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Sample records for weak mg ii

  1. The Influence of Mg(II and Ca(II Ions on Rutin Autoxidation in Weakly Alkaline Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović Slavoljub C.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rutin (quercetin-3-O-rutinoside is one of the most abundant bioflavonoids with various biological and pharmacological activities. Considering the ubiquitous presence of Mg(II and Ca(II ions in biological systems we decided to investigate their influence on the autoxidation of rutin in weakly alkaline aqueous solutions. Changes in UV-Vis spectra recorded during the rutin autoxidation in aqueous solution at pH 8.4 revealed that this process was very slow in the absence of metal ions. The presence of Mg(II and, especially Ca(II ion, increased the transformation rate of rutin. UV-Vis spectra recorded after prolonged autoxidation indicated the formation of humic acidlike products in the presence of Mg(II and Ca(II ions. Four new compounds formed during the initial stage of rutin autoxidation in the presence of Mg(II and Ca(II ions were detected by HPLCDAD. Based on the analysis of their DAD UV-Vis spectra and comparison of their retention times with the retention time value for rutin, we concluded that the initial rutin transformation products were formed by the water addition on double bond in ring C and hydroxylation of ring B. A very small decrease of the initial rutin concentration (4% was observed by HPLC-DAD in the absence of metal ions for the period of 90 minutes. However, rutin concentration decrease was much larger in the presence of Mg(II and Ca(II ions (14% and 24%, respectively. The more pronounced effect of Ca(II ion on the rutin autoxidation may be explained by the stronger binding of Mg(II ion to rutin and thus greater stabilizing effect on reaction intermediates caused by its higher ionic potential (charge/ionic radius ratio in comparison to Ca(II ion. The results of this study may contribute to the better understanding of interactions of Mg(II and Ca(II ions with natural phenolic antioxidants which are important for their various biological activities.

  2. The Weak Haagerup Property II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, Uffe; Knudby, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The weak Haagerup property for locally compact groups and the weak Haagerup constant were recently introduced by the second author [27]. The weak Haagerup property is weaker than both weak amenability introduced by Cowling and the first author [9] and the Haagerup property introduced by Connes [6......] and Choda [5]. In this paper, it is shown that a connected simple Lie group G has the weak Haagerup property if and only if the real rank of G is zero or one. Hence for connected simple Lie groups the weak Haagerup property coincides with weak amenability. Moreover, it turns out that for connected simple...... Lie groups the weak Haagerup constant coincides with the weak amenability constant, although this is not true for locally compact groups in general. It is also shown that the semidirect product R2 × SL(2,R) does not have the weak Haagerup property....

  3. Mg II Absorbers: Metallicity Evolution and Cloud Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ting-Wen; Fukugita, Masataka

    2017-12-01

    Metal abundance and its evolution are studied for Mg II quasar absorption line systems from their weak, unsaturated spectral lines using stacked spectra from the archived data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. They show an abundance pattern that resembles that of the Galactic halo or Small Magellanic Cloud, with metallicity [Z/H] showing an evolution from redshift z = 2 to 0.5: metallicity becomes approximately solar or even larger at z≈ 0. We show that the evolution of the metal abundance traces the cumulative amount of the hydrogen fuel consumed in star formation in galaxies. With the aid of a spectroscopic simulation code, we infer the median gas density of the cloud to be roughly 0.3 {{cm}}-3, with which the elemental abundance in various ionization stages, in particular C I, is consistently explained. This gas density implies that the size of the Mg II clouds is of the order of 0.03 kpc, which suggests that individual Mg II clouds around a galaxy are of a baryonic mass typically {10}3 {M}⊙ . This means that Mg II clouds are numerous and “foamy,” rather than a large entity that covers a sizable fraction of galaxies with a single cloud.

  4. Transition probabilities for Be I, Be II, Mg I, and Mg II

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng Neng Wu; Yangru Yi; Zhou Tao; Ma Dong Xia; Wu Yong Gang; Xu Hai Ta

    2001-01-01

    The Weakest Bound Electron Potential Model (WBEPM) is used to calculate transition probabilities between LS multiplets of Be I, Be II, Mg I, and Mg II. In this calculation, a coupled set of equations is employed to determine effective charges Z* and effective quantum numbers n* and l* using, as input data, experimental energy levels and radial expectation values obtained with the numerical Coulomb approximation. Transition probabilities between highly excited states are evaluated using modified hydrogenic wavefunctions. Good agreement is seen in comparisons of the present results with those from other works.

  5. Average [O II]nebular emission associated with Mg II absorbers: Dependence on Fe II absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ravi; Srianand, Raghunathan; Petitjean, Patrick; Noterdaeme, Pasquier

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the effect of Fe II equivalent width (W2600) and fibre size on the average luminosity of [O II]λλ3727,3729 nebular emission associated with Mg II absorbers (at 0.55 ≤ z ≤ 1.3) in the composite spectra of quasars obtained with 3 and 2 arcsec fibres in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We confirm the presence of strong correlations between [O II] luminosity (L_{[O II]}) and equivalent width (W2796) and redshift of Mg II absorbers. However, we show L_{[O II]} and average luminosity surface density suffers from fibre size effects. More importantly, for a given fibre size the average L_{[O II]} strongly depends on the equivalent width of Fe II absorption lines and found to be higher for Mg II absorbers with R ≡W2600/W2796 ≥0.5. In fact, we show the observed strong correlations of L_{[O II]} with W2796 and z of Mg II absorbers are mainly driven by such systems. Direct [O II] detections also confirm the link between L_{[O II]} and R. Therefore, one has to pay attention to the fibre losses and dependence of redshift evolution of Mg II absorbers on W2600 before using them as a luminosity unbiased probe of global star formation rate density. We show that the [O II] nebular emission detected in the stacked spectrum is not dominated by few direct detections (i.e., detections ≥3σ significant level). On an average the systems with R ≥0.5 and W2796 ≥2Å are more reddened, showing colour excess E(B - V) ˜ 0.02, with respect to the systems with R <0.5 and most likely traces the high H I column density systems.

  6. Mg(II) binding by bovine prothrombin fragment 1 via equilibrium dialysis and the relative roles of Mg(II) and Ca(II) in blood coagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deerfield, D.W. 2d.; Olson, D.L.; Berkowitz, P.; Byrd, P.A.; Koehler, K.A.; Pedersen, L.G.; Hiskey, R.G.

    1987-03-25

    The first direct equilibrium dialysis titration of the blood coagulation protein bovine prothrombin fragment 1 with Mg(II) is presented. Fragment 1 has fewer thermodynamic binding sites for Mg(II) than Ca(II), less overall binding affinity, and significantly less cooperativity. Several nonlinear curve fitting models were tested for describing the binding of fragment 1 with Mg(II), Ca(II), and mixed metal binding data. The Mg(II) data is represented by essentially five equivalent, noninteracting sites; for Ca(II), a model with three tight, cooperative sites and four ''loose'', equal affinity, noninteracting sites provides the best model. Based on the reported equilibrium dialysis data and in conjunction with other experimental data, a model for the binding of Ca(II) and Mg(II) to bovine prothrombin fragment 1 is proposed. The key difference between the binding of these divalent ions is that Ca(II) apparently causes a specific conformational change reflected by the cooperativity observed in the Ca(II) titration. The binding of Ca(II) ions to the three tight, cooperative sites establishes a conformation that is essential for phospholipid X Ca(II) X protein binding. The filling of the loose sites with Ca(II) ions leads to charge reduction and subsequent phospholipid X Ca(II) X protein complex interaction. Binding of Mg(II) to bovine prothrombin fragment 1 does not yield a complex with the necessary phospholipid-binding conformation. However, Mg(II) is apparently capable of stabilizing the Ca(II) conformation as is observed in the mixed metal ion binding data and the synergism in thrombin formation.

  7. [O II] nebular emission from Mg II absorbers: star formation associated with the absorbing gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ravi; Srianand, Raghunathan; Petitjean, Patrick; Noterdaeme, Pasquier

    2017-10-01

    We present nebular emission associated with 198 strong Mg II absorbers at 0.35 ≤z ≤ 1.1 in the fibre spectra of quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Measured [O II] luminosities (L_[O II]) are typical of sub-L⋆ galaxies with derived star formation rate (uncorrected for fibre losses and dust reddening) in the range of 0.5-20 M⊙ yr-1. Typically less than ∼3 per cent of the Mg II systems with rest equivalent width, W2796≥2Å, show L_[O II] ≥0.3 L^{\\star }_[O II]. The detection rate is found to increase with increasing W2796 and z. No significant correlation is found between W2796 and L_[O II] even when we restrict the samples to narrow z ranges. A strong correlation is seen between L_[O II] and z. While this is expected from the luminosity evolution of galaxies, we show that finite fibre size plays a very crucial role in this correlation. The measured nebular line ratios (like [O III]/[O II] and [O III]/H β) and their z evolution are consistent with those of galaxies detected in deep surveys. Based on the median stacked spectra, we infer the average metallicity (log Z ∼8.3), ionization parameter (log q∼7.5) and stellar mass (log (M/M⊙) ∼ 9.3). The Mg II systems with nebular emission typically have W2796 ≥2 Å, Mg II doublet ratio close to 1 and W(Fe II λ2600)/W2796∼0.5 as often seen in damped Ly α and 21-cm absorbers at these redshifts. This is the biggest reported sample of [O II] emission from Mg II absorbers at low-impact parameters ideally suited for probing various feedback processes at play in z ≤ 1 galaxies.

  8. FeII/MgII Emission Line Ratio in High Redshift Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, M.; Hamann, F.; Appenzeller, I.

    2003-01-01

    We present results of the analysis of near infrared spectroscopic observations of 6 high-redshift quasars (z > 4), emphasizing the measurement of the ultraviolet FeII/MgII emission line strength in order to estimate the beginning of intense star formation in the early universe. To investigate the...

  9. Catalog of strong MgII absorbers (Lawther+, 2012)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawther, D.; Paarup, Troels; Schmidt, Morten L.

    2012-01-01

    Here we present a catalog of strong (rest equivalent width Wr> intervening Mg II absorbers in the SDSS Data Release 7 quasar catalog (2010AJ....139.2360S, Cat. VII/260). The intervening absorbers were found by a semi-automatic algorithm written in IDL - for details of the algorithm see section 2......, and considers only sight-lines towards non-BAL quasars. Any questions regarding the catalog should be sent to Daniel Lawther (unclellama(at)gmail.com). (3 data files)....

  10. The comoving mass density of Mg II from z ˜ 2 to 5.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codoreanu, Alex; Ryan-Weber, Emma V.; Crighton, Neil H. M.; Becker, George; Pettini, Max; Madau, Piero; Venemans, Bram

    2017-11-01

    We present the results of a survey for intervening Mg II absorbers in the redshift range z ≃ 2-6 in the foreground of four high-redshift quasar spectra, 5.79 ≤ zem ≤ 6.133, obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope X-Shooter. We visually identify 52 Mg II absorption systems and perform a systematic completeness and false positive analysis. We find 24 absorbers at ≥ 5σ significance in the equivalent width range 0.117 ≤ W2796 ≤ 3.655 Å with the highest redshift absorber at z = 4.89031 ± 4 × 10-5. For weak (W2796 absorbers exceeds the number expected from an exponential fit to stronger systems (W2796 > 0.3 Å). We find that there must be significant evolution in the absorption halo properties of Mg II absorbers with W2796 > 0.1 Å by 〈z〉 = 4.77 and/or that they are associated with galaxies with luminosities beyond the limits of the current luminosity function at z ˜ 5. We find that the incidence rate of strong Mg II absorbers (W2796 > 1.0 Å) can be explained if they are associated with galaxies with L ≥ 0.29L* and/or their covering fraction increases. If they continue to only be associated with galaxies with L ≥ 0.50L* then their physical cross-section (σphys) increases from 0.015 Mpc2 at z = 2.3-0.041 Mpc2 at 〈z〉 = 4.77. We measure Ω _{Mg II} = 2.1^{+6.3}_{-0.6}× 10^{-8}, 1.9^{+2.9}_{-0.2} × 10^{-8} and 3.9^{+7.1}_{-2.4}× 10^{-7} at 〈z〉 = 2.48, 3.41 and 4.77, respectively. At 〈z〉 = 4.77, Ω _{Mg II} exceeds the value expected from Ω _{H I} estimated from the global metallicity of damped Ly α systems (DLAs) at z ≃ 4.85 by a factor of ˜44 suggesting that either Mg II absorbers trace both ionized and neutral gas and/or are more metal rich than the average DLA at this redshift.

  11. SCORPIO - II. Spectral indices of weak Galactic radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, F.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Norris, R. P.; Leto, P.; Ingallinera, A.; Buemi, C. S.; Marvil, J.; Agliozzo, C.; Bufano, F.; Cerrigone, L.; Riggi, S.

    2018-01-01

    In the next few years the classification of radio sources observed by the large surveys will be a challenging problem and spectral index is a powerful tool for addressing it. Here we present an algorithm to estimate the spectral index of sources from multiwavelength radio images. We have applied our algorithm to SCORPIO, a Galactic plane survey centred around 2.1 GHz carried out with Australian Telescope Compact Array and found we can measure reliable spectral indices only for sources stronger than 40 times the rms noise. Above a threshold of 1 mJy, the source density in SCORPIO is 20 per cent greater than in a typical extragalactic field, like Australia Telescope Large Area Survey because of the presence of Galactic sources. Among this excess population, 16 sources per square degree have a spectral index of about zero suggesting optically thin thermal emission such as H II regions and planetary nebulae, while 12 per square degree present a rising spectrum, suggesting optically thick thermal emission such as stars and UCH II regions.

  12. Calculated resonance line profiles of [Mg II], [C II], and [Si IV] in the solar atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avrett, E.; McKillop, S. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Landi, E. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph space mission, launched 2013 June 27, is intended to study the structure of the solar chromosphere and the transition region between the chromosphere and corona. The spectral lines to be observed include the Mg II k line at 2796.5 Å, the C II 1334.5 Å line, and the Si IV line at 1393.8 Å, which are formed in the middle chromosphere, the upper chromosphere, and the lower transition region, respectively. Here we calculate the profiles of these lines from four models of the solar atmosphere, intended to represent the faint and mean internetwork, a network lane, and bright network. We show how the profiles change from the center of the solar disk toward the limb of the Sun and in response to outflows and inflows. These results are intended to cover the range of expected quiet-Sun observations and assist in their interpretation. We expect that the observations will lead to improvements in the models, which can then be used to estimate the required non-radiative heating in the different regions.

  13. Adsorption of Ca(II, Mg(II, Zn(II, and Cd(II on Chitosan Membrane Blended with Rice Hull Ash Silica and Polyethylene Glycol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Widhi Mahatmanti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research, chitosan based membrane blended with rice hull ash (RHA silica and polyethylene glycol (PEG has been applied as adsorbent of Ca(II, Mg(II, Zn(II and Cd(II in an aqueous solution. Membrane was synthesized by blending RHA silica and polyethylene glycol into chitosan. Silica and polyethylene glycol blended into the chitosan to improve the mechanical properties and the membrane porous. The membrane was characterized using Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, and swelling degree analyzer. Adsorption of metal ions investigated was conducted in a batch system with variation of pH, initial ion concentration and contact time. Thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption were evaluated based on the adsorption data at initial metal ion concentration and contact time variations, respectively. Results showed that the optimum condition of adsorption was at pH 9.0 for Ca(II, 6.0 for both Mg(II and Zn(II and 5.5 for Cd(II, and contact time of 24 h for all ions investigated. Kinetics of all investigated metal ion adsorption followed a kinetic model of pseudo-second-order. Adsorption of Ca(II and Mg(II on the membrane fitted to Freundlich model with the affinity of 1.266 and 1.099, respectively; and Zn(II and Cd(II fitted to Langmuir one with the capacity of 182 and 106 µmol/g, respectively.

  14. Mg II-Absorbing Galaxies in the UltraVISTA Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroupe, Darren; Lundgren, Britt

    2018-01-01

    Light that is emitted from distant quasars can become partially absorbed by intervening gaseous structures, including galaxies, in its path toward Earth, revealing information about the chemical content, degree of ionization, organization and evolution of these structures through time. In this project, quasar spectra are used to probe the halos of foreground galaxies at a mean redshift of z=1.1 in the COSMOS Field. Mg II absorption lines in Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar spectra are paired with galaxies in the UltraVISTA catalog at an impact parameter less than 200 kpc. A sample of 77 strong Mg II absorbers with a rest-frame equivalent width ≥ 0.3 Å and redshift from 0.34 < z < 2.21 are investigated to find equivalent width ratios of Mg II, C IV and Fe II absorption lines, and their relation to the impact parameter and the star formation rates, stellar masses, environments and redshifts of their host galaxies.

  15. The Relationship between Mg ii Broad Emission and Quasar Inclination Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor Wildy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Several observed spectral properties of quasars are believed to be influenced by quasar orientation. In this investigation we examine the effect of orientation on the Mg ii line located at 2,798 Å in a sample of 36 radio-loud quasars, with orientation angles having been obtained in a previous study using radio observations. We find no significant relationship between orientation angle and either Mg ii line full-width at half-maximum or equivalent width. The lack of correlation with inclination angle contradicts previous studies which also use radio data as a proxy for inclination angle and suggests the Mg ii emission region does not occupy a disk-like geometry. The lack of correlation with Mg ii equivalent width, however, is reported in at least one previous study. Although the significance is not very strong (86%, there is a possible negative relationship between inclination angle and Fe ii strength which, if true, could explain the Fe ii anti-correlation with [O iii] strength associated with Eigenvector 1. Interestingly, there are objects having almost edge-on inclinations while still exhibiting broad lines. This could be explained by a torus which is either clumpy (allowing sight lines to the central engine or mis-aligned with the accretion disk.

  16. Coexistence of type-II Dirac point and weak topological phase in Pt3Sn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minsung; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2017-11-01

    Intriguing topological phases may appear in both insulating and semimetallic states. Topological insulators exhibit topologically nontrivial band inversion, while topological Dirac/Weyl semimetals show "relativistic" linear band crossings. Here, we report an unusual topological state of Pt3Sn , where the two topological features appear simultaneously. Based on first-principles calculations, we show that Pt3Sn is a three-dimensional weak topological semimetal with topologically nontrivial band inversion between the valence and conduction bands, where the band structure also possesses type-II Dirac points at the boundary of two electron pockets. The formation of the Dirac points can be understood in terms of the representations of relevant symmetry groups and the compatibility relations. The topological surface states appear in accordance with the nontrivial bulk band topology. The unique coexistence of the two distinct topological features in Pt3Sn enlarges the material scope in topological physics, and is potentially useful for spintronics.

  17. A Parameter Study for Modeling Mg ii h and k Emission during Solar Flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kleint, Lucia, E-mail: frubio@stanford.edu [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, 5210, Windisch (Switzerland)

    2017-06-20

    Solar flares show highly unusual spectra in which the thermodynamic conditions of the solar atmosphere are encoded. Current models are unable to fully reproduce the spectroscopic flare observations, especially the single-peaked spectral profiles of the Mg ii h and k lines. We aim to understand the formation of the chromospheric and optically thick Mg ii h and k lines in flares through radiative transfer calculations. We take a flare atmosphere obtained from a simulation with the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN as input for a radiative transfer modeling with the RH code. By iteratively changing this model atmosphere and varying thermodynamic parameters such as temperature, electron density, and velocity, we study their effects on the emergent intensity spectra. We reproduce the typical single-peaked Mg ii h and k flare spectral shape and approximate the intensity ratios to the subordinate Mg ii lines by increasing either densities, temperatures, or velocities at the line core formation height range. Additionally, by combining unresolved upflows and downflows up to ∼250 km s{sup −1} within one resolution element, we reproduce the widely broadened line wings. While we cannot unambiguously determine which mechanism dominates in flares, future modeling efforts should investigate unresolved components, additional heat dissipation, larger velocities, and higher densities and combine the analysis of multiple spectral lines.

  18. A First Comparison of Millimeter Continuum and Mg ii Ultraviolet Line Emission from the Solar Chromosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastian, T. S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Chintzoglou, G.; De Pontieu, B.; Schmit, D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Shimojo, M. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Leenaarts, J. [Institute for Solar Physics, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Loukitcheva, M., E-mail: tbastian@nrao.edu [Center For Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2017-08-20

    We present joint observations of the Sun by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ). Both millimeter/submillimeter- λ continuum emission and ultraviolet (UV) line emission originate from the solar chromosphere and both have the potential to serve as powerful and complementary diagnostics of physical conditions in this enigmatic region of the solar atmosphere. The observations were made of a solar active region on 2015 December 18 as part of the ALMA science verification effort. A map of the Sun’s continuum emission was obtained by ALMA at a wavelength of 1.25 mm (239 GHz). A contemporaneous map was obtained by IRIS in the Mg ii h doublet line at 2803.5 Å. While a clear correlation between the 1.25 mm brightness temperature T{sub B} and the Mg ii h line radiation temperature T {sub rad} is observed, the slope is <1, perhaps as a result of the fact that these diagnostics are sensitive to different parts of the chromosphere and that the Mg ii h line source function includes a scattering component. There is a significant difference (35%) between the mean T{sub B} (1.25 mm) and mean T {sub rad} (Mg ii). Partitioning the maps into “sunspot,” “quiet areas,” and “plage regions” we find the relation between the IRIS Mg ii h line T {sub rad} and the ALMA T {sub B} region-dependent. We suggest this may be the result of regional dependences of the formation heights of the IRIS and ALMA diagnostics and/or the increased degree of coupling between the UV source function and the local gas temperature in the hotter, denser gas in plage regions.

  19. A First Comparison of Millimeter Continuum and Mg II Ultraviolet Line Emission from the Solar Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, T. S.; Chintzoglou, G.; De Pontieu, B.; Shimojo, M.; Schmit, D.; Leenaarts, J.; Loukitcheva, M.

    2017-08-01

    We present joint observations of the Sun by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Both millimeter/submillimeter-λ continuum emission and ultraviolet (UV) line emission originate from the solar chromosphere and both have the potential to serve as powerful and complementary diagnostics of physical conditions in this enigmatic region of the solar atmosphere. The observations were made of a solar active region on 2015 December 18 as part of the ALMA science verification effort. A map of the Sun’s continuum emission was obtained by ALMA at a wavelength of 1.25 mm (239 GHz). A contemporaneous map was obtained by IRIS in the Mg II h doublet line at 2803.5 Å. While a clear correlation between the 1.25 mm brightness temperature T B and the Mg II h line radiation temperature T rad is observed, the slope is <1, perhaps as a result of the fact that these diagnostics are sensitive to different parts of the chromosphere and that the Mg II h line source function includes a scattering component. There is a significant difference (35%) between the mean T B (1.25 mm) and mean T rad (Mg II). Partitioning the maps into “sunspot,” “quiet areas,” and “plage regions” we find the relation between the IRIS Mg II h line T rad and the ALMA T B region-dependent. We suggest this may be the result of regional dependences of the formation heights of the IRIS and ALMA diagnostics and/or the increased degree of coupling between the UV source function and the local gas temperature in the hotter, denser gas in plage regions.

  20. Estimating Black Hole Masses in Active Galactic Nuclei Using the Mg II λ2800 Emission Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Guo; Dong, Xiao-Bo; Wang, Ting-Gui; Ho, Luis C.; Yuan, Weimin; Wang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Shaohua; Zhou, Hongyan

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the relationship between the linewidths of broad Mg II λ2800 and Hβ in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to refine them as tools to estimate black hole (BH) masses. We perform a detailed spectral analysis of a large sample of AGNs at intermediate redshifts selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, along with a smaller sample of archival ultraviolet spectra for nearby sources monitored with reverberation mapping (RM). Careful attention is devoted to accurate spectral decomposition, especially in the treatment of narrow-line blending and Fe II contamination. We show that, contrary to popular belief, the velocity width of Mg II tends to be smaller than that of Hβ, suggesting that the two species are not cospatial in the broad-line region. Using these findings and recently updated BH mass measurements from RM, we present a new calibration of the empirical prescriptions for estimating virial BH masses for AGNs using the broad Mg II and Hβ lines. We show that the BH masses derived from our new formalisms show subtle but important differences compared to some of the mass estimators currently used in the literature.

  1. MgII Linear Polarization Measurements Using the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Sounding Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) sounding rocket program, with emphasis on the polarization characteristics of the VUV optics and their spectral, spatial and polarization resolution. SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria and this paper will describe the data that was acquired with emphasis on the MgII linear polarization measurements.

  2. HI 21cm absorption in low redshift MgII-selected systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lane, W; Smette, A; Briggs, F; Carilli, CL; Radford, SJE; Menten, KM; Langston, GI

    1999-01-01

    We report the discovery of two low redshift HI 21cm absorbers, one at z = 0.2212 towards the z(em) = 0.630 quasar OI 363 (B0738+313), and the other at z = 0.3127 towards PKS B1127-145 (z(em) = 1.187). Both were found during a survey of MgII selected systems at redshifts 0.2

  3. Investigation on the efficiency and mechanism of Cd(II) and Pb(II) removal from aqueous solutions using MgO nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Chunmei; Wang, Wei; Tan, Fatang; Luo, Fan; Chen, Jianguo; Qiao, Xueliao

    2015-12-15

    In this study, the removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions using MgO nanoparticles prepared by a simple sol-gel method was investigated. The efficiency of Cd(II) and Pb(II) removal was examined through batch adsorption experiments. For the single adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II), The adsorption kinetics and isotherm data obeyed well Pseudo-second-order and Langmuir models, indicating the monolayer chemisorption of heavy metal ions. The maximum adsorption capacities calculated by Langmuir equation were 2294 mg/g for Cd(II) and 2614 mg/g for Pb(II), respectively. The adsorption process was controlled simultaneously by external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion. In the binary system, a competitive adsorption was observed, showing preference of adsorption followed Pb(II) >Cd(II). Significantly, the elution experiments confirmed that neither Cd(II) nor Pb(II) could be greatly desorbed after water washing even for five times. XRD and XPS measurements revealed the mechanism of Cd(II) and Pb(II) removal by MgO nanoparticles was mainly involved in precipitation and adsorption on the surface of MgO, resulting from the interaction between active sites of MgO and heavy metal ions. Easy preparation, remarkable removal efficiency and firmly adsorptive ability make the MgO nanoparticles to be an efficient material in the treatment of heavy metal-contaminated water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. CLASP2: High-Precision Spectro-Polarimetery in Mg II h & k

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, R.; McKenzie, D.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Auchere, F.; Rachmeler, L.; Okamoto, T. J.; Kano, R.; Song, D.; Kubo, M.; Narukage, N.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The international team is promoting the CLASP2 (Chromospheric LAyer Spectro-Polarimeter 2) sounding rocket experiment, which is the re-flight of CLASP (2015). In this second flight, we will refit the existing CLASP instrument to measure all Stokes parameters in Mg II h k lines, and aim at inferring the magnetic field information in the upper chromosphere combining the Hanle and Zeeman effects. CLASP2 project was approved by NASA in December 2016, and is now scheduled to fly in 2019.

  5. Intervening Mg II absorption systems from the SDSS DR12 quasar spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Clowes, Roger G.; Campusano, Luis E.; Söchting, Ilona K.; Graham, Matthew J.; Williger, Gerard M.

    2016-12-01

    We present the catalogue of the Mg II absorption systems detected at a high significance level using an automated search algorithm in the spectra of quasars from the 12th data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A total of 266,433 background quasars were searched for the presence of absorption systems in their spectra. The continuum modelling for the quasar spectra was performed using a mean filter. A pseudo-continuum derived using a median filter was used to trace the emission lines. The absorption system catalogue contains 39,694 Mg II systems detected at a 6.0, 3.0σ level respectively for the two lines of the doublet. The catalogue was constrained to an absorption line redshift of 0.35 ≤ z2796 ≤ 2.3. The rest-frame equivalent width of the λ2796 line ranges between 0.2 ≤ Wr ≤ 6.2 Å. Using Gaussian noise-only simulations, we estimate a false positive rate of 7.7 per cent in the catalogue. We measured the number density ∂N2796/∂z of Mg II absorbers and find evidence for steeper evolution of the systems with Wr ≥ 1.2 Å at low redshifts (z2796 ≤ 1.0), consistent with other earlier studies. A suite of null tests over the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z2796 ≤ 1.5 was used to study the presence of systematics and selection effects like the dependence of the number density evolution of the absorption systems on the properties of the background quasar spectra. The null tests do not indicate the presence of any selection effects in the absorption catalogue if the quasars with spectral signal-to-noise level less than 5.0 are removed. The resultant catalogue contains 36,981 absorption systems. The Mg II absorption catalogue is publicly available and can be downloaded from the link http://srini.ph.unimelb.edu.au/mgii.php.

  6. Removal of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution on Amberlite IRC 748 synthetic resin by ion exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhihui; Qi, Tao; Qu, Jingkui; Wang, Lina; Chu, Jinglong

    2009-08-15

    Experimental measurements have been made on the batch ion exchange of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution using cation exchanger of Amberlite IRC 748 as K+ form. The ion exchange behavior of two alkaline-earth metals on the resin, depending on contact time, pH, temperature and resin dosage was studied. The adsorption isotherms were described by means of the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. For Ca(II) ion, the Langmuir model represented the adsorption process better than the Freundlich model. The maximum ion exchange capacity was found to be 47.21 mg g(-1) for Ca(II) and 27.70 mg g(-1) for Mg(II). The kinetic data were tested using Lagergren-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. Kinetic data correlated well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating that the chemical adsorption was the rate-limiting step. Various thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy (DeltaG degrees ), enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ) and entropy (DeltaS degrees ) were also calculated. These parameters showed that the ion exchange of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic process in nature. The activation energy of ion-exchange (E(a)) was determined as 12.34 kJ mol(-1) for Ca(II) and 9.865 kJ mol(-1) for Mg(II) according to the Arrhenius equation.

  7. Large-scale correlations in gas traced by Mg II absorbers around low-mass galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2018-03-01

    The physical origin of the large-scale conformity in the colours and specific star formation rates of isolated low-mass central galaxies and their neighbours on scales in excess of 1 Mpc is still under debate. One possible scenario is that gas is heated over large scales by feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs), leading to coherent modulation of cooling and star formation between well-separated galaxies. In this Letter, the metal line absorption catalogue of Zhu & Ménard is used to probe gas out to large projected radii around a sample of a million galaxies with stellar masses ˜1010M⊙ and photometric redshifts in the range 0.4 statistically significant excess of Mg II absorbers is present around the red-low-mass galaxies compared to their blue counterparts out to projected radii of 10 Mpc. In addition, the equivalent width distribution function of Mg II absorbers around low-mass galaxies is shown to be strongly affected by the presence of a nearby (Rp < 2 Mpc) radio-loud AGNs out to projected radii of 5 Mpc.

  8. Mg(OH)2 Supported Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron Enhancing the Removal of Pb(II) from Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minghui; Wang, Yonghao; Chen, Luntai; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Zhang

    2015-04-22

    In this article, a novel composite (Mg(OH)2 supported nanoscale zerovalent iron (denoted as nZVI@Mg(OH)2) was prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy method. The morphology analysis revealed that Mg(OH)2 appeared as self-supported flower-like spheres, and nano Fe0 particles were uniformly immobilized on the surface of their "flower petals", thus aggregation of Fe0 particles was minimized. Then the Pb(II) removal performance was tested by batch experiments. The composite presented exceptional removal capacity (1986.6 mg/g) compared with Mg(OH)2 and nanoscale zerovalent iron due to the synergistic effect. Mechanisms were also explored by a comparative study of the phase, morphology, and surface valence state of composite before and after reaction, indicating that at least three paths are involved in the synergistic removal process: (1) Pb(II) adsorption by Mg(OH)2 (companied with ion exchange reaction); (2) Pb(II) reduction to Pb0 by nanoscale zerovalent iron; and (3) Pb(II) precipitation as Pb(OH)2. The hydroxies provided by Mg(OH)2 can dramatically promote the role of nanoscale zerovalent iron as reducer, thus greatly enhancing the whole Pb(II) sequestration process. The excellent performance shown in our research potentially provides an alternative technique for Pb(II) pollution treatment.

  9. Design of a Binuclear Ni(II) Complex with Large Ising-type Anisotropy and Weak Anti-Ferromagnetic Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khatib, Fatima; Cahier, Benjamin; López-Jordà, Maurici; Guillot, Régis; Rivière, Eric; Hafez, Hala; Saad, Zeinab; Girerd, Jean-Jacques; Guihéry, Nathalie; Mallah, Talal

    2017-09-05

    The preparation of a binuclear Ni(II) complex with a pentacoordinate environment using a cryptand organic ligand and the imidazolate bridge is reported. The coordination sphere is close to trigonal bipyramidal (tbp) for one Ni(II) and to square pyramidal (spy) for the other. The use of the imidazolate bridge that undergoes π-π stacking with two benzene rings of the chelating ligand induces steric hindrance that stabilizes the pentacoordinate environment. Magnetic measurements together with theoretical studies of the spin states energy levels allow fitting the data and reveal a large Ising-type anisotropy and a weak anti-ferromagnetic exchange coupling between the metal ions. The magnitude and the nature of the magnetic anisotropy and the difference in anisotropy between the two metal ions are rationalized using wave-function-based calculations. We show that a slight distortion of the coordination sphere of Ni(II) from spy to tbp leads to an Ising-type anisotropy. Broken-symmetry density functional calculations rationalize the weak anti-ferromagnetic exchange coupling through the imidazolate bridge.

  10. Removal of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution on Amberlite IRC 748 synthetic resin by ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Zhihui [Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Qi Tao, E-mail: tqgreen@home.ipe.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Qu Jingkui; Wang Lina; Chu Jinglong [Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2009-08-15

    Experimental measurements have been made on the batch ion exchange of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution using cation exchanger of Amberlite IRC 748 as K{sup +} form. The ion exchange behavior of two alkaline-earth metals on the resin, depending on contact time, pH, temperature and resin dosage was studied. The adsorption isotherms were described by means of the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. For Ca(II) ion, the Langmuir model represented the adsorption process better than the Freundlich model. The maximum ion exchange capacity was found to be 47.21 mg g{sup -1} for Ca(II) and 27.70 mg g{sup -1} for Mg(II). The kinetic data were tested using Lagergren-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. Kinetic data correlated well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating that the chemical adsorption was the rate-limiting step. Various thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy ({Delta}G{sup o}), enthalpy ({Delta}H{sup o}) and entropy ({Delta}S{sup o}) were also calculated. These parameters showed that the ion exchange of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic process in nature. The activation energy of ion-exchange (E{sub a}) was determined as 12.34 kJ mol{sup -1} for Ca(II) and 9.865 kJ mol{sup -1} for Mg(II) according to the Arrhenius equation.

  11. Growth, structure, crystalline perfection and characterization of Mg(II)-incorporated tris(thiourea)Zn(II) sulfate crystals: Enhanced second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthu, K. [Department of Chemistry, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar-608 002 (India); Bhagavannarayana, G. [Crystal Growth and X-ray Analysis Activity, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110 012 (India); Meenakshisundaram, S.P., E-mail: aumats2009@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar-608 002 (India)

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small quantity incorporation of Mg(II)- enhances the SHG efficiency of ZTS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystal stress is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of Mg(II)-incorporated ZTS is elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystalline perfection is evaluated by HRXRD. - Abstract: Single crystals of Mg(II)-incorporated tris(thiourea)Zn(II) sulfate (MZTS) have been grown from aqueous solution at room temperature by slow evaporation solution growth technique. The incorporation of Mg(II)- into the crystalline lattice was well confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The reduction in the intensities observed in powder X-ray diffraction patterns of doped specimen and slight shifts in vibrational frequencies in FT-IR indicate the lattice stress as a result of doping. Thermal studies reveal the purity of the material and no decomposition is observed up to the melting point. High transmittance is observed in the visible region and the band gap energy is estimated by Kubelka-Munk algorithm. Surface morphology of doped material was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Decreased crystalline perfection by doping observed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) analysis is justified by the crystal stress. Even a small quantity incorporation of Mg(II)- enhances the SHG efficiency significantly. The as-grown crystal is further characterized by microhardness and dielectric studies.

  12. Axial Mn-CCN Bonds of Cyano Manganese(II) Porphyrin Complexes: Flexible and Weak?

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingrui; Li, Xiangjun; Liu, Yanhong; Li, Jianfeng

    2016-06-20

    Three five-coordinate high-spin (cyano)manganese(II) complexes, utilized tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP), tetratolylporphyrin (TTP), and tetramesitylporphyrin (TMP) as ligands, are prepared and studied by single-crystal X-ray, FT-IR, UV-vis, and EPR spectroscopies. The crystal structure studies revealed noteworthy structural features including unexpectedly wide tilting angles of the axial Mn-CCN bonds, which is contrasted to the isoelectronic Fe(III)-CCN bonds. Solid-state EPR measurements (90 K) and simulations are applied to obtain the ZFS parameters (D, E, and E/D (λ)), which are compared to Mn(II) porphyrin analogues of hemes to understand the ligand field of the cyanide. The solution EPR studies gave new insights into the chemical equilibrium of four- and five-coordinate species, which has been monitored by UV-vis spectroscopy.

  13. O2(a1Δg) + Mg, Fe, and Ca: experimental kinetics and formulation of a weak collision, multiwell master equation with spin-hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plane, J M C; Whalley, C L; Frances-Soriano, L; Goddard, A; Harvey, J N; Glowacki, D R; Viggiano, A A

    2012-07-07

    The first excited electronic state of molecular oxygen, O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)), is formed in the upper atmosphere by the photolysis of O(3). Its lifetime is over 70 min above 75 km, so that during the day its concentration is about 30 times greater than that of O(3). In order to explore its potential reactivity with atmospheric constituents produced by meteoric ablation, the reactions of Mg, Fe, and Ca with O(2)(a) were studied in a fast flow tube, where the metal atoms were produced either by thermal evaporation (Ca and Mg) or by pulsed laser ablation of a metal target (Fe), and detected by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. O(2)(a) was produced by bubbling a flow of Cl(2) through chilled alkaline H(2)O(2), and its absolute concentration determined from its optical emission at 1270 nm (O(2)(a(1)Δ(g) - X(3)Σ(g) (-)). The following results were obtained at 296 K: k(Mg + O(2)(a) + N(2) → MgO(2) + N(2)) = (1.8 ± 0.2) × 10(-30) cm(6) molecule(-2) s(-1); k(Fe + O(2)(a) → FeO + O) = (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1); k(Ca + O(2)(a) + N(2) → CaO(2) + N(2)) = (2.9 ± 0.2) × 10(-28) cm(6) molecule(-2) s(-1); and k(Ca + O(2)(a) → CaO + O) = (2.7 ± 1.0) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The total uncertainty in these rate coefficients, which mostly arises from the systematic uncertainty in the O(2)(a) concentration, is estimated to be ±40%. Mg + O(2)(a) occurs exclusively by association on the singlet surface, producing MgO(2)((1)A(1)), with a pressure dependent rate coefficient. Fe + O(2)(a), on the other hand, shows pressure independent kinetics. FeO + O is produced with a probability of only ∼0.1%. There is no evidence for an association complex, suggesting that this reaction proceeds mostly by near-resonant electronic energy transfer to Fe(a(5)F) + O(2)(X). The reaction of Ca + O(2)(a) occurs in an intermediate regime with two competing pressure dependent channels: (1) a recombination to produce CaO(2)((1)A(1)), and (2) a singlet

  14. Mixed ligand complexes of alkaline earth metals: Part XII. Mg(II, Ca(II, Sr(II and Ba(II complexes with 5-chlorosalicylaldehyde and salicylaldehyde or hydroxyaromatic ketones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MITHLESH AGRAWAL

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The reactions of alkaline earth metal chlorides with 5-chlorosalicylaldehyde and salicylaldehyde, 2-hydroxyacetophenone or 2-hydroxypropiophenone have been carried out in 1 : 1 : 1 mole ratio and the mixed ligand complexes of the type MLL’(H2O2 (where M = Mg(II, Ca(II, Sr(II and Ba(II, HL = 5-chlorosalicylaldehyde and HL’ = salicylaldehyde, 2-hydroxyacetophenone or 2-hydroxypropiophenone have been isolated. These complexes were characterized by TLC, conductance measurements, IR and 1H-NMR spectra.

  15. The Solar Spectral Irradiance as a Function of the Mg II Index for Atmosphere and Climate Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuillier, Gerard; DeLand, Matthew; Shapiro, Alexander; Schmutz, Werner; Bolsee, David; Melo, Stella

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method to reconstruct the solar spectrum irradiance in the Ly alpha-400 nm region, and its variability, based on the Mg II index and neutron monitor. Measurements of the solar spectral irradiance available in the literature have been made with different instruments at different times and different spectral ranges. However, climate studies require harmonized data sets. This new approach has the advantage of being independent of the absolute calibration and aging of the instruments. First, the Mg II index is derived using solar spectra from Ly alpha (121 nm) to 410 nm measured from 1978 to 2010 by several space missions. The variability of the spectra with respect to a chosen reference spectrum as a function of time and wavelength is scaled to the derived Mg II index. The set of coefficients expressing the spectral variability can be applied to the chosen reference spectrum to reconstruct the solar spectra within a given time frame or Mg II index values. The accuracy of this method is estimated using two approaches: by direct comparison with particular cases where solar spectra are available from independent measurements, and by calculating the standard deviation between the measured spectra and their reconstruction. From direct comparisons with measurements we obtain an accuracy of about 1 to 2 %, which degrades towards Ly alpha. In a further step, we extend our solar spectral irradiance reconstruction back to the Maunder Minimum introducing the relationship between the Mg II index and the neutron monitor data. Consistent measurements of the Mg II index are not available prior to 1978. However, we observe that over the last three solar cycles, the Mg II index shows strong correlation with the modulation potential determined from the neutron monitor data. Assuming that this correlation can be applied to the past, we reconstruct the Mg II index from the modulation potential back to the Maunder Minimum, and obtain the corresponding solar

  16. Roulettes: A weak lensing formalism for strong lensing - II. Derivation and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Clarkson, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present a new extension of the weak lensing formalism capable of describing strongly lensed images. This paper accompanies Paper I, where we provided a condensed overview of the approach and illustrated how it works. Here we give all the necessary details, together with some more explicit examples. We solve the non-linear geodesic deviation equation order-by-order, keeping the leading derivatives of the optical tidal matrix, giving rise to a series of maps from which a complete strongly lensed image is formed. The family of maps are decomposed by separating the trace and trace-free parts of each map. Each trace-free tensor represents an independent spin mode, which distort circles into a variety of roulettes in the screen-space. It is shown how summing this series expansion allows us to create large strongly lensed images in regions where convergence, shear and flexion are not sufficient. This paper is a detailed exposition of Paper I which presents the key elements of the subject matter in a wider context...

  17. Fulvestrant 500 mg Versus Anastrozole 1 mg for the First-Line Treatment of Advanced Breast Cancer: Overall Survival Analysis From the Phase II FIRST Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Matthew J; Llombart-Cussac, Antonio; Feltl, David; Dewar, John A; Jasiówka, Marek; Hewson, Nicola; Rukazenkov, Yuri; Robertson, John F R

    2015-11-10

    To compare overall survival (OS) for fulvestrant 500 mg versus anastrozole as first-line endocrine therapy for advanced breast cancer. The Fulvestrant First-Line Study Comparing Endocrine Treatments (FIRST) was a phase II, randomized, open-label, multicenter trial. Postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive, locally advanced/metastatic breast cancer who had no previous therapy for advanced disease received either fulvestrant 500 mg (days 0, 14, 28, and every 28 days thereafter) or anastrozole 1 mg (daily). The primary end point (clinical benefit rate [72.5% and 67.0%]) and a follow-up analysis (median time to progression [23.4 months and 13.1 months]) have been reported previously for fulvestrant 500 mg and anastrozole, respectively. Subsequently, the protocol was amended to assess OS by unadjusted log-rank test after approximately 65% of patients had died. Treatment effect on OS across several subgroups was examined. Tolerability was evaluated by adverse event monitoring. In total, 205 patients were randomly assigned (fulvestrant 500 mg, n = 102; anastrozole, n = 103). At data cutoff, 61.8% (fulvestrant 500 mg, n = 63) and 71.8% (anastrozole, n = 74) had died. The hazard ratio (95% CI) for OS with fulvestrant 500 mg versus anastrozole was 0.70 (0.50 to 0.98; P = .04; median OS, 54.1 months v 48.4 months). Treatment effects seemed generally consistent across the subgroups analyzed. No new safety issues were observed. There are several limitations of this OS analysis, including that it was not planned in the original protocol but instead was added after time-to-progression results were analyzed, and that not all patients participated in additional OS follow-up. However, the present results suggest fulvestrant 500 mg extends OS versus anastrozole. This finding now awaits prospective confirmation in the larger phase III FALCON (Fulvestrant and Anastrozole Compared in Hormonal Therapy Naïve Advanced Breast Cancer) trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT

  18. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of the Co(II) and Ni(II) ions removal from aqueous solutions by Ca-Mg phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanets, A I; Srivastava, V; Kitikova, N V; Shashkova, I L; Sillanpää, M

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work was to study the sorption kinetics and thermodynamics of Co(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solutions by sorbents on the basis of hydrogen (PD-1) and tertiary (PD-2) Ca-Mg phosphates depending on the solution temperature and sorbents chemical composition. Kinetic studies of adsorption of Co(II) and Ni(II) ions onto samples of phosphate sorbents were performed in batch experiment at the temperatures 288, 303, 318 and 333 K. The sorbent dose was fixed at 10 g L-1, initial pH value 2.6, and contact time varied from 5 to 600 min. The kinetics of Co(II) and Ni(II) adsorption were analyzed by using pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°) for the sorption of Co(II) and Ni(II) were determined using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. The calculated kinetic parameters and corresponding correlation coefficients revealed that Co(II) and Ni(II) uptake process followed the pseudo-second order rate expression. Thermodynamic studies confirmed the spontaneous and endothermic nature of removal process which indicate that sorption of Co(II) and Ni(II) ions onto both phosphate sorbents is favoured at higher temperatures and has the chemisorptive mechanism. The data thus obtained would be useful for practical application of the low cost and highly effective Ca-Mg phosphate sorbents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. THE MAGNETIC SENSITIVITY OF THE Mg ii k LINE TO THE JOINT ACTION OF HANLE, ZEEMAN, AND MAGNETO-OPTICAL EFFECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, E. Alsina; Bueno, J. Trujillo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Belluzzi, L., E-mail: ealsina@iac.es, E-mail: jtb@iac.es, E-mail: belluzzi@irsol.ch [Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno, CH-6605 Locarno Monti (Switzerland)

    2016-11-10

    We highlight the main results of a radiative transfer investigation on the magnetic sensitivity of the solar Mg ii k resonance line at 2795.5 Å, accounting for the joint action of the Hanle and Zeeman effects as well as partial frequency redistribution phenomena. We confirm that at the line center, the linear polarization signals produced by scattering processes are measurable, and that they are sensitive, via the Hanle effect, to magnetic fields with strengths between 5 and 50 G, approximately. We also show that the Zeeman effect produces conspicuous circular polarization signals, especially for longitudinal fields stronger than 50 G, which can be used to estimate the magnetization of the solar chromosphere via the familiar magnetograph formula. The most novel result is that magneto-optical effects produce, in the wings of the line, a decrease of the Q / I scattering polarization pattern and the appearance of U / I signals (i.e., a rotation of the plane of linear polarization). This sensitivity of the Q / I and U / I wing signals to both weak (∼5 G) and stronger magnetic fields expands the scientific interest of the Mg ii k line for probing the chromosphere in quiet and active regions of the Sun.

  20. Synthesis, spectroscopic and thermal studies of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) diclofenac sodium complexes as anti-inflammatory drug and their protective effects on renal functions impairment and oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Hamza, Reham Z.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2015-01-01

    The main task of our present study is the preparation of newly complexes of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) with diclofenac which succeeded to great extent in alleviating the side effects of diclofenac alone and ameliorating the kidney function parameters and antioxidant capacities with respect to diclofenac treated group alone. The Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) with diclofenac have been synthesized and characterized using infrared, electronic and 1H NMR spectral, thermogravimetric and conductivity measurements. The diclofenac ligand has been found to act as bidentate chelating agent. Diclofenac complexes coordinate through the oxygen's of the carboxyl group. The molar ratio chelation is 1:2 (M2+-dic) with general formula [M(dic)2(H2O)2]ṡnH2O. Antibacterial screening of the alkaline earth metal complexes against Escherichia coli (Gram - ve), Bacillus subtilis (Gram + ve) and anti-fungal (Asperagillus oryzae, Asperagillus niger, Asperagillus flavus) were investigated. The kidney functions in male albino rats were ameliorated upon treatment with metal complexes of dic, which are represented by decreasing the levels of urea and uric acid to be located within normal values. The other looks bright spot in this article is the assessment of antioxidant defense system including SOD, CAT and MDA with the help of Sr2+, Mg2+ and Ca2+-dic complexes. The hormones related to kidney functions and stresses have been greatly ameliorated in groups treated with dic complexes in comparable with dic treated group.

  1. SALT long-slit spectroscopy of quasar HE 0435-4312: fast displacement of the Mg II emission line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Średzińska, J.; Czerny, B.; Hryniewicz, K.; Krupa, M.; Kurcz, A.; Marziani, P.; Adhikari, T. P.; Basak, R.; You, B.; Wang, J.-M.; Hu, C.; Pych, W.; Bilicki, M.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The Mg II emission line is visible in the optical band for intermediate redshift quasars (0.4 frame. The Mg II line shape is clearly non-Gaussian but single-component, and the increase in line equivalent width and line shift is not accompanied with significant evolution of the line shape. We analyse the conditions in the Mg II and Fe II formation region and we note that the very large difference in the covering factor and the turbulent velocity also support the conclusion that the two regions are spatially separated. Conclusions: The measured acceleration of the line systematic shift is too large to connect it with the orbital motion at a distance of the BLR in this source. It may imply a precessing inner disk illuminating the BLR. Further monitoring is still needed to better constrain the variability mechanism. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) under program 2012-2-POL-003 and 2013-1-POL-RSA-002 (PI: B. Czerny).Spectra shown in Figs. 3 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/601/A32

  2. MAGIICAT III. Interpreting self-similarity of the circumgalactic medium with virial mass using Mg II absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchill, Christopher W.; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Nielsen, Nikole M. [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Kacprzak, Glenn G. [Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2013-12-10

    In Churchill et al., we used halo abundance matching applied to 182 galaxies in the Mg II Absorber-Galaxy Catalog (MAGIICAT) and showed that the mean Mg II λ2796 equivalent width follows a tight inverse-square power law, W{sub r} (2796)∝(D/R {sub vir}){sup –2}, with projected location relative to the galaxy virial radius and that the Mg II absorption covering fraction is effectively invariant with galaxy virial mass, M {sub h}, over the range 10.7 ≤ log M {sub h}/M {sub ☉} ≤ 13.9. In this work, we explore multivariate relationships between W{sub r} (2796), virial mass, impact parameter, virial radius, and the theoretical cooling radius that further elucidate self-similarity in the cool/warm (T = 10{sup 4}-10{sup 4.5} K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) with virial mass. We show that virial mass determines the extent and strength of the Mg II absorbing gas such that the mean W{sub r} (2796) increases with virial mass at fixed distance while decreasing with galactocentric distance for fixed virial mass. The majority of the absorbing gas resides within D ≅ 0.3 R {sub vir}, independent of both virial mass and minimum absorption threshold; inside this region, and perhaps also in the region 0.3 < D/R {sub vir} ≤ 1, the mean W{sub r} (2796) is independent of virial mass. Contrary to absorber-galaxy cross-correlation studies, we show there is no anti-correlation between W{sub r} (2796) and virial mass. We discuss how simulations and theory constrained by observations support self-similarity of the cool/warm CGM via the physics governing star formation, gas-phase metal enrichment, recycling efficiency of galactic scale winds, filament and merger accretion, and overdensity of local environment as a function of virial mass.

  3. The reaction 26Mg(p,γ)27Al : (II). Spins of 27Al levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheppard, D.M.; Leun, C. van der

    1967-01-01

    Measurements of double and triple angular correlations and gamma-ray polarizations at twenty resonances in the reaction 26Mg(p, γ)27Al, lead to the unambiguous spin and panty assignments J[pi]=7+/2,5+/2, 3+/2,9+/2 and 5/2 to the bound states of 27Al at 2 21, 2.73, 2.98, 3.00 and 4.81 MeV,

  4. Physicochemical impact studies of gamma rays on "aspirin" analgesics drug and its metal complexes in solid form: Synthesis, spectroscopic and biological assessment of Ca(II), Mg(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) aspirinate complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Sharshar, T.; Elsabawy, Khaled M.; Heiba, Zein K.

    2013-09-01

    Metal aspirinate complexes, M2(Asp)4, where M is Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) or Ba(II) are formed by refluxed of aspirin (Asp) with divalent non-transition metal ions of group (II) and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic measurements (infrared, electronic, 1H NMR, Raman, X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy). Elemental analysis of the chelates suggests the stoichiometry is 1:2 (metal:ligand). Infrared spectra of the complexes agree with the coordination to the central metal atom through three donation sites of two oxygen atoms of bridge bidentate carboxylate group and oxygen atom of sbnd Cdbnd O of acetyl group. Infrared spectra coupled with the results of elemental analyzes suggested a distorted octahedral structure for the M(II) aspirinate complexes. Gamma irradiation was tested as a method for stabilization of aspirin as well as their complexes. The effect of gamma irradiation, with dose of 80 Gy, on the properties of aspirinate complexes was studied. The aspirinate chelates have been screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against four bacteria, gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and two strains of fungus (Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans). The metal chelates were shown to possess more antibacterial activity than the free aspirin chelate.

  5. Evaluation of the use of Classical Nucleation Theory for predicting intestinal crystalline precipitation of two weakly basic BSC class II drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlert, Sara; Lennernäs, Hans; Abrahamsson, Bertil

    2014-03-12

    The aim of this work was to evaluate an in vitro-in silico approach for prediction of small intestinal crystalline precipitation and drug absorption of two weakly basic model BCS class II drugs, AZD0865 and mebendazole. The crystallization rates were investigated in an in vitro method using simulated gastric and intestinal media, and the result was modeled by using Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT). The effect of varying in vitro parameters (initial drug concentration, rate of mixing gastric and intestinal fluid, stirring and filtration) on the interfacial tension γ, being a key parameter in CNT, was investigated. The initial drug concentration had the most significant effect on γ for both substances tested, although γ is a fundamental parameter independent of concentration according to CNT. In the subsequent in silico prediction of drug absorption, by use of a Compartmental and Transit intestinal model, an empirical approach was used where γ was allowed to vary with simulated small intestinal concentrations. The in silico predictions were compared to published human in vivo plasma drug concentration data for different doses of AZD0865 and dog intestinal drug concentrations, amount precipitated in intestine and plasma concentrations for mebendazole. The results showed that lack of significant crystallization effects on absorption in man of the model drug AZD0865 up to doses of 4 mg/kg could be predicted which was in accordance with in vivo data. Mebendazole intestinal precipitation in canines was also well described by the model, where mean predicted amount precipitated was 136% (range 111-164%) of measured solid amount, and mean predicted intestinal concentration was 94% (range 59-147%) of measured concentration. In conclusion, the in vitro-in silico approach can be used for predictions of absorption effects of crystallization, but the model could benefit from further development work on the theoretical crystallization model and in vitro experimental design

  6. On the low-lying states of MgO. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Lengsfield, B. H., III; Silver, D. M.; Yarkony, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    Using a double zeta plus polarization basis set of Slater orbitals, full valence MCSCF (FVMCSCF) calculations were performed for the low-lying states of MgO. For each state the FVMCSCF calculations were used to identify the important configurations which are then used in the MCSCF calculation and subsequently as references in a single and double excitation CI calculation. This approach is found to treat all states equivalently, with the maximum error in the computed transition energies and equilibrium bond lengths of 800/cm and approximately 0.03 A, respectively. The b 3 Sigma + state which has yet to be characterized experimentally is predicted to have a transition energy of approximately 8300/cm and a bond length of 1.79 A. A spectroscopic analysis of the potential curves indicates that their shapes are in quite reasonable agreement with the range of experimental results.

  7. SYNTHESIS AND STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A NOVEL Mg(II COMPLEX WITH 1,2-PHENYLENEDIOXYDIACETIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XI-SHI TAI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel Mg(II complex, [Mg(HL2•(H2O4]•4H2O•HCl (HL = 1,2-phenylenedioxydiacetato, has been synthesized by the reaction of 1,2-phenylenedioxydiacetic acid, NaOH and MgCl2•6H2O in one-pot. The compound was characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis. The crystal of the title complex belongs to monoclinic, space group Pn with a = 10.772(2 Å, b = 9.7145(19 Å, c = 13.996(3 Å, β = 104.32(3º, V = 1419.1(5 Å3, Z = 2, Dc = 1.498 μg•m-3, μ = 0.245 mm-1, F(000 = 658 and final R1 = 0.0653, ωR2 = 0.1913. The molecules are connected by π-π stacking to form three dimensional network structures.

  8. Heavy Metals (Mg, Mn, Ni and Sn contamination in Soil Samples of Ahvaz II Industrial Estate of Iran in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil l Sobhanardakani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Due to the rapid industrial development in Khuzestan province of Iran during recent years, this study was performed to analyze the variation of metals concentrations (Mg, Mn, Ni, and Sn in soil samples of Ahvaz II Industrial estate during the spring season of 2013. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study, 27 topsoil samples were collected from nine stations. The intensity of the soil contamination was evaluated, using a contamination factor (Cf and geo-accumulation index (I-geo. Results:  The mean soil concentrations (in mg kg-1 (dry weight were in ranged within 870-1144 (Mg, 188-300 (Mn, 93-199 (Ni and 9-15 (Sn. The data indicated that the I-geo value for all metals falls in class ‘1’. Also the Cf value for Mg and Mn falls in class ‘0’, the Cf value for Sn falls in class ‘1’ and the Cf value for Ni falls in the classes of ‘1’ and ‘2’. The result of the Pearson correlation showed that there were significant positive associations between all metals. Conclusions: According to the results which were achieved by a cluster analysis, there were significant positive associations among all metals based on Pearson correlation coefficient, especially between Ni and Sn; also both of them with Mn. Because the Ni originates from oil sources it can be resulted that Mn and Sn originate from oil sources, too. Therefore, industrial activities and exploitation of oil reservoirs are the main cause of pollution in that area. Also, it can be concluded that, with increasing the distance from the source of pollution, the accumulation of contaminants in the soil samples decreased.

  9. Structures and Spectroscopy Studies of Two M(II-Phosphonate Coordination Polymers Based on Alkaline Earth Metals (M = Ba, Mg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui-Rong Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The two examples of alkaline-earth M(II-phosphonate coordination polymers, [Ba2(L(H2O9]·3H2O (1 and [Mg1.5(H2O9]·(L-H21.5·6H2O (2 (H4L = H2O3PCH2N(C4H8NCH2PO3H2, N,N′-piperazinebis(methylenephosphonic acid, (L-H2 = O3PH2CHN(C4H8NHCH2PO3 have been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, PXRD, TG-DSC, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 possesses a 2D inorganic-organic alternate arrangement layer structure built from 1D inorganic chains through the piperazine bridge, in which the ligand L−4 shows two types of coordination modes reported rarely at the same time. In 1, both crystallographic distinct Ba(1 and Ba(2 ions adopt 8-coordination two caps and 9-coordination three caps triangular prism geometry structures, respectively. Compound 2 possesses a zero-dimensional mononuclear structure with two crystallographic distinct Mg(II ions. Free metal cations   [MgO6]n2+ and uncoordinated anions (L-H2n2- are joined together by static electric force. Results of photoluminescent measurement indicate three main emission bands centered at 300 nm, 378.5 nm, and 433 nm for 1 and 302 nm, 378 nm, and 434.5 nm for 2 (λex=235 nm, respectively. The high energy emissions could be derived from the intraligand π∗-n transition stations of H4L (310 nm and 382 nm, λex=235 nm, while the low energy emission (>400 nm of 1-2 may be due to the coordination effect with metal(II ions.

