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Sample records for weak positive selection

  1. Primate ABO Gene is under Weak Positive Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Santos EVANOVICH

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available ABO locus presents three main alleles: A, B and O. A and B encode glycosyltransferases that catalyze the addiction of an N-GalNac and D-galactose to a precursor substance (H substance, producing A and B antigens, while the O allele does not produce a functional protein. The presence of A and B antigens have been associated to resistance against infectious agents which could use them as attachment factors increasing the virulence of some parasitic agents. As these antigens are not restrict to humans, analyses them in others species, for instance non-human primates, may be crucial to understand the relationship between pathogens and ABO phenotypes. Despite of the relevance of this issue, in the last decade few studies have addressed, mainly in New World Monkeys (NWM, natural reservoir of tropical diseases in Amazon Region. In order to understand the evolution of the ABO system in the primates, it has been obtained the partial sequence of the most important exon of ABO gene (exon 7, in platyrrhini families: Atelidae, Pithecidae and Cebidae. Then, it has been compared the sequences obtained those present in the literature, and measured the selective pressure. The present results shown that residues 266 and 268 are also crucial to distinguish A and B phenotypes in the platyrrhines, such as in catarrhines, and the 266 codon is under positive selection, although the most site codons are under action of purifying selection.

  2. Extrapolating Weak Selection in Evolutionary Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; García, Julián; Hauert, Christoph; Traulsen, Arne

    2013-01-01

    In evolutionary games, reproductive success is determined by payoffs. Weak selection means that even large differences in game outcomes translate into small fitness differences. Many results have been derived using weak selection approximations, in which perturbation analysis facilitates the derivation of analytical results. Here, we ask whether results derived under weak selection are also qualitatively valid for intermediate and strong selection. By “qualitatively valid” we mean that the ranking of strategies induced by an evolutionary process does not change when the intensity of selection increases. For two-strategy games, we show that the ranking obtained under weak selection cannot be carried over to higher selection intensity if the number of players exceeds two. For games with three (or more) strategies, previous examples for multiplayer games have shown that the ranking of strategies can change with the intensity of selection. In particular, rank changes imply that the most abundant strategy at one intensity of selection can become the least abundant for another. We show that this applies already to pairwise interactions for a broad class of evolutionary processes. Even when both weak and strong selection limits lead to consistent predictions, rank changes can occur for intermediate intensities of selection. To analyze how common such games are, we show numerically that for randomly drawn two-player games with three or more strategies, rank changes frequently occur and their likelihood increases rapidly with the number of strategies . In particular, rank changes are almost certain for , which jeopardizes the predictive power of results derived for weak selection. PMID:24339769

  3. Extrapolating weak selection in evolutionary games.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wu

    Full Text Available In evolutionary games, reproductive success is determined by payoffs. Weak selection means that even large differences in game outcomes translate into small fitness differences. Many results have been derived using weak selection approximations, in which perturbation analysis facilitates the derivation of analytical results. Here, we ask whether results derived under weak selection are also qualitatively valid for intermediate and strong selection. By "qualitatively valid" we mean that the ranking of strategies induced by an evolutionary process does not change when the intensity of selection increases. For two-strategy games, we show that the ranking obtained under weak selection cannot be carried over to higher selection intensity if the number of players exceeds two. For games with three (or more strategies, previous examples for multiplayer games have shown that the ranking of strategies can change with the intensity of selection. In particular, rank changes imply that the most abundant strategy at one intensity of selection can become the least abundant for another. We show that this applies already to pairwise interactions for a broad class of evolutionary processes. Even when both weak and strong selection limits lead to consistent predictions, rank changes can occur for intermediate intensities of selection. To analyze how common such games are, we show numerically that for randomly drawn two-player games with three or more strategies, rank changes frequently occur and their likelihood increases rapidly with the number of strategies [Formula: see text]. In particular, rank changes are almost certain for [Formula: see text], which jeopardizes the predictive power of results derived for weak selection.

  4. The robustness of the weak selection approximation for the evolution of altruism against strong selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullon, C; Lehmann, L

    2014-10-01

    The weak selection approximation of population genetics has made possible the analysis of social evolution under a considerable variety of biological scenarios. Despite its extensive usage, the accuracy of weak selection in predicting the emergence of altruism under limited dispersal when selection intensity increases remains unclear. Here, we derive the condition for the spread of an altruistic mutant in the infinite island model of dispersal under a Moran reproductive process and arbitrary strength of selection. The simplicity of the model allows us to compare weak and strong selection regimes analytically. Our results demonstrate that the weak selection approximation is robust to moderate increases in selection intensity and therefore provides a good approximation to understand the invasion of altruism in spatially structured population. In particular, we find that the weak selection approximation is excellent even if selection is very strong, when either migration is much stronger than selection or when patches are large. Importantly, we emphasize that the weak selection approximation provides the ideal condition for the invasion of altruism, and increasing selection intensity will impede the emergence of altruism. We discuss that this should also hold for more complicated life cycles and for culturally transmitted altruism. Using the weak selection approximation is therefore unlikely to miss out on any demographic scenario that lead to the evolution of altruism under limited dispersal. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  5. Malaria was a weak selective force in ancient Europeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelabert, Pere; Olalde, Iñigo; de-Dios, Toni; Civit, Sergi; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2017-05-03

    Malaria, caused by Plasmodium parasites, is thought to be one of the strongest selective forces that has shaped the genome of modern humans and was endemic in Europe until recent times. Due to its eradication around mid-twentieth century, the potential selective history of malaria in European populations is largely unknown. Here, we screen 224 ancient European genomes from the Upper Palaeolithic to the post-Roman period for 22 malaria-resistant alleles in twelve genes described in the literature. None of the most specific mutations for malaria resistance, like those at G6PD, HBB or Duffy blood group, have been detected among the available samples, while many other malaria-resistant alleles existed well before the advent of agriculture. We detected statistically significant differences between ancient and modern populations for the ATP2B4, FCGR2B and ABO genes and we found evidence of selection at IL-10 and ATP2B4 genes. However it is unclear whether malaria is the causative agent, because these genes are also involved in other immunological challenges. These results suggest that the selective force represented by malaria was relatively weak in Europe, a fact that could be associated to a recent historical introduction of the severe malaria pathogen.

  6. Selective diaphragm muscle weakness after contractile inactivity during thoracic surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welvaart, W.N.; Paul, M.A.; Stienen, G.J.; Hees, H.W.H. van; Loer, S.A.; Bouwman, R.; Niessen, H.; Man, F.S. de; Witt, C.C.; Granzier, H.; Vonk-Noordegraaf, A.; Ottenheijm, C.A.C.

    2011-01-01

    RATIONALE: Postoperative pulmonary complications are significant contributors to morbidity in patients who have undergone upper abdominal, thoracic, or cardiac surgery. The pathophysiology of these complications might involve postoperative inspiratory muscle weakness. The nature of postoperative

  7. Weak gravitational lensing with COSMOS : galaxy selection and shape measurements.

    OpenAIRE

    Leauthaud, Alexie; Massey, Richard; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Rhodes, Jason; Johnston, David E.; Capak, Peter; Heymans, Catherine; Ellis, Richard S.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Le Fevre, Oliver; Mellier, Yannick; Refregier, Alexandre; Robin, Annie C.; Scoville, Nick; Tasca, Lidia

    2007-01-01

    With a primary goal of conducting precision weak-lensing measurements from space, the COSMOS survey has imaged the largest contiguous area observed by Hubble Space Telescope to date, using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). This is the first paper in a series in which we describe our strategy for addressing the various technical challenges in the production of weak-lensing measurements from COSMOS data. We first construct a source catalog from 575 ACS/WFC tiles (1.64 deg^2) subsampled at ...

  8. Determinants of Labour Force Participation for Selected Groups With Weak Labour Market Attachment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Maire, Daniel; Scheuer, Christian

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the eects of economic incentives on the labour market participation for selected groups with weak labour market attachment. We argue that the people most likely to be affected by economic incentives are recipients of socialassistance and home-working housewives. Partner...... income only seems to be exogenous to the participation decision for home-working housewives. We also estimate participationequations with own potential income gab from working, which in the case of recipients of social assistence are found to have signifcant positive effect. The elasticities fromchanging...

  9. Widespread positive but weak assortative mating by diet within stickleback populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Travis; Jiang, Yuexin; Rangel, Racine; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2015-08-01

    Assortative mating - correlation between male and female traits - is common within populations and has the potential to promote genetic diversity and in some cases speciation. Despite its importance, few studies have sought to explain variation in the extent of assortativeness across populations. Here, we measure assortative mating based on an ecologically important trait, diet as inferred from stable isotopes, in 16 unmanipulated lake populations of three-spine stickleback. As predicted, we find a tendency toward positive assortment on the littoral-pelagic axis, although the magnitude is consistently weak. These populations vary relatively little in the strength of assortativeness, and what variation occurs is not explained by hypothesized drivers including habitat cosegregation, the potential for disruptive selection, costs to choosiness, and the strength of the relationship between diet and body size. Our results support recent findings that most assortative mating is positive, while suggesting that new approaches may be required to identify the environmental variables that drive the evolution of nonrandom mating within populations.

  10. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, Jonathan P; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome...

  11. CASP Position Paper: Specific Learning Disabilities and Patterns of Strengths and Weaknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christo, Catherine; Ponzuric, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    California Association of School Psychologists (CASP) adopted a Position Paper in March, 2014 intended to support school psychologists in California in electing to use a process known as Patterns of Strengths and Weaknesses (PSW) as one of three methods specified in IDEA 2014 and California Code of Regulations, Title 5, to identify students being…

  12. Physicochemical evolution and positive selection of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amino acid sites relating to these properties and to different secondary structures were found and have the potential to affect group II intron maturase function. Despite the evolutionary constraint on the rapidly evolving matK, this protein evolves under positive selection in gymnosperm. Several regions of matK have ...

  13. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, J.P.; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    that the residues under positive selection occur almost exclusively in the extracellular region of the proteins that are enriched with sites known to be targets of phages, colicins, or the host immune system. More surprisingly, we also find a number of other categories of genes that show very strong evidence...

  14. Demography and weak selection drive patterns of transposable element diversity in natural populations of Arabidopsis lyrata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockton, Steven; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey; Gaut, Brandon S.

    2008-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are the major component of most plant genomes, and characterizing their population dynamics is key to understanding plant genome complexity. Yet there have been few studies of TE population genetics in plant systems. To study the roles of selection, transposition, and demography in shaping TE population diversity, we generated a polymorphism dataset for six TE families in four populations of the flowering plant Arabidopsis lyrata. The TE data indicated significant differentiation among populations, and maximum likelihood procedures suggested weak selection. For strongly bottlenecked populations, the observed TE band-frequency spectra fit data simulated under neutral demographic models constructed from nucleotide polymorphism data. Overall, we propose that TEs are subjected to weak selection, the efficacy of which varies as a function of demographic factors. Thus, demographic effects could be a major factor driving distributions of TEs among plant lineages. PMID:18772373

  15. Alcohol dependent patients have weak negative rather than strong positive implicit alcohol associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Joanne M; Gately, Claire; Field, Matt

    2013-08-01

    Alcohol dependence is characterised by motivational conflict (or ambivalence) in controlled cognitive processes, but it is unclear if ambivalence also exists within automatic cognitive processes, and if ambivalence operates between controlled and automatic processes. To investigate ambivalence operating within and between controlled and automatic processes in alcohol dependence. Alcohol-dependent patients who had recently completed inpatient alcohol detoxification (N = 47) and social drinking controls (N = 40) completed unipolar implicit association tests and self-report measures of alcohol approach and avoidance motivation and alcohol outcome expectancies. As predicted, both positive and negative alcohol outcome expectancies were stronger in alcohol-dependent patients compared to controls, indicative of ambivalence. Groups did not differ on implicit alcohol-positive associations, but alcohol-dependent participants had significantly weaker alcohol-negative associations than controls. Regression analyses revealed that implicit negative associations accounted for unique variance in group membership after controlling for alcohol outcome expectancies. Our findings demonstrate that alcohol dependent patients possess weak automatic alcohol-negative associations but not strong automatic alcohol-positive associations, and they suggest the presence of conflict between controlled and automatic processes with regard to negative alcohol cognitions.

  16. A Case Report of Positive HTLV-I Infection with Bilateral Facial Weakness and Myelitis

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    M. Mazdeh

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Infection with human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I causes multiple neurologic disorder , due to the retroviruses.Spinal cord disease of this type is named TSP (tropical spastic paraparesis that were drawn to the attention of neurologists 45 years ago. The clinical picture is one of the slowly progressive paraparesis with increased tendon reflexes & Babinski signs ; disorder of sphincteric control is usually an early change. Paresthesia , reduced vibratory & position senses, & ataxia have been described. The diagnosis is confirmed by the detection the antibodies to the virus in serum . There are anecdotal reports of improvement with IV-administration of gammaglobulin. But HTLV1-infection has other clinical manifestations. This report presents a rare case with bilateral facial weakness as primary manifestation. This case is related to a 41 years old woman. The clinical picture was bilateral facial weekness and approximately after 2 months, she referred to hospital with myelitis. In primary exams and evaluation, the diagnose was HTLV-I infection. The diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of the antibodies against the virus in her serum. She dead after 2.5 months of the first sign due to disease severity and bulbar palsy. Possible transmission routes and the risk of encountering the disease outside endemic areas must be attended , and it is recommended to evaluate antibodies in the children of the patients.

  17. The limits of weak selection and large population size in evolutionary game theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sample, Christine; Allen, Benjamin

    2017-11-01

    Evolutionary game theory is a mathematical approach to studying how social behaviors evolve. In many recent works, evolutionary competition between strategies is modeled as a stochastic process in a finite population. In this context, two limits are both mathematically convenient and biologically relevant: weak selection and large population size. These limits can be combined in different ways, leading to potentially different results. We consider two orderings: the [Formula: see text] limit, in which weak selection is applied before the large population limit, and the [Formula: see text] limit, in which the order is reversed. Formal mathematical definitions of the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] limits are provided. Applying these definitions to the Moran process of evolutionary game theory, we obtain asymptotic expressions for fixation probability and conditions for success in these limits. We find that the asymptotic expressions for fixation probability, and the conditions for a strategy to be favored over a neutral mutation, are different in the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] limits. However, the ordering of limits does not affect the conditions for one strategy to be favored over another.

  18. The power of the positive: revisiting weak coherence in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happé, Francesca G E; Booth, Rhonda D L

    2008-01-01

    This paper reexamines Frith's original concept of weak coherence, its historical origins, recent reformulations, and alternative accounts. We suggest that the key notion of reduced global integration of information, which Frith proposed to underlie the assets in local processing, has been neglected in recent accounts of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In fact, most paradigms used to test weak coherence conflate global and local processing, often placing them in direct trade-off, so that it is not possible to tell whether patterns of performance in ASD reflect reduced global processing, increased local processing, or both. We review the literature from typical development and ASD that may be pertinent to this distinction and examine some data from our own studies. Only once tasks are devised that measure separately the effects of reduced global processing and increased local processing will it be possible to test the on-line and developmental relations between these two aspects of "weak coherence". Some preliminary ideas about these relationships are discussed, and suggestions are made for why disentangling two possibly independent dimensions of weak coherence may be timely and productive.

  19. Gower sign positive muscle weakness in a patient with short stature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 17-year-old Sudanese patient presented with short stature, generalized body aches, and proximal muscle weakness. He was seen by two orthopedic surgeons and an adult neurologist and misdiagnosed as having benign bone cysts, osteomalacia and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In fact, he was suffering from severe ...

  20. Genetic variation but weak genetic covariation between pre- and post-copulatory episodes of sexual selection in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, L M; Garcia-Gonzalez, F; Simmons, L W

    2016-08-01

    When females mate polyandrously, male reproductive success depends both on the male's ability to attain matings and on his ability to outcompete rival males in the fertilization of ova post-copulation. Increased investment in  ejaculate components may trade off with investment in precopulatory traits due to resource allocation. Alternatively, pre- and post-copulatory traits could be positively related if individuals can afford to invest heavily in traits advantageous at both episodes of selection. There is empirical evidence for both positive and negative associations between pre- and post-copulatory episodes, but little is known about the genetic basis of these correlations. In this study, we measured morphological, chemical and behavioural precopulatory male traits and investigated their relationship with measures of male fitness (male mating success, remating inhibition and offensive sperm competitiveness) across 40 isofemale lines of Drosophila melanogaster. We found significant variation among isofemale lines, indicating a genetic basis for most of the traits investigated. However, we found weak evidence for genetic correlations between precopulatory traits and our indices of male fitness. Moreover, pre- and post-copulatory episodes of selection were uncorrelated, suggesting selection may act independently at the different episodes to maximize male reproductive success. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  1. Evolutionary dynamics in the two-locus two-allele model with weak selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontz, Martin; Hofbauer, Josef; Bürger, Reinhard

    2018-01-01

    Two-locus two-allele models are among the most studied models in population genetics. The reason is that they are the simplest models to explore the role of epistasis for a variety of important evolutionary problems, including the maintenance of polymorphism and the evolution of genetic incompatibilities. Many specific types of models have been explored. However, due to the mathematical complexity arising from the fact that epistasis generates linkage disequilibrium, few general insights have emerged. Here, we study a simpler problem by assuming that linkage disequilibrium can be ignored. This is a valid approximation if selection is sufficiently weak relative to recombination. The goal of our paper is to characterize all possible equilibrium structures, or more precisely and general, all robust phase portraits or evolutionary flows arising from this weak-selection dynamics. For general fitness matrices, we have not fully accomplished this goal, because some cases remain undecided. However, for many specific classes of fitness schemes, including additive fitnesses, purely additive-by-additive epistasis, haploid selection, multilinear epistasis, marginal overdominance or underdominance, and the symmetric viability model, we obtain complete characterizations of the possible equilibrium structures and, in several cases, even of all possible phase portraits. A central point in our analysis is the inference of the number and stability of fully polymorphic equilibria from the boundary flow, i.e., from the dynamics at the four marginal single-locus subsystems. The key mathematical ingredient for this is index theory. The specific form of epistasis has both a big influence on the possible boundary flows as well as on the internal equilibrium structure admitted by a given boundary flow.

  2. Physicochemical evolution and positive selection of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-04-08

    Apr 8, 2010 ... gene from mustard (Sinapsis alba) contains a class II intron po- tentially coding for a maturase-related polypeptide. Curr. Genet. 11, 251–257. Posada D. 2006 ModelTest Server: a web-based tool for the statisti- cal selection of models of nucleotide substitution online. Nucleic. Acids Res. 34, 700–703.

  3. Positive selection on the killer whale mitogenome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foote, Andrew David; Morin, Phillip A.; Durban, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria produce up to 95 per cent of the eukaryotic cell's energy. The coding genes of the mitochondrial DNA may therefore evolve under selection owing to metabolic requirements. The killer whale, Orcinus orca, is polymorphic, has a global distribution and occupies a range of ecological niches...

  4. Giant positive and negative lateral shifts from the Kretschmann-Raether configuration with a weakly absorbing left-handed slab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yaoju [College of Physics and Electronic Information, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China)], E-mail: zhangyaoju@sohu.com

    2008-07-07

    The lateral shift of a TE-polarized beam reflected from the Kretschmann-Raether structure with a weakly absorbing left-handed slab is studied theoretically. It is shown that the lateral shift can be very large negative as well as positive near the resonant condition. These large negative and positive shifts can be one order of magnitude much larger than the shift from the corresponding nonabsorbing slab. As the absorption factor increases, the incident angle of producing largest lateral shift increases when the thickness is kept unchanged but the thickness of the slab of producing largest lateral shift decreases when the incident angle is kept unchanged.

  5. Existence of positive radial solutions for a weakly coupled system via blow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta García-Huidobro

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of positive solutions to certain systems of ordinary differential equations is studied. Particular forms of these systems are satisfied by radial solutions of associated partial differential equations.

  6. Positive Selection and the Evolution of izumo Genes in Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Grayson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most genes linked to male reproductive function have been known to evolve rapidly among species and to show signatures of positive selection. Different male species-specific reproductive strategies have been proposed to underlie positive selection, such as sperm competitive advantage and control over females postmating physiology. However, an underexplored aspect potentially affecting male reproductive gene evolution in mammals is the effect of gene duplications. Here we analyze the molecular evolution of members of the izumo gene family in mammals, a family of four genes mostly expressed in the sperm with known and potential roles in sperm-egg fusion. We confirm a previously reported bout of selection for izumo1 and establish that the bout of selection is restricted to the diversification of species of the superorder Laurasiatheria. None of the izumo genes showed evidence of positive selection in Glires (Rodentia and Lagomorpha, and in the case of the non-testes-specific izumo4, rapid evolution was driven by relaxed selection. We detected evidence of positive selection for izumo3 among Primates. Interestingly, positively selected sites include several serine residues suggesting modifications in protein function and/or localization among Primates. Our results suggest that positive selection is driven by aspects related to species-specific adaptations to fertilization rather than sexual selection.

  7. Post-duplication charge evolution of phosphoglucose isomerases in teleost fishes through weak selection on many amino acid sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yukuto; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2007-10-29

    The partitioning of ancestral functions among duplicated genes by neutral evolution, or subfunctionalization, has been considered the primary process for the evolution of novel proteins (neofunctionalization). Nonetheless, how a subfunctionalized protein can evolve into a more adaptive protein is poorly understood, mainly due to the limitations of current analytical methods, which can detect only strong selection for amino acid substitutions involved in adaptive molecular evolution. In this study, we employed a comparative evolutionary approach to this question, focusing on differences in the structural properties of a protein, specifically the electric charge, encoded by fish-specific duplicated phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi) genes. Full-length cDNA cloning, RT-PCR based gene expression analyses, and comparative sequence analyses showed that after subfunctionalization with respect to the expression organ of duplicate Pgi genes, the net electric charge of the PGI-1 protein expressed mainly in internal tissues became more negative, and that of PGI-2 expressed mainly in muscular tissues became more positive. The difference in net protein charge was attributable not to specific amino acid sites but to the sum of various amino acid sites located on the surface of the PGI molecule. This finding suggests that the surface charge evolution of PGI proteins was not driven by strong selection on individual amino acid sites leading to permanent fixation of a particular residue, but rather was driven by weak selection on a large number of amino acid sites and consequently by steady directional and/or purifying selection on the overall structural properties of the protein, which is derived from many modifiable sites. The mode of molecular evolution presented here may be relevant to various cases of adaptive modification in proteins, such as hydrophobic properties, molecular size, and electric charge.

  8. Post-duplication charge evolution of phosphoglucose isomerases in teleost fishes through weak selection on many amino acid sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato Yukuto

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The partitioning of ancestral functions among duplicated genes by neutral evolution, or subfunctionalization, has been considered the primary process for the evolution of novel proteins (neofunctionalization. Nonetheless, how a subfunctionalized protein can evolve into a more adaptive protein is poorly understood, mainly due to the limitations of current analytical methods, which can detect only strong selection for amino acid substitutions involved in adaptive molecular evolution. In this study, we employed a comparative evolutionary approach to this question, focusing on differences in the structural properties of a protein, specifically the electric charge, encoded by fish-specific duplicated phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi genes. Results Full-length cDNA cloning, RT-PCR based gene expression analyses, and comparative sequence analyses showed that after subfunctionalization with respect to the expression organ of duplicate Pgi genes, the net electric charge of the PGI-1 protein expressed mainly in internal tissues became more negative, and that of PGI-2 expressed mainly in muscular tissues became more positive. The difference in net protein charge was attributable not to specific amino acid sites but to the sum of various amino acid sites located on the surface of the PGI molecule. Conclusion This finding suggests that the surface charge evolution of PGI proteins was not driven by strong selection on individual amino acid sites leading to permanent fixation of a particular residue, but rather was driven by weak selection on a large number of amino acid sites and consequently by steady directional and/or purifying selection on the overall structural properties of the protein, which is derived from many modifiable sites. The mode of molecular evolution presented here may be relevant to various cases of adaptive modification in proteins, such as hydrophobic properties, molecular size, and electric charge.

  9. Widespread positive selection in the photosynthetic Rubisco enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filatov Dmitry A

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rubisco enzyme catalyzes the first step in net photosynthetic CO2 assimilation and photorespiratory carbon oxidation and is responsible for almost all carbon fixation on Earth. The large subunit of Rubisco is encoded by the chloroplast rbcL gene, which is widely used for reconstruction of plant phylogenies due to its conservative nature. Plant systematicists have mainly used rbcL paying little attention to its function, and the question whether it evolves under Darwinian selection has received little attention. The purpose of our study was to evaluate how common is positive selection in Rubisco among the phototrophs and where in the Rubisco structure does positive selection occur. Results We searched for positive selection in rbcL sequences from over 3000 species representing all lineages of green plants and some lineages of other phototrophs, such as brown and red algae, diatoms, euglenids and cyanobacteria. Our molecular phylogenetic analysis found the presence of positive selection in rbcL of most analyzed land plants, but not in algae and cyanobacteria. The mapping of the positively selected residues on the Rubisco tertiary structure revealed that they are located in regions important for dimer-dimer, intradimer, large subunit-small subunit and Rubisco-Rubisco activase interactions, and that some of the positively selected residues are close to the active site. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that despite its conservative nature, Rubisco evolves under positive selection in most lineages of land plants, and after billions of years of evolution Darwinian selection still fine-tunes its performance. Widespread positive selection in rbcL has to be taken into account when this gene is used for phylogenetic reconstructions.

  10. Countable Alphabet Random Subhifts of Finite Type with Weakly Positive Transfer Operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Volker; Urbański, Mariusz

    2015-09-01

    We deal with countable alphabet locally compact random subshifts of finite type (the latter merely meaning that the symbol space is generated by an incidence matrix) under the absence of big images property and under the absence of uniform positivity of the transfer operator. We first establish the existence of random conformal measures along with good bounds for the iterates of the Perron-Frobenius operator. Then, using the technique of positive cones and proving a version of Bowen's type contraction (see Equilibrium states and the ergodic theory of Anosov diffeomorphisms, 1975), we also establish a fairly complete thermodynamical formalism. This means that we prove the existence and uniqueness of fiberwise invariant measures (giving rise to a global invariant measure) equivalent to the fiberwise conformal measures. Furthermore, we establish the existence of a spectral gap for the transfer operators, which in the random context precisely means the exponential rate of convergence of the normalized iterated transfer operator. This latter property in a relatively straightforward way entails the exponential decay of correlations and the Central Limit Theorem.

  11. Selective Mottness as a key to iron superconductors: weak and strong correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medici, Luca

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss the strength of electronic correlations in the normal phase of Fe-superconductors and trace a comparison with cuprates. The phase diagram of the high-Tc cuprates is dominated by the Mott insulating phase of the parent compounds. Approaching it from large doping, a standard Fermi-liquid is seen to gradually turn into a bad non-Fermi liquid metal in which quasiparticles have heavily differentiated coherence depending on momentum, a process which culminates in the pseudogap regime, in which the antinodal region in momentum space acquires a gap before the material reaches a fully gapped Mott state. I will show that experiments for electron- and hole-doped BaFe2As2 support an analogous scenario. The doping evolution is dominated by the influence of a Mott insulator that would be realized for half-filled conduction bands, while the stoichiometric compound does not play a special role. Weakly and strongly correlated conduction electrons coexist in much of the phase diagram, a differentiation that increases with hole-doping. We identify the reason for this ``selective Mottness'' in a simple emergent mechanism, an ``orbital decoupling,'' triggered by the strong Hund's coupling. When this mechanism is active charge excitations in the different orbitals are decoupled and each orbital behaves as a single band Hubbard model, where the correlation degree almost only depends on how doped is each orbital from half-filling. This scenario reconciles contrasting evidences on the electronic correlation strength, implies a strong asymmetry between hole- and electron-doping and establishes a deep connection with the cuprates. L. de' Medici, G. Giovannetti and M. Capone, ArXiv:1212.3966 Work supported by CNRS - ESPCI ParisTech, France

  12. Positive selection of digestive Cys proteases in herbivorous Coleoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorster, Juan; Rasoolizadeh, Asieh; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Cloutier, Conrad; Sainsbury, Frank; Michaud, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    Positive selection is thought to contribute to the functional diversification of insect-inducible protease inhibitors in plants in response to selective pressures exerted by the digestive proteases of their herbivorous enemies. Here we assessed whether a reciprocal evolutionary process takes place on the insect side, and whether ingestion of a positively selected plant inhibitor may translate into a measurable rebalancing of midgut proteases in vivo. Midgut Cys proteases of herbivorous Coleoptera, including the major pest Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), were first compared using a codon-based evolutionary model to look for the occurrence of hypervariable, positively selected amino acid sites among the tested sequences. Hypervariable sites were found, distributed within -or close to- amino acid regions interacting with Cys-type inhibitors of the plant cystatin protein family. A close examination of L. decemlineata sequences indicated a link between their assignment to protease functional families and amino acid identity at positively selected sites. A function-diversifying role for positive selection was further suggested empirically by in vitro protease assays and a shotgun proteomic analysis of L. decemlineata Cys proteases showing a differential rebalancing of protease functional family complements in larvae fed single variants of a model cystatin mutated at positively selected amino acid sites. These data confirm overall the occurrence of hypervariable, positively selected amino acid sites in herbivorous Coleoptera digestive Cys proteases. They also support the idea of an adaptive role for positive selection, useful to generate functionally diverse proteases in insect herbivores ingesting functionally diverse, rapidly evolving dietary cystatins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Selective and effective binding of pillar[5,6]arenes toward secondary ammonium salts with a weakly coordinating counteranion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunju; Shu, Xiaoyan; Li, Jian; Fan, Jiazeng; Chen, Zhenxia; Weng, Linhong; Jia, Xueshun

    2012-08-17

    The selective and effective binding of secondary ammoniums with a weakly coordinating tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate (BArF) counteranion by per-ethylated pillar[5,6]arenes is reported. The construction of a first pillararene-based self-sorting system consisting of two wheels and two axles is also described.

  14. Positively selected sites in cetacean myoglobins contribute to protein stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Kepp, Kasper P

    2013-01-01

    between Mb folding stability and protein abundance, suggesting that a selection pressure for stability acts proportionally to higher expression. We also identify a major divergence event leading to the common ancestor of whales, during which major stabilization occurred. Most of the positively selected...

  15. A systematic search for positive selection in higher plants (Embryophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roth Christian

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously, a database characterizing examples of Embryophyte gene family lineages showing evidence of positive selection was reported. Of the gene family trees, 138 Embryophyte branches showed Ka/Ks>>1 and are candidates for functional adaptation. The database and these examples have now been studied in further detail to better understand the molecular basis for plant genome evolution. Results Neutral modeling showed an excess of positive and/or negative selection in the database over a neutral expectation centered on the mean Ka/Ks ratio. Out of 673 families with assigned structures, 490 have at least one branch with Ka/Ks >>1 in a region of the protein, enabling a picture of selective pressures delineated by protein structure. Most gene families allowed reconstruction back to the last common ancestor of flowering plants (Magnoliophytes without saturation of 4- fold degenerate codon position. Positive selection occurred in a wide variety of gene families with different functions, including in the self incompatibility locus, in defense against pathogens, in embryogenesis, in cold acclimation, and in electrontransport. Structurally, selective pressures were similar between alpha-helices and beta- sheets, but were less negative and more variant on the surface and away from the hydrophobic core. Conclusion Positive selection was detected statistically significantly in a small and nonrandom minority of gene families in a systematic analysis of embryophyte gene families. More sensitive methods increased the level of positive selection that was detected and presented a structural basis for the role of positive selection in plant genomes.

  16. Selective control of attention supports the positivity effect in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasse, Laura K; Gamer, Matthias; Büchel, Christian; Brassen, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    There is emerging evidence for a positivity effect in healthy aging, which describes an age-specific increased focus on positive compared to negative information. Life-span researchers have attributed this effect to the selective allocation of cognitive resources in the service of prioritized emotional goals. We explored the basic principles of this assumption by assessing selective attention and memory for visual stimuli, differing in emotional content and self-relevance, in young and old participants. To specifically address the impact of cognitive control, voluntary attentional selection during the presentation of multiple-item displays was analyzed and linked to participants' general ability of cognitive control. Results revealed a positivity effect in older adults' selective attention and memory, which was particularly pronounced for self-relevant stimuli. Focusing on positive and ignoring negative information was most evident in older participants with a generally higher ability to exert top-down control during visual search. Our findings highlight the role of controlled selectivity in the occurrence of a positivity effect in aging. Since the effect has been related to well-being in later life, we suggest that the ability to selectively allocate top-down control might represent a resilience factor for emotional health in aging.

  17. The restorative logic of punishment: another argument in favor of weak selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumard, Nicolas

    2012-02-01

    Strong reciprocity theorists claim that punishment has evolved to promote the good of the group and to deter cheating. By contrast, weak reciprocity suggests that punishment aims to restore justice (i.e., reciprocity) between the criminal and his victim. Experimental evidences as well as field observations suggest that humans punish criminals to restore fairness rather than to support group cooperation.

  18. A map of recent positive selection in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin F Voight

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The identification of signals of very recent positive selection provides information about the adaptation of modern humans to local conditions. We report here on a genome-wide scan for signals of very recent positive selection in favor of variants that have not yet reached fixation. We describe a new analytical method for scanning single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data for signals of recent selection, and apply this to data from the International HapMap Project. In all three continental groups we find widespread signals of recent positive selection. Most signals are region-specific, though a significant excess are shared across groups. Contrary to some earlier low resolution studies that suggested a paucity of recent selection in sub-Saharan Africans, we find that by some measures our strongest signals of selection are from the Yoruba population. Finally, since these signals indicate the existence of genetic variants that have substantially different fitnesses, they must indicate loci that are the source of significant phenotypic variation. Though the relevant phenotypes are generally not known, such loci should be of particular interest in mapping studies of complex traits. For this purpose we have developed a set of SNPs that can be used to tag the strongest approximately 250 signals of recent selection in each population.

  19. Positive Selection on Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase Genes of H1N1 Influenza Viruses

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Li, Wenfu

    2011-04-21

    Abstract Background Since its emergence in March 2009, the pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus has posed a serious threat to public health. To trace the evolutionary path of these new pathogens, we performed a selection-pressure analysis of a large number of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) gene sequences of H1N1 influenza viruses from different hosts. Results Phylogenetic analysis revealed that both HA and NA genes have evolved into five distinct clusters, with further analyses indicating that the pandemic 2009 strains have experienced the strongest positive selection. We also found evidence of strong selection acting on the seasonal human H1N1 isolates. However, swine viruses from North America and Eurasia were under weak positive selection, while there was no significant evidence of positive selection acting on the avian isolates. A site-by-site analysis revealed that the positively selected sites were located in both of the cleaved products of HA (HA1 and HA2), as well as NA. In addition, the pandemic 2009 strains were subject to differential selection pressures compared to seasonal human, North American swine and Eurasian swine H1N1 viruses. Conclusions Most of these positively and\\/or differentially selected sites were situated in the B-cell and\\/or T-cell antigenic regions, suggesting that selection at these sites might be responsible for the antigenic variation of the viruses. Moreover, some sites were also associated with glycosylation and receptor-binding ability. Thus, selection at these positions might have helped the pandemic 2009 H1N1 viruses to adapt to the new hosts after they were introduced from pigs to humans. Positive selection on position 274 of NA protein, associated with drug resistance, might account for the prevalence of drug-resistant variants of seasonal human H1N1 influenza viruses, but there was no evidence that positive selection was responsible for the spread of the drug resistance of the pandemic H1N1 strains.

  20. Line Assignments and Position Measurements in Several Weak CO2 Bands between 4590 /cm and 7930/ cm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giver, L. P.; Kshirsagar, R. J.; Freedman, R. C.; Chackerian, C.; Wattson, R. B.

    1998-01-01

    A substantial set of CO2 spectra from 4500 to 12000 /cm has been obtained at Ames with 1500 m path length using a Bomem DA8 FTS. The signal/noise was improved compared to prior spectra obtained in this laboratory by including a filter wheel limiting the band-pass of each spectrum to several hundred/cm. We have measured positions of lines in several weak bands not previously resolved in laboratory spectra. Using our positions and assignments of lines of the Q branch of the 31103-00001 vibrational band at 4591/cm, we have re-determined the rotational constants for the 31103f levels. Q-branch lines of this band were previously observed, but misassigned, in Venus spectra by Mandin. The current HITRAN values of the rotational constants for this level are incorrect due to the Q-branch misassignments. Our prior measurements of the 21122-00001 vibrational band at 7901/cm were limited to Q- and R-branch lines; with the improved signal/noise of these new spectra we have now measured lines in the weaker P branch.

  1. A Demonstration of Regression False Positive Selection in Data Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Business analytics courses, such as marketing research, data mining, forecasting, and advanced financial modeling, have substantial predictive modeling components. The predictive modeling in these courses requires students to estimate and test many linear regressions. As a result, false positive variable selection ("type I errors") is…

  2. Evidence for Very Recent Positive Selection in Mongolians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Kazuhiro; Ohashi, Jun; Watanabe, Kazuhisa; Munkhtulga, Lkagvasuren; Iwamoto, Sadahiko

    2017-08-01

    Mongols, the founders of the largest continental empire in history, successfully adapted to the harsh environments of Inner Asia through nomadic pastoralism. Considerable interest exists in ascertaining whether genetic adaptation also contributed to the Mongols' success, and dissecting the genome diversity of present-day populations in Mongolia can help address this question. To this end, we determined the genotypes of nearly 2.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 96 unrelated Mongolian individuals in Ulaanbaatar city, and performed genome-wide scans for population-specific positive selection. We discovered signatures of Mongolian-specific positive selection at the chromosomal region 3p12.1, in which hits in genome-wide association studies were reported for medical and biological traits related to energy metabolism and reproduction. The top SNP, rs117799927, showed a distinctive geographic distribution: the frequency of the derived allele, rs117799927 G, was extremely low among worldwide populations (0.005) but exceptionally high in Mongolians (0.247). Approximate Bayesian computation-based age estimation showed that the rs117799927 G allele emerged or positive selection began to operate 50 generations before the present, near the age of the climate anomaly named Late Antique Little Ice Age. Furthermore, rs117799927 showed significant associations with multiple adiposity-related traits in Mongolians and allelic difference in enhancer activity in cells of adipocyte lineage, suggesting that positive selection at 3p12.1 might be related to adaptation in the energy metabolism system. These findings provide novel evidence for a very recent positive-selection event in Homo sapiens and offer insights into the roles of genes in 3p12.1 in the adaptive evolution of our species. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Positive selection for unpreferred codon usage in eukaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galagan James E

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural selection has traditionally been understood as a force responsible for pushing genes to states of higher translational efficiency, whereas lower translational efficiency has been explained by neutral mutation and genetic drift. We looked for evidence of directional selection resulting in increased unpreferred codon usage (and presumably reduced translational efficiency in three divergent clusters of eukaryotic genomes using a simple optimal-codon-based metric (Kp/Ku. Results Here we show that for some genes natural selection is indeed responsible for causing accelerated unpreferred codon substitution, and document the scope of this selection. In Cryptococcus and to a lesser extent Drosophila, we find many genes showing a statistically significant signal of selection for unpreferred codon usage in one or more lineages. We did not find evidence for this type of selection in Saccharomyces. The signal of positive selection observed from unpreferred synonymous codon substitutions is coincident in Cryptococcus and Drosophila with the distribution of upstream open reading frames (uORFs, another genic feature known to reduce translational efficiency. Functional enrichment analysis of genes exhibiting low Kp/Ku ratios reveals that genes in regulatory roles are particularly subject to this type of selection. Conclusion Through genome-wide scans, we find recent selection for unpreferred codon usage at approximately 1% of genetic loci in a Cryptococcus and several genes in Drosophila. Unpreferred codons can impede translation efficiency, and we find that genes with translation-impeding uORFs are enriched for this selection signal. We find that regulatory genes are particularly likely to be subject to selection for unpreferred codon usage. Given that expression noise can propagate through regulatory cascades, and that low translational efficiency can reduce expression noise, this finding supports the hypothesis that translational

  4. Detecting positive selection from genome scans of linkage disequilibrium

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    Rogers Alan R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though a variety of linkage disequilibrium tests have recently been introduced to measure the signal of recent positive selection, the statistical properties of the various methods have not been directly compared. While most applications of these tests have suggested that positive selection has played an important role in recent human history, the results of these tests have varied dramatically. Results Here, we evaluate the performance of three statistics designed to detect incomplete selective sweeps, LRH and iHS, and ALnLH. To analyze the properties of these tests, we introduce a new computational method that can model complex population histories with migration and changing population sizes to simulate gene trees influenced by recent positive selection. We demonstrate that iHS performs substantially better than the other two statistics, with power of up to 0.74 at the 0.01 level for the variation best suited for full genome scans and a power of over 0.8 at the 0.01 level for the variation best suited for candidate gene tests. The performance of the iHS statistic was robust to complex demographic histories and variable recombination rates. Genome scans involving the other two statistics suffer from low power and high false positive rates, with false discovery rates of up to 0.96 for ALnLH. The difference in performance between iHS and ALnLH, did not result from the properties of the statistics, but instead from the different methods for mitigating the multiple comparison problem inherent in full genome scans. Conclusions We introduce a new method for simulating genealogies influenced by positive selection with complex demographic scenarios. In a power analysis based on this method, iHS outperformed LRH and ALnLH in detecting incomplete selective sweeps. We also show that the single-site iHS statistic is more powerful in a candidate gene test than the multi-site statistic, but that the multi-site statistic maintains a low

  5. Estimating the position of illuminants in paintings under weak model assumptions: an application to the works of two Baroque masters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, David; Stork, David G.

    2009-02-01

    The problems of estimating the position of an illuminant and the direction of illumination in realist paintings have been addressed using algorithms from computer vision. These algorithms fall into two general categories: In model-independent methods (cast-shadow analysis, occluding-contour analysis, ...), one does not need to know or assume the three-dimensional shapes of the objects in the scene. In model-dependent methods (shape-fromshading, full computer graphics synthesis, ...), one does need to know or assume the three-dimensional shapes. We explore the intermediate- or weak-model condition, where the three-dimensional object rendered is so simple one can very confidently assume its three-dimensional shape and, further, that this shape admits an analytic derivation of the appearance model. Specifically, we can assume that floors and walls are flat and that they are horizontal and vertical, respectively. We derived the maximum-likelihood estimator for the two-dimensional spatial location of a point source in an image as a function of the pattern of brightness (or grayscale value) over such a planar surface. We applied our methods to two paintings of the Baroque, paintings for which the question of the illuminant position is of interest to art historians: Georges de la Tour's Christ in the carpenter's studio (1645) and Caravaggio's The calling of St. Matthew (1599-1600). Our analyses show that a single point source (somewhat near to the depicted candle) is a slightly better explanation of the pattern of brightness on the floor in Christ than are two point sources, one in place of each of the figures. The luminance pattern on the rear wall in The calling implies the source is local, a few meters outside the picture frame-not the infinitely distant sun. Both results are consistent with previous rebuttals of the recent art historical claim that these paintings were executed by means of tracing optically projected images. Our method is the first application of such

  6. Patterns of positive selection in six Mammalian genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosiol, Carolin; Vinar, Tomás; da Fonseca, Rute R

    2008-01-01

    numbers of available genomes. Here we present the most comprehensive examination of mammalian PSGs to date, using the six high-coverage genome assemblies now available for eutherian mammals. The increased phylogenetic depth of this dataset results in substantially improved statistical power, and permits...... and taste perception. Several pathways were strongly enriched for PSGs, suggesting possible co-evolution of interacting genes. A novel Bayesian analysis of the possible "selection histories" of each gene indicated that most PSGs have switched multiple times between positive selection and nonselection...

  7. Local Integration Accounts for Weak Selectivity of Mouse Neocortical Parvalbumin Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Benjamin; Pattadkal, Jagruti J; Dilly, Geoffrey A; Priebe, Nicholas J; Zemelman, Boris V

    2015-07-15

    Dissecting the functional roles of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in cortical circuits is a fundamental goal in neuroscience. Of particular interest are their roles in emergent cortical computations such as binocular integration in primary visual cortex (V1). We measured the binocular response selectivity of genetically defined subpopulations of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Parvalbumin (PV+) interneurons received strong inputs from both eyes but lacked selectivity for binocular disparity. Because broad selectivity could result from heterogeneous synaptic input from neighboring neurons, we examined how individual PV+ interneuron selectivity compared to that of the local neuronal network, which is primarily composed of excitatory neurons. PV+ neurons showed functional similarity to neighboring neuronal populations over spatial distances resembling measurements of synaptic connectivity. On the other hand, excitatory neurons expressing CaMKIIα displayed no such functional similarity with the neighboring population. Our findings suggest that broad selectivity of PV+ interneurons results from nonspecific integration within local networks. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Positive selection on gene expression in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khaitovich, Philipp; Tang, Kun; Franz, Henriette

    2006-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the expression levels of genes transcribed in the brains of humans and chimpanzees have changed less than those of genes transcribed in other tissues [1] . However, when gene expression changes are mapped onto the evolutionary lineage in which they occurred, the brain...... shows more changes than other tissues in the human lineage compared to the chimpanzee lineage [1] , [2] and [3] . There are two possible explanations for this: either positive selection drove more gene expression changes to fixation in the human brain than in the chimpanzee brain, or genes expressed...... in the brain experienced less purifying selection in humans than in chimpanzees, i.e. gene expression in the human brain is functionally less constrained. The first scenario would be supported if genes that changed their expression in the brain in the human lineage showed more selective sweeps than other genes...

  9. The signature of positive selection at randomly chosen loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przeworski, Molly

    2002-03-01

    In Drosophila and humans, there are accumulating examples of loci with a significant excess of high-frequency-derived alleles or high levels of linkage disequilibrium, relative to a neutral model of a random-mating population of constant size. These are features expected after a recent selective sweep. Their prevalence suggests that positive directional selection may be widespread in both species. However, as I show here, these features do not persist long after the sweep ends: The high-frequency alleles drift to fixation and no longer contribute to polymorphism, while linkage disequilibrium is broken down by recombination. As a result, loci chosen without independent evidence of recent selection are not expected to exhibit either of these features, even if they have been affected by numerous sweeps in their genealogical history. How then can we explain the patterns in the data? One possibility is population structure, with unequal sampling from different subpopulations. Alternatively, positive selection may not operate as is commonly modeled. In particular, the rate of fixation of advantageous mutations may have increased in the recent past.

  10. African signatures of recent positive selection in human FOXI1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno-Estrada Andrés

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human FOXI1 gene codes for a transcription factor involved in the physiology of the inner ear, testis, and kidney. Using three interspecies comparisons, it has been suggested that this may be a gene under human-specific selection. We sought to confirm this finding by using an extended set of orthologous sequences. Additionally, we explored for signals of natural selection within humans by sequencing the gene in 20 Europeans, 20 East Asians and 20 Yorubas and by analysing SNP variation in a 2 Mb region centered on FOXI1 in 39 worldwide human populations from the HGDP-CEPH diversity panel. Results The genome sequences recently available from other primate and non-primate species showed that FOXI1 divergence patterns are compatible with neutral evolution. Sequence-based neutrality tests were not significant in Europeans, East Asians or Yorubas. However, the Long Range Haplotype (LRH test, as well as the iHS and XP-Rsb statistics revealed significantly extended tracks of homozygosity around FOXI1 in Africa, suggesting a recent episode of positive selection acting on this gene. A functionally relevant SNP, as well as several SNPs either on the putatively selected core haplotypes or with significant iHS or XP-Rsb values, displayed allele frequencies strongly correlated with the absolute geographical latitude of the populations sampled. Conclusions We present evidence for recent positive selection in the FOXI1 gene region in Africa. Climate might be related to this recent adaptive event in humans. Of the multiple functions of FOXI1, its role in kidney-mediated water-electrolyte homeostasis is the most obvious candidate for explaining a climate-related adaptation.

  11. All-fiber-based selective mode multiplexer and demultiplexer for weakly-coupled mode-division multiplexed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Koji; Park, Kyung Jun; Tsuritani, Takahiro; Morita, Itsuro; Kim, Byoung Yoon

    2018-02-01

    We show all-fiber-based selective mode multiplexers and demultiplexers for weakly-coupled mode-division multiplexed systems. We fabricate a set of six-mode multiplexer and demultiplexer based on fiber mode selective couplers, and experimentally evaluate the performance for the six-mode dual-polarization (DP) quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) optical signals. In the mode multiplexer and demultiplexer, the mode couplings between the lower three modes and the higher three modes are suppressed to be less than -20 dB, which enables us to apply partial 6 ×6 MIMO equalizers even for the six-mode demultiplexing. For the six-mode DP-QPSK signals, the penalty of optical signal-to-noise ratio by replacing the full 12 ×12MIMO to the partial 6 ×6 MIMO is suppressed by less than 1 dB.

  12. SELECTION AND PROMOTION PROCESS TO SUPERVISORY POSITIONS IN MEXICO, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Guadalupe Hernández López

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In Mexico it is starting a process of selection and promotion of teachers to supervisory positions through what has been called competitive examinations. This competition, derived from the Education Reform 2013, is justified by the alleged finding the best teachers to fill them. As a "new" process in the Mexican education system has led to a series of disputes since that examination was confined to the application and resolution of a standardized test consisting of multiple-choice questions applied in a session of eight hours which it determines whether a teacher is qualified or not qualified for the job.

  13. Positive selection on a bacterial oncoprotein associated with gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delgado-Rosado Gisela

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Helicobacter pylori is a vertically inherited gut commensal that is carcinogenic if it possesses the cag pathogenicity island (cag PaI; infection with H.pylori is the major risk factor for gastric cancer, the second leading cause of death from cancer worldwide (WHO. The cag PaI locus encodes the cagA gene, whose protein product is injected into stomach epithelial cells via a Type IV secretion system, also encoded by the cag PaI. Once there, the cagA protein binds to various cellular proteins, resulting in dysregulation of cell division and carcinogenesis. For this reason, cagA may be described as an oncoprotein. A clear understanding of the mechanism of action of cagA and its benefit to the bacteria is lacking. Results Here, we reveal that the cagA gene displays strong signatures of positive selection in bacteria isolated from amerindian populations, using the Ka/Ks ratio. Weaker signatures are also detected in the gene from bacteria isolated from asian populations, using the Ka/Ks ratio and the more sensitive branches-sites model of the PAML package. When the cagA gene isolated from amerindian populations was examined in more detail it was found that the region under positive selection contains the EPIYA domains, which are known to modulate the carcinogenicity of the gene. This means that the carcinogenicity modulating region of the gene is undergoing adaptation. The results are discussed in relation to the high incidences of stomach cancer in some latin american and asian populations. Conclusion Positive selection on cagA indicates antagonistic coevolution between host and bacteria, which appears paradoxical given that cagA is detrimental to the human host upon which the bacteria depends. This suggests several non-exclusive possibilities; that gastric cancer has not been a major selective pressure on human populations, that cagA has an undetermined benefit to the human host, or that horizontal transmission of H.pylori between hosts

  14. Genome wide evolutionary analyses reveal serotype specific patterns of positive selection in selected Salmonella serotypes

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    Sun Qi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Salmonella enterica includes a diversity of serotypes that cause disease in humans and different animal species. Some Salmonella serotypes show a broad host range, some are host restricted and exclusively associated with one particular host, and some are associated with one particular host species, but able to cause disease in other host species and are thus considered "host adapted". Five Salmonella genome sequences, representing a broad host range serotype (Typhimurium, two host restricted serotypes (Typhi [two genomes] and Paratyphi and one host adapted serotype (Choleraesuis were used to identify core genome genes that show evidence for recombination and positive selection. Results Overall, 3323 orthologous genes were identified in all 5 Salmonella genomes analyzed. Use of four different methods to assess homologous recombination identified 270 genes that showed evidence for recombination with at least one of these methods (false discovery rate [FDR] ompC, a gene encoding an outer membrane protein, which has also been found to be under positive selection in other bacteria. A total of 8, 16, 7, and 5 genes showed evidence for positive selection in Choleraesuis, Typhi, Typhimurium, and Paratyphi branch analyses, respectively. Sequencing and evolutionary analyses of four genes in an additional 42 isolates representing 23 serotypes confirmed branch specific positive selection and recombination patterns. Conclusion Our data show that, among the four serotypes analyzed, (i less than 10% of Salmonella genes in the core genome show evidence for homologous recombination, (ii a number of Salmonella genes are under positive selection, including genes that appear to contribute to virulence, and (iii branch specific positive selection contributes to the evolution of host restricted Salmonella serotypes.

  15. The young, the weak and the sick: evidence of natural selection by predation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meritxell Genovart

    Full Text Available It is assumed that predators mainly prey on substandard individuals, but even though some studies partially support this idea, evidence with large sample sizes, exhaustive analysis of prey and robust analysis is lacking. We gathered data from a culling program of yellow-legged gulls killed by two methods: by the use of raptors or by shooting at random. We compared both data sets to assess whether birds of prey killed randomly or by relying on specific individual features of the prey. We carried out a meticulous post-mortem examination of individuals, and analysing multiple prey characteristics simultaneously we show that raptors did not hunt randomly, but rather preferentially predate on juveniles, sick gulls, and individuals with poor muscle condition. Strikingly, gulls with an unusually good muscle condition were also predated more than expected, supporting the mass-dependent predation risk theory. This article provides a reliable example of how natural selection may operate in the wild and proves that predators mainly prey on substandard individuals.

  16. The Young, the Weak and the Sick: Evidence of Natural Selection by Predation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovart, Meritxell; Negre, Nieves; Tavecchia, Giacomo; Bistuer, Ana; Parpal, Luís; Oro, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    It is assumed that predators mainly prey on substandard individuals, but even though some studies partially support this idea, evidence with large sample sizes, exhaustive analysis of prey and robust analysis is lacking. We gathered data from a culling program of yellow-legged gulls killed by two methods: by the use of raptors or by shooting at random. We compared both data sets to assess whether birds of prey killed randomly or by relying on specific individual features of the prey. We carried out a meticulous post-mortem examination of individuals, and analysing multiple prey characteristics simultaneously we show that raptors did not hunt randomly, but rather preferentially predate on juveniles, sick gulls, and individuals with poor muscle condition. Strikingly, gulls with an unusually good muscle condition were also predated more than expected, supporting the mass-dependent predation risk theory. This article provides a reliable example of how natural selection may operate in the wild and proves that predators mainly prey on substandard individuals. PMID:20333305

  17. A genome scan for positive selection in thoroughbred horses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Gu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Thoroughbred horses have been selected for exceptional racing performance resulting in system-wide structural and functional adaptations contributing to elite athletic phenotypes. Because selection has been recent and intense in a closed population that stems from a small number of founder animals Thoroughbreds represent a unique population within which to identify genomic contributions to exercise-related traits. Employing a population genetics-based hitchhiking mapping approach we performed a genome scan using 394 autosomal and X chromosome microsatellite loci and identified positively selected loci in the extreme tail-ends of the empirical distributions for (1 deviations from expected heterozygosity (Ewens-Watterson test in Thoroughbred (n = 112 and (2 global differentiation among four geographically diverse horse populations (F(ST. We found positively selected genomic regions in Thoroughbred enriched for phosphoinositide-mediated signalling (3.2-fold enrichment; P<0.01, insulin receptor signalling (5.0-fold enrichment; P<0.01 and lipid transport (2.2-fold enrichment; P<0.05 genes. We found a significant overrepresentation of sarcoglycan complex (11.1-fold enrichment; P<0.05 and focal adhesion pathway (1.9-fold enrichment; P<0.01 genes highlighting the role for muscle strength and integrity in the Thoroughbred athletic phenotype. We report for the first time candidate athletic-performance genes within regions targeted by selection in Thoroughbred horses that are principally responsible for fatty acid oxidation, increased insulin sensitivity and muscle strength: ACSS1 (acyl-CoA synthetase short-chain family member 1, ACTA1 (actin, alpha 1, skeletal muscle, ACTN2 (actinin, alpha 2, ADHFE1 (alcohol dehydrogenase, iron containing, 1, MTFR1 (mitochondrial fission regulator 1, PDK4 (pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isozyme 4 and TNC (tenascin C. Understanding the genetic basis for exercise adaptation will be crucial for the identification of genes

  18. Positive allometry and the prehistory of sexual selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkins, Joseph L; LeBas, Natasha R; Witton, Mark P; Martill, David M; Humphries, Stuart

    2010-08-01

    The function of the exaggerated structures that adorn many fossil vertebrates remains largely unresolved. One recurrent hypothesis is that these elaborated traits had a role in thermoregulation. This orthodoxy persists despite the observation that traits exaggerated to the point of impracticality in extant organisms are almost invariably sexually selected. We use allometric scaling to investigate the role of sexual selection and thermoregulation in the evolution of exaggerated traits of the crested pterosaur Pteranodon longiceps and the sail-backed eupelycosaurs Dimetrodon and Edaphosaurus. The extraordinarily steep positive allometry of the head crest of Pteranodon rules out all of the current hypotheses for this trait's main function other than sexual signaling. We also find interspecific patterns of allometry and sexual dimorphism in the sails of Dimetrodon and patterns of elaboration in Edaphosaurus consistent with a sexually selected function. Furthermore, small ancestral, sail-backed pelycosaurs would have been too small to need adaptations to thermoregulation. Our results question the popular view that the elaborated structures of these fossil species evolved as thermoregulatory organs and provide evidence in support of the hypothesis that Pteranodon crests and eupelycosaur sails are among the earliest and most extreme examples of elaborate sexual signals in the evolution of terrestrial vertebrates.

  19. Positive-negative-selection-mediated gene targeting in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenpei eShimatani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting (GT refers to the designed modification of genomic sequence(s through homologous recombination (HR. GT is a powerful tool both for the study of gene function and for molecular breeding. However, in transformation of higher plants, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ occurs overwhelmingly in somatic cells, masking HR-mediated GT. Positive-negative selection (PNS is an approach for finding HR-mediated GT events because it can eliminate NHEJ effectively by expression of a negative-selection marker gene. In rice—a major crop worldwide—reproducible PNS-mediated GT of endogenous genes has now been successfully achieved. The procedure is based on strong PNS using diphtheria toxin A-fragment as a negative marker, and has succeeded in the directed modification of several endogenous rice genes in various ways. In addition to gene knock-outs and knock-ins, a nucleotide substitution in a target gene was also achieved recently. This review presents a summary of the development of the rice PNS system, highlighting its advantages. Different types of gene modification and gene editing aimed at developing new plant breeding technology (NPBT based on PNS are discussed.

  20. Evidence of recombination and positive selection in cetacean papillomaviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio, E-mail: refugio.robles1@gmail.com [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, Center for Marine Veterinary Virology, 2595 Ingraham Street, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); Rivera, Rebecca, E-mail: RRivera@hswri.org [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, Center for Marine Veterinary Virology, 2595 Ingraham Street, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); Nollens, Hendrik H., E-mail: Hendrik.Nollens@SeaWorld.com [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, Center for Marine Veterinary Virology, 2595 Ingraham Street, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, PO Box 110885, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); SeaWorld San Diego, 500 SeaWorld Drive, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); St Leger, Judy, E-mail: Judy.St.Leger@SeaWorld.com [SeaWorld San Diego, 500 SeaWorld Drive, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); Durden, Wendy N., E-mail: WNoke@hswri.org [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, 3830 South Highway A1A 4-181, Melbourne Beach, FL 32951 (United States); Stolen, Megan, E-mail: MStolen@hswri.org [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, 3830 South Highway A1A 4-181, Melbourne Beach, FL 32951 (United States); Burchell, Jennifer, E-mail: JBurchell@hswri.org [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, Center for Marine Veterinary Virology, 2595 Ingraham Street, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); Wellehan, James F.X., E-mail: WellehanJ@ufl.edu [College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, PO Box 110885, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2012-06-05

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are small DNA viruses that have been associated with increased epithelial proliferation. Over one hundred PV types have been identified in humans; however, only three have been identified in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) to date. Using rolling circle amplification and degenerate PCR, we identified four novel PV genomes of bottlenose dolphins. TtPV4, TtPV5 and TtPV6 were identified in genital lesions while TtPV7 was identified in normal genital mucosa. Bayesian analysis of the full-length L1 genes found that TtPV4 and TtPV7 group within the Upsilonpapillomavirus genus while TtPV5 and TtPV6 group with Omikronpapillomavirus. However, analysis of the E1 gene did not distinguish these genera, implying that these genes may not share a common history, consistent with recombination. Recombination analyses identified several probable events. Signals of positive selection were found mostly in the E1 and E2 genes. Recombination and diversifying selection pressures constitute important driving forces of cetacean PV evolution.

  1. Guidelines for selecting weak-base versus strong-base anion-exchange resins for the recovery of chromate from cooling tower blowdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, J.; Reed, L.W.

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines for selecting weak-base versus strong-base anion-exchange resins for the recovery of chromate from cooling tower blowdown are given, together with actual operating data on large-scale industrial systems based on strong-base anion-exchange resins, data from a similar pilot system based on weak-base anion resin, and the chemical costs for operating both systems for a cooling tower blowdown containing 2500 ppm total dissolved solids and 20 ppm chromata.

  2. Shifting Balance on a Static Mutation-Selection Landscape: A Novel Scenario of Positive Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher T; Youssef, Noor; Susko, Edward; Bielawski, Joseph P

    2017-02-01

    A version of the mechanistic mutation-selection (MutSel) model that accounts for temporal dynamics at a site is presented. This is used to show that the rate ratio dN/dS at a site can be transiently >1 even when fitness coefficients are fixed or the fitness landscape is static. This occurs whenever a site drifts away from its fitness peak and is then forced back by selection, a process reminiscent of shifting balance. Shifting balance is strongest when the substitution process is not dominated by selection or drift, but admits interplay between the two. Under this condition, site-specific changes in dN/dS were inferred in 78-100% of trials, and positive selection (i.e., dN/dS>1) in 10-40% of trials, when sequence alignments generated under MutSel were fitted to two popular phenomenological branch-site models. These results demonstrate that positive selection can occur without a change in fitness regime, and that this is detectable by branch-site models. In addition, MutSel is used to show that a site can be occupied by a sub-optimal amino acid for long periods on a fixed landscape when selection is stringent. This has implications for the interpretation of constant-but-different site patterns typically attributed to changes in fitness. Furthermore, a version of MutSel with episodic changes in fitness coefficients is used to illustrate systematic differences between parameters used to generate data under MutSel and their counterparts estimated by a simple codon model. Motivated by a discrepancy in the literature, interpretation of dN/dS in the context of MutSel is also discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Optimization of transmission-scan time for the FixER method: a MR-based PET attenuation correction with a weak fixed-position external radiation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Kershaw, Jeff; Yoshida, Eiji [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shiraishi, Takahiro [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Suga, Mikio [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Center for Frontier Medical Engineering, Chiba University (Japan); Obata, Takayuki [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ito, Hiroshi; Yamaya, Taiga [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2014-07-29

    In recent work, we proposed an MRI-based attenuation-coefficient (μ-value) estimation method that uses a weak fixed-position external radiation source to construct an attenuation map for PET/MRI. In this presentation we refer to this method as FixER, and perform a series of simulations to investigate the duration of the transmission scan required to accurately estimate μ-values.

  4. Improving seed health and seed performance by positive selection in three Kenyan potato varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulte-Geldermann, E.; Gildemacher, P.R.; Struik, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Selecting seed potatoes from healthy-looking mother plants (positive selection) was compared with common Kenyan farmer practice of selection from the harvested bulk of potatoes (farmer selection) in 23 farmer-managed trials. Positive selection assured lower incidences of PLRV (39%), PVY (35%) and

  5. Autonomous site selection and instrument positioning for sample acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A.; Barnes, D.; Pugh, S.

    The European Space Agency Aurora Exploration Program aims to establish a European long-term programme for the exploration of Space, culminating in a human mission to space in the 2030 timeframe. Two flagship missions, namely Mars Sample Return and ExoMars, have been proposed as recognised steps along the way. The Exomars Rover is the first of these flagship missions and includes a rover carrying the Pasteur Payload, a mobile exobiology instrumentation package, and the Beagle 2 arm. The primary objective is the search for evidence of past or present life on mars, but the payload will also study the evolution of the planet and the atmosphere, look for evidence of seismological activity and survey the environment in preparation for future missions. The operation of rovers in unknown environments is complicated, and requires large resources not only on the planet but also in ground based operations. Currently, this can be very labour intensive, and costly, if large teams of scientists and engineers are required to assess mission progress, plan mission scenarios, and construct a sequence of events or goals for uplink. Furthermore, the constraints in communication imposed by the time delay involved over such large distances, and line-of-sight required, make autonomy paramount to mission success, affording the ability to operate in the event of communications outages and be opportunistic with respect to scientific discovery. As part of this drive to reduce mission costs and increase autonomy the Space Robotics group at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth is researching methods of autonomous site selection and instrument positioning, directly applicable to the ExoMars mission. The site selection technique used builds on the geometric reasoning algorithms used previously for localisation and navigation [Shaw 03]. It is proposed that a digital elevation model (DEM) of the local surface, generated during traverse and without interaction from ground based operators, can be

  6. The effect of achievement test selection on identification of learning disabilities within a patterns of strengths and weaknesses framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miciak, Jeremy; Taylor, W Pat; Denton, Carolyn A; Fletcher, Jack M

    2015-09-01

    Few empirical investigations have evaluated learning disabilities (LD) identification methods based on a pattern of cognitive strengths and weaknesses (PSW). This study investigated the reliability of LD classification decisions of the concordance/discordance method (C/DM) across different psychoeducational assessment batteries. C/DM criteria were applied to assessment data from 177 second-grade students based on 2 psychoeducational assessment batteries. The achievement tests were different, but were highly correlated and measured the same latent construct. Resulting LD identifications were then evaluated for agreement across batteries on LD status and the academic domain of eligibility. The 2 batteries identified a similar number of participants as having LD (80 and 74). However, indices of agreement for classification decisions were low (κ = .29), especially for percent positive agreement (62%). The 2 batteries demonstrated agreement on the academic domain of eligibility for only 25 participants. Cognitive discrepancy frameworks for LD identification are inherently unstable because of imperfect reliability and validity at the observed level. Methods premised on identifying a PSW profile may never achieve high reliability because of these underlying psychometric factors. An alternative is to directly assess academic skills to identify students in need of intervention. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Strengths and weaknesses of Global Positioning System (GPS) data-loggers and semi-structured interviews for capturing fine-scale human mobility: findings from Iquitos, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Soldan, Valerie A; Reiner, Robert C; Morrison, Amy C; Stoddard, Steven T; Kitron, Uriel; Scott, Thomas W; Elder, John P; Halsey, Eric S; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Astete, Helvio; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M

    2014-06-01

    Quantifying human mobility has significant consequences for studying physical activity, exposure to pathogens, and generating more realistic infectious disease models. Location-aware technologies such as Global Positioning System (GPS)-enabled devices are used increasingly as a gold standard for mobility research. The main goal of this observational study was to compare and contrast the information obtained through GPS and semi-structured interviews (SSI) to assess issues affecting data quality and, ultimately, our ability to measure fine-scale human mobility. A total of 160 individuals, ages 7 to 74, from Iquitos, Peru, were tracked using GPS data-loggers for 14 days and later interviewed using the SSI about places they visited while tracked. A total of 2,047 and 886 places were reported in the SSI and identified by GPS, respectively. Differences in the concordance between methods occurred by location type, distance threshold (within a given radius to be considered a match) selected, GPS data collection frequency (i.e., 30, 90 or 150 seconds) and number of GPS points near the SSI place considered to define a match. Both methods had perfect concordance identifying each participant's house, followed by 80-100% concordance for identifying schools and lodgings, and 50-80% concordance for residences and commercial and religious locations. As the distance threshold selected increased, the concordance between SSI and raw GPS data increased (beyond 20 meters most locations reached their maximum concordance). Processing raw GPS data using a signal-clustering algorithm decreased overall concordance to 14.3%. The most common causes of discordance as described by a sub-sample (n=101) with whom we followed-up were GPS units being accidentally off (30%), forgetting or purposely not taking the units when leaving home (24.8%), possible barriers to the signal (4.7%) and leaving units home to recharge (4.6%). We provide a quantitative assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of

  8. Signatures of positive selection in LY96 gene in vertebrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To investigate the natural selection hypothesis, we compared the coding sequences from 13 vertebrates and evaluated the molecular evolution of LY96 gene in these species. Result shows that natural selection at exon 4 has indeed played a role in shaping the function of LY96 in the course of evolution. In addition to the ...

