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Sample records for weak acid solution

  1. Resistometric studies of anodic dissolution and passivation of chromium in weakly acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlepakov, M.N.; Sukhotin, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    The method of calculating the rate of Cr anodic solution according to the change of electric resistance of chromium anodes under the effect of potentiostatic polarization, is applied. The maximum corresponding to ranges of active-passive transition is absent in weakly acid solutions with pH>3. The range of existence of active-passive transition is expanded to pH approximately 5.2. The existence of a dissolving section in Cr in the chemical mechanism is proved. Cr passivation mechanism with the formation of passivating oxide of a complex composition is suggested

  2. Propolis as a green corrosion inhibitor for bronze in weakly acidic solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvara, Simona; Bostan, Roxana; Bobis, Otilia; Găină, Luiza; Popa, Florin; Mena, Vicente; Souto, Ricardo M.

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, the inhibitive action of natural propolis on bronze corrosion in a weakly acidic solution containing Na2SO4 and NaHCO3 at pH 5 was evaluated using multiscale electrochemical techniques, namely potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning vibrating electrode technique measurements. The major constituents of propolis were identified by HPLC. Surface characterization was performed by SEM-EDX and AFM analysis. Experiments were performed as a function of the propolis concentration and immersion time in the corrosive electrolyte. The obtained results showed that propolis presents good anticorrosive properties on bronze, acting as a mixed-type inhibitor, but its protective effectiveness is time-dependent. The highest inhibiting efficiency of 98.9% was obtained in the presence of 100 ppm propolis, after about 12 h of exposure to inhibitor-containing electrolyte through the stabilization of Cu2O on the bronze surface. The inhibitive properties of propolis on bronze corrosion are likely due to the adsorption of its main constituents (flavonoids and phenolic compounds), through the oxygen atoms in their functional groups and aromatic rings, which have been evidenced by FT-IR spectra. The adsorption of propolis on bronze was found to follow Langmuir adsorption isotherm.

  3. Reactions of vanadium(5) with aluminium(3) in weakly acid aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditrikh, I.V.; Makhno, A.Ya.

    1996-01-01

    Conditions of vanadium(5) heteropolycompounds formation in aqueous solutions containing aluminium(3) have been studied. By the methods of potentiometry and conductometry in solutions of Al(NO 3 ) 3 -NaVO 3 salt mixture the formation of complexes with the ratios [Al 3+ ]:[V 5+ ]=1:3, 1:6 and 1:12 has been ascertained. A salt of gross formula 3NaO · Al 2 ) 3 · 12V 2 O 5 · 67H 2 O has been isolated. 3 refs.; 2 figs

  4. Evaluation of some phenothiazine derivatives as corrosion inhibitors for bronze in weakly acidic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostan, Roxana; Varvara, Simona; Găină, Luiza; Mureşan, Liana Maria

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Phenothiazine derivatives are efficient inhibitors for bronze corrosion. ► Potentiodynamic polarization and EIS were used to elucidate inhibition mechanism. ► Adsorption of phenothiazine derivatives on bronze surface obeys Langmuir isotherm. ► A correlation between energy gaps and inhibition efficiencies values was obtained. - Abstract: Four phenothiazine derivatives have been tested as inhibitors for bronze corrosion in a solution containing Na 2 SO 4 and NaHCO 3 (pH 5). Electrochemical investigations (potentiodynamic polarisation and impedance measurements) revealed that all phenothiazine derivatives exert a protective effect against bronze corrosion and, in some cases their inhibition efficiency exceeds 90% at concentration level as low as 75 μM. An adherent layer of organic molecules chemisorbed on bronze surface is responsible for the protective effect of the investigated compounds. Adsorption of phenothiazine derivatives on bronze obeys Langmuir isotherm. Correlation between quantum chemical calculations and inhibition efficiency of the investigated compounds was discussed using DFT method.

  5. Determination of acid ionization constants for weak acids by osmometry and the instrumental analysis self-evaluation feedback approach to student preparation of solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakolesha, Nyanguila

    One focus of this work was to develop of an alternative method to conductivity for determining the acid ionization constants. Computer-controlled osmometry is one of the emerging analytical tools in industrial research and clinical laboratories. It is slowly finding its way into chemistry laboratories. The instrument's microprocessor control ensures shortened data collection time, repeatability, accuracy, and automatic calibration. The equilibrium constants of acetic acid, chloroacetic acid, bromoacetic acid, cyanoacetic acid, and iodoacetic acid have been measured using osmometry and their values compared with the existing literature values obtained, usually, from conductometric measurements. Ionization constant determined by osmometry for the moderately strong weak acids were in reasonably good agreement with literature values. The results showed that two factors, the ionic strength and the osmotic coefficient, exert opposite effects in solutions of such weak acids. Another focus of the work was analytical chemistry students solution preparation skills. The prevailing teacher-structured experiments leave little room for students' ingenuity in quantitative volumetric analysis. The purpose of this part of the study was to improve students' skills in making solutions using instrument feedback in a constructivist-learning model. After making some solutions by weighing and dissolving solutes or by serial dilution, students used the spectrophotometer and the osmometer to compare their solutions with standard solutions. Students perceived the instrument feedback as a nonthreatening approach to monitoring the development of their skill levels and liked to clarify their understanding through interacting with an instructor-observer. An assessment of the instrument feedback and the constructivist model indicated that students would assume responsibility for their own learning if given the opportunity. This study involved 167 students enrolled in Quantitative Chemical

  6. Why is hydrofluoric acid a weak acid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayotte, Patrick; Hébert, Martin; Marchand, Patrick

    2005-11-08

    The infrared vibrational spectra of amorphous solid water thin films doped with HF at 40 K reveal a strong continuous absorbance in the 1000-3275 cm(-1) range. This so-called Zundel continuum is the spectroscopic hallmark for aqueous protons. The extensive ionic dissociation of HF at such low temperature suggests that the reaction enthalpy remains negative down to 40 K. These observations support the interpretation that dilute HF aqueous solutions behave as weak acids largely due to the large positive reaction entropy resulting from the structure making character of the hydrated fluoride ion.

  7. Influence of electro-activated solutions of weak organic acid salts on microbial quality and overall appearance of blueberries during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liato, Viacheslav; Hammami, Riadh; Aïder, Mohammed

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this work was to study the potential of diluted electro-activated solutions of weak organic acid salts (potassium acetate, potassium citrate and calcium lactate) to extend the shelf life of blueberries during post-harvest storage. The sanitizing capacity of these solutions was studied against pathogenic bacteria Listeria monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 as well as phytopathogenic fungi A. alternata, F. oxysporum and B. cinerea. The results showed that a 5-min treatment of inoculated blueberries with electro-activated solutions resulted in a 4 log CFU/g reduction in Listeria monocytogenes for all solutions. For E. coli O157:H7, the electro-activated potassium acetate and potassium citrate solutions achieved a decrease of 3.5 log CFU/g after 5 min of berry washing. The most important fungus reduction was found when blueberries were washed with an electro-activated solution of potassium acetate and a NaOCl solution. After 5 min of blueberry washing with an electro-activated potassium acetate solution, a very high reduction effect was observed for A. alternata, F. oxysporum and B. cinerea, which showed survival levels of only 2.2 ± 0.16, 0.34 ± 0.15 and 0.21 ± 0.16 log CFU/g, respectively. Regarding the effect of the washing on the organoleptic quality of blueberries, the obtained results showed no negative effect on the product color or textural profile. Finally, this work suggests that washing with electro-activated solutions of weak organic acid salts can be used to enhance the shelf-life of blueberries during post-harvest storage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Weak solutions of magma equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, E.V.

    1999-01-01

    Periodic solutions in terms of Jacobian cosine elliptic functions have been obtained for a set of values of two physical parameters for the magma equation which do not reduce to solitary-wave solutions. It was also obtained solitary-wave solutions for another set of these parameters as an infinite period limit of periodic solutions in terms of Weierstrass and Jacobian elliptic functions

  9. Weak Solution and Weakly Uniformly Bounded Solution of Impulsive Heat Equations Containing “Maximum” Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyelami, Benjamin Oyediran

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, criteria for the existence of weak solutions and uniformly weak bounded solution of impulsive heat equation containing maximum temperature are investigated and results obtained. An example is given for heat flow system with impulsive temperature using maximum temperature simulator and criteria for the uniformly weak bounded of solutions of the system are obtained.

  10. From Suitable Weak Solutions to Entropy Viscosity

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc; Pasquetti, Richard; Popov, Bojan

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the notion of suitable weak solutions for the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and discusses the relevance of this notion to Computational Fluid Dynamics. The purpose of the paper is twofold (i

  11. From Suitable Weak Solutions to Entropy Viscosity

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2010-12-16

    This paper focuses on the notion of suitable weak solutions for the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and discusses the relevance of this notion to Computational Fluid Dynamics. The purpose of the paper is twofold (i) to recall basic mathematical properties of the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and to show how they might relate to LES (ii) to introduce an entropy viscosity technique based on the notion of suitable weak solution and to illustrate numerically this concept. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  12. Natural monocrystalline pyrite as a sensor in non-aqueous solution Part I: Potentiometric titration of weak acids in, N,N-dimethylformamide, methylpyrrolidone and pyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihajlović, Lj V; Mihajlović, R P; Antonijević, M M; Vukanović, B V

    2004-11-15

    The possibility of applying natural monocrystaline pyrite as a sensor for the potentiometric titration of weak acids in N,N-dimethylformamide, methylpyrrolidone and pyridine was investigated. The potential of this electrode in N,N-dimethylformamide, methylpyrrolidone and pyridine exhibits a sub-Nernst dependence. In N,N-dimethylformamide the slope (mV/pH) is 39.0 and in methylpyrrolidone it is 45.0. The potential jumps at the titration end-point obtained in the titration of weak acids are higher than those obtained by the application of a glass electrode as the indicator electrode The potential in the course of the titration and at the titration end-point (TEP) are rapidly established. Sodium methylate, potassium hydroxide and tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) proved to be very suitable titrating agents for these titrations. The results obtained in the determination of the investigated weak acids deviate by 0.1-0.35% with respect to those obtained by using a glass electrode as the indicator electrode.

  13. Use of the sulfide mineral pyrite as electrochemical sensor in non-aqueous solutions: potentiometric titration of weak acids in acetonitrile, propionitrile and benzonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihajlović, Ljiljana; Nikolić-Mandić, Snezana; Vukanović, Branislav; Mihajlović, Randel

    2009-03-01

    Natural monocrystalline pyrite as a new indicator electrode for the potentiometric titration of weak acids in acetonitrile, propionitrile and benzonitrile was studied. The investigated electrode showed a linear dynamic response for p-toluenesulfonic acid concentrations in the range from 0.1 to 0.001 M, with a Nernstian slope of 74 mV per decade. Sodium methylate, potassium hydroxide and tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) proved to be very suitable titrating agent for this titration. The response time was less than (11 s) and the lifetime of the electrode is long. The advantages of the electrode are log-term stability, fast response, and reproducibility, while the sensor is easy to prepare and of low cost.

  14. Weak organic acid stress in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Beek, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Weak organic acids are commonly used food preservatives that protect food products from bacterial contamination. A variety of spore-forming bacterial species pose a serious problem to the food industry by causing extensive food spoilage or even food poisoning. Understanding the mechanisms of

  15. Influence of variation in mobile phase pH and solute pK(a) with the change of organic modifier fraction on QSRRs of hydrophobicity and RP-HPLC retention of weakly acidic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shu-ying; Liang, Chao; Zou, Kuan; Qiao, Jun-qin; Lian, Hong-zhen; Ge, Xin

    2012-11-15

    The variation in mobile phase pH and ionizable solute dissociation constant (pK(a)) with the change of organic modifier fraction in hydroorganic mobile phase has seemingly been a troublesome problem in studies and applications of reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Most of the early studies regarding the RP-HPLC of acid-base compounds have to measure the actual pH of the mixed mobile phase rigorously, sometimes bringing difficulties in the practices of liquid chromatographic separation. In this paper, the effect of this variation on the apparent n-octanol/water partition coefficient (K(ow)″) and the related quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) of logK(ow)″ vs. logk(w), the logarithm of retention factor of analytes in neat aqueous mobile phases, was investigated for weakly acidic compounds. This QSRR is commonly used as a classical method for K(ow) measurement by RP-HPLC. The theoretical and experimental derivation revealed that the variation in mobile phase pH and solute pK(a) will not affect the QSRRs of acidic compounds. This conclusion is proved to be suitable for various types of ion-suppressors, i.e., strong acid (perchloric acid), weak acid (acetic acid) and buffer salt (potassium dihydrogen phosphate/phosphoric acid, PBS). The QSRRs of logK(ow)″ vs. logk(w) were modeled by 11 substituted benzoic acids using different types of ion-suppressors in a binary methanol-water mobile phase to confirm our deduction. Although different types of ion-suppressor all can be used as mobile phase pH modifiers, the QSRR model obtained by using perchloric acid as the ion-suppressor was found to have the best result, and the slightly inferior QSRRs were obtained by using acetic acid or PBS as the ion-suppressor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Systematic review: role of acid, weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E.; Smout, A.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is gaining recognition. To quantify the proportions of reflux episodes that are acidic (pH <4), weakly acidic (pH 4-7) and weakly alkaline (pH >7) in adult patients with GERD, and to evaluate their

  17. Classical and Weak Solutions for Two Models in Mathematical Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyulov, Tihomir B.; Valkov, Radoslav L.

    2011-12-01

    We study two mathematical models, arising in financial mathematics. These models are one-dimensional analogues of the famous Black-Scholes equation on finite interval. The main difficulty is the degeneration at the both ends of the space interval. First, classical solutions are studied. Positivity and convexity properties of the solutions are discussed. Variational formulation in weighted Sobolev spaces is introduced and existence and uniqueness of the weak solution is proved. Maximum principle for weak solution is discussed.

  18. Weak Acid Ionization Constants and the Determination of Weak Acid-Weak Base Reaction Equilibrium Constants in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyasulu, Frazier; McMills, Lauren; Barlag, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory to determine the equilibrium constants of weak acid negative weak base reactions is described. The equilibrium constants of component reactions when multiplied together equal the numerical value of the equilibrium constant of the summative reaction. The component reactions are weak acid ionization reactions, weak base hydrolysis…

  19. Existence of Weak Solutions for a Nonlinear Elliptic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert RobertP

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the existence of weak solutions to the following Dirichlet boundary value problem, which occurs when modeling an injection molding process with a partial slip condition on the boundary. We have in ; in ; , and on .

  20. Reactions of vanadium(5) with aluminium(3) in weakly acid aqueous solutions; Vzaimodejstvie mezhdu vanadiem(5) i alyhminiem(3) v slabokislykh vodnykh rastvorakh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditrikh, I V; Makhno, A Ya [Donetskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Donetsk (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    Conditions of vanadium(5) heteropolycompounds formation in aqueous solutions containing aluminium(3) have been studied. By the methods of potentiometry and conductometry in solutions of Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}-NaVO{sub 3} salt mixture the formation of complexes with the ratios [Al{sup 3+}]:[V{sup 5+}]=1:3, 1:6 and 1:12 has been ascertained. A salt of gross formula 3NaO {center_dot} (Al{sub 2}){sub 3} {center_dot} 12V{sub 2}O{sub 5} {center_dot} 67H{sub 2}O has been isolated. 3 refs.; 2 figs.

  1. Microwave-assisted Weak Acid Hydrolysis of Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyeong Seo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Myoglobin was hydrolyzed by microwave-assisted weak acid hydrolysis with 2% formic acid at 37 oC, 50 oC, and100 oC for 1 h. The most effective hydrolysis was observed at 100 oC. Hydrolysis products were investigated using matrixassistedlaser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Most cleavages predominantly occurred at the C-termini ofaspartyl residues. For comparison, weak acid hydrolysis was also performed in boiling water for 20, 40, 60, and 120 min. A 60-min weak acid hydrolysis in boiling water yielded similar results as a 60-min microwave-assisted weak acid hydrolysis at100 oC. These results strongly suggest that microwave irradiation has no notable enhancement effect on acid hydrolysis of proteinsand that temperature is the major factor that determines the effectiveness of weak acid hydrolysis.

  2. On the existence of weak solutions of quantum stochastic differential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We establish further results concerning the existence, uniqueness and stability of weak solutions of quantum stochastic differential equations (QSDEs). Our results are achieved by considering a more general Lipschit condition on the coefficients than our previous considerations in [1]. We exhibit a class of Lipschitzian ...

  3. Global weak solution for a equations in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Boling; Huang Daiwen

    2010-01-01

    The existence of global weak solutions of the initial boundary value problem to a simplified equations, derived from the equations of two fluid system in plasma, is proven by using energy method and some embedding theorems in Sobolev-Orlicz space.

  4. Analytical solutions of weakly coupled map lattices using recurrence relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotelo Herrera, Dolores, E-mail: dsh@dfmf.uned.e [Applied Maths, EUITI, UPM, Ronda de Valencia, 3-28012 Madrid (Spain); San Martin, Jesus [Applied Maths, EUITI, UPM, Ronda de Valencia, 3-28012 Madrid (Spain); Dep. Fisica Matematica y de Fluidos, UNED, Senda del Rey 9-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-20

    By using asymptotic methods recurrence relations are found that rule weakly CML evolution, with both global and diffusive coupling. The solutions obtained from these relations are very general because they do not hold restrictions about boundary conditions, initial conditions and number of oscilators in the CML. Furthermore, oscillators are ruled by an arbitraty C{sup 2} function.

  5. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  6. Analytical solution for a coaxial plasma gun: Weak coupling limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, D.

    1987-01-01

    The analytical solution of the system of coupled ODE's which describes the time evolution of an ideal (i.e., zero resistance) coaxial plasma gun operating in the snowplow mode is obtained in the weak coupling limit, i.e, when the gun is fully influenced by the driving (RLC) circuit in which it resides but the circuit is negligibly influenced by the gun. Criteria for the validity of this limit are derived and numerical examples are presented. Although others have obtained approximate, asymptotic and numerical solutions of the equations, the present analytical results seem not to have appeared previously in the literature

  7. Feasibility of isotachochromatography as a method for the preparative separation of weak acids and weak bases. I. Theoretical considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, C.; Sluyterman, L.A.A.E.

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental equation of isotachochromatography, i.e., isotachophoresis translated into ion-exchange chromatography, has been derived for weak acids and weak bases. Weak acids are separated on strong cation exchangers and weak bases on strong anion exchangers. According to theory, the elution

  8. Weak solutions to interdiffusion models with Vegard rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapa, Lucjan; BoŻek, Bogusław; Danielewski, Marek

    2018-01-01

    In this work we consider the diffusional transport in an r-component solid solution. The one and multidimensional models are expressed by the nonlinear systems of strongly coupled differential equations with the initial and the nonlinear coupled boundary conditions. They are obtained from the local mass conservation law for fluxes which are a sum of the diffusional and Darken drift terms, together with the Vegard rule. The considered boundary conditions allow the physical system to be not only closed but also open. The theorems on existence, uniqueness and properties of global weak solutions in the one-dimensional case are formulated. The agreement between the theoretical results, numerical simulations and experimental data in the one-dimensional case is shown.

  9. Weakly hydrated surfaces and the binding interactions of small biological solutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, John W; Tavagnacco, Letizia; Ehrlich, Laurent; Chen, Mo; Schnupf, Udo; Himmel, Michael E; Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Cesàro, Attilio

    2012-04-01

    Extended planar hydrophobic surfaces, such as are found in the side chains of the amino acids histidine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, exhibit an affinity for the weakly hydrated faces of glucopyranose. In addition, molecular species such as these, including indole, caffeine, and imidazole, exhibit a weak tendency to pair together by hydrophobic stacking in aqueous solution. These interactions can be partially understood in terms of recent models for the hydration of extended hydrophobic faces and should provide insight into the architecture of sugar-binding sites in proteins.

  10. General analytical procedure for determination of acidity parameters of weak acids and bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarski, Bogusław; Kaliszan, Roman; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Młodzianowski, Janusz; Balińska, Agata

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a new convenient, inexpensive, and reagent-saving general methodology for the determination of pK a values for components of the mixture of diverse chemical classes weak organic acids and bases in water solution, without the need to separate individual analytes. The data obtained from simple pH-metric microtitrations are numerically processed into reliable pK a values for each component of the mixture. Excellent agreement has been obtained between the determined pK a values and the reference literature data for compounds studied.

  11. A Weak Solution of a Stochastic Nonlinear Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Hadji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a problem modeling a porous medium with a random perturbation. This model occurs in many applications such as biology, medical sciences, oil exploitation, and chemical engineering. Many authors focused their study mostly on the deterministic case. The more classical one was due to Biot in the 50s, where he suggested to ignore everything that happens at the microscopic level, to apply the principles of the continuum mechanics at the macroscopic level. Here we consider a stochastic problem, that is, a problem with a random perturbation. First we prove a result on the existence and uniqueness of the solution, by making use of the weak formulation. Furthermore, we use a numerical scheme based on finite differences to present numerical results.

  12. How cocrystals of weakly basic drugs and acidic coformers might modulate solubility and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuminek, G; Rodríguez-Hornedo, N; Siedler, S; Rocha, H V A; Cuffini, S L; Cardoso, S G

    2016-04-30

    Cocrystals of a weakly basic drug (nevirapine) with acidic coformers are shown to alter the solubility dependence on pH, and to exhibit a pHmax above which a less soluble cocrystal becomes more soluble than the drug. The cocrystal solubility advantage can be dialed up or down by solution pH.

  13. Molecular physiology of weak organic acid stress in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, J.W.A.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism by which weak organic acid (WOA) preservatives inhibit growth of microorganisms may differ between different WOAs and these differences are not well understood. The aim of this thesis has been to obtain a better understanding of the mode of action of these preservatives by which they

  14. Corrosion of alloy C-22 in organic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.; Rodriguez, Martin A.; Giordano, Celia M.

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical studies such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022) in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C degrees. All the tested material was wrought Mill Annealed (MA). Tests were also performed in NaCl solutions containing weak organic acids such as oxalic, acetic, citric and picric acids. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was significantly higher in solutions containing oxalic acid than in solutions of pure NaCl at the same pH. Citric and Picric acids showed a slightly higher corrosion rate, and Acetic acid maintained the corrosion rate of pure chloride solutions at the same pH. Organic acids revealed to be weak inhibitors for crevice corrosion. Higher concentration ratios, compared to nitrate ions, were needed to completely inhibit crevice corrosion in chloride solutions. Results are discussed considering acid dissociation constants, buffer capacity and complex formation constants of the different weak acids. (author) [es

  15. Increase of weakly acidic gas esophagopharyngeal reflux (EPR) and swallowing-induced acidic/weakly acidic EPR in patients with chronic cough responding to proton pump inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, O; Shimoyama, Y; Hosaka, H; Kuribayashi, S; Maeda, M; Nagoshi, A; Zai, H; Kusano, M

    2011-05-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD)-related chronic cough (CC) may have multifactorial causes. To clarify the characteristics of esophagopharyngeal reflux (EPR) events in CC patients whose cough was apparently influenced by gastro-esophageal reflux (GER), we studied patients with CC clearly responding to full-dose proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy (CC patients). Ten CC patients, 10 GERD patients, and 10 healthy controls underwent 24-h ambulatory pharyngo-esophageal impedance and pH monitoring. Weakly acidic reflux was defined as a decrease of pH by >1 unit with a nadir pH >4. In six CC patients, monitoring was repeated after 8 weeks of PPI therapy. The number of each EPR event and the symptom association probability (SAP) were calculated. Symptoms were evaluated by a validated GERD symptom questionnaire. Weakly acidic gas EPR and swallowing-induced acidic/weakly acidic EPR only occurred in CC patients, and the numbers of such events was significantly higher in the CC group than in the other two groups (P pump inhibitor therapy abolished swallowing-induced acidic/weakly acidic EPR, reduced weakly acidic gas EPR, and improved symptoms (all P gas EPR and swallowing-induced acidic/weakly acidic EPR. A direct effect of acidic mist or liquid refluxing into the pharynx may contribute to chronic cough, while cough may also arise indirectly from reflux via a vago-vagal reflex in some patients. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Nonelectrolyte NRTL-NRF model to study thermodynamics of strong and weak electrolyte solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghtalab, Ali, E-mail: haghtala@modares.ac.i [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shojaeian, Abolfazl; Mazloumi, Seyed Hossein [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    An electrolyte activity coefficient model is proposed by combining non-electrolyte NRTL-NRF local composition model and Pitzer-Debye-Hueckel equation as short-range and long-range contributions, respectively. With two adjustable parameters per each electrolyte, the present model is applied to correlation of the mean activity coefficients of more than 150 strong aqueous electrolyte solutions at 298.15 K. Also the results of the present model are compared with the other local composition models such as electrolyte-NRTL, electrolyte-NRTL-NRF and electrolyte-Wilson-NRF models. Moreover, the present model is used for prediction of the osmotic coefficient of several aqueous binary electrolytes systems at 298.15 K. Also the present activity coefficient model is adopted for representation of nonideality of the acid gases, as weak gas electrolytes, soluble in alkanolamine solutions. The model is applied for calculation of solubility and heat of absorption (enthalpy of solution) of acid gas in the two {l_brace}(H{sub 2}O + MDEA + CO{sub 2}) and (H{sub 2}O + MDEA + H{sub 2}S){r_brace} systems at different conditions. The results demonstrate that the present model can be successfully applied to study thermodynamic properties of both strong and weak electrolyte solutions.

  17. Zirconium for nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yau, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    The excellent corrosion resistance of zirconium in nitric acid has been known for over 30 years. Recently, there is an increasing interest in using zirconium for nitric acid services. Therefore, an extensive research effort has been carried out to achieve a better understanding of the corrosion properties of zirconium in nitric acid. Particular attention is paid to the effect of concentration, temperature, structure, solution impurities, and stress. Immersion, autoclave, U-bend, and constant strain-rate tests were used in this study. Results of this study indicate that the corrosion resistance of zirconium in nitric acid is little affected by changes in temperature and concentration, and the presence of common impurities such as seawater, sodium chloride, ferric chloride, iron, and stainless steel. Moreover, the presence of seawater, sodium chloride, ferric chloride, and stainless steel has little effect on the stress corrosion craking (SCC) susceptibility of zirconium in 70% nitric acid at room temperatures. However, zirconium could be attacked by fluoride-containing nitric acid and the vapors of chloride-containing nitric acid. Also, high sustained tensile stresses should be avoided when zirconium is used to handle 70% nitric acid at elevated temperatures or > 70% nitric acid

  18. Role of Acid and weakly acidic reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease off proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hea Jung; Cho, Yu Kyung; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Lim, Chul Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gye

    2012-07-01

    Available data about reflux patterns and symptom determinants in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) subtypes off proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy are lacking. We aimed to evaluate reflux patterns and determinants of symptom perception in patients with GERD off PPI therapy by impedance-pH monitoring. We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data in patients diagnosed as GERD based on results of impedance-pH monitoring, endoscopy and/or typical symptoms. The characteristics of acid and weakly acidic reflux were evaluated. Symptomatic and asymptomatic reflux were compared according to GERD subtypes and individual symptoms. Forty-two patients (22 males, mean age 46 years) were diagnosed as GERD (17 erosive reflux disease, 9 pH(+) non-erosive reflux disease [NERD], 9 hypersensitive esophagus and 7 symptomatic NERD). A total of 1,725 reflux episodes were detected (855 acid [50%], 857 weakly acidic [50%] and 13 weakly alkaline reflux [Acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and bolus clearance was longer compared with weakly acidic reflux. In terms of globus, weakly acidic reflux was more symptomatic. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed reflux; these associations were more pronounced in erosive reflux disease and symptomatic NERD. The perception of regurgitation was related to acid reflux, while that of globus was more related to weakly acidic reflux. In patients not taking PPI, acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and had longer bolus clearance. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed type; however, weakly acidic reflux was associated more with globus. These data suggest a role for impedance-pH data in the evaluation of globus.

  19. Relative entropies, suitable weak solutions, and weak-strong uniqueness for the compressible Navier–Stokes system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Jin, B.J.; Novotný, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2012), s. 717-730 ISSN 1422-6928 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0917 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : suitable weak solution * weak-strong uniqueness * compressible Navier-Stokes system Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.415, year: 2012 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00021-011-0091-9

  20. Role of Acid and Weakly Acidic Reflux in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Off Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hea Jung; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Lim, Chul Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gye

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Available data about reflux patterns and symptom determinants in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) subtypes off proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy are lacking. We aimed to evaluate reflux patterns and determinants of symptom perception in patients with GERD off PPI therapy by impedance-pH monitoring. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data in patients diagnosed as GERD based on results of impedance-pH monitoring, endoscopy and/or typical symptoms. The characteristics of acid and weakly acidic reflux were evaluated. Symptomatic and asymptomatic reflux were compared according to GERD subtypes and individual symptoms. Results Forty-two patients (22 males, mean age 46 years) were diagnosed as GERD (17 erosive reflux disease, 9 pH(+) non-erosive reflux disease [NERD], 9 hypersensitive esophagus and 7 symptomatic NERD). A total of 1,725 reflux episodes were detected (855 acid [50%], 857 weakly acidic [50%] and 13 weakly alkaline reflux [reflux was more frequently symptomatic and bolus clearance was longer compared with weakly acidic reflux. In terms of globus, weakly acidic reflux was more symptomatic. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed reflux; these associations were more pronounced in erosive reflux disease and symptomatic NERD. The perception of regurgitation was related to acid reflux, while that of globus was more related to weakly acidic reflux. Conclusions In patients not taking PPI, acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and had longer bolus clearance. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed type; however, weakly acidic reflux was associated more with globus. These data suggest a role for impedance-pH data in the evaluation of globus. PMID:22837877

  1. Nocturnal weakly acidic reflux promotes aspiration of bile acids in lung transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondeau, Kathleen; Mertens, Veerle; Vanaudenaerde, Bart A; Verleden, Geert M; Van Raemdonck, Dirk E; Sifrim, Daniel; Dupont, Lieven J

    2009-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and aspiration of bile acids have been implicated as non-alloimmune risk factors for the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) after lung transplantation. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between GER and gastric aspiration of bile acids and to establish which reflux characteristics may promote aspiration of bile acids into the lungs and may feature as a potential diagnostic tool in identifying lung transplantation (LTx) patients at risk for aspiration. Twenty-four stable LTx recipients were studied 1 year after transplantation. All patients underwent 24-hour ambulatory impedance-pH recording for the detection of acid (pH acidic (pH 4 to 7) reflux. On the same day, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected and then analyzed for the presence of bile acids (Bioquant enzymatic assay). Increased GER was detected in 13 patients, of whom 9 had increased acid reflux and 4 had exclusively increased weakly acidic reflux. Sixteen patients had detectable bile acids in the BALF (0.6 [0.4 to 1.5] micromol/liter). The 24-hour esophageal volume exposure was significantly increased in patients with bile acids compared to patients without bile acids in the BALF. Acid exposure and the number of reflux events (total, acid and weakly acidic) were unrelated to the presence of bile acids in the BALF. However, both nocturnal volume exposure and the number of nocturnal weakly acidic reflux events were significantly higher in patients with bile acids in the BALF. Weakly acidic reflux events, especially during the night, are associated with the aspiration of bile acids in LTx recipients and may therefore feature as a potential risk factor for the development of BOS.

  2. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 ± 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO 4 at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO 2 F 2 . Studies on the effect of added LiNO 3 or Na 2 WO 4 ·2H 2 O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF 6 content of WF 6 gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF 6

  3. Study of weak solutions for parabolic variational inequalities with nonstandard growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yan

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we study the degenerate parabolic variational inequality problem in a bounded domain. First, the weak solutions of the variational inequality are defined. Second, the existence and uniqueness of the solutions in the weak sense are proved by using the penalty method and the reduction method.

  4. Fast high-throughput method for the determination of acidity constants by capillary electrophoresis: I. Monoprotic weak acids and bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuguet, Elisabet; Ràfols, Clara; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2009-04-24

    A new and fast method to determine acidity constants of monoprotic weak acids and bases by capillary zone electrophoresis based on the use of an internal standard (compound of similar nature and acidity constant as the analyte) has been developed. This method requires only two electrophoretic runs for the determination of an acidity constant: a first one at a pH where both analyte and internal standard are totally ionized, and a second one at another pH where both are partially ionized. Furthermore, the method is not pH dependent, so an accurate measure of the pH of the buffer solutions is not needed. The acidity constants of several phenols and amines have been measured using internal standards of known pK(a), obtaining a mean deviation of 0.05 pH units compared to the literature values.

  5. Membrane potential and proton cotransport of alanine and phosphate as affected by permeant weak acids in Lemna gibba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basso, B.; Ullrich-Eberius, C.I.

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of Lemna gibba plants with the weak acids (trimethylacetic acid and butyric acid), used as tools to decrease intracellular pH, induced a hyperpolarization of membrane potential, dependent on the concentration of the undissociated permeant form of the weak acid and on the value of the resting potential. Measurements were carried out both with high potential and low potential plants and the maximum values of acid induced hyperpolarization were about 35 and 71 millivolts, respectively. Weak acids influenced also the transient light-dark membrane potential changes, typical for photosynthesizing material, suggesting a dependence of these changes on an acidification of cytoplasm. In the presence of the weak acids, the membrane depolarization induced by the cotransport of alanine and phosphate with protons was reduced; the maximum reduction (about 90%) was obtained with alanine during 2 millimolar trimethylacetic acid perfusion at pH 5. A strong inhibition of the uptake rates (up to 48% for [ 14 C]alanine and 68% for 32 P-phosphate) was obtained in the presence of the weak acids, both by decreasing the pH of the medium and by increasing the concentration of the acid. In these experimental conditions, the ATP level and O 2 uptake rates did not change significantly. These results constitute good evidence that H + /solute cotransport in Lemna, already known to be dependent on the electrochemical potential difference for protons, is also strongly regulated by the cytoplasmic pH value

  6. Weak stability of Lagrangian solutions to the semigeostrophic equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Josiane C O; Lopes Filho, Milton C; Nussenzveig Lopes, Helena J

    2009-01-01

    In (Cullen and Feldman 2006 SIAM J. Math. Anal. 37 137–95), Cullen and Feldman proved the existence of Lagrangian solutions for the semigeostrophic system in physical variables with initial potential vorticity in L p , p > 1. Here, we show that a subsequence of the Lagrangian solutions corresponding to a strongly convergent sequence of initial potential vorticities in L 1 converges strongly in L q , q < ∞, to a Lagrangian solution, in particular extending the existence result of Cullen and Feldman to the case p = 1. We also present a counterexample for Lagrangian solutions corresponding to a sequence of initial potential vorticities converging in BM. The analytical tools used include techniques from optimal transportation, Ambrosio's results on transport by BV vector fields and Orlicz spaces

  7. Existence of weak solutions to stochastic evolution inclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Jakubowski , Adam; Kamenskii , Mikhail; Raynaud de Fitte , Paul

    2005-01-01

    International audience; We consider the Cauchy problem for a semilinear stochastic differential inclusion in a Hilbert space. The linear operator generates a strongly continuous semigroup and the nonlinear term is multivalued and satisfies a condition which is more heneral than the Lipschitz condition. We prove the existence of a mild solution to this problem. This solution is not "strong" in the probabilistic sense, that is, it is not defined on the underlying probability space, but on a lar...

  8. Automatic protein structure solution from weak X-ray data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skubák, Pavol; Pannu, Navraj S.

    2013-11-01

    Determining new protein structures from X-ray diffraction data at low resolution or with a weak anomalous signal is a difficult and often an impossible task. Here we propose a multivariate algorithm that simultaneously combines the structure determination steps. In tests on over 140 real data sets from the protein data bank, we show that this combined approach can automatically build models where current algorithms fail, including an anisotropically diffracting 3.88 Å RNA polymerase II data set. The method seamlessly automates the process, is ideal for non-specialists and provides a mathematical framework for successfully combining various sources of information in image processing.

  9. Weak solutions for Euler systems with non-local interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Carrillo, J. A.; Feireisl, Eduard; Gwiazda, P.; Swierczewska-Gwiazda, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 3 (2017), s. 705-724 ISSN 0024-6107 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 320078 - MATHEF Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Euler system * dissipative solutions * Newtonian interaction Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.895, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1112/jlms.12027/abstract

  10. Polyaniline: Aniline oxidation with strong and weak oxidants under various acidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bláha, Michal, E-mail: blaha@imc.cas.cz [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Trchová, Miroslava; Bober, Patrycja; Morávková, Zuzana [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Prokeš, Jan [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Stejskal, Jaroslav [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2017-06-15

    Aniline was oxidized with three strong inorganic oxidants (ammonium peroxydisulfate, cerium(IV) sulfate, potassium dichromate), two weak inorganic oxidants (iron(III) chloride, silver nitrate), and one organic oxidant (p-benzoquinone) in aqueous solutions of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) of various concentration. Whereas oxidation of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate yielded high-molecular-weight conducting polyaniline (PANI) in the whole acidity range, the oxidation with cerium(IV) sulfate led also to a single product close to PANI with considerably lower molecular weight and lower conductivity. Potassium dichromate gave PANI only at high concentration of MSA. The use of iron(III) chloride yielded composite mixtures of PANI and low-molecular-weight aniline oligomers. The oxidation of aniline with silver nitrate led to composites of silver and an organic part, which was constituted either by aniline oligomers or conducting polyaniline or both. p-Benzoquinone as oxidant produced mainly aniline oligomers with poor conductivity and 2,5-dianilino-p-benzoquinone-like structure detected in FTIR and Raman spectra when oxidation proceeded with weak oxidants. A general model of oxidation with strong and weak oxidants was formulated. - Highlights: • Comparison of aniline oxidation with oxidants of different redox potential. • UV–vis, FTIR and Raman spectroscopies combined with size-exclusion chromatography. • The contents of polymer and oligomers were analyzed and discussed. • General model of aniline oxidation with strong and weak oxidants was formulated.

  11. Existence of weak solutions to first-order stationary mean-field games with Dirichlet conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Ferreira, Rita; Gomes, Diogo A.; Tada, Teruo

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we study first-order stationary monotone mean-field games (MFGs) with Dirichlet boundary conditions. While for Hamilton--Jacobi equations Dirichlet conditions may not be satisfied, here, we establish the existence of solutions of MFGs that satisfy those conditions. To construct these solutions, we introduce a monotone regularized problem. Applying Schaefer's fixed-point theorem and using the monotonicity of the MFG, we verify that there exists a unique weak solution to the regularized problem. Finally, we take the limit of the solutions of the regularized problem and using Minty's method, we show the existence of weak solutions to the original MFG.

  12. Existence of weak solutions to first-order stationary mean-field games with Dirichlet conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Ferreira, Rita

    2018-04-19

    In this paper, we study first-order stationary monotone mean-field games (MFGs) with Dirichlet boundary conditions. While for Hamilton--Jacobi equations Dirichlet conditions may not be satisfied, here, we establish the existence of solutions of MFGs that satisfy those conditions. To construct these solutions, we introduce a monotone regularized problem. Applying Schaefer\\'s fixed-point theorem and using the monotonicity of the MFG, we verify that there exists a unique weak solution to the regularized problem. Finally, we take the limit of the solutions of the regularized problem and using Minty\\'s method, we show the existence of weak solutions to the original MFG.

  13. Analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts by single pump cycling-column-switching ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhongping; Ni, Chengzhu; Zhu, Zhuyi; Pan, Zaifa; Wang, Lili; Zhu, Yan

    2015-05-01

    The application of ion chromatography with the single pump cycling-column-switching technique was described for the analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts within a single run. Due to the hydrogen ions provided by an anion suppressor electrolyzing water, weak acid anions could be transformed into weak acids, existing as molecules, after passing through the suppressor. Therefore, an anion suppressor and ion-exclusion column were adopted to achieve on-line matrix elimination of weak acid anions with high concentration for the analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts. A series of standard solutions consisting of target anions of various concentrations from 0.005 to 10 mg/L were analyzed, with correlation coefficients r ≥ 0.9990. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.67 to 1.51 μg/L, based on the signal-to-noise ratio of 3 and a 25 μL injection volume. Relative standard deviations for retention time, peak area, and peak height were all less than 2.01%. A spiking study was performed with satisfactory recoveries between 90.3 and 104.4% for all anions. The chromatographic system was successfully applied to the analysis of trace inorganic anions in five weak acid salts. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Weak Frictional Healing as Controlled by Intergranular Pressure Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, C.

    2017-12-01

    Unstable fault slips due to velocity weakening requires a frictional healing effect that is stronger than the instantaneous rate effect. Based on a previous analytical result regarding the healing effect at spherical contacts by intergranular pressure solution (He et al., 2013), we extend the analysis to incorporate the full range of dilatancy angles from π/6 to -π/6, covering uphill and downhill situations of many contacts with different dilatancy angles. Assuming that both healing effect (parameter b) and instantaneous rate effect (parameter a) are controlled by intergranular pressure solution, and averaging over the whole range of dilatancy angle, our analysis derives each of the two effects as a function of temperature. The result shows velocity weakening for friction coefficient>0.274. As hydrothermal conditions are important for deep portion of actual fault zones, the strength of velocity weakening is of interest when the related faulting behavior is concerned. As a measure of the strength of velocity weakening, the derived ratio b/a fully controlled by pressure solution shows an upper bound of 1.22. Data analyses in previous studies on plagioclase (He et al., 2013) and oceanic basalt (Zhang and He, 2017) shows a range of b/a =1.05-1.2, consistent with the analytical result. The valuesrate effect, which reduces b/a to levels below the upper bound. These values are significantly less than in dry experiments on granite by Mitchell et al.(2016), where b/a ranges from 1.54-2.59 as inferred by reanalyzing their stick-slip data at temperatures of 20°C, 500°C and 600°C. Comparison between the two ranges of b/a helps understand the dominant mechanism of frictional healing at contacts, especially under hydrothermal conditions in fault zones. For comparable ratios of system stiffness to the critical value, numerical simulations with a single-degree-of-freedom system show that a smaller b/a significantly reduces the peak slip velocity as a result of reduced period

  15. Acetic acid extraction from aqueous solutions using fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJmker, H.M.; Gramblicka, M.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; Schuur, Boelo

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for production of acetic acid via bio-based routes is cost-effective concentration and purification of the acetic acid from the aqueous solutions, for which liquid–liquid extraction is a possible method. A main challenge in extraction of acetic acid from dilute aqueous solutions is

  16. Weak solutions for nonlocal evolution variational inequalities involving gradient constraints and variable exponent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingqi Xiang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we study a class of nonlocal quasilinear parabolic variational inequality involving $p(x$-Laplacian operator and gradient constraint on a bounded domain. Choosing a special penalty functional according to the gradient constraint, we transform the variational inequality to a parabolic equation. By means of Galerkin's approximation method, we obtain the existence of weak solutions for this equation, and then through a priori estimates, we obtain the weak solutions of variational inequality.

  17. Existence and multiplicity of weak solutions for a class of degenerate nonlinear elliptic equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihăilescu Mihai

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to study the existence and the multiplicity of non-trivial weak solutions for some degenerate nonlinear elliptic equations on the whole space . The solutions will be obtained in a subspace of the Sobolev space . The proofs rely essentially on the Mountain Pass theorem and on Ekeland's Variational principle.

  18. Existence and multiplicity of weak solutions for a class of degenerate nonlinear elliptic equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Mihăilescu

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to study the existence and the multiplicity of non-trivial weak solutions for some degenerate nonlinear elliptic equations on the whole space RN. The solutions will be obtained in a subspace of the Sobolev space W1/p(RN. The proofs rely essentially on the Mountain Pass theorem and on Ekeland's Variational principle.

  19. Investigation of mono/competitive adsorption of environmentally relevant ionized weak acids on graphite: impact of molecular properties and thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Ahmed M A; McPhedran, Kerry N; Moreira, Jesús; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2014-12-16

    The thermodynamics of adsorption and competitive interactions of five weak acids on a graphite surface was assessed in alkaline solutions. Adsorption of the acids in mono- and multicompound solutions followed their Freundlich isotherms which suggest a diversity of graphite adsorption sites as confirmed by the presence of carboxylic and phenolic groups observed on graphite surfaces. Thermodynamic calculations assigned the formation of the negatively charged assisted hydrogen bond (-CAHB) between ionized solutes and adsorbent surface groups as the possible adsorption mechanism. However, the similar pKa values of current acids resulted in comparable free energies for -CAHB formation (ΔG(-CAHB)) being less than solvation free energies (ΔGSolv). Thus, additional ΔG is supplemented by increased hydrophobicity due to proton exchange of ionized acids with water (ΔΔG Hydrophobicity). Adsorption capacities and competition coefficients indicated that ΔΔG Hydrophobicity values depend on the neutral and ionized acid Kow. Competitive adsorption implies that multilayer adsorption may occur via hydrophobic bonding with the CH3 ends of the self-assembled layer which affects the acid adsorption capacities in mixtures as compared to monocompound solutions. The determination of adsorption mechanisms will assist in understanding of the fate and bioavailability of emerging and classical weak acids released into natural waters.

  20. Process monitored spectrophotometric titration coupled with chemometrics for simultaneous determination of mixtures of weak acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Lifu; Yang, Jing; Yuan, Jintao

    2007-05-15

    A new spectrophotometric titration method coupled with chemometrics for the simultaneous determination of mixtures of weak acids has been developed. In this method, the titrant is a mixture of sodium hydroxide and an acid-base indicator, and the indicator is used to monitor the titration process. In a process of titration, both the added volume of titrant and the solution acidity at each titration point can be obtained simultaneously from an absorption spectrum by least square algorithm, and then the concentration of each component in the mixture can be obtained from the titration curves by principal component regression. The method only needs the information of absorbance spectra to obtain the analytical results, and is free of volumetric measurements. The analyses are independent of titration end point and do not need the accurate values of dissociation constants of the indicator and the acids. The method has been applied to the simultaneous determination of the mixtures of benzoic acid and salicylic acid, and the mixtures of phenol, o-chlorophenol and p-chlorophenol with satisfactory results.

  1. Characterizing Corrosion Effects of Weak Organic Acids Using a Modified Bono Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuqin; Turbini, Laura J.; Ramjattan, Deepchand; Christian, Bev; Pritzker, Mark

    2013-12-01

    To meet environmental requirements and achieve benefits of cost-effective manufacturing, no-clean fluxes (NCFs) or low-solids fluxes have become popular in present electronic manufacturing processes. Weak organic acids (WOAs) as the activation ingredients in NCFs play an important role, especially in the current lead-free and halogen-free soldering technology era. However, no standard or uniform method exists to characterize the corrosion effects of WOAs on actual metallic circuits of printed wiring boards (PWBs). Hence, the development of an effective quantitative test method for evaluating the corrosion effects of WOAs on the PWB's metallic circuits is imperative. In this paper, the modified Bono test, which was developed to quantitatively examine the corrosion properties of flux residues, is used to characterize the corrosion effects of five WOAs (i.e., abietic acid, succinic acid, glutaric acid, adipic acid, and malic acid) on PWB metallic circuits. Experiments were performed under three temperature/humidity conditions (85°C/85% RH, 60°C/93% RH, and 40°C/93% RH) using two WOA solution concentrations. The different corrosion effects among the various WOAs were best reflected in the testing results at 40°C and 60°C. Optical microscopy was used to observe the morphology of the corroded copper tracks, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) characterization was performed to determine the dendrite composition.

  2. Partial regularity of weak solutions to a PDE system with cubic nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Xu, Xiangsheng

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we investigate regularity properties of weak solutions to a PDE system that arises in the study of biological transport networks. The system consists of a possibly singular elliptic equation for the scalar pressure of the underlying biological network coupled to a diffusion equation for the conductance vector of the network. There are several different types of nonlinearities in the system. Of particular mathematical interest is a term that is a polynomial function of solutions and their partial derivatives and this polynomial function has degree three. That is, the system contains a cubic nonlinearity. Only weak solutions to the system have been shown to exist. The regularity theory for the system remains fundamentally incomplete. In particular, it is not known whether or not weak solutions develop singularities. In this paper we obtain a partial regularity theorem, which gives an estimate for the parabolic Hausdorff dimension of the set of possible singular points.

  3. Correlation and prediction of ion exchange equilibria on weak-acid resins by means of the surface complex formation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horst, J.

    1988-11-01

    The present work summarizes investigations of the equilibrium of the exchange of protons, copper, zinc, calcium, magnesium and sodium ions on two weak-acid exchange resins in hydrochloric and carbonic acid bearing solutions at 25 0 C. The description of the state of equilibrium between resin and solution is based on the individual chemical equilibria which have to be adjusted simultaneously. The equilibrium in the liquid phase is described by the mass action law and the condition of electroneutrality using activity coefficients calculated according to the theory of Debye and Hueckel. The exchange equilibria are described by means of a surface complex formation model, which was developed by Davis, James and Leckie for activated aluminia and which has been applied to weak-acid resins. The model concept assumes the resin as a plane surface in which the functional groups are distributed uniformly. (orig./RB) [de

  4. Quantitative analysis of the modes of growth inhibition by weak organic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ullah, A.; Orij, R.; Brul, S.; Smits, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Weak organic acids are naturally occurring compounds that are commercially used as preservatives in the food and beverage industries. They extend the shelf life of food products by inhibiting microbial growth. There are a number of theories that explain the antifungal properties of these weak acids,

  5. Simultaneous estimation of a binary mixture of a weak acid and a strong acid by volumetric titration and pH measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmakar, Sanat; Mallika, C.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2012-01-01

    High level liquid waste (HLLW) generated in the aqueous reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels for the separation of uranium and plutonium by PUREX process, comprises the fission and corrosion products in 4 M nitric acid. Reduction in waste volume is accomplished by destroying the acidity of the waste solution from 4 to less than 2 M by treating it with formaldehyde and subsequent concentration by evaporation. In the denitration by HCHO, nitric acid in the waste solution is reduced to NOx and water via nitrous acid as the intermediate product: whereas formaldehyde is oxidized to formic acid which is converted to CO 2 and H 2 O subsequently. The reaction is highly exothermic and the release of all gaseous products may lead to uncontrollable process conditions. Hence, for the safe operation, it is desirable to estimate the concentration of residual formic acid as well as nitric acid in the product stream as a function of time. The acidity in the feed solution is 4 M and the concentration of HNO 3 in the product solution is in the range 1- 4 M. Since the formic acid generated during the reaction will be consumed immediately, the concentration of residual acid will be in the range 0.05-0.5 M. A simultaneous titration method based on pH measurement and volumetric analysis has been developed in the present work for the quantitative determination of the weak acid (HCOOH)with known pKa value and the strong acid (HNO 3 ) in the binary mixture

  6. Extraction of cesium from acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katykhin, G.S.; Simonov, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    The extraction of cesium from acidic solutions is studied. Halogen-substituted carboxylic acids were chosen for the aqueous phase and nitrobenzene the diluent. The distribution coefficients are determined by the use of radioactive tracers 134 Cs and 137 Cs. It is believed that large singly charged anions of strong acids are necessary for the extraction of cesium. Metal halide acids are selected for supplying the anions

  7. Aitken extrapolation and epsilon algorithm for an accelerated solution of weakly singular nonlinear Volterra integral equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesgarani, H; Parmour, P; Aghazadeh, N

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we apply Aitken extrapolation and epsilon algorithm as acceleration technique for the solution of a weakly singular nonlinear Volterra integral equation of the second kind. In this paper, based on Tao and Yong (2006 J. Math. Anal. Appl. 324 225-37.) the integral equation is solved by Navot's quadrature formula. Also, Tao and Yong (2006) for the first time applied Richardson extrapolation to accelerating convergence for the weakly singular nonlinear Volterra integral equations of the second kind. To our knowledge, this paper may be the first attempt to apply Aitken extrapolation and epsilon algorithm for the weakly singular nonlinear Volterra integral equations of the second kind.

  8. Measurement of acid dissociation constants of weak acids by cation exchange and conductometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, P.K.; Nara, Osamu (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock (USA))

    1990-06-01

    A simple strategy is presented for the determination of acid dissociation constants based on the measurement of conductance of a known concentration of the acid and/or the conductance of a solution of its fully or partially neutralized alkali-metal salts. For an n-protic acid, 2n conductance measurements are minimally necessary. In the simplest case of a typical monoprotic acid, the conductance of its alkali salt solution is measured before and after passage through an H{sup +}-form exchanger. From these data both the pK{sub a} of the acid and the equivalent conductance of the anion can be computed. The underlying equations are rigorously solved for monoprotic acids and some diprotic acid systems. For other diprotic and multiprotic acid systems, initial estimates are obtained by making approximations; the complete data set is then subjected to multiparametric fitting. The method does not require pH measurements; conductance can generally be measured accurately at low enough ionic strengths to obviate the need for major activity correction. Several experimental measurements are presented and excellent agreement with literature pK{sub a} values is observed. The reliability of the equivalent conductance values computed in this fashion is limited, however.

  9. Ion-exclusion chromatography with conductimetric detection of aliphatic carboxylic acids on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin by elution with benzoic acid-beta-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Mori, Masanobu; Xu, Qun; Helaleh, Murad I H; Ikedo, Mikaru; Taoda, Hiroshi; Hu, Wenzhi; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Fritz, James S; Haddad, Paul R

    2003-05-16

    In this study, an aqueous solution consisting of benzoic acid with low background conductivity and beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) of hydrophilic nature and the inclusion effect to benzoic acid were used as eluent for the ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of aliphatic carboxylic acids with different pKa values and hydrophobicity on a polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H+ form. With increasing concentration of beta-cyclodextrin in the eluent, the retention times of the carboxylic acids decreased due to the increased hydrophilicity of the polymethacrylate-based cation-exchange resin surface from the adsorption of OH groups of beta-cyclodextrin. Moreover, the eluent background conductivity decreased with increasing concentration of beta-cyclodextrin in 1 mM benzoic acid, which could result in higher sensitivity for conductimetric detection. The ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of carboxylic acids with high resolution and sensitivity was accomplished successfully by elution with a 1 mM benzoic acid-10 mM cyclodextrin solution without chemical suppression.

  10. Large Time Behavior for Weak Solutions of the 3D Globally Modified Navier-Stokes Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbai Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the large time behavior of the weak solutions for three-dimensional globally modified Navier-Stokes equations. With the aid of energy methods and auxiliary decay estimates together with Lp-Lq estimates of heat semigroup, we derive the optimal upper and lower decay estimates of the weak solutions for the globally modified Navier-Stokes equations as C1(1+t-3/4≤uL2≤C2(1+t-3/4,  t>1. The decay rate is optimal since it coincides with that of heat equation.

  11. The weak acid preservative sorbic acid inhibits conidial germination and mycelial growth of Aspergillus niger through intracellular acidification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plumridge, A.; Hesse, S.J.A.; Watson, A.J.; Lowe, K.C.; Stratford, M.; Archer, D.B.

    2004-01-01

    The growth of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger, a common food spoilage organism, is inhibited by the weak acid preservative sorbic acid (trans-trans-2,4-hexadienoic acid). Conidia inoculated at 105/ml of medium showed a sorbic acid MIC of 4.5 mM at pH 4.0, whereas the MIC for the amount of

  12. NIR spectroscopic properties of aqueous acids solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; Atan, Hanafi; Matjafri, Mohd Zubir

    2012-06-15

    Acid content is one of the important quality attributes in determining the maturity index of agricultural product, particularly fruits. Despite the fact that much research on the measurement of acidity in fruits through non-destructive spectroscopy analysis at NIR wavelengths between 700 to 1,000 nm has been conducted, the same response towards individual acids is not well known. This paper presents NIR spectroscopy analysis on aqueous citric, tartaric, malic and oxalic solutions through quantitative analysis by selecting a set of wavelengths that can best be used to measure the pH of the solutions. The aquaphotomics study of the acid solutions has generated R² above 0.9 for the measurement of all acids. The most important wavelengths for pH are located at 918-925 nm and 990-996 nm, while at 975 nm for water.