  10. Efficacy and Safety of Alirocumab 150 mg Every 4 Weeks in Patients With Hypercholesterolemia Not on Statin Therapy : The ODYSSEY CHOICE II Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroes, Erik; Guyton, John R; Lepor, Norman; Civeira, Fernando; Gaudet, Daniel; Watts, Gerald F; Baccara-Dinet, Marie T; Lecorps, Guillaume; Manvelian, Garen; Farnier, Michel; Visseren, FLJ

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The PCSK9 antibody alirocumab (75 mg every 2 weeks; Q2W) as monotherapy reduced low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels by 47%. Because the option of a monthly dosing regimen is convenient, ODYSSEY CHOICE II evaluated alirocumab 150 mg Q4W in patients with inadequately

  11. Copernicus observations of Ly-alpha and Mg II emission from HR 1099 /V711 Tauri/ and UX Ari

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of two RS CVn binaries obtained with Copernicus are described. High-resolution (0.05 A) U1 observations indicate that both HR 1099 and UX Ari display broad Ly-alpha emission. The Ly-alpha emission strength from HR 1099 is variable and seems to be correlated with orbital phase, while the UX Ari results indicate no significant variation. Moderate resolution (0.51 A) V2 scans of both systems show variable Mg II h and k emission-line profiles which usually matched the velocity of the more active star in each binary. Additionally, displaced emission components were seen at velocities of up to + or - 250 km/s, indicative of high-velocity gas motions. The radial velocities of these emission features from HR 1099 are marginally correlated with orbital phase. Highly active and variable chromospheric phenomena are found to be the most consistent explanation of these results.

  12. PREDICTING Lyα AND Mg II FLUXES FROM K AND M DWARFS USING GALAXY EVOLUTION EXPLORER ULTRAVIOLET PHOTOMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Rolph, Kristina A. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Peacock, Sarah; Barman, Travis S., E-mail: shkolnik@lowell.edu, E-mail: kristina.rolph@fandm.edu, E-mail: speacock@lpl.arizona.edu, E-mail: barman@lpl.arizona.edu [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    A star's ultraviolet (UV) emission can greatly affect the atmospheric chemistry and physical properties of closely orbiting planets with the potential for severe mass loss. In particular, the Lyα emission line at 1216 Å, which dominates the far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectrum, is a major source of photodissociation of important atmospheric molecules such as water and methane. The intrinsic flux of Lyα, however, cannot be directly measured due to the absorption of neutral hydrogen in the interstellar medium and contamination by geocoronal emission. To date, reconstruction of the intrinsic Lyα line based on Hubble Space Telescope spectra has been accomplished for 46 FGKM nearby stars, 28 of which have also been observed by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). Our investigation provides a correlation between published intrinsic Lyα and GALEX far- and near-ultraviolet (NUV) chromospheric fluxes for K and M stars. The negative correlations between the ratio of the Lyα to the GALEX fluxes reveal how the relative strength of Lyα compared to the broadband fluxes weakens as the FUV and NUV excess flux increase. We also correlate GALEX fluxes with the strong NUV Mg II h+k spectral emission lines formed at lower chromospheric temperatures than Lyα. The reported correlations provide estimates of intrinsic Lyα and Mg II fluxes for the thousands of K and M stars in the archived GALEX all-sky surveys. These will constrain new stellar upper atmosphere models for cool stars and provide realistic inputs to models describing exoplanetary photochemistry and atmospheric evolution in the absence of UV spectroscopy.

  13. Presentation - I: Electronic structure calculations of ordered cubic-based Mg-Li alloys; II: Microstructural evolution of a+ß

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Phasha, MJ

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available University, UK M. Osawa# and H. Harada# #National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), High Temperature Materials Group, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba Science City, Ibaraki, 305-0047, Japan II: Microstructural evolution of α+β region of Mg... is the mechanically unstable) and vice versa. II: Microstructural evolution of α+β region of MgLi alloys From ab initio predictions, exp. were conducted as follows - Preparations of Mg-Li samples - Heat treatments - Microstructural phase...

  14. A CFH12k lensing survey of X-ray luminous galaxy clusters - II. Weak lensing analysis and global correlations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardeau, S.; Soucail, G.; Kneib, J.-P.; Czoske, O.; Ebeling, H.; Hudelot, P.; Smail, I.; Smith, G. P.

    Aims. We present a wide-field multi-color survey of a homogeneous sample of eleven clusters of galaxies for which we measure total masses and mass distributions from weak lensing. This sample, spanning a small range in both X-ray luminosity and redshift, is ideally suited to determining the

  15. In Silico Prediction of Drug Dissolution and Absorption with variation in Intestinal pH for BCS Class II Weak Acid Drugs: Ibuprofen and Ketoprofen§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Langguth, Peter; Garcia-Arieta, Alfredo; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2012-01-01

    The FDA Biopharmaceutical Classification System guidance allows waivers for in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for immediate-release solid oral dosage forms only for BCS class I. Extensions of the in vivo biowaiver for a number of drugs in BCS Class III and BCS class II have been proposed, particularly, BCS class II weak acids. However, a discrepancy between the in vivo- BE results and in vitro- dissolution results for a BCS class II acids was recently observed. The objectives of this study were to determine the oral absorption of BCS class II weak acids via simulation software and to determine if the in vitro dissolution test with various dissolution media could be sufficient for in vitro bioequivalence studies of ibuprofen and ketoprofen as models of carboxylic acid drugs. The oral absorption of these BCS class II acids from the gastrointestinal tract was predicted by GastroPlus™. Ibuprofen did not satisfy the bioequivalence criteria at lower settings of intestinal pH=6.0. Further the experimental dissolution of ibuprofen tablets in the low concentration phosphate buffer at pH 6.0 (the average buffer capacity 2.2 mmol L-1/pH) was dramatically reduced compared to the dissolution in SIF (the average buffer capacity 12.6 mmol L -1/pH). Thus these predictions for oral absorption of BCS class II acids indicate that the absorption patterns largely depend on the intestinal pH and buffer strength and must be carefully considered for a bioequivalence test. Simulation software may be very useful tool to aid the selection of dissolution media that may be useful in setting an in vitro bioequivalence dissolution standard. PMID:22815122

  16. Weak ferromagnetic behavior, crystal structure, and electronic studies of novel [Cu(II)(Br)(PhCO 2)(Sp)] (Sp=(-)-sparteine) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Ortega, Yasmi; Alcántara-Flores, José Luis; Hernández-Galindo, María del Carmen; Gutiérrez-Pérez, René; Ramírez-Rosales, Daniel; Bernès, Sylvain; Cabrera-Vivas, Blanca Martha; Durán-Hernández, Alejandro; Zamorano-Ulloa, Rafael

    2006-05-01

    Complex [Cu(II)(Br)(PhCO 2)(Sp)] 1 is obtained starting from copper(0), (-)-sparteine (sp) and benzoyl bromide. 1 Crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2 1 with a=14.8857(11), b=8.9257(9), c=17.4456(14) Å, β=111.689(5)°, and Z=4. The UV-vis spectrum is characteristic of Cu(II) complexes with tetragonally distorted square pyramidal geometry. The far IR spectrum of 1 shows characteristic vibrations of Cu-Br (239 cm -1), Cu-N (437 cm -1) and Cu-O (466 cm -1) bonds. The 1H NMR broad chemical shifts of 1 integrated for a total of 31 protons and are typical of Cu(II) complexes. ESR spectra of polycrystalline 1 at 77 and 300 K show axial spectra with areas in the ratio A77/ A300=4.02, suggesting a very weak Cu-Cu ferromagnetic interaction. Complex 1-doped with Zn(II) gives hfs with hyperfine interaction constant value A∥=112.45×10 -4 cm -1. The magnetization vs temperature data in the 2-299 K range, show that cupric ion pairs interact through a small antiferromagnetic Heisenberg exchange energy— JS1· S2 with a ground singlet state S=0, separated by J=-1.3 cm -1 from the excited triplet state S=1. The sign of the very weak interchange interaction constant, J, does not agree with the ESR spectra areas ratio of 1 at 77 and 300 K, which is a more accurate quantification of the weak ferromagnetic interaction Cu-Cu through the space.

  17. Methanol Sensing Behavior of Strontium(II Added MgAl2O4 Composites Through Solid-State Electrical Conductivity Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. JUDITH VIJAYA

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Strontium(II added MgAl2O4 composites prepared by sol – gel technique was utilized for the detection of methanol vapors. XRD, SEM and BET surface area measurements were employed to identify the structural phases and surface morphology. The composites were prepared with the molar ratios of Mg: Sr as (1.0: 0.0, 0.8:0.2, 0.6:0.4, 0.4:0.6, 0.2:0.8, 0.0:1.0 keeping the aluminium molar ratio as constant for all the compositions and were labeled as MgSA1, MgSA2, MgSA3, MgSA4, MgSA5 and MgSA6 respectively. The samples sintered at 900oC for 5 h were subjected to dc resistance measurements in the temperature range of 30-200oC to study the methanol vapor detection characteristics. The results revealed that the sensitivity in detecting methanol vapor increased with increase in temperature up to 150 oC and thereafter decreased. The sensitivity increased with methanol concentration from 100-5000 ppm at 150oC. Among the different compositions of the composites MgSA5 showed the best sensitivity to methanol detection at an operating temperature of 150oC.

  18. Branching Fractions and log(gf)s for Weak Lines of Co II connected to the Ground and Low Metastable Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James Edward; Feigenson, Thomas; Sneden, Chris; Cowan, John J.

    2018-01-01

    New branching fraction (BF) measurements and log(gf)s of Highly Reliable Lines (HRLs) of Co II are reported. Our measurements test and confirm earlier work by Salih et al. [1985] and Mullman et al. [1998] and expand the earlier BF measurements to include more weak and very weak HRLs. HRLs are UV lines that connect to the population reservoir levels including the ground and low metastable levels of Co+. Such levels contain most of the cobalt in the photospheres of typical F, G, and K stars used in abundance studies. HRLs are essentially immune to departures from Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) because they connect to the primary reservoir levels. Lightly-populated high-lying levels of the ion and essentially all levels of the neutral atom have some possibility of being pulled out of LTE through various reactions. Weak and very weak HRLs are needed to determine Co abundances in higher metallicity stars while dominant branches are useful in low metallicity stars of abundance surveys. A large set of HRLs with reliable log(gf)s is desired to avoid blending and saturation problems in photospheric studies. The relative abundance of Fe-peak elements changes as a function of metallicity [e.g. Henry et al. 2010, Sneden et al. 2016] but contributions to the trends from nuclear physics effects in early stars need to be cleanly separated from effect due to limitations of classic photospheric models based on One Dimensional (1D) and LTE approximations. The 1D/LTE approximations of classic photospheric models, which work in well in metal rich dwarf stars such as the Sun, are a source of some concern in Metal Poor (MP) giant stars due to much lower electron and atom pressures. Our new measurements on HRLS of Co II are applied to determine stellar abundances in MP stars.Henry, R. B. C., Cowan, J. J., & Sobeck, J, 2010, ApJ 709, 715Mullman, K. L., Cooper, J. C., & Lawler, J. E. 1998, ApJ, 495, 503Salih, S., Lawler, J. E., & Whaling, W. 1985, PhRvA, 31, 744Sneden et al. 2016

  19. Cross-correlation Weak Lensing of SDSS galaxy Clusters II: Cluster Density Profiles and the Mass--Richness Relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, David E.; Sheldon, Erin S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Rozo, Eduardo; Koester, Benjamin P.; Frieman, Joshua A.; McKay, Timothy A.; Evrard, August E.; Becker, Matthew; Annis, James

    2007-09-28

    We interpret and model the statistical weak lensing measurements around 130,000 groups and clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey presented by Sheldon et al. (2007). We present non-parametric inversions of the 2D shear profiles to the mean 3D cluster density and mass profiles in bins of both optical richness and cluster i-band luminosity. Since the mean cluster density profile is proportional to the cluster-mass correlation function, the mean profile is spherically symmetric by the assumptions of large-scale homogeneity and isotropy. We correct the inferred 3D profiles for systematic effects, including non-linear shear and the fact that cluster halos are not all precisely centered on their brightest galaxies. We also model the measured cluster shear profile as a sum of contributions from the brightest central galaxy, the cluster dark matter halo, and neighboring halos. We infer the relations between mean cluster virial mass and optical richness and luminosity over two orders of magnitude in cluster mass; the virial mass at fixed richness or luminosity is determined with a precision of {approx} 13% including both statistical and systematic errors. We also constrain the halo concentration parameter and halo bias as a function of cluster mass; both are in good agreement with predictions from N-body simulations of LCDM models. The methods employed here will be applicable to deeper, wide-area optical surveys that aim to constrain the nature of the dark energy, such as the Dark Energy Survey, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and space-based surveys.

  20. Search for cold gas in strong Mg II absorbers at 0.5 < z < 1.5: nature and evolution of 21-cm absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, N.; Srianand, R.; Petitjean, P.; Bergeron, J.; Noterdaeme, P.; Muzahid, S.

    2012-08-01

    We report four new detections of 21-cm absorption from a systematic search of 21-cm absorption in a sample of 17 strong (rest equivalent width, Wr(Mg iiλ2796) ≥ 1 Å) intervening Mg ii absorbers at 0.5 100 km s-1 are mainly seen towards the quasars with extended radio morphology at arcsecond scales. However, we do not find any correlation between the integrated 21-cm optical depth, ∫τdv, or the width of 21-cm absorption line, ΔV, with the LS measured from the milliarcsecond scale images. All this can be understood if the absorbing gas is patchy with a typical correlation length of ~30-100 pc. We confirm our previous finding that the 21-cm detection rate for a given optical depth threshold can be increased by up to a factor 2 by imposing the following additional constraints: Mg ii doublet ratio 0.27. This suggests that the probability of detecting 21-cm absorption is higher in the systems with high N(H i). We show that within the measurement uncertainty, the 21-cm detection rate in strong Mg ii systems is constant over 0.5 total age of universe. We show that the detection rate can be underestimated by up to a factor 2 if 21-cm optical depths are not corrected for the partial coverage estimated using milliarcsecond scale maps. Since stellar feedback processes are expected to diminish the filling factor of cold neutral medium over 0.5 blind surveys of 21-cm absorption lines with the upcoming Square Kilometre Array pathfinders will provide a complete view of the evolution of cold gas in galaxies and shed light on the nature ofMg ii systems and DLAs, and their relationship with stellar feedback processes. Table 4 and appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Anoxic and Oxic Oxidation of Rocks Containing Fe(II)Mg-Silicates and Fe(II)-Monosulfides as Source of Fe(III)-Minerals and Hydrogen. Geobiotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2017-12-01

    In this article, anoxic and oxic hydrolyses of rocks containing Fe (II) Mg-silicates and Fe (II)-monosulfides are analyzed at 25 °C and 250-350 °C. A table of the products is drawn. It is shown that magnetite and hydrogen can be produced during low-temperature (25 °C) anoxic hydrolysis/oxidation of ferrous silicates and during high-temperature (250 °C) anoxic hydrolysis/oxidation of ferrous monosulfides. The high-T (350 °C) anoxic hydrolysis of ferrous silicates leads mainly to ferric oxides/hydroxides such as the hydroxide ferric trihydroxide, the oxide hydroxide goethite/lepidocrocite and the oxide hematite, and to Fe(III)-phyllosilicates. Magnetite is not a primary product. While the low-T (25 °C) anoxic hydrolysis of ferrous monosulfides leads to pyrite. Thermodynamic functions are calculated for elementary reactions of hydrolysis and carbonation of olivine and pyroxene and E-pH diagrams are analyzed. It is shown that the hydrolysis of the iron endmember is endothermic and can proceed within the exothermic hydrolysis of the magnesium endmember and also within the exothermic reactions of carbonations. The distinction between three products of the iron hydrolysis, magnetite, goethite and hematite is determined with E-pH diagrams. The hydrolysis/oxidation of the sulfides mackinawite/troilite/pyrrhotite is highly endothermic but can proceed within the heat produced by the exothermic hydrolyses and carbonations of ferromagnesian silicates and also by other sources such as magma, hydrothermal sources, impacts. These theoretical results are confirmed by the products observed in several related laboratory experiments. The case of radiolyzed water is studied. It is shown that magnetite and ferric oxides/hydroxides such as ferric trihydroxide, goethite/lepidocrocite and hematite are formed in oxic hydrolysis of ferromagnesian silicates at 25 °C and 350 °C. Oxic oxidation of ferrous monosulfides at 25 °C leads mainly to pyrite and ferric oxides/hydroxides such as

  2. Anoxic and Oxic Oxidation of Rocks Containing Fe(II)Mg-Silicates and Fe(II)-Monosulfides as Source of Fe(III)-Minerals and Hydrogen. Geobiotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2017-03-01

    In this article, anoxic and oxic hydrolyses of rocks containing Fe (II) Mg-silicates and Fe (II)-monosulfides are analyzed at 25 °C and 250-350 °C. A table of the products is drawn. It is shown that magnetite and hydrogen can be produced during low-temperature (25 °C) anoxic hydrolysis/oxidation of ferrous silicates and during high-temperature (250 °C) anoxic hydrolysis/oxidation of ferrous monosulfides. The high-T (350 °C) anoxic hydrolysis of ferrous silicates leads mainly to ferric oxides/hydroxides such as the hydroxide ferric trihydroxide, the oxide hydroxide goethite/lepidocrocite and the oxide hematite, and to Fe(III)-phyllosilicates. Magnetite is not a primary product. While the low-T (25 °C) anoxic hydrolysis of ferrous monosulfides leads to pyrite. Thermodynamic functions are calculated for elementary reactions of hydrolysis and carbonation of olivine and pyroxene and E-pH diagrams are analyzed. It is shown that the hydrolysis of the iron endmember is endothermic and can proceed within the exothermic hydrolysis of the magnesium endmember and also within the exothermic reactions of carbonations. The distinction between three products of the iron hydrolysis, magnetite, goethite and hematite is determined with E-pH diagrams. The hydrolysis/oxidation of the sulfides mackinawite/troilite/pyrrhotite is highly endothermic but can proceed within the heat produced by the exothermic hydrolyses and carbonations of ferromagnesian silicates and also by other sources such as magma, hydrothermal sources, impacts. These theoretical results are confirmed by the products observed in several related laboratory experiments. The case of radiolyzed water is studied. It is shown that magnetite and ferric oxides/hydroxides such as ferric trihydroxide, goethite/lepidocrocite and hematite are formed in oxic hydrolysis of ferromagnesian silicates at 25 °C and 350 °C. Oxic oxidation of ferrous monosulfides at 25 °C leads mainly to pyrite and ferric oxides/hydroxides such as

  3. Synthesis of high surface area, mesoporous MgO nanosheets with excellent adsorption capability for Ni(II) via a distillation treating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jing; Zou, Linyi; Wang, Yuting; Li, Bowen; He, Xiaofeng; Fan, Zhuangjun; Ren, Yueming; Lv, Yanzhuo; Zhang, Milin; Chen, Dan

    2015-01-15

    Hexagonal mesoporous MgO nanosheets with a side length of 250 nm and specific surface area of 181.692 m(2)/g were fabricated by a three-step process. Firstly, MgO powders were obtained by sintered Mg5(OH)2(CO3)4⋅4H2O, which was synthesized by a wet precipitation process using ammonium hydrogen carbonate as precipitants. Secondly, the above-MgO were distilled 2 h in a three-necked bottle with condenser device. Lastly, we annealed the distilled-MgO at 500-800 °C to form mesoporous MgO nanosheets. We found the pore size distribution and the thicknesses of nanosheets were determined by the distillation process in step 2 and annealed temperature in step 3. By optimizing the experimental parameters, the mesoporous dis-MgO annealed at 600 °C displayed uniform hexagonal structure with the largest pore volume (0.875 cm(3)/g) and highest BET surface area (181.692 m(2)/g), as well as the maximum adsorption capability of 1684.25 mg/g for Ni(II). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Part I. Student success in intensive versus traditional introductory chemistry courses. Part II. Synthesis of salts of the weakly coordinating trisphat anion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Mildred V.

    Part I. Intensive courses have been shown to be associated with equal or greater student success than traditional-length courses in a wide variety of disciplines and education levels. Student records from intensive and traditional-length introductory general chemistry courses were analyzed to determine the effects, of the course format, the level of academic experience, life experience (age), GPA, academic major and gender on student success in the course. Pretest scores, GPA and ACT composite scores were used as measures of academic ability and prior knowledge; t-tests comparing the means of these variables were used to establish that the populations were comparable prior to the course. Final exam scores, total course points and pretest-posttest differences were used as measures of student success; t-tests were used to determine if differences existed between the populations. ANCOVA analyses revealed that student GPA, pretest scores and course format were the only variables tested that were significant in accounting for the variance of the academic success measures. In general, the results indicate that students achieved greater academic success in the intensive-format course, regardless of the level of academic experience, life experience, academic major or gender. Part II. Weakly coordinating anions have many important applications, one of which is to function as co-catalysts in the polymerization of olefins by zirconocene. The structure of tris(tetrachlorobenzenedialato) phosphate(V) or "trisphat" anion suggests that it might be an outstanding example of a weakly coordinating anion. Trisphat acid was synthesized and immediately used to prepare the stable tributylammonium trisphat, which was further reacted to produce trisphat salts of Group I metal cations in high yields. Results of the 35Cl NQR analysis of these trisphat salts indicate only very weak coordination between the metal cations and the chlorine atoms of the trisphat anion.

  5. pH-Dependent Solubility and Dissolution Behavior of Carvedilol--Case Example of a Weakly Basic BCS Class II Drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Rania; Awadallah, Areeg; Sunoqrot, Suhair; Tarawneh, Ola; Nazzal, Sami; AlBaraghthi, Tamadur; Al Sayyad, Jihan; Abbas, Aiman

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the pH-dependent solubility and dissolution of weakly basic Biopharmaceutical Classification Systems (BCS) class II drugs, characterized by low solubility and high permeability, using carvedilol, a weak base with a pK a value of 7.8, as a model drug. A series of solubility and in vitro dissolution studies was carried out using media that simulate the gastric and intestinal fluids and cover the physiological pH range of the GI from 1.2 to 7.8. The effect of ionic strength, buffer capacity, and buffer species of the dissolution media on the solubility and dissolution behavior of carvedilol was also investigated. The study revealed that carvedilol exhibited a typical weak base pH-dependent solubility profile with a high solubility at low pH (545.1-2591.4 μg/mL within the pH range 1.2-5.0) and low solubility at high pH (5.8-51.9 μg/mL within the pH range 6.5-7.8). The dissolution behavior of carvedilol was consistent with the solubility results, where carvedilol release was complete (95.8-98.2% released within 60 min) in media simulating the gastric fluid (pH 1.2-5.0) and relatively low (15.9-86.2% released within 240 min) in media simulating the intestinal fluid (pH 6.5-7.8). It was found that the buffer species of the dissolution media may influence the solubility and consequently the percentage of carvedilol released by forming carvedilol salts of varying solubilities. Carvedilol solubility and dissolution decreased with increasing ionic strength, while lowering the buffer capacity resulted in a decrease in carvedilol solubility and dissolution rate.

  6. A combined experimental and theoretical study of the supramolecular self-assembly of Cu(II) malonate complex assisted by various weak forces and water dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Prankrishna; Ray Choudhury, Somnath; Mitra, Monojit; Kumar Seth, Saikat; Helliwell, Madeleine; Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata

    2014-12-01

    A Cu(II) malonate complex with formula [Cu(C3H2O4)(C6H8N2)(H2O)]2·4H2O (1) [C6H8N2=2-picolylamine, C3H2O42-=malonate dianion] has been synthesized by mixing the reactants in their stoichiometric proportion and its crystal structure has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In 1, monomeric neutral metal malonate units [Cu(C3H2O4)(C6H8N2)(H2O)] are interlinked with each other through hydrogen bonds, weak lone pair⋯π and cuprophilic interactions to generate supramolecular dimers, which in turn further associated through hydrogen bonding to form infinite 1D chains. Water dimers, through series of hydrogen bonds and weak π-stacking forces are found to be responsible for interconnection of 1D chains, which resulted in a 3D network. A density functional (DFT) study of the energetic features of several noncovalent interactions observed in the solid state have been analyzed and characterized using Bader's theory of “atoms-in-molecules”. We also present here Hirshfeld surface analysis to investigate the close intermolecular contacts.

  7. The Numerical Simulation of Nonsupercell Tornadogenesis. Part II: Evolution of a Family of Tornadoes along a Weak Outflow Boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bruce D.; Wilhelmson, Robert B.

    1997-10-01

    Nonsupercell tornadogenesis along a weak outflow boundary has been simulated using a three-dimensional moist convective cloud model. Thermodynamic conditions similar to those observed for nonsupercell tornado (NST) events of the High Plains were utilized in the model initialization. As the ensemble system of storm, outflow boundary, and leading edge vortices evolve, six distinct life cycle stages for the development and decay of NSTs are documented that span a period of about 35 min. Consistent with the results of Part I of this numerical study, vortex sheet dynamics exert considerable control over the outflow leading edge. The progression of pretornadic life cycle stages serves to concentrate vertical vorticity effectively along the outflow boundary in discrete misocyclone circulations aligned in a 3-km wavelength pattern. The organization of larger-scale misocyclones and ultimate intensification to initial tornadic intensity occurs coincident with the rapid development of deep convection overhead. The strongest members of a family of NSTs that develop in the model maintain ground-relative surface wind speeds of greater than 30 m s1 for approximately 11 min within which wind speeds meet F1 severity criteria for 6 min. The mature vortices reach the midlevels of the moist convection and display deep, rotationally induced axial downdrafts. The rapid transition to a predominant downdraft character for the storm complex and to an outflow dominated subcloud air mass heralds the onset of NST dissipation. The NST evolution simulated here compares very favorably to observational NST studies.The misocyclones are shown to provide an asymmetric pattern of convective forcing along the outflow boundary, which supports the formation of deep moist convection directly over them. Vertical vorticity in the boundary layer misocyclones is redistributed upward into the midlevels of the moist convection (6 km) by developing deep updrafts. The mature vortices are maintained by vertical

  8. A combined experimental and theoretical study of the supramolecular self-assembly of Cu(II) malonate complex assisted by various weak forces and water dimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manna, Prankrishna [Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Ray Choudhury, Somnath [Central Chemical Laboratory, Geological Survey of India, 15 A and B Kyd Street, Kolkata 700 016 (India); Mitra, Monojit [Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Kumar Seth, Saikat [Department of Physics, M. G. Mahavidyalaya, Bhupatinagar, Purba Medinipur, West Bengal 721 425 (India); Helliwell, Madeleine [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bauzá, Antonio [Departament de Química, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Crta. de Valldemossa km 7.5, 07122 Palma (Baleares) (Spain); Frontera, Antonio, E-mail: toni.frontera@uib.es [Departament de Química, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Crta. de Valldemossa km 7.5, 07122 Palma (Baleares) (Spain); Mukhopadhyay, Subrata, E-mail: smukhopadhyay@chemistry.jdvu.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2014-12-15

    A Cu(II) malonate complex with formula [Cu(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(C{sub 6}H{sub 8}N{sub 2})(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O (1) [C{sub 6}H{sub 8}N{sub 2}=2-picolylamine, C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup 2−}=malonate dianion] has been synthesized by mixing the reactants in their stoichiometric proportion and its crystal structure has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In 1, monomeric neutral metal malonate units [Cu(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(C{sub 6}H{sub 8}N{sub 2})(H{sub 2}O)] are interlinked with each other through hydrogen bonds, weak lone pair⋯π and cuprophilic interactions to generate supramolecular dimers, which in turn further associated through hydrogen bonding to form infinite 1D chains. Water dimers, through series of hydrogen bonds and weak π–stacking forces are found to be responsible for interconnection of 1D chains, which resulted in a 3D network. A density functional (DFT) study of the energetic features of several noncovalent interactions observed in the solid state have been analyzed and characterized using Bader's theory of “atoms-in-molecules”. We also present here Hirshfeld surface analysis to investigate the close intermolecular contacts. - Graphical Abstract: Interplay of weak forces like hydrogen bonding, lone pair⋯π, Cu⋯Cu and π–stacking interactions leading to the formation of supramolecular network in [Cu(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(C{sub 6}H{sub 8}N{sub 2})(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O complex. - Highlights: • A complex of Cu(II) with malonate and 2-picolylamine is synthesized and X-ray characterized. • We report a density functional study of the energetic features of several noncovalent interactions • We perform Hirshfeld surface analysis to investigate the close intermolecular contacts.

  9. In situ reactive zone with modified Mg(OH)2 for remediation of heavy metal polluted groundwater: Immobilization and interaction of Cr(III), Pb(II) and Cd(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; Li, Bowen; Bao, Qiburi

    2017-04-01

    Mg(OH)2 dissolves slowly and can provide a long-term source of alkalinity, thus a promising alternative reagent for the in situ remediation of heavy metal polluted groundwater. However, the application of Mg(OH)2 on in situ reactive zone (IRZ) for heavy metal polluted groundwater has never been investigated. In this study, the behaviors of heavy metals in a Mg(OH)2 IRZ were monitored for 45 d. The heavy metals show a sequential precipitation by modified Mg(OH)2 due to the difference of Ksp. Column tests were conducted to investigate the temporal and spatial distribution of heavy metals in Mg(OH)2 IRZ and evaluate the stabilization effect for multi-heavy metal polluted groundwater. Experimental results indicate that there exist interactions between different heavy metals, and their zoning distribution is attributed either to the competitive adsorption onto porous media (control column) or to the sequential precipitation of heavy metal ions (IRZ column). In contrast with the control column, heavy metal contaminated area in Mg(OH)2 IRZ significantly shrinks. According to the chemical speciation analysis, when water containing Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cr(III) flows through Mg(OH)2 IRZ, exchangeable fraction of total concentration significantly reduce and the proportion of carbonate and Fe/Mn oxides fraction increase, indicating the decrease of their mobility and toxicity.

  10. Synthesis, crystal structure, weak antiferromagnetic behavior and electronic studies of novel [((-)-sparteine)(PhCO 2)(Cl)]Cu(II) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara-Flores, José Luis; Vázquez-Bravo, José Jaime; Gutiérrez-Pérez, René; Ramírez-Rosales, Daniel; Bernès, Sylvain; Ramírez Bokhimi, José Guadalupe; Zamorano-Ulloa, Rafael; Reyes-Ortega, Yasmi

    2003-09-01

    [((-)-Sparteine)(PhCO 2)(Cl)]Cu(II) 1 complex is obtained by direct synthesis using copper(0). 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2 1 with a=14.7355(12), b=8.9768(5), c=17.2810(10) Å, β=111.916(5)°, and Z=4. The electronic spectrum of 1 shows a broad band with λ max˜841 nm(ɛ=0.261 mM-1 cm-6) characteristic of a low symmetry and tetragonally distorted square pyramidal local Cu geometry. The far IR spectrum of 1 shows characteristic vibrations of Cu-Cl (260, 267 cm -1), Cu-N (436, 467 cm -1) and Cu-O (457 cm -1) bonds. The 1H NMR spectrum of 1 is typical of magnetic Cu(II) complexes with line broadening due to efficient nuclear relaxation from the metal center. ESR spectra of polycrystalline 1 at 77 K show an axial spectrum with linewidth of 58.6 G and at 300 K of 89.0 G, with areas in the ratio A77/ A300=2.79, indicative of antiferromagnetic order. The linewidth is reduced by 34% on going from 300 to 77 K. Standard magnetization measurements at low temperatures show an Curie-Weiss behavior with θ=-21.67 K, suggesting a weak exchange coupling interaction. The crystalline structure of 1 shows that the lattice is arranged so that the space between molecules is smaller than 40 Å 3, not enough to accommodate solvent molecules. However, the shortest Cu-Cu contact is 7.5912(8) Å.

  11. Contribución al flujo infrarrojo de las estrellas Be de la recombinación dielectrónica del MgII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruzado, A.; di Rocco, H.; Ringuelet, A.

    Para evaluar la contribución del proceso de recombinación dielectrónica del átomo de MgII al exceso de flujo infrarrojo observado en las estrellas Be, calculamos la energía emitida en las líneas originadas por este proceso. Se evaluaron los efectos de las condiciones físicas del medio, como la temperatura electrónica y la densidad electrónica, sobre el flujo emitido. Se consideró también la influencia de una posible opacidad.

  12. Weak relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Selleri, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Weak Relativity is an equivalent theory to Special Relativity according to Reichenbach’s definition, where the parameter epsilon equals to 0. It formulates a Neo-Lorentzian approach by replacing the Lorentz transformations with a new set named “Inertial Transformations”, thus explaining the Sagnac effect, the twin paradox and the trip from the future to the past in an easy and elegant way. The cosmic microwave background is suggested as a possible privileged reference system. Most importantly, being a theory based on experimental proofs, rather than mutual consensus, it offers a physical description of reality independent of the human observation.

  13. The origins and evolution of weak low ionization quasar absorption line systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Anand

    This thesis examines the physical nature of the gaseous structures selected by weak MgII quasar absorption line systems. The classic quasar absorption systems such as damped Lyman-a absorbers (DLAs), sub-DLAs and other Lyman Limit systems are widely studied because of their established association with galaxies of a wide range of morphology and luminosity. In contrast, weak MgII absorbers represent a population(s) that does not appear to be directly associated with luminous galaxies. Nonetheless, at z ~ 1, they outnumber the strong MgII absorbers by a factor of 3:1, and also account for a large fraction (> 25%) of the high column density regime of the Ly a forest. Moreover, a significant fraction of the weak MgII gas clouds have metallicities that are 0.5-2 dex higher than the average metallicity of DLA absorbers. In spite of such unique properties, the astrophysical structures and processes associated with weak MgII systems remain unidentified. In this thesis, I present results from UV and optical spectroscopic surveys, of ~ 100 quasars, offering a full census of weak MgII absorbers over the last 10 Gyr cosmological history of the universe, corresponding to 0 z z factor of ~ 8 from z = 1 to z = 0, the estimated dN/dz , at z = 0, for a static population of absorbers is a factor of ~ 2 larger than the observed dN/dz . This suggests that the gaseous structures that produce weak MgII absorbers are evolving from z = 1 to z = 0, and are regenerated at a rate that is consistent with the observed dN/dz . Towards, high- z ( z > 1), the dN/dz evolves with the number density reaching a peak at z = 1.2, thereafter declining such that there may not be a large separate population of weak absorbers at z > 2. I hypothesize this observed trend is indicative of the weak MgII clouds, at high- z , being kinematically connected to galaxies that produce strong MgII absorption. Photoionization models have suggested the weak MgII absorbing structures are unstable over astronomical

  14. Single crystal EPR study of the dinuclear Cu(II) complex [Cu(tda)(phen)](2)·H(2)tda (tda = thiodiacetate, phen = phenanthroline): influence of weak interdimeric magnetic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Nicolás I; Perec, Mireille; González, Pablo J; Passeggi, Mario C G; Rizzi, Alberto C; Brondino, Carlos D

    2010-12-23

    We report powder and single crystal EPR measurements of [Cu(tda)(phen)](2)·H(2)tda (tda = thiodiacetate, phen = phenanthroline) at 9.7 GHz. This compound consists of centrosymmetric copper(II) ion dimers, weakly ferromagnetically exchange-coupled (J = +3.2 cm(-1)), in which the dimeric units are linked by hydrophobic chemical paths involving the phen molecules. EPR revealed that the triplet spectra are collapsed by interdimeric exchange interactions mediated by that chemical path. Analysis and simulation of the single crystal EPR spectra were performed using Anderson's exchange narrowing model, together with statistical arguments. This approach allowed us to interpret the spectra modulated by the interdimeric interactions in situations of weak, intermediate, and strong exchange. We evaluated an interdimeric exchange constant J' = 0.0070(3) cm(-1), indicating that hydrophobic paths can transmit weak exchange interactions between centers at relatively long distances of the order of ∼10 Å.

  15. Muscle Weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al Kaissi MD, MSc

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Marked ligamentous hyperlaxity and muscle weakness/wasting associated with awkward gait are the main deficits confused with the diagnosis of myopathy. Seven children (6 boys and 1 girl with an average age of 8 years were referred to our department because of diverse forms of skeletal abnormalities. No definitive diagnosis was made, and all underwent a series of sophisticated investigations in other institutes in favor of myopathy. We applied our methodology through the clinical and radiographic phenotypes followed by targeted genotypic confirmation. Three children (2 boys and 1 girl were compatible with the diagnosis of progressive pseudorheumatoid chondrodysplasia. The genetic mutation was correlated with the WISP 3 gene actively expressed by articular chondrocytes and located on chromosome 6. Klinefelter syndrome was the diagnosis in 2 boys. Karyotyping confirmed 47,XXY (aneuploidy of Klinefelter syndrome. And 2 boys were finally diagnosed with Morquio syndrome (MPS type IV A as both showed missense mutations in the N-acetylgalactosamine-sulfate sulfatase gene. Misdiagnosis can lead to the initiation of a long list of sophisticated investigations.

  16. Growth and characterization of ZnCdMgSe-based green light emitters and distributed Bragg reflectors towards II-VI based semiconductor disk lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jesus, Joel; Gayen, Swapan K. [The Graduate Center, City University of New York (CUNY), New York, NY (United States); Department of Physics, The City College of New York, New York, NY (United States); Garcia, Thor A.; Tamargo, Maria C. [The Graduate Center, City University of New York (CUNY), New York, NY (United States); Department of Chemistry, The City College of New York, New York, NY (United States); Kartazaev, Vladimir [Department of Physics, The City College of New York, New York, NY (United States); Jones, Brynmor E.; Schlosser, Peter J.; Hastie, Jennifer E. [Institute of Photonics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    We report the structural and optical properties of molecular beam epitaxy grown II-VI semiconductor multiple quantum well (MQW) structures and distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) on InP substrates for application in developing optically-pumped semiconductor disk lasers (SDLs) operating in the green spectral range. One sample was grown directly on an InP substrate with an InGaAs buffer layer, while another had a 5-period ZnCdMgSe-based DBR grown on the InGaAs/InP substrate. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy measurements revealed sharp superlattice peaks and abrupt layer interfaces, while steady-state photoluminescence measurements demonstrated surface emission between 540-570 nm. Under pulsed excitation both samples exhibited features of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) or stimulated emission, accompanied by luminescence lifetime shortening. The sample with the DBR showed higher surface luminescence and the onset of ASE at lower pump power. To further explore the design and performance of a ZnCdMgSe-based DBR, a 20-period DBR was grown and a reflectivity of 83% was obtained at ∝560 nm. We estimate that a DBR with ∝40 periods would be needed for optimal performance in a SDL using these materials. These results show the potential of II-VI MQW structures on InP substrates for the development of SDLs operational in the green-yellow wavelength range. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Delayed-release oral mesalamine at 4.8 g/day (800 mg tablet) for the treatment of moderately active ulcerative colitis: the ASCEND II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, Stephen B; Sandborn, William J; Kornbluth, Asher; Katz, Seymour; Safdi, Michael; Woogen, Scott; Regalli, Gino; Yeh, Chyon; Smith-Hall, Nancy; Ajayi, Funmilay

    2005-11-01

    Preliminary data have shown that delayed release oral mesalamine (Asacol) dosed at 4.8 g/day provided additional efficacy benefit compared to 1.6 g/day in patients with mildly to moderately active ulcerative colitis. Additionally, Asacol dosed at 2.4 g/day has been proved to be more effective than 1.6 g/day. Whether 4.8 g/day of mesalamine (dosed with an investigational 800 mg tablet) is more effective than Asacol 2.4 g/day (dosed with a 400 mg tablet) in patients with moderately active ulcerative colitis is unknown. A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial (ASCEND II) was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of 4.8 g/day of mesalamine in adults with active ulcerative colitis. Three hundred eighty-six patients with mild to moderate ulcerative colitis were randomized for treatment with mesalamine 2.4 g/day (400 mg tablet) or 4.8 g/day (800 mg tablet) for 6 wk. The primary efficacy population was 268 patients with moderately active ulcerative colitis treated with 2.4 g/day (n = 139) or 4.8 g/day (n = 129). The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients in each treatment group that achieved overall improvement ("treatment success," defined as either complete remission or a clinical response to therapy) from baseline at week 6. Seventy-two percent of patients receiving 4.8 g/day of mesalamine for moderate ulcerative colitis (89/124 patients) achieved treatment success at week 6, compared with 59% of those who received 2.4 g/day (77/130 patients) (p= 0.036). Both regimens were well tolerated. Adverse events and clinically significant changes in laboratory results were similar in both treatment groups. Patients with moderately active ulcerative colitis treated with 4.8 g/day of mesalamine (800 mg tablet) are significantly more likely to achieve overall improvement at 6 wk compared to patients treated with 2.4 g/day.

  18. I. Measuring and Reducing Stress and Surface Roughness in IBAD MgO Films and II. Developing Tools to Measure Transfer in Undergraduate Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonakos, Cory Dale

    I. MgO may be grown with a biaxial texture onto an amorphous substrate with the use of ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). This MgO film may then be used as a platform on which to grow epitaxial films on an amorphous membrane for characterization purposes. However, the IBAD MgO film is stressed, causing buckles in the amorphous membrane and problems with further film growth on the IBAD MgO. This dissertation work explores the source of this film stress and develops methods to relax the stress and reduce surface roughness with annealing and increased growth temperature. It is determined that annealing and increased growth temperature coupled with a higher ion-to-atom ratio (IAR) during film growth reduce stress and surface roughness sufficiently to use even thinner IBAD MgO films as an intermediate layer between an amorphous membrane and epitaxial film. II. Much of the existing literature on knowledge transfer concludes that transfer is rare and does not occur spontaneously. However, studies supporting that transfer is rare often use methods that focus on binary success or failure to solve a problem correctly and do not analyze thought process. This dissertation work aims at developing transfer questions that allow open-ended responses, developing a method of analysis for these responses that looks for transfer in the problem-solving process, and assessing the methodology itself and its sensitivity, validity, and utility as a general transfer measurement technique for use across a broad range of expertise levels in chemistry. Detailed analysis of responses to each transfer question show that some transfer questions are more effective at distinguishing between expertise levels while also allowing responders of all levels to show knowledge transfer. Simpler questions that are more accessible to students of introductory chemistry proved the most useful at eliciting a range of responses that correlate with expertise level while still showing some degree of transfer in

  19. Resisting Weakness of the Will.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Neil

    2011-01-01

    I develop an account of weakness of the will that is driven by experimental evidence from cognitive and social psychology. I will argue that this account demonstrates that there is no such thing as weakness of the will: no psychological kind corresponds to it. Instead, weakness of the will ought to be understood as depletion of System II resources. Neither the explanatory purposes of psychology nor our practical purposes as agents are well-served by retaining the concept. I therefore suggest that we ought to jettison it, in favour of the vocabulary and concepts of cognitive psychology.

  20. The efficacy and safety of docetaxel-based chemotherapy combined with dexamethasone 1 mg daily oral administration: JMTO Pca 10-01 phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Nishimura, Kazuo; Okajima, Eijiro; Ina, Kenji; Ogawa, Osamu; Nagata, Hirohiko; Akakura, Koichiro; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Gotoh, Momokazu; Teramukai, Satoshi; Hirao, Yoshihiko

    2017-03-01

    Previously, one randomized control trial (TAX327) revealed the efficacy of docetaxel-based chemotherapy combined with prednisone. On the other hand, several studies showed a high prostate specific antigen (PSA) response with low-dose dexamethasone in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of docetaxel-based chemotherapy combined with dexamethasone in CRPC patients. This study was a single-arm multi-institutional phase II trial. Patients received 75 mg/m2 of docetaxel, and 0.5 mg of dexamethasone orally twice a day continuing throughout the treatment period. Treatment was planned for 10 cycles, and continued for at least four cycles depending on the observation of PSA flare. The primary endpoint was PSA response defined as a reduction from baseline of at least 50% that continued for at least 3 weeks. Secondary endpoints were safety, PSA flare, time to PSA failure and adherence rate to protocol treatment (10 cycles). Between January 2011 and February 2014, a total of 76 chemotherapy-naïve CRPC patients were enrolled. Seventy-five patients received docetaxel-based chemotherapy combined with dexamethasone. The median age and PSA level at enrollment were 71 years (53-85) and 23.2 ng/mL (2.9-852), respectively. PSA response rate was 76.8% (90% confidence interval (CI): 66.9-84.9). Of all patients, 30 patients completed 10 cycles of chemotherapy (40%). The incidence rate of PSA flare was 10.7% (eight patients). The median time to PSA failure was 369 days (95% CI: 245-369). The most frequently observed adverse event was hematotoxicity (neutropenia of G2 or greater: 100%). The present study showed a significantly high PSA response compared with previous reports. Most patients tolerated the protocol treatment well, whereas hematotoxicity was often observed.

  1. Facilitative capture of As(V), Pb(II) and methylene blue from aqueous solutions with MgO hybrid sponge-like carbonaceous composite derived from sugarcane leafy trash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ronghua; Liang, Wen; Wang, Jim J; Gaston, Lewis A; Huang, Di; Huang, Hui; Lei, Shuang; Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar; Zhou, Baoyue; Xiao, Ran; Zhang, Zengqiang

    2018-02-08

    Enhancing the contaminant adsorption capacity is a key factor affecting utilization of carbon-based adsorbents in wastewater treatment and encouraging development of biomass thermo-disposal. In this study, a novel MgO hybrid sponge-like carbonaceous composite (HSC) derived from sugarcane leafy trash was prepared through an integrated adsorption-pyrolysis method. The resulted HSC composite was characterized and employed as adsorbent for the removal of negatively charged arsenate (As(V)), positively charged Pb(II), and the organic pollutant methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions in batch experiments. The effects of solution pH, contact time, initial concentration, temperature, and ionic strength on As(V), Pb(II) and MB adsorption were investigated. HSC was composed of nano-size MgO flakes and nanotube-like carbon sponge. Hybridization significantly improved As(V), Pb(II) and methylene blue (MB) adsorption when compared with the material without hybridization. The maximum As(V), Pb(II) and MB adsorption capacities obtained from Langmuir model were 157 mg/g, 103 mg/g and 297 mg/g, respectively. As(V) adsorption onto HSC was best fit by the pseudo-second-order model, and Pb(II) and MB with the intraparticle diffusion model. Increased temperature and ionic strength decreased Pb(II) and MB adsorption onto HSC more than As(V). Further FT-IR, XRD and XPS analysis demonstrated that the removal of As(V) by HSC was mainly dominated by surface deposition of MgHAsO 4 and Mg(H 2 AsO 4 ) 2 crystals on the HSC composite, while carbon π-π* transition and carbon π-electron played key roles in Pb(II) and MB adsorption. The interaction of Pb(II) with carbon matrix carboxylate was also evident. Overall, MgO hybridization improves the preparation of the nanotube-like carbon sponge composite and provides a potential agricultual residue-based adsorbent for As(V), Pb(II) and MB removal. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. FLARE-LIKE VARIABILITY OF THE Mg II {lambda}2800 EMISSION LINE IN THE {gamma}-RAY BLAZAR 3C 454.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon-Tavares, J. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Chavushyan, V.; Patino-Alvarez, V.; Carraminana, A.; Carrasco, L. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Apartado Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Valtaoja, E. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20100 Turku (Finland); Arshakian, T. G. [I. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Popovic, L. C. [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11160 Belgrade 74 (Serbia); Tornikoski, M.; Laehteenmaeki, A. [Aalto University Metsaehovi Radio Observatory, Metsaehovintie 114, FI-02540 Kylmaelae (Finland); Lobanov, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-02-01

    We report the detection of a statistically significant flare-like event in the Mg II {lambda}2800 emission line of 3C 454.3 during the outburst of autumn 2010. The highest levels of emission line flux recorded over the monitoring period (2008-2011) coincide with a superluminal jet component traversing through the radio core. This finding crucially links the broad emission line fluctuations to the non-thermal continuum emission produced by relativistically moving material in the jet and hence to the presence of broad-line region clouds surrounding the radio core. If the radio core were located at several parsecs from the central black hole, then our results would suggest the presence of broad-line region material outside the inner parsec where the canonical broad-line region is envisaged to be located. We briefly discuss the implications of broad emission line material ionized by non-thermal continuum in the context of virial black hole mass estimates and gamma-ray production mechanisms.

  3. Electronic structure of a weakly antiferromagnetically coupled Mn(II)Mn(III) model relevant to manganese proteins: a combined EPR, 55Mn-ENDOR, and DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Nicholas; Ames, William; Epel, Boris; Kulik, Leonid V; Rapatskiy, Leonid; Neese, Frank; Messinger, Johannes; Wieghardt, Karl; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2011-09-05

    An analysis of the electronic structure of the [Mn(II)Mn(III)(μ-OH)-(μ-piv)(2)(Me(3)tacn)(2)](ClO(4))(2) (PivOH) complex is reported. It displays features that include: (i) a ground 1/2 spin state; (ii) a small exchange (J) coupling between the two Mn ions; (iii) a mono-μ-hydroxo bridge, bis-μ-carboxylato motif; and (iv) a strongly coupled, terminally bound N ligand to the Mn(III). All of these features are observed in structural models of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). Multifrequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) measurements were performed on this complex, and the resultant spectra simulated using the Spin Hamiltonian formalism. The strong field dependence of the (55)Mn-ENDOR constrains the (55)Mn hyperfine tensors such that a unique solution for the electronic structure can be deduced. Large hyperfine anisotropy is required to reproduce the EPR/ENDOR spectra for both the Mn(II) and Mn(III) ions. The large effective hyperfine tensor anisotropy of the Mn(II), a d(5) ion which usually exhibits small anisotropy, is interpreted within a formalism in which the fine structure tensor of the Mn(III) ion strongly perturbs the zero-field energy levels of the Mn(II)Mn(III) complex. An estimate of the fine structure parameter (d) for the Mn(III) of -4 cm(-1) was made, by assuming the intrinsic anisotropy of the Mn(II) ion is small. The magnitude of the fine structure and intrinsic (onsite) hyperfine tensor of the Mn(III) is consistent with the known coordination environment of the Mn(III) ion as seen from its crystal structure. Broken symmetry density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed on the crystal structure geometry. DFT values for both the isotropic and the anisotropic components of the onsite (intrinsic) hyperfine tensors match those inferred from the EPR/ENDOR simulations described above, to within 5%. This study demonstrates that DFT calculations provide reliable estimates for spectroscopic

  4. Patterns of Strengths and Weaknesses on the WISC-V, DAS-II, and KABC-II and Their Relationship to Students' Errors in Oral Language, Reading, Writing, Spelling, and Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaux, Kristina C.; Avitia, Maria; Koriakin, Taylor; Bray, Melissa A.; DeBiase, Emily; Courville, Troy; Pan, Xingyu; Witholt, Thomas; Grossman, Sandy

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between specific cognitive patterns of strengths and weaknesses and the errors children make on oral language, reading, writing, spelling, and math subtests from the Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement-Third Edition (KTEA-3). Participants with scores from the KTEA-3 and either the Wechsler Intelligence…

  5. KiDS-450: cosmological constraints from weak-lensing peak statistics - II: Inference from shear peaks using N-body simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinet, Nicolas; Schneider, Peter; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Shan, HuanYuan; Asgari, Marika; Dietrich, Jörg P.; Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Erben, Thomas; Grado, Aniello; Heymans, Catherine; Hoekstra, Henk; Klaes, Dominik; Kuijken, Konrad; Merten, Julian; Nakajima, Reiko

    2018-02-01

    We study the statistics of peaks in a weak-lensing reconstructed mass map of the first 450 deg2 of the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS-450). The map is computed with aperture masses directly applied to the shear field with an NFW-like compensated filter. We compare the peak statistics in the observations with that of simulations for various cosmologies to constrain the cosmological parameter S_8 = σ _8 √{Ω _m/0.3}, which probes the (Ωm, σ8) plane perpendicularly to its main degeneracy. We estimate S8 = 0.750 ± 0.059, using peaks in the signal-to-noise range 0 ≤ S/N ≤ 4, and accounting for various systematics, such as multiplicative shear bias, mean redshift bias, baryon feedback, intrinsic alignment, and shear-position coupling. These constraints are ˜ 25 per cent tighter than the constraints from the high significance peaks alone (3 ≤ S/N ≤ 4) which typically trace single-massive haloes. This demonstrates the gain of information from low-S/N peaks. However, we find that including S/N cosmological probe.

  6. Systematic Study of a Family of Butterfly-Like {M2Ln2} Molecular Magnets (M = Mg(II), Mn(III), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II); Ln = Y(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III), Ho(III), and Er(III)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Pineda, Eufemio; Chilton, Nicholas F; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E P; McInnes, Eric J L

    2015-06-15

    A family of 3d-4f [M(II)2Ln(III)2(μ3-OH)2(O2C(t)Bu)10](2-) "butterflies" (where M(II) = Mg, Co, Ni, and Cu; Ln(III) = Y, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er) and [Mn(III)2Ln(III)2(μ3-O)2(O2C(t)Bu)10](2-) molecules (where Ln(III) = Y, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er) has been synthesized and characterized through single-crystal X-ray diffraction, SQUID magnetometry, and ab initio calculations. All dysprosium- and some erbium-containing tetramers showed frequency-dependent maxima in the out-of-phase component of the susceptibility associated with slow relaxation of magnetization, and hence, they are single-molecule magnets (SMMs). AC susceptibility measurements have shown that the SMM behavior is entirely intrinsic to the Dy and Er sites and the magnitude of the energy barrier is influenced by the interactions between the 4f and the 3d metal. A trend is observed between the strength of the 3d-4f exchange interaction between and the maximum observed in the χ″M(T).

  7. Posttreatment with group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist 2R,4R-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate is only weakly effective on seizures in immature rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Druga, Rastislav; Tsenov, Grygoriy; Haugvicová, Renata; Otáhal, Jakub

    2009-06-01

    The present study has examined the anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effect of 2R,4R-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (2R,4R-APDC), a selective agonist for group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) when given 10-15 min after the onset of seizures induced in 12-day-old rats by bilateral icv infusion of DL-homocysteic acid (DL-HCA, 600 nmol/side). For biochemical analyses, rat pups were sacrificed during generalized clonic-tonic seizures, approximately 45-50 min after infusion of DL-HCA. Comparable time intervals were used for sacrificing the animals which received 2R,4R-APDC (0.05 nmol/side) or saline. The severity of seizures was influenced only slightly when the agonist was given after the onset of seizures, as evaluated both from the behavioral symptoms and from EEG recordings. A tendency to lower number and a shorter duration of seizures was outlined in animals posttreated with 2R,4R-APDC, but the differences did not reach the level of statistical significance. Cortical energy metabolite changes which normally accompany seizures in immature rats (large decrease of glucose and glycogen and a marked rise of lactate) were ameliorated only partially. The neuroprotective effect of 2R,4R-APDC was evaluated after 24 h and 6 days of survival following DL-HCA-induced seizures. Massive neuronal degeneration in many brain regions, mainly in the hippocampus and thalamus, following infusion of DL-HCA alone was only partially attenuated after 2R,4R-APDC posttreatment. The present findings clearly indicate that both anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effect of 2R,4R-APDC against DL-HCA-induced seizures is substantially diminished when the agonist is given after the onset of seizures as compared with its efficacy after the pretreatment (Exp. Neurol.192, 420-436, 2005).

  8. Influence of Ca/Mg ratio on phytoextraction properties of Salix viminalis. II. Secretion of low molecular weight organic acids to the rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdziak, Z; Kozlowska, M; Kaczmarek, Z; Mleczek, M; Chadzinikolau, T; Drzewiecka, K; Golinski, P

    2011-01-01

    A hydroponic experiment in a phytotron was performed to investigate the effect of two different Ca/Mg ratios (4:1 and 1:10) and trace element ions (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) in solution on the efficiency of low molecular weight organic acid (LMWOA) formation in Salix viminalis rhizosphere. Depending on the Ca/Mg ratio and presence of selected trace elements at 0.5mM concentration, the amount and kind of LMWOAs in the rhizosphere were significantly affected. In physiological 4:1 Ca/Mg ratio the following complex of acids was observed: malonic (Pb, Zn), citric, lactic, maleic and succinic (Zn) acids. Under 1:10 Ca/Mg ratio, citric (Cd, Zn), maleic and succinic (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) acids were seen. Additionally, high accumulation of zinc and copper in all systems was observed, with the exception of those where one of the metals was at higher concentration. Summing up, the results indicate a significant role of LMWOAs in Salix phytoremediation abilities. Both effects can be modulated depending on the mutual Ca/Mg ratio. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermodynamic modeling of poorly complexing metals in concentrated electrolyte solutions: an X-ray absorption and UV-Vis spectroscopic study of Ni(II) in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Brugger, Joël; Etschmann, Barbara; Ngothai, Yung; Zeng, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and speciation of aqueous Ni(II)-chloride complexes is important for understanding Ni behavior in hydrometallurgical extraction. The effect of concentration on the first-shell structure of Ni(II) in aqueous NiCl2 and NiCl2-MgCl2 solutions was investigated by Ni K edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy at ambient conditions. Both techniques show that no large structural change (e.g., transition from octahedral to tetrahedral-like configuration) occurs. Both methods confirm that the Ni(II) aqua ion (with six coordinated water molecules at RNi-O = 2.07(2) Å) is the dominant species over the whole NiCl2 concentration range. However, XANES, EXAFS and UV-Vis data show subtle changes at high salinity (> 2 mol∙kg(-1) NiCl2), which are consistent with the formation of small amounts of the NiCl+ complex (up to 0.44(23) Cl at a Ni-Cl distance of 2.35(2) Å in 5.05 mol∙kg(-1) NiCl2) in the pure NiCl2 solutions. At high Cl:Ni ratio in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, small amounts of [NiCl2]0 are also present. We developed a speciation-based mixed-solvent electrolyte (MSE) model to describe activity-composition relationships in NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, and at the same time predict Ni(II) speciation that is consistent with our XAS and UV-Vis data and with existing literature data up to the solubility limit, resolving a long-standing uncertainty about the role of chloride complexing in this system.

