inflammatory cytokines that cause renal damage. Hypertension is also accompanied by infiltration of the adventitia and perivascular adipose tissue by inflammatory immune cells including macrophages. Increased cytokine production induces myogenic and structural changes in the resistance vessels, causing elevated blood pressure. Cardiac hypertrophy in hypertension may result from the mechanical afterload and the inflammatory response to resident or migratory immune cells. Toll-like receptors on innate immune cells function as sterile injury detectors and initiate the inflammatory pathway. Finally, abnormalities of innate immune cells and the molecular determinants of their activation that include toll-like receptor, adrenergic, cholinergic and AT1 receptors can define the severity of inflammation in hypertension. These receptors are putative therapeutic targets.

  20. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Vico, Antonio; Lardone, Patricia J.; Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Ana; Guerrero, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed. PMID:23609496

  1. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Guerrero

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed.

  2. The Immune System in Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Daniel W.; Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely…

  3. Immune engineering: from systems immunology to engineering immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ning

    2017-03-01

    The smallpox vaccine represents the earliest attempt in engineering immunity. The recent success of chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR-T cells) in cancer once again demonstrates the clinical potential of immune engineering. Inspired by this success, diverse approaches have been used to boost various aspects of immunity: engineering dendritic cells (DCs), natural killer (NK) cells, T cells, antibodies, cytokines, small peptides, and others. With recent development of various high-throughput technologies (of which engineers, especially biomedical engineers/bioengineers contributed significantly), such as immune repertoire sequencing, and analytical methods, a systems level of understanding immunity (or the lack of it) beyond model animals has provided critical insights into the human immune system. This review focuses on recent progressed made in systems biology and the engineering of adaptive immunity.

  4. Adaptation in the innate immune system and heterologous innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stefan F

    2014-11-01

    The innate immune system recognizes deviation from homeostasis caused by infectious or non-infectious assaults. The threshold for its activation seems to be established by a calibration process that includes sensing of microbial molecular patterns from commensal bacteria and of endogenous signals. It is becoming increasingly clear that adaptive features, a hallmark of the adaptive immune system, can also be identified in the innate immune system. Such adaptations can result in the manifestation of a primed state of immune and tissue cells with a decreased activation threshold. This keeps the system poised to react quickly. Moreover, the fact that the innate immune system recognizes a wide variety of danger signals via pattern recognition receptors that often activate the same signaling pathways allows for heterologous innate immune stimulation. This implies that, for example, the innate immune response to an infection can be modified by co-infections or other innate stimuli. This "design feature" of the innate immune system has many implications for our understanding of individual susceptibility to diseases or responsiveness to therapies and vaccinations. In this article, adaptive features of the innate immune system as well as heterologous innate immunity and their implications are discussed.

  5. Immune System Toxicity and Immunotoxicity Hazard Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to chemicals may alter immune system health, increasing the risk of infections, allergy and autoimmune diseases. The chapter provides a concise overview of the immune system, host factors that affect immune system heal, and the effects that xenobiotic exposure may have ...

  6. Immune Evasion, Immunopathology and the Regulation of the Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Faivre

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Costs and benefits of the immune response have attracted considerable attention in the last years among evolutionary biologists. Given the cost of parasitism, natural selection should favor individuals with the most effective immune defenses. Nevertheless, there exists huge variation in the expression of immune effectors among individuals. To explain this apparent paradox, it has been suggested that an over-reactive immune system might be too costly, both in terms of metabolic resources and risks of immune-mediated diseases, setting a limit to the investment into immune defenses. Here, we argue that this view neglects one important aspect of the interaction: the role played by evolving pathogens. We suggest that taking into account the co-evolutionary interactions between the host immune system and the parasitic strategies to overcome the immune response might provide a better picture of the selective pressures that shape the evolution of immune functioning. Integrating parasitic strategies of host exploitation can also contribute to understand the seemingly contradictory results that infection can enhance, but also protect from, autoimmune diseases. In the last decades, the incidence of autoimmune disorders has dramatically increased in wealthy countries of the northern hemisphere with a concomitant decrease of most parasitic infections. Experimental work on model organisms has shown that this pattern may be due to the protective role of certain parasites (i.e., helminths that rely on the immunosuppression of hosts for their persistence. Interestingly, although parasite-induced immunosuppression can protect against autoimmunity, it can obviously favor the spread of other infections. Therefore, we need to think about the evolution of the immune system using a multidimensional trade-off involving immunoprotection, immunopathology and the parasitic strategies to escape the immune response.

  7. Maternal immunity enhances systemic recall immune responses upon oral immunization of piglets with F4 fimbriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ut V; Melkebeek, Vesna; Devriendt, Bert; Goetstouwers, Tiphanie; Van Poucke, Mario; Peelman, Luc; Goddeeris, Bruno M; Cox, Eric

    2015-06-23

    F4 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) cause diarrhoea and mortality in piglets leading to severe economic losses. Oral immunization of piglets with F4 fimbriae induces a protective intestinal immune response evidenced by an F4-specific serum and intestinal IgA response. However, successful oral immunization of pigs with F4 fimbriae in the presence of maternal immunity has not been demonstrated yet. In the present study we aimed to evaluate the effect of maternal immunity on the induction of a systemic immune response upon oral immunization of piglets. Whereas F4-specific IgG and IgA could be induced by oral immunization of pigs without maternal antibodies and by intramuscular immunization of pigs with maternal antibodies, no such response was seen in the orally immunized animals with maternal antibodies. Since maternal antibodies can mask an antibody response, we also looked by ELIspot assays for circulating F4-specific antibody secreting cells (ASCs). Enumerating the F4-specific ASCs within the circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and the number of F4-specific IgA ASCs within the circulating IgA(+) B-cells revealed an F4-specific immune response in the orally immunized animals with maternal antibodies. Interestingly, results suggest a more robust IgA booster response by oral immunization of pigs with than without maternal antibodies. These results demonstrate that oral immunization of piglets with F4-specific maternal antibodies is feasible and that these maternal antibodies seem to enhance the secondary systemic immune response. Furthermore, our ELIspot assay on enriched IgA(+) B-cells could be used as a screening procedure to optimize mucosal immunization protocols in pigs with maternal immunity.

  8. Unique aspects of the perinatal immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhivaki, Dania; Lo-Man, Richard

    2017-08-01

    The early stages of life are associated with increased susceptibility to infection, which is in part due to an ineffective immune system. In the context of infection, the immune system must be stimulated to provide efficient protection while avoiding insufficient or excessive activation. Yet, in early life, age-dependent immune regulation at molecular and cellular levels contributes to a reduced immunological fitness in terms of pathogen clearance and response to vaccines. To enable microbial colonization to be tolerated at birth, epigenetic immune cell programming and early life-specific immune regulatory and effector mechanisms ensure that vital functions and organ development are supported and that tissue damage is avoided. Advancement in our understanding of age-related remodelling of immune networks and the consequent tuning of immune responsiveness will open up new possibilities for immune intervention and vaccine strategies that are designed specifically for early life.

  9. The Immune System and Bodily Defence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Immunity and the inver- tebrates in Scientific. American. Vo1.275(5). p60.1996. • G W Litman. Sharks and the origins of vertebrate immunity in Scientific. American. Vo1.275(5), p67.1996. • C A Janeway Jr and P. Travers.lmmunobiology: the immune system in health and disease. Blackwell Scientific. Publications. (A concise.

  10. Ocean acidification weakens the immune response of blood clam through hampering the NF-kappa β and toll-like receptor pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Saixi; Shi, Wei; Guo, Cheng; Zhao, Xinguo; Han, Yu; Peng, Chao; Chai, Xueliang; Liu, Guangxu

    2016-07-01

    The impact of pCO2 driven ocean acidification on marine bivalve immunity remains poorly understood. To date, this impact has only been investigated in a few bivalve species and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown. In the present study, the effects of the realistic future ocean pCO2 levels (pH at 8.1, 7.8, and 7.4) on the total number of haemocyte cells (THC), phagocytosis status, blood cell types composition, and expression levels of twelve genes from the NF-kappa β signaling and toll-like receptor pathways of a typical bottom burrowing bivalve, blood clam (Tegillarca granosa), were investigated. The results obtained showed that while both THC number and phagocytosis frequency were significantly reduced, the percentage of red and basophil granulocytes were significantly decreased and increased, respectively, upon exposure to elevated pCO2. In addition, exposure to pCO2 acidified seawater generally led to a significant down-regulation in the inducer and key response genes of NF-kappa β signaling and toll-like receptor pathways. The results of the present study revealed that ocean acidification may hamper immune responses of the bivalve T. granosa which subsequently render individuals more susceptible to pathogens attacks such as those from virus and bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inside the mucosal immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry R McGhee

    Full Text Available An intricate network of innate and immune cells and their derived mediators function in unison to protect us from toxic elements and infectious microbial diseases that are encountered in our environment. This vast network operates efficiently by use of a single cell epithelium in, for example, the gastrointestinal (GI and upper respiratory (UR tracts, fortified by adjoining cells and lymphoid tissues that protect its integrity. Perturbations certainly occur, sometimes resulting in inflammatory diseases or infections that can be debilitating and life threatening. For example, allergies in the eyes, skin, nose, and the UR or digestive tracts are common. Likewise, genetic background and environmental microbial encounters can lead to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs. This mucosal immune system (MIS in both health and disease is currently under intense investigation worldwide by scientists with diverse expertise and interests. Despite this activity, there are numerous questions remaining that will require detailed answers in order to use the MIS to our advantage. In this issue of PLOS Biology, a research article describes a multi-scale in vivo systems approach to determine precisely how the gut epithelium responds to an inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, given by the intravenous route. This article reveals a previously unknown pathway in which several cell types and their secreted mediators work in unison to prevent epithelial cell death in the mouse small intestine. The results of this interesting study illustrate how in vivo systems biology approaches can be used to unravel the complex mechanisms used to protect the host from its environment.

  12. Immunization Information System and Informatics to Promote Immunizations: Perspective From Minnesota Immunization Information Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscoplat, Miriam Halstead; Rajamani, Sripriya

    2017-01-01

    The vision for management of immunization information is availability of real-time consolidated data and services for all ages, to clinical, public health, and other stakeholders. This is being executed through Immunization Information Systems (IISs), which are population-based and confidential computerized systems present in most US states and territories. Immunization Information Systems offer many functionalities, such as immunization assessment reports, client follow-up, reminder/recall feature, vaccine management tools, state-supplied vaccine ordering, comprehensive immunization history, clinical decision support/vaccine forecasting and recommendations, data processing, and data exchange. This perspective article will present various informatics tools in an IIS, in the context of the Minnesota Immunization Information Connection.

  13. Synthetic immunology: modulating the human immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geering, Barbara; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Humans have manipulated the immune system to dampen or boost the immune response for thousands of years. As our understanding of fundamental immunology and biotechnological methodology accumulates, we can capitalize on this combined knowledge to engineer biological devices with the aim of rationally manipulating the immune response. We address therapeutic approaches based on the principles of synthetic immunology that either ameliorate disorders of the immune system by interfering with the immune response, or improve diverse pathogenic conditions by exploiting immune cell effector functions. We specifically highlight synthetic proteins investigated in preclinical and clinical trials, summarize studies that have used engineered immune cells, and finish with a discussion of possible future therapeutic concepts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Local and systemic tumor immune dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderling, Heiko

    Tumor-associated antigens, stress proteins, and danger-associated molecular patterns are endogenous immune adjuvants that can both initiate and continually stimulate an immune response against a tumor. In retaliation, tumors can hijack intrinsic immune regulatory programs that are intended to prevent autoimmune disease, thereby facilitating continued growth despite the activated antitumor immune response. In metastatic disease, this ongoing tumor-immune battle occurs at each site. Adding an additional layer of complexity, T cells activated at one tumor site can cycle through the blood circulation system and extravasate in a different anatomic location to surveil a distant metastasis. We propose a mathematical modeling framework that incorporates the trafficking of activated T cells between metastatic sites. We extend an ordinary differential equation model of tumor-immune system interactions to multiple metastatic sites. Immune cells are activated in response to tumor burden and tumor cell death, and are recruited from tumor sites elsewhere in the body. A model of T cell trafficking throughout the circulatory system can inform the tumor-immune interaction model about the systemic distribution and arrival of T cells at specific tumor sites. Model simulations suggest that metastases not only contribute to immune surveillance, but also that this contribution varies between metastatic sites. Such information may ultimately help harness the synergy of focal therapy with the immune system to control metastatic disease.

  15. Transport modeling: An artificial immune system approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodorović Dušan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an artificial immune system approach (AIS to modeling time-dependent (dynamic, real time transportation phenomenon characterized by uncertainty. The basic idea behind this research is to develop the Artificial Immune System, which generates a set of antibodies (decisions, control actions that altogether can successfully cover a wide range of potential situations. The proposed artificial immune system develops antibodies (the best control strategies for different antigens (different traffic "scenarios". This task is performed using some of the optimization or heuristics techniques. Then a set of antibodies is combined to create Artificial Immune System. The developed Artificial Immune transportation systems are able to generalize, adapt, and learn based on new knowledge and new information. Applications of the systems are considered for airline yield management, the stochastic vehicle routing, and real-time traffic control at the isolated intersection. The preliminary research results are very promising.

  16. The Immune System and Bodily Defence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 2. The Immune System and Bodily Defence How Do Parasites and the Immune System Choose their Dances? Vineeta Bal Satyajit Rath. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 2 February 1997 pp 17-24 ...

  17. Nutritional support for the infant's immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niers, L.; Stasse-Wolthuis, M.; Rombouts, F.M.; Rijkers, G.T.

    2007-01-01

    Newborn babies possess a functional but immature immune system as a defense against a world teeming with microorganisms. Breast milk contains a number of biological, active compounds that support the infant's immune system. These include secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA), which confers specific

  18. The Immune System and Bodily Defence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 6. The Immune System and Bodily Defence How Does the Immune System Organize Itself so as to Connect Target Recognition to Expected Functions? Vineeta Bal Satyajit Rath. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 6 June 1997 pp 25-38 ...

  19. Feeding Our Immune System: Impact on Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Wolowczuk

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous intestinal microflora and environmental factors, such as diet, play a central role in immune homeostasis and reactivity. In addition, microflora and diet both influence body weight and insulin-resistance, notably through an action on adipose cells. Moreover, it is known since a long time that any disturbance in metabolism, like obesity, is associated with immune alteration, for example, inflammation. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on how nutrients-derived factors (mostly focusing on fatty acids and glucose impact the innate and acquired immune systems, including the gut immune system and its associated bacterial flora. We will try to show the reader how the highly energy-demanding immune cells use glucose as a main source of fuel in a way similar to that of insulin-responsive adipose tissue and how Toll-like receptors (TLRs of the innate immune system, which are found on immune cells, intestinal cells, and adipocytes, are presently viewed as essential actors in the complex balance ensuring bodily immune and metabolic health. Understanding more about these links will surely help to study and understand in a more fundamental way the common observation that eating healthy will keep you and your immune system healthy.

  20. MECHANISMS OF VITAMIN D ACTION ON THE IMMUNE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Snopov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Besides the well-known effects upon bone metabolism, vitamin D (VD plays important roles in many other processes in the body, including immune regulation. VD action is carried out through its cellular membrane receptor, which is expressed in a variety of human organs and tissues, e.g., most cells of immune system, as well as epithelial cells lining the mucous membranes. The cell-membrane bound VD receptor is transferred to the cytoplasm, to form a functional complex with vitamin A and its receptor. This complex provides either inhibiting, or enhancing effect upon transcription of hundreds genes in the nuclear DNA, including those that regulate cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, thus preventing malignancy and angiogenesis. The following effects of VD are supposed with respect to immune system: VD inhibits antigen presentation by dendritic cells, supresses Th1-cell differentiation and the production of Th1-cytokines, shifts the balance of Th1/Th2 cell responses towards the Th2 response, exerts inhibitory effect upon Th17 cells, promotes Treg cell development, and increases their activity. In addition, VD boosts production of «endogenous antibiotics» that may provide powerful effects upon Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, fungi and viruses. Therefore, VD seems quite important for prevention of autoimmune and atopic diseases: multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, development of asthma in children and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. VD protects from a wide range of infections, including tuberculosis, leprosy and respiratory infections, and prevents the development of several tumors. Almost half the population of different countries has a VD hypovitaminosis, often hidden and undiagnosed, and this can be a leading cause of weakened immunity and increased morbidity. The diagnostics of VD hypovitaminosis, prevention and treatment of hypovitaminosis should be among the

  1. The missing sense modality: the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Felice L

    2011-01-01

    The five senses were handed down by Aristotle. I argue that it has only taken two millennia to recognize that the immune system has been the hidden sensory modality. The immune system completes the range of operation allowing detection of meaningful entities at all distances, from very near to very far. It also withstands the often implicit criteria for being a sense modality. Finally, cross-modal interactions between the immune system and vision and other sense modalities should be possible, opening up new research directions.

  2. Inflammation and Immune System Alterations in Frailty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xu; Li, Huifen; Leng, Sean X.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Frailty is an important geriatric syndrome characterized by multi-system dysregulation. Substantial evidence suggests heightened inflammatory state and significant immune system alterations in frailty. A heightened inflammatory state is marked by increases in levels of inflammatory molecules (IL-6 and CRP) and counts of white blood cell and its subpopulations, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of frailty, directly or through its detrimental influence to other physiologic systems. Alterations in the innate immune system include decreased proliferation of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and upregulated monocytic expression of specific stress responsive inflammatory pathway genes. In the adaptive immune system, while little information is available about potential B-cell changes, significant alterations have been identified in the T-cell compartment including increased counts of CD8+, CD8+CD28−, CCR5+ T cells, above and beyond age-related senescent immune remodeling. PMID:21093724

  3. The innate immune system in demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Lior; Quintana, Francisco J; Weiner, Howard L

    2012-07-01

    Demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis are chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases with a heterogeneous clinical presentation and course. Both the adaptive and the innate immune systems have been suggested to contribute to their pathogenesis and recovery. In this review, we discuss the role of the innate immune system in mediating demyelinating diseases. In particular, we provide an overview of the anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory functions of dendritic cells, mast cells, natural killer (NK) cells, NK-T cells, γδ T cells, microglial cells, and astrocytes. We emphasize the interaction of astroctyes with the immune system and how this interaction relates to the demyelinating pathologies. Given the pivotal role of the innate immune system, it is possible that targeting these cells may provide an effective therapeutic approach for demyelinating diseases. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. The role of immune system in autism

    OpenAIRE

    Niederlová, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder with yet unknown etiology. The research point out abnormalities in the immune system of pacients with autism, which could be related to the development of the disease. This thesis reviews current scientific knowledge about the role of the immune system in the development of autism. The leading chapters include family history of autoimmune diseases, specific HLA alleles, the most common autoantibodies and maternal antibodies, lowered NK cell acti...

  5. The Innate Immune System in Demyelinating Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mayo, Lior; Quintana, Francisco J.; Weiner, Howard L

    2012-01-01

    Demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis are chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases with a heterogeneous clinical presentation and course. Both the adaptive and the innate immune systems have been suggested to contribute to their pathogenesis and recovery. In this review, we discuss the role of the innate immune system in mediating demyelinating diseases. In particular, we provide an overview of the anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory functions of dendritic cells, mast cells, nat...

  6. Regional specialization within the intestinal immune system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mowat, Allan M.; Agace, William Winston

    2014-01-01

    The intestine represents the largest compartment of the immune system. It is continually exposed to antigens and immunomodulatory agents from the diet and the commensal microbiota, and it is the port of entry for many clinically important pathogens. Intestinal immune processes are also increasingly...... the intestine. We describe how the distribution of innate, adaptive and innate-like immune cells varies in different segments of the intestine and discuss the environmental factors that may influence this. Finally, we consider the implications of regional immune specialization for inflammatory disease...... implicated in controlling disease development elsewhere in the body. In this Review, we detail the anatomical and physiological distinctions that are observed in the small and large intestines, and we suggest how these may account for the diversity in the immune apparatus that is seen throughout...

  7. A Viral Noncoding RNA Complements a Weakened Viral RNA Silencing Suppressor and Promotes Efficient Systemic Host Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Flobinus

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic movement of beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV in Beta macrocarpa depends on viral RNA3, whereas in Nicotiana benthamiana this RNA is dispensable. RNA3 contains a coremin motif of 20 nucleotides essential for the stabilization of noncoding RNA3 (ncRNA3 and for long‐distance movement in Beta species. Coremin mutants that are unable to accumulate ncRNA3 also do not achieve systemic movement in Beta species. A mutant virus carrying a mutation in the p14 viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR, unable to move long distances, can be complemented with the ncRNA3 in the lesion phenotype, viral RNA accumulation, and systemic spread. Analyses of the BNYVV VSR mechanism of action led to the identification of the RNA‐dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6 pathway as a target of the virus VSR and the assignment of a VSR function to the ncRNA3.

  8. Vitamin D: modulator of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeke, Femke; Takiishi, Tatiana; Korf, Hannelie; Gysemans, Conny; Mathieu, Chantal

    2010-08-01

    1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)), the active form of vitamin D, is known to regulate calcium and phosphorus metabolism, thus being a key-player in bone-formation. However 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) also has a physiological role beyond its well-known role in skeletal homeostasis. Here, we describe 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) as an immunomodulator targeting various immune cells, including monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs), as well as T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes, hence modulating both innate and adaptive immune responses. Besides being targets, immune cells express vitamin D-activating enzymes, allowing local conversion of inactive vitamin D into 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) within the immune system. Taken together, these data indicate that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) plays a role in maintenance of immune homeostasis. Several epidemiological studies have linked inadequate vitamin D levels to a higher susceptibility of immune-mediated disorders, including chronic infections and autoimmune diseases. This review will discuss the complex immune-regulatory effects of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) on immune cells as well as its role in infectious and autoimmune diseases, more in particular in tuberculosis and type 1 diabetes (T1D). Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. INFORMATION-MEASURING SYSTEM FOR EVALUATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION POWER LEVELS INFLUENCE TO ITS WEAKENED BY PROTECTIVE SHIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Boiprav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An information-measuring system and realized on the basis of its methodology used for evaluation of electromagnetic radiation power levels passing via the protective shielding construction are described. It’s proposed to use the developed methodology for the testing of electromagnetic radiation shields for anechoic chambers

  10. Chemical controls on fault behavior: weakening of serpentinite sheared against quartz-bearing rocks and its significance for fault creep in the San Andreas system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The serpentinized ultramafic rocks found in many plate-tectonic settings commonly are juxtaposed against crustal rocks along faults, and the chemical contrast between the rock types potentially could influence the mechanical behavior of such faults. To investigate this possibility, we conducted triaxial experiments under hydrothermal conditions (200-350°C), shearing serpentinite gouge between forcing blocks of granite or quartzite. In an ultramafic chemical environment, the coefficient of friction, µ, of lizardite and antigorite serpentinite is 0.5-0.6, and µ increases with increasing temperature over the tested range. However, when either lizardite or antigorite serpentinite is sheared against granite or quartzite, strength is reduced to µ ~ 0.3, with the greatest strength reductions at the highest temperatures (temperature weakening) and slowest shearing rates (velocity strengthening). The weakening is attributed to a solution-transfer process that is promoted by the enhanced solubility of serpentine in pore fluids whose chemistry has been modified by interaction with the quartzose wall rocks. The operation of this process will promote aseismic slip (creep) along serpentinite-bearing crustal faults at otherwise seismogenic depths. During short-term experiments serpentine minerals reprecipitate in low-stress areas, whereas in longer experiments new Mg-rich phyllosilicates crystallize in response to metasomatic exchanges across the serpentinite-crustal rock contact. Long-term shear of serpentinite against crustal rocks will cause the metasomatic mineral assemblages, which may include extremely weak minerals such as saponite or talc, to play an increasingly important role in the mechanical behavior of the fault. Our results may explain the distribution of creep on faults in the San Andreas system.

  11. The immune system vs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Ilya Metchnikoff and Paul Ehrlich were awarded the Nobel price in 1908. Since then, numerous studies have unraveled a multitude of mechanistically different immune responses to intruding microorganisms. However, in the vast majority of these studies, the underlying infectious agents have appeared...... the present review on the immune system vs. biofilm bacteria is focused on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (mainly because this is the most thoroughly studied), many of the same mechanisms are also seen with biofilm infections generated by other microorganisms....

  12. Immune system stimulation by probiotic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Rabia; Shah, Nagendra P

    2014-01-01

    Probiotic organisms are claimed to offer several functional properties including stimulation of immune system. This review is presented to provide detailed informations about how probiotics stimulate our immune system. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus casei Shirota, Bifidobacterium animalis Bb-12, Lactobacillus johnsonii La1, Bifidobacterium lactis DR10, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae boulardii are the most investigated probiotic cultures for their immunomodulation properties. Probiotics can enhance nonspecific cellular immune response characterized by activation of macrophages, natural killer (NK) cells, antigen-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes, and the release of various cytokines in strain-specific and dose-dependent manner. Mixture and type (gram-positive and gram-negative) of probiotic organisms may induce different cytokine responses. Supplementation of probiotic organisms in infancy could help prevent immune-mediated diseases in childhood, whereas their intervention in pregnancy could affect fetal immune parameters, such as cord blood interferon (IFN)-γ levels, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 levels, and breast milk immunoglobulin (Ig)A. Probiotics that can be delivered via fermented milk or yogurt could improve the gut mucosal immune system by increasing the number of IgA(+) cells and cytokine-producing cells in the effector site of the intestine.

  13. Immune regulation in gut and cord : opportunities for directing the immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Roock, S.

    2012-01-01

    The gut is an important organ for the immune system. Microbes and immune cells interact directly or via epithelial cells. Both TH17 and Treg cells mature in this environment. The composition of the microbiota has an important influence on the immune homeostasis. Influencing the immune system via the

  14. [Immune system in chronic narcotic intoxication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigolkin, Iu I; Gasanov, A B

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of the literature data demonstrates that secondary immunodeficiency in chronic narcotic intoxication results, primarily, from T-system dysfunction and attenuation of both cellular and humoral reactions. However, some evidence exist on the absence of such effects or even stimulation of the immune system by narcotic drugs. Morphological analysis of changes in the lymphoid organs of drug addicts who had died of different diseases in chronic narcotic intoxication was made by only few researchers, so functional morphology of immune system organs in chronic narcotic intoxication is an issue of the day which requires further investigation.

  15. Dysbiosis and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Maayan; Kolodziejczyk, Aleksandra A; Thaiss, Christoph A; Elinav, Eran

    2017-04-01

    Throughout the past century, we have seen the emergence of a large number of multifactorial diseases, including inflammatory, autoimmune, metabolic, neoplastic and neurodegenerative diseases, many of which have been recently associated with intestinal dysbiosis - that is, compositional and functional alterations of the gut microbiome. In linking the pathogenesis of common diseases to dysbiosis, the microbiome field is challenged to decipher the mechanisms involved in the de novo generation and the persistence of dysbiotic microbiome configurations, and to differentiate causal host-microbiome associations from secondary microbial changes that accompany disease course. In this Review, we categorize dysbiosis in conceptual terms and provide an overview of immunological associations; the causes and consequences of bacterial dysbiosis, and their involvement in the molecular aetiology of common diseases; and implications for the rational design of new therapeutic approaches. A molecular- level understanding of the origins of dysbiosis, its endogenous and environmental regulatory processes, and its downstream effects may enable us to develop microbiome-targeting therapies for a multitude of common immune-mediated diseases.

  16. Artificial immune system applications in computer security

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This book provides state-of-the-art information on the use, design, and development of the Artificial Immune System (AIS) and AIS-based solutions to computer security issues. Artificial Immune System: Applications in Computer Security focuses on the technologies and applications of AIS in malware detection proposed in recent years by the Computational Intelligence Laboratory of Peking University (CIL@PKU). It offers a theoretical perspective as well as practical solutions for readers interested in AIS, machine learning, pattern recognition and computer security. The book begins by introducing the basic concepts, typical algorithms, important features, and some applications of AIS. The second chapter introduces malware and its detection methods, especially for immune-based malware detection approaches. Successive chapters present a variety of advanced detection approaches for malware, including Virus Detection System, K-Nearest Neighbour (KNN), RBF networ s, and Support Vector Machines (SVM), Danger theory, ...

  17. Extracellular adenosine mediates a systemic metabolic switch during immune response

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bajgar, Adam; Kucerova, Katerina; Jonatova, Lucie; Tomcala, Ales; Schneedorferova, Ivana; Okrouhlik, Jan; Dolezal, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Immune defense is energetically costly, and thus an effective response requires metabolic adaptation of the organism to reallocate energy from storage, growth, and development towards the immune system...

  18. Role of the Immune System in Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Pons, Hector; Johnson, Richard J

    2017-07-01

    High blood pressure is present in more than one billion adults worldwide and is the most important modifiable risk factor of death resulting from cardiovascular disease. While many factors contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension, a role of the immune system has been firmly established by a large number of investigations from many laboratories around the world. Immunosuppressive drugs and inhibition of individual cytokines prevent or ameliorate experimental hypertension, and studies in genetically-modified mouse strains have demonstrated that lymphocytes are necessary participants in the development of hypertension and in hypertensive organ injury. Furthermore, immune reactivity may be the driving force of hypertension in autoimmune diseases. Infiltration of immune cells, oxidative stress, and stimulation of the intrarenal angiotensin system are induced by activation of the innate and adaptive immunity. High blood pressure results from the combined effects of inflammation-induced impairment in the pressure natriuresis relationship, dysfunctional vascular relaxation, and overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system. Imbalances between proinflammatory effector responses and anti-inflammatory responses of regulatory T cells to a large extent determine the severity of inflammation. Experimental and human studies have uncovered autoantigens (isoketal-modified proteins and heat shock protein 70) of potential clinical relevance. Further investigations on the immune reactivity in hypertension may result in the identification of new strategies for the treatment of the disease. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Gut Microbiota, Immune System, and Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, P; Sassi, F

    2017-09-30

    The gut microbiota (GM) is the whole of commensal, symbiotic, and pathogenic microorganisms living in our intestine. The GM-host interactions contribute to the maturation of the host immune system, modulating its systemic response. It is well documented that GM can interact with non-enteral cells such as immune cells, dendritic cells, and hepatocytes, producing molecules such as short-chain fatty acids, indole derivatives, polyamines, and secondary bile acid. The receptors for some of these molecules are expressed on immune cells, and modulate the differentiation of T effector and regulatory cells: this is the reason why dysbiosis is correlated with several autoimmune, metabolic, and neurodegenerative diseases. Due to the close interplay between immune and bone cells, GM has a central role in maintaining bone health and influences bone turnover and density. GM can improve bone health also increasing calcium absorption and modulating the production of gut serotonin, a molecule that interacts with bone cells and has been suggested to act as a bone mass regulator. Thus, GM manipulation by consumption of antibiotics, changes in dietary habits, and the use of pre- and probiotics may affect bone health. This review summarizes evidences on the influence of GM on immune system and on bone turnover and density and how GM manipulation may influence bone health.

  20. The innate immune system in human systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenbusch, Marc; Kulkarni, Onkar P; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-04-25

    Although the role of adaptive immune mechanisms, e.g. autoantibody formation and abnormal T-cell activation, has been long noted in the pathogenesis of human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the role of innate immunity has been less well characterized. An intricate interplay between both innate and adaptive immune elements exists in protective anti-infective immunity as well as in detrimental autoimmunity. More recently, it has become clear that the innate immune system in this regard not only starts inflammation cascades in SLE leading to disease flares, but also continues to fuel adaptive immune responses throughout the course of the disease. This is why targeting the innate immune system offers an additional means of treating SLE. First trials assessing the efficacy of anti-type I interferon (IFN) therapy or modulators of pattern recognition receptor (PRR) signalling have been attempted. In this review, we summarize the available evidence on the role of several distinct innate immune elements, especially neutrophils and dendritic cells as well as the IFN system, as well as specific innate PRRs along with their signalling pathways. Finally, we highlight recent clinical trials in SLE addressing one or more of the aforementioned components of the innate immune system. © 2017 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  1. Overview of the Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Applying Timelines for Assignment, Review, & Funding Timeline for Managing Your Grant Apply for a Grant Sample Applications ... Foreign Organization System Review Sample Agenda: FOS Workshops Changes to Project or ... Center Organizational Chart Find NIAID Staff Office of the Director ...

  2. HIF Stabilization Weakens Primary Cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Although solitary or sensory cilia are present in most cells of the body and their existence has been known since the sixties, very little is known about their functions. One suspected function is fluid flow sensing- physical bending of cilia produces an influx of Ca++, which can then result in a variety of activated signaling pathways. Defective cilia and ciliary-associated proteins have been shown to result in cystic diseases. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is a progressive disease, typically appearing in the 5th decade of life and is one of the most common monogenetic inherited human diseases, affecting approximately 600,000 people in the United States. Because the mechanical properties of cilia impact their response to applied flow, we asked how the stiffness of cilia can be controlled pharmacologically. We performed an experiment subjecting cilia to Taxol (a microtubule stabilizer) and CoCl2 (a HIF stabilizer to model hypoxia). Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells were selected as our model system. After incubation with a selected pharmacological agent, cilia were optically trapped and the bending modulus measured. We found that HIF stabilization significantly weakens cilia. These results illustrate a method to alter the mechanical properties of primary cilia and potentially alter the flow sensing properties of cilia.

  3. The Immune System and Bodily Defence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bacterium; or via skin like malarial parasites which get in through a mosquito bite. The immune system is scattered .... the B cell surface will activate the B cell in many ways and cause their maturation into plasma cells which ..... with this diversification of MHC molecules, causes a major problem for the development of the ...

  4. Hibernation : the immune system at rest?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Hjalmar R.; Carey, Hannah V.; Kroese, Frans G. M.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian hibernation consists of torpor phases when metabolism is severely depressed, and T can reach as low as approximately -2 degrees C, interrupted by euthermic arousal phases. Hibernation affects the function of the innate and the adaptive immune systems. Torpor drastically reduces numbers of

  5. The aging immune system and nutritional interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, Adriaan A.

    2017-01-01

    The increased numbers of elderly people pose a major burden to public health care and society. DNA damage is considered to be the major origin of age-related changes in the body. With aging, the immune system becomes deregulated and is characterized by a low-grade inflammation (inflammaging). In

  6. Immune System Model Calibration by Genetic Algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Presbitero, A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.; Mancini, E.; Brands, R.; Sloot, P.

    2016-01-01

    We aim to develop a mathematical model of the human immune system for advanced individualized healthcare where medication plan is fine-tuned to fit a patient's conditions through monitored biochemical processes. One of the challenges is calibrating model parameters to satisfy existing experimental

  7. Immune system alterations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovden, H; Frederiksen, J L; Pedersen, S W

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a disease of which the underlying cause and pathogenesis are unknown. Cumulatative data clearly indicates an active participation by the immune system in the disease. An increasingly recognized theory suggests a non-cell autonomous mechanism, meaning that multiple...

  8. SISTEMAS INMUNES ALTERNATIVOS Alternative Immune Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUIS F. CADAVID

    Full Text Available El sistema inmune en animales es una red compleja de moléculas, células y tejidos que de manera conjunta mantienen la integridad fisiológica y genética de los organismos. Convencionalmente se ha considerado la existencia de dos clases de inmunidad, la innata y la adaptativa. La primera es ancestral, con variabilidad limitada y baja discriminación, mientras que la segunda es altamente variable, específica y restringida a vertebra-dos mandibulados. La inmunidad adaptativa se basa en receptores de antígeno que se rearreglan somáticamente para generar una diversidad casi ilimitada de moléculas. Este mecanismo de recombinación somática muy probablemente emergió como consecuencia de un evento de transferencia horizontal de transposones y transposasas bacterianas en el ancestro de los vertebrados mandibulados. El reciente descubrimiento en vertebrados no mandibulados e invertebrados de mecanismos alternativos de inmunidad adaptativa, sugiere que en el transcurso de la evolución distintos grupos animales han encontrado soluciones alternativas al problema del reconocimiento inmunológico.The immune system in animals is a complex network of molecules, cells and tissues that coordinately maintain the physiological and genetic integrity of the organism. Traditionally, two classes of immunity have been considered, the innate immunity and the adaptive immunity. The former is ancestral, with limited variability and low discrimination. The latter is highly variable, specific and limited to jawed vertebrates. Adaptive immunity is based on antigen receptors that rearrange somatically to generate a nearly unlimited diversity of molecules. Likely, this mechanism of somatic recombination arose as a consequence of horizontal transfer of transposons and transposases from bacterial genomes in the ancestor of jawed vertebrates. The recent discovery in jawless vertebrates and invertebrates of alternative adaptive immune mechanisms, suggests that during

  9. The Immune System: the ultimate fractionated cyber-physical system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Talcott

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this little vision paper we analyze the human immune system from a computer science point of view with the aim of understanding the architecture and features that allow robust, effective behavior to emerge from local sensing and actions. We then recall the notion of fractionated cyber-physical systems, and compare and contrast this to the immune system. We conclude with some challenges.

  10. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Irene

    2015-08-12

    Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT) and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT(+) B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture.

  11. Fishing for mammalian paradigms in the teleost immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunyer, J Oriol

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a renaissance in the study of fish immune systems. Such studies have greatly expanded the knowledge of the evolution and diversification of vertebrate immune systems. Several findings in those studies have overturned old paradigms about the immune system and led to the discovery of novel aspects of mammalian immunity. Here I focus on how findings pertaining to immunity in teleost (bony) fish have led to major new insights about mammalian B cell function in innate and adaptive immunity. Additionally, I illustrate how the discovery of the most ancient mucosal immunoglobulin described thus far will help resolve unsettled paradigms of mammalian mucosal immunity. PMID:23507645

  12. Archaeal CRISPR-based immune systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrett, Roger A; Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Shah, Shiraz Ali

    2011-01-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-based immune systems are essentially modular with three primary functions: the excision and integration of new spacers, the processing of CRISPR transcripts to yield mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs), and the targeting and cleavage...... of foreign nucleic acid. The primary target appears to be the DNA of foreign genetic elements, but the CRISPR/Cmr system that is widespread amongst archaea also specifically targets and cleaves RNA in vitro. The archaeal CRISPR systems tend to be both diverse and complex. Here we examine evidence...... of CRISPR loci and the evidence for intergenomic exchange of CRISPR systems....

  13. Leptin as immune mediator: Interaction between neuroendocrine and immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procaccini, Claudio; La Rocca, Claudia; Carbone, Fortunata; De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone/cytokine that links nutritional status with neuroendocrine and immune functions. Initially described as an anti-obesity hormone, leptin has subsequently been shown to exert pleiotropic effects, being also able to influence haematopoiesis, thermogenesis, reproduction, angiogenesis, and more importantly immune homeostasis. As a cytokine, leptin can affect both innate and adaptive immunity, by inducing a pro-inflammatory response and thus playing a key role in the regulation of the pathogenesis of several autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances on the role of leptin as immune-modulator in mammals and we also provide an overview on its main functions in non-mammalian vertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. SISTEMAS INMUNES ALTERNATIVOS - Alternative Immune Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cadavid Gutierrez Luis Fernando

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available El sistema inmune en animales es una red compleja de moléculas, células y tejidos que de manera conjunta mantienen la integridad fisiológica y genética de los organismos. Convencionalmente se ha considerado la existencia de dos clases de inmunidad, la innata y la adaptativa. La primera es ancestral, con variabilidad limitada y baja discriminación, mientras que la segunda es altamente variable, específica y restringida a vertebrados mandibulados. La inmunidad adaptativa se basa en receptores de antígeno que se rearreglan somáticamente para generar una diversidad casi ilimitada de moléculas. Este mecanismo de recombinación somática muy probablemente emergió como consecuencia de un evento de transferencia horizontal de transposones y transposasas bacterianas en el ancestro de los vertebrados mandibulados. El reciente descubrimiento en vertebrados no mandibulados e invertebrados de mecanismos alternativos de inmunidad adaptativa, sugiere que en el transcurso de la evolución distintos grupos animales han encontrado soluciones alternativas al problema del reconocimiento inmunológico. Palabras claves: Sistema inmune, evolución, VLR, Dscam, Alorreconocimiento ABSTRACT The immune system in animals is a complex network of molecules, cells and tissues that coordinately maintain the physiological and genetic integrity of the organism. Traditionally, two classes of immunity have been considered, the innate immunity and the adaptive immunity. The former is ancestral, with limited variability and low discrimination. The latter is highly variable, specific and limited to jawed vertebrates. Adaptive immunity is based on antigen receptors that rearrange somatically to generate a nearly unlimited diversity of molecules. Likely, this mechanism of somatic recombination arose as a consequence of a horizontal transfer of transposons and transposases from bacterial genomes in the ancestor of jawed vertebrates. The recent discovery in jawless

  15. The deconvolution of complex spectra by artificial immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiakhmetova, D. I.; Sibgatullin, M. E.; Galimullin, D. Z.; Kamalova, D. I.

    2017-11-01

    An application of the artificial immune system method for decomposition of complex spectra is presented. The results of decomposition of the model contour consisting of three components, Gaussian contours, are demonstrated. The method of artificial immune system is an optimization method, which is based on the behaviour of the immune system and refers to modern methods of search for the engine optimization.

  16. Environmental modulation of the immune system via the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S L

    1998-09-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that a variety of hormones have receptors and exert biologic actions on tissues of the immune system. Conversely, cytokines exert biologic actions on the endocrine system. This bidirectional interaction is likely involved in maintenance of physiological and immunologic homeostasis. This paper summarizes a variety of actions of growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), glucocorticoids and thyroid hormones (TH) on the immune system. It then proceeds to put these actions into a hypothetical context whereby these hormones may mediate some changes in immune system function in response to environmental stimuli such as physical and emotional stress, nutritional deprivation and environmental temperature. In the first example, it is proposed that PRL secretion in response to stress may serve an immunomodulatory role in two ways. The first is by stimulating the immune system directly and the second is by dampening or reducing the degree to which glucocorticoids are secreted in response to stress. The second example suggests that the increase in GH secretion and reduced IGF-I secretion in response to protein/energy restriction may have two potential immunomodulatory actions. One action is a direct effect of GH on several components of the immune system. The other is the partitioning of nutrient use away from skeletal muscle growth and toward tissues of higher priority such as the immune system. The third example proposes that the increased secretion of TH during cold environmental temperatures not only increases basic metabolic rate, but also directly stimulates both primary and secondary lymphoid tissues. It is suggested, therefore, that these three hormones are involved in maintaining immune system homeostasis in response to environmental change.

  17. Prion diseases and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucouturier, P; Frangione, B; Wisniewski, T

    1999-02-01

    Unlike other infectious diseases, transmissible spongiform encephalopathies elicit no specific immune response. Indeed, because the infectious agent, the prion, seems to be essentially composed of a protein with a primary structure identical to a host encoded protein, the lymphoid system is naturally tolerant. However, lymphoid organs are strongly implicated in the early peripheral steps of the disease. Paradoxically, immunodeficient animals, which are more susceptible to infections by usual pathogens, appear to be partially or completely resistant to experimental infection by prions by peripheral route. Several studies suggest that in normal subjects, cells of the immune system support the replication of prions and might allow their spreading from the periphery to the central nervous system. Thus, the lymphoid system appears to behave as a Trojan horse rather than a protective fortification in the process of prion infection. A greater understanding of the pathophysiology of these aspects of prion diseases could lead to immunomanipulation strategies aimed at preventing prion spread into the central nervous system, once peripheral exposure has occurred.

  18. Protection against HIV-disease progression: From immune activation to T-cell immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spits, H.B.

    2015-01-01

    HIV infection undermines the immune system by causing a gradual loss of CD4+ T cells. Eventually, the weakened immune system is no longer able to offer resistance to opportunistic infections and the HIV-infected individual will develop AIDS. Even after 30 years of intensive research on HIV, there is

  19. Write 'systemic small RNAs': read 'systemic immunity'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifi Abdolabad, A.R.

    2011-01-01

    About 50 years ago, it was reported that pathogen-infected plants are less susceptible to a broad spectrum of the subsequent pathogen attacks. This form of induced resistance, which resembles the immunisation in mammalian cells, is called systemic acquired resistance (SAR). In the last 10 years,

  20. Network intrusion detection by the coevolutionary immune algorithm of artificial immune systems with clonal selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamatova, T.; Zhukov, V.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the application of the artificial immune systems apparatus as a heuristic method of network intrusion detection for algorithmic provision of intrusion detection systems. The coevolutionary immune algorithm of artificial immune systems with clonal selection was elaborated. In testing different datasets the empirical results of evaluation of the algorithm effectiveness were achieved. To identify the degree of efficiency the algorithm was compared with analogs. The fundamental rules based of solutions generated by this algorithm are described in the article.

  1. Memorizing innate instructions requires a sufficiently specific adaptive immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghans, J.A.M.; Boer, R.J. de

    2002-01-01

    During its primary encounter with a pathogen, the immune system has to decide which type of immune response is most appropriate. Based on signals from the innate immune system and the immunological context in which the pathogen is presented, responding lymphocytes will adopt a particular phenotype,

  2. Scaling of Adaptive Immune System Repertoires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethna, Zachary; Elhanati, Yuval; Callan, Curtis

    The adaptive immune system has evolved a stochastic method called VDJ recombination for the purpose of generating the necessary receptor diversity to identify all foreign pathogens. Recent work characterizing the probability distributions of this VDJ recombination process in mouse and human T-cell repertoires shows a massive difference in the corresponding diversities. The increased diversity of the human repertoire is wholly driven by an increase in the average number of nucleotide insertions in VDJ recombination. In this talk the impact of different insertion profiles is quantified and a model for the scaling of such repertoires with respect to the size of the repertoire is laid out.

  3. Multithreshold Segmentation Based on Artificial Immune Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Cuevas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bio-inspired computing has lately demonstrated its usefulness with remarkable contributions to shape detection, optimization, and classification in pattern recognition. Similarly, multithreshold selection has become a critical step for image analysis and computer vision sparking considerable efforts to design an optimal multi-threshold estimator. This paper presents an algorithm for multi-threshold segmentation which is based on the artificial immune systems(AIS technique, also known as theclonal selection algorithm (CSA. It follows the clonal selection principle (CSP from the human immune system which basically generates a response according to the relationship between antigens (Ag, that is, patterns to be recognized and antibodies (Ab, that is, possible solutions. In our approach, the 1D histogram of one image is approximated through a Gaussian mixture model whose parameters are calculated through CSA. Each Gaussian function represents a pixel class and therefore a thresholding point. Unlike the expectation-maximization (EM algorithm, the CSA-based method shows a fast convergence and a low sensitivity to initial conditions. Remarkably, it also improves complex time-consuming computations commonly required by gradient-based methods. Experimental evidence demonstrates a successful automatic multi-threshold selection based on CSA, comparing its performance to the aforementioned well-known algorithms.

  4. Cross-talk between probiotic lactobacilli and host immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemgang, T S; Kapila, S; Shanmugam, V P; Kapila, R

    2014-08-01

    The mechanism by which probiotic lactobacilli affect the immune system is strain specific. As the immune system is a multicompartmental system, each strain has its way to interact with it and induce a visible and quantifiable effect. This review summarizes the interplay existing between the host immune system and probiotic lactobacilli, that is, with emphasis on lactobacilli as a prototype probiotic genus. Several aspects including the bacterial-host cross-talk with the mucosal and systemic immune system are presented, as well as short sections on the competing effect towards pathogenic bacteria and their uses as delivery vehicle for antigens. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. The Immune System and Bodily Defence-How Does the Immune ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 1. The Immune System and Bodily Defence - How Does the Immune System Live With a Randomly Generated Repertoire? Vineeta Bal Satyajit Rath. Series Article Volume 3 Issue 1 January 1998 pp 15-20 ...

  6. Reciprocal Interactions of the Intestinal Microbiota and Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Craig L.; Elson, Charles O.; Hatton, Robin D.; Weaver, Casey T.

    2013-01-01

    Preface Emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates set the stage for evolution of an advanced symbiotic relationship with the intestinal microbiota. The defining features of specificity and memory that characterize adaptive immunity have afforded vertebrates mechanisms for efficiently tailoring immune responses to diverse types of microbes, whether to promote mutualism or host defense. These same attributes carry risk for immune-mediated diseases that are increasingly linked to the intestinal microbiota. Understanding how the adaptive immune system copes with the remarkable number and diversity of microbes that colonize the digestive tract, and how it integrates with more primitive innate immune mechanisms to maintain immune homeostasis, holds considerable promise for new approaches to modulate immune networks in order to treat and prevent disease. PMID:22972296

  7. Interactions of lactobacilli with the host immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to better understand the molecular mechanism of host res-ponses to probiotics. Probiotics can be used to stimulate or regulate immune responses in epithelial and immune cells of the intestinal mucosa and generate beneficial effects on the immune system. Carefully selected

  8. Fracture strength and nanoleakage of weakened roots reconstructed using relined glass fiber-reinforced dowels combined with a novel prefabricated core system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Rania A; Mandour, Mona H; Abd El-Ghany, Ossama Saleh

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fracture strength and nanoleakage of endodontically treated weakened teeth after being restored with relined glass fiber-reinforced dowels and two types of cores. Sixty sound human decoronated and endodontically treated teeth were embedded in epoxy resin blocks, then divided into three groups (n = 20) according to the method of root reconstruction. Group 1 (control): nonweakened roots were restored with glass fiber-reinforced dowels (UNIC); group 2: weakened roots restored with glass fiber-reinforced dowels relined with composite resin; group 3: weakened roots restored with glass fiber-reinforced dowels and a thick layer of luting cement. Dowels were cemented using Corposit, a dual-cured adhesive resin cement, then each group was assigned into two subgroups (n = 10) according to the type of core used; subgroup a: custom-made core using the same luting cement, subgroup b: prefabricated glass fiber-reinforced core (UNIC). Half the specimens of each subgroup were individually mounted at 45° angles and statically compressed until fracture at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed with a 5 kN load cell. The type of failure was assessed using a magnification lens. The other half of the specimens were removed from the block, placed in silver nitrate solution for 24 hours followed by photo developer for 8 hours, then examined using environmental scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive analytical X-ray for nanoleakage evaluation. Data were statistically analyzed. The nonweakened group recorded the highest fracture strength values. The composite relined group showed significantly higher fracture strength values than the cement group. The prefabricated core yielded higher fracture strength values than the custom-made core. All groups showed a degree of nanoleakage, with higher scores recorded for the composite group. The fracture resistance of wide root canals can be improved by using glass fiber-reinforced dowels relined with composite

  9. Dynamics of Immune Checkpoints, Immune System, and BCG in the Treatment of Superficial Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farouk Tijjani Saad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the dynamics of immune suppressors/checkpoints, immune system, and BCG in the treatment of superficial bladder cancer. Programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β are some of the examples of immune suppressors/checkpoints. They are responsible for deactivating the immune system and enhancing immunological tolerance. Moreover, they categorically downregulate and suppress the immune system by preventing and blocking the activation of T-cells, which in turn decreases autoimmunity and enhances self-tolerance. In cancer immunotherapy, the immune checkpoints/suppressors prevent and block the immune cells from attacking, spreading, and killing the cancer cells, which leads to cancer growth and development. We formulate a mathematical model that studies three possible dynamics of the treatment and establish the effects of the immune checkpoints on the immune system and the treatment at large. Although the effect cannot be seen explicitly in the analysis of the model, we show it by numerical simulations.

  10. Scale-free dynamics of somatic adaptability in immune system

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Shiro

    2009-01-01

    The long-time dynamics of somatic adaptability in immune system is simulated by a simple physical model. The immune system described by the model exhibits a scale free behavior as is observed in living systems. The balance between the positive and negative feedbacks of the model leads to a robust immune system where the positive one corresponds to the formation of memory cells and the negative one to immunosuppression. Also the immunosenescence of the system is discussed based on the time-dependence of the epigenetic landscape of the adaptive immune cells in the shape space.

  11. Diffuse endocrine system, neuroendocrine tumors and immunity: what's new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Pietro; Ferone, Diego

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, research into the modulation of immunity by the neuroendocrine system has flourished, unravelling significant effects of several neuropeptides, including somatostatin (SRIH), and especially cortistatin (CST), on immune cells. Scientists have learnt that the diffuse neuroendocrine system can regulate the immune system at all its levels: innate immunity, adaptive immunity, and maintenance of immune tolerance. Compelling studies with animal models have demonstrated that some neuropeptides may be effective in treating inflammatory disorders, such as sepsis, and T helper 1-driven autoimmune diseases, like Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Here, the latest findings concerning the neuroendocrine control of the immune system are discussed, with emphasis on SRIH and CST. The second part of the review deals with the immune response to neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). The anti-NET immune response has been described in the last years and it is still being characterized, similarly to what is happening for several other types of cancer. In parallel with investigations addressing the mechanisms by which the immune system contrasts NET growth and spreading, ground-breaking clinical trials of dendritic cell vaccination as immunotherapy for metastatic NETs have shown in principle that the immune reaction to NETs can be exploited for treatment. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. [Neonatal immune system changes caused by phototherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrkaić, Lj; Kamenov, B; Najman, S; Dimitrijević, H; Mitrović, V; Maglajlić, S

    1994-01-01

    It is noticed that phototerapy may cause disturbance in the behavior and higher incidence of infections in neonate. Moreover an electromagnetic radiation may influence different functions of cells. We examined the effects of pototherapy on the immune system of neonates applied because of hyperbilirubinemia. The examined healthy patients, without signs of infection, anoxia or birth injury. Physical examination, white blood cell count, surface differentiation markers on peripheral blood lymphocytes,and hemiluminescent response of peripheral blood leukocytes were performed before and immediately after phototerapy. Our results showed an increase in the total number of peripheral white blood cells: polymorphonuclears, lymphocytes and monocytes as well as a delay in the chemilumonescence response of the peripheral blood phagocytes with lower values of the pick, suggesting a decrease of their functional ability to respond by respiratory burst. This might be important in the case of bacteriemia when phothoterapy may complicate the existing infection. Those findings are temporary.

  13. Neuroendocrine and Immune System Responses with Spaceflights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Charles M.; Greenleaf, John E.; Jackson, Catherine G. R.