  13. Regional oesophageal sensitivity to acid and weakly acidic reflux in patients with non-erosive reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerenziani, S; Ribolsi, M; Sifrim, D; Blondeau, K; Cicala, M

    2009-03-01

    The mechanisms underlying symptoms in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) remain to be elucidated. Non-erosive reflux disease patients appear to be more sensitive to intraluminal stimula than erosive patients, the proximal oesophagus being the most sensitive. In order to assess regional oesophageal changes in reflux acidity and sensitivity to reflux, according either to the acidity or the composition of the refluxate, combined multiple pH and multiple pH-impedance (pH-MII) was performed in 16 NERD patients. According to multiple pH-metry, 29% and 12% of reflux events reached the middle and proximal oesophagus respectively, and 35% and 19% according to conventional pH-MII (P acid reflux became weakly acidic at the proximal oesophagus. In all patients, the frequency of symptomatic refluxes, both acid and weakly acidic, was significantly higher at the proximal, compared with distal oesophagus (25 +/- 8%vs 11 +/- 2% for acid reflux and 27 +/- 8%vs 8 +/- 2% for weakly acidic reflux; P reflux. As approximately 30% of acid reflux becomes weakly acidic along the oesophageal body, to better characterize proximal reflux, in clinical practice, combined proximal pH-impedance monitoring should be used. In NERD patients, the proximal oesophagus seems to be more sensitive to both acid and weakly acidic reflux.

  14. Weak asymptotic solution for a non-strictly hyperbolic system of conservation laws-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manas Ranjan Sahoo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article we introduce a concept of entropy weak asymptotic solution for a system of conservation laws and construct the same for a prolonged system of conservation laws which is highly non-strictly hyperbolic. This is first done for Riemann type initial data by introducing $\\delta,\\delta',\\delta''$ waves along a discontinuity curve and then for general initial data by piecing together the Riemann solutions.

  15. Global weak solutions for coupled transport processes in concrete walls at high temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Beneš, Michal; Štefan, Radek

    2012-01-01

    We consider an initial-boundary value problem for a fully nonlinear coupled parabolic system with nonlinear boundary conditions modelling hygro-thermal behavior of concrete at high temperatures. We prove a global existence of a weak solution to this system on an arbitrary time interval. The main result is proved by an approximation procedure. This consists in proving the existence of solutions to mollified problems using the Leray-Schauder theorem, for which a priori estimates are obtained. T...

  16. On the regularity criterion of weak solutions for the 3D MHD equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gala, Sadek; Ragusa, Maria Alessandra

    2017-12-01

    The paper deals with the 3D incompressible MHD equations and aims at improving a regularity criterion in terms of the horizontal gradient of velocity and magnetic field. It is proved that the weak solution ( u, b) becomes regular provided that ( \

  17. Dissipative weak solutions to compressible Navier–Stokes–Fokker–Planck systems with variable viscosity coefficients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Lu, Y.; Süli, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 443, č. 1 (2016), s. 322-351 ISSN 0022-247X Keywords : weak solutions * kinetic polymer models * FENE chain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.064, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022247X1630172X

  18. Weak linear degeneracy and lifespan of classical solutions for first order quasilinear hyperbolic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tatsien

    1994-01-01

    By means of the concept of the weak linear degeneracy, one gets the global existence and the sharp estimate of the lifespan of C 1 solutions to the Cauchy problem for general first order quasilinear hyperbolic systems with small initial data with compact support. (author). 23 refs, 1 fig

  19. Existence of weak solutions in lower order Sobolev space for a Camassa-Holm-type equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Shaoyong; Wu Yonghong

    2010-01-01

    A generalized Camassa-Holm equation containing a nonlinear dissipative effect is investigated. The existence of the weak solution of the equation in lower order Sobolev space H s with 1

  20. On the weak solutions to the equations of a compressible heat conducting gas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chiodaroli, E.; Feireisl, Eduard; Kreml, O.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 1 (2015), s. 225-243 ISSN 0294-1449 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 320078 - MATHEF Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Euler-Fourier system * convex integration * weak solution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.066, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0294144913001339

  1. A Note on Weak Solutions of Conservation Laws and Energy/Entropy Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwiazda, Piotr; Michálek, Martin; Świerczewska-Gwiazda, Agnieszka

    2018-03-01

    A common feature of systems of conservation laws of continuum physics is that they are endowed with natural companion laws which are in such cases most often related to the second law of thermodynamics. This observation easily generalizes to any symmetrizable system of conservation laws; they are endowed with nontrivial companion conservation laws, which are immediately satisfied by classical solutions. Not surprisingly, weak solutions may fail to satisfy companion laws, which are then often relaxed from equality to inequality and overtake the role of physical admissibility conditions for weak solutions. We want to answer the question: what is a critical regularity of weak solutions to a general system of conservation laws to satisfy an associated companion law as an equality? An archetypal example of such a result was derived for the incompressible Euler system in the context of Onsager's conjecture in the early nineties. This general result can serve as a simple criterion to numerous systems of mathematical physics to prescribe the regularity of solutions needed for an appropriate companion law to be satisfied.

  2. Global, finite energy, weak solutions for the NLS with rough, time-dependent magnetic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Paolo; Michelangeli, Alessandro; Scandone, Raffaele

    2018-04-01

    We prove the existence of weak solutions in the space of energy for a class of nonlinear Schrödinger equations in the presence of a external, rough, time-dependent magnetic potential. Under our assumptions, it is not possible to study the problem by means of usual arguments like resolvent techniques or Fourier integral operators, for example. We use a parabolic regularisation, and we solve the approximating Cauchy problem. This is achieved by obtaining suitable smoothing estimates for the dissipative evolution. The total mass and energy bounds allow to extend the solution globally in time. We then infer sufficient compactness properties in order to produce a global-in-time finite energy weak solution to our original problem.

  3. Global low-energy weak solution and large-time behavior for the compressible flow of liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guochun; Tan, Zhong

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the weak solution of the simplified Ericksen-Leslie system modeling compressible nematic liquid crystal flows in R3. When the initial data are of small energy and initial density is positive and essentially bounded, we prove the existence of a global weak solution in R3. The large-time behavior of a global weak solution is also established.

  4. Volumetric properties of itaconic acid aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisenbaum, Alexander; Apelblat, Alexander; Manzurola, Emanuel

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Densities of itaconic acid aqueous solutions in a wide range of concentrations and temperatures. ► The apparent molar volumes and the cubic expansion coefficients. ► The derivatives of isobaric heat capacities with respect to pressure. ► Changes in the structure of water when itaconic acid is dissolved. - Abstract: Densities of itaconic acid aqueous solutions were measured at 5 K intervals from T = (278.15 to 343.15) K. From the determined densities, the apparent molar volumes, the cubic expansion coefficients and the second derivatives of volume with respect to temperature which are interrelated with the derivatives of isobaric heat capacities with respect to pressure were evaluated. These derivatives were qualitatively correlated with the changes in the structure of water when itaconic acid is dissolved in it.

  5. PP-16 WEAK ACID REFLUX A TRIGGER FOR RECURRENT RESPIRATORY DISEASES IN CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostovski, Aco; Zdraveska, Nikolina

    2015-10-01

    The main advantage of multichannel intraluminar impedance (MII) compared with pH monitoring is its ability to detect both acid and non-acid gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and to determine the characteristics of reflux (liquid or gas). To compare the value of pH monitoring and MII for diagnosis of GER in children who present with refractory respiratory symptoms. A prospective study that included 37 patients, aged 4.25 ± 3.15 years, using combined MII-pH monitoring was performed. Patients were referred for investigation because of suspected GER as the etiology of recurrent respiratory diseases, including recurrent obstructive bronchitis, recurrent pneumonia, laryngitis, and chronic cough. We analyzed the percentage of time during which the pH was less than 4, the numeric and percentile values of acid, weak acid, and non-acid reflux episodes, and the values of liquid and mixed reflux. Diagnostic values were determined separately for pH monitoring and MII using Fisher's exact test. Reflux was detected in 31 patients. pH monitoring was positive in 20 patients (% time during which pH acid and weak acid reflux episodes, 3 had only acid reflux, 8 had weak acid reflux, and 3 had non-acid reflux. Sixteen patients had mixed (liquid and gas) reflux, and 14 had both liquid and mixed reflux. This study suggests that significant numbers of GER include weak acid reflux that cannot be detected by pH probes alone. The weak acid reflux could be a trigger for recurrent respiratory symptoms. Combining pH with MII monitoring is a valuable diagnostic method for diagnosing GER in children.

  6. Global Existence and Uniqueness of Weak and Regular Solutions of Shallow Shells with Thermal Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzala, G. Perla, E-mail: perla@lncc.br [National Laboratory of Scientific Computation, (LNCC/MCTI) (Brazil); Cezaro, F. Travessini De, E-mail: fabianacezaro@furg.br [Federal University of Rio Grande (FURG/IMEF), Institute of Mathematics, Statistics and Physics (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    We study a dynamical thin shallow shell whose elastic deformations are described by a nonlinear system of Marguerre–Vlasov’s type under the presence of thermal effects. Our main result is the proof of a global existence and uniqueness of a weak solution in the case of clamped boundary conditions. Standard techniques for uniqueness do not work directly in this case. We overcame this difficulty using recent work due to Lasiecka (Appl Anal 4:1376–1422, 1998).

  7. On weak solutions to a diffuse interface model of a binary mixture of compressible fluids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2016), s. 173-183 ISSN 1937-1632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Euler-Cahn-Hilliard system * weak solution * diffuse interface model Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.781, year: 2016 http://aimsciences.org/journals/displayArticlesnew.jsp?paperID=12093

  8. Self-similar solutions for implosion and reflection of strong and weak shocks in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, B.N.; Chavda, L.K.

    1980-06-01

    We present an improved approximation scheme for finding approximate solutions in analytic form to the self-similar equations of gas dynamics. The method gives better agreement with exact results not only for the weak shocks which were considered previously but also for strong shocks for which the previous method gave poor results. We have considered various shock configurations in spherical and cylindrical geometries. (author)

  9. The Navier-Stokes-Fourier system: From weak solutions to numerical analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 3 (2015), s. 185-193 ISSN 0174-4747 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Navier-Stokes-Fourier system * weak solution * mixed finite-volume finite-element numerical scheme Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/anly.2015.35.issue-3/anly-2014-1300/anly-2014-1300. xml

  10. Non-uniqueness of admissible weak solutions to the Riemann problem for the isentropic Euler equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chiodaroli, E.; Kreml, Ondřej

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 4 (2018), s. 1441-1460 ISSN 0951-7715 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ17-01694Y Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Riemann problem * non-uniqueness * weak solutions Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.767, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/ article /10.1088/1361-6544/aaa10d/meta

  11. Non-uniqueness of admissible weak solutions to the Riemann problem for the isentropic Euler equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chiodaroli, E.; Kreml, Ondřej

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 4 (2018), s. 1441-1460 ISSN 0951-7715 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ17-01694Y Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Riemann problem * non-uniqueness * weak solutions Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.767, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6544/aaa10d/meta

  12. Existence and non-uniqueness of global weak solutions to inviscid primitive and Boussinesq equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chiodaroli, E.; Michálek, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 353, č. 3 (2017), s. 1201-1216 ISSN 0010-3616 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 320078 - MATHEF Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Boussinesq equations * global weak solutions Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 2.500, year: 2016 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00220-017-2846-5

  13. Non-uniqueness of admissible weak solutions to the Riemann problem for isentropic Euler equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodaroli, Elisabetta; Kreml, Ondřej

    2018-04-01

    We study the Riemann problem for multidimensional compressible isentropic Euler equations. Using the framework developed in Chiodaroli et al (2015 Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 68 1157–90), and based on the techniques of De Lellis and Székelyhidi (2010 Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 195 225–60), we extend the results of Chiodaroli and Kreml (2014 Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 214 1019–49) and prove that it is possible to characterize a set of Riemann data, giving rise to a self-similar solution consisting of one admissible shock and one rarefaction wave, for which the problem also admits infinitely many admissible weak solutions.

  14. Chromatographic retention prediction and octanol-water partition coefficient determination of monobasic weak acidic compounds in ion-suppression reversed-phase liquid chromatography using acids as ion-suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Han, Shu-ying; Qi, Zheng-chun; Sheng, Dong; Lian, Hong-zhen

    2009-08-15

    Although simple acids, replacing buffers, have been widely applied to suppress the ionization of weakly ionizable acidic analytes in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), none of the previously reported works focused on the systematic studies about the retention behavior of the acidic solutes in this ion-suppression RPLC mode. The subject of this paper was therefore to investigate the retention behavior of monobasic weak acidic compounds using acetic, perchloric and phosphoric acids as the ion-suppressors. The apparent octanol-water partition coefficient (K" ow) was proposed to calibrate the octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)) of these weak acidic compounds, which resulted in a better linear correlation with log k(w), the logarithm of the hypothetical retention factor corresponding to neat aqueous fraction of hydroorganic mobile phase. This log K" ow-log k w linear correlation was successfully validated by the results of monocarboxylic acids and monohydrating phenols, and moreover by the results under diverse experimental conditions for the same solutes. This straightforward relationship not only can be used to effectively predict the retention values of weak acidic solutes combined with Snyder-Soczewinski equation, but also can offer a promising medium for directly measuring K(ow) data of these compounds via Collander equation. In addition, the influence of the different ion-suppressors on the retention of weak acidic compounds was also compared in this RPLC mode.

  15. Determination of the Equilibrium Constants of a Weak Acid: An Experiment for Analytical or Physical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, Russell A.

    1998-05-01

    A simple experiment, utilizing readily available equipment and chemicals, is described. It allows students to explore the concepts of chemical equilibria, nonideal behavior of aqueous solutions, least squares with adjustment of nonlinear model parameters, and errors. The relationship between the pH of a solution of known initial concentration and volume of a weak acid as it is titrated by known volumes of a monohydroxy strong base is developed rigorously assuming ideal behavior. A distinctive feature of this work is a method that avoids dealing with the problems presented by equations with multiple roots. The volume of base added is calculated in terms of a known value of the pH and the equilibrium constants. The algebraic effort involved is nearly the same as the alternative of deriving a master equation for solving for the hydrogen ion concentration or activity and results in a more efficient computational algorithm. This approach offers two advantages over the use of computer software to solve directly for the hydrogen ion concentration. First, it avoids a potentially lengthy iterative procedure encountered when the polynomial exceeds third order in the hydrogen ion concentration; and second, it provides a means of obtaining results with a hand calculator that can prove useful in checking computer code. The approach is limited to weak solutions to avoid dealing with molalities and to insure that the Debye-Hückel limiting law is applicable. The nonlinear least squares algorithm Nonlinear Fit, found in the computational mathematics library Mathematica, is utilized to fit the measured volume of added base to the calculated value as a function of the measured pH subject to variation of all the equilibrium constants as parameters (including Kw). The experiment emphasizes both data collection and data analysis aspects of the problem. Data for the titration of phosphorous acid, H3PO3, by NaOH are used to illustrate the approach. Fits of the data without corrections

  16. Exact solution of planar and nonplanar weak shock wave problem in gasdynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, L.P.; Ram, S.D.; Singh, D.B.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → An exact solution is derived for a problem of weak shock wave in adiabatic gas dynamics. → The density ahead of the shock is taken as a power of the position from the origin of the shock wave. → For a planar and non-planar motion, the total energy carried by the wave varies with respect to time. → The solution obtained for the planer, and cylindrically symmetric flow is new one. → The results obtained are also presented graphically for different Mach numbers. - Abstract: In the present paper, an analytical approach is used to determine a new exact solution of the problem of one dimensional unsteady adiabatic flow of planer and non-planer weak shock waves in an inviscid ideal fluid. Here it is assumed that the density ahead of the shock front varies according to the power law of the distance from the source of disturbance. The solution of the problem is presented in the form of a power in the distance and the time.

  17. Acceleration of criticality analysis solution convergence by matrix eigenvector for a system with weak neutron interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Yasushi; Takada, Tomoyuki; Kuroishi, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kadotani, Hiroyuki [Shizuoka Sangyo Univ., Iwata, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    In the case of Monte Carlo calculation to obtain a neutron multiplication factor for a system of weak neutron interaction, there might be some problems concerning convergence of the solution. Concerning this difficulty in the computer code calculations, theoretical derivation was made from the general neutron transport equation and consideration was given for acceleration of solution convergence by using the matrix eigenvector in this report. Accordingly, matrix eigenvector calculation scheme was incorporated together with procedure to make acceleration of convergence into the continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP. Furthermore, effectiveness of acceleration of solution convergence by matrix eigenvector was ascertained with the results obtained by applying to the two OECD/NEA criticality analysis benchmark problems. (author)

  18. Evaluation of the efficacy of four weak acids as antifungal preservatives in low-acid intermediate moisture model food systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yang; Wilson, Mark; Chapman, Belinda; Hocking, Ailsa D

    2010-02-01

    The potential efficacy of four weak acids as preservatives in low-acid intermediate moisture foods was assessed using a glycerol based agar medium. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC, % wt./wt.) of each acid was determined at two pH values (pH 5.0, pH 6.0) and two a(w) values (0.85, 0.90) for five food spoilage fungi, Eurotium herbariorum, Eurotium rubrum, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus and Penicillium roqueforti. Sorbic acid, a preservative commonly used to control fungal growth in low-acid intermediate moisture foods, was included as a reference. The MIC values of the four acids were lower at pH 5.0 than pH 6.0 at equivalent a(w) values, and lower at 0.85 a(w) than 0.90 a(w) at equivalent pH values. By comparison with the MIC values of sorbic acid, those of caprylic acid and dehydroacetic acid were generally lower, whereas those for caproic acid were generally higher. No general observation could be made in the case of capric acid. The antifungal activities of all five weak acids appeared related not only to the undissociated form, but also the dissociated form, of each acid.

  19. Characteristics of weak base-induced vacuoles formed around individual acidic organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruma, Hiromi; Kawakami, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    We have previously found that the weak base 4-aminopyridine induces Brownian motion of acidic organelles around which vacuoles are formed, causing organelle traffic disorder in neurons. Our present study investigated the characteristics of vacuoles induced by weak bases (NH(4)Cl, aminopyridines, and chloroquine) using mouse cells. Individual vacuoles included acidic organelles identified by fluorescent protein expression. Mitochondria and actin filaments were extruded outside the vacuoles, composing the vacuole rim. Staining with amine-reactive fluorescence showed no protein/amino acid content in vacuoles. Thus, serous vacuolar contents are probably partitioned by viscous cytosol, other organelles, and cytoskeletons, but not membrane. The weak base (chloroquine) was immunochemically detected in intravacuolar organelles, but not in vacuoles. Early vacuolization was reversible, but long-term vacuolization caused cell death. The vacuolization and cell death were blocked by the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase inhibitor and Cl--free medium. Staining with LysoTracker or LysoSensor indicated that intravacuolar organelles were strongly acidic and vacuoles were slightly acidic. This suggests that vacuolization is caused by accumulation of weak base and H(+) in acidic organelles, driven by vacuolar H(+)-ATPase associated with Cl(-) entering, and probably by subsequent extrusion of H(+) and water from organelles to the surrounding cytoplasm.

  20. Global existence of weak solutions to dissipative transport equations with nonlocal velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hantaek; Granero-Belinchón, Rafael; Lazar, Omar

    2018-04-01

    We consider 1D dissipative transport equations with nonlocal velocity field: where is a nonlocal operator given by a Fourier multiplier. We especially consider two types of nonlocal operators: (1) , the Hilbert transform, (2) . In this paper, we show several global existence of weak solutions depending on the range of γ, δ and α. When , we take initial data having finite energy, while we take initial data in weighted function spaces (in the real variables or in the Fourier variables), which have infinite energy, when .

  1. Blow-Up Criterion of Weak Solutions for the 3D Boussinesq Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaohui Dai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Boussinesq equations describe the three-dimensional incompressible fluid moving under the gravity and the earth rotation which come from atmospheric or oceanographic turbulence where rotation and stratification play an important role. In this paper, we investigate the Cauchy problem of the three-dimensional incompressible Boussinesq equations. By commutator estimate, some interpolation inequality, and embedding theorem, we establish a blow-up criterion of weak solutions in terms of the pressure p in the homogeneous Besov space Ḃ∞,∞0.

  2. Radiolysis of concentrated nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaishi, R.; Jiang, P.Y.; Katsumura, Y.; Domae, M.; Ishigure, K.

    1995-01-01

    A study on electron pulse- and 60 Co γ-radiolysis of concentrated nitric acid and nitrate solutions has been carried out to elucidate the radiation induced reactions taking place in the solutions. Dissociation into NO 2 - and O( 3 P) was proposed as a direct action of the radiation on nitrate and gave the G-values were dependent on the chemical forms of nitrate: g s2 (-NO 3 - )=1.6 and g s2 (-HNO 3 )=2.2 (molecules/100eV). Based on the experimental yields of HNO 2 and reduced Ce IV , the primary yields of radiolysis products of water, g w , were evaluated to clarify the effects of nitrate on spur reactions of water in various nitrate solutions. (author)

  3. Solution of the non-stationary electron Boltzmann equation for a weakly ionized collision dominated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, R.; Wilhelm, J.

    A detailed description is presented of calculating the nonstationary electron distribution function in a weakly ionized collision-dominated plasma from the Boltzmann kinetic equation respecting the effects of the time-dependent electric field, collision processes and the electron formation and loss. The finite difference approximation was used for numerical solution. Using the Crank-Nicolson method and parabolic interpolation between the grid points the Boltzmann equation was transformed to a system of linear equations which was then solved by iterations at a preset accuracy. Using the calculated distribution function values, the macroscopic plasma parameters were determined and the balance of electron density and energy checked in each time step. The mathematical procedure is illustrated using a neon plasma perturbed by a rectangular electric pulse. The time development shown of the distribution function at moments when the pulse was switched on and off demonstrates the great stability of the numerical solution. (J.U.)

  4. Holder continuity of bounded weak solutions to generalized parabolic p-Laplacian equations II: singular case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukjung Hwang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we generalize quasilinear parabolic p-Laplacian type equations to obtain the prototype equation $$ u_t - \\hbox{div} \\Big(\\frac{g(|Du|}{|Du|} Du\\Big = 0, $$ where g is a nonnegative, increasing, and continuous function trapped in between two power functions $|Du|^{g_0 -1}$ and $|Du|^{g_1 -1}$ with $1weak solution is locally Holder continuous with some degree of commonality between degenerate and singular types. By using geometric characters, our proof does not rely on any of alternatives which is based on the size of solutions.

  5. On the Construction and Properties of Weak Solutions Describing Dynamic Cavitation

    KAUST Repository

    Miroshnikov, Alexey

    2014-08-21

    We consider the problem of dynamic cavity formation in isotropic compressible nonlinear elastic media. For the equations of radial elasticity we construct self-similar weak solutions that describe a cavity emanating from a state of uniform deformation. For dimensions d=2,3 we show that cavity formation is necessarily associated with a unique precursor shock. We also study the bifurcation diagram and do a detailed analysis of the singular asymptotics associated to cavity initiation as a function of the cavity speed of the self-similar profiles. We show that for stress free cavities the critical stretching associated with dynamically cavitating solutions coincides with the critical stretching in the bifurcation diagram of equilibrium elasticity. Our analysis treats both stress-free cavities and cavities with contents.

  6. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  7. Diazotisation of Weakly Basic Aromatic and Heterocyclic Amines in Strongly Acid Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godovikova, Tamara I.; Rakitin, Oleg A.; Khmel'nitskii, Lenor I.

    1983-05-01

    The review is devoted to the diazotisation of weakly basic aromatic amines. The methods of synthesis of diazonium salts based on these amines by non-traditional methods are examined. Data on the mechanism of the diazotisation reaction in strongly acid media are surveyed. Reactions of diazonium salts leading to the synthesis of new compounds are presented. The bibliography includes 75 references.

  8. Functional genomics for food microbiology: Molecular mechanisms of weak organic acid preservative adaptation in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brul, S.; Kallemeijn, W.; Smits, G.

    2008-01-01

    The recent era of genomics has offered tremendous possibilities to biology. This concise review describes the possibilities of applying (functional) genomics studies to the field of microbial food stability. In doing so, the studies on weak-organic-acid stress response in yeast are discussed by way

  9. Solution Phase Measurement of Both Weak Sigma and C-H---X- Hydrogen Bonding Interactions in Synthetic Anion Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, Mr. Orion B. [University of Oregon; Sather, Mr. Aaron C [University of Oregon; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL; Meisner, Mr. Jeffrey S. [University of Oregon; Johnson, Prof. Darren W. [University of Oregon

    2008-01-01

    A series of tripodal receptors preorganize electron-deficient aromatic rings to bind halides in organic solvents using weak sigma anion-to-arene interactions or C-H---X- hydrogen bonds. 1H NMR spectroscopy proves to be a powerful technique for quantifying binding in solution, and determining the interaction motifs, even in cases of weak binding.

  10. Trapping proton transfer intermediates in the disordered hydrogen-bonded network of cryogenic hydrofluoric acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayotte, Patrick; Plessis, Sylvain; Marchand, Patrick

    2008-08-28

    A molecular-level description of the structural and dynamical aspects that are responsible for the weak acid behaviour of dilute hydrofluoric acid solutions and their unusual increased acidity at near equimolar concentrations continues to elude us. We address this problem by reporting reflection-absorption infrared spectra (RAIRS) of cryogenic HF-H(2)O binary mixtures at various compositions prepared as nanoscopic films using molecular beam techniques. Optical constants for these cryogenic solutions [n(omega) and k(omega)] are obtained by iteratively solving Fresnel equations for stratified media. Modeling of the experimental RAIRS spectra allow for a quantitative interpretation of the complex interplay between multiple reflections, optical interference and absorption effects. The evolution of the strong absorption features in the intermediate 1000-3000 cm(-1) range with increasing HF concentration reveals the presence of various ionic dissociation intermediates that are trapped in the disordered H-bonded network of cryogenic hydrofluoric acid solutions. Our findings are discussed in light of the conventional interpretation of why hydrofluoric acid is a weak acid revealing molecular-level details of the mechanism for HF ionization that may be relevant to analogous elementary processes involved in the ionization of weak acids in aqueous solutions.

  11. Reactive solute transport in acidic streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broshears, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of Ph and concentrations of toxic metals in streams affected by acid mine drainage are the result of the interplay of physical and biogeochemical processes. This paper describes a reactive solute transport model that provides a physically and thermodynamically quantitative interpretation of these profiles. The model combines a transport module that includes advection-dispersion and transient storage with a geochemical speciation module based on MINTEQA2. Input to the model includes stream hydrologic properties derived from tracer-dilution experiments, headwater and lateral inflow concentrations analyzed in field samples, and a thermodynamic database. Simulations reproduced the general features of steady-state patterns of observed pH and concentrations of aluminum and sulfate in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream near Leadville, Colorado. These patterns were altered temporarily by injection of sodium carbonate into the stream. A transient simulation reproduced the observed effects of the base injection.

  12. In Vivo Predictive Dissolution: Comparing the Effect of Bicarbonate and Phosphate Buffer on the Dissolution of Weak Acids and Weak Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Brian J; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Amidon, Gordon L; Amidon, Gregory E

    2015-09-01

    Bicarbonate is the main buffer in the small intestine and it is well known that buffer properties such as pKa can affect the dissolution rate of ionizable drugs. However, bicarbonate buffer is complicated to work with experimentally. Finding a suitable substitute for bicarbonate buffer may provide a way to perform more physiologically relevant dissolution tests. The dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs was conducted in bicarbonate and phosphate buffer using rotating disk dissolution methodology. Experimental results were compared with the predicted results using the film model approach of (Mooney K, Mintun M, Himmelstein K, Stella V. 1981. J Pharm Sci 70(1):22-32) based on equilibrium assumptions as well as a model accounting for the slow hydration reaction, CO2 + H2 O → H2 CO3 . Assuming carbonic acid is irreversible in the dehydration direction: CO2 + H2 O ← H2 CO3 , the transport analysis can accurately predict rotating disk dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs in bicarbonate buffer. The predictions show that matching the dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs in phosphate and bicarbonate buffer is possible. The phosphate buffer concentration necessary to match physiologically relevant bicarbonate buffer [e.g., 10.5 mM (HCO3 (-) ), pH = 6.5] is typically in the range of 1-25 mM and is very dependent upon drug solubility and pKa . © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  13. Existence of weak solutions to a nonlinear reaction-diffusion system with singular sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida de Bonis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the existence of a class of weak solutions to a nonlinear parabolic system of reaction-diffusion type endowed with singular production terms by reaction. The singularity is due to a potential occurrence of quenching localized to the domain boundary. The kind of quenching we have in mind is due to a twofold contribution: (i the choice of boundary conditions, modeling in our case the contact with an infinite reservoir filled with ready-to-react chemicals and (ii the use of a particular nonlinear, non-Lipschitz structure of the reaction kinetics. Our working techniques use fine energy estimates for approximating non-singular problems and uniform control on the set where singularities are localizing.

  14. Shock-jump conditions in a general medium: weak-solution approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, L. K.; Krzysik, O. A.

    2017-05-01

    General conservation laws are considered, and the concept of a weak solution is extended to the case of an equation involving three space variables and time. Four-dimensional vector calculus is used to develop general jump conditions at a shock wave in the material. To illustrate the use of this result, jump conditions at a shock in unsteady three-dimensional compressible gas flow are presented. It is then proved rigorously that these reduce to the commonly assumed conditions in coordinates normal and tangential to the shock face. A similar calculation is also outlined for an unsteady three-dimensional shock in magnetohydrodynamics, and in a chemically reactive fluid. The technique is available for determining shock-jump conditions in quite general continuous media.

  15. Solution of weakly compressible isothermal flow in landfill gas collection networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nec, Y [Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, British Columbia (Canada); Huculak, G, E-mail: cranberryana@gmail.com, E-mail: greg@gnhconsulting.ca [GNH Consulting, Delta, British Columbia (Canada)

    2017-12-15

    Pipe networks collecting gas in sanitary landfills operate under the regime of a weakly compressible isothermal flow of ideal gas. The effect of compressibility has been traditionally neglected in this application in favour of simplicity, thereby creating a conceptual incongruity between the flow equations and thermodynamic equation of state. Here the flow is solved by generalisation of the classic Darcy–Weisbach equation for an incompressible steady flow in a pipe to an ordinary differential equation, permitting continuous variation of density, viscosity and related fluid parameters, as well as head loss or gain due to gravity, in isothermal flow. The differential equation is solved analytically in the case of ideal gas for a single edge in the network. Thereafter the solution is used in an algorithm developed to construct the flow equations automatically for a network characterised by an incidence matrix, and determine pressure distribution, flow rates and all associated parameters therein. (paper)

  16. Solution of weakly compressible isothermal flow in landfill gas collection networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nec, Y.; Huculak, G.

    2017-12-01

    Pipe networks collecting gas in sanitary landfills operate under the regime of a weakly compressible isothermal flow of ideal gas. The effect of compressibility has been traditionally neglected in this application in favour of simplicity, thereby creating a conceptual incongruity between the flow equations and thermodynamic equation of state. Here the flow is solved by generalisation of the classic Darcy-Weisbach equation for an incompressible steady flow in a pipe to an ordinary differential equation, permitting continuous variation of density, viscosity and related fluid parameters, as well as head loss or gain due to gravity, in isothermal flow. The differential equation is solved analytically in the case of ideal gas for a single edge in the network. Thereafter the solution is used in an algorithm developed to construct the flow equations automatically for a network characterised by an incidence matrix, and determine pressure distribution, flow rates and all associated parameters therein.

  17. Solution of weakly compressible isothermal flow in landfill gas collection networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nec, Y; Huculak, G

    2017-01-01

    Pipe networks collecting gas in sanitary landfills operate under the regime of a weakly compressible isothermal flow of ideal gas. The effect of compressibility has been traditionally neglected in this application in favour of simplicity, thereby creating a conceptual incongruity between the flow equations and thermodynamic equation of state. Here the flow is solved by generalisation of the classic Darcy–Weisbach equation for an incompressible steady flow in a pipe to an ordinary differential equation, permitting continuous variation of density, viscosity and related fluid parameters, as well as head loss or gain due to gravity, in isothermal flow. The differential equation is solved analytically in the case of ideal gas for a single edge in the network. Thereafter the solution is used in an algorithm developed to construct the flow equations automatically for a network characterised by an incidence matrix, and determine pressure distribution, flow rates and all associated parameters therein. (paper)

  18. Containment of Nitric Acid Solutions of Plutonium-238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Silver, G.L.; Pansoy-Hjelvik, L.; Ramsey, K.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion of various metals that could be used to contain nitric acid solutions of Pu-238 has been studied. Tantalum and tantalum/2.5% tungsten resisted the test solvent better than 304L stainless steel and several INCONEL alloys. The solvent used to imitate nitric acid solutions of Pu-238 contained 70% nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid, and ammonium hexanitratocerate

  19. Gastrointestinal Behavior of Weakly Acidic BCS Class II Drugs in Man--Case Study of Diclofenac Potassium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Abeele, Jens; Brouwers, Joachim; Mattheus, Ruben; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the gastrointestinal supersaturation and precipitation behavior of a weakly acidic Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) Class II drug in healthy volunteers. For this purpose, a tablet containing 50 mg diclofenac potassium (Cataflam(®)) was predissolved in 240 mL of water and this solution was subsequently orally administered to five healthy volunteers under fasted and fed state conditions with or without concomitant use of a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) (40 mg esomeprazole, Nexiam(®)). Subsequently, total diclofenac content and dissolved intraluminal drug concentrations as well as drug thermodynamic solubility were determined in gastrointestinal aspirates. In all volunteers, gastric supersaturation resulted in precipitation of diclofenac in the stomach. The extent of precipitation correlated well with gastric pH (r = - 0.78). pH dependency of precipitation was corroborated by the absence of precipitate in the stomach after coadministration of a meal and/or a PPI. Diclofenac was found to be fully dissolved in the duodenum in all test conditions. It can be concluded that substantial pH-dependent gastric precipitation of a weakly acidic BCS Class II drug administered as a solution occurs in humans. With regard to its implications for intestinal absorption, results suggest the instantaneous redissolution of gastric drug precipitate upon transfer to the duodenum. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Intracellular pH Response to Weak Acid Stress in Individual Vegetative Bacillus subtilis Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Rachna; Vischer, Norbert O E; Smelt, Jan P P M; van Beilen, Johan W A; Ter Beek, Alexander; De Vos, Winnok H; Brul, Stanley; Manders, Erik M M

    2016-11-01

    Intracellular pH (pH i ) critically affects bacterial cell physiology. Hence, a variety of food preservation strategies are aimed at perturbing pH i homeostasis. Unfortunately, accurate pH i quantification with existing methods is suboptimal, since measurements are averages across populations of cells, not taking into account interindividual heterogeneity. Yet, physiological heterogeneity in isogenic populations is well known to be responsible for differences in growth and division kinetics of cells in response to external stressors. To assess in this context the behavior of intracellular acidity, we have developed a robust method to quantify pH i at single-cell levels in Bacillus subtilis Bacilli spoil food, cause disease, and are well known for their ability to form highly stress-resistant spores. Using an improved version of the genetically encoded ratiometric pHluorin (IpHluorin), we have quantified pH i in individual B. subtilis cells, cultured at an external pH of 6.4, in the absence or presence of weak acid stresses. In the presence of 3 mM potassium sorbate, a decrease in pH i and an increase in the generation time of growing cells were observed. Similar effects were observed when cells were stressed with 25 mM potassium acetate. Time-resolved analysis of individual bacteria in growing colonies shows that after a transient pH decrease, long-term pH evolution is highly cell dependent. The heterogeneity at the single-cell level shows the existence of subpopulations that might be more resistant and contribute to population survival. Our approach contributes to an understanding of pH i regulation in individual bacteria and may help scrutinizing effects of existing and novel food preservation strategies. This study shows how the physiological response to commonly used weak organic acid food preservatives, such as sorbic and acetic acids, can be measured at the single-cell level. These data are key to coupling often-observed single-cell heterogeneous growth

  1. A Semilinear Wave Equation with a Boundary Condition of Many-Point Type: Global Existence and Stability of Weak Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giai Giang Vo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the study of a wave equation with a boundary condition of many-point type. The existence of weak solutions is proved by using the Galerkin method. Also, the uniqueness and the stability of solutions are established.

  2. An online computer method for the potentiometric titration of mixtures of a strong and a weak acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.

    1977-01-01

    A PDP-11 online computer method for the titration of mixtures or a strong and a weak acid is described.The method is based on multiparametric curve-fitting. One or the parameters found from the calculations is the dissociation constant of the weak acid, hence the method can be applied even when this

  3. Mechanisms of acid, weakly acidic and gas reflux after anti-reflux surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, A. J.; Draaisma, W. A.; Weusten, B. L. A. M.; Gooszen, H. G.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whereas it is well documented that fundoplication reduces acid reflux, the effects of the procedure on non-acid and gas reflux and the mechanisms through which this is achieved have not been fully elucidated. METHODS: In 14 patients, reflux was measured with impedance-pH monitoring

  4. Interaction between Al3+ and acrylic acid and polyacrylic acid in acidic aqueous solution: a model experiment for the behavior of Al3+ in acidified soil solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etou, Mayumi; Masaki, Yuka; Tsuji, Yutaka; Saito, Tomoyuki; Bai, Shuqin; Nishida, Ikuko; Okaue, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Takushi

    2011-01-01

    From the viewpoint of the phytotoxicity and mobility of Al(3+) released from soil minerals due to soil acidification, the interaction between Al(3+) and acrylic acid (AA) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) as a model compound of fulvic acid was investigated. The interaction was examined at pH 3 so as to avoid the hydrolysis of Al(3+). The interaction between Al(3+) and AA was weak. However, the interaction between Al(3+) and PAA was strong and depended on the initial (COOH in PAA)/Al molar ratio (R(P)) of the solution. For the range of 1/R(P), the interaction between Al(3+) and PAA can be divided into three categories: (1) 1:1 Al-PAA-complex (an Al(3+) combines to a carboxyl group), (2) intermolecular Al-PAA-complex (an Al(3+) combines to more than 2 carboxyl groups of other Al-PAA-complexes) in addition to the 1:1 Al-PAA-complex and (3) precipitation of intermolecular complexes. In conclusion, R(P) is an important factor affecting the behavior of Al(3+) in acidic soil solution.

  5. Very weak solutions to the rotating Stokes, Oseen and Navier–Stokes problems in weighted spaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kračmar, S.; Krbec, Miroslav; Nečasová, Šárka; Penel, P.; Schumacher, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 289, 11-12 (2016), s. 1466-1487 ISSN 0025-584X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/11/1304 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : viscous incompressible fluid * flow around rotating rigid body * very weak solution * weighted homogenous Sobolev spaces Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mana.201400052/abstract?systemMessage=Wiley+Online+Library+will+be+unavailable+on+Saturday+3rd+ September +2016+at+08.30+BST%2F+03%3A30+EDT%2F+15%3A30+SGT+for+5+hours+ and +Sunday+4th+ September +at+10%3A00+BST%2F+05%3A00+EST%2F+17%3A00+SGT+for+1+hour++for+essential+maintenance.+Apologies+for+the+inconvenience

  6. Bloch Modes and Evanescent Modes of Photonic Crystals: Weak Form Solutions Based on Accurate Interface Triangulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Saba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new approach to calculate the complex photonic band structure, both purely dispersive and evanescent Bloch modes of a finite range, of arbitrary three-dimensional photonic crystals. Our method, based on a well-established plane wave expansion and the weak form solution of Maxwell’s equations, computes the Fourier components of periodic structures composed of distinct homogeneous material domains from a triangulated mesh representation of the inter-material interfaces; this allows substantially more accurate representations of the geometry of complex photonic crystals than the conventional representation by a cubic voxel grid. Our method works for general two-phase composite materials, consisting of bi-anisotropic materials with tensor-valued dielectric and magnetic permittivities ε and μ and coupling matrices ς. We demonstrate for the Bragg mirror and a simple cubic crystal closely related to the Kelvin foam that relatively small numbers of Fourier components are sufficient to yield good convergence of the eigenvalues, making this method viable, despite its computational complexity. As an application, we use the single gyroid crystal to demonstrate that the consideration of both conventional and evanescent Bloch modes is necessary to predict the key features of the reflectance spectrum by analysis of the band structure, in particular for light incident along the cubic [111] direction.

  7. Effect of Organic Acid Additions on the General and Localized Corrosion Susceptibility of Alloy 22 in Chloride Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carranza, R M; Giordano, C M; Rodr?guez, M A; Ilevbare, G O; Rebak, R B

    2007-08-28

    Electrochemical studies such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022) in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C. All the tested material was wrought Mill Annealed (MA). Tests were also performed in NaCl solutions containing weak organic acids such as oxalic, acetic, citric and picric. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was significantly higher in solutions containing oxalic acid than in solutions of pure NaCl at the same pH. Citric and picric acids showed a slightly higher corrosion rate, and acetic acid maintained the corrosion rate of pure chloride solutions at the same pH. Organic acids revealed to be weak inhibitors for crevice corrosion. Higher concentration ratios, compared to nitrate ions, were needed to completely inhibit crevice corrosion in chloride solutions. Results are discussed considering acid dissociation constants, buffer capacity and complex formation constants of the different weak acids.

  8. Wang-Landau Reaction Ensemble Method: Simulation of Weak Polyelectrolytes and General Acid-Base Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsgesell, Jonas; Holm, Christian; Smiatek, Jens

    2017-02-14

    We present a novel method for the study of weak polyelectrolytes and general acid-base reactions in molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. The approach combines the advantages of the reaction ensemble and the Wang-Landau sampling method. Deprotonation and protonation reactions are simulated explicitly with the help of the reaction ensemble method, while the accurate sampling of the corresponding phase space is achieved by the Wang-Landau approach. The combination of both techniques provides a sufficient statistical accuracy such that meaningful estimates for the density of states and the partition sum can be obtained. With regard to these estimates, several thermodynamic observables like the heat capacity or reaction free energies can be calculated. We demonstrate that the computation times for the calculation of titration curves with a high statistical accuracy can be significantly decreased when compared to the original reaction ensemble method. The applicability of our approach is validated by the study of weak polyelectrolytes and their thermodynamic properties.

  9. Gamma radiolysis of aqueous solution of ascorbic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyola V, V.M.; Azamer B, J.A.; Laviada C, A.; Luna V, P.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary study of the gamma radiolysis of a 1.13 x 10 -4 Maqueous solution of ascorbic acid is presented. It was found that dehydroascorbic acid was the principal product at doses of about 75 Krad. An increase in the dehydroascorbic acid concentration rangins from 5 to 40% was obtained, these values depend mainly on the initial ascorbic acid concentration. (author)

  10. Optical and rheological studies on weak gel-sol transition in aqueous solutions of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-block-polystyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sanjeevi Prasath

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The optical and rheological properties of aqueous solutions of block copolymer composed of low molecular weight poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-b-polystyrene are studied as a function of temperature. From light scattering measurements the block copolymer solution is found to form micelles at very low concentrations and the critical micellar concentration is identified as 0.005 wt%. Apart from the concentration dependence, a unique temperature dependent micelle formation is noted at 34 °C. Further, temperature dependent refractive index measurements shows that the refractive index increases with temperature (beyond the lower critical solution temperature, 31.6 °C of the polymer, and is attributed to the stable rearrangement of the proximal hydrophobic isopropyl-polystyrene chains in the collapsed polymer so as to overcome the steric hindrance effects offered by the hydrophobic chains. In the polymer concentrations investigated for rheological studies, the solution flows, yet manifested solid like behavior with G' > G" with the modulus being frequency dependent and the magnitude of G' two-fold higher than G" implying a weak gel state. Weak gel states are in general noted at high temperatures in most of the polymer systems, contrary to this, in our studies weak gel state is observed at lower temperature. Further, a transition from weak gel to sol state is observed at slightly elevated temperatures. The reason for the existence of weak gel state below the lower critical solution temperature is due to the micellar entanglements of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-b-polystyrene with one another and whereas above the lower critical solution temperature disentanglement of the micelles makes the system behave like a viscoelastic liquid.

  11. Perturbed invariant subspaces and approximate generalized functional variable separation solution for nonlinear diffusion-convection equations with weak source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ya-Rong; Zhang, Shun-Li; Xin, Xiang-Peng

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we propose the concept of the perturbed invariant subspaces (PISs), and study the approximate generalized functional variable separation solution for the nonlinear diffusion-convection equation with weak source by the approximate generalized conditional symmetries (AGCSs) related to the PISs. Complete classification of the perturbed equations which admit the approximate generalized functional separable solutions (AGFSSs) is obtained. As a consequence, some AGFSSs to the resulting equations are explicitly constructed by way of examples.

  12. The Role of the Pressure in the Partial Regularity Theory for Weak Solutions of the Navier-Stokes Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Diego; Lemarié-Rieusset, Pierre-Gilles; Mayoufi, Kawther

    2018-04-01

    We study the role of the pressure in the partial regularity theory for weak solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. By introducing the notion of dissipative solutions, due to D uchon and R obert (Nonlinearity 13:249-255, 2000), we will provide a generalization of the Caffarelli, Kohn and Nirenberg theory. Our approach sheels new light on the role of the pressure in this theory in connection to Serrin's local regularity criterion.

  13. HTGR fuel development: investigations of breakages of uranium-loaded weak acid resin microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.A. Jr.

    1977-11-01

    During the HTGR fuel development program, a high percentage of uranium-loaded weak acid resin microspheres broke during pneumatic transfer, carbonization, and conversion. One batch had been loaded by the UO 3 method; the other by the ammonia neutralization method. To determine the causes of failure, samples of the two failed batches were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron beam microprobe, and other techniques. Causes of failure are postulated and methods are suggested to prevent recurrence of this kind of failure

  14. Fission product behavior in HTGR fuel particles made from weak-acid resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs, T.N.; Henson, T.J.

    1979-04-01

    Fission product retention and behavior are of utmost importance in HTGR fuel particles. The present study concentrates on particles made from weak-acid resins, which can vary in composition from 100% UO 2 plus excess carbon to 100% UC 2 plus excess carbon. Five compositions were tested: UC 4 58 O 2 04 , UC 3 68 O 0 01 , UC 4 39 O 1 72 , UC 4 63 O 0 97 , and UC 4 14 O 1 53 . Metallographically sectioned particles were examined with a shielded electron microprobe. The distributions of the fission products were determined by monitoring characteristic x-ray lines while scanning the electron beam over the particle surface

  15. Radiation protection by ascorbic acid in sodium alginate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliste, A.J.; Mastro, N.L. Del [Center of Radiation Technology, IPEN/CNEN/SP, University City, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: ajaliste@ipen.br

    2004-07-01

    Alginates are gelling hydrocolloids extracted from brown seaweed used widely in the nourishing and pharmaceutical industries. As alginic acid gellification retard food entrance in the stomach alginate is an additive used in diets. The objective of this work was to study the protective action of the ascorbic acid in alginate solutions against the action of {sup 60} Co gamma radiation. One % (w/v) solutions of alginate had been used and concentrations of ascorbic acid varied from 0 to 2.5% (w/v). The solutions were irradiated with doses up to 10 kGy. Viscosity/dose relationship and the p H of the solutions at 25 Centigrade were determined. Ascorbic acid behaved as an antioxidant against radiation oxidative shock in this model system of an irradiated viscous solution. Besides its radiation protective role on alginate solutions ascorbic acid promoted a viscosity increase in the range of concentrations employed. (Author)

  16. Radiation protection by ascorbic acid in sodium alginate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliste, A.J.; Mastro, N.L. Del

    2004-01-01

    Alginates are gelling hydrocolloids extracted from brown seaweed used widely in the nourishing and pharmaceutical industries. As alginic acid gellification retard food entrance in the stomach alginate is an additive used in diets. The objective of this work was to study the protective action of the ascorbic acid in alginate solutions against the action of 60 Co gamma radiation. One % (w/v) solutions of alginate had been used and concentrations of ascorbic acid varied from 0 to 2.5% (w/v). The solutions were irradiated with doses up to 10 kGy. Viscosity/dose relationship and the p H of the solutions at 25 Centigrade were determined. Ascorbic acid behaved as an antioxidant against radiation oxidative shock in this model system of an irradiated viscous solution. Besides its radiation protective role on alginate solutions ascorbic acid promoted a viscosity increase in the range of concentrations employed. (Author)

  17. The Cucker-Smale Equation: Singular Communication Weight, Measure-Valued Solutions and Weak-Atomic Uniqueness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucha, Piotr B.; Peszek, Jan

    2018-01-01

    The Cucker-Smale flocking model belongs to a wide class of kinetic models that describe a collective motion of interacting particles that exhibit some specific tendency, e.g. to aggregate, flock or disperse. This paper examines the kinetic Cucker-Smale equation with a singular communication weight. Given a compactly supported measure as an initial datum we construct a global in time weak measure-valued solution in the space {C_{weak}(0,∞M)}. The solution is defined as a mean-field limit of the empirical distributions of particles, the dynamics of which is governed by the Cucker-Smale particle system. The studied communication weight is {ψ(s)=|s|^{-α}} with {α \\in (0,1/2)}. This range of singularity admits the sticking of characteristics/trajectories. The second result concerns the weak-atomic uniqueness property stating that a weak solution initiated by a finite sum of atoms, i.e. Dirac deltas in the form {m_i δ_{x_i} ⊗ δ_{v_i}}, preserves its atomic structure. Hence these coincide with unique solutions to the system of ODEs associated with the Cucker-Smale particle system.

  18. A note on local interior regularity of a suitable weak solution to the Navier--Stokes problem

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neustupa, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 5 (2013), s. 1391-1400 ISSN 1937-1632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Navier-Stokes equations * suitable weak solution * regularity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://aimsciences.org/journals/displayArticlesnew.jsp?paperID=8344

  19. Almost-Periodic Weak Solutions of Second-Order Neutral Delay-Differential Equations with Piecewise Constant Argument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the existence of almost-periodic weak solutions of second-order neutral delay-differential equations with piecewise constant argument of the form , where denotes the greatest integer function, is a real nonzero constant, and is almost periodic.

  20. Regularity of a weak solution to the Navier--Stokes equations via one component of a spectral projection of vorticity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neustupa, Jiří; Penel, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 2 (2014), s. 1681-1700 ISSN 0036-1410 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Navier-Stokes equations * weak solution * regularity criteria Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.265, year: 2014 http://epubs.siam.org/doi/abs/10.1137/120874874

  1. Measuring and modeling aqueous electrolyte/amino-acid solutions with ePC-SAFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, Christoph; Reschke, Thomas; Müller, Rainer; Kunz, Werner; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Amino-acid solubilities and osmotic coefficients in ternary solutions containing one amino acids and one salt measured. • Weak salt influence on amino-acid solubilities except for salts containing Mg [2+] or NO 3 [−] (salting-in behavior). • Osmotic coefficients dominated by the solute with the highest molality. • Amino-acid solubilities and osmotic coefficients predicted reasonably with ePC-SAFT with deviations of 3.7% and 9.3%. • Predictions based on pure-component parameters for ions and amino acids using no ion/amino-acid fitting parameters. -- Abstract: In this work thermodynamic properties of electrolyte/amino acid/water solutions were measured and modeled. Osmotic coefficients at 298.15 K were measured by means of vapor-pressure osmometry. Amino-acid solubility at 298.15 K was determined gravimetrically. Considered aqueous systems contained one of the four amino acids: glycine, L-/DL-alanine, L-/DL-valine, and L-proline up to the respective amino-acid solubility limit and one of 13 salts composed of the ions Li + , Na + , K + , NH 4 + , Cl − , Br − , I − , NO 3 − , and SO 4 2− at salt molalities of 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mol · kg −1 , respectively. The data show that the salt influence is more pronounced on osmotic coefficients than on amino-acid solubility. The electrolyte Perturbed-Chain Statistical Association Theory (ePC-SAFT) was applied to model thermodynamic properties in aqueous electrolyte/amino-acid solutions. In previous works, this model had been applied to binary salt/water and binary amino acid/water systems. Without fitting any additional parameters, osmotic coefficients and amino-acid solubility in the ternary electrolyte/amino acid/water systems could be predicted with overall deviations of 3.7% and 9.3%, respectively, compared to the experimental data

  2. Photochemical reactions of neptunium in nitric acid solution containing photocatalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Fumio

    1991-01-01

    Photochemical oxidation and reduction behaviors of neptunium were preliminarily investigated in 3 mol/l nitric acid solution. Nitric acid of 3 mol/l simulated the high level waste solution from a spent fuel reprocessing process. Concentrations of Np(V), Np(VI) and nitrous acid were determined with a photospectrometer, and solution potential with an electrode. Without additives, Np(VI) was reduced to Np(V) by nitrous acid which was photolytically generated from nitric acid. With a scavenger for nitrous acid, Np(V) was oxidized to extractable Np(VI) by a photolytically generated oxidizing reagent which were predicted by the solution potential measurement. The reduction rate was higher than the oxidation rate because of the larger quantity and higher reactivity of nitrous acid than an oxidizing reagent. Photocatalyst was proved to be effective for the oxidation of Np(V) to Np(VI). (author)

  3. Acid reflux episodes sensitize the esophagus to perception of weakly acidic and mixed reflux in non-erosive reflux disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerenziani, S; Ribolsi, M; Guarino, M P L; Balestrieri, P; Altomare, A; Rescio, M P; Cicala, M

    2014-01-01

    Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients are more sensitive than erosive esophagitis patients to weakly acidic reflux and to the presence of gas in the refluxate. Intra-esophageal acid perfusion sensitizes esophageal receptors to mechanical and chemical stimuli. To establish whether acid sensitization plays a role in the perception of weakly acidic and mixed reflux episodes, 29 NERD patients, responders and 14 non-responders to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), underwent pH-impedance monitoring. Non-responders repeated the study while on PPIs. To assess the effect of acid exposure on symptom perception, the time period with pH below 4 was measured in 15- and 30-minute time-windows preceding the onset of each reflux episode. Considering weakly acidic and mixed refluxes, both in responder and non-responder patients (off PPIs), the symptomatic refluxes were preceded by a significantly higher cumulative acid exposure than the asymptomatic refluxes. In all patients, following acid reflux, the percentage of symptomatic weakly acidic reflux episodes was significantly higher than that of asymptomatic refluxes. Non-responder patients, off-treatment, were characterized by a lower proportion of weakly acidic reflux and mixed reflux episodes. In the non-responder patients on PPI, only mixed and weakly symptomatic reflux episodes were preceded by a higher cumulative acid exposure. In NERD patients, spontaneous acid reflux enhances subsequent reflux perception, regardless of acidity or liquid/mixed composition of episodes; in non-responder patients on PPIs, only the perception of mixed and weakly acidic reflux episodes seems to be mediated by a preceding acid exposure. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Online Automatic Titration of Chromic Acid in Chromium Plating Solutions and Phosphoric and Sulfuric Acids in Electropolishing Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sopok, Samuel

    1991-01-01

    .... The analytical chemistry literature lacks an adequate online automatic titration method for the monitoring of chromic acid in chromium plating solutions and the monitoring of phosphoric and sulfuric...

  5. Anodic stripping voltammetric determination of heavy metals in solutions containing humic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labuda, J.; Saur, D.; Neeb, R.

    1994-01-01

    Various simultaneous effects of humic acids on the current and potential of differential pulse anodic stripping peaks of copper, lead, cadmium and zinc in weakly alkaline and acidic (pH 2) solutions have been investigated and interpreted with regard to metal complexation and the adsorption of humic acid on the mercury electrode. The applicability of the standard additions method for metal quantitation and the experimental conditions for UV-photolysis with a high-pressure mercury lamp have been examined in model as well as real water samples. (orig.)

  6. Feasibility of isotachochromatography as a method for the preparative separation of weak acids and weak bases. II. Experimental verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, C.; Sluyterman, L.A.A.E.

    1988-01-01

    The theory of isotachochromatography has been verified and proved to be essentially correct. Acetate was used as a leading buffer and mostly serine as a terminal buffer to separate acids with pKa values intermediate between those of the leading and terminal buffers on a column of Dowex 50W-X2.