  10. Thermodynamic Modeling of Poorly Complexing Metals in Concentrated Electrolyte Solutions: An X-Ray Absorption and UV-Vis Spectroscopic Study of Ni(II) in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Brugger, Joël; Etschmann, Barbara; Ngothai, Yung; Zeng, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and speciation of aqueous Ni(II)-chloride complexes is important for understanding Ni behavior in hydrometallurgical extraction. The effect of concentration on the first-shell structure of Ni(II) in aqueous NiCl2 and NiCl2-MgCl2 solutions was investigated by Ni K edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy at ambient conditions. Both techniques show that no large structural change (e.g., transition from octahedral to tetrahedral-like configuration) occurs. Both methods confirm that the Ni(II) aqua ion (with six coordinated water molecules at RNi-O = 2.07(2) Å) is the dominant species over the whole NiCl2 concentration range. However, XANES, EXAFS and UV-Vis data show subtle changes at high salinity (> 2 mol∙kg-1 NiCl2), which are consistent with the formation of small amounts of the NiCl+ complex (up to 0.44(23) Cl at a Ni-Cl distance of 2.35(2) Å in 5.05 mol∙kg-1 NiCl2) in the pure NiCl2 solutions. At high Cl:Ni ratio in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, small amounts of [NiCl2]0 are also present. We developed a speciation-based mixed-solvent electrolyte (MSE) model to describe activity-composition relationships in NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, and at the same time predict Ni(II) speciation that is consistent with our XAS and UV-Vis data and with existing literature data up to the solubility limit, resolving a long-standing uncertainty about the role of chloride complexing in this system. PMID:25885410

  11. Efficacy and safety of liraglutide 3.0 mg for weight management are similar across races: subgroup analysis across the SCALE and phase II randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ard, J; Cannon, A; Lewis, C E; Lofton, H; Vang Skjøth, T; Stevenin, B; Pi-Sunyer, X

    2016-04-01

    The efficacy and safety of liraglutide 3.0 mg versus placebo, as adjunct to diet and exercise, was evaluated in racial subgroups. This post hoc analysis of pooled data from five double-blind randomized, placebo-controlled trials was conducted in 5325 adults with either a body mass index (BMI) ≥27 kg/m(2) plus ≥1 comorbidity or a BMI ≥30 kg/m(2). Statistical interaction tests evaluated possible treatment effect differences between racial subgroups: white (4496, 84.4%), black/African-American (550, 10.3%), Asian (168, 3.2%) and other (111, 2.1%). Effects of liraglutide 3.0 mg on weight loss, associated metabolic effects and safety profile were generally consistent across racial subgroups. All achieved statistically significant mean weight loss at end-of-treatment with liraglutide 3.0 mg versus placebo: white 7.7% versus 2.3%, black/African-American 6.3% versus 1.4%, Asian 6.3% versus 2.5%, other 7.3% versus 0.49%. Treatment effects on weight and cardiovascular risk markers generally showed no dependence on race (interaction test p > 0.05). Adverse events were similar across racial subgroups. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Part II: Quantum mechanical prediction of heats of adsorption for C2-C4 hydrocarbons in MOF-74-Mg/Zn periodic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degaga, Gemechis D.; Valenzano, Loredana

    2017-08-01

    Periodic boundary condition models are used to investigate the interaction of small hydrocarbons (C2-C4) with MOF-74-Mg/Zn. In contrast to other studies where molecular cluster approaches are used, the complete chemical environment of the framework is included. This allows correcting the binding energies for basis-set superposition error, molecular lateral interaction, zero-point energy, and thermal contributions. As such, the presented results are directly comparable to experimental calorimetric values. This work discusses, for the first time, the origin of the fictitious agreement between binding energies obtained with molecular clusters and experimental heats of adsorption, identifying its origin as due to compensation of errors.

  13. Adsorption of acetanilide herbicides on soil and its components. II. Adsorption and catalytic hydrolysis of diethatyl-ethyl on saturated Na(+)-, K(+)-, Ca(2+)-, and Mg(2+)-montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W P; Fang, Z; Liu, H J; Yang, W C

    2001-04-01

    Adsorption and catalytic hydrolysis of the herbicide diethatyl-ethyl [N-chloroacetyl-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)glycine ethyl ester] on homoionic Na(+)-, K(+)-, Ca(2+)-, and Mg(2+)-montmorillonite clays were investigated in water solution. The Freundlich adsorption coefficient, Ki, got from isotherms on clay followed the order of Na+ approximately K+ > Mg2+ approximately Ca2+. Analysis of FT-IR spectra of diethatyl-ethyl adsorbed on clay suggests probable bonding at the carboxyl and amide carbonyl groups of the herbicide. The rate of herbicide hydrolysis in homoionic clay suspensions followed the same order as that for adsorption, indicating that adsorption may have preceded and thus caused hydrolysis. Preliminary product identification showed that hydrolysis occurred via nucleophilic substitution at the carboxyl carbon, causing the cleavage of the ester bond and formation of diethatyl and its dechlorinated derivative, and at the amide carbon, yielding an ethyl ester derivative and its acid. These pathways also suggest that hydrolysis of diethatyl-ethyl was catalyzed by adsorption on the clay surface.

  14. Low-temperature MIR to submillimeter mass absorption coefficient of interstellar dust analogues. II. Mg and Fe-rich amorphous silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demyk, K.; Meny, C.; Leroux, H.; Depecker, C.; Brubach, J.-B.; Roy, P.; Nayral, C.; Ojo, W.-S.; Delpech, F.

    2017-10-01

    Context. To model the cold dust emission observed in the diffuse interstellar medium, in dense molecular clouds or in cold clumps that could eventually form new stars, it is mandatory to know the physical and spectroscopic properties of this dust and to understand its emission. Aims: This work is a continuation of previous studies aiming at providing astronomers with spectroscopic data of realistic cosmic dust analogues for the interpretation of observations. The aim of the present work is to extend the range of studied analogues to iron-rich silicate dust analogues. Methods: Ferromagnesium amorphous silicate dust analogues were produced by a sol-gel method with a mean composition close to Mg1-xFexSiO3 with x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4. Part of each sample was annealed at 500 °C for two hours in a reducing atmosphere to modify the oxidation state of iron. We have measured the mass absorption coefficient (MAC) of these eight ferromagnesium amorphous silicate dust analogues in the spectral domain 30-1000 μm for grain temperature in the range 10-300 K and at room temperature in the 5-40 μm range. Results: The MAC of ferromagnesium samples behaves in the same way as the MAC of pure Mg-rich amorphous silicate samples. In the 30-300 K range, the MAC increases with increasing grain temperature whereas in the range 10-30 K, we do not see any change of the MAC. The MAC cannot be described by a single power law in λ- β. The MAC of the samples does not show any clear trend with the iron content. However the annealing process has, on average, an effect on the MAC that we explain by the evolution of the structure of the samples induced by the processing. The MAC of all the samples is much higher than the MAC calculated by dust models. Conclusions: The complex behavior of the MAC of amorphous silicates with wavelength and temperature is observed whatever the exact silicate composition (Mg vs. Fe amount). It is a universal characteristic of amorphous materials, and therefore of

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi Discret Typing Units (TcII and TcVI) in samples of patients from two municipalities of the Jequitinhonha Valley, MG, Brazil, using two molecular typing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Maykon Tavares; de Assis, Girley Francisco Machado; Oliveira e Silva, Jaquelline Carla Valamiel; Machado, Evandro Marques Menezes; da Silva, Glenda Nicioli; Veloso, Vanja Maria; Macedo, Andrea Mara; Martins, Helen Rodrigues; de Lana, Marta

    2015-10-31

    Trypanosoma cruzi is classified into six discrete taxonomic units (DTUs). For this classification, different biological markers and classification criteria have been used. The objective was to identify the genetic profile of T. cruzi samples isolated from patients of two municipalities of Jequitinhonha Valley, MG, Brazil. Molecular characterization was performed using two different criteria for T. cruzi typing to characterize 63 T. cruzi samples isolated from chronic Chagas disease patients. The characterizations followed two distinct methodologies. Additionally, the RAPD technique was used to evaluate the existence of genetic intragroup variability. The first methodology identified 89% of the samples as TcII, but it was not possible to define the genetic identity of seven isolates. The results obtained with the second methodology corroborated the classification as TcII of the same samples and defined the classification of the other seven as TcVI. RAPD analysis showed lower intra-group variability in TcII. The results confirmed the preliminary data obtained in other municipalities of the Jequitinhonha Valley, showing a predominance of TcII, similar to that verified in northeast/south axis of Brazil and the first detection of TcVI in the study region. The second protocol was more simple and reliable to identify samples of hybrid character.

  16. Pedogeoquímica em perfis de alteração na região de Lavras (MG. II - elementos menores e elementos das terras raras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. C. Lacerda

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Na região de Lavras, MG, analisou-se o comportamento geoquímico dos elementos menores (EM e elementos das terras raras (ETR ao longo da evolução pedogenética em perfis de solos com horizonteB textural, individualizados a partir de rochas de composição ácida, intermediária e básica do substrato. Nos perfis, realizaram-se análises químicas de EM e ETR, avaliando perdas e ganhos pelo balanço químico de massa. O estudo possibilitou o grupamento dos EM em duas classes: (amobilidade moderada a alta: perda da rocha fresca até o sólum; (bmobilidade moderada: enriquecimento relativo e eventualmente real no sólum. O comportamento dos ETR revelou grande mobilidade ao longo da evolução dos perfis de alteração.

  17. WEAK GORENSTEIN GLOBAL DIMENSION

    OpenAIRE

    Bennis, Driss

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the weak Gorenstein global dimensions. We are mainly interested in studying the problem when the left and right weak Gorenstein global dimensions coincide. We first show, for GF-closed rings, that the left and right weak Gorenstein global dimensions are equal when they are finite. Then, we prove that the same equality holds for any two-sided coherent ring. We conclude the paper with some examples and a brief discussion of the scope and limits of our results.

  18. History of Weak Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. D.

    1970-07-01

    While the phenomenon of beta-decay was discovered near the end of the last century, the notion that the weak interaction forms a separate field of physical forces evolved rather gradually. This became clear only after the experimental discoveries of other weak reactions such as muon-decay, muon-capture, etc., and the theoretical observation that all these reactions can be described by approximately the same coupling constant, thus giving rise to the notion of a universal weak interaction. Only then did one slowly recognize that the weak interaction force forms an independent field, perhaps on the same footing as the gravitational force, the electromagnetic force, and the strong nuclear and sub-nuclear forces.

  19. ISORROPIA II: a computationally efficient thermodynamic equilibrium model for K+─Ca²+─Mg²+─NH4+─Na+─SO4²-─NO3-─Cl-─H2O aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fountoukis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents ISORROPIA II, a thermodynamic equilibrium model for the K+–Ca2+–Mg2+–NH4+–Na+–SO42−–NO3−–Cl−–H2O aerosol system. A comprehensive evaluation of its performance is conducted against water uptake measurements for laboratory aerosol and predictions of the SCAPE2 thermodynamic module over a wide range of atmospherically relevant conditions. The two models agree well, to within 13% for aerosol water content and total PM mass, 16% for aerosol nitrate and 6% for aerosol chloride and ammonium. Largest discrepancies were found under conditions of low RH, primarily from differences in the treatment of water uptake and solid state composition. In terms of computational speed, ISORROPIA II was more than an order of magnitude faster than SCAPE2, with robust and rapid convergence under all conditions. The addition of crustal species does not slow down the thermodynamic calculations (compared to the older ISORROPIA code because of optimizations in the activity coefficient calculation algorithm. Based on its computational rigor and performance, ISORROPIA II appears to be a highly attractive alternative for use in large scale air quality and atmospheric transport models.

  20. FORS2/VLT survey of Milky Way globular clusters. II. Fe and Mg abundances of 51 Milky Way globular clusters on a homogeneous scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, B.; Barbuy, B.; Saviane, I.; Held, E. V.; Da Costa, G. S.; Ortolani, S.; Gullieuszik, M.; Vásquez, S.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Globular clusters trace the formation and evolution of the Milky Way and surrounding galaxies, and outline their chemical enrichment history. To accomplish these tasks it is important to have large samples of clusters with homogeneous data and analysis to derive kinematics, chemical abundances, ages and locations. Aims: We obtain homogeneous metallicities and α-element enhancement for 51 Galactic bulge, disc, and halo globular clusters that are among the most distant and/or highly reddened in the Galaxy's globular cluster system. We also provide membership selection based on stellar radial velocities and atmospheric parameters. The implications of our results are discussed. Methods: We observed R ~ 2000 spectra in the wavelength interval 456-586 nm for over 800 red giant stars in 51 Galactic globular clusters. We applied full spectrum fitting with the code ETOILE together with libraries of observed and synthetic spectra. We compared the mean abundances of all clusters with previous work and with field stars. We used the relation between mean metallicity and horizontal branch morphology defined by all clusters to select outliers for discussion. Results: [Fe/H], [Mg/Fe], and [α/Fe] were derived in a consistent way for almost one-third of all Galactic globular clusters. We find our metallicities are comparable to those derived from high-resolution data to within σ = 0.08 dex over the interval -2.5integrated spectroscopy and photometry. Two other clusters, HP 1 and NGC 6558, are confirmed as candidates for the oldest globular clusters in the Milky Way. Conclusions: Stellar spectroscopy in the visible at R ~ 2000 for a large sample of globular clusters is a robust and efficient way to trace the chemical evolution of the host galaxy and to detect interesting objects for follow-up at higher resolution and with forthcoming giant telescopes. The technique used here can also be applied to globular cluster systems in nearby galaxies with current instruments and to

  1. Muon motion in pure and weakly doped aluminium

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, T O; Karlsson, E; Kehr, K W; Norlin, L O; Richter, D; Welter, J M

    1981-01-01

    The authors have studied the diffusion and localization of positive muons in pure and weakly doped aluminium, in the temperature range 30 mK-100K, by measuring the damping parameter of the muon spin rotation ( mu SR) signal. In this paper they discuss some of their recent results and draw the following conclusions: i) in pure Al, positive muons are delocalized in band states (coherent motion); ii) in Al doped with 5-70 ppm Mn, the temperature, concentration and field dependences of the damping parameter suggest diffusion or capture limited trapping to octahedral interstitial sites in the aluminium lattice below 1K; iii) above 2K a two-state diffusion-trapping model explains well the peak in the damping parameter, which appears at 15-50K for the dopants Mn, Mg, Li and Ag so far studied. (11 refs).

  2. Weak bond screening system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, S. Y.; Chang, F. H.; Bell, J. R.

    Consideration is given to the development of a weak bond screening system which is based on the utilization of a high power ultrasonic (HPU) technique. The instrumentation of the prototype bond strength screening system is described, and the adhesively bonded specimens used in the system developmental effort are detailed. Test results obtained from these specimens are presented in terms of bond strength and level of high power ultrasound irradiation. The following observations were made: (1) for Al/Al specimens, 2.6 sec of HPU irradiation will screen weak bond conditions due to improper preparation of bonding surfaces; (2) for composite/composite specimens, 2.0 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to under-cured conditions; (3) for Al honeycomb core with composite skin structure, 3.5 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive or oils contamination of bonding surfaces; and (4) for Nomex honeycomb with Al skin structure, 1.3 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive.

  3. Bagging Weak Predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Manuel; Hillebrand, Eric

    Relations between economic variables can often not be exploited for forecasting, suggesting that predictors are weak in the sense that estimation uncertainty is larger than bias from ignoring the relation. In this paper, we propose a novel bagging predictor designed for such weak predictor...... variables. The predictor is based on a test for finitesample predictive ability. Our predictor shrinks the OLS estimate not to zero, but towards the null of the test which equates squared bias with estimation variance. We derive the asymptotic distribution and show that the predictor can substantially lower...

  4. Charged weak currents

    CERN Document Server

    Turlay, René

    1979-01-01

    In this review of charged weak currents the author concentrates on inclusive high energy neutrino physics. The authors discusses the general structure of charged currents, new results on total cross- sections, the Callan-Gross relation, antiquark distributions, scaling violations and tests of QCD. A very short summary on multilepton physics is given. (44 refs).

  5. On Weak Markov's Principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlenbach, Ulrich Wilhelm

    2002-01-01

    We show that the so-called weak Markov's principle (WMP) which states that every pseudo-positive real number is positive is underivable in E-HA + AC. Since allows one to formalize (atl eastl arge parts of) Bishop's constructive mathematics, this makes it unlikely that WMP can be proved within...

  6. Detection of Rest-frame Optical Lines from X-shooter Spectroscopy of Weak Emission Line Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Richard M.; Shemmer, Ohad; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W. N.; Fan, Xiaohui; Gallo, Elena; Lira, Paulina; Luo, Bin; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Strauss, Michael A.; Wu, Jianfeng

    2015-06-01

    Over the past 15 yr, examples of exotic radio-quiet quasars with intrinsically weak or absent broad emission line regions (BELRs) have emerged from large-scale spectroscopic sky surveys. Here, we present spectroscopy of seven such weak emission line quasars (WLQs) at moderate redshifts (z = 1.4-1.7) using the X-shooter spectrograph, which provides simultaneous optical and near-infrared spectroscopy covering the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) through optical. These new observations effectively double the number of WLQs with spectroscopy in the optical rest-frame, and they allow us to compare the strengths of (weak) high-ionization emission lines (e.g., C iv) to low-ionization lines (e.g., Mg ii, Hβ, Hα) in individual objects. We detect broad Hβ and Hα emission in all objects, and these lines are generally toward the weaker end of the distribution expected for typical quasars (e.g., Hβ has rest-frame equivalent widths ranging from 15-40 Å). However, these low-ionization lines are not exceptionally weak, as is the case for high-ionization lines in WLQs. The X-shooter spectra also display relatively strong optical Fe ii emission, Hβ FWHM ≲ 4000 km s-1, and significant C iv blueshifts (≈1000-5500 km s-1) relative to the systemic redshift; two spectra also show elevated UV Fe ii emission, and an outflowing component to their (weak) Mg ii emission lines. These properties suggest that WLQs are exotic versions of “wind-dominated” quasars. Their BELRs either have unusual high-ionization components, or their BELRs are in an atypical photoionization state because of an unusually soft continuum. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program IDs 088.B-0355 and 090.B-0438.

  7. From Suitable Weak Solutions to Entropy Viscosity

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2010-12-16

    This paper focuses on the notion of suitable weak solutions for the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and discusses the relevance of this notion to Computational Fluid Dynamics. The purpose of the paper is twofold (i) to recall basic mathematical properties of the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and to show how they might relate to LES (ii) to introduce an entropy viscosity technique based on the notion of suitable weak solution and to illustrate numerically this concept. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  8. Weak lensing with GEST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, J. D.; Bennett, D. P.; Kaiser, N.

    2001-12-01

    Weak lensing by large-scale structure (cosmic shear) provides an opportunity to directly observe the dark matter in the universe. Current ground-based and space-based surveys have demonstrated the efficacy of this technique in determining the mass distribution and thus placing constraints on cosmological parameters such as Ω m, σ 8, and the bias parameter b. Current surveys have been hampered by the comparatively low resolution of ground-based telescopes and the small field of view of HST. To make significant progress in this field, wide field space-based surveys are needed. The Galactic Exoplanet Survey Telescope (GEST) will be able to provide 500- 1000 sqare degrees with a resolution of better than 0.2 arcseconds in multiple filters. This will make it an ideal instrument for a weak lensing survey.

  9. Composite weak bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, M.

    1988-04-01

    Dynamical mechanism of composite W and Z is studied in a 1/N field theory model with four-fermion interactions in which global weak SU(2) symmetry is broken explicitly by electromagnetic interaction. Issues involved in such a model are discussed in detail. Deviation from gauge coupling due to compositeness and higher order loop corrections are examined to show that this class of models are consistent not only theoretically but also experimentally.

  10. Measurement of weak radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Theodorsson , P

    1996-01-01

    This book is intended for scientists engaged in the measurement of weak alpha, beta, and gamma active samples; in health physics, environmental control, nuclear geophysics, tracer work, radiocarbon dating etc. It describes the underlying principles of radiation measurement and the detectors used. It also covers the sources of background, analyzes their effect on the detector and discusses economic ways to reduce the background. The most important types of low-level counting systems and the measurement of some of the more important radioisotopes are described here. In cases where more than one type can be used, the selection of the most suitable system is shown.

  11. ICU-Acquired Weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Sarah E; Bunnell, Aaron E; Hough, Catherine L

    2016-11-01

    Survivorship after critical illness is an increasingly important health-care concern as ICU use continues to increase while ICU mortality is decreasing. Survivors of critical illness experience marked disability and impairments in physical and cognitive function that persist for years after their initial ICU stay. Newfound impairment is associated with increased health-care costs and use, reductions in health-related quality of life, and prolonged unemployment. Weakness, critical illness neuropathy and/or myopathy, and muscle atrophy are common in patients who are critically ill, with up to 80% of patients admitted to the ICU developing some form of neuromuscular dysfunction. ICU-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is associated with longer durations of mechanical ventilation and hospitalization, along with greater functional impairment for survivors. Although there is increasing recognition of ICUAW as a clinical entity, significant knowledge gaps exist concerning identifying patients at high risk for its development and understanding its role in long-term outcomes after critical illness. This review addresses the epidemiologic and pathophysiologic aspects of ICUAW; highlights the diagnostic challenges associated with its diagnosis in patients who are critically ill; and proposes, to our knowledge, a novel strategy for identifying ICUAW. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Using an innovative multiple regression procedure in a cancer population (Part II): fever, depressive affect, and mobility problems clarify an influential symptom pair (pain–fatigue/weakness) and cluster (pain–fatigue/weakness–sleep problems)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francoeur, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    Background Most patients with advanced cancer experience symptom pairs or clusters among pain, fatigue, and insomnia. However, only combinations where symptoms are mutually influential hold potential for identifying patient subgroups at greater risk, and in some contexts, interventions with “cross-over” (multisymptom) effects. Improved methods to detect and interpret interactions among symptoms, signs, or biomarkers are needed to reveal these influential pairs and clusters. I recently created sequential residual centering (SRC) to reduce multicollinearity in moderated regression, which enhances sensitivity to detect these interactions. Methods I applied SRC to moderated regressions of single-item symptoms that interact to predict outcomes from 268 palliative radiation outpatients. I investigated: 1) the hypothesis that the interaction, pain × fatigue/weakness × sleep problems, predicts depressive affect only when fever presents, and 2) an exploratory analysis, when fever is absent, that the interaction, pain × fatigue/weakness × sleep problems × depressive affect, predicts mobility problems. In the fever context, three-way interactions (and derivative terms) of the four symptoms (pain, fatigue/weakness, fever, sleep problems) are tested individually and simultaneously; in the non-fever context, a single four-way interaction (and derivative terms) is tested. Results Fever interacts separately with fatigue/weakness and sleep problems; these comoderators each magnify the pain–depressive affect relationship along the upper or full range of pain values. In non-fever contexts, fatigue/weakness, sleep problems, and depressive affect comagnify the relationship between pain and mobility problems. Conclusion Different mechanisms contribute to the pain × fatigue/weakness × sleep problems interaction, but all depend on the presence of fever, a sign/biomarker/symptom of proinflammatory sickness behavior. In non-fever contexts, depressive affect is no longer an

  13. Using an innovative multiple regression procedure in a cancer population (Part II: fever, depressive affect, and mobility problems clarify an influential symptom pair (pain–fatigue/weakness and cluster (pain–fatigue/weakness–sleep problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francoeur RB

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Richard B Francoeur1,2 1School of Social Work and the Center for Health Innovation, Adelphi University, Garden City, NY, USA; 2Center for the Psychosocial Study of Health and Illness, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA Background: Most patients with advanced cancer experience symptom pairs or clusters among pain, fatigue, and insomnia. However, only combinations where symptoms are mutually influential hold potential for identifying patient subgroups at greater risk, and in some contexts, interventions with "cross-over" (multisymptom effects. Improved methods to detect and interpret interactions among symptoms, signs, or biomarkers are needed to reveal these influential pairs and clusters. I recently created sequential residual centering (SRC to reduce multicollinearity in moderated regression, which enhances sensitivity to detect these interactions. Methods: I applied SRC to moderated regressions of single-item symptoms that interact to predict outcomes from 268 palliative radiation outpatients. I investigated: 1 the hypothesis that the interaction, pain × fatigue/weakness × sleep problems, predicts depressive affect only when fever presents, and 2 an exploratory analysis, when fever is absent, that the interaction, pain × fatigue/weakness × sleep problems × depressive affect, predicts mobility problems. In the fever context, three-way interactions (and derivative terms of the four symptoms (pain, fatigue/weakness, fever, sleep problems are tested individually and simultaneously; in the non-fever context, a single four-way interaction (and derivative terms is tested. Results: Fever interacts separately with fatigue/weakness and sleep problems; these comoderators each magnify the pain–depressive affect relationship along the upper or full range of pain values. In non-fever contexts, fatigue/weakness, sleep problems, and depressive affect comagnify the relationship between pain and mobility problems. Conclusion: Different mechanisms

  14. Weak Quantum Ergodicity

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, L

    1998-01-01

    We examine the consequences of classical ergodicity for the localization properties of individual quantum eigenstates in the classical limit. We note that the well known Schnirelman result is a weaker form of quantum ergodicity than the one implied by random matrix theory. This suggests the possibility of systems with non-gaussian random eigenstates which are nonetheless ergodic in the sense of Schnirelman and lead to ergodic transport in the classical limit. These we call "weakly quantum ergodic.'' Indeed for a class of "slow ergodic" classical systems, it is found that each eigenstate becomes localized to an ever decreasing fraction of the available state space, in the semiclassical limit. Nevertheless, each eigenstate in this limit covers phase space evenly on any classical scale, and long-time transport properties betwen individual quantum states remain ergodic due to the diffractive effects which dominate quantum phase space exploration.

  15. Solvation of Mg in Helium-4: Are there Meta-stable Mg Dimers ?

    CERN Document Server

    Krotscheck, Eckhard

    2016-01-01

    Experiments on the formation of magnesium complexes in $^4$He nanodroplets were interpreted as the observation of the formation of weakly bound magnesium complexes. We present results for single Mg and Mg dimer solvation using the hypernetted chain / Euler-Lagrange method as well as path integral Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the phonon-mediated, indirect Mg-Mg interaction adds an oscillatory component to the direct Mg-Mg interaction. We undertake a step-by-step examination of the ingredients of the calculation of the phonon-induced interaction, comparing the results of semi-analytic HNC-EL calculations for bulk and single impurity results with experiments as well as Monte Carlo data. We do not find evidence for a sufficiently strong secondary minimum in the effective Mg-Mg interaction to support a metastable state.

  16. Low temperature vibrational spectroscopy. II. Evidence for order–disorder phase transitions due to weak C–H···Cl hydrogen bonding in tetramethylammonium hexachloroplatinate (IV), -tellurate (IV), and -stannate (IV) and the related perdeuterated compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    1978-01-01

    and it is suggested that the phase transitions are caused by an ordering of rotationally disordered methyl groups via the formation of weak C–H···Cl hydrogen bonds at low temperatures. The transition temperatures and hence the interactions are shown to depend on both the kind of hydrogen isotope and metal present...... torsions and other noncubic features play a role, especially in spectra at low temperatures. Possible site symmetries of the [PtCl6]2− ion, which cannot have strictly Oh symmetry in either phase, have been deduced. The spectra of a mixed Pt : Te compound showed that the hexachlorometallate anions vibrate...

  17. Once daily maraviroc 300 mg or 150 mg in combination with ritonavir-boosted darunavir 800/100 mg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoli, Chinyere; Siccardi, Marco; Thomas-William, Sathish; Dufty, Ngozi; Khonyongwa, Kirstin; Ainsworth, Jonathan; Watson, John; Cook, Roseanne; Gandhi, Kate; Hickinbottom, Geraldine; Owen, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen

    2012-03-01

    To describe the pharmacokinetics of maraviroc when dosed at 150 or 300 mg once daily with 800/100 mg of darunavir/ritonavir. A retrospective case-note review of HIV-infected adults taking maraviroc was conducted. Patients on a maraviroc-based regimen for a minimum of 5 weeks were grouped as receiving: (i) 300 mg of maraviroc twice daily with 245 mg of tenofovir/200 mg of emtricitabine; (ii) 300 mg of maraviroc once daily with 800/100 mg of darunavir/ritonavir once daily; and (iii) 150 mg of maraviroc once daily with 800/100 mg of darunavir/ritonavir once daily. C(trough) and C(peak) data were collected at 2, 12 or 24 h post-dose. Sixty-six patients were included, providing 115 samples. The median (IQR) C(peak) was 378 (350-640) ng/mL for 300 mg of maraviroc twice daily with 245 mg of tenofovir/200 mg of emtricitabine (n=9), 728 (378-935) ng/mL for 300 mg of maraviroc once daily with darunavir/ritonavir (n=29) and 364 (104-624) ng/mL for 150 mg of maraviroc once daily with darunavir/ritonavir (n=2; P=0.24). The median (IQR) C(trough) was 46 (33-61) ng/mL for 300 mg of maraviroc twice daily with 245 mg of tenofovir/200 mg of emtricitabine (n=12), 70 (49-97) ng/mL for 300 mg of maraviroc once daily with darunavir/ritonavir (n=34) and 43 (35-55) ng/mL for 150 mg of maraviroc once daily with darunavir/ritonavir (n=17; P=0.001). The maraviroc C(trough) in black patients (n=34) was 61 (45-110) ng/mL and in white patients (n=29) it was 49 (42-70) ng/mL (P=0.04). The C(peak) in black patients (n=20) was 800 (397-1060) ng/mL versus 387 (336-723) ng/mL in white patients (n=20; P=0.02). Once daily coadministration of 300 mg of maraviroc with 800/100 mg of darunavir/ritonavir was well tolerated and had favourable pharmacokinetics when compared with 300 mg of maraviroc twice daily with 245 mg of tenofovir/200 mg of emtricitabine. A 24% higher C(trough) and 107% higher C(peak) was seen in black patients compared with white patients.

  18. Weak Measurement and Quantum Correlation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arun Kumar Pati

    The concept of the weak measurements, for the first time, was introduced by Aharonov et al.1. Quantum state is preselected in |ψi〉 and allowed to interact weakly with apparatus. Measurement strength can be tuned and for “small g(t)” it is called 'weak measurement'. With postselection in |ψf 〉, apparatus state is shifted by an ...

  19. Evaluation the effect of 50 and 100 mg doses of Cuminum cyminum essential oil on glycemic indices, insulin resistance and serum inflammatory factors on patients with diabetes type II: A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Sahar; Sattari, Roghieh; Ghavamzadeh, Sa'id

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of 50 and 100 mg doses of green cumin essential oil on glycemic and inflammatory indices in patients with diabetes type II. In this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, subjects were divided into three groups after selecting them randomly according to the inclusion criteria: 1 - Cuminum cyminum capsule (100 mg/day,n = 33), 2 - C. cyminum capsule (50 mg/day, n = 33), and 3 - placebo (n = 33). Before and after 8 weeks of intervention, a blood sample was taken. The findings demonstrated that the mean of the FBS, glycosylated hemoglobin (HgA1c) and the serum levels of insulin were significantly decreased and insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR) was significantly increased in the groups receiving the 100 mg supplement (P < 0.001) and 50 mg supplement, but these indices were increased in the placebo group. The mean serum levels of TNF-α and hsCRP were significantly decreased, and serum levels of adiponectin was significantly increased at the end of the study in the groups receiving 100 mg (P < 0.001) and 50 mg (P = 0.008) supplement as well as in the group who received the placebo. There were no significant change in HOMA-B and QUICKI as insulin resistance parameters. Administering C. cyminum supplement in patients with diabetes type II may decrease the serum levels of insulin, FBS, and glycosylated hemoglobin and also the inflammatory indices of TNF-α and hsCRP and increased the serum levels of adiponectin. In addition it may control the complications of diabetes type II in these patients.

  20. Water-Soluble Fe(II)−H2O Complex with a Weak O−H Bond Transfers a Hydrogen Atom via an Observable Monomeric Fe(III)−OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brines, Lisa M.; Coggins, Michael K.; Poon, Penny Chaau Yan; Toledo, Santiago; Kaminsky, Werner; Kirk, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the metal ion properties that favor O−H bond formation versus cleavage should facilitate the development of catalysts tailored to promote a specific reaction, e.g., C−H activation or H2O oxidation. The first step in H2O oxidation involves the endothermic cleavage of a strong O−H bond (BDFE = 122.7 kcal/mol), promoted by binding the H2O to a metal ion, and by coupling electron transfer to proton transfer (PCET). This study focuses on details regarding how a metal ion’s electronic structure and ligand environment can tune the energetics of M(HO−H) bond cleavage. The synthesis and characterization of an Fe(II)−H2O complex, 1, that undergoes PCET in H2O to afford a rare example of a monomeric Fe(III)−OH, 7, is described. High-spin 7 is also reproducibly generated via the addition of H2O to {[FeIII(OMe2N4(tren))]2-(µ-O)}2+ (8). The O−H bond BDFE of Fe(II)−H2O (1) (68.6 kcal/mol) is calculated using linear fits to its Pourbaix diagram and shown to be 54.1 kcal/mol less than that of H2O and 10.9 kcal/mol less than that of [Fe(II)(H2O)6]2+. The O−H bond of 1 is noticeably weaker than the majority of reported Mn+(HxO−H) (M = Mn, Fe; n+ = 2+, 3+; x = 0, 1) complexes. Consistent with their relative BDFEs, Fe(II)−H2O (1) is found to donate a H atom to TEMPO•, whereas the majority of previously reported Mn+−O(H) complexes, including [MnIII(SMe2N4(tren))(OH)]+ (2), have been shown to abstract H atoms from TEMPOH. Factors responsible for the weaker O−H bond of 1, such as differences in the electron-donating properties of the ligand, metal ion Lewis acidity, and electronic structure, are discussed. PMID:25611075

  1. Water-soluble Fe(II)-H2O complex with a weak O-H bond transfers a hydrogen atom via an observable monomeric Fe(III)-OH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brines, Lisa M; Coggins, Michael K; Poon, Penny Chaau Yan; Toledo, Santiago; Kaminsky, Werner; Kirk, Martin L; Kovacs, Julie A

    2015-02-18

    Understanding the metal ion properties that favor O-H bond formation versus cleavage should facilitate the development of catalysts tailored to promote a specific reaction, e.g., C-H activation or H2O oxidation. The first step in H2O oxidation involves the endothermic cleavage of a strong O-H bond (BDFE = 122.7 kcal/mol), promoted by binding the H2O to a metal ion, and by coupling electron transfer to proton transfer (PCET). This study focuses on details regarding how a metal ion's electronic structure and ligand environment can tune the energetics of M(HO-H) bond cleavage. The synthesis and characterization of an Fe(II)-H2O complex, 1, that undergoes PCET in H2O to afford a rare example of a monomeric Fe(III)-OH, 7, is described. High-spin 7 is also reproducibly generated via the addition of H2O to {[Fe(III)(O(Me2)N4(tren))]2-(μ-O)}(2+) (8). The O-H bond BDFE of Fe(II)-H2O (1) (68.6 kcal/mol) is calculated using linear fits to its Pourbaix diagram and shown to be 54.1 kcal/mol less than that of H2O and 10.9 kcal/mol less than that of [Fe(II)(H2O)6](2+). The O-H bond of 1 is noticeably weaker than the majority of reported M(n+)(HxO-H) (M = Mn, Fe; n+ = 2+, 3+; x = 0, 1) complexes. Consistent with their relative BDFEs, Fe(II)-H2O (1) is found to donate a H atom to TEMPO(•), whereas the majority of previously reported M(n+)-O(H) complexes, including [Mn(III)(S(Me2)N4(tren))(OH)](+) (2), have been shown to abstract H atoms from TEMPOH. Factors responsible for the weaker O-H bond of 1, such as differences in the electron-donating properties of the ligand, metal ion Lewis acidity, and electronic structure, are discussed.

  2. AB Initio Characterization of MgCCH, MgCCH(+), and MgC2, and Pathways to their Formation in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, David E.

    1996-01-01

    A study of Mg-bearing compounds has been performed in order to determine molecular properties which are critical for planning new astronomical searches and laboratory studies. The primary focus of the work is on MgCCH, MgCCH(+), and the isomers of MgC2. Only MgCCH has been identified in laboratory studies. Additional calculations have been carried out on MgH, MgNC, MgCN, and their cations in an effort to evaluate pathways to the formation of MgCCH and MgCCH(+) in the InterStellar Medium (ISM) or in circumstellar envelopes. Correlated ab initio methods and correlation-consistent basis sets have been employed. Properties including structures, rotational constants, dipole moments, and harmonic frequencies are reported. A transition state between linear MgCC and cyclic MgC2 has been characterized and was found to yield a minimal barrier (approx. 0.5 kcal/mole), indicating easy interconversion to the cyclic form. Direct reactions in the ISM between Mg or Mg(+) and HCCH are precluded by energetic considerations, but a number of ion- molecule or neutral-neutral exchange reactions between CCH and various Mg-containing species offer plausible pathways to MgCCH or MgCCH(+). Weakly bound MgH may react with CCH to form MgCCH, but MgH has not been detected. Both MgNC and MgCN have been observed, but reactions with CCH are slightly endothermic by 1-3 kcal/mole. Although MgH(+), MgNC(+), and MgCN(+) have not been detected, their reactions with CCH to form MgCCH(+) are all exothermic. With only a small barrier separating linear MgCC and cyclic MgC2, the dissociative recombination of MgCCH(+) with an electron is expected to yield cyclic MgC2, and regenerate Mg and CCH. New astronomical searches for MgCCH, MgCCH(+), cyclic MgC2, MgNC(+), and MgCN(+) will provide further insight into organo-magnesium astrochemistry.

  3. Formation, stability and structural characterization of ternary MgUO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 2-} and Mg{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun-Yeop; Yun, Jong-Il [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering; Vespa, Marika; Gaona, Xavier; Dardenne, Kathy; Rothe, Joerg; Rabung, Thomas; Altmaier, Marcus [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal

    2017-06-01

    The formation of ternary Mg-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complexes under weakly alkaline pH conditions was investigated by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and compared to Ca-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complexes. The presence of two different Mg-UO{sub 2}-C{sub 3} complexes was identified by means of two distinct fluorescence lifetimes of 17±2 ns and 51±2 ns derived from the multi-exponential decay of the fluorescence signal. Slope analysis in terms of fluorescence intensity coupled with fluorescence intensity factor as a function of log [Mg(II)] was conducted for the identification of the Mg-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complexes forming. For the first time, the formation of both MgUO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 2-} and Mg{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) species was confirmed and the corresponding equilibrium constants were determined as log β {sub 113}=25.8±0.3 and β {sub 213}=27.1±0.6, respectively. Complementarily, fundamental structural information for both Ca-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} and Mg-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complexes was gained by extended EXAFS revealing very similar structures between these two species, except for the clearly shorter U-Mg distance (3.83 Aa) compared with U-Ca distance (4.15 Aa). These results confirmed the inner-sphere character of the Ca/Mg-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complexes. The formation constants determined for MgUO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 2-} and Mg{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) species indicate that ternary Mg-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complexes contribute to the relevant uranium species in carbonate saturated solutions under neutral to weakly alkaline pH conditions in the presence of Mg(II) ions, which will induce notable influences on the U(VI) chemical species under seawater conditions.

  4. Modeling Chemical Interaction Profiles: II. Molecular Docking, Spectral Data-Activity Relationship, and Structure-Activity Relationship Models for Potent and Weak Inhibitors of Cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 Isozyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Demchuk

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Polypharmacy increasingly has become a topic of public health concern, particularly as the U.S. population ages. Drug labels often contain insufficient information to enable the clinician to safely use multiple drugs. Because many of the drugs are bio-transformed by cytochrome P450 (CYP enzymes, inhibition of CYP activity has long been associated with potentially adverse health effects. In an attempt to reduce the uncertainty pertaining to CYP-mediated drug-drug/chemical interactions, an interagency collaborative group developed a consensus approach to prioritizing information concerning CYP inhibition. The consensus involved computational molecular docking, spectral data-activity relationship (SDAR, and structure-activity relationship (SAR models that addressed the clinical potency of CYP inhibition. The models were built upon chemicals that were categorized as either potent or weak inhibitors of the CYP3A4 isozyme. The categorization was carried out using information from clinical trials because currently available in vitro high-throughput screening data were not fully representative of the in vivo potency of inhibition. During categorization it was found that compounds, which break the Lipinski rule of five by molecular weight, were about twice more likely to be inhibitors of CYP3A4 compared to those, which obey the rule. Similarly, among inhibitors that break the rule, potent inhibitors were 2–3 times more frequent. The molecular docking classification relied on logistic regression, by which the docking scores from different docking algorithms, CYP3A4 three-dimensional structures, and binding sites on them were combined in a unified probabilistic model. The SDAR models employed a multiple linear regression approach applied to binned 1D 13C-NMR and 1D 15N-NMR spectral descriptors. Structure-based and physical-chemical descriptors were used as the basis for developing SAR models by the decision forest method. Thirty-three potent inhibitors

  5. December 2014 critical care case of the month: weak for weeks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natt B

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. History of Present Illness: A 65 year old woman presents with weakness involving both upper and lower extremities that is intermittent over the last 3 months, but in the last 2 weeks she has also noticed increasing neck weakness, droopy eyelids and increased drooling. Prior to this she was able to walk without difficulty and ride a recumbent bike for 20 minutes, but now is having difficulty walking on her own. She denies fevers, weight loss, shortness of breath, chest pain, palpitations, LE edema, joint pain, rash, any recent or current GI/GU symptoms and no new medications. Past Medical History, Social History, and Family History: The patient has a past history of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus Type II, GERD, obstructive sleep apnea (compliant with BiPAP, atrial fibrillation and hypothyroidism. She has a 40 pack-year history of tobacco use. Family history is noncontributory. Medications: Dabigatran 75mg BID, Esomeprazole 20 mg BID ...

  6. The effects of Mg incorporation and annealing temperature on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-01-09

    Jan 9, 2017 ... Listeria monocytogenes bacterium is a food-borne pathogen that causes Listeriosis and can cause menin- gitis and sepsis in newborns and adults with weak- ened immune systems, encephalitis, abortions in both animals and the humans. In this study, Mg-doped ZnO nanopowderes with varying Mg doping ...

  7. Weak Coupling Phases future directions

    CERN Document Server

    Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2003-01-01

    Recent results obtained from B decays on the phases of weak couplings described by the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix are discussed, with particular emphasis on $\\alpha$ and $\\gamma = \\pi - \\beta - \\alpha$.

  8. Weakly compact operators and interpolation

    OpenAIRE

    Maligranda, Lech

    1992-01-01

    The class of weakly compact operators is, as well as the class of compact operators, a fundamental operator ideal. They were investigated strongly in the last twenty years. In this survey, we have collected and ordered some of this (partly very new) knowledge. We have also included some comments, remarks and examples. The class of weakly compact operators is, as well as the class of compact operators, a fundamental operator ideal. They were investigated strongly in the last twenty years. I...

  9. Weak interactions of elementary particles

    CERN Document Server

    Okun, Lev Borisovich

    1965-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Natural Philosophy, Volume 5: Weak Interaction of Elementary Particles focuses on the composition, properties, and reactions of elementary particles and high energies. The book first discusses elementary particles. Concerns include isotopic invariance in the Sakata model; conservation of fundamental particles; scheme of isomultiplets in the Sakata model; universal, unitary-symmetric strong interaction; and universal weak interaction. The text also focuses on spinors, amplitudes, and currents. Wave function, calculation of traces, five bilinear covariants,

  10. Acute muscular weakness in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Pablo Javier Erazo Torricelli

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Acute muscle weakness in children is a pediatric emergency. During the diagnostic approach, it is crucial to obtain a detailed case history, including: onset of weakness, history of associated febrile states, ingestion of toxic substances/toxins, immunizations, and family history. Neurological examination must be meticulous as well. In this review, we describe the most common diseases related to acute muscle weakness, grouped into the site of origin (from the upper motor neuron to the motor unit. Early detection of hyperCKemia may lead to a myositis diagnosis, and hypokalemia points to the diagnosis of periodic paralysis. Ophthalmoparesis, ptosis and bulbar signs are suggestive of myasthenia gravis or botulism. Distal weakness and hyporeflexia are clinical features of Guillain-Barré syndrome, the most frequent cause of acute muscle weakness. If all studies are normal, a psychogenic cause should be considered. Finding the etiology of acute muscle weakness is essential to execute treatment in a timely manner, improving the prognosis of affected children.

  11. Precision metrology using weak measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijian; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2015-05-29

    Weak values and measurements have been proposed as a means to achieve dramatic enhancements in metrology based on the greatly increased range of possible measurement outcomes. Unfortunately, the very large values of measurement outcomes occur with highly suppressed probabilities. This raises three vital questions in weak-measurement-based metrology. Namely, (Q1) Does postselection enhance the measurement precision? (Q2) Does weak measurement offer better precision than strong measurement? (Q3) Is it possible to beat the standard quantum limit or to achieve the Heisenberg limit with weak measurement using only classical resources? We analyze these questions for two prototypical, and generic, measurement protocols and show that while the answers to the first two questions are negative for both protocols, the answer to the last is affirmative for measurements with phase-space interactions, and negative for configuration space interactions. Our results, particularly the ability of weak measurements to perform at par with strong measurements in some cases, are instructive for the design of weak-measurement-based protocols for quantum metrology.

  12. Sensing mechanisms involved in Ca2+ and Mg2+ homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferre, S.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) and magnesium (Mg(2+)) ions are involved in many vital physiological functions. In the human body, Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) homeostatic systems rely on three components: (i) tissues (re)absorbing or storing Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), mainly kidney, intestine, and bone; (ii) hormones that modulate

  13. Phase II randomized study of trabectedin given as two different every 3 weeks dose schedules (1.5 mg/m2 24 h or 1.3 mg/m2 3 h) to patients with relapsed, platinum-sensitive, advanced ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    del Campo, J. M.; Roszak, A.; Bidzinski, M.; Ciuleanu, T. E.; Hogberg, T.; Wojtukiewicz, M. Z.; Poveda, A.; Boman, K.; Westermann, A. M.; Lebedinsky, C.; Brugger, W.; Kreienberg, R.; Cikowska-Wozniak, E.; Dańska, A.; Curescu, S.; Parera, M.; Germá, J. R.; Casado, A.; Balañá, C.; González, A. J.; Mendiola, C.; Palacio-Vázquez, I.; Alonso-Carrión, L.; Alfaro, V.; Gómez, J.; Kalling, M. U.; Perren, T. J.

    2009-01-01

    This randomized, open-label, phase II clinical trial evaluated the optimal regimen of trabectedin administered every 3 weeks in patients with platinum-sensitive, relapsed, advanced ovarian cancer (AOC). Patients previously treated with less than two or two previous chemotherapy lines were randomized

  14. Nickel(II) biosorption by Rhodotorula glutinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suazo-Madrid, Alicia; Morales-Barrera, Liliana; Aranda-García, Erick; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo

    2011-01-01

    The present study reports the feasibility of using Rhodotorula glutinis biomass as an alternative low-cost biosorbent to remove Ni(II) ions from aqueous solutions. Acetone-pretreated R. glutinis cells showed higher Ni(II) biosorption capacity than untreated cells at pH values ranging from 3 to 7.5, with an optimum pH of 7.5. The effects of other relevant environmental parameters, such as initial Ni(II) concentration, shaking contact time and temperature, on Ni(II) biosorption onto acetone-pretreated R. glutinis were evaluated. Significant enhancement of Ni(II) biosorption capacity was observed by increasing initial metal concentration and temperature. Kinetic studies showed that the kinetic data were best described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Among the two-, three-, and four-parameter isotherm models tested, the Fritz-Schluender model exhibited the best fit to experimental data. Thermodynamic parameters (activation energy, and changes in activation enthalpy, activation entropy, and free energy of activation) revealed that the biosorption of Ni(II) ions onto acetone-pretreated R. glutinis biomass is an endothermic and non-spontaneous process, involving chemical sorption with weak interactions between the biosorbent and Ni(II) ions. The high sorption capacity (44.45 mg g(-1) at 25°C, and 63.53 mg g(-1) at 70°C) exhibited by acetone-pretreated R. glutinis biomass places this biosorbent among the best adsorbents currently available for removal of Ni(II) ions from aqueous effluents.

  15. Kinetic study of a highly active MgCl2-supported Ziegler-Natta catalyst in liquid pool propylene polymerization. II. The influence of alkyl aluminum and alkoxysilane on catalyst activation and deactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shimizu, Fumihiko; Pater, J.T.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Weickert, G.

    2001-01-01

    The influence of alkyl aluminum and alkoxysilane on the kinetics in liquid pool propylene batch polymerization was investigated with a highly active Ziegler-Natta catalyst system that consisted of MgCl2/TiCl4/diester-alkoxysilane/AlR3. In this study, diethyl phthalate and t-BuEtSi(OMe)2 were used as

  16. Quasi-Chemical Viscosity Model for Fully Liquid Slag in the Al2O3-CaO-MgO-SiO2 System. Part II: Evaluation of Slag Viscosities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masanori; Jak, Evgueni

    2013-12-01

    A model is presented that enables viscosities to be predicted reliably over the whole range of compositions and temperatures in the Al2O3-CaO-MgO-SiO2 slag system above liquidus in the temperature range from 1543 K to 2643 K (1270 °C to 2370 °C). Experimental procedures and data from the studies reported in the literature have been collected and critically reviewed with particular attention to the viscometry methods and possible contamination of slag samples to select reliable data points for further model development. Relevant revised formalism to describe the complex viscosity trends including charge-compensation effect of the Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations on the formation of tetrahedrally coordinated Al3+ was introduced. Parameters of the quasi-chemical viscosity model have been optimized to reproduce within experimental uncertainties most of the selected experimental data in the Al2O3-CaO-MgO-SiO2 system and all subsystems. This study is part of the overall development of the self-consistent viscosity model of the Al2O3-CaO-FeO-Fe2O3- MgO-Na2O-SiO2 multicomponent slag system.

  17. Quantum discord with weak measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Uttam, E-mail: uttamsingh@hri.res.in; Pati, Arun Kumar, E-mail: akpati@hri.res.in

    2014-04-15

    Weak measurements cause small change to quantum states, thereby opening up the possibility of new ways of manipulating and controlling quantum systems. We ask, can weak measurements reveal more quantum correlation in a composite quantum state? We prove that the weak measurement induced quantum discord, called as the “super quantum discord”, is always larger than the quantum discord captured by the strong measurement. Moreover, we prove the monotonicity of the super quantum discord as a function of the measurement strength and in the limit of strong projective measurement the super quantum discord becomes the normal quantum discord. We find that unlike the normal discord, for pure entangled states, the super quantum discord can exceed the quantum entanglement. Our results provide new insights on the nature of quantum correlation and suggest that the notion of quantum correlation is not only observer dependent but also depends on how weakly one perturbs the composite system. We illustrate the key results for pure as well as mixed entangled states. -- Highlights: •Introduced the role of weak measurements in quantifying quantum correlation. •We have introduced the notion of the super quantum discord (SQD). •For pure entangled state, we show that the SQD exceeds the entanglement entropy. •This shows that quantum correlation depends not only on observer but also on measurement strength.

  18. Warping the Weak Gravity Conjecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karta Kooner

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Weak Gravity Conjecture, if valid, rules out simple models of Natural Inflation by restricting their axion decay constant to be sub-Planckian. We revisit stringy attempts to realise Natural Inflation, with a single open string axionic inflaton from a probe D-brane in a warped throat. We show that warped geometries can allow the requisite super-Planckian axion decay constant to be achieved, within the supergravity approximation and consistently with the Weak Gravity Conjecture. Preliminary estimates of the brane backreaction suggest that the probe approximation may be under control. However, there is a tension between large axion decay constant and high string scale, where the requisite high string scale is difficult to achieve in all attempts to realise large field inflation using perturbative string theory. We comment on the Generalized Weak Gravity Conjecture in the light of our results.

  19. Cosmology and the weak interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)):(Chicago Univ., IL (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The weak interaction plays a critical role in modern Big Bang cosmology. This review will emphasize two of its most publicized cosmological connections: Big Bang nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter. The first of these is connected to the cosmological prediction of Neutrino Flavours, N{sub {nu}} {approximately} 3 which is now being confirmed at SLC and LEP. The second is interrelated to the whole problem of galaxy and structure formation in the universe. This review will demonstrate the role of the weak interaction both for dark matter candidates and for the problem of generating seeds to form structure. 87 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Nonlinear waves and weak turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharov, V E

    1997-01-01

    This book is a collection of papers on dynamical and statistical theory of nonlinear wave propagation in dispersive conservative media. Emphasis is on waves on the surface of an ideal fluid and on Rossby waves in the atmosphere. Although the book deals mainly with weakly nonlinear waves, it is more than simply a description of standard perturbation techniques. The goal is to show that the theory of weakly interacting waves is naturally related to such areas of mathematics as Diophantine equations, differential geometry of waves, Poincaré normal forms, and the inverse scattering method.

  1. Submanifolds weakly associated with graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sci. (Math. Sci.) Vol. 119, No. 3, June 2009, pp. 297–318. © Printed in India. Submanifolds weakly associated with graphs. A CARRIAZO, L M FERN ´ANDEZ and A RODRÍGUEZ-HIDALGO. Department of Geometry and Topology, Faculty of Mathematics, University of Sevilla,. Apartado de Correos 1160, 41080-Sevilla, Spain.

  2. Beam splitting on weak illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, A W; Buryak, A V; Mitchell, D J

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate, in both two and three dimensions, how a self-guided beam in a non-Kerr medium is split into two beams on weak illumination. We also provide an elegant physical explanation that predicts the universal character of the observed phenomenon. Possible applications of our findings to guiding light with light are also discussed.

  3. On Weak-BCC-Algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomys, Janus; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2013-01-01

    We describe weak-BCC-algebras (also called BZ-algebras) in which the condition (x∗y)∗z = (x∗z)∗y is satisfied only in the case when elements x, y belong to the same branch. We also characterize ideals, nilradicals, and nilpotent elements of such algebras. PMID:24311983

  4. Voltage Weak DC Distribution Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hailu, T.G.; Mackay, L.J.; Ramirez Elizondo, L.M.; Ferreira, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the behavior of voltage weak DC distribution systems. These systems have relatively small system capacitance. The size of system capacitance, which stores energy, has a considerable effect on the value of fault currents, control complexity, and system reliability. A number of

  5. Weak and strong typicality in quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Lea F; Polkovnikov, Anatoli; Rigol, Marcos

    2012-07-01

    We study the properties of mixed states obtained from eigenstates of many-body lattice Hamiltonians after tracing out part of the lattice. Two scenarios emerge for generic systems: (i) The diagonal entropy becomes equivalent to the thermodynamic entropy when a few sites are traced out (weak typicality); and (ii) the von Neumann (entanglement) entropy becomes equivalent to the thermodynamic entropy when a large fraction of the lattice is traced out (strong typicality). Remarkably, the results for few-body observables obtained with the reduced, diagonal, and canonical density matrices are very similar to each other, no matter which fraction of the lattice is traced out. Hence, for all physical quantities studied here, the results in the diagonal ensemble match the thermal predictions.

  6. The magnetosphere under weak solar wind forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Farrugia

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's magnetosphere was very strongly disturbed during the passage of the strong shock and the following interacting ejecta on 21–25 October 2001. These disturbances included two intense storms (Dst*≈−250 and −180 nT, respectively. The cessation of this activity at the start of 24 October ushered in a peculiar state of the magnetosphere which lasted for about 28 h and which we discuss in this paper. The interplanetary field was dominated by the sunward component [B=(4.29±0.77, −0.30±0.71, 0.49±0.45 nT]. We analyze global indicators of geomagnetic disturbances, polar cap precipitation, ground magnetometer records, and ionospheric convection as obtained from SuperDARN radars. The state of the magnetosphere is characterized by the following features: (i generally weak and patchy (in time low-latitude dayside reconnection or reconnection poleward of the cusps; (ii absence of substorms; (iii a monotonic recovery from the previous storm activity (Dst corrected for magnetopause currents decreasing from ~−65 to ~−35 nT, giving an unforced decreased of ~1.1 nT/h; (iv the probable absence of viscous-type interaction originating from the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH instability; (v a cross-polar cap potential of just 20–30 kV; (vi a persistent, polar cap region containing (vii very weak, and sometimes absent, electron precipitation and no systematic inter-hemisphere asymmetry. Whereas we therefore infer the presence of a moderate amount of open flux, the convection is generally weak and patchy, which we ascribe to the lack of solar wind driver. This magnetospheric state approaches that predicted by Cowley and Lockwood (1992 but has never yet been observed.

  7. The magnetosphere under weak solar wind forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Farrugia

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's magnetosphere was very strongly disturbed during the passage of the strong shock and the following interacting ejecta on 21–25 October 2001. These disturbances included two intense storms (Dst*≈−250 and −180 nT, respectively. The cessation of this activity at the start of 24 October ushered in a peculiar state of the magnetosphere which lasted for about 28 h and which we discuss in this paper. The interplanetary field was dominated by the sunward component [B=(4.29±0.77, −0.30±0.71, 0.49±0.45 nT]. We analyze global indicators of geomagnetic disturbances, polar cap precipitation, ground magnetometer records, and ionospheric convection as obtained from SuperDARN radars. The state of the magnetosphere is characterized by the following features: (i generally weak and patchy (in time low-latitude dayside reconnection or reconnection poleward of the cusps; (ii absence of substorms; (iii a monotonic recovery from the previous storm activity (Dst corrected for magnetopause currents decreasing from ~−65 to ~−35 nT, giving an unforced decreased of ~1.1 nT/h; (iv the probable absence of viscous-type interaction originating from the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH instability; (v a cross-polar cap potential of just 20–30 kV; (vi a persistent, polar cap region containing (vii very weak, and sometimes absent, electron precipitation and no systematic inter-hemisphere asymmetry. Whereas we therefore infer the presence of a moderate amount of open flux, the convection is generally weak and patchy, which we ascribe to the lack of solar wind driver. This magnetospheric state approaches that predicted by Cowley and Lockwood (1992 but has never yet been observed.

  8. Competing weak localization and weak antilocalization in ultrathin topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Murong; He, Liang; Kou, Xufeng; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Fan, Yabin; Chu, Hao; Jiang, Ying; Bardarson, Jens H; Jiang, Wanjun; Choi, Eun Sang; Wang, Yong; Yeh, Nai-Chang; Moore, Joel; Wang, Kang L

    2013-01-09

    We demonstrate evidence of a surface gap opening in topological insulator (TI) thin films of (Bi(0.57)Sb(0.43))(2)Te(3) below six quintuple layers through transport and scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements. By effective tuning the Fermi level via gate-voltage control, we unveil a striking competition between weak localization and weak antilocalization at low magnetic fields in nonmagnetic ultrathin films, possibly owing to the change of the net Berry phase. Furthermore, when the Fermi level is swept into the surface gap of ultrathin samples, the overall unitary behaviors are revealed at higher magnetic fields, which are in contrast to the pure WAL signals obtained in thicker films. Our findings show an exotic phenomenon characterizing the gapped TI surface states and point to the future realization of quantum spin Hall effect and dissipationless TI-based applications.

  9. Raman spectroscopy of DNA-metal complexes. II. The thermal denaturation of DNA in the presence of Sr2+, Ba2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, and Cd2+.

    OpenAIRE

    Duguid, J G; Bloomfield, V A; Benevides, J M; Thomas, G J

    1995-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry, laser Raman spectroscopy, optical densitometry, and pH potentiometry have been used to investigate DNA melting profiles in the presence of the chloride salts of Ba2+, Sr2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, and Cd2+. Metal-DNA interactions have been observed for the molar ratio [M2+]/[PO2-] = 0.6 in aqueous solutions containing 5% by weight of 160 bp mononucleosomal calf thymus DNA. All of the alkaline earth metals, plus Mn2+, elevate the melting temperature of ...

  10. Alternative solution model for the ternary carbonate system CaCO3 - MgCO3 - FeCO3 - II. Calibration of a combined ordering model and mixing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSwiggen, P.L.

    1993-01-01

    Earlier attempts at solution models for the ternary carbonate system have been unable to adequately accommodate the cation ordering which occurs in some of the carbonate phases. The carbonate solution model of this study combines a Margules type of interaction model with a Bragg-Williams type of ordering model. The ordering model determines the equilibrium state of order for a crystal, from which the cation distribution within the lattice can be obtained. The interaction model addresses the effect that mixing different cation species within a given cation layer has on the total free energy of the system. An ordering model was derived, based on the Bragg-Williams approach; it is applicable to ternary systems involving three cations substituting on two sites, and contains three ordering energy parameters (WCaMg, WCaFe, and WCaMgFe). The solution model of this study involves six Margules-type interaction parameters (W12, W21, W13, W31, W23, and W32). Values for the two sets of energy parameters were calculated from experimental data and from compositional relationships in natural assemblages. ?? 1993 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Measurements of weak localization of graphene in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvall, N.; Shivayogimath, Abhay; Yurgens, A.