  9. Positional Differences in Elite Basketball: Selecting Appropriate Training - Load Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svilar, Luka; Castellano, Julen; Jukic, Igor; Casamichana, David

    2018-01-18

    The purpose of this paper was to study the structure of interrelationships among external training load measures and how these vary among different positions in elite basketball. Eight external variables of jumping (JUMP), acceleration (ACC), deceleration (DEC) and change of direction (COD), and two internal load variables (RPE and sRPE) were collected from 13 professional players with 300 session records. Three playing positions were considered: guards (n=4), forwards (n=4) and centers (n=5). High and total external variables (hJUMP and tJUMP, hACC and tACC, hDEC and tDEC, hCOD and tCOD) were used for the principal component analysis. Extraction criteria were set at the eigenvalue of greater than one. Varimax rotation mode was used to extract multiple principal components. The analysis showed that all positions had two or three principal components (explaining almost all of the variance), but the configuration of each factor was different: tACC, tDEC, tCOD and hJUMP for centers, hACC, tACC, tCOD and hJUMP for guards, and tACC, hDEC, tDEC, hCOD, and tCOD for forwards are specifically demanded in training sessions and, therefore, these variables must be prioritized in load monitoring. Furthermore, for all playing positions, RPE and sRPE have high correlation with the total amount of ACC, DEC and COD. This would suggest that, although players perform the same training tasks, the demands of each position can vary. A particular combination of external load measures is required to describe training load of each playing position, especially to better understand internal responses among players.

  10. Strengthening weak primary care systems: steps towards stronger primary care in selected Western and Eastern European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.P.; Dourgnon, P.; Greß, S.; Jurgutis, A.; Willems, S.

    2013-01-01

    European health care systems are facing diverse challenges. In health policy, strong primary care is seen as key to deal with these challenges. European countries differ in how strong their primary care systems are. Two groups of traditionally weak primary care systems are distinguished. First a

  11. A Scan for Positively Selected Genes in the Genomes of Humans and Chimpanzees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Bustamente, Carlos; Clark, Andrew G.

    2005-01-01

    also tend to show an elevated tendency for positive selection. We also present polymorphism data from 20 Caucasian Americans and 19 African Americans for the 50 annotated genes showing the strongest evidence for positive selection. The polymorphism analysis further supports the presence of positive...

  12. Functional divergence of the NIP III subgroup proteins involved altered selective constraints and positive selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Zhujun

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nod26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs that belong to the aquaporin superfamily are unique to plants. According to homology modeling and phylogenetic analysis, the NIP subfamily can be further divided into three subgroups with distinct biological functions (NIP I, NIP II, and NIP III. In some grasses, the NIP III subgroup proteins (NIP2s were demonstrated to be permeable to solutes with larger diameter, such as silicic acid and arsenous acids. However, to date there is no data-mining or direct experimental evidences for the permeability of such larger solutes for dicot NIP2s, although they exhibit similar three-dimensional structures as those in grasses. It is therefore intriguing to investigate the molecular mechanisms that drive the evolution of plant NIP2s. Results The NIP III subgroup is more ancient with a divergence time that predates the monocot-dicot split. The proliferation of NIP2 genes in modern grass species is primarily attributed to whole genome and segmental chromosomal duplication events. The structure of NIP2 genes is relatively conserved, possessing five exons and four introns. All NIP2s possess an ar/R filter consisting of G, S, G, and R, except for the cucumber CsNIP2;2, where a small G in the H2 is substituted with the bulkier C residue. Our maximum likelihood analysis revealed that NIP2s, especially the loop A (LA region, have undergone strong selective pressure for adaptive evolution. The analysis at the amino acid level provided strong statistical evidences for the functional divergence between monocot and dicot NIP III subgroup proteins. In addition, several SDPs (Specificity Determining Positions responsible for functional specificity were predicted. Conclusions The present study provides the first evidences of functional divergence between dicot and monocot NIP2s, and suggests that positive selection, as well as a radical shift of evolutionary rate at some critical amino acid sites is the primary

  13. Evolution of adaptive phenotypic traits without positive Darwinian selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, A L

    2012-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests the frequent occurrence of a simple non-Darwinian (but non-Lamarckian) model for the evolution of adaptive phenotypic traits, here entitled the plasticity-relaxation-mutation (PRM) mechanism. This mechanism involves ancestral phenotypic plasticity followed by specialization in one alternative environment and thus the permanent expression of one alternative phenotype. Once this specialization occurs, purifying selection on the molecular basis of other phenotypes is relaxed. Finally, mutations that permanently eliminate the pathways leading to alternative phenotypes can be fixed by genetic drift. Although the generality of the PRM mechanism is at present unknown, I discuss evidence for its widespread occurrence, including the prevalence of exaptations in evolution, evidence that phenotypic plasticity has preceded adaptation in a number of taxa and evidence that adaptive traits have resulted from loss of alternative developmental pathways. The PRM mechanism can easily explain cases of explosive adaptive radiation, as well as recently reported cases of apparent adaptive evolution over ecological time.

  14. Bayes Empirical Bayes Inference of Amino Acid Sites Under Positive Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Ziheng; Wong, Wendy Shuk Wan; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    , with > 1 indicating positive selection. Statistical distributions are used to model the variation in among sites, allowing a subset of sites to have > 1 while the rest of the sequence may be under purifying selection with

  15. Reference satellite selection method for GNSS high-precision relative positioning

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao Gao; Wujiao Dai; Zhiyong Song; Changsheng Cai

    2017-01-01

    Selecting the optimal reference satellite is an important component of high-precision relative positioning because the reference satellite directly influences the strength of the normal equation. The reference satellite selection methods based on elevation and positional dilution of precision (PDOP) value were compared. Results show that all the above methods cannot select the optimal reference satellite. We introduce condition number of the design matrix in the reference satellite selection ...

  16. Reference satellite selection method for GNSS high-precision relative positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Gao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Selecting the optimal reference satellite is an important component of high-precision relative positioning because the reference satellite directly influences the strength of the normal equation. The reference satellite selection methods based on elevation and positional dilution of precision (PDOP value were compared. Results show that all the above methods cannot select the optimal reference satellite. We introduce condition number of the design matrix in the reference satellite selection method to improve structure of the normal equation, because condition number can indicate the ill condition of the normal equation. The experimental results show that the new method can improve positioning accuracy and reliability in precise relative positioning.

  17. Selective inhibition of proteoglycan and hyaluronate synthesis in chondrocyte cultures by cyclofenil diphenol, a non-steroidal weak oestrogen.

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, R.M.; Lineham, J D; Phillipson, M A; Black, C M

    1984-01-01

    Cyclofenil diphenol, a weak non-steroidal oestrogen, binds to albumin. In the presence of concentrations of albumin just sufficient to keep cyclofenil diphenol in solution, the compound inhibited the synthesis of [35S]proteoglycans, [3H]glycoproteins, [3H]hyaluronate and [3H]proteins in primary cultures of chondrocytes from the Swarm rat chondrosarcoma in a dose-dependent manner. When excess albumin was present, conditions were found (90 micrograms of cyclofenil diphenol and 4 mg of albumin p...

  18. Human and non-human primate genomes share hotspots of positive selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Enard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Among primates, genome-wide analysis of recent positive selection is currently limited to the human species because it requires extensive sampling of genotypic data from many individuals. The extent to which genes positively selected in human also present adaptive changes in other primates therefore remains unknown. This question is important because a gene that has been positively selected independently in the human and in other primate lineages may be less likely to be involved in human specific phenotypic changes such as dietary habits or cognitive abilities. To answer this question, we analysed heterozygous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in the genomes of single human, chimpanzee, orangutan, and macaque individuals using a new method aiming to identify selective sweeps genome-wide. We found an unexpectedly high number of orthologous genes exhibiting signatures of a selective sweep simultaneously in several primate species, suggesting the presence of hotspots of positive selection. A similar significant excess is evident when comparing genes positively selected during recent human evolution with genes subjected to positive selection in their coding sequence in other primate lineages and identified using a different test. These findings are further supported by comparing several published human genome scans for positive selection with our findings in non-human primate genomes. We thus provide extensive evidence that the co-occurrence of positive selection in humans and in other primates at the same genetic loci can be measured with only four species, an indication that it may be a widespread phenomenon. The identification of positive selection in humans alongside other primates is a powerful tool to outline those genes that were selected uniquely during recent human evolution.

  19. Positive selection and functional divergence of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase genes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jieying; Liu, Yong; Chao, Naixia; Ma, Chengtong; Chen, Qicong; Sun, Jian; Wu, Yaosheng

    2017-02-04

    Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPS) belongs to the short-chain prenyltransferase family, and it performs a conserved and essential role in the terpenoid biosynthesis pathway. However, its classification, evolutionary history, and the forces driving the evolution of FPS genes in plants remain poorly understood. Phylogeny and positive selection analysis was used to identify the evolutionary forces that led to the functional divergence of FPS in plants, and recombinant detection was undertaken using the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection (GARD) method. The dataset included 68 FPS variation pattern sequences (2 gymnosperms, 10 monocotyledons, 54 dicotyledons, and 2 outgroups). This study revealed that the FPS gene was under positive selection in plants. No recombinant within the FPS gene was found. Therefore, it was inferred that the positive selection of FPS had not been influenced by a recombinant episode. The positively selected sites were mainly located in the catalytic center and functional areas, which indicated that the 98S and 234D were important positively selected sites for plant FPS in the terpenoid biosynthesis pathway. They were located in the FPS conserved domain of the catalytic site. We inferred that the diversification of FPS genes was associated with functional divergence and could be driven by positive selection. It was clear that protein sequence evolution via positive selection was able to drive adaptive diversification in plant FPS proteins. This study provides information on the classification and positive selection of plant FPS genes, and the results could be useful for further research on the regulation of triterpenoid biosynthesis.

  20. THE USE OF CAPITAL AND CONDITION OF ECONOMICALLY WEAK FARMS IN THE SELECTED CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldona SKARŻYŃSKA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the economic situation of economically weak farms in 8 countries of Central and Eastern Europe(CEE in 2010. The data were obtained from the survey on EU farms carried out under the FADN system. The studyincluded countries in which economically weak farms were the dominant farm type (i.e. Bulgaria, Estonia, Hungary,Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania and Slovakia. The aim of the study was to assess the economic performance ofthose farms and indicate advantages of the competing farm types. The analysis was performed in terms of totalfactor productivity, income levels, assets and debt level. The influence of CAP instruments on managementefficiency was also demonstrated. The study found a high diversity in terms of production potential as well asfinancial condition of farms in particular countries, whereas one point of correspondence between farms is theprevalence of fixed assets, i.e. an excessive assets-to-area ratio, and the dominance of own capital in financingthose assets. Romanian, Polish and Bulgarian farms are characterised by the highest efficiency of use of currentoutlays and, in turn, a lower cost of the production unit, which accounted for 66%, 86% and 87% of the outputvalue respectively. In Latvia, Estonia and Slovenia, the costs exceeded the output value by 6%, 7% and 23%respectively and, as a result, the income of those farms was generated exclusively due to subsidies.

  1. Weak orientation and direction selectivity in lateral geniculate nucleus representing central vision in the gray squirrel Sciurus carolinensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaltsman, Julia B; Heimel, J Alexander; Van Hooser, Stephen D

    Classic studies of lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and visual cortex (V1) in carnivores and primates have found that a majority of neurons in LGN exhibit a center-surround organization, while V1 neurons exhibit strong orientation selectivity and, in many species, direction selectivity. Recent work

  2. Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect and X-ray Scaling Relations from Weak-Lensing Mass Calibration of 32 SPT Selected Galaxy Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, J.P.; et al.

    2017-11-14

    Uncertainty in the mass-observable scaling relations is currently the limiting factor for galaxy cluster based cosmology. Weak gravitational lensing can provide a direct mass calibration and reduce the mass uncertainty. We present new ground-based weak lensing observations of 19 South Pole Telescope (SPT) selected clusters and combine them with previously reported space-based observations of 13 galaxy clusters to constrain the cluster mass scaling relations with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE), the cluster gas mass $M_\\mathrm{gas}$, and $Y_\\mathrm{X}$, the product of $M_\\mathrm{gas}$ and X-ray temperature. We extend a previously used framework for the analysis of scaling relations and cosmological constraints obtained from SPT-selected clusters to make use of weak lensing information. We introduce a new approach to estimate the effective average redshift distribution of background galaxies and quantify a number of systematic errors affecting the weak lensing modelling. These errors include a calibration of the bias incurred by fitting a Navarro-Frenk-White profile to the reduced shear using $N$-body simulations. We blind the analysis to avoid confirmation bias. We are able to limit the systematic uncertainties to 6.4% in cluster mass (68% confidence). Our constraints on the mass-X-ray observable scaling relations parameters are consistent with those obtained by earlier studies, and our constraints for the mass-SZE scaling relation are consistent with the the simulation-based prior used in the most recent SPT-SZ cosmology analysis. We can now replace the external mass calibration priors used in previous SPT-SZ cosmology studies with a direct, internal calibration obtained on the same clusters.

  3. Weakly Deleterious Mutations and Low Rates of Recombination Limit the Impact of Natural Selection on Bacterial Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Morgan N; Arkin, Adam P

    2015-12-15

    Free-living bacteria are usually thought to have large effective population sizes, and so tiny selective differences can drive their evolution. However, because recombination is infrequent, "background selection" against slightly deleterious alleles should reduce the effective population size (Ne) by orders of magnitude. For example, for a well-mixed population with 10(12) individuals and a typical level of homologous recombination (r/m = 3, i.e., nucleotide changes due to recombination [r] occur at 3 times the mutation rate [m]), we predict that Ne is selection should be sufficient to drive evolution if Ne × s is >1, where s is the selection coefficient. We found that this remains approximately correct if background selection is occurring or when population structure is present. Overall, we predict that even for free-living bacteria with enormous populations, natural selection is only a significant force if s is above 10(-7) or so. Because bacteria form huge populations with trillions of individuals, the simplest theoretical prediction is that the better allele at a site would predominate even if its advantage was just 10(-9) per generation. In other words, virtually every nucleotide would be at the local optimum in most individuals. A more sophisticated theory considers that bacterial genomes have millions of sites each and selection events on these many sites could interfere with each other, so that only larger effects would be important. However, bacteria can exchange genetic material, and in principle, this exchange could eliminate the interference between the evolution of the sites. We used simulations to confirm that during multisite evolution with realistic levels of recombination, only larger effects are important. We propose that advantages of less than 10(-7) are effectively neutral. Copyright © 2015 Price and Arkin.

  4. Evidence for positive selection on the E2 gene of bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fangqiang; Zhang, Chuyu

    2007-12-01

    Despite the growing interest in the molecular epidemiology of pestivirus, there have been few attempts to determine which regions of the pestivirus genome are subject to positive selection, although this may be a key indicator of the nature of the interaction between host and virus. By using likelihood-based methods for phylogenetic inference, the positive selection pressure of BVDV-1 E2 gene were assessed and a site-by-site analysis of the dN/dS ratio was performed, to identify specific codons undergoing diversifying positive selection. The overall omega was 0.20, indicating that most sites were subject to strong purifying selection and five positively selected sites (886, 888, 905, 944, and 946) were identified. It is surprising to find that all the potential positively selected sites fall within the C-terminal of E2, and out of the N-terminal of E2 which is thought to be surface-exposed and therefore prime targets for host antibody response. In conclusion, these results suggest that selection favoring avoidance of antibody recognition has not been a major factor in the history of BVDV-1. Further analysis is necessary to see if amino acid substitutions in the BVDV-1 positively selected sites can lead to change of host tropism or\\and escape from epitope-specific CD8 T-cell response.

  5. Basal DNA repair machinery is subject to positive selection in ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barkallah Insaf

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria (IRRB show a surprising capacity for adaptation to ionizing radiation and desiccation. Positive Darwinian selection is expected to play an important role in this trait, but no data are currently available regarding the role of positive adaptive selection in resistance to ionizing-radiation and tolerance of desiccation. We analyzed the four known genome sequences of IRRB (Deinococcus geothermalis, Deinococcus radiodurans, Kineococcus radiotolerans, and Rubrobacter xylanophilus to determine the role of positive Darwinian selection in the evolution of resistance to ionizing radiation and tolerance of desiccation. Results We used the programs MultiParanoid and DnaSP to deduce the sets of orthologs that potentially evolved due to positive Darwinian selection in IRRB. We find that positive selection targets 689 ortholog sets of IRRB. Among these, 58 ortholog sets are absent in ionizing-radiation-sensitive bacteria (IRSB: Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus. The most striking finding is that all basal DNA repair genes in IRRB, unlike many of their orthologs in IRSB, are subject to positive selection. Conclusion Our results provide the first in silico prediction of positively selected genes with potential roles in the molecular basis of resistance to γ-radiation and tolerance of desiccation in IRRB. Identification of these genes provides a basis for future experimental work aimed at understanding the metabolic networks in which they participate.

  6. How to Make a Dolphin: Molecular Signature of Positive Selection in Cetacean Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana F Nery

    Full Text Available Cetaceans are unique in being the only mammals completely adapted to an aquatic environment. This adaptation has required complex changes and sometimes a complete restructuring of physiology, behavior and morphology. Identifying genes that have been subjected to selection pressure during cetacean evolution would greatly enhance our knowledge of the ways in which genetic variation in this mammalian order has been shaped by natural selection. Here, we performed a genome-wide scan for positive selection in the dolphin lineage. We employed models of codon substitution that account for variation of selective pressure over branches on the tree and across sites in a sequence. We analyzed 7,859 nuclear-coding ortholog genes and using a series of likelihood ratio tests (LRTs, we identified 376 genes (4.8% with molecular signatures of positive selection in the dolphin lineage. We used the cow as the sister group and compared estimates of selection in the cetacean genome to this using the same methods. This allowed us to define which genes have been exclusively under positive selection in the dolphin lineage. The enrichment analysis found that the identified positively selected genes are significantly over-represented for three exclusive functional categories only in the dolphin lineage: segment specification, mesoderm development and system development. Of particular interest for cetacean adaptation to an aquatic life are the following GeneOntology targets under positive selection: genes related to kidney, heart, lung, eye, ear and nervous system development.

  7. How to Make a Dolphin: Molecular Signature of Positive Selection in Cetacean Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Mariana F; González, Dimar J; Opazo, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    Cetaceans are unique in being the only mammals completely adapted to an aquatic environment. This adaptation has required complex changes and sometimes a complete restructuring of physiology, behavior and morphology. Identifying genes that have been subjected to selection pressure during cetacean evolution would greatly enhance our knowledge of the ways in which genetic variation in this mammalian order has been shaped by natural selection. Here, we performed a genome-wide scan for positive selection in the dolphin lineage. We employed models of codon substitution that account for variation of selective pressure over branches on the tree and across sites in a sequence. We analyzed 7,859 nuclear-coding ortholog genes and using a series of likelihood ratio tests (LRTs), we identified 376 genes (4.8%) with molecular signatures of positive selection in the dolphin lineage. We used the cow as the sister group and compared estimates of selection in the cetacean genome to this using the same methods. This allowed us to define which genes have been exclusively under positive selection in the dolphin lineage. The enrichment analysis found that the identified positively selected genes are significantly over-represented for three exclusive functional categories only in the dolphin lineage: segment specification, mesoderm development and system development. Of particular interest for cetacean adaptation to an aquatic life are the following GeneOntology targets under positive selection: genes related to kidney, heart, lung, eye, ear and nervous system development.

  8. Signatures of positive selection: from selective sweeps at individual loci to subtle allele frequency changes in polygenic adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In the past 15 years, numerous methods have been developed to detect selective sweeps underlying adaptations. These methods are based on relatively simple population genetic models, including one or two loci at which positive directional selection occurs, and one or two marker loci at which the impact of selection on linked neutral variation is quantified. Information about the phenotype under selection is not included in these models (except for fitness). In contrast, in the quantitative genetic models of adaptation, selection acts on one or more phenotypic traits, such that a genotype-phenotype map is required to bridge the gap to population genetics theory. Here I describe the range of population genetic models from selective sweeps in a panmictic population of constant size to evolutionary traffic when simultaneous sweeps at multiple loci interfere, and I also consider the case of polygenic selection characterized by subtle allele frequency shifts at many loci. Furthermore, I present an overview of the statistical tests that have been proposed based on these population genetics models to detect evidence for positive selection in the genome. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Positive Selection and Centrality in the Yeast and Fly Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

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    Sandip Chakraborty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins within a molecular network are expected to be subject to different selective pressures depending on their relative hierarchical positions. However, it is not obvious what genes within a network should be more likely to evolve under positive selection. On one hand, only mutations at genes with a relatively high degree of control over adaptive phenotypes (such as those encoding highly connected proteins are expected to be “seen” by natural selection. On the other hand, a high degree of pleiotropy at these genes is expected to hinder adaptation. Previous analyses of the human protein-protein interaction network have shown that genes under long-term, recurrent positive selection (as inferred from interspecific comparisons tend to act at the periphery of the network. It is unknown, however, whether these trends apply to other organisms. Here, we show that long-term positive selection has preferentially targeted the periphery of the yeast interactome. Conversely, in flies, genes under positive selection encode significantly more connected and central proteins. These observations are not due to covariation of genes’ adaptability and centrality with confounding factors. Therefore, the distribution of proteins encoded by genes under recurrent positive selection across protein-protein interaction networks varies from one species to another.

  10. Positive selection of gene-modified cells increases the efficacy of pancreatic cancer suicide gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi; Cascallo, Manel; Gros, Alena; Fillat, Cristina; Alemany, Ramon

    2009-11-01

    Thymidine kinase (TK)-mediated suicide gene therapy has been considered for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, despite a bystander effect, the proportion of transduced tumor cells has proven too low to result in efficacy. We propose the use of a drug-selectable marker (MDR1) to enrich TK-expressing cells using chemotherapy. This enrichment or positive selection phase may increase the efficacy of suicide gene therapy. To test this strategy, we generated stable NP18MDR/TK-GFP transfectants and showed docetaxel resistance in vivo. Mixed tumors of MDR/TK-expressing cells and parental NP18 cells were established and docetaxel was used to increase the proportion of TK-expressing cells. After this positive selection phase, suicide gene therapy with ganciclovir was applied. Upon positive selection, the proportion of TK-expressing cells increased from 4% to 22%. Subsequent suicide gene therapy was more effective compared with a control group without positive selection. Starting with 10% of TK-expressing cells the positive-negative selection strategy completely inhibited tumor growth. Taken together, these results suggest that a positive-negative selection strategy based on MDR and TK genes represents an efficient way to increase the proportion of TK-expressing cells in the tumor and the efficacy of TK-mediated suicide gene therapy.

  11. Genome-wide signals of positive selection in strongylocentrotid sea urchins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kober, Kord M; Pogson, Grant H

    2017-07-21

    Comparative genomics studies investigating the signals of positive selection among groups of closely related species are still rare and limited in taxonomic breadth. Such studies show great promise in advancing our knowledge about the proportion and the identity of genes experiencing diversifying selection. However, methodological challenges have led to high levels of false positives in past studies. Here, we use the well-annotated genome of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, as a reference to investigate the signals of positive selection at 6520 single-copy orthologs from nine sea urchin species belonging to the family Strongylocentrotidae paying careful attention to minimizing false positives. We identified 1008 (15.5%) candidate positive selection genes (PSGs). Tests for positive selection along the nine terminal branches of the phylogeny identified 824 genes that showed lineage-specific adaptive diversification (1.67% of branch-sites tests performed). Positively selected codons were not enriched at exon borders or near regions containing missing data, suggesting a limited contribution of false positives caused by alignment or annotation errors. Alignments were validated at 10 loci with re-sequencing using Sanger methods. No differences were observed in the rates of synonymous substitution (d S), GC content, and codon bias between the candidate PSGs and those not showing positive selection. However, the candidate PSGs had 68% higher rates of nonsynonymous substitution (d N) and 33% lower levels of heterozygosity, consistent with selective sweeps and opposite to that expected by a relaxation of selective constraint. Although positive selection was identified at reproductive proteins and innate immunity genes, the strongest signals of adaptive diversification were observed at extracellular matrix proteins, cell adhesion molecules, membrane receptors, and ion channels. Many candidate PSGs have been widely implicated as targets of pathogen binding

  12. Selective inhibition of proteoglycan and hyaluronate synthesis in chondrocyte cultures by cyclofenil diphenol, a non-steroidal weak oestrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R M; Lineham, J D; Phillipson, M A; Black, C M

    1984-10-15

    Cyclofenil diphenol, a weak non-steroidal oestrogen, binds to albumin. In the presence of concentrations of albumin just sufficient to keep cyclofenil diphenol in solution, the compound inhibited the synthesis of [35S]proteoglycans, [3H]glycoproteins, [3H]hyaluronate and [3H]proteins in primary cultures of chondrocytes from the Swarm rat chondrosarcoma in a dose-dependent manner. When excess albumin was present, conditions were found (90 micrograms of cyclofenil diphenol and 4 mg of albumin per ml of culture medium) which completely inhibited [35S]proteoglycan and [3H]hyaluronate synthesis but had little effect on [3H]protein or [3H]glycoprotein synthesis. The time of onset of inhibition of [35S]proteoglycan synthesis by cyclofenil diphenol was very rapid (t1/2 less than 25 min) and incompatible with an action mediated through suppression of proteoglycan core protein synthesis. Cyclofenil diphenol inhibited the synthesis of [35S]chondroitin sulphate chains onto p-nitrophenyl beta-D-xyloside in the cultures. Cyclofenil diphenol had little effect on the secretion from chondrocytes of [35S]proteoglycans synthesized immediately prior to treatment. Chondrocyte cultures treated with cyclofenil diphenol recovered their biosynthetic activities almost completely within 3 h of removing the compound from the culture medium. Cyclofenil diphenol had a similar inhibitory action on the synthesis of [35S]proteoglycans in secondary cultures of human dermal fibroblasts from both normal subjects and patients with systemic sclerosis. It is proposed that cyclofenil diphenol inhibits the synthesis of [35S]proteoglycans by interfering with the formation of the glycosaminoglycan side chains of these molecules in the Golgi apparatus of cells. The action may be due to disturbance of Golgi membrane organization by the compound.

  13. On the Choice of Access Point Selection Criterion and Other Position Estimation Characteristics for WLAN-Based Indoor Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Elina; Lohan, Elena Simona

    2016-05-20

    The positioning based on Wireless Local Area Networks (WLAN) is one of the most promising technologies for indoor location-based services, generally using the information carried by Received Signal Strengths (RSS). One challenge, however, is the huge amount of data in the radiomap database due to the enormous number of hearable Access Points (AP) that could make the positioning system very complex. This paper concentrates on WLAN-based indoor location by comparing fingerprinting, path loss and weighted centroid based positioning approaches in terms of complexity and performance and studying the effects of grid size and AP reduction with several choices for appropriate selection criterion. All results are based on real field measurements in three multi-floor buildings. We validate our earlier findings concerning several different AP selection criteria and conclude that the best results are obtained with a maximum RSS-based criterion, which also proved to be the most consistent among the different investigated approaches. We show that the weighted centroid based low-complexity method is very sensitive to AP reduction, while the path loss-based method is also very robust to high percentage removals. Indeed, for fingerprinting, 50% of the APs can be removed safely with a properly chosen removal criterion without increasing the positioning error much.

  14. Positive Darwinian selection results in resistance to cardioactive toxins in true toads (Anura: Bufonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David J; Halliday, Damien C T; Rowell, David M; Robinson, Anthony J; Keogh, J Scott

    2009-08-23

    Members of the Family Bufonidae, true toads, are famous for their endogenously synthesized cardioactive steroids that serve as defensive toxins. Evolution of resistance to these toxins is not understood. We sequenced a key region of the toxin's binding site in the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase for relevant taxa representing Hyloidea (including bufonids), Ranoidea and Archaeobatrachia and tested for positive selection in a phylogenetic context. Bufonidae were distinct from other Hyloidea at 4-6 of 12 sites and, with one exception, had a homologous amino acid sequence. Melanophryniscus stelzneri had a distinct sequence, consistent with other independent evidence for a differentiated toxin. Tests within Bufonidae detected positive selection within the binding region, providing, to our knowledge, the first evidence of this type for positive selection within Amphibia. There was no evidence for positive selection on Bufonidae or M. stelzneri lineages. Sequence change in Leptodactylus ocellatus, a leptodactylid predator of Bufonidae, provides a molecular basis for predator resistance possibly associated with gene duplication.

  15. On Weak Markov's Principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlenbach, Ulrich Wilhelm

    2002-01-01

    We show that the so-called weak Markov's principle (WMP) which states that every pseudo-positive real number is positive is underivable in E-HA + AC. Since allows one to formalize (atl eastl arge parts of) Bishop's constructive mathematics, this makes it unlikely that WMP can be proved within...

  16. Positive selection neighboring functionally essential sites and disease-implicated regions of mammalian reproductive proteins.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan, Claire C

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Reproductive proteins are central to the continuation of all mammalian species. The evolution of these proteins has been greatly influenced by environmental pressures induced by pathogens, rival sperm, sexual selection and sexual conflict. Positive selection has been demonstrated in many of these proteins with particular focus on primate lineages. However, the mammalia are a diverse group in terms of mating habits, population sizes and germ line generation times. We have examined the selective pressures at work on a number of novel reproductive proteins across a wide variety of mammalia. RESULTS: We show that selective pressures on reproductive proteins are highly varied. Of the 10 genes analyzed in detail, all contain signatures of positive selection either across specific sites or in specific lineages or a combination of both. Our analysis of SP56 and Col1a1 are entirely novel and the results show positively selected sites present in each gene. Our findings for the Col1a1 gene are suggestive of a link between positive selection and severe disease type. We find evidence in our dataset to suggest that interacting proteins are evolving in symphony: most likely to maintain interacting functionality. CONCLUSION: Our in silico analyses show positively selected sites are occurring near catalytically important regions suggesting selective pressure to maximize efficient fertilization. In those cases where a mechanism of protein function is not fully understood, the sites presented here represent ideal candidates for mutational study. This work has highlighted the widespread rate heterogeneity in mutational rates across the mammalia and specifically has shown that the evolution of reproductive proteins is highly varied depending on the species and interacting partners. We have shown that positive selection and disease are closely linked in the Col1a1 gene.

  17. The role of positive selection in determining the molecular cause of species differences in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foord Steven M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Related species, such as humans and chimpanzees, often experience the same disease with varying degrees of pathology, as seen in the cases of Alzheimer's disease, or differing symptomatology as in AIDS. Furthermore, certain diseases such as schizophrenia, epithelial cancers and autoimmune disorders are far more frequent in humans than in other species for reasons not associated with lifestyle. Genes that have undergone positive selection during species evolution are indicative of functional adaptations that drive species differences. Thus we investigate whether biomedical disease differences between species can be attributed to positively selected genes. Results We identified genes that putatively underwent positive selection during the evolution of humans and four mammals which are often used to model human diseases (mouse, rat, chimpanzee and dog. We show that genes predicted to have been subject to positive selection pressure during human evolution are implicated in diseases such as epithelial cancers, schizophrenia, autoimmune diseases and Alzheimer's disease, all of which differ in prevalence and symptomatology between humans and their mammalian relatives. In agreement with previous studies, the chimpanzee lineage was found to have more genes under positive selection than any of the other lineages. In addition, we found new evidence to support the hypothesis that genes that have undergone positive selection tend to interact with each other. This is the first such evidence to be detected widely among mammalian genes and may be important in identifying molecular pathways causative of species differences. Conclusion Our dataset of genes predicted to have been subject to positive selection in five species serves as an informative resource that can be consulted prior to selecting appropriate animal models during drug target validation. We conclude that studying the evolution of functional and biomedical disease differences

  18. The role of positive selection in determining the molecular cause of species differences in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamathevan, Jessica J; Hasan, Samiul; Emes, Richard D; Amrine-Madsen, Heather; Rajagopalan, Dilip; Topp, Simon D; Kumar, Vinod; Word, Michael; Simmons, Mark D; Foord, Steven M; Sanseau, Philippe; Yang, Ziheng; Holbrook, Joanna D

    2008-10-06

    Related species, such as humans and chimpanzees, often experience the same disease with varying degrees of pathology, as seen in the cases of Alzheimer's disease, or differing symptomatology as in AIDS. Furthermore, certain diseases such as schizophrenia, epithelial cancers and autoimmune disorders are far more frequent in humans than in other species for reasons not associated with lifestyle. Genes that have undergone positive selection during species evolution are indicative of functional adaptations that drive species differences. Thus we investigate whether biomedical disease differences between species can be attributed to positively selected genes. We identified genes that putatively underwent positive selection during the evolution of humans and four mammals which are often used to model human diseases (mouse, rat, chimpanzee and dog). We show that genes predicted to have been subject to positive selection pressure during human evolution are implicated in diseases such as epithelial cancers, schizophrenia, autoimmune diseases and Alzheimer's disease, all of which differ in prevalence and symptomatology between humans and their mammalian relatives. In agreement with previous studies, the chimpanzee lineage was found to have more genes under positive selection than any of the other lineages. In addition, we found new evidence to support the hypothesis that genes that have undergone positive selection tend to interact with each other. This is the first such evidence to be detected widely among mammalian genes and may be important in identifying molecular pathways causative of species differences. Our dataset of genes predicted to have been subject to positive selection in five species serves as an informative resource that can be consulted prior to selecting appropriate animal models during drug target validation. We conclude that studying the evolution of functional and biomedical disease differences between species is an important way to gain insight into

  19. Genetic signature of strong recent positive selection at interleukin-32 gene in goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Akhtar Rasool; Qadri, Sumayyah; Ijaz, Nabeel; Javed, Ruheena; Ansari, Abdur Rahman; Awais, Muhammd; Younus, Muhammad; Riaz, Hasan; Du, Xiaoyong

    2017-07-01

    Identification of the candidate genes that play key roles in phenotypic variations can provide new information about evolution and positive selection. Interleukin (IL)-32 is involved in many biological processes, however, its role for the immune response against various diseases in mammals is poorly understood. Therefore, the current investigation was performed for the better understanding of the molecular evolution and the positive selection of single nucleotide polymorphisms in IL-32 gene. By using fixation index (FST ) based method, IL-32 (9375) gene was found to be outlier and under significant positive selection with the provisional combined allocation of mean heterozygosity and FST . Using nucleotide sequences of 11 mammalian species from National Center for Biotechnology Information database, the evolutionary selection of IL-32 gene was determined using Maximum likelihood model method, through four models (M1a, M2a, M7, and M8) in Codeml program of phylogenetic analysis by maximum liklihood. IL-32 is detected under positive selection using the FST simulations method. The phylogenetic tree revealed that goat IL-32 was in close resemblance with sheep IL-32. The coding nucleotide sequences were compared among 11 species and it was found that the goat IL-32 gene shared identity with sheep (96.54%), bison (91.97%), camel (58.39%), cat (56.59%), buffalo (56.50%), human (56.13%), dog (50.97%), horse (54.04%), and rabbit (53.41%) respectively. This study provides evidence for IL-32 gene as under significant positive selection in goat.

  20. Widespread signatures of positive selection in common risk alleles associated to autism spectrum disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Polimanti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The human brain is the outcome of innumerable evolutionary processes; the systems genetics of psychiatric disorders could bear their signatures. On this basis, we analyzed five psychiatric disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder (ASD, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia (SCZ, using GWAS summary statistics from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. Machine learning-derived scores were used to investigate two natural-selection scenarios: complete selection (loci where a selected allele reached fixation and incomplete selection (loci where a selected allele has not yet reached fixation. ASD GWAS results positively correlated with incomplete-selection (p = 3.53*10-4. Variants with ASD GWAS p<0.1 were shown to have a 19%-increased probability to be in the top-5% for incomplete-selection score (OR = 1.19, 95%CI = 1.11-1.8, p = 9.56*10-7. Investigating the effect directions of minor alleles, we observed an enrichment for positive associations in SNPs with ASD GWAS p<0.1 and top-5% incomplete-selection score (permutation p<10-4. Considering the set of these ASD-positive-associated variants, we observed gene-expression enrichments for brain and pituitary tissues (p = 2.3*10-5 and p = 3*10-5, respectively and 53 gene ontology (GO enrichments, such as nervous system development (GO:0007399, p = 7.57*10-12, synapse organization (GO:0050808, p = 8.29*10-7, and axon guidance (GO:0007411, p = 1.81*10-7. Previous genetic studies demonstrated that ASD positively correlates with childhood intelligence, college completion, and years of schooling. Accordingly, we hypothesize that certain ASD risk alleles were under positive selection during human evolution due to their involvement in neurogenesis and cognitive ability.

  1. Weak relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Selleri, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Weak Relativity is an equivalent theory to Special Relativity according to Reichenbach’s definition, where the parameter epsilon equals to 0. It formulates a Neo-Lorentzian approach by replacing the Lorentz transformations with a new set named “Inertial Transformations”, thus explaining the Sagnac effect, the twin paradox and the trip from the future to the past in an easy and elegant way. The cosmic microwave background is suggested as a possible privileged reference system. Most importantly, being a theory based on experimental proofs, rather than mutual consensus, it offers a physical description of reality independent of the human observation.

  2. Contribution of both positive selection and relaxation of selective constraints to degeneration of flyability during geese domestication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Wang

    Full Text Available Flyability is the most discrepant trait between modern-day geese and their wild ancestors, and the degeneration of flyability is a key marker of the successful domestication of wild geese. In light of the relatively short history of domestic geese, intense artificial selection is thought to play an important role in the degeneration of flyability. However, the underlying mechanism behind this phenomenon has seldom been investigated. In this study, we applied a molecular evolutionary approach to the evaluation of partial breeds of domestic geese in order to look for genes involved in the selection pressure toward degeneration of flyability. The haplotype networks, pairwise fixation index (FST values, and analysis of molecular variance results all clearly illustrated a population variance between Landes geese and partial Chinese domestic geese. We also detected signatures of positive artificial selection in the COX2 and COX3 genes, and related selection in the HBB gene. Our results support the independent origins of partial European domestic geese and Chinese domestic geese. In addition, both positive artificial selection and the relaxation of functional constraints appeared to play important roles in the degeneration of flyability in domestic geese.

  3. Evidence for positive selection in putative virulence factors within the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis species complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Matute

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a dimorphic fungus that is the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, the most important prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. Recently, the existence of three genetically isolated groups in P. brasiliensis was demonstrated, enabling comparative studies of molecular evolution among P. brasiliensis lineages. Thirty-two gene sequences coding for putative virulence factors were analyzed to determine whether they were under positive selection. Our maximum likelihood-based approach yielded evidence for selection in 12 genes that are involved in different cellular processes. An in-depth analysis of four of these genes showed them to be either antigenic or involved in pathogenesis. Here, we present evidence indicating that several replacement mutations in gp43 are under positive balancing selection. The other three genes (fks, cdc42 and p27 show very little variation among the P. brasiliensis lineages and appear to be under positive directional selection. Our results are consistent with the more general observations that selective constraints are variable across the genome, and that even in the genes under positive selection, only a few sites are altered. We present our results within an evolutionary framework that may be applicable for studying adaptation and pathogenesis in P. brasiliensis and other pathogenic fungi.

  4. Physicochemical evolution and positive selection of the gymnosperm matK proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Da Cheng; Mu, Jun; Chen, Shi Lin; Xiao, Pei Gen

    2010-04-01

    It is not clear whether matK evolves under Darwinian selection. In this study, the gymnosperm Taxaceae, Cephalotaxaceae and Pinaceae were used to illustrate the physicochemical evolution, molecular adaptation and evolutionary dynamics of gene divergence in matKs. matK sequences were amplified from 27 Taxaceae and 12 Cephalotaxaceae species. matK sequences of 19 Pinaceae species were retrieved from GenBank. The phylogenetic tree was generated using conceptual-translated amino acid sequences. Selective influences were investigated using standard dN/dS ratio methods and more sensitive techniques investigating the amino acid property changes resulting from nonsynonymous replacements in a phylogenetic context. Analyses revealed the presence of positive selection in matKs (N-terminal region, RT domain and domain X) of Taxaceae and Pinaceae,and found positive destabilizing selection in N-terminal region and RT domain of Cephalotaxaceae matK. Moreover, various amino acid properties were found to be influenced by destabilizing positive selection. Amino acid sites relating to these properties and to different secondary structures were found and have the potential to affect group II intron maturase function. Despite the evolutionary constraint on the rapidly evolving matK, this protein evolves under positive selection in gymnosperm. Several regions of matK have experienced molecular adaptation which fine-tunes maturase performance.

  5. Tracing evolutionary relicts of positive selection on eight malaria-related immune genes in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bing-Hong; Liao, Pei-Chun

    2015-07-01

    Plasmodium-induced malaria widely infects primates and other mammals. Multiple past studies have revealed that positive selection could be the main evolutionary force triggering the genetic diversity of anti-malaria resistance-associated genes in human or primates. However, researchers focused most of their attention on the infra-generic and intra-specific genome evolution rather than analyzing the complete evolutionary history of mammals. Here we extend previous research by testing the evolutionary link of natural selection on eight candidate genes associated with malaria resistance in mammals. Three of the eight genes were detected to be affected by recombination, including TNF-α, iNOS and DARC. Positive selection was detected in the rest five immunogenes multiple times in different ancestral lineages of extant species throughout the mammalian evolution. Signals of positive selection were exposed in four malaria-related immunogenes in primates: CCL2, IL-10, HO1 and CD36. However, selection signals of G6PD have only been detected in non-primate eutherians. Significantly higher evolutionary rates and more radical amino acid replacement were also detected in primate CD36, suggesting its functional divergence from other eutherians. Prevalent positive selection throughout the evolutionary trajectory of mammalian malaria-related genes supports the arms race evolutionary hypothesis of host genetic response of mammalian immunogenes to infectious pathogens. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. A new approach for using genome scans to detect recent positive selection in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Tang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide scanning for signals of recent positive selection is essential for a comprehensive and systematic understanding of human adaptation. Here, we present a genomic survey of recent local selective sweeps, especially aimed at those nearly or recently completed. A novel approach was developed for such signals, based on contrasting the extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH profiles between populations. We applied this method to the genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data of both the International HapMap Project and Perlegen Sciences, and detected widespread signals of recent local selection across the genome, consisting of both complete and partial sweeps. A challenging problem of genomic scans of recent positive selection is to clearly distinguish selection from neutral effects, given the high sensitivity of the test statistics to departures from neutral demographic assumptions and the lack of a single, accurate neutral model of human history. We therefore developed a new procedure that is robust across a wide range of demographic and ascertainment models, one that indicates that certain portions of the genome clearly depart from neutrality. Simulations of positive selection showed that our tests have high power towards strong selection sweeps that have undergone fixation. Gene ontology analysis of the candidate regions revealed several new functional groups that might help explain some important interpopulation differences in phenotypic traits.

  7. Transcriptome Sequencing of Lima Bean (Phaseolus lunatus) to Identify Putative Positive Selection in Phaseolus and Legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengqi; Cao, Depan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Ting; Wang, Guirong

    2015-07-03

    The identification of genes under positive selection is a central goal of evolutionary biology. Many legume species, including Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) and Phaseolus lunatus (lima bean), have important ecological and economic value. In this study, we sequenced and assembled the transcriptome of one Phaseolus species, lima bean. A comparison with the genomes of six other legume species, including the common bean, Medicago, lotus, soybean, chickpea, and pigeonpea, revealed 15 and 4 orthologous groups with signatures of positive selection among the two Phaseolus species and among the seven legume species, respectively. Characterization of these positively selected genes using Non redundant (nr) annotation, gene ontology (GO) classification, GO term enrichment and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analyses revealed that these genes are mostly involved in thylakoids, photosynthesis and metabolism. This study identified genes that may be related to the divergence of the Phaseolus and legume species. These detected genes are particularly good candidates for subsequent functional studies.

  8. Transcriptome Sequencing of Lima Bean (Phaseolus lunatus to Identify Putative Positive Selection in Phaseolus and Legumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengqi Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The identification of genes under positive selection is a central goal of evolutionary biology. Many legume species, including Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean and Phaseolus lunatus (lima bean, have important ecological and economic value. In this study, we sequenced and assembled the transcriptome of one Phaseolus species, lima bean. A comparison with the genomes of six other legume species, including the common bean, Medicago, lotus, soybean, chickpea, and pigeonpea, revealed 15 and 4 orthologous groups with signatures of positive selection among the two Phaseolus species and among the seven legume species, respectively. Characterization of these positively selected genes using Non redundant (nr annotation, gene ontology (GO classification, GO term enrichment and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway analyses revealed that these genes are mostly involved in thylakoids, photosynthesis and metabolism. This study identified genes that may be related to the divergence of the Phaseolus and legume species. These detected genes are particularly good candidates for subsequent functional studies.

  9. Selective anion exchange with nanogated isoreticular positive metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiang; Bu, Xianhui; Wu, Tao; Zheng, Shou-Tian; Wang, Le; Feng, Pingyun

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline porous materials, especially inorganic porous solids such as zeolites, usually have negative frameworks with extra-framework mobile cations and are widely used for cation exchange. It is highly desirable to develop new materials with positive frameworks for selective anion exchange and separation or storage and delivery. Recent advances in metal-organic framework synthesis have created new opportunities in this direction. Here we report the synthesis of a series of positive indium metal-organic frameworks and their utilization as a platform for the anion exchange-based separation process. This process is capable of size- or charge-selective ion-exchange of organic dyes and may form the basis for size-selective ion chromatography. Ion-exchange dynamics of a series of organic dyes and their selective encapsulation and release are also studied, highlighting the advantages of metal-organic framework compositions for designing host materials tailored for applications in anion separation and purification.

  10. Superoxide dismutase 1 is positively selected to minimize protein aggregation in great apes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2017-01-01

    Positive (adaptive) selection has recently been implied in human superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a highly abundant antioxidant protein with energy signaling and antiaging functions, one of very few examples of direct selection on a human protein product (exon); the molecular drivers of this select...... and SOD1 aggregates and triggered by aging. Our study thus marks an example of direct selection for a particular chemical phenotype (high net charge and stability) in a single human protein with possible implications for the evolution of aging.......Positive (adaptive) selection has recently been implied in human superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a highly abundant antioxidant protein with energy signaling and antiaging functions, one of very few examples of direct selection on a human protein product (exon); the molecular drivers...... of this selection are unknown. We mapped 30 extant SOD1 sequences to the recently established mammalian species tree and inferred ancestors, key substitutions, and signatures of selection during the protein's evolution. We detected elevated substitution rates leading to great apes (Hominidae) at ~1 per 2 million...

  11. Genome-Wide Survey of Genes Under Positive Selection in Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Thaís Cabrera Galvão; Lobo, Francisco Pereira; Hongo, Jorge Augusto; Vicentini, Renato; Verma, Renu; Maluta, Renato Pariz; da Silveira, Wanderley Dias

    2017-05-01

    The ability to obtain bacterial genomes from the same host has allowed for comparative studies that help in the understanding of the molecular evolution of specific pathotypes. Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) is a group of extraintestinal strains responsible for causing colibacillosis in birds. APEC is also suggested to possess a role as a zoonotic agent. Despite its importance, APEC pathogenesis still has several cryptic pathogenic processes that need to be better understood. In this work, a genome-wide survey of eight APEC strains for genes with evidence of recombination revealed that ∼14% of the homologous groups evaluated present signs of recombination. Enrichment analyses revealed that nine Gene Ontology (GO) terms were significantly more represented in recombinant genes. Among these GO terms, several were noted to be ATP-related categories. The search for positive selection in these APEC genomes revealed 32 groups of homologous genes with evidence of positive selection. Among these groups, we found several related to cell metabolism, as well as several uncharacterized genes, beyond the well-known virulence factors ompC, lamB, waaW, waaL, and fliC. A GO term enrichment test showed a prevalence of terms related to bacterial cell contact with the external environment (e.g., viral entry into host cell, detection of virus, pore complex, bacterial-type flagellum filament C, and porin activity). Finally, the genes with evidence of positive selection were retrieved from genomes of non-APEC strains and tested as were done for APEC strains. The result revealed that none of the groups of genes presented evidence of positive selection, confirming that the analysis was effective in inferring positive selection for APEC and not for E. coli in general, which means that the study of the genes with evidence of positive selection identified in this study can contribute for the better understanding of APEC pathogenesis processes.

  12. Positive Selection or Free to Vary? Assessing the Functional Significance of Sequence Change Using Molecular Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane R Allison

    Full Text Available Evolutionary arms races between pathogens and their hosts may be manifested as selection for rapid evolutionary change of key genes, and are sometimes detectable through sequence-level analyses. In the case of protein-coding genes, such analyses frequently predict that specific codons are under positive selection. However, detecting positive selection can be non-trivial, and false positive predictions are a common concern in such analyses. It is therefore helpful to place such predictions within a structural and functional context. Here, we focus on the p19 protein from tombusviruses. P19 is a homodimer that sequesters siRNAs, thereby preventing the host RNAi machinery from shutting down viral infection. Sequence analysis of the p19 gene is complicated by the fact that it is constrained at the sequence level by overprinting of a viral movement protein gene. Using homology modeling, in silico mutation and molecular dynamics simulations, we assess how non-synonymous changes to two residues involved in forming the dimer interface-one invariant, and one predicted to be under positive selection-impact molecular function. Interestingly, we find that both observed variation and potential variation (where a non-synonymous change to p19 would be synonymous for the overprinted movement protein does not significantly impact protein structure or RNA binding. Consequently, while several methods identify residues at the dimer interface as being under positive selection, MD results suggest they are functionally indistinguishable from a site that is free to vary. Our analyses serve as a caveat to using sequence-level analyses in isolation to detect and assess positive selection, and emphasize the importance of also accounting for how non-synonymous changes impact structure and function.

  13. Interrogating eleven fast-evolving genes for signatures of recent positive selection in worldwide human populations

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Estrada, Andrés; Bosch Fusté, Elena; Stoneking, Mark; Bertranpetit, Jaume, 1952-; Calafell i Majó, Francesc; Navarro i Cuartiellas, Arcadi, 1969-; Casals López, Ferran; Tang, Kun; Marquès i Bonet, Tomàs, 1975-; Sikora, Martin, 1976-

    2009-01-01

    Different signatures of natural selection persist over varying time scales in our genome, revealing possible episodes of adaptative evolution during human history. Here, we identify genes showing signatures of ancestral positive selection in the human lineage and investigate whether some of those genes have been evolving adaptatively in extant human populations. Specifically, we compared more than 11,000 human genes with their orthologs in/nchimpanzee, mouse, rat and dog and applied a branch-...

  14. How to Make a Dolphin: Molecular Signature of Positive Selection in Cetacean Genome

    OpenAIRE

    Nery, Mariana F.; Gonz?lez, Dimar J.; Opazo, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Cetaceans are unique in being the only mammals completely adapted to an aquatic environment. This adaptation has required complex changes and sometimes a complete restructuring of physiology, behavior and morphology. Identifying genes that have been subjected to selection pressure during cetacean evolution would greatly enhance our knowledge of the ways in which genetic variation in this mammalian order has been shaped by natural selection. Here, we performed a genome-wide scan for positive s...

  15. Direct comparison of the Ames microplate format (MPF) test in liquid medium with the standard Ames pre-incubation assay on agar plates by use of equivocal to weakly positive test compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flückiger-Isler, Sini; Kamber, Markus

    2012-08-30

    The Ames microplate format (MPF™) test, which uses liquid media and in 384-well microplates with a readout based on a colour-change, has been used for over 10 years at several major pharmaceutical companies for screening the genotoxic potential of early drug candidates when compound supply is minimal. Meanwhile, Xenometrix has adapted this screen from the two-strain Ames II test for use with five tester strains, in compliance with OECD Guideline 471. A set of 15 equivocal to weakly positive chemicals selected from the National Toxicology Program (NTP) database was tested simultaneously in the Ames microplate format (MPF) and the standard Ames pre-incubation method on agar plates. Such a direct comparison of the two test methods with the same overnight culture(s), chemicals and S9-mix preparation should exclude external variability factors. Thirteen of the 15 chemicals showed concordant results in both tests despite the choice of chemicals that showed varying inter- and even intra-laboratory results in the NTP studies. These results indicate that the Ames MPF™ assay is a reliable predictive tool that can be used like the regular Ames test to evaluate compounds for mutagenicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Recruitment and selection for the packer position in a supermarket network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucila Moraes Cardoso

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The method of personnel recruitment and selection is a common practice to hire people in organizations. The goal of this study is to report and to reflect about this process in a supermarket chain, which operates in food and non-food retail in the state of Sao Paulo. The purpose of the present intervention was to facilitate the recruitment and selection process for the packer position. After the intervention, we noticed an improvement on the hiring process, on the working conditions and a turnover reduction in this position.

  17. Genetic signature of strong recent positive selection at interleukin-32 gene in goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtar Rasool Asif

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Identification of the candidate genes that play key roles in phenotypic variations can provide new information about evolution and positive selection. Interleukin (IL-32 is involved in many biological processes, however, its role for the immune response against various diseases in mammals is poorly understood. Therefore, the current investigation was performed for the better understanding of the molecular evolution and the positive selection of single nucleotide polymorphisms in IL-32 gene. Methods By using fixation index (FST based method, IL-32 (9375 gene was found to be outlier and under significant positive selection with the provisional combined allocation of mean heterozygosity and FST. Using nucleotide sequences of 11 mammalian species from National Center for Biotechnology Information database, the evolutionary selection of IL-32 gene was determined using Maximum likelihood model method, through four models (M1a, M2a, M7, and M8 in Codeml program of phylogenetic analysis by maximum liklihood. Results IL-32 is detected under positive selection using the FST simulations method. The phylogenetic tree revealed that goat IL-32 was in close resemblance with sheep IL-32. The coding nucleotide sequences were compared among 11 species and it was found that the goat IL-32 gene shared identity with sheep (96.54%, bison (91.97%, camel (58.39%, cat (56.59%, buffalo (56.50%, human (56.13%, dog (50.97%, horse (54.04%, and rabbit (53.41% respectively. Conclusion This study provides evidence for IL-32 gene as under significant positive selection in goat.

  18. Common Risk Alleles for Inflammatory Diseases Are Targets of Recent Positive Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Towfique; Kuchroo, Manik; Replogle, Joseph M.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Stranger, Barbara E.; De Jager, Philip L.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified hundreds of loci harboring genetic variation influencing inflammatory-disease susceptibility in humans. It has been hypothesized that present day inflammatory diseases may have arisen, in part, due to pleiotropic effects of host resistance to pathogens over the course of human history, with significant selective pressures acting to increase host resistance to pathogens. The extent to which genetic factors underlying inflammatory-disease susceptibility has been influenced by selective processes can now be quantified more comprehensively than previously possible. To understand the evolutionary forces that have shaped inflammatory-disease susceptibility and to elucidate functional pathways affected by selection, we performed a systems-based analysis to integrate (1) published GWASs for inflammatory diseases, (2) a genome-wide scan for signatures of positive selection in a population of European ancestry, (3) functional genomics data comprised of protein-protein interaction networks, and (4) a genome-wide expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping study in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We demonstrate that loci for inflammatory-disease susceptibility are enriched for genomic signatures of recent positive natural selection, with selected loci forming a highly interconnected protein-protein interaction network. Further, we identify 21 loci for inflammatory-disease susceptibility that display signatures of recent positive selection, of which 13 also show evidence of cis-regulatory effects on genes within the associated locus. Thus, our integrated analyses highlight a set of susceptibility loci that might subserve a shared molecular function and has experienced selective pressure over the course of human history; today, these loci play a key role in influencing susceptibility to multiple different inflammatory diseases, in part through alterations of gene expression in immune cells. PMID:23522783

  19. Positive and relaxed selection associated with flight evolution and loss in insect transcriptomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitterboeck, T Fatima; Liu, Shanlin; Adamowicz, Sarah J; Fu, Jinzhong; Zhang, Rui; Song, Wenhui; Meusemann, Karen; Zhou, Xin

    2017-10-01

    The evolution of powered flight is a major innovation that has facilitated the success of insects. Previously, studies of birds, bats, and insects have detected molecular signatures of differing selection regimes in energy-related genes associated with flight evolution and/or loss. Here, using DNA sequences from more than 1000 nuclear and mitochondrial protein-coding genes obtained from insect transcriptomes, we conduct a broader exploration of which gene categories display positive and relaxed selection at the origin of flight as well as with multiple independent losses of flight. We detected a number of categories of nuclear genes more often under positive selection in the lineage leading to the winged insects (Pterygota), related to catabolic processes such as proteases, as well as splicing-related genes. Flight loss was associated with relaxed selection signatures in splicing genes, mirroring the results for flight evolution. Similar to previous studies of flight loss in various animal taxa, we observed consistently higher nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitution ratios in mitochondrial genes of flightless lineages, indicative of relaxed selection in energy-related genes. While oxidative phosphorylation genes were not detected as being under selection with the origin of flight specifically, they were most often detected as being under positive selection in holometabolous (complete metamorphosis) insects as compared with other insect lineages. This study supports some convergence in gene-specific selection pressures associated with flight ability, and the exploratory analysis provided some new insights into gene categories potentially associated with the gain and loss of flight in insects. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Muscle Weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al Kaissi MD, MSc

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Marked ligamentous hyperlaxity and muscle weakness/wasting associated with awkward gait are the main deficits confused with the diagnosis of myopathy. Seven children (6 boys and 1 girl with an average age of 8 years were referred to our department because of diverse forms of skeletal abnormalities. No definitive diagnosis was made, and all underwent a series of sophisticated investigations in other institutes in favor of myopathy. We applied our methodology through the clinical and radiographic phenotypes followed by targeted genotypic confirmation. Three children (2 boys and 1 girl were compatible with the diagnosis of progressive pseudorheumatoid chondrodysplasia. The genetic mutation was correlated with the WISP 3 gene actively expressed by articular chondrocytes and located on chromosome 6. Klinefelter syndrome was the diagnosis in 2 boys. Karyotyping confirmed 47,XXY (aneuploidy of Klinefelter syndrome. And 2 boys were finally diagnosed with Morquio syndrome (MPS type IV A as both showed missense mutations in the N-acetylgalactosamine-sulfate sulfatase gene. Misdiagnosis can lead to the initiation of a long list of sophisticated investigations.

  1. Positive selection in the leucine-rich repeat domain of Gro1 genes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In potato, the gene Gro1-4 confers resistance to Globodera rostochiensis. The investigation of variablity in different copies of this gene represents a good model for the verification of positive selection mechanisms. Two datasets of Gro1 LRR sequences were constructed, one derived from the Gro1-4 gene, belonging to ...

  2. Signatures of positive selection in East African Shorthorn Zebu: a genome-wide SNP analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The small East African Shorthorn Zebu is the main indigenous cattle across East Africa. A recent genome wide SNPs analysis has revealed their ancient stable African taurine x Asian zebu admixture. Here, we assess the presence of candidate signature of positive selection in their genome, with the aim...

  3. Diversity at the Mla powdery mildew resistance locus from cultivated barley reveals sites of positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeholzer, Sabine; Tsuchimatsu, Takashi; Jordan, Tina; Bieri, Stéphane; Pajonk, Simone; Yang, Wenxiang; Jahoor, Ahmed; Shimizu, Kentaro K; Keller, Beat; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2010-04-01

    The Mla locus in barley (Hordeum vulgare) conditions isolate-specific immunity to the powdery mildew fungus (Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei) and encodes intracellular coiled-coil (CC) domain, nucleotide-binding (NB) site, and leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing receptor proteins. Over the last decades, genetic studies in breeding material have identified a large number of functional resistance genes at the Mla locus. To study the structural and functional diversity of this locus at the molecular level, we isolated 23 candidate MLA cDNAs from barley accessions that were previously shown by genetic studies to harbor different Mla resistance specificities. Resistance activity was detected for 13 candidate MLA cDNAs in a transient gene-expression assay. Sequence alignment of the deduced MLA proteins improved secondary structure predictions, revealing four additional, previously overlooked LRR. Analysis of nucleotide diversity of the candidate and validated MLA cDNAs revealed 34 sites of positive selection. Recombination or gene conversion events were frequent in the first half of the gene but positive selection was also found when this region was excluded. The positively selected sites are all, except two, located in the LRR domain and cluster in predicted solvent-exposed residues of the repeats 7 to 15 and adjacent turns on the concave side of the predicted solenoid protein structure. This domain-restricted pattern of positively selected sites, together with the length conservation of individual LRR, suggests direct binding of effectors to MLA receptors.

  4. Selectivity issues in targeted metabolomics: Separation of phosphorylated carbohydrate isomers by mixed-mode hydrophilic interaction/weak anion exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinterwirth, Helmut; Lämmerhofer, Michael; Preinerstorfer, Beatrix; Gargano, Andrea; Reischl, Roland; Bicker, Wolfgang; Trapp, Oliver; Brecker, Lothar; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Phosphorylated carbohydrates are important intracellular metabolites and thus of prime interest in metabolomics research. Complications in their analysis arise from the existence of structural isomers that do have similar fragmentation patterns in MS/MS and are hard to resolve chromatographically. Herein, we present selective methods for the liquid chromatographic separation of sugar phosphates, such as hexose and pentose phosphates, 2- and 3-phosphoglycerate, dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, as well as glucosamine 1- and 6-phosphate utilizing mixed-mode chromatography with reversed-phase/weak anion-exchangers and a charged aerosol detector. The best results were obtained when the reversed-phase/weak anion-exchanger column was operated under hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography elution conditions. The effects of various chromatographic parameters were examined and are discussed on the basis of a simple stoichiometric displacement model for explaining ion-exchange processes. Employed acidic conditions have led to the complete separation of α- and β-anomers of glucose 6-phosphate at low temperature. The anomers coeluted in a single peak at elevated temperatures (>40°C) (peak coalescence), while at intermediate temperatures on-column interconversion with a plateau in-between resolved anomer peaks was observed with apparent reaction rate constants between 0.1 and 27.8×10(-4) s(-1). Dynamic HPLC under specified conditions enabled to investigate mutarotation of phosphorylated carbohydrates, their interconversion kinetics, and energy barriers for interconversion. A complex mixture of six hexose phosphate structural isomers could be resolved almost completely.

  5. Evaluation of an Improved Branch-Site Likelihood Method for Detecting Positive Selection at the Molecular Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jianzhi; Nielsen, Rasmus; Yang, Ziheng

    2005-01-01

    Detecting positive Darwinian selection at the DNA sequence level has been a subject of considerable interest. However, positive selection is difficult to detect because it often operates episodically on a few amino acid sites, and the signal may be masked by negative selection. Several methods have...... of interest, while test 2 had acceptable false-positive rates and appeared robust against violations of model assumptions. As test 2 is a direct test of positive selection on the lineages of interest, it is referred to as the branch-site test of positive selection and is recommended for use in real data...

  6. Positive and negative selection, self-nonself discrimination and the roles of costimulation and anergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostardinha, P.; de Abreu, F. Vistulo

    2012-10-01

    It is still unclear whether the adaptive immune system can perform accurate self-nonself discrimination and what could influence its performance. Starting from simple cellular interaction rules we show that it is possible to achieve perfect self-nonself discrimination in a consistent framework provided positive and negative selection operate during repertoire education, and costimulation and anergy are also considered during T cell activation. In this theory T cell receptors diversity is required for cells to sense differently different peptides; positive selection is needed to guarantee maximal lymphocyte's interactivity and to allow negative selection to reduce conjugation lifetimes maximally; costimulation is necessary to signal that an antigen presenting cell established an uncommon rate of long lived conjugations when presenting foreign peptides; anergy is required to guarantee that these stable contacts involved different T cells and not always the same. These results suggest that accurate self-nonself discrimination can have shaped the adaptive immune system.

  7. Superoxide dismutase 1 is positively selected to minimize protein aggregation in great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper P

    2017-08-01

    Positive (adaptive) selection has recently been implied in human superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a highly abundant antioxidant protein with energy signaling and antiaging functions, one of very few examples of direct selection on a human protein product (exon); the molecular drivers of this selection are unknown. We mapped 30 extant SOD1 sequences to the recently established mammalian species tree and inferred ancestors, key substitutions, and signatures of selection during the protein's evolution. We detected elevated substitution rates leading to great apes (Hominidae) at ~1 per 2 million years, significantly higher than in other primates and rodents, although these paradoxically generally evolve much faster. The high evolutionary rate was partly due to relaxation of some selection pressures and partly to distinct positive selection of SOD1 in great apes. We then show that higher stability and net charge and changes at the dimer interface were selectively introduced upon separation from old world monkeys and lesser apes (gibbons). Consequently, human, chimpanzee and gorilla SOD1s have a net charge of -6 at physiological pH, whereas the closely related gibbons and macaques have -3. These features consistently point towards selection against the malicious aggregation effects of elevated SOD1 levels in long-living great apes. The findings mirror the impact of human SOD1 mutations that reduce net charge and/or stability and cause ALS, a motor neuron disease characterized by oxidative stress and SOD1 aggregates and triggered by aging. Our study thus marks an example of direct selection for a particular chemical phenotype (high net charge and stability) in a single human protein with possible implications for the evolution of aging.