    1996-01-01

    Despite the fact that the first human was in space during 1961 and individuals have existed in a microgravity environment for more than a year, there are limited spaceflight data available on the responses of the neuroendocrine and immune systems. Because of mutual interactions between these respective integrative systems, it is inappropriate to assume that the responses of one have no impact on functions of the other. Blood and plasma volume consistently decrease with spaceflight; hence, blood endocrine and immune constituents will be modified by both gravitational and measurement influences. The majority of the in-flight data relates to endocrine responses that influence fluids and electrolytes during the first month in space. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), aldo-sterone. and anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) appear to be elevated with little change in the atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP). Flight results longer than 60 d show increased ADH variability with elevations in angiotensin and cortisol. Although post-flight results are influenced by reentry and recovery events, ACTH and ADH appear to be consistently elevated with variable results being reported for the other hormones. Limited in-flight data on insulin and growth hormone levels suggest they are not elevated to counteract the loss in muscle mass. Post-flight results from short- and long-term flights indicate that thyroxine and insulin are increased while growth hormone exhibits minimal change. In-flight parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels are variable for several weeks after which they remain elevated. Post-flight PTH was increased on missions that lasted either 7 or 237 d, whereas calcitonin concentrations were increased after 1 wk but decreased after longer flights. Leukocytes are elevated in flights of various durations because of an increase in neutrophils. The majority of post-flight data indicates immunoglobulin concentrations are not significantly changed from pre-flight measurements. However, the numbers of T

  14. Systemic Immunity Is Required for Effective Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Matthew H; Carmi, Yaron; Reticker-Flynn, Nathan E; Kwek, Serena S; Madhireddy, Deepthi; Martins, Maria M; Gherardini, Pier Federico; Prestwood, Tyler R; Chabon, Jonathan; Bendall, Sean C; Fong, Lawrence; Nolan, Garry P; Engleman, Edgar G

    2017-01-26

    Immune responses involve coordination across cell types and tissues. However, studies in cancer immunotherapy have focused heavily on local immune responses in the tumor microenvironment. To investigate immune activity more broadly, we performed an organism-wide study in genetically engineered cancer models using mass cytometry. We analyzed immune responses in several tissues after immunotherapy by developing intuitive models for visualizing single-cell data with statistical inference. Immune activation was evident in the tumor and systemically shortly after effective therapy was administered. However, during tumor rejection, only peripheral immune cells sustained their proliferation. This systemic response was coordinated across tissues and required for tumor eradication in several immunotherapy models. An emergent population of peripheral CD4 T cells conferred protection against new tumors and was significantly expanded in patients responding to immunotherapy. These studies demonstrate the critical impact of systemic immune responses that drive tumor rejection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Immune genes undergo more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes in Daphnia pulex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McTaggart Seanna J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding which parts of the genome have been most influenced by adaptive evolution remains an unsolved puzzle. Some evidence suggests that selection has the greatest impact on regions of the genome that interact with other evolving genomes, including loci that are involved in host-parasite co-evolutionary processes. In this study, we used a population genetic approach to test this hypothesis by comparing DNA sequences of 30 putative immune system genes in the crustacean Daphnia pulex with 24 non-immune system genes. Results In support of the hypothesis, results from a multilocus extension of the McDonald-Kreitman (MK test indicate that immune system genes as a class have experienced more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes. However, not all immune system genes show evidence of adaptive evolution. Additionally, we apply single locus MK tests and calculate population genetic parameters at all loci in order to characterize the mode of selection (directional versus balancing in the genes that show the greatest deviation from neutral evolution. Conclusions Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that immune system genes undergo more adaptive evolution than non-immune system genes, possibly as a result of host-parasite arms races. The results of these analyses highlight several candidate loci undergoing adaptive evolution that could be targeted in future studies.

  16. CMV immune evasion and manipulation of the immune system with aging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jackson, Sarah E; Redeker, Anke; Arens, Ramon; van Baarle, Debbie; van den Berg, Sara P H; Benedict, Chris A; Čičin-Šain, Luka; Hill, Ann B; Wills, Mark R

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes numerous proteins and microRNAs that function to evade the immune response and allow the virus to replicate and disseminate in the face of a competent innate and acquired immune system. The establishment of a latent infection by CMV, which if completely quiescent

  17. [Psychoneuroimmunology--regulation of immunity at the systemic level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boranić, Milivoj; Sabioncello, Ante; Gabrilovac, Jelka

    2008-01-01

    Innate and acquired immune reactions are controlled by their intrinsic regulatory mechanisms, ie. by an array of cytokines that mediate communication among cells of the immune system itself and with other cells and tissues, e. g. in areas of inflammation. In addition, the immune system is also subjected to systemic regulation by the vegetative and endocrine systems since immune cells express receptors for neurotransmitters and hormones. Neuroendocrine signals may enhance or suppress the immune reaction, accelerate or slow it, but do not affect specificity. Various stressful factors, including the psychosocial ones, affect immunity. In turn, cytokines generated by the immune system influence hormonal secretion and central nervous system, producing specific behavioral changes (the "sickness behavior") accompanying infectious and inflammatory diseases. That includes somnolence, loss of apetite, depression or anxiety and decrease of cognitive abilities, attention and memory. Local immune systems in skin and mucosa are also subjected to systemic neuroendocrine regulation and possess intrinsic neuroregulatory networks as well. These mechanisms render skin and respiratory and digestive tracts responsive to various forms of stress. Examples are neurodermitis, asthma and ulcerative colitis. In children, the immune and the neuroendocrine systems are still developing, particularly in fetal, neonatal and early infant periods, and exposure to stressful experiences at that time may result in late consequences in the form of deficient immunity or greater risks for allergic or autoimmune reactions. Recognition of the participation of neuroendocrine mechanisms in regulation of immunity helps us understand alterations and disturbances of immune reactions under the influence of stressful factors but so far has not produced reliable therapeutic implications. Psychosocial interventions involving the child and its family may be useful.

  18. Interaction between the gut microbiome and mucosal immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Na; Li, Na; Duan, Xinwang; Niu, Haitao

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiota, the largest symbiotic ecosystem with the host, has been shown to play important roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Dysbiosis of the gut microbiome is caused by the imbalance between the commensal and pathogenic microbiomes. The commensal microbiome regulates the maturation of the mucosal immune system, while the pathogenic microbiome causes immunity dysfunction, resulting in disease development. The gut mucosal immune system, which consists of lymph nodes, lamina propria and epithelial cells, constitutes a protective barrier for the integrity of the intestinal tract. The composition of the gut microbiota is under the surveillance of the normal mucosal immune system. Inflammation, which is caused by abnormal immune responses, influences the balance of the gut microbiome, resulting in intestinal diseases. In this review, we briefly outlined the interaction between the gut microbiota and the immune system and provided a reference for future studies.

  19. Causes, consequences, and reversal of immune system aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecino-Rodriguez, Encarnacion; Berent-Maoz, Beata; Dorshkind, Kenneth

    2013-03-01

    The effects of aging on the immune system are manifest at multiple levels that include reduced production of B and T cells in bone marrow and thymus and diminished function of mature lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid tissues. As a result, elderly individuals do not respond to immune challenge as robustly as the young. An important goal of aging research is to define the cellular changes that occur in the immune system and the molecular events that underlie them. Considerable progress has been made in this regard, and this information has provided the rationale for clinical trials to rejuvenate the aging immune system.

  20. Immune response induction in the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Babcock, Alicia

    2002-01-01

    The primary function of the immune response is protection of the host against infection with pathogens, including viruses. Since viruses can infect any tissue of the body, including the central nervous system (CNS), it is logical that cells of the immune system should equally have access to all...... tissues. Nevertheless, the brain and spinal cord are noted for their lack of immune presence. Relative to other organ systems, the CNS appears immunologically privileged. Furthermore, when immune responses do occur in the CNS, they are frequently associated with deleterious effects such as inflammatory...

  1. Malignant pirates of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Lixin; Schmitz, Roland; Ceribelli, Michele; Staudt, Louis M

    2011-09-20

    At great human cost, cancer is the largest genetic experiment ever conducted. This review highlights how lymphoid malignancies have genetically perverted normal immune signaling and regulatory mechanisms for their selfish oncogenic goals of unlimited proliferation, perpetual survival and evasion of the immune response.

  2. SISTEMAS INMUNES ALTERNATIVOS - Alternative Immune Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luis Fernando Cadavid Gutierrez

    2011-01-01

    .... Likely, this mechanism of somatic recombination arose as a consequence of a horizontal transfer of transposons and transposases from bacterial genomes in the ancestor of jawed vertebrates. The recent discovery in jawless vertebrates and invertebrates of alternative adaptive immune mechanisms, suggests during evolution different animal groups have found alternative solutions to the problem of immune recognition.

  3. The effects of early life adversity on the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwenspoek, Martha M C; Kuehn, Annette; Muller, Claude P; Turner, Jonathan D

    2017-08-01

    Early life adversity (ELA) is associated with a higher risk for diseases in adulthood. Although the pathophysiological effects of ELA are varied, there may be a unifying role for the immune system in all of the long-term pathologies such as chronic inflammatory disorders (autoimmune diseases, allergy, and asthma). Recently, significant efforts have been made to elucidate the long-term effects ELA has on immune function, as well as the mechanisms underlying these immune changes. In this review, we focus on data from human studies investigating immune parameters in relation to post-natal adverse experiences. We describe the current understanding of the 'ELA immune phenotype', characterized by inflammation, impairment of the cellular immune system, and immunosenescence. However, at present, data addressing specific immune functions are limited and there is a need for high-quality, well powered, longitudinal studies to unravel cause from effect. Besides the immune system, also the stress system and health behaviors are altered in ELA. We discuss probable underlying mechanisms based on epigenetic programming that could explain the ELA immune phenotype and whether this is a direct effect of immune programming or an indirect consequence of changes in behavior or stress reactivity. Understanding the underlying mechanisms will help define effective strategies to prevent or counteract negative ELA-associated outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neutrophils: Cinderella of innate immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V; Sharma, A

    2010-11-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of innate immune defense against infectious diseases. However, since their discovery by Elie Metchnikoff, they have always been considered tissue-destructive cells responsible for inflammatory tissue damage occurring during acute infections. Now, extensive research in the field of neutrophil cell biology and their role skewing the immune response in various infections or inflammatory disorders revealed their importance in the regulation of immune response. Along with releasing various antimicrobial molecules, neutrophils also release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) for the containment of infection and inflammation. Activated neutrophils provide signals for the activation and maturation of macrophages as well as dendritic cells. Neutrophils are also involved in the regulation of T-cell immune response against various pathogens and tumor antigens. Thus, the present review is intended to highlight the emerging role of neutrophils in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity during acute infectious or inflammatory conditions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Psychoneuroimmunology--cross-talk between the immune and nervous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemssen, Tjalf; Kern, Simone

    2007-05-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is a relatively new field of study that investigates interactions between behaviour and the immune system, mediated by the endocrine and nervous systems. The immune and central nervous system (CNS) maintain extensive communication. On the one hand, the brain modulates the immune system by hardwiring sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves (autonomic nervous system) to lymphoid organs. On the other hand, neuroendocrine hormones such as corticotrophin-releasing hormone or substance P regulate cytokine balance. Vice versa, the immune system modulates brain activity including sleep and body temperature. Based on a close functional and anatomical link, the immune and nervous systems act in a highly reciprocal manner. From fever to stress, the influence of one system on the other has evolved in an intricate manner to help sense danger and to mount an appropriate adaptive response. Over recent decades, reasonable evidence has emerged that these brain-to-immune interactions are highly modulated by psychological factors which influence immunity and immune system-mediated disease.

  6. The University Immune System: Overcoming Resistance to Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilley, Ann; Godek, Marisha; Gilley, Jerry W.

    2009-01-01

    A university, similar to any other organization, has an immune system that erects a powerful barrier against change. This article discusses the university immune system and what can be done to counteract its negative effects and thereby allow change to occur.

  7. Breakdown of the innate immune system by bacterial proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarman, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria have developed many strategies to circumvent our immune system to survive and colonize human tissues. One of these strategies is by secreting proteases that specifically target the innate immune system. Aureolysin is a metalloprotease from Staphylococcus aureus which target the main

  8. Overview of fish immune system and infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brief overview of the fish immune system and the emerging or re-emerging bacterial, viral, parasitic and fungal diseases considered to currently have a negative impact on aquaculture is presented. The fish immune system has evolved with both innate (natural resistance) and adaptive (acquired) immu...

  9. The role of intestinal microbiota and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purchiaroni, F; Tortora, A; Gabrielli, M; Bertucci, F; Gigante, G; Ianiro, G; Ojetti, V; Scarpellini, E; Gasbarrini, A

    2013-02-01

    The human gut is an ecosystem consisting of a great number of commensal bacteria living in symbiosis with the host. Several data confirm that gut microbiota is engaged in a dynamic interaction with the intestinal innate and adaptive immune system, affecting different aspects of its development and function. To review the immunological functions of gut microbiota and improve knowledge of its therapeutic implications for several intestinal and extra-intestinal diseases associated to dysregulation of the immune system. Significant articles were identified by literature search and selected based on content, including atopic diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases and treatment of these conditions with probiotics. Accumulating evidence indicates that intestinal microflora has protective, metabolic, trophic and immunological functions and is able to establish a "cross-talk" with the immune component of mucosal immunity, comprising cellular and soluble elements. When one or more steps in this fine interaction fail, autoimmune or auto-inflammatory diseases may occur. Furthermore, it results from the data that probiotics, used for the treatment of the diseases caused by the dysregulation of the immune system, can have a beneficial effect by different mechanisms. Gut microbiota interacts with both innate and adaptive immune system, playing a pivotal role in maintenance and disruption of gut immune quiescence. A cross talk between the mucosal immune system and endogenous microflora favours a mutual growth, survival and inflammatory control of the intestinal ecosystem. Based on these evidences, probiotics can be used as an ecological therapy in the treatment of immune diseases.  

  10. How the immune system detects lipid antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Libero, Gennaro; Mori, Lucia

    2010-04-01

    T lymphocytes are the cells of the immune system that may recognize glycolipids as antigens. T cells recognize lipids associated with the non-polymorphic molecules of the CD1 family present on the membrane of antigen-presenting cells. CD1 molecules contain hydrophobic pockets, which bind a large variety of lipid molecules in various manners. Lipid antigenicity is determined by their mode of uptake, membrane trafficking properties, degradation within endosomal compartments and capacity to form stable complexes with CD1. Extracellular and intracellular lipid binding proteins participate in lipid handling and loading on CD1 molecules within antigen-presenting cells. Recent crystal structures have disclosed how the T cell receptor contacts CD1-lipid complexes, revealing the contribution of both CD1 and lipid residues in making functionally relevant contacts. Lipid-specific T cells are important in autoimmunity, cancer surveillance, protection during infections, and in immunoregulation. The immunogenicity of lipids is being exploited in novel approaches to immunotherapy, including inhibition of autoimmunity and anti-cancer and bacterial vaccines. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Mathematical model of radiation effect on the immunity system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnova, O.A. (Institut Mediko-Biologicheskikh Problem, Moscow (USSR))

    1984-03-01

    A mathematical model, simulating the effect of ionizing radiation on the dynamics of humoral immune reaction is suggested. It represents the system of nonlinear differential equations and is realized in the form of program in Fortran computer language. The model describes the primary immune reaction of nonirradiated organism on T-independent antigen, reflects the postradiation lymphopoiesis dynamics in nonimmunized mammals, simulates the processes of injury and recovery of the humoral immunity system under the combined effect of ionizing radiation and antigenic stimulation. The model can be used for forecasting immunity state in irradiated mammals.

  12. Effects of microbes on the immune system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fujinami, Robert S; Cunningham, Madeleine W

    2000-01-01

    .... The book synthesizes recent discoveries on the various mechanisms by which microbes subvert the immune response and on the role of these immunologic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases...

  13. Does cold activate the Drosophila melanogaster immune system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehipour-Shirazi, Golnaz; Ferguson, Laura V; Sinclair, Brent J

    2017-01-01

    Cold exposure appears to activate aspects of the insect immune system; however, the functional significance of the relationship between cold and immunity is unclear. Insect success at low temperatures is shaped in part by interactions with biotic stressors, such as pathogens, thus it is important to understand how and why immunity might be activated by cold. Here we explore which components of the immune system are activated, and whether those components differ among different kinds of cold exposure. We exposed Drosophila melanogaster to both acute (2h, -2°C) and sustained (10h, -0.5°C) cold, and measured potential (antimicrobial peptide expression, phenoloxidase activity, haemocyte counts) and realised (survival of fungal infection, wound-induced melanisation, bacterial clearance) immunity following recovery. Acute cold increased circulating haemocyte concentration and the expression of Turandot-A and diptericin, but elicited a short-term decrease in the clearance of gram-positive bacteria. Sustained cold increased the expression of Turandot-A, with no effect on other measures of potential or realised immunity. We show that measures of potential immunity were up-regulated by cold, whereas realised immunity was either unaffected or down-regulated. Thus, we hypothesize that cold-activation of potential immunity in Drosophila may be a compensatory mechanism to maintain stable immune function during or after low temperature exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. CMV immune evasion and manipulation of the immune system with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Sarah E; Redeker, Anke; Arens, Ramon; van Baarle, Debbie; van den Berg, Sara P H; Benedict, Chris A; Čičin-Šain, Luka; Hill, Ann B; Wills, Mark R

    2017-06-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes numerous proteins and microRNAs that function to evade the immune response and allow the virus to replicate and disseminate in the face of a competent innate and acquired immune system. The establishment of a latent infection by CMV, which if completely quiescent at the level of viral gene expression would represent an ultimate in immune evasion strategies, is not sufficient for lifelong persistence and dissemination of the virus. CMV needs to reactivate and replicate in a lytic cycle of infection in order to disseminate further, which occurs in the face of a fully primed secondary immune response. Without reactivation, latency itself would be redundant for the virus. It is also becoming clear that latency is not a totally quiescent state, but is characterized by limited viral gene expression. Therefore, the virus also needs immune evasion strategies during latency. An effective immune response to CMV is required or viral replication will cause morbidity and ultimately mortality in the host. There is clearly a complex balance between virus immune evasion and host immune recognition over a lifetime. This poses the important question of whether long-term evasion or manipulation of the immune response driven by CMV is detrimental to health. In this meeting report, three groups used the murine model of CMV (MCMV) to examine if the contribution of the virus to immune senescence is set by the (i) initial viral inoculum, (ii) inflation of T cell responses, (iii) or the balance between functionally distinct effector CD4+ T cells. The work of other groups studying the CMV response in humans is discussed. Their work asks whether the ability to make immune responses to new antigens is compromised by (i) age and HCMV carriage, (ii) long-term exposure to HCMV giving rise to an overall immunosuppressive environment and increased levels of latent virus, or (iii) adapted virus mutants (used as potential vaccines) that have the capacity to

  15. An immunity-based anomaly detection system with sensor agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Takeshi; Ishida, Yoshiteru

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes an immunity-based anomaly detection system with sensor agents based on the specificity and diversity of the immune system. Each agent is specialized to react to the behavior of a specific user. Multiple diverse agents decide whether the behavior is normal or abnormal. Conventional systems have used only a single sensor to detect anomalies, while the immunity-based system makes use of multiple sensors, which leads to improvements in detection accuracy. In addition, we propose an evaluation framework for the anomaly detection system, which is capable of evaluating the differences in detection accuracy between internal and external anomalies. This paper focuses on anomaly detection in user's command sequences on UNIX-like systems. In experiments, the immunity-based system outperformed some of the best conventional systems.

  16. An Immunity-Based Anomaly Detection System with Sensor Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiteru Ishida

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an immunity-based anomaly detection system with sensor agents based on the specificity and diversity of the immune system. Each agent is specialized to react to the behavior of a specific user. Multiple diverse agents decide whether the behavior is normal or abnormal. Conventional systems have used only a single sensor to detect anomalies, while the immunity-based system makes use of multiple sensors, which leads to improvements in detection accuracy. In addition, we propose an evaluation framework for the anomaly detection system, which is capable of evaluating the differences in detection accuracy between internal and external anomalies. This paper focuses on anomaly detection in user’s command sequences on UNIX-like systems. In experiments, the immunity-based system outperformed some of the best conventional systems.

  17. The suppression of immune system disorders by passive attrition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P Stromberg

    Full Text Available Exposure to infectious diseases has an unexpected benefit of inhibiting autoimmune diseases and allergies. This is one of many fundamental fitness tradeoffs associated with immune system architecture. The immune system attacks pathogens, but also may (inappropriately attack the host. Exposure to pathogens can suppress the deleterious response, at the price of illness and the decay of immunity to previous diseases. This "hygiene hypothesis" has been associated with several possible underlying biological mechanisms. This study focuses on physiological constraints that lead to competition for survival between immune system cell types. Competition maintains a relatively constant total number of cells within each niche. The constraint implies that adding cells conferring new immunity requires loss (passive attrition of some cells conferring previous immunities. We consider passive attrition as a mechanism to prevent the initial proliferation of autoreactive cells, thus preventing autoimmune disease. We see that this protection is a general property of homeostatic regulation and we look specifically at both the IL-15 and IL-7 regulated niches to make quantitative predictions using a mathematical model. This mathematical model yields insight into the dynamics of the "Hygiene Hypothesis," and makes quantitative predictions for experiments testing the ability of passive attrition to suppress immune system disorders. The model also makes a prediction of an anti-correlation between prevalence of immune system disorders and passive attrition rates.

  18. A boost for the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, V C

    1997-01-01

    A 15-member medical research team at Tygerberg Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, has developed a compound which halted, and even reversed, the progression of HIV disease in human clinical trial subjects. The compound is a mixture of sterols and sterolins, which are found in all plants, yet identified through the more than $10 million of medical research and clinical trial funding provided by Essential Sterolin Products, a small, family-owned South African pharmaceutical company which has recently acquired a world patent for the compound. The compound does not affect viral replication, but instead helps the patient's natural immune system fight off HIV. 300 volunteers with HIV were involved in the double-blind placebo clinical trials launched in 1993. The compound's therapeutic power became clear after 6 months, so the trial was ended on ethical grounds. Administration of the compound has halted patients' physical deterioration, T-cell counts have increased by several hundred percent in some patients, HIV loads are decreasing, there have been no apparent side effects, and patients report both weight gain and a reduction in skin irritations. The compound is taken in pill form three times per day before meals at the current cost of approximately 40 US cents per day. The head of Essential Sterolin Products wants to keep the compound's price low so that people with HIV can afford it. The company is currently negotiating with two international drug corporations to market the compound worldwide as therapy for HIV patients. The capsules are already on the market in South Africa as a food supplement in health nutrition stores.

  19. Role of the immune system in hypertensive target organ damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvakan, Heda; Luft, Friedrich C; Muller, Dominik N

    2009-10-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of cardiovascular diseases clearly show that inflammation and activation of immunity are central features in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, ischemic myocardial injury, and also in hypertension-induced target organ damage. However, the idea that special immune cells could regulate immune responses in these conditions in favor of minimizing disease is a novel concept. Regulatory T cells have unique immune modulatory properties that offer an attractive alternative to common immunosuppressant drugs. Their application in animal models of autoimmunity and neoplastic conditions offers exciting therapeutic avenues. Thus, with the use of regulatory T cells in hypertension-induced target organ damage enables new insights into the pathophysiologic mechanisms and widen our knowledge of the role of the immune system in cardiovascular disease. The aim of this review was to summarize and discuss some of the most recent insights and put them into a perspective based on well-known interactions between immunity and hypertensive damage.

  20. Nociception and role of immune system in pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vivek; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Ahmed, Ahad S

    2015-09-01

    Both pain and inflammation are protective responses. However, these self-limiting conditions (with well-established negative feedback loops) become pathological if left uncontrolled. Both pain and inflammation can interact with each other in a multi-dimensional manner. These interactions are known to create an array of 'difficult to manage' pathologies. This review explains in detail the role of immune system and the related cells in peripheral sensitization and neurogenic inflammation. Various neuro-immune interactions are analyzed at peripheral, sensory and central nervous system levels. Innate immunity plays a critical role in central sensitization and in establishing acute pain as chronic condition. Moreover, inflammatory mediators also exhibit psychological effects, thus contributing towards the emotional elements associated with pain. However, there is also a considerable anti-inflammatory and analgesic role of immune system. This review also attempts to enlist various novel pharmacological approaches that exhibit their actions through modification of neuro-immune interface.

  1. Impact of aging immune system on neurodegeneration and potential immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhanfeng; Zhao, Yang; Ruan, Linhui; Zhu, Linnan; Jin, Kunlin; Zhuge, Qichuan; Su, Dong-Ming; Zhao, Yong

    2017-10-01

    The interaction between the nervous and immune systems during aging is an area of avid interest, but many aspects remain unclear. This is due, not only to the complexity of the aging process, but also to a mutual dependency and reciprocal causation of alterations and diseases between both the nervous and immune systems. Aging of the brain drives whole body systemic aging, including aging-related changes of the immune system. In turn, the immune system aging, particularly immunosenescence and T cell aging initiated by thymic involution that are sources of chronic inflammation in the elderly (termed inflammaging), potentially induces brain aging and memory loss in a reciprocal manner. Therefore, immunotherapeutics including modulation of inflammation, vaccination, cellular immune therapies and "protective autoimmunity" provide promising approaches to rejuvenate neuroinflammatory disorders and repair brain injury. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries linking the aging immune system with the development of neurodegeneration. Additionally, we discuss potential rejuvenation strategies, focusing aimed at targeting the aging immune system in an effort to prevent acute brain injury and chronic neurodegeneration during aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Memorizing innate instructions requires a sufficiently specific adaptive immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghans, José A M; De Boer, Rob J

    2002-05-01

    During its primary encounter with a pathogen, the immune system has to decide which type of immune response is most appropriate. Based on signals from the innate immune system and the immunological context in which the pathogen is presented, responding lymphocytes will adopt a particular phenotype, e.g. secrete a particular profile of cytokines. Once stimulated, lymphocytes store the appropriate type of response by differentiating from a naive to a memory phenotype. This allows the appropriate type of immune reaction to be regenerated upon re-stimulation of those memory clones. We developed a computer simulation model in which cross-reacting effector/memory clones contribute to the immunological context of pathogens. If a pathogen is recognized by both naive clones and pre-existing effector/memory clones, the naive lymphocytes adopt the effector mechanism of the memory clone. The adaptive immune system thereby stores immunological decisions and somatically learns to induce the right type of immune response to pathogens sharing epitopes. The influence of effector/memory lymphocytes may be detrimental when they cross-react to new pathogens that require a different kind of immune response. Here, we show that the immune system needs to be sufficiently specific to avoid such mistakes and to profit from the information that is stored in effector/memory lymphocytes. Repertoire diversity is required to reconcile this specificity with reactivity against many pathogens.

  3. Evaluation of mucosal and systemic immune responses elicited by GPI-0100- adjuvanted influenza vaccine delivered by different immunization strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Liu

    Full Text Available Vaccines for protection against respiratory infections should optimally induce a mucosal immune response in the respiratory tract in addition to a systemic immune response. However, current parenteral immunization modalities generally fail to induce mucosal immunity, while mucosal vaccine delivery often results in poor systemic immunity. In order to find an immunization strategy which satisfies the need for induction of both mucosal and systemic immunity, we compared local and systemic immune responses elicited by two mucosal immunizations, given either by the intranasal (IN or the intrapulmonary (IPL route, with responses elicited by a mucosal prime followed by a systemic boost immunization. The study was conducted in BALB/c mice and the vaccine formulation was an influenza subunit vaccine supplemented with GPI-0100, a saponin-derived adjuvant. While optimal mucosal antibody titers were obtained after two intrapulmonary vaccinations, optimal systemic antibody responses were achieved by intranasal prime followed by intramuscular boost. The latter strategy also resulted in the best T cell response, yet, it was ineffective in inducing nose or lung IgA. Successful induction of secretory IgA, IgG and T cell responses was only achieved with prime-boost strategies involving intrapulmonary immunization and was optimal when both immunizations were given via the intrapulmonary route. Our results underline that immunization via the lungs is particularly effective for priming as well as boosting of local and systemic immune responses.

  4. Promoting tissue regeneration by modulating the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julier, Ziad; Park, Anthony J; Briquez, Priscilla S; Martino, Mikaël M

    2017-04-15

    The immune system plays a central role in tissue repair and regeneration. Indeed, the immune response to tissue injury is crucial in determining the speed and the outcome of the healing process, including the extent of scarring and the restoration of organ function. Therefore, controlling immune components via biomaterials and drug delivery systems is becoming an attractive approach in regenerative medicine, since therapies based on stem cells and growth factors have not yet proven to be broadly effective in the clinic. To integrate the immune system into regenerative strategies, one of the first challenges is to understand the precise functions of the different immune components during the tissue healing process. While remarkable progress has been made, the immune mechanisms involved are still elusive, and there is indication for both negative and positive roles depending on the tissue type or organ and life stage. It is well recognized that the innate immune response comprising danger signals, neutrophils and macrophages modulates tissue healing. In addition, it is becoming evident that the adaptive immune response, in particular T cell subset activities, plays a critical role. In this review, we first present an overview of the basic immune mechanisms involved in tissue repair and regeneration. Then, we highlight various approaches based on biomaterials and drug delivery systems that aim at modulating these mechanisms to limit fibrosis and promote regeneration. We propose that the next generation of regenerative therapies may evolve from typical biomaterial-, stem cell-, or growth factor-centric approaches to an immune-centric approach. Most regenerative strategies have not yet proven to be safe or reasonably efficient in the clinic. In addition to stem cells and growth factors, the immune system plays a crucial role in the tissue healing process. Here, we propose that controlling the immune-mediated mechanisms of tissue repair and regeneration may support

  5. Biological Immune System Applications on Mobile Robot for Disabled People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songmin Jia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the service quality of service robots for the disabled, immune system is applied on robot for its advantages such as diversity, dynamic, parallel management, self-organization, and self-adaptation. According to the immune system theory, local environment condition sensed by robot is considered an antigen while robot is regarded as B-cell and possible node as antibody, respectively. Antibody-antigen affinity is employed to choose the optimal possible node to ensure the service robot can pass through the optimal path. The paper details the immune system applications on service robot and gives experimental results.

  6. Clonal Selection Based Artificial Immune System for Generalized Pattern Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsberger, Terry

    2011-01-01

    The last two decades has seen a rapid increase in the application of AIS (Artificial Immune Systems) modeled after the human immune system to a wide range of areas including network intrusion detection, job shop scheduling, classification, pattern recognition, and robot control. JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) has developed an integrated pattern recognition/classification system called AISLE (Artificial Immune System for Learning and Exploration) based on biologically inspired models of B-cell dynamics in the immune system. When used for unsupervised or supervised classification, the method scales linearly with the number of dimensions, has performance that is relatively independent of the total size of the dataset, and has been shown to perform as well as traditional clustering methods. When used for pattern recognition, the method efficiently isolates the appropriate matches in the data set. The paper presents the underlying structure of AISLE and the results from a number of experimental studies.

  7. The S(c)ensory Immune System Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique; Freitas, António A

    2017-10-01

    Viewpoints on the immune system have evolved across different paradigms, including the clonal selection theory, the idiotypic network, and the danger and tolerance models. Herein, we propose that in multicellular organisms, where panoplies of cells from different germ layers interact and immune cells are constantly generated, the behavior of the immune system is defined by the rules governing cell survival, systems physiology and organismic homeostasis. Initially, these rules were imprinted at the single cell-protist level, but supervened modifications in the transition to multicellular organisms. This context determined the emergence of the 'sensory immune system', which operates in a s(c)ensor mode to ensure systems physiology, organismic homeostasis, and perpetuation of its replicating molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  9. Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Why Exercise Is Wise Are Detox Diets Safe? Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A What's in this article? ... fault if you don't have all the immunizations (vaccinations) you need. Shots that doctors recommend today ...

  10. The mucosal immune system: From dentistry to vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyono, Hiroshi; Azegami, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is the beginning of the aero-digestive tract, which is covered by mucosal epithelium continuously under the threat of invasion of pathogens, it is thus protected by the mucosal immune system. In the early phase of our scientific efforts for the demonstration of mucosal immune system, dental science was one of major driving forces due to their foreseeability to use oral immunity for the control of oral diseases. The mucosal immune system is divided functionally into, but interconnected inductive and effector sites. Intestinal Peyer's patches (PPs) are an inductive site containing antigen-sampling M cells and immunocompetent cells required to initiate antigen-specific immune responses. At effector sites, PP-originated antigen-specific IgA B cells become plasma cells to produce polymeric IgA and form secretory IgA by binding to poly-Ig receptor expressed on epithelial cells for protective immunity. The development of new-generation mucosal vaccines, including the rice-based oral vaccine MucoRice, on the basis of the coordinated mucosal immune system is a promising strategy for the control of mucosal infectious diseases.

  11. ALLERGIC ASTHMA AND THE DEVELOPING IMMUNE SYSTEM: A PILOT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: The predisposition towards atopic disease begins early in life, and that the risk of developing asthma is heightened following prenatal exposure to some compounds. Nonetheless, the effect of gestational aeroallergen exposure on the developing immune system is unclear....

  12. Effects of Probiotics on the Immune System and Allergic Diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shimojo, Naoki; Suzuki, Shuichi; Campos, Eduardo; Kohno, Yoichi

    2005-01-01

    ... and/or prevention of allergic diseases. Although it has been shown that part of the effect of probiotics arises from its interaction with the host immune system, the precise mechanisms remain to be determined...

  13. TUBERCULOSIS AS AN INFECTIOUS PATHOLOGY OF IMMUNE SYSTEM

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martynov AV; Bomko TV; Nosalskaya TN; Lisnyak YuV; Romanova EA; Kabluchko TV; Sidorenko TA; Igumnova NI; Pogorelaya MS; Shcherbak EM; Yukhimenko VI; Farber BS; Farber SB

    2016-01-01

    .... In fact, TB is a pathology of the immune system. Mycobacterium tuberculosis persist within macrophages and thereby inhibit the process of phagocytosis completion and digesting the contents of phagosome...

  14. Salmonella enterica induces and subverts the plant immune system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    García, Ana V; Hirt, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    .... Recent reports shed light into the molecular interaction between plants and Salmonella, highlighting the defense pathways induced and the means used by the bacteria to escape the plant immune system...

  15. Rearing environment affects development of the immune system in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inman, C.F.; Haverson, K.; Konstantinov, S.R.; Jones, P.H.; Harris, C.; Smidt, H.; Miller, B.; Bailey, M.; Stokes, C.

    2010-01-01

    P>Early-life exposure to appropriate microbial flora drives expansion and development of an efficient immune system. Aberrant development results in increased likelihood of allergic disease or increased susceptibility to infection. Thus, factors affecting microbial colonization may also affect

  16. HIV and Malnutrition: Effects on Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Duggal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV or human immunodeficiency virus infection has assumed worldwide proportions and importance in just a span of 25 years. Continuous research is being done in many parts of the world regarding its treatment and vaccine development, and a lot of money has flown into this. However, fully understanding the mechanisms of immune depletion has still not been possible. The focus has also been on improving the quality of life of people living with HIV/AIDS through education, counselling, and nutritional support. Malnutrition further reduces the capacity of the body to fight this infection by compromising various immune parameters. Knowledge of essential components of nutrition and incorporating them in the management goes a long way in improving quality of life and better survival in HIV-infected patients.

  17. Materials to Engineer the Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    immunomodulation by T regulatory (Treg) cells allows solid tumors to develop by dysregulating DC activity and the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL...incorporating CpG-ODN attenuate immune regulation by FoxP3+ Treg number and immunosuppressive cytokines Although several vaccines designed to program DCs...cytokines commonly associated with Treg activity and immunosuppression . Further, as observed pre- viously in GM-CSF–based vaccines (33, 34), GM-CSF

  18. Viral Evasion and Subversion Mechanisms of the Host Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Ghaemi-Bafghi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the most abundant and versatile pathogens which challenge the immune system and cause major threats to human health. Viruses employ differ¬ent mechanisms to evade host immune responses that we describe them under the following headings: Inhibition of humoral responses, Interference with interferons, Inhibition and modulation of cytokines and chemokines, Inhibitors of apoptosis, Evading CTLs and NKs, and modulating MHC function.Viruses inhibit humoral immunity in different ways which contains change of viral antigens, production of regulatory proteins of complement system and receptors of the Fc part of antibodies. Viruses block interferon production and function via interruption of cell signaling JAK/STAT pathway, Inhibition of eIF-2α phosphorylation and translational arrest and 2'5'OS/RNAse L system. Also, Poxviruses produce soluble versions of receptors for interferons. One of the most important ways of viral evasion is inhibition and manipulation of cytokines; for example, Herpsviruses and Poxviruses produce viral cytokines (virokines and cytokine receptors (viroceptors. In addition, viruses change maturation and expression of MHC I and MHC II molecules to interrupt viral antigens presentation and hide them from immune system recognition. Also, they inhibit NK cell functions.In this review, we provide an overview of the viral evasion mechanisms of immune system. Since most viruses have developed strategies for evasion of immune system, if we know these mechanisms in detail we can fight them more successfully.

  19. Neuronal regulation of immune responses in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Li; Rauvala, Heikki; Gahmberg, Carl G

    2009-02-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has traditionally been considered to be immunologically privileged, but over the years there has been a re-evaluation of this dogma. To date, studies have tended to focus on the immune functions of glial cells, whereas the roles of neurons have been regarded as passive and their immune-regulatory properties have been less examined. However, recent findings indicate that CNS neurons actively participate in immune regulation by controlling their glial cell counterparts and infiltrated T cells. Here, we describe the immune-regulatory roles of CNS neurons by both contact-dependent and contact-independent mechanisms. In addition, we specifically deal with the immune functions of neuronal cell adhesion molecules, many of which are key modulators of neuronal synaptic formation and plasticity.

  20. The immune system and the impact of zinc during aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haase Hajo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The trace element zinc is essential for the immune system, and zinc deficiency affects multiple aspects of innate and adaptive immunity. There are remarkable parallels in the immunological changes during aging and zinc deficiency, including a reduction in the activity of the thymus and thymic hormones, a shift of the T helper cell balance toward T helper type 2 cells, decreased response to vaccination, and impaired functions of innate immune cells. Many studies confirm a decline of zinc levels with age. Most of these studies do not classify the majority of elderly as zinc deficient, but even marginal zinc deprivation can affect immune function. Consequently, oral zinc supplementation demonstrates the potential to improve immunity and efficiently downregulates chronic inflammatory responses in the elderly. These data indicate that a wide prevalence of marginal zinc deficiency in elderly people may contribute to immunosenescence.

  1. Metabolites: messengers between the microbiota and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Maayan; Thaiss, Christoph A; Elinav, Eran

    2016-07-15

    The mammalian intestine harbors one of the largest microbial densities on Earth, necessitating the implementation of control mechanisms by which the host evaluates the state of microbial colonization and reacts to deviations from homeostasis. While microbial recognition by the innate immune system has been firmly established as an efficient means by which the host evaluates microbial presence, recent work has uncovered a central role for bacterial metabolites in the orchestration of the host immune response. In this review, we highlight examples of how microbiota-modulated metabolites control the development, differentiation, and activity of the immune system and classify them into functional categories that illustrate the spectrum of ways by which microbial metabolites influence host physiology. A comprehensive understanding of how microbiota-derived metabolites shape the human immune system is critical for the rational design of therapies for microbiota-driven diseases. © 2016 Levy et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. Aging of the Immune System. Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyand, Cornelia M; Goronzy, Jörg J

    2016-12-01

    Beginning with the sixth decade of life, the human immune system undergoes dramatic aging-related changes, which continuously progress to a state of immunosenescence. The aging immune system loses the ability to protect against infections and cancer and fails to support appropriate wound healing. Vaccine responses are typically impaired in older individuals. Conversely, inflammatory responses mediated by the innate immune system gain in intensity and duration, rendering older individuals susceptible to tissue-damaging immunity and inflammatory disease. Immune system aging functions as an accelerator for other age-related pathologies. It occurs prematurely in some clinical conditions, most prominently in patients with the autoimmune syndrome rheumatoid arthritis (RA); and such patients serve as an informative model system to study molecular mechanisms of immune aging. T cells from patients with RA are prone to differentiate into proinflammatory effector cells, sustaining chronic-persistent inflammatory lesions in the joints and many other organ systems. RA T cells have several hallmarks of cellular aging; most importantly, they accumulate damaged DNA. Because of deficiency of the DNA repair kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated, RA T cells carry a higher burden of DNA double-strand breaks, triggering cell-indigenous stress signals that shift the cell's survival potential and differentiation pattern. Immune aging in RA T cells is also associated with metabolic reprogramming; specifically, with reduced glycolytic flux and diminished ATP production. Chronic energy stress affects the longevity and the functional differentiation of older T cells. Altered metabolic patterns provide opportunities to therapeutically target the immune aging process through metabolic interference.

  3. Trauma: the role of the innate immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rijkers GT

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immune dysfunction can provoke (multiple organ failure in severely injured patients. This dysfunction manifests in two forms, which follow a biphasic pattern. During the first phase, in addition to the injury by trauma, organ damage is caused by the immune system during a systemic inflammatory response. During the second phase the patient is more susceptible for sepsis due to host defence failure (immune paralysis. The pathophysiological model outlined in this review encompasses etiological factors and the contribution of the innate immune system in the end organ damage. The etiological factors can be divided into intrinsic (genetic predisposition and physiological status and extrinsic components (type of injury or "traumaload" and surgery or "intervention load". Of all the factors, the intervention load is the only one which, can be altered by the attending emergency physician. Adjustment of the therapeutic approach and choice of the most appropriate treatment strategy can minimize the damage caused by the immune response and prevent the development of immunological paralysis. This review provides a pathophysiological basis for the damage control concept, in which a staged approach of surgery and post-traumatic immunomonitoring have become important aspects of the treatment protocol. The innate immune system is the main objective of immunomonitoring as it has the most prominent role in organ failure after trauma. Polymorphonuclear phagocytes and monocytes are the main effector-cells of the innate immune system in the processes that lead to organ failure. These cells are controlled by cytokines, chemokines, complement factors and specific tissue signals. The contribution of tissue barrier integrity and its interaction with the innate immune system is further evaluated.

  4. Role of innate immune system in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullard, Nicola; O'Reilly, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Recognition of microbial or viral compounds is crucial to elicit an immune response and pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) form the first line of defence. An important family of PRRs are the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) with numerous evidences indicating their crucial role in identifying microbial or viral compounds. However, the danger theory, where the innate immune system responds to danger signals such as proteins released during damage or necrosis rather than only non-self is gaining ground. Indeed, TLRs are able to recognise endogenous molecules and have been implicated as key players in numerous autoimmune diseases including systemic sclerosis (SSc). TLR2 is known to be upregulated in SSc and has been shown to respond to the endogenous ligand amyloid A resulting in increased IL-6 secretion. TLR4 is now known to respond to a variety of endogenous ligands including fibronectin, containing alternatively spliced exons encoding type III repeat extra domain (EDA). EDA is only expressed upon tissue damage, and elevated levels can be found in SSc patients, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cardiac allograft fibrosis, while deletion of EDA or TLR4 in mice reduces their fibrotic response. Further, stimulation of TLR8 with single-stranded RNA leads to increased expression of TIMP-1. This has been shown to require both IRAK4 and NF-κB with evidence suggesting autoantibodies bind to RNA to stimulate TIMP-1 production in monocytes. Therefore, TLR-mediated signalling provides numerous potential therapeutic targets for development of therapies for the treatment of multi-systemic autoimmune diseases.

  5. The immune system: role in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2013-05-01

    Over the past 20 years it has become recognized that low-grade inflammation plays a role in cardiovascular disease. More recently, participation of the innate and the adaptive immune response in mechanisms that contribute to inflammation in cardiovascular disease has been reported in atherosclerosis and hypertension. Different subsets of lymphocytes and their cytokines are involved in vascular remodelling and hypertensive renal disease as well as heart disease. Effector T cells including T-helper (Th) 1 (interferon-γ-producing) and Th2 lymphocytes (interleukin-4 producing), as well as Th17 (which produce interleukin-17), and T suppressor lymphocytes such as T regulatory cells, which express the transcription factor forkhead box P3, participate respectively as pro- and anti-inflammatory cells, and mediate effects of angiotensin II and mineralocorticoids. Involvement of immune mechanisms in cardiac, vascular, and renal changes in hypertension has been demonstrated in many experimental models, an example being the Dahl-salt sensitive rat and the spontaneously hypertensive rat. How activation of immunity is triggered remains unknown, but neoantigens could be generated by elevated blood pressure through damage-associated molecular pattern receptors or other mechanisms. When activated, Th1 may contribute to blood pressure elevation by affecting the kidney, vascular remodelling of blood vessels directly via effects of the cytokines produced, or through their effects on perivascular fat. T regulatory cells protect from blood pressure elevation acting on similar targets. These novel findings may open the way for new therapeutic approaches to improve outcomes in hypertension and cardiovascular disease in humans. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Theory of an Immune System Retrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-23

    expected strong dependence on the rate of virus produccion as well as the very powerful effect of immunization via the increase of Bo cells.* 4. -4...for the non-linear produccion term YP’= Y’ tdt’(Q(t’)) 2 = 2 ’ftdt it Y(t’)B (t’)z(t’)dt’ (A7) where Y’= Y "’’¥6 YpF = Y>(B YTY’) and now Z =fty(t

  7. Immunization information systems in Canada: Attributes, functionality, strengths and challenges. A Canadian Immunization Research Network study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sarah E; Quach, Susan; MacDonald, Shannon E; Naus, Monika; Deeks, Shelley L; Crowcroft, Natasha S; Mahmud, Salaheddin M; Tran, Dat; Kwong, Jeffrey C; Tu, Karen; Johnson, Caitlin; Desai, Shalini

    2017-03-01

    Canada does not have a national immunization registry. Diverse systems to record vaccine uptake exist, but these have not been systematically described. Our objective was to describe the immunization information systems (IISs) and non-IIS processes used to record childhood and adolescent vaccinations, and to outline the strengths and limitations of the systems and processes. We collected information from key informants regarding their provincial, territorial or federal organization's surveillance systems for assessing immunization coverage. Information collection consisted of a self-administered questionnaire and a follow-up interview. We evaluated systems against attributes derived from the literature using content analysis. Twenty-six individuals across 16 public health organizations participated over the period of April to August 2015. Twelve of Canada's 13 provinces and territories (P/Ts) and two organizations involved in health service delivery for on-reserve First Nations people participated. Across systems, there were differences in data collection processes, reporting capabilities and advanced functionality. Commonly cited challenges included timeliness and data completeness of records, particularly for physician-administered immunizations. Privacy considerations and the need for data standards were stated as challenges to the goal of information sharing across P/T systems. Many P/Ts have recently implemented new systems and, in some cases, legislation to improve timeliness and/or completeness. Considerable variability exists among IISs and non-IIS processes used to assess immunization coverage in Canada. Although some P/Ts have already pursued legislative or policy initiatives to address the completeness and timeliness of information, many additional opportunities exist in the information technology realm.

  8. EBV Infection of Mice with Reconstituted Human Immune System Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was discovered 50 years ago as the first candidate human tumor virus. Since then, we have realized that this human γ-herpesvirus establishes persistent infection in the majority of adult humans, but fortunately causes EBV-associated diseases only in few individuals. This is an incredible success story of the human immune system, which controls EBV infection and its transforming capacity for decades. A better understanding of this immune control would not only benefit patients with EBV-associated malignancies, but could also provide clues how to establish such a potent, mostly cell-mediated immune control against other pathogens and tumors. However, the functional relevance of EBV-specific immune responses can only be addressed in vivo, and mice with reconstituted human immune system components (huMice) constitute a small animal model to interrogate the protective value of immune compartments during EBV infection, but also might provide a platform to test EBV-specific vaccines. This chapter will summarize the insights into EBV immunobiology that have already been gained in these models and provide an outlook into promising future avenues to develop this in vivo model of EBV infection and human immune responses further.

  9. Direct and Electronic Health Record Access to the Clinical Decision Support for Immunizations in the Minnesota Immunization Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamani, Sripriya; Bieringer, Aaron; Wallerius, Stephanie; Jensen, Daniel; Winden, Tamara; Muscoplat, Miriam Halstead

    2016-01-01

    Immunization information systems (IIS) are population-based and confidential computerized systems maintained by public health agencies containing individual data on immunizations from participating health care providers. IIS hold comprehensive vaccination histories given across providers and over time. An important aspect to IIS is the clinical decision support for immunizations (CDSi), consisting of vaccine forecasting algorithms to determine needed immunizations. The study objective was to analyze the CDSi presentation by IIS in Minnesota (Minnesota Immunization Information Connection [MIIC]) through direct access by IIS interface and by access through electronic health records (EHRs) to outline similarities and differences. The immunization data presented were similar across the three systems examined, but with varying ability to integrate data across MIIC and EHR, which impacts immunization data reconciliation. Study findings will lead to better understanding of immunization data display, clinical decision support, and user functionalities with the ultimate goal of promoting IIS CDSi to improve vaccination rates.

  10. Maintaining the Body's Immune System: Incidence of Latent Virus Shedding During Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane; Bloomberg, Jacob; Lee, Angie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Your body protects you from illness with its own security system - the immune system. This system keeps illness at bay not only by mounting a defense against foreign organisms, but also by controlling the population of bacteria and viruses that normally live in your body. But there's no need to panic: certain microbes can actually exist in your body without causing illness. Some bacteria are even beneficial - like the E. coli in the large intestine that are an important source of vitamin K. While viruses are not exactly considered beneficial, they can also inhabit the human body without causing immediate harm or infection. A good example is the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1), more commonly known as cold sores or fever blisters. This virus infects 70 to 80 percent of all adults but remains latent much of the time. While latent, the virus within cells remains dormant. Activation of the dormant virus causes it to make copies of itself (known as replication) constantly detectable in body fluids such as urine or saliva in a process called shedding. When a person becomes sick or stressed, however, this weakened condition allows the virus to reactivate and multiply. These elevated levels may be enough to produce symptoms, but shedding can also occur without symptoms. This ability to shed without showing signs of infection, or asymptomatic shedding, is of great interest, as it increases the chances of infecting others. The stresses associated with space flight - adapting to microgravity, isolation from family and friends, living and working in a confined space, sleep deprivation, and busy schedules, to name but a few - may weaken astronauts' immune systems, leaving them at greater risk of viral reactivation. Members of the STS-107 crew will participate in this experiment, Incidence of Latent Viral Shedding in Space Flight, to help scientists understand how reactivation works in space, and at what level replication reaches before symptoms begin to show. This study also

  11. CRISPR-Cas systems: prokaryotes upgrade to adaptive immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Marraffini, Luciano A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR), and associated proteins (Cas) comprise the CRISPR-Cas system, which confers adaptive immunity against exogenic elements in many bacteria and most archaea. CRISPR-mediated immunization occurs through the uptake of DNA from invasive genetic elements such as plasmids and viruses, followed by its integration into CRISPR loci. These loci are subsequently transcribed and processed into small interfering RNAs that guide nucleases for specific cleavage of complementary sequences. Conceptually, CRISPR-Cas shares functional features with the mammalian adaptive immune system, while also exhibiting characteristics of Lamarckian evolution. Because immune markers spliced from exogenous agents are integrated iteratively in CRISPR loci, they constitute a genetic record of vaccination events and reflect environmental conditions and changes over time. Cas endonucleases, which can be reprogrammed by small guide RNAs have shown unprecedented potential and flexibility for genome editing, and can be repurposed for numerous DNA targeting applications including transcriptional control. PMID:24766887

  12. Parkinson's Disease: A Role for the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Dwight C; Eagar, Todd; Sonsalla, Patricia K

    2011-06-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with the loss of catecholaminergic neurons in several brain regions. The motor symptoms of the disease are related to degeneration of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons, which occurs some time after the disease has begun. Both the innate and adaptive immune systems appear to play a role in the neurodegenerative process, and may contribute to disease progression. Here we review the neuropathology of PD with attention focused on the involvement of the innate immune cells (microglia) and the adaptive immune cells (T lymphocytes). In addition, we discuss animal models of the disease with emphasis on a progressive rat model which allows a detailed analysis of how the immune system contributes to neurodegeneration both during early and late stages of degeneration. Finally, for the early detection and treatment of PD, we discuss immunotherapy approaches.

  13. Maintenance of systemic immune functions prevents accelerated presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Hiroshi; Baba, Susumu; Omae, Mariko; Lee, Shinryu; Yamashita, Toshio; Ikehara, Susumu

    2008-05-07

    There is no effective therapy for progressive hearing loss such as presbycusis, the causes of which remain poorly understood because of the difficulty of separating genetic and environmental contributions. In the present study, we show that the age-related dysfunctions of the systemic immune system in an animal model of accelerated presbycusis (SAMP1, senescence-accelerated mouse P1) can be corrected by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). We also demonstrate that this presbycusis can be prevented; BMT protects the recipients from age-related hearing impairment and the degeneration of spiral ganglion cells (SGCs) as well as the dysfunctions of T lymphocytes, which have a close relation to immune senescence. No donor cells are infiltrated to the spiral ganglia, confirming that this experimental system using BMT is connected to the systemic immune system and does not contribute to transdifferentiation or fusion by donor hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), or to the direct maintenance of ganglion cells by locally infiltrated donor immunocompetent cells. Therefore, another procedure which attempts to prevent the age-related dysfunctions of the recipient immune system is the inoculation of syngeneic splenocytes from young donors. These mice show no development of hearing loss, compared with the recipient mice with inoculation of saline or splenocytes from old donors. Our studies on the relationship between age-related systemic immune dysfunctions and neurodegeneration mechanisms open up new avenues of treatment for presbycusis, for which there is no effective therapy.

  14. Does the immune system naturally protect against cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre eCorthay

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the immune system in conferring protection against pathogens like viruses, bacteria, and parasitic worms is well established. In contrast, there is a long-lasting debate on whether cancer prevention is a primary function of the immune system. The concept of immunological surveillance of cancer was developed by Lewis Thomas and Frank Macfarlane Burnet more than fifty years ago. We are still lacking convincing data illustrating immunological eradication of precancerous lesions in vivo. Here, I present eight types of evidence in support of the cancer immunosurveillance hypothesis. First, primary immunodeficiency in mice and humans is associated with increased cancer risk. Second, organ transplant recipients, who are treated with immunosuppressive drugs, are more prone to cancer development. Third, acquired immunodeficiency due to infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 leads to elevated risk of cancer. Fourth, the quantity and quality of the immune cell infiltrate found in human primary tumors represent an independent prognostic factor for patient survival. Fifth, cancer cells harbor mutations in protein-coding genes that are specifically recognized by the adaptive immune system. Sixth, cancer cells selectively accumulate mutations to evade immune destruction (immunoediting. Seventh, lymphocytes bearing the NKG2D receptor are able to recognize and eliminate stressed premalignant cells. Eighth, a promising strategy to treat cancer consists in potentiating the naturally occurring immune response of the patient, through blockade of the immune checkpoint molecules CTLA-4, PD-1, or PD-L1. Thus, there are compelling pieces of evidence that a primary function of the immune system is to confer protection against cancer.

  15. Immune System, Friend or Foe of Oncolytic Virotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C. Filley

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses (OVs are an emerging class of targeted anticancer therapies designed to selectively infect, replicate in, and lyse malignant cells without causing harm to normal, healthy tissues. In addition to direct oncolytic activity, OVs have shown dual promise as immunotherapeutic agents. The presence of viral infection and subsequently generated immunogenic tumor cell death trigger innate and adaptive immune responses that mediate further tumor destruction. However, antiviral immune responses can intrinsically limit OV infection, spread, and overall therapeutic efficacy. Host immune system can act both as a barrier as well as a facilitator and sometimes both at the same time based on the phase of viral infection. Thus, manipulating the host immune system to minimize antiviral responses and viral clearance while still promoting immune-mediated tumor destruction remains a key challenge facing oncolytic virotherapy. Recent clinical trials have established the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of virotherapies in the treatment of a variety of malignancies. Most notably, talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC, a genetically engineered oncolytic herpesvirus-expressing granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor, was recently approved for the treatment of melanoma, representing the first OV to be approved by the FDA as an anticancer therapy in the US. This review discusses OVs and their antitumor properties, their complex interactions with the immune system, synergy between virotherapy and existing cancer treatments, and emerging strategies to augment the efficacy of OVs as anticancer therapies.