    2015-01-01

    attribute this to the inhomogeneous field caused by vortices in the superconductor. The deviation, which depends on the carrier concentration in graphene, can be tuned by the gate voltage. In addition, collective vortex motion, known as vortex avalanches, is observed through magnetoresistance measurements......Weak localization in graphene is studied in inhomogeneous magnetic fields. To generate the inhomogeneous field, a thin film of type-II superconducting niobium is put in close proximity to graphene. A deviation from the ordinary quadratic weak localization behavior is observed at low fields. We...... of graphene....

  12. Bubble, weak and strong hyperinflation: Theory and empirical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando de Holanda Barbosa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical framework that allows a taxonomy of hyperinflation, namely: (i bubble, (ii weak and (iii strong hyperinflation. The inflation tax revenue curve is used to characterize each type of hyperinflation and we use this curve to test them. The bubble and strong hyperinflation hypotheses are rejected using Brazilian data. The weak hyperinflation hypothesis is not rejected and the economy could have been on the ‘wrong’ side of the Laffer curve during hyperinflation. This outcome, contrary to conventional wisdom, is predicted by this hypothesis, which presents a solution to an old puzzle of the hyperinflation literature.

  13. Optimal Weak Lensing Skewness Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Tong-Jie; Pen, Ue-Li; Zhang, Pengjie; Dubinski, John

    2003-01-01

    Weak lensing measurements are entering a precision era to statistically map the distribution of matter in the universe. The most common measurement has been of the variance of the projected surface density of matter, which corresponds to the induced correlation in alignments of background galaxies. This measurement of the fluctuations is insensitive to the total mass content, like using waves on the ocean to measure its depths. But when the depth is shallow as happens near a beach, waves beco...

  14. Weak neutral-current interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, R.M.

    1978-08-01

    The roles of each type of experiment in establishing uniquely the values of the the neutral-current couplings of u and d quarks are analyzed together with their implications for gauge models of the weak and electromagnetic interactions. An analysis of the neutral-current couplings of electrons and of the data based on the assumption that only one Z/sup 0/ boson exists is given. Also a model-independent analysis of parity violation experiments is discussed. 85 references. (JFP)

  15. [Muscle weakness in cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givon, Uri

    2009-01-01

    Over the last two decades, muscle weakness has been shown to be a major component of cerebral palsy (CP) pathology. Caused by multiple etiologies including variations in the muscle fiber type, pathologic motor unit function, co-contraction of agonists and antagonists, and muscle size and rigidity, weakness interferes with function and leads to limited function and participation. Muscle strength was found to be associated with walking ability and with functional scales. Children with CP were found to be weaker than typically developing children, and differences were found with respect to muscle groups in children with CP. Muscle weakness should be evaluated as objectively as possible to improve the quality of diagnosis and treatment. Manual muscle testing is not sufficient for evaluation, and instrumented muscle testing is validated in CP. Muscle strengthening is an important part of treatment of CP. Several methods of strengthening have been described. Muscle lengthening and other spasticity-modifying therapies have been shown to have a positive effect on muscle strength. Children who participated in muscle strengthening programs had a better quality of life and improved function.

  16. Completely continuous and weakly completely continuous abstract ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    if the operator ρa of right multiplication by a is compact (weakly compact, respectively). An algebra A is called right completely continuous (right weakly completely continuous) if any element a ∈ A is right completely continuous (right weakly completely con- tinuous, respectively). Left completely continuous (left weakly ...

  17. Protecting weak measurements against systematic errors

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Shengshi; Alonso, Jose Raul Gonzalez; Brun, Todd A.; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we consider the systematic error of quantum metrology by weak measurements under decoherence. We derive the systematic error of maximum likelihood estimation in general to the first-order approximation of a small deviation in the probability distribution, and study the robustness of standard weak measurement and postselected weak measurements against systematic errors. We show that, with a large weak value, the systematic error of a postselected weak measurement when the probe u...

  18. Gossip and Distributed Kalman Filtering: Weak Consensus Under Weak Detectability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Soummya; Moura, José M. F.

    2011-04-01

    The paper presents the gossip interactive Kalman filter (GIKF) for distributed Kalman filtering for networked systems and sensor networks, where inter-sensor communication and observations occur at the same time-scale. The communication among sensors is random; each sensor occasionally exchanges its filtering state information with a neighbor depending on the availability of the appropriate network link. We show that under a weak distributed detectability condition: 1. the GIKF error process remains stochastically bounded, irrespective of the instability properties of the random process dynamics; and 2. the network achieves \\emph{weak consensus}, i.e., the conditional estimation error covariance at a (uniformly) randomly selected sensor converges in distribution to a unique invariant measure on the space of positive semi-definite matrices (independent of the initial state.) To prove these results, we interpret the filtered states (estimates and error covariances) at each node in the GIKF as stochastic particles with local interactions. We analyze the asymptotic properties of the error process by studying as a random dynamical system the associated switched (random) Riccati equation, the switching being dictated by a non-stationary Markov chain on the network graph.

  19. 'Culture and memory of the Sto. Antonio do Morro Grande/MG Quilombola community' program - case study: environmental licensing progress for the Rio de Janeiro-Belo Horizonte Gas Pipeline (GASBEL II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismerio, Marcia [Pallos Environmental Consulting, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (United States); Bartolini, Marcia [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The 'Culture and Memory of the Sto. Antonio do Morro Grande Quilombola Community' Program was included in the environmental licensing process of the Rio de Janeiro-Minas Gerais gas pipeline ('GASBEL II'), as requested by the Palmares Cultural Foundation (Fundacao Cultural Palmares), which stipulates the elaboration and implementation of this program as a condition for obtaining the installation license. To develop the program and submit it to this institution, we used methodological procedures in the form of an anthropological social research, such as: interviews with the community's older or most active residents, and a preliminary recognition of the territory and the local culture; all in order to learn more about the community's history and current needs and to identify the remaining 'quilombolas' still living in the community. Analyzing the information raised the need for guided actions designed to rescue the community's cultural memory as an ethnic group and to contribute to its process of affirmation as a Traditional Rural 'Quilombola' Community. This led to the creation of the proposed 'Culture and Memory of the Sto. Antonio do Morro Grande Quilombola Community' Program, currently being developed for the Quilombola Community located in Ressaquinha, in the State of Minas Gerais. (author)

  20. Weak polyelectrolytes in Confined Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmer, Jonathan K.; Rathee, Vikramjit S.; Sikora, Benjamin

    Crucial to the behavior of recently designed charge-rejection and mosaic membranes are the conformations of polyelectrolyte brushes and oligomeric grafts used to control the membranes' surface charge. The use of pH-tunable weak polyelectrolytes with associative interactions enables fine tuning of material transport properties. Here, we apply constant-pH molecular dynamics along with free energy sampling algorithms to understand the subtle tug-of-war between pH, salt concentrations, and solvation forces in confined systems, and determine how each of these effects alters transport within the system. We further discuss the implications of our findings for the design of electrolyte separation membranes.

  1. Raman spectroscopy of DNA-metal complexes. II. The thermal denaturation of DNA in the presence of Sr2+, Ba2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, and Cd2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguid, J G; Bloomfield, V A; Benevides, J M; Thomas, G J

    1995-12-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry, laser Raman spectroscopy, optical densitometry, and pH potentiometry have been used to investigate DNA melting profiles in the presence of the chloride salts of Ba2+, Sr2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, and Cd2+. Metal-DNA interactions have been observed for the molar ratio [M2+]/[PO2-] = 0.6 in aqueous solutions containing 5% by weight of 160 bp mononucleosomal calf thymus DNA. All of the alkaline earth metals, plus Mn2+, elevate the melting temperature of DNA (Tm > 75.5 degrees C), whereas the transition metals Co2+, Ni2+, and Cd2+ lower Tm. Calorimetric (delta Hcal) and van't Hoff (delta HVH) enthalpies of melting range from 6.2-8.7 kcal/mol bp and 75.6-188.6 kcal/mol cooperative unit, respectively, and entropies from 17.5 to 24.7 cal/K mol bp. The average number of base pairs in a cooperative melting unit () varied from 11.3 to 28.1. No dichotomy was observed between alkaline earth and transition DNA-metal complexes for any of the thermodynamic parameters other than their effects on Tm. These results complement Raman difference spectra, which reveal decreases in backbone order, base unstacking, distortion of glycosyl torsion angles, and rupture of hydrogen bonds, which occur after thermal denaturation. Raman difference spectroscopy shows that transition metals interact with the N7 atom of guanine in duplex DNA. A broader range of interaction sites with single-stranded DNA includes ionic phosphates, the N1 and N7 atoms of purines, and the N3 atom of pyrimidines. For alkaline earth metals, very little interaction was observed with duplex DNA, whereas spectra of single-stranded complexes are very similar to those of melted DNA without metal. However, difference spectra reveal some metal-specific perturbations at 1092 cm-1 (nPO2-), 1258 cm-1 (dC, dA), and 1668 cm-1 (nC==O, dNH2 dT, dG, dC). Increased spectral intensity could also be observed near 1335 cm-1 (dA, dG) for CaDNA. Optical densitometry, employed to detect DNA

  2. Weak lensing and cosmological investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Acquaviva, V

    2005-01-01

    In the last few years the scientific community has been dealing with the challenging issue of identifying the dark energy component. We regard weak gravitational lensing as a brand new, and extremely important, tool for cosmological investigation in this field. In fact, the features imprinted on the cosmic microwave background radiation by the lensing from the intervening distribution of matter represent a pretty unbiased estimator, and can thus be used for putting constraints on different dark energy models. This is true in particular for the magnetic-type B-modes of CMB polarization, whose unlensed spectrum at large multipoles (l approximately=1000) is very small even in presence of an amount of gravitational waves as large as currently allowed by the experiments: therefore, on these scales the lensing phenomenon is the only responsible for the observed power, and this signal turns out to be a faithful tracer of the dark energy dynamics. We first recall the formal apparatus of the weak lensing in extended t...

  3. Time—periodic weak solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Henriques de Brito

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available In continuing from previous papers, where we studied the existence and uniqueness of the global solution and its asymptotic behavior as time t goes to infinity, we now search for a time-periodic weak solution u(t for the equation whose weak formulation in a Hilbert space H isddt(u′,v+δ(u′,v+αb(u,v+βa(u,v+(G(u,v=(h,vwhere: ′=d/dt; (′ is the inner product in H; b(u,v, a(u,v are given forms on subspaces U⊂W, respectively, of H; δ>0, α≥0, β≥0 are constants and α+β>0; G is the Gateaux derivative of a convex functional J:V⊂H→[0,∞ for V=U, when α>0 and V=W when α=0, hence β>0; v is a test function in V; h is a given function of t with values in H.

  4. Political corruption and weak state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojiljković Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The author starts from the hypothesis that it is essential for the countries of the region to critically assess the synergy established between systemic, political corruption and a selectively weak, “devious” nature of the state. Moreover, the key dilemma is whether the expanded practice of political rent seeking supports the conclusion that the root of all corruption is in the very existence of the state - particularly in excessive, selective and deforming state interventions and benefits that create a fertile ground for corruption? The author argues that the destructive combination of weak government and rampant political corruption is based on scattered state intervention, while also rule the parties cartel in the executive branch subordinate to parliament, the judiciary and the police. Corrupt exchange takes place with the absence of strong institutional framework and the precise rules of the political and electoral games, control of public finances and effective political and anti-monopoly legislation and practice included. Exit from the current situation can be seen in the realization of effective anti­corruption strategy that integrates preventive and repressive measures and activities and lead to the establishment of principles of good governance. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179076: Politički identitet Srbije u regionalnom i globalnom kontekstu

  5. Microwave absorption studies of MgB2 superconductor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Technical Physics and Prototype Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre,. Mumbai 400 085, India ... for polycrystalline (grain size ∼ 10 µm) samples suggested the absence of weak-link character. The ... Experimental. Polycrystalline (grain size ∼ 10 µm) and large single-grain (3×2×1 mm3) MgB2 samples.

  6. Microwave absorption studies of MgB 2 superconductor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microwave absorption studies have been carried out on MgB2 superconductor using a standard X-band EPR spectrometer. The modulated low-field microwave absorption signals recorded for polycrystalline (grain size ∼ 10m) samples suggested the absence of weak-link character. The field dependent direct microwave ...

  7. Weak transitions in lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maturana, G.

    1984-01-01

    Some techniques to calculate the effects of the strong interactions on the matrix elements of weak processes are described. The lattice formulation of Quantum Chromodynamics is used to account for the low energy gluons, and the corresponding numerical methods are explained. The high energy contributions are included in effective lagrangians and the problem of matching the different scales related to the renormalization of the operators and wavefunctions is also discussed. The ..delta..l = 1/2 enhancement rule and the K/sup 0/-anti-K/sup 0/ are used to illustrate these techniques and the results of a numerical calculation is reported. The values obtained are very encouraging and they certainly show good qualitative agreement with the experimental values. The emphasis is on general techniques, and in particular, several improvements to this particular calculation are proposed.

  8. Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Joseph William; Jobstvogt, N.; Böhnke-Henrichs, A.

    2016-01-01

    The ecosystem services concept (ES) is becoming a cornerstone of contemporary sustainability thought. Challenges with this concept and its applications are well documented, but have not yet been systematically assessed alongside strengths and external factors that influence uptake. Such an assess......The ecosystem services concept (ES) is becoming a cornerstone of contemporary sustainability thought. Challenges with this concept and its applications are well documented, but have not yet been systematically assessed alongside strengths and external factors that influence uptake....... Such an assessment could form the basis for improving ES thinking, further embedding it into environmental decisions and management.The Young Ecosystem Services Specialists (YESS) completed a Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats (SWOT) analysis of ES through YESS member surveys. Strengths include the approach...

  9. Fault zone fabric and fault weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collettini, C.; Niemeijer, A.; Viti, C.; Marone, C.

    2009-01-01

    Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that some crustal faults are weak1–6 compared to laboratory measurements of frictional strength7. Explanations for fault weakness include the presence of weak minerals4, high fluid pressures within the fault core8,9 and dynamic processes such as

  10. Weakly distributive modules. Applications to supplement submodules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, we define and study weakly distributive modules as a proper generalization of distributive modules. We prove that, weakly distributive supplemented modules are amply supplemented. In a weakly distributive supplemented module every submodule has a unique coclosure. This generalizes a result of ...

  11. Potentiometric studies of Nickel (II) and copper (II) acetyl acetonato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potentiometric studies of Nickel (II) and copper (II) acetyl acetonato complexes. HN Aliyu, A Mustapha. Abstract. The dissociation constant pKa of acetylacetone has been determined potentiometrically. The pKa value obtained is 9.40, indicating a weak acid. The stability constants of the complex compounds formed from the ...

  12. POTENTIOMETRIC STUDIES OF NICKEL (II) AND COPPER (II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The dissociation constant pKa of acetylacetone has been determined potentiometrically. The pKa value obtained is 9.40, indicating a weak acid. The stability constants of the complex compounds formed from the reaction of nickel (II) and copper (II) with acetylacetone determined using potentiometer are ...

  13. Highly efficient copper(II) ion sorbents obtained by calcium carbonate mineralization on functionalized cross-linked copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, Marcela; Bunia, Ion; Doroftei, Florica; Varganici, Cristian-Dragos; Simionescu, Bogdan C

    2015-03-23

    A new type of Cu(II) ion sorbents is presented. These are obtained by CaCO3 mineralization from supersaturated solutions on gel-like cross-linked polymeric beads as insoluble templates. A divinylbenzene-ethylacrylate-acrylonitrile cross-linked copolymer functionalized with weakly acidic, basic, or amphoteric functional groups has been used, as well as different initial inorganic concentrations and addition procedures for CaCO3 crystal growth. The morphology of the new composites was investigated by SEM and compared to that of the unmodified beads, and the polymorph content was established by X-ray diffraction. The beads, before and after CaCO3 mineralization, were tested as sorbents for Cu(II) ions. The newly formed patterns on the bead surface after Cu(II) sorption were observed by SEM, and the elemental distribution on the composites and the chemical structure of crystals after interaction with Cu(II) were investigated by EDAX elemental mapping and by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy, respectively. The sorption capacity increased significantly after CaCO3 crystals growth on the weak anionic bead surface (up to 1041.5 mg Cu(II) /g sample) compared to that of unmodified beads (491.5 mg Cu(II) /g sample). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Weak matrix elements of kaons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C. (California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (USA). Inst. for Theoretical Physics); Soni, A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1989-01-01

    We present results from the Wilson fermion part of the Grand Challenge'' weak matrix element project. A new procedure for correcting the chiral behavior of {Beta}{sub LL}{sup sd}, the K{sup 0}-{bar K}{sup 0} {Beta} parameter,'' is proposed and applied. On our largest lattice (24{sup 3} {times} 40 at {beta} = 6.0), we get {Beta}{sub LL}{sup sd} = .86 {plus minus} .11 {plus minus} .05, where the first error is statistical and the second is a measure of the systematic errors due to the procedure and to related finite-size effects. Results for the direct K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} amplitude are also presented. There is some evidence for higher order chiral effects which may make these results compatible both with experiment and with the {Beta}{sub LL}{sup sd} computation. The status of the direct K{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {pi} {sup +} {pi}{sup {minus}} {Delta}I = 1/2 amplitude is then discussed. 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. A Universe without Weak Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; Perez, Gilad

    2006-04-07

    A universe without weak interactions is constructed that undergoes big-bang nucleosynthesis, matter domination, structure formation, and star formation. The stars in this universe are able to burn for billions of years, synthesize elements up to iron, and undergo supernova explosions, dispersing heavy elements into the interstellar medium. These definitive claims are supported by a detailed analysis where this hypothetical ''Weakless Universe'' is matched to our Universe by simultaneously adjusting Standard Model and cosmological parameters. For instance, chemistry and nuclear physics are essentially unchanged. The apparent habitability of the Weakless Universe suggests that the anthropic principle does not determine the scale of electroweak breaking, or even require that it be smaller than the Planck scale, so long as technically natural parameters may be suitably adjusted. Whether the multi-parameter adjustment is realized or probable is dependent on the ultraviolet completion, such as the string landscape. Considering a similar analysis for the cosmological constant, however, we argue that no adjustments of other parameters are able to allow the cosmological constant to raise up even remotely close to the Planck scale while obtaining macroscopic structure. The fine-tuning problems associated with the electroweak breaking scale and the cosmological constant therefore appear to be qualitatively different from the perspective of obtaining a habitable universe.

  16. Protecting weak measurements against systematic errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shengshi; Alonso, Jose Raul Gonzalez; Brun, Todd A.; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we consider the systematic error of quantum metrology by weak measurements under decoherence. We derive the systematic error of maximum likelihood estimation in general to the first-order approximation of a small deviation in the probability distribution and study the robustness of standard weak measurement and postselected weak measurements against systematic errors. We show that, with a large weak value, the systematic error of a postselected weak measurement when the probe undergoes decoherence can be significantly lower than that of a standard weak measurement. This indicates another advantage of weak-value amplification in improving the performance of parameter estimation. We illustrate the results by an exact numerical simulation of decoherence arising from a bosonic mode and compare it to the first-order analytical result we obtain.

  17. Oxidation of Mg atomic monolayer onto silicon: A road toward MgOx/Mg2Si (11-1)/Si (100) heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpi, B.; Rochdi, N.; Daineche, R.; Bertoglio, M.; Girardeaux, C.; Baronnet, A.; Perrin-Toinin, J.; Bocquet, M.; Djafari Rouhani, M.; Hemeryck, A.; Vizzini, S.

    2015-12-01

    Surface interfaces of thin magnesium oxide films elaborated onto Si(100)-(2 × 1) substrates were characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. We report that a flat and highly homogeneous magnesium oxide with well-defined interfaces could be grown at room temperature (RT) by repeating alternate adsorption of Mg atomic monolayer and O2 on Si(100). RT oxidation process of the first Mg monolayer plays a crucial role as driving force allowing a partial decomposition of amorphous ultra-thin Mg2Si at the Mg/Si interface to form more magnesium oxide in the surface. This process induces crystallization of the interfacial Mg2Si thin film and then gives arise to an unexpected MgOx/Mg2Si(11-1)/Si(100) heterostructure. MgOx monolayer displays a band gap of about 6 eV and exhibits a weak RMS roughness on large areas.

  18. Magnified Weak Lensing Cross Correlation Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, Melville P., Clowe, Douglas I.

    2010-11-30

    This project carried out a weak lensing tomography (WLT) measurement around rich clusters of galaxies. This project used ground based photometric redshift data combined with HST archived cluster images that provide the WLT and cluster mass modeling. The technique has already produced interesting results (Guennou et al, 2010,Astronomy & Astrophysics Vol 523, page 21, and Clowe et al, 2011 to be submitted). Guennou et al have validated that the necessary accuracy can be achieved with photometric redshifts for our purposes. Clowe et al titled "The DAFT/FADA survey. II. Tomographic weak lensing signal from 10 high redshift clusters," have shown that for the **first time** via this purely geometrical technique, which does not assume a standard rod or candle, that a cosmological constant is **required** for flat cosmologies. The intent of this project is not to produce the best constraint on the value of the dark energy equation of state, w. Rather, this project is to carry out a sustained effort of weak lensing tomography that will naturally feed into the near term Dark Energy Survey (DES) and to provide invaluable mass calibration for that project. These results will greatly advance a key cosmological method which will be applied to the top-rated ground-based project in the Astro2020 decadal survey, LSST. Weak lensing tomography is one of the key science drivers behind LSST. CO-I Clowe is on the weak lensing LSST committee, and senior scientist on this project, at FNAL James Annis, plays a leading role in the DES. This project has built on successful proposals to obtain ground-based imaging for the cluster sample. By 1 Jan, it is anticipated the project will have accumulated complete 5-color photometry on 30 (or about 1/3) of the targeted cluster sample (public webpage for the survey is available at http://cencos.oamp.fr/DAFT/ and has a current summary of the observational status of various clusters). In all, the project has now been awarded the equivalent of over 60

  19. Intrinsic Conductivity in Magnesium-Oxygen Battery Discharge Products: MgO and MgO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Jeffrey G.; Naruse, Junichi; Hiramatsu, Hidehiko

    2017-01-01

    Nonaqueous magnesium–oxygen (or “Mg-air”) batteries are attractive next generation energy storage devices due to their high theoretical energy densities, projected low cost, and potential for rechargeability. Prior experiments identified magnesium oxide, MgO, and magnesium peroxide, MgO2, as the ......Nonaqueous magnesium–oxygen (or “Mg-air”) batteries are attractive next generation energy storage devices due to their high theoretical energy densities, projected low cost, and potential for rechargeability. Prior experiments identified magnesium oxide, MgO, and magnesium peroxide, MgO2......, as the primary discharge products in a Mg/O2 cell. Charge transport within these nominally insulating compounds is expected to limit battery performance; nevertheless, these transport mechanisms either are incompletely understood (in MgO2) or remain a matter of debate (in MgO). The present study characterizes......O, the equilibrium concentration of carriers in MgO2 is low, and moderate-to-poor mobility further limits conductivity. If equilibrium behavior is realized, then we conclude that (i) sluggish charge transport in MgO or MgO2 will limit battery performance when these compounds cover the cathode support and (ii) what...

  20. Measurements of Narrow Mg II Associated Absorption Doublets with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Zhi-Fu Chen1 2 Cai-Juan Pan1 Guo-Qiang Li2 Wei-Rong Huang2 Mu-Sheng Li2. Department of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering of Baise University, Baise 533000, China. Center for Astrophysics of Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006, China.

  1. Spin effects in the weak interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, S.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA) Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Dept. of Physics Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-01-01

    Modern experiments investigating the beta decay of the neutron and light nuclei are still providing important constraints on the theory of the weak interaction. Beta decay experiments are yielding more precise values for allowed and induced weak coupling constants and putting constraints on possible extensions to the standard electroweak model. Here we emphasize the implications of recent experiments to pin down the strengths of the weak vector and axial vector couplings of the nucleon.

  2. A declaration of independence for Mg/Si. [Al/Si intensity ratio predictive usefulness for Mg/Si intensity ratio in lunar X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, N.; Keith, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    The weak covariation that exists between Al/Si and Mg/Si for large areas of the lunar surface is little, if any, stronger than that forced on a random set of numbers that are subject to closure. The Mg and Al variations implied by the Mg/Si and Al/Si intensity ratio data are qualitatively like those seen in lunar soil sample data. Two petrogenetic provinces are suggested for terra materials; one appears to have 50% higher Mg values than the other. Using the improved data, Mg/Si variations can be studied at a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 5/1.

  3. Galaxy rotation curves and the deceleration parameter in weak gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.

    2017-07-01

    We present a theory of weak gravity parametrized by a fundamental frequency ω0 = 1 - qH of the cosmological horizon, where H and q denote the Hubble and, respectively, deceleration parameter. It predicts (i) a C0 onset to weak gravity across accelerations α = adS in galaxy rotation curves, where adS = cH denotes the de Sitter acceleration with velocity of light c, and (ii) fast evolution Q(z) = dq(z)/dz of the deceleration parameter by Λ = ω02 satisfying Q0 > 2.5, Q0 = Q(0), distinct from Q0 ≲ 1 in ΛCDM. The first is identified in the high resolution data of Lelli et al. (2017), the second in the heterogeneous data on H(z) over 0 LISA Pathfinder are included.

  4. Weak isometries of the Boolean cube

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, S De; Korb, M

    2014-01-01

    Consider the metric space $\\mathcal{C}$ consisting of the $n$-dimensional Boolean cube equipped with the Hamming distance. A weak isometry of $\\mathcal{C}$ is a permutation of $\\mathcal{C}$ preserving a given subset of Hamming distances. In \\cite{Krasin} Krasin showed that in most cases preserving a single Hamming distance forces a weak isometry to be an isometry. In this article we study those weak isometries that are not automatically an isometry, providing a complete classification of weak...

  5. Pseudo-Weak-R0 Algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Lin Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A positive answer to the open problem of Iorgulescu on extending weak-R0 algebras and R0-algebras to the noncommutative forms is given. We show that pseudo-weak-R0 algebras are categorically isomorphic to pseudo-IMTL algebras and that pseudo-R0 algebras are categorically isomorphic to pseudo-NM algebras. Some properties, the noncommutative forms of the properties in weak-R0 algebras and R0-algebras, are investigated. The simplified axiom systems of pseudo-weak-R0 algebras and pseudo-R0 algebras are obtained.

  6. Learning to recognize animals by watching documentaries: using subtitles as weak supervision

    OpenAIRE

    Nurani Venkitasubramanian, Aparna; Tuytelaars, Tinne; Moens, Marie-Francine

    2017-01-01

    We investigate animal recognition models learned from wildlife video documentaries by using the weak supervision of the textual subtitles. This is a challenging setting, since i) the animals occur in their natural habitat and are often largely occluded and ii) subtitles are to a great degree complementary to the visual content, providing a very weak supervisory signal. This is in contrast to most work on integrated vision and language in the literature, where textual descriptions are ti...

  7. A classification of weakly acyclic games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apt, K.R.; Simon, S.

    2012-01-01

    Weakly acyclic games form a natural generalization of the class of games that have the finite improvement property (FIP). In such games one stipulates that from any initial joint strategy some finite improvement path exists. We classify weakly acyclic games using the concept of a scheduler recently

  8. Revisiting Weak Simulation for Substochastic Markov Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, David N.; Song, Lei; Zhang, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum of branching-time relations for probabilistic systems has been investigated thoroughly by Baier, Hermanns, Katoen and Wolf (2003, 2005), including weak simulation for systems involving substochastic distributions. Weak simulation was proven to be sound w.r.t. the liveness fragment...

  9. A note on Weak Stability Boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    García González, Fernando; Gómez Muntané, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    This paper is devoted to clarify the algorithmic definition of the weak stability boundary in the framework of the planar Restricted Three Body Problem. The role of the invariant hyperbolic manifolds associated to the central manifolds of the libration points L1 and L2, as boundary of the weak stability region, is shown Peer Reviewed

  10. CP Violation, Neutral Currents, and Weak Equivalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, V. L.

    1972-03-23

    Within the past few months two excellent summaries of the state of our knowledge of the weak interactions have been presented. Correspondingly, we will not attempt a comprehensive review but instead concentrate this discussion on the status of CP violation, the question of the neutral currents, and the weak equivalence principle.

  11. Towards a classification of weak hand holds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimmelman, V.; Sáfár, A.; Crasborn, O.

    2016-01-01

    The two symmetrical manual articulators (the hands) in signed languages are a striking modalityspecific phonetic property. The weak hand can maintain the end position of an articulation while the other articulator continues to produce additional signs. This weak hand spreading (hold) has been

  12. Spin Seebeck effect in a weak ferromagnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arboleda, Juan David, E-mail: juan.arboledaj@udea.edu.co; Arnache Olmos, Oscar [Instituto de Física, Universidad de Antioquia, A.A. 1226, Medellín (Colombia); Aguirre, Myriam Haydee; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Ramos, Rafael [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Spin Quantum Rectification Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Anadon, Alberto [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2016-06-06

    We report the observation of room temperature spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in a weak ferromagnetic normal spinel Zinc Ferrite (ZFO). Despite the weak ferromagnetic behavior, the measurements of the SSE in ZFO show a thermoelectric voltage response comparable with the reported values for other ferromagnetic materials. Our results suggest that SSE might possibly originate from the surface magnetization of the ZFO.

  13. On modeling weak sinks in MODPATH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Daniel B.; Haitjema, Henk; Kauffman, Leon J.

    2012-01-01

    Regional groundwater flow systems often contain both strong sinks and weak sinks. A strong sink extracts water from the entire aquifer depth, while a weak sink lets some water pass underneath or over the actual sink. The numerical groundwater flow model MODFLOW may allow a sink cell to act as a strong or weak sink, hence extracting all water that enters the cell or allowing some of that water to pass. A physical strong sink can be modeled by either a strong sink cell or a weak sink cell, with the latter generally occurring in low resolution models. Likewise, a physical weak sink may also be represented by either type of sink cell. The representation of weak sinks in the particle tracing code MODPATH is more equivocal than in MODFLOW. With the appropriate parameterization of MODPATH, particle traces and their associated travel times to weak sink streams can be modeled with adequate accuracy, even in single layer models. Weak sink well cells, on the other hand, require special measures as proposed in the literature to generate correct particle traces and individual travel times and hence capture zones. We found that the transit time distributions for well water generally do not require special measures provided aquifer properties are locally homogeneous and the well draws water from the entire aquifer depth, an important observation for determining the response of a well to non-point contaminant inputs.

  14. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, J.; Hermans, G.

    2017-01-01

    When critically ill, a severe weakness of the limbs and respiratory muscles often develops with a prolonged stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), a condition vaguely termed intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW). Many of these patients have serious nerve and muscle injury. This syndrome is

  15. Persisting weakness after withdrawal of a statin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mygland, Åse; Ljøstad, Unn; Krossnes, Bård Kronen

    2014-04-08

    An 81-year-old woman treated with simvastatin for several years followed by atorvastatin for about 1 year presented with fatigue, weakness and unsteady gait. The finding of elevated creatine kinase (CK) and symmetric muscle weakness around shoulders and hips led to suspicion of a toxic statin-associated myopathy. Atorvastatin was withdrawn, but her weakness persisted. Owing to persisting weakness, an autoimmune myopathy (myositis) was suspected, but initially disregarded since a muscle biopsy showed necrotic muscle fibres without inflammatory cell infiltrates and myositis-specific autoantibodies were absent. After 18 months with slowly progressive weakness and increasing CK values, awareness of new knowledge about autoimmunity as a cause of necrotic myopathy, led to a successful treatment trial with intravenous immunoglobulines, followed by steroids and metothrexate. Antibodies to the target enzyme of statins (HMGCR (3-hydroksy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase)) were detected in her serum, and she was diagnosed with autoimmune necrotic myositis probably triggered by atorvastatin.

  16. Ureilite Carbon and mg Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudon, P.; Romanek, C.; Paddock, L.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2004-05-01

    Ureilites are carbon-bearing ultramafic achondrites composed primarily of olivine and pyroxene with intergranular fine-grained metal, sulfides, and silicates. Carbon (up to 6.5 wt%) is either amorphous or present as graphite, lonsdaleite, and/or diamond. It has been shown that carbon-silicate redox (i.e. "smelting") reactions are responsible for the positive correlation between modal percent pigeonite and mg# and for the negative FeO-MnO trend seen in the mineral and bulk compositions of ureilites. Carbon redox reactions are strongly exothermic and pressure dependent; so ureilites with the largest mg# are the most reduced, experienced the highest temperatures, and formed at the lowest pressures, i.e. near the surface of the ureilite parent body. Ureilites with the largest mg# have the smallest δ 18O and the largest Δ 17O. To further investigate possible relationships, we performed carbon isotope and electron probe measurements on a suite of 27 ureilites in order to see the type of correlation that exists between mg# and carbon. Mg#s of olivine cores, carbon contents, and δ 13C data were taken from this study and the literature, and averaged. Polymict ureilites were not considered. A well-defined negative correlation is observed between the mg# of olivine cores and Δ 17O. A less well-defined negative correlation may exist between mg# of olivine cores and δ 13C, but there is substantial scatter in the data. However, a well-defined negative correlation exists between mg# of olivine rims and δ 13C. At first glance, this trend is unexpected: if ureilites with the largest mg# experienced the greatest amount of reduction, they should have the largest δ 13C and the correlation between mg# and δ 13C should be positive. A plot of carbon content versus δ 13C seems to show a general trend: the smaller the carbon content, the heavier is the carbon. This general trend is exactly what one would expect if smelting has affected the ureilite parent body: the more C is

  17. Weak Solution and Weakly Uniformly Bounded Solution of Impulsive Heat Equations Containing “Maximum” Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Oyelami, Benjamin Oyediran

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, criteria for the existence of weak solutions and uniformly weak bounded solution of impulsive heat equation containing maximum temperature are investigated and results obtained. An example is given for heat flow system with impulsive temperature using maximum temperature simulator and criteria for the uniformly weak bounded of solutions of the system are obtained.

  18. Weak Solution and Weakly Uniformly Bounded Solution of Impulsive Heat Equations Containing “Maximum” Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyelami, Benjamin Oyediran

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, criteria for the existence of weak solutions and uniformly weak bounded solution of impulsive heat equation containing maximum temperature are investigated and results obtained. An example is given for heat flow system with impulsive temperature using maximum temperature simulator and criteria for the uniformly weak bounded of solutions of the system are obtained.

  19. Quadriceps weakness and osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemenda, C; Brandt, K D; Heilman, D K; Mazzuca, S; Braunstein, E M; Katz, B P; Wolinsky, F D

    1997-07-15

    The quadriceps weakness commonly associated with osteoarthritis of the knee is widely believed to result from disuse atrophy secondary to pain in the involved joint. However, quadriceps weakness may be an etiologic factor in the development of osteoarthritis. To explore the relation between lower-extremity weakness and osteoarthritis of the knee. Cross-sectional prevalence study. Population-based, with recruitment by random-digit dialing. 462 volunteers 65 years of age or older. Radiographs of the knee were graded for the presence of osteoarthritis. Knee pain and function were assessed with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index, the strength of leg flexors and extensors was assessed with isokinetic dynamometry, and lower-extremity lean tissue mass was assessed with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Among participants with osteoarthritis, quadriceps weakness, but not hamstring weakness, was common. The ratio of extensor strength to body weight was approximately 20% lower in those with than in those without radiographic osteoarthritis. Notably, among women with tibiofemoral osteoarthritis, extensor weakness was present in the absence of knee pain and was seen in participants with normal lower-extremity lean mass (extensor strength, 30.1 lb-ft for those with osteoarthritis and 34.8 lb-ft for those without osteoarthritis; P osteoarthritis of the knee (odds ratio for prevalence of osteoarthritis per 10 lb-ft loss of strength, 0.8 [95% CI, 0.71 to 0.90] for radiographic osteoarthritis and 0.71 [CI, 0.51 to 0.87] for symptomatic osteoarthritis). Quadriceps weakness may be present in patients who have osteoarthritis but do not have knee pain or muscle atrophy; this suggests that the weakness may be due to muscle dysfunction. The data are consistent with the possibility that quadriceps weakness is a primary risk factor for knee pain, disability, and progression of joint damage in persons with osteoarthritis of the knee.

  20. Strong versus Weak Ties in Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Giulietti, Corrado; Wahba, Jackline; Zenou, Yves

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the role of strong versus weak ties in the rural-to-urban migration decision in China. We first develop a network model that puts forward the different roles of weak and strong ties in helping workers to migrate to the city. We then use a unique longitudinal data that allows us to test our model by focusing on first-time migration. Strong ties are measured by the closest family contact (excluding household members) while weak ties are determined by the fraction of migrants ...

  1. Quantum correlation cost of the weak measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jun; Wu, Shao-xiong; Yu, Chang-shui, E-mail: quaninformation@sina.com

    2014-12-15

    Quantum correlation cost (QCC) characterizing how much quantum correlation is used in a weak-measurement process is presented based on the trace norm. It is shown that the QCC is related to the trace-norm-based quantum discord (TQD) by only a factor that is determined by the strength of the weak measurement, so it only catches partial quantumness of a quantum system compared with the TQD. We also find that the residual quantumness can be ‘extracted’ not only by the further von Neumann measurement, but also by a sequence of infinitesimal weak measurements. As an example, we demonstrate our outcomes by the Bell-diagonal state.

  2. Current problems in the weak interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pais, A

    1977-01-01

    Some reasons are discussed showing why the recent SU(2) x U(1) gauge theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions is not a complete theory of these interactions, Lepton theory, charm, and the CP problem are considered. 60 references. (JFP)

  3. Coulomb excitation of (31)Mg

    CERN Document Server

    Seidlitz, M; Reiter, P; Bildstein, V; Blazhev, A; Bree, N; Bruyneel, B; Cederkall, J; Clement, E; Davinson, T; van Duppen, P; Ekstrom, A; Finke, F; Fraile, L M; Geibel, K; Gernhauser, R; Hess, H; Holler, A; Huyse, M; Ivanov, O; Jolie, J; Kalkuhler, M; Kotthaus, T; Krucken, R; Lutter, R; Piselli, E; Scheit, H; Stefanescu, I; van de Walle, J; Voulot, D; Warr, N; Wenander, F; Wiens, A

    2011-01-01

    The ground state properties of ^3^1Mg indicate a change of nuclear shape at N=19 with a deformed J^@p=1/2^+ intruder state as a ground state, implying that ^3^1Mg is part of the ''island of inversion''. The collective properties of excited states were the subject of a Coulomb excitation experiment at REX-ISOLDE, CERN, employing a radioactive ^3^1Mg beam. De-excitation @c-rays were detected by the MINIBALL @c-spectrometer in coincidence with scattered particles in a segmented Si-detector. The level scheme of ^3^1Mg was extended. Spin and parity assignment of the 945 keV state yielded 5/2^+ and its de-excitation is dominated by a strong collective M1 transition. Comparison of the transition probabilities of ^3^0^,^3^1^,^3^2Mg establishes that for th e N=19 magnesium isotope not only the ground state but also excited states are largely dominated by a deformed pf intruder configuration.

  4. Hyperglycemia-induced diaphragm weakness is mediated by oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A major consequence of ICU-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is diaphragm weakness, which prolongs the duration of mechanical ventilation. Hyperglycemia (HG) is a risk factor for ICUAW. However, the mechanisms underlying HG-induced respiratory muscle weakness are not known. Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) injure multiple tissues during HG, but only one study suggests that excessive ROS generation may be linked to HG-induced diaphragm weakness. We hypothesized that HG-induced diaphragm dysfunction is mediated by excessive superoxide generation and that administration of a specific superoxide scavenger, polyethylene glycol superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD), would ameliorate these effects. Methods HG was induced in rats using streptozotocin (60 mg/kg intravenously) and the following groups assessed at two weeks: controls, HG, HG + PEG-SOD (2,000U/kg/d intraperitoneally for seven days), and HG + denatured (dn)PEG-SOD (2000U/kg/d intraperitoneally for seven days). PEG-SOD and dnPEG-SOD were administered on day 8, we measured diaphragm specific force generation in muscle strips, force-pCa relationships in single permeabilized fibers, contractile protein content and indices of oxidative stress. Results HG reduced diaphragm specific force generation, altered single fiber force-pCa relationships, depleted troponin T, and increased oxidative stress. PEG-SOD prevented HG-induced reductions in diaphragm specific force generation (for example 80 Hz force was 26.4 ± 0.9, 15.4 ± 0.9, 24.0 ± 1.5 and 14.9 ± 0.9 N/cm2 for control, HG, HG + PEG-SOD, and HG + dnPEG-SOD groups, respectively, P hyperglycemia-induced diaphragm dysfunction. This new mechanistic information could explain how HG alters diaphragm function during critical illness. PMID:24886999

  5. Regularity of Tor for weakly stable ideals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Ansaldi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It is proved that if I and J are weakly stable ideals in a polynomial ring R = k[x_1, . . ., x_n], with k a field, then the regularity of Tor^R_i (R/I, R/J has the expected upper bound. We also give a bound for the regularity of Ext^i_R (R/I, R for I a weakly stable ideal.

  6. The regularization of Old English weak verbs

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Tío Sáenz

    2015-01-01

    [EN] This article deals with the regularization of non-standard spellings of the verbal forms extracted from a corpus. It addresses the question of what the limits of regularization are when lemmatizing Old English weak verbs. The purpose of such regularization, also known as normalization, is to carry out lexicological analysis or lexicographical work. The analysis concentrates on weak verbs from the second class and draws on the lexical database of Old English Nerthus, which has incorporate...

  7. Drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic, M.; Melchior, H.

    1968-01-01

    A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated.......A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated....

  8. Genetics Home Reference: glutaric acidemia type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood and tissues to become too acidic (metabolic acidosis). Glutaric acidemia type II usually appears in infancy ... sudden episode called a metabolic crisis, in which acidosis and low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) cause weakness, behavior ...

  9. Muscle weakness causes joint degeneration in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan Youssef, A; Longino, D; Seerattan, R; Leonard, T; Herzog, W

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of botulinum toxin type-A (BTX-A) induced quadriceps weakness on micro-structural changes in knee cartilage of New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. Fifteen rabbits were divided randomly into an experimental and a sham control group. Each group received a unilateral single quadriceps muscle injection either with saline (sham control; n=4) or BTX-A (experimental; n=11). BTX-A injection produced significant quadriceps muscle weakness (Pmuscle mass (Pknee cartilage, assessed with the Mankin grading system, were the same for the injected and non-injected hind limbs of the experimental group animals. Sham injection had no effect on joint degeneration but all control animals showed some degenerative changes in the knee. Degenerative changes of the retro-patellar cartilage were more severe in the experimental compared to sham control group rabbits (P0.05). Quadriceps muscle weakness caused increased degeneration in the retro-patellar cartilage of NZW rabbits, providing evidence that muscle weakness might be a risk factor for the onset and progression of osteoarthritis (OA). Future work needs to delineate whether muscle weakness directly affects joint degeneration, or if changes in function and movement execution associated with muscle weakness are responsible for the increased rate of OA onset and progression observed here.

  10. Extraction of weak transition strengths via the (He-3, t) reaction at 420 MeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, R. G. T.; Adachi, T.; Akimune, H.; Austin, Sam M.; van den Berg, A. M.; Brown, B. A.; Fujita, Y.; Fujiwara, M.; Gales, S.; Guess, C. J.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hashimoto, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Hayami, R.; Hitt, G. W.; Howard, M. E.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Kawase, K.; Kinoshita, M.; Matsubara, M.; Nakanishi, K.; Nakayama, S.; Okumura, S.; Ohta, T.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Scholl, C.; Simenel, C.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Uchida, M.; Yamagata, T.; Yosoi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Differential cross sections for transitions of known weak strength were measured with the (He-3, t) reaction at 420 MeV on targets of C-12, C-13, O-18, Mg-26, Ni-58, Ni-60, Zr-90, Sn-118, Sn-120, and Pb-208. Using these data, it is shown that the proportionalities between strengths and cross

  11. Myasthenia Gravis (MG): Medical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extremely rare. Thymectomy Thymectomy — surgical removal of the thymus gland — is recommended for thymoma and for most cases of generalized MG. It’s believed to be the only therapy capable of ... Because the thymus is required for immune system development, most doctors ...

  12. SIMULATION OF SUBGRADE EMBANKMENT ON WEAK BASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Petrenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This article provides: the question of the sustainability of the subgrade on a weak base is considered in the paper. It is proposed to use the method of jet grouting. Investigation of the possibility of a weak base has an effect on the overall deformation of the subgrade; the identification and optimization of the parameters of subgrade based on studies using numerical simulation. Methodology. The theoretical studies of the stress-strain state of the base and subgrade embankment by modeling in the software package LIRA have been conducted to achieve this goal. Findings. After making the necessary calculations perform building fields of a subsidence, borders cramped thickness, bed’s coefficients of Pasternak and Winkler. The diagrams construction of vertical stress performs at any point of load application. Also, using the software system may perform peer review subsidence, rolls railroad tracks in natural and consolidated basis. Originality. For weak soils is the most appropriate nonlinear model of the base with the existing areas of both elastic and limit equilibrium, mixed problem of the theory of elasticity and plasticity. Practical value. By increasing the load on the weak base as a result of the second track construction, adds embankment or increasing axial load when changing the rolling stock process of sedimentation and consolidation may continue again. Therefore, one of the feasible and promising options for the design and reconstruction of embankments on weak bases is to strengthen the bases with the help of jet grouting. With the expansion of the railway infrastructure, increasing speed and weight of the rolling stock is necessary to ensure the stability of the subgrade on weak bases. LIRA software package allows you to perform all the necessary calculations for the selection of a proper way of strengthening weak bases.

  13. New insight in oxidative conversion of alkanes : exploring Li-promoted MgO catalysts and plasma micro-reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trionfetti, C.

    2008-01-01

    In this study the preparation of Li-promoted MgO catalysts is described using, respectively, (i) wet impregnation and (ii) sol-gel method. In the case of Li-promoted MgO catalysts, defects sites, due to the surface substitution of Mg2+ ions by a Li+ ion in the MgO matrix, are reported to play a

  14. The First Gauge Theory of Weak Interactions and the Prediction of Weak Neutral Currents

    OpenAIRE

    Bludman, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    The three theoretical and historical components of the Standard Model are the exact chiral gauge theory of weak interactions, electroweak unification, and the Higgs mechanism for spontaneous symmetry breaking. I put into historical perspective my 1958 invention of the first gauge theory of weak interactions, predicting weak neutral currents, and show how the fundamental differences between global and gauge symmetries and between partial flavour and exact gauge symmetries, emerged in the stron...

  15. Geometric phase topology in weak measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samlan, C. T.; Viswanathan, Nirmal K.

    2017-12-01

    The geometric phase visualization proposed by Bhandari (R Bhandari 1997 Phys. Rep. 281 1–64) in the ellipticity-ellipse orientation basis of the polarization ellipse of light is implemented to understand the geometric aspects of weak measurement. The weak interaction of a pre-selected state, acheived via spin-Hall effect of light (SHEL), results in a spread in the polarization ellipticity (η) or ellipse orientation (χ) depending on the resulting spatial or angular shift, respectively. The post-selection leads to the projection of the η spread in the complementary χ basis results in the appearance of a geometric phase with helical phase topology in the η ‑ χ parameter space. By representing the weak measurement on the Poincaré sphere and using Jones calculus, the complex weak value and the geometric phase topology are obtained. This deeper understanding of the weak measurement process enabled us to explore the techniques’ capabilities maximally, as demonstrated via SHEL in two examples—external reflection at glass-air interface and transmission through a tilted half-wave plate.

  16. The Potential Value of Near Patient Platelet Function Testing in PCI: Randomised Comparison of 600 mg versus 900 mg Clopidogrel Loading Doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex R. Hobson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Whilst poor response to clopidogrel is associated with adverse outcomes uncertainty exists as to how (a response should be assessed and (b poor responders managed. We utilised VerifyNow P2Y12 and short Thrombelastography (TEG to assess 900 mg doses in (i initial poor responders to 600 mg and (ii in a randomised comparison with 600 mg. Blood was taken before and six hours post clopidogrel in (i 30 volunteers receiving 600 mg (poor responders received 900 mg > two weeks later and (ii 60 patients randomized 1 : 1 to 600 mg or 900 mg doses. Poor response was defined as TEG %Clotting Inhibition (%CIn or VerifyNow Platelet Response Unit (PRU reduction <30%. (i Poor responders to 600 mg had greater PRU reduction (45.0 versus 20.1%, P = 0.03 and greater %CIn (22.9 versus −15.1%, P = 0.01 after 900 mg but (ii there were no significant differences between the patient groups. Near-patient assessment of response to clopidogrel is feasible and clinically useful. Whilst ineffective on a population basis 900 mg doses increase the effect of clopidogrel in initial poor responders.

  17. Turfeiras da Serra do Espinhaço Meridional - MG: II - influência da drenagem na composição elementar e substâncias húmicas Peat bogs in the Serra do Espinhaço Meridional - Minas Gerais, Brazil: II - influence of drainage on elemental humus composition and substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Christófaro Silva

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available As turfeiras são Organossolos que resultam de condições ecológicas ideais ao acúmulo de material orgânico, controladas pelos sistemas geomorfológicos e processos geológicos e climáticos globais. Sua constituição física, química e biológica é pouco conhecida. No presente trabalho foi realizado um estudo sobre as turfeiras da Serra do Espinhaço Meridional (SdEM - MG, por meio da descrição e coleta de amostras em três perfis situados a 1.250 m (P1, 1.350 m (P4 e 1.800 m (P2 de altitude. Os três perfis foram caracterizados morfologicamente e, nas amostras coletadas, foram realizadas análises químicas e fracionamento da matéria orgânica em ácidos húmicos, ácidos fúlvicos e humina. A matéria orgânica dos perfis de Turfeiras da SdEM apresentou marcantes diferenças entre si em relação à sua composição química e ao teor das substâncias húmicas e à composição química dos ácidos húmicos. A variação das condições de drenagem foi preponderante para a diferenciação qualitativa e quantitativa da matéria orgânica. A turfeira P1, com moderadas condições de drenagem, apresentou matéria orgânica com maiores relações C/N e O/C, predomínio de ácidos fúlvicos entre as substâncias húmicas e ácidos húmicos e elevada relação C/N. Nas turfeiras P2 e P4, com muito más condições de drenagem, as relações C/N e O/C da matéria orgânica foram mais baixas, a humina predominou amplamente entre as substâncias húmicas e os ácidos húmicos apresentaram a mais baixa relação C/N.Peat bogs are Organosols formed under ideal ecological conditions in terms of the accumulation of organic material, controlled by geomorphological and geological processes and climate. The physical, chemistry and biological constitution of peat bogs is largely unknown. In this study the peat bogs of the Southern Serra do Espinhaço (Minas Gerais, Brazil were described and sampled from three profiles at 1,250 m (P1, 1,350 m (P4 and

  18. Weak KAM theory for a weakly coupled system of Hamilton–Jacobi equations

    KAUST Repository

    Figalli, Alessio

    2016-06-23

    Here, we extend the weak KAM and Aubry–Mather theories to optimal switching problems. We consider three issues: the analysis of the calculus of variations problem, the study of a generalized weak KAM theorem for solutions of weakly coupled systems of Hamilton–Jacobi equations, and the long-time behavior of time-dependent systems. We prove the existence and regularity of action minimizers, obtain necessary conditions for minimality, extend Fathi’s weak KAM theorem, and describe the asymptotic limit of the generalized Lax–Oleinik semigroup. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  19. Weak layer fracture: facets and depth hoar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Reiweger

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding failure initiation within weak snow layers is essential for modeling and predicting dry-snow slab avalanches. We therefore performed laboratory experiments with snow samples containing a weak layer consisting of either faceted crystals or depth hoar. During these experiments the samples were loaded with different loading rates and at various tilt angles until fracture. The strength of the samples decreased with increasing loading rate and increasing tilt angle. Additionally, we took pictures of the side of four samples with a high-speed video camera and calculated the displacement using a particle image velocimetry (PIV algorithm. The fracture process within the weak layer could thus be observed in detail. Catastrophic failure started due to a shear fracture just above the interface between the depth hoar layer and the underlying crust.

  20. Extrapolating Weak Selection in Evolutionary Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; García, Julián; Hauert, Christoph; Traulsen, Arne

    2013-01-01

    In evolutionary games, reproductive success is determined by payoffs. Weak selection means that even large differences in game outcomes translate into small fitness differences. Many results have been derived using weak selection approximations, in which perturbation analysis facilitates the derivation of analytical results. Here, we ask whether results derived under weak selection are also qualitatively valid for intermediate and strong selection. By “qualitatively valid” we mean that the ranking of strategies induced by an evolutionary process does not change when the intensity of selection increases. For two-strategy games, we show that the ranking obtained under weak selection cannot be carried over to higher selection intensity if the number of players exceeds two. For games with three (or more) strategies, previous examples for multiplayer games have shown that the ranking of strategies can change with the intensity of selection. In particular, rank changes imply that the most abundant strategy at one intensity of selection can become the least abundant for another. We show that this applies already to pairwise interactions for a broad class of evolutionary processes. Even when both weak and strong selection limits lead to consistent predictions, rank changes can occur for intermediate intensities of selection. To analyze how common such games are, we show numerically that for randomly drawn two-player games with three or more strategies, rank changes frequently occur and their likelihood increases rapidly with the number of strategies . In particular, rank changes are almost certain for , which jeopardizes the predictive power of results derived for weak selection. PMID:24339769

  1. Extrapolating weak selection in evolutionary games.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wu

    Full Text Available In evolutionary games, reproductive success is determined by payoffs. Weak selection means that even large differences in game outcomes translate into small fitness differences. Many results have been derived using weak selection approximations, in which perturbation analysis facilitates the derivation of analytical results. Here, we ask whether results derived under weak selection are also qualitatively valid for intermediate and strong selection. By "qualitatively valid" we mean that the ranking of strategies induced by an evolutionary process does not change when the intensity of selection increases. For two-strategy games, we show that the ranking obtained under weak selection cannot be carried over to higher selection intensity if the number of players exceeds two. For games with three (or more strategies, previous examples for multiplayer games have shown that the ranking of strategies can change with the intensity of selection. In particular, rank changes imply that the most abundant strategy at one intensity of selection can become the least abundant for another. We show that this applies already to pairwise interactions for a broad class of evolutionary processes. Even when both weak and strong selection limits lead to consistent predictions, rank changes can occur for intermediate intensities of selection. To analyze how common such games are, we show numerically that for randomly drawn two-player games with three or more strategies, rank changes frequently occur and their likelihood increases rapidly with the number of strategies [Formula: see text]. In particular, rank changes are almost certain for [Formula: see text], which jeopardizes the predictive power of results derived for weak selection.

  2. Weak Acid Ionization Constants and the Determination of Weak Acid-Weak Base Reaction Equilibrium Constants in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyasulu, Frazier; McMills, Lauren; Barlag, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory to determine the equilibrium constants of weak acid negative weak base reactions is described. The equilibrium constants of component reactions when multiplied together equal the numerical value of the equilibrium constant of the summative reaction. The component reactions are weak acid ionization reactions, weak base hydrolysis…

  3. A theoretical overview of hypernuclear weak decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumillas, C. [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Garbarino, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita di Torino and INFN, Sezione di Torino, I-10125 Torino (Italy)], E-mail: garbarin@to.infn.it; Parreno, A.; Ramos, A. [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-05-15

    The physics of the weak decay of hypernuclei is briefly reviewed from a theoretical point of view. Special regard is devoted to the recent progress concerning the determination of the non-mesonic decay widths and the asymmetry parameters. Convincing evidence has been achieved for a solution of the long-standing puzzle on the ratio {gamma}{sub n}/{gamma}{sub p}. Very recently, it has been shown that the exchange of a {pi}{pi} pair in the weak mechanism plays a crucial role in explaining the discrepancies between theory and experiment on the decay asymmetries.

  4. Weak interactions at high energies. [Lectures, review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, J.

    1978-08-01

    Review lectures are presented on the phenomenological implications of the modern spontaneously broken gauge theories of the weak and electromagnetic interactions, and some observations are made about which high energy experiments probe what aspects of gauge theories. Basic quantum chromodynamics phenomenology is covered including momentum dependent effective quark distributions, the transverse momentum cutoff, search for gluons as sources of hadron jets, the status and prospects for the spectroscopy of fundamental fermions and how fermions may be used to probe aspects of the weak and electromagnetic gauge theory, studies of intermediate vector bosons, and miscellaneous possibilities suggested by gauge theories from the Higgs bosons to speculations about proton decay. 187 references. (JFP)

  5. A Continuation Method for Weakly Kannan Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariza-Ruiz David

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The first continuation method for contractive maps in the setting of a metric space was given by Granas. Later, Frigon extended Granas theorem to the class of weakly contractive maps, and recently Agarwal and O'Regan have given the corresponding result for a certain type of quasicontractions which includes maps of Kannan type. In this note we introduce the concept of weakly Kannan maps and give a fixed point theorem, and then a continuation method, for this class of maps.

  6. Studying dark matter haloes with weak lensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velander, Malin Barbro Margareta

    2012-01-01

    Our Universe is comprised not only of normal matter but also of unknown components: dark matter and dark energy. This Thesis recounts studies of dark matter haloes, using a technique known as weak gravitational lensing, in order to learn more about the nature of these dark components. The haloes

  7. Common fixed points for weakly compatible maps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The purpose of this paper is to prove a common fixed point theorem, from the class of compatible continuous maps to a larger class of maps having weakly compatible maps without appeal to continuity, which generalized the results of Jungck [3], Fisher [1], Kang and Kim [8], Jachymski [2], and Rhoades [9].

  8. Quantum mechanical calculations on weakly interacting complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmen, T.G.A.

    1998-01-01

    Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) has been applied to compute the intermolecular potential energy surfaces and the interaction-induced electrical properties of weakly interacting complexes. Asymptotic (large R) expressions have been derived for the contributions to the collision-induced

  9. Cultural capital: strengths, weaknesses and two advancements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Werfhorst, H.G.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I discuss two weaknesses in Bourdieu’s work on cultural capital, both of which are related to his integration of the multidimensional nature of social space in different domains of life: social mobility, lifestyle differentiation, and political orientation. First, there is an anomaly

  10. Reducing Weak to Strong Bisimilarity in CCP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Aristizábal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Concurrent constraint programming (ccp is a well-established model for concurrency that singles out the fundamental aspects of asynchronous systems whose agents (or processes evolve by posting and querying (partial information in a global medium. Bisimilarity is a standard behavioural equivalence in concurrency theory. However, only recently a well-behaved notion of bisimilarity for ccp, and a ccp partition refinement algorithm for deciding the strong version of this equivalence have been proposed. Weak bisimiliarity is a central behavioural equivalence in process calculi and it is obtained from the strong case by taking into account only the actions that are observable in the system. Typically, the standard partition refinement can also be used for deciding weak bisimilarity simply by using Milner's reduction from weak to strong bisimilarity; a technique referred to as saturation. In this paper we demonstrate that, because of its involved labeled transitions, the above-mentioned saturation technique does not work for ccp. We give an alternative reduction from weak ccp bisimilarity to the strong one that allows us to use the ccp partition refinement algorithm for deciding this equivalence.

  11. Thermorheological effect on magnetoconvection in weak electrically ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The thermorheological effect on magnetoconvection in fluids with weak elec- trical conductivity is studied numerically under 1g and μg conditions. The results with a non-linear thermorheological equation considered in the problem when compared with those of the classical approach with constant viscosity ...

  12. Solitons and Weakly Nonlinear Waves in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical descriptions of solitons and weakly nonlinear waves propagating in plasma media are reviewed, with particular attention to the Korteweg-de Vries (KDV) equation and the Nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS). The modifications of these basic equations due to the effects of resonant...