  8. Cancer Evolution Is Associated with Pervasive Positive Selection on Globally Expressed Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrow, Sheli L.; Barshir, Ruth; DeGregori, James; Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Hershberg, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is an evolutionary process in which cells acquire new transformative, proliferative and metastatic capabilities. A full understanding of cancer requires learning the dynamics of the cancer evolutionary process. We present here a large-scale analysis of the dynamics of this evolutionary process within tumors, with a focus on breast cancer. We show that the cancer evolutionary process differs greatly from organismal (germline) evolution. Organismal evolution is dominated by purifying selection (that removes mutations that are harmful to fitness). In contrast, in the cancer evolutionary process the dominance of purifying selection is much reduced, allowing for a much easier detection of the signals of positive selection (adaptation). We further show that, as a group, genes that are globally expressed across human tissues show a very strong signal of positive selection within tumors. Indeed, known cancer genes are enriched for global expression patterns. Yet, positive selection is prevalent even on globally expressed genes that have not yet been associated with cancer, suggesting that globally expressed genes are enriched for yet undiscovered cancer related functions. We find that the increased positive selection on globally expressed genes within tumors is not due to their expression in the tissue relevant to the cancer. Rather, such increased adaptation is likely due to globally expressed genes being enriched in important housekeeping and essential functions. Thus, our results suggest that tumor adaptation is most often mediated through somatic changes to those genes that are important for the most basic cellular functions. Together, our analysis reveals the uniqueness of the cancer evolutionary process and the particular importance of globally expressed genes in driving cancer initiation and progression. PMID:24603726

  9. Evolution of the class C GPCR Venus flytrap modules involved positive selected functional divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianhua; Huang, Siluo; Qian, Ji; Huang, Jinlin; Jin, Li; Su, Zhixi; Yang, Ji; Liu, Jianfeng

    2009-03-27

    Class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a distinct group of the GPCR family, which structurally possess a characteristically distinct extracellular domain inclusive of the Venus flytrap module (VFTM). The VFTMs of the class C GPCRs is responsible for ligand recognition and binding, and share sequence similarity with bacterial periplasmic amino acid binding proteins (PBPs). An extensive phylogenetic investigation of the VFTMs was conducted by analyzing for functional divergence and testing for positive selection for five typical groups of the class C GPCRs. The altered selective constraints were determined to identify the sites that had undergone functional divergence via positive selection. In order to structurally demonstrate the pattern changes during the evolutionary process, three-dimensional (3D) structures of the GPCR VFTMs were modelled and reconstructed from ancestral VFTMs. Our results show that the altered selective constraints in the VFTMs of class C GPCRs are statistically significant. This implies that functional divergence played a key role in characterizing the functions of the VFTMs after gene duplication events. Meanwhile, positive selection is involved in the evolutionary process and drove the functional divergence of the VFTMs. Our results also reveal that three continuous duplication events occurred in order to shape the evolutionary topology of class C GPCRs. The five groups of the class C GPCRs have essentially different sites involved in functional divergence, which would have shaped the specific structures and functions of the VFTMs. Taken together, our results show that functional divergence involved positive selection and is partially responsible for the evolutionary patterns of the class C GPCR VFTMs. The sites involved in functional divergence will provide more clues and candidates for further research on structural-function relationships of these modules as well as shedding light on the activation mechanism of the class C

  10. Evolution of the class C GPCR Venus flytrap modules involved positive selected functional divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Zhixi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs represent a distinct group of the GPCR family, which structurally possess a characteristically distinct extracellular domain inclusive of the Venus flytrap module (VFTM. The VFTMs of the class C GPCRs is responsible for ligand recognition and binding, and share sequence similarity with bacterial periplasmic amino acid binding proteins (PBPs. An extensive phylogenetic investigation of the VFTMs was conducted by analyzing for functional divergence and testing for positive selection for five typical groups of the class C GPCRs. The altered selective constraints were determined to identify the sites that had undergone functional divergence via positive selection. In order to structurally demonstrate the pattern changes during the evolutionary process, three-dimensional (3D structures of the GPCR VFTMs were modelled and reconstructed from ancestral VFTMs. Results Our results show that the altered selective constraints in the VFTMs of class C GPCRs are statistically significant. This implies that functional divergence played a key role in characterizing the functions of the VFTMs after gene duplication events. Meanwhile, positive selection is involved in the evolutionary process and drove the functional divergence of the VFTMs. Our results also reveal that three continuous duplication events occurred in order to shape the evolutionary topology of class C GPCRs. The five groups of the class C GPCRs have essentially different sites involved in functional divergence, which would have shaped the specific structures and functions of the VFTMs. Conclusion Taken together, our results show that functional divergence involved positive selection and is partially responsible for the evolutionary patterns of the class C GPCR VFTMs. The sites involved in functional divergence will provide more clues and candidates for further research on structural-function relationships of these modules as well as

  11. Selective sweep with significant positive selection serves as the driving force for the differentiation of japonica and indica rice cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yang; Zhang, Qijun; Zeng, Shuiyun; Gu, Longjiang; Si, Weina; Zhang, Xiaohui; Tian, Dacheng; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Long

    2017-04-19

    Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.), including japonica and indica, is unarguable the most important crop in Asia as well as worldwide. However, a decisive conclusion of its origination and domestication processes are still lacking. Nowadays, the ever-increasing high-throughput sequencing data of numerous rice samples have provided us new opportunities to get close to the answer of these questions. By compiling 296 whole-genome sequenced rice cultivars and 39 diverse wild rice, two types of domesticated regions (DR-I and DR-II) with strong selective sweep signals between different groups were detected. DR-I regions included 28 blocks which significantly differentiated between japonica and indica subspecies, while DR-II regions were consisted of another 28 blocks which significantly differentiated between wild and cultivated rice, each covered 890 kb and 640 kb, respectively. In-depth analysis suggested that both DR-Is and DR-IIs could have originated from Indo-China Peninsula to southern China, and DR-IIs might be introgressed from indica to japonica. Functional bias with significant positive selection has also been detected in the genes of DR-I, suggesting important role of the selective sweep in differentiation of japonica and indica. This research promoted a new possible model of the origin of the cultivated rice that DR-Is in japonica and indica maybe independently originated from the divergent wild rice in the Indo-China Peninsula to southern China, and then followed by frequent introgression. Genes with significant positive selection and biased functions were also detected which could play important roles in rice domestication and differentiation processes.

  12. Signatures of positive selection in Toll-like receptor (TLR genes in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areal Helena

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a major class of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs expressed in the cell surface or membrane compartments of immune and non-immune cells. TLRs are encoded by a multigene family and represent the first line of defense against pathogens by detecting foreigner microbial molecular motifs, the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. TLRs are also important by triggering the adaptive immunity in vertebrates. They are characterized by the presence of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs in the ectodomain, which are associated with the PAMPs recognition. The direct recognition of different pathogens by TLRs might result in different evolutionary adaptations important to understand the dynamics of the host-pathogen interplay. Ten mammal TLR genes, viral (TLR3, 7, 8, 9 and non-viral (TLR1-6, 10, were selected to identify signatures of positive selection that might have been imposed by interacting pathogens and to clarify if viral and non-viral TLRs might display different patterns of molecular evolution. Results By using Maximum Likelihood approaches, evidence of positive selection was found in all the TLRs studied. The number of positively selected codons (PSC ranged between 2-26 codons (0.25%-2.65% with the non-viral TLR4 as the receptor with higher percentage of positively selected codons (2.65%, followed by the viral TLR8 (2.50%. The results indicated that viral and non-viral TLRs are similarly under positive selection. Almost all TLRs have at least one PSC located in the LRR ectodomain which underlies the importance of the pathogen recognition by this region. Conclusions Our results are not in line with previous studies on primates and birds that identified more codons under positive selection in non-viral TLRs. This might be explained by the fact that both primates and birds are homogeneous groups probably being affected by only a restricted number of related viruses with equivalent motifs to be

  13. Detecting signatures of positive selection associated with musical aptitude in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuanyao; Kanduri, Chakravarthi; Oikkonen, Jaana; Karma, Kai; Raijas, Pirre; Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa; Teo, Yik-Ying; Järvelä, Irma

    2016-02-16

    Abilities related to musical aptitude appear to have a long history in human evolution. To elucidate the molecular and evolutionary background of musical aptitude, we compared genome-wide genotyping data (641 K SNPs) of 148 Finnish individuals characterized for musical aptitude. We assigned signatures of positive selection in a case-control setting using three selection methods: haploPS, XP-EHH and FST. Gene ontology classification revealed that the positive selection regions contained genes affecting inner-ear development. Additionally, literature survey has shown that several of the identified genes were known to be involved in auditory perception (e.g. GPR98, USH2A), cognition and memory (e.g. GRIN2B, IL1A, IL1B, RAPGEF5), reward mechanisms (RGS9), and song perception and production of songbirds (e.g. FOXP1, RGS9, GPR98, GRIN2B). Interestingly, genes related to inner-ear development and cognition were also detected in a previous genome-wide association study of musical aptitude. However, the candidate genes detected in this study were not reported earlier in studies of musical abilities. Identification of genes related to language development (FOXP1 and VLDLR) support the popular hypothesis that music and language share a common genetic and evolutionary background. The findings are consistent with the evolutionary conservation of genes related to auditory processes in other species and provide first empirical evidence for signatures of positive selection for abilities that contribute to musical aptitude.

  14. Evidence for positive selection on the leptin gene in Cetacea and Pinnipedia.

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    Li Yu

    Full Text Available The leptin gene has received intensive attention and scientific investigation for its importance in energy homeostasis and reproductive regulation in mammals. Furthermore, study of the leptin gene is of crucial importance for public health, particularly for its role in obesity, as well as for other numerous physiological roles that it plays in mammals. In the present work, we report the identification of novel leptin genes in 4 species of Cetacea, and a comparison with 55 publicly available leptin sequences from mammalian genome assemblies and previous studies. Our study provides evidence for positive selection in the suborder Odontoceti (toothed whales of the Cetacea and the family Phocidae (earless seals of the Pinnipedia. We also detected positive selection in several leptin gene residues in these two lineages. To test whether leptin and its receptor evolved in a coordinated manner, we analyzed 24 leptin receptor gene (LPR sequences from available mammalian genome assemblies and other published data. Unlike the case of leptin, our analyses did not find evidence of positive selection for LPR across the Cetacea and Pinnipedia lineages. In line with this, positively selected sites identified in the leptin genes of these two lineages were located outside of leptin receptor binding sites, which at least partially explains why co-evolution of leptin and its receptor was not observed in the present study. Our study provides interesting insights into current understanding of the evolution of mammalian leptin genes in response to selective pressures from life in an aquatic environment, and leads to a hypothesis that new tissue specificity or novel physiologic functions of leptin genes may have arisen in both odontocetes and phocids. Additional data from other species encompassing varying life histories and functional tests of the adaptive role of the amino acid changes identified in this study will help determine the factors that promote the adaptive

  15. Evidence of Positive Selection of Aquaporins Genes from Pontoporia blainvillei during the Evolutionary Process of Cetaceans.

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    São Pedro, Simone Lima; Alves, João Marcelo Pereira; Barreto, André Silva; Lima, André Oliveira de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Marine mammals are well adapted to their hyperosmotic environment. Several morphological and physiological adaptations for water conservation and salt excretion are known to be present in cetaceans, being responsible for regulating salt balance. However, most previous studies have focused on the unique renal physiology of marine mammals, but the molecular bases of these mechanisms remain poorly explored. Many genes have been identified to be involved in osmotic regulation, including the aquaporins. Considering that aquaporin genes were potentially subject to strong selective pressure, the aim of this study was to analyze the molecular evolution of seven aquaporin genes (AQP1, AQP2, AQP3, AQP4, AQP6, AQP7, and AQP9) comparing the lineages of cetaceans and terrestrial mammals. Our results demonstrated strong positive selection in cetacean-specific lineages acting only in the gene for AQP2 (amino acids 23, 83, 107,179, 180, 181, 182), whereas no selection was observed in terrestrial mammalian lineages. We also analyzed the changes in the 3D structure of the aquaporin 2 protein. Signs of strong positive selection in AQP2 sites 179, 180, 181, and 182 were unexpectedly identified only in the baiji lineage, which was the only river dolphin examined in this study. Positive selection in aquaporins AQP1 (45), AQP4 (74), AQP7 (342, 343, 356) was detected in cetaceans and artiodactyls, suggesting that these events are not related to maintaining water and electrolyte homeostasis in seawater. Our results suggest that the AQP2 gene might reflect different selective pressures in maintaining water balance in cetaceans, contributing to the passage from the terrestrial environment to the aquatic. Further studies are necessary, especially those including other freshwater dolphins, who exhibit osmoregulatory mechanisms different from those of marine cetaceans for the same essential task of maintaining serum electrolyte balance.

  16. Evidence of Positive Selection of Aquaporins Genes from Pontoporia blainvillei during the Evolutionary Process of Cetaceans.

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    Simone Lima São Pedro

    Full Text Available Marine mammals are well adapted to their hyperosmotic environment. Several morphological and physiological adaptations for water conservation and salt excretion are known to be present in cetaceans, being responsible for regulating salt balance. However, most previous studies have focused on the unique renal physiology of marine mammals, but the molecular bases of these mechanisms remain poorly explored. Many genes have been identified to be involved in osmotic regulation, including the aquaporins. Considering that aquaporin genes were potentially subject to strong selective pressure, the aim of this study was to analyze the molecular evolution of seven aquaporin genes (AQP1, AQP2, AQP3, AQP4, AQP6, AQP7, and AQP9 comparing the lineages of cetaceans and terrestrial mammals.Our results demonstrated strong positive selection in cetacean-specific lineages acting only in the gene for AQP2 (amino acids 23, 83, 107,179, 180, 181, 182, whereas no selection was observed in terrestrial mammalian lineages. We also analyzed the changes in the 3D structure of the aquaporin 2 protein. Signs of strong positive selection in AQP2 sites 179, 180, 181, and 182 were unexpectedly identified only in the baiji lineage, which was the only river dolphin examined in this study. Positive selection in aquaporins AQP1 (45, AQP4 (74, AQP7 (342, 343, 356 was detected in cetaceans and artiodactyls, suggesting that these events are not related to maintaining water and electrolyte homeostasis in seawater.Our results suggest that the AQP2 gene might reflect different selective pressures in maintaining water balance in cetaceans, contributing to the passage from the terrestrial environment to the aquatic. Further studies are necessary, especially those including other freshwater dolphins, who exhibit osmoregulatory mechanisms different from those of marine cetaceans for the same essential task of maintaining serum electrolyte balance.

  17. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus selectively improves learning of weakly associated cue combinations during probabilistic classification learning in Parkinson's disease.

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    Wilkinson, Leonora; Beigi, Mazda; Lagnado, David A; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2011-05-01

    Evidence from functional imaging and clinical studies on patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) or Huntington's disease (HD) suggests that the basal ganglia play a crucial role in learning on the weather prediction task (WPT). Using deep brain stimulation (DBS) on versus off methodology, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of altering the output from the basal ganglia to the prefrontal cortex on implicit probabilistic classification learning on the WPT by patients with PD. Eleven PD patients with bilateral DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and 13 matched controls completed 200 trials of the WPT on 2 separate occasions, with the patients tested with DBS of the STN on or off. DBS of the STN had no effect on overall WPT learning. However, STN DBS selectively improved implicit learning of cue combinations that were weakly (implicitly), rather than strongly (explicitly), associated with the WPT outcome. Results suggest that the STN plays a role in implicit probabilistic classification learning by altering basal ganglia output to the frontal cortex.

  18. Positive selection moments identify potential functional residues in human olfactory receptors

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    Singer, M. S.; Weisinger-Lewin, Y.; Lancet, D.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Correlated mutation analysis and molecular models of olfactory receptors have provided evidence that residues in the transmembrane domains form a binding pocket for odor ligands. As an independent test of these results, we have calculated positive selection moments for the alpha-helical sixth transmembrane domain (TM6) of human olfactory receptors. The moments can be used to identify residues that have been preferentially affected by positive selection and are thus likely to interact with odor ligands. The results suggest that residue 622, which is commonly a serine or threonine, could form critical H-bonds. In some receptors a dual-serine subsite, formed by residues 622 and 625, could bind hydroxyl determinants on odor ligands. The potential importance of these residues is further supported by site-directed mutagenesis in the beta-adrenergic receptor. The findings should be of practical value for future physiological studies, binding assays, and site-directed mutagenesis.

  19. Evolutionary analysis of TLR9 genes reveals the positive selection of extant teleosts in Perciformes.

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    Zhu, Zhihuang; Sun, Yuena; Wang, Rixin; Xu, Tianjun

    2013-08-01

    The innate immune system can recognize non-self through pattern recognition receptors. Toll-like receptors were the best-known members of these receptors, and they could sense, recognize, and bind pathogen-associated molecular patterns. TLRs played an important role in innate immune system and were conserved in both invertebrate and vertebrate lineages. Thereinto, TLR9 could detect unmethylated CpG motifs in dsDNA and was expected to undergo coevolution with its microbial ligands. It was known that aquatic and terrestrial organisms dwelled in different environments which contained different pathogens, and they had to adapt to their local environmental conditions. Therefore, we collected TLR9 genes from invertebrate to vertebrate to further explore whether the huge differences between aquatic and terrestrial environments affected the TLR9s evolution between aquatic and terrestrial organisms. Molecular evolution analysis detected positively selected sites in the ancestral lineages of vertebrates, teleosts, and Perciformes but not in the ancestral lineage of mammals. In PAML, site model revealed that extant mammalian TLR9 genes underwent positive selection. However, the positive selection of extant teleosts appeared primarily in Perciformes in which there were 14 positively selected sites. Among these sites, two of them were located on the amino acid insertions of the leucine-rich repeats which could create DNA binding sites, three were found on the convex surface which might possibly affect the flexibility of the TLR solenoids, and six were located on the β-face of concave surface which contained the ligand-binding sites of the TLR solenoids. In other ML methods, we also found three sites under selection that coincided with the codons identified by M8 and these sites were all located in LRRs. The diverse aquatic and terrestrial environments might possess different pathogens to make the living organisms adapt to their local environmental conditions. The positive

  20. SNP@Evolution: a hierarchical database of positive selection on the human genome

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    Richards Elliott

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Positive selection is a driving force that has shaped the modern human. Recent developments in high throughput technologies and corresponding statistics tools have made it possible to conduct whole genome surveys at a population scale, and a variety of measurements, such as heterozygosity (HET, FST, and Tajima's D, have been applied to multiple datasets to identify signals of positive selection. However, great effort has been required to combine various types of data from individual sources, and incompatibility among datasets has been a common problem. SNP@Evolution, a new database which integrates multiple datasets, will greatly assist future work in this area. Description As part of our research scanning for evolutionary signals in HapMap Phase II and Phase III datasets, we built SNP@Evolution as a multi-aspect database focused on positive selection. Among its many features, SNP@Evolution provides computed FST and HET of all HapMap SNPs, 5+ HapMap SNPs per qualified gene, and all autosome regions detected from whole genome window scanning. In an attempt to capture multiple selection signals across the genome, selection-signal enrichment strength (ES values of HET, FST, and P-values of iHS of most annotated genes have been calculated and integrated within one frame for users to search for outliers. Genes with significant ES or P-values (with thresholds of 0.95 and 0.05, respectively have been highlighted in color. Low diversity chromosome regions have been detected by sliding a 100 kb window in a 10 kb step. To allow this information to be easily disseminated, a graphical user interface (GBrowser was constructed with the Generic Model Organism Database toolkit. Conclusion Available at http://bighapmap.big.ac.cn, SNP@Evolution is a hierarchical database focused on positive selection of the human genome. Based on HapMap Phase II and III data, SNP@Evolution includes 3,619,226/1,389,498 SNPs with their computed HET and FST, as

  1. DISCRIMINATIVE MODEL OF CERTAIN MOTOR INDICATORS OF FOOTBALL PLAYERS AS SELECTION CRITERIA FOR TEAM POSITION

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    Goran Vučković

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Well-designed and implemented selection is one of the important prerequisites for achieving the expected results in the modern competitive sport at all levels. The aim of this work was to determine how the selection was made for Serbian League players, on the basis of their certain motor parameters and the positions in the team. A sample of 25 senior players of a football team competing in the Serbian League is divided into four sub-samples, based on team positions. For assessment of motor characteristics following tests were used: long jump (LJ, Abalac test (AT; 10 seconds push-ups (PU, 30 seconds trunk bends (TB, 20 meter flying start running (20FSR, 20 meter high start running (20HSR, 50 meter high start running (50HSR and Cooper test (CT . Based on the obtained results it can be concluded that there are significant differences for variable 20FSR and variable CT (F = 3754, 9835, p = .027, .000, respectively. Three canonical discriminant functions were singled out, where the first explained even 84.6%, the second 14.5% and the third only 1% of the total variance, or in summary first two functions explained 99.0% of the variance. It can be concluded that the selected players, in terms of the position in the team, distinguished first by performing on the Cooper test, followed by the result of 20 meter flying start running, 20 meter high start running, 50 meter high start running, trunk bends, and finally by Abalac test, push-ups and long jump. Observed as a function of certain motor characteristics, it could be concluded that in the selection of players in terms of the playing position confidence level was 72.0% in general level, with the most reliable for goalkeepers (100%, midfielders (71.4% and defensive players (70.0%, while the smallest was at strikers (50%.

  2. The role of positive selection in determining the molecular cause of species differences in disease

    OpenAIRE

    Foord Steven M; Simmons Mark D; Word Michael; Kumar Vinod; Topp Simon D; Rajagopalan Dilip; Amrine-Madsen Heather; Emes Richard D; Hasan Samiul; Vamathevan Jessica J; Sanseau Philippe; Yang Ziheng; Holbrook Joanna D

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Related species, such as humans and chimpanzees, often experience the same disease with varying degrees of pathology, as seen in the cases of Alzheimer's disease, or differing symptomatology as in AIDS. Furthermore, certain diseases such as schizophrenia, epithelial cancers and autoimmune disorders are far more frequent in humans than in other species for reasons not associated with lifestyle. Genes that have undergone positive selection during species evolution are indica...

  3. Relation between flexibility and positively selected HIV-1 protease mutants against inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, Antônio S K; Tufanetto, Patrícia; Perahia, David; Scott, Luis P B

    2012-12-01

    The antiretroviral chemotherapy helps to reduce the mortality of HIVs infected patients. However, RNA dependant virus replication has a high mutation rate. Human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 protease plays an essential role in viral replication cycle. This protein is an important target for therapy with viral protein inhibitors. There are few works using normal mode analysis to investigate this problem from the structural changes viewpoint. The investigation of protein flexibility may be important for the study of processes associated with conformational changes and state transitions. The normal mode analysis allowed us to investigate structural changes in the protease (such as flexibility) in a straightforward way and try to associate these changes with the increase of fitness for each positively selected HIV-1 mutant protease of patients treated with several protease inhibitors (saquinavir, indinavir, ritonavir, nelfinavir, lopinavir, fosamprenavir, atazanavir, darunavir, and tripanavir) in combination or separately. These positively selected mutations introduce significant flexibility in important regions such as the active site cavity and flaps. These mutations were also able to cause changes in accessible solvent area. This study showed that the majority of HIV-1 protease mutants can be grouped into two main classes of protein flexibility behavior. We presented a new approach to study structural changes caused by positively selected mutations in a pathogen protein, for instance the HIV-1 protease and their relationship with their resistance mechanism against known inhibitors. The method can be applied to any pharmaceutically relevant pathogen proteins and could be very useful to understand the effects of positively selected mutations in the context of structural changes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Growth of non-Campylobacter, oxidase-positive bacteria on selective Campylobacter agar.

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    Moskowitz, L B; Chester, B

    1982-01-01

    A total of 67 oxidase-positive, gram-negative bacteria were tested for growth on selective Campylobacter agar (Blaser formulation, BBL Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville, Md.) at 42 degrees C under microaerophilic conditions. Although the growth of most of these bacteria was prevented, all strains of Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putrefaciens, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, and Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes grew as well as Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni.

  5. High amino acid diversity and positive selection at a putative coral immunity gene (tachylectin-2

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    Hellberg Michael E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes involved in immune functions, including pathogen recognition and the activation of innate defense pathways, are among the most genetically variable known, and the proteins that they encode are often characterized by high rates of amino acid substitutions, a hallmark of positive selection. The high levels of variation characteristic of immunity genes make them useful tools for conservation genetics. To date, highly variable immunity genes have yet to be found in corals, keystone organisms of the world's most diverse marine ecosystem, the coral reef. Here, we examine variation in and selection on a putative innate immunity gene from Oculina, a coral genus previously used as a model for studies of coral disease and bleaching. Results In a survey of 244 Oculina alleles, we find high nonsynonymous variation and a signature of positive selection, consistent with a putative role in immunity. Using computational protein structure prediction, we generate a structural model of the Oculina protein that closely matches the known structure of tachylectin-2 from the Japanese horseshoe crab (Tachypleus tridentatus, a protein with demonstrated function in microbial recognition and agglutination. We also demonstrate that at least three other genera of anthozoan cnidarians (Acropora, Montastrea and Nematostella possess proteins structurally similar to tachylectin-2. Conclusions Taken together, the evidence of high amino acid diversity, positive selection and structural correspondence to the horseshoe crab tachylectin-2 suggests that this protein is 1 part of Oculina's innate immunity repertoire, and 2 evolving adaptively, possibly under selective pressure from coral-associated microorganisms. Tachylectin-2 may serve as a candidate locus to screen coral populations for their capacity to respond adaptively to future environmental change.

  6. Selective Imaging of Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Microbiotas in the Mouse Gut.

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    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuntao; Chen, Xing

    2017-08-01

    The diverse gut microbial communities are crucial for host health. How the interactions between microbial communities and between host and microbes influence the host, however, is not well understood. To facilitate gut microbiota research, selective imaging of specific groups of microbiotas in the gut is of great utility but remains technically challenging. Here we present a chemical approach that enables selective imaging of Gram-negative and Gram-positive microbiotas in the mouse gut by exploiting their distinctive cell wall components. Cell-selective labeling is achieved by the combined use of metabolic labeling of Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharides with a clickable azidosugar and direct labeling of Gram-positive bacteria with a vancomycin-derivatized fluorescent probe. We demonstrated this strategy by two-color fluorescence imaging of Gram-negative and Gram-positive gut microbiotas in the mouse intestines. This chemical method should be broadly applicable to different gut microbiota research fields and other bacterial communities studied in microbiology.

  7. Identification and evidence of positive selection upon resistance gene analogs in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

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    Zambounis, Antonios; Ganopoulos, Ioannis; Kalivas, Apostolos; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Madesis, Panagiotis

    2016-07-01

    Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is an important fiber crop species, which is intensively plagued by a plethora of phytopathogenic fungi such as Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (Fov) causing severe wilt disease. Resistance gene analogs (RGAs) are the largest class of potential resistance (R) genes depicting highly conserved domains and structures in plants. Additionally, RGAs are pivotal components of breeding projects towards host disease resistance, serving as useful functional markers linked to R genes. In this study, a cloning approach based on conserved RGAs motifs was used in order to amplify 38 RGAs from two upland cotton cultivars differing in their Fov susceptibility. Besides, we assessed the phylogenetic expansion and the evolutionary pressures acting upon 127 RGA homologues, which were previously deposited in GenBank along with the 38 RGAs from this study. A total of 165 RGAs sequences were clustered according to their BLAST(P) similarities in ten paralogous genes groups (PGGs). These RGAs exhibited intensive signs of positive selection as it was revealed by inferring various maximum likelihood analyses. The results showed robust signs of positive selection, acting in almost all PGGs across the phylogeny. The evolutionary analysis revealed the existence of 42 positively selected residue sites across the PGG lineages, putatively affecting their ligand-binding specificities. As RGAs derived markers are in close linkage to R genes, these results could be used in ongoing breeding programs of upland cotton.

  8. Red Queen Processes Drive Positive Selection on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC Genes.

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    Maciej Jan Ejsmond

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC genes code for proteins involved in the incitation of the adaptive immune response in vertebrates, which is achieved through binding oligopeptides (antigens of pathogenic origin. Across vertebrate species, substitutions of amino acids at sites responsible for the specificity of antigen binding (ABS are positively selected. This is attributed to pathogen-driven balancing selection, which is also thought to maintain the high polymorphism of MHC genes, and to cause the sharing of allelic lineages between species. However, the nature of this selection remains controversial. We used individual-based computer simulations to investigate the roles of two phenomena capable of maintaining MHC polymorphism: heterozygote advantage and host-pathogen arms race (Red Queen process. Our simulations revealed that levels of MHC polymorphism were high and driven mostly by the Red Queen process at a high pathogen mutation rate, but were low and driven mostly by heterozygote advantage when the pathogen mutation rate was low. We found that novel mutations at ABSs are strongly favored by the Red Queen process, but not by heterozygote advantage, regardless of the pathogen mutation rate. However, while the strong advantage of novel alleles increased the allele turnover rate, under a high pathogen mutation rate, allelic lineages persisted for a comparable length of time under Red Queen and under heterozygote advantage. Thus, when pathogens evolve quickly, the Red Queen is capable of explaining both positive selection and long coalescence times, but the tension between the novel allele advantage and persistence of alleles deserves further investigation.

  9. Red Queen Processes Drive Positive Selection on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Genes.

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    Ejsmond, Maciej Jan; Radwan, Jacek

    2015-11-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes code for proteins involved in the incitation of the adaptive immune response in vertebrates, which is achieved through binding oligopeptides (antigens) of pathogenic origin. Across vertebrate species, substitutions of amino acids at sites responsible for the specificity of antigen binding (ABS) are positively selected. This is attributed to pathogen-driven balancing selection, which is also thought to maintain the high polymorphism of MHC genes, and to cause the sharing of allelic lineages between species. However, the nature of this selection remains controversial. We used individual-based computer simulations to investigate the roles of two phenomena capable of maintaining MHC polymorphism: heterozygote advantage and host-pathogen arms race (Red Queen process). Our simulations revealed that levels of MHC polymorphism were high and driven mostly by the Red Queen process at a high pathogen mutation rate, but were low and driven mostly by heterozygote advantage when the pathogen mutation rate was low. We found that novel mutations at ABSs are strongly favored by the Red Queen process, but not by heterozygote advantage, regardless of the pathogen mutation rate. However, while the strong advantage of novel alleles increased the allele turnover rate, under a high pathogen mutation rate, allelic lineages persisted for a comparable length of time under Red Queen and under heterozygote advantage. Thus, when pathogens evolve quickly, the Red Queen is capable of explaining both positive selection and long coalescence times, but the tension between the novel allele advantage and persistence of alleles deserves further investigation.

  10. Evaluation of HIV testing algorithms in Ethiopia: the role of the tie-breaker algorithm and weakly reacting test lines in contributing to a high rate of false positive HIV diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Leslie; Siddiqui, M Ruby; Kliescikova, Jarmila; Pearce, Neil; Ariti, Cono; Muluneh, Libsework; Pirou, Erwan; Ritmeijer, Koert; Masiga, Johnson; Abebe, Almaz

    2015-02-03

    In Ethiopia a tiebreaker algorithm using 3 rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) in series is used to diagnose HIV. Discordant results between the first 2 RDTs are resolved by a third 'tiebreaker' RDT. Médecins Sans Frontières uses an alternate serial algorithm of 2 RDTs followed by a confirmation test for all double positive RDT results. The primary objective was to compare the performance of the tiebreaker algorithm with a serial algorithm, and to evaluate the addition of a confirmation test to both algorithms. A secondary objective looked at the positive predictive value (PPV) of weakly reactive test lines. The study was conducted in two HIV testing sites in Ethiopia. Study participants were recruited sequentially until 200 positive samples were reached. Each sample was re-tested in the laboratory on the 3 RDTs and on a simple to use confirmation test, the Orgenics Immunocomb Combfirm® (OIC). The gold standard test was the Western Blot, with indeterminate results resolved by PCR testing. 2620 subjects were included with a HIV prevalence of 7.7%. Each of the 3 RDTs had an individual specificity of at least 99%. The serial algorithm with 2 RDTs had a single false positive result (1 out of 204) to give a PPV of 99.5% (95% CI 97.3%-100%). The tiebreaker algorithm resulted in 16 false positive results (PPV 92.7%, 95% CI: 88.4%-95.8%). Adding the OIC confirmation test to either algorithm eliminated the false positives. All the false positives had at least one weakly reactive test line in the algorithm. The PPV of weakly reacting RDTs was significantly lower than those with strongly positive test lines. The risk of false positive HIV diagnosis in a tiebreaker algorithm is significant. We recommend abandoning the tie-breaker algorithm in favour of WHO recommended serial or parallel algorithms, interpreting weakly reactive test lines as indeterminate results requiring further testing except in the setting of blood transfusion, and most importantly, adding a confirmation test

  11. The dilemma of Fisherian sexual selection: mate choice for indirect benefits despite rarity and overall weakness of trait-preference genetic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Michael D; Alem, Sylvain; Limousin, Denis; Bailey, Nathan W

    2014-12-01

    Fisher's mechanism of sexual selection is a fundamental element of evolutionary theory. In it nonrandom mate choice causes a genetic covariance between a male trait and female preference for that trait and thereby generates a positive feedback process sustaining accelerated coevolution of the trait and preference. Numerous theoretical models of Fisher's mechanism have confirmed its mathematical underpinnings, yet biologists have often failed to find evidence for trait-preference genetic correlation in populations in which the mechanism was expected to function. We undertook a survey of the literature to conduct a formal meta-analysis probing the incidence and strength of trait-preference correlation among animal species. Our meta-analysis found significant positive genetic correlations in fewer than 20% of the species studied and an overall weighted correlation that is slightly positive. Importantly, a significant positive correlation was not found in any thorough study that included multiple subgroups. We discuss several ways in which the dynamic, multivariate nature of mate choice may reduce the trait-preference genetic correlation predicted by Fisher's mechanism. We then entertain the possibilities that Fisherian-like processes sometimes function without genetic correlation, and that mate choice may persist in a population as long as genetic correlation, and therefore Fisher's mechanism, occurs intermittently. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. Species-specific activity of HIV-1 Vpu and positive selection of tetherin transmembrane domain variants.

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    Matthew W McNatt

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin/BST-2/CD317 is a recently identified antiviral protein that blocks the release of nascent retrovirus, and other virus, particles from infected cells. An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vpu, acts as an antagonist of tetherin. Here, we show that positive selection is evident in primate tetherin sequences and that HIV-1 Vpu appears to have specifically adapted to antagonize variants of tetherin found in humans and chimpanzees. Tetherin variants found in rhesus macaques (rh, African green monkeys (agm and mice were able to inhibit HIV-1 particle release, but were resistant to antagonism by HIV-1 Vpu. Notably, reciprocal exchange of transmembrane domains between human and monkey tetherins conferred sensitivity and resistance to Vpu, identifying this protein domain as a critical determinant of Vpu function. Indeed, differences between hu-tetherin and rh-tetherin at several positions in the transmembrane domain affected sensitivity to antagonism by Vpu. Two alterations in the hu-tetherin transmembrane domain, that correspond to differences found in rh- and agm-tetherin proteins, were sufficient to render hu-tetherin completely resistant to HIV-1 Vpu. Interestingly, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain sequences in primate tetherins exhibit variation at numerous codons that is likely the result of positive selection, and some of these changes coincide with determinants of HIV-1 Vpu sensitivity. Overall, these data indicate that tetherin could impose a barrier to viral zoonosis as a consequence of positive selection that has been driven by ancient viral antagonists, and that the HIV-1 Vpu protein has specialized to target the transmembrane domains found in human/chimpanzee tetherin proteins.

  13. Gossip and Distributed Kalman Filtering: Weak Consensus Under Weak Detectability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Soummya; Moura, José M. F.

    2011-04-01

    The paper presents the gossip interactive Kalman filter (GIKF) for distributed Kalman filtering for networked systems and sensor networks, where inter-sensor communication and observations occur at the same time-scale. The communication among sensors is random; each sensor occasionally exchanges its filtering state information with a neighbor depending on the availability of the appropriate network link. We show that under a weak distributed detectability condition: 1. the GIKF error process remains stochastically bounded, irrespective of the instability properties of the random process dynamics; and 2. the network achieves \\emph{weak consensus}, i.e., the conditional estimation error covariance at a (uniformly) randomly selected sensor converges in distribution to a unique invariant measure on the space of positive semi-definite matrices (independent of the initial state.) To prove these results, we interpret the filtered states (estimates and error covariances) at each node in the GIKF as stochastic particles with local interactions. We analyze the asymptotic properties of the error process by studying as a random dynamical system the associated switched (random) Riccati equation, the switching being dictated by a non-stationary Markov chain on the network graph.

  14. Widespread Positive Selection Drives Differentiation of Centromeric Proteins in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Emily A; Llopart, Ana

    2015-11-25

    Rapid evolution of centromeric satellite repeats is thought to cause compensatory amino acid evolution in interacting centromere-associated kinetochore proteins. Cid, a protein that mediates kinetochore/centromere interactions, displays particularly high amino acid turnover. Rapid evolution of both Cid and centromeric satellite repeats led us to hypothesize that the apparent compensatory evolution may extend to interacting partners in the Condensin I complex (i.e., SMC2, SMC4, Cap-H, Cap-D2, and Cap-G) and HP1s. Missense mutations in these proteins often result in improper centromere formation and aberrant chromosome segregation, thus selection for maintained function and coevolution among proteins of the complex is likely strong. Here, we report evidence of rapid evolution and recurrent positive selection in seven centromere-associated proteins in species of the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup, and further postulate that positive selection on these proteins could be a result of centromere drive and compensatory changes, with kinetochore proteins competing for optimal spindle attachment.

  15. Ubc9 Is Required for Positive Selection and Late-Stage Maturation of Thymocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aibo; Ding, Xiao; Demarque, Maud; Liu, Xindong; Pan, Deng; Xin, Huawei; Zhong, Bo; Wang, Xiaohu; Dejean, Anne; Jin, Wei; Dong, Chen

    2017-05-01

    SUMOylation is an important posttranslational modification that regulates protein function in diverse biological processes. However, its role in early T cell development has not been genetically studied. UBC9 is the only E2 enzyme for all SUMOylation. In this study, by selectively deleting Ubc9 gene in T cells, we have investigated the functional roles of SUMOylation in T cell development. Loss of Ubc9 results in a significant reduction of CD4 and CD8 single-positive lymphocytes in both thymus and periphery. Ubc9-deficient cells exhibit defective late-stage maturation post the initial positive selection with increased apoptosis and impaired proliferation, among which attenuated IL-7 signaling was correlated with the decreased survival of Ubc9-deficent CD8 single-positive cells. Furthermore, NFAT nuclear retention induced by TCR signals was regulated by SUMOylation during thymocytes development. Our study thus reveals a novel posttranslational mechanism underlying T cell development. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Design and optimization of selective azaindole amide M1 positive allosteric modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoren, Jennifer E; O'Neil, Steven V; Anderson, Dennis P; Brodney, Michael A; Chenard, Lois; Dlugolenski, Keith; Edgerton, Jeremy R; Green, Michael; Garnsey, Michelle; Grimwood, Sarah; Harris, Anthony R; Kauffman, Gregory W; LaChapelle, Erik; Lazzaro, John T; Lee, Che-Wah; Lotarski, Susan M; Nason, Deane M; Obach, R Scott; Reinhart, Veronica; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Steyn, Stefanus J; Webb, Damien; Yan, Jiangli; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-15

    Selective activation of the M1 receptor via a positive allosteric modulator (PAM) is a new approach for the treatment of the cognitive impairments associated with schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. A novel series of azaindole amides and their key pharmacophore elements are described. The nitrogen of the azaindole core is a key design element as it forms an intramolecular hydrogen bond with the amide N-H thus reinforcing the bioactive conformation predicted by published SAR and our homology model. Representative compound 25 is a potent and selective M1 PAM that has well aligned physicochemical properties, adequate brain penetration and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties, and is active in vivo. These favorable properties indicate that this series possesses suitable qualities for further development and studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Area-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition: Conformal Coating, Subnanometer Thickness Control, and Smart Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ming; Ho, Johnny C

    2015-09-22

    Transistors have already been made three-dimensional (3D), with device channels (i.e., fins in trigate field-effect transistor (FinFET) technology) that are taller, thinner, and closer together in order to enhance device performance and lower active power consumption. As device scaling continues, these transistors will require more advanced, fabrication-enabling technologies for the conformal deposition of high-κ dielectric layers on their 3D channels with accurate position alignment and thickness control down to the subnanometer scale. Among many competing techniques, area-selective atomic layer deposition (AS-ALD) is a promising method that is well suited to the requirements without the use of complicated, complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-incompatible processes. However, further progress is limited by poor area selectivity for thicker films formed via a higher number of ALD cycles as well as the prolonged processing time. In this issue of ACS Nano, Professor Stacy Bent and her research group demonstrate a straightforward self-correcting ALD approach, combining selective deposition with a postprocess mild chemical etching, which enables selective deposition of dielectric films with thicknesses and processing times at least 10 times larger and 48 times shorter, respectively, than those obtained by conventional AS-ALD processes. These advances present an important technological breakthrough that may drive the AS-ALD technique a step closer toward industrial applications in electronics, catalysis, and photonics, etc. where more efficient device fabrication processes are needed.

  18. Selectivity of Brij-35 in Micellar Liquid Chromatographic Separation of Positional Isomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najma Memon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of Brij-35, a nonionic surfactant, as a mobile phase for separation of positional isomers is investigated. Chromolith C-18 SpeedROD is used as a stationary phase. The effect of surfactant and organic modifier (propanol concentration on the separation of some selected isomers is studied and evaluated in terms of linear solvation energy relationship (LSER. Shape selectivity is assessed by α value of sorbic and benzoic acid, which is found to be 1.339 by using mobile phase composed of 0.5% aqueous solutions of Brij-35 and propanol in 9 : 1. Isomers of parabens, nitroanilines, nitrophenols, and quinolinols are successfully separated using mobile phases composed of various percentages of surfactant and propanol. System constants for nonionic MLC using LSER analysis show that hydrogen bond basicity and dipolarity may be major contributors to selectivity, while excess molar refraction helps fine-tuning the separation which also imparts unique selectivity to nonionic surfactants as compared to ionic ones.

  19. Genome-Wide Analyses Reveal Genes Subject to Positive Selection in Pasteurella multocida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Peili; Guo, Dongchun; Liu, Jiasen; Jiang, Qian; Xu, Zhuofei; Qu, Liandong

    2017-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida, a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen, has led to a broad range of diseases in mammals and birds, including fowl cholera in poultry, pneumonia and atrophic rhinitis in swine and rabbit, hemorrhagic septicemia in cattle, and bite infections in humans. In order to better interpret the genetic diversity and adaptation evolution of this pathogen, seven genomes of P. multocida strains isolated from fowls, rabbit and pigs were determined by using high-throughput sequencing approach. Together with publicly available P. multocida genomes, evolutionary features were systematically analyzed in this study. Clustering of 70,565 protein-coding genes showed that the pangenome of 33 P. multocida strains was composed of 1,602 core genes, 1,364 dispensable genes, and 1,070 strain-specific genes. Of these, we identified a full spectrum of genes related to virulence factors and revealed genetic diversity of these potential virulence markers across P. multocida strains, e.g., bcbAB, fcbC, lipA, bexDCA, ctrCD, lgtA, lgtC, lic2A involved in biogenesis of surface polysaccharides, hsf encoding autotransporter adhesin, and fhaB encoding filamentous haemagglutinin. Furthermore, based on genome-wide positive selection scanning, a total of 35 genes were subject to strong selection pressure. Extensive analyses of protein subcellular location indicated that membrane-associated genes were highly abundant among all positively selected genes. The detected amino acid sites undergoing adaptive selection were preferably located in extracellular space, perhaps associated with bacterial evasion of host immune responses. Our findings shed more light on conservation and distribution of virulence-associated genes across P. multocida strains. Meanwhile, this study provides a genetic context for future researches on the mechanism of adaptive evolution in P. multocida. PMID:28611758

  20. Genome-Wide Analyses Reveal Genes Subject to Positive Selection in Pasteurella multocida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peili Cao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida, a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen, has led to a broad range of diseases in mammals and birds, including fowl cholera in poultry, pneumonia and atrophic rhinitis in swine and rabbit, hemorrhagic septicemia in cattle, and bite infections in humans. In order to better interpret the genetic diversity and adaptation evolution of this pathogen, seven genomes of P. multocida strains isolated from fowls, rabbit and pigs were determined by using high-throughput sequencing approach. Together with publicly available P. multocida genomes, evolutionary features were systematically analyzed in this study. Clustering of 70,565 protein-coding genes showed that the pangenome of 33 P. multocida strains was composed of 1,602 core genes, 1,364 dispensable genes, and 1,070 strain-specific genes. Of these, we identified a full spectrum of genes related to virulence factors and revealed genetic diversity of these potential virulence markers across P. multocida strains, e.g., bcbAB, fcbC, lipA, bexDCA, ctrCD, lgtA, lgtC, lic2A involved in biogenesis of surface polysaccharides, hsf encoding autotransporter adhesin, and fhaB encoding filamentous haemagglutinin. Furthermore, based on genome-wide positive selection scanning, a total of 35 genes were subject to strong selection pressure. Extensive analyses of protein subcellular location indicated that membrane-associated genes were highly abundant among all positively selected genes. The detected amino acid sites undergoing adaptive selection were preferably located in extracellular space, perhaps associated with bacterial evasion of host immune responses. Our findings shed more light on conservation and distribution of virulence-associated genes across P. multocida strains. Meanwhile, this study provides a genetic context for future researches on the mechanism of adaptive evolution in P. multocida.

  1. Genome-Wide Analyses Reveal Genes Subject to Positive Selection in Pasteurella multocida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Peili; Guo, Dongchun; Liu, Jiasen; Jiang, Qian; Xu, Zhuofei; Qu, Liandong

    2017-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida, a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen, has led to a broad range of diseases in mammals and birds, including fowl cholera in poultry, pneumonia and atrophic rhinitis in swine and rabbit, hemorrhagic septicemia in cattle, and bite infections in humans. In order to better interpret the genetic diversity and adaptation evolution of this pathogen, seven genomes of P. multocida strains isolated from fowls, rabbit and pigs were determined by using high-throughput sequencing approach. Together with publicly available P. multocida genomes, evolutionary features were systematically analyzed in this study. Clustering of 70,565 protein-coding genes showed that the pangenome of 33 P. multocida strains was composed of 1,602 core genes, 1,364 dispensable genes, and 1,070 strain-specific genes. Of these, we identified a full spectrum of genes related to virulence factors and revealed genetic diversity of these potential virulence markers across P. multocida strains, e.g., bcbAB, fcbC, lipA, bexDCA, ctrCD, lgtA, lgtC, lic2A involved in biogenesis of surface polysaccharides, hsf encoding autotransporter adhesin, and fhaB encoding filamentous haemagglutinin. Furthermore, based on genome-wide positive selection scanning, a total of 35 genes were subject to strong selection pressure. Extensive analyses of protein subcellular location indicated that membrane-associated genes were highly abundant among all positively selected genes. The detected amino acid sites undergoing adaptive selection were preferably located in extracellular space, perhaps associated with bacterial evasion of host immune responses. Our findings shed more light on conservation and distribution of virulence-associated genes across P. multocida strains. Meanwhile, this study provides a genetic context for future researches on the mechanism of adaptive evolution in P. multocida.

  2. The Role of Positive and Negative Signaling Communication by Strong and Weak Ties in the Shaping of Safe Sex Subjective Norms of Adolescents in South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Hendrik; Westhoff, Yvette

    We propose the theory that subjective (injunctive) social norms are shaped through two intertwined processes: positive and negative signaling communication by the personal social network and construal of the communicated social norm. Construal is evoked by the strength of the relation between a tie

  3. Positive evolutionary selection of an HD motif on Alzheimer precursor protein orthologues suggests a functional role.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Miklós

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available HD amino acid duplex has been found in the active center of many different enzymes. The dyad plays remarkably different roles in their catalytic processes that usually involve metal coordination. An HD motif is positioned directly on the amyloid beta fragment (Aβ and on the carboxy-terminal region of the extracellular domain (CAED of the human amyloid precursor protein (APP and a taxonomically well defined group of APP orthologues (APPOs. In human Aβ HD is part of a presumed, RGD-like integrin-binding motif RHD; however, neither RHD nor RXD demonstrates reasonable conservation in APPOs. The sequences of CAEDs and the position of the HD are not particularly conserved either, yet we show with a novel statistical method using evolutionary modeling that the presence of HD on CAEDs cannot be the result of neutral evolutionary forces (p<0.0001. The motif is positively selected along the evolutionary process in the majority of APPOs, despite the fact that HD motif is underrepresented in the proteomes of all species of the animal kingdom. Position migration can be explained by high probability occurrence of multiple copies of HD on intermediate sequences, from which only one is kept by selective evolutionary forces, in a similar way as in the case of the "transcription binding site turnover." CAED of all APP orthologues and homologues are predicted to bind metal ions including Amyloid-like protein 1 (APLP1 and Amyloid-like protein 2 (APLP2. Our results suggest that HDs on the CAEDs are most probably key components of metal-binding domains, which facilitate and/or regulate inter- or intra-molecular interactions in a metal ion-dependent or metal ion concentration-dependent manner. The involvement of naturally occurring mutations of HD (Tottori (D7N and English (H6R mutations in early onset Alzheimer's disease gives additional support to our finding that HD has an evolutionary preserved function on APPOs.

  4. Positive selection in seed potato production in Kenya as a case of successful research-led innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gildemacher, P.R.; Leeuwis, C.; Demo, P.; Borus, D.; Schulte-Geldermann, E.; Kinyae, P.; Mundia, P.; Nyongesa, M.; Struik, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    By identifying the success factors of a programme on positive seed potato selection, this article analyses the role of research in agricultural innovation. The positive seed selection programme developed an approach to improve the quality of seed potatoes by ware potato growers, complementary to

  5. Adaptive molecular evolution of MC1R gene reveals the evidence for positive diversifying selection in indigenous goat populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Hafiz Ishfaq; Liu, Guiqiong; Jiang, Xunping; Liu, Chenhui; Chong, Yuqing; Huarong, Huang

    2017-07-01

    Detecting signatures of selection can provide a new insight into the mechanism of contemporary breeding and artificial selection and further reveal the causal genes associated to the phenotypic variation. However, the signatures of selection on genes entailing for profitable traits between Chinese commercial and indigenous goats have been poorly interpreted. We noticed footprints of positive selection at MC1R gene containing SNPs genotyped in five Chinese native goat breeds. An experimental distribution of FST was built based on approximations of FST for each SNP across five breeds. We identified selection using the high FST outlier method and found that MC1R candidate gene show evidence of positive selection. Furthermore, adaptive selection pressure on specific codons was determined using different codon based on maximum-likelihood methods; signature of positive selection in mammalian MC1R was explored in individual codons. Evolutionary analyses were inferred under maximum likelihood models, the HyPhy package implemented in the DATAMONKEY Web Server. The results of codon selection displayed positive diversifying selection at the sites were mainly involved in development of genetic variations in coat color in various mammalian species. Positive diversifying selection inferred with recent evolutionary changes in domesticated goat MC1R provides new insights that the gene evolution may have been modulated by domestication events in goats.

  6. Evidence of positive selection associated with placental loss in tiger sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Dominic G; Dunning, Luke T; Igea, Javier; Brooks, Edward J; Jones, Catherine S; Noble, Leslie R; Ciezarek, Adam; Humble, Emily; Savolainen, Vincent

    2016-06-14

    All vertebrates initially feed their offspring using yolk reserves. In some live-bearing species these yolk reserves may be supplemented with extra nutrition via a placenta. Sharks belonging to the Carcharhinidae family are all live-bearing, and with the exception of the tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier), develop placental connections after exhausting yolk reserves. Phylogenetic relationships suggest the lack of placenta in tiger sharks is due to secondary loss. This represents a dramatic shift in reproductive strategy, and is likely to have left a molecular footprint of positive selection within the genome. We sequenced the transcriptome of the tiger shark and eight other live-bearing shark species. From this data we constructed a time-calibrated phylogenetic tree estimating the tiger shark lineage diverged from the placental carcharhinids approximately 94 million years ago. Along the tiger shark lineage, we identified five genes exhibiting a signature of positive selection. Four of these genes have functions likely associated with brain development (YWHAE and ARL6IP5) and sexual reproduction (VAMP4 and TCTEX1D2). Our results indicate the loss of placenta in tiger sharks may be associated with subsequent adaptive changes in brain development and sperm production.

  7. Positive selection is the main driving force for evolution of citrus canker-causing Xanthomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunzeng; Jalan, Neha; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Goss, Erica; Jones, Jeffrey B; Setubal, João C; Deng, Xiaoling; Wang, Nian

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the evolutionary history and potential of bacterial pathogens is critical to prevent the emergence of new infectious bacterial diseases. Xanthomonas axonopodis subsp. citri (Xac) (synonym X. citri subsp. citri), which causes citrus canker, is one of the hardest-fought plant bacterial pathogens in US history. Here, we sequenced 21 Xac strains (14 XacA, 3 XacA* and 4 XacAw) with different host ranges from North America and Asia and conducted comparative genomic and evolutionary analyses. Our analyses suggest that acquisition of beneficial genes and loss of detrimental genes most likely allowed XacA to infect a broader range of hosts as compared with XacAw and XacA*. Recombination was found to have occurred frequently on the relative ancient branches, but rarely on the young branches of the clonal genealogy. The ratio of recombination/mutation ρ/θ was 0.0790±0.0005, implying that the Xac population was clonal in structure. Positive selection has affected 14% (395 out of 2822) of core genes of the citrus canker-causing Xanthomonas. The genes affected are enriched in ‘carbohydrate transport and metabolism' and ‘DNA replication, recombination and repair' genes (Pcitrus canker-causing Xanthomonas. Our results suggest that both metabolism and virulence genes provide advantages to endow XacA with higher virulence and a wider host range. Our analysis advances our understanding of the genomic basis of specialization by positive selection in bacterial evolution. PMID:25689023

  8. Positive selection at the ASPM gene coincides with brain size enlargements in cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shixia; Chen, Yuan; Cheng, Yuefeng; Yang, Dan; Zhou, Xuming; Xu, Junxiao; Zhou, Kaiya; Yang, Guang

    2012-11-07

    The enlargement of cetacean brain size represents an enigmatic event in mammalian evolution, yet its genetic basis remains poorly explored. One candidate gene associated with brain size evolution is the abnormal spindle-like microcephaly associated (ASPM), as mutations in this gene cause severe reductions in the cortical size of humans. Here, we investigated the ASPM gene in representative cetacean lineages and previously published sequences from other mammals to test whether the expansion of the cetacean brain matched adaptive ASPM evolution patterns. Our analyses yielded significant evidence of positive selection on the ASPM gene during cetacean evolution, especially for the Odontoceti and Delphinoidea lineages. These molecular patterns were associated with two major events of relative brain size enlargement in odontocetes and delphinoids. It is of particular interest to find that positive selection was restricted to cetaceans and primates, two distant lineages both characterized by a massive expansion of brain size. This result is suggestive of convergent molecular evolution, although no site-specific convergence at the amino acid level was found.

  9. Positive selection on the nonhomologous end-joining factor Cernunnos-XLF in the human lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurka Jerzy

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cernunnos-XLF is a nonhomologous end-joining factor that is mutated in patients with a rare immunodeficiency with microcephaly. Several other microcephaly-associated genes such as ASPM and microcephalin experienced recent adaptive evolution apparently linked to brain size expansion in humans. In this study we investigated whether Cernunnos-XLF experienced similar positive selection during human evolution. Results We obtained or reconstructed full-length coding sequences of chimpanzee, rhesus macaque, canine, and bovine Cernunnos-XLF orthologs from sequence databases and sequence trace archives. Comparison of coding sequences revealed an excess of nonsynonymous substitutions consistent with positive selection on Cernunnos-XLF in the human lineage. The hotspots of adaptive evolution are concentrated around a specific structural domain, whose analogue in the structurally similar XRCC4 protein is involved in binding of another nonhomologous end-joining factor, DNA ligase IV. Conclusion Cernunnos-XLF is a microcephaly-associated locus newly identified to be under adaptive evolution in humans, and possibly played a role in human brain expansion. We speculate that Cernunnos-XLF may have contributed to the increased number of brain cells in humans by efficient double strand break repair, which helps to prevent frequent apoptosis of neuronal progenitors and aids mitotic cell cycle progression. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Chris Ponting and Richard Emes (nominated by Chris Ponting, Kateryna Makova, Gáspár Jékely and Eugene V. Koonin.

  10. Positive selection is the main driving force for evolution of citrus canker-causing Xanthomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunzeng; Jalan, Neha; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Goss, Erica; Jones, Jeffrey B; Setubal, João C; Deng, Xiaoling; Wang, Nian

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the evolutionary history and potential of bacterial pathogens is critical to prevent the emergence of new infectious bacterial diseases. Xanthomonas axonopodis subsp. citri (Xac) (synonym X. citri subsp. citri), which causes citrus canker, is one of the hardest-fought plant bacterial pathogens in US history. Here, we sequenced 21 Xac strains (14 XacA, 3 XacA* and 4 XacA(w)) with different host ranges from North America and Asia and conducted comparative genomic and evolutionary analyses. Our analyses suggest that acquisition of beneficial genes and loss of detrimental genes most likely allowed XacA to infect a broader range of hosts as compared with XacA(w) and XacA*. Recombination was found to have occurred frequently on the relative ancient branches, but rarely on the young branches of the clonal genealogy. The ratio of recombination/mutation ρ/θ was 0.0790±0.0005, implying that the Xac population was clonal in structure. Positive selection has affected 14% (395 out of 2822) of core genes of the citrus canker-causing Xanthomonas. The genes affected are enriched in 'carbohydrate transport and metabolism' and 'DNA replication, recombination and repair' genes (Pcitrus canker-causing Xanthomonas. Our results suggest that both metabolism and virulence genes provide advantages to endow XacA with higher virulence and a wider host range. Our analysis advances our understanding of the genomic basis of specialization by positive selection in bacterial evolution.

  11. Transcriptome profile and unique genetic evolution of positively selected genes in yak lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, DaoLiang; Xiong, XianRong; Ji, WenHui; Li, Jian; Mipam, Tserang-Donko; Ai, Yi; Chai, ZhiXin

    2017-12-28

    The yak (Bos grunniens), which is a unique bovine breed that is distributed mainly in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, is considered a good model for studying plateau adaptability in mammals. The lungs are important functional organs that enable animals to adapt to their external environment. However, the genetic mechanism underlying the adaptability of yak lungs to harsh plateau environments remains unknown. To explore the unique evolutionary process and genetic mechanism of yak adaptation to plateau environments, we performed transcriptome sequencing of yak and cattle (Bos taurus) lungs using RNA-Seq technology and a subsequent comparison analysis to identify the positively selected genes in the yak. After deep sequencing, a normal transcriptome profile of yak lung that containing a total of 16,815 expressed genes was obtained, and the characteristics of yak lungs transcriptome was described by functional analysis. Furthermore, Ka/Ks comparison statistics result showed that 39 strong positively selected genes are identified from yak lungs. Further GO and KEGG analysis was conducted for the functional annotation of these genes. The results of this study provide valuable data for further explorations of the unique evolutionary process of high-altitude hypoxia adaptation in yaks in the Tibetan Plateau and the genetic mechanism at the molecular level.

  12. Examination of Signatures of Recent Positive Selection on Genes Involved in Human Sialic Acid Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jiyun M; Aronoff, David M; Capra, John A; Abbot, Patrick; Rokas, Antonis

    2018-02-21

    Sialic acids are nine carbon sugars ubiquitously found on the surfaces of vertebrate cells and are involved in various immune response-related processes. In humans, at least 58 genes spanning diverse functions, from biosynthesis and activation to recycling and degradation, are involved in sialic acid biology. Because of their role in immunity, sialic acid biology genes have been hypothesized to exhibit elevated rates of evolutionary change. Consistent with this hypothesis, several genes involved in sialic acid biology have experienced higher rates of non-synonymous substitutions in the human lineage than their counterparts in other great apes, perhaps in response to ancient pathogens that infected hominins millions of years ago (paleopathogens). To test whether sialic acid biology genes have also experienced more recent positive selection during the evolution of the modern human lineage, reflecting adaptation to contemporary cosmopolitan or geographically-restricted pathogens, we examined whether their protein-coding regions showed evidence of recent hard and soft selective sweeps. This examination involved the calculation of four measures that quantify changes in allele frequency spectra, extent of population differentiation, and haplotype homozygosity caused by recent hard and soft selective sweeps for 55 sialic acid biology genes using publicly available whole genome sequencing data from 1,668 humans from three ethnic groups. To disentangle evidence for selection from confounding demographic effects, we compared the observed patterns in sialic acid biology genes to simulated sequences of the same length under a model of neutral evolution that takes into account human demographic history. We found that the patterns of genetic variation of most sialic acid biology genes did not significantly deviate from neutral expectations and were not significantly different among genes belonging to different functional categories. Those few sialic acid biology genes that

  13. Phylogenetic analysis and positive-selection site detecting of vascular endothelial growth factor family in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenwu; Tang, Yanyan; Qi, Bin; Lu, Chuansen; Qin, Chao; Wei, Yunfei; Yi, Jiachao; Chen, Mingwu

    2014-02-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), known to play an important role in vascular homeostasis, vascular integrity and angiogenesis, is little known about the evolutionary relationship of its five members especially the role of gene duplication and natural selection in the evolution of the VEGF family. In this study, seventy-five full-length cDNA sequences from 33 vertebrate species were extracted from the NCBI's GenBank, UniProt protein database and the Ensembl database. By phylogenetic analyses, we investigated the origin, conservation, and evolution of the VEGFs. Five VEGF family members in vertebrates might be formed by gene duplication. The inferred evolutionary transitions that separate members which belong to different gene clusters correlated with changes in functional properties. Selection analysis and protein structure analysis were combined to explain the relationship of the site-specific evolution in the vertebrate VEGF family. Eleven positive selection sites, one transmembrane region and the active sites were detected in this process. © 2013.

  14. Measurement of weak radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Theodorsson , P

    1996-01-01

    This book is intended for scientists engaged in the measurement of weak alpha, beta, and gamma active samples; in health physics, environmental control, nuclear geophysics, tracer work, radiocarbon dating etc. It describes the underlying principles of radiation measurement and the detectors used. It also covers the sources of background, analyzes their effect on the detector and discusses economic ways to reduce the background. The most important types of low-level counting systems and the measurement of some of the more important radioisotopes are described here. In cases where more than one type can be used, the selection of the most suitable system is shown.

  15. Selective Population of Unbound Positive Parity States in 25F and 26F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Nathan; Herman, Jacob; Rabeh, Ali; Tuttle-Timm, Matthew; MoNA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Unbound Positive Parity States in 25F and 26F were populated in the one-proton removal reaction from a radioactive 27Ne beam. The experiment was performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), where a 101.3 MeV/u 27Ne ion beam impinged on a liquid deuterium target populating states in 26F. States above the one- and two- neutron separation energies lead to 24F and 25F, respectively. The MoNA/LISA setup at NSCL was used to detect the fragments in coincidence with neutrons and the decay energy spectra of 25F and 26F were reconstructed by invariant mass spectroscopy. Resonance energies of approximately 0.35 MeV and 0.5 MeV for 25F* and 26F*, respectively, were extracted. Based on the calculated spectroscopic strength distribution of negative and positive parity states in 26F and the selectivity of one proton-removal reactions both states were assigned positive parity. NSF Grant #1404236.

  16. Genes Regulated by Vitamin D in Bone Cells Are Positively Selected in East Asians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Arciero

    Full Text Available Vitamin D and folate are activated and degraded by sunlight, respectively, and the physiological processes they control are likely to have been targets of selection as humans expanded from Africa into Eurasia. We investigated signals of positive selection in gene sets involved in the metabolism, regulation and action of these two vitamins in worldwide populations sequenced by Phase I of the 1000 Genomes Project. Comparing allele frequency-spectrum-based summary statistics between these gene sets and matched control genes, we observed a selection signal specific to East Asians for a gene set associated with vitamin D action in bones. The selection signal was mainly driven by three genes CXXC finger protein 1 (CXXC1, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5 and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2. Examination of population differentiation and haplotypes allowed us to identify several candidate causal regulatory variants in each gene. Four of these candidate variants (one each in CXXC1 and RUNX2 and two in LRP5 had a >70% derived allele frequency in East Asians, but were present at lower (20-60% frequency in Europeans as well, suggesting that the adaptation might have been part of a common response to climatic and dietary changes as humans expanded out of Africa, with implications for their role in vitamin D-dependent bone mineralization and osteoporosis insurgence. We also observed haplotype sharing between East Asians, Finns and an extinct archaic human (Denisovan sample at the CXXC1 locus, which is best explained by incomplete lineage sorting.