  7. Recovery of fission products from acidic waste solutions thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlin, W.W.; Darlington, W.B.; Dubois, D.W.

    1975-01-01

    Fission products, e.g., palladium, ruthenium and technetium, are removed from aqueous, acidic waste solutions thereof. The acidic waste solution is electrolyzed in an electrolytic cell under controlled cathodic potential conditions and technetium, ruthenium, palladium and rhodium are deposited on the cathode. Metal deposit is removed from the cathode and dissolved in acid. Acid insoluble rhodium metal is recovered, dissolved by alkali metal bisulfate fusion and purified by electrolysis. In one embodiment, the solution formed by acid dissolution of the cathode metal deposit is treated with a strong oxidizing agent and distilled to separate technetium and ruthenium (as a distillate) from palladium. Technetium is separated from ruthenium by organic solvent extraction and then recovered, e.g., as an ammonium salt. Ruthenium is disposed of as waste by-product. Palladium is recovered by electrolysis of an acid solution thereof under controlled cathodic potential conditions. Further embodiments wherein alternate metal recovery sequences are used are described. (U.S.)

  8. Lower pH values of weakly acidic refluxes as determinants of heartburn perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with normal esophageal acid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bortoli, N; Martinucci, I; Savarino, E; Franchi, R; Bertani, L; Russo, S; Ceccarelli, L; Costa, F; Bellini, M; Blandizzi, C; Savarino, V; Marchi, S

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel impedance pH monitoring has shown that weakly acidic refluxes are able to generate heartburn. However, data on the role of different pH values, ranging between 4 and 7, in the generation of them are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether different pH values of weakly acidic refluxes play a differential role in provoking reflux symptoms in endoscopy-negative patients with physiological esophageal acid exposure time and positive symptom index and symptom association probability for weakly acidic refluxes. One hundred and forty-three consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, nonresponders to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), were allowed a washout from PPIs before undergoing: upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and multichannel impedance pH monitoring. In patients with both symptom index and symptom association probability positive for weakly acidic reflux, each weakly acidic reflux was evaluated considering exact pH value, extension, physical characteristics, and correlation with heartburn. Forty-five patients with normal acid exposure time and positive symptom association probability for weakly acidic reflux were identified. The number of refluxes not heartburn related was higher than those heartburn related. In all distal and proximal liquid refluxes, as well as in distal mixed refluxes, the mean pH value of reflux events associated with heartburn was significantly lower than that not associated. This condition was not confirmed for proximal mixed refluxes. Overall, a low pH of weakly acidic reflux represents a determinant factor in provoking heartburn. This observation contributes to better understand the pathophysiology of symptoms generated by weakly acidic refluxes, paving the way toward the search for different therapeutic approaches to this peculiar condition of esophageal hypersensitivity. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  9. SFG study of platinum electrodes in perchloric acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, W. Q.; Pluchery, O.; Tadjeddine, A.

    2002-04-01

    Infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy has been used to study the structure of water molecules (and/or its derivatives OH -, H 3O + etc.) at aqueous electrolyte/electrode interfaces. For Pt(1 1 0) and Pt(1 0 0) electrodes in 0.1 M perchloric acid solution, we did not observe any significant O-H stretching resonance. In striking contrast to the resonant SFG signal, the nonresonant SFG (NRSFG) signal varies sensitively with the applied electrochemical potential, indicating that the interaction of water molecules with platinum electrodes is relatively weak as compared to that of H + and ClO 4- ions. From changes in the NRSFG signal and on the basis of an ionic adsorption model, we can also deduce that the potential of zero charge of Pt(1 1 0) in 0.1 M HClO 4 should be located at about 0.22 V (vs. NHE). This value is in good agreement with that measured recently by electrochemical method.

  10. Dissolution-modulating mechanism of pH modifiers in solid dispersion containing weakly acidic or basic drugs with poor water solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phuong Ha-Lien; Tran, Thao Truong-Dinh; Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Dong-Jin; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2010-05-01

    Although the solid dispersion method has been known to increase the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs by dispersing them in hydrophilic carriers, one obstacle of the solid dispersion method is its limited solubilization capacity, especially for pH-dependent soluble drugs. pH-modified solid dispersion, in which pH modifiers are incorporated, may be a useful method for increasing the dissolution rate of weakly acidic or basic drugs. Sufficient research, including the most recent reports, was undertaken in this review. How could the inclusion of the pH the pH modifiers in the solid dispersion system change drug structural behaviors, molecular interactions, microenvironmental pH, and/or release rate of pH modifiers, relating with the enhanced dissolution of weakly acidic or weakly basic drugs with poor water solubility? These questions have been investigated to determine the dissolution-modulating mechanism of pH modifiers in solid dispersion containing weakly acidic or basic drugs. It is believed that step-by-step mechanistic approaches could provide the ultimate solution for solubilizing several poorly water-soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility from a solid dispersion system, as well as provide ideas for developing future dosage systems.

  11. Corrosion control of vanadium in aqueous solutions by amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Rabiee, M.M.; Helal, N.H.; El-Hafez, Gh.M. Abd; Badawy, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of vanadium in amino acid free and amino acid containing aqueous solutions of different pH was studied using open-circuit potential measurements, polarization techniques and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The corrosion current density, i corr , the corrosion potential, E corr and the corrosion resistance, R corr , were calculated. A group of amino acids, namely, glycine, alanine, valine, histidine, glutamic and cysteine has been investigated as environmentally safe inhibitors. The effect of Cl - on the corrosion inhibition efficiency especially in acid solutions was investigated. In neutral and basic solutions, the presence of amino acids increases the corrosion resistance of the metal. The electrochemical behavior of V before and after the corrosion inhibition process has shown that some amino acids like glutamic acid and histidine have promising corrosion inhibition efficiency at low concentration (≅25 mM). The inhibition efficiency (η) was found to depend on the structure of the amino acid and the constituents of the corrosive medium. The corrosion inhibition process is based on the adsorption of the amino acid molecules on the metal surface and the adsorption process follows the Freundlich isotherm. The adsorption free energy for valine on V in acidic solutions was found to be -9.4 kJ/mol which reveals strong physical adsorption of the amino acid molecules on the vanadium surface

  12. Relaxation to equilibrium following photoacid dissociation in mineral acids and buffer solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pines, D; Nibbering, E T J; Pines, E

    2007-01-01

    The relaxation to the dissociation equilibrium of a weak acid undergoing a transient pK a change in the presence of a strong mineral acid has been the subject of considerable interest both experimentally and theoretically. Here we compare this process with the analogue event taking place in a buffer solution of a weak carboxylic acid. The comparison has been performed in identical pH and ionic strength conditions and at a sufficiently short timescale where the buffer can only affect the weak acid relaxation by proton scavenging. Although the two relaxation processes have been found to differ in their temporal behaviour, they have both resulted in identical equilibrium amplitudes of the photoacid. This observation reassures the well-known chemical wisdom that pK a values measured in buffer solutions do not depend on the specific chemical reactivity of the buffer. We analyse the essentially many-body relaxation problem in terms of a re-normalized geminate recombination reaction which persists over longer times than the exponential relaxation to equilibrium of homogenously distributed populations of the reactants

  13. Uranium loss from BISO-coated weak-acid-resin HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, R.L.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1977-02-01

    Recycle fuel for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) contains a weak-acid-resin (WAR) kernel, which consists of a mixture of UC 2 , UO 2 , and free carbon. At 1900 0 C, BISO-coated WAR UC 2 or UC 2 -UO 2 kernels lose a significant portion of their uranium in several hundred hours. The UC 2 decomposes and uranium diffuses through the pyrolytic coating. The rate of escape of the uranium is dependent on the temperature and the surface area of the UC 2 , but not on a temperature gradient. The apparent activation energy for uranium loss, ΔH, is approximately 90 kcal/mole. Calculations indicate that uranium loss from the kernel would be insignificant under conditions to be expected in an HTGR

  14. Weak acid extractable metals in Bramble Bay, Queensland, Australia: temporal behaviour, enrichment and source apportionment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, James P; Ayoko, Godwin A; Martens, Wayde N; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2015-02-15

    Sediment samples were taken from six sampling sites in Bramble Bay, Queensland, Australia between February and November in 2012. They were analysed for a range of heavy metals including Al, Fe, Mn, Ti, Ce, Th, U, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Sb, Te, Hg, Tl and Pb. Fraction analysis, Enrichment Factors and Principal Component Analysis-Absolute Principal Component Scores (PCA-APCS) were carried out in order to assess metal pollution, potential bioavailability and source apportionment. Cr and Ni exceeded the Australian Interim Sediment Quality Guidelines at some sampling sites, while Hg was found to be the most enriched metal. Fraction analysis identified increased weak acid soluble Hg and Cd during the sampling period. Source apportionment via PCA-APCS found four sources of metals pollution, namely, marine sediments, shipping, antifouling coatings and a mixed source. These sources need to be considered in any metal pollution control measure within Bramble Bay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Uniform in Time Description for Weak Solutions of the Hopf Equation with Nonconvex Nonlinearity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Olivas Martinez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the Riemann problem for the Hopf equation with concave-convex flux functions. Applying the weak asymptotics method we construct a uniform in time description for the Cauchy data evolution and show that the use of this method implies automatically the appearance of the Oleinik E-condition.

  16. Determination of free acid in plutonium (IV) solutions - thermometrically, potentiometrically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, T.L.; Tucker, G.M.; Huff, G.A.; Jordan, L.G.

    1981-09-01

    The thermometric titration technique was found to offer certain advantages over potentiometry in the determination of free acid in Pu(IV) solutions. The thermometric technique was applied to the determination of free acid in plutonium nitrate solutions using potassium fluoride to suppress the hydrolytic interference of plutonium(IV). The results indicate that 0.2 to 2.0 milliequivalents of free acid can be determined with acceptable bias and precision in solutions containing up to 30 milligrams of plutonium. In contrast, neither the thermometric nor the potentiometric technique was suitable for samples containing more than eight milligrams of plutonium complexed with potassium oxalate

  17. Weak solutions for the motion of a self-propelled deformable structure in a viscous incompressible fluid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nečasová, Šárka; Takahashi, T.; Tucsnak, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 3 (2011), s. 329-352 ISSN 0167-8019 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/11/1304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Navier-Stokes equations * fluid-structure integration * weak solutions * free boundary Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.899, year: 2011 http://rd.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10440-011-9646-2#

  18. On the energy inequality for weak solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations of compressible fluids on unbounded domains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dell'Oro, Filippo; Feireisl, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 128, November (2015), s. 136-148 ISSN 0362-546X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : compressible Navier-Stokes equations * unbounded domain * weak solutions * energy inequality Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.125, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0362546X15002692

  19. Strong ion and weak acid analysis in severe preeclampsia: potential clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortner, C M; Combrinck, B; Allie, S; Story, D; Landau, R; Cain, K; Dyer, R A

    2015-08-01

    The influence of common disturbances seen in preeclampsia, such as changes in strong ions and weak acids (particularly albumin) on acid-base status, has not been fully elucidated. The aims of this study were to provide a comprehensive acid-base analysis in severe preeclampsia and to identify potential new biological predictors of disease severity. Fifty women with severe preeclampsia, 25 healthy non-pregnant- and 46 healthy pregnant controls (26-40 weeks' gestation), were enrolled in this prospective case-control study. Acid-base analysis was performed by applying the physicochemical approach of Stewart and Gilfix. Mean [sd] base excess was similar in preeclamptic- and healthy pregnant women (-3.3 [2.3], and -2.8 [1.5] mEq/L respectively). In preeclampsia, there were greater offsetting contributions to the base excess, in the form of hyperchloraemia (BE(Cl) -2 [2.3] vs -0.4 [2.3] mEq/L, Palkalosis was associated with a non-reassuring/abnormal fetal heart tracing (Prespiratory and hypoalbuminaemic alkalosis that was metabolically offset by acidosis, secondary to unmeasured anions and dilution. While the overall base excess in severe preeclampsia is similar to that in healthy pregnancy, preeclampsia is associated with a greater imbalance offsetting hypoalbuminaemic alkalosis and hyperchloraemic acidosis. Rather than the absolute value of base excess, the magnitude of these opposing contributors may be a better indicator of the severity of this disease. Hypoalbuminaemic alkalosis may also be a predictor of fetal compromise. clinicaltrials.gov: NCT 02164370. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Retention prediction and hydrophobicity estimation of weak acidic compounds by reversed-phase liquid chromatography using acetic and perchloric acids as ion suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shu-ying; Ming, Xin; Qi, Zheng-chun; Sheng, Dong; Lian, Hong-zhen

    2010-11-01

    Simple acids are usually applied to suppress the ionization of weakly ionizable acidic analytes in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. The purpose of this study is to investigate the retention behavior of various weak acidic compounds (monoprotic, diprotic, triprotic, and tetraprotic acids) using acetic or perchloric acid as ion suppressor in a binary hydroorganic mobile phase. The apparent n-octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)") was proposed to calibrate the n-octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)) of weak acidic compound. LogK(ow)" was found to have a better linear correlation with logk(w), the logarithm of the retention factor obtained by extrapolating to neat aqueous fraction of the mobile phase, for all weakly ionizable acidic compounds. This straightforward relationship offers a potential medium for direct measurement of K(ow) data of weak acidic analytes and can be used to predict retention behavior of these compounds in the ion suppression reversed-phase liquid chromatographic mode.

  1. Distribution-valued weak solutions to a parabolic problem arising in financial mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eydenberg

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We study distribution-valued solutions to a parabolic problem that arises from a model of the Black-Scholes equation in option pricing. We give a minor generalization of known existence and uniqueness results for solutions in bounded domains $Omega subset mathbb{R}^{n+1}$ to give existence of solutions for certain classes of distributions $fin mathcal{D}'(Omega$. We also study growth conditions for smooth solutions of certain parabolic equations on $mathbb{R}^nimes (0,T$ that have initial values in the space of distributions.

  2. Applications of on-line weak affinity interactions in free solution capillary electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Niels H H; Nissen, Mogens H; Chen, David D Y

    2002-01-01

    The impressive selectivity offered by capillary electrophoresis can in some cases be further increased when ligands or additives that engage in weak affinity interactions with one or more of the separated analytes are added to the electrophoresis buffer. This on-line affinity capillary...... electrophoresis approach is feasible when the migration of complexed molecules is different from the migration of free molecules and when separation conditions are nondenaturing. In this review, we focus on applying weak interactions as tools to enhance the separation of closely related molecules, e.g., drug...... enantiomers and on using capillary electrophoresis to characterize such interactions quantitatively. We describe the equations for binding isotherms, illustrate how selectivity can be manipulated by varying the additive concentrations, and show how the methods may be used to estimate binding constants. On...

  3. RodZ and PgsA Play Intertwined Roles in Membrane Homeostasis of Bacillus subtilis and Resistance to Weak Organic Acid Stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, Johan; Blohmke, Christoph J.; Folkerts, Hendrik; de Boer, Richard; Zakrzewska, Anna; Kulik, Wim; Vaz, Fred M.; Brul, Stanley; Ter Beek, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Weak organic acids like sorbic and acetic acid are widely used to prevent growth of spoilage organisms such as Bacilli. To identify genes involved in weak acid stress tolerance we screened a transposon mutant library of Bacillus subtilis for sorbic acid sensitivity. Mutants of the rodZ (ymfM) gene

  4. Global existence of a weak solution for a model in radiation magnetohydrodynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ducomet, B.; Kobera, M.; Nečasová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 150, č. 1 (2017), s. 43-65 ISSN 0167-8019 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : radiation magnetohydrodynamics * Navier-Stokes- Fourier system * weak solutio Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.702, year: 2016 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10440-016-0093-y

  5. Global existence of a weak solution for a model in radiation magnetohydrodynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ducomet, B.; Kobera, M.; Nečasová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 150, č. 1 (2017), s. 43-65 ISSN 0167-8019 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : radiation magnetohydrodynamics * Navier-Stokes-Fourier system * weak solutio Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.702, year: 2016 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10440-016-0093-y

  6. Potentiometric titration of free acid in uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, M. Y.; Kim, W. H.; Kim, J. S.; Sohn, S. C.; Eom, T. Y.; Lee, C. H.; Jeon, Y. S.; Han, S. H.

    1998-02-01

    Hydrolysis properties of metal cations and fundamental principles of the potentiometric titration of free acid in aqueous solutions containing metal cations were described. The published papers and reports for the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration of free acid were surveyed, and the applicability of these titration methods to the uranium and/or plutonium solutions were discussed. This technical report also includes the various results obtained from the authors' researches to establish the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration methods for the determination of free acid in nitric acid solutions containing uranium and/or oxalic acid, and aluminum. The procedure manuals used in chemical processes and the newly prepared manuals based on the authors' researches are appended. (author). 26 refs., 54 figs

  7. Potentiometric titration of free acid in uranium solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, M. Y.; Kim, W. H.; Kim, J. S.; Sohn, S. C.; Eom, T. Y.; Lee, C. H.; Jeon, Y. S.; Han, S. H.

    1998-02-01

    Hydrolysis properties of metal cations and fundamental principles of the potentiometric titration of free acid in aqueous solutions containing metal cations were described. The published papers and reports for the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration of free acid were surveyed, and the applicability of these titration methods to the uranium and/or plutonium solutions were discussed. This technical report also includes the various results obtained from the authors` researches to establish the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration methods for the determination of free acid in nitric acid solutions containing uranium and/or oxalic acid, and aluminum. The procedure manuals used in chemical processes and the newly prepared manuals based on the authors` researches are appended. (author). 26 refs., 54 figs.

  8. Study of free acidity determinations in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kergreis, A.

    1966-04-01

    The object of this work is the study of the principal methods which can be applied to the measurement of 'free' acidity. In the first part, we define the various types of acidity which can exist in aqueous solution; then, after having studied some hydrolysis reactions, we compare the value of the neutralisation pH of the hydrated cation and that of the precipitation of the hydroxide. In the second part we have started to study the determination of the acidity of an aqueous solution. After having rapidly considered the 'total' acidity determination, we deal with the problem of the 'free' acidity titration. We have considered in particular certain methods: extrapolation of the equivalent point, colorimetric titrations with or without a complexing agent, and finally the use of ion-exchange resins with mixed aqueous and solvent solutions. (author) [fr

  9. Removal of plutonium from nitric acid-oxalic acid solutions using anion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasar, U.M.; Pawar, S.M.; Joshi, A.R.

    1999-01-01

    An anion exchange method using Amberlyst A-26 (MP) resin was developed for removal of Pu from nitric acid-oxalic acid solutions without destroying oxalate. The method consists of sorption of Pu(IV) on Amberlyst A-26, a macroporous anion exchange resin, from nitric acid-oxalic acid medium in the presence of Al(NO 3 ) 3 . Pu(IV) breakthrough capacity of Amberlyst A-26 using synthetic feed solution was determined. (author)

  10. Thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions with citrate ions. Compressibility studies in aqueous solutions of citric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apelblat, Alexander; Korin, Eli; Manzurola, Emanuel

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Over a wide range of concentrations and temperatures sound velocities were measured in aqueous solutions of citric acid. • Compressibility properties of citric acid solutions are thermodynamically characterized. • Changes in the structure of water when citric acid is dissolved are discussed. -- Abstract: Sound velocities in aqueous solutions of citric acid were measured from 15 °C to 50 °C in 5 °C intervals, within the 0.1 mol · kg −1 to 5.0 mol · kg −1 concentration range. These sound velocities served to evaluate the isentropic and isothermal compressibilities, the apparent molar compressibilities, the isochoric thermal pressure coefficients, changes of the cubic expansion coefficients with pressure at constant temperature, the changes of heat capacities with volume and hydration numbers of citric acid in aqueous solutions

  11. Vacuum-jacketed hydrofluoric acid solution calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robie, R.A.

    1965-01-01

    A vacuum-jacketed metal calorimeter for determining heats of solution in aqueous HF was constructed. The reaction vessel was made of copper and was heavily gold plated. The calorimeter has a cooling constant of 0.6 cal-deg -1-min-1, approximately 1/4 that of the air-jacketed calorimeters most commonly used with HF. It reaches equilibrium within 10 min after turning off the heater current. Measurements of the heat of solution of reagent grade KCl(-100 mesh dried 2 h at 200??C) at a mole ratio of 1 KCl to 200 H2O gave ??H = 4198??11 cal at 25??C. ?? 1965 The American Institute of Physics.

  12. Compatible solutes in lactic acid bacteria subjected to water stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kets, E.P.W.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the research project described in this thesis was to investigate the protective effect of compatible solutes on tactic acid bacteria subjected to drying. Dried preparations of lactic acid bacteria are applied as starter cultures in feed and food industries. Dried starter

  13. Electrochemical dissolution of tin in methanesulphonic acid solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Greef, R.A.T.; Janssen, L.J.J.

    2001-01-01

    High-rate electroplating of tin on a moving steel strip is generally carried out in cells with dimensionally stable anodes. To obtain a matt tin deposit a concentrated acidic tin methanesulphonate solution containing a small concentration of sulphuric acid is used. The concentrated tin

  14. Extraction of fission product rhodium from nitric acid solutions. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorski, B.; Beer, M.; Russ, L.

    1988-01-01

    The extraction of noble metals from nitric acid solutions represents one problem of separating valueable substances from nuclear wastes in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Results of distribution experiments demonstrate the possibility of solvent extraction of rhodium using tertiary amines in presence of nitrite. Even short mixing times realize high distribution coefficients allowing quantitative separation from aqueous solutions. (author)

  15. Precipitation of plutonium from acidic solutions using magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    Magnesium oxide will be used as a neutralizing agent for acidic plutonium-containing solutions. It is expected that as the magnesium oxide dissolves, the pH of the solution will rise, and plutonium will precipitate. The resulting solid will be tested for suitability to storage. The liquid is expected to contain plutonium levels that meet disposal limit requirements

  16. Studies on removal of plutonium from oxalic acid containing hydrochloric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadse, D R; Noronha, D M; Joshi, A R [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    Solution containing hydrochloric acid, oxalic acid and considerable quantities of plutonium may be generated while recycling of scrap produced during the metallic fuel fabrication. Plutonium from such waste is normally recovered by anion exchange method after the destruction of oxalic acid using suitable oxidising agent. Solvent extraction and ion exchange methods are being explored in this laboratory for recovery of Pu from oxalic acid containing HCl solutions without prior destruction of oxalic acid. This paper describes the results on the determination of distribution ratios for extraction of Pu(IV) from hydrochloric acid using Aliquot-336 or HDEHP under varying experimental conditions. (author). 5 refs., 5 tabs.

  17. Radiolysis studies of uranyl nitrate solution in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siri, Sandra; Mondino, Angel V.

    2005-01-01

    The radiolysis of acidic uranyl nitrate solutions was investigated using Co-60 gamma radiation. Hydrogen peroxide was determined as a function of increasing dose. The UV-vis absorption spectra of the irradiated solutions were measured and the spectral changes were analyzed. The increasing dose increases the absorbance intensities, possibly by an increment in nitrate concentration produced by radiolysis, which can originate the formation of different uranyl complexes in solution. (author)

  18. Retention prediction of highly polar ionizable solutes under gradient conditions on a mixed-mode reversed-phase and weak anion-exchange stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkatzopoulou, P; Fasoula, S; Gika, H; Nikitas, P; Pappa-Louisi, A

    2015-05-29

    In the present work the retention of three highly polar and ionizable solutes - uric acid, nicotinic acid and ascorbic acid - was investigated on a mixed-mode reversed-phase and weak anion-exchange (RP/WAX) stationary phase in buffered aqueous acetonitrile (ACN) mobile phases. A U-shaped retention behavior was observed for all solutes with respect to the eluent organic modifier content studied in a range of 5-95% (v/v). This retention behavior clearly demonstrates the presence of a HILIC-type retention mechanism at ACN-rich hydro-organic eluents and an RP-like retention at aqueous-rich hydro-organic eluents. Hence, this column should be promising for application under both RP and HILIC gradient elution modes. For this reason, a series of programmed elution runs were carried out with increasing (RP) and decreasing (HILIC) organic solvent concentration in the mobile phase. This dual gradient process was successfully modeled by two retention models exhibiting a quadratic or a cubic dependence of the logarithm of the solute retention factor (lnk) upon the organic modifier volume fraction (φ). It was found that both models produced by gradient retention data allow the prediction of solute retention times for both types of programmed elution on the mixed-mode column. Four, in the case of the quadratic model, or five, in the case of the cubic model, initial HILIC- and RP-type gradient runs gave satisfactory retention predictions of any similar kind elution program, even with different flow rate, with an overall error of only 2.5 or 1.7%, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Almost-everywhere uniqueness of Lagrangian trajectories for suitable weak solutions of the three-dimensional Navier–Stokes equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, James C; Sadowski, Witold

    2009-01-01

    We show that if u is a suitable weak solution of the unforced three-dimensional Navier–Stokes equations corresponding to a divergence-free initial condition in H 1/2 (Ω), then the Lagrangian trajectory through almost every initial condition in Ω is unique for all t ≥ 0. This is a corollary of two subsidiary results: (i) if S is the singular set of some suitable weak solution of the three-dimensional Navier–Stokes equations for which p in L 5/3 (Ω × (0, T)) (such solutions are known to exist), then for any compact subset K of Ω × (0, T) the upper box-counting dimension of S intersection K is no larger than 5/3 and (ii) for a volume-preserving flow in R n arising from a vector field in L 1 (0, T; L ∞ ), trajectories through almost every initial condition avoid any set whose box-counting dimension is strictly less than n − 1. The result (i) is new, although it requires only a small variation of an argument contained in Caffarelli et al (1982 Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 35 771–831) and we give a simple geometric proof of (ii), a result originally proved by Aizenmann using other methods (1978 Duke Math. J. 45 809–12)

  20. Polarography of hexavalent molybdenum in hypophosphorous acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, A.; El-Shatory, S.A.; Azab, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    The polarographic behaviour and determination of Mo(6) in hypophosphorous acid solutions of concentrations varying from 0,1 to 5,0 moll -1 and T = 25±0,1 0 C have been investigated. It was shown that reduction of MoO 4 2- takes place along a single or two waves depending upon the acid concentration. Microcoulometric experiments have been performed at the limiting region of the different waves obtained at different acid concentrations. A scheme for the mechanism of reduction occuring at the DME has been deduced. A method for analytical determination of Mo(6) on both the micro- and macro-scales in hypophosphorous acid solutions has been reported. Analysis of a binary mixture Mo(6)/Cd(2) and a tertiary mixture Mo(6)/Cd(2)/Zn(2) in moll -1 hypophosphorous acid has been investigated. (Author)

  1. Almost-Periodic Weak Solutions of Second-Order Neutral Delay-Differential Equations with Piecewise Constant Argument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanyi Zhang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the existence of almost-periodic weak solutions of second-order neutral delay-differential equations with piecewise constant argument of the form (x(t+x(t−1′′=qx(2[(t+1/2]+f(t, where [⋅] denotes the greatest integer function, q is a real nonzero constant, and f(t is almost periodic.

  2. Eight supramolecular assemblies constructed from bis(benzimidazole) and organic acids through strong classical hydrogen bonding and weak noncovalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shouwen; Wang, Daqi

    2014-05-01

    Eight crystalline organic acid-base adducts derived from alkane bridged bis(N-benzimidazole) and organic acids (2,4,6-trinitrophenol, p-nitrobenzoic acid, m-nitrobenzoic acid, 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 5-sulfosalicylic acid and oxalic acid) were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. Of the eight compounds five are organic salts (1, 4, 6, 7 and 8) and the other three (2, 3, and 5) are cocrystals. In all of the adducts except 1 and 8, the ratio of the acid and the base is 2:1. All eight supramolecular assemblies involve extensive intermolecular classical hydrogen bonds as well as other noncovalent interactions. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. These weak interactions combined, all the complexes displayed 3D framework structure. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the classical N+-H⋯O-, O-H⋯O, and O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds (ionic or neutral) and other nonbonding associations between acids and ditopic benzimidazoles are sufficient to bring about the formation of cocrystals or organic salts.

  3. Photolysis of Periodate and Periodic Acid in Aqueous Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Knud; Kläning, U. K.

    1978-01-01

    The photochemistry of periodate and periodic acid in aqueous solution was studied (i) by quantum yield measurements at low light intensity (ii) by flash photolysis, and (iii) by photolysis of glassy samples at 77 K. The photochemical studies were supplemented with pulse radiolysis studies...... of aqueous periodate solutions and with kinetic studies using stopped-flow technique. In strongly alkaline solution the photodecomposition of periodate proceeds via formation of O– and IVI. At pH solution O3 P is formed in a small...

  4. Uranium extraction from sulfuric acid solution using anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheta, M. E.; Abdel Aal, M. M.; Kandil, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Uranium is currently recovered from sulfuric acid leach liquor using anion exchange resin as Amberlite IRA 402 (CT). This technology is based on fact that, uranium exists as anionic complexes. This takes place by controlling the pH of the solution, agitation time, temperature and resin to solution ratio (R/S). In this work, batch stirrer tank used for uranium extraction from sulfate medium and after extraction, elution process was done using 1M NaCl solution. After extraction and elution process, the resin was separated from the system and uranium was determined in the solution. (Author)

  5. Density of nitric acid solutions of plutonium; Densite des solutions nitriques de plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibergia, J P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    The report is intended to furnish an expression making it possible to determine the density of a nitric acid solution of plutonium. Under certain defined experimental conditions, the equation found makes it possible to deduce, for a solution whose concentration, free acidity and temperature are known, the corresponding value of the density of that solution. (author) [French] L'expose a pour but de donner une formule permettant la determination de la densite d'une solution nitrique de plutonium. Suivant certaines conditions experimentales precisees, l'equation trouvee permet, pour une solution dont la concentration, l'acidite libre nitrique et la temperature sont donnees, de deduire la valeur correspondant de la densite de cette solution. (auteur)

  6. Vibrational studies in aqueous solutions. Part II. The acid oxalate ion and oxalic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shippey, T. A.

    1980-08-01

    Assignments for oxalic acid in solution are re-examined. A detailed assignment of the IR and Raman spectra of the acid oxalate ion is presented for the first time. Raman spectroscopy is used to study the first ionization of oxalic acid.

  7. Removal of sulfamic acid from plutonium sulfamate--sulfamic acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.

    1978-10-01

    Plutonium metal can be readily dissolved in aqueous solutions of sulfamic acid. When the plutonium sulfamate--sulfamic acid solutions are added to normal purex process streams, the sulfamate ion is oxidized by addition of sodium nitrite. This generates sodium sulfate which must be stored as radioactive waste. When recovery of ingrown 241 Am or storage of the dissolved plutonium must be considered, the sulfamate ion poses major and undesirable precipitation problems in the process streams. The present studies show that 40 to 80% of the sulfamate present in the dissolver solutions can be removed by precipitation as sulfamic acid by the addition of concentrated nitric acid. Addition of 64% nitric acid allows precipitation of 40 to 50% of the sulfamate; addition of 72% nitric acid allows precipitation of 50 to 60% of the sulfamate. If the solutions are chilled, additional sulfamic acid will precipitate. If the solutions are chilled to -10 0 C, about 70 to 80% of the orginal sulfamic acid in the dissolver will precipitate. A single, low-volume wash of the sulfamic acid crystals with concentrated nitric acid will decontaminate the crystals to a plutonium content of 5 dis/(min-gram)

  8. Classical and weak solutions for semilinear parabolic equations with Preisach hysteresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Jais

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the solvability of the semilinear parabolic differential equation \\[\\frac{\\partial u}{\\partial t}(x,t- \\Delta u(x,t + c(x,tu(x,t = \\mathcal{P}(u + \\gamma (x,t\\] in a cylinder \\(D=\\Omega \\times (0,T\\, where \\(\\mathcal{P}\\ is a hysteresis operator of Preisach type. We show that the corresponding initial boundary value problems have unique classical solutions. We further show that using this existence and uniqueness result, one can determine the properties of the Preisach operator \\(\\mathcal{P}\\ from overdetermined boundary data.

  9. Specific features of concentrated phase under decomposition of weak solid /sup 3/He-/sup 4/He solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikheev, V A; Majdamov, V A; Kal' noj, S E; Omelaenko, N I

    1988-06-01

    The decomposition of solid /sup 3/He-/sup 4/He solutuions is studied on the samples 0.54% /sup 3/He(V=20.55 cm/sup 3//mole) and 0.60% /sup 4/He (V=24.04-24.93 cm/sup 3//mole) using pulse NMR method. At T=100 mK the decomposition of a weak solution proceeds more than for 30 h, the decomposition rate and temperature being dependent on the sample prehistory. In the concentrated phase of the decomposed weak solution the spin diffraction of /sup 3/He is of the quasi-one-dimensional character with the diffusion coefficient D /similar to/ 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2//sec typical of liquid /sup 3/He and exceeding that bulk solid /sup 3/He by two orders of magnitude. The longitudinal relaxation time in the quasi-one-dimensional phase (/similar to/ 1 sec) is characteristic of the solid state and coinsides with data for bulk /sup 3/He. The temperature behaviour of magnetization in the quasi-one-dimensional phase is well described by the Curie law.

  10. Coprecipitation of thorium and uranium peroxides from acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McTaggart, D.R.; Mailen, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The factors affecting successful coprecipitation of thorium and uranium peroxides from acid media were studied. Variables considered in this work were H/sup +/ concentration, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentration, duration of contact, and rate of feed solution addition. In all experiments, stock solutions of Th(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/ and UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ were fed at a controlled rate into H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ solutions with constant stirring. Samples were taken as a function of time to follow the H/sup +/ concentration of the solution, uranium precipitation, thorium precipitation, precipitant weight/volume of solution, and crystalline structure and growth. The optimum conditions for maximum coprecipitation are low H/sup +/ concentration, high H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentration, and extended contact time between the solutions.

  11. 15N NMR spectroscopic investigation of nitrous and nitric acids in sulfuric acid solutions of varying acidities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, G.K.S.; Heiliger, L.; Olah, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Both nitrous and nitric acids were studied in sulfuric acid solutions of varying acid strengths by 15 N NMR spectroscopy. The study gives new insights into the nature of intermediates present at different acid strengths. Furthermore, we have also discovered a novel redox reaction between NO 2 + and NO + ions involving the intermediacy of their respective acids. A mechanism is proposed to explain the observed results. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  12. Precipitation behavior of uranium in multicomponent solution by oxalic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.J.; Kim, I.S.; Lee, W.K.; Shin, H.S.; Ro, S.G.

    1996-01-01

    A study on the precipitation of uranium by oxalic acid was carried out in a multicomponent solution. The precipitation method is usually applied to the treatment of radioactive waste and the recovery of uranium from a uranium-scrap contaminated with impurities. In these cases, the problem is how to increase the precipitation yield of target element and to prevent impurities from coprecipitation. The multicomponent solution in the present experiment was prepared by dissolving U, Nd, Cs and Sr in nitric acid. The effects of concentrations of oxalic acid and ascorbic acid on the precipitation yield and purity of uranium were observed. As results of the study, the maximum precipitation yield of uranium is revealed to be about 96.5% and the relative precipitation ratio of Nd, Cs and Sr versus uranium are discussed at the condition of the maximum precipitation yield of uranium, respectively. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  13. Process for extracting uranium from phosphoric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The description is given of a method for extracting uranium from phosphoric acid solutions whereby the previously oxided acid is treated with an organic solvent constituted by a mixture of dialkylphosphoric acid and trialkylphosphine oxide in solution in a non-reactive inert solvent so as to obtain de-uraniated phosphoric acid and an organic extract constituted by the solvent containing most of the uranium. The uranium is then separated from the extract as uranyl ammonium tricarbonate by reaction with ammonia and ammonium carbonate and the extract de-uraniated at the extraction stage is recycled. The extract is treated in a re-extraction apparatus comprising not less than two stages. The extract to be treated is injected at the top of the first stage. At the bottom of the first stage, ammonia is introduced counter current as gas or as an aqueous solution whilst controlling the pH of the first stage so as to keep it to 8.0 or 8.5 and at the bottom of the last stage an ammonium carbonate aqueous solution is injected in a quantity representing 50 to 80% of the stoichiometric quantity required to neutralize the dialkylphosphoric acid contained in the solvent and transform the uranium into uranyl ammonium tricarbonate [fr

  14. Uranium dispersion in the coating of weak-acid-resin-deprived HTGR fuel microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, G.W.; Beatty, R.L.; Tennery, V.J.; Lackey, W.J. Jr.

    1976-02-01

    The current reference HTGR recycle fuel particle is a UO 2 /UC 2 kernel with a Triso coating comprising a low-density pyrocarbon (PyC) buffer, a high-density PyC inner LTI coating, SiC, and a high-density PyC outer LTI. The kernel is fabricated from a weak-acid ion exchange resin (WAR). Microradiographic examination of coated WAR particles has demonstrated that considerable U can be transferred from the kernel to the buffer coating during fabrication. Investigation of causes of fuel dispersion has indicated several different factors that contribute to fuel redistribution if not properly controlled. The presence of a nonequilibrium UC/sub 1-x/O/sub x/ (0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.3) phase had no significant effect on initiating fuel dispersion. Gross exposure of the completed fuel kernel to ambient atmosphere or to water vapor at room temperature produced very minimal levels of dispersion. Exposure of the fuel to perchloroethylene during buffer and inner LTI deposition produced massive redistribution. Fuel redistribution observed in Triso-coated particles results from permeation of the inner LTI by HCl during SiC deposition. As the decomposition of CH 3 Cl 3 Si is used to deposit SiC, chlorine is readily available during this process. The permeability of the inner LTI coating has a marked effect on the extent of this mode of fuel dispersion. LTI permeability was determined by chlorine leaching studies to be a strong function of density, coating gas dilution, and coating temperature but relatively unaffected by application of a seal coat, variations in coating thickness, and annealing at 1800 0 C. Mechanical attrition of the kernels during processing was identified as a potential source of U-bearing fines that may be incorporated into the coating in some circumstances

  15. Ionizing radiation induced degradation of salicylic acid in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarrán, Guadalupe; Mendoza, Edith

    2018-06-01

    The radiation-induced degradation of salicylic acid (SA-) in aqueous solutions (1.0 and 0.1 mmol dm-3) saturated with N2O or air or without oxygen were studied. Irradiation was carried out using a cobalt-60 source. With a 1 mmol dm-3 solution saturated with N2O a seemingly total degradation occurred at about 18 kGy, although small quantities of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, catechol and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid were present at that dose at concentrations of 67, 22 and 6 μmol dm-3 respectively. Under air and when free oxygen, the three radiolytic products were present at 18.54 kGy while SA- was destroyed only to 90% and 62%, respectively. In the case of 0.1 mmol dm-3 SA- solutions, the acid was degraded at 3.5 kGy if the solution contained N2O, at 5.8 kGy in air and at 7 kGy without oxygen. The concentration of the radiolytic products increased with increasing dose and after a maximum they decreased. The oxidation was followed by measuring the chemical oxygen demand; the slopes were 0.48 and 0.11, 0.21 and 0.07, 0.15 and 0.03 mmol dm-3 kGy-1 for 1.0 and 0.10 mmol dm-3 solutions saturated with N2O or air or without oxygen, respectively.

  16. Liquid Superlubricity of Polyethylene Glycol Aqueous Solution Achieved with Boric Acid Additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiangyu; Li, Jinjin; Zhang, Chenhui; Luo, Jianbin

    2018-03-27

    Boric acid is a weak acid and has been used as a lubrication additive because of its special structure. In this study, we report that boric acid could achieve a robust superlubricity (μ friction coefficient of approximately 0.004-0.006 could be achieved with boric acid under neutral conditions (pH of approximately 6.4), which is different from the acidic conditions leading to superlubricity. The influence of various factors, including boric acid concentration, sliding speed, applied load, PEG molecular weight, and the volume of lubricant on the superlubricity, were investigated. The results reveal that the PEG aqueous solution with the boric acid additive could achieve superlubricity under a wide range of conditions. The surface composition analysis shows that the synergy effect between boric acid and PEG provides sufficient H + ions to realize the running-in process. Moreover, a composite tribochemical film composed of silica and ammonia-containing compounds were formed on the ball surface, contributing to the superlubricity. The film thickness calculation shows that superlubricity was achieved in a mixed lubrication region, and therefore, the superlubricity state was dominated by both the composite tribochemical film formed via the tribochemical reaction on the contact surfaces and the hydrodynamic lubricating film between the contact surfaces. Such a liquid superlubricity achieved under neutral conditions is of importance for both scientific understanding and engineering applications.

  17. Selective extraction of metals from acidic uranium(VI) solutions using neo-tridecano-hydroxamic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardoncelli, F.; Grossi, G.

    1975-01-01

    According to this invention neo-alkyl-hydroxamic acids are employed as ion-exchanging agents in processes for liquid-liquid extraction with the aim of separating, purifying dissolved metals and of converting a metal salt solution into a solution of a salt of the same metal but with different anion. In particular it is an objective of this invention to provide a method whereby a molecular pure uranium solution is obtained by selective extraction from a uranium solution delivered by irradiated fuel reprocessing plants and containing plutonium, fission products and other unwanted metals, in which method neo-tridecane-hydroxamic acid is employed as ion exchanger. (Official Gazette)

  18. Copper complexation by tannic acid in aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraal, P.; Jansen, B.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Verstraten, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The speciation of titrated copper in a dissolved tannic acid (TA) solution with an initial concentration of 4 mmol organic carbon ((OC)/l was investigated in a nine-step titration experiment (Cu/oC molar ratio = 0.0030-0.0567). We differentiated between soluble and insoluble Cu species by 0.45 mu m

  19. Acid-base titrations by stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant with special reference to automatic titrations-II Theory of titration of mixtures of acids, polyprotic acids, acids in mixture with weak bases, and ampholytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrsson, L; Ingman, F; Johansson, S

    A general method for evaluating titration data for mixtures of acids and for acids in mixture with weak bases is presented. Procedures are given that do not require absolute [H]-data, i.e., relative [H]-data may be used. In most cases a very rough calibration of the electrode system is enough. Further, for simple systems, very approximate values of the stability constants are sufficient. As examples, the titration of the following are treated in some detail: a mixture of two acids, a diprotic acid, an acid in presence of its conjugate base, and an ampholyte.

  20. Aspartic acid interaction with cobalt(II) in dilute aqueous solution: A {sup 57}Co emission Moessbauer spectroscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamnev, Alexander A.; Tugarova, Anna V. [Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Kovacs, Krisztina; Homonnay, Zoltan, E-mail: homonnay@ludens.elte.hu; Kuzmann, Erno; Vertes, Attila [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary)

    2012-03-15

    Emission ({sup 57}Co) Moessbauer spectra of the aspartic acid-{sup 57}CoCl{sub 2} system were measured at T = 80 K in frozen aqueous solution and in the form of a dried residue of this solution. The Moessbauer spectra, besides a weak contribution from after-effects, showed two Fe{sup 2 + }/Co{sup 2 + } components which were ascribed to octahedrally and tetrahedrally coordinated {sup 57}Co{sup II} microenvironments in the Asp-cobalt(II) complex. This dual coordination mode may be due to the involvement of the second terminal carboxylic group of aspartic acid in the coordination sphere of Co.

  1. Immobilization of citric acid solutions in portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Valdir M.; Rzyski, Barbara M.

    1997-01-01

    Decontamination processes by using citric acid on certain items used in the nuclear area, can result in large volumes of liquid wastes with low activity or effluents, contaminated with uranium and some elements dangerous to the environment. A great number of installations that have decontamination processes adopt the zero discharge philosophy. So, one of the forms to isolate the solutions is by reducing its volume through the evaporation process. The generated must can be neutralized and encapsulated or immobilized in Portland cement. This work propose a chemical technique to destroy the citric acid in the decontamination solutions instead of neutralization and, depending on the installation convenience, a direct cement immobilization of these solutions or of the evaporation mud. The results obtained in this work involve data about the workability, setting time and mechanical resistance, after 28 days of sealed cure, for samples with water-cement ratios of 4, 0.5 and 0.6, by weight. (author). 5 refs., 2 tabs

  2. Interactions of acidic solutions with sediments: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.R.; Serne, R.J.; Felmy, A.R.; Erikson, R.L.; Krupka, K.M.; Gee, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology is presented for investigating the chemical interactions of acidic solutions with sediments. The MINTEQ geochemical computer code was used to predict solid-phase reactions that might occur when acidic solutions contact neutral sediments which, in turn, may control the concentrations of certain dissolved components. Results of X-ray diffraction analysis of laboratory samples of sediments that have been contacted with acidic uranium mill tailings solutions suggest gypsum and jarosite precipitated. These same mineralogical changes were identified in sediment samples collected from a drained uranium mill evaporation pond (Lucky Mc mine in Wyoming) with a 10-year history of acid attack. Geochemical modeling predicted that these same phases and several amorphous solids not identifiable by X-ray diffraction should have precipitated in the contacted sediments. An equilibrium conceptual model consisting of an assemblage of minerals and amorphous solid phases was then developed to represent a sediment column through which uranium mill tailings solutions were percolated. The MINTEQ code was used to predict effluent solution concentrations resulting from the reactions of the tailings solution with the assemblage of solid phases in the conceptual model. The conceptual model successfully predicted the concentrations of several of the macro-constituents (e.g., Ca, SO 4 , Al, Fe, and Mn), but was not successful in modeling the concentrations of trace elements. The lack of success in predicting the observed trace metal concentrations suggests that other mechanisms, such as adsorption, must be included in future models. The geochemical modeling methodology coupled with the laboratory and field studies should be applicable to a variety of waste disposal problems

  3. Uniqueness Results for Weak Leray-Hopf Solutions of the Navier-Stokes System with Initial Values in Critical Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, T.

    2018-03-01

    The main subject of this paper concerns the establishment of certain classes of initial data, which grant short time uniqueness of the associated weak Leray-Hopf solutions of the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. In particular, our main theorem that this holds for any solenodial initial data, with finite L_2(R^3) norm, that also belongs to certain subsets of {it{VMO}}^{-1}(R^3). As a corollary of this, we obtain the same conclusion for any solenodial u0 belonging to L2(R^3)\\cap \\dot{B}^{-1+3/p}_{p,∞}(R^3), for any 3norm is sufficiently small, where 3

  4. The effect of cocoa fermentation and weak organic acids on growth and ochratoxin A production by Aspergillus species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Copetti, Marina V.; Iamanaka, Beatriz T.; Mororó, Raimundo C.

    2012-01-01

    The acidic characteristics of cocoa beans have influence on flavor development in chocolate. Cocoa cotyledons are not naturally acidic, the acidity comes from organic acids produced by the fermentative microorganisms which grow during the processing of cocoa. Different concentrations of these met...... by Aspergillus carbonarius in cocoa, and the effect of weak organic acids such as acetic, lactic and citric at different pH values on growth and ochratoxin A production by A. carbonarius and Aspergillus niger in culture media. A statistical difference (ρ......The acidic characteristics of cocoa beans have influence on flavor development in chocolate. Cocoa cotyledons are not naturally acidic, the acidity comes from organic acids produced by the fermentative microorganisms which grow during the processing of cocoa. Different concentrations...... of these metabolites can be produced according to the fermentation practices adopted in the farms, which could affect the growth and ochratoxin A production by fungi. This work presents two independent experiments carried out to investigate the effect of some fermentation practices on ochratoxin A production...

  5. Existence and Stability of the Periodic Solution with an Interior Transitional Layer in the Problem with a Weak Linear Advection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay N. Nefedov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, we study a singularly perturbed periodic in time problem for the parabolic reaction-advection-diffusion equation with a weak linear advection. The case of the reactive term in the form of a cubic nonlinearity is considered. On the basis of already known results, a more general formulation of the problem is investigated, with weaker sufficient conditions for the existence of a solution with an internal transition layer to be provided than in previous studies. For convenience, the known results are given, which ensure the fulfillment of the existence theorem of the contrast structure. The justification for the existence of a solution with an internal transition layer is based on the use of an asymptotic method of differential inequalities based on the modification of the terms of the constructed asymptotic expansion. Further, sufficient conditions are established to fulfill these requirements, and they have simple and concise formulations in the form of the algebraic equation w(x0,t = 0 and the condition wx(x0,t < 0, which is essentially a condition of simplicity of the root x0(t and ensuring the stability of the solution found. The function w is a function of the known functions appearing in the reactive and advective terms of the original problem. The equation w(x0,t = 0 is a problem for finding the zero approximation x0(t to determine the localization region of the inner transition layer. In addition, the asymptotic Lyapunov stability of the found periodic solution is investigated, based on the application of the so-called compressible barrier method. The main result of the paper is formulated as a theorem. 

  6. Radiation-chemical oxidation of neptunium in perchloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilov, V.P.; Gusev, Yu.K.; Pikaev, A.K.; Stepanova, E.S.; Krot, N.N.

    1979-01-01

    The γ-radiation effect (at a dose rate of 5x10 16 eV/mlxs) on 1x10 -3 Np(6) and Np(5) perchloric acid solutions is studied. The output of Np(6) loss in aerated 0.001-0.005M HClO 4 solutions was 2.4 ions/100 eV. The output of Np(5) loss in solutions saturated with nitrous oxide was 2.1 ions/100 eV at pH-4. In aerated 0.1-1.0 M HClO 4 solutions in presence of XeO 4 the output of Np(5) loss grows from 6.6 to 13.5 ions/100 eV as (XeO 3 ) 0 increases from 1x10 -3 to 2x10 -2 M. Possible process mechanisms have been proposed

  7. Determination of free nitric acid in uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayankutty, P.C.; Ravi, S.; Nadkarni, M.N.

    1981-01-01

    Potentiometric titration of uranyl nitrate solution with sodium hydroxide exhibits two peaks. The first peak characterises the following reaction, UO 2 (C 2 O 4 )+NaOH Na[UO 2 (C 2 O 4 )(OH)]. This reaction, indicating the partial hydrolysis of uranyl oxalate complex, appears to be complete at pH9. If the titration is carried out to this end-point pH, the total alkali consumed can be equated to the sum of uranium content and the free acidity present in the sample volume. Based on this, a method was standardised to determine the free acidity in uranyl nitrate solution. The sample, taken in a solution of potassium oxalate previously adjusted to pH9, is titrated to this pH with standard sodium hydroxide. The free acidity in the sample can be computed by subtracting the alkali reacted with uranium from the total alkali consumed. Analyses of several synthetic samples containing uranium and nitric acid in a wide range of combinations indicate that the free acidity can be accurately determined by this method, if uranium concentration in the sample is known. The results are compared to those obtained by two other widely used methods, viz., (i) titration of pH7 in the presence of neutral potassium oxalate to suppress hydrolysis and (ii) separation of hydrolyzable ions on a cationic resin and alkali titration of the free acid released. The advantages of and the precision obtained with the present method over the above two methods are discussed. (author)

  8. Studies of the Tc oxidation states in humic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bo; Liu Dejun; Yao Jun

    2010-01-01

    The oxidation state is an important aspect of the speciation of Tc in groundwater that contained organic substances due to it control the precipitation, complexation, sorption and colloid formation behavior of the Tc under HWL geological disposal conditions. In present work, the oxidation states of Tc were investigated using the LaCl 3 coagulation method and solution extraction method in aqueous solutions in which the humic acid concentration range is from 0 to 20 mg L -1 and the Tc (Ⅶ) concentration range is about 10 -8 mol l -1 . The radiocounting of 99 Tc was determined using liquid scintillation spectrometry. The humic acid will influence the radiocounting ratio of 99 Tc apparently, however, the quenching effect can be restrained once keep the volume of the cocktail to about twenty times of the sample volume. The LaCl 3 coagulation methods were carried out for the investigation of Tc oxidation states in humic acid aqueous systems at about pH 8. The tetraphenylarsonium chloride (IPA)-chloroform extraction method was used also simultaneously to investigation the concentrations of Tc (Ⅳ) and Tc (Ⅶ) for the availability of the LaCl 3 precipitation method, and the experimental results demonstrate that tetravalent technetium and pertechnetate concentrations are well agreement with the LaCl 3 precipitation method. These two experimental results demonstrated that Tc (Ⅶ) is very stable in the Tc (Ⅶ)-humic acid system during a 350 days experimental period, and the Tc (Ⅳ) concentrations are very lower, that is indicate that there didn't oxidizing reactions between the Fluka humic acid and Tc (Ⅶ) in aqueous solutions under anaerobic conditions. That is means the presence of humic acids even in anaerobic groundwater is disadvantage for the retardance of radionuclides. (authors)

  9. Studies of Tc oxidation states in humic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bo; Liu Dejun; Yao Jun

    2011-01-01

    The oxidation state of Tc is an important aspect of the speciation in groundwater which contained organic substances due to it control the precipitation, complexation, sorption and colloid formation behavior of the Tc under HWL geological disposal conditions. In present work, the oxidation states of Tc were investigated using the LaCl 3 coagulation method and solution extraction method in aqueous solutions in which the humic acid concentration range is from 0 to 20 mg/L and the Tc (VII) concentration is about 10 -8 mol/L. The radiocounting of 99 Tc was determined using liquid scintillation spectrometry. The humic acid will influence the radiocounting ratio of 99 Tc apparently, however, the quenching effect can be restrained once keep the volume of the cocktail to about twenty times of the sample volume. The LaCl 3 coagulation method was carried out for the investigation of Tc oxidation states in humic acid aqueous systems at about pH 8. The tetraphenylarsonium chloride (TPA)-chloroform extraction method was used also simultaneously to investigation the concentrations of Tc (IV) and Tc (VII) for the availability of the LaCl 3 precipitation method, and the experimental results demonstrate that tetravalent technetium and pertechnetate concentration are well agreement with the LaCl 3 precipitation method. These two experimental results demonstrated that Tc (VII) is very stable in the Tc (VII)-humic acid system during a 350 days experimental period, and the Tc (IV) concentrations are very lower, that is indicate that there didn't oxidizing reactions between the Fluka humic acid and Tc (VII) in aqueous solutions under anaerobic conditions. That means the presence of humic acids even in anaerobic groundwater is disadvantage for the retardance of radionuclides. (authors)

  10. The reducibility of sulphuric acid and sulphate in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1991-07-01

    In connection with the Swedish project for final storage of spent fuel elements it was necessary to assess whether dissolved sulphate can corrode the copper canister. A simple reaction between copper and sulphate is thermodynamically impossible, but copper can react to give copper sulphide if an additional electron donor such as iron(II) is available. The problem was extended to the more general question of the reducibility of sulphur(VI) in dilute aqueous solution. Chemical reduction of sulphate does not take place in dilute solution at temperatures below 100 o C. In experiments on the reduction of sulphates under hydrothermal conditions a reaction only takes place at temperatures above 275-300 o C. The oxidising action of sulphuric acid on metals becomes perceptible only at acid concentrations over 45-50%. In experiments on the cathodic reduction of 74% sulphuric acid the formation of hydrogen sulphide and elementary sulphur starts, depending on the current density, at 50-130 o C, and polarographic measurements suggest that the reducible species is not the hydrogen sulphate ion but molecular sulphuric acid. The resistance of copper to oxygen-free sulphuric acid up to a concentration of 60% is well-known. Numerous processes in industrial electrochemistry take place in sulphuric acid or sulphate electrolytes. The reversible metal/metal-sulphate electrodes of lead and cadmium are unstable relative to the corresponding metal sulphides. Nevertheless the reversible lead sulphate electrode does not fail from sulphide formation. All these facts confirm that sulphur(VI) in dilute solution is completely inert towards chemical reducing agents and also to cathodic reduction. Thus corrosion of copper by sulphate under final-storage conditions and in the absence of sulphate reducing bacteria can be almost certainly be ruled out. (author) 5 figs., 85 refs

  11. Chemical dosimetry by UV spectrophotometry of aqueous ascorbic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alian, A.; El-Assay, N.B.; Abdel-Rehim, F.; Amin, N.E.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Roushdy, H.

