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Sample records for wavelength-dependent collagen fragmentation

  1. Topology optimised wavelength dependent splitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, K. K.; Burgos Leon, J.; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    A photonic crystal wavelength dependent splitter has been constructed by utilising topology optimisation1. The splitter has been fabricated in a silicon-on-insulator material (Fig. 1). The topology optimised wavelength dependent splitter demonstrates promising 3D FDTD simulation results. This com......A photonic crystal wavelength dependent splitter has been constructed by utilising topology optimisation1. The splitter has been fabricated in a silicon-on-insulator material (Fig. 1). The topology optimised wavelength dependent splitter demonstrates promising 3D FDTD simulation results...

  2. Urinary collagen fragments are significantly altered in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    ) with 85% (95% CI: 81-88%) accuracy. Specific collagen fragments were associated with diabetes and type of diabetes indicating changes in collagen turnover and extracellular matrix as one hallmark of the molecular pathophysiology of diabetes. Additional biomarkers including inflammatory processes and pro...

  3. Molecular Organization of Various Collagen Fragments as Revealed by Atomic Force Microscopy and Diffusion-Ordered NMR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stötzel, S.; Schurink, M.; Wienk, H.L.J.; Siebler, U.; Burg-Roderfeld, M.; Eckert, T.; Kulik, B.; Wechselberger, R.W.; Sewing, J.; Steinmeyer, J.; Oesser, S.; Boelens, R.; Siebert, H.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous mixtures of collagen fragments can be used as nutrition supplement or as key ingredients for ointments with therapeutic relevance in wound healing. Some mixtures of collagen fragments are referred to as collagen hydrolysates owing to the production process with hydrolytic enzymes.

  4. Quantitation of collagen fragments and gelatin by deconvolution of polarimetry denaturation curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condell, R A; Sakai, N; Mercado, R T; Larenas, E

    1988-09-01

    A method for quantitating nicked or shortened molecules (fragments) in pepsinized bovine type I collagen preparations using polarimetry thermal denaturation curves is described. The shortened molecules denature about 4 degrees C lower than intact collagen molecules. The analog output of a polarimeter was digitized and stored on a microcomputer disk. A BASIC program was written which retrieves the specific rotation data from the disk, smooths the data with a boxcar average, and plots the derivative of the denaturation curve. The derivative curve was deconvoluted by fitting three Gaussian curves to the derivative curve using published algorithms. The area of the Gaussian centered at 37 degrees C was proportional to the amount of collagen fragments. A good correlation between the amount of fragments determined by polarimetry and by a trypsin sensitivity assay was observed. The overall precision of the method was about 10% RSD, and the method was repeatable by multiple analysts. Application of the method to reconstituted fibrillar collagen samples showed that more fragments are generated when pepsin digestion time is lengthened. By fitting a fourth Gaussian component to the derivative curve, the method can also be used to determine relative amounts of denatured collagen (helix partially unwound but alpha chains not nicked). The detection limit for denatured collagen is about 20%.

  5. Matrilysin cleavage of corneal collagen type XVIII NC1 domain and generation of a 28-kDa fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H C; Chang, J H; Jain, S; Gabison, E E; Kure, T; Kato, T; Fukai, N; Azar, D T

    2001-10-01

    To localize endostatin and collagen type XVIII in human corneas and to characterize the enzymatic action of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the cleavage of collagen type XVIII and generation of endostatin in the cornea. Anti-endostatin and anti-hinge antibodies were generated using peptide fragments corresponding to the endostatin region and the adjacent nonendostatin hinge region of collagen XVIII noncollagenous (NC)1 domain, respectively. Confocal immunostaining was performed to localize collagen XVIII in human corneas. SV40-immortalized corneal epithelial cells were immunoprecipitated and incubated with active MMP-1, -2, -3, -7, or -9, and Western blot analysis was performed to study collagen XVIII cleavage. Incubation with MMP-7 was performed at various concentrations (0, 2, 4, and 6 microg/ml) and time intervals (0, 1, 5, and 12 hours). Purified recombinant NC1 fragment of collagen XVIII was also digested with MMP-7, and the cleavage product was sequenced. Collagen XVIII was immunolocalized to the human corneal epithelium, epithelial basement membrane, and Descemet membrane. Western blot analysis demonstrated a 180- to 200-kDa band corresponding to collagen XVIII. MMP-7 (but not MMP-1, -2, -3, and -9) cleaved corneal epithelium-derived collagen XVIII to generate a 28-kDa endostatin-spanning fragment in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion. MMP-7 cleaved purified recombinant 34-kDa NC1 fragment of collagen XVIII in the hinge region to generate a 28-kDa fragment. Collagen XVIII is present in human cornea. MMP-7 cleaves the collagen XVIII NC1 domain to generate a 28-kDa fragment in the cornea.

  6. Semitransparent organic solar cells with organic wavelength dependent reflectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galagan, Y.O.; Debije, M.G.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Semitransparent organic solar cells employing solution-processable organic wavelength dependent reflectors of chiral nematic (cholesteric) liquid crystals are demonstrated. The cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) reflects only in a narrow band of the solar spectrum and remains transparent for the

  7. Stromal alterations in ovarian cancers via wavelength dependent Second Harmonic Generation microscopy and optical scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilbury, Karissa B; Campbell, Kirby R; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Salih, Sana M; Patankar, Manish; Campagnola, Paul J

    2017-02-06

    Ovarian cancer remains the most deadly gynecological cancer with a poor aggregate survival rate; however, the specific rates are highly dependent on the stage of the disease upon diagnosis. Current screening and imaging tools are insufficient to detect early lesions and are not capable of differentiating the subtypes of ovarian cancer that may benefit from specific treatments. As an alternative to current screening and imaging tools, we utilized wavelength dependent collagen-specific Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) imaging microscopy and optical scattering measurements to probe the structural differences in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of normal stroma, benign tumors, endometrioid tumors, and low and high-grade serous tumors. The SHG signatures of the emission directionality and conversion efficiency as well as the optical scattering are related to the organization of collagen on the sub-micron size scale and encode structural information. The wavelength dependence of these readouts adds additional characterization of the size and distribution of collagen fibrils/fibers relative to the interrogating wavelengths. We found a strong wavelength dependence of these metrics that are related to significant structural differences in the collagen organization and are consistent with the dualistic classification of type I and II serous tumors. Moreover, type I endometrioid tumors have strongly differing ECM architecture than the serous malignancies. The SHG metrics and optical scattering measurements were used to form a linear discriminant model to classify the tissues, and we obtained high accuracy (>90%) between high-grade serous tumors from the other tissue types. High-grade serous tumors account for ~70% of ovarian cancers, and this delineation has potential clinical applications in terms of supplementing histological analysis, understanding the etiology, as well as development of an in vivo screening tool. SHG and optical scattering measurements provide sub

  8. Wavelength dependence of silicon avalanche photodiode fabricated by CMOS process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed Napiah, Zul Atfyi Fauzan; Hishiki, Takuya; Iiyama, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    Avalanche photodiodes fabricated by CMOS process (CMOS-APDs) have features of high avalanche gain below 10 V, wide bandwidth over 5 GHz, and easy integration with electronic circuits. In CMOS-APDs, guard ring structure is introduced for high-speed operation by canceling photo-generated carriers in the substrate at the sacrifice of the responsivity. We describe here wavelength dependence of the responsivity and the bandwidth of the CMOS-APDs with shorted and opened guard ring structure.

  9. Urinary collagen fragments are significantly altered in diabetes: a link to pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Maahs

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM is variable, comprising different inflammatory and immune responses. Proteome analysis holds the promise of delivering insight into the pathophysiological changes associated with diabetes. Recently, we identified and validated urinary proteomics biomarkers for diabetes. Based on these initial findings, we aimed to further validate urinary proteomics biomarkers specific for diabetes in general, and particularity associated with either type 1 (T1D or type 2 diabetes (T2D.Therefore, the low-molecular-weight urinary proteome of 902 subjects from 10 different centers, 315 controls and 587 patients with T1D (n = 299 or T2D (n = 288, was analyzed using capillary-electrophoresis mass-spectrometry. The 261 urinary biomarkers (100 were sequenced previously discovered in 205 subjects were validated in an additional 697 subjects to distinguish DM subjects (n = 382 from control subjects (n = 315 with 94% (95% CI: 92-95 accuracy in this study. To identify biomarkers that differentiate T1D from T2D, a subset of normoalbuminuric patients with T1D (n = 68 and T2D (n = 42 was employed, enabling identification of 131 biomarker candidates (40 were sequenced differentially regulated between T1D and T2D. These biomarkers distinguished T1D from T2D in an independent validation set of normoalbuminuric patients (n = 108 with 88% (95% CI: 81-94% accuracy, and in patients with impaired renal function (n = 369 with 85% (95% CI: 81-88% accuracy. Specific collagen fragments were associated with diabetes and type of diabetes indicating changes in collagen turnover and extracellular matrix as one hallmark of the molecular pathophysiology of diabetes. Additional biomarkers including inflammatory processes and pro-thrombotic alterations were observed.These findings, based on the largest proteomic study performed to date on subjects with DM, validate the previously described biomarkers for DM, and pinpoint differences in the urinary

  10. The type II collagen fragments Helix-II and CTX-II reveal different enzymatic pathways of human cartilage collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charni-Ben Tabassi, N; Desmarais, S; Jensen, Anne-Christine Bay

    2008-01-01

    that they may be generated through different collagenolytic pathways. In this study we analyzed the release of Helix-II and CTX-II from human cartilage collagen by the proteinases reported to play a role in cartilage degradation. METHODS: In vitro, human articular cartilage extract was incubated with activated...... sections were then incubated for up to 84h in the presence or absence of E-64 and GM6001, inhibitors of cysteine proteases and MMPs, respectively. RESULTS: In vitro, Cats K, L and S generated large amount of Helix-II, but not CTX-II. Cat B generated CTX-II fragment, but destroyed Helix-II immunoreactivity...

  11. Porphyromonas gingivalis Induced Fragmentation of Type IV Collagen Through Macrophage-Activated MMP-9: (In Vitro Study of Collagenolytic Mechanism in Pathogenesis of Atherosclerotic Plaque Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nurul Mubarokah

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Periodontitis is caused mostly by Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.gingivalis and it is related to acute coronary syndrome. P.gingivalis  readily invades blood circulation and potentially induces collagenolytic activity of inflammatory cells that results in collagen vascular degradation leading to atherosclerotic plague rupture (APR. APR is responsible for the occurence of fatal cardiovascular events such as acute myocardial infraction (AMI. AIMS: To show that P.gingivalis potentially induces fragmentation of the type IV vascular collagen due to macrophage-activated MMP-9. METHODS: The ability of P.gingivalis to induce the type IV collagen fragmentation, shown by digesting type IV collagen with the supernatant of monocyte-derived macrophage activated by exposure to P.gingivalis suspension for 18 hours, 37oC, 5% CO2. The type IV collagen fragments were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and confirmed by Western-blotting. Antibody of type IV collagen produced and confirmed by dot-blotting prior to its being used as primary antibody of Western-blotting. The existence of MMP-9 was detected by Dot-blot and Western-blot technique, while the MMP-9 activity was assessed by SDS-PAGE and zymograms. RESULTS: Our data showed that P.gingivalis induced macrophage to produce MMP-9 as one of collagenolytic components, and interaction with P.gingivalis proteases enhanced the proteolytic activity and resulted in degradation of type IV collagen with molecular weight of 88 kDa into two smaller fragments with molecular weight of 80 kDa and 60 kDa. CONCLUSIONS: P.gingivalis induced macrophage to activate its MMP-9 that led to fragmentation of vascular type IV collagen in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic plaque rupture. KEYWORDS: P.gingivalis, macrophage, type IV collagen fragmentation, atherosclerotic plaque rupture, AMI.

  12. Measurement of matrix metalloproteinase 9-mediated Collagen type III degradation fragment as a marker of skin fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsen Lise

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current study utilized a Bleomycin-induced model of skin fibrosis to investigate the neo-epitope CO3-610 (KNGETGPQGP, a fragment of collagen III released during matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9 degradation of the protein, we have previously described as a novel biomarker for liver fibrosis. The aim was to investigate CO3-610 levels in another well characterised model of fibrosis, to better describe the biomarker in relation to additional fibrotic pathologies. Methods Skin fibrosis was induced by daily injections of Bleomycin to a total of 52 female C3 H mice, while control mice (n = 28 were treated with phosphate buffered saline (PBS, for 2, 4, 6 or 8 weeks. Skin fibrosis was evaluated using Visiopharm software on Sirius-red stained skin sections. Urine ELISA assays and creatinine corrections were performed to measure CO3-610 levels. Results CO3-610 levels were significantly higher in Bleomycin-treated vs. PBS-treated mice at each time point of termination. The mean increases were: 59.2%, P Conclusion Increased levels in mouse urine of the MMP-9 mediated collagen III degradation fragment CO3-610 were correlated with skin fibrosis progression, suggesting that CO3-610 may be a potential positive biomarker to study the pathogenesis of skin fibrosis in mice.

  13. Wavelength dependent SHG imaging and scattering probes of extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations in ovarian cancer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnola, Paul J.; Tilbury, Karissa B.; Campbell, Kirby R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Patankar, Manish

    2017-02-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the most deadly gynecological cancer with a poor aggregate survival rate. To improve upon this situation, we utilized collagen-specific Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) imaging microscopy and optical scattering measurements to probe structural differences in the extracellular matrix of normal stroma, benign tumors, endometrioid tumors, and low and high-grade serous (LGS and HGS) tumors. The SHG signatures of the emission directionality and conversion efficiency as well as the optical scattering are related to the organization of collagen on the sub-micron size. The wavelength dependence of these readouts adds additional characterization of the size and distribution of collagen fibrils/fibers relative to the interrogating wavelengths. We found strong wavelength dependent dependencies of these metrics that were different between the different tumors that are related to respective structural attributes in the collagen organization. These sub-resolution determinations are consistent with the dualistic classification of type I and II serous tumors. However, type I endometrioid tumors have strongly differing ECM architecture than the serous malignancies. Moreover, our analyses are further consistent with LGS and benign tumors having similar etiology. We identified optimal wavelengths for the SHG metrics as well as optical scattering measurements. The SHG metrics and optical scattering measurements were then used to form a linear discriminant model to classify the tissues, and we obtained high accuracy ( 90%) between the tissue types. This delineation is superior to current clinical performance and has potential applicability in supplementing histological analysis, understanding the etiology, as well as development of an in vivo screening tool.

  14. Experimental prediction of the wavelength-dependent path-length factor for optical intrinsic signal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Koichiro; Tachibana, Tomoya; Furukawa, Shunsuke; Katsura, Takushige; Yamazaki, Kyoko; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Maki, Atsushi; Okada, Eiji

    2007-05-10

    Analysis of the optical intrinsic signal of an exposed cortex has been applied to measurement of functional brain activation. It is important for accurate measurement of concentration changes in oxygenated hemoglobin and deoxygenated hemoglobin to consider the wavelength dependence of the mean optical path lengths for the reflectance of cortical tissue. A method is proposed to experimentally estimate the wavelength dependence of the mean optical path length in cortical tissue from the multispectral reflectance of the exposed cortex without any additional instruments. The trend in the wavelength dependence of the mean optical path length estimated by the proposed method agrees with that estimated by the model-based prediction, whereas the magnitude of the wavelength dependence predicted by the proposed method is greater than that of the model-based prediction. The experimentally predicted mean optical path length minimizes the difference in the measured changes in the concentrations of the oxygenated hemoglobin and deoxygenated hemoglobin calculated from different wavelength pairs.

  15. Wavelength-dependent Crosstalk in Trench-Assisted Multi-Core Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Feihong; Tu, Jiajing; Saitoh, Kunimasa

    2014-01-01

    Analytical expressions for wavelength-dependent crosstalk in homogeneous trench-assisted multi-core fibers are derived. The calculated results from the expressions agree well with the numerical simulation results based on finite element method....

  16. Elucidating the Wavelength Dependence of Phonon Scattering in Nanoparticle-Matrix Composites using Phonon Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-11

    converted into a solid inorganic matrix afterwards. Metal-chalcogenide complexes (MCCs) have been demonstrated to be soluble precursors for a broad range...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0246 Elucidating the Wavelength Dependence of Phonon Scattering in Nanoparticle- Matrix Composites using PhononSpectroscopy...SUBTITLE Elucidating the Wavelength Dependence of Phonon Scattering in Nanoparticle- Matrix Composites using PhononSpectroscopy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  17. Wavelength dependence of sub-laser-cycle few-electron dynamics in strong-field multiple ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrwerth, O; Rudenko, A; Kremer, M; Jesus, V L B de; Fischer, B; Gademann, G; Simeonidis, K; Achtelik, A; Ergler, Th; Feuerstein, B; Schroeter, C D; Moshammer, R; Ullrich, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: Artem.Rudenko@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    2008-02-15

    Recoil-ion momentum distributions for double and triple ionization of Ne and Ar, as well as for double ionization of N{sub 2} molecule by intense (0.3-0.5 PW cm{sup -2}), short ({approx}35-40 fs) laser pulses have been recorded in a so far unexplored long laser-wavelength regime at 1300 nm. Compared to earlier results at 800 nm, the direct (e, ne) ionization pathway during recollision is strongly enhanced manifesting itself in a pronounced double-hump structure in the longitudinal ion momentum spectra not only for Ne, but also surprisingly distinct for Ar and, found for the first time, for molecules. Observed wavelength dependence of the sub-laser-cycle correlated few-electron dynamics might be of paramount importance for possible future applications in attosecond science, in particular, for imaging of ultrafast molecular processes via recollision-induced fragmentation.

  18. Relationship between Disease Activity and Circulating Level of Collagen II C-Telopeptide Fragments in Papain Induced Osteoarthritis Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humaira Majeed Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a progressive degeneration of articular cartilage leading to failure in functional mobility of joints. It is characterized by morphological, biochemical and molecular changes in histology of cartilage. Different biological markers are used as indicators to precisely predict the stage of cartilage destruction of joints in OA patients and to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of drugs used for OA. The present research was chalked out to establish relationship between disease activity and serum level of C-terminal telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II in experimentally induced OA rat model. Out of 30 male Wistar rats, 25 were used to induce OA by injecting papain (10mg/0.5mL of 0.05M sodium acetate in right knee joints whereas five (control were injected with sterile normal saline solution on day 0. Blood samples (5mL each were collected on weekly basis up to 28th days of post papain injection. Sera were separated and subjected to perform ELISA for estimating CTX-II fragments as cartilage biomarker (CartiLaps ® ELISA kit in experimental groups. Maximum level of CTX–II (pg/mL (40.44±3.07 was observed in sera samples of day 14 post papain injection followed by days 21 (40.22±2.01, 28 (36.82±3.81, 7 (34.48±4.17, 1 (15.08±4.22 and day 0 (2.55±0.10. The early changes in serum CTX-II from day 0 to 14 showed significant association with cartilage damage. Later on, no significant difference was observed in CTX-II level on day 14, 21 and 28 post papain injection. It is concluded that elevation in serum CTX-II level was concomitant with the onset of disease and degradation of cartilage. Moreover, CTX-II is a sensitive diagnostic biomarker to monitor joint disorder severity in papain induced OA rat experimental model on different days. These findings may be used as base line for early diagnosis of disease and initiation of therapy for successful outcome.

  19. Wavelength dependence of light diffusion in strongly scattering macroporous gallium phosphide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, W.H.; Vellekoop, Ivo Micha; Mosk, Allard; Lagendijk, Aart

    2008-01-01

    We present time-resolved measurements of light transport through strongly scattering macroporous gallium phosphide at various vacuum wavelengths between 705 nm and 855 nm. Within this range the transport mean free path is strongly wavelength dependent, whereas the observed energy velocity is shown

  20. Quantitative diagnosis of small approximal caries lesions utilizing wavelength-dependent fiber-optic transillumination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaarkamp, J; TenBosch, JJ; Verdonschot, EH; Tranaeus, S

    The instruments clinically available for the diagnosis of approximal caries lesions are inadequate to detect lesions early and quantitatively. The aim of this study was to investigate whether wavelength-dependent light scattering and absorption of carious tissues may be utilized for the quantitative

  1. The wavelength dependence of gold nanorod-mediated optical breakdown during infrared ultrashort pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davletshin, Yevgeniy R.; Kumaradas, J. Carl [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2017-04-15

    This paper investigates the wavelength dependence of the threshold of gold nanorod-mediated optical breakdown during picosecond and femtosecond near infrared optical pulses. It was found that the wavelength dependence in the picosecond regime is governed solely by the changes of a nanorod's optical properties. On the other hand, the optical breakdown threshold during femtosecond pulse exposure falls within one of two regimes. When the ratio of the maximum electric field from the outside to the inside of the nanorod is less then 7 (the absorption regime) the seed electrons are initiated by photo-thermal emission, and the wavelength dependence in the threshold of optical breakdown is the result of optical properties of the nanoparticle. When the ratio is greater than 7 (the near-field regime) more seed electrons are initiated by multiphoton ionization, and the wavelength dependence of the threshold of optical breakdown results from a combination of nanorod's optical properties and transitions in the order of multiphoton ionization. The findings of this study can guide the design of nanoparticle based optical breakdown applications. This analysis also deepens the understanding of nanoparticle-mediated laser induced breakdown for picosecond and femtosecond pulses at near infrared wavelengths. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Wavelength-Dependence of Inter-Core Crosstalk in Homogeneous Multi-Core Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Feihong; Saitoh, Kunimasa; Takenaga, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of inter-core crosstalk in homogeneous multi-core fibers (MCFs) is investigated, and the corresponding analytical expressions are derived. The derived analytical expressions can be used to determine the crosstalk at any wavelength necessary for designing future MCF wavel...

  3. Phosphodiesterase inhibition mediates matrix metalloproteinase activity and the level of collagen degradation fragments in a liver fibrosis ex vivo rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veidal Sanne Skovgård

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM and increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP activity are hallmarks of liver fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to develop a model of liver fibrosis combining ex vivo tissue culture of livers from CCl4 treated animals with an ELISA detecting a fragment of type III collagen generated in vitro by MMP-9 (C3M, known to be associated with liver fibrosis and to investigate cAMP modulation of MMP activity and liver tissue turnover in this model. Findings In vivo: Rats were treated for 8 weeks with CCl4/Intralipid. Liver slices were cultured for 48 hours. Levels of C3M were determined in the supernatants of slices cultured without treatment, treated with GM6001 (positive control or treated with IBMX (phosphodiesterase inhibitor. Enzymatic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were studied by gelatin zymography. Ex vivo: The levels of serum C3M increased 77% in the CCl4-treated rats at week 8 (p 4-treated animals had highly increased MMP-9, but not MMP-2 activity, compared to slices derived from control animals. Conclusions We have combined an ex vivo model of liver fibrosis with measurement of a biochemical marker of collagen degradation in the condition medium. This technology may be used to evaluate the molecular process leading to structural fibrotic changes, as collagen species are the predominant structural part of fibrosis. These data suggest that modulation of cAMP may play a role in regulation of collagen degradation associated with liver fibrosis.

  4. Immunological detection of the type V collagen propeptide fragment, PVCP-1230, in connective tissue remodeling associated with liver fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassiliadis, Efstathios; Veidal, Sanne Skovgård; Simonsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    = 0.0020); 12 weeks: 81.3 ng/mL, controls 50.2 ng/mL (P = 0.0020); 16 weeks: 85.1 ng/mL, controls 51 ng/mL (P = 0055); 20 weeks: 92 ng/mL, controls 47.8 ng/mL (P = 0.0033)]. CO5-1230 levels correlated with the total amount of collagen in sections from the injured livers, quantified from Sirius red...

  5. Wavelength-Dependent Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy: Selectively Imaging Nanoparticle Probes in Live Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei; Wang, Gufeng; Fang, Ning; and Yeung, Edward S.

    2009-11-15

    Gold and silver nanoparticles display extraordinarily large apparent refractive indices near their plasmon resonance (PR) wavelengths. These nanoparticles show good contrast in a narrow spectral band but are poorly resolved at other wavelengths in differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The wavelength dependence of DIC contrast of gold/silver nanoparticles is interpreted in terms of Mie's theory and DIC working principles. We further exploit this wavelength dependence by modifying a DIC microscope to enable simultaneous imaging at two wavelengths. We demonstrate that gold/silver nanoparticles immobilized on the same glass slides through hybridization can be differentiated and imaged separately. High-contrast, video-rate images of living cells can be recorded both with and without illuminating the gold nanoparticle probes, providing definitive probe identification. Dual-wavelength DIC microscopy thus presents a new approach to the simultaneous detection of multiple probes of interest for high-speed live-cell imaging.

  6. Increased susceptibility to collagen-induced arthritis in female mice carrying congenic Cia40/Pregq2 fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liljander, Maria; Andersson, Åsa Inga Maria; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2008-01-01

    of the B10.Q strain. The major polymorphic candidate genes for the effects on CIA are Cd79b, Abca8a, and Map2k6. The congenic fragment also contains polymorphic genes that affect reproductive behavior and reproductive success. The Sox9 gene, known to influence sex reversal, is a candidate gene...... effects on onset, incidence, severity, and anti-CII antibody titers were observed in female mice carrying a heterozygous congenic Cia40/Pregq2 fragment of NFR/N origin, containing one or more polymorphic genes. Congenic male mice did not show increased incidence of CIA, but males carrying a heterozygous...