  17. Positive Selection of Iris, a Retroviral Envelope-Derived Host Gene in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes can usurp enzymatic functions encoded by mobile elements for their own use. A particularly interesting kind of acquisition involves the domestication of retroviral envelope genes, which confer infectious membrane-fusion ability to retroviruses. So far, these examples have been limited to vertebrate genomes, including primates where the domesticated envelope is under purifying selection to assist placental function. Here, we show that in Drosophila genomes, a previously unannotated gene (CG4715, renamed Iris was domesticated from a novel, active Kanga lineage of insect retroviruses at least 25 million years ago, and has since been maintained as a host gene that is expressed in all adult tissues. Iris and the envelope genes from Kanga retroviruses are homologous to those found in insect baculoviruses and gypsy and roo insect retroviruses. Two separate envelope domestications from the Kanga and roo retroviruses have taken place, in fruit fly and mosquito genomes, respectively. Whereas retroviral envelopes are proteolytically cleaved into the ligand-interaction and membrane-fusion domains, Iris appears to lack this cleavage site. In the takahashii/suzukii species groups of Drosophila, we find that Iris has tandemly duplicated to give rise to two genes (Iris-A and Iris-B. Iris-B has significantly diverged from the Iris-A lineage, primarily because of the "invention" of an intron de novo in what was previously exonic sequence. Unlike domesticated retroviral envelope genes in mammals, we find that Iris has been subject to strong positive selection between Drosophila species. The rapid, adaptive evolution of Iris is sufficient to unambiguously distinguish the phylogenies of three closely related sibling species of Drosophila (D. simulans, D. sechellia, and D. mauritiana, a discriminative power previously described only for a putative "speciation gene." Iris represents the first instance of a retroviral envelope-derived host gene

  18. Positive selection of Iris, a retroviral envelope-derived host gene in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmit S Malik

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes can usurp enzymatic functions encoded by mobile elements for their own use. A particularly interesting kind of acquisition involves the domestication of retroviral envelope genes, which confer infectious membrane-fusion ability to retroviruses. So far, these examples have been limited to vertebrate genomes, including primates where the domesticated envelope is under purifying selection to assist placental function. Here, we show that in Drosophila genomes, a previously unannotated gene (CG4715, renamed Iris was domesticated from a novel, active Kanga lineage of insect retroviruses at least 25 million years ago, and has since been maintained as a host gene that is expressed in all adult tissues. Iris and the envelope genes from Kanga retroviruses are homologous to those found in insect baculoviruses and gypsy and roo insect retroviruses. Two separate envelope domestications from the Kanga and roo retroviruses have taken place, in fruit fly and mosquito genomes, respectively. Whereas retroviral envelopes are proteolytically cleaved into the ligand-interaction and membrane-fusion domains, Iris appears to lack this cleavage site. In the takahashii/suzukii species groups of Drosophila, we find that Iris has tandemly duplicated to give rise to two genes (Iris-A and Iris-B. Iris-B has significantly diverged from the Iris-A lineage, primarily because of the "invention" of an intron de novo in what was previously exonic sequence. Unlike domesticated retroviral envelope genes in mammals, we find that Iris has been subject to strong positive selection between Drosophila species. The rapid, adaptive evolution of Iris is sufficient to unambiguously distinguish the phylogenies of three closely related sibling species of Drosophila (D. simulans, D. sechellia, and D. mauritiana, a discriminative power previously described only for a putative "speciation gene." Iris represents the first instance of a retroviral envelope-derived host gene

  19. Selective Inactivation of Resistant Gram-Positive Pathogens with a Light-Driven Hybrid Nanomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüner, Malte; Tuchscherr, Lorena; Löffler, Bettina; Gonnissen, Dominik; Riehemann, Kristina; Staniford, Mark C; Kynast, Ulrich; Strassert, Cristian A

    2015-09-23

    Herein, we present a straightforward strategy to disperse highly insoluble photosensitizers in aqueous environments, without major synthetic efforts and keeping their photosensitizing abilities unaffected. A layered nanoclay was employed to adsorb and to solubilize a highly efficient yet hydrophobic Si(IV) phthalocyaninate in water. The aggregation of the photoactive dye was correlated with its photophysical properties, particularly with the ability to produce highly cytotoxic singlet oxygen. Moreover, the resulting hybrid nanomaterial is able to selectively photoinactivate Gram-positive pathogens, due to local interactions between the bacterial membranes and the negatively charged nanodiscs. Nanotoxicity assays confirmed its innocuousness toward eukaryotic cells, showing that it constitutes a new class of "phototriggered magic bullet" for the inactivation of pathogens in phototherapy, as well as in the development of coatings for self-disinfecting surfaces.

  20. Analysis of complexity measures and information planes of selected molecules in position and momentum spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, Rodolfo O; Angulo, Juan Carlos; Antolín, Juan; Dehesa, Jesús S; López-Rosa, Sheila; Flores-Gallegos, Nelson

    2010-07-14

    The Fisher-Shannon and LMC shape complexities and the Shannon-disequilibrium, Fisher-Shannon and Fisher-disequilibrium information planes, which consist of two localization-delocalization factors, are computed in both position and momentum spaces for the one-particle densities of 90 selected molecules of various chemical types, at the CISD/6-311++G(3df,2p) level of theory. We found that while the two measures of complexity show general trends only, the localization-delocalization planes clearly exhibit chemically significant patterns. Several molecular properties (energy, ionization potential, total dipole moment, hardness, electrophilicity) are analyzed and used to interpret and understand the chemical nature of the composite information-theoretic measures above mentioned. Our results show that these measures detect not only randomness or localization but also pattern and organization.

  1. The solvent influence on the positional selectivity of Novozym 435 during 1,3-diolein synthesis by esterification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhang-Qun; Du, Wei; Liu, De-Hua

    2010-04-01

    The influence of solvents with a wide range of log P (from -0.23 to 4.5) on the positional selectivity of the immobilized lipase Novozym 435 during the esterification of oleic acid with glycerol for 1,3-diolein preparation was investigated. Analysis was performed on the basis of a simplified kinetic model of 1,3-diolein synthesis. The results showed that the preferential selectivity of Novozym 435 to 1-position over 2-position of the glycerol molecular became weaker and weaker with the increasing log P of the solvent. But after one 1-position was acylated, the preferential selectivity to the other 1-position over 2-position would be enhanced strongly for each solvent. The study also revealed that relatively hydrophilic solvent such as t-butanol was an ideal solvent for Novozym 435 catalyzed 1,3-diolein synthesis through esterification of oleic acid with glycerol. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Positive selection in octopus haemocyanin indicates functional links to temperature adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oellermann, Michael; Strugnell, Jan M; Lieb, Bernhard; Mark, Felix C

    2015-07-05

    Octopods have successfully colonised the world's oceans from the tropics to the poles. Yet, successful persistence in these habitats has required adaptations of their advanced physiological apparatus to compensate impaired oxygen supply. Their oxygen transporter haemocyanin plays a major role in cold tolerance and accordingly has undergone functional modifications to sustain oxygen release at sub-zero temperatures. However, it remains unknown how molecular properties evolved to explain the observed functional adaptations. We thus aimed to assess whether natural selection affected molecular and structural properties of haemocyanin that explains temperature adaptation in octopods. Analysis of 239 partial sequences of the haemocyanin functional units (FU) f and g of 28 octopod species of polar, temperate, subtropical and tropical origin revealed natural selection was acting primarily on charge properties of surface residues. Polar octopods contained haemocyanins with higher net surface charge due to decreased glutamic acid content and higher numbers of basic amino acids. Within the analysed partial sequences, positive selection was present at site 2545, positioned between the active copper binding centre and the FU g surface. At this site, methionine was the dominant amino acid in polar octopods and leucine was dominant in tropical octopods. Sites directly involved in oxygen binding or quaternary interactions were highly conserved within the analysed sequence. This study has provided the first insight into molecular and structural mechanisms that have enabled octopods to sustain oxygen supply from polar to tropical conditions. Our findings imply modulation of oxygen binding via charge-charge interaction at the protein surface, which stabilize quaternary interactions among functional units to reduce detrimental effects of high pH on venous oxygen release. Of the observed partial haemocyanin sequence, residue 2545 formed a close link between the FU g surface and the

  3. A Study on the Enhancement of Positioning Accuracy Performance Using Interrogator Selection Schemes over Indoor Wireless Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seungkeun; Kang, Byeong Gwon

    In this paper, two kinds of interrogator selection schemes named as random interrogator selection and hybrid interrogator selection methods are considered to enhance the positioning accuracy under indoor wireless LAN environments and the performances are compared with those of the conventional methods called as normal and reference interrogator selection schemes. These interrogator selection schemes are based on received signal strength(RSS) levels and trilateration method. A testbed was set up to measure and compare the positioning estimation error of the considered methods and previous conventional ones. The experiments results showed that the accuracy of location estimation was enormously improved with the hybrid method as much as 3m especially in a hostile environment with some obstacles. Meanwhile, the differences of estimation errors are not so much (< 0.2m) without obstacle conditions among the four kinds of interrogator selection methods.

  4. Functional divergence caused by ancient positive selection of a Drosophila hybrid incompatibility locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Barbash

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Interspecific hybrid lethality and sterility are a consequence of divergent evolution between species and serve to maintain the discrete identities of species. The evolution of hybrid incompatibilities has been described in widely accepted models by Dobzhansky and Muller where lineage-specific functional divergence is the essential characteristic of hybrid incompatibility genes. Experimentally tractable models are required to identify and test candidate hybrid incompatibility genes. Several Drosophila melanogaster genes involved in hybrid incompatibility have been identified but none has yet been shown to have functionally diverged in accordance with the Dobzhansky-Muller model. By introducing transgenic copies of the X-linked Hybrid male rescue (Hmr gene into D. melanogaster from its sibling species D. simulans and D. mauritiana, we demonstrate that Hmr has functionally diverged to cause F1 hybrid incompatibility between these species. Consistent with the Dobzhansky-Muller model, we find that Hmr has diverged extensively in the D. melanogaster lineage, but we also find extensive divergence in the sibling-species lineage. Together, these findings implicate over 13% of the amino acids encoded by Hmr as candidates for causing hybrid incompatibility. The exceptional level of divergence at Hmr cannot be explained by neutral processes because we use phylogenetic methods and population genetic analyses to show that the elevated amino-acid divergence in both lineages is due to positive selection in the distant past-at least one million generations ago. Our findings suggest that multiple substitutions driven by natural selection may be a general phenomenon required to generate hybrid incompatibility alleles.

  5. New evidence for positive selection helps explain the paternal age effect observed in achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Deepali N.; Elmer, Dominik P.; Calabrese, Peter; Boulanger, Jérôme; Arnheim, Norman; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2013-01-01

    There are certain de novo germline mutations associated with genetic disorders whose mutation rates per generation are orders of magnitude higher than the genome average. Moreover, these mutations occur exclusively in the male germ line and older men have a higher probability of having an affected child than younger ones, known as the paternal age effect (PAE). The classic example of a genetic disorder exhibiting a PAE is achondroplasia, caused predominantly by a single-nucleotide substitution (c.1138G>A) in FGFR3. To elucidate what mechanisms might be driving the high frequency of this mutation in the male germline, we examined the spatial distribution of the c.1138G>A substitution in a testis from an 80-year-old unaffected man. Using a technology based on bead-emulsion amplification, we were able to measure mutation frequencies in 192 individual pieces of the dissected testis with a false-positive rate lower than 2.7 × 10−6. We observed that most mutations are clustered in a few pieces with 95% of all mutations occurring in 27% of the total testis. Using computational simulations, we rejected the model proposing an elevated mutation rate per cell division at this nucleotide site. Instead, we determined that the observed mutation distribution fits a germline selection model, where mutant spermatogonial stem cells have a proliferative advantage over unmutated cells. Combined with data on several other PAE mutations, our results support the idea that the PAE, associated with a number of Mendelian disorders, may be explained primarily by a selective mechanism. PMID:23740942

  6. Optimization strategies for fast detection of positive selection on phylogenetic trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Mario; Schabauer, Hannes; Pacher, Christoph; Stockinger, Heinz; Stamatakis, Alexandros; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc; Salamin, Nicolas

    2014-04-15

    The detection of positive selection is widely used to study gene and genome evolution, but its application remains limited by the high computational cost of existing implementations. We present a series of computational optimizations for more efficient estimation of the likelihood function on large-scale phylogenetic problems. We illustrate our approach using the branch-site model of codon evolution. We introduce novel optimization techniques that substantially outperform both CodeML from the PAML package and our previously optimized sequential version SlimCodeML. These techniques can also be applied to other likelihood-based phylogeny software. Our implementation scales well for large numbers of codons and/or species. It can therefore analyse substantially larger datasets than CodeML. We evaluated FastCodeML on different platforms and measured average sequential speedups of FastCodeML (single-threaded) versus CodeML of up to 5.8, average speedups of FastCodeML (multi-threaded) versus CodeML on a single node (shared memory) of up to 36.9 for 12 CPU cores, and average speedups of the distributed FastCodeML versus CodeML of up to 170.9 on eight nodes (96 CPU cores in total). ftp://ftp.vital-it.ch/tools/FastCodeML/ CONTACT: selectome@unil.ch or nicolas.salamin@unil.ch. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Selective positive-negative feedback produces the winner-take-all competition in recurrent neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Liu, Bo; Li, Yangming

    2013-02-01

    The winner-take-all (WTA) competition is widely observed in both inanimate and biological media and society. Many mathematical models are proposed to describe the phenomena discovered in different fields. These models are capable of demonstrating the WTA competition. However, they are often very complicated due to the compromise with experimental realities in the particular fields; it is often difficult to explain the underlying mechanism of such a competition from the perspective of feedback based on those sophisticate models. In this paper, we make steps in that direction and present a simple model, which produces the WTA competition by taking advantage of selective positive-negative feedback through the interaction of neurons via p-norm. Compared to existing models, this model has an explicit explanation of the competition mechanism. The ultimate convergence behavior of this model is proven analytically. The convergence rate is discussed and simulations are conducted in both static and dynamic competition scenarios. Both theoretical and numerical results validate the effectiveness of the dynamic equation in describing the nonlinear phenomena of WTA competition.

  8. Differential positive selection of malaria resistance genes in three indigenous populations of Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuanyao; Yunus, Yushimah; Lu, Dongsheng; Aghakhanian, Farhang; Saw, Woei-Yuh; Deng, Lian; Ali, Mohammad; Wang, Xu; Nor, Fadzilah Mohd; Ghazali, Fadzilah; Rahman, Thuhairah Abdul; Shaari, Shahrul Azlin; Salleh, Mohd Zaki; Phipps, Maude E; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Xu, Shuhua; Teo, Yik-Ying; Hoh, Boon-Peng

    2015-04-01

    The indigenous populations from Peninsular Malaysia, locally known as Orang Asli, continue to adopt an agro-subsistence nomadic lifestyle, residing primarily within natural jungle habitats. Leading a hunter-gatherer lifestyle in a tropical jungle environment, the Orang Asli are routinely exposed to malaria. Here we surveyed the genetic architecture of individuals from four Orang Asli tribes with high-density genotyping across more than 2.5 million polymorphisms. These tribes reside in different geographical locations in Peninsular Malaysia and belong to three main ethno-linguistic groups, where there is minimal interaction between the tribes. We first dissect the genetic diversity and admixture between the tribes and with neighboring urban populations. Later, by implementing five metrics, we investigated the genome-wide signatures for positive natural selection of these Orang Asli, respectively. Finally, we searched for evidence of genomic adaptation to the pressure of malaria infection. We observed that different evolutionary responses might have emerged in the different Orang Asli communities to mitigate malaria infection.

  9. Duplicated paralogous genes subject to positive selection in the genome of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D Emes

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Whole genome studies have highlighted duplicated genes as important substrates for adaptive evolution. We have investigated adaptive evolution in this class of genes in the human parasite Trypanosoma brucei, as indicated by the ratio of non-synonymous (amino-acid changing to synonymous (amino acid retaining nucleotide substitution rates.We have identified duplicated genes that are most rapidly evolving in this important human parasite. This is the first attempt to investigate adaptive evolution in this species at the codon level. We identify 109 genes within 23 clusters of paralogous gene expansions to be subject to positive selection.Genes identified include surface antigens in both the mammalian and insect host life cycle stage suggesting that competitive interaction is not solely with the adaptive immune system of the mammalian host. Also surface transporters related to drug resistance and genes related to developmental progression are detected. We discuss how adaptive evolution of these genes may highlight lineage specific processes essential for parasite survival. We also discuss the implications of adaptive evolution of these targets for parasite biology and control.

  10. Transcriptome-based phylogeny of endemic Lake Baikal amphipod species flock: fast speciation accompanied by frequent episodes of positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, Sergey A; Logacheva, Maria D; Popova, Nina V; Klepikova, Anna V; Penin, Aleksey A; Bazykin, Georgii A; Etingova, Anna E; Mugue, Nikolai S; Kondrashov, Alexey S; Yampolsky, Lev Y

    2017-01-01

    Endemic species flocks inhabiting ancient lakes, oceanic islands and other long-lived isolated habitats are often interpreted as adaptive radiations. Yet molecular evidence for directional selection during species flocks radiation is scarce. Using partial transcriptomes of 64 species of Lake Baikal (Siberia, Russia) endemic amphipods and two nonendemic outgroups, we report a revised phylogeny of this species flock and analyse evidence for positive selection within the endemic lineages. We confirm two independent invasions of amphipods into Baikal and demonstrate that several morphological features of Baikal amphipods, such as body armour and reduction in appendages and sensory organs, evolved in several lineages in parallel. Radiation of Baikal amphipods has been characterized by short phylogenetic branches and frequent episodes of positive selection which tended to be more frequent in the early phase of the second invasion of amphipods into Baikal when the most intensive diversification occurred. Notably, signatures of positive selection are frequent in genes encoding mitochondrial membrane proteins with electron transfer chain and ATP synthesis functionality. In particular, subunits of both the membrane and substrate-level ATP synthases show evidence of positive selection in the plankton species Macrohectopus branickii, possibly indicating adaptation to active plankton lifestyle and to survival under conditions of low temperature and high hydrostatic pressures known to affect membranes functioning. Other functional categories represented among genes likely to be under positive selection include Ca-binding muscle-related proteins, possibly indicating adaptation to Ca-deficient low mineralization Baikal waters. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Facilitating creative idea selection: The combined effects of self-affirmation, promotion focus and positive affect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buisonjé, D.R. de; Ritter, S.M.; Bruin, S. de; Horst, J.M.L. ter; Meeldijk, A.

    2017-01-01

    Generating creative ideas in a brainstorm session is a crucial part of innovation. However, for actual implementation, the most creative ideas must be selected from a pool of ideas. To date, idea selection has remained relatively unexplored and validated instruments to measure idea selection

  12. Facilitating Creative Idea Selection: The Combined Effects of Self-Affirmation, Promotion Focus and Positive Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Buisonjé, David R.; Ritter, Simone M.; de Bruin, Suze; ter Horst, J. Marie-Louise; Meeldijk, Arne

    2017-01-01

    Generating creative ideas in a brainstorm session `is a crucial part of innovation. However, for actual implementation, the most creative ideas must be selected from a pool of ideas. To date, idea selection has remained relatively unexplored and validated instruments to measure idea selection performance are not systematically employed. This study…

  13. Silencing, positive selection and parallel evolution: busy history of primate cytochromes C.

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    Denis Pierron

    Full Text Available Cytochrome c (cyt c participates in two crucial cellular processes, energy production and apoptosis, and unsurprisingly is a highly conserved protein. However, previous studies have reported for the primate lineage (i loss of the paralogous testis isoform, (ii an acceleration and then a deceleration of the amino acid replacement rate of the cyt c somatic isoform, and (iii atypical biochemical behavior of human cyt c. To gain insight into the cause of these major evolutionary events, we have retraced the history of cyt c loci among primates. For testis cyt c, all primate sequences examined carry the same nonsense mutation, which suggests that silencing occurred before the primates diversified. For somatic cyt c, maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses yielded the same tree topology. The evolutionary analyses show that a fast accumulation of non-synonymous mutations (suggesting positive selection occurred specifically on the anthropoid lineage root and then continued in parallel on the early catarrhini and platyrrhini stems. Analysis of evolutionary changes using the 3D structure suggests they are focused on the respiratory chain rather than on apoptosis or other cyt c functions. In agreement with previous biochemical studies, our results suggest that silencing of the cyt c testis isoform could be linked with the decrease of primate reproduction rate. Finally, the evolution of cyt c in the two sister anthropoid groups leads us to propose that somatic cyt c evolution may be related both to COX evolution and to the convergent brain and body mass enlargement in these two anthropoid clades.

  14. Positive Selection Drives Rapid Evolution of the meq Oncogene of Marek's Disease Virus.

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    Abinash Padhi

    Full Text Available Marek's disease (MD, caused by Marek's disease virus (MDV, a poultry-borne alphaherpesvirus, is a devastating disease of poultry causing an estimated annual loss of one billion dollars to poultry producers, worldwide. Despite decades of control through vaccination, MDV field strains continue to emerge having increased virulence. The evolutionary mechanism driving the emergence of this continuum of strains to increased MDV virulence, however, remains largely enigmatic. Increase in MDV virulence has been associated with specific amino acid changes within the C-terminus domain of Mareks's EcoRI-Q (meq-encoded oncoprotein. In this study, we sought to determine whether the meq gene has evolved adaptively and whether past vaccination efforts have had any significant effect on the reduction or increase of MDV diversity over time. Our analysis suggests that meq is estimated to be evolving at a much faster rate than most dsDNA viruses, and is comparable with the evolutionary rate of RNA viruses. Interestingly, most of the polymorphisms in meq gene appear to have evolved under positive selection and the time of divergence at the meq locus coincides with the period during which the poultry industry had undergone transitions in management practices including the introduction and widespread use of live attenuated vaccines. Our study has revealed that the decades-long use of vaccines did not reduce MDV diversity, but rather had a stimulating effect on the emergence of field strains with increased genetic diversity until the early 2000s. During the years 2004-2005, there was an abrupt decline in the genetic diversity of field isolates followed by a recovery from this bottleneck in the year 2010. Collectively, these data suggest that vaccination seems to not have had any effect on MDV eradication, but rather had a stimulating effect on MDV emergence through adaptation.

  15. Adaptive evolution of the spike gene of SARS coronavirus: changes in positively selected sites in different epidemic groups

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    He Shao-Heng

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is believed that animal-to-human transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS coronavirus (CoV is the cause of the SARS outbreak worldwide. The spike (S protein is one of the best characterized proteins of SARS-CoV, which plays a key role in SARS-CoV overcoming species barrier and accomplishing interspecies transmission from animals to humans, suggesting that it may be the major target of selective pressure. However, the process of adaptive evolution of S protein and the exact positively selected sites associated with this process remain unknown. Results By investigating the adaptive evolution of S protein, we identified twelve amino acid sites (75, 239, 244, 311, 479, 609, 613, 743, 765, 778, 1148, and 1163 in the S protein under positive selective pressure. Based on phylogenetic tree and epidemiological investigation, SARS outbreak was divided into three epidemic groups: 02–04 interspecies, 03-early-mid, and 03-late epidemic groups in the present study. Positive selection was detected in the first two groups, which represent the course of SARS-CoV interspecies transmission and of viral adaptation to human host, respectively. In contrast, purifying selection was detected in 03-late group. These indicate that S protein experiences variable positive selective pressures before reaching stabilization. A total of 25 sites in 02–04 interspecies epidemic group and 16 sites in 03-early-mid epidemic group were identified under positive selection. The identified sites were different between these two groups except for site 239, which suggests that positively selected sites are changeable between groups. Moreover, it was showed that a larger proportion (24% of positively selected sites was located in receptor-binding domain (RBD than in heptad repeat (HR1-HR2 region in 02–04 interspecies epidemic group (p = 0.0208, and a greater percentage (25% of these sites occurred in HR1–HR2 region than in RBD in 03-early

  16. Rapidly evolving genes in pathogens: methods for detecting positive selection and examples among fungi, bacteria, viruses and protists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguileta, Gabriela; Refrégier, Guislaine; Yockteng, Roxana; Fournier, Elisabeth; Giraud, Tatiana

    2009-07-01

    The ongoing coevolutionary struggle between hosts and pathogens, with hosts evolving to escape pathogen infection and pathogens evolving to escape host defences, can generate an 'arms race', i.e., the occurrence of recurrent selective sweeps that each favours a novel resistance or virulence allele that goes to fixation. Host-pathogen coevolution can alternatively lead to a 'trench warfare', i.e., balancing selection, maintaining certain alleles at loci involved in host-pathogen recognition over long time scales. Recently, technological and methodological progress has enabled detection of footprints of selection directly on genes, which can provide useful insights into the processes of coevolution. This knowledge can also have practical applications, for instance development of vaccines or drugs. Here we review the methods for detecting genes under positive selection using divergence data (i.e., the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates, d(N)/d(S)). We also review methods for detecting selection using polymorphisms, such as methods based on F(ST) measures, frequency spectrum, linkage disequilibrium and haplotype structure. In the second part, we review examples where targets of selection have been identified in pathogens using these tests. Genes under positive selection in pathogens have mostly been sought among viruses, bacteria and protists, because of their paramount importance for human health. Another focus is on fungal pathogens owing to their agronomic importance. We finally discuss promising directions in pathogen studies, such as detecting selection in non-coding regions.

  17. Prediction of Genes Related to Positive Selection Using Whole-Genome Resequencing in Three Commercial Pig Breeds

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    HyoYoung Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Selective sweep can cause genetic differentiation across populations, which allows for the identification of possible causative regions/genes underlying important traits. The pig has experienced a long history of allele frequency changes through artificial selection in the domestication process. We obtained an average of 329,482,871 sequence reads for 24 pigs from three pig breeds: Yorkshire (n = 5, Landrace (n = 13, and Duroc (n = 6. An average read depth of 11.7 was obtained using whole-genome resequencing on an Illumina HiSeq2000 platform. In this study, cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity and cross-population composite likelihood ratio tests were implemented to detect genes experiencing positive selection for the genome-wide resequencing data generated from three commercial pig breeds. In our results, 26, 7, and 14 genes from Yorkshire, Landrace, and Duroc, respectively were detected by two kinds of statistical tests. Significant evidence for positive selection was identified on genes ST6GALNAC2 and EPHX1 in Yorkshire, PARK2 in Landrace, and BMP6, SLA-DQA1, and PRKG1 in Duroc.These genes are reportedly relevant to lactation, reproduction, meat quality, and growth traits. To understand how these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs related positive selection affect protein function, we analyzed the effect of non-synonymous SNPs. Three SNPs (rs324509622, rs80931851, and rs80937718 in the SLA-DQA1 gene were significant in the enrichment tests, indicating strong evidence for positive selection in Duroc. Our analyses identified genes under positive selection for lactation, reproduction, and meat-quality and growth traits in Yorkshire, Landrace, and Duroc, respectively.

  18. A longitudinal evaluation of anthropometric and fitness characteristics in junior rugby league players considering playing position and selection level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Kevin; Cobley, Stephen; O'Hara, John; Chapman, Chris; Cooke, Carlton

    2013-09-01

    The current study provided a longitudinal evaluation of the anthropometric and fitness characteristics in junior rugby league players across three annual-age categories (i.e., under 13s, 14s and 15s) considering playing position and selection level. Longitudinal design. Eighty-one junior rugby league players selected to a talent development programme were tracked over a two year period. Anthropometric (height, sitting height, body mass and sum of four skinfolds) and fitness (lower and upper body power, speed, change of direction speed and maximal aerobic power) characteristics were measured on three occasions (i.e., under 13s, 14s and 15s). Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA; controlling chronological and maturational age) analysed changes across annual-age categories in relation to playing position and selection level. Findings identified significant improvements in anthropometric and fitness characteristics across annual-age categories (pMANCOVA analysis identified significant overall effects for playing position (p<0.001) and selection level (p<0.05) throughout the two year period. Interactions between playing position and time were identified for height, vertical jump and estimated V˙O2max (p<0.05). Selection level by time interactions were identified for 20m, 30m and 60m sprint (p<0.05). This study demonstrates the improvement of anthropometric and fitness characteristics within junior representative rugby league players. Interactive effects for playing position and selection level by time highlight the variation in the development of characteristics that occur during adolescence. Tracking the progression of characteristics longitudinally during adolescence, instead of at one-off time points, may assist selection and/or performance assessments within rugby league and other youth sport contexts. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Mixed Approach to Similarity Metric Selection in Affinity Propagation-Based WiFi Fingerprinting Indoor Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Giuseppe; de Nardis, Luca; di Benedetto, Maria-Gabriella

    2015-10-30

    The weighted k-nearest neighbors (WkNN) algorithm is by far the most popular choice in the design of fingerprinting indoor positioning systems based on WiFi received signal strength (RSS). WkNN estimates the position of a target device by selecting k reference points (RPs) based on the similarity of their fingerprints with the measured RSS values. The position of the target device is then obtained as a weighted sum of the positions of the k RPs. Two-step WkNN positioning algorithms were recently proposed, in which RPs are divided into clusters using the affinity propagation clustering algorithm, and one representative for each cluster is selected. Only cluster representatives are then considered during the position estimation, leading to a significant computational complexity reduction compared to traditional, flat WkNN. Flat and two-step WkNN share the issue of properly selecting the similarity metric so as to guarantee good positioning accuracy: in two-step WkNN, in particular, the metric impacts three different steps in the position estimation, that is cluster formation, cluster selection and RP selection and weighting. So far, however, the only similarity metric considered in the literature was the one proposed in the original formulation of the affinity propagation algorithm. This paper fills this gap by comparing different metrics and, based on this comparison, proposes a novel mixed approach in which different metrics are adopted in the different steps of the position estimation procedure. The analysis is supported by an extensive experimental campaign carried out in a multi-floor 3D indoor positioning testbed. The impact of similarity metrics and their combinations on the structure and size of the resulting clusters, 3D positioning accuracy and computational complexity are investigated. Results show that the adoption of metrics different from the one proposed in the original affinity propagation algorithm and, in particular, the combination of different

  20. A Mixed Approach to Similarity Metric Selection in Affinity Propagation-Based WiFi Fingerprinting Indoor Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Caso

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The weighted k-nearest neighbors (WkNN algorithm is by far the most popular choice in the design of fingerprinting indoor positioning systems based on WiFi received signal strength (RSS. WkNN estimates the position of a target device by selecting k reference points (RPs based on the similarity of their fingerprints with the measured RSS values. The position of the target device is then obtained as a weighted sum of the positions of the k RPs. Two-step WkNN positioning algorithms were recently proposed, in which RPs are divided into clusters using the affinity propagation clustering algorithm, and one representative for each cluster is selected. Only cluster representatives are then considered during the position estimation, leading to a significant computational complexity reduction compared to traditional, flat WkNN. Flat and two-step WkNN share the issue of properly selecting the similarity metric so as to guarantee good positioning accuracy: in two-step WkNN, in particular, the metric impacts three different steps in the position estimation, that is cluster formation, cluster selection and RP selection and weighting. So far, however, the only similarity metric considered in the literature was the one proposed in the original formulation of the affinity propagation algorithm. This paper fills this gap by comparing different metrics and, based on this comparison, proposes a novel mixed approach in which different metrics are adopted in the different steps of the position estimation procedure. The analysis is supported by an extensive experimental campaign carried out in a multi-floor 3D indoor positioning testbed. The impact of similarity metrics and their combinations on the structure and size of the resulting clusters, 3D positioning accuracy and computational complexity are investigated. Results show that the adoption of metrics different from the one proposed in the original affinity propagation algorithm and, in particular, the combination

  1. Whole-Genome Analysis Revealed the Positively Selected Genes during the Differentiation of indica and Temperate japonica Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xinli; Jia, Qi; Guo, Yuchun; Zheng, Xiujuan; Liang, Kangjing

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the selective pressures acting on the protein-coding genes during the differentiation of indica and japonica, all of the possible orthologous genes between the Nipponbare and 93–11 genomes were identified and compared with each other. Among these genes, 8,530 pairs had identical sequences, and 27,384 pairs shared more than 90% sequence identity. Only 2,678 pairs of genes displaying a Ka/Ks ratio significantly greater than one were revealed, and most of these genes contained only nonsynonymous sites. The genes without synonymous site were further analyzed with the SNP data of 1529 O. sativa and O. rufipogon accessions, and 1068 genes were identified to be under positive selection during the differentiation of indica and temperate japonica. The positively selected genes (PSGs) are unevenly distributed on 12 chromosomes, and the proteins encoded by the PSGs are dominant with binding, transferase and hydrolase activities, and especially enriched in the plant responses to stimuli, biological regulations, and transport processes. Meanwhile, the most PSGs of the known function and/or expression were involved in the regulation of biotic/abiotic stresses. The evidence of pervasive positive selection suggested that many factors drove the differentiation of indica and japonica, which has already started in wild rice but is much lower than in cultivated rice. Lower differentiation and less PSGs revealed between the Or-It and Or-IIIt wild rice groups implied that artificial selection provides greater contribution on the differentiation than natural selection. In addition, the phylogenetic tree constructed with positively selected sites showed that the japonica varieties exhibited more diversity than indica on differentiation, and Or-III of O. rufipogon exhibited more than Or-I. PMID:25774680

  2. An approach to selecting the optimal sensing coil configuration structure for switched reluctance motor rotor position measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jun; Deng, Zhiquan

    2015-02-01

    Accurate rotor position signal is highly required for controlling the switched reluctance motor (SRM). The use of galvanic isolated sensing coils can provide independent circuit for position estimation without affecting the SRM actuation. However, the cross-coupling between main winding and sensing coil, and the mutual coupling between adjacent phase sensing coils may affect the position estimation performance seriously. In this paper, three sensing coil configurations in a 12/8 structure SRM are analyzed and compared for selecting an optimal configuration that can effectively minimize the bad effects of the cross-coupling factors. The finite element analysis and experimental results are provided for verification.

  3. Balancing selection at nonself recognition loci in the chestnut blight fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica, demonstrated by trans-species polymorphisms, positive selection, and even allele frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgroom, Michael G; Smith, Myron L; Drott, Milton T; Nuss, Donald L

    2018-02-10

    Balancing selection has been inferred in diverse organisms for nonself recognition genes, including those involved in immunity, mating compatibility, and vegetative incompatibility. Although selective forces maintaining polymorphisms are known for genes involved in immunity and mating, mechanisms of balancing selection for vegetative incompatibility genes in fungi are being debated. We hypothesized that allorecognition and its consequent inhibition of virus transmission contribute to the maintenance of polymorphisms in vegetative incompatibility loci (vic) in the chestnut blight fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica. Balancing selection was demonstrated at two loci, vic2 and vic6, by trans-species polymorphisms in C. parasitica, C. radicalis, and C. japonica and signatures of positive selection in gene sequences. In addition, more than half (31 of 54) of allele frequency estimates at six vic loci in nine field populations of C. parasitica from Asia and the eastern US were not significantly different from 0.5, as expected at equilibrium for two alleles per locus under balancing selection. At three vic loci, deviations from 0.5 were predicted based on the effects of heteroallelism on virus transmission. Twenty-five of 27 allele frequency estimates were greater than or equal to 0.5 for the allele that confers significantly stronger inhibition of virus transmission at three loci with asymmetric transmission. These results are consistent with the allorecognition hypothesis that vegetative incompatibility genes are under selection because of their role in reducing infection by viruses.

  4. Evolution of species-specific major seminal fluid proteins in placental mammals by gene death and positive selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meslin, C.; Laurin, M.; Callebaut, I.; Druart, X.; Monget, P.

    2015-01-01

    The seminal fluid is a complex substance composed of a variety of secreted proteins and has been shown to play an important role in the fertilisation process in mammals and also in Drosophila. Several genes under positive selection have been documented in some rodents and primates. Our study

  5. Role of maturity timing in selection procedures and in the specialisation of playing positions in youth basketball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Wierike, Sanne Cornelia Maria; Elferink-Gemser, Marije Titia; Tromp, Eveline Jenny Yvonne; Vaeyens, Roel; Visscher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the role of maturity timing in selection procedures and in the specialisation of playing positions in youth male basketball. Forty-three talented Dutch players (14.66 +/- 1.09years) participated in this study. Maturity timing (age at peak height velocity), anthropometric,

  6. Powerful methods to establish chromosomal markers in Lactococcus lactis: an analysis of pyrimidine salvage pathway mutants obtained by positive selections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    1995-01-01

    Using different 5-fluoropyrimidine analogues, positive selection procedures for obtaining mutants blocked in pyrimidine and purine salvage genes of Lactococcus lactis were established. Strains lacking the following enzyme activities due to mutations in the corresponding genes were isolated: uracil...... of many related lactic acid bacteria....

  7. Positive selection and ancient duplications in the evolution of class B floral homeotic genes of orchids and grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Marcus A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Positive selection is recognized as the prevalence of nonsynonymous over synonymous substitutions in a gene. Models of the functional evolution of duplicated genes consider neofunctionalization as key to the retention of paralogues. For instance, duplicate transcription factors are specifically retained in plant and animal genomes and both positive selection and transcriptional divergence appear to have played a role in their diversification. However, the relative impact of these two factors has not been systematically evaluated. Class B MADS-box genes, comprising DEF-like and GLO-like genes, encode developmental transcription factors essential for establishment of perianth and male organ identity in the flowers of angiosperms. Here, we contrast the role of positive selection and the known divergence in expression patterns of genes encoding class B-like MADS-box transcription factors from monocots, with emphasis on the family Orchidaceae and the order Poales. Although in the monocots these two groups are highly diverse and have a strongly canalized floral morphology, there is no information on the role of positive selection in the evolution of their distinctive flower morphologies. Published research shows that in Poales, class B-like genes are expressed in stamens and in lodicules, the perianth organs whose identity might also be specified by class B-like genes, like the identity of the inner tepals of their lily-like relatives. In orchids, however, the number and pattern of expression of class B-like genes have greatly diverged. Results The DEF-like genes from Orchidaceae form four well-supported, ancient clades of orthologues. In contrast, orchid GLO-like genes form a single clade of ancient orthologues and recent paralogues. DEF-like genes from orchid clade 2 (OMADS3-like genes are under less stringent purifying selection than the other orchid DEF-like and GLO-like genes. In comparison with orchids, purifying selection

  8. Positive selection and ancient duplications in the evolution of class B floral homeotic genes of orchids and grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana; Hiese, Luisa; Härter, Andrea; Koch, Marcus A; Theißen, Günter

    2009-01-01

    Background Positive selection is recognized as the prevalence of nonsynonymous over synonymous substitutions in a gene. Models of the functional evolution of duplicated genes consider neofunctionalization as key to the retention of paralogues. For instance, duplicate transcription factors are specifically retained in plant and animal genomes and both positive selection and transcriptional divergence appear to have played a role in their diversification. However, the relative impact of these two factors has not been systematically evaluated. Class B MADS-box genes, comprising DEF-like and GLO-like genes, encode developmental transcription factors essential for establishment of perianth and male organ identity in the flowers of angiosperms. Here, we contrast the role of positive selection and the known divergence in expression patterns of genes encoding class B-like MADS-box transcription factors from monocots, with emphasis on the family Orchidaceae and the order Poales. Although in the monocots these two groups are highly diverse and have a strongly canalized floral morphology, there is no information on the role of positive selection in the evolution of their distinctive flower morphologies. Published research shows that in Poales, class B-like genes are expressed in stamens and in lodicules, the perianth organs whose identity might also be specified by class B-like genes, like the identity of the inner tepals of their lily-like relatives. In orchids, however, the number and pattern of expression of class B-like genes have greatly diverged. Results The DEF-like genes from Orchidaceae form four well-supported, ancient clades of orthologues. In contrast, orchid GLO-like genes form a single clade of ancient orthologues and recent paralogues. DEF-like genes from orchid clade 2 (OMADS3-like genes) are under less stringent purifying selection than the other orchid DEF-like and GLO-like genes. In comparison with orchids, purifying selection was less stringent in DEF

  9. Inference of purifying and positive selection in three subspecies of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) from exome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bataillon, Thomas; Duan, Jinjie; Hvilsom, Christina

    2015-01-01

    of recent gene flow from Western into Eastern chimpanzees. The striking contrast in X-linked vs. autosomal polymorphism and divergence previously reported in Central chimpanzees is also found in Eastern and Western chimpanzees. We show that the direction of selection (DoS) statistic exhibits a strong non......We study genome-wide nucleotide diversity in three subspecies of extant chimpanzees using exome capture. After strict filtering, SNVs and indels were called and genotyped for >50% of exons at a mean coverage of 35x per individual. Central chimpanzees (P. t. troglodytes) are the most polymorphic......-monotonic relationship with the strength of purifying selection S, making it inappropriate for estimating S. We instead use counts in synonymous vs. non-synonymous frequency classes to infer the distribution of S coefficients acting on non-synonymous mutations in each subspecies. The strength of purifying selection we...

  10. Positive selection in the SLC11A1 gene in the family Equidae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayerova, Zuzana; Janova, Eva; Matiasovic, Jan

    2016-01-01

    and other species. We analyzed the genomic organization, genetic variation, and evolution of the SLC11A1 gene in the family Equidae to identify patterns of selection within this important gene. Nucleotide SLC11A1 sequences were shown to be highly conserved in ten equid species, with more than 97 % sequence...... a transporter protein mediating antimicrobial activity of macrophages. Little is known about the patterns of selection shaping this gene during evolution. Although it is a typical evolutionarily conserved gene, functionally important polymorphisms associated with various diseases were identified in humans...... identity across the family. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found in the coding and noncoding regions of the gene. Seven codon sites were identified to be under strong purifying selection. Codons located in three regions, including the glycosylated extracellular loop, were shown to be under...

  11. Partial imputation to improve predictive modelling in insurance risk classification using a hybrid positive selection algorithm and correlation-based feature selection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duma, M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available accuracy and resilience of supervised learning methods improve significantly when applied with the imputation strategy under these assumptions. Keywords: Insurance risk classification, missing data, positive selection, supervised learning. DATASETS... environment. The experiments were conducted on syn- thetic and real-world datasets and the results show excep- tional estimation accuracy, with error rates as low as 0.78% and 1.7% compared to other algorithms (such as SPIRIT and TinyDB). Furthermore...

  12. Distribution of events of positive selection and population differentiation in a metabolic pathway: the case of asparagine N-glycosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dall’Olio Giovanni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asparagine N-Glycosylation is one of the most important forms of protein post-translational modification in eukaryotes. This metabolic pathway can be subdivided into two parts: an upstream sub-pathway required for achieving proper folding for most of the proteins synthesized in the secretory pathway, and a downstream sub-pathway required to give variability to trans-membrane proteins, and involved in adaptation to the environment and innate immunity. Here we analyze the nucleotide variability of the genes of this pathway in human populations, identifying which genes show greater population differentiation and which genes show signatures of recent positive selection. We also compare how these signals are distributed between the upstream and the downstream parts of the pathway, with the aim of exploring how forces of population differentiation and positive selection vary among genes involved in the same metabolic pathway but subject to different functional constraints. Results Our results show that genes in the downstream part of the pathway are more likely to show a signature of population differentiation, while events of positive selection are equally distributed among the two parts of the pathway. Moreover, events of positive selection are frequent on genes that are known to be at bifurcation points, and that are identified as being in key position by a network-level analysis such as MGAT3 and GCS1. Conclusions These findings indicate that the upstream part of the Asparagine N-Glycosylation pathway has lower diversity among populations, while the downstream part is freer to tolerate diversity among populations. Moreover, the distribution of signatures of population differentiation and positive selection can change between parts of a pathway, especially between parts that are exposed to different functional constraints. Our results support the hypothesis that genes involved in constitutive processes can be expected to show

  13. Exposure to selected fragrance materials. A case study of fragrance-mix-positive eczema patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Rastogi, Suresh Chandra; Menné, T

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess exposure to constituents of the fragrance mix from cosmetic products used by fragrance-mix-positive eczema patients. 23 products, which had either given a positive patch and/or use test in a total of 11 fragrance-mix-positive patients, were analyzed....... In all cases, the use of these cosmetics completely or partly explained present or past episodes of eczema. Between 1 to 6 constituents of the fragrance mix were found in 22 out of 23 products. The cosmetics of all the patients sensitive to hydroxycitronellal, eugenol, cinnamic alcohol and alpha......-amylcinnamic aldehyde were found to contain the respective substances. Exposure concentrations were seen to cover a large range. The content of hydroxycitronellal was, on average, 5 x higher in cosmetics from hydroxycitronellal-sensitive patients, compared to cosmetics from hydroxycitronellal-negative patients...

  14. Exposure to selected fragrance materials. A case study of fragrance-mix-positive eczema patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Rastogi, Suresh Chandra; Menné, T

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess exposure to constituents of the fragrance mix from cosmetic products used by fragrance-mix-positive eczema patients. 23 products, which had either given a positive patch and/or use test in a total of 11 fragrance-mix-positive patients, were analyzed....... In all cases, the use of these cosmetics completely or partly explained present or past episodes of eczema. Between 1 to 6 constituents of the fragrance mix were found in 22 out of 23 products. The cosmetics of all the patients sensitive to hydroxycitronellal, eugenol, cinnamic alcohol and alpha....... It is concluded that exposure to constituents of the fragrance mix is common in fragrance-allergic patients with cosmetic eczema, and that the fragrance mix is a good reflection of actual exposure....

  15. Sexually selected traits evolve positive allometry when some matings occur irrespective of the trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromhage, Lutz; Kokko, Hanna

    2014-05-01

    Positive allometry of secondary sexual traits (whereby larger individuals have disproportionally larger traits than smaller individuals) has been called one of the most pervasive and poorly understood regularities in the study of animal form and function. Its widespread occurrence is in contrast with theoretical predictions that it should evolve only under rather special circumstances. Using a combination of mathematical modeling and simulations, here we show that positive allometry is predicted to evolve under much broader conditions than previously recognized. This result hinges on the assumption that mating success is not necessarily zero for males with the lowest trait values: for example, a male who lacks horns or antlers might still be able to copulate if encountering an unguarded female. We predict the strongest positive allometry when males typically (but not always) compete in large groups, and when trait differences decisively determine the outcome of competitive interactions. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  16. Response to Comment on "Positive Selection of Tyrosine Loss in Metazoan Evolution"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Chris Soon Heng; Schoof, Erwin; Creixell, Pau

    2011-01-01

    Su et al. claim guanine-cytosine (GC) content variation can largely explain the observed tyrosine frequency variation, independent of adaptive evolution of cell-signaling complexity. We found that GC content variation, in the absence of selection for amino acid changes, can only maximally account...

  17. Female promiscuity is positively associated with neutral and selected genetic diversity in passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohli, Jostein; Anmarkrud, Jarl A; Johnsen, Arild; Kleven, Oddmund; Borge, Thomas; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2013-05-01

    Passerine birds show large interspecific variation in extrapair paternity rates. There is accumulating evidence that such promiscuous behavior is driven by indirect, genetic benefits to females. Sexual selection theory distinguishes between two types of genetic benefits, additive and nonadditive effects, mediated by preferences for good and compatible genes, respectively. Good genes preferences should imply directional selection and mating skew among males, and thus reduced genetic diversity in the population. In contrast, compatible genes preferences should give balancing selection that retains genetic diversity. Here, we test how well these predictions fit with patterns of variation in genetic diversity and promiscuity levels among passerine birds. We found that more promiscuous species had higher nucleotide diversity at autosomal introns, but not at Z-chromosome introns. We also found that major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class IIB alleles had higher sequence diversity, and therefore should recognize a broader spectrum of pathogens, in more promiscuous species. Our results suggest that female promiscuity targets a multitude of autosomal genes for their nonadditive, compatibility benefits. Also, as immunity genes seem to be of particular importance, we hypothesize that interspecific variation in female promiscuity among passerine birds has arisen in response to the strength of pathogen-mediated selection. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  18. Inference of purifying and positive selection in three subspecies of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) from exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataillon, Thomas; Duan, Jinjie; Hvilsom, Christina; Jin, Xin; Li, Yingrui; Skov, Laurits; Glemin, Sylvain; Munch, Kasper; Jiang, Tao; Qian, Yu; Hobolth, Asger; Wang, Jun; Mailund, Thomas; Siegismund, Hans R; Schierup, Mikkel H

    2015-03-30

    We study genome-wide nucleotide diversity in three subspecies of extant chimpanzees using exome capture. After strict filtering, Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and indels were called and genotyped for greater than 50% of exons at a mean coverage of 35× per individual. Central chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) are the most polymorphic (nucleotide diversity, θw = 0.0023 per site) followed by Eastern (P. t. schweinfurthii) chimpanzees (θw = 0.0016) and Western (P. t. verus) chimpanzees (θw = 0.0008). A demographic scenario of divergence without gene flow fits the patterns of autosomal synonymous nucleotide diversity well except for a signal of recent gene flow from Western into Eastern chimpanzees. The striking contrast in X-linked versus autosomal polymorphism and divergence previously reported in Central chimpanzees is also found in Eastern and Western chimpanzees. We show that the direction of selection statistic exhibits a strong nonmonotonic relationship with the strength of purifying selection S, making it inappropriate for estimating S. We instead use counts in synonymous versus nonsynonymous frequency classes to infer the distribution of S coefficients acting on nonsynonymous mutations in each subspecies. The strength of purifying selection we infer is congruent with the differences in effective sizes of each subspecies: Central chimpanzees are undergoing the strongest purifying selection followed by Eastern and Western chimpanzees. Coding indels show stronger selection against indels changing the reading frame than observed in human populations. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  19. Ground Receiving Station Reference Pair Selection Technique for a Minimum Configuration 3D Emitter Position Estimation Multilateration System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmalik Shehu Yaro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multilateration estimates aircraft position using the Time Difference Of Arrival (TDOA with a lateration algorithm. The Position Estimation (PE accuracy of the lateration algorithm depends on several factors which are the TDOA estimation error, the lateration algorithm approach, the number of deployed GRSs and the selection of the GRS reference used for the PE process. Using the minimum number of GRSs for 3D emitter PE, a technique based on the condition number calculation is proposed to select the suitable GRS reference pair for improving the accuracy of the PE using the lateration algorithm. Validation of the proposed technique was performed with the GRSs in the square and triangular GRS configuration. For the selected emitter positions, the result shows that the proposed technique can be used to select the suitable GRS reference pair for the PE process. A unity condition number is achieved for GRS pair most suitable for the PE process. Monte Carlo simulation result, in comparison with the fixed GRS reference pair lateration algorithm, shows a reduction in PE error of at least 70% for both GRS in the square and triangular configuration.

  20. Analysis of C3 suggests three periods of positive selection events and different evolutionary patterns between fish and mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanxing Meng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The third complement component (C3 is a central protein of the complement system conserved from fish to mammals. It also showed distinct characteristics in different animal groups. Striking features of the fish complement system were unveiled, including prominent levels of extrahepatic expression and isotypic diversity of the complement components. The evidences of the involvement of complement system in the enhancement of B and T cell responses found in mammals indicated that the complement system also serves as a bridge between the innate and adaptive responses. For the reasons mentioned above, it is interesting to explore the evolutionary process of C3 genes and to investigate whether the huge differences between aquatic and terrestrial environments affected the C3 evolution between fish and mammals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Analysis revealed that these two groups of animals had experienced different evolution patterns. The mammalian C3 genes were under purifying selection pressure while the positive selection pressure was detected in fish C3 genes. Three periods of positive selection events of C3 genes were also detected. Two happened on the ancestral lineages to all vertebrates and mammals, respectively, one happened on early period of fish evolutionary history. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Three periods of positive selection events had happened on C3 genes during history and the fish and mammals C3 genes experience different evolutionary patterns for their distinct living environments.

  1. Towards a classification of weak hand holds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimmelman, V.; Sáfár, A.; Crasborn, O.

    2016-01-01

    The two symmetrical manual articulators (the hands) in signed languages are a striking modalityspecific phonetic property. The weak hand can maintain the end position of an articulation while the other articulator continues to produce additional signs. This weak hand spreading (hold) has been

  2. Selective and Nonselective Transfer: Positive and Negative Priming in a Multiple-Task Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboe, Jason P.; Whittlesea, Bruce W. A.; Milliken, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Processing of a probe stimulus can be affected either positively or negatively by presenting a related stimulus immediately before it. According to structural accounts, such effects occur because processing of the prime activates or inhibits the mental representation of the probe before it is presented. In contrast, transfer-appropriate processing…

  3. Signatures of positive selection and local adaptation to urbanization in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Stephen E; Munshi-South, Jason

    2017-11-01

    Urbanization significantly alters natural ecosystems and has accelerated globally. Urban wildlife populations are often highly fragmented by human infrastructure, and isolated populations may adapt in response to local urban pressures. However, relatively few studies have identified genomic signatures of adaptation in urban animals. We used a landscape genomic approach to examine signatures of selection in urban populations of white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) in New York City. We analysed 154,770 SNPs identified from transcriptome data from 48 P. leucopus individuals from three urban and three rural populations and used outlier tests to identify evidence of urban adaptation. We accounted for demography by simulating a neutral SNP data set under an inferred demographic history as a null model for outlier analysis. We also tested whether candidate genes were associated with environmental variables related to urbanization. In total, we detected 381 outlier loci and after stringent filtering, identified and annotated 19 candidate loci. Many of the candidate genes were involved in metabolic processes and have well-established roles in metabolizing lipids and carbohydrates. Our results indicate that white-footed mice in New York City are adapting at the biomolecular level to local selective pressures in urban habitats. Annotation of outlier loci suggests selection is acting on metabolic pathways in urban populations, likely related to novel diets in cities that differ from diets in less disturbed areas. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Pseudo-Weak-R0 Algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Lin Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A positive answer to the open problem of Iorgulescu on extending weak-R0 algebras and R0-algebras to the noncommutative forms is given. We show that pseudo-weak-R0 algebras are categorically isomorphic to pseudo-IMTL algebras and that pseudo-R0 algebras are categorically isomorphic to pseudo-NM algebras. Some properties, the noncommutative forms of the properties in weak-R0 algebras and R0-algebras, are investigated. The simplified axiom systems of pseudo-weak-R0 algebras and pseudo-R0 algebras are obtained.

  5. Simultaneous purifying selection on the ancestral MC1R allele and positive selection on the melanoma-risk allele V60L in south Europeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cadenas, Conrado; López, Saioa; Ribas, Gloria; Flores, Carlos; García, Oscar; Sevilla, Arrate; Smith-Zubiaga, Isabel; Ibarrola-Villaba, Maider; Pino-Yanes, Maria del Mar; Gardeazabal, Jesús; Boyano, Dolores; García de Galdeano, Alicia; Izagirre, Neskuts; de la Rúa, Concepción; Alonso, Santos

    2013-12-01

    In humans, the geographical apportionment of the coding diversity of the pigmentary locus melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) is, unusually, higher in Eurasians than in Africans. This atypical observation has been interpreted as the result of purifying selection due to functional constraint on MC1R in high UV-B radiation environments. By analyzing 3,142 human MC1R alleles from different regions of Spain in the context of additional haplotypic information from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project data, we show that purifying selection is also strong in southern Europe, but not so in northern Europe. Furthermore, we show that purifying and positive selection act simultaneously on MC1R. Thus, at least in Spain, regions at opposite ends of the incident UV-B radiation distribution show significantly different frequencies for the melanoma-risk allele V60L (a mutation also associated to red hair and fair skin and even blonde hair), with higher frequency of V60L at those regions of lower incident UV-B radiation. Besides, using the 1000G south European data, we show that the V60L haplogroup is also characterized by an extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH) pattern indicative of positive selection. We, thus, provide evidence for an adaptive value of human skin depigmentation in Europe and illustrate how an adaptive process can simultaneously help to maintain a disease-risk allele. In addition, our data support the hypothesis proposed by Jablonski and Chaplin (Human skin pigmentation as an adaptation to UVB radiation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010;107:8962-8968), which posits that habitation of middle latitudes involved the evolution of partially depigmented phenotypes that are still capable of suitable tanning.

  6. Position-Related Differences in Selected Morphological Body Characteristics of Top-Level Female Handball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bon, Marta; Pori, Primoz; Sibila, Marko

    2015-09-01

    The study aimed to establish the main morphological characteristics of Slovenian junior and senior female national handball team players. Morphological characteristics of various player subgroups (goalkeepers, wings, back players and pivots) were also determined so as to establish whether they had distinct profiles. The subjects were 87 handball players who were members of the Slovenian junior and senior female national teams in the period from 2003 to 2009. A standardised anthropometric protocol was used to assess the subjects' morphological characteristics. The measurements included 23 different anthropometric measures. First, basic statistical characteristics of anthropometric measures were obtained for all subjects together and then for each group separately. Somatotypes were determined using Heath-Carter's method. Endomorphic, mesomorphic and ectomorphic components were calculated by computer on the basis of formulas. In order to determine differences in the body composition and anthropometric data of the subjects playing in different positions, a one-way analysis of variance was employed. The results show that, on average, the wings differed the most from the other player groups in terms of their morphological body characteristics. The wings differed most prominently from the other player groups in terms of their morphological body parameters as they were significantly smaller and had a statistically significantly lower body mass than the other groups. In terms of transversal measures of the skeleton and the circumferences, the wings significantly differed mainly from the pivots and goalkeepers and less from the backs. The goalkeepers were the tallest, with high values of body mass and low values of transversal measures compared to P. Their skin folds were the most pronounced among all the groups on average and their share of subcutaneous fat in total body mass was the highest. Consequently, their endomorphic component of the somatotype was pronounced

  7. Optimal Growth Conditions for Selective Ge Islands Positioning on Pit-Patterned Si(001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergamaschini R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We investigate ordered nucleation of Ge islands on pit-patterned Si(001 using an original hybrid Kinetic Monte Carlo model. The method allows us to explore long time-scale evolution while using large simulation cells. We analyze the possibility to achieve selective nucleation and island homogeneity as a function of the various parameters (flux, temperature, pit period able to influence the growth process. The presence of an optimal condition where the atomic diffusivity is sufficient to guarantee nucleation only within pits, but not so large to induce significant Ostwald ripening, is clearly demonstrated.

  8. Positive Selection in Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 Targets a Natural Mutation Associated with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency in Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslin, Camille; Monestier, Olivier; Di Pasquale, Elisa; Pascal, Géraldine; Persani, Luca; Fabre, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 (BMP15) is a TGFβ-like oocyte-derived growth factor involved in ovarian folliculogenesis as a critical regulator of many granulosa cell processes. Alterations of the BMP15 gene have been found associated with different ovarian phenotypic effects depending on the species, from sterility to increased prolificacy in sheep, slight subfertility in mouse or associated with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) in women. To investigate the evolving role of BMP15, a phylogenetic analysis of this particular TGFβ family member was performed. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of several TGFβ/BMP family members expressed by the ovary showed that BMP15 has a very strong divergence and a rapid evolution compared to others. Moreover, among 24 mammalian species, we detected signals of positive selection in the hominidae clade corresponding to F146, L189 and Y235 residues in human BMP15. The biological importance of these residues was tested functionally after site directed-mutagenesis in a COV434 cells luciferase assay. By replacing the positively selected amino acid either by alanine or the most represented residue in other studied species, only L189A, Y235A and Y235C mutants showed a significant increase of BMP15 signaling when compared to wild type. Additionally, the Y235C mutant was more potent than wild type in inhibiting progesterone secretion of ovine granulosa cells in primary culture. Interestingly, the Y235C mutation was previously identified in association with POI in women. In conclusion, this study evidences that the BMP15 gene has evolved faster than other members of the TGFß family and was submitted to a positive selection pressure in the hominidae clade. Some residues under positive selection are of great importance for the normal function of the protein and thus for female fertility. Y235 represents a critical residue in the determination of BMP15 biological activity, thus indirectly confirming its role in the onset of POI in

  9. WEAK GORENSTEIN GLOBAL DIMENSION

    OpenAIRE

    Bennis, Driss

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the weak Gorenstein global dimensions. We are mainly interested in studying the problem when the left and right weak Gorenstein global dimensions coincide. We first show, for GF-closed rings, that the left and right weak Gorenstein global dimensions are equal when they are finite. Then, we prove that the same equality holds for any two-sided coherent ring. We conclude the paper with some examples and a brief discussion of the scope and limits of our results.

  10. EnhancerPred2.0: predicting enhancers and their strength based on position-specific trinucleotide propensity and electron-ion interaction potential feature selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenying; Jia, Cangzhi

    2017-03-28

    Enhancers are cis-acting elements that play major roles in upregulating eukaryotic gene expression by providing binding sites for transcription factors and their complexes. Because enhancers are highly cell/tissue specific, lack common motifs, and are far from the target gene, the systematic and precise identification of enhancer regions in DNA sequences is a big challenge. In this study, we developed an enhancer prediction method called EnhancerPred2.0 by combining position-specific trinucleotide propensity (PSTNP) information with the electron-ion interaction potential (EIIP) values for trinucleotides, to predict enhancers and their subgroups. To obtain the optimal combination of features, F-score values were used in a two-step wrapper-based feature selection method, which was applied in a high dimensional feature vector from PSTNP and EIIP. Finally, 126 optimized features from PSTNP combined with 32 optimized features from EIIP yielded the best performance for identifying enhancers and non-enhancers, with an overall accuracy (Acc) of 88.27% and a Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.77. Additionally, 198 features from PSTNP combined with 37 features from EIIP yielded the best performance for identifying strong and weak enhancers, with an overall Acc of 98.05% and a MCC of 0.96. Rigorous jackknife tests indicated that EnhancerPred2.0 was significantly better than the existing enhancer prediction methods in both overall accuracy and stability.

  11. Positive selection results in frequent reversible amino acid replacements in the G protein gene of human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane F Botosso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children under 5 years of age and the elderly, causing annual disease outbreaks during the fall and winter. Multiple lineages of the HRSVA and HRSVB serotypes co-circulate within a single outbreak and display a strongly temporal pattern of genetic variation, with a replacement of dominant genotypes occurring during consecutive years. In the present study we utilized phylogenetic methods to detect and map sites subject to adaptive evolution in the G protein of HRSVA and HRSVB. A total of 29 and 23 amino acid sites were found to be putatively positively selected in HRSVA and HRSVB, respectively. Several of these sites defined genotypes and lineages within genotypes in both groups, and correlated well with epitopes previously described in group A. Remarkably, 18 of these positively selected tended to revert in time to a previous codon state, producing a "flip-flop" phylogenetic pattern. Such frequent evolutionary reversals in HRSV are indicative of a combination of frequent positive selection, reflecting the changing immune status of the human population, and a limited repertoire of functionally viable amino acids at specific amino acid sites.

  12. Molecular cloning, characterization and positively selected sites of the glutathione S-transferase family from Locusta migratoria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyao Zhang

    Full Text Available Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs are multifunctional enzymes that are involved in the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous compounds and are related to insecticide resistance. The purpose of this study was to provide new information on the molecular characteristics and the positive selection of locust GSTs. Based on the transcriptome database, we sequenced 28 cytosolic GSTs and 4 microsomal GSTs from the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria. We assigned the 28 cytosolic GSTs into 6 classes--sigma, epsilon, delta, theta, omega and zeta, and the 4 microsomal GSTs into 2 subclasses--insect and MGST3. The tissue- and stage-expression patterns of the GSTs differed at the mRNA level. Further, the substrate specificities and kinetic constants of the cytosolic GSTs differed markedly at the protein level. The results of likelihood ratio tests provided strong evidence for positive selection in the delta class. The result of Bayes Empirical Bayes analysis identified 4 amino acid sites in the delta class as positive selection sites. These sites were located on the protein surface. Our findings will facilitate the elucidation of the molecular characteristics and evolutionary aspects of insect GST superfamily.

  13. Neanderthal introgression at chromosome 3p21.31 was under positive natural selection in East Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qiliang; Hu, Ya; Xu, Shuhua; Wang, Jiucun; Jin, Li

    2014-03-01

    Studies of the Neanderthal and Denisovan genomes demonstrate archaic hominin introgression in Eurasians. Here, we present evidence of Neanderthal introgression within the chromosome 3p21.31 region, occurring with a high frequency in East Asians (ranging from 49.4% to 66.5%) and at a low frequency in Europeans. We also detected a signal of strong positive selection in this region only in East Asians. Our data indicate that likely candidate targets of selection include rs12488302-T and its associated alleles--among which four are nonsynonymous, including rs35455589-G in HYAL2, a gene related to the cellular response to ultraviolet-B irradiation. Furthermore, suggestive evidence supports latitude-dependent selection, implicating a role of ultraviolet-B. Interestingly, the distribution of rs35455589-G suggests that this allele was lost during the exodus of ancestors of modern Eurasians from Africa and reintroduced to Eurasians from Neanderthals.

  14. Position of the Mental Foramen in Panoramic Radiography and Its Relationship to Age in a Selected Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The position of the mental foramen is critical for surgery and local anesthesia. Objectives This study was conducted to assess the position of the mental foramen and its relationship to age in a selected Iranian population. Materials and Methods This was a cross-sectional descriptive study. Three hundred panoramic radiographs were assessed. Three variables were assessed for each radiograph: anterior-posterior position, superior-inferior position, and radiographic appearance. The position and appearance of the mental foramen were recorded according to gender and age. The results were analyzed using Chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests. Results Considering the anterior-posterior position, the mental foramina were located in the following positions: between premolars (41.5%, at the apex of the second premolars (31.7%, in the posterior area of the second premolars (19.2%, in the anterior area of the first premolars (4.3%, and at the apex of the first premolars (3.3%.The superior-inferior position of the mental foramina were below, above, and at the level of the apices of the premolars in 78.8%, 2.5%, and 18.7% of cases, respectively. The appearance of the mental foramen was continuous in relation to the mandibular canal in 55.9% of cases, while it was separated, diffuse, and unidentified in 29.5%, 9.7%, and 5% of cases, respectively. Age was found to affect the position and appearance of mental foramen. Conclusions The mental foramina were most commonly located between the first and second premolars and below the apex. A continuous appearance was the most common appearance for the mental foramen, which was similar in males and females.

  15. Religiousness, well-being and ageing – selected explanations of positive relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woźniak Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available According to research that have been conducted in the field of gerontology, sociology and psychology of ageing, there is a relationship between the level of religious involvement and health status/ well-being/quality of life in older age. How does religiousness influence aging process and health status? The aim of the article is to review explanations of a positive relationship between religiousness and health that are discussed in the literature. Those explanations may be grouped in three broad categories reflecting three functions of religion that play a role for well-being in older age. Those functions are: (1 religiousness as a source of coherence and the role of religious coping and provision of meaning in dealing with stressful life events (including ageing losses (2 religiousness as a source of positive self-perception and a sense of personal control, (3 provision of social resources (i.e. social ties and social support within religious community and emphasis on interpersonal relations (with special focus on forgiveness as a norm in interpersonal relations. Those functions of religion are discussed in the context of their potential role in successful ageing, as determined by - among others - active engagement in life.

  16. The role of needle tip position on the accuracy of diagnostic selective nerve root blocks in spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, A; Khan, A L; Fender, D; Sanderson, P L; Gibson, M J

    2014-04-01

    The specificity of a selective nerve root block (SNRB) is dependant on isolating only the required nerve root whilst avoiding injectate flow to traversing nerves. Needle tip position is therefore crucial. Nerve root blocks (SNRBs) in the presence of deformity can be particularly technically challenging to perform. The aims of this study were to document the relationship of needle tip position and SNRB accuracy in patients with and without spinal deformity. Over an 8-month period, all SNRBs performed by one spinal surgeon were included. Patients with radiographic evidence of spinal deformity were analysed separately and their lumbar deformity graded using the Schwab grading system. Needle tip position in relation to the superior pedicle and flow of contrast was documented. 76 patients received 85 injections without deformity, 26 patients with deformity underwent 30 SNRBs. In the normal spinal alignment group, there was on overall accuracy of 70.1% regardless of needle tip position, which improved to 91.8% for a lateral needle tip position (P deformity, the overall accuracy was significantly lower irrespective of needle tip position 36 versus 70%, respectively (P deformity where a needle tip placement lateral to the middle third of the pedicle is achieved. The presence of spinal deformity significantly reduces the accuracy of SNRBs with a higher chance of epidural infiltration.

