WorldWideScience

Sample records for waves generation propagation

  1. Faraday Pilot-Waves: Generation and Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano-Rios, Carlos; Milewski, Paul; Nachbin, André; Bush, John

    2015-11-01

    We examine the dynamics of drops bouncing on a fluid bath subjected to vertical vibration. We solve a system of linear PDEs to compute the surface wave generation and propagation. Waves are triggered at each bounce, giving rise to the Faraday pilot-wave field. The model captures several of the behaviors observed in the laboratory, including transitions between a variety of bouncing and walking states, the Doppler effect, and droplet-droplet interactions. Thanks to the NSF.

  2. Mathematical modelling of generation and forward propagation of dispersive waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lie She Liam, L.S.L.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation concerns the mathematical theory of forward propagation and generation of dispersive waves. We derive the AB2-equation which describes forward traveling waves in two horizontal dimension. It is the generalization of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvilli (KP) equation. The derivation is based

  3. Nonlinear propagation of planet-generated tidal waves

    OpenAIRE

    Rafikov, Roman

    2001-01-01

    The propagation and evolution of planet-generated density waves in protoplanetary disks is considered. The evolution of waves, leading to the shock formation and wake dissipation, is followed in the weakly nonlinear regime. The local approach of Goodman & Rafikov (2001) is extended to include the effects of surface density and temperature variations in the disk as well as the disk cylindrical geometry and nonuniform shear. Wave damping due to shocks is demonstrated to be a nonlocal process sp...

  4. Generation and propagation of nonlinear internal waves in Massachusetts Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, A.; Beardsley, R.C.; Butman, B.

    2007-01-01

    During the summer, nonlinear internal waves (NLIWs) are commonly observed propagating in Massachusetts Bay. The topography of the area is unique in the sense that the generation area (over Stellwagen Bank) is only 25 km away from the shoaling area, and thus it represents an excellent natural laboratory to study the life cycle of NLIWs. To assist in the interpretation of the data collected during the 1998 Massachusetts Bay Internal Wave Experiment (MBIWE98), a fully nonlinear and nonhydrostatic model covering the generation/shoaling region was developed, to investigate the response of the system to the range of background and driving conditions observed. Simplified models were also used to elucidate the role of nonlinearity and dispersion in shaping the NLIW field. This paper concentrates on the generation process and the subsequent evolution in the basin. The model was found to reproduce well the range of propagation characteristics observed (arrival time, propagation speed, amplitude), and provided a coherent framework to interpret the observations. Comparison with a fully nonlinear hydrostatic model shows that during the generation and initial evolution of the waves as they move away from Stellwagen Bank, dispersive effects play a negligible role. Thus the problem can be well understood considering the geometry of the characteristics along which the Riemann invariants of the hydrostatic problem propagate. Dispersion plays a role only during the evolution of the undular bore in the middle of Stellwagen Basin. The consequences for modeling NLIWs within hydrostatic models are briefly discussed at the end.

  5. Nonlinear Propagation of Planet-Generated Tidal Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafikov, R. R.

    2002-01-01

    The propagation and evolution of planet-generated density waves in protoplanetary disks is considered. The evolution of waves, leading to shock formation and wake dissipation, is followed in the weakly nonlinear regime. The 2001 local approach of Goodman and Rafikov is extended to include the effects of surface density and temperature variations in the disk as well as the disk cylindrical geometry and nonuniform shear. Wave damping due to shocks is demonstrated to be a nonlocal process spanning a significant fraction of the disk. Torques induced by the planet could be significant drivers of disk evolution on timescales of approx. 10(exp 6)-10(exp 7) yr, even in the absence of strong background viscosity. A global prescription for angular momentum deposition is developed that could be incorporated into the study of gap formation in a gaseous disk around the planet.

  6. Nonlinear propagation of planet-generated tidal waves

    CERN Document Server

    Rafikov, R R

    2002-01-01

    The propagation and evolution of planet-generated density waves in protoplanetary disks is considered. The evolution of waves, leading to the shock formation and wake dissipation, is followed in the weakly nonlinear regime. The local approach of Goodman & Rafikov (2001) is extended to include the effects of surface density and temperature variations in the disk as well as the disk cylindrical geometry and nonuniform shear. Wave damping due to shocks is demonstrated to be a nonlocal process spanning a significant fraction of the disk. Torques induced by the planet could be significant drivers of disk evolution on timescales of the order 1-10 Myr even in the absence of strong background viscosity. A global prescription for angular momentum deposition is developed which could be incorporated into the study of gap formation in a gaseous disk around the planet.

  7. Cumulative second-harmonic generation of Lamb waves propagating in a two-layered solid plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Yan-Xun; Deng Ming-Xi

    2008-01-01

    The physical process of cumulative second-harmonic generation of Lamb waves propagating in a two-layered solid plate is presented by using the second-order perturbation and the technique of nonlinear reflection of acoustic waves at an interface.In general,the cumulative second-harmonic generation of a dispersive guided wave propagation does not occur.However,the present paper shows that the second-harmonic of Lamb wave propagation arising from the nonlinear interaction of the partial bulk acoustic waves and the restriction of the three boundaries of the solid plates does have a cumulative growth effect if some conditions are satisfied.Through boundary condition and initial condition of excitation,the analytical expression of cumulative second-harmonic of Lamb waves propagation is determined.Numerical results show the cumulative effect of Lamb waves on second-harmonic field patterns.

  8. Wave Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrarese, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Lectures: A. Jeffrey: Lectures on nonlinear wave propagation.- Y. Choquet-Bruhat: Ondes asymptotiques.- G. Boillat: Urti.- Seminars: D. Graffi: Sulla teoria dell'ottica non-lineare.- G. Grioli: Sulla propagazione del calore nei mezzi continui.- T. Manacorda: Onde nei solidi con vincoli interni.- T. Ruggeri: "Entropy principle" and main field for a non linear covariant system.- B. Straughan: Singular surfaces in dipolar materials and possible consequences for continuum mechanics

  9. Experimental observation of cumulative second-harmonic generation of lamb waves propagating in long bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenggang; Liu, Dan; Deng, Mingxi; Ta, Dean; Wang, Weiqi

    2014-07-01

    The experimental observation of cumulative second-harmonic generation of fundamental Lamb waves in long bones is reported. Based on the modal expansion approach to waveguide excitation and the dispersion characteristics of Lamb waves in long bones, the mechanism underlying the generation and accumulation of second harmonics by propagation of the fundamental Lamb waves was investigated. An experimental setup was established to detect the second-harmonic signals of Lamb wave propagation in long bones in vitro. Through analysis of the group velocities of the received signals, the appropriate fundamental Lamb wave modes and the duration of the second-harmonic signals could be identified. The integrated amplitude of the time-domain second-harmonic signal was introduced and used to characterize the efficiency of second-harmonic generation by fundamental Lamb wave propagation. The results indicate that the second-harmonic signal generated by fundamental Lamb waves propagating in long bones can be observed clearly, and the effect was cumulative with propagation distance when the fundamental Lamb wave mode and the double-frequency Lamb wave mode had the same phase velocities. The present results may be important in the development of a new method to evaluate the status of long bones using the cumulative second harmonic of ultrasonic Lamb waves.

  10. Elastic parabolic equation solutions for oceanic T-wave generation and propagation from deep seismic sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Scott D; Collis, Jon M; Odom, Robert I

    2015-06-01

    Oceanic T-waves are earthquake signals that originate when elastic waves interact with the fluid-elastic interface at the ocean bottom and are converted to acoustic waves in the ocean. These waves propagate long distances in the Sound Fixing and Ranging (SOFAR) channel and tend to be the largest observed arrivals from seismic events. Thus, an understanding of their generation is important for event detection, localization, and source-type discrimination. Recently benchmarked seismic self-starting fields are used to generate elastic parabolic equation solutions that demonstrate generation and propagation of oceanic T-waves in range-dependent underwater acoustic environments. Both downward sloping and abyssal ocean range-dependent environments are considered, and results demonstrate conversion of elastic waves into water-borne oceanic T-waves. Examples demonstrating long-range broadband T-wave propagation in range-dependent environments are shown. These results confirm that elastic parabolic equation solutions are valuable for characterization of the relationships between T-wave propagation and variations in range-dependent bathymetry or elastic material parameters, as well as for modeling T-wave receptions at hydrophone arrays or coastal receiving stations.

  11. Numerical study of Balearic meteotsunami generation and propagation under synthetic gravity wave forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ličer, Matjaž; Mourre, Baptiste; Troupin, Charles; Krietemeyer, Andreas; Jansá, Agusti; Tintoré, Joaquín

    2017-03-01

    We use a high resolution nested ocean modelling system forced by synthetic atmospheric gravity waves to investigate Balearic meteotsunami generation, amplification and propagation properties. We determine how meteotsunami amplitude outside and inside of the Balearic port of Ciutadella depends on forcing gravity wave direction, speed and trajectory. We quantify the contributions of Mallorca shelves and Menorca Channel for different gravity wave forcing angles and speeds. The Channel is demonstrated to be the key build-up region determining meteotsunami amplitude in Ciutadella while northern and southern Mallorca shelves serve mostly as barotropic wave guides but do not significantly contribute to seiche amplitude in Ciutadella. This fact seriously reduces early-warning alert times in cases of locally generated pressure perturbations. We track meteotsunami propagation paths in the Menorca Channel for several forcing velocities and show that the Channel bathymetry serves as a focusing lens for meteotsunami waves whose paths are constrained by the forcing direction. We show that faster meteotsunamis propagate over deeper ocean regions, as required by Proudman resonance. We estimate meteotsunami speed under sub- and supercritical forcing and derive a first order estimate of its magnitude. We show that meteotsunamis, generated by supercritical gravity waves, propagate with a velocity which is equal to an arithmetic mean of the forcing velocity and local barotropic ocean wave speed.

  12. Third harmonic generation of shear horizontal guided waves propagation in plate-like structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wei Bin [School of Aerospace Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Xu, Chun Guang [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing (China); Cho, Youn Ho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The use of nonlinear ultrasonics wave has been accepted as a promising tool for monitoring material states related to microstructural changes, as it has improved sensitivity compared to conventional non-destructive testing approaches. In this paper, third harmonic generation of shear horizontal guided waves propagating in an isotropic plate is investigated using the perturbation method and modal analysis approach. An experimental procedure is proposed to detect the third harmonics of shear horizontal guided waves by electromagnetic transducers. The strongly nonlinear response of shear horizontal guided waves is measured. The accumulative growth of relative acoustic nonlinear response with an increase of propagation distance is detected in this investigation. The experimental results agree with the theoretical prediction, and thus providing another indication of the feasibility of using higher harmonic generation of electromagnetic shear horizontal guided waves for material characterization.

  13. Numerical Investigation on the Generation and Propagation of Irregular Waves in A Two-Dimensional Wave Tank

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruey-syan SHIH; Chung-ren CHOU; John Z. YIM

    2004-01-01

    The modeling of generation and subsequent propagation of irregular waves in a numerical wave flume is performed by mean of the boundary element method. Random waves are generated by a piston-type wave generator at one end of the flume with the Mitsuyasu-Bretschneider spectrum used as the target spectrum for the generation. An artificial absorbing beach is placed at the other end of the flume to minimize wave reflection. Surface fluctuations are described by use of the Lagrangian description, and finite difference is adopted for the approximation of time derivative. To monitor the developments of the waves, a number of pseudo wave gauges are installed along the tank. Through comparison of the spectra from those gauges with the target spectrum, satisfactory results can be obtained from the present numerical scheme.

  14. Simulation of ultrasonic lamb wave generation, propagation and detection for a reconfigurable air coupled scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobie, Gordon; Spencer, Andrew; Burnham, Kenneth; Pierce, S Gareth; Worden, Keith; Galbraith, Walter; Hayward, Gordon

    2011-04-01

    A computer simulator, to facilitate the design and assessment of a reconfigurable, air-coupled ultrasonic scanner is described and evaluated. The specific scanning system comprises a team of remote sensing agents, in the form of miniature robotic platforms that can reposition non-contact Lamb wave transducers over a plate type of structure, for the purpose of non-destructive evaluation (NDE). The overall objective is to implement reconfigurable array scanning, where transmission and reception are facilitated by different sensing agents which can be organised in a variety of pulse-echo and pitch-catch configurations, with guided waves used to generate data in the form of 2-D and 3-D images. The ability to reconfigure the scanner adaptively requires an understanding of the ultrasonic wave generation, its propagation and interaction with potential defects and boundaries. Transducer behaviour has been simulated using a linear systems approximation, with wave propagation in the structure modelled using the local interaction simulation approach (LISA). Integration of the linear systems and LISA approaches are validated for use in Lamb wave scanning by comparison with both analytic techniques and more computationally intensive commercial finite element/difference codes. Starting with fundamental dispersion data, the paper goes on to describe the simulation of wave propagation and the subsequent interaction with artificial defects and plate boundaries, before presenting a theoretical image obtained from a team of sensing agents based on the current generation of sensors and instrumentation.

  15. Three-dimensional visualization of shear wave propagation generated by dual acoustic radiation pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Yuta; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    An elastic property of biological soft tissue is an important indicator of the tissue status. Therefore, quantitative and noninvasive methods for elasticity evaluation have been proposed. Our group previously proposed a method using acoustic radiation pressure irradiated from two directions for elastic property evaluation, in which by measuring the propagation velocity of the shear wave generated by the acoustic radiation pressure inside the object, the elastic properties of the object were successfully evaluated. In the present study, we visualized the propagation of the shear wave in a three-dimensional space by the synchronization of signals received at various probe positions. The proposed method succeeded in visualizing the shear wave propagation clearly in the three-dimensional space of 35 × 41 × 4 mm3. These results show the high potential of the proposed method to estimate the elastic properties of the object in the three-dimensional space.

  16. The propagation and growth of whistler mode waves generated by electron beams in earth's bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, R. L.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    In this study, the propagation and growth of whistler mode waves generated by electron beams within earth's bow shock is investigated using a planar model for the bow shock and a model electron distribution function. Within the shock, the model electron distribution function possesses a field-aligned T greater than T beam that is directed toward the magnetosheath. Waves with frequencies between about 1 and 100 Hz with a wide range of wave normal angles are generated by the beam via Landau and anomalous cyclotron resonances. However, because the growth rate is small and because the wave packets traverse the shock quickly, these waves do not attain large amplitudes. Waves with frequencies between about 30 and 150 Hz with a wide range of wave normal angles are generated by the beam via the normal cyclotron resonance. The ray paths for most of these waves are directed toward the solar wind although some wave packets, due to plasma convection travel transverse to the shock normal. These wave packets grow to large amplitudes because they spend a long time in the growth region. The results suggest that whistler mode noise within the shock should increase in amplitude with increasing upstream theta sub Bn. The study provides an explanation for the origin of much of the whistler mode turbulence observed at the bow shock.

  17. The New Year Wave: Generation, Propagation, Kinematics and Dynamics - Registered in a Seakeeping Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, Günther; Klein, Marco

    2010-05-01

    optimization process which samples the signal into several decomposition levels where each resulting coefficient describes the control signal in a specific time range and frequency bandwidth. To improve the control signal, the experimental optimization routine iterates until the target parameters are satisfied by applying the subplex optimization method. The resulting control signal in the small wave tank is then transferred to a large wave tank considering the electrical and hydrodynamic RAOs of the respective wave generator. The extreme sea state with the embedded New Year Wave obtained with this method is measured at different locations in the tank, in a range from 2163 m (full scale) ahead of to 1470 m behind the target position-520 registrations altogether. The focus lies on the detailed description of a possible evolution of the New Year Wave over a large area and time interval. The analysis of the registrations reveals freak waves occurring at three different positions in the wave tank and the observed freak waves are developing from a wave group of three waves, which travels with constant speed along the wave tank up to the target position. The group velocity, wave propagation, and the energy flux of this wave group are analyzed within this paper.

  18. A large volume uniform plasma generator for the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Min; Li Xiaoping; Xie Kai; Liu Donglin [School of Electronical and Mechanical Engineering, Xidian University, Xi' an Shaanxi 710071 (China); Liu Yanming [School of Telecommunications Engineering, Xidian University, Xi' an Shaanxi 710071 (China)

    2013-01-15

    A large volume uniform plasma generator is proposed for the experiments of electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in plasma, to reproduce a 'black out' phenomenon with long duration in an environment of the ordinary laboratory. The plasma generator achieves a controllable approximate uniform plasma in volume of 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 180 mm without the magnetic confinement. The plasma is produced by the glow discharge, and the special discharge structure is built to bring a steady approximate uniform plasma environment in the electromagnetic wave propagation path without any other barriers. In addition, the electron density and luminosity distributions of plasma under different discharge conditions were diagnosed and experimentally investigated. Both the electron density and the plasma uniformity are directly proportional to the input power and in roughly reverse proportion to the gas pressure in the chamber. Furthermore, the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma are conducted in this plasma generator. Blackout phenomena at GPS signal are observed under this system and the measured attenuation curve is of reasonable agreement with the theoretical one, which suggests the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Viscothermal wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, Marten Jozef Johannes

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the accuracy, efficiency and range of applicability of various (approximate) models for viscothermal wave propagation are investigated. Models for viscothermal wave propagation describe thewave behavior of fluids including viscous and thermal effects. Cases where viscothermal effects a

  20. Wave generation by fracture initiation and propagation in geomaterials with internal rotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esin, Maxim; Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady; Xu, Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Crack or fracture initiation and propagation in geomaterials are sources of waves and is important in both stability and fracture (e.g. hydraulic fracture) monitoring. Many geomaterials consist of particles or other constituents capable of rotating with respect to each other, either due to the absence of the binder phase (fragmented materials) or due to extensive damage of the cement between the constituents inflicted by previous loading. In investigating the wave generated in fracturing it is important to distinguish between the cases when the fracture is instantaneously initiated to its full length or propagates from a smaller initial crack. We show by direct physical experiments and discrete element modelling of 2D arrangements of unbonded disks that under compressive load fractures are initiated instantaneously as a result of the material instability and localisation. Such fractures generate waves as a single impulse impact. When the fractures propagate, they produce a sequence of impulses associated with the propagation steps. This manifests itself as acoustic (microseismic) emission whose temporal pattern contains the information of the fracture geometry, such as fractal dimension of the fracture. The description of this process requires formulating criteria of crack growth capable of taking into account the internal rotations. We developed an analytical solution based on the Cosserat continuum where each point of body has three translational and three rotational degrees of freedom. When the Cosserat characteristic lengths are comparable with the grain sizes, the simplified equations of small-scale Cosserat continuum can be used. We established that the order of singularity of the main asymptotic term for moment stress is higher than the order of singularity for conventional stress. Therefore, the mutual rotation of particles and related bending and/or twisting of the bonds between the particles represent an unconventional mechanism of crack propagation.

  1. The generation and damping of propagating MHD kink waves in the solar atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, R. J. [Mathematics and Information Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Verth, G.; Erdélyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Hillier, A., E-mail: richard.morton@northumbria.ac.uk, E-mail: g.verth@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: robertus@sheffield.ac.uk [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, 17 Ohmine-cho Kita Kazan, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto City, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2014-03-20

    The source of the non-thermal energy required for the heating of the upper solar atmosphere to temperatures in excess of a million degrees and the acceleration of the solar wind to hundreds of kilometers per second is still unclear. One such mechanism for providing the required energy flux is incompressible torsional Alfvén and kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, which are magnetically dominated waves supported by the Sun's pervasive and complex magnetic field. In particular, propagating MHD kink waves have recently been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere, but, until now, critical details of the transport of the kink wave energy throughout the Sun's atmosphere were lacking. Here, the ubiquity of the waves is exploited for statistical studies in the highly dynamic solar chromosphere. This large-scale investigation allows for the determination of the chromospheric kink wave velocity power spectra, a missing link necessary for determining the energy transport between the photosphere and corona. Crucially, the power spectra contain evidence for horizontal photospheric motions being an important mechanism for kink wave generation in the quiescent Sun. In addition, a comparison with measured coronal power spectra is provided for the first time, revealing frequency-dependent transmission profiles, suggesting that there is enhanced damping of kink waves in the lower corona.

  2. Generation of fast propagating combustion and shock waves with copper oxide/aluminum nanothermite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apperson, S.; Shende, R. V.; Subramanian, S.; Tappmeyer, D.; Gangopadhyay, S.; Chen, Z.; Gangopadhyay, K.; Redner, P.; Nicholich, S.; Kapoor, D.

    2007-12-01

    Nanothermite composites containing metallic fuel and inorganic oxidizer are gaining importance due to their outstanding combustion characteristics. In this paper, the combustion behaviors of copper oxide/aluminum nanothermites are discussed. CuO nanorods were synthesized using the surfactant-templating method, then mixed or self-assembled with Al nanoparticles. This nanoscale mixing resulted in a large interfacial contact area between fuel and oxidizer. As a result, the reaction of the low density nanothermite composite leads to a fast propagating combustion, generating shock waves with Mach numbers up to 3.

  3. Generation and Propagation of Finite-Amplitude Waves in Flexible Tubes (A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1972-01-01

    Highly reproducible finite-amplitude waves, generated by a modified electromagnetic plane-wave generator, characterized by a rise time......Highly reproducible finite-amplitude waves, generated by a modified electromagnetic plane-wave generator, characterized by a rise time...

  4. Temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound wave propagation in water at various frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraghechi, Borna; Hasani, Mojtaba H; Kolios, Michael C; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound-based thermometry requires a temperature-sensitive acoustic parameter that can be used to estimate the temperature by tracking changes in that parameter during heating. The objective of this study is to investigate the temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound wave propagation in water at various pulse transmit frequencies from 1 to 20 MHz. Simulations were conducted using an expanded form of the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov nonlinear acoustic wave propagation model in which temperature dependence of the medium parameters was included. Measurements were performed using single-element transducers at two different transmit frequencies of 3.3 and 13 MHz which are within the range of frequencies simulated. The acoustic pressure signals were measured by a calibrated needle hydrophone along the axes of the transducers. The water temperature was uniformly increased from 26 °C to 46 °C in increments of 5 °C. The results show that the temperature dependence of the harmonic generation is different at various frequencies which is due to the interplay between the mechanisms of absorption, nonlinearity, and focusing gain. At the transmit frequencies of 1 and 3.3 MHz, the harmonic amplitudes decrease with increasing the temperature, while the opposite temperature dependence is observed at 13 and 20 MHz.

  5. Characteristics of Spherical Shock Wave and Circular Pulse Jet Generated by Discharge of Propagating Shock Wave at Open End of Tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsukasa Irie; Tsuyoshi Yasunobu; Hideo Kashimura; Toshiaki Setoguchi; Kazuyasu Matsuo

    2003-01-01

    When the shock wave propagating in the straight circular tube reaches at the open end, the impulsive wave is generated by the emission of a shock wave from an open end, and unsteady pulse jet is formed near the open end behind the impulsive wave under the specific condition. The pulse jet transits to spherical shock wave with the increase in the strength of shock wave. The strength is dependent on the Mach number of shock wave, which attenuates by propagation distance from the open end. In this study, the mechanism of generating the unsteady pulse jet, the characteristics of the pressure distribution in the flow field and the emission of shock wave from straight circular tube which has the infinite flange at open end are analyzed numerically by the TVD method. Strength of spherical shock wave, relation of shock wave Mach number, distance decay of spherical shock wave and directional characteristics are clarified.

  6. Influences of interfacial properties on second-harmonic generation of Lamb waves propagating in layered planar structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Mingxi [College of Automation, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); Wang Ping [College of Automation, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); Lv Xiafu [College of Automation, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China)

    2006-07-21

    This paper describes influences of interfacial properties on second-harmonic generation of Lamb waves propagating in layered planar structures. The nonlinearity in the elastic wave propagation is treated as a second-order perturbation of the linear elastic response. Due to the kinematic nonlinearity and the elastic nonlinearity of materials, there are second-order bulk and surface/interface driving sources in layered planar structures through which Lamb waves propagate. These driving sources can be thought of as forcing functions of a series of double frequency lamb waves (DFLWs) in terms of the approach of modal expansion analysis for waveguide excitation. The total second-harmonic fields consist of a summation of DFLWs in the corresponding stress-free layered planar structures. The interfacial properties of layered planar structures can be described by the well-known finite interfacial stiffness technique. The normal and tangential interfacial stiffness constants can be coupled with the equation governing the expansion coefficient of each DFLW component. On the other hand, the normal and tangential interfacial stiffness constants are associated with the degree of dispersion between Lamb waves and DFLWs. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations indicate that the efficiency of second-harmonic generation by Lamb wave propagation is closely dependent on the interfacial properties of layered structures. The potential of using the effect of second-harmonic generation by Lamb wave propagation to characterize the interfacial properties of layered structures are considered. Some experimental results are presented.

  7. Time-domain analysis of second-harmonic generation of primary Lamb wave propagation in an elastic plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Ming-Xi; Xiang Yan-Xun

    2010-01-01

    Within the second-order perturbation approximation,this paper investigates the physical process of generation of the time-domain second harmonic by a primary Lamb wave waveform in an elastic plate.The present work is performed based on the preconditions that the phase velocity matching is satisfied and that the transfer of energy from the primary Lamb wave to the double frequency Lamb wave is not zero.It investigates the influences of the difference between the group velocities of the primary Lamb wave and the double frequency Lamb wave,the propagation distance and the duration of the primary Lamb wave waveform on the envelope shape of the time-domain second harmonic.It finds that the maximum magnitude of the envelope of the second-harmonic waveform can grow within some propagation distance even if the condition of group velocity matching is not satisfied.Our analyses also indicate that the maximum magnitude of the envelope of the second-harmonic waveform is kept constant beyond a specific propagation distance.Furthermore,it concludes that the integration amplitude of the time-domain second-harmonic waveform always grows with propagation distance within the second-order perturbation.The present research yields new physical insight not previously available into the effect of generation of the time-domain second harmonic by propagation of a primary Lamb wave waveform.

  8. Wave Generation, Propagation and Absorption in CFD Simulations of Free Surface Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duz, B.

    2015-01-01

    The PhD study focused on two topics. The first topic was energy dissipation in wave propagation. The wave dissipation can be caused by physical and/or numerical phenomena, such as the free surface treatment, physical viscosity and artificial viscosity due to discretization of the momentum equations.

  9. Generation of higher derivatives operators and electromagnetic wave propagation in a Lorentz-violation scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Borges, L H C; Ferrari, A F; Nascimento, J R; Petrov, A Yu

    2016-01-01

    We study the perturbative generation of higher-derivative operators as corrections to the photon effective action, which are originated from a Lorentz violation background. Such corrections are obtained, at one-loop order, through the proper-time method, using the zeta function regularization. We focus over the lowest order corrections and investigate their influence in the propagation of electromagnetic waves through the vacuum, in the presence of a strong, constant magnetic field. This is a setting of experimental relevance, since it bases active efforts to measure non linear electromagnetic effects. After surprising cancellations of Lorentz violating corrections to the Maxwell's equation, we show that no effects of the kind of Lorentz violation we consider can be detected in such a context.

  10. Generation of higher derivatives operators and electromagnetic wave propagation in a Lorentz-violation scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.H.C. Borges

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We study the perturbative generation of higher-derivative Lorentz violating operators as quantum corrections to the photon effective action, originated from a specific Lorentz violation background, which has already been studied in connection with the physics of light pseudoscalars. We calculate the complete one loop effective action of the photon field through the proper-time method, using the zeta function regularization. This result can be used as a starting point to study possible effects of the Lorentz violating background we are considering in photon physics. As an example, we focus on the lowest order corrections and investigate whether they could influence the propagation of electromagnetic waves through the vacuum. We show, however, that no effects of the kind of Lorentz violation we consider can be detected in such a context, so that other aspects of photon physics have to be studied.

  11. Stochastic wave propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Sobczyk, K

    1985-01-01

    This is a concise, unified exposition of the existing methods of analysis of linear stochastic waves with particular reference to the most recent results. Both scalar and vector waves are considered. Principal attention is concentrated on wave propagation in stochastic media and wave scattering at stochastic surfaces. However, discussion extends also to various mathematical aspects of stochastic wave equations and problems of modelling stochastic media.

  12. Propagation Characteristics of Laser-Generated Rayleigh Waves in Coating-Substrate Structures with Anisotropic and Viscoelastic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-xiang; Zhang, Shu-yi; Xia, Jian-ping

    2015-06-01

    The propagation characteristics of laser-generated Rayleigh waves in coating-substrate structures with anisotropic and viscoelastic properties have been investigated quantitatively. Based on the plane strain theory, finite element models for simulating laser-generated Rayleigh waves in coating-substrate structures are established, in which the carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy matrix composite and aluminum are used as the coating and/or the substrate alternately. The numerical results exhibit that the characteristics of the laser-generated Rayleigh waves, including attenuation, velocity, and dispersion, are mainly and closely related to the anisotropic and viscoelastic properties of the composite in the coating-substrate structures.

  13. Time-Domain Second-Harmonic Generation of Primary Lamb-Wave Propagation in an Elastic Plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Ming-Xi; XIANG Yan-Xun; LIU Liang-Bing

    2011-01-01

    We present an experimental observation of the generation of the time-domain second harmonic by propagation of the primary Lamb-wave tone-burst.For a case where the phase velocity matching between the primary and the double frequency Lamb waves is satisfied but the group velocity matching between them is not,our observation clearly shows that the duration of the time-domain second-harmonic tone-burst,as well as its integrated amplitude,increases with the increasing propagation distance.This experimental result is consistent with the theoretical prediction and demonstrates that group velocity matching is not absolutely necessary for the generation of the cumulative time-domain second harmonic by primary Lamb-wave propagation.

  14. Propagation of waves

    CERN Document Server

    David, P

    2013-01-01

    Propagation of Waves focuses on the wave propagation around the earth, which is influenced by its curvature, surface irregularities, and by passage through atmospheric layers that may be refracting, absorbing, or ionized. This book begins by outlining the behavior of waves in the various media and at their interfaces, which simplifies the basic phenomena, such as absorption, refraction, reflection, and interference. Applications to the case of the terrestrial sphere are also discussed as a natural generalization. Following the deliberation on the diffraction of the "ground? wave around the ear

  15. MODELING THE ASIAN TSUNAMI EVOLUTION AND PROPAGATION WITH A NEW GENERATION MECHANISM AND A NON-LINEAR DISPERSIVE WAVE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. Rivera

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A common approach in modeling the generation and propagation of tsunami is based on the assumption of a kinematic vertical displacement of ocean water that is analogous to the ocean bottom displacement during a submarine earthquake and the use of a non-dispersive long-wave model to simulate its physical transformation as it radiates outward from the source region. In this study, a new generation mechanism and the use of a highly-dispersive wave model to simulate tsunami inception, propagation and transformation are proposed. The new generation model assumes that transient ground motion during the earthquake can accelerate horizontal currents with opposing directions near the fault line whose successive convergence and divergence generate a series of potentially destructive oceanic waves. The new dynamic model incorporates the effects of earthquake moment magnitude, ocean compressibility through the buoyancy frequency, the effects of focal and water depths, and the orientation of ruptured fault line in the tsunami magnitude and directivity.For tsunami wave simulation, the nonlinear momentum-based wave model includes important wave propagation and transformation mechanisms such as refraction, diffraction, shoaling, partial reflection and transmission, back-scattering, frequency dispersion, and resonant wave-wave interaction. Using this model and a coarse-resolution bathymetry, the new mechanism is tested for the Indian Ocean tsunami of December 26, 2004. A new flooding and drying algorithm that consider waves coming from every direction is also proposed for simulation of inundation of low-lying coastal regions.It is shown in the present study that with the proposed generation model, the observed features of the Asian tsunami such as the initial drying of areas east of the source region and the initial flooding of western coasts are correctly simulated. The formation of a series of tsunami waves with periods and lengths comparable to observations

  16. Propagation and dispersion of whistler waves generated by fast reconnection onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nagendra

    2013-02-01

    The role of whistler mode during the onset of magnetic reconnection (MR) has been widely suggested, but the manifestations of its highly dispersive and anisotropic propagation properties in reconnection events remain largely unclear. Comparing results from a recently developed theoretical model for reconnection in terms of whistler's dispersive behavior with those reported from laboratory experiments on fast spontaneous magnetic reconnection, we demonstrate that the onset of fast reconnection in electron current layers (ECLs) emits whistler wave packets. The time scale of the explosively fast reconnection events are inversely related to the whistler mode frequencies at the lower end of the whistler frequency band. The wave packets in this frequency band have a characteristic angular dispersion, which marks the initial opening of the reconnection exhaust angle. The multidimensional propagation of the whistler for the reconnection with a strong guide magnetic field is investigated, showing that the measured propagation velocities of the reconnection electric field along the guide field in the Versatile Toroidal Facility at MIT quantitatively compare with the group velocities of the whistler wave packets. The whistler mode dispersive properties measured in laboratory experiments without a guide magnetic field in the magnetic reconnection experiments at Princeton also compare well with the theoretically predicted dispersion of the wave packets depending on the ECL width. Fast normalized reconnection rates extending to ˜0.35 at the MR onset in thin ECLs imply whistler wave propagation away from the onset location. We also present evidences for the whistler wave packets being emitted from reconnection diffusion region as seen in simulations and satellite observations.

  17. Effects of boundary layer on flame propagation generated by forced ignition behind an incident shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, S.; Tamura, S.; Ishii, K.; Kataoka, H.

    2016-09-01

    To study the effects of the boundary layer on the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) process, the mixture behind an incident shock wave was ignited using laser breakdown. Ignition timing was controlled so that the interaction of the resulting flame with a laminar or turbulent boundary layer could be examined. In the case of the interaction with a laminar boundary layer, wrinkling of the flame was observed after the flame reached the corner of the channel. On the other hand, interaction with the turbulent boundary layer distorted the flame front and increased the spreading rate of the flame followed by prompt DDT. The inner structure of the turbulent boundary layer plays an important role in the DDT process. The region that distorted the flame within the turbulent boundary layer was found to be the intermediate region 0.01DDT was independent of the ignition position. The effect of the boundary layer on the propagating flame, thus, became relatively small after the accelerating flame was generated.

  18. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  19. Generation of propagating spin waves from regions of increased dynamic demagnetising field near magnetic antidots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, C. S., E-mail: csd203@exeter.ac.uk; Kruglyak, V. V. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Sadovnikov, A. V.; Nikitov, S. A. [Laboratory “Metamaterials,” Saratov State University, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation); Kotel' nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125009 (Russian Federation); Grishin, S. V.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P. [Laboratory “Metamaterials,” Saratov State University, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-19

    We have used Brillouin Light Scattering and micromagnetic simulations to demonstrate a point-like source of spin waves created by the inherently nonuniform internal magnetic field in the vicinity of an isolated antidot formed in a continuous film of yttrium-iron-garnet. The field nonuniformity ensures that only well-defined regions near the antidot respond in resonance to a continuous excitation of the entire sample with a harmonic microwave field. The resonantly excited parts of the sample then served as reconfigurable sources of spin waves propagating (across the considered sample) in the form of caustic beams. Our findings are relevant to further development of magnonic circuits, in which point-like spin wave stimuli could be required, and as a building block for interpretation of spin wave behavior in magnonic crystals formed by antidot arrays.

  20. Laser-Generated Lamb Waves Propagation in Multilayered Plates Composed of Viscoelastic Fiber-reinforced Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-xiang; Zhang, Shu-yi; Yuan, Shou-qi; Guan, Yi-jun; Ge, Yong

    2016-07-01

    The propagation characteristics of laser-generated Lamb waves in multilayered fiber-reinforced composite plates with different fiber orientations and number of layers have been investigated quantitatively. Considering the viscoelasticity of the composite materials, we have set up finite element models for simulating the laser-generated Lamb waves in two types of the multilayered composite plates. In the first type, different fiber orientations are adopted. In the second one, different number of layers are considered. The results illustrate the occurrence of attenuation and dispersion, which is induced by the viscoelasticity and multilayer structure, respectively.

  1. Flexural edge waves generated by steady-state propagation of a loaded rectilinear crack in an elastically supported thin plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, Andrea; Radi, Enrico; Lanzoni, Luca

    2017-08-01

    The problem of a rectilinear crack propagating at constant speed in an elastically supported thin plate and acted upon by an equally moving load is considered. The full-field solution is obtained and the spotlight is set on flexural edge wave generation. Below the critical speed for the appearance of travelling waves, a threshold speed is met which marks the transformation of decaying edge waves into edge waves propagating along the crack and dying away from it. Yet, besides these, and for any propagation speed, a pair of localized edge waves, which rapidly decay behind the crack tip, is also shown to exist. These waves are characterized by a novel dispersion relation and fade off from the crack line in an oscillatory manner, whence they play an important role in the far field behaviour. Dynamic stress intensity factors are obtained and, for speed close to the critical speed, they show a resonant behaviour which expresses the most efficient way to channel external work into the crack. Indeed, this behaviour is justified through energy considerations regarding the work of the applied load and the energy release rate. Results might be useful in a wide array of applications, ranging from fracturing and machining to acoustic emission and defect detection.

  2. The phase of the crosspolarized signal generated by millimeter wave propagation through rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, W. P.; Bostian, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    Proposed schemes for cancelling rain-induced crosstalk in dual-polarized communications systems depend upon the phase relationships between the wanted and unwanted signals. This report investigates the phase relationship of the rain-generated crosspolarized signal relative to the copolarized signal. Theoretical results obtained from a commonly accepted propagation model are presented. Experimental data from the Communications Technology Satellite beacon and from the Comstar beacon are presented and the correlation between theory and data is discussed. An inexpensive semi-adaptive cancellation system is proposed and its performance expectations are presented. The implications of phase variations on a cancellation system are also discussed.

  3. TSUNAMI WAVE PROPAGATION ALONG WAVEGUIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei G. Marchuk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a study of tsunami wave propagation along the waveguide on a bottom ridge with flat sloping sides, using the wave rays method. During propagation along such waveguide the single tsunami wave transforms into a wave train. The expression for the guiding velocities of the fastest and slowest signals is defined. The tsunami wave behavior above the ocean bottom ridges, which have various model profiles, is investigated numerically with the help of finite difference method. Results of numerical experiments show that the highest waves are detected above a ridge with flat sloping sides. Examples of tsunami propagation along bottom ridges of the Pacific Ocean are presented.

  4. Wave propagation in elastic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, Jan

    1984-01-01

    The propagation of mechanical disturbances in solids is of interest in many branches of the physical scienses and engineering. This book aims to present an account of the theory of wave propagation in elastic solids. The material is arranged to present an exposition of the basic concepts of mechanical wave propagation within a one-dimensional setting and a discussion of formal aspects of elastodynamic theory in three dimensions, followed by chapters expounding on typical wave propagation phenomena, such as radiation, reflection, refraction, propagation in waveguides, and diffraction. The treat

  5. Effects of imperfection of ionic channels and exposure to electromagnetic fields on the generation and propagation of front waves in nervous fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mboussi Nkomidio, A.; Woafo, P.

    2010-09-01

    This work deals with the effects of perturbations such as imperfection of ionic channels and exposure to electromagnetic field on the generation and propagation of wave fronts in a nervous fibre. The initial excitation inserted in the fibre is a pulse of amplitude a and width 1/k. The domain of initial values of a and k leading to front waves generation are delineated for each type of perturbation. Links of the results to biological facts are given. It is found that imperfections of ionic channels strongly modify the velocity of propagation and can even lead to propagation failure.

  6. Wave propagation in electromagnetic media

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Julian L

    1990-01-01

    This is the second work of a set of two volumes on the phenomena of wave propagation in nonreacting and reacting media. The first, entitled Wave Propagation in Solids and Fluids (published by Springer-Verlag in 1988), deals with wave phenomena in nonreacting media (solids and fluids). This book is concerned with wave propagation in reacting media-specifically, in electro­ magnetic materials. Since these volumes were designed to be relatively self­ contained, we have taken the liberty of adapting some of the pertinent material, especially in the theory of hyperbolic partial differential equations (concerned with electromagnetic wave propagation), variational methods, and Hamilton-Jacobi theory, to the phenomena of electromagnetic waves. The purpose of this volume is similar to that of the first, except that here we are dealing with electromagnetic waves. We attempt to present a clear and systematic account of the mathematical methods of wave phenomena in electromagnetic materials that will be readily accessi...

  7. Nonlinear effects in the propagation of optically generated magnetostatic volume mode spin waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilburg, L. J. A.; Buijnsters, F. J.; Fasolino, A.; Rasing, T.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2017-08-01

    Recent experimental work has demonstrated optical control of spin wave emission by tuning the shape of the optical pulse [Satoh et al., Nat. Photon. 6, 662 (2012), 10.1038/nphoton.2012.218]. We reproduce these results and extend the scope of the control by investigating nonlinear effects for large amplitude excitations. We observe an accumulation of spin wave power at the center of the initial excitation combined with short-wavelength spin waves. These kinds of nonlinear effects have not been observed in earlier work on nonlinearities of spin waves. Our observations pave the way for the manipulation of magnetic structures at a smaller scale than the beam focus, for instance in devices with all-optical control of magnetism.

  8. Measurement of Elastic Properties of Tissue by Shear Wave Propagation Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaru, Marie; Azuma, Takashi; Hashiba, Kunio

    2010-07-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) imaging has been developed as a novel elastography technology to diagnose hepatic disease and breast cancer. The accuracy of shear wave speed estimation, which is one of the applications of ARF elastography, is studied. The Young's moduli of pig liver and foie gras samples estimated from the shear wave speed were compared with those measured the static Young's modulus measurement. The difference in the two methods was 8%. Distance attenuation characteristics of the shear wave were also studied using finite element method (FEM) analysis. We found that the differences in the axial and lateral beam widths in pressure and ARF are 16 and 9% at F-number=0.9. We studied the relationship between two branch points in distance attenuation characteristics and the shape of ARF. We found that the maximum measurable length to estimate shear wave speed for one ARF excitation was 8 mm.

  9. Propagation of Shear Waves Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force in Nondissipative Inhomogeneous Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ming-Zhu; LIU Xue-Jin; SHI Yu; KANG Yan-Ni; GUAN Yu-Bo; WAN Ming-Xi

    2012-01-01

    We concentrate on the nondissipative mechanism induced shear wave in inhomogenous tissue.The shear wave equation of radiation force in inhomogeneous media is solved numerically with a finite-difference time-domain method.A rarely studied nondissipative mechanism of shear displacement due to a smooth medium inhomogeneity is evaluated.It is noted that unlike the dissipative effect,the nondissipative action on a localized inhomogeneity with its hardness parameter changing smoothly along the beam axis,compresses or stretches the focus area.The shear waves in nondissipative inhomogeneous media remain the property of sharp turn with 100% peak positive displacement and 64% peak negative displacement.This action is useful in discerning the water-like lesion.%We concentrate on the nondissipative mechanism induced shear wave in inhomogenous tissue. The shear wave equation of radiation force in inhomogeneous media is solved numerically with a finite-difference time-domain method. A rarely studied nondissipative mechanism of shear displacement due to a smooth medium inhomogeneity is evaluated. It is noted that unlike the dissipative effect, the nondissipative action on a localized inhomogeneity with its hardness parameter changing smoothly along the beam axis, compresses or stretches the focus area. The shear waves in nondissipative inhomogeneous media remain the property of sharp turn with 100% peak positive displacement and 64% peak negative displacement. This action is useful in discerning the water-like lesion.

  10. Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Jiuyang; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2014-01-01

    We propose an efficient design route to generate unidirectional propagation of the designer surface acoustic waves. The whole system consists of a periodically corrugated rigid plate combining with a pair of asymmetric narrow slits. The directionality of the structure-induced surface waves stems from the destructive interference between the evanescent waves emitted from the double slits. The theoretical prediction is validated well by simulations and experiments. Promising applications can be anticipated, such as in designing compact acoustic circuits.

  11. Longitudinal nonlinear wave propagation through soft tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, M; Balachandran, B

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, wave propagation through soft tissue is investigated. A primary aim of this investigation is to gain a fundamental understanding of the influence of soft tissue nonlinear material properties on the propagation characteristics of stress waves generated by transient loadings. Here, for computational modeling purposes, the soft tissue is modeled as a nonlinear visco-hyperelastic material, the geometry is assumed to be one-dimensional rod geometry, and uniaxial propagation of longitudinal waves is considered. By using the linearized model, a basic understanding of the characteristics of wave propagation is developed through the dispersion relation and in terms of the propagation speed and attenuation. In addition, it is illustrated as to how the linear system can be used to predict brain tissue material parameters through the use of available experimental ultrasonic attenuation curves. Furthermore, frequency thresholds for wave propagation along internal structures, such as axons in the white matter of the brain, are obtained through the linear analysis. With the nonlinear material model, the authors analyze cases in which one of the ends of the rods is fixed and the other end is subjected to a loading. Two variants of the nonlinear model are analyzed and the associated predictions are compared with the predictions of the corresponding linear model. The numerical results illustrate that one of the imprints of the nonlinearity on the wave propagation phenomenon is the steepening of the wave front, leading to jump-like variations in the stress wave profiles. This phenomenon is a consequence of the dependence of the local wave speed on the local deformation of the material. As per the predictions of the nonlinear material model, compressive waves in the structure travel faster than tensile waves. Furthermore, it is found that wave pulses with large amplitudes and small elapsed times are attenuated over shorter spans. This feature is due to the elevated

  12. Reconstruction of nonlinear wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Jason W; Barsi, Christopher; Wan, Wenjie

    2013-04-23

    Disclosed are systems and methods for characterizing a nonlinear propagation environment by numerically propagating a measured output waveform resulting from a known input waveform. The numerical propagation reconstructs the input waveform, and in the process, the nonlinear environment is characterized. In certain embodiments, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment facilitates determination of an unknown input based on a measured output. Similarly, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment also facilitates formation of a desired output based on a configurable input. In both situations, the input thus characterized and the output thus obtained include features that would normally be lost in linear propagations. Such features can include evanescent waves and peripheral waves, such that an image thus obtained are inherently wide-angle, farfield form of microscopy.

  13. Wave propagation in ballistic gelatine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naarayan, Srinivasan S; Subhash, Ghatu

    2017-01-23

    Wave propagation characteristics in long cylindrical specimens of ballistic gelatine have been investigated using a high speed digital camera and hyper elastic constitutive models. The induced transient deformation is modelled with strain rate dependent Mooney-Rivlin parameters which are determined by modelling the stress-strain response of gelatine at a range of strain rates. The varying velocity of wave propagation through the gelatine cylinder is derived as a function of prestress or stretch in the gelatine specimen. A finite element analysis is conducted using the above constitutive model by suitably defining the impulse imparted by the polymer bar into the gelatine specimen. The model results are found to capture the experimentally observed wave propagation characteristics in gelatine effectively.

  14. Propagation of shock waves through clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin Xin

    1990-10-01

    The behavior of a shock wave propagating into a cloud consisting of an inert gas, water vapor and water droplets was investigated. This has particular application to sonic bangs propagating in the atmosphere. The finite different method of MacCormack is extended to solve the one and two dimensional, two phase flow problems in which mass, momentum and energy transfers are included. The FCT (Fluid Corrected Transport) technique developed by Boris and Book was used in the basic numerical scheme as a powerful corrective procedure. The results for the transmitted shock waves propagating in a one dimensional, semi infinite cloud obtained by the finite difference approach are in good agreement with previous results by Kao using the method characteristics. The advantage of the finite difference method is its adaptability to two and three dimensional problems. Shock wave propagation through a finite cloud and into an expansion with a 90 degree corner was investigated. It was found that the transfer processes between the two phases in two dimensional flow are much more complicated than in the one dimensional flow cases. This is mainly due to the vortex and expansion wave generated at the corner. In the case considered, further complications were generated by the reflected shock wave from the floor. Good agreement with experiment was found for one phase flow but experimental data for the two phase case is not yet available to validate the two phase calculations.

  15. A simple model of ultrasound propagation in a cavitating liquid. Part I: Theory, nonlinear attenuation and traveling wave generation

    CERN Document Server

    Louisnard, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The bubbles involved in sonochemistry and other applications of cavitation oscillate inertially. A correct estimation of the wave attenuation in such bubbly media requires a realistic estimation of the power dissipated by the oscillation of each bubble, by thermal diffusion in the gas and viscous friction in the liquid. Both quantities and calculated numerically for a single inertial bubble driven at 20 kHz, and are found to be several orders of magnitude larger than the linear prediction. Viscous dissipation is found to be the predominant cause of energy loss for bubbles small enough. Then, the classical nonlinear Caflish equations describing the propagation of acoustic waves in a bubbly liquid are recast and simplified conveniently. The main harmonic part of the sound field is found to fulfill a nonlinear Helmholtz equation, where the imaginary part of the squared wave number is directly correlated with the energy lost by a single bubble. For low acoustic driving, linear theory is recovered, but for larger ...

  16. Regional Seismic Wave Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-31

    Baikal to the Pamirs, earthquakes occuring in the Baikal region, Sinkiang , the Gobi desert, southwest China and the Himalayas generated Lg/P ratios...data were obtained from stations within the USSR from earthquake events occuring in Baikal, Sinkiang , the Gobi desert, Southwest China and the...earthquakes originating in the Sinkiang province and recorded by seismo- graphic stations along the Pamir-Lena River profile [25] 0 - recorded by short

  17. Wave propagation and group velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Brillouin, Léon

    1960-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Group Velocity contains papers on group velocity which were published during the First World War and are missing in many libraries. It introduces three different definitions of velocities: the group velocity of Lord Rayleigh, the signal velocity of Sommerfeld, and the velocity of energy transfer, which yields the rate of energy flow through a continuous wave and is strongly related to the characteristic impedance. These three velocities are identical for nonabsorbing media, but they differ considerably in an absorption band. Some examples are discussed in the last chapter

  18. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, B.W.

    1987-06-24

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity. The memo discusses various ways of characterizing the polarization characteristics of plane waves, that is, of parameterizing a transverse unit vector, such as the Jones vector, the Stokes vector, and the Poincare sphere. It discusses the connection between macroscopically defined quantities, such as the intensity or, more generally, the Stokes parameters, and microscopic field amplitudes. The material presented here is a portion of a more extensive treatment of propagation to be presented separately. The equations presented here have been described in various books and articles. They are collected here as a summary and review of theory needed when treating pulse propagation.

  19. Wave Generation Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Høgedal, Michael; Christensen, Morten

    The intention of this manual is to provide some formulas and techniques which can be used for generating waves in hydraulic laboratories. Both long crested waves (2-D waves) and short crested waves (3-D waves) are considered....

  20. Wave Generation Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Frigaard, Peter; Høgedal, Michael; Christensen, Morten

    1993-01-01

    The intention of this manual is to provide some formulas and techniques which can be used for generating waves in hydraulic laboratories. Both long crested waves (2-D waves) and short crested waves (3-D waves) are considered.

  1. Solitary Wave Propagation Influenced by Submerged Breakwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王锦; 左其华; 王登婷

    2013-01-01

    The form of Boussinesq equation derived by Nwogu (1993) using velocity at an arbitrary distance and surface elevation as variables is used to simulate wave surface elevation changes. In the numerical experiment, water depth was divided into five layers with six layer interfaces to simulate velocity at each layer interface. Besides, a physical experiment was carried out to validate numerical model and study solitary wave propagation.“Water column collapsing”method (WCCM) was used to generate solitary wave. A series of wave gauges around an impervious breakwater were set-up in the flume to measure the solitary wave shoaling, run-up, and breaking processes. The results show that the measured data and simulated data are in good agreement. Moreover, simulated and measured surface elevations were analyzed by the wavelet transform method. It shows that different wave frequencies stratified in the wavelet amplitude spectrum. Finally, horizontal and vertical velocities of each layer interface were analyzed in the process of solitary wave propagation through submerged breakwater.

  2. Wave Propagation in Modified Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Lindroos, Jan Ø; Mota, David F

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the propagation of scalar waves induced by matter sources in the context of scalar-tensor theories of gravity which include screening mechanisms for the scalar degree of freedom. The usual approach when studying these theories in the non-linear regime of cosmological perturbations is based on the assumption that scalar waves travel at the speed of light. Within General Relativity such approximation is good and leads to no loss of accuracy in the estimation of observables. We find, however, that mass terms and non-linearities in the equations of motion lead to propagation and dispersion velocities significantly different from the speed of light. As the group velocity is the one associated to the propagation of signals, a reduction of its value has direct impact on the behavior and dynamics of nonlinear structures within modified gravity theories with screening. For instance, the internal dynamics of galaxies and satellites submerged in large dark matter halos could be affected by the fact that t...