  7. N-terminal Dentin Sialoprotein fragment induces type I collagen production and upregulates dentinogenesis marker expression in osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaha, Haytham; Husein, Dina; Ohyama, Yoshio; Xu, Dongliang; Suzuki, Shigeki; Huang, George T-J; Mochida, Yoshiyuki

    2016-06-01

    Bone and dentin are mineralized extracellular matrices produced by osteoblasts and odontoblasts, respectively, and their major organic portion is type I collagen. Dentinogenesis Imperfecta (DGI) is one of the most common clinically- and genetically-based disturbances of dentin formation, causing irreversible dentin defects. Among several types of DGI, patients with DGI type II exhibit opalescent dentin with partial or complete pulp obliteration. It has been previously reported that the non-sense mutation (c.133C>T) in Dentin Sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) was identified in DGI type II patients at glutamine residue 45, resulting in the premature stop codon (p.Q45X). DSPP is known to be synthesized as a single gene product and further processed at Gly(462)-Asp(463), resulting in the production of Dentin Sialoprotein (DSP) and Dentin Phosphoprotein (DPP). We hypothesized that the shorter form (Q45X) of N-terminal Dentin Sialoprotein (N-DSP) may cause over-production of type I collagen protein as obliterated pulp is occupied by dentin. To test this hypothesis, we generated mouse recombinant Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST)-N-DSP fusion protein, and the effect of GST-N-DSP was investigated in calvarial bone explant culture and MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic culture systems. Here we show that a significant increase in calvarial bone formation is observed by GST-N-DSP. GST-N-DSP accelerates MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cell growth and proliferation and subsequent osteoblast differentiation by inducing the expression of certain osteogenic markers such as type I collagen, Runx2, Osterix and ATF4. Interestingly, GST-N-DSP significantly enhances dentinogenesis marker gene expression including Dspp and Dmp1 gene expression in non-odontogenic MC3T3-E1 cells. To rule out any artificial effect of GST-tag, we also used the synthetic peptide of N-DSP and confirmed the results of N-DSP peptide were essentially similar to those of GST-N-DSP. Taken together, our data suggest that N-DSP promotes bone

  8. Laboratory measurements for the wavelength dependence of the linear polarization with the PROGRA2 instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Hadamcik, Edith; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Carrasco, Nathalie; Couté, Benoit; Duverger, Vincent; Guerrini, Vincent

    2017-04-01

    Clouds of solid particles are present in many regions of the Solar System (comets, interplanetary dust cloud, planetary atmospheres). These clouds can be remotely studied by the light they scatter. There is a need for a data base of the light scattered by a large variety of samples at different wavelengths to interpret such measurements. The PROGRA2 instruments are used for this purpose. The PROGRA2 instruments, PROGRA2-VIS and PROGRA2-IR, are imaging polarimeters with a rotating arm to change the phase angle (angle between directions of illumination and observation). They allow to retrieve the complete polarization phase function between 10° and 165°. The light sources are at around 550 and 650 nm for PROGRA2-VIS, and 1000 and 1500 nm for PROGRA2-IR. The detectors are cameras, with a spatial resolution between 20 and 40 micrometers per pixel (PROGRA2-IR uses now new high sensitivity cameras). Measurements are conducted in the laboratory by an air draught technique for grains smaller than about 20 micrometers (which can be included in porous aggregates), and during parabolic flights on-board the A300 ZeroG and now the A310 ZeroG for larger grains; these flights campaigns are funded by the French and European Space Agencies. Hundreds of scattering phase functions have been obtained since 20 years, for a large number of samples (sands, silicon carbide, basalt, volcanic ashes, lunar and Martian simulants, tholins, meteoritic material, black carbon, carbonaceous compounds, …); the main results are available at www.icare.univ-lille1.fr/progra2/. Several samples have been already studied by the two instruments, showing a large diversity of wavelength dependences, from close-to-zero dependence for yellow and ocher sand grains to high dependence for silicon carbide and anthracite grains. These variations should be related to the wavelength dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the refractive index of the particles. We present a summary of the main results of

  9. Light sensitive memristor with bi-directional and wavelength-dependent conductance control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, P.; Hartmann, F., E-mail: fabian.hartmann@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de; Emmerling, M.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Worschech, L. [Technische Physik and Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Physikalisches Institut, Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Rebello Sousa Dias, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, São Paulo (Brazil); Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Castelano, L. K.; Marques, G. E.; Lopez-Richard, V. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, São Paulo (Brazil); Höfling, S. [Technische Physik and Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Physikalisches Institut, Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-11

    We report the optical control of localized charge on positioned quantum dots in an electro-photo-sensitive memristor. Interband absorption processes in the quantum dot barrier matrix lead to photo-generated electron-hole-pairs that, depending on the applied bias voltage, charge or discharge the quantum dots and hence decrease or increase the conductance. Wavelength-dependent conductance control is observed by illumination with red and infrared light, which leads to charging via interband and discharging via intraband absorption. The presented memristor enables optical conductance control and may thus be considered for sensory applications in artificial neural networks as light-sensitive synapses or optically tunable memories.

  10. Role of wavelength dependent sensitivity in affecting the crosstalk mitigation of homogeneous multicore fiber: an analytical estimation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Borui; Fu, Songnian; Tang, Ming; Cheng, Yu; Wei, Huifeng; Tong, Weijun; Shum, P; Liu, Deming

    2014-06-16

    The mitigation of both crosstalk and its wavelength dependent sensitivity for homogeneous multicore fiber (MCF) is theoretically investigated using an analytical evaluation approach. It is found there exists a performance trade-off between the crosstalk mitigation and its wavelength dependent sensitivity suppression. After characterizing the fabricated homogeneous MCFs, we verify that although the increasing core pitch can mitigate the crosstalk, the wavelength dependent sensitivity is drastically degraded from 0.07dB/nm to 0.11dB/nm, which is harmful to the dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) transmission over C + L band using MCF.

  11. Emission-wavelength-dependent decay of the fluorescent probe N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matayoshi, E D; Kleinfeld, A M

    1981-06-22

    We have measured the fluorescence decay of N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine using the phase-modulation method, in several solvent systems and egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The decay is monoexponential in pure solvents (both polar and non-polar) of low viscosity. In polar viscous solvents or in non-polar solvents containing an added polar solute, the decay is heterogeneous and emission wavelength dependent. In such cases, dielectric relaxation and/or excited-rate complexing give rise to a shift of the emission spectrum on the nanosecond time scale. Emission-wavelength-dependent decay was also observed when N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine was bound to egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles. From these results as well as the position of the emission spectral maximum, we conclude that N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine probes the ester-carbonyl region of the phospholipid acyl chains, where it undergoes an excited-state reaction. This result contradicts the often made assumption that N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine probes the deeper hydrocarbon region of the bilayer.

  12. Light-emitting-diode induced retinal damage and its wavelength dependency in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yu-Man; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Sliney, David H; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lee, Li-Ling

    2017-01-01

    To examine light-emitting-diode (LED)-induced retinal neuronal cell damage and its wavelength-driven pathogenic mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to blue LEDs (460 nm), green LEDs (530 nm), and red LEDs (620 nm). Electroretinography (ERG), Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, Western blotting (WB) and the detection of superoxide anion (O2(-)·), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), total iron, and ferric (Fe(3+)) levels were applied. ERG results showed the blue LED group induced more functional damage than that of green or red LED groups. H&E staining, TUNEL, IHC, and TEM revealed apoptosis and necrosis of photoreceptors and RPE, which indicated blue LED also induced more photochemical injury. Free radical production and iron-related molecular marker expressions demonstrated that oxidative stress and iron-overload were associated with retinal injury. WB assays correspondingly showed that defense gene expression was up-regulated after the LED light exposure with a wavelength dependency. The study results indicate that LED blue-light exposure poses a great risk of retinal injury in awake, task-oriented rod-dominant animals. The wavelength-dependent effect should be considered carefully when switching to LED lighting applications.

  13. Light-emitting-diode induced retinal damage and its wavelength dependency in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yu-Man; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Sliney, David H.; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lee, Li-Ling

    2017-01-01

    AIM To examine light-emitting-diode (LED)-induced retinal neuronal cell damage and its wavelength-driven pathogenic mechanisms. METHODS Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to blue LEDs (460 nm), green LEDs (530 nm), and red LEDs (620 nm). Electroretinography (ERG), Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, Western blotting (WB) and the detection of superoxide anion (O2−·), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), total iron, and ferric (Fe3+) levels were applied. RESULTS ERG results showed the blue LED group induced more functional damage than that of green or red LED groups. H&E staining, TUNEL, IHC, and TEM revealed apoptosis and necrosis of photoreceptors and RPE, which indicated blue LED also induced more photochemical injury. Free radical production and iron-related molecular marker expressions demonstrated that oxidative stress and iron-overload were associated with retinal injury. WB assays correspondingly showed that defense gene expression was up-regulated after the LED light exposure with a wavelength dependency. CONCLUSION The study results indicate that LED blue-light exposure poses a great risk of retinal injury in awake, task-oriented rod-dominant animals. The wavelength-dependent effect should be considered carefully when switching to LED lighting applications. PMID:28251076

  14. Photon wavelength dependent valley photocurrent in multilayer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Hongming; Tang, Ning; Xu, Xiaolong; Shang, LiangLiang; Huang, Wei; Fu, Lei; Fang, Xianfa; Yu, Jiachen; Zhang, Caifeng; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Dai, Lun; Chen, Yonghai; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2017-12-01

    The degree of freedom (DOF) of the K (K') valley in transition-metal dichalcogenides, especially molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), offers an opportunity for next-generation valleytronics devices. In this work, the K (K') valley DOF of multilayer MoS2 is studied by means of the photon wavelength dependent circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) at room temperature upon a strong external out-of-plane electric field induced by an ionic liquid (IL) gate, which breaks the spatial-inversion symmetry. It is demonstrated that only on resonant excitations in the K (K') valley can the valley-related CPGE signals in multilayer MoS2 with an IL gate be detected, indicating that the valley contrast is indeed regenerated between the K and K' valleys when the electric field is applied. As expected, it can also be seen that the K (K') valley DOF in multilayer MoS2 can be modulated by the external electric field. The observation of photon wavelength dependent valley photocurrent in multilayer MoS2, with the help of better Ohmic contacts, may pave a way for optoelectronic applications of valleytronics in the future.

  15. Holographic Spectroscopy: Wavelength-Dependent Analysis of Photosensitive Materials by Means of Holographic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay-Michael Voit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Holographic spectroscopy is highlighted as a powerful tool for the analysis of photosensitive materials with pronounced alterations of the complex permittivity over a broad range in the visible spectrum, due to the advances made both in the fields of advanced holographic media and highly tunable lasers systems. To analytically discuss consequences for in- and off-Bragg reconstruction, we revised Kogelnik’s coupled wave theory strictly on the basis of complex permittivities. We extended it to comply with modern experimental parameters such as out-of-phase mixed holograms and highly modulated gratings. A spatially modulated, wavelength-dependent permittivity that superimposes a spatially homogeneous wavelength-dependent ground state spectrum is taken into account for signal wave reconstruction with bulky elementary mixed gratings as an example. The dispersion characteristics of the respective diffraction efficiency is modelled for color-center-absorption and absorption of strongly localized carriers. As an example for the theoretical possibilities of our newly derived set of equations, we present a quantitative analysis of the Borrmann effect connected to out-of-phase gratings, providing easier and more intuitive methods for the derivation of their grating parameters.

  16. Multiple scattering wavelength dependent backscattering of kaolin dust in the IR: Measurements and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, Avishai

    1992-01-01

    Knowing the optical properties of aerosol dust is important for designing electro-optical systems and for modeling the effect on propagation of light in the atmosphere. As CO2 lidar technology becomes more advanced and is used for multiwavelength measurements, information on the wavelength dependent backscattering of aerosol dust particles is required. The volume backscattering coefficient of aerosols in the IR is relatively small. Thus, only a few field measurements of backscattering, usually at only a few wavelengths, are reported in the literature. We present spectral field measurements of backscattering of kaolin dust in the 9-11 micron wavelength range. As the quantity of dust increases, multiple scattering contributes more to the measured backscattered signal. The measurements show the effect of the dust quantity of the spectral backscatter measurements. A simple analytical two stream radiative transfer model is applied to confirm the measurements and to give insight to the multiple scattering spectra of backscattering.

  17. Wavelength Dependence of the Polarization Singularities in a Two-Mode Optical Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. G. Krishna Inavalli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here an experimental demonstration of the wavelength dependence of the polarization singularities due to linear combination of the vector modes excited directly in a two-mode optical fiber. The coherent superposition of the vector modes excited by linearly polarized Gaussian beam as offset skew rays propagated in a helical path inside the fiber results in the generation of phase singular beams with edge dislocation in the fiber output. The polarization character of these beams is found to change dramatically with wavelength—from left-handed elliptically polarized edge dislocation to right-handed elliptically polarized edge-dislocation through disclinations. The measured behaviour is understood as being due to intermodal dispersion of the polarization corrections to the propagating vector modes, as the wavelength of the input beam is scanned.

  18. Wavelength-dependent optical properties of melanosomes in retinal pigmented epithelium (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ji; Zhang, Lei

    2017-02-01

    Melanosome is an organelle for synthesis, storage and transport the melanin, a major intrinsic pigment. In retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), it is generally accepted that melanosome plays a critical photoprotective role, and it has been shown that that loss of melanin from RPE could be an early event towards age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meanwhile, melanosome is also the major contributor to the optical properties of RPE, due to its high refractive index and the strong optical absorption of melanin. Therefore, a characterization and understanding the optical properties of melanin is of great interest to relate the physical and chemical changes of melanosomes, and their fundamental roles in RPE-related retinal diseases such as AMD. Here, we present a theoretical study to characterize the full optical properties of melanosomes. We modeled melanosomes as uniformly melanin filled spheroids, based on their morphology under transmission electron microscopy. T-matrix method was used to simulate the wavelength dependent total scattering, backscattering, absorption cross sections, and anisotropy factor. We verified our simulation on backscattering cross section of melanosome by comparing optical coherence tomography taken in visible and NIR ranges. In addition, we studied the changes of the optical properties of melanosomes on melanin bleaching. The results suggested a spectroscopic mechanism for optical detection of melanin loss by inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography.

  19. Synthesis of α-collagen fragments and research of their influence on the degree of hydration of a model of epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubkowska, Beata; Grobelna, Beata; Maćkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2013-02-01

    In recent years the interest into areas of science, such as cosmetology, dermatology, pharmacology or aesthetic medicine has increased significantly. Scientists are more frequently looking for ingredients that affect the skin's condition and slow down the aging process. Practically every year, the scientists discover a number of new chemical substances (both natural and synthetic) that can be potentially used to manufacture cosmetics. To evaluate the influence of selected peptides derived from α-collagen fragments on the degree of hydration of a model of epidermis isolated from a pig. The synthesis of selected cosmetic oligopeptides were performed manually, on the solid medium, using procedure of SPPS (solid phase peptide synthesis). Following components: aqua, carbomer, glycerine, phenonip, D-panthenol, dimethicone and triethanolamine were used to prepare a reference hydrogel masks. Both the number of components and the composition of hydrogels have been developed individually for the purposes of this research. For this study the skin from a domestic pig was used. The degree of the skin hydration was measured with the SKINTEST plus camera, which uses the latest semiconductor technology. During the study the absorption of hydrogels with peptides was faster than that of the reference hydrogel mask. The combination of hydrophilic properties of the peptide with hydrophobic properties of Palm enabled receiving an amphiphilic structure. Such molecules are considered to be able to penetrate the corneum barrier with the greatest ease. The results showed that the modified compounds have contributed to water retention in the cells, thereby increasing the degree of hydration of the biological material.

  20. Fragments of Citrullinated and MMP-degraded Vimentin and MMP-degraded Type III Collagen Are Novel Serological Biomarkers to Differentiate Crohn's Disease from Ulcerative Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Joachim Høg; Godskesen, Line Elbjerg; Jensen, Michael Dam

    2015-01-01

    ] and Crohn's disease [CD] represent a heterogeneous expression pattern, and may be applied as a tool to aid in the differentiation between UC and CD. METHODS: Serum biomarkers of degraded collagens I, III-IV [C1M, C3M, and C4M], collagen type 1 and IV formation [P1NP, P4NP], and citrullinated and MMP...

  1. Red Light-Dose or Wavelength-Dependent Photoresponse of Antioxidants in Herb Microgreens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giedė Samuolienė

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of 638-nm and 665-nm LEDs on changes of antioxidants of basil (Ocimum basilicum and parsley (Petroselinum crispum, and to assess the effect of light quality on antioxidative status. Plants were grown in peat substrate for 19 days (21/17 ±2°C, 16 h. Experiments were performed in (I a controlled-environment: B455,R638,R665,FR731(control; B455,R*638,R665,FR731; B455,R638,R*665,FR731; R638; R665 (B-blue, R- red, FR-far-red light. PPFD was set from 231 during growth, upto 300 μmol m-2 s-1 during 3-day treatment changing R638 or R665 PPFD level; in (II greenhouse (November: high-pressure sodium lamps (HPS (control-300 μmol m-2s-1; and HPS + 638 (HPS generated 90 and red LEDs-210 μmol m-2s-1. In general, under supplemental or increased red 638 nm light, amounts of tested antioxidants were greater in basil, whereas sole 665 nm or sole 638 nm is more favourable for parsley. Increased or supplemental red light significantly increased contents of phenolics, α-tocopherol, ascorbic acid and DPPH• but suppressed accumulation of lutein and β-carotene in basil, whereas an increase of β-carotene and DPPH• was observed in parsley. Hereby, the photoresponse of antioxidant compounds suggests that photoprotective mechanism is stimulated by both light-dose-dependent and wavelength-dependent reactions.

  2. On the wavelength dependence of UV induced thymine photolesions: a synchrotron radiation circular dichroism study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Marlene Møller; Jones, Nykola C; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning

    2016-11-09

    Solar mutagenesis via the formation of thymine dimer photoproducts is a primary cause of skin cancer. The aim of this study is to provide a direct method for following the development of photolesions in thymine single strands and to determine how the formation of these photoproducts depends on the excitation wavelength in the ultraviolet (UV) between 210 nm and 325 nm. Experiments were performed both with a 20 Hz pulsed, intense, tunable laser as well as UV lamps (at 254 nm and 302 nm), but we find that only the dose matters at these wavelengths for the yield of photoproducts. Hence in both cases the lesion process is due to one-photon absorption. The formation and yields of the photoproducts as the irradiation dose is increased is followed through measurement of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) spectra. A principal component analysis (PCA) of the SRCD data yields CD signatures for each of the resulting photoproducts and reveals a strong irradiation wavelength dependence upon which products are formed; cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are formed primarily at higher irradiation wavelengths (from 250 to 300 nm); the 6,4 pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoadduct (64PP) is formed in the range 210 to 285 nm, with a higher rate of formation in the lower part of that range, while in the very lowest irradiation wavelength range (210 to 240 nm) we find thymidine monophosphate (dTMP), which indicates cleavage of the DNA backbone. Our work demonstrates the strength of SRCD spectroscopy compared to ordinary absorption spectroscopy, as the latter is not sufficient to obtain fingerprints of the thymine photoproducts.

  3. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joël [Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l’Environnement, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LGGE, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S. [Copenhagen Center for Atmospheric Research (CCAR), Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jost, Rémy [Laboratoire de Interdisciplinaire de Physique (LIPHY) Univ. de Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Bhattacharya, S. K. [Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Nangang, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-28

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [“Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry,” J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate ({sup 15}N, {sup 17}O, and {sup 18}O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (δ{sup 15}N, δ{sup 18}O, and Δ{sup 17}O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−15 ± 1.2)‰ was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−47.9 ± 6.8)‰, in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from −40 to −74.3‰. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of {sup 14}NO{sub 3}{sup −} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup −} in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying

  4. Attacking a practical quantum-key-distribution system with wavelength-dependent beam-splitter and multiwavelength sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hong-Wei [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information,University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026 (China); Zhengzhou Information Science and Technology Institute, Zhengzhou, 450004 (China); Wang, Shuang; Huang, Jing-Zheng; Chen, Wei; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Li, Fang-Yi; Zhou, Zheng; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information,University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026 (China); Bao, Wan-Su [Zhengzhou Information Science and Technology Institute, Zhengzhou, 450004 (China)

    2011-12-15

    It is well known that the unconditional security of quantum-key distribution (QKD) can be guaranteed by quantum mechanics. However, practical QKD systems have some imperfections, which can be controlled by the eavesdropper to attack the secret key. With current experimental technology, a realistic beam splitter, made by fused biconical technology, has a wavelength-dependent property. Based on this fatal security loophole, we propose a wavelength-dependent attacking protocol, which can be applied to all practical QKD systems with passive state modulation. Moreover, we experimentally attack a practical polarization encoding QKD system to obtain all the secret key information at the cost of only increasing the quantum bit error rate from 1.3 to 1.4%.

  5. Roughened glass slides and a spectrophotometer for the detection of the wavelength-dependent refractive index of transparent liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Ilpo; Räty, Jukka; Myllylä, Risto; Sutinen, Veijo; Matsuda, Kiyofumi; Homma, Kazuhiro; Silfsten, Pertti; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2012-07-01

    We describe a method to determine the wavelength-dependent refractive index of liquids by measurement of light transmittance with a spectrophotometer. The method is based on using roughened glass slides with different a priori known refractive indices and immersing the slides into the transparent liquid with unknown refractive index. Using the dispersion data on the glass material it is possible to find the index match between the liquid and the glass slide, and hence the refractive index of the liquid.

  6. Collagenous Gastritis

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Hugh J.; Piercy, James R.A.; Raine, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented with nausea, vomiting and weight loss associated with impaired gastric emptying necessitating institution of parenteral nutrition. Subsequent studies revealed an unusual gastric mucosa! inflammatory process characterized by unique subepithelial collagenous deposits. Collagenous gastritis appears to be a distinct, possibly immune-mediated, chronic disorder, pathologically reminiscent of collagenous sprue and collagenous colitis.

  7. Influence of the Wavelength Dependence of Birefringence in the Generation of Supercontinuum and Dispersive Wave in Fiber Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Acuna Herrera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we perform numerical analysis about the influence of the wavelength dependence of birefringence (WDB in the Supercontinuum (SC and dispersive wave (DW generation. We study different birefringence profiles such as constant, linear, and parabolic. We see that, for a linear and parabolic profile, the generation of SC practically does not change, while this does so when the constant value of the birefringence varies. Similar situation happens with the generation of dispersive waves. In addition, we observe that the broadband of the SC increases when the Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS is neglected for all WDB profiles.

  8. Wavelength Dependence of Solar Irradiance Enhancement During X-Class Flares and Its Influence on the Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanshi; Richmond, Arthur D.; Deng, Yue; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Qian, Liying; Solomon, Stanley C.; Roble, Raymond G.; Xiao, Zuo

    2013-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of solar irradiance enhancement during flare events is one of the important factors in determining how the Thermosphere-Ionosphere (T-I) system responds to flares. To investigate the wavelength dependence of flare enhancement, the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) was run for 61 X-class flares. The absolute and the percentage increases of solar irradiance at flare peaks, compared to pre-flare conditions, have clear wavelength dependences. The 0-14 nm irradiance increases much more (approx. 680% on average) than that in the 14-25 nm waveband (approx. 65% on average), except at 24 nm (approx. 220%). The average percentage increases for the 25-105 nm and 122-190 nm wavebands are approx. 120% and approx. 35%, respectively. The influence of 6 different wavebands (0-14 nm, 14-25 nm, 25-105 nm, 105- 120 nm, 121.56 nm, and 122-175 nm) on the thermosphere was examined for the October 28th, 2003 flare (X17-class) event by coupling FISM with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM) under geomagnetically quiet conditions (Kp=1). While the enhancement in the 0-14 nm waveband caused the largest enhancement of the globally integrated solar heating, the impact of solar irradiance enhancement on the thermosphere at 400 km is largest for the 25-105 nm waveband (EUV), which accounts for about 33 K of the total 45 K temperature enhancement, and approx. 7.4% of the total approx. 11.5% neutral density enhancement. The effect of 122-175 nm flare radiation on the thermosphere is rather small. The study also illustrates that the high-altitude thermospheric response to the flare radiation at 0-175 nm is almost a linear combination of the responses to the individual wavebands. The upper thermospheric temperature and density enhancements peaked 3-5 h after the maximum flare radiation.

  9. Wavelength-dependent optical properties of melanosomes in retinal pigmented epithelium and their changes with melanin bleaching: a numerical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weiye; Zhang, Lei; Ness, Steve; Yi, Ji

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present the first numerical study on full metrics of wavelength-dependent optical properties of melanosomes in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. T-matrix method was used to simulate the spheroidal shapes of mature melanosomes, and the complex refractive index was calculated by a subtractive Kramers-Kronig relation for melanin. The validity of the method was first confirmed by Mie theory, and corroborated by a comparison between visible light and near infrared (NIR) optical coherence tomography (OCT) on human retinal imaging. We also studied the changes of melanosome optical properties due to melanin bleaching by numerically reducing the absorption of melanin. This study implies a unique approach to detect melanin changes specifically in RPE by a spectroscopic contrast of optical coherence tomography.

  10. Excitation wavelength dependence of water-window line emissions from boron-nitride laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crank, M.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the effects of laser excitation wavelength on water-window emission lines of laser-produced boron-nitride plasmas. Plasmas are produced by focusing 1064 nm and harmonically generated 532 and 266 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG laser on BN target in vacuum. Soft x-ray emission lines in the water-window region are recorded using a grazing-incidence spectrograph. Filtered photodiodes are used to obtain complementary data for water-window emission intensity and angular dependence. Spectral emission intensity changes in nitrogen Ly-{alpha} and He-{alpha} are used to show how laser wavelength affects emission. Our results show that the relative intensity of spectral lines is laser wavelength dependent, with the ratio of Ly-{alpha} to He-{alpha} emission intensity decreasing as laser wavelength is shortened. Filtered photodiode measurements of angular dependence showed that 266 and 532 nm laser wavelengths produce uniform emission.

  11. Excitation wavelength dependence of water-window line emissions from boron-nitride laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crank, M.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the effects of laser excitation wavelength on water-window emission lines of laser-produced boron-nitride plasmas. Plasmas are produced by focusing 1064 nm and harmonically generated 532 and 266 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG laser on BN target in vacuum. Soft x-ray emission lines in the water-window region are recorded using a grazing-incidence spectrograph. Filtered photodiodes are used to obtain complementary data for water-window emission intensity and angular dependence. Spectral emission intensity changes in nitrogen Ly-α and He-α are used to show how laser wavelength affects emission. Our results show that the relative intensity of spectral lines is laser wavelength dependent, with the ratio of Ly-α to He-α emission intensity decreasing as laser wavelength is shortened. Filtered photodiode measurements of angular dependence showed that 266 and 532 nm laser wavelengths produce uniform emission.

  12. Light at night acutely impairs glucose tolerance in a time-, intensity- and wavelength-dependent manner in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opperhuizen, Anne-Loes; Stenvers, Dirk J; Jansen, Remi D; Foppen, Ewout; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2017-07-01

    Exposure to light at night (LAN) has increased dramatically in recent decades. Animal studies have shown that chronic dim LAN induced obesity and glucose intolerance. Furthermore, several studies in humans have demonstrated that chronic exposure to artificial LAN may have adverse health effects with an increased risk of metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes. It is well-known that acute exposure to LAN affects biological clock function, hormone secretion and the activity of the autonomic nervous system, but data on the effects of LAN on glucose homeostasis are lacking. This study aimed to investigate the acute effects of LAN on glucose metabolism. Male Wistar rats were subjected to i.v. glucose or insulin tolerance tests while exposed to 2 h of LAN in the early or late dark phase. In subsequent experiments, different light intensities and wavelengths were used. LAN exposure early in the dark phase at ZT15 caused increased glucose responses during the first 20 min after glucose infusion (p effect of LAN was both intensity- and wavelength-dependent. White light of 50 and 150 lx induced greater glucose responses than 5 and 20 lx, whereas all intensities other than 5 lx reduced locomotor activity. Green light induced glucose intolerance, but red and blue light did not, suggesting the involvement of a specific retina-brain pathway. Together, these data show that exposure to LAN has acute adverse effects on glucose metabolism in a time-, intensity- and wavelength-dependent manner.