  16. Immune System, Friend or Foe of Oncolytic Virotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filley, Anna C; Dey, Mahua

    2017-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are an emerging class of targeted anticancer therapies designed to selectively infect, replicate in, and lyse malignant cells without causing harm to normal, healthy tissues. In addition to direct oncolytic activity, OVs have shown dual promise as immunotherapeutic agents. The presence of viral infection and subsequently generated immunogenic tumor cell death trigger innate and adaptive immune responses that mediate further tumor destruction. However, antiviral immune responses can intrinsically limit OV infection, spread, and overall therapeutic efficacy. Host immune system can act both as a barrier as well as a facilitator and sometimes both at the same time based on the phase of viral infection. Thus, manipulating the host immune system to minimize antiviral responses and viral clearance while still promoting immune-mediated tumor destruction remains a key challenge facing oncolytic virotherapy. Recent clinical trials have established the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of virotherapies in the treatment of a variety of malignancies. Most notably, talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC), a genetically engineered oncolytic herpesvirus-expressing granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor, was recently approved for the treatment of melanoma, representing the first OV to be approved by the FDA as an anticancer therapy in the US. This review discusses OVs and their antitumor properties, their complex interactions with the immune system, synergy between virotherapy and existing cancer treatments, and emerging strategies to augment the efficacy of OVs as anticancer therapies.

  17. Peripheral education of the immune system by the colonic microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Kristine A; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2013-11-30

    There is growing interest in understanding the effects of host-microbial interactions on host physiologic processes. Much of the work in this arena is logically focused on the interaction at mucosal surfaces as this is a primary site of interaction. However, there is ample evidence to suggest that the effects of the microbiota have a much farther reach including the systemic immune system. While there are some similarities to effects at mucosal surfaces (i.e. reduced numbers of adaptive immune cells, diminished innate responses), there are some important differences that we highlight such as the response to immunogens and bacterial antigens. We propose that understanding the details of how specific components of the microbiota influence the systemic immune system likely will have significant impact on our understanding the pathophysiology of a variety of autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. New insights into innate immune control of systemic candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionakis, Michail S

    2014-08-01

    Systemic infection caused by Candida species is the fourth leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection in modern hospitals and carries high morbidity and mortality despite antifungal therapy. A recent surge of immunological studies in the mouse models of systemic candidiasis and the parallel discovery and phenotypic characterization of inherited genetic disorders in antifungal immune factors that are associated with enhanced susceptibility or resistance to the infection have provided new insights into the cellular and molecular basis of protective innate immune responses against Candida. In this review, the new developments in our understanding of how the mammalian immune system responds to systemic Candida challenge are synthesized and important future research directions are highlighted. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology 2014. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  19. New insights into innate immune control of systemic candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionakis, Michail S.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic infection caused by Candida species is the fourth leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection in modern hospitals and carries high morbidity and mortality despite antifungal therapy. A recent surge of immunological studies in the mouse models of systemic candidiasis and the parallel discovery and phenotypic characterization of inherited genetic disorders in antifungal immune factors that are associated with enhanced susceptibility or resistance to the infection have provided new insights into the cellular and molecular basis of protective innate immune responses against Candida. In this review, the new developments in our understanding of how the mammalian immune system responds to systemic Candida challenge are synthesized and important future research directions are highlighted. PMID:25023483

  20. Systems biology of neutrophil differentiation and immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilgaard-Mönch, Kim; Porse, Bo T; Borregaard, Niels

    2005-01-01

    Systems biology has emerged as a new scientific field, which aims at investigating biological processes at the genomic and proteomic levels. Recent studies have unravelled aspects of neutrophil differentiation and immune responses at the systems level using high-throughput technologies. These stu......Systems biology has emerged as a new scientific field, which aims at investigating biological processes at the genomic and proteomic levels. Recent studies have unravelled aspects of neutrophil differentiation and immune responses at the systems level using high-throughput technologies....... These studies have identified a plethora of novel effector proteins stored in the granules of neutrophils. In addition, these studies provide evidence that neutrophil differentiation and immune response are governed by a highly coordinated transcriptional programme that regulates cellular fate and function...

  1. "Health system approach" for improving immunization program performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakant Lahariya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunization programs are one of the most well-recognized and successful public health programs across the world. The immunization programs have achieved significant successes in a number of countries; however, the coverage with available vaccines remains sub-optimal in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs. This article, based upon extensive review of literature and using universal immunization program (UIP in India as a case study, summarizes the latest developments and initiatives in the area of vaccination and immunization in the last few years. The article analyzes initiatives under UIP in India from the "health system approach" and argues that it is possible to increase coverage with available vaccines and overall program performance by focused attention on various functions of health systems. It also discusses the emerging evidence that health systems could be strengthened prior to the introduction of new interventions (vaccines included and the introduction of new interventions (including vaccines could be planned in a way to strengthen the health systems. It concludes that immunization programs could be one of the entry points for strengthening health systems in the countries and lessons from vaccine introduction could pave pathway for scaling up other health interventions and therefore, could contribute to advancing Universal Health Coverage (UHC.

  2. Thermodynamics as the driving principle behind the immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Finger

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 120 years, few things contributed more to ourunderstanding of immune system than the study of its behavior inthe host/parasite relationship. Despite the advances though, a fewquestions remain, such as what drives the immune system? Whatare its guiding principles? If we ask these questions randomly, mostwill immediately answer “defend the body from external threats,” butwhat exactly do we defend ourselves from? How do these threatsharm us? What criteria define what constitutes a threat? On theother hand, if the immune system evolved to defend us againstexternal threats, how does its action against “internal” processes,such as neoplasms, qualify? Why do we die from cancer? Or frominfection? Or even, why do we die at all? These apparently obviousquestions are nor simple neither trivial, and the difficulty answeringthem reveals the complex reality that the immune system handles.The objective of this article is to articulate for the reader something that he instinctively already knows: that the decisions of the immune system are thermodynamically driven. Additionally, we will discuss how this apparent change in paradigm alters concepts such as health, disease, and therapeutics.

  3. Modulation of systemic immune responses through commensal gastrointestinal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle M Schachtschneider

    Full Text Available Colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI tract is initiated during birth and continually seeded from the individual's environment. Gastrointestinal microorganisms play a central role in developing and modulating host immune responses and have been the subject of investigation over the last decades. Animal studies have demonstrated the impact of GI tract microbiota on local gastrointestinal immune responses; however, the full spectrum of action of early gastrointestinal tract stimulation and subsequent modulation of systemic immune responses is poorly understood. This study explored the utility of an oral microbial inoculum as a therapeutic tool to affect porcine systemic immune responses. For this study a litter of 12 pigs was split into two groups. One group of pigs was inoculated with a non-pathogenic oral inoculum (modulated, while another group (control was not. DNA extracted from nasal swabs and fecal samples collected throughout the study was sequenced to determine the effects of the oral inoculation on GI and respiratory microbial communities. The effects of GI microbial modulation on systemic immune responses were evaluated by experimentally infecting with the pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Coughing levels, pathology, toll-like receptors 2 and 6, and cytokine production were measured throughout the study. Sequencing results show a successful modulation of the GI and respiratory microbiomes through oral inoculation. Delayed type hypersensitivity responses were stronger (p = 0.07, and the average coughing levels and respiratory TNF-α variance were significantly lower in the modulated group (p<0.0001 and p = 0.0153, respectively. The M. hyopneumoniae infection study showed beneficial effects of the oral inoculum on systemic immune responses including antibody production, severity of infection and cytokine levels. These results suggest that an oral microbial inoculation can be used to modulate microbial communities, as well as

  4. The interplay between the gut microbiota and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuking, Markus B; Köller, Yasmin; Rupp, Sandra; McCoy, Kathy D

    2014-01-01

    The impact of the gut microbiota on immune homeostasis within the gut and, importantly, also at systemic sites has gained tremendous research interest over the last few years. The intestinal microbiota is an integral component of a fascinating ecosystem that interacts with and benefits its host on several complex levels to achieve a mutualistic relationship. Host-microbial homeostasis involves appropriate immune regulation within the gut mucosa to maintain a healthy gut while preventing uncontrolled immune responses against the beneficial commensal microbiota potentially leading to chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Furthermore, recent studies suggest that the microbiota composition might impact on the susceptibility to immune-mediated disorders such as autoimmunity and allergy. Understanding how the microbiota modulates susceptibility to these diseases is an important step toward better prevention or treatment options for such diseases.

  5. Perinatal Environmental Effects on the Neonatal Immune System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thysen, Anna Hammerich

    2014-01-01

    . This was mirrored in the signature of immune mediators in the airway epithelial lining fluid. The distribution of cord blood immune cells and airway inflammatory mediators was skewed towards Th1 and Th17 responses in winter and spring births and towards Th2 responses in newborns from fall term. We speculate......Asthma, allergies, and autoimmune disease are common chronic diseases of the western world. The disease etiologies remains unknown, but are believed to be a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental exposure. Disease incidence has increased in recent decades and the diseases...... are thought to be programmed in utero supporting a role of the early environment. The aim of the present PhD thesis was to study if known risk factors are imprinted in the immune system of newborns. The hypotheses were that cesarean section and season of birth would influence the immune signature in early...

  6. Lymph node inspired computing: towards holistic immune system inspired algorithms for human-engineered complex systems

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Soumya

    2017-01-01

    The immune system is a distributed decentralized system that functions without any centralized control. The immune system has millions of cells that function somewhat independently and can detect and respond to pathogens with considerable speed and efficiency. Lymph nodes are physical anatomical structures that allow the immune system to rapidly detect pathogens and mobilize cells to respond to it. Lymph nodes function as: 1) information processing centers, and 2) a distributed detection and ...

  7. Antiviral immunity in Drosophila requires systemic RNA interference spread.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saleh, M.C.; Tassetto, M.; Rij, R.P. van; Goic, B.; Gausson, V.; Berry, B.; Jacquier, C.; Antoniewski, C.; Andino, R.

    2009-01-01

    Multicellular organisms evolved sophisticated defence systems to confer protection against pathogens. An important characteristic of these immune systems is their ability to act both locally at the site of infection and at distal uninfected locations. In insects, such as Drosophila melanogaster, RNA

  8. Interaction of entomopathogenic fungi with the host immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shuang; Wang, Sibao

    2018-02-02

    Entomopathogenic fungi can invade wide range of insect hosts in the natural world and have been used as environmentally friendly alternatives to chemical insecticides for pest control. Studies of host-pathogen interactions provide valuable insights into the coevolutionay arms race between fungal pathogens and their hosts. Entomopathogenic fungi have evolved a series of sophisticated strategies to counter insect immune defenses. In response to fungal infection, insect hosts rely on behavior avoidance, physical barrier and innate immune defenses in the fight against invading pathogens. The insect cuticle acts as the first physical barrier against pathogens. It is an inhospitable physiological environment that contains chemicals (e.g., antimicrobial peptides and reactive oxygen species), which inhibit fungal growth. In addition, innate immune responses, including cellular immunity and humoral immunity, play critical roles in preventing fungal infection. In this review, we outline the current state of our knowledge of insect defenses to fungal infection and discuss the strategies by which entomopathogenic fungi counter the host immune system. Increased knowledge regarding the molecular interactions between entomopathogenic fungi and the insect host could provide new strategies for pest management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Lymphatic System: An Active Pathway for Immune Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shan; von der Weid, Pierre-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels are well known to participate in the immune response by providing the structural and functional support for the delivery of antigens and antigen presenting cells to draining lymph nodes. Recent advances have improved our understanding of how the lymphatic system works and how it participates to the development of immune responses. New findings suggest that the lymphatic system may control the ultimate immune response through a number of ways which include guiding antigen/dendritic cells (DC) entry into initial lymphatics at the periphery; promoting antigen/DC trafficking through afferent lymphatic vessels by actively facilitating lymph and cell movement; enabling antigen presentation in lymph nodes via a network of lymphatic endothelial cells and lymph node stroma cell and finally by direct lymphocytes exit from lymph nodes. The same mechanisms are likely also important to maintain peripheral tolerance. In this review we will discuss how the morphology and gene expression profile of the lymphatic endothelial cells in lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes provides a highly efficient pathway to initiate immune responses. The fundamental understanding of how lymphatic system participates in immune regulation will guide the research on lymphatic function in various diseases. PMID:25534659

  10. Beneficial and Harmful Interactions of Antibiotics with Microbial Pathogens and the Host Innate Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Anderson

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In general antibiotics interact cooperatively with host defences, weakening and decreasing the virulence of microbial pathogens, thereby increasing vulnerability to phagocytosis and eradication by the intrinsic antimicrobial systems of the host. Antibiotics, however, also interact with host defences by several other mechanisms, some harmful, others beneficial. Harmful activities include exacerbation of potentially damaging inflammatory responses, a property of cell-wall targeted agents, which promotes the release of pro-inflammatory microbial cytotoxins and cell-wall components. On the other hand, inhibitors of bacterial protein synthesis, especially macrolides, possess beneficial anti-inflammatory/cytoprotective activities, which result from interference with the production of microbial virulence factors/cytotoxins. In addition to these pathogen-directed, anti-inflammatory activities, some classes of antimicrobial agent possess secondary anti-inflammatory properties, unrelated to their conventional antimicrobial activities, which target cells of the innate immune system, particularly neutrophils. This is a relatively uncommon, potentially beneficial property of antibiotics, which has been described for macrolides, imidazole anti-mycotics, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Although of largely unproven significance in the clinical setting, increasing awareness of the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory properties of antibiotics may contribute to a more discerning and effective use of these agents.

  11. Hopf bifurcation for tumor-immune competition systems with delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Bi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a immune response system with delay is considered, which consists of two-dimensional nonlinear differential equations. The main purpose of this paper is to explore the Hopf bifurcation of a immune response system with delay. The general formula of the direction, the estimation formula of period and stability of bifurcated periodic solution are also given. Especially, the conditions of the global existence of periodic solutions bifurcating from Hopf bifurcations are given. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate the the theoretical analysis and the obtained results.

  12. Cells of the immune system in atherosclerosis – chosen data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Niedźwiedzka-Rystwej

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Development of artherosclerosis is associated with participation of various cell types of the immune system such as: granulocytes, B and T lymphocytes, mast cells, dendritic cells and progenitor cells. Cytokines and growth factors have a great impact on activation of the atheromatous plaque. This pathological process results in increase of artery’s tunic intima thickness, leading to coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction or stroke. It is suggested that a closer look at participation of the immune system cells in artherosclerosis may contribute to a change in the profile of therapy of this disease.

  13. The evolution of secondary organization in immune system gene libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hightower, R.; Forrest, S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Perelson, A.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-02-01

    A binary model of the immune system is used to study the effects of evolution on the genetic encoding for antibody molecules. We report experiments which show that the evolution of immune system genes, simulated by the genetic algorithm, can induce a high degree of genetic organization even though that organization is not explicitly required by the fitness function. This secondary organization is related to the true fitness of an individual, in contrast to the sampled fitness which is the explicit fitness measure used to drive the process of evolution.

  14. The Adaptive Immune System of Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa-Katharina Maier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To fight off invading genetic elements, prokaryotes have developed an elaborate defence system that is both adaptable and heritable—the CRISPR-Cas system (CRISPR is short for: clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and Cas: CRISPR associated. Comprised of proteins and multiple small RNAs, this prokaryotic defence system is present in 90% of archaeal and 40% of bacterial species, and enables foreign intruders to be eliminated in a sequence-specific manner. There are three major types (I–III and at least 14 subtypes of this system, with only some of the subtypes having been analysed in detail, and many aspects of the defence reaction remaining to be elucidated. Few archaeal examples have so far been analysed. Here we summarize the characteristics of the CRISPR-Cas system of Haloferax volcanii, an extremely halophilic archaeon originally isolated from the Dead Sea. It carries a single CRISPR-Cas system of type I-B, with a Cascade like complex composed of Cas proteins Cas5, Cas6b and Cas7. Cas6b is essential for CRISPR RNA (crRNA maturation but is otherwise not required for the defence reaction. A systematic search revealed that six protospacer adjacent motif (PAM sequences are recognised by the Haloferax defence system. For successful invader recognition, a non-contiguous seed sequence of 10 base-pairs between the crRNA and the invader is required.

  15. Liposome-based immunity-inducing systems for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuba, Eiji

    2017-11-08

    Cancer immunotherapy has gained much attention for next-generation cancer treatment. To conduct cancer immunotherapy, efficient antigen delivery systems must be able to deliver an antigen selectively to antigen-presenting cells, release it at suitable sites for induction of cross-presentation, and simultaneously induce activation of immunocompetent cells. Liposomes are a candidate for use as such multifunctional antigen delivery carriers because of their capability for easy functionalization. This review describes the rational design of liposome-based antigen delivery systems. Surface modification of liposomes by pH-responsive or fusogenic materials can achieve cytoplasmic delivery of antigen, leading to cross-presentation of exogenous antigen via a "cytosolic pathway." In contrast, targeting surface receptors on antigen presenting cells or the selective release of antigen in early endosome induced "vacuolar pathway"-mediated cross-presentation. Introduction of adjuvant molecules such as Toll like receptor agonists, synthetic cationic lipids or bioactive polysaccharides to liposomes improved their immunity-inducing ability. Combination with cancelling systems of immunosuppression in tumor microenvironment enhanced antitumor immunity of antigen delivery systems. Further understanding of immunity-inducing mechanism and molecular basis of tumor immunosuppressive environments and purposeful design of liposome-based antigen delivery systems can provide effective immunity-inducing systems for cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Special Operations Forces: A Global Immune System?

    CERN Document Server

    Norman, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The use of special operations forces (SOF) in war fighting and peace keeping efforts has increased dramatically in recent decades. A scientific understanding of the reason for this increase would provide guidance as to the contexts in which SOF can be used to their best effect. Ashby's law of requisite variety provides a scientific framework for understanding and analyzing a system's ability to survive and prosper in the face of environmental challenges. We have developed a generalization of this law to extend the analysis to systems that must respond to disturbances at multiple scales. This analysis identifies a necessary tradeoff between scale and complexity in a multiscale control system. As with Ashby's law, the framework applies to the characterization of successful biological and social systems in the context of complex environmental challenges. Here we apply this multiscale framework to provide a control theoretic understanding of the historical and increasing need for SOF, as well as conventional mili...

  17. Viral load affects the immune response to HBV in mice with humanized immune system and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusséaux, Mathilde; Masse-Ranson, Guillemette; Darche, Sylvie; Ahodantin, James; Li, Yan; Fiquet, Oriane; Beaumont, Elodie; Moreau, Pierrick; Rivière, Lise; Neuveut, Christine; Soussan, Patrick; Roingeard, Philippe; Kremsdorf, Dina; Di Santo, James P; Strick-Marchand, Helene

    2017-08-26

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects hepatocytes, but the mechanisms of the immune response against the virus, and how it affects disease progression, are unclear. We performed studies with BALB/c Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-)Sirpa(NOD)Alb-uPA(tg/tg) mice, stably engrafted with human hepatocytes (HUHEP) with or without a human immune system (HIS). HUHEP and HIS-HUHEP mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of HBV. Mononuclear cells were isolated from spleen and liver for analysis by flow cytometry. Liver was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and mRNA levels were measured by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Plasma levels of HBV DNA was quantified by quantitative PCR, and antigen-specific antibodies were detected by immunocytochemistry of HBV transfected BHK-21 cells. Following HBV infection, a complete viral life cycle, with production of HBV DNA, hepatitis B e, core (HBc) and surface (HBs) antigens, and covalently closed circular DNA, was observed in HUHEP and HIS-HUHEP mice. HBV replicated unrestricted in HUHEP mice resulting in high viral titers without pathologic effects. In contrast, HBV-infected HIS-HUHEP mice developed chronic hepatitis with 10-fold lower titers and antigen-specific IgGs, (anti-HBs, anti-HBc), consistent with partial immune control. HBV-infected HIS-HUHEP livers contained infiltrating Kupffer cells, mature activated natural killer cells (CD69+), and PD-1+ effector memory T cells (CD45RO+). Reducing the viral inoculum resulted in more efficient immune control. Plasma from HBV-infected HIS-HUHEP mice had increased levels of inflammatory and immune-suppressive cytokines (C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 10 and interleukin 10), which correlated with populations of intrahepatic CD4+ T cells (CD45RO+PD-1+). Mice with high levels of viremia had HBV-infected liver progenitor cells. Giving the mice the nucleoside analogue entecavir reduced viral loads and decreased liver inflammation. In HIS-HUHEP mice, HBV infection completes a full life cycle and

  18. Graphene and the Immune System: A Romance of Many Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav P. Mukherjee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Graphene-based materials (GBMs are emerging as attractive materials for biomedical applications. Understanding how these materials are perceived by and interact with the immune system is of fundamental importance. Phagocytosis is a major mechanism deployed by the immune system to remove pathogens, particles, and cellular debris. Here, we discuss recent studies on the interactions of GBMs with different phagocytic cells, including macrophages, neutrophils, and dendritic cells. The importance of assessing GBMs for endotoxin contamination is discussed as this may skew results. We also explore the role of the bio-corona for interactions of GBMs with immune cells. Finally, we highlight recent evidence for direct plasma membrane interactions of GBMs.

  19. Quantifying adaptive evolution in the Drosophila immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J Obbard

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that a large proportion of amino acid substitutions in Drosophila have been fixed by natural selection, and as organisms are faced with an ever-changing array of pathogens and parasites to which they must adapt, we have investigated the role of parasite-mediated selection as a likely cause. To quantify the effect, and to identify which genes and pathways are most likely to be involved in the host-parasite arms race, we have re-sequenced population samples of 136 immunity and 287 position-matched non-immunity genes in two species of Drosophila. Using these data, and a new extension of the McDonald-Kreitman approach, we estimate that natural selection fixes advantageous amino acid changes in immunity genes at nearly double the rate of other genes. We find the rate of adaptive evolution in immunity genes is also more variable than other genes, with a small subset of immune genes evolving under intense selection. These genes, which are likely to represent hotspots of host-parasite coevolution, tend to share similar functions or belong to the same pathways, such as the antiviral RNAi pathway and the IMD signalling pathway. These patterns appear to be general features of immune system evolution in both species, as rates of adaptive evolution are correlated between the D. melanogaster and D. simulans lineages. In summary, our data provide quantitative estimates of the elevated rate of adaptive evolution in immune system genes relative to the rest of the genome, and they suggest that adaptation to parasites is an important force driving molecular evolution.

  20. Expression of immune genes in systemic and mucosal immune tissues of channel catfish vaccinated with live theronts of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, De-Hai; Moreira, Gabriel S A; Shoemaker, Craig A; Zhang, Dunhua; Beck, Benjamin H

    2017-07-01

    Ichthyophthiriasis caused by Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) has a worldwide distribution and affects most freshwater fishes. Fish surviving natural infection and/or immunized with Ich develop strong innate and adaptive immune responses. However, there is a lack of the knowledge regarding immune gene expression patterns in systemic and mucosal immune tissues, and how immune genes interact and lead to innate and adaptive immune protection against Ich infection in fish. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of innate and adaptive immune-related genes in systemic (liver, spleen) and mucosal (gill, intestine) tissues of channel catfish over time following vaccination with live Ich theronts. The vaccinated fish showed significantly higher antibody titers and survival (95%) than those of mock immunized fish. Expression of IgM and IgD heavy chain genes exhibited a rapid increase from 4 h (h4) to 2 days (d2) post-vaccination in systemic immune tissues. Immune cell receptor genes (CD4, CD8-α, MHC I, MHC II β, TcR-α, and TcR-β) were more highly upregulated and remained upregulated for longer duration in systemic tissues than in mucosal tissues of the vaccinated fish. The cytokine genes IL-1βa and IFN-γ were rapidly upregulated in both systemic and mucosal tissues of vaccinated fish, with peak expression from h4 to d1 post-vaccination. Toll-like receptor genes TLR-1 and TLR-9 showed relatively stable upregulation in the gill of immunized fish following vaccination. Results of this study revealed the molecular immune responses in mucosal and systemic tissues of vaccinated fish and demonstrated that Ich vaccination resulted in innate and adaptive immune responses against Ich infection. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. The contribution of the immune system to parturition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. De Jongh

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune system plays a central role before and during parturition, including the main physiological processes of parturition: uterine contractions and cervical ripening. The immune system comprises white blood cells and their secretions. Polymorphonuclear cells and macrophages invade the cervical tissue and release compounds, such as oxygen radicals and enzymes, which break down the cervical matrix to allow softening and dilatation. During this inflammatory process, white blood cells undergo chemotaxis, adherence to endothelial cells, diapedesis, migration and activation. Factors that regulate white blood cell invasion and secretion include cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor and interleukins. Glucocorticoids, sex hormones and prostaglandins, affect cytokine synthesis. They also modulate the target cells, resulting in altered responses to cytokines. On the other hand, the immune system has profound effects on the hormonal system and prostaglandin synthesis. In animals, nitric oxide has marked effects on uterine quiescence during gestation. At the same time, it plays an important role in regulating the vascular tone of uterine arteries and has anti-adhesive effects on leukocytes. Cytokines are found in amniotic fluid, and in maternal and foetal serum at term and preterm. Several intrauterine cells have been shown to produce these cytoldnes. Since neither white blood cells, cytokines nor nitric oxide seem to be the ultimate intermediate for human parturition, the immune system is an additional but obligatory and underestimated component in the physiology of delivery. Scientists, obstetricians and anaesthesiologists must thus be aware of these processes.

  2. Molecular architecture of the fruit fly's airway epithelial immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fehrenbach Heinz

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway epithelial cells not only constitute a physical barrier, but also the first line of defence against airborne pathogens. At the same time, they are constantly exposed to reactive oxygen species. Therefore, airway epithelia cells have to possess a sophisticated innate immune system and a molecular armamentarium to detoxify reactive oxygen species. It has become apparent that deregulation of epithelial innate immunity is a major reason for the development of chronic inflammatory lung diseases. To elucidate the molecular architecture of the innate immune system of airway epithelial cells, we choose the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model, because it has the simplest type of airways, consisting of epithelial cells only. Elucidating the structure of the innate immune system of this "airway epithelial cell culture" might enable us to understand why deregulatory processes in innate immune signalling cascades lead to long lasting inflammatory events. Results All airway epithelial cells of the fruit fly are able to launch an immune response. They contain only one functional signal transduction pathway that converges onto NF-κB factors, namely the IMD-pathway, which is homologous to the TNF-α receptor pathway. Although vital parts of the Toll-pathway are missing, dorsal and dif, the NF-κB factors dedicated to this signalling system, are present. Other pathways involved in immune regulation, such as the JNK- and the JAK/STAT-pathway, are completely functional in these cells. In addition, most peptidoglycan recognition proteins, representing the almost complete collection of pattern recognition receptors, are part of the epithelial cells equipment. Potential effector molecules are different antimicrobial peptides and lysozymes, but also transferrin that can inhibit bacterial growth through iron-depletion. Reactive oxygen species can be inactivated through the almost complete armamentarium of enzymatic antioxidants that

  3. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction

    OpenAIRE

    Hirauchi, Ken-ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite goug...

  4. Mathematical modeling of radiation effect on immune system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnova, O.A.

    The fruitful application of mathematical models to immunology research has been solidly justified by achievements in theoretical and experimental immunology. The present article describes use of such modeling to clarify the effect of various doses of ionizing radiation on the dynamics of the humoral immune response; it also analyzes the temporal characteristics of the processes of post-radiation injury in recovery of the immune system. Initially, a model was constructed of the dynamics of humoral immunity; this was limited to the first humoral immune response to a soluble T-independent antigen, when the role of the T-cell-helpers cannot be studied; the model is based on Bernet's clonal-selection theory. A block design of the model of the dynamics is presented, coupled with pertinent mathematical expressions (non-linear differential equations) of the stages of response. The model (derived in seven mathematical expressions) is realized in the form of a FORTRAN program. A model of the post-radiation dynamics of lymphopoiesis is then constructed which is limited to post-radiation damage and recovery of cells of the lymphoid series and their predecessors in bone marrow. Finally, a model is constructed of the combined action, on immunity, of antigen stimulation and irradiation in mammals; the model is realized in the form of a system of differential equations for concentration of antigens, antibodies, damaged by radiation, and undamaged immunocompetent cells, and their predecessors, in bone marrow. It is suggested that the model can be used to predict the state of a mammalian immune system. 11 references, 4 figures.

  5. Antioxidant status, immune system, blood metabolites and carcass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary turmeric rhizome powder (TP) on performance, blood metabolite, immune system, antioxidant status, and relative weight of organs in pre and post heat stressed broilers. Two hundred and sixty-four (264) day-old male Arian broiler chicks were randomly ...

  6. The interplay between the innate immune system and the microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaiss, Christoph A; Levy, Maayan; Suez, Jotham; Elinav, Eran

    2014-02-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract harbors one of the highest densities of microorganisms on earth, called the microbiota. In fact, the number of microbial cells in the intestine outnumbers the amount of human cells of the entire organism by a factor of 10. As such, a human being is more and more perceived as a super-organism consisting of a eukaryotic and a prokaryotic part. The compartment mediating the communication between both parts is the innate immune system and its various microbe-sensing pattern-recognition receptors. Co-evolution of the microbiota with the innate immune system has resulted in elaborate interdependency and feedback mechanisms by which both systems control mutual homeostasis. Here, we review the most important innate immune-microbiota interdependencies known to date. While microbial sensing by pattern-recognition receptors is required for stable microbial composition, the presence of the microbiota, in turn, is necessary for proper development and function of the immune system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. TV synchronization system features stability and noise immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landauer, F. P.

    1967-01-01

    Horizontal jitter in the video presentation in television systems is prevented by using an additional sync level. This circuitry uses simultaneous signals at both sync and porch frequencies, providing a sync identification from which a coincidence circuit can generate pulses having the required stability and noise immunity.

  8. Ready-to-use colloidal adjuvant systems for intranasal immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Jun; Shim, Aeri; Lee, Song Yi; Kwon, Bo-Eun; Kim, Seong Ryeol; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Cho, Hyun-Jong

    2016-04-01

    Adjuvant systems based on oil-in-water (o/w) microemulsions (MEs) for vaccination via intranasal administration were prepared and evaluated. A ready-to-use blank ME system composed of mineral oil (oil), Labrasol (surfactant), Tween 80 (cosurfactant), and water was prepared and blended with antigen (Ag) solution prior to use. The o/w ME system developed exhibited nano-size droplets within the tested range of Ag concentrations and dilution factors. The maintenance of primary, secondary, and tertiary structural stability of ovalbumin (OVA) in ME, compared with OVA in solution, was demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), circular dichroism (CD), and fluorescence intensity measurements, respectively. The uptake efficiency in RAW 264.7 cells, evaluated by flow cytometry, of OVA in the ME group was significantly higher than that of the OVA solution group (p<0.05). In an intranasal immunization study with OVA ME in mice, elevated adjuvant effects in terms of mucosal immunization and Th1-dominant cell-mediated immune responses were identified. Given the convenience of use (simply mixing with Ag solution prior to use) and the adjuvant effects after intranasal immunization, the new o/w ME may be a practical and efficient adjuvant system for intranasal vaccination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Targeting the humoral immune system of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teng, Yoe Kie Onno

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to unravel the role of the humoral immune system in rheumatoid arthritis patients by employing new immunosuppressive strategies, i.e. specific B-cell depletion with Rituximab and non-specific lymfoablative treatment with high dose chemotherapy and hematopoeietic stem cell

  10. Immune System and Its Link to Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not entirely clear. In some of these illnesses, the blood vessels are innocent bystanders. As our bodies are fighting a virus (e. ... other drugs, such as methotrexate . These drugs suppress the immune system, so careful monitoring of side effects is essential. Only a physician experienced with these ...

  11. Systems vaccinology : molecular signatures of immunity to Bordetella pertussis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raeven, R.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide resurgence of whooping cough (pertussis), even in highly vaccinated populations, demands improved pertussis vaccines. In this thesis a systems vaccinology approach is applied to deepen knowledge of the immune responses evoked by different pertussis vaccines and compare this with a

  12. Artificial immune system algorithm in VLSI circuit configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Mohd. Asyraf; Sathasivam, Saratha; Kasihmuddin, Mohd Shareduwan Mohd

    2017-08-01

    In artificial intelligence, the artificial immune system is a robust bio-inspired heuristic method, extensively used in solving many constraint optimization problems, anomaly detection, and pattern recognition. This paper discusses the implementation and performance of artificial immune system (AIS) algorithm integrated with Hopfield neural networks for VLSI circuit configuration based on 3-Satisfiability problems. Specifically, we emphasized on the clonal selection technique in our binary artificial immune system algorithm. We restrict our logic construction to 3-Satisfiability (3-SAT) clauses in order to outfit with the transistor configuration in VLSI circuit. The core impetus of this research is to find an ideal hybrid model to assist in the VLSI circuit configuration. In this paper, we compared the artificial immune system (AIS) algorithm (HNN-3SATAIS) with the brute force algorithm incorporated with Hopfield neural network (HNN-3SATBF). Microsoft Visual C++ 2013 was used as a platform for training, simulating and validating the performances of the proposed network. The results depict that the HNN-3SATAIS outperformed HNN-3SATBF in terms of circuit accuracy and CPU time. Thus, HNN-3SATAIS can be used to detect an early error in the VLSI circuit design.

  13. Understanding plant immunity as a surveillance system to detect invasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cook III, D.E.; Mesarich, C.H.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Various conceptual models to describe the plant immune system have been presented. The most recent paradigm to gain wide acceptance in the field is often referred to as the zigzag model, which reconciles the previously formulated gene-for-gene hypothesis with the recognition of general elicitors in

  14. Periodontitis: from microbial immune subversion to systemic inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, George

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a dysbiotic inflammatory disease with an adverse impact on systemic health. Recent studies have provided insights into the emergence and persistence of dysbiotic oral microbial communities, which can mediate inflammatory pathology at local as well as distant sites. This Review discusses mechanisms of microbial immune subversion that tip the balance from homeostasis to disease in oral or extraoral sites. PMID:25534621

  15. The nervous and the immune systems: conspicuous physiological analogies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Julio

    2015-02-01

    From all biological constituents of complex organisms, two are highly sophisticated: the nervous and the immune systems. Interestingly, their goals and processes appear to be distant from each other; however, their physiological mechanisms keep notorious similarities. Both construct intelligence, learn from experience, and keep memory. Their precise responses to innumerable stimuli are delicately modulated, and the exposure of the individual to thousands of potential challenges integrates their functionality; they use a large part of their constituents not in excitatory activities but in the maintenance of inhibitory mechanisms to keep silent vast intrinsic potentialities. The nervous and immune systems are integrated by a basic cell lineage (neurons and lymphocytes, respectively) but each embodies countless cell subgroups with different and specialized deeds which, in contrast with cells from other organs, labyrinthine molecular arrangements conduct to "one cell, one function". Also, nervous and immune actions confer identity that differentiates every individual from countless others in the same species. Both systems regulate and potentiate their responses aided by countless biological resources of variable intensity: hormones, peptides, cytokines, pro-inflammatory molecules, etc. How the immune and the nervous systems buildup memory, learning capability, and exquisite control of excitatory/inhibitory mechanisms constitute major intellectual challenges for contemporary research.

  16. Biology of longevity: role of the innate immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candore, Giuseppina; Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Balistreri, Carmela Rita; Di Carlo, Daniele; Grimaldi, Maria Paola; Listì, Florinda; Nuzzo, Domenico; Vasto, Sonya; Lio, Domenico; Caruso, Calogero

    2006-01-01

    Genetic factors play a relevant role in the attainment of longevity because they are involved in cell maintenance systems, including the immune system. In fact, longevity may be correlated with optimal functioning of clonotypic and natural immunity. The aging of the immune system, known as immunosenescence, is the consequence of the continuous attrition caused by chronic antigenic overload. The antigenic load results in the progressive generation of inflammatory responses involved in age-related diseases. Most of the parameters influencing immunosenescence appear to be under genetic control, and immunosenescence fits with the basic assumptions of evolutionary theories of aging, such as antagonistic pleiotropy. In fact, by neutralizing infectious agents the immune system plays a beneficial role until reproduction and parenting. However, by determining chronic inflammation, it can be detrimental later in life, a period largely unforeseen by evolution. In particular, the data coming from the long-lived male population under study show that genetic polymorphisms responsible for a low inflammatory response might result in an increased chance of long lifespan in an environment with a reduced pathogen burden. Such a modern and healthy environment also permits a lower grade of survivable atherogenic inflammatory response.

  17. Fungal plant pathogens and the plant immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are notorious plant pathogens and continuously threat global food production. In the last decades we have obtained a better understanding of infection strategies of fungi and the plant immune system. This has facilitated more efficient introduction of disease resistance genes in crop plants by

  18. Stochastic stage-structured modeling of the adaptive immune system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, D. L. (Dennis L.); Davenport, M. P. (Miles P.); Forrest, S. (Stephanie); Perelson, Alan S.,

    2003-01-01

    We have constructed a computer model of the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to antigen and the maintenance of immunological memory. Because immune responses often begin with small numbers of cells and there is great variation among individual immune systems, we have chosen to implement a stochastic model that captures the life cycle of T cells more faithfully than deterministic models. Past models of the immune response have been differential equation based, which do not capture stochastic effects, or agent-based, which are computationally expensive. We use a stochastic stage-structured approach that has many of the advantages of agent-based modeling but is more efficient. Our model can provide insights into the effect infections have on the CTL repertoire and the response to subsequent infections.

  19. Effects of chalcone derivatives on players of the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jian Sian; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas; Fauzi, Norsyahida Mohd

    2015-01-01

    The immune system is the defense mechanism in living organisms that protects against the invasion of foreign materials, microorganisms, and pathogens. It involves multiple organs and tissues in human body, such as lymph nodes, spleen, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues. However, the execution of immune activities depends on a number of specific cell types, such as B cells, T cells, macrophages, and granulocytes, which provide various immune responses against pathogens. In addition to normal physiological functions, abnormal proliferation, migration, and differentiation of these cells (in response to various chemical stimuli produced by invading pathogens) have been associated with several pathological disorders. The unwanted conditions related to these cells have made them prominent targets in the development of new therapeutic interventions against various pathological implications, such as atherosclerosis and autoimmune diseases. Chalcone derivatives exhibit a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities, such as immunomodulation, as well as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, and antimicrobial properties. Many studies have been conducted to determine their inhibitory or stimulatory activities in immune cells, and the findings are of significance to provide a new direction for subsequent research. This review highlights the effects of chalcone derivatives in different types of immune cells. PMID:26316713

  20. Chemical inducers of systemic immunity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qing-Ming; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2014-04-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a highly desirable form of resistance that protects against a broad-spectrum of related or unrelated pathogens. SAR involves the generation of multiple signals at the site of primary infection, which arms distal portions against subsequent secondary infections. The last decade has witnessed considerable progress, and a number of chemical signals contributing to SAR have been isolated and characterized. The diverse chemical nature of these chemicals had led to the growing belief that SAR might involve interplay of multiple diverse and independent signals. However, recent results suggest that coordinated signalling from diverse signalling components facilitates SAR in plants. This review mainly discusses organized signalling by two such chemicals, glycerol-3-phoshphate and azelaic acid, and the role of basal salicylic acid levels in G3P-conferred SAR.

  1. Effects of delayed immune-response in tumor immune-system interplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto d'Onofrio

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumors constitute a wide family of diseases kinetically characterized by the co-presence of multiple spatio-temporal scales. So, tumor cells ecologically interplay with other kind of cells, e.g. endothelial cells or immune system effectors, producing and exchanging various chemical signals. As such, tumor growth is an ideal object of hybrid modeling where discrete stochastic processes model agents at low concentrations, and mean-field equations model chemical signals. In previous works we proposed a hybrid version of the well-known Panetta-Kirschner mean-field model of tumor cells, effector cells and Interleukin-2. Our hybrid model suggested -at variance of the inferences from its original formulation- that immune surveillance, i.e. tumor elimination by the immune system, may occur through a sort of side-effect of large stochastic oscillations. However, that model did not account that, due to both chemical transportation and cellular differentiation/division, the tumor-induced recruitment of immune effectors is not instantaneous but, instead, it exhibits a lag period. To capture this, we here integrate a mean-field equation for Interleukins-2 with a bi-dimensional delayed stochastic process describing such delayed interplay. An algorithm to realize trajectories of the underlying stochastic process is obtained by coupling the Piecewise Deterministic Markov process (for the hybrid part with a Generalized Semi-Markovian clock structure (to account for delays. We (i relate tumor mass growth with delays via simulations and via parametric sensitivity analysis techniques, (ii we quantitatively determine probabilistic eradication times, and (iii we prove, in the oscillatory regime, the existence of a heuristic stochastic bifurcation resulting in delay-induced tumor eradication, which is neither predicted by the mean-field nor by the hybrid non-delayed models.

  2. Salmonella enterica induces and subverts the plant immune system

    KAUST Repository

    García, Ana V.

    2014-04-04

    Infections with Salmonella enterica belong to the most prominent causes of food poisoning and infected fruits and vegetables represent important vectors for salmonellosis. Although it was shown that plants raise defense responses against Salmonella, these bacteria persist and proliferate in various plant tissues. Recent reports shed light into the molecular interaction between plants and Salmonella, highlighting the defense pathways induced and the means used by the bacteria to escape the plant immune system and accomplish colonization. It was recently shown that plants detect Salmonella pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the flagellin peptide flg22, and activate hallmarks of the defense program known as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Interestingly, certain Salmonella strains carry mutations in the flg22 domain triggering PTI, suggesting that a strategy of Salmonella is to escape plant detection by mutating PAMP motifs. Another strategy may rely on the type III secretion system (T3SS) as T3SS mutants were found to induce stronger plant defense responses than wild type bacteria. Although Salmonella effector delivery into plant cells has not been shown, expression of Salmonella effectors in plant tissues shows that these bacteria also possess powerful means to manipulate the plant immune system. Altogether, these data suggest that Salmonella triggers PTI in plants and evolved strategies to avoid or subvert plant immunity. 2014 Garca and Hirt.

  3. Signal transduction in cells of the immune system in microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Kathrin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Life on Earth developed in the presence and under the constant influence of gravity. Gravity has been present during the entire evolution, from the first organic molecule to mammals and humans. Modern research revealed clearly that gravity is important, probably indispensable for the function of living systems, from unicellular organisms to men. Thus, gravity research is no more or less a fundamental question about the conditions of life on Earth. Since the first space missions and supported thereafter by a multitude of space and ground-based experiments, it is well known that immune cell function is severely suppressed in microgravity, which renders the cells of the immune system an ideal model organism to investigate the influence of gravity on the cellular and molecular level. Here we review the current knowledge about the question, if and how cellular signal transduction depends on the existence of gravity, with special focus on cells of the immune system. Since immune cell function is fundamental to keep the organism under imnological surveillance during the defence against pathogens, to investigate the effects and possible molecular mechanisms of altered gravity is indispensable for long-term space flights to Earth Moon or Mars. Thus, understanding the impact of gravity on cellular functions on Earth will provide not only important informations about the development of life on Earth, but also for therapeutic and preventive strategies to cope successfully with medical problems during space exploration.

  4. Artificial Immune System for Multi-Area Economic Dispatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Shankha Suvra; Hazra, Abhik; Basu, Mousumi

    2013-09-01

    This article presents artificial immune system for solving multi-area economic dispatch (MAED) problem with tie line constraints considering transmission losses, multiple fuels, valve-point loading and prohibited operating zones. Artificial immune system is based on the clonal selection principle which implements adaptive cloning, hyper mutation, aging operator and tournament selection. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm has been verified on three different test systems, both small and large, involving varying degree of complexity. Compared with differential evolution, evolutionary programming and real-coded genetic algorithm, considering the quality of the solution obtained, the proposed algorithm seems to be a promising alternative approach for solving the MAED problems in practical power system.

  5. Flux-weakening control methods for hybrid excitation synchronous motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Huang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid excitation synchronous motor (HESM, which aim at combining the advantages of permanent magnet motor and wound excitation motor, have the characteristics of low-speed high-torque hill climbing and wide speed range. Firstly, a new kind of HESM is presented in the paper, and its structure and mathematical model are illustrated. Then, based on a space voltage vector control, a novel flux-weakening method for speed adjustment in the high speed region is presented. The unique feature of the proposed control method is that the HESM driving system keeps the q-axis back-EMF components invariable during the flux-weakening operation process. Moreover, a copper loss minimization algorithm is adopted to reduce the copper loss of the HESM in the high speed region. Lastly, the proposed method is validated by the simulation and the experimental results.

  6. Progress in immunization information systems --- United States, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    An immunization information system (IIS) is a confidential, computerized, population-based system that collects and consolidates vaccination data from vaccine providers and provides tools for designing and sustaining effective immunization strategies at the provider and program levels. Among the capabilities of an IIS are the capacity to inform vaccine providers of upcoming patient vaccination needs; generate vaccination coverage reports, patient reminders, or recalls for past due vaccinations; and interoperate with electronic health record (EHR) systems. In 2010, the Task Force on Community Preventive Services recommended that immunization information systems be used to increase vaccination coverage after showing strong evidence of their effectiveness. A Healthy People 2020 objective is to increase to 95% the percentage of children aged Information Systems Annual Report (IISAR) survey (completed by 53 of 56 federal grantees with IIS sites), which indicated that 77% of all U.S. children aged send and receive vaccination data using Health Level Seven (HL7) messaging standards, and 73% reported that some vaccine providers with EHR systems in their geographic area were providing vaccination data directly to an IIS from EHRs. Enhancing IIS and EHR with standards such as HL7 will provide greater consistency in data exchange and likely help to improve the quality and timeliness of IIS data.

  7. Nostalgia Weakens the Desire for Money

    OpenAIRE

    Jannine D. Lasaleta; Constantine Sedikides; Kathleen D. Vohs

    2014-01-01

    Nostalgia has a strong presence in the marketing of goods and services. The current research asked whether its effectiveness is driven by its weakening of the desire for money. Six experiments demonstrated that feeling nostalgic decreased people's desire for money. Using multiple operationalizations of desire for money, nostalgia (vs. neutral) condition participants were willing to pay more for products (experiment 1), parted with more money but not more time (experiment 2), valued money less...

  8. The Microbiota, the Immune System and the Allograft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Mannon, Roslyn B.; Mannon, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota represents the complex collections of microbial communities that colonize a host. In health, the microbiota is essential for metabolism, protection against pathogens and maturation of the immune system. In return, the immune system determines the composition of the microbiota. Altered microbial composition (dysbiosis) has been correlated with a number of diseases in humans. The tight reciprocal immune/microbial interactions complicate determining whether dysbiosis is a cause and/or a consequence of immune dysregulation and disease initiation or progression. However, a number of studies in germ-free and antibiotic-treated animal models support causal roles for intestinal bacteria in disease susceptibility. The role of the microbiota in transplant recipients is only starting to be investigated and its study is further complicated by putative contributions of both recipient and donor microbiota. Moreover, both flora may be affected directly or indirectly by immunosuppressive drugs and anti-microbial prophylaxis taken by transplant patients, as well as by inflammatory processes secondary to ischemia/reperfusion and allorecognition, and the underlying cause of end-organ failure. Whether the ensuing dysbiosis affects alloresponses and whether therapies aimed at correcting dysbiosis should be considered in transplant patients constitutes an exciting new field of research. PMID:24840316

  9. Controlling Cytomegalovirus: Helping the Immune System Take the Lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Hanley

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus, of the Herpesviridae family, has evolved alongside humans for thousands of years with an intricate balance of latency, immune evasion, and transmission. While upwards of 70% of humans have evidence of CMV infection, the majority of healthy people show little to no clinical symptoms of primary infection and CMV disease is rarely observed during persistent infection in immunocompetent hosts. Despite the fact that the majority of infected individuals are asymptomatic, immunologically, CMV hijacks the immune system by infecting and remaining latent in antigen-presenting cells that occasionally reactivate subclinically and present antigen to T cells, eventually causing the inflation of CMV-specific T cells until they can compromise up to 10% of the entire T cell repertoire. Because of this impact on the immune system, as well as its importance in fields such as stem cell and organ transplant, the relationship between CMV and the immune response has been studied in depth. Here we provide a review of many of these studies and insights into how CMV-specific T cells are currently being used therapeutically.

  10. Hippocampal adult neurogenesis: Does the immune system matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miranda, Aline Silva; Zhang, Cun-Jin; Katsumoto, Atsuko; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio

    2017-01-15

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis involves proliferation, survival, differentiation and integration of newborn neurons into pre-existing neuronal networks. Although its functional significance in the central nervous system (CNS) has not comprehensively elucidated, adult neurogenesis has been attributed a role in cognition, learning and memory. There is a growing body of evidence that CNS resident as well as peripheral immune cells participate in regulating hippocampal adult neurogenesis. Microglial cells are closely associated with neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) in the neurogenic niche engaged in a bidirectional communication with neurons, which may be important for adult neurogenesis. Microglial and neuronal crosstalk is mediated in part by CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling and a disruption in this pathway has been associated with impaired neurogenesis. It has been also reported that microglial neuroprotective or neurotoxic effects in adult neurogenesis occur in a context-dependent manner. Apart from microglia other brain resident and peripheral immune cells including pericytes, perivascular macrophages, mast cells and T-cells also modulate this phenomenon. It is worth mentioning that under some physiological circumstances such as normal aging there is a significant decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis. A role for innate and adaptive immune system in adult neurogenesis has been also reported during aging. Here, we review the current evidence regarding neuro-immune interactions in the regulation of neurogenesis under distinct conditions, including aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Controlling Cytomegalovirus: Helping the Immune System Take the Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Patrick J.; Bollard, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus, of the Herpesviridae family, has evolved alongside humans for thousands of years with an intricate balance of latency, immune evasion, and transmission. While upwards of 70% of humans have evidence of CMV infection, the majority of healthy people show little to no clinical symptoms of primary infection and CMV disease is rarely observed during persistent infection in immunocompetent hosts. Despite the fact that the majority of infected individuals are asymptomatic, immunologically, CMV hijacks the immune system by infecting and remaining latent in antigen-presenting cells that occasionally reactivate subclinically and present antigen to T cells, eventually causing the inflation of CMV-specific T cells until they can compromise up to 10% of the entire T cell repertoire. Because of this impact on the immune system, as well as its importance in fields such as stem cell and organ transplant, the relationship between CMV and the immune response has been studied in depth. Here we provide a review of many of these studies and insights into how CMV-specific T cells are currently being used therapeutically. PMID:24872114

  12. Dissecting Phaseolus vulgaris Innate Immune System against Colletotrichum lindemuthianum Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Bablu; Caldas, Danielle Gregório Gomes; Tsai, Siu Mui; Camargo, Luis Eduardo Aranha; Melotto, Maeli

    2012-01-01

    Background The genus Colletotrichum is one of the most economically important plant pathogens, causing anthracnose on a wide range of crops including common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Crop yield can be dramatically decreased depending on the plant cultivar used and the environmental conditions. This study aimed to identify potential genetic components of the bean immune system to provide environmentally friendly control measures against this fungus. Methodology and Principal Findings As the common bean is not amenable to reverse genetics to explore functionality and its genome is not fully curated, we used putative Arabidopsis orthologs of bean expressed sequence tag (EST) to perform bioinformatic analysis and experimental validation of gene expression to identify common bean genes regulated during the incompatible interaction with C. lindemuthianum. Similar to model pathosystems, Gene Ontology (GO) analysis indicated that hormone biosynthesis and signaling in common beans seem to be modulated by fungus infection. For instance, cytokinin and ethylene responses were up-regulated and jasmonic acid, gibberellin, and abscisic acid responses were down-regulated, indicating that these hormones may play a central role in this pathosystem. Importantly, we have identified putative bean gene orthologs of Arabidopsis genes involved in the plant immune system. Based on experimental validation of gene expression, we propose that hypersensitive reaction as part of effector-triggered immunity may operate, at least in part, by down-regulating genes, such as FLS2-like and MKK5-like, putative orthologs of the Arabidopsis genes involved in pathogen perception and downstream signaling. Conclusions/Significance We have identified specific bean genes and uncovered metabolic processes and pathways that may be involved in the immune response against pathogens. Our transcriptome database is a rich resource for mining novel defense-related genes, which enabled us to develop a model of

  13. Dissecting Phaseolus vulgaris innate immune system against Colletotrichum lindemuthianum infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Rodrigues Oblessuc

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genus Colletotrichum is one of the most economically important plant pathogens, causing anthracnose on a wide range of crops including common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.. Crop yield can be dramatically decreased depending on the plant cultivar used and the environmental conditions. This study aimed to identify potential genetic components of the bean immune system to provide environmentally friendly control measures against this fungus. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As the common bean is not amenable to reverse genetics to explore functionality and its genome is not fully curated, we used putative Arabidopsis orthologs of bean expressed sequence tag (EST to perform bioinformatic analysis and experimental validation of gene expression to identify common bean genes regulated during the incompatible interaction with C. lindemuthianum. Similar to model pathosystems, Gene Ontology (GO analysis indicated that hormone biosynthesis and signaling in common beans seem to be modulated by fungus infection. For instance, cytokinin and ethylene responses were up-regulated and jasmonic acid, gibberellin, and abscisic acid responses were down-regulated, indicating that these hormones may play a central role in this pathosystem. Importantly, we have identified putative bean gene orthologs of Arabidopsis genes involved in the plant immune system. Based on experimental validation of gene expression, we propose that hypersensitive reaction as part of effector-triggered immunity may operate, at least in part, by down-regulating genes, such as FLS2-like and MKK5-like, putative orthologs of the Arabidopsis genes involved in pathogen perception and downstream signaling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified specific bean genes and uncovered metabolic processes and pathways that may be involved in the immune response against pathogens. Our transcriptome database is a rich resource for mining novel defense-related genes, which enabled us to

  14. Humoral and cellular immunity in progressive systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierakowski, S; Bernacka, K

    1987-01-01

    There is ever increasing evidence that immune disturbances can play an essential role in the pathogenesis of progressive systemic sclerosis. However, there are still a great many controversial opinions and complex studies in this domain are few. Tests of lymphocyte blastic transformation and of leukocyte migration inhibition as well as E and EAC rosette tests were performed and the serum level of A, G and M immunoglobulins and complement were estimated in 13 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis. The increase of serum IgA, IgG and IgM and the decrease of early and delayed E rosette formation was observed in the patients as compared with the control group. The patients also presented increase spontaneous and PHA induced lymphocyte blastic transformation. The results support the hypothesis of the role played by immune disturbances in the pathogenesis of progressive systemic sclerosis.