  3. Propagation of sound waves in ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    2000-01-01

    Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described....

  4. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, B. W.

    1987-06-01

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity.

  5. Propagation of sound waves in ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    2000-01-01

    Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described.......Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described....

  6. Large-scale Globally Propagating Coronal Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Warmuth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale, globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere and by inference in the corona since the 1960s. However, detailed analysis of these phenomena has only been conducted since the late 1990s. This was prompted by the availability of high-cadence coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, which routinely show spectacular globally propagating bright fronts. Coronal waves, as these perturbations are usually referred to, have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Many findings have supported the “classical” interpretation of the disturbances: fast-mode MHD waves or shocks that are propagating in the solar corona. However, observations that seemed inconsistent with this picture have stimulated the development of alternative models in which “pseudo waves” are generated by magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding coronal mass ejection. This has resulted in a vigorous debate on the physical nature of these disturbances. This review focuses on demonstrating how the numerous observational findings of the last one and a half decades can be used to constrain our models of large-scale coronal waves, and how a coherent physical understanding of these disturbances is finally emerging.

  7. Wave propagation in thermoelastic saturated porous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M D Sharma

    2008-12-01

    Biot ’s theory for wave propagation in saturated porous solid is modified to study the propagation of thermoelastic waves in poroelastic medium. Propagation of plane harmonic waves is considered in isotropic poroelastic medium. Relations are derived among the wave-induced temperature in the medium and the displacements of fluid and solid particles. Christoffel equations obtained are modified with the thermal as well as thermoelastic coupling parameters. These equations explain the existence and propagation of four waves in the medium. Three of the waves are attenuating longitudinal waves and one is a non-attenuating transverse wave. Thermal properties of the medium have no effect on the transverse wave. The velocities and attenuation of the longitudinal waves are computed for a numerical model of liquid-saturated sandstone. Their variations with thermal as well as poroelastic parameters are exhibited through numerical examples.

  8. Numerical study of the generation and propagation of ultralow-frequency waves by artificial ionospheric F region modulation at different latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiang; Zhou, Chen; Shi, Run; Ni, Binbin; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Yuannong

    2016-09-01

    Powerful high-frequency (HF) radio waves can be used to efficiently modify the upper-ionospheric plasmas of the F region. The pressure gradient induced by modulated electron heating at ultralow-frequency (ULF) drives a local oscillating diamagnetic ring current source perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, which can act as an antenna radiating ULF waves. In this paper, utilizing the HF heating model and the model of ULF wave generation and propagation, we investigate the effects of both the background ionospheric profiles at different latitudes in the daytime and nighttime ionosphere and the modulation frequency on the process of the HF modulated heating and the subsequent generation and propagation of artificial ULF waves. Firstly, based on a relation among the radiation efficiency of the ring current source, the size of the spatial distribution of the modulated electron temperature and the wavelength of ULF waves, we discuss the possibility of the effects of the background ionospheric parameters and the modulation frequency. Then the numerical simulations with both models are performed to demonstrate the prediction. Six different background parameters are used in the simulation, and they are from the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2012) model and the neutral atmosphere model (NRLMSISE-00), including the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP; 62.39° N, 145.15° W), Wuhan (30.52° N, 114.32° E) and Jicamarca (11.95° S, 76.87° W) at 02:00 and 14:00 LT. A modulation frequency sweep is also used in the simulation. Finally, by analyzing the numerical results, we come to the following conclusions: in the nighttime ionosphere, the size of the spatial distribution of the modulated electron temperature and the ground magnitude of the magnetic field of ULF wave are larger, while the propagation loss due to Joule heating is smaller compared to the daytime ionosphere; the amplitude of the electron temperature oscillation decreases with

  9. Observations of Obliquely Propagating Electron Bernstein Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armstrong, R. J.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Stenzel, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Plane electron Bernstein waves propagating obliquely to the magnetic field are investigated. The waves are excited by a plane grid antenna in a large volume magnetoplasma. The observations compare favorably with the predictions of the linear dispersion relation.......Plane electron Bernstein waves propagating obliquely to the magnetic field are investigated. The waves are excited by a plane grid antenna in a large volume magnetoplasma. The observations compare favorably with the predictions of the linear dispersion relation....

  10. Lamb Wave Propagation in Laminated Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Damage detection using guided Lamb waves is an important tool in Structural health Monitoring. In this paper, we outline a method of obtaining Lamb wave modes in composite structures using two dimensional Spectral Finite Elements. Using this approach, Lamb wave dispersion curves are obtained for laminated composite structures with different fibre orientation. These propagating Lamb wave modes are pictorially captured using tone burst signal.

  11. Water waves generated by underwater explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Mehaute, Bernard Le

    1996-01-01

    This is the first book on explosion-generated water waves. It presents the theoretical foundations and experimental results of the generation and propagation of impulsively generated waves resulting from underwater explosions. Many of the theories and concepts presented herein are applicable to other types of water waves, in particular, tsunamis and waves generated by the fall of a meteorite. Linear and nonlinear theories, as well as experimental calibrations, are presented for cases of deep and shallow water explosions. Propagation of transient waves on dissipative, nonuniform bathymetries to

  12. Topology optimization of wave-propagation problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2006-01-01

    Topology optimization is demonstrated as a useful tool for systematic design of wave-propagation problems. We illustrate the applicability of the method for optical, acoustic and elastic devices and structures.......Topology optimization is demonstrated as a useful tool for systematic design of wave-propagation problems. We illustrate the applicability of the method for optical, acoustic and elastic devices and structures....

  13. Terrestrial propagation of long electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Galejs, Janis; Fock, V A

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial Propagation of Long Electromagnetic Waves deals with the propagation of long electromagnetic waves confined principally to the shell between the earth and the ionosphere, known as the terrestrial waveguide. The discussion is limited to steady-state solutions in a waveguide that is uniform in the direction of propagation. Wave propagation is characterized almost exclusively by mode theory. The mathematics are developed only for sources at the ground surface or within the waveguide, including artificial sources as well as lightning discharges. This volume is comprised of nine chapte

  14. Voigt-wave propagation in active materials

    CERN Document Server

    Mackay, Tom G

    2015-01-01

    If a dissipative anisotropic dielectric material, characterized by the permittivity matrix $\\underline{\\underline{\\epsilon}}$, supports Voigt-wave propagation, then so too does the analogous active material characterized by the permittivity matrix $\\underline{\\underline{{\\tilde{\\epsilon}}}}$, where $\\underline{\\underline{{\\tilde{\\epsilon}}}}$ is the hermitian conjugate of $\\underline{\\underline{\\epsilon}}$. Consequently, a dissipative material that supports Voigt-wave propagation can give rise to a material that supports the propagation of Voigt waves with attendant linear gain in amplitude with propagation distance, by infiltration with an active dye.

  15. ON THE SOURCE OF PROPAGATING SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Jess, D. B. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Khomenko, Elena, E-mail: krishna.prasad@qub.ac.uk [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-10-10

    Recent high-resolution observations of sunspot oscillations using simultaneously operated ground- and space-based telescopes reveal the intrinsic connection between different layers of the solar atmosphere. However, it is not clear whether these oscillations are externally driven or generated in situ. We address this question by using observations of propagating slow magnetoacoustic waves along a coronal fan loop system. In addition to the generally observed decreases in oscillation amplitudes with distance, the observed wave amplitudes are also found to be modulated with time, with similar variations observed throughout the propagation path of the wave train. Employing multi-wavelength and multi-instrument data, we study the amplitude variations with time as the waves propagate through different layers of the solar atmosphere. By comparing the amplitude modulation period in different layers, we find that slow magnetoacoustic waves observed in sunspots are externally driven by photospheric p-modes, which propagate upward into the corona before becoming dissipated.

  16. Slow wave propagation in soft adhesive interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan K; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2016-11-16

    Stick-slip in sliding of soft adhesive surfaces has long been associated with the propagation of Schallamach waves, a type of slow surface wave. Recently it was demonstrated using in situ experiments that two other kinds of slow waves-separation pulses and slip pulses-also mediate stick-slip (Viswanathan et al., Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 5265-5275). While separation pulses, like Schallamach waves, involve local interface detachment, slip pulses are moving stress fronts with no detachment. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of the propagation of these three waves in a linear elastodynamics framework. Different boundary conditions apply depending on whether or not local interface detachment occurs. It is shown that the interface dynamics accompanying slow waves is governed by a system of integral equations. Closed-form analytical expressions are obtained for the interfacial pressure, shear stress, displacements and velocities. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves emerge naturally as wave solutions of the integral equations, with oppositely oriented directions of propagation. Wave propagation is found to be stable in the stress regime where linearized elasticity is a physically valid approximation. Interestingly, the analysis reveals that slow traveling wave solutions are not possible in a Coulomb friction framework for slip pulses. The theory provides a unified picture of stick-slip dynamics and slow wave propagation in adhesive contacts, consistent with experimental observations.

  17. ANALYSE OF PULSE WAVE PROPAGATION IN ARTERIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Yi-shan; JIA Xiao-bo; CUI Chang-kui; XIAO Xiao-chun

    2006-01-01

    Based upon the blood vessel of being regarded as the elasticity tube, and that the tissue restricts the blood vessel wall, the rule of pulse wave propagation in blood vessel was studied. The viscosity of blood, the elastic modulus of blood vessel, the radius of tube that influenced the pulse wave propagation were analyzed. Comparing the result that considered the viscosity of blood with another result that did not consider the viscosity of blood, we finally discover that the viscosity of blood that influences the pulse wave propagation can not be neglected; and with the accretion of the elastic modulus the speed of propagation augments and the press value of blood stream heightens; when diameter of blood vessel reduces, the press of blood stream also heightens and the speed of pulse wave also augments. These results will contribute to making use of the information of pulse wave to analyse and auxiliarily diagnose some causes of human disease.

  18. WAVE: Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation for Virtual Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Ravish; Rungta, Atul; Golas, Abhinav; Ming Lin; Manocha, Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    We present an interactive wave-based sound propagation system that generates accurate, realistic sound in virtual environments for dynamic (moving) sources and listeners. We propose a novel algorithm to accurately solve the wave equation for dynamic sources and listeners using a combination of precomputation techniques and GPU-based runtime evaluation. Our system can handle large environments typically used in VR applications, compute spatial sound corresponding to listener's motion (including head tracking) and handle both omnidirectional and directional sources, all at interactive rates. As compared to prior wave-based techniques applied to large scenes with moving sources, we observe significant improvement in runtime memory. The overall sound-propagation and rendering system has been integrated with the Half-Life 2 game engine, Oculus-Rift head-mounted display, and the Xbox game controller to enable users to experience high-quality acoustic effects (e.g., amplification, diffraction low-passing, high-order scattering) and spatial audio, based on their interactions in the VR application. We provide the results of preliminary user evaluations, conducted to study the impact of wave-based acoustic effects and spatial audio on users' navigation performance in virtual environments.

  19. Investigation of the generation and propagation of low frequency internal waves: A case study for the east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, A.D.; Babu, S.V.; Prasad, K.V.S.R.; Murty, T.V.R.; Sadhuram, Y.; Mahapatra, D.K.

    , this is discernable more in the north, particularly offshore. The current at the coastal boundary is probably hampering the signatures being perceptible there. To understand how the internal wave activity varies along the coast, vertical transects of temperature...

  20. Propagation of SLF/ELF electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Weiyan

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with the SLF/ELF wave propagation, an important branch of electromagnetic theory. The SLF/ELF wave propagation theory is well applied in earthquake electromagnetic radiation, submarine communication, thunderstorm detection, and geophysical prospecting and diagnostics. The propagation of SLF/ELF electromagnetic waves is introduced in various media like the earth-ionospheric waveguide, ionospheric plasma, sea water, earth, and the boundary between two different media or the stratified media. Applications in the earthquake electromagnetic radiation and the submarine communications are also addressed. This book is intended for scientists and engineers in the fields of radio propagation and EM theory and applications. Prof. Pan is a professor at China Research Institute of Radiowave Propagation in Qingdao (China). Dr. Li is a professor at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou (China).

  1. Wave propagation and scattering in random media

    CERN Document Server

    Ishimaru, Akira

    1978-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Scattering in Random Media, Volume 2, presents the fundamental formulations of wave propagation and scattering in random media in a unified and systematic manner. The topics covered in this book may be grouped into three categories: waves in random scatterers, waves in random continua, and rough surface scattering. Random scatterers are random distributions of many particles. Examples are rain, fog, smog, hail, ocean particles, red blood cells, polymers, and other particles in a state of Brownian motion. Random continua are the media whose characteristics vary randomly an

  2. PROPAGATION OF CYLINDRICAL WAVES IN POROELASTIC MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorona Yu.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the harmonic axisymmetric wave propagation in poroelastic media. The computational formulas for the study of displacements and stresses that occur during vibrations in a wide frequency range are proposed.

  3. Explosive Line Wave Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    curvature produced by each line wave generator. Piezoelectric pins were used for an additional assessment of the explosive lens design...to a visual assessment of the wave curvature from the high speed camera images, the explosive lens design was also evaluated using piezoelectric pins...High Explosive Firing Complex (HEFC). The various explosive line wave generators were taped vertically on a supporting board and the detonation wave

  4. Simulation of guided wave propagation near numerical Brillouin zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijanka, Piotr; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Packo, Pawel

    2016-04-01

    Attractive properties of guided waves provides very unique potential for characterization of incipient damage, particularly in plate-like structures. Among other properties, guided waves can propagate over long distances and can be used to monitor hidden structural features and components. On the other hand, guided propagation brings substantial challenges for data analysis. Signal processing techniques are frequently supported by numerical simulations in order to facilitate problem solution. When employing numerical models additional sources of errors are introduced. These can play significant role for design and development of a wave-based monitoring strategy. Hence, the paper presents an investigation of numerical models for guided waves generation, propagation and sensing. Numerical dispersion analysis, for guided waves in plates, based on the LISA approach is presented and discussed in the paper. Both dispersion and modal amplitudes characteristics are analysed. It is shown that wave propagation in a numerical model resembles propagation in a periodic medium. Consequently, Lamb wave propagation close to numerical Brillouin zone is investigated and characterized.

  5. Wave Beam Propagation Through Density Fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balakin, A. A.; Bertelli, N.; Westerhof, E.

    2011-01-01

    Perturbations induced by edge density fluctuations on electron cyclotron wave beams propagating in fusion plasmas are studied by means of a quasi-optical code. The effects of such fluctuations are illustrated here by showing the beam propagation in the case of single harmonic perturbations to the wa

  6. Detection of Electromechanical Wave Propagation Using Synchronized Phasor Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryawanshi, Prakash; Dambhare, Sanjay; Pramanik, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Considering electrical network as a continuum has become popular for electromechanical wave analysis. This paper reviews the concept of electromechanical wave propagation. Analysis of large number of generator ring system will be an easy way to illustrate wave propagation. The property of traveling waves is that the maximum and minimum values do not occur at the same time instants and hence the difference between these time delays can be easily calculated. The homogeneous, isotropic 10 generator ring system is modeled using electromagnetic transient simulation programs. The purpose of this study is to investigate the time delays and wave velocities using Power System Computer Aided Design (PSCAD)/Electromagnetic Transient Program (EMTP). The disturbances considered here are generator disconnections and line trips.

  7. Supersaturation of vertically propagating internal gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindzen, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    The usual assumption that vertically propagating internal gravity waves will cease growing with height once their amplitudes are such as to permit convective instability anywhere within the wave is reexamined. Two factors lead to amplitude limitation: (1) wave clipping associated with convective mixing, and (2) energetic constraints associated with the rate at which the wave can supply energy to the convection. It is found that these two factors limit supersaturation to about 50 percent for waves with short horizontal wavelengths and high relative phase speeds. Usually the degree of supersaturation will be much less. These factors also lead to a gradual, rather than sudden, cessation of wave growth with height.

  8. The generation and propagation of nonlinear waves in a reservoir; Geracao e propagacao de ondas nao-lineares em um reservatorio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Roger Matsumoto; Mendes, Andre Avelino de Oliveira; Bacchi, Raphael David Aquilino [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Lab. de Dinamica dos Fluidos Computacional (LabCFD)], e-mail: roger@vm.uff.br, e-mail: andreavelinoom@gmail.com, e-mail: raphael@esss.com.br

    2006-07-01

    The present work aims to model numerically the generation and propagation of waves in a reservoir, represented by a two-dimensional impermeable box, with a flat horizontal bottom and two vertical walls. The horizontal or vertical harmonic motion is imposed at the container, which is partially filled with water, with two possible initial conditions for the free surface: still water or a stationary sinusoidal wave. Two numerical methods are employed in the solution of the boundary value problem. The first is based on solving an integral equation that arises from Cauchy's integral theorem for functions of a complex variable. The transient nonlinear free surface flow is simulated using a boundary integral method. Numerical results are validated by comparing them with classical analytical solutions. The second method uses the commercial code ANSYS CFX with its homogeneous free surface model. In this case, results are compared with experiments done by Bredmose et al. (2003). In both models, interesting features at the free surface are obtained and discussed. (author)

  9. Inward propagating chemical waves in Taylor vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Barnaby W; Novak, Jan; Wilson, Mark C T; Britton, Melanie M; Taylor, Annette F

    2010-04-01

    Advection-reaction-diffusion (ARD) waves in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in steady Taylor-Couette vortices have been visualized using magnetic-resonance imaging and simulated using an adapted Oregonator model. We show how propagating wave behavior depends on the ratio of advective, chemical and diffusive time scales. In simulations, inward propagating spiral flamelets are observed at high Damköhler number (Da). At low Da, the reaction distributes itself over several vortices and then propagates inwards as contracting ring pulses--also observed experimentally.

  10. Generation and propagation of infrasonic airwaves from volcanic explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. B.

    2003-02-01

    Analysis of infrasonic pressure waves generated by active volcanoes is essential to the understanding of volcanic explosion dynamics. Unlike seismic waves propagating in the earth, infrasonic airwaves offer a relatively unfiltered representation of source motions at the vent during an eruption. Time-varying acoustic propagation filters caused by changeable atmospheric conditions are minimal for microphones deployed at intermediate distances (article [ Johnson et al., J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res., in press].

  11. Wave propagation in predator-prey systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Sheng-Chen; Tsai, Je-Chiang

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we study a class of predator-prey systems of reaction-diffusion type. Specifically, we are interested in the dynamical behaviour for the solution with the initial distribution where the prey species is at the level of the carrying capacity, and the density of the predator species has compact support, or exponentially small tails near x=+/- ∞ . Numerical evidence suggests that this will lead to the formation of a pair of diverging waves propagating outwards from the initial zone. Motivated by this phenomenon, we establish the existence of a family of travelling waves with the minimum speed. Unlike the previous studies, we do not use the shooting argument to show this. Instead, we apply an iteration process based on Berestycki et al 2005 (Math Comput. Modelling 50 1385-93) to construct a set of super/sub-solutions. Since the underlying system does not enjoy the comparison principle, such a set of super/sub-solutions is not based on travelling waves, and in fact the super/sub-solutions depend on each other. With the aid of the set of super/sub-solutions, we can construct the solution of the truncated problem on the finite interval, which, via the limiting argument, can in turn generate the wave solution. There are several advantages to this approach. First, it can remove the technical assumptions on the diffusivities of the species in the existing literature. Second, this approach is of PDE type, and hence it can shed some light on the spreading phenomenon indicated by numerical simulation. In fact, we can compute the spreading speed of the predator species for a class of biologically acceptable initial distributions. Third, this approach might be applied to the study of waves in non-cooperative systems (i.e. a system without a comparison principle).

  12. Analysis of Blast Wave Propagation Inside Tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jingbo; YAN Qiushi; WU Jun

    2008-01-01

    The explosion inside tunnel would generate blast wave which transmits through the longi tudinal tunnel.Because of the close-in effects of the tunnel and the reflection by the confining tunnel structure,blast wave propagation inside tunnel is distinguished from that in air.When the explosion happens inside tunnel,the overpressure peak is higher than that of explosion happening in air.The continuance time of the biast wave also becomes longer.With the help of the numerical simu lation finite element software LS-DYNA.a three-dimensional nonlinear dynamic simulation analysis for an explosion experiment inside tunnel was carried out.LS-DYNA is a fully integrated analysis program specifically designed for nonlinear dynamics and large strain problems.Compared with the experimental results.the simulation results have made the material parameters of numerical simulation model available.By using the model and the same material parameters,many results were adopted by calculating the model under different TNT explosion dynamites.Then the method of dimensional analysis was Used for the Simulation resufts.AS Overpressures of the explosion biast wave are the governing factor in fhe tunnel responses.a formula for the explosion biast wave overpressure at a certain distance from the detonation center point inside the tunnel was de rived by using the dimensional analysis theory.By cornparing the results computed by the fromula with experimental results which were obtained before.the formula was proved to be very applicable at some instance.The research may be helpful to estimate rapidly the effect of internal explosion of tunnel on the structure.

  13. FLEXURAL WAVE PROPAGATION IN NARROW MINDLIN'S PLATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Chao; HAN Gang; FANG Xue-qian; HUANG Wen-hu

    2006-01-01

    Appling Mindlin's theory of thick plates and Hamilton system to propagation of elastic waves under free boundary condition, a solution of the problem was given.Dispersion equations of propagation mode of strip plates were deduced from eigenfunction expansion method. It was compared with the dispersion relation that was gained through solution of thick plate theory proposed by Mindlin. Based on the two kinds of theories,the dispersion curves show great difference in the region of short waves, and the cutoff frequencies are higher in Hamiltonian systems. However, the dispersion curves are almost the same in the region of long waves.

  14. Wave propagation in spatially modulated tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Ziepke, A; Engel, H

    2016-01-01

    We investigate wave propagation in rotationally symmetric tubes with a periodic spatial modulation of cross section. Using an asymptotic perturbation analysis, the governing quasi two-dimensional reaction-diffusion equation can be reduced into a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion-advection equation. Assuming a weak perturbation by the advection term and using projection method, in a second step, an equation of motion for traveling waves within such tubes can be derived. Both methods predict properly the nonlinear dependence of the propagation velocity on the ratio of the modulation period of the geometry to the intrinsic width of the front, or pulse. As a main feature, we can observe finite intervals of propagation failure of waves induced by the tube's modulation. In addition, using the Fick-Jacobs approach for the highly diffusive limit we show that wave velocities within tubes are governed by an effective diffusion coefficient. Furthermore, we discuss the effects of a single bottleneck on the period of pul...

  15. Ducted propagation of chorus waves: Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. H. Yearby

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Ducted propagation of whistler waves in the terrestrial magnetosphere-ionosphere system was discussed and studied long before the first in-situ spacecraft measurements. While a number of implicit examples of the existence of ducted propagation have been found, direct observation of ducts has been hampered by the low sampling rates of measurements of the plasma density. The present paper is based on Cluster observations of chorus waves. The ability to use measurements of the spacecraft potential as a proxy for high time resolution electron density measurements is exploited to identify a number of cases when increased chorus wave power, observed within the radiation belts, is observed simultaneously with density enchantments. It is argued that the observation of ducted propagation of chorus implies modification of numerical models for plasma-wave interactions within the radiation belts.

  16. Radiation and propagation of electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Tyras, George; Declaris, Nicholas

    1969-01-01

    Radiation and Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves serves as a text in electrical engineering or electrophysics. The book discusses the electromagnetic theory; plane electromagnetic waves in homogenous isotropic and anisotropic media; and plane electromagnetic waves in inhomogenous stratified media. The text also describes the spectral representation of elementary electromagnetic sources; the field of a dipole in a stratified medium; and radiation in anisotropic plasma. The properties and the procedures of Green's function method of solution, axial currents, as well as cylindrical boundaries a

  17. Turbulent Transitions in Optical Wave Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierangeli, D; Di Mei, F; Di Domenico, G; Agranat, A J; Conti, C; DelRe, E

    2016-10-28

    We report the direct observation of the onset of turbulence in propagating one-dimensional optical waves. The transition occurs as the disordered hosting material passes from being linear to one with extreme nonlinearity. As the response grows, increased wave interaction causes a modulational unstable quasihomogeneous flow to be superseded by a chaotic and spatially incoherent one. Statistical analysis of high-resolution wave behavior in the turbulent regime unveils the emergence of concomitant rogue waves. The transition, observed in a photorefractive ferroelectric crystal, introduces a new and rich experimental setting for the study of optical wave turbulence and information transport in conditions dominated by large fluctuations and extreme nonlinearity.

  18. Properties, Propagation, and Excitation of EMIC Waves Properties, Propagation, and Excitation of EMIC Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jichun; Coffey, Victoria N.; Chandler, Michael O.; Boardsen, Scott A.; Saikin, Anthony A.; Mello, Emily M.; Russell, Christopher T.; Torbert, Roy B.; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Giles, Barbara L.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves (0.1-5 Hz) play an important role in particle dynamics in the Earth's magnetosphere. EMIC waves are preferentially excited in regions where hot anisotropic ions and cold dense plasma populations spatially overlap. While the generation region of EMIC waves is usually on or near the magnetic equatorial plane in the inner magnetosphere, EMIC waves have both equatorial and off-equator source regions on the dayside in the compressed outer magnetosphere. Using field and plasma measurements from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, we perform a case study of EMIC waves and associated local plasma conditions observed on 19 October 2015. From 0315 to 0810 UT, before crossing the magnetopause into the magnetosheath, all four MMS spacecraft detected long-lasting He(exp +)-band EMIC wave emissions around local noon (MLT = 12.7 - 14.0) at high L-shells (L = 8.8 - 15.2) and low magnetic latitudes (MLAT = -21.8deg - -30.3deg). Energetic (greater than 1 keV) and anisotropic ions were present throughout this event that was in the recovery phase of a weak geomagnetic storm (min. Dst = -48 nT at 1000 UT on 18 October 2015). The testing of linear theory suggests that the EMIC waves were excited locally. Although the wave event is dominated by small normal angles, its polarization is mixed with right- and left-handedness and its propagation is bi-directional with regard to the background magnetic field. The short inter-spacecraft distances (as low as 15 km) of the MMS mission make it possible to accurately determine the k vector of the waves using the phase difference technique. Preliminary analysis finds that the k vector magnitude, phase speed, and wavelength of the 0.3-Hz wave packet at 0453:55 UT are 0.005 km(exp -1), 372.9 km/s, and 1242.9 km, respectively.

  19. Tropical response to extratropical eastward propagating waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sridharan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Space–time spectral analysis of ERA-interim winds and temperature at 200 hPa for December 2012–February 2013 shows the presence of eastward propagating waves with period near 18 days in mid-latitude meridional winds at 200 hPa. The 18 day waves of k = 1–2 are dominantly present at latitudes greater than 80°, whereas the waves of k = 3–4 are dominant at 60° of both Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Though the 18 day wave of smaller zonal wavenumbers (k = 1–2 are confined to high latitudes, there is an equatorward propagation of the 18 day wave of k = 4 and 5. The wave amplitude of k = 5 is dominant than that of k = 4 at tropical latitudes. In the Northern Hemisphere (NH, there is a poleward tilt in the phase of the wave of k = 5 at mid-latitudes, as height increases indicating the baroclinic nature of the wave, whereas in the Southern Hemisphere (SH, the wave has barotropic structure as there is no significant phase variation with height. At the NH subtropics, the wave activity is confined to 500–70 hPa with moderate amplitudes. It is reported for the first time that the wave of similar periodicity (18 day and zonal structure (k = 5 as that of extratropical wave disturbance has been observed in tropical OLR, a proxy for tropical convection. We suggest that the selective response of the tropical wave forcing may be due to the lateral forcing of the eastward propagating extratropical wave of similar periodicity and zonal structure.

  20. Wave propagation on microstate geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Keir, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Supersymmetric microstate geometries were recently conjectured to be nonlinearly unstable due to numerical and heuristic evidence, based on the existence of very slowly decaying solutions to the linear wave equation on these backgrounds. In this paper, we give a thorough mathematical treatment of the linear wave equation on both two and three charge supersymmetric microstate geometries, finding a number of surprising results. In both cases we prove that solutions to the wave equation have uniformly bounded local energy, despite the fact that three charge microstates possess an ergoregion; these geometries therefore avoid Friedman's "ergosphere instability". In fact, in the three charge case we are able to construct solutions to the wave equation with local energy that neither grows nor decays, although this data must have nontrivial dependence on the Kaluza-Klein coordinate. In the two charge case we construct quasimodes and use these to bound the uniform decay rate, showing that the only possible uniform dec...

  1. Nonlinear propagation and control of acoustic waves in phononic superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, Noé; Picó, Rubén; García-Raffi, Lluís M; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor J

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of intense acoustic waves in a one-dimensional phononic crystal is studied. The medium consists in a structured fluid, formed by a periodic array of fluid layers with alternating linear acoustic properties and quadratic nonlinearity coefficient. The spacing between layers is of the order of the wavelength, therefore Bragg effects such as band-gaps appear. We show that the interplay between strong dispersion and nonlinearity leads to new scenarios of wave propagation. The classical waveform distortion process typical of intense acoustic waves in homogeneous media can be strongly altered when nonlinearly generated harmonics lie inside or close to band gaps. This allows the possibility of engineer a medium in order to get a particular waveform. Examples of this include the design of media with effective (e.g. cubic) nonlinearities, or extremely linear media (where distortion can be cancelled). The presented ideas open a way towards the control of acoustic wave propagation in nonlinear regime.

  2. Wave propagation in complex coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Horsley, S A R; Philbin, T G

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the analytic continuation of wave equations into the complex position plane. For the particular case of electromagnetic waves we provide a physical meaning for such an analytic continuation in terms of a family of closely related inhomogeneous media. For bounded permittivity profiles we find the phenomenon of reflection can be related to branch cuts in the wave that originate from poles of the permittivity at complex positions. Demanding that these branch cuts disappear, we derive a large family of inhomogeneous media that are reflectionless for a single angle of incidence. Extending this property to all angles of incidence leads us to a generalized form of the Poschl Teller potentials. We conclude by analyzing our findings within the phase integral (WKB) method.

  3. Wave Propagation in Smart Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we deal with the behavior of solutions to hyperbolicequations such as the wave equation:\\begin{equation}\\label{waveeq1}\\frac{\\partial^2}{\\partial t^2}u-\\Delta u=f,\\end{equation}or the equations of linear elasticity for an isotropic medium:\\begin{equation}\\label{elasteq1}\\frac{\\parti...

  4. Wave Propagation in Smart Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we deal with the behavior of solutions to hyperbolic equations such as the wave equation: \\begin{equation}\\label{waveeq1} \\frac{\\partial^2}{\\partial t^2}u-\\Delta u=f, \\end{equation} or the equations of linear elasticity for an isotropic medium: \\begin{equation}\\label{elasteq1} \\frac...

  5. Topology Optimization for Transient Wave Propagation Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, René

    as for vectorial elastic wave propagation problems using finite element analysis [P2], [P4]. The concept is implemented in a parallel computing code that includes efficient techniques for performing gradient based topology optimization. Using the developed computational framework the thesis considers four...... new technology, by designing new materials and their layout. The thesis presents a general framework for applying topology optimization in the design of material layouts for transient wave propagation problems. In contrast to the high level of modeling in the frequency domain, time domain topology...

  6. Wind generated rogue waves in an annular wave flume

    CERN Document Server

    Toffoli, A; Salman, H; Monbaliu, J; Frascoli, F; Dafilis, M; Stramignoni, E; Forza, R; Manfrin, M; Onorato, M

    2016-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the statistical properties of a wind-generated wave field and the spontaneous formation of rogue waves in an annular flume. Unlike many experiments on rogue waves, where waves are mechanically generated, here the wave field is forced naturally by wind as it is in the ocean. What is unique about the present experiment is that the annular geometry of the tank makes waves propagating circularly in an {\\it unlimited-fetch} condition. Within this peculiar framework, we discuss the temporal evolution of the statistical properties of the surface elevation. We show that rogue waves and heavy-tail statistics may develop naturally during the growth of the waves just before the wave height reaches a stationary condition. Our results shed new light on the formation of rogue waves in a natural environment.

  7. Wind Generated Rogue Waves in an Annular Wave Flume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toffoli, A; Proment, D; Salman, H; Monbaliu, J; Frascoli, F; Dafilis, M; Stramignoni, E; Forza, R; Manfrin, M; Onorato, M

    2017-04-07

    We investigate experimentally the statistical properties of a wind-generated wave field and the spontaneous formation of rogue waves in an annular flume. Unlike many experiments on rogue waves where waves are mechanically generated, here the wave field is forced naturally by wind as it is in the ocean. What is unique about the present experiment is that the annular geometry of the tank makes waves propagating circularly in an unlimited-fetch condition. Within this peculiar framework, we discuss the temporal evolution of the statistical properties of the surface elevation. We show that rogue waves and heavy-tail statistics may develop naturally during the growth of the waves just before the wave height reaches a stationary condition. Our results shed new light on the formation of rogue waves in a natural environment.

  8. Transient processes in the parametric interaction of counter-propagating waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slabko, V V; Rasskazova, E V; Tkachenko, V A; Moskalev, A K [Siberian Federal University, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Popov, A K [Purdue University, 1205 W State St, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Myslivets, S A [L.V.Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Academgorodok, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-31

    We present a comparative analysis of transient processes in media with a negative refractive index for the parametric interaction of co- and counter-propagating waves. The transient time for the interaction of counter-propagating waves is shown to considerably exceed that for the interaction of co-propagating waves. In the case of counter-propagating waves, we present fitting results for the generated wave amplitude as a function of time and for the transient time vs. the amplitude of the pump wave and the length of the medium. (optical metamaterials)

  9. Longitudinally propagating traveling waves of the mammalian tectorial membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Aranyosi, Alexander J; Freeman, Dennis M

    2007-10-16

    Sound-evoked vibrations transmitted into the mammalian cochlea produce traveling waves that provide the mechanical tuning necessary for spectral decomposition of sound. These traveling waves of motion that have been observed to propagate longitudinally along the basilar membrane (BM) ultimately stimulate the mechano-sensory receptors. The tectorial membrane (TM) plays a key role in this process, but its mechanical function remains unclear. Here we show that the TM supports traveling waves that are an intrinsic feature of its visco-elastic structure. Radial forces applied at audio frequencies (2-20 kHz) to isolated TM segments generate longitudinally propagating waves on the TM with velocities similar to those of the BM traveling wave near its best frequency place. We compute the dynamic shear storage modulus and shear viscosity of the TM from the propagation velocity of the waves and show that segments of the TM from the basal turn are stiffer than apical segments are. Analysis of loading effects of hair bundle stiffness, the limbal attachment of the TM, and viscous damping in the subtectorial space suggests that TM traveling waves can occur in vivo. Our results show the presence of a traveling wave mechanism through the TM that can functionally couple a significant longitudinal extent of the cochlea and may interact with the BM wave to greatly enhance cochlear sensitivity and tuning.

  10. Proton beam generation of oblique whistler waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H. K.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    It is known that ion beams are capable of generating whistler waves that propagate parallel to the mean magnetic field. Such waves may have been observed both upstream of the earth's bow shock and in the vicinity of comets. Previous analyses are extended to include propagation oblique to the mean magnetic field. The instability is generated by the perpendicular component of free energy in the ions, which can arise either via a temperature anisotropy or via a gyrating distribution. In the former case, the generation of whistler waves is confined to a fairly narrow cone of propagation directions centered about parallel propagation; in the latter case, the maximum growth of the instability can occur at fairly large obliquities (theta equal to about 50 deg).

  11. Solitary wave propagation through two-dimensional treelike structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, William J; Sen, Surajit

    2014-02-01

    It is well known that a velocity perturbation can travel through a mass spring chain with strongly nonlinear interactions as a solitary and antisolitary wave pair. In recent years, nonlinear wave propagation in 2D structures have also been explored. Here we first consider the propagation of such a velocity perturbation for cases where the system has a 2D "Y"-shaped structure. Here each of the three pieces that make up the "Y" are made of a small mass spring chain. In addition, we consider a case where multiple "Y"-shaped structures are used to generate a "tree." We explore the early time dynamical behavior associated with the propagation of a velocity perturbation initiated at the trunk and at the extremities for both cases. We are looking for the energy transmission properties from one branch to another of these "Y"-shaped structures. Our dynamical simulations suggest the following broad observations: (i) for strongly nonlinear interactions, mechanical energy propagation resembles pulse propagation with the energy propagation being dispersive in the linear case; (ii) for strong nonlinear interactions, the tree-like structure acts as an energy gate showing preference for large perturbations in the system while the behavior of the linear case shows no such preference, thereby suggesting that such structures can possibly act as switches that activate at sufficiently high energies. The study aspires to develop insights into the nature of nonlinear wave propagation through a network of linear chains.

  12. Free Propagation of Wave in Viscoelastic Cables with Small Curvature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹宗兰

    2003-01-01

    The coupled longitudinal-transverse waves propagating freely along a viscoelastic cable was studied. The frequency-spectrum equation governing propagating waves and the formulations of the phase velocities and the group velocities characterizing propagating waves were derived. The effects of viscosity parameters on the phase velocities and the group velocities were investigated with numerical simulation. The analyses show that viscosity has a strong influence on the phase velocity and the group velocity of propagating waves and attenuation waves for longitudinal-dominant waves, but the phase velocities of propagating waves of transverse-dominant waves do not change with viscosity.

  13. Propagation of Vortex Electron Wave Functions in a Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Gallatin, Gregg M

    2012-01-01

    The physics of coherent beams of photons carrying axial orbital angular momentum (OAM) is well understood and such beams, sometimes known as vortex beams, have found applications in optics and microscopy. Recently electron beams carrying very large values of axial OAM have been generated. In the absence of coupling to an external electromagnetic field the propagation of such vortex electron beams is virtually identical mathematically to that of vortex photon beams propagating in a medium with a homogeneous index of refraction. But when coupled to an external electromagnetic field the propagation of vortex electron beams is distinctly different from photons. Here we use the exact path integral solution to Schrodingers equation to examine the time evolution of an electron wave function carrying axial OAM. Interestingly we find that the nonzero OAM wave function can be obtained from the zero OAM wave function, in the case considered here, simply by multipling it by an appropriate time and position dependent pref...

  14. Coupled seismic and electromagnetic wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    Coupled seismic and electromagnetic wave propagation is studied theoretically and experimentally. This coupling arises because of the electrochemical double layer, which exists along the solid-grain/fluid-electrolyte boundaries of porous media. Within the double layer, charge is redistributed, creat

  15. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Random Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1984-01-01

    The propagation of a narrow frequency band beam of electromagnetic waves in a medium with randomly varying index of refraction is considered. A novel formulation of the governing equation is proposed. An equation for the average Green function (or transition probability) can then be derived...

  16. Domain Wall Propagation through Spin Wave Emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.S.; Yan, P.; Shen, Y.H.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Wang, X.R.

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically study field-induced domain wall motion in an electrically insulating ferromagnet with hard- and easy-axis anisotropies. Domain walls can propagate along a dissipationless wire through spin wave emission locked into the known soliton velocity at low fields. In the presence of damping

  17. Electromagnetic wave propagations in conjugate metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yadong; Fu, Yangyang; Chen, Huanyang

    2017-03-06

    In this work, by employing field transformation optics, we deduce a special kind of materials called conjugate metamaterials, which can support intriguing electromagnetic wave propagations, such as negative refractions and lasing phenomena. These materials could also serve as substrates for making a subwavelength-resolution lens, and the so-called "perfect lens" is demonstrated to be a limiting case.

  18. Antenna Construction and Propagation of Radio Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on antenna construction and propagation of radio waves is designed to provide communicators with instructions in the selection and/or construction of the proper antenna(s) for use with current field radio equipment. Introductory materials include…

  19. Wave propagation in axially moving periodic strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Vladislav S.; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with analytically studying transverse waves propagation in an axially moving string with periodically modulated cross section. The structure effectively models various relevant technological systems, e.g. belts, thread lines, band saws, etc., and, in particular, roller chain drive...

  20. Wave propagation in elastic layers with damping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Sergey; Darula, Radoslav

    2016-01-01

    The conventional concepts of a loss factor and complex-valued elastic moduli are used to study wave attenuation in a visco-elastic layer. The hierarchy of reduced-order models is employed to assess attenuation levels in various situations. For the forcing problem, the attenuation levels are found...... for alternative excitation cases. The differences between two regimes, the low frequency one, when a waveguide supports only one propagating wave, and the high frequency one, when several waves are supported, are demonstrated and explained....

  1. Thermoelastic wave propagation in laminated composites plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma K. L.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The dispersion of thermoelastic waves propagation in an arbitrary direction in laminated composites plates is studied in the framework of generalized thermoelasticity in this article. Three dimensional field equations of thermoelasticity with relaxation times are considered. Characteristic equation is obtained on employing the continuity of displacements, temperature, stresses and thermal gradient at the layers’ interfaces. Some important particular cases such as of free waves on reducing plates to single layer and the surface waves when thickness tends to infinity are also discussed. Uncoupled and coupled thermoelasticity are the particular cases of the obtained results. Numerical results are also obtained and represented graphically.

  2. Love Wave Propagation in Poro elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.V. Rama Rao

    1978-10-01

    Full Text Available It is observed that on similar reasons as in classical theory of elasticity, SH wave propagation in a semi infinite poroelastic body is not possible and is possible when there is a layer of another poro elastic medium over it i.e., Love waves. Two particular cases are considered in one of which phase velocity can be determined for a given wave length. In the same case, equation for phase velocity is of the same form as that of the classical theory of Elasticity.

  3. Propagation and Generation of Electromagnetic Waves at Proton Gyrofrequencies in a Relativistic Electron-Positron Plasma. II. Excitation of Electromagnetic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheleznyakov, V. V.; Bespalov, P. A.

    2016-04-01

    In part I of this work [1], we study the dispersion characteristics of low-frequency waves in a relativistic electron-positron plasma. In part II, we examine the electromagnetic wave instability in this plasma caused by an admixture of nonrelativistic protons with energy comparable with the energy of relativistic low-mass particles. The instability occurs in the frequency band between the fundamental harmonic of proton gyrofrequency and the fundamental harmonic of relativistic electron gyrofrequency. The results can be used for the interpretation of known observations of the pulsar emissions obtained with a high time and frequency resolution. The considered instability can probably be the initial stage of the microwave radio emission nanoshots typical of the pulsar in the Crab Nebula.

  4. Propagation behavior of acoustic wave in wood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huadong Xu; Guoqi Xu; Lihai Wang; Lei Yu

    2014-01-01

    We used acoustic tests on a quarter-sawn poplar timbers to study the effects of wood anisotropy and cavity defects on acoustic wave velocity and travel path, and we investigated acoustic wave propagation behavior in wood. The timber specimens were first tested in unmodified condition and then tested after introduction of cavity defects of varying sizes to quantify the transmitting time of acoustic waves in laboratory conditions. Two-dimensional acoustic wave contour maps on the radial section of specimens were then simulated and analyzed based on the experimental data. We tested the relationship between wood grain and acoustic wave velocity as waves passed in various directions through wood. Wood anisotropy has significant effects on both velocity and travel path of acoustic waves, and the velocity of waves passing longitudinally through timbers exceeded the radial velocity. Moreover, cavity defects altered acoustic wave time contours on radial sections of timbers. Acous-tic wave transits from an excitation point to the region behind a cavity in defective wood more slowly than in intact wood.

  5. Nonlinear wave propagation in constrained solids subjected to thermal loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucera, Claudio; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The classical mathematical treatment governing nonlinear wave propagation in solids relies on finite strain theory. In this scenario, a system of nonlinear partial differential equations can be derived to mathematically describe nonlinear phenomena such as acoustoelasticity (wave speed dependency on quasi-static stress), wave interaction, wave distortion, and higher-harmonic generation. The present work expands the topic of nonlinear wave propagation to the case of a constrained solid subjected to thermal loads. The origin of nonlinear effects in this case is explained on the basis of the anharmonicity of interatomic potentials, and the absorption of the potential energy corresponding to the (prevented) thermal expansion. Such "residual" energy is, at least, cubic as a function of strain, hence leading to a nonlinear wave equation and higher-harmonic generation. Closed-form solutions are given for the longitudinal wave speed and the second-harmonic nonlinear parameter as a function of interatomic potential parameters and temperature increase. The model predicts a decrease in longitudinal wave speed and a corresponding increase in nonlinear parameter with increasing temperature, as a result of the thermal stresses caused by the prevented thermal expansion of the solid. Experimental measurements of the ultrasonic nonlinear parameter on a steel block under constrained thermal expansion confirm this trend. These results suggest the potential of a nonlinear ultrasonic measurement to quantify thermal stresses from prevented thermal expansion. This knowledge can be extremely useful to prevent thermal buckling of various structures, such as continuous-welded rails in hot weather.

  6. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry, E-mail: rochtch@iptm.ru; Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Irzhak, Dmitry [Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High-Purity Materials Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Ortega, Luc [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, UMR 8502, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Zizak, Ivo; Erko, Alexei [Institute for Nanometre Optics and Technology, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Insepov, Zinetula [Nazarbayev University Research and Innovation System, 53 Kabanbay Batyr St., Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan)

    2015-09-14

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals.

  7. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Zizak, Ivo; Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Erko, Alexei; Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Irzhak, Dmitry; Insepov, Zinetula

    2015-09-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals.

  8. Wave propagation in spatially modulated tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziepke, A; Martens, S; Engel, H

    2016-09-07

    We investigate wave propagation in rotationally symmetric tubes with a periodic spatial modulation of cross section. Using an asymptotic perturbation analysis, the governing quasi-two-dimensional reaction-diffusion equation can be reduced into a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion-advection equation. Assuming a weak perturbation by the advection term and using projection method, in a second step, an equation of motion for traveling waves within such tubes can be derived. Both methods predict properly the nonlinear dependence of the propagation velocity on the ratio of the modulation period of the geometry to the intrinsic width of the front, or pulse. As a main feature, we observe finite intervals of propagation failure of waves induced by the tube's modulation and derive an analytically tractable condition for their occurrence. For the highly diffusive limit, using the Fick-Jacobs approach, we show that wave velocities within modulated tubes are governed by an effective diffusion coefficient. Furthermore, we discuss the effects of a single bottleneck on the period of pulse trains. We observe period changes by integer fractions dependent on the bottleneck width and the period of the entering pulse train.

  9. Wave propagation in spatially modulated tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziepke, A.; Martens, S.; Engel, H.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate wave propagation in rotationally symmetric tubes with a periodic spatial modulation of cross section. Using an asymptotic perturbation analysis, the governing quasi-two-dimensional reaction-diffusion equation can be reduced into a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion-advection equation. Assuming a weak perturbation by the advection term and using projection method, in a second step, an equation of motion for traveling waves within such tubes can be derived. Both methods predict properly the nonlinear dependence of the propagation velocity on the ratio of the modulation period of the geometry to the intrinsic width of the front, or pulse. As a main feature, we observe finite intervals of propagation failure of waves induced by the tube's modulation and derive an analytically tractable condition for their occurrence. For the highly diffusive limit, using the Fick-Jacobs approach, we show that wave velocities within modulated tubes are governed by an effective diffusion coefficient. Furthermore, we discuss the effects of a single bottleneck on the period of pulse trains. We observe period changes by integer fractions dependent on the bottleneck width and the period of the entering pulse train.

  10. Linear and nonlinear propagation of water wave groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, W. J., Jr.; Donelan, M. A.; Hui, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from a study of the evolution of waveforms with known analytical group shapes, in the form of both transient wave groups and the cloidal (cn) and dnoidal (dn) wave trains as derived from the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The waveforms were generated in a long wind-wave tank of the Canada Centre for Inland Waters. It was found that the low-amplitude transients behaved as predicted by the linear theory and that the cn and dn wave trains of moderate steepness behaved almost as predicted by the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. Some of the results did not fit into any of the available theories for waves on water, but they provide important insight on how actual groups of waves propagate and on higher-order effects for a transient waveform.

  11. Propagating wave correlations in complex systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creagh, Stephen C.; Gradoni, Gabriele; Hartmann, Timo; Tanner, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    We describe a novel approach for computing wave correlation functions inside finite spatial domains driven by complex and statistical sources. By exploiting semiclassical approximations, we provide explicit algorithms to calculate the local mean of these correlation functions in terms of the underlying classical dynamics. By defining appropriate ensemble averages, we show that fluctuations about the mean can be characterised in terms of classical correlations. We give in particular an explicit expression relating fluctuations of diagonal contributions to those of the full wave correlation function. The methods have a wide range of applications both in quantum mechanics and for classical wave problems such as in vibro-acoustics and electromagnetism. We apply the methods here to simple quantum systems, so-called quantum maps, which model the behaviour of generic problems on Poincaré sections. Although low-dimensional, these models exhibit a chaotic classical limit and share common characteristics with wave propagation in complex structures.

  12. Fractional Calculus in Wave Propagation Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Mainardi, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Fractional calculus, in allowing integrals and derivatives of any positive order (the term "fractional" kept only for historical reasons), can be considered a branch of mathematical physics which mainly deals with integro-differential equations, where integrals are of convolution form with weakly singular kernels of power law type. In recent decades fractional calculus has won more and more interest in applications in several fields of applied sciences. In this lecture we devote our attention to wave propagation problems in linear viscoelastic media. Our purpose is to outline the role of fractional calculus in providing simplest evolution processes which are intermediate between diffusion and wave propagation. The present treatment mainly reflects the research activity and style of the author in the related scientific areas during the last decades.

  13. Obliquely propagating dust-density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, A.; Arp, O.; Klindworth, M.; Melzer, A.

    2008-02-01

    Self-excited dust-density waves are experimentally studied in a dusty plasma under microgravity. Two types of waves are observed: a mode inside the dust volume propagating in the direction of the ion flow and another mode propagating obliquely at the boundary between the dusty plasma and the space charge sheath. The dominance of oblique modes can be described in the frame of a fluid model. It is shown that the results fom the fluid model agree remarkably well with a kinetic electrostatic model of Rosenberg [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996)]. In the experiment, the instability is quenched by increasing the gas pressure or decreasing the dust density. The critical pressure and dust density are well described by the models.

  14. Wave propagation retrieval method for chiral metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the wave propagation method for the retrieving of effective properties of media with circularly polarized eigenwaves, in particularly for chiral metamaterials. The method is applied for thick slabs and provides bulk effective parameters. Its strong sides are the absence...... of artificial branches of the refractive index and simplicity in implementation. We prove the validity of the method on three case studies of homogeneous magnetized plasma, bi-cross and U-shaped metamaterials....

  15. Turbulence generation by waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  16. Wave Propagation in Jointed Geologic Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoun, T

    2009-12-17

    Predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in a jointed geologic media remain a modern day scientific frontier. In part this is due to a lack of comprehensive understanding of the complex physical processes associated with the transient response of geologic material, and in part it is due to numerical challenges that prohibit accurate representation of the heterogeneities that influence the material response. Constitutive models whose properties are determined from laboratory experiments on intact samples have been shown to over-predict the free field environment in large scale field experiments. Current methodologies for deriving in situ properties from laboratory measured properties are based on empirical equations derived for static geomechanical applications involving loads of lower intensity and much longer durations than those encountered in applications of interest involving wave propagation. These methodologies are not validated for dynamic applications, and they do not account for anisotropic behavior stemming from direcitonal effects associated with the orientation of joint sets in realistic geologies. Recent advances in modeling capabilities coupled with modern high performance computing platforms enable physics-based simulations of jointed geologic media with unprecedented details, offering a prospect for significant advances in the state of the art. This report provides a brief overview of these modern computational approaches, discusses their advantages and limitations, and attempts to formulate an integrated framework leading to the development of predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in jointed and fractured geologic materials.

  17. Interchange Reconnection Alfven Wave Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, B J; Li, Y

    2014-01-01

    Given recent observational results of interchange reconnection processes in the solar corona and the theoretical development of the S-Web model for the slow solar wind, we present further analysis of the 3D MHD simulation of interchange reconnection by Edmondson et al. (Astrophys. J. 707, 1427, 2009). Specifically, we analyze the consequences of the dynamic streamer belt jump that corresponds to flux opening by interchange reconnection. Information about the magnetic field restructuring by interchange reconnection is carried throughout the system by Alfven waves propagating away from the reconnection region, distributing the shear and twist imparted by the driving flows, including shedding the injected stress-energy and accumulated magnetic helicity along newly-open field lines. We quantify the properties of the reconnection-generated wave activity in the simulation. There is a localized high frequency component associated with the current sheet/reconnection site and an extended low frequency component associ...