  17. History of Weak Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. D.

    1970-07-01

    While the phenomenon of beta-decay was discovered near the end of the last century, the notion that the weak interaction forms a separate field of physical forces evolved rather gradually. This became clear only after the experimental discoveries of other weak reactions such as muon-decay, muon-capture, etc., and the theoretical observation that all these reactions can be described by approximately the same coupling constant, thus giving rise to the notion of a universal weak interaction. Only then did one slowly recognize that the weak interaction force forms an independent field, perhaps on the same footing as the gravitational force, the electromagnetic force, and the strong nuclear and sub-nuclear forces.

  18. Is self-selection the main driver of positive interpretations of general health checks?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, Anne Mette; Jørgensen, Torben; Pisinger, Charlotta

    2015-01-01

    group (n=47,987). Persons in the intervention group were invited for a health check and individual lifestyle counselling. At baseline, 52.5% participated. Differences between participants and control group in 10-year all-cause and disease specific mortality was assessed. In survival analyses we...... controlled for socio-demography and mental and physical health. RESULTS: Mortality rates were highest among non-participants and lowest among participants in the intervention group, whereas mortality rates of controls were approximately the average of those of participants and non-participants. In adjusted......OBJECTIVE: To investigate if the lower mortality among participants of a health check followed by lifestyle intervention of high risk persons is explained by self-selection. METHODS: All persons residing in the study area (Copenhagen; Denmark) were randomized to intervention (n=11,629) or control...

  19. James Cook University's rurally orientated medical school selection process: quality graduates and positive workforce outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Robin A; Woolley, Torres; Sen Gupta, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    The regionally based James Cook University (JCU) College of Medicine and Dentistry aims to meet its mission to address the health needs of the region by using a selection policy favouring rural origin applicants and providing students with early and repeated exposure to rural experiences during training. This study seeks to determine if the JCU medical school's policy of preferentially selecting rural and remote background students is associated with differing patterns of undergraduate performance or graduate practice location. Data at application to medical school and during the undergraduate years was retrieved from administrative databases held by the university and the medical school. Postgraduate location data were obtained either from personal contact via email, telephone or Facebook or electronically from the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Authority website. Practice location was described across Australian Standard Geographical Classification Remoteness Area (ASGC-RA) categories, with 1 being a major city and 5 being a very remote location. The 856 Australian-based students accepted into the JCU medical program between 2000 and 2008 came from all geographical regions across Australia: 20% metropolitan (ASGC-RA 1), 20% inner regional (ASGC-RA 2), 56% outer regional (ASGC-RA 3), and 5% from remote or very remote locations (ASGC-RA 4 and 5). Having a rural or remote hometown at application (ASGC-RA 3-5) was significantly associated with a lower tertiary entrance score (pacademic achievement across years 1 to 3 (p=0.002, p=0.005 and p=0.025, respectively). Graduates having either a rural or a remote home town at application were more likely to practise in rural (RA 3-5) towns than graduates from metropolitan/inner regional centre across all postgraduate years. For example, the prevalence odds ratios (POR) for graduates practising in a rural town at postgraduate year 1 (PGY 1) having either a rural or remote hometown were 2.6 and 1.8, respectively

  20. Multi-scale textural feature extraction and particle swarm optimization based model selection for false positive reduction in mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyout, Imad; Czajkowska, Joanna; Grzegorzek, Marcin

    2015-12-01

    The high number of false positives and the resulting number of avoidable breast biopsies are the major problems faced by current mammography Computer Aided Detection (CAD) systems. False positive reduction is not only a requirement for mass but also for calcification CAD systems which are currently deployed for clinical use. This paper tackles two problems related to reducing the number of false positives in the detection of all lesions and masses, respectively. Firstly, textural patterns of breast tissue have been analyzed using several multi-scale textural descriptors based on wavelet and gray level co-occurrence matrix. The second problem addressed in this paper is the parameter selection and performance optimization. For this, we adopt a model selection procedure based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for selecting the most discriminative textural features and for strengthening the generalization capacity of the supervised learning stage based on a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. For evaluating the proposed methods, two sets of suspicious mammogram regions have been used. The first one, obtained from Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM), contains 1494 regions (1000 normal and 494 abnormal samples). The second set of suspicious regions was obtained from database of Mammographic Image Analysis Society (mini-MIAS) and contains 315 (207 normal and 108 abnormal) samples. Results from both datasets demonstrate the efficiency of using PSO based model selection for optimizing both classifier hyper-parameters and parameters, respectively. Furthermore, the obtained results indicate the promising performance of the proposed textural features and more specifically, those based on co-occurrence matrix of wavelet image representation technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Selective internalization of self-assembled artificial oil bodies by HER2/neu-positive cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Chung-Jen; Lin, Che-Chin [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Li-Jen [School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Chao, Yun-Peng, E-mail: cjchiang@mail.cmu.edu.tw, E-mail: ypchao@fcu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-01-07

    A novel delivery carrier was developed using artificial oil bodies (AOBs). Plant seed oil bodies (OBs) consist of a triacylglycerol matrix surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids embedded with the storage protein oleosin (Ole). Ole consists of a central hydrophobic domain with two amphiphatic arms that extrude from the surface of OBs. In this study, a bivalent anti-HER2/neu affibody domain (ZH2) was fused with Ole at the C terminus. After overproduction in Escherichia coli, the fusion protein (Ole-ZH2) was recovered to assemble AOBs. The size of self-assembled AOBs was tailored by varying the oil/Ole-ZH2 ratio and pH to reach a nanoscale. Upon co-incubation with tumor cells, the nanoscale AOBs encapsulated with a hydrophobic fluorescence dye were selectively internalized by HER2/neu-overexpressing cells and displayed biocompatibility with the cells. In addition, the ZH2-mediated endosomal entry of AOBs occurred in a time- and AOB dose-dependent manner. The internalization efficiency was as high as 90%. The internalized AOBs disintegrated at the non-permissive pH (e.g. in acidic endosomes) and the cargo dye was released. Results of in vitro study revealed a sustained and prolonged release profile. Taken together, our findings indicate the potential of AOBs as a delivery carrier.

  2. Identifying selectively important amino acid positions associated with alternative habitat environments in fish mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun Hong; Li, Hong Lian; Zhang, Yong; Meng, Zi Ning; Lin, Hao Ran

    2017-04-19

    Fish species inhabitating seawater (SW) or freshwater (FW) habitats have to develop genetic adaptations to alternative environment factors, especially salinity. Functional consequences of the protein variations associated with habitat environments in fish mitochondrial genomes have not yet received much attention. We analyzed 829 complete fish mitochondrial genomes and compared the amino acid differences of 13 mitochondrial protein families between FW and SW fish groups. We identified 47 specificity determining sites (SDS) that associated with FW or SW environments from 12 mitochondrial protein families. Thirty-two (68%) of the SDS sites are hydrophobic, 13 (28%) are neutral, and the remaining sites are acidic or basic. Seven of those SDS from ND1, ND2 and ND5 were scored as probably damaging to the protein structures. Furthermore, phylogenetic tree based Bayes Empirical Bayes analysis also detected 63 positive sites associated with alternative habitat environments across ten mtDNA proteins. These signatures could be important for studying mitochondrial genetic variation relevant to fish physiology and ecology.

  3. Weak bond screening system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, S. Y.; Chang, F. H.; Bell, J. R.

    Consideration is given to the development of a weak bond screening system which is based on the utilization of a high power ultrasonic (HPU) technique. The instrumentation of the prototype bond strength screening system is described, and the adhesively bonded specimens used in the system developmental effort are detailed. Test results obtained from these specimens are presented in terms of bond strength and level of high power ultrasound irradiation. The following observations were made: (1) for Al/Al specimens, 2.6 sec of HPU irradiation will screen weak bond conditions due to improper preparation of bonding surfaces; (2) for composite/composite specimens, 2.0 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to under-cured conditions; (3) for Al honeycomb core with composite skin structure, 3.5 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive or oils contamination of bonding surfaces; and (4) for Nomex honeycomb with Al skin structure, 1.3 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive.

  4. Micronutrient Availability in Relation to Selected Soil Properties and landscape Position in Calcareous Soils of Golpayegan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Fathi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Variety of soil reactions govern the distribution of metal micronutrients that includes complexation with organic and inorganic ligands, ion exchange, adsorption and desorption processes, precipitation and dissolution of solids and acid-based equilibria. The relative importance of these reactions depends on many factors such as soil physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties and the nature of metal ions. Environmental factors such as climate, physiographic position, and soil development may affect variability of some soil properties and thereby nutrient availability. The present research was conducted to find relationships between Iron, manganese, zinc, and copper availability and some major soil properties, physiographic condition and soil development. Materials and Methods: Golpayegan region is located in northwest of Isfahan province in central Iran. The mean elevation of the studied area is 1790 above sea level. Annual precipitation was about 244mm and mean monthly temperature ranges from -6 in January to 34°C in August. The soils were developed on different physiographic conditions including piedmont plains, alluvial-fan, plateaus, and flood plains belonging to Entisols and Aridisols. Soil samples (0–60 cm were collected from 98 grid points with 2000m distance in the agricultural area of Golpayegan. Particle size distribution, calcium carbonate, organic carbon, available potassium and phosphorus of the soils were measured by SWRI standard methods. Available Zn, Cu, Mn, and Fe were determined by addition of 10 g soil to 20mL 0.005M diethylentriaminepentacetic‏. The solutions were shaken for 2 h at 25°C, centrifuged, filtered, and Fe, Mn, Zn, and Cu concentrations were measured by an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results Discussion: Studied soils were developed on calcareous material and about 60% of samples have more than 20% of calcium carbonate. Available Fe ranged from 1.4 to 6.5 mg kg-1 (mean 15.8 mg kg-1

  5. Antipsychotic drug-like effects of the selective M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator VU0152100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Nellie E; Grannan, Michael; Bubser, Michael; Barry, Robert L; Thompson, Analisa; Rosanelli, John; Gowrishankar, Raajaram; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Damon, Stephen; Bridges, Thomas M; Melancon, Bruce J; Tarr, James C; Brogan, John T; Avison, Malcolm J; Deutch, Ariel Y; Wess, Jürgen; Wood, Michael R; Lindsley, Craig W; Gore, John C; Conn, P Jeffrey; Jones, Carrie K

    2014-06-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that selective M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) activators may offer a novel strategy for the treatment of psychosis. However, previous efforts to develop selective M4 activators were unsuccessful because of the lack of M4 mAChR subtype specificity and off-target muscarinic adverse effects. We recently developed VU0152100, a highly selective M4 positive allosteric modulator (PAM) that exerts central effects after systemic administration. We now report that VU0152100 dose-dependently reverses amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion in rats and wild-type mice, but not in M4 KO mice. VU0152100 also blocks amphetamine-induced disruption of the acquisition of contextual fear conditioning and prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex. These effects were observed at doses that do not produce catalepsy or peripheral adverse effects associated with non-selective mAChR agonists. To further understand the effects of selective potentiation of M4 on region-specific brain activation, VU0152100 alone and in combination with amphetamine were evaluated using pharmacologic magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI). Key neural substrates of M4-mediated modulation of the amphetamine response included the nucleus accumbens (NAS), caudate-putamen (CP), hippocampus, and medial thalamus. Functional connectivity analysis of phMRI data, specifically assessing correlations in activation between regions, revealed several brain networks involved in the M4 modulation of amphetamine-induced brain activation, including the NAS and retrosplenial cortex with motor cortex, hippocampus, and medial thalamus. Using in vivo microdialysis, we found that VU0152100 reversed amphetamine-induced increases in extracellular dopamine levels in NAS and CP. The present data are consistent with an antipsychotic drug-like profile of activity for VU0152100. Taken together, these data support the development of selective M4 PAMs as a new approach to the treatment of psychosis

  6. Positive Darwinian selection in the piston that powers proton pumps in complex I of the mitochondria of Pacific salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Garvin

    Full Text Available The mechanism of oxidative phosphorylation is well understood, but evolution of the proteins involved is not. We combined phylogenetic, genomic, and structural biology analyses to examine the evolution of twelve mitochondrial encoded proteins of closely related, yet phenotypically diverse, Pacific salmon. Two separate analyses identified the same seven positively selected sites in ND5. A strong signal was also detected at three sites of ND2. An energetic coupling analysis revealed several structures in the ND5 protein that may have co-evolved with the selected sites. These data implicate Complex I, specifically the piston arm of ND5 where it connects the proton pumps, as important in the evolution of Pacific salmon. Lastly, the lineage to Chinook experienced rapid evolution at the piston arm.

  7. Positive Darwinian selection is a driving force for the diversification of terpenoid biosynthesis in the genus Oryza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Li, Guanglin; Köllner, Tobias G; Jia, Qidong; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Chen, Feng

    2014-09-16

    Terpenoids constitute the largest class of secondary metabolites made by plants and display vast chemical diversity among and within species. Terpene synthases (TPSs) are the pivotal enzymes for terpenoid biosynthesis that create the basic carbon skeletons of this class. Functional divergence of paralogous and orthologous TPS genes is a major mechanism for the diversification of terpenoid biosynthesis. However, little is known about the evolutionary forces that have shaped the evolution of plant TPS genes leading to terpenoid diversity. The orthologs of Oryza Terpene Synthase 1 (OryzaTPS1), a rice terpene synthase gene involved in indirect defense against insects in Oryza sativa, were cloned from six additional Oryza species. In vitro biochemical analysis showed that the enzymes encoded by these OryzaTPS1 genes functioned either as (E)-β-caryophyllene synthases (ECS), or (E)-β-caryophyllene & germacrene A synthases (EGS), or germacrene D & germacrene A synthases (DAS). Because the orthologs of OryzaTPS1 in maize and sorghum function as ECS, the ECS activity was inferred to be ancestral. Molecular evolutionary detected the signature of positive Darwinian selection in five codon substitutions in the evolution from ECS to DAS. Homology-based structure modeling and the biochemical analysis of laboratory-generated protein variants validated the contribution of the five positively selected sites to functional divergence of OryzaTPS1. The changes in the in vitro product spectra of OryzaTPS1 proteins also correlated closely to the changes in in vivo blends of volatile terpenes released from insect-damaged rice plants. In this study, we found that positive Darwinian selection is a driving force for the functional divergence of OryzaTPS1. This finding suggests that the diverged sesquiterpene blend produced by the Oryza species containing DAS may be adaptive, likely in the attraction of the natural enemies of insect herbivores.

  8. Comparison of Several Selective Media for Isolation and Differentiation of Coagulase-Positive Strains of Staphylococcus aureus1

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDivitt, Maxine E.; Topp, Eleanor B.

    1964-01-01

    Six coagulase-positive strains of Staphylococcus aureus which had been cultivated in Brain Heart Infusion broth, milk, and brine were plated on seven isolation media. A significant difference in the growth patterns of the individual strains was found as well as a significant effect resulting from the previous cultivation history before plating. Brine and, to a lesser extent, milk were found to reduce maximal cell concentrations attained, but strains grown in brine and milk showed greater ability to withstand the selective action of the isolation media. Fibrinogen applied to the surface of five of the media allowed the formation of characteristic halos by coagulase-positive strains of S. aureus. Only half of the strains studied produced a zone of precipitation on SM110-Egg Yolk agar. The isolation medium containing cycloheximide and a high level of polymxin B was most inhibitory to the organisms. PMID:14131367

  9. Enkephalin-like immunoreactivity in human skin is found selectively in a fraction of CD68-positive dermal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, J B; Lund, Marianne; Stengaard-Pedersen, K

    1997-01-01

    psoriasis, sections of skin from psoriatic patients were immunohistochemically stained with antisera against methionine and leucine enkephalin, CD68 (KP1, PG-M1), calprotectin (M747), M130 (Ber-MAC3), CD1a and CD3. Enkephalin-like activity was detected selectively in dermal CD68-positive macrophages....../monocytes. The activity showed no association with the activation markers M747 and Ber-MAC3. There was a statistically significant increase in enkephalin-positive cells in involved psoriatic skin compared with uninvolved and normal skin. These results were confirmed by radioimmunoassay which showed elevated levels...... the threshold for biological activity, they may play a role in the regulation of the inflammatory processes seen in this skin disease....

  10. Bagging Weak Predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Manuel; Hillebrand, Eric

    Relations between economic variables can often not be exploited for forecasting, suggesting that predictors are weak in the sense that estimation uncertainty is larger than bias from ignoring the relation. In this paper, we propose a novel bagging predictor designed for such weak predictor...... variables. The predictor is based on a test for finitesample predictive ability. Our predictor shrinks the OLS estimate not to zero, but towards the null of the test which equates squared bias with estimation variance. We derive the asymptotic distribution and show that the predictor can substantially lower...

  11. HIV-positive patients’ perceptions of care received at a selected antiretroviral therapy clinic in Vhembe district, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshifhiwa V. Ndou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients’ experiences are a reflection of what has happened during the care process and, therefore, provide information about the performance of health care professional workers. They refer to the process of care provision at the antiretroviral therapy (ART sites.Aim and setting: This article explored the perceptions of HIV-positive patients of care received at the Gateway Clinic of the regional hospital that provides antiretroviral treatment in the Vhembe district.Methods: A qualitative, explorative and descriptive design was used. A non-probability, convenient sampling method was used to select 20 HIV-positive patients who were above 18 years of age. In-depth individual interviews were used to collect data. Data were analysed through Tech’s open coding method.Results: One theme and two sub-themes emerged, namely positive experiences related to the environment and attitudes of health professionals, and negative experiences concerning the practices by health care providers.Conclusion: Patients’ perceptions of quality of, and satisfaction with, health care may affect health outcomes. Recommendations are made to consider, practice and strengthen the protocols, the standard operating procedures and the principles of infection control in the health facilities.Keywords: Human Immunodeficiecy Virus, Antiretroviral Treatment, HIV positive, Limpopo

  12. [Muscle weakness in cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givon, Uri

    2009-01-01

    Over the last two decades, muscle weakness has been shown to be a major component of cerebral palsy (CP) pathology. Caused by multiple etiologies including variations in the muscle fiber type, pathologic motor unit function, co-contraction of agonists and antagonists, and muscle size and rigidity, weakness interferes with function and leads to limited function and participation. Muscle strength was found to be associated with walking ability and with functional scales. Children with CP were found to be weaker than typically developing children, and differences were found with respect to muscle groups in children with CP. Muscle weakness should be evaluated as objectively as possible to improve the quality of diagnosis and treatment. Manual muscle testing is not sufficient for evaluation, and instrumented muscle testing is validated in CP. Muscle strengthening is an important part of treatment of CP. Several methods of strengthening have been described. Muscle lengthening and other spasticity-modifying therapies have been shown to have a positive effect on muscle strength. Children who participated in muscle strengthening programs had a better quality of life and improved function.

  13. Structure-based discovery of selective positive allosteric modulators of antagonists for the M2muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczynska, Magdalena; Clark, Mary J; Valant, Celine; Xu, Jun; Moo, Ee Von; Albold, Sabine; Weiss, Dahlia R; Torosyan, Hayarpi; Huang, Weijiao; Kruse, Andrew C; Lyda, Brent R; May, Lauren T; Baltos, Jo-Anne; Sexton, Patrick M; Kobilka, Brian K; Christopoulos, Arthur; Shoichet, Brian K; Sunahara, Roger K

    2018-02-16

    Subtype-selective antagonists for muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) have long been elusive, owing to the highly conserved orthosteric binding site. However, allosteric sites of these receptors are less conserved, motivating the search for allosteric ligands that modulate agonists or antagonists to confer subtype selectivity. Accordingly, a 4.6 million-molecule library was docked against the structure of the prototypical M 2 mAChR, seeking molecules that specifically stabilized antagonist binding. This led us to identify a positive allosteric modulator (PAM) that potentiated the antagonist N -methyl scopolamine (NMS). Structure-based optimization led to compound '628, which enhanced binding of NMS, and the drug scopolamine itself, with a cooperativity factor (α) of 5.5 and a K B of 1.1 μM, while sparing the endogenous agonist acetylcholine. NMR spectral changes determined for methionine residues reflected changes in the allosteric network. Moreover, '628 slowed the dissociation rate of NMS from the M 2 mAChR by 50-fold, an effect not observed at the other four mAChR subtypes. The specific PAM effect of '628 on NMS antagonism was conserved in functional assays, including agonist stimulation of [ 35 S]GTPγS binding and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation. Importantly, the selective allostery between '628 and NMS was retained in membranes from adult rat hypothalamus and in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, supporting the physiological relevance of this PAM/antagonist approach. This study supports the feasibility of discovering PAMs that confer subtype selectivity to antagonists; molecules like '628 can convert an armamentarium of potent but nonselective GPCR antagonist drugs into subtype-selective reagents, thus reducing their off-target effects. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  14. Charged weak currents

    CERN Document Server

    Turlay, René

    1979-01-01

    In this review of charged weak currents the author concentrates on inclusive high energy neutrino physics. The authors discusses the general structure of charged currents, new results on total cross- sections, the Callan-Gross relation, antiquark distributions, scaling violations and tests of QCD. A very short summary on multilepton physics is given. (44 refs).

  15. A genomic survey of positive selection in Burkholderia pseudomallei provides insights into the evolution of accidental virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tannistha Nandi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Certain environmental microorganisms can cause severe human infections, even in the absence of an obvious requirement for transition through an animal host for replication ("accidental virulence". To understand this process, we compared eleven isolate genomes of Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp, a tropical soil microbe and causative agent of the human and animal disease melioidosis. We found evidence for the existence of several new genes in the Bp reference genome, identifying 282 novel genes supported by at least two independent lines of supporting evidence (mRNA transcripts, database homologs, and presence of ribosomal binding sites and 81 novel genes supported by all three lines. Within the Bp core genome, 211 genes exhibited significant levels of positive selection (4.5%, distributed across many cellular pathways including carbohydrate and secondary metabolism. Functional experiments revealed that certain positively selected genes might enhance mammalian virulence by interacting with host cellular pathways or utilizing host nutrients. Evolutionary modifications improving Bp environmental fitness may thus have indirectly facilitated the ability of Bp to colonize and survive in mammalian hosts. These findings improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of melioidosis, and establish Bp as a model system for studying the genetics of accidental virulence.

  16. A Novel Variant with Positive Natural Selection Influenced Hb A2 Levels in Chinese Individuals with β-Thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shanjuan; Chen, Yang; Lai, Ketong; Dewan, Roma Kajal; He, Yunyan

    2017-05-01

    β-Thalassemia (β-thal) is the most common inherited hemolytic anemia worldwide. Elevated Hb A2 is a mark of β-thal carriers. The aim of this study was to identify the pathogenic variants associated with the Hb A2 levels. One thousand and thirty β-thal carriers were recruited for this study. Using positive natural expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis, a significant variant was selected. Genotyping for the rs231841 polymorphism was performed by the Sequenom MassARRAY IPLEX platform. All genetic association analyses were performed with the PLINK program. The linear regression analysis showed that rs231841 in the intron region of the potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily Q member 1 (KCNQ1) gene on chromosome 11p15 was significantly associated with Hb A2 levels. The presence of the C allele was associated with elevated Hb A2 levels. Our results suggest that rs231841 on the KCNQ1 gene with positive natural selection is related to Hb A2 levels in Chinese β-thal carriers, and KCNQ1 is probably associated with the expression of the β-like globin gene cluster.

  17. Positive selection and increased antiviral activity associated with the PARP-containing isoform of human zinc-finger antiviral protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Kerns

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic immunity relies on specific recognition of viral epitopes to mount a cell-autonomous defense against viral infections. Viral recognition determinants in intrinsic immunity genes are expected to evolve rapidly as host genes adapt to changing viruses, resulting in a signature of adaptive evolution. Zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP from rats was discovered to be an intrinsic immunity gene that can restrict murine leukemia virus, and certain alphaviruses and filoviruses. Here, we used an approach combining molecular evolution and cellular infectivity assays to address whether ZAP also acts as a restriction factor in primates, and to pinpoint which protein domains may directly interact with the virus. We find that ZAP has evolved under positive selection throughout primate evolution. Recurrent positive selection is only found in the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP-like domain present in a longer human ZAP isoform. This PARP-like domain was not present in the previously identified and tested rat ZAP gene. Using infectivity assays, we found that the longer isoform of ZAP that contains the PARP-like domain is a stronger suppressor of murine leukemia virus expression and Semliki forest virus infection. Our study thus finds that human ZAP encodes a potent antiviral activity against alphaviruses. The striking congruence between our evolutionary predictions and cellular infectivity assays strongly validates such a combined approach to study intrinsic immunity genes.

  18. Natural resistance to experimental feline infectious peritonitis virus infection is decreased rather than increased by positive genetic selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Niels C; Liu, Hongwei; Durden, Monica; Lyons, Leslie A

    2016-03-01

    A previous study demonstrated the existence of a natural resistance to feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) among 36% of randomly bred laboratory cats. A genome wide association study (GWAS) on this population suggested that resistance was polygenic but failed to identify any strong specific associations. In order to enhance the power of GWAS or whole genome sequencing to identify strong genetic associations, a decision was made to positively select for resistance over three generations. The inbreeding experiment began with a genetically related parental (P) population consisting of three toms and four queens identified from among the survivors of the earlier study and belonging to a closely related subgroup (B). The subsequent effects of inbreeding were measured using 42 genome-wide STR markers. P generation cats produced 57 first filial (F1) kittens, only five of which (9.0%) demonstrated a natural resistance to FIPV infection. One of these five F1 survivors was then used to produce six F1/P-backcrosses kittens, only one of which proved resistant to FIP. Six of eight of the F1 and F1/P survivors succumbed to a secondary exposure 4-12 months later. Therefore, survival after both primary and secondary infection was decreased rather than increased by positive selection for resistance. The common genetic factor associated with this diminished resistance was a loss of heterozygosity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Weak lensing magnification in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Fernandez, M.; Sanchez, E.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Suchyta, E.; Huff, E. M.; Gaztanaga, E.; Aleksić, J.; Ponce, R.; Castander, F. J.; Hoyle, B.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kirk, D.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; MacCrann, N.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper the effect of weak lensing magnification on galaxy number counts is studied by cross-correlating the positions of two galaxy samples, separated by redshift, using the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification dataset. This analysis is carried out for galaxies that are selected only by its photometric redshift. An extensive analysis of the systematic effects, using new methods based on simulations is performed, including a Monte Carlo sampling of the selection function of the survey.

  20. Footprint of Positive Selection in Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum Genome Sequences Suggests Adaptive Microevolution of the Syphilis Pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Jeffrey, Brendan M.; Le, Hoavan T.; Molini, Barbara J.; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.; Rockey, Daniel D.

    2012-01-01

    In the rabbit model of syphilis, infection phenotypes associated with the Nichols and Chicago strains of Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum), though similar, are not identical. Between these strains, significant differences are found in expression of, and antibody responses to some candidate virulence factors, suggesting the existence of functional genetic differences between isolates. The Chicago strain genome was therefore sequenced and compared to the Nichols genome, available since 1998. Initial comparative analysis suggested the presence of 44 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 103 small (≤3 nucleotides) indels, and 1 large (1204 bp) insertion in the Chicago genome with respect to the Nichols genome. To confirm the above findings, Sanger sequencing was performed on most loci carrying differences using DNA from Chicago and the Nichols strain used in the original T. pallidum genome project. A majority of the previously identified differences were found to be due to errors in the published Nichols genome, while the accuracy of the Chicago genome was confirmed. However, 20 SNPs were confirmed between the two genomes, and 16 (80.0%) were found in coding regions, with all being of non-synonymous nature, strongly indicating action of positive selection. Sequencing of 16 genomic loci harboring SNPs in 12 additional T. pallidum strains, (SS14, Bal 3, Bal 7, Bal 9, Sea 81-3, Sea 81-8, Sea 86-1, Sea 87-1, Mexico A, UW231B, UW236B, and UW249C), was used to identify “Chicago-“ or “Nichols -specific” differences. All but one of the 16 SNPs were “Nichols-specific”, with Chicago having identical sequences at these positions to almost all of the additional strains examined. These mutations could reflect differential adaptation of the Nichols strain to the rabbit host or pathoadaptive mutations acquired during human infection. Our findings indicate that SNPs among T. pallidum strains emerge under positive selection and, therefore, are likely to be functional in

  1. Political corruption and weak state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojiljković Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The author starts from the hypothesis that it is essential for the countries of the region to critically assess the synergy established between systemic, political corruption and a selectively weak, “devious” nature of the state. Moreover, the key dilemma is whether the expanded practice of political rent seeking supports the conclusion that the root of all corruption is in the very existence of the state - particularly in excessive, selective and deforming state interventions and benefits that create a fertile ground for corruption? The author argues that the destructive combination of weak government and rampant political corruption is based on scattered state intervention, while also rule the parties cartel in the executive branch subordinate to parliament, the judiciary and the police. Corrupt exchange takes place with the absence of strong institutional framework and the precise rules of the political and electoral games, control of public finances and effective political and anti-monopoly legislation and practice included. Exit from the current situation can be seen in the realization of effective anti­corruption strategy that integrates preventive and repressive measures and activities and lead to the establishment of principles of good governance. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179076: Politički identitet Srbije u regionalnom i globalnom kontekstu

  2. Trastuzumab-grafted PAMAM dendrimers for the selective delivery of anticancer drugs to HER2-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulhari, Hitesh; Pooja, Deep; Shrivastava, Shweta; Kuncha, Madhusudana; Naidu, V G M; Bansal, Vipul; Sistla, Ramakrishna; Adams, David J

    2016-04-07

    Approximately 20% of breast cancer cases are human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive. This type of breast cancer is more aggressive and tends to reoccur more often than HER2-negative breast cancer. In this study, we synthesized trastuzumab (TZ)-grafted dendrimers to improve delivery of docetaxel (DTX) to HER2-positive breast cancer cells. Bioconjugation of TZ on the surface of dendrimers was performed using a heterocrosslinker, MAL-PEG-NHS. For imaging of cancer cells, dendrimers were also conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate. Comparative in vitro studies revealed that these targeted dendrimers were more selective, and had higher antiproliferation activity, towards HER2-positive MDA-MB-453 human breast cancer cells than HER2-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. When compared with unconjugated dendrimers, TZ-conjugated dendrimers also displayed higher cellular internalization and induction of apoptosis against MDA-MB-453 cells. Binding of TZ to the dendrimer surface could help site-specific delivery of DTX and reduce systemic toxicity resulting from its lack of specificity. In addition, in vivo studies revealed that the pharmacokinetic profile of DTX was significantly improved by the conjugated nanosystem.

  3. Weak lensing with GEST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, J. D.; Bennett, D. P.; Kaiser, N.

    2001-12-01

    Weak lensing by large-scale structure (cosmic shear) provides an opportunity to directly observe the dark matter in the universe. Current ground-based and space-based surveys have demonstrated the efficacy of this technique in determining the mass distribution and thus placing constraints on cosmological parameters such as Ω m, σ 8, and the bias parameter b. Current surveys have been hampered by the comparatively low resolution of ground-based telescopes and the small field of view of HST. To make significant progress in this field, wide field space-based surveys are needed. The Galactic Exoplanet Survey Telescope (GEST) will be able to provide 500- 1000 sqare degrees with a resolution of better than 0.2 arcseconds in multiple filters. This will make it an ideal instrument for a weak lensing survey.

  4. Composite weak bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, M.

    1988-04-01

    Dynamical mechanism of composite W and Z is studied in a 1/N field theory model with four-fermion interactions in which global weak SU(2) symmetry is broken explicitly by electromagnetic interaction. Issues involved in such a model are discussed in detail. Deviation from gauge coupling due to compositeness and higher order loop corrections are examined to show that this class of models are consistent not only theoretically but also experimentally.

  5. Phylodynamic analysis of clinical and environmental Vibrio cholerae isolates from Haiti reveals diversification driven by positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarian, Taj; Ali, Afsar; Johnson, Judith A; Mohr, David; Prosperi, Mattia; Veras, Nazle M; Jubair, Mohammed; Strickland, Samantha L; Rashid, Mohammad H; Alam, Meer T; Weppelmann, Thomas A; Katz, Lee S; Tarr, Cheryl L; Colwell, Rita R; Morris, J Glenn; Salemi, Marco

    2014-12-23

    Phylodynamic analysis of genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data is a powerful tool to investigate underlying evolutionary processes of bacterial epidemics. The method was applied to investigate a collection of 65 clinical and environmental isolates of Vibrio cholerae from Haiti collected between 2010 and 2012. Characterization of isolates recovered from environmental samples identified a total of four toxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolates, four non-O1/O139 isolates, and a novel nontoxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolate with the classical tcpA gene. Phylogenies of strains were inferred from genome-wide SNPs using coalescent-based demographic models within a Bayesian framework. A close phylogenetic relationship between clinical and environmental toxigenic V. cholerae O1 strains was observed. As cholera spread throughout Haiti between October 2010 and August 2012, the population size initially increased and then fluctuated over time. Selection analysis along internal branches of the phylogeny showed a steady accumulation of synonymous substitutions and a progressive increase of nonsynonymous substitutions over time, suggesting diversification likely was driven by positive selection. Short-term accumulation of nonsynonymous substitutions driven by selection may have significant implications for virulence, transmission dynamics, and even vaccine efficacy. Cholera, a dehydrating diarrheal disease caused by toxigenic strains of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, emerged in 2010 in Haiti, a country where there were no available records on cholera over the past 100 years. While devastating in terms of morbidity and mortality, the outbreak provided a unique opportunity to study the evolutionary dynamics of V. cholerae and its environmental presence. The present study expands on previous work and provides an in-depth phylodynamic analysis inferred from genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms of clinical and environmental strains from dispersed geographic settings in

  6. Positive and negative selection of the T cell repertoire: what thymocytes see and don't see

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Ludger; Kyewski, Bruno; Allen, Paul M.; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2016-01-01

    The fate of developing T cells is specified by interactions of their antigen receptor with self-peptide/MHC complexes displayed by thymic antigen presenting cells (APCs). Various thymic APCs subsets are strategically positioned in particular thymic microenvironments and orchestrate the selection of a functional and self-tolerant T cell repertoire. Here, we will review the different strategies that these APCs employ to sample and process self-antigens and thereby generate partly unique, ‘idiosyncratic’ peptide/MHC ligandomes. We will discuss how the particular composition of these APC-subset-specific peptide/MHC ligandomes not only shapes the T cell repertoire in the thymus, but may also indelibly imprint the behavior of mature T cells in the periphery. PMID:24830344

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Five Selective and Differential Media for the Detection and Enumeration of Coagulase-Positive Staphylococci in Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisley, F. D.; Peeler, J. T.; Angelotti, R.

    1965-01-01

    Five selective media for the detection and enumeration of coagulase-positive staphylococci were evaluated for their efficiency in the recovery of 17 strains of coagulase-positive staphylococci from foods. They were Staphylococcus Medium 110 (SM-110), tellurite-glycine-agar (TGA), egg-tellurite-glycine-pyruvate-agar (ETGPA), tellurite-egg-agar (TEA), and tellurite-polymyxin-egg yolk-agar (TPEY). Statistical analysis by the rank correlation method of the efficiency with which these media recovered staphylococci from pure 24-hr Brain Heart Infusion cultures revealed the following efficiencies in descending order: (i) TPEY, (ii) ETGPA, (iii) TGA, (iv) TEA, (v) SM-110. Growth of 17 strains of coagulase-negative cocci on these media showed the following approximate descending order of inhibition to these organisms: (i) ETGPA, (ii) TEA, (iii) SM-110, (iv) TGA, (v) TPEY. The appearance of colonies of the various coagulase-negative strains on each medium was studied for the degree to which they could be confused with colonies of coagulase-positive strains. Nineteen food contaminants, including Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus sp., Escherichia coli, Erwinia sp., fecal streptococci, and others, were also studied for similarities in appearance to staphylococci and for ability to grow on the selective media. The influence of five sterile food homogenates (frozen chicken and tuna pies, custard, smoked ham, and raw whole egg) on recovery of 1,500 enterotoxigenic staphylococci (three strains) per milliliter was determined by statistical analysis. Three main effects (culture, media, and food) and three interactions (media with food, food with cultures, and media with culture) were found to be significant. Recovery on TPEY was influenced less by food than the other selective media and showed optimal recovery ability from sterile custard, eggs, and ham. TGA recovered well from sterile chicken pie and custard, SM-110 from sterile custard, and TEA from sterile ham. None of the media was

  8. Positive selection of natural poly-reactive B cells in the periphery occurs independent of heavy chain allelic inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ying; Ji, Qiuhe; Lin, Ying; Fu, Meng; Gao, Jixin; Zhang, Ping; Hu, Xingbin; Feng, Lei; Liu, Yufeng; Han, Hua; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Natural autoreactive B cells are important mediators of autoimmune diseases. Receptor editing is known to play an important role in both central and peripheral B cell tolerance. However, the role of allelic inclusion in the development of natural autoreactive B cells is not clear. Previously, we generated μ chain (TgV(H)3B4I) and μ/κ chains (TgV(H/L)3B4) transgenic mice using transgene derived from the 3B4 hybridoma, which produce poly-reactive natural autoantibodies. In this study, we demonstrate that a considerable population of B cells edited their B cells receptors (BCRs) via light chain or heavy chain allelic inclusion during their development in TgV(H)3B4I mice. Additionally, allelic inclusion occurred more frequently in the periphery and promoted the differentiation of B cells into marginal zone or B-1a cells in TgV(H)3B4I mice. B cells from TgV(H/L)3B4 mice expressing the intact transgenic 3B4 BCR without receptor editing secreted poly-reactive 3B4 antibody. Interestingly, however, B cell that underwent allelic inclusion in TgV(H)3B4I mice also produced poly-reactive autoantibodies in vivo and in vitro. Our findings suggest that receptor editing plays a minor role in the positive selection of B cells expressing natural poly-reactive BCRs, which can be positively selected through heavy chain allelic inclusion to retain their poly-reactivity in the periphery.

  9. Positive selection of natural poly-reactive B cells in the periphery occurs independent of heavy chain allelic inclusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xing

    Full Text Available Natural autoreactive B cells are important mediators of autoimmune diseases. Receptor editing is known to play an important role in both central and peripheral B cell tolerance. However, the role of allelic inclusion in the development of natural autoreactive B cells is not clear. Previously, we generated μ chain (TgV(H3B4I and μ/κ chains (TgV(H/L3B4 transgenic mice using transgene derived from the 3B4 hybridoma, which produce poly-reactive natural autoantibodies. In this study, we demonstrate that a considerable population of B cells edited their B cells receptors (BCRs via light chain or heavy chain allelic inclusion during their development in TgV(H3B4I mice. Additionally, allelic inclusion occurred more frequently in the periphery and promoted the differentiation of B cells into marginal zone or B-1a cells in TgV(H3B4I mice. B cells from TgV(H/L3B4 mice expressing the intact transgenic 3B4 BCR without receptor editing secreted poly-reactive 3B4 antibody. Interestingly, however, B cell that underwent allelic inclusion in TgV(H3B4I mice also produced poly-reactive autoantibodies in vivo and in vitro. Our findings suggest that receptor editing plays a minor role in the positive selection of B cells expressing natural poly-reactive BCRs, which can be positively selected through heavy chain allelic inclusion to retain their poly-reactivity in the periphery.

  10. The Weak Haagerup Property II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, Uffe; Knudby, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The weak Haagerup property for locally compact groups and the weak Haagerup constant were recently introduced by the second author [27]. The weak Haagerup property is weaker than both weak amenability introduced by Cowling and the first author [9] and the Haagerup property introduced by Connes [6......] and Choda [5]. In this paper, it is shown that a connected simple Lie group G has the weak Haagerup property if and only if the real rank of G is zero or one. Hence for connected simple Lie groups the weak Haagerup property coincides with weak amenability. Moreover, it turns out that for connected simple...... Lie groups the weak Haagerup constant coincides with the weak amenability constant, although this is not true for locally compact groups in general. It is also shown that the semidirect product R2 × SL(2,R) does not have the weak Haagerup property....

  11. Positive genetic correlation between brain size and sexual traits in male guppies artificially selected for brain size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrschal, A; Corral-Lopez, A; Zajitschek, S; Immler, S; Maklakov, A A; Kolm, N

    2015-04-01

    Brain size is an energetically costly trait to develop and maintain. Investments into other costly aspects of an organism's biology may therefore place important constraints on brain size evolution. Sexual traits are often costly and could therefore be traded off against neural investment. However, brain size may itself be under sexual selection through mate choice on cognitive ability. Here, we use guppy (Poecilia reticulata) lines selected for large and small brain size relative to body size to investigate the relationship between brain size, a large suite of male primary and secondary sexual traits, and body condition index. We found no evidence for trade-offs between brain size and sexual traits. Instead, larger-brained males had higher expression of several primary and precopulatory sexual traits--they had longer genitalia, were more colourful and developed longer tails than smaller-brained males. Larger-brained males were also in better body condition when housed in single-sex groups. There was no difference in post-copulatory sexual traits between males from the large- and small-brained lines. Our data do not support the hypothesis that investment into sexual traits is an important limiting factor to brain size evolution, but instead suggest that brain size and several sexual traits are positively genetically correlated. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society for Evolutionary Biology.

  12. The Landscape of A-to-I RNA Editome Is Shaped by Both Positive and Purifying Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yimeng; Pan, Bohu; Chen, Longxian; Wang, Hongbing; Hao, Pei; Li, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    The hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine (A-to-I editing) in precursor mRNA induces variable gene products at the post-transcription level. How and to what extent A-to-I RNA editing diversifies transcriptome is not fully characterized in the evolution, and very little is known about the selective constraints that drive the evolution of RNA editing events. Here we present a study on A-to-I RNA editing, by generating a global profile of A-to-I editing for a phylogeny of seven Drosophila species, a model system spanning an evolutionary timeframe of approximately 45 million years. Of totally 9281 editing events identified, 5150 (55.5%) are located in the coding sequences (CDS) of 2734 genes. Phylogenetic analysis places these genes into 1,526 homologous families, about 5% of total gene families in the fly lineages. Based on conservation of the editing sites, the editing events in CDS are categorized into three distinct types, representing events on singleton genes (type I), and events not conserved (type II) or conserved (type III) within multi-gene families. While both type I and II events are subject to purifying selection, notably type III events are positively selected, and highly enriched in the components and functions of the nervous system. The tissue profiles are documented for three editing types, and their critical roles are further implicated by their shifting patterns during holometabolous development and in post-mating response. In conclusion, three A-to-I RNA editing types are found to have distinct evolutionary dynamics. It appears that nervous system functions are mainly tested to determine if an A-to-I editing is beneficial for an organism. The coding plasticity enabled by A-to-I editing creates a new class of binary variations, which is a superior alternative to maintain heterozygosity of expressed genes in a diploid mating system. PMID:27467689

  13. Positive selection on sperm ion channels in a brooding brittle star: consequence of life-history traits evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, A A-T; Abi-Rached, L; Galtier, N; Bernard, A; Montoya-Burgos, J I; Chenuil, A

    2017-07-01

    Closely related species are key models to investigate mechanisms leading to reproductive isolation and early stages of diversification, also at the genomic level. The brittle star cryptic species complex Ophioderma longicauda encompasses the sympatric broadcast-spawning species C3 and the internal brooding species C5. Here, we used de novo transcriptome sequencing and assembly in two closely related species displaying contrasting reproductive modes to compare their genetic diversity and to investigate the role of natural selection in reproductive isolation. We reconstructed 20 146 and 22 123 genes for C3 and C5, respectively, and characterized a set of 12 229 orthologs. Genetic diversity was 1.5-2 times higher in C3 compared to C5, confirming that species with low parental investment display higher levels of genetic diversity. Forty-eight genes were the targets of positive diversifying selection during the evolution of the two species. Notably, two genes (NHE and TetraKCNG) are sperm-specific ion channels involved in sperm motility. Ancestral sequence reconstructions show that natural selection targeted the two genes in the brooding species. This may result from an adaptation to the novel environmental conditions surrounding sperm in the brooding species, either directly affecting sperm or via an increase in male/female conflict. This phenomenon could have promoted prezygotic reproductive isolation between C3 and C5. Finally, the sperm receptors to egg chemoattractants differed between C3 and C5 in the ligand-binding region. We propose that mechanisms of species-specific gamete recognition in brittle stars occur during sperm chemotaxis (sperm attraction towards the eggs), contrary to other marine invertebrates where prezygotic barriers to interspecific hybridization typically occur before sperm-egg fusion. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Exploring evidence of positive selection reveals genetic basis of meat quality traits in Berkshire pigs through whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyeonsoo; Song, Ki-Duk; Seo, Minseok; Caetano-Anollés, Kelsey; Kim, Jaemin; Kwak, Woori; Oh, Jae-Don; Kim, EuiSoo; Jeong, Dong Kee; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Heebal; Lee, Hak-Kyo

    2015-08-20

    Natural and artificial selection following domestication has led to the existence of more than a hundred pig breeds, as well as incredible variation in phenotypic traits. Berkshire pigs are regarded as having superior meat quality compared to other breeds. As the meat production industry seeks selective breeding approaches to improve profitable traits such as meat quality, information about genetic determinants of these traits is in high demand. However, most of the studies have been performed using trained sensory panel analysis without investigating the underlying genetic factors. Here we investigate the relationship between genomic composition and this phenotypic trait by scanning for signatures of positive selection in whole-genome sequencing data. We generated genomes of 10 Berkshire pigs at a total of 100.6 coverage depth, using the Illumina Hiseq2000 platform. Along with the genomes of 11 Landrace and 13 Yorkshire pigs, we identified genomic variants of 18.9 million SNVs and 3.4 million Indels in the mapped regions. We identified several associated genes related to lipid metabolism, intramuscular fatty acid deposition, and muscle fiber type which attribute to pork quality (TG, FABP1, AKIRIN2, GLP2R, TGFBR3, JPH3, ICAM2, and ERN1) by applying between population statistical tests (XP-EHH and XP-CLR). A statistical enrichment test was also conducted to detect breed specific genetic variation. In addition, de novo short sequence read assembly strategy identified several candidate genes (SLC25A14, IGF1, PI4KA, CACNA1A) as also contributing to lipid metabolism. Results revealed several candidate genes involved in Berkshire meat quality; most of these genes are involved in lipid metabolism and intramuscular fat deposition. These results can provide a basis for future research on the genomic characteristics of Berkshire pigs.

  15. Selective agonists and antagonists of formylpeptide receptors: duplex flow cytometry and mixture-based positional scanning libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinilla, Clemencia; Edwards, Bruce S; Appel, Jon R; Yates-Gibbins, Tina; Giulianotti, Marc A; Medina-Franco, Jose L; Young, Susan M; Santos, Radleigh G; Sklar, Larry A; Houghten, Richard A

    2013-09-01

    The formylpeptide receptor (FPR1) and formylpeptide-like 1 receptor (FPR2) are G protein-coupled receptors that are linked to acute inflammatory responses, malignant glioma stem cell metastasis, and chronic inflammation. Although several N-formyl peptides are known to bind to these receptors, more selective small-molecule, high-affinity ligands are needed for a better understanding of the physiologic roles played by these receptors. High-throughput assays using mixture-based combinatorial libraries represent a unique, highly efficient approach for rapid data acquisition and ligand identification. We report the superiority of this approach in the context of the simultaneous screening of a diverse set of mixture-based small-molecule libraries. We used a single cross-reactive peptide ligand for a duplex flow cytometric screen of FPR1 and FPR2 in color-coded cell lines. Screening 37 different mixture-based combinatorial libraries totaling more than five million small molecules (contained in 5,261 mixture samples) resulted in seven libraries that significantly inhibited activity at the receptors. Using positional scanning deconvolution, selective high-affinity (low nM K(i)) individual compounds were identified from two separate libraries, namely, pyrrolidine bis-diketopiperazine and polyphenyl urea. The most active individual compounds were characterized for their functional activities as agonists or antagonists with the most potent FPR1 agonist and FPR2 antagonist identified to date with an EC₅₀ of 131 nM (4 nM K(i)) and an IC₅₀ of 81 nM (1 nM K(i)), respectively, in intracellular Ca²⁺ response determinations. Comparative analyses of other previous screening approaches clearly illustrate the efficiency of identifying receptor selective, individual compounds from mixture-based combinatorial libraries.

  16. ICU-Acquired Weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Sarah E; Bunnell, Aaron E; Hough, Catherine L

    2016-11-01

    Survivorship after critical illness is an increasingly important health-care concern as ICU use continues to increase while ICU mortality is decreasing. Survivors of critical illness experience marked disability and impairments in physical and cognitive function that persist for years after their initial ICU stay. Newfound impairment is associated with increased health-care costs and use, reductions in health-related quality of life, and prolonged unemployment. Weakness, critical illness neuropathy and/or myopathy, and muscle atrophy are common in patients who are critically ill, with up to 80% of patients admitted to the ICU developing some form of neuromuscular dysfunction. ICU-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is associated with longer durations of mechanical ventilation and hospitalization, along with greater functional impairment for survivors. Although there is increasing recognition of ICUAW as a clinical entity, significant knowledge gaps exist concerning identifying patients at high risk for its development and understanding its role in long-term outcomes after critical illness. This review addresses the epidemiologic and pathophysiologic aspects of ICUAW; highlights the diagnostic challenges associated with its diagnosis in patients who are critically ill; and proposes, to our knowledge, a novel strategy for identifying ICUAW. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A counting renaissance: combining stochastic mapping and empirical Bayes to quickly detect amino acid sites under positive selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemey, Philippe; Suchard, Marc A.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Statistical methods for comparing relative rates of synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions maintain a central role in detecting positive selection. To identify selection, researchers often estimate the ratio of these relative rates () at individual alignment sites. Fitting a codon substitution model that captures heterogeneity in across sites provides a reliable way to perform such estimation, but it remains computationally prohibitive for massive datasets. By using crude estimates of the numbers of synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions at each site, counting approaches scale well to large datasets, but they fail to account for ancestral state reconstruction uncertainty and to provide site-specific estimates. Results: We propose a hybrid solution that borrows the computational strength of counting methods, but augments these methods with empirical Bayes modeling to produce a relatively fast and reliable method capable of estimating site-specific values in large datasets. Importantly, our hybrid approach, set in a Bayesian framework, integrates over the posterior distribution of phylogenies and ancestral reconstructions to quantify uncertainty about site-specific estimates. Simulations demonstrate that this method competes well with more-principled statistical procedures and, in some cases, even outperforms them. We illustrate the utility of our method using human immunodeficiency virus, feline panleukopenia and canine parvovirus evolution examples. Availability: Renaissance counting is implemented in the development branch of BEAST, freely available at http://code.google.com/p/beast-mcmc/. The method will be made available in the next public release of the package, including support to set up analyses in BEAUti. Contact: philippe.lemey@rega.kuleuven.be or msuchard@ucla.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23064000

  18. Selective loss of Purkinje cells in a patient with anti-gliadin-antibody-positive autoimmune cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasegawa Akira

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The patient was an 84-year-old woman who had the onset of truncal ataxia at age 77 and a history of Basedow's disease. Her ataxic gait gradually deteriorated. She could not walk without support at age 81 and she was admitted to our hospital at age 83. Gaze-evoked nystagmus and dysarthria were observed. Mild ataxia was observed in all limbs. Her deep tendon reflex and sense of position were normal. IgA anti-gliadin antibody, IgG anti-gliadin antibody, anti-SS-A/Ro antibody, anti-SS-B/La antibody and anti-TPO antibody were positive. A conventional brain MRI did not show obvious cerebellar atrophy. However, MRI voxel based morphometry (VBM and SPECT-eZIS revealed cortical cerebellar atrophy and reduced cerebellar blood flow. IVIg treatment was performed and was moderately effective. After her death at age 85, the patient was autopsied. Neuropathological findings were as follows: selective loss of Purkinje cells; no apparent degenerative change in the efferent pathways, such as the dentate nuclei or vestibular nuclei; no prominent inflammatory reaction. From these findings, we diagnosed this case as autoimmune cerebellar atrophy associated with gluten ataxia. All 3 autopsies previously reported on gluten ataxia have noted infiltration of inflammatory cells in the cerebellum. In this case, we postulated that the infiltration of inflammatory cells was not found because the patient's condition was based on humoral immunity. The clinical conditions of gluten ataxia have not yet been properly elucidated, but are expected to be revealed as the number of autopsied cases increases.

  19. Weak Quantum Ergodicity

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, L

    1998-01-01

    We examine the consequences of classical ergodicity for the localization properties of individual quantum eigenstates in the classical limit. We note that the well known Schnirelman result is a weaker form of quantum ergodicity than the one implied by random matrix theory. This suggests the possibility of systems with non-gaussian random eigenstates which are nonetheless ergodic in the sense of Schnirelman and lead to ergodic transport in the classical limit. These we call "weakly quantum ergodic.'' Indeed for a class of "slow ergodic" classical systems, it is found that each eigenstate becomes localized to an ever decreasing fraction of the available state space, in the semiclassical limit. Nevertheless, each eigenstate in this limit covers phase space evenly on any classical scale, and long-time transport properties betwen individual quantum states remain ergodic due to the diffractive effects which dominate quantum phase space exploration.

  20. Whole-gene positive selection, elevated synonymous substitution rates, duplication, and indel evolution of the chloroplast clpP1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Erixon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Synonymous DNA substitution rates in the plant chloroplast genome are generally relatively slow and lineage dependent. Non-synonymous rates are usually even slower due to purifying selection acting on the genes. Positive selection is expected to speed up non-synonymous substitution rates, whereas synonymous rates are expected to be unaffected. Until recently, positive selection has seldom been observed in chloroplast genes, and large-scale structural rearrangements leading to gene duplications are hitherto supposed to be rare. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: We found high substitution rates in the exons of the plastid clpP1 gene in Oenothera (the Evening Primrose family and three separate lineages in the tribe Sileneae (Caryophyllaceae, the Carnation family. Introns have been lost in some of the lineages, but where present, the intron sequences have substitution rates similar to those found in other introns of their genomes. The elevated substitution rates of clpP1 are associated with statistically significant whole-gene positive selection in three branches of the phylogeny. In two of the lineages we found multiple copies of the gene. Neighboring genes present in the duplicated fragments do not show signs of elevated substitution rates or positive selection. Although non-synonymous substitutions account for most of the increase in substitution rates, synonymous rates are also markedly elevated in some lineages. Whereas plant clpP1 genes experiencing negative (purifying selection are characterized by having very conserved lengths, genes under positive selection often have large insertions of more or less repetitive amino acid sequence motifs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found positive selection of the clpP1 gene in various plant lineages to correlated with repeated duplication of the clpP1 gene and surrounding regions, repetitive amino acid sequences, and increase in synonymous substitution rates. The present study sheds light on the

  1. Positively charged retinoids are potent and selective inhibitors of the trans-cis isomerization in the retinoid (visual) cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golczak, Marcin; Kuksa, Vladimir; Maeda, Tadao; Moise, Alexander R; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2005-06-07

    In vertebrate retinal photoreceptors, photoisomerization of opsin-bound visual chromophore 11-cis-retinal to all-trans-retinal triggers phototransduction events. Regeneration of the chromophore is a critical step in restoring photoreceptors to their dark-adapted state. This regeneration process, called the retinoid cycle, takes place in the photoreceptor outer segments and in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE). We have suggested that the regeneration of the chromophore might occur through a retinyl carbocation intermediate. Here, we provide evidence that isomerization is inhibited by positively charged retinoids, which could act as transition state analogs of the isomerization process. We demonstrate that retinylamine (Ret-NH2) potently and selectively inhibits the isomerization step of the retinoid cycle in vitro and in vivo. Ret-NH2 binds a protein(s) in the RPE microsomes, but it does not bind RPE65, a protein implicated in the isomerization reaction. Although Ret-NH2 inhibits the regeneration of visual chromophore in rods and, in turn, severely attenuates rod responses, it has a much smaller effect on cone function in mice. Ret-NH2 interacts only at micromolar concentrations with retinoic acid receptor, does not activate retinoid-X receptor, and is not a substrate for CYP26s, the retinoic acid-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes. Ret-NH2 can be a significant investigational tool to study the mechanism of regeneration of visual chromophore.

  2. A microfluidic device for reversible environmental changes around single cells using optical tweezers for cell selection and positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Emma; Sott, Kristin; Lundqvist, Fredrik; Sveningsson, Martin; Scrimgeour, Jan; Hanstorp, Dag; Goksör, Mattias; Granéli, Annette

    2010-03-07

    Cells naturally exist in a dynamic chemical environment, and therefore it is necessary to study cell behaviour under dynamic stimulation conditions in order to understand the signalling transduction pathways regulating the cellular response. However, until recently, experiments looking at the cellular response to chemical stimuli have mainly been performed by adding a stress substance to a population of cells and thus only varying the magnitude of the stress. In this paper we demonstrate an experimental method enabling acquisition of data on the behaviour of single cells upon reversible environmental perturbations, where microfluidics is combined with optical tweezers and fluorescence microscopy. The cells are individually selected and positioned in the measurement region on the bottom surface of the microfluidic device using optical tweezers. The optical tweezers thus enable precise control of the cell density as well as the total number of cells within the measurement region. Consequently, the number of cells in each experiment can be optimized while clusters of cells, that render subsequent image analysis more difficult, can be avoided. The microfluidic device is modelled and demonstrated to enable reliable changes between two different media in less than 2 s. The experimental method is tested by following the cycling of GFP-tagged proteins (Mig1 and Msn2, respectively) between the cytosol and the nucleus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae upon changes in glucose availability.

  3. The EG95 antigen of Echinococcus spp. contains positively selected amino acids, which may influence host specificity and vaccine efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Luisa Haag

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis is a worldwide zoonotic parasitic disease of humans and various herbivorous domestic animals (intermediate hosts transmitted by the contact with wild and domestic carnivores (definitive hosts, mainly foxes and dogs. Recently, a vaccine was developed showing high levels of protection against one parasite haplotype (G1 of Echinococcus granulosus, and its potential efficacy against distinct parasite variants or species is still unclear. Interestingly, the EG95 vaccine antigen is a secreted glycosylphosphatydilinositol (GPI-anchored protein containing a fibronectin type III domain, which is ubiquitous in modular proteins involved in cell adhesion. EG95 is highly expressed in oncospheres, the parasite life cycle stage which actively invades the intermediate hosts. After amplifying and sequencing the complete CDS of 57 Echinococcus isolates belonging to 7 distinct species, we uncovered a large amount of genetic variability, which may influence protein folding. Two positively selected sites are outside the vaccine epitopes, but are predicted to alter protein conformation. Moreover, phylogenetic analyses indicate that EG95 isoform evolution is convergent with regard to the number of beta-sheets and alpha-helices. We conclude that having a variety of EG95 isoforms is adaptive for Echinococcus parasites, in terms of their ability to invade different hosts, and we propose that a mixture of isoforms could possibly maximize vaccine efficacy.

  4. Geometric phase topology in weak measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samlan, C. T.; Viswanathan, Nirmal K.

    2017-12-01

    The geometric phase visualization proposed by Bhandari (R Bhandari 1997 Phys. Rep. 281 1–64) in the ellipticity-ellipse orientation basis of the polarization ellipse of light is implemented to understand the geometric aspects of weak measurement. The weak interaction of a pre-selected state, acheived via spin-Hall effect of light (SHEL), results in a spread in the polarization ellipticity (η) or ellipse orientation (χ) depending on the resulting spatial or angular shift, respectively. The post-selection leads to the projection of the η spread in the complementary χ basis results in the appearance of a geometric phase with helical phase topology in the η ‑ χ parameter space. By representing the weak measurement on the Poincaré sphere and using Jones calculus, the complex weak value and the geometric phase topology are obtained. This deeper understanding of the weak measurement process enabled us to explore the techniques’ capabilities maximally, as demonstrated via SHEL in two examples—external reflection at glass-air interface and transmission through a tilted half-wave plate.

  5. Duplications and Positive Selection Drive the Evolution of Parasitism-Associated Gene Families in the Nematode Strongyloides papillosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Praveen; Jaleta, Tegegn G; Streit, Adrian; Rödelsperger, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Gene duplication is a major mechanism playing a role in the evolution of phenotypic complexity and in the generation of novel traits. By comparing parasitic and nonparasitic nematodes, a recent study found that the evolution of parasitism in Strongyloididae is associated with a large expansion in the Astacin and CAP gene families.To gain novel insights into the developmental processes in the sheep parasite Strongyloides papillosus, we sequenced transcriptomes of different developmental stages and sexes. Overall, we found that the majority of genes are developmentally regulated and have one-to-one orthologs in the diverged S. ratti genome. Together with the finding of similar expression profiles between S. papillosus and S. ratti, these results indicate a strong evolutionary constraint acting against change at sequence and expression levels. However, the comparison between parasitic and free-living females demonstrates a quite divergent pattern that is mostly due to the previously mentioned expansion in the Astacin and CAP gene families. More detailed phylogenetic analysis of both gene families shows that most members date back to single expansion events early in the Strongyloides lineage and have undergone subfunctionalization resulting in clusters that are highly expressed either in infective larvae or in parasitic females. Finally, we found increased evidence for positive selection in both gene families relative to the genome-wide expectation.In summary, our study reveals first insights into the developmental transcriptomes of S. papillosus and provides a detailed analysis of sequence and expression evolution in parasitism-associated gene families. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. A haplotype at STAT2 Introgressed from neanderthals and serves as a candidate of positive selection in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Fernando L; Watkins, Joseph C; Hammer, Michael F

    2012-08-10

    Signals of archaic admixture have been identified through comparisons of the draft Neanderthal and Denisova genomes with those of living humans. Studies of individual loci contributing to these genome-wide average signals are required for characterization of the introgression process and investigation of whether archaic variants conferred an adaptive advantage to the ancestors of contemporary human populations. However, no definitive case of adaptive introgression has yet been described. Here we provide a DNA sequence analysis of the innate immune gene STAT2 and show that a haplotype carried by many Eurasians (but not sub-Saharan Africans) has a sequence that closely matches that of the Neanderthal STAT2. This haplotype, referred to as N, was discovered through a resequencing survey of the entire coding region of STAT2 in a global sample of 90 individuals. Analyses of publicly available complete genome sequence data show that haplotype N shares a recent common ancestor with the Neanderthal sequence (~80 thousand years ago) and is found throughout Eurasia at an average frequency of ~5%. Interestingly, N is found in Melanesian populations at ~10-fold higher frequency (~54%) than in Eurasian populations. A neutrality test that controls for demography rejects the hypothesis that a variant of N rose to high frequency in Melanesia by genetic drift alone. Although we are not able to pinpoint the precise target of positive selection, we identify nonsynonymous mutations in ERBB3, ESYT1, and STAT2-all of which are part of the same 250 kb introgressive haplotype-as good candidates. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A genome-wide metabolic QTL analysis in Europeans implicates two loci shaped by recent positive selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Nicholson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a metabolite quantitative trait locus (mQTL study of the (1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1H NMR metabolome in humans, building on recent targeted knowledge of genetic drivers of metabolic regulation. Urine and plasma samples were collected from two cohorts of individuals of European descent, with one cohort comprised of female twins donating samples longitudinally. Sample metabolite concentrations were quantified by (1H NMR and tested for association with genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Four metabolites' concentrations exhibited significant, replicable association with SNP variation (8.6×10(-11positive selection in European populations. Genes NAT8 and PYROXD2, both with relatively uncharacterized functional roles, are good candidates for mediating the corresponding mQTL associations. The study's longitudinal twin design allowed detailed variance-components analysis of the sources of population variation in metabolite levels. The mQTLs explained 40%-64% of biological population variation in the corresponding metabolites' concentrations. These effect sizes are stronger than those reported in a recent, targeted mQTL study of metabolites in serum using the targeted-metabolomics Biocrates platform. By re-analysing our plasma samples using the Biocrates platform, we replicated the mQTL findings of the previous study and discovered a previously uncharacterized yet substantial familial component of variation in metabolite levels in addition to the heritability contribution from

  8. The Changes of Positive Selection Within env Gene of HIV-1 B', CRF07_BC and CRF08_BC from China Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Sun, Binlian; Jiang, Yanyan; Zeng, Haiyan; Li, Yanpeng; Wang, Yan; Yang, Rongge

    2017-01-01

    It is not clear about the possible evolutionary changes of the three predominant strains of HIV-1 in China over the course of the epidemic. Envelope (env) gene of HIV-1 is a good target for this evolutionary pressure for its enriched epitopes. We collected 159 full or part of env sequences sampled between 1997 and 2010 from database of China, we calculated the genetic distance, detected the positively selected sites by PAML suite and then compared the number using Fisher's exact test between the early period 1997 to 2003 and the late period 2004 to 2010. We found that the diversity of env genes had increased significantly and the positively selected sites were significantly becoming more over time. V2, V4, and C3 regions had suffered an increase positive selection pressure, while V1, V3, V5 and other conserved regions were relatively stable. Several sites were widely selected and compactly located in C3 and V4, five sites were consecutive in V4.There were two common positively selected sites in all groups: 413T in gp120 and 619L in gp41. The common positively selected sites identified in our study implied that they are important in viral survival and adaptation. Based on the role of V3 region in coreceptor determination and disease progression, our results suggested that the virulence of HIV-1 in China might be stable in the short time span. Given the overall increased tendency of positively selection sites in env, we might predict a less virulent state in the long run. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. SIMULATION OF SUBGRADE EMBANKMENT ON WEAK BASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Petrenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This article provides: the question of the sustainability of the subgrade on a weak base is considered in the paper. It is proposed to use the method of jet grouting. Investigation of the possibility of a weak base has an effect on the overall deformation of the subgrade; the identification and optimization of the parameters of subgrade based on studies using numerical simulation. Methodology. The theoretical studies of the stress-strain state of the base and subgrade embankment by modeling in the software package LIRA have been conducted to achieve this goal. Findings. After making the necessary calculations perform building fields of a subsidence, borders cramped thickness, bed’s coefficients of Pasternak and Winkler. The diagrams construction of vertical stress performs at any point of load application. Also, using the software system may perform peer review subsidence, rolls railroad tracks in natural and consolidated basis. Originality. For weak soils is the most appropriate nonlinear model of the base with the existing areas of both elastic and limit equilibrium, mixed problem of the theory of elasticity and plasticity. Practical value. By increasing the load on the weak base as a result of the second track construction, adds embankment or increasing axial load when changing the rolling stock process of sedimentation and consolidation may continue again. Therefore, one of the feasible and promising options for the design and reconstruction of embankments on weak bases is to strengthen the bases with the help of jet grouting. With the expansion of the railway infrastructure, increasing speed and weight of the rolling stock is necessary to ensure the stability of the subgrade on weak bases. LIRA software package allows you to perform all the necessary calculations for the selection of a proper way of strengthening weak bases.