    1984-01-01

    The decrease in the ultraviolet absorption of aqueous solutions of ascorbic acid brought about by large doses of gamma radiation has been investigated as a means of developing a new chemical dosimeter. Because of spontaneous ring opening under various conditions after dissolution in water, some additives were examined as possible stabilizers against such denaturing of aqueous ascorbic acid. At an ascorbic acid concentration of 10 -4 M, either 1 to 2% glycine or 0.2 M NaCl was found to be a good stabilizer. A mechanism of radiation chemistry has been proposed based on hydroxyl radical and hydroxyl adduct intermediates, leading to dehydroascorbic acid through the ascorbate complex. The optimum dosimeter solution covers an absorbed dose range approx. 50 to 350 Gy, when measured at 264 nm wavelength. The G-values for dehydroascorbic acid production were determined to be 2.94 +- 0.33 and 2.43 +- 0.11 (100 eV) -1 , with glycine and NaCl used respectively as stabilizers. (author)

  12. Unified solution of the Boltzmann equation for electron and ion velocity distribution functions and transport coefficients in weakly ionized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Dmitry A.; Cocks, Daniel G.; White, Ronald D.

    2017-10-01

    The velocity distribution function and transport coefficients for charged particles in weakly ionized plasmas are calculated via a multi-term solution of Boltzmann's equation and benchmarked using a Monte-Carlo simulation. A unified framework for the solution of the original full Boltzmann's equation is presented which is valid for ions and electrons, avoiding any recourse to approximate forms of the collision operator in various limiting mass ratio cases. This direct method using Lebedev quadratures over the velocity and scattering angles avoids the need to represent the ion mass dependence in the collision operator through an expansion in terms of the charged particle to neutral mass ratio. For the two-temperature Burnett function method considered in this study, this amounts to avoiding the need for the complex Talmi-transformation methods and associated mass-ratio expansions. More generally, we highlight the deficiencies in the two-temperature Burnett function method for heavy ions at high electric fields to calculate the ion velocity distribution function, even though the transport coefficients have converged. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Physics of Ionized Gases (SPIG 2016)", edited by Goran Poparic, Bratislav Obradovic, Dragana Maric and Aleksandar Milosavljevic.

  13. Cs separation from nitric acid solutions of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckmann, K.; Pieronczyk, W.; Strnad, J.; Feldmaier, F.

    1989-01-01

    It was the objective of this study to selectively separate active caesium (Cs-134 and Cs-137) from acid radioactive waste solutions (especially MAW and HAWC). The following 'strategy' was designed for a separation process: synthesis of reagents which are acid-resistant and selective for caesium; precipitation of Cs + and separation of the precipitates by filtration or centrifugation or precipitation of Cs + and separation of the precipitates by flotation; caesium separation by liquid-liquid extraction. As precipitating agents, sodium tetraphenylborate (kalignost) and several of its fluorine derivatives were examined. (orig./RB) [de

  14. Global Classical and Weak Solutions to the Three-Dimensional Full Compressible Navier-Stokes System with Vacuum and Large Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiangdi; Li, Jing

    2018-03-01

    For the three-dimensional full compressible Navier-Stokes system describing the motion of a viscous, compressible, heat-conductive, and Newtonian polytropic fluid, we establish the global existence and uniqueness of classical solutions with smooth initial data which are of small energy but possibly large oscillations where the initial density is allowed to vanish. Moreover, for the initial data, which may be discontinuous and contain vacuum states, we also obtain the global existence of weak solutions. These results generalize previous ones on classical and weak solutions for initial density being strictly away from a vacuum, and are the first for global classical and weak solutions which may have large oscillations and can contain vacuum states.

  15. Sorption of molybdenum by cellulose polyphosphate from acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luneva, N.K.; Oputina, A.G.; Ermolenko, I.N.

    1985-01-01

    The sorption of molybdenum on cellulose polyphosphate from acid solutions of ammonium molybdate depending on the phosphorus content in samples, concentration and pH of the solution, sorption time is studied. It is shown that a maximum molybdenum content on the cellulose samples with different phosphorus content is pointed out at an ammonium molybdate concentration 0.02 M. Saturation of the sorption curve is attained at molar ratio of adsrbed molybdenum to phosphorus 1:4. In case of small fillings the compound with molybdenum to phosphorus ratio 1:10 is formed

  16. A Novel Method for Fabricating Double Layers Porous Anodic Alumina in Phosphoric/Oxalic Acid Solution and Oxalic Acid Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfang Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for fabricating ordered double layers porous anodic alumina (DL-PAA with controllable nanopore size was presented. Highly ordered large pore layer with interpore distance of 480 nm was fabricated in phosphoric acid solution with oxalic acid addition at the potential of 195 V and the small pore layer was fabricated in oxalic acid solution at the potential from 60 to 100 V. Experimental results show that the thickness of large pore layer is linearly correlative with anodizing time, and pore diameter is linearly correlative with pore widening time. When the anodizing potential in oxalic acid solution was adjusted from 60 to 100 V, the small pore layers with continuously tunable interpore distance from 142 to 241 nm and pore density from 1.94×109 to 4.89×109 cm−2 were obtained. And the interpore distance and the pore density of small pore layers are closely correlative with the anodizing potential. The fabricated DL-PAA templates can be widely utilized for fabrication of ordered nanomaterials, such as superhydrophobic or gecko-inspired adhesive materials and metal or semiconductor nanowires.

  17. The anodizing behavior of aluminum in malonic acid solution and morphology of the anodic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jianjun; Zuo, Yu

    2012-11-01

    The anodizing behavior of aluminum in malonic acid solution and morphology of the anodic films were studied. The voltage-time response for galvanostatic anodization of aluminum in malonic acid solution exhibits a conventional three-stage feature but the formation voltage is much higher. With the increase of electrolyte concentration, the electrolyte viscosity increases simultaneously and the high viscosity decreases the film growth rate. With the concentration increase of the malonic acid electrolyte, the critical current density that initiates local "burning" on the sample surface decreases. For malonic acid anodization, the field-assisted dissolution on the oxide surface is relatively weak and the nucleation of pores is more difficult, which results in greater barrier layer thickness and larger cell dimension. The embryo of the porous structure of anodic film has been created within the linear region of the first transient stage, and the definite porous structure has been established before the end of the first transient stage. The self-ordering behavior of the porous film is influenced by the electrolyte concentration, film thickness and the applied current density. Great current density not only improves the cell arrangement order but also brings about larger cell dimension.

  18. Pulse Radiolysis of Adrenaline in Acid Aqueous Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gohn, M.; Getoff, N.; Bjergbakke, Erling

    1976-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis of adrenaline in acid aqueous solutions (pH 1–3) was carried out. The rate constants for the reactions of adrenaline with H and OH were determined: k(H + adr.) = (0·9±0·1) × 109 dm3 mol−1s−1; k(OH + adr.) = (1·65±0·15) × 1010 dm3 mol−1s−1. The H-adduct of adrenaline has two λmax...

  19. Measurement of acidity and density of plutonium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Bowers, D.L.; Kemmerlin, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    The solutions were analyzed for acidity and total Pu concentration at ambient temperature while the density was determined at 25, 35, 45, and 60 0 C. From least squares fitting, it was found that the density could be computed to within 1% of the experimental value using the equation D = 1 + 0.0477[H + ] - 4.25 x 10 -3 [H + ] 2 + 1.477 x 10 -3 [Pu] - (T - 25)/1000

  20. Volumetric studies of some amino acids in binary aqueous solutions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    0 values of glycine, L-alanine, and L-valine in aqueous MgCl2⋅6H2O solutions at. 298⋅15 K in order to describe the temperature dependence behaviour of partial molar quantities. Group contributions to partial molar volumes have been determined for the amino acids. The trends of transfer volumes (∆Vφ. 0) have been ...

  1. Effects of intravenous solutions on acid-base equilibrium: from crystalloids to colloids and blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Thomas; Ferrari, Michele; Zazzeron, Luca; Gattinoni, Luciano; Caironi, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous fluid administration is a medical intervention performed worldwide on a daily basis. Nevertheless, only a few physicians are aware of the characteristics of intravenous fluids and their possible effects on plasma acid-base equilibrium. According to Stewart's theory, pH is independently regulated by three variables: partial pressure of carbon dioxide, strong ion difference (SID), and total amount of weak acids (ATOT). When fluids are infused, plasma SID and ATOT tend toward the SID and ATOT of the administered fluid. Depending on their composition, fluids can therefore lower, increase, or leave pH unchanged. As a general rule, crystalloids having a SID greater than plasma bicarbonate concentration (HCO₃-) cause an increase in plasma pH (alkalosis), those having a SID lower than HCO₃- cause a decrease in plasma pH (acidosis), while crystalloids with a SID equal to HCO₃- leave pH unchanged, regardless of the extent of the dilution. Colloids and blood components are composed of a crystalloid solution as solvent, and the abovementioned rules partially hold true also for these fluids. The scenario is however complicated by the possible presence of weak anions (albumin, phosphates and gelatins) and their effect on plasma pH. The present manuscript summarises the characteristics of crystalloids, colloids, buffer solutions and blood components and reviews their effect on acid-base equilibrium. Understanding the composition of intravenous fluids, along with the application of simple physicochemical rules best described by Stewart's approach, are pivotal steps to fully elucidate and predict alterations of plasma acid-base equilibrium induced by fluid therapy.

  2. Conformation of poly(γ-glutamic acid) in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroga, Yoshio; Nakaya, Asami; Inoue, Atsuki; Itoh, Daiki; Abiru, Masaya; Wada, Kaori; Takada, Masako; Ikake, Hiroki; Shimizu, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    Local conformation and overall conformation of poly(γ-DL-glutamic acid) (PγDLGA) and poly(γ-L-glutamic acid) (PγLGA) in aqueous solution was studied as a function of degree of ionization ε by (1) H-NMR, circular dichroism, and potentiometric titration. It was clarified that their local conformation is represented by random coil over an entire ε range and their overall conformation is represented by expanded random-coil in a range of ε > ε(*) , where ε(*) is about 0.3, 0.35, 0.45, and 0.5 for added-salt concentration of 0.02M, 0.05M, 0.1M, and 0.2M, respectively. In a range of ε acidic media. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Weak and saturable protein-surfactant interactions in the denaturation of apo-alpha-lactalbumin by acidic and lactonic sophorolipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kell K Andersen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants are of growing interest as sustainable alternatives to fossil-fuel-derived chemical surfactants, particularly for the detergent industry. To realize this potential, it is necessary to understand how they affect proteins which they may encounter in their applications. However knowledge of such interactions is limited. Here we present a study of the interactions between the model protein apo-alpha-lactalbumin and the biosurfactant sophorolipid (SL produced by the yeast Starmerella bombicola. SL occurs both as an acidic and a lactonic form; the lactonic form (lactSL is sparingly soluble and has a lower critical micelle concentration than the acidic form (acidSL. We show that acidSL affects apo-aLA in a similar way to the related glycolipid biosurfactant rhamnolipid (RL, with the important difference that RL is also active below the cmc in contrast to acidSL. Using isothermal titration calorimetry data, we show that acidSL has weak and saturable interactions with apo-aLA at low concentrations; due to the relatively low cmc of acidSL (which means that the monomer concentration is limited to ca. 0-1 mM SL, it is only possible to observe interactions with monomeric acidSL at high apo-aLA concentrations. However, the denaturation kinetics of apo-aLA in the presence of acidSL are consistent with a collaboration between monomeric and micellar surfactant species, similar to RL and nonionic or zwitterionic surfactants. Inclusion of lactSL as mixed micelles with acidSL lowers the cmc and this effectively reduces the rate of unfolding, emphasizing that SL like other biosurfactants is a gentle anionic surfactant. Our data highlight the potential of these biosurfactants for future use in the detergent industry.

  4. Photometric estimation of plutonium in product solutions and acid waste solutions using flow injection analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhas, A.J.A.; Dharmapurikar, G.R.; Kumaraguru, K.; Vijayan, K.; Kapoor, S.C.; Ramanujam, A.

    1995-01-01

    Flow injection analysis technique is employed for the measurement of plutonium concentrations in product nitrate solutions by measuring the absorbance of Pu(III) at 565 nm and of Pu(IV) at 470 nm, using a Metrohm 662 photometer, with a pyrex glass tube of 2 nm (ID) inserted in the light path of the detector serving as a flow cell. The photometer detector never comes in contact with radioactive solution. In the case of acid waste solutions Pu is first purified by extraction chromatography with 2-ethyl hexyl hydrogen 2 ethyl hexyl phosphonate (KSM 17)- chromosorb and the Pu in the eluate in complexed with Arsenazo III followed by the measured of absorbance at 665 nm. Absorbance of reference solutions in the desired concentration ranges are measured to calibrate the system. The results obtained agree with the reference values within ±2.0%. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab

  5. Amelioration of acidic soil increases the toxicity of the weak base carbendazim to the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kailin; Wang, Shaoyun; Luo, Kun; Liu, Xiangying; Yu, Yunlong

    2013-12-01

    Ameliorating acidic soils is a common practice and may affect the bioavailability of an ionizable organic pollutant to organisms. The toxicity of the weak base carbendazim to the earthworm (Eisenia fetida) was studied in an acidic soil (pH-H₂O, 4.6) and in the ameliorated soil (pH-H₂O, 7.5). The results indicated that the median lethal concentration of carbendazim for E. fetida decreased from 21.8 mg/kg in acidic soil to 7.35 mg/kg in the ameliorated soil. To understand why the amelioration increased carbendazim toxicity to the earthworm, the authors measured the carbendazim concentrations in the soil porewater. The authors found increased carbendazim concentrations in porewater, resulting in increased toxicity of carbendazim to earthworms. The increased pore concentrations result from decreased adsorption because of the effects of pH and calcium ions. © 2013 SETAC.

  6. A mathematical model of a steady flow through the Kaplan turbine - The existence of a weak solution in the case of an arbitrarily large inflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neustupa, Tomáš

    2017-07-01

    The paper presents the mathematical model of a steady 2-dimensional viscous incompressible flow through a radial blade machine. The corresponding boundary value problem is studied in the rotating frame. We provide the classical and weak formulation of the problem. Using a special form of the so called "artificial" or "natural" boundary condition on the outflow, we prove the existence of a weak solution for an arbitrarily large inflow.

  7. Regular properties of simple electrophoretic BGEs with multiprotic weak acids: Discovery of complex hybrid system boundaries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gebauer, Petr; Malá, Zdeňka; Šlampová, Andrea; Boček, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 5 (2008), s. 1067-1076 ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/2106; GA AV ČR IAA400310609; GA AV ČR IAA400310703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : electrophoresis * hybrid boundaries * multivalent weak electrolytes Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.509, year: 2008

  8. Reaction Kinetics of Monomethylhydrazine With Nitrous Acid in Perchloric Acid Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Yan; Wang Hui; Pan Yongjun; Cong Haifeng; Jiao Haiyang; Jia Yongfen; Zheng Weifang

    2009-01-01

    The oxidation of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) by nitrous acid was researched in perchloric acid solution with spectrophotometry. The rate equation has been determined as follows: -dc (HNO 2 ) /dt= kc (H + ) 0.9 c (MMH) 1.1 c (HNO 2 ), k is (46.0 ± 2.7) L 2 / (mol 2 · s) with the initial perchlorate concentration of 0.50 mol/L at the temperature of 4.5 degree C. The corresponding activation energy of the reaction is (42.4 ± 0.1) kJ/mol. The results indicate that oxidation of mono-methylhydrazine (MMH) by nitrous acid is fast. The higher concentration of MMH can accelerate the reduction process of nitrous acid. Higher acidity can also speed up the reduction of nitrous acid. (authors)

  9. Structure of polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid solutions : a small angle neutron scattering study

    OpenAIRE

    Moussaid , A.; Schosseler , F.; Munch , J.; Candau , S.

    1993-01-01

    The intensity scattered from polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid solutions has been measured by small angle neutron scattering experiemnts. The influence of polymer concentration, ionization degree, temperature and salt content has been investigated. Results are in qualitative agreement with a model which predicts the existence of microphases in the unstable region of the phase diagram. Quantitative comparison with the theory is performed by fitting the theoretical structure factor to t...

  10. Calorimetric investigation of solution heat of rare earth sulfates in acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasin, S.K.; Babkin, A.G.; Kessler, Yu.M.

    1978-01-01

    To determine the thermodynamic characteristics of sulfates of rare elements an adiabatic airtight calorimeter has been developed, enabling measurement of minor heat effects of processes in aggressive media with an absolute error of about 5x10 -3 cal, the temperature sensitivity being no less than 2x10 -5 C 0 . The calorimeter is schematically represented. Measured with the aid of the calorimeter was the heat of dissolution of TiOSO 4 x2H 2 O in chloric acid solutions

  11. Arsenic removal from acidic solutions with biogenic ferric precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahoranta, Sarita H; Kokko, Marika E; Papirio, Stefano; Özkaya, Bestamin; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2016-04-05

    Treatment of acidic solution containing 5g/L of Fe(II) and 10mg/L of As(III) was studied in a system consisting of a biological fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) for iron oxidation, and a gravity settler for iron precipitation and separation of the ferric precipitates. At pH 3.0 and FBR retention time of 5.7h, 96-98% of the added Fe(II) precipitated (99.1% of which was jarosite). The highest iron oxidation and precipitation rates were 1070 and 28mg/L/h, respectively, and were achieved at pH 3.0. Subsequently, the effect of pH on arsenic removal through sorption and/or co-precipitation was examined by gradually decreasing solution pH from 3.0 to 1.6 (feed pH). At pH 3.0, 2.4 and 1.6, the highest arsenic removal efficiencies obtained were 99.5%, 80.1% and 7.1%, respectively. As the system had ferric precipitates in excess, decreased arsenic removal was likely due to reduced co-precipitation at pHremoves iron and arsenic from acidic solutions, indicating potential for mining wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Speciation of platinum(IV) in nitric acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilchenko, Danila; Tkachev, Sergey; Baidina, Iraida; Korenev, Sergey

    2013-09-16

    The speciation of platinum(IV) ions in nitric acid (6-15.8 M) solutions of H2[Pt(OH)6] has been studied by (195)Pt NMR and Raman spectroscopy. Series of aqua-hydroxo-nitrato complexes [Pt(L)(x)(NO3)(6-x)] (L = H2O or OH(-); x = 0, ..., 6) were found to exist in such solutions. The pair additivity model of chemical shifts and statistical theory were used to assign signals in NMR spectra to particular [Pt(L)(x)(NO3)(6-x)] species. Mononuclear hexanitratoplatinates(IV) have been isolated in solid state in substantial yield as pyridinium salt (PyH)2[Pt(NO3)6] and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Aging of the platinum nitric acid solutions for more than 5-6 h results in oligomerization of [Pt(L)(x)(NO3)(6-x)] species and the formation of oligonuclear aqua-hydroxo-nitrato complexes with OH(-) and NO3(-) bridging ligands. Oligomeric platinum(IV) complexes with two and four nuclei were unambiguously detected by NMR on (195)Pt -enriched samples. Oligomers with even higher nuclearity were also detected. Dimeric anions [Pt2(μ-OH)2(NO3)8](2-) have been isolated as single crystals of tetramethylammonium salt and characterized by X-ray diffraction.

  13. Reaction of nitrous acid with U(IV) and nitric acid in 30% TBP-kerosene solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiangrong; Hu Jingxin; Huang Huaian; Qiu Xiaoxi

    1990-01-01

    Reaction of nitrous acid with U(IV) and nitric acid in 30% TBP-kerosene solution is investigated, the rate equations of oxidation of U(IV) by nitrous acid and that of nitrous acid reacting with nitric acid are obtained

  14. Extraction of americium from acid aqueous solutions by diethyl-2-hexyl-pyro-phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaume, Bernard

    1971-02-01

    After having outlined the interesting properties of americium and the difficulties of its recovery, the author reports the study of the mechanism of extraction of americium from acid aqueous solutions by using the diethyl-2hexyl-pyro-phosphoric acid. Several aspects are thus discussed: influence of concentration of H 2 DEHPP, influence of the acidity of the aqueous phase, saturation of extracting agent, influence of the diluting agent, complexing of americium, influence of other cations. In a second part, the author reports the application to the recovery of americium from effluents, and discusses the obtained results

  15. Structure of polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid solutions: a small angle neutron scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussaid, A. (Lab. d' Ultrasons et de Dynamique des Fluides Complexes, Univ. Louis Pasteur, 67 - Strasbourg (France)); Schosseler, F. (Lab. d' Ultrasons et de Dynamique des Fluides Complexes, Univ. Louis Pasteur, 67 - Strasbourg (France)); Munch, J.P. (Lab. d' Ultrasons et de Dynamique des Fluides Complexes, Univ. Louis Pasteur, 67 - Strasbourg (France)); Candau, S.J. (Lab. d' Ultrasons et de Dynamique des Fluides Complexes, Univ. Louis Pasteur, 67 - Strasbourg (France))

    1993-04-01

    The intensity scattered from polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid solutions has been measured by small angle neutron scattering experiments. The influence of polymer concentration, ionization degree, temperature and salt content has been investigated. Results are in qualitative agreement with a model which predicts the existence of microphases in the unstable region of the phase diagram. Quantitative comparison with the theory is performed by fitting the theoretical structure factor to the experimental data. For a narrow range of ionization degrees nearly quantitative agreement with the theory is found for the polyacrylic acid system. (orig.).

  16. Structure of polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid solutions : a small angle neutron scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussaid, A.; Schosseler, F.; Munch, J. P.; Candau, S. J.

    1993-04-01

    The intensity scattered from polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid solutions has been measured by small angle neutron scattering experiemnts. The influence of polymer concentration, ionization degree, temperature and salt content has been investigated. Results are in qualitative agreement with a model which predicts the existence of microphases in the unstable region of the phase diagram. Quantitative comparison with the theory is performed by fitting the theoretical structure factor to the experimental data. For a narrow range of ionizaiton degrees nearly quantitative agreement with the theory is found for the polyacrylic acide system.

  17. Quenching characteristics of bathocuproinedisulfonic acid, disodium salt in aqueous solution and copper sulfate plating solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Toshiaki; Hirakawa, Chieko; Takeshita, Michinori; Terasaki, Nao

    2018-04-01

    Bathocuproinedisulfonic acid, disodium salt (BCS) is generally used to detect Cu(I) through a color reaction. We newly found BCS fluorescence in the visible blue region in an aqueous solution. However, the fluorescence mechanism of BCS is not well known, so we should investigate its fundamental information. We confirmed that the characteristics of fluorescence are highly dependent on the molecular concentration and solvent properties. In particular, owing to the presence of the copper compound, the fluorescence intensity extremely decreases. By fluorescence quenching, we observed that a copper compound concentration of 10-6 mol/L or less could easily be measured in an aqueous solution. We also observed BCS fluorescence in copper sulfate plating solution and the possibility of detecting monovalent copper by fluorescence reabsorption.

  18. Intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine against copper corrosion in hydrochloric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Daquan; Xie Bin; Gao Lixin; Cai Qirui; Joo, Hyung Goun; Lee, Kang Yong

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion protection of copper by glutamic acid, cysteine, glycine and their derivative (glutathione) in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid solution has been studied by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The inhibition efficiency of the organic inhibitors on copper corrosion increases in the order: glutathione > cysteine > cysteine + glutamic acid + glycine > glutamic acid > glycine. Maximum inhibition efficiency for cysteine reaches about 92.9% at 15 mM concentration level. The glutathione can give 96.4% inhibition efficiency at a concentration of 10 mM. The molecular structure parameters were obtained by PM3 (Parametric Method 3) semi-empirical calculation. The intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine moieties in glutathione is attributed to the lower energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E LUMO ) level and to the excess hetero-atom adsorption centers and the bigger coverage on the copper surface.

  19. Electrochemical Studies of Lead Telluride Behavior in Acidic Nitrate Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudnik E.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemistry of lead telluride stationary electrode was studied in nitric acid solutions of pH 1.5-3.0. E-pH diagram for Pb-Te-H2O system was calculated. Results of cyclic voltammetry of Pb, Te and PbTe were discussed in correlation with thermodynamic predictions. Anodic dissolution of PbTe electrode at potential approx. -100÷50 mV (SCE resulted in tellurium formation, while above 300 mV TeO2 was mainly produced. The latter could dissolve to HTeO+2 under acidic electrolyte, but it was inhibited by increased pH of the bath.

  20. Radiation chemistry of amino acids and peptides in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simic, M.G.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation chemistry relevant to radiation preservation of high protein foods is reviewed. Some conclusions concerning the chemistry of irradiated amino acids, peptides, and proteins have been derived from product analysis of γ-irradiated solutions while the main mechanistic considerations result from the chemistry and kinetics of free radical intermediates observed by pulse radiolysis. The precursors of chemistry in not too concentrated solutions ( - , OH, and H. Their reactivity with molecules and their preference for characteristic groups within the molecule are discussed. The reviewed reactions of the model systems are accountable for a variety of radiolytic products found in irradiated foods. From detailed understanding of radiation chemistry in aqueous and frozen systems formation of many classes of compounds can be predicted or entirely eliminated in order to corroborate and extend the conclusions reached from the animal feeding experiments concerning the formation of toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic compounds and/or reduction of the nutritional value of foods

  1. Cyclohexanone microfluidic extraction of radioactive perrhenate from acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmázio, Ilza [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Oehlke, Elisabeth, E-mail: E.Oehlke@tudelft.nl [Section Radiation and Isotopes for Health, Department of Radiation Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology (Netherlands)

    2017-07-01

    Several studies have investigated the application of microfluidic devices in extraction processes. A potential use of microfluidic devices is in radionuclide generators based on solvent extraction, as the {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator. The aim of this work is to present the initial results of microfluidic solvent extraction of radioactive perrhenate. Aqueous solutions of ammonium perrhenate at 0.1 mg/mL (in water, HCl or sodium tungstate) were used as feed solution and cyclohexanone as extractant. As a first step, the fluid behaviour inside the glass microchannel was evaluated to reach laminar flow. The second step was the determination of extraction efficiency using thermal neutron activated perrhenate to produce feed solutions. The extraction conditions permitted liquid-liquid contact times as short as 0.5 s. Increasing of the contact time, resulted in a higher extraction efficiency of perrhenate, e.g. 14 % for 0.5 s and 32 % for 1.1 s using a 0.1 mol/L HCl feed solution. The extraction of perrhenate improved also when applying a feed solution with higher acidity, e.g. 52% for 1 mol/L HCl with contact time of 1.1 s. The influence of adding sodium tungstate to the feed solution was also examined. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first results related to perrhenate solvent extraction using a microfluidic device. The usefulness of microfluidic devices to screen extraction conditions was demonstrated making it possible to evaluate the effect of electrolytes on the perrhenate extraction process in a short time-frame. (author)

  2. Cyclohexanone microfluidic extraction of radioactive perrhenate from acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalmázio, Ilza; Oehlke, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the application of microfluidic devices in extraction processes. A potential use of microfluidic devices is in radionuclide generators based on solvent extraction, as the 188 W/ 188 Re generator. The aim of this work is to present the initial results of microfluidic solvent extraction of radioactive perrhenate. Aqueous solutions of ammonium perrhenate at 0.1 mg/mL (in water, HCl or sodium tungstate) were used as feed solution and cyclohexanone as extractant. As a first step, the fluid behaviour inside the glass microchannel was evaluated to reach laminar flow. The second step was the determination of extraction efficiency using thermal neutron activated perrhenate to produce feed solutions. The extraction conditions permitted liquid-liquid contact times as short as 0.5 s. Increasing of the contact time, resulted in a higher extraction efficiency of perrhenate, e.g. 14 % for 0.5 s and 32 % for 1.1 s using a 0.1 mol/L HCl feed solution. The extraction of perrhenate improved also when applying a feed solution with higher acidity, e.g. 52% for 1 mol/L HCl with contact time of 1.1 s. The influence of adding sodium tungstate to the feed solution was also examined. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first results related to perrhenate solvent extraction using a microfluidic device. The usefulness of microfluidic devices to screen extraction conditions was demonstrated making it possible to evaluate the effect of electrolytes on the perrhenate extraction process in a short time-frame. (author)

  3. Aspartic acid interaction with cobalt(II) in dilute aqueous solution: A 57Co emission Mössbauer spectroscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamnev, Alexander A.; Tugarova, Anna V.; Kovács, Krisztina; Homonnay, Zoltan; Kuzmann, Erno; Vértes, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Emission ( 57 Co) Mössbauer spectra of the aspartic acid— 57 CoCl 2 system were measured at T = 80 K in frozen aqueous solution and in the form of a dried residue of this solution. The Mössbauer spectra, besides a weak contribution from after-effects, showed two Fe 2 +  /Co 2 +  components which were ascribed to octahedrally and tetrahedrally coordinated 57 Co II microenvironments in the Asp–cobalt(II) complex. This dual coordination mode may be due to the involvement of the second terminal carboxylic group of aspartic acid in the coordination sphere of Co.

  4. Volumetric properties of aqueous solutions of glutaric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Hamo, Meyrav [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Apelblat, Alexander [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)]. E-mail: apelblat@bgu.ac.il; Manzurola, Emanuel [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2007-07-15

    Densities of aqueous solutions with molalities up to 6 mol . kg{sup -1} were determined at 5 K temperature intervals, from T = 288.15 K to T = 333.15 K. Densities served to evaluate the apparent molar volumes, V {sub 2,{phi}}(m, T), the cubic expansion coefficients, {alpha}(m, T), and the changes of isobaric heat capacities with respect to pressure, ({partial_derivative}C {sub P}/{partial_derivative}P) {sub T,m}. They were qualitatively correlated with the changes in the structure of water when glutaric acid is dissolved in it.

  5. Volumetric properties of aqueous solutions of glutaric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Hamo, Meyrav; Apelblat, Alexander; Manzurola, Emanuel

    2007-01-01

    Densities of aqueous solutions with molalities up to 6 mol . kg -1 were determined at 5 K temperature intervals, from T = 288.15 K to T = 333.15 K. Densities served to evaluate the apparent molar volumes, V 2,φ (m, T), the cubic expansion coefficients, α(m, T), and the changes of isobaric heat capacities with respect to pressure, (∂C P /∂P) T,m . They were qualitatively correlated with the changes in the structure of water when glutaric acid is dissolved in it

  6. The extraction of trace amounts of tantalum(V) from different mineral acid solutions by 4-(5-nonyl) pyridine oxide and trioctylamine oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejaz, M.; Carswell, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Data are presented on the distribution of trace amounts of tantalum(V) between different mineral acid solutions and 0.1M solutions of N-oxides of 4-(5-nonyl) pyridine and trioctylamine. The optimal acidity is 0.01-0.5M, depending on the nature of the acid. Common anions have little effect on extraction. Possible mechanism of extraction are suggested making use of slope analysis data. Separation factors for a number of metal ions with respect to tantalum are reported for the 0.1M 4-(5-nonyl)pyridine oxide - 1M sulphuric acid extraction system. Separation from uranium(VI), thorium(IV) and a number of fission products is suggested. The conclusions are unique as follows: Amine oxides are as unique as oxygen-donor extractants in their extraction of tantalum(V) from weakly acid solutions; tantalum is almost completely extracted from weakly nitric, hydrochloric and sulphuric acid solutions by both of the amine oxides; the extraction in low acidity solutions is independent of the nature of the anion of the acids present, indicating the ability of amine oxides to extract the product of hydrolysis of hydrolysable elements. In this respect amine oxides are much better than tributyl phosphate. (T.G.)

  7. The Influence of Mg(II and Ca(II Ions on Rutin Autoxidation in Weakly Alkaline Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović Slavoljub C.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rutin (quercetin-3-O-rutinoside is one of the most abundant bioflavonoids with various biological and pharmacological activities. Considering the ubiquitous presence of Mg(II and Ca(II ions in biological systems we decided to investigate their influence on the autoxidation of rutin in weakly alkaline aqueous solutions. Changes in UV-Vis spectra recorded during the rutin autoxidation in aqueous solution at pH 8.4 revealed that this process was very slow in the absence of metal ions. The presence of Mg(II and, especially Ca(II ion, increased the transformation rate of rutin. UV-Vis spectra recorded after prolonged autoxidation indicated the formation of humic acidlike products in the presence of Mg(II and Ca(II ions. Four new compounds formed during the initial stage of rutin autoxidation in the presence of Mg(II and Ca(II ions were detected by HPLCDAD. Based on the analysis of their DAD UV-Vis spectra and comparison of their retention times with the retention time value for rutin, we concluded that the initial rutin transformation products were formed by the water addition on double bond in ring C and hydroxylation of ring B. A very small decrease of the initial rutin concentration (4% was observed by HPLC-DAD in the absence of metal ions for the period of 90 minutes. However, rutin concentration decrease was much larger in the presence of Mg(II and Ca(II ions (14% and 24%, respectively. The more pronounced effect of Ca(II ion on the rutin autoxidation may be explained by the stronger binding of Mg(II ion to rutin and thus greater stabilizing effect on reaction intermediates caused by its higher ionic potential (charge/ionic radius ratio in comparison to Ca(II ion. The results of this study may contribute to the better understanding of interactions of Mg(II and Ca(II ions with natural phenolic antioxidants which are important for their various biological activities.

  8. A geometric improvement of the velocity-pressure local regularity criterion for a suitable weak solution to the Navier-Stokes equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neustupa, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 4 (2014), s. 685-698 ISSN 0862-7959 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Navier-Stokes equation * suitable weak solution * regularity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://hdl.handle.net/10338.dmlcz/144145

  9. Characterization of the silicon/hydrofluoric acid interface: electrochemical processes under weak potential disturbance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertagna, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    Within the frame of the increase of the density of integrated circuits, of simplification of cleaning processes and of improvement of control of surface reactions (for a better control of the elimination of defects and contamination risks), this research thesis first gives a large overview of previous works in the fields of silicon electrochemistry in hydrofluoric environment, of silicon chemical condition after treatment by a diluted hydrofluoric acid, of metallic contamination of silicon during cleaning with a diluted hydrofluoric acid, and of theoretical models of interpretation. Then, the author reports the development of a new electrochemical cell, and the detailed study of mono-crystalline silicon in a diluted hydrofluoric environment (electrochemical investigation, modelling of charge transfer at the interface, studies by atomic force microscopy, contamination of silicon by copper)

  10. Influence of dopant on dielectric properties of polyaniline weakly doped with dichloro and trichloroacetic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattoum, A; Arous, M; Gmati, F; Dhaoui, W; Mohamed, A Belhadj

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of dielectric measurements over the frequency range10 Hz-1 MHz and the temperature range 150-300 K on polyaniline subjected to doping with dichloroacetic acid (DCA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) with various doping levels (6.1%, 8.2%, 13.3% and 4.1%, 6.15%, 13.5%, respectively). Conductivity is increased when the doping level or temperature is increased and samples doped with TCA are more conductive than those doped with DCA. A high frequency relaxation peak is observed in the loss factor curves attributed to the motion of charge carriers in the bulk polymer. A second loss peak appears in the low frequency range when we use the dielectric modulus representation and is attributed to electrode polarization. Both relaxations are well fitted by the Havriliak-Negami function, and the fitting parameters are determined. The characteristic relaxation frequency is described by the Arrhenius law. The activation energy for both relaxations is decreased by increasing the doping level and it is lower in the case of TCA doping acid

  11. Processes for working-up an aqueous fluosilicic acid solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpha O. Toure

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous fluosilicic acid solutions were once considered to be only adverse by-products of phosphoric acid production, which required treatment to prevent ecosystem destruction when discharged into the sea. However, a range of chemicals can be generated by the transformation of this industrial waste product. Through experiments undertaken in the laboratory, we have shown the possibility of caustic soda production. Volumetric analysis showed caustic soda to be present as a 6%– 7%solution with yields of about 70% – 80%by weight. Two processes were investigated for the caustification of sodium fluoride, using different precipitates: sodium chloride and ethanol and are described by modelling caustification curves. The activation energies of precipitation determined by semi-empirical correlations showed that precipitation by ethanol (EA = 933.536 J/mol was more successful than precipitation by sodium chloride (EA = 7452.405 J/mol. Analyses performed on the precipitates highlighted compositions that are essential and useful constituents in the cement industry.

  12. CO2 Capture from Flue Gas using Amino Acid Salt Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    difficult. Amino acid salt solutions have emerged as an alternative to the alkanolamine solutions. A number of advantages make amino acid salt solutions attractive solvents for CO2 capture from flue gas. In the present study CO2 absorption in aqueous solutions of 0.5 M potassium glycinate and 0.5 M...

  13. Double thermal transitions of type I collagen in acidic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Lingrong; Chen, Mingmao; Zhang, Qiqing

    2013-01-01

    Contributed equally to this work. To further understand the origin of the double thermal transitions of collagen in acidic solution induced by heating, the denaturation of acidic soluble collagen was investigated by micro-differential scanning calorimeter (micro-DSC), circular dichroism (CD), dynamic laser light scattering (DLLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and two-dimensional (2D) synchronous fluorescence spectrum. Micro-DSC experiments revealed that the collagen exhibited double thermal transitions, which were located within 31-37 °C (minor thermal transition, T(s) ∼ 33 °C) and 37-55 °C (major thermal transition, T(m) ∼ 40 °C), respectively. The CD spectra suggested that the thermal denaturation of collagen resulted in transition from polyproline II type structure to unordered structure. The DLLS results showed that there were mainly two kinds of collagen fibrillar aggregates with different sizes in acidic solution and the larger fibrillar aggregates (T(p2) = 40 °C) had better heat resistance than the smaller one (T(p1) = 33 °C). TEM revealed that the depolymerization of collagen fibrils occurred and the periodic cross-striations of collagen gradually disappeared with increasing temperature. The 2D fluorescence correlation spectra were also applied to investigate the thermal responses of tyrosine and phenylalanine residues at the molecular level. Finally, we could draw the conclusion that (1) the minor thermal transition was mainly due to the defibrillation of the smaller collagen fibrillar aggregates and the unfolding of a little part of triple helices; (2) the major thermal transition primarily arose from the defibrillation of the larger collagen fibrillar aggregates and the complete denaturation of the majority part of triple helices.

  14. Arsenic removal from acidic solutions with biogenic ferric precipitates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahoranta, Sarita H., E-mail: sarita.ahoranta@tut.fi [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Kokko, Marika E., E-mail: marika.kokko@tut.fi [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Papirio, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.papirio@unicas.it [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Özkaya, Bestamin, E-mail: bozkaya@yildiz.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Department of Environmental Engineering, Yildiz Technical University, Davutpasa Campus 34220, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Puhakka, Jaakko A., E-mail: jaakko.puhakka@tut.fi [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • Continuous and rapid arsenic removal with biogenic jarosite was achieved at pH 3.0. • Arsenic removal was inefficient below pH 2.4 due to reduced Fe–As co-precipitation. • As(V) had better sorption characteristics than As(III). • Biogenic jarosite adsorbed arsenic more effectively than synthetic jarosite. - Abstract: Treatment of acidic solution containing 5 g/L of Fe(II) and 10 mg/L of As(III) was studied in a system consisting of a biological fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) for iron oxidation, and a gravity settler for iron precipitation and separation of the ferric precipitates. At pH 3.0 and FBR retention time of 5.7 h, 96–98% of the added Fe(II) precipitated (99.1% of which was jarosite). The highest iron oxidation and precipitation rates were 1070 and 28 mg/L/h, respectively, and were achieved at pH 3.0. Subsequently, the effect of pH on arsenic removal through sorption and/or co-precipitation was examined by gradually decreasing solution pH from 3.0 to 1.6 (feed pH). At pH 3.0, 2.4 and 1.6, the highest arsenic removal efficiencies obtained were 99.5%, 80.1% and 7.1%, respectively. As the system had ferric precipitates in excess, decreased arsenic removal was likely due to reduced co-precipitation at pH < 2.4. As(III) was partially oxidized to As(V) in the system. In shake flask experiments, As(V) sorbed onto jarosite better than As(III). Moreover, the sorption capacity of biogenic jarosite was significantly higher than that of synthetic jarosite. The developed bioprocess simultaneously and efficiently removes iron and arsenic from acidic solutions, indicating potential for mining wastewater treatment.

  15. The photochemistry of neptunium in aqueous perchloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, H.A.; Toth, L.M.; Osborne, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    The photochemistry of neptunium ions in aqueous perchloric acid has been investigated using 254 and 300 nm UV radiation. In the absence of other reagents, Np(IV) and (V) oxidized to Np(VI), in a stepwise fashion, with individual quantum efficiencies for each step that vary from 0.02 to 0.004. Decreasing acid concentration favors the Np(IV) → Np(V) reaction whereas it hinders the Np(V) → Np(VI) photo-oxidation. When ethanol, acetaldehyde and other mild reducing agents are added to neptunium-perchloric acid solutions which are then photolyzed, the Np species are reduced to Np(III) in a stepwise fashion with individual quantum efficiencies that vary from 0.07 to 0.006. The overall photoredox reactions of neptunium are subject to competing secondary product reactions that become significant as the photolysis products accumulate. Absorption spectrophotometry was used to monitor the changes in Np oxidation states and reference spectra of the various Np oxidation states are given for 1.0 N HClO 4 . The Np species have absorption bands in the 300 to 1320 nm region that obey Beer's law only when they were properly resolved. (author)

  16. Interpolymer reactions of nonionic polymers with polyacrylic acid in aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Shaikhutdinov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Results of fundamental investigations in the intermacromolecular reactions and interpolymer complexes to be performed by authors with co-workes within last 20 years have been intergrated and summarized in the present review. The raw of fundamental regularities in the effect of factors of different nature (pH, ionic strength, temperature, hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance of macrochain, etc. on the complexation of nonionic polymers with polycarboxylic acids in aqueous solutions has been revealed. Critical pH upon complexation (pHcrit. has been used for evaluation of the complexing ability of the polymers. It was shown tha tdepending on pHcrit. all systems can be divided into 2 groups, namely, weak complexing and strongly complexing. The existence of two critical pH upon complexation responsible for formation typical interpolymer complexes and hydrophilic associations has been demonstrated by the method of luminescence spectroscopy.

  17. Precipitation of plutonium from acidic solutions using magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    Plutonium (IV) is only marginally soluble in alkaline solution. Precipitation of plutonium using sodium or potassium hydroxide to neutralize acidic solutions produces a gelatinous solid that is difficult to filter and an endpoint that is difficult to control. If the pH of the solution is too high, additional species precipitate producing an increased volume of solids separated. The use of magnesium oxide as a reagent has advantages. It is added as a solid (volume of liquid waste produced is minimized), the pH is self-limiting (pH does not exceed about 8.5), and the solids precipitated are more granular (larger particle size) than those produced using KOH or NaOH. Following precipitation, the raffinate is expected to meet criteria for disposal to tank farms. The solid will be heated in a furnace to dry it and convert any hydroxide salts to the oxide form. The material will be cooled in a desiccator. The material is expected to meet vault storage criteria

  18. Behavior of copper in acidic sulfate solution: Comparison with acidic chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromans, D.; Silva, J.C. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Dept. of Metals and Materials Engineering

    1997-03-01

    The anodic polarization behavior of copper in a 0.1 M sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) + 1 M sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) solution (pH = 2.0) was studied at room temperature under quiescent and stirred conditions. The behavior was compared with aqueous equilibria via construction of a potential-vs-pH (E-pH) diagram for the copper-sulfate-water (Cu-SO{sub 4}{sup 2}-H{sub 2}O) system. Interpretation of the behavior was aided by comparison with aqueous equilibria and polarization studies of copper in a 0.2 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) + 1 M sodium chloride (NaCl) solution(pH = 0.8). The initial anodic dissolution region in the acidic sulfate solution exhibited Tafel behavior with a slope consistent with formation of cupric ions (Cu{sup 2+}) whose rate of formation was charge-transfer controlled. At higher potentials, limiting current density (i{sub L}) behavior was observed under E-pH conditions that were consistent with formation of a film of copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO{sub 4} {degree} 5H{sub 2}O). Comparison of experimental i{sub L} values with those predicted by mass transport-controlled processes, using estimates of the diffusion layer thickness obtained from the mass transfer-influenced region of apparent Tafel behavior in the acidic chloride solution, were in sufficient agreement to indicate i{sub L} was controlled by the rate of dissolution of the CuSO{sub 4} {degree} 5H{sub 2}O film via transport of Cu{sup 2+} from the film-electrolyte interface into the bulk solution.

  19. Chasing equilibrium: measuring the intrinsic solubility of weak acids and bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Martin; Box, Karl

    2005-02-15

    A novel procedure is described for rapid (20-80 min) measurement of intrinsic solubility values of organic acids, bases, and ampholytes. In this procedure, a quantity of substance was first dissolved at a pH where it exists predominantly in its ionized form, and then a precipitate of the neutral (un-ionized) species was formed by changing the pH. Subsequently, the rate of change of pH due to precipitation or dissolution was monitored and strong acid and base titrant were added to adjust the pH to discover its equilibrium conditions, and the intrinsic solubility of the neutral form of the compound could then be determined. The procedure was applied to a variety of monoprotic and diprotic pharmaceutical compounds. The results were highly repeatable and had a good correlation to available published values. Data collected during the procedure provided good diagnostic information. Kinetic solubility data were also collected but provided a poor guide to the intrinsic solubility.

  20. Comparative studies of the structure, morphology and electrical conductivity of polyaniline weakly doped with chlorocarboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmati, Fethi; Fattoum, Arbi; Bohli, Nadra; Dhaoui, Wadia; Mohamed, Abdellatif Belhadj

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of studies on two series of polyaniline (PANI), doped with dichloroacetic (DCA) and trichloroacetic (TCA) acids, respectively, at various doping rates and obtained by the in situ polymerization method. Samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and conductivity measurements. The direct current (dc) and alternating current (ac) electrical conductivities of PANI salts have been investigated in the temperature range 100-310 K and frequency range 7-10 6 Hz. The results of this study indicate better chain ordering and higher conductivity for PANI doped with TCA. The dc conductivity of all samples is suitably fitted to Mott's three-dimensional variable-range hopping (VRH) model. Different Mott parameters such as characteristic temperature T 0 , density of states at the Fermi level (N(E F )), average hopping energy (W) and the average hopping distance (R) have been evaluated. The dependence of such values on the dopant acid used is discussed. At high frequencies, the ac conductivity follows the power law σ ac (ω,T) A(T)ω s(T,ω) , which is characteristic for charge transport in disordered materials by hopping or tunnelling processes. The observed increase in the frequency exponent s with temperature suggests that the small-polaron tunnelling model best describes the dominant ac conduction mechanism. A direct correlation between conductivity, structure and morphology was obtained in our systems

  1. Linoleic Acid-Induced Ultra-Weak Photon Emission from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a Tool for Monitoring of Lipid Peroxidation in the Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ankush; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species formed as a response to various abiotic and biotic stresses cause an oxidative damage of cellular component such are lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Lipid peroxidation is considered as one of the major processes responsible for the oxidative damage of the polyunsaturated fatty acid in the cell membranes. Various methods such as a loss of polyunsaturated fatty acids, amount of the primary and the secondary products are used to monitor the level of lipid peroxidation. To investigate the use of ultra-weak photon emission as a non-invasive tool for monitoring of lipid peroxidation, the involvement of lipid peroxidation in ultra-weak photon emission was studied in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Lipid peroxidation initiated by addition of exogenous linoleic acid to the cells was monitored by ultra-weak photon emission measured with the employment of highly sensitive charged couple device camera and photomultiplier tube. It was found that the addition of linoleic acid to the cells significantly increased the ultra-weak photon emission that correlates with the accumulation of lipid peroxidation product as measured using thiobarbituric acid assay. Scavenging of hydroxyl radical by mannitol, inhibition of intrinsic lipoxygenase by catechol and removal of molecular oxygen considerably suppressed ultra-weak photon emission measured after the addition of linoleic acid. The photon emission dominated at the red region of the spectrum with emission maximum at 680 nm. These observations reveal that the oxidation of linoleic acid by hydroxyl radical and intrinsic lipoxygenase results in the ultra-weak photon emission. Electronically excited species such as excited triplet carbonyls are the likely candidates for the primary excited species formed during the lipid peroxidation, whereas chlorophylls are the final emitters of photons. We propose here that the ultra-weak photon emission can be used as a non-invasive tool for the

  2. Linoleic acid-induced ultra-weak photon emission from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a tool for monitoring of lipid peroxidation in the cell membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankush Prasad

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species formed as a response to various abiotic and biotic stresses cause an oxidative damage of cellular component such are lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Lipid peroxidation is considered as one of the major processes responsible for the oxidative damage of the polyunsaturated fatty acid in the cell membranes. Various methods such as a loss of polyunsaturated fatty acids, amount of the primary and the secondary products are used to monitor the level of lipid peroxidation. To investigate the use of ultra-weak photon emission as a non-invasive tool for monitoring of lipid peroxidation, the involvement of lipid peroxidation in ultra-weak photon emission was studied in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Lipid peroxidation initiated by addition of exogenous linoleic acid to the cells was monitored by ultra-weak photon emission measured with the employment of highly sensitive charged couple device camera and photomultiplier tube. It was found that the addition of linoleic acid to the cells significantly increased the ultra-weak photon emission that correlates with the accumulation of lipid peroxidation product as measured using thiobarbituric acid assay. Scavenging of hydroxyl radical by mannitol, inhibition of intrinsic lipoxygenase by catechol and removal of molecular oxygen considerably suppressed ultra-weak photon emission measured after the addition of linoleic acid. The photon emission dominated at the red region of the spectrum with emission maximum at 680 nm. These observations reveal that the oxidation of linoleic acid by hydroxyl radical and intrinsic lipoxygenase results in the ultra-weak photon emission. Electronically excited species such as excited triplet carbonyls are the likely candidates for the primary excited species formed during the lipid peroxidation, whereas chlorophylls are the final emitters of photons. We propose here that the ultra-weak photon emission can be used as a non

  3. Water solubilization and the dielectric permeability of isomolar solutions of oleic acid and triethanolamine soap of oleic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demchenko, P.A.; Novitskaya, L.D.

    The investigation of the dependence of water solubilization on the dielectric permeability of isomolar solutions of oleic acid and triethanolamine soap of oleic acid in benzene has shown that at certain acid additions, the solubilization effect can increase almost 6 times, as compared to the soap solution without acid additions. In some cases, electron donor-acceptor complexes are formed, which are more polar than the original components. This leads to a change in the molecular-disperse and micellar part of solution and affects significantly the structure and properties of micellar hydrocarbon solutions of surfactants.

  4. Post-duplication charge evolution of phosphoglucose isomerases in teleost fishes through weak selection on many amino acid sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato Yukuto

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The partitioning of ancestral functions among duplicated genes by neutral evolution, or subfunctionalization, has been considered the primary process for the evolution of novel proteins (neofunctionalization. Nonetheless, how a subfunctionalized protein can evolve into a more adaptive protein is poorly understood, mainly due to the limitations of current analytical methods, which can detect only strong selection for amino acid substitutions involved in adaptive molecular evolution. In this study, we employed a comparative evolutionary approach to this question, focusing on differences in the structural properties of a protein, specifically the electric charge, encoded by fish-specific duplicated phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi genes. Results Full-length cDNA cloning, RT-PCR based gene expression analyses, and comparative sequence analyses showed that after subfunctionalization with respect to the expression organ of duplicate Pgi genes, the net electric charge of the PGI-1 protein expressed mainly in internal tissues became more negative, and that of PGI-2 expressed mainly in muscular tissues became more positive. The difference in net protein charge was attributable not to specific amino acid sites but to the sum of various amino acid sites located on the surface of the PGI molecule. Conclusion This finding suggests that the surface charge evolution of PGI proteins was not driven by strong selection on individual amino acid sites leading to permanent fixation of a particular residue, but rather was driven by weak selection on a large number of amino acid sites and consequently by steady directional and/or purifying selection on the overall structural properties of the protein, which is derived from many modifiable sites. The mode of molecular evolution presented here may be relevant to various cases of adaptive modification in proteins, such as hydrophobic properties, molecular size, and electric charge.

  5. Conductometric investigation of salt-free solutions of polyriboguanylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, A.G.; Davydova, O.V.; Kargov, S.I.

    1993-01-01

    Salt-free solutions of various ionic forms of polyriboguanylic acid (poly(G)) were studied by the methods of conductometry and spectroscopy of annular dichroism. The Manning approach was employed to calculate transport characteristics and structural parameters of poly(G) on the basis of spectra permit putting poly(G) salts in two groups: the first one comprising NH 4 + -, Rb + -, K + -, Na + -, the second one - Cs + -, and Li + -poly(G). The assumption is made that Li + and Cs + ions, bound with concrete groups of polyanion in a specific way, can promote formation of a stable structure different from the one observed in the presence of the first group counterions. 25 refs., 3 figs

  6. Carbamazepine-Fumaric Acid Co-Crystal Screening Using Solution Based Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd Rahim Syarifah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-crystals is a multi-component system which connected by non-covalent interactions, present physically as a solid form under ambient conditions. Nowadays, co-crystal has becoming as an alternative approach to improve the bioavailability of poor water soluble drugs especially for a weakly ionisable groups or neutral compounds. In this study the co-crystal screening was carried out for carbamazepine (CBZ and fumaric acid (FUM co-crystal former (CCF using non-stoichiometric method (addition of CBZ to CCF saturated solution and stoichiometric method (evaporation of 1:1 molar ratio of CBZ to CCF in acetonitrile, ethyl acetate, propanol, ethanol and formic acid solvent systems. The crystals produced from the screening were characterized using Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR. The PXRD analysis had confirmed that the co-crystal was successfully formed in both methods for all of the solvent system studied with an exception to formic acid in the stoichiometric method where no crystal was found precipitate. The findings from this study revealed that Form A and Form B of CBZ-FUM co-crystal had been successfully formed from different solvent systems.

  7. Solubility of xenon in amino-acid solutions. II. Nine less-soluble amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennan, Richard P.; Himm, Jeffrey F.; Pollack, Gerald L.

    1988-05-01

    Ostwald solubility (L) of xenon gas, as the radioisotope 133Xe, has been measured as a function of solute concentration, at 25.0 °C, in aqueous solutions of nine amino acids. The amino-acid concentrations investigated covered much of their solubility ranges in water, viz., asparagine monohydrate (0-0.19 M), cysteine (0-1.16 M), glutamine (0-0.22 M), histidine (0-0.26 M), isoleucine (0-0.19 M), methionine (0-0.22 M), serine (0-0.38 M), threonine (0-1.4 M), and valine (0-0.34 M). We have previously reported solubility results for aqueous solutions of six other, generally more soluble, amino acids (alanine, arginine, glycine, hydroxyproline, lysine, and proline), of sucrose and sodium chloride. In general, L decreases approximately linearly with increasing solute concentration in these solutions. If we postulate that the observed decreases in gas solubility are due to hydration, the results under some assumptions can be used to calculate hydration numbers (H), i.e., the number of H2O molecules associated with each amino-acid solute molecule. The average values of hydration number (H¯) obtained at 25.0 °C are 15.3±1.5 for asparagine, 6.8±0.3 for cysteine, 11.5±1.1 for glutamine, 7.3±0.7 for histidine, 5.9±0.4 for isoleucine, 10.6±0.8 for methionine, 11.2±1.3 for serine, 7.7± 1.0 for threonine, and 6.6±0.6 for valine. We have also measured the temperature dependence of solubility L(T) from 5-40 °C for arginine, glycine, and proline, and obtained hydration numbers H¯(T) in this range. Between 25-40 °C, arginine has an H¯ near zero. This may be evidence for an attractive interaction between xenon and arginine molecules in aqueous solution.