  13. Fermi and the Theory of Weak Interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    The history of weak interactions starting with. Fermi's creation of the beta decay theory and culminating in its modern avatar in the form of the electroweak gauge theory is described. Dis- coveries of parity violation, matter{antimatter asymmetry, W and Z bosons and neutrino mass are highlighted. Introduction. Sun gives us ...

  14. Phenomenological model of the weak interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Schunck, Franz E.

    2008-01-01

    We use the informations known so far about elementary particles in order to construct a simple model. We find a reason for the gyromagnetic factor of 2 for leptons and a vivid imagination for the weak interaction. By this, we understand, why the elementary particles with lowest mass are stable and all other unstable.

  15. Fermi and the Theory of Weak Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Rajasekaran, G.

    2014-01-01

    The history of weak interactions starting with Fermi's creation of the beta decay theory and culminating in its modern avatar in the form of the electroweak gauge theory is described. Discoveries of parity violation, matter-antimatter asymmetry, W and Z bosons and neutrino mass are highlighted.

  16. Dynamical theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Englert, F

    1974-01-01

    The gauge theory of unified weak and electromagnetic interactions is developed without the use of scalar mesons. It is shown that the Glashow Weinberg scheme is unrealistic, but that a similar such scheme is possible if one includes two pairs of leptons, identified with e-, νe and μ-, νμ.

  17. The weak acid nature of precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    John O. Frohliger; Robert L. Kane

    1976-01-01

    Recent measurements of the pH of precipitation leave no doubt that rainfall is acidic. Evidence will be presented that precipitation is a weak acid system. The results of this research indicate the need to establish standard sampling procedures to provide uniform sampling of precipitation

  18. Neutrino propagation in a weakly magnetized medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the W and Z bosons allowing us to neglect the momentum dependence in the. W and Z propagators. This is equivalent to lowest-order GF calculations and is justified for low-energy neutrinos and low temperatures and weak fields compared to the Fermi scale. Since, in this work we focus our attention on the possible astro ...

  19. Fermi and the Theory of Weak Interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 1. Fermi and the Theory of Weak Interactions. G Rajasekaran. General Article Volume 19 Issue 1 January 2014 pp 18-44 ... Keywords. Fermi; beta decay; parity violation; electroweak theory; neutral current; quarks and leptons; neutrino mass.

  20. Weak organic acid stress in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Beek, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Weak organic acids are commonly used food preservatives that protect food products from bacterial contamination. A variety of spore-forming bacterial species pose a serious problem to the food industry by causing extensive food spoilage or even food poisoning. Understanding the mechanisms of

  1. Weak versus strong wave turbulence in the MMT model

    CERN Document Server

    Chibbaro, Sergio; Onorato, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Within the spirit of fluid turbulence, we consider the one-dimensional Majda-McLaughlin-Tabak (MMT) model that describes the interactions of nonlinear dispersive waves. We perform a detailed numerical study of the direct energy cascade in the defocusing regime. In particular, we consider a configuration with large-scale forcing and small scale dissipation, and we introduce three non- dimensional parameters: the ratio between nonlinearity and dispersion, {\\epsilon}, and the analogues of the Reynolds number, Re, i.e. the ratio between the nonlinear and dissipative time-scales, both at large and small scales. Our numerical experiments show that (i) in the limit of small {\\epsilon} the spectral slope observed in the statistical steady regime corresponds to the one predicted by the Weak Wave Turbulence (WWT) theory. (ii) As the nonlinearity is increased, the WWT theory breaks down and deviations from its predictions are observed. (iii) It is shown that such departures from the WWT theoretical predictions are accom...

  2. New weak keys in simplified IDEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafman, Sari Agustini; Muhafidzah, Arini

    2016-02-01

    Simplified IDEA (S-IDEA) is simplified version of International Data Encryption Algorithm (IDEA) and useful teaching tool to help students to understand IDEA. In 2012, Muryanto and Hafman have found a weak key class in the S-IDEA by used differential characteristics in one-round (0, ν, 0, ν) → (0,0, ν, ν) on the first round to produce input difference (0,0, ν, ν) on the fifth round. Because Muryanto and Hafman only use three differential characteristics in one-round, we conducted a research to find new differential characteristics in one-round and used it to produce new weak key classes of S-IDEA. To find new differential characteristics in one-round of S-IDEA, we applied a multiplication mod 216+1 on input difference and combination of active sub key Z1, Z4, Z5, Z6. New classes of weak keys are obtained by combining all of these characteristics and use them to construct two new differential characteristics in full-round of S-IDEA with or without the 4th round sub key. In this research, we found six new differential characteristics in one round and combined them to construct two new differential characteristics in full-round of S-IDEA. When two new differential characteristics in full-round of S-IDEA are used and the 4th round sub key required, we obtain 2 new classes of weak keys, 213 and 28. When two new differential characteristics in full-round of S-IDEA are used, yet the 4th round sub key is not required, the weak key class of 213 will be 221 and 28 will be 210. Membership test can not be applied to recover the key bits in those weak key classes. The recovery of those unknown key bits can only be done by using brute force attack. The simulation result indicates that the bit of the key can be recovered by the longest computation time of 0,031 ms.

  3. Hexaaquamanganese(II bis[hydrogen (4-aminophenylarsonate] tetrahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Smith

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the structure of the complex salt formed from the reaction of manganese(II acetate with (4-aminophenylarsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid, [Mn(H2O6](C6H7AsNO32·4H2O, the centrosymmetric Mn(H2O6 coordination polyhedron has slightly distorted octahedral stereochemistry, with the two hydrogen (4-aminophenylarsonate anions and the four water molecules of solvation related by inversion. Extensive O—H...O, O—H...N and N—H...O hydrogen bonds link all species, giving an overall three-dimensional supramolecular structure, which also has weak π–π ring interactions [minimum ring-centroid separation = 3.7304 (15 Å]. The structure is isotypic with that of the Mg salt.

  4. Quantum Groups, Property (T), and Weak Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannan, Michael; Kerr, David

    2017-11-01

    For second countable discrete quantum groups, and more generally second countable locally compact quantum groups with trivial scaling group, we show that property (T) is equivalent to every weakly mixing unitary representation not having almost invariant vectors. This is a generalization of a theorem of Bekka and Valette from the group setting and was previously established in the case of low dual by Daws, Skalski, and Viselter. Our approach uses spectral techniques and is completely different from those of Bekka-Valette and Daws-Skalski-Viselter. By a separate argument we furthermore extend the result to second countable nonunimodular locally compact quantum groups, which are shown in particular not to have property (T), generalizing a theorem of Fima from the discrete setting. We also obtain quantum group versions of characterizations of property (T) of Kerr and Pichot in terms of the Baire category theory of weak mixing representations and of Connes and Weiss in terms of the prevalence of strongly ergodic actions.

  5. Model Reduction of Strong-Weak Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven James Cox

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider neurons with large dendritic trees that are weakly excitable in the sense that back propagating action potentials are severly attenuated as they travelfrom the small, strongly excitable, spike initiation zone. In previous workwe have shown that the computational size of weakly excitable cell modelsmay be reduced by two or more orders of magnitude, and that the size of stronglyexcitable models may be reduced by at least one order of magnitude,without sacrificing thespatio-temporal nature of its inputs (in the sense we reproduce the cell's precise mapping of inputs to outputs. We combine the best of these twostrategies via a predictor--corrector decomposition scheme andachieve a drastically reduced highly accurate model of a caricature of the neuron responsible for collision detection in the locust.

  6. Model reduction of strong-weak neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bosen; Sorensen, Danny; Cox, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    We consider neurons with large dendritic trees that are weakly excitable in the sense that back propagating action potentials are severly attenuated as they travel from the small, strongly excitable, spike initiation zone. In previous work we have shown that the computational size of weakly excitable cell models may be reduced by two or more orders of magnitude, and that the size of strongly excitable models may be reduced by at least one order of magnitude, without sacrificing the spatio-temporal nature of its inputs (in the sense we reproduce the cell's precise mapping of inputs to outputs). We combine the best of these two strategies via a predictor-corrector decomposition scheme and achieve a drastically reduced highly accurate model of a caricature of the neuron responsible for collision detection in the locust.

  7. Towards weakly constrained double field theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanghoon Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We show that it is possible to construct a well-defined effective field theory incorporating string winding modes without using strong constraint in double field theory. We show that X-ray (Radon transform on a torus is well-suited for describing weakly constrained double fields, and any weakly constrained fields are represented as a sum of strongly constrained fields. Using inverse X-ray transform we define a novel binary operation which is compatible with the level matching constraint. Based on this formalism, we construct a consistent gauge transform and gauge invariant action without using strong constraint. We then discuss the relation of our result to the closed string field theory. Our construction suggests that there exists an effective field theory description for massless sector of closed string field theory on a torus in an associative truncation.

  8. Weak Gravitational Lensing of Finite Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Pierre; Larena, Julien; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2017-11-01

    The standard theory of weak gravitational lensing relies on the infinitesimal light beam approximation. In this context, images are distorted by convergence and shear, the respective sources of which unphysically depend on the resolution of the distribution of matter—the so-called Ricci-Weyl problem. In this Letter, we propose a strong-lensing-inspired formalism to describe the lensing of finite beams. We address the Ricci-Weyl problem by showing explicitly that convergence is caused by the matter enclosed by the beam, regardless of its distribution. Furthermore, shear turns out to be systematically enhanced by the finiteness of the beam. This implies, in particular, that the Kaiser-Squires relation between shear and convergence is violated, which could have profound consequences on the interpretation of weak-lensing surveys.

  9. On Uniform Weak König's Lemma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlenbach, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    The so-called weak Konig's lemma WKL asserts the existence of an infinite path b in any infinite binary tree (given by a representing function f). Based on this principle one can formulate subsystems of higher-order arithmetic which allow to carry out very substantial parts of classical mathematics...... is of interest in the context of explicit mathematics as developed by S. Feferman. The elimination process in Kohlenbach [10] actually can be used to eliminate even this uniform weak Konig's lemma provided that PRA only has a quantifier-free rule of extensionality QF-ER instead of the full axioms (E...... as the computational strength of UWKL relative to the intuitionistic variant of PRA both with and without the Markov principle....

  10. Weak mixing angle measurements at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Di Simone, Andrea; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Talk will cover weak mixing angle measurements at hadron colliders ATLAS and CMS in particular. ATLAS has measured the forward-backward asymmetry for the neutral current Drell Yan process in a wide mass range around the Z resonance region using dielectron and dimuon final states with $\\sqrt{s}$ =7 TeV data. For the dielectron channel, the measurement includes electrons detected in the forward calorimeter which extends the covered phase space. The result is then used to extract a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle. Uncertainties from the limited knowledge on the parton distribution functions in the proton constitute a significant part of the uncertainty and a dedicated study is performed to obtain a PDF set describing W and Z data measured previously by ATLAS. Similar studies from CMS will be reported.

  11. The regularization of Old English weak verbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Tío Sáenz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the regularization of non-standard spellings of the verbal forms extracted from a corpus. It addresses the question of what the limits of regularization are when lemmatizing Old English weak verbs. The purpose of such regularization, also known as normalization, is to carry out lexicological analysis or lexicographical work. The analysis concentrates on weak verbs from the second class and draws on the lexical database of Old English Nerthus, which has incorporated the texts of the Dictionary of Old English Corpus. As regards the question of the limits of normalization, the solution adopted are, in the first place, that when it is necessary to regularize, normalization is restricted to correspondences based on dialectal and diachronic variation and, secondly, that normalization has to be unidirectional.

  12. Asymptotic theory of weakly dependent random processes

    CERN Document Server

    Rio, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Presenting tools to aid understanding of asymptotic theory and weakly dependent processes, this book is devoted to inequalities and limit theorems for sequences of random variables that are strongly mixing in the sense of Rosenblatt, or absolutely regular. The first chapter introduces covariance inequalities under strong mixing or absolute regularity. These covariance inequalities are applied in Chapters 2, 3 and 4 to moment inequalities, rates of convergence in the strong law, and central limit theorems. Chapter 5 concerns coupling. In Chapter 6 new deviation inequalities and new moment inequalities for partial sums via the coupling lemmas of Chapter 5 are derived and applied to the bounded law of the iterated logarithm. Chapters 7 and 8 deal with the theory of empirical processes under weak dependence. Lastly, Chapter 9 describes links between ergodicity, return times and rates of mixing in the case of irreducible Markov chains. Each chapter ends with a set of exercises. The book is an updated and extended ...

  13. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamics of shock waves in weakly ionized argon plasmas has been performed using a pressure ruptured shock tube. The velocity of the shock is observed to increase when the shock traverses the plasma. The observed increases cannot be accounted for by thermal effects alone. Possible mechanisms that could explain the anomalous behavior include a vibrational/translational relaxation in the nonequilibrium plasma, electron diffusion across the shock front resulting from high electron mobility, and the propagation of ion-acoustic waves generated at the shock front. Using a turbulence model based on reduced kinetic theory, analysis of the observed results suggest a role for turbulence in anomalous shock dynamics in weakly ionized media and plasma-induced hypersonic drag reduction.

  14. Orbits in weak and strong bars

    CERN Document Server

    Contopoulos, George

    1980-01-01

    The authors study the plane orbits in simple bar models embedded in an axisymmetric background when the bar density is about 1% (weak), 10% (intermediate) or 100% (strong bar) of the axisymmetric density. Most orbits follow the stable periodic orbits. The basic families of periodic orbits are described. In weak bars with two Inner Lindblad Resonances there is a family of stable orbits extending from the center up to the Outer Lindblad Resonance. This family contains the long period orbits near corotation. Other stable families appear between the Inner Lindblad Resonances, outside the Outer Lindblad Resonance, around corotation (short period orbits) and around the center (retrograde). Some families become unstable or disappear in strong bars. A comparison is made with cases having one or no Inner Lindblad Resonance. (12 refs).

  15. Weakly Collisional and Collisionless Astrophysical Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berlok, Thomas

    investigate helium mixing in the weakly collisional intracluster medium of galaxy clusters using Braginskii MHD. Secondly, we present a newly developed Vlasov-fluid code which can be used for studying fully collisionless plasmas such as the solar wind and hot accretions flows. The equations of Braginskii MHD...... are used to study weakly collisional, stratified atmospheres which offer a useful model of the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters. Using linear theory and computer simulations, we study instabilities that feed off thermal and compositional gradients. We find that these instabilities lead to vigorous...... mixing of the composition and discuss the potential consequences for X-ray observations of galaxy clusters. Collisionless plasmas can be subject to microscale velocity-space instabilities which are not well-described by Braginskii MHD. In contrast, Vlasov-fluid theory captures all the kinetic phenomena...

  16. A dynamical weak scale from inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Tevong

    2017-09-01

    Dynamical scanning of the Higgs mass by an axion-like particle during inflation may provide a cosmological component to explaining part of the hierarchy problem. We propose a novel interplay of this cosmological relaxation mechanism with inflation, whereby the backreaction of the Higgs vacuum expectation value near the weak scale causes inflation to end. As Hubble drops, the relaxion's dissipative friction increases relative to Hubble and slows it down enough to be trapped by the barriers of its periodic potential. Such a scenario raises the natural cut-off of the theory up to ~ 1010 GeV, while maintaining a minimal relaxion sector without having to introduce additional scanning scalars or new physics coincidentally close to the weak scale.

  17. On weakly D-differentiable operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Let DD be a self-adjoint operator on a Hilbert space HH and aa a bounded operator on HH. We say that aa is weakly DD-differentiable, if for any pair of vectors ξ,ηξ,η from HH the function 〈eitDae−itDξ,η〉〈eitDae−itDξ,η〉 is differentiable. We give an elementary example of a bounded operator aa...

  18. Dynamic properties of superconducting weak links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Albert; Schön, Gerd; Tinkham, Michael

    1980-06-01

    A comprehensive theoretical picture of the dynamic properties of the order parameter and the quasiparticles in superconducting short weak links is presented. Both diffusion and inelastic scattering are found to be important in relaxing nonequilibrium populations. At low voltages a dissipative current, which is considerably larger than the normal ohmic current, is found and at higher voltages the maximum supercurrent is enhanced. These effects describe quantitatively well the foot structure in the I-V characteristic observed experimentally by Octavio, Skocpol, and Tinkham.

  19. On weak compactness in L_1 spaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fabian, Marián; Montesinos, V.; Zizler, Václav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 6 (2009), s. 1885-1893 ISSN 0035-7596 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100190610; GA AV ČR IAA100190502; GA AV ČR IAA1019103 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : weak compactness * subspace of L_1 * superreflexive space Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.260, year: 2009

  20. Summary of the Hadronic Weak Interaction session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, G.; Bryman, D. A.; Numao, T.

    1993-07-01

    We summarize and discuss present and future experiments on decays of light mesons and muons that were presented in the Hadronic Weak Interaction working group session of the Workshop on Future Directions in Particle and Nuclear Physics at Multi-GeV Hadron Facilities. Precise measurements and rare-decay searches, which sense mass scales in the 1-1000 TeV region, are discussed in the context of the standard model and beyond.

  1. Summary of the Hadronic Weak Interaction session

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bock, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Bryman, D.A.; Numao, T. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). TRIUMF Facility

    1993-07-01

    We summarize and discuss present and future experiments on decays of light mesons and muons that were presented in the Hadronic Weak Interaction working group session of the ``Workshop on Future Directions in Particle and Nuclear Physics at Multi-GeV Hadron Facilities.`` Precise measurements and rare-decay searches, which sense mass scales in the 1--1000 TeV region, are discussed in the context of the standard model and beyond.

  2. Diffusion in a weakly random Hamiltonian flow

    OpenAIRE

    Komorowski, T.; Ryzhik, L.

    2005-01-01

    We consider the motion of a particle governed by a weakly random Hamiltonian flow. We identify temporal and spatial scales on which the particle trajectory converges to a spatial Brownian motion. The main technical issue in the proof is to obtain error estimates for the convergence of the solution of the stochastic acceleration problem to a momentum diffusion. We also apply our results to the system of random geometric acoustics equations and show that the energy density of the acoustic waves...

  3. Francium Spectroscopy for Weak Interaction Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Francium, a radioactive element, is the heaviest alkali. Its atomic and nuclear structure makes it an ideal laboratory to study the weak interaction. Laser trapping and cooling in-line with the superconducting LINAC accelerator at Stony Brook opened the precision study of its atomic structure. I will present our proposal and progress towards weak interaction measurements at TRIUMF, the National Canadian Accelerator in Vancouver. These include the commissioning run of the Francium Trapping Facility, hyperfine anomaly measurements on a chain of Fr isotopes, the nuclear anapole moment through parity non-conserving transitions in the ground state hyperfine manifold. These measurements should shed light on the nucleon-nucleon weak interaction. This work is done by the FrPNC collaboration: S. Aubin College of William and Mary, J. A. Behr TRIUMF, R. Collister U. Manitoba, E. Gomez UASLP, G. Gwinner U. Manitoba, M. R. Pearson TRIUMF, L. A. Orozco UMD, M. Tandecki TRIUMF, J. Zhang UMD Supported by NSF and DOE from the USA; TRIUMF, NRC and NSERC from Canada; and CONACYT from Mexico

  4. Mechanisms Undlerlying Quadriceps Weakness in Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    PETTERSON, STEPHANIE C.; BARRANCE, PETER; BUCHANAN, THOMAS; BINDER-MACLEOD, STUART; SNYDER-MACKLER, LYNN

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify determinants of quadriceps weakness among persons with end-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods One-hundred twenty-three individuals (mean age 64.9 ± 8.5 yr) with Kellgren/Lawrence grade IV knee OA participated. Quadriceps strength (MVIC) and volitional muscle activation (CAR) were measured using a burst superimposition test. Muscle composition (lean muscle cross-sectional area (LMCSA) and fat CSA (FCSA)) were quantified using magnetic resonance imaging. Specific strength (MVIC/LMCSA) was computed. Interlimb differences were analyzed using paired-sample t-tests. Regression analysis was applied to identify determinants of MVIC. An alpha level of 0.05 was adopted. Results The OA limb was significantly weaker, had lower CAR, and had smaller LMCSA than the contralateral limb. CAR explained 17% of the variance in the contralateral limb's MVIC compared with 40% in the OA limb. LMCSA explained 41% of the variance in the contralateral limb's MVIC compared with 27% in the OA limb. Conclusion Both reduced CAR and LMCSA contribute to muscle weakness in persons with knee OA. Similar to healthy elders, the best predictor of strength in the contralateral, nondiseased limb was largely determined by LMCSA, whereas CAR was found to be the primary determinant of strength in the OA limb. Deficits in CAR may undermine the effectiveness of volitional strengthening programs in targeting quadriceps weakness in the OA population. PMID:18379202

  5. Mechanisms underlying quadriceps weakness in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petterson, Stephanie C; Barrance, Peter; Buchanan, Thomas; Binder-Macleod, Stuart; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2008-03-01

    To identify determinants of quadriceps weakness among persons with end-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA). One-hundred twenty-three individuals (mean age 64.9 +/- 8.5 yr) with Kellgren/Lawrence grade IV knee OA participated. Quadriceps strength (MVIC) and volitional muscle activation (CAR) were measured using a burst superimposition test. Muscle composition (lean muscle cross-sectional area (LMCSA) and fat CSA (FCSA)) were quantified using magnetic resonance imaging. Specific strength (MVIC/LMCSA) was computed. Interlimb differences were analyzed using paired-sample t-tests. Regression analysis was applied to identify determinants of MVIC. An alpha level of 0.05 was adopted. The OA limb was significantly weaker, had lower CAR, and had smaller LMCSA than the contralateral limb. CAR explained 17% of the variance in the contralateral limb's MVIC compared with 40% in the OA limb. LMCSA explained 41% of the variance in the contralateral limb's MVIC compared with 27% in the OA limb. Both reduced CAR and LMCSA contribute to muscle weakness in persons with knee OA. Similar to healthy elders, the best predictor of strength in the contralateral, nondiseased limb was largely determined by LMCSA, whereas CAR was found to be the primary determinant of strength in the OA limb. Deficits in CAR may undermine the effectiveness of volitional strengthening programs in targeting quadriceps weakness in the OA population.

  6. Effects of exogenous epibrassinolide on photosynthetic characteristics in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) seedlings under weak light stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Jiang, Weijie; Yu, Hongjun

    2010-03-24

    The effects of three concentrations (0.1, 0.01, 0.001 mg/kg) of exogenous 24-epibrassinolide on leaf photosynthesis, chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence, and parameters of light response curve in tomato seedlings under 150 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1) weak light stress were studied, with two tomato cultivars, 'Zhongza9', tolerant, and 'Zhongshu6', sensitive to weak light stress. The results showed that the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), maximal photochemical quantum efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm), light saturation point (LSP), and dark respiration rate (Rd) decreased remarkably under weak light, but the chlorophyll content, especially chlorophyll b (chlb) content, increased obviously compared with normal light intensity control. However, exogenous 24-epibrassinolide alleviated the decrease of leaf Pn and Fv/Fm and induced the further increase of chlb content as well as the further decrease of Rd and chla/chlb under weak light stress, which indicated that exogenous 24-epibrassinolide could enhance plant tolerance to weak light and diminish damage from weak light. However, the optimum concentrations were different between the two cultivars; 0.1 mg/kg 24-epibrassinolide showed the best induction effects in 'Zhongshu6', and the best level for 'Zhongza9' was 0.01 mg/kg 24-epibrassinolide.

  7. Systematic review: role of acid, weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    OpenAIRE

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Smout, Smout J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The importance of weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is gaining recognition. Aim To quantify the proportions of reflux episodes that are acidic (pH 7) in adult patients with GERD, and to evaluate their correlation with symptoms. Methods Studies were identified by systematic PubMed and Embase searches. Data are presented as sample-size weighted ...

  8. Complexation of the fungal metabolite tenuazonic acid with copper (II), iron (III), nickel (II), and magnesium (II) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, M H; Duvert, P; Gaudemer, F; Gaudemer, A; Deballon, C; Boucly, P

    1985-07-01

    Tenuazonic acid (TA) is a phytotoxin produced by a fungal pathogen of rice, Pyricularia oryzae. We have synthesized and characterized the metal complexes of TA with copper (II), iron (III), nickel (II), and magnesium (II). The stoichiometry of the complexes determined by microanalysis and mass spectroscopy (D/CI) are Cu(II)TA2, Fe(III)TA3, Ni(II)TA2, and Mg(TA)2. Voltammograms of Fe(III)TA3, and Cu(II)TA2 in methanolic solutions confirmed this stoichiometry. Ni(II)TA2 paramagnetism and visible absorption data suggest an octahedral geometry. Fe(III)TA3 showed a characteristic visible absorption at 450 nm. Addition of Fe(III)Cl3 and Mg(II)Cl2 did not reverse the toxicity of NaTA to rice and bacterial cells, showing that this toxicity is not due to the privation of the cells of these metals essential for cell growth.

  9. DNA damage by the cobalt (II) and zinc (II) complexes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using the single cell gel electrophoresis method, the tetraazamacrocycle Zn(II) complex (Zn(II)-L) and the tetraazamacrocycle Co(II) complex (Co(II)-L) were investigated focusing on their DNA damage to Tetrahymena thermophila. When the cells were treated with the 0.05, 0.25 and 0.50 mg/ml Zn(II)-L, the tail length ...

  10. DNA damage by the cobalt (II) and zinc (II) complexes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-03

    Sep 3, 2008 ... Using the single cell gel electrophoresis method, the tetraazamacrocycle Zn(II) complex (Zn(II)-L) and the tetraazamacrocycle Co(II) complex (Co(II)-L) were investigated focusing on their DNA damage to. Tetrahymena thermophila. When the cells were treated with the 0.05, 0.25 and 0.50 mg/ml Zn(II)-L, the.

  11. Mg-based amorphous alloys for decolorization of azo dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changqin; Zhu, Zhengwang; Zhang, Haifeng

    The authors recently found that Mg-based amorphous ribbons had a prominent effect on the decolorization of azo dyes. Direct Blue 2B and Acid Orange II solutions of 100 mg/L could be decolorized nearly completely by the ribbons within 30 min. Decolorization mechanism was discussed briefly, and kinetic analysis based on the experimental data indicated that physical adsorption and reductive degradation for the azo dye solutions mediated by Mg63Cu16.8Ag11.2Er9 amorphous ribbons could proceed in an elegant and rapid manner. This new finding seems attractive, valuable and promising for the raw effluent generated by textile dye manufacturing company in the future.

  12. Improved thermal stability of gas-phase Mg nanoparticles for hydrogen storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishnan, Gopi; Palasantzas, G.; Kooi, B. J.

    2010-01-01

    This work focuses on improving the thermal stability of Mg nanoparticles (NPs) for use in hydrogen storage. Three ways are investigated that can achieve this goal. (i) Addition of Cu prevents void formation during NP production and reduces the fast evaporation/voiding of Mg during annealing. (ii)

  13. Correlation of Ischemia-Modified Albumin with SOFA and APACHE II Scores in Preoperative Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Satoh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Critical illnesses are assessed according to the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II. Circulating ischemia-modified albumin (IMA is a biomarker generated under ischemic and oxidative conditions and may reflect disease severity in preoperative patients. This study investigated the correlations of IMA with SOFA and APACHE II scores in inpatients admitted for colorectal surgery. Methods. We examined 27 patients with advanced colorectal cancers (mean age 69 years, men/women = 15/12. Correlations between SOFA and APACHE II scores in addition to preoperative serum IMA and C-reactive protein (CRP levels were analyzed. Results. The mean IMA level was 0.5 AU, and the median CRP level was 0.6 mg/dL. Median scores for SOFA and APACHE II were 2 and 12 points, respectively. Significant positive correlations between IMA and SOFA (r=0.45, P<0.05 and IMA and APACHE II (r=0.45, P<0.05 were identified which remained significant in confounder-adjusted analyses. In contrast, weak correlations were observed between CRP and the SOFA and APACHE II scores. Conclusions. The positive correlations between IMA and both SOFA and APACHE II scores suggest that serum IMA measurements reflect the severity of systemic failure in patients admitted for colorectal surgery in the preoperative phase.

  14. Systematic review: role of acid, weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E.; Smout, A.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is gaining recognition. To quantify the proportions of reflux episodes that are acidic (pH <4), weakly acidic (pH 4-7) and weakly alkaline (pH >7) in adult patients with GERD, and to evaluate their

  15. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  16. Spurious Shear in Weak Lensing with LSST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.; Kahn, S.M.; Jernigan, J.G.; Peterson, J.R.; AlSayyad, Y.; Ahmad, Z.; Bankert, J.; Bard, D.; Connolly, A.; Gibson, R.R.; Gilmore, K.; Grace, E.; Hannel, M.; Hodge, M.A.; Jee, M.J.; Jones, L.; Krughoff, S.; Lorenz, S.; Marshall, P.J.; Marshall, S.; Meert, A.

    2012-09-19

    The complete 10-year survey from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will image {approx} 20,000 square degrees of sky in six filter bands every few nights, bringing the final survey depth to r {approx} 27.5, with over 4 billion well measured galaxies. To take full advantage of this unprecedented statistical power, the systematic errors associated with weak lensing measurements need to be controlled to a level similar to the statistical errors. This work is the first attempt to quantitatively estimate the absolute level and statistical properties of the systematic errors on weak lensing shear measurements due to the most important physical effects in the LSST system via high fidelity ray-tracing simulations. We identify and isolate the different sources of algorithm-independent, additive systematic errors on shear measurements for LSST and predict their impact on the final cosmic shear measurements using conventional weak lensing analysis techniques. We find that the main source of the errors comes from an inability to adequately characterise the atmospheric point spread function (PSF) due to its high frequency spatial variation on angular scales smaller than {approx} 10{prime} in the single short exposures, which propagates into a spurious shear correlation function at the 10{sup -4}-10{sup -3} level on these scales. With the large multi-epoch dataset that will be acquired by LSST, the stochastic errors average out, bringing the final spurious shear correlation function to a level very close to the statistical errors. Our results imply that the cosmological constraints from LSST will not be severely limited by these algorithm-independent, additive systematic effects.

  17. Supersymmetric Higgs bosons in weak boson fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollik, Wolfgang; Plehn, Tilman; Rauch, Michael; Rzehak, Heidi

    2009-03-06

    We compute the complete supersymmetric next-to-leading-order corrections to the production of a light Higgs boson in weak-boson fusion. The size of the electroweak corrections is of similar order as the next-to-leading-order corrections in the standard model. The supersymmetric QCD corrections turn out to be significantly smaller than expected and than their electroweak counterparts. These corrections are an important ingredient to a precision analysis of the (supersymmetric) Higgs sector at the LHC, either as a known correction factor or as a contribution to the theory error.

  18. Are the Weak Measurements Really Measurements?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Sokolovski

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Weak measurements can be seen as an attempt at answering the Which way? question without destroying interference between the pathways involved. Unusual mean values obtained in such measurements represent the response of a quantum system to this forbidden question, in which the true composition of virtual pathways is hidden from the observer. Such values indicate a failure of a measurement where the uncertainty principle says it must fail, rather than provide an additional insight into physical reality. Quanta 2013; 2: 50–57.

  19. Legitimacy Building under Weak Institutional Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejs, Anja; Harvold, Kjell; Larsen, Sanne Vammen

    2014-01-01

    Local strategies for adaptation to climate change in Denmark and Norway are discussed. In both countries, the national impetus for local adaptation is weak; it is largely left to local actors to take the initiative. The dynamics of the different approaches to climate-change adaptation at the local...... level are illuminated. Using decision-making and learning theory, we present an analytical framework to examine four cases, two in Norway and two in Denmark, which represent two different responses, i.e. anticipatory actions and obligatory actions. We find that, by bringing in knowledge and resources...

  20. Superconductor in a weak static gravitational field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ummarino, Giovanni Alberto [Dipartimento DISAT, Politecnico di Torino, Turin (Italy); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI-Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gallerati, Antonio [Dipartimento DISAT, Politecnico di Torino, Turin (Italy)

    2017-08-15

    We provide the detailed calculation of a general form for Maxwell and London equations that takes into account gravitational corrections in linear approximation. We determine the possible alteration of a static gravitational field in a superconductor making use of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations, providing also an analytic solution in the weak field condition. Finally, we compare the behavior of a high-T{sub c} superconductor with a classical low-T{sub c} superconductor, analyzing the values of the parameters that can enhance the reduction of the gravitational field. (orig.)

  1. Infrared spectroscopy of weakly bound molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Lisa I-Ching

    1988-11-01

    The infrared spectra of a series of hydrated hydronium cluster ions and of protonated ethane ion are presented. A tandem mass spectrometer is ideally suited to obtaining the spectra of such weakly bound molecular ions. Traditional absorption spectroscopy is not feasible in these situations, so the techniques described in this thesis make use of some consequence of photon absorption with higher sensitivity than simply attenuation of laser power. That consequence is dissociation. By first mass selecting the parent ion under study and then mass selecting the fragment ion formed from dissociation, the near unit detection efficiency of ion counting methods has been used to full advantage.

  2. Weak η production off the nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, M. Rafi; Athar, M. Sajjad [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202 002 (India); Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Vacas, M. J. Vicente [Departamento de Física Teórica and Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The weak η-meson production off the nucleon induced by (anti)neutrinos is studied at low and intermediate energies, the range of interest for several ongoing and future neutrino experiments. We consider Born diagrams and the excitation of N{sup *} (1535)S{sub 11} and N{sup *} (1650)S{sub 11} resonances. The vector part of the N-S{sub 11} transition form factors has been obtained from the MAID helicity amplitudes while the poorly known axial part is constrained with the help of the partial conservation of the axial current (PCAC) and assuming the pion-pole dominance of the pseudoscalar form factor.

  3. Impact of amorphous precursor phases on magnesium isotope signatures of Mg-calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Purgstaller, Bettina; Dietzel, Martin; Buhl, Dieter; Immenhauser, Adrian; Schott, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    Various marine calcifiers form exoskeletons via an amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phase and magnesium plays an important role in the temporary stabilization of this metastable phase. Thus, the use of Mg isotope ratios of marine biogenic carbonates as a proxy to reconstruct past seawater chemistry calls for a detailed understanding of the mechanisms controlling Mg isotope signatures during the formation and transformation of ACC to the final crystalline carbonate mineral. For this purpose we have investigated the Mg isotope fractionation between (Ca,Mg)CO3 solids and aqueous fluids at 25 °C and pH = 8.3 during (i) the direct precipitation of crystalline Mg-calcite and (ii) the formation of Mg-rich ACC (Mg-ACC) and its transformation to Mg-calcite. The outcome documents that the small Mg isotope fractionation between Mg-ACC and reactive fluid (ΔMg26ACC-fluid = - 1.0 ± 0.1 ‰) is not preserved during the transformation of the ACCs into Mg-calcite. Following a pronounced isotopic shift accompanying the transformation of Mg-ACC into Mg-calcite, Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid progressively decreases with reaction progress from ∼ - 3.0 ‰ to - 3.6 ‰, reflecting both the approach of isotopic equilibrium and the increase of calcite Mg content (to near 20 mol % Mg). In contrast the crystalline Mg-calcite precipitated directly from the reacting fluid, i.e. lacking a discernable formation of an amorphous precursor, exhibits only small temporal variations in Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid which overall is affected by the precipitation kinetics. The values found in this study at the onset of Mg-ACC precipitation for Mg isotope fractionation between Mg-ACC and the fluid (ΔMg26ACC-fluid = - 1.0 ‰) and between Mg-ACC and Mg2+(aq) (Δ (aq) 26Mg ACC-Mg2+ = + 2.0 ‰) are consistent with the formation of a hydrated Ca nanoporous solid accommodating Mg bicarbonate/carbonate species in combination with hydrated magnesium. This material crossed by percolating channels filled with the

  4. Nonparametric estimation of the stationary M/G/1 workload distribution function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Bøgsted

    In this paper it is demonstrated how a nonparametric estimator of the stationary workload distribution function of the M/G/1-queue can be obtained by systematic sampling the workload process. Weak convergence results and bootstrap methods for empirical distribution functions for stationary...

  5. Nonparametric estimation of the stationary M/G/1 workload distribution function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Bøgsted

    2005-01-01

    In this paper it is demonstrated how a nonparametric estimator of the stationary workload distribution function of the M/G/1-queue can be obtained by systematic sampling the workload process. Weak convergence results and bootstrap methods for empirical distribution functions for stationary...

  6. Preparation and Hydrogen Storage Properties of Mg-Rich Mg-Ni Ultrafine Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxin Zou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, Mg-rich Mg-Ni ultrafine powders were prepared through an arc plasma method. The phase components, microstructure, and hydrogen storage properties of the powders were carefully investigated. It is found that Mg2Ni and MgNi2 could be obtained directly from the vapor state reactions between Mg and Ni, depending on the local vapor content in the reaction chamber. A nanostructured MgH2 + Mg2NiH4 hydrogen storage composite could be generated after hydrogenation of the Mg-Ni ultrafine powders. After dehydrogenation, MgH2 and Mg2NiH4 decomposed into nanograined Mg and Mg2Ni, respectively. Thermogravimetry/differential scanning calorimetry (TG/DSC analyses showed that Mg2NiH4 phase may play a catalytic role in the dehydriding process of the hydrogenated Mg ultrafine particles.

  7. EPR interpretation, magnetism and biological study of a Cu(II) dinuclear complex assisted by a schiff base precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kuheli; Patra, Chiranjit; Sen, Chandana; Datta, Amitabha; Massera, Chiara; Garribba, Eugenio; El Fallah, Mohamed Salah; Beyene, Belete B; Hung, Chen-Hsiung; Sinha, Chittaranjan; Askun, Tulin; Celikboyun, Pinar; Escudero, Daniel; Frontera, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    A new Cu(II) dinuclear complex, Cu2L2 (1) was afforded employing the potentially pentatentate Schiff base precursor H2L, a refluxed product of o-vanillin and diethylenetriamine in methanol. Complex 1 was systematically characterized by FTIR, UV-Vis, emission and EPR spectrometry. The single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of 1 reveals that the copper atom exhibits a distorted square planar geometry, comprising two pairs of phenolato-O and imine-N donors from two different H2L ligands. The temperature dependent magnetic interpretation agrees with the existence of weak antiferromagnetic interactions between the bridging dinuclear Cu(II) ions. A considerable body of experimental evidence has been accumulated to elucidate the magneto-structural relationship in this dinuclear Cu(II) complex by DFT computation. Both the ligand and complex 1 exhibit anti-mycobacterial activity and considerable efficacy on M. tuberculosis H37Ra (ATCC 25177) and M. tuberculosis H37Rv (ATCC 25618) strains. The practical applicability of the ligand and complex 1 has been examined in living cells (African Monkey Vero Cells). The MTT assay proves the non-toxicity of the probe up to 100 mg mL-1. A new homometallic dinuclear Cu(II) complex is afforded with a tetradentate Schiff base precursor. EPR interpretation and temperature dependent magnetic studies show that complex 1 has weak antiferromagnetic coupling and DFT computation is governed to explain the magneto-structural correlation.

  8. Optimal Weak-Lensing Skewness Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong-Jie; Pen, Ue-Li; Zhang, Pengjie; Dubinski, John

    2003-12-01

    Weak-lensing measurements are starting to provide statistical maps of the distribution of matter in the universe that are increasingly precise and complementary to cosmic microwave background maps. The most common measurement is the correlation in alignments of background galaxies, which can be used to infer the variance of the projected surface density of matter. This measurement of the fluctuations is insensitive to the total mass content and is analogous to using waves on the ocean to measure its depths. However, when the depth is shallow, as happens near a beach, waves become skewed. Similarly, a measurement of skewness in the projected matter distribution directly measures the total matter content of the universe. While skewness has already been convincingly detected, its constraint on cosmology is still weak. We address optimal analyses for the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey in the presence of noise. We show that a compensated Gaussian filter with a width of 2.5‧ optimizes the cosmological constraint, yielding ΔΩm/Ωm~10%. This is significantly better than other filters that have been considered in the literature. This can be further improved with tomography and other sophisticated analyses.

  9. Conformational transitions of a weak polyampholyte

    KAUST Repository

    Nair, Arun Kumar Narayanan

    2014-10-07

    Using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a flexible polyelectrolyte where the charges are in contact with a reservoir of constant chemical potential given by the solution pH, we study the behavior of weak polyelectrolytes in poor and good solvent conditions for polymer backbone. We address the titration behavior and conformational properties of a flexible diblock polyampholyte chain formed of two oppositely charged weak polyelectrolyte blocks, each containing equal number of identical monomers. The change of solution pH induces charge asymmetry in a diblock polyampholyte. For diblock polyampholyte chains in poor solvents, we demonstrate that a discontinuous transition between extended (tadpole) and collapsed (globular) conformational states is attainable by varying the solution pH. The double-minima structure in the probability distribution of the free energy provides direct evidence for the first-order like nature of this transition. At the isoelectric point electrostatically driven coil-globule transition of diblock polyampholytes in good solvents is found to consist of different regimes identified with increasing electrostatic interaction strength. At pH values above or below the isoelectric point diblock chains are found to have polyelectrolyte-like behavior due to repulsion between uncompensated charges along the chain.

  10. Synchronizability of nonidentical weakly dissipative systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendiña-Nadal, Irene; Letellier, Christophe

    2017-10-01

    Synchronization is a very generic process commonly observed in a large variety of dynamical systems which, however, has been rarely addressed in systems with low dissipation. Using the Rössler, the Lorenz 84, and the Sprott A systems as paradigmatic examples of strongly, weakly, and non-dissipative chaotic systems, respectively, we show that a parameter or frequency mismatch between two coupled such systems does not affect the synchronizability and the underlying structure of the joint attractor in the same way. By computing the Shannon entropy associated with the corresponding recurrence plots, we were able to characterize how two coupled nonidentical chaotic oscillators organize their dynamics in different dissipation regimes. While for strongly dissipative systems, the resulting dynamics exhibits a Shannon entropy value compatible with the one having an average parameter mismatch, for weak dissipation synchronization dynamics corresponds to a more complex behavior with higher values of the Shannon entropy. In comparison, conservative dynamics leads to a less rich picture, providing either similar chaotic dynamics or oversimplified periodic ones.

  11. Do weak global stresses synchronize earthquakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendick, R.; Bilham, R.

    2017-08-01

    Insofar as slip in an earthquake is related to the strain accumulated near a fault since a previous earthquake, and this process repeats many times, the earthquake cycle approximates an autonomous oscillator. Its asymmetric slow accumulation of strain and rapid release is quite unlike the harmonic motion of a pendulum and need not be time predictable, but still resembles a class of repeating systems known as integrate-and-fire oscillators, whose behavior has been shown to demonstrate a remarkable ability to synchronize to either external or self-organized forcing. Given sufficient time and even very weak physical coupling, the phases of sets of such oscillators, with similar though not necessarily identical period, approach each other. Topological and time series analyses presented here demonstrate that earthquakes worldwide show evidence of such synchronization. Though numerous studies demonstrate that the composite temporal distribution of major earthquakes in the instrumental record is indistinguishable from random, the additional consideration of event renewal interval serves to identify earthquake groupings suggestive of synchronization that are absent in synthetic catalogs. We envisage the weak forces responsible for clustering originate from lithospheric strain induced by seismicity itself, by finite strains over teleseismic distances, or by other sources of lithospheric loading such as Earth's variable rotation. For example, quasi-periodic maxima in rotational deceleration are accompanied by increased global seismicity at multidecadal intervals.

  12. Weak gravity conjecture and effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    The weak gravity conjecture (WGC) is a proposed constraint on theories with gauge fields and gravity, requiring the existence of light charged particles and/or imposing an upper bound on the field theory cutoff Λ . If taken as a consistency requirement for effective field theories (EFTs), it rules out possibilities for model building including some models of inflation. I demonstrate simple models which satisfy all forms of the WGC, but which through Higgsing of the original gauge fields produce low-energy EFTs with gauge forces that badly violate the WGC. These models illustrate specific loopholes in arguments that motivate the WGC from a bottom-up perspective; for example the arguments based on magnetic monopoles are evaded when the magnetic confinement that occurs in a Higgs phase is accounted for. This indicates that the WGC should not be taken as a veto on EFTs, even if it turns out to be a robust property of UV quantum gravity theories. However, if the latter is true, then parametric violation of the WGC at low energy comes at the cost of nonminimal field content in the UV. I propose that only a very weak constraint is applicable to EFTs, Λ ≲(log 1/g )-1 /2Mpl , where g is the gauge coupling, motivated by entropy bounds. Remarkably, EFTs produced by Higgsing a theory that satisfies the WGC can saturate but not violate this bound.

  13. Probing hysteretic elasticity in weakly nonlinear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haupert, Sylvain [UPMC UNIV PARIS; Renaud, Guillaume [UPMC UNIV PARIS; Riviere, Jacques [UPMC UNIV PARIS; Talmant, Maryline [UPMC UNIV PARIS; Laugier, Pascal [UPMC UNIV PARIS

    2010-12-07

    Our work is aimed at assessing the elastic and dissipative hysteretic nonlinear parameters' repeatability (precision) using several classes of materials with weak, intermediate and high nonlinear properties. In this contribution, we describe an optimized Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (NRUS) measuring and data processing protocol applied to small samples. The protocol is used to eliminate the effects of environmental condition changes that take place during an experiment, and that may mask the intrinsic elastic nonlinearity. As an example, in our experiments, we identified external temperature fluctuation as a primary source of material resonance frequency and elastic modulus variation. A variation of 0.1 C produced a frequency variation of 0.01 %, which is similar to the expected nonlinear frequency shift for weakly nonlinear materials. In order to eliminate environmental effects, the variation in f{sub 0} (the elastically linear resonance frequency proportional to modulus) is fit with the appropriate function, and that function is used to correct the NRUS calculation of nonlinear parameters. With our correction procedure, we measured relative resonant frequency shifts of 10{sup -5} , which are below 10{sup -4}, often considered the limit to NRUS sensitivity under common experimental conditions. Our results show that the procedure is an alternative to the stringent control of temperature often applied. Applying the approach, we report nonlinear parameters for several materials, some with very small nonclassical nonlinearity. The approach has broad application to NRUS and other Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy approaches.

  14. [Effects of grafting on photosynthesis of sweet pepper seedlings under low temperature and weak light intensity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nan; Wang, Mei-ling; Wang, Hong-tao; Ai, Xi-zhen

    2009-03-01

    Sweet pepper 'Chifengtexuan' seedlings were grafted onto 'Weishi' and 'Buyeding' rootstocks, treated with low temperature (8 degrees C/ 5 degrees C) and weak light intensity (100 micromol x m(-2) s(-1)) for 7 days, and then recovered under normal conditions (25 degrees C/ 18 degrees C, PFD 550-600 micromol x s(-1)) for 3 days to study the variations of their gas exchange parameters, carboxylation efficiency, and fluorescence parameters, with the own-rooted 'Chifengtexuan' seedlings as the control. The results showed that on the 3rd day of low temperature and weak light intensity stress, the photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs), and carboxylation efficiency (CE) of both own-rooted and grafted seedling leaves decreased more than 50%, and after then, the Pn and Gs tended to stable while CE decreased continually. The intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) declined first, but enhanced after the 4th day of the stress. Low temperature and weak light intensity decreased the maximal photochemical efficiency of PS II in darkness (Fv/Fm), actual photochemical efficiency of PS II during illumination (phi (PS II)) and electron transport rate (ETR), but increased the initial fluorescence (Fo), which implied that the stress caused definite damage of photosynthetic apparatus. However, the damage diminished after 3 days of recovery. Comparing with those of own-rooted seedlings, the Pn, Gs, CE, phi(PS II), and Fv/Fm of grafted seedlings increased to various degrees, and Fo decreased markedly during the stress. It was concluded that grafting could promote the photosynthetic function, and alleviate the effects of low temperature and weak light intensity on the photosynthesis of sweet pepper seedlings.

  15. Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2,5-Disulfonamide are Strong Dual Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors, although the Ligand Possesses very Weak such Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuran, C T

    1995-01-01

    Coordination compounds of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) with 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-disulfonamide as ligand were synthesized and characterized by IR and UV spectroscopy, conductimetry and thermogravimetry. The parent ligand is a very weak carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, although it constituted the lead for developing important classes of diuretics. The complex derivatives behave as much stronger CA inhibitors, with IC(50) values around 10(-8)M against isozyme CA II, and 10(-7) M against isozyme CAI.

  16. Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2,5-Disulfonamide are Strong Dual Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors, although the Ligand Possesses very Weak such Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Claudiu T. Supuran

    1995-01-01

    Coordination compounds of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) with 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-disulfonamide as ligand were synthesized and characterized by IR and UV spectroscopy, conductimetry and thermogravimetry. The parent ligand is a very weak carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, although it constituted the lead for developing important classes of diuretics. The complex derivatives behave as much stronger CA inhibitors, with IC50 values around 10−8M against isozyme CA II, and 10−7 M agai...

  17. II Infused Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin L. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory properties of PPAR-α plays an important role in attenuating hypertension. The current study determines the anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory role of PPAR-α agonist during a slow-pressor dose of Ang II (400 ng/kg/min. Ten to twelve week old male PPAR-α KO mice and their WT controls were implanted with telemetry devices and infused with Ang II for 12 days. On day 12 of Ang II infusion, MAP was elevated in PPAR-α KO mice compared to WT (161±4 mmHg versus 145±4 mmHg and fenofibrate (145 mg/kg/day reduced MAP in WT + Ang II mice (134±7 mmHg. Plasma IL-6 levels were higher in PPAR-α KO mice on day 12 of Ang II infusion (30±4 versus 8±2 pg/mL and fenofibrate reduced plasma IL-6 in Ang II-treated WT mice (10±3 pg/mL. Fenofibrate increased renal expression of CYP4A, restored renal CYP2J expression, reduced the elevation in renal ICAM-1, MCP-1 and COX-2 in WT + Ang II mice. Our results demonstrate that activation of PPAR-α attenuates Ang II-induced hypertension through up-regulation of CYP4A and CYP2J and an attenuation of inflammatory markers such as plasma IL-6, renal MCP-1, renal expression of ICAM-1 and COX-2.

  18. Reversible S(0) /MgSx Redox Chemistry in a MgTFSI2 /MgCl2 /DME Electrolyte for Rechargeable Mg/S Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tao; Hou, Singyuk; Wang, Fei; Ma, Zhaohui; Li, Xiaogang; Xu, Kang; Wang, Chunsheng

    2017-10-16

    The redox chemistry of magnesium and its application in rechargeable Mg batteries has received increasing attention owing to the unique benefits of Mg metal electrodes, namely high reversibility without dendrite formation, low reduction potentials, and high specific capacities. The Mg/S couple is of particular interest owing to its high energy density and low cost. Previous reports have confirmed the feasibility of a rechargeable Mg/S battery; however, only limited cycling stability was achieved, and the complicated procedure for the preparation of the electrolytes has significantly compromised the benefits of Mg/S chemistry and hindered the development of Mg/S batteries. Herein, we report the development of the first rechargeable Mg/S battery with a MgTFSI2 /MgCl2 /DME electrolyte (DME=1,2-dimethoxyethane, TFSI=bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide) and realize the best cycling stability among all reported Mg/S batteries by suppressing polysulfide dissolution. Mechanistic studies show that the battery works via S(0) /MgSx redox processes and that the large voltage hysteresis is mainly due to the Mg anode overpotential. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Tourmaline, an indicator of external Mg-contamination of granitic pegmatites from host serpentinite; examples from the Moldanubian Zone, Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, M.; Prokop, J.; Losos, Z.; Macek, I.

    2017-09-01

    Dominant primary solidus and minor subsolidus tourmalines from a variety of granitic pegmatites enclosed in serpentinites of the Moldanubian Zone, Czech Republic were examined, mainly by electron probe micro-analyser, to reveal the degree of external Mg(Ca)-contamination from their host rocks. The rocks include: (i) homogeneous to slightly heterogeneous nests of plagioclase-tourmaline rocks (group A) of anatectic or metasomatic origin, (ii) subhomogeneous to simply zoned barren pegmatite dikes (group B), and (iii) Li-bearing zoned pegmatite dikes of rare-element class (group C). The plagioclase-tourmaline rocks (group A) show spatial relation to pegmatites of the group B. Mostly black primary tourmalines (dravite, oxy-dravite, uvite, schorl, oxy-schorl, fluor-schorl) show extensive Mg- and Ca-contamination (group A), moderate Mg- and locally minor Ca-contamination (group B plus the locality Věžná I of the group C) and weak Mg-contamination of the tourmaline solely from outermost pegmatite units (group C); tourmalines from internal units of the pegmatites are typically Mg-free. The substitution mechanisms include MgR2+ -1 (R2+ = Fe2+ > Mn2+) in all groups, NaR2+ (□Al)-1 and R2+ (OH) (AlO)-1 in Ca-poor tourmalines and CaO (NaOH)-1 combined with the substitution CaR2+ (NaAl)-1 in Ca-enriched tourmalines (group A). Both Mg- and Ca-contamination events were very likely contemporaneous. The extent of contamination is higher in small and texturally simple plagioclase-tourmaline rocks (group A). Larger and more highly evolved Li-bearing pegmatites (group C) with zoned internal structure show a high degree of undercooling; consequently, rapid crystallization of outer zones with biotite and/or tourmaline depleted melt in almost all Mg and isolated the pegmatite body from further external contamination during solidus crystallisation. The granitic pegmatites (group B and group C) were open to the host serpentinite during early solidus crystallization immediately after

  20. Density functional theory (DFT) study on the hydrolysis behavior of degradable Mg/Mg alloys for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezafati, Marjan

    Magnesium-based (Mg and/or Mg alloys) materials possess many advantageous physicochemical/biological characteristics such as good biocompatibility and similarity of the mechanical properties to the human bone tissue, which renders this material a promising candidate for the biomedical and implant applications. One of the most attractive features of Mg-based materials is the degradability in the physiological environment. With the burst of research on the biodegradable materials for the healthcare device applications, Mg and its alloys attracted a strong attention in the bioengineering field in recent years. However, the major limitation of applying Mg-based materials to biomedical applications is the fast degradation/corrosion rate with regards to the healing process time-span. In the present thesis, an atomistic model employing the density-functional theory (DFT) has been developed to study the hydrolysis process by understanding the influences of commonly used alloying elements (zinc (Zn), calcium (Ca), aluminum (Al), and yttrium (Y)) and the crystallographic orientation of the dissolution surfaces (basal (0001), prism (1010), and pyramidal (1011) planes) on the corrosion behavior. These parameters are known to strongly impact the initial hydrolysis phenomena of Mg-based materials. To develop the atomistic computational model, we have implemented the Dmol3 software package in conjunction with PBE (Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof) correlation energy functional in the GGA (generalized gradient approximation) scheme. Throughout the thesis, we performed three sets of calculations, i) surface energy, ii) dissolution potential, and iii) water adsorption computations, to examine the hydrolysis mechanism and the subsequent corrosion/degradation of Mg/Mg alloys. The total energy changes of various Mg-based systems in different conditions for these surface energies, dissolution behavior, and tendency of the system for adsorbing the water molecule were quantified. The results

  1. Algorithms for singularities and real structures of weak Del Pezzo surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Lubbes, Niels

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the classification of singularities [P. Du Val, On isolated singularities of surfaces which do not affect the conditions of adjunction. I, II, III, Proc. Camb. Philos. Soc. 30 (1934) 453-491] and real structures [C. T. C. Wall, Real forms of smooth del Pezzo surfaces, J. Reine Angew. Math. 1987(375/376) (1987) 47-66, ISSN 0075-4102] of weak Del Pezzo surfaces from an algorithmic point of view. It is well-known that the singularities of weak Del Pezzo surfaces correspond to root subsystems. We present an algorithm which computes the classification of these root subsystems. We represent equivalence classes of root subsystems by unique labels. These labels allow us to construct examples of weak Del Pezzo surfaces with the corresponding singularity configuration. Equivalence classes of real structures of weak Del Pezzo surfaces are also represented by root subsystems. We present an algorithm which computes the classification of real structures. This leads to an alternative proof of the known classification for Del Pezzo surfaces and extends this classification to singular weak Del Pezzo surfaces. As an application we classify families of real conics on cyclides. © World Scientific Publishing Company.

  2. Search for a new weakly interacting particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decamp, D.; Deschizeaux, B.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Alemany, R.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Mato, P.; Ll. M., Mir; Pacheco, A.; Catanesi, M. G.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Gao, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Lou, J.; Qiao, C.; Ruan, T.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Atwood, W. B.; Bird, F.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Bossi, F.; Brown, D.; Burnett, T. H.; Drevermann, H.; Dydak, F.; Forty, R. W.; Grab, C.; Hagelberg, R.; Haywood, S.; Hilgart, J.; Jost, B.; Kasemann, M.; Knobloch, J.; Lacourt, A.; Lançon, E.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Marchioro, A.; Martinez, M.; Menary, S.; Minten, A.; Miotto, A.; Miguel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Nash, J.; Palazzi, P.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Roth, A.; Rothberg, J.; Rotscheidt, H.; St. Denis, R.; Schlatter, D.; Takashima, M.; Talby, M.; Tejessy, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wheeler, S.; Wiedenmann, W.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Falvard, A.; El Fellous, R.; Gay, P.; Harvey, J.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Stimpfl, G.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nielsen, E. R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Bourotte, J.; Braems, F.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Gamess, A.; Guirlet, R.; Orteu, S.; Rosowsky, A.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Veitch, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Lannutti, J.; Levinthal, D.; Mermikides, M.; Sawyer, L.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Nicoletti, G.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Zografou, P.; Altoon, B.; Boyle, O.; Halley, A. W.; Ten Have, I.; Hearns, J. L.; Lynch, J. G.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geiges, R.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Belk, A. T.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Dornan, P. J.; Dugeay, S.; Greene, A. M.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Patton, S. J.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Taylor, G.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Rowlingson, B. S.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Barczewski, T.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Kleinknecht, K.; Renk, B.; Roehn, S.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Albanese, J.-P.; Aubert, J.-J.; Benchouk, C.; Bernard, V.; Bonissent, A.; Courvoisier, D.; Etienne, F.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Qian, Z.; Becker, H.; Blum, W.; Cattaneo, P.; Cowan, G.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Jahn, A.; Kozanecki, W.; Lange, E.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Pan, Y.; Richter, R.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Stierlin, U.; Thomas, J.; Wolf, G.; Bertin, V.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, X.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Ganis, G.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Moneta, L.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Carter, J. M.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Saich, M. R.; Strong, J. A.; Thomas, R. M.; West, L. R.; Wildish, T.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Edwards, M.; Fisher, S. M.; Jones, T. J.; Norton, P. R.; Salmon, D. P.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Klopfenstein, C.; Locci, E.; Loucatos, S.; Monnier, E.; Perez, P.; Perlas, J. A.; Perrier, F.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Vallage, B.; Ashman, J. G.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Carney, R.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dinsdale, M.; Dogru, M.; Hatfield, F.; Martin, J.; Parker, D.; Reeves, P.; Thompson, L. F.; Brandt, S.; Burkhardt, H.; Grupen, C.; Meinhard, H.; Mirabito, L.; Neugebauer, E.; Schäfer, U.; Seywerd, H.; Apollinari, G.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Liello, F.; Ragusa, F.; Rolandi, L.; Stiegler, U.; Bellantoni, L.; Boudreau, J. F.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J. S.; Cowen, D. F.; Deweerd, A. J.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Jacobsen, J. E.; Jared, R. C.; Johnson, R. P.; Leclaire, B. W.; Pan, Y. B.; Pater, J. R.; Saadi, Y.; Sharma, V.; Walsh, A. M.; Wear, J. A.; Weber, F. V.; Whitney, M. H.; Sau, Lan, Wu; Zhou, Z. L.; Zobernig, G.