  10. The mechanism of solvent effect on the positional selectivity of Candida antarctica lipase B during 1,3-diolein synthesis by esterification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhang-Qun; Du, Wei; Liu, De-Hua

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the influence of solvent on the positional selectivity of Novozym 435 which was the immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) during the esterification of oleic acid with glycerol for 1,3-diolein preparation previously. Herein, molecular modeling was used to elucidate the underlying mechanism of the solvent effect on the positional selectivity of the enzyme. The results showed that the binding energy of sn-1 hydroxyl of glycerol molecular with CALB became higher, and the binding energy of sn-2 hydroxyl of glycerol molecular with CALB became lower along with the increase of the solvent log P. It was demonstrated that, increasing log P of the solvent, the enzyme selectivity to sn-1 hydroxyl of glycerol molecular grew weaker, and the selectivity to sn-2 hydroxyl of glycerol molecular grew stronger. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Weapon of the Weak?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amber, Van der Graaf; Otjes, Simon; Rasmussen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    on the sparse existing literature on interest groups and social media in a quantitative, structural analysis of both the range and volume of social media use examining a data set of groups active in European Union lobbying. Despite the positive expectations, we find limited evidence that social media have been...... if they lose ground to traditional membership groups when the actual volume of Twitter and Facebook use is assessed....

  12. Comment on papers by Evans et al. and Mekel-Bobrov et al. on Evidence for Positive Selection of MCPH1 and ASPM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpson, Nicholas; Heron, Jon; Smith, George Davey; Enard, Wolfgang

    2007-08-24

    Evans et al. and Mekel-Bobrov et al. (Reports, 9 September 2005, p. 1717 and 1720, respectively) reported that human genetic variants of Microcephalin (MCPH1) and abnormal spindle-like microcephaly associated (ASPM) are under strong positive selection. We genotyped these variants in 9000 children and find no meaningful associations with brain size and various cognitive measures, which indicates that contrary to previous speculations, ASPM and MCPH1 have not been selected for brain-related effects.

  13. Positive selection drives rapid evolution of certain amino acid residues in an evolutionarily highly conserved interferon-inducible antiviral protein of fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, Abinash

    2013-01-01

    Viperin, an evolutionarily highly conserved interferon-inducible multifunctional protein, has previously been reported to exhibit antiviral activity against a wide range of DNA and RNA viruses. Utilizing the complete nucleotide coding sequence data of fish viperin antiviral genes, and employing the maximum likelihood-based codon substitution models, the present study reports the pervasive role of positive selection in the evolution of viperin antiviral protein in fishes. The overall rate of nonsynonymous (dN) to synonymous (dS) substitutions (dN/dS) for the three functional domains of viperin (N-terminal, central domain and C-terminal) were 1.1, 0.12, and 0.24, respectively. Codon-by-codon substitution analyses have revealed that while most of the positively selected sites were located at the N-terminal amphipathic α-helix domain, few amino acid residues at the C-terminal domain were under positive selection. However, none of the sites in the central domain were under positive selection. These results indicate that, although viperin is evolutionarily highly conserved, the three functional domains experienced differential selection pressures. Taken together with the results of previous studies, the present study suggests that the persistent antagonistic nature of surrounding infectious viral pathogens might be the likely cause for such adaptive evolutionary changes of certain amino acids in fish viperin antiviral protein.

  14. POTION: an end-to-end pipeline for positive Darwinian selection detection in genome-scale data through phylogenetic comparison of protein-coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Jorge A; de Castro, Giovanni M; Cintra, Leandro C; Zerlotini, Adhemar; Lobo, Francisco P

    2015-08-01

    Detection of genes evolving under positive Darwinian evolution in genome-scale data is nowadays a prevailing strategy in comparative genomics studies to identify genes potentially involved in adaptation processes. Despite the large number of studies aiming to detect and contextualize such gene sets, there is virtually no software available to perform this task in a general, automatic, large-scale and reliable manner. This certainly occurs due to the computational challenges involved in this task, such as the appropriate modeling of data under analysis, the computation time to perform several of the required steps when dealing with genome-scale data and the highly error-prone nature of the sequence and alignment data structures needed for genome-wide positive selection detection. We present POTION, an open source, modular and end-to-end software for genome-scale detection of positive Darwinian selection in groups of homologous coding sequences. Our software represents a key step towards genome-scale, automated detection of positive selection, from predicted coding sequences and their homology relationships to high-quality groups of positively selected genes. POTION reduces false positives through several sophisticated sequence and group filters based on numeric, phylogenetic, quality and conservation criteria to remove spurious data and through multiple hypothesis corrections, and considerably reduces computation time thanks to a parallelized design. Our software achieved a high classification performance when used to evaluate a curated dataset of Trypanosoma brucei paralogs previously surveyed for positive selection. When used to analyze predicted groups of homologous genes of 19 strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a case study we demonstrated the filters implemented in POTION to remove sources of errors that commonly inflate errors in positive selection detection. A thorough literature review found no other software similar to POTION in terms of customization

  15. Weak Measurement and Quantum Correlation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arun Kumar Pati

    The concept of the weak measurements, for the first time, was introduced by Aharonov et al.1. Quantum state is preselected in |ψi〉 and allowed to interact weakly with apparatus. Measurement strength can be tuned and for “small g(t)” it is called 'weak measurement'. With postselection in |ψf 〉, apparatus state is shifted by an ...

  16. A Position Statement by the International Graphonomics Society on the Use of Graphology in Personnel Selection Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simner, Marvin L.; Goffin, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    Among the various tests employed in personnel selection, handwriting analysis, or graphology, has enjoyed long-standing international popularity despite being highly contentious. This report contains not only an evaluation of the current published scientific reviews on the use of graphology in personnel selection, but also an evaluation of several…

  17. Positive directional selection in the proline-rich antigen (PRA) gene among the human pathogenic fungi Coccidioides immitis, C. posadasii and their closest relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesson, Hanna; Vidal, Pilar; Guarro, Josep; Herr, Roger A; Cole, Garry T; Taylor, John W

    2004-06-01

    In this study, we investigate the possibility of selection acting on the proline-rich antigen (PRA) gene in natural populations of the two human pathogens, Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii, and three of their close relatives, Chrysosporium lucknowense, Chrysosporium queenslandicum, and Uncinocarpus reesii. We addressed the following questions: Is diversifying selection acting on PRA in the pathogenic species as a result of avoidance of the host's immune system, and has adaptation to a pathogenic life style lead to positive directional selection and increased rate of evolution in PRA between the species? For these purposes, we amplified and sequenced from 40 individuals belonging to the five species, the entire coding region of the PRA gene, as well as partial sequences from the coding region of each of the three housekeeping genes glyderaldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, glutamine synthetase A, and hexokinase A. We used likelihood-based methods to compare models of different types of selective pressure among codons to analyze the mode of evolution of the genes and found that the PRA gene evolves under positive selection, but the investigated parts of the housekeeping genes evolve primarily under purifying selection. We found a very low level of intraspecific variability and no evidence of diversifying selection, suggesting that the increased rate of evolution in the PRA gene is not a result of avoidance of the host's immune system. Neither did likelihood-based analyses suggest that selection was stronger on the branch separating pathogenic and nonpathogenic species. Instead, we suggest that positive selection act on PRA as a consequence of spore cell-wall morphogenesis unique to each species.

  18. Genomic selection strategies in breeding programs: Strong positive interaction between application of genotypic information and intensive use of young bulls on genetic gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Line Hjortø; Sørensen, Morten Kargo; Berg, Peer

    2012-01-01

    We tested the following hypotheses: (i) breeding schemes with genomic selection are superior to breeding schemes without genomic selection regarding annual genetic gain of the aggregate genotype (ΔGAG), annual genetic gain of the functional traits and rate of inbreeding per generation (ΔF), (ii......) a positive interaction exists between the use of genotypic information and a short generation interval on ΔGAG and (iii) the inclusion of an indicator trait in the selection index will only result in a negligible increase in ΔGAG if genotypic information about the breeding goal trait is known. We examined...... four breeding schemes with or without genomic selection and with or without intensive use of young bulls using pseudo-genomic stochastic simulations. The breeding goal consisted of a milk production trait and a functional trait. The two breeding schemes with genomic selection resulted in higher ΔGAG...

  19. An efficient positive selection procedure for the isolation of peroxisomal import and peroxisome assembly mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elgersma, Y.; van den Berg, M.; Tabak, H. F.; Distel, B.

    1993-01-01

    To study peroxisome biogenesis, we developed a procedure to select for Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants defective in peroxisomal protein import or peroxisome assembly. For this purpose, a chimeric gene was constructed encoding the bleomycin resistance protein linked to the peroxisomal protein

  20. Alpha-conotoxin analogs with additional positive charge show increased selectivity towards Torpedo californica and some neuronal subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasheverov, I.E.; Zhmak, M.N.; Vulfius, C.A.; Corbacheva, E.V.; Mordvintsev, D.Y.; Utkin, Y.N.; van Elk, R.; Smit, A.B.; Tsetlin, V.I.

    2006-01-01

    α-Conotoxins from Conus snails are indispensable tools for distinguishing various subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and synthesis of α-conotoxin analogs may yield novel antagonists of higher potency and selectivity. We incorporated additional positive charges into α-conotoxins

  1. National Transportation Safety Board : weak internal control impaired financial accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-28

    The U. S. General Accounting Office (GAO) was asked to review the National Transportation Safety Board's (NTSB) internal controls over selected types of fiscal year expenditures. They were asked to determine whether internal control weaknesses were a...

  2. Genome wide signatures of positive selection: The comparison of independent samples and the identification of regions associated to traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Merle B

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of genome wide analyses of polymorphisms is to achieve a better understanding of the link between genotype and phenotype. Part of that goal is to understand the selective forces that have operated on a population. Results In this study we compared the signals of selection, identified through population divergence in the Bovine HapMap project, to those found in an independent sample of cattle from Australia. Evidence for population differentiation across the genome, as measured by FST, was highly correlated in the two data sets. Nevertheless, 40% of the variance in FST between the two studies was attributed to the differences in breed composition. Seventy six percent of the variance in FST was attributed to differences in SNP composition and density when the same breeds were compared. The difference between FST of adjacent loci increased rapidly with the increase in distance between SNP, reaching an asymptote after 20 kb. Using 129 SNP that have highly divergent FST values in both data sets, we identified 12 regions that had additive effects on the traits residual feed intake, beef yield or intramuscular fatness measured in the Australian sample. Four of these regions had effects on more than one trait. One of these regions includes the R3HDM1 gene, which is under selection in European humans. Conclusion Firstly, many different populations will be necessary for a full description of selective signatures across the genome, not just a small set of highly divergent populations. Secondly, it is necessary to use the same SNP when comparing the signatures of selection from one study to another. Thirdly, useful signatures of selection can be obtained where many of the groups have only minor genetic differences and may not be clearly separated in a principal component analysis. Fourthly, combining analyses of genome wide selection signatures and genome wide associations to traits helps to define the trait under selection or

  3. Infrared spectroscopy of weakly bound molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Lisa I-Ching

    1988-11-01

    The infrared spectra of a series of hydrated hydronium cluster ions and of protonated ethane ion are presented. A tandem mass spectrometer is ideally suited to obtaining the spectra of such weakly bound molecular ions. Traditional absorption spectroscopy is not feasible in these situations, so the techniques described in this thesis make use of some consequence of photon absorption with higher sensitivity than simply attenuation of laser power. That consequence is dissociation. By first mass selecting the parent ion under study and then mass selecting the fragment ion formed from dissociation, the near unit detection efficiency of ion counting methods has been used to full advantage.

  4. SU-G-BRC-13: Model Based Classification for Optimal Position Selection for Left-Sided Breast Radiotherapy: Free Breathing, DIBH, Or Prone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, H; Liu, T; Xu, X [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Shi, C [Saint Vincent Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States); Petillion, S; Kindts, I [University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Vlaams-Brabant (Belgium); Tang, X [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, West Harrison, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: There are clinical decision challenges to select optimal treatment positions for left-sided breast cancer patients—supine free breathing (FB), supine Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) and prone free breathing (prone). Physicians often make the decision based on experiences and trials, which might not always result optimal OAR doses. We herein propose a mathematical model to predict the lowest OAR doses among these three positions, providing a quantitative tool for corresponding clinical decision. Methods: Patients were scanned in FB, DIBH, and prone positions under an IRB approved protocol. Tangential beam plans were generated for each position, and OAR doses were calculated. The position with least OAR doses is defined as the optimal position. The following features were extracted from each scan to build the model: heart, ipsilateral lung, breast volume, in-field heart, ipsilateral lung volume, distance between heart and target, laterality of heart, and dose to heart and ipsilateral lung. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was applied to remove the co-linearity of the input data and also to lower the data dimensionality. Feature selection, another method to reduce dimensionality, was applied as a comparison. Support Vector Machine (SVM) was then used for classification. Thirtyseven patient data were acquired; up to now, five patient plans were available. K-fold cross validation was used to validate the accuracy of the classifier model with small training size. Results: The classification results and K-fold cross validation demonstrated the model is capable of predicting the optimal position for patients. The accuracy of K-fold cross validations has reached 80%. Compared to PCA, feature selection allows causal features of dose to be determined. This provides more clinical insights. Conclusion: The proposed classification system appeared to be feasible. We are generating plans for the rest of the 37 patient images, and more statistically significant

  5. Selection on Feed intake or Feed Efficiency: A Position Paper from gDMI Breeding Goal Discussions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerkamp, R.F.; Pryce, J.; Spurlock, D.M.; Berry, D.P.; Coffey, M.; Lovendahl, P.; Linde, van der R.; Bryant, J.M.; Migliore, G.; Wang, Z.; Winters, M.; Krattenmacher, N.; Haas, de Y.

    2013-01-01

    The widespread use of genomic information in dairy cattle breeding programs has opened up the possibility to select for novel traits, especially for traits that are traditionally difficult to record in a progeny testing scheme. Feed intake and efficiency is such a difficult to measure trait. In

  6. Testing the prediction from sexual selection of a positive genetic correlation between human mate preferences and corresponding traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, C.J.H.; Burri, A.V.; Zietsch, B.P.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual selection can cause evolution in traits that affect mating success, and it has thus been implicated in the evolution of human physical and behavioural traits that influence attractiveness. We use a large sample of identical and nonidentical female twins to test the prediction from mate choice

  7. Resisting Weakness of the Will.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Neil

    2011-01-01

    I develop an account of weakness of the will that is driven by experimental evidence from cognitive and social psychology. I will argue that this account demonstrates that there is no such thing as weakness of the will: no psychological kind corresponds to it. Instead, weakness of the will ought to be understood as depletion of System II resources. Neither the explanatory purposes of psychology nor our practical purposes as agents are well-served by retaining the concept. I therefore suggest that we ought to jettison it, in favour of the vocabulary and concepts of cognitive psychology.

  8. Selection, purification, and characterization of a HER2-targeting soluble designed ankyrin repeat protein by E. coli surface display using HER2-positive melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaofei; Yu, Xiaoxiao; Song, Xiaoda; Liu, Li; Yi, Yuting; Yao, Wenbing; Gao, Xiangdong

    2018-01-09

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a powerful target for cancer immune therapy. The development of anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies targeting different domains of HER2 is quite effective. However, the selection and production of multivalent antibodies are complicated. In this study, a mimivirus-based designed ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin) targeting HER2 was selected from an artificial library by bacteria surface display. The selection was performed on HER2-positive B16BL6/E2 melanoma cells and HER2-nagative cells. DARPin selected from the library could be expressed in soluble form with a yield of 70 mg/L. After purified by two continuous and easy steps, the purity of DARPin was 90% as established by SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC. Selected DARPin showed significant HER2-targeting ability with an affinity of 1.05 ± 0.47 µM. MTT assay demonstrated that at the concentration of 640 nM, the selected DARPin dimer could inhibit the SK-BR-3 growth at a rate of 36.63 and 46.34% in 48 and 72 hr incubation separately, which was similar to trastuzumab (43.12 and 49.14% separately). These findings suggested that it was an effective method to select antibody mimetic DARPin by bacteria surface display combined with live cells sorting and provided a drug candidate for cancer therapy.

  9. A mixer-first receiver with enhanced selectivity by capacitive positive feedback achieving +39dBm IIP3 and

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lien, Yuan-Ching; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Tenbroek, Bernard; Strange, Jon; Nauta, Bram

    2017-01-01

    A mixer-first receiver enhanced with capacitive positive feedback is proposed to obtain a steeper filter roll-off and enhanced linearity, while keeping low noise figure. It covers all sub-6GHz cellular bands and achieves a high IIP3 of +39dBm and blocker 1dB gain compression point of +12dBm for a

  10. Pemetrexed improves tumor selectivity of 111In-DTPA-folate in mice with folate receptor-positive ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Müller (Cristina); R. Schibli (Roger); E.P. Krenning (Eric); M. de Jong (Marion)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractFolate-based radiopharmaceuticals can be used as imaging agents and for potential radiotherapy of folate receptor (FR)-positive malignant tissue (e.g., ovarian carcinomas). However, substantial FR expression in the kidneys results in undesired renal retention of radioactivity. Recently,

  11. Selective changes in sensitivity to benzodiazepines, and not other positive GABAA modulators, in rats receiving flunitrazepam chronically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerak, Lisa R.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Tolerance and dependence can develop during chronic benzodiazepine treatment; however, cross tolerance and cross dependence to positive modulators acting at other sites on GABAA receptors might not occur. Objectives The current study evaluated changes in sensitivity to positive GABAA modulators during chronic treatment with the benzodiazepine flunitrazepam to determine whether cross tolerance and cross dependence varied as a function of site of action. Methods Eight rats responded under a fixed ratio 20 schedule of food presentation. Dose-effect curves were determined before, during and after chronic treatment with 1 or 2 daily injections of 1 mg/kg of flunitrazepam. Results Prior to chronic treatment, benzodiazepines (flunitrazepam, midazolam), a barbiturate (pentobarbital), a neuroactive steroid (pregnanolone), and drugs with primary mechanisms of action at receptors other than GABAA receptors (morphine, ketamine) dose dependently decreased responding. Twice daily treatment with flunitrazepam produced 9.5- and 23-fold shifts to the right in the flunitrazepam and midazolam dose-effect curves, respectively. In contrast, dose-effect curves for other drugs either were not changed or were shifted ≤4-fold to the right. Conclusions Decreased sensitivity to benzodiazepines and not to a barbiturate or a neuroactive steroid during chronic flunitrazepam treatment indicates that tolerance and cross tolerance developed only to benzodiazepines. Despite similar acute behavioral effects among positive GABAA modulators, the differential development of cross tolerance suggests that adaptations at GABAA receptors produced by chronic benzodiazepine treatment differentially affect positive modulators depending on their site of action; such differences might be exploited to benefit patients treated daily with positive GABAA modulators. PMID:19274455

  12. Selective changes in sensitivity to benzodiazepines, and not other positive GABA(A) modulators, in rats receiving flunitrazepam chronically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerak, Lisa R

    2009-07-01

    Tolerance and dependence can develop during chronic benzodiazepine treatment; however, cross tolerance and cross dependence to positive modulators acting at other sites on GABA(A) receptors might not occur. The current study evaluated changes in sensitivity to positive GABA(A) modulators during chronic treatment with the benzodiazepine flunitrazepam to determine whether cross tolerance and cross dependence varied as a function of site of action. Eight rats responded under a fixed ratio 20 schedule of food presentation. Dose-effect curves were determined before, during and after chronic treatment with one or two daily injections of 1 mg/kg of flunitrazepam. Prior to chronic treatment, benzodiazepines (flunitrazepam, midazolam), a barbiturate (pentobarbital), a neuroactive steroid (pregnanolone), and drugs with primary mechanisms of action at receptors other than GABA(A) receptors (morphine, ketamine) dose-dependently decreased responding. Twice daily treatment with flunitrazepam produced 9.5- and 23-fold shifts to the right in the flunitrazepam and midazolam dose-effect curves, respectively. In contrast, dose-effect curves for other drugs either were not changed or were shifted less than or equal to fourfold to the right. Decreased sensitivity to benzodiazepines and not to a barbiturate or a neuroactive steroid during chronic flunitrazepam treatment indicates that tolerance and cross tolerance developed only to benzodiazepines. Despite similar acute behavioral effects among positive GABA(A) modulators, the differential development of cross tolerance suggests that adaptations at GABA(A) receptors produced by chronic benzodiazepine treatment differentially affect positive modulators depending on their site of action; such differences might be exploited to benefit patients treated daily with positive GABA(A) modulators.

  13. Positive Selection in CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes of Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein Revealed by a Comparative Analysis of Human and Swine Viral Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machkovech, Heather M; Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Bloom, Jesse D

    2015-11-01

    Numerous experimental studies have demonstrated that CD8(+) T cells contribute to immunity against influenza by limiting viral replication. It is therefore surprising that rigorous statistical tests have failed to find evidence of positive selection in the epitopes targeted by CD8(+) T cells. Here we use a novel computational approach to test for selection in CD8(+) T-cell epitopes. We define all epitopes in the nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix protein (M1) with experimentally identified human CD8(+) T-cell responses and then compare the evolution of these epitopes in parallel lineages of human and swine influenza viruses that have been diverging since roughly 1918. We find a significant enrichment of substitutions that alter human CD8(+) T-cell epitopes in NP of human versus swine influenza virus, consistent with the idea that these epitopes are under positive selection. Furthermore, we show that epitope-altering substitutions in human influenza virus NP are enriched on the trunk versus the branches of the phylogenetic tree, indicating that viruses that acquire these mutations have a selective advantage. However, even in human influenza virus NP, sites in T-cell epitopes evolve more slowly than do nonepitope sites, presumably because these epitopes are under stronger inherent functional constraint. Overall, our work demonstrates that there is clear selection from CD8(+) T cells in human influenza virus NP and illustrates how comparative analyses of viral lineages from different hosts can identify positive selection that is otherwise obscured by strong functional constraint. There is a strong interest in correlates of anti-influenza immunity that are protective against diverse virus strains. CD8(+) T cells provide such broad immunity, since they target conserved viral proteins. An important question is whether T-cell immunity is sufficiently strong to drive influenza virus evolution. Although many studies have shown that T cells limit viral replication in animal

  14. Weak Coupling Phases future directions

    CERN Document Server

    Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2003-01-01

    Recent results obtained from B decays on the phases of weak couplings described by the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix are discussed, with particular emphasis on $\\alpha$ and $\\gamma = \\pi - \\beta - \\alpha$.

  15. Weakly compact operators and interpolation

    OpenAIRE

    Maligranda, Lech

    1992-01-01

    The class of weakly compact operators is, as well as the class of compact operators, a fundamental operator ideal. They were investigated strongly in the last twenty years. In this survey, we have collected and ordered some of this (partly very new) knowledge. We have also included some comments, remarks and examples. The class of weakly compact operators is, as well as the class of compact operators, a fundamental operator ideal. They were investigated strongly in the last twenty years. I...

  16. Weak interactions of elementary particles

    CERN Document Server

    Okun, Lev Borisovich

    1965-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Natural Philosophy, Volume 5: Weak Interaction of Elementary Particles focuses on the composition, properties, and reactions of elementary particles and high energies. The book first discusses elementary particles. Concerns include isotopic invariance in the Sakata model; conservation of fundamental particles; scheme of isomultiplets in the Sakata model; universal, unitary-symmetric strong interaction; and universal weak interaction. The text also focuses on spinors, amplitudes, and currents. Wave function, calculation of traces, five bilinear covariants,

  17. Using ArcMap, Google Earth, and Global Positioning Systems to select and locate random households in rural Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wampler Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A remote sensing technique was developed which combines a Geographic Information System (GIS; Google Earth, and Microsoft Excel to identify home locations for a random sample of households in rural Haiti. The method was used to select homes for ethnographic and water quality research in a region of rural Haiti located within 9 km of a local hospital and source of health education in Deschapelles, Haiti. The technique does not require access to governmental records or ground based surveys to collect household location data and can be performed in a rapid, cost-effective manner. Methods The random selection of households and the location of these households during field surveys were accomplished using GIS, Google Earth, Microsoft Excel, and handheld Garmin GPSmap 76CSx GPS units. Homes were identified and mapped in Google Earth, exported to ArcMap 10.0, and a random list of homes was generated using Microsoft Excel which was then loaded onto handheld GPS units for field location. The development and use of a remote sensing method was essential to the selection and location of random households. Results A total of 537 homes initially were mapped and a randomized subset of 96 was identified as potential survey locations. Over 96% of the homes mapped using Google Earth imagery were correctly identified as occupied dwellings. Only 3.6% of the occupants of mapped homes visited declined to be interviewed. 16.4% of the homes visited were not occupied at the time of the visit due to work away from the home or market days. A total of 55 households were located using this method during the 10 days of fieldwork in May and June of 2012. Conclusions The method used to generate and field locate random homes for surveys and water sampling was an effective means of selecting random households in a rural environment lacking geolocation infrastructure. The success rate for locating households using a handheld GPS was excellent and only

  18. Using ArcMap, Google Earth, and Global Positioning Systems to select and locate random households in rural Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampler, Peter J; Rediske, Richard R; Molla, Azizur R

    2013-01-18

    A remote sensing technique was developed which combines a Geographic Information System (GIS); Google Earth, and Microsoft Excel to identify home locations for a random sample of households in rural Haiti. The method was used to select homes for ethnographic and water quality research in a region of rural Haiti located within 9 km of a local hospital and source of health education in Deschapelles, Haiti. The technique does not require access to governmental records or ground based surveys to collect household location data and can be performed in a rapid, cost-effective manner. The random selection of households and the location of these households during field surveys were accomplished using GIS, Google Earth, Microsoft Excel, and handheld Garmin GPSmap 76CSx GPS units. Homes were identified and mapped in Google Earth, exported to ArcMap 10.0, and a random list of homes was generated using Microsoft Excel which was then loaded onto handheld GPS units for field location. The development and use of a remote sensing method was essential to the selection and location of random households. A total of 537 homes initially were mapped and a randomized subset of 96 was identified as potential survey locations. Over 96% of the homes mapped using Google Earth imagery were correctly identified as occupied dwellings. Only 3.6% of the occupants of mapped homes visited declined to be interviewed. 16.4% of the homes visited were not occupied at the time of the visit due to work away from the home or market days. A total of 55 households were located using this method during the 10 days of fieldwork in May and June of 2012. The method used to generate and field locate random homes for surveys and water sampling was an effective means of selecting random households in a rural environment lacking geolocation infrastructure. The success rate for locating households using a handheld GPS was excellent and only rarely was local knowledge required to identify and locate households. This

  19. Acute muscular weakness in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Pablo Javier Erazo Torricelli

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Acute muscle weakness in children is a pediatric emergency. During the diagnostic approach, it is crucial to obtain a detailed case history, including: onset of weakness, history of associated febrile states, ingestion of toxic substances/toxins, immunizations, and family history. Neurological examination must be meticulous as well. In this review, we describe the most common diseases related to acute muscle weakness, grouped into the site of origin (from the upper motor neuron to the motor unit. Early detection of hyperCKemia may lead to a myositis diagnosis, and hypokalemia points to the diagnosis of periodic paralysis. Ophthalmoparesis, ptosis and bulbar signs are suggestive of myasthenia gravis or botulism. Distal weakness and hyporeflexia are clinical features of Guillain-Barré syndrome, the most frequent cause of acute muscle weakness. If all studies are normal, a psychogenic cause should be considered. Finding the etiology of acute muscle weakness is essential to execute treatment in a timely manner, improving the prognosis of affected children.

  20. Precision metrology using weak measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijian; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2015-05-29

    Weak values and measurements have been proposed as a means to achieve dramatic enhancements in metrology based on the greatly increased range of possible measurement outcomes. Unfortunately, the very large values of measurement outcomes occur with highly suppressed probabilities. This raises three vital questions in weak-measurement-based metrology. Namely, (Q1) Does postselection enhance the measurement precision? (Q2) Does weak measurement offer better precision than strong measurement? (Q3) Is it possible to beat the standard quantum limit or to achieve the Heisenberg limit with weak measurement using only classical resources? We analyze these questions for two prototypical, and generic, measurement protocols and show that while the answers to the first two questions are negative for both protocols, the answer to the last is affirmative for measurements with phase-space interactions, and negative for configuration space interactions. Our results, particularly the ability of weak measurements to perform at par with strong measurements in some cases, are instructive for the design of weak-measurement-based protocols for quantum metrology.

  1. Selective functionalization of 2-fluoropyridine, 2,3-difluoropyridine, and 2,5-difluoropyridine at each vacant position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbio, Carla; Schlosser, Manfred

    2005-04-15

    The concept of "regioexhaustive substitution" has been successfully applied to 2-fluoro-, 2,3-difluoro-, and 2,5-difluoropyridine. All vacant positions were amenable to regioselective metalation and subsequent carboxylation by employing either chlorine as a neighboring site activating protective group or trimethylsilyl as a neighboring site screening protective group. In this way, approximately half a dozen fluorinated pyridinecarboxylic acids were derived from each starting material.

  2. Evaluation of Relationships Between Reported Resilience and Soldier Outcomes. Report Number 2: Positive Performance Outcomes in Officers (Promotions, Selections, & Professions)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    related to successful functioning in both the workplace (Lyubomirsky, King, & Diener , 2005; Seligman, 1990) and in everyday life (Wrzesniewski...organizational behavior. Journal of Management, 33, 321-349. Lyubomirsky, S., King, L., & Diener , E. (2005). The benefits of frequent positive...Robins, R.W., Trzesniewski, K. & Caspi, A. (2003). Personality trait development in adulthood. In J. Mortimer & M. Shanahan ( Eds .), Handbook of the

  3. Citation bias and selective focus on positive findings in the literature on the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR), life stress and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Y A; Roest, A M; Franzen, M; Munafò, M R; Bastiaansen, J A

    2016-10-01

    Caspi et al.'s 2003 report that 5-HTTLPR genotype moderates the influence of life stress on depression has been highly influential but remains contentious. We examined whether the evidence base for the 5-HTTLPR-stress interaction has been distorted by citation bias and a selective focus on positive findings. A total of 73 primary studies were coded for study outcomes and focus on positive findings in the abstract. Citation rates were compared between studies with positive and negative results, both within this network of primary studies and in Web of Science. In addition, the impact of focus on citation rates was examined. In all, 24 (33%) studies were coded as positive, but these received 48% of within-network and 68% of Web of Science citations. The 38 (52%) negative studies received 42 and 23% of citations, respectively, while the 11 (15%) unclear studies received 10 and 9%. Of the negative studies, the 16 studies without a positive focus (42%) received 47% of within-network citations and 32% of Web of Science citations, while the 13 (34%) studies with a positive focus received 39 and 51%, respectively, and the nine (24%) studies with a partially positive focus received 14 and 17%. Negative studies received fewer citations than positive studies. Furthermore, over half of the negative studies had a (partially) positive focus, and Web of Science citation rates were higher for these studies. Thus, discussion of the 5-HTTLPR-stress interaction is more positive than warranted. This study exemplifies how evidence-base-distorting mechanisms undermine the authenticity of research findings.

  4. Selection of the new position for the instrumented fuel Flip type; Seleccion de la nueva posicion para el combustible instrumentado tipo Flip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes G, L.C

    1991-12-15

    It was selected and proved the new position for the instrumented fuel, in function of the smallest influence on the temperature of the fuel due to movements of the control bars, as well as to its functionality regarding their geometric localization in the core. Therefore, it intends that the instrumented fuel Flip type, pass from the position C-9 to the C-6. It was selected the turn angle of the fuel of 180 C, for to be the one that presents a smaller influence of the control bars and it allows to register the values of temperature but high. It was as the movements of the control bars they produce local interferences of the neutron flow in the fuels and that in the case of the ring C, these interferences became maximum variations of the fuel temperature of 125 C, for operations to 1 MW in the thermal column. (Author)

  5. Runs of homozygosity reveal signatures of positive selection for reproduction traits in breed and non-breed horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Julia; Karwath, Matthias; Tonda, Raul; Beltran, Sergi; Águeda, Lídia; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo Glynne; Distl, Ottmar

    2015-10-09

    Modern horses represent heterogeneous populations specifically selected for appearance and performance. Genomic regions under high selective pressure show characteristic runs of homozygosity (ROH) which represent a low genetic diversity. This study aims at detecting the number and functional distribution of ROHs in different horse populations using next generation sequencing data. Next generation sequencing was performed for two Sorraia, one Dülmen Horse, one Arabian, one Saxon-Thuringian Heavy Warmblood, one Thoroughbred and four Hanoverian. After quality control reads were mapped to the reference genome EquCab2.70. ROH detection was performed using PLINK, version 1.07 for a trimmed dataset with 11,325,777 SNPs and a mean read depth of 12. Stretches with homozygous genotypes of >40 kb as well as >400 kb were defined as ROHs. SNPs within consensus ROHs were tested for neutrality. Functional classification was done for genes annotated within ROHs using PANTHER gene list analysis and functional variants were tested for their distribution among breed or non-breed groups. ROH detection was performed using whole genome sequences of ten horses of six populations representing various breed types and non-breed horses. In total, an average number of 3492 ROHs were detected in windows of a minimum of 50 consecutive homozygous SNPs and an average number of 292 ROHs in windows of 500 consecutive homozygous SNPs. Functional analyses of private ROHs in each horse revealed a high frequency of genes affecting cellular, metabolic, developmental, immune system and reproduction processes. In non-breed horses, 198 ROHs in 50-SNP windows and seven ROHs in 500-SNP windows showed an enrichment of genes involved in reproduction, embryonic development, energy metabolism, muscle and cardiac development whereas all seven breed horses revealed only three common ROHs in 50-SNP windows harboring the fertility-related gene YES1. In the Hanoverian, a total of 18 private ROHs could be shown to be

  6. Socially selected ornaments and fitness: Signals of fighting ability in paper wasps are positively associated with survival, reproductive success, and rank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbetts, Elizabeth A; Forrest, Taylor; Vernier, Cassondra; Jinn, Judy; Madagame, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Many animals have ornaments that mediate choice and competition in social and sexual contexts. Individuals with elaborate sexual ornaments typically have higher fitness than those with less elaborate ornaments, but less is known about whether socially selected ornaments are associated with fitness. Here, we test the relationship between fitness and facial patterns that are a socially selected signal of fighting ability in Polistes dominula wasps. We found wasps that signal higher fighting ability have larger nests, are more likely to survive harsh winters, and obtain higher dominance rank than wasps that signal lower fighting ability. In comparison, body weight was not associated with fitness. Larger wasps were dominant over smaller wasps, but showed no difference in nest size or survival. Overall, the positive relationship between wasp facial patterns and fitness indicates that receivers can obtain diverse information about a signaler's phenotypic quality by paying attention to socially selected ornaments. Therefore, there are surprisingly strong parallels between the information conveyed by socially and sexually selected signals. Similar fitness relationships in social and sexually selected signals may be one reason it can be difficult to distinguish the role of social versus sexual selection in ornament evolution. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  7. Position-controlled III-V compound semiconductor nanowire solar cells by selective-area metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Takashi; Yoshimura, Masatoshi; Nakai, Eiji; Tomioka, Katsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate position-controlled III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs) by using selective-area metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and their application to solar cells. Efficiency of 4.23% is achieved for InP core-shell NW solar cells. We form a 'flexible NW array' without a substrate, which has the advantage of saving natural resources over conventional thin film photovoltaic devices. Four junction NW solar cells with over 50% efficiency are proposed and discussed.

  8. Constraints on the Richness-Mass Relation and the Optical-SZE Positional Offset Distribution for SZE-Selected Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Saro, A; Rozo, E; Benson, B A; Mohr, J; Rykoff, E S; Soares-Santos, M; Bleem, L; Dodelson, S; Melchior, P; Sobreira, F; Upadhyay, V; Weller, J; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Armstrong, R; Banerji, M; Bauer, A H; Bayliss, M; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bertin, E; Brodwin, M; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Carlstrom, J E; Capasso, R; Capozzi, D; Carnero Rosell, A; Carrasco Kind, M; Chiu, I; Covarrubias, R; Crawford, T M; Crocce, M; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; de Haan, T; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Cunha, C E; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Fausti Neto, A; Fernandez, E; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gangkofner, C; Gaztanaga, E; Gerdes, D; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gupta, N; Hennig, C; Holzapfel, W L; Honscheid, K; Jain, B; James, D; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Li, T S; Lin, H; Maia, M A G; March, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, Paul; McDonald, M; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Reichardt, C L; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Schubnell, M; Sevilla, I; Smith, R C; Stalder, B; Stark, A A; Strazzullo, V; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, D; Tucker, D; Vikram, V; von der Linden, A; Walker, A R; Wechsler, R H; Wester, W; Zenteno, A; Ziegler, K E

    2015-01-01

    We cross-match galaxy cluster candidates selected via their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures in 129.1 deg$^2$ of the South Pole Telescope 2500d SPT-SZ survey with optically identified clusters selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data. We identify 25 clusters between $0.1\\lesssim z\\lesssim 0.8$ in the union of the SPT-SZ and redMaPPer (RM) samples. RM is an optical cluster finding algorithm that also returns a richness estimate for each cluster. We model the richness $\\lambda$-mass relation with the following function $\\langle\\ln\\lambda|M_{500}\\rangle\\propto B_\\lambda\\ln M_{500}+C_\\lambda\\ln E(z)$ and use SPT-SZ cluster masses and RM richnesses $\\lambda$ to constrain the parameters. We find $B_\\lambda= 1.14^{+0.21}_{-0.18}$ and $C_\\lambda=0.73^{+0.77}_{-0.75}$. The associated scatter in mass at fixed richness is $\\sigma_{\\ln M|\\lambda} = 0.18^{+0.08}_{-0.05}$ at a characteristic richness $\\lambda=70$. We demonstrate that our model provides an adequate description of the ma...

  9. Effects of Gene Duplication, Positive Selection, and Shifts in Gene Expression on the Evolution of the Venom Gland Transcriptome in Widow Spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Robert A.; Clarke, Thomas H.; Gadgil, Rujuta; Fitzpatrick, Ryan; Hayashi, Cheryl Y.; Ayoub, Nadia A.; Garb, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication and positive selection can be important determinants of the evolution of venom, a protein-rich secretion used in prey capture and defense. In a typical model of venom evolution, gene duplicates switch to venom gland expression and change function under the action of positive selection, which together with further duplication produces large gene families encoding diverse toxins. Although these processes have been demonstrated for individual toxin families, high-throughput multitissue sequencing of closely related venomous species can provide insights into evolutionary dynamics at the scale of the entire venom gland transcriptome. By assembling and analyzing multitissue transcriptomes from the Western black widow spider and two closely related species with distinct venom toxicity phenotypes, we do not find that gene duplication and duplicate retention is greater in gene families with venom gland biased expression in comparison with broadly expressed families. Positive selection has acted on some venom toxin families, but does not appear to be in excess for families with venom gland biased expression. Moreover, we find 309 distinct gene families that have single transcripts with venom gland biased expression, suggesting that the switching of genes to venom gland expression in numerous unrelated gene families has been a dominant mode of evolution. We also find ample variation in protein sequences of venom gland–specific transcripts, lineage-specific family sizes, and ortholog expression among species. This variation might contribute to the variable venom toxicity of these species. PMID:26733576

  10. Use of "biokit HSV-2 Rapid Assay" to improve the positive predictive value of Focus HerpeSelect HSV-2 ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Rhoda Ashley; Friedrich, David; Meier, Amalia; Corey, Lawrence

    2005-10-14

    Commercially available assays to detect antibodies to the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)-specific glycoprotein gG-2 have markedly improved serologic diagnosis of HSV-2 infection. However, even tests with high specificity can have low positive predictive values in low prevalence populations. HSV-2 is a chronic, life-long viral infection that requires both medical attention and potential alterations in health care strategy. As such, the concern for false positive diagnoses is high confirmatory testing is routine for other viral serologies such as HIV and hepatitis C. We evaluated such a strategy for HSV-2 serology by using an easily performed commercial test, biokitHSV-2 rapid test ("Biokit"; Biokit USA, Lexington MA) as a confirmatory test for the widely used gG-2 specific serology ("Focus;" HerpeSelect HSV-2 ELISA; Focus Diagnostics, Cypress CA). We tested 782 sera by Focus HSV-2 ELISA, Biokit, and the current gold standard test, Western blot (WB). The positive predictive value of the Focus HSV-2 ELISA increased from 80.5% to 95.6% when Biokit testing was performed on sera that were initially positive by Focus HSV-2 ELISA. Confirmatory testing increased the specificity markedly among sera with Focus EIA values between 1.1 and 3.5: only 35% of low positive (index values 1.1-3.5) Focus HSV-2 ELISA results confirmed as positive by Biokit and WB compared with 92% of those with index values >3.5. Mathematical modeling of the data resulted in expected positive predictive values over 98% for populations with antibody prevalences typical of clinical practices in the US and Europe. Confirmatory Biokit testing of positive Focus HSV-2 ELISA results is fast, easy, and effective in reducing falsely positive HSV-2 antibody results. Patients, clinicians, and laboratories could benefit from the enhanced specificity of this simple HSV-2 serologic test combination.

  11. Use of "biokit HSV-2 Rapid Assay" to improve the positive predictive value of Focus HerpeSelect HSV-2 ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich David

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Commercially available assays to detect antibodies to the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2-specific glycoprotein gG-2 have markedly improved serologic diagnosis of HSV-2 infection. However, even tests with high specificity can have low positive predictive values in low prevalence populations. HSV-2 is a chronic, life-long viral infection that requires both medical attention and potential alterations in health care strategy. As such, the concern for false positive diagnoses is high confirmatory testing is routine for other viral serologies such as HIV and hepatitis C. We evaluated such a strategy for HSV-2 serology by using an easily performed commercial test, biokitHSV-2 rapid test ("Biokit"; Biokit USA, Lexington MA as a confirmatory test for the widely used gG-2 specific serology ("Focus;" HerpeSelect HSV-2 ELISA; Focus Diagnostics, Cypress CA. Methods We tested 782 sera by Focus HSV-2 ELISA, Biokit, and the current gold standard test, Western blot (WB. Results The positive predictive value of the Focus HSV-2 ELISA increased from 80.5% to 95.6% when Biokit testing was performed on sera that were initially positive by Focus HSV-2 ELISA. Confirmatory testing increased the specificity markedly among sera with Focus EIA values between 1.1 and 3.5: only 35% of low positive (index values 1.1–3.5 Focus HSV-2 ELISA results confirmed as positive by Biokit and WB compared with 92% of those with index values >3.5. Mathematical modeling of the data resulted in expected positive predictive values over 98% for populations with antibody prevalences typical of clinical practices in the US and Europe. Conclusion Confirmatory Biokit testing of positive Focus HSV-2 ELISA results is fast, easy, and effective in reducing falsely positive HSV-2 antibody results. Patients, clinicians, and laboratories could benefit from the enhanced specificity of this simple HSV-2 serologic test combination.

  12. Quantum discord with weak measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Uttam, E-mail: uttamsingh@hri.res.in; Pati, Arun Kumar, E-mail: akpati@hri.res.in

    2014-04-15

    Weak measurements cause small change to quantum states, thereby opening up the possibility of new ways of manipulating and controlling quantum systems. We ask, can weak measurements reveal more quantum correlation in a composite quantum state? We prove that the weak measurement induced quantum discord, called as the “super quantum discord”, is always larger than the quantum discord captured by the strong measurement. Moreover, we prove the monotonicity of the super quantum discord as a function of the measurement strength and in the limit of strong projective measurement the super quantum discord becomes the normal quantum discord. We find that unlike the normal discord, for pure entangled states, the super quantum discord can exceed the quantum entanglement. Our results provide new insights on the nature of quantum correlation and suggest that the notion of quantum correlation is not only observer dependent but also depends on how weakly one perturbs the composite system. We illustrate the key results for pure as well as mixed entangled states. -- Highlights: •Introduced the role of weak measurements in quantifying quantum correlation. •We have introduced the notion of the super quantum discord (SQD). •For pure entangled state, we show that the SQD exceeds the entanglement entropy. •This shows that quantum correlation depends not only on observer but also on measurement strength.

  13. Lineage-specific positive selection at the merozoite surface protein 1 (msp1 locus of Plasmodium vivax and related simian malaria parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawai Satoru

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 200 kDa merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1 of malaria parasites, a strong vaccine candidate, plays a key role during erythrocyte invasion and is a target of host protective immune response. Plasmodium vivax, the most widespread human malaria parasite, is closely related to parasites that infect Asian Old World monkeys, and has been considered to have become a parasite of man by host switch from a macaque malaria parasite. Several Asian monkey parasites have a range of natural hosts. The same parasite species shows different disease manifestations among host species. This suggests that host immune responses to P. vivax-related malaria parasites greatly differ among host species (albeit other factors. It is thus tempting to invoke that a major immune target parasite protein such as MSP-1 underwent unique evolution, depending on parasite species that exhibit difference in host range and host specificity. Results We performed comparative phylogenetic and population genetic analyses of the gene encoding MSP-1 (msp1 from P. vivax and nine P. vivax-related simian malaria parasites. The inferred phylogenetic tree of msp1 significantly differed from that of the mitochondrial genome, with a striking displacement of P. vivax from a position close to P. cynomolgi in the mitochondrial genome tree to an outlier of Asian monkey parasites. Importantly, positive selection was inferred for two ancestral branches, one leading to P. inui and P. hylobati and the other leading to P. vivax, P. fieldi and P. cynomolgi. This ancestral positive selection was estimated to have occurred three to six million years ago, coinciding with the period of radiation of Asian macaques. Comparisons of msp1 polymorphisms between P. vivax, P. inui and P. cynomolgi revealed that while some positively selected amino acid sites or regions are shared by these parasites, amino acid changes greatly differ, suggesting that diversifying selection is acting species

  14. Antibacterial Activityof Aqueous And Ethanolic Leaf Extracts Of Vernonia Amygdalina On Selected Species Of Gram Positive And Gram Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AM Bukar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The phytochemical screening and antibacterial activity of ethanolic and Methanolic leaves extract of Vernonia amygdalina against five clinical isolates (Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, Pseudomonas species, Salmonella species and Proteus species was determined using standard method of analysis. The results of the antibacterial activity of ethanol, methanol and aqueous extract of leaves of V. amygdalina have diameters ranging between 0.4 to 10mm. The plant extracts from the plants had profound activities against gram-positive than gram negative bacteria. From the above studies, it has clearly indicated that V. amygdalina extract may represent new sources of antibacterial drug, if the phytoactive components are purified and proper dosage are determined for administration. International Journal of Environment, Volume-2, Issue-1, Sep-Nov 2013, Pages 147-152 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v2i1.9217

  15. Warping the Weak Gravity Conjecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karta Kooner

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Weak Gravity Conjecture, if valid, rules out simple models of Natural Inflation by restricting their axion decay constant to be sub-Planckian. We revisit stringy attempts to realise Natural Inflation, with a single open string axionic inflaton from a probe D-brane in a warped throat. We show that warped geometries can allow the requisite super-Planckian axion decay constant to be achieved, within the supergravity approximation and consistently with the Weak Gravity Conjecture. Preliminary estimates of the brane backreaction suggest that the probe approximation may be under control. However, there is a tension between large axion decay constant and high string scale, where the requisite high string scale is difficult to achieve in all attempts to realise large field inflation using perturbative string theory. We comment on the Generalized Weak Gravity Conjecture in the light of our results.

  16. Artificial selection on relative brain size reveals a positive genetic correlation between brain size and proactive personality in the guppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrschal, Alexander; Lievens, Eva J P; Dahlbom, Josefin; Bundsen, Andreas; Semenova, Svetlana; Sundvik, Maria; Maklakov, Alexei A; Winberg, Svante; Panula, Pertti; Kolm, Niclas

    2014-04-01

    Animal personalities range from individuals that are shy, cautious, and easily stressed (a "reactive" personality type) to individuals that are bold, innovative, and quick to learn novel tasks, but also prone to routine formation (a "proactive" personality type). Although personality differences should have important consequences for fitness, their underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated how genetic variation in brain size affects personality. We put selection lines of large- and small-brained guppies (Poecilia reticulata), with known differences in cognitive ability, through three standard personality assays. First, we found that large-brained animals were faster to habituate to, and more exploratory in, open field tests. Large-brained females were also bolder. Second, large-brained animals excreted less cortisol in a stressful situation (confinement). Third, large-brained animals were slower to feed from a novel food source, which we interpret as being caused by reduced behavioral flexibility rather than lack of innovation in the large-brained lines. Overall, the results point toward a more proactive personality type in large-brained animals. Thus, this study provides the first experimental evidence linking brain size and personality, an interaction that may affect important fitness-related aspects of ecology such as dispersal and niche exploration. © 2013 The Authors. Evolution published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  17. ARTIFICIAL SELECTION ON RELATIVE BRAIN SIZE REVEALS A POSITIVE GENETIC CORRELATION BETWEEN BRAIN SIZE AND PROACTIVE PERSONALITY IN THE GUPPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrschal, Alexander; Lievens, Eva JP; Dahlbom, Josefin; Bundsen, Andreas; Semenova, Svetlana; Sundvik, Maria; Maklakov, Alexei A; Winberg, Svante; Panula, Pertti; Kolm, Niclas; Morrow, E

    2014-01-01

    Animal personalities range from individuals that are shy, cautious, and easily stressed (a “reactive” personality type) to individuals that are bold, innovative, and quick to learn novel tasks, but also prone to routine formation (a “proactive” personality type). Although personality differences should have important consequences for fitness, their underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated how genetic variation in brain size affects personality. We put selection lines of large- and small-brained guppies (Poecilia reticulata), with known differences in cognitive ability, through three standard personality assays. First, we found that large-brained animals were faster to habituate to, and more exploratory in, open field tests. Large-brained females were also bolder. Second, large-brained animals excreted less cortisol in a stressful situation (confinement). Third, large-brained animals were slower to feed from a novel food source, which we interpret as being caused by reduced behavioral flexibility rather than lack of innovation in the large-brained lines. Overall, the results point toward a more proactive personality type in large-brained animals. Thus, this study provides the first experimental evidence linking brain size and personality, an interaction that may affect important fitness-related aspects of ecology such as dispersal and niche exploration. PMID:24359469

  18. Cosmology and the weak interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)):(Chicago Univ., IL (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The weak interaction plays a critical role in modern Big Bang cosmology. This review will emphasize two of its most publicized cosmological connections: Big Bang nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter. The first of these is connected to the cosmological prediction of Neutrino Flavours, N{sub {nu}} {approximately} 3 which is now being confirmed at SLC and LEP. The second is interrelated to the whole problem of galaxy and structure formation in the universe. This review will demonstrate the role of the weak interaction both for dark matter candidates and for the problem of generating seeds to form structure. 87 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Nonlinear waves and weak turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharov, V E

    1997-01-01

    This book is a collection of papers on dynamical and statistical theory of nonlinear wave propagation in dispersive conservative media. Emphasis is on waves on the surface of an ideal fluid and on Rossby waves in the atmosphere. Although the book deals mainly with weakly nonlinear waves, it is more than simply a description of standard perturbation techniques. The goal is to show that the theory of weakly interacting waves is naturally related to such areas of mathematics as Diophantine equations, differential geometry of waves, Poincaré normal forms, and the inverse scattering method.

  20. Platelets augment respiratory burst in neutrophils activated by selected species of gram-positive or gram-negative bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Pytel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils and platelets circulate in blood system and play important physiological roles as part of immunological system. Neutrophils are the first line of host defense against various intruders, and platelets are satellite cells cooperating with other components of defense system. Recent studies report about the cooperation among these types of cells. We analyzed the effect of platelets on oxygen burst in neutrophils triggered by Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria in vitro. The effect of platelets on oxygen burst in neutrophils was measured by luminol enhanced chemiluminescence. Opsonized and non-opsonized bacteria were used as activators. Activation of neutrophils with live non-opsonized and opsonized bacteria in the presence of platelets increased the oxygen burst as compared to the same system without platelets. The gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus were causing higher activation than gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli. This work demonstrate that platelets potentate the response of neutrophils augmenting their respiratory burst in vitro when triggered by bacteria.

  1. The roles of gene duplication, gene conversion and positive selection in rodent Esp and Mup pheromone gene families with comparison to the Abp family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karn, Robert C; Laukaitis, Christina M

    2012-01-01

    Three proteinaceous pheromone families, the androgen-binding proteins (ABPs), the exocrine-gland secreting peptides (ESPs) and the major urinary proteins (MUPs) are encoded by large gene families in the genomes of Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus. We studied the evolutionary histories of the Mup and Esp genes and compared them with what is known about the Abp genes. Apparently gene conversion has played little if any role in the expansion of the mouse Class A and Class B Mup genes and pseudogenes, and the rat Mups. By contrast, we found evidence of extensive gene conversion in many Esp genes although not in all of them. Our studies of selection identified at least two amino acid sites in β-sheets as having evolved under positive selection in the mouse Class A and Class B MUPs and in rat MUPs. We show that selection may have acted on the ESPs by determining K(a)/K(s) for Exon 3 sequences with and without the converted sequence segment. While it appears that purifying selection acted on the ESP signal peptides, the secreted portions of the ESPs probably have undergone much more rapid evolution. When the inner gene converted fragment sequences were removed, eleven Esp paralogs were present in two or more pairs with K(a)/K(s) >1.0 and thus we propose that positive selection is detectable by this means in at least some mouse Esp paralogs. We compare and contrast the evolutionary histories of all three mouse pheromone gene families in light of their proposed functions in mouse communication.

  2. Enzymatic Analysis of Positional Fatty Acid Distributions in Triacylglycerols by 1(3)-Selective Transesterification with Candida antarctica Lipase B: a Collaborative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yomi; Sato, Shinichi; Asada, Mihoko; Arishima, Toshiharu; Iida, Yasuhiro; Imagi, Jun; Saito, Katsuyoshi; Sano, Takashi; Sasaki, Akiko; Sasaki, Ryo; Sato, Chiemi; Shibuya, Tadahisa; Tsukahara, Yuki; Nagai, Toshiharu; Fukazawa, Toru; Hori, Ryuji; Homma, Rika; Miyazaki, Yosuke; Yamashita, Atsushi; Yoshinaga, Kazuaki; Watanabe, Shimpei

    2015-01-01

    The positional distributions of fatty acids (FAs) in fats and oils are principally analyzed by selectively transesterifying the target triacylglycerols (TAGs) at the 1(3) position using Pseudozyma (Candida) antarctica lipase, followed by recovering the resulting 2-monoacylglycerols (MAGs) by chromatography. FA compositions were measured by gas chromatography (GC) after methylating target TAGs and 2-MAGs. The method was collaboratively evaluated by 12 laboratories by analyzing the positional FA distributions in soybean, palm, and sardine oils. The maximum reproducibility relative standard deviations for the major FAs and those at the sn-2 positions of soybean, palm, and sardine oils were 4.41% and 3.92% (18:3n-3), 4.48% and 3.82% (18:0), and 8.93 and 8.24% (14:0), respectively. The values at the sn-2 position were always low. Therefore, these results indicated that the variations were mainly caused by the FA analysis procedure, i.e., the methylation and GC analyses, rather than the enzymatic transesterification and chromatography utilized to prepare 2-MAGs from the target oil.

  3. Weak measurements measure probability amplitudes (and very little else)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolovski, D., E-mail: dgsokol15@gmail.com [Departmento de Química-Física, Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Leioa (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Maria Diaz de Haro 3, 48013, Bilbao (Spain)

    2016-04-22

    Conventional quantum mechanics describes a pre- and post-selected system in terms of virtual (Feynman) paths via which the final state can be reached. In the absence of probabilities, a weak measurement (WM) determines the probability amplitudes for the paths involved. The weak values (WV) can be identified with these amplitudes, or their linear combinations. This allows us to explain the “unusual” properties of the WV, and avoid the “paradoxes” often associated with the WM. - Highlights: • Weak measurement on a pre- and post-selected system is a particular perturbative scheme. • A conventional average for the additional degree of freedom measured. • The result is proportional to the amplitudes on the virtual paths connecting two system's states. • Over-interpretation of the weak values (WV) is unwise. • “Unusual” WVs are not unusual after all.

  4. Benchmark selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Tvede, Mich

    2002-01-01

    Within a production theoretic framework, this paper considers an axiomatic approach to benchmark selection. It is shown that two simple and weak axioms; efficiency and comprehensive monotonicity characterize a natural family of benchmarks which typically becomes unique. Further axioms are added...... in order to obtain a unique selection...

  5. Different positioning elements select poly(A) sites at the 3'-end of GCN4 mRNA in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düvel, K; Braus, G H

    1999-12-15

    Cleavage and polyadenylation of eukaryotic mRNA requires efficiency and positioning elements in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the mRNA. Specific point mutations were introduced into the yeast GCN4 3'-UTR to detect sequence motifs which are involved in the positioning of the poly(A) site. 3'-End proces-sing activities of different GCN4 3'-UTR alleles were measured in an in vivo test system. Point mutations in an AAGAA motif defocussed selection of the poly(A) sites of the GCN4 3'-UTR to various additional poly(A) sites instead of the single site of the wild-type GCN4 3'-UTR. A strain with an intact wild-type GCN4 3'-UTR but impaired in RNA15 encoding an RNA-binding processing factor showed a similar defocussed pattern of poly(A) site selection. Remarkably, two additional sequence motifs upstream of the AAGAA motif which resemble yeast efficiency motifs independently affected poly(A) site positioning but not efficiency of 3'-end processing. Mutations in one motif resulted in an additional upstream poly(A) site. Alterations of the other motif shifted the poly(A) sites exclusively to two downstream poly(A) sites. These data suggest several contact points between the precursor mRNA and the polyadenylation machinery in yeast.

  6. Submanifolds weakly associated with graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sci. (Math. Sci.) Vol. 119, No. 3, June 2009, pp. 297–318. © Printed in India. Submanifolds weakly associated with graphs. A CARRIAZO, L M FERN ´ANDEZ and A RODRÍGUEZ-HIDALGO. Department of Geometry and Topology, Faculty of Mathematics, University of Sevilla,. Apartado de Correos 1160, 41080-Sevilla, Spain.

  7. Beam splitting on weak illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, A W; Buryak, A V; Mitchell, D J

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate, in both two and three dimensions, how a self-guided beam in a non-Kerr medium is split into two beams on weak illumination. We also provide an elegant physical explanation that predicts the universal character of the observed phenomenon. Possible applications of our findings to guiding light with light are also discussed.

  8. On Weak-BCC-Algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomys, Janus; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2013-01-01

    We describe weak-BCC-algebras (also called BZ-algebras) in which the condition (x∗y)∗z = (x∗z)∗y is satisfied only in the case when elements x, y belong to the same branch. We also characterize ideals, nilradicals, and nilpotent elements of such algebras. PMID:24311983

  9. Voltage Weak DC Distribution Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hailu, T.G.; Mackay, L.J.; Ramirez Elizondo, L.M.; Ferreira, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the behavior of voltage weak DC distribution systems. These systems have relatively small system capacitance. The size of system capacitance, which stores energy, has a considerable effect on the value of fault currents, control complexity, and system reliability. A number of

  10. Investigation for improving Global Positioning System (GPS) orbits using a discrete sequential estimator and stochastic models of selected physical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goad, Clyde C.; Chadwell, C. David

    1993-01-01

    GEODYNII is a conventional batch least-squares differential corrector computer program with deterministic models of the physical environment. Conventional algorithms were used to process differenced phase and pseudorange data to determine eight-day Global Positioning system (GPS) orbits with several meter accuracy. However, random physical processes drive the errors whose magnitudes prevent improving the GPS orbit accuracy. To improve the orbit accuracy, these random processes should be modeled stochastically. The conventional batch least-squares algorithm cannot accommodate stochastic models, only a stochastic estimation algorithm is suitable, such as a sequential filter/smoother. Also, GEODYNII cannot currently model the correlation among data values. Differenced pseudorange, and especially differenced phase, are precise data types that can be used to improve the GPS orbit precision. To overcome these limitations and improve the accuracy of GPS orbits computed using GEODYNII, we proposed to develop a sequential stochastic filter/smoother processor by using GEODYNII as a type of trajectory preprocessor. Our proposed processor is now completed. It contains a correlated double difference range processing capability, first order Gauss Markov models for the solar radiation pressure scale coefficient and y-bias acceleration, and a random walk model for the tropospheric refraction correction. The development approach was to interface the standard GEODYNII output files (measurement partials and variationals) with software modules containing the stochastic estimator, the stochastic models, and a double differenced phase range processing routine. Thus, no modifications to the original GEODYNII software were required. A schematic of the development is shown. The observational data are edited in the preprocessor and the data are passed to GEODYNII as one of its standard data types. A reference orbit is determined using GEODYNII as a batch least-squares processor and the

  11. Prevalence of Weak D Antigen In Western Indian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvi Sadaria

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Discovery of Rh antigens in 1939 by Landsteiner and Weiner was the revolutionary stage in blood banking. Of these antigens, D, which decides Rh positivity or negativity, is the most antigenic. A problem is encountered when an individual has a weakened expression of D (Du, i.e., fewer numbers of D antigens on red cell membrane. Aims and Objectives: To know the prevalence of weak D in Indian population because incidence varies in different population. To determine the risk of alloimmunization among Rh D negative patients who receives the blood of weak D positive donors. Material and Methods: Rh grouping of 38,962 donors who came to The Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion of Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad from 1st January 2013 to 30th September 2014 was done using the DIAGAST (Automated Grouping. The samples that tested negative for D antigen were further analysed for weak D (Du by indirect antiglobulin test using blend of Ig G and Ig M Anti D. This was done using Column agglutination method in ID card (gel card. Results: The total number of donors studied was 38,962. Out of these 3360(8.6% were tested Rh D negative. All Rh D negative donors were tested for weak D (Du. 22 (0.056% of total donors and 0.65% of Rh negative donors turned out to be weak D (Du positive. Conclusion: The prevalence of weak D (Du in Western Indian population is 0.056 %, So the risk of alloimmunization in our setting due to weak D (Du antigen is marginal. But, testing of weak D antigen is necessary in blood bank because weak D antigen is immunogenic and can produce alloimmunization if transfused to Rh D negative subjects.

  12. Positive selection for new disease mutations in the human germline: evidence from the heritable cancer syndrome multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Kyung Choi

    Full Text Available Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN2B is a highly aggressive thyroid cancer syndrome. Since almost all sporadic cases are caused by the same nucleotide substitution in the RET proto-oncogene, the calculated disease incidence is 100-200 times greater than would be expected based on the genome average mutation frequency. In order to determine whether this increased incidence is due to an elevated mutation rate at this position (true mutation hot spot or a selective advantage conferred on mutated spermatogonial stem cells, we studied the spatial distribution of the mutation in 14 human testes. In donors aged 36-68, mutations were clustered with small regions of each testis having mutation frequencies several orders of magnitude greater than the rest of the testis. In donors aged 19-23 mutations were almost non-existent, demonstrating that clusters in middle-aged donors grew during adulthood. Computational analysis showed that germline selection is the only plausible explanation. Testes of men aged 75-80 were heterogeneous with some like middle-aged and others like younger testes. Incorporating data on age-dependent death of spermatogonial stem cells explains the results from all age groups. Germline selection also explains MEN2B's male mutation bias and paternal age effect. Our discovery focuses attention on MEN2B as a model for understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of germline selection. Since RET function in mouse spermatogonial stem cells has been extensively studied, we are able to suggest that the MEN2B mutation provides a selective advantage by altering the PI3K/AKT and SFK signaling pathways. Mutations that are preferred in the germline but reduce the fitness of offspring increase the population's mutational load. Our approach is useful for studying other disease mutations with similar characteristics and could uncover additional germline selection pathways or identify true mutation hot spots.

  13. Competing weak localization and weak antilocalization in ultrathin topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Murong; He, Liang; Kou, Xufeng; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Fan, Yabin; Chu, Hao; Jiang, Ying; Bardarson, Jens H; Jiang, Wanjun; Choi, Eun Sang; Wang, Yong; Yeh, Nai-Chang; Moore, Joel; Wang, Kang L

    2013-01-09

    We demonstrate evidence of a surface gap opening in topological insulator (TI) thin films of (Bi(0.57)Sb(0.43))(2)Te(3) below six quintuple layers through transport and scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements. By effective tuning the Fermi level via gate-voltage control, we unveil a striking competition between weak localization and weak antilocalization at low magnetic fields in nonmagnetic ultrathin films, possibly owing to the change of the net Berry phase. Furthermore, when the Fermi level is swept into the surface gap of ultrathin samples, the overall unitary behaviors are revealed at higher magnetic fields, which are in contrast to the pure WAL signals obtained in thicker films. Our findings show an exotic phenomenon characterizing the gapped TI surface states and point to the future realization of quantum spin Hall effect and dissipationless TI-based applications.

  14. ZP domain proteins in the abalone egg coat include a paralog of VERL under positive selection that binds lysin and 18-kDa sperm proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Jan E; Vacquier, Victor D; MacCoss, Michael J; Swanson, Willie J

    2010-01-01

    Identifying fertilization molecules is key to our understanding of reproductive biology, yet only a few examples of interacting sperm and egg proteins are known. One of the best characterized comes from the invertebrate archeogastropod abalone (Haliotis spp.), where sperm lysin mediates passage through the protective egg vitelline envelope (VE) by binding to the VE protein vitelline envelope receptor for lysin (VERL). Rapid adaptive divergence of abalone lysin and VERL are an example of positive selection on interacting fertilization proteins contributing to reproductive isolation. Previously, we characterized a subset of the abalone VE proteins that share a structural feature, the zona pellucida (ZP) domain, which is common to VERL and the egg envelopes of vertebrates. Here, we use additional expressed sequence tag sequencing and shotgun proteomics to characterize this family of proteins in the abalone egg VE. We expand 3-fold the number of known ZP domain proteins present within the VE (now 30 in total) and identify a paralog of VERL (vitelline envelope zona pellucida domain protein [VEZP] 14) that contains a putative lysin-binding motif. We find that, like VERL, the divergence of VEZP14 among abalone species is driven by positive selection on the lysin-binding motif alone and that these paralogous egg VE proteins bind a similar set of sperm proteins including a rapidly evolving 18-kDa paralog of lysin, which may mediate sperm-egg fusion. This work identifies an egg coat paralog of VERL under positive selection and the candidate sperm proteins with which it may interact during abalone fertilization.