  18. EXACT ANALYSIS OF WAVE PROPAGATION IN AN INFINITE RECTANGULAR BEAM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙卫明; 杨光松; 李东旭

    2004-01-01

    The Fourier series method was extended for the exact analysis of wave propagation in an infinite rectangular beam. Initially, by solving the three-dimensional elastodynamic equations a general analytic solution was derived for wave motion within the beam. And then for the beam with stress-free boundaries, the propagation characteristics of elastic waves were presented. This accurate wave propagation model lays a solid foundation of simultaneous control of coupled waves in the beam.

  19. Astrocytes generate Na+-mediated metabolic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardinelli, Yann; Magistretti, Pierre J; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2004-10-12

    Glutamate-evoked Na+ increase in astrocytes has been identified as a signal coupling synaptic activity to glucose consumption. Astrocytes participate in multicellular signaling by transmitting intercellular Ca2+ waves. Here we show that intercellular Na+ waves are also evoked by activation of single cultured cortical mouse astrocytes in parallel with Ca2+ waves; however, there are spatial and temporal differences. Indeed, maneuvers that inhibit Ca2+ waves also inhibit Na+ waves; however, inhibition of the Na+/glutamate cotransporters or enzymatic degradation of extracellular glutamate selectively inhibit the Na+ wave. Thus, glutamate released by a Ca2+ wave-dependent mechanism is taken up by the Na+/glutamate cotransporters, resulting in a regenerative propagation of cytosolic Na+ increases. The Na+ wave gives rise to a spatially correlated increase in glucose uptake, which is prevented by glutamate transporter inhibition. Therefore, astrocytes appear to function as a network for concerted neurometabolic coupling through the generation of intercellular Na+ and metabolic waves.

  20. Seismic Wave Propagation on the Tablet Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emoto, K.

    2015-12-01

    Tablet computers widely used in recent years. The performance of the tablet computer is improving year by year. Some of them have performance comparable to the personal computer of a few years ago with respect to the calculation speed and the memory size. The convenience and the intuitive operation are the advantage of the tablet computer compared to the desktop PC. I developed the iPad application of the numerical simulation of the seismic wave propagation. The numerical simulation is based on the 2D finite difference method with the staggered-grid scheme. The number of the grid points is 512 x 384 = 196,608. The grid space is 200m in both horizontal and vertical directions. That is the calculation area is 102km x 77km. The time step is 0.01s. In order to reduce the user waiting time, the image of the wave field is drawn simultaneously with the calculation rather than playing the movie after the whole calculation. P and S wave energies are plotted on the screen every 20 steps (0.2s). There is the trade-off between the smooth simulation and the resolution of the wave field image. In the current setting, it takes about 30s to calculate the 10s wave propagation (50 times image updates). The seismogram at the receiver is displayed below of the wave field updated in real time. The default medium structure consists of 3 layers. The layer boundary is defined by 10 movable points with linear interpolation. Users can intuitively change to the arbitrary boundary shape by moving the point. Also users can easily change the source and the receiver positions. The favorite structure can be saved and loaded. For the advance simulation, users can introduce the random velocity fluctuation whose spectrum can be changed to the arbitrary shape. By using this application, everyone can simulate the seismic wave propagation without the special knowledge of the elastic wave equation. So far, the Japanese version of the application is released on the App Store. Now I am preparing the

  1. Wave propagation in axially moving periodic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Vladislav S.; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2017-04-01

    The paper deals with analytically studying transverse waves propagation in an axially moving string with periodically modulated cross section. The structure effectively models various relevant technological systems, e.g. belts, thread lines, band saws, etc., and, in particular, roller chain drives for diesel engines by capturing both their spatial periodicity and axial motion. The Method of Varying Amplitudes is employed in the analysis. It is shown that the compound wave traveling in the axially moving periodic string comprises many components with different frequencies and wavenumbers. This is in contrast to non-moving periodic structures, for which all components of the corresponding compound wave feature the same frequency. Due to this "multi-frequency" character of the wave motion, the conventional notion of frequency band-gaps appears to be not applicable for the moving periodic strings. Thus, for such structures, by frequency band-gaps it is proposed to understand frequency ranges in which the primary component of the compound wave attenuates. Such frequency band-gaps can be present for a moving periodic string, but only if its axial velocity is lower than the transverse wave speed, and, the higher the axial velocity, the narrower the frequency band-gaps. The revealed effects could be of potential importance for applications, e.g. they indicate that due to spatial inhomogeneity, oscillations of axially moving periodic chains always involve a multitude of frequencies.

  2. Propagation of a constant velocity fission wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deinert, Mark

    2011-10-01

    The ideal nuclear fuel cycle would require no enrichment, minimize the need fresh uranium, and produce few, if any, transuranic elements. Importantly, the latter goal would be met without the reprocessing. For purely physical reasons, no reactor system or fuel cycle can meet all of these objectives. However, a traveling-wave reactor, if feasible, could come remarkably close. The concept is simple: a large cylinder of natural (or depleted) uranium is subjected to a fast neutron source at one end, the neutrons would transmute the uranium downstream and produce plutonium. If the conditions were right, a self-sustaining fission wave would form, producing yet more neutrons which would breed more plutonium and leave behind little more than short-lived fission products. Numerical studies have shown that fission waves of this type are also possible. We have derived an exact solution for the propagation velocity of a fission wave through fertile material. The results show that these waves fall into a class of traveling wave phenomena that have been encountered in other systems. The solution places a strict conditions on the shapes of the flux, diffusive, and reactive profiles that would be required for such a phenomenon to persist. The results are confirmed numerically.

  3. Internal Wave Generation by Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoanet, Daniel Michael

    In nature, it is not unusual to find stably stratified fluid adjacent to convectively unstable fluid. This can occur in the Earth's atmosphere, where the troposphere is convective and the stratosphere is stably stratified; in lakes, where surface solar heating can drive convection above stably stratified fresh water; in the oceans, where geothermal heating can drive convection near the ocean floor, but the water above is stably stratified due to salinity gradients; possible in the Earth's liquid core, where gradients in thermal conductivity and composition diffusivities maybe lead to different layers of stable or unstable liquid metal; and, in stars, as most stars contain at least one convective and at least one radiative (stably stratified) zone. Internal waves propagate in stably stratified fluids. The characterization of the internal waves generated by convection is an open problem in geophysical and astrophysical fluid dynamics. Internal waves can play a dynamically important role via nonlocal transport. Momentum transport by convectively excited internal waves is thought to generate the quasi-biennial oscillation of zonal wind in the equatorial stratosphere, an important physical phenomenon used to calibrate global climate models. Angular momentum transport by convectively excited internal waves may play a crucial role in setting the initial rotation rates of neutron stars. In the last year of life of a massive star, convectively excited internal waves may transport even energy to the surface layers to unbind them, launching a wind. In each of these cases, internal waves are able to transport some quantity--momentum, angular momentum, energy--across large, stable buoyancy gradients. Thus, internal waves represent an important, if unusual, transport mechanism. This thesis advances our understanding of internal wave generation by convection. Chapter 2 provides an underlying theoretical framework to study this problem. It describes a detailed calculation of the

  4. Spectral-element seismic wave propagation on emerging HPC architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Daniel; Liu, Qiancheng; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2017-04-01

    Seismic tomography is the most prominent approach to infer physical properties of Earth's internal structures such as compressional- and shear-wave speeds, anisotropy and attenuation. Using seismic signals from ground-motion records, recent advances in full-waveform inversions require increasingly accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex 3D media to provide access to the complete 3D seismic wavefield. However, such numerical simulations are computationally expensive and need high-performance computing (HPC) facilities for further improving the current state of knowledge. During recent years, new multi- and many-core architectures such as graphics processing units (GPUs) have been added to available large HPC systems. GPU-accelerated computing together with advances in multi-core central processing units (CPUs) can greatly accelerate scientific applications. To employ a wide variety of hardware accelerators for seismic wave propagation simulations, we incorporated a code generation tool BOAST into an existing spectral-element code package SPECFEM3D_GLOBE. This allows us to use meta-programming of computational kernels and generate optimized source code for both CUDA and OpenCL languages, running simulations on either CUDA or OpenCL hardware accelerators. We show here benchmark applications of seismic wave propagation on GPUs and CPUs, comparing performances on emerging hardware architectures.

  5. Propagating magnetohydrodynamics waves in coronal loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moortel, I

    2006-02-15

    High cadence Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) observations show that outward propagating intensity disturbances are a common feature in large, quiescent coronal loops, close to active regions. An overview is given of measured parameters of such longitudinal oscillations in coronal loops. The observed oscillations are interpreted as propagating slow magnetoacoustic waves and are unlikely to be flare-driven. A strong correlation, between the loop position and the periodicity of the oscillations, provides evidence that the underlying oscillations can propagate through the transition region and into the corona. Both a one- and a two-dimensional theoretical model of slow magnetoacoustic waves are presented to explain the very short observed damping lengths. The results of these numerical simulations are compared with the TRACE observations and show that a combination of the area divergence and thermal conduction agrees well with the observed amplitude decay. Additionally, the usefulness of wavelet analysis is discussed, showing that care has to be taken when interpreting the results of wavelet analysis, and a good knowledge of all possible factors that might influence or distort the results is a necessity.

  6. A numerical study of the breaking of modulated waves generated at a wave maker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andonowati,; Kusumawinahyu, W.M; Groesen, van E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concerned with breaking criteria for generated waves. An input in the form of a time signal is prescribed to a wave maker located at one end of a wave tank as used in hydrodynamic laboratories. The motion of this wave maker produces waves propagating into initially still water in the t

  7. Torsional wave propagation in solar tornadoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasheghani Farahani, S.; Ghanbari, E.; Ghaffari, G.; Safari, H.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: We investigate the propagation of torsional waves in coronal structures together with their collimation effects in the context of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The interplay of the equilibrium twist and rotation of the structure, e.g. jet or tornado, together with the density contrast of its internal and external media is studied to shed light on the nature of torsional waves. Methods: We consider a rotating magnetic cylinder embedded in a plasma with a straight magnetic field. This resembles a solar tornado. In order to express the dispersion relations and phase speeds of the axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic waves, the second-order thin flux tube approximation is implemented for the internal medium and the ideal MHD equations are implemented for the external medium. Results: The explicit expressions for the phase speed of the torsional wave show the modification of the torsional wave speed due to the equilibrium twist, rotation, and density contrast of the tornado. The speeds could be either sub-Alfvénic or ultra-Alfvénic depending on whether the equilibrium twist or rotation is dominant. The equilibrium twist increases the phase speed while the equilibrium rotation decreases it. The good agreement between the explicit versions for the phase speed and that obtained numerically proves adequate for the robustness of the model and method. The density ratio of the internal and external media also play a significant role in the speed and dispersion. Conclusions: The dispersion of the torsional wave is an indication of the compressibility of the oscillations. When the cylinder is rotating or twisted, in contrast to when it only possesses a straight magnetic field, the torsional wave is a collective mode. In this case its phase speed is determined by the Alfvén waves inside and outside the tornado.

  8. The effect of source's shape for seismic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, S.; Mikada, H.; Goto, T.; Takekawa, J.; Onishi, K.; Kasahara, J.; Kuroda, T.

    2009-12-01

    In conventional simulation of seismic wave propagation, the source which generates signals is usually given by a point force or by a particle velocity at a point. In practice, seismic wave is generated by signal generators with finite volume and width. Since seismic lines span a distance up to hundreds meter to several kilometers, many people conducted seismic survey and data processing with the assumption that the size of signal generator is negligible compared with survey scale. However, there are no studies that tells how the size of baseplate influences generated seismic waves. Such estimations, therefore, are meaningful to consider the scale of generator. In this sense, current seismic processing might require a theoretical background about the seismic source for further detailed analysis. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of seismic source’s shape to resultant wave properties, and then estimate how effective the consideration about the scale of signal generator is for analyzing the seismic data. To evaluate source’s scale effect, we performed finite element analysis with the 3D model including the baseplate of source and the heterogeneous ground medium. We adopted a finite element method (FEM) and chose the code named “MD Nastran” (MSC Software Ver.2008) to calculate seismic wave propagation. To verify the reliability of calculation, we compared the result of FEM and that of finite-difference method (FDM) with wave propagating simulation of isotropic and homogeneous model with a point source. The amplitude and phase of those two were nearly equal each other. We considered the calculation of FEM is accurate enough and can be performed in the following calculations. As the first step, we developed a simple point source model and a baseplate model. The point source model contains only the ground represented by an elastic medium. The force generating the signal is given at the nodal point of the surface in this case. On the other

  9. Lightning location with variable radio wave propagation velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongjian; Koh, Kuang Liang; Mezentsev, Andrew; Sugier, Jacqueline; Fullekrug, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Lightning discharges can be located by triangulation of their broadband electromagnetic pulses in long-baseline (~500 km) radio receiver networks. Here we apply the time of arrival difference (TOA) method to electric field recordings with a low frequency radio receiver array consisting of four stations in western Europe. The electromagnetic wave propagation velocity at low radio frequencies is an important input parameter for the TOA calculation and it is normally assumed to be equal to the speed of light. However, the radio wave propagation depends for example on the frequency, ground conductivity and the ionospheric height and small variations can cause location differences from hundreds to thousands of meters, as demonstrated in this study. The radio wave propagation from two VLF transmissions at 20.9 kHz and 23.4 kHz are compared. The results show that the apparent phase velocities are 0.6% slower and 0.5% faster than the speed of light respectively. As a result, a variable velocity is implemented in the TOA method using continuously recorded data on the 8th August 2014, when a mesoscale convective system developed over central France. The lightning locations inferred with a variable wave propagation velocity are more clustered than those using a fixed velocity. The distribution of the lightning velocities in a given geographic area fits a normal distribution that is not centred at the speed of light. As a result, representative velocities can be calculated for smaller regions to generate a velocity map over a larger area of enhanced lightning activity. These results suggest a connection with the ground elevation and/or surface conductivity that might have an impact on the observed wave propagation velocities.

  10. Wave envelopes method for description of nonlinear acoustic wave propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, J; Nowicki, A; Lewin, P A; Bloomfield, P E; Kujawska, T; Filipczyński, L

    2006-07-01

    A novel, free from paraxial approximation and computationally efficient numerical algorithm capable of predicting 4D acoustic fields in lossy and nonlinear media from arbitrary shaped sources (relevant to probes used in medical ultrasonic imaging and therapeutic systems) is described. The new WE (wave envelopes) approach to nonlinear propagation modeling is based on the solution of the second order nonlinear differential wave equation reported in [J. Wójcik, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 104 (1998) 2654-2663; V.P. Kuznetsov, Akust. Zh. 16 (1970) 548-553]. An incremental stepping scheme allows for forward wave propagation. The operator-splitting method accounts independently for the effects of full diffraction, absorption and nonlinear interactions of harmonics. The WE method represents the propagating pulsed acoustic wave as a superposition of wavelet-like sinusoidal pulses with carrier frequencies being the harmonics of the boundary tone burst disturbance. The model is valid for lossy media, arbitrarily shaped plane and focused sources, accounts for the effects of diffraction and can be applied to continuous as well as to pulsed waves. Depending on the source geometry, level of nonlinearity and frequency bandwidth, in comparison with the conventional approach the Time-Averaged Wave Envelopes (TAWE) method shortens computational time of the full 4D nonlinear field calculation by at least an order of magnitude; thus, predictions of nonlinear beam propagation from complex sources (such as phased arrays) can be available within 30-60 min using only a standard PC. The approximate ratio between the computational time costs obtained by using the TAWE method and the conventional approach in calculations of the nonlinear interactions is proportional to 1/N2, and in memory consumption to 1/N where N is the average bandwidth of the individual wavelets. Numerical computations comparing the spatial field distributions obtained by using both the TAWE method and the conventional approach

  11. Enhancing propagation characteristics of truncated localized waves in silica

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-07-01

    The spectral characteristics of truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica are analyzed. Numerical experiments show that the immunity of the truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica to decay and distortion is enhanced as the non-linearity of the relation between the transverse spatial spectral components and the wave vector gets stronger, in contrast to free-space propagating waves, which suffer from early decay and distortion. © 2011 IEEE.

  12. Investigation into stress wave propagation in metal foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate stress wave propagation in metal foams under high-speed impact loading. Three-dimensional Voronoi model is established to represent real closed-cell foam. Based on the one-dimensional stress wave theory and Voronoi model, a numerical model is developed to calculate the velocity of elastic wave and shock wave in metal foam. The effects of impact velocity and relative density of metal foam on the stress wave propagation in metal foams are explored respectively. The results show that both elastic wave and shock wave propagate faster in metal foams with larger relative density; with increasing the impact velocity, the shock wave propagation velocity increase, but the elastic wave propagation is not sensitive to the impact velocity.

  13. An optimal design problem in wave propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellido, J.C.; Donoso, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    We consider an optimal design problem in wave propagation proposed in Sigmund and Jensen (Roy. Soc. Lond. Philos. Trans. Ser. A 361:1001-1019, 2003) in the one-dimensional situation: Given two materials at our disposal with different elastic Young modulus and different density, the problem consists...... of finding the best distributions of the two initial materials in a rod in order to minimize the vibration energy in the structure under periodic loading of driving frequency Omega. We comment on relaxation and optimality conditions, and perform numerical simulations of the optimal configurations. We prove...

  14. Stationary Rossby wave propagation through easterly layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, E. K.; Watterson, I. G.

    1984-01-01

    The zonal mean basic state sensitivity of the steady response to midlatitude mountain forcing is examined through the numerical solution of linearized shallow water equations on a sphere. The zonal mean basic state consists of meridionally varying zonal winds and meridional winds. Attention is given to cases in which the former are westerly everywhere, except within a tropical region in which they are easterly. A zonal wavenumber three mountain confined to the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes provides the forcing. It is concluded that critical latitude effects on wave propagation are sensitive to mean meridional circulation structure in the critical latitude region of the model.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of shear wave propagation in excised tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J; Poole, G; Leitch, M; Plewes, D B

    1998-01-01

    The propagation of shear waves in ex vivo tissue samples, agar/gel phantoms, and human volunteers was investigated. A moving coil apparatus was constructed to generate low acoustic frequency shear perturbations of 50 to 400 Hz. Oscillating gradients phase-locked with the shear stimulus were used to generate a series of phase contrast images of the shear waves at different time-points throughout the wave cycle. Quantitative measurements of wave velocity and attenuation were obtained to evaluate the effects of temperature, frequency, and tissue anisotropy. Results of these experiments demonstrate significant variation in shear wave behavior with tissue type, whereas frequency and anisotropic behavior was mixed. Temperature-dependent behavior related mainly to the presence of fat. Propagation velocities ranged from 1 to 5 m/sec, and attenuation coefficients of from 1 to 3 nepers/unit wavelength, depending on tissue type. These results confirm the potential of elastic imaging attributable to the intrinsic variability of elastic properties observed in normal tissue, although some difficulty may be experienced in clinical implementation because of viscous attenuation in fat.

  16. Surface waves propagation on a turbulent flow forced electromagnetically

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    We study the propagation of monochromatic surface waves on a turbulent flow. The flow is generated in a layer of liquid metal by an electromagnetic forcing. This forcing creates a quasi two-dimensional (2D) turbulence with strong vertical vorticity. The turbulent flow contains much more energy than the surface waves. In order to focus on the surface wave, the deformations induced by the turbulent flow are removed. This is done by performing a coherent phase averaging. For wavelengths smaller than the forcing lengthscale, we observe a significant increase of the wavelength of the propagating wave that has not been reported before. We suggest that it can be explained by the random deflection of the wave induced by the velocity gradient of the turbulent flow. Under this assumption, the wavelength shift is an estimate of the fluctuations of deflection angle. The local measurements of the wave frequency far from the wavemaker do not reveal such systematic behavior, although a small shift is measured. Finally we qu...

  17. Similarity solution of the shock wave propagation in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller M.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the possibility of calculation of propagation of a shock wave generated during the bubble collapse in water including the dissipation effect. The used semi-empirical model is based on an assumption of similarity between the shock pressure time profiles in different shock wave positions. This assumption leads to a system of two ordinary differential equations for pressure jump and energy at the shock front. The NIST data are used for the compilation of the equation of state, which is applied to the calculation of the shock wave energy dissipation. The initial conditions for the system of equations are obtained from the modified method of characteristics in the combination with the differential equations of cavitation bubble dynamics, which considers viscous compressible liquid with the influence of surface tension. The initial energy of the shock wave is estimated from the energy between the energies of the bubble growth to the first and second maximum bubble radii.

  18. Seismic wave propagation in granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancredi, Gonzalo; López, Francisco; Gallot, Thomas; Ginares, Alejandro; Ortega, Henry; Sanchís, Johnny; Agriela, Adrián; Weatherley, Dion

    2016-10-01

    Asteroids and small bodies of the Solar System are thought to be agglomerates of irregular boulders, therefore cataloged as granular media. It is a consensus that many asteroids might be considered as rubble or gravel piles.Impacts on their surface could produce seismic waves which propagate in the interior of these bodies, thus causing modifications in the internal distribution of rocks and ejections of particles and dust, resulting in a cometary-type comma.We present experimental and numerical results on the study of propagation of impact-induced seismic waves in granular media, with special focus on behavior changes by increasing compression.For the experiment, we use an acrylic box filled with granular materials such as sand, gravel and glass spheres. Pressure inside the box is controlled by a movable side wall and measured with sensors. Impacts are created on the upper face of the box through a hole, ranging from free-falling spheres to gunshots. We put high-speed cameras outside the box to record the impact as well as piezoelectic sensors and accelerometers placed at several depths in the granular material to detect the seismic wave.Numerical simulations are performed with ESyS-Particle, a software that implements the Discrete Element Method. The experimental setting is reproduced in the numerical simulations using both individual spherical particles and agglomerates of spherical particles shaped as irregular boulders, according to rock models obtained with a 3D scanner. The numerical experiments also reproduces the force loading on one of the wall to vary the pressure inside the box.We are interested in the velocity, attenuation and energy transmission of the waves. These quantities are measured in the experiments and in the simulations. We study the dependance of these three parameters with characteristics like: impact speed, properties of the target material and the pressure in the media.These results are relevant to understand the outcomes of impacts in

  19. Effect of spatial discretization of energy on detonation wave propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Mi, XiaoCheng; Higgins, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Detonation propagation in the limit of highly spatially discretized energy sources is investigated. The model of this problem begins with a medium consisting of a calorically perfect gas with a prescribed energy release per unit mass. The energy release is collected into sheet-like sources that are now embedded in an inert gas that fills the spaces between them. The release of energy in the first sheet results in a planar blast wave that propagates to the next source, which is triggered after a prescribed delay, generating a new blast, and so forth. The resulting wave dynamics as the front passes through hundreds of such sources is computationally simulated by numerically solving the governing one-dimensional Euler equations in the lab-fixed reference frame. The average wave speed for each simulation is measured once the wave propagation has reached a quasi-periodic solution. Velocities in excess of the CJ speed are found as the sources are made increasingly discrete, with the deviation above CJ being as grea...

  20. Supersonic Propagation of Heat Waves in Low Density Heavy Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Shaoen; Zhang Wenhai; Yi Rongqing; Cui Yanli; Chen Jiusen; Xu Yan; Ding Yongkun; Lai Dongxian; Zheng Zhijian; Huang Yikiang; Li Jinghong; Sun Kexu; Hu Xin

    2005-01-01

    The propagation of a supersonic heat-wave through copper-doped foam with a density of 50 mg/cm3 was experimentally investigated. The wave is driven by 140 eV Holhraum radiations generated in a cylindrical gold cavity heated by a 2 k J, 1ns laser pulse (0.35 μm). The delayed breakout time of the radiation waves from the rear side of the foam is measured by a threechromatic streaked x-ray spectrometer (TCS) consisting of a set of three-imaging pinholes and an array of three transmission gratings coupled with an x-ray streak camera (XSC). With one shot,simultaneous measurements of the delays of the drive source and the radiation with two different energies (210 eV, 840 eV) through the foam have been made for the first time. The experimental results indicate that the time delays vary with photon energies. The radiation with an energy of 210 eV propagates at a lower velocity. The radiating heat wave propagates with a velocity that is larger than the sound speed. Using TGS, the transmitting spectrum was measured, and then lower limit of the optical depth which is more than 1, was obtained. The experimental data were in agreement with numerical simulations.

  1. Time reversal techniques in electromagnetic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jiang

    The time reversal method is a novel scheme utilizing the scattering components in a highly cluttered environment to achieve super-resolution focusing beyond Rayleigh criteria. In acoustics, time reversal effects are comprehensively analyzed and utilized in underwater target detection and communication. Successful demonstrations of the time reversal method using low frequency waveform in acoustics have generated wide interest in utilizing time reversal method by radio frequency electromagnetic waves. However, applications of the time reversal method in electromagnetics are considered to be emerging research topics and lack extensive analyses and studies. In this thesis, we present a systematic study in which a series of novel time reversal techniques have been developed for target detection and imaging in highly cluttered environments where higher order scattering is substantial. This thesis also contributes to insightful understanding of basic time reversal properties in electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in such environment. EM time reversal focusing and nulling effects using both single and multiple antennas are first demonstrated by FDTD simulations. Based on these properties, single antenna time reversal detection indicates significant enhancement in detection capability over traditional change detection scheme. A frequency selection scheme utilizing the frequencies with strong constructive interference between the target and background environment is developed to further improve the performance of the time reversal detector. Moreover, a novel time reversal adaptive interference cancellation (TRAIC) detection scheme developed based on TR properties can obtain null of the background through the time reversal nulling effect and achieve automatic focusing on the target through the time reversal focusing effect. Therefore, the detection ability, dynamic range and signal to noise ratio of a radar system can be significantly enhanced by the time reversal method

  2. Wave propagation in random granular chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, Mohith; Awasthi, Amnaya P; Geubelle, Philippe H

    2012-03-01

    The influence of randomness on wave propagation in one-dimensional chains of spherical granular media is investigated. The interaction between the elastic spheres is modeled using the classical Hertzian contact law. Randomness is introduced in the discrete model using random distributions of particle mass, Young's modulus, or radius. Of particular interest in this study is the quantification of the attenuation in the amplitude of the impulse associated with various levels of randomness: two distinct regimes of decay are observed, characterized by an exponential or a power law, respectively. The responses are normalized to represent a vast array of material parameters and impact conditions. The virial theorem is applied to investigate the transfer from potential to kinetic energy components in the system for different levels of randomness. The level of attenuation in the two decay regimes is compared for the three different sources of randomness and it is found that randomness in radius leads to the maximum rate of decay in the exponential regime of wave propagation.

  3. Viscothermal wave propagation including acousto-elastic interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beltman, Willem Martinus

    1998-01-01

    This research deals with pressure waves in a gas trapped in thin layers or narrow tubes. In these cases viscous and thermal effects can have a significant effect on the propagation of waves. This so-called viscothermal wave propagation is governed by a number of dimensionless parameters. The two mos

  4. Frozen waves: experimental generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Tarcio A; Gesualdi, Marcos R R; Zamboni-Rached, Michel

    2012-06-01

    Frozen waves (FWs) are very interesting particular cases of nondiffracting beams whose envelopes are static and whose longitudinal intensity patterns can be chosen a priori. We present here for the first time (that we know of) the experimental generation of FWs. The experimental realization of these FWs was obtained using a holographic setup for the optical reconstruction of computer generated holograms (CGH), based on a 4-f Fourier filtering system and a nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM), where FW CGHs were first computationally implemented, and later electronically implemented, on the LC-SLM for optical reconstruction. The experimental results are in agreement with the corresponding theoretical analytical solutions and hold excellent prospects for implementation in scientific and technological applications.

  5. Nonlinear wave propagation in a rapidly-spun fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinstrie, C J; Kogelnik, H

    2006-09-04

    Multiple-scale analysis is used to study linear wave propagation in a rapidly-spun fiber and its predictions are shown to be consistent with results obtained by other methods. Subsequently, multiple-scale analysis is used to derive a generalized Schroedinger equation for nonlinear wave propagation in a rapidly-spun fiber. The consequences of this equation for pulse propagation and four-wave mixing are discussed briefly.

  6. Lamb wave propagation modeling for structure health monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyue ZHANG; Shenfang YUAN; Tong HAO

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to model the propagation of Lamb waves used in structure health monitoring. A number of different numerical computational techniques have been developed for wave propagation studies. The local interaction simulation approach, used for modeling sharp interfaces and discontinuities in complex media (LISA/SIM theory), has been effectively applied to numerical simulations of elastic wave interaction. This modeling is based on the local interaction simulation approach theory and is finally accomplished through the finite elements software Ansys11. In this paper, the Lamb waves propagating characteristics and the LISA/SIM theory are introduced. The finite difference equations describing wave propagation used in the LISA/SIM theory are obtained. Then, an anisotropic metallic plate model is modeled and a simulating Lamb waves signal is loaded on. Finally, the Lamb waves propagation modeling is implemented.

  7. Acoustic wave propagation in high-pressure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldyna, Josef; Sitek, Libor; Habán, Vladimír

    2006-12-22

    Recently, substantial attention is paid to the development of methods of generation of pulsations in high-pressure systems to produce pulsating high-speed water jets. The reason is that the introduction of pulsations into the water jets enables to increase their cutting efficiency due to the fact that the impact pressure (so-called water-hammer pressure) generated by an impact of slug of water on the target material is considerably higher than the stagnation pressure generated by corresponding continuous jet. Special method of pulsating jet generation was developed and tested extensively under the laboratory conditions at the Institute of Geonics in Ostrava. The method is based on the action of acoustic transducer on the pressure liquid and transmission of generated acoustic waves via pressure system to the nozzle. The purpose of the paper is to present results obtained during the research oriented at the determination of acoustic wave propagation in high-pressure system. The final objective of the research is to solve the problem of transmission of acoustic waves through high-pressure water to generate pulsating jet effectively even at larger distances from the acoustic source. In order to be able to simulate numerically acoustic wave propagation in the system, it is necessary among others to determine dependence of the sound speed and second kinematical viscosity on operating pressure. Method of determination of the second kinematical viscosity and speed of sound in liquid using modal analysis of response of the tube filled with liquid to the impact was developed. The response was measured by pressure sensors placed at both ends of the tube. Results obtained and presented in the paper indicate good agreement between experimental data and values of speed of sound calculated from so-called "UNESCO equation". They also show that the value of the second kinematical viscosity of water depends on the pressure.

  8. Theoretical Model of Acoustic Wave Propagation in Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozaczka Eugeniusz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the propagation of low frequency waves in a shallow sea. As a source of acoustic waves, underwater disturbances generated by ships were adopted. A specific feature of the propagation of acoustic waves in shallow water is the proximity of boundaries of the limiting media characterised by different impedance properties, which affects the acoustic field coming from a source situated in the water layer “deformed” by different phenomena. The acoustic field distribution in the real shallow sea is affected not only by multiple reflections, but also by stochastic changes in the free surface shape, and statistical changes in the seabed shape and impedance. The paper discusses fundamental problems of modal sound propagation in the water layer over different types of bottom sediments. The basic task in this case was to determine the acoustic pressure level as a function of distance and depth. The results of the conducted investigation can be useful in indirect determination of the type of bottom.

  9. On the generation of internal wave modes by surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlander, Uwe; Kirschner, Ian; Maas, Christian; Zaussinger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves play an important role in the ocean since they transport energy and momentum and the can lead to mixing when they break. Surface waves and internal gravity waves can interact. On the one hand, long internal waves imply a slow varying shear current that modifies the propagation of surface waves. Surface waves generated by the atmosphere can, on the other hand, excite internal waves by nonlinear interaction. Thereby a surface wave packet consisting of two close frequencies can resonate with a low frequency internal wave (Phillips, 1966). From a theoretical point of view, the latter has been studied intensively by using a 2-layer model, i.e. a surface layer with a strong density contrast and an internal layer with a comparable weak density contrast (Ball, 1964; Craig et al., 2010). In the present work we analyse the wave coupling for a continuously stratified fluid using a fully non-linear 2D numerical model (OpenFoam) and compare this with laboratory experiments (see Lewis et al. 1974). Surface wave modes are used as initial condition and the time development of the dominant surface and internal waves are studied by spectral and harmonic analysis. For the simple geometry of a box, the results are compared with analytical spectra of surface and gravity waves. Ball, F.K. 1964: Energy transfer between external and internal gravity waves. J. Fluid Mech. 19, 465. Craig, W., Guyenne, P., Sulem, C. 2010: Coupling between internal and surface waves. Natural Hazards 57, 617-642. Lewis, J.E., Lake, B.M., Ko, D.R.S 1974: On the interaction of internal waves and surfacr gravity waves, J. Fluid Mech. 63, 773-800. Phillips, O.M. 1966: The dynamics of the upper ocean, Cambridge University Press, 336pp.

  10. Wave propagation in sandwich panels with a poroelastic core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Finnveden, Svante; Barbagallo, Mathias; Arteaga, Ines Lopez

    2014-05-01

    Wave propagation in sandwich panels with a poroelastic core, which is modeled by Biot's theory, is investigated using the waveguide finite element method. A waveguide poroelastic element is developed based on a displacement-pressure weak form. The dispersion curves of the sandwich panel are first identified as propagating or evanescent waves by varying the damping in the panel, and wave characteristics are analyzed by examining their motions. The energy distributions are calculated to identify the dominant motions. Simplified analytical models are also devised to show the main physics of the corresponding waves. This wave propagation analysis provides insight into the vibro-acoustic behavior of sandwich panels lined with elastic porous materials.

  11. Effects of external magnetic field on oblique propagation of ion acoustic cnoidal wave in nonextensive plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhad Kiyaei, Forough; Dorranian, Davoud

    2017-01-01

    Effects of the obliqueness and the strength of external magnetic field on the ion acoustic (IA) cnoidal wave in a nonextensive plasma are investigated. The reductive perturbation method is employed to derive the corresponding KdV equation for the IA wave. Sagdeev potential is extracted, and the condition of generation of IA waves in the form of cnoidal waves or solitons is discussed in detail. In this work, the domain of allowable values of nonextensivity parameter q for generation of the IA cnoidal wave in the plasma medium is considered. The results show that only the compressive IA wave may generate and propagate in the plasma medium. Increasing the strength of external magnetic field will increase the frequency of the wave and decrease its amplitude, while increasing the angle of propagation will decrease the frequency of the wave and increase its amplitude.

  12. Guided wave propagation in porous unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobmann, Nicolas; Bach, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Networks of piezoelectric transducers mounted on aircraft structures for Acousto Ultrasonics (AU) purposes are designed to be applied during the service life of the aircraft. The approach to integrate these sensor networks already during the manufacture of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) host structures prompts ideas to achieve an additional benefit by their application for cure monitoring, thus extending their use to the manufacturing chain. This benefit could be extended even further if guided waves generated by AU sensor networks could be used for porosity testing extensively applied for CFRP aircraft structures. In light of this, an experimental study was conducted to investigate effects of porosity on the propagation of guided waves in a basic configuration of unidirectional CFRP. Several samples were manufactured at different porosity levels by variation of the processing pressure. Wave fields were acquired using an ultrasonic scanning device. In the present work, phase velocities are chosen as best measurable and quantifiable propagation feature and the approach for the analysis of phase velocities in porosity samples is outlined. First results are presented and discussed regarding the influence of porosity on guided wave phase velocity and basic applicability for porosity testing of aircraft structures.

  13. Effect of Resolution on Propagating Detonation Wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-10

    Simulations of the cylinder test are used to illustrate the effect of mesh resolution on a propagating detonation wave. For this study we use the xRage code with the SURF burn model for PBX 9501. The adaptive mesh capability of xRage is used to vary the resolution of the reaction zone. We focus on two key properties: the detonation speed and the cylinder wall velocity. The latter is related to the release isentrope behind the detonation wave. As the reaction zone is refined (2 to 15 cells for cell size of 62 to 8μm), both the detonation speed and final wall velocity change by a small amount; less than 1 per cent. The detonation speed decreases with coarser resolution. Even when the reaction zone is grossly under-resolved (cell size twice the reaction-zone width of the burn model) the wall velocity is within a per cent and the detonation speed is low by only 2 per cent.

  14. Mathematical problems in wave propagation theory

    CERN Document Server

    1970-01-01

    The papers comprising this collection are directly or indirectly related to an important branch of mathematical physics - the mathematical theory of wave propagation and diffraction. The paper by V. M. Babich is concerned with the application of the parabolic-equation method (of Academician V. A. Fok and M. A, Leontovich) to the problem of the asymptotic behavior of eigenfunc­ tions concentrated in a neighborhood of a closed geodesie in a Riemannian space. The techniques used in this paper have been föund useful in solving certain problems in the theory of open resonators. The topic of G. P. Astrakhantsev's paper is similar to that of the paper by V. M. Babich. Here also the parabolic-equation method is used to find the asymptotic solution of the elasticity equations which describes Love waves concentrated in a neighborhood of some surface ray. The paper of T. F. Pankratova is concerned with finding the asymptotic behavior of th~ eigenfunc­ tions of the Laplace operator from the exact solution for the surf...

  15. Propagation and linear mode conversion of magnetosonic and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Richard B.; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi

    2016-10-01

    Magnetosonic waves and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are important for electron acceleration and loss from the radiation belts. It is generally understood that these waves are generated by unstable ion distributions that form during geomagnetically disturbed times. Here we show that magnetosonic waves could be a source of EMIC waves as a result of propagation and a process of linear mode conversion. The converse is also possible. We present ray tracing to show how magnetosonic (EMIC) waves launched with large (small) wave normal angles can reach a location where the wave normal angle is zero and the wave frequency equals the so-called crossover frequency whereupon energy can be converted from one mode to another without attenuation. While EMIC waves could be a source of magnetosonic waves below the crossover frequency, magnetosonic waves could be a source of hydrogen band waves but not helium band waves.

  16. Generation and controlling of the dispersive wave by femtosecond pulses propagating in the normal dispersion regimes of the birefringent photonic crystal fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the generation of the dispersive wave (DW) in the normal dispersion regimes of the birefringent photonic crystal fiber (BPCF) fabricated in this work. The remarkable blue-shifted radiation is found to be generated when 30 fs pulses are input in the normal dispersion regime of the BPCF for the first time. The characteristics of the blue-shifted DW strongly depend on the polarization of the input pulse. As a result, two peaks appear in the blue-shifted region of the spectrum when the input pulses polarize along the slow axis of the BPCF. With the increase of the center wavelength of the initial input pulse, the difference between the wavelengths of the two peaks widens. The peak location in the spectrum can be explained by the phase matching condition between the DW and the input pulse. In addition, when the input polarization is set to an angle of 45° with respect to the principal axes of the BPCF, the cross-phase modulation and coherent coupling between two orthogonally polarized modes would result in pulse trapping in the BPCF. Accordingly, the DW shift toward short wavelength is restrained. The DW generation in the normal-dispersion regimes of BPCF can be controlled by the phase matching condition and polarization of the input pulse.

  17. Topology optimization for transient wave propagation problems in one dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jonas; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Structures exhibiting band gap properties, i.e., having frequency ranges for which the structure attenuates propagating waves, have applications in damping of acoustic and elastic wave propagation and in optical communication. A topology optimization method for synthesis of such structures, emplo...

  18. Generation and propagation of optical vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozas, David

    Optical vortices are singularities in phase fronts of laser beams. They are characterized by a dark core whose size (relative to the size of the background beam) may dramatically affect their behavior upon propagation. Previously, only large-core vortices have been extensively studied. The object of the research presented in this dissertation was to explore ways of generating small-core optical vortices (also called optical vortex filaments ), and to examine their propagation using analytical, numerical and experimental methods. Computer-generated holography enabled us to create arbitrary distributions of optical vortex filaments for experimental exploration. Hydrodynamic analogies were used to develop an heuristic model which described the dependence of vortex motion on other vortices and the background beam, both qualitatively and quantitatively. We predicted that pair of optical vortex filaments will rotate with angular rates inversely proportional to their separation distance (just like vortices in a fluid). We also reported the first experimental observation of this novel fluid-like effect. It was found, however, that upon propagation in linear media, the fluid-like rotation was not sustained owing to the overlap of diffracting vortex cores. Further numerical studies and experiments showed that rotation angle may be enhanced in nonlinear self-defocusing media. The results presented in this thesis offer us a better understanding of dynamics of propagating vortices which may result in applications in optical switching, optical data storage, manipulation of micro-particles and optical limiting for eye protection.

  19. Coherence theory of electromagnetic wave propagation through stratified N-layer media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenders, B.J.; Bertolotti, M.

    The theory of second-order coherence in connection with wave propagation through a stratified N-layer (SNL) medium is developed. Especially, the influence of the SNL medium on the propagation of the coherence generated by a given state of coherence at the entrance plane of the medium is considered.

  20. Parametric instabilities of large-amplitude parallel propagating Alfven waves: 2-D PIC simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Nariyuki, Yasuhiro; Hada, Tohru

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the parametric instabilities of large-amplitude parallel propagating Alfven waves using the 2-D PIC simulation code. First, we confirmed the results in the past study [Sakai et al, 2005] that the electrons are heated due to the modified two stream instability and that the ions are heated by the parallel propagating ion acoustic waves. However, although the past study argued that such parallel propagating longitudinal waves are excited by transverse modulation of parent Alfven wave, we consider these waves are more likely to be generated by the usual, parallel decay instability. Further, we performed other simulation runs with different polarization of the parent Alfven waves or the different ion thermal velocity. Numerical results suggest that the electron heating by the modified two stream instability due to the large amplitude Alfven waves is unimportant with most parameter sets.

  1. Wave propagation in nanostructures nonlocal continuum mechanics formulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalakrishnan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Wave Propagation in Nanostructures describes the fundamental and advanced concepts of waves propagating in structures that have dimensions of the order of nanometers. The book is fundamentally based on non-local elasticity theory, which includes scale effects in the continuum model. The book predominantly addresses wave behavior in carbon nanotubes and graphene structures, although the methods of analysis provided in this text are equally applicable to other nanostructures. The book takes the reader from the fundamentals of wave propagation in nanotubes to more advanced topics such as rotating nanotubes, coupled nanotubes, and nanotubes with magnetic field and surface effects. The first few chapters cover the basics of wave propagation, different modeling schemes for nanostructures and introduce non-local elasticity theories, which form the building blocks for understanding the material provided in later chapters. A number of interesting examples are provided to illustrate the important features of wave behav...

  2. The Green-function transform and wave propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin eSheppard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Fourier methods well known in signal processing are applied to three-dimensional wave propagation problems. The Fourier transform of the Green function, when written explicitly in terms of a real-valued spatial frequency, consists of homogeneous and inhomogeneous components. Both parts are necessary to result in a pure out-going wave that satisfies causality. The homogeneous component consists only of propagating waves, but the inhomogeneous component contains both evanescent and propagating terms. Thus we make a distinction between inhomogeneous waves and evanescent waves. The evanescent component is completely contained in the region of the inhomogeneous component outside the k-space sphere. Further, propagating waves in the Weyl expansion contain both homogeneous and inhomogeneous components. The connection between the Whittaker and Weyl expansions is discussed. A list of relevant spherically symmetric Fourier transforms is given.

  3. The Green-function transform and wave propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Sheppard, Colin J R; Lin, Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Fourier methods well known in signal processing are applied to three-dimensional wave propagation problems. The Fourier transform of the Green function, when written explicitly in terms of a real-valued spatial frequency, consists of homogeneous and inhomogeneous components. Both parts are necessary to result in a pure out-going wave that satisfies causality. The homogeneous component consists only of propagating waves, but the inhomogeneous component contains both evanescent and propagating terms. Thus we make a distinction between inhomogenous waves and evanescent waves. The evanescent component is completely contained in the region of the inhomogeneous component outside the k-space sphere. Further, propagating waves in the Weyl expansion contain both homogeneous and inhomogeneous components. The connection between the Whittaker and Weyl expansions is discussed. A list of relevant spherically symmetric Fourier transforms is given.

  4. Upward-propagating capillary waves on the surface of short Taylor bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Dan; Shemer, Lev; Barnea, Dvora

    2006-04-01

    Upward-propagating capillary waves are observed on the surface of short Taylor air bubbles rising in vertical pipes. The wave length distribution along the bubble surface is measured for bubbles rising in pipes of different diameters in stagnant and up-flowing water by digital image processing. It is shown that the waves are generated by bubble bottom oscillations, and their length is determined by wave-current interaction along the liquid film.

  5. Numerical Time-Domain Modeling of Lamb Wave Propagation Using Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein Rappel; Aghil Yousefi-Koma; Jalil Jamali; Ako Bahari

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of lamb wave propagation in a homogenous steel plate using elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) as well as its validation with analytical results. Lamb wave method is a long range inspection technique which is considered to have unique future in the field of structural health monitoring. One of the main problems facing the lamb wave method is how to choose the most appropriate frequency to generate the waves for adequate transmission capab...

  6. Wave propagation and radiation in gyrotropic and anisotropic media

    CERN Document Server

    Eroglu, Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    ""Wave Propagation and Radiation in Gyrotropic and Anisotropic Media"" fills the gap in the area of applied electromagnetics for the design of microwave and millimeter wave devices using composite structures where gyrotropic, anisotropic materials are used. The book provides engineers with the information on theory and practical skills they need to understand wave propagation and radiation characteristics of materials and the ability to design devices at higher frequencies with optimum device performance.

  7. Voltage modulation of propagating spin waves in Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawaoka, Kohei; Shiota, Yoichi; Miwa, Shinji; Tamura, Eiiti [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science Technology, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Tomita, Hiroyuki; Mizuochi, Norikazu; Shinjo, Teruya [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Suzuki, Yoshishige, E-mail: suzuki-y@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science Technology, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Display and Semiconductor Physics Department, Korea University, Sejong 339-700 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-07

    The effect of a voltage application on propagating spin waves in single-crystalline 5 nm-Fe layer was investigated. Two micro-sized antennas were employed to excite and detect the propagating spin waves. The voltage effect was characterized using AC lock-in technique. As a result, the resonant field of the magnetostatic surface wave in the Fe was clearly modulated by the voltage application. The modulation is attributed to the voltage induced magnetic anisotropy change in ferromagnetic metals.

  8. Stable Propagating Waves and Wake Fields in Relativistic Electromagnetic Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yi-Shi; XIE Bai-Song; TIAN Miao; YIN Xin-Tao; ZHANG Xin-Hui

    2008-01-01

    Stable propagating waves and wake fields in relativistic electromagnetic plasma are investigated. The incident electromagnetic field has a finite initial constant amplitude meanwhile the longitudinal momentum of electrons is taken into account in the problem. It is found that in the moving frame with transverse wave group velocity the stable propagating transverse electromagnetic waves and longitudinal plasma wake fields can exist in the appropriate regime of plasma.

  9. Laboratory measurements of the effect of internal waves on sound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likun; Swinney, Harry L.; Lin, Ying-Tsong

    2016-11-01

    The fidelity of acoustic signals used in communication and imaging in the oceans is limited by density fluctuations arising from many sources, particularly from internal waves. We present results from laboratory experiments on sound propagation through an internal wave field produced by a wave generator consisting of multiple oscillating plates. The fluid density as a function of height is measured and used to determine the sound speed as a function of the height. Sound pulses from a transducer propagate through the fluctuating stratified density field and are detected to determine sound refraction, pulse arrival time, and sound signal distortion. The results are compared with sound ray model and numerical models of underwater sound propagation. The laboratory experiments can explore the parameter dependence by varying the fluid density profile, the sound pulse signal, and the internal wave amplitude and frequency. The results lead to a better understanding of sound propagation through and scattered by internal waves.

  10. Wave Propagation In Strongly Nonlinear Two-Mass Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Si Yin; Herbold, Eric B.; Nesterenko, Vitali F.

    2010-05-01

    We developed experimental set up that allowed the investigation of propagation of oscillating waves generated at the entrance of nonlinear and strongly nonlinear two-mass granular chains composed of steel cylinders and steel spheres. The paper represents the first experimental data related to the propagation of these waves in nonlinear and strongly nonlinear chains. The dynamic compressive forces were detected using gauges imbedded inside particles at depths equal to 4 cells and 8 cells from the entrance gauge detecting the input signal. At these relatively short distances we were able to detect practically perfect transparency at low frequencies and cut off effects at higher frequencies for nonlinear and strongly nonlinear signals. We also observed transformation of oscillatory shocks into monotonous shocks. Numerical calculations of signal transformation by non-dissipative granular chains demonstrated transparency of the system at low frequencies and cut off phenomenon at high frequencies in reasonable agreement with experiments. Systems which are able to transform nonlinear and strongly nonlinear waves at small sizes of the system are important for practical applications such as attenuation of high amplitude pulses.

  11. Finite volume schemes for dispersive wave propagation and runup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutykh, Denys; Katsaounis, Theodoros; Mitsotakis, Dimitrios

    2011-04-01

    Finite volume schemes are commonly used to construct approximate solutions to conservation laws. In this study we extend the framework of the finite volume methods to dispersive water wave models, in particular to Boussinesq type systems. We focus mainly on the application of the method to bidirectional nonlinear, dispersive wave propagation in one space dimension. Special emphasis is given to important nonlinear phenomena such as solitary waves interactions, dispersive shock wave formation and the runup of breaking and non-breaking long waves.

  12. Finite volume schemes for dispersive wave propagation and runup

    CERN Document Server

    Dutykh, Denys; Mitsotakis, Dimitrios

    2010-01-01

    Finite volume schemes are commonly used to construct approximate solutions to conservation laws. In this study we extend the framework of the finite volume methods to dispersive water wave models, in particular to Boussinesq type systems. We focus mainly on the application of the method to bidirectional nonlinear, dispersive wave propagation in one space dimension. Special emphasis is given to important nonlinear phenomena such as solitary waves interactions, dispersive shock wave formation and the runup of breaking and non-breaking long waves.

  13. Wave Generation in Physical Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter

    The present book describes the most important aspects of wave generation techniques in physical models. Moreover, the book serves as technical documentation for the wave generation software AwaSys 6, cf. Aalborg University (2012). In addition to the two main authors also Tue Hald and Michael...

  14. Spatial damping of propagating sausage waves in coronal cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Ming-Zhe; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Sausage modes are important in coronal seismology. Spatially damped propagating sausage waves were recently observed in the solar atmosphere. We examine how wave leakage influences the spatial damping of sausage waves propagating along coronal structures modeled by a cylindrical density enhancement embedded in a uniform magnetic field. Working in the framework of cold magnetohydrodynamics, we solve the dispersion relation (DR) governing sausage waves for complex-valued longitudinal wavenumber $k$ at given real angular frequencies $\\omega$. For validation purposes, we also provide analytical approximations to the DR in the low-frequency limit and in the vicinity of $\\omega_{\\rm c}$, the critical angular frequency separating trapped from leaky waves. In contrast to the standing case, propagating sausage waves are allowed for $\\omega$ much lower than $\\omega_{\\rm c}$. However, while able to direct their energy upwards, these low-frequency waves are subject to substantial spatial attenuation. The spatial damping ...

  15. Propagation law of impact elastic wave based on specific materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmin CHEN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the propagation law of the impact elastic wave on the platform, the experimental platform is built by using the specific isotropic materials and anisotropic materials. The glass cloth epoxy laminated plate is used for anisotropic material, and an organic glass plate is used for isotropic material. The PVDF sensors adhered on the specific materials are utilized to collect data, and the elastic wave propagation law of different thick plates and laminated plates under impact conditions is analyzed. The Experimental results show that in anisotropic material, transverse wave propagation speed along the fiber arrangement direction is the fastest, while longitudinal wave propagation speed is the slowest. The longitudinal wave propagation speed in anisotropic laminates is much slower than that in the laminated thick plates. In the test channel arranged along a particular angle away from the central region of the material, transverse wave propagation speed is larger. Based on the experimental results, this paper proposes a material combination mode which is advantageous to elastic wave propagation and diffusion in shock-isolating materials. It is proposed to design a composite material with high acoustic velocity by adding regularly arranged fibrous materials. The overall design of the barrier material is a layered structure and a certain number of 90°zigzag structure.

  16. Does the Decay Wave Propagate Forwards in Dusty Plasmas?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢柏松

    2002-01-01

    The decay interaction of the ion acoustic wave in a dusty plasma with variable-charge dust grains is studied.Even if strong charging relaxation for dust grains and the short wavelength regime for ion waves are included, it is found that the decay wave must be backward propagating.