  15. The role of the adaptive immune system in regulation of gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Lucia M; Kawamoto, Shimpei; Maruya, Mikako; Fagarasan, Sidonia

    2014-07-01

    The gut nourishes rich bacterial communities that affect profoundly the functions of the immune system. The relationship between gut microbiota and the immune system is one of reciprocity. The microbiota contributes to nutrient processing and the development, maturation, and function of the immune system. Conversely, the immune system, particularly the adaptive immune system, plays a key role in shaping the repertoire of gut microbiota. The fitness of host immune system is reflected in the gut microbiota, and deficiencies in either innate or adaptive immunity impact on diversity and structures of bacterial communities in the gut. Here, we discuss the mechanisms that underlie this reciprocity and emphasize how the adaptive immune system via immunoglobulins (i.e. IgA) contributes to diversification and balance of gut microbiota required for immune homeostasis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. How photons modulate wound healing via the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Mary

    2009-02-01

    The immune system is a diverse group of cells that recognize and attack foreign substances, pathogenic organisms and cancer cells. It also produces inflammation, an essential component of the wound healing process and, following the resolution of inflammation, plays a crucial role in the control of granulation tissue formation. Granulation tissue is the precursor of scar tissue. Injured skin and mucous membranes generally heal rapidly. However, some wounds are either slow to heal or fail to heal while in others overgrowth of scar tissue occurs, resulting in the production of either hypertophic or keloid scars. The modulation of wound healing in such conditions is clinically important and may even be vital. Evidence will be presented that phototherapy can modulate wound healing, and that changes induced in the immune system, in particular the secretion of soluble protein mediators including cytokines, may be involved in this modulation. The immune system has peripheral and deep components. The former, being located mainly in the skin and mucous membranes, are readily accessible to photons, which can affect them directly. The components of the immune system are linked by lymphatic vessels and blood vessels, which include many capillaries located in the sub-epithelial connective tissues of the skin and mucous membranes. The superficial location of these capillaries provides the immune cells and molecules in transit through them with ready access to photons. When these cells and molecules, some modified by exposure to photons, reach susceptible cells such as lymphocytes in the deeper parts of the immune system and cells of injured tissues, they can modify their activity. In addition to having direct effects on peripheral cells, photons can thus also produce indirect effects on cells too distant for the photons to reach them. For example, cytokines released from peripheral macrophages in response to the direct action of photons can be transported to and affect other

  17. Gut Microbiota-Immune System Crosstalk and Pancreatic Disorders

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    D. Pagliari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota is key to the development and modulation of the mucosal immune system. It plays a central role in several physiological functions, in the modulation of inflammatory signaling and in the protection against infections. In healthy states, there is a perfect balance between commensal and pathogens, and microbiota and the immune system interact to maintain gut homeostasis. The alteration of such balance, called dysbiosis, determines an intestinal bacterial overgrowth which leads to the disruption of the intestinal barrier with systemic translocation of pathogens. The pancreas does not possess its own microbiota, and it is believed that inflammatory and neoplastic processes affecting the gland may be linked to intestinal dysbiosis. Increasing research evidence testifies a correlation between intestinal dysbiosis and various pancreatic disorders, but it remains unclear whether dysbiosis is the cause or an effect. The analysis of specific alterations in the microbiome profile may permit to develop novel tools for the early detection of several pancreatic disorders, utilizing samples, such as blood, saliva, and stools. Future studies will have to elucidate the mechanisms by which gut microbiota is modulated and how it tunes the immune system, in order to be able to develop innovative treatment strategies for pancreatic disorders.

  18. The Role of Non-specific and Specific Immune Systems in Poultry against Newcastle Disease

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    Dyah Ayu Hewajuli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Newcastle disease (ND is caused by avian paramyxovirus-1 which belong to Avulavirus genus and Paramyxoviridae family. The birds have abnormalities in humoral (bursa fabricius and cellular (thymus and spleen lymphoid organs. Lesions decrease the immune system. Immune system consists of non-specific and specific immune systems. The main components of non-specific immunity are physical and chemical barrier (feather and skin or mucosa, phagocytic cells (macrophages and natural killer, protein complement and the mediator of inflammation and cytokines. Interferons (IFNs belong to a group of cytokines that play a major role in the nonspecific or innate (natural immunity. The virulent ND virus encodes protein of V gene can be suppressed IFN type I. This leads to non-specific immune system fail to respond to the virulent strains resulting in severe pathogenicity. The defense mechanism of the host is replaced by specific immunity (adaptive immunity when natural immunity fails to overcome the infection. The specific immune system consists of humoral mediated immunity (HMI and cell-mediated immunity (CMI. The cells of immune system that react specifically with the antigen are B lymphocytes producing the antibodies, T lymphocytes that regulate the synthesis of antibodies and T cells as effector or the direct cytotoxic cells. Both non-specific and specific immunities are complementary against the invasion of ND virus in the birds. The objective of this article is to discuss the role of non specific and specific immune system in ND.

  19. Memory and Specificity in the Insect Immune System: Current Perspectives and Future Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Dustin Cooper; Ioannis Eleftherianos

    2017-01-01

    The immune response of a host to a pathogen is typically described as either innate or adaptive. The innate form of the immune response is conserved across all organisms, including insects. Previous and recent research has focused on the nature of the insect immune system and the results imply that the innate immune response of insects is more robust and specific than previously thought. Priming of the insect innate immune system involves the exposure of insects to dead or a sublethal dose of...

  20. Correlation between obesity, adipokines and the immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Regini Silveira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a worldwide health problem and the increase in its incidence, risks and consequences are a matter of growing concern. Obesity is characterized by the accumulation of fat in the body. Many studies are currently investigating obesity and associated comorbidities in an attempt to clarify the mechanisms involved. Fat tissue is a dynamic organ that secretes several factors, including adipokines. Adipokines are bioactive peptides secreted by fat cells, which are important for energy regulation and inflammatory and immune responses. Leptin, adiponectin and resistin are the most studied adipokines. The aim of this review was to gather information about these adipokines (leptin, adiponectin and resistin and their relationship with the immune response in obese individuals, as well as the susceptibility of these patients to infections. The results of the literature review permit some observations. The circulating levels of these adipokines are directly involved in the degree of obesity of the patient. High or low circulating concentrations of these adipokines may have beneficial or negative effects on immune competence, with obese patients being more susceptible to infection and inflammation than eutrophic individuals.Key words: Obesity; Adipokines; Leptin; Adiponectin; Resistin; Immune system.

  1. Polio Endgame: Lessons Learned From the Immunization Systems Management Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipursky, Simona; Vandelaer, Jos; Brooks, Alan; Dietz, Vance; Kachra, Tasleem; Farrell, Margaret; Ottosen, Ann; Sever, John L; Zaffran, Michel J

    2017-07-01

    The Immunization Systems Management Group (IMG) was established to coordinate and oversee objective 2 of the Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018, namely, (1) introduction of ≥1 dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine in all 126 countries using oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) only as of 2012, (2) full withdrawal of OPV, starting with the withdrawal of its type 2 component, and (3) using polio assets to strengthen immunization systems in 10 priority countries. The IMG's inclusive, transparent, and partnership-focused approach proved an effective means of leveraging the comparative and complementary strengths of each IMG member agency. This article outlines 10 key factors behind the IMG's success, providing a potential set of guiding principles for the establishment and implementation of other interagency collaborations and initiatives beyond the polio sphere. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  2. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor: multitasking in the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockinger, Brigitta; Di Meglio, Paola; Gialitakis, Manolis; Duarte, João H

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), for many years almost exclusively studied by the pharmacology/toxicology field for its role in mediating the toxicity of xenobiotics such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), has more recently attracted the attention of immunologists. The evolutionary conservation of this transcription factor and its widespread expression in the immune system point to important physiological functions that are slowly being unraveled. In particular, the emphasis is now shifting from the role of AhR in the xenobiotic pathway toward its mode of action in response to physiological ligands. In this article, we review the current understanding of the molecular interactions and functions of AhR in the immune system in steady state and in the presence of infection and inflammation, with a focus on barrier organs such as the skin, the gut, and the lung.

  3. Targeting the humoral immune system of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Teng, Yoe Kie Onno

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to unravel the role of the humoral immune system in rheumatoid arthritis patients by employing new immunosuppressive strategies, i.e. specific B-cell depletion with Rituximab and non-specific lymfoablative treatment with high dose chemotherapy and hematopoeietic stem cell transplantation. This thesis evaluates the clinical benefit of these strategies as well as the immunological changes that coincide with clinical improvement. By combining clinical outcome with immu...

  4. Fungal plant pathogens and the plant immune system

    OpenAIRE

    Wit, de, J.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are notorious plant pathogens and continuously threat global food production. In the last decades we have obtained a better understanding of infection strategies of fungi and the plant immune system. This has facilitated more efficient introduction of disease resistance genes in crop plants by plant breeders. A brief overview of progress in research and applications will be provided as well as a glimpse into the future.

  5. Targeting the immune system to treat hypertension: where are we?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, Jennifer L; Sharma, Avadhesh C

    2014-09-01

    Research over the past decade has significantly deepened our understanding of mechanisms that drive the development of hypertension. In particular, a novel paradigm of inflammation as a common mediator of cardiovascular and kidney disease has emerged. This review will summarize the role of the immune system in cardiovascular disease, explore some of the most promising new therapeutic directions and consider their potential as new treatments for hypertension. Recent data continue to demonstrate that targeting the immune system can prevent hypertension in a variety of experimental models. Tempering the enthusiasm for a long-awaited new approach to treating hypertension is decades of clinical data, showing that classic immunosuppression regimens are associated with significant side-effects - including cardiovascular disease - that effectively preclude their use in the setting of chronic hypertension. New, more specific therapies are being developed that target cytokines including IL-17, IL-6 and TNFα. Preclinical data convincingly demonstrate a key role for the immune system and specific cytokine mediators. Several biotherapeutics targeting these pathways are on the market and more are in development. Side-effects, however, continue to resemble those of classic immunosuppressants, highlighting the challenge of translating these research advances into new therapies for hypertension. http://links.lww.com/CONH/A9.

  6. Using systems biology to simplify complex disease: immune cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polpitiya, Ashoka D; McDunn, Jonathan E; Burykin, Anton; Ghosh, Bijoy K; Cobb, J Perren

    2009-01-01

    What if there was a rapid, inexpensive, and accurate blood diagnostic that could determine which patients were infected, identify the organism(s) responsible, and identify patients who were not responding to therapy? We hypothesized that systems analysis of the transcriptional activity of circulating immune effector cells could be used to identify conserved elements in the host response to systemic inflammation, and furthermore, to discriminate between sterile and infectious etiologies. We review herein a validated, systems biology approach demonstrating that 1) abdominal and pulmonary sepsis diagnoses can be made in mouse models using microarray (RNA) data from circulating blood, 2) blood microarray data can be used to differentiate between the host response to Gram-negative and Gram-positive pneumonia, 3) the endotoxin response of normal human volunteers can be mapped at the level of gene expression, and 4) a similar strategy can be used in the critically ill to follow septic patients and quantitatively determine immune recovery. These findings provide the foundation of immune cartography and demonstrate the potential of this approach for rapidly diagnosing sepsis and identifying pathogens. Further, our data suggest a new approach to determine how specific pathogens perturb the physiology of circulating leukocytes in a cell-specific manner. Large, prospective clinical trails are needed to validate the clinical utility of leukocyte RNA diagnostics (e.g., the riboleukogram).

  7. The avian lung-associated immune system: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Sven; Dalamani, Grammatia; Kaspers, Bernd

    2006-01-01

    The lung is a major target organ for numerous viral and bacterial diseases of poultry. To control this constant threat birds have developed a highly organized lung-associated immune system. In this review the basic features of this system are described and their functional properties discussed. Most prominent in the avian lung is the bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) which is located at the junctions between the primary bronchus and the caudal secondary bronchi. BALT nodules are absent in newly hatched birds, but gradually developed into the mature structures found from 6-8 weeks onwards. They are organized into distinct B and T cell areas, frequently comprise germinal centres and are covered by a characteristic follicle-associated epithelium. The interstitial tissue of the parabronchial walls harbours large numbers of tissue macrophages and lymphocytes which are scattered throughout tissue. A striking feature of the avian lung is the low number of macrophages on the respiratory surface under non-inflammatory conditions. Stimulation of the lung by live bacteria but not by a variety of bacterial products elicits a significant efflux of activated macrophages and, depending on the pathogen, of heterophils. In addition to the cellular components humoral defence mechanisms are found on the lung surface including secretory IgA. The compartmentalisation of the immune system in the avian lung into BALT and non BALT-regions should be taken into account in studies on the host-pathogen interaction since these structures may have distinct functional properties during an immune response.

  8. Production of complement components by cells of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, R; van Essen, M F; van Kooten, C; Trouw, L A

    2017-05-01

    The complement system is an important part of the innate immune defence. It contributes not only to local inflammation, removal and killing of pathogens, but it also assists in shaping of the adaptive immune response. Besides a role in inflammation, complement is also involved in physiological processes such as waste disposal and developmental programmes. The complement system comprises several soluble and membrane-bound proteins. The bulk of the soluble proteins is produced mainly by the liver. While several complement proteins are produced by a wide variety of cell types, other complement proteins are produced by only a few related cell types. As these data suggest that local production by specific cell types may have specific functions, more detailed studies have been employed recently analysing the local and even intracellular role of these complement proteins. Here we review the current knowledge about extrahepatic production and/or secretion of complement components. More specifically, we address what is known about complement synthesis by cells of the human immune system. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  9. Effects of Helminth Eradication on the Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziva Weisman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Helminth infection has a profound effect on the immune system. However, the precise nature of the immune changes that are elicited by helminth infection have not been sufficiently characterized. Furthermore, the reversibility of these changes after treatment has not been documented sufficiently. We studied the immune profiles of Ethiopian immigrants to Israel at baseline, that is on arrival and at one-year follow-up and compared individuals who received antihelminthic treatment during the study period with those who missed the treatment. Methods: A longitudinal follow up study involving different groups of subjects was conducted. Baseline data was recorded from the newly arrived Ethiopian immigrants for a series of peripheral blood tests, including: IgE and Eosinophil levels, T-cell populations, T-cell receptor phenotypes, and cytokine measurement. These tests were all repeated after a 1-year interval. Results were compared between the newly arrived Ethiopian immigrants (NEW-Eth-Il, long term Ethiopian immigrants (LT-Eth-Il, and non Ethiopian Israeli controls (NON-Imm-Il. Results: Of the 184 individuals, 111 were NEW-Eth-Il, who had a high prevalence of helminth infection, the immunological changes were elevated IgE levels and eosinophil counts, decreased CD4/CD8 ratio, increased proportion of HLA-DR+CD3+, HLA-DR+CD4+ and HLA-DR+CD8+ cells, decreased proportion of CD45RA+CD4+ (naive and CD28+CD8+ cells, increased proportion of CD45RO+CD4+ (memory cells, and increased secretion of IL-4 and IL-5 (Th2 type cytokines. In the 42 LT-Eth-Il participants, who all had negative tests for helminth infection, we did not observe these immune changes and their immune profile did not differ markedly from that of the NON-Imm-Il controls. The follow-up immune profiles of 33 NEW-Eth-Il who received succesful antihelminth treatment, showed a significant normalization in the above-mentioned variables that was not observed in the 19 NEW-Eth-Il who

  10. Immune System Activation and Depression: Roles of Serotonin in the Central Nervous System and Periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Matthew J; Quinlan, Meagan A; Blakely, Randy D

    2017-05-17

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has long been recognized as a key contributor to the regulation of mood and anxiety and is strongly associated with the etiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Although more known for its roles within the central nervous system (CNS), 5-HT is recognized to modulate several key aspects of immune system function that may contribute to the development of MDD. Copious amounts of research have outlined a connection between alterations in immune system function, inflammation status, and MDD. Supporting this connection, peripheral immune activation results in changes in the function and/or expression of many components of 5-HT signaling that are associated with depressive-like phenotypes. How 5-HT is utilized by the immune system to effect CNS function and ultimately behaviors related to depression is still not well understood. This Review summarizes the evidence that immune system alterations related to depression affect CNS 5-HT signaling that can alter MDD-relevant behaviors and that 5-HT regulates immune system signaling within the CNS and periphery. We suggest that targeting the interrelationships between immune and 5-HT signaling may provide more effective treatments for subsets of those suffering from inflammation-associated MDD.

  11. Interaction of the tick immune system with transmitted pathogens

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    Ondrej eHajdusek

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ticks are hematophagous arachnids transmitting a wide variety of pathogens including viruses, bacteria, and protozoans to their vertebrate hosts. The tick vector competence has to be intimately linked to the ability of transmitted pathogens to evade tick defense mechanisms encountered on their route through the tick body comprising midgut, hemolymph, salivary glands or ovaries. Tick innate immunity is, like in other invertebrates, based on an orchestrated action of humoral and cellular immune responses. The direct antimicrobial defense in ticks is accomplished by a variety of small molecules such as defensins, lysozymes or by tick-specific antimicrobial compounds such as microplusin/hebraein or 5.3-kDa family proteins. Phagocytosis of the invading microbes by tick hemocytes seems to be mediated by the primordial complement-like system composed of thioester-containing proteins, fibrinogen-related lectins and convertase-like factors. Moreover, an important role in survival of the ingested microbes seems to be played by host proteins and redox balance maintenance in the tick midgut. Here, we summarize recent knowledge about the major components of tick immune system and focus on their interaction with the relevant tick-transmitted pathogens, represented by spirochetes (Borrelia, rickettsiae (Anaplasma, and protozoans (Babesia. Availability of the tick genomic database and feasibility of functional genomics based on RNA interference greatly contribute to the understanding of molecular and cellular interplay at the tick-pathogen interface and may provide new targets for blocking the transmission of tick pathogens.

  12. Impacts of Low Temperature on the Teleost Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn H. Abram

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As poikilothermic vertebrates, fish can experience changes in water temperature, and hence body temperature, as a result of seasonal changes, migration, or efflux of large quantities of effluent into a body of water. Temperature shifts outside of the optimal temperature range for an individual fish species can have negative impacts on the physiology of the animal, including the immune system. As a result, acute or chronic exposure to suboptimal temperatures can impair an organisms’ ability to defend against pathogens and thus compromise the overall health of the animal. This review focuses on the advances made towards understanding the impacts of suboptimal temperature on the soluble and cellular mediators of the innate and adaptive immune systems of fishes. Although cold stress can result in varying effects in different fish species, acute and chronic suboptimal temperature exposure generally yield suppressive effects, particularly on adaptive immunity. Knowledge of the effects of environmental temperature on fish species is critical for both the optimal management of wild species and the best management practices for aquaculture species.

  13. Building a National Immunization System: A Guide to Immunization Services and Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Paula; And Others

    Over the past several years, outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases have drawn greater attention to the problem of low immunization rates in the U.S. In response to this problem, the federal government created the Vaccines for Children program as a foundation for a new national immunization policy to ensure proper and timely immunizations for…

  14. Inference of selection in the adaptive immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhanati, Yuval; Callan, Curtis; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Alexandra

    The adaptive immune system can recognize many threats by maintaining a large diversity of immune cells with different membrane receptors. This receptor diversity is based on initial random sequence generation, using a recombination mechanism, followed by functional selection stages via interactions with self and foreign peptides. These selection processes shape the initially random receptor ensemble into a functional repertoire that can bind many foreign pathogens. We analyzed high throughput data of human receptor sequences to infer the selection pressures on particular elements of the receptors using maximum likelihood methods. We can quantify the global and site-specific selection pressures and disentangle selection on amino acids from biases in the generated repertoire. We find correlations between generation and initial selection of receptors, and a significant reduction of diversity during selection, suggesting natural evolution of the generating mechanisms.

  15. Effects of TNF antagonists on immune and neuroendocrine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cutolo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the literature on the effects of TNFa-antagonists (etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab on the immune system is reviewed. These biologic agents are employed in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative spondyloarthritides, as well as psoriasis and Crohn’s disease. The differences of these drugs, testified by the different effects on the immune response, are discussed. These molecules exert their effect through cytokine inhibition, but they present striking differences since they can modulate macrophage activity, T cells apoptosis, leukocyte migration, and angiogenesis to a different degree. Some studies showed that these agents also affect the hypothalamo- pituitary-adrenal axis. The potential immunogenicity of these biologic agents is also discussed.

  16. Threshold for extinction and survival in stochastic tumor immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongxi; Cheng, Fangjuan

    2017-10-01

    This paper mainly investigates the stochastic character of tumor growth and extinction in the presence of immune response of a host organism. Firstly, the mathematical model describing the interaction and competition between the tumor cells and immune system is established based on the Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics. Then, the threshold conditions for extinction, weak persistence and stochastic persistence of tumor cells are derived by the rigorous theoretical proofs. Finally, stochastic simulation are taken to substantiate and illustrate the conclusion we have derived. The modeling results will be beneficial to understand to concept of immunoediting, and develop the cancer immunotherapy. Besides, our simple theoretical model can help to obtain new insight into the complexity of tumor growth.

  17. Olive oil and immune system functions: potential involvement in immunonutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez de Cienfuegos, Gerardo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Olive oil plays a crucial role as a main component of the Mediterranean diet, which has shown important benefits for the human health. According to the current knowledge, the administration of diets containing olive oil exerts some beneficial effects on the immune system functions due likely to the action of oleic acid rather than other substances contained in this fat. In the last few years, epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies have evidenced the potential of certain dietary lipids (containing polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fatty acids as modulators of immune system functions due to their ability to suppress several functions of immune system in both humans and animals. As a result, these fats have been applied in the reduction of symptoms from diseases characterized by an overactivation of the immune system (autoimmune diseases or in the reduction of cancer risk. Here, we review several relevant experimental and clinical data associated with the beneficial effects of olive oil upon the health, the mechanisms of action and the immune function susceptible of being be altered by the administration of dietary lipids and particularly of olive oil. In addition, we will also discuss the detrimental effects on the immune system functions caused by the administration of certain dietary lipids attributed mainly to a reduction of host natural resistance against infectious microorganisms as well as the involvement of olive oil diets in the regulation of immune resistance.El aceite de oliva tiene un papel crucial como componente de la dieta Mediterránea, con importantes beneficios sobre la salud humana. Dietas conteniendo aceite de oliva actúan de manera favorable en las funciones del sistema inmune por la acción sobretodo del ácido oleico. Los estudios epidemiológicos, clínicos y experimentales publicados en los últimos años demuestran que ciertos lípidos de la dieta [ácidos grasos monoinsaturados (MUFA y poliinsaturados (PUFA

  18. Vascular, glial, and lymphatic immune gateways of the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Engelhardt, Britta; Carare, Roxana O; Bechmann, Ingo; Fluegel, Alexander; Jon D Laman; Weller, Roy O.

    2016-01-01

    Immune privilege of the central nervous system (CNS) has been ascribed to the presence of a blood-brain barrier and the lack of lymphatic vessels within the CNS parenchyma. However, immune reactions occur within the CNS and it is clear that the CNS has a unique relationship with the immune system. Recent developments in high-resolution imaging techniques have prompted a reassessment of the relationships between the CNS and the immune system. This review will take these developments into accou...

  19. Terrestrial stress analogs for spaceflight associated immune system dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Simpson, Richard J; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Chouker, Alexander; Hwang, Shen-An; Actor, Jeffrey K; Salam, Alex P; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarence

    2014-07-01

    Recent data indicates that dysregulation of the immune system occurs and persists during spaceflight. Impairment of immunity, especially in conjunction with elevated radiation exposure and limited clinical care, may increase certain health risks during exploration-class deep space missions (i.e. to an asteroid or Mars). Research must thoroughly characterize immune dysregulation in astronauts to enable development of a monitoring strategy and validate any necessary countermeasures. Although the International Space Station affords an excellent platform for on-orbit research, access may be constrained by technical, logistical vehicle or funding limitations. Therefore, terrestrial spaceflight analogs will continue to serve as lower cost, easier access platforms to enable basic human physiology studies. Analog work can triage potential in-flight experiments and thus result in more focused on-orbit studies, enhancing overall research efficiency. Terrestrial space analogs generally replicate some of the physiological or psychological stress responses associated with spaceflight. These include the use of human test subjects in a laboratory setting (i.e. exercise, bed rest, confinement, circadian misalignment) and human remote deployment analogs (Antarctica winterover, undersea, etc.) that incorporate confinement, isolation, extreme environment, physiological mission stress and disrupted circadian rhythms. While bed rest has been used to examine the effects of physical deconditioning, radiation and microgravity may only be simulated in animal or microgravity cell culture (clinorotation) analogs. This article will characterize the array of terrestrial analogs for spaceflight immune dysregulation, the current evidence base for each, and interpret the analog catalog in the context of acute and chronic stress. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Noncanonical roles of the immune system in eliciting oncogene addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Stephanie C; Bellovin, David I; Felsher, Dean W

    2013-04-01

    Cancer is highly complex. The magnitude of this complexity makes it highly surprising that even the brief suppression of an oncogene can sometimes result in rapid and sustained tumor regression, illustrating that cancers can be 'oncogene addicted' [1-10]. The essential implication is that oncogenes may not only fuel the initiation of tumorigenesis, but in some cases must be excessively activated to maintain a neoplastic state [11]. Oncogene suppression acutely restores normal physiological programs that effectively overrides secondary genetic events and a cancer collapses [12,13]. Oncogene addiction is the description of the dramatic and sustained regression of some cancers upon the specific inactivation of a single oncogene [1-13,14(••),15,16(••)], that can occur through tumor intrinsic [1,2,4,12], but also host immune mechanisms [17-23]. Notably, oncogene inactivation elicits a host immune response that involves specific immune effectors and cytokines that facilitate a remodeling of the tumor microenvironment including the shut down of angiogenesis and the induction of cellular senescence of tumor cells [16(••)]. Hence, immune effectors are not only critically involved in tumor prevention, initiation [17-19], and progression [20], but also appear to be essential to tumor regression upon oncogene inactivation [21,22(••),23(••)]. Understanding how the inactivation of an oncogene elicits a systemic signal in the host that prompts a deconstruction of a tumor could have important implications. The combination of oncogene-targeted therapy together with immunomodulatory therapy may be ideal for the development of both robust tumor intrinsic and immunological responses, effectively leading to sustained tumor regression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The hydrolytic weakening effect in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, B. E.

    Experiments on single crystals of quartz have shown that an order of magnitude increase in the fugacity of H2O is associated with about an order of magnitude decrease in the flow strength at a given temperature and pressure. The classical interpretation of this hydrolytic weakening effect is that H2O groups are incorporated into the quartz structure as Si-OH.HO-Si groups. Then, in order to move a dislocation, OH.HO bonds need to be broken rather than Si-O bonds. The rate controlling process is envisaged as the diffusion of the (OH)-defect to or with the dislocation core. This paper discusses the manner in which charged hydrogen- or hydroxyl-defects alter the concentrations of other charged defects such as kinks and jogs on dislocations or vacancies and interstitials and so have an influence on the deformation rate. As an example, an increase in the concentration of negatively charged (OH)-defects leads to an increase in the concentration of positively charged kinks on dislocations thus increasing the strain rate. Other deformation mechanisms involving diffusion of oxygen and silicon with or without climb of dislocations or motion of kinks are also investigated and are shown to be capable of explaining the observed effect. This defect chemistry interpretation is consistent with the classical interpretation but also proposes other mechanisms where the direct diffusion of (OH)-defects plays no role in the process. As an example, an increase in the concentration of negatively charged (OH)-defects increases both the concentration of positively charged jogs and positively charged silicon interstitials in such a way as to explain the magnitude of the hydrolytic weakening effect. As such, the rate controlling process is the climb of dislocations controlled by silicon diffusion, not the diffusion of (OH)-defects. Although several different mechanisms are capable of explaining the hydrolytic weakening effect, many have different dependencies upon the activity of oxygen so

  2. Vascular, glial, and lymphatic immune gateways of the central nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhardt, Britta; Carare, Roxana O.; Bechmann, Ingo; Fluegel, Alexander; Laman, Jon D.; Weller, Roy O.

    Immune privilege of the central nervous system (CNS) has been ascribed to the presence of a blood-brain barrier and the lack of lymphatic vessels within the CNS parenchyma. However, immune reactions occur within the CNS and it is clear that the CNS has a unique relationship with the immune system.

  3. MICROFLORA AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE IMMUNE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Khavkin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of the intestinal microflora, which is one of the most urgent problems in pediatrics. Special attention is paid to the process of microbiocenosis formation during early postnatal period, as well as to the realization of the main microflora function, which consists in colonization resistance in close interaction with the components of the local immune system. The author throws light upon the mechanisms of the development of the tolerance to the indigenous microflora, as well as upon the methods of the microflora correction with the help of alimentary pharmacobiotic drugs.

  4. Artificial immune system for effective properties optimization of magnetoelectric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteralski, Arkadiusz; Dziatkiewicz, Grzegorz

    2018-01-01

    The optimization problem of the effective properties for magnetoelectric composites is considered. The effective properties are determined by the semi-analytical Mori-Tanaka approach. The generalized Eshelby tensor components are calculated numerically by using the Gauss quadrature method for the integral representation of the inclusion problem. The linear magnetoelectric constitutive equation is used. The effect of orientation of the electromagnetic materials components is taken into account. The optimization problem of the design is formulated and the artificial immune system is applied to solve it.

  5. Extracellular Adenosine Mediates a Systemic Metabolic Switch during Immune Response: e1002135

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adam Bajgar; Katerina Kucerova; Lucie Jonatova; Ales Tomcala; Ivana Schneedorferova; Jan Okrouhlik; Tomas Dolezal

    2015-01-01

      Immune defense is energetically costly, and thus an effective response requires metabolic adaptation of the organism to reallocate energy from storage, growth, and development towards the immune system...

  6. Stability and bifurcation for Marchuk's model of an immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzuki, Ira Syazwani Mohamad; Roslan, Ummu'Atiqah Mohd

    2017-08-01

    The investigation of an immune system has long been and will continue to be one of dominant themes in both ecology and biology due to its importance. In this paper, we consider Marchuk's model of an immune system where this model is governed by a system of three differential equations with time. This model has two equilibrium states which are healthy state and chronic state. It is healthy state when the antigen reproduction is small while chronic state is when antigen reproduction rate is large. The objectives of this paper are to analyse the stability of this model, to summarize this stability using bifurcation diagram and to discuss interaction between the healthy and chronic states at stationary solution. The methods involved are stability theory and bifurcation theory. Our results show that healthy states are saddle and only one chronic state is asymptotically stable for a region of parameter considered. For the bifurcation's case, as we increase the value of a parameter in this model, the chronic state shows that there are increment in the number of antigen, plasma cell and the antibody production.

  7. Systemic immune presentations of Coxiella burnetii infection (Q Fever).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Maeva; Grossi, Olivier; Agard, Christian; Perret, Christophe; Le Pape, Patrice; Raoult, Didier; Hamidou, Mohamed A

    2010-04-01

    Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. Its presentation can be atypical, delaying and complicating the diagnosis. We report 7 cases of Q fever mimicking vasculitis, systemic inflammatory disease, or auto-immune disorder. Seven cases of Q fever diagnosed between 1995 and 2007 in Nantes University Hospital (France) are described. They occurred in a nonendemic region and were selected on the basis of initial clinical presentation suggesting systemic immune disease. C. burnetii was detected using indirect immunofluorescence serology. Q fever was acute in 4 of the 7 patients and chronic in 3. None had endocarditis. The initial presentations suggested Crohn's disease, Goodpasture's syndrome, polymyalgia rheumatica, adult-onset Still's disease, polyarteritis nodosa, giant-cell arteritis, and essential type II cryoglobulinemia. Two patients had antiphospholipid antibodies, 1 had transient IgG kappa monoclonal gammopathy, and 1 had polyclonal T CD8+ large granular lymphocyte expansion. Clinicians must be aware of the potential diagnosis of Q fever, and C. burnetii serology is a helpful diagnostic tool in the investigation of fever of unknown origin with atypical systemic symptoms suggesting vasculitis or inflammatory disease. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mechanisms for eco-immunity in a changing enviroment: how does the coral innate immune system contend with climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traylor-Knowles, N. G.

    2016-02-01

    Innate immunity plays a central role in maintaining homeostasis, and within the context of impending climate change scenarios, understanding how this system works is critical. However, the actual mechanisms involved in the evolution of the innate immune system are largely unknown. Cnidaria (including corals, sea anemones and jellyfish) are well suited for studying the fundamental functions of innate immunity because they share a common ancestor with bilaterians. This study will highlight the transcriptomic changes during a heat shock in the coral Acropora hyacinthus of American Samoa, examining the temporal changes, every half an hour for 5 hours. We hypothesize that genes involved in innate immunity, and extracellular matrix maintenance will be key components to the heat stress response. This presentation will highlight the novel role of the tumor necrosis factor receptor gene family as a responder to heat stress and present future directions for this developing field in coral reef research.

  9. IMMUNITY AND INFECTION IN WOMEN WITH HYPERPLASTIC STATES OF IMMUNE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lukach

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. One hundred and ninety-nine patients with hyperplastic processes of reproductive system were examined, and 131 (66.16% of them were found to be infected with Chlamydia or Ureaplasma. The mean age of female patients was 42,7±1,35 years. Different infectious agents (e.g. Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealiticum, Mycoplasma hominis were identified in cervical canal of uterine cervix and surgical specimens (biopsy samples of excised myoma, adenomyosis or endometrial hyperplasia. The infected patients were found to have decreased monocytes and neutrophils in blood counts, lower phagocytic activity of monocytes and neutrophils, and decreased bactericidal activity of leukocytes. Other findings included lower CD20+, CD8+ and rFAS CD 95 lymphocytes. Assessment of cytokine-synthesizing activity of CD3+ lymphocytes showed a decrease in both spontaneous and stimulated response (р < 0,001. A weakest spontaneous and stimulated response was found in CD3+/IL-4+ lymphocytes. Analysis of results obtained shows systemic immune disorders and impaired cytokine-synthesizing activity of CD3+ lymphocytes correlating with infection factors in the women with hyperplastic processes of reproductive system. (Med. Immunol., 2008, vol. 10, N 2-3, pp 223-228.

  10. [The interrelations of the thrombohemorrhagic syndrome and the immune system by peritonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanov, F D

    2011-01-01

    The study aimed the influence of the thrombohemorrhagic syndrome (THS) on the immune system in conditions of peritonitis of various severity. The study included 120 patients. Main indicators of the cell and humoral immunity were correlated with I-III degree of the immune system disorders, which, in turn, was correlated with the peritonitis stage. The study proved the importance and necessity of the immune correction in patients with severe peritonitis.

  11. Influence of Hesperidin on the Systemic and Intestinal Rat Immune Response

    OpenAIRE

    Camps-Bossacoma, Mariona; Franch, ?ngels; P?rez-Cano, Francisco J.; Castell, Margarida

    2017-01-01

    Polyphenols, widely found in edible plants, influence the immune system. Nevertheless, the immunomodulatory properties of hesperidin, the predominant flavanone in oranges, have not been deeply studied. To establish the effect of hesperidin on in vivo immune response, two different conditions of immune system stimulations in Lewis rats were applied. In the first experimental design, rats were intraperitoneally immunized with ovalbumin (OVA) plus Bordetella pertussis toxin and alum as the adjuv...

  12. Innate immune system and tissue regeneration in planarians: an area ripe for exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, T Harshani; Hoyer, Katrina K; Oviedo, Néstor J

    2014-08-01

    The immune system has been implicated as an important modulator of tissue regeneration. However, the mechanisms driving injury-induced immune response and tissue repair remain poorly understood. For over 200 years, planarians have been a classical model for studies on tissue regeneration, but the planarian immune system and its potential role in repair is largely unknown. We found through comparative genomic analysis and data mining that planarians contain many potential homologs of the innate immune system that are activated during injury and repair of adult tissues. These findings support the notion that the relationship between adult tissue repair and the immune system is an ancient feature of basal Bilateria. Further analysis of the planarian immune system during regeneration could potentially add to our understanding of how the innate immune system and inflammatory responses interplay with regenerative signals to induce scar-less tissue repair in the context of the adult organism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ejercicio y sistema inmune Exercise and the immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Javier Patiño Grajales

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se ha demostrado que el ejercicio hecho a diferentes intensidades cumple una función moduladora sobre diversos sistemas, y que su acción sobre la respuesta inmune es de gran importancia. Por lo tanto, es necesario esclarecer si estos cambios constituyen efectos benéficos o perjudiciales en cuanto a las adaptaciones del hospedero frente a diversos agentes patógenos. El estudio de estos cambios inducidos por el estrés físico puede tener un impacto grande en la comprensión y prevención de algunas enfermedades que involucran la respuesta del sistema inmune como las alergias, las infecciones, las inmunodeficiencias y el cáncer. En este artículo se presenta una revisión actualizada de la información existente al respecto, con el propósito de aportar elementos que ayuden a comprender este fenómeno biológico, así como sus implicaciones para la salud humana. Se han estudiado varios parámetros de la respuesta inmune durante el ejercicio físico, entre ellos su relación con la respuesta hormonal al estrés y el comportamiento de las diferentes hormonas de acuerdo con la intensidad de aquél. También se han evaluado los cambios en las poblaciones de células sanguíneas (linfocitos, monocitos y neutrófilos así como el comportamiento de las citoquinas y la síntesis de inmunoglobulinas específicas. Todo esto ha permitido establecer una relación entre los sistemas inmune y neuroendocrino, la cual explicaría en It has been demonstrated that physical exercise, carried out at diverse intensities, modulates the function of different human body systems, and that it plays a major role in the immune response. Therefore, it is necessary to find out if these changes have benefic or harmful effects on the host adaptation against several pathogenic agents. The study of these physical-stress-induced changes might have a great impact on the comprehension and prevention of some diseases that involve activation of the immune system such as allergies

  14. Nipah and hendra virus interactions with the innate immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, Christopher F

    2012-01-01

    Nipah virus and Hendra virus are related, highly pathogenic paramyxoviruses with unusually broad host ranges. Henipaviruses encode several proteins that block innate immune responses, and these are likely to serve as virulence factors. Specfically, four virus-encoded proteins, the phosphoprotein (P), the V protein, the W protein, and the C protein have each been demonstrated to counteract aspects of the interferon (IFN)-α/β response, a key component of the innate immune response to virus infection. The available data indicate that V and W can inhibit the production of IFNα/β in response to various stimuli, while the P, V, and W proteins also block the ability of IFNs to signal and induce an antiviral state in cells. The C protein also inhibits the antiviral effects of IFNα/β by a poorly characterized mechanism. Reverse genetics systems, which allow the generation of recombinant viruses bearing specific mutations, have demonstrated the importance of the viral IFN-antagonists for replication. With these systems in hand, the field is now poised to define how specific viral IFN-antagonist functions influence viral pathogenesis.

  15. Similarities in the Metabolic Reprogramming of Immune System and Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu-Yik Tang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellular metabolism has been known for its role in bioenergetics. In recent years, much light has been shed on the reprogrammable cellular metabolism underlying many vital cellular processes, such as cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. Metabolic reprogramming in immune and endothelial cells (ECs is being studied extensively. These cell compartments are implicated in inflammation and pathogenesis of many diseases but their similarities in metabolic reprogramming have not been analyzed in detail. One of the most notable metabolic reprogramming is the Warburg-like effect, famously described as one of the hallmarks of cancer cells. Immune cells and ECs can display this phenotype that is characterized by a metabolic switch favoring glycolysis over oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS in aerobic conditions. Though energy-inefficient, aerobic glycolysis confers many benefits to the respiring cells ranging from higher rate of adenosine triphosphate production to maintaining redox homeostasis. Chemical and biological regulators either promote or perturb this effect. In this review, nitric oxide, hypoxia-inducible factor, and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase have been discussed for their common involvement in metabolic reprogramming of both systems. From in vitro and animal studies, various discrepancies exist regarding the effects of those regulators on metabolic switch. However, it is generally accepted that glycolysis favors inflammatory reactions while OXPHOS favors anti-inflammatory processes. The reasons for such observation are currently subject of intense studies and not completely understood. Finally, metabolic reprogramming in immune cells and ECs does not limit to the physiological state in health but can also be observed in pathological states, such as atherosclerosis and cancer. These new insights provide us with a better understanding of the similarities in metabolic reprogramming across a number of cell types

  16. Similarities in the Metabolic Reprogramming of Immune System and Endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chu-Yik; Mauro, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Cellular metabolism has been known for its role in bioenergetics. In recent years, much light has been shed on the reprogrammable cellular metabolism underlying many vital cellular processes, such as cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. Metabolic reprogramming in immune and endothelial cells (ECs) is being studied extensively. These cell compartments are implicated in inflammation and pathogenesis of many diseases but their similarities in metabolic reprogramming have not been analyzed in detail. One of the most notable metabolic reprogramming is the Warburg-like effect, famously described as one of the hallmarks of cancer cells. Immune cells and ECs can display this phenotype that is characterized by a metabolic switch favoring glycolysis over oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in aerobic conditions. Though energy-inefficient, aerobic glycolysis confers many benefits to the respiring cells ranging from higher rate of adenosine triphosphate production to maintaining redox homeostasis. Chemical and biological regulators either promote or perturb this effect. In this review, nitric oxide, hypoxia-inducible factor, and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase have been discussed for their common involvement in metabolic reprogramming of both systems. From in vitro and animal studies, various discrepancies exist regarding the effects of those regulators on metabolic switch. However, it is generally accepted that glycolysis favors inflammatory reactions while OXPHOS favors anti-inflammatory processes. The reasons for such observation are currently subject of intense studies and not completely understood. Finally, metabolic reprogramming in immune cells and ECs does not limit to the physiological state in health but can also be observed in pathological states, such as atherosclerosis and cancer. These new insights provide us with a better understanding of the similarities in metabolic reprogramming across a number of cell types, which could pave

  17. A survey of artificial immune system based intrusion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; Li, Tao; Hu, Xinlei; Wang, Feng; Zou, Yang

    2014-01-01

    In the area of computer security, Intrusion Detection (ID) is a mechanism that attempts to discover abnormal access to computers by analyzing various interactions. There is a lot of literature about ID, but this study only surveys the approaches based on Artificial Immune System (AIS). The use of AIS in ID is an appealing concept in current techniques. This paper summarizes AIS based ID methods from a new view point; moreover, a framework is proposed for the design of AIS based ID Systems (IDSs). This framework is analyzed and discussed based on three core aspects: antibody/antigen encoding, generation algorithm, and evolution mode. Then we collate the commonly used algorithms, their implementation characteristics, and the development of IDSs into this framework. Finally, some of the future challenges in this area are also highlighted.

  18. A Survey of Artificial Immune System Based Intrusion Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the area of computer security, Intrusion Detection (ID is a mechanism that attempts to discover abnormal access to computers by analyzing various interactions. There is a lot of literature about ID, but this study only surveys the approaches based on Artificial Immune System (AIS. The use of AIS in ID is an appealing concept in current techniques. This paper summarizes AIS based ID methods from a new view point; moreover, a framework is proposed for the design of AIS based ID Systems (IDSs. This framework is analyzed and discussed based on three core aspects: antibody/antigen encoding, generation algorithm, and evolution mode. Then we collate the commonly used algorithms, their implementation characteristics, and the development of IDSs into this framework. Finally, some of the future challenges in this area are also highlighted.

  19. Hypotheses of cancer weakening and origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, John Cheung Yuen

    2015-01-01

    modified organisms from ancient eukaryotic genes (GMOE). The GMOE group lives in hypoxic environments and metabolizes glucose by fermentation. GMOEs represent advanced cancer, which proliferate aggressively and are resistant to DNA damage. It has been demonstrated that as an ERV becomes more prevalent in a mammalian genome, the possibility that the mammal will develop cancer increases. The hypothesis also states that most cancers have their origins in GMOV by the incorporation of viral genes from junk genes. As the cancer progresses, further subgroups of cancer GMOs will develop. If the cancer advances even further, the GMOE could eventually develop prior to late-stage cancer. Because the genes of ancient eukaryotes have enhanced innate immunity, GMOE will eventually prevail over the weaker GMOV during cancer subgroup competition. Hence, cancer development is mainly determined by genes in the mammalian genome. An inherent weakness of cancer cells is their dependence on glucose and iron. Furthermore, they cannot tolerate physical disturbance. Ancient gene GMOs can be treated with a combination of mechanical vibration using glucose-coated magnetic nanoparticles and strengthening of the immune system. Herein, I suggest trials for verifying this hypothesis.

  20. Effect of oral administration of Lactobacillus paracasei L9 on mouse systemic immunity and the immune response in the intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yuanbo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A probiotic strain Lactobacillus paracasei L9,which was isolated from human intestine, was investigated for its immunomodulatory activity in vivo. Results showed that L9 improved systemic immunity by enhancing the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages, the proliferation ratio of splenocytes, the IgG level in the serum and the level of IgA in the mucosa. Further, L9induced theTh1-polarized immune response by elevating the IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio in the mucosa. This effect was confirmed by the enhanced IL-12-inducing activity of macrophages after in vitro stimulation of L9. Also detected was increased expression of TLR-2mRNA in the mucosa. We predict that L9 could enhance innate immunity by activating TLR-2 in the mucosa, and enhance acquired immunity by promoting Th1 polarization through induced production of IL-12 by macrophages.

  1. The immune system mediates blood-brain barrier damage; Possible implications for pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric illnesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderWerf, YD; DeJongste, MJL; terHorst, GJ

    1995-01-01

    The immune system mediates blood-brain barrier damage; possible implications for pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric illnesses. In this investigation the effects of immune activation on the brain are characterized In order to study this, we used a model for chronic immune activation, the myocardial

  2. Why AIDS? The Mystery of How HIV Attacks the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Damaris

    1999-01-01

    Reviews differing theories surrounding the mystery of how human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) attacks the immune system. Claims that understanding how HIV triggers immune-cell depletion may enable researchers to block its effects. New knowledge could reveal strategies for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) therapies that go beyond the drugs…

  3. Massage-like stroking boosts the immune system in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Benjamin; Rattazzi, Lorenza; Brod, Samuel; Pilipović, Ivan; Leposavić, Gordana; D’Acquisto, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    Recent clinical evidence suggests that the therapeutic effect of massage involves the immune system and that this can be exploited as an adjunct therapy together with standard drug-based approaches. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms behind these effects exploring the immunomodulatory function of stroking as a surrogate of massage-like therapy in mice. C57/BL6 mice were stroked daily for 8 days either with a soft brush or directly with a gloved hand and then analysed for differences in their immune repertoire compared to control non-stroked mice. Our results show that hand- but not brush-stroked mice demonstrated a significant increase in thymic and splenic T cell number (p massage-like therapy were associated with a decreased noradrenergic innervation of lymphoid organs and counteracted the immunosuppressive effect of hydrocortisone in vivo. Together our results in mice support the hypothesis that massage-like therapies might be of therapeutic value in the treatment of immunodeficiencies and related disorders and suggest a reduction of the inhibitory noradrenergic tone in lymphoid organs as one of the possible explanations for their immunomodulatory function. PMID:26046935

  4. Studies of innate immune systems against human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Rieko; Kitano, Etsuko; Maeda, Akira; Lo, Pei-Chi; Eguchi, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Masahito; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Miyagawa, Shuji

    2017-02-01

    Pigs are frequently used as animal models for experiments in the surgical field, including allo- and xeno-transplantation. Regeneration studies, including studies dealing with human- and monkey-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), have gradually progressed, with pigs sometimes being used as the scaffold. However, the immunological response of pigs against humans, especially innate immunities, remain unclear. This study reports on a comprehensive study of pig innate immunity against humans. Hemolytic complement activity of pig serum was measured using a microtitration technique. The pig natural anti-human antibody (Ab) was examined using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The reaction of pig natural killer (NK) cells and monocytes/macrophages against human cells was also assessed. Most of the pig complement titers were measured based on methods used in human complement assays. The alternative pathway for pig complement reacts with human cells, indicating that pig complement can react with human cells. Pig serum contains relatively high levels of natural antibodies, IgM and IgG, to human PBMC. Furthermore, the killing of NK cells- and monocyte/macrophage-mediated human cells was clearly confirmed. The collective findings indicate that the pig innate immunological systems, not only serum but also cellular factors, are able to recognize and injure human cells. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. DNA Vaccination: Using the Patient's Immune System to Overcome Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Eschenburg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the most challenging diseases of today. Optimization of standard treatment protocols consisting of the main columns of chemo- and radiotherapy followed or preceded by surgical intervention is often limited by toxic side effects and induction of concomitant malignancies and/or development of resistant mechanisms. This requires the development of therapeutic strategies which are as effective as standard therapies but permit the patients a life without severe negative side effects. Along this line, the development of immunotherapy in general and the innovative concept of DNA vaccination in particular may provide a venue to achieve this goal. Using the patient's own immune system by activation of humoral and cellular immune responses to target the cancer cells has shown first promising results in clinical trials and may allow reduced toxicity standard therapy regimen in the future. The main challenge of this concept is to transfer the plethora of convincing preclinical and early clinical results to an effective treatment of patients.

  6. Effects of Probiotics on the Immune System and Allergic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Shimojo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal microbiota play a crucial role in the development of mucosal tolerance and adaptation. Perturbations in microbiota composition are strongly associated with allergies and asthma in westernized countries. There has been accumulating evidence that the administration of probiotics, “live microbial supplements that exert a beneficial effect on human health,” may be effective in the treatment and/or prevention of allergic diseases. Although it has been shown that part of the effect of probiotics arises from its interaction with the host immune system, the precise mechanisms remain to be determined. In addition, future studies are necessary to define appropriate species and strains, optimum dose, frequency, and duration for the treatment of allergic diseases.

  7. Application of Artificial Immune System in Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiachen Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of methods have been proposed in the area of structural health monitoring (SHM. However, many of them rely on the prior knowledge of structural-parameter-values or the assumption that the structural-parameter-values do not change without damage. This dependence on specific parameter values limits these methods’ applicability. This paper proposes an artificial immune system- (AIS- based approach for the civil structural health monitoring, which does not require specific parameter values to work. A linear three-floor structure model and a number of single-damage scenarios were used to evaluate the proposed method’s performance. The high success rate showed this approach’s great potential for the SHM tasks. This approach has merits of less dependence on the structural-parameter-values and low demand on the training conditions.

  8. Perinatal complications and schizophrenia: involvement of the immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trisha Anne Jenkins

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia suggests that, at least in part, events occurring within the intrauterine or perinatal environment at critical times of brain development underlies emergence of the psychosis observed during adulthood, and brain pathologies that are hypothesised to be from birth. All potential risks stimulate activation of the immune system, and are suggested to act in parallel with an underlying genetic liability, such that an imperfect regulation of the genome mediates these prenatal or early postnatal environmental effects. Epidemiologically based animal models looking at environment and with genes have provided us with a wealth of knowledge in the understanding of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and give us the best possibility for interventions and treatments for schizophrenia.

  9. Short-time evolution in the adaptive immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttenberg, Nicholas; Tabei, S M Ali; Dinner, Aaron R

    2011-09-01

    We exploit a simple model to numerically and analytically investigate the effect of enforcing a time constraint for achieving a system-wide goal during an evolutionary dynamics. This situation is relevant to finding antibody specificities in the adaptive immune response as well as to artificial situations in which an evolutionary dynamics is used to generate a desired capability in a limited number of generations. When the likelihood of finding the target phenotype is low, we find that the optimal mutation rate can exceed the error threshold, in contrast to conventional evolutionary dynamics. We also show how a logarithmic correction to the usual inverse scaling of population size with mutation rate arises. Implications for natural and artificial evolutionary situations are discussed.

  10. An artificial immune system algorithm approach for reconfiguring distribution network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syahputra, Ramadoni; Soesanti, Indah

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes an artificial immune system (AIS) algorithm approach for reconfiguring distribution network with the presence distributed generators (DG). The distribution network with high-performance is a network that has a low power loss, better voltage profile, and loading balance among feeders. The task for improving the performance of the distribution network is optimization of network configuration. The optimization has become a necessary study with the presence of DG in entire networks. In this work, optimization of network configuration is based on an AIS algorithm. The methodology has been tested in a model of 33 bus IEEE radial distribution networks with and without DG integration. The results have been showed that the optimal configuration of the distribution network is able to reduce power loss and to improve the voltage profile of the distribution network significantly.

  11. BRAF inhibition improves tumor recognition by the immune system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; Fagone, Paolo; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2012-01-01

    to be poorly efficient. By characterizing the immunological interactions between T cells and cancer cells in clinical material as well as the influence of the FDA-approved BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib on the immune system, we aimed at unraveling new strategies to expand the efficacy of adoptive T-cell transfer......, which represents one of the most promising approaches currently in clinical development for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Here we show that blocking the BRAF-MAPK pathway in BRAF signaling-addicted melanoma cells significantly increases the ability of T cells contained in clinical grade tumor......-infiltrating lymphocytes to recognize autologous BRAF(V600) mutant melanoma cell lines in vitro. Antitumor reactivity was improved regardless of the class of antigen recognized by tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells. Microarray data suggests that improved tumor recognition is associated with modified expression of MHC Class I...

  12. System immune response to vaccination on FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingos, Mark; Howard, Stephanie; Giaclone, Micholas; Kozono, David; Jacene, Heather [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A patient with newly diagnosed right lung cancer had transient 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-avid left axillary lymph nodes and intense splenic FDG uptake on positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). History revealed that the patient received a left-sided influenza vaccine 2-3 days before the examination. Although inflammatory FDG uptake in ipsilateral axillary nodes is reported, to our knowledge, this is the first report of visualization of the systemic immune response in the spleen related to the influenza vaccination on FDG-PET/CT. The history, splenic uptake and time course on serial FDG-PET/CT helped to avoid a false-positive interpretation for progressing lung cancer and alteration of the radiation therapy plan.

  13. Neural Network Enhanced Structure Determination of Osteoporosis, Immune System, and Radiation Repair Proteins Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation will utilize self learning neural network technology to determine the structure of osteoporosis, immune system disease, and excess radiation...

  14. The placenta in toxicology. Part II : Systemic and local immune adaptations in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svensson-Arvelund, Judit; Ernerudh, Jan; Buse, Eberhard; Cline, J Mark; Haeger, Jan-Dirk; Dixon, Darlene; Markert, Udo R; Pfarrer, Christiane; De Vos, Paul; Faas, Marijke M

    During pregnancy, the maternal immune system is challenged by the semiallogeneic fetus, which must be tolerated without compromising fetal or maternal health. This review updates the systemic and local immune changes taking place during human pregnancy, including some examples in rodents. Systemic

  15. Effect of immune system imagery on secretory IgA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, M S; Achterberg, J; Lawlis, G F; Goven, A; Toledo, R; Butler, J R

    1990-12-01

    This study was an investigation of the effects of physiologically-oriented mental imagery on immune functioning. College students with normal medical histories were randomly selected to one of three groups. Subjects in Group 1 participated in short educational training on the production of secretory immunoglobulin A. They were then tested on salivary IgA, skin temperature, and the Profile of Mood States (POMS) before and after listening to a 17-minute tape of imagery instructions with specially composed background "entrainment" music designed to enhance imagery. Subjects in Group 2 (placebo controls) listened to the same music but received nor formal training on the immune system. Group 3 acted as a control and subjects were tested before and after 17 minutes of no activity. Treatment groups listened to their tapes at home on a bi-daily basis for six weeks. All groups were again tested at Weeks 3 and 6. Secretory IgA was analyzed using standard radial immunodiffusion techniques. Repeated measures analyses of variance with planned orthogonal contrasts were used to evaluate the data. Significant overall increases (p less than 0.05) were found between pre- and posttests for all three trials. Groups 1 and 2 combined (treatment groups) yielded significantly greater increases in sIgA over Group 3 (control) for all three trials. Group 1 (imagery) was significantly higher than Group 2 (music) in antibody production for Trials 2 and 3. Symptomatology, recorded by subjects at Weeks 3 and 6, was significantly lower for three symptoms (rapid heartbeat, breathing difficulty, and jaw clenching), favoring both treatment groups over the control group.