  15. Accelerated evolution of Fetuin-A (FETUA, also AHSG) is driven by positive Darwinian selection, not GC-biased gene conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Yvonne; Zechner, Ulrich; Roos, Christian; Rosenkranz, David; Zischler, Hans; Herlyn, Holger

    2010-09-01

    Human Fetuin-A (FETUA, also termed AHSG) is a serum protein composed of two cystatin-like domains D1 and D2 of together 235 amino acids (aa) and an unrelated domain D3 of 114 aa. Though the protein plays a role in diverse physiological and pathological processes, comparably little is known about sequence evolution of FETUA. We therefore analyzed its molecular evolution on the basis of coding sequences of 16 primate species. Ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates (d(n)/d(s)=omega) suggest that a previously reported acceleration of sequence evolution of exon 7, which encodes domain D3, is driven by positive selection instead of neutral evolution. Irrespective of the maximum likelihood model used, a remarkable 40% of codon sites is estimated to be positively selected in domain D3, with an average omega of 4.3. Analyses of GC/AT- and AT/GC-substitutions reveal that GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC) cannot explain the observed pattern. We thus reject the extended null model of molecular evolution (neutral evolution and gBGC) and conclude that positive Darwinian selection contributes to the sequence evolution of FETUA domain D3. Remarkably, domain D3 of human FETUA is characterized by a significant accumulation of proteolytic cleavage sites. Though speculative at present, the accelerated evolution of domain D3 might be due to the evolution of differential cleavage site patterns across primates reflecting different paths to achieve one goal, the decomposition of FETUA under pathological conditions. Present analyses use a PERL-script ("Substitution Bias Indicator", SBI) for the extraction of the numbers of GC/AT- and AT/GC-substitutions from supplemental results files of PAML analyses. The script is available upon request and the presented approach of testing the extended null hypothesis of molecular evolution can be transferred to every other protein coding locus. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Selective growth of Au nanograins on specific positions (tips, edges and facets) of Cu2O octahedrons to form Cu2O-Au hierarchical heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Han; Du, MingLiang; Yu, DongLiang; Wang, Yin; Zou, MeiLing; Xu, CongSheng; Fu, YaQin

    2012-12-07

    This communication demonstrates a novel strategy for the selective growth of Au nanograins (AuNGs) on specific positions (tips, edges and facets) of Cu(2)O octahedrons to form Cu(2)O-Au hierarchical heterostructures. The surface energy distribution of the octahedrons generally follows the order of γ((facets)) tips)) and leads to the preferential growth and evolution of the heterostructures. These novel Cu(2)O-Au hierarchical heterostructures show fascinating degradations of methylene blue (MB), due to the suppressed electron/hole recombination phenomena and the highly efficient light harvesting.

  17. Classical and Weak Solutions for Two Models in Mathematical Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyulov, Tihomir B.; Valkov, Radoslav L.

    2011-12-01

    We study two mathematical models, arising in financial mathematics. These models are one-dimensional analogues of the famous Black-Scholes equation on finite interval. The main difficulty is the degeneration at the both ends of the space interval. First, classical solutions are studied. Positivity and convexity properties of the solutions are discussed. Variational formulation in weighted Sobolev spaces is introduced and existence and uniqueness of the weak solution is proved. Maximum principle for weak solution is discussed.

  18. Photoassociation spectra and the validity of the dipole approximation for weakly bound dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Daniel G.; Whittingham, Ian B.

    2010-03-01

    Photoassociation (PA) of ultracold metastable helium to the 2s2p manifold is theoretically investigated using a nonperturbative close-coupled treatment in which the laser coupling is evaluated without assuming the dipole approximation. The results are compared with our previous study [D. G. Cocks and I. B. Whittingham, Phys. Rev. A 80, 023417 (2009)], which makes use of the dipole approximation. The approximation is found to strongly affect the PA spectra because the photoassociated levels are weakly bound, and a similar impact is predicted to occur in other systems of a weakly bound nature. The inclusion of the approximation does not affect the resonance positions or widths; however, significant differences are observed in the background of the spectra and the maximum laser intensity at which resonances are discernible. Couplings not satisfying the dipole selection rule |J-1|⩽J'⩽|J+1| do not lead to observable resonances.

  19. Weakness acquired in the intensive care unit. Incidence, risk factors and their association with inspiratory weakness. Observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballve, Ladislao Pablo Diaz; Dargains, Nahuel; Inchaustegui, José García Urrutia; Bratos, Antonella; Percaz, Maria de Los Milagros; Ardariz, Cesar Bueno; Cagide, Sabrina; Balestrieri, Carolina; Gamarra, Claudio; Paz, Dario; Rotela, Eliana; Muller, Sebastian; Bustos, Fernando; Castro, Ricard Aranda; Settembrino, Esteban

    2017-12-07

    This paper sought to determine the accumulated incidence and analyze the risk factors associated with the development of weakness acquired in the intensive care unit and its relationship to inspiratory weakness. We conducted a prospective cohort study at a single center, multipurpose medical-surgical intensive care unit. We included adult patients who required mechanical ventilation ≥ 24 hours between July 2014 and January 2016. No interventions were performed. Demographic data, clinical diagnoses, the factors related to the development of intensive care unit -acquired weakness, and maximal inspiratory pressure were recorded. Of the 111 patients included, 66 developed intensive care unit -acquired weakness, with a cumulative incidence of 40.5% over 18 months. The group with intensive care unit-acquired weakness were older (55.9 ± 17.6 versus 45.8 ± 16.7), required more mechanical ventilation (7 [4 - 10] days versus 4 [2 - 7.3] days), and spent more time in the intensive care unit (15.5 [9.2 - 22.8] days versus 9 [6 - 14] days). More patients presented with delirium (68% versus 39%), hyperglycemia > 3 days (84% versus 59%), and positive balance > 3 days (73.3% versus 37%). All comparisons were significant at p 5 days as independent predictors of intensive care unit-acquired weakness. Low maximal inspiratory pressure was associated with intensive care unit-acquired weakness (p intensive care unit-acquired weakness. The intensive care unit acquired weakness is a condition with a high incidence in our environment. The development of intensive care unit-acquired weakness was associated with age, delirium, hyperglycemia, and mechanical ventilation > 5 days. The maximum inspiratory pressure value of ≥ 36cmH2O was associated with a high diagnostic value to exclude the presence of intensive care unit -acquired weakness.

  20. Optimal Weak Lensing Skewness Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Tong-Jie; Pen, Ue-Li; Zhang, Pengjie; Dubinski, John

    2003-01-01

    Weak lensing measurements are entering a precision era to statistically map the distribution of matter in the universe. The most common measurement has been of the variance of the projected surface density of matter, which corresponds to the induced correlation in alignments of background galaxies. This measurement of the fluctuations is insensitive to the total mass content, like using waves on the ocean to measure its depths. But when the depth is shallow as happens near a beach, waves beco...

  1. Weak neutral-current interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, R.M.

    1978-08-01

    The roles of each type of experiment in establishing uniquely the values of the the neutral-current couplings of u and d quarks are analyzed together with their implications for gauge models of the weak and electromagnetic interactions. An analysis of the neutral-current couplings of electrons and of the data based on the assumption that only one Z/sup 0/ boson exists is given. Also a model-independent analysis of parity violation experiments is discussed. 85 references. (JFP)

  2. Positive selection on the osteoarthritis-risk and decreased-height associated variants at the GDF5 gene in East Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Dong; Li, Gui-Mei; Jin, Wei; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2012-01-01

    GDF5 is a member of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) gene family, and plays an important role in the development of the skeletal system. Variants of the gene are associated with osteoarthritis and height in some human populations. Here, we resequenced the gene in individuals from four geographically separated human populations, and found that the evolution of the promoter region deviated from neutral expectations, with the sequence evolution driven by positive selection in the East Asian population, especially the haplotypes carrying the derived alleles of 5' UTR SNPs rs143384 and rs143383. The derived alleles of rs143384 and rs143383, which are associated with a risk of osteoarthritis and decreased height, have high frequencies in non-Africans and show strong extended haplotype homozygosity and high population differentiation in East Asian. It is concluded that positive selection has driven the rapid evolution of the two osteoarthritis osteoarthritis-risk and decreased height associated variants of the human GDF5 gene, and supports the suggestion that the reduction in body size during the terminal Pleistocene and Holocene period might have been an adaptive process influenced by genetic factors.

  3. Patterns of Nucleotide Diversity at the Regions Encompassing the Drosophila Insulin-Like Peptide (dilp) Genes: Demography vs. Positive Selection in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirao-Rico, Sara; Aguadé, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila, the insulin-signaling pathway controls some life history traits, such as fertility and lifespan, and it is considered to be the main metabolic pathway involved in establishing adult body size. Several observations concerning variation in body size in the Drosophila genus are suggestive of its adaptive character. Genes encoding proteins in this pathway are, therefore, good candidates to have experienced adaptive changes and to reveal the footprint of positive selection. The Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs) are the ligands that trigger the insulin-signaling cascade. In Drosophila melanogaster, there are several peptides that are structurally similar to the single mammalian insulin peptide. The footprint of recent adaptive changes on nucleotide variation can be unveiled through the analysis of polymorphism and divergence. With this aim, we have surveyed nucleotide sequence variation at the dilp1-7 genes in a natural population of D. melanogaster. The comparison of polymorphism in D. melanogaster and divergence from D. simulans at different functional classes of the dilp genes provided no evidence of adaptive protein evolution after the split of the D. melanogaster and D. simulans lineages. However, our survey of polymorphism at the dilp gene regions of D. melanogaster has provided some evidence for the action of positive selection at or near these genes. The regions encompassing the dilp1-4 genes and the dilp6 gene stand out as likely affected by recent adaptive events. PMID:23308258

  4. Completely continuous and weakly completely continuous abstract ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    if the operator ρa of right multiplication by a is compact (weakly compact, respectively). An algebra A is called right completely continuous (right weakly completely continuous) if any element a ∈ A is right completely continuous (right weakly completely con- tinuous, respectively). Left completely continuous (left weakly ...

  5. Factors associated with performing tuberculosis screening of HIV-positive patients in Ghana: LASSO-based predictor selection in a large public health data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Using, Susanne; Feldt, Torsten; Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Eberhardt, Kirsten Alexandra

    2016-07-13

    The purpose of this study is to propose the Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operators procedure (LASSO) as an alternative to conventional variable selection models, as it allows for easy interpretation and handles multicollinearities. We developed a model on the basis of LASSO-selected parameters in order to link associated demographical, socio-economical, clinical and immunological factors to performing tuberculosis screening in HIV-positive patients in Ghana. Applying the LASSO method and multivariate logistic regression analysis on a large public health data set, we selected relevant predictors related to tuberculosis screening. One Thousand Ninety Five patients infected with HIV were enrolled into this study with 691 (63.2 %) of them having tuberculosis screening documented in their patient folders. Predictors found to be significantly associated with performance of tuberculosis screening can be classified into factors related to the clinician's perception of the clinical state, as well as those related to PLHIV's awareness. These factors include newly diagnosed HIV infections (n = 354 (32.42 %), aOR 1.84), current CD4+ T cell count (aOR 0.92), non-availability of HIV type (n = 787 (72.07 %), aOR 0.56), chronic cough (n = 32 (2.93 %), aOR 5.07), intake of co-trimoxazole (n = 271 (24.82 %), aOR 2.31), vitamin supplementation (n = 220 (20.15 %), aOR 2.64) as well as the use of mosquito bed nets (n = 613 (56.14 %), aOR 1.53). Accelerated TB screening among newly diagnosed HIV-patients indicates that application of the WHO screening form for intensifying tuberculosis case finding among HIV-positive individuals in resource-limited settings is increasingly adopted. However, screening for TB in PLHIV is still impacted by clinician's perception of patient's health state and PLHIV's health awareness. Education of staff, counselling of PLHIV and sufficient financing are needed for further improvement in implementation of TB screening

  6. Lgals6, a 2-million-year-old gene in mice: a case of positive Darwinian selection and presence/absence polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houzelstein, Denis; Gonçalves, Isabelle R; Orth, Annie; Bonhomme, François; Netter, Pierre

    2008-03-01

    Duplications of genes are widely considered to be a driving force in the evolutionary process. The fate of such duplicated genes (paralogs) depends mainly on the early stages of their evolution. Therefore, the study of duplications that have already started to diverge is useful to better understand their evolution. We present here the example of a 2-million-year-old segmental duplication at the origin of the Lgals4 and Lgals6 genes in the mouse genome. We analyzed the distribution of these genes in samples from 110 wild individuals and wild-derived inbred strains belonging to eight mouse species from Mus (Coelomys) pahari to M. musculus and 28 laboratory strains. Using a maximum-likelihood method, we show that the sequence of the Lgals6 gene has evolved under the influence of strong positive selection that is likely to result in its neofunctionalization. Surprisingly, despite this selection pressure, the Lgals6 gene is present in some mouse species, but not all. Furthermore, even within the species and populations where it is present, the Lgals6 gene is never fixed. To explain this paradox, we propose different hypotheses such as balanced selection and neutral retention of ancient polymophism and we discuss this unexpected result with regard to known galectin properties and response to infections by pathogens.

  7. Genetic diversity of MHC class I loci in six non-model frogs is shaped by positive selection and gene duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemnec-Tyburczy, K M; Richmond, J Q; Savage, A E; Lips, K R; Zamudio, K R

    2012-09-01

    Comparative studies of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes across vertebrate species can reveal the evolutionary processes that shape the structure and function of immune regulatory proteins. In this study, we characterized MHC class I sequences from six frog species representing three anuran families (Hylidae, Centrolenidae and Ranidae). Using cDNA from our focal species, we amplified a total of 79 unique sequences spanning exons 2-4 that encode the extracellular domains of the functional alpha chain protein. We compared intra- and interspecific nucleotide and amino-acid divergence, tested for recombination, and identified codon sites under selection by estimating the rate of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions with multiple codon-based maximum likelihood methods. We determined that positive (diversifying) selection was acting on specific amino-acid sites located within the domains that bind pathogen-derived peptides. We also found significant signals of recombination across the physical distance of the genes. Finally, we determined that all the six species expressed two or three putative classical class I loci, in contrast to the single locus condition of Xenopus laevis. Our results suggest that MHC evolution in anurans is a dynamic process and that variation in numbers of loci and genetic diversity can exist among taxa. Thus, the accumulation of genetic data for more species will be useful in further characterizing the relative importance of processes such as selection, recombination and gene duplication in shaping MHC loci among amphibian lineages.

  8. Episodic nucleotide substitutions in seasonal influenza virus H3N2 can be explained by stochastic genealogical process without positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kangchon; Kim, Yuseob

    2015-03-01

    Nucleotide substitutions in the HA1 domain of seasonal influenza virus H3N2 occur in temporal clusters, which was interpreted as a result of recurrent selective sweeps underlying antigenic drift. However, classical theory by Watterson suggests that episodic substitutions are mainly due to stochastic genealogy combined with unique genetic structure of influenza virus: High mutation rate over a nonrecombining viral segment. This explains why even larger variance in the number of allelic fixations per year is observed in nonantigenic gene segments of H3N2 than in antigenic (hemagglutinin and neuraminidase) segments. Using simulation, we confirm that allelic substitutions at nonrecombining segments with high mutation rate become temporally clustered without selection. We conclude that temporal clustering of fixations, as it is primarily caused by inherent randomness in genealogical process at linked sites, cannot be used as an evidence of positive selection in the H3N2 population. This effect of linkage and high mutation rate should be carefully considered in analyzing the genomic patterns of allelic substitutions in asexually reproducing systems in general. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Differential selection on carotenoid biosynthesis genes as a function of gene position in the metabolic pathway: a study on the carrot and dicots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy Clotault

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selection of genes involved in metabolic pathways could target them differently depending on the position of genes in the pathway and on their role in controlling metabolic fluxes. This hypothesis was tested in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway using population genetics and phylogenetics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Evolutionary rates of seven genes distributed along the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, IPI, PDS, CRTISO, LCYB, LCYE, CHXE and ZEP, were compared in seven dicot taxa. A survey of deviations from neutrality expectations at these genes was also undertaken in cultivated carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus, a species that has been intensely bred for carotenoid pattern diversification in its root during its cultivation history. Parts of sequences of these genes were obtained from 46 individuals representing a wide diversity of cultivated carrots. Downstream genes exhibited higher deviations from neutral expectations than upstream genes. Comparisons of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates between genes among dicots revealed greater constraints on upstream genes than on downstream genes. An excess of intermediate frequency polymorphisms, high nucleotide diversity and/or high differentiation of CRTISO, LCYB1 and LCYE in cultivated carrot suggest that balancing selection may have targeted genes acting centrally in the pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results are consistent with relaxed constraints on downstream genes and selection targeting the central enzymes of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway during carrot breeding history.

  10. The transcriptomes of cave and surface populations of Gammarus minus (Crustacea: Amphipoda provide evidence for positive selection on cave downregulated transcripts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Carlini

    Full Text Available Gammarus minus, a freshwater amphipod living in the cave and surface streams in the eastern USA, is an excellent model for investigating evolutionary adaptation to the subterranean environment. RNA-Seq was conducted on one pair of morphologically distinct sister populations inhabiting surface and cave habitats to identify genes that were differentially expressed in the two populations, as well as to compare levels and patterns of genetic variation within and between populations. Of the 104,630 transcripts identified in the transcriptome assembly, 57% had higher average levels of expression in the cave population. After Benjamini-Hochberg correction for multiple tests, 1517 and 551 transcripts were significantly upregulated or downregulated, respectively, in the cave population, indicating an almost three-fold enrichment of cave-upregulated genes. The average level of nucleotide diversity across all transcripts was significantly lower in the cave population. Within the cave population, where the average nucleotide diversity of cave-downregulated transcripts was 75% that of the cave-upregulated transcripts, a highly significant difference, whereas within the spring population the nucleotide diversities of cave-downregulated and cave-upregulated transcripts was virtually identical. Three lines of evidence suggest that the reduced variation in cave downregulated transcripts is due to positive selection in the cave population: 1 the average neutrality index of cave-downregulated genes was < 1, consistent with positive selection, and significantly less than that of cave-upregulated genes; 2 Tajima's D was positively correlated with the cave:surface expression ratio, and 3 cave-downregulated transcripts were significantly more likely to be highly diverged from their surface homologs than cave-upregulated transcripts. Five transcripts had fixed premature termination codons in the cave population. The expression patterns and sequence variation in one

  11. The transcriptomes of cave and surface populations of Gammarus minus (Crustacea: Amphipoda) provide evidence for positive selection on cave downregulated transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlini, David B; Fong, Daniel W

    2017-01-01

    Gammarus minus, a freshwater amphipod living in the cave and surface streams in the eastern USA, is an excellent model for investigating evolutionary adaptation to the subterranean environment. RNA-Seq was conducted on one pair of morphologically distinct sister populations inhabiting surface and cave habitats to identify genes that were differentially expressed in the two populations, as well as to compare levels and patterns of genetic variation within and between populations. Of the 104,630 transcripts identified in the transcriptome assembly, 57% had higher average levels of expression in the cave population. After Benjamini-Hochberg correction for multiple tests, 1517 and 551 transcripts were significantly upregulated or downregulated, respectively, in the cave population, indicating an almost three-fold enrichment of cave-upregulated genes. The average level of nucleotide diversity across all transcripts was significantly lower in the cave population. Within the cave population, where the average nucleotide diversity of cave-downregulated transcripts was 75% that of the cave-upregulated transcripts, a highly significant difference, whereas within the spring population the nucleotide diversities of cave-downregulated and cave-upregulated transcripts was virtually identical. Three lines of evidence suggest that the reduced variation in cave downregulated transcripts is due to positive selection in the cave population: 1) the average neutrality index of cave-downregulated genes was < 1, consistent with positive selection, and significantly less than that of cave-upregulated genes; 2) Tajima's D was positively correlated with the cave:surface expression ratio, and 3) cave-downregulated transcripts were significantly more likely to be highly diverged from their surface homologs than cave-upregulated transcripts. Five transcripts had fixed premature termination codons in the cave population. The expression patterns and sequence variation in one such transcript

  12. Oxidative stress-mediated selective antimicrobial ability of nano-VO2 against Gram-positive bacteria for environmental and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Zhou, Huaijuan; Wang, Jiaxing; Wang, Donghui; Shen, Ruxiang; Zhang, Xianlong; Jin, Ping; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-06-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is a unique thermochromic material as a result of its semiconductor-metal transition, holding great promise for energy-saving intelligent windows. Herein, pure nano-VO2 from discrete nanoparticles to continuous films were successfully deposited on quartz glass by controlling the sputtering parameters. It was demonstrated that, for Gram-positive S. aureus and S. epidermidis, the nano-VO2 could effectively disrupt bacteria morphology and membrane integrity, and eventually cause death. By contrast, the nano-VO2 did not exhibit significant toxicity towards Gram-negative E. coli and P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a selective antimicrobial effect of nano-VO2 materials on Gram-positive bacteria. Based on the experimental results, a plausible mechanism was proposed for the antimicrobial selectivity, which might originate from the different sensitivity of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria to intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. Elevated intracellular ROS levels exceed the threshold that bacteria can self-regulate to maintain cellular redox homeostasis and thus cause oxidative stress, which can be alleviated by the intervention of glutathione (GSH) antioxidant. In addition, nano-VO2 did not produce significant cytotoxicity (hemolysis) against human erythrocytes within 12 h. Meanwhile, potential cytotoxicity against HIBEpiC revealed a time- and dose-dependent behavior that might be controlled and balanced by careful design. The findings in the present work may contribute to understanding the antimicrobial behavior of nano-VO2, and to expanding the new applications of VO2-based nanomaterials in environmental and biomedical fields.

  13. Selection by current compliance of negative and positive bipolar resistive switching behaviour in ZrO2-x /ZrO2 bilayer memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruomeng; Yan, Xingzhao; Morgan, Katrina A.; Charlton, Martin D. B.; (Kees de Groot, C. H.

    2017-05-01

    We report here a ZrO2-x /ZrO2-based bilayer resistive switching memory with unique properties that enables the selection of the switching mode by applying different electroforming current compliances. Two opposite polarity modes, positive bipolar and negative bipolar, correspond to the switching in the ZrO2 and ZrO2-x layer, respectively. The ZrO2 layer is proved to be responsible for the negative bipolar mode which is also observed in a ZrO2 single layer device. The oxygen deficient ZrO2-x layer plays the dominant role in the positive bipolar mode, which is exclusive to the bilayer memory. A systematic investigation of the ZrO2-x composition in the bilayer memory suggests that ZrO1.8 layer demonstrates optimum switching performance with low switching voltage, narrow switching voltage distribution and good cycling endurance. An excess of oxygen vacancies, beyond this composition, leads to a deterioration of switching properties. The formation and dissolution of the oxygen vacancy filament model has been proposed to explain both polarity switching behaviours and the improved properties in the bilayer positive bipolar mode are attributed to the confined oxygen vacancy filament size within the ZrO2-x layer.

  14. Simultaneous weak measurement of angular and spatial Goos-Hänchen and Imbert-Fedorov shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Chandravati; Viswanathan, Nirmal K.

    2017-10-01

    We propose and demonstrate the weak measurement scheme to simultaneously measure the amplified angular and spatial contributions to the Goos-Hänchen (GH) and Imbert-Fedorov (IF) shifts, due to transmission through a glass plate. We have studied two cases of post-selection using a polarizer in the first case and a quarter-wave plate (QWP)-polarizer combination in the second case. The two cases are analyzed theoretically using Jones calculus of polarization formalism and the results are verified experimentally. In the first case of post-selection, the projection of the polarizer at +/- {{Δ }} away from the crossed position amplifies the angular GH and IF shifts, while in the second case of post-selection, the projection of QWP at +/- {{Δ }} and polarizer kept fixed measures the polarization ellipticity in the beam and thus amplifies the spatial shift along with the angular shift simultaneously, for {{Δ }}\\ll 1.

  15. Protecting weak measurements against systematic errors

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Shengshi; Alonso, Jose Raul Gonzalez; Brun, Todd A.; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we consider the systematic error of quantum metrology by weak measurements under decoherence. We derive the systematic error of maximum likelihood estimation in general to the first-order approximation of a small deviation in the probability distribution, and study the robustness of standard weak measurement and postselected weak measurements against systematic errors. We show that, with a large weak value, the systematic error of a postselected weak measurement when the probe u...

  16. Early routine versus late selective surfactant in preterm neonates with respiratory distress syndrome on nasal continuous positive airway pressure: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandraju, Hemasree; Murki, Srinivas; Subramanian, Sreeram; Gaddam, Pramod; Deorari, Ashok; Kumar, Praveen

    2013-01-01

    Preterm neonates with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) benefit from early application of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP). However, it is not clear whether surfactant should be administered early as a routine to all such infants or later in a selective manner. It was the aim of this study to compare the efficacy of early routine versus late selective surfactant treatment in reducing the need for mechanical ventilation (MV) during the first week of life among moderate-sized preterm infants with RDS being supported by nCPAP. Infants born at 28(0/7) to 33(6/7) weeks of gestation with RDS and on nCPAP were randomly assigned within the first 2 h of life to early routine surfactant administration by the InSurE technique (early surfactant group) or to late selective administration of surfactant (late surfactant group). The primary outcome was need for MV in the first 7 days of life. Among 153 infants randomized to early (n = 74) or late surfactant (n = 79) groups, the need for MV was significantly lower in the early surfactant group (16.2 vs. 31.6%; relative risk 0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.19-0.91). The incidence of pneumothorax (1.9 vs. 2.3%) and the need for supplemental O2 at 28 days (2.7 vs. 8.9%) were similar in the two groups. Early routine surfactant administration within 2 h of life as compared to late selective administration significantly reduced the need for MV in the first week of life among preterm infants with RDS on nCPAP. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Whole-genome sequence analyses of Western Central African Pygmy hunter-gatherers reveal a complex demographic history and identify candidate genes under positive natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, PingHsun; Veeramah, Krishna R; Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A; Wall, Jeffrey D; Hammer, Michael F; Gutenkunst, Ryan N

    2016-03-01

    African Pygmies practicing a mobile hunter-gatherer lifestyle are phenotypically and genetically diverged from other anatomically modern humans, and they likely experienced strong selective pressures due to their unique lifestyle in the Central African rainforest. To identify genomic targets of adaptation, we sequenced the genomes of four Biaka Pygmies from the Central African Republic and jointly analyzed these data with the genome sequences of three Baka Pygmies from Cameroon and nine Yoruba famers. To account for the complex demographic history of these populations that includes both isolation and gene flow, we fit models using the joint allele frequency spectrum and validated them using independent approaches. Our two best-fit models both suggest ancient divergence between the ancestors of the farmers and Pygmies, 90,000 or 150,000 yr ago. We also find that bidirectional asymmetric gene flow is statistically better supported than a single pulse of unidirectional gene flow from farmers to Pygmies, as previously suggested. We then applied complementary statistics to scan the genome for evidence of selective sweeps and polygenic selection. We found that conventional statistical outlier approaches were biased toward identifying candidates in regions of high mutation or low recombination rate. To avoid this bias, we assigned P-values for candidates using whole-genome simulations incorporating demography and variation in both recombination and mutation rates. We found that genes and gene sets involved in muscle development, bone synthesis, immunity, reproduction, cell signaling and development, and energy metabolism are likely to be targets of positive natural selection in Western African Pygmies or their recent ancestors. © 2016 Hsieh et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Positive rheotaxis extended drop: a one-step procedure to select and recover sperm with mature chromatin for intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martin, Hamilton; Cocuzza, Marcello S; Tiseo, Bruno C; Wood, Guilherme J A; Miranda, Eduardo P; Monteleone, Pedro A A; Soares, José Maria; Serafini, Paulo C; Srougi, Miguel; Baracat, Edmund C

    2017-09-19

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel one-step ICSI approach to select sperm with better chromatin maturity than the conventional method. This was a pilot diagnostic study, which prospectively recruited men during a 6-month period in a University-affiliated infertility centre. Forty consecutive semen samples were provided for analysis. The positive rheotaxis extended drop (PRED) was set up creating a pressure and viscosity gradient. Each semen sample was divided into four aliquots: one aliquot for density gradient centrifugation (DGC), two aliquots for PRED (fresh semen (PRED-FS) and processed semen (PRED-DGC)), and one aliquot as the control (FS). In PRED, a mean of 200 spermatozoa were collected consecutively without selection from the outlet reservoir. The aniline blue assay was used to assess chromatin immaturity. The mean channel length, measured from inlet to outlet, was 32.55 ± 0.86 mm, with a mean width of 1.04 ± 0.21 mm. In 82.5% of cases (33/40), at least 50 spermatozoa were captured between 15 and 30 min. Improved chromatin maturity after the DGC preparation and the PRED approach was observed in all samples. This was reflected by a mean reduction from 28.65 ± 8.97% uncondensed chromatin in the native ejaculates to 17.29 ± 7.72% in DGC and 0.89 ± 1.31% in the PRED approach (P < 0.01). The PRED method may improve the current ICSI technique by providing it with its own sperm selection process. ICSI would probably become an even more complete technique comprising selection, capture and injection of the male gamete.

  19. Altered Ca2+ kinetics associated with α-actinin-3 deficiency may explain positive selection for ACTN3 null allele in human evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart I Head

    Full Text Available Over 1.5 billion people lack the skeletal muscle fast-twitch fibre protein α-actinin-3 due to homozygosity for a common null polymorphism (R577X in the ACTN3 gene. α-Actinin-3 deficiency is detrimental to sprint performance in elite athletes and beneficial to endurance activities. In the human genome, it is very difficult to find single-gene loss-of-function variants that bear signatures of positive selection, yet intriguingly, the ACTN3 null variant has undergone strong positive selection during recent evolution, appearing to provide a survival advantage where food resources are scarce and climate is cold. We have previously demonstrated that α-actinin-3 deficiency in the Actn3 KO mouse results in a shift in fast-twitch fibres towards oxidative metabolism, which would be more "energy efficient" in famine, and beneficial to endurance performance. Prolonged exposure to cold can also induce changes in skeletal muscle similar to those observed with endurance training, and changes in Ca2+ handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR are a key factor underlying these adaptations. On this basis, we explored the effects of α-actinin-3 deficiency on Ca2+ kinetics in single flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibres from Actn3 KO mice, using the Ca2+-sensitive dye fura-2. Compared to wild-type, fibres of Actn3 KO mice showed: (i an increased rate of decay of the twitch transient; (ii a fourfold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ leak; (iii a threefold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ pumping; and (iv enhanced maintenance of tetanic Ca2+ during fatigue. The SR Ca2+ pump, SERCA1, and the Ca2+-binding proteins, calsequestrin and sarcalumenin, showed markedly increased expression in muscles of KO mice. Together, these changes in Ca2+ handling in the absence of α-actinin-3 are consistent with cold acclimatisation and thermogenesis, and offer an additional explanation for the positive selection of the ACTN3 577X null allele in populations living in cold environments

  20. Ventrolateral Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons Positively Regulate Food-Incentive, Goal-Directed Behavior Independently of D1 and D2 Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsubori, Akiyo; Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Nishida, Hiroshi; Bouchekioua, Youcef; Sekiya, Hiroshi; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Watanabe, Masahiko; de Kerchove d'Exaerde, Alban; Mimura, Masaru; Takata, Norio; Tanaka, Kenji F

    2017-03-08

    The ventral striatum is involved in motivated behavior. Akin to the dorsal striatum, the ventral striatum contains two parallel pathways: the striatomesencephalic pathway consisting of dopamine receptor Type 1-expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-MSNs) and the striatopallidal pathway consisting of D2-MSNs. These two genetically identified pathways are thought to encode opposing functions in motivated behavior. It has also been reported that D1/D2 genetic selectivity is not attributed to the anatomical discrimination of two pathways. We wanted to determine whether D1- and D2-MSNs in the ventral striatum functioned in an opposing manner as previous observations claimed, and whether D1/D2 selectivity corresponded to a functional segregation in motivated behavior of mice. To address this question, we focused on the lateral portion of ventral striatum as a region implicated in food-incentive, goal-directed behavior, and recorded D1 or D2-MSN activity by using a gene-encoded ratiometric Ca 2+ indicator and by constructing a fiberphotometry system, and manipulated their activities via optogenetic inhibition during ongoing behaviors. We observed concurrent event-related compound Ca 2+ elevations in ventrolateral D1- and D2-MSNs, especially at trial start cue-related and first lever press-related times. D1 or D2 selective optogenetic inhibition just after the trial start cue resulted in a reduction of goal-directed behavior, indicating a shared coding of motivated behavior by both populations at this time. Only D1-selective inhibition just after the first lever press resulted in the reduction of behavior, indicating D1-MSN-specific coding at that specific time. Our data did not support opposing encoding by both populations in food-incentive, goal-directed behavior. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT An opposing role of dopamine receptor Type 1 or Type 2-expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-MSNs or D2-MSNs) on striatum-mediated behaviors has been widely accepted. However, this idea has

  1. Weak polyelectrolytes in Confined Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmer, Jonathan K.; Rathee, Vikramjit S.; Sikora, Benjamin

    Crucial to the behavior of recently designed charge-rejection and mosaic membranes are the conformations of polyelectrolyte brushes and oligomeric grafts used to control the membranes' surface charge. The use of pH-tunable weak polyelectrolytes with associative interactions enables fine tuning of material transport properties. Here, we apply constant-pH molecular dynamics along with free energy sampling algorithms to understand the subtle tug-of-war between pH, salt concentrations, and solvation forces in confined systems, and determine how each of these effects alters transport within the system. We further discuss the implications of our findings for the design of electrolyte separation membranes.

  2. Selection of DNA aptamers for extra cellular domain of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 to detect HER2 positive carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sett, A; Borthakur, B B; Bora, U

    2017-08-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2, an orphan receptor of ErbB family) is considered as an important biomarker as it plays a key role in the development and progression of aggressive types of breast, ovarian, stomach and gastric cancer. In the present study, we developed novel DNA aptamers against the extra-cellular domain (ECD) of Her2 protein for detection of Her2-positive carcinomas. We cloned and expressed Her2-ECD protein in E. coli system. After purification, the protein was used as a bait for screening of specific DNA aptamer candidate from a pool of 10 14-15 random oligonucleotides through in vitro Systematic Evaluation of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) process. The aptamer-protein binding kinetics was elucidated by isothermal calorimetry. The specificity of FAM-labelled ECD_Apt1 towards Her2-positive cell lines was estimated by FACS and immunofluorescence assay. The specificity of the candidate was also verified with the tissue samples of breast cancer patients by immunohistochemistry process. Among four selected candidates, ECD_Apt1 (having minimum ∆G = -3.24) showed the highest binding affinity (K d  = 6.33 ± 0.86 nM) to Her2-ECD protein. The aptamer-protein sandwich assay showed a linear rise in chemiluminescence (at 490 nm wavelength) in the dynamic range of 100-700 nM ECD_Apt1 with a detection limit of 12.5 ± 2.5 ng/mL. Biotinylated ECD_Apt1 showed stronger cytoplasmic staining in Her2-positive breast cancer cell lines (SKBR3) compared to Her2-negative cells (MDA MB 231, MCF7). In paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissue sections, it showed specific and selective localization in the cytoplasmic niche of malignant duct cancer cells without any cross-reactivity to fibroblasts, inflammatory cells and adipocytes. Binding assays, cytochemical and histochemical studies support ECD_Apt1 as a potential theranostic agent for Her2-positive carcinomas. ECD_Apt1 could be an effective low-cost alternative to conventional anti-Her2

  3. Weak lensing and cosmological investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Acquaviva, V

    2005-01-01

    In the last few years the scientific community has been dealing with the challenging issue of identifying the dark energy component. We regard weak gravitational lensing as a brand new, and extremely important, tool for cosmological investigation in this field. In fact, the features imprinted on the cosmic microwave background radiation by the lensing from the intervening distribution of matter represent a pretty unbiased estimator, and can thus be used for putting constraints on different dark energy models. This is true in particular for the magnetic-type B-modes of CMB polarization, whose unlensed spectrum at large multipoles (l approximately=1000) is very small even in presence of an amount of gravitational waves as large as currently allowed by the experiments: therefore, on these scales the lensing phenomenon is the only responsible for the observed power, and this signal turns out to be a faithful tracer of the dark energy dynamics. We first recall the formal apparatus of the weak lensing in extended t...

  4. Time—periodic weak solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Henriques de Brito

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available In continuing from previous papers, where we studied the existence and uniqueness of the global solution and its asymptotic behavior as time t goes to infinity, we now search for a time-periodic weak solution u(t for the equation whose weak formulation in a Hilbert space H isddt(u′,v+δ(u′,v+αb(u,v+βa(u,v+(G(u,v=(h,vwhere: ′=d/dt; (′ is the inner product in H; b(u,v, a(u,v are given forms on subspaces U⊂W, respectively, of H; δ>0, α≥0, β≥0 are constants and α+β>0; G is the Gateaux derivative of a convex functional J:V⊂H→[0,∞ for V=U, when α>0 and V=W when α=0, hence β>0; v is a test function in V; h is a given function of t with values in H.

  5. Evolution of land plant genes encoding L-Ala-D/L-Glu epimerases (AEEs) via horizontal gene transfer and positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zefeng; Wang, Yifan; Zhou, Yong; Gao, Qingsong; Zhang, Enying; Zhu, Lei; Hu, Yunyun; Xu, Chenwu

    2013-03-01

    The L-Ala-D/L-Glu epimerases (AEEs), a subgroup of the enolase superfamily, catalyze the epimerization of L-Ala-D/L-Glu and other dipeptides in bacteria and contribute to the metabolism of the murein peptide of peptidoglycan. Although lacking in peptidoglycan, land plants possess AEE genes that show high similarity to those in bacteria. Similarity searches revealed that the AEE gene is ubiquitous in land plants, from bryophytas to angiosperms. However, other eukaryotes, including green and red algae, do not contain genes encoding proteins with an L-Ala-D/L-Glu_epimerase domain. Homologs of land plant AEE genes were found to only be present in prokaryotes, especially in bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the land plant AEE genes formed a monophyletic group with some bacterial homologs. In addition, land plant AEE proteins showed the highest similarity with these bacterial homologs and shared motifs only conserved in land plant and these bacterial AEEs. Integrated information on the taxonomic distribution, phylogenetic relationships and sequence similarity of the AEE proteins revealed that the land plant AEE genes were acquired from bacteria through an ancient horizontal gene transfer (HGT) event. Further evidence revealed that land plant AEE genes had undergone positive selection and formed the main characteristics of exon/intron structures through gaining some introns during the initially evolutionary period in the ancestor of land plants. The results of this study clearly demonstrated that the ancestor of land plants acquired an AEE gene from bacteria via an ancient HGT event. Other findings illustrated that adaptive evolution through positive selection has contributed to the functional adaptation and fixation of this gene in land plants.

  6. Can evidence from genome-wide association studies and positive natural selection surveys be used to evaluate the thrifty gene hypothesis in East Asians?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan-Han Koh

    Full Text Available Body fat deposition and distribution differ between East Asians and Europeans, and for the same level of obesity, East Asians are at higher risks of Type 2 diabetes (T2D and other metabolic disorders. This observation has prompted the reclassifications of body mass index thresholds for the definitions of "overweight" and "obese" in East Asians. However, the question remains over what evolutionary mechanisms have driven the differences in adiposity morphology between two population groups that shared a common ancestor less than 80,000 years ago. The Thrifty Gene hypothesis has been suggested as a possible explanation, where genetic factors that allowed for efficient food-energy conversion and storage are evolutionarily favoured by conferring increased chances of survival and fertility. Here, we leveraged on the existing findings from genome-wide association studies and large-scale surveys of positive natural selection to evaluate whether there is currently any evidence to support the Thrifty Gene hypothesis. We first assess whether the existing genetic associations with obesity and T2D are located in genomic regions that are reported to be under positive selection, and if so, whether the risk alleles sit on the extended haplotype forms. In addition, we interrogate whether these risk alleles are the derived forms that differ from the ancestral alleles, and whether there is significant evidence of population differentiation at these SNPs between East Asian and European populations. Our systematic survey did not yield conclusive evidence to support the Thrifty Gene hypothesis as a possible explanation for the differences observed between East Asians and Europeans.

  7. Can evidence from genome-wide association studies and positive natural selection surveys be used to evaluate the thrifty gene hypothesis in East Asians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Xuan-Han; Liu, Xuanyao; Teo, Yik-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Body fat deposition and distribution differ between East Asians and Europeans, and for the same level of obesity, East Asians are at higher risks of Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and other metabolic disorders. This observation has prompted the reclassifications of body mass index thresholds for the definitions of "overweight" and "obese" in East Asians. However, the question remains over what evolutionary mechanisms have driven the differences in adiposity morphology between two population groups that shared a common ancestor less than 80,000 years ago. The Thrifty Gene hypothesis has been suggested as a possible explanation, where genetic factors that allowed for efficient food-energy conversion and storage are evolutionarily favoured by conferring increased chances of survival and fertility. Here, we leveraged on the existing findings from genome-wide association studies and large-scale surveys of positive natural selection to evaluate whether there is currently any evidence to support the Thrifty Gene hypothesis. We first assess whether the existing genetic associations with obesity and T2D are located in genomic regions that are reported to be under positive selection, and if so, whether the risk alleles sit on the extended haplotype forms. In addition, we interrogate whether these risk alleles are the derived forms that differ from the ancestral alleles, and whether there is significant evidence of population differentiation at these SNPs between East Asian and European populations. Our systematic survey did not yield conclusive evidence to support the Thrifty Gene hypothesis as a possible explanation for the differences observed between East Asians and Europeans.

  8. Evolution of land plant genes encoding L-Ala-D/L-Glu epimerases (AEEs) via horizontal gene transfer and positive selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The L-Ala-D/L-Glu epimerases (AEEs), a subgroup of the enolase superfamily, catalyze the epimerization of L-Ala-D/L-Glu and other dipeptides in bacteria and contribute to the metabolism of the murein peptide of peptidoglycan. Although lacking in peptidoglycan, land plants possess AEE genes that show high similarity to those in bacteria. Results Similarity searches revealed that the AEE gene is ubiquitous in land plants, from bryophytas to angiosperms. However, other eukaryotes, including green and red algae, do not contain genes encoding proteins with an L-Ala-D/L-Glu_epimerase domain. Homologs of land plant AEE genes were found to only be present in prokaryotes, especially in bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the land plant AEE genes formed a monophyletic group with some bacterial homologs. In addition, land plant AEE proteins showed the highest similarity with these bacterial homologs and shared motifs only conserved in land plant and these bacterial AEEs. Integrated information on the taxonomic distribution, phylogenetic relationships and sequence similarity of the AEE proteins revealed that the land plant AEE genes were acquired from bacteria through an ancient horizontal gene transfer (HGT) event. Further evidence revealed that land plant AEE genes had undergone positive selection and formed the main characteristics of exon/intron structures through gaining some introns during the initially evolutionary period in the ancestor of land plants. Conclusions The results of this study clearly demonstrated that the ancestor of land plants acquired an AEE gene from bacteria via an ancient HGT event. Other findings illustrated that adaptive evolution through positive selection has contributed to the functional adaptation and fixation of this gene in land plants. PMID:23452519

  9. Gas exchange and lung mechanics in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: comparison of three different strategies of positive end expiratory pressure selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Ricardo; Aquino-Esperanza, José; Bonelli, Ignacio; Maskin, Patricio; Setten, Mariano; Danze, Florencia; Attie, Shiry; Rodriguez, Pablo O

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare gas exchange and lung mechanics between different strategies to select positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In 20 consecutive ARDS patients, 3 PEEP selection strategies were evaluated. One strategy was based on oxygenation using the ARDS network PEEP/fraction of inspired oxygen (Fio2) table; and two were based on lung mechanics, either PEEP titrated to reach a plateau pressure of 28 to 30 cm H2O as in the ExPress trial or best respiratory compliance method during a derecruitment maneuver. Gas exchange, airway pressures, stress index (SI), and end-expiratory transpulmonary pressure (P(tpe)) and end-inspiratory transpulmonary pressure (P(tpi)) values were assessed. Data are expressed as median (interquartile range [IQR]). Lower total PEEP levels were observed with the use of the PEEP/Fio2 table (8.7 [6-10] cm H2O); intermediate PEEP levels, with the Best Compliance approach (13.0 [10.2-13.8] cm H2O); and higher PEEP levels, with the ExPress strategy (16.5 [15.0-18.5] cm H2O) (P respiratory compliance approach resulted in better oxygenation levels without risk of overdistension according to SI and P(tpi), achieving a mild risk of lung collapse according to P(tpe). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Survival of the fittest: positive selection of CD4+ T cells expressing a membrane-bound fusion inhibitor following HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Kimpel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Although a variety of genetic strategies have been developed to inhibit HIV replication, few direct comparisons of the efficacy of these inhibitors have been carried out. Moreover, most studies have not examined whether genetic inhibitors are able to induce a survival advantage that results in an expansion of genetically-modified cells following HIV infection. We evaluated the efficacy of three leading genetic strategies to inhibit HIV replication: 1 an HIV-1 tat/rev-specific small hairpin (sh RNA; 2 an RNA antisense gene specific for the HIV-1 envelope; and 3 a viral entry inhibitor, maC46. In stably transduced cell lines selected such that >95% of cells expressed the genetic inhibitor, the RNA antisense envelope and viral entry inhibitor maC46 provided the strongest inhibition of HIV-1 replication. However, when mixed populations of transduced and untransduced cells were challenged with HIV-1, the maC46 fusion inhibitor resulted in highly efficient positive selection of transduced cells, an effect that was evident even in mixed populations containing as few as 1% maC46-expressing cells. The selective advantage of the maC46 fusion inhibitor was also observed in HIV-1-infected cultures of primary T lymphocytes as well as in HIV-1-infected humanized mice. These results demonstrate robust inhibition of HIV replication with the fusion inhibitor maC46 and the antisense Env inhibitor, and importantly, a survival advantage of cells expressing the maC46 fusion inhibitor both in vitro and in vivo. Evaluation of the ability of genetic inhibitors of HIV-1 replication to confer a survival advantage on genetically-modified cells provides unique information not provided by standard techniques that may be important in the in vivo efficacy of these genes.

  11. Weak transitions in lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maturana, G.

    1984-01-01

    Some techniques to calculate the effects of the strong interactions on the matrix elements of weak processes are described. The lattice formulation of Quantum Chromodynamics is used to account for the low energy gluons, and the corresponding numerical methods are explained. The high energy contributions are included in effective lagrangians and the problem of matching the different scales related to the renormalization of the operators and wavefunctions is also discussed. The ..delta..l = 1/2 enhancement rule and the K/sup 0/-anti-K/sup 0/ are used to illustrate these techniques and the results of a numerical calculation is reported. The values obtained are very encouraging and they certainly show good qualitative agreement with the experimental values. The emphasis is on general techniques, and in particular, several improvements to this particular calculation are proposed.

  12. Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Joseph William; Jobstvogt, N.; Böhnke-Henrichs, A.

    2016-01-01

    The ecosystem services concept (ES) is becoming a cornerstone of contemporary sustainability thought. Challenges with this concept and its applications are well documented, but have not yet been systematically assessed alongside strengths and external factors that influence uptake. Such an assess......The ecosystem services concept (ES) is becoming a cornerstone of contemporary sustainability thought. Challenges with this concept and its applications are well documented, but have not yet been systematically assessed alongside strengths and external factors that influence uptake....... Such an assessment could form the basis for improving ES thinking, further embedding it into environmental decisions and management.The Young Ecosystem Services Specialists (YESS) completed a Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats (SWOT) analysis of ES through YESS member surveys. Strengths include the approach...

  13. Lack of experimental evidence to support mcr-1-positive Escherichia coli strain selection during oral administration of colistin at recommended and higher dose given by gavage in weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viel, Alexis; Henri, Jérôme; Perrin-Guyomard, Agnès; Laroche, Julian; Couet, William; Grégoire, Nicolas; Laurentie, Michel

    2017-06-28

    In this study, we assessed the selective effect of colistin administered orally to healthy weaned piglets harbouring an intestinal mcr-1-positive Escherichia coli strain. Maximum recommended dose and a higher dose often used in European pig farms were given by gavage. No selection of the mcr-1-positive strain was observed in our controlled conditions, irrespective of the dose. Further investigations in real farming conditions seem necessary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  14. Weakly time consistent concave valuations and their dual representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, B.; Schumacher, Hans

    We derive dual characterizations of two notions of weak time consistency for concave valuations, which are convex risk measures under a positive sign convention. Combined with a suitable risk aversion property, these notions are shown to amount to three simple rules for not necessarily minimal

  15. Weakly time consistent concave valuations and their dual representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, Berend; Schumacher, Johannes M.

    2016-01-01

    We derive dual characterizations of two notions of weak time consistency for concave valuations, which are convex risk measures under a positive sign convention. Combined with a suitable risk aversion property, these notions are shown to amount to three simple rules for not necessarily minimal

  16. A young woman with weakness of the legs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On neurological examination she had profound bilateral weakness of the lower limbs, hypertonia, hyperreflexia, a positive Babinski sign and a T6 sensory level. Tests for syphilis and HIV and screening for auto-immune conditions were negative. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and spinal cord revealed ...

  17. Fault zone fabric and fault weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collettini, C.; Niemeijer, A.; Viti, C.; Marone, C.

    2009-01-01

    Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that some crustal faults are weak1–6 compared to laboratory measurements of frictional strength7. Explanations for fault weakness include the presence of weak minerals4, high fluid pressures within the fault core8,9 and dynamic processes such as

  18. Weakly distributive modules. Applications to supplement submodules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, we define and study weakly distributive modules as a proper generalization of distributive modules. We prove that, weakly distributive supplemented modules are amply supplemented. In a weakly distributive supplemented module every submodule has a unique coclosure. This generalizes a result of ...

  19. Positive selection and multiple losses of the LINE-1-derived L1TD1 gene in mammals suggest a dual role in genome defense and pluripotency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N McLaughlin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian genomes comprise many active and fossilized retroelements. The obligate requirement for retroelement integration affords host genomes an opportunity to 'domesticate' retroelement genes for their own purpose, leading to important innovations in genome defense and placentation. While many such exaptations involve retroviruses, the L1TD1 gene is the only known domesticated gene whose protein-coding sequence is almost entirely derived from a LINE-1 (L1 retroelement. Human L1TD1 has been shown to play an important role in pluripotency maintenance. To investigate how this role was acquired, we traced the origin and evolution of L1TD1. We find that L1TD1 originated in the common ancestor of eutherian mammals, but was lost or pseudogenized multiple times during mammalian evolution. We also find that L1TD1 has evolved under positive selection during primate and mouse evolution, and that one prosimian L1TD1 has 'replenished' itself with a more recent L1 ORF1 from the prosimian genome. These data suggest that L1TD1 has been recurrently selected for functional novelty, perhaps for a role in genome defense. L1TD1 loss is associated with L1 extinction in several megabat lineages, but not in sigmodontine rodents. We hypothesize that L1TD1 could have originally evolved for genome defense against L1 elements. Later, L1TD1 may have become incorporated into pluripotency maintenance in some lineages. Our study highlights the role of retroelement gene domestication in fundamental aspects of mammalian biology, and that such domesticated genes can adopt different functions in different lineages.

  20. Weak Interaction Studies by Precision Experiments in Nuclear Beta Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severijns, Nathal

    The framework and formalism related to the study of symmetries and the structure of the weak interaction in nuclear -decay are presented and discussed. This is illustrated with a number of selected experiments in nuclear -decay addressing the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, the search for right-handed (V+A), scalar and tensor components in the weak interaction and the search for non-Standard Model sources of time reversal violation. Finally, an outlook is given on important progress in this field that can be expected for the near future.

  1. Weak matrix elements of kaons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C. (California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (USA). Inst. for Theoretical Physics); Soni, A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1989-01-01

    We present results from the Wilson fermion part of the Grand Challenge'' weak matrix element project. A new procedure for correcting the chiral behavior of {Beta}{sub LL}{sup sd}, the K{sup 0}-{bar K}{sup 0} {Beta} parameter,'' is proposed and applied. On our largest lattice (24{sup 3} {times} 40 at {beta} = 6.0), we get {Beta}{sub LL}{sup sd} = .86 {plus minus} .11 {plus minus} .05, where the first error is statistical and the second is a measure of the systematic errors due to the procedure and to related finite-size effects. Results for the direct K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} amplitude are also presented. There is some evidence for higher order chiral effects which may make these results compatible both with experiment and with the {Beta}{sub LL}{sup sd} computation. The status of the direct K{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {pi} {sup +} {pi}{sup {minus}} {Delta}I = 1/2 amplitude is then discussed. 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. A Universe without Weak Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; Perez, Gilad

    2006-04-07

    A universe without weak interactions is constructed that undergoes big-bang nucleosynthesis, matter domination, structure formation, and star formation. The stars in this universe are able to burn for billions of years, synthesize elements up to iron, and undergo supernova explosions, dispersing heavy elements into the interstellar medium. These definitive claims are supported by a detailed analysis where this hypothetical ''Weakless Universe'' is matched to our Universe by simultaneously adjusting Standard Model and cosmological parameters. For instance, chemistry and nuclear physics are essentially unchanged. The apparent habitability of the Weakless Universe suggests that the anthropic principle does not determine the scale of electroweak breaking, or even require that it be smaller than the Planck scale, so long as technically natural parameters may be suitably adjusted. Whether the multi-parameter adjustment is realized or probable is dependent on the ultraviolet completion, such as the string landscape. Considering a similar analysis for the cosmological constant, however, we argue that no adjustments of other parameters are able to allow the cosmological constant to raise up even remotely close to the Planck scale while obtaining macroscopic structure. The fine-tuning problems associated with the electroweak breaking scale and the cosmological constant therefore appear to be qualitatively different from the perspective of obtaining a habitable universe.

  3. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors suppress the AR-V7-mediated transcription and selectively inhibit cell growth in AR-V7-positive prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Daisuke; Koyama, Ryokichi; Nakayama, Kazuhide; Kitazawa, Satoshi; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Hara, Takahito

    2017-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that androgen receptor (AR) splice variants, including AR-V7, play a pivotal role in resistance to androgen blockade in prostate cancer treatment. The development of new therapeutic agents that can suppress the transcriptional activities of AR splice variants has been anticipated as the next generation treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. High-throughput screening of AR-V7 signaling inhibitors was performed using an AR-V7 reporter system. The effects of a glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) inhibitor, LY-2090314, on endogenous AR-V7 signaling were evaluated in an AR-V7-positive cell line, JDCaP-hr, by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The relationship between AR-V7 signaling and β-catenin signaling was assessed using RNA interference. The effect of LY-2090314 on cell growth in various prostate cancer cell lines was also evaluated. We identified GSK3 inhibitors as transcriptional suppressors of AR-V7 using a high-throughput screen with an AR-V7 reporter system. LY-2090314 suppressed the reporter activity and endogenous AR-V7 activity in JDCaP-hr cells. Because silencing of β-catenin partly rescued the suppression, it was evident that the suppression was mediated, at least partially, via the activation of β-catenin signaling. AR-V7 signaling and β-catenin signaling reciprocally regulate each other in JDCaP-hr cells, and therefore, GSK3 inhibition can repress AR-V7 transcriptional activity by accumulating intracellular β-catenin. Notably, LY-2090314 selectively inhibited the growth of AR-V7-positive prostate cancer cells in vitro. Our findings demonstrate the potential of GSK3 inhibitors in treating advanced prostate cancer driven by AR splice variants. In vivo evaluation of AR splice variant-positive prostate cancer models will help illustrate the overall significance of GSK3 inhibitors in treating prostate cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Evolution of type 2 vaccine derived poliovirus lineages. Evidence for codon-specific positive selection at three distinct locations on capsid wall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapani Hovi

    Full Text Available Partial sequences of 110 type 2 poliovirus strains isolated from sewage in Slovakia in 2003-2005, and most probably originating from a single dose of oral poliovirus vaccine, were subjected to a detailed genetic analysis. Evolutionary patterns of these vaccine derived poliovirus strains (SVK-aVDPV2 were compared to those of type 1 and type 3 wild poliovirus (WPV lineages considered to have a single seed strain origin, respectively. The 102 unique SVK-aVDPV VP1 sequences were monophyletic differing from that of the most likely parental poliovirus type 2/Sabin (PV2 Sabin by 12.5-15.6%. Judging from this difference and from the rate of accumulation of synonymous transversions during the 22 month observation period, the relevant oral poliovirus vaccine dose had been administered to an unknown recipient more than 12 years earlier. The patterns of nucleotide substitution during the observation period differed from those found in the studied lineages of WPV1 or 3, including a lower transition/transversion (Ts/Tv bias and strikingly lower Ts/Tv rate ratios at the 2(nd codon position for both purines and pyrimidines. A relatively low preference of transitions at the 2(nd codon position was also found in the large set of VP1 sequences of Nigerian circulating (cVDPV2, as well as in the smaller sets from the Hispaniola cVDPV1 and Egypt cVDPV2 outbreaks, and among aVDPV1and aVDPV2 strains recently isolated from sewage in Finland. Codon-wise analysis of synonymous versus non-synonymous substitution rates in the VP1 sequences suggested that in five codons, those coding for amino acids at sites 24, 144, 147, 221 and 222, there may have been positive selection during the observation period. We conclude that pattern of poliovirus VP1 evolution in prolonged infection may differ from that found in WPV epidemics. Further studies on sufficiently large independent datasets are needed to confirm this suggestion and to reveal its potential significance.

  5. Research on diversity receive technology for wireless optical communication using PPM in weak turbulence atmosphere channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Guo-an

    2014-09-01

    In order to mitigate atmospheric turbulence, the free space optical (FSO) system model with spatial diversity is analyzed based on intensity detection pulse position modulation (PPM) in the weak turbulence atmosphere. The slot error rate (SER) calculating formula of the system without diversity is derived under pulse position modulation firstly. Then as a benchmark, independent of identical distribution, the average slot error rates of the three linear combining technologies, which are the maximal ratio combining (MRC), equal gain combining (EGC) and selection combining (SelC), are compared. Simulation results show that the performance of system is the best improved by MRC, followed by EGC, and is poor by SelC, but SelC is simpler and more convenient. Spatial diversity is efficient to improve the performance and has strong ability on resistance to atmospheric channel decline. The above scheme is more suitable for optical wireless communication systems.

  6. Protecting weak measurements against systematic errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shengshi; Alonso, Jose Raul Gonzalez; Brun, Todd A.; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we consider the systematic error of quantum metrology by weak measurements under decoherence. We derive the systematic error of maximum likelihood estimation in general to the first-order approximation of a small deviation in the probability distribution and study the robustness of standard weak measurement and postselected weak measurements against systematic errors. We show that, with a large weak value, the systematic error of a postselected weak measurement when the probe undergoes decoherence can be significantly lower than that of a standard weak measurement. This indicates another advantage of weak-value amplification in improving the performance of parameter estimation. We illustrate the results by an exact numerical simulation of decoherence arising from a bosonic mode and compare it to the first-order analytical result we obtain.

  7. An intriguing shift occurs in the novel protein phosphatase 1 binding partner, TCTEX1D4: evidence of positive selection in a pika model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Korrodi-Gregório

    Full Text Available T-complex testis expressed protein 1 domain containing 4 (TCTEX1D4 contains the canonical phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 (PPP1 binding motif, composed by the amino acid sequence RVSF. We identified and validated the binding of TCTEX1D4 to PPP1 and demonstrated that indeed this protein is a novel PPP1 interacting protein. Analyses of twenty-one mammalian species available in public databases and seven Lagomorpha sequences obtained in this work showed that the PPP1 binding motif 90RVSF93 is present in all of them and is flanked by a palindromic sequence, PLGS, except in three species of pikas (Ochotona princeps, O. dauurica and O. pusilla. Furthermore, for the Ochotona species an extra glycosylation site, motif 96NLS98, and the loss of the palindromic sequence were observed. Comparison with other lagomorphs suggests that this event happened before the Ochotona radiation. The dN/dS for the sequence region comprising the PPP1 binding motif and the flanking palindrome highly supports the hypothesis that for Ochotona species this region has been evolving under positive selection. In addition, mutational screening shows that the ability of pikas TCTEX1D4 to bind to PPP1 is maintained, although the PPP1 binding motif is disrupted, and the N- and C-terminal surrounding residues are also abrogated. These observations suggest pika as an ideal model to study novel PPP1 complexes regulatory mechanisms.

  8. Selective photochemical synthesis of Ag nanoparticles on position-controlled ZnO nanorods for the enhancement of yellow-green light emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeong-Ho; Zhang, Xin; Lee, Keun Woo; Sohn, Ahrum; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Joondong; Song, Jin-Won; Choi, Young Su; Lee, Hee Kwan; Jung, Sang Hyun; Lee, In-Geun; Cho, Young-Dae; Shin, Hyun-Beom; Sung, Ho Kun; Park, Kyung Ho; Kang, Ho Kwan; Park, Won-Kyu; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2015-12-28

    A novel technique for the selective photochemical synthesis of silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) on ZnO nanorod arrays is established by combining ultraviolet-assisted nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) for the definition of growth sites, hydrothermal reaction for the position-controlled growth of ZnO nanorods, and photochemical reduction for the decoration of Ag NPs on the ZnO nanorods. During photochemical reduction, the size distribution and loading of Ag NPs on ZnO nanorods can be tuned by varying the UV-irradiation time. The photochemical reduction is hypothesized to facilitate the adsorbed citrate ions on the surface of ZnO, allowing Ag ions to preferentially form Ag NPs on ZnO nanorods. The ratio of visible emission to ultraviolet (UV) emission for the Ag NP-decorated ZnO nanorod arrays, synthesized for 30 min, is 20.5 times that for the ZnO nanorod arrays without Ag NPs. The enhancement of the visible emission is believed to associate with the surface plasmon (SP) effect of Ag NPs. The Ag NP-decorated ZnO nanorod arrays show significant SP-induced enhancement of yellow-green light emission, which could be useful in optoelectronic applications. The technique developed here requires low processing temperatures (120 °C and lower) and no high-vacuum deposition tools, suitable for applications such as flexible electronics.

  9. Competition among networks highlights the power of the weak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranzo, Jaime; Buldú, Javier M.; Aguirre, Jacobo

    2016-11-01

    The unpreventable connections between real networked systems have recently called for an examination of percolation, diffusion or synchronization phenomena in multilayer networks. Here we use network science and game theory to explore interactions in networks-of-networks and model these as a game for gaining importance. We propose a viewpoint where networks choose the connection strategies, in contrast with classical approaches where nodes are the active players. Specifically, we investigate how creating paths between networks leads to different Nash equilibria that determine their structural and dynamical properties. In a wide variety of cases, selecting adequate connections leads to a cooperative solution that allows weak networks to overcome the strongest opponent. Counterintuitively, each weak network can induce a global transition to such cooperative configuration regardless of the actions of the strongest network. This power of the weak reveals a critical dominance of the underdogs in the fate of networks-of-networks.

  10. Molecular imprinting sensor based on quantum weak measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongmei; He, Qinghua; He, Yonghong; Xin, Meiguo; Zhang, Yilong; Shen, Zhiyuan

    2017-08-15

    A new type of sensing protocol, based on a high precision metrology of quantum weak measurement, was first proposed for molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) sensor. The feasibility, sensitivity and selectivity of weak measurement based MIP (WMMIP) sensor were experimentally demonstrated with bovine serum albumin (BSA). Weak measurement system exhibits high sensitivity to the optical phase shift corresponding to the refractive index change, which is induced by the specific capture of target protein molecules with its recognition sites. The recognition process can be finally characterized by the central wavelength shift of output spectra through weak value amplification. In our experiment, we prepared BSA@MIP with modified reversed-phase microemulsion method, and coated it on the internal surface of measuring channels assembled into the Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer based optical weak measurement system. The design of this home-built optical system makes it possible to detect analyte in real time. The dynamic process of the specific adsorption and concentration response to BSA from 5×10-4 to 5×10-1μg/L was achieved with a limit of detection (LOD) of 8.01×10-12g/L. This WMMIP shows superiority in accuracy, fast response and low cost. Furthermore, real-time monitoring system can creatively promote the performance of MIP in molecular analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Phytoplankton Richness on Phytoplankton Biomass Is Weak Where the Distribution of Herbivores is Patchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Jerome J

    2016-01-01

    Positive effects of competitor species richness on competitor productivity can be more pronounced at a scale that includes heterogeneity in 'bottom-up' environmental factors, such as the supply of limiting nutrients. The effect of species richness is not well understood in landscapes where variation in 'top-down' factors, such as the abundance of predators or herbivores, has a strong influence competitor communities. I asked how phytoplankton species richness directly influenced standing phytoplankton biomass in replicate microcosm regions where one patch had a population of herbivores (Daphnia pulicaria) and one patch did not have herbivores. The effect of phytoplankton richness on standing phytoplankton biomass was positive but weak and not statistically significant at this regional scale. Among no-Daphnia patches, there was a significant positive effect of phytoplankton richness that resulted from positive selection effects for two dominant and productive species in polycultures. Among with-Daphnia patches there was not a significant effect of phytoplankton richness. The same two species dominated species-rich polycultures in no- and with-Daphnia patches but both species were relatively vulnerable to consumption by Daphnia. Consistent with previous studies, this experiment shows a measurable positive influence of primary producer richness on biomass when herbivores were absent. It also shows that given the patchy distribution of herbivores at a regional scale, a regional positive effect was not detected.

  12. How the Weak Variance of Momentum Can Turn Out to be Negative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyereisen, M. R.

    2015-05-01

    Weak values are average quantities, therefore investigating their associated variance is crucial in understanding their place in quantum mechanics. We develop the concept of a position-postselected weak variance of momentum as cohesively as possible, building primarily on material from Moyal (Mathematical Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1949) and Sonego (Found Phys 21(10):1135, 1991) . The weak variance is defined in terms of the Wigner function, using a standard construction from probability theory. We show this corresponds to a measurable quantity, which is not itself a weak value. It also leads naturally to a connection between the imaginary part of the weak value of momentum and the quantum potential. We study how the negativity of the Wigner function causes negative weak variances, and the implications this has on a class of `subquantum' theories. We also discuss the role of weak variances in studying determinism, deriving the classical limit from a variational principle.