  8. RodZ and PgsA play intertwined roles in membrane homeostasis of Bacillus subtilis and resistance to weak organic acid stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Willem Albertus Van Beilen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Weak organic acids like sorbic and acetic acid are widely used to prevent growth of spoilage organisms such as Bacilli. To identify genes involved in weak acid stress tolerance we screened a transposon mutant library of Bacillus subtilis for sorbic acid sensitivity. Mutants of the rodZ (ymfM gene were found to be hypersensitive to the lipophilic weak organic acid. RodZ is involved in determining the cell’s rod-shape and believed to interact with the bacterial actin-like MreB cytoskeleton. Since rodZ lies upstream in the genome of the essential gene pgsA (phosphatidylglycerol phosphate synthase we hypothesized that expression of the latter might also be affected in rodZ mutants and hence contribute to the phenotype observed. We show that both genes are co-transcribed and that both the rodZ::mini-Tn10 mutant and a conditional pgsA mutant, under conditions of minimal pgsA expression, were sensitive to sorbic and acetic acid. Both strains displayed a severely altered membrane composition. Compared to the wild-type strain, phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin levels were lowered and the average acyl chain length was elongated. Induction of rodZ expression from a plasmid in our transposon mutant led to no recovery of weak acid susceptibility comparable to wild-type levels. However, pgsA overexpression in the same mutant partly restored sorbic acid susceptibility and fully restored acetic acid sensitivity. A construct containing both rodZ and pgsA as on the genome led to some restored growth as well. We propose that RodZ and PgsA play intertwined roles in membrane homeostasis and resistance to weak organic acid stress.

  9. Magnesium hydroxide as the neutralizing agent for radioactive hydrochloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, M.J.; Fife, K.W.

    1995-10-01

    The current technology at Los Alamos for removing actinides from acidic chloride waste streams is precipitation with approximately 10 M potassium hydroxide. Although successful, there are many inherent drawbacks to this precipitation technique which will be detailed in this paper. Magnesium hydroxide (K sp = 1.3 x 10 -11 ) has limited solubility in water and as a result of the common ion effect, cannot generate a filtrate with a pH greater than 9. At a pH of 9, calcium (K sp = 5.5 x 10 -6 ) will not coprecipitate as the hydroxide. This is an important factor since many acidic chloride feeds to hydroxide precipitation contain significant amounts of calcium. In addition, neutralization with Mg(OH) 2 produces a more filterable precipitate because neutralization occurs as the Mg(OH) 2 is dissolved by the acid rather than as a result of the much faster liquid/liquid reaction of KOH with the waste acid. This slower solid/liquid reaction allows time for crystal growth to occur and produces more easily filterable precipitates. On the other hand, neutralization of spent acid with strong KOH that yields numerous hydroxide ions in solution almost instantaneously forming a much larger volume of small crystallites that result in gelatinous, slow-filtering precipitates. Magnesium hydroxide also offers a safety advantage. Although mildly irritating, it is a weak base and safe and easy to handle. From a waste minimization perspective, Mg(OH) 2 offers many advantages. First, the magnesium hydroxide is added as a solid. This step eliminates the diluent water used in KOH neutralizations. Secondly, because the particle size of the precipitate is larger, more actinides are caught on the filter paper resulting in a smaller amount of actinide being transferred to the TA-50 Liquid Waste Treatment Facility. Third, the amount of solids that must be reprocessed is significantly smaller resulting in less waste generation from the downstream processes

  10. Uptake of ozone to mixed sodium bromide/ citric acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Tao; Steimle, Emilie; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Kato, Shunsuke; Lampimäki, Markus; Brown, Matthew; van Bokhoven, Jeroen; Nolting, Frithjof; Kleibert, Armin; Türler, Andreas; Ammann, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Sea-salt solution - air interfaces play an important role in the chemistry of the marine boundary layer. The reaction of ozone (O3) with bromide is of interest in the context of formation of photolabile halogens (Br2, BrCl) in the marine boundary layer. Recent experiments have suggested that the bromide oxidation rate is related to the surface concentration of bromide [1] and inversely related to the gas phase concentration of O3, an indication for a precursor mediated reaction at the surface [2]. So far, the effect of organics (such as those occurring at the ocean surface or in marine aerosols) on the reaction of O3 with bromide aerosols has not been studied yet. In our study we investigate the uptake kinetics of O3 to a mixed solution of sodium bromide (NaBr) and citric acid (CA), which represents highly oxidized organic compounds present in the environment, with a well-established coated wall flow tube technique, which leads to exposure of the film to O3 allowing the heterogeneous reactions to take place and the loss of O3 being measured. The results indicate that the uptake of O3 to the films with the higher bromide concentrations (0.34M and 4M) is independent of the gas phase concentration and roughly consistent with uptake limited by reaction in the bulk. For the lower bromide concentration (84mM), however, we observe a trend of the uptake coefficient to decrease with increasing O3 concentration, indicating an increasing importance of a surface reaction. In an attempt to constrain the kinetic data, we employed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to get insight into the surface composition of the aqueous solution - air interface. Previous XPS studies have shown that halide ion concentrations are enhanced at the aqueous solution air interface [3-4], which likely promotes the surface reactions of bromide or iodide with O3. A first XPS study of ternary solutions of KI with butanol indicated the importance of specific interactions of the cation with the alcohol

  11. Quantifying capability of a local seismic network in terms of locations and focal mechanism solutions of weak earthquakes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojtíková, Lucia; Kristeková, M.; Málek, Jiří; Sokos, E.; Csicsay, K.; Zahradník, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2016), 93-106 ISSN 1383-4649 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/12/2336 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : Focal-mechanism uncertainty * Little Carpathians * Relative location uncertainty * Seismic network * Uncertainty mapping * Waveform inversion * Weak earthquake s Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.089, year: 2016

  12. High-Yield Production of Levulinic Acid from Pretreated Cow Dung in Dilute Acid Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialei Su

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural waste cow dung was used as feedstock for the production of a high value–added chemical levulinic acid (LA in dilute acid aqueous solutions. A high LA yield of 338.9 g/kg was obtained from the pretreated cow dung, which was much higher than that obtained from the crude cow dung (135 g/kg, mainly attributed to the breakage of the lignin fraction in the lignocellulose structure of the cow dung by potassium hydroxide (KOH pretreatment, and thus enhanced the accessibility of cow dung to the acid sites in the catalytic reaction. Meanwhile, another value-added chemical formic acid could be obtained with a yield of ca. 160 g/kg in the process, implying a total production of ca. 500 g/kg yield for LA and formic acid from the pretreated cow dung with the proposed process. The developed process was shown to be tolerant to high initial substrate loading with a satisfied LA yield. This work provides a promising strategy for the value-increment utilization of liglocellulosic agricultural residues.

  13. Acid-base equilibrium in aqueous solutions of 1,3-dimethylbarbituric acid as studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryff-Keller, A.; Kraska-Dziadecka, A.

    2011-12-01

    13C NMR spectra of 1,3-dimethylbarbituric acid in aqueous solutions of various acidities and for various solute concentrations have been recorded and interpreted. The spectra recorded at pH = 2 and below contain the signals of the neutral solute molecule exclusively, while the ones recorded at pH = 7 and above only the signals of the appropriate anion, which has been confirmed by theoretical GIAO-DFT calculations. The signals in the spectra recorded for solutions of pH pH variation have been observed for the parent barbituric acid.

  14. Isothermal heat measurements of TBP-nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.R.; Cavin, W.S.

    1994-01-01

    Net heats of reaction were measured in an isothermal calorimeter for both single phase (organic) and two phase (organic and aqueous) TBP/HNO 3 reacting solutions at temperatures above 100 C. The oxidation rate constant was determined to be 5.4E-4 min -1 at 110 C for an open ''vented'' system as compared to 1.33 E-3 min -1 in the closed system. The heat released per unit material oxidized was also reduced. The oxidation in both phases was found to be first order in nitric acid and pseudo-zero order in butylnitrate and water. The hydrolysis (esterification) rate constant determined by Nichols' (1.33E-3 min -1 ) fit the experimental data from this work well. Forced evaporation of the volatile components by the product gases from oxidation resulted in a cooling mechanism which more than balanced the heat from the oxidation reaction in the two-phased systems. Rate expressions were derived and rate constants determined for both the single and two phase systems. An approximating mathematical model was developed to fit the experimental data and to extrapolate beyond the experimental conditions. This model shows that one foot of ''reacting'' 14.3M HNO 3 aqueous phase solution at 121 C will transport sufficient water to the organic phase to replace evaporative losses, maintaining endothermicity, for organic layers up to 12.2 + 6.0 feet deep. If the pressure in a reacting system is allowed to increase due to insufficient venting the temperature of the organic phase would increase in temperature to reach a new equilibrium. The rate of oxidation would increase not only due to the increase in temperature but also from the increased concentration of dissolved HNO 3 reduction products. Another important factor is that the cooling system described in this work becomes less effective as the total pressure increases. These factors probably contributed to the explosion at Tomsk

  15. Humic acid removal from aqueous solutions by peroxielectrocoagulation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Reza Yazdanbakhsh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Natural organic matter is the cause of many problems associated with water treatment such as the presence of disinfection by-products (DBPs and membrane fouling during water filtration. In this study, the performance of the peroxi-electrocoagulation process (PEP was investigated for the removal of humic acids (HAs from aqueous solutions. Methods: PEP was carried out for the removal of HA using a plexiglas reactor with a volume of 2 L and fitted with iron electrodes and a direct current supply (DC. Samples were taken at various amounts of pH (2-4, current density (1 and 2A/cm2, hydrogen peroxide (50-150 mg/L and reaction time (5-20 minutes and then filtered to remove sludge formed during reaction. Finally, the HA concentration was measured by UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV254. Results: Results indicated that increasing the concentration of H2O2 from 50 to 150 mg/L increased HA removal efficiency from 83% to 94.5%. The highest removal efficiency was observed at pH 3.0; by increasing the pH to the alkaline range, the efficiency of the process was reduced. It was found that HA removal efficiency was high in current density 1A/cm2. Increasing current density up to 1 A cm-2 caused a decrease in removal efficiency. Results of this study showed that under the optimum operating range for the process ([current density] = 1A/cm2, [hydrogen peroxide concentration] = 150 mg/L, [reaction time]= 20 minutes and [pH]= 3.0, HA removal efficiency reached 98%. Conclusion: It can be concluded that PEP has the potential to be utilized for cost-effective removal of HA from aqueous solutions.

  16. Fate of aliphatic compounds in nitric acid processing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.E.; Howerton, W.B.

    1975-01-01

    The reaction of hyperazeotropic iodic acid-saturated nitric acid with short chain aliphatic iodides, nitrates, and acids was studied in order to determine the conditions for complete removal of organic materials from nitric acid systems. The aliphatic iodides are converted to the nitrates and the nitrates in strong HNO 3 are extensively converted into CO 2 and acids. The aliphatic acids are rather stable; acetic acid was unattacked by boiling in 20M HNO 3 and n-butyric acid was 80 percent unattacked. The dibasic acids oxalic and malonic are extensively attacked, but succinic acid is relatively stable. A wet oxidation method is successful in destroying acetic acid in 5 to 8M HNO 3 . (U.S.)

  17. Calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurbanov, A.R.; Sharipov, D.Sh.

    1993-01-01

    Present article is devoted to calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid. The calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid was carried out in order to determine the thermal effects of reactions. The results of interaction of Ba(OH) 4 ·8H 2 O with 5, 10, and 20% solution of hydrofluoric acid were considered.

  18. Weak Organic Acids Decrease Borrelia burgdorferi Cytoplasmic pH, Eliciting an Acid Stress Response and Impacting RpoN- and RpoS-Dependent Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Dulebohn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi survives in its tick vector, Ixodes scapularis, or within various hosts. To transition between and survive in these distinct niches, B. burgdorferi changes its gene expression in response to environmental cues, both biochemical and physiological. Exposure of B. burgdorferi to weak monocarboxylic organic acids, including those detected in the blood meal of fed ticks, decreased the cytoplasmic pH of B. burgdorferi in vitro. A decrease in the cytoplasmic pH induced the expression of genes encoding enzymes that have been shown to restore pH homeostasis in other bacteria. These include putative coupled proton/cation exchangers, a putative Na+/H+ antiporter, a neutralizing buffer transporter, an amino acid deaminase and a proton exporting vacuolar-type VoV1 ATPase. Data presented in this report suggested that the acid stress response triggered the expression of RpoN- and RpoS-dependent genes including important virulence factors such as outer surface protein C (OspC, BBA66, and some BosR (Borreliaoxidative stress regulator-dependent genes. Because the expression of virulence factors, like OspC, are so tightly connected by RpoS to general cellular stress responses and cell physiology, it is difficult to separate transmission-promoting conditions in what is clearly a multifactorial and complex regulatory web.

  19. Pulse radiolysis of pyridinecarboxylic acids in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solar, S.; Getoff, N.; Sehested, K.

    1991-01-01

    The reactivity of OH, e(aq)- and H radicals towards aqueous carboxypyridines: picolinic acid (2-pyridinecarboxylic acid), PA; isonicotinic acid (4-pyridinecarboxylic acid), i-NA; 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 2,6-PDCA; and 3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 3,5-PDCA was investigated in the pH-range 1...... radical are: 20% for PA, 75% for i-NA, 60% for 2,6-PDCA and 25% for 3,5-PDCA (a yield of 50% has been found earlier for nicotinic acid, NA)....

  20. Hydrogen oxidation on gold electrode in perchloric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sustersic, M.G.; Almeida, N.V.; Von Mengershausen, A.E. [Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, 25 de Mayo N 384, 5730 Villa Mercedes, San Luis (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this research is to study the interface gold/perchloric acid solution in presence of hydrogen. The reactive is generated by H{sup +} ion reduction and by saturating the electrolyte with the gaseous H{sub 2}. No evidence of H{sub 2} dissociative adsorption is found. In special conditions, a strongly adsorbed layer is formed from the atoms diffusing from inside of the metal. The mass transport occurs in three ways: the diffusion of H atoms inwards, the diffusion of H atoms back to the surface and the dissolved H{sub 2} diffusion from the bulk electrolyte to the surface. When dissolved H{sub 2} reacts, the reaction is kinetically controlled when the H{sub 2} partial pressure is high, and it is diffusionally controlled when the reactive partial pressure is low. Above 0.7 V, (measured vs. RHE), the (100) plane surface reconstruction lifts, and the rate determining step is the H diffusion towards inside of the metal, and the current suddenly falls. The Hydrogen redox reaction on gold shows reversibility with respect to the potential when the reactives are the H diffusing outwards of the metal and the H{sup +} ion present in the electrolyte. However, the absolute current values of oxidation and reduction are different because the reactive sources are different. (author)

  1. Characteristics of alkali activated material (geopolymer) in sulfuric acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simatupang, Partogi H.

    2017-09-01

    Alkali Activated Material (AAM) or Geopolymer is a solid material which made by mixing rich silica alumina material with alkaline activator. AAM is a well known candidate to replace cement based material. Many researches have claimed that AAM has better durability compared to cement based material in agressive environment. However, there was rare paper presented the direct comparison of material characteristics between Class F fly ash based AAM and Class C fly ash based AAM in such aggresive environment. Because of that, this paper present material characteristics of Class F fly ash based AAM and Class C fly ash based AAM if the materials were immersed in 10% sulfuric acid solution for 65 days. Material characteristics evaluated were (1) weight loss, (2) mineral of the material which evaluated by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), (3) morphology and oxide compounds of material which evaluated by SEM/EDXA (Scanning Electron Microscopic/Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analyzer) and (4) compound bond which evaluated by FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra Red) Spectroscopy Testing. Alkali Activated Material used were Class F fly ash based AAM Mortar and Class C fly ash based AAM Mortar. The result is a quite difference of material characteristics between Class F fly ash based AAM and Class C fly ash based AAM.

  2. A new chemical system solution for acid gas removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, M.; Rolker, J.; Witthaut, D.; Schulze, S. [Evonik Industries AG, Hanau (Germany); Buchholz, S. [Evonik Industries AG, Marl (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    An energy-efficient absorbent formulation fors eparating acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2}, H2S) from gas streams such as natural gas, syngas or flue gas is important for a number of industrial applications. In many cases, a substantial share of their costs is driven by the operational expenditure (OPEX) of the CO{sub 2} separation unit. One possible strategy for reducing OPEX is the improvement of the absorbent performance. Although a number of absorbents for the separation of CO{sub 2} from gas streams exist, there is still a need to develop CO{sub 2} absorbents with an improved absorption performance, less corrosion and foaming, no nitrosamine formation, lower energy requirement and therefore less OPEX. This contribution aims at giving a brief state-of-the-art overview followed by an introduction and performance characterization of a new family of amine-based CO{sub 2} absorbents. High cyclic capacities in the range of 2.9 to 3.2 mol CO{sub 2} kg{sup -1} absorbent and low absorption enthalpies of about -30 kJ mol{sup -1} allow for significant savings in the regeneration energy of the new absorbent system. Calculations with the modified Kremser model indicate a reduction in the specific reboiler heat duty of 45 %. Moreover, the high-performance absorbents developed show much lower corrosion rates than state-of-the-art solutions that are currently employed. (orig.)

  3. Pulse radiolysis of adrenaline in acid aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohn, M.; Getoff, N.; Bjergbakke, E.

    1976-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis of adrenaline in acid aqueous solutions (pH 1 to 3) was carried out. The rate constants for the reactions of adrenaline with H and 0H were determined: k(H + adr.) = (0.9 +- 0.1) x 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 ; k(0H + adr.) = (1.65 +- 0.15) x 10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . The H-adduct of adrenaline has two lambdasub(max), at 280 and 355 nm, with epsilon 280 = 420 m 2 mol -1 and epsilon 355 = 390 m 2 mol -1 , which disappears according to a first order reaction, k 1 = 1.4 x 10 3 s -1 . The spectra formed by 0H attack was assigned to the corresponding benzoxy radical with absorption maxima at 285 and 365 nm and epsilon 285 = 620 m 2 mol -1 and epsilon 365 = 105 m 2 mol -1 . Due to the overlapping of the intermediates, no decay kinetics could be obtained. (author)

  4. Hyaluronic acid solution injection for upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed conventional endoscopic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyung Hun

    2014-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be an additional endoscopic modality for controlling bleeding in difficult cases when other techniques have failed. We evaluated 12 cases in which we used hyaluronic acid solution injection for stopping bleeding. Immediately following hyaluronic acid solution injection, bleeding was controlled in 11 out of 12 cases. There was no clinical evidence of renewed bleeding in 11 cases during follow up.Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be a simple and efficient additional method for controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed endoscopic therapy. © 2013 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2013 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  5. A pulse radiolysis study of salicylic acid and 5-sulpho-salicylic acid in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, Kamal; Mukherjee, T.

    2006-01-01

    Reactions of H, OH, e aq - and some one-electron oxidants have been studied with salicylic acid and 5-sulpho-salicylic acid in aqueous solutions. Rate constants for the reaction of e aq - with these compounds were of the order of 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 and this reaction led to the formation of reducing radicals which could transfer electron to methyl viologen. Other one-electron reductants were not able to reduce these compounds. OH radicals reacted with these compounds by addition pathway with very high rate constants (>10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 ) while O - radical anions could oxidize these molecules to give phenoxyl type of radicals. Amongst the one-electron oxidants, only N 3 radicals and SO 4 - radicals could oxidize salicylic acid while 5-sulpho-salicylic acid could be oxidized only by SO 4 - radicals indicating that while one-electron reduction potential for semi-oxidized SA may be o1 for N 3 ? radical), it is more than 1.33V vs. NHE for semi-oxidized SSA species

  6. The nonlinear dirac equation in Bose-Einstein condensates: vortex solutions and spectra in a weak harmonic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, L. H.; Carr, Lincoln D.

    2015-11-01

    We analyze the vortex solution space of the (2+1)-dimensional nonlinear Dirac equation for bosons in a honeycomb optical lattice at length scales much larger than the lattice spacing. Dirac point relativistic covariance combined with s-wave scattering for bosons leads to a large number of vortex solutions characterized by different functional forms for the internal spin and overall phase of the order parameter. We present a detailed derivation of these solutions which include skyrmions, half-quantum vortices, Mermin-Ho and Anderson-Toulouse vortices for vortex winding {\\ell }=1. For {\\ell }≥slant 2 we obtain topological as well as non-topological solutions defined by the asymptotic radial dependence. For arbitrary values of ℓ the non-topological solutions include bright ring-vortices which explicitly demonstrate the confining effects of the Dirac operator. We arrive at solutions through an asymptotic Bessel series, algebraic closed-forms, and using standard numerical shooting methods. By including a harmonic potential to simulate a finite trap we compute the discrete spectra associated with radially quantized modes. We demonstrate the continuous spectral mapping between the vortex and free particle limits for all of our solutions.

  7. Acid in perchloroethylene scrubber solutions used in HTGR fuel preparation processes. Analytical chemistry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.A.

    1979-02-01

    Acids and corrosion products in used perchloroethylene scrubber solutions collected from HTGR fuel preparation processes have been analyzed by several analytical methods to determine the source and possible remedy of the corrosion caused by these solutions. Hydrochloric acid was found to be concentrated on the carbon particles suspended in perchloroethylene. Filtration of carbon from the scrubber solutions removed the acid corrosion source in the process equipment. Corrosion products chemisorbed on the carbon particles were identified. Filtered perchloroethylene from used scrubber solutions contained practically no acid. It is recommended that carbon particles be separated from the scrubber solutions immediately after the scrubbing process to remove the source of acid and that an inhibitor be used to prevent the hydrolysis of perchloroethylene and the formation of acids

  8. Investigations on the oxidation of nitric acid plutonium solutions with ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, M.

    1983-01-01

    The reaction of ozone with nitric acid Pu solutions was studied as a function of reaction time, acid concentration and Pu concentration. Strong nitric acid Pu solutions are important in nuclear fuel element production and reprocessing. The Pu must be converted into hexavalent Pu before precipitation from the homogeneous solution together with uranium-IV, ammonia and CO 2 in the form of ammonium uranyl/plutonyl carbonate (AUPuC). Formation of a solid phase during ozonation was observed for the first time. The proneness to solidification increases with incrasing plutonium concentrations and with decreasing acid concentrations. If the formation of a solid phase during ozonation of nitric acid Pu solutions cannot be prevented, the PU-IV oxidation process described is unsuitable for industrial purposes as Pu solutions in industrial processes have much higher concentrations than the solutions used in the present investigation. (orig./EF) [de

  9. The weak acid resin process: a dustless conversion route for the synthesis of americium bearing-blanket precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picart, S.; Gauthe, A.; Parant, P.; Remy, E.; Jobelin, I.; Pomared, J.M.; Grangaud, P.; Dauby, J.; Delahaye, T.; Caisso, M.; Bataille, M.; Bayle, J.P.; Frost, C.; Delage, C.; Martin, C.L.; Ayral, E.

    2016-01-01

    Mixed uranium-americium oxides are one of the materials envisaged for Americium Bearing Blankets dedicated to transmutation in fast neutron reactors. Conversion and fabrication processes are currently developed to make those materials in the form of dense and homogeneous oxide ceramic pellets or dense granulates incorporating uranium and americium. Their development points out the need of a simplified and optimized process which could lower hazards linked to dust generation of highly contaminating and irradiating compounds and facilitate material transfer in remote handling operations. This reason motivated the development of innovative 'dustless' route such as the Weak Acid Resin route (WAR) which provides the oxide precursors in the form of sub-millimeter-sized microspheres with optimal flowability and limits dust generation during conversion and fabrication steps. This study is thus devoted to the synthesis of mixed uranium-americium oxide microspheres by the WAR process and to the characterization of such precursors. This work also deals with their application to the fabrication of dense or porous pellets and with their potential use as dense spherules to make Sphere-Pac fuel. (authors)

  10. The weak acid resin process: a dustless conversion route for the synthesis of americium bearing-blanket precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picart, S.; Gauthe, A.; Parant, P.; Remy, E.; Jobelin, I.; Pomared, J.M.; Grangaud, P.; Dauby, J.; Delahaye, T. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, DEN/MAR/DRCP, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Caisso, M.; Bataille, M.; Bayle, J.P. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, DEN/MAR/DTEC, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Frost, C. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, DEN/MAR/DRCP, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Institut Europeen des Membranes, CNRS-ENSCM-UM, CC47, University of Montpellier, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Delage, C. [CEA, Centre de Cadarache, DEN/CAD/DEC, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Martin, C.L. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Ayral, E. [Institut Europeen des Membranes, CNRS-ENSCM-UM, CC47, University of Montpellier, F-34095 Montpellier (France)

    2016-07-01

    Mixed uranium-americium oxides are one of the materials envisaged for Americium Bearing Blankets dedicated to transmutation in fast neutron reactors. Conversion and fabrication processes are currently developed to make those materials in the form of dense and homogeneous oxide ceramic pellets or dense granulates incorporating uranium and americium. Their development points out the need of a simplified and optimized process which could lower hazards linked to dust generation of highly contaminating and irradiating compounds and facilitate material transfer in remote handling operations. This reason motivated the development of innovative 'dustless' route such as the Weak Acid Resin route (WAR) which provides the oxide precursors in the form of sub-millimeter-sized microspheres with optimal flowability and limits dust generation during conversion and fabrication steps. This study is thus devoted to the synthesis of mixed uranium-americium oxide microspheres by the WAR process and to the characterization of such precursors. This work also deals with their application to the fabrication of dense or porous pellets and with their potential use as dense spherules to make Sphere-Pac fuel. (authors)

  11. A strategy for the preparation of thioantimonates based on the concept of weak acids and corresponding strong bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderer, Carolin; Delwa de Alarcón, Natalie; Näther, Christian; Bensch, Wolfgang

    2014-12-15

    By following a new synthetic approach, which is based on the in situ formation of a basic medium by the reaction between the strong base Sb(V)S4 (3-) and the weak acid H2 O, it was possible to prepare three layered thioantimonate(III) compounds of composition [TM(2,2'-bipyridine)3 ][Sb6 S10 ] (TM=Ni, Fe) and [Ni(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)3 ][Sb6 S10 ] under hydrothermal conditions featuring two different thioantimonate(III) network topologies. The antimony source, Na3 SbS4 ⋅ 9 H2 O, undergoes several decomposition reactions and produces the Sb(III) S3 species, which condenses to generate the layered anion. The application of transition-metal complexes avoids crystallization of dense phases. The reactions are very fast compared to conventional hydrothermal/solvothermal syntheses and are much less sensitive to changes of the reaction parameters. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Dissolution of thorium/uranium mixed oxide in nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filgueiras, S.A.C.

    1984-01-01

    The dissolution process of thorium oxide and mixed uranium-thorium oxide is studied, as a step of the head-end of the fuel reprocessing. An extensive bibliography was analysed, concerning the main aspects of the system, specially the most important process variables. Proposed mechanisms and models for the thorium oxide dissolution are presented. The laboratory tests were performed in two phases: at first, powdered thoria was used as the material to be dissolved. The objective was to know how changes in he concentrations of the dissolvent solution components HNO 3 , HF and Al(NO 3 ) 3 affect the dissolution rate. The tests were planned according to the fractional factorial method. Thes results showed that it is advantageous to work with powdered material, since the reaction occurs rapidly. And, if the Thorex solution (HNO 3 13M, HF 0.05M and Al(NO 3 ) 3 0.10M) is a suitable dissolvent, it was verified that it is possible to reduce the concentration of either nitric or fluoridric acid, without reducing the reaction rate to an undesirable value. It was also observed significant interaction between the components of the dissolvent solution. In the second phase of the tests, (Th, 5%U)O 2 sintered pellets were used. The main goals were to know the pellets dissolution behaviour and to compare the results for different pellets among themselves. It was observed that the metallurgical history of the material strongly influences its dissolution, specially the density and the microstructure. It was also studied how the (Th,U)O 2 mass/Thorex solution volume ratio affects the time needed to obtain an 1 M Th/liter solution. The activation energy for the reaction was obtained. (Author) [pt

  13. Preparation of acid deficient solutions of uranyl nitrate and thorium nitrate by steam denitration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, Shigeru; Takahashi, Yoshihisa

    1996-01-01

    Acid deficient heavy metal (HM) nitrate solutions are often required in the internal gelation processes for nuclear fuel fabrication. The stoichiometric HM-nitrate solutions are needed in a sol-gel process for fuel fabrication. A method for preparing such nitrate solutions with a controlled molar ratio of nitrate/metal by denitration of acid-excess nitrate solutions was developed. The denitration was conducted by bubbling a nitrate solution with a mixture of steam+Ar. It was found that steam was more effective for the denitration than Ar. The acid deficient uranyl nitrate solution with nitrate/U=1.55 was yielded by steam bubbling, while not by only Ar bubbling. As for thorium nitrate, acid deficient solutions of nitrate/Th≥3.1 were obtained by steam bubbling. (author)

  14. Use of a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column and propionic acid as an eluent in ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography of aliphatic carboxylic acids and ethanol in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masanobu; Hironaga, Takahiro; Kajiwara, Hiroe; Nakatani, Nobutake; Kozaki, Daisuke; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    We developed an ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography (IEAC) method employing a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin (PS-WCX) column with propionic acid as the eluent for the simultaneous determination of multivalent aliphatic carboxylic acids and ethanol in food samples. The PS-WCX column well resolved mono-, di-, and trivalent carboxylic acids in the acidic eluent. Propionic acid as the eluent gave a higher signal-to-noise ratio, and enabled sensitive conductimetric detection of analyte acids. We found the optimal separation condition to be the combination of a PS-WCX column and 20-mM propionic acid. Practical applicability of the developed method was confirmed by using a short precolumn with a strongly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H(+)-form connected before the separation column; this was to remove cations from food samples by converting them to hydrogen ions. Consequently, common carboxylic acids and ethanol in beer, wine, and soy sauce were successfully separated by the developed method.

  15. Separation of rare earths from solutions of phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.A.

    1977-01-01

    Rare earths are separated from 6M phosphoric acid by adsorption onto cation resin BIORAD AG50W-X8. The phosphoric acid is then washed from the column, and the rare earths are eluted with 4M hydrochloric acid

  16. Adsorption mechanism of acids and bases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography in weak buffered mobile phases designed for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2009-03-06

    The overloaded band profiles of five acido-basic compounds were measured, using weakly buffered mobile phases. Low buffer concentrations were selected to provide a better understanding of the band profiles recorded in LC/MS analyses, which are often carried out at low buffer concentrations. In this work, 10 microL samples of a 50 mM probe solution were injected into C(18)-bonded columns using a series of five buffered mobile phases at (SW)pH between 2 and 12. The retention times and the shapes of the bands were analyzed based on thermodynamic arguments. A new adsorption model that takes into account the simultaneous adsorption of the acidic and the basic species onto the endcapped adsorbent, predicts accurately the complex experimental profiles recorded. The adsorption mechanism of acido-basic compounds onto RPLC phases seems to be consistent with the following microscopic model. No matter whether the acid or the base is the neutral or the basic species, the neutral species adsorbs onto a large number of weak adsorption sites (their saturation capacity is several tens g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of 0.1 L/g). In contrast, the ionic species adsorbs strongly onto fewer active sites (their saturation capacity is about 1g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of a few L/g). From a microscopic point of view and in agreement with the adsorption isotherm of the compound measured by frontal analysis (FA) and with the results of Monte-Carlo calculations performed by Schure et al., the first type of adsorption sites are most likely located in between C(18)-bonded chains and the second type of adsorption sites are located deeper in contact with the silica surface. The injected concentration (50 mM) was too low to probe the weakest adsorption sites (saturation capacity of a few hundreds g/L with an equilibrium constant of one hundredth of L/g) that are located at the very interface between the C(18)-bonded layer and the bulk phase.

  17. Acid Solutions for Etching Corrosion-Resistant Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    New study characterized solutions for etching austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base alloys, and titanium alloys (annealed). Solutions recommended for use remove at least 0.4 mil of metal from surface in less than an hour. Solutions do not cause intergranular attack on metals for which they are effective, when used under specified conditions.

  18. Behaviour of Pu-IV with various ion exchangers in solutions containing nitric acid and oxalates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, E.; Ali, S.A.

    1982-02-01

    The distribution of Pu-IV on the ion exchangers Dowex 50W-X8, Dowex 1-X8 und Dowex Chelating Resin Al-X8 in the presence of various concentrations of nitric acid and oxalate were investigated. The results indicate that nitric acid and oxalic acid influence each other during complexation of Pu-IV with oxalate ions solutions containing nitric acid it is not possible to neglect the formation of Pu-IV nitrate complexes. The complex Pu(IV) (C 2 O 4 ) 3 2 - only is formed in solutions containing low nitric acid and high oxalic acid concentrations. The separation of Pu-IV in Dowex Chelating Resin from nitric acid solution in the presence of higher oxalate concentrations is possible, provided that the nitric acid concentration is lower than 0.25 molar [fr

  19. Comparative radiosensitivity of amino acids during γ-radiolysis in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duzhenkova, N.A.; Savich, A.V.

    1977-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of amino acids contained in proteins has been compared. The γ-radiolysis of aqueous solutions of amino acids has studied over a wide range of concentrations in the presence of air, the dose rate being 60 rad/sec, and the dose, 100 krad. Radiation-chemical yields of amino acid decay and ammonia accumulation are given. An increase in yields with amino acid concentration has been established. Assumptions concerning some peculiarities of the amino acid decay mechanism are made

  20. Casein Kinase I Isoform Hrr25 Is a Negative Regulator of Haa1 in the Weak Acid Stress Response Pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Morgan E; Black, Joshua J; Liu, Zhengchang

    2017-07-01

    Haa1 is a transcription factor that adapts Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to weak organic acid stresses by activating the expression of various genes. Many of these genes encode membrane proteins, such as TPO2 and YRO2 How Haa1 is activated by weak acids is not clear. Here, we show that casein kinase I isoform Hrr25 is an important negative regulator of Haa1. Haa1 is known to be multiply phosphorylated. We found that mutations in HRR25 lead to reduced Haa1 phosphorylation and increased expression of Haa1 target genes and that Hrr25 interacts with Haa1. The other three casein kinase I isoforms, Yck1, Yck2, and Yck3, do not seem to play critical roles in Haa1 regulation. Hrr25 has a 200-residue C-terminal region, including a proline- and glutamine-rich domain. Our data suggest that the C-terminal region of Hrr25 is required for normal inhibition of expression of Haa1 target genes TPO2 and YRO2 and is important for cell growth but is not required for cell morphogenesis. We propose that Hrr25 is an important regulator of cellular adaptation to weak acid stress by inhibiting Haa1 through phosphorylation. IMPORTANCE Our study has revealed the casein kinase I protein Hrr25 to be a negative regulator of Haa1, a transcription factor mediating the cellular response to stresses caused by weak acids. Many studies have focused on the target genes of Haa1 and their roles in weak acid stress responses, but little has been reported on the regulatory mechanism of Haa1. Weak acids, such as acetic acid, have long been used for food preservation by slowing down the growth of fungal species, including S. cerevisiae In the biofuel industry, acetic acid in the lignocellulosic hydrolysates limits the production of ethanol, which is undesirable. By understanding how Haa1 is regulated, we can make advances in the field of food sciences to better preserve food and engineer acetic acid-resistant strains that will increase productivity in the biofuel industry. Copyright © 2017 American

  1. Recovery of Tin and Nitric Acid from Spent Solder Stripping Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Jae-Woo; Ryu, Seong-Hyung; Kim, Tae-young

    2015-01-01

    Spent solder-stripping solutions containing tin, copper, iron, and lead in nitric acid solution, are by-products of the manufacture of printed-circuit boards. The recovery of these metals and the nitric acid, for re-use has economic and environmental benefits. In the spent solder-stripping solution, a systematic method to determine a suitable process for recovery of valuable metals and nitric acid was developed. Initially, more than 90% of the tin was successfully recovered as high-purity SnO 2 by thermal precipitation at 80 ℃ for 3 hours. About 94% of the nitric acid was regenerated effectively from the spent solutions by diffusion dialysis, after which there remained copper, iron, and lead in solution. Leakage of tin through the anion-exchange membrane was the lowest (0.026%), whereas Pb-leakage was highest (4.26%). The concentration of the regenerated nitric acid was about 5.1 N.

  2. Acid-base and copper-binding properties of three organic matter fractions isolated from a forest floor soil solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Joris W. J.; Kleja, Dan B.; Gustafsson, Jon Petter

    2010-02-01

    Vast amounts of knowledge about the proton- and metal-binding properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in natural waters have been obtained in studies on isolated humic and fulvic (hydrophobic) acids. Although macromolecular hydrophilic acids normally make up about one-third of DOM, their proton- and metal-binding properties are poorly known. Here, we investigated the acid-base and Cu-binding properties of the hydrophobic (fulvic) acid fraction and two hydrophilic fractions isolated from a soil solution. Proton titrations revealed a higher total charge for the hydrophilic acid fractions than for the hydrophobic acid fraction. The most hydrophilic fraction appeared to be dominated by weak acid sites, as evidenced by increased slope of the curve of surface charge versus pH at pH values above 6. The titration curves were poorly predicted by both Stockholm Humic Model (SHM) and NICA-Donnan model calculations using generic parameter values, but could be modelled accurately after optimisation of the proton-binding parameters (pH ⩽ 9). Cu-binding isotherms for the three fractions were determined at pH values of 4, 6 and 9. With the optimised proton-binding parameters, the SHM model predictions for Cu binding improved, whereas the NICA-Donnan predictions deteriorated. After optimisation of Cu-binding parameters, both models described the experimental data satisfactorily. Iron(III) and aluminium competed strongly with Cu for binding sites at both pH 4 and pH 6. The SHM model predicted this competition reasonably well, but the NICA-Donnan model underestimated the effects significantly at pH 6. Overall, the Cu-binding behaviour of the two hydrophilic acid fractions was very similar to that of the hydrophobic acid fraction, despite the differences observed in proton-binding characteristics. These results show that for modelling purposes, it is essential to include the hydrophilic acid fraction in the pool of 'active' humic substances.

  3. Enthalpic characteristics of interactions occurring between an ascorbic acid and some saccharides in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terekhova, Irina V.; Kulikov, Oleg V.; Titova, Elena S.

    2004-01-01

    The enthalpies of solution of mono- and disaccharides were measured in water and aqueous ascorbic acid solutions at 298.15 K using a calorimeter of solution. Enthalpies of transfer of saccharides from water to aqueous ascorbic acid solutions were derived, and enthalpic coefficients of pair interaction h xy were calculated according to MacMillan-Mayer theory. Interactions of ascorbic acid with D-fructose and sucrose are energetically favorable and characterized by negative h xy coefficients while h xy for the interactions occurring between ascorbic acid and α-D glucose, D-galactose and maltose are positive. The obtained results are interpreted in terms of the influence of structure and solvation of solutes on the thermodynamic parameters of their interaction in solutions

  4. Solvent extraction of uranium from high acid leach solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadevi, G.; Sreenivas, T.; Navale, A.S.; Padmanabhan, N.P.H.

    2010-01-01

    A significant part of the total uranium reserves all over the world is contributed by refractory uranium minerals. The refractory oxides are highly stable and inert to attack by most of the commonly used acids under normal conditions of acid strength, pressure and temperature. Quantitative dissolution of uranium from such ores containing refractory uranium minerals requires drastic operating conditions during chemical leaching like high acid strength, elevated pressures and temperatures. The leach liquors produced under these conditions normally have high free acidity, which affects the downstream operations like ion exchange and solvent extraction

  5. Process for denitrating waste solutions containing nitric acid actinides simultaneously separating the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gompper, K.

    1984-01-01

    The invention should reduce the acid and nitrate content of waste solutions containing nitric acid as much as possible, should reduce the total salt content of the waste solution, remove the actinides contained in it by precipitation and reduce the α radio-activity in the remaining solution, without having to worry about strong reactions or an increase in the volume of the waste solution. The invention achieves this by mixing the waste solution with diethyl oxalate at room temperature and heating the mixture to at least 80 0 C. (orig.) [de

  6. Oxalic acid complexes: Promising draw solutes for forward osmosis (FO) in protein enrichment

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Qingchun; Chung, Neal Tai-Shung

    2015-01-01

    Highly soluble oxalic acid complexes (OACs) were synthesized through a one-pot reaction. The OACs exhibit excellent performance as draw solutes in FO processes with high water fluxes and negligible reverse solute fluxes. Efficient protein enrichment was achieved. The diluted OACs can be recycled via nanofiltration and are promising as draw solutes.

  7. Adsorption of zirconium from nitric acid solutions on hydrated tin dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tret' yakov, S Ya; Sharygin, L M; Egorov, Yu V

    1977-01-01

    Adsorption of zirconium from nitric acid solutions has been studied with the use of the labeled atom method on hydrated tin dioxide depending on the sorbate concentration, pH and prehistory of the solution. It has been found that adsorption behavior of zirconium essentially depends on its state in the solution.

  8. Solution properties and taste behavior of lactose monohydrate in aqueous ascorbic acid solutions at different temperatures: Volumetric and rheological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Sinha, Biswajit

    2016-11-15

    The densities and viscosities of lactose monohydrate in aqueous ascorbic acid solutions with several molal concentrations m=(0.00-0.08)molkg(-1) of ascorbic acid were determined at T=(298.15-318.15)K and pressure p=101kPa. Using experimental data apparent molar volume (ϕV), standard partial molar volume (ϕV(0)), the slope (SV(∗)), apparent specific volumes (ϕVsp), standard isobaric partial molar expansibility (ϕE(0)) and its temperature dependence [Formula: see text] the viscosity B-coefficient and solvation number (Sn) were determined. Viscosity B-coefficients were further employed to obtain the free energies of activation of viscous flow per mole of the solvents (Δμ1(0≠)) and of the solute (Δμ2(0≠)). Effects of molality, solute structure and temperature and taste behavior were analyzed in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions; results revealed that the solutions are characterized predominantly by solute-solvent interactions and lactose monohydrate behaves as a long-range structure maker. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Enlarging the fission fragment tracks in glass detectors by etching in weak solutions of HF - a safe etchant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, V.P.; Sharma, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of etchant concentration and temperature on track revelation properties of soda glass detectors has been studied. Etch rate ratio, maximum observable diameter and the energy resolution of the fission fragment tracks of 252 Cf in glasses are increased when the samples are etched in 1.25 vol% HF as compared to higher concentrations of HF and other etching solutions. The critical angle of etching is found to decrease with decrease in etchant concentration. The activation energies for bulk etching and track etching have also been estimated. Better results were obtained by using lower etching temperatures. (author)

  10. Optical constants of anodic aluminum oxide films formed in oxalic acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jian [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Wang Chengwei [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)], E-mail: cwwang@nwnu.edu.cn; Li Yan [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Liu Weimin [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2008-09-01

    The anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) films with highly ordered nanopore arrays were prepared in oxalic acid solution under different anodizing voltage and time, its surface and cross section appearances were characterized by using field emission scanning electron microscopy, the transmission spectra with the interference fringes were measured at normal incidence over the wavelength range 200 to 2500 nm. Then the modified Swanepoel method was used for the determination of the optical constants and thickness of the free standing AAO films. The results indicate that the refractive index increases with the increase of anodizing voltage and the decrease of anodizing time, which is mainly due to the content of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with octahedron increases in the AAO films. The dispersion of the refractive index is discussed in terms of the single-oscillator Wemple-DiDomenico model, and the energy dependence of the absorption coefficient can be described using the direct transition model proposed by Tauc. Likewise, the optical energy gap E{sub g} is derived from Tauc's extrapolation, and E{sub g} increases from 4.178 to 4.256 eV with the anodizing voltage, but is weakly dependent on anodizing time. All the results are self-consistent in the paper.

  11. Efficient in situ separation and production of L-lactic acid by Bacillus coagulans using weak basic anion-exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yitong; Qian, Zijun; Liu, Peng; Liu, Lei; Zheng, Zhaojuan; Ouyang, Jia

    2018-02-01

    To get rid of the dependence on lactic acid neutralizer, a simple and economical approach for efficient in situ separation and production of L-lactic acid was established by Bacillus coagulans using weak basic anion-exchange resin. During ten tested resins, the 335 weak basic anion-exchange resins demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity and selectivity for lactic acid recovery. The adsorption study of the 335 resins for lactic acid confirmed that it is an efficient adsorbent under fermentation condition. Langmuir models gave a good fit to the equilibrium data at 50 °C and the maximum adsorption capacity for lactic acid by 335 resins was about 402 mg/g. Adsorption kinetic experiments showed that pseudo-second-order kinetics model gave a good fit to the adsorption rate. When it was used for in situ fermentation, the yield of L-lactic acid by B. coagulans CC17 was close to traditional fermentation and still maintained at about 82% even after reuse by ten times. These results indicated that in situ separation and production of L-lactic acid using the 335 resins were efficient and feasible. This process could greatly reduce the dosage of neutralizing agent and potentially be used in industry.

  12. PAR-2 activation enhances weak acid-induced ATP release through TRPV1 and ASIC sensitization in human esophageal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liping; Oshima, Tadayuki; Shan, Jing; Sei, Hiroo; Tomita, Toshihiko; Ohda, Yoshio; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Miwa, Hiroto

    2015-10-15

    Esophageal visceral hypersensitivity has been proposed to be the pathogenesis of heartburn sensation in nonerosive reflux disease. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is expressed in human esophageal epithelial cells and is believed to play a role in inflammation and sensation. PAR-2 activation may modulate these responses through adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release, which is involved in transduction of sensation and pain. The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are both acid-sensitive nociceptors. However, the interaction among these molecules and the mechanisms of heartburn sensation are still not clear. We therefore examined whether ATP release in human esophageal epithelial cells in response to acid is modulated by TRPV1 and ASICs and whether PAR-2 activation influences the sensitivity of TRPV1 and ASICs. Weak acid (pH 5) stimulated the release of ATP from primary human esophageal epithelial cells (HEECs). This effect was significantly reduced after pretreatment with 5-iodoresiniferatoxin (IRTX), a TRPV1-specific antagonist, or with amiloride, a nonselective ASIC blocker. TRPV1 and ASIC3 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection also decreased weak acid-induced ATP release. Pretreatment of HEECs with trypsin, tryptase, or a PAR-2 agonist enhanced weak acid-induced ATP release. Trypsin treatment led to the phosphorylation of TRPV1. Acid-induced ATP release enhancement by trypsin was partially blocked by IRTX, amiloride, or a PAR-2 antagonist. Conversely, acid-induced ATP release was augmented by PAR-2 activation through TRPV1 and ASICs. These findings suggested that the pathophysiology of heartburn sensation or esophageal hypersensitivity may be associated with the activation of PAR-2, TRPV1, and ASICs. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Process for the removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheitlin, F.M.

    The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of /sup 226/Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

  14. Investigations of the sorption of cesium from acid solutions by various inorganic sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suess, M.; Pfrepper, G.

    1981-01-01

    Studies have been made to investigate the suitability of various inorganic sorbents for separating and obtaining cesium from acid solutions. In greater details, the distribution coefficients of cesium from nitric acid and ammonium nitrate solution were determined. To determine the saturation capacities it was necessary to plot the isotherms of adsorption from 0.5 N and 3.1 N nitric acid. Experimental sorption from a model solution, of which the composition was equal to that of the liquid Purex waste, enabled the suitability of the various exchangers for obtaining cesium from fission product solutions to be determined. From the results obtained it is apparent that ammonium phosphomolybdate is best suited for obtaining cesium from acid fission product solutions. (orig.)

  15. Chemical dosimetry at less than 1000 rad: aqueous trimesic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, R.W.; Wilson, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of trimesic acid were investigated for possible use as a chemical dosimeter. In aerated 10 -2 M sulphuric acid solution containing 10 -3 M trimesic acid, a highly fluorescent product is formed with its maximum fluorescence at 450nm when excited by 350nm light. The product has fluorescence characteristics very similar to quinine in 0.05 M sulphuric acid. The fluorescence intensity is linear with dose in the range 1-1000 rad and a precision of +-2% was obtained from a number of runs. Solutions are stable for at least several days before and after irradiation. The yield is little affected by moderate changes in trimesic acid concentration, oxygen concentration, water purity, energy of radiation and irradiation temperature. The small dependence of the yield on dose rate and the effect of measurement temperature on the fluorescence signal have been quantified. The most significant factor affecting the fluorescence signal is the hydrogen ion concentration of the solution. In aerated neutral and alkaline (pH 10) solutions, hydroxytrimesic acid (HTMA) is formed with G(HTMA) equal to 2.07 +- 0.04 and 2.21 +- 0.04, for 10 -3 M trimesate. In these solutions, G(HTMA) increases appreciably with increase in the trimesate concentration. The main fluorescent product formed in irradiated acid solutions was not identified but it was not HTMA. (author)

  16. Method for separation of Cs from acid solution dissolving radionuclides and microanalysis of solution with ICP-AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Toru; Hidaka, Akihide; Kudo, Tamotsu; Nakamura, Takehiko; Fuketa, Toyoshi

    2004-06-01

    The VEGA (Verification Experiments of radionuclides Gas/Aerosol release) program is being performed at JAERI to understand mechanisms of radionuclides release from irradiated fuel during severe accidents. As a part of evaluation in the program, the mass balances of released and deposited FP (Fission Products) onto the test apparatus are estimated from gamma ray measurement for acid solution leached from the apparatus, but short-life nuclides are difficult to be measured because those in the VEGA fuel have been mostly depleted due to cooling for several years. Moreover, the radionuclides without emitting gamma rays and very small quantity of elements cannot be quantified by gamma ray measurement. Therefore, a microanalysis by ICP-AES (Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectrometry) for the acid solution leached from VEGA apparatuses is being applied to evaluate the released and deposited masses for those elements. Since Cs-134 and -137, which are major FP dissolved in the solution, have high intensity of gamma ray spectrum, they have to be removed from the solution before the microanalysis in order to avoid contamination of ICP system and to decrease exposure to gamma ray. In this report, methods for separation of Cs from acid solution were reviewed and the applicability of them to the ICP-AES analysis was discussed. The method for Cs separation using the inorganic ion exchanger, AMP (Ammonium Molybdate Phosphate) was applied to the solutions of cold and hot test and the effectiveness was examined. The results showed that more than 99.9% of Cs could be removed from the test solutions, and once removed Sb by AMP was recovered by using a complexing agent such as citric acid. Next, the method was applied to an acid solution leached from VEGA-3 apparatus, and ICP-AES analysis was performed for it. The analysis showed that amount of U, Sr and Zr were successfully quantified. Most of elements to be analyzed were measurable except for Sb, Ag and Sn, although

  17. Separation of ions in acidic solution by capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, Michelle [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an effective method for separating ionic species according to differences in their electrophoretic mobilities. CE separations of amino acids by direct detection are difficult due to their similar electrophoretic mobilities and low absorbances. However, native amino acids can be separated by CE as cations at a low pH by adding an alkanesulfonic acid to the electrolyte carrier which imparts selectivity to the system. Derivatization is unnecessary when direct UV detection is used at 185 nm. Simultaneous speciation of metal cations such as vanadium (IV) and vanadium (V) can easily be performed without complexation prior to analysis. An indirect UV detection scheme for acidic conditions was also developed using guanidine as the background carrier electrolyte (BCE) for the indirect detection of metal cations. Three chapters have been removed for separate processing. This report contains introductory material, references, and general conclusions. 80 refs.

  18. Extraction of uranium from aqueous solution by phosphonic acid-imbedded polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katragadda, S.; Gesser, H.D.; Chow, A.

    1997-01-01

    Phenylphosphonic acid was imbedded into the matrix of the polyurethane foam during the fabrication process of the polymer. The extraction of uranium by phosphonic acid-imbedded polyurethane foam and blank polyurethane (i.e., foam without phosphonic acid functional groups) was investigated. Phosphonic acid-imbedded foam showed superior extractability of uranium from solutions with pH = 7.0 ± 1.5 over a wide range of temperatures. (author)

  19. Extraction of Collagen from Chicken Feet with Various Acidic Solutions and Soaking Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prayitno Prayitno

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to know the ability of various acidic solutions on dissolving collagen  chicken feet, with different soaked time.  Each acid 5 percent (v/v, collagen extraction was done by washing chicken feet and then cutted into small pieces and finally grinded.  Every 100 gram treatment was soaked in acetic acid (a1, citric acid (a2, lactic acid (a3 and hydrochloric acid (a4, for 12, 24 and 36 hours.  Precipitated collagen in the filtrate was 5 percent NaOH to reach the neutral pH (pH 7.  Collagen precipitate was separated by filtration usingfilter paper and then  rendement was calculated, HPLC was used to determin amino acid composition, and SDS-PAGE was use determin the type of collagen.  This experiment use factorial completely randomized design (CRD 4 x 3 and three time replication.   Result showed that lactic acid has highest capability to dissolve collagen, while citric acid the lowest.  Combination of acid solution and soaking time had significant (P<0.01 effect on dissolving collagen of chicken feet.  Extracted collagen in all acid solution, hassame amino acid, composition but different in percentage of amino acid molecules.  Collagen type in treatment combination was the same, but for soaking time of 36 hours revealed some peptide band.  Lactic acid had highest capability of collagen extraction in chicken feet than citric acid, acetic acid and hydrochloric acid with soaking time of 12, 24 and 36 hours.  It was estimated that extracted collagen can be grouped to type I consisted of two chain of a1. (Animal Production 9(2: 99-104 (2007   Key Words : Chicken feet, acids, soaking time, collagen

  20. Adsorption of pertechnetate ion on various active carbons from mineral acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, K.

    1991-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of pertechnetate ion (TcO 4 - ) on active carbon has been studied for various acid solutions, taking as indicative value the distribution coefficient K d of Tc between active carbon surface and solution. In a system where the total anion concentration of the acid and its sodium salt was maintained constant, modifying the pH of the solution proved distinctly to influence the Tc adsorption behavior of active carbon: taking the case of active carbon derived from coconut shell, increasing the acidity raised K d ; around neutrality there occurred a level stage; in the alkali region, K d declined. The rise of K d in the acid region, however, was observed only with active carbon derived from coconut shell, from oil pitch or from saw dust; it failed to occur when the active carbon was derived from coal or from bone. With a hydrochloric acid system, the rise of K d started around 1 M (mol dm -1 ) HCl. Beyond 3 M, on the other hand, a breakthrough occurred, and K d declined with increasing acidity. With a nitric acid system, K d rose from 1 M, and the breakthrough occurred at 2 M. When the adsorption was left to equilibrate beyond 4 h, desorption displacement of TcO 4 - by a coexisting other anion was observed in the case of perchloric acid solutions of concentration above 0.1 M and with sulfuric acid solutions above 0.5 M. (author)

  1. Hydrophobic interactions between polymethacrylic acid and sodium laureth sulfate in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaremko, Z. M.; Fedushinskaya, L. B.; Burka, O. A.; Soltys, M. N.

    2014-09-01

    The role of hydrophobic interaction in the development of associative processes is demonstrated, based on the concentration dependences of the viscosity and pH of binary solutions of polymethacrylic acid as an anionic polyelectrolyte and sodium laureth sulfate as an anionic surfactant. It is found that the inflection point on the dependence of the difference between the pH values of binary solutions of polymethacrylic acid and sodium laureth sulfate on the polyelectrolyte concentration is a criterion for determining the predominant contribution from hydrophobic interaction, as is the inflection point on the dependence of pH of individual solutions of polymethacrylic acid on the polyelectrolyte concentration.

  2. Indium sulfide precipitation from hydrochloric acid solutions of calcium and sodium chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochetkova, N.V.; Bayandina, Yu.E.; Toptygina, G.M.; Shepot'ko, A.O.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of precipitation duration, acid concentration, indium complexing with chloride ions on the process of indium sulfide chemical precipitation in hydrochloric acid solutions, precipitate composition and dispersity are studied. It is established that indium sulfide solubility increases in solutions with acid concentration exceeding 0.40-0.45 mol/l. Calcium and indium chloride addition to diluted hydrochloric solutions greatly increases the solubility of indium sulfide. The effect of calcium chloride on In 2 S 3 solubility is higher than that of sodium chloride

  3. Studying titanium-molybdenum-zirconium alloys of increased corrosion resistance in acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomashov, N.D.; Kazarin, V.I.; Mikheev, V.S.; Goncharenko, B.A.; Sigalovskaya, T.M.; Kalyanova, M.P.