  17. Propagation of Weak Pressure Waves against Two Parallel Subsonic Streams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Makiko YONAMINE; Takanori USHIJIMA; Yoshiaki MIYAZATO; Mitsuharu MASUDA; Hiroshi KATANODA; Kazuyasu MATSUO

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristics of a pressure wave propagating against two parallel subsonic streams in a constant-area straight duct are investigated by one-dimensional analysis, two-dimensional numerical simulation,and experiments. Computations have been carried out by the two-dimensional Euler Equations using the Chakravarthy-Osher-type TVD scheme. Optical observations by the schlieren method as well as wall pressure measurements have been performed to clarify both the structure and the propagation velocity of pressure waves.The results show that the pressure wave propagating against the streams changes into a bifurcated pressure wave and the bifurcation occurs in the low speed streams. It is also found that the propagation velocity of the pressure wave obtained by the analysis and computation agrees well with the present experimental data.

  18. Numerical and experimental study of Lamb wave propagation in a two-dimensional acoustic black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shiling; Lomonosov, Alexey M.; Shen, Zhonghua

    2016-06-01

    The propagation of laser-generated Lamb waves in a two-dimensional acoustic black-hole structure was studied numerically and experimentally. The geometrical acoustic theory has been applied to calculate the beam trajectories in the region of the acoustic black hole. The finite element method was also used to study the time evolution of propagating waves. An optical system based on the laser-Doppler vibration method was assembled. The effect of the focusing wave and the reduction in wave speed of the acoustic black hole has been validated.

  19. On the propagation of truncated localized waves in dispersive silica

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Propagation characteristics of truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica and free space are numerically analyzed. It is shown that those characteristics are affected by the changes in the relation between the transverse spatial spectral components and the wave vector. Numerical experiments demonstrate that as the non-linearity of this relation gets stronger, the pulses propagating in silica become more immune to decay and distortion whereas the pulses propagating in free-space suffer from early decay and distortion. © 2010 Optical Society of America.

  20. The stimulus-evoked population response in visual cortex of awake monkey is a propagating wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Lyle; Reynaud, Alexandre; Chavane, Frédéric; Destexhe, Alain

    2014-04-28

    Propagating waves occur in many excitable media and were recently found in neural systems from retina to neocortex. While propagating waves are clearly present under anaesthesia, whether they also appear during awake and conscious states remains unclear. One possibility is that these waves are systematically missed in trial-averaged data, due to variability. Here we present a method for detecting propagating waves in noisy multichannel recordings. Applying this method to single-trial voltage-sensitive dye imaging data, we show that the stimulus-evoked population response in primary visual cortex of the awake monkey propagates as a travelling wave, with consistent dynamics across trials. A network model suggests that this reliability is the hallmark of the horizontal fibre network of superficial cortical layers. Propagating waves with similar properties occur independently in secondary visual cortex, but maintain precise phase relations with the waves in primary visual cortex. These results show that, in response to a visual stimulus, propagating waves are systematically evoked in several visual areas, generating a consistent spatiotemporal frame for further neuronal interactions.

  1. Studies of Gravity Wave Propagation in the Middle Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    34 . . . . . • * * . , . • :’ . . . , ",.,,- -. ’’’ " . ’-- o p - %"""" * " AFOSR.TR. 85-0505 physical dynamics,inc. PD-NW-85-330R L n STUDIES OF GRAVITY WAVE PROPAGATION IN...8217.. , .,- - -. ( %’. , .;: :..............,....... .-... . ~.b .. .. - ..... ,......... ..-. ....-.. PD-NW-85-330R STUDIES OF GRAVITY WAVE PROPAGATION...Include SewftY CsuiclUon STUDIES OF GRAVITY WAVE PROPAGATION IN THE MIDD E 12. PERSONAL AUTHORE) TMOPHU. r Timothy J. Dunkerton a13a. TYPE OF REPORT I3k

  2. Analysis of guided wave propagation in a tapered composite panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandowski, Tomasz; Malinowski, Pawel; Moll, Jochen; Radzienski, Maciej; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw

    2015-03-01

    Many studies have been published in recent years on Lamb wave propagation in isotropic and (multi-layered) anisotropic structures. In this paper, adiabatic wave propagation phenomenon in a tapered composite panel made out of glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP) will be considered. Such structural elements are often used e.g. in wind turbine blades and aerospace structures. Here, the wave velocity of each wave mode does not only change with frequency and the direction of wave propagation. It further changes locally due to the varying cross-section of the GFRP panel. Elastic waves were excited using a piezoelectric transducer. Full wave-field measurements using scanning Laser Doppler vibrometry have been performed. This approach allows the detailed analysis of elastic wave propagation in composite specimen with linearly changing thickness. It will be demonstrated here experimentally, that the wave velocity changes significantly due to the tapered geometry of the structure. Hence, this work motivates the theoretical and experimental analysis of adiabatic mode propagation for the purpose of Non-Destructive Testing and Structural Health Monitoring.

  3. Wave propagation in a magneto-electro- elastic plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The wave propagation in a magneto-electro-elastic plate was studied. Some new characteristics were discovered: the guided waves are classified in the forms of the Quasi-P, Quasi-SV and Quasi-SH waves and arranged by the standing wavenumber; there are many patterns for the physical property of the magneto-electro-elastic dielectric medium influencing the stress wave propagation. We proposed a self-adjoint method, by which the guided-wave restriction condition was derived. After the corresponding orthogonal sets were found, the analytic dispersion equa-tion was obtained. In the end, an example was presented. The dispersive spectrum, the group velocity curved face and the steady-state response curve of a mag-neto-electro-elastic plate were plotted. Then the wave propagations affected by the induced electric and magnetic fields were analyzed.

  4. An effective absorbing boundary algorithm for acoustical wave propagator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, Berenger's perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition for electromagnetic waves is introduced as the truncation area of the computational domain to absorb one-dimensional acoustic wave for the scheme of acoustical wave propagator (AWP). To guarantee the efficiency of the AWP algorithm, a regulated propagator matrix is derived in the PML medium.Numerical simulations of a Gaussian wave packet propagating in one-dimensional duct are carried out to illustraze the efficiency of the combination of PML and AWP. Compared with the traditional smoothing truncation windows technique of AWP, this scheme shows high computational accuracy in absorbing acoustic wave when the acoustical wave arrives at the computational edges. Optimal coefficients of the PML configurations are also discussed.

  5. Beam Propagation Factor and Generation of Cosh-squared-Gaussian Beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Kaicheng; TANG Huiqin; ZHU Zhenhe

    2001-01-01

    A new light beam termed as a cosh-squared-Gaussian beam (ChSGB) which may be one of solutions of the paraxial wave equation for propagation in complex optical systems has been introduced. Their beam propagation factor (M2-factor) is derived and schemes to generate this light beams are proposed.

  6. Wave propagation in chiral media: composite Fresnel equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, Ruey-Lin

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, the author studies the features of wave propagation in chiral media. A general form of wave equations in biisotropic media is employed to derive concise formulas for the reflection and transmission coefficients. These coefficients are represented as a composite form of Fresnel equations for ordinary dielectrics, which reveal the circularly polarized nature of chiral media. The important features of negative refraction and a backward wave associated with left-handed waves are analyzed.

  7. Acoustoelastic Lamb Wave Propagation in Biaxially Stressed Plates (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    particularly as compared to most bulk wave NDE methods, Lamb wave are particularly sensitive to changes in the propagation environment, such as... Wilcox , and J. E. Michaels, “Efficient temperature compensation strategies for guided wave structural health monitoring,” Ultrasonics, 50, pp. 517...Liu, “Effects of residual stress on guided waves in layered media,” Rev. Prog. Quant. NDE , 17, D. O. Thompson and D. E. Chimenti (Eds.), Plenum Press

  8. Regional wave propagation using the discontinuous Galerkin method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wenk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an application of the discontinuous Galerkin (DG method to regional wave propagation. The method makes use of unstructured tetrahedral meshes, combined with a time integration scheme solving the arbitrary high-order derivative (ADER Riemann problem. This ADER-DG method is high-order accurate in space and time, beneficial for reliable simulations of high-frequency wavefields over long propagation distances. Due to the ease with which tetrahedral grids can be adapted to complex geometries, undulating topography of the Earth's surface and interior interfaces can be readily implemented in the computational domain. The ADER-DG method is benchmarked for the accurate radiation of elastic waves excited by an explosive and a shear dislocation source. We compare real data measurements with synthetics of the 2009 L'Aquila event (central Italy. We take advantage of the geometrical flexibility of the approach to generate a European model composed of the 3-D EPcrust model, combined with the depth-dependent ak135 velocity model in the upper mantle. The results confirm the applicability of the ADER-DG method for regional scale earthquake simulations, which provides an alternative to existing methodologies.

  9. Regional wave propagation using the discontinuous Galerkin method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wenk

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an application of the discontinuous Galerkin (DG method to regional wave propagation. The method makes use of unstructured tetrahedral meshes, combined with a time integration scheme solving the arbitrary high-order derivative (ADER Riemann problem. The ADER-DG method is high-order accurate in space and time, beneficial for reliable simulations of high-frequency wavefields over long propagation distances. Due to the ease with which tetrahedral grids can be adapted to complex geometries, undulating topography of the Earth's surface and interior interfaces can be readily implemented in the computational domain. The ADER-DG method is benchmarked for the accurate radiation of elastic waves excited by an explosive and a shear dislocation source. We compare real data measurements with synthetics of the 2009 L'Aquila event (central Italy. We take advantage of the geometrical flexibility of the approach to generate a European model composed of the 3-D EPcrust model, combined with the depth-dependent ak135 velocity model in the upper-mantle. The results confirm the applicability of the ADER-DG method for regional scale earthquake simulations, which provides an alternative to existing methodologies.

  10. Stress wave propagation in a composite beam subjected to transverse impact.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo; Jin, Huiqing

    2010-08-01

    Composite materials, particularly fiber reinforced plastic composites, have been extensively utilized in many military and industrial applications. As an important structural component in these applications, the composites are often subjected to external impact loading. It is desirable to understand the mechanical response of the composites under impact loading for performance evaluation in the applications. Even though many material models for the composites have been developed, experimental investigation is still needed to validate and verify the models. It is essential to investigate the intrinsic material response. However, it becomes more applicable to determine the structural response of composites, such as a composite beam. The composites are usually subjected to out-of-plane loading in applications. When a composite beam is subjected to a sudden transverse impact, two different kinds of stress waves, longitudinal and transverse waves, are generated and propagate in the beam. The longitudinal stress wave propagates through the thickness direction; whereas, the propagation of the transverse stress wave is in-plane directions. The longitudinal stress wave speed is usually considered as a material constant determined by the material density and Young's modulus, regardless of the loading rate. By contrast, the transverse wave speed is related to structural parameters. In ballistic mechanics, the transverse wave plays a key role to absorb external impact energy [1]. The faster the transverse wave speed, the more impact energy dissipated. Since the transverse wave speed is not a material constant, it is not possible to be calculated from stress-wave theory. One can place several transducers to track the transverse wave propagation. An alternative but more efficient method is to apply digital image correlation (DIC) to visualize the transverse wave propagation. In this study, we applied three-pointbending (TPB) technique to Kolsky compression bar to facilitate

  11. Wave Propagation in Fluids Models and Numerical Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Guinot, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    This book presents the physical principles of wave propagation in fluid mechanics and hydraulics. The mathematical techniques that allow the behavior of the waves to be analyzed are presented, along with existing numerical methods for the simulation of wave propagation. Particular attention is paid to discontinuous flows, such as steep fronts and shock waves, and their mathematical treatment. A number of practical examples are taken from various areas fluid mechanics and hydraulics, such as contaminant transport, the motion of immiscible hydrocarbons in aquifers, river flow, pipe transients an

  12. Laser beam propagation generation and propagation of customized light

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    ""The text is easy to read and is accompanied by beautiful illustrations. It is an excellent book for anyone working in laser beam propagation and an asset for any library.""-Optics & Photonics News, July 2014

  13. Wave Propagation in Isotropic Media with Two Orthogonal Fracture Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, S.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2016-10-01

    Orthogonal intersecting fracture sets form fracture networks that affect the hydraulic and mechanical integrity of a rock mass. Interpretation of elastic waves propagated through orthogonal fracture networks is complicated by guided modes that propagate along and between fractures, by multiple internal reflections, as well as by scattering from fracture intersections. The existence of some or all of these potentially overlapping modes depends on local stress fields that can preferentially close or open either one or both sets of fractures. In this study, an acoustic wave front imaging system was used to examine the effect of bi-axial loading conditions on acoustic wave propagation in isotropic media containing two orthogonal fracture sets. From the experimental data, orthogonal intersecting fracture sets support guided waves that depend on fracture spacing and fracture-specific stiffnesses. In addition, fracture intersections have stronger effects on propagating wave fronts than merely the superposition of the effects of two independent fractures because of energy partitioning among transmitted/reflected waves, scattered waves and guided modes. Interpretation of the properties of fractures or fracture sets from seismic measurements must consider non-uniform fracture stiffnesses within and among fracture sets, as well as considering the striking effects of fracture intersections on wave propagation.

  14. Measuring Gravitational-Wave Propagation Speed with Multimessenger Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Nishizawa, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    A measurement of gravitational wave (GW) propagation speed is one of important tests of gravity in a dynamical regime. We report a method to measure the GW propagation speed by directly comparing arrival times of GWs, neutrinos from supernovae (SN), and photons from short gamma-ray bursts (SGRB). We found that the future multimessenger observations can test the GW propagation speed with the precision of ~ 10^(-16)-10^(-15), improving the previous suggestions by 9 — 10 orders of magnitude. We ...

  15. Topology optimization of vibration and wave propagation problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2007-01-01

    The method of topology optimization is a versatile method to determine optimal material layouts in mechanical structures. The method relies on, in principle, unlimited design freedom that can be used to design materials, structures and devices with significantly improved performance and sometimes...... novel functionality. This paper addresses basic issues in simulation and topology design of vibration and wave propagation problems. Steady-state and transient wave propagation problems are addressed and application examples for both cases are presented....

  16. Characteristic wave diversity in near vertical incidence skywave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witvliet, Ben A.; Maanen, van Erik; Petersen, George J.; Westenberg, Albert J.; Bentum, Mark J.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Schiphorst, Roel

    2015-01-01

    In Near Vertical Incidence Skywave (NVIS) propagation, effective diversity reception can be realized using a dual channel receiver and a dual polarization antenna with polarization matched to the (left hand and right hand) circular polarization of the characteristic waves propagating in the ionosphe

  17. Time-domain Wave Propagation in Dispersive Media①

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    The equation of time-domain wave propagation in dispersive media and the explicit beam propagation method are presented in this paper.This method is demonstrated by the short optical pulses in a directional coupler with second order dispersive effect and shows to be in full agreement with former references.This method is simple,easy and practical.

  18. Wave propagation of spectral energy content in a granular chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Rohit Kumar; Luding, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    A mechanical wave is propagation of vibration with transfer of energy and momentum. Understanding the spectral energy characteristics of a propagating wave through disordered granular media can assist in understanding the overall properties of wave propagation through inhomogeneous materials like soil. The study of these properties is aimed at modeling wave propagation for oil, mineral or gas exploration (seismic prospecting) or non-destructive testing of the internal structure of solids. The focus is on the total energy content of a pulse propagating through an idealized one-dimensional discrete particle system like a mass disordered granular chain, which allows understanding the energy attenuation due to disorder since it isolates the longitudinal P-wave from shear or rotational modes. It is observed from the signal that stronger disorder leads to faster attenuation of the signal. An ordered granular chain exhibits ballistic propagation of energy whereas, a disordered granular chain exhibits more diffusive like propagation, which eventually becomes localized at long time periods. For obtaining mean-field macroscopic/continuum properties, ensemble averaging has been used, however, such an ensemble averaged spectral energy response does not resolve multiple scattering, leading to loss of information, indicating the need for a different framework for micro-macro averaging.

  19. Wave propagation of spectral energy content in a granular chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrivastava Rohit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A mechanical wave is propagation of vibration with transfer of energy and momentum. Understanding the spectral energy characteristics of a propagating wave through disordered granular media can assist in understanding the overall properties of wave propagation through inhomogeneous materials like soil. The study of these properties is aimed at modeling wave propagation for oil, mineral or gas exploration (seismic prospecting or non-destructive testing of the internal structure of solids. The focus is on the total energy content of a pulse propagating through an idealized one-dimensional discrete particle system like a mass disordered granular chain, which allows understanding the energy attenuation due to disorder since it isolates the longitudinal P-wave from shear or rotational modes. It is observed from the signal that stronger disorder leads to faster attenuation of the signal. An ordered granular chain exhibits ballistic propagation of energy whereas, a disordered granular chain exhibits more diffusive like propagation, which eventually becomes localized at long time periods. For obtaining mean-field macroscopic/continuum properties, ensemble averaging has been used, however, such an ensemble averaged spectral energy response does not resolve multiple scattering, leading to loss of information, indicating the need for a different framework for micro-macro averaging.

  20. Propagation of high frequency waves in the quiet solar atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andić A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency waves (5 mHz to 20 mHz have previously been suggested as a source of energy accounting for partial heating of the quiet solar atmosphere. The dynamics of previously detected high-frequency waves is analyzed here. Image sequences were taken by using the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT, Observatorio del Teide, Izana, Tenerife, with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer. The data were speckle reduced and analyzed with wavelets. Wavelet phase-difference analysis was performed to determine whether the waves propagate. We observed the propagation of waves in the frequency range 10 mHz to 13 mHz. We also observed propagation of low-frequency waves in the ranges where they are thought to be evanescent in the regions where magnetic structures are present.

  1. Propagation of High Frequency Waves in the Quiet Solar Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andić, A.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency waves (5 mHz to 20 mHz have previously been suggested as a source of energy accounting for partial heating of the quiet solar atmosphere. The dynamics of previously detected high-frequency waves is analysed here. Image sequences were taken by using the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT, Observatorio del Teide, Izana, Tenerife, with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer. The data were speckle reduced and analysed with wavelets. Wavelet phase-difference analysis was performed to determine whether the waves propagate. We observed the propagation of waves in the frequency range 10 mHz to 13 mHz. We also observed propagation of low-frequency waves in the ranges where they are thought to be evanescent in the regions where magnetic structures are present.

  2. Propagation of High Frequency Waves in the Quiet Solar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Andić, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency waves (5 mHz to 20mHz) have previously been suggested as a source of energy accounting partial heating of the quiet solar atmosphere. The dynamics of previously detected high-frequency waves is analysed here. Image sequences are taken using the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), Observatorio del Teide, Izana, Tenerife, with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer. The data were speckle reduced and analyzed with wavelets. Wavelet phase-difference analysis is performed to determine whether the waves propagate. We observe the propagation of waves in the frequency range 10mHz to 13mHz. We also observe propagation of low-frequency waves in the ranges where they are thought to be evanescent in regions where magnetic structures are present.

  3. Time dependent wave envelope finite difference analysis of sound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    A transient finite difference wave envelope formulation is presented for sound propagation, without steady flow. Before the finite difference equations are formulated, the governing wave equation is first transformed to a form whose solution tends not to oscillate along the propagation direction. This transformation reduces the required number of grid points by an order of magnitude. Physically, the transformed pressure represents the amplitude of the conventional sound wave. The derivation for the wave envelope transient wave equation and appropriate boundary conditions are presented as well as the difference equations and stability requirements. To illustrate the method, example solutions are presented for sound propagation in a straight hard wall duct and in a two dimensional straight soft wall duct. The numerical results are in good agreement with exact analytical results.

  4. Propagation of gravitational waves in the nonperturbative spinor vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Department of Theoretical and Nuclear Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Eurasian National University, Institute for Basic Research, Astana (Kazakhstan); Institute of Physicotechnical Problems and Material Science of the NAS of the Kyrgyz Republic, Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan); Folomeev, Vladimir [Institute of Physicotechnical Problems and Material Science of the NAS of the Kyrgyz Republic, Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan)

    2014-09-15

    The propagation of gravitational waves on the background of a nonperturbative vacuum of a spinor field is considered. It is shown that there are several distinctive features in comparison with the propagation of plane gravitational waves through empty space: there exists a fixed phase difference between the h{sub yy,zz} and h{sub yz} components of the wave; the phase and group velocities of gravitational waves are not equal to the velocity of light; the group velocity is always less than the velocity of light; under some conditions the gravitational waves are either damped or absent; for given frequency, there exist two waves with different wave vectors. We also discuss the possibility of an experimental verification of the obtained effects as a tool to investigate nonperturbative quantum field theories. (orig.)

  5. Computational simulation of wave propagation problems in infinite domains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the computational simulation of both scalar wave and vector wave propagation problems in infinite domains. Due to its advantages in simulating complicated geometry and complex material properties, the finite element method is used to simulate the near field of a wave propagation problem involving an infinite domain. To avoid wave reflection and refraction at the common boundary between the near field and the far field of an infinite domain, we have to use some special treatments to this boundary. For a wave radiation problem, a wave absorbing boundary can be applied to the common boundary between the near field and the far field of an infinite domain, while for a wave scattering problem, the dynamic infinite element can be used to propagate the incident wave from the near field to the far field of the infinite domain. For the sake of illustrating how these two different approaches are used to simulate the effect of the far field, a mathematical expression for a wave absorbing boundary of high-order accuracy is derived from a two-dimensional scalar wave radiation problem in an infinite domain, while the detailed mathematical formulation of the dynamic infinite element is derived from a two-dimensional vector wave scattering problem in an infinite domain. Finally, the coupled method of finite elements and dynamic infinite elements is used to investigate the effects of topographical conditions on the free field motion along the surface of a canyon.

  6. Special Course on Acoustic Wave Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    exesiple) et cules se propagent 41 is surface du liquido . WW.JF~q W - , -- r -w w 144 Dens ce cax Von (10) 4 =/.+ Sane entrer dans le ddtail des...543-546. 57. STUFF, R., Analytic solution for the sound propagation through the atmospheric wind boundary layer. Proc. Noise Control Conf., Warszawa...between nodal surfaces of one-half wavelength. Evidently this property, like the energy conservation one, is available for use as a " control " on any

  7. Resonant dispersive waves generated with multi-input femtosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Peng, Jiahui; Sokolov, Alex

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the resonant dispersive waves generated by high-order dispersion theoretically. We considered different femtosecond pulses propagating in the kagome-lattice hollow-core photonics crystal fibers. The two third order and fourth order resonant dispersive waves would be produced in the visible range to produce the ultrashort pulse.

  8. Spiral density wave generation by vortices in Keplerian flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bodo, G; Murante, G; Tevzadze, A; Rossi, P; Ferrari, A

    2005-01-01

    We perform a detailed analytical and numerical study of the dynamics of perturbations (vortex/aperiodic mode, Rossby and spiral-density waves) in 2D compressible disks with a Keplerian law of rotation. We draw attention to the process of spiral-density wave generation from vortices, discussing, in particular, the initial, most peculiar stages of wave emission. We show that the linear phenomenon of wave generation by vortices in smooth (without inflection points) shear flows found by using the so-called non-modal approach, is directly applicable to the present case. After an analytical non-modal description of the physics and characteristics of the spiral-density wave generation/propagation in the local shearing-sheet model, we follow the process of wave generation by small amplitude coherent circular vortex structures, by direct global numerical simulation, describing the main features of the generated waves.

  9. Automated classification of spatiotemporal characteristics of gastric slow wave propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Gao, Jerry; Du, Peng; O'Grady, Gregory; Cheng, Leo K

    2013-01-01

    Gastric contractions are underpinned by an electrical event called slow wave activity. High-resolution electrical mapping has recently been adapted to study gastric slow waves at a high spatiotemporal detail. As more slow wave data becomes available, it is becoming evident that the spatial organization of slow wave plays a key role in the initiation and maintenance of gastric dsyrhythmias in major gastric motility disorders. All of the existing slow wave signal processing techniques deal with the identification and partitioning of recorded wave events, but not the analysis of the slow wave spatial organization, which is currently performed visually. This manual analysis is time consuming and is prone to observer bias and error. We present an automated approach to classify spatial slow wave propagation patterns via the use of Pearson cross correlations. Slow wave propagations were grouped into classes based on their similarity to each other. The method was applied to high-resolution gastric slow wave recordings from four pigs. There were significant changes in the velocity of the gastric slow wave wavefront and the amplitude of the slow wave event when there was a change in direction to the slow wave wavefront during dsyrhythmias, which could be detected with the automated approach.

  10. Impact of the Collisional Plasma on the Propagation of Millimeter Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁忠才; 时家明; 汪家春; 许波

    2004-01-01

    The plasma generated in the low-altitude atmosphere is of high collision frequencies.In this paper, the transmission coefficients of millimeter(MM) waves normally incident upon the plasma with high collision frequencies are calculated and analyzed. The experimental results of reflection and attenuation are presented for the eight-millimeter waves propagating through the plasma. Both the calculated experimental results indicate that the MM-waves concerned are attenuated significantly and reflected weakly, when propagating through the plasma of high collision frequencies.

  11. Stress Wave Propagation in Larch Plantation Trees-Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenglu Liu; Fang Jiang; Xiping Wang; Houjiang Zhang; Wenhua Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we attempted to simulate stress wave propagation in virtual tree trunks and construct two dimensional (2D) wave-front maps in the longitudinal-radial section of the trunk. A tree trunk was modeled as an orthotropic cylinder in which wood properties along the fiber and in each of the two perpendicular directions were different. We used the COMSOL...

  12. Stress Wave Propagation in a Gradient Elastic Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵亚溥; 赵涵; 胡宇群

    2002-01-01

    The gradient elastic constitutive equation incorporating the second gradient of the strains is used to determinethe monochromatic elastic plane wave propagation in a gradient infinite medium and thin rod. The equationof motion, together with the internal material length, has been derived. Various dispersion relations have beendetermined. We present explicit expressions for the relationship between various wave speeds, wavenumber andinternal material length.

  13. Nonlinear propagation of short wavelength drift-Alfven waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P. K.; Pecseli, H. L.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    Making use of a kinetic ion and a hydrodynamic electron description together with the Maxwell equation, the authors derive a set of nonlinear equations which governs the dynamics of short wavelength ion drift-Alfven waves. It is shown that the nonlinear drift-Alfven waves can propagate as two...

  14. Statistical Characterization of Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Mine Environments

    KAUST Repository

    Yucel, Abdulkadir C.

    2013-01-01

    A computational framework for statistically characterizing electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation through mine tunnels and galleries is presented. The framework combines a multi-element probabilistic collocation method with a full-wave fast Fourier transform and fast multipole method accelerated surface integral equation-based EM simulator to statistically characterize fields from wireless transmitters in complex mine environments. 1536-1225 © 2013 IEEE.

  15. Shock wave propagation in soda lime glass using optical shadowgraphy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRASAD Y B S R; BARNWAL S; NAIK P A; YADAV Y; PATIDAR R; KAMATH M P; UPADHYAY A; BAGCHI S; KUMAR A; JOSHI A S; GUPTA P D

    2016-07-01

    Propagation of shock waves in soda lime glass, which is a transparent material, has been studied using the optical shadowgraphy technique. The time-resolved shock velocity information has been obtained (1) in single shot, using the chirped pulse shadowgraphy technique, with a temporal resolution of tens of picoseconds and (2) in multiple shots, using conventional snapshot approach, with a second harmonic probe pulse. Transient shock velocities of $(5–7) \\times 10^{6}$ cm/s have been obtained. The scaling of the shock velocity with intensity in the $2 \\times 10^{13}–10^{14}$ W/cm$^2$ range has been obtained. The shock velocity is observed to scale with laser intensity as $I^{0.38}$. The present experiments also show the presence of ionization tracks, generated probably due to X-ray hotspots from small-scale filamentation instabilities. The results and various issues involved in these experiments are discussed

  16. In-plane propagation of electromagnetic waves in planar metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Changhyun; Rhee, Joo Yull; Kim, Ki Won; Lee, YoungPak

    2016-08-01

    Some planar metamaterials (MMs) or subwavelength antenna/hole arrays have a considerable amount of in-plane propagation when certain conditions are met. In this paper, the in-plane propagation caused by a wave incident on a MM absorber was studied by using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. By using a FDTD simulation, we were able to observe a nonnegligible amount of in-plane propagation after the incident wave had arrived at the surface of the planar structure and gradually decreased propagation of the electromagnetic wave in the planar direction gradually decreased. We performed the FDTD simulation carefully to reproduce valid results and to verify the existence of in-plane propagation. For verification of the in-plane propagation explicitly, Poynting vectors were calculated and visualized inside the dielectric substrate between the metallic back-plate and an array of square patches. We also investigated several different structures with resonators of various shapes and found that the amount of facing edges of adjacent metallic patches critically determined the strength of the in-plane propagation. Through this study, we could establish the basis for the existence of in-plane propagation in MMs.

  17. Laser propagation and soliton generation in strongly magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, W.; Li, J. Q.; Kishimoto, Y. [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    The propagation characteristics of various laser modes with different polarization, as well as the soliton generation in strongly magnetized plasmas are studied numerically through one-dimensional (1D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations and analytically by solving the laser wave equation. PIC simulations show that the laser heating efficiency substantially depends on the magnetic field strength, the propagation modes of the laser pulse and their intensities. Generally, large amplitude laser can efficiently heat the plasma with strong magnetic field. Theoretical analyses on the linear propagation of the laser pulse in both under-dense and over-dense magnetized plasmas are well confirmed by the numerical observations. Most interestingly, it is found that a standing or moving soliton with frequency lower than the laser frequency is generated in certain magnetic field strength and laser intensity range, which can greatly enhance the laser heating efficiency. The range of magnetic field strength for the right-hand circularly polarized (RCP) soliton formation with high and low frequencies is identified by solving the soliton equations including the contribution of ion's motion and the finite temperature effects under the quasi-neutral approximation. In the limit of immobile ions, the RCP soliton tends to be peaked and stronger as the magnetic field increases, while the enhanced soliton becomes broader as the temperature increases. These findings in 1D model are well validated by 2D simulations.

  18. Shear horizontal (SH) ultrasound wave propagation around smooth corners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petcher, P A; Burrows, S E; Dixon, S

    2014-04-01

    Shear horizontal (SH) ultrasound guided waves are being used in an increasing number of non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. One advantage SH waves have over some wave types, is their ability to propagate around curved surfaces with little energy loss; to understand the geometries around which they could propagate, the wave reflection must be quantified. A 0.83mm thick aluminium sheet was placed in a bending machine, and a shallow bend was introduced. Periodically-poled magnet (PPM) electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs), for emission and reception of SH waves, were placed on the same side of the bend, so that reflected waves were received. Additional bending of the sheet demonstrated a clear relationship between bend angles and the reflected signal. Models suggest that the reflection is a linear superposition of the reflections from each bend segment, such that sharp turns lead to a larger peak-to-peak amplitude, in part due to increased phase coherence.

  19. Propagation of internal waves up continental slope and shelf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Dejun; WANG Wei; QIAO Fangli; YUAN Yeli; XIANG Wenxi

    2008-01-01

    In a two-dimensional and linear framework, a transformation was developed to derive eigensolutions of internal waves over a subcriticai hyperbolic slope and to approximate the continental slope and shelf. The transformation converts a hyperbolic slope in physical space into a fiat bottom in transform space while the governing equations of internal waves remain hyperbolic. The eigensolutions are further used to study the evolution of linear internal waves as it propagates to subcritical continental slope and shelf. The stream function, velocity, and vertical shear of velocity induced by internal wave at the hyperbolic slope are analytically expressed by superposition of the obtained eigensolutions. The velocity and velocity shear increase as the internal wave propagates to a hyperbolic slope. They become very large especially when the slope of internal wave rays approaches the topographic slope, which is consistent with the previous studies.

  20. Propagation of Iamb waves in adhesively bonded multilayered media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Haiyan; XIE Yuanxia; LIU Zhenqing

    2003-01-01

    The effect of introducing attenuation on Lamb wave dispersion curves is studied in this paper. Attenuation is introduced to a three-layered composite plate by an adhesive bond layer with viscous behavior. No changes are required to the transfer matrix formulation for the propagation of elastic waves. By introduction of a complex wavenumber, the model can be used to the propagation of attenuative Lamb waves. Numerical examples for a three-layered aluminium-epoxy-aluminium plate show that attenuation values of each mode in plates are related not only to attenuation, but also to the thickness of the bonded layer, which is in agreement with practical situations.

  1. Wave propagation in reconfigurable magneto-elastic kagome lattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Marshall; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    The paper discusses the wave propagation characteristics of two-dimensional magneto-elastic kagome lattices. Mechanical instabilities caused by magnetic interactions are exploited in combination with particle contact to bring about changes in the topology and stiffness of the lattices. The analysis uses a lumped mass system of particles, which interact through axial and torsional elastic forces as well as magnetic forces. The propagation of in-plane waves is predicted by applying Bloch theorem to lattice unit cells with linearized interactions. Elastic wave dispersion in these lattices before and after topological changes is compared, and large differences are highlighted.

  2. Electron acceleration in the ionosphere by obliquely propagating electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, William J.; Ginet, Gregory P.; Heinemann, Michael A.; Villalon, Elena

    The paper presents an analysis of the relativistic equations of motion for electrons in magnetized plasma and externally imposed electromagnetic fields that propagate at arbitrary angles to the background magnetic field. The relativistic Lorentz equation for a test electron moving under the influence of an electromagnetic wave in a cold magnetized plasma and wave propagation through the ionospheric 'radio window' are examined. It is found that at wave energy fluxes greater than 10 to the 8th mW/sq m, initially cold electrons can be accelerated to energies of several MeV in less than a millisecond. Plans to test the theoretical results with rocket flights are discussed.

  3. Efficient Generation of Freak Waves in Laboratory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, Kriebel's method is improved to generate freak waves in laboratory. The improved method superposes a random wave train with two transient wave trains to simulate freak wave events in a wave tank. The freak waves are more nonlinear than what generated with Kriebel's method of the same energy. It can also generate freak waves to satisfy all the qualifications of the adopted definition with less energy than Kriebel's and can hardly influence the significant wave height.

  4. General solution of cumulative second harmonic by Lamb wave propagation in a solid plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Mingxi

    2008-01-01

    A straightforward approach has been developed for the general solution of cumulative second harmonic by Lamb wave propagation in a solid plate. The present analyses of second-harmonic generation by Lamb waves focus on the cases where the phase velocity of the fundamental Lamb wave is exactly or approximately equal to that of the double frequency Lamb wave (DFLW). Based on the general solution obtained, the numerical analyses show that the cumulative second-harmonic fields are associated with the position of excitation source and the difference between the phase velocity of the fundamental Lamb wave and that of the dominant DFLW component.

  5. Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves in Extremely Dense Media

    CERN Document Server

    Masood, Samina

    2016-01-01

    We study the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves in extremely dense exotic systems with very unique properties. These EM waves develop a longitudinal component due to its interaction with the medium. Renormalization scheme of QED is used to understand the propagation of EM waves in both longitudinal and transverse directions. The propagation of EM waves in a quantum statistically treatable medium affects the properties of the medium itself. The electric permittivity and the magnetic permeability of the medium are modified and influence the related behavior of the medium. All the electromagnetic properties of a medium become a function of temperature and chemical potential of the medium. We study in detail the modifications of electric permittivity and magnetic permeability and other related properties of a medium in the superdense stellar objects.

  6. PROPAGATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE IN THE THREE PHASES SOIL MEDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈云敏; 边学成; 陈仁朋; 梁志刚

    2003-01-01

    The fundamental parameters such as dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability are required to solve the propagation of electromagnetic wave (EM Wave) in the soil. Based on Maxwell equations, the equivalent model is proposed to calculate the dielectric permittivity of mixed soil. The results of calculation fit. the test data well and will provide solid foundation for the application of EM wave in the soil moisture testing, CT analyzing of soil and the inspecting of geoenvironment.

  7. Propagation simulation and attenuation law analysis of seismic wave in elastoplastic tunnel rock medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Tong-bin; LI Jian-gong; XIAO Ya-xun; CHENG Guo-qiang

    2007-01-01

    The energy caused by the dynamic impact in mining engineering forth release and spread by the way of seismic waves, monitoring is an effective way for forecasting mine dynamical disasters, such as rockburst and coal and gas outburst. Three-dimensional dynamic model was built to simulate the propagating progress of seismic waves in the elastoplastic tunnel rock and analyzed the propagating law of perturbation acceleration around tunnel, based on the finite element dynamic analysis software ANSYS/LS-DYNA.The simulation results indicate that: (1) The propagation attenuation of seismic wave is a negative index relationship; (2) The acceleration amplitude of seismic wave decays rapidly in near-field and decays slowly in far-field; (3) When the perturbation is generated in the dead ahead of tunnel, the acceleration of seismic wave become smaller and smaller away from the roadway-rib;(4) The elastic and plastic stress state of tunnel rock is also an important factor for propagation process of wave, the energy of seismic wave is mainly consumed for geometric spreading and plastic deformation in propagation in the elastoplastic medium model.

  8. Millimeter Wave Radio Frequency Propagation Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-28

    assume that no excess attenuation or obstacles are present, and the signal propagates along a clear signal path directly between the transmitter and...performed by simple trigonometry . The angle is determined by: θ sin | |, (103) where CL is the channel length, hTX is the height of the

  9. Propagation of waves in shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Fabrikant, A L

    1998-01-01

    The state of the art in a theory of oscillatory and wave phenomena in hydrodynamical flows is presented in this book. A unified approach is used for waves of different physical origins. A characteristic feature of this approach is that hydrodynamical phenomena are considered in terms of physics; that is, the complement of the conventionally employed formal mathematical approach. Some physical concepts such as wave energy and momentum in a moving fluid are analysed, taking into account induced mean flow. The physical mechanisms responsible for hydrodynamic instability of shear flows are conside

  10. Self-similar propagation of Hermite-Gauss water-wave pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shenhe; Tsur, Yuval; Zhou, Jianying; Shemer, Lev; Arie, Ady

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally propagation dynamics of surface gravity water-wave pulses, having Hermite-Gauss envelopes. We show that these waves propagate self-similarly along an 18-m wave tank, preserving their general Hermite-Gauss envelopes in both the linear and the nonlinear regimes. The measured surface elevation wave groups enable observing the envelope phase evolution of both nonchirped and linearly frequency chirped Hermite-Gauss pulses, hence allowing us to measure Gouy phase shifts of high-order Hermite-Gauss pulses for the first time. Finally, when increasing pulse amplitude, nonlinearity becomes essential and the second harmonic of Hermite-Gauss waves was observed. We further show that these generated second harmonic bound waves still exhibit self-similar Hermite-Gauss shapes along the tank.

  11. Guided wave propagation in multilayered piezoelectric structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A general formulation of the method of the reverberation-ray matrix (MRRM) based on the state space formalism and plane wave expansion technique is presented for the analysis of guided waves in multilayered piezoelectric structures. Each layer of the structure is made of an arbitrarily anisotropic piezoelectric material. Since the state equation of each layer is derived from the three-dimensional theory of linear piezoelectricity, all wave modes are included in the formulation. Within the framework of the MRRM, the phase relation is properly established by excluding exponentially growing functions, while the scattering relation is also appropriately set up by avoiding matrix inversion operation. Consequently, the present MRRM is unconditionally numerically stable and free from computational limitations to the total number of layers, the thickness of individual layers, and the frequency range. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the good performance of the proposed formulation for the analysis of the dispersion characteristic of waves in layered piezoelectric structures.

  12. Wave propagation and energy dissipation in viscoelastic granular media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In terms of viscoelasticity, the relevant theory of wave in granular media is analyzed in this paper.Under the conditions of slight deformation of granules, wave equation, complex number expressions of propagation vector and attenuation vector, attenuation coefficient expressions of longitudinal wave and transverse wave,etc, are analyzed and deduced. The expressions of attenuation coefficients of viscoelastic longitudinal wave and transverse wave show that the attenuation of wave is related to frequency. The higher the frequency is, the more the attenuation is, which is tested by the laboratory experiment. In addition, the energy dissipation is related to the higher frequency wave that is absorbed by granular media. The friction amongst granular media also increase the energy dissipation. During the flowing situation the expression of transmission factor of energy shows that the granular density difference is the key factor which leads to the attenuation of vibrating energy.This has been proved by the experiment results.

  13. Spatial damping of propagating sausage waves in coronal cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming-Zhe; Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Context. Sausage modes are important in coronal seismology. Spatially damped propagating sausage waves were recently observed in the solar atmosphere. Aims: We examine how wave leakage influences the spatial damping of sausage waves propagating along coronal structures modeled by a cylindrical density enhancement embedded in a uniform magnetic field. Methods: Working in the framework of cold magnetohydrodynamics, we solve the dispersion relation (DR) governing sausage waves for complex-valued, longitudinal wavenumber k at given real angular frequencies ω. For validation purposes, we also provide analytical approximations to the DR in the low-frequency limit and in the vicinity of ωc, the critical angular frequency separating trapped from leaky waves. Results: In contrast to the standing case, propagating sausage waves are allowed for ω much lower than ωc. However, while able to direct their energy upward, these low-frequency waves are subject to substantial spatial attenuation. The spatial damping length shows little dependence on the density contrast between the cylinder and its surroundings, and depends only weakly on frequency. This spatial damping length is of the order of the cylinder radius for ω ≲ 1.5vAi/a, where a and vAi are the cylinder radius and the Alfvén speed in the cylinder, respectively. Conclusions: If a coronal cylinder is perturbed by symmetric boundary drivers (e.g., granular motions) with a broadband spectrum, wave leakage efficiently filters out the low-frequency components.

  14. A Wave Expansion Method for Aeroacoustic Propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Hammar, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Although it is possible to directly solve an entire flow-acoustics problem in one computation, this approach remains prohibitively large in terms of the computational resource required for most practical applications. Aeroacoustic problems are therefore usually split into two parts; one consisting of the source computation and one of the source propagation. Although both these parts entail great challenges on the computational method, in terms of accuracy and efficiency, it is still better th...

  15. Wave fields in real media wave propagation in anisotropic, anelastic, porous and electromagnetic media

    CERN Document Server

    Carcione, José M

    2014-01-01

    Authored by the internationally renowned José M. Carcione, Wave Fields in Real Media: Wave Propagation in Anisotropic, Anelastic, Porous and Electromagnetic Media examines the differences between an ideal and a real description of wave propagation, starting with the introduction of relevant stress-strain relations. The combination of this relation and the equations of momentum conservation lead to the equation of motion. The differential formulation is written in terms of memory variables, and Biot's theory is used to describe wave propagation in porous media. For each rheology, a plane-wave analysis is performed in order to understand the physics of wave propagation. This book contains a review of the main direct numerical methods for solving the equation of motion in the time and space domains. The emphasis is on geophysical applications for seismic exploration, but researchers in the fields of earthquake seismology, rock acoustics, and material science - including many branches of acoustics of fluids and ...

  16. Impact of mountain gravity waves on infrasound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiens, Florentin; Lott, François; Millet, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Linear theory of acoustic propagation is used to analyze how mountain waves can change the characteristics of infrasound signals. The mountain wave model is based on the integration of the linear inviscid Taylor-Goldstein equation forced by a nonlinear surface boundary condition. For the acoustic propagation we solve the wave equation using the normal mode method together with the effective sound speed approximation. For large-amplitude mountain waves we use direct numerical simulations to compute the interactions between the mountain waves and the infrasound component. It is shown that the mountain waves perturb the low level waveguide, which leads to significant acoustic dispersion. The mountain waves also impact the arrival time and spread of the signals substantially and can produce a strong absorption of the wave signal. To interpret our results we follow each acoustic mode separately and show which mode is impacted and how. We also show that the phase shift between the acoustic modes over the horizontal length of the mountain wave field may yield to destructive interferences in the lee side of the mountain, resulting in a new form of infrasound absorption. The statistical relevance of those results is tested using a stochastic version of the mountain wave model and large enough sample sizes.

  17. Long-range interaction effects on calcium-wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepseu, W. D.; Woafo, P.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, numerical simulation of calcium waves in a network of cells coupled together by a paracrine signaling is investigated. The model takes into account the long-range interaction between cells due to the action of extracellular messengers, which provide links between first-neighbor cells, but also on cells located far away from the excited cell. When considering bidirectional coupling, the long-range interaction influences neither the frequency nor the amplitude of oscillations, contrary to one-directional coupling. The long-range interaction influences the speed of propagation of Ca2+ waves in the network and induces enlargement of the transition zone before the steady regime of propagation is attained. We also investigate the long-range effects on the colonization of a given niche by a pathogenic microorganism signal on calcium wave propagation in the network.

  18. A propagating heat wave model of skin electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliquett, Uwe; Gusbeth, Ch; Nuccitelli, Richard

    2008-03-21

    The main barrier to transdermal drug delivery in human skin is the stratum corneum. Pulsed electric fields (PEFs) of sufficient amplitude can create new aqueous pathways across this barrier and enhance drug delivery through the skin. Here, we describe a model of pore formation between adjacent corneocytes that predicts the following sequence of events: (1) the PEF rapidly charges the stratum corneum near the electrode until the transepidermal potential difference is large enough to drive water into a small region of the stratum corneum, creating new aqueous pathways. (2) PEFs then drive a high current density through this newly created electropore to generate Joule heating that warms the pore perimeter. (3) This temperature rise at the perimeter increases the probability of further electroporation there as the local sphingolipids reach their phase transition temperature. (4) This heat-generated wave of further electroporation propagates outward until the surface area of the pore becomes so large that the reduced current density no longer generates sufficient heat to reach the phase transition temperature of the sphingolipids. (5) Cooling and partial recovery occurs after the field pulse. This process yields large, high permeability regions in the stratum corneum at which molecules can more readily cross this skin barrier. We present a model for this process that predicts that the initial radius of the first aqueous pathway is approximately 5nm for a transdermal voltage of 60V at room temperature.

  19. Nonhydrostatic effects of nonlinear internal wave propagation in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Fringer, O. B.

    2007-05-01

    It is well known that internal tides are generated over steep topography at the Luzon Strait on the eastern boundary of the South China Sea. These internal tides propagate westward and steepen into trains of weakly nonlinear internal waves that propagate relatively free of dissipation until they interact with the continental shelf on the western side of the South China Sea, some 350 km from their generation point. The rate at which the internal tide transforms into trains of nonlinear waves depends on the Froude number at the generation site, which is defined as the ratio of the barotropic current speed to the local internal wave speed. Large Froude numbers lead to rapid evolution of wave trains while low Froude numbers generate internal tides that may not evolve into wave trains before reaching the continental shelf. Although the evolution into trains of weakly nonlinear waves results from the delicate interplay between nonlinear steepening and nonhydrostatic dispersion, the steepening process is represented quite well, at least from a qualitative standpoint, by hydrostatic models, which contain no explicit nonhydrostatic dispersion. Furthermore, hydrostatic models predict the propagation speed of the leading wave in wave trains extremely well, indicating that its propagation speed depends very weakly on nonlinear or dispersive effects. In order to examine how hydrostatic models introduce dispersion that leads to the formation of wave trains, we simulate the generation and evolution of nonlinear waves in the South China Sea with and without the hydrostatic approximation using the nonhydrostatic model SUNTANS, which can be run in either hydrostatic or nonhydrostatic mode. We show that the dispersion leading to the formation of wave trains in the hydrostatic model results from numerically-induced dispersion that is implicit in the numerical formulation of the advection terms. While the speed of the leading wave in the wave trains is correct, the amplitude and number

  20. Localization of angular momentum in optical waves propagating through turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Darryl J; Oesch, Denis W

    2011-12-01

    This is the first in a series of papers demonstrating that photons with orbital angular momentum can be created in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence. The scope of this first paper is much narrower. Here, we demonstrate that atmospheric turbulence can impart non-trivial angular momentum to beams and that this non-trivial angular momentum is highly localized. Furthermore, creation of this angular momentum is a normal part of propagation through atmospheric turbulence.

  1. Detecting electromagnetic cloaks using backward-propagating waves

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    A novel approach for detecting transformation-optics invisibility cloaks is proposed. The detection method takes advantage of the unusual backward-propagation characteristics of recently reported beams and pulses to induce electromagnetic scattering from the cloak. Even though waves with backward-propagating energy flux cannot penetrate the cloaking shell and interact with the cloaked objects (i.e., they do not make the cloaked object visible), they provide a mechanism for detecting the presence of cloaks. © 2011 IEEE.

  2. Modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation through the atmosphere with spectral element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2014-12-01

    Low-frequency events such as tsunamis generate acoustic and gravity waves which quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Since the atmospheric density decreases exponentially as the altitude increases and from the conservation of the kinetic energy, those waves see their amplitude raise (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), allowing their detection in the upper atmosphere. Various tools have been developed through years to model this propagation, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but none offer a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling.A modeling tool is worthy interest since there are many different phenomena, from quakes to atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool.Starting from the SPECFEM program that already propagate waves in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, this work offers a tool with the ability to model acoustic and gravity waves propagation in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source.Atmospheric attenuation is required in a proper modeling framework since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented due to its ability to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's surface (that vibrates when a surface wave go through it) but also huge atmospheric events.

  3. Neural circuits for peristaltic wave propagation in crawling Drosophila larvae: analysis and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjorgjieva, Julijana; Berni, Jimena; Evers, Jan Felix; Eglen, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila larvae crawl by peristaltic waves of muscle contractions, which propagate along the animal body and involve the simultaneous contraction of the left and right side of each segment. Coordinated propagation of contraction does not require sensory input, suggesting that movement is generated by a central pattern generator (CPG). We characterized crawling behavior of newly hatched Drosophila larvae by quantifying timing and duration of segmental boundary contractions. We developed a CPG network model that recapitulates these patterns based on segmentally repeated units of excitatory and inhibitory (EI) neuronal populations coupled with immediate neighboring segments. A single network with symmetric coupling between neighboring segments succeeded in generating both forward and backward propagation of activity. The CPG network was robust to changes in amplitude and variability of connectivity strength. Introducing sensory feedback via "stretch-sensitive" neurons improved wave propagation properties such as speed of propagation and segmental contraction duration as observed experimentally. Sensory feedback also restored propagating activity patterns when an inappropriately tuned CPG network failed to generate waves. Finally, in a two-sided CPG model we demonstrated that two types of connectivity could synchronize the activity of two independent networks: connections from excitatory neurons on one side to excitatory contralateral neurons (E to E), and connections from inhibitory neurons on one side to excitatory contralateral neurons (I to E). To our knowledge, such I to E connectivity has not yet been found in any experimental system; however, it provides the most robust mechanism to synchronize activity between contralateral CPGs in our model. Our model provides a general framework for studying the conditions under which a single locally coupled network generates bilaterally synchronized and longitudinally propagating waves in either direction.

  4. Neural Circuits for Peristaltic Wave Propagation in Crawling Drosophila Larvae: Analysis and Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julijana eGjorgjieva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila larvae crawl by peristaltic waves of muscle contractions, which propagate along the animal body and involve the simultaneous contraction of the left and right side of each segment. Coordinated propagation of contraction does not require sensory input, suggesting that movement is generated by a central pattern generator (CPG. We characterized crawling behavior of newly hatched Drosophila larvae by quantifying timing and duration of segmental boundary contractions. We developed a CPG network model that recapitulates these patterns based on segmentally repeated units of excitatory and inhibitory neuronal populations coupled with immediate neighboring segments. A single network with symmetric coupling between neighboring segments succeeded in generating both forward and backward propagation of activity. The CPG network was robust to changes in amplitude and variability of connectivity strength. Introducing sensory feedback via `stretch-sensitive' neurons improved wave propagation properties such as speed of propagation and segmental contraction duration as observed experimentally. Sensory feedback also restored propagating activity patterns when an inappropriately tuned CPG network failed to generate waves. Finally, in a two-sided CPG model we demonstrated that two types of connectivity could synchronize the activity of two independent networks: connections from excitatory neurons on one side to excitatory contralateral neurons (E to E, and connections from inhibitory neurons on one side to excitatory contralateral neurons (I to E. To our knowledge, such I to E connectivity has not yet been found in any experimental system; however, it provides the most robust mechanism to synchronize activity between contralateral CPGs in our model. Our model provides a general framework for studying the conditions under which a single locally coupled network generates bilaterally synchronized and longitudinally propagating waves in either direction.