  13. Selective photochemical synthesis of Ag nanoparticles on position-controlled ZnO nanorods for the enhancement of yellow-green light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeong-Ho; Zhang, Xin; Lee, Keun Woo; Sohn, Ahrum; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Joondong; Song, Jin-Won; Choi, Young Su; Lee, Hee Kwan; Jung, Sang Hyun; Lee, In-Geun; Cho, Young-Dae; Shin, Hyun-Beom; Sung, Ho Kun; Park, Kyung Ho; Kang, Ho Kwan; Park, Won-Kyu; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2015-12-01

    A novel technique for the selective photochemical synthesis of silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) on ZnO nanorod arrays is established by combining ultraviolet-assisted nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) for the definition of growth sites, hydrothermal reaction for the position-controlled growth of ZnO nanorods, and photochemical reduction for the decoration of Ag NPs on the ZnO nanorods. During photochemical reduction, the size distribution and loading of Ag NPs on ZnO nanorods can be tuned by varying the UV-irradiation time. The photochemical reduction is hypothesized to facilitate the adsorbed citrate ions on the surface of ZnO, allowing Ag ions to preferentially form Ag NPs on ZnO nanorods. The ratio of visible emission to ultraviolet (UV) emission for the Ag NP-decorated ZnO nanorod arrays, synthesized for 30 min, is 20.5 times that for the ZnO nanorod arrays without Ag NPs. The enhancement of the visible emission is believed to associate with the surface plasmon (SP) effect of Ag NPs. The Ag NP-decorated ZnO nanorod arrays show significant SP-induced enhancement of yellow-green light emission, which could be useful in optoelectronic applications. The technique developed here requires low processing temperatures (120 °C and lower) and no high-vacuum deposition tools, suitable for applications such as flexible electronics.A novel technique for the selective photochemical synthesis of silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) on ZnO nanorod arrays is established by combining ultraviolet-assisted nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) for the definition of growth sites, hydrothermal reaction for the position-controlled growth of ZnO nanorods, and photochemical reduction for the decoration of Ag NPs on the ZnO nanorods. During photochemical reduction, the size distribution and loading of Ag NPs on ZnO nanorods can be tuned by varying the UV-irradiation time. The photochemical reduction is hypothesized to facilitate the adsorbed citrate ions on the surface of ZnO, allowing Ag ions to

  14. A functional ABCA1 gene variant is associated with low HDL-cholesterol levels and shows evidence of positive selection in Native Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Flores-Dorantes, Teresa; Kruit, Janine K.; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Hünemeier, Tábita; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Ortiz-López, Ma Guadalupe; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; León-Mimila, Paola; Villalobos-Comparan, Marisela; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Ramírez-Jiménez, Salvador; Sikora, Martin; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Pape, Terry D.; de Ángeles Granados-Silvestre, Ma; Montufar-Robles, Isela; Tito-Alvarez, Ana M.; Zurita-Salinas, Camilo; Bustos-Arriaga, José; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Gómez-Trejo, Celta; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Vieira-Filho, Joao P.; Granados, Julio; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Huertas-Vázquez, Adriana; González-Martín, Antonio; Gorostiza, Amaya; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Wang, Li; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Lisker, Ruben; Moises, Regina S.; Menjivar, Marta; Salzano, Francisco M.; Knowler, William C.; Bortolini, M. Cátira; Hayden, Michael R.; Baier, Leslie J.; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that the higher susceptibility of Hispanics to metabolic disease is related to their Native American heritage. A frequent cholesterol transporter ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) gene variant (R230C, rs9282541) apparently exclusive to Native American individuals was associated with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, obesity and type 2 diabetes in Mexican Mestizos. We performed a more extensive analysis of this variant in 4405 Native Americans and 863 individuals from other ethnic groups to investigate genetic evidence of positive selection, to assess its functional effect in vitro and to explore associations with HDL-C levels and other metabolic traits. The C230 allele was found in 29 of 36 Native American groups, but not in European, Asian or African individuals. C230 was observed on a single haplotype, and C230-bearing chromosomes showed longer relative haplotype extension compared with other haplotypes in the Americas. Additionally, single-nucleotide polymorphism data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel Native American populations were enriched in significant integrated haplotype score values in the region upstream of the ABCA1 gene. Cells expressing the C230 allele showed a 27% cholesterol efflux reduction (P< 0.001), confirming this variant has a functional effect in vitro. Moreover, the C230 allele was associated with lower HDL-C levels (P = 1.77 × 10−11) and with higher body mass index (P = 0.0001) in the combined analysis of Native American populations. This is the first report of a common functional variant exclusive to Native American and descent populations, which is a major determinant of HDL-C levels and may have contributed to the adaptive evolution of Native American populations. PMID:20418488

  15. The loss of the hemoglobin H2S-binding function in annelids from sulfide-free habitats reveals molecular adaptation driven by Darwinian positive selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Xavier; Leroy, Riwanon; Carney, Susan; Collin, Olivier; Zal, Franck; Toulmond, André; Jollivet, Didier

    2003-01-01

    The hemoglobin of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent vestimentiferan Riftia pachyptila (annelid) is able to bind toxic hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to free cysteine residues and to transport it to fuel endosymbiotic sulfide-oxidising bacteria. The cysteine residues are conserved key amino acids in annelid globins living in sulfide-rich environments, but are absent in annelid globins from sulfide-free environments. Synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution analysis from two different sets of orthologous annelid globin genes from sulfide rich and sulfide free environments have been performed to understand how the sulfide-binding function of hemoglobin appeared and has been maintained during the course of evolution. This study reveals that the sites occupied by free-cysteine residues in annelids living in sulfide-rich environments and occupied by other amino acids in annelids from sulfide-free environments, have undergone positive selection in annelids from sulfide-free environments. We assumed that the high reactivity of cysteine residues became a disadvantage when H2S disappeared because free cysteines without their natural ligand had the capacity to interact with other blood components, disturb homeostasis, reduce fitness and thus could have been counterselected. To our knowledge, we pointed out for the first time a case of function loss driven by molecular adaptation rather than genetic drift. If constraint relaxation (H2S disappearance) led to the loss of the sulfide-binding function in modern annelids from sulfide-free environments, our work suggests that adaptation to sulfide-rich environments is a plesiomorphic feature, and thus that the annelid ancestor could have emerged in a sulfide-rich environment. PMID:12721359

  16. Spin effects in the weak interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, S.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA) Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Dept. of Physics Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-01-01

    Modern experiments investigating the beta decay of the neutron and light nuclei are still providing important constraints on the theory of the weak interaction. Beta decay experiments are yielding more precise values for allowed and induced weak coupling constants and putting constraints on possible extensions to the standard electroweak model. Here we emphasize the implications of recent experiments to pin down the strengths of the weak vector and axial vector couplings of the nucleon.

  17. Weak isometries of the Boolean cube

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, S De; Korb, M

    2014-01-01

    Consider the metric space $\\mathcal{C}$ consisting of the $n$-dimensional Boolean cube equipped with the Hamming distance. A weak isometry of $\\mathcal{C}$ is a permutation of $\\mathcal{C}$ preserving a given subset of Hamming distances. In \\cite{Krasin} Krasin showed that in most cases preserving a single Hamming distance forces a weak isometry to be an isometry. In this article we study those weak isometries that are not automatically an isometry, providing a complete classification of weak...

  18. Radiolabeled high affinity peptidomimetic antagonist selectively targets {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} receptor-positive tumor in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Beom-Su [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Lim, Esther [Department of Radiology, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Hee Park, Seung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Shin, In Soo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Danthi, S. Narasimhan [Department of Radiology, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Hwang, In Sook [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Le, Nhat [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Yu, Sarah [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Xie Jianwu [Department of Radiology, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Li, King C.P. [Department of Radiology, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Carrasquillo, Jorge A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Paik, Chang H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)]. E-mail: cpaik@mail.nih.gov

    2007-05-15

    Objectives: The aim of this research was to synthesize radiolabeled peptidomimetic integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} antagonists that selectively target integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} receptor and clear rapidly from the whole body. Methods: Integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} antagonists, 4-[2-(3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine-2-ylamino) ethyloxy]benzoyl-2-(S)-aminoethylsulfonyl-amino-{beta}-alanine (IA) and 4-[2-(3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-pyrimidin-2-ylamino)-ethyloxy]benzoyl-2-(S)-[N- (3-amino-neopenta-1-carbamyl)]-aminoethylsulfonylamino-{beta}-alanine hydrochloride (IAC), a hydrophobic carbamate derivative of IA, were conjugated with 2-p-isothiocyanatobenzyl-DOTA at the amino terminus and labeled with {sup 111}In. The {sup 111}In labeled IA and IAC were subjected to in vitro receptor binding, biodistribution and imaging studies using nude mice bearing the receptor-positive M21 human melanoma xenografts. Results: The {sup 111}In-labeled IA (40%) and -IAC (72%) specifically bound in vitro to {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} (0.8 {mu}M) at a molar excess. This receptor binding was completely blocked by a molar excess of cold IA to {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}. The higher receptor-binding affinity of the {sup 111}In-labeled IAC was reflected in higher tumor uptake and retention: 5.6{+-}1.4 and 4.5{+-}0.7 %ID/g vs. 3.8{+-}0.9 and 2.0{+-}0.3 %ID/g for the {sup 111}In-labeled IA at 0.33 and 2 h. The tumor uptakes were inhibited by the co-injection of 200 {mu}g of IA, indicating that the uptake was receptor mediated. These antagonists were excreted primarily via the renal system. The {sup 111}In activity retained in the whole body was quite comparable between the {sup 111}In-labeled IA (24% ID) and the {sup 111}In-labeled IAC (33% ID) at 2 h. The higher peak tumor uptake and longer retention resulted in higher tumor-to-background ratios for the {sup 111}In-labeled IAC at 2 h with 9.7, 2.3, 0.8, 1.9, 7.1, 2.2, 0.9, 3.7 and 9.9 for blood, liver, kidney, lung, heart, stomach

  19. Topic Detection Based on Weak Tie Analysis: A Case Study of LIS Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Based on the weak tie theory, this paper proposes a series of connection indicators of weak tie subnets and weak tie nodes to detect research topics, recognize their connections, and understand their evolution. Design/methodology/approach: First, keywords are extracted from article titles and preprocessed. Second, high-frequency keywords are selected to generate weak tie co-occurrence networks. By removing the internal lines of clustered sub-topic networks, we focus on the analysis of weak tie subnets' composition and functions and the weak tie nodes' roles. Findings: The research topics' clusters and themes changed yearly; the subnets clustered with technique-related and methodology-related topics have been the core, important subnets for years; while close subnets are highly independent, research topics are generally concentrated and most topics are application-related; the roles and functions of nodes and weak ties are diversified. Research limitations: The parameter values are somewhat inconsistent; the weak tie subnets and nodes are classified based on empirical observations, and the conclusions are not verified or compared to other methods. Practical implications: The research is valuable for detecting important research topics as well as their roles, interrelations, and evolution trends. Originality/value: To contribute to the strength of weak tie theory, the research translates weak and strong ties concepts to co-occurrence strength, and analyzes weak ties' functions. Also, the research proposes a quantitative method to classify and measure the topics' clusters and nodes.

  20. Cognitive-Processing Bias in Chinese Student Teachers with Strong and Weak Professional Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Qiang; Zhu, Jun-Cheng; Liu, Lu; Chen, Xiang-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Professional identity plays an important role in career development. Although many studies have examined professional identity, differences in cognitive-processing biases between Chinese student teachers with strong and weak professional identity are poorly understood. The current study adopted Tversky's social-cognitive experimental paradigm to explore cognitive-processing biases in Chinese student teachers with strong and weak professional identity. Experiment 1 showed that participants with strong professional identity exhibited stronger positive-coding bias toward positive profession-related life events, relative to that observed in those with weak professional identity. Experiment 2 showed that participants with strong professional identity exhibited greater recognition bias for previously read items, relative to that observed in those with weak professional identity. Overall, the results suggested that participants with strong professional identity exhibited greater positive cognitive-processing bias relative to that observed in those with weak professional identity.

  1. Cognitive-Processing Bias in Chinese Student Teachers with Strong and Weak Professional Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-qiang; Zhu, Jun-cheng; Liu, Lu; Chen, Xiang-yu

    2017-01-01

    Professional identity plays an important role in career development. Although many studies have examined professional identity, differences in cognitive-processing biases between Chinese student teachers with strong and weak professional identity are poorly understood. The current study adopted Tversky’s social-cognitive experimental paradigm to explore cognitive-processing biases in Chinese student teachers with strong and weak professional identity. Experiment 1 showed that participants with strong professional identity exhibited stronger positive-coding bias toward positive profession-related life events, relative to that observed in those with weak professional identity. Experiment 2 showed that participants with strong professional identity exhibited greater recognition bias for previously read items, relative to that observed in those with weak professional identity. Overall, the results suggested that participants with strong professional identity exhibited greater positive cognitive-processing bias relative to that observed in those with weak professional identity. PMID:28555123

  2. The future of Jungian analysis: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats ('SWOT').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    Using a methodology derived from management and organizational studies, the author reviews the future of Jungian analysis. The methodology is termed SWOT - strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats. A selected list in each of these categories is presented. The author is transparent in allowing for the fact that the paper not only derives from a public lecture on the topic, but also retains the immediacy and the contrarian and opinionated style of such a lecture. © 2017, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  3. A classification of weakly acyclic games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apt, K.R.; Simon, S.

    2012-01-01

    Weakly acyclic games form a natural generalization of the class of games that have the finite improvement property (FIP). In such games one stipulates that from any initial joint strategy some finite improvement path exists. We classify weakly acyclic games using the concept of a scheduler recently

  4. Revisiting Weak Simulation for Substochastic Markov Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, David N.; Song, Lei; Zhang, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum of branching-time relations for probabilistic systems has been investigated thoroughly by Baier, Hermanns, Katoen and Wolf (2003, 2005), including weak simulation for systems involving substochastic distributions. Weak simulation was proven to be sound w.r.t. the liveness fragment...

  5. A note on Weak Stability Boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    García González, Fernando; Gómez Muntané, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    This paper is devoted to clarify the algorithmic definition of the weak stability boundary in the framework of the planar Restricted Three Body Problem. The role of the invariant hyperbolic manifolds associated to the central manifolds of the libration points L1 and L2, as boundary of the weak stability region, is shown Peer Reviewed

  6. CP Violation, Neutral Currents, and Weak Equivalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, V. L.

    1972-03-23

    Within the past few months two excellent summaries of the state of our knowledge of the weak interactions have been presented. Correspondingly, we will not attempt a comprehensive review but instead concentrate this discussion on the status of CP violation, the question of the neutral currents, and the weak equivalence principle.

  7. Spin Seebeck effect in a weak ferromagnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arboleda, Juan David, E-mail: juan.arboledaj@udea.edu.co; Arnache Olmos, Oscar [Instituto de Física, Universidad de Antioquia, A.A. 1226, Medellín (Colombia); Aguirre, Myriam Haydee; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Ramos, Rafael [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Spin Quantum Rectification Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Anadon, Alberto [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2016-06-06

    We report the observation of room temperature spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in a weak ferromagnetic normal spinel Zinc Ferrite (ZFO). Despite the weak ferromagnetic behavior, the measurements of the SSE in ZFO show a thermoelectric voltage response comparable with the reported values for other ferromagnetic materials. Our results suggest that SSE might possibly originate from the surface magnetization of the ZFO.

  8. On modeling weak sinks in MODPATH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Daniel B.; Haitjema, Henk; Kauffman, Leon J.

    2012-01-01

    Regional groundwater flow systems often contain both strong sinks and weak sinks. A strong sink extracts water from the entire aquifer depth, while a weak sink lets some water pass underneath or over the actual sink. The numerical groundwater flow model MODFLOW may allow a sink cell to act as a strong or weak sink, hence extracting all water that enters the cell or allowing some of that water to pass. A physical strong sink can be modeled by either a strong sink cell or a weak sink cell, with the latter generally occurring in low resolution models. Likewise, a physical weak sink may also be represented by either type of sink cell. The representation of weak sinks in the particle tracing code MODPATH is more equivocal than in MODFLOW. With the appropriate parameterization of MODPATH, particle traces and their associated travel times to weak sink streams can be modeled with adequate accuracy, even in single layer models. Weak sink well cells, on the other hand, require special measures as proposed in the literature to generate correct particle traces and individual travel times and hence capture zones. We found that the transit time distributions for well water generally do not require special measures provided aquifer properties are locally homogeneous and the well draws water from the entire aquifer depth, an important observation for determining the response of a well to non-point contaminant inputs.

  9. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, J.; Hermans, G.

    2017-01-01

    When critically ill, a severe weakness of the limbs and respiratory muscles often develops with a prolonged stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), a condition vaguely termed intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW). Many of these patients have serious nerve and muscle injury. This syndrome is

  10. Acceptability of lifelong treatment among HIV-positive pregnant and breastfeeding women (Option B+) in selected health facilities in Zimbabwe: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadambuka, Addmore; Katirayi, Leila; Muchedzi, Auxilia; Tumbare, Esther; Musarandega, Reuben; Mahomva, Agnes I; Woelk, Godfrey

    2017-07-25

    Zimbabwe's Ministry of Health and Child Care (MOHCC) adopted 2013 World Health Organization (WHO) prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) guidelines recommending initiation of HIV-positive pregnant and breastfeeding women (PPBW) on lifelong antiretroviral treatment (ART) irrespective of clinical stage (Option B+). Option B+ was officially launched in Zimbabwe in November 2013; however the acceptability of life-long ART and its potential uptake among women was not known. A qualitative study was conducted at selected sites in Harare (urban) and Zvimba (rural) to explore Option B+ acceptability; barriers, and facilitators to ART adherence and service uptake. In-depth interviews (IDIs), focus group discussions (FGDs) and key informant interviews (KIIs) were conducted with PPBW, healthcare providers, and community members. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated; data were coded and analyzed in MaxQDA v10. Forty-three IDIs, 22 FGDs, and five KIIs were conducted. The majority of women accepted lifelong ART. There was however, a fear of commitment to taking lifelong medication because they were afraid of defaulting, especially after cessation of breastfeeding. There was confusion around dosage; and fear of side effects, not having enough food to take drugs, and the lack of opportunities to ask questions in counseling. Participants reported the need for strengthening community sensitization for Option B+. Facilitators included receiving a simplified pill regimen; ability to continue breastfeeding beyond 6 months like HIV-negative women; and partner, community and health worker support. Barriers included distance of health facility, non-disclosure of HIV status, poor male partner support and knowing someone who had negative experience on ART. This study found that Option B+ is generally accepted among PPBW as a means to strengthen their health and protect their babies. Consistent with previous literature, this study demonstrated the

  11. Acceptability of lifelong treatment among HIV-positive pregnant and breastfeeding women (Option B+ in selected health facilities in Zimbabwe: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addmore Chadambuka

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zimbabwe’s Ministry of Health and Child Care (MOHCC adopted 2013 World Health Organization (WHO prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT guidelines recommending initiation of HIV-positive pregnant and breastfeeding women (PPBW on lifelong antiretroviral treatment (ART irrespective of clinical stage (Option B+. Option B+ was officially launched in Zimbabwe in November 2013; however the acceptability of life-long ART and its potential uptake among women was not known. Methods A qualitative study was conducted at selected sites in Harare (urban and Zvimba (rural to explore Option B+ acceptability; barriers, and facilitators to ART adherence and service uptake. In-depth interviews (IDIs, focus group discussions (FGDs and key informant interviews (KIIs were conducted with PPBW, healthcare providers, and community members. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated; data were coded and analyzed in MaxQDA v10. Results Forty-three IDIs, 22 FGDs, and five KIIs were conducted. The majority of women accepted lifelong ART. There was however, a fear of commitment to taking lifelong medication because they were afraid of defaulting, especially after cessation of breastfeeding. There was confusion around dosage; and fear of side effects, not having enough food to take drugs, and the lack of opportunities to ask questions in counseling. Participants reported the need for strengthening community sensitization for Option B+. Facilitators included receiving a simplified pill regimen; ability to continue breastfeeding beyond 6 months like HIV-negative women; and partner, community and health worker support. Barriers included distance of health facility, non-disclosure of HIV status, poor male partner support and knowing someone who had negative experience on ART. Conclusions This study found that Option B+ is generally accepted among PPBW as a means to strengthen their health and protect their babies

  12. Persisting weakness after withdrawal of a statin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mygland, Åse; Ljøstad, Unn; Krossnes, Bård Kronen

    2014-04-08

    An 81-year-old woman treated with simvastatin for several years followed by atorvastatin for about 1 year presented with fatigue, weakness and unsteady gait. The finding of elevated creatine kinase (CK) and symmetric muscle weakness around shoulders and hips led to suspicion of a toxic statin-associated myopathy. Atorvastatin was withdrawn, but her weakness persisted. Owing to persisting weakness, an autoimmune myopathy (myositis) was suspected, but initially disregarded since a muscle biopsy showed necrotic muscle fibres without inflammatory cell infiltrates and myositis-specific autoantibodies were absent. After 18 months with slowly progressive weakness and increasing CK values, awareness of new knowledge about autoimmunity as a cause of necrotic myopathy, led to a successful treatment trial with intravenous immunoglobulines, followed by steroids and metothrexate. Antibodies to the target enzyme of statins (HMGCR (3-hydroksy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase)) were detected in her serum, and she was diagnosed with autoimmune necrotic myositis probably triggered by atorvastatin.

  13. Demand effects on positive response distortion by police officer applicants on the Revised NEO Personality Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detrick, Paul; Chibnall, John T; Call, Cynthia

    2010-09-01

    Understanding and detecting response distortion is important in the high-demand circumstances of personnel selection. In this article, we describe positive response distortion on the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO PI-R; Costa & McCrae, 1992) among police officer applicants under high and low demand conditions. Positive response distortion primarily reflected denial/minimization of Neuroticism and accentuation of traits associated with moralistic bias (Agreeableness and Conscientiousness). Validity of the NEO PI-R research validity scale, Positive Presentation Management, was weakly supported with respect to the Neuroticism domain only. Results will be useful in interpreting personality inventory results in the police personnel selection process.

  14. The weak spots in contemporary science (and how to fix them)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wicherts, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this review, the author discusses several of the weak spots in contemporary science, including scientific misconduct, the problems of post hoc hypothesizing (HARKing), outcome switching, theoretical bloopers in formulating research questions and hypotheses, selective reading of the literature,

  15. Cosmic Divergence, Weak Cosmic Convergence, and Fixed Points at Infinity

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Ernest K.

    2017-01-01

    To characterize the asymptotic behavior of fixed-point iterations of non-expansive operators with no fixed points, Bauschke et al. [Fixed Point Theory Appl. (2016)] recently studied cosmic convergence and conjectured that cosmic convergence always holds. This paper presents a cosmically divergent counter example, which disproves this conjecture. This paper also demonstrates, with a counter example, that cosmic convergence can be weak in infinite dimensions. Finally, this paper shows positive ...

  16. Weak Solution and Weakly Uniformly Bounded Solution of Impulsive Heat Equations Containing “Maximum” Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Oyelami, Benjamin Oyediran

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, criteria for the existence of weak solutions and uniformly weak bounded solution of impulsive heat equation containing maximum temperature are investigated and results obtained. An example is given for heat flow system with impulsive temperature using maximum temperature simulator and criteria for the uniformly weak bounded of solutions of the system are obtained.

  17. Weak Solution and Weakly Uniformly Bounded Solution of Impulsive Heat Equations Containing “Maximum” Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyelami, Benjamin Oyediran

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, criteria for the existence of weak solutions and uniformly weak bounded solution of impulsive heat equation containing maximum temperature are investigated and results obtained. An example is given for heat flow system with impulsive temperature using maximum temperature simulator and criteria for the uniformly weak bounded of solutions of the system are obtained.

  18. Formation flying design and applications in weak stability boundary regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folta, David

    2004-05-01

    Weak stability regions serve as superior locations for interferomertric scientific investigations. These regions are often selected to minimize environmental disturbances and maximize observation efficiency. Designs of formations in these regions are becoming ever more challenging as more complex missions are envisioned. The development of algorithms to enable the capability for formation design must be further enabled to incorporate better understanding of weak stability boundary solution space. This development will improve the efficiency and expand the capabilities of current approaches. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is currently supporting multiple formation missions in weak stability boundary regions. This end-to-end support consists of mission operations, trajectory design, and control. It also includes both algorithm and software development. The Constellation-X, Maxim, and Stellar Imager missions are examples of the use of improved numeric methods to attain constrained formation geometries and control their dynamical evolution. This paper presents a survey of formation missions in the weak stability boundary regions and a brief description of formation design using numerical and dynamical techniques.

  19. Fast weak-lensing simulations with halo model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giocoli, Carlo; Di Meo, Sandra; Meneghetti, Massimo; Jullo, Eric; de la Torre, Sylvain; Moscardini, Lauro; Baldi, Marco; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Metcalf, R. Benton

    2017-09-01

    Full ray-tracing maps of gravitational lensing, constructed from N-body simulations, represent a fundamental tool to interpret present and future weak-lensing data. However, the limitation of computational resources and storage capabilities severely restricts the number of realizations that can be performed in order to accurately sample both the cosmic shear models and covariance matrices. In this paper, we present a halo model formalism for weak gravitational lensing that alleviates these issues by producing weak-lensing mocks at a reduced computational cost. Our model takes as input the halo population within a desired light cone and the linear power spectrum of the underlined cosmological model. We examine the contribution given by the presence of substructures within haloes to the cosmic shear power spectrum and quantify it to the percent level. Our method allows us to reconstruct high-resolution convergence maps, for any desired source redshifts, of light cones that realistically trace the matter density distribution in the universe, account for masked area and sample selections. We compare our analysis on the same large-scale structures constructed using ray-tracing techniques and find very good agreements in both the linear and non-linear regimes up to few percent levels. The accuracy and speed of our method demonstrate the potential of our halo model for weak-lensing statistics and the possibility to generate a large sample of convergence maps for different cosmological models as needed for the analysis of large galaxy redshift surveys.

  20. Quadriceps weakness and osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemenda, C; Brandt, K D; Heilman, D K; Mazzuca, S; Braunstein, E M; Katz, B P; Wolinsky, F D

    1997-07-15

    The quadriceps weakness commonly associated with osteoarthritis of the knee is widely believed to result from disuse atrophy secondary to pain in the involved joint. However, quadriceps weakness may be an etiologic factor in the development of osteoarthritis. To explore the relation between lower-extremity weakness and osteoarthritis of the knee. Cross-sectional prevalence study. Population-based, with recruitment by random-digit dialing. 462 volunteers 65 years of age or older. Radiographs of the knee were graded for the presence of osteoarthritis. Knee pain and function were assessed with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index, the strength of leg flexors and extensors was assessed with isokinetic dynamometry, and lower-extremity lean tissue mass was assessed with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Among participants with osteoarthritis, quadriceps weakness, but not hamstring weakness, was common. The ratio of extensor strength to body weight was approximately 20% lower in those with than in those without radiographic osteoarthritis. Notably, among women with tibiofemoral osteoarthritis, extensor weakness was present in the absence of knee pain and was seen in participants with normal lower-extremity lean mass (extensor strength, 30.1 lb-ft for those with osteoarthritis and 34.8 lb-ft for those without osteoarthritis; P osteoarthritis of the knee (odds ratio for prevalence of osteoarthritis per 10 lb-ft loss of strength, 0.8 [95% CI, 0.71 to 0.90] for radiographic osteoarthritis and 0.71 [CI, 0.51 to 0.87] for symptomatic osteoarthritis). Quadriceps weakness may be present in patients who have osteoarthritis but do not have knee pain or muscle atrophy; this suggests that the weakness may be due to muscle dysfunction. The data are consistent with the possibility that quadriceps weakness is a primary risk factor for knee pain, disability, and progression of joint damage in persons with osteoarthritis of the knee.

  1. Morphological clines and weak drift along an urbanization gradient in the butterfly, Pieris rapae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoville, Sean D; Widmer, Ivo; Deschamps-Cottin, Magali; Manel, Stéphanie

    2013-01-01

    Urban areas are increasing globally, providing opportunities for biodiversity researchers to study the process in which species become established in novel, highly disturbed habitats. This ecological process can be understood through analyses of morphological and genetic variation, which can shed light on patterns of neutral and adaptive evolution. Previous studies have shown that urban populations often diverge genetically from non-urban source populations. This could occur due to neutral genetic drift, but an alternative is that selection could lead to allele frequency changes in urban populations. The development of genome scan methods provides an opportunity to investigate these outcomes from samples of genetic variation taken along an urbanization gradient. Here we examine morphological variation in wing size and diversity at neutral amplified fragment length polymorphisms in the butterfly Pieris rapae L. (Lepidoptera, Pieridae) sampled from the center to the periphery of Marseille. We utilize established and novel environmental correlation approaches to scan genetic variation for evidence of selection. We find significant morphological differences in urban populations, as well as weak genetic structure and decreased genetic diversity in urban versus non-urban sites. However, environmental correlation tests provide little support for selection in our dataset. Our comparison of different methods and allele frequency clines suggests that loci identified as significant are false positives. Although there is some indication that selection may be acting on wing size in urban butterflies, genetic analyses suggest P. rapae are undergoing neutral drift.

  2. Morphological clines and weak drift along an urbanization gradient in the butterfly, Pieris rapae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean D Schoville

    Full Text Available Urban areas are increasing globally, providing opportunities for biodiversity researchers to study the process in which species become established in novel, highly disturbed habitats. This ecological process can be understood through analyses of morphological and genetic variation, which can shed light on patterns of neutral and adaptive evolution. Previous studies have shown that urban populations often diverge genetically from non-urban source populations. This could occur due to neutral genetic drift, but an alternative is that selection could lead to allele frequency changes in urban populations. The development of genome scan methods provides an opportunity to investigate these outcomes from samples of genetic variation taken along an urbanization gradient. Here we examine morphological variation in wing size and diversity at neutral amplified fragment length polymorphisms in the butterfly Pieris rapae L. (Lepidoptera, Pieridae sampled from the center to the periphery of Marseille. We utilize established and novel environmental correlation approaches to scan genetic variation for evidence of selection. We find significant morphological differences in urban populations, as well as weak genetic structure and decreased genetic diversity in urban versus non-urban sites. However, environmental correlation tests provide little support for selection in our dataset. Our comparison of different methods and allele frequency clines suggests that loci identified as significant are false positives. Although there is some indication that selection may be acting on wing size in urban butterflies, genetic analyses suggest P. rapae are undergoing neutral drift.

  3. Strong versus Weak Ties in Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Giulietti, Corrado; Wahba, Jackline; Zenou, Yves

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the role of strong versus weak ties in the rural-to-urban migration decision in China. We first develop a network model that puts forward the different roles of weak and strong ties in helping workers to migrate to the city. We then use a unique longitudinal data that allows us to test our model by focusing on first-time migration. Strong ties are measured by the closest family contact (excluding household members) while weak ties are determined by the fraction of migrants ...

  4. Quantum correlation cost of the weak measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jun; Wu, Shao-xiong; Yu, Chang-shui, E-mail: quaninformation@sina.com

    2014-12-15

    Quantum correlation cost (QCC) characterizing how much quantum correlation is used in a weak-measurement process is presented based on the trace norm. It is shown that the QCC is related to the trace-norm-based quantum discord (TQD) by only a factor that is determined by the strength of the weak measurement, so it only catches partial quantumness of a quantum system compared with the TQD. We also find that the residual quantumness can be ‘extracted’ not only by the further von Neumann measurement, but also by a sequence of infinitesimal weak measurements. As an example, we demonstrate our outcomes by the Bell-diagonal state.

  5. Current problems in the weak interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pais, A

    1977-01-01

    Some reasons are discussed showing why the recent SU(2) x U(1) gauge theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions is not a complete theory of these interactions, Lepton theory, charm, and the CP problem are considered. 60 references. (JFP)

  6. Regularity of Tor for weakly stable ideals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Ansaldi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It is proved that if I and J are weakly stable ideals in a polynomial ring R = k[x_1, . . ., x_n], with k a field, then the regularity of Tor^R_i (R/I, R/J has the expected upper bound. We also give a bound for the regularity of Ext^i_R (R/I, R for I a weakly stable ideal.

  7. The regularization of Old English weak verbs

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Tío Sáenz

    2015-01-01

    [EN] This article deals with the regularization of non-standard spellings of the verbal forms extracted from a corpus. It addresses the question of what the limits of regularization are when lemmatizing Old English weak verbs. The purpose of such regularization, also known as normalization, is to carry out lexicological analysis or lexicographical work. The analysis concentrates on weak verbs from the second class and draws on the lexical database of Old English Nerthus, which has incorporate...

  8. Drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic, M.; Melchior, H.

    1968-01-01

    A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated.......A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated....

  9. An examination of positive selection and changing effective population size in Angus and Holstein cattle populations (Bos taurus using a high density SNP genotyping platform and the contribution of ancient polymorphism to genomic diversity in Domestic cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayes Ben

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying recent positive selection signatures in domesticated animals could provide information on genome response to strong directional selection from domestication and artificial selection. With the completion of the cattle genome, private companies are now providing large numbers of polymorphic markers for probing variation in domestic cattle (Bos taurus. We analysed over 7,500 polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in beef (Angus and dairy (Holstein cattle and outgroup species Bison, Yak and Banteng in an indirect test of inbreeding and positive selection in Domestic cattle. Results Outgroup species: Bison, Yak and Banteng, were genotyped with high levels of success (90% and used to determine ancestral and derived allele states in domestic cattle. Frequency spectrums of the derived alleles in Angus and Holstein were examined using Fay and Wu's H test. Significant divergences from the predicted frequency spectrums expected under neutrality were identified. This appeared to be the result of combined influences of positive selection, inbreeding and ascertainment bias for moderately frequent SNP. Approximately 10% of all polymorphisms identified as segregating in B. taurus were also segregating in Bison, Yak or Banteng; highlighting a large number of polymorphisms that are ancient in origin. Conclusion These results suggest that a large effective population size (Ne of approximately 90,000 or more existed in B. taurus since they shared a common ancestor with Bison, Yak and Banteng ~1–2 million years ago (MYA. More recently Ne decreased sharply probably associated with domestication. This may partially explain the paradox of high levels of polymorphism in Domestic cattle and the relatively small recent Ne in this species. The period of inbreeding caused Fay and Wu's H statistic to depart from its expectation under neutrality mimicking the effect of selection. However, there was also evidence for selection

  10. An examination of positive selection and changing effective population size in Angus and Holstein cattle populations (Bos taurus) using a high density SNP genotyping platform and the contribution of ancient polymorphism to genomic diversity in Domestic cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEachern, Sean; Hayes, Ben; McEwan, John; Goddard, Mike

    2009-04-24

    Identifying recent positive selection signatures in domesticated animals could provide information on genome response to strong directional selection from domestication and artificial selection. With the completion of the cattle genome, private companies are now providing large numbers of polymorphic markers for probing variation in domestic cattle (Bos taurus). We analysed over 7,500 polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in beef (Angus) and dairy (Holstein) cattle and outgroup species Bison, Yak and Banteng in an indirect test of inbreeding and positive selection in Domestic cattle. Outgroup species: Bison, Yak and Banteng, were genotyped with high levels of success (90%) and used to determine ancestral and derived allele states in domestic cattle. Frequency spectrums of the derived alleles in Angus and Holstein were examined using Fay and Wu's H test. Significant divergences from the predicted frequency spectrums expected under neutrality were identified. This appeared to be the result of combined influences of positive selection, inbreeding and ascertainment bias for moderately frequent SNP. Approximately 10% of all polymorphisms identified as segregating in B. taurus were also segregating in Bison, Yak or Banteng; highlighting a large number of polymorphisms that are ancient in origin. These results suggest that a large effective population size (N(e)) of approximately 90,000 or more existed in B. taurus since they shared a common ancestor with Bison, Yak and Banteng ~1-2 million years ago (MYA). More recently N(e) decreased sharply probably associated with domestication. This may partially explain the paradox of high levels of polymorphism in Domestic cattle and the relatively small recent N(e) in this species. The period of inbreeding caused Fay and Wu's H statistic to depart from its expectation under neutrality mimicking the effect of selection. However, there was also evidence for selection, because high frequency derived alleles tended to

  11. An examination of positive selection and changing effective population size in Angus and Holstein cattle populations (Bos taurus) using a high density SNP genotyping platform and the contribution of ancient polymorphism to genomic diversity in Domestic cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEachern, Sean; Hayes, Ben; McEwan, John; Goddard, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Background Identifying recent positive selection signatures in domesticated animals could provide information on genome response to strong directional selection from domestication and artificial selection. With the completion of the cattle genome, private companies are now providing large numbers of polymorphic markers for probing variation in domestic cattle (Bos taurus). We analysed over 7,500 polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in beef (Angus) and dairy (Holstein) cattle and outgroup species Bison, Yak and Banteng in an indirect test of inbreeding and positive selection in Domestic cattle. Results Outgroup species: Bison, Yak and Banteng, were genotyped with high levels of success (90%) and used to determine ancestral and derived allele states in domestic cattle. Frequency spectrums of the derived alleles in Angus and Holstein were examined using Fay and Wu's H test. Significant divergences from the predicted frequency spectrums expected under neutrality were identified. This appeared to be the result of combined influences of positive selection, inbreeding and ascertainment bias for moderately frequent SNP. Approximately 10% of all polymorphisms identified as segregating in B. taurus were also segregating in Bison, Yak or Banteng; highlighting a large number of polymorphisms that are ancient in origin. Conclusion These results suggest that a large effective population size (Ne) of approximately 90,000 or more existed in B. taurus since they shared a common ancestor with Bison, Yak and Banteng ~1–2 million years ago (MYA). More recently Ne decreased sharply probably associated with domestication. This may partially explain the paradox of high levels of polymorphism in Domestic cattle and the relatively small recent Ne in this species. The period of inbreeding caused Fay and Wu's H statistic to depart from its expectation under neutrality mimicking the effect of selection. However, there was also evidence for selection, because high frequency

  12. Muscle weakness causes joint degeneration in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan Youssef, A; Longino, D; Seerattan, R; Leonard, T; Herzog, W

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of botulinum toxin type-A (BTX-A) induced quadriceps weakness on micro-structural changes in knee cartilage of New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. Fifteen rabbits were divided randomly into an experimental and a sham control group. Each group received a unilateral single quadriceps muscle injection either with saline (sham control; n=4) or BTX-A (experimental; n=11). BTX-A injection produced significant quadriceps muscle weakness (Pmuscle mass (Pknee cartilage, assessed with the Mankin grading system, were the same for the injected and non-injected hind limbs of the experimental group animals. Sham injection had no effect on joint degeneration but all control animals showed some degenerative changes in the knee. Degenerative changes of the retro-patellar cartilage were more severe in the experimental compared to sham control group rabbits (P0.05). Quadriceps muscle weakness caused increased degeneration in the retro-patellar cartilage of NZW rabbits, providing evidence that muscle weakness might be a risk factor for the onset and progression of osteoarthritis (OA). Future work needs to delineate whether muscle weakness directly affects joint degeneration, or if changes in function and movement execution associated with muscle weakness are responsible for the increased rate of OA onset and progression observed here.

  13. Distinguishing Motor Weakness From Impaired Spatial Awareness: A Helping Hand!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneil A Raju

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Our patient, aged 73 years, had background peripheral neuropathy of unknown cause, stable for several years, which caused some difficulty in walking on uneven ground. He attended for a teaching session but now staggered in, a new development. He had apparent weakness of his right arm, but there was difficulty in distinguishing motor weakness from impaired spatial awareness suggestive of parietal lobe dysfunction. With the patient seated, eyes closed, and left arm outstretched, S.A.R. lifted the patient’s right arm and asked him to indicate when both were level. This confirmed motor weakness. Urgent computed tomographic scan confirmed left subdural haematoma and its urgent evacuation rapidly resolved the patient’s symptoms. Intrigued by our patient’s case, we explored further and learnt that in rehabilitation medicine, the awareness of limb position is commonly viewed in terms of joint position sense. We present recent literature evidence indicating that the underlying mechanisms are more subtle.

  14. Strengths and Weaknesses of Synthetic Mammography in Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanaprasatporn, Linda; Chikarmane, Sona A; Giess, Catherine S

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic mammography (SM) consists of two-dimensional images reconstructed from digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) data. Unlike standard full-field digital mammography (FFDM), SM does not require additional radiation exposure. SM is being introduced in breast imaging centers because early clinical data demonstrate that synthetic images are comparable to FFDM in cancer detection, positive predictive values, and recall rates. SM has completely replaced FFDM in some practices. Thus, an understanding of SM and its strengths and weaknesses compared with those of FFDM is essential. The artifacts of SM include blurring subcutaneous tissue, loss of resolution in the axilla on mediolateral oblique views, pseudocalcifications, and decreased resolution near foreign bodies (eg, biopsy markers). SM's strengths include a reduced radiation dose, shorter acquisition time compared with a combined FFDM/DBT screening examination (with potentially less motion artifact), and increased conspicuity of calcifications, spiculated margins, and architectural distortion. The weaknesses of SM include the potential for false positives due to pseudocalcifications and the difficulty in assessing for motion artifact. This article reviews SM and its role in screening and presents clinical cases to highlight SM's strengths, weaknesses, and artifacts. © RSNA, 2017.

  15. Observed adducts on positive mode direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry - Proton/ammonium adduct selectivities of 600-sample in-house chemical library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Natsuhiko; Furuya, Asami; Yatsu, Takahiro; Igarashi, Yoko; Aoyama, Reiko; Izutani, Chisato; Yamamoto, Yorihiro; Shibue, Toshimichi

    2017-02-01

    In this study, direct analysis in real time adduct selectivities of a 558 in-house high-resolution mass spectrometry sample library was evaluated. The protonated molecular ion ([M + H]+) was detected in 462 samples. The ammonium adduct ion ([M + NH4]+) was also detected in 262 samples. [M + H]+ and [M + NH4]+ molecular ions were observed simultaneously in 166 samples. These adduct selectivities were related to the elemental compositions of the sample compounds. [M + NH4]+ selectivity correlated with the number of oxygen atom(s), whereas [M + H]+ selectivity correlated with the number of nitrogen atom(s) in the elemental compositions. For compounds including a nitrogen atom and an oxygen atom [M + H]+ was detected; [M + NH4]+ was detected for compounds including an oxygen atom only. Density functional theory calculations were performed for selected library samples and model compounds. Energy differences were observed between compounds detected as [M + H]+ and [M + NH4]+, and between compounds including a nitrogen atom and an oxygen atom in their elemental compositions. The results suggested that the presence of oxygen atoms stabilizes [M + NH4]+, but not every oxygen atom has enough energy for detection of [M + NH4]+. It was concluded that the nitrogen atom(s) and oxygen atom(s) in the elemental compositions play important roles in the adduct formation in direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry.

  16. Weak ergodicity breaking, irreproducibility, and ageing in anomalous diffusion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzler, Ralf [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm, Germany and Department of Physics, Tampere University of Technology, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2014-01-14

    Single particle traces are standardly evaluated in terms of time averages of the second moment of the position time series r(t). For ergodic processes, one can interpret such results in terms of the known theories for the corresponding ensemble averaged quantities. In anomalous diffusion processes, that are widely observed in nature over many orders of magnitude, the equivalence between (long) time and ensemble averages may be broken (weak ergodicity breaking), and these time averages may no longer be interpreted in terms of ensemble theories. Here we detail some recent results on weakly non-ergodic systems with respect to the time averaged mean squared displacement, the inherent irreproducibility of individual measurements, and methods to determine the exact underlying stochastic process. We also address the phenomenon of ageing, the dependence of physical observables on the time span between initial preparation of the system and the start of the measurement.

  17. Can quantum probes satisfy the weak equivalence principle?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seveso, Luigi, E-mail: luigi.seveso@unimi.it [Quantum Technology Lab, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Paris, Matteo G.A. [Quantum Technology Lab, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, I-20133 Milano (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Milano, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    We address the question whether quantum probes in a gravitational field can be considered as test particles obeying the weak equivalence principle (WEP). A formulation of the WEP is proposed which applies also in the quantum regime, while maintaining the physical content of its classical counterpart. Such formulation requires the introduction of a gravitational field not to modify the Fisher information about the mass of a freely-falling probe, extractable through measurements of its position. We discover that, while in a uniform field quantum probes satisfy our formulation of the WEP exactly, gravity gradients can encode nontrivial information about the particle’s mass in its wavefunction, leading to violations of the WEP. - Highlights: • Can quantum probes under gravity be approximated as test-bodies? • A formulation of the weak equivalence principle for quantum probes is proposed. • Quantum probes are found to violate it as a matter of principle.

  18. Tests of the weak equivalence principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speake, C. C.; Will, C. M.

    2012-09-01

    The Einstein equivalence principle is the foundation for general relativity and all metric theories of gravity. Of its three tenets—the equality of acceleration of test bodies, or weak equivalence principle; the validity of Lorentz invariance in local freely falling frames; and the position invariance of local physical laws—the weak equivalence principle has played the most important role historically, and continues to be a focus of intense theoretical and experimental investigation. From the probably apocryphal 16th century demonstrations by Galileo at Pisa's leaning tower to the sensitive torsion-balance measurements of today (both pictured on the cover of this issue), this principle, dubbed WEP, has been crucial to the development of gravitation theory. The universality of the rate of acceleration of all types of matter in a gravitational field can be taken as evidence that gravitation is fundamentally determined by the geometry, or metric, of spacetime. Newton began his magnum opus 'The Principia' with a discussion of WEP and his experiments to verify it, while Einstein took WEP for granted in his construction of general relativity, never once referring to the epochal experiments by Baron Eötvös. The classic 1964 experiment of Roll, Krotkov and Dicke ushered in the modern era of high-precision tests, and the search for a 'fifth force' during the late 1980s (instigated, ironically, by purported anomalies in Eötvös's old data) caused the enterprise to pivot from pure tests of the foundation of GR to searches for new physics beyond the standard model of the non-gravitational interactions. Today, the next generation of experimental tests of WEP are being prepared for launch or are being developed, with the goal of reaching unprecedented levels of sensitivity, in search of signatures of interactions inspired by string theory, extra dimensions and other concepts from the world of high-energy physics. At the same time observations continue using lunar laser

  19. Selective deficits in semantic verbal fluency in patients with a first affective episode with psychotic symptoms and a positive history of mania.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kravariti, Eugenia

    2009-05-01

    Neurocognitive dysfunction is likely to represent a trait characteristic of bipolar disorder, but the extent to which it comprises \\'core\\' deficits as opposed to those secondary to longstanding illness or intellectual decline is unclear. We investigated neuropsychological performance in an epidemiologically derived sample of patients with a first affective episode with psychotic symptoms and a positive history of mania, compared to community controls.

  20. The First Gauge Theory of Weak Interactions and the Prediction of Weak Neutral Currents

    OpenAIRE

    Bludman, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    The three theoretical and historical components of the Standard Model are the exact chiral gauge theory of weak interactions, electroweak unification, and the Higgs mechanism for spontaneous symmetry breaking. I put into historical perspective my 1958 invention of the first gauge theory of weak interactions, predicting weak neutral currents, and show how the fundamental differences between global and gauge symmetries and between partial flavour and exact gauge symmetries, emerged in the stron...

  1. Weak KAM theory for a weakly coupled system of Hamilton–Jacobi equations

    KAUST Repository

    Figalli, Alessio

    2016-06-23

    Here, we extend the weak KAM and Aubry–Mather theories to optimal switching problems. We consider three issues: the analysis of the calculus of variations problem, the study of a generalized weak KAM theorem for solutions of weakly coupled systems of Hamilton–Jacobi equations, and the long-time behavior of time-dependent systems. We prove the existence and regularity of action minimizers, obtain necessary conditions for minimality, extend Fathi’s weak KAM theorem, and describe the asymptotic limit of the generalized Lax–Oleinik semigroup. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  2. Use of the BD vacutainer rapid serum tube reduces false-positive results for selected beckman coulter Unicel DxI immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strathmann, Frederick G; Ka, Michael M; Rainey, Petrie M; Baird, Geoffrey S

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the use of serum samples from BD Vacutainer rapid serum tubes (RSTs; BD, Franklin Lakes, NJ) to reduce undetermined interferences contributing to false-positive immunoassay results in heparin plasma samples. Patients being evaluated for suspected myocardial infarction had specimens drawn into an RST in addition to the standard lithium-heparin plasma separator tube (PST). We measured 28 separate analytes in both specimens using immunoassay, electrochemical, and spectrophotometric methods. Higher results were observed in some PST specimens tested for troponin I, creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme, human chorionic gonadotropin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone. These discrepancies were investigated by repeating analyses after recentrifugation of both specimens. Reanalysis gave results for the PST specimens that were lower and agreed well with initial results from RSTs, suggesting false-positive rates of 10.8% for troponin I and about 2% for each of the other 3 analytes. Overall, specimens collected in RSTs had fewer false-positive immunoassay results than specimens collected in plasma separator tubes.

  3. Promoter selectivity of the Bacillus subtilis response regulator DegU, a positive regulator of the fla/che operon and sacB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukahara, Kensuke; Ogura, Mitsuo

    2008-01-15

    The response regulator DegU and its cognate histidine kinase DegS constitute a two-component system in the Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms of DegU are known to activate target gene transcription in B. subtilis. Although phosphorylated DegU (DegU-P) regulates more than one hundred and twenty genes, the targets of unphosphorylated DegU are unknown, except for comK. We found that the fla/che (flagella and chemotaxis) operon is positively regulated by unphosphorylated DegU. The effect was most prominent in a strain bearing the functional swrAA gene, a positive regulator of fla/che. Unphosphorylated DegU bound to two regions in the fla/che regulatory region containing an inverted repeat-like sequence that resembles the inverted repeat (IR) in the comK promoter. Mutational analysis revealed that positive regulation of fla/che by SwrAA requires DegU-binding. An analysis of the DegU-P-regulated gene sacB (levansucrase gene) by footprint and mutational analyses revealed that DegU-P bound to a direct repeat (DR) of the DegU-recognition motifs, which has been shown to be functional in vivo, while unphosphorylated DegU did not. These results strongly suggest that the arrangement of the DegU-binding motifs determines whether unphosphorylated DegU or DegU-P binds to the sacB promoter. The hypothesis was confirmed by observing degS-independent expression when the DR in the sacB-lacZ fusion was changed to an IR, suggesting that unphosphorylated DegU regulates the sacB promoter through the newly created IR. This was confirmed by binding of unphosphorylated DegU to the IR in the sacB promoter. This study demonstrated that DegU positively regulates flgB and sacB through its binding to the promoter regions. We demonstrated that DegU-P prefers binding to DR but not to IR in the sacB promoter.

  4. Weak layer fracture: facets and depth hoar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Reiweger

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding failure initiation within weak snow layers is essential for modeling and predicting dry-snow slab avalanches. We therefore performed laboratory experiments with snow samples containing a weak layer consisting of either faceted crystals or depth hoar. During these experiments the samples were loaded with different loading rates and at various tilt angles until fracture. The strength of the samples decreased with increasing loading rate and increasing tilt angle. Additionally, we took pictures of the side of four samples with a high-speed video camera and calculated the displacement using a particle image velocimetry (PIV algorithm. The fracture process within the weak layer could thus be observed in detail. Catastrophic failure started due to a shear fracture just above the interface between the depth hoar layer and the underlying crust.

  5. Improved Axillary Evaluation Following Neoadjuvant Therapy for Patients With Node-Positive Breast Cancer Using Selective Evaluation of Clipped Nodes: Implementation of Targeted Axillary Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudle, Abigail S; Yang, Wei T; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Black, Dalliah M; Gilcrease, Michael Z; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Hobbs, Brian P; DeSnyder, Sarah M; Hwang, Rosa F; Adrada, Beatriz E; Shaitelman, Simona F; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Smith, Benjamin D; Candelaria, Rosalind P; Babiera, Gildy V; Dogan, Basak E; Santiago, Lumarie; Hunt, Kelly K; Kuerer, Henry M

    2016-04-01

    Placing clips in nodes with biopsy-confirmed metastasis before initiating neoadjuvant therapy allows for evaluation of response in breast cancer. Our goal was to determine if pathologic changes in clipped nodes reflect the status of the nodal basin and if targeted axillary dissection (TAD), which includes sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND) and selective localization and removal of clipped nodes, improves the false-negative rate (FNR) compared with SLND alone. A prospective study of patients with biopsy-confirmed nodal metastases with a clip placed in the sampled node was performed. After neoadjuvant therapy, patients underwent axillary surgery and the pathology of the clipped node was compared with other nodes. Patients undergoing TAD had SLND and selective removal of the clipped node using iodine-125 seed localization. The FNR was determined in patients undergoing complete axillary lymphadenectomy (ALND). Of 208 patients enrolled in this study, 191 underwent ALND, with residual disease identified in 120 (63%). The clipped node revealed metastases in 115 patients, resulting in an FNR of 4.2% (95% CI, 1.4 to 9.5) for the clipped node. In patients undergoing SLND and ALND (n = 118), the FNR was 10.1% (95% CI, 4.2 to 19.8), which included seven false-negative events in 69 patients with residual disease. Adding evaluation of the clipped node reduced the FNR to 1.4% (95% CI, 0.03 to 7.3; P = .03). The clipped node was not retrieved as an SLN in 23% (31 of 134) of patients, including six with negative SLNs but metastasis in the clipped node. TAD followed by ALND was performed in 85 patients, with an FNR of 2.0% (1 of 50; 95% CI, 0.05 to 10.7). Marking nodes with biopsy-confirmed metastatic disease allows for selective removal and improves pathologic evaluation for residual nodal disease after chemotherapy. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Idiotypic selection of an antibody mutant with changed hapten binding specificity, resulting from a point mutation in position 50 of the heavy chain.

    OpenAIRE

    Brüggemann, M.; Müller, H J; Burger, C; Rajewsky, K.

    1986-01-01

    Somatic mutation occurs at a low rate in the rearranged antibody V region genes of the hybridoma line B1-8. delta 1 which expresses an antibody with specificity for the hapten 4-hydroxy-3-nitro-5-iodo-phenylacetyl (NIP). A mutant was selected which had lost a binding site-related idiotope but retained most of its other idiotypic determinants. The mutant had concomitantly lost NIP binding and acquired specificity for dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin. It carried a single point mutation in...

  7. Positive selection of Plasmodium falciparum parasites with multiple var2csa-type PfEMP1 genes during the course of infection in pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Adam F; Salanti, Ali; Lavstsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    multiple genes coding for different VAR2CSA proteins, and parasites with >1 var2csa gene appear to be more common in pregnant women with placental malaria than in nonpregnant individuals. We present evidence that, in pregnant women, parasites containing multiple var2csa-type genes possess a selective...... advantage over parasites with a single var2csa gene. Accumulation of parasites with multiple copies of the var2csa gene during the course of pregnancy was also correlated with the development of antibodies involved in blocking VAR2CSA adhesion. The data suggest that multiplicity of var2csa-type genes...

  8. Weak Acid Ionization Constants and the Determination of Weak Acid-Weak Base Reaction Equilibrium Constants in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyasulu, Frazier; McMills, Lauren; Barlag, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory to determine the equilibrium constants of weak acid negative weak base reactions is described. The equilibrium constants of component reactions when multiplied together equal the numerical value of the equilibrium constant of the summative reaction. The component reactions are weak acid ionization reactions, weak base hydrolysis…

  9. A theoretical overview of hypernuclear weak decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumillas, C. [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Garbarino, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita di Torino and INFN, Sezione di Torino, I-10125 Torino (Italy)], E-mail: garbarin@to.infn.it; Parreno, A.; Ramos, A. [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-05-15

    The physics of the weak decay of hypernuclei is briefly reviewed from a theoretical point of view. Special regard is devoted to the recent progress concerning the determination of the non-mesonic decay widths and the asymmetry parameters. Convincing evidence has been achieved for a solution of the long-standing puzzle on the ratio {gamma}{sub n}/{gamma}{sub p}. Very recently, it has been shown that the exchange of a {pi}{pi} pair in the weak mechanism plays a crucial role in explaining the discrepancies between theory and experiment on the decay asymmetries.

  10. Weak interactions at high energies. [Lectures, review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, J.

    1978-08-01

    Review lectures are presented on the phenomenological implications of the modern spontaneously broken gauge theories of the weak and electromagnetic interactions, and some observations are made about which high energy experiments probe what aspects of gauge theories. Basic quantum chromodynamics phenomenology is covered including momentum dependent effective quark distributions, the transverse momentum cutoff, search for gluons as sources of hadron jets, the status and prospects for the spectroscopy of fundamental fermions and how fermions may be used to probe aspects of the weak and electromagnetic gauge theory, studies of intermediate vector bosons, and miscellaneous possibilities suggested by gauge theories from the Higgs bosons to speculations about proton decay. 187 references. (JFP)

  11. From Suitable Weak Solutions to Entropy Viscosity

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2010-12-16

    This paper focuses on the notion of suitable weak solutions for the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and discusses the relevance of this notion to Computational Fluid Dynamics. The purpose of the paper is twofold (i) to recall basic mathematical properties of the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and to show how they might relate to LES (ii) to introduce an entropy viscosity technique based on the notion of suitable weak solution and to illustrate numerically this concept. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  12. A Continuation Method for Weakly Kannan Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariza-Ruiz David

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The first continuation method for contractive maps in the setting of a metric space was given by Granas. Later, Frigon extended Granas theorem to the class of weakly contractive maps, and recently Agarwal and O'Regan have given the corresponding result for a certain type of quasicontractions which includes maps of Kannan type. In this note we introduce the concept of weakly Kannan maps and give a fixed point theorem, and then a continuation method, for this class of maps.

  13. Human action recognition based on estimated weak poses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wenjuan; Gonzàlez, Jordi; Roca, Francesc Xavier

    2012-12-01

    We present a novel method for human action recognition (HAR) based on estimated poses from image sequences. We use 3D human pose data as additional information and propose a compact human pose representation, called a weak pose, in a low-dimensional space while still keeping the most discriminative information for a given pose. With predicted poses from image features, we map the problem from image feature space to pose space, where a Bag of Poses (BOP) model is learned for the final goal of HAR. The BOP model is a modified version of the classical bag of words pipeline by building the vocabulary based on the most representative weak poses for a given action. Compared with the standard k-means clustering, our vocabulary selection criteria is proven to be more efficient and robust against the inherent challenges of action recognition. Moreover, since for action recognition the ordering of the poses is discriminative, the BOP model incorporates temporal information: in essence, groups of consecutive poses are considered together when computing the vocabulary and assignment. We tested our method on two well-known datasets: HumanEva and IXMAS, to demonstrate that weak poses aid to improve action recognition accuracies. The proposed method is scene-independent and is comparable with the state-of-art method.

  14. Procedure Selection and Patient Positioning Influence Spine Kinematics During High-Velocity, Low-Amplitude Spinal Manipulation Applied to the Low Back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Spencer; D'Angelo, Kevin; Kawchuk, Gregory N; Triano, John J; Howarth, Samuel J

    This investigation compared indirect 3-dimensional angular kinematics (position, velocity, and acceleration) of the lumbar spine for 2 different high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) spinal manipulation procedures (lumbar spinous pull or push), and altered initial patient lower limb posture. Twenty-four participants underwent 6 HVLA procedures directed toward the presumed L4 vertebra, reflecting each combination of 2 variants of a spinal manipulation application technique (spinous pull and push) and 3 initial hip flexion angles (0°, 45°, and 90°) applied using a right lateral recumbent patient position. All contact forces and moments between the patient and the external environment, as well as 3-dimensional kinematics of the patient's pelvis and thorax, were recorded. Lumbar spine angular positions, velocities, and accelerations were analyzed within the preload and impulse stages of each HVLA trial. Lumbar spine left axial rotation was greater for the pull HVLA. The pull HVLA also generated a greater maximum (leftward) and lower minimum (rightward) axial rotation velocity and deceleration and greater leftward and rightward lateral bend velocities, acceleration, and deceleration components. Not flexing the hip produced the greatest amount of extension, as well as the lowest axial rotation and maximum axial rotation acceleration during the impulse. This investigation provides basic kinematic information for clinicians to understand the similarities and differences between 2 HVLA side-lying manipulations in the lumbar spine. Use of these findings and novel technology can drive future research initiatives that can both affect clinical decision making and influence teaching environments surrounding spinal manipulative therapy skill acquisition. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Positive end expiratory pressure during one-lung ventilation: Selecting ideal patients and ventilator settings with the aim of improving arterial oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoftman Nir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP in treating intraoperative hypoxemia during one-lung ventilation (OLV remains in question given conflicting results of prior studies. This study aims to (1 evaluate the efficacy of PEEP during OLV, (2 assess the utility of preoperative predictors of response to PEEP, and (3 explore optimal intraoperative settings that would maximize the effects of PEEP on oxygenation. Forty-one thoracic surgery patients from a single tertiary care university center were prospectively enrolled in this observational study. After induction of general anesthesia, a double-lumen endotracheal tube was fiberoptically positioned and OLV initiated. Intraoperatively, PEEP = 5 and 10 cmH 2 O were sequentially applied to the ventilated lung during OLV. Arterial oxygenation, cardiovascular performance parameters, and proposed perioperative variables that could predict or enhance response to PEEP were analysed. T-test and c2 tests were utilized for continuous and categorical variables, respectively. Multivariate analyses were carried out using a classification tree model of binary recursive partitioning. PEEP improved arterial oxygenation by ≥20% in 29% of patients (n = 12 and failed to do so in 71% (n = 29; however, no cardiovascular impact was noted. Among the proposed clinical predictors, only intraoperative tidal volume per kilogram differed significantly between responders to PEEP and non-responders (mean 6.6 vs. 5.7 ml/kg, P = 0.013; no preoperative variable predicted response to PEEP. A multivariate analysis did not yield a clinically significant model for predicting PEEP responsiveness. PEEP improved oxygenation in a subset of patients; larger, although still protective tidal volumes favored a positive response to PEEP. No preoperative variables, however, could be identified as reliable predictors for PEEP responders.

  16. Positioning consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkier, Bente; Keller, Margit

    2014-01-01

    positionings emerges based on empirical examples of research in parent–children consumption. Positionings are flexible discursive fixations of the relationship between the performances of the practitioner, other practitioners, media discourse and consumption activities. The basic positioning types...

  17. The Weak Spots in Contemporary Science (and How to Fix Them)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary Several fraud cases, widespread failure to replicate or reproduce seminal findings, and pervasive error in the scientific literature have led to a crisis of confidence in the biomedical, behavioral, and social sciences. In this review, the author discusses some of the core findings that point at weak spots in contemporary science and considers the human factors that underlie them. He delves into the human tendencies that create errors and biases in data collection, analyses, and reporting of research results. He presents several solutions to deal with observer bias, publication bias, the researcher’s tendency to exploit degrees of freedom in their analysis of data, low statistical power, and errors in the reporting of results, with a focus on the specific challenges in animal welfare research. Abstract In this review, the author discusses several of the weak spots in contemporary science, including scientific misconduct, the problems of post hoc hypothesizing (HARKing), outcome switching, theoretical bloopers in formulating research questions and hypotheses, selective reading of the literature, selective citing of previous results, improper blinding and other design failures, p-hacking or researchers’ tendency to analyze data in many different ways to find positive (typically significant) results, errors and biases in the reporting of results, and publication bias. The author presents some empirical results highlighting problems that lower the trustworthiness of reported results in scientific literatures, including that of animal welfare studies. Some of the underlying causes of these biases are discussed based on the notion that researchers are only human and hence are not immune to confirmation bias, hindsight bias, and minor ethical transgressions. The author discusses solutions in the form of enhanced transparency, sharing of data and materials, (post-publication) peer review, pre-registration, registered reports, improved training, reporting

  18. Natural selection on protein-coding genes in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bustamente, Carlos D.; Fledel-Alon, Adi; Williamson, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Comparisons of DNA polymorphism within species to divergence between species enables the discovery of molecular adaptation in evolutionarily constrained genes as well as the differentiation of weak from strong purifying selection 1, 2, 3, 4 . The extent to which weak negative and positive darwinian......, showing an excess of deleterious variation within local populations 9, 10 . Here we contrast patterns of coding sequence polymorphism identified by direct sequencing of 39 humans for over 11,000 genes to divergence between humans and chimpanzees, and find strong evidence that natural selection has shaped...... selection have driven the molecular evolution of different species varies greatly 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 , with some species, such as Drosophila melanogaster, showing strong evidence of pervasive positive selection 6, 7, 8, 9 , and others, such as the selfing weed Arabidopsis thaliana...

  19. Extreme population differences in the human zinc transporter ZIP4 (SLC39A4 are explained by positive selection in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Engelken

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extreme differences in allele frequency between West Africans and Eurasians were observed for a leucine-to-valine substitution (Leu372Val in the human intestinal zinc uptake transporter, ZIP4, yet no further evidence was found for a selective sweep around the ZIP4 gene (SLC39A4. By interrogating allele frequencies in more than 100 diverse human populations and resequencing Neanderthal DNA, we confirmed the ancestral state of this locus and found a strong geographical gradient for the derived allele (Val372, with near fixation in West Africa. In extensive coalescent simulations, we show that the extreme differences in allele frequency, yet absence of a classical sweep signature, can be explained by the effect of a local recombination hotspot, together with directional selection favoring the Val372 allele in Sub-Saharan Africans. The possible functional effect of the Leu372Val substitution, together with two pathological mutations at the same codon (Leu372Pro and Leu372Arg that cause acrodermatitis enteropathica (a disease phenotype characterized by extreme zinc deficiency, was investigated by transient overexpression of human ZIP4 protein in HeLa cells. Both acrodermatitis mutations cause absence of the ZIP4 transporter cell surface expression and nearly absent zinc uptake, while the Val372 variant displayed significantly reduced surface protein expression, reduced basal levels of intracellular zinc, and reduced zinc uptake in comparison with the Leu372 variant. We speculate that reduced zinc uptake by the ZIP4-derived Val372 isoform may act by starving certain pathogens of zinc, and hence may have been advantageous in Sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, these functional results may indicate differences in zinc homeostasis among modern human populations with possible relevance for disease risk.

  20. Sequence variability is correlated with weak immunogenicity in Streptococcus pyogenes M protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lannergård, Jonas; Kristensen, Bodil M.; Gustafsson, Mattias C. U.

    2015-01-01

    The M protein of Streptococcus pyogenes, a major bacterial virulence factor, has an amino-terminal hypervariable region (HVR) that is a target for type-specific protective antibodies. Intriguingly, the HVR elicits a weak antibody response, indicating that it escapes host immunity by two mechanisms....... Thus, we identified a correlation between sequence variability and weak immunogenicity for M protein regions. A potential explanation for the weak immunogenicity was provided by the demonstration that protease digestion selectively eliminated the HVR-B part from whole M protein-expressing bacteria...