    1977-01-01

    New promising Ti-Mo-Nb-Zr system alloys, possessing good workability and a high corrosion resistance in non-oxidizing solutions of acids, have been developed. The alloys may be recommended as structural materials for equipment operating in severely agressive acid media, such as hydrochloric, sulphuric and phosphoric acids. The corrosion resistance of alloys of the above system in solutions of H 2 SO 4 , HCl and H 3 PO 4 acids may be maximized by increasing the overall alloying to 42% (keeping the ratio of the alloying components Mo/Nb/Zr=4/1/1 unchanged), while retaining sufficiently good plasticity and workability

  4. Dynamic flow method to study the CO2 loading capacity of amino acid salt solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Thomsen, Kaj

    Due to a number of advantages amino acid salt solutions have emerged as alternatives to the alkanolamine solvents for the chemical absorption of CO2 from flue gas. The use of amino acids in CO2 capture is a bio-mimetic process, as it is similar to CO2 binding by proteins in the blood......, such as hemoglobin. Amino acid salt solutions have the same amine functionality as alkanolamines, and are thus expected to behave similar towards CO2 in flue gas. Despite rising interest, few studies have been performed so far on amino acids as CO2 absorbents....

  5. Study of free acidity determinations in aqueous solution; Etude des dosages d'acidite libre en solution aqueuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kergreis, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-04-01

    The object of this work is the study of the principal methods which can be applied to the measurement of 'free' acidity. In the first part, we define the various types of acidity which can exist in aqueous solution; then, after having studied some hydrolysis reactions, we compare the value of the neutralisation pH of the hydrated cation and that of the precipitation of the hydroxide. In the second part we have started to study the determination of the acidity of an aqueous solution. After having rapidly considered the 'total' acidity determination, we deal with the problem of the 'free' acidity titration. We have considered in particular certain methods: extrapolation of the equivalent point, colorimetric titrations with or without a complexing agent, and finally the use of ion-exchange resins with mixed aqueous and solvent solutions. (author) [French] Le but de ce travail est l'etude des principales methodes de determination de l'acidite 'libre'. Dans une premiere partie nous avons defini les differentes sortes d'acidites pouvant exister en solution aqueuse, puis apres avoir etudie quelques reactions d'hydrolyse, nous avons compare la valeur de pH de neutralisation du cation hydrate et celle de precipitation de l'hydroxyde. Dans la seconde partie nous avons aborde l'etuce des dosages de l'acidite d'une solution aqueuse. Apres avoir envisage assez rapidement la determination de l'acidite 'totale', nous traitons du probleme du titrage de l'acidite 'libre'. Nous avons porte notre attention sur certaines methodes: extrapolation du point equivalent, titrimetrie colorimetrique avec ou sans complexant, et enfin utilisation des resines echangeuses d'ions en milieu aqueux et solvant mixte.

  6. CO2 Capture from Flue gas using Amino acid salt solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai

    to storage. Typical solvents for the process are based on aqueous solutions of alkanolamines, such as mono-ethanolamine (MEA), but their use implies economic disadvantages and environmental complications. Amino acid salt solutions have emerged as an alternative to the alkanolamines, partlybecause...... for measuring of CO2 solubility based on the semi-flow method. A validation study of CO2 solubility in aqueous solutions of MEA is presented. Chapter 5 focuses on the determination of the chemical compositions of the precipitations, which arise in the five amino acid salt solutions upon CO2 absorption...

  7. Mutagenicity of irradiated solutions of nuclei acid bases and nucleosides in Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmer, J.; Schubert, J.

    1981-01-01

    Solutions of nucleic acid bases, nucleosides and a nucleotide, saturated with either N 2 , N 2 O or O 2 , were irradiated and tested for mutagenicity towards Salmonella typhimurium, with and without pre-incubation. Irradiated solutions of the nuclei acid bases were all non-mutagenic. Irradiated solutions of the nucleosides showed mutagenicity in S. typhimurium TA100 (pre-incubation assay). Generally, the mutagenicity followed the order: N 2 O > N 2 > O 2 . The results show that the formation of mutagenic radiolytic products is initiated by attack of mainly solutions of the nucleotide thymidine-5'-monophosphate, no mutagenicity could be detected. (orig.)

  8. Reactivity of the cadmium ion in concentrated phosphoric acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gyves, J; Gonzales, J; Louis, C; Bessiere, J

    1989-07-01

    The solvation transfer coefficients which characterize the changes of ion reactivity with phosphoric acid concentration have been calculated for cadmium from the constants of the successive chloride complexes, and for silver and diethyldithiophosphate from potentiometric measurements. They evidence the strong desolvation of the cadmium species in concentrated phosphoric acid media, causing a remarkable increase of its reactivity. They allow the results of liquid-liquid extraction, precipitation and flotation reactions to be correctly interpreted and their changes to be foreseen when the reagents are modified.

  9. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which

  10. Thermal decomposition of dilute aqueous formic acid solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, A.B.; Sørensen, E.

    1992-01-01

    or a decarboxylation. In particular the second one is dependent on the reactor vessel used. It is shown to be catalyzed by a mixture of oxides of stainless steel components. The presence of CH3COOH or CH3CHO promotes the decomposition of HCOOH by way of both decarboxylation and oxidation. In any case formic acid...

  11. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.

    2016-01-01

    to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 ... occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process....

  12. Regioselective dimerization of ferulic acid in a micellar solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, E; Andreasen, Mette Findal; Christensen, L P

    2001-01-01

    Dehydrodimers of hydroxycinnamates play an important role in the cross-linking of plant cell walls. An aqueous solution of quaternary ammonium salts with a long aliphatic chain is known to spontaneously organize itself into micelles with the ionic part at the outer sphere. It is shown...

  13. Characterization of electrochemical and passive behaviour of Alloy 59 in acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Hong; Gao, Shujun; Dong, Chaofang; Li, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A considerably thinner n-type passive film is observed on the Alloy-59. • The passive film formed in air was thicker than that formed in acid solution. • Primary constituents of passive film in air and acid solution are (Cr, Ni)-oxides and (Cr, Ni) hydroxides, respectively. - Abstract: The electrochemical behaviour and passive film properties of the Alloy 59 in sulfuric acid solution was evaluated by the potentiodynamic electrochemical measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, Mott-Schottky approach, and ex situ surface analytical technique as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger Electronic Spectrometer (AES). The results confirmed that the Alloy 59 exhibits well passive behaviour. A considerably thinner n-type passive film is observed on this type alloy. Based on the evaluations of surface composition analysis, the primary constituents of passive film formed in the air and acid solution are different, with the (Cr, Ni)-oxides and (Cr, Ni) hydroxides, respectively

  14. Effect of temperature on the dilution enthalpies of α,ω-amino acids in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, C.M.; Cadena, J.C.; Lamprecht, I.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The dilution of 3-amino propanoic acid, 4-amino butanoic acid, 5-amino pentanoic acid, and 6-amino hexanoic acid in water is an exothermic process at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K. → The limiting experimental slopes of the enthalpies of dilution with respect to the molality change Δm, are negative suggesting that the solutes interact with water primarily through their alkyl groups. → The value of the pairwise coefficient is positive at the temperatures considered, and the magnitude increases linearly with the number of methylene groups. → The comparison between the pairwise interaction coefficients for α,ω-amino acids and α-amino acids shows that the change in the enthalpic interaction coefficient is related to the relative position of the polar groups. - Abstract: Dilution enthalpies of aqueous solutions of 3-amino propanoic acid, 4-amino butanoic acid, 5-amino pentanoic acid, and 6-amino hexanoic acid were determined at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K using an LKB flow microcalorimeter. The homotactic interaction coefficients were obtained according to the McMillan-Mayer theory from the experimental data. For all the systems studied, the dilution of α,ω-amino acids in water is an exothermic process; the pair coefficients have positive values which increases with chain length. The obtained values of the interaction coefficients are interpreted in terms of solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions and are used as indicative of hydrophobic behavior of the amino acid studied.

  15. Effect of citric acid on the acidification of artificial pepsin solution for metacercariae isolation from fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Ki; Pyo, Kyoung-Ho; Hwang, Young-Sang; Chun, Hyang Sook; Park, Ki Hwan; Ko, Seong-Hee; Chai, Jong-Yil; Shin, Eun-Hee

    2013-11-15

    Artificial digestive solution based on pepsin is essential for collecting metacercariae from fish. To promote the enzymatic reactivity of pepsin, the pH of the solution has to be adjusted to pH 1.0-2.0. Hydrochloride (HCl) is usually used for this purpose, but the use of HCl raises safety concerns. The aim of this work was to address the usefulness of citric acid as an alternative for HCl for the acidification of pepsin solution, and to examine its potential to damage metacercariae during in vitro digestion as compared with HCl. Changes in pH after adding 1-9% of citric acid (m/v) to pepsin solution were compared to a 1% HCl (v/v) addition. Digestion of fish muscle was evaluated by measuring released protein concentrations by spectrophotometry. In addition, survival rates of metacercariae in pepsin solution were determined at different citric acid concentrations and were compared that of with 1% HCl. The present study shows that addition of citric acid reduced the pH of pepsin solutions to the required level. Addition of more than 5% of citric acid resulted in the effective digestion of fish muscle over 3h in vitro, and 5% citric acid was less lethal to metacercariae than 1% HCl in pepsin solution. Pepsin solution containing 5% citric acid had digestive capacity superior to pepsin solution containing 1% HCl after 3h incubation with released protein concentrations of 12.0 ng/ml for 5% citric acid and 9.6 ng/ml for 1% HCl. Accordingly, the present study suggests that the addition of 5% citric acid to pepsin solution is a good alternative to 1% HCl in infection studies because citric acid is a stable at room temperature and has a good safety profile. In addition, we suggest that the use of citric acid enables the preparation of commercial digestive solutions for the detection of microorganisms in fish and other vertebrate muscle tissue. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Amino acid salt solutions as solvents in CO2 capture from flue gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai; Thomsen, Kaj; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    New solvents based on the salts of amino acids have emerged as an alternative to the alkanolamine solutions, for the chemical absorption of CO2 from flue gas. But only few studies on amino acids as CO2 capturing agents have been performed so far. One of the interesting features of amino acid salt...... solutions is their ability to form solid precipitates upon the absorption of CO2. The occurrence of crystallization offers the possibility of increasing the CO2 loading capacity of the solvent. However, precipitation can also have negative effect on the CO2 capture process. The chemical nature of the solid...... of glycine, taurine, and lysine, while in the case of proline, and glutamic acid, the precipitate was found to be bicarbonate. These results give an important contribution to further understanding the potential of amino acid salt solutions in CO2 capture from flue gas....

  17. Process for the removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheitlin, F.M.

    1984-01-01

    Radium is removed from an inorganic-acid solution contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of 226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings, and thus contain thorium and uranium. The contaminated fly ash may be incorporated in a suitable matrix and stored, and the residual solutions processed to separate uranium and thorium. (author)

  18. Process for recovering uranium using an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid and alkaline stripping solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worthington, R.E.; Magdics, A.

    1987-01-01

    A process is described for stripping uranium for a pregnant organic extractant comprising an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in a substantially water-immiscible organic diluent. The organic extractant contains tetravalent uranium and an alcohol or phenol modifier in a quantity sufficient to retain substantially all the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid in solution in the diluent during stripping. The process comprises adding an oxidizing agent to the organic extractant and thereby oxidizing the tetravalent uranium to the +6 state in the organic extractant, and contacting the organic extractant containing the uranium in the +6 state with a stripping solution comprising an aqueous solution of an alkali metal or ammonium carbonate or hydroxide thereby stripping uranium from the organic extractant into the stripping solution. The resulting barren organic extractant containing substantially all of the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in the diluent is separated from the stripping solution containing the stripped uranium, the barren extractant being suitable for recycle

  19. A bibliographical review on the radiolysis of uranyl nitrate solutions in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siri, Sandra; Mondino, Angel V.

    2004-01-01

    A bibliographical study on the effects of ionizing radiation on uranyl nitrate solutions in nitric acid medium was performed, and the state of knowledge on this subject is presented. The main experimental and theoretical results on water, nitric acid and uranium solutions radiolysis are reviewed and critically evaluated. This paper provides a collection of references as an aid to the development of practical applications, and to stimulate new research on fundamental processes in these systems. (author) [es

  20. An investigation into the stability and sterility of citric acid solutions used for cough reflex testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, James R; Wu, Zimei; Lau, Hugo; Suen, Joanna; Wang, Lucy; Pottinger, Sarah; Lee, Elaine; Alazawi, Nawar; Kallesen, Molly; Gargiulo, Derryn A; Swift, Simon; Svirskis, Darren

    2014-10-01

    Citric acid is used in cough reflex testing in clinical and research settings to assess reflexive cough in patients at risk of swallowing disorders. To address a lack of knowledge in this area, this study investigated the stability and sterility of citric acid solutions. Triplicate solutions of citric acid (0.8 M) in isotonic saline were stored at 4 ± 2 °C for up to 28 days and analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbiological sterility of freshly prepared samples and bulk samples previously used for 2 weeks within the hospital was determined using a pour plate technique. Microbial survival in citric acid was determined by inoculating Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, or Candida albicans into citric acid solution and monitoring the number of colony-forming units/mL over 40 min. Citric acid solutions remained stable at 4 °C for 28 days (98.4 ± 1.8 % remained). The freshly prepared and clinical samples tested were sterile. However, viability studies revealed that citric acid solution allows for the survival of C. albicans but not for S. aureus or E. coli. The microbial survival study showed that citric acid kills S. aureus and E. coli but has no marked effect on C. albicans after 40 min. Citric acid samples at 0.8 M remained stable over the 4-week testing period, with viable microbial cells absent from samples tested. However, C. albicans has the ability to survive in citric acid solution if inadvertently introduced in practice. For this reason, in clinical and research practice it is suggested to use single-use aliquots prepared aseptically which can be stored for up to 28 days at 4 °C.

  1. The disproportionation of Pu4+ in nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, L.M.; Bell, J.T.; Friedman, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Pu 4+ disproportionation equilibrium in nitric acid has been examined at ≤25deg C to extend our understanding and predictive ability with regard to species distribution under these conditions. Vis/UV absorption spectrophotometry has been used in a conventional manner to determine the concentrations of the various plutonium species. Values for the overall equilibrium quotient at 5, 15, and 25deg C were determined to be 0.098, 3.46, and 58.8, respectively, at zero ionic strength. From these values, the enthalpy of the reaction was found to be +52.7 kcal (220 kJ)/mol. The excellent reproducibility of the equilibrium quotients, even while parameters such as acid, nitrate ion and plutonium concentrations were changed, lend confidence to future predictive calculations regarding this reaction. (orig.)

  2. Savannah River Site Tank Cleaning: Corrosion Rate For One Versus Eight Percent Oxalic Acid Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, the use of oxalic acid for chemically cleaning the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste tanks focused on using concentrated 4 and 8-wt% solutions. Recent testing and research on applicable dissolution mechanisms have concluded that under appropriate conditions, dilute solutions of oxalic acid (i.e., 1-wt%) may be more effective. Based on the need to maximize cleaning effectiveness, coupled with the need to minimize downstream impacts, SRS is now developing plans for using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution. A technology gap associated with using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution was a dearth of suitable corrosion data. Assuming oxalic acid's passivation of carbon steel was proportional to the free oxalate concentration, the general corrosion rate (CR) from a 1-wt% solution may not be bound by those from 8-wt%. Therefore, after developing the test strategy and plan, the corrosion testing was performed. Starting with the envisioned process specific baseline solvent, a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution, with sludge (limited to Purex type sludge-simulant for this initial effort) at 75 C and agitated, the corrosion rate (CR) was determined from the measured weight loss of the exposed coupon. Environmental variations tested were: (a) Inclusion of sludge in the test vessel or assuming a pure oxalic acid solution; (b) acid solution temperature maintained at 75 or 45 C; and (c) agitation of the acid solution or stagnant. Application of select electrochemical testing (EC) explored the impact of each variation on the passivation mechanisms and confirmed the CR. The 1-wt% results were then compared to those from the 8-wt%. The immersion coupons showed that the maximum time averaged CR for a 1-wt% solution with sludge was less than 25-mils/yr for all conditions. For an agitated 8-wt% solution with sludge, the maximum time averaged CR was about 30-mils/yr at 50 C, and 86-mils/yr at 75 C. Both the 1-wt% and the 8-wt% testing demonstrated that if the sludge was removed from

  3. [Effect of amino acid solutions on the blood ammonia level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjo, K; Harihara, Y; Kawasaki, S; Umekita, N; Idezuki, Y

    1985-09-01

    We have carried out several basic experiments on artificial liver support and found that the plasma free amino acid balance was lost after treatment according to this procedure. Application of fluid therapy--Using conventional amino acid preparations available on the market--Is not adequate during and after the treatment with artificial liver. Fluid therapy using mainly special amino acid preparations should have been established; preparations, named Todai Hospital fluid (THF), are intended to correct the deranged aminogram, supply nutrition and promote the improvement in symptoms. Furthermore, experimental animals with acute hepatic insufficiency of diverse severity were prepared and basic experiments were performed which these animals to see how the efficacy of THF developed. In the basic experiments, psychoneurotic symptoms and the electroencephalogram were improved with the lowering of the blood ammonia level. Clinically, THF was not only used as a therapeutic agent after treatment by artificial liver support in patients with fulminant hepatitis, but is also served as a further indication in hepatic encephalopathy accompanying chronic liver diseases in late stages. Improvement in encephalopathy was observed immediately after the administration of THF and persisted while the aminogram pattern returned to the premedication representation. There was more improvement in patients in whom ammonemia was complicated, and the blood ammonia level was reduced markedly.

  4. Plutonium determination in solution with excess hydrofluoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krtil, J.; Kuvik, V.; Spevackova, V.

    1975-01-01

    The determination is described of plutonium in solutions in the presence of fluoride ions resulting from the hydrolysis of PuF 6 . The method is based on reduction of Pu(VI) by excess of Fe(II) and on re-titration of Fe(II) with ceric salt. The effect of fluoride ions on plutonium determination was studied. It was found that a 3 mole excess of HF with respect to Pu decreased the results of Pu determination. The interference of fluoride ions was eliminated by a two-fold evaporation of the solution to be titrated with HNO 3 to dryness or by complex formation with boric arid. The amount of 20.50 mg Pu in the presence of a 10 mole excess of fluoride ions (17 mg HF) was determined with an error of +- 0.09 mg ). (author)

  5. Some remarks on hydrogen release from nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specht, S.

    1980-01-01

    After a survey of the literature on generalisable statements on β, γ-radiolysis of water and salty solutions, an attempt is made to summarize and evaluate existing measurements in connection with the formation of H 2 in nitrous fission product solutions (or corresponding simulates). It is seen that laboratory experiments with such fission products show rather uniform and plausible G(H 2 )-values in the region -3 . It is also seen, however, that G(H 2 )-values and steady H 2 -release rates are not suitable to describe technical systems (HAW stores). Either H 2 is carried away by purge air or it is, in a non-operating system, consumed again in situ, obviously by back reactions. (orig.) [de

  6. Treatment of infectious skin defects or ulcers with electrolyzed strong acid aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, S; Ohmori, K; Harii, K

    1997-01-01

    A chronic ulcer with an infection such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is hard to heal. Plastic and reconstructive surgeons often encounter such chronic ulcers that are resistant to surgical or various conservative treatments. We applied conservative treatment using an electrolyzed strong acid aqueous solution and obtained satisfactory results. The lesion was washed with the solution or soaked in a bowl of the solution for approximately 20 min twice a day. Fresh electrolyzed strong acid aqueous solution is unstable and should be stored in a cool, dark site in a sealed bottle. It should be used within a week after it has been produced. Here we report on 15 cases of infectious ulcers that were treated by electrolyzed strong acid aqueous solution. Of these cases, 7 patients were healed, 3 were granulated, and in 5, infection subsided. In most cases the lesion became less reddish and less edematous. Discharge or foul odor from the lesion was decreased. Electrolyzed strong acid aqueous solution was especially effective for treating a chronic refractory ulcer combined with diabetes melitus or peripheral circulatory insufficiency. This clinically applied therapy of electrolyzed strong acid aqueous solution was found to be effective so that this new therapeutic technique for ulcer treatment can now be conveniently utilized.

  7. Mutual diffusion coefficients of L-glutamic acid and monosodium L-glutamate in aqueous solutions at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Ana C.F.; Rodrigo, M.M.; Barros, Marisa C.F.; Verissimo, Luis M.P.; Romero, Carmen; Valente, Artur J.M.; Esteso, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Interdiffusion coefficients of L-glutamic acid and sodium L-glutamate were measured. • The L-glutamic acid behaves as a monoprotic weak acid. • The sodium L-glutamate shows a symmetrical 1:1 non-associated behaviour. • Limiting diffusion coefficients and ionic conductivities were estimated. • Diffusion coefficients were discussed on the basis of the Onsager–Fuoss equations. - Abstract: Mutual diffusion coefficient values for binary aqueous solutions of both L-glutamic acid (H 2 Glu) and sodium L-glutamate (NaHGlu) were measured with the Taylor dispersion technique, at T = 298.15 K, and concentrations ranging from (0.001 to 0.100) mol · dm −3 . The results were discussed on the basis of the Onsager–Fuoss and the Nernst theoretical equations, by considering the H 2 Glu as a weak acid (monoprotic acid, with K 2 = 5.62 · 10 −5 ). The smaller values found for the acid with respect to those of the salt, confirm this association hypothesis. From the diffusion coefficient values at infinitesimal concentration, limiting ionic conductivities as well as the hydrodynamic radius of the hydrogen glutamate ion (HGlu − ) were derived and analyzed in terms of the chain methylene groups. The effect of different phenomena, such as association or complexation, were also taken into consideration and discussed. Values for the dissociation degree for H 2 Glu were also estimated

  8. Reactive extraction and recovery of levulinic acid, formic acid and furfural from aqueous solutions containing sulphuric acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Thomas; Blahusiak, Marek; Babic, Katarina; Schuur, Boelo

    2017-01-01

    Levulinic acid (LA) can be produced from lignocellulosic materials via hydroxylation followed by an acid-catalyzed conversion of hexoses. Inorganic homogeneous catalysts are mostly used, in particular sulphuric acid, yielding a mixture of LA with sulphuric acid, formic acid (FA) and furfural.

  9. Vapor-liquid equilibria for nitric acid-water and plutonium nitrate-nitric acid-water solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maimoni, A.

    1980-01-01

    The liquid-vapor equilibrium data for nitric acid and nitric acid-plutnonium nitrate-water solutions were examined to develop correlations covering the range of conditions encountered in nuclear fuel reprocessing. The scanty available data for plutonium nitrate solutions are of poor quality but allow an order of magnitude estimate to be made. A formal thermodynamic analysis was attempted initially but was not successful due to the poor quality of the data as well as the complex chemical equilibria involved in the nitric acid and in the plutonium nitrate solutions. Thus, while there was no difficulty in correlating activity coefficients for nitric acid solutions over relatively narrow temperature ranges, attempts to extend the correlations over the range 25 0 C to the boiling point were not successful. The available data were then analyzed using empirical correlations from which normal boiling points and relative volatilities can be obtained over the concentration ranges 0 to 700 g/l Pu, 0 to 13 M nitric acid. Activity coefficients are required, however, if estimates of individual component vapor pressures are needed. The required ternary activity coefficients can be approximated from the correlations

  10. Waste acid/metal solution reduction and recovery by vacuum distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.O.; Wilcox, W.A.; Johnson, N.T.; Bowdish, F.W.

    1995-01-01

    Processes involving distillation under reduced pressure were developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory several years ago to recover spent acid solutions generated during the manufacture of nuclear fuel for the N-Reactor at the Hanford site. Following construction and testing of a pilot-plant, the technology was licensed to Viatec Recovery Systems, Inc. for commercialization. The technology developed included specialized distillation and rectification of volatile acids, removal of water and/or volatile acid from sulfuric acid, and precipitation of salts. A key feature of the Waste Acid Detoxification and Reclamation (WADR) technology is the development and use of advanced thermoplastic and fluoropolymer materials of construction in all critical process equipment. The technology was then expanded to include crystallization to recover metal salts for possible reuse. Economic and environmental advantages of the procedures include recovery of acids for reuse, simplification or elimination of the disposal of waste solutions, and possible recovery of metals. Industries expected to benefit from such applications include galvanizing, electroplating, sand leaching and any where metals are cleaned in acid solutions. Currently a modular system has been assembled for recovery of several different spent acid solutions

  11. Study of the mechanism and kinetics of the reduction of uranyl ions in phosphoric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Kacemi, K.; Tyburce, B.; Belcadi, S.

    1982-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of uranyl ions in 0.1 to 9 M phosphoric acid has been investigated by polarography, cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and potentiostatic coulometry. In concentrated phosphoric acid solutions (H 3 PO 4 3 PO 4 concentrations. So, when the concentration of U(VI) increases and/or that of H 3 PO 4 reduces, the system becomes reversible. (author)

  12. Acetanilide interaction with hydriodic acid in aqueous solutions at 20 and 40 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkasov, R.Sh.; Nurakhmetov, N.I.

    1990-01-01

    Isothermal method was used to study acetanilide solubility in aqueous solutions of hydriodic acid at 20 and 40 deg C. formation of two new anhydrous compounds of 2:1 and 1:1 compositions (anilide: acid molar ratio) was established. Temperature and concentration boundaries of solid phase formation were established for these compounds. Their IR spectroscopic investigation was conducted

  13. Kinetics of reactions of aquacobalamin with aspartic and glutamic acids and their amides in water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, T. T. T.; Sal'nikov, D. S.; Dereven'kov, I. A.; Makarov, S. V.

    2017-04-01

    The kinetics of aquacobalamin reaction with aspartic and glutamic acids, and with their amides in water solutions, is studied via spectrophotometry. The kinetic and activation parameters of the process are determined. It is shown that the reaction product is cobalamin-amino acid complex. The data are compared to results on the reaction between aquacobalamin and primary amines.

  14. Study of ion exchange behaviour of some elements at phosphonic-acid cationite in diluted solutions of nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razbash, A.A.; Sevast'yanov, Yu.G.

    1985-01-01

    Ce(3, 4), Eu(3), Gd(3), Sm(3), Sc(3) distribution coefficients are determined in the macroporic phosphonic acid cationite KRF-20T-60 in nitric acid solutions in 0.1-2.0 M concentration interval using statistical method. A simple method of cerium-139 radionuclide extraction from the industrial lanthanum target is developed. The product yield made up more than 99%, specific activity - 2.37x10 9 Bq/mg, radiochemical purity - no less than 99.9%

  15. NMR 11B, 19F of hydroxofluoroborate solutions in acetic and peracetic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchetinina, G.P.; Brovkina, O.V.; Chernyshov, B.N.

    1985-01-01

    Hydroxofluoroborate solutions in acetic and peracetic acids are studied by the 11 B, 19 F NMR method. The reactions of substitutions of acetate- and peracetate ions for nucleophilic hydroxogroups with the formation of the respective complexes are shown to occur in these solutions, with monodentate coordination of BF 3 CH 3 COO - - and BF 3 CH 3 COOO - - groups being accomplished in this case

  16. The immiscible aqueous solutions of alkyl phosphates. Study for the purpose of uranium extraction from phosphoric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauborgne, Bernard

    1979-01-01

    Systems of immiscible aqueous solutions composed by a phase rich in mineral salt and by another phase almost totally containing an organic salt, have been studied for years, with quaternary ammonium salts with an organic cation. The objective of this research is to study systems symmetric to the previous ones, i.e. with organic anions such as alkyl phosphates, and then to try to understand mechanisms of extraction of metals in these environments. Based on properties of immiscible aqueous solutions, an original three-phase process of liquid-liquid extraction has been developed, and is used to separate uranium in phosphoric acids with better performance than the existing industrial processes [fr

  17. Boron removal from aqueous solutions by activated carbon impregnated with salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celik, Z. Ceylan; Can, B.Z.; Kocakerim, M. Muhtar

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the removal of boric acid from aqueous solution by activated carbon impregnated with salicylic acid was studied in batch system. pH, adsorbent amount, initial boron concentration, temperature, shaking rate and salicylic acid film thickness were chosen as parameters. Boron removal efficiencies increased with increasing adsorbent amount, temperature and pH, decreasing initial boron concentration. As thickness of salicylic acid film on activated carbon becomes thin up to 0.088 nm, the efficiency increased, and then, the efficiency decreased with becoming thinner than 0.088 nm of salicylic acid film. Shaking rate was no effect on removal efficiency. In result, it was determined that the use of salicylic acid as an impregnant for activated carbon led to the increase of the amount of boron adsorbed. A lactone ring, being the most appropriate conformation, forms between boric acid and -COOH and -OH groups of salicylic acid

  18. Boron removal from aqueous solutions by activated carbon impregnated with salicylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celik, Z. Ceylan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Atatuerk University, Faculty of Engineering, Erzurum (Turkey)], E-mail: zcelik@atauni.edu.tr; Can, B.Z. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Atatuerk University, Faculty of Engineering, Erzurum (Turkey); Kocakerim, M. Muhtar [Department of Chemical Engineering, Atatuerk University, Faculty of Engineering, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2008-03-21

    In this study, the removal of boric acid from aqueous solution by activated carbon impregnated with salicylic acid was studied in batch system. pH, adsorbent amount, initial boron concentration, temperature, shaking rate and salicylic acid film thickness were chosen as parameters. Boron removal efficiencies increased with increasing adsorbent amount, temperature and pH, decreasing initial boron concentration. As thickness of salicylic acid film on activated carbon becomes thin up to 0.088 nm, the efficiency increased, and then, the efficiency decreased with becoming thinner than 0.088 nm of salicylic acid film. Shaking rate was no effect on removal efficiency. In result, it was determined that the use of salicylic acid as an impregnant for activated carbon led to the increase of the amount of boron adsorbed. A lactone ring, being the most appropriate conformation, forms between boric acid and -COOH and -OH groups of salicylic acid.

  19. A systematic investigation and insight into the formation mechanism of bilayers of fatty acid/soap mixtures in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenlong; Song, Aixin; Dong, Shuli; Chen, Jingfei; Hao, Jingcheng

    2013-10-08

    Vesicles are the most common form of bilayer structures in fatty acid/soap mixtures in aqueous solutions; however, a peculiar bilayer structure called a "planar sheet" was found for the first time in the mixtures. In the past few decades, considerable research has focused on the formation theory of bilayers in fatty acid/soap mixtures. The hydrogen bond theory has been widely accepted by scientists to explain the formation of bilayers. However, except for the hydrogen bond, no other driving forces were proposed systematically. In this work, three kinds of weak interactions were investigated in detail, which could perfectly demonstrate the formation mechanism of bilayer structures in the fatty acid/soap mixtures in aqueous solutions. (i) The influence of hydrophobic interaction was detected by changing the chain length of fatty acid (C(n)H(2n+1)COOH), in which n = 10 to 18, the phase behavior was investigated, and the phase region was presented. With the help of cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) observations, deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ((2)H NMR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, the vesicles and planar sheets were determined. The chain length of C(n)H(2n+1)COOH has an important effect on the physical state of the hydrophobic chain, resulting in an obvious difference in the viscoelasticity of the solution samples. (ii) The existence of hydrogen bonds between fatty acids and their soaps in aqueous solutions was demonstrated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and molecule dynamical simulation. From the pH measurements, the pH ranges of the bilayer formation were at the pKa values of fatty acids, respectively. (iii) Counterions can be embedded in the stern layer of the bilayers and screen the electrostatic repulsion between the COO(-) anionic headgroups. FT-IR characterization demonstrated a bidentate bridging coordination mode between counterions and carboxylates. The conductivity measurements provided the degree

  20. Study on the utilization of a sodium-sulfuric acid solution for the uranium minerals' leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echenique, Patricia; Fruchtenicht, Fernando; Gil, Daniel; Vigo, Daniel; Bouza, Angel; Vert, Gabriela; Becquart, Elena

    1988-01-01

    Argentine uranium minerals have been leached at bench scale with a different agent trying to reduce sulfuric acid consumption. The leaching agent was a sodium sulfate-sulfuric acid solution and the ore was from Sierra Pintada (San Rafael - Mendoza). The work was performed in stirred vessel at atmospheric pressure. The influence of different variables, pH, temperature, oxidant agent, sodium sulfate concentration and time, in the sulfuric acid consumption and the uranium yield was studied. (Author) [es

  1. Effect of acetic acid on wet patterning of copper/molybdenum thin films in phosphoric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Bo.-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Park, In-Sun; Seo, Jong Hyun; Choe, HeeHwan; Jeon, Jae-Hong; Hong, Munpyo; Lee, Yong Uk; Winkler, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    Copper metallization is a key issue for high performance thin film transistor (TFT) technology. A phosphoric acid based copper etchant is a potentially attractive alternative to the conventional hydrogen peroxide based etchant due to its longer-life expectancy time and higher stability in use. In this paper, it is shown that amount of the acetic acid in the phosphoric based copper etchant plays an important role in controlling the galvanic reaction between the copper and the molybdenum. As the concentration of acetic acid in the phosphoric mixture solution increased from 0 M to 0.4 M, the measured galvanic current density dropped from 32 mA/cm 2 to 26 mA/cm 2 , indicating that the acetic acid induces the lower galvanic reaction between the copper and the molybdenum in the solution. From the XPS analysis, with the addition of the acetic acid, the thickness of the protective MoO 2 passive film covering the molybdenum surface grew and the dissolution rate of the molybdenum thin film decreased. However, the dissolution rate of the copper thin film increased as the concentration of acetic acid in the mixture solution increased.

  2. Effect of acetic acid on wet patterning of copper/molybdenum thin films in phosphoric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Bo.-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Park, In-Sun [Department of Materials Engineering, Korea Aerospace University, Hwajeon, Goyang, Gyonggi-do 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jong Hyun, E-mail: jhseo@kau.ac.kr [Department of Materials Engineering, Korea Aerospace University, Hwajeon, Goyang, Gyonggi-do 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, HeeHwan; Jeon, Jae-Hong [School of Electronics, Telecommunications and Computer Engineering, Korea Aerospace University, Hwajeon, Goyang, Gyonggi-do 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Munpyo [Display and Semiconductor Physics, Korea University (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong Uk [PETEC (The Printable Electronics Technology Centre) (United Kingdom); Winkler, Joerg [PLANSEE Metal GmbH, Metallwerk-Plansee-Str. 71A-6600, Reutte (Austria)

    2011-08-01

    Copper metallization is a key issue for high performance thin film transistor (TFT) technology. A phosphoric acid based copper etchant is a potentially attractive alternative to the conventional hydrogen peroxide based etchant due to its longer-life expectancy time and higher stability in use. In this paper, it is shown that amount of the acetic acid in the phosphoric based copper etchant plays an important role in controlling the galvanic reaction between the copper and the molybdenum. As the concentration of acetic acid in the phosphoric mixture solution increased from 0 M to 0.4 M, the measured galvanic current density dropped from 32 mA/cm{sup 2} to 26 mA/cm{sup 2}, indicating that the acetic acid induces the lower galvanic reaction between the copper and the molybdenum in the solution. From the XPS analysis, with the addition of the acetic acid, the thickness of the protective MoO{sub 2} passive film covering the molybdenum surface grew and the dissolution rate of the molybdenum thin film decreased. However, the dissolution rate of the copper thin film increased as the concentration of acetic acid in the mixture solution increased.

  3. Copper-Sulfate Pentahydrate as a Product of the Waste Sulfuric Acid Solution Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Marković, Radmila; Stevanović, Jasmina; Avramović, Ljiljana; Nedeljković, Dragutin; Jugović, Branimir; Stajić Trošić, Jasna; Gvozdenović, Milica M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is synthesis of copper-sulfate pentahydrate from the waste sulfuric acid solution-mother liquor generated during the regeneration process of copper bleed solution. Copper is removed from the mother liquor solution in the process of the electrolytic treatment using the insoluble lead anodes alloyed with 6 mass pct of antimony on the industrial-scale equipment. As the result of the decopperization process, copper is removed in the form of the cathode sludge and is precipit...

  4. TBP determination in nitric acid solutions from solvent extraction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuada, T.A.; Carvalho, E.I. de; Araujo, I. da C.; Cohen, V.H.

    1988-07-01

    Heavy organic phases have been observed on some occasions during TBP extraction process. These products, described as red oils, were considered as the main cause for process failures, specially in evaporators and concentrators. In view of safety aspects it is necessary to control organic concentration in product and waste solutions. The proposed method involves the organic removal by chloroform as a first step, followed by purification onto a silica gel column. The results are given from analysing TBP and its degradation product (DBP) by gas chromatography. (author) [pt

  5. Weak currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite Lopes, J.

    1976-01-01

    A survey of the fundamental ideas on weak currents such as CVC and PCAC and a presentation of the Cabibbo current and the neutral weak currents according to the Salam-Weinberg model and the Glashow-Iliopoulos-Miami model are given [fr

  6. Extraction of plutonium and uranium from oxalate bearing solutions using phosphonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godbole, A.G.; Mapara, P.M.; Swarup, Rajendra

    1995-01-01

    A feasibility study on the solvent extraction of plutonium and uranium from solutions containing oxalic and nitric acids using a phosphonic acid extractant (PC88A) was made to explore the possibility of recovering Pu from these solutions. Batch experiments on the extraction of Pu(IV) and U(VI) under different parameters were carried out using PC88A in dodecane. The results indicated that Pu could be extracted quantitatively by PC88A from these solutions. A good separation of Pu from U could be achieved at higher temperatures. (author). 6 refs., 3 tabs

  7. Coagulation of some humic acid solutions by Moringa oleifera lam seeds: effect on chlorine requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Bawa

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out to study humic acid solutions and surface waters coagulation by Moringa oleifera Lam seeds aqueous extract. High amounts of such extract (up to 10 g/L were required to clarify humic acid solutions whereas 0.5 g/L were used to remove 90% of initial turbidity of a surface water. The treatment of water with low turbidity (Moringa oleifera Lam seeds extract released a high amount of organic compounds in treated solutions leading to a high chlorine requirement.

  8. Proton magnetic resonance studies in solutions of o- and p-hydroxy benzoic acids in dioxan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arulmozhi, V.; Srinivasa Rao, A.; Balasubramanian, V.

    1990-01-01

    High resolution proton(NMR) studies were carried out in solutions of o- and p-hydroxy benzoic acids(OHBA and PHBA) in dioxan (D) for several solute concentrations in the range of 0.01 to 0.10 mole fraction (mf). The spectra corresponding to OH and COOH protons could be distinguished in solutions of OHBA in D whereas solution of PHBA in D show only peak in the range of chemical shifts attributable to OH and COOH protons. In the solution of OHBA in dioxan the chemical shift of the proton of the hydroxyl group increases with increase of solute concentration and attains a maximum at a solute concentration of 0.04 mf and then decreases with further increase of solute concentration. For the carboxyl group, the chemical shift increase with increase of solute concentration and attians a maximum at 0.08 mf solute concentration. In solutions of PHBA in D the chemical shift of the single line observed increases with increase of solute concentration and attains a maximum at a solute concentration of 0.05 mf. The data are interpreted as due to formation of hydrogen bonds between the molecule of OHBA and PHBA and dioxan. The proton magnetic relaxation studies in the above solutions also confirm the above findings. (author). 6 refs., 5 figs

  9. Kinetics of neptunium (5) disproprotionation in nitric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koltunov, V S; Tikhonov, M F

    1975-01-01

    The kinetics of Np(5) disproportionation in HNO/sub 3/+NaNO/sub 3/ solutions at the ionic strength ..mu..=4 is studied by spectrophotometric method in the region of (HNO/sub 3/) = 2.1-4 M at 61-96 deg C. To shift an equilibrium of reaction and to exclude the reverse reaction of Np(6) and Np(4), 0.02 M of hydrazine was added to the solution which rapidly reduced Np(6) to Np(5). Under these conditions no further reduction of Np(5) into Np(4) occurs directly with hydrazine. The disproportionation rate of NpO/sub 2//sup +/ ions obeys the equation: -d(Np(5))dt = 2k(Np(5))/sup 2/H/sup +2/, where k = 0.113 + 0.005M/sup -3/min/sup -1/ at 90 deg C and ..mu.. = 4. Temperature dependence of k enabled to compute the energy (E=16.4 kcal/mole), enthalpy (..delta..Hsup(*) = 15.8 kcal/mole) free energy (..delta..Fsup(*) = 24.0 kcal/mole) and entropy (..delta..S=-27 eu) of the reaction activation. The reaction mechanism includes a slow step of charge transfer between two protonated NpO/sub 2/H/sup 2 +/ ions. The data obtaned are compared to the results of Np(5) diproportionation in HClO/sub 4/ medium.

  10. Microporous uranyl chromates successively formed by evaporation from acidic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siidra, Oleg I.; Nazarchuk, Evgeny V.; Bocharov, Sergey N.; Kayukov, Roman A. [St. Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Crystallography; Depmeier, Wulf [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geowissenschaften

    2018-04-01

    The first microporous framework structures containing uranium and chromium have been synthesized and characterized. Rb{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}](H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (1) was crystallized from uranyl chromate solution by evaporation. Further evaporation led to increased viscosity of the solution and overgrowing of Rb{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O)](H{sub 2}O) (2) on the crystals of 1. With respect to 1, the framework of 2 is partially dehydrated. Both frameworks differ compositionally by only one water molecule, but this seemingly small difference affects significantly the pore size and overall structural topology of the frameworks, which present very different flexibility of the U-O-Cr links. These are rigid in the pillared framework of 1, in contrast to 2 where the U-O-Cr angles range from 126.3 to 168.2 , reflecting the substantial flexibility of Cr-O-U connections which make them comparable to the corresponding Mo-O-U links in uranyl molybdates.

  11. The amino acid's backup bone - storage solutions for proteomics facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckel, Hagen; Stephan, Christian; Bunse, Christian; Krafzik, Michael; Reher, Christopher; Kohl, Michael; Meyer, Helmut Erich; Eisenacher, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics methods, especially high-throughput mass spectrometry analysis have been continually developed and improved over the years. The analysis of complex biological samples produces large volumes of raw data. Data storage and recovery management pose substantial challenges to biomedical or proteomic facilities regarding backup and archiving concepts as well as hardware requirements. In this article we describe differences between the terms backup and archive with regard to manual and automatic approaches. We also introduce different storage concepts and technologies from transportable media to professional solutions such as redundant array of independent disks (RAID) systems, network attached storages (NAS) and storage area network (SAN). Moreover, we present a software solution, which we developed for the purpose of long-term preservation of large mass spectrometry raw data files on an object storage device (OSD) archiving system. Finally, advantages, disadvantages, and experiences from routine operations of the presented concepts and technologies are evaluated and discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics in the Post-Identification Era. Guest Editors: Martin Eisenacher and Christian Stephan. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Solute-enhanced production of gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from aqueous solutions of levulinic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumesic, James A.; Wettstein, Stephanie G.; Alonso, David Martin; Gurbuz, Elif Ispir

    2016-06-28

    A method to produce levulinic acid (LA) and gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from biomass-derived cellulose or lignocellulose by selective extraction of LA using GVL and optionally converting the LA so isolated into GVL, with no purifications steps required to yield the GVL.

  13. Solute-enhanced production of gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from aqueous solutions of levulinic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumesic, James A; Wettstein, Stephanie G; Alonso, David Martin; Gurbuz, Elif Ispir

    2015-02-24

    A method to produce levulinic acid (LA) and gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from biomass-derived cellulose or lignocellulose by selective extraction of LA using GVL and optionally converting the LA so isolated into GVL, with no purifications steps required to yield the GVL.

  14. Comparative study of buffered 50% glycolic acid (pH 3.0) + 0.5% salicylic acid solution vs Jessner's solution in patients with acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Jae, Jeong; Dong Ju, Hyun; Dong Hyun, Kim; Yoon, Moon Soo; Lee, Hee Jung

    2017-11-21

    Superficial chemical peels are frequently used in acne vulgaris treatment. Although glycolic acid (GA) has been widely used in clinical practice, its pH ranges from 0.08-2.75 and thus should be neutralized after application to avoid burns. To evaluate treatment efficacy and safety of chemical peeling using buffered 50% GA (pH 3.0) + 0.5% salicylic acid (SA) solution that does not need to be neutralized in the treatment of acne vulgaris compared to the conventional peeling using Jessner's solution. We performed a prospective, randomized, evaluator-blind, split-face clinical trial. Twenty patients were randomized by assigning one side of each patient's face to receive a 50% GA (pH 3.0) + 0.5% SA peel (GA side) and the other side to receive the Jessner's solution (Jessner's solution side). All patients underwent 2 sessions of treatment spaced 2 weeks apart. Lesion count, acne severity, subjective efficacy assessment, and side effects were evaluated. The total lesion count was significantly reduced for the GA and Jessner's solution sides (P  .05). The GA side had fewer side effects than the Jessner's solution side. The results of this study suggest that chemical peeling using the 50% GA (pH 3.0) + 0.5% SA solution can be as effective and convenient as the conventional peeling using Jessner's solution in the treatment of acne vulgaris and may show fewer adverse events than the conventional peeling. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Control and monitoring of the localized corrosion of zirconium in acidic chloride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahey, J.; Holmes, D.; Yau, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    Zirconium in acidic chloride solutions which are contaminated with ferric or cupric cations is prone to localized corrosion. This tendency can be reduced by ensuring that the zirconium surface is clean and smooth. In this paper, the effect of surface condition on the localized corrosion of zirconium in acidic chloride solutions is predicted with potentiodynamic scans. These predictions are confirmed by weight loss tests on various combinations of surface finish and acid concentrations. A real time indication of localized corrosion is seen by monitoring the electrochemical noise produced between two similar electrodes immersed in an acidic chloride solutions. Electrochemical noise monitoring correlates well with the predictions from potentiodynamic and weight loss experiments. The electrochemical noise results show that while an elevated (more anodic) potential caused by ferric ion contamination may be a necessary condition for localized corrosion, it is not a sufficient condition: A smooth, clean zirconium surface reduces the localized corrosion of zirconium

  16. THE KINETICS OF SAPONIFICATION OF IODOACETIC ACID BY SODIUM HYDROXIDE AND BY CERTAIN ALKALINE BUFFER SOLUTIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brdicka, R

    1936-07-20

    1. The rate of the saponification of iodoacetic acid in sodium hydroxide and alkaline buffer solutions yielding glycollic acid was measured by means of Heyrovský's polarographic method. 2. From the bimolecular velocity constants, increasing with the ionic strength of the solution, the Brönsted factor, F, which characterizes the primary salt effect, was calculated. 3. In the borate buffer solutions the monomolecular constants of the saponification were determined which, at values above the pH of neutralization of boric acid, show a proportionality to the concentration of hydroxyl anions. Below the pH of neutralization of boric acid, they are proportional to the concentration of borate anions.

  17. Dissolution of Simulated and Radioactive Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Sludges with Oxalic Acid & Citric Acid Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STALLINGS, MARY

    2004-01-01

    This report presents findings from tests investigating the dissolution of simulated and radioactive Savannah River Site sludges with 4 per cent oxalic acid and mixtures of oxalic and citric acid previously recommended by a Russian team from the Khlopin Radium Institute and the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC). Testing also included characterization of the simulated and radioactive waste sludges. Testing results showed the following: Dissolution of simulated HM and PUREX sludges with oxalic and citric acid mixtures at SRTC confirmed general trends reported previously by Russian testing. Unlike the previous Russian testing six sequential contacts of a mixture of oxalic acid citric acids at a 2:1 ratio (v/w) of acid to sludge did not produce complete dissolution of simulated HM and PUREX sludges. We observed that increased sludge dissolution occurred at a higher acid to sludge ratio, 50:1 (v/w), compared to the recommended ratio of 2:1 (v/w). We observed much lower dissolution of aluminum in a simulated HM sludge by sodium hydroxide leaching. We attribute the low aluminum dissolution in caustic to the high fraction of boehmite present in the simulated sludge. Dissolution of HLW sludges with 4 per cent oxalic acid and oxalic/citric acid followed general trends observed with simulated sludges. The limited testing suggests that a mixture of oxalic and citric acids is more efficient for dissolving HM and PUREX sludges and provides a more homogeneous dissolution of HM sludge than oxalic acid alone. Dissolution of HLW sludges in oxalic and oxalic/citric acid mixtures produced residual sludge solids that measured at higher neutron poison to equivalent 235U weight ratios than that in the untreated sludge solids. This finding suggests that residual solids do not present an increased nuclear criticality safety risk. Generally the neutron poison to equivalent 235U weight ratios of the acid solutions containing dissolved sludge components are lower than those in the untreated

  18. Growth behavior of anodic porous alumina formed in malic acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2013-11-01

    The growth behavior of anodic porous alumina formed on aluminum by anodizing in malic acid solutions was investigated. High-purity aluminum plates were electropolished in CH3COOH/HClO4 solutions and then anodized in 0.5 M malic acid solutions at 293 K and constant cell voltages of 200-350 V. The anodic porous alumina grew on the aluminum substrate at voltages of 200-250 V, and a black, burned oxide film was formed at higher voltages. The nanopores of the anodic oxide were only formed at grain boundaries of the aluminum substrate during the initial stage of anodizing, and then the growth region extended to the entire aluminum surface as the anodizing time increased. The anodic porous alumina with several defects was formed by anodizing in malic acid solution at 250 V, and oxide cells were approximately 300-800 nm in diameter.

  19. Identification of Weak Acids and Bases by Titration with Primary Standards. A Modern Version of an Old Analytical Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert Q.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise in which acid dissociation constants and molecular weights are extracted from sample data and the sample is identified. Emphasizes accurate volumetric work while bringing to practice the concepts of acid-base equilibria, activity coefficients, and thermodynamic constants. (CW)

  20. Synergistic extraction behaviour of americium from simulated acidic waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, P.N.; Veeraraghavan, R.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Manchanda, V.K.

    1998-01-01

    The extraction behaviour of americium has been investigated with mixtures of 3-phenyl-4-benzoyl-5-isoxazolone (PBI) and oxodonors viz. tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) and di-n-butyl octanamide (DBOA) using dodecane as the diluent from 1-6 M HNO 3 media. It is observed that D Am remains unaltered with PBI concentration (in the range 0.06-0.1 M) at 1.47 M TBP in the entire range of HNO 3 concentration. PBI and TBP in combination appears more promising compared to other synergistic systems. The possibility of using this mixture for americium removal from high level liquid waste solution has been explored. Extraction studies indicated that prior removal of uranium by 20% TBP in dodecane is helpful in the quantitative recovery of americium in three contacts. Effect of lanthanides on D Am is found to be marginal. (orig.)

  1. In silico prediction of drug dissolution and absorption with variation in intestinal pH for BCS class II weak acid drugs: ibuprofen and ketoprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Langguth, Peter; Garcia-Arieta, Alfredo; Amidon, Gordon L

    2012-10-01

    The FDA Biopharmaceutical Classification System guidance allows waivers for in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for immediate-release solid oral dosage forms only for BCS class I. Extensions of the in vivo biowaiver for a number of drugs in BCS class III and BCS class II have been proposed, in particular, BCS class II weak acids. However, a discrepancy between the in vivo BE results and in vitro dissolution results for BCS class II acids was recently observed. The objectives of this study were to determine the oral absorption of BCS class II weak acids via simulation software and to determine if the in vitro dissolution test with various dissolution media could be sufficient for in vitro bioequivalence studies of ibuprofen and ketoprofen as models of carboxylic acid drugs. The oral absorption of these BCS class II acids from the gastrointestinal tract was predicted by GastroPlus™. Ibuprofen did not satisfy the bioequivalence criteria at lower settings of intestinal pH of 6.0. Further the experimental dissolution of ibuprofen tablets in a low concentration phosphate buffer at pH 6.0 (the average buffer capacity 2.2 mmol l (-1) /pH) was dramatically reduced compared with the dissolution in SIF (the average buffer capacity 12.6 mmol l (-1) /pH). Thus these predictions for the oral absorption of BCS class II acids indicate that the absorption patterns depend largely on the intestinal pH and buffer strength and must be considered carefully for a bioequivalence test. Simulation software may be a very useful tool to aid the selection of dissolution media that may be useful in setting an in vitro bioequivalence dissolution standard. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. In Silico Prediction of Drug Dissolution and Absorption with variation in Intestinal pH for BCS Class II Weak Acid Drugs: Ibuprofen and Ketoprofen§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Langguth, Peter; Garcia-Arieta, Alfredo; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2012-01-01

    The FDA Biopharmaceutical Classification System guidance allows waivers for in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for immediate-release solid oral dosage forms only for BCS class I. Extensions of the in vivo biowaiver for a number of drugs in BCS Class III and BCS class II have been proposed, particularly, BCS class II weak acids. However, a discrepancy between the in vivo- BE results and in vitro- dissolution results for a BCS class II acids was recently observed. The objectives of this study were to determine the oral absorption of BCS class II weak acids via simulation software and to determine if the in vitro dissolution test with various dissolution media could be sufficient for in vitro bioequivalence studies of ibuprofen and ketoprofen as models of carboxylic acid drugs. The oral absorption of these BCS class II acids from the gastrointestinal tract was predicted by GastroPlus™. Ibuprofen did not satisfy the bioequivalence criteria at lower settings of intestinal pH=6.0. Further the experimental dissolution of ibuprofen tablets in the low concentration phosphate buffer at pH 6.0 (the average buffer capacity 2.2 mmol L-1/pH) was dramatically reduced compared to the dissolution in SIF (the average buffer capacity 12.6 mmol L -1/pH). Thus these predictions for oral absorption of BCS class II acids indicate that the absorption patterns largely depend on the intestinal pH and buffer strength and must be carefully considered for a bioequivalence test. Simulation software may be very useful tool to aid the selection of dissolution media that may be useful in setting an in vitro bioequivalence dissolution standard. PMID:22815122

  3. Growth and membrane fluidity of food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in the presence of weak acid preservatives and hydrochloric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis eDiakogiannis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses a major issue in microbial food safety, the elucidation of correlations between acid stress and changes in membrane fluidity of the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. In order to assess the possible role that membrane fluidity changes play in L. monocytogenes tolerance to antimicrobial acids (acetic, lactic, hydrochloric acid at low pH or benzoic acid at neutral pH, the growth of the bacterium and the gel-to-liquid crystalline transition temperature point (Tm of cellular lipids of each adapted culture was measured and compared with unexposed cells. The Tm of extracted lipids was measured by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC. A trend of increasing Tm values but not of equal extent was observed upon acid tolerance for all samples and this increase is not directly proportional to each acid antibacterial action. The smallest increase in Tm value was observed in the presence of lactic acid, which presented the highest antibacterial action. In the presence of acids with high antibacterial action such as acetic, hydrochloric acid or low antibacterial action such as benzoic acid, increased Tm values were measured. The Tm changes of lipids were also correlated with our previous data about fatty acid changes to acid adaptation. The results imply that the fatty acid changes are not the sole adaptation mechanism for decreased membrane fluidity (increased Tm. Therefore, this study indicates the importance of conducting an in-depth structural study on how acids commonly used in food systems affect the composition of individual cellular membrane lipid molecules.