    1991-06-01

    A search for events of the type e+e--->l+l-X0, where X0 can be any weakly interacting particle which couples to the Z, has been performed with the ALEPH detector at LEP, by searching for acollinear lepton pairs. Such particles can be excluded up to a mass of 7.0 GeV/c2 for a value of the ratio of branching fractions, Br(Z-->X0l+l-)/Br(Z-->l+l-), greater than 2.5 × 10-3 if the X0 has third component of isospin, I3 greater than 1/2 and decays to a pair of virtual gauge bosons. When this analysis is combined with the previous results of the Higgs particle searches from ALEPH, this limit can be extended to an X0 mass of 60 GeV/c2.

  3. Simulating Error in Cluster Weak Lensing Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kellen J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of an N-body simulation of the various sources of systematic error in constraining the dark energy equation of state via cluster weak lensing tomography. The use of tomographic techniques to constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter is a pivotal component of future large survey missions, however, the application of tomography to cosmic shear necessitates the exclusion of regions around galaxy clusters from analysis. We therefore test the applicability tomography to cluster-induced shear as a secondary, complementary sample through which estimates of the dark energy e.o.s. parameter can be made. Furthermore, we demonstrate the application of this technique to a test sample of 10 massive galaxy clusters imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope.

  4. Casimir apparatuses in a weak gravitational field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe; Calloni, Enrico; Esposito, Giampiero

    2009-01-01

    We review and assess a part of the recent work on Casimir apparatuses in the weak gravitational field of the Earth. For a free, real massless scalar field subject to Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on the parallel plates, the resulting regularized and renormalized energy-momentum tensor...... is covariantly conserved, while the trace anomaly vanishes if the massless field is conformally coupled to gravity. Conformal coupling also ensures a finite Casimir energy and finite values of the pressure upon parallel plates. These results have been extended to an electromagnetic field subject to perfect...... conductor (hence idealized) boundary conditions on parallel plates, by various authors. The regularized and renormalized energy-momentum tensor has beene valuated up to second order in the gravity acceleration. In both the scalar and the electromagnetic case, studied to first order in the gravity...

  5. A Soberania Fraca / The Weak Sovereignty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Matthes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumo Em Vadios: Dois Ensaios sobre a Razão, Derrida propõe que se entenda o conceito de soberania a partir de duas noções principais: incondicionalidade e indivisibilidade. O objetivo desse artigo é mostrar que o autor aborda esses dois pontos com o intuito de criar uma compreensão da soberania como uma força fraca e divisível no tempo. Palavras Chaves: Soberania, Jacques Derrida, Filosofia Francesa, Voyous, Política. Abstract In Rogues: Two Essays on Reason, Derrida argues that sovereignty is comprised of two main features: the unconditional and the indivisible. The aim of this article is to show that the author approaches these aspects in order to make a point about the concept of sovereignty. This point is precisely to think sovereignty as a weak force and as something divisible in time. Key Words: Sovereignty, Jacques Derrida, French Philosophy, Rogues, Politics.

  6. Sex hormones and skeletal muscle weakness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sipilä, Sarianna; Narici, Marco; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Human ageing is accompanied with deterioration in endocrine functions the most notable and well characterized of which being the decrease in the production of sex hormones. Current research literature suggests that low sex hormone concentration may be among the key mechanism for sarcopenia...... and muscle weakness. Within the European large scale MYOAGE project, the role of sex hormones, estrogens and testosterone, in causing the aging-related loss of muscle mass and function was further investigated. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in women is shown to diminish age-associated muscle loss, loss...... properties. HRT influences gene expression in e.g. cytoskeletal and cell-matrix proteins, has a stimulating effect upon IGF-I, and a role in IL-6 and adipokine regulation. Despite low circulating steroid-hormone level, postmenopausal women have a high local concentration of steroidogenic enzymes in skeletal...

  7. Crossover between weak antilocalization and weak localization of bulk states in ultrathin Bi₂Se₃ films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huichao; Liu, Haiwen; Chang, Cui-Zu; Zuo, Huakun; Zhao, Yanfei; Sun, Yi; Xia, Zhengcai; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xie, X C; Xue, Qi-Kun; Wang, Jian

    2014-07-24

    We report transport studies on the 5 nm thick Bi₂Se₃ topological insulator films which are grown via molecular beam epitaxy technique. The angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data show that the Fermi level of the system lies in the bulk conduction band above the Dirac point, suggesting important contribution of bulk states to the transport results. In particular, the crossover from weak antilocalization to weak localization in the bulk states is observed in the parallel magnetic field measurements up to 50 Tesla. The measured magneto-resistance exhibits interesting anisotropy with respect to the orientation of parallel magnetic field B// and the current I, signifying intrinsic spin-orbit coupling in the Bi₂Se₃ films. Our work directly shows the crossover of quantum interference effect in the bulk states from weak antilocalization to weak localization. It presents an important step toward a better understanding of the existing three-dimensional topological insulators and the potential applications of nano-scale topological insulator devices.

  8. CATHERINE II AND HER PLAYS

    OpenAIRE

    Drozdek, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Catherine II produced a fairly large number of plays in which she satirized particular vices and included a moderate number de moral teachings. However, in many of them Catherine was primarily occupied with amorous pursuits. Her so-called French plays are weak, full of gossip and ridiculing. Catherine also addressed the problem of education, but in most cases this was reduced to crude criticism, particularly of the masonry, fairly popular then in Russia. Although she was technically the head ...

  9. Molecular aspects of Mg2+ transport systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D L; Maguire, M E

    1993-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Salmonella typhimurium possesses three distinct Mg2+ transport systems, encoded by the CorA, MgtA, and MgtB loci. The CorA transport system is the constitutive Mg2+ influx system but can also mediate efflux at high extracellular Mg2+ concentrations. The CorA protein lacks homology to any known protein, is an integral membrane protein containing 28% percent-charged amino acids, and has three carboxyl terminal membrane-spanning segments. Its properties indicate that it is a new class of membrane transport protein, likely found in all gram-negative bacteria and possibly other organisms. In contrast, the MgtA and MgtB Mg2+ transport systems are normally expressed only at low extracellular Mg2+ concentrations and can mediate only the influx of Mg2+. Both MgtA and MgtB system are P-type ATPases; they have relatively poor homology to other known prokaryotic P-type ATPases but are highly homologous to mammalian P-type ATPases, particularly reticular Ca(2+)-ATPases. Expression of both MgtA and MgtB is highly regulated by the concentration of extracellular Mg2+. Transcription of MgtB is increased about 1,000-fold by lowering Mg2+ from 1 mM to 1 microM, and, under growth conditions of limiting Mg2+, MgtB becomes the dominant Mg2+ influx system. However, it is unclear why the cells require the use of ATP to mediate the influx of Mg2+ down its electrochemical gradient. Study of these Mg2+ transport systems should lead to further understanding of cellular Mg2+ homeostasis and eventually to characterization of eukaryotic Mg2+ transport systems.

  10. Critical types of Krasnoselskii fixed point theorems in weak topologies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this note, by means of the technique of measures of weak noncompactness, we establish a generalized form of fixed point theorem for the sum of T + S in weak topology setups of a metrizable locally convex space, where S is not weakly compact, I − T allows to be noninvertible, and T is not necessarily continuous.

  11. The influence of weak impacts on certain processes of nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupik, V. A.; Margolin, V. I.; Potekhin, M. S.

    2017-07-01

    The article deals with the influence of weak and super weak impacts on certain technological processes in nanotechnology related to the synthesis of nanoscale films and coatings. We also touch upon the impacts of weak diffraction fields of complex shape on the formation of fractal films and coatings.

  12. Vibrational spectra of Cu(II), Cu(I), Ni(II), Pd(II), Pt(II) and Hg(II) complexes with dithizone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, Danuta; Kowal, Andrzei T.

    1985-01-01

    The far i.r. spectra of Cu(II), Cu(I) and Ni(II) complexes with dithizone are presented. The assignment of the metal—ligand vibrations was carried out by 63Cu/ 65Cu and 58Ni/ 62Ni isotopic substitution. Resonance Raman spectra of Hg(II), Pd(II), Pt(II), Cu(II) and Cu(I) complexes were measured. Excitation profiles of the enhanced Raman modes of Hg(II) dithizonate allowed us to identify vibrations associated with the chromophoric azo group. It is concluded that Pd(II) dithizonate and Pt(II) dithizonate are N, S coordinated and form a trans square-planar structure, whereas in Cu(I) dithizonate the Cu(I) ion forms a strong bond with the sulfur atom and a weak secondary bond with the azo nitrogen as well as with sulfur atoms from the neighboring molecules conferring a tetrahedral configuration on the coordination sphere and polymeric structure of the complex.

  13. Copper (II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    ABSTRACT: A Schiff base was prepared from the reaction of 2 - amino - 3 – methylbutanoic acid and 2, 4 - pentanedione. The reaction of the prepared Schiff base with ethanolic solution of copper (II) chloride formed diaquo bis( N – 2 – amino – 3 - methylbutyl - 2, 4 - pentanedionato) copper (II) complex. The Schiff base is ...

  14. Re-examining the 26Mg(α ,α')26Mg reaction: Probing astrophysically important states in 26Mg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsley, P.; Brümmer, J. W.; Li, K. C. W.; Marín-Lámbarri, D. J.; Kheswa, N. Y.; Donaldson, L. M.; Neveling, R.; Papka, P.; Pellegri, L.; Pesudo, V.; Pool, L. C.; Smit, F. D.; van Zyl, J. J.

    2017-11-01

    Background: The 22Ne(α ,n )25Mg reaction is one of the neutron sources for the s process in massive stars. The properties of levels in 26Mg above the α -particle threshold control the strengths of the 22Ne(α ,n )25Mg and 22Ne(α ,γ )26Mg reactions. The strengths of these reactions as functions of temperature are one of the major uncertainties in the s process. Purpose: Information on the existence, spin, and parity of levels in 26Mg can assist in constraining the strengths of the 22Ne(α ,γ )26Mg and 22Ne(α ,n )25Mg reactions, and therefore in constraining s -process abundances. Methods: Inelastically scattered α particles from a 26Mg target were momentum-analyzed in the K600 magnetic spectrometer at iThemba LABS, South Africa. The differential cross sections of states were deduced from the focal-plane trajectory of the scattered α particles. Based on the differential cross sections, spin and parity assignments to states are made. Results: A newly assigned 0+ state was observed in addition to a number of other states, some of which can be associated with states observed in other experiments. Some of the deduced Jπ values of the states observed in the present study show discrepancies with those assigned in a similar experiment performed at RCNP Osaka. The reassignments and additions of the various states can strongly affect the reaction rate at low temperatures. Conclusion: The number, location, and assignment of levels in 26Mg that may contribute to the 22Ne+α reactions are not clear. Future experimental investigations of 26Mg must have an extremely good energy resolution to separate the contributions from different levels. Coincidence experiments of 26Mg provide a possible route for future investigations.

  15. Competitive adsorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) onto xanthate-modified magnetic chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yehua; Hu, Jun; Wang, Jianlong

    2012-06-30

    The competitive adsorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) onto a novel xanthate-modified magnetic chitosan (XMCS) was systematically investigated in single and ternary metal systems. In single system, equilibrium studies showed that the adsorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) followed the Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacities were found to be 76.9, 34.5 and 20.8mg/g, respectively. In ternary system, the combined action of the metals was found to be antagonistic and the metal sorption followed the order of Pb(II)>Cu(II)>Zn(II); the Langmuir isotherm fitted the data of Pb(II) and Cu(II) well while the isotherm data of Zn(II) correlated well with the Freundlich model. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) studies showed that the thiol and amino group participated in the adsorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Blind quantum computing with weak coherent pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunjko, Vedran; Kashefi, Elham; Leverrier, Anthony

    2012-05-18

    The universal blind quantum computation (UBQC) protocol [A. Broadbent, J. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, in Proceedings of the 50th Annual IEEE Symposiumon Foundations of Computer Science (IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, 2009), pp. 517-526.] allows a client to perform quantum computation on a remote server. In an ideal setting, perfect privacy is guaranteed if the client is capable of producing specific, randomly chosen single qubit states. While from a theoretical point of view, this may constitute the lowest possible quantum requirement, from a pragmatic point of view, generation of such states to be sent along long distances can never be achieved perfectly. We introduce the concept of ϵ blindness for UBQC, in analogy to the concept of ϵ security developed for other cryptographic protocols, allowing us to characterize the robustness and security properties of the protocol under possible imperfections. We also present a remote blind single qubit preparation protocol with weak coherent pulses for the client to prepare, in a delegated fashion, quantum states arbitrarily close to perfect random single qubit states. This allows us to efficiently achieve ϵ-blind UBQC for any ϵ>0, even if the channel between the client and the server is arbitrarily lossy.

  17. Forensic bitemark identification: weak foundations, exaggerated claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saks, Michael J.; Albright, Thomas; Bohan, Thomas L.; Bierer, Barbara E.; Bowers, C. Michael; Bush, Mary A.; Bush, Peter J.; Casadevall, Arturo; Cole, Simon A.; Denton, M. Bonner; Diamond, Shari Seidman; Dioso-Villa, Rachel; Epstein, Jules; Faigman, David; Faigman, Lisa; Fienberg, Stephen E.; Garrett, Brandon L.; Giannelli, Paul C.; Greely, Henry T.; Imwinkelried, Edward; Jamieson, Allan; Kafadar, Karen; Kassirer, Jerome P.; Koehler, Jonathan ‘Jay’; Korn, David; Mnookin, Jennifer; Morrison, Alan B.; Murphy, Erin; Peerwani, Nizam; Peterson, Joseph L.; Risinger, D. Michael; Sensabaugh, George F.; Spiegelman, Clifford; Stern, Hal; Thompson, William C.; Wayman, James L.; Zabell, Sandy; Zumwalt, Ross E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several forensic sciences, especially of the pattern-matching kind, are increasingly seen to lack the scientific foundation needed to justify continuing admission as trial evidence. Indeed, several have been abolished in the recent past. A likely next candidate for elimination is bitemark identification. A number of DNA exonerations have occurred in recent years for individuals convicted based on erroneous bitemark identifications. Intense scientific and legal scrutiny has resulted. An important National Academies review found little scientific support for the field. The Texas Forensic Science Commission recently recommended a moratorium on the admission of bitemark expert testimony. The California Supreme Court has a case before it that could start a national dismantling of forensic odontology. This article describes the (legal) basis for the rise of bitemark identification and the (scientific) basis for its impending fall. The article explains the general logic of forensic identification, the claims of bitemark identification, and reviews relevant empirical research on bitemark identification—highlighting both the lack of research and the lack of support provided by what research does exist. The rise and possible fall of bitemark identification evidence has broader implications—highlighting the weak scientific culture of forensic science and the law's difficulty in evaluating and responding to unreliable and unscientific evidence. PMID:28852538

  18. Blind Quantum Computing with Weak Coherent Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunjko, Vedran; Kashefi, Elham; Leverrier, Anthony

    2012-05-01

    The universal blind quantum computation (UBQC) protocol [A. Broadbent, J. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, in Proceedings of the 50th Annual IEEE Symposiumon Foundations of Computer Science (IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, 2009), pp. 517-526.] allows a client to perform quantum computation on a remote server. In an ideal setting, perfect privacy is guaranteed if the client is capable of producing specific, randomly chosen single qubit states. While from a theoretical point of view, this may constitute the lowest possible quantum requirement, from a pragmatic point of view, generation of such states to be sent along long distances can never be achieved perfectly. We introduce the concept of ɛ blindness for UBQC, in analogy to the concept of ɛ security developed for other cryptographic protocols, allowing us to characterize the robustness and security properties of the protocol under possible imperfections. We also present a remote blind single qubit preparation protocol with weak coherent pulses for the client to prepare, in a delegated fashion, quantum states arbitrarily close to perfect random single qubit states. This allows us to efficiently achieve ɛ-blind UBQC for any ɛ>0, even if the channel between the client and the server is arbitrarily lossy.

  19. Forensic bitemark identification: weak foundations, exaggerated claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saks, Michael J; Albright, Thomas; Bohan, Thomas L; Bierer, Barbara E; Bowers, C Michael; Bush, Mary A; Bush, Peter J; Casadevall, Arturo; Cole, Simon A; Denton, M Bonner; Diamond, Shari Seidman; Dioso-Villa, Rachel; Epstein, Jules; Faigman, David; Faigman, Lisa; Fienberg, Stephen E; Garrett, Brandon L; Giannelli, Paul C; Greely, Henry T; Imwinkelried, Edward; Jamieson, Allan; Kafadar, Karen; Kassirer, Jerome P; Koehler, Jonathan 'Jay'; Korn, David; Mnookin, Jennifer; Morrison, Alan B; Murphy, Erin; Peerwani, Nizam; Peterson, Joseph L; Risinger, D Michael; Sensabaugh, George F; Spiegelman, Clifford; Stern, Hal; Thompson, William C; Wayman, James L; Zabell, Sandy; Zumwalt, Ross E

    2016-12-01

    Several forensic sciences, especially of the pattern-matching kind, are increasingly seen to lack the scientific foundation needed to justify continuing admission as trial evidence. Indeed, several have been abolished in the recent past. A likely next candidate for elimination is bitemark identification. A number of DNA exonerations have occurred in recent years for individuals convicted based on erroneous bitemark identifications. Intense scientific and legal scrutiny has resulted. An important National Academies review found little scientific support for the field. The Texas Forensic Science Commission recently recommended a moratorium on the admission of bitemark expert testimony. The California Supreme Court has a case before it that could start a national dismantling of forensic odontology. This article describes the (legal) basis for the rise of bitemark identification and the (scientific) basis for its impending fall. The article explains the general logic of forensic identification, the claims of bitemark identification, and reviews relevant empirical research on bitemark identification-highlighting both the lack of research and the lack of support provided by what research does exist. The rise and possible fall of bitemark identification evidence has broader implications-highlighting the weak scientific culture of forensic science and the law's difficulty in evaluating and responding to unreliable and unscientific evidence.

  20. Atomic Inference from Weak Gravitational Lensing Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Phil; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-12-14

    We present a novel approach to reconstructing the projected mass distribution from the sparse and noisy weak gravitational lensing shear data. The reconstructions are regularized via the knowledge gained from numerical simulations of clusters, with trial mass distributions constructed from n NFW profile ellipsoidal components. The parameters of these ''atoms'' are distributed a priori as in the simulated clusters. Sampling the mass distributions from the atom parameter probability density function allows estimates of the properties of the mass distribution to be generated, with error bars. The appropriate number of atoms is inferred from the data itself via the Bayesian evidence, and is typically found to be small, reecting the quality of the data. Ensemble average mass maps are found to be robust to the details of the noise realization, and succeed in recovering the demonstration input mass distribution (from a realistic simulated cluster) over a wide range of scales. As an application of such a reliable mapping algorithm, we comment on the residuals of the reconstruction and the implications for predicting convergence and shear at specific points on the sky.

  1. The conduction bands of MgO, MgS and HfO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, P.K. de; Groot, R.A. de

    1998-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations for MgO, MgS and HfO2 are reported. It is shown that the conduction bands of MgO and MgS have predominantly anion character, contrary to the common picture of the conduction band being derived from cation states. In transition metal oxides, unoccupied anion states

  2. TRPM6 forms the Mg2+ influx channel involved in intestinal and renal Mg2+ absorption.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voets, T.; Nilius, B.; Hoefs, S.J.G.; Kemp, J.W.C.M. van der; Droogmans, G.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Mg2+ is an essential ion involved in a multitude of physiological and biochemical processes and a major constituent of bone tissue. Mg2+ homeostasis in mammals depends on the equilibrium between intestinal Mg2+ absorption and renal Mg2+ excretion, but little is known about the molecular nature of

  3. Mg/Ca ratio in fertilization and agricultural soils, Mg percent of liming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mg is a cofactor in more than 300 enzymatic reactions and its deficiency has been reported to be associated with cardiovascular diseases. Human Mg balance depends on food composition, food processing and Mg variation in foodstuffs, which can be roughly prognostigated by Mg proportion in fertilization and ...

  4. Strong and Weak Chaos in Weakly Nonintegrable Many-Body Hamiltonian Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulansky, M.; Ahnert, K.; Pikovsky, A.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    We study properties of chaos in generic one-dimensional nonlinear Hamiltonian lattices comprised of weakly coupled nonlinear oscillators by numerical simulations of continuous-time systems and symplectic maps. For small coupling, the measure of chaos is found to be proportional to the coupling strength and lattice length, with the typical maximal Lyapunov exponent being proportional to the square root of coupling. This strong chaos appears as a result of triplet resonances between nearby modes. In addition to strong chaos we observe a weakly chaotic component having much smaller Lyapunov exponent, the measure of which drops approximately as a square of the coupling strength down to smallest couplings we were able to reach. We argue that this weak chaos is linked to the regime of fast Arnold diffusion discussed by Chirikov and Vecheslavov. In disordered lattices of large size we find a subdiffusive spreading of initially localized wave packets over larger and larger number of modes. The relations between the exponent of this spreading and the exponent in the dependence of the fast Arnold diffusion on coupling strength are analyzed. We also trace parallels between the slow spreading of chaos and deterministic rheology.

  5. Tests of the weak equivalence principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speake, C. C.; Will, C. M.

    2012-09-01

    The Einstein equivalence principle is the foundation for general relativity and all metric theories of gravity. Of its three tenets—the equality of acceleration of test bodies, or weak equivalence principle; the validity of Lorentz invariance in local freely falling frames; and the position invariance of local physical laws—the weak equivalence principle has played the most important role historically, and continues to be a focus of intense theoretical and experimental investigation. From the probably apocryphal 16th century demonstrations by Galileo at Pisa's leaning tower to the sensitive torsion-balance measurements of today (both pictured on the cover of this issue), this principle, dubbed WEP, has been crucial to the development of gravitation theory. The universality of the rate of acceleration of all types of matter in a gravitational field can be taken as evidence that gravitation is fundamentally determined by the geometry, or metric, of spacetime. Newton began his magnum opus 'The Principia' with a discussion of WEP and his experiments to verify it, while Einstein took WEP for granted in his construction of general relativity, never once referring to the epochal experiments by Baron Eötvös. The classic 1964 experiment of Roll, Krotkov and Dicke ushered in the modern era of high-precision tests, and the search for a 'fifth force' during the late 1980s (instigated, ironically, by purported anomalies in Eötvös's old data) caused the enterprise to pivot from pure tests of the foundation of GR to searches for new physics beyond the standard model of the non-gravitational interactions. Today, the next generation of experimental tests of WEP are being prepared for launch or are being developed, with the goal of reaching unprecedented levels of sensitivity, in search of signatures of interactions inspired by string theory, extra dimensions and other concepts from the world of high-energy physics. At the same time observations continue using lunar laser

  6. Planckian axions and the Weak Gravity Conjecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachlechner, Thomas C.; Long, Cody; McAllister, Liam [Department of Physics, Cornell University,Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2016-01-18

    Several recent works http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1475-7516/2015/09/020, http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP08(2015)032, http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP10(2015)023 have claimed that the Weak Gravity Conjecture (WGC) excludes super-Planckian displacements of axion fields, and hence large-field axion inflation, in the absence of monodromy. We argue that in theories with N≫1 axions, super-Planckian axion diameters D are readily allowed by the WGC. We clarify the nontrivial relationship between the kinetic matrix K — unambiguously defined by its form in a Minkowski-reduced basis — and the diameter of the axion fundamental domain, emphasizing that in general the diameter is not solely determined by the eigenvalues f{sub 1}{sup 2}≤…≤f{sub N}{sup 2} of K: the orientations of the eigenvectors with respect to the identifications imposed by instantons must be incorporated. In particular, even if one were to impose the condition f{sub N}M{sub pl} does not immediately imply the existence of unsuppressed higher harmonic contributions to the potential. Finally, we argue that in effective axion-gravity theories, the zero-form version of the WGC can be satisfied by gravitational instantons that make negligible contributions to the potential.

  7. Probing outflows in z = 1 ∼ 2 galaxies through Fe II/Fe II* multiplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yuping; Giavalisco, Mauro [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Guo, Yicheng [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kurk, Jaron, E-mail: yupingt@astro.umass.edu [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrial Physik, Gießenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2014-10-01

    We report on a study of the 2300-2600 Å Fe II/Fe II* multiplets in the rest-UV spectra of star-forming galaxies at 1.0 < z < 2.6 as probes of galactic-scale outflows. We extracted a mass-limited sample of 97 galaxies at z ∼ 1.0-2.6 from ultra-deep spectra obtained during the GMASS spectroscopic survey in the GOODS South field with the Very Large Telescope and FORS2. We obtain robust measures of the rest equivalent width of the Fe II absorption lines down to a limit of W{sub r} > 1.5 Å and of the Fe II* emission lines to W{sub r} > 0.5 Å. Whenever we can measure the systemic redshift of the galaxies from the [O II] emission line, we find that both the Fe II and Mg II absorption lines are blueshifted, indicating that both species trace gaseous outflows. We also find, however, that the Fe II gas has generally lower outflow velocity relative to that of Mg II. We investigate the variation of Fe II line profiles as a function of the radiative transfer properties of the lines, and find that transitions with higher oscillator strengths are more blueshifted in terms of both line centroids and line wings. We discuss the possibility that Fe II lines are suppressed by stellar absorptions. The lower velocities of the Fe II lines relative to the Mg II doublet, as well as the absence of spatially extended Fe II* emission in two-dimensional stacked spectra, suggest that most clouds responsible for Fe II absorption lie close (3 ∼ 4 kpc) to the disks of galaxies. We show that the Fe II/Fe II* multiplets offer unique probes of the kinematic structure of galactic outflows.

  8. Roles of nuclear weak rates on the evolution of degenerate cores in stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Toshio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron-capture and β-decay rates in stellar environments are evaluated with the use of new shell-model Hamiltonians for sd-shell and pf-shell nuclei as well as for nuclei belonging to the island of inversion. Important role of the nuclear weak rates on the final evolution of stellar degenerate cores is presented. The weak interaction rates for sd-shell nuclei are calculated to study nuclear Urca processes in O-Ne-Mg cores of stars with 8-10 M⊙ (solar mass and their effects on the final fate of the stars. Nucleosynthesis of iron-group elements in Type Ia supernova explosions are studied with the weak rates for pf-shell nuclei. The problem of the neutron-rich iron-group isotope over-production compared to the solar abundances is shown to be nearly solved with the use of the new rates and explosion model of slow defraglation with delayed detonation. Evaluation of the weak rates is extended to the island of inversion and the region of neutron-rich nuclei near 78Ni, where two major shells contribute to their configurations.

  9. Roles of nuclear weak rates on the evolution of degenerate cores in stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toshio; Tsunodaa, Naofumi; Tsunoda, Yuhsuke; Shimizu, Noritaka; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2018-01-01

    Electron-capture and β-decay rates in stellar environments are evaluated with the use of new shell-model Hamiltonians for sd-shell and pf-shell nuclei as well as for nuclei belonging to the island of inversion. Important role of the nuclear weak rates on the final evolution of stellar degenerate cores is presented. The weak interaction rates for sd-shell nuclei are calculated to study nuclear Urca processes in O-Ne-Mg cores of stars with 8-10 M⊙ (solar mass) and their effects on the final fate of the stars. Nucleosynthesis of iron-group elements in Type Ia supernova explosions are studied with the weak rates for pf-shell nuclei. The problem of the neutron-rich iron-group isotope over-production compared to the solar abundances is shown to be nearly solved with the use of the new rates and explosion model of slow defraglation with delayed detonation. Evaluation of the weak rates is extended to the island of inversion and the region of neutron-rich nuclei near 78Ni, where two major shells contribute to their configurations.

  10. Porous cellulosic adsorbent for the removal of Cd (II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions from aqueous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsbay, Murat; Kavaklı, Pınar Akkaş; Tilki, Serhad; Kavaklı, Cengiz; Güven, Olgun

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to prepare a renewable cellulosic adsorbent by γ-initiated grafting of poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) from cellulose substrate and subsequent modification of PGMA with chelating species, iminodiacetic acid (IDA), for Cd (II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) removal from aqueous media. Modification of PGMA grafted cellulose with IDA in aqueous solution under mild conditions has proceeded efficiently to yield a natural-based and effective porous adsorbent with well-defined properties as provided by the controlled polymerization technique, namely RAFT, applied during the radiation-induced graft copolymerization step and with sufficient degree of IDA immobilization as confirmed by XPS, FTIR, contact angle measurements and elemental analysis. In order to examine the Cd (II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) removing performance of the resulting adsorbent, batch experiments were carried out by ICP-MS. The adsorption capacities were determined as 53.4 mg Cd(II)/g polymer, 52.0 mg Pb(II)/g polymer and 69.6 mg Cu(II)/g polymer at initial feed concentration of 250 ppm, showing the promising potential of the natural-based adsorbent to steadily and efficiently chemisorb toxic metal ions.

  11. First-Principles Study of Structural, Electronic, Optical, and Thermal Properties of BeSiSb2 and MgSiSb2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlamari, S.; Boukhtouta, M.; Taïri, L.; Meradji, H.; Amirouche, L.; Ghemid, S.

    2017-12-01

    Structural, electronic, optical, and thermal properties of ternary II-IV-V2 (BeSiSb2 and MgSiSb2) chalcopyrite semiconductors have been calculated using the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave scheme in the generalized gradient approximation. The optimized equilibrium structural parameters (a, c, and u) are in good agreement with theoretical results obtained using other methods. The band structure and density of states reveal that BeSiSb2 has an indirect (Γ-Z) bandgap of about 0.61 eV, whereas MgSiSb2 has a direct (Γ-Γ) bandgap of 0.80 eV. The dielectric function, refractive index, and extinction coefficient were calculated to investigate the optical properties, revealing that BeSiSb2 and MgSiSb2 present very weak birefringence. The temperature dependence of the volume, bulk modulus, Debye temperature, and heat capacities (C v and C p) was predicted using the quasiharmonic Debye model at different pressures. Significant differences in properties are observed at high pressure and high temperature. We predict that, at 300 K and 0 GPa, the heat capacity at constant volume C v, heat capacity at constant pressure C P, Debye temperature θ D, and Grüneisen parameter γ will be about 94.91 J/mol K, 98.52 J/mol K, 301.30 K, and 2.11 for BeSiSb2 and about 96.08 J/mol K, 100.47 J/mol K, 261.38 K, and 2.20 for MgSiSb2, respectively.

  12. Mg Isotopes of USGS Igneous Rock Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F.; Glessner, J. J.; Lundstrom, C. C.

    2008-12-01

    Magnesium has three stable isotopes, 24Mg, 25Mg, and 26Mg with abundances of 78.99%, 10.00%, and 11.01%, respectively. It is one of the most abundant elements in the crust and mantle. As advancements of analytical techniques using MC-ICP-MS have dramatically advanced our ability to measure isotope ratios of Mg with greater precision, Mg isotopes can now be applied to study a variety of fundamental geological processes, such as continental crust weathering, chemical diffusion, and chondrule formation. Therefore the need for well characterized Mg isotope ratios for geological materials is increasingly important. Routine measurement of readily-available USGS rock standards is a viable way for inter-lab comparison to show the quality of data. However, the Mg isotope data for USGS standards reported in the literature are limited and inconsistent. USGS standards reported by different MC-ICP-MS labs have a range of Mg isotopic data outside of the normal external error of 0.1‰ (2σ). Mg isotopes of USGS igneous rock standards (dunite, DTS-1; basalts, BCR-1, BCR-2, BHVO-1; and andesite, AGV-1) were measured by a sample-standard bracketing method using a low resolution MC-ICP- MS (Nu-Plasma HR). The method has a large tolerance of matrix bias with Na/Mg and Al/Mg > 100% only changing the δ26Mg by less than 0.1‰. Dilution effects do not cause significant error (99.5%) and acceptable concentrations of matrix (mainly Na, Al, Ca, and Fe) are included in these results. Duplicate analyses of independently processed standards yielded the following results (δ26MgDSM-3 (‰)): BCR-2 (-0.306±0.144, - 0.290±0.116, -0.283±0.048, -0.288±0.057), BCR-1 (-0.399±0.079, -0.346±0.046), AGV-1 (-0.295±0.110, -0.307±0.086, -0.339±0.068), BHVO-1 (-0.308±0.076, - 0.299±0.103), and DTS-1 (-0.299±0.163, -0.368±0.059). δ26MgDSM-3 of measured USGS standards are consistent within error (2σ).

  13. Role of MgO impurity on the superconducting properties of MgB{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Tiwari, Brajesh; Jha, Rajveer; Kishan, H.; Awana, V.P.S., E-mail: awana@mail.npindia.org

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Multiphase Rietveld refinement and presence of MgO volume fraction in MgB{sub 2}. • Inhomogeneity in superconducting transition of MgB{sub 2} due to hidden MgO. • Diamagnetic and paramagnetic Meissner effect in MgB{sub 2}. - Abstract: We address the effect of MgO impurity on the superconducting properties of MgB{sub 2}. The synthesis of MgB{sub 2} is very crucial because of sensitivity of Mg to oxidation which may lead to MgO as a secondary phase. Rietveld refinement was performed to determine the quantitative volume fraction of MgO in the samples synthesized by two different techniques. Both the samples were subjected to magnetization measurements under dc and a.c. applied magnetic fields and the observed results were compared as a function of temperature. Paramagnetic Meissner effect has been observed in a sample of MgB{sub 2} having more amount of MgO (with T{sub c} = 37.1 K) whereas the pure sample MgB{sub 2} having minor quantity of MgO shows diamagnetic Meissner effect with T{sub c} = 38.8 K. M–H measurements at 10 K reveal a slight difference in irreversibility field which is due to MgO impurity along with wide transition observed from ac magnetic susceptibility measurements. The magnetotransport measurements ρ(T) using ρ{sub N} = 90%, 50% and 10% criterion on pure sample of MgB{sub 2} has been used to determine the upper critical field whereas the sample having large quantity of MgO does not allow these measurements due to its high resistance.

  14. Quantitative detection of the respective concentrations of chiral compounds with weak measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Linguo; Qiu, Xiaodong; Luo, Lan; Liu, Xiong; Li, Zhaoxue; Zhang, Zhiyou; Du, Jinglei; Wang, Deqiang

    2017-11-01

    In this letter, we determine the respective concentrations of glucose and fructose in the mixed chiral solution by simultaneously measuring the optical rotation angle (ORA) and the refractive index change (RIC) with weak measurements. The photonic spin Hall effect (PSHE) serves as a probe in our scheme. The measurement of ORA is based on the high sensitivity of the amplification factor to the polarization state in weak measurements. The measurement of RIC is based on the rapid variation of spin splitting of the PSHE. The measurement precision of the respective concentrations can be achieved to be 0.02 mg/ml. This method can detect traces of enantiomeric impurities and has a potential application in chiral sensing.

  15. The native point defects of ternary C14 Laves phase Mg2Cu3Si: Ab initio investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xue-Feng; Yao, Xiao-Jing; Yang, Yan; Tang, Bi-Yu

    2017-10-01

    Nine possible native point defects in ternary C14 Laves phase Mg2Cu3Si are investigated from ab initio calculation based on density function theory. The two-dimensional phase diagram of chemical potentials is determined, and then defect formation energy is calculated. The energetic results show that CuSi and CuMg are more favorable over a broad range of chemical potentials. The formation enthalpies for defective Mg2Cu3Si also demonstrate the same stability. Local distortions around point defects increase from SiCu to SiMg, showing that the polyhedral symmetry and coordination number for constituent atoms will affect the structure of defects. The electronic structure shows the strong (Cu, Si)-Si covalent bonding, also indicates that the CuMg is favorable because the weak Mg-Cu bonding is replaced by the strong Cu-Cu bonding, whereas MgCu and MgSi are unfavorable because the strong Cu-Si bonding is replaced by the weak Mg-(Cu, Si) bonding.

  16. Proximal Limb Weakness Reverting After CSF Diversion In Intracranial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about two young girls who developed progressive visual failure secondary to increased intracranial pressure and had significant proximal muscle weakness of limbs. Patients with elevated intracranial pressure (ICP may present with "false localizing signs", besides having headache, vomiting and papilledema. Radicular pain as a manifestation of raised ICP is rare and motor weakness attributable to polyradiculopathy is exceptional. Two patients with increased intracranial pressure without lateralizing signs′ had singnificant muscle weakness. Clinical evaluation and laboratory tests did not disclose any other cause for weakness. Following theco-peritoneal shunt, in both patients, there was variable recovery of vision but the proximal weakness and symptoms of elevated ICP improved rapidly. Recognition of this uncommon manifestation of raised ICP may obviate the need for unnecessary investigation and reduce morbidity due to weakness by CSF diversion procedure.

  17. Weak Lensing by Galaxy Clusters: from Pixels to Cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruen, Daniel [Ludwig Maximilian Univ., Munich (Germany)

    2015-03-11

    The story of the origin and evolution of our Universe is told, equivalently, by space-time itself and by the structures that grow inside of it. Clusters of galaxies are the frontier of bottom-up structure formation. They are the most massive objects to have collapsed at the present epoch. By that virtue, their abundance and structural parameters are highly sensitive to the composition and evolution of the Universe. The most common probe of cluster cosmology, abundance, uses samples of clusters selected by some observable. Applying a mass-observable relation (MOR), cosmological parameters can be constrained by comparing the sample to predicted cluster abundances as a function of observable and redshift. Arguably, however, cluster probes have not yet entered the era of per cent level precision cosmology. The primary reason for this is our imperfect understanding of the MORs. The overall normalization, the slope of mass vs. observable, the redshift evolution, and the degree and correlation of intrinsic scatters of observables at fixed mass have to be constrained for interpreting abundances correctly. Mass measurement of clusters by means of the differential deflection of light from background sources in their gravitational field, i.e. weak lensing, is a powerful approach for achieving this. This thesis presents new methods for and scientific results of weak lensing measurements of clusters of galaxies. The former include, on the data reduction side, (i) the correction of CCD images for non-linear effects due to the electric fields of accumulated charges and (ii) a method for masking artifact features in sets of overlapping images of the sky by comparison to the median image. Also, (iii) I develop a method for the selection of background galaxy samples based on their color and apparent magnitude that includes a new correction for contamination with cluster member galaxies. The main scientific results are the following. (i) For the Hubble Frontier Field cluster RXC J

  18. Information flow between weakly interacting lattices of coupled maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobyns, York [PEAR, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-5263 (United States); Atmanspacher, Harald [Institut fuer Grenzgebiete der Psychologie und Psychohygiene, Wilhelmstr. 3a, 79098 Freiburg (Germany)]. E-mail: haa@igpp.de

    2006-05-15

    Weakly interacting lattices of coupled maps can be modeled as ordinary coupled map lattices separated from each other by boundary regions with small coupling parameters. We demonstrate that such weakly interacting lattices can nevertheless have unexpected and striking effects on each other. Under specific conditions, particular stability properties of the lattices are significantly influenced by their weak mutual interaction. This observation is tantamount to an efficacious information flow across the boundary.

  19. Kramers systems with weak spin-dependent interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radwanski, R.J. [Inst. of Physics and Informatics, Pedagogical University, 30-084, Krakow (Poland)]|[Center for Solid State Physics, Sw. Filip 5, 31-150, Krakow (Poland)

    1995-02-09

    Magnetic properties of a paramagnetic Kramers f{sup 3} subsystem under charge interactions of the hexagonal symmetry have been examined in the combination with weak spin-dependent (S-D) interactions for the case of the weakly-magnetic charge-formed ground state. The Kramers systems with weak S-D interactions exhibit particular phenomena like large specific heat at low temperatures. ((orig.)).

  20. Diffusion of Ca and Mg in Calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cygan, R.T.; Fisler, D.K.

    1999-02-10

    The self-diffusion of Ca and the tracer diffusion of Mg in calcite have been experimentally measured using isotopic tracers of {sup 25}Mg and {sup 44}Ca. Natural single crystals of calcite were coated with a thermally-sputtered oxide thin film and then annealed in a CO{sub 2} gas at one atmosphere total pressure and temperatures from 550 to 800 C. Diffusion coefficient values were derived from the depth profiles obtained by ion microprobe analysis. The resultant activation energies for Mg tracer diffusion and Ca self-diffusion are respectively: E{sub a}(Mg) = 284 {+-} 74 kJ/mol and E{sub a}(Ca) = 271 {+-} 80 kJ/mol. For the temperature ranges in these experiments, the diffusion of Mg is faster than Ca. The results are generally consistent in magnitude with divalent cation diffusion rates obtained in previous studies and provide a means of interpreting the thermal histories of carbonate minerals, the mechanism of dolomitization, and other diffusion-controlled processes. The results indicate that cation diffusion in calcite is relatively slow and cations are the rate-limiting diffusing species for the deformation of calcite and carbonate rocks. Application of the calcite-dolomite geothermometer to metamorphic assemblages will be constrained by cation diffusion and cooling rates. The direct measurement of Mg tracer diffusion in calcite indicates that dolomitization is unlikely to be accomplished by Mg diffusion in the solid state but by a recrystallization process.

  1. LOW-TEMPERATURE OZONE DECOMPOSITION BY COMPLEXES OF Cu(II, Co(II AND Mn(II WITH HEXAMETHYLENETETRAMINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Truba

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available First, the complexes MCl2*HTMA*xH2O/SiO2 (M = Cu(II, Co(II, Mn(II with hexa-methylenetetramine (HMTA molecule weakly bound with a central M atom (CM ranging from 5.010-7 to 5.010-6 mol/g have been found to catalyse the ozone decomposition. Their activity and turnover number exceeded much those for MCl2*хН2О/ SiO2 acido complexes

  2. Preparation and characterization of multi-carboxyl-functionalized silica gel for removal of Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Li, Ming-yu; Feng, Chang-gen; Zeng, Qing-xuan

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the multi-carboxyl-functionalized silica gel was prepared by surface grafting method and applied for the removal of Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) from aqueous solution. The adsorbent was characterized by FT-IR, thermogravimetry, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement and elemental analysis, and it proved that the organic functional group, carboxyl group, was grafted successfully onto the silica gel surface. The effect of solution pH on removal efficiencies of Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) was investigated and it was found that with the exception of Zn (II), the removal efficiencies of the rest of metal ions increased with the increasing of pH in the solution, the maximum removal efficiency occurred at pH 6.0, whereas the maximum removal efficiency for Zn (II) was found to be at pH 7.0. Adsorption equilibrium data were well fitted to Langmuir than Freundlich isotherm model and the maximum adsorption capacity for Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) was 47.07, 41.48, 30.80 and 39.96 mg/g, respectively. Competitive adsorption experiments demonstrated that the adsorbent material had excellent adsorption amount and high affinity for the Cu (II) in the binary systems. In addition, the column experiments were used to investigate stability and reusability of the adsorbent, the dynamic adsorption performance, and desorption of metal ions absorbed from the adsorbent. The results confirmed that the adsorbent presents good dynamic adsorption performance for Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) and these metal ions adsorbed were easy to be desorbed from the adsorbent. The adsorption capacities of metal ions did not present an obvious decrease after five cycles of adsorption-desorption.

  3. Esomeprazole 40 mg provides more effective intragastric acid control than lansoprazole 30 mg, omeprazole 20 mg, pantoprazole 40 mg and rabeprazole 20 mg in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhss, Kerstin; Lind, Tore; Wilder-Smith, Clive

    2004-10-01

    To compare the effect of esomeprazole 40 mg with lansoprazole 30 mg, omeprazole 20 mg, pantoprazole 40 mg and rabeprazole 20 mg on intragastric pH during single and repeated dosing in four separate studies in patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disorder (GERD). In four randomised crossover studies, patients with symptoms of GERD received once-daily treatment with esomeprazole 40 mg or lansoprazole 30 mg (study A), omeprazole 20 mg (study B), pantoprazole 40 mg (study C) and rabeprazole 20 mg (study D) for 5 days. Continuous 24-h intragastric pH recording was performed on days 1 (except study B) and 5. Percentage of time over 24 h with intragastric pH greater than 4, 24-h median pH and the proportion of patients with pH greater than 4 for greater than or equal to 12 h and 16 h during the 24-h recording periods were investigated. In all four studies, esomeprazole 40 mg OD maintained intragastric pH greater than 4 for a significantly higher mean percentage of the 24-h period compared with all other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on days 1 (esomeprazole 40.6% versus lansoprazole 33.4%, P=0.0182; esomeprazole 50.3% versus pantoprazole 29.1%, Pomeprazole 43.7%, Pomeprazole 20 mg, pantoprazole 40 mg and rabeprazole 20 mg in patients with symptoms of GERD.

  4. The role of MgO content in ex situ MgB2 wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovac, P.; Hugek, I.; Meligek, T.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study of the effect of MgO content in the MgB2 powder used for ex situ made composite wires was carried out. Two single-core MgB2/Fe/Cu wires were made using commercial MgB2 powders from Alfa Aesar containing different fraction of MgO. Critical temperature and critical currents...... of as-deformed and heat-treated wires were measured. The differences between the wires are discussed and correlated with the MgO content. It was found that by increasing the amount of MgO, the inter-grain connectivity worsens, but well distributed and low size MgO particles improve flux pinning....

  5. Nonlinear response of a MgZnO/ZnO heterostructure close to zero bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Q.; Falson, J.; Zudov, M. A.; Kozuka, Y.; Tsukazaki, A.; Kawasaki, M.; Smet, J.

    2017-09-01

    We report on magnetotransport properties of a MgZnO/ZnO heterostructure subjected to weak direct currents. We find that in the regime of overlapping Landau levels, the differential resistivity acquires a quantum correction proportional to both the square of the current and the Dingle factor. The analysis shows that the correction to the differential resistivity is dominated by a current-induced modification of the electron distribution function and allows us to access both quantum and inelastic scattering rates.

  6. Study of MgO transformation into MgF2 in the presence of CF2Cl2•

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedyagin Aleksey A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline-earth metal oxide aerogels prepared by sol–gel method followed by autoclave drying are nanocrystalline mesoporous materials with high reactivity. Bulk solid-state reaction of MgO aerogels with CF2Cl2 takes place after a long induction period, during which the active sites are accumulated on the surface of the nanoparticles. It was found that vanadium addition has a promoting effect on this reaction accelerating the process of the active sites formation. A method for characterization of electron-acceptor sites by electron spin resonance spectroscopy using perylene as the spin probe was developed. A good correlation was observed between the rate of the CF2Cl2 destructive sorption and the concentration of weak electron-acceptor sites. Simplified models of such sites were suggested. The acid sites on the modified MgO surface were supposed to be originated from separation of the charged fragments resulting in the surface polarization. Uncompensated oxygen substitution for chlorine and/or fluorine ions leads to appearance of Lewis acid sites while HCl/HF chemisorption results in Bronsted acid sites formation.

  7. Mg/Ca of Continental Ostracode Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, E.; Forester, R. M.; Marco-Barba, J.; Mezquita, F.

    2007-12-01

    Marine ionic chemistry is thought to remain constant. This, together with the belief that marine calcifiers partition Mg/Ca in a systematic manner as functions of temperature (and Mg/Ca) of water forms the basis of the Mg/Ca thermometer. In continental settings both of these assumptions are usually not true. Continental waters contain a wide variety of solutes in absolute and relative ion concentrations. Hence, waters with identical Mg/Ca may have very different concentrations of Mg and Ca and very different anions. Here we use two examples to focus on the effects of ion chemistry on Mg/Ca partitioning in continental ostracode shells and we ignore the complexities of solute evolution, which can change Mg/Ca over timescales of minutes to millennia. Palacios-Fest and Dettman (2001) conducted a monthly study of ,Cypridopsis vidua at El Yeso Lake in Sonora, Mexico. They established a relation between temperature and average shell Mg/Ca using regression analyses on averaged data. When their Mg/Ca-temperature relation is applied to monthly ,C. vidua data from Page Pond near Cleveland, Ohio, water temperatures of -8 to -1°C are obtained. The observed Mg/Ca ranges for El Yeso Lake (0.31 to 0.46) and Page Pond (0.33 to 0.46) are similar, as are their specific conductivities (700 to 850μS for El Yeso Lake; 400 to 600μS for Page Pond). However, [Ca] is 140-260 mg/L for El Yeso, but only 70-90 mg/L for Page Pond. Page Pond data, in fact, shows a good temperature shell Mg/Ca relation for .C. vidua, but the relation is different from that at El Yeso. Hence, shell Mg/Ca is a multi-valued, family of curves function of temperature and Mg/Ca of water that depends on the [Mg] and [Ca] values in water and perhaps other factors. Our second example comes from sites near Valencia, Spain and involves shell data for ,Cyprideis torosa, an estuarine ostracode that is tolerant of a wide range of salinity and can live in continental waters as long as the carbonate alkalinity to Ca ratio is

  8. Synaptic organizations and dynamical properties of weakly connected neural oscillators. II. Learning phase information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppensteadt, F C; Izhikevich, E M

    1996-08-01

    This is the second of two articles devoted to analyzing the relationship between synaptic organizations (anatomy) and dynamical properties (function) of networks of neural oscillators near multiple supercritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcation points. Here we analyze learning processes in such networks. Regarding learning dynamics, we assume (1) learning is local (i.e. synaptic modification depends on pre- and postsynaptic neurons but not on others), (2) synapses modify slowly relative to characteristic neuron response times, (3) in the absence of either pre- or postsynaptic activity, the synapse weakens (forgets). Our major goal is to analyze all synaptic organizations of oscillatory neural networks that can memorize and retrieve phase information or time delays. We show that such network have the following attributes: (1) the rate of synaptic plasticity connected with learning is determined locally by the presynaptic neurons, (2) the excitatory neurons must be long-axon relay neurons capable of forming distant connections with other excitatory and inhibitory neurons, (3) if inhibitory neurons have long axons, then the network can learn, passively forget and actively unlearn information by adjusting synaptic plasticity rates.

  9. Ni(II), Mn(II), Zn(II)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Neutral tetradentate N2O2 type complexes of Cu(II), Ni(II), Mn(II),. Zn(II) and VO(II) have been synthesised using a Schiff base formed by the condensation of o-phenylenediamine with acetoacetanilide in alcohol medium. All the complexes were characterised on the basis of their microanalytical data, molar.

  10. SORPTION BEHAVIOR OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE AND AMORPHOUS PEROXOTITANATE MATERIALS UNDER WEAKLY ACIDIC CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.; Elvington, M.; Click, D.

    2009-11-11

    Inorganic, titanate-based sorbents are tested with respect to adsorption of a variety of sorbates under weakly acidic conditions (pH 3). Specifically, monosodium titanate (MST) and amorphous peroxotitanate (APT) sorption characteristics are initially probed through a screening process consisting of a pair of mixed metal solutions containing a total of 29 sorbates including alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, transition metals, metalloids and nonmetals. MST and APT sorption characteristics are further analyzed individually with chromium(III) and cadmium(II) using a batch method at ambient laboratory temperature, varying concentrations of the sorbents and sorbates and contact times. Maximum sorbate loadings are obtained from the respective adsorption isotherms.

  11. Biosorption of Cd(II) and Zn(II) by nostoc commune: isotherm and kinetics studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morsy, Fatthy M. [Faculty of Science, Botany Department, Assiut University, Assiut (Egypt); Hassan, Sedky H.A. [Department of Biological Environment, Kangwon National University, Kangwon-do (Korea, Republic of); Koutb, Mostafa [Faculty of Science, Botany Department, Assiut University, Assiut (Egypt); Umm Al-Qura University, Faculty of Applied Science, Biology Department, Mecca (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-07-15

    In this study, Nostoc commune (cyanobacterium) was used as an inexpensive and efficient biosorbent for Cd(II) and Zn(II) removal from aqueous solutions. The effect of various physicochemical factors on Cd(II) and Zn(II) biosorption such as pH 2.0-7.0, initial metal concentration 0.0-300 mg/L and contact time 0-120 min were studied. Optimum pH for removal of Cd(II) and Zn(II) was 6.0, while the contact time was 30 min at room temperature. The nature of biosorbent and metal ion interaction was evaluated by infrared (IR) technique. IR analysis of bacterial biomass revealed the presence of amino, carboxyl, hydroxyl, and carbonyl groups, which are responsible for biosorption of Cd(II) and Zn (II). The maximum biosorption capacities for Cd(II) and Zn(II) biosorption by N. commune calculated from Langmuir biosorption isotherm were 126.32 and 115.41 mg/g, respectively. The biosorption isotherm for two biosorbents fitted well with Freundlich isotherm than Langmuir model with correlation coefficient (r{sup 2} < 0.99). The biosorption kinetic data were fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Thus, this study indicated that the N. commune is an efficient biosorbent for the removal of Cd(II) and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. On n-weak amenability of Rees semigroup algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    semigroups. In this work, we shall consider this class of Banach algebras. We examine the n-weak amenability of some semigroup algebras, and give an easier example of a Banach algebra which is n-weakly amenable if n is odd. Let L1(G) be the group algebra of a locally compact group G (§3.3 of [3]). Then Johnson.

  13. Superluminal pulse reflection from a weakly absorbing dielectric slab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Gang; Zhu, Shi-Yao

    2006-07-15

    Group delay for a reflected light pulse from a weakly absorbing dielectric slab is theoretically investigated, and large negative group delay is found for weak absorption near a resonance of the slab [Re(kd)=mpi]. The group delay for both the reflected and transmitted pulses will be saturated with an increase of the absorption.

  14. Space group constraints on weak indices in topological insulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varjas, D.; De Juan, Fernando; Lu, Yuan Ming

    Lattice translation symmetry gives rise to a large class of "weak" topological insulators (TIs), characterized by translation-protected gapless surface states and dislocation bound states. In this work we show that space group symmetries lead to constraints on the weak topological indices that

  15. Electron Capture Dissociation of Weakly Bound Polypeptide Polycationic Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haselmann, Kim F; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Budnik, Bogdan A

    2002-01-01

    We have previously reported that, in electron capture dissociation (ECD), rupture of strong intramolecular bonds in weakly bound supramolecular aggregates can proceed without dissociation of weak intermolecular bonds. This is now illustrated on a series of non-specific peptide-peptide dimers...

  16. Perturbated rotational motion of weakly deformable celestial bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Yu. V.

    The rotation equations of weakly deformable celestial bodies (in canonical and non-canonical Andoyer variables) are developed in detail. A theory of the perturbed rotational motion of an isolated weakly deformable body has been developed. Applications to Earth's rotation theory are given.

  17. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness : Pathophysiology and diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, E.

    2017-01-01

    Many patients on the intensive care unit (ICU) develop generalized muscle weakness. This condition, called intensive care unit- acquired weakness (ICU-AW), is caused by dysfunction or damage of muscles, nerves, or both. ICU-AW is associated with increased short- and long-term morbidity and

  18. On defining soft spaces by weak soft neighborhood systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha ÖZTÜRK

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we define the concepts of weak soft neighborhood space, soft w^{s}(?,?'-continuous, soft w^{s}-continuous and soft w^{s^{*}}-continuous on weak soft neighborhood spaces. Finally, we introduce their basic properties and some examples.

  19. Secure Authentication from a Weak Key, Without Leaking Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Bouman (Niek); S. Fehr (Serge); K.G. Paterson (Kerry)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractWe study the problem of authentication based on a weak key in the information-theoretic setting. A key is weak if its min-entropy is an arbitrary small fraction of its bit length. This problem has recently received considerable attention, with different solutions optimizing different

  20. Some Viable Techniques for Assessing and Counselling Cognitive Processing Weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruna, Abubakar Sadiq

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive Processing weakness (CPW) is a psychological problem that impedes students' ability to learn effectively in a normal school setting. Such weakness may include; auditory, visual, conceptual, sequential, speed and attention processing. This paper therefore examines the basic assessment or diagnostic approaches such as Diagnosis by…

  1. Bunched soliton states in weakly coupled sine-Gordon systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, N.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm; Lomdahl, P. S.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction between solitons of two weakly coupled sine-Gordon systems is considered. In particular, the stability of bunched states is investigated, and perturbation results are compared with numerical results.......The interaction between solitons of two weakly coupled sine-Gordon systems is considered. In particular, the stability of bunched states is investigated, and perturbation results are compared with numerical results....

  2. Measuring Workload Weak Resilience Signals at a Rail Control Post

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegel, A.W.; Schraagen, J.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    OCCUPATIONAL APPLICATIONS This article describes an observational study at a rail control post to measure workload weak resilience signals. A weak resilience signal indicates a possible degradation of a system's resilience, which is defined as the ability of a complex socio-technical system to cope

  3. Covenants with Weak Swords: ISO 14001 and Facilities' Environmental Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potoski, Matthew; Prakash, Aseem

    2005-01-01

    Voluntary environmental programs are codes of progressive environmental conduct that firms pledge to adopt. This paper investigates whether ISO 14001, a voluntary program with a weak sword--a weak monitoring and sanctioning mechanism--can mitigate shirking and improve participants' environmental performance. Sponsored by the International…

  4. Diaphragm weakness in pulmonary arterial hypertension: role of sarcomeric dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manders, E.; Man, F.S. de; Handoko, M.L.; Westerhof, N.; Hees, H.W.H. van; Stienen, G.J.; Vonk-Noordegraaf, A.; Ottenheijm, C.A.C.

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that diaphragm muscle weakness is present in experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH). However, the nature of this diaphragm weakness is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether changes at the sarcomeric level contribute to

  5. Measures of weak noncompactness, nonlinear Leray-Schauder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we establish some new nonlinear Leray-Schauder alternatives for the sum and the product of weakly sequentially continuous operators in Banach algebras satisfying certain sequential condition (P). The main condition in our results is formulated in terms of axiomatic measures of weak noncompactness.

  6. Classical simulations of heavy-ion fusion reactions and weakly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This model is extended to simulate heavy-ion reactions such as 6Li + 209Bi involving the weakly-bound projectile considered as a weakly-bound cluster of deuteron and 4He nuclei, thus, simulating a 3-body system in 3S-CMD model. All the essential features of breakup reactions, such as complete fusion, incomplete fusion ...

  7. Influence of Mg Content on Deformability of AlMg Alloys during Extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leśniak D.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the research on deformability of AlMg alloys with high Mg contents in extrusion was carried out. The different shapes from AlMg alloys containing 3.5%, 4.5% and 5.5% of Mg were extruded on 500 T semi-industrial press by using one-hole and multi-hole flat dies. The extrudates surface quality was under investigations in relation with the temperature-speed parameters of the extrusion process. The metal exit speed was estimated depending on the extrudates shape, wall thickness and Mg content. The alloy’s border solidus and liquidus temperatures were also determined.

  8. Pb II

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    used was oven-dried till constant weight and were ground to fine powder in a pestle and mortar. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. Screening for lead sorption. 15 fungal isolates were screened for Pb(II) biosorption potential at initial pH value of 4.5 and temperature 30°C by incubating freshly harvested wet biomass corres-.

  9. Isotropy of Angular Frequencies and Weak Chimeras with Broken Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Christian

    2017-04-01

    The notion of a weak chimeras provides a tractable definition for chimera states in networks of finitely many phase oscillators. Here, we generalize the definition of a weak chimera to a more general class of equivariant dynamical systems by characterizing solutions in terms of the isotropy of their angular frequency vector—for coupled phase oscillators the angular frequency vector is given by the average of the vector field along a trajectory. Symmetries of solutions automatically imply angular frequency synchronization. We show that the presence of such symmetries is not necessary by giving a result for the existence of weak chimeras without instantaneous or setwise symmetries for coupled phase oscillators. Moreover, we construct a coupling function that gives rise to chaotic weak chimeras without symmetry in weakly coupled populations of phase oscillators with generalized coupling.

  10. Microwave-assisted Weak Acid Hydrolysis of Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyeong Seo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Myoglobin was hydrolyzed by microwave-assisted weak acid hydrolysis with 2% formic acid at 37 oC, 50 oC, and100 oC for 1 h. The most effective hydrolysis was observed at 100 oC. Hydrolysis products were investigated using matrixassistedlaser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Most cleavages predominantly occurred at the C-termini ofaspartyl residues. For comparison, weak acid hydrolysis was also performed in boiling water for 20, 40, 60, and 120 min. A 60-min weak acid hydrolysis in boiling water yielded similar results as a 60-min microwave-assisted weak acid hydrolysis at100 oC. These results strongly suggest that microwave irradiation has no notable enhancement effect on acid hydrolysis of proteinsand that temperature is the major factor that determines the effectiveness of weak acid hydrolysis.