  16. Epigenetic regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Pek Siew; Li, Jasmine; Holloway, Adele F; Rao, Sudha

    2013-07-01

    T cells are exquisitely poised to respond rapidly to pathogens and have proved an instructive model for exploring the regulation of inducible genes. Individual genes respond to antigenic stimulation in different ways, and it has become clear that the interplay between transcription factors and the chromatin platform of individual genes governs these responses. Our understanding of the complexity of the chromatin platform and the epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to transcriptional control has expanded dramatically in recent years. These mechanisms include the presence/absence of histone modification marks, which form an epigenetic signature to mark active or inactive genes. These signatures are dynamically added or removed by epigenetic enzymes, comprising an array of histone-modifying enzymes, including the more recently recognized chromatin-associated signalling kinases. In addition, chromatin-remodelling complexes physically alter the chromatin structure to regulate chromatin accessibility to transcriptional regulatory factors. The advent of genome-wide technologies has enabled characterization of the chromatin landscape of T cells in terms of histone occupancy, histone modification patterns and transcription factor association with specific genomic regulatory regions, generating a picture of the T-cell epigenome. Here, we discuss the multi-layered regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system, focusing on the interplay between transcription factors, and the T-cell epigenome, including the role played by chromatin remodellers and epigenetic enzymes. We will also use IL2, a key inducible cytokine gene in T cells, as an example of how the different layers of epigenetic mechanisms regulate immune responsive genes during T-cell activation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. A Service Oriented Architecture Approach to Achieve Interoperability between Immunization Information Systems in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Masoud; Ahmadi, Maryam; Dixon, Brian E

    2014-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems can support vaccine forecasting and immunization reminders; however, immunization decision-making requires data from fragmented, independent systems. Interoperability and accurate data exchange between immunization information systems (IIS) is an essential factor to utilize Immunization CDS systems. Service oriented architecture (SOA) and Health Level 7 (HL7) are dominant standards for web-based exchange of clinical information. We implemented a system based on SOA and HL7 v3 to support immunization CDS in Iran. We evaluated system performance by exchanging 1500 immunization records for roughly 400 infants between two IISs. System turnaround time is less than a minute for synchronous operation calls and the retrieved immunization history of infants were always identical in different systems. CDS generated reports were accordant to immunization guidelines and the calculations for next visit times were accurate. Interoperability is rare or nonexistent between IIS. Since inter-state data exchange is rare in United States, this approach could be a good prototype to achieve interoperability of immunization information.

  18. HIV-1 and hijacking of the host immune system: the current scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad; Manzoor, Sobia; Saalim, Muhammad; Resham, Saleha; Ashraf, Javed; Javed, Aneela; Waqar, Ahmed Bilal

    2016-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a major health burden across the world which leads to the development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). This review article discusses the prevalence of HIV, its major routes of transmission, natural immunity, and evasion from the host immune system. HIV is mostly prevalent in Sub-Saharan Africa and low income countries. It is mostly transmitted by sharing syringe needles, blood transfusion, and sexual routes. The host immune system is categorized into three main types; the innate, the adaptive, and the intrinsic immune system. Regarding the innate immune system against HIV, the key players are mucosal membrane, dendritic cells (DCs), complement system, interferon, and host Micro RNAs. The major components of the adaptive immune system exploited by HIV are T cells mainly CD4+ T cells and B cells. The intrinsic immune system confronted by HIV involves (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3G) APOBEC3G, tripartite motif 5-α (TRIM5a), terherin, and (SAM-domain HD-domain containing protein) SAMHD1. HIV-1 efficiently interacts with the host immune system, exploits the host machinery, successfully replicates and transmits from one cell to another. Further research is required to explore evasion strategies of HIV to develop novel therapeutic approaches against HIV. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Reaction-induced rheological weakening enables oceanic plate subduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirauchi, Ken-Ichi; Fukushima, Kumi; Kido, Masanori; Muto, Jun; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-08-26

    Earth is the only terrestrial planet in our solar system where an oceanic plate subducts beneath an overriding plate. Although the initiation of plate subduction requires extremely weak boundaries between strong plates, the way in which oceanic mantle rheologically weakens remains unknown. Here we show that shear-enhanced hydration reactions contribute to the generation and maintenance of weak mantle shear zones at mid-lithospheric depths. High-pressure friction experiments on peridotite gouge reveal that in the presence of hydrothermal water, increasing strain and reactions lead to an order-of-magnitude reduction in strength. The rate of deformation is controlled by pressure-solution-accommodated frictional sliding on weak hydrous phyllosilicate (talc), providing a mechanism for the 'cutoff' of the high peak strength at the brittle-plastic transition. Our findings suggest that infiltration of seawater into transform faults with long lengths and low slip rates is an important controlling factor on the initiation of plate tectonics on terrestrial planets.

  20. Immune System Dysregulation and Herpesvirus Reactivation Persist During Long-Duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, B. E.; Mehta, S.; Stowe, R. P.; Uchakin, P.; Quiriarte, H.; Pierson, D.; Sams, C. F.

    2011-01-01

    This poster presentation reviews a study that is designed to address immune system dysregulation and the risk to crewmembers in long duration exploration class missions. This study will address these objectives: (1) Determine the status of adaptive immunity physiological stress, viral immunity, latent herpesvirus reactivation in astronauts during 6 month missions to the International Space Station; (2) determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight; and (3) determine an appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures. The study anticipates 17 subjects, and for this presentation, (midpoint study data) 10 subjects are reviewed.

  1. Defence mechanisms and immune evasion in the interplay between the humane immune system and Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theander, T G

    1992-01-01

    antigens, which probably is precipitated by defects in the early events of T-cell activation and inhibition of IL-2 function elucidated, but soluble factors secreted either by the parasites, or by host cells as a result of exposure to the parasite, seem to be involved. 4) Immune effector mechanisms...... in the liver and the spleen are avoided by sequestration of the mature parasites to the vascular endothelium. The interplay between the human defence system and the malaria parasite governs the symptomatology, the pathology and the development of immunity to the disease. These interactions are extremely...

  2. The immune system strikes back: cellular immune responses against indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Baek; Berge-Hansen, Linda; Junker, Niels

    2009-01-01

    of the major immune suppressive cell populations. CONCLUSION: IDO may serve as an important and widely applicable target for anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies. Furthermore, as emerging evidence suggests that IDO constitutes a significant counter-regulatory mechanism induced by pro-inflammatory signals...

  3. Chronic Schistosome Infection Leads to Modulation of Granuloma Formation and Systemic Immune Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven K. Lundy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Schistosome worms have been infecting humans for millennia, but it is only in the last half century that we have begun to understand the complexities of this inter-relationship. As our sophistication about the inner workings of every aspect of the immune system has increased, it has also become obvious that schistosome infections have broad ranging effects on nearly all of the innate and adaptive immune response mechanisms. Selective pressures on both the worms and their hosts, has no doubt led to co-evolution of protective mechanisms, particularly those that favor granuloma formation around schistosome eggs and immune suppression during chronic infection. The immune modulatory effects that chronic schistosome infection and egg deposition elicit have been intensely studied, not only because of their major implications to public health issues, but also due to the emerging evidence that schistosome infection may protect humans from severe allergies and autoimmunity. Mouse models of schistosome infection have been extremely valuable for studying immune modulation and regulation, and in the discovery of novel aspects of immunity. A progression of immune reactions occurs during granuloma formation ranging from innate inflammation, to activation of each branch of adaptive immune response, and culminating in systemic immune suppression and granuloma fibrosis. Although molecular factors from schistosome eggs have been identified as mediators of immune modulation and suppressive functions of T and B cells, much work is still needed to define the mechanisms of the immune alteration and determine whether therapies for asthma or autoimmunity could be developed from these pathways.

  4. Differential Radiative Heating Drives Tropical Atmospheric Circulation Weakening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yan; Huang, Yi

    2017-10-01

    The tropical atmospheric circulation is projected to weaken during global warming, although the mechanisms that cause the weakening remain to be elucidated. We hypothesize that the weakening is related to the inhomogeneous distribution of the radiative forcing and feedback, which heats the tropical atmosphere in the ascending and subsiding regions differentially and thus requires the circulation to weaken due to energetic constraints. We test this hypothesis in a series of numerical experiments using a fully coupled general circulation model (GCM), in which the radiative forcing distribution is controlled using a novel method. The results affirm the effect of inhomogeneous forcing on the tropical circulation weakening, and this effect is greatly amplified by radiative feedback, especially that of clouds. In addition, we find that differential heating explains the intermodel differences in tropical circulation response to CO2 forcing in the GCM ensemble of the Climate Model Intercomparison Project.

  5. Depletion of complement system immunity in patients with myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenwen; Che, Lin; Jiang, Jinfa; Yang, Fan; Duan, Qianglin; Song, Haoming; Liu, Xiaohong; Shen, Yuqin; Wang, Lemin

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate differences in the expression of complement system genes, and serum levels of CH50, C3 and C4 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with myocardial infarction (AMI), stable angina pectoris (SA) and controls. A total of 100 patients with AMI, 100 with SA and 100 clinical controls were recruited in the present study. In each group, 20 randomly selected individuals were examined using whole human genome microarray analysis to detect the expression of genes of the complement system. The serum levels of CH50, C3 and C4 were measured in all 300 subjects. In the patients with AMI, the expression levels of genes encoding C1qα, C1qβ, C1qγ, C1r, Factor P, C5a (complement component), CR1, integrin αM, integrin αX, integrin β2, C5aR, CRIg (complement receptors) and CD46, CD55 and CD59 (complement regulators) were significantly higher, compared with the respective genes in the SA patients and controls (Pcomplement components or regulators between the SA and control groups. The serum levels of CH50, C3 and C4 were significantly increased in the AMI and SA groups, compared with the controls. In the AMI and SA groups, the complement system was activated. However, the differential mRNA expression of complement components, receptors and regulators in the AMI group suggested the dysfunction of the C5b-9 complex. The depression of complement system immunity in the patients with AMI may be associated with the pathogenesis of AMI.

  6. An update on an immune system that goes awry in systemic sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bon, L. van; Cossu, M.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review aims to provide an overview of the recent data that emerged, further substantiating the critical role of innate immunity in systemic sclerosis (SSc). RECENT FINDINGS: Driven by the evidence that newly identified SSc susceptibility genes are predominantly involved in

  7. Hormetic Response to Low-Dose Radiation: Focus on the Immune System and Its Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiuwei Cui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The interrelationship between ionizing radiation and the immune system is complex, multifactorial, and dependent on radiation dose/quality and immune cell type. High-dose radiation usually results in immune suppression. On the contrary, low-dose radiation (LDR modulates a variety of immune responses that have exhibited the properties of immune hormesis. Although the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood yet, LDR has been used clinically for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and malignant tumors. These advancements in preclinical and clinical studies suggest that LDR-mediated immune modulation is a well-orchestrated phenomenon with clinical potential. We summarize recent developments in the understanding of LDR-mediated immune modulation, with an emphasis on its potential clinical applications.

  8. Chronic lower limb wounds evoke systemic response of the lymphatic (immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W L Olszewski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing should not be considered as a process limited only to the damaged tissues. It is always accompanied by an intensive local immune response and in advanced stages, the systemic lymphatic (immune structure. In this review we present evidence from our own studies as well as pertinent literature on the role of skin and subcutaneous tissue lymphatics at the wound site and of transport of antigens along with collecting afferent lymphatics to the lymph nodes. We also speculate the role of lymph nodes in raising cohorts of bacterial and own tissue antigen-specific lymphocytes and their participation in healing and not infrequently evoking uncontrolled chronic immune reaction causing a delay of healing. It is also speculated as to why there is a rapid response of lymph node cells to microbial antigens and tolerance to damaged-tissue-derived antigens occurs

  9. TUBERCULOSIS AS AN INFECTIOUS PATHOLOGY OF IMMUNE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martynov AV

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available As a result of years’ research of the many research groups around the world able to understand the reason why it will be impossible to create really effective vaccine for the prevention of tuberculosis infection in the near future. The main reason for the impossibility creating such vaccine is an intracellular nature of tuberculosis. In fact, TB is a pathology of the immune system. Mycobacterium tuberculosis persist within macrophages and thereby inhibit the process of phagocytosis completion and digesting the contents of phagosome. The destruction of the lysosomal membrane inside macrophages is blocked by changing the pH in lysosomes. For the presence of lytic activity for most lysosomal enzymes require need acidic environment. Mycobacteria are also getting into the lysosomes of macrophages start to rapidly hydrolysis for urea by urease to form ammonia. Wherein pH in the medium changes to alkaline, this inactivates enzymes and stabilizes lysosomal membrane. Thus mycobacterium prevent lysosome collapse at inactivated lysosomal enzymes and do not allow them to complete macrophage digestion phase by transition lysosomal to phagosomal stage. Stop phagocytolysis process leads to imbalance of the host immune system. Increasing the number of infected macrophages sensitized to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens, leading to constant hyperfunction of cellular immunity, particularly enhanced immune response to cell wall components of mycobacteria, induction high titers of interferon-gamma in response to a stimulus, a sharp jump IL-2 titers and TNF-α , IFN-γ specific activation CD8 + CTL. Need also focus attention on the main differences from the MBT and human BCG, that is well growth in the human body, persists along host life, but does not cause active TB (except in patients with HIV/AIDS. After MBT cell destruction in the environment gets some additional high allergenic antigens, such as 85B, ESAT6, Rv2660c, HyVaC 4 (Ag85B and TB10.4.. These

  10. Nutritional modulation of age-related changes in the immune system and risk of infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The immune system undergoes some adverse alterations during aging, many of which have been implicated in the increased morbidity and mortality associated with infection in the elderly. In addition to intrinsic changes to the immune system with aging, the elderly are more likely to have poor nutritio...

  11. Nervous immunity: A study on the role of complement system in neuronal degeneration and regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sta, M.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes research that shows that activation of the immune system is it not always beneficial. An activated immune system in the brain or in the peripheral nerves acts as a dual edged sword. A little activation is required for normal function, clearance and inhibiting disease

  12. Improving vaccine registries through mobile technologies: a vision for mobile enhanced Immunization information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kumanan; Atkinson, Katherine M; Deeks, Shelley L; Crowcroft, Natasha S

    2016-01-01

    Immunization registries or information systems are critical to improving the quality and evaluating the ongoing success of immunization programs. However, the completeness of these systems is challenged by a myriad of factors including the fragmentation of vaccine administration, increasing mobility of individuals, new vaccine development, use of multiple products, and increasingly frequent changes in recommendations. Mobile technologies could offer a solution, which mitigates some of these challenges. Engaging individuals to have more control of their own immunization information using their mobile devices could improve the timeliness and accuracy of data in central immunization information systems. Other opportunities presented by mobile technologies that could be exploited to improve immunization information systems include mobile reporting of adverse events following immunization, the capacity to scan 2D barcodes, and enabling bidirectional communication between individuals and public health officials. Challenges to utilizing mobile solutions include ensuring privacy of data, access, and equity concerns, obtaining consent and ensuring adoption of technology at sufficiently high rates. By empowering individuals with their own health information, mobile technologies can also serve as a mechanism to transfer immunization information as individuals cross local, regional, and national borders. Ultimately, mobile enhanced immunization information systems can help realize the goal of the individual, the healthcare provider, and public health officials always having access to the same immunization information. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Probiotics and the Gut Immune System: Indirect Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fata, Giorgio; Weber, Peter; Mohajeri, M Hasan

    2017-08-31

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) represents the largest interface between the human organism and the external environment. In the lumen and upper part of the mucus layer, this organ hosts an enormous number of microorganisms whose composition affects the functions of the epithelial barrier and the gut immune system. Consequentially, the microorganisms in the GIT influence the health status of the organism. Probiotics are living microorganisms which, in specific conditions, confer a health benefit to the host. Among others, probiotics have immunomodulatory properties that usually act directly by (a) increasing the activity of macrophages or natural killer cells, (b) modulating the secretion of immunoglobulins or cytokines, or indirectly by (c) enhancing the gut epithelial barrier, (d) altering the mucus secretion, and (e) competitive exclusion of other (pathogenic) bacteria. This review focuses on specific bacteria strains with indirect immunomodulatory properties. Particularly, we describe here the mechanisms through which specific probiotics enhance the gut epithelial barrier and modulate mucus production. Moreover, we describe the antimicrobial properties of specific bacteria strains. Recent data suggest that multiple pathologies are associated with an unbalanced gut microflora (dysbiosis). Although the cause-effect relationship between pathology and gut microflora is not yet well established, consumption of specific probiotics may represent a powerful tool to re-establish gut homeostasis and promote gut health.

  14. Nutrition and Immune System in Children with Simple Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwonogrodzka-Senczyna, Aneta; Janusz, Malgorzata; Jeznach-Steinhagen, Anna; Demkow, Urszula; Pyrzak, Beata

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dietary factors in nutrition influencing the immune system of children and teenagers suffering from simple obesity. The study involved 100 children and teenagers aged 7-18 with simple obesity. Nutritional data were obtained from 3-day food records. The consumed nutrients, including immunomodulators and immunostimulants, were estimated based on the nutrition interview. The results were compared with the nutritional norms. On average, the proportion of n-6:n-3 fatty acids equalled 10:1. Among the amino acids, the highest intake values in the diet were observed for glutamine (13,694.6 mg/day). The study demonstrates inadequate intake levels of iron (73% of recommended dietary allowance, RDA), vitamin C (65% of RDA), and vitamin D (11% of RDA) taking into account the median values for the entire study group. The median daily intake of other nutrients exceeded the RDA values. The diets of the participants in this study were not properly balanced with respect to immunomodulators, which may contribute to the occurrence of immunological disorders and immunodeficiency in this group of patients.

  15. Comprehensive immune profiling reveals substantial immune system alterations in a subset of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Gustafson

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with a median lifespan of 2-3 years after diagnosis. There are few meaningful treatments that alter progression in this disease. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that neuroinflammation may play a key role in the progression rate of ALS. Despite this, there are no validated biomarkers of neuroinflammation for use in clinical practice or clinical trials. Biomarkers of neuroinflammation could improve patient management, provide new therapeutic targets, and possibly help stratify clinical trial selection and monitoring. However, attempts to identify a singular cause of neuroinflammation have not been successful. Here, we performed multi-parameter flow cytometry to comprehensively assess 116 leukocyte populations and phenotypes from lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes in a cohort of 80 ALS patients. We identified 32 leukocyte phenotypes that were altered in ALS patients compared to age and gender matched healthy volunteers (HV that included phenotypes of both inflammation and immune suppression. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering and principle component analysis of ALS and HV immunophenotypes revealed two distinct immune profiles of ALS patients. ALS patients were clustered into a profile distinct from HVs primarily due to differences in a multiple T cell phenotypes, CD3+CD56+ T cells and HLA-DR on monocytes. Patients clustered into an abnormal immune profile were younger, more likely to have a familial form of the disease, and survived longer than those patients who clustered similarly with healthy volunteers (344 weeks versus 184 weeks; p = 0.012. The data set generated from this study establishes an extensive accounting of immunophenotypic changes readily suitable for biomarker validation studies. The extensive immune system changes measured in this study indicate that normal immune homeostatic mechanisms are disrupted in ALS patients, and that

  16. Innate immune system activation by viral RNA: How to predict it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondili, M; Roux, M; Vabret, N; Bailly-Bechet, M

    2016-01-15

    The immune system is able to identify foreign pathogens via different pathways. In the case of viral infection, recognition of the viral RNA is a crucial step, and many efforts have been made to understand which features of viral RNA are detected by the immune system. The biased viral RNA composition, measured as host-virus nucleotidic divergence, or CpG enrichment, has been proposed as salient signal. Peculiar structural features of these RNA could also be related to the immune system activation. Here, we gather multiple datasets and proceed to a meta-analysis to uncover the best predictors of immune system activation by viral RNA. "A" nucleotide content and Minimum Folding Energy are good predictors, and are more easily generalized than more complex indicators suggested previously. As RNA composition and structure are highly correlated, we suggest further experiments on synthetic sequences to identify the viral RNA sensing mechanisms by immune system receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Under Pressure: Interactions between Commensal Microbiota and the Teleost Immune System

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    Cecelia Kelly

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Commensal microorganisms inhabit every mucosal surface of teleost fish. At these surfaces, microorganisms directly and indirectly shape the teleost immune system. This review provides a comprehensive overview of how the microbiota and microbiota-derived products influence both the mucosal and systemic immune system of fish. The cross talk between the microbiota and the teleost immune system shifts significantly under stress or disease scenarios rendering commensals into opportunists or pathogens. Lessons learnt from germ-free fish models as well as from oral administration of live probiotics to fish highlight the vast impact that microbiota have on immune development, antibody production, mucosal homeostasis, and resistance to stress. Future studies should dissect the specific mechanisms by which different members of the fish microbiota and the metabolites they produce interact with pathogens, with other commensals, and with the teleost immune system.

  18. Under Pressure: Interactions between Commensal Microbiota and the Teleost Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Cecelia; Salinas, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Commensal microorganisms inhabit every mucosal surface of teleost fish. At these surfaces, microorganisms directly and indirectly shape the teleost immune system. This review provides a comprehensive overview of how the microbiota and microbiota-derived products influence both the mucosal and systemic immune system of fish. The cross talk between the microbiota and the teleost immune system shifts significantly under stress or disease scenarios rendering commensals into opportunists or pathogens. Lessons learnt from germ-free fish models as well as from oral administration of live probiotics to fish highlight the vast impact that microbiota have on immune development, antibody production, mucosal homeostasis, and resistance to stress. Future studies should dissect the specific mechanisms by which different members of the fish microbiota and the metabolites they produce interact with pathogens, with other commensals, and with the teleost immune system.

  19. Role of the adaptive immune system in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David G; Vinh, Antony; Lob, Heinrich; Madhur, Meena S

    2010-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that both innate and adaptive immunity contribute to hypertension. Inflammatory cells, including macrophages and T cells accumulate in the vessel wall, particularly in the perivascular fat, and in the kidney of hypertensive animals. Mice lacking lymphocytes are resistant to the development of hypertension, and adoptive transfer of T cells restores hypertensive responses to angiotensin II and DOCA-salt challenge. Immune modulating agents have variable, but often-beneficial effects in ameliorating end-organ damage and blood pressure elevation in experimental hypertension. The mechanisms by which hypertension stimulates an immune response remain unclear, but might involve the formation of neoantigens that activate adaptive immunity. Identification of these neoantigens and understanding how they form might prove useful in the prevention and treatment of this widespread and devastating disease. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Research on Immunotherapy: Using the Immune System to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... laboratories that will be responsible for the comprehensive molecular analysis of clinical trial specimens for biomarkers associated ... Immunotherapy to Treat Cancer Biological Therapies for Cancer CAR T Cells: Engineering Patients’ Immune Cells to Treat ...

  1. Interaction Between Familial Transmission and a Constitutively Active Immune System Shapes Gut Microbiota in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Rupal; Kounatidis, Ilias; Ligoxygakis, Petros

    2017-01-01

    Resident gut bacteria are constantly influencing the immune system, yet the role of the immune system in shaping microbiota composition during an organism’s life span has remained unclear. Experiments in mice have been inconclusive due to differences in husbandry schemes that led to conflicting results. We used Drosophila as a genetically tractable system with a simpler gut bacterial population structure streamlined genetic backgrounds and established cross schemes to address this issue. We found that, depending on their genetic background, young flies had microbiota of different diversities that converged with age to the same Acetobacteraceae-dominated pattern in healthy flies. This pattern was accelerated in immune-compromised flies with higher bacterial load and gut cell death. Nevertheless, immune-compromised flies resembled their genetic background, indicating that familial transmission was the main force regulating gut microbiota. In contrast, flies with a constitutively active immune system had microbiota readily distinguishable from their genetic background with the introduction and establishment of previously undetectable bacterial families. This indicated the influence of immunity over familial transmission. Moreover, hyperactive immunity and increased enterocyte death resulted in the highest bacterial load observed starting from early adulthood. Cohousing experiments showed that the microenvironment also played an important role in the structure of the microbiota where flies with constitutive immunity defined the gut microbiota of their cohabitants. Our data show that, in Drosophila, constitutively active immunity shapes the structure and density of gut microbiota. PMID:28413160

  2. Interactions between intestinal microbiota and innate immune system in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiara, Salvatore; Stronati, Laura; Aloi, Marina

    2012-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the result of an altered immune homeostasis within the intestinal mucosa against the gut microbiota, leading to chronic inflammation in genetically predisposed individuals. Under normal conditions, the immune system defends against pathogens and prevents the passage of excessive intestinal bacteria; regulatory pathways must maintain a low-grade, controlled inflammation in a healthy gut, but also induce a protective response against pathogens. The innate immune system is the first-line defense from microbes; dendritic cells, macrophages, and epithelial cells produce an initial, immediate response. The immune system constantly controls commensal bacteria and utilizes constitutive antimicrobial mechanisms to sustain immune homeostasis. The discovery that several genes linked to IBD modulate microbial recognition and innate immune pathways, such as nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (Nod2), and genes that mediate autophagy (ie, ATG16L1, IRGM), has highlighted the critical role of host-microbe interactions in controlling intestinal immune homeostasis. Commensal microorganisms actively interact with the intestinal mucosa and influence the activity of the immune system as well as the amplitude of the immune response. In contrast, host factors can influence microbes, which in turn modulate disease susceptibility. In this paper, we focus on the mechanisms that mediate host-microbe interactions and how the disruption of this balance leads to chronic intestinal inflammation in IBD.

  3. Activation of innate immunity during systemic Candida infections

    OpenAIRE

    Ifrim, D.C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increased knowledge on the mechanisms of Candida recognition and the networks of innate and adaptive host defense activated during infection, much remains to be learned regarding the distinctive modulatory effects of Candida spp on host immune responses. We showed that the chronic exposure of primary human immune cells to C. albicans primes them for subsequent stimulation with different microorganisms, mechanism that could explain the potential stimulatory effects of the fungus in...

  4. Role of the Adaptive Immune System in Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, David G.; Vinh, Antony; Lob, Heinrich; Madhur, Meena S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that both innate and adaptive immunity contribute to hypertension. Inflammatory cells, including macrophages and T cells accumulate in the vessel wall, particularly in the perivascular fat, and in the kidney. Mice lacking lymphocytes are resistant to development of hypertension, and adoptive transfer of T cells restores hypertensive responses to angiotensin II and DOCA-salt challenge. Immune modulating agents have variable, but often-beneficial effects in amelioratin...

  5. periapical cyst and its relation with the body immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vahid

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common outcomes of pulp inflammation is periapical granuloma formation. Existence of immune cells in these lesions showed involvement of both humoral and cellular immunity in the site. The presence of different antigens in the root canal causes production o various antibodies and consequent immunological reactions. Different theories have been proposed on periapical cysts. The most valid of them is based onimmunologic response which can lead to tissue destruction due to immunological reactions.

  6. Pulmonary and Systemic Immune Response to Chronic Lunar Dust Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Quiriarte, Heather; Nelman, Mayra; Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.; Sams, Clarence

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to millennia of meteorite impact with virtually no erosive effects, the surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of ultra-fine, reactive Lunar dust. Very little is known regarding the toxicity of Lunar dust on human physiology. Given the size and electrostatic characteristics of Lunar dust, countermeasures to ensure non-exposure of astronauts will be difficult. To ensure astronaut safety during any future prolonged Lunar missions, it is necessary to establish the effect of chronic pulmonary Lunar dust exposure on all physiological systems. Methods: This study assessed the toxicity of airborne lunar dust exposure in rats on pulmonary and system immune system parameters. Rats were exposed to 0, 20.8, or 60.8 mg/m3 of lunar dust (6h/d; 5d/wk) for up to 13 weeks. Sacrifices occurred after exposure durations of 1day, 7 days, 4 weeks and 13 weeks post-exposure, when both blood and lung lavage fluid were collected for analysis. Lavage and blood assays included leukocyte distribution by flow cytometry, electron/fluorescent microscopy, and cytokine concentration. Cytokine production profiles following mitogenic stimulation were performed on whole blood only. Results: Untreated lavage fluid was comprised primarily of pulmonary macrophages. Lunar dust inhalation resulted in an influx of neutrophils and lymphocytes. Although the percentage of lymphocytes increased, the T cell CD4:CD8 ratio was unchanged. Cytokine analysis of the lavage fluid showed increased levels of IL-1b and TNFa. These alterations generally persisted through the 13 week sampling. Blood analysis showed few systemic effects from the lunar dust inhalation. By week 4, the peripheral granulocyte percentage was elevated in the treated rats. Plasma cytokine levels were unchanged in all treated rats compared to controls. Peripheral blood analysis showed an increased granulocyte percentage and altered cytokine production profiles consisting of increased in IL-1b and IL-6, and decreased IL-2

  7. Next-Generation Sequencing and the Crustacean Immune System: The Need for Alternatives in Immune Gene Annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K F; Greenwood, Spencer J

    2016-12-01

    (Homarus americanus) transcriptome as an example. Immune genes have evolved rapidly over time, facilitating speciation and adaption to highly divergent ecological niches. Complete and proper annotation of immune genes from invertebrates has been challenging. Modulation of the crustacean immune system occurs in a variety of physiological responses including biotic and abiotic stressors, molting and reproduction. A simple method for the identification of a greater number of potential immune genes is proposed, along with a short introductory primer on crustacean immune response. The intended audience is not the advanced bioinformatic user, but those investigating physiological responses who require rudimentary understanding of crustacean immunological principles, but where immune gene regulation is not their primary interest. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Effects of ultraviolet radiation on the immune system in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morison, W.L. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA). School of Medicine)

    1989-10-01

    In experimental animals, exposure to UV-B radiation produces selective alterations of immune function which are mainly in the form of suppression of normal immune responses. This immune suppression is important in the development of nonmelanoma skin cancer, may influence the development and course of infectious disease and possibly protects against autoimmune reactions. The evidence that this form of immune suppression occurs in humans is less compelling and very incomplete. The wavelengths of radiation most affected by a depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer are those known to be most immunosuppressive in animals and it is likely that such depletion will increase any suppressive effect of sunlight on immunity in humans. In addition to establishing whether or not UV-B radiation can cause suppression of immune function in humans, studies are required to determine if melanin can provide protection against such suppression, the role of this suppression in the pathogenesis of skin cancer, the development of infectious disease and vaccine effectiveness, and the capacity for humans to develop adaptive, protective mechanisms which may limit damage from continued exposure to UV-B radiation. (author).

  9. Integrated Immune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarnece

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to replace several recent studies about astronaut immune systems with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling. The study will address lack of in-flight data to determine the inflight status of immune systems, physiological stress, viral immunity, to determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight, and to determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  10. Mucosal and systemic anti-GAG immunity induced by neonatal immunization with HIV LAMP/gag DNA vaccine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldoni, Adriana Letícia; Maciel, Milton; Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; Piubelli, Orlando; de Brito, Cyro Alves; Melo, Andrea; Marques, Ernesto Torres; August, Joseph Thomas; Duarte, Alberto José da Silva; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2011-04-01

    Vaccines capable of inducing mucosal immunity in early postnatal life until adulthood, protecting early sexual initiation, should be considered as strategies to vaccination against HIV. The HIV-1 GAG protein as a chimera with the lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP/gag), encoded by a DNA vaccine, is targeted to the endosomal/lysosomal compartment that contains class II MHC molecules and has been shown to be immunogenic in adult mice. Assuming that one such strategy could help to overcome the immunological immaturity in the early postnatal period, we have evaluated the systemic and mucosal immunogenicity of LAMP/gag immunization in neonatal mice. Intranasal immunization with LAMP/gag vaccine induced higher levels of sIgA and IgG anti-GAG antibodies in intestinal washes than did the gag vaccine. The combination of ID injections and the IN protocol with the chimeric vaccine promoted the increase of Ab levels in sera. Both vaccines induced splenic IFN-γ- secreting cells against GAG peptide pools, as well as in vivo cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) function, and increased the percentage of CD8+ T cells to the immunodominant class I peptide in gut and spleen. However, only the chimeric vaccine was able to enhance Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion in response to class II GAG peptide and to enhance IL-4-secreting cells against GAG peptides and p24 protein stimuli. Long-lasting humoral and cellular responses were detected until adult age, following neonatal immunization with the chimeric vaccine. The LAMP/gag vaccination was able to induce potent GAG-specific T and B cell immune responses in early life which are essential to elicit sustained and long-lasting mucosal and systemic humoral response. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Vitamin effects on the immune system: vitamins A and D take centre stage

    OpenAIRE

    Mora, J. Rodrigo; Iwata, Makoto; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2008-01-01

    Vitamins are essential constituents of our diet that have long been known to influence the immune system. Vitamins A and D have received particular attention in recent years as these vitamins have been shown to have an unexpected and crucial effect on the immune response. We present and discuss our current understanding of the essential roles of vitamins in modulating a broad range of immune processes, such as lymphocyte activation and proliferation, T-helper-cell differentiation, tissue-spec...

  12. Experimental research into indoor static geomagnetic field weakening phenomenon

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    V.Yu. Rozov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A technique and results of experimental studies of geomagnetic field (GMF induction in 195 different rooms in educational institutions, residential buildings, shopping malls and subway are presented. It is shown that in all the buildings there is weakening of the natural GMF. However, the GMF weakening is slight in the most areas and not dangerous to public health. Exceptions are areas of high-rise frame-cast-in-place residential blocks, offices and premises of shopping centers with steel frames and platforms of underground stations. Here, the GMF can be weakened to a dangerous level (less than 25 µT, which requires measures for its normalization.

  13. Glycan recognition at the interface of the intestinal immune system: target for immune modulation via dietary components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kivit, Sander; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Garssen, Johan; Willemsen, Linette E M

    2011-09-01

    The intestinal mucosa is constantly exposed to the luminal content, which includes micro-organisms and dietary components. Prebiotic non-digestible oligosaccharides may be supplemented to the diet to exert modulation of immune responses in the intestine. Short chain galacto- and long chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scGOS/lcFOS), functionally mimicking oligosaccharides present in human milk, have been reported to reduce the development of allergy through modulation of the intestinal microbiota and immune system. Nonetheless, the underlying working mechanisms of scGOS/lcFOS are unclear. Intestinal epithelial cells lining the mucosa are known to express carbohydrate (glycan)-binding receptors that may be involved in modulation of the mucosal immune response. This review aims to provide an overview of glycan-binding receptors, in particular galectins, which are expressed by intestinal epithelial cells and immune cells. In addition, their involvement in health and disease will be addressed, especially in food allergy and inflammatory bowel disease, diseases originating from the gastro-intestinal tract. Insight in the recognition of glycans in the intestinal tract may open new avenues for the treatment of intestinal inflammatory diseases by either nutritional concepts or pharmacological intervention. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Memory and Specificity in the Insect Immune System: Current Perspectives and Future Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Dustin; Eleftherianos, Ioannis

    2017-01-01

    The immune response of a host to a pathogen is typically described as either innate or adaptive. The innate form of the immune response is conserved across all organisms, including insects. Previous and recent research has focused on the nature of the insect immune system and the results imply that the innate immune response of insects is more robust and specific than previously thought. Priming of the insect innate immune system involves the exposure of insects to dead or a sublethal dose of microbes in order to elicit an initial response. Comparing subsequent infections in primed insects to non-primed individuals indicates that the insect innate immune response may possess some of the qualities of an adaptive immune system. Although some studies demonstrate that the protective effects of priming are due to a "loitering" innate immune response, others have presented more convincing elements of adaptivity. While an immune mechanism capable of producing the same degree of recognition specificity as seen in vertebrates has yet to be discovered in insects, a few interesting cases have been identified and discussed.

  15. Memory and Specificity in the Insect Immune System: Current Perspectives and Future Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin Cooper

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The immune response of a host to a pathogen is typically described as either innate or adaptive. The innate form of the immune response is conserved across all organisms, including insects. Previous and recent research has focused on the nature of the insect immune system and the results imply that the innate immune response of insects is more robust and specific than previously thought. Priming of the insect innate immune system involves the exposure of insects to dead or a sublethal dose of microbes in order to elicit an initial response. Comparing subsequent infections in primed insects to non-primed individuals indicates that the insect innate immune response may possess some of the qualities of an adaptive immune system. Although some studies demonstrate that the protective effects of priming are due to a “loitering” innate immune response, others have presented more convincing elements of adaptivity. While an immune mechanism capable of producing the same degree of recognition specificity as seen in vertebrates has yet to be discovered in insects, a few interesting cases have been identified and discussed.

  16. The immune system strikes back: cellular immune responses against indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

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    Rikke Baek Sørensen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO exerts an well established immunosuppressive function in cancer. IDO is expressed within the tumor itself as well as in antigen-presenting cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes, where it promotes the establishment of peripheral immune tolerance to tumor antigens. In the present study, we tested the notion whether IDO itself may be subject to immune responses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The presence of naturally occurring IDO-specific CD8 T cells in cancer patients was determined by MHC/peptide stainings as well as ELISPOT. Antigen specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL from the peripheral blood of cancer patients were cloned and expanded. The functional capacity of the established CTL clones was examined by chrome release assays. The study unveiled spontaneous cytotoxic T-cell reactivity against IDO in peripheral blood as well as in the tumor microenvironment of different cancer patients. We demonstrate that these IDO reactive T cells are indeed peptide specific, cytotoxic effector cells. Hence, IDO reactive T cells are able to recognize and kill tumor cells including directly isolated AML blasts as well as IDO-expressing dendritic cells, i.e. one of the major immune suppressive cell populations. CONCLUSION: IDO may serve as an important and widely applicable target for anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies. Furthermore, as emerging evidence suggests that IDO constitutes a significant counter-regulatory mechanism induced by pro-inflammatory signals, IDO-based immunotherapy holds the promise to boost anti-cancer immunotherapy in general.

  17. Age-Dependent Differences in Systemic and Cell-Autonomous Immunity to L. monocytogenes

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    Ashley M. Sherrid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Host defense against infection can broadly be categorized into systemic immunity and cell-autonomous immunity. Systemic immunity is crucial for all multicellular organisms, increasing in importance with increasing cellular complexity of the host. The systemic immune response to Listeria monocytogenes has been studied extensively in murine models; however, the clinical applicability of these findings to the human newborn remains incompletely understood. Furthermore, the ability to control infection at the level of an individual cell, known as “cell-autonomous immunity,” appears most relevant following infection with L. monocytogenes; as the main target, the monocyte is centrally important to innate as well as adaptive systemic immunity to listeriosis. We thus suggest that the overall increased risk to suffer and die from L. monocytogenes infection in the newborn period is a direct consequence of age-dependent differences in cell-autonomous immunity of the monocyte to L. monocytogenes. We here review what is known about age-dependent differences in systemic innate and adaptive as well as cell-autonomous immunity to infection with Listeria monocytogenes.

  18. Genes of the major histocompatibility complex highlight interactions of the innate and adaptive immune system

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    Barbara Lukasch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background A well-functioning immune defence is crucial for fitness, but our knowledge about the immune system and its complex interactions is still limited. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules are involved in T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses, but MHC is also highly upregulated during the initial innate immune response. The aim of our study was therefore to determine to what extent the highly polymorphic MHC is involved in interactions of the innate and adaptive immune defence and if specific functional MHC alleles (FA or heterozygosity at the MHC are more important. Methods To do this we used captive house sparrows (Passer domesticus to survey MHC diversity and immune function controlling for several environmental factors. MHC class I alleles were identified using parallel amplicon sequencing and to mirror immune function, several immunological tests that correspond to the innate and adaptive immunity were conducted. Results Our results reveal that MHC was linked to all immune tests, highlighting its importance for the immune defence. While all innate responses were associated with one single FA, adaptive responses (cell-mediated and humoral were associated with several different alleles. Discussion We found that repeated injections of an antibody in nestlings and adults were linked to different FA and hence might affect different areas of the immune system. Also, individuals with a higher number of different FA produced a smaller secondary response, indicating a disadvantage of having numerous MHC alleles. These results demonstrate the complexity of the immune system in relation to the MHC and lay the foundation for other studies to further investigate this topic.

  19. Role of Vitamin D in the Immune System

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    Gonca Tamer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is suggested to be an important immune system regulator. 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH2D3, which is the active form of vitamin D, decreases the proliferation of purified T-helper (Th1 cells as well as the production of interferon (IFN, interleukin (IL-2, IL-5 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-. In Th2 cells, 1,25 (OH2D3 stimulates IL-4 and transforming growth factor TGF production, which in turn may suppress inflammatory T cell activity. In the absence of vitamin D signaling, the T cell compartment has a potentially stronger Th1 phenotype. Furthermore, 1,25(OH2D3 inhibits dendritic cell (DC differentiation and maturation, leading to down-regulated expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC-II, co-stimulatory molecules and IL-12; enhances IL-10 production and promotes DC apoptosis. Because of these effects, 1,25(OH2D3 inhibits DC-dependent T cell activation. In vitro, it is determined that 1,25(OH2D3 stimulates phagocytosis and killing of bacteria by macrophages, but suppresses the antigen presenting capacity of these cells and dendritic cells. Additionally, Chen et al. have suggested that vitamin D might have a role in regulating antibody production. They have found that 1,25(OH2D3 not only inhibits activated B cell proliferation but induces their apoptosis as well. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 5-7

  20. Artificial immune system for diabetes meal plans optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prilianti, K. R.; Callista, P. B.; Setiawan, H.

    2017-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a disease that occurs because the body lacks of insulin or the insulin produced by the pancreas cannot work effectively such that the glucose level in the blood cannot well controlled. One of the most common causes of diabetes mellitus type 2 is obesity, therefore this disease can be controlled with the appropriate diet regarding to the daily calorie requirement. Hence, the level of blood glucose is maintained. Unfortunately, because the lack of proper diet education and facility, many people cannot work on proper daily healthy diet by their own. In this research Artificial Immune System algorithm was applied to build a model that help diabetes mellitus patient arrange their meal plans. The model can calculate the amount of daily calorie needed and arrange the appropriate daily meal plans based on it. The meal plans vary according to the patient calorie needs. The required input data are age, gender, weight, height, and type of patient daily main activity. The experiments show that this model has a good result. The result is already approaching the patients' daily calorie need, i.e. 97.6% (actual need is not less than 80% and not greater than 100%). Carbohydrate of the meal plan is 55-57% (actual need is not less than 45% and not greater than 60%) whereas the protein approximate 15-18% (actual need is not less than 15% and not greater than 20%) and fat of approximate 22-24% (actual need is not less than 20% and not greater than 25%).

  1. Perturbation of the normal immune system in patients with CLL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forconi, Francesco; Moss, Paul

    2015-07-30

    Immune dysregulation is a cardinal feature of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) from its early stage and worsens during clinical observation, even in absence of disease progression. Although the mechanisms remain unclear, new insights are emerging into the complex relationship between the CLL clone and its immune environment. T cells are increased in early-stage disease and show progressive accumulation and exhaustion. The mechanisms that drive this expansion may include auto-antigens involved in the original clonal expansion. In addition, chronic viral infections such as cytomegalovirus generate huge virus-specific immune responses, which are further expanded in CLL. Attention is now focused largely on the direct immunosuppressive properties of the tumor. Remarkably, CLL clones often have features of the recently described regulatory B cells producing immunosuppressive IL-10. Better knowledge of the regulatory properties intrinsic to CLL cells may soon become more important with the switch from chemotherapy-based treatments, which trade control of CLL with further impairment of immune function, to the new agents targeting CLL B-cell receptor-associated signaling. Treatment with these new agents is associated with evidence of immune recovery and reduced infectious complications. As such, they offer the prospect of immunologic rehabilitation and a platform from which to ultimately replace chemotherapy. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  2. Activation and pathogenic manipulation of the sensors of the innate immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odendall, Charlotte; Kagan, Jonathan C

    The innate immune system detects the presence of microbes through different families of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs). PRRs detect pathogens of all origins and trigger signaling events that activate innate and adaptive immunity. These events need to be tightly regulated in order to ensure optimal activation when required, and minimal signaling in the absence of microbial encounters. This regulation is achieved, at least in part, through the precise subcellular positioning of receptors and downstream signaling proteins. Consequently, mislocalization of these proteins inhibits innate immune pathways, and pathogens have evolved to alter host protein localization as a strategy to evade immune detection. This review describes the importance of subcellular localization of various PRR families and their adaptors, and highlights pathogenic immune evasion strategies that operate by altering immune protein localization. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Immune System Dysregulation, Viral Reactivation and Stress During Short-Duration Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarence

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a study that was conducted to ascertain if the immune system dysregulation, viral reactivation and stress from short duration space flight were a result of the stress of landing and readjustment to gravity. The objectives of the study were to replace several recent immune studies with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling; address lack of in-flight data: (i.e., determine the in-flight status of immunity, physiological stress, viral immunity/reactivation); determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight; and determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  4. Development of Ingredients of the Feed-stuff for Improving Immune system using Centipede grass Extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Hyoungwoo; Chung, Byungyeoup; Lee, Seungsik; Lee, Sungbeom

    2013-09-15

    The purpose of the this project provides new application areas using naturally occurring flavonoids, cenetpedegrass extracts, for improving immune system and used as ingredients for feed-stuff. In order to provide the immune improving effects of centipedegrass, cell and animal experiments were carried out. Research scope includes determine the effect of centipedegrass extracts on immune functions using LPS-induced RAW cells and found that cytokines, IL-6 and IL-10, which were induced by LPS, were reduced by inhibiting phosphorylation of STAT-3, determine the effects of immune stimulating activity of centipedegrass in animals, cenetipedegrass extracts were administrated once a day for 2 weeks. After treated with LPS, immune suppressor, cytokines were down regulated, however, the cytokines in the group pretreated with centipedegrass extracts, were not down regulated as much as non treated group. The overall mechanism of immune stimulating effect of centipedegrass extracts, was that STAT-3 phosphorylation was inhibited by contipedegrass extracts.

  5. Interactions between Innate Lymphoid Cells and Cells of the Innate and Adaptive Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symowski, Cornelia; Voehringer, David

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) are a major source of cytokines, which are also produced by Th2 cells and several cell types of the innate immune system. Work over the past few years indicates that ILC2s play a central role in regulating type 2 immune responses against allergens and helminths. ILC2s can interact with a variety of cells types of the innate and adaptive immune system by cell-cell contacts or by communication via soluble factors. In this review, we provide an overview about recent advances in our understanding how ILC2s orchestrate type 2 immune responses with focus on direct interactions between ILC2s and other cells of the immune system.

  6. The Impact of Immune System in Regulating Bone Metastasis Formation by Osteotropic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia D’Amico

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastases are frequent and debilitating consequence for many tumors, such as breast, lung, prostate, and kidney cancer. Many studies report the importance of the immune system in the pathogenesis of bone metastasis. Indeed, bone and immune system are strictly linked to each other because bone regulates the hematopoietic stem cells from which all cells of the immune system derive, and many immunoregulatory cytokines influence the fate of bone cells. Furthermore, both cytokines and factors produced by immune and bone cells promote the growth of tumor cells in bone, contributing to supporting the vicious cycle of bone metastasis. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the interactions among bone, immune, and tumor cells aiming to provide an overview of the osteoimmunology field in bone metastasis from solid tumors.

  7. Role of the immune system in cardiac tissue damage and repair following myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saparov, Arman; Ogay, Vyacheslav; Nurgozhin, Talgat; Chen, William C W; Mansurov, Nurlan; Issabekova, Assel; Zhakupova, Jamilya

    2017-09-01

    The immune system plays a crucial role in the initiation, development, and resolution of inflammation following myocardial infarction (MI). The lack of oxygen and nutrients causes the death of cardiomyocytes and leads to the exposure of danger-associated molecular patterns that are recognized by the immune system to initiate inflammation. At the initial stage of post-MI inflammation, the immune system further damages cardiac tissue to clear cell debris. The excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by immune cells and the inability of the anti-oxidant system to neutralize ROS cause oxidative stress that further aggravates inflammation. On the other hand, the cells of both innate and adaptive immune system and their secreted factors are critically instrumental in the very dynamic and complex processes of regulating inflammation and mediating cardiac repair. It is important to decipher the balance between detrimental and beneficial effects of the immune system in MI. This enables us to identify better therapeutic targets for reducing the infarct size, sustaining the cardiac function, and minimizing the likelihood of heart failure. This review discusses the role of both innate and adaptive immune systems in cardiac tissue damage and repair in experimental models of MI.

  8. TLR4 links podocytes with the innate immune system to mediate glomerular injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banas, Miriam C; Banas, Bernhard; Hudkins, Kelly L

    2008-01-01

    profile of chemokines. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that TLR4 is constitutively expressed by podocytes and is upregulated in MPGN, where it may mediate glomerular injury by modulating expression of chemokines; therefore, TLR4 may link podocytes with the innate immune system to mediate MPGN triggered...... by the deposition of immune complexes....

  9. Influence of the gastrointestinal microbiota on development of the immune system in young animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, E.; Williams, B.A.; Smidt, H.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Mosenthin, R.

    2006-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of adult mammals is colonized by a complex and dynamic community of microorganisms. Most protection against potential pathogens occurs via a mucosal immune system involving mechanisms of innate immunity as well as a secondary lymphoid organ, the gut-associated

  10. Variation in the innate and acquired arms of the immune system among five shorebird species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, L.; Piersma, T.; Hasselquist, D.; Matson, K.D.; Ricklefs, R.E.

    2006-01-01

    To contribute to an understanding of the evolutionary processes that shape variation in immune responses, we compared several components of the innate and acquired arms of the immune system in five related, but ecologically diverse, migratory shorebirds (ruff Philomachus pugnax L., ruddy turnstone

  11. Variation in the innate and acquired arms of the immune system among five shorebird species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, L; Piersma, T; Hasselquist, D; Matson, KD; Ricklefs, RE; Ricklefs, Robert E.

    To contribute to an understanding of the evolutionary processes that shape variation in immune responses, we compared several components of the innate and acquired arms of the immune system in five related, but ecologically diverse, migratory shorebirds (ruff Philomachus pugnax L., ruddy turnstone

  12. Probiotic bacteria and the immune system: mechanistic insights and therapeutic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mariman, R.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis aimed to provide insight into the role of microbiota-host interactions in the regulation of mucosal and systemic immunity in the context of IBD. Regulation of microbiota composition (e.g. by probiotics and prebiotics) offers the possibility to modulate immune responses and contribute to

  13. Growth hormone treatment in cartilage-hair hypoplasia: effects on growth and the immune system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bocca, G.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Burgt, C.J.A. van der; Otten, B.J.

    2004-01-01

    Cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by metaphyseal chondrodysplasia with severe growth retardation and impaired immunity. We studied the effects of growth hormone treatment on growth parameters and the immune system in four children with CHH. The

  14. The eel immune system: present knowledge and the need for research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht; Esteve-Gassent, M. D.

    2006-01-01

    The European eel, Anguilla anguilla, is one of the most important warm water fish species cultured in southern Europe and the Mediterranean as well as in northern countries including Germany, the Netherlands and Denmark. The Japanese eel, A. japonica, is an important cultured fish in several...... immune responses. This review summarizes the present knowledge relating to the eel immune system and includes new data....

  15. Micromanagement of the immune system by microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Harvey F; Zhou, Beiyan; Liu, Gwen; Chen, Chang-Zheng

    2008-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of evolutionarily conserved small non-coding RNAs that are thought to control gene expression by targeting mRNAs for degradation or translational repression. Emerging evidence suggests that miRNA-mediated gene regulation represents a fundamental layer of genetic programmes at the post-transcriptional level and has diverse functional roles in animals. Here, we provide an overview of the mechanisms by which miRNAs regulate gene expression, with specific focus on the role of miRNAs in regulating the development of immune cells and in modulating innate and adaptive immune responses.

  16. The postnatal development of the mucosal immune system and mucosal tolerance in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Mick; Haverson, Karin

    2006-01-01

    The mucosal immune system is exposed to a range of antigens associated with pathogens, to which it must mount active immune responses. However, it is also exposed to a large number of harmless antigens associated with food and with commensal microbial flora, to which expression of active, inflammatory immune responses to these antigens is undesirable. The mucosal immune system must contain machinery capable of evaluating the antigens to which it is exposed and mounting appropriate effector or regulatory responses. Since the immune system is likely to have evolved initially in mucosal tissues, the requirement to prevent damaging allergic responses must be at least as old as the adaptive immune system, and studies of the mechanisms should include a range of non-mammalian species. Despite the importance for rational design of vaccines and for control of allergic reactions, the mechanisms involved are still largely unclear. It is not clear that the classical experimental protocol of "oral tolerance" is, in fact, measuring a biologically important phenomenon, nor is it clear whether tolerance is regulated in the evolutionarily recent organised lymphoid tissue (the lymph nodes) or the more ancient, diffuse architecture in the intestine. The capacity of the immune system to discriminate between "dangerous" and "harmless" antigens appears to develop with age and exposure to microbial flora. Thus, the ability of an individual or a group of animals to correctly regulate mucosal immune responses will depend on age, genetics and on their microbial environment and history. Attempts to manipulate the mucosal immune system towards active immune responses by oral vaccines, or towards oral tolerance, are likely to be confounded by environmentally-induced variability between individuals and between groups of animals.

  17. The multiple faces of the human immune system : Modern life causes low-grade inflammation and thereby provokes conflict between the selfish immune system and the selfish brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruimboom, Leo

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes the multiple ways by which the human immune system can react upon direct and indirect challenges, such as infection and wounds on the one hand, and chronic stress factors, such as smoking, on the other. The human defense system exhibits a type of selfish behaviour during both

  18. Monocyte-lymphocyte cross-communication via soluble CD163 directly links innate immune system activation and adaptive immune system suppression following ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Grant C; Tennant, Connie S; Lucke-Wold, Noelle; Kabbani, Yasser; Tarabishy, Abdul R; Chantler, Paul D; Barr, Taura L

    2017-10-11

    CD163 is a scavenger receptor expressed on innate immune cell populations which can be shed from the plasma membrane via the metalloprotease ADAM17 to generate a soluble peptide with lympho-inhibitory properties. The purpose of this study was to investigate CD163 as a possible effector of stroke-induced adaptive immune system suppression. Liquid biopsies were collected from ischemic stroke patients (n = 39), neurologically asymptomatic controls (n = 20), and stroke mimics (n = 20) within 24 hours of symptom onset. Peripheral blood ADAM17 activity and soluble CD163 levels were elevated in stroke patients relative to non-stroke control groups, and negatively associated with post-stroke lymphocyte counts. Subsequent in vitro experiments suggested that this stroke-induced elevation in circulating soluble CD163 likely originates from activated monocytic cells, as serum from stroke patients stimulated ADAM17-dependant CD163 shedding from healthy donor-derived monocytes. Additional in vitro experiments demonstrated that stroke-induced elevations in circulating soluble CD163 can elicit direct suppressive effects on the adaptive immune system, as serum from stroke patients inhibited the proliferation of healthy donor-derived lymphocytes, an effect which was attenuated following serum CD163 depletion. Collectively, these observations provide novel evidence that the innate immune system employs protective mechanisms aimed at mitigating the risk of post-stroke autoimmune complications driven by adaptive immune system overactivation, and that CD163 is key mediator of this phenomenon.

  19. Cross-talk between the Immune System and Tuberculosis Pathogenesis; a Review with Emphasis on the Immune Based Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Javan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As a globally major health problem, tuberculosis (TB causes almost two million cases of death annually. Epidemiological studies demonstrate that a third of the world’s individuals is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Approximately 10% of infected patients with M. tuberculosis develop chronic manifestation as TB. Due to HIV coinfection and emerging the drug-resistant TB, the disease has been increasing and its control has been frustrated in several parts of the world.Current diagnostic techniques and therapeutic tools for TB are not satisfactory. Consequently, it is urgently essential to establish new therapies concerning vaccines, immunotherapeutic agents to provide prosperous attempts for TB controlling. To achieve this goal, it is required to be armed with comprehensive understanding of immunobiology and immunopathogenesis of TB. This would be beneficial in designing new immune-based protections, drug discoveries, personalized medicine by choosing highly-effective immunotherapeutic interventions, identification and development of novel drug candidates. Hopefully, immunotherapies could be advantageous in modulating the immune system in patients with TB, providing efficient control of M. tuberculosis infection perpetuation and, therefore, its pathogenesis. This review herein attempts to describe the function of immune system in response to TB that is of the therapeutical and clinical importance. Moreover, new insights based on therapeutics to resolve TB with immunological orientation will be discussed.