  13. Collagen fragment biomarkers as serological biomarkers of lean body mass – a biomarker pilot study from the DAHANCA25B cohort and matched controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Anders; Dalgas, Ulrik; Primdahl, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    ) or change therein in head and neck cancer patients in the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group(DAHANCA) 25B cohort subjected to resistance training as well as in an age-matched and gender-matched control group. Methods Blood samples and dual X-ray absorptiometry data were measured at baseline, after 12 and 24......Background Loss of muscle mass and function is an important complication to ageing and a range of pathologies, including, but not restricted to, cancer, organ failures, and sepsis. A number of interventions have been proposed ranging from exercise to anabolic pharmacological therapy, with varying...... success. Easily applicable serological biomarkers of lean and/or muscle mass and change therein would benefit monitoring of muscle mass during muscle atrophy as well as during recovery. We set out to validate if novel peptide biomarkers derived from Collagen III and VI were markers of lean body mass (LBM...

  14. Excitation wavelength dependence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    phobic location whose polarity is intermediate be- tween cyclohexane and ethyl acetate. The 530 nm emission peak of C153 may arise from a polar and hydrophilic region which is similar to ethanol. The relative intensity (area) of the two emission spectra. (A480/A530) decreases from 3⋅5 at λex = 375 nm to 0.6 at λex = 435 ...

  15. Corneal collagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, L; Legeais, J M; Robert, A M; Renard, G

    2001-05-01

    Cornea is a highly differentiated tissue rich in extracellular matrix (ECM) specifically distributed in space in order to insure its dual role--transparency and protection of inner eye-tissues. Corneal ECM is especially rich in collagens. Since the characterisation of a number of distinct collagen types it appeared that most of them are present in the cornea. Their synthesis follows a specific program of sequential expression of the different collagen types to be synthesised during the development and maturation of the cornea. The precise regulation of the diameter and orientation of fibers, and of the interfibrillar spaces is partially at least attributed to interactions between glycosaminoglycans and collagens. The 'program' of vectorial collagen synthesis and GAG-collagen interactions changes also with age and in several pathological conditions as corneal dystrophies and wound healing. The Maillard reaction, especially in diabetes, is one of these important factors involved in age-dependent modifications of corneal structure and function. Far from being inert, corneal collagens were shown to have relatively short half-lives. The biosynthesis of corneal collagens was studied also during wound healing. The refibrillation of wounded corneas does not follow the original 'program' of ECM-synthesis as shown by the comparative study of wound healing using biochemical and morphometric methods. This review recapitulates briefly previous and recent studies on corneal collagens in order to present to clinicians and scientists an overview of the state of the art of this important field at the intersection of eye research and matrix biology.

  16. Satellite-based evidence of wavelength-dependent aerosol absorption in biomass burning smoke inferred from Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Jethva

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We provide satellite-based evidence of the spectral dependence of absorption in biomass burning aerosols over South America using near-UV measurements made by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI during 2005–2007. In the current near-UV OMI aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV, it is implicitly assumed that the only absorbing component in carbonaceous aerosols is black carbon whose imaginary component of the refractive index is wavelength independent. With this assumption, OMI-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD is found to be significantly over-estimated compared to that of AERONET at several sites during intense biomass burning events (August-September. Other well-known sources of error affecting the near-UV method of aerosol retrieval do not explain the large observed AOD discrepancies between the satellite and the ground-based observations. A number of studies have revealed strong spectral dependence in carbonaceous aerosol absorption in the near-UV region suggesting the presence of organic carbon in biomass burning generated aerosols. A sensitivity analysis examining the importance of accounting for the presence of wavelength-dependent aerosol absorption in carbonaceous particles in satellite-based remote sensing was carried out in this work. The results convincingly show that the inclusion of spectrally-dependent aerosol absorption in the radiative transfer calculations leads to a more accurate characterization of the atmospheric load of carbonaceous aerosols. The use of a new set of aerosol models assuming wavelength-dependent aerosol absorption in the near-UV region (Absorption Angstrom Exponent λ−2.5 to −3.0 improved the OMAERUV retrieval results by significantly reducing the AOD bias observed when gray aerosols were assumed. In addition, the new retrieval of single-scattering albedo is in better agreement with those of AERONET within the uncertainties (ΔSSA = ±0.03. The new colored carbonaceous aerosol model was also found to

  17. Phase-space perspective on the wavelength-dependent electron correlation of strong-field double ionization of Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yun; Yuan, Zongqiang; Ye, Difa; Fu, Libin; Liu, Ming-Ming; Sun, Xufei; Wu, Chengyin; Liu, Jie; Gong, Qihuang; Liu, Yunquan

    2017-12-01

    We measure the wavelength-dependent correlated-electron momentum (CEM) spectra of strong-field double ionization of Xe atoms, and observe a significant change from a roughly nonstructured (uncorrelated) pattern at 795 nm to an elongated distribution with V-shaped structure (correlated) at higher wavelengths of 1320 and 1810 nm, pointing to the transition of the ionization dynamics imprinted in the momentum distributions. These observations are well reproduced by a semiclassical model using Green–Sellin–Zachor potential to take into account the screening effect. We show that the momentum distribution of Xe2+ undergoes a bifurcation structure emerging from single-hump to double-hump structure as the laser wavelength increases, which is dramatically different from that of He2+, indicating the complex multi-electron effect. By back analyzing the double ionization trajectories in the phase space (the initial transverse momentum and the laser phase at the tunneling exit) of the first tunneled electrons, we provide deep insight into the physical origin for electron correlation dynamics. We find that a random distribution in phase-space is responsible for a less distinct structured CEM spectrum at shorter wavelength. While increasing the laser wavelength, a topology-invariant pattern in phase-space appears, leading to the clearly visible V-shaped structures.

  18. Wavelength-dependent visible light response in vertically aligned nanohelical TiO2-based Schottky diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyunah; Sung, Ji Ho; Lee, Yuna; Jo, Moon-Ho; Kim, Jong Kyu

    2018-01-01

    Enhancements in photocatalytic performance under visible light have been reported by noble metal functionalization on nanostructured TiO2; however, the non-uniform and discrete distribution of metal nanoparticles on the TiO2 surface makes it difficult to directly clarify the optical and electrical mechanisms. Here, we investigate the light absorption and the charge separation at the metal/TiO2 Schottky junctions by using a unique device architecture with an array of TiO2 nanohelixes (NHs) forming Schottky junctions both with Au-top and Pt-bottom electrodes. Wavelength-dependent photocurrent measurements through the Pt/TiO2 NHs/Au structures revealed that the origin of the visible light absorption and the separation of photogenerated carriers is the internal photoemission at the metal/nanostructured TiO2 Schottky junctions. In addition, a huge persistent photoconductivity was observed by the time-dependent photocurrent measurement, implying a long lifetime of the photogenerated carriers before recombination. We believe that the results help one to understand the role of metal functionalization on TiO2 and hence to enhance the photocatalytic efficiency by utilizing appropriately designed Schottky junctions.

  19. A complete parameterisation of the relative humidity and wavelength dependence of the refractive index of hygroscopic inorganic aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterell, Michael I.; Willoughby, Rose E.; Bzdek, Bryan R.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Reid, Jonathan P.

    2017-08-01

    Calculations of aerosol radiative forcing require knowledge of wavelength-dependent aerosol optical properties, such as single-scattering albedo. These aerosol optical properties can be calculated using Mie theory from knowledge of the key microphysical properties of particle size and refractive index, assuming that atmospheric particles are well-approximated to be spherical and homogeneous. We provide refractive index determinations for aqueous aerosol particles containing the key atmospherically relevant inorganic solutes of NaCl, NaNO3, (NH4)2SO4, NH4HSO4 and Na2SO4, reporting the refractive index variation with both wavelength (400-650 nm) and relative humidity (from 100 % to the efflorescence value of the salt). The accurate and precise retrieval of refractive index is performed using single-particle cavity ring-down spectroscopy. This approach involves probing a single aerosol particle confined in a Bessel laser beam optical trap through a combination of extinction measurements using cavity ring-down spectroscopy and elastic light-scattering measurements. Further, we assess the accuracy of these refractive index measurements, comparing our data with previously reported data sets from different measurement techniques but at a single wavelength. Finally, we provide a Cauchy dispersion model that parameterises refractive index measurements in terms of both wavelength and relative humidity. Our parameterisations should provide useful information to researchers requiring an accurate and comprehensive treatment of the wavelength and relative humidity dependence of refractive index for the inorganic component of atmospheric aerosol.

  20. Microscopic Origin of the Valley Hall Effect in Transition Metal Dichalcogenides Revealed by Wavelength-Dependent Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubrig, Nicolas; Jo, Sanghyun; Philippi, Marc; Costanzo, Davide; Berger, Helmuth; Kuzmenko, Alexey B.; Morpurgo, Alberto F.

    2017-09-01

    The band structure of many semiconducting monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) possesses two degenerate valleys, with equal and opposite Berry curvature. It has been predicted that, when illuminated with circularly polarized light, interband transitions generate an unbalanced non-equilibrium population of electrons and holes in these valleys, resulting in a finite Hall voltage at zero magnetic field when a current flows through the system. This is the so-called valley Hall effect that has recently been observed experimentally. Here, we show that this effect is mediated by photo-generated neutral excitons and charged trions, and not by inter-band transitions generating independent electrons and holes. We further demonstrate an experimental strategy, based on wavelength dependent spatial mapping of the Hall voltage, which allows the exciton and trion contributions to the valley Hall effect to be discriminated in the measurement. These results represent a significant step forward in our understanding of the microscopic origin of photo-induced valley Hall effect in semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, and demonstrate experimentally that composite quasi-particles, such as trions, can also possess a finite Berry curvature.

  1. Satellite-Based Evidence of Wavelength-Dependent Aerosol Absorption in Biomass Burning Smoke Inferred from Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethva, H.; Torres, O.

    2012-01-01

    We provide satellite-based evidence of the spectral dependence of absorption in biomass burning aerosols over South America using near-UV measurements made by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) during 2005-2007. In the current near-UV OMI aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV), it is implicitly assumed that the only absorbing component in carbonaceous aerosols is black carbon whose imaginary component of the refractive index is wavelength independent. With this assumption, OMI-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) is found to be significantly over-estimated compared to that of AERONET at several sites during intense biomass burning events (August-September). Other well-known sources of error affecting the near-UV method of aerosol retrieval do not explain the large observed AOD discrepancies between the satellite and the ground-based observations. A number of studies have revealed strong spectral dependence in carbonaceous aerosol absorption in the near-UV region suggesting the presence of organic carbon in biomass burning generated aerosols. A sensitivity analysis examining the importance of accounting for the presence of wavelength-dependent aerosol absorption in carbonaceous particles in satellite-based remote sensing was carried out in this work. The results convincingly show that the inclusion of spectrally-dependent aerosol absorption in the radiative transfer calculations leads to a more accurate characterization of the atmospheric load of carbonaceous aerosols.

  2. Excitation-wavelength-dependent small polaron trapping of photoexcited carriers in α-Fe2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Lucas M.; Cushing, Scott K.; Liu, Chong; Su, Yude; Yang, Peidong; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Leone, Stephen R.

    2017-08-01

    Small polaron formation is known to limit ground-state mobilities in metal oxide photocatalysts. However, the role of small polaron formation in the photoexcited state and how this affects the photoconversion efficiency has yet to be determined. Here, transient femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet measurements suggest that small polaron localization is responsible for the ultrafast trapping of photoexcited carriers in haematite (α-Fe2O3). Small polaron formation is evidenced by a sub-100 fs splitting of the Fe 3p core orbitals in the Fe M2,3 edge. The small polaron formation kinetics reproduces the triple-exponential relaxation frequently attributed to trap states. However, the measured spectral signature resembles only the spectral predictions of a small polaron and not the pre-edge features expected for mid-gap trap states. The small polaron formation probability, hopping radius and lifetime varies with excitation wavelength, decreasing with increasing energy in the t2g conduction band. The excitation-wavelength-dependent localization of carriers by small polaron formation is potentially a limiting factor in haematite's photoconversion efficiency.

  3. Development and validation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the quantification of a specific MMP-9 mediated degradation fragment of type III collagen--A novel biomarker of atherosclerotic plaque remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, Natasha; Vassiliadis, Efstathios; Larsen, Lise

    2011-01-01

    Degradation of collagen in the arterial wall by matrix metalloproteinases is the hallmark of atherosclerosis. We have developed an ELISA for the quantification of type III collagen degradation mediated by MMP-9 in urine....

  4. Saharan dust events at the Jungfraujoch: detection by wavelength dependence of the single scattering albedo and first climatology analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Collaud Coen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Scattering and absorption coefficients have been measured continuously at several wavelengths since March 2001 at the high altitude site Jungfraujoch (3580ma.s.l.. From these data, the wavelength dependences of the Ångström exponent and particularly of the single scattering albedo are determined. While the exponent of the single scattering albedo usually increases with wavelength, it decreases with wavelength during Saharan dust events (SDE due to the greater size of the mineral aerosol particles and their different chemical composition. This change in the sign of the single scattering exponent turns out to be a sensitive means for detecting Saharan dust events. The occurrence of SDE detected by this new method was confirmed by visual inspection of filter colors and by studying long-range back-trajectories. An examination of SDE over a 22-month period shows that SDE are more frequent during the March-June period as well as during October and November. The trajectory analysis indicated a mean traveling time of 96.5h, with the most important source countries situated in the northern and north-western part of the Saharan desert. Most of the SDE do not lead to a detectable increase of the 48-h total suspended particulate matter (TSP concentration at the Jungfraujoch. During Saharan dust events, the average contribution of this dust to hourly TSP at the Jungfraujoch is 16µg/m3, which corresponds to an annual mean of 0.8µg/m3 or 24% of TSP.

  5. Collagenous sprue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soendergaard, Christoffer; Riis, Lene Buhl; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2014-01-01

    disease and together with frequent histological findings like mucosal thinning and intraepithelial lymphocytosis the diagnosis may be hard to reach without awareness of this condition. While coeliac disease is treated using gluten restriction, collagenous sprue is, however, not improved...... by this intervention. In cases of diet-refractory 'coeliac disease' it is therefore essential to consider collagenous sprue to initiate treatment at an early stage to prevent the fibrotic progression. Here, we report a case of a 78-year-old man with collagenous sprue and present the clinical and histological...

  6. Wavelength-dependent fibre-optic transillumination of small approximal caries lesions : The use of a dye, and a comparison to bitewing radiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaarkamp, J; tenBosch, JJ; Verdonschot, EH; Huysmans, MCDNJM

    1997-01-01

    The mere detection of caries lesions is insufficient for optimal treatment decision-making. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate whether quantitative information about approximal lesion depth can be obtained from a technique based on the wavelength dependency of light propagation and

  7. Asporin competes with decorin for collagen binding, binds calcium and promotes osteoblast collagen mineralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Aspberg, Anders; Lindblom, Karin

    2009-01-01

    The interactions of the ECM (extracellular matrix) protein asporin with ECM components have previously not been investigated. Here, we show that asporin binds collagen type I. This binding is inhibited by recombinant asporin fragment LRR (leucine-rich repeat) 10-12 and by full-length decorin......, but not by biglycan. We demonstrate that the polyaspartate domain binds calcium and regulates hydroxyapatite formation in vitro. In the presence of asporin, the number of collagen nodules, and mRNA of osteoblastic markers Osterix and Runx2, were increased. Moreover, decorin or the collagen-binding asporin fragment...... LRR 10-12 inhibited the pro-osteoblastic activity of full-length asporin. Our results suggest that asporin and decorin compete for binding to collagen and that the polyaspartate in asporin directly regulates collagen mineralization. Therefore asporin has a role in osteoblast-driven collagen...

  8. Study of photoemission and work function of large surface areas, phase 3, phase 4. [wavelength dependences of photoelectric space probe materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The photoemission of materials which might be used in probe measurements of the exo-atmospheric electric field is considered by evaluating the wavelength dependence of their photoelectric yield for eleven elements over the range 800 to 3200 A. Yield data for zinc, copper beryllium, platinum, cadmium, graphite, carbon, gold, silver, tantalum, and tungsten show that copper-beryllium is a preferred material. Silver has one of the highest photoemissions when exposed to solar radiation.

  9. Initial investigation of the wavelength dependence of optical properties measured with a new multi-pass Aerosol Extinction Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (AE-DOAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Chartier

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols directly affect climate by scattering and absorbing radiation. The magnitude of the impact is dependent upon the wavelength of light, but is often estimated near 550 nm. When light scattering and absorption by aerosols is approximated, the wavelength dependence of the refractive index for specific components is lost. As a result, climate models would have inherent uncertainties for aerosol contributions to radiative forcing when considering the entire solar spectrum. An aerosol extinction differential optical absorption spectrometer has been developed to directly measure aerosol extinction at mid-ultraviolet to near infrared wavelengths. The instrument consists of a spectrometer coupled to a closed White-type multi-pass gas cell with an adjustable path length of up to approximately 20 m. Laboratory measurements of various gases are compared with known absorption cross sections. Additionally, the extinction of monodisperse samples of polystyrene latex spheres are measured and compared to Mie theory generated with refractive index values from the literature to validate the new instrument. The polystyrene experiments also emphasize the ability of the new instrument to retrieve the wavelength dependent refractive index, especially in the ultraviolet wavelength regions where variability is expected. The spectrometer will be a significant advancement for determining wavelength dependent complex refractive indices in future laboratory studies as well as provide the ability to monitor ambient aerosol light extinction.

  10. Collagenous gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaoyi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Chiba, Takashi; Kondo, Yutaka; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Iijima, Katsunori; Imatani, Akira; Watanabe, Mika; Shirane, Akio; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-09-01

    In the present paper, we report a case of rare collagenous gastritis. The patient was a 25-year-old man who had experienced nausea, abdominal distention and epigastralgia since 2005. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) carried out at initial examination by the patient's local doctor revealed an extensively discolored depression from the upper gastric body to the lower gastric body, mainly including the greater curvature, accompanied by residual mucosa with multiple islands and nodularity with a cobblestone appearance. Initial biopsies sampled from the nodules and accompanying atrophic mucosa were diagnosed as chronic gastritis. In August, 2011, the patient was referred to Tohoku University Hospital for observation and treatment. EGD at our hospital showed the same findings as those by the patient's local doctor. Pathological findings included a membranous collagen band in the superficial layer area of the gastric mucosa, which led to a diagnosis of collagenous gastritis. Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, but it is important to recognize its characteristic endoscopic findings to make a diagnosis. © 2012 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2012 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  11. New method of estimating wavelength-dependent optical path length ratios for oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin measurement using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeyama, Shinji; Yamada, Toru

    2009-01-01

    In near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), concentration changes in oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin are calculated using an attenuation change of the measurement light and by solving a linear equation based on the modified Lambert-Beer law. While solving this equation, we need to know the wavelength-dependent mean optical path lengths of the measurement lights. However, it is very difficult to know these values by a continuous-wave-type (CW-type) system. We propose a new method of estimating wavelength-dependent optical path length ratios of the measurement lights based on the data obtained by a triple wavelength CW-type NIRS instrument. The proposed method does not give a path length itself, but it gives a path length ratio. Thus, it is possible to obtain the accurate hemoglobin concentration changes without cross talk, although the method cannot contribute to the quantification of the absolute magnitude of hemoglobin changes. The method is based on the principle that two possible estimations of hemoglobin concentration changes calculated using a triple-wavelength measurement system should be identical. The method was applied to the experimental data of human subjects' foreheads. The estimated path length ratios were very similar to literature values obtained by using picosecond laser pulses and a streak camera detector [M. Essenpreis et al., Appl. Opt. 32(4), 418-425 (1993)].

  12. A novel cryptic binding motif, LRSKSRSFQVSDEQY, in the C-terminal fragment of MMP-3/7-cleaved osteopontin as a novel ligand for α9β1 integrin is involved in the anti-type II collagen antibody-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeyuki Kon

    Full Text Available Osteopontin (OPN is a multifunctional protein that has been linked to various intractable inflammatory diseases. One way by which OPN induces inflammation is the production of various functional fragments by enzyme cleavage. It has been well appreciated that OPN is cleaved by thrombin, and/or matrix metalloproteinase-3 and -7 (MMP-3/7. Although the function of thrombin-cleaved OPN is well characterized, little is known about the function of MMP-3/7-cleaved OPN. In this study, we found a novel motif, LRSKSRSFQVSDEQY, in the C-terminal fragment of MMP-3/7-cleaved mouse OPN binds to α9β1 integrin. Importantly, this novel motif is involved in the development of anti-type II collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA. This study provides the first in vitro and in vivo evidence that OPN cleavage by MMP-3/7 is an important regulatory mechanism for CAIA.

  13. Ultraviolet Wavelength-Dependent Optoelectronic Properties in Two-Dimensional NbSe2-WSe2van der Waals Heterojunction-Based Field-Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Seung Bae; Kim, Yonghun; Kim, AhRa; Cho, Byungjin; Hong, Woong-Ki

    2017-11-29

    Atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures are one of the very important research issues for stacked optoelectronic device applications. In this study, using the transferred and stacked NbSe 2 -WSe 2 films as electrodes and a channel, we fabricated the field-effect transistor (FET) devices based on 2D-2D vdW metal-semiconductor heterojunctions (HJs) and systematically studied their ultraviolet (UV) wavelength-dependent electrical and photoresponse properties. Upon the exposure to UV light with a wavelength of 365 nm, the NbSe 2 -WSe 2 vdW HJFET devices exhibited threshold voltage shift toward positive gate bias direction, a current increase, and a nonlinear photocurrent increase upon applying a gate bias due to the contribution of the photogenerated hole current. In contrast, for the 254 nm UV-irradiated FET devices, the drain current was decreased dramatically and the threshold voltage was negatively shifted. The time-resolved photoresponse properties showed that the device current after turning off the 254 nm UV light was completely and much more rapidly recovered compared with the case of the persistent photocurrent after turning off the 365 nm UV light. Interestingly, we found that the wettability of the WSe 2 surface was changed with increasing irradiation time only after 254 nm UV irradiation. The measured wetting behavior on the WSe 2 surface provided direct evidence that the experimentally observed UV-wavelength-dependent phenomena was attributed to the UV-induced dissociative adsorption of oxygen and water molecules, leading to the modulation of charge trap states on the photogenerated and intrinsic carriers in the p-type WSe 2 channel. This study will help provide an understanding of the influence of environmental and electrical measurement conditions on the electrical and optical properties of 2D-2D vdW HJ devices for a variety of device applications through the stacking of 2D heterostructures.

  14. The non-phagocytic route of collagen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H; Ingvarsen, Signe; Jürgensen, Henrik J

    2011-01-01

    of these utilized uPARAP/Endo180 for their collagen uptake process. Macrophages internalized collagen in a process mediated by the mannose receptor, a protein belonging to the same protein family as uPARAP/Endo180. β1-Integrins were found not to be involved in the endocytosis of soluble collagen, irrespectively......-regulates the receptor protein level on treated cells, to examine the role of uPARAP/Endo180 as a mediator of collagen internalization by a wide range of cultured cell types. With the exception of macrophages, all cells that proved capable of efficient collagen internalization were of mesenchymal origin and all......The degradation of collagens, the most abundant proteins of the extracellular matrix, is involved in numerous physiological and pathological conditions including cancer invasion. An important turnover pathway involves cellular internalization and degradation of large, soluble collagen fragments...

  15. Wavelength dependence of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage as determined by laser irradiation suggests that cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are the principal DNA lesions produced by terrestrial sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besaratinia, Ahmad; Yoon, Jae-in; Schroeder, Christi; Bradforth, Stephen E.; Cockburn, Myles; Pfeifer, Gerd P.

    2011-01-01

    To elucidate the involvement of specific ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths in solar mutagenesis, we used a laser system to investigate the induction of DNA damage, both in the overall genome and at the nucleotide resolution level, in the genomic DNA of transgenic Big Blue mouse fibroblasts irradiated with a series of UV wavelengths, inclusive of UVC (λ320 nm). Subsequently, we sought correlation between the locations of UV-induced DNA lesions in the cII transgene of irradiated DNA samples and the frequency distribution and codon position of the induced cII mutations in counterpart mouse cells irradiated with simulated sunlight. Using a combination of enzymatic digestion assays coupled with gel electrophoresis, immunodot blot assays, and DNA footprinting assays, we demonstrated a unique wavelength-dependent formation of photodimeric lesions, i.e., cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and (6–4) photoproducts [(6–4)PPs], based on direct UV absorption of DNA, in irradiated mouse genomic DNA, which could partially explain the induction of mutations in mouse cells irradiated with simulated sunlight. Most notably, there was a divergence of CPD and (6–4)PP formation at an irradiation wavelength of 296 nm in mouse genomic DNA. Whereas substantial formation of (6–4)PPs was detectable in samples irradiated at this wavelength, which intensified as the irradiation wavelength decreased, only small quantities of these lesions were found in samples irradiated at wavelengths of 300–305 nm, with no detectable level of (6–4)PPs in samples irradiated with longer wavelengths. Although CPD formation followed the same pattern of increase with decreasing wavelengths of irradiation, there were substantial levels of CPDs in samples irradiated with UVB wavelengths borderlined with UVA, and small but detectable levels of these lesions in samples irradiated with longer wavelengths. Because the terrestrial sunlight spectrum rolls off sharply at wavelengths ∼300 nm, our findings

  16. Enhancement of Faraday effect in one-dimensional magneto-optical photonic crystal including a magnetic layer with wavelength dependent off-diagonal elements of dielectric constant tensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inui, Chie; Ozaki, Shinsuke; Kura, Hiroaki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama-shi 223-8522 (Japan); Sato, Tetsuya, E-mail: satoh@appi.keio.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama-shi 223-8522 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    Optical and magneto-optical properties of one-dimensional magneto-optical photonic crystal (1-D MPC) prepared by the sol-gel dip-coating method, including a magnetic defect layer composed of mixture of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and SiO{sub 2}, are investigated from both the experimental and theoretical standpoints. The resonant transmission of light was observed around 570 nm in the photonic band gap. The Faraday rotation angle {theta}{sub F} showed two maxima at 490 and 640 nm, and the wavelength dependence of {theta}{sub F} above 760 nm was similar to that of the CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}+SiO{sub 2} single-layer film. The two maxima of {theta}{sub F} are attributed to the enhanced Faraday rotation of nonmagnetic TiO{sub 2} layers in the cavity structure and that in magnetic CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}+SiO{sub 2} layer through the light localization in MPC. The maximum value of {theta}{sub F} due to the magnetic CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}+SiO{sub 2} layer in the MPC was 22-times larger than that in the single-layer film. The simulation study of MPC with CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}+SiO{sub 2} magnetic defect layer, based on the matrix approach method, showed that the resonant light transmission was accompanied by the localization of electric field, and large enhancement of {theta}{sub F} appeared at different wavelengths so as to agree with the experimental features. This can be explained in terms of the wavelength dependent off-diagonal components of the dielectric constant tensor in addition to the large extinction coefficient in the CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}+SiO{sub 2} magnetic defect layer. - Highlights: > 1-D magnetic photonic crystal (MPC) prepared by sol-gel method. > Enhancement of Faraday rotation due to the magnetic defect layer of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. > Shift of wavelength of Faraday rotation maximum from resonant light transmission.