  11. Theoretical Study of the Low-Lying States of MgN+2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitre, Philippe; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The structure and binding energies of the low-lying states of MgN2+ have been computed at the multireference configuration interaction level of theory. The effect of Mg inner-shell correlation have been included using the core-polarization potential method. The charge-quadrupole interaction results in a linear 2Sigma+ ground state as expected. The excited states can arise from either the interaction of the 2-P state of Mg+ with N2 or from charge transfer states with Mg(sup 2+)N2- bonding character. The lowest lying excited state, 2-B2, is mixture of these two mechanisms, which results in a C2v, geometry with Mg atoms sitting at the N2 bond midpoint. The small barrier in the bending potential exists between this state and the 2-II State which is the lowest lying linear excited state.

  12. KINETIC AND EQUILIBRIUM STUDIES OF Pb(II) AND Cd(II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    equilibrium adsorption capacity for lead and cadmium ions were obtained from Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin and DRK isotherms and the experimental data were found to fit best the Langmuir isotherm with values of 21.28 and 40.00 mg/g for Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions, respectively. The Pseudo-second order kinetics model had ...

  13. Weakness acquired in the intensive care unit. Incidence, risk factors and their association with inspiratory weakness. Observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballve, Ladislao Pablo Diaz; Dargains, Nahuel; Inchaustegui, José García Urrutia; Bratos, Antonella; Percaz, Maria de Los Milagros; Ardariz, Cesar Bueno; Cagide, Sabrina; Balestrieri, Carolina; Gamarra, Claudio; Paz, Dario; Rotela, Eliana; Muller, Sebastian; Bustos, Fernando; Castro, Ricard Aranda; Settembrino, Esteban

    2017-12-07

    This paper sought to determine the accumulated incidence and analyze the risk factors associated with the development of weakness acquired in the intensive care unit and its relationship to inspiratory weakness. We conducted a prospective cohort study at a single center, multipurpose medical-surgical intensive care unit. We included adult patients who required mechanical ventilation ≥ 24 hours between July 2014 and January 2016. No interventions were performed. Demographic data, clinical diagnoses, the factors related to the development of intensive care unit -acquired weakness, and maximal inspiratory pressure were recorded. Of the 111 patients included, 66 developed intensive care unit -acquired weakness, with a cumulative incidence of 40.5% over 18 months. The group with intensive care unit-acquired weakness were older (55.9 ± 17.6 versus 45.8 ± 16.7), required more mechanical ventilation (7 [4 - 10] days versus 4 [2 - 7.3] days), and spent more time in the intensive care unit (15.5 [9.2 - 22.8] days versus 9 [6 - 14] days). More patients presented with delirium (68% versus 39%), hyperglycemia > 3 days (84% versus 59%), and positive balance > 3 days (73.3% versus 37%). All comparisons were significant at p 5 days as independent predictors of intensive care unit-acquired weakness. Low maximal inspiratory pressure was associated with intensive care unit-acquired weakness (p intensive care unit-acquired weakness. The intensive care unit acquired weakness is a condition with a high incidence in our environment. The development of intensive care unit-acquired weakness was associated with age, delirium, hyperglycemia, and mechanical ventilation > 5 days. The maximum inspiratory pressure value of ≥ 36cmH2O was associated with a high diagnostic value to exclude the presence of intensive care unit -acquired weakness.

  14. Measuring one nucleon transfer reaction 24Mg( p, d)23Mg for astrophysical reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E. J.; Chae, K. Y.

    2017-12-01

    The level structure of a radionuclide 23Mg has been studied by using the 24Mg( p, d)23Mg one nucleon transfer reaction measurement for the astrophysical 19Ne(α, γ)23Mg reaction rate. A 41 MeV proton beam was produced and accelerated at the 25 MV tandem accelerator of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the United States. The beam particles impinged on an isotopically-enriched 24Mg solid target. Angular distributions of recoiling deuterons were extracted by using a large area silicon strip detector array. By comparing the experimentally-obtained angular distributions with zero range distorted wave Born approximation calculations, spins and parities of three energy levels of 23Mg could be constrained for the first time, which is very important information needed to understand the 19Ne(α, γ)23Mg reaction rate.

  15. Dissimilar ultrasonic spot welding of Mg-Al and Mg-high strength low alloy steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K. Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sound dissimilar lap joints were achieved via ultrasonic spot welding (USW, which is a solid-state joining technique. The addition of Sn interlayer during USW effectively blocked the formation of brittle al12Mg17 intermetallic compound in the Mg-Al dissimilar joints without interlayer, and led to the presence of a distinctive composite-like Sn and Mg2Sn eutectic structure in both Mg-Al and Mg-high strength low alloy (HSLA steel joints. The lap shear strength of both types of dissimilar joints with a Sn interlayer was significantly higher than that of the corresponding dissimilar joints without interlayer. Failure during the tensile lap shear tests occurred mainly in the mode of cohesive failure in the Mg-Al dissimilar joints and in the mode of partial cohesive failure and partial nugget pull-out in the Mg-HSLA steel dissimilar joints.

  16. Photodissociation Spectroscopy as a Probe of Molecular Dynamics: Mg-Acetaldehyde Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiber, P. D.; Lu, W.-Y.

    2001-05-01

    Photodissociation spectroscopy of a weakly bound bimolecular precursor complex serves to mimic a “half-collision”, and provides an important experimental tool for the study of excited state molecular interactions and chemical dynamics. Here we focus on results from recent studies of Mg^+-acetaldehyde photodissociation. Spectroscopic results are consistent with ab initio calculations that find the Mg^+-acetaldehyde complex to be moderately strongly bound in an end-on Mg^+-OCH_3CH geometry. Nonreactive dissociation to Mg^+ is the dominant quenching channel. However, excitation in the Mg^+-based 3pσreaction, favoring σ-like approach symmetry with the Mg^+ p-orbital aligned along the Mg-O axis. Furthermore, reaction apparently follows in a single step process through either aldehydic C-H or C-C bond cleavage, with roughly comparable yields. This is consistent with suggestions that molecular orbital reorientation may play an important role in determining the relative probability for C-C vs. C-H σ-bond activation in small hydrocarbons, and that this barrier is lower in aldehydes than in alkanes.

  17. Computer modeling of binding of diverse weak toxins to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordvitsev, D Yu; Polyak, Ya L; Kuzmin, D A; Levtsova, O V; Tourleigh, Ye V; Utkin, Yu N; Shaitan, K V; Tsetlin, V I

    2007-04-01

    Weak toxins are the "three-fingered" snake venoms toxins grouped together by having an additional disulfide in the N-terminal loop I. In general, weak toxins have low toxicity, and biological targets have been identified for some of them only, recently by detecting the effects on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Here the methods of docking and molecular dynamics simulations are used for comparative modeling of the complexes between four weak toxins of known spatial structure (WTX, candoxin, bucandin, gamma-bungarotoxin) and nAChRs. WTX and candoxin are those toxins whose blocking of the neuronal alpha7- and muscle-type nAChR has been earlier shown in binding assays and electrophysiological experiments, while for the other two toxins no such activity has been reported. Only candoxin and WTX are found here to give stable solutions for the toxin-nAChR complexes. These toxins appear to approach the binding site similarly to short alpha-neurotoxins, but their final position resembles that of alpha-cobratoxin, a long alpha-neurotoxin, in the complex with the acetylcholine-binding protein. The final spatial structures of candoxin and WTX complexes with the alpha7 neuronal or muscle-type nAChR are very similar and do not provide immediate answer why candoxin has a much higher affinity than WTX, but both of them share a virtually irreversible mode of binding to one or both these nAChR subtypes. Possible explanation comes from docking and MD simulations which predict fast kinetics of candoxin association with nAChR, no gross changes in the toxin conformation (with smaller toxin flexibility on alpha7 nAChR), while slow WTX binding to nAChR is associated with slow irreversible rearrangement both of the tip of the toxin loop II and of the binding pocket residues locking finally the toxin molecule. Computer modeling showed that the additional disulfide in the loop I is not directly involved in receptor binding of WTX and candoxin, but it stabilizes the structure of

  18. Perbandingan Gabapentin 600 mg dengan 1.200 mg per Oral Preoperatif terhadap Nilai Visual Analogue Scale dan Pengurangan Kebutuhan Petidin Pascaoperasi pada Modifikasi Mastektomi Radikal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardi Zulfariansyah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gabapentin is a GABA analog which has the effect of anti hyperalgesia, anti allodynia, and anti nociceptive. This research was conducted in order to assess the effect of 600mg and 1,200 mg gabapentin given preoperatively to assess visual analogue scale (VAS score and reduction of pethidine requirement. The study was done by conducting a double blind randomized controlled trial on 38 patients, aged 18–65 years, with ASA physical status I–II. Patients were divided into two groups: 600 mg gabapentin and 1,200 mg gabapentin group. The quality of pain was assessed using VAS score. The results were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney Test with 95% confidence interval and considered significant if p value <0.05. From the results, the VAS values obtained at rest and during mobilization were significantly different (p<0.05. The 1,200 mg gabapentin group received less additional pethidine (10.5% vs 15.8%, although no significant difference was shown (p=0.631. The conclusion of this study is that administration of 1,200 mg gabapentin per oral pre operatively is better when compared to 600 mg in reducing post operative visual analog scale score in modified radical mastectomy. However, it do not reduce the need for analgesic significantly.

  19. Adsorption of saponin compound in Carica papaya leaves extract using weakly basic ion exchanger resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Noraziani Zainal; Janam, Anathasia; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan

    2016-11-01

    Adsorption of saponin compound in papaya leaves juice extract using Amberlite® IRA-67 resin was not reported in previous studies. In this research, Amberlite® IRA-67 was used to determine the amount of saponin that can be adsorbed using different weights of dry resin (0.1 g and 0.5 g). Peleg model was used to determine the maximum yield of saponin (43.67 mg) and the exhaustive time (5.7 days) prior to a preliminary resin-saponin adsorption study. After adsorption process, there was no significant difference (p>0.05) in total saponin content (mg) for sample treated with 0.1 g (3.79 ± 0.55 mg) and sample treated with 0.5 g (3.43 ± 0.51 mg) dry weight resin. Long-term kinetic adsorption of resin-saponin method (>24 hours) should be conducted to obtain optimum freed saponin extract. Besides that, sample treated with 0.1 g dry weight resin had high free radical scavenging value of 50.33 ± 2.74% compared to sample treated with 0.5 g dry weight resin that had low free radical scavenging value of 24.54 ± 1.66% dry weights. Total saponin content (mg), total phenolic content (mg GAE) and free radical scavenging activity (%) was investigated to determine the interaction of those compounds with Amberlite® IRA-67. The RP-HPLC analysis using ursolic acid as standard at 203 nm showed no peak even though ursolic acid was one of the saponin components that was ubiquitous in plant kingdom. The absence of peak was due to weak solubility of ursolic acid in water and since it was only soluble in solvent with moderate polarity. The Pearson's correlation coefficient for total saponin content (mg) versus total phenolic content (mg GAE) and radical scavenging activity (%) were +0.959 and +0.807. Positive values showed that whenever there was an increase in saponin content (mg), the phenolic content (mg GAE) and radical scavenging activity (%) would also increase. However, as the resin-saponin adsorption was carried out, there was a significant decrease of radical scavenging activity

  20. Chelation of Cu(II), Zn(II), and Fe(II) by tannin constituents of selected edible nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamać, Magdalena

    2009-12-22

    The tannin fractions isolated from hazelnuts, walnuts and almonds were characterised by colorimetric assays and by an SE-HPLC technique. The complexation of Cu(II) and Zn(II) was determined by the reaction with tetramethylmurexide, whereas for Fe(II), ferrozine was employed. The walnut tannins exhibited a significantly weaker reaction with the vanillin/HCl reagent than hazelnut and almond tannins, but the protein precipitation capacity of the walnut fraction was high. The SE-HPLC chromatogram of the tannin fraction from hazelnuts revealed the presence of oligomers with higher molecular weights compared to that of almonds. Copper ions were most effectively chelated by the constituents of the tannin fractions of hazelnuts, walnuts and almonds. At a 0.2 mg/assay addition level, the walnut tannins complexed almost 100% Cu(II). The Fe(II) complexation capacities of the tannin fractions of walnuts and hazelnuts were weaker in comparison to that of the almond tannin fraction, which at a 2.5 mg/assay addition level, bound Fe(II) by approximately 90%. The capacity to chelate Zn(II) was quite varied for the different nut tannin fractions: almond tannins bound as much as 84% Zn(II), whereas the value for walnut tannins was only 8.7%; and for hazelnut tannins, no Zn(II) chelation took place at the levels tested.

  1. The redshift of the Einstein ring in MG 1549+305

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treu, T.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2003-01-01

    A deep spectrum taken with the Echelle Spectrograph and Imager (ESI) at the Keck II Telescope as part of the Lenses Structure and Dynamics (LSD) Survey reveals the redshifts of the extremely red source of the radio Einstein ring in the gravitational lens system MG 1549+305 (zs= 1.170 +/- 0.001) and

  2. Hydrodechlorination of Tetrachloromethane over Palladium Catalysts Supported on Mixed MgF₂-MgO Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonarowska, Magdalena; Wojciechowska, Maria; Zieliński, Maciej; Kiderys, Angelika; Zieliński, Michał; Winiarek, Piotr; Karpiński, Zbigniew

    2016-11-25

    Pd/MgO, Pd/MgF₂ and Pd/MgO-MgF₂ catalysts were investigated in the reaction of CCl₄ hydrodechlorination. All the catalysts deactivated in time on stream, but the degree of deactivation varied from catalyst to catalyst. The MgF₂-supported palladium with relatively large metal particles appeared the best catalyst, characterized by good activity and selectivity to C₂-C₅ hydrocarbons. Investigation of post-reaction catalyst samples allowed to find several details associated with the working state of hydrodechlorination catalysts. The role of support acidity was quite complex. On the one hand, a definite, although not very high Lewis acidity of MgF₂ is beneficial for shaping high activity of palladium catalysts. The MgO-MgF₂ support characterized by stronger Lewis acidity than MgF₂ contributes to very good catalytic activity for a relatively long reaction period (~5 h) but subsequent neutralization of stronger acid centers (by coking) eliminates them from the catalyst. On the other hand, the role of acidity evolution, which takes place when basic supports (like MgO) are chlorided during HdCl reactions, is difficult to assess because different events associated with distribution of chlorided support species, leading to partial or even full blocking of the surface of palladium, which plays the role of active component in HdCl reactions.

  3. Mg2+-dependent gating of bacterial MgtE channel underlies Mg2+ homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Iwase, Norihiko; Furuya, Noritaka; Tanaka, Yoshiki; Tsukazaki, Tomoya; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Maguire, Michael E; Ito, Koichi; Maturana, Andres; Nureki, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    The MgtE family of Mg2+ transporters is ubiquitously distributed in all phylogenetic domains. Recent crystal structures of the full-length MgtE and of its cytosolic domain in the presence and absence of Mg2+ suggested a Mg2+-homeostasis mechanism, in which the MgtE cytosolic domain acts as a ‘Mg2+ sensor' to regulate the gating of the ion-conducting pore in response to the intracellular Mg2+ concentration. However, complementary functional analyses to confirm the proposed model have been lacking. Moreover, the limited resolution of the full-length structure precluded an unambiguous characterization of these regulatory divalent-cation-binding sites. Here, we showed that MgtE is a highly Mg2+-selective channel gated by Mg2+ and elucidated the Mg2+-dependent gating mechanism of MgtE, using X-ray crystallographic, genetic, biochemical, and electrophysiological analyses. These structural and functional results have clarified the control of Mg2+ homeostasis through cooperative Mg2+ binding to the MgtE cytosolic domain. PMID:19798051

  4. Mg Incorporation Efficiency in Pulsed MOCVD of N-Polar GaN:Mg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Jonathan; Mahaboob, Isra; Hogan, Kasey; Novak, Steve; Bell, L. D.; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the effect of growth polarity and pulsed or δ -doped growth mode on impurity incorporation in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition-grown GaN. In Ga-polar orientation, up to 12× enhancement in Mg concentration for given Mg flow rate is observed, resulting in enhanced p-type conductivity for these samples. In contrast, this enhancement effect is greatly diminished for N-polar samples, falling off with increasing Mg flow and showing maximum enhancement of 2.7× at 30 nmol/min Mg flow. At higher Mg flow rates, Mg incorporation at normal levels did not correspond to p-type conductivity, which may be due to Mg incorporation at nonacceptor sites. Concentrations of C, O, and Si were also investigated, revealing dependence on Mg flow in N-polar pulsed samples. Carbon incorporation was found to decrease with increasing Mg flow, and oxygen incorporation was found to remain high across varied Mg flow. These effects combine to result in N-polar samples that are not p-type when using the pulsed growth mode.

  5. A submillimetre-wave SIS mixer using NbN/MgO/NbN trilayers grown epitaxially on an MgO substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Uzawa, Y; Saito, A; Takeda, M; Wang, Z

    2002-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and tested a quasi-optical superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer employing distributed NbN/MgO/NbN tunnel junctions and NbN/MgO/NbN microstriplines at submillimetre-wave frequencies. These trilayers were fabricated by dc- and rf-magnetron sputtering on an MgO substrate at ambient temperature so that the NbN and MgO films were grown epitaxially. Our SIS mixer consists of an MgO hyperhemispherical lens with an antireflection cap and a self-complementary log-periodic antenna made of a single-crystal NbN film, on which the distributed SIS junctions and the two-section impedance transformers were mirror-symmetrically placed at the feed point of the antenna. As designed, the junctions are 0.6 mu m wide and 15.5 mu m long, which is sufficient to absorb the incoming signal along this lossy transmission line, assuming a current density of 10 kA cm sup - sup 2. The mixer showed good I-V characteristics, with subgap-to-normal resistance ratios of about 13, although weak-link br...

  6. Effect of short peptides containing lysine and epsilon-aminocaproic acid on fibrinolytic activity of plasmin and topoisomerase II action on supercoiled DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midura-Nowaczek, Krystyna; Purwin, Maciej; Markowska, Agnieszka; Drozdowska, Danuta; Bruzgo, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Effects of eight short peptides containing lysine and epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA) on prolongation of the clot lysis time, as well as hemolytic and antibacterial activities were investigated. Interaction with plasmids pBR322 and pUC19 with the use of ethidium bromide assay and determination of influence on the activity of topoisomerase I and II were also tested. Examined compounds inhibited fibrinolytic activity of plasmin and five of them were more active than EACA. Amides of dipeptides were most active antifibrinolytics (IC50 512 mg/L). DNA binding effects determined with the use of ethidium bromide were weak for all peptides and similar to those observed with EACA. Six compounds inhibited topoisomerase II action on supercoiled DNA.

  7. Unraveling the role of Mg(++) in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqiang; Yue, Jiaji; Yang, Chunxi

    2016-02-15

    Mg(++) is widely involved in human physiological processes that may play key roles in the generation and progression of diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex joint disorder characterized by articular cartilage degradation, abnormal mineralization and inflammation. Magnesium deficiency is considered to be a major risk factor for OA development and progression. Magnesium deficiency is active in several pathways that have been implicated in OA, including increased inflammatory mediators, cartilage damage, defective chondrocyte biosynthesis, aberrant calcification and a weakened effect of analgesics. Abundant in vitro and in vivo evidence in animal models now suggests that the nutritional supplementation or local infiltration of Mg(++) represent effective therapies for OA. The goal of this review is to summarize the current understanding of the role of Mg(++) in OA with particular emphasis on the related molecular mechanisms involved in OA progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. "Safe" Coulomb Excitation of $^{30}$Mg

    CERN Document Server

    Niedermaier, O; Bildstein, V; Boie, H; Fitting, J; Von Hahn, R; Köck, F; Lauer, M; Pal, U K; Podlech, H; Repnow, R; Schwalm, D; Alvarez, C; Ames, F; Bollen, G; Emhofer, S; Habs, D; Kester, O; Lutter, R; Rudolph, K; Pasini, M; Thirolf, P G; Wolf, B H; Eberth, J; Gersch, G; Hess, H; Reiter, P; Thelen, O; Warr, N; Weisshaar, D; Aksouh, F; Van den Bergh, P; Van Duppen, P; Huyse, M; Ivanov, O; Mayet, P; Van de Walle, J; Äystö, J; Butler, P A; Cederkäll, J; Delahaye, P; Fynbo, H O U; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Forstner, O; Franchoo, S; Köster, U; Nilsson, T; Oinonen, M; Sieber, T; Wenander, F; Pantea, M; Richter, A; Schrieder, G; Simon, H; Behrens, T; Gernhäuser, R; Kröll, T; Krücken, R; Münch, M M; Davinson, T; Gerl, J; Huber, G; Hurst, A; Iwanicki, J; Jonson, B; Lieb, P; Liljeby, L; Schempp, A; Scherillo, A; Schmidt, P; Walter, G

    2005-01-01

    We report on the first radioactive beam experiment performed at the recently commissioned REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN in conjunction with the highly efficient $\\gamma$ -spectrometer MINIBALL. Using $^{30}$Mg ions accelerated to an energy of 2.25MeV/u together with a thin $^{nat}$Ni target, Coulomb excitation of the first excited 2+ states of the projectile and target nuclei well below the Coulomb barrier was observed. From the measured relative de-excitation $\\gamma$ -ray yields the B(E2; 0$^{+}_{gs} \\rightarrow 2^{+}_{1}$) value of $^{30}$Mg was determined to be 241(31)$e^{2}$fm$^{4}$. Our result is lower than values obtained at projectile fragmenttion facilities using the intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation method and confirms that the theoretical conjecture that the neutron-rich magnesium isotope $^{30}$Mg lies still outside the "island of inversion".

  9. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness in the burn population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Davies, Menna; Lye, George; Evans, Janine; Combellack, Tom; Dickson, William; Nguyen, Dai Q

    2016-05-01

    Intensive care unit-acquired weakness is an evolving problem in the burn population. As patients are surviving injuries that previously would have been fatal, the focus of treatment is shifting from survival to long-term outcome. The rehabilitation of burn patients can be challenging; however, a certain subgroup of patients have worse outcomes than others. These patients may suffer from intensive care unit-acquired weakness, and their treatment, physiotherapy and expectations need to be adjusted accordingly. This study investigates the condition of intensive care unit-acquired weakness in our burn centre. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all the admissions to our burn centre between 2008 and 2012 and identified 22 patients who suffered from intensive care unit-acquired weakness. These patients were significantly younger with significantly larger burns than those without intensive care unit-acquired weakness. The known risk factors for intensive care unit-acquired weakness are commonplace in the burn population. The recovery of these patients is significantly affected by their weakness. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Weak-value Metrology and Shot-Noise Limited Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viza, Gerardo Ivan

    This thesis contains a subset of the research in which I have participated in during my studies at the University of Rochester. It contains three projects and one overarching theme of weak-value metrology. We start with chapter 1 where we cover the historical background leading up to quantum optics, which we use for precision metrology. We also introduce the weak-value formulation and give examples of metrological implementations for parameter estimation. Chapter 2 introduces two experiments to measure a longitudinal velocity and a transverse momentum kick. We show that weak-value based techniques are shot-noise limited because we saturate the Cramer-Rao bound for the estimator used, and efficient because we experimentally demonstrate there is virtually no loss of Fisher information of the parameter of interest from the discarded events. In Chapter 3 we present a comparison of two experiments that measure a beam deflection. One experiment is a weak-value based technique, while the other is the standard focusing technique. We set up the two experiments in the presence of simulated technical noise sources and show how the weak-value based technique out performs the standard technique in both visibility and in deviation of the transverse momentum kick. Chapter 4 contains work of the exploration of concatenated postselection for weak-value amplification. We demonstrate an optimization and conditions where postselecting on two degrees of freedom can be beneficial to enhance the weak-value amplification.

  11. Weaknesses, strengths and needs in fertility care according to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Empel, Inge W H; Nelen, Willianne L D M; Tepe, Eveline T; van Laarhoven, Esther A P; Verhaak, Christianne M; Kremer, Jan A M

    2010-01-01

    The patients' role in assessing health care quality is increasingly recognized. Measuring patients' specific experiences and needs generates concrete information for care improvement, whereas satisfaction surveys only give an overoptimistic, undifferentiating picture. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate possible weaknesses, strengths and needs in fertility care by measuring patients' specific experiences. Mixed (qualitative and quantitative) methods were used to identify weaknesses, strengths and needs in fertility care. Four focus groups with 21 infertile patients were used for documenting care aspects relevant to patients. The fully transcribed qualitative results were analysed and converted into a 124-item questionnaire, to investigate whether these aspects were regarded as weaknesses, strengths or needs in fertility care. The questionnaire was distributed to 369 eligible couples attending 13 Dutch fertility clinics. Descriptive statistics were used to determine the quantity of the weaknesses, strengths and needs. Overall, 286 women (78%) and 280 men (76%) completed the questionnaire. Patients experienced many weaknesses in fertility care, mostly regarding emotional support and continuity of care. Respect and autonomy and partner involvement were considered strengths in current care. Furthermore, women expressed their need for more doctors' continuity during their treatment, and couples strongly desired to have free access to their own medical record. The questionnaire's internal consistency and construct validity were sufficient. Infertile couples experience strengths, but also many weaknesses and needs in current fertility care. Lack of patient centredness seems to be a major cause herein. Using mixed methods is a sensitive means for identifying these weaknesses and needs.

  12. Lifting a weak Poisson bracket to the algebra of forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhovich, S.; Peddie, M.; Sharapov, A.

    2017-06-01

    We detail the construction of a weak Poisson bracket over a submanifold Σ of a smooth manifold M with respect to a local foliation of this submanifold. Such a bracket satisfies a weak type Jacobi identity but may be viewed as a usual Poisson bracket on the space of leaves of the foliation. We then lift this weak Poisson bracket to a weak odd Poisson bracket on the odd tangent bundle ΠTM, interpreted as a weak Koszul bracket on differential forms on M. This lift is achieved by encoding the weak Poisson structure into a homotopy Poisson structure on an extended manifold, and lifting the Hamiltonian function that generates this structure. Such a construction has direct physical interpretation. For a generic gauge system, the submanifold Σ may be viewed as a stationary surface or a constraint surface, with the foliation given by the foliation of the gauge orbits. Through this interpretation, the lift of the weak Poisson structure is simply a lift of the action generating the corresponding BRST operator of the system.

  13. Prevalence of Weak D Antigen In Western Indian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvi Sadaria

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Discovery of Rh antigens in 1939 by Landsteiner and Weiner was the revolutionary stage in blood banking. Of these antigens, D, which decides Rh positivity or negativity, is the most antigenic. A problem is encountered when an individual has a weakened expression of D (Du, i.e., fewer numbers of D antigens on red cell membrane. Aims and Objectives: To know the prevalence of weak D in Indian population because incidence varies in different population. To determine the risk of alloimmunization among Rh D negative patients who receives the blood of weak D positive donors. Material and Methods: Rh grouping of 38,962 donors who came to The Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion of Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad from 1st January 2013 to 30th September 2014 was done using the DIAGAST (Automated Grouping. The samples that tested negative for D antigen were further analysed for weak D (Du by indirect antiglobulin test using blend of Ig G and Ig M Anti D. This was done using Column agglutination method in ID card (gel card. Results: The total number of donors studied was 38,962. Out of these 3360(8.6% were tested Rh D negative. All Rh D negative donors were tested for weak D (Du. 22 (0.056% of total donors and 0.65% of Rh negative donors turned out to be weak D (Du positive. Conclusion: The prevalence of weak D (Du in Western Indian population is 0.056 %, So the risk of alloimmunization in our setting due to weak D (Du antigen is marginal. But, testing of weak D antigen is necessary in blood bank because weak D antigen is immunogenic and can produce alloimmunization if transfused to Rh D negative subjects.

  14. The development of a weak anion micro-capillary film for protein chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouyoumdjian, A J M; Lazar, R A; Slater, N K H

    2016-10-14

    In this study, the surface of a microporous walled micro-capillary film (MMCF) was modified into a weak anion exchanger by coupling cyanuric chloride and 2-diethylaminoethylamine (DEAE) to the ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVOH) matrix. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements of modified and unmodified MMCFs confirmed the addition of a triazine ring and DEAE onto the membrane. Binding of bovine serum albumin (BSA) at pH 7.2 was found to follow a Langmuir isotherm with a maximum equilibrium binding of 12.4mg BSA/mL adsorbent and 8.2mg BSA/mL adsorbent under static and flow conditions, respectively. The ion exchange capacity, determined by Mohr's titration of chlorine atoms displaced from the functionalised surface, was found to be 195±21μmol Cl - /mL of adsorber, comparable to commercial ion exchangers. BSA adsorption onto the ion exchanger was strongly pH-dependant, with an observed reduction in binding above pH 8.2. Frontal experiments of a BSA (5mg/mL) and lysozyme (5mg/mL) mixture demonstrated successful separation of BSA from lysozyme at more than 97% purity as verified by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Separation between similarly charged anionic molecules was also achieved using BSA (5mg/mL) and herring sperm DNA (0.25mg/mL). BSA was extracted at 100% purity, demonstrating the ability of MMCF-DEAE to remove significant DNA contamination from a protein solution. These experiments highlight the potential for MMCFs to be used for fast protein purification in preparative chromatography application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermochemistry of MgCr2O4, MgAl2O4, MgFe2O4 spinels in SO2-O2-SO3 atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gerle

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates high-temperature sulphate corrosion of basic refractory ceramics containing magnesium spinels (MgAl2O4, MgFe2O4, MgCr2O4 and their solid solutions widely used in metallurgy, chemical, ceramic and glass industry. This group of refractories are exposed to a number of destructive factors during a working campaign. One of such factors is gas corrosion caused by sulphur oxides. However, gas sulphate corrosion of basic refractory materials containing magnesium spinels, which has a great practical meaning for the corrosion resistance of the material main components, is not sufficiently examined. This work presents a thermodynamic analysis of (MgCr2O4, MgAl2O4, MgFe2O4−SO2−O2−SO3 system aimed to calculate: i the standard free enthalpy of chemical reactions, ii the equilibrium composition of the gas mixture initially containing SO2 and O2 and iii sulphates equilibrium dissociation pressure and equilibrium partial pressure for the reaction of SO3 with the spinels to predict the temperature range of corrosion products’ stability. A thermochemical calculation provides information about equilibrium state in the analysed system. In real conditions the state of equilibrium does not have to be achieved. For this reason, the results of calculations were compared with experimental data. The experiment results were consistent with the theoretical predictions.

  16. Detection of weak frequency jumps for GNSS onboard clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinming; Gong, Hang; Ou, Gang

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a weak frequency jump detection method is developed for onboard clocks in global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). A Kalman filter is employed to facilitate the onboard real-time processing of atomic clock measurements, whose N-step prediction residuals are used to construct the weak frequency jump detector. Numerical simulations show that the method can successfully detect weak frequency jumps. The detection method proposed in this paper is helpful for autonomous integrity monitoring of GNSS satellite clocks, and can also be applied to other frequency anomalies with an appropriately modified detector.

  17. Ultra-weak sector, Higgs boson mass, and the dilaton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Allison

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Higgs boson mass may arise from a portal coupling to a singlet field σ which has a very large VEV f≫mHiggs. This requires a sector of “ultra-weak” couplings ζi, where ζi≲mHiggs2/f2. Ultra-weak couplings are technically naturally small due to a custodial shift symmetry of σ in the ζi→0 limit. The singlet field σ has properties similar to a pseudo-dilaton. We engineer explicit breaking of scale invariance in the ultra-weak sector via a Coleman–Weinberg potential, which requires hierarchies amongst the ultra-weak couplings.

  18. Linear optics implementation of weak values in Hardy's paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnert, S. E.; Payne, M. C.

    2004-10-01

    We propose an experimental setup for the implementation of weak measurements in the context of the gedanken experiment known as Hardy’s paradox. As Aharonov et al. [Y. Aharonov, A. Botero, S. Popescu, B. Reznik, and J. Tollaksen, Phys. Lett. A301, 130 (2002)] showed, these weak values form a language with which the paradox can be resolved. Our analysis shows that this language is indeed consistent and experimentally testable. It also reveals exactly how a combination of weak values can give rise to an apparently paradoxical result.

  19. Epitaxial growth and properties of cubic WN on MgO(001), MgO(111), and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozsdolay, B.D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Mulligan, C.P. [U.S. Army Armament Research Development & Engineering Center, Benet Laboratories, Watervliet, NY 12189 (United States); Guerette, Michael; Huang, Liping [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Gall, D., E-mail: galld@rpi.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Tungsten nitride layers, 1.45-μm-thick, were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering on MgO(001), MgO(111), and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) in 20 mTorr N{sub 2} at 700 °C. X-ray diffraction ω-2θ scans, ω-rocking curves, φ scans, and reciprocal space maps show that all layers exhibit a cubic rock salt structure, independent of their N-to-W ratio which ranges from x = 0.83–0.93, as determined by energy dispersive and photoelectron spectroscopies. Growth on MgO(001) leads to an epitaxial WN(001) layer which contains a small fraction of misoriented grains, WN(111)/MgO(111) is an orientation- and phase-pure single-crystal, and WN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) exhibits a 111-preferred orientation containing misoriented cubic WN grains as well as N-deficient BCC W. Layers on MgO(001) and MgO(111) with x = 0.92 and 0.83 have relaxed lattice constants of 4.214 ± 0.005 and 4.201 ± 0.031 Å, respectively, indicating a decreasing lattice constant with an increasing N-vacancy concentration. Nanoindentation provides hardness values of 9.8 ± 2.2, 12.5 ± 1.0, and 10.3 ± 0.4 GPa, and elastic moduli of 240 ± 40, 257 ± 13, and 242 ± 10 GPa for layers grown on MgO(001), MgO(111), and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001), respectively. Brillouin spectroscopy measurements yield shear moduli of 120 ± 2 GPa, 114 ± 2 GPa and 108 ± 2 GPa for WN on MgO(001), MgO(111) and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001), respectively, suggesting a WN elastic anisotropy factor of 1.6 ± 0.3, consistent with the indentation results. The combined analysis of the epitaxial WN(001) and WN(111) layers indicate Hill's elastic and shear moduli for cubic WN of 251 ± 17 and 99 ± 8 GPa, respectively. The resistivity of WN(111)/MgO(111) is 1.9 × 10{sup −5} and 2.2 × 10{sup −5} Ω-m at room temperature and 77 K, respectively, indicating weak carrier localization. The room temperature resistivities are 16% and 42% lower for WN/MgO(001) and WN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001), suggesting a resistivity decrease with decreasing

  20. Weak annihilation and new physics in charmless [Formula: see text] decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobeth, Christoph; Gorbahn, Martin; Vickers, Stefan

    We use currently available data of nonleptonic charmless 2-body [Formula: see text] decays ([Formula: see text]) that are mediated by [Formula: see text] QCD- and QED-penguin operators to study weak annihilation and new-physics effects in the framework of QCD factorization. In particular we introduce one weak-annihilation parameter for decays related by [Formula: see text] quark interchange and test this universality assumption. Within the standard model, the data supports this assumption with the only exceptions in the [Formula: see text] system, which exhibits the well-known "[Formula: see text] puzzle", and some tensions in [Formula: see text]. Beyond the standard model, we simultaneously determine weak-annihilation and new-physics parameters from data, employing model-independent scenarios that address the "[Formula: see text] puzzle", such as QED-penguins and [Formula: see text] current-current operators. We discuss also possibilities that allow further tests of our assumption once improved measurements from LHCb and Belle II become available.

  1. Weak annihilation and new physics in charmless B → MM decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobeth, Christoph [Institute for Advanced Study, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Gorbahn, Martin [University of Liverpool, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Vickers, Stefan [Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    We use currently available data of nonleptonic charmless 2-body B → MM decays (MM = PP, PV,VV) that are mediated by b → (d, s) QCD- and QED-penguin operators to study weak annihilation and new-physics effects in the framework of QCD factorization. In particular we introduce one weak-annihilation parameter for decays related by (u <-> d) quark interchange and test this universality assumption. Within the standard model, the data supports this assumption with the only exceptions in the B → Kπ system, which exhibits the well-known ''ΔA{sub CP} puzzle'', and some tensions in B → K*φ. Beyond the standard model, we simultaneously determine weak-annihilation and new-physics parameters from data, employing model independent scenarios that address the ''ΔA{sub CP} puzzle'', such as QED-penguins and b → s anti uu current-current operators. We discuss also possibilities that allow further tests of our assumption once improved measurements from LHCb and Belle II become available. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic properties of Mn-doped chalcopyrites: (BeSn,BeGe,MgGe)N2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufinus, Jeff; DeWinter, Jennifer L.

    2008-04-01

    The current interest in the emerging field of semiconductor spintronics is mostly focused on transition metal-doped binary materials. Recently, however, the explorations of transition metal-doped chalcopyrite semiconductors have intensified. Since the chalcopyrites are ternary materials, there are possibilities of having ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic configurations, depending on which metal site was substituted by the dopant. A density functional theory within generalized gradient approximation study of three thermodynamically stable Mn-doped (II-IV)-N2 chalcopyrites: (BeSn,BeGe,MgGe)N2 was performed. The results show both BeSnN2 and BeGeN2 to be antiferromagnetic for MnII (Mn substitutes II site) and ferromagnetic for MnIV (Mn substitutes IV site.) On the other hand, MgGeN2 was found to be antiferromagnetic, independent of the substitution sites.

  3. How phyllosilicate mineral structure affects fault strength in Mg-rich fault systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Roa, C.; Faulkner, D. R.; Boulton, C.; Jimenez-Millan, J.; Nieto, F.

    2017-06-01

    The clay mineralogy of fault gouges has important implications for the frictional properties of faults, often identified as a major factor contributing to profound fault weakness. This work compares the frictional strength of a group of Mg-rich minerals common in the Mg-Al-Si-O compositional space (talc, saponite, sepiolite, and palygorskite) by conducting triaxial frictional tests with water or argon as pore fluid. The studied minerals are chemically similar but differ in their crystallographic structure. Results show that fibrous Mg-rich phyllosilicates are stronger than their planar equivalents. Frictional strength in this group of minerals is highly influenced by strength of the atomic bonds, continuity of water layers within the crystals, and interactions of mineral surfaces with water molecules, all of which are dictated by crystal structure. The formation and stability of the minerals studied are mainly controlled by small changes in pore fluid chemistry, which can lead to significant differences in fault strength.

  4. Calculated Changes in the Elastic Properties of MgCNi3 at the Superconducting Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Abd-Shukor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We calculated the elastic properties of MgCNi3 at the superconducting transition ( using various thermodynamic and acoustic data. From the calculations, a step discontinuity of 8 ppm in the bulk modulus, 7 ppm in the Young’s modulus, and 3 ppm in the longitudinal sound velocity ( is expected at . The step discontinuities at the transition temperature indicated the importance of lattice changes to the superconducting mechanism of MgCNi3. The Debye temperature was calculated to be 460 K. The electron-phonon coupling constants calculated in the weak and strong coupling limits of the BCS theory and the van Hove scenario showed that MgCNi3 is a moderately strong coupled superconductor.

  5. Microstructure and Pinning Properties of Hexagonal Disc Shaped Single Crystalline MgB2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, J. R.

    2003-04-30

    We synthesized hexagonal-disc-shaped MgB{sub 2} single crystals under high-pressure conditions and analyzed the microstructure and pinning properties. The lattice constants and the Laue pattern of the crystals from X-ray micro-diffraction showed the crystal symmetry of MgB{sub 2}. A thorough crystallographic mapping within a single crystal showed that the edge and c-axis of hexagonal-disc shape exactly matched the (10-10) and the (0001) directions of the MgB{sub 2} phase. Thus, these well-shaped single crystals may be the best candidates for studying the direction dependences of the physical properties. The magnetization curve and the magnetic hysteresis for these single crystals showed the existence of a wide reversible region and weak pinning properties, which supported our single crystals being very clean.

  6. The reactive Mg-liquid infiltration to obtain long superconducting MgB$_{2}$ cables

    CERN Document Server

    Giunchi, G

    2009-01-01

    An alternative “in situ” process to the MgB2 wire manufacturing is represented by the Reactive Mg-Liquid Infiltration (Mg-RLI) process [1], in which the precursor wire is constituted by a metallic sheath encasing a central Mg rod, surrounded by the B powders. We demonstrated that this peculiar “internal Mg” assembly is able to produce very dense superconducting material of high critical current density, with an acceptable fill factor, up to 0.28. Furthermore the Mg-RLI allows also to easily dope the MgBB2 material either by carbon or nanoSiC powders. In order to realize long cables with this technique, two different approaches may be applied. The first one relies on the assembly of thin wires, fine enough that the liquid Mg cannot freely percolate along the wire during the reaction, and the second one relies on the assembly of thick hollow wires, reacted with a continuous supply of Mg to avoid deficiency of Mg in some part of the precursor wire. Both techniques have been demonstrated feasible and the ...

  7. Electronic structure of MgB2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boron isotope effect [2] has been observed in MgB2 re- vealing that the pairing mechanism ... energy there is a flat band which is predominantly of boron 2p origin. This band makes a large contribution to the ... This yields a Tc = 24.7 K. We thus find that a phonon mediated theory of strong coupling superconductivity gives a ...

  8. doped LiMgPO4 phosphor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is a well- established technique in personal and medical dosimetry, ... first suggested for personal dosimetry in 1950s. Further, it was spurred by introduction of a method .... product in sample. The LiMgPO4 phosphor was orthorhombic, with the space group Pnma with a about twice.

  9. Hydrogenation properties of Mg-Al alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    . Further, it is found that the kinetics of hydrogenation, as well dehydrogenation, may be significantly improved by alloying compared to pure Mg. The expense of these improvements of the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation properties is a lower gravimetric hydrogen density in the hydrogenated product, (C) 2008...

  10. exchanged Mg-Al hydrotalcite catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The MnO. −1. 4 - exchanged Mg–Al-hydrotalcite (Mg/Al = 10) showed high activity in the oxidation of different aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes to their corresponding acids and also showed excellent reusability in the oxidation process which is environmental-friendly. Keywords. Aldehyde; acid; oxidation; TBHP; MnO. −1.

  11. Electronic structure of MgB 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Results of ab initio electronic structure calculations on the compound MgB2 using the FPLAPW method employing GGA for the exchange-correlation energy are presented. Total energy minimization enables us to estimate the equilibrium volume, / ratio and the bulk modulus, all of which are in excellent agreement with ...

  12. cis-Bis(1,10-phenanthroline-κ2N,N′bis(thiocyanato-κNmagnesium(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhao

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Mg(NCS2(C12H8N22], has been synthesized from the hydrothermal reaction of MgCl2, KSCN, 1,10-phenanthroline and H2O. Its structure is isotypic with the MnII, FeII, CoII, NiII, CuII and ZnII analogues. The MgII cation has a slightly distorted octahedral geometry containing four N atoms from two 1,10-phenanthroline molecules and two N atoms from two thiocyanate anions. The asymmetric unit contains one-half molecule, and the complete complex has 2 symmetry.

  13. The role of Mg dopant on the morphological, structural and optical properties of Mg doped zinc oxide grown through hydrothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susetyo, P.; Fauzia, V.; Sugihartono, I.

    2017-04-01

    ZnO nanorods is a low cost II-VI semiconductor compound with huge potential to be applied in optoelectronic devices i.e. light emitting diodes, solar cells, gas sensor, spintronic devices and lasers. In order to improve the electrical and optical properties, group II, III and IV elements were widely investigated as dopand elements on ZnO. In this work, magnesium (Mg) was doped into ZnO nanorods. Samples were prepared firstly by deposition of undoped ZnO seed layer on indium thin oxide coated glass substrates by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis method and then followed by the growth of ZnO nanorods doped by three different Mg concentrations by hydrothermal method. Based on the morphological, microstructural and optical characterizations results, it is concluded that the increase of magnesium concentration tends to reduce the diameter of ZnO nanorods, increases the bandgap energy and decreases the UV absorption the luminescence in UV and visible range.

  14. Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical speciation of citric acid complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) was investigated pH-metrically in 0.0-2.5% anionic, cationic and neutral micellar media. The primary alkalimetric data were pruned with SCPHD program. The existence of different binary species was established from modeling studies using the ...

  15. Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    2010-06-15

    Jun 15, 2010 ... physico-chemical techniques. A square planar geometry was suggested for Cu(II) and octahedral geometry proposed for Co(II),. Ni(II) and Zn(II). TG curves indicated that the complexes decompose in three to four steps. The presence of coordinated water in metal complexes was confirmed by thermal and ...

  16. Existence of Weak Solutions for a Nonlinear Elliptic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert RobertP

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the existence of weak solutions to the following Dirichlet boundary value problem, which occurs when modeling an injection molding process with a partial slip condition on the boundary. We have in ; in ; , and on .

  17. Weak measurements measure probability amplitudes (and very little else)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolovski, D., E-mail: dgsokol15@gmail.com [Departmento de Química-Física, Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Leioa (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Maria Diaz de Haro 3, 48013, Bilbao (Spain)

    2016-04-22

    Conventional quantum mechanics describes a pre- and post-selected system in terms of virtual (Feynman) paths via which the final state can be reached. In the absence of probabilities, a weak measurement (WM) determines the probability amplitudes for the paths involved. The weak values (WV) can be identified with these amplitudes, or their linear combinations. This allows us to explain the “unusual” properties of the WV, and avoid the “paradoxes” often associated with the WM. - Highlights: • Weak measurement on a pre- and post-selected system is a particular perturbative scheme. • A conventional average for the additional degree of freedom measured. • The result is proportional to the amplitudes on the virtual paths connecting two system's states. • Over-interpretation of the weak values (WV) is unwise. • “Unusual” WVs are not unusual after all.

  18. Hysteresis in superconducting short weak links and μ -SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Dibyendu; Pascal, Lætitia M. A.; Courtois, Hervé; Gupta, Anjan K.

    2010-11-01

    Thermal hysteresis in a micron-size superconducting quantum interference device ( μ -SQUID), with weak links as Josephson junctions, is an obstacle for improving its performance for magnetometry. Following the “hot-spot” model of Skocpol [J. Appl. Phys. 45, 4054 (1974)]10.1063/1.1663912 and by incorporating the temperature dependence of the superconductor thermal conductivity under a linear approximation, we find a much better agreement with the observed temperature dependence of the retrapping current in short superconducting Nb-based weak links and μ -SQUIDs. In addition, using the temperature dependence of the critical current, we find that above a certain temperature hysteresis disappears. We analyze the current-voltage characteristics and the weak link temperature variation in both the hysteretic and nonhysteretic regimes. We also discuss the effect of the weak link geometry in order to widen the temperature range of hysteresis-free operation.

  19. Space group constraints on weak indices in topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjas, Dániel; de Juan, Fernando; Lu, Yuan-Ming

    2017-07-01

    Lattice translation symmetry gives rise to a large class of "weak" topological insulators (TIs), characterized by translation-protected gapless surface states and dislocation bound states. In this work we show that space group symmetries lead to constraints on the weak topological indices that define these phases. In particular, we show that screw rotation symmetry enforces the Hall conductivity in planes perpendicular to the screw axis to be quantized in multiples of the screw rank, which generally applies to interacting systems. We further show that certain 3D weak indices associated with quantum spin Hall effects (class AII) are forbidden by the Bravais lattice and by glide or even-fold screw symmetries. These results put strong constraints on weak TI candidates in the experimental and numerical search for topological materials, based on the crystal structure alone.

  20. A weakly compressible formulation for modelling liquid-gas sloshing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heyns, Johan A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available , the implementation of a weakly compressible formulation which accounts for variations in the gas density is presented. With the aim of ensuring a computational efficient implementation of the proposed formulation, an implicit iterative GMRES solver with LU...

  1. Ultrasmall polarization rotation measurements via weak value amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Bernardo, Bertúlio de, E-mail: bertulio@fisica.ufpb.br; Azevedo, Sérgio; Rosas, Alexandre

    2014-06-13

    Highlights: • We present a class of weak measurements where the measurer is an angular variable of the system. • Photon-energy qubits are required, which seems to be the first application of this kind of light. • Both weak optical activity and reflection-induced polarization rotation can be amplified. • This protocol can amplify the optical activity signal in nanostructures and biological tissues. - Abstract: We propose a framework to analyze weak measurements based on an angular version of the von Neumann measurement scheme, where the coupling between the system and the meter causes rotation of the measuring variable. We also discuss an experimental application of this theory in which measurements of weak optical activity and reflection-induced polarization rotation could be amplified in nearly two orders of magnitude. It can shed a new light on a great variety of physical chemistry, molecular biology and nanotechnology studies.

  2. Strengths only or strengths and relative weaknesses? A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Teri; Diessner, Rhett; Reade, Lindsay

    2009-10-01

    Does working on developing character strengths and relative character weaknesses cause lower life satisfaction than working on developing character strengths only? The present study provides a preliminary answer. After 76 college students completed the Values in Action Inventory of Strengths (C. Peterson & M. E. P. Seligman, 2004), the authors randomly assigned them to work on 2 character strengths or on 1 character strength and 1 relative weakness. Combined, these groups showed significant gains on the Satisfaction With Life Scale (E. Diener, R. A. Emmons, R. J. Larsen, & S. Griffin, 1985), compared with a 32-student no-treatment group. However, there was no significant difference in gain scores between the 2-strengths group and the 1-character-strength-and-1-relative-character-weakness group. The authors discuss how focusing on relative character weaknesses (along with strengths) does not diminish-and may assist in increasing-life satisfaction.

  3. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Fatigue (Feeling Weak and Very Tired)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Fatigue (Feeling weak and very tired) Why do I feel ... level. Some people write down how they are feeling each day in a notebook to share with ...

  4. Graphene-Based Superconducting Weak Links in Low Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Scott; Kumaravadivel, Piranavan; Du, Xu

    The impact of magnetic field on Andreev reflection is studied in graphene-based superconducting weak links. We found, through studying weak links with different adhesion layers and superconducting leads (including Graphene-Ti/Au-Nb, Graphene-Ti/Pd-Nb, Graphene-V-Nb, Graphene-Ti-Nb, Graphene-Ti/Pd-NbN), that in low field (B graphene-superconductor interface. As the effective gap of the weak link approaches the intrinsic gap of the superconducting leads, a remnant of Andreev reflection can survive into the quantum Hall regime, allowing study of the interplay between the quantum Hall effect and Andreev reflection in high quality suspended graphene-superconductor weak links.

  5. Notification: FY 2018 CSB Management Challenges and Internal Control Weaknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    December 26, 2017. The OIG is beginning work to update for fiscal year 2018 its list of proposed key management challenges and internal control weaknesses confronting the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB).

  6. Selective diaphragm muscle weakness after contractile inactivity during thoracic surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welvaart, W.N.; Paul, M.A.; Stienen, G.J.; Hees, H.W.H. van; Loer, S.A.; Bouwman, R.; Niessen, H.; Man, F.S. de; Witt, C.C.; Granzier, H.; Vonk-Noordegraaf, A.; Ottenheijm, C.A.C.

    2011-01-01

    RATIONALE: Postoperative pulmonary complications are significant contributors to morbidity in patients who have undergone upper abdominal, thoracic, or cardiac surgery. The pathophysiology of these complications might involve postoperative inspiratory muscle weakness. The nature of postoperative

  7. Undecidability of Weak Bisimilarity for PA-Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srba, Jiri

    2003-01-01

    We prove that the problem whether two PA-processes are weakly bisimilar is undecidable. We combine several proof techniques to provide a reduction from Post's correspondence problem to our problem: existential quantification technique, masking technique and deadlock elimination technique....

  8. National Transportation Safety Board : weak internal control impaired financial accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-28

    The U. S. General Accounting Office (GAO) was asked to review the National Transportation Safety Board's (NTSB) internal controls over selected types of fiscal year expenditures. They were asked to determine whether internal control weaknesses were a...

  9. Informal Institutions and the "Weaknesses" of Human Behavior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goebel, Markus; Thomas, Tobias

    2005-01-01

    ... to interpersonal consistency and interpersonal conformity here. These sources of a systematic deviation from the standard model of the homo oeconomicus result in systematic weaknesses of perception and deviations of behavior...

  10. Electrostatics in Chemistry-Electrostatic Models for Weak Molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 12. Electrostatics in Chemistry - Electrostatic Models for Weak Molecular Complexation. Shridhar R Gadre Pravin K Babu. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 12 December 1999 pp 11-20 ...

  11. Compressive strength of brick masonry made with weak mortars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Erik Steen; Hansen, Klavs Feilberg

    2013-01-01

    (fm≈6 N/mm2) compression tests of masonry with perforated bricks show that the EC6 expression is not always safe for Danish masonry. This is probably because the tensile strength of the bricks also has an effect on the compressive strength of masonry when the mortar is stronger than weak lime mortar......The use of weak mortar has a number of advantages (e.g. prevention of expansion joints, environmental issues). However, according to EC6, the strength of masonry vanishes when the compressive strength of the mortar approaches zero. In reality the presence of even unhardened mortar kept in place...... in the joint will ensure a certain level of load-carrying capacity. This is due to the interaction between compression in the weak mortar and tension in the adjacent bricks. This paper proposes an expression for the compressive strength of masonry made with weak lime mortars (fmstrength...

  12. Stability in Real Food Webs: Weak Links in Long Loops

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anje-Margriet Neutel; Johan A. P. Heesterbeek; Peter C. de Ruiter

    2002-01-01

    ... of these patterns, how they come about, and why they influence stability. We show that in real food webs, interaction strengths are organized in trophic loops in such a way that long loops contain relatively many weak links...

  13. Magnetic nanoparticles in MgB{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandu, Viorel, E-mail: viorelsandu51@yahoo.com [National Institute of Materials Physics, Str. Atomistilor 105 bis, Magurele 077125 (Romania); Chee, Ching Yern [Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Lembah Pantai, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • Critical current density in MgB{sub 2} composites with magnetic nanoparticles is analyzed. • A maximum in critical current occurs if the magnetization at T{sub c} is 0.015 emu/cm{sup 3}. • A tentative description in the framework of collective pinning is proposed. - Abstract: Additional pinning generated by magnetic nanoparticles which were created or inserted within polycrystalline MgB{sub 2} superconductor is analyzed. The composites were built in two ways: (i) ceramization of polysiloxane-co-ferrocene based copolymers and (ii) insertion of coated nanoparticles. The composites present two types of pinning: core pinning based on the variation of the superconducting parameter when a non-superconducting particle is present and a magnetic pinning resulting from the interaction of the screening currents around the particle and the flux line. All samples show a consistent improvement of the critical current density when the magnetic moment of the sample in normal state is finite but small, showing a maximum for a magnetic moment of 0.015 emu/cm{sup 3}. A tentative description of the effect of magnetic pinning is presented in the framework of the collective pinning.

  14. Preparation and characterization of Sc doped MgB{sub 2} wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grivel, J.-C., E-mail: jean@dtu.dk [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, 4000-Roskilde (Denmark); Burdusel, M. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Polytechnical University of Bucharest, 060042-Bucharest (Romania)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • MgB{sub 2} wires doped with Sc (scandium) were prepared by the in-situ route. • The solubility of Sc in the MgB{sub 2} lattice under the present conditions is negligible. • J{sub c} and B{sup *} are slightly improved for low doping levels. - Abstract: The in-situ technique was used to manufacture scandium (Sc) doped MgB{sub 2} wires in a composite Cu–Nb sheath. After reaction at 700 °C, at most 1 at.% Mg was replaced by Sc in the MgB{sub 2} phase, without significant influence on its superconducting transition temperature. For higher Sc concentrations in the nominal composition, the formation of Sc–rich impurity phases was evidenced by SEM/EDS observations. The critical current density and accommodation field of the wires are weakly dependant on the Sc content. It is believed that these effects are related more to modifications of the thermal behaviour of the precursor powders revealed by DTA measurements than to actual doping. The best performance was obtained in a wire with Mg:Sc = 0.995-0.005 atomic ratio.

  15. Production of metallic nanopowders (Mg, Al by solar carbothermal reduction of their oxides at low pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Puig

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The carbothermal reduction of MgO and Al2O3 in argon flow at low pressure allows to lower the onset temperature of metal vapor formation. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that metal formation begins at 1400 and 1700 K for a primary vacuum (1000 Pa, respectively, for Mg and Al. In the experimental section, concentrated solar energy was used for the process heating in order to favor energy savings. The products of the reaction between MgO or Al2O3 and 2 varieties of carbon (graphite, carbon black in flowing argon atmosphere at a total pressure of around 1000 to 1600 Pa were studied using X-ray diffraction, and microstructure observations revealed the formation of metallic nanopowders with some by-products. Metallic conversions close to 45 wt% and 52 wt%, respectively, for Mg and Al, were obtained. The low conversion yield of the carbothermal reduction of MgO can be attributed to a backward reaction reforming MgO powder and to a sintering process between oxide particles at high temperature. Aluminum production challenge is to avoid formation of undesired by-products: Al2O, Al4C3 and Al-oxycarbides. Advantages and weaknesses of the used process are described and some improvements are proposed to increase metallic yields.

  16. What are the weak points of LHC operation?

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, B

    2010-01-01

    The few weeks of LHC operation in 2009 was a resounding success with extremely fast progress in the beam commissioning. Nevertheless, the period also revealed a number of possible weaknesses in various aspects of the LHC operation, including procedures, tools, discipline, equipment and organisation. The weaknesses are discussed with a view to feeding the experience back to improve the machine operation for 2010 and beyond. The distinction is made impacting efficiency, and those points which are more serious and might impact machine protection.

  17. Experimentally quantifying the advantages of weak-value-based metrology

    OpenAIRE

    Viza, Gerardo I.; Martínez-Rincón, Julián; Alves, Gabriel B.; Jordan, Andrew N.; Howell, John C.

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the relative advantages of implementing weak-value-based metrology versus standard methods. While the techniques outlined herein apply more generally, we measure small optical beam deflections both using a Sagnac interferometer with a monitored dark port (the weak-value-based technique), and by focusing the entire beam to a split detector (the standard technique). By introducing controlled external transverse detector modulations and transverse beam deflection mo...

  18. Strength and Weakness of Animal Vaccine Industry in China

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Hong-hai; Wang, Geng-xin

    2010-01-01

    Based on the introduction of the status of animal vaccine industry in China, the strength, weakness, opportunity and threat of animal vaccine industry is analyzed by SWOT. Among them, strength is mainly reflected in the broad market, and the favorable industrial policy and development environment. Weakness is the irrational structure of product, the nonstandard production inspection, and the irregular market. Opportunity is mainly reflected in improving government’s emphasis on animal secur...

  19. Updating the theoretical analysis of the weak gravitational shielding experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Modanese, G

    1996-01-01

    The most recent data about the weak gravitational shielding produced recently through a levitating and rotating HTC superconducting disk show a very weak dependence of the shielding value ($\\sim 1 \\%$) on the height above the disk. We show that whilst this behaviour is incompatible with an intuitive vectorial picture of the shielding, it is consistently explained by our theoretical model. The expulsive force observed at the border of the shielded zone is due to energy conservation.

  20. Classical and Weak Solutions for Two Models in Mathematical Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyulov, Tihomir B.; Valkov, Radoslav L.

    2011-12-01

    We study two mathematical models, arising in financial mathematics. These models are one-dimensional analogues of the famous Black-Scholes equation on finite interval. The main difficulty is the degeneration at the both ends of the space interval. First, classical solutions are studied. Positivity and convexity properties of the solutions are discussed. Variational formulation in weighted Sobolev spaces is introduced and existence and uniqueness of the weak solution is proved. Maximum principle for weak solution is discussed.