  4. Laser-induced photochemical reaction of aqueous maleic acid solutions containing H2O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yuichi; Kawanishi, Shunichi; Suzuki, Nobutake

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxy acid such as glycolic, tartaric and malic acids was directly produced by XeF-laser irradiation of the N 2 -saturated maleic acid aqueous solution containing H 2 O 2 . The selectivities of these products at the maximum of tartaric acid were 71, 4, and 2% at H 2 O 2 feeding rate of 3.2 ml h -1 , respectively. On the other hand, the irradiation of maleates such as dipotassium, calcium, and disodium greatly enhanced the selectivities of tartaric acid formation to 19%, and of malic acid formation to 13%, respectively, for dipotassium maleate. It may be considered from these results that the stability of the hydroxylated intermediate radical plays an important role for the efficient formations of tartaric and malic acids. (author)

  5. Weak decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcicki, S.

    1978-11-01

    Lectures are given on weak decays from a phenomenological point of view, emphasizing new results and ideas and the relation of recent results to the new standard theoretical model. The general framework within which the weak decay is viewed and relevant fundamental questions, weak decays of noncharmed hadrons, decays of muons and the tau, and the decays of charmed particles are covered. Limitation is made to the discussion of those topics that either have received recent experimental attention or are relevant to the new physics. (JFP) 178 references

  6. Radiolysis of poly(acrylic acid) in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanski, Piotr; Bothe, Eberhard; Hildenbrand, Knut; Rosiak, Janusz M.; von Sonntag, Clemens

    1995-02-01

    Poly(acrylic acid), PAA, reacts with OH-radicals yielding -CHCH(CO 2H)- (β-radicals) and -CH 2C(CO 2H)- (α-radicals) in a ratio of approximately 2:1. This estimate is based on pulse radiolysis data where the absorption spectrum of the PAA-radicals was compared with the spectra of α-radicals from model systems. The β-radicals convert slowly into α-radicals ( k = 0.7 s -1 at pH 10). This process has also been observed by ESR. At PAA-concentrations of 10 -2 mol dm -3 chain scission dominates over other competing reactions except at low pH. The rate of chain scission was followed by pulse conductometry and in the pH range 7-9 k = 4 × 10 -2s -1 was observed. Oxygen reacts with PAA-radicals with k = 3.1 × 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 at pH 3.5 and k = 1.0 × 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 at pH 10. The corresponding peroxyl radicals undergo slow intramolecular H-transfer yielding a UV-absorbing product whose properties are that of 1,3-diketones.

  7. Radiolysis of poly(acrylic acid) in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulanski, P [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Strahlenchemie, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany); [Politechnika Lodzka, Lodz (Poland); Bothe, E; Hildenbrand, K; Sonntag, C von [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Strahlenchemie, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany); Rosiak, J M [Politechnika Lodzka, Lodz (Poland)

    1995-10-01

    Poly(acrylic acid), PAA, reacts with OH-radicals yielding -CH-CH(CO{sub 2}H)- ({beta}-radicals) and -CH{sub 2}-C(CO{sub 2}H)-({alpha}-radicals) in a ratio of approximately 2:1. This estimate is based on pulse radiolysis data where the absorption spectrum of the PAA-radicals was compared with the spectra of {alpha}-radicals from model systems. The {beta}-radicals convert slowly into {alpha}-radicals (k = 0.7s {sup -1} at pH 10). This process has also been observed by ESR. At PAA-concentrations of 10{sup -2} mol dm{sup -3} chain scission dominates over other competing reactions except at low pH. The rate of chain scission was followed by pulse conductometry and in the pH range 7-9 k = 4 x 10{sup -2}s{sup -1} was observed. Oxygen reacts with PAA-radicals with k = 3.1 x 10{sup 8} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} at pH 3.5 and k = 1.0 x 10{sup 8} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} at pH 10. The corresponding peroxyl radicals undergo slow intramolecular H-transfer yielding a UV-absorbing product whose properties are that of 1,3-diketones. (Author).

  8. Acid-base chemistry of omeprazole in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Rong; Schulman, Stephen G.; Zavala, Pedro J.

    2003-01-01

    Omeprazole is a potent anti-acid drug. Its absorption and mode of action are closely related to its prototropic behavior. In the present study, omeprazole samples from different sources and in different forms were studied spectrophotometrically to obtain pK a values. In the neutral to alkaline pH region, two consistent pK a values of 7.1 and 14.7 were obtained from various samples. The assignment of these pK a values was realized by comparison with the prototropic properties of N(1)-methylated omeprazole substituted on the nitrogen at the 1-position of the benzimidazole ring, which was found to have a pK a of 7.5. The omeprazole pK a of 14.7 is assigned to the dissociation of the hydrogen from the 1-position of the benzimidazole ring and the pK a of 7.1 is assigned to the dissociation from the protonated pyridine nitrogen of omeprazole. The results presented are at variance with those of earlier work

  9. Acid-Base Properties of Azo Dyes in Solution Studied Using Spectrophotometry and Colorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snigur, D. V.; Chebotarev, A. N.; Bevziuk, K. V.

    2018-03-01

    Colorimetry and spectrophotometry with chemometric data processing were used to study the acid-base properties of azo dyes in aqueous solution. The capabilities of both methods were compared. Ionization constants of all the functional groups of the azo compounds studied could be determined relative to the change in the specific color difference depending on the acidity of the medium. The colorimetric functions of ion-molecular forms of azo compounds used as an analytical signal allow us to obtain complete information on the acid-base equilibrium in a wide acidity range.

  10. Zinc-Nickel Codeposition in Sulfate Solution Combined Effect of Cadmium and Boric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Addi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined effect of cadmium and boric acid on the electrodeposition of zinc-nickel from a sulfate has been investigated. The presence of cadmium ion decreases zinc in the deposit. In solution, cadmium inhibits the zinc ion deposition and suppresses it when deposition potential value is more negative than −1.2 V. Low concentration of CdSO4 reduces the anomalous nature of Zn-Ni deposit. Boric acid decreases current density and shifts potential discharge of nickel and hydrogen to more negative potential. The combination of boric acid and cadmium increases the percentage of nickel in the deposit. Boric acid and cadmium.

  11. The kinetics of oxidation of bilirubin and ascorbic acid in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonov, A. V.; Rumyantsev, E. V.; Kochergin, B. A.; Antina, E. V.

    2012-07-01

    The results of a comparative study of the oxidation of bilirubin, ascorbic acid, and their mixture in aqueous solutions under the action of air oxygen and hydrogen peroxide are presented. The observed and true rate constants for the oxidation reactions were determined. It was shown that the oxidation of tetrapyrrole pigment occurred under these conditions bypassing the stage of biliverdin formation to monopyrrole products. Simultaneous oxidation of bilirubin and ascorbic acid was shown to be accompanied by the inhibition of ascorbic acid oxidation by bilirubin, whereas ascorbic acid itself activated the oxidation of bilirubin.

  12. Effect of triethanolamine and heliotropin on cathodic polarization of weakly acidic baths and properties of Sn-Ag-Cu alloy electrodeposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jinqiu; An Maozhong; Chang Limin; Liu Guiyuan

    2008-01-01

    The effect of triethanolamine (TEA) and heliotropin (HT) on the cathodic polarization of weakly acidic baths and the properties of Sn-Ag-Cu alloy electrodeposits were investigated. Lead-free Sn-Ag-Cu solder alloy were electrodeposited in weakly acidic baths (pH 5.5) containing Sn(CH 3 SO 3 ) 2 , AgI, Cu(CH 3 SO 3 ) 2 , K 4 P 2 O 7 , KI, hydroquinone, TEA, HT and methylsulfonic acid (MSA). The cathodic polarization of baths and the properties of electrodeposits were evaluated by Liner sweep voltammetry (LSV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that HT is a main brightening agent that increases the cathodic polarization of baths and refines the grains of electrodeposits; TEA is a complexing agent for copper ions and a brightening promoter that decreases the cathodic polarization of baths and densifies the electrodeposits. The bright, compact, and smooth Sn-Ag-Cu alloy electrodeposits contain 88-95 wt% tin, 5-10 wt% silver and 0.5-2 wt% copper. Organic compounds used in the baths neither adsorb on the electrodeposits surfaces nor are included in the electrodeposits. It can be therefore concluded that the use of both TEA and HT is better than that of them either in the process of electroplating bright Sn-Ag-Cu alloy

  13. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogava, S.; Savada, S.; Nakagava, M.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of the use of weak interaction laws to study models of elementary particles is discussed. The most typical examples of weak interaction is beta-decay of nucleons and muons. Beta-interaction is presented by quark currents in the form of universal interaction of the V-A type. Universality of weak interactions is well confirmed using as examples e- and μ-channels of pion decay. Hypothesis on partial preservation of axial current is applicable to the analysis of processes with pion participation. In the framework of the model with four flavours lepton decays of hadrons are considered. Weak interaction without lepton participation are also considered. Properties of neutral currents are described briefly

  14. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanda, R.

    1981-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental evidences to form a basis for Lagrangian Quantum field theory for Weak Interactions are discussed. In this context, gauge invariance aspects of such interactions are showed. (L.C.) [pt

  15. The recuperation of sulphuric acid out of contaminated solutions by electro electrodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattoir, S.

    1997-05-01

    The dismantling of a nuclear reactor results in large amounts of contaminated waste. The amount of waste is minimized by so-called decontamination processes. These decontamination processes result in decontaminated metal as well as contaminated effluents, containing acid and metal salts. Standard treatment of these effluents involves neutralisation of the acid using sodium hydroxide, resulting in the precipitation of hydroxides; and evaporation of the solvent. However, if the acid is extracted out of the decontamination effluents prior to neutralisation, this acid can be re-used in the decontamination process, substantially reducing the final waste. This report investigates the possibility of using Electro Electrodialysis (EED) for the extraction of 900 moles of sulphuric acid out of a 1 m 3 contaminated solution, containing 22 kg of ferrous, chromous, cerous and nickel ions and 1000 moles of sulphuric acid. EED removes acids out of acid/salts solutions, using an electrolyser equipped with an anionic membrane: the acid-anion is displaced by migration through the membrane while the proton is displaced by electrolysis. This report gives a full description of the technique, the lab-scale apparatus, the analyses involved in studying the technique on lab-scale or monitoring it on full scale, the choice of electrode and membrane and of process parameters such as temperature and current density. On lab scale, EED can displace 90% of the acid out of the acid/salt solution just described, at a current density as high as 0.14 A.cm -2 , at 50 degrees Celsius, if the cathode and the anode are of smoothed platina or of platinised titanium, and the anion selective membrane is the Neosepta AMH -membrane of Tokuyama. The study of EED still needs to be completed with a further study of metal deposition on the cathode, and a comparison of the technique to other (electro)membrane techniques

  16. Amination of oxy acids in aqueous solution by gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ema, Kimiko; Kato, Taizo; Shinagawa, Mutsuaki

    1978-01-01

    Alanin, β-alanine, glicine, and aspartic, α-amino-n-butyric, and γ-amino-n-butyric acids were obtained by γ-irradiation of aqueous ammonia solutions of lactic, β-oxypropionic, glycolic, malic, α-oxybutyric, and γ-oxybutyric acids, respectively. The yields of amino acids were examined for functions of radiation dose (0.75 - 3.55Mrad), concentrations of oxy acid (0.01 - 0.1M) and ammonia (0.1 - 15M), and substances added as radical (potassium iodide), and hydrated electron (nitrous oxide) scavengers. The maximum G-values were 0.6 for alanine in a solution of 0.1M lactic acid-4M ammonia and some nitrous oxide and 1.14 for β-alanine in a solution of 0.1M β-oxypropionic acid and 0.7M ammonia. The yield of alanine increased with increased concentrations of lactic acid and ammonia due to saturation of nitrous oxide but decreased when potassium iodide (0.03M) was added. The yield of β-alanine showed a maximum increase at ca. 0.7M ammonia and decreased when potassium iodide and nitrous oxide were added. Serine was obtained from G = 0.002 in a solution of β-oxypropionic acid and increased to G = 0.058 due to saturation of nitrous oxide. The manner of chemical amination due to radiation was studied from the above results. In general, oxy acids from which hydrogen has been abstracted by an H or OH radical react with ammonia to form amino acids. The effect of ammonia concentration on the yield of amino acids demonstrates that the NH 2 radical abstracts the α-hydrogen of lactic acid but does not react with the β-hydrogen of β-oxypropionic acid. The effect of nitrous oxide indicates that hydrated electrons interfere with alanine formation, contribute to β-alanine formation, react with the carboxyl group of lactic acids to form lactamide, and abstract the β-hydroxyl group of β-oxypropionic acids to form β-alanine. (Bell, E.)

  17. Methodology of analysis of very weak acids by isotachophoresis with electrospray-ionization mass-spectrometric detection: Anionic electrolyte systems for the medium-alkaline pH range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malá, Zdena; Gebauer, Petr

    2018-01-15

    This work describes for the first time a functional electrolyte system setup for anionic isotachophoresis (ITP) with electrospray-ionization mass-spectrometric (ESI-MS) detection in the neutral to medium-alkaline pH range. So far no application was published on the analysis of very weak acids by anionic ITP-MS although there is a broad spectrum of potential analytes with pK a values in the range 5-10, where application of this technique promises interesting gains in both sensitivity and specificity. The problem so far was the lack of anionic ESI-compatible ITP systems in the mentioned pH range as all typical volatile anionic system components are fully ionized at neutral and alkaline pH and thus too fast to suit as terminators. We propose an original solution of the problem based on the combination of two ITP methods: (i) use of the hydroxyl ion as a natural and ESI-compatible terminator, and (ii) use of configurations based on moving-boundary ITP. The former method ensures effective stacking of analytes by an alkaline terminator of sufficiently low mobility and the latter offers increased flexibility for tuning of the separation window and selectivity according to actual needs. A theoretical description of the proposed model is presented and applied to the design of very simple functional electrolyte configurations. The properties of example systems are demonstrated by both computer simulation and experiments with a group of model analytes. Potential effects of carbon dioxide present in the solutions are demonstrated for particular systems. Experimental results confirm that the proposed methodology is well capable of performing sensitive and selective ITP-MS analyses of very weak acidic analytes (e.g. sulfonamides or chlorophenols). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Determination of humic acid in alkali leaching solution of uranium by spectophotrometry-COD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yu; An Wei; Chen Shusen

    2014-01-01

    It is one of the main causes of extraction emulsification or resin toxicosis during alkali leaching process in uranium metallurgy which organic matters including humic acid exist in lixiviums. In order to study the effect of humic acid in uranium metallurgy, a method for determination of content of humic acid in aqueous solution need to be established. Spectrophotometry is a simple and convenient method in humic acid analysis. However, accuracy of spectrophotometry can be reduced greatly because of interference of uranium and other elements in the humic acid solutions. Although chemical oxygen demand (COD) method is a common analysis way of organic matters in aqueous solutions, the concentration of humic acid cannot be directly measured. In this paper, COD method is related with spectrophotometry to avoid the interference of uranium and ensure the accurate analysis of humic acid. The results showed that the detection limit of the method was 1.78 mg/L and the recovery rate was 101.2%. (authors)

  19. Effect of humic acid on the underpotential deposition-stripping voltammetry of copper in acetic acid soil extract solutions at mercaptoacetic acid-modified gold electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, Gregoire; Beni, Valerio; Dillon, Patrick H.; Barry, Thomas; Arrigan, Damien W.M

    2004-05-24

    Electrochemical measurements were undertaken for the investigation of the underpotential deposition-stripping process of copper at bare and modified gold electrodes in 0.11 M acetic acid, the first fraction of the European Union's Bureau Communautaire de References (BCR) sequential extraction procedure for fractionating metals within soils and sediments. Gold electrodes modified with mercaptoacetic acid showed higher sensitivity for the detection of copper than bare gold electrodes, both in the absence and in the presence of humic acid in acetic acid solutions, using the underpotential deposition-stripping voltammetry (UPD-SV) method. In the presence of 50 mg l{sup -1} of humic acid, the mercaptoacetic acid modified electrode proved to be 1.5 times more sensitive than the bare gold electrode. The mercaptoacetic acid monolayer formed on the gold surface provided efficient protection against the adsorption of humic acid onto the gold electrode surface. Variation of the humic acid concentration in the solution showed little effect on the copper stripping signal at the modified electrode. UPD-SV at the modified electrode was applied to the analysis of soil extract samples. Linear correlation of the electrochemical results with atomic spectroscopic results yielded the straight-line equation y ({mu}g l{sup -1}) = 1.10x - 44 (ppb) (R=0.992, n=6), indicating good agreement between the two methods.

  20. Gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions. [prebiotic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Graff, R. L.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1980-01-01

    The gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions was studied under initially oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions in an attempt to determine the possible interconversion of malic acid into other carboxylic acids, specifically those associated with Krebs cycle. The effect of dose on product formation of the system was investigated. Gas-liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry was used as the principal means of identification of the nonvolatile products. Thin layer chromatography and direct probe mass spectroscopy were also employed. The findings show that a variety of carboxylic acids are formed, with malonic and succinic acids in greatest abundance. These products have all been identified as being formed in the gamma-irradiation of acetic acid, suggesting a common intermediary. Since these molecules fit into a metabolic cycle, it is strongly suggestive that prebiotic pathways provided the basis for biological systems.

  1. Formation of amino acids by cobalt-60 irradiation of hydrogen cyanide solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, M. A.; Toste, A. P.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the pathway for the prebiotic origin of amino acids from hydrogen cyanide (HCN) under the action of ionizing radiation considered as an effective source of energy on the primitive earth. The irradiations were performed in a cobalt-60 source with a dose rate of 200,000 rad/hr. Seven naturally occurring amino acids are identified among the products formed by the hydrolysis of gamma-irradiated solutions of HCN: glycine, alanine, valine, serine, threonine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. The identity of these amino acids is established by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Control experiments provided evidence that the amino acids are not the result of contamination.

  2. Chloride stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in boric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, Ph.; Noel, D.; Gras, J.M.; Prieux, B.

    1997-10-01

    The high nickel austenitic alloys are generally considered to have good resistance to chloride stress corrosion cracking. In the standard boiling magnesium chloride solution tests, alloys with more than 40% nickel are immune. Nevertheless, more recent data show that cracking can occur in both Alloys 600 and 690 if the solution is acidified. In other low pH media, such as boric acid solution at 100 deg C, transgranular and intergranular cracking are observed in Alloy 600 in the presence of minor concentrations of sodium chloride (2g/I). In concentrated boric acid at higher temperatures (250 and 290 deg C), intergranular cracking also occurs, either when the chloride concentration is high, or at low chloride contents and high oxygen levels. The role of pH and a possible specific action of boric acid are discussed, together with the influence of electrochemical potential. (author)

  3. Crack propagation behavior of Ti-5Ta alloy in boiling nitric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motooka, Takafumi; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    1999-05-01

    The crack propagation behavior of Ti-5Ta alloy both in boiling nitric acid solution and in air at room temperature has been investigated. The crack growth rate of Ti-5Ta alloy was measured as a function of the stress intensity factor range. After the tests, the fracture surface morphology was observed by a scanning electron microscope and the crystallographic orientation was examined by X-ray diffraction analysis. Difference in the crack growth behavior was not observed in both environments. The crack growth rate in boiling nitric acid solution was similar to that in air at room temperature. Moreover, the crystallographic orientation of Ti-5Ta alloy had little effect on the fatigue behavior, because this alloy does not have the susceptibility to SCC in nitric acid solution. (author)

  4. Density, viscosity, and N2O solubility of aqueous amino acid salt and amine amino acid salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronu, Ugochukwu E.; Hartono, Ardi; Svendsen, Hallvard F.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Density of amino acid salt and amine amino acid salt. ► Viscosity of amino acid salt and amine amino acid salt. ► Henry’s law constant/N 2 O solubility of amino acid salt and amine amino acid salt. ► Schumpe model. Correlations for density, viscosity, and N 2 O solubility. - Abstract: Physicochemical properties of aqueous amino acid salt (AAS), potassium salt of sarcosine (KSAR) and aqueous amine amino acid salt (AAAS), 3-(methylamino)propylamine/sarcosine (SARMAPA) have been studied. Densities of KSAR were measured for sarcosine mole fraction 0.02 to 0.25 for temperature range 298.15 K to 353.15 K, the viscosities were measured for 0.02 to 0.10 mole fraction sarcosine (293.15 K to 343.15 K) while the N 2 O solubilities were measured from 0.02 to 0.10 mole fraction sarcosine solutions (298.15 K to 363.15 K). Densities of SARMAPA were measured for sarcosine mole fraction 0.02 to 0.23 for temperature range (298.15 K to 353.15 K), viscosities were measured for 0.02 to 0.16 mole fraction sarcosine (293.15 K to 343.15 K) while the N 2 O solubilities were measured from 0.02 to 0.16 mole fraction sarcosine solutions (298.15 K to 343.15 K). Experimental results were correlated well with empirical correlations and N 2 O solubility results for KSAR were predicted adequately by a Schumpe model. The solubilities of N 2 O in AAS and AAAS are significantly lower than values for amines. The solubilities vary as: amine > AAAS > AAS.

  5. The influence of temperature on the decomposition kinetics of peracetic acid in solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunigk L.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Peracetic acid is a powerful sanitizer that has only recently been introduced in the Brazilian food industry. The main disadvantage of this sanitizer is its decomposition rate. The main purpose of this paper is to present results obtained in experiments carried out to study the decomposition kinetics of peracetic acid in aqueous solutions at 25, 35, 40 and 45 °C. The decompositon of peracetic acid is a first-order reaction. The decomposition rate constants are between 1.71x10-3 h -1 for 25 °C and 9.64x10-3 h-1 for 45 °C. The decomposition rate constant is affected by temperature according to the Arrhenius equation, and the activation energy for the decomposition of peracetic acid in aqueous solutions prepared from the commercial formulation used in this work is 66.20 kJ/mol.

  6. Interactions of hydrazine, ferrous sulfamate, sodium nitrite, and nitric acid in nuclear fuel processing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.

    1977-03-01

    Hydrazine and ferrous sulfamate are used as reductants in a variety of nuclear fuel processing solutions. An oxidant, normally sodium nitrite, must frequently be added to these nitric acid solutions before additional processing can proceed. The interactions of these four chemicals have been studied under a wide variety of conditions using a 2/sup p/ factorial experimental design to determine relative reaction rates for desired reactions and side reactions. Evidence for a hydrazine-stabilized, sulfamic acid--nitrous acid intermediate was obtained; this intermediate can hydrolyze to ammonia or decompose to nitrogen. The oxidation of Fe 2+ by NO 2 - was shown to proceed at about the same rate as the scavenging of NO 2 - by sulfamic acid. Various side reactions are discussed

  7. Dissolution study of thorium-uranium oxides in aqueous triflic acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulemela, E.; Bergeron, A.; Stoddard, T. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories - CNL, 286 Plant Rd., Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2016-07-01

    The dissolution of sintered mixed oxides of thorium with uranium in various concentrations of trifluoromethanesulfonic (triflic) acid solutions was investigated under reflux conditions to evaluate the suitability of the method. Various fragment sizes (1.00 mm < x < 7.30 mm) of sintered (Th,U)O{sub 2} and simulated high-burnup nuclear fuel (SIMFUEL) were almost completely dissolved in a few hours, which implies that triflic acid could be used as an alternative to the common dissolution method, involving nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid mixture. The influence of acid concentration, composition of the solids, and reaction time on the dissolution yield of Th and U ions was studied using Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The dissolution rate was found to depend upon the triflic acid concentration and size of the solid fragments, with near complete dissolution for the smallest fragments occurring in boiling 87% w/w triflic acid. The formation of Th and U ions in solution appears to occur at the same rate as the triflic acid simultaneously reacts with the constituent oxides as evidenced by the results of a constant U/Th concentration ratio with the progress of the dissolution. (authors)

  8. Uranium removal from acidic aqueous solutions by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Candida colliculosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarri, S.; Misaelides, P.; Papanikolaou, M.; Zamboulis, D.

    2009-01-01

    The sorption of uranium from acidic aqueous solutions (pH 4.5, C init = 10 to 1000 mg U/L) by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Candida colliculosa was investigated using a batch technique. The U-sorption onto Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Debaryomyces hansenii followed a Langmuir, while that onto Kluyveromyces marxianus and Candida colliculosa a Freundlich isotherm. The results demonstrated that all investigated biomasses could effectively remove uranium from acidic aqueous solutions. From all sorbents, Saccharomyces cerevisiae appeared to be the most effective with a maximum sorption capacity of 127.7 mg U/g dry biomass. (author)

  9. Phase equilibria in a system of aqueous arginine with an octane solution of sulfonic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuvaeva, Z. I.; Koval'chuk, I. V.; Vodop'yanova, L. A.; Soldatov, V. S.

    2013-05-01

    The extraction of arginine (Arg) from aqueous salt (0.1 M NaCl) solutions with a sulfo extractant in a wide range of pH values and amino acid concentrations was studied. The 0.1 M solution of dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (HD) in octane was used as an extractant. The degree of extraction was found to be high at pH 0.8-9.0. This can be explained by the effect of additional intermolecular interactions in the extractant phase involving the guanidine group of Arg.

  10. Corrosion behavior of niobium coated 304 stainless steel in acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, T.J., E-mail: tjpan@cczu.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Photovolatic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Material Surface Technology, Changzhou 213164 (China); Chen, Y.; Zhang, B. [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Photovolatic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Hu, J. [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Photovolatic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Material Surface Technology, Changzhou 213164 (China); Li, C. [Light Industry College of Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)

    2016-04-30

    Highlights: • The Nb coating produced by HEMAA offers good protection for 304SS in acid solution. • The coating increases corrosion potential and induces decrease of corrosion rate. • The protection of coating is ascribed to the stability of Nb in acid solution. - Abstract: The niobium coating is fabricated on the surface of AISI Type 304 stainless steel (304SS) by using a high energy micro arc alloying technique in order to improvecorrosion resistance of the steel against acidic environments. The electrochemical corrosion resistance of the niobium coating in 0.7 M sulfuric acid solutions is evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization and the open circuit potential versus time. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the niobium coating increases the free corrosion potential of the substrate by 110 mV and a reduction in the corrosion rate by two orders of magnitude compared to the substrate alone. The niobium coating maintains large impedance and effectively offers good protection for the substrate during the long-term exposure tests, which is mainly ascribed to the niobium coating acting inhibiting permeation of corrosive species. Finally, the corresponding electrochemical impedance models are proposed to elucidate the corrosion resistance behavior of the niobium coating in acid solutions.

  11. Corrosion behavior of niobium coated 304 stainless steel in acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, T.J.; Chen, Y.; Zhang, B.; Hu, J.; Li, C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The Nb coating produced by HEMAA offers good protection for 304SS in acid solution. • The coating increases corrosion potential and induces decrease of corrosion rate. • The protection of coating is ascribed to the stability of Nb in acid solution. - Abstract: The niobium coating is fabricated on the surface of AISI Type 304 stainless steel (304SS) by using a high energy micro arc alloying technique in order to improvecorrosion resistance of the steel against acidic environments. The electrochemical corrosion resistance of the niobium coating in 0.7 M sulfuric acid solutions is evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization and the open circuit potential versus time. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the niobium coating increases the free corrosion potential of the substrate by 110 mV and a reduction in the corrosion rate by two orders of magnitude compared to the substrate alone. The niobium coating maintains large impedance and effectively offers good protection for the substrate during the long-term exposure tests, which is mainly ascribed to the niobium coating acting inhibiting permeation of corrosive species. Finally, the corresponding electrochemical impedance models are proposed to elucidate the corrosion resistance behavior of the niobium coating in acid solutions.

  12. Stability of antimicrobial activity of peracetic acid solutions used in the final disinfection process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Alves da Silva COSTA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The instruments and materials used in health establishments are frequently exposed to microorganism contamination, and chemical products are used before sterilization to reduce occupational infection. We evaluated the antimicrobial effectiveness, physical stability, and corrosiveness of two commercial formulations of peracetic acid on experimentally contaminated specimens. Stainless steel specimens were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, blood, and saliva and then immersed in a ready peracetic acid solution: 2% Sekusept Aktiv (SA or 0.25% Proxitane Alpha (PA, for different times. Then, washes of these instruments were plated in culture medium and colony-forming units counted. This procedure was repeated six times per day over 24 non-consecutive days. The corrosion capacity was assessed with the mass loss test, and the concentration of peracetic acid and pH of the solutions were measured with indicator tapes. Both SA and PA significantly eliminated microorganisms; however, the SA solution was stable for only 4 days, whereas PA remained stable throughout the experiment. The concentration of peracetic acid in the SA solutions decreased over time until the chemical was undetectable, although the pH remained at 5. The PA solution had a concentration of 500-400 mg/L and a pH of 2-3. Neither formulation induced corrosion and both reduced the number of microorganisms (p = 0.0001. However, the differences observed in the performance of each product highlight the necessity of establishing a protocol for optimizing the use of each one.

  13. Stability of antimicrobial activity of peracetic acid solutions used in the final disinfection process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Solange Alves da Silva; Paula, Olívia Ferreira Pereira de; Silva, Célia Regina Gonçalves E; Leão, Mariella Vieira Pereira; Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira dos

    2015-01-01

    The instruments and materials used in health establishments are frequently exposed to microorganism contamination, and chemical products are used before sterilization to reduce occupational infection. We evaluated the antimicrobial effectiveness, physical stability, and corrosiveness of two commercial formulations of peracetic acid on experimentally contaminated specimens. Stainless steel specimens were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, blood, and saliva and then immersed in a ready peracetic acid solution: 2% Sekusept Aktiv (SA) or 0.25% Proxitane Alpha (PA), for different times. Then, washes of these instruments were plated in culture medium and colony-forming units counted. This procedure was repeated six times per day over 24 non-consecutive days. The corrosion capacity was assessed with the mass loss test, and the concentration of peracetic acid and pH of the solutions were measured with indicator tapes. Both SA and PA significantly eliminated microorganisms; however, the SA solution was stable for only 4 days, whereas PA remained stable throughout the experiment. The concentration of peracetic acid in the SA solutions decreased over time until the chemical was undetectable, although the pH remained at 5. The PA solution had a concentration of 500-400 mg/L and a pH of 2-3. Neither formulation induced corrosion and both reduced the number of microorganisms (p = 0.0001). However, the differences observed in the performance of each product highlight the necessity of establishing a protocol for optimizing the use of each one.

  14. A new approach to study cadmium complexes with oxalic acid in soil solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dytrtová, Jana Jaklová; Jakl, Michal; Sestáková, Ivana; Zins, Emilie-Laure; Schröder, Detlef; Navrátil, Tomáš

    2011-05-05

    This study presents a new analytical approach for the determination of heavy metals complexed to low-molecular-weight-organic acids in soil solutions, which combines the sensitivity of differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) with the molecular insight gained by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The combination of these analytical methods allows the investigation of such complexes in complex matrixes. On the voltammograms of the soil solutions, in addition to the expected complexes of oxalic acid with cadmium and lead, respectively, also peaks belonging to mixed complexes of cadmium, lead, and oxalic acid (OAH(2)) were observed. In order to verify the possible formation of complexes with OAH(2), aqueous solutions of OAH(2) with traces of Cd(II) were investigated as model systems. Signals corresponding to several distinct molecular complexes between cadmium and oxalic acid were detected in the model solutions using negative-ion ESI-MS, which follow the general formula [Cd(n)(X,Y)((2n+1))](-), where n is the number of cadmium atoms, X=Cl(-), and Y=OAH(-). Some of these complexes were also identified in the ESI mass spectra taken from the soil solutions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A new approach to study cadmium complexes with oxalic acid in soil solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaklova Dytrtova, Jana; Jakl, Michal; Sestakova, Ivana; Zins, Emilie-Laure; Schroeder, Detlef; Navratil, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a new analytical approach for the determination of heavy metals complexed to low-molecular-weight-organic acids in soil solutions, which combines the sensitivity of differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) with the molecular insight gained by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The combination of these analytical methods allows the investigation of such complexes in complex matrixes. On the voltammograms of the soil solutions, in addition to the expected complexes of oxalic acid with cadmium and lead, respectively, also peaks belonging to mixed complexes of cadmium, lead, and oxalic acid (OAH 2 ) were observed. In order to verify the possible formation of complexes with OAH 2 , aqueous solutions of OAH 2 with traces of Cd(II) were investigated as model systems. Signals corresponding to several distinct molecular complexes between cadmium and oxalic acid were detected in the model solutions using negative-ion ESI-MS, which follow the general formula [Cd n (X,Y) (2n+1) ] - , where n is the number of cadmium atoms, X = Cl - , and Y = OAH - . Some of these complexes were also identified in the ESI mass spectra taken from the soil solutions.

  16. A new approach to study cadmium complexes with oxalic acid in soil solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaklova Dytrtova, Jana, E-mail: dytrtova@uochb.cas.cz [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the AS CR, v.v.i., Flemingovo namesti 2, 16610 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Jakl, Michal [Department of Agro-Environmental Chemistry and Plant Nutrition, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences, Kamycka 129, 16521 Prague - Suchdol (Czech Republic); Sestakova, Ivana [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry of the AS CR, v.v.i., Dolejskova 3, 182 23 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Zins, Emilie-Laure; Schroeder, Detlef [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the AS CR, v.v.i., Flemingovo namesti 2, 16610 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Navratil, Tomas [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry of the AS CR, v.v.i., Dolejskova 3, 182 23 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2011-05-05

    This study presents a new analytical approach for the determination of heavy metals complexed to low-molecular-weight-organic acids in soil solutions, which combines the sensitivity of differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) with the molecular insight gained by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The combination of these analytical methods allows the investigation of such complexes in complex matrixes. On the voltammograms of the soil solutions, in addition to the expected complexes of oxalic acid with cadmium and lead, respectively, also peaks belonging to mixed complexes of cadmium, lead, and oxalic acid (OAH{sub 2}) were observed. In order to verify the possible formation of complexes with OAH{sub 2}, aqueous solutions of OAH{sub 2} with traces of Cd(II) were investigated as model systems. Signals corresponding to several distinct molecular complexes between cadmium and oxalic acid were detected in the model solutions using negative-ion ESI-MS, which follow the general formula [Cd{sub n}(X,Y){sub (2n+1)}]{sup -}, where n is the number of cadmium atoms, X = Cl{sup -}, and Y = OAH{sup -}. Some of these complexes were also identified in the ESI mass spectra taken from the soil solutions.

  17. Oxidation of ascorbic acid by a (salen)ruthenium(VI) nitrido complex in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Man, Wai-Lun; Lam, William W Y; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2014-12-25

    The oxidation of ascorbic acid (H2A) by [Ru(VI)(N)(L)(MeOH)](+) in aqueous acidic solutions has the following stoichiometry: 2[Ru(VI)(N)] + 3H2A → 2[Ru(III)(NH2-HA)](+) + A. Mechanisms involving HAT/N-rebound at low pH (≤2) and nucleophilic attack at the nitride at high pH (≥5) are proposed.

  18. Cefuroxime axetil: A commercially available drug as corrosion inhibitor for aluminum in hydrochloric acid solution

    OpenAIRE

    Ameh, Paul O.; Sani, Umar M.

    2016-01-01

    Cefuroxime axetil (CA) a prodrug was tested as corrosion inhibitor for aluminum in hydrochloric acid solution using thermometric, gasometric weight loss and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. Results obtained showed that this compound has a good inhibiting properties for aluminum corrosion in acidic medium, with inhibition efficiencies values reaching 89.87 % at 0.5 g / L . It was also found out that the results from weight loss method are highly consistent with those obtained by ...

  19. Thermodynamics of uranium and nitric acid extraction from aqueous solution of TBP/diluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Freitas, R.F. de.

    1982-06-01

    A thermodynamically consistent procedure for predicting distribution equilibria for uranyl nitrate and nitric acid between an aqueous solution and 30 vol % tributyl phosphate (TBP) in a hydrocarbon diluent is studied. Experimental work is developed in order to obtain equilibrium data for the system uranyl nitrate, nitric acid, water and 30 vol % TBP in n-dodecane, at 25 0 C and 40 0 C. The theoretical equilibrium data, obtained with the aid of a computer, are compared with the experimental results. (Author) [pt

  20. Influence of Concentration and Agitation of Sodium Hypochlorite and Peracetic Acid Solutions on Tissue Dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanomaru-Filho, Mário; Silveira, Bruna Ramos Franco; Martelo, Roberta Bosso; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria

    2015-11-01

    To evaluated the tissue dissolution of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and peracetic acid (PA) solutions at different concentrations, with or without ultrasonic agitation. The following solutions were analyzed: 2.5% NaOCl, 0.5, 1 and 2% PA, 1% PA associated with 6.5% hydrogen peroxide (HP) and saline. Fragments of bovine pulp tissue with 25 ± 2g mg were immersed into test tubes containing 4 mL of the solutions for 10 minutes. In the groups with agitation, pulp tissues were submitted to 2 cycles of 1 minute of ultrasonic agitation. The specimens were weighed after the removal from the solutions. The percentage of mass loss was calculated according to the difference of mass before and after exposure to solutions. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey tests (p Peracetic acid solution has pulp tissue dissolution. However, this ability is lower than 2.5% NaOCl solution. The sodium hypochlorite solution shows higher ability to dissolve tissue than PA.

  1. The impact of reduced gastric acid secretion on dissolution of salts of weak bases in the fasted upper gastrointestinal lumen: Data in biorelevant media and in human aspirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litou, Chara; Vertzoni, Maria; Xu, Wei; Kesisoglou, Filippos; Reppas, Christos

    2017-06-01

    To propose media for simulating the intragastric environment under reduced gastric acid secretion in the fasted state at three levels of simulation of the gastric environment and evaluate their usefulness in evaluating the intragastric dissolution of salts of weak bases. To evaluate the importance of bicarbonate buffer in biorelevant in vitro dissolution testing when using Level II biorelevant media simulating the environment in the fasted upper small intestine, regardless of gastric acid secretions. Media for simulating the hypochlorhydric and achlorhydric conditions in stomach were proposed using phosphates, maleates and bicarbonates buffers. The impact of bicarbonates in Level II biorelevant media simulating the environment in upper small intestine was evaluated so that pH and bulk buffer capacity were maintained. Dissolution data were collected using two model compounds, pioglitazone hydrochloride and semifumarate cocrystal of Compound B, and the mini-paddle dissolution apparatus in biorelevant media and in human aspirates. Simulated gastric fluids proposed in this study were in line with pH, buffer capacity, pepsin content, total bile salt/lecithin content and osmolality of the fasted stomach under partial and under complete inhibition of gastric acid secretion. Fluids simulating the conditions under partial inhibition of acid secretion were useful in simulating concentrations of both model compounds in gastric aspirates. Bicarbonates in Level III biorelevant gastric media and in Level II biorelevant media simulating the composition in the upper intestinal lumen did not improve simulation of concentrations in human aspirates. Level III biorelevant media for simulating the intragastric environment under hypochlorhydric conditions were proposed and their usefulness in the evaluation of concentrations of two model salts of weak bases in gastric aspirates was shown. Level II biorelevant media for simulating the environment in upper intestinal lumen led to

  2. EFFECT OF STABILIZERS ON THE CHEMICAL AND PHOTODEGRADATION OF ASCORBIC ACID IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ascorbic acid (vitamin C is susceptible to light and air and forms various degradation products. A number of stabilizers have been used to study their effect on the degradation of ascorbic acid (AH2 in dark and light at pH 4.0 and 6.0 alone and in combination with citric and tartaric acids. The assay of AH2 in degraded solutions was performed by a specific UV spectrometric method. The degradation product of AH2 at pH 4.0 and 6.0 was identified as dehydroascorbic acid. The degradation of AH2 has been found to follow first-order kinetics. The apparent first-order rate constants, t90 and percent inhibition in rate in the presence of stabilizers and the second-order rate constants for the interaction of stabilizers with AH2 have been determined. The highest stabilizing effect on AH2 was found by sodium metabisulfite, followed by sodium sulfite, sodium bisulfate, sodium thiosulfate and thiourea. The pH of the solutions has also been found to influence the degradation of AH2 as the rates are higher at pH 6.0 compared to those of pH 4.0, probably due to the ionization of AH2. A synergistic effect has been observed when citric or tartaric acid was added to the solutions containing stabilizers where citric acid showed comparatively better effect.

  3. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    Weak interactions are studied from a phenomenological point of view, by using a minimal number of theoretical hypotheses. Charged-current phenomenology, and then neutral-current phenomenology are discussed. This all is described in terms of a global SU(2) symmetry plus an electromagnetic correction. The intermediate-boson hypothesis is introduced and lower bounds on the range of the weak force are inferred. This phenomenology does not yet reconstruct all the predictions of the conventional SU(2)xU(1) gauge theory. To do that requires an additional assumption of restoration of SU(2) symmetry at asymptotic energies

  4. EXTRACTION AND SORPTION BENZOIC ACID FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF POLYMERS BASED ON N-VINYLAMIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Savvina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of aromatic acids (benzoic acid, salicylic as preservatives necessitates their qualitative and quantitative determination in food. Effective and common way to separation and concentration of aromatic acids liquid extraction. Biphasic system of water-soluble polymers based on (poly-N-vinyl pyrrolidone, and poly-N-vinylcaprolactam satisfy the requirements of the extraction system. When sorption concentration improved definition of the metrological characteristics, comply with the requirements for sensitivity and selectivity definition appears possible, use of inexpensive and readily available analytical equipment. When studying the adsorption of benzoic acid used as a sorbent crosslinked polymer based on N-vinyl pyrrolidone, obtained by radical polymerisation of a functional monomer and crosslinker. In the extraction of benzoic acid to maximize the allocation of water and the organic phase of the polymer used salt solutions with concentrations close to saturation. Regardless of the nature of the anion salt is used as salting-out agent, aromatic acids sorption increases with the size of the cations. In the experiment the maximum recovery rate (80% benzoic acid obtained in the PVP (0.2 weight%. Ammonium sulphate. The dependence stepepni benzoic acid extraction from time sorption sorbent mass and the pH of the aqueous phase. To establish equilibrium in the system, for 20 minutes. The dependence of the degree of extraction of the acid pH indicates that the acid is extracted into the molecular form. The maximum adsorption is reached at pH 3,5, with its efficiency decreases symbatically reduce the amount of undissociated acid molecules in solution.

  5. Engineering metal (hydr)oxide sorbents for removal of arsenate and similar weak-acid oxyanion contaminants: A critical review with emphasis on factors governing sorption processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristovski, Kiril D; Markovski, Jasmina

    2017-11-15

    To create an integrative foundation for engineering of the next generation inexpensive sorbent systems, this critical review addresses the existing knowledge gap in factor/performance relationships between weak-acid oxyanion contaminants and metal (hydr)oxide sorbents. In-depth understanding of fundamental thermodynamics and kinetics mechanisms, material fabrication, and analytical and characterization techniques, is necessary to engineer sorbent that exhibit high capacity, selectivity, stability, durability and mass transport of contaminants under a wide range of operating and water matrix conditions requirements. From the perspective of thermodynamics and kinetics, this critical review examines the factors affecting sorbent performances and analyzes the existing research to elucidate future directions aimed at developing novel sorbents for removal of weak-acid oxyanion contaminants from water. Only sorbents that allow construction of simple and inexpensive water treatment systems adapted to overcome fiscal and technological barriers burdening small communities could pave the road for providing inexpensive potable water to millions of people. Novel sorbents, which exhibit (1) poor performances in realistic operating and water matrix conditions and/or (2) do not comply with the purely driven economics factors of production scalability or cost expectations, are predestined to never be commercialized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Laboratory evaluation of limestone and lime neutralization of acidic uranium mill tailings solution. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opitz, B.E.; Dodson, M.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1984-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate a two-step neutralization scheme for treatment of acidic uranium mill tailings solutions. Tailings solutions from the Lucky Mc Mill and Exxon Highland Mill, both in Wyoming, were neutralized with limestone, CaCO 3 , to an intermediate pH of 4.0 or 5.0, followed by lime, Ca(OH) 2 , neutralization to pH 7.3. The combination limestone/lime treatment methods, CaCO 3 neutralization to pH 4 followed by neutralization with Ca(OH) 2 to pH 7.3 resulted in the highest quality effluent solution with respect to EPA's water quality guidelines. The combination method is the most cost-effective treatment procedure tested in our studies. Neutralization experiments to evaluate the optimum solution pH for contaminant removal were performed on the same two tailings solutions using only lime Ca(OH) 2 as the neutralizing agent. The data indicate solution neutralization above pH 7.3 does not significantly increase removal of pH dependent contaminants from solution. Column leaching experiments were performed on the neutralized sludge material (the precipitated solid material which forms as the acidic tailings solutions are neutralized to pH 4 or above). The sludges were contacted with laboratory prepared synthetic ground water until several effluent pore volumes were collected. Effluent solutions were analyzed for macro ions, trace metals and radionuclides in an effort to evaluate the long term effectiveness of attenuating contaminants in sludges formed during solution neutralization. Neutralized sludge leaching experiments indicate that Ca, Na, Mg, Se, Cl, and SO 4 are the only constituents which show solution concentrations significantly higher than the synthetic ground water in the early pore volumes of long-term leaching studies

  7. The influence of temperature on the decomposition kinetics of peracetic acid in solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Kunigk, L.; Gomes, D.R.; Forte, F.; Vidal, K.P.; Gomes, L.F.; Sousa, P.F.

    2001-01-01

    Peracetic acid is a powerful sanitizer that has only recently been introduced in the Brazilian food industry. The main disadvantage of this sanitizer is its decomposition rate. The main purpose of this paper is to present results obtained in experiments carried out to study the decomposition kinetics of peracetic acid in aqueous solutions at 25, 35, 40 and 45 °C. The decompositon of peracetic acid is a first-order reaction. The decomposition rate constants are between 1.71x10-3 h -1 for 25 °C...

  8. Steric structure and thermodynamic aspects of Dy3+ complexes with aminobenzoic acids in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrashina, Yu.G.; Mustafina, A.R.; Vul'fson, S.G.

    1994-01-01

    Stability and structure of dysprosium(3) aminobenzoate complexes with molar ratios Dy:L 1:1 and 1:2 (HL-aminobenzoic acid) in aqueous solutions are determined on the basis of pH-metric and paramagnetic birefringence data. The increase of conjugation effect in the series of benzoic, meta- ortho-, and para-aminobenzoic acid results in the increase of stability of 1:1 and 1:2 complexes. Features of the structure and coordination of ligands in dysprosium complexes with meta-, ortho-, and para-aminobenzoic acid are considered. 11 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  9. Extraction of antimony from nitric acid solutions using tributyl phosphate. II. Tributyl phosphate-antimony(V)-nitric acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakaev, V.S.; Smelov, V.S.

    1989-01-01

    The extraction of pentavalent antimony from nitric acid solutions using tributyl phosphate has been investigated. A possible mechanism for the extraction of antimony(V) has been determined and the (pre)concentration constant for the process has been calculated. The composition of the extracted antimony(V) complex has been deduced. A negative effect of temperature on the distribution coefficient for antimony(V) has also been demonstrated

  10. Collagen tissue treated with chitosan solutions in carbonic acid for improved biological prosthetic heart valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallyamov, Marat O.; Chaschin, Ivan S.; Khokhlova, Marina A.; Grigorev, Timofey E.; Bakuleva, Natalia P.; Lyutova, Irina G.; Kondratenko, Janna E.; Badun, Gennadii A.; Chernysheva, Maria G.; Khokhlov, Alexei R.

    2014-01-01

    Calcification of bovine pericardium dramatically shortens typical lifetimes of biological prosthetic heart valves and thus precludes their choice for younger patients. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate that the calcification is to be mitigated by means of treatment of bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid, i.e. water saturated with carbon dioxide at high pressure. This acidic aqueous fluid unusually combines antimicrobial properties with absolute biocompatibility as far as at normal pressure it decomposes spontaneously and completely into H 2 O and CO 2 . Yet, at high pressures it can protonate and dissolve chitosan materials with different degrees of acetylation (in the range of 16–33%, at least) without any further pretreatment. Even exposure of the bovine pericardium in pure carbonic acid solution without chitosan already favours certain reduction in calcification, somewhat improved mechanical properties, complete biocompatibility and evident antimicrobial activity of the treated collagen tissue. The reason may be due to high extraction ability of this peculiar compressed fluidic mixture. Moreover, exposure of the bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid introduces even better mechanical properties and highly pronounced antimicrobial activity of the modified collagen tissue against adherence and biofilm formation of relevant Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains. Yet, the most important achievement is the detected dramatic reduction in calcification for such modified collagen tissues in spite of the fact that the amount of the thus introduced chitosan is rather small (typically ca. 1 wt.%), which has been reliably detected using original tritium labelling method. We believe that these improved properties are achieved due to particularly deep and uniform impregnation of the collagen matrix with chitosan from its pressurised solutions in carbonic acid. - Highlights: • Treatment of GA-stabilised bovine

  11. Kinetic study of solid phase demineralization by weak acids in one-step enzymatic bio-refinery of shrimp cuticles

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Regis; Socol, Marius; Arhaliass, A.; Bruzac, Sandrine; Le Roux, Karine; Del Pino, J. Rodriguez; Berge, Jean-pascal; Kaas, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    We describe a one-step bio-refinery process for shrimp composites by-products. Its originality lies in a simple rapid (6 h) biotechnological cuticle fragmentation process that recovers all major compounds (chitins, peptides and minerals in particular calcium). The process consists of a controlled exogenous enzymatic proteolysis in a food-grade acidic medium allowing chitin purification (solid phase), and recovery of peptides and minerals (liquid phase). At a pH of between 3.5 and 4, protease ...

  12. Determination of acid-base dissociation constants of very weak zwitterionic heterocyclic bases by capillary zone electrophoresis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ehala, Sille; Grishina, Anastasia; Sheshenev, Andrey; Lyapkalo, Ilya; Kašička, Václav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1217, - (2010), s. 8048-8053 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/08/1428; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/09/0675 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : acidity constant * capillary zone electrophoresis * zwitterionic heterocyclic bases Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.194, year: 2010

  13. Length scale dependence of the dynamic properties of hyaluronic acid solutions in the presence of salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horkay, Ferenc; Falus, Peter; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2010-12-02

    In solutions of the charged semirigid biopolymer hyaluronic acid in salt-free conditions, the diffusion coefficient D(NSE) measured at high transfer momentum q by neutron spin echo is more than an order of magnitude smaller than that determined by dynamic light scattering, D(DLS). This behavior contrasts with neutral polymer solutions. With increasing salt content, D(DLS) approaches D(NSE), which is independent of ionic strength. Contrary to theoretical expectation, the ion-polymer coupling, which dominates the low q dynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions, already breaks down at distance scales greater than the Debye-Hückel length.

  14. Investigation into sorption of uranium fron its high-concentrated nitric acid solutions on resin AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savel'eva, V.I.; Sudarikov, B.N.; Kireeva, G.N.; Ryzhkova, V.N.; Kandaryuk, V.V.

    1976-01-01

    Sorption of uranium has been studied on strongly basic anion-exchange resin from nitric acid solutions with concentration in metal 10-150 g/l in presence of sodium, calcium, and aluminium nitrates. Sorption of uranium from solutions has been performed by the static method with the aid of contacting the initial solution with airdry resin for 4 hours, resin to solution ratio being 1:12.5. It has been established that sorption of uranium increases with a rise in concentration of salting out agents in the following order: Al(NO 3 ) 3 > Ca(NO 3 ) 2 > Na(NO 3 ). It has been shown spectrophotometricatly that in solutions of nitrates and HNO 3 with a concentration 3 exceeds 6 mol/l

  15. Electrochemical behaviour of a vanadium anode in phosphoric acid and phosphate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonzo, V.; Darchen, A.; Fur, E. Le; Pivan, J.Y.

    2006-01-01

    Anodic polarisation of a vanadium electrode has been studied in H 3 PO 4 solutions and some phosphate solutions: LiH 2 PO 4 , NaH 2 PO 4 , KH 2 PO 4 and NH 4 H 2 PO 4 . The anodic behaviour of a vanadium electrode showed similarities in weak concentrated H 3 PO 4 , in LiH 2 PO 4 and NaH 2 PO 4 solutions: the polarisation curve exhibited a current peak followed by current oscillations and then a current plateau. Concentrated H 3 PO 4 , 1 M KH 2 PO 4 and NH 4 H 2 PO 4 solutions involved vanadium passivation with a very slight current density plateau. Yellow compound identified to VOPO 4 .2H 2 O was obtained after controlled potential oxidation of vanadium in 5-10 M H 3 PO 4 . Green products were obtained in 1 M phosphate solutions and in 1-3 M H 3 PO 4 on vanadium anode after controlled potential electrolysis. All these vanadophosphate compounds contained the monovalent cation which was present in the solution

  16. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Gregory Hudson

    2014-07-01

    A system for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizes a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide.

  17. Citric acid-modified Fenton's reaction for the oxidation of chlorinated ethylenes in soil solution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-06-01

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H2O2 concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H2O2 relative to iron catalysts (Fe2+/H2O2<1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelation in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  18. Features of obtaining malt with use of aqueous solutions of organic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Pivovarov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the traditional formulations of essential food products are actively including malt – a valuable dietary product rich in extractives and hydrolytic enzymes, obtained by germination in artificially created conditions. Containing a full set of essential amino acids and a high saccharifying ability of malt, obtained from grain cereals, determines its wide use in the production of beer, alcohol, mono- and poly-malt extracts, bakery products, special types of flour, food additives, cereals, non-alcoholic beverages, lactic acid products and, in particular, in the production of natural coffee substitutes. However, the classical germination technology, which includes 2-3 days of soaking and 5-8 days of germination due to the considerable duration and laboriousness of the process, does not meet the requirements of modern technology and the constantly growing rates of industrial production, so this problem requires finding new and improving existing scientific and technical solutions. The features of malt production using organic acids of different concentrations are presented. The malt production technology has been analyzed and investigated. It includes washing, disinfection, air and water soaking of grains, germination and drying. The feature of the technology under investigation is using of aqueous solutions of butadiene, 3-pyridinecarboxylic acid and pteroylglutamic acid. The results of the inquiry of the effect of these organic acids on energy and the ability of germination of the grain are presented. The optimal values of concentrations of active substances in solutions are revealed. The influence of organic acids on the absorption of grain moisture has been investigated. It has been established that in comparison with the classical technology, the use of these acids as a growth stimulator can reduce the overall length of the reproduction process of the material from 1.5 to 2 times and increase the yield of flour grains in the batch of

  19. Regularities in the association of polymethacrylic acid with benzethonium chloride in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugay, A. V.; Zakordonskiy, V. P.

    2006-06-01

    The association of cationogenic benzethonium chloride with polymethacrylic acid in aqueous solutions was studied by nephelometry, conductometry, tensiometry, viscometry, and pH-metry. The critical concentrations of aggregation and polymer saturation with the surface-active substance were determined. A model describing processes in such systems step by step was suggested.

  20. Radiolytic degradation of gallic acid and its derivatives in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, R.; Leal, J.P.; Takacs, E.; Wojnarovits, L.

    2009-01-01

    Polyphenols, like gallic acid (GA) released in the environment in larger amount, by inducing some unwanted oxidations, may constitute environmental hazard: their concentration in wastewater should be controlled. Radiolytic degradation of GA was investigated by pulse radiolysis and final product techniques in dilute aqueous solution. Subsidiary measurements were made with 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid (TMBA) and 3,4,5-trihydroxy methylbenzoate (MGA). The hydroxyl radical and hydrogen atom intermediates of water radiolysis react with the solute molecules yielding cyclohexadienyl radicals. The radicals formed in GA and MGA solutions in acid/base catalyzed water elimination decay to phenoxyl radicals. This reaction is not observed in TMBA solution. The hydrated electron intermediate of water decomposition adds to the carbonyl oxygen, the anion thus formed protonates on the ring forming cyclohexadienyl radical or on the carbonyl group forming carbonyl centred radical. The GA intermediates formed during reaction with primary water radicals in presence of oxygen transform to non-aromatic molecules, e.g., to aliphatic carboxylic acids.

  1. Radiolytic degradation of gallic acid and its derivatives in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, R. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, UCQR, Estrada Nacional No. 10, Apartado 21, 2686-953, Sacavem (Portugal); Leal, J.P. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, UCQR, Estrada Nacional No. 10, Apartado 21, 2686-953, Sacavem (Portugal); Centro Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Takacs, E., E-mail: takacs@iki.kfki.hu [Institute of Isotopes, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 77, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Wojnarovits, L. [Institute of Isotopes, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 77, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2009-12-30

    Polyphenols, like gallic acid (GA) released in the environment in larger amount, by inducing some unwanted oxidations, may constitute environmental hazard: their concentration in wastewater should be controlled. Radiolytic degradation of GA was investigated by pulse radiolysis and final product techniques in dilute aqueous solution. Subsidiary measurements were made with 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid (TMBA) and 3,4,5-trihydroxy methylbenzoate (MGA). The hydroxyl radical and hydrogen atom intermediates of water radiolysis react with the solute molecules yielding cyclohexadienyl radicals. The radicals formed in GA and MGA solutions in acid/base catalyzed water elimination decay to phenoxyl radicals. This reaction is not observed in TMBA solution. The hydrated electron intermediate of water decomposition adds to the carbonyl oxygen, the anion thus formed protonates on the ring forming cyclohexadienyl radical or on the carbonyl group forming carbonyl centred radical. The GA intermediates formed during reaction with primary water radicals in presence of oxygen transform to non-aromatic molecules, e.g., to aliphatic carboxylic acids.