  17. The Collagen Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant proteins in mammals. The collagen family comprises 28 members that contain at least one triple-helical domain. Collagens are deposited in the extracellular matrix where most of them form supramolecular assemblies. Four collagens are type II membrane proteins that also exist in a soluble form released from the cell surface by shedding. Collagens play structural roles and contribute to mechanical properties, organization, and shape of tissues. They interact with cells via several receptor families and regulate their proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Some collagens have a restricted tissue distribution and hence specific biological functions. PMID:21421911

  18. Wavelength-dependent photooxidation and photoreduction of protochlorophyllide and protochlorophyll in the innermost leaves of cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Anna Laura; Kósa, Annamária; Kovács-Smirová, Lilla; Böddi, Béla

    2016-04-01

    The photoreduction and photooxidation processes of different protochlorophyll(ide) forms were studied in the innermost leaves of cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) under monochromatic irradiations. Room-temperature fluorescence emission spectra were measured from the same leaf spots before and after illumination to follow the wavelength dependence of the photochemical reactions. Short-wavelength light of 7 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1) (625-630 nm) provoked mainly bleaching, and longer wavelengths (630-640 nm) caused both bleaching and photoreduction, while above 640 nm resulted in basically photoreduction. When bleached leaves were kept in darkness at room temperature, all protochlorophyll(ide) forms regenerated during 72 h. Oxygen-reduced environment decreased the extent of bleaching suggesting the involvement of reactive oxygen species. These results confirm that the short-wavelength, 628 nm absorbing, and 633 nm emitting protochlorophyll(ide) form in etiolated cabbage leaves sensibilizes photooxidation. However, the 628 nm light at low intensities stimulates the photoreduction of the longer wavelength protochlorophyllide forms. Kinetic measurements showed that photoreduction saturates at a low PFD (photon flux density) compared to bleaching, suggesting that the quantum yield of photoreduction is higher than that of bleaching.

  19. Porous silicon-VO{sub 2} based hybrids as possible optical temperature sensor: Wavelength-dependent optical switching from visible to near-infrared range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunez, E. E.; Salazar-Kuri, U.; Estevez, J. O.; Basurto, M. A.; Agarwal, V., E-mail: vagarwal@uaem.mx [Centro de Investigación en Ingeniería y Ciencias Aplicadas, Instituto de Investigación en Ciencias Básicas y Aplicadas, UAEM, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Mor. 62209 (Mexico); Campos, J. [Instituto de Energías Renovables, UNAM, Priv. Xochicalco S/N, Temixco, Mor. 62580 (Mexico); Jiménez Sandoval, S. [Laboratorio de Investigación en Materiales, Centro de Investigación y estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Unidad Querétaro, Qro. 76001 (Mexico)

    2015-10-07

    Morphological properties of thermochromic VO{sub 2}—porous silicon based hybrids reveal the growth of well-crystalized nanometer-scale features of VO{sub 2} as compared with typical submicron granular structure obtained in thin films deposited on flat substrates. Structural characterization performed as a function of temperature via grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman demonstrate reversible semiconductor-metal transition of the hybrid, changing from a low-temperature monoclinic VO{sub 2}(M) to a high-temperature tetragonal rutile VO{sub 2}(R) crystalline structure, coupled with a decrease in phase transition temperature. Effective optical response studied in terms of red/blue shift of the reflectance spectra results in a wavelength-dependent optical switching with temperature. As compared to VO{sub 2} film over crystalline silicon substrate, the hybrid structure is found to demonstrate up to 3-fold increase in the change of reflectivity with temperature, an enlarged hysteresis loop and a wider operational window for its potential application as an optical temperature sensor. Such silicon based hybrids represent an exciting class of functional materials to display thermally triggered optical switching culminated by the characteristics of each of the constituent blocks as well as device compatibility with standard integrated circuit technology.

  20. Binding of collagens to an enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visai, L.; Speziale, P.; Bozzini, S. (Univ. of Pavia (Italy))

    1990-02-01

    An enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli, B34289c, has been shown to bind the N-terminal region of fibronectin with high affinity. We now report that this strain also binds collagen. The binding of 125I-labeled type II collagen to bacteria was time dependent and reversible. Bacteria expressed a limited number of collagen receptors (2.2 x 10(4) per cell) and bound collagen with a Kd of 20 nM. All collagen types tested (I to V) as well as all tested cyanogen bromide-generated peptides (alpha 1(I)CB2, alpha 1(I)CB3, alpha 1(I)CB7, alpha 1(I)CB8, and alpha 2(I)CB4) were recognized by bacterial receptors, as demonstrated by the ability of these proteins to inhibit the binding of 125I-labeled collagen to bacteria. Of several unlabeled proteins tested in competition experiments, fibronectin and its N-terminal region strongly inhibited binding of the radiolabeled collagen to E. coli cells. Conversely, collagen competed with an 125I-labeled 28-kilodalton fibronectin fragment for bacterial binding. Collagen bound to bacteria could be displaced by excess amounts of either unlabeled fibronectin or its N-terminal fragment. Similarly, collagen could displace 125I-labeled N-terminal peptide of fibronectin bound to the bacterial cell surface. Bacteria grown at 41 degrees C or in the presence of glucose did not express collagen or fibronectin receptors. These results indicate the presence of specific binding sites for collagen on the surface of E. coli cells and furthermore that the collagen and fibronectin binding sites are located in close proximity, possibly on the same structure.

  1. Collagen vascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many specific conditions ...

  2. The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180 in tissue degradation and cancer (Review)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen Melander, Eva Maria; Jürgensen, Henrik J; Madsen, Daniel H

    2015-01-01

    The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180, the product of the MRC2 gene, is a central component in the collagen turnover process governed by various mesenchymal cells. Through the endocytosis of collagen or large collagen fragments, this recycling receptor serves to direct basement membrane collagen...... as well as interstitial collagen to lysosomal degradation. This capacity, shared only with the mannose receptor from the same protein family, endows uPARAP/Endo180 with a critical role in development and homeostasis, as well as in pathological disruptions of the extracellular matrix structure. Important...

  3. Endocytic collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H.; Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Ingvarsen, Signe Ziir

    2012-01-01

    it crucially important to understand both the collagen synthesis and turnover mechanisms in this condition. Here we show that the endocytic collagen receptor, uPARAP/Endo180, is a major determinant in governing the balance between collagen deposition and degradation. Cirrhotic human livers displayed a marked...

  4. Piezoelectric Collagen Hydrogels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Piezoelectric Collagen Hydrogels. Stress-induced potential in bone is produced by shear piezoelectricity in collagen fibers and streaming potential in canaliculae. The growth of bone is regulated to best resist external force. Piezo electrical property of collagen has ...

  5. Process Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Hanna; Unger, Tobias; Leymann, Frank

    The concepts presented in this paper are motivated by the assumption that process knowledge is distributed knowledge and not completely known just by one person. Driven by this assumption we deal in this paper with the following questions: How can partial process knowledge be represented? How can this partial knowledge be used to define something more complete? To use higher level artefacts as building blocks to new applications has a long tradition in software engineering to increase flexibility and reduce modeling costs. In this paper we take a first step in applying this concept to processes, by defining process building blocks and operations which compose process building blocks. The building blocks will be referred to as process fragments in the following. The process fragment composition may take place either at design or runtime of the process. The design time approach reduces design costs by reusing artefacts. However the runtime fragment composition approach realizes high flexibility due to the possibility in the dynamic selection of the fragments to be composed. The contribution of this work lies in a fragment definition that enables the fragment modeler to represent his 'local' and fragmentary knowledge in a formal way and which allows fragment models to be composed.

  6. Pseudomembranous collagenous colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shan; Reyes, Victoria; Bronner, Mary P

    2003-10-01

    The classic clinical and histologic features of collagenous colitis are well characterized; however, the acute or neutrophilic inflammatory changes that may accompany this entity are less well established. In this report of 10 patients, we describe the first series of pseudomembranous collagenous colitis. Because superimposed Clostridium difficile infection was only demonstrated in one patient and no other causes of pseudomembranous colitis were evident in the remaining nine patients, we conclude that pseudomembranes are part of the spectrum of collagenous colitis itself. This case series illustrates the importance of searching for collagenous colitis in the evaluation of pseudomembranous colitis. At the same time, superimposed infectious or ischemic etiologies need to be excluded clinically in any patient with superimposed pseudomembranes. The existence of pseudomembranes in collagenous colitis also lends support to the hypothesis that toxin- and/or ischemia-mediated injury may be involved in the pathogenesis of collagenous colitis.

  7. MMP mediated type V collagen degradation (C5M) is elevated in ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veidal, S S; Larsen, D V; Chen, Xijuan

    2012-01-01

    Type V collagen has been demonstrated to control fibril formation. The aim of this study was to develop an ELISA capable of detecting a fragment of type V collagen generated by MMP-2/9 and to evaluate the assay as biomarker for ankylosing spondylitis (AS).......Type V collagen has been demonstrated to control fibril formation. The aim of this study was to develop an ELISA capable of detecting a fragment of type V collagen generated by MMP-2/9 and to evaluate the assay as biomarker for ankylosing spondylitis (AS)....

  8. Collagen and gelatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dasong; Nikoo, Mehdi; Boran, Gökhan; Zhou, Peng; Regenstein, Joe M

    2015-01-01

    Collagen and gelatin have been widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries due to their excellent biocompatibility, easy biodegradability, and weak antigenicity. Fish collagen and gelatin are of renewed interest, owing to the safety and religious concerns of their mammalian counterparts. The structure of collagen has been studied using various modern technologies, and interpretation of the raw data should be done with caution. The structure of collagen may vary with sources and seasons, which may affect its applications and optimal extraction conditions. Numerous studies have investigated the bioactivities and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and their hydrolysis peptides, using both in vitro and in vivo assay models. In addition to their established nutritional value as a protein source, collagen and collagen-derived products may exert various potential biological activities on cells in the extracellular matrix through the corresponding food-derived peptides after ingestion, and this might justify their applications in dietary supplements and pharmaceutical preparations. Moreover, an increasing number of novel applications have been found for collagen and gelatin. Therefore, this review covers the current understanding of the structure, bioactivities, and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and gelatin hydrolysates as well as their most recent applications.

  9. Chameleon fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brax, Philippe [Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA, IPhT, CNRS, URA 2306, F-91191Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Upadhye, Amol, E-mail: philippe.brax@cea.fr, E-mail: aupadhye@anl.gov [Institute for the Early Universe, Ewha University, International Education, Building #601, 11-1, Daehyun-Dong Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    A scalar field dark energy candidate could couple to ordinary matter and photons, enabling its detection in laboratory experiments. Here we study the quantum properties of the chameleon field, one such dark energy candidate, in an ''afterglow'' experiment designed to produce, trap, and detect chameleon particles. In particular, we investigate the possible fragmentation of a beam of chameleon particles into multiple particle states due to the highly non-linear interaction terms in the chameleon Lagrangian. Fragmentation could weaken the constraints of an afterglow experiment by reducing the energy of the regenerated photons, but this energy reduction also provides a unique signature which could be detected by a properly-designed experiment. We show that constraints from the CHASE experiment are essentially unaffected by fragmentation for φ{sup 4} and 1/φ potentials, but are weakened for steeper potentials, and we discuss possible future afterglow experiments.

  10. Dynamic interplay between the collagen scaffold and tumor evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeblad, Mikala; Rasch, Morten G; Weaver, Valerie M

    2010-01-01

    and remodeling of the ECM network regulate tissue tension, generate pathways for migration, and release ECM protein fragments to direct normal developmental processes such as branching morphogenesis. Collagens are major components of the ECM of which basement membrane type IV and interstitial matrix type I...... are the most prevalent. Here we discuss how abnormal expression, proteolysis and structure of these collagens influence cellular functions to elicit multiple effects on tumors, including proliferation, initiation, invasion, metastasis, and therapy response....

  11. Collagen abnormalities in conjunctiva of patients with cicatricial pemphigoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, J E; Ledoux, D; Baer, H; Foster, C S

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the distribution and types of collagen in the substantia propria of the conjunctiva of patients with ocular cicatricial pemphigoid (OCP). Biopsy specimens were collected from 10 patients with active OCP, five patients with active Behçet's disease, nine patients with atopic keratoconjunctivitis, five patients with chronic rosacea blepharoconjunctivitis, and six normal patients undergoing cataract surgery. Cryostat tissue sections were cut and stained using an indirect immunofluorescence technique, employing a panel of primary antibodies directed against seven collagen types. Differences between OCP, Behçet's, and normal conjunctiva were seen in the staining for collagen types III, IV, and VII. The intensity of staining for type III collagen was increased in the substantia propria of OCP conjunctiva as compared to the other groups. The basement membrane zone (BMZ) of OCP patients was typically disrupted and fragmented in appearance when stained for type IV collagen, a finding not seen in the non-OCP specimens. The BMZ staining pattern for type VII collagen in OCP conjunctiva was even more disrupted than that seen for type IV collagen, particularly on the posterior side, which was thickened and reduplicated with short fibers extending into the superficial stroma. The production of type III collagen by fibroblasts of the substantia propria is a common feature of diseases associated with subepithelial fibrosis. The damage to the epithelial BMZ and the subsequent attempt at repair with aberrant type IV and VII collagen production are unique to conjunctiva affected by OCP.

  12. Proof of direct radiogenic destruction of collagen in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acil, Y.; Springer, I.N.; Gassling, P.; Warnke, P.H.; Acmaz, S.; Soenmez, T.T.; Wiltfang, J. [Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Niehoff, P.; Kimmig, B. [Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (DE). Dept. of Radiotherapy (Radiooncology); Lefteris, V. [Univ. of Athens Medical School (Greece). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    2007-07-15

    Background: Fibroses of vessels and soft tissue are side effects of radiotherapy. The authors assumed that there was an immediate direct radiogenic damage of collagen of bone, periosteum and skin. Material and Methods: 15 porcine jaws samples (group 1) were exposed to a total dose of 60 Gy (cobalt-60, 2 Gy/day, five fractions/week). 15 jaws samples were stored accordingly (group 2, no irradiation, control). Collagen fragments of bone, periosteum and skin samples of groups 1 and 2 were isolated by ultrafiltration. Collagen types were characterized by SDS-PAGE measurement of the mature collagen cross-links hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP) and lysylpyridinoline (LP) by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and analysis of hydroxyproline (Hyp) was used to determine the ratio of the amount of collagen fragments from irradiated as opposed to nonirradiated samples. Results: The concentrations of HP, LP and Hyp in ultrafiltrates of probes of irradiated bone, periosteum and skin were markedly increased (average factors for bone: 3.69, 1.84, and 3.40, respectively; average factors for periosteum: 1.55, 1.41, and 1.77, respectively; average factors for skin: 1.55, 1.60, and 2.23, respectively) as compared to nonirradiated probes. SDS-PAGE did show collagen types I and V in nonirradiated bone, I and III in nonirradiated skin, and I in nonirradiated periosteum samples. In irradiated samples, smeared bands illustrated fragmentation of the collagen molecule. Conclusion: The increased concentrations of HP, LP and Hyp in ultrafiltrates indicated increased concentrations of split collagen. Direct and instant radiogenic damage of (extracellular matrix of) bone, periosteum and skin tissue collagen could be demonstrated. (orig.)

  13. Rock fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.S.; Green, S.J.; Hakala, W.W.; Hustrulid, W.A.; Maurer, W.C. (eds.)

    1976-01-01

    Experts in rock mechanics, mining, excavation, drilling, tunneling and use of underground space met to discuss the relative merits of a wide variety of rock fragmentation schemes. Information is presented on novel rock fracturing techniques; tunneling using electron beams, thermocorer, electric spark drills, water jets, and diamond drills; and rock fracturing research needs for mining and underground construction. (LCL)

  14. Neo-Epitopes—Fragments of Cartilage and Connective Tissue Degradation in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis and Unclassified Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maijer, Karen I; Gudmann, Natasja Stæhr; Karsdal, Morten Asser

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Tissue destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is predominantly mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), thereby generating protein fragments. Previous studies have revealed that these fragments include MMP-mediated collagen type I, II, and III degradation, citrullinated and MMP...

  15. Bespoke Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The PhD project Bespoke Fragments is investigating the space emerging in the exploration of the relationship between digital drawing and fabrication, and the field of materials and their properties and capacities. Through a series of different experiments, the project situates itself in a shuttling...... tangible experiments, the project discusses materiality and digitally controlled fabrication tools as a expansion of the architect’s tool box and workflow. Bespoke Fragments considers this expansion as an opportunity to establish a connection between forms of digital drawing and the specificities...... of materials. Through that connection, the project seeks to use the realisation to generate developments and findings and, through an iterative mode of thinking, establish a dialogue between drawing, materials, and fabrication. The use of digital fabrication tools through digital drawing opens up a new...

  16. Architectural fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Jacob Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    . I try to invent the ways of drawing the models - that decode and unfold them into architectural fragments- into future buildings or constructions in the landscape. [1] Luigi Moretti: Italian architect, 1907 - 1973 [2] Man Ray: American artist, 1890 - 1976. in 2015, I saw the wonderful exhibition......I have created a large collection of plaster models: a collection of Obstructions, errors and opportunities that may develop into architecture. The models are fragments of different complex shapes as well as more simple circular models with different profiling and diameters. In this contect I have...... been studying Luigi Moretti's [1] plastermodel - "the Model of the inner spaces of the Saint Maria of the Divine Providence" - in which context I see my own models. In 1934, Man Ray [2] photographed mathematical rmodels (in plaster) at the Henri Poincaré Institute in Paris and later used...

  17. Proximal collagenous gastroenteritides:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Riis, Lene Buhl; Danese, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    a systematic review of collagenous gastritis, collagenous sprue, and a combination thereof. METHOD: The search yielded 117 studies which were suitable for inclusion in the systematic review. Excluding repeated cases, 89 case reports and 28 case series were reported, whereas no prospective studies...... of these disorders is presented. The prognosis of both collagenous gastritis and sprue seems not to be as dismal as considered previously. Data point to involvement of immune or autoimmune mechanisms potentially driven by luminal antigens initiating the fibroinflammatory condition. CONCLUSIONS: To reach...

  18. Effects of endogenous cysteine proteinases on structures of collagen fibres from dermis of sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Xin; Zhou, Da-Yong; Ma, Dong-Dong; Liu, Zi-Qiang; Liu, Yan-Fei; Song, Liang; Dong, Xiu-Ping; Li, Dong-Mei; Zhu, Bei-Wei; Konno, Kunihiko; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2017-10-01

    Autolysis of sea cucumber, caused by endogenous enzymes, leads to postharvest quality deterioration of sea cucumber. However, the effects of endogenous proteinases on structures of collagen fibres, the major biologically relevant substrates in the body wall of sea cucumber, are less clear. Collagen fibres were prepared from the dermis of sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus), and the structural consequences of degradation of the collagen fibres caused by endogenous cysteine proteinases (ECP) from Stichopus japonicus were examined. Scanning electron microscopic images showed that ECP caused partial disaggregation of collagen fibres into collagen fibrils by disrupting interfibrillar proteoglycan bridges. Differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared analysis revealed increased structural disorder of fibrillar collagen caused by ECP. SDS-PAGE and chemical analysis indicated that ECP can liberate glycosaminoglycan, hydroxyproline and collagen fragments from collagen fibres. Thus ECP can cause disintegration of collagen fibres by degrading interfibrillar proteoglycan bridges. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fragmentation based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Gaining the understanding of mobile agent architecture and the security concerns, in this paper, we proposed a security protocol which addresses security with mitigated computational cost. The protocol is a combination of self decryption, co-operation and obfuscation technique. To circumvent the risk of malicious code execution in attacking environment, we have proposed fragmentation based encryption technique. Our encryption technique suits the general mobile agent size and provides hard and thorny obfuscation increasing attacker’s challenge on the same plane providing better performance with respect to computational cost as compared to existing AES encryption.

  20. Cytological diagnosis of collagenous spherulosis of breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday A Gokhale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Collagenous spherulosis is a rare entity usually seen in association with benign breast lesions. It is often picked up incidentally with a reported incidence of about 0.2% in cytological material. There are very few reports describing cytomorphological features of collagenous spherulosis. To the best of our knowledge this is the only case reported from the middle-east region. The presence of hyaline spherules surrounded by a single layer of benign myoepithelial cells is the hallmark of collagenous spherulosis on FNA. However, due to close cytological resemblance, it can be misdiagnosed as adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast. A 40-year-old woman presented with a history of a painless lump in the infraareolar region of left breast for a year. Fine needle aspiration was performed. The smears showed scanty cellularity comprising of cohesive clusters and a few branching fragments of benign ductal epithelial cells closely intermingled with many spherical, acellular homogenous hyaline globules. Few bare bipolar nuclei were noted in the background. A diagnosis of collagenous spherulosis associated with benign proliferative breast disease was made. Cytopathologists need to be aware of this entity in order to differentiate it from adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast which requires radical treatment.

  1. The distribution of collagen types I, III, and IV in normal and malignant colorectal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilska, M; Collan, Y; Peltonen, J; Gullichsen, R; Paajanen, H; Laato, M

    1998-06-01

    To compare the distribution of interstitial collagens (type I and III) and basement membrane collagen (type IV) in cancerous and normal colon. Retrospective study. University hospital, Finland. 13 patients with colorectal cancer of different stages and grades. Indirect immunofluorescence labelling for type I, III, and IV collagens of fresh frozen tissue samples, both normal and cancerous, cut into serial sections 6 microm thick. In normal mucosa, the epithelial basement membrane showed an intense immunoreaction for type IV collagen. Type I and III collagens were localised to the interstitial stroma underlying it. The membrane in cancer samples was characterised by discontinuities and thinning as estimated by immunolabelling for type IV collagen. Furthermore, immediately adjacent to the membrane type I and III collagen positivity was fragmented. The cancerous stroma showed a strong positive immunosignal for type I and III collagens. Both the epithelial basement membrane and the collagenous matrix immediately beneath it are degraded in malignant tissue. This may suggest the simultaneous activation of several degradative enzymes (as type I and III collagens are at least in part degraded by different enzymes from type IV collagen) or alterations in the expression of collagen subtypes in normal compared with malignant tissue.

  2. Bespoke Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    the digital environment with the reality of materials – and use realisation and materialisation to generate architectural developments and findings through an iterative mode of thinking about the dialogue between drawing, materials and fabrication. The control of fabrication tools through digital drawing......The Ph.D. -project Bespoke Fragments seeks to explore and utilise the space emerging between the potentials of digital drawing and fabrication and the field of materials and their properties and capacities. Within this span, the project is situated in a shuttling between the virtual and the actual......, investigating levels of control and uncertainty encountering with these. Through tangible experiments, the project discusses materiality and digitally controlled fabrications tools as direct expansions of the architect's digital drawing and workflow. The project sees this expansion as an opportunity to connect...

  3. Framing Fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary industrialized architecture based on advanced information technology and highly technological production processes, implies a radically different approach to architecture than what we have experienced in the past. Works of architecture composed of prefabricated building components......, contain distinctive architectural traits, not only based on rational repetition, but also supporting composition and montage as dynamic concepts. Prefab architecture is an architecture of fragmentation, individualization and changeability, and this sets up new challenges for the architect. This paper...... tries to develop a strategy for the architect dealing with industrially based architecture; a strategy which exploits architectural potentials in industrial building, which recognizes the rules of mass production and which redefines the architect’s position among the agents of building. If recent...

  4. Extracellular collagenases and the endocytic receptor, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein/Endo180, cooperate in fibroblast-mediated collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H; Engelholm, Lars H; Ingvarsen, Signe

    2007-01-01

    of large collagen fragments. First, we show that collagen that has been pre-cleaved by a mammalian collagenase is taken up much more efficiently than intact, native collagen by uPARAP/Endo180-positive cells. Second, we demonstrate that this preference is governed by the acquisition of a gelatin...

  5. [Collagen types ratio in prediction of postoperative ventral hernias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarenko, V A; Ivanov, S V; Ivanov, I S; Rosberg, E P; Tsukanov, A V; Popova, L P; Tarabrin, D V; Obyedkov, E G

    To analyze collagen types ratio in skin and aponeurosis in order to predict postoperative ventral hernias. The trial included 141 patients for the period 2012-2015. Group I (n=65) of patients without ventral hernias was divided into subgroup AI (primary operation, n=41) and BI (re-operation, n=24). Group II consisted of 76 patients with ventral hernias. We performed histological examination of skin and aponeurosis to define the collagen structure of connective tissue. There were significant differences between collagen type I/III ratio in skin (2.81±0.52 in group I vs. 1.13±0.48 in group II) and aponeurosis (2.69±0.41 vs. 1.09±0.21, respectively, p≤0.05). We revealed strong direct correlation (r=+0.92) between aponeurosis and skin specimens in one group. Collagen type I level was 73.81±2.74% in subgroup AI and 72.03±2.47% in subgroup BI. Collagen type I was predominant (p≤0.05). In patients with ventral hernias collagen type I/III ratio in skin is 2.54 times lower than in patients without hernias. Significant correlation of collagen types in skin and aponeurosis (r= +0.92) allows to predict the risk of postoperative ventral hernias on basis of skin fragment.

  6. Collagen fragment biomarkers as serological biomarkers of lean body mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, A.; Dalgas, U.; Primdahl, H.

    2015-01-01

    ) or change therein in head and neck cancer patients in the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group(DAHANCA) 25B cohort subjected to resistance training as well as in an age-matched and gender-matched control group. Methods Blood samples and dual X-ray absorptiometry data were measured at baseline, after 12 and 24...... derived from the dual X-ray absorptiometry scans. Results We were not able to show any correlation between biomarkers and LBM or C6M and anabolic response to exercise in recovering head and neck cancer patients. However, we did find that the biomarkers IC6, IC6/C6M, and ProC3 are biomarkers of LBM...... weeks in 41 HNSCC subjects of the DAHANCA 25B cohort of subjects recovering from neck and head cancer (stages provided in Table 1), and at baseline only in 21 healthy age-matched and gender-matched controls. Serum from blood was analyzed for the ProC3, IC6, and C6M peptide biomarkers and LBM were...