  5. Efficient counter-propagating wave acoustic micro-particle manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinenko, A.; Ong, C. K.; Courtney, C. R. P.; Wilcox, P. D.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2012-12-01

    A simple acoustic system consisting of a pair of parallel singe layered piezoelectric transducers submerged in a fluid used to form standing waves by a superposition of two counter-propagating waves is reported. The nodal positions of the standing wave are controlled by applying a variable phase difference to the transducers. This system was used to manipulate polystyrene micro-beads trapped at the nodal positions of the standing wave. The demonstrated good manipulation capability of the system is based on a lowering of the reflection coefficient in a narrow frequency band near the through-thickness resonance of the transducer plates.

  6. Transient Aspects of Wave Propagation Connected with Spatial Coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzat G. Bakhoum

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents transient aspects of light wave propagation connected with spatial coherence. It is shown that reflection and refraction phenomena involve spatial patterns which are created within a certain transient time interval. After this transient time interval, these patterns act like a memory, determining the wave vector for subsequent sets of reflected/refracted waves. The validity of this model is based on intuitive aspects regarding phase conservation of energy for waves reflected/refracted by multiple centers in a certain material medium.

  7. Variational principle for nonlinear wave propagation in dissipative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierckx, Hans; Verschelde, Henri

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of many natural systems is dominated by nonlinear waves propagating through the medium. We show that in any extended system that supports nonlinear wave fronts with positive surface tension, the asymptotic wave-front dynamics can be formulated as a gradient system, even when the underlying evolution equations for the field variables cannot be written as a gradient system. The variational potential is simply given by a linear combination of the occupied volume and surface area of the wave front and changes monotonically over time.

  8. Wave propagation in elastic layers with damping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Sergey; Darula, Radoslav

    2016-01-01

    The conventional concepts of a loss factor and complex-valued elastic moduli are used to study wave attenuation in a visco-elastic layer. The hierarchy of reduced-order models is employed to assess attenuation levels in various situations. For the forcing problem, the attenuation levels are found...

  9. On the propagation of Voigt waves in energetically active materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Tom G.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2016-11-01

    If Voigt-wave propagation is possible in a dissipative anisotropic dielectric material characterised by the permittivity dyadic \\mathop{\\varepsilon }\\limits\\raise{2pt=}, then it is also possible in the analogous energetically active material characterised by the permittivity dyadic \\mathop{\\tilde{\\varepsilon }}\\limits\\raise{2pt=}, where \\mathop{\\tilde{\\varepsilon }}\\limits\\raise{2pt=} is the hermitian conjugate of \\mathop{\\varepsilon }\\limits\\raise{2pt=}. This symmetry follows directly from a theoretical analysis of the necessary and sufficient conditions for Voigt-wave propagation in anisotropic materials. As a consequence of this symmetry, a porous dissipative material that exhibits Voigt-wave propagation can be used to construct a material that allows the propagation of Voigt waves with attendant linear gain in amplitude with propagation distance, by means of infiltration with an electrically or optically activated dye, for example. This phenomenon is captured by the Bruggeman formalism for homogenised composite materials based on isotropic dielectric component materials that are randomly distributed as oriented spheroidal particles.

  10. Wave Propagation in Origami-inspired Foldable Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pai; Sun, Sijie; Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-03-01

    We study the propagation of elastic waves in foldable thin-plate structures. Both 1D systems of periodic folds and 2D Miura-Ori patterns are investigated. The dispersion relations are calculated by finite element simulations on the unit cell of spatial periodicity. Experimental efforts and considerations are also discussed. The characteristic propagating bands and bandgaps are found to be very sensitive to the folding angles. The existence of highly tunable bandgap makes the system suitable for potential applications including adaptive filters in vibration-reduction devices, wave guides and acoustic imaging equipment.

  11. Polarization controlled directional propagation of Bloch surface wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalevich, Tatiana; Boyer, Philippe; Suarez, Miguel; Salut, Roland; Kim, Myun-Sik; Herzig, Hans Peter; Bernal, Maria-Pilar; Grosjean, Thierry

    2017-03-06

    Bloch surface waves (BSWs) are recently developing alternative to surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Due to dramatically enhanced propagation distance and strong field confinement these surface states can be successfully used in on-chip all-optical integrated devices of increased complexity. In this work we propose a highly miniaturized grating based BSW coupler which is gathering launching and directional switching functionalities in a single element. This device allows to control with polarization the propagation direction of Bloch surface waves at subwavelength scale, thus impacting a large panel of domains such as optical circuitry, function design, quantum optics, etc.

  12. 24 GHz cmWave Radio Propagation Through Vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Ignacio; Abreu, Renato; Portela Lopes de Almeida, Erika;

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement-based analysis of cm-wave radio propagation through vegetation at 24 GHz. A set of dedicated directional measurements were performed with horn antennas located close to street level inside a densely-vegetated area illuminated from above. The full azimuth was exam......This paper presents a measurement-based analysis of cm-wave radio propagation through vegetation at 24 GHz. A set of dedicated directional measurements were performed with horn antennas located close to street level inside a densely-vegetated area illuminated from above. The full azimuth...

  13. Propagation of shock waves in a magneto viscous medium

    CERN Document Server

    Anand, R K; Mishra, Manoj K

    2012-01-01

    Recently the authors [Phys. Scr. 83 (2011) 065402] have studied the entropy production in a viscous medium due to the propagation of shock waves. In the present paper, a theoretical model has been developed for a more realistic problem that deals with the study of entropy production due to propagation of shock waves in a viscous medium under the effect of a static magnetic field, for the cases of plane, cylindrical and spherical symmetry of the shock. Exact solutions for the flow variables have been discovered and their numerical estimations in the shock transition region have been analyzed with respect to static magnetic field, shock symmetry, shock strength, and specific heat ratio.

  14. Multi-layer Study of Wave Propagation in Sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipe, T.; Khomenko, E.; Collados, M.; Beck, C.

    2010-10-01

    We analyze the propagation of waves in sunspots from the photosphere to the chromosphere using time series of co-spatial Ca II H intensity spectra (including its line blends) and polarimetric spectra of Si I λ10,827 and the He I λ10,830 multiplet. From the Doppler shifts of these lines we retrieve the variation of the velocity along the line of sight at several heights. Phase spectra are used to obtain the relation between the oscillatory signals. Our analysis reveals standing waves at frequencies lower than 4 mHz and a continuous propagation of waves at higher frequencies, which steepen into shocks in the chromosphere when approaching the formation height of the Ca II H core. The observed nonlinearities are weaker in Ca II H than in He I lines. Our analysis suggests that the Ca II H core forms at a lower height than the He I λ10,830 line: a time delay of about 20 s is measured between the Doppler signal detected at both wavelengths. We fit a model of linear slow magnetoacoustic wave propagation in a stratified atmosphere with radiative losses according to Newton's cooling law to the phase spectra and derive the difference in the formation height of the spectral lines. We show that the linear model describes well the wave propagation up to the formation height of Ca II H, where nonlinearities start to become very important.

  15. Propagation of gravity wave packet near critical level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Xianchang; YI Fan

    2005-01-01

    A couple of two-dimensional linear and fully nonlinear numerical models for compressible atmosphere are used to numerically study the propagation of the gravity wave packet into a mean wind shear. For a linear propagation wave packet, the critical level interactions are in good agreement with the linear critical level theory. The dynamically and convectively unstable regions are formed due to the critical level interaction of a finite-amplitude wave packet, but they would not break. The free exchange of potential energy with kinetic energy in the background atmosphere at rest ceases after entering the mean wind shear. However, it still goes on in the nonlinear propagation. It is shown that the nonlinear effects modify the mean flow markedly, reduce the momentum and energy propagation velocity and drop the elevation of the critical level.The gravity wave packet becomes unstable and breaks down into smaller scales in some regions. It expends much more kinetic energy than potential energy in the early phase of the breakdown. This means that the wave breakdown sets up due to the action of the shear instability rather than a convective one.

  16. High frequency guided wave propagation in monocrystalline silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, Marco; Masserey, Bernard; Robyr, Jean-Luc; Fromme, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Monocrystalline silicon wafers are widely used in the photovoltaic industry for solar panels with high conversion efficiency. The cutting process can introduce micro-cracks in the thin wafers and lead to varying thickness. High frequency guided ultrasonic waves are considered for the structural monitoring of the wafers. The anisotropy of the monocrystalline silicon leads to variations of the wave characteristics, depending on the propagation direction relative to the crystal orientation. Full three-dimensional Finite Element simulations of the guided wave propagation were conducted to visualize and quantify these effects for a line source. The phase velocity (slowness) and skew angle of the two fundamental Lamb wave modes (first anti-symmetric mode A0 and first symmetric mode S0) for varying propagation directions relative to the crystal orientation were measured experimentally. Selective mode excitation was achieved using a contact piezoelectric transducer with a custom-made wedge and holder to achieve a controlled contact pressure. The out-of-plane component of the guided wave propagation was measured using a noncontact laser interferometer. Good agreement was found with the simulation results and theoretical predictions based on nominal material properties of the silicon wafer.

  17. Propagation of sound waves in tubes of noncircular cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    Plane-acoustic-wave propagation in small tubes with a cross section in the shape of a flattened oval is described. Theoretical descriptions of a plane wave propagating in a tube with circular cross section and between a pair of infinite parallel plates, including viscous and thermal damping, are expressed in similar form. For a wide range of useful duct sizes, the propagation constant (whose real and imaginary parts are the amplitude attenuation rate and the wave number, respectively) is very nearly the same function of frequency for both cases if the radius of the circular tube is the same as the distance between the parallel plates. This suggests that either a circular-cross-section model or a flat-plate model can be used to calculate wave propagation in flat-oval tubing, or any other shape tubing, if its size is expressed in terms of an equivalent radius, given by g = 2 x (cross-sectional area)/(length of perimeter). Measurements of the frequency response of two sections of flat-oval tubing agree with calculations based on this idea. Flat-plate formulas are derived, the use of transmission-line matrices for calculations of plane waves in compound systems of ducts is described, and examples of computer programs written to carry out the calculations are shown.

  18. Propagation of elastic waves through textured polycrystals: application to ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Agnès; Lund, Fernando; Montagnat, Maurine

    2015-05-08

    The propagation of elastic waves in polycrystals is revisited, with an emphasis on configurations relevant to the study of ice. Randomly oriented hexagonal single crystals are considered with specific, non-uniform, probability distributions for their major axis. Three typical textures or fabrics (i.e. preferred grain orientations) are studied in detail: one cluster fabric and two girdle fabrics, as found in ice recovered from deep ice cores. After computing the averaged elasticity tensor for the considered textures, wave propagation is studied using a wave equation with elastic constants c=〈c〉+δc that are equal to an average plus deviations, presumed small, from that average. This allows for the use of the Voigt average in the wave equation, and velocities are obtained solving the appropriate Christoffel equation. The velocity for vertical propagation, as appropriate to interpret sonic logging measurements, is analysed in more details. Our formulae are shown to be accurate at the 0.5% level and they provide a rationale for previous empirical fits to wave propagation velocities with a quantitative agreement at the 0.07-0.7% level. We conclude that, within the formalism presented here, it is appropriate to use, with confidence, velocity measurements to characterize ice fabrics.

  19. Propagation characteristics of shock waves from a plane carbon-nanotube-coated optoacoustic transducer in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaofeng; Baek, Yonggeun; Ha, Kanglyeol; Kim, Moojoon; Kim, Jungsoon; Kim, Duckjong; Kang, Hyun Wook; Oh, Junghwan

    2017-07-01

    An optoacoustic transducer made of light-absorbing and elastomeric materials can generate high-pressure wide-band ultrasound waves in water when it is illuminated by a pulse laser. To generate such waves with high efficiency, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) are widely used as the light-absorbing and elastomeric materials, respectively. It was previously reported that an optoacoustic concave transducer made of these materials can produce strong shock waves, namely, blast waves, within its focal zone. In this study, we have shown that these waves can also be generated by a plane optoacoustic transducer fabricated by coating CNTs-PDMS on a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plate. Some propagation characteristics of the blast wave generated were measured and compared with the calculated results. It was found that the propagation speed and attenuation of the wave are different from those of usual sounds. From the comparison of the measured and the calculated acoustic fields, it is assumed that every point on the transducer surface produces almost the same blast wave.

  20. Propagation of ULF waves from the upstream region to the midnight sector of the inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazue; Hartinger, Michael D.; Malaspina, David M.; Smith, Charles W.; Koga, Kiyokazu; Singer, Howard J.; Frühauff, Dennis; Baishev, Dmitry G.; Moiseev, Alexey V.; Yoshikawa, Akimasa

    2016-09-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) waves generated in the ion foreshock are a well-known source of Pc3-Pc4 waves (7-100 mHz) observed in the dayside magnetosphere. We use data acquired on 10 April 2013 by multiple spacecraft to demonstrate that ULF waves of upstream origin can propagate to the midnight sector of the inner magnetosphere. At 1130-1730 UT on the selected day, the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft and the geostationary ETS-VIII satellite detected compressional 20 to 40 mHz magnetic field oscillations between L ˜ 4 and L ˜ 7 in the midnight sector, along with other spacecraft located closer to noon. Upstream origin of the oscillations is concluded from the wave frequency that matches a theoretical model, globally coherent amplitude modulation, and duskward propagation that is consistent with expected entry of the upstream wave energy through the dawnside flank under the observed interplanetary magnetic field. The oscillations are attributed to magnetohydrodynamic fast-mode waves based on their propagation velocity of ˜300 km/s and the relationship between the electric and magnetic field perturbations. The magnitude of the azimuthal wave number is estimated to be ˜30. There is no evidence that the oscillations propagated to the ground in the midnight sector.

  1. Propagation of Nonlinear Waves in Waveguides and Application to Nondestructive Stress Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucera, Claudio

    Propagation of nonlinear waves in waveguides is a field that has received an ever increasing interest in the last few decades. Nonlinear guided waves are excellent candidates for interrogating long waveguide like structures because they combine high sensitivity to structural conditions, typical of nonlinear parameters, with large inspection ranges, characteristic of wave propagation in bounded media. The primary topic of this dissertation is the analysis of ultrasonic waves, including ultrasonic guided waves, propagating in their nonlinear regime and their application to structural health monitoring problems, particularly the measurement of thermal stress in Continuous Welded Rail (CWR). Following an overview of basic physical principles generating nonlinearities in ultrasonic wave propagation, the case of higher-harmonic generation in multi-mode and dispersive guided waves is examined in more detail. A numerical framework is developed in order to predict favorable higher-order generation conditions (i.e. specific guided modes and frequencies) for waveguides of arbitrary cross-sections. This model is applied to various benchmark cases of complex structures. The nonlinear wave propagation model is then applied to the case of a constrained railroad track (CWR) subjected to thermal variations. This study is a direct response to the key need within the railroad transportation community to develop a technique able to measure thermal stresses in CWR, or determine the rail temperature corresponding to a null thermal stress (Neutral Temperature -- NT). The numerical simulation phase concludes with a numerical study performed using ABAQUS commercial finite element package. These analyses were crucial in predicting the evolution of the nonlinear parameter beta with thermal stress level acting in the rail. A novel physical model, based on interatomic potential, was developed to explain the origin of nonlinear wave propagation under constrained thermal expansion. In fact

  2. TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELLING OF ACCIDENTAL FLOOD WAVES PROPAGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorand Catalin STOENESCU

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The study presented in this article describes a modern modeling methodology of the propagation of accidental flood waves in case a dam break; this methodology is applied in Romania for the first time for the pilot project „Breaking scenarios of Poiana Uzului dam”. The calculation programs used help us obtain a bidimensional calculation (2D of the propagation of flood waves, taking into consideration the diminishing of the flood wave on a normal direction to the main direction; this diminishing of the flood wave is important in the case of sinuous courses of water or with urban settlements very close to the minor river bed. In the case of Poiana Uzului dam, 2 scenarios were simulated with the help of Ph.D. Eng. Dan Stematiu, plausible scenarios but with very little chances of actually producing. The results were presented as animations with flooded surfaces at certain time steps successively.

  3. Signatures of thermal hysteresis in Tamm-wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiadini, Francesco; Fiumara, Vincenzo; Mackay, Tom G.; Scaglione, Antonio; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2017-10-01

    We numerically solved the boundary-value problem for Tamm waves (which may also be classified as Uller-Zenneck waves here) guided by the planar interface of a homogeneous isotropic dissipative dielectric (HIDD) material and a periodically multilayered isotropic dielectric material. The HIDD material was chosen to be VO${}_2$ which, at optical wavelengths, has a temperature-dependent refractive index with a hysteresis feature, i.e., the temperature-dependence of its refractive index varies depending upon whether the temperature is increasing or decreasing. A numerical code was implemented to extract solutions of the dispersion equation at a fixed wavelength for both $p$- and $s$-polarization states over the temperature range [50,80] degrees. A multitude of Tamm waves of both linear polarization states were found, demonstrating a clear demarcation of the heating and cooling phases in terms of wavenumbers and propagation distances. Thereby, the signatures of thermal hysteresis in Tamm-wave propagation were revealed.

  4. Fully Coupled Electromechanical Elastodynamic Model for Guided Wave Propagation Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, Luke; Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2013-01-01

    Physics-based computational models play a key role in the study of wave propagation for structural health monitoring (SHM) and the development of improved damage detection methodologies. Due to the complex nature of guided waves, accurate and efficient computation tools are necessary to investigate the mechanisms responsible for dispersion, coupling, and interaction with damage. In this paper, a fully coupled electromechanical elastodynamic model for wave propagation in a heterogeneous, anisotropic material system is developed. The final framework provides the full three dimensional displacement and electrical potential fields for arbitrary plate and transducer geometries and excitation waveform and frequency. The model is validated theoretically and proven computationally efficient. Studies are performed with surface bonded piezoelectric sensors to gain insight into the physics of experimental techniques used for SHM. Collocated actuation of the fundamental Lamb wave modes is modeled over a range of frequenc...

  5. Propagation of Acoustic Waves in Troposphere and Stratosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kashyap, J M

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic waves are those waves which travel with the speed of sound through a medium. H. Lamb has derived a cutoff frequency for stratified and isothermal medium for the propagation of acoustic waves. In order to find the cutoff frequency many methods were introduced after Lamb's work. In this paper, we have chosen the method to determine cutoff frequencies for acoustic waves propagating in non-isothermal media. This turning point frequency method can be applied to various atmospheres like solar atmosphere, stellar atmosphere, earth's atmosphere etc. Here, we have analytically derived the cutoff frequency and have graphically analyzed and compared with the Lamb's cut-off frequencyfor earth's troposphere, lower and upper stratosphere.

  6. Propagation of elastic waves in DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Mukherjee

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical analyses of longitudinal and torsional elastic waves transmitted along DNA molecule undergoing Brownian motion in solution are presented. Longitudinal vibrations in DNA are shown to be responsible for drug intercalation and breathing. The near neighbor exclusion mode of drug intercalation is explained. Torsional oscillations in DNA are shown to be responsible for conformation transitions from a right handed to a left handed form, depending on sequence specificity in high salt concentration.

  7. Linear wave propagation in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Keppens, R

    2008-01-01

    The properties of linear Alfv\\'en, slow, and fast magnetoacoustic waves for uniform plasmas in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are discussed, augmenting the well-known expressions for their phase speeds with knowledge on the group speed. A 3+1 formalism is purposely adopted to make direct comparison with the Newtonian MHD limits easier and to stress the graphical representation of their anisotropic linear wave properties using the phase and group speed diagrams. By drawing these for both the fluid rest frame and for a laboratory Lorentzian frame which sees the plasma move with a three-velocity having an arbitrary orientation with respect to the magnetic field, a graphical view of the relativistic aberration effects is obtained for all three MHD wave families. Moreover, it is confirmed that the classical Huygens construction relates the phase and group speed diagram in the usual way, even for the lab frame viewpoint. Since the group speed diagrams correspond to exact solutions for initial conditions co...

  8. The rarefaction wave propagation in transparent windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glam, B.; Porat, E.; Horovitz, Y.; Yosef-Hai, A.

    2017-01-01

    The radial (lateral) rarefaction wave velocity of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and Lithium Fluoride (LiF) windows were studied by plate impact experiments that were carried out at Soreq NRC up to a pressure of 146 kbar in the PMMA and 334 kbar in the LiF. The windows were glued to Lead targets that were impacted by a copper impactor. The VISAR measurement was done in the window interface with the target. This information was utilized to identify the radial rarefaction arrival time at the center of different diameter windows after the shock event, and served as a measurement to the radial wave velocity in the shocked material. It was found that for both windows, LiF or PMMA, the measured radial wave velocity increases with the pressure. Furthermore, this velocity is significantly higher compared to the expected longitudinal sound velocity at the same pressure, calculated by the Steinberg EOS in the PMMA and by ab initio calculation in the LiF. Here we present the experimental results and a comparison with analytical calculation of the sound velocity using the Steinberg EOS.

  9. Transient eastward-propagating long-period waves observed over the South Pole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Palo

    Full Text Available Observations of the horizontal wind field over the South Pole were made during 1995 using a meteor radar. These data have revealed the presence of a rich spectrum of waves over the South Pole with a distinct annual occurrence. Included in this spectrum are long-period waves, whose periods are greater than one solar day, which are propagating eastward. These waves exhibit a distinct seasonal occurrence where the envelope of wave periods decreases from a period of 10 days near the fall equinox to a minimum of 2 days near the winter solstice and then progresses towards a period near 10 days at the spring equinox. Computation of the meridional gradient of quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity has revealed a region in the high-latitude upper mesosphere which could support an instability and serve as a source for these waves. Estimation of the wave periods which would be generated from an instability in this region closely resembles the observed seasonal variation in wave periods over the South Pole. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the observed eastward propagating long-period waves over the South Pole are generated by an instability in the polar upper mesosphere. However, given our limited data set we cannot rule out a stratospheric source. Embedded in this spectrum of eastward propagating waves during the austral winter are a number of distinct wave events. Eight such wave events have been identified and localized using a constant-Q filter bank. The periods of these wave events ranges from 1.7 to 9.8 days and all exist for at least 3 wave periods. Least squares analysis has revealed that a number of these events are inconsistent with a wave propagating zonally around the geographic pole and could be related to waves propagating around a dynamical pole which is offset from the geographic pole. Additionally, one event which was observed appears to be a standing oscillation.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric

  10. Analysis of wave propagation in periodic 3D waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Christoph; Bischoff, Stefan; Gaul, Lothar

    2013-11-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is a growing research field in the realm of civil engineering. SHM concepts are implemented using integrated sensors and actuators to evaluate the state of a structure. Within this work, wave-based techniques are addressed. Dispersion effects for propagating waves in waveguides of different materials are analyzed for various different cross-sections. Since analytical theory is limited, a general approach based on the Waveguide Finite Element Method is applied. Numerical results are verified experimentally.

  11. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  12. Elastic Wave Propagation Mechanisms in Underwater Acoustic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    excited flexural mode that propagates in the ice layer at certain acoustic frequencies in ice-covered environments.[3] • Previously implemented EPE self...and ks,3, corresponding to the water layer sound speed, bottom compressional and shear wave speed, and ice layer compressional and shear wave speed... excitation of the Scholte interface mode. Dashed curve shows spectra for a source at 1 m depth and receiver at 25 m, showing the excitation of the

  13. Electromagnetic wave propagation in alternating material-metamaterial layered structures

    CERN Document Server

    Carrera-Escobedo, V H

    2016-01-01

    Using the transfer matrix method, we examine the parametric behavior of the transmittance of an electromagnetic plane wave propagating in the lossless regime through a periodic multilayered system as a function of the frequency and angle of incidence of the electromagnetic wave for the case in which the periodic structure comprises alternating material-metamaterial layers. A specific example of high transmittance at any angle of incidence in the visible region of the spectrum is identified

  14. Propagation of shock waves in a viscous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Harish C; Anand, R K, E-mail: harish0chandra@gmail.com, E-mail: anand.rajkumar@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India)

    2011-06-01

    A theoretical model for entropy production in a viscous medium due to the propagation of shock waves has been developed. An exact general solution is achieved for plane, cylindrical and spherical symmetries of shock waves in viscous flow, which on numerical substitutions gives variations in the entropy production, temperature ratio and particle velocity in the shock transition region with the coefficient of viscosity, specific heat ratio, shock strength, initial density and initial pressure.

  15. Wave Propagation in Accretion Disks with Self-Gravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-Ci; YANG Lan-Tian; WU Shao-Ping; DING Shi-Xue

    2001-01-01

    We extend the research by Lubow and Pringle of axisymmetric waves in accretion disks to the case where self gravity of disks should be considered. We derive and analyse the dispersion relations with the effect of self-gravity. Results show that self-gravity extends the forbidden region of the wave propagation: for high frequency p-modes, self-gravity makes the wavelength shorter and the group velocity larger; for low frequency g-modes, the effect is opposite.

  16. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  17. Love wave propagation in piezoelectric layered structure with dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianke; Xian, Kai; Wang, Ji; Yong, Yook-Kong

    2009-02-01

    We investigate analytically the effect of the viscous dissipation of piezoelectric material on the dispersive and attenuated characteristics of Love wave propagation in a layered structure, which involves a thin piezoelectric layer bonded perfectly to an unbounded elastic substrate. The effects of the viscous coefficient on the phase velocity of Love waves and attenuation are presented and discussed in detail. The analytical method and the results can be useful for the design of the resonators and sensors.

  18. Unified interpretation of superluminal behaviors in wave propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranfagni, A. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Viliani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Ranfagni, C. [Facolta di Scienze Matematiche Fisiche e Naturali, Corso di Laurea in Fisica dell' Universita di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Mignani, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' Edoardo Amaldi' , Universita degli Studi di Roma ' Roma Tre' , Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma (Italy); Ruggeri, R. [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Sezione di Firenze, Firenze (Italy)], E-mail: rocco.ruggeri@isc.cnr.it; Ricci, A.M. [Istituto per le Telecomunicazioni e l' Elettronica della Marina Militare ' Giancarlo Vallauri' (Mariteleradar), Viale Italia 72, 57100 Livorno (Italy)

    2007-10-29

    By using two approaches, we demonstrate that superluminal behaviors in wave propagation can be attributed to mechanisms acting in the near-field limit. One approach is based on complex waves, while the other relies on a path-integral treatment of stochastic motion. The results of the two approaches are comparable, and suitable for interpreting the data obtained in microwave experiments; these experiments, over a wide range of distances, show a time advance which, in any case, is limited to nanoseconds.

  19. Numerical modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation in the atmosphere using a spectral element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roland; Brissaud, Quentin; Garcia, Raphael; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    During low-frequency events such as tsunamis, acoustic and gravity waves are generated and quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Due to the exponential decrease of the atmospheric density with the altitude, the conservation of the kinetic energy imposes that the amplitude of those waves increases (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), which allows their detection in the upper atmosphere. This propagation bas been modelled for years with different tools, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling is still crucially needed. A modeling tool is worth of interest since there are many different sources, as earthquakes or atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool. By adding some developments to the SPECFEM package that already models wave propagation in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, we show here that acoustic and gravity waves propagation can now be modelled in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's vibrating surfaces but also huge atmospheric events. Atmospheric attenuation is also introduced since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals.

  20. Noise induced intercellular propagation of calcium waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nchange, A. K.; Kepseu, W. D.; Woafo, P.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a bidirectional coupled chain of cells, in which a cell is subjected to an external noise. Noisy oscillations of calcium (Ca 2+), that is, a bursting-like phenomenon induced by noise with fluctuations in the baseline values of calcium, are induced in the first cell and propagated along the chain with noise suppression. This phenomenon of noise suppression is further investigated by computing the normalized fluctuation of pulse durations. It is therefore found that the noise induced coherence resonance phenomenon occurs at the cellular level. Coherence biresonance behaviour appears in the transmission of noise induced oscillations at appropriate noise intensity or noise coupling (for low noise intensity) and the information flow in each cell can be simultaneously optimized at the optimal value of noise or coupling.

  1. Impact of Fog on Electromagnetic Wave Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jonathon; Fleisch, Daniel

    2002-04-01

    This experiment was designed to explore the impact of fog on electromagnetic radiation, in particular microwaves and infrared light. For years law enforcement agencies have used microwave radiation (radar guns) to measure the speed of vehicles, and the last ten years has seen increased use of LIDAR, which uses 905-nm infrared radiation rather than microwaves. To evaulate the effect of fog on the operation of these devices, we have constructed a fog chamber with microwave and optical portals to allow light from a HeNe laser and 10.6-GHz microwaves to propagate through various densities of fog. Data is acquired using Vernier Logger Pro and analyzed using MATLAB and Mathematica. Using the attenuation of the laser light to determine fog density, the impact of fog on the signal-to-noise ratio of both microwave and IR devices may be quantified, and the maximum useful range may be calculated.

  2. Elastic-wave generation in the evolution of displacement peaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukov, V.P.; Boldin, A.A.

    1988-06-01

    This paper investigated the character of elastic shock wave generation and damping in irradiated materials along with the possibility of their long-range influence on the structure of the irradiated materials. Dispersion at the elastoplastic stage of atomic displacement peak development was taken into account. The three-dimensional nonlinear wave was described by an equation in the approximation of weak nonlinearity and weak spatial dispersion. Numerical modeling of the propagation of a plane shock wave in a crystal lattice was conducted. The distribution of the density and mass velocity of the material at the instant of complete damping of the plastic shock-wave component was determined. The appearance of solitary waves (solitons) at large amplitudes, localized in space, which propagate without distortion to arbitrary distances and retain their amplitude and form in interacting with one another, was investigated. Some physical consequences of the influence of solitary waves on the irradiated materials were considered.

  3. Study of transient wave propagation in plates using double pulse TV holography

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, H.; Guedes, R. M.; M. A. P. Vaz; Rodrigues, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a numerical and experimental study of the transient response of an isotropic plate. A low mass impact is used to generate the bending wave propagation. Displacements due to the bending wave propagation were assessed using an out-of-plane double pulse TV holography set-up. A PZT transducer is used to record the impact force and its temporal evolution. A novel experimental technique is presented for determination of the stress field in the plate using the out-of-plane ...

  4. Propagation of plane waves in poroviscoelastic anisotropic media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.K.Vashishth,M.D.Sharma

    2008-01-01

    This study discusses wave propagation in perhaps the most general model of a poroelastic medium.The medium is considered as a viscoelastic,anisotropic and porous solid frame such that its pores of anisotropic permeability are filled with a viscous fluid.The anisotropy considered is of general type,and the attenuating waves in the medium are treated as the inhomogeneous waves.The complex slowness vector is resolved to define the phase velocity,homogeneous attenuation,inhomogeneous attenuation,and angle of attenuation for each of the four attenuating waves in the medium.A non-dimensional parameter measures the deviation of an inhomogeneous wave from its homogeneous version.An numerical model of a North-Sea sandstone is used to analyze the effects of the propagation direction,inhomogeneity parameter,frequency regime,anisotropy symmetry,anelasticity of the frame,and viscosity of the pore-fluid on the propagation characteristics of waves in such a medium.

  5. Numerical simulation for explosion wave propagation of combustible mixture gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng; NING Jian-guo; MA Tian-bao

    2008-01-01

    A two-dimensional multi-material code was indigenously developed to investigate the effects of duct boundary conditions and ignition positions on the propagation law of explosion wave for hydrogen and methane-based combustible mixture gas. In the code, Young's technique was employed to track the interface between the explosion products and air, and combustible function model was adopted to simulate ignition process. The code was employed to study explosion flow field inside and outside the duct and to obtain peak pressures in different boundary conditions and ignition positions. Numerical results suggest that during the propagation in a duct, for point initiation, the curvature of spherical wave front gradually decreases and evolves into plane wave. Due to the multiple reflections on the duct wall, multi-peak values appear on pressure-time curve, and peak pressure strongly relies on the duct boundary conditions and ignition position. When explosive wave reaches the exit of the duct, explosion products expand outward and forms shock wave in air. Multiple rarefaction waves also occur and propagate upstream along the duct to decrease the pressure in the duct. The results are in agreement with one-dimensional isentropic gas flow theory of the explosion products, and indicate that the ignition model and multi-material interface treatment method are feasible.

  6. Effect of fuel stratification on detonation wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masselot, Damien; Fievet, Romain; Raman, Venkat

    2016-11-01

    Rotating detonation engines (RDEs) form a class of pressure-gain combustion systems of higher efficiency compared to conventional gas turbine engines. One of the key features of the design is the injection system, as reactants need to be continuously provided to the detonation wave to sustain its propagation speed. As inhomogeneities in the reactant mixture can perturb the detonation wave front, premixed fuel jet injectors might seem like the most stable solution. However, this introduces the risk of the detonation wave propagating through the injector, causing catastrophic failure. On the other hand, non-premixed fuel injection will tend to quench the detonation wave near the injectors, reducing the likelihood of such failure. Still, the effects of such non-premixing and flow inhomogeneities ahead of a detonation wave have yet to be fully understood and are the object of this study. A 3D channel filled with O2 diluted in an inert gas with circular H2 injectors is simulated as a detonation wave propagates through the system. The impact of key parameters such as injector spacing, injector size, mixture composition and time variations will be discussed. PhD Candidate.

  7. Stress Wave Propagation in Two-dimensional Buckyball Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Zheng, Bowen

    2016-11-01

    Orderly arrayed granular crystals exhibit extraordinary capability to tune stress wave propagation. Granular system of higher dimension renders many more stress wave patterns, showing its great potential for physical and engineering applications. At nanoscale, one-dimensionally arranged buckyball (C60) system has shown the ability to support solitary wave. In this paper, stress wave behaviors of two-dimensional buckyball (C60) lattice are investigated based on square close packing and hexagonal close packing. We show that the square close packed system supports highly directional Nesterenko solitary waves along initially excited chains and hexagonal close packed system tends to distribute the impulse and dissipates impact exponentially. Results of numerical calculations based on a two-dimensional nonlinear spring model are in a good agreement with the results of molecular dynamics simulations. This work enhances the understanding of wave properties and allows manipulations of nanoscale lattice and novel design of shock mitigation and nanoscale energy harvesting devices.

  8. Acoustoelastic Lamb wave propagation in biaxially stressed plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Navneet; Michaels, Jennifer E; Lee, Sang Jun

    2012-09-01

    Acoustoelasticity, or the change in elastic wave speeds with stress, is a well-studied phenomenon for bulk waves. The effect of stress on Lamb waves is not as well understood, although it is clear that anisotropic stresses will produce anisotropy in the Lamb wave dispersion curves. Here the theory of acoustoelastic Lamb wave propagation is developed for isotropic media subjected to a biaxial, homogeneous stress field. It is shown that, as expected, dispersion curves change anisotropically for most stresses, modes, and frequencies. Interestingly, for some mode-frequency combinations, changes in phase velocity are isotropic even for a biaxial stress field. Theoretical predictions are compared to experimental results for several Lamb wave modes and frequencies for uniaxial loads applied to an aluminum plate, and the agreement is reasonably good.

  9. Wave Propagation through Axially Symmetric Dielectric Shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    1-8 2..2 Sc lr .o en i.. . . . . ..........eo oe e .eoe. o. eeeeo. oo....... 2 1 1.2 Baekground: Analytical Methods Based on Flat Sheet Appr oatei...Fields Near a Radome Consist of Constituent Waves. 1-2 - -t . -__-_-_-_-_-_-_..._._._._._._. 1.2 BACKGROUND: ANALYTICAL METHODS BASED ON FLAT SHEET...2.4.2. So A2 ikR x (4 ) = (K-1) E feik Cos2 dado dz (2-100) x 2 R2 o where = (aa - ap cos - zz’) R - 1 (2-101) and -11 = [6 (a+6p)-6 (a-6p)-a 1. (2

  10. Whistler wave generation by non-gyrotropic, relativistic, electron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Skender, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Particle-in-cell code, EPOCH, is used for studying features of the wave component evident to propagate backwards from the front of the non-gyrotropic, relativistic beam of electrons injected in the Maxwellian, magnetised background plasma with decreasing density profile. According to recent findings presented in Tsiklauri (2011), Schmitz & Tsiklauri (2013) and Pechhacker & Tsiklauri (2012), in a 1.5-dimensional magnetised plasma system, the non-gyrotropic beam generates freely escaping electromagnetic radiation with properties similar to the Type-III solar radio bursts. In this study the backwards propagating wave component evident in the perpendicular components of the elecromagnetic field in such a system is presented for the first time. Background magnetic field strength in the system is varied in order to prove that the backwards propagating wave's frequency, prescribed by the whistler wave dispersion relation, is proportional to the specified magnetic field. Moreover, the identified whistlers are...

  11. Frozen Gaussian approximation for three-dimensional seismic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Lihui; Tong, Ping; Yang, Xu

    2016-09-01

    We present a systematic introduction on applying frozen Gaussian approximation (FGA) to compute synthetic seismograms in three-dimensional earth models. In this method, seismic wavefield is decomposed into frozen (fixed-width) Gaussian functions, which propagate along ray paths. Rather than the coherent state solution to the wave equation, this method is rigorously derived by asymptotic expansion on phase plane, with analysis of its accuracy determined by the ratio of short wavelength over large domain size. Similar to other ray-based beam methods (e.g. Gaussian beam methods), one can use relatively small number of Gaussians to get accurate approximations of high-frequency wavefield. The algorithm is embarrassingly parallel, which can drastically speed up the computation with a multicore-processor computer station. We illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method by comparing it to the spectral element method for a three-dimensional (3D) seismic wave propagation in homogeneous media, where one has the analytical solution as a benchmark. As another proof of methodology, simulations of high-frequency seismic wave propagation in heterogeneous media are performed for 3D waveguide model and smoothed Marmousi model respectively. The second contribution of this paper is that, we incorporate the Snell's law into the FGA formulation, and asymptotically derive reflection, transmission and free surface conditions for FGA to compute high-frequency seismic wave propagation in high contrast media. We numerically test these conditions by computing traveltime kernels of different phases in the 3D crust-over-mantle model.

  12. Frozen Gaussian approximation for 3-D seismic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Lihui; Tong, Ping; Yang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    We present a systematic introduction on applying frozen Gaussian approximation (FGA) to compute synthetic seismograms in 3-D earth models. In this method, seismic wavefield is decomposed into frozen (fixed-width) Gaussian functions, which propagate along ray paths. Rather than the coherent state solution to the wave equation, this method is rigorously derived by asymptotic expansion on phase plane, with analysis of its accuracy determined by the ratio of short wavelength over large domain size. Similar to other ray-based beam methods (e.g. Gaussian beam methods), one can use relatively small number of Gaussians to get accurate approximations of high-frequency wavefield. The algorithm is embarrassingly parallel, which can drastically speed up the computation with a multicore-processor computer station. We illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method by comparing it to the spectral element method for a 3-D seismic wave propagation in homogeneous media, where one has the analytical solution as a benchmark. As another proof of methodology, simulations of high-frequency seismic wave propagation in heterogeneous media are performed for 3-D waveguide model and smoothed Marmousi model, respectively. The second contribution of this paper is that, we incorporate the Snell's law into the FGA formulation, and asymptotically derive reflection, transmission and free surface conditions for FGA to compute high-frequency seismic wave propagation in high contrast media. We numerically test these conditions by computing traveltime kernels of different phases in the 3-D crust-over-mantle model.

  13. Normal Wave Propagation Velocity in a Static Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    34 " " ’ . " . " . " " . " , " " . " -" " " " . " " . " " " " . " * . - " " " , 4 . " . " . " " " . " " "." "-" "." " . . . . . " " " " -w A- INah . . . . . . - - 1 NORMAL WAVE PROPAGATION VELOCITY IN A STATIC WEB By

  14. Chiral metamaterials characterisation using the wave propagation retrieval method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation we extend the wave propagation method for the retrieval of the effective properties to the case of chiral metamaterials with circularly polarised eigenwaves. The method is unambiguous, simple and provides bulk effective parameters. Advantages and constraints are discussed...

  15. Transient Topology Optimization of Two-Dimensional Elastic Wave Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, René; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    A tapering device coupling two monomodal waveguides is designed with the topology optimization method based on transient wave propagation. The gradient-based optimization technique is applied to predict the material distribution in the tapering area such that the squared output displacement (a...

  16. Seismic wave propagation in fractured media: A discontinuous Galerkin approach

    KAUST Repository

    De Basabe, Jonás D.

    2011-01-01

    We formulate and implement a discontinuous Galekin method for elastic wave propagation that allows for discontinuities in the displacement field to simulate fractures or faults using the linear- slip model. We show numerical results using a 2D model with one linear- slip discontinuity and different frequencies. The results show a good agreement with analytic solutions. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  17. Late time tail of wave propagation on curved spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Ching, E S C; Suen, W M; Young, K; Ching, E S C; Leung, P T; Suen, W M; Young, K

    1994-01-01

    The late time behavior of waves propagating on a general curved spacetime is studied. The late time tail is not necessarily an inverse power of time. Our work extends, places in context, and provides understanding for the known results for the Schwarzschild spacetime. Analytic and numerical results are in excellent agreement.

  18. Chiral metamaterials characterisation using the wave propagation retrieval method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation we extend the wave propagation method for the retrieval of the effective properties to the case of chiral metamaterials with circularly polarised eigenwaves. The method is unambiguous, simple and provides bulk effective parameters. Advantages and constraints are discussed...

  19. Plane-Wave Propagation in Extreme Magnetoelectric (EME) Media

    CERN Document Server

    Lindell, I V; Favaro, A

    2016-01-01

    The extreme magnetoelectric medium (EME medium) is defined in terms of two medium dyadics, $\\alpha$, producing electric polarization by the magnetic field and $\\beta$, producing magnetic polarization by the electric field. Plane-wave propagation of time-harmonic fields of fixed finite frequency in the EME medium is studied. It is shown that (if $\\omega\

  20. Wave propagation in turbulent media: use of convergence acceleration methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram, A; Tsadka, S; Azar, Z; Tur, M

    1988-06-01

    We propose the use of convergence acceleration methods for the evaluation of integral expressions of an oscillatory nature, often encountered in the study of optical wave propagation in the turbulent atmosphere. These techniques offer substantial savings in computation time with appreciable gain in accuracy. As an example, we apply the Levin u acceleration scheme to the problem of remote sensing of transversal wind profiles.

  1. Statistical characterization of wave propagation in mine environments

    KAUST Repository

    Bakir, Onur

    2012-07-01

    A computational framework for statistically characterizing electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation through mine tunnels and galleries is presented. The framework combines a multi-element probabilistic collocation (ME-PC) method with a novel domain-decomposition (DD) integral equation-based EM simulator to obtain statistics of electric fields due to wireless transmitters in realistic mine environments. © 2012 IEEE.

  2. Directional bending wave propagation in periodically perforated plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Erik; Manktelow, Kevin; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    We report on the investigation of wave propagation in a periodically perforated plate. A unit cell with double-C perforations is selected as a test article suitable to investigate two-dimensional dispersion characteristics, group velocities, and internal resonances. A numerical model, formulated ...

  3. Coupling 3d Tsunami Generation With Boussinesq Tsunami Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, P.; Grilli, S. T.; Kirby, J. T.

    A general recognition of landslide tsunami hazards has recently led to a proliferation of landslide tsunami models with widely varying assumptions and capabilities. We develop a two part simulation technique that makes few fluid dynamic assumptions so that we can examine the sensitivity of landslide tsunami events to geological param- eters. Tsunami generation of underwater landslide tsunamis is currently being simu- lated with a fully nonlinear, higher order, three-dimensional (3D) Boundary Element Method (BEM) model at the University of Rhode Island. Likewise, wave propagation and runup is currently being simulated with a fully nonlinear Boussinesq model called FUNWAVE at the University of Delaware's Center for Applied Coastal Research. We demonstrate an exact coupling of the 3D BEM model to FUNWAVE by running the generation model until after landslide motion ceases. The free surface shape and water velocities are then transferred to the Boussinesq model FUNWAVE for wave propaga- tion and runup. We run the coupled models for the 1994 Skagway, Alaska event, the 1998 Papua New Guinea event, and the somewhat more speculative 1812 Santa Bar- bara event. We demonstrate that good agreement is obtained with known observations and measurements, thereby validating our geological description of these events. We also show that the tsunami sources predicted by TOPICS are satisfactory to describe these events. We find that fluid dynamic simulations are sensitive to some geological parameters, indicating a need to refine our geological understanding of underwater landslides.

  4. Wave propagation and shock formation in different magnetic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Centeno, Rebecca; Bueno, Javier Trujillo

    2008-01-01

    Velocity oscillations "measured" simultaneously at the photosphere and the chromosphere -from time series of spectropolarimetric data in the 10830 A region- of different solar magnetic features allow us to study the properties of wave propagation as a function of the magnetic flux of the structure (i.e. two different-sized sunspots, a tiny pore and a facular region). While photospheric oscillations have similar characteristics everywhere, oscillations measured at chromospheric heights show different amplitudes, frequencies and stages of shock development depending on the observed magnetic feature. The analysis of the power and the phase spectra, together with simple theoretical modeling, lead to a series of results concerning wave propagation within the range of heights of this study. We find that, while the atmospheric cut-off frequency and the propagation properties of the different oscillating modes depend on the magnetic feature, in all the cases the power that reaches the high chromosphere above the atmo...

  5. Numerical Analysis of a Blocking Mass Attenuating Wave Propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianzhong Wang; Xiongliang Yao; Qiangyong Wang; Shuai Lv

    2011-01-01

    Based on wave theory,blocking mass impeding propagation of flexural waves was analyzed with force excitation applied on a ship pedestal.The analysis model of a complex structure was developed by combining statistical energy analysis and the finite element method.Based on the hybrid FE-SEA method,the vibro-acoustic response of a complex structure was solved.Then,the sound radiation of a cylindrical shell model influenced by blocking mass was calculated in mid/high frequency.The result shows that blocking mass has an obvious effect on impeding propagation.The study provides a theoretical and experimental basis for application of the blocking mass to structure-borne sound propagation control.

  6. Ionization wave propagation on a micro cavity plasma array

    CERN Document Server

    Wollny, Alexander; Gebhardt, Markus; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Boettner, Henrik; Winter, Joerg; der Gathen, Volker Schulz-von; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Microcavity plasma arrays are regular arrays of inverse pyramidal cavities created on positive doped silicon wafers. Each cavity acts as a microscopic dielectric barrier discharge. Operated at atmospheric pressure in argon and excited with high voltage at about 10 kHz frequency each cavity develops a localized microplasma. Experiments show a strong interaction of the individual cavities, leading to the propagation of wave-like emission structures along the array surface. This paper studies the ignition process of a micro cavity plasma array by means of a numerical simulation and confirms the experimental results. The propagation of an ionization wave is observed. Its propagation speed of 1 km/s matches experimental findings.

  7. Skewon field and cosmic wave propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Wei-Tou

    2013-01-01

    For the study of the gravitational coupling of electromagnetism and the equivalence principle, we have used the spacetime constitutive tensor density {chi}ijkl, and discovered the nonmetric (axion) part (A){chi}ijkl (equal to {phi}eijkl) of {chi}ijkl worthy investigation. Since we have used Lagrangian formalism, {chi}ijkl is effectively symmetric under the interchange of index pairs, ij and kl, and has 21 independent degrees of freedom. Hehl, Obukhov and Rubilar have started from charge-flux formalism to study electromagnetism, discovered the antisymmetric part (Sk){chi}ijkl (15 degrees of freedom) of {chi}ijkl under the interchange of index pairs ij and kl worthy investigation, and called it skewon field. In this paper, we study the propagation of the Hehl-Obukhov-Rubilar skewon field in weak gravity field/dilute matter or with weak violation of the Einstein Equivalence Principle (EEP), and further classify it into Type I and Type II skewons. From the dispersion relation we show that no dissipation/no amplif...

  8. Scattering of relativistic and ultra-relativistic electrons by obliquely propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzbekov, Bogdan; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Orlova, Ksenia

    2016-10-01

    Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves are transverse plasma waves that are generated in the Earth magnetosphere by ring current protons with temperature anisotropy in three different bands: below the H+, He+ and O+ ion gyrofrequencies. EMIC events are enhanced during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm when intensifications in the electric field result in enhanced injections of ions and are usually confined to high-density regions just inside the plasmapause or within drainage plumes. EMIC waves are capable of scattering radiation belt electrons and thus provide an important link between the intensification of the electric field, ion populations, and radiation belt electrons. Bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients computed with the assumption of parallel wave propagation are compared to the results of the code that uses the full cold plasma dispersion relation taking into account oblique propagation of waves and higher-order resonances. We study the sensitivity of the scattering rates to a number of included higher-order resonances, wave spectral distribution parameters, wave normal angle distribution parameters, ambient plasma density, and ion composition. Inaccuracies associated with the neglect of higher-order resonances and oblique propagation of waves are compared to potential errors introduced by uncertainties in the model input parameters.

  9. Optical wave propagation in photonic crystal metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kaisar; Mnaymneh, Khaled; Awad, Hazem; Hasan, Imad; Hall, Trevor

    2014-09-01

    Metamaterials that provide negative refraction can be implemented in photonic crystals (PhCs) through careful design of the devices. Theoretically, we demonstrate that the dispersion can be altered to achieve negative refraction. This can be done through engineering the geometry of the device as well as selecting appropriate materials. The PhC also demonstrates slow light that facilitate sensing chemicals or biological agents. Using metallic materials such as gold nano-particle enables PhCs to guide optical waves in desired pathways. Also using magnetic materials such as highly doped n-GaAs, we can tune the band gap by changing magnetic field. The simulated results are consistent with some of the previously reported experimental results and give us guidance for future experiments.

  10. Enhanced propagation of photon density waves in random amplifying media

    CERN Document Server

    Renthlei, Lalruatfela; Ramakrishna, S A

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate enhanced wave-like character of diffuse photon density waves (DPDW) in an amplifying random medium. The amplifying nature makes it contingent to choose the wave solution that grows inside the amplifying medium, and has a propagation vector pointing opposite to the growth direction. This results in negative refraction of the DPDW at an absorbing-amplifying random medium interface as well as the possibility of supporting "anti"-surface-like modes at the interface. A slab of amplifying random medium sandwiched between two absorbing random media supports waveguide resonances that can be utilized to extend the imaging capabilities of DPDW.

  11. Wave Propagation in Stochastic Spacetimes Localization, Amplification and Particle Creation

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, B L

    1998-01-01

    Here we study novel effects associated with electromagnetic wave propagation in a Robertson-Walker universe and the Schwarzschild spacetime with a small amount of metric stochasticity. We find that localization of electromagnetic waves occurs in a Robertson-Walker universe with time-independent metric stochasticity, while time-dependent metric stochasticity induces exponential instability in the particle production rate. For the Schwarzschild metric, time-independent randomness can decrease the total luminosity of Hawking radiation due to multiple scattering of waves outside the black hole and gives rise to event horizon fluctuations and thus fluctuations in the Hawking temperature.

  12. Wave propagation in a chiral fluid an undergraduate study

    CERN Document Server

    Garel, T

    2003-01-01

    We study the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a chiral fluid, where the molecules are described by a simplified version of the Kuhn coupled oscillator model. The eigenmodes of Maxwell's equations are circularly polarized waves. The application of a static magnetic field further leads to a magnetochiral term in the index of refraction of the fluid, which is independent of the wave polarization. A similar result holds when absorption is taken into account. Interference experiments and photochemical reactions have recently demonstrated the existence of the magnetochiral term. The comparison with Faraday rotation in an achiral fluid emphasizes the different symmetry properties of the two effects.

  13. Analysis of Vibration and Wave Propagation in Cylindrical Grid-Like Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Min Jeong

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The wave propagation in and the vibration of cylindrical grid structures are analyzed. The grids are composed of a sequence of identical elementary cells repeating along the axial and the circumferential direction to form a two-dimensional periodic structure. Two-dimensional periodic structures are characterized by wave propagation patterns that are strongly frequency dependent and highly directional. Their wave propagation characteristics are determined through the analysis of the dynamic properties of the unit cell. Each cell here is modelled as an assembly of curved beam elements, formulated according to a mixed interpolation method. The combined application of this Finite Element formulation and the theory of two-dimensional periodic structures is used to generate the phase constant surfaces, which define, for the considered cell lay-out, the directions of wave propagation at assigned frequencies. In particular, the directions and frequencies corresponding to wave attenuation are evaluated for cells of different size and geometry, in order to identify topologies with attractive wave attenuation and vibration confinement characteristics. The predictions from the analysis of the phase constant surfaces are verified by estimating the forced harmonic response of complete cylindrical grids, obtained through the assembly of the unit cells. The considered analysis provides invaluable guidelines for the investigation of the dynamic properties and for the design of grid stiffened cylindrical shells with unique vibration confinement characteristics.