  1. MRT letter: recovering weak-textured surfaces using image focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Mannan Saeed; Choi, Tae-Sun

    2009-10-01

    In nature, objects have partially weak texture and their shape reconstruction using focus based passive methods like shape from focus (SFF), is difficult. This article presents a new SFF algorithm which can compute precise depth of dense as well as weak textured objects. Segmentation is applied to discard wrong depth estimate and then later interpolating them from accurate depth values of their neighbors. The performance of the proposed method is tested, using different image sequences of synthetic and real objects, with varying textures.

  2. Weak bond detection in composites using highly nonlinear solitary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Taru; Kim, Eunho; Kim, Tae-Yeon; Yang, Jinkyu

    2017-05-01

    We experimentally investigate a diagnostic technique for identifying a weak bond in composites using highly nonlinear solitary waves (HNSWs). We set up a one-dimensional chain of granular crystals, consisting of spherical particles with nonlinear interactions, to generate HNSWs. These solitary wave packets are transmitted into an inspection area of composites by making a direct contact with the chain. We demonstrate that a strong type of solitary waves injected to the weak bond area can break the weak bond of laminates, thereby causing delamination. Then, to identify the creation of the delamination, we transmit a weak type of solitary waves by employing the same apparatus, and measure the solitary waves reflected from the specimens. By analyzing these reflected solitary waves, we differentiate the weak bond samples with the pristine bond ones in an efficient and fast manner. The diagnostic results based on the proposed method are compared with the strength and energy release rate at bond interfaces, which are measured via standard testing methods such as three point bending and end notched flexure tests. This study shows the potential of solitary wave-based detection of weak bonds for hot spot monitoring of composite-based structures.

  3. Enhanced mechanical properties of an Al–Si–Cu–Mg alloy at 300 °C: Effects of Mg and the Q-precipitate phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkoosh, A.R., E-mail: amir.rezaeifarkoosh@mail.mcgill.ca; Pekguleryuz, M., E-mail: mihriban.pekguleryuz@mcgill.ca

    2015-01-05

    Strategies to improve the strength of Al–Si alloys at elevated temperatures can follow two routes: (i) improving the age-hardening behavior and/or (ii) producing effective dispersoid strengthening. In this study, the influence of Mg (in the range of 0.3–0.7 wt%) on the precipitation characteristics and mechanical properties of the Al–7Si–0.5Cu–(Mg) alloy was investigated. Thermodynamic calculations were performed via the CALPHAD method which showed that Q-Al{sub 5}Mg{sub 8}Cu{sub 2}Si{sub 6} is the main thermodynamically stable precipitate at 300 °C. The calculations were validated by transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry analyses. Increasing the Mg level from 0.3 wt% to the maximum solubility limit of ∼0.5 wt% increased the amount of the Q-Al{sub 5}Mg{sub 8}Cu{sub 2}Si{sub 6} precipitates at 300 °C by ∼60 wt% and significantly improved the tensile strength and creep resistance at the expense of some ductility. Mg in excess of the solubility limit was seen to remain within the microstructure in the form of the large π-Al{sub 8}FeMg{sub 3}Si{sub 6} and β-Mg{sub 2}Si intermetallics after solution treatment at 530 °C. Cracking of the brittle π-Al{sub 8}FeMg{sub 3}Si{sub 6} intermetallics during deformation was accounted for the decreased ductility of the alloys at high Mg levels. It is concluded that the Mg level can be increased to 0.5 wt% in the A–7Si–0.5Cu alloys to improve strength. However, for elevated temperature applications in which both strength and ductility are required (e.g. Diesel engine), modification of the π-Al{sub 8}FeMg{sub 3}Si{sub 6} intermetallics would be required to improve the ductility of the alloys with high Mg contents.

  4. A mechanism for extremely weak SpaP-expression in Streptococcus mutans strain Z1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Sato

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptococcus mutans surface-protein antigen (SpaP, PAc, or antigen I/II has been well known to play an important role in initial attachment to tooth surfaces. However, strains with weak SpaP-expression were recently reported to be found in natural populations of S. mutans. The S. mutans gbpC-negative strain Z1, which we previously isolated from saliva and plaque samples, apparently expresses relatively low levels of SpaP protein compared to S. mutans strains MT8148 or UA159. Objective: To elucidate the mechanism for weak SpaP-expression in this strain, the spaP gene region in strain Z1 was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and analyzed. Methods: Allelic exchange mutants between strains Z1 and UA159 involving the spaP gene region were constructed. The SpaP protein expressed in the mutants was detected with Coomasie Brilliant Blue (CBB-staining and Western blot analysis following SDS-PAGE. Results: The 4689 bp spaP gene coding sequence for Z1 appeared to be intact. In contrast, a 20 bp nucleotide sequence appeared to be deleted from the region immediately upstream from the Z1 spaP gene when compared to the same region in UA159. The 216 bp and 237 bp intergenic fragments upstream from the spaP gene, respectively, from Z1 and UA159 were isolated, modified, and transformed into the other strain by allelic replacement. The resultant UA159-promoter region-mutant exhibited extremely weak SpaP-expression similar to that of strain Z1 and the Z1 complemented mutant expressed Spa protein levels like that of strain UA159. Conclusion: These results suggest that weak SpaP-expression in strain Z1 resulted from a 20 bp-deletion in the spaP gene promoter region.

  5. Competitive Fixed-Bed Adsorption of Pb(II, Cu(II, and Ni(II from Aqueous Solution Using Chitosan-Coated Bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Chi Tsai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fixed-bed adsorption studies using chitosan-coated bentonite (CCB as adsorbent media were investigated for the simultaneous adsorption of Pb(II, Cu(II, and Ni(II from a multimetal system. The effects of operational parameters such as bed height, flow rate, and initial concentration on the length of mass transfer zone, breakthrough time, exhaustion time, and adsorption capacity at breakthrough were evaluated. With increasing bed height and decreasing flow rate and initial concentration, the breakthrough and exhaustion time were observed to favorably increase. Moreover, the adsorption capacity at breakthrough was observed to increase with decreasing initial concentration and flow rate and increasing bed height. The maximum adsorption capacity at breakthrough of 13.49 mg/g for Pb(II, 12.14 mg/g for Cu(II, and 10.29 mg/g for Ni(II was attained at an initial influent concentration of 200 mg/L, bed height of 2.0 cm, and flow rate of 0.4 mL/min. Adsorption data were fitted with Adams-Bohart, Thomas, and Yoon-Nelson models. Experimental breakthrough curves were observed to be in good agreement (R2>0.85 and E%<50% with the predicted curves generated by the kinetic models. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of CCB in the removal of Pb(II, Cu(II, and Ni(II from a ternary metal solution.

  6. Efficacy of fipronil (1.0 mg/kg) against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus strains resistant to ivermectin (0.63 mg/kg).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Teixeira, Weslen Fabrício Pires; Felippelli, Gustavo; Maciel, Willian Giquelin; Buzzulini, Carolina; Gomes, Lucas V Costa; Favero, Flávia; Soares, Vando Edésio; Bichuette, Murilo A; de Oliveira, Gilson Pereira; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2014-08-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of fipronil (1 mg/kg) against three strains of ivermectin-resistant Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (R. (B.) microplus), naturally infesting cattle from different states of Brazil. Three rural properties with a history of macrocyclic lactones ineffectiveness against the cattle tick, and low frequency use of fipronil in the herd, were selected for the study. The animals were randomized according to the mean tick counts, performed on days -3, -2 and -1, into three groups with 10 animals each: T01, control (saline solution); T02, subcutaneous ivermectin (0.63 mg/kg) and T03, topical fipronil (1 mg/kg). Treatment was performed on day 0. Counts of partially engorged female ticks were performed on days 3, 7 and 14 post-treatment (DPT), and then every 7 days until the 49th DPT. In all three experiments, it was possible to diagnose resistance of R. (B.) microplus to ivermectin (0.63 mg/kg). The maximum efficacy (arithmetic mean) obtained for ivermectin was 64% in experiment II. On the other hand, the formulation containing fipronil (1 mg/kg) reached high efficacy values (≥97%) in all three experiments. The results from all experiments in this study demonstrate the high efficacy of 1mg/kg fipronil, administered pour-on in naturally infested cattle, against strains of R. (B.) microplus that are resistant to 630 mcg/kg ivermectin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Transport measurements of lateral MgB{sub 2}/Fe/MgB{sub 2} junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabretti, Savio; Thomas, Patrick; Schaefers, Markus; Schebaum, Oliver; Thomas, Andy [Bielefeld University (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    We fabricated MgB{sub 2}/Fe/MgB{sub 2} lateral junctions by rf-dc co-sputtering. The MgB{sub 2} films have a thickness of about 30nm and a critical temperature of up to 33 K. The samples were annealed in-situ between 450 C and 750 C. Our MgB{sub 2} films were sputtered on different substrates such as (100)MgO and r-cut sapphire. Their crystalline structure and magnetic anisotropy were investigated. For transport measurement a thin iron cross strip of about 30 nm was placed between the MgB{sub 2} strip. The MgB{sub 2} strip was relieved by a groove of about 5 {mu}m. The superconductivity of MgB{sub 2} is suppressed due to the proximity effect near the junction area and builds a natural metallic barrier. With this configuration, we get a magnetoresistance due to the domain wall scattering in iron where the magnetoresistance was measured perpendicular and in plane of this array. Further, we investigated their I-V and dI/dV characteristics in dependence of an applied magnetic field up to 4T. The {sigma} gap as well as the {pi} gap was observed.

  8. Respiratory outcomes following 100 mg/kg v. 200 mg/kg of poractant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. e treatment guideline for the management of respiratory distress syndrome in the newborn unit at Auckland City Hospital (ACH), Auckland, New Zealand, was amended in July 2010. In keeping with current evidence, the initial dose of poractant alpha was increased from 100 mg/kg to 200 mg/kg. e outcomes of ...

  9. Preliminary study of the characteristics of a high Mg containing Al-Mg-Si alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, F.; McKay, B. J.; Fan, Z.; Chen, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    An Al-20Mg-4Si high Mg containing alloy has been produced and its characteristics investigated. The as-cast alloy revealed primary Mg2Si particles evenly distributed throughout an α-Al matrix with a β-Al3Mg2 fully divorced eutectic phase observed in interdendritic regions. The Mg2Si particles displayed octahedral, truncated octahedral, and hopper morphologies. Additions of Sb, Ti and Zr had a refining influence reducing the size of the Mg2Si from 52 ± 4 μm to 25 ± 0.1 μm, 35 ± 1 μm and 34 ± 1 μm respectively. HPDC tensile test samples could be produced with a 0.6 wt.% Mn addition which prevented die soldering. Solution heating for 1 hr was found to dissolve the majority of the Al3Mg2 eutectic phase with no evidence of any effect on the primary Mg2Si. Preliminary results indicate that the heat treatment has a beneficial effect on the elongation and the UTS.

  10. Bulk amorphous Mg-based alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini

    2004-01-01

    and a low glass transition temperature. The alloys were prepared by using a relatively simple technique, i.e. rapid cooling of the melt in a copper wedge mould. The essential structural changes that are achieved by going from the amorphous to the crystalline state through the supercooled liquid state...... are discussed in this paper. On the basis of these measurements phase diagrams of the different systems were constructed. Finally, it is demonstrated that when pressing the bulk amorphous alloy onto a metallic dies at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region, the alloy faithfully replicates the surface......The present paper describes the preparation and properties of bulk amorphous quarternary Mg-based alloys and the influence of additional elements on the ability of the alloy to form bulk amorphous. The main goal is to find a Mg-based alloy system which shows both high strength to weight ratio...

  11. The significance of Mg in prebiotic geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, N G

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium plays a special role in biochemistry because of its ability to coordinate six oxygen atoms efficiently in its first coordination shell. Such oxygen atoms may be part of one or two charged oxyanions, which means that Mg2+ can, for instance, tie together two different phosphate groups that are located at distance from each other in a macromolecule, and in this way be responsible for the folding of molecules like RNA. This property of Mg2+ also helps the stabilization of diphosphate and triphosphate groups of nucleotides, as well as promoting the condensation of orthophosphate to oligophosphates, like pyrophosphate and trimetaphosphate. Borates, on the other hand, are known to promote the formation of nucleobases and carbohydrates, ribose in particular, which is yet another constituent of nucleotides. The oldest borate minerals that we find on Earth today are magnesium borates. Dissolved borate stabilizes pentose sugars by forming complexes with cis-hydroxyl groups. In the furanose form of ribose, the preferential binding occurs to the 2 and 3 carbon, leaving the 5 carbon free for phosphorylation. The central role of Mg2+ in the function of ribozymes and its ‘archaic’ position in ribosomes, and the fact that magnesium generally has coordination properties different from other cations, suggests that the inorganic chemistry of magnesium had a key position in the first chemical processes leading to the origin and early evolution of life. PMID:22429303

  12. Interstitial Fe in MgO

    CERN Document Server

    Mølholt, T E; Gunnlaugsson, H P; Svane, A; Masenda, H; Naidoo, D; Bharuth-Ram, K; Fanciulli, M; Gislason, H P; Johnston, K; Langouche, G; Ólafsson, S; Sielemann, R; Weyer, G

    2014-01-01

    Isolated Fe-57 atoms were studied in MgO single-crystals by emission Mossbauer spectroscopy following implantation of Mn-57 decaying to Fe-57. Four Mossbauer spectral components were found corresponding to different Fe lattice positions and/or charge states. Two components represent Fe atoms substituting Mg as Fe2+ and Fe3+, respectively; a third component is due to Fe in a strongly implantation-induced disturbed region. The fourth component, which is the focus of this paper, can be assigned to Fe at an interstitial site. Comparison of its measured isomer shift with ab initio calculations suggests that the interstitial Fe is located on, or close to, the face of the rock-salt MgO structure. To harmonize such an assignment with the measured near-zero quadrupole interaction a local motion process (cage motion) of the Fe has to be stipulated. The relation of such a local motion as a starting point for long range diffusion is discussed.

  13. Spectroscopic, electrochemical, magnetic and structural investigations of dimanganese-(II/II) and mixed-valence-(II/III)-tetraiminodiphenolate complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, Julio C. da; Poneti, Giordano; Ferreira,Janaina G.; Ribeiro, Ronny R.; Nunes, Fábio S.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis, spectroscopic [electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), UV-Vis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)], magnetic and spectroeletrochemical properties of [MnII2(tidf)(OAc)(ClO4)(MeOH)] (tidf = a Robson type macrocyclic ligand obtained through condensation of 2,6-diformyl-4-methylphenol and 1,3-diaminopropane) are reported. Compound [MnII2(tidf)(OAc)(ClO4)(MeOH)] shows a weak antiferromagnetic behavior with exchange coupling constant J = -1.59(1) cm-1. UV-Vis and EPR spectr...

  14. Silica Aerogel-supported Hydrozincite and Carbonate-intercalated Hydrotalcite for High-efficiency Removal of Pb(II) Ions by Precipitation Transformation Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Wang, Xiaoxia; Li, Jianfa; Feng, Xiaolan; Wang, Yusen

    2017-09-01

    In this work, hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3 2- hydrotalcite supported on silica aerogel were prepared via a simple and economical process and used as adsorbents for Pb(II) removal. The supported hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3 2- hydrotalcite possess ultra-thin thickness, high surface area, and weak crystallinity. In the batch Pb(II) adsorption experiments, the adsorbents with higher Zn(II) contents showed higher Pb(II) adsorption capacities, and the adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating a mechanism of surface chemisorption. The adsorption capacities calculated based Langmuir isotherm model are 684.9 mg/g and 555.6 mg/g for the supported hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3 2- hydrotalcite, respectively, higher than the adsorption capacities of other hydrotalcite-based adsorbents and most of other inorganic adsorbents reported previously. The XRD diffraction peaks of hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3 2- hydrotalcite disappeared after the adsorption, and the Pb(II) species were uniformly dispersed in the adsorbents in form of Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2 proven by TEM, EDS mapping and XRD analysis, demonstrating the nature of the adsorption is the precipitation conversion of hydrozincite or Zn/Al-CO3 2- hydrotalcite into Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2. These results demonstrate the synergic Pb(II) removal effect of the CO3 2- and OH- derived from hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3 2- hydrotalcite together with their ultra-thin thickness and high surface area contribute the excellent properties of the adsorbents.

  15. Silica Aerogel-supported Hydrozincite and Carbonate-intercalated Hydrotalcite for High-efficiency Removal of Pb(II) Ions by Precipitation Transformation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Wang, Xiaoxia; Li, Jianfa; Feng, Xiaolan; Wang, Yusen

    2017-09-25

    In this work, hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3(2-) hydrotalcite supported on silica aerogel were prepared via a simple and economical process and used as adsorbents for Pb(II) removal. The supported hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3(2-) hydrotalcite possess ultra-thin thickness, high surface area, and weak crystallinity. In the batch Pb(II) adsorption experiments, the adsorbents with higher Zn(II) contents showed higher Pb(II) adsorption capacities, and the adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating a mechanism of surface chemisorption. The adsorption capacities calculated based Langmuir isotherm model are 684.9 mg/g and 555.6 mg/g for the supported hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3(2-) hydrotalcite, respectively, higher than the adsorption capacities of other hydrotalcite-based adsorbents and most of other inorganic adsorbents reported previously. The XRD diffraction peaks of hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3(2-) hydrotalcite disappeared after the adsorption, and the Pb(II) species were uniformly dispersed in the adsorbents in form of Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2 proven by TEM, EDS mapping and XRD analysis, demonstrating the nature of the adsorption is the precipitation conversion of hydrozincite or Zn/Al-CO3(2-) hydrotalcite into Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2. These results demonstrate the synergic Pb(II) removal effect of the CO3(2-) and OH(-) derived from hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3(2-) hydrotalcite together with their ultra-thin thickness and high surface area contribute the excellent properties of the adsorbents.

  16. Thermodynamic Property Study of Nanostructured Mg-H, Mg-Ni-H, and Mg-Cu-H Systems by High Pressure DSC Method

    OpenAIRE

    Huaiyu Shao; Gongbiao Xin; Xingguo Li; Etsuo Akiba

    2013-01-01

    Mg, Ni, and Cu nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogen plasma metal reaction method. Preparation of Mg2Ni and Mg2Cu alloys from these Mg, Ni, and Cu nanoparticles has been successfully achieved in convenient conditions. High pressure differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique in hydrogen atmosphere was applied to study the synthesis and thermodynamic properties of the hydrogen absorption/desorption processes of nanostructured Mg-H, Mg-Ni-H, and Mg-Cu-H systems. Van’t Hoff equation o...

  17. trans-Dichloridotetrapyrazineruthenium(II dichloromethane disolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir N. Nesterov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [RuCl2(C4H4N24]·2CH2Cl2, the RuII atom occupies a position of 222 symmetry and the C atom of the solvent molecule occupies a site with twofold symmetry. The RuII atom has a slightly distorted octahedral geometry. The pyrazine rings are propeller-like and rotated 45.1 (1° from the RuN4 plane. In the crystal, the complex and solvent molecules are bridged by weak C—H...N hydrogen bonds along the c axis. Weak intermolecular C—H...Cl contacts link the complexes in the ab plane, forming a network.

  18. Electronic structure of ferromagnet-insulator interfaces: Fe/MgO and Co/MgO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, M.

    2007-07-11

    In this thesis the electronic structure of Fe/MgO{sub x} and Co/MgO{sub x} ferromagnet-insulator interfaces, representing material systems which are widely used in magnetic tunnel junctions, is studied by means of spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The photoemission studies focus particularly on the response of the ferromagnetic electronic system in contact with MgO of varying stoichiometries, as this reflects the mechanisms of metal-oxide bonding at real ferromagnet-insulator interfaces. The correlation between chemical bonding and electronic structure formation is analyzed by combining information from core- and valence-band photoemission spectroscopy. The spectral features are compared to band structure calculations, which are performed using the SPR-KKR method. The Fe/MgO and Co/MgO systems are prepared by molecular beam epitaxy under ultrahigh vacuum conditions on well-defined (4 x 6) GaAs(001) substrates. A structural analysis by means of low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) reveals their body-centered cubic crystalline structure, whereas the chemical characterization by Auger electron spectroscopy is used to quantify the chemical environment at the sample surfaces. The magnetic analysis, using the magneto-optical Kerr effect, reveals the uniaxial anisotropy of the ferromagnetic layers. A crucial parameter is given by the MgO degree of oxidation, which is addressed by means of core-level spectroscopy and quantified by suitable fitting procedures of the Mg 2p core level. The results of the photoemission experiments show, that the electronic structure of the Fe/MgO and Co/MgO ferromagnet/insulator interfaces and, consequently, the interfacial spin polarization are sensitively controlled by the interface chemistry. In particular, three distinct scenarios are identified: the nearly stoichiometric, the oxygen-deficient and the over-oxidized ferromagnet/MgO interface. Each case is defined by innate characteristics of the electronic structure at

  19. Crystal structures of the G protein Gi alpha 1 complexed with GDP and Mg2+: a crystallographic titration experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, D E; Sprang, S R

    1998-10-13

    The effect of Mg2+ binding on the conformation of the inactive GDP-bound complex of the heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunit Gi alpha 1 has been investigated by X-ray crystallography. Crystal structures of the Gi alpha 1.GDP complex were determined after titration with 5, 10, 100, and 200 mM Mg2+. Comparison of these structures with that of the Mg2+-free complex revealed Mg2+ bound at the same site as observed in the structure of the active, Gi alpha 1. GTP gamma S.Mg2+-bound complex of Gi alpha 1, with a similar coordination scheme except for the substitution of a water molecule for an oxygen ligand of the gamma-phosphate of Gi alpha 1.GTP gamma S. Mg2+. In contrast to the GDP.Mg2+ complex of Gt alpha and of other G proteins, switch I residues of Gi alpha 1 participate in Mg2+ binding and undergo conformational changes as a consequence of Mg2+ binding. Partial order is induced in switch II, which is disordered in the Mg2+-free complex, but no order is observed in the switch III region. This contrasts with the GDP.Mg2+ complex of Gt alpha in which both switch II and III switch are ordered. Mg2+ binding also induces binding of an SO42- molecule to the active site in a manner which may mimic a Gi alpha 1.GDP.PO42-.Mg2+ product complex. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  20. Molecular imprinting sensor based on quantum weak measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongmei; He, Qinghua; He, Yonghong; Xin, Meiguo; Zhang, Yilong; Shen, Zhiyuan

    2017-08-15

    A new type of sensing protocol, based on a high precision metrology of quantum weak measurement, was first proposed for molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) sensor. The feasibility, sensitivity and selectivity of weak measurement based MIP (WMMIP) sensor were experimentally demonstrated with bovine serum albumin (BSA). Weak measurement system exhibits high sensitivity to the optical phase shift corresponding to the refractive index change, which is induced by the specific capture of target protein molecules with its recognition sites. The recognition process can be finally characterized by the central wavelength shift of output spectra through weak value amplification. In our experiment, we prepared BSA@MIP with modified reversed-phase microemulsion method, and coated it on the internal surface of measuring channels assembled into the Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer based optical weak measurement system. The design of this home-built optical system makes it possible to detect analyte in real time. The dynamic process of the specific adsorption and concentration response to BSA from 5×10-4 to 5×10-1μg/L was achieved with a limit of detection (LOD) of 8.01×10-12g/L. This WMMIP shows superiority in accuracy, fast response and low cost. Furthermore, real-time monitoring system can creatively promote the performance of MIP in molecular analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Elliptic and weakly coercive systems of operators in Sobolev spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limanskiĭ, D. V.; Malamud, Mark M.

    2008-12-01

    It is known that an elliptic system \\{P_j(x,D)\\}_1^N of order l is weakly coercive in \\overset{\\circ}{W}{}^l_{\\!\\infty}(\\mathbb R^n), that is, all differential monomials of order \\le l-1 on C_0^\\infty(\\mathbb R^n)-functions are subordinated to this system in the L^\\infty-norm. Conditions for the converse result are found and other properties of weakly coercive systems are investigated. An analogue of the de Leeuw-Mirkil theorem is obtained for operators with variable coefficients: it is shown that an operator P(x,D) of n\\ge 3 variables with constant principal part is weakly coercive in \\overset{\\circ}{W}{}^l_{\\!\\infty}(\\mathbb R^n) if and only if it is elliptic. A similar result is obtained for systems \\{P_j(D)\\}_1^N with constant coefficients under the condition n\\ge 2N+1 and with several restrictions on the symbols P_j(\\xi). A complete description of differential polynomials of two variables which are weakly coercive in \\overset{\\circ}{W}{}^l_{\\!\\infty}(\\mathbb R^2) is given. Wide classes of systems with constant coefficients which are weakly coercive in \\overset{\\circ}{W}{}^l_{\\!\\infty}(\\mathbb R^n), but non-elliptic are constructed. Bibliography: 32 titles.

  2. Weak-Values Metrological Techniques for Parameter Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Rincon, Julian Rodrigo

    Precision measurements are bounded by the Standard Quantum Limit, and preparing non-classical states is often used to circumvent such a limit. In all cases, it is common to improve the precision in a parameter estimation procedure by averaging measurements of a large ensemble of identically prepared systems. However, such a task cannot be performed indefinitely due to sources of technical noise setting an experimental bound. Weak-Value Amplification (WVA) allows one to overcome some of these issues by amplifying a signal of interest above the technical-noise floor. This built-in robustness to external sources of noise relies on a weak coupling to a meter and postselection. In this document we evaluate, theoretically and experimentally, under what circumstances the technique is superior to non-postselected standard techniques. We also present a novel protocol where a WVA-like response is induced in an optical homodyne-type detection technique. We dub this technique Almost-Balanced Weak Values (ABWV) and present three experimental measurements of different physical velocities to evaluate the practical advantages over the well-known technique of WVA. In addition, we point out the existence of a third postselected-weak-measurements technique for metrology, Inverse Weak Value (IWV), that has been ignored by the scientific community. We use this protocol to measure ultra small tilts of a mirror in a Sagnac interferometer. We report all three techniques as complementary to each other, and show their robustness for low-frequency signals.

  3. Experimentally quantifying the advantages of weak-value-based metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viza, Gerardo I.; Martínez-Rincón, Julián; Alves, Gabriel B.; Jordan, Andrew N.; Howell, John C.

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the relative advantages of implementing weak-value-based metrology versus standard methods. While the techniques outlined herein apply more generally, we measure small optical beam deflections both using a Sagnac interferometer with a monitored dark port (the weak-value-based technique), and by focusing the entire beam to a split detector (the standard technique). By introducing controlled external transverse detector modulations and transverse beam deflection momentum modulations, we quantify the mitigation of these sources in the weak-value-based experiment versus the standard focusing experiment. The experiments are compared using a combination of deterministic and stochastic methods. In all cases, the weak-value technique performs the same or better than the standard technique by up to two orders of magnitude in precision for our parameters. We further measure the statistical efficiency of the weak-value-based technique. By postselecting on 1 % of the photons, we obtain 99 % of the available Fisher information of the beam deflection parameter.

  4. Spectral Properties of AGN with Very Weak [O III] Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovacevic, J.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The spectral properties of a sample of 58 Active GalacticNuclei (AGN spectra, in which emission [O~III] $lambdalambda$4959, 5007 AA lines are weak or totally absent, are analyzed. In order to investigate thephysical reason for the [O~III] emission suppression, the spectral propertiesof the weak [O~III] spectra sample are compared with the same properties of asample of 269 spectra with the strong [O~III] lines. The spectra are obtainedfrom Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS Database. It is found that the objectswith the weak or absent [O~III] $lambdalambda$4959, 5007 AA linesgenerally have the high continuum luminosities (log($lambda$L$_{5100}$ $>$45, that they are very rare at smaller redshifts ($z <$ 0.3 and that theyusually have strong starburst influence. From the sample with weak or absent[O~III] lines, two boundary subgroups may be distinguished: the subgroup witha strong H$beta$ narrow component and subgroup with a very weak or negligibleH$beta$ narrow component. The physical causes for the [O~III] linessuppressing are probably different in these two subgroups: the [O~III] linesare absent in objects with strong narrow H$beta$ probably because of strongstarburst (SB activity, which produces high density of the gas, while in theobjects with the negligible narrow H$beta$, the reason for [O~III] and narrowH$beta$ suppression may be a low covering factor.

  5. Weak electric fields detectability in a noisy neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jia; Deng, Bin; Qin, Yingmei; Men, Cong; Wang, Jiang; Wei, Xile; Sun, Jianbing

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the detectability of weak electric field in a noisy neural network based on Izhikevich neuron model systematically. The neural network is composed of excitatory and inhibitory neurons with similar ratio as that in the mammalian neocortex, and the axonal conduction delays between neurons are also considered. It is found that the noise intensity can modulate the detectability of weak electric field. Stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon induced by white noise is observed when the weak electric field is added to the network. It is interesting that SR almost disappeared when the connections between neurons are cancelled, suggesting the amplification effects of the neural coupling on the synchronization of neuronal spiking. Furthermore, the network parameters, such as the connection probability, the synaptic coupling strength, the scale of neuron population and the neuron heterogeneity, can also affect the detectability of the weak electric field. Finally, the model sensitivity is studied in detail, and results show that the neural network model has an optimal region for the detectability of weak electric field signal.

  6. Learning from Weak and Noisy Labels for Semantic Segmentation

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Zhiwu

    2016-04-08

    A weakly supervised semantic segmentation (WSSS) method aims to learn a segmentation model from weak (image-level) as opposed to strong (pixel-level) labels. By avoiding the tedious pixel-level annotation process, it can exploit the unlimited supply of user-tagged images from media-sharing sites such as Flickr for large scale applications. However, these ‘free’ tags/labels are often noisy and few existing works address the problem of learning with both weak and noisy labels. In this work, we cast the WSSS problem into a label noise reduction problem. Specifically, after segmenting each image into a set of superpixels, the weak and potentially noisy image-level labels are propagated to the superpixel level resulting in highly noisy labels; the key to semantic segmentation is thus to identify and correct the superpixel noisy labels. To this end, a novel L1-optimisation based sparse learning model is formulated to directly and explicitly detect noisy labels. To solve the L1-optimisation problem, we further develop an efficient learning algorithm by introducing an intermediate labelling variable. Extensive experiments on three benchmark datasets show that our method yields state-of-the-art results given noise-free labels, whilst significantly outperforming the existing methods when the weak labels are also noisy.

  7. Towards liquid-helium-free, persistent-mode MgB2 MRI magnets: FBML experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2017-05-01

    In this article I present our experience at the Magnet Technology Division of the MIT Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory on liquid-helium (LHe)-free, persistent-mode MgB2 MRI magnets. Before reporting on our MgB2 magnets, I first summarize the basic work that we began in the late 1990s to develop LHe-free, high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnets cooled in solid cryogen—I begin by discussing the enabling feature, particularly of solid nitrogen (SN2), for adiabatic HTS magnets. The next topic is our first LHe-free, SN2-HTS magnet, for which we chose Bi2223 because in the late 1990s Bi2223 was the only HTS available to build an HTS magnet. I then move on to two MgB2 magnets, I and II, developed after discovery of MgB2 in 2000. The SN2-MgB2 Magnet II—0.5 T/240 mm, SN2-cooled, and operated in persistent mode—was completed in January 2016. The final major topic in this article is a tabletop LHe-free, persistent-mode 1.5 T/70 mm SN2-MgB2 ‘finger’ MRI magnet for osteoporosis screening—we expect to begin this project in 2017. Before concluding this article, I present my current view on challenges and prospects for MgB2 MRI magnets.

  8. Proton resonance elastic scattering of $^{30}$Mg for single particle structure of $^{31}$Mg

    CERN Multimedia

    The single particle structure of $^{31}$Mg, which is located in the so-called “island of inversion”, will be studied through measuring Isobaric Analog Resonances (IARs) of bound states of $^{31}$Mg. They are located in the high excitation energy of $^{31}$Al. We are going to determine the spectroscopic factors and angular momenta of the parent states by measuring the excitation function of the proton resonance elastic scattering around 0 degrees in the laboratory frame with around 3 MeV/nucleon $^{30}$Mg beam. The present study will reveal the shell evolution around $^{32}$Mg. In addition, the spectroscopic factor of the (7/2)$^{−}$ state which was not yet determined experimentally, may allow one to study the shape coexistence in this nucleus.

  9. Quantum weak and modular values in enlarged Hilbert spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Le Bin; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2018-01-01

    We introduce an enlarged state, which combines both pre- and postselection states at a given time t in between the pre- and postselection. Based on this form, quantum weak and modular values can be completely interpreted as expectation values of a linear combination of given operators in the enlarged Hilbert space. This formalism thus enables us to describe and measure the weak and modular values at any time dynamically. A protocol for implementing an enlarged Hamiltonian has also been proposed and applied to a simple example of a single spin under an external magnetic field. In addition, the time-dependent weak and modular values for pre- and postselection density matrices mapping onto an enlarged density matrix are also discussed.

  10. Identification and classification of weak layers in the snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Klimenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the role of vertical snowpack structure for snow avalanche formation and describes the idea of «structural instability». It aims at enhancing the knowledge about transition mechanisms between stable and unstable states of snowpack and snow avalanches release. Structural instability implies the presence of weak layer or interface in vertical snowpack profile. Type of snow failure and avalanche characteristics are completely defined by snowpack state and properties. Thus wide variety of genetic types of snow avalanches indicates the existence of structural instability of different types. The detailed analysis of scientific publications and field observations led to the creation of a new classification of weak layers. The layers are classified basing on their cohesiveness, the causes of initial disturbance and internal and external processes which form a weak layer. The classification is a necessary part of global method which allows assessing snowpack stability using modern physical models of snow cover evolution.

  11. Testing the Weak Form Efficiency of Karachi Stock Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Arshad Haroon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In an efficient market, share prices reflect all available information. The study of efficient market hypothesis helps to take right decisions related to investments. In this research,weak form efficiency has been tested of Karachi Stock Exchange—KSE covering the period of 2nd November 1991 to 2nd November 2011. Descriptive statistics indicated the absence of weak form efficiency while results of non-parametric tests, showed consistency as well. We employed non-parametric tests were KS Goodness-of-Fit test,run test and autocorrelation test to find out serial independency of the data. Results prove that KSE is not weak-form-efficient. This happens because KSE is an emerging market and there, it has been observed that information take time to be processed. Thus it can besaid that technical analysis may be applied to gain abnormal returns.

  12. Non-perturbative aspects in a weakly interacting Higgs sector

    CERN Document Server

    Maas, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Just like the weakly interacting QED can support non-perturbative phenomena, like atoms, so can the weak and Higgs interactions. Especially, there are strong field-theoretical arguments that only bound states can be the (quasi-)asymptotic physical degrees of freedom of this sector. After a brief review of these arguments, the 2-point, 3-point and 4-point correlation functions of the Higgs-W system are determined using lattice gauge theory. The results support a conjectured duality between elementary states and bound states for weak Higgs self-interactions. This leads to relations between the bound states and the experimentally observed particles. Interestingly, these may yield pseudo-scalar admixtures at the Higgs energy, and possibly a faint standard-model signal in the channel where a Kaluza-Klein graviton would be expected.

  13. Enhancing teleportation fidelity by means of weak measurements or reversal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Liang, E-mail: lqiu@cumt.edu.cn [College of Sciences, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Tang, Gang; Yang, Xianqing [College of Sciences, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Wang, Anmin [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2014-11-15

    The enhancement of teleportation fidelity by weak measurement or quantum measurement reversal is investigated. One qubit of a maximally entangled state undergoes the amplitude damping, and the subsequent application of weak measurement or quantum measurement reversal could improve the teleportation fidelity beyond the classical region. The improvement could not be attributed to the increasing of entanglement, quantum discord, classical correlation or total correlation. We declare that it should be owed to the probabilistic nature of the method. - Highlights: • The method’s probabilistic nature should be responsible for the improvement. • Quantum or classical correlation cannot explain the improvement. • The receiver cannot apply weak measurements. • The sender’s quantum measurement reversal is only useful for |Ψ{sup ±}〉.

  14. Competition among networks highlights the power of the weak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranzo, Jaime; Buldú, Javier M.; Aguirre, Jacobo

    2016-11-01

    The unpreventable connections between real networked systems have recently called for an examination of percolation, diffusion or synchronization phenomena in multilayer networks. Here we use network science and game theory to explore interactions in networks-of-networks and model these as a game for gaining importance. We propose a viewpoint where networks choose the connection strategies, in contrast with classical approaches where nodes are the active players. Specifically, we investigate how creating paths between networks leads to different Nash equilibria that determine their structural and dynamical properties. In a wide variety of cases, selecting adequate connections leads to a cooperative solution that allows weak networks to overcome the strongest opponent. Counterintuitively, each weak network can induce a global transition to such cooperative configuration regardless of the actions of the strongest network. This power of the weak reveals a critical dominance of the underdogs in the fate of networks-of-networks.

  15. Horizontal mergers and weak and strong competition commissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Bojan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse the horizontal merger of companies in an already concentrated industry. The participants in mergers are obliged to submit notification to the Competition Commission but they also have the option of rejecting the merger. At the time of the notification submission the participants do not know whether the Commission is strong or weak, and they can complain to the Court if the Commission prohibits the merger. We model the strategic interaction between Participants and Commission in a dynamic game of incomplete information and determine weak perfect Bayesian equilibria. The main finding of our paper is that Participants will base their decision to submit notification on their belief in a weak Commission decision and will almost completely ignore the possibility of a strong Commission decision. We also provide a detailed examination of one case from Serbian regulatory practice, which coincides with the results of our game theoretical model.

  16. Using evidence from different sources: an example using paracetamol 1000 mg plus codeine 60 mg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lesley A; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J; Gavaghan, David

    2001-01-01

    Background Meta-analysis usually restricts the information pooled, for instance using only randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. This neglects other types of high quality information. This review explores using different information for the combination of paracetamol 1000 mg and codeine 60 mg in acute postoperative pain. Results Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of paracetamol 1000 mg and codeine 60 mg had an NNT of 2.2 (95% confidence interval 1.7 to 2.9) for at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours in three trials with 197 patients. Computer simulation of randomised trials demonstrated 92% confidence that the simulated NNT was within ± 0.5 of the underlying value of 2.2 with this number of patients. The result was supported a rational dose-response relationship for different doses of paracetamol and codeine in 17 additional trials with 1,195 patients. Three controlled trials lacking a placebo and with 117 patients treated with of paracetamol 1000 mg and codeine 60 mg had 73% (95%CI 56% to 81%) of patients with at least 50% pain relief, compared with 57% (48% to 66%) in placebo controlled trials. Six trials in acute pain were omitted because of design issues, like the use of different pain measures or multiple dosing regimens. In each paracetamol 1000 mg and codeine 60 mg was shown to be better than placebo or comparators for at least one measure. Conclusions Different designs of high quality trials can be used to support limited information used in meta-analysis without recourse to low quality trials that might be biased. PMID:11231885

  17. Flunarizine in migraine prophylaxis: efficacy and tolerability of 5 mg and 10 mg dose levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centonze, V; Magrone, D; Vino, M; Caporaletti, P; Attolini, E; Campanale, G; Albano, O

    1990-02-01

    The use of flunarizine, a drug which has proven its efficacy in migraine, is often associated with important side effects. The aim of this paper has been to check their incidence at different dose levels (5 mg vs 10 mg). Our data confirm the occurrence of important side effects (in particular weight gain); on the other hand, they emphasize the dose-dependency of the side effects.

  18. Degree of Enhancement on Contrast Enhanced Spectral Mammography (CESM) and Lesion Type on Mammography (MG): Comparison Based on Histological Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łuczyńska, Elżbieta; Niemiec, Joanna; Hendrick, Edward; Heinze, Sylwia; Jaszczyński, Janusz; Jakubowicz, Jerzy; Sas-Korczyńska, Beata; Rys, Janusz

    2016-10-21

    BACKGROUND Contrast enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) is a new method of breast cancer diagnosis in which an iodinated contrast agent is injected and dual-energy mammography is obtained in multiple views of the breasts. The aim of this study was to compare the degree of enhancement on CESM with lesion characteristics on mammography (MG) and lesion histology in women with suspicious breast lesions. MATERIAL AND METHODS The degree of enhancement on CESM (absent, weak, medium, or strong) was compared to lesion characteristics on MG (mass, mass with microcalcifications, or microcalcifications alone) and histology (infiltrating carcinoma, intraductal carcinoma, or benign) to compare sensitivity of the two modalities and to establish correlations that might improve diagnostic accuracy. RESULTS Among 225 lesions identified with CESM and MG, histological evaluation revealed 143 carcinomas (127 infiltrating, 16 intraductal) and 82 benign lesions. This is the largest cohort investigated with CESM to date. The sensitivity of CESM was higher than that of MG (100% and 90%, respectively, p=0.010). Medium or strong enhancement on CESM and the presence of a mass on MG was the most likely indictor of malignancy (55.1% p=0.002). Among benign lesions, 60% presented as enhancement on CESM (were false-positive), and most frequently as medium or weak enhancement, together with a mass on MG (53%, p=0.047). Unfortunately, the study did not find combinations of MG findings and CESM enhancement patterns that would be helpful in defining false-positive lesions. We observed systematic overestimation of maximum lesion diameter on CESM compared to histology (mean difference: 2.29 mm). CONCLUSIONS Strong or medium enhancement on CESM and mass or mass with microcalcifications on MG were strong indicators of malignant transformation. However, we found no combination of MG and CESM characteristics helpful in defining false-positive lesions.

  19. Nuclear molecules and their deexcitation channels, case of Cr{sup 48} generated by the Mg{sup 24} + Mg{sup 24} resonant reaction; Molecules nucleaires et leurs modes de desexcitation: le cas du {sup 48}Cr et de la reaction resonante {sup 24}Mg + {sup 24}Mg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salsac, M.D

    2006-12-15

    This work is dedicated to the study of the resonance (E = 45,7 MeV, J{sup {pi}} = 36{sup +}, {gamma} = 170 keV) of the Mg{sup 24} + Mg{sup 24} composite nucleus. The PRISMA fragment spectrometer combined with the CLARA gamma detector have been used to study the deexcitation through inelastic channels of the composite system. It is showed that the resonant flux is mainly observed in the inelastic channels involving the contributions 0{sup +}, 2{sup +} and 4{sup +} of the band based on the fundamental state of Mg{sup 24}. This is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions of the molecular model of Uegaki and Abe. Only 30% of the resonant flux has been observed in the inelastic channels and in the transfer channels. The missing flux has been investigated in the fusion/evaporation deexcitation channels with the GASP gamma multi-detector. A weak resonant effect has been highlighted in some residual nuclei such as Ti{sup 45}, Ca{sup 42} and K{sup 39}. A link between the prolate di-nucleus Ca{sup 48} generated in Mg{sup 24} + Mg{sup 24} reaction and a Cr{sup 48} nucleus that has just undergone a Jacobi transition from oblate to prolate, has been discovered. To explain a part of the missing flux it is suggested that the dipolar giant resonance might feed very deformed nuclei through particle emission.

  20. Tailoring acidity of HZSM-5 nanoparticles for methyl bromide dehydrobromination by Al and Mg incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Zhongdong; Xing, Wei; Komarneni, Sridhar; Yan, Zifeng; Gao, Xionghou; Zhou, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Three kinds of HZSM-5 nanoparticles with different acidity were tailored by impregnating MgO or varying Si/Al ratios. Both the textural and acidic properties of the as-prepared nanoparticles were characterized by nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ammonia temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR or Py-FTIR). It was found that the intensity of Lewis acid sites with weak strength was enhanced by impregnating MgO or reducing Al concentration, and such an enhancement could be explained by the formation of Mg(OH)(+) or charge unbalance of the MgO framework on the surface of HZSM-5 support. The effect of HZSM-5 nanoparticles' acidity on methyl bromide dehydrobromination as catalyst was evaluated. As the results, MgHZ-360 catalyst with the highest concentration of Lewis acid sites showed excellent stability, which maintained methyl bromide conversion of up 97% in a period of 400 h on stream. Coke characterization by BET measurements and TGA/DTA and GC/MS analysis revealed that polymethylated naphthalenes species were formed outside the channels of the catalyst with higher acid intensity and higher Brønsted acid concentration during the initial period of reaction, while graphitic carbon formed in the channels of catalyst with lower acid intensity and higher Lewis acid concentration during the stable stage.

  1. A first-principles study of the thermodynamic and electronic properties of Mg and MgH2 nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinxing; Zhang, Ruiqi; Yang, Jinlong

    2016-07-28

    In this article, we studied the thermodynamic and electronic properties of Mg and MgH2 nanowires with different diameters, and elucidated why MgH2 nanowires are good hydrogen storage materials through first-principles calculations. Previous experiments have shown that the orientation relationship between Mg and MgH2 nanowires is the Mg[0001] direction parallel to the MgH2[110] direction. In our calculations, Mg nanowires oriented along the [0001] direction and MgH2 nanowires oriented along the [110] direction were built from bulk Mg and MgH2 crystals, respectively. We found that as the diameters of Mg and MgH2 nanowires decrease, Mg and MgH2 nanowires become more unstable, and the hydrogen desorption energies and temperatures of MgH2 nanowires decrease. That is, the thinner the MgH2 nanowires get, the more dramatically hydrogen desorption temperatures (Td) will decrease. Meanwhile, we also found that when the diameters of MgH2 nanowires are larger than 1.94 nm, the Td almost maintain the same value at about 440 K, only about 40 K lower than that of bulk MgH2 crystal; if the diameters are less than 1.94 nm, the Td reduce very quickly. In particular, compared with bulk MgH2 crystal, the Td of the thinnest MgH2 nanowire with a diameter of 0.63 nm can be reduced by 164 K. In addition, the electronic structure calculations showed that Mg nanowires are metals, while MgH2 nanowires are semiconductors. In particular, our results showed that the electronic structures of MgH2 nanowires are influenced by the surface effect and quantum size effect. That is to say, the band gaps of MgH2 nanowires are controlled by surface electronic states and the size of MgH2 nanowires.

  2. A thermokinetic model for Mg-Si couple formation in Al-Mg-Si alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, J.; Shan, Y. V.; Kozeschnik, E.; Fischer, F. D.

    2016-03-01

    Mg-Si couples formed from atomic Mg and Si represent the first step in Mg-Si cluster formation in a dilute Al-Mg-Si system. Based on the thermodynamic extremal principle, a kinetic model for Mg-Si couple formation is developed. The model utilizes the trapping concept for the calculation of Gibbs energy of the non-equilibrium system and provides a generalized (multiplicative) form of the Oriani equation for description of the equilibrium state. The dissipation in the system accounts for diffusion of both Mg and Si atoms in the lattice. The model is compared with the classical Lidiard and Howard equilibrium theory. Some demonstrative examples are presented. Finally the model is applied to an experimentally studied system. Good quantitative agreement with quenching experiments is obtained, if, simultaneously, the impact of excess quenched-in vacancies and their gradual annihilation in the system, which has been already treated in a previous paper, are accounted for. The model is generally applicable for any couple (and pair) formation.

  3. Children's ambiguous understanding of weak and strong quantifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik-Jan Smits

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite suggestions in the literature that the semantics of many might be the key for understanding children’s non-adult-like interpretations of quantified sentences (cf. Drozd 2001, Geurts 2003, experimental data on the acquisition of weak quantifiers like many is rare. This paper investigates children’s comprehension of weak (many versus strong (many of, all quantifiers in English. In particular, by means of a truth-value judgment task, taking the semantic and syntactic characteristics of many into account, we tested whether 28 children aged between four and seven understand the ambiguous nature of many as described in the literature (Partee, 1988 and whether they transfer this ambiguity to many of and all. The results show that children have an ambiguous quantifier system for both strong and weak quantifiers. This runs counter the idea that the child always prefers a reading of many in which the arguments seem to ‘switch’ (as for adults in Many French have won the Tour de France, resulting in the interpretation Many Tour de France winners are French, as predicted by Drozd and Van Loosbroek’s (1999 Weak Quantification Hypothesis. On the basis of our experimental results on children’s understanding of both weak and strong quantifiers, we conclude that children’s non-adult interpretations of quantified sentences are due to the ambiguous nature of (weak quantifiers. This presents the language learner with the difficult, but necessary, task to distinguish between those different kinds of readings and understand their different semantic and syntactic representations in order to converge with the target language.

  4. Thermodynamic Property Study of Nanostructured Mg-H, Mg-Ni-H, and Mg-Cu-H Systems by High Pressure DSC Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaiyu Shao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mg, Ni, and Cu nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogen plasma metal reaction method. Preparation of Mg2Ni and Mg2Cu alloys from these Mg, Ni, and Cu nanoparticles has been successfully achieved in convenient conditions. High pressure differential scanning calorimetry (DSC technique in hydrogen atmosphere was applied to study the synthesis and thermodynamic properties of the hydrogen absorption/desorption processes of nanostructured Mg-H, Mg-Ni-H, and Mg-Cu-H systems. Van’t Hoff equation of Mg-Ni-H system as well as formation enthalpy and entropy of Mg2NiH4 was obtained by high pressure DSC method. The results agree with the ones by pressure-composition isotherm (PCT methods in our previous work and the ones in literature.

  5. 1-Cyanomethyl-1,4-diazoniabicyclo[2.2.2]octane tetrabromidocadmate(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wei

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the title salt, (C8H15N3[CdBr4], four Br atoms coordinate the CdII atom in a distorted tetrahedral geometry. In the crystal, weak N—H...Br interactions connect the anion to three symmetry-related cations. The crystal structure also displays very weak C—H...Br interactions.

  6. Magnesium isotope fractionation between brucite [Mg(OH)2] and Mg aqueous species: Implications for silicate weathering and biogeochemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiqiang; Beard, Brian L.; Li, Chengxiang; Johnson, Clark M.

    2014-05-01

    Brucite, with its octahedral structure, has a lattice configuration that is similar to the Mg-bearing octahedral layers in phyllosilicates. Understanding stable Mg isotope fractionation between brucite and aqueous solution therefore bears on interpretation of Mg isotope data in natural weathering systems. In this study, we experimentally determined Mg isotope fractionation between brucite and two Mg aqueous species, the free Mg aquo ion ([Mg(OH2)6]2+) and EDTA-bonded Mg (Mg-EDTA2-). Results from recrystallization and brucite synthesis experiments suggest mild preferential partitioning of light Mg isotopes into brucite compared to Mg aquo ions at low temperatures, where measured ΔMgbrucite-Mg26 fractionation increased from ca. -0.3‰ at 7 °C, to ca. -0.2‰ at 22 °C, to ca. 0‰ at 40 °C. MgO hydrolysis experiments in EDTA-bearing solutions suggest that the ΔMgbrucite-Mg-EDTA26 fractionation is ⩾+2.0‰ at 22 °C, indicating that light Mg isotopes strongly partition into Mg-EDTA complex relative to brucite, as well as relative to Mg aquo ions. Magnesium atoms in brucite, Mg aquo ions, and Mg-EDTA complexes are all octahedrally coordinated, and the measured Mg isotope fractionations correlate with average bond lengths for Mg. Aqueous Mg ions have the shortest bond length among the three phases, and enrich heavy Mg isotopes relative to brucite and Mg-EDTA. In contrast, Mg-EDTA has the longest average bond length for Mg, and enriches light Mg isotopes relative to Mg aquo ions and brucite; the relatively long Mg-EDTA bond suggests that organically bound Mg may commonly have low 26Mg/24Mg ratios, which may explain proposed "vital" effects for stable Mg isotopes. Such relations between bond length and Mg isotope fractionation could be extended to other phyllosilicates such as serpentine- and clay-group minerals where Mg is also octahedrally coordinated.

  7. Magnesium homeostasis in cardiac myocytes of Mg-deficient rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko Tashiro

    Full Text Available To study possible modulation of Mg(2+ transport in low Mg(2+ conditions, we fed either a Mg-deficient diet or a Mg-containing diet (control to Wistar rats for 1-6 weeks. Total Mg concentrations in serum and cardiac ventricular tissues were measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Intracellular free Mg(2+ concentration ([Mg(2+]i of ventricular myocytes was measured with the fluorescent indicator furaptra. Mg(2+ transport rates, rates of Mg(2+ influx and Mg(2+ efflux, were estimated from the rates of change in [Mg(2+]i during Mg loading/depletion and recovery procedures. In Mg-deficient rats, the serum total Mg concentration (0.29±0.026 mM was significantly lower than in control rats (0.86±0.072 mM after 4-6 weeks of Mg deficiency. However, neither total Mg concentration in ventricular tissues nor [Mg(2+]i of ventricular myocytes was significantly different between Mg-deficient rats and control rats. The rates of Mg(2+ influx and efflux were not significantly different in both groups. In addition, quantitative RT-PCR revealed that Mg deficiency did not substantially change mRNA expression levels of known Mg(2+ channels/transporters (TRPM6, TRPM7, MagT1, SLC41A1 and ACDP2 in heart and kidney tissues. These results suggest that [Mg(2+]i as well as the total Mg content of cardiac myocytes, was well maintained even under chronic hypomagnesemia without persistent modulation in function and expression of major Mg(2+ channels/transporters in the heart.

  8. Weak partial metric spaces and some fixed point results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishak Altun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of partial metric p on a nonempty set X was introduced by Matthews. One of the most interesting properties of a partial metric is that p(x, x may not be zero for x e X. Also, each partial metric p on a nonempty set X generates a T0 topology on X. By omitting the small self-distance axiom of partial metric, Heckmann defined the weak partial metric space. In the present paper, we give some fixed point results on weak partial metric spaces.

  9. Weak Approximation of SDEs by Discrete-Time Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryk Zähle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the martingale problem related to the solution of an SDE on the line. It is shown that the solution of this martingale problem can be approximated by solutions of the corresponding time-discrete martingale problems under some conditions. This criterion is especially expedient for establishing the convergence of population processes to SDEs. We also show that the criterion yields a weak Euler scheme approximation of SDEs under fairly weak assumptions on the driving force of the approximating processes.

  10. Weak Interaction Studies by Precision Experiments in Nuclear Beta Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severijns, Nathal

    The framework and formalism related to the study of symmetries and the structure of the weak interaction in nuclear -decay are presented and discussed. This is illustrated with a number of selected experiments in nuclear -decay addressing the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, the search for right-handed (V+A), scalar and tensor components in the weak interaction and the search for non-Standard Model sources of time reversal violation. Finally, an outlook is given on important progress in this field that can be expected for the near future.

  11. Weak gravitational lensing with COSMOS : galaxy selection and shape measurements.

    OpenAIRE

    Leauthaud, Alexie; Massey, Richard; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Rhodes, Jason; Johnston, David E.; Capak, Peter; Heymans, Catherine; Ellis, Richard S.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Le Fevre, Oliver; Mellier, Yannick; Refregier, Alexandre; Robin, Annie C.; Scoville, Nick; Tasca, Lidia

    2007-01-01

    With a primary goal of conducting precision weak-lensing measurements from space, the COSMOS survey has imaged the largest contiguous area observed by Hubble Space Telescope to date, using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). This is the first paper in a series in which we describe our strategy for addressing the various technical challenges in the production of weak-lensing measurements from COSMOS data. We first construct a source catalog from 575 ACS/WFC tiles (1.64 deg^2) subsampled at ...

  12. Power control for wind turbines in weak grids: Project summary

    OpenAIRE

    Bindner, H.

    1999-01-01

    In many parts of the world and certainly in Europe large areas exist where the wind resources are good or very good and the grid is relatively weak due to a small population. In these areas the capacity of the grid can very often be a limiting factor forthe exploitation of the wind resource. There are two main problems concerned with wind power and weak grids. The first is the steady state voltage level. When the power consumption is low e.g. during the night the voltage of the grid can incre...

  13. A weak equivalence principle test on a suborbital rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reasenberg, Robert D; Phillips, James D, E-mail: reasenberg@cfa.harvard.ed [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2010-05-07

    We describe a Galilean test of the weak equivalence principle, to be conducted during the free fall portion of a sounding rocket flight. The test of a single pair of substances is aimed at a measurement uncertainty of sigma(eta) < 10{sup -16} after averaging the results of eight separate drops. The weak equivalence principle measurement is made with a set of four laser gauges that are expected to achieve 0.1 pm Hz{sup -1/2}. The discovery of a violation (eta not = 0) would have profound implications for physics, astrophysics and cosmology.

  14. A weak equivalence principle test on a suborbital rocket

    CERN Document Server

    Reasenberg, Robert D

    2010-01-01

    We describe a Galilean test of the weak equivalence principle, to be conducted during the free fall portion of a sounding rocket flight. The test of a single pair of substances is aimed at a measurement uncertainty of sigma(eta) < 10^-16 after averaging the results of eight separate drops. The weak equivalence principle measurement is made with a set of four laser gauges that are expected to achieve 0.1 pm Hz^-1/2. The discovery of a violation (eta not equal to 0) would have profound implications for physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  15. Weak Molecular Interactions in Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah M.; Baker, Michael; Halebian, Mary; Smith, Corinne J.

    2017-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is a process by which specific molecules are internalized from the cell periphery for delivery to early endosomes. The key stages in this step-wise process, from the starting point of cargo recognition, to the later stage of assembly of the clathrin coat, are dependent on weak interactions between a large network of proteins. This review discusses the structural and functional data that have improved our knowledge and understanding of the main weak molecular interactions implicated in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, with a particular focus on the two key proteins: AP2 and clathrin.

  16. Processing on weak electric signals by the autoregressive model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jinli; Zhao, Jiayin; Wang, Lanzhou; Li, Qiao

    2008-10-01

    A model of the autoregressive model of weak electric signals in two plants was set up for the first time. The result of the AR model to forecast 10 values of the weak electric signals is well. It will construct a standard set of the AR model coefficient of the plant electric signal and the environmental factor, and can be used as the preferences for the intelligent autocontrol system based on the adaptive characteristic of plants to achieve the energy saving on agricultural productions.

  17. On Weak and Strong 2k- bent Boolean Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    no. 1, 34–64; translation in J. Appl. Ind. Math . 5:1 (2011), 110–129. [17] N. Tokareva, Bent Functions – Results and Applications to Cryptogra- phy...On weak and strong 2k-bent Boolean functions Pantelimon Stănică Department of Applied Mathematics Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5212... functions , which we shall call (weak, strong) octa/hexadeca and in general, 2k-bent functions . We investigate relationships between these classes and

  18. High-redshift SDSS Quasars with Weak Emission Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Brandt, W. N.

    2009-01-01

    We identify a sample of 74 high-redshift quasars (z > 3) with weak emission lines from the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and present infrared, optical, and radio observations of a subsample of four objects at z > 4. These weak emission-line quasars (WLQs) constitute a prominent...... rest-frame 0.1-5 µm spectral energy distributions that are quite similar to those of normal quasars. The variability, polarization, and radio properties of WLQs are also different from those of BL Lacs, making continuum boosting by a relativistic jet an unlikely physical interpretation. The most...

  19. A Weak Comparison Principle for Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Valero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove a weak comparison principle for a reaction-diffusion system without uniqueness of solutions. We apply the abstract results to the Lotka-Volterra system with diffusion, a generalized logistic equation, and to a model of fractional-order chemical autocatalysis with decay. Moreover, in the case of the Lotka-Volterra system a weak maximum principle is given, and a suitable estimate in the space of essentially bounded functions L∞ is proved for at least one solution of the problem.

  20. Fuzzy Weak Regular, Strong and Preassociative Filters in Residuated Lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the notions of fuzzy weak regular, strong and preassociative filters are introduced with some properties of them investigated. In particular, under the context of Glivenko algebras, fuzzy weak regular filters and regular ones are equivalent and characterizations of Glivenko algebras are concluded by characterizations of fuzzy strong filters. At last the notion of fuzzy preassociative filters are defined, which are proved to coincide with fuzzy Boolean filters, and then some new alternative definitions of Boolean algebras are obtained by this type of filters.