  20. The Immune System Bridges the Gut Microbiota with Systemic Energy Homeostasis: Focus on TLRs, Mucosal Barrier, and SCFAs

    OpenAIRE

    Martina Spiljar; Martina Spiljar; Doron Merkler; Mirko Trajkovski; Mirko Trajkovski; Mirko Trajkovski

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiota is essential for the development and regulation of the immune system and the metabolism of the host. Germ-free animals have altered immunity with increased susceptibility to immunologic diseases and show metabolic alterations. Here, we focus on two of the major immune-mediated microbiota-influenced components that signal far beyond their local environment. First, the activation or suppression of the toll-like receptors (TLRs) by microbial signals can dictate the tone of the...

  1. Immune regulation of systemic hypertension, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and preeclampsia: shared disease mechanisms and translational opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafri, Salema; Ormiston, Mark L

    2017-12-01

    Systemic hypertension, preeclampsia, and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are diseases of high blood pressure in the systemic or pulmonary circulation. Beyond the well-defined contribution of more traditional pathophysiological mechanisms, such as changes in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, to the development of these hypertensive disorders, there is substantial clinical evidence supporting an important role for inflammation and immunity in the pathogenesis of each of these three conditions. Over the last decade, work in small animal models, bearing targeted deficiencies in specific cytokines or immune cell subsets, has begun to clarify the immune-mediated mechanisms that drive changes in vascular structure and tone in hypertensive disease. By summarizing the clinical and experimental evidence supporting a contribution of the immune system to systemic hypertension, preeclampsia, and PAH, the current review highlights the cellular and molecular pathways that are common to all three hypertensive disorders. These mechanisms are centered on an imbalance in CD4+ helper T cell populations, defined by excessive Th17 responses and impaired Treg activity, as well as the excessive activation or impairment of additional immune cell types, including macrophages, dendritic cells, CD8+ T cells, B cells, and natural killer cells. The identification of common immune mechanisms in systemic hypertension, preeclampsia, and PAH raises the possibility of new therapeutic strategies that target the immune component of hypertension across multiple disorders. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Nitrogen deposition weakens plant-microbe interactions in grassland ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Cunzheng; Yu, Qiang; Bai, Edith; Lü, Xiaotao; Li, Qi; Xia, Jianyang; Kardol, Paul; Liang, Wenju; Wang, Zhengwen; Han, Xingguo

    2013-12-01

    Soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stoichiometry is a main driver of ecosystem functioning. Global N enrichment has greatly changed soil C : N ratios, but how altered resource stoichiometry influences the complexity of direct and indirect interactions among plants, soils, and microbial communities has rarely been explored. Here, we investigated the responses of the plant-soil-microbe system to multi-level N additions and the role of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and inorganic N stoichiometry in regulating microbial biomass in semiarid grassland in northern China. We documented a significant positive correlation between DOC and inorganic N across the N addition gradient, which contradicts the negative nonlinear correlation between nitrate accrual and DOC availability commonly observed in natural ecosystems. Using hierarchical structural equation modeling, we found that soil acidification resulting from N addition, rather than changes in the plant community, was most closely related to shifts in soil microbial community composition and decline of microbial respiration. These findings indicate a down-regulating effect of high N availability on plant-microbe interactions. That is, with the limiting factor for microbial biomass shifting from resource stoichiometry to soil acidity, N enrichment weakens the bottom-up control of soil microorganisms by plant-derived C sources. These results highlight the importance of integratively studying the plant-soil-microbe system in improving our understanding of ecosystem functioning under conditions of global N enrichment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Attack, parry and riposte: molecular fencing between the innate immune system and human herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le-Trilling, V T K; Trilling, M

    2015-07-01

    Once individuals acquire one of the eight human-pathogenic herpesviruses, the upcoming relationship is predefined to last lifelong. Despite the fact that acute phases of herpesviral replication are usually confined and controlled by a concerted action of all branches of the healthy immune system, sterile immunity is never reached. To accomplish this, herpesviruses evolved the unique ability to outlast episodes of efficient immunity in a dormant state called latency and a remarkable array of immune antagonists which counteract most (if not all) relevant aspects of intrinsic, innate and adaptive immune responses. Certain psychological and physiological conditions (such as stress, immuno-suppression or pregnancy) predispose for viral reactivation which can lead to recurrent disease and virus spread. One important pillar of immunity is the innate immune system. The leading cytokines of the innate immune response are interferons (IFN). IFNs reinforce intrinsic immunity, induce a cell-intrinsic antiviral state and recruit and orchestrate adaptive immunity. Consistently, individuals lacking a functional IFN system suffer from otherwise harmless opportunists and live-attenuated vaccines. The selective pressure elicited by IFNs drove herpesviruses to evolve numerous IFN antagonistic gene products. A molecular in-depth understanding of (herpes-) viral IFN antagonists might allow the design of novel antiviral drugs which reconstitute IFN responses by blocking the antagonistic function and thereby help the host to help himself. Additionally, virus mutants lacking immune evasins constitute promising candidates for vaccine viruses. Here we summarize the current knowledge on IFN antagonistic strategies of the eight human herpesviruses and try to decipher common strategies. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Activation of innate immunity during systemic Candida infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ifrim, D.C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increased knowledge on the mechanisms of Candida recognition and the networks of innate and adaptive host defense activated during infection, much remains to be learned regarding the distinctive modulatory effects of Candida spp on host immune responses. We showed that the chronic

  5. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: when the immune system runs amok.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janka, G

    2009-09-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening syndrome in which an exaggerated but ineffective immune response leads to severe hyperinflammation. Key players in HLH are activated lymphocytes and histiocytes which infiltrate all organs and secrete large amounts of cytokines. Cardinal symptoms are prolonged fever, hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenias, and hemophagocytosis. Biochemical markers include elevated ferritin, triglycerides, and low fibrinogen. HLH occurs on the basis of various inherited and acquired immune defects. Impaired function of natural killer cells and cytotoxic T cells is shared by all forms of HLH. Nearly all genetic defects identified in inherited cases of HLH are either mutations in the perforin gene or in genes important for the exocytosis of cytotoxic granules. Cytotoxic granules contain perforin and granzymes which induce apoptosis upon entering the target cell. Additionally perforin is important for the down-regulation of the immune response. Acquired forms of HLH are found in association with infectious agents, in patients with autoimmune diseases, in malignant diseases, and in patients receiving immune suppression or after organ transplantation. - HLH is still difficult to diagnose and may be overlooked since initially it may masquerade as a normal infection. HLH should be considered when symptoms are more pronounced than usual and in case of progression. Suppression of the severe hyperinflammation can be achieved with immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory agents and cytostatic drugs. Patients with genetic HLH have to undergo stem cell transplantation for cure.

  6. Arthropod Innate Immune Systems and Vector-Borne Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Richard H G; Contet, Alicia; Krueger, Kathryn

    2017-02-21

    Arthropods, especially ticks and mosquitoes, are the vectors for a number of parasitic and viral human diseases, including malaria, sleeping sickness, Dengue, and Zika, yet arthropods show tremendous individual variation in their capacity to transmit disease. A key factor in this capacity is the group of genetically encoded immune factors that counteract infection by the pathogen. Arthropod-specific pattern recognition receptors and protease cascades detect and respond to infection. Proteins such as antimicrobial peptides, thioester-containing proteins, and transglutaminases effect responses such as lysis, phagocytosis, melanization, and agglutination. Effector responses are initiated by damage signals such as reactive oxygen species signaling from epithelial cells and recognized by cell surface receptors on hemocytes. Antiviral immunity is primarily mediated by siRNA pathways but coupled with interferon-like signaling, antimicrobial peptides, and thioester-containing proteins. Molecular mechanisms of immunity are closely linked to related traits of longevity and fertility, and arthropods have the capacity for innate immunological memory. Advances in understanding vector immunity can be leveraged to develop novel control strategies for reducing the rate of transmission of both ancient and emerging threats to global health.

  7. Assessing Effects of Pesticides on the Bee Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Populations of some managed and wild pollinators are in decline as a result of multiple interacting factors including parasites, disease, poor nutrition and pesticides. The role that diminished immunity plays in these declines is not understood. The U.S. Environmental Protection ...

  8. Blobs strengthen repetition but weaken symmetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Csathó, A.I.; Vloed, G. van der; Helm, P.A. van der

    2003-01-01

    The human visual system is more sensitive to symmetry than to repetition. According to the so-called holographic approach [J. Math. Psychol. 35 (1991) 151; Psychol. Rev. 103 (1996) 429; Psychol. Rev. 106 (1999) 622], however, this perceptual difference between symmetry and repetition depends

  9. Probiotic bacteria in the human gastrointestinal tract as a factor stimulating the immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Górska

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of bacterial microflora of the human digestive tract in supporting the protection of the organism against food-borne pathogens and antigens is described. The effect of bacterial microflora on the immune system of the mucous surface of the intestinal tract (GALT and its effect on secretory function of the immune system, particularly regarding antibody, mainly IgA, secretion, are discussed. The modulating effect of commensals and probiotics on the innate immunity response and their direct influence on the specific response are dealt with as are digestive tract dysfunctions connected with changes in microflora and their prophylaxis. Attention is paid to the beneficial effect of probiotics on human health by indicating noninvasive ways of increasing natural immunity by these microorganisms. There is a necessity to understand the mechanisms of the induction of the immune response by probiotic bacteria responsible for maintaining the organism in an alert state in the defense against pathogens.

  10. The transcriptional regulators, the immune system and the the circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinciguerra, M; Borghesan, M; Pazienza, V; Piepoli, A; Palmieri, O; Tarquini, R; Tevy, M F; De Cata, A; Mazzoccoli, G

    2013-01-01

    The immune system function oscillates with a 24-hour period driving circadian rhythmicity of immune responses. A circadian timing system comprising central and peripheral oscillators entrains body rhythmicity of physiology and behavior to environmental cues by means of humoral signals and autonomic neural outputs. In every single cell an oscillator goes ticking through a molecular clock operated by transcriptional/translational feedback loops driven by the rhythmic expression of circadian genes. This clock gene machinery steers daily oscillations in the regulation of immune cell activity, driving the periodicity in immune system function. The transcriptional networks that regulate temporal variation in gene expression in immunocompetent cells and tissues respond to diverse physiological clues, addressing well-timed adjustments of transcription and translation processes. Nuclear receptors comprise a unique class of transcriptional regulators that are capable of gauging hormones, metabolites, endobiotics and xenobiotics, linking ligand sensing to transcriptional responses in various cell types through switching between coactivator and corepressor recruitment. The expression of coregulators is highly responsive to physiological signals, and plays an important role in the control of rhythmic patterns of gene expression, optimizing the switch between nycthemeral patterns, and synchronizing circadian rhythmicity with changing physiological demands across the light-dark cycle. The nuclear receptors and transcription factors expressed in the immune components contribute to the cross-talk between the circadian timing system, the clock gene machinery and the immune system, influencing transcriptional activities and directing cell-type specific gene expression programs linked to innate and adaptive immune responses.

  11. Cancer-targeted oncolytic adenoviruses for modulation of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, Vincenzo; Capasso, Cristian; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Otto; Hemminki, Akseli

    2017-05-02

    Adenovirus is one of the most commonly used vectors for gene therapy and it is the first approved virus-derived drug for treatment of cancer. As an oncolytic agent, it can induce lysis of infected cells, but it can also engage the immune system, promoting activation and maturation of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). In essence, oncolysis combined with the associated immunostimulatory actions result in a "personalized in situ vaccine" for each patient. In order to take full advantage of these features, we should try to understand how adenovirus interacts with the immune system, what are the receptors involved in triggering subsequent signals and which kind of responses they elicit. Tackling these questions will give us further insight in how to manipulate adenovirus-mediated immune responses for enhancement of anti-tumor efficacy. In this review, we first highlight how oncolytic adenovirus interacts with the innate immune system and its receptors such as Toll-like receptors, nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors and other immune sensors. Then we describe the effect of these interactions on the adaptive immune system and its cells, especially B and T lymphocytes. Finally, we summarize the most significant preclinical and clinical results in the field of gene therapy where researchers have engineered adenovirus to manipulate the host immune system by expressing cytokines and signaling mediators. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Measures of the constitutive immune system are linked to diet and roosting habits of neotropical bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Schneeberger

    Full Text Available Ecological and social factors are central in the emergence and transmission of infectious diseases, thus bearing the potential for shaping a species' immune functions. Although previous studies demonstrated a link between social factors and the cellular immune system for captive mammals, it is yet poorly understood how ecological factors are connected with the different branches of the immune system in wild populations. Here, we tested how variation in aspects of the constitutive cellular and humoral immune system of free ranging bats is associated with two ecological factors that likely influence the putative risk of species to become infected by parasites and pathogens: diet and shelter. We found that white blood cell counts of 24 syntopic Neotropical bat species varied with the species' diet and body mass. Bats that included at least partially vertebrates in their diet exhibited the highest white blood cell counts, followed by phytophagous and insectivorous species, which is in agreement with the assumption that the immune system varies with the pathogen transmission risk of a trophic level. The soluble part of the constitutive immune response, assessed by an in vitro bacterial killing assay, decreased with increasing roost permanence. Our results suggest that the ecology is an important factor in the evolution of the immune system in bats and probably also other mammals.

  13. Physical model of the immune response of bacteria against bacteriophage through the adaptive CRISPR-Cas immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pu; Niestemski, Liang Ren; Barrick, Jeffrey E.; Deem, Michael W.

    2013-04-01

    Bacteria and archaea have evolved an adaptive, heritable immune system that recognizes and protects against viruses or plasmids. This system, known as the CRISPR-Cas system, allows the host to recognize and incorporate short foreign DNA or RNA sequences, called ‘spacers’ into its CRISPR system. Spacers in the CRISPR system provide a record of the history of bacteria and phage coevolution. We use a physical model to study the dynamics of this coevolution as it evolves stochastically over time. We focus on the impact of mutation and recombination on bacteria and phage evolution and evasion. We discuss the effect of different spacer deletion mechanisms on the coevolutionary dynamics. We make predictions about bacteria and phage population growth, spacer diversity within the CRISPR locus, and spacer protection against the phage population.

  14. ImmuneDB: a system for the analysis and exploration of high-throughput adaptive immune receptor sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Aaron M; Meng, Wenzhao; Luning Prak, Eline T; Hershberg, Uri

    2017-01-15

    As high-throughput sequencing of B cells becomes more common, the need for tools to analyze the large quantity of data also increases. This article introduces ImmuneDB, a system for analyzing vast amounts of heavy chain variable region sequences and exploring the resulting data. It can take as input raw FASTA/FASTQ data, identify genes, determine clones, construct lineages, as well as provide information such as selection pressure and mutation analysis. It uses an industry leading database, MySQL, to provide fast analysis and avoid the complexities of using error prone flat-files. ImmuneDB is freely available at http://immunedb.comA demo of the ImmuneDB web interface is available at: http://immunedb.com/demo CONTACT: Uh25@drexel.eduSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Studying the Impact of Spaceflight Environment on Immune Functions Using New Molecular Diagnostics System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Luchino

    Immune functions are altered during space flights. Latent virus reactivation, reduction in the number of immune cells, decreased cell activation and increased sensitivity of astronauts to infections following their return on Earth demonstrate that the immune system is less efficient during space flight. The causes of this immune deficiency are not fully understood and this dysfunction during long-term missions could result in the appearance of opportunistic infections or a decrease in the immuno-surveillance mechanisms that eradicate cancer cells. Therefore, the immune functions of astronauts will have to be monitored continuously during long-term missions in space, using miniature and semi-automated diagnostic systems. The objectives of this project are to study the causes of space-related immunodeficiency, to develop countermeasures to maintain an optimal immune function and to improve our capacity to detect infectious diseases during space missions through the monitoring of astronauts' immune system. In order to achieve these objectives, an Immune Function Diagnostic System (IFDS) will be designed to perform a set of immunological assays on board spacecrafts or on planet-bound bases. Through flow cytometric assays and molecular biology analyses, this diagnostic system could improve medical surveillance of astronauts and could be used to test countermeasures aimed at preventing immune deficiency during space missions. The capacity of the instrument to assess cellular fluorescence and to quantify the presence of soluble molecules in biological samples would support advanced molecular studies in space life sciences. Finally, such diagnostic system could also be used on Earth in remote areas or in mobile hospitals following natural disasters to fight against infectious diseases and other pathologies.

  16. Impact of nest sanitation on the immune system of parents and nestlings in a passerine bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jessica K; Griffith, Simon C; Klasing, Kirk C; Buchanan, Katherine L

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial communities are thought to have fundamental effects on the growth and development of nestling birds. The antigen exposure hypothesis suggests that, for both nestlings and adult birds, exposure to a diverse range of bacteria would select for stronger immune defences. However, there are relatively few studies that have tested the immune/bacterial relationships outside of domestic poultry. We therefore sought to examine indices of immunity (microbial killing ability in naive birds, which is a measure of innate immunity, and the antibody response to sheep red blood cells, which measures adaptive immunity) in both adult and nestling zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). We did this throughout breeding and between reproductive attempts in nests that were experimentally manipulated to change the intensity of bacterial exposure. Our results suggest that nest sanitation and bacterial load affected measures of the adaptive immune system, but not the innate immune parameters tested. Adult finches breeding in clean nests had a lower primary antibody response to sheep red blood cells, particularly males, and a greater difference between primary and secondary responses. Adult microbial killing of Escherichia coli decreased as parents moved from incubation to nestling rearing for both nest treatments; however, killing of Candida albicans remained consistent throughout. In nestlings, both innate microbial killing and the adaptive antibody response did not differ between nest environments. Together, these results suggest that exposure to microorganisms in the environment affects the adaptive immune system in nesting birds, with exposure upregulating the antibody response in adult birds. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Weakening of the North American monsoon with global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Salvatore; Boos, William R.; Bordoni, Simona; Delworth, Thomas L.; Kapnick, Sarah B.; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Zhang, Wei

    2017-11-01

    Future changes in the North American monsoon, a circulation system that brings abundant summer rains to vast areas of the North American Southwest, could have significant consequences for regional water resources. How this monsoon will change with increasing greenhouse gases, however, remains unclear, not least because coarse horizontal resolution and systematic sea-surface temperature biases limit the reliability of its numerical model simulations. Here we investigate the monsoon response to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations using a 50-km-resolution global climate model which features a realistic representation of the monsoon climatology and its synoptic-scale variability. It is found that the monsoon response to CO2 doubling is sensitive to sea-surface temperature biases. When minimizing these biases, the model projects a robust reduction in monsoonal precipitation over the southwestern United States, contrasting with previous multi-model assessments. Most of this precipitation decline can be attributed to increased atmospheric stability, and hence weakened convection, caused by uniform sea-surface warming. These results suggest improved adaptation measures, particularly water resource planning, will be required to cope with projected reductions in monsoon rainfall in the American Southwest.

  18. Oral probiotics supplementation can stimulate the immune system in a stress process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palomar Martin Manuel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In a bifactorial stress mouse model we studied the effect of probiotic supplementation on biochemical parameter in serum, the intestinal impairment of the villi induced by stress, the systemic immune response and the susceptibility to intestinal infections. Probiotic effect was also evaluated on cells from the innate immunity. Mice were subjected to a stress protocol based on food deprivation and movement restrictions for 11 days. We analyzed the probiotic supplementation effect, as probiotic bacteria suspension or as a fermented milk, on the changes induced by stress: biochemical parameters as glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol in serum, body weight and in the gut we determined the number of goblet cells, the length of the microvilli and bacterial translocation from the intestinal microbiota into deep tissues. Peritoneal and spleen macrophages activity, the immune response to ovalbumin immunization, the protection against Salmonella infection during the stress process in mice receiving probiotic, were also determined. We found that probiotic supplementation in the chronic stress model, improves the gut histological structure, increases phagocytic activity of peritoneal and spleen macrophages, enhance the humoral response to the OVA antigen and protect against Salmonella infection. Conclusion: Probiotic supplementation was able to act on the gut and systemic immunity by improvement of the length and cellularity of the villi, increasing the systemic immune response and protecting against Salmonella infection. The effectiveness on the immune system exerted by probiotic consumption suggests the use of these bacteria as an alternative to minimize the damage induced during stress situation.

  19. Probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics: impact on the gut immune system and allergic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourbeyre, Pascal; Denery, Sandra; Bodinier, Marie

    2011-05-01

    Probiotics and prebiotics, alone or together (synbiotics), can influence the intestinal microbiota and modulate the immune response. They may therefore be tools that can prevent or alleviate certain pathologies involving the gut immune system, such as allergies for which no treatment is yet available. This review focuses first on the definitions of probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics and key cells in the gut immune system. It then discusses their effects on mucosal immune stimulation. Experimental findings suggest that different probiotic species have similar effects on innate immunity by improving the mechanisms of pathogen destruction. On the contrary, their impacts seem to be variable on the adaptive immune system. Prebiotics can also exert an influence on the gut immune system via the stimulation of the autochthonous bacteria metabolism. Finally, this review focuses on the effects of food supplements on allergy. Different studies performed in humans or rodents have supported a potential role for selected probiotics and prebiotics in reducing some allergic parameters. Probiotic effects on allergy treatment are unclear, especially in human studies. However, they are potentially effective at short-term for prevention when they are administered in perinatal conditions. A clinical study performed with an infant cohort revealed a beneficial effect of prebiotics in preventing allergic manifestations at long-term. Further studies are nonetheless essential to confirm these findings. Food supplements offer potential tools for the prevention or treatment of allergy, but insufficient evidence is available at present to recommend their use in clinical practice.

  20. FNL Scientists Introduce Concept That Could Help the Immune System Respond to Vaccines | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists have discovered an efficient and straightforward model to manipulate RNA nanoparticles, a new concept that could help trigger desirable activation of the immune system with vaccines and therapies. A multi-institutional team of researchers

  1. FNL Scientists Introduce Concept That Could Help the Immune System Respond to Vaccines | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists have discovered an efficient and straightforward model to manipulate RNA nanoparticles, a new concept that could help trigger desirable activation of the immune system with vaccines and therapies. A multi-institutional team of researchers

  2. Biodegradable Vaccine Microspheres for System and Mucosal Immunization Against Equine Encephalitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michalek, Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    .... Recent interest has been directed towards developing stable, single-dose vaccines that can be given via mucosal or systemic routes and induce protective immune responses against infectious agents, e.g., EEE, WEE and VEE...

  3. Mindfulness meditation and the immune system: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Black, David S; Slavich, George M

    2016-01-01

    .... To address this issue, we conducted the first comprehensive review of randomized controlled trials examining the effects of mindfulness meditation on immune system parameters, with a specific focus on five outcomes: (1...

  4. Oral probiotics supplementation can stimulate the immune system in a stress process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Palomar Martin Manuel; Bru Elena; Maldonado Galdeano Carolina; Perdigón Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    In a bifactorial stress mouse model we studied the effect of probiotic supplementation on biochemical parameter in serum, the intestinal impairment of the villi induced by stress, the systemic immune...

  5. Fish Immunology. The modification and manipulation of the innate immune system: Brazilian studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAQUELINE D. BILLER-TAKAHASHI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of fish immune system structure and function is essential for the development of new technologies and products to improve productivity. This is the first review on immune system of fish with Brazilian studies. Aquaculture in Brazil has shown massive growth in recent years due to methods of culture intensification. However, these procedures led to disease outbreaks, as well as the chemotherapy and the misuse of antibiotics. A viable alternative to avoid the use of chemicals and prevent economic losses is the administration of immunostimulants and prebiotcs, which act by increasing the innate immune system. In Brazil there is a lack of studies on fish immune system, except by some groups that have studied the effects of the immunostimulants administration in various species.

  6. Information processing in immune systems : clonal selection versus idiotypic network models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J. de

    1989-01-01

    Experimental immunology is a rapidly developing field in which an everincreasing number of cell types, molecules and interactions between them are being described. Despite the availability of detailed experimental data, our understanding of the 'functioning' of the immune system remains

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past ... are prone to fracture). Source: NIAMS Who Gets Rheumatoid Arthritis? The disease occurs in all racial and ethnic ...

  8. Systemic immune suppression in glioblastoma: the interplay between CD14+HLA-DRlo/neg monocytes, tumor factors, and dexamethasone

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafson, Michael P.; Lin, Yi; New, Kent C.; Bulur, Peggy A.; O'Neill, Brian Patrick; Gastineau, Dennis A.; Dietz, Allan B.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with glioblastoma (GBM) exhibit profound systemic immune defects that affect the success of conventional and immune-based treatments. A better understanding of the contribution of the tumor and/or therapy on systemic immune suppression is necessary for improved therapies, to monitor negative effects of novel treatments, to improve patient outcomes, and to increase understanding of this complex system. To characterize the immune profile of GBM patients, we phenotyped peripheral blood ...

  9. The impact of probiotics and prebiotics on the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaenhammer, Todd R; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Kopp, Matthias Volkmar; Rescigno, Maria

    2012-10-01

    Probiotics and prebiotics are increasingly being added to foodstuffs with claims of health benefits. Probiotics are live microorganisms that are thought to have beneficial effects on the host, whereas prebiotics are ingredients that stimulate the growth and/or function of beneficial intestinal microorganisms. But can these products directly modulate immune function and influence inflammatory diseases? Here, Nature Reviews Immunology asks four experts to discuss these issues and provide their thoughts on the future application of probiotics as a disease therapy.

  10. Possible Weakening Processes Imposed on California's Earthen Levees under Protracted Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J. D.; Vahedifard, F.; AghaKouchak, A.

    2015-12-01

    California is currently suffering from a multiyear extreme drought and the impacts of the drought are anticipated to worsen in a warming climate. The resilience of critical infrastructure under extreme drought conditions is a major concern which has not been well understood. Thus, there is a crucial need to improve our understanding about the potential threats of drought on infrastructure and take subsequent actions in a timely manner to mitigate these threats and adopt our infrastructure for forthcoming extreme events. The need is more pronounced for earthen levees, since their functionality to protect limited water resources and dryland is more critical during drought. A significant amount of California's levee systems are currently operating under a high risk condition. Protracted drought can further threaten the structural competency of these already at-risk levee systems through several thermo-hydro mechanical weakening processes that undermine their stability. Viable information on the implications of these weakening processes, particularly on California's earthen levees, is relatively incomplete. This article discusses, from a geotechnical engineering perspective, how California's protracted drought might threaten the integrity of levee systems through the imposition of several thermo-hydro mechanical weakening processes. Pertinent facts and statistics regarding the drought in California are presented and discussed. Catastrophic levee failures and major damages resulting from drought-induce weakening processes such as shear strength reduction, desiccation cracking, land subsidence and surface erosion, fissuring and soil softening, and soil carbon oxidation are discussed to illustrate the devastating impacts that the California drought might impose on existing earthen levees. This article calls for further research in light of these potential drought-inducing weakening mechanisms to support mitigation strategies for reducing future catastrophic levee failures.

  11. Avian Bornaviruses Escape Recognition by the Innate Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Reuter

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Like other pathogens that readily persist in animal hosts, members of the Bornaviridae family have evolved effective mechanisms to evade the innate immune response. The prototype of this virus family, Borna disease virus employs an unusual replication strategy that removes the triphosphates from the 5’ termini of the viral RNA genome. This strategy allows the virus to avoid activation of RIG-I and other innate immune response receptors in infected cells. Here we determined whether the newly discovered avian bornaviruses (ABV might use a similar strategy to evade the interferon response. We found that de novo infection of QM7 and CEC32 quail cells with two different ABV strains was efficiently inhibited by exogenous chicken IFN-α. IFN-α also reduced the viral load in QM7 and CEC32 cells persistently infected with both ABV strains, suggesting that ABV is highly sensitive to type I IFN. Although quail cells persistently infected with ABV contained high levels of viral RNA, the supernatants of infected cultures did not contain detectable levels of biologically active type I IFN. RNA from cells infected with ABV failed to induce IFN-β synthesis if transfected into human cells. Furthermore, genomic RNA of ABV was susceptible to 5’-monophosphate-specific RNase, suggesting that it lacks 5’-triphospates like BDV. These results indicate that bornaviruses of mammals and birds use similar strategies to evade the host immune response.

  12. Avian Bornaviruses Escape Recognition by the Innate Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Antje; Ackermann, Andreas; Kothlow, Sonja; Rinder, Monika; Kaspers, Bernd; Staeheli, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Like other pathogens that readily persist in animal hosts, members of the Bornaviridae family have evolved effective mechanisms to evade the innate immune response. The prototype of this virus family, Borna disease virus employs an unusual replication strategy that removes the triphosphates from the 5′ termini of the viral RNA genome. This strategy allows the virus to avoid activation of RIG-I and other innate immune response receptors in infected cells. Here we determined whether the newly discovered avian bornaviruses (ABV) might use a similar strategy to evade the interferon response. We found that de novo infection of QM7 and CEC32 quail cells with two different ABV strains was efficiently inhibited by exogenous chicken IFN-α. IFN-α also reduced the viral load in QM7 and CEC32 cells persistently infected with both ABV strains, suggesting that ABV is highly sensitive to type I IFN. Although quail cells persistently infected with ABV contained high levels of viral RNA, the supernatants of infected cultures did not contain detectable levels of biologically active type I IFN. RNA from cells infected with ABV failed to induce IFN-β synthesis if transfected into human cells. Furthermore, genomic RNA of ABV was susceptible to 5′-monophosphate-specific RNase, suggesting that it lacks 5′-triphospates like BDV. These results indicate that bornaviruses of mammals and birds use similar strategies to evade the host immune response. PMID:21994661

  13. Procedure for Selection of Suitable Resources in Interactions in Complex Dynamic Systems Using Artificial Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naors Y. anadalsaleem

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic optimization procedure for -dimensional vector function of a system, the state of which is interpreted as adaptable immune cell, is considered Using the results of the theory of artificial immune systems. The procedures for estimate of monitoring results are discussed. The procedure for assessing the entropy is recommended as a general recursive estimation algorithm. The results are focused on solving the optimization problems of cognitive selection of suitable physical resources, what expands the scope of Electromagnetic compatibility.

  14. How the immune system talks to itself: the varied role of synapses

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Jianming; Tato, Cristina M.; Davis, Mark M

    2013-01-01

    Using an elaborately evolved language of cytokines and chemokines as well as cell-cell interactions, the different components of the immune system communicate with each other and orchestrate a response (or wind one down). Immunological synapses are a key feature of the system in the ways in which they can facilitate and direct these responses. Studies analyzing the structure of an immune synapse as it forms between two cells have provided insight into how the stability and kinetics of this in...

  15. Is immune system-related hypertension associated with ovarian hormone deficiency?

    OpenAIRE

    Sandberg, Kathryn; Ji, Hong; Einstein, Gillian; Au, April; Hay, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    The immune system is known to contribute to the development of high blood pressure in males. However, the role of the immune system in the development of high blood pressure in females and the role of ovarian hormones has only recently begun to be studied. In animal studies, both the sex of the host and the T cell are critical biological determinants of susceptibility and resistance to hypertension induced by angiotensin II. In women, natural menopause is known to result in significant change...

  16. Attention to touch weakens audiovisual speech integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsius, Agnès; Navarra, Jordi; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2007-11-01

    One of the classic examples of multisensory integration in humans occurs when speech sounds are combined with the sight of corresponding articulatory gestures. Despite the longstanding assumption that this kind of audiovisual binding operates in an attention-free mode, recent findings (Alsius et al. in Curr Biol, 15(9):839-843, 2005) suggest that audiovisual speech integration decreases when visual or auditory attentional resources are depleted. The present study addressed the generalization of this attention constraint by testing whether a similar decrease in multisensory integration is observed when attention demands are imposed on a sensory domain that is not involved in speech perception, such as touch. We measured the McGurk illusion in a dual task paradigm involving a difficult tactile task. The results showed that the percentage of visually influenced responses to audiovisual stimuli was reduced when attention was diverted to a tactile task. This finding is attributed to a modulatory effect on audiovisual integration of speech mediated by supramodal attention limitations. We suggest that the interactions between the attentional system and crossmodal binding mechanisms may be much more extensive and dynamic than it was advanced in previous studies.

  17. Water distribution in the lower mantle: Implications for hydrolytic weakening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Joshua M. R.; Brodholt, John P.

    2018-02-01

    The presence of water in lower mantle minerals is thought to have substantial effects on the rheological properties of the Earth's lower mantle in what is generally known as "hydrolytic weakening". This weakening will have profound effects on global convection, but hydrolytic weakening in lower mantle minerals has not been observed experimentally and thus the effect of water on global dynamics remains speculative. In order to constrain the likelihood of hydrolytic weakening being important in the lower mantle, we use first principles methods to calculate the partitioning of water (strictly protons) between mineral phases of the lower mantle under lower mantle conditions. We show that throughout the lower mantle water is primarily found either in the minor Ca-perovskite phase or in bridgmanite as an Al3+-H+ pair. Ferropericlase remains dry. However, neither of these methods of water absorption creates additional vacancies in bridgmanite and thus the effect of hydrolytic weakening is likely to be small. We find that water creates significant number of vacancies in bridgmanite only at the deepest part of the lower mantle and only for very high water contents (>1000 ppm). We conclude that water is thus likely to have only a limited effect on the rheological properties of the lower mantle.

  18. Is immune system-related hypertension associated with ovarian hormone deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Kathryn; Ji, Hong; Einstein, Gillian; Au, April; Hay, Meredith

    2016-03-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review summarizes recent data on the role of ovarian hormones and sex in inflammation-related hypertension. What advances does it highlight? The adaptive immune system has recently been implicated in the development of hypertension in males but not in females. The role of the immune system in the development of hypertension in women and its relationship to ovarian hormone production are highlighted. The immune system is known to contribute to the development of high blood pressure in males. However, the role of the immune system in the development of high blood pressure in females and the role of ovarian hormones has only recently begun to be studied. In animal studies, both the sex of the host and the T cell are critical biological determinants of susceptibility and resistance to hypertension induced by angiotensin II. In women, natural menopause is known to result in significant changes in the expression of genes regulating the immune system. Likewise, in animal models, ovariectomy results in hypertension and an upregulation in T-cell tumour necrosis factor-α-related genes. Oestrogen replacement results in decreases in inflammatory genes in the brain regions involved in blood pressure regulation. Together, these studies suggest that the response of the adaptive immune system to ovarian hormone deficiency is a significant contributor to hypertension in women. © 2015 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  19. On the evolutionary origin of the adaptive immune system--the adipocyte hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Niekerk, Gustav; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart

    2015-04-01

    Jawless vertebrates utilize a form of adaptive immunity that is functionally based on molecular effectors that are completely different from those of vertebrates. This observation raises an intriguing question: why did vertebrates, representing only 5% of all animals, twice evolve a system as complex as adaptive immunity? Theories aimed at identifying a selective pressure that would 'drive' the development of an adaptive immune system (AIS) fail to explain why invertebrates would not similarly develop an AIS. We argue that an AIS can only be implemented in a certain physiological context, i.e., that an AIS represents an unevolvable trait for invertebrates. The immune system is functionally integrated with other systems; therefore a preexisting physiological innovation unique to vertebrates may have acted as the prerequisite infrastructure that allowed the development of an AIS. We propose that future efforts should be directed toward identifying the evolutionary release that allowed the development of an adaptive immune system in vertebrates. In particular, the advent of specialized adipocytes might have expanded the metabolic scope of vertebrates, allowing the opportunistic incorporation of an AIS. However, physiological innovations, unique to (or more developed in) vertebrates, support the implementation of an AIS. Thus, understanding the interaction between systems (e.g. neural-immune-adipose connection) may illuminate our understanding regarding the perplexing immunological dimorphism within the animal kingdom. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Vitamin effects on the immune system: vitamins A and D take centre stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, J Rodrigo; Iwata, Makoto; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2008-09-01

    Vitamins are essential constituents of our diet that have long been known to influence the immune system. Vitamins A and D have received particular attention in recent years as these vitamins have been shown to have an unexpected and crucial effect on the immune response. We present and discuss our current understanding of the essential roles of vitamins in modulating a broad range of immune processes, such as lymphocyte activation and proliferation, T-helper-cell differentiation, tissue-specific lymphocyte homing, the production of specific antibody isotypes and regulation of the immune response. Finally, we discuss the clinical potential of vitamin A and D metabolites for modulating tissue-specific immune responses and for preventing and/or treating inflammation and autoimmunity.

  1. Immune responses to non-tumor antigens in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K. Huber

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS, once viewed as an immune privileged site protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB, is now known to be a dynamic immunological environment through which immune cells migrate to prevent and respond to events such as localized infection. During these responses, endogenous glial cells, including astrocytes and microglia, become highly reactive and may secrete inflammatory mediators that regulate BBB permeability and recruit additional circulating immune cells. Here, we discuss the various roles played by astrocytes, microglia, and infiltrating immune cells during host immunity to non-tumor antigens in the CNS, focusing first on bacterial and viral infections, and then turning to responses directed against self-antigens in the setting of CNS autoimmunity.

  2. impact of aluminum exposure on the immune system: a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y Z; Liu, D W; Liu, Z Y; Li, Y F

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is widely used in daily life and will lead to environmental release and exposure. The toxicity of Al had been documented, and which attracted a growing concern on human and animal health. The immune system appears to be sensitive to Al exposure. But few studies focused on the potential immunological responses induced by Al. It is imperative to study the effects of Al on the immune function and this review discusses the effects of Al on autoimmunity, oral tolerance, expression of the immune cells, hypersensitivity and erythrocyte immune function. It will provide evidence to study the association between Al and immune function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Targeting the innate immune system as immunotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Kathleen Curran

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Because of its disseminated nature and lack of tumor-draining lymph nodes, acute myeloid leukemia (AML likely employs unique immune evasion strategies as compared to solid malignancies. Targeting these unique mechanisms may result in improved immunotherapeutic approaches. Emerging data suggests that a specific dendritic cell (DC subset, CD8α DCs, may be responsible for mediating tolerance in AML and thus targeting the innate immune system may be of benefit in this disease. Promising immune targets include the Toll-like receptors (TLRs, calreticulin/CD47, the stimulator of interferon genes (STING pathway and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3. However, it is becoming clear that compensatory mechanisms may limit the efficacy of these agents alone and thus rationale combinations of immunotherapies are warranted. This review discusses the potential immune evasion strategies in AML, as well as discussion of the promising innate immune targets, both alone and in combination, for this disease.

  4. Skin immune systems and inflammation: protector of the skin or promoter of aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Mary F; Robinson, Michael K; Baron, Elma D; Cooper, Kevin D

    2008-04-01

    The immune system may either have a protective role against sunburn and skin cancer or, conversely, promote solar damage. The skin is poised to react to infections and injury, such as sunburn, with rapidly acting mechanisms (innate immunity) that precede the development of acquired immunity and serve as an immediate defense system. Some of these mechanisms, including activation of defensins and complement, modify subsequent acquired immunity. An array of induced immune-regulatory and pro-inflammatory mediators is evident, at the gene expression level, from the microarray analysis of both intrinsically aged and photoaged skin. Thus, inflammatory mechanisms may accentuate the effect of UV radiation to amplify direct damaging effects on molecules and cells, including DNA, proteins, and lipids, which cause immunosuppression, cancer, and photoaging. A greater understanding of the cutaneous immune system's response to photo-skin interactions is essential to comprehensively protect the skin from adverse solar effects. Sunscreen product protection measured only as reduction in redness (current "sun" protection factor) may no longer be sufficient, as it is becoming clear that protection against UV-induced immune changes is of equal if not of greater importance. Greater knowledge of these processes will also enable the development of improved strategies to repair photodamaged skin.

  5. Cardiorespiratory fitness: relationship with the immune system of adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Zampier Ulbrich

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This work to investigate the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness with count of cells in the immune system (IS in adolescents. The sample was composed by 102 boys (B and 131 (G girls (12 to 17 years-old. BMI was calculated and categorized (Cole et al. and absolute and relative VO2máx was obtained through the shuttle run test (Léger et al. and categorized according to Rodrigues et al. Maturation stage was assessing (Tanner. The cells of IS by leukogram was obtained. It was hypothesized (H that individuals with higher VO2máx could present a higher ratio of chances in the counting of cells in the SI. Was used frequency distribution, Student t test, ANOVAs one-way and binary logistic regression (p< 0.05. The overweight was demonstrated that 27.8% (B 13.2% (G. The values of VO2máx were between 29 to 59 ml.kg-1.min-1 and 25 to 53 ml.kg-1.min-1 to B and G, respectively. The average of IS cells differ between B and G, and in greater range in the: Leukocytes (B = 5697.1 cel.ml and G = 6496.9 cel.ml; t= 3,959 p = 0,000, Segmented (B= 3288,1 cel.ml and G= 4023,8 cel.ml; t= 4,145; p= 0,000, and neutrophils (B = 3306,9 cel.ml and G = 4101.2 cel.ml; t= 4,431 , p= 0,000 in G, while Eosinophils (B = 286.1 cel.ml and G = 211.1 cel.ml; t= 2,644; p= 0,009 had a higher count for B. There were differences between the maturational stages only between puberty stage and pos puberty for Leukocytes and Segmented in G. The analyses of relative VO2máx indicated the M with low cardiorespiratory fitness is 4,6; 2,76; 3,57 respectively have more chances of eosinophils, lymphocytes and monocytes below the 50th percentile, as well as to observe the absolute VO2máx, the R with regular fitness is 9,0; 5,16; 9,65 respectively have more chances of leukocytes, monocytes and neutrophils below the 50th percentile. The M showed that the regular fitness has 3.0 times more chances to have leukocytes and neutrophils below the 50th percentile. It is concluded that the

  6. Cardiorespiratory fitness: relationship with the immune system of adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Zampier Ulbrich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2009v11n4p478 This work to investigate the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness with count of cells in the immune system (IS in adolescents. The sample was composed by 102 boys (B and 131 (G girls (12 to 17 years-old. BMI was calculated and categorized (Cole et al. and absolute and relative VO2máx was obtained through the shuttle run test (Léger et al. and categorized according to Rodrigues et al. Maturation stage was assessing (Tanner. The cells of IS by leukogram was obtained. It was hypothesized (H that individuals with higher VO2máx could present a higher ratio of chances in the counting of cells in the SI. Was used frequency distribution, Student t test, ANOVAs one-way and binary logistic regression (p< 0.05. The overweight was demonstrated that 27.8% (B 13.2% (G. The values of VO2máx were between 29 to 59 ml.kg-1.min-1 and 25 to 53 ml.kg-1.min-1 to B and G, respectively. The average of IS cells differ between B and G, and in greater range in the: Leukocytes (B = 5697.1 cel.ml and G = 6496.9 cel.ml; t= 3,959 p = 0,000, Segmented (B= 3288,1 cel.ml and G= 4023,8 cel.ml; t= 4,145; p= 0,000, and neutrophils (B = 3306,9 cel.ml and G = 4101.2 cel.ml; t= 4,431 , p= 0,000 in G, while Eosinophils (B = 286.1 cel.ml and G = 211.1 cel.ml; t= 2,644; p= 0,009 had a higher count for B. There were differences between the maturational stages only between puberty stage and pos puberty for Leukocytes and Segmented in G. The analyses of relative VO2máx indicated the M with low cardiorespiratory fitness is 4,6; 2,76; 3,57 respectively have more chances of eosinophils, lymphocytes and monocytes below the 50th percentile, as well as to observe the absolute VO2máx, the R with regular fitness is 9,0; 5,16; 9,65 respectively have more chances of leukocytes, monocytes and neutrophils below the 50th percentile. The M showed that the regular fitness has 3.0 times more chances to have leukocytes and neutrophils below

  7. Liability immunity as a legal defense for recent emergency medical services system litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, D L; Trail, W R; Trompler, V A

    1995-01-01

    Although many emergency medical services (EMS) providers are concerned about liability litigation, no comprehensive, national studies of EMS appelate cases have been published. Information about these cases and the use of liability immunity (sovereign immunity, emergency medical care immunity, or Good Samaritan immunity) as a defense could be used for EMS risk management and better patient care. To review recent EMS system civil litigation cases to determine their common characteristics and the number that used liability immunity as a legal defense. An observational study of the WESTLAW computerized database of legal cases from all state and federal appellate courts. All legal cases that named a member of the EMS system as a defendant, involved either a patient-care incident or ambulance collision, and received an appellate court opinion from 1987 through 1992, were studied. Eighty-six cases were identified and analyzed. Most cases (85%) were related to a patient-care incident, and 71% of the cases involved a death or significant physical injury. More than 49% of the patient cases alleged inadequate assessment or treatment, and 27% alleged delay in ambulance arrival or no ambulance arrival. There were 11 cases (15%) that alleged no transport of the patient to the hospital. Liability immunity was used as a defense in 53% of the cases. The appellate courts ruled in favor of 68% of the defendants that did not use an immunity defense and in favor of 72% of those that did use liability immunity. There have been a large number of recent appellate cases involving EMS systems. The common characteristics of many of these cases demonstrate the need for providing rapid ambulance arrival, proper assessment and treatment, and rapid patient transportation to a hospital. Although liability immunity was used as a legal defense by most EMS system defendants, the appellate court outcome was similar regardless of its use.

  8. CB2 and GPR55 receptors as therapeutic targets for systemic immune dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Zhou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system (ECS is involved in many physiological processes and has been suggested to play critical roles in the immune response and the central nervous system (CNS. Therefore, ECS modulation has potential therapeutic effects on immune dysfunctional disorders, such as sepsis and CNS injury-induced immunodeficiency syndrome (CIDS. In sepsis, excessive release of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators results in multi-organ dysfunction/failure and death. In CIDS, an acute CNS injury dysregulates a normally well-balanced interplay between the CNS and immune system, leading to increased patients’ susceptibility to infections. In this review, we will discuss potential therapeutic modulation of the immune response in sepsis and CNS injury by manipulation of the ECS representing a novel target for immunotherapy.

  9. Correlation between early-life regulation of the immune system by microbiota and allergy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensollen, Thomas; Blumberg, Richard S

    2017-04-01

    Early postnatal life is a key time for development of the immune system and colonization of the host by microbiota. Recent studies have shown that specific limbs of the immune system can be regulated by microbiota in a time-restricted period during early life. Studies in mouse models have shown that perturbations of the microbiota during early life can cause immune effects that can persist into adulthood and create increased host susceptibility to certain diseases. Here we discuss the role of early-life regulation of the immune system by the microbiota and how it can be related to allergy development. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An Immune System Inspired Theory for Crime and Violence in Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Banerjee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Crime is ubiquitous and has been around for millennia. Crime is analogous to a pathogenic infection and police response to it is similar to an immune response. The biological immune system is also engaged in an arms race with pathogens. We propose an immune system inspired theory of crime and violence in human societies, especially in large agglomerations like cities. In this work we suggest that an immune system inspired theory of crime can provide a new perspective on the dynamics of violence in societies. The competitive dynamics between police and criminals has similarities to how the immune system is involved in an arms race with invading pathogens. Cities have properties similar to biological organisms and in this theory the police and military forces would be the immune system that protects against detrimental internal and external forces. Our theory has implications for public policy: ranging from how much financial resource to invest in crime fighting, to optimal policing strategies, pre-placement of police, and number of police to be allocated to different cities. Our work can also be applied to other forms of violence in human societies (like terrorism and violence in other primate societies and eusocial insects. We hope this will be the first step towards a quantitative theory of violence and conflict in human societies. Ultimately we hope that this will help in designing smart and efficient cities that can scale and be sustainable despite population increase.

  11. The Innate and Adaptive Immune System as Targets for Biologic Therapies in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleran, Grainne; Lopetuso, Loris; Petito, Valentina; Graziani, Cristina; Ianiro, Gianluca; McNamara, Deirdre; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Scaldaferri, Franco

    2017-09-21

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an immune-mediated inflammatory condition causing inflammation of gastrointestinal and systemic cells, with an increasing prevalence worldwide. Many factors are known to trigger and maintain inflammation in IBD including the innate and adaptive immune systems, genetics, the gastrointestinal microbiome and several environmental factors. Our knowledge of the involvement of the immune system in the pathophysiology of IBD has advanced rapidly over the last two decades, leading to the development of several immune-targeted treatments with a biological source, known as biologic agents. The initial focus of these agents was directed against the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) leading to dramatic changes in the disease course for a proportion of patients with IBD. However, more recently, it has been shown that a significant proportion of patients do not respond to anti-TNF-α directed therapies, leading a shift to other inflammatory pathways and targets, including those of both the innate and adaptive immune systems, and targets linking both systems including anti-leukocyte trafficking agents-integrins and adhesion molecules. This review briefly describes the molecular basis of immune based gastrointestinal inflammation in IBD, and then describes how several current and future biologic agents work to manipulate these pathways, and their clinical success to date.

  12. Are the innate and adaptive immune systems setting hypertension on fire?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomfim, Gisele F; Rodrigues, Fernanda Luciano; Carneiro, Fernando S

    2017-03-01

    Hypertension is the most common chronic cardiovascular disease and is associated with several pathological states, being an important cause of morbidity and mortality around the world. Low-grade inflammation plays a key role in hypertension and the innate and adaptive immune systems seem to contribute to hypertension development and maintenance. Hypertension is associated with vascular inflammation, increased vascular cytokines levels and infiltration of immune cells in the vasculature, kidneys and heart. However, the mechanisms that trigger inflammation and immune system activation in hypertension are completely unknown. Cells from the innate immune system express pattern recognition receptors (PRR), which detect conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that induce innate effector mechanisms to produce endogenous signals, such as inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, to alert the host about danger. Additionally, antigen-presenting cells (APC) act as sentinels that are activated by PAMPs and DAMPs to sense the presence of the antigen/neoantigen, which ensues the adaptive immune system activation. In this context, different lymphocyte types are activated and contribute to inflammation and end-organ damage in hypertension. This review will focus on experimental and clinical evidence demonstrating the contribution of the innate and adaptive immune systems to the development of hypertension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pauci-immune and Immune Glomerular Lesions in Kidney Transplants for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Meehan, Shane M.; Chang, Anthony; Khurana, Amandeep; Baliga, Rajendra; Kadambi, Pradeep V.; Javaid, Basit

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Glomerular lesions in allografts in recipients with end-stage nephritis resulting from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were examined to determine the spectrum of glomerular pathology in recurrent glomerulonephritis (GN).

  14. What vaccination studies tell us about immunological memory within the innate immune system of cultured shrimp and crayfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Hsuan; Kumar, Ramya; Ng, Tze Hann; Wang, Han-Ching

    2018-03-01

    The possibility of immunological memory in invertebrates is a topic that has recently attracted a lot of attention. Today, even vertebrates are known to exhibit innate immune responses that show memory-like properties, and since these responses are triggered by cells that are involved in the innate immune system, it seems that immune specificity and immune memory do not necessarily require the presence of B cells and T cells after all. This kind of immune response has been called "immune priming" or "trained immunity". In this report, we review recent observations and our current understanding of immunological memory within the innate immune system in cultured shrimp and crayfish after vaccination with live vaccine, killed vaccine and subunit vaccines. We also discuss the possible mechanisms involved in this immune response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Immune system of the inner ear as a novel therapeutic target for sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki eOkano

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL is a common clinical condition resulting from dysfunction in one or more parts in the auditory pathway between the inner ear and auditory cortex. Despite the prevalence of SNHL, little is known about its etiopathology, although several mechanisms have been postulated including ischemia, viral infection or reactivation, and microtrauma. Immune-mediated inner ear disease has been introduced and accepted as one SNHL pathophysiology; it responds to immunosuppressive therapy and is one of the few reversible forms of bilateral SNHL. The concept of immune-mediated inner ear disease is straightforward and comprehensible, but criteria for clinical diagnosis and the precise mechanism of hearing loss have not been determined. Moreover, the therapeutic mechanisms of corticosteroids are unclear, leading to several misconceptions by both clinicians and investigators concerning corticosteroid therapy. This review addresses our current understanding of the immune system in the inner ear and its involvement in the pathophysiology in SNHL. Treatment of SNHL, including immune-mediated inner ear disorder, will be discussed with a focus on the immune mechanism and immunocompetent cells as therapeutic targets. Finally, possible interventions modulating the immune system in the inner ear to repair the tissue organization and improve hearing in patients with SNHL will be discussed. Tissue macrophages in the inner ear appear to be a potential target for modulating the immune response in the inner ear in the pathophysiology of SNHL.

  16. Neuronal influence behind the central nervous system regulation of the immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANAHI eCHAVARRIA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system has a highly specialized microenvironment, and despite being initially considered an immune privileged site, this immune status is far from absolute because it varies with age and brain topography. The brain monitors immune responses by several means that act in parallel; one pathway involves afferent nerves (vagal nerve and the other resident cells (neurons and glia. These cell populations exert a strong role in the regulation of the immune system, favoring an immune-modulatory environment in the CNS. Neurons control glial cell and infiltrated T-cells by contact-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Contact-dependent mechanisms are provided by several membrane immune modulating molecules such as Sema-7A, CD95L, CD22, CD200, CD47, NCAM, ICAM-5 and cadherins; which can inhibit the expression of microglial inflammatory cytokines, induce apoptosis or inactivate infiltrated T-cells. On the other hand, soluble neuronal factors like Sema-3A, cytokines, neurotrophins, neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters attenuate microglial and/or T-cell activation. In this review, we focused on all known mechanism driven only by neurons in order to control the local immune cells.

  17. Stress, glucocorticoids and ageing of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Moisés Evandro

    2005-03-01

    Ageing has been associated with immunological changes (immunosenescence) that resemble those observed following chronic stress or glucocorticoid (GC) treatment. These changes include thymic involution, lower number of naïve T cells, reduced cell-mediated immunity, and poor vaccination response to new antigens. It follows that immunosenescence could be associated with changes of peripheral GC levels. Indeed, when compared with young subjects, healthy elders are more stressed and show activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. However, both beneficial and undesirable effects of GCs ultimately depend on the target tissue sensitivity to these steroids. Recent data indicate that peripheral lymphocytes from elders respond poorly to GC treatment in vitro. The present review summarizes recent findings which suggest that immunosenescence may be closely related to both psychological distress and stress hormones. Furthermore, chronically stressed elderly subjects may be particularly at risk of stress-related pathology because of further alterations in GC-immune signalling. Finally, the neuroendocrine hypothesis of immunosenescence is finally reconsidered in which the age-related increase in the cortisol/DHEA ratio is major determinant of immunological changes observed during ageing.

  18. Transcriptional Analysis Reveals Gender-Specific Changes in the Aging of the Human Immune System

    OpenAIRE

    Saara Marttila; Juulia Jylhävä; Tapio Nevalainen; Matti Nykter; Marja Jylhä; Antti Hervonen; Liina Tserel; Pärt Peterson; Mikko Hurme

    2013-01-01

    Aging and gender have a strong influence on the functional capacity of the immune system. In general, the immune response in females is stronger than that in males, but there is scant information about the effect of aging on the gender difference in the immune response. To address this question, we performed a transcriptomic analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from elderly individuals (nonagenarians, n = 146) and young controls (aged 19-30 years, n = 30). When compared to y...