  14. Surface Wave Propagation in non--ideal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, B P

    2015-01-01

    The properties of surface waves in a partially ionized, compressible magnetized plasma slab are investigated in this work. The waves are affected by the nonideal magnetohydrodynamic effects which causes finite drift of the magnetic field in the medium. When the magnetic field drift is ignored, the characteristics of the wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma fluid is similar to the fully ionized ideal MHD except now the propagation properties depend on the fractional ionization as well as on the compressibility of the medium. The phase velocity of the sausage and kink waves increases marginally (by a few percent) due to the compressibility of the medium in both ideal as well as Hall diffusion dominated regimes. However, unlike ideal regime, only waves below certain cut off frequency can propagate in the medium in Hall dominated regime. This cut off for a thin slab has a weak dependence on the plasma beta whereas for thick slab no such dependence exists. More importantly, since the cut off is introduce...

  15. Experimental and theoretical study of Rayleigh-Lamb wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Wayne P.; Datta, Subhendu K.; Ju, T. H.

    1990-01-01

    Many space structures, such as the Space Station Freedom, contain critical thin-walled components. The structural integrity of thin-walled plates and shells can be monitored effectively using acoustic emission and ultrasonic testing in the Rayleigh-Lamb wave frequency range. A new PVDF piezoelectric sensor has been developed that is well suited to remote, inservice nondestructive evaluation of space structures. In the present study the new sensor was used to investigate Rayleigh-Lamb wave propagation in a plate. The experimental apparatus consisted of a glass plate (2.3 m x 25.4 mm x 5.6 mm) with PVDF sensor (3 mm diam.) mounted at various positions along its length. A steel ball impact served as a simulated acoustic emission source, producing surface waves, shear waves and longitudinal waves with dominant frequencies between 1 kHz and 200 kHz. The experimental time domain wave-forms were compared with theoretical predictions of the wave propagation in the plate. The model uses an analytical solution for the Green's function and the measured response at a single position to predict response at any other position in the plate. Close agreement was found between the experimental and theoretical results.

  16. Second harmonic generation of shear waves in crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenhua; Cao, Wenwu

    2004-02-01

    Nonlinear self-interaction of shear waves in electro-elastic crystals is investigated based on the rotationally invariant state function. Theoretical analyses are conducted for cubic, hexagonal, and trigonal crystals. The calculations show that nonlinear self-interaction of shear waves has some characteristics distinctly different from that of longitudinal waves. First, the process of self-interaction to generate its own second harmonic wave is permitted only in some special wave propagation directions for a shear wave. Second, the geometrical nonlinearity originated from finite strain does not contribute to the second harmonic generation (SHG) of shear waves. Therefore, unlike the case of longitudinal wave, the second-order elastic constants do not involve in the nonlinear parameter of the second harmonic generation of shear waves. Third, unlike the nonlinearity parameter of the longitudinal waves, the nonlinear parameter of the shear wave exhibits strong anisotropy, which is directly related to the symmetry of the crystal. In the calculations, the electromechanical coupling nonlinearity is considered for the 6 mm and 3 m symmetry crystals. Complement to the SHG of longitudinal waves already in use, the SHG of shear waves provides more measurements for the determination of third-order elastic constants of solids. The method is applied to a Z-cut lithium niobate (LiNbO3) crystal, and its third-order elastic constant c444 is determined.

  17. Torsional wave propagation in multiwalled carbon nanotubes using nonlocal elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arda, Mustafa; Aydogdu, Metin

    2016-03-01

    Torsional wave propagation in multiwalled carbon nanotubes is studied in the present work. Governing equation of motion of multiwalled carbon nanotube is obtained using Eringen's nonlocal elasticity theory. The effect of van der Waals interaction coefficient is considered between inner and outer nanotubes. Dispersion relations are obtained and discussed in detail. Effect of nonlocal parameter and van der Waals interaction to the torsional wave propagation behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes is investigated. It is obtained that torsional van der Waals interaction between adjacent tubes can change the rotational direction of multiwalled carbon nanotube as in-phase or anti-phase. The group and escape velocity of the waves converge to a limit value in the nonlocal elasticity approach.

  18. Wave propagation in coated cylinders with reference to fretting fatigue

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Ramesh; Satish V Kailas; K R Y Simha

    2008-06-01

    Fretting fatigue is the phenomenon of crack initiation due to dynamic contact loading, a situation which is commonly encountered in mechanical couplings subjected to vibration. The study of fretting fatigue in high frequency regime has gained importance in recent years. However the stress wave effects at high frequency y loading is scanty in the literature. The objective of present investigation is to study stress wave propagation in cylinders with reference to high frequency fretting. The case of a coated cylinder is considered since coating is often provided to improve tribological properties of the component. Rule of mixtures is proposed to understand the dispersion phenomenon in coated or layered cylinder knowing the dispersion relation for the cases of homogeneous cylinders made of coating and substrate materials separately. The possibility of stress wave propagation at the interface with a particular phase velocity without dispersion is also discussed. Results are given for two different thicknesses of coating.

  19. Quasinormal modes and classical wave propagation in analogue black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, E; Lemos, J P S; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Lemos, Jose' P. S.

    2004-01-01

    Many properties of black holes can be studied using acoustic analogues in the laboratory through the propagation of sound waves. We investigate in detail sound wave propagation in a rotating acoustic (2+1)-dimensional black hole, which corresponds to the ``draining bathtub'' fluid flow. We compute the quasinormal mode frequencies of this system and discuss late-time power-law tails. Due to the presence of an ergoregion, waves in a rotating acoustic black hole can be superradiantly amplified. We also compute reflection coefficients and instability timescales for the acoustic black hole bomb, the equivalent of the Press-Teukolsky black hole bomb. Finally we discuss quasinormal modes and late-time tails in a non-rotating canonical acoustic black hole, corresponding to an incompressible, spherically symmetric (3+1)-dimensional fluid flow.

  20. Internal solitary waves propagating through variable background hydrology and currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Grimshaw, R.; Johnson, E.

    2017-08-01

    Large-amplitude, horizontally-propagating internal wave trains are commonly observed in the coastal ocean, fjords and straits. They are long nonlinear waves and hence can be modelled by equations of the Korteweg-de Vries type. However, typically they propagate through regions of variable background hydrology and currents, and over variable bottom topography. Hence a variable-coefficient Korteweg-de Vries equation is needed to model these waves. Although this equation is now well-known and heavily used, a term representing non-conservative effects, arising from dissipative or forcing terms in the underlying basic state, has usually been omitted. In particular this term arises when the hydrology varies in the horizontal direction. Our purpose in this paper is to examine the possible significance of this term. This is achieved through analysis and numerical simulations, using both a two-layer fluid model and a re-examination of previous studies of some specific ocean cases.

  1. Wave packet propagation across barriers by semiclassical initial value methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jakob; Kay, Kenneth G.

    2015-07-01

    Semiclassical initial value representation (IVR) formulas for the propagator have difficulty describing tunneling through barriers. A key reason is that these formulas do not automatically reduce, in the classical limit, to the version of the Van Vleck-Gutzwiller (VVG) propagator required to treat barrier tunneling, which involves trajectories that have complex initial conditions and that follow paths in complex time. In this work, a simple IVR expression, that has the correct tunneling form in the classical limit, is derived for the propagator in the case of one-dimensional barrier transmission. Similarly, an IVR formula, that reduces to the Generalized Gaussian Wave Packet Dynamics (GGWPD) expression [D. Huber, E. J. Heller, and R. Littlejohn, J. Chem. Phys. 89, 2003 (1988)] in the classical limit, is derived for the transmitted wave packet. Uniform semiclassical versions of the IVR formulas are presented and simplified expressions in terms of real trajectories and WKB penetration factors are described. Numerical tests show that the uniform IVR treatment gives good results for wave packet transmission through the Eckart and Gaussian barriers in all cases examined. In contrast, even when applied with the proper complex trajectories, the VVG and GGWPD treatments are inaccurate when the mean energy of the wave packet is near the classical transmission threshold. The IVR expressions for the propagator and wave packet are cast as contour integrals in the complex space of initial conditions and these are generalized to potentially allow treatment of a larger variety of systems. A steepest descent analysis of the contour integral formula for the wave packet in the present cases confirms its relationship to the GGWPD method, verifies its semiclassical validity, and explains results of numerical calculations.

  2. Topology Optimization for Wave Propagation Problems with Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rasmus Ellebæk

    from acoustics, however problems for TE or TM polarized electromagnetic waves and shear waves in solids in two dimensions may be treated using the proposed methods with minor modifications. A brief introduction to wave problems and to density-based topology optimizationis included, as is a brief......This Thesis treats the development and experimental validation of density-based topology optimization methods for wave propagation problems. Problems in the frequency regime where design dimensions are between approximately one fourth and ten wavelengths are considered. All examples treat problems...... discussion of the finite element method and a hybrid ofa wave based method and the finite element method, used to discretize the modelproblems under consideration. A short discussion of the benefits and drawbacks of applying the hybrid method compared to the finite element method, used in conjunction...

  3. WAVE PROPAGATION IN PIEZOELECTRIC/PIEZOMAGNETIC LAYERED PERIODIC COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Pang; Jinxi Liu; Yuesheng Wang; Daining Fang

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the dynamic behaviors of wave propagation in layered periodic composites consisting of piezoelectric and piezomagnetic phases. The dispersion relations of Lamb waves are derived. Dispersion curves and displacement fields are calculated with different piezoelectric volume fractions. Numerical results for BaTiOa/CoFe204 composites show that the dispersion curves resemble the symmetric Lamb waves in a plate. Exchange between the longitudinal (i.e. thickness) mode and coupled mode takes place at the crossover point between dispersion curves of the first two branches. With the increase of BaTiO3 volume fraction, the crossover point appears at a lower wave number and wave velocity is higher. These findings are useful for magnetoelectric transducer applications.

  4. Effective action approach to wave propagation in scalar QED plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Yuan; Qin, Hong

    2016-01-01

    A relativistic quantum field theory with nontrivial background fields is developed and applied to study waves in plasmas. The effective action of the electromagnetic 4-potential is calculated ab initio from the standard action of scalar QED using path integrals. The resultant effective action is gauge invariant and contains nonlocal interactions, from which gauge bosons acquire masses without breaking the local gauge symmetry. To demonstrate how the general theory can be applied, we study a cold unmagnetized plasma and a cold uniformly magnetized plasma. Using these two examples, we show that all linear waves well-known in classical plasma physics can be recovered from relativistic quantum results when taking the classical limit. In the opposite limit, classical wave dispersion relations are modified substantially. In unmagnetized plasmas, longitudinal waves propagate with nonzero group velocities even when plasmas are cold. In magnetized plasmas, anharmonically spaced Bernstein waves persist even when plasma...

  5. Optical coherence tomography detection of shear wave propagation in MCF7 cell modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Yang, Victor X. D.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using Optical Coherence Elastography (OCE) in MCF7 cell modules (comprised of MCF7 cells and collagen) and based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a piezoelectric transducer transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with an OCT swept source wavelength sweep imaging system. Acoustic radiation force was applied to the MCF7 cell constructs. Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the acoustic radiation force, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these modules. The OCT phase maps are acquired with a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system. We also calculated the tissue mechanical properties based on the propagating shear waves in the MCF7 + collagen phantoms using the Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) of an ultrasound transducer, and measured the shear wave speed with the OCT phase maps. This method lays the foundation for future studies of mechanical property measurements of breast cancer structures, with applications in the study of breast cancer pathologies.

  6. Aquatic manoeuvering with counter-propagating waves: a novel locomotive strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curet, Oscar M.; Patankar, Neelesh A.; Lauder, George V.; MacIver, Malcolm A.

    2011-01-01

    Many aquatic organisms swim by means of an undulating fin. These undulations often form a single wave travelling from one end of the fin to the other. However, when these aquatic animals are holding station or hovering, there is often a travelling wave from the head to the tail, and another moving from the tail to the head, meeting in the middle of the fin. Our study uses a biomimetic fish robot and computational fluid dynamics on a model of a real fish to uncover the mechanics of these inward counter-propagating waves. In addition, we compare the flow structure and upward force generated by inward counter-propagating waves to standing waves, unidirectional waves, and outward counter-propagating waves (i.e. one wave travelling from the middle of the fin to the head, and another wave travelling from the middle of the fin to the tail). Using digital particle image velocimetry to capture the flow structure around the fish robot, and computational fluid dynamics, we show that inward counter-propagating waves generate a clear mushroom-cloud-like flow structure with an inverted jet. The two streams of fluid set up by the two travelling waves ‘collide’ together (forming the mushroom cap) and collect into a narrow jet away from the cap (the mushroom stem). The reaction force from this jet acts to push the body in the opposite direction to the jet, perpendicular to the direction of movement provided by a single travelling wave. This downward jet provides a substantial increase in the perpendicular force when compared with the other types of fin actuation. Animals can thereby move upward if the fin is along the bottom midline of the body (or downward if on top); or left–right if the fins are along the lateral margins. In addition to illuminating how a large number of undulatory swimmers can use elongated fins to move in unexpected directions, the phenomenon of counter-propagating waves provides novel motion capabilities for systems using robotic undulators, an emerging

  7. Bble Size Distribution for Waves Propagating over A Submerged Breakwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Experiments are carried out to study the characteristics of active bubbles entrained by breaking waves as these propagate over an abruptly topographical change or a submerged breakwater. Underwater sounds generated by the entrained air bubbles are detected by a hydrophone connected to a charge amplifier and a data acquisition system. The size distribution of the bubbles is then determined inversely from the received sound frequencies. The sound signals are converted from time domain to time-frequency domain by applying Gabor transform. The number of bubbles with different sizes are counted from the signal peaks in the time-frequency domain. The characteristics of the bubbles are in terms of bubble size spectra, which account for the variation in bubble probability density related to the bubble radius r. The experimental data demonstrate that the bubble probability density function shows a-2.39 power-law scaling with radius for r>0.8 mm, and a-1.11 power law for r<0.8 mm.

  8. Source and listener directivity for interactive wave-based sound propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Ravish; Antani, Lakulish; Kim, Sujeong; Manocha, Dinesh

    2014-04-01

    We present an approach to model dynamic, data-driven source and listener directivity for interactive wave-based sound propagation in virtual environments and computer games. Our directional source representation is expressed as a linear combination of elementary spherical harmonic (SH) sources. In the preprocessing stage, we precompute and encode the propagated sound fields due to each SH source. At runtime, we perform the SH decomposition of the varying source directivity interactively and compute the total sound field at the listener position as a weighted sum of precomputed SH sound fields. We propose a novel plane-wave decomposition approach based on higher-order derivatives of the sound field that enables dynamic HRTF-based listener directivity at runtime. We provide a generic framework to incorporate our source and listener directivity in any offline or online frequency-domain wave-based sound propagation algorithm. We have integrated our sound propagation system in Valve's Source game engine and use it to demonstrate realistic acoustic effects such as sound amplification, diffraction low-passing, scattering, localization, externalization, and spatial sound, generated by wave-based propagation of directional sources and listener in complex scenarios. We also present results from our preliminary user study.

  9. Pressure wave propagation in fluid-filled co-axial elastic tubes. Part 1: Basic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkouk, K; Carpenter, P W; Lucey, A D

    2003-12-01

    Our work is motivated by ideas about the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. This is a serious disease characterized by the appearance of longitudinal cavities within the spinal cord. Its causes are unknown, but pressure propagation is probably implicated. We have developed an inviscid theory for the propagation of pressure waves in co-axial, fluid-filled, elastic tubes. This is intended as a simple model of the intraspinal cerebrospinal-fluid system. Our approach is based on the classic theory for the propagation of longitudinal waves in single, fluid-filled, elastic tubes. We show that for small-amplitude waves the governing equations reduce to the classic wave equation. The wave speed is found to be a strong function of the ratio of the tubes' cross-sectional areas. It is found that the leading edge of a transmural pressure pulse tends to generate compressive waves with converging wave fronts. Consequently, the leading edge of the pressure pulse steepens to form a shock-like elastic jump. A weakly nonlinear theory is developed for such an elastic jump.

  10. Investigation on the propagation process of rotating detonation wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Li; Ma, Hu; Xu, Can; Zhou, Changsheng; Liu, Xiao

    2017-10-01

    Effects of mass flow rate and equivalence ratio on the wave speed performance and instantaneous pressure characteristics of rotating detonation wave are investigated using hydrogen and air mixtures. The interaction between air and fuel manifolds and combustion chamber is also identified. The results show that the rotating detonation waves are able to adapt themselves to the changes of equivalence ratio during the run, the rotating detonation waves decayed gradually and then quenched after the shutdown of reactants supply. The wave speed performance is closely related to the mass flow rate and the pressure ratio of the fuel to air manifolds at different equivalence ratios. The blockage ratio of the air manifold increases with the increasing of the wave speed due to high-pressure detonation products, while increasing of the equivalence ratios will reduce the blockage ratio of the hydrogen manifold. Higher equivalence ratio can enhance the stabilization of the rotating detonation wave and lower equivalence ratio will lead to the large fluctuations of the lap time and instantaneous pressure magnitude. The overpressure of rotating detonation wave is determined by the combination of mass flow rate and equivalence ratio, which increases with the increasing of mass flow rate in the equivalence ratio ranges that the rotating detonation wave propagates stably. The secondary spike in the instantaneous pressure and ionization signals indicates that a shocked mixing zone exists near the fuel injection holes and the reflection of shock in the mixing zone induces the reaction.

  11. Efficient way to convert propagating waves into guided waves via gradient wire structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hong Chen; Luo, Jie; Lai, Yun

    2016-08-01

    We propose a method for the design of gradient wire structures that are capable of converting propagating waves into guided waves along the wire. The conversion process is achieved by imposing an additional wave vector to the scattered waves via the gradient wire structure, such that the wave vector of scattered waves is beyond the wave number in the background medium. Thus, the scattered waves turn into evanescent waves. We demonstrate that two types of gradient wire structures, with either a gradient permittivity and a fixed radius, or a gradient radius and a fixed permittivity, can both be designed to realize such a wave conversion effect. The principle demonstrated in our work has potential applications in various areas including nanophotonics, silicone photonics, and plasmonics.

  12. Linear propagation of pulsatile waves in viscoelastic tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsten, J B; Van Steenhoven, A A; Van Dongen, M E

    1989-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical analysis is made of pulsatile wave propagation in deformable latex tubes as a model of the propagation of pressure pulses in arteries. A quasi one-dimensional linear model is used in which, in particular, attention is paid to the viscous phenomena in fluid and tube wall. The agreement between experimental and theoretical results is satisfactory. It appeared that the viscoelastic behaviour of the tube wall dominates the damping of the pressure pulse. Several linear models are used to describe the wall behaviour. No significant differences between the results of these models were found.

  13. Multi-layer study of wave propagation in sunspots

    CERN Document Server

    Felipe, T; Collados, M; Beck, C

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the propagation of waves in sunspots from the photosphere to the chromosphere using time series of co-spatial Ca II H intensity spectra (including its line blends) and polarimetric spectra of Si I 10827 and the He I 10830 multiplet. From the Doppler shifts of these lines we retrieve the variation of the velocity along the line-of-sight at several heights. Phase spectra are used to obtain the relation between the oscillatory signals. Our analysis reveals standing waves at frequencies lower than 4 mHz and a continuous propagation of waves at higher frequencies, which steepen into shocks in the chromosphere when approaching the formation height of the Ca II H core. The observed non-linearities are weaker in Ca II H than in He I lines. Our analysis suggests that the Ca II H core forms at a lower height than the He I 10830 line: a time delay of about 20 s is measured between the Doppler signal detected at both wavelengths. We fit a model of linear slow magnetoacoustic wave propagation in a stratified at...

  14. Neutrino signal of supernova shock wave propagation:MSW distortion of the spectra and neucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagoe, Shiou; Suzuki, H.; Sumiyoshi, K.; Yamada, H.; Kajino, T.

    We try to limit the neutrino oscillation parameters from the supernova neutrinos by studying the MSW matter effect. The supernova neutrinos are generated in the core and propagate through the envelope. It is pointed out that shock wave propagation has strong influences on the supernova neutrino oscillation through the change of density profile. Using an implicit Lagrangian code for general relativistic spherical hydrodynamics (Ya- mada,1997), we succeeded in calculating propagation of shock waves which are generated by adiabatic collapse of iron cores and pass into the stellar envelopes for more than ˜5s. We examined how the influence of the shock wave appears in the neutrino spectrum, using density profile obtained in our calculation. We confirmed that the influence of the shock wave appears from low-energy side and moves toward high-energy side according to the shock propagation. In addition, we calculated the neutrino signal that will be observed on the earth, and found that this manner of the neutrino signal depends remarkably on the neutrino oscillation parameters. There- fore, there is a possibility of constraining the neutrino oscillation parameters from the supernova neutrino spectrum. Moreover, there is a possibility of finding the influence on the nucleosynthesis by changing the neutrino spectrum.

  15. Waves spontaneously generated by heterogeneity in oscillatory media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaohua; Huang, Xiaodong; Hu, Gang

    2016-05-04

    Wave propagation is an important characteristic for pattern formation and pattern dynamics. To date, various waves in homogeneous media have been investigated extensively and have been understood to a great extent. However, the wave behaviors in heterogeneous media have been studied and understood much less. In this work, we investigate waves that are spontaneously generated in one-dimensional heterogeneous oscillatory media governed by complex Ginzburg-Landau equations; the heterogeneity is modeled by multiple interacting homogeneous media with different system control parameters. Rich behaviors can be observed by varying the control parameters of the systems, whereas the behavior is incomparably simple in the homogeneous cases. These diverse behaviors can be fully understood and physically explained well based on three aspects: dispersion relation curves, driving-response relations, and wave competition rules in homogeneous systems. Possible applications of heterogeneity-generated waves are anticipated.

  16. Propagation of elastic waves in a plate with rough surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Shuwu; ZHANG Hailan

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of Lamb wave propagating in a solid plate with rough surfacesare studied on the basis of small perturbation approximation. The Rayleigh-Lamb frequencyequation expressed with SA matrix is presented. The Rayleigh-Lamb frequency equation fora rough surface plate is different from that for a smooth surface plate, resulting in a smallperturbation Ak on Lamb wave vector k. The imaginary part of Ak gives the attenuationcaused by wave scattering. An experiment is designed to test our theoretical predications.By using wedge-shape pipes, different Lamb wave modes are excited. The signals at differentpositions are received and analyzed to get the dispersion curves and attenuations of differentmodes. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical predications.

  17. Theoretical analysis of the magnetocardiographic pattern for reentry wave propagation in a three-dimensional human heart model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Uk Bin; Kwon, Soon Sung; Kim, Kiwoong; Lee, Yong Ho; Park, Yong Ki; Youn, Chan Hyun; Shim, Eun Bo

    2008-01-01

    We present a computational study of reentry wave propagation using electrophysiological models of human cardiac cells and the associated magnetic field map of a human heart. We examined the details of magnetic field variation and related physiological parameters for reentry waves in two-dimensional (2-D) human atrial tissue and a three-dimensional (3-D) human ventricle model. A 3-D mesh system representing the human ventricle was reconstructed from the surface geometry of a human heart. We used existing human cardiac cell models to simulate action potential (AP) propagation in atrial tissue and 3-D ventricular geometry, and a finite element method and the Galerkin approximation to discretize the 3-D domain spatially. The reentry wave was generated using an S1-S2 protocol. The calculations of the magnetic field pattern assumed a horizontally layered conductor for reentry wave propagation in the 3-D ventricle. We also compared the AP and magnetocardiograph (MCG) magnitudes during reentry wave propagation to those during normal wave propagation. The temporal changes in the reentry wave motion and magnetic field map patterns were also analyzed using two well-known MCG parameters: the current dipole direction and strength. The current vector in a reentry wave forms a rotating spiral. We delineated the magnetic field using the changes in the vector angle during a reentry wave, demonstrating that the MCG pattern can be helpful for theoretical analysis of reentry waves.

  18. Propagation characteristics of converted refracted wave and its application in static correction of converted wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Three-component seismic exploration through P-wave source and three-component geophone is an effective technique used in complicated reservoir exploration. In three-component seismic exploration data processing,one of the difficulties is static correction of converted wave. This paper analyzes propagation characteristics of non-converted and converted refracted waves,and discovers a favor-able condition for the formation of converted refracted wave,i.e. the velocity of overlaying medium S wave is much lower than that of underlying medium S wave. In addition,the paper proposes the static correction method of converted wave based on PPS converted refracted wave,and processes the real three-component seismic data with better results of static correction of converted wave.

  19. Modeling anomalous surface - wave propagation across the Southern Caspian basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priestly, K.F.; Patton, H.J.; Schultz, C.A.

    1998-01-09

    The crust of the south Caspian basin consists of 15-25 km of low velocity, highly attenuating sediment overlying high velocity crystalline crust. The Moho depth beneath the basin is about 30 km as compared to about 50 km in the surrounding region. Preliminary modeling of the phase velocity curves shows that this thick sediments of the south Caspian basin are also under-lain by a 30-35 km thick crystalline crust and not by typical oceanic crust. This analysis also suggest that if the effect of the over-pressuring of the sediments is to reduce Poissons` ratio, the over-pressured sediments observed to approximately 5 km do not persist to great depths. It has been shown since 1960`s that the south Caspian basin blocks the regional phase Lg. Intermediate frequency (0.02-0.04 Hz) fundamental mode Raleigh waves propagating across the basin are also severely attenuated, but the low frequency surface waves are largely unaffected. This attenuation is observed along the both east-to-west and west-to-east great circle paths across the basin, and therefore it cannot be related to a seismograph site effect. We have modeled the response of surface waves in an idealized rendition of the south Caspian basin model using a hybrid normal mode / 2-D finite difference approach. To gain insight into the features of the basin which cause the anomalous surface wave propagation, we have varied parameters of the basin model and computed synthetic record sections to compare with the observed seismograms. We varied the amount of mantel up-warp, the shape of the boundaries, the thickness and shear wave Q of the sediments and mantle, and the depth of the water layer. Of these parameters, the intermediate frequency surface waves are most severely affected by the sediments thickness and shear wave attenuation. fundamental mode Raleigh wave phase velocities measure for paths crossing the basin are extremely low.

  20. Enhanced propagation of photon density waves in random amplifying media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renthlei, Lalruatfela; Wanare, Harshawardhan; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate enhanced wavelike character of diffuse photon density waves (DPDW) in an amplifying random medium. The amplifying nature makes it necessary to choose the wave solution that grows inside the amplifying medium, and has a propagation vector pointing opposite to the growth direction. This results in negative refraction of the DPDW at an absorbing-amplifying random medium interface as well as the possibility of supporting "anti"-surface-like modes at the interface. A slab of an amplifying random medium sandwiched between two absorbing random media supports waveguide resonances that can be utilized to extend the imaging capabilities of DPDW.

  1. Wave propagation in a moving cold magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebenstreit, H.

    1980-03-01

    Polarization relations and dispersion equations are derived for media that are electrically anisotropic in the comoving frame. Three-dimensional calculations for media at rest recover the known dispersion equations, i.e., Astrom's dispersion equation for magnetized cold plasmas and Fresnel's wave normal equation for uniaxial crystals. An analogous four-dimensional calculation yields the generalization to moving media. The dispersion equations so obtained for moving gyrotropic media are then discussed qualitatively for various special media and special directions of wave propagation. Finally, the polarization relations are specialized to media gyrotropic in the comoving frame.

  2. Nonlinear evolution of parallel propagating Alfven waves: Vlasov - MHD simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Nariyuki, Y; Kumashiro, T; Hada, T

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear evolution of circularly polarized Alfv\\'en waves are discussed by using the recently developed Vlasov-MHD code, which is a generalized Landau-fluid model. The numerical results indicate that as far as the nonlinearity in the system is not so large, the Vlasov-MHD model can validly solve time evolution of the Alfv\\'enic turbulence both in the linear and nonlinear stages. The present Vlasov-MHD model is proper to discuss the solar coronal heating and solar wind acceleration by Alfve\\'n waves propagating from the photosphere.

  3. Modelling Acoustic Wave Propagation in Axisymmetric Varying-Radius Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Willatzen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    A computationally fast and accurate model (a set of coupled ordinary differential equations) for fluid sound-wave propagation in infinite axisymmetric waveguides of varying radius is proposed. The model accounts for fluid heat conduction and fluid irrotational viscosity. The model problem is solved...... by expanding solutions in terms of cross-sectional eigenfunctions following Stevenson’s method. A transfer matrix can be easily constructed from simple model responses of a given waveguide and later used in computing the response to any complex wave input. Energy losses due to heat conduction and viscous...

  4. Experimental evidence of Alfven wave propagation in a Gallium alloy

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    10p.; International audience; Experiments with a liquid metal alloy, galinstan, are reported and show clear evidence of Alfvén wave propagation as well as resonance of Alfvén modes. Galinstan is liquid at room temperature, and although its electrical conductivity is not as large as that of liquid sodium or NaK, it has still been possible to study Alfvén waves, thanks to the use of intense magnetic fi elds, up to 13 teslas. The maximal values of Lundquist number, around 60, are similar to that...

  5. Scintillation index of optical wave propagating in turbulent atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rao Rui-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    A concise expression of the scintillation index is proposed for a plane optical wave and a spherical optical wave both propagating in a turbulent atmosphere with a zero inner scale and a finite inner scale under an arbitrary fluc- tuation condition. The expression is based on both the results in the Rytov approximation under a weak fluctuation condition and the numerical results in a strong fluctuation regime. The maximum value of the scintillation index and its corresponding Rytov index axe evaluated. These quantities are affected by the ratio of the turbulence inner scale to the Frcsnel size.

  6. MULTIRESOLUTION SYMPLECTIC SCHEME FOR WAVE PROPAGATION IN COMPLEX MEDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马坚伟; 杨慧珠

    2004-01-01

    A fast adaptive symplectic algorithm named Multiresolution Symplectic Scheme (MSS) was first presented to solve the problem of the wave propagation (WP) in complex media, using the symplectic scheme and Daubechies' compactly supported orthogonal wavelet transform to respectively discretise the time and space dimension of wave equation. The problem was solved in multiresolution symplectic geometry space under the conservative Hamiltonian system rather than the traditional Lagrange system. Due to the fascinating properties of the wavelets and symplectic scheme, MSS is a promising method because of little computational burden, robustness and reality of long-time simulation.

  7. Simulations of shock wave propagation in heterogeneous solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzsch, Jan-Martin; Ivanov, Boris A.; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2002-11-01

    Studies of shock wave propagation in heterogeneous materials are important for the interpretation of impact deformation and impact metamorphism of natural rocks. Reflection, refraction, and interference of shock waves caused by inhomogeneities lead to localised concentrations of pressure, temperature, and deformation rate, and in some cases to phase transitions. We have simulated numerically the shock compression of complex media in selected geometries with the aim of modelling shock recovery experiments and have observed reversible phase transitions in the target, shock heating alone may not be sufficient for the formation of impact melt, but localised shear at material boundaries results in considerable temperature increase which makes partial melting possible.

  8. Numerical modelling of nonlinear full-wave acoustic propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.velasco@ccadet.unam.mx; Rendón, Pablo L., E-mail: pablo.rendon@ccadet.unam.mx [Grupo de Acústica y Vibraciones, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Apartado Postal 70-186, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico)

    2015-10-28

    The various model equations of nonlinear acoustics are arrived at by making assumptions which permit the observation of the interaction with propagation of either single or joint effects. We present here a form of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics which are deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A two-dimensional, finite-volume method using Roe’s linearisation has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. This code, which has been written for parallel execution on a GPU, can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, to parametric acoustic arrays and nonlinear propagation in acoustic waveguides. Examples related to these applications are shown and discussed.

  9. Waves of DNA: Propagating Excitations in Extended Nanoconfined Polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Klotz, Alexander R; Reisner, Walter W

    2016-01-01

    We use a nanofluidic system to investigate the emergence of thermally driven collective phenomena along a single polymer chain. In our approach, a single DNA molecule is confined in a nanofluidic slit etched with arrays of embedded nanocavities; the cavity lattice is designed so that a single chain occupies multiple cavities. Fluorescent video-microscopy data shows that waves of excess fluorescence propagate across the cavity-straddling molecule, corresponding to propagating fluctuations of contour overdensity in the cavities. The waves are quantified by examining the correlation in intensity fluctuations between neighbouring cavities. Correlations grow from an anti-correlated minimum to a correlated maximum before decaying, corresponding to a transfer of contour between neighbouring cavities at a fixed transfer time-scale. The observed dynamics can be modelled using Langevin dynamics simulations and a minimal lattice model of coupled diffusion. This study shows how confinement-based sculpting of the polymer ...

  10. Ultrasonic Guided Wave Propagation through Welded Lap Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrius Jankauskas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research presented here is the investigation of ultrasonic guided wave (UGW propagation through the lap joint welded plates used in the construction of a storage tank floors. The investigations have been performed using numerical simulation by finite element method (FEM and tested by measurement of the transmission losses of the guided waves transmitted through the welded lap joints. Propagation of the symmetric S0 mode in the welded stainless steel plates in the cases of different lap joint overlap width, operation frequency, and additional plate bonding caused by corrosion were investigated. It was shown that the transmission losses of the S0 mode can vary in the range of 2 dB to 8 dB depending on the ratio between lap joint width and wavelength. It was also demonstrated that additional bonding in the overlap zone caused by corrosion can essentially reduce transmission losses.

  11. Wave propagation in non-Gaussian random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Mariano; Calzetta, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    We develop a compact perturbative series for acoustic wave propagation in a medium with a non-Gaussian stochastic speed of sound. We use Martin-Siggia and Rose auxiliary field techniques to render the classical wave propagation problem into a ‘quantum’ field theory one, and then frame this problem within the so-called Schwinger-Keldysh of closed time-path (CTP) formalism. Variation of the so-called two-particle irreducible (2PI) effective action (EA), whose arguments are both the mean fields and the irreducible two point correlations, yields the Schwinger-Dyson and the Bethe-Salpeter equations. We work out the loop expansion of the 2PI CTP EA and show that, in the paradigmatic problem of overlapping spherical intrusions in an otherwise homogeneous medium, non-Gaussian corrections might be much larger than Gaussian ones at the same order of loops.

  12. Fundamentals of Seismic Wave Propagation by Chris Chapman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aster, Richard

    2005-03-01

    The analytic characterization and modeling of seismic wave propagation using ray theory based formulations is a core aspect of seismology with a distinguished and very important history. Fundamentals of Seismic Wave Propagation, by Chris Chapman, provides a mathematically rigorous and substantially complete summary of theory and techniques, with exercises, written at an accessible level for intermediate-to-advanced seismology graduate students and for the general research community. I was particularly pleased to see that much relevant mathematics is well summarized in a valuable ``preliminaries'' section containing mathematical and physics background material, coupled with four focused mathematical Appendices covering relevant integrals, Fourier transforms, ordinary differential equations, and saddle-point methods. This bodes well for the text as a teaching resource.

  13. Love wave propagation in layered magneto- electro-elastic structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An analytical approach was taken to investigate Love wave propagation in a layered magneto-electro-elastic structure, where a piezomagnetic (or piezoelectric) mate-rial thin layer was bonded to a semi-infinite piezoelectric (or piezomagnetic) sub-strate. Both piezoelectric and piezomagnetic ceramics were polarized in the anti-plane (z-axis) direction. The analytical solution of dispersion relations was obtained for magneto-electrically open and short boundary conditions. The phase velocity, group velocity, magneto-electromechanical coupling factor, electric po-tential, and magnetic potential were calculated and discussed in detail. The nu-merical results show that the piezomagnetic effects have remarkable effect on the propagation of Love waves in the layered piezomagnetic/piezoelectric structures.

  14. Love wave propagation in layered magneto-electro-elastic structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU JianKe; JIN XiaoYing; WANG Ji

    2008-01-01

    An analytical approach was taken to investigate Love wave propagation in a layered magneto-electro-elastic structure,where a piezomagnetic (or piezoelectric) mate-rial thin layer was bonded to a semi-infinite piezoelectric (or piezomagnetic) sub-strate.Both piezoelectric and piezomagnetic ceramics were polarized in the anti-plane (z-axis) direction.The analytical solution of dispersion relations was obtained for magneto-electrically open and short boundary conditions.The phase velocity,group velocity,magneto-electromechanical coupling factor,electric po-tential,and magnetic potential were calculated and discussed in detail.The nu-merical results show that the piezomagnetic effects have remarkable effect on the propagation of Love waves in the layered piezomagnetic/piezoelectric structures.

  15. Vertical propagation of baroclinic Kelvin waves along the west coast of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Nethery; D Shankar

    2007-08-01

    A linear, continuously stratified ocean model is used to investigate vertical propagation of remotely forced, baroclinic Kelvin waves along the Indian west coast. The extent of vertical propagation over the length of the coast is found to be an increasing function of the forcing frequency. Simulations show that, over the length of the Indian west coast, vertical propagation is limited at annual and semi-annual periods, but significant at periods shorter than about 120 days. This has two major consequences. First, the depth of subsurface currents associated with these frequencies varies substantially along the coast. Second, baroclinic Kelvin waves generated in the Bay of Bengal at periods shorter than about 120 days have negligible influence on surface currents along the north Indian west coast.

  16. Computational study of nonlinear plasma waves: 1: Simulation model and monochromatic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matda, Y.; Crawford, F. W.

    1974-01-01

    An economical low noise plasma simulation model is applied to a series of problems associated with electrostatic wave propagation in a one-dimensional, collisionless, Maxwellian plasma, in the absence of magnetic field. The model is described and tested, first in the absence of an applied signal, and then with a small amplitude perturbation, to establish the low noise features and to verify the theoretical linear dispersion relation at wave energy levels as low as 0.000,001 of the plasma thermal energy. The method is then used to study propagation of an essentially monochromatic plane wave. Results on amplitude oscillation and nonlinear frequency shift are compared with available theories. The additional phenomena of sideband instability and satellite growth, stimulated by large amplitude wave propagation and the resulting particle trapping, are described.

  17. Wave fields in real media wave propagation in anisotropic, anelastic, porous and electromagnetic media

    CERN Document Server

    Carcione, José M

    2007-01-01

    This book examines the differences between an ideal and a real description of wave propagation, where ideal means an elastic (lossless), isotropic and single-phase medium, and real means an anelastic, anisotropic and multi-phase medium. The analysis starts by introducing the relevant stress-strain relation. This relation and the equations of momentum conservation are combined to give the equation of motion. The differential formulation is written in terms of memory variables, and Biot's theory is used to describe wave propagation in porous media. For each rheology, a plane-wave analysis is performed in order to understand the physics of wave propagation. The book contains a review of the main direct numerical methods for solving the equation of motion in the time and space domains. The emphasis is on geophysical applications for seismic exploration, but researchers in the fields of earthquake seismology, rock acoustics, and material science - including many branches of acoustics of fluids and solids - may als...

  18. Wave propagation of coupled modes in the DNA double helix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabi, C B; Ekobena Fouda, H P [Laboratory of Biophysics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaounde (Cameroon); Mohamadou, A [Condensed Matter Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Douala, PO Box 24157, Douala (Cameroon); Kofane, T C, E-mail: contab408@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Mechanics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2011-03-15

    The remarkable dynamics of waves propagating along the DNA molecule is described by the coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations. We consider both the single and the coupled nonlinear excitation modes and, under numerical simulations of the Peyrard-Bishop model, with the use of realistic values of parameters, their biological implications are studied. Furthermore, the characteristics of the coupled mode solution are discussed and we show that such a solution can describe the local opening observed within the transcription and the replication phenomena.

  19. Design Optimization and Simulation of Wave Propagation in Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-24

    simple-cubic lattices. wave propagation, metamaterials, periodic media, band - gap optimization, semidefinite programming, photonic crystal design...Robust topology optimization of three-dimensional photonic -crystal band - gap structures,” with H. Men, K. Y. K. Lee, J. Peraire, and S. G...crystal structures in order to find optimal omnidirectional band gaps for various symmetry groups, including fcc (including diamond), bcc, and

  20. Wave propagation in fluids models and numerical techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Guinot, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    This second edition with four additional chapters presents the physical principles and solution techniques for transient propagation in fluid mechanics and hydraulics. The application domains vary including contaminant transport with or without sorption, the motion of immiscible hydrocarbons in aquifers, pipe transients, open channel and shallow water flow, and compressible gas dynamics. The mathematical formulation is covered from the angle of conservation laws, with an emphasis on multidimensional problems and discontinuous flows, such as steep fronts and shock waves. Finite

  1. Monograph on propagation of sound waves in curved ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostafinski, Wojciech

    1991-01-01

    After reviewing and evaluating the existing material on sound propagation in curved ducts without flow, it seems strange that, except for Lord Rayleigh in 1878, no book on acoustics has treated the case of wave motion in bends. This monograph reviews the available analytical and experimental material, nearly 30 papers published on this subject so far, and concisely summarizes what has been learned about the motion of sound in hard-wall and acoustically lined cylindrical bends.

  2. Wave propagation in layered anisotropic media with application to composites

    CERN Document Server

    Nayfeh, AH

    1995-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of the dynamic behavior of layered materials in general, and laminated fibrous composites in particular, are presented in this book. The need to understand the microstructural behavior of such classes of materials has brought a new challenge to existing analytical tools. This book explores the fundamental question of how mechanical waves propagate and interact with layered anisotropic media. The chapters are organized in a logical sequence depending upon the complexity of the physical model and its mathematical treatment.

  3. A numerical simulation of nonlinear propagation of gravity wave packet in three-dimension compressible atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Shaoping(吴少平); YI; Fan(易帆)

    2002-01-01

    By using FICE scheme, a numerical simulation of nonlinear propagation of gravity wave packet in three-dimension compressible atmosphere is presented. The whole nonlinear propagation process of the gravity wave packet is shown; the basic characteristics of nonlinear propagation and the influence of the ambient winds on the propagation are analyzed. The results show that FICE scheme can be extended in three-dimension by which the calculation is steady and kept for a long time; the increase of wave amplitude is faster than the exponential increase according to the linear gravity theory; nonlinear propagation makes the horizontal perturbation velocity increase greatly which can lead to enhancement of the local ambient winds; the propagation path and the propagation velocity of energy are different from the results expected by the linear gravity waves theory, the nonlinearity causes the change in propagation characteristics of gravity wave; the ambient winds alter the propagation path and group velocity of gravity wave.

  4. Radio Wave Propagation Handbook for Communication on and Around Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Christian; Golshan, Nasser; Kliore, Arvydas

    2002-01-01

    This handbook examines the effects of the Martian environment on radio wave propagation on Mars and in the space near the planet. The environmental effects include these from the Martian atmosphere, ionosphere, global dust storms, aerosols, clouds, and geomorphologic features. Relevant Martian environmental parameters were extracted from the measurements of Mars missions during the past 30 years, especially from Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor. The results derived from measurements and analyses have been reviewed through an extensive literature search. The updated parameters have been theoretically analyzed to study their effects on radio propagation. This handbook also provides basic information about the entire telecommunications environment on and around Mars for propagation researchers, system engineers, and link analysts. Based on these original analyses, some important recommendations have been made, including the use of the Martian ionosphere as a reflector for Mars global or trans-horizon communication between future Martian colonies, reducing dust storm scattering effects, etc. These results have extended our wave propagation knowledge to a planet other than Earth; and the tables, models, and graphics included in this handbook will benefit telecommunication system engineers and scientific researchers.

  5. FORWARD MODELING OF PROPAGATING SLOW WAVES IN CORONAL LOOPS AND THEIR FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT DAMPING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Sudip; Banerjee, Dipankar [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India); Magyar, Norbert; Yuan, Ding; Doorsselaere, Tom Van, E-mail: sudip@iiap.res.in [Center for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, bus 2400, B-3001, Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-03-20

    Propagating slow waves in coronal loops exhibit a damping that depends upon the frequency of the waves. In this study we aim to investigate the relationship of the damping length (L{sub d}) with the frequency of the propagating wave. We present a 3D coronal loop model with uniform density and temperature and investigate the frequency-dependent damping mechanism for the four chosen wave periods. We include the thermal conduction to damp the waves as they propagate through the loop. The numerical model output has been forward modeled to generate synthetic images of SDO/AIA 171 and 193 Å channels. The use of forward modeling, which incorporates the atomic emission properties into the intensity images, allows us to directly compare our results with the real observations. The results show that the damping lengths vary linearly with the periods. We also measure the contributions of the emission properties on the damping lengths by using density values from the simulation. In addition to that we have also calculated the theoretical dependence of L{sub d} with wave periods and showed that it is consistent with the results we obtained from the numerical modeling and earlier observations.

  6. Lamb waves propagation in layered piezoelectric/piezomagnetic plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzin, Hamdi; Ben Amor, Morched; Ben Ghozlen, Mohamed Hédi

    2017-04-01

    A dynamic solution is presented for the propagation of harmonic waves in magneto-electro-elastic plates composed of piezoelectric BaTiO3(B) and magnetostrictive CoFe2O4(F) material. The state-vector approach is employed to derive the propagator matrix which connects the field variables at the upper interface to those at the lower interface of each layer. The ordinary differential approach is employed to determine the wave propagating characteristics in the plate by imposing the traction-free boundary condition on the top and bottom surfaces of the layered plate. The dispersion curves of the piezoelectric-piezomagnetic plate are shown for different thickness ratios. The numerical results show clearly the influence of different stacking sequences as well as thickness ratio on dispersion curves and on magneto-electromechanical coupling factor. These findings could be relevant to the analysis and design of high-performance surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices constructed from piezoelectric and piezomagnetic materials.

  7. Review Article: MHD Wave Propagation Near Coronal Null Points of Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, J. A.; Hood, A. W.; de Moortel, I.

    2011-07-01

    We present a comprehensive review of MHD wave behaviour in the neighbourhood of coronal null points: locations where the magnetic field, and hence the local Alfvén speed, is zero. The behaviour of all three MHD wave modes, i.e. the Alfvén wave and the fast and slow magnetoacoustic waves, has been investigated in the neighbourhood of 2D, 2.5D and (to a certain extent) 3D magnetic null points, for a variety of assumptions, configurations and geometries. In general, it is found that the fast magnetoacoustic wave behaviour is dictated by the Alfvén-speed profile. In a β=0 plasma, the fast wave is focused towards the null point by a refraction effect and all the wave energy, and thus current density, accumulates close to the null point. Thus, null points will be locations for preferential heating by fast waves. Independently, the Alfvén wave is found to propagate along magnetic fieldlines and is confined to the fieldlines it is generated on. As the wave approaches the null point, it spreads out due to the diverging fieldlines. Eventually, the Alfvén wave accumulates along the separatrices (in 2D) or along the spine or fan-plane (in 3D). Hence, Alfvén wave energy will be preferentially dissipated at these locations. It is clear that the magnetic field plays a fundamental role in the propagation and properties of MHD waves in the neighbourhood of coronal null points. This topic is a fundamental plasma process and results so far have also lead to critical insights into reconnection, mode-coupling, quasi-periodic pulsations and phase-mixing.

  8. Modeling and measurement of angle-beam wave propagation in a scatterer-free plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2017-02-01

    Wavefield imaging has been shown to be a powerful tool for improving the understanding and characterization of wave propagation and scattering in plates. The complete measurement of surface displacement over a 2-D grid provided by wavefield imaging has the potential to serve as a useful means of validating ultrasonic models. Here, a preliminary study of ultrasonic angle-beam wave propagation in a scatterer-free plate using a combination of wavefield measurements and 2-D finite element models is described. Both wavefield imaging and finite element analysis are used to study the propagation of waves at a refracted angle of 56.8° propagating in a 6.35 mm thick aluminum plate. Wavefield imaging is performed using a laser vibrometer mounted on an XYZ scanning stage, which is programmed to move point-to-point on a rectilinear grid to acquire waveform data. The commercial finite element software package, PZFlex, which is specifically designed to handle large, complex ultrasonic problems, is used to create a 2-D cross-sectional model of the transducer and plate. For model validation, vertical surface displacements from both the wavefield measurements and the PZFlex finite element model are compared and found to be in excellent agreement. The validated PZFlex model is then used to explain the mechanism of Rayleigh wave generation by the angle-beam wedge. Since the wavefield measurements are restricted to the specimen surface, the cross-sectional PZFlex model is able to provide insights the wavefield data cannot. This study illustrates how information obtained from ultrasonic experiments and modeling results can be combined to improve understanding of angle-beam wave generation and propagation.

  9. Three-Dimensional Propagation of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in the Solar Chromosphere and Corona

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李波; 郑惠南; 王水

    2002-01-01

    We study the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave propagation in the solar atmosphere consisting of the chromosphere and corona. Pressure enhancement and velocity shear are implemented simultaneously at the bottom of the chromosphere. The global propagation of the incurred MHD waves, including fast-mode and slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves as well as Alfvén wave, can be identified. Wave front positions obtained numerically with respect to specific waves fit well with those calculated with local MHD wave speeds.

  10. Study on the electromagnetic waves propagation characteristics in partially ionized plasma slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Bin Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Propagation characteristics of electromagnetic (EM waves in partially ionized plasma slabs are studied in this paper. Such features are significant to applications in plasma antennas, blackout of re-entry flying vehicles, wave energy injection to plasmas, and etc. We in this paper developed a theoretical model of EM wave propagation perpendicular to a plasma slab with a one-dimensional density inhomogeneity along propagation direction to investigate essential characteristics of EM wave propagation in nonuniform plasmas. Particularly, the EM wave propagation in sub-wavelength plasma slabs, where the geometric optics approximation fails, is studied and in comparison with thicker slabs where the geometric optics approximation applies. The influences of both plasma and collisional frequencies, as well as the width of the plasma slab, on the EM wave propagation characteristics are discussed. The results can help the further understanding of propagation behaviours of EM waves in nonuniform plasma, and applications of the interactions between EM waves and plasmas.

  11. Mitigation and propagation of sound generated by heavy weapons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, F. van den; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    Much environmental research is performed on predicting the noise impact of heavy weapons or explosives, as the shock waves can propagate over large distances. In the densely populated area of the Netherlands this is of particular interest for the Ministry of Defense. In one research program the miti

  12. Voltage amplification of thermopower waves via current crowding at high resistances in self-propagating combustion waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Taehan; Hwang, Hayoung; Cho, Yonghwan; Shin, Dongjoon; Choi, Wonjoon

    2015-07-01

    Combustion wave propagation in micro/nanostructured materials generates a chemical-thermal-electrical energy conversion, which enables the creation of an unusual source of electrical energy, called a thermopower wave. In this paper, we report that high electrical resistance regimes would significantly amplify the output voltage of thermopower waves, because the current crowding creates a narrow path for charge carrier transport. We show that the structurally defective regions in the hybrid composites of chemical fuels and carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays determine both the resistance levels of the hybrid composites and the corresponding output voltage of thermopower waves. A sudden acceleration of the crowded charges would be induced by the moving reaction front of the combustion wave when the supplied driving force overcomes the potential barrier to cause charge carrier transport over the defective region. This property is investigated experimentally for the locally manipulated defective areas using diverse methods. In this study, thermopower waves in CNT-based hybrid composites are able to control the peak voltages in the range of 10-1000 mV by manipulating the resistance from 10 Ω to 100 kΩ. This controllable voltage generation from thermopower waves may enable applications using the combustion waves in micro/nanostructured materials and better understanding of the underlying physics.

  13. A Kinetic Approach to Propagation and Stability of Detonation Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, R.; Bianchi, M. Pandolfi; Soares, A. J.

    2008-12-01

    The problem of the steady propagation and linear stability of a detonation wave is formulated in the kinetic frame for a quaternary gas mixture in which a reversible bimolecular reaction takes place. The reactive Euler equations and related Rankine-Hugoniot conditions are deduced from the mesoscopic description of the process. The steady propagation problem is solved for a Zeldovich, von Neuman and Doering (ZND) wave, providing the detonation profiles and the wave thickness for different overdrive degrees. The one-dimensional stability of such detonation wave is then studied in terms of an initial value problem coupled with an acoustic radiation condition at the equilibrium final state. The stability equations and their initial data are deduced from the linearized reactive Euler equations and related Rankine-Hugoniot conditions through a normal mode analysis referred to the complex disturbances of the steady state variables. Some numerical simulations for an elementary reaction of the hydrogen-oxygen chain are proposed in order to describe the time and space evolution of the instabilities induced by the shock front perturbation.