  2. Cesium absorption from acidic solutions using ammonium molybdophosphate on a polyacrylonitrile support (AMP-PAN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.J.; Olson, A.L.; Johnson, C.K.

    1995-01-01

    Recent efforts at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) have included evaluation of cesium removal technologies as applied to ICPP acidic radioactive waste streams. Ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) immobilized on a polyacrylonitrile support (AMP-PAN) has been studied as an ion exchange agent for cesium removal from acidic waste solutions. Capacities, distribution coefficients, elutability, and kinetics of cesium-extraction have been evaluated. Exchange breakthrough curves using small columns have been determined from 1M HNO 3 and simulated waste solutions. The theoretical capacity of AMP is 213 g Cs/kg AMP. The average experimental capacity in batch contacts with various acidic solutions was 150 g Cs/kg AMP. The measured cesium distribution coefficients from actual waste solutions were 3287 mL/g for dissolved zirconia calcines, and 2679 mL/g for sodium-bearing waste. The cesium in the dissolved alumina calcines was analyzed for; however, the concentration was below analytical detectable limits resulting in inconclusive results. The reaction kinetics are very rapid (2-10 minutes). Cesium absorption appears to be independent of acid concentration over the range tested (0.1 M to 5 M HNO 3 )

  3. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed in...

  4. Removing ferric ions from concentrated acid leaching solution of an uranium ore by jarosite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Huanbi; Hu Yezang

    1997-01-01

    The author expounds the fundamental rules of removing ferric ions by jarosite and presents results of removing ferric ions from concentrated acid curing-trickle leaching solution of an uranium ore. It turns out that the method can be applied to uranium hydrometallurgical process effectively

  5. Nanostructural characterization of large-scale porous alumina fabricated via anodizing in arsenic acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiya, Shunta; Kikuchi, Tatsuya, E-mail: kiku@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Natsui, Shungo; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Anodic porous alumina was formed in an arsenic acid solution. • Potential difference (voltage) anodizing at 340 V was achieved. • The porous alumina was slightly ordered under the appropriate conditions. • Pore sealing behavior was not observed in boiling distilled water. • The porous alumina exhibits a white photoluminescence emission under UV irradiation. - Abstract: Anodizing of aluminum in an arsenic acid solution is reported for the fabrication of anodic porous alumina. The highest potential difference (voltage) without oxide burning increased as the temperature and the concentration of the arsenic acid solution decreased, and a high anodizing potential difference of 340 V was achieved. An ordered porous alumina with several tens of cells was formed in 0.1–0.5 M arsenic acid solutions at 310–340 V for 20 h. However, the regularity of the porous alumina was not improved via anodizing for 72 h. No pore sealing behavior of the porous alumina was observed upon immersion in boiling distilled water, and it may be due to the formation of an insoluble complex on the oxide surface. The porous alumina consisted of two different layers: a hexagonal alumina layer that contained arsenic from the electrolyte and a pure alumina honeycomb skeleton. The porous alumina exhibited a white photoluminescence emission at approximately 515 nm under UV irradiation at 254 nm.

  6. Chemically modified carbon paste electrode for fast screening of oxalic acid levels in soil solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šestáková, Ivana; Jakl, M.; Jaklová Dytrtová, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 102, - (2008), s. 140-140 E-ISSN 1213-7103. [International Conference on Electroanalysis /12./. 16.06.2008-19.06.2008, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/06/0496 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : oxalic acid * carbon paste electrodes * soil solutions Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  7. Solution blow spun Poly(lactic acid)/Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose nanofibers with antimicrobial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanofibers containing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and tetracycline hydrochloride (THC) were solution blow spun from two different solvents, chloroform/acetone (CA, 80:20 v/v) and 2,2,2-triflouroethanol (TFE). The diameter distribution, chemical, thermal, thermal stab...

  8. Ginger extract as green corrosion inhibitor of mild steel in hydrochloric acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidrusli, A.; Suryanto; Mahmood, M.

    2018-01-01

    Ginger extract as corrosion inhibitor from natural resources was studied to prevent corrosion of mild steel in acid media. Ginger rhizome was extracted to produce green corrosion inhibitor (G-1) while ginger powder bought at supermarket was also extract to form green corrosion inhibitor (G-2). Effectiveness of inhibitor in preventing corrosion process of mild steel was studied in 1.0 M of hydrochloric acid. The experiment of weight loss method and polarization technique were conducted to measure corrosion rate and inhibition efficiency of mild steel in solution containing 1.0 M of hydrochloric acid with various concentration of inhibitor at room temperature. The results showed that, the rate of corrosion dropped from 8.09 mmpy in solution containing no inhibitor to 0.72 mmpy in solution containing 150g/l inhibitor while inhibition efficiency up to 91% was obtained. The polarization curve in polarization experiments shows that the inhibition efficiency is 86% with high concentration of inhibitor. The adsorption of ginger extract on the surface of mild steel was observed by using optical microscope and the characterization analysis was done by using pH measurement method. When high concentration of green inhibitor in the acid solution is used, the pH at the surface of steel is increasing.

  9. Moessbauer studies of iron(III)-(indole-3-alkanoic acids) systems in frozen aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, K.; Kuzmann, E.; Homonnay, Z.; Szilagyi, P.A.; Vertes, A.; Kamnev, A.A.; Sharma, V.K.

    2005-01-01

    Moessbauer investigations of iron(III) salts in aqueous solutions in the presence of indole-3-alkanoic acid ligands are described. The measurements showed two parallel reactions between the ligands and ferric ions: a complex formation and a redox process. The oxidation process takes place in the ligands, and a part of Fe 3+ is reduced to Fe 2+ . (author)

  10. Liquid crystalline solutions of cellulose in phosphoric acid for preparing cellulose yarns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerstoel, H.

    2006-01-01

    The presen thesis describes a new process for manufacturing high tenacity and high modulus cellulose yarns. A new direct solvent for cellulose has been discovered, leading to liquid crystalline solutions. This new solvent, superphosphoric acid, rapidly dissolves cellulose. These liquid crystalline

  11. Long-term stability of earthen materials in contact with acidic tailings solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.R.; Erikson, R.L.; Gee, G.W.

    1982-11-01

    The objectives of the studies documented in this report were to use experimental and geochemical computer modeling tools to assess the long-term environmental impact of leachate movement from acidic uranium mill tailings. Liner failure (i.e., an increase in the permeability of the liner material) was not found to be a problem when various acidic tailings solutions leached through liner materials for periods up to 3 years. On the contrary, materials that contained over 30% clay showed a decrease in permeability with time in the laboratory columns. The high clay materials tested appear suitable for lining tailings impoundment ponds. The decreases in permeability are attributed to pore plugging resulting from the precipitation of minerals and solids. This precipitation takes place due to the increase in pH of the tailings solution brought about by the buffering capacity of the soil. Geochemical modeling predicts, and x-ray characterization confirms, that precipitation of solids from solution is occurring in the acidic tailings solution/liner interactions studied. In conclusion the same mineralogical changes and contaminant reactions predicted by geochemical modeling and observed in laboratory studies were found at a drained evaporation pond (Lucky Mc in Wyoming) with a 4 year history of acid attack

  12. An overview of the recovery of acid from spent acidic solutions from steel and electroplating industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Archana; Sahu, K K

    2009-11-15

    Every metal and metallurgical industry is associated with the generation of waste, which may be a solid, liquid or gaseous in nature. Their impacts on the ecological bodies are noticeable due to their complex and hazardous nature affecting the living and non-living environment which is an alarming issue to the environmentalist. The increasingly stringent regulations regarding the discharge of acid and metal into the environment, and the increasing stress upon the recycling/reuse of these effluents after proper treatment have focused the interest of the research community on the development of new approaches for the recovery of acid and metals from industrial wastes. This paper is a critical review on the acidic waste streams generated from steel and electroplating industries particularly from waste pickle liquor and spent bleed streams. Various aspects on the generation of these streams and the methods used for their treatment either for the recovery of acid for reuse or disposal are being dealt with. Major stress is laid upon the hydrometallurgical methods such as solvent extraction.

  13. Forward osmosis for oily wastewater reclamation: Multi-charged oxalic acid complexes as draw solutes

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Qingchun

    2017-06-11

    Forward osmosis (FO) has demonstrated its merits in hybrid FO seawater desalination. However, FO may have a potential for other applications if suitable draw solutes are available. In this study, a series of novel draw solutes based on oxalic acid (OA)-transitional metal complexes are presented. Influential factors of FO performance have been systematically investigated by varying the transitional metals, cations of the complex draw solutes as well as the experimental conditions. Compared to NaCl and other recently synthesized draw solutes, the OA complexes show superior FO performance in terms of high water fluxes up to 27.5 and 89.1 LMH under the respective FO and PRO (pressure retarded osmosis) modes, both with negligible reverse solute fluxes. The features of octahedral geometry, abundant hydrophilic groups and ionic species are crucial for the OA complexes as appropriate draw solutes with satisfactory FO performance. Among the synthesized OA complexes, the ammonium salt of chromic complex (NH4-Cr-OA) outperforms others due to the presence of more ionic species in its complex system. NH4-Cr-OA also performs better than the typical NaCl draw solute in FO oily wastewater treatment with higher water recovery and negligible reverse fluxes. Dilute solutions of OA complexes have been reconcentrated through membrane distillation (MD) and reused to new round of FO processes. The OA complexes have demonstrated their suitability and superiority as a novel class of draw solutes for the FO process in this study.

  14. EPR spectra of vanadyl(2) intra-complexes with amino acids in solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shodiev, U.M.; Musaev, Z.M.; Khodzhaev, O.F.; Usmankhodzhaeva, Ya.S.; Parpiev, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    EPR spectra of vanadyl (2) intracomplexes with glycine, α- and β-alanines, benzoylglycine, lencine, glutamine and the aspartic acid of VOL 2 xH 2 O composition as well as with cystine of VOLxH 2 O composition (where L-monodeprotonated, in case of cystine and the aspartic acid - dideprotonated form of the amino acid) in aqueous, methanol, dimethylsulfoxide and pyridine solutions are studied. It is established that the structure determined in the solid state is retained in the dimethylsulfoxide solution and partially - in methanol. In aqueous, pyridine and partially in methanol solutions complexes are distorted and two molecules of the amino acid are coordinated monodentately through oxygen atoms of the carboxyl group, and ''vacant'' coordination places in the equatorial plane take two molecules of the solvent. From the data obtained it follows that the metal - nitrogen bond in the vanadyl (2) complexes studied with amino acids is not so strong than the metal - oxygen bond of the carboxyl ligand group

  15. Adsorption of NI (II on activated Carbon of Coconut shell Chemicaly Modifieded with Acid Nitric Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Hernández-Rodríguez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the research the effect of modification of coconut shell activated carbon with diluted solutions of nitric acid, in its chemical characteristics and removal capacity of the nickel (II ions present in modeling solutions of sulfates with similar characteristics to the acid liquor waste of the nickel industry, was studied. The characterization of the adsorbent material evidenced that the modification process increases the superficial acids groups according with the increase of acid nitric concentration employee in the treatment. The adsorption equilibrium tests, carried out with metallic species solutions at concentrations between 0,5 and 3,5 g/L evidenced that the process is described by Freundlich model. The effect of chemical modification of the adsorbent material in adsorption capacity of nickel (II ions was evaluated using a traditional experimental design at pH of 1,2 and 6,9 units, obtaining that the increase of acid groups in the carbon surface causes an increase of adsorption capacity and removal percentages of nickel (II, due to specific interactions of these groups with the metal cations.

  16. Effect of organic solvents on dissolution process of mechano-chemically activated molybdenum by inorganic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevtsova, I.Ya.; Chernyak, A.S.; Khal'zov, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    The process of chemical dissolution of mechanochemically activated and nonactivated molybdenite by inorganic acid solutions in certain organic solvents of different nature was considered. It is shown that the highest extraction of molybdenum in solution is achieved in the presence of nitric acid. The dissociation constant of the acid used in the given organic solvent does not affect molybdenite solubility. When dissolving molybdenite by solutions of nitric acid in carbonic acids, alcohols and esters, the solubility of the concentrate depends on the length of hydrocarbon chain of the organic solvent and dispersion degree of mineral source material

  17. Impedance and hydrogen evolution studies on magnesium alloy in oxalic acid solution containing different anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fekry, A.M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt)

    2010-12-15

    The corrosion behavior of AZ31E alloy was investigated in oxalic acid solution using different electrochemical techniques. The effect of concentration was studied, where the corrosion rate was found to increase with increasing oxalic acid concentration and hydrogen evolution. The effect of adding Cl{sup -}, F{sup -} or PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} ions on the electrochemical behavior of AZ31E electrode was studied in 0.01 M oxalic acid solution at 298 K. It was found that the corrosion rate increases with increasing Cl{sup -} or F{sup -} ion concentration, however, it decreases with increasing PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} ion concentration. Good agreement was observed between the results obtained from electrochemical techniques and confirmed by Scanning electron micrographs. (author)

  18. Spectrophotometric determination of uranium and plutonium in nitric acid solutions at their co-presence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levakov, B.I.; Mishenev, V.B.; Nezgovorov, N.Yu.; Ryazanova, G.K.; Timofeev, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    The method of spectrophotometric determination of uranium (6) and plutonium (4) in nitric acid solutions is described. Uranium is determined by light absorption of the complex with arsenazo 3 in 0.05 mol/l nitric acid at λ=654 nm, plutonium - by light absorption of the complex with xylenol orange in 0.1 mol/l nitric acid at λ=540 nm. To disguise plutonium, tetravalent and certain trivalent elements DTPA is introduced into photometered solution for uranium determination. The relative root-mean square deviation of determination results does not exceed 0.03 in uranium concenration ranges 0.5-5 μg/ml, of plutonium -1-3 μg/ml

  19. Synthesis of highly ordered TiO2 nanotube in malonic acid solution by anodization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Won Hee; Park, Chan Jin; Kwon, Hyuk Sang

    2008-10-01

    We synthesized TiO2 nanotube array by anodizing in a solution of malonic acid (HOOCCH2COOH) and NH4F, and analyzed the morphology of the nanotube using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphology of TiO2 nanotube was largely affected by anodizing time, anodizing voltage, and malonic acid concentration. With increasing the anodizing voltage from 5 V to 20 V, the diameter of TiO2 nanotube was increased from about 20 nm to 110 nm and its length from about 10 nm to 700 nm. In addition, the length of TiO2 nanotube was increased with increasing anodizing time up to 6 h at 20 V. We obtained the longest and the most highly ordered nanotube structure when anodizing Ti in a solution of 0.5 wt% NH4F and 1 M malonic acid at 20 V for 6 h.

  20. Inhibitory effect of some carbazides on corrosion of aluminium in hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouda, A.S. [El-Mansoura Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Chemistry; Madkour, L.H. [Tanta Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Chemistry; Elshafei, A.A. [El-Mansoura Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Chemistry; Elasklany, A.H. [El-Mansoura Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-06-01

    The dissolution of aluminium in hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide solutions in the presence of semicarbazide, thiosemicarbazide and sym.diphenylcarbazide as corrosion inhibitors has been studied using thermometric, weight-loss and polarization methods. The three methods gave consistent results. The higher inhibition efficiency of these compounds in acidic than in alkaline madia may be due to the less negative potential of aluminium in hydrochloric acid solution, favouring adsorption of the additive. The adsorption of these compounds were found to obey Frumkin adsorption isotherm. Cathodic polarization measurements showed that these compounds are cathodic inhibitors and their adsorption in the double layer does not change the mechanism of the hydrogen evolution reaction. The results are analysed in terms of both molecular and cationic adsorption. (orig.)

  1. Contribution to the study of the redox couple Np(VI)/Np(V) in the presence of uranium(VI) in solutions of nitric acid and nitrous acid; Contribution a l'etude du comportement redox du couple Np(VI)/Np(V) en presence d'uranium VI dans les solutions constituees d'acide nitrique et d'acide nitreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arpigny, S. [CEA Marcoule, Dept. de Radiochimie et Procedes, DRP, 30 (France)

    2001-07-01

    The redox behavior of the Np(VI)/Np(V) couple was the subject of a spectrometric study of the Np(VI) reduction reaction in nitric acid solutions (4 to 5 M) containing variable concentrations (1.5 to 3.5 x 10{sup -3} M) of nitrous acid. A low nitrous acid concentration and a high nitric acid concentration were found to favor the stabilization of Np(VI). The stoichiometric coefficients of nitrous acid and nitric acid in the Np(VI) reduction reaction were determined thermodynamically, although only the reaction order with respect to HNO{sub 2} could be calculated from a kinetic analysis. Adding nitrate ions to a HNO{sub 3}/HNO{sub 2} solution enhanced the stability of neptunium at oxidation state +VI, but also increased the reduction rate. When uranium(VI) was added to the HNO{sub 3}/HNO{sub 2} solutions, the total quantity of neptunium at oxidation state +V (either free or as a Np(V)-U(VI) complex) remained practically unchanged, as did the Np(VI) reduction rate. The electrochemical behavior of the Np(VI)/Np(V) couple was investigated in a weak acidic medium by voltammetry with an ultra-micro-electrode (UME). The oxidation wave limiting current variation was a linear function of the Np(V) concentration when a gold UME was used, but not with a platinum UME; the reduction wave limiting current variation versus the Np(V) concentration was linear with either gold or platinum UMEs. The presence of the Np(V)-U(VI) complex in the neptunium solutions was characterized by a shift in the normal apparent potential of the Np(VI)/Np(V) couple toward anodic potentials consistent with the previously determined values of the complexation constants. (author)

  2. Mixed field radiation effects on dry and acidic solution saturated polyamide 6,6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ont., K7K 7B4 (Canada); Bonin, H.W. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ont., K7K 7B4 (Canada)]. E-mail: bonin-h@rmc.ca; Bui, V.T. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ont., K7K 7B4 (Canada)

    2005-05-15

    The disposal of Canada's radioactive waste materials has been the focus of ongoing research at the Royal Military College of Canada, in the use of polymer-based composite materials for the fabrication of disposal containers. An evaluation of the performance of polyamide 6,6 after exposure to radiation and acidic aqueous solutions provides the basis for the assessment of the lifetime performance of a polymeric-based storage container. This work demonstrates the importance of the combined effects of aqueous solution diffusion and radiation exposure on the mechanical performance and molecular structure of polyamide 6,6. Irradiation of dry samples initially results in a marked reduction of mechanical performance, however, post-irradiation aging allows for the return to pre-irradiation mechanical strength. Samples irradiated after exposure to either distilled water or 0.1 M sulfuric acid solutions exhibited increases in mechanical performance upon exposure to a mixed field radioactive environment.

  3. Mixed field radiation effects on dry and acidic solution saturated polyamide 6,6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.; Bonin, H.W.; Bui, V.T.

    2005-01-01

    The disposal of Canada's radioactive waste materials has been the focus of ongoing research at the Royal Military College of Canada, in the use of polymer-based composite materials for the fabrication of disposal containers. An evaluation of the performance of polyamide 6,6 after exposure to radiation and acidic aqueous solutions provides the basis for the assessment of the lifetime performance of a polymeric-based storage container. This work demonstrates the importance of the combined effects of aqueous solution diffusion and radiation exposure on the mechanical performance and molecular structure of polyamide 6,6. Irradiation of dry samples initially results in a marked reduction of mechanical performance, however, post-irradiation aging allows for the return to pre-irradiation mechanical strength. Samples irradiated after exposure to either distilled water or 0.1 M sulfuric acid solutions exhibited increases in mechanical performance upon exposure to a mixed field radioactive environment

  4. Anion-exchange Studies of Radioactive Trace Elements in Sulphuric Acid Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsahl, K

    1963-01-15

    As part of a chemical group separation procedure used as a pretreatment in gamma spectrometric analysis, a study has been made of the adsorption from sulphuric acid solutions on strongly basic anion exchange resins, prepared in the hydroxide and the sulphate forms, of trace activities of Na, P, K, Ca, Sc, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ag, Cd, In, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Hf, Ta, W, Ir, Pa and Np. Besides adsorbing some of the trace elements in the solution, the anion exchange resin in the hydroxide form will neutralize the bulk of the sulphuric acid. This makes possible the subsequent sequential separation of chloride complexes on short anion-exchange columns by a stepwise increasing of the HCl concentration of the solution. On the basis of the results obtained in the present and earlier experiments, a new improved chemical group-separation procedure for mixtures of radioactive trace elements is outlined.

  5. A mathematical model for chemical reactions with actinide elements in the aqueous nitric acid solution: REACT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachimori, Shoichi

    1990-02-01

    A mathematical model of chemical reactions with actinide elements: REACT code, was developed to simulate change of valency states of U, Pu and Np in the aqueous nitric acid solution. Twenty seven rate equations for the redox reactions involving some reductants, disproportionation reactions, and radiolytic growth and decay reaction of nitrous acid were programmed in the code . Eight numerical solution methods such as Porsing method to solve the rate equations were incorporated parallel as options depending on the characteristics of the reaction systems. The present report gives a description of the REACT code, e.g., chemical reactions and their rate equations, numerical solution methods, and some examples of the calculation results. A manual and a source file of the program was attached to the appendix. (author)

  6. The response of soil solution chemistry in European forests to decreasing acid deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, James; Pannatier, Elisabeth Graf; Carnicelli, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    to emissions controls. In this study, we assessed the response of soil solution chemistry in mineral horizons of European forests to these changes. Trends in pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), major ions, total aluminium (Altot) and dissolved organic carbon were determined for the period 1995–2012. Plots...... with at least 10 years of observations from the ICP Forests monitoring network were used. Trends were assessed for the upper mineral soil (10–20 cm, 104 plots) and subsoil (40–80 cm, 162 plots). There was a large decrease in the concentration of sulphate () in soil solution; over a 10‐year period (2000...... over the entire dataset. The response of soil solution acidity was nonuniform. At 10–20 cm, ANC increased in acid‐sensitive soils (base saturation ≤10%) indicating a recovery, but ANC decreased in soils with base saturation >10%. At 40–80 cm, ANC remained unchanged in acid‐sensitive soils (base...

  7. Effect of Surface Precipitate on the Crevice Corrosion in HYBRID and Oxalic Acid Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. Y.; Jung, J. Y.; Won, H. J.; Kim, S. B.; Choi, W. K.; Moon, J. K.; Park, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the characteristics of the crevice corrosion for Inconel-600 and 304SS in OA solution according to the change in pH. The evaluation of the crevice corrosion with the chemical thermodynamic analysis identified the effect of the residual chemicals such as iron-oxalate and nickeloxalate to the crevice corrosion behavior. Test results were compared with those of HYBRID (HYdrizine Base Reductive metal Ion Decontamination). The crevice corrosion properties of 304 SS and Inconel-600 in HYBRID and oxalic acid solution were evaluated. In case of oxalic acid solution, the corrosion rate on 304SS was rapidly increased with a pH decrease of around 2, but there was no increase in the corrosion rate on Inconel-600

  8. Raman spectrometric determination of Pu(VI) and Pu(V) in nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantner, E.; Freudenberger, M.; Steinert, D.; Ache, H.J.

    1987-03-01

    The determination of Pu(VI) in nitric acid solutions by spontaneous Laser Raman Spectrometry (LRS) was investigated and a calibration curve was established using U(VI) as internal standard. In addition, the concentrations of Pu(VI) and Pu(V) as a function of time were measured by this method in Pu(VI) solutions of different acidity containing H 2 O 2 as the reducing agent. In solutions which are intensely coloured by the presence of Ru(NO) complexes Pu(VI) can also be determined by LRS using a Kr + laser as excitation source. In future experiments, the study of the Pu(IV)-interaction with Ru using LRS and spectrophotometry as analytical techniques is therefore intended. (orig.) [de

  9. Characterisation of solution cast cellulose nanofibre – reinforced poly(lactic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose nanofibres, 20 nm in diameter and 300 nm long, were prepared by acid hydrolysis of flax yarns. Composite films containing 2.5 and 5.0 wt% flax cellulose (FC fibres were prepared by solution casting of mixtures of poly(lactic acid (PLA solution and cellulose nanofibre suspension in chloroform. The resulting composite films and solution cast pure PLA film, with thickness of around 160 m, showed good transparency. For composites with 2.5 and 5.0 wt% FC, the tensile strength increased by 25 and 59% and tensile modulus by 42 and 47%, respectively, compared to pure PLA film. The composite film with 2.5 wt% FC combined high strength and ductility with tensile strength of 24.3 MPa and 70% elongation at break. Flax cellulose appeared to facilitate nucleation and subsequent crystallisation of PLA more effectively in the amorphous composites than in the crystalline composites.

  10. High-temperature extraction of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with trialkylamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladyhev, V.P.; Andreeva, N.N.; Kim, E.M.; Kovaleva, S.V.

    1985-01-01

    This paper attempts to determine the possibility of conducting high-temperature extraction of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with trialkylamines (TAA) using higher hydrocarbon-paraffin mixtures as the diluent of the extraction system. Substitution of kerosene by paraffin in the extraction system would permit decreasing the danger of fire and explosions during he extraction process. In extracting rhenium from industrial solutions with a melt of higher paraffins containing TAA and alcohols, the extraction system can be continously heated in heat exchangers through which washing sulfuric acid passes and then goes to the extractor. This permits utilizing the heat and decreases the temperature of the solutions for extraction to the optimum temperatures. Extraction of rhenium with a melt of trioctylamine in paraffin obeys the same mechanisms as high-temperature extraction of ruthenium (IV) by amines in kerosene and aromatic hydrocarbons

  11. Porous polycarbene-bearing membrane actuator for ultrasensitive weak-acid detection and real-time chemical reaction monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian-Ke; Zhang, Weiyi; Guterman, Ryan; Lin, Hui-Juan; Yuan, Jiayin

    2018-04-30

    Soft actuators with integration of ultrasensitivity and capability of simultaneous interaction with multiple stimuli through an entire event ask for a high level of structure complexity, adaptability, and/or multi-responsiveness, which is a great challenge. Here, we develop a porous polycarbene-bearing membrane actuator built up from ionic complexation between a poly(ionic liquid) and trimesic acid (TA). The actuator features two concurrent structure gradients, i.e., an electrostatic complexation (EC) degree and a density distribution of a carbene-NH 3 adduct (CNA) along the membrane cross-section. The membrane actuator performs the highest sensitivity among the state-of-the-art soft proton actuators toward acetic acid at 10 -6  mol L -1 (M) level in aqueous media. Through competing actuation of the two gradients, it is capable of monitoring an entire process of proton-involved chemical reactions that comprise multiple stimuli and operational steps. The present achievement constitutes a significant step toward real-life application of soft actuators in chemical sensing and reaction technology.

  12. Whole-body nitrogen and tyrosine metabolism in surgical patients receiving branched-chain amino acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, S.P.; Bistrian, B.R.; Moldawer, L.L.; Blackburn, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    Fifteen patients undergoing gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity received preoperatively a standard crystalline amino acid solution containing 15.6% branched-chain amino acids. During the first five postoperative days, the patients were randomized to receive one of three amino acid solutions of different branched-chain amino acid content. Whole-body amino acid appearance and oxidation were estimated using a continuous intravenous infusion of L-(U- 14 C)-tyrosine preoperatively and on the third postoperative day. This study suggests that an adequate nitrogen intake of a balanced amino acid mixture, as well as a solution enriched with branched-chain amino acids, maintains protein homeostasis and supports protein synthesis similarly in well-nourished patients following major abdominal surgery. A diet containing only branched-chain amino acids in isomolar ratios was as effective at maintaining protein retention and whole-body protein synthesis and albumin renewal postoperatively when compared with a standard amino acid formula

  13. Thermometric Study of Inhibition of Aluminium Corrosion in Hydrochloric Acid Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Al Gaber, A.S. [امينة سلطان الجابر; Seliman, S. A.; Mourad, M.

    1997-01-01

    The use of 6- amino - 4- (4-phenyl)-l,4- dihydro -3- methylpyrano [2,3- c] pyrazole -5- carbonitrile and some related compounds as corrosion inhibitors for aluminium in 2 M HCl solution was studied by the thermometric method. The results indicate that the additives reduce the corrosion rate via weak adsorption through the cationic oxygen of the pyran ring. They act as mixed inhibitors and their adsorption was found to obey Frumkin's isotherm. The inhibition efficiency of the additives is rela...

  14. Solution of Azelaic Acid (20%), Resorcinol (10%) and Phytic Acid (6%) Versus Glycolic Acid (50%) Peeling Agent in the Treatment of Female Patients with Facial Melasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Gita; Taheri, Azam; Shahmoradi, Zabihollah; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali

    2017-01-01

    Melasma, a common acquired disorder of hyperpigmentation, especially in women, is often resistant to therapy. This study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of azelaic acid, resorcinol and phytic acid solution in chemical peeling of melasma in comparison to 50% glycolic acid. This clinical trial was performed, on 42 female patients with bilateral melasma. Severity of melasma was assessed by melasma area and severity index (MASI). Combination of (20% azelaic acid + 10% resorcinol + 6% phytic acid) was used as a new peeling agent on the right side of the face and 50% glycolic acid on the left side every 2 weeks for 6 times. Follow-up was carried out for 3 months after the last session. Any decrease in MASI score and unwanted complications following peeling were evaluated and compared during the trial. Patients showed marked improvement as calculated with MASI score before and after treatment in both sides of the face. The efficacy of combination formula (azelaic acid, resorcinol and phytic acid) was similar to glycolic acid, but with fewer complications. There was no statistically difference in improvement between two groups ( P > 0.05). However, the patient's discomfort following procedures was significantly lower with azelaic acid, resorcinol and phytic compared with the glycolic acid peels ( P < 0.05) and there was the same duration in the beginning of the therapeutic response in both groups. Results showed that triple-combination was found to be an effective and safe peeling agent in the treatment of melasma and it was as effective as 50% glycolic acid peel.

  15. Solution of Azelaic Acid (20%, Resorcinol (10% and Phytic Acid (6% Versus Glycolic Acid (50% Peeling Agent in the Treatment of Female Patients with Facial Melasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Faghihi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Melasma, a common acquired disorder of hyperpigmentation, especially in women, is often resistant to therapy. This study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of azelaic acid, resorcinol and phytic acid solution in chemical peeling of melasma in comparison to 50% glycolic acid. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial was performed, on 42 female patients with bilateral melasma. Severity of melasma was assessed by melasma area and severity index (MASI. Combination of (20% azelaic acid + 10% resorcinol + 6% phytic acid was used as a new peeling agent on the right side of the face and 50% glycolic acid on the left side every 2 weeks for 6 times. Follow-up was carried out for 3 months after the last session. Any decrease in MASI score and unwanted complications following peeling were evaluated and compared during the trial. Results: Patients showed marked improvement as calculated with MASI score before and after treatment in both sides of the face. The efficacy of combination formula (azelaic acid, resorcinol and phytic acid was similar to glycolic acid, but with fewer complications. There was no statistically difference in improvement between two groups (P > 0.05. However, the patient's discomfort following procedures was significantly lower with azelaic acid, resorcinol and phytic compared with the glycolic acid peels (P < 0.05 and there was the same duration in the beginning of the therapeutic response in both groups. Conclusion: Results showed that triple-combination was found to be an effective and safe peeling agent in the treatment of melasma and it was as effective as 50% glycolic acid peel.

  16. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renwu Zhou

    Full Text Available Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS. Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma.

  17. RECOVERY OF CARBOXYLIC ACIDS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION WITH A TRIISOOCTYLAMINE DILUENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Malmary

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Tertiary alkylamines in solution with organic diluents are attractive extractants for the recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous phases. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism for extraction of organic acids from water by a long-chain aliphatic tertiary amine. In order to attain this objective, we studied the liquid-liquid equilibria between the triisooctylamine + 1-octanol + n-heptane system as solvent and an aqueous solution of an individual carboxylic acid such as citric, lactic and malic acids. The experiments showed that the partition coefficient for a particular organic acid depends on the kind of solute, notably when the acid concentration in the aqueous phase is low. A mathematical model, where both chemical association and physical distribution are taken into consideration, is proposed. The model suggests that the various complexes obtained between amine and organic acids contribute to the distribution of the solute between the coexisting phases in equilibrium.

  18. Direct and indirect photodegradation of estriol in the presence of humic acid, nitrate and iron complexes in water solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yong [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, MA 02747 (United States); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Kai [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, MA 02747 (United States); Zuo, Yuegang, E-mail: yzuo@umassd.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, MA 02747 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The photochemical behavior of a natural estrogen estriol (E3) was investigated in the presence of the natural photoreactive constituents including nitrate, iron(III), and humic acid (HA). The direct photodegradation of E3 increased with increasing incident light intensity, decreasing initial concentration of E3 and increasing pH in the range of 6.0 to 10.0. The direct photodegradation of the deprotonated speciation of E3 was much faster than that of its protonated form. The presence of NO{sub 3}{sup −} and iron(III) promoted the photochemical loss of E3 in the aqueous solutions. The quenching experiments verified that hydroxyl radicals were predominantly responsible for the indirect photodegradation of E3. HA could act as photosensitizer, light screening agent and free radical quencher. For the first time, the enhancement or inhibition effect of HA on photodegradation was found to depend on the irradiation light intensity. HA enhanced the photodegradation of E3 under sunlight or weak irradiation of simulated sunlight. In contrast, under high irradiation light intensity, HA inhibited the photodegradation. The hydroxylation photoproducts were identified using GC-MS and the photodegradation pathway of E3 was proposed. - Highlights: • Direct and indirect photodegradation of estriol (E3) were first investigated. • The direct photodegradation of E3 increased with increasing pH of the solutions. • The light intensity affected the photosensitization effect of humic acid. • Nitrate and iron(III) promoted the photodecomposition of estriol in water. • The ·OH oxidation products of E3 was first determined.

  19. Some features of transplutonium and rare earth elements extraction by HDEHP from lactic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, V.M.; Lebedev, V.M.; Lebedeva, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanisms of transplutonium (TPE) and rare earth elements (REE) extraction by HDEHP from lactic acid solutions are analysed in the literature. On the base of the known expressions and experimental data the model for TPE and REE extraction by HDEHP from lactic acid, accounting lactic acid and metal extraction as MeA 3 x3HA, MeLA 2 x2HA and MeLA 2 complexes, is suggested. The expression, permitting to estimate quantitatively the effect of TPE and REE complexing with lactic acid and the extraction of complex forms on the distribution coefficient of the extracted metal, is obtained. Comparison of calculational data with experimental ones show their good coincidence that confirms the rightness of the model accepted for extraction

  20. Evaluation of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution and gel for smear layer removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotto, Sidney Ricardo; Travassos, Rosana Maria Coelho; de Oliveira, Elias Pandonor Motcy; Machado, Manoel Eduardo de Lima; Martins, José Luiz

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of 24% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) gel and 17% EDTA solution in cleaning dentine walls after root canal instrumentation. Thirty human canine teeth were divided into three groups of 10 teeth each. In Group 1, 1% sodium hypochlorite was used as the irrigating solution; in Group 2, 1% sodium hypochlorite was used with 17% EDTA solution; and in Group 3, 1% sodium hypochlorite was used with 24% EDTA gel. The presence of a smear layer was analysed after instrumentation using scanning electron microscopy. The Kruskal-Wallis test revealed a statistical difference (P 0.05). The results indicate that 1% sodium hypochlorite alone does not remove the smear layer and that there was no statistical difference between EDTA gel and EDTA solution in smear layer removal.

  1. Comparative study of polypyrrole films electrosynthesized in alkaline and acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehr, I.L.; Quinzani, O.V.; Saidman, S.B.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the pH of electropolymerization solutions on the properties of polypyrrole films has been studied using potentiodynamic techniques and faradaic impedance spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), IR and Raman spectroscopies, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were also used for products characterization. Results indicate that, contrary to what happen with the polymer electrogenerated in acid solutions, the films prepared in alkaline media are stable and present good electrochemical activity in basic solutions. Possible explanations for the observed differences are discussed and it is proposed that the pH of electropolymerization medium directly affects chains organization. Electrosynthesis in solutions of increased basicity results in a more compact and closed polymer structure.

  2. Evaluation of Acoustic Cavitation in Terephthalic Acid Solutions Containing Gold Nanoparticles by the Spectrofluorometry Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameneh Sazgarnia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. When a liquid is irradiated with high intensity and low-frequency ultrasound, acoustic cavitation occurs. The existence of particles in a liquid provides nucleation sites for cavitation bubbles and leads to a decrease in the ultrasonic intensity threshold needed for cavitation onset. Materials and Methods. The study was designed to measure hydroxyl radicals in terephthalic acid solutions containing gold nanoparticles in a near field of a 1 MHz sonotherapy probe. The effect of ultrasound irradiation parameters containing mode of sonication and ultrasound intensity in hydroxyl radicals production have been investigated by the spectrofluorometry method. Results. Recorded fluorescence signal in terephthalic acid solution containing gold nanoparticles was higher than the terephthalic acid solution without gold nanoparticles. Also, the results showed that any increase in intensity of the sonication would be associated with an increase in the fluorescence intensity. Conclusion. Acoustic cavitation in the presence of gold nanoparticles has been introduced as a way for improving therapeutic effects on the tumors in sonodynamic therapy. Also, the terephthalic acid dosimetry is suitable for detecting and quantifying free hydroxyl radicals as a criterion of cavitation production over a certain range of conditions in medical ultrasound fields.

  3. Effects of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, polyamines, amino acids, and weak bases (amines and ammonia) on development and ribosomal RNA synthesis in Xenopus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiokawa, Koichiro; Aso, Mai; Kondo, Takeshi; Takai, Jun-Ichi; Yoshida, Junki; Mishina, Takamichi; Fuchimukai, Kota; Ogasawara, Tsukasa; Kariya, Taro; Tashiro, Kosuke; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2010-02-01

    We have been studying control mechanisms of gene expression in early embryogenesis in a South African clawed toad Xenopus laevis, especially during the period of midblastula transition (MBT), or the transition from the phase of active cell division (cleavage stage) to the phase of extensive morphogenesis (post-blastular stages). We first found that ribosomal RNA synthesis is initiated shortly after MBT in Xenopus embryos and those weak bases, such as amines and ammonium ion, selectively inhibit the initiation and subsequent activation of rRNA synthesis. We then found that rapidly labeled heterogeneous mRNA-like RNA is synthesized in embryos at pre-MBT stage. We then performed cloning and expression studies of several genes, such as those for activin receptors, follistatin and aldolases, and then reached the studies of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), a key enzyme in polyamine metabolism. Here, we cloned a Xenopus SAMDC cDNA and performed experiments to overexpress the in vitro-synthesized SAMDC mRNA in Xenopus early embryos, and found that the maternally preset program of apoptosis occurs in cleavage stage embryos, which is executed when embryos reach the stage of MBT. In the present article, we first summarize results on SAMDC and the maternal program of apoptosis, and then describe our studies on small-molecular-weight substances like polyamines, amino acids, and amines in Xenopus embryos. Finally, we summarize our studies on weak bases, especially on ammonium ion, as the specific inhibitor of ribosomal RNA synthesis in Xenopus embryonic cells.

  4. Behaviour of Type 316 steel in acidic sulphate solutions at 300-3500C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, J.F.

    1987-11-01

    Most cation resin beds in service in CEGB power stations, and particularly those in AGR stations, are regenerated with sulphuric acid. Slippage results in trace levels of sulphate passing into the boilers. Previous work has shown that in once-through boilers, feedwater containing 2 μg kg -1 of sulphate could concentrate at localized dry-out sites to form solutions having from 0.1 to 7 wt% of solute. It has been shown also that if the sulphate was present in an acidic solution and it were to be in contact with Type 316 austentitic superheater steel, then intergranular corrosion and intergranular cracking could occur. Previous data, including some unreported results, are tabulated and discussed. The current work had two main objectives. The first was to extend the previous investigations to examine a wider range of acidic sulphate concentrations (as indicated by calculations on the concentration of solute in feedwater), the influence of environment pH, and the effect of sensitization of specimens. The second objective was primarily concerned with elucidating the causes of scatter in the results. This involved examining the influence of electrode potential, the ageing characteristics of the environment, and the method of applying stress to the specimens. (author)

  5. Investigation of radiation-chemical behaviour of divalent palladium in perchloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirova, M.V.; Kalinina, S.V.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma-radiolysis of divalent palladium in perchloric acid solutions is studied. Absorption spectra of intermediate palladium compounds formed in the irradiated solution are taken. The analysis of literature data as well as comparative analysis of the absorption spectra obtained under irradiation of palladium (2) perchloric acid solutions with absorption spectra of palladium chlorocomplexes allows to suppose that the mentioned compounds are chlorocomplexes of palladium (2) of different composition depending on HClO 4 concentration in the initial solution and absorbed radiation dose. Radiation-chemical reduction of palladium (2) up to metal is stated to take place in the whole studied range of initial concentrations of components of the system and dose rates. Kinetic dependences of metallic palladium formation are obtained. Values of radiation-chemical yields of metallic palladium formation depending on the initial concentrations of palladium (2) and perchloric acid are given. A mechanism of radiolytic reduction of palladium (2) in the investigated system is suggested based on the experimental data, and a theoretical value of the radiation-chemical yield of palladium (2) reduction being in a good agreement with experimentally found values is calculated

  6. Heat integration of an ethanol polygeneration plant based on lignocellulose: Comparing weak acid hydrolysis and enzymatic hydrolysis; Energiintegrerat etanolkombinat baserat paa lignocellulosa - Jaemfoerelse mellan svagsyrahydrolys och enzymhydrolys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Marcus; Nordman, Roger; Taherzadeh, Mohammad

    2011-07-01

    Plants for bioethanol production have been planned in several cities in Sweden, including Boraas. This report provides answers to general questions regarding how such a facility's energy demand is affected by the external integration with a heat and power plant and the internal energy integration between process units. Heat integration of a bioethanol plant means that energy is reused as much as is technically possible; this sets a practical minimum level for the energy demand of the plant. In the study, ethanol production from cellulose has been simulated using Aspen Plus. Weak acid hydrolysis and enzymatic hydrolysis have been simulated, each with 50,000 and 100,000 tonnes of ethanol per year, resulting in four simulation cases. In all cases, heat integration is evaluated using pinch analysis. The steam in the ethanol plant has been covered by steam from a heat and power plant similar to that found today in Boraas. It is important to note that the energy quotas reported here includes energy use for upgrading the residual products. This leads to lower energy quotas than would be the case if the upgrading of residuals were allocated outside of the ethanol production. The conclusions from the project are: - The steam demand of the ethanol plant leads to a reduction in both the electricity and heat production of the heat and power plant. For the weak acid hydrolysis, the electricity loss is relatively high, 26-98%, which will affect the revenue significantly. The loss of electricity production is lower for the enzymatic process: 11-47%. - The difference in decreased electricity between the theoretical case of heating the raw material and the two alternative heating cases is about a factor of two, so the design of the heating of raw material is extremely important. - The reduced heat output of the power plant can, in most cases, be balanced by the surplus heat from the ethanol plant, but to completely balance the shortage, heat over 100 deg C must be used

  7. Adsorption of uranium ions by crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cemal Oezeroglu; Niluefer Metin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the crosslinked polyester resin containing acrylic acid functional groups was used for the adsorption of uranium ions from aqueous solutions. For this purpose, the crosslinked polyester resin of unsaturated polyester in styrene monomer (Polipol 353, Poliya) and acrylic acid as weight percentage at 80 and 20%, respectively was synthesized by using methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKp, Butanox M60, Azo Nobel)-cobalt octoate initiator system. The adsorption of uranium ions on the sample (0.05 g copolymer and 5 mL of U(VI) solution were mixed) of the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid was carried out in a batch reactor. The effects of adsorption parameters of the contact time, temperature, pH of solution and initial uranium(VI) concentration for U(VI) adsorption on the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid were investigated. The adsorption data obtained from experimental results depending on the initial U(VI) concentration were analyzed by the Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity and free energy change were determined by using D-R isotherm. The obtained experimental adsorption data depending on temperature were evaluated to calculate the thermodynamic parameters of enthalpy (ΔH o ), entropy (ΔS o ) and free energy change (ΔG o ) for the U(VI) adsorption on the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid from aqueous solutions. The obtained adsorption data depending on contact time were analyzed by using adsorption models such as the modified Freundlich, Elovich, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. (author)

  8. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  9. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660±0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46±0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 x 10 6 ±3.56 x 10 4 at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610±0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412±0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72±1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured

  10. Weak relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Selleri, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Weak Relativity is an equivalent theory to Special Relativity according to Reichenbach’s definition, where the parameter epsilon equals to 0. It formulates a Neo-Lorentzian approach by replacing the Lorentz transformations with a new set named “Inertial Transformations”, thus explaining the Sagnac effect, the twin paradox and the trip from the future to the past in an easy and elegant way. The cosmic microwave background is suggested as a possible privileged reference system. Most importantly, being a theory based on experimental proofs, rather than mutual consensus, it offers a physical description of reality independent of the human observation.

  11. Metabolic Engineering of Yeast to Produce Fatty Acid-derived Biofuels: Bottlenecks and Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayuan eSheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid-derived biofuels can be a better solution than bioethanol to replace petroleum fuel, since they have similar energy content and combustion properties as current transportation fuels. The environmentally friendly microbial fermentation process has been used to synthesize advanced biofuels from renewable feedstock. Due to their robustness as well as the high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors and phage contamination, yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica have attracted tremendous attention in recent studies regarding the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, including fatty acids, fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and fatty alkanes. However, the native yeast strains cannot produce fatty acids and fatty acid-derived biofuels in large quantities. To this end, we have summarized recent publications in this review on metabolic engineering of yeast strains to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, identified the bottlenecks that limit the productivity of biofuels, and categorized the appropriate approaches to overcome these obstacles.

  12. Corrosion of stainless steel in alcohol solutions of the simplest carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigdorovich, V.I.; Korneeva, T.V.; Tsygankova, L.E.

    1975-01-01

    The behaviour of stainless Kh18N10T steel is considered in the methanol and ethanol solutions of formic and acetic acids, respectively. Consideration is given to the effect of the concentration (C) of the acid (0.01-1.00 N), water (0.1-20.0 mass.%) and temperature (room temperature, 40 and 60 deg C). Curves of anodic polarization were plotted. In the course of time in 1.0 and 0.5 N anhydrous methanol solutions of HCOOH at room temperature in the absence of the external anode current one can observe an increase in the electrode potential. Continued reduction of the formic acid concentration results in an improvement on the initial potential (psi) and a practical constancy of psi in time. It is shown that depending on the acid concentration the additions of water are capable of producing both a passivating and an activating effect. It is assumed that the growth in the length of the hydrocarbon radical of carboxylic acid promotes the adsorption displacement of water and alcohols from the metal surface and enhancement of the corrosion rate

  13. Mechanism and Kinetics for the Dissolution of Apatitic Materials in Acid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calmanovici C.E.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - This work concerns the study of the digestion step in the production process of phosphoric acid. Some qualitative experiments indicate that the difference between the pH at the surface of the phosphate and that in the bulk of the solution is negligible and that the dissolution is controlled by diffusion of products away from the phosphate particle. In further experiments, to isolate the dissolution phenomenon from the formation of calcium sulfate, the sulfuric acid normally used industrially is replaced by hydrochloric acid. The phosphate material used in our experiments is a model apatitic material: synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP. The dissolution of calcium hydroxyapatite was studied with increasing amounts of calcium and phosphate at different temperatures. A simple method was developed for this observation based on the time required for complete dissolution of the HAP powder. The results confirm that the dissolution is controlled by a diffusional process through an interface of calcium and phosphate ions released from the solid surface. A kinetic model for the dissolution of apatitic materials is proposed which assumes a shrinking particle behaviour controlled by diffusion of calcium ions. The experimental results are fitted to this model to determine the mass transfer constant for HAP dissolution in acid solutions. The activation energy of the reaction is about 14kJ/mol. This study was carried on in conditions similar to the industrial ones for the production of phosphoric acid by the dihydrate-process

  14. Copper-Sulfate Pentahydrate as a Product of the Waste Sulfuric Acid Solution Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Radmila; Stevanović, Jasmina; Avramović, Ljiljana; Nedeljković, Dragutin; Jugović, Branimir; Stajić-Trošić, Jasna; Gvozdenović, Milica

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is synthesis of copper-sulfate pentahydrate from the waste sulfuric acid solution-mother liquor generated during the regeneration process of copper bleed solution. Copper is removed from the mother liquor solution in the process of the electrolytic treatment using the insoluble lead anodes alloyed with 6 mass pct of antimony on the industrial-scale equipment. As the result of the decopperization process, copper is removed in the form of the cathode sludge and is precipitated at the bottom of the electrolytic cell. By this procedure, the content of copper could be reduced to the 20 mass pct of the initial value. Chemical characterization of the sludge has shown that it contains about 90 mass pct of copper. During the decopperization process, the very strong poison, arsine, can be formed, and the process is in that case terminated. The copper leaching degree of 82 mass pct is obtained using H2SO4 aqueous solution with the oxygen addition during the cathode sludge chemical treatment at 80 °C ± 5 °C. Obtained copper salt satisfies the requirements of the Serbian Standard for Pesticide, SRPS H.P1. 058. Therefore, the treatment of waste sulfuric acid solutions is of great economic and environmental interest.

  15. Aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids formed radiolytically in aqueous solutions of cyanides and simple nitriles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Draganic, Z.D.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Graganic, I.G.

    1983-01-01

    A systematic search for aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids was carried out in aqueous solutions of HCN, NH 4 CN, CH 3 CN, and C 2 H 4 CN, that had received multikilogray doses of 60 Co γ radiation. About 30 radiolytic products were identified, among them a large variety of dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids. Some of them might be of significant interest in molecular evolution studies of prebiotic processes. They originate in the free-radical-initiated chemical reactions where the additional oligomerization processes are particularly important. Most of the radiolytic products appear in both cyanides and nitriles and point to the importance of reactions involving the carbon-nitrogen triple bond

  16. Ferulic acid stabilizes a solution of vitamins C and E and doubles its photoprotection of skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Lin, Jing-Yi; Gupta, Ravindra D; Tournas, Joshua A; Burch, James A; Selim, M Angelica; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A; Grichnik, James M; Zielinski, Jan; Pinnell, Sheldon R

    2005-10-01

    Ferulic acid is a potent ubiquitous plant antioxidant. Its incorporation into a topical solution of 15%l-ascorbic acid and 1%alpha-tocopherol improved chemical stability of the vitamins (C+E) and doubled photoprotection to solar-simulated irradiation of skin from 4-fold to approximately 8-fold as measured by both erythema and sunburn cell formation. Inhibition of apoptosis was associated with reduced induction of caspase-3 and caspase-7. This antioxidant formulation efficiently reduced thymine dimer formation. This combination of pure natural low molecular weight antioxidants provides meaningful synergistic protection against oxidative stress in skin and should be useful for protection against photoaging and skin cancer.

  17. The distribution of n-caprylic acid between organic solvents and aqueous sodium sulfate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloe, K.; Muehl, P.; Kholkin, A.I.; Gindin, L.M.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of 14 C-labelled n-caprylic acid between n-decane, benzene, isoamyl acetate, diisopropyl ketone, isoamyl alcohol and an aqueous 0.6 molar sodium sulfate solution was studied. The distribution constants and the dimerisation constants were determined for the reactions HRsub((w)) reversible HRsub((org)) and 2 HRsub((org)) reversible (HR)sub(2(org)), respectively. Both the effect of the solvent on the acid distribution and the importance of such studies for the interpretation of liquid-liquid extraction equilibria are discussed. (author)

  18. Synthesis and Surface Activity of Cationic Amino Acid-Based Surfactants in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Katarzyna E

    2017-01-01

    I studied the possibility of using amino acid-based surfactants as emulsifiers at the same time as preservatives. Fourteen lipopeptides were synthesized employing a solid phase peptide synthesis procedure. All compounds were designed to be positively charged from +1 to +4 and acylated with fatty acid chain-palmitic and miristic. The surface activity of the obtained lipopeptides was tested using a semi-automatic tensiometer to calculate parameters describing the behavior of lipopeptides in the air/water interface. Such parameters as CMC, surface tension at the CMC point ( σ CMC ), effectiveness ( π CMC ), and efficiency (pC20) were measured. Emulsifying properties of all lipopeptides were also examined. The studies reveal that the surface active properties of synthesized compounds strongly depend on the length of alkyl chains as well as on the composition of amino acid polar heads. The critical micelle concentration decreases with increasing alkyl chain length of lipopeptides with the same polar head. The effectiveness and efficiency decrease when the number of amino acids in the polar head increases. All lipopeptides established a very weak emulsification power and created unstable water/Miglyol 812 and water/paraffin oil emulsions. Results suggest that lipopeptides cannot be used as emulsifiers; nonetheless, it is possible to use them as auxiliary surfactants with disinfectant properties in combination with more potent emulsifiers.

  19. Solvent Extraction of Tungsten(VI) from Moderate Hydrochloric Acid Solutions with LIX 63

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Hoai Thanh; Lee, Man Seung [Mokpo National University, Jeollanamdo (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Hwan [Incheon Technology Service Centre, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The solvent extraction of tungsten(VI) from hydrochloric acid solutions using 5,8-diethyl-7-hydroxydodecan-6-one oxime (LIX 63) was analyzed in solutions having an initial pH range from 2 to 5, by varying the concentration of metal and extractant. In our experimental range, the cationic exchange reaction as well as the solvation reaction occurred simultaneously. The cation exchange reaction was identified by applying a slope analysis method to the extraction data. The existence of cationic tungsten(VI) species was confirmed by ion exchange experiments with Diphonix resin at pH 3. Further study is needed to identify the nature of this tungsten cationic species.

  20. Interactions of calcium ions with weakly acidic active ingredients slow cuticular penetration: a case study with glyphosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönherr, Jörg; Schreiber, Lukas

    2004-10-20

    Potassium and calcium salts of glyphosate were obtained by titrating glyphosate acid with the respective bases to pH 4.0, and rates of penetration of these salts across isolated astomatous cuticular membranes (CMs) were measured at 20 degrees C and 70, 80, 90, and 100% humidity. K-glyphosate exhibited first-order penetration kinetics, and rate constants (k) increased with increasing humidity. Ca-glyphosate penetrated only when the humidity above the salt residue was 100%. At 90% humidity and below, Ca-glyphosate formed a solid residue on the CMs and penetration was not measurable. With Ca-glyphosate, the k value at 100% humidity decreased with time and the initial rates were lower than for K-glyphosate by a factor of 3.68. After equimolar concentrations of ammonium oxalate were added to Ca-glyphosate, high penetration rates close to those measured with K-glyphosate were measured at all humidities. Adding ammonium sulfate or potassium carbonate also increased rates between 70 and 100% humidity, but they were not as high as with ammonium oxalate. The data indicate that at pH 4.0 one Ca2+ ion is bound to two glyphosate anions. This salt has its deliquescence point near 100% humidity. Therefore, it is a solid at lower humidity and does not penetrate. Its molecular weight is 1.82 times larger than that of K-glyphosate, and this greatly slows down rates of penetration, even at 100% humidity. The additives tested have low solubility products and form insoluble precipitates with Ca2+ ions, but only ammonium oxalate binds Ca2+ quantitatively. The resulting ammonium salt of glyphosate penetrates at 70-100% humidity and at rates comparable to K-glyphosate. The results contribute to a better understanding of the hard water antagonism observed with glyphosate. It is argued that other pesticides and hormones with carboxyl functions are likely to respond to Ca2+ ions in a similar fashion. In all of these cases, ammonium oxalate is expected to overcome hard water antagonism