  19. When carbon nanotubes encounter the immune system: desirable and undesirable effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumortier, Hélène

    2013-12-01

    The role of our immune system is to bring efficient protection against invasion by foreign elements, not only pathogens but also any material it may be in contact with. Nanoparticles may enter the body and encounter the immune system either intentionally (e.g. administration for biomedical application) or not (e.g. respiratory occupational exposure). Therefore, it is of fundamental importance to get a thorough knowledge of the way they interact with immune cells and all related consequences. Among nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are of special interest because of their tremendous field of applications. Consequently, their increasing production, processing and eventual incorporation into new types of composites and/or into biological systems have raised fundamental issues regarding their potential impact on health. This review aims at giving an overview of the known desirable and undesirable effects of CNTs on the immune system, i.e. beneficial modulation of immune cells by CNTs engineered for biomedical applications versus toxicity, inflammation and unwanted immune reactions triggered by CNTs themselves. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Immune system responses and fitness costs associated with consumption of bacteria in larvae of Trichoplusia ni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heckel David G

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insects helped pioneer, and persist as model organisms for, the study of specific aspects of immunity. Although they lack an adaptive immune system, insects possess an innate immune system that recognizes and destroys intruding microorganisms. Its operation under natural conditions has not been well studied, as most studies have introduced microbes to laboratory-reared insects via artificial mechanical wounding. One of the most common routes of natural exposure and infection, however, is via food; thus, the role of dietary microbial communities in herbivorous insect immune system evolution invites study. Here, we examine the immune system response and consequences of exposing a lepidopteran agricultural pest to non-infectious microorganisms via simple oral consumption. Results Immune system response was compared between Trichoplusia ni larvae reared on diets with or without non-pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli and Micrococcus luteus. Two major immune response-related enzymatic activities responded to diets differently – phenoloxidase activity was inhibited in the bacteria-fed larvae, whereas general antibacterial activity was enhanced. Eight proteins were highly expressed in the hemolymph of the bacteria fed larvae, among them immune response related proteins arylphorin, apolipophorin III and gloverin. Expression response among 25 putative immune response-related genes were assayed via RT-qPCR. Seven showed more than fivefold up regulation in the presence of bacterial diet, with 22 in total being differentially expressed, among them apolipophorin III, cecropin, gallerimycin, gloverin, lysozyme, and phenoloxidase inhibiting enzyme. Finally, potential life-history trade-offs were studied, with pupation time and pupal mass being negatively affected in bacteria fed larvae. Conclusion The presence of bacteria in food, even if non-pathogenic, can trigger an immune response cascade with life history tradeoffs. Trichoplusia ni

  1. [Interrelations between cells of the nervous and immune systems in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiĭski, D; Svetoslavova, M; Khristov, I; Losev, B

    2001-01-01

    The collaborative character of the immune response requires direct cell- to cell or humoral contacts between the lymphocytes and the cells of mononuclear phagocyte system. The proposed model of direct interrelationship between the cells of the CNS and the immune system throws much light on the morphology of the lymphocyte entry and its recruitment into parenchyma during pathology. The structure, distribution and membrane morphology of the formed in situ rosette-like clusters (containing microglia, as CNS type of mononuclear phagocytes, and syngeneic lymphocytes) was investigated by light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results were discussed in relation with the strong expression of a number of immune capacities from the ubiquitiously situated in the CNS microglia and the pivotal role of the lymphocytes and microglia in pairs with a close contact to each other in the brain immune processing.

  2. Mucosal and systemic immune modulation by Trichuris trichiura in a self-infected individual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Anders Kirch; Rasmussen, Tue Kruse; Nejsum, Peter

    2017-01-01

    trichiura colonization induced equally increased expressions of T-helper (h)1-, Th2-, Th17- and Treg-associated cytokines and transcription factors, measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We observed several indicators of modulation of systemic immunity during the T. trichiura infection. Plasma......Helminthic therapy of immune-mediated diseases has gained attention in recent years, but we know little of how helminths modulate human immunity. In this study, we investigated how self-infection with Trichuris (T.) trichiura in an adult man without intestinal disease affected mucosal and systemic...... immunity. Colonic mucosal biopsies were obtained at baseline, during T. trichiura infection, and after its clearance following mebendazole treatment. Unexpectedly, the volunteer experienced a Campylobacter colitis following T. trichiura clearance, and this served as a positive infectious control. Trichuris...

  3. Leptin as a link between the immune system and kidney-related diseases: leading actor or just a coadjuvant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes-Vieira, P M M; Bassi, E J; Araujo, R C; Câmara, N O S

    2012-08-01

    Food intake and nutritional status modify the physiological responses of the immune system to illness and infection and regulate the development of chronic inflammatory processes, such as kidney disease. Adipose tissue secretes immune-related proteins called adipokines that have pleiotropic effects on both the immune and neuroendocrine systems, linking metabolism and immune physiology. Leptin, an adipose tissue-derived adipokine, displays a variety of immune and physiological functions, and participates in several immune responses. Here, we review the current literature on the role of leptin in kidney diseases, linking adipose tissue and the immune system with kidney-related disorders. The modulation of this adipose hormone may have a major impact on the treatment of several immune- and metabolic-related kidney diseases. © 2012 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  4. Infection-Induced Interaction between the Mosquito Circulatory and Immune Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jonas G.; Hillyer, Julián F.

    2012-01-01

    Insects counter infection with innate immune responses that rely on cells called hemocytes. Hemocytes exist in association with the insect's open circulatory system and this mode of existence has likely influenced the organization and control of anti-pathogen immune responses. Previous studies reported that pathogens in the mosquito body cavity (hemocoel) accumulate on the surface of the heart. Using novel cell staining, microdissection and intravital imaging techniques, we investigated the mechanism of pathogen accumulation in the pericardium of the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, and discovered a novel insect immune tissue, herein named periostial hemocytes, that sequesters pathogens as they flow with the hemolymph. Specifically, we show that there are two types of endocytic cells that flank the heart: periostial hemocytes and pericardial cells. Resident periostial hemocytes engage in the rapid phagocytosis of pathogens, and during the course of a bacterial or Plasmodium infection, circulating hemocytes migrate to the periostial regions where they bind the cardiac musculature and each other, and continue the phagocytosis of invaders. Periostial hemocyte aggregation occurs in a time- and infection dose-dependent manner, and once this immune process is triggered, the number of periostial hemocytes remains elevated for the lifetime of the mosquito. Finally, the soluble immune elicitors peptidoglycan and β-1,3-glucan also induce periostial hemocyte aggregation, indicating that this is a generalized and basal immune response that is induced by diverse immune stimuli. These data describe a novel insect cellular immune response that fundamentally relies on the physiological interaction between the insect circulatory and immune systems. PMID:23209421

  5. Infection-induced interaction between the mosquito circulatory and immune systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas G King

    Full Text Available Insects counter infection with innate immune responses that rely on cells called hemocytes. Hemocytes exist in association with the insect's open circulatory system and this mode of existence has likely influenced the organization and control of anti-pathogen immune responses. Previous studies reported that pathogens in the mosquito body cavity (hemocoel accumulate on the surface of the heart. Using novel cell staining, microdissection and intravital imaging techniques, we investigated the mechanism of pathogen accumulation in the pericardium of the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, and discovered a novel insect immune tissue, herein named periostial hemocytes, that sequesters pathogens as they flow with the hemolymph. Specifically, we show that there are two types of endocytic cells that flank the heart: periostial hemocytes and pericardial cells. Resident periostial hemocytes engage in the rapid phagocytosis of pathogens, and during the course of a bacterial or Plasmodium infection, circulating hemocytes migrate to the periostial regions where they bind the cardiac musculature and each other, and continue the phagocytosis of invaders. Periostial hemocyte aggregation occurs in a time- and infection dose-dependent manner, and once this immune process is triggered, the number of periostial hemocytes remains elevated for the lifetime of the mosquito. Finally, the soluble immune elicitors peptidoglycan and β-1,3-glucan also induce periostial hemocyte aggregation, indicating that this is a generalized and basal immune response that is induced by diverse immune stimuli. These data describe a novel insect cellular immune response that fundamentally relies on the physiological interaction between the insect circulatory and immune systems.

  6. Anopheles gambiae antiviral immune response to systemic O'nyong-nyong infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Waldock

    Full Text Available Mosquito-borne viral diseases cause significant burden in much of the developing world. Although host-virus interactions have been studied extensively in the vertebrate host, little is known about mosquito responses to viral infection. In contrast to mosquitoes of the Aedes and Culex genera, Anopheles gambiae, the principal vector of human malaria, naturally transmits very few arboviruses, the most important of which is O'nyong-nyong virus (ONNV. Here we have investigated the A. gambiae immune response to systemic ONNV infection using forward and reverse genetic approaches.We have used DNA microarrays to profile the transcriptional response of A. gambiae inoculated with ONNV and investigate the antiviral function of candidate genes through RNAi gene silencing assays. Our results demonstrate that A. gambiae responses to systemic viral infection involve genes covering all aspects of innate immunity including pathogen recognition, modulation of immune signalling, complement-mediated lysis/opsonisation and other immune effector mechanisms. Patterns of transcriptional regulation and co-infections of A. gambiae with ONNV and the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei suggest that hemolymph immune responses to viral infection are diverted away from melanisation. We show that four viral responsive genes encoding two putative recognition receptors, a galectin and an MD2-like receptor, and two effector lysozymes, function in limiting viral load.This study is the first step in elucidating the antiviral mechanisms of A. gambiae mosquitoes, and has revealed interesting differences between A. gambiae and other invertebrates. Our data suggest that mechanisms employed by A. gambiae are distinct from described invertebrate antiviral immunity to date, and involve the complement-like branch of the humoral immune response, supressing the melanisation response that is prominent in anti-parasitic immunity. The antiviral immune response in A. gambiae is thus

  7. Prebiotics, probiotics, synbiotics, and the immune system: experimental data and clinical evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Frei, Remo; Akdis, Mübeccel; O'Mahony, Liam

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW The intestinal immune system is constantly exposed to foreign antigens, which for the most part should be tolerated. Certain probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics are able to influence immune responses. In this review, we highlight the recent publications (within the last 2 years) that have substantially progressed this field. RECENT FINDINGS The immunological mechanisms underpinning probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics effects continue to be better defined with novel ...

  8. Systemic protein delivery by muscle-gene transfer is limited by a local immune response

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lixin; Dobrzynski, Eric; Schlachterman, Alexander; Cao, Ou; Herzog, Roland W.

    2005-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have been successfully used for therapeutic expression of systemic transgene products (such as factor IX or erythropoietin) following in vivo administration to skeletal muscle of animal models of inherited hematologic disorders. However, an immune response may be initiated if the transgene product represents a neoantigen. Here, we use ovalbumin (OVA) as a model antigen and demonstrate immune-mediated elimination of expression on muscle-directed AAV-2 gene ...

  9. Effect of petting a dog on immune system function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnetski, Carl J; Riggers, Sandra; Brennan, Francis X

    2004-12-01

    The present study assessed the effect of petting a dog on secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels. 55 college students were randomly assigned to either an experimental group or one of two control groups. Group 1 (n= 19) petted a live dog; Group 2 (n = 17) petted a stuffed dog, while Group 3 (n = 19) simply sat comfortably on a couch. Each participant was exposed to one of the three conditions for 18 min. Pre- and posttreatment saliva samples yielded a significant increase in IgA for Group 1 only. Participants were also asked to complete the Pet Attitude Scale of Templer, Salter, Dickey, Baldwin and Veleber. Scores on this scale correlated with IgA increases only for participants in Group 2 (petting a stuffed animal). Results are discussed in terms of the beneficial effects of pets on health in general, and immunity in particular.

  10. Immune System in the Brain: A Modulatory Role on Dendritic Spine Morphophysiology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Kurt Bitzer-Quintero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system is closely linked to the immune system at several levels. The brain parenchyma is separated from the periphery by the blood brain barrier, which under normal conditions prevents the entry of mediators such as activated leukocytes, antibodies, complement factors, and cytokines. The myeloid cell lineage plays a crucial role in the development of immune responses at the central level, and it comprises two main subtypes: (1 resident microglia, distributed throughout the brain parenchyma; (2 perivascular macrophages located in the brain capillaries of the basal lamina and the choroid plexus. In addition, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, endothelial cells, and, to a lesser extent, neurons are implicated in the immune response in the central nervous system. By modulating synaptogenesis, microglia are most specifically involved in restoring neuronal connectivity following injury. These cells release immune mediators, such as cytokines, that modulate synaptic transmission and that alter the morphology of dendritic spines during the inflammatory process following injury. Thus, the expression and release of immune mediators in the brain parenchyma are closely linked to plastic morphophysiological changes in neuronal dendritic spines. Based on these observations, it has been proposed that these immune mediators are also implicated in learning and memory processes.

  11. Nonconsumptive effects of a predator weaken then rebound over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbro, David L; Grabowski, Jonathan H; Hughes, A Randall; Piehler, Michael F; White, J Wilson

    2017-03-01

    Predators can influence prey traits and behavior (nonconsumptive effects [NCEs]), often with cascading effects for basal resources and ecosystem function. But critiques of NCE experiments suggest that their duration and design produce results that describe the potential importance of NCEs rather than their actual importance. In light of these critiques, we re-evaluated a toadfish (predator), crab (prey), and oyster (resource) NCE-mediated trophic cascade. In a 4-month field experiment, we varied toadfish cue (NCE) and crab density (approximating variation in predator consumptive effects, CE). Toadfish initially benefitted oyster survival by causing crabs to reduce consumption. But this NCE weakened over time (possibly due to prey hunger), so that after 2 months, crab density (CE) dictated oyster survivorship, regardless of cue. However, the NCE ultimately re-emerged on reefs with a toadfish cue, increasing oyster survivorship. At no point did the effect of toadfish cue on mud crab foraging behavior alter oyster population growth or sediment organic matter on the reef, which is a measure of benthic-pelagic coupling. Instead, both decreased with increasing crab density. Thus, within a system shown to exhibit strong NCEs in short-term experiments (days) our study supported predictions from theoretical models: (a) within the generation of individual prey, the relative influence of NCEs appears to cycle over longer time periods (months); and (b) predator CEs, not NCEs, drive longer-term resource dynamics and ecosystem function. Thus, our study implies that the impacts of removing top predators via activities such as hunting and overfishing will cascade to basal resources and ecosystem properties primarily through density-mediated interactions. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  12. The Spleen: A Hub Connecting Nervous and Immune Systems in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori, Andrea; Perrotta, Marialuisa; Lembo, Giuseppe; Carnevale, Daniela

    2017-06-07

    Metabolic disorders have been identified as major health problems affecting a large portion of the world population. In addition, obesity and insulin resistance are principal risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases. Altered immune responses are common features of both hypertension and obesity and, moreover, the involvement of the nervous system in the modulation of immune system is gaining even more attention in both pathophysiological contexts. For these reasons, during the last decades, researches focused their efforts on the comprehension of the molecular mechanisms connecting immune system to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. On the other hand, it has been reported that in these pathological conditions, central neural pathways modulate the activity of the peripheral nervous system, which is strongly involved in onset and progression of the disease. It is interesting to notice that neural reflex can also participate in the modulation of immune functions. In this scenario, the spleen becomes the crucial hub allowing the interaction of different systems differently involved in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Here, we summarize the major findings that dissect the role of the immune system in disorders related to metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunctions, and how this could also be influenced by neural reflexes.

  13. The Spleen: A Hub Connecting Nervous and Immune Systems in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Lori

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders have been identified as major health problems affecting a large portion of the world population. In addition, obesity and insulin resistance are principal risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases. Altered immune responses are common features of both hypertension and obesity and, moreover, the involvement of the nervous system in the modulation of immune system is gaining even more attention in both pathophysiological contexts. For these reasons, during the last decades, researches focused their efforts on the comprehension of the molecular mechanisms connecting immune system to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. On the other hand, it has been reported that in these pathological conditions, central neural pathways modulate the activity of the peripheral nervous system, which is strongly involved in onset and progression of the disease. It is interesting to notice that neural reflex can also participate in the modulation of immune functions. In this scenario, the spleen becomes the crucial hub allowing the interaction of different systems differently involved in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Here, we summarize the major findings that dissect the role of the immune system in disorders related to metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunctions, and how this could also be influenced by neural reflexes.

  14. The Dugdale solution for two unequal straight cracks weakening in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A crack arrest model is proposed for an infinite elastic perfectly-plastic plate weakened by two unequal, quasi-static, collinear straight cracks. The Dugdale model solution is obtained for the above problem when the developed plastic zones are subjected to normal cohesive quadratically varying yield point stress. Employing ...

  15. Earthquake slip weakening and asperities explained by thermal pressurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibberley, Christopher A J; Shimamoto, Toshihiko

    2005-08-04

    An earthquake occurs when a fault weakens during the early portion of its slip at a faster rate than the release of tectonic stress driving the fault motion. This slip weakening occurs over a critical distance, D(c). Understanding the controls on D(c) in nature is severely limited, however, because the physical mechanism of weakening is unconstrained. Conventional friction experiments, typically conducted at slow slip rates and small displacements, have obtained D(c) values that are orders of magnitude lower than values estimated from modelling seismological data for natural earthquakes. Here we present data on fluid transport properties of slip zone rocks and on the slip zone width in the centre of the Median Tectonic Line fault zone, Japan. We show that the discrepancy between laboratory and seismological results can be resolved if thermal pressurization of the pore fluid is the slip-weakening mechanism. Our analysis indicates that a planar fault segment with an impermeable and narrow slip zone will become very unstable during slip and is likely to be the site of a seismic asperity.

  16. The Dugdale solution for two unequal straight cracks weakening in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A crack arrest model is proposed for an infinite elastic perfectly- plastic plate weakened by two unequal, quasi-static, collinear straight cracks. The. Dugdale model solution is obtained for the above problem when the developed plastic zones are subjected to normal cohesive quadratically varying yield point stress.

  17. Is there a role for the immune system in glaucomatous optic neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, M B

    2000-04-01

    Glaucoma and immunity are not traditionally perceived as being causally related. Recently, however, compelling observations have provided insight into a potential role for the immune system in the development of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. In this article, it is proposed that the role of the immune system in glaucoma is two-fold. In some patients, there is evidence that an autoimmune mechanism may be responsible for eliciting damage to the optic nerve, resulting in glaucomatous injury. Autoimmune damage to the optic nerve may occur directly by autoantibodies, or indirectly by way of a "mimicked" autoimmune response to a sensitizing antigen which, in turn, injuries retinal ganglion cells. We suggest that autoimmune-mediated glaucoma injury occurs most often, but not exclusively, in patients in whom the intraocular pressure has never been found to be elevated. A second role of the immune system in glaucoma is likely one of surveillance, in which signal pathways of the immune system regulate cell death in response to conditions that stress retinal neurons in glaucoma. These might include mechanical stress from high intraocular pressure, ischemia, excessive excitatory amino acids, or toxic products resulting from excessive nitric oxide synthase production in either neurons or glial fibers that surround the optic nerve as it exits the eye. In these cases, we propose that the immune system acts as an "arbiter" to help determine whether a neuronal cell will ultimately survive, or succumb to, those stressors that are perceived as injurious. It is conceivable that such surveillance and cell death regulation by the immune system is important in determining the fate of retinal neurons in both the more common "high-pressure" forms of glaucoma, such as primary open-angle glaucoma, and in cases in which the intraocular pressure appears within normal range.

  18. Paying for the Tolls: The High Cost of the Innate Immune System for the Cardiac Myocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Anne A

    2017-01-01

    The cardiac myocyte differs strikingly from the specialized cells of the immune system, which has two different responses to invading organisms and tissue damage. Adaptive or acquired immunity generates highly specific antibodies in response to threats and is an essential component of immunity; however, adaptive immunity can take 4-7 days to mobilize, and a more primitive response, innate immunity, fills the gap. Innate immunity is expressed in complex and in primitive life forms. Specialized receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are widely distributed throughout different tissues recognize danger signals and rapidly respond with the release of noxious substances, such as TNFα. The problem is that many endogenous molecules have been found to act as ligands for specific TLRs, and when these molecules are released into the extracellular environment, they can cause problems by activating innate immunity and an inflammatory response. In cardiac myocytes heat shock protein (HSP)60 can activate TLR4, as can HMGB1, and this type of response can amplify the response to ischemia/reperfusion leading to increased cell and tissue injury. Activation of TLRs can potentially amplify chronic, inflammatory diseases, such as ischemic heart failure. Thus, it is important to understand the regulation of the TLRs and their downstream effects. This chapter will focus on the TLRs and cardiac myocytes.

  19. Invader immunology: invasion history alters immune system function in cane toads (Rhinella marina) in tropical Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory P; Phillips, Benjamin L; Dubey, Sylvain; Shine, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Because an individual's investment into the immune system may modify its dispersal rate, immune function may evolve rapidly in an invader. We collected cane toads (Rhinella marina) from sites spanning their 75-year invasion history in Australia, bred them, and raised their progeny in standard conditions. Evolved shifts in immune function should manifest as differences in immune responses among the progeny of parents collected in different locations. Parental location did not affect the offspring's cell-mediated immune response or stress response, but blood from the offspring of invasion-front toads had more neutrophils, and was more effective at phagocytosis and killing bacteria. These latter measures of immune function are negatively correlated with rate of dispersal in free-ranging toads. Our results suggest that the invasion of tropical Australia by cane toads has resulted in rapid genetically based compensatory shifts in the aspects of immune responses that are most compromised by the rigours of long-distance dispersal. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  20. Immune activation in the central nervous system throughout the course of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spudich, Serena S

    2016-03-01

    Robust and dynamic innate and adaptive responses characterize the acute central nervous system (CNS) response to HIV and other viral infections. In a state of chronic infection or viral latency, persistent immune activation associates with abnormality in the CNS. Understanding this process is critical, as immune-mediated abnormality in nonrenewable CNS cells may result in long-term neurologic sequelae for HIV-infected individuals. In humans, immune activation is reduced by suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy, but persists at abnormally elevated levels on treatment. CNS immune activation is initiated in acute infection and progressively increases until combination antiretroviral therapy is started. Newly identified characteristics of the CNS immune surveillance network include features of homeostasis and function of brain microglial cells, lymphatic drainage from CNS to cervical lymph nodes, and cells in cerebrospinal fluid associated with neurocognitive impairment. More research is required to determine whether early intervention to reduce infection limits the immunopathology established by sustained immune responses that ultimately fail to resolve infection, and to unravel mechanisms of persistent immune activation during treated HIV so that strategies can be developed to therapeutically protect the brain.

  1. Hormones in the immune system and their possible role. A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaba, György

    2014-09-01

    Immune cells synthesize, store and secrete hormones, which are identical with the hormones of the endocrine glands. These are: the POMC hormones (ACTH, endorphin), the thyroid system hormones (TRH, TSH, T3), growth hormone (GH), prolactin, melatonin, histamine, serotonin, catecholamines, GnRH, LHRH, hCG, renin, VIP, ANG II. This means that the immune cells contain all of the hormones, which were searched at all and they also have receptors for these hormones. From this point of view the immune cells are similar to the unicells (Tetrahymena), so it can be supposed that these cells retained the properties characteristic at a low level of phylogeny while other cells during the evolution accumulated to form endocrine glands. In contrast to the glandular endocrine cells, immune cells are polyproducers and polyreceivers. As they are mobile cells, they are able to transport the stored hormone to different places (packed transport) or attracted by local factors, accumulate in the neighborhood of the target, synthesizing and secreting hormones locally. This is taking place, e.g. in the case of endorphin, where the accumulating immune cells calms pain caused by the inflammation. The targeted packed transport is more economical than the hormone-pouring to the blood circulation of glandular endocrines and the targeting also cares the other receptor-bearing cells timely not needed the effect. Mostly the immune-effects of immune-cell derived hormones were studied (except endorphin), however, it is not exactly cleared, while the system could have scarcely studied important roles in other cases. The evolutionary aspects and the known as well, as possible roles of immune-endocrine system and their hormones are listed and discussed.

  2. Cancer as an immune-mediated disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shurin MR

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael R ShurinDepartments of Pathology and Immunology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: The link between oncology and immunology has a long history and its development is forced by the necessity to develop innovative and highly efficient modalities for immunological destruction of malignant cells. The limited efficacy of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation also exemplify these issues, as these treatments do not eliminate all cancerous cells, do not address the immunosuppressive nature of the disease and can further impair the patient's immune response weakening patient's resistance to the cancer. Multidisciplinary analysis of the interaction between the immune system and cancer in preclinical and clinical settings suggests that the immune system is closely intertwined with both cancer pathogenesis and treatment. On the one hand, cancer is a manifestation of malfunctions in immunity, as malignant cells manage to escape recognition and elimination by the immune system. Chronic infections and inflammation associated with limited or polarized immune responses also contribute to carcinogenesis and tumor progression. The tumor immunoenvironment represents specific conditions and elements that support cancerous cell survival, proliferation and spreading. On the other hand, the specificity and strength of antitumor immunity is a powerful and efficient tool that can be used to recognize and destroy neoplastic cells or their supporting microenvironment. Understanding the role of the immune system in controlling and supporting tumor initiation, formation, growth and progression has crucial implications for cancer therapy and will therefore guide the future development of cancer immunotherapy and its combination with conventional therapies to achieve optimal antitumor effects in patients with different types of cancer.Keywords: tumor immunology and immunotherapy, tumor immunoenvironment, cancer, immunosuppression

  3. Experimental investigation of processes responsible for dehydration weakening and embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, G.; Okazaki, K.; Proctor, B.

    2016-12-01

    We have conducted suites of experiments designed to test the efficacy of dehydration embrittlement for inducing intermediate depth earthquakes. Deformation experiments have been conducted in a Griggs apparatus at 1 to 2 GPa on both antigorite and lawsonite gouge. To scale experimental results to natural conditions, we conducted experiments where we use temperature ramps to induce dehydration while the samples deform at a constant strain rate. The weakening rate of the samples scales with the ratio of the temperature ramp rate over the strain rate. We also conducted experiments at these conditions where the pore fluid pressure is either drained or undrained. In this poster, we will describe the following observations: (1) Experiments on antigorite demonstrate that weakening is associated with an increase in pore-fluid pressure. However, weakening is always stable even when the weakening rate is the same as the apparatus stiffness. Strain rate stepping experiments on both antigorite, and dehydrating antigorite indicate velocity strengthening behavior and no AEs are resolvable during the dehydration reaction. (2) Experiments on lawsonite show unstable weakening (i.e. stick slip behavior) at all ratios of temperature ramp rate over strain rate. Experiments within the lawsonite stability field exhibit stick-slip behavior and AEs are detected both during deformation within the lawsonite stability field and during the dehydration reaction. These results indicate that dehydration embrittlement is suppressed when the reacting phase shows velocity strengthening frictional behavior. The results of the experiments on dehydration of antigorite also suggest that embrittlement of the reaction products is suppressed by enhancement of solution-precipitation processes. This observation provides a possible explanation for why dehydration of antigorite induces embrittlement at lower confining pressures (i.e. 200 MPa), where the dehydration temperature is lower and hence the

  4. Delayed development of systemic immunity in preterm pigs as a model for preterm infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Jiang, Pingping; Frøkiær, Hanne; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Thymann, Thomas; Sangild, Per T.

    2016-01-01

    Preterm neonates are highly sensitive to systemic infections in early life but little is known about systemic immune development following preterm birth. We hypothesized that preterm neonates have immature systemic immunity with distinct developmental trajectory for the first several weeks of life, relative to those born at near-term or term. Using pigs as a model, we characterized blood leukocyte subsets, antimicrobial activities and TLR-mediated cytokine production during the first weeks after preterm birth. Relative to near-term and term pigs, newborn preterm pigs had low blood leukocyte counts, poor neutrophil phagocytic rate, and limited cytokine responses to TLR1/2/5/7/9 and NOD1/2 agonists. The preterm systemic responses remained immature during the first postnatal week, but thereafter showed increased blood leukocyte numbers, NK cell proportion, neutrophil phagocytic rate and TLR2-mediated IL-6 and TNF-α production. These immune parameters remained different between preterm and near-term pigs at 2–3 weeks, even when adjusted for post-conceptional age. Our data suggest that systemic immunity follows a distinct developmental trajectory following preterm birth that may be influenced by postnatal age, complications of prematurity and environmental factors. Consequently, the immediate postnatal period may represent a window of opportunity to improve innate immunity in preterm neonates by medical, antimicrobial or dietary interventions. PMID:27830761

  5. Robust Artificial Immune System in the Hopfield network for Maximum k-Satisfiability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Asyraf Bin Mansor

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Artificial Immune System (AIS algorithm is a novel and vibrant computational paradigm, enthused by the biological immune system. Over the last few years, the artificial immune system has been sprouting to solve numerous computational and combinatorial optimization problems. In this paper, we introduce the restricted MAX-kSAT as a constraint optimization problem that can be solved by a robust computational technique. Hence, we will implement the artificial immune system algorithm incorporated with the Hopfield neural network to solve the restricted MAX-kSAT problem. The proposed paradigm will be compared with the traditional method, Brute force search algorithm integrated with Hopfield neural network. The results demonstrate that the artificial immune system integrated with Hopfield network outperforms the conventional Hopfield network in solving restricted MAX-kSAT. All in all, the result has provided a concrete evidence of the effectiveness of our proposed paradigm to be applied in other constraint optimization problem. The work presented here has many profound implications for future studies to counter the variety of satisfiability problem.

  6. Embracing Complexity beyond Systems Medicine: A New Approach to Chronic Immune Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Velde, Anje A; Bezema, Tjitske; van Kampen, Antoine H C; Kraneveld, Aletta D; 't Hart, Bert A; van Middendorp, Henriët; Hack, Erik C; van Montfrans, Joris M; Belzer, Clara; Jans-Beken, Lilian; Pieters, Raymond H; Knipping, Karen; Huber, Machteld; Boots, Annemieke M H; Garssen, Johan; Radstake, Tim R; Evers, Andrea W M; Prakken, Berent J; Joosten, Irma

    2016-01-01

    In order to combat chronic immune disorders (CIDs), it is an absolute necessity to understand the bigger picture, one that goes beyond insights at a one-disease, molecular, cellular, and static level. To unravel this bigger picture we advocate an integral, cross-disciplinary approach capable of embracing the complexity of the field. This paper discusses the current knowledge on common pathways in CIDs including general psychosocial and lifestyle factors associated with immune functioning. We demonstrate the lack of more in-depth psychosocial and lifestyle factors in current research cohorts and most importantly the need for an all-encompassing analysis of these factors. The second part of the paper discusses the challenges of understanding immune system dynamics and effectively integrating all key perspectives on immune functioning, including the patient's perspective itself. This paper suggests the use of techniques from complex systems science in describing and simulating healthy or deviating behavior of the immune system in its biopsychosocial surroundings. The patient's perspective data are suggested to be generated by using specific narrative techniques. We conclude that to gain more insight into the behavior of the whole system and to acquire new ways of combatting CIDs, we need to construct and apply new techniques in the field of computational and complexity science, to an even wider variety of dynamic data than used in today's systems medicine.

  7. The paradox of chronic neuroinflammation, systemic immune suppression and autoimmunity after traumatic chronic spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Marcel A.; Brommer, Benedikt; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2014-01-01

    During the transition from acute to chronic stages of recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI), there is an evolving state of immunologic dysfunction that exacerbates the problems associated with the more clinically obvious neurologic deficits. Since injury directly affects cells embedded within the “immune privileged/specialized” milieu of the spinal cord, maladaptive or inefficient responses are likely to occur. Collectively, these responses qualify as part of the continuum of “SCI disease” and are important therapeutic targets to improve neural repair and neurological outcome. Generic immune suppressive therapies have been largely unsuccessful, mostly because nflammation and immunity exert both beneficial (plasticity enhancing) and detrimental (e.g. glia- and neurodegenerative; secondary damage) effects and these functions change over time. Moreover, “compartmentalized” investigations, limited to only intraspinal inflammation and associated cellular or molecular changes in the spinal cord, neglect the reality that the structure and function of the CNS is influenced by systemic immune challenges and that the immune system is hardwired into the nervous system. Here, we consider this interplay during the progression from acute to chronic SCI. Specifically, we survey impaired/non-resolving intraspinal inflammation and the paradox of systemic inflammatory responses in the face of ongoing chronic immune suppression and autoimmunity. The concepts of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) and ‘neurogenic’ spinal cord injury-induced immune depression syndrome (SCI-IDS) are discussed as determinants of impaired ‘host-defense’ and trauma-induced autoimmunity. PMID:25017893

  8. The realization of a permanent magnet synchronous motor drive with flux weakening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Norum

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the realization and performance of a fully digital permanent magnet synchronous motor drive. A new control algorithm gives maximum torque to current ratio in both the constant torque region and in flux weakening. Inner loop current control and vector modulation with short calculation time are obtained by thc use of look-up tables. The controller is implemented in a singleboard control computer for power electronics systems, which is based on a 16 bit microcontroller.

  9. Early infections by myxoma virus of young rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) protected by maternal antibodies activate their immune system and enhance herd immunity in wild populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchandeau, Stéphane; Pontier, Dominique; Guitton, Jean-Sébastien; Letty, Jérôme; Fouchet, David; Aubineau, Jacky; Berger, Francis; Léonard, Yves; Roobrouck, Alain; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Peralta, Brigitte; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2014-03-04

    The role of maternal antibodies is to protect newborns against acute early infection by pathogens. This can be achieved either by preventing any infection or by allowing attenuated infections associated with activation of the immune system, the two strategies being based on different cost/benefit ratios. We carried out an epidemiological survey of myxomatosis, which is a highly lethal infectious disease, in two distant wild populations of rabbits to describe the epidemiological pattern of the disease. Detection of specific IgM and IgG enabled us to describe the pattern of immunity. We show that maternal immunity attenuates early infection of juveniles and enables activation of their immune system. This mechanism associated with steady circulation of the myxoma virus in both populations, which induces frequent reinfections of immune rabbits, leads to the maintenance of high immunity levels within populations. Thus, myxomatosis has a low impact, with most infections being asymptomatic. This work shows that infection of young rabbits protected by maternal antibodies induces attenuated disease and activates their immune system. This may play a major role in reducing the impact of a highly lethal disease when ecological conditions enable permanent circulation of the pathogen.

  10. [The role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, Avshalom; Grossman, Ehud

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Innate and adaptive immune response may contribute to this process. The mechanisms implicating immune response in hypertension are still elusive. To date, the evidence originates in three major areas of data: cytokine production, central nervous system (CNS) stimulation and kidney damage. The cytokine microenvironment can become proinflammatory and propagate low-grade inflammation, which may contribute to vascular injury and end-organ damage in hypertension. In addition, stimulation of the CNS by some stimuli (e.g. angiotensin II) causes mild hypertension that may modulate peripheral immune responses leading to aggravation of blood pressure elevation. The immune response can induce kidney injury and also interfere with sodium excretion, further contributing to elevation of blood pressure.

  11. The mucosal immune system of fish: the evolution of tolerating commensals while fighting pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Daniela; Sunyer, J Oriol; Salinas, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The field of mucosal immunology research has grown fast over the past few years, and our understanding on how mucosal surfaces respond to complex antigenic cocktails is expanding tremendously. With the advent of new molecular sequencing techniques, it is easier to understand how the immune system of vertebrates is, to a great extent, orchestrated by the complex microbial communities that live in symbiosis with their hosts. The commensal microbiota is now seen as the “extended self” by many scientists. Similarly, fish immunologist are devoting important research efforts to the field of mucosal immunity and commensals. Recent breakthroughs on our understanding of mucosal immune responses in teleost fish open up the potential of teleosts as animal research models for the study of human mucosal diseases. Additionally, this new knowledge places immunologists in a better position to specifically target the fish mucosal immune system while rationally designing mucosal vaccines and other immunotherapies. In this review, an updated view on how teleost skin, gills and gut immune cells and molecules, function in response to pathogens and commensals is provided. Finally, some of the future avenues that the field of fish mucosal immunity may follow in the next years are highlighted. PMID:24099804

  12. Systemic protein delivery by muscle-gene transfer is limited by a local immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixin; Dobrzynski, Eric; Schlachterman, Alexander; Cao, Ou; Herzog, Roland W

    2005-06-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have been successfully used for therapeutic expression of systemic transgene products (such as factor IX or erythropoietin) following in vivo administration to skeletal muscle of animal models of inherited hematologic disorders. However, an immune response may be initiated if the transgene product represents a neoantigen. Here, we use ovalbumin (OVA) as a model antigen and demonstrate immune-mediated elimination of expression on muscle-directed AAV-2 gene transfer. Administration to immune competent mice resulted in transient systemic OVA expression. Within 10 days, OVA-specific T-helper cells had been activated in draining lymph nodes, an inflammatory immune response ensued, and OVA-expressing muscle fibers were destroyed by a cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell response. Use of a muscle-specific promoter did not prevent this immune response. Adoptively transferred CD4(+) cells transgenic for a T-cell receptor specific to OVA peptide-major histocompatibility complex class II showed antigen-specific, vector dose-dependent proliferation confined to the draining lymph nodes of AAV-OVA-transduced muscle within 5 days after gene transfer and subsequently participated in lymphocytic infiltration of transduced muscle. This study documents that a local immune response limits sustained expression of a secreted protein in muscle gene transfer, a finding that may have consequences for design of clinical protocols.

  13. Changes in the immune system after moderate beer consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Javier; Wärnberg, Julia; Nova, Esther; Díaz, Ligia E; González-Gross, Marcela; Marcos, Ascensión

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that moderate alcohol consumption is associated with lower morbidity. However, intervention studies are needed to elucidate mechanisms involved. This study was aimed to determine the effects of moderate beer consumption on the immune function of healthy adults, taking into account gender differences. After a 30-day alcohol abstinence period, 57 healthy volunteers consumed a moderate intake of beer (330 ml for women and 660 ml for men) for 30 days. Total leukocyte and lymphocyte counts; absolute values of T-lymphocyte CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ subsets; delayed-hypersensitivity skin response (DHSR); absolute values of B lymphocytes (CD19+) and serum immunoglobulin concentrations (IgG, IgA, and IgM); and cytokine production (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha) were evaluated following the abstinence and alcohol consumption periods. After moderate beer consumption CD3+ cells increased only in women (p beer consumption produced an immunomodulatory effect in a healthy adult Spanish population; this effect appears to be more relevant in women than in men. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Social networking of human neutrophils within the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scapini, Patrizia; Cassatella, Marco A

    2014-07-31

    It is now widely recognized that neutrophils are highly versatile and sophisticated cells that display de novo synthetic capacity and may greatly extend their lifespan. In addition, concepts such as "neutrophil heterogeneity" and "neutrophil plasticity" have started to emerge, implying that, under pathological conditions, neutrophils may differentiate into discrete subsets defined by distinct phenotypic and functional profiles. A number of studies have shown that neutrophils act as effectors in both innate and adaptive immunoregulatory networks. In fact, once recruited into inflamed tissues, neutrophils engage into complex bidirectional interactions with macrophages, natural killer, dendritic and mesenchymal stem cells, B and T lymphocytes, or platelets. As a result of this cross-talk, mediated either by contact-dependent mechanisms or cell-derived soluble factors, neutrophils and target cells reciprocally modulate their survival and activation status. Altogether, these novel aspects of neutrophil biology have shed new light not only on the potential complex roles that neutrophils play during inflammation and immune responses, but also in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory disorders including infection, autoimmunity, and cancer. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  15. Impact of stress, gender and menstrual cycle on immune system: possible role of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivanoğlu, B; Balkanci, Z D; Ridvanağaoğlu, A Y; Durmazlar, N; Oztürk, G; Erbaş, D; Okur, H

    2001-10-01

    Stress is a factor found to be involved in the etiology of many diseases. Gender and menstrual cycle phases are other factors affecting the predisposition of individuals for certain diseases. Results from animal and human studies suggest that the distribution of immune system cells may change at different phases of the menstrual cycle. Acute mental stress in humans alters immune variables, too. The increase in the number of natural killer (NK) cells is the most consistent finding among the immune variables, though there are controversies for the other lymphocyte groups. Nitric oxide (NO) as an immune mediator has an unsettled role whether it causes the redistribution of the immune cells, or is an end product of lymphocyte activation. This study was planned to investigate the effect of mental stress on lymphocyte subtypes and the role of NO, for men and women at different phases of the cycle. For this purpose, healthy men (n = 10) and women (n = 10), during the follicular and luteal phases underwent Stroop colour-word interference and cold pressor tests. The immune system responses before and after the tests were determined by cell counts with the flowcytometer. Menstrual cycle phase was ascertained by plasma estrogen and progesterone measurements. Stress response was evaluated by blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) measurements throughout the tests and plasma cortisol and urinary metanephrine and vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) measurements before and after the tests. Plasma and urinary NO determinations were performed before and after the test was completed. All the results were analysed with the appropriate statistical methods. The luteal phase differed from the other groups due to the presence of suppressed immune response to acute stress, including decreased CD4/CD8 ratio and NK cell percentage. On the other hand, acute stress caused a shift from cellular to humoral immunity in men. As indicated by these results, individual reaction towards stress is affected

  16. CD95-CD95L: can the brain learn from the immune system?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becher, B; Barker, P A; Owens, T

    1998-01-01

    Members of the tumor necrosis factor/nerve growth factor receptor superfamily of cell-surface molecules can play the dual role of mediating either cytotoxicity or cell survival, both in the immune system and in the nervous system. A member of this superfamily, CD95 (also known as ApoI or Fas), wa...

  17. Clonal Selection Versus Idiotypic Network Models of the Immune System : A Bioinformatic Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J. de

    1989-01-01

    Immune systems function by means of complex "networks" of interactions between various cell types and/or molecules. These interactions vary from specific to non-specific, from local to systemic, are positive or negative (or bimodal), and are generally non-linear (involving positive or negative

  18. The innate and adaptive infiltrating immune systems as targets for breast cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Andrew M K; Lim, Elgene; Ormandy, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    A cancer cell-centric view has long dominated the field of cancer biology. Research efforts have focussed on aberrant cancer cell signalling pathways and on changes to cancer cell DNA. Mounting evidence demonstrates that many cancer-associated cell types within the tumour stroma co-evolve and support tumour growth and development, greatly modifying cancer cell behaviour, facilitating invasion and metastasis and controlling dormancy and sensitivity to drug therapy. Thus, these stromal cells represent potential targets for cancer therapy. Among these cell types, immune cells have emerged as a promising target for therapy. The adaptive and the innate immune system play an important role in normal mammary development and breast cancer. The number of infiltrating adaptive immune system cells with tumour-rejecting capacity, primarily, T lymphocytes, is lower in breast cancer compared with other cancer types, but infiltration occurs in a large proportion of cases. There is strong evidence demonstrating the importance of the immunosuppressive role of the innate immune system during breast cancer progression. A consideration of components of both the innate and the adaptive immune system is essential for the design and development of immunotherapies in breast cancer. In this review, we focus on the importance of immunosuppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) as potential targets for breast cancer therapy. PMID:28193698

  19. Characterization of the Probiotic Yeast Saccharomyces boulardii in the Healthy Mucosal Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Lauren E; McDermott, Courtney D; Stewart, Taryn P; Hudson, William H; Rios, Daniel; Fasken, Milo B; Corbett, Anita H; Lamb, Tracey J

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii has been shown to ameliorate disease severity in the context of many infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, use of S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent or therapeutic delivery vector would require delivery of S. boulardii to a healthy, uninflamed intestine. In contrast to inflamed mucosal tissue, the diverse microbiota, intact epithelial barrier, and fewer inflammatory immune cells within the healthy intestine may all limit the degree to which S. boulardii contacts and influences the host mucosal immune system. Understanding the nature of these interactions is crucial for application of S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent or therapeutic delivery vehicle. In this study, we explore both intrinsic and immunomodulatory properties of S. boulardii in the healthy mucosal immune system. Genomic sequencing and morphological analysis of S. boulardii reveals changes in cell wall components compared to non-probiotic S. cerevisiae that may partially account for probiotic functions of S. boulardii. Flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry demonstrate limited S. boulardii association with murine Peyer's patches. We also show that although S. boulardii induces a systemic humoral immune response, this response is small in magnitude and not directed against S. boulardii itself. RNA-seq of the draining mesenteric lymph nodes indicates that even repeated administration of S. boulardii induces few transcriptional changes in the healthy intestine. Together these data strongly suggest that interaction between S. boulardii and the mucosal immune system in the healthy intestine is limited, with important implications for future work examining S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent and therapeutic delivery vehicle.

  20. Construction of an integrated gene regulatory network link to stress-related immune system in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behdani, Elham; Bakhtiarizadeh, Mohammad Reza

    2017-10-01

    The immune system is an important biological system that is negatively impacted by stress. This study constructed an integrated regulatory network to enhance our understanding of the regulatory gene network used in the stress-related immune system. Module inference was used to construct modules of co-expressed genes with bovine leukocyte RNA-Seq data. Transcription factors (TFs) were then assigned to these modules using Lemon-Tree algorithms. In addition, the TFs assigned to each module were confirmed using the promoter analysis and protein-protein interactions data. Therefore, our integrated method identified three TFs which include one TF that is previously known to be involved in immune response (MYBL2) and two TFs (E2F8 and FOXS1) that had not been recognized previously and were identified for the first time in this study as novel regulatory candidates in immune response. This study provides valuable insights on the regulatory programs of genes involved in the stress-related immune system.

  1. Hygiene and other early childhood influences on the subsequent function of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rook, Graham A W; Lowry, Christopher A; Raison, Charles L

    2015-08-18

    The immune system influences brain development and function. Hygiene and other early childhood influences impact the subsequent function of the immune system during adulthood, with consequences for vulnerability to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Inflammatory events during pregnancy can act directly to cause developmental problems in the central nervous system (CNS) that have been implicated in schizophrenia and autism. The immune system also acts indirectly by "farming" the intestinal microbiota, which then influences brain development and function via the multiple pathways that constitute the gut-brain axis. The gut microbiota also regulates the immune system. Regulation of the immune system is crucial because inflammatory states in pregnancy need to be limited, and throughout life inflammation needs to be terminated completely when not required; for example, persistently raised levels of background inflammation during adulthood (in the presence or absence of a clinically apparent inflammatory stimulus) correlate with an increased risk of depression. A number of factors in the perinatal period, notably immigration from rural low-income to rich developed settings, caesarean delivery, breastfeeding and antibiotic abuse have profound effects on the microbiota and on immunoregulation during early life that persist into adulthood. Many aspects of the modern western environment deprive the infant of the immunoregulatory organisms with which humans co-evolved, while encouraging exposure to non-immunoregulatory organisms, associated with more recently evolved "crowd" infections. Finally, there are complex interactions between perinatal psychosocial stressors, the microbiota, and the immune system that have significant additional effects on both physical and psychiatric wellbeing in subsequent adulthood. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Neuroimmunology in Health And Disease. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  2. Modular and Coordinated Expression of Immune System Regulatory and Signalling Components in the Developing and Adult Nervous System

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    Jimena eMonzon-Sandoval

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available During development, the nervous system is assembled and sculpted through a concerted series of neurodevelopmental events orchestrated by a complex genetic programme. While neural-specific gene expression plays a critical part in this process, in recent years, a number of immune-related signalling and regulatory components have also been shown to play key physiological roles in the developing and adult nervous system. While the involvement of individual immune-related signalling components in neural functions may reflect their ubiquitous character, it may also reflect a much wider, as yet undescribed, genetic network of immune–related molecules acting as an intrinsic component of the neural-specific regulatory machinery that ultimately shapes the nervous system. In order to gain insights into the scale and wider functional organization of immune-related genetic networks in the nervous system, we examined the large scale pattern of expression of these genes in the brain. Our results show a highly significant correlated expression and transcriptional clustering among immune-related genes in the developing and adult brain, and this correlation was the highest in the brain when compared to muscle, liver, kidney and endothelial cells. We experimentally tested the regulatory clustering of immune system genes by using microarray expression profiling in cultures of dissociated neurons stimulated with the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha, and found a highly significant enrichment of immune system-related genes among the resulting differentially expressed genes. Our findings strongly suggest a coherent recruitment of entire immune-related genetic regulatory modules by the neural-specific genetic programme that shapes the nervous system.

  3. Immune system changes during simulated planetary exploration on Devon Island, high arctic

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    Effenhauser Rainer

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysregulation of the immune system has been shown to occur during spaceflight, although the detailed nature of the phenomenon and the clinical risks for exploration class missions have yet to be established. Also, the growing clinical significance of immune system evaluation combined with epidemic infectious disease rates in third world countries provides a strong rationale for the development of field-compatible clinical immunology techniques and equipment. In July 2002 NASA performed a comprehensive immune assessment on field team members participating in the Haughton-Mars Project (HMP on Devon Island in the high Canadian Arctic. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of mission-associated stressors on the human immune system. To perform the study, the development of techniques for processing immune samples in remote field locations was required. Ten HMP-2002 participants volunteered for the study. A field protocol was developed at NASA-JSC for performing sample collection, blood staining/processing for immunophenotype analysis, whole-blood mitogenic culture for functional assessments and cell-sample preservation on-location at Devon Island. Specific assays included peripheral leukocyte distribution; constitutively activated T cells, intracellular cytokine profiles, plasma cortisol and EBV viral antibody levels. Study timepoints were 30 days prior to mission start, mid-mission and 60 days after mission completion. Results The protocol developed for immune sample processing in remote field locations functioned properly. Samples were processed on Devon Island, and stabilized for subsequent analysis at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. The data indicated that some phenotype, immune function and stress hormone changes occurred in the HMP field participants that were largely distinct from pre-mission baseline and post-mission recovery data. These immune changes appear similar to those observed in astronauts

  4. The innate immune system and diabetes mellitus: the relevance of periodontitis? A hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazenby, Martin G; Crook, Martin A

    2010-08-05

    About a decade ago, a hypothesis was proposed suggesting that the innate immune system, including acute-phase reactants, contribute to the development of T2DM [Type 2 DM (diabetes mellitus)] and the metabolic syndrome. In this model, it was hypothesized that the innate immune system modulates the effects of many factors, including genes, fetal programming, nutrition and aging, upon the later development of metabolic problems associated with insulin resistance. In this present article, we expand this hypothesis by looking at the involvement of periodontitis in DM and its complications. Periodontitis is a common inflammatory process involving the innate immune system and is associated with DM. We will also illustrate how dental disease is important in patients with DM and could be implicated in various diabetic complications.

  5. The application of an artificial immune system for solving the identification problem

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    Astachova Irina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecological prognosis sets the identification task, which is to find the capacity of pollution sources based on the available experimental data. This problem is an inverse problem, for the solution of which the method of symbolic regression is considered. The distributed artificial immune system is used as an algorithm for the problem solving. The artificial immune system (AIS is a model that allows solving various problems of identification, its concept was borrowed from biology. The solution is sought using a distributed version of the artificial immune system, which is implemented through a network. This distributed network can operate in any heterogeneous environment, which is achieved through the use of cross-platform Python programming language. AIS demonstrates the ability to restore the original function in the problem of identification. The obtained solution for the test data is represented by the graph.

  6. Effect of Milk thistle plant, Vitis vinifera extract on immune system of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss challenge by diazinon

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    Mina Rabie

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The pollutants due to effect on the immune system of fish increase fish sensitivity to pathogens. Diazinon is one of the most used organophosphates pesticide in many agricultural areas. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of diazinon on the immune system of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and application of Milk thistle plant, Vitis vinifera extract to reduce the adverse effects of this pesticide on its immune system. The reduction in the level of plasma peroxides, IgM, total complement and lysozyme were observed in fish exposed to diazinon showing its effect on the fish’s immune system. No significant difference between control group and fish fed by Milk thistle plant extract and exposed to diazinon can reflect protective impact of Milk thistle plant extract on the immune system of rainbow trout by eliminating the free radicals and boosting the immune system.

  7. Systemic and Terminal Ileum Mucosal Immunity Elicited by Oral Immunization With the Ty21a Typhoid Vaccine in HumansSummary

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    Jayaum S. Booth

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Systemic cellular immunity elicited by the Ty21a oral typhoid vaccine has been extensively characterized. However, very limited data are available in humans regarding mucosal immunity at the site of infection (terminal ileum [TI]. Here we investigated the host immunity elicited by Ty21a immunization on terminal ileum–lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC and peripheral blood in volunteers undergoing routine colonoscopy. Methods: We characterized LPMC-T memory (TM subsets and assessed Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S Typhi–specific responses by multichromatic flow cytometry. Results: No differences were observed in cell yields and phenotypes in LPMC CD8+-TM subsets following Ty21a immunization. However, Ty21a immunization elicited LPMC CD8+ T cells exhibiting significant S Typhi–specific responses (interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-17A, and/or CD107a in all major TM subsets (T-effector/memory [TEM], T-central/memory, and TEM-CD45RA+, although each TM subset exhibited unique characteristics. We also investigated whether Ty21a immunization elicited S Typhi–specific multifunctional effectors in LPMC CD8+ TEM. We observed that LPMC CD8+ TEM responses were mostly multifunctional, except for those cells exhibiting the characteristics associated with cytotoxic responses. Finally, we compared mucosal with systemic responses and made the important observation that LPMC CD8+ S Typhi–specific responses were unique and distinct from their systemic counterparts. Conclusions: This study provides the first demonstration of S Typhi–specific responses in the human terminal ileum mucosa and provides novel insights into the generation of mucosal immune responses following oral Ty21a immunization. Keywords: Lamina Propria Mononuclear Cells, Multifunctional T Cells, CD8+-T Memory Cells, Typhoid, Vaccines

  8. A review of the equine age-related changes in the immune system: comparisons between human and equine aging, with focus on lung-specific immune-aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S; Baptiste, K E; Fjeldborg, J; Horohov, D W

    2015-03-01

    The equine aging process involves many changes to the immune system that may be related to genetics, the level of nutrition, the environment and/or an underlying subclinical disease. Geriatric horses defined as horses above the age of 20, exhibit a decline in body condition, muscle tone and general well-being. It is not known whether these changes contribute to decreased immune function or are the result of declining immune function. Geriatric years are characterized by increased susceptibility to infections and a reduced antibody response to vaccination as a result of changes in the immune system. Humans and horses share many of these age-related changes, with only a few differences. Thus, inflamm-aging and immunosenescence are well-described phenomena in both human and equine research, particularly in relation to the peripheral blood and especially the T-cell compartment. However, the lung is faced with unique challenges because of its constant interaction with the external environment and thus may not share similarities to peripheral blood when considering age-related changes in immune function. Indeed, recent studies have shown discrepancies in cytokine mRNA and protein expression between the peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage immune cells. These results provide important evidence that age-related immune changes or 'dys-functions' are organ-specific. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. DMPD: Glucocorticoids and the innate immune system: crosstalk with the toll-likereceptor signaling network. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17576036 Glucocorticoids and the innate immune system: crosstalk with the toll-like...07 May 13. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Glucocorticoids and the innate immune system: crosstalk with t...he toll-likereceptor signaling network. PubmedID 17576036 Title Glucocorticoids and the innate immune syst...em: crosstalk with the toll-likereceptor signaling network. Authors Chinenov Y, Rog

  10. pH-Responsive Micelle-Based Cytoplasmic Delivery System for Induction of Cellular Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuba, Eiji; Sakaguchi, Naoki; Kanda, Yuhei; Miyazaki, Maiko; Koiwai, Kazunori

    2017-11-04

    (1) Background: Cytoplasmic delivery of antigens is crucial for the induction of cellular immunity, which is an important immune response for the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. To date, fusogenic protein-incorporated liposomes and pH-responsive polymer-modified liposomes have been used to achieve cytoplasmic delivery of antigen via membrane rupture or fusion with endosomes. However, a more versatile cytoplasmic delivery system is desired for practical use. For this study, we developed pH-responsive micelles composed of dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine (DLPC) and deoxycholic acid and investigated their cytoplasmic delivery performance and immunity-inducing capability. (2) Methods: Interaction of micelles with fluorescence dye-loaded liposomes, intracellular distribution of micelles, and antigenic proteins were observed. Finally, antigen-specific cellular immune response was evaluated in vivo using ELIspot assay. (3) Results: Micelles induced leakage of contents from liposomes via lipid mixing at low pH. Micelles were taken up by dendritic cells mainly via macropinocytosis and delivered ovalbumin (OVA) into the cytosol. After intradermal injection of micelles and OVA, OVA-specific cellular immunity was induced in the spleen. (4) Conclusions: pH-responsive micelles composed of DLPC and deoxycholic acid are promising as enhancers of cytosol delivery of antigens and the induction capability of cellular immunity for the treatment of cancer immunotherapy and infectious diseases.