  14. Low frequency piezoresonance defined dynamic control of terahertz wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Moumita; Betal, Soutik; Peralta, Xomalin G.; Bhalla, Amar S.; Guo, Ruyan

    2016-11-01

    Phase modulators are one of the key components of many applications in electromagnetic and opto-electric wave propagations. Phase-shifters play an integral role in communications, imaging and in coherent material excitations. In order to realize the terahertz (THz) electromagnetic spectrum as a fully-functional bandwidth, the development of a family of efficient THz phase modulators is needed. Although there have been quite a few attempts to implement THz phase modulators based on quantum-well structures, liquid crystals, or meta-materials, significantly improved sensitivity and dynamic control for phase modulation, as we believe can be enabled by piezoelectric-resonance devices, is yet to be investigated. In this article we provide an experimental demonstration of phase modulation of THz beam by operating a ferroelectric single crystal LiNbO3 film device at the piezo-resonance. The piezo-resonance, excited by an external a.c. electric field, develops a coupling between electromagnetic and lattice-wave and this coupling governs the wave propagation of the incident THz beam by modulating its phase transfer function. We report the understanding developed in this work can facilitate the design and fabrication of a family of resonance-defined highly sensitive and extremely low energy sub-millimeter wave sensors and modulators.

  15. Surface characters of internal waves generated by Rankine ovoid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoting Xu; Xu Chen; Izolda V. Sturova

    2006-01-01

    A linear theory on the internal waves generated in the stratified fluid with a pycnocline is presented in this paper. The internal wave fields such as the velocity fields in the stratified fluid and velocity gradient fields at the free surface are also investigated by means of the theoretical and numerical method. From the numerical results, it is shown that the internal wave generated by horizontally moving Rankine ovoid is a sort of trapped wave which propagates in a wave guide, and its waveform is a kind of Mach front-type internal wave in the pycnocline. Influence of the internal wave on the flow fields at the free surface is represented by the velocity gradient fields resulted from the internal waves generated by motion of the Rankine ovoid. At the same time, it is also shown that under the hypothesis of inviscid fluid, the synchronism between the surface velocity gradient fields at the free surface and the internal wave fields in the fluid is retained. This theory opens a possibility to study further the modulated spectrum of the Bragg waves at the free surface.

  16. Spectral-element Seismic Wave Propagation on CUDA/OpenCL Hardware Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, D. B.; Videau, B.; Pouget, K.; Komatitsch, D.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wave propagation codes are essential tools to investigate a variety of wave phenomena in the Earth. Furthermore, they can now be used for seismic full-waveform inversions in regional- and global-scale adjoint tomography. Although these seismic wave propagation solvers are crucial ingredients to improve the resolution of tomographic images to answer important questions about the nature of Earth's internal processes and subsurface structure, their practical application is often limited due to high computational costs. They thus need high-performance computing (HPC) facilities to improving the current state of knowledge. At present, numerous large HPC systems embed many-core architectures such as graphics processing units (GPUs) to enhance numerical performance. Such hardware accelerators can be programmed using either the CUDA programming environment or the OpenCL language standard. CUDA software development targets NVIDIA graphic cards while OpenCL was adopted by additional hardware accelerators, like e.g. AMD graphic cards, ARM-based processors as well as Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. For seismic wave propagation simulations using the open-source spectral-element code package SPECFEM3D_GLOBE, we incorporated an automatic source-to-source code generation tool (BOAST) which allows us to use meta-programming of all computational kernels for forward and adjoint runs. Using our BOAST kernels, we generate optimized source code for both CUDA and OpenCL languages within the source code package. Thus, seismic wave simulations are able now to fully utilize CUDA and OpenCL hardware accelerators. We show benchmarks of forward seismic wave propagation simulations using SPECFEM3D_GLOBE on CUDA/OpenCL GPUs, validating results and comparing performances for different simulations and hardware usages.

  17. Characteristics of Plane Wave Propagation in Biaxially Anisotropic Gyrotropic Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Wei-Tao; LIU Song-Hua; QIU Zhi-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves at the interface between an isotropic regular medium and a biaxially anisotropic gyrotropic medium are investigated.The results indicate that the reflection and refract ionproperties of electromagnetic waves are closely dependent on the dispersion relation of the gyrotropic media,and that anomalous total reflection and negative refraction may occur.The existence conditions of total transmission are also considered.It is found that total transmission arises when the TE-polarized incident waves are normal to the interface and the physical parameters of the two media are chosen properly,which are quite different from the existence conditions of total transmission at the anisotropic left-handed material interface.Numerical resul tsare given to validate our theoretical analysis.

  18. Modal decomposition of a propagating matter wave via electron ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, S.; Kok, P.; Li, P.; Maiden, A. M.; Rodenburg, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    We employ ptychography, a phase-retrieval imaging technique, to show experimentally that a partially coherent high-energy matter (electron) wave emanating from an extended source can be decomposed into a set of mutually independent modes of minimal rank. Partial coherence significantly determines the optical transfer properties of an electron microscope and so there has been much work on this subject. However, previous studies have employed forms of interferometry to determine spatial coherence between discrete points in the wave field. Here we use the density matrix to derive a formal quantum mechanical description of electron ptychography and use it to measure a full description of the spatial coherence of a propagating matter wave field, at least within the fundamental uncertainties of the measurements we can obtain.

  19. Wave propagation in pantographic 2D lattices with internal discontinuities

    CERN Document Server

    Madeo, A; Neff, P

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper we consider a 2D pantographic structure composed by two orthogonal families of Euler beams. Pantographic rectangular 'long' waveguides are considered in which imposed boundary displacements can induce the onset of traveling (possibly non-linear) waves. We performed numerical simulations concerning a set of dynamically interesting cases. The system undergoes large rotations which may involve geometrical non-linearities, possibly opening the path to appealing phenomena such as propagation of solitary waves. Boundary conditions dramatically influence the transmission of the considered waves at discontinuity surfaces. The theoretical study of this kind of objects looks critical, as the concept of pantographic 2D sheets seems to have promising possible applications in a number of fields, e.g. acoustic filters, vascular prostheses and aeronautic/aerospace panels.

  20. Scholte waves generated by seafloor topography

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Yingcai; Liu, Jing; Fehler, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Seafloor topography can excite strong interface waves called Scholte waves that are often dispersive and characterized by slow propagation but large amplitude. This type of wave can be used to invert for near seafloor shear wave velocity structure that is important information for multi-component P-S seismic imaging. Three different approaches are taken to understand excitation of Scholte waves and numerical aspects of modeling Scholte waves, including analytical Cagniard-de Hoop analysis, the boundary integral method and a staggered grid finite difference method. For simple media for which the Green's function can be easily computed, the boundary element method produces accurate results. The finite difference method shows strong numerical artifacts and stagnant artificial waves can be seen in the vicinity of topography at the fluid-solid interface even when using fine computational grids. However, the amplitude of these artificial waves decays away from the seafloor. It is sensible to place receivers away fr...

  1. Higher order acoustoelastic Lamb wave propagation in stressed plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Ning; Bond, Leonard J

    2016-11-01

    Modeling and experiments are used to investigate Lamb wave propagation in the direction perpendicular to an applied stress. Sensitivity, in terms of changes in velocity, for both symmetrical and anti-symmetrical modes was determined. Codes were developed based on analytical expressions for waves in loaded plates and they were used to give wave dispersion curves. The experimental system used a pair of compression wave transducers on variable angle wedges, with set separation, and variable frequency tone burst excitation, on an aluminum plate 0.16 cm thick with uniaxial applied loads. The loads, which were up to 600 με, were measured using strain gages. Model results and experimental data are in good agreement. It was found that the change in Lamb wave velocity, due to the acoustoelastic effect, for the S1 mode exhibits about ten times more sensitive, in terms of velocity change, than the traditional bulk wave measurements, and those performed using the fundamental Lamb modes. The data presented demonstrate the potential for the use of higher order Lamb modes for online industrial stress measurement in plate, and that the higher sensitivity seen offers potential for improved measurement systems.

  2. Strength and wave parameters for sound propagation in random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostashev, Vladimir E; Wilson, D Keith

    2017-03-01

    Line-of-sight sound propagation of plane and spherical waves in a statistically isotropic, random moving medium is considered. The variances of the phase and log-amplitude fluctuations of these waves are expressed in terms of the strength and wave parameters for arbitrary spectra of temperature and velocity fluctuations, and results are then derived specifically for the Gaussian and generalized von Kármán spectra. This representation of the variances reduces significantly the number of independent parameters of the problem and enables better understanding of sound scattering by plane and spherical waves, and due to temperature and velocity fluctuations. Using this representation, the boundary between the weak and strong scattering regimes is determined in terms of the strength and wave parameters. The results obtained are compared with the Λ - Φ diagram adopted in ocean acoustics. Other statistical moments of plane and spherical waves in a medium with arbitrary spectra of temperature and velocity fluctuations such as the mean sound field, the spatial and temporal mutual coherence functions, the coherence bandwidth, and the variance of the angle-of-arrival fluctuations are expressed in terms of the strength parameter and length scale of the fluctuations.

  3. Propagation of Transverse Waves in Elastic-Micropolar Porous Semispaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Shao-Yi; Chiu, Shih-Ming; Su, Chih-Chun; Chen, Teng-Hui

    2007-11-01

    Porous materials are widely used in the passive noise control field as sound absorbers. Conventional models of porous materials are assumed to have a rigid frame and show finite bulk elasticity. However, in the case of acoustical waves — characterized by high frequencies and small wavelengths — the effect of microstructure becomes significant. This effect of microstructure has resulted in the development of new types of waves, not found in the classical theory of elasticity. Generalized continuum theories include the construction of the linear theory of micropolar elasticity that consists of deformation and microrotation with six degrees of freedom, and hence can be used to study the acoustical characteristics of composites with a granular structure. In this study, we investigated transverse wave propagation and its reflection and transmission from a plane interface between two different elastic-micropolar porous interfaces in perfect contact. The micropolar porous composite was constructed using hollow glass microbubbles embedded in an epoxy matrix with six material constants that can be used as the acoustical absorbers. It was found that there are different wave types in a micropolar porous material for the incident \\mathit{SV} (vertical transverse) or \\mathit{SH} (horizontal transverse) wave. It was also found that these two coupled sets of transverse waves, when traveling with different velocities, are dominated by the critical value of microinertia, showing the influence of the micropolar porous characteristics.

  4. Propagation of waves in a multicomponent plasma having charged dust particles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sukanya Burman; A Roy Chowdhury; S N Paul

    2001-06-01

    Propagation of both low and high frequency waves in a plasma consisting of electrons, ions, positrons and charged dust particles have been theoretically studied. The characteristics of dust acoustic wave propagating through the plasma has been analysed and the dispersion relation deduced is a generalization of that obtained by previous authors. It is found that nonlinear localization of high frequency electromagnetic field in such a plasma generates magnetic field. This magnetic field is seen to depend on the temperatures of electrons and positrons and also on their equilibrium density ratio. It is suggested that the present model would be applicable to find the magnetic field generation in space plasma.

  5. Cyclotron resonances of ions with obliquely propagating waves in coronal holes and the fast solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Markovskii, S. A.

    2002-06-01

    There is a growing consensus that cyclotron resonances play important roles in heating protons and ions in coronal holes where the fast solar wind originates and throughout interplanetary space as well. Most work on cyclotron resonant interactions has concentrated on the special, but unrealistic, case of propagation along the ambient magnetic field, B0, because of the great simplification it gives. This paper offers a physical discussion of how the cyclotron resonances behave when the waves propagate obliquely to B0. We show how resonances at harmonics of the cyclotron frequency come about, and how the physics can be different depending on whether E⊥ is in or perpendicular to the plane containing k and B0 (k is wave vector, and E⊥ is the component of the wave electric field perpendicular to B0). If E⊥ is in the k-B0 plane, the resonances are analogous to the Landau resonance and arise because the particle tends to stay in phase with the wave during the part of its orbit when it is interacting most strongly with E⊥. If E⊥ is perpendicular to the k-B0 plane, then the resonances depend on the fact that the particle is at different positions during the parts of its orbit when it is interacting most strongly with E⊥. Our main results are our refid="df10" type="formula">equations (10), refid="df11" type="formula">(11), and refid="df13" type="formula">(13) for the secular rate of energy gain (or loss) by a resonant particle and the unfamiliar result that ions can resonate with a purely right-hand circularly polarized wave if the propagation is oblique. We conclude with some speculations about the origin of highly obliquely propagating ion resonant waves in the corona and solar wind. We point out that there are a number of instabilities that may generate such waves locally in the corona and solar wind.

  6. Propagation of whistler waves driven by fine structured ion beams in the magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burinskaya, T.; Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1994-01-01

    In a previous paper, which examined the propagation of low-frequency whistler waves generated by ion beams in the Earth's plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL), it was found that whistler waves driven in the PSBL are focused toward the central plasma sheet due to the global magnetotail inhomogeneities; this finding may help explain the observations of magnetic noise bursts in the tail (Burinskaya et al., 1993). In this paper the same phenomenon is examined, but this time a much more realistic model is used for the ion beam in the PSBL. While the PSBL has been modeled as a solid, homogeneous ion beams with a width of one Earth radius, observations and theoretical considerations have shown that PSBL ion beams actually have a decreasing velocity profile toward the plasma sheet and that the density of the beams within the PSBL can vary locally. We consider again the propagation and generation of electromagnetic waves but in the presence of fine structured ion beams in the PSBL. Our results show that whistler waves, generated quasi-parallel to the background magnetic field, can be trapped locally within small spatial regions where the ion beam density is enhanced compared to the density of the adjacent PSBL region. Wave spectra and nonlinear saturation mechanisms are discussed.

  7. Indoor propagation and assessment of blast waves from weapons using the alternative image theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, S.; Jung, S.; Song, K. H.

    2016-03-01

    Blast waves generated from the muzzles of various weapons might have significant effects on the human body, and these effects are recognized as being more severe when weapons are fired indoors. The risk can be assessed by various criteria, such as waveform, exposed energy, and model-based types. This study introduces a prediction model of blast wave propagation for estimating waveform parameters related to damage risk assessment. To simulate indoor multiple reflections in a simple way, the model is based on the alternative image theory and discrete wavefront method. The alternative theory is a kind of modified image theory, but it uses the image space concept from a receiver's perspective, so that it shows improved efficiency for indoor problems. Further, the discrete wavefront method interprets wave propagation as the forward movement of a finite number of wavefronts. Even though the predicted results show slight differences from the measured data, the locations of significant shock waves indicate a high degree of correlation between them. Since the disagreement results not from the proposed techniques but from the assumptions used, it is concluded that the model is appropriate for analysis of blast wave propagation in interior spaces.

  8. Efficient techniques for wave-based sound propagation in interactive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Ravish

    Sound propagation techniques model the effect of the environment on sound waves and predict their behavior from point of emission at the source to the final point of arrival at the listener. Sound is a pressure wave produced by mechanical vibration of a surface that propagates through a medium such as air or water, and the problem of sound propagation can be formulated mathematically as a second-order partial differential equation called the wave equation. Accurate techniques based on solving the wave equation, also called the wave-based techniques, are too expensive computationally and memory-wise. Therefore, these techniques face many challenges in terms of their applicability in interactive applications including sound propagation in large environments, time-varying source and listener directivity, and high simulation cost for mid-frequencies. In this dissertation, we propose a set of efficient wave-based sound propagation techniques that solve these three challenges and enable the use of wave-based sound propagation in interactive applications. Firstly, we propose a novel equivalent source technique for interactive wave-based sound propagation in large scenes spanning hundreds of meters. It is based on the equivalent source theory used for solving radiation and scattering problems in acoustics and electromagnetics. Instead of using a volumetric or surface-based approach, this technique takes an object-centric approach to sound propagation. The proposed equivalent source technique generates realistic acoustic effects and takes orders of magnitude less runtime memory compared to prior wave-based techniques. Secondly, we present an efficient framework for handling time-varying source and listener directivity for interactive wave-based sound propagation. The source directivity is represented as a linear combination of elementary spherical harmonic sources. This spherical harmonic-based representation of source directivity can support analytical, data

  9. A General Linear Wave Theory for Water Waves Propagating over Uneven Porous Bottoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    锁要红; 黄虎

    2004-01-01

    Starting from the widespread phenomena of porous bottoms in the near shore region, considering fully the diversity of bottom topography and wave number variation, and including the effect of evanescent modes, a general linear wave theory for water waves propagating over uneven porous bottoms in the near shore region is established by use of Green's second identity. This theory can be reduced to a number of the most typical mild-slope equations currently in use and provide a reliable research basis for follow-up development of nonlinear water wave theory involving porous bottoms.

  10. On the Source of Propagating Slow Magneto-acoustic Waves in Sunspots

    OpenAIRE

    S. Krishna Prasad; Jess, D. B.; Khomenko, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Recent high-resolution observations of sunspot oscillations using simultaneously operated ground- and space-based telescopes reveal the intrinsic connection between different layers of the solar atmosphere. However, it is not clear whether these oscillations are externally driven or generated in-situ. We address this question by using observations of propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves along a coronal fan loop system. In addition to the generally observed decreases in oscillation amplitud...

  11. Laboratory investigation on mechanisms of stress wave propagations in porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Yang; YANG YongMing; MAO YanZhe; LIU HongBin; WANG HuiJie

    2009-01-01

    A number of porous models having the similar statistical characteristics of pores and physical properties with natural sandstones have been produced using reactive powder concrete (RPC) and polystyrene. Spit-Hopkinson-Pressure -Bar tests and CT scans have been carried out on the models with the various porosities to probe the performance of wave propagations and the responses of pores and the matrix during wave propagations. It is shown that porosities significantly influence wave propagations. For an identical impact strain rate, the greater the porosity is, the larger the amplitude of the reflected wave appears, the more the peak in the reflected wave presents, and the smaller the amplitude of the trans-mitted wave turns out. A single peak emerges in the reflected wave when the porosity falls down to 5%.The larger the impact strain rate, the much remarkable the phenomena. The energy-dissipated ratio of porous models, i.e., WJ/Wb linearly increases with the increment of porosities. The ratio is sensitive to the impact strain rate. Differences in the performance of wave propagations and energy dissipation result from the varied mechanisms that pores response to impacts. For the porosity less than 10%, the mechanism appears to be a process fracturing the matrix to generate new surfaces or pores. Energy has primarily been dissipated in creating new surfaces or pores. No apparent pore deformation takes place. The impact strain rate takes little effect on pore geometry. For the porosity of 15% or more, the mechanism works depending on the impact strain rate. When a low impact strain rate applies, the mechanism still appears to crack the matrix to generate surfaces or pores, but the amount is lower as compared to the case with a low porosity. If a large impact stain rate applies, the mechanism combines both fracturing the matrix and deforming the pores, with the deforming pores predominating. The vast majority of energy has been dissipated to deform pores. Only high

  12. Laboratory investigation on mechanisms of stress wave propagations in porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A number of porous models having the similar statistical characteristics of pores and physical properties with natural sandstones have been produced using reactive powder concrete(RPC) and polystyrenes.Spit-Hopkinson-Pressure-Bar tests and CT scans have been carried out on the models with the various porosities to probe the performance of wave propagations and the responses of pores and the matrix during wave propagations.It is shown that porosities significantly influence wave propagations.For an identical impact strain rate,the greater the porosity is,the larger the amplitude of the reflected wave appears,the more the peak in the reflected wave presents,and the smaller the amplitude of the trans-mitted wave turns out.A single peak emerges in the reflected wave when the porosity falls down to 5%.The larger the impact strain rate,the much remarkable the phenomena.The energy-dissipated ratio of porous models,i.e.,WJ /WI,linearly increases with the increment of porosities.The ratio is sensitive to the impact strain rate.Differences in the performance of wave propagations and energy dissipation result from the varied mechanisms that pores response to impacts.For the porosity less than 10%,the mechanism appears to be a process fracturing the matrix to generate new surfaces or pores.Energy has primarily been dissipated in creating new surfaces or pores.No apparent pore deformation takes place.The impact strain rate takes little effect on pore geometry.For the porosity of 15% or more,the mechanism works depending on the impact strain rate.When a low impact strain rate applies,the mechanism still appears to crack the matrix to generate surfaces or pores,but the amount is lower as compared to the case with a low porosity.If a large impact stain rate applies,the mechanism combines both fracturing the matrix and deforming the pores,with the deforming pores predominating.The vast majority of energy has been dissipated to deform pores.Only high porosity and impact strain rate

  13. Effects of wave propagation anisotropy on the wave focusing by negative refractive sonic crystal flat lenses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Alagoz

    2012-01-01

    In this study,wave propagation anisotropy in a triangular lattice crystal structure and its associated waveform shaping in a crystal structure are investigated theoretically.A directional variation in wave velocity inside a crystal structure is shown to cause bending wave envelopes.The authors report that a triangular lattice sonic crystal possesses six numbers of a high symmetry direction,which leads to a wave convergence caused by wave velocity anisotropy inside the crystal.However,two of them are utilized mostly in wave focusing by an acoustic flat lens.Based on wave velocity anisotropy,the pseudo ideal imaging effect obtained in the second band of the flat lens is discussed.

  14. Review article: MHD wave propagation near coronal null points of magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    McLaughlin, J A; De Moortel, I; 10.1007/s11214-010-9654-y

    2010-01-01

    We present a comprehensive review of MHD wave behaviour in the neighbourhood of coronal null points: locations where the magnetic field, and hence the local Alfven speed, is zero. The behaviour of all three MHD wave modes, i.e. the Alfven wave and the fast and slow magnetoacoustic waves, has been investigated in the neighbourhood of 2D, 2.5D and (to a certain extent) 3D magnetic null points, for a variety of assumptions, configurations and geometries. In general, it is found that the fast magnetoacoustic wave behaviour is dictated by the Alfven-speed profile. In a $\\beta=0$ plasma, the fast wave is focused towards the null point by a refraction effect and all the wave energy, and thus current density, accumulates close to the null point. Thus, null points will be locations for preferential heating by fast waves. Independently, the Alfven wave is found to propagate along magnetic fieldlines and is confined to the fieldlines it is generated on. As the wave approaches the null point, it spreads out due to the di...

  15. How study of hurricane swell can help to provide a better prediction of the tsunami wave propagation on Caribbean coasts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorville, Jean-François; Dondin, Frédéric; Cécé, Raphael; Bernard, Didier

    2014-05-01

    Prediction of tsunami wave propagation on a complex bathymetry can be fatal. Do a mistake on the location of the tsunami wave impact on the coast is highly dangerous. The destruction due to mechanical impact or submersion of the large area of the coast zone can be avoid with a good estimation (i.e.; height, location, duration) of the hazard. Features of the propagation are important in term of values but also in term of dynamic, an evacuation plan is directly base on the prediction of the sequence of events. The frequency of large tsunami is low, but the study of real case may help to have a complete comprehension of the process. We would be better prepare for a tsunami if we had more tsunami. Caribbean arc was generated by an intense tectonic motion and volcanic activity. The risk of tsunami is high in the area both generated by tectonic motion and volcanic landslide. The quality of a numerical propagation of tsunami is highly dependent of the quality of the DEM Caribbean coast are impact by large Hurricane wave. The study of those can be helpful in the tsunami study, particularly for the bathymetry effect on large wave. The shape of the both types of wave are not the same, we do not try to do a direct comparison, but used the information of the dispersion of large swell wave to applied it to the tsunami dispersion and fill the lack of information of the bathymetry. We focus on the comparative study of the propagation of tsunami wave generated by submarine volcano land slide and hurricane wave on a small scale bathymetry (10 m, Lito 3d). The case of Guadeloupe and Martinique island are detailed in this study, due to the available dataset. We used those two territories as reference area. The numerical propagation of the waves is done with FUNWAVE on two different bathymetry (10 m & 50 m). The tsunami wave was generated by VolcFlow in case of submarine volcano collapse and the swell determine by coupling of WaveWatchIII and SWAN in case of past Hurricane. The

  16. Characteristics of a compression wave propagating over porous plate wall in a high-speed railway tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A pressure wave is generated ahead of a high-speed train, while entering a tunnel. This pressure wave propagates to the tunnel exit and spouts as a micro-pressure wave, which causes an exploding sound. From the fact that the ballast track tunnel has smaller noise than the slab track tunnel, we have suggested a new inner tunnel model to decrease the noise of the micro-pressure wave, using the ballast effect. Experimental and numerical investigations are carried out to clarify the attenuation and distortion of propagating compression wave over porous plate wall in a model tunnel. Data shows that the strength of the compression wave and a maximum pressure gradient of the compression wave was weakened. These data shows the possibility of the present a11eviative method using the porous plate wall in a tunnel

  17. Applicability of Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method to Simulation of Wave Propagation in Cancellous Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Yoshiki; Imaizumi, Hirotaka; Fukuda, Takashi; Matsukawa, Mami; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Otani, Takahiko

    2006-09-01

    In cancellous bone, longitudinal waves often separate into fast and slow waves depending on the alignment of bone trabeculae. This interesting phenomenon becomes an effective tool for the diagnosis of osteoporosis because wave propagation behavior depends on the bone structure. We have, therefore, simulated wave propagation in such a complex medium by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, using a three-dimensional X-ray computer tomography (CT) model of an actual cancellous bone. In this simulation, experimentally observed acoustic constants of the cortical bone were adopted. As a result, the generation of fast and slow waves was confirmed. The speed of fast waves and the amplitude of slow waves showed good correlations with the bone volume fraction. The simulated results were also compared with the experimental results obtained from the identical cancellous bone.

  18. A study on compressive shock wave propagation in metallic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihua; Zhang, Yifen; Ren, Huilan; Zhao, Longmao

    2010-02-01

    Metallic foam can dissipate a large amount of energy due to its relatively long stress plateau, which makes it widely applicable in the design of structural crashworthiness. However, in some experimental studies, stress enhancement has been observed when the specimens are subjected to intense impact loads, leading to severe damage to the objects being protected. This paper studies this phenomenon on a 2D mass-spring-bar model. With the model, a constitutive relationship of metal foam and corresponding loading and unloading criteria are presented; a nonlinear kinematics equilibrium equation is derived, where an explicit integration algorithm is used to calculate the characteristic of the compressive shock wave propagation within the metallic foam; the effect of heterogeneous distribution of foam microstructures on the shock wave features is also included. The results reveal that under low impact pulses, considerable energy is dissipated during the progressive collapse of foam cells, which then reduces the crush of objects. When the pulse is sufficiently high, on the other hand, stress enhancement may take place, especially in the heterogeneous foams, where high peak stresses usually occur. The characteristics of compressive shock wave propagation in the foam and the magnitude and location of the peak stress produced are strongly dependent on the mechanical properties of the foam material, amplitude and period of the pulse, as well as the homogeneity of the microstructures. This research provides valuable insight into the reliability of the metallic foams used as a protective structure.

  19. Synthetic observations of wave propagation in a sunspot umbra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felipe, T. [NorthWest Research Associates, Colorado Research Associates, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Socas-Navarro, H.; Khomenko, E. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, C/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2014-11-01

    Spectropolarimetric temporal series from Fe I λ6301.5 Å and Ca II infrared triplet lines are obtained by applying the Stokes synthesis code NICOLE to a numerical simulation of wave propagation in a sunspot umbra from MANCHA code. The analysis of the phase difference between Doppler velocity and intensity core oscillations of the Fe I λ6301.5 Å line reveals that variations in the intensity are produced by opacity fluctuations rather than intrinsic temperature oscillations, except for frequencies between 5 and 6.5 mHz. On the other hand, the photospheric magnetic field retrieved from the weak field approximation provides the intrinsic magnetic field oscillations associated to wave propagation. Our results suggest that this is due to the low magnetic field gradient of our sunspot model. The Stokes parameters of the chromospheric Ca II infrared triplet lines show striking variations as shock waves travel through the formation height of the lines, including emission self-reversals in the line core and highly abnormal Stokes V profiles. Magnetic field oscillations inferred from the Ca II infrared lines using the weak field approximation appear to be related with the magnetic field strength variation between the photosphere and the chromosphere.

  20. Effects of obliquely opposing and following currents on wave propagation in a new 3D wave-current basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieske, Mike; Schlurmann, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    INTRODUCTION & MOTIVATION The design of structures in coastal and offshore areas and their maintenance are key components of coastal protection. Usually, assessments of processes and loads on coastal structures are derived from experiments with flow and wave parameters in separate physical models. However, Peregrin (1976) already points out that processes in natural shallow coastal waters flow and sea state processes do not occur separately, but influence each other nonlinearly. Kemp & Simons (1982) perform 2D laboratory tests and study the interactions between a turbulent flow and following waves. They highlight the significance of wave-induced changes in the current properties, especially in the mean flow profiles, and draw attention to turbulent fluctuations and bottom shear stresses. Kemp & Simons (1983) also study these processes and features with opposing waves. Studies on the wave-current interaction in three-dimensional space for a certain wave height, wave period and water depth were conducted by MacIver et al. (2006). The research focus is set on the investigation of long-crested waves on obliquely opposing and following currents in the new 3D wave-current basin. METHODOLOGY In a first step the flow analysis without waves is carried out and includes measurements of flow profiles in the sweet spot of the basin at predefined measurement positions. Five measuring points in the water column have been delineated in different water depths in order to obtain vertical flow profiles. For the characterization of the undisturbed flow properties in the basin, an uniformly distributed flow was generated in the wave basin. In the second step wave analysis without current, the unidirectional wave propagation and wave height were investigated for long-crested waves in intermediate wave conditions. In the sweet spot of the wave basin waves with three different wave directions, three wave periods and uniform wave steepness were examined. For evaluation, we applied a common

  1. Orbital angular momentum in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Darryl J; Oesch, Denis W

    2011-11-21

    This is the second of two papers demonstrating that photons with orbital angular momentum can be created in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence. In the companion paper, it is shown that propagation through atmospheric turbulence can create non-trivial angular momentum. Here, we extend the result and demonstrate that this momentum is, at least in part, orbital angular momentum. Specifically, we demonstrate that branch points (in the language of the adaptive optic community) indicate the presence of photons with non-zero OAM. Furthermore, the conditions required to create photons with non-zero orbital angular momentum are ubiquitous. The repercussions of this statement are wide ranging and these are cursorily enumerated.

  2. Pressure wave model for action potential propagation in excitable cells

    CERN Document Server

    Rvachev, M M

    2003-01-01

    Speed of propagation of small-amplitude pressure waves through the cytoplasmic interior of myelinated and unmyelinated axons of different diameters is theoretically estimated and is found to generally agree with the action potential (AP) conduction velocities. This remarkable coincidence allows to surmise a model in which AP spread along axon is propelled not by straggling ionic currents as in the widely accepted local circuit theory, but by mechanoactivation of the membrane ion channels by a traveling pressure pulse. Hydraulic pulses propagating in the viscous axoplasm are calculated to decay over ~1 mm distances, and it is further hypothesized that it is the role of influxing during the AP calcium ions to activate membrane skeletal protein network attached to the membrane cytoplasmic side for a brief radial contraction amplifying the pressure pulse and preventing its decay. The model correctly predicts that the AP conduction velocity should vary as the one-half power of axon diameter for large unmyelinated ...

  3. Wave propagation, scattering and emission in complex media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ya-Qiu

    I. Polarimetric scattering and SAR imagery. EM wave propagation and scattering in polarimetric SAR interferometry / S. R. Cloude. Terrain topographic inversion from single-pass polarimetric SAR image data by using polarimetric stokes parameters and morphological algorithm / Y. Q. Jin, L. Luo. Road detection in forested area using polarimetric SAR / G. W. Dong ... [et al.]. Research on some problems about SAR radiometric resolution / G. Dong ... [et al.]. A fast image matching algorithm for remote sensing applications / Z. Q. Hou ... [et al.]. A new algorithm of noised remote sensing image fusion based on steerable filters / X. Kang ... [et al.]. Adaptive noise reduction of InSAR data based on anisotropic diffusion models and their applications to phase unwrapping / C. Wang, X. Gao, H. Zhang -- II. Scattering from randomly rough surfaces. Modeling tools for backscattering from rough surfaces / A. K. Fung, K. S. Chen. Pseudo-nondiffracting beams from rough surface scattering / E. R. Méndez, T. A. Leskova, A. A. Maradudin. Surface roughness clutter effects in GPR modeling and detection / C. Rappaport. Scattering from rough surfaces with small slopes / M. Saillard, G. Soriano. Polarization and spectral characteristics of radar signals reflected by sea-surface / V. A. Butko, V. A. Khlusov, L. I. Sharygina. Simulation of microwave scattering from wind-driven ocean surfaces / M. Y. Xia ... [et al.]. HF surface wave radar tests at the Eastern China Sea / X. B. Wu ... [et al.] -- III. Electromagnetics of complex materials. Wave propagation in plane-parallel metamaterial and constitutive relations / A. Ishimaru ... [et al.]. Two dimensional periodic approach for the study of left-handed metamaterials / T. M. Grzegorczyk ... [et al.]. Numerical analysis of the effective constitutive parameters of a random medium containing small chiral spheres / Y. Nanbu, T. Matsuoka, M. Tateiba. Wave propagation in inhomogeneous media: from the Helmholtz to the Ginzburg -Landau equation / M

  4. Micromechanics of Seismic Wave Propagation in Granular Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihei, Kurt Toshimi

    1992-09-01

    This thesis investigates the details of seismic wave propagation in granular rocks by examining the micromechanical processes which take place at the grain level. Grain contacts are identified as the primary sites of attenuation in dry and fluid-saturated rocks. In many sedimentary rocks such as sandstones and limestones, the process of diagenesis leaves the grains only partially cemented together. When viewed at the micron scale, grain contacts are non-welded interfaces similar in nature to large scale joints and faults. Using a lumped properties approximation, the macroscopic properties of partially cemented grain contacts are modeled using a displacement-discontinuity boundary condition. This model is used to estimate the magnitude and the frequency dependence of the grain contact scattering attenuation for an idealized grain packing geometry. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave group velocity and attenuation measurements on sintered glass beads, alundum, and Berea sandstones were performed to determine the effects of stress, frequency, and pore fluid properties in granular materials with sintered and partially sintered grain contacts. P - and S-wave attenuation displayed the same overall trends for tests with n-decane, water, silicone oil, and glycerol. The magnitudes of the attenuation coefficients were, in general, higher for S-waves. The experimental measurements reveal that viscosity-dependent attenuation dominates in material with sintered grain contacts. Viscosity-dependent attenuation is also observed in Berea sandstone but only at hydrostatic stresses in excess of 15 MPa where the grain contacts are highly stiffened. Fluid surface chemistry-related attenuation was observed in Berea sandstone loaded uniaxially. These measurements suggest that attenuation in fluid-saturated rocks with partially cemented grain contacts is dependent on both the fluid properties and the state of stress at the grain contacts. A numerical method for simulating seismic wave propagation in

  5. Chromospheric and Coronal Wave Generation in a Magnetic Flux Sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoshiaki; Steiner, Oskar; Hansteen, Viggo; Gudiksen, Boris; Wedemeyer, Sven; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-08-01

    Using radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar atmospheric layers from the upper convection zone to the lower corona, we investigate the self-consistent excitation of slow magneto-acoustic body waves (slow modes) in a magnetic flux concentration. We find that the convective downdrafts in the close surroundings of a two-dimensional flux slab “pump” the plasma inside it in the downward direction. This action produces a downflow inside the flux slab, which encompasses ever higher layers, causing an upwardly propagating rarefaction wave. The slow mode, excited by the adiabatic compression of the downflow near the optical surface, travels along the magnetic field in the upward direction at the tube speed. It develops into a shock wave at chromospheric heights, where it dissipates, lifts the transition region, and produces an offspring in the form of a compressive wave that propagates further into the corona. In the wake of downflows and propagating shock waves, the atmosphere inside the flux slab in the chromosphere and higher tends to oscillate with a period of ν ≈ 4 mHz. We conclude that this process of “magnetic pumping” is a most plausible mechanism for the direct generation of longitudinal chromospheric and coronal compressive waves within magnetic flux concentrations, and it may provide an important heat source in the chromosphere. It may also be responsible for certain types of dynamic fibrils.

  6. Wave turbulence in integrable systems: nonlinear propagation of incoherent optical waves in single-mode fibers

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    International audience; We study theoretically, numerically and experimentally the nonlinear propagation of partially incoherent optical waves in single mode optical fibers. We revisit the traditional treatment of the wave turbulence theory to provide a statistical kinetic description of the integrable scalar NLS equation. In spite of the formal reversibility and of the integrability of the NLS equation, the weakly nonlinear dynamics reveals the existence of an irreversible evolution toward a...

  7. Light wave propagation through a dilaton-Maxwell domain wall

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, J R

    2015-01-01

    We consider the propagation of electromagnetic waves through a dilaton-Maxwell domain wall of the type introduced by Gibbons and Wells [G.W. Gibbons and C.G. Wells, Class. Quant. Grav. 11, 2499-2506 (1994)]. It is found that if such a wall exists within our observable universe, it would be absurdly thick, or else have a magnetic field in its core which is much stronger than observed intergalactic fields. We conclude that it is highly improbable that any such wall is physically realized.

  8. ON FREE WAVE PROPAGATION IN ANISOTROPIC LAYERED MEDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongqiang Guo; Weiqiu Chen

    2008-01-01

    The method of reverberation-ray matrix (MRRM) is extended and modified for the analysis of free wave propagation in anisotropic layered elastic media. A general, numerically stable formulation is established within the state space framework. The compatibility of physical variables in local dual coordinates gives the phase relation, from which exponentially growing functions are excluded. The interface and boundary conditions lead to the scattering relation,which avoids matrix inversion operation. Numerical examples are given to show the high accuracy of the present MRRM.

  9. Plane-Wave Propagation in Electromagnetic PQ Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Lindell, Ismo V

    2015-01-01

    Two basic classes of electromagnetic media, recently defined and labeled as those of P media and Q media, are generalized to define the class of PQ media. Plane wave propagation in the general PQ medium is studied and the quartic dispersion equation is derived in analytic form applying four-dimensional dyadic formalism. The result is verified by considering various special cases of PQ media for which the dispersion equation is known to decompose to two quadratic equations or be identically satisfied (media with no dispersion equation). As a numerical example, the dispersion surface of a PQ medium with non-decomposable dispersion equation is considered.

  10. Propagating speed of primordial gravitational waves and inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Yong; Piao, Yun-Song

    2016-01-01

    We show that if the propagating speed of gravitational waves (GWs) gradually diminishes during inflation, the power spectrum of primordial GWs will be strongly blue, while that of the primordial scalar perturbation may be unaffected. We also illustrate that such a scenario is actually a disformal dual to the superinflation, but has no the ghost instability. The blue tilt obtained is $0

  11. Particle velocity non-uniformity and steady-wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshcheryakov, Yu. I.

    2017-03-01

    A constitutive equation grounded in dislocation dynamics is shown to be incapable of describing the propagation of shock fronts in solids. Shock wave experiments and theoretical investigations motivate an additional collective mechanism of stress relaxation that should be incorporated into the model through the standard deviation of the particle velocity, which is found to be proportional to the strain rate. In this case, the governing equation system results in a second-order differential equation of square non-linearity. Solution to this equation and calculations for D16 aluminum alloy show a more precise coincidence of the theoretical and experimental velocity profiles.

  12. Propagation of linear waves in relativistic anisotropic magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebretsadkan, W B; Kalra, G L

    2002-11-01

    Gedalin [Phys. Rev. E 47, 4354 (1993)] derived a dispersion relation for linear waves in relativistic anisotropic Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). This dispersion relation is used to point out the regions where the relativistic anisotropic MHD leads to new results that cannot be obtained using usual collisional relativistic MHD. This is highlighted by plotting a Fresnal ray surface. Conditions for the onset of firehose and mirror instabilities are also indicated. Such a study can be applied to astrophysical features such as pulsar winds, propagation of cosmic rays, etc.

  13. Investigation of guided waves propagation in pipe buried in sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinov, Eli; Cawley, Peter; Lowe, Michael J.S. [NDE Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18

    The inspection of pipelines by guided wave testing is a well-established method for the detection of corrosion defects in pipelines, and is currently used routinely in a variety of industries, e.g. petrochemical and energy. When the method is applied to pipes buried in soil, test ranges tend to be significantly compromised because of attenuation of the waves caused by energy radiating into the soil. Moreover, the variability of soil conditions dictates different attenuation characteristics, which in-turn results in different, unpredictable, test ranges. We investigate experimentally the propagation and attenuation characteristics of guided waves in pipes buried in fine sand using a well characterized full scale experimental apparatus. The apparatus consists of an 8 inch-diameter, 5.6-meters long steel pipe embedded over 3 meters of its length in a rectangular container filled with fine sand, and an air-bladder for the application of overburden pressure. Longitudinal and torsional guided waves are excited in the pipe and recorded using a transducer ring (Guided Ultrasonics Ltd). Acoustic properties of the sand are measured independently in-situ and used to make model predictions of wave behavior in the buried pipe. We present the methodology and the systematic measurements of the guided waves under a range of conditions, including loose and compacted sand. It is found that the application of overburden pressure modifies the compaction of the sand and increases the attenuation, and that the measurement of the acoustic properties of sand allows model prediction of the attenuation of guided waves in buried pipes with a high level of confidence.

  14. Hybrid local FEM/global LISA modeling of guided wave propagation and interaction with damage in composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a hybrid modeling technique for the efficient simulation of guided wave propagation and interaction with damage in composite structures. This hybrid approach uses a local finite element model (FEM) to compute the excitability of guided waves generated by piezoelectric transducers, while the global domain wave propagation, wave-damage interaction, and boundary reflections are modeled with the local interaction simulation approach (LISA). A small-size multi-physics FEM with non-reflective boundaries (NRB) was built to obtain the excitability information of guided waves generated by the transmitter. Frequency-domain harmonic analysis was carried out to obtain the solution for all the frequencies of interest. Fourier and inverse Fourier transform and frequency domain convolution techniques are used to obtain the time domain 3-D displacement field underneath the transmitter under an arbitrary excitation. This 3-D displacement field is then fed into the highly efficient time domain LISA simulation module to compute guided wave propagation, interaction with damage, and reflections at structural boundaries. The damping effect of composite materials was considered in the modified LISA formulation. The grids for complex structures were generated using commercial FEM preprocessors and converted to LISA connectivity format. Parallelization of the global LISA solution was achieved through Compute Unified Design Architecture (CUDA) running on Graphical Processing Unit (GPU). The multi-physics local FEM can reliably capture the detailed dimensions and local dynamics of the piezoelectric transducers. The global domain LISA can accurately solve the 3-D elastodynamic wave equations in a highly efficient manner. By combining the local FEM with global LISA, the efficient and accurate simulation of guided wave structural health monitoring procedure is achieved. Two numerical case studies are presented: (1) wave propagation in a unidirectional CFRP composite plate

  15. Horizontal structure and propagation characteristics of mesospheric gravity waves observed by Antarctic Gravity Wave Imaging/Instrument Network (ANGWIN), using a 3-D spectral analysis technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Takashi S.; Nakamura, Takuji; Murphy, Damian; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Moffat-Griffin, Tracy; Zhao, Yucheng; Pautet, Pierre-Dominique; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Taylor, Michael

    2016-07-01

    ANGWIN (Antarctic Gravity Wave Imaging/Instrument Network) is an international airglow imager/instrument network in the Antarctic, which commenced observations in 2011. It seeks to reveal characteristics of mesospheric gravity waves, and to study sources, propagation, breaking of the gravity waves over the Antarctic and the effects on general circulation and upper atmosphere. In this study, we compared distributions of horizontal phase velocity of the gravity waves at around 90 km altitude observed in the mesospheric airglow imaging over different locations using our new statistical analysis method of 3-D Fourier transform, developed by Matsuda et al. (2014). Results from the airglow imagers at four stations at Syowa (69S, 40E), Halley (76S, 27W), Davis (69S, 78E) and McMurdo (78S, 156E) out of the ANGWIN imagers have been compared, for the observation period between April 6 and May 21 in 2013. In addition to the horizontal distribution of propagation and phase speed, gravity wave energies have been quantitatively compared, indicating a smaller GW activity in higher latitude stations. We further investigated frequency dependence of gravity wave propagation direction, as well as nightly variation of the gravity wave direction and correlation with the background wind variations. We found that variation of propagation direction is partly due to the effect of background wind in the middle atmosphere, but variation of wave sources could play important role as well. Secondary wave generation is also needed to explain the observed results.

  16. Generation of whistler-wave heated discharges with planar resonant RF networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guittienne, Ph; Howling, A A; Hollenstein, Ch

    2013-09-20

    Magnetized plasma discharges generated by a planar resonant rf network are investigated. A regime transition is observed above a magnetic field threshold, associated with rf waves propagating in the plasma and which present the characteristics of whistler waves. These wave heated regimes can be considered as analogous to conventional helicon discharges, but in planar geometry.

  17. Cross-polarized wave generation by effective cubic nonlinear optical interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, G I; Albert, O; Etchepare, J; Saltiel, S M

    2001-03-15

    A new cubic nonlinear optical effect in which a linearly polarized wave propagating in a single quadratic medium is converted into a wave that is cross polarized to the input wave is observed in BBO crystal. The effect is explained by cascading of two different second-order processes: second-harmonic generation and difference frequency mixing.

  18. Discretizing singular point sources in hyperbolic wave propagation problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, N. Anders; O'Reilly, Ossian; Sjögreen, Björn; Bydlon, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    We develop high order accurate source discretizations for hyperbolic wave propagation problems in first order formulation that are discretized by finite difference schemes. By studying the Fourier series expansions of the source discretization and the finite difference operator, we derive sufficient conditions for achieving design accuracy in the numerical solution. Only half of the conditions in Fourier space can be satisfied through moment conditions on the source discretization, and we develop smoothness conditions for satisfying the remaining accuracy conditions. The resulting source discretization has compact support in physical space, and is spread over as many grid points as the number of moment and smoothness conditions. In numerical experiments we demonstrate high order of accuracy in the numerical solution of the 1-D advection equation (both in the interior and near a boundary), the 3-D elastic wave equation, and the 3-D linearized Euler equations.

  19. Small-Scale Effect on Longitudinal Wave Propagation in Laser-Excited Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Kh. Mirzade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal wave propagation in an elastic isotopic laser-excited solid plate with atomic defect (vacancies, interstitials generation is studied by the nonlocal continuum model. The nonlocal differential constitutive equations of Eringen are used in the formulations. The coupled governing equations for the dynamic of elastic displacement and atomic defect concentration fields are obtained. The frequency equations for the symmetrical and antisymmetrical motions of the plate are found and discussed. Explicit expressions for different characteristics of waves like phase velocity and attenuation (amplification coefficients are derived. It is shown that coupling between the displacement and defect concentration fields affects the wave dispersion characteristics in the nonlocal elasticity. The dispersion curves of the elastic-diffusion instability are investigated for different pump parameters and larger wave numbers.

  20. Numerical Time-Domain Modeling of Lamb Wave Propagation Using Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Rappel

    2014-01-01

    integration technique (EFIT as well as its validation with analytical results. Lamb wave method is a long range inspection technique which is considered to have unique future in the field of structural health monitoring. One of the main problems facing the lamb wave method is how to choose the most appropriate frequency to generate the waves for adequate transmission capable of properly propagating in the material, interfering with defects/damages, and being received in good conditions. Modern simulation tools based on numerical methods such as finite integration technique (FIT, finite element method (FEM, and boundary element method (BEM may be used for modeling. In this paper, two sets of simulation are performed. In the first set, group velocities of lamb wave in a steel plate are obtained numerically. Results are then compared with analytical results to validate the simulation. In the second set, EFIT is employed to study fundamental symmetric mode interaction with a surface braking defect.

  1. BEM Analysis of Wave Propagation in a Water-Filled Borehole in an Anisotropic Solid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a time-domain boundary element method developed to analyze the interactions of acoustic and elastic waves near the interfaces between water and an anisotropic elastic solid. Two models are analyzed with one being the interface between two half spaces of fluid and solid and the other being a fluid region sandwiched by half space domains of anisotropic elastic solids. Both monopole and dipole point sources are used to generate an initial pressure wave in the fluid. Some snapshots of the transient wave behavior near the fluid-solid interfaces are given. The effect of the anisotropy in the solid on the pressure waveforms in the fluid is discussed. The numerical results allow detailed arrival identification and interpretation of acoustic and elastic waves propagating along the fluid-solid interfaces.

  2. Using field programmable gate array hardware for the performance improvement of ultrasonic wave propagation imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, Jaffry Syed [Hamdard University, Karachi (Pakistan); Abbas, Syed Haider; Lee, Jung Ryul [Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dong Hoon [Advanced Materials Research Team, Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Recently, wave propagation imaging based on laser scanning-generated elastic waves has been intensively used for nondestructive inspection. However, the proficiency of the conventional software based system reduces when the scan area is large since the processing time increases significantly due to unavoidable processor multitasking, where computing resources are shared with multiple processes. Hence, the field programmable gate array (FPGA) was introduced for a wave propagation imaging method in order to obtain extreme processing time reduction. An FPGA board was used for the design, implementing post-processing ultrasonic wave propagation imaging (UWPI). The results were compared with the conventional system and considerable improvement was observed, with at least 78% (scanning of 100x100mm{sup 2} with 0.5 mm interval) to 87.5% (scanning of 200x200mm{sup 2} with 0.5 mm interval) less processing time, strengthening the claim for the research. This new concept to implement FPGA technology into the UPI system will act as a break-through technology for full-scale automatic inspection.

  3. Modeling and experiments with low-frequency pressure wave propagation in liquid-filled, flexible tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelland, C; Bjarnø, Leif

    1992-01-01

    A model for wave propagation in a liquid-filled viscoelastic tube with arrays of receivers inside, is being used to analyze the influence of noise generated by in-line vibrational noise sources. In this model, distensibility is of greater importance than compressibility of the liquid....... The dispersion and attenuation is shown to be strongly dependent on the viscoelastic properties of the tube wall. The complex, frequency-dependent moduli of relevant tube materials have been measured in stress wave transfer function experiments. The moduli are used in the model to produce realistic dispersion...... relations and frequency-dependent attenuation. A 12-m-long, liquid-filled tube with interior stress members and connectors in each end is hanging vertically from an upper fixture. The lower end connector is excited by a power vibrator to generate the relevant wave modes. Measurements with reference...

  4. Whistler wave generation by non-gyrotropic, relativistic, electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skender, Marina; Tsiklauri, David

    2014-05-01

    Super-thermal electron beams travelling away from the Sun on the open magnetic field lines are widely accepted to be the source of the Type-III bursts. The earliest idea of the generation of the Type-III bursts was based on the plasma emission mechanism. A fast moving electron beam excites Langmuir waves at the local plasma frequency, ωp. The Langmuir waves are partially transformed via scattering at ωp and 2ωp, with ion sound and oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, respectively, into electromagnetic waves. As the electron beam propagates away from the Sun, through less dense coronal and interplanetary environment, the frequency of the emitted electromagnetic radiation decreases, because plasma frequency is a function of the square root of the plasma density. Type-III bursts have been subject of theoretical, observational and numerical studies. The first detailed theory of the Type-III emission invoked coherent plasma waves, generated by a stream of fast particles, which are due to Rayleigh and combination scattering at ωp and 2ωp subsequently transformed into radio waves. Stochastic growth of the density irregularities was invoked in order to produce stochastically generated clumpy Langmuir waves, where the ambient density perturbations cause the beam to fluctuate around marginal stability. Other theories on the mechanism which generates the Type-III emission include: linear mode conversion of Langmuir waves, Langmuir waves producing electromagnetic radiation as antennas and non-gyroptropic electron beam emission [1] of commensurable properties to the Type-III bursts. In Refs. [2,3] it was found that the non-gyrotropic beam excites electromagnetic radiation by the current transverse to the magnetic field, which results in (ω,k)-space drift while propagating along the 1-dimensional spatial domain throughout the decreasing plasma density profile. The role of the electron beam pitch angle and the background density gradient profile was investigated in [4

  5. Hybrid local FEM/global LISA modeling of damped guided wave propagation in complex composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid modeling technique for the efficient simulation of guided wave generation, propagation, and interaction with damage in complex composite structures. A local finite element model is deployed to capture the piezoelectric effects and actuation dynamics of the transmitter, while the global domain wave propagation and interaction with structural complexity (structure features and damage) are solved utilizing a local interaction simulation approach (LISA). This hybrid approach allows the accurate modeling of the local dynamics of the transducers and keeping the LISA formulation in an explicit format, which facilitates its readiness for parallel computing. The global LISA framework was extended through the 3D Kelvin-Voigt viscoelasticity theory to include anisotropic damping effects for composite structures, as an improvement over the existing LISA formulation. The global LISA framework was implemented using the compute unified device architecture running on graphic processing units. A commercial preprocessor is integrated seamlessly with the computational framework for grid generation and material property allocation to handle complex structures. The excitability and damping effects are successfully captured by this hybrid model, with experimental validation using the scanning laser doppler vibrometry. To demonstrate the capability of our hybrid approach for complex structures, guided wave propagation and interaction with a delamination in a composite panel with stiffeners is presented.