  7. Collagen metabolism in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M H; Jensen, L T; Andersen, T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of obesity, fat distribution and weight loss on collagen turnover using serum concentrations of the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (S-PICP) and the aminoterminal propeptide of type III pro-collagen (S-PIIINP) as markers for collagen turnover...... (r = 0.37; P = 0.004), height (r = 0.27; P = 0.04), waist circumference (r = 0.35; P = 0.007), as well as with WHR (r = 0.33; P = 0.01) and was inversely correlated to age (r = -0.40; P = 0.002). Compared with randomly selected controls from a large pool of healthy volunteers, the obese patients had...... restriction (P obesity and associated with body fat distribution, suggesting...

  8. Collagen in organ development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    It is important to know whether microgravity will adversely affect developmental processes. Collagens are macromolecular structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which may be altered by perturbations in gravity. Interstitial collagens have been shown to be necessary for normal growth and morphogenesis in some embryonic organs, and in the mouse salivary gland, the biosynthetic pattern of these molecules changes during development. Determination of the effects of microgravity on epithelial organ development must be preceded by crucial ground-based studies. These will define control of normal synthesis, secretion, and deposition of ECM macromolecules and the relationship of these processes to morphogenesis.

  9. Quantification of left ventricular myocardial collagen system in children, young adults, and the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bogoslavsky Levy Mendes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the collagen system of the human myocardium are still limited compared to those on small laboratory animals. The aim of this work was to observe the collagen tissue of the myocardium of the human heart as a function of age. The types of collagen, as well as the density of collagen tissue and the diameter of collagen fibrils, were examined. Fragments of the left ventricular wall from 15 hearts, 5 from children, 5 from young adults, and 5 from elderly individuals, were analyzed by using the Picrosirius-polarization method and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The results showed the presence of collagen type III and collagen type I, both in the endomysium and perimysium of the 3 groups studied. Measurements of collagen content in myocardial tissue displayed that both endomysial and perimysial collagen increase in number and thickness in the adult and elderly. These histochemical results coincided with the observations obtained with the electron microscope in showing an increase in the number of collagen fibrils with a large diameter in the adult and elderly hearts. The present results on cardiac collagen may be important for assessing the pathogenesis of several cardiopathies in the hearts of children, young adults, and the elderly.

  10. Corneal collagen crosslinking for keratoconus. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Bikbov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photochemical crosslinking is widely applied in ophthalmology. Its biochemical effect is due to the release of singlet oxygen that promotes anaerobic photochemical reaction. Keratoconus is one of the most common corneal ectasia affecting 1 in 250 to 250 000 persons. Currently, the rate of iatrogenic ectasia following eximer laser refractive surgery increases due to biomechanical weakening of the cornea. Morphologically and biochemically, ectasia is characterized by corneal layers thinning, contact between the stroma and epithelium resulting from Bowman’s membrane rupture, chromatin fragmentation in keratocyte nuclei, phagocytosis, abnormal staining and arrangement of collagen fibers, enzyme system disorders, and keratocyte apoptosis. In corneal ectasia, altered enzymatic processes result in the synthesis of abnormal collagen. Collagen packing is determined by the activity of various extracellular matrix enzymes which bind amines and aldehydes of collagen fiber amino acids. In the late stage, morphological changes of Descemet’s membrane (i.e., rupture and detachment develop. Abnormal hexagonal-shaped keratocytes and their apoptosis are the signs of endothelial dystrophy. The lack of analogs in domestic ophthalmology encouraged the scientists of Ufa Eye Research Institute to develop a device for corneal collagen crosslinking. The parameters of ultraviolet (i.e., wavelength, exposure time, power to achieve the desired effect were identified. The specifics of some photosensitizers in the course of the procedure were studied. UFalink, a device for UV irradiation of cornea, and photosensitizer Dextralink were developed and adopted. Due to the high risk of endothelial damage, this treatment is contraindicated in severe keratoconus (CCT less than 400 microns. Major effects of corneal collagen crosslinking are the following: Young’s modulus (modulus of elasticity increase by 328.9 % (on average, temperature tolerance increase by 5

  11. Corneal collagen crosslinking for keratoconus. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Bikbov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Photochemical crosslinking is widely applied in ophthalmology. Its biochemical effect is due to the release of singlet oxygen that promotes anaerobic photochemical reaction. Keratoconus is one of the most common corneal ectasia affecting 1 in 250 to 250 000 persons. Currently, the rate of iatrogenic ectasia following eximer laser refractive surgery increases due to biomechanical weakening of the cornea. Morphologically and biochemically, ectasia is characterized by corneal layers thinning, contact between the stroma and epithelium resulting from Bowman’s membrane rupture, chromatin fragmentation in keratocyte nuclei, phagocytosis, abnormal staining and arrangement of collagen fibers, enzyme system disorders, and keratocyte apoptosis. In corneal ectasia, altered enzymatic processes result in the synthesis of abnormal collagen. Collagen packing is determined by the activity of various extracellular matrix enzymes which bind amines and aldehydes of collagen fiber amino acids. In the late stage, morphological changes of Descemet’s membrane (i.e., rupture and detachment develop. Abnormal hexagonal-shaped keratocytes and their apoptosis are the signs of endothelial dystrophy. The lack of analogs in domestic ophthalmology encouraged the scientists of Ufa Eye Research Institute to develop a device for corneal collagen crosslinking. The parameters of ultraviolet (i.e., wavelength, exposure time, power to achieve the desired effect were identified. The specifics of some photosensitizers in the course of the procedure were studied. UFalink, a device for UV irradiation of cornea, and photosensitizer Dextralink were developed and adopted. Due to the high risk of endothelial damage, this treatment is contraindicated in severe keratoconus (CCT less than 400 microns. Major effects of corneal collagen crosslinking are the following: Young’s modulus (modulus of elasticity increase by 328.9 % (on average, temperature tolerance increase by 5

  12. Cancer risk in collagenous colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, J. L.; Tersmette, A. C.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Gruber, S. B.; Bayless, T. M.; Giardiello, F. M.

    1999-01-01

    Collagenous colitis is a recently described form of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Other inflammatory bowel disorders are associated with increased risk of colorectal and extracolonic malignancies, but this has not been evaluated in collagenous colitis. Colorectal and extracolonic malignancies

  13. Collagen Homeostasis and Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, S Peter; Heinemeier, Katja M; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system and its collagen rich tissue is important for ensuring architecture of skeletal muscle, energy storage in tendon and ligaments, joint surface protection, and for ensuring the transfer of muscular forces into resulting limb movement. Structure of tendon is stable and the...

  14. Fragmentation and Hadronization

    OpenAIRE

    Webber, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental data, theoretical ideas and models concerning jet fragmentation and the hadronization process are reviewed, concentrating on the following topics: factorization and small-x resummation of fragmentation functions, hadronization models, single-particle yields and spectra in Z decay, comparisons between quark and gluon jets, current and target fragmentation in deep inelastic scattering, heavy quark fragmentation, Bose-Einstein correlations and WW fragmentation.

  15. Fragmentation and Hadronization

    OpenAIRE

    Webber, B.R.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental data, theoretical ideas and models concerning jet fragmentation and the hadronization process are reviewed, concentrating on the following topics: factorization and small-x resummation of fragmentation functions, hadronization models, single-particle yields and spectra in Z decay, comparisons between quark and gluon jets, current and target fragmentation in deep inelastic scattering, heavy quark fragmentation, Bose-Einstein correlations and WW fragmentation.

  16. Biglycan fragmentation in pathologies associated with extracellular matrix remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genovese, Federica; Barascuk, Natasha; Larsen, Lise Skakkebæk

    2013-01-01

    The proteoglycan biglycan (BGN) is involved in collagen fibril assembly and its fragmentation is likely to be associated with collagen turnover during the pathogenesis of diseases which involve dysregulated extracellular matrix remodeling (ECMR), such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and liver fibrosis...

  17. Collagen turnover after tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joerring, S; Krogsgaard, M; Wilbek, H

    1994-01-01

    Collagen turnover after tibial fractures was examined in 16 patients with fracture of the tibial diaphysis and in 8 patients with fracture in the tibial condyle area by measuring sequential changes in serological markers of turnover of types I and III collagen for up to 26 weeks after fracture....... The markers were the carboxy-terminal extension peptide of type I procollagen (PICP), the amino-terminal extension peptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP), and the pyridinoline cross-linked carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP). The latter is a new serum marker of degradation of type I...... collagen. A group comparison showed characteristic sequential changes in the turnover of types I and III collagen in fractures of the tibial diaphysis and tibial condyles. The turnover of type III collagen reached a maximum after 2 weeks in both groups. The synthesis of type I collagen reached a maximum...

  18. Always cleave up your mess: targeting collagen degradation to treat tissue fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKleroy, William; Lee, Ting-Hein

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a vexing clinical problem with no proven therapeutic options. In the normal lung there is continuous collagen synthesis and collagen degradation, and these two processes are precisely balanced to maintain normal tissue architecture. With lung injury there is an increase in the rate of both collagen production and collagen degradation. The increase in collagen degradation is critical in preventing the formation of permanent scar tissue each time the lung is exposed to injury. In pulmonary fibrosis, collagen degradation does not keep pace with collagen production, resulting in extracellular accumulation of fibrillar collagen. Collagen degradation occurs through both extracellular and intracellular pathways. The extracellular pathway involves cleavage of collagen fibrils by proteolytic enzyme including the metalloproteinases. The less-well-described intracellular pathway involves binding and uptake of collagen fragments by fibroblasts and macrophages for lysosomal degradation. The relationship between these two pathways and their relevance to the development of fibrosis is complex. Fibrosis in the lung, liver, and skin has been associated with an impaired degradative environment. Much of the current scientific effort in fibrosis is focused on understanding the pathways that regulate increased collagen production. However, recent reports suggest an important role for collagen turnover and degradation in regulating the severity of tissue fibrosis. The objective of this review is to evaluate the roles of the extracellular and intracellular collagen degradation pathways in the development of fibrosis and to examine whether pulmonary fibrosis can be viewed as a disease of impaired matrix degradation rather than a disease of increased matrix production. PMID:23564511

  19. Characterizing matrix remodeling in collagen gels using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitz, David; Hinds, Monica T.; Hanson, Stephen R.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has shown promise at non-destructively characterizing engineered tissues such as collagen gels. However, as the collagen gels develop, the OCT images lose contrast of structures as the gels develop, making visual assessment difficult. Our group proposed quantitatively characterizing these gels by fitting the optical properties from the OCT signals. In this paper, we imaged collagen gels seeded with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) over a 5-day period and used the data to measure their optical properties. Our results showed that over time, the reflectivity of the samples increased 10-fold, corresponding to a decrease in anisotropy factor g, without much change in the scattering coefficient μs. Overall, the optical properties appeared to be dominated by scattering from the collagen matrix, not the cells. However, SMCs remodeled the collagen matrix, and this collagen remodeling by the cells is what causes the observed changes in optical properties. Moreover, the data showed that the optical properties were sensitive to the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), enzymes that break down local collagen fibrils into smaller fragments. Blocking MMPs in the SMC gels greatly impeded both the remodeling process and change in optical properties at day 5. Treating day 1 acellular gels with MMP-8 for 3 hr managed to partially reproduce the remodeling observed in SMC gels at day 5. Altogether, we conclude that matrix remodeling in general, and MMPs specifically, greatly affect the local optical properties of the sample, and OCT is a unique tool that can assess MMP activity in collagen gels both non-destructively and label free.

  20. Polarized Raman anisotropic response of collagen in tendon: towards 3D orientation mapping of collagen in tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Galvis

    Full Text Available In this study, polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS was used to characterize the anisotropic response of the amide I band of collagen as a basis for evaluating three-dimensional collagen fibril orientation in tissues. Firstly, the response was investigated theoretically by applying classical Raman theory to collagen-like peptide crystal structures. The theoretical methodology was then tested experimentally, by measuring amide I intensity anisotropy in rat tail as a function of the orientation of the incident laser polarization. For the theoretical study, several collagen-like triple-helical peptide crystal structures obtained from the Protein Data Bank were rotated "in plane" and "out of plane" to evaluate the role of molecular orientation on the intensity of the amide I band. Collagen-like peptides exhibit a sinusoidal anisotropic response when rotated "in plane" with respect to the polarized incident laser. Maximal intensity was obtained when the polarization of the incident light is perpendicular to the molecule and minimal when parallel. In the case of "out of plane" rotation of the molecular structure a decreased anisotropic response was observed, becoming completely isotropic when the structure was perpendicular to the plane of observation. The theoretical Raman response of collagen was compared to that of alpha helical protein fragments. In contrast to collagen, alpha helices have a maximal signal when incident light is parallel to the molecule and minimal when perpendicular. For out-of-plane molecular orientations alpha-helix structures display a decreased average intensity. Results obtained from experiments on rat tail tendon are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions, thus demonstrating the high potential of PRS for experimental evaluation of the three-dimensional orientation of collagen fibers in biological tissues.

  1. Heterogeneity of collagens in rabbit cornea: type VI collagen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cintron, C; Hong, BS

    1988-01-01

    .... These physical characteristics, together with the susceptibility of these polypeptides to collagenase and their amino acid composition, identified the high molecular weight aggregate as type VI collagen...

  2. Reevaluation of the role of the polar groups of collagen in the platelet-collagen interaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Chesney, C M; Pifer, D. D.; Crofford, L J; Huch, K. M.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical modification of collagen is a tool for exploring the platelet-collagen interaction. Since collagen must polymerize prior to the initiation of platelet aggregation and secretion, modification must be shown to affect platelet-collagen interaction and not collagen-collagen interaction. To address this point, the authors carried out the following chemical modifications on soluble monomeric collagen and preformed fibrillar collagen in parallel: 1) N-and O-acetylation, 2) esterification of...

  3. Mycobacterial laminin-binding histone-like protein mediates collagen-dependent cytoadherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Alves Dias

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available When grown in the presence of exogenous collagen I, Mycobacterium bovis BCG was shown to form clumps. Scanning electron microscopy examination of these clumps revealed the presence of collagen fibres cross-linking the bacilli. Since collagen is a major constituent of the eukaryotic extracellular matrices, we assayed BCG cytoadherence in the presence of exogenous collagen I. Collagen increased the interaction of the bacilli with A549 type II pneumocytes or U937 macrophages, suggesting that BCG is able to recruit collagen to facilitate its attachment to host cells. Using an affinity chromatography approach, we have isolated a BCG collagen-binding protein corresponding to the previously described mycobacterial laminin-binding histone-like protein (LBP/Hlp, a highly conserved protein associated with the mycobacterial cell wall. Moreover, Mycobacterium leprae LBP/Hlp, a well-characterized adhesin, was also able to bind collagen I. Finally, using recombinant fragments of M. leprae LBP/Hlp, we mapped the collagen-binding activity within the C-terminal domain of the adhesin. Since this protein was already shown to be involved in the recognition of laminin and heparan sulphate-containing proteoglycans, the present observations reinforce the adhesive activities of LBP/Hlp, which can be therefore considered as a multifaceted mycobacterial adhesin, playing an important role in both leprosy and tuberculosis pathogenesis.

  4. Collagen Conduit Versus Microsurgical Neurorrhaphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel; Sørensen, Allan Ibsen; Viñeta, Joaquin Fores

    2013-01-01

    To compare repair of acute lacerations of mixed sensory-motor nerves in humans using a collagen tube versus conventional repair.......To compare repair of acute lacerations of mixed sensory-motor nerves in humans using a collagen tube versus conventional repair....

  5. Collagen: Benefits in wound Healing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Collagen: Benefits in wound Healing. As substrate for haemostasis. As chemotactic to cellular elements. As scaffold for transition to mature collagen production & alignment. Resistant to degradation. As template for cellular attachment, migration and proliferation.

  6. Alterations of Dermal Connective Tissue Collagen in Diabetes: Molecular Basis of Aged-Appearing Skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela J Argyropoulos

    Full Text Available Alterations of the collagen, the major structural protein in skin, contribute significantly to human skin connective tissue aging. As aged-appearing skin is more common in diabetes, here we investigated the molecular basis of aged-appearing skin in diabetes. Among all known human matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, diabetic skin shows elevated levels of MMP-1 and MMP-2. Laser capture microdissection (LCM coupled real-time PCR indicated that elevated MMPs in diabetic skin were primarily expressed in the dermis. Furthermore, diabetic skin shows increased lysyl oxidase (LOX expression and higher cross-linked collagens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM further indicated that collagen fibrils were fragmented/disorganized, and key mechanical properties of traction force and tensile strength were increased in diabetic skin, compared to intact/well-organized collagen fibrils in non-diabetic skin. In in vitro tissue culture system, multiple MMPs including MMP-1 and MM-2 were induced by high glucose (25 mM exposure to isolated primary human skin dermal fibroblasts, the major cells responsible for collagen homeostasis in skin. The elevation of MMPs and LOX over the years is thought to result in the accumulation of fragmented and cross-linked collagen, and thus impairs dermal collagen structural integrity and mechanical properties in diabetes. Our data partially explain why old-looking skin is more common in diabetic patients.

  7. Fragmented QRS and Left Ventricular Geometry in Hypertensive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lütfü Bekar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fragmented QRS is a depolarization abnormality detected with routin ECG recording. It is related with conduction defect which occurs after myocardial fibrosis. In the left ventricular hypertrophy, an excessive amount of collagen accumulates in the interstitium when the myocytes became hypertrophied, resulting in myocardial fibrosis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship of fragmented QRS which was detected on ECG recordings of the hypertensive patients with the left ventricular geometry.Patients and Methods: Essential hypertension patients referred to our hospital on outpatient bases were included in the study. 12-lead resting ECG was taken in all the patients. Left ventricular geometry defined using left ventricular mass index and relative wall thickness with transthorasic echocardiography.Results: Sixy seven patients with fragmented QRS and 63 patients without fragmented QRS included the study. We found that patients in the group with fragmented QRS detected have a wider mean left atrium diameter, greater left ventricular mass and left ventricular mass index compared with the group without fragmented QRS. Concentric and eccentric hypertrophy were more common in fragmented QRS group, while normal geometry and concentric remodelling have greater rates in the normal group.Conclusion: Left ventricular hypertrophy is observed more frequently in the patients with fragmented QRS than without fragmented QRS. This may be associated with the increased myocardial fibrosis in the left ventricular hypertrophy. Existence of fragmented QRS can be used for risk stratification in the hypertensive patients.

  8. MMP Mediated Degradation of Type VI Collagen Is Highly Associated with Liver Fibrosis - Identification and Validation of a Novel Biochemical Marker Assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veidal, Sanne Skovgard; Karsdal, Morten Asser; Vassiliadis, Efstathios

    2011-01-01

    fragments, so-called neo-epitopes, may be specific biochemical marker of liver fibrosis. The aim of this study was to develop an ELISA detecting a fragment of type VI collagen generated by MMP-2 and MMP-9, and evaluate this assay in two preclinical models of liver fibrosis. Methods: Mass spectrometric...... analysis of cleaved type VI collagen revealed a large number of protease-generated neo-epitopes. A fragment unique to type VI collagen generated by MMP-2 and MMP-9 was selected for ELISA development. The CO6-MMP assay was evaluated in two rat models of liver fibrosis: bile duct ligation (BDL) and carbon......Background and Aims: During fibrogenesis, in which excessive remodeling of the extracellular matrix occurs, both the quantity of type VI collagen and levels of matrix metalloproteinases, including MMP-2 and MMP-9, increase significantly. Proteolytic degradation of type VI collagen into small...

  9. Collagenous Gastritis: A Rare Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten Limaiem

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Collagenous gastritis is a rare entity of unknown etiology characterized histologically by the presence of a thick subepithelial collagen band associated with an inflammatory infiltrate of gastric mucosa. A 40-year-old male presented with a history of chronic intermittent abdominal pain for about 6 months. Physical examination was unremarkable, and biological tests were within normal range. The patient underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy which showed a nodular mucosa of the stomach. Biopsies of the duodenum and colon were unremarkable. However, biopsies of the gastric fundus revealed a mild chronic gastritis characterized by lymphocytic and plasma cell infiltration of deep mucosa, without lymphoid follicle formation or active inflammation. No microorganisms were identified on routine hematoxylin and eosin or Giemsa-stained sections. Subepithelial collagen in the gastric biopsies was thickened and showed entrapped capillaries. Subepithelial collagen was highlighted by Masson's trichrome staining and was negative for amyloid by Congo Red. In the areas containing thickened collagen, there were no intraepithelial lymphocytes. The final pathological diagnosis was collagenous gastritis. Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, but it is important to recognize its characteristic endoscopic and pathologic findings to make a correct diagnosis. Specific therapy for this rare entity has not yet been established. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2015; 3(2.000: 68-70

  10. Stability of collagen during denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, R; Goshev, I; Gorinstein, S; Nedkov, P

    1999-05-01

    The stability of calf skin collagen (CSC) type I during thermal and chemical denaturation in the presence of glycerol was investigated. Thermal denaturation of type I collagen was performed in the presence of glycerol or in combination with urea and sodium chloride. The denaturation curves obtained in the presence of urea or sodium chloride retained their original shape without glycerol. These curves were shifted upward proportionally to the glycerol concentration in the reaction medium. This means that glycerol and the denaturants act independently. The explanation is based on the difference in the mechanism of their action on the collagen molecule.

  11. Protein release from collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano; Hojo; Maeda; Fujioka

    1998-05-04

    The effective delivery of protein drugs is an important research subject in the field of pharmacology, and to prolong the effect of protein drugs, many studies are being conducted to control the release of proteins from various carrier materials. Collagen is one of the most useful candidates for this purpose, and many studies have been reported; pharmaceutical formulations containing collagen in gel, film and sponge form are used to incorporate low-molecular-weight compounds such as antibiotics and carcinostatics, and the release of these compounds is controlled by the concentration of the gel as well as the shape and degree of crosslinking of the matrix. However, it is still difficult to retain protein drugs in the collagen. In this article, we report on the controlled release of protein drugs using collagen which exhibits good biocompatibility as a carrier, focusing on a new drug delivery system, the Minipellet, which we have developed.

  12. Analysis of human collagen sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassa, Manisha; Anand, Pracheta; Jain, Aditi; Chhabra, Aastha; Jaiswal, Astha; Malhotra, Umang; Rani, Vibha

    2012-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is fast emerging as important component mediating cell-cell interactions, along with its established role as a scaffold for cell support. Collagen, being the principal component of extracellular matrix, has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions. However, collagens are complex protein structures belonging to a large family consisting of 28 members in humans; hence, there exists a lack of in depth information about their structural features. Annotating and appreciating the functions of these proteins is possible with the help of the numerous biocomputational tools that are currently available. This study reports a comparative analysis and characterization of the alpha-1 chain of human collagen sequences. Physico-chemical, secondary structural, functional and phylogenetic classification was carried out, based on which, collagens 12, 14 and 20, which belong to the FACIT collagen family, have been identified as potential players in diseased conditions, owing to certain atypical properties such as very high aliphatic index, low percentage of glycine and proline residues and their proximity in evolutionary history. These collagen molecules might be important candidates to be investigated further for their role in skeletal disorders.

  13. Oriented Collagen Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Shohta Kodama; Taro Saku; Hiroshi Mikami; Go Kuwahara; Toru Kosaka; Yoshihiro Isobe

    2012-01-01

    Oriented collagen scaffolds were developed in the form of sheet, mesh and tube by arraying flow-oriented collagen string gels and dehydrating the arrayed gels. The developed collagen scaffolds can be any practical size with any direction of orientation for tissue engineering applications. The birefringence of the collagen scaffolds was quantitatively analyzed by parallel Nicols method. Since native collagen in the human body has orientations such as bone, cartilage, tendon and cornea, and the...

  14. Urinary collagen degradation products as early markers of progressive renal fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hijmans, Ryanne S.; Rasmussen, Daniel Guldager Kring; Yazdani, Saleh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Renal fibrogenesis is associated with increased ECM remodeling and release of collagen fragments in urine in progressive renal disease. We investigated the diagnostic value of urinary collagen degradation products in a proteinuria-driven fibrosis rat model with and without anti......-fibrotic S1P-receptor modulator FTY720 treatment. Methods: Proteinuria was induced in male Wistar rats by Adriamycin (ADR) injection (n = 16). Healthy rats served as controls (n = 12). Six weeks post-injection, all underwent renal biopsy, and FTY720-treatment started in ADR-rats (n = 8) and controls (n = 6......). Others remained untreated. Rats were sacrificed after 12 weeks. Collagen type I (C1M) and III (C3M) degradation fragments were measured in blood and urine using ELISA. Kidneys were stained for various inflammatory and fibrotic markers. Results: Six weeks post-injection proteinuria increased (versus...

  15. Disease-associated mutations prevent GPR56-collagen III interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Luo

    Full Text Available GPR56 is a member of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Mutations in GPR56 cause a devastating human brain malformation called bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria (BFPP. Using the N-terminal fragment of GPR56 (GPR56(N as a probe, we have recently demonstrated that collagen III is the ligand of GPR56 in the developing brain. In this report, we discover a new functional domain in GPR56(N, the ligand binding domain. This domain contains four disease-associated mutations and two N-glycosylation sites. Our study reveals that although glycosylation is not required for ligand binding, each of the four disease-associated mutations completely abolish the ligand binding ability of GPR56. Our data indicates that these four single missense mutations cause BFPP mostly by abolishing the ability of GPR56 to bind to its ligand, collagen III, in addition to affecting GPR56 protein surface expression as previously shown.

  16. Monitoring single protease activities on triple-helical collagen molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzar, Raj; Froberg, James; Srivastava, D. K.; Choi, Yongki

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a particular family of proteases, play a pivotal role in degrading the extracellular matrix (ECM). It has been known for more than 40 years that MMPs are closely involved in multiple human cancers during cell growth, invasion, and metastasis. However, the mechanisms of MMP activity are far from being understood. Here, we monitored enzymatic processing of MMPs with two complementary approaches, atomic force microscopy and nanocircuits measurements. AFM measurements demonstrated that incubation of collagen monomers with MMPs resulted in a single position cleavage, producing 3/4 and 1/4 collagen fragments. From electronic monitoring of single MMP nanocircuit measurements, we were able to capture a single cleavage event with a rate of 0.012 Hz, which were in good agreement with fluorescence assay measurements. This work was supported financially by the NIGMS/NIH (P30GM103332-02) and ND NASA EPSCoR RID Grant.

  17. Noninvasive corneal stromal collagen imaging using two-photon-generated second-harmonic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishige, Naoyuki; Petroll, W Matthew; Nishida, Teruo; Kenney, M Cristina; Jester, James V

    2006-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using femtosecond-pulse lasers to produce second-harmonic generated (SHG) signals to noninvasively assess corneal stromal collagen organization. The Eye Institute, University of California, Irvine, California, USA. Mouse, rabbit, and human corneas were examined by two-photon confocal microscopy using a variable-wavelength femtosecond lasers to produce SHG signals. Two types were detected: forward scattered and backward scattered. Wavelength dependence of the SHG signal was confirmed by spectral separation using the 510 Meta (Zeiss). To verify the spatial relation between SHG signals and corneal cells, staining of cytoskeletons and nuclei was performed. Second-harmonic-generated signal intensity was strongest with an excitation wavelength of 800 nm for all 3 species. Second-harmonic-generated forward signals showed a distinct fibrillar pattern organized into bands suggesting lamellae, while backscattered SHG signals appeared more diffuse and indistinct. Reconstruction of SHG signals showed two patterns of lamellar organization: highly interwoven in the anterior stroma and orthogonally arranged in the posterior stroma. Unique to the human cornea was the presence of transverse, sutural lamellae that inserted into Bowman's layer, suggesting an anchoring function. Using two-photon confocal microscopy to generate SHG signals from the corneal collagen provides a powerful new approach to noninvasively study corneal structure. Human corneas had a unique organizational pattern with sutural lamellae to provide important biomechanical support that was not present in mouse or rabbit corneas.

  18. Aging-associated modifications of collagen affect its degradation by matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Preety; Butler, Georgina S; Jamroz, Andrew; Azizi, Pouya; Overall, Christopher M; Brömme, Dieter

    2017-06-17

    The natural aging process and various pathologies correlate with alterations in the composition and the structural and mechanical integrity of the connective tissue. Collagens represent the most abundant matrix proteins and provide for the overall stiffness and resilience of tissues. The structural changes of collagens and their susceptibility to degradation are associated with skin wrinkling, bone and cartilage deterioration, as well as cardiovascular and respiratory malfunctions. Here, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are major contributors to tissue remodeling and collagen degradation. During aging, collagens are modified by mineralization, accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and the depletion of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which affect fiber stability and their susceptibility to MMP-mediated degradation. We found a reduced collagenolysis in mineralized and AGE-modified collagen fibers when compared to native fibrillar collagen. GAGs had no effect on MMP-mediated degradation of collagen. In general, MMP digestion led to a reduction in the mechanical strength of native and modified collagen fibers. Successive fiber degradation with MMPs and the cysteine-dependent collagenase, cathepsin K (CatK), resulted in their complete degradation. In contrast, MMP-generated fragments were not or only poorly cleaved by non-collagenolytic cathepsins such as cathepsin V (CatV). In conclusion, our data indicate that aging and disease-associated collagen modifications reduce tissue remodeling by MMPs and decrease the structural and mechanic integrity of collagen fibers, which both may exacerbate extracellular matrix pathology. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Reconstituted collagen fibrils. Fibrillar and molecular stability of the collagen upon maturation in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Danielsen, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    During the maturation in vitro of reconstituted collagen fibrils prepared from rat skin, the mechanical and thermal stability of collagen increased and the pepsin-solubility decreased. At the same time a larger fraction of the pepsin-soluble collagen attained a lower molecular thermal stability that resulted in a biphasic thermal transition of the soluble collagen. Type-I collagen, with a similar biphasic thermal transition, was isolated from acid-insoluble rat skin collagen.

  20. [Morphological tissue changes after the implantation of a biodegradable material on collagen basis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maĭborodin, I V; Beregovoĭ, E A; Shevela, A I; Kuznetsova, I V; Barannik, M I; Manaev, A A; Maĭborodina, V I

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the peculiarities of tissue reactions during the degradation of "Collost" bioplastic material on the collagen basis with completely preserved fibrous structure, after its implantation into the bone tissue defect. The defect in bone tissue sized 1-2 mm x 3-5 mm was created in tibial condyle. The study was performed on 24 Wistar rats using light microscopic methods. The tissue reactions were studied at different time intervals (1, 2, 6 and 12 months) after the implantation of collagenic material. It was found that after the implantation, the material became impregnated with blood, and due to fibrin, densely adhered to the damaged tissues. Further, the cells were found to migrate along the blood clot into its depth from the surrounding tissues. These were primarily the fibroblasts which were located in a network of fibers and started to absorb collagen from a surrounding material and to synthesize new collagen. Gradually, the collagenic material became similar to a cell-containing network. The volume of the newly synthesized collagen increased, and after some time all the foreign material was absorbed by fibroblasts and replaced with connective tissue. After 1 year, a large "Collost" fragment was completely degraded and replaced by loose connective tissue. The implantation of a collagenic material did not stimulate the formation of a delimiting connective tissue capsule

  1. Streptococcus sanguis modulates type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costalonga, Massimo; Hodges, James S; Herzberg, Mark C

    2002-08-15

    Native type II collagen is tolerogenic when given orally or i.p. to DBA/1J mice and induces autoimmune arthritis when given s.c. in CFA. The tolerogenic epitope is contained in cyanogen bromide fragment 11 (CB11) and is structurally mimicked by PGEQGPK within the platelet aggregation-associated protein (PAAP) on Streptococcus sanguis. To learn whether S. sanguis modulates transmucosally the Ag-specific development of autoimmune arthritis, DBA/1J pups were given live S. sanguis, CB11, or type II collagen intragastrically. Feeding S. sanguis at 6 days postpartum delayed the onset of arthritis, and reduced the rate, final severity, and percentage of affected limbs. Next, PAAP(+) S. sanguis and type II collagen were tested for T cell cross-reactivity. T cells primed with the tolerogenic epitope of type II collagen proliferated more when incubated with PAAP(+) S. sanguis than with PAAP(-) Streptococcus gordonii or type II collagen, suggesting an Ag-specific transmucosal tolerogenic effect. In neonatal mice, therefore, bacterial surface Ags that mimic self can transmucosally stimulate Ag-specific inhibitory T cells. In adult mice immunized with type II collagen, these Ag-specific inhibitory T cells manifest later as attenuated arthritis. The PAAP(+) S. sanguis appear to activate adult memory, rather than naive, type II collagen-specific T cells, suggesting that systemic challenge with commensal self-mimicking microorganisms may perpetuate existing autoimmunity, but not initiate autorecognition.

  2. A modified collagen scaffold facilitates endogenous neurogenesis for acute spinal cord injury repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Caixia; Li, Xing; Xiao, Zhifeng; Zhao, Yannan; Liang, Hui; Wang, Bin; Han, Sufang; Li, Xiaoran; Xu, Bai; Wang, Nuo; Liu, Sumei; Xue, Weiwei; Dai, Jianwu

    2017-03-15

    Due to irreversible neuronal loss and glial scar deposition, spinal cord injury (SCI) ultimately results in permanent neurological dysfunction. Neuronal regeneration of neural stem cells (NSCs) residing in the spinal cord could be an ideal strategy for replenishing the lost neurons and restore function. However, many myelin-associated inhibitors in the SCI microenvironment limit the ability of spinal cord NSCs to regenerate into neurons. Here, a linearly ordered collagen scaffold was used to prevent scar deposition, guide nerve regeneration and carry drugs to neutralize the inhibitory molecules. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody Fab fragment, CBD-Fab, was constructed to neutralize the myelin inhibitory molecules, which was demonstrated to promote neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth under myelin in vitro. This fragment could also specifically bind to the collagen and undergo sustained release from collagen scaffold. Then, the scaffolds modified with CBD-Fab were transplanted into an acute rat SCI model. The robust neurogenesis of endogenous injury-activated NSCs was observed, and these NSCs could not only differentiate into neurons but further mature into functional neurons to reconnect the injured gap. The results indicated that the modified collagen scaffold could be an ideal candidate for spinal cord regeneration after acute SCI. A linearly ordered collagen scaffold was specifically modified with collagen-binding EGFR antibody, allowed for sustained release of this EGFR neutralizing factor, to block the myelin associated inhibitory molecules and guide spinal cord regeneration along its linear fibers. Dorsal root ganglion neurons and neural stem cells induced by CBD-Fab exhibited enhanced neurite outgrowth and neuronal differentiation rate under myelin in vitro. Transplantation of the modified collagen scaffold with moderate EGFR neutralizing proteins showed greatest advantage on endogenous neurogenesis of injury-activated neural stem cells for acute

  3. Analysis of the collagen I and fibronectin of temporomandibular joint synovial fluid and discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natiella, Joseph R; Burch, Lindsay; Fries, Kristin M; Upton, L George; Edsberg, Laura E

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the content of synovial fluid aspirates and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc tissue for collagen I and total fibronectin in patients with closed lock. Fibronectin contains dual properties of assisting with wound healing and inducing cartilage degradation. Native fibronectin has been shown to assist with wound repair, whereas particular fibronectin fragments may degrade cartilage. In addition, collagen I is the major supporting protein of the TMJ disc and will degrade as osteoarthritis progresses. Fibronectin or collagen I expression in human TMJ synovial aspirates and disc tissue may indicate the proteins' involvement in closed lock. The hypothesis of this study is that TMJ discs and serum of patients with closed lock will contain an increased amount of fibronectin and decreased amount of collagen I. We analyzed a total of 8 diseased TMJ discs and 4 diseased synovial fluid aspirates. For our control samples, we assessed 5 synovial samples from healthy patients and control skin samples. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay allowed us to measure the total amount of fibronectin and collagen I in synovial aspirates. Furthermore, we used light microscopy to assess TMJ disc histology and collagen architecture in control skin samples. Lastly, using fluorescent staining, we examined fibronectin and collagen I expression in TMJ discs. We compared the fluorescent staining and light microscopy results of both proteins within each disc to confirm fibronectin and collagen I expression. Disc specimens with advanced morphologic pathology showed significant labeling for fibronectin in 3 of 3 cases and for collagen I in 4 of 4 cases. There was no considerable difference in detection of either fibronectin or collagen I in TMJ synovial aspirates from patients with advanced disc pathology compared with controls. The levels of fibronectin and collagen I in the TMJ disc and synovial fluid may be influenced by the stage of disease

  4. Oriented Collagen Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Yoshihiro; Kosaka, Toru; Kuwahara, Go; Mikami, Hiroshi; Saku, Taro; Kodama, Shohta

    2012-01-01

    Oriented collagen scaffolds were developed in the form of sheet, mesh and tube by arraying flow-oriented collagen string gels and dehydrating the arrayed gels. The developed collagen scaffolds can be any practical size with any direction of orientation for tissue engineering applications. The birefringence of the collagen scaffolds was quantitatively analyzed by parallel Nicols method. Since native collagen in the human body has orientations such as bone, cartilage, tendon and cornea, and the orientation has a special role for the function of human organs, the developed various types of three-dimensional oriented collagen scaffolds are expected to be useful biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicines. PMID:28817059

  5. Oriented Collagen Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohta Kodama

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Oriented collagen scaffolds were developed in the form of sheet, mesh and tube by arraying flow-oriented collagen string gels and dehydrating the arrayed gels. The developed collagen scaffolds can be any practical size with any direction of orientation for tissue engineering applications. The birefringence of the collagen scaffolds was quantitatively analyzed by parallel Nicols method. Since native collagen in the human body has orientations such as bone, cartilage, tendon and cornea, and the orientation has a special role for the function of human organs, the developed various types of three-dimensional oriented collagen scaffolds are expected to be useful biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicines.

  6. Oriented Collagen Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Yoshihiro; Kosaka, Toru; Kuwahara, Go; Mikami, Hiroshi; Saku, Taro; Kodama, Shohta

    2012-03-16

    Oriented collagen scaffolds were developed in the form of sheet, mesh and tube by arraying flow-oriented collagen string gels and dehydrating the arrayed gels. The developed collagen scaffolds can be any practical size with any direction of orientation for tissue engineering applications. The birefringence of the collagen scaffolds was quantitatively analyzed by parallel Nicols method. Since native collagen in the human body has orientations such as bone, cartilage, tendon and cornea, and the orientation has a special role for the function of human organs, the developed various types of three-dimensional oriented collagen scaffolds are expected to be useful biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicines.

  7. Fragmentation trees reloaded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böcker, Sebastian; Dührkop, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Untargeted metabolomics commonly uses liquid chromatography mass spectrometry to measure abundances of metabolites; subsequent tandem mass spectrometry is used to derive information about individual compounds. One of the bottlenecks in this experimental setup is the interpretation of fragmentation spectra to accurately and efficiently identify compounds. Fragmentation trees have become a powerful tool for the interpretation of tandem mass spectrometry data of small molecules. These trees are determined from the data using combinatorial optimization, and aim at explaining the experimental data via fragmentation cascades. Fragmentation tree computation does not require spectral or structural databases. To obtain biochemically meaningful trees, one needs an elaborate optimization function (scoring). We present a new scoring for computing fragmentation trees, transforming the combinatorial optimization into a Maximum A Posteriori estimator. We demonstrate the superiority of the new scoring for two tasks: both for the de novo identification of molecular formulas of unknown compounds, and for searching a database for structurally similar compounds, our method SIRIUS 3, performs significantly better than the previous version of our method, as well as other methods for this task. SIRIUS 3 can be a part of an untargeted metabolomics workflow, allowing researchers to investigate unknowns using automated computational methods.Graphical abstractWe present a new scoring for computing fragmentation trees from tandem mass spectrometry data based on Bayesian statistics. The best scoring fragmentation tree most likely explains the molecular formula of the measured parent ion.

  8. Fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasak, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Fragmentation is a degradation pathway ubiquitously observed in proteins despite the remarkable stability of peptide bond; proteins differ only by how much and where cleavage occurs. The goal of this review is to summarize reports regarding the non-enzymatic fragmentation of the peptide backbone of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The sites in the polypeptide chain susceptible to fragmentation are determined by a multitude of factors. Insights are provided on the intimate chemical mechanisms that can make some bonds prone to cleavage due to the presence of specific side-chains. In addition to primary structure, the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures have a significant impact in modulating the distribution of cleavage sites by altering local flexibility, accessibility to solvent or bringing in close proximity side chains that are remote in sequence. This review focuses on cleavage sites observed in the constant regions of mAbs, with special emphasis on hinge fragmentation. The mechanisms responsible for backbone cleavage are strongly dependent on pH and can be catalyzed by metals or radicals. The distribution of cleavage sites are different under acidic compared to basic conditions, with fragmentation rates exhibiting a minimum in the pH range 5–6; therefore, the overall fragmentation pattern observed for a mAb is a complex result of structural and solvent conditions. A critical review of the techniques used to monitor fragmentation is also presented; usually a compromise has to be made between a highly sensitive method with good fragment separation and the capability to identify the cleavage site. The effect of fragmentation on the function of a mAb must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending on whether cleavage sites are observed in the variable or constant regions, and on the mechanism of action of the molecule. PMID:21487244

  9. Collagen crosslinks in chondromalacia of the patella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väätäinen, U; Kiviranta, I; Jaroma, H; Arokosi, J; Tammi, M; Kovanen, V

    1998-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine collagen concentration and collagen crosslinks in cartilage samples from chondromalacia of the patella. To study the extracellular matrix alterations associated to chondromalacia, we determined the concentration of collagen (hydroxyproline) and its hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline crosslinks from chondromalacia foci of the patellae in 12 patients and 7 controls from apparently normal cadavers. The structure of the collagen network in 8 samples of grades II-IV chondromalacia was examined under polarized light microscopy. The full-thickness cartilage samples taken with a surgical knife from chondromalacia lesions did not show changes in collagen, hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline concentration as compared with the controls. Polarized light microscopy showed decreased birefringence in the superficial cartilage of chondromalacia lesions, indicating disorganization or disappearance of collagen fibers in this zone. It is concluded that the collagen network shows gradual disorganization with the severity of chondromalacia lesion of the patella without changes in the concentration or crosslinks of collagen.

  10. Embedded Fragments Registry (EFR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — In 2009, the Department of Defense estimated that approximately 40,000 service members who served in OEF/OIF may have embedded fragment wounds as the result of small...

  11. Fragmentation Main Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The fragmentation model combines patch size and patch continuity with diversity of vegetation types per patch and rarity of vegetation types per patch. A patch was...

  12. DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rex, A S; Aagaard, J.; Fedder, J

    2017-01-01

    Sperm DNA Fragmentation has been extensively studied for more than a decade. In the 1940s the uniqueness of the spermatozoa protein complex which stabilizes the DNA was discovered. In the fifties and sixties, the association between unstable chromatin structure and subfertility was investigated....... In the seventies, the impact of induced DNA damage was investigated. In the 1980s the concept of sperm DNA fragmentation as related to infertility was introduced as well as the first DNA fragmentation test: the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA). The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labelling...... (TUNEL) test followed by others was introduced in the nineties. The association between DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa and pregnancy loss has been extensively investigated spurring the need for a therapeutic tool for these patients. This gave rise to an increased interest in the aetiology of DNA damage...

  13. Fragmented Work Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humle, Didde Maria; Reff Pedersen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    stories. We argue that meaning by story making is not always created by coherence and causality; meaning is created by different types of fragmentation: discontinuities, tensions and editing. The objective of this article is to develop and advance antenarrative practice analysis of work stories......Following a strand of narrative studies pointing to the living conditions of storytelling and the micro-level implications of working within fragmented narrative perspectives, this article contributes to narrative research on work stories by focusing on how meaning is created from fragmented...... by exploring how different types of fragmentation create meanings. This is done by studying the work stories of job and personnel consultants and by drawing on the results of a narrative, ethnographic study of a consultancy. The analysis demonstrates how work stories are social practices negotiated, retold...

  14. Collagen fibril architecture, domain organization, and triple-helical conformation govern its proteolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perumal, Shiamalee; Antipova, Olga; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O. (IIT)

    2008-06-24

    We describe the molecular structure of the collagen fibril and how it affects collagen proteolysis or 'collagenolysis.' The fibril-forming collagens are major components of all mammalian connective tissues, providing the structural and organizational framework for skin, blood vessels, bone, tendon, and other tissues. The triple helix of the collagen molecule is resistant to most proteinases, and the matrix metalloproteinases that do proteolyze collagen are affected by the architecture of collagen fibrils, which are notably more resistant to collagenolysis than lone collagen monomers. Until now, there has been no molecular explanation for this. Full or limited proteolysis of the collagen fibril is known to be a key process in normal growth, development, repair, and cell differentiation, and in cancerous tumor progression and heart disease. Peptide fragments generated by collagenolysis, and the conformation of exposed sites on the fibril as a result of limited proteolysis, regulate these processes and that of cellular attachment, but it is not known how or why. Using computational and molecular visualization methods, we found that the arrangement of collagen monomers in the fibril (its architecture) protects areas vulnerable to collagenolysis and strictly governs the process. This in turn affects the accessibility of a cell interaction site located near the cleavage region. Our observations suggest that the C-terminal telopeptide must be proteolyzed before collagenase can gain access to the cleavage site. Collagenase then binds to the substrate's 'interaction domain,' which facilitates the triple-helix unwinding/dissociation function of the enzyme before collagenolysis.

  15. Biology, chemistry and pathology of collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischmajer, R.; Olsen, B.R.; Kuhn, K.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of five parts and a section of poster papers. Some of the articles are: Structure of the Type II Collagen Gene; Structural and Functional Analysis of the Genes for ..cap alpha..2(1) and ..cap alpha..1(III) collagens; Structure and Expression of the Collagen Genes of C. Elegans; Molecular Basis of Clinical Heterogeneity in the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; and Normal and Mutant Human Collagen Genes.

  16. Crystallographic fragment screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, John

    2012-01-01

    Crystallographic fragment screening is a technique for initiating drug discovery in which protein crystals are soaked or grown with high concentrations of small molecule compounds (typically MW 110-250 Da) chosen to represent fragments of potential drugs. Specific binding of these compounds to the protein is subsequently visualized in electron density maps obtained from analysis of X-ray diffraction data collected from these crystals. Theoretical and practical experience indicate that a suitably diverse library of fragment compounds containing only a few hundred compounds may be sufficient to provide a comprehensive screen of the protein target. By soaking crystals in mixtures of 3-10 compounds a fragment screen may be completed within ∼100 diffraction data sets. This data collection requirement may be met given reproducible well-diffracting protein crystals and robotic sample handling equipment at a high flux X-ray source. The leading practical issue for most crystallography laboratories that wish to launch a fragment screening project is the design and/or procurement of an appropriate fragment library. Although several off-the-shelf fragment libraries are available from chemical suppliers, the numbers, sizes, and solubility of the compounds in relatively few of these libraries are well-match to the specific needs of the crystallographic screening experiment. Informed consideration of the properties of compounds in the screening library, possibly augmented by additional filtering of available compounds with appropriate search tools, is required to design a successful experiment. The analysis of results from crystallographic fragment screening involves highly repetitive application of routine image data processing and structure refinement calculations from many very similar crystals. Efficient handling of the data applies a high-throughput structure determination methodology that conveniently packages the structure solution calculations into a single process that

  17. Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevitz, Daniel Wolf [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Key, Brian P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Garcia, Daniel B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-05

    The Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT) is a software package used for probabilistic consequence evaluation of fragmenting sources. The typical use case for FIT is to simulate an exploding shell and evaluate the consequence on nearby objects. FIT is written in the programming language Python and is designed as a collection of interacting software modules. Each module has a function that interacts with the other modules to produce desired results.

  18. Fracture mechanics of collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene B; Mulder, Hindrik; Kovanen, Vuokko

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are important load-bearing structures, which are frequently injured in both sports and work. Type I collagen fibrils are the primary components of tendons and carry most of the mechanical loads experienced by the tissue, however, knowledge of how load is transmitted between and within fib...

  19. Kinetic hysteresis in collagen folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Kazunori; Boudko, Sergei P; Engel, Jürgen; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2010-06-16

    The triple helix of collagen shows a steep unfolding transition upon heating, whereas less steep and more gradual refolding is observed upon cooling. The shape of the hysteresis loop depends on the rate of temperature change as well as the peptide concentration. Experimental heating and cooling rates are usually much faster than rates of unfolding and refolding. In this work, collagen model peptides were used to study hysteresis quantitatively. Their unfolding and refolding profiles were recorded at different heating and cooling rates, and at different peptide concentrations. Data were fitted assuming kinetic mechanisms in which three chains combine to a helix with or without an intermediate that acts as a nucleus. A quantitative fit was achieved with the same kinetic model for the forward and backward reactions. Transitions of exogenously trimerized collagen models were also analyzed with a simplified kinetic mechanism. It follows that true equilibrium transitions can only be measured at high concentrations of polypeptide chains with slow scanning rates, for example, 0.1 degrees C/h at 0.25 mM peptide concentration of (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10). (Gly-Pro-4(R)Hyp)(10) folds approximately 2000 times faster than (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10). This was explained by a more stable nucleus, whereas the rate of propagation was almost equal. The analysis presented here can be used to derive kinetic and thermodynamic data for collagenous and other systems with kinetically controlled hysteresis. (c) 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Highly purified collagen coating enhances tissue adherence and integration properties of monofilament polypropylene meshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalchi, Rodrigo Teixeira; Melo, Marli; Palma, Paulo César Rodrigues; Dal Fabbro, Inácio Maria; Vidal, Benedicto de Campos; Riccetto, Cassio Luiz Zanettini

    2013-10-01

    Complications related to tissue integration of polypropylene implants used in the treatment of pelvic organ prolapse are relatively prevalent. Collagen, a biocompatible, less immunogenic material with modulating properties on the inflammatory process, may improve polypropylene integration. The objective was to study biomechanical and histological effects of monofilament polypropylene mesh coated with purified collagen gel. Forty rats were implanted with two fragments of polypropylene mesh in their abdominal walls (one on each side of the linea alba). One of the fragments had a collagen gel coating (group I) while the other one did not (group II). The animals were euthanized at 7, 14, 90, and 180 days after implantation and their abdominal walls were excised for analysis. The biomechanical study showed that mesh adherence to neighboring tissue increased significantly in group II (p Polypropylene mesh coated with purified collagen gel increases adherence to tissue, promotes a less intense and lasting inflammatory response and triggers a greater organization and packing arrangement of collagen fibers in the late phase of implantation.

  1. Collagen content and types in trachomatous conjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu el-Asrar, A M; Geboes, K; al-Kharashi, S A; Tabbara, K F; Missotten, L

    1998-01-01

    To study alterations in conjunctival collagen in the conjunctiva of patients with active trachoma. We studied conjunctival biopsy specimens obtained from nine subjects with active trachoma and from four control subjects. We used immunohistochemical techniques and a panel of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies directed against types I, III, IV and V collagen. In normal conjunctiva, the staining for types I and III collagen was localised to the substantia propria. Type IV collagen was located in the epithelial and capillary endothelial basement membranes. The staining for type V collagen was absent. In trachoma biopsy specimens, staining for types I and III collagen showed collagen fibrils among epithelial cells, patchy increase in staining intensity in the upper stroma, and thicker and irregularly arranged collagen fibrils in the substantia propria. Staining for type IV collagen showed irregularly thickened epithelial basement membrane. Staining for type V collagen showed patchy staining in the upper substantia propria; it was also noted in the cytoplasm of fibroblasts, in the walls of blood vessels in the substantia propria, and in the walls of accessory lacrimal glands. Our data indicate new type V collagen formation, and increased types I, III and IV collagen content, in the conjunctiva from patients with active trachoma.

  2. Mass Spectral Fragmentation of VX

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rohrbaugh, Dennis K

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide structural identification of VX fragment ions formed during mass spectrometric analysis, elucidation of fragmentation pathways, and a compilation of tandem...

  3. Collagen breakdown products and lung collagen metabolism: an in vitro study on fibroblast cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Gardi, C.; Calzoni, P; Marcolongo, P.; Cavarra, E.; Vanni, L.; Lungarella, G

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--In fibrotic diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis there is evidence suggesting enhanced synthesis and degradation of lung connective tissue components, including collagen. It has therefore been hypothesised that products of collagen degradation may have a role in the promotion of collagen deposition. In support of this hypothesis, it has recently been shown that intravenous injection of lung collagen degradation products in experimental animals stimulated collagen synthesis leading ...

  4. Collagens in the aged human macular sclera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, G E; Konstas, A G; Lee, W R

    1993-02-01

    Scleral tissue from the region of the human macula was studied by the immunogold labeling technique (cryoultramicrotomy and LR white resin embedding) in an attempt to identify the fine structural distribution of collagen types I-VI. Labeling of the striated collagen fibrils suggested colocalisation of collagen types I, III and V with type V occurring at the fibril surface. Both types V and VI collagen were localised to filamentous strands in the interfibrillar matrix. Collagen types II and IV were absent from the scleral stroma.

  5. Collagen cross linking: Current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas K Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus is a common ectatic disorder occurring in more than 1 in 1,000 individuals. The condition typically starts in adolescence and early adulthood. It is a disease with an uncertain cause and its progression is unpredictable, but in extreme cases, vision deteriorates and can require corneal transplant surgery. Corneal collagen cross-linking (CCL with riboflavin (C3R is a recent treatment option that can enhance the rigidity of the cornea and prevent disease progression. Since its inception, the procedure has evolved with newer instrumentation, surgical techniques, and is also now performed for expanded indications other than keratoconus. With increasing experience, newer guidelines regarding optimization of patient selection, the spectrum of complications and their management, and combination procedures are being described. This article in conjunction with the others in this issue, will try and explore the uses of collagen cross-linking (CXL in its current form.

  6. Collagen XXIV, a vertebrate fibrillar collagen with structural features of invertebrate collagens: selective expression in developing cornea and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Manuel; Laub, Friedrich; Zhou, Peihong; Hahn, Rita A; Tanaka, Shizuko; Burgeson, Robert E; Gerecke, Donald R; Ramirez, Francesco; Gordon, Marion K

    2003-10-31

    Tissue-specific assembly of fibers composed of the major collagen types I and II depends in part on the formation of heterotypic fibrils, using the quantitatively minor collagens V and XI. Here we report the identification of a new fibrillar-like collagen chain that is related to the fibrillar alpha1(V), alpha1(XI), and alpha2(XI) collagen polypeptides and which is coexpressed with type I collagen in the developing bone and eye. The new collagen was designated the alpha1(XXIV) chain and consists of a long triple helical domain flanked by typical propeptide-like sequences. The carboxyl propeptide is classic, with 8 conserved cysteine residues. The amino-terminal peptide contains a thrombospodin-N-terminal-like (TSP) motif and a highly charged segment interspersed with several tyrosine residues, like the fibril diameter-regulating collagen chains alpha1(V) and alpha1(XI). However, a short imperfection in the triple helix makes alpha1(XXIV) unique from other chains of the vertebrate fibrillar collagen family. The triple helical interruption and additional select features in both terminal peptides are common to the fibrillar chains of invertebrate organisms. Based on these data, we propose that collagen XXIV is an ancient molecule that may contribute to the regulation of type I collagen fibrillogenesis at specific anatomical locations during fetal development.

  7. Fragments of Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    Time travel films necessarily fragment linear narratives, as scenes are revisited with differences from the first time we saw it. Popular films such as Back to the Future mine comedy from these visitations, but there are many different approaches. One extreme is Chris Marker's La Jetée - a film...... made almost completely of still images, recounting the end of the world. These stills can be viewed as fragments that have survived the end of the world and now provide the only access to the events that occured. Shane Carruth's Primer has a different approach to time travel, the narrative diegesis...

  8. The Serendipity of Fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leixnering, Stephan; Meyer, Renate E.

    , it was the central government’s task to coordinate, steer and control the newly emerged decentralized organizations. This raises questions about the overall design of the public sector at present. Our paper engages with the prevalent public governance phenomenon of fragmentation from a design perspective in order...... form of organizing between networks and formal organization: lacking a single center and featuring multiplex and multifaceted relations within the politico-administrative apparatus and between government and PSOs, high fragmentation, local and robust action, but latent structures of significant formal...

  9. Immunostimulation effect of jellyfish collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Takuya; Ueno, Masashi; Goto, Yoko; Shiraishi, Ryusuke; Doi, Mikiharu; Akiyama, Koichi; Yamauchi, Satoshi

    2006-09-01

    Certain edible large jellyfishes belonging to the order Rhizostomeae are consumed in large quantities in China and Japan. The exumbrella part of the edible jellyfish Stomolophus nomurai was cut and soaked in dilute hydrochloric acid solution (pH 3.0) for 12 h, and heated at 121 degrees C for 20 min. The immunostimulation effects of the jellyfish extract were examined. The jellyfish extract enhanced IgM production of human hybridoma HB4C5 cells 34-fold. IgM and IgG production of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were also accelerated, 2.8- and 1.4-fold respectively. Moreover, production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha by human PBL was stimulated 100- and 17-fold respectively. Collagenase treatment inactivated the immunostimulation activity of the jellyfish extract. In addition, purified collagen from bovine Achilles' tendon accelerated IgM production of hybridoma cells. These facts mean that collagen has an immunostimulation effect, and that the active substance in jellyfish extract is collagen.

  10. Collagen telopeptides (cross-linking sites) play a role in collagen gel lattice contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, D. T.; Yamauchi, M.; Wynn, K. C.; Mechanic, G.; Briggaman, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Solubilized interstitial collagens will form a fibrillar, gel-like lattice when brought to physiologic conditions. In the presence of human dermal fibroblasts the collagen lattice will contract. The rate of contraction can be determined by computer-assisted planemetry. The mechanisms involved in contraction are as yet unknown. Using this system it was found that the rate of contraction was markedly decreased when collagen lacking telopeptides was substituted for native collagen. Histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) is a major stable trifunctional collagen cross-link in mature skin that involves a carboxyl terminal, telopeptide site 16c, the sixteenth amino acid residue from the carboxy terminal of the telopeptide region of alpha 1 (I) in type I collagen. Little, if any, HHL was present in native, purified, reconstituted, soluble collagen fibrils from 1% acetic acid-extracted 2-year-old bovine skin. In contrast, HHL cross-links were present (0.22 moles of cross-link per mole of collagen) in lattices of the same collagen contracted by fibroblasts. However, rat tail tendon does not contain HHL cross-links, and collagen lattices made of rat tail tendon collagen are capable of contraction. This suggests that telopeptide sites, and not mature HHL cross-links per se, are essential for fibroblasts to contract collagen lattices. Beta-aminopropionitrile fumarate (BAPN), a potent lathyrogen that perturbs collagen cross-linking by inhibition of lysyl oxidase, also inhibited the rate of lattice cell contraction in lattices composed of native collagen. However, the concentrations of BAPN that were necessary to inhibit the contraction of collagen lattices also inhibited fibroblast growth suggestive of cellular toxicity. In accordance with other studies, we found no inhibition of the rate of lattice contraction when fibronectin-depleted serum was used. Electron microscopy of contracted gels revealed typical collagen fibers with a characteristic axial periodicity. The data

  11. Fluorescence self-quenching assay for the detection of target collagen sequences using a short probe peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Linge; Hu, Yue; Fu, Caihong; Song, Chen; Wang, Jie; Xiao, Jianxi

    2018-01-01

    The development of novel assays to detect collagen fragments is of utmost importance for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic decisions in various collagen-related diseases, and one essential question is to discover probe peptides that can specifically recognize target collagen sequences. Herein we have developed the fluorescence self-quenching assay as a convenient tool to screen the capability of a series of fluorescent probe peptides of variable lengths to bind with target collagen peptides. We have revealed that the targeting ability of probe peptides is length-dependent, and have discovered a relatively short probe peptide FAM-G(POG)8 capable to identify the target peptide. We have further demonstrated that fluorescence self-quenching assay together with this short probe peptide can be applied to specifically detect the desired collagen fragment in complex biological media. Fluorescence self-quenching assay provides a powerful new tool to discover effective peptides for the recognition of collagen biomarkers, and it may have great potential to identify probe peptides for various protein biomarkers involved in pathological conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. DSC Study of Collagen in Disc Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Skrzyński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC has been used to estimate the effect of disc disease on the collagen helix-coil transition and morphology for tissue extracted from patients during surgical operation. Forty discs were obtained from patients with degenerative disc disease undergoing surgery for low back pain. The patients were in the age between 20 and 70 years old. The specimens were kept wet during DSC experiment. The data allow the comparison between thermal stability of collagen tissue from healthy patients and from patients suffering from disc disease. In the paper the comparison between thermal helix-coil transition for collagen fibers from patients suffering from disc disease and collagen fibers from healthy organisms has been discussed. The heating rate has an influence on the position on denaturation temperatures of collagen in disc tissues. Higher helix-coil transition temperature of collagen in degenerated disc suggests that additional intermolecular cross linking of collagen fibers occurs. Denaturation temperatures of collagen in degenerated male disc possess smaller values than in female ones. Disc disease induces changes in collagen structure and leads to formation of additional crosslinks between collagen fibers.

  13. Stone fragmentation by ultrasound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Some delicate nerves and fibres in the surrounding areas of the stones present in the kidney are also damaged by high ultrasonic intensity used in such systems. In the present work, enhancement of the kidney stone fragmentation by using ultrasound is studied. The cavitation bubbles are found to implode faster, with more ...

  14. Fragments of the Past

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Szende

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With travel being made more accessible throughout the decades, the hospitality industry constantly evolved their practices as society and technology progressed. Hotels looked for news ways up service their customers, which led to the invention of the Servidor in 1918. Once revolutionary innovations have gone extinct, merely becoming fragments of the past.

  15. Wildlife habitat fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John. Lehmkuhl

    2005-01-01

    A primary issue in forest wildlife management is habitat fragmentation and its effects on viability, which is the "bottom line" for plant and animal species of conservation concern. Population viability is the likelihood that a population will be able to maintain itself (remain viable) over a long period of time-usually 100 years or more. Though it is true...

  16. Cross-reactivity of autoantibodies from patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita with murine collagen VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorba, Kinga; Sesarman, Alina; Oswald, Eva; Feldrihan, Vasile; Fritsch, Anja; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sitaru, Cassian

    2010-04-01

    The pathomechanism of antibody-mediated tissue damage in autoimmune diseases can be best studied in experimental models by passively transferring specific autoantibodies into animals. The reproduction of the disease in animals depends on several factors, including the cross-reactivity of patient autoantibodies with the animal tissue. Here, we show that autoantibodies from patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), a subepidermal autoimmune blistering disease, recognize multiple epitopes on murine collagen VII. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that EBA patients' IgG cross-reacts with mouse skin. Overlapping, recombinant fragments of murine collagen VII were used to characterize the reactivity of EBA sera and to map the epitopes on the murine antigen by ELISA and immunoblotting. The patients' autoantibody binding to murine collagen VII triggered pathogenic events as demonstrated by a complement fixing and an ex vivo granulocyte-dependent dermal-epidermal separation assay. These findings should greatly facilitate the development of improved disease models and novel therapeutic strategies.

  17. Fragmentation and dimerization of aliphatic amino acid films induced by vacuum ultraviolet irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Masahito [Research Institute of Instrumentation Frontier, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Tyuou-2, AIST, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8568 (Japan)], E-mail: masahito-tanaka@aist.go.jp; Kaneko, Fusae [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kobe University, Tsurukabuto 3-11, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Koketsu, Toshiyuki [Graduate School of Human Development and Environment, Kobe University, Tsurukabuto 3-11, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Nakagawa, Kazumichi [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kobe University, Tsurukabuto 3-11, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Graduate School of Human Development and Environment, Kobe University, Tsurukabuto 3-11, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Yamada, Toru [Neuroscience Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Tyuou-2, AIST, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2008-10-15

    The chemical reaction of aliphatic amino acid, such as alanine (Ala) and leucine (Leu), in the solid phase induced by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation was studied by high-performance liquid chromatography technique and mass spectroscopic method. Quantum efficiencies of dimerization of Ala in the solid phase obviously showed irradiated VUV wavelength dependence. The values of quantum efficiencies of formation of Ala dimer were determined to be 5.7x10{sup -5}, 1.3x10{sup -3}, and 2.4x10{sup -4} for 208, 183, and 87 nm irradiation, respectively. VUV-induced fragment desorption from Ala and Leu films has also been examined by mass spectroscopic method. Observed mass spectra clearly indicated that both the deamination and decarboxylation reactions were common in both Ala and Leu films, and the dissociation of side chain occurred only in Leu film.

  18. Stress controls the mechanics of collagen networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licup, Albert James; Münster, Stefan; Sharma, Abhinav; Sheinman, Michael; Jawerth, Louise M.; Fabry, Ben; Weitz, David A.; MacKintosh, Fred C.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen is the main structural and load-bearing element of various connective tissues, where it forms the extracellular matrix that supports cells. It has long been known that collagenous tissues exhibit a highly nonlinear stress–strain relationship, although the origins of this nonlinearity remain unknown. Here, we show that the nonlinear stiffening of reconstituted type I collagen networks is controlled by the applied stress and that the network stiffness becomes surprisingly insensitive to network concentration. We demonstrate how a simple model for networks of elastic fibers can quantitatively account for the mechanics of reconstituted collagen networks. Our model points to the important role of normal stresses in determining the nonlinear shear elastic response, which can explain the approximate exponential relationship between stress and strain reported for collagenous tissues. This further suggests principles for the design of synthetic fiber networks with collagen-like properties, as well as a mechanism for the control of the mechanics of such networks. PMID:26195769

  19. Synchronous Occurrence of Collagenous and Pseudomembranous Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Vesoulis

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Synchronous collagenous and pseudomembranous colitis has not been previously reported. A 73-year-old woman presented with chronic watery diarrhea and abdominal cramping of six weeks’ duration. Biopsies of the colon revealed findings of collagenous colitis involving the endoscopically normal right colon, and superimposed collagenous and pseudomembranous colitis involving the rectosigmoid colon. Endoscopically, the left colon revealed discrete ulcerative plaques, and Clostridium difficile toxin A assay was positive. The patient partially responded to a three-week regimen of metronidazole, and symptoms resolved completely with subsequent steroid therapy. At follow-up endoscopy four months later, colon biopsies demonstrated persistence of subepithelial collagen but no pseudomembranes. The patient remained asymptomatic during this interval. Collagenous colitis has been reported in association with other inflammatory bowel diseases, including lymphocytic colitis, sprue and idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease. This unique association of collagenous colitis with an endotoxigenic inflammatory bowel disease is presented with a review of related disease features.

  20. A novel functional role of collagen glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgensen, Henrik J; Madsen, Daniel H; Ingvarsen, Signe

    2011-01-01

    Collagens make up the most abundant component of interstitial extracellular matrices and basement membranes. Collagen remodeling is a crucial process in many normal physiological events and in several pathological conditions. Some collagen subtypes contain specific carbohydrate side chains......, the function of which is poorly known. The endocytic collagen receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP)/Endo180 plays an important role in matrix remodeling through its ability to internalize collagen for lysosomal degradation. uPARAP/Endo180 is a member of the mannose....... The molecular basis for this interaction is known to involve the fibronectin type II domain but nothing is known about the function of the lectin domains in this respect. In this study, we have investigated a possible role of the single active lectin domain of uPARAP/Endo180 in the interaction with collagens...

  1. Properties of radiolabeled type I, II, and III collagens related to their use as substrates in collagenase assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookhtiar, K A; Mallya, S K; Van Wart, H E

    1986-11-01

    Calf skin and rat tendon type I, bovine cartilage type II, and human amnion type III collagens have been radiolabeled by reaction with [3H]acetic anhydride, [3H]formaldehyde, and succinimidyl 2,3-[3H]propionate. All three reactions produce collagens with high specific activities that are suitable for use as substrates in collagenase assays. The identity of the radiolabel and the labeling indices do not alter the molecular weights or thermal stabilities of the collagens or the solubilities of the collagens or gelatins in dioxane-water mixtures at 4 degrees C. However, in contrast to native or sparsely labeled collagens, those with 40 or more lysine + hydroxylysine residues labeled per molecule do not undergo fibrillogenesis in the presence of 0.2-0.4 M NaCl in the 4-35 degree C temperature range. Thus, the modification reactions not only serve to introduce the radiolabel, but also to keep the collagens soluble over a wide range of temperatures and concentrations. The TCA, TCB fragments produced on partial reaction of each collagen type with tissue collagenases can be selectively denatured by a 10-minute incubation under specific conditions and the intact collagens selectively precipitated by addition of 50% v/v dioxane. This serves as the basis for soluble collagenase assays. The effect of labeling index on the properties of the collagens has been investigated and the results establish the range of conditions over which these collagens can be used as substrates for soluble versus fibrillar collagenase assays.

  2. Biochemical markers of type II collagen breakdown and synthesis are positioned at specific sites in human osteoarthritic knee cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne-Christine Bay; Levin Andersen, Thomas; Charni-Ben Tabassi, N

    2007-01-01

    sections were obtained from full-depth cartilage biopsies from 32 OA knees. Immunohistochemistry was performed for Helix-II and CTX-II, which are type II collagen fragments originating from the triple helix and the telopeptide region, respectively, and believed to reflect distinct breakdown events, as well......OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether type II collagen turnover markers used for osteoarthritis (OA) activity evaluation in body fluids can be detected at the level of specific histological features of OA cartilage tissue, as well as how they relate with each other at this level. METHODS: Adjacent...... as for type IIA N propeptide (PIIANP), a biochemical marker reflecting synthesis of type IIA collagen. RESULTS: Helix-II and CTX-II were detected in areas where collagen damage was reported previously, most frequently around chondrocytes, but also frequently in regions not previously investigated...

  3. Alginate-Collagen Fibril Composite Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Baniasadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis and the mechanical characterization of an alginate-collagen fibril composite hydrogel. Native type I collagen fibrils were used to synthesize the fibrous composite hydrogel. We characterized the mechanical properties of the fabricated fibrous hydrogel using tensile testing; rheometry and atomic force microscope (AFM-based nanoindentation experiments. The results show that addition of type I collagen fibrils improves the rheological and indentation properties of the hydrogel.

  4. Direct detection of collagenous proteins by fluorescently labeled collagen mimetic peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Ho, Daniel; Meng, Huan; Chan, Tania R.; An, Bo; Yu, Hanry; Brodsky, Barbara; Jun, Albert S.; Yu, S. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Although fibrous collagens are major structural components of extracellular matrix in mammals, collagen overproduction is associated with many human diseases including cancers and fibrosis. Collagen is typically identified in biomedical research by western blot and immunohistochemistry; however anti-collagen antibodies employed in these analyses are difficult to prepare and their affinities to collagen can diminish if collagen becomes denatured during analyses. Previously, we discovered that single-stranded collagen mimetic peptides [CMPs, sequence: (GlyProHyp)9] can bind to denatured collagen chains by triple helix hybridization. Here we present collagen-specific staining methods using simple CMPs conjugated to common fluorophores (e.g. carboxyfluorescein), which allow direct detection of collagens and collagen-like proteins in SDS-PAGE and in various mammalian tissue sections. By directly staining SDS-PAGE gels with fluorescently labeled CMPs, both intact (type I, II, and IV) and MMP-1 cleaved collagen (type I) chains as well as complement factor C1q were detected. Collagen bands containing as little as 5 ng were optically visualized while no staining was observed for fibronectin, laminin, and a collection of proteins from mammalian cell lysate. The CMP was unable to stain collagen-like bacterial protein which contains numerous charged amino acids that are believed to stabilize triple helix in place of Hyp. We also show that fluorescently labeled CMPs can specifically visualize collagens in fixed tissue sections (e.g., skin, cornea, and bone) more effectively than anti-collagen I antibody, and allow facile identification of pathologic conditions in fibrotic liver tissues. PMID:23253177

  5. Heavy-Quark Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Cacciari, M; Cacciari, Matteo; Gardi, Einan

    2003-01-01

    We study perturbative and non-perturbative aspects of heavy-quark fragmentation into hadrons, emphasizing the large-x region, where x is the energy fraction of the detected hadron. We first prove that when the moment index N and the quark mass m get large simultaneously with the ratio (N Lambda/m) fixed, the fragmentation function depends on this ratio alone. This opens up the way to formulate the non-perturbative contribution to the fragmentation function at large N as a shape function of m(1-x) which is convoluted with the Sudakov-resummed perturbative result. We implement this resummation and the parametrization of the corresponding shape function using Dressed Gluon Exponentiation. The Sudakov exponent is calculated in a process independent way from a generalized splitting function which describes the emission probability of an off-shell gluon off a heavy quark. Non-perturbative corrections are parametrized based on the renormalon structure of the Sudakov exponent. They appear in moment space as an expone...

  6. Fracture, failure, and fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dienes, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    Though continuum descriptions of material behavior are useful for many kinds of problems, particularly those involving plastic flow, a more general approach is required when the failure is likely to involve growth and coalescence of a large number of fractures, as in fragmentation. Failures of this kind appear frequently in rapid dynamic processes such as those resulting from impacts and explosions, particularly in the formation of spall fragments. In the first part of this paper an approach to formulating constitutive relations that accounts for the opening, shear and growth of an ensemble of cracks is discussed. The approach also accounts for plastic flow accompanying fragmentation. The resulting constitutive relations have been incorporated into a Lagrangean computer program. In the second part of this paper a theoretical approach to coalescence is described. The simplest formulation makes use of a linear Liouville equation, with crack growth limited by the mean free path of cracks, assumed constant. This approach allows for an anisotropic distribution of cracks. An alternative approach is also described in which the decrease of the mean free path with increasing crack size is accounted for, but the crack distribution is assumed isotropic. A reduction of the governing Liouville equation to an ordinary differential equation of third order is possible, and the result can be used to determine how mean-free-path decreases with increasing crack size.

  7. Ecosystem extent and fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, Roger; Hansen, Matt

    2017-01-01

    One of the candidate essential biodiversity variable (EBV) groups described in the seminal paper by Pereira et al. (2014) concerns Ecosystem Structure. This EBV group is distinguished from another EBV group which encompasses aspects of Ecosystem Function. While the Ecosystem Function EBV treats ecosystem processes like nutrient cycling, primary production, trophic interactions, etc., the Ecosystem Structure EBV relates to the set of biophysical properties of ecosystems that create biophysical environmental context, confer biophysical structure, and occur geographically. The Ecosystem Extent and Fragmentation EBV is one of the EBVs in the Ecosystem Structure EBV group.Ecosystems are understood to exist at multiple scales, from very large areas (macro-ecosystems) like the Arctic tundra, for example, to something as small as a tree in an Amazonian rain forest. As such, ecosystems occupy space and therefore can be mapped across any geography of interest, whether that area of interest be a site, a nation, a region, a continent, or the planet. One of the most obvious and seemingly straightforward EBVs is Ecosystem Extent and Fragmentation. Ecosystem extent refers to the location and geographic distribution of ecosystems across landscapes or in the oceans, while ecosystem fragmentation refers to the spatial pattern and connectivity of ecosystem occurrences on the landscape.

  8. Laser welding and collagen crosslinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, K.M.; Last, J.A. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Medicine; Small, W. IV; Maitland, D.J.; Heredia, N.J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-02-20

    Strength and stability of laser-welded tissue may be influenced, in part, by effects of laser exposure on collagen crosslinking. We therefore studied effects of diode laser exposure (805 nm, 1-8 watts, 30 seconds) + indocyanine green dye (ICG) on calf tail tendon collagen crosslinks. Effect of ICG dye alone on crosslink content prior to laser exposure was investigated; unexpectedly, we found that ICG-treated tissue had significantly increased DHLNL and OHP, but not HLNL. Laser exposure after ICG application reduced elevated DHLNL and OHP crosslink content down to their native levels. The monohydroxylated crosslink HLNL was inversely correlated with laser output (p<0.01 by linear regression analysis). DHLNL content was highly correlated with content of its maturational product, OHP, suggesting that precursor-product relations are maintained. We conclude that: (1)ICG alone induces DHLNL and OHP crosslink formation; (2)subsequent laser exposure reduces the ICG-induced crosslinks down to native levels; (3)excessive diode laser exposure destroys normally occurring HLNL crosslinks.

  9. Passive transfer of collagen XVII-specific antibodies induces sustained blistering disease in adult mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiriac Mircea Teodor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bullous pemphigoid is a subepidermal blistering disorder associated with tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies directed mainly to the hemidesmosomal component collagen XVII. While recapitulating the main immunopathological features of the human disease, frank skin blistering does not develop in the absence of skin rubbing in experimental pemphigoid models that have been established in neonatal mice. Moreover, due to their experimental design they only allow for short-term disease observation. In the present study we aimed to establish a model that reproduces the frank skin blistering seen in patients and allows for longer observation times. Methods Rabbit and sheep antibodies specific to several fragments of collagen XVII were generated and the purified antibodies were passively transferred into adult mice. Results Collagen XVII-specific IgG bound to the basal membrane of the skin and mucous membranes activating murine complement in vivo. Mice injected with collagen XVII-specific antibodies, in contrast to mice receiving control antibodies, developed frank skin blistering disease, reproducing human bullous pemphigoid at the clinical, histological and immunopathological levels. Titres of circulating IgG in the serum of mice correlated with the extent of the clinical disease. Mice receiving sheep antibodies specific to murine collagen XVII showed an early onset and a more active disease when compared to litter mates receiving specific rabbit antibodies. Conclusion This novel animal model for bullous pemphigoid should facilitate further investigations of the pathogenesis of bullous pemphigoid and the development of innovative therapies for this disease.

  10. CONTROL OF FRAGMENTATION BY BLASTING

    OpenAIRE

    Božić, Branko

    1998-01-01

    The degree of fragmentation influences the economy of the excavation operations. Characteristics of blasted rock such as fragment size, volume and mass are fundamental variables effecting the economics of a mining operation and are in effect the basis for evaluating the quality of a blast. The properties of fragmentation, such as size and shape, are very important information for the optimization of production. Three factors control the fragment size distribution: the rock structure, the q...

  11. Fibroblast Activation Protein (FAP) Accelerates Collagen Degradation and Clearance from Lungs in Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ming-Hui; Zhu, Qiang; Li, Hui-Hua; Ra, Hyun-Jeong; Majumdar, Sonali; Gulick, Dexter L.; Jerome, Jacob A.; Madsen, Daniel H.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Speicher, David W.; Bachovchin, William W.; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Puré, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a disease characterized by progressive, unrelenting lung scarring, with death from respiratory failure within 2–4 years unless lung transplantation is performed. New effective therapies are clearly needed. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a cell surface-associated serine protease up-regulated in the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as well as in wound healing and cancer. We postulate that FAP is not only a marker of disease but influences the development of pulmonary fibrosis after lung injury. In two different models of pulmonary fibrosis, intratracheal bleomycin instillation and thoracic irradiation, we find increased mortality and increased lung fibrosis in FAP-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Lung extracellular matrix analysis reveals accumulation of intermediate-sized collagen fragments in FAP-deficient mouse lungs, consistent with in vitro studies showing that FAP mediates ordered proteolytic processing of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-derived collagen cleavage products. FAP-mediated collagen processing leads to increased collagen internalization without altering expression of the endocytic collagen receptor, Endo180. Pharmacologic FAP inhibition decreases collagen internalization as expected. Conversely, restoration of FAP expression in the lungs of FAP-deficient mice decreases lung hydroxyproline content after intratracheal bleomycin to levels comparable with that of wild-type controls. Our findings indicate that FAP participates directly, in concert with MMPs, in collagen catabolism and clearance and is an important factor in resolving scar after injury and restoring lung homeostasis. Our study identifies FAP as a novel endogenous regulator of fibrosis and is the first to show FAP's protective effects in the lung. PMID:26663085

  12. SCALING AND 4-QUARK FRAGMENTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHOLTEN, O; BOSVELD, GD

    1991-01-01

    The conditions for a scaling behaviour from the fragmentation process leading to slow protons are discussed- The scaling referred to implies that the fragmentation functions depend on the light-cone momentum fraction only. It is shown that differences in the fragmentation functions for valence- and

  13. Quantification of left ventricular myocardial collagen system in children, young adults, and the elderly Cuantificación del sistema de colágeno del ventrículo izquierdo del miocardio en niños, adultos jóvenes y ancianos

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Bogoslavsky Levy Mendes; Marcelo Ferro; Bruno Rodrigues; Monica Rodrigues de Souza; Rubens Correa Araujo; Romeu Rodrigues de Souza

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the collagen system of the human myocardium are still limited compared to those on small laboratory animals. The aim of this work was to observe the collagen tissue of the myocardium of the human heart as a function of age. The types of collagen, as well as the density of collagen tissue and the diameter of collagen fibrils, were examined. Fragments of the left ventricular wall from 15 hearts, 5 from children, 5 from young adults, and 5 from elderly individuals, were analyzed by us...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: collagen VI-related myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Collagen VI-related myopathy Collagen VI-related myopathy Printable PDF Open All Close ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Collagen VI-related myopathy is a group of disorders ...

  15. Dimensional Changes of Collagen: with thermo mechanical stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thermo gram of collagen displays multiples of heat inducted transitions and relaxation of collagen fibers exhibit multiple processes. Multiplicity of pressure and temperature induced processes offers special attributes for the use of collagen as a biomaterial.

  16. Collagen gene interactions and endurance running performance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, variants within the COL5A1 3'-UTR, including rs12722, are proposed to alter the expression of type V collagen, thereby modulating normal fibrillogenesis and resulting in changes to the collagen fibril architecture, structure and mechanical properties. [9] Simi- larly, COL6A1 rs35796750 is proposed to result in ...

  17. The collagens of the developing bovine cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R E; Davison, P F

    1984-11-01

    The morphology of the developing bovine eye has been examined and the collagens in fetal bovine eyes from three months' gestation to maturity have been solubilized by pepsin treatment and analyzed to determine the ratios of the predominant types of collagen. The type I collagen decreased, while the type V collagen increased with age. Type III collagen comprised less than 1% of all the corneas, except for the three-month fetal calf. The anterior to posterior thickness of the paraffin-embedded fetal calf cornea increased from the third to the seventh month, decreased from the seventh month to birth, and then increased after birth. Descemet's membrane increased in thickness with age. Analysis of dissected regions of the calf cornea showed a uniform distribution of the collagen populations from the center to the limbus (89% type I, 10% type V and less than 1% type III collagen) and uniformity through the depth of the stroma, except that type III was concentrated around Bowman's layer, and type IV in Descement's membrane. The localization of the different collagens was consistent with the immunofluorescent staining studies with anticollagen antibodies, but the ratios of the intensities of the fluorescence did not correspond to the quantitative analyses. These results are concordant with other studies that have shown that antibody binding may be masked or diminished in certain tissues and therefore immunofluorescence cannot be used reliably for quantitative measurements.

  18. Pseudomembranous collagenous colitis with superimposed drug damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanacci, Vincenzo; Cristina, Silvia; Muscarà, Maurizio; Saettone, Silvia; Broglia, Laura; Antonelli, Elisabetta; Salemme, Marianna; Occhipinti, Pietro; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2013-11-01

    Pseudomembranous collagenous colitis is a rare pathological condition, not related to infectious agents, and characterized by thickening of the subepithelial collagen and formation of pseudomembranes. We report one such case, which responded to budesonide treatment after failures of previous approaches given, being unaware of the correct diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. A novel benign solution for collagen processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoult, Olivier

    Collagen is the main protein constituting the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tissues in the body (skin, cartilage, blood vessels...). It exists many types of collagen, this work studies only fibrillar collagen (e.g. collagen type I contained in the skin) that exhibits a triple helical structure composed of 3 alpha-helical collagen chains. This particular and defined hierarchical structure is essential to the biological and mechanical properties of the collagen. Processing collagen into scaffolds to mimic the ECM is crucial for successful tissue engineering. Recently collagen was processed into fibrous and porous scaffold using electrospinning process. However the solvent (HFIP) used for electrospinning is extremely toxic for the user and expensive. This work shows that HFIP can be replaced by a benign mixture composed of water, salt and alcohol. Yet only three alcohols (methanol, ethanol and iso-propanol) enable the dissolution of large quantity of collagen in the benign mixture, with a wide range of alcohol to buffer ratio, and conserve the collagen hierarchical structure at least as well as the HFIP. Collagen can be electrospun from the benign mixture into sub-micron fibers with concentrations as low as 6 wt-% for a wide range of alcohol to buffer ratio, with at least 10wt-% of salt, and any of the three alcohols. Specific conditions yield nano size fibers. After processing from HFIP or a benign mixture, collagen is water soluble and needs to be chemically crosslink for tissue engineering application. Post-crosslinking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) results in the loss of the scaffold fibrous aspect and porosity, hence it is useless for tissue engineering. Such issue could be prevented by incorporating the crosslinker into the mixture prior to electrospinning. When EDC is used alone, collagen forms a gel in the mixture within minutes, preventing electrospinning. The addition of N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in excess to EDC

  20. Synthesis of arabinoxylan fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underlin, Emilie Nørmølle; Böhm, Maximilian F.; Madsen, Robert

    The cell wall of plants can be termed the skeleton of the plant. One of the parts making up the cell wall is hemicellulose. Hemicellulose is composed of a number of saccharides where one of the most abundant are the arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides. In many instances the biosynthesis and degration...... of arabinoxylan oligosaccharides remain elusive. As a consequence defined arabinoxylan fragments have been chosen as synthetic targets which subsequently will be submitted to enzymatic studies. A better understanding of these processes could lead to e.g. better utilisation of the biomass for biofuel production...

  1. An Archeology of Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald L. Bruns

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a short (fragmentary history of fragmentary writing from the German Romantics (F. W. Schlegel, Friedrich Hölderlin to modern and contemporary concrete or visual poetry. Such writing is (often deliberately a critique of the logic of subsumption that tries to assimilate whatever is singular and irreducible into totalities of various categorical or systematic sorts. Arguably, the fragment (parataxis is the distinctive feature of literary Modernism, which is a rejection, not of what precedes it, but of what Max Weber called “the rationalization of the world” (or Modernity whose aim is to keep everything, including all that is written, under surveillance and control.

  2. Collagen types I, III, and V constitute the thick collagen fibrils of the mouse decidua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiess, Karin; Zorn, Telma Maria Tenório

    2007-01-01

    A mammal's endometrium is deeply remodeled while receiving and implanting an embryo. In addition to cell proliferation and growth, endometrial remodeling also comprises synthesis and degradation of several molecular components of the extracellular matrix. All of these events are orchestrated by a precise sequence of ovarian hormones and influenced by several types of cytokines. As we have previously reported, an intriguing and rapid increase in collagen fibril diameter occurs in the decidualized areas of the endometrium, surrounding the implantation crypt, whereas collagen fibrils situated far from the embryo remain unchanged. Collagen fibrilogenesis is a complex molecular process coordinated by a number of factors, such as the types and amounts of glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans associated with collagen molecules. Collagen genetic type, mechanical stress, aging, and other factors not yet identified also contribute to this development. A recent study suggests that thick fibrils from mouse decidua are formed, at least in part, by aggregation of thin fibrils existing in the stroma before the onset of decidualization. In the present ultrastructural study using single and double immunogold localization, we showed that both thin and thick collagen fibrils present in the mouse pregnant endometrium endometrium are heterotypic structures formed at least by type I, type III, and type V collagens. However, type V collagen predominates in the thick collagen fibrils, whereas it is almost absent of the thin collagen fibrils. The putative role of type V homotrimer in the rapid increase of the diameter of collagen fibrils of the mouse decidua is discussed.

  3. Chondroitin Sulfate Perlecan Enhances Collagen Fibril Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, A. J.; Johnson, A. E.; Mörgelin, M.

    2006-01-01

    in collagen type II fibril assembly by perlecan-null chondrocytes. Cartilage perlecan is a heparin sulfate or a mixed heparan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The latter form binds collagen and accelerates fibril formation in vitro, with more defined fibril morphology and increased fibril diameters...... produced in the presence of perlecan. Interestingly, the enhancement of collagen fibril formation is independent on the core protein and is mimicked by chondroitin sulfate E but neither by chondroitin sulfate D nor dextran sulfate. Furthermore, perlecan chondroitin sulfate contains the 4,6-disulfated...... disaccharides typical for chondroitin sulfate E. Indeed, purified glycosaminoglycans from perlecan-enriched fractions of cartilage extracts contain elevated levels of 4,6-disulfated chondroitin sulfate disaccharides and enhance collagen fibril formation. The effect on collagen assembly is proportional...

  4. Bioengineered collagens: emerging directions for biomedical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramshaw, John A M; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications.

  5. Collagen Structure of Tendon Relates to Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Franchi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A tendon is a tough band of fibrous connective tissue that connects muscle to bone, designed to transmit forces and withstand tension during muscle contraction. Tendon may be surrounded by different structures: 1 fibrous sheaths or retinaculae; 2 reflection pulleys; 3 synovial sheaths; 4 peritendon sheaths; 5 tendon bursae. Tendons contain a few cells, mostly represented by tenoblasts along with endothelial cells and some chondrocytes; b proteoglycans (PGs, mainly decorin and hyaluronan, and c collagen, mostly type I. Tendon is a good example of a high ordered extracellular matrix in which collagen molecules assemble into filamentous collagen fibrils (formed by microfibrils which aggregate to form collagen fibers, the main structural components. It represents a multihierarchical structure as it contains collagen molecules arranged in fibrils then grouped in fibril bundles, fascicles and fiber bundles that are almost parallel to the long axis of the tendon, named as primary, secondary and tertiary bundles. Collagen fibrils in tendons show prevalently large diameter, a D-period of about 67 nm and appear built of collagen molecules lying at a slight angle (< 5°. Under polarized light microscopy the collagen fiber bundles appear crimped with alternative dark and light transverse bands. In recent studies tendon crimps observed via SEM and TEM show that the single collagen fibrils suddenly changing their direction contain knots. These knots of collagen fibrils inside each tendon crimp have been termed “fibrillar crimps”, and even if they show different aspects they all may fulfil the same functional role. As integral component of musculoskeletal system, the tendon acts to transmit muscle forces to the skeletal system. There is no complete understanding of the mechanisms in transmitting/absorbing tensional forces within the tendon; however it seems likely that a flattening of tendon crimps may occur at a first stage of tendon stretching

  6. Proportion of types I and III collagen in longissimus collagen from bulls and steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burson, D E; Hunt, M C; Unruh, J A; Dikeman, M E

    1986-08-01

    The proportion of types I and III intramuscular collagen in longissimus muscles of Simmental bulls (n = 8) and steers (n = 8) 17 mo of age was studied. Longissimus samples taken 7 d after slaughter were evaluated for total collagen, types I and III collagen, heat-soluble collagen, sensory panel traits and Warner-Bratzler shear force. Intramuscular collagen (IMC) was isolated and digested with cyanogen bromide, and peptides were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Percentage of type III IMC was calculated from the total of types I and III collagen as determined from the peak area of densitometric scans of the cyanogen bromide peptides alpha 1(I)CB8 and alpha 1(III)CB8. Longissimus muscles from steers had lower (P less than .05) Warner-Bratzler shear values, less (P less than .05) sensory panel-detectable connective tissue and more (P less than .05) tender panel ratings for muscle fiber tenderness and overall tenderness. Muscles from steers had more (P less than .05) heat-soluble collagen than those from bulls, but no differences (P greater than .05) were found for total collagen and percentage of type III collagen. Some intramuscular-collagen characteristics may have contributed to the less tender muscle of bulls. However, the proportion of types I and III collagen did not account entirely for the tenderness difference between steer and bull muscles. Because there were differences in collagen solubility in muscles from steers and bulls, other collagen characteristics such as crosslinking or fiber size may have been more important than collagen type.

  7. Collagen fibrillogenesis in vitro: interaction of types I and V collagen regulates fibril diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, D E; Fitch, J M; Babiarz, J P; Doane, K J; Linsenmayer, T F

    1990-04-01

    The small-diameter fibrils of the chick corneal stroma are heterotypic, composed of both collagen types I and V. This tissue has a high concentration of type V collagen relative to other type I-containing tissues with larger-diameter fibrils, suggesting that heterotypic interactions may have a regulatory role in the control of fibril diameter. The interactions of collagen types I and V were studied using an in vitro self-assembly system. Collagens were purified from lathyritic chick embryos in the presence of protease inhibitors. The type V collagen preparations contained higher molecular weight forms of the alpha 1(V) and alpha 2(V) chains constituting 60-70% of the total. Rotary-shadow electron micrographs showed a persistence of a small, pepsin-sensitive terminal region in an amount consistent with that seen by electrophoresis. In vitro, this purified type V collagen formed thin fibrils with no apparent periodicity, while type I collagen fibrils had a broad distribution of large diameters. However, when type I collagen was mixed with increasing amounts of type V collagen a progressive and significant decrease in both the mean fibril diameter and the variance was observed for D periodic fibrils. The amino-terminal domain of the type V collagen molecule was required for this regulatory effect and in its absence little diameter reducing activity was observed. Electron microscopy using collagen type-specific monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that the fibrils formed were heterotypic, containing both collagen types I and V. These data indicate that the interaction of type V with type I collagen is one mechanism modulating fibril diameter and is at least partially responsible for the regulation of collagen fibril formation.

  8. Effect of fibroblast activation protein and alpha2-antiplasmin cleaving enzyme on collagen types I, III, and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Victoria J; Jackson, Kenneth W; Lee, Kyung N; McKee, Patrick A

    2007-01-15

    The circulating enzyme, alpha2-antiplasmin cleaving enzyme (APCE), has very similar sequence homology and proteolytic specificity as fibroblast activation protein (FAP), a membrane-bound proteinase. FAP is expressed on activated fibroblasts associated with rapid tissue growth as in embryogenesis, wound healing, and epithelial-derived malignancies, but not in normal tissues. Its presence on stroma suggests that FAP functions to remodel extracellular matrix (ECM) during neoplastic growth. Precise biologic substrates have not been defined for FAP, although like APCE, it cleaves alpha2-antiplasmin to a derivative more easily cross-linked to fibrin. While FAP has been shown to cleave gelatin, evidence for cleavage of native collagen, the major ECM component, remains indistinct. We examined the potential proteolytic effects of FAP or APCE alone and in concert with selected matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) on collagens I, III, and IV. SDS-PAGE analyses demonstrated that neither FAP nor APCE cleaves collagen I. Following collagen I cleavage by MMP-1, however, FAP or APCE digested collagen I into smaller peptides. These peptides were analogous to, yet different from, those produced by MMP-9 following MMP-1 cleavage. Amino-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry analyses of digestion mixtures identified several peptide fragments within the sequences of the two collagen chains. The proteolytic synergy of APCE in the cleavage of collagen I and III was not observed with collagen IV. We conclude that FAP works in synchrony with other proteinases to cleave partially degraded or denatured collagen I and III as ECM is excavated, and that derivative peptides might function to regulate malignant cell growth and motility.

  9. Open tubular capillary electrochromatography: A useful microreactor for collagen I glycation and interaction studies with low-density lipoprotein particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ulivo, Lucia; Witos, Joanna [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Ooerni, Katariina; Kovanen, Petri T. [Wihuri Research Institute, Kalliolinnantie 4, FIN-00140, Helsinki (Finland); Riekkola, Marja-Liisa, E-mail: marja-liisa.riekkola@helsinki.fi [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-04-07

    Diabetes, a multifunctional disease and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the industrialized countries, strongly associates with the development and progression of atherosclerosis. One of the consequences of high level of glucose in the blood circulation is glycation of long-lived proteins, such as collagen I, the most abundant component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in the arterial wall. Glycation is a long-lasting process that involves the reaction between a carbonyl group of the sugar and an amino group of the protein, usually a lysine residue. This reaction generates an Amadori product that may evolve in advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs, as reactive molecules, can provoke cross-linking of collagen I fibrils. Since binding of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) to the ECM of the inner layer of the arterial wall, the intima, has been implicated to be involved in the onset of the development of an atherosclerotic plaque, collagen modifications, which can affect the affinity of native and oxidized LDL for collagen I, can promote the entrapment of LDLs in the intima and accelerate the progression of atherosclerosis. In this study, open tubular capillary electrochromatography is proposed as a new microreactor to study in situ glycation of collagen I. The kinetics of glycation was first investigated in a fused silica collagen I-coated capillary. Dimethyl sulphoxide, injected as an electroosmotic flow marker, gave information about the charge of coating. Native and oxidized LDL, and selected peptide fragments from apolipoprotein B-100, the protein covering LDL particles, were injected as marker compounds to clarify the interactions between LDLs and the glycated collagen I coating. The method proposed is simple and inexpensive, since only small amounts of collagen and LDL are required. Atomic force microscopy images complemented our studies, highlighting the difference between unmodified and glycated collagen I surfaces.

  10. Fragmentation of Chitosan by Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Kasaai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragmentation of chitosan in aqueous solution by hydrochloric acid was investigated. The kinetics of fragmentation, the number of chain scissions, and polydispersity of the fragments were followed by viscometry and size exclusion chromatography. The chemical structure and the degree of N-acetylation (DA of the original chitosan and its fragments were examined by 1H NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The kinetic data indicates that the reaction was of first order. The results of polydispersity and the DA suggest that the selected experimental conditions (temperature and concentration of acid were appropriate to obtain the fragments having the polydispersity and the DA similar to or slightly different from those of the original one. A procedure to estimate molecular weight of fragments as well as the number of chain scissions of the fragments under the experimental conditions was also proposed.

  11. Resorbable collagen membranes: histopathologic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almazrooa, Soulafa A; Noonan, Vikki; Woo, Sook-Bin

    2014-08-01

    Resorbable collagen membranes (RCMs) are commonly used by oral surgeons, periodontists, and endodontists for multiple purposes. We report 6 cases of RCMs that did not resorb as expected and describe the histopathologic features. Cases of an unusual fibrillar foreign material were noted in biopsy specimens curetted from bone. Hematoxylin-eosin and Masson trichrome stains were performed. Clinicians were contacted for detailed clinical information. There were 3 men and 3 women. RCMs presented as hyalinized, paucicellular, delicate eosinophilic fibrils or a meshwork without a foreign body reaction. They were refractile and stained for Masson trichrome as expected. These RCMs persisted longer than expected (2-6 weeks) in 3 cases and may have retarded healing in 5 cases. Although RCM is supposed to be fairly rapidly resorbable, this material sometimes persists within wound sites without any obvious foreign body reaction and may retard healing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The use of autologous adult, allogenic juvenile, and combined juvenile-adult cartilage fragments for the repair of chondral defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Martin, James A; Marmotti, Antonio; Kurriger, Gail L; Lehman, Abigail D; Rossi, Roberto; Amendola, Annunziato

    2016-12-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the repair of chondral lesions treated with combined autologous adult/allogenic juvenile cartilage fragments, compared with isolated adult and isolated juvenile cartilage fragments. Fifty-eight adult (>16 week old) and five juvenile (cartilage fragments; Group 3 = juvenile cartilage fragments; and Group 4 = adult + juvenile cartilage fragments. Killings were performed at 3 and 6 months. The defects were evaluated with ICRS macroscopic score, modified O'Driscoll score, and Collagen type II immunostaining. At 3 months, Group 4 performed better than Group 1, in terms of modified O'Driscoll score (p = 0.001) and Collagen type II immunostaining (p = 0.015). At 6 months, Group 4 showed higher modified O'Driscoll score (p = 0.003) and Collagen type II immunostaining score (p cartilage fragments improved cartilage repair in a rabbit model. In the clinical setting, a new "one-stage" procedure combining the two cartilage sources can be hypothesized, with the advantages of improved chondral repair and large defect coverage, because of the use of an off-the-shelf juvenile allograft. Further studies on larger animals and clinical trials are required to confirm these results.

  13. Age Increases Monocyte Adhesion on Collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaji, Samira; Zondler, Lisa; Kleinjan, Fenneke; Nolte, Ulla; Mulaw, Medhanie A.; Danzer, Karin M.; Weishaupt, Jochen H.; Gottschalk, Kay-E.

    2017-05-01

    Adhesion of monocytes to micro-injuries on arterial walls is an important early step in the occurrence and development of degenerative atherosclerotic lesions. At these injuries, collagen is exposed to the blood stream. We are interested whether age influences monocyte adhesion to collagen under flow, and hence influences the susceptibility to arteriosclerotic lesions. Therefore, we studied adhesion and rolling of human peripheral blood monocytes from old and young individuals on collagen type I coated surface under shear flow. We find that firm adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is elevated in old individuals. Pre-stimulation by lipopolysaccharide increases the firm adhesion of monocytes homogeneously in older individuals, but heterogeneously in young individuals. Blocking integrin αx showed that adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is specific to the main collagen binding integrin αxβ2. Surprisingly, we find no significant age-dependent difference in gene expression of integrin αx or integrin β2. However, if all integrins are activated from the outside, no differences exist between the age groups. Altered integrin activation therefore causes the increased adhesion. Our results show that the basal increase in integrin activation in monocytes from old individuals increases monocyte adhesion to collagen and therefore the risk for arteriosclerotic plaques.

  14. The Mineral–Collagen Interface in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The interface between collagen and the mineral reinforcement phase, carbonated hydroxyapatite (cAp), is essential for bone’s remarkable functionality as a biological composite material. The very small dimensions of the cAp phase and the disparate natures of the reinforcement and matrix are essential to the material’s performance but also complicate study of this interface. This article summarizes what is known about the cAp-collagen interface in bone and begins with descriptions of the matrix and reinforcement roles in composites, of the phases bounding the interface, of growth of cAp growing within the collagen matrix, and of the effect of intra- and extrafibrilar mineral on determinations of interfacial properties. Different observed interfacial interactions with cAp (collagen, water, non-collagenous proteins) are reviewed; experimental results on interface interactions during loading are reported as are their influence on macroscopic mechanical properties; conclusions of numerical modeling of interfacial interactions are also presented. The data suggest interfacial interlocking (bending of collagen molecules around cAp nanoplatelets) and water-mediated bonding between collagen and cAp are essential to load transfer. The review concludes with descriptions of areas where new research is needed to improve understanding of how the interface functions. PMID:25824581

  15. Cosmetic Potential of Marine Fish Skin Collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L. Alves

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Many cosmetic formulations have collagen as a major component because of its significant benefits as a natural humectant and moisturizer. This industry is constantly looking for innovative, sustainable, and truly efficacious products, so marine collagen based formulations are arising as promising alternatives. A solid description and characterization of this protein is fundamental to guarantee the highest quality of each batch. In the present study, we present an extensive characterization of marine-derived collagen extracted from salmon and codfish skins, targeting its inclusion as component in cosmetic formulations. Chemical and physical characterizations were performed using several techniques such as sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, Fourier Transformation Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy rheology, circular dichroism, X-ray diffraction, humidity uptake, and a biological assessment of the extracts regarding their irritant potential. The results showed an isolation of type I collagen with high purity but with some structural and chemical differences between sources. Collagen demonstrated a good capacity to retain water, thus being suitable for dermal applications as a moisturizer. A topical exposure of collagen in a human reconstructed dermis, as well as the analysis of molecular markers for irritation and inflammation, exhibited no irritant potential. Thus, the isolation of collagen from fish skins for inclusion in dermocosmetic applications may constitute a sustainable and low-cost platform for the biotechnological valorization of fish by-products.

  16. Characterization of Genipin-Modified Dentin Collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Nagaoka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of biomodification techniques to dentin can improve its biochemical and biomechanical properties. Several collagen cross-linking agents have been reported to strengthen the mechanical properties of dentin. However, the characteristics of collagen that has undergone agent-induced biomodification are not well understood. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of a natural cross-linking agent, genipin (GE, on dentin discoloration, collagen stability, and changes in amino acid composition and lysyl oxidase mediated natural collagen cross-links. Dentin collagen obtained from extracted bovine teeth was treated with three different concentrations of GE (0.01%, 0.1%, and 0.5% for several treatment times (0–24 h. Changes in biochemical properties of NaB3H4-reduced collagen were characterized by amino acid and cross-link analyses. The treatment of dentin collagen with GE resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent pigmentation and stability against bacterial collagenase. The lysyl oxidase-mediated trivalent mature cross-link, pyridinoline, showed no difference among all groups while the major divalent immature cross-link, dehydro-dihydroxylysinonorleucine/its ketoamine in collagen treated with 0.5% GE for 24 h, significantly decreased compared to control (P< 0.05. The newly formed GE-induced cross-links most likely involve lysine and hydroxylysine residues of collagen in a concentration-dependent manner. Some of these cross-links appear to be reducible and stabilized with NaB3H4.

  17. Collagen plug occlusion of Molteno tube shunts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, W; Feldman, R M; Gross, R L

    1993-01-01

    We report five patients in whom collagen lacrimal plugs were used to temporarily occlude the lumen of Molteno shunts to prevent early postoperative hypotony. Only one eye, with a double plate, developed hypotony and a flat anterior chamber that required reformation. However, in three patients, the collagen plugs did not dissolve and had to be removed surgically to lower the intraocular pressure. Although the semipermeability of collagen is desirable, its unpredictable degradation renders it unsuitable for temporary occlusion of tube shunts. Other biodegradable materials may be more appropriate for this purpose.

  18. CONTROL OF FRAGMENTATION BY BLASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Božić

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The degree of fragmentation influences the economy of the excavation operations. Characteristics of blasted rock such as fragment size, volume and mass are fundamental variables effecting the economics of a mining operation and are in effect the basis for evaluating the quality of a blast. The properties of fragmentation, such as size and shape, are very important information for the optimization of production. Three factors control the fragment size distribution: the rock structure, the quantity of explosive and its distribution within the rock mass. Over the last decade there have been considerable advances in our ability to measure and analyze blasting performance. These can now be combined with the continuing growth in computing power to develop a more effective description of rock fragmentation for use by future blasting practitioners. The paper describes a view of the fragmentation problem by blasting and the need for a new generation of engineering tools to guide the design and implementation of blasting operations.

  19. Daily consumption of the collagen supplement Pure Gold Collagen® reduces visible signs of aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borum

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maryam Borumand, Sara Sibilla Minerva Research Labs Ltd., London, UK Abstract: With age, changes in the metabolic processes of structural components of the skin lead to visible signs of aging, such as increased dryness and wrinkle formation. The nutritional supplement, Pure Gold Collagen®, which consists of hydrolyzed collagen, hyaluronic acid, vitamins, and minerals, was developed to counteract these signs. An open-label study was conducted to investigate the effects of this nutritional supplement on skin properties. Supplementation with 50 mL of Pure Gold Collagen on a daily basis for 60 