  11. The components of the Daphnia pulex immune system as revealed by complete genome sequencing

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    Blaxter Mark L

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Branchiopod crustaceans in the genus Daphnia are key model organisms for investigating interactions between genes and the environment. One major theme of research on Daphnia species has been the evolution of resistance to pathogens and parasites, but lack of knowledge of the Daphnia immune system has limited the study of immune responses. Here we provide a survey of the immune-related genome of D. pulex, derived from the newly completed genome sequence. Genes likely to be involved in innate immune responses were identified by comparison to homologues from other arthropods. For each candidate, the gene model was refined, and we conducted an analysis of sequence divergence from homologues from other taxa. Results and conclusion We found that some immune pathways, in particular the TOLL pathway, are fairly well conserved between insects and Daphnia, while other elements, in particular antimicrobial peptides, could not be recovered from the genome sequence. We also found considerable variation in gene family copy number when comparing Daphnia to insects and present phylogenetic analyses to shed light on the evolution of a range of conserved immune gene families.

  12. pH-Responsive Micelle-Based Cytoplasmic Delivery System for Induction of Cellular Immunity

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    Eiji Yuba

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Cytoplasmic delivery of antigens is crucial for the induction of cellular immunity, which is an important immune response for the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. To date, fusogenic protein-incorporated liposomes and pH-responsive polymer-modified liposomes have been used to achieve cytoplasmic delivery of antigen via membrane rupture or fusion with endosomes. However, a more versatile cytoplasmic delivery system is desired for practical use. For this study, we developed pH-responsive micelles composed of dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine (DLPC and deoxycholic acid and investigated their cytoplasmic delivery performance and immunity-inducing capability. (2 Methods: Interaction of micelles with fluorescence dye-loaded liposomes, intracellular distribution of micelles, and antigenic proteins were observed. Finally, antigen-specific cellular immune response was evaluated in vivo using ELIspot assay. (3 Results: Micelles induced leakage of contents from liposomes via lipid mixing at low pH. Micelles were taken up by dendritic cells mainly via macropinocytosis and delivered ovalbumin (OVA into the cytosol. After intradermal injection of micelles and OVA, OVA-specific cellular immunity was induced in the spleen. (4 Conclusions: pH-responsive micelles composed of DLPC and deoxycholic acid are promising as enhancers of cytosol delivery of antigens and the induction capability of cellular immunity for the treatment of cancer immunotherapy and infectious diseases.

  13. Mining the human gut microbiota for effector strains that shape the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Philip P; Faith, Jeremiah J; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2014-06-19

    The gut microbiota codevelops with the immune system beginning at birth. Mining the microbiota for bacterial strains responsible for shaping the structure and dynamic operations of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system represents a formidable combinatorial problem but one that needs to be overcome to advance mechanistic understanding of microbial community and immune system coregulation and to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that promote health. Here, we discuss a scalable, less biased approach for identifying effector strains in complex microbial communities that impact immune function. The approach begins by identifying uncultured human fecal microbiota samples that transmit immune phenotypes to germ-free mice. Clonally arrayed sequenced collections of bacterial strains are constructed from representative donor microbiota. If the collection transmits phenotypes, effector strains are identified by testing randomly generated subsets with overlapping membership in individually housed germ-free animals. Detailed mechanistic studies of effector strain-host interactions can then be performed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Leptin in the interplay of inflammation, metabolism and immune system disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Vanessa; Scotece, Morena; Conde, Javier; Pino, Jesús; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel Angel; Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Mera, Antonio; Lago, Francisca; Gómez, Rodolfo; Gualillo, Oreste

    2017-02-01

    Leptin is one of the most relevant factors secreted by adipose tissue and the forerunner of a class of molecules collectively called adipokines. Initially discovered in 1994, its crucial role as a central regulator in energy homeostasis has been largely described during the past 20 years. Once secreted into the circulation, leptin reaches the central and peripheral nervous systems and acts by binding and activating the long form of leptin receptor (LEPR), regulating appetite and food intake, bone mass, basal metabolism, reproductive function and insulin secretion, among other processes. Research on the regulation of different adipose tissues has provided important insights into the intricate network that links nutrition, metabolism and immune homeostasis. The neuroendocrine and immune systems communicate bi-directionally through common ligands and receptors during stress responses and inflammation, and control cellular immune responses in several pathological situations including immune-inflammatory rheumatic diseases. This Review discusses the latest findings regarding the role of leptin in the immune system and metabolism, with particular emphasis on its effect on autoimmune and/or inflammatory rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

  15. Coincident helminth infection modulates systemic inflammation and immune activation in active pulmonary tuberculosis.

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    Parakkal Jovvian George

    Full Text Available Helminth infections are known to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB. However, the role of helminth infections in modulating responses associated with inflammation and immune activation (reflecting disease activity and/or severity in TB is not known.We measured markers of inflammation and immune activation in active pulmonary TB individuals (ATB with co-incidental Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss infection. These included systemic levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases and their endogenous inhibitors and immune activation markers. As a control, we measured the systemic levels of the same molecules in TB-uninfected individuals (NTB with or without Ss infection.Our data confirm that ATB is associated with elevated levels of the various measured molecules when compared to those seen in NTB. Our data also reveal that co-incident Ss infection in ATB individuals is associated with significantly decreased circulating levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases as well as the systemic immune activation markers, sCD14 and sCD163. These changes are specific to ATB since they are absent in NTB individuals with Ss infection.Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the markers associated with TB disease activity and severity and indicate that co-incidental helminth infections might dampen the severity of TB disease.

  16. The genome sequence of Atlantic cod reveals a unique immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star, Bastiaan; Nederbragt, Alexander J; Jentoft, Sissel; Grimholt, Unni; Malmstrøm, Martin; Gregers, Tone F; Rounge, Trine B; Paulsen, Jonas; Solbakken, Monica H; Sharma, Animesh; Wetten, Ola F; Lanzén, Anders; Winer, Roger; Knight, James; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; Aken, Bronwen; Andersen, Oivind; Lagesen, Karin; Tooming-Klunderud, Ave; Edvardsen, Rolf B; Tina, Kirubakaran G; Espelund, Mari; Nepal, Chirag; Previti, Christopher; Karlsen, Bård Ove; Moum, Truls; Skage, Morten; Berg, Paul R; Gjøen, Tor; Kuhl, Heiner; Thorsen, Jim; Malde, Ketil; Reinhardt, Richard; Du, Lei; Johansen, Steinar D; Searle, Steve; Lien, Sigbjørn; Nilsen, Frank; Jonassen, Inge; Omholt, Stig W; Stenseth, Nils Chr; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2011-08-10

    Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is a large, cold-adapted teleost that sustains long-standing commercial fisheries and incipient aquaculture. Here we present the genome sequence of Atlantic cod, showing evidence for complex thermal adaptations in its haemoglobin gene cluster and an unusual immune architecture compared to other sequenced vertebrates. The genome assembly was obtained exclusively by 454 sequencing of shotgun and paired-end libraries, and automated annotation identified 22,154 genes. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II is a conserved feature of the adaptive immune system of jawed vertebrates, but we show that Atlantic cod has lost the genes for MHC II, CD4 and invariant chain (Ii) that are essential for the function of this pathway. Nevertheless, Atlantic cod is not exceptionally susceptible to disease under natural conditions. We find a highly expanded number of MHC I genes and a unique composition of its Toll-like receptor (TLR) families. This indicates how the Atlantic cod immune system has evolved compensatory mechanisms in both adaptive and innate immunity in the absence of MHC II. These observations affect fundamental assumptions about the evolution of the adaptive immune system and its components in vertebrates.

  17. Molecular players involved in the interaction between beneficial bacteria and the immune system

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    Arancha eHevia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The human gastrointestinal tract is a very complex ecosystem, in which there is a continuous interaction between nutrients, host cells, and microorganisms. The gut microbiota comprises trillions of microbes that have been selected during evolution on the basis of their functionality and capacity to survive in, and adapt to, the intestinal environment. Host bacteria and our immune system constantly sense and react to one another. In this regard, commensal microbes contribute to gut homeostasis, whereas the necessary responses are triggered against enteropathogens. Some representatives of our gut microbiota have beneficial effects on human health. Some of the most important roles of these microbes are to help to maintain the integrity of the mucosal barrier, to provide nutrients such as vitamins, or to protect against pathogens. In addition, the interaction between commensal microbiota and the mucosal immune system is crucial for proper immune function. This process is mainly performed via the pattern recognition receptors of epithelial cells, such as Toll-like or Nod-like receptors, which are able to recognize the molecular effectors that are produced by intestinal microbes. These effectors mediate processes that can ameliorate certain inflammatory gut disorders, discriminate between beneficial and pathogenic bacteria, or increase the number of immune cells or their pattern recognition receptors. This review intends to summarize the molecular players produced by probiotic bacteria, notably Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains, but also other very promising potential probiotics, which affect the human immune system.

  18. Geometric Distribution-Based Readers Scheduling Optimization Algorithm Using Artificial Immune System

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    Litian Duan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the multiple-reader environment (MRE of radio frequency identification (RFID system, multiple readers are often scheduled to interrogate the randomized tags via operating at different time slots or frequency channels to decrease the signal interferences. Based on this, a Geometric Distribution-based Multiple-reader Scheduling Optimization Algorithm using Artificial Immune System (GD-MRSOA-AIS is proposed to fairly and optimally schedule the readers operating from the viewpoint of resource allocations. GD-MRSOA-AIS is composed of two parts, where a geometric distribution function combined with the fairness consideration is first introduced to generate the feasible scheduling schemes for reader operation. After that, artificial immune system (including immune clone, immune mutation and immune suppression quickly optimize these feasible ones as the optimal scheduling scheme to ensure that readers are fairly operating with larger effective interrogation range and lower interferences. Compared with the state-of-the-art algorithm, the simulation results indicate that GD-MRSOA-AIS could efficiently schedules the multiple readers operating with a fairer resource allocation scheme, performing in larger effective interrogation range.

  19. A novel mouse model for stable engraftment of a human immune system and human hepatocytes.

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    Helene Strick-Marchand

    Full Text Available Hepatic infections by hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and Plasmodium parasites leading to acute or chronic diseases constitute a global health challenge. The species tropism of these hepatotropic pathogens is restricted to chimpanzees and humans, thus model systems to study their pathological mechanisms are severely limited. Although these pathogens infect hepatocytes, disease pathology is intimately related to the degree and quality of the immune response. As a first step to decipher the immune response to infected hepatocytes, we developed an animal model harboring both a human immune system (HIS and human hepatocytes (HUHEP in BALB/c Rag2-/- IL-2Rγc-/- NOD.sirpa uPAtg/tg mice. The extent and kinetics of human hepatocyte engraftment were similar between HUHEP and HIS-HUHEP mice. Transplanted human hepatocytes were polarized and mature in vivo, resulting in 20-50% liver chimerism in these models. Human myeloid and lymphoid cell lineages developed at similar frequencies in HIS and HIS-HUHEP mice, and splenic and hepatic compartments were humanized with mature B cells, NK cells and naïve T cells, as well as monocytes and dendritic cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that HIS-HUHEP mice can be stably (> 5 months and robustly engrafted with a humanized immune system and chimeric human liver. This novel HIS-HUHEP model provides a platform to investigate human immune responses against hepatotropic pathogens and to test novel drug strategies or vaccine candidates.

  20. Vitamin D Level Between Calcium-Phosphorus Homeostasis and Immune System: New Perspective in Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellavia, Daniele; Costa, Viviana; De Luca, Angela; Maglio, Melania; Pagani, Stefania; Fini, Milena; Giavaresi, Gianluca

    2016-10-13

    Vitamin D is a key molecule in calcium and phosphate homeostasis; however, increasing evidence has recently shown that it also plays a crucial role in the immune system, both innate and adaptive. A deregulation of vitamin D levels, due also to mutations and polymorphisms in the genes of the vitamin D pathway, determines severe alterations in the homeostasis of the organism, resulting in a higher risk of onset of some diseases, including osteoporosis. This review gives an overview of the influence of vitamin D levels on the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, between bone homeostasis and immune system.

  1. [Reconstitution of cyclophosphamide-induced, impaired function of the immune system in animal models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artym, Jolanta

    2003-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CY) is an alkylating agent used in chemotherapy of tumors and autoimmune disorders. The drug causes a large number of side-effects including deep, transient lymphopenia and neutropenia, thus rendering the immune system susceptible to infections. In this review we focus on the effects of CY on the haematopoetic system and the immune response in rodents. In addition, we present approaches aimed at reconstitution of lympho- and myelopoiesis using a spectrum of immunotropic factors including: thymic hormones, cytokines, low-molecular weight compounds, bacterial products and lactoferrin.

  2. Simplified Fuzzy Control for Flux-Weakening Speed Control of IPMSM Drive

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    M. J. Hossain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simplified fuzzy logic-based speed control scheme of an interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM above the base speed using a flux-weakening method. In this work, nonlinear expressions of d-axis and q-axis currents of the IPMSM have been derived and subsequently incorporated in the control algorithm for the practical purpose in order to implement fuzzy-based flux-weakening strategy to operate the motor above the base speed. The fundamentals of fuzzy logic algorithms as related to motor control applications are also illustrated. A simplified fuzzy speed controller (FLC for the IPMSM drive has been designed and incorporated in the drive system to maintain high performance standards. The efficacy of the proposed simplified FLC-based IPMSM drive is verified by simulation at various dynamic operating conditions. The simplified FLC is found to be robust and efficient. Laboratory test results of proportional integral (PI controller-based IPMSM drive have been compared with the simulated results of fuzzy controller-based flux-weakening IPMSM drive system.

  3. An improved recommendation algorithm via weakening indirect linkage effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang; Qiu, Tian; Shen, Xiao-Quan

    2015-07-01

    We propose an indirect-link-weakened mass diffusion method (IMD), by considering the indirect linkage and the source object heterogeneity effect in the mass diffusion (MD) recommendation method. Experimental results on the MovieLens, Netflix, and RYM datasets show that, the IMD method greatly improves both the recommendation accuracy and diversity, compared with a heterogeneity-weakened MD method (HMD), which only considers the source object heterogeneity. Moreover, the recommendation accuracy of the cold objects is also better elevated in the IMD than the HMD method. It suggests that eliminating the redundancy induced by the indirect linkages could have a prominent effect on the recommendation efficiency in the MD method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11175079) and the Young Scientist Training Project of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant No. 20133BCB23017).

  4. Are fish immune systems really affected by parasites? an immunoecological study of common carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The basic function of the immune system is to protect an organism against infection in order to minimize the fitness costs of being infected. According to life-history theory, energy resources are in a trade-off between the costly demands of immunity and other physiological demands. Concerning fish, both physiology and immunity are influenced by seasonal changes (i.e. temporal variation) associated to the changes of abiotic factors (such as primarily water temperature) and interactions with pathogens and parasites. In this study, we investigated the potential associations between the physiology and immunocompetence of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) collected during five different periods of a given year. Our sampling included the periods with temporal variability and thus, it presented a different level in exposure to parasites. We analyzed which of two factors, seasonality or parasitism, had the strongest impact on changes in fish physiology and immunity. Results We found that seasonal changes play a key role in affecting the analyzed measurements of physiology, immunity and parasitism. The correlation analysis revealed the relationships between the measures of overall host physiology, immunity and parasite load when temporal variability effect was removed. When analyzing separately parasite groups with different life-strategies, we found that fish with a worse condition status were infected more by monogeneans, representing the most abundant parasite group. The high infection by cestodes seems to activate the phagocytes. A weak relationship was found between spleen size and abundance of trematodes when taking into account seasonal changes. Conclusions Even if no direct trade-off between the measures of host immunity and physiology was confirmed when taking into account the seasonality, it seems that seasonal variability affects host immunity and physiology through energy allocation in a trade-off between life important functions, especially reproduction

  5. Heating, weakening and shear localization in earthquake rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, James R.

    2017-08-01

    Field and borehole observations of active earthquake fault zones show that shear is often localized to principal deforming zones of order 0.1-10 mm width. This paper addresses how frictional heating in rapid slip weakens faults dramatically, relative to their static frictional strength, and promotes such intense localization. Pronounced weakening occurs even on dry rock-on-rock surfaces, due to flash heating effects, at slip rates above approximately 0.1 m s-1 (earthquake slip rates are typically of the order of 1 m s-1). But weakening in rapid shear is also predicted theoretically in thick fault gouge in the presence of fluids (whether native ground fluids or volatiles such as H2O or CO2 released by thermal decomposition reactions), and the predicted localizations are compatible with such narrow shear zones as have been observed. The underlying concepts show how fault zone materials with high static friction coefficients, approximately 0.6-0.8, can undergo strongly localized shear at effective dynamic friction coefficients of the order of 0.1, thus fitting observational constraints, e.g. of earthquakes producing negligible surface heat outflow and, for shallow events, only rarely creating extensive melt. The results to be summarized include those of collaborative research published with Nicolas Brantut (University College London), Eric Dunham (Stanford University), Nadia Lapusta (Caltech), Hiroyuki Noda (JAMSTEC, Japan), John D. Platt (Carnegie Institution for Science, now at *gramLabs), Alan Rempel (Oregon State University) and John W. Rudnicki (Northwestern University). This article is part of the themed issue 'Faulting, friction and weakening: from slow to fast motion'.

  6. AN IMMUNE AGENTS SYSTEM FOR NETWORK INTRUSIONS DETECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Noria Benyettou; Abdelkader Benyettou; Vincent Rodin

    2014-01-01

    With the development growing of network technology, computer networks became increasingly wide and opened. This evolution gave birth to new techniques allowing accessibility of networks and information systems with an aim of facilitating the transactions. Consequently, these techniques gave also birth to new forms of threats. In this article, we present the utility to use a system of intrusion detection through a presentation of these characteristics. Using as inspiration the i...

  7. The Research on Full-speed Field Weakening Control Method of Electric Vehicle Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Run-Ze

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The motor drive system represents a key technology for development of the electrical vehicles, and the permanent magnet synchronous motor becomes the mainstream of the new energy vehicle drive motor for the superior performances in power density, low-speed torque density, efficiency and reliability. The paper studies the field weakening control strategy for the interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM and provides a field weakening control strategy for the IPMSM at the full-speed range. By studying the mathematical IPMSM model and the methods of conventional vector control and analyzing the operating conditions of the IPMSM at the full-speed range, the paper divides the operating conditions into constant torque operation region I, constant torque operation region II, constant power field weakening operation region and high-speed field weakening operation region to confirm the control strategy algorithm in each region and the transition conditions between regions and provide the current control strategy that the d-axis current and q-axis current are confirmed by the reference torque and the feedback speed. Modeling of the field weakening control strategies in each region is made through the Matlab/Simulink, and simulation of the operating conditions with a steady-state load and a dynamic load is done to verify that the field weakening control strategy in each region is feasible. A co-simulation is made by combining the Matlab/Simulink-based control model, the RecurDyn-based virtual prototype and the RT-LAB to verify the feasible field weakening control strategy.

  8. The effects of stress hormones on immune function may be vital for the adaptive reconfiguration of the immune system during fight-or-flight behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Shelley A

    2014-09-01

    Intense, short-term stress (i.e., robust activation of the fight-or-flight response) typically produces a transient decline in resistance to disease in animals across phyla. Chemical mediators of the stress response (e.g., stress hormones) help induce this decline, suggesting that this transient immunosuppression is an evolved response. However, determining the function of stress hormones on immune function is difficult because of their complexity. Nevertheless, evidence suggests that stress hormones help maintain maximal resistance to disease during the physiological changes needed to optimize the body for intense physical activity. Work on insects demonstrates that stress hormones both shunt resources away from the immune system during fight-or-flight responses as well as reconfigure the immune system. Reconfiguring the immune system minimizes the impact of the loss of these resources and reduces the increased costs of some immune functions due to the physiological changes demanded by the fight-or-flight response. For example, during the stress response of the cricket Gryllus texensis, some molecular resources are shunted away from the immune system and toward lipid transport, resulting in a reduction in resistance to disease. However, insects' immune cells (hemocytes) have receptors for octopamine (the insect stress neurohormone). Octopamine increases many hemocyte functions, such as phagocytosis, and these changes would tend to mitigate the decline in immunity due to the loss of molecular resources. Moreover, because the stress response generates oxidative stress, some immune responses are probably more costly when activated during a stress response (e.g., those that produce reactive molecules). Some of these immune responses are depressed during stress in crickets, while others, whose costs are probably not increased during a stress response, are enhanced. Some effects of stress hormones on immune systems may be better understood as examples of reconfiguration

  9. Intestinal Microbiota and the Innate Immune System - A Crosstalk in Crohn's Disease Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Lea-Maxie; Siegmund, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory disorder that can occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract. The precise etiology of CD is still unclear but it is widely accepted that a complex series of interactions between susceptibility genes, the immune system and environmental factors are implicated in the onset and perpetuation of the disease. Increasing evidence from experimental and clinical studies implies the intestinal microbiota in disease pathogenesis, thereby supporting the hypothesis that chronic intestinal inflammation arises from an abnormal immune response against the microorganisms of the intestinal flora in genetically susceptible individuals. Given that CD patients display changes in their gut microbiota composition, collectively termed "dysbiosis," the question raises whether the altered microbiota composition is a cause of disease or rather a consequence of the inflammatory state of the intestinal environment. This review will focus on the crosstalk between the gut microbiota and the innate immune system during intestinal inflammation, thereby unraveling the role of the microbiota in CD pathogenesis.

  10. [Considerations about mechanisms of acupuncture therapy for improving hypertension by regulating immune system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zheng; Wu, Qiao-Feng; Liang, Fan-Rong

    2014-08-01

    Essential hypertension (EH) is a very common clinical disorder affecting the patient's health. Accumulating evidence indicates that immunological factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. In the present paper, the authors introduce 1) progress of researches on the pathogenesis of hypertension from cellular immune and body fluid immune (multiple immuno-humoral factors); 2) effects of acupuncture intervention on natural killer cell activity, exercise-induced immunosuppression, circulating inflammatory factor levels and balance of cytokines; 3) blood-pressure reduction effect of acupuncture intervention by lowering circulating TNF-alpha, IL-6, matrix metalloproteinases-9, angiotensin convertase and endothelin levels, and up-regulating serum opioid peptide content, etc. to decrease inflammatory injury of the cardiovascular system. Many researches have demonstrated that acupuncture may have a positive role in improving EH in clinical practice, which may be associated with its regulative effect on immune system, but its mechanism has not been fully elucidated.

  11. Analytical tools for the study of cellular glycosylation in the immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette eVan Kooyk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that glycosylation plays important role in intercellular communication within the immune system. Glycosylation-dependent interactions are crucial for the innate and adaptive immune system and regulate immune cell trafficking, synapse formation, activation, and survival. These functions take place by the cis or trans interaction of lectins with glycans. Classical immunological and biochemical methods have been used for the study of lectin function; however, the investigation of their counterparts, glycans, requires very specialized methodologies that have been extensively developed in the past decade within the Glycobiology scientific community. This Mini-Review intends to summarize the available technology for the study of glycan biosynthesis, its regulation and characterization for their application to the study of glycans in Immunology.

  12. Adjuvants modulating mucosal immune responses or directing systemic responses towards the mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Eric; Verdonck, Frank; Vanrompay, Daisy; Goddeeris, Bruno

    2006-01-01

    In developing veterinary mucosal vaccines and vaccination strategies, mucosal adjuvants are one of the key players for inducing protective immune responses. Most of the mucosal adjuvants seem to exert their effect via binding to a receptor/or target cells and these properties were used to classify the mucosal adjuvants reviewed in the present paper: (1) ganglioside receptor-binding toxins (cholera toxin, LT enterotoxin, their B subunits and mutants); (2) surface immunoglobulin binding complex CTA1-DD; (3) TLR4 binding lipopolysaccharide; (4) TLR2-binding muramyl dipeptide; (5) Mannose receptor-binding mannan; (6) Dectin-1-binding ss 1,3/1,6 glucans; (7) TLR9-binding CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides; (8) Cytokines and chemokines; (9) Antigen-presenting cell targeting ISCOMATRIX and ISCOM. In addition, attention is given to two adjuvants able to prime the mucosal immune system following a systemic immunization, namely 1alpha, 25(OH)2D3 and cholera toxin.

  13. Identification of SPAM messages using an approach inspired on the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzella, T S; Mota-Santos, T A; Uchôa, J Q; Caminhas, W M

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, an immune-inspired model, named innate and adaptive artificial immune system (IA-AIS) is proposed and applied to the problem of identification of unsolicited bulk e-mail messages (SPAM). It integrates entities analogous to macrophages, B and T lymphocytes, modeling both the innate and the adaptive immune systems. An implementation of the algorithm was capable of identifying more than 99% of legitimate or SPAM messages in particular parameter configurations. It was compared to an optimized version of the naive Bayes classifier, which has been attained extremely high correct classification rates. It has been concluded that IA-AIS has a greater ability to identify SPAM messages, although the identification of legitimate messages is not as high as that of the implemented naive Bayes classifier.

  14. Weakening of the Yellow Sea Warm Current during 1951 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yue; Tana, Celia; Sun, Shuangwen; Wang, Huiwu; Liu, Baochao; Liu, Yanliang

    2017-04-01

    The Yellow Sea Warm Current (YSWC) plays a critical role in heat and mass transport in the Yellow Sea and has great impacts on ecosystem and sedimentation. The YSWC is mainly driven by the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) and shows strong intra-seasonal and inter-annual variability. However, how it varies on longer timescale, in particular decadal timescale under the influence of global climate change, has not yet been revealed. Here we show a significant slowdown in the YSWC during 1950s-1990s. Weakening of the EAWM and the spatial variation of bathymetry are the key factors in the change of the YSWC. The change is further verified with the variation of the thermal front to the east of the Shandong peninsular. The anomalous heat transport induced by the weakening of the YSWC enhances the warming trend in the sea surface temperature (SST) in the western Yellow Sea but suppresses that in the eastern Yellow Sea. Our findings demonstrate how the current and SST in a marginal sea respond to the global climate change. The weakening of the YSWC may have serious consequences on self-cleaning capacity of the Yellow Sea if the global warming persists considering the increasing pollutant discharge due to the fast growing economy of the coastal cities.

  15. Prediction of microRNAs involved in immune system diseases through network based features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabahar, Archana; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding regulatory RNA molecules that modulate the expression of several genes at post-transcriptional level and play a vital role in disease pathogenesis. Recent research shows that a range of miRNAs are involved in the regulation of immunity and its deregulation results in immune mediated diseases such as cancer, inflammation and autoimmune diseases. Computational discovery of these immune miRNAs using a set of specific features is highly desirable. In the current investigation, we present a SVM based classification system which uses a set of novel network based topological and motif features in addition to the baseline sequential and structural features to predict immune specific miRNAs from other non-immune miRNAs. The classifier was trained and tested on a balanced set of equal number of positive and negative examples to show the discriminative power of our network features. Experimental results show that our approach achieves an accuracy of 90.2% and outperforms the classification accuracy of 63.2% reported using the traditional miRNA sequential and structural features. The proposed classifier was further validated with two immune disease sub-class datasets related to multiple sclerosis microarray data and psoriasis RNA-seq data with higher accuracy. These results indicate that our classifier which uses network and motif features along with sequential and structural features will lead to significant improvement in classifying immune miRNAs and hence can be applied to identify other specific classes of miRNAs as an extensible miRNA classification system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The innate immune and systemic response in honey bees to a bacterial pathogen, Paenibacillus larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster Leonard J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a major paradox in our understanding of honey bee immunity: the high population density in a bee colony implies a high rate of disease transmission among individuals, yet bees are predicted to express only two-thirds as many immunity genes as solitary insects, e.g., mosquito or fruit fly. This suggests that the immune response in bees is subdued in favor of social immunity, yet some specific immune factors are up-regulated in response to infection. To explore the response to infection more broadly, we employ mass spectrometry-based proteomics in a quantitative analysis of honey bee larvae infected with the bacterium Paenibacillus larvae. Newly-eclosed bee larvae, in the second stage of their life cycle, are susceptible to this infection, but become progressively more resistant with age. We used this host-pathogen system to probe not only the role of the immune system in responding to a highly evolved infection, but also what other mechanisms might be employed in response to infection. Results Using quantitative proteomics, we compared the hemolymph (insect blood of five-day old healthy and infected honey bee larvae and found a strong up-regulation of some metabolic enzymes and chaperones, while royal jelly (food and energy storage proteins were down-regulated. We also observed increased levels of the immune factors prophenoloxidase (proPO, lysozyme and the antimicrobial peptide hymenoptaecin. Furthermore, mass spectrometry evidence suggests that healthy larvae have significant levels of catalytically inactive proPO in the hemolymph that is proteolytically activated upon infection. Phenoloxidase (PO enzyme activity was undetectable in one or two-day-old larvae and increased dramatically thereafter, paralleling very closely the age-related ability of larvae to resist infection. Conclusion We propose a model for the host response to infection where energy stores and metabolic enzymes are regulated in concert with direct

  17. Mucosal and systemic immunization with targeted fusion anti-caries DNA plasmid in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G X; Xu, Q A; Jin, J; Li, Y H; Jia, R; Guo, J H; Fan, M W

    2009-05-14

    Early life vaccination is necessary to protect young children from dental caries. Our group had previously reported that a plasmid DNA vaccine pGJA-P/VAX against the glucosyltransferase (GTF) enzyme and cell surface antigen AgI/II (PAc) of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) elicited a specific and protective immunity in adult experimental animal models. In this report, early life immunization with the same plasmid was studied following intranasal (i.n.) and intramuscular (i.m.) delivery in murine models. The potential of inducing mucosal and systemic immune responses to special antigens was measured by ELISA. In addition, cytokine production and protection effectiveness against dental caries formation were also investigated. In the i.n. route, rats were primed when they were 5 days old, and boosted after 10 and 20 days with either plasmid pGJA-P/VAX-bupivacaine complexes, or pGJA-P/VAX alone, or empty vector. The pGJA-P/VAX-bupivacaine combination was able to mount the immune responses characterized by increased antibody levels of specific salivary IgA and serum IgG, preferential IFN-gamma production and significant reduction in the dental caries lesions. In the i.m. route, rats were vaccinated with either pGJA-P/VAX alone or empty vector with the same immunization schedule as the i.n. route. Plasmid pGJA-P/VAX alone induced a significant increase in the serum IgG and IFN-gamma production. However, it was not effective in eliciting specific salivary IgA and in decreasing the dental caries formation. All these findings indicate the feasibility of immunity with a targeted fusion DNA vaccine to a young immune system.

  18. Use of animal models for space flight physiology studies, with special focus on the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Animal models have been used to study the effects of space flight on physiological systems. The animal models have been used because of the limited availability of human subjects for studies to be carried out in space as well as because of the need to carry out experiments requiring samples and experimental conditions that cannot be performed using humans. Experiments have been carried out in space using a variety of species, and included developmental biology studies. These species included rats, mice, non-human primates, fish, invertebrates, amphibians and insects. The species were chosen because they best fit the experimental conditions required for the experiments. Experiments with animals have also been carried out utilizing ground-based models that simulate some of the effects of exposure to space flight conditions. Most of the animal studies have generated results that parallel the effects of space flight on human physiological systems. Systems studied have included the neurovestibular system, the musculoskeletal system, the immune system, the neurological system, the hematological system, and the cardiovascular system. Hindlimb unloading, a ground-based model of some of the effects of space flight on the immune system, has been used to study the effects of space flight conditions on physiological parameters. For the immune system, exposure to hindlimb unloading has been shown to results in alterations of the immune system similar to those observed after space flight. This has permitted the development of experiments that demonstrated compromised resistance to infection in rodents maintained in the hindlimb unloading model as well as the beginning of studies to develop countermeasures to ameliorate or prevent such occurrences. Although there are limitations to the use of animal models for the effects of space flight on physiological systems, the animal models should prove very valuable in designing countermeasures for exploration class missions of the future.

  19. Characterising the CRISPR immune system in Archaea using genome sequence analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Shiraz Ali

    Archaea, a group of microorganisms distinct from bacteria and eukaryotes, are equipped with an adaptive immune system called the CRISPR system, which relies on an RNA interference mechanism to combat invading viruses and plasmids. Using a genome sequence analysis approach, the four components...... of archaeal genomic CRISPR loci were analysed, namely, repeats, spacers, leaders and cas genes. Based on analysis of spacer sequences it was predicted that the immune system combats viruses and plasmids by targeting their DNA. Furthermore, analysis of repeats, leaders and cas genes revealed that CRISPR...... systems exist as distinct families which have key differences between themselves. Closely related organisms were seen harbouring different CRISPR systems, while some distantly related species carried similar systems, indicating frequent horizontal exchange. Moreover, it was found that cas genes of Type I...

  20. Vascular, glial, and lymphatic immune gateways of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Britta; Carare, Roxana O; Bechmann, Ingo; Flügel, Alexander; Laman, Jon D; Weller, Roy O

    2016-09-01

    Immune privilege of the central nervous system (CNS) has been ascribed to the presence of a blood-brain barrier and the lack of lymphatic vessels within the CNS parenchyma. However, immune reactions occur within the CNS and it is clear that the CNS has a unique relationship with the immune system. Recent developments in high-resolution imaging techniques have prompted a reassessment of the relationships between the CNS and the immune system. This review will take these developments into account in describing our present understanding of the anatomical connections of the CNS fluid drainage pathways towards regional lymph nodes and our current concept of immune cell trafficking into the CNS during immunosurveillance and neuroinflammation. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid are the two major components that drain from the CNS to regional lymph nodes. CSF drains via lymphatic vessels and appears to carry antigen-presenting cells. Interstitial fluid from the CNS parenchyma, on the other hand, drains to lymph nodes via narrow and restricted basement membrane pathways within the walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries that do not allow traffic of antigen-presenting cells. Lymphocytes targeting the CNS enter by a two-step process entailing receptor-mediated crossing of vascular endothelium and enzyme-mediated penetration of the glia limitans that covers the CNS. The contribution of the pathways into and out of the CNS as initiators or contributors to neurological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, will be discussed. Furthermore, we propose a clear nomenclature allowing improved precision when describing the CNS-specific communication pathways with the immune system.

  1. The liver-inherent immune system: its role against blood-stage malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eWunderlich

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The liver is well known as that organ which is obligately required for the intra-hepatocyte development of the pre-erythrocytic stages of the malaria-causative agent Plasmodium. However, largely neglected is the fact that the liver is also a central player of the host defense against the morbidity- and mortality-causing blood stages of the malaria parasites. Indeed, the liver is equipped with an unique immune system that acts locally, however with systemic impact. Its main ‚antipodal’ functions are to recognize and to generate effective immunoreactivity against pathogens on the one hand, and to generate tolerance to avoid immunoreactivity with ‚self’ and harmless substances as dietary compounds on the other hand. This review provides an introductory survey of the liver-inherent immune system: its pathogen recognition receptors including Toll-like receptors and its major cell constituents with their different facilities to fight and eliminate pathogens. Then, evidence is presented that the liver is also an essential organ to overcome blood-stage malaria. Finally, we discuss effector responses of the liver-inherent immune system directed against blood-stage malaria: activation of Toll-like receptors, acute phase response, phagocytic activity, cytokine-mediated pro- and anti-inflammatory responses, generation of ‚protective’ autoimmunity by extrathymic T cells and B-1 cells, and T cell-mediated repair of liver injuries mainly produced by malaria-induced overreactions of the liver-inherent immune system.

  2. Influence of Melatonin on the Immune System of Fish: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, M. Ángeles; Cuesta, Alberto; Chaves-Pozo, Elena; Meseguer, José

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine-immune system interactions have been widely demonstrated in mammals, whereas in fish, these relationships remain unclear. Of the organs that constitute the endocrine system, the pineal gland and its secretory product melatonin act in the synchronization of daily and seasonal rhythms in most vertebrates, including fish. Seasonal differences in immunocompetence and disease prevalence have been well documented in humans. Seasonality also strongly influences the life history of fish by controlling the timing of physiological events, such as reproduction, food intake, locomotor activity, and growth performance. Apart from its synchronizing capabilities, the role of melatonin in physiological processes in fish is not thoroughly understood. The purpose of this review is to summarize current studies on the effects of melatonin on the fish immune system. These studies suggest that melatonin represents an important component of fish endocrine-immune system interactions. The elucidation of the defense mechanisms of fish will facilitate the development of health management tools to support the growing finfish aquaculture industry as well as address questions concerning the origins and evolution of the immune system in vertebrates. PMID:23579958

  3. Influence of Melatonin on the Immune System of Fish: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Meseguer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine-immune system interactions have been widely demonstrated in mammals, whereas in fish, these relationships remain unclear. Of the organs that constitute the endocrine system, the pineal gland and its secretory product melatonin act in the synchronization of daily and seasonal rhythms in most vertebrates, including fish. Seasonal differences in immunocompetence and disease prevalence have been well documented in humans. Seasonality also strongly influences the life history of fish by controlling the timing of physiological events, such as reproduction, food intake, locomotor activity, and growth performance. Apart from its synchronizing capabilities, the role of melatonin in physiological processes in fish is not thoroughly understood. The purpose of this review is to summarize current studies on the effects of melatonin on the fish immune system. These studies suggest that melatonin represents an important component of fish endocrine-immune system interactions. The elucidation of the defense mechanisms of fish will facilitate the development of health management tools to support the growing finfish aquaculture industry as well as address questions concerning the origins and evolution of the immune system in vertebrates.

  4. InnateDB: systems biology of innate immunity and beyond—recent updates and continuing curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Karin; Foroushani, Amir K.; Laird, Matthew R.; Chen, Carol; Sribnaia, Anastasia; Lo, Raymond; Winsor, Geoffrey L.; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Lynn, David J.

    2013-01-01

    InnateDB (http://www.innatedb.com) is an integrated analysis platform that has been specifically designed to facilitate systems-level analyses of mammalian innate immunity networks, pathways and genes. In this article, we provide details of recent updates and improvements to the database. InnateDB now contains >196 000 human, mouse and bovine experimentally validated molecular interactions and 3000 pathway annotations of relevance to all mammalian cellular systems (i.e. not just immune relevant pathways and interactions). In addition, the InnateDB team has, to date, manually curated in excess of 18 000 molecular interactions of relevance to innate immunity, providing unprecedented insight into innate immunity networks, pathways and their component molecules. More recently, InnateDB has also initiated the curation of allergy- and asthma-related interactions. Furthermore, we report a range of improvements to our integrated bioinformatics solutions including web service access to InnateDB interaction data using Proteomics Standards Initiative Common Query Interface, enhanced Gene Ontology analysis for innate immunity, and the availability of new network visualizations tools. Finally, the recent integration of bovine data makes InnateDB the first integrated network analysis platform for this agriculturally important model organism. PMID:23180781

  5. InnateDB: systems biology of innate immunity and beyond--recent updates and continuing curation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Karin; Foroushani, Amir K; Laird, Matthew R; Chen, Carol; Sribnaia, Anastasia; Lo, Raymond; Winsor, Geoffrey L; Hancock, Robert E W; Brinkman, Fiona S L; Lynn, David J

    2013-01-01

    InnateDB (http://www.innatedb.com) is an integrated analysis platform that has been specifically designed to facilitate systems-level analyses of mammalian innate immunity networks, pathways and genes. In this article, we provide details of recent updates and improvements to the database. InnateDB now contains >196 000 human, mouse and bovine experimentally validated molecular interactions and 3000 pathway annotations of relevance to all mammalian cellular systems (i.e. not just immune relevant pathways and interactions). In addition, the InnateDB team has, to date, manually curated in excess of 18 000 molecular interactions of relevance to innate immunity, providing unprecedented insight into innate immunity networks, pathways and their component molecules. More recently, InnateDB has also initiated the curation of allergy- and asthma-related interactions. Furthermore, we report a range of improvements to our integrated bioinformatics solutions including web service access to InnateDB interaction data using Proteomics Standards Initiative Common Query Interface, enhanced Gene Ontology analysis for innate immunity, and the availability of new network visualizations tools. Finally, the recent integration of bovine data makes InnateDB the first integrated network analysis platform for this agriculturally important model organism.

  6. Immune system stimulation by the native gut microbiota of honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Waldan K; Mancenido, Amanda L; Moran, Nancy A

    2017-02-01

    Gut microbial communities can greatly affect host health by modulating the host's immune system. For many important insects, however, the relationship between the gut microbiota and immune function remains poorly understood. Here, we test whether the gut microbial symbionts of the honey bee can induce expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a crucial component of insect innate immunity. We find that bees up-regulate gene expression of the AMPs apidaecin and hymenoptaecin in gut tissue when the microbiota is present. Using targeted proteomics, we detected apidaecin in both the gut lumen and the haemolymph; higher apidaecin concentrations were found in bees harbouring the normal gut microbiota than in bees lacking gut microbiota. In in vitro assays, cultured strains of the microbiota showed variable susceptibility to honey bee AMPs, although many seem to possess elevated resistance compared to Escherichia coli . In some trials, colonization by normal gut symbionts resulted in improved survivorship following injection with E. coli . Our results show that the native, non-pathogenic gut flora induces immune responses in the bee host. Such responses might be a host mechanism to regulate the microbiota, and could potentially benefit host health by priming the immune system against future pathogenic infections.

  7. Sympathetic‐mediated activation versus suppression of the immune system: consequences for hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It is generally well‐accepted that the immune system is a significant contributor in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Specifically, activated and pro‐inflammatory T‐lymphocytes located primarily in the vasculature and kidneys appear to have a causal role in exacerbating elevated blood pressure. It has been proposed that increased sympathetic nerve activity and noradrenaline outflow associated with hypertension may be primary contributors to the initial activation of the immune system early in the disease progression. However, it has been repeatedly demonstrated in many different human and experimental diseases that sympathoexcitation is immunosuppressive in nature. Moreover, human hypertensive patients have demonstrated increased susceptibility to secondary immune insults like infections. Thus, it is plausible, and perhaps even likely, that in diseases like hypertension, specific immune cells are activated by increased noradrenaline, while others are in fact suppressed. We propose a model in which this differential regulation is based upon activation status of the immune cell as well as the resident organ. With this, the concept of global immunosuppression is obfuscated as a viable target for hypertension treatment, and we put forth the concept of focused organ‐specific immunotherapy as an alternative option. PMID:26830047

  8. Sympathetic-mediated activation versus suppression of the immune system: consequences for hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Adam J; Zimmerman, Matthew C

    2016-02-01

    It is generally well-accepted that the immune system is a significant contributor in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Specifically, activated and pro-inflammatory T-lymphocytes located primarily in the vasculature and kidneys appear to have a causal role in exacerbating elevated blood pressure. It has been proposed that increased sympathetic nerve activity and noradrenaline outflow associated with hypertension may be primary contributors to the initial activation of the immune system early in the disease progression. However, it has been repeatedly demonstrated in many different human and experimental diseases that sympathoexcitation is immunosuppressive in nature. Moreover, human hypertensive patients have demonstrated increased susceptibility to secondary immune insults like infections. Thus, it is plausible, and perhaps even likely, that in diseases like hypertension, specific immune cells are activated by increased noradrenaline, while others are in fact suppressed. We propose a model in which this differential regulation is based upon activation status of the immune cell as well as the resident organ. With this, the concept of global immunosuppression is obfuscated as a viable target for hypertension treatment, and we put forth the concept of focused organ-specific immunotherapy as an alternative option. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  9. Immunization Information Systems: A Decade of Progress in Law and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Daniel W.; Lowery, N. Elaine; Brand, Bill; Gold, Rebecca; Horlick, Gail

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a study of laws, regulations, and policies governing Immunization Information Systems (IIS, also known as “immunization registries”) in states and selected urban areas of the United States. The study included a search of relevant statutes, administrative codes and published attorney general opinions/findings, an online questionnaire completed by immunization program managers and/or their staff, and follow-up telephone interviews. The legal/regulatory framework for IIS has changed considerably since 2000, largely in ways that improve IIS’ ability to perform their public health functions while continuing to maintain strict confidentiality and privacy controls. Nevertheless, the exchange of immunization data and other health information between care providers and public health and between entities in different jurisdictions remains difficult due in part to ongoing regulatory diversity. To continue to be leaders in health information exchange and facilitate immunization of children and adults, IIS will need to address the challenges presented by the interplay of federal and state legislation, regulations, and policies and continue to move toward standardized data collection and sharing necessary for interoperable systems. PMID:24402434

  10. Influence of Hesperidin on the Systemic and Intestinal Rat Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariona Camps-Bossacoma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenols, widely found in edible plants, influence the immune system. Nevertheless, the immunomodulatory properties of hesperidin, the predominant flavanone in oranges, have not been deeply studied. To establish the effect of hesperidin on in vivo immune response, two different conditions of immune system stimulations in Lewis rats were applied. In the first experimental design, rats were intraperitoneally immunized with ovalbumin (OVA plus Bordetella pertussis toxin and alum as the adjuvants, and orally given 100 or 200 mg/kg hesperidin. In the second experimental design, rats were orally sensitized with OVA together with cholera toxin and fed a diet containing 0.5% hesperidin. In the first approach, hesperidin administration changed mesenteric lymph node lymphocyte (MLNL composition, increasing the TCRαβ+ cell percentage and decreasing that of B lymphocytes. Furthermore, hesperidin enhanced the interferon (IFN-γ production in stimulated MLNL. In the second approach, hesperidin intake modified the lymphocyte composition in the intestinal epithelium (TCRγδ+ cells and the lamina propria (TCRγδ+, CD45RA+, natural killer, natural killer T, TCRαβ+CD4+, and TCRαβ+CD8+ cells. Nevertheless, hesperidin did not modify the level of serum anti-OVA antibodies in either study. In conclusion, hesperidin does possess immunoregulatory properties in the intestinal immune response, but this effect is not able to influence the synthesis of specific antibodies.

  11. The interaction between the immune system and epigenetics in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Nardone

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have firmly established that the etiology of autism includes both genetic and environmental components. However, we are only just beginning to elucidate the environmental factors that might be involved in the development of autism, as well as the molecular mechanisms through which they function. Mounting epidemiological and biological evidence suggest that prenatal factors that induce a more activated immune state in the mother are involved in the development of autism. In parallel, molecular studies have highlighted the role of epigenetics in brain development as process susceptible to environmental influences and potentially causative of ASD. In this review, we will discuss converging evidence for a multidirectional interaction between immune system activation in the mother during pregnancy and epigenetic regulation in the brain of the fetus that may cooperate to produce an autistic phenotype. This interaction includes immune factor-induced changes in epigenetic signatures in the brain, dysregulation of epigenetic modifications specifically in genomic regions that encode immune functions, and aberrant epigenetic regulation of microglia. Overall, the interaction between immune system activation in the mother and the subsequent epigenetic dysregulation in the developing fetal brain may be a main consideration for the environmental factors that cause autism.

  12. Influence of Hesperidin on the Systemic and Intestinal Rat Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps-Bossacoma, Mariona; Franch, Àngels; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J.; Castell, Margarida

    2017-01-01

    Polyphenols, widely found in edible plants, influence the immune system. Nevertheless, the immunomodulatory properties of hesperidin, the predominant flavanone in oranges, have not been deeply studied. To establish the effect of hesperidin on in vivo immune response, two different conditions of immune system stimulations in Lewis rats were applied. In the first experimental design, rats were intraperitoneally immunized with ovalbumin (OVA) plus Bordetella pertussis toxin and alum as the adjuvants, and orally given 100 or 200 mg/kg hesperidin. In the second experimental design, rats were orally sensitized with OVA together with cholera toxin and fed a diet containing 0.5% hesperidin. In the first approach, hesperidin administration changed mesenteric lymph node lymphocyte (MLNL) composition, increasing the TCRαβ+ cell percentage and decreasing that of B lymphocytes. Furthermore, hesperidin enhanced the interferon (IFN)-γ production in stimulated MLNL. In the second approach, hesperidin intake modified the lymphocyte composition in the intestinal epithelium (TCRγδ+ cells) and the lamina propria (TCRγδ+, CD45RA+, natural killer, natural killer T, TCRαβ+CD4+, and TCRαβ+CD8+ cells). Nevertheless, hesperidin did not modify the level of serum anti-OVA antibodies in either study. In conclusion, hesperidin does possess immunoregulatory properties in the intestinal immune response, but this effect is not able to influence the synthesis of specific antibodies. PMID:28587283

  13. Immune surveillance of the central nervous system in multiple sclerosis– Relevance for therapy and experimental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Rehana Z.; Hayardeny, Liat; Cravens, Petra C.; Yarovinsky, Felix; Eagar, Todd N.; Arellano, Benjamine; Deason, Krystin; Castro-Rojas, Cyd; Stüve, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune disorders frequently involves the reduction, or depletion of immune-competent cells. Alternatively, immune cells are being sequestered away from the target organ by interfering with their movement from secondary lymphoid organs, or their migration into tissues. These therapeutic strategies have been successful in multiple sclerosis (MS), the most prevalent autoimmune inflammatory disorder of the CNS. However, many of the agents that are currently approved or in clinical development also have severe potential adverse effects that stem from the very mechanisms that mediate their beneficial effects by interfering with CNS immune surveillance. This review will outline the main cellular components of the innate and adaptive immune system that participate in host defense and maintain immune surveillance of the CNS. Their pathogenic role in MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is also discussed. Furthermore, an experimental model is introduced that may assist in evaluating the effect of therapeutic interventions on leukocyte homeostasis and function within the CNS. This model or similar models may become a useful tool in the repertoire of pre-clinical tests of pharmacological agents to better explore their potential for adverse events. PMID:25282087

  14. The Serum Complement System: A Simplified Laboratory Exercise to Measure the Activity of an Important Component of the Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Jordan E.; Radziwon, Kimberly A.; Maniero, Gregory D.

    2008-01-01

    The immune system is a vital physiological component that affords animals protection from disease and is composed of innate and adaptive mechanisms that rely on cellular and dissolved components. The serum complement system is a series of dissolved proteins that protect against a variety of pathogens. The activity of complement in serum can be…

  15. New vaccine introductions: assessing the impact and the opportunities for immunization and health systems strengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Susan A; Hyde, Terri B; Mounier-Jack, Sandra; Brenzel, Logan; Favin, Michael; Gordon, W Scott; Shearer, Jessica C; Mantel, Carsten F; Arora, Narendra; Durrheim, David

    2013-04-18

    In 2010, global immunization partners posed the question, "Do new vaccine introductions (NVIs) have positive or negative impacts on immunization and health systems of countries?" An Ad-hoc Working Group was formed for WHO's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on immunization (SAGE) to examine this question through five approaches: a published literature review, a grey literature review, in-depth interviews with regional and country immunization staff, in-depth studies of recent NVIs in 3 countries, and a statistical analysis of the impact of NVI on DTP3 coverage in 176 countries. The WHO Health System Framework of building blocks was used to organize the analysis of these data to assess potential areas of impact of NVI on health systems. In April 2012, the Ad-hoc Working Group presented its findings to SAGE. While reductions in disease burden and improvements in disease and adverse events surveillance, training, cold chain and logistics capacity and injection safety were commonly documented as beneficial impacts, opportunities for strengthening the broader health system were consistently missed during NVI. Weaknesses in planning for human and financial resource needs were highlighted as a concern. Where positive impacts on health systems following NVI occurred, these were often in areas where detailed technical guidance or tools and adequate financing were available. SAGE supported the Ad-hoc Working Group's conclusion that future NVI should explicitly plan to optimize and document the impact of NVI on broader health systems. Furthermore, opportunities for improving integration of delivery of immunization services, commodities, and messages with other parts of the health system should be actively sought with the recognition that integration is a bidirectional process. To avoid the gaps in planning for NVI that can compromise existing immunization and health systems, donors and partners should provide sufficient and timely support to facilitate country planning

  16. Per-oral immunization with antigen-conjugated nanoparticles followed by sub-cutaneous boosting immunization induces long-lasting mucosal and systemic antibody responses in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savannah E Howe

    Full Text Available Food or water-borne enteric pathogens invade their hosts via intestinal mucosal surfaces, thus developing effective oral vaccines would greatly reduce the burden of infectious diseases. The nature of the antigen, as well as the mode of its internalization in the intestinal mucosa affects the ensuing immune response. We show that model protein antigen ovalbumin (Ova given per-orally (p.o. induces oral tolerance (OT, characterized by systemic IgG1-dominated antibody response, which cannot be boosted by sub-cutaneous (s.c. immunization with Ova in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA. Intestinal IgA generated in response to Ova feeding diminished over time and was abrogated by s.c. immunization with Ova+CFA. Humoral response to Ova was altered by administering Ova conjugated to 20 nm nanoparticles (NP-Ova. P.o. administration of NP-Ova induced systemic IgG1/IgG2c, and primed the intestinal mucosa for secretion of IgA. These responses were boosted by secondary s.c. immunization with Ova+CFA or p.o. immunization with NP-Ova. However, only in s.c.-boosted mice serum and mucosal antibody titers remained elevated for 6 months after priming. In contrast, s.c. priming with NP-Ova induced IgG1-dominated serum antibodies, but did not prime the intestinal mucosa for secretion of IgA, even after secondary p.o. immunization with NP-Ova. These results indicate that Ova conjugated to NPs reaches the internal milieu in an immunogenic form and that mucosal immunization with NP-Ova is necessary for induction of a polarized Th1/Th2 immune response, as well as intestinal IgA response. In addition, mucosal priming with NP-Ova, followed by s.c. boosting induces superior systemic and mucosal memory responses. These findings are important for the development of efficacious mucosal vaccines.

  17. Innate immune responses in central nervous system inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finsen, Bente; Owens, Trevor

    2011-01-01

    In autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), innate glial cell responses play a key role in determining the outcome of leukocyte infiltration. Access of leukocytes is controlled via complex interactions with glial components of the blood-brain barrier that include angiotensin II...... of oligodendrocyte precursor cells in response to axonal injury. These innate responses offer potential targets for immunomodulatory therapy....

  18. The skin immune system: lupus erythematosus as a paradigm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) was first described as a clinical dermatological entity in 1851. The possibility of serious systemic manifestations became recognized by 1872 as the result of the work of M. Kaposi. Since then, it took a long time before LE was recognized to be an immunological disease.

  19. Interactions of Streptococcus suis with the innate immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wichgers Schreur, P.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304841331

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important pig pathogen able to cause systemic disease and also able to asymptomatically colonize the upper respiratory tract. In almost all countries, S. suis has become an endemic pathogen and a substantial economic burden due to loss of production and expensive control

  20. Always one step ahead: How pathogenic bacteria use the type III secretion system to manipulate the intestinal mucosal immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchès Olivier

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The intestinal immune system and the epithelium are the first line of defense in the gut. Constantly exposed to microorganisms from the environment, the gut has complex defense mechanisms to prevent infections, as well as regulatory pathways to tolerate commensal bacteria and food antigens. Intestinal pathogens have developed strategies to regulate intestinal immunity and inflammation in order to establish or prolong infection. The organisms that employ a type III secretion system use a molecular syringe to deliver effector proteins into the cytoplasm of host cells. These effectors target the host cell cytoskeleton, cell organelles and signaling pathways. This review addresses the multiple mechanisms by which the type III secretion system targets the intestinal immune response, with a special focus on pathogenic E. coli.