  6. Propagation characteristics of ultrasonic guided waves in continuously welded rail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wenqing; Sheng, Fuwei; Wei, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Yuan

    2017-07-01

    Rail defects cause numerous railway accidents. Trains are derailed and serious consequences often occur. Compared to traditional bulk wave testing, ultrasonic guided waves (UGWs) can provide larger monitoring ranges and complete coverage of the waveguide cross-section. These advantages are of significant importance for the non-destructive testing (NDT) of the continuously welded rail, and the technique is therefore widely used in high-speed railways. UGWs in continuous welded rail (CWR) and their propagation characteristics have been discussed in this paper. Finite element methods (FEMs) were used to accomplish a vibration modal analysis, which is extended by a subsequent dispersion analysis. Wave structure features were illustrated by displacement profiles. It was concluded that guided waves have the ability to detect defects in the rail via choice of proper mode and frequency. Additionally, thermal conduction that is caused by temperature variation in the rail is added into modeling and simulation. The results indicated that unbalanced thermal distribution may lead to the attenuation of UGWs in the rail.

  7. Propagation of shock waves and fracture in the Al—Cu composite: Numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelko, V. V.; Mayer, A. E.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate regularities of the shock wave propagation and fracture in the Al-Cu composite under high-current electron irradiation. A model of multiphase medium mechanics is used, which takes into account the finite rate of stress relaxation between phases, the heat transfer, and the relative motion and friction between components. The multiphase medium model is supplemented by the models of plasticity and fracture. The presence of inclusions in the matrix significantly influences the generation and propagation of stress waves in the irradiated target. In addition, molecular dynamics calculations of tensile strength are performed, which show that the presence of copper inclusions reduces the strength of the material. The reason for softening is the stress concentration near the inclusion, rather than the weak adhesion between copper and aluminum.

  8. Wave propagation across sea-ice thickness changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, V. A.; Williams, T. D.

    Williams and Squire (Williams, T.D., Squire, V.A., in press. The effect of submergence on wave scattering across a transition between two floating flexible plates. Wave Motion) present a mathematical theory that properly incorporates freeboard and draft, i.e. submergence, in a description of how ocean surface waves propagate across an abrupt change of properties in a continuous sea-ice cover. Typically the abrupt feature is an ice floe of different thickness from the surrounding plate, a trapped iceberg, a pressure ridge, or an open or refrozen lead. Here, we investigate how the assimilation of this floe submergence into theory alters the transmission of the wave trains, allowing the approximation and consequent limitations inherent in the majority of previous models that apply the under-ice boundary conditions at the mean open water surface to be assessed. This is done for isolated features and, using the wide-spacing approximation, for heterogeneous ice sheets made up of many such irregularities drawn from appropriate probability density distributions. It is found that the contribution associated with the underwater draft of ice floes is modest and can invariably be neglected, aside from at short periods and in heavily deformed sea-ice. While its amassed effect across the many irregular features that habitually characterize sea-ice will be significant, it is offset because of the tendency of ice covers to discourage the passage of short wavelengths preferentially by creating a background wave spectrum composed only of long period wave energy in the ice interior. More general geophysical implications are discussed, particularly in relation to global climate change and the value of ice-covered regions as a proxy for observing a warmer Earth.

  9. Characteristics of gravity waves generated in a baroclinic instability simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-H. Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An idealized baroclinic instability case is simulated using a ~ 10 km resolution global model to investigate the characteristics of gravity waves (GWs generated in the baroclinic life cycle. Three groups of GWs (W1–W3 appear around the high-latitude surface trough at the mature stage of the baroclinic wave. They have horizontal and vertical wavelengths of 40–400 and 2.9–9.8 km, respectively, in the upper troposphere. The two-dimensional phase-velocity spectrum of the waves is arc-shaped with a peak at 17 m s−1 eastward, which is difficult for the waves to propagate upward through the tropospheric westerly jet. At the breaking stage of the baroclinic wave, a midlatitude surface low is isolated from the higher-latitude trough, and two groups of quasi-stationary GWs (W4 and W5 appear near the surface low. These waves have horizontal and vertical wavelengths of 60–400 and 4.9–14 km, respectively, and are able to propagate vertically for long distances. The generation mechanism of the simulated GWs is discussed.

  10. Electromagnetic wave propagation of wireless capsule endoscopy in human body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIM; Eng-Gee; 王炤; 陈瑾慧; TILLO; Tammam; MAN; Ka-lok

    2013-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy(WCE) is a promising technique which has overcome some limitations of traditional diagnosing tools, such as the comfortlessness of the cables and the inability of examining small intestine section. However, this technique is still far from mature and asks for the feasible improvements. For example, the relatively low transmission data rate and the absence of the real-time localization information of the capsule are all important issues. The studies of them rely on the understanding of the electromagnetic wave propagation in human body. Investigation of performance of WCE communication system was carried out by studying electromagnetic(EM) wave propagation of the wireless capsule endoscopy transmission channel. Starting with a pair of antennas working in a human body mimic environment, the signal transmissions and attenuations were examined. The relationship between the signal attenuation and the capsule(transmitter) position, and direction was also evaluated. These results provide important information for real-time localization of the capsule. Moreover, the pair of antennas and the human body were treated as a transmission channel, on which the binary amplitude shift keying(BASK) modulation scheme was used. The relationship between the modulation scheme, data rate and bit error rate was also determined in the case of BASK. With the obtained studies, it make possible to provide valuable information for further studies on the selection of the modulation scheme and the real-time localization of the capsules.

  11. Numerical Homogenization of Jointed Rock Masses Using Wave Propagation Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasmi, Hatem; Hamdi, Essaïeb; Bouden Romdhane, Nejla

    2014-07-01

    Homogenization in fractured rock analyses is essentially based on the calculation of equivalent elastic parameters. In this paper, a new numerical homogenization method that was programmed by means of a MATLAB code, called HLA-Dissim, is presented. The developed approach simulates a discontinuity network of real rock masses based on the International Society of Rock Mechanics (ISRM) scanline field mapping methodology. Then, it evaluates a series of classic joint parameters to characterize density (RQD, specific length of discontinuities). A pulse wave, characterized by its amplitude, central frequency, and duration, is propagated from a source point to a receiver point of the simulated jointed rock mass using a complex recursive method for evaluating the transmission and reflection coefficient for each simulated discontinuity. The seismic parameters, such as delay, velocity, and attenuation, are then calculated. Finally, the equivalent medium model parameters of the rock mass are computed numerically while taking into account the natural discontinuity distribution. This methodology was applied to 17 bench fronts from six aggregate quarries located in Tunisia, Spain, Austria, and Sweden. It allowed characterizing the rock mass discontinuity network, the resulting seismic performance, and the equivalent medium stiffness. The relationship between the equivalent Young's modulus and rock discontinuity parameters was also analyzed. For these different bench fronts, the proposed numerical approach was also compared to several empirical formulas, based on RQD and fracture density values, published in previous research studies, showing its usefulness and efficiency in estimating rapidly the Young's modulus of equivalent medium for wave propagation analysis.

  12. Obliquely propagating large amplitude solitary waves in charge neutral plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Verheest

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals in a consistent way with the implications, for the existence of large amplitude stationary structures in general plasmas, of assuming strict charge neutrality between electrons and ions. With the limit of pair plasmas in mind, electron inertia is retained. Combining in a fluid dynamic treatment the conservation of mass, momentum and energy with strict charge neutrality has indicated that nonlinear solitary waves (as e.g. oscillitons cannot exist in electron-ion plasmas, at no angle of propagation with respect to the static magnetic field. Specifically for oblique propagation, the proof has turned out to be more involved than for parallel or perpendicular modes. The only exception is pair plasmas that are able to support large charge neutral solitons, owing to the high degree of symmetry naturally inherent in such plasmas. The nonexistence, in particular, of oscillitons is attributed to the breakdown of the plasma approximation in dealing with Poisson's law, rather than to relativistic effects. It is hoped that future space observations will allow to discriminate between oscillitons and large wave packets, by focusing on the time variability (or not of the phase, since the amplitude or envelope graphs look very similar.

  13. Wave damping by MHD turbulence and its effect upon cosmic ray propagation in the ISM

    CERN Document Server

    Farmer, A J; Farmer, Alison J.; Goldreich, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Cosmic rays scatter off magnetic irregularities (Alfven waves) with which they are resonant, that is waves of wavelength comparable to their gyroradii. These waves may be generated either by the cosmic rays themselves, if they stream faster than the Alfven speed, or by sources of MHD turbulence. Waves excited by streaming cosmic rays are ideally shaped for scattering, whereas the scattering efficiency of MHD turbulence is severely diminished by its anisotropy. We show that MHD turbulence has an indirect effect on cosmic ray propagation by acting as a damping mechanism for cosmic ray generated waves. The hot (``coronal'') phase of the interstellar medium is the best candidate location for cosmic ray confinement by scattering from self-generated waves. We relate the streaming velocity of cosmic rays to the rate of turbulent dissipation in this medium, for the case in which turbulent damping is the dominant damping mechanism. We conclude that cosmic rays with up to 10^2 GeV could not stream much faster than the ...

  14. Asymptotic Speed of Wave Propagation for A Discrete Reaction-Diffusion Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-xiang Liu; Pei-xuan Weng

    2006-01-01

    We deal with asymptotic speed of wave propagation for a discrete reaction-diffusion equation. We find the minimal wave speed c* from the characteristic equation and show that c* is just the asymptotic speed of wave propagation. The isotropic property and the existence of solution of the initial value problem for the given equation are also discussed.

  15. Modelling Mechanical Wave Propagation: Guidelines and Experimentation of a Teaching-Learning Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Claudio; Guastella, Ivan; Sperandeo-Mineo, Rosa Maria; Tarantino, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    The present paper reports the design process and the experimentation of a teaching-learning sequence about the concept of mechanical wave propagation and the role played by media where waves are propagating. The sequence focuses on the central issue of the relationships between observable phenomena, like macroscopic behaviours of waves, and their…

  16. Transverse wave propagation in photonic crystal based on holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Andy Ying-Guey; Li, Ming Shian; Wu, Shing Trong

    2011-07-04

    This study investigates the transversely propagating waves in a body-centered tetragonal photonic crystal based on a holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal film. Rotating the film reveals three different transverse propagating waves. Degeneracy of optical Bloch waves from reciprocal lattice vectors explains their symmetrical distribution.

  17. Viscothermal wave propagation including acousto-elastic interaction, Part I: Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beltman, W.M.

    1999-01-01

    This research deals with pressure waves in a gas trapped in thin layers or narrow tubes. In these cases viscous and thermal effects can have a significant effect on the propagation of waves. This so-called viscothermal wave propagation is governed by a number of dimensionless parameters. The two mos

  18. Generation of Nanometer Wavelength Acoustic Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Yu. Komina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of acoustic wave generation of nanometer range in plates is shown. The experimental results that show the possible reconfiguring of the generator frequency in YFeO3 with a constant magnetic field are given.

  19. Vertical propagation of baroclinic Kelvin waves along the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nethery, D.; Shankar, D.

    A linear, continuously stratified ocean model is used to investigate vertical propagation of remotely forced, baroclinic Kelvin waves along the Indian west coast. The extent of vertical propagation over the length of the coast is found...

  20. Quadridirectional eigenmode expansion scheme for 2-D modeling of wave propagation in integrated optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohmeyer, Manfred; Honsa, R.; Richter, L.

    2003-01-01

    Superpositions of two perpendicularly oriented bidirectional eigenmode propagation (BEP) fields, composed of basis modes that satisfy Dirichlet boundary conditions, can establish rigorous semianalytical solutions for problems of 2-D fixed-frequency wave propagation on unbounded, cross-shaped domains

  1. Piecewise parabolic method for simulating one-dimensional shear shock wave propagation in tissue-mimicking phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, B. B.; Espíndola, D.; Pinton, G. F.

    2017-06-01

    The recent discovery of shear shock wave generation and propagation in the porcine brain suggests that this new shock phenomenology may be responsible for a broad range of traumatic injuries. Blast-induced head movement can indirectly lead to shear wave generation in the brain, which could be a primary mechanism for injury. Shear shock waves amplify the local acceleration deep in the brain by up to a factor of 8.5, which may tear and damage neurons. Currently, there are numerical methods that can model compressional shock waves, such as comparatively well-studied blast waves, but there are no numerical full-wave solvers that can simulate nonlinear shear shock waves in soft solids. Unlike simplified representations, e.g., retarded time, full-wave representations describe fundamental physical behavior such as reflection and heterogeneities. Here we present a piecewise parabolic method-based solver for one-dimensional linearly polarized nonlinear shear wave in a homogeneous medium and with empirical frequency-dependent attenuation. This method has the advantage of being higher order and more directly extendable to multiple dimensions and heterogeneous media. The proposed numerical scheme is validated analytically and experimentally and compared to other shock capturing methods. A Riemann step-shock problem is used to characterize the numerical dissipation. This dissipation is then tuned to be negligible with respect to the physical attenuation by choosing an appropriate grid spacing. The numerical results are compared to ultrasound-based experiments that measure planar polarized shear shock wave propagation in a tissue-mimicking gelatin phantom. Good agreement is found between numerical results and experiment across a 40 mm propagation distance. We anticipate that the proposed method will be a starting point for the development of a two- and three-dimensional full-wave code for the propagation of nonlinear shear waves in heterogeneous media.

  2. Energy Transport by Propagating Alfvén Waves in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reep, Jeffrey

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic reconnection generates Alfvénic waves, which carry a significant fraction of energy in a solar flare. In previous work, we showed that the dissipation of these waves due to ion-neutral collisions effectively deliver that energy to the upper chromosphere, and are capable of heating the atmosphere strongly enough to drive explosive evaporation. However, that work disregarded travel times of these waves, which is an assumption that we now correct. Using a ray tracing method, we have implemented heating by propagating Alfvénic waves into a hydrodynamics code. We validate the method against an MHD code. We examine the effects of travel times, and find that the waves are extremely efficient at heating the chromosphere, that the ionization level plays a critical role in determining the depths and rate of wave dissipation, that the first waves effectively bore a hole into the chromosphere so that any successive waves travel even deeper into the chromosphere so that the heating falls to greater depths with time, which is opposite to the behavior of an electron beam.

  3. Nonlinear Alfvén wave propagating in ideal MHD plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jugao; Chen, Yinhua; Yu, Mingyang

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of nonlinear Alfvén waves propagating in ideal MHD plasmas is investigated numerically. It is found that in a one-dimensional weakly nonlinear system an Alfvén wave train can excite two longitudinal disturbances, namely an acoustic wave and a ponderomotively driven disturbance, which behave differently for β \\gt 1 and β \\lt 1, where β is the ratio of plasma-to-magnetic pressures. In a strongly nonlinear system, the Alfvén wave train is modulated and can steepen to form shocks, leading to significant dissipation due to appearance of current sheets at magnetic-pressure minima. For periodic boundary condition, we find that the Alfvén wave transfers its energy to the plasma and heats it during the shock formation. In two-dimensional systems, fast magneto-acoustic wave generation due to Alfvén wave phase mixing is considered. It is found that the process depends on the amplitude and frequency of the Alfvén waves, as well as their speed gradients and the pressure of the background plasma.

  4. A study on compressive shock wave propagation in metallic foams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Metallic foam can dissipate a large amount of energy due to its relatively long stress plateau,which makes it widely applicable in the design of structural crashworthiness. However,in some experimental studies,stress enhancement has been observed when the specimens are subjected to intense impact loads,leading to severe damage to the objects being protected. This paper studies this phenomenon on a 2D mass-spring-bar model. With the model,a constitutive relationship of metal foam and corresponding loading and unloading criteria are presented; a nonlinear kinematics equilibrium equation is derived,where an explicit integra-tion algorithm is used to calculate the characteristic of the compressive shock wave propagation within the metallic foam; the effect of heterogeneous distribution of foam microstructures on the shock wave features is also included. The results reveal that under low impact pulses,considerable energy is dissipated during the progressive collapse of foam cells,which then reduces the crush of objects. When the pulse is sufficiently high,on the other hand,stress enhancement may take place,especially in the heterogeneous foams,where high peak stresses usually occur. The characteristics of compressive shock wave propagation in the foam and the magnitude and location of the peak stress produced are strongly dependent on the mechanical properties of the foam material,amplitude and period of the pulse,as well as the homogeneity of the microstructures. This research provides valuable insight into the reliability of the metallic foams used as a protective structure.

  5. Wave propagation simulation of radio occultations based on ECMWF refractivity profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Høeg, Per

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a complete radio occultation simulation environment, including realistic refractivity profiles, wave propagation modeling, instrument modeling, and bending angle retrieval. The wave propagator is used to simulate radio occultation measurements. The radio waves are propagated...... of radio occultations. The output from the wave propagator simulator is used as input to a Full Spectrum Inversion retrieval module which calculates geophysical parameters. These parameters can be compared to the ECMWF atmospheric profiles. The comparison can be used to reveal system errors and get...... a better understanding of the physics. The wave propagation simulations will in this paper also be compared to real measurements. These radio occultations have been exposed to the same atmospheric conditions as the radio occultations simulated by the wave propagator. This comparison reveals that precise...

  6. An Improved Coupling of Numerical and Physical Models for Simulating Wave Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhiwen; Liu, Shu-xue; Li, Jin-xuan

    2014-01-01

    An improved coupling of numerical and physical models for simulating 2D wave propagation is developed in this paper. In the proposed model, an unstructured finite element model (FEM) based Boussinesq equations is applied for the numerical wave simulation, and a 2D piston-type wavemaker is used fo...... that the proposed numerical scheme and transfer function modulation method are efficient for the data transfer from the numerical model to the physical model up to a deterministic level.......An improved coupling of numerical and physical models for simulating 2D wave propagation is developed in this paper. In the proposed model, an unstructured finite element model (FEM) based Boussinesq equations is applied for the numerical wave simulation, and a 2D piston-type wavemaker is used...... for the physical wave generation. An innovative scheme combining fourth-order Lagrange interpolation and Runge-Kutta scheme is described for solving the coupling equation. A Transfer function modulation method is presented to minimize the errors induced from the hydrodynamic invalidity of the coupling model and...

  7. One-dimensional numerical simulation of shock wave propagation induced by vacuum accidents in a beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takiya, Toshio; Terada, Yukihiro; Komura, Akio [Hitachi Zosen Corp., Osaka (Japan); Higashino, Fumio; Miyajima, Shinichi; Ando, Masami

    1997-05-01

    A simulation for shock wave propagation in a vacuum tube has been conducted from the viewpoint of protection from vacuum accidents in beamlines of a synchrotron radiation facility. Inserted devices in beamlines such as absorbers, slits, masks and beryllium windows were replaced with orifices installed in a shock tube as a simulation model. One-dimensional Euler`s equations with friction terms were used for estimating the effects on shock wave decay as well as the effects of friction along a tube on shock attenuation. The results indicated that the entrance diameter of the shock tube was an important parameter for determining the strength of shock waves generated by the expansion of gases at the tube entrance and that the friction effects were too large to delay the arrival time of shock waves at the end of a long tube. Moreover, shock wave propagation in a long beamline model based on the MR beamline in the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics was simulated for designing adequate protection from vacuum accidents. The present simulation provides necessary information for the design of a protection system for vacuum accidents in other facilities. (author)

  8. On wave propagation characteristics in fluid saturated porous materials by a nonlocal Biot theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Lihong; Yu, Yang; Hu, Wentao; Shi, Yufeng; Xu, Changjie

    2016-09-01

    A nonlocal Biot theory is developed by combing Biot theory and nonlocal elasticity theory for fluid saturated porous material. The nonlocal parameter is introduced as an independent variable for describing wave propagation characteristics in poroelastic material. A physical insight on nonlocal term demonstrates that the nonlocal term is a superposition of two effects, one is inertia force effect generated by fluctuation of porosity and the other is pore size effect inherited from nonlocal constitutive relation. Models for situations of excluding fluid nonlocal effect and including fluid nonlocal effect are proposed. Comparison with experiment confirms that model without fluid nonlocal effect is more reasonable for predicting wave characteristics in saturated porous materials. The negative dispersion is observed theoretically which agrees well with the published experimental data. Both wave velocities and quality factors as functions of frequency and nonlocal parameter are examined in practical cases. A few new physical phenomena such as backward propagation and disappearance of slow wave when exceeding critical frequency and disappearing shear wave in high frequency range, which were not predicted by Biot theory, are demonstrated.

  9. Generation of rogue waves in a wave tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, A.

    2012-04-01

    Rogue waves have been reported as causing damages and ship accidents all over the oceans of the world. For this reason in the past decades theoretical studies have been carried out with the double aim of improving the knowledge of their main characteristics and of attempting to predict its sudden appearance. As an effort on this line we are trying to generate them in a water tank. The description of the procedure to do that is the objective of this presentation. After Akhmediev et al. (2011) we use a symmetric spectrum as input on the wave maker to produce waves with a rate(Maximun wave height/ significant wave height) of 2.33 and a kurtosis of 4.77, clearly between the limits of rogue waves. As it was pointed out by Janssen (2003), Onorato et al. (2006) and Kharif, Pelinovsky and Slunyaev (2009) modulation instability is enhanced when waves depart from Gaussian statistics (i.e. big kurtosis) and therefore both numbers enforce the criterion that we are generating genuine rogue waves. The same is confirmed by Shemer (2010) and Dudley et al.(2009) from a different perspective. If besides being symmetrical the spectrum is triangular, following Akhmediev(2011),the generated waves are even more conspicuously rogue waves.

  10. Study Of Three Dimensional Propagation Of Waves In Hollow Poroelastic Circular Cylinders

    OpenAIRE

    Shah S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Employing Biot’s theory of wave propagation in liquid saturated porous media, waves propagating in a hollow poroelastic circular cylinder of infinite extent are investigated. General frequency equations for propagation of waves are obtained each for a pervious and an impervious surface. Degenerate cases of the general frequency equations of pervious and impervious surfaces, when the longitudinal wavenumber k and angular wavenumber n are zero, are considered. When k=0, the plane-strain vibrati...

  11. WAVE PROPAGATION IN TWO-DIMENSIONAL DISORDERED PIEZOELECTRIC PHONONIC CRYSTALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinqiang Li; Fengming Li; Yuesheng Wang; Kikuo Kishimoto

    2008-01-01

    The wave propagation is studied in two-dimensional disordered piezoelectric phononie crystals using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. For different eases of disorder,the transmission coefficients are calculated. The influences of disorders on band gaps are investigated. The results show that the disorder in the piezoelectric phononic crystals has more significant influences on the band gap in the low frequency regions than in the high frequency ones. The relation between the width of band gap and the direction of position disorder is also discussed. When the position disorder is along the direction perpendicular to the wave transmission, the piezoelectric phononic crystals have wider band gaps at low frequency regions than the case of position disorder being along the wave transmission direction. It can also be found that the effect of. size disorder on band gaps is analogous to that of location disorder. When the perturbation coefficient is big, it has more pronounced effects on the pass bands in the piezoelectric phononic crystals with both size and location disorders than in the piezoelectric phononic crystals with single disorder.In higher frequency regions the piezoelectric effect reduces the transmission coefficients. But for larger disorder degree, the effects of the piezoelectricity will be reduced.

  12. Experimental research on dust lifting by propagating shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żydak, P.; Oleszczak, P.; Klemens, R.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the presented work was to study the dust lifting process from a layer of dust behind a propagating shock wave. The experiments were conducted with the use of a shock tube and a specially constructed, five-channel laser optical device enabling measurements at five positions located in one vertical plane along the height of the tube. The system enabled measurements of the delay in lifting up of the dust from the layer, and the vertical velocity of the dust cloud was calculated from the dust concentration measurements. The research was carried out for various initial conditions and for three fractions of black coal dust. In the presented tests, three shock wave velocities: 450, 490 and 518 m/s and three dust layer thicknesses, equal to 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm, were taken into consideration. On the grounds of the obtained experimental results, it was assumed that the vertical component of the lifted dust velocity is a function of the dust particle diameter, the velocity of the air flow in the channel, the layer thickness and the dust bulk density. It appeared, however, that lifting up of the dust from the thick layers, thicker than 1 mm, is a more complex process than that from thin layers and still requires further research. A possible explanation is that the shock wave action upon the thick layer results in its aggregation in the first stage of the dispersing process, which suppresses the dust lifting process.

  13. FDTD Simulation on Terahertz Waves Propagation Through a Dusty Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Maoyan; Zhang, Meng; Li, Guiping; Jiang, Baojun; Zhang, Xiaochuan; Xu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The frequency dependent permittivity for dusty plasmas is provided by introducing the charging response factor and charge relaxation rate of airborne particles. The field equations that describe the characteristics of Terahertz (THz) waves propagation in a dusty plasma sheath are derived and discretized on the basis of the auxiliary differential equation (ADE) in the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Compared with numerical solutions in reference, the accuracy for the ADE FDTD method is validated. The reflection property of the metal Aluminum interlayer of the sheath at THz frequencies is discussed. The effects of the thickness, effective collision frequency, airborne particle density, and charge relaxation rate of airborne particles on the electromagnetic properties of Terahertz waves through a dusty plasma slab are investigated. Finally, some potential applications for Terahertz waves in information and communication are analyzed. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 41104097, 11504252, 61201007, 41304119), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Nos. ZYGX2015J039, ZYGX2015J041), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120185120012)

  14. Love wave propagation in functionally graded piezoelectric material layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianke; Jin, Xiaoying; Wang, Ji; Xian, Kai

    2007-03-01

    An exact approach is used to investigate Love waves in functionally graded piezoelectric material (FGPM) layer bonded to a semi-infinite homogeneous solid. The piezoelectric material is polarized in z-axis direction and the material properties change gradually with the thickness of the layer. We here assume that all material properties of the piezoelectric layer have the same exponential function distribution along the x-axis direction. The analytical solutions of dispersion relations are obtained for electrically open or short circuit conditions. The effects of the gradient variation of material constants on the phase velocity, the group velocity, and the coupled electromechanical factor are discussed in detail. The displacement, electric potential, and stress distributions along thickness of the graded layer are calculated and plotted. Numerical examples indicate that appropriate gradient distributing of the material properties make Love waves to propagate along the surface of the piezoelectric layer, or a bigger electromechanical coupling factor can be obtained, which is in favor of acquiring a better performance in surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices.

  15. Theoretical Study of Wave Breaking for Nonlinear Water Waves Propagating on a Sloping Bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Hsu, H. C.; Li, M. S.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, a third-order asymptotic solution in a Lagrangian framework describing nonlinear water wave propagation on the surface of a uniform sloping bottom is presented. A two-parameter perturbation method is used to develop a new mathematical derivation. The particle trajectories, wave pressure and Lagrangian velocity potential are obtained as a function of the nonlinear wave steepness and the bottom slope perturbed to third order. This theoretical solution in Lagrangian form satisfies state of the normal pressure at the free surface. The condition of the conservation of mass flux is examined in detail for the first time. The two important properties in Lagrangian coordinates, Lagrangian wave frequency and Lagrangian mean level, are included in the third-order solution. The solution can also be used to estimate the mean return current for waves progressing over the sloping bottom. The Lagrangian solution untangle the description of the features of wave shoaling in the direction of wave propagation from deep to shallow water, as well as the process of successive deformation of a wave profile and water particle trajectories leading to wave breaking. A series of experiment was conducted to validate the obtained theoretical solution. The proposed solution will be used to determine the wave shoaling and breaking process and the comparisons between the experimental and theoretical results are excellent. For example, the variations of phase velocity on sloping bottom are obtained by 7 set of two close wave gauges and the theoretical result could accurately predict the measured phase velocity. The theoretical wave breaking index can be derived by use of the kinematic stability parameter (K.P.S). The comparisons between the theory, experiment (present study, Iwagali et al.(1974), Deo et al.(2003) and Tsai et al.(2005)) and empirical formula of Goda (2004) for the breaking index(u/C) versus the relative water depth(d/L) under two different bottom slopes shows that the

  16. Frequency Domain Modelling of Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Layered Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Felix; Lünenschloss, Peter; Mai, Juliane; Wagner, Norman; Töpfer, Hannes; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The amount of water in porous media such as soils and rocks is a key parameter when water resources are under investigation. Especially the quantitative spatial distribution and temporal evolution of water contents in soil formations are needed. In high frequency electromagnetic applications soil water content is quantitatively derived from the propagation behavior of electromagnetic waves along waveguides embedded in soil formations. The spatial distribution of the dielectric material properties along the waveguide can be estimated by numerical solving of the inverse problem based on the full wave forward model in time or frequency domain. However, current approaches mostly neglect or approximate the frequency dependence of the electromagnetic material properties of transfer function of the waveguide. As a first prove of concept a full two port broadband frequency domain forward model for propagation of transverse electromagnetic (TEM) waves in coaxial waveguide has been implemented. It is based on the propagation matrix approach for layered transmission line sections. Depending on the complexity of the material different models for the frequency dependent complex permittivity were applied. For the validation of the model a broadband frequency domain measurement with network analyzer technique was used. The measurement is based on a 20 cm long 50 Ohm 20/46 coaxial transmission line cell considering inhomogeneous material distributions. This approach allows (i) an increase of the waveguide calibration accuracy in comparison to conventional TDR based technique and (ii) the consideration of the broadband permittivity spectrum of the porous material. In order to systematic analyze the model, theoretical results were compared with measurements as well as 3D broadband finite element modeling of homogeneous and layered media in the coaxial transmission line cell. Defined standards (Teflon, dry glass beads, de-ionized water) were placed inside the line as the dielectric

  17. Shock wave evolution and discontinuity propagation for relativistic superfluid hydrodynamics with spontaneous symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Sun, E-mail: szhang@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology (J-CPNPC), PMO-NJU, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2014-02-05

    In this Letter, we have studied the shock wave and discontinuity propagation for relativistic superfluid with spontaneous U(1) symmetry breaking in the framework of hydrodynamics. General features of shock waves are provided, the propagation of discontinuity and the sound modes of shock waves are also presented. The first sound and the second sound are identified as the propagation of discontinuity, and the results are in agreement with earlier theoretical studies. Moreover, a differential equation, called the growth equation, is obtained to describe the decay and growth of the discontinuity propagating along its normal trajectory. The solution is in an integral form and special cases of diverging waves are also discussed.

  18. DETERMINATION OF TRANSVERSE DENSITY STRUCTURING FROM PROPAGATING MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arregui, I.; Asensio Ramos, A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Pascoe, D. J., E-mail: iarregui@iac.es [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-01

    We present a Bayesian seismology inversion technique for propagating magnetohydrodynamic transverse waves observed in coronal waveguides. The technique uses theoretical predictions for the spatial damping of propagating kink waves in transversely inhomogeneous coronal waveguides. It combines wave amplitude damping length scales along the waveguide with theoretical results for resonantly damped propagating kink waves to infer the plasma density variation across the oscillating structures. Provided that the spatial dependence of the velocity amplitude along the propagation direction is measured and the existence of two different damping regimes is identified, the technique would enable us to fully constrain the transverse density structuring, providing estimates for the density contrast and its transverse inhomogeneity length scale.

  19. Determination of Transverse Density Structuring from Propagating MHD Waves in the Solar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Arregui, I; Pascoe, D J

    2013-01-01

    We present a Bayesian seismology inversion technique for propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) transverse waves observed in coronal waveguides. The technique uses theoretical predictions for the spatial damping of propagating kink waves in transversely inhomogeneous coronal waveguides. It combines wave amplitude damping length scales along the waveguide with theoretical results for resonantly damped propagating kink waves to infer the plasma density variation across the oscillating structures. Provided the spatial dependence of the velocity amplitude along the propagation direction is measured and the existence of two different damping regimes is identified, the technique would enable us to fully constrain the transverse density structuring, providing estimates for the density contrast and its transverse inhomogeneity length scale.

  20. Time-resolved study of laser initiated shock wave propagation in superfluid 4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Allan; Buelna, Xavier; Popov, Evgeny; Eloranta, Jussi

    2016-09-01

    Intense shock waves in superfluid 4He between 1.7 and 2.1 K are generated by rapidly expanding confined plasma from laser ablation of a metal target immersed in the liquid. The resulting shock fronts in the liquid with initial velocities up to ca. Mach 10 are visualized by time-resolved shadowgraph photography. These high intensity shocks decay within 500 ns into less energetic shock waves traveling at Mach 2, which have their lifetime in the microsecond time scale. Based on the analysis using the classical Rankine-Hugoniot theory, the shock fronts created remain in the solid phase up to 1 μs and the associated thermodynamic state appears outside the previously studied region. The extrapolated initial shock pressure of 0.5 GPa is comparable to typical plasma pressures produced during liquid phase laser ablation. A secondary shock originating from fast heat propagation on the metal surface is also observed and a lower limit estimate for the heat propagation velocity is measured as 7 × 104 m/s. In the long-time limit, the high intensity shocks turn into liquid state waves that propagate near the speed of sound.

  1. Propagation and Breaking at High Altitudes of Gravity Waves Excited by Tropospheric Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.; Garcia, Rolando R.

    1996-01-01

    An anelastic approximation is used with a time-variable coordinate transformation to formulate a two-dimensional numerical model that describes the evolution of gravity waves. The model is solved using a semi-Lagrangian method with monotone (nonoscillatory) interpolation of all advected fields. The time-variable transformation is used to generate disturbances at the lower boundary that approximate the effect of a traveling line of thunderstorms (a squall line) or of flow over a broad topographic obstacle. The vertical propagation and breaking of the gravity wave field (under conditions typical of summer solstice) is illustrated for each of these cases. It is shown that the wave field at high altitudes is dominated by a single horizontal wavelength; which is not always related simply to the horizontal dimension of the source. The morphology of wave breaking depends on the horizontal wavelength; for sufficiently short waves, breaking involves roughly one half of the wavelength. In common with other studies, it is found that the breaking waves undergo "self-acceleration," such that the zonal-mean intrinsic frequency remains approximately constant in spite of large changes in the background wind. It is also shown that many of the features obtained in the calculations can be understood in terms of linear wave theory. In particular, linear theory provides insights into the wavelength of the waves that break at high altitudes, the onset and evolution of breaking. the horizontal extent of the breaking region and its position relative to the forcing, and the minimum and maximum altitudes where breaking occurs. Wave breaking ceases at the altitude where the background dissipation rate (which in our model is a proxy for molecular diffusion) becomes greater than the rate of dissipation due to wave breaking, This altitude, in effect, the model turbopause, is shown to depend on a relatively small number of parameters that characterize the waves and the background state.

  2. Vibration and wave propagation characteristics of multisegmented elastic beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, Adnan H.; Hawwa, Muhammad A.

    1990-01-01

    Closed form analytical solutions are derived for the vibration and wave propagation of multisegmented elastic beams. Each segment is modeled as a Timoshenko beam with possible inclusion of material viscosity, elastic foundation and axial forces. Solutions are obtained by using transfer matrix methods. According to these methods formal solutions are first constructed which relate the deflection, slope, moment and shear force of one end of the individual segment to those of the other. By satisfying appropriate continuity conditions at segment junctions, a global 4x4 matrix results which relates the deflection, slope, moment and shear force of one end of the beam to those of the other. If any boundary conditions are subsequently invoked on the ends of the beam one gets the appropriate characteristic equation for the natural frequencies. Furthermore, by invoking appropriate periodicity conditions the dispersion relation for a periodic system is obtained. A variety of numerical examples are included.

  3. Two-dimensional wave propagation in layered periodic media

    KAUST Repository

    Quezada de Luna, Manuel

    2014-09-16

    We study two-dimensional wave propagation in materials whose properties vary periodically in one direction only. High order homogenization is carried out to derive a dispersive effective medium approximation. One-dimensional materials with constant impedance exhibit no effective dispersion. We show that a new kind of effective dispersion may arise in two dimensions, even in materials with constant impedance. This dispersion is a macroscopic effect of microscopic diffraction caused by spatial variation in the sound speed. We analyze this dispersive effect by using highorder homogenization to derive an anisotropic, dispersive effective medium. We generalize to two dimensions a homogenization approach that has been used previously for one-dimensional problems. Pseudospectral solutions of the effective medium equations agree to high accuracy with finite volume direct numerical simulations of the variable-coeffi cient equations.

  4. Converging spherical wave propagation in a hemispherical solid lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaoju; Ye, Xuehua; Chen, Junfeng

    2006-06-01

    The propagation of converging spherical waves through a hemispherical solid lens (HSL) is studied, and the multiple reflections inside the HSL are considered. It is found that the reflectivity and transmissivity have an oscillatory behaviour related to the optical radius of the HSL. When the refractive index of the HSL is smaller than that of the sample, the small mismatch in refractive indices is preferable for transmission-mode microscopy. But when the refractive index of the HSL is larger than that of the sample, the reflectivity increases rapidly as the mismatch in refractive indices and the converging angle of incident light increase, the larger mismatch and converging angle are useful for reflection-mode microscopy. The magnitude of the whole reflectivity and its modulation depth are strongly sensitive to the incident polarization, which is also discussed.

  5. A nonlinear RDF model for waves propagating in shallow water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王厚杰; 杨作升; 李瑞杰; 张军

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a composite explicit nonlinear dispersion relation is presented with reference to Stokes 2nd order dispersion relation and the empirical relation of Hedges. The explicit dispersion relation has such advantages that it can smoothly match the Stokes relation in deep and intermediate water and Hedgs’s relation in shallow water. As an explicit formula, it separates the nonlinear term from the linear dispersion relation. Therefore it is convenient to obtain the numerical solution of nonlinear dispersion relation. The present formula is combined with the modified mild-slope equation including nonlinear effect to make a Refraction-Diffraction (RDF) model for wave propagating in shallow water. This nonlinear model is verified over a complicated topography with two submerged elliptical shoals resting on a slope beach. The computation results compared with those obtained from linear model show that at present the nonlinear RDF model can predict the nonlinear characteristics and the combined refracti

  6. Electromagnetic wave propagation through a slab of a dispersive medium

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    A method is proposed for the analysis of the propagation of electromagnetic waves through a homogeneous slab of a medium with Drude-Lorentz dispersion behavior, and excited by a causal sinusoidal source. An expression of the time dependent field, free from branch-cuts in the plane of complex frequencies, is established. This method provides the complete temporal response in both the steady-state and transient regimes in terms of discrete poles contributions. The Sommerfeld and Brillouin precursors are retrieved and the corresponding set of poles are identified. In addition, the contribution in the transient field of the resonance frequency in the Drude-Lorentz model is exhybited, and the effect of reflections resulting from the refractive index mismatch at the interfaces of the slab are analyzed.

  7. MHD waves generated by high-frequency photospheric vortex motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fedun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss simulations of MHD wave generation and propagation through a three-dimensional open magnetic flux tube in the lower solar atmosphere. By using self-similar analytical solutions for modelling the magnetic field in Cartesian coordinate system, we have constructed a 3-D magnetohydrostatic configuration which is used as the initial condition for non-linear MHD wave simulations. For a driver we have implemented a high-frequency vortex-type motion at the footpoint region of the open magnetic flux tube. It is found that the implemented swirly source is able to excite different types of wave modes, i.e. sausage, kink and torsional Alfvén modes. Analysing these waves by magneto-seismology tools could provide insight into the magnetic structure of the lower solar atmosphere.

  8. HF wave propagation and induced ionospheric turbulence in the magnetic equatorial region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, B.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2016-03-01

    The propagation and excitation of artificial ionospheric turbulence in the magnetic equatorial region by high-frequency electromagnetic (EM) waves injected into the overhead ionospheric layer is examined. EM waves with ordinary (O) mode polarization reach the critical layer only if their incidence angle is within the Spitze cone. Near the critical layer the wave electric field is linearly polarized and directed parallel to the magnetic field lines. For large enough amplitudes, the O mode becomes unstable to the four-wave oscillating two-stream instability and the three-wave parametric decay instability driving large-amplitude Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. The interaction between the induced Langmuir turbulence and electrons located within the 50-100 km wide transmitter heating cone at an altitude of 230 km can potentially accelerate the electrons along the magnetic field to several tens to a few hundreds of eV, far beyond the thresholds for optical emissions and ionization of the neutral gas. It could furthermore result in generation of shear Alfvén waves such as those recently observed in laboratory experiments at the University of California, Los Angeles Large Plasma Device.

  9. Modulation of propagation-invariant Localized Waves for FSO communication systems

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    The novel concept of spatio-Temporal modulation of Nyquist pulses is introduced, and the resulting wave-packets are termed Nyquist Localized Waves (LWs). Ideal Nyquist LWs belong to the generic family of LW solutions and can propagate indefinitely in unbounded media without attenuation or chromatic dispersion. The possibility of modulating Nyquist LWs for free-space optical (FSO) communication systems is demonstrated using two different modulation techniques. The first technique is on-off keying (OOK) with alternate mark inversion (AMI) coding for 1-bit per symbol transmission, and the second one is 16-Ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) for 4-bits per symbol transmission. Aspects related to the performance, detection and generation of the spatio-Temporally coupled wave-packets are discussed and future research directions are outlined. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  10. Acoustic propagation from a spiral wave front source in an ocean environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefner, Brian T; Dzikowicz, Benjamin R

    2012-03-01

    A spiral wave front source generates a pressure field that has a phase that depends linearly on the azimuthal angle at which it is measured. This differs from a point source that has a phase that is constant with direction. The spiral wave front source has been developed for use in navigation; however, very little work has been done to model this source in an ocean environment. To this end, the spiral wave front analogue of the acoustic point source is developed and is shown to be related to the point source through a simple transformation. This makes it possible to transform the point source solution in a particular ocean environment into the solution for a spiral source in the same environment. Applications of this transformation are presented for a spiral source near the ocean surface and seafloor as well as for the more general case of propagation in a horizontally stratified waveguide.

  11. Annual report 1992/93, FOA 38. Radio systems and wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildh, I. M.

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of the division of Radio Systems and Wave Propagation is to carry out research and development in the field of secure and robust radio communications for Sweden's national defense. This is the Annual Report for fiscal year 1992/93 of the Division of Radio Systems and Wave Propagation. The division is responsible for research and development of secure radio communication for information transmission. We are also responsible for wave propagation research within a frequency range from LF to SHF. We carry out applied research in fields like antijamming systems, modulation, error correcting codes, wave propagation and digital signal processing. The wave propagation research is carried out by basic research so the demands from new techniques and new radio systems for accurate propagation models can be achieved.

  12. Acoustic waves: should they be propagated forward in time, or forward in space?

    CERN Document Server

    Kinsler, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of acoustic waves can be evaluated in two ways: either as a temporal, or a spatial propagation. Propagating in space provides the considerable advantage of being able to handle dispersion and propagation across interfaces with remarkable efficiency; but propagating in time is more physical and gives correctly behaved reflections and scattering without effort. Which should be chosen in a given situation, and what compromises might have to be made? Here the natural behaviors of each choice of propagation are compared and contrasted for an ordinary second order wave equation, the time-dependent diffusion wave equation, an elastic rod wave equation, and the Stokes'/ van Wijngaarden's equations, each case illuminating a characteristic feature of the technique. Either choice of propagation axis enables a partitioning the wave equation that gives rise to a directional factorization based on a natural "reference" dispersion relation. The resulting exact coupled bidirectional equations then reduce to a s...

  13. Three dimensional image-based simulation of ultrasonic wave propagation in polycrystalline metal using phase-field modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahata, K; Sugahara, H; Barth, M; Köhler, B; Schubert, F

    2016-04-01

    When modeling ultrasonic wave propagation in metals, it is important to introduce mesoscopic crystalline structures because the anisotropy of the crystal structure and the heterogeneity of grains disturb ultrasonic waves. In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) polycrystalline structure generated by multiphase-field modeling was introduced to ultrasonic simulation for nondestructive testing. 3D finite-element simulations of ultrasonic waves were validated and compared with visualization results obtained from laser Doppler vibrometer measurements. The simulation results and measurements showed good agreement with respect to the velocity and front shape of the pressure wave, as well as multiple scattering due to grains. This paper discussed the applicability of a transversely isotropic approach to ultrasonic wave propagation in a polycrystalline metal with columnar structures.

  14. Semiclassical methods for high frequency wave propagation in periodic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgadillo, Ricardo A.

    We will study high-frequency wave propagation in periodic media. A typical example is given by the Schrodinger equation in the semiclassical regime with a highly oscillatory periodic potential and external smooth potential. This problem presents a numerical challenge when in the semiclassical regime. For example, conventional methods such as finite differences and spectral methods leads to high numerical cost, especially in higher dimensions. For this reason, asymptotic methods like the frozen Gaussian approximation (FGA) was developed to provide an efficient computational tool. Prior to the development of the FGA, the geometric optics and Gaussian beam methods provided an alternative asymptotic approach to solving the Schrodinger equation efficiently. Unlike the geometric optics and Gaussian beam methods, the FGA does not lose accuracy due to caustics or beam spreading. In this thesis, we will briefly review the geometric optics, Gaussian beam, and FGA methods. The mathematical techniques used by these methods will aid us in formulating the Bloch-decomposition based FGA. The Bloch-decomposition FGA generalizes the FGA to wave propagation in periodic media. We will establish the convergence of the Bloch-decomposition based FGA to the true solution for Schrodinger equation and develop a gauge-invariant algorithm for the Bloch-decomposition based FGA. This algorithm will avoid the numerical difficulty of computing the gauge-dependent Berry phase. We will show the numerical performance of our algorithm by several one-dimensional examples. Lastly, we will propose a time-splitting FGA-based artificial boundary conditions for solving the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLS) on an unbounded domain. The NLS will be split into two parts, the linear and nonlinear parts. For the linear part we will use the following absorbing boundary strategy: eliminate Gaussian functions whose centers are too distant to a fixed domain.

  15. Two models of anisotropic propagation of a cardiac excitation wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erofeev, I. S.; Agladze, K. I.

    2014-11-01

    Propagation of the action potential in the real heart is direction-dependent (anisotropic). We propose two general physical models explaining this anisotropy on the cellular level. The first, "delay" model takes into account the frequency of the cell-cell transitions in different directions of propagation, assuming each transition requires some small time interval. The second model relies on the assumption that the action potential transmits to the next cell only from the area at the pole of the previous cell. We estimated parameters of both models by doing optical mapping and fluorescent staining of cardiac cell samples grown on polymer fiber substrate. Both models gave reasonable estimations, but predicted different behaviors of the anisotropy ratio (ratio of the highest and lowest wave velocities) after addition of the suppressor of sodium channels such as lidocaine. The results of the experiment on lidocaine effect on anisotropy ratio were in favor of the first, "delay" model. Estimated average cell-cell transition delay was 240 ± 80 μs, which is close to the characteristic values of synaptic delay.

  16. Optimised prefactored compact schemes for linear wave propagation phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rona, A.; Spisso, I.; Hall, E.; Bernardini, M.; Pirozzoli, S.

    2017-01-01

    A family of space- and time-optimised prefactored compact schemes are developed that minimise the computational cost for given levels of numerical error in wave propagation phenomena, with special reference to aerodynamic sound. This work extends the approach of Pirozzoli [1] to the MacCormack type prefactored compact high-order schemes developed by Hixon [2], in which their shorter Padé stencil from the prefactorisation leads to a simpler enforcement of numerical boundary conditions. An explicit low-storage multi-step Runge-Kutta integration advances the states in time. Theoretical predictions for spatial and temporal error bounds are derived for the cost-optimised schemes and compared against benchmark schemes of current use in computational aeroacoustic applications in terms of computational cost for a given relative numerical error value. One- and two-dimensional test cases are presented to examine the effectiveness of the cost-optimised schemes for practical flow computations. An effectiveness up to about 50% higher than the standard schemes is verified for the linear one-dimensional advection solver, which is a popular baseline solver kernel for computational physics problems. A substantial error reduction for a given cost is also obtained in the more complex case of a two-dimensional acoustic pulse propagation, provided the optimised schemes are made to operate close to their nominal design points.

  17. The analysis of optical wave beams propagation in lens systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, I.; Mosentsov, S.; Moskaletz, O.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper some aspects of the formation and propagation of optical wave beams in lens systems were considered. As an example, the two-lens optical information processing system was considered. Analysis of the two-lens optical circuit has been made with a systems approach perspective. As part of the radio-optical analogies had been applied certain provisions of the theory of dynamical systems to the spatial optical system. The lens system is represented as a simple series-connected optical elements with known spatial impulse response. General impulse response of such a system has been received, as well as consider some special cases of the impulse response. The question of the relationship between the parameters and the size of the input aperture lenses for undistorted transmission of the optical signal has been considered. Analysis of the energy loss resulting from the finite aperture of the lens. It's based on an assessment of the fraction of radiation that propagates beyond the lens. Analysis showed that the energy losses depend explicitly on the following parameters: radiation wavelength, distance between input aperture and lens, and ratio of the input aperture and lens aperture. With the computer help simulation the dependence of losses was shown on the above parameters

  18. Radio-wave propagation for space communications systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    The most recent information on the effects of Earth's atmosphere on space communications systems is reviewed. The design and reliable operation of satellite systems that provide the many applications in space which rely on the transmission of radio waves for communications and scientific purposes are dependent on the propagation characteristics of the transmission path. The presence of atmospheric gases, clouds, fog, precipitation, and turbulence causes uncontrolled variations in the signal characteristics. These variations can result in a reduction of the quality and reliability of the transmitted information. Models and other techniques are used in the prediction of atmospheric effects as influenced by frequency, geography, elevation angle, and type of transmission. Recent data on performance characteristics obtained from direct measurements on satellite links operating to above 30 GHz have been reviewed. Particular emphasis has been placed on the effects of precipitation on the Earth/space path, including rain attenuation, and ice particle depolarization. Other factors are sky noise, antenna gain degradation, scintillations, and bandwidth coherence. Each of the various propagation factors has an effect on design criteria for communications systems. These criteria include link reliability, power margins, noise contribution, modulation and polarization factors, channel cross talk, error rate, and bandwidth limitations.

  19. Second harmonic wave generation from a nonlinear combination of volume wave and overdense plasma in negative permeability space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Akinori; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Osamu

    2016-09-01

    We clarify the relation between second harmonic wave (SH wave) and plasma generation in various experimental conditions by detecting properties of propagating electromagnetic waves (EM waves). Plasma has a nonlinear reaction against EM wave, generating harmonic waves which depends on electron density ne. In the case with increased ne, EM wave comes to be prevented from going into plasma with negative permittivity ɛp. Double-split-ring resonators (DSRRs), one of metamaterials, make permeability μD negative. We have shown that EM wave being volume wave can propagate into the combination of overdense plasma and DSRRs because of real negative value refractive index N. In our previous paper, we have confirmed enhanced SH wave (4.9 GHz) generation in the composite with 2.45-GHz input. In this report, we show the dependence of the SH wave emission with plasma generation on plasma parameters and gas conditions of plasma. Furthermore, we show the phase change with N variation of the composite space in the case with various input power as the proof of the negative index state.

  20. Anomalous Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves in Anisotropic Media with a Unique Dispersion Relation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU Wei-Xing; LUO Hai-Lu; LI Fei; REN Zhong-Zhou

    2006-01-01

    @@ We investigate the propagation of electromagnetic waves at the interface between an isotropic material and the anisotropic medium with a unique dispersion relation. We show that the refraction behaviour of E-polarized waves is opposite to that of H-polarized waves, though the dispersion relations for E- and H-polarized waves are the same. It is found that waves exhibit different propagation properties in anisotropic media with different sign combinations of the permittivity and permeability tensors. Some interesting properties of propagation are also found in the special anisotropic media, leading to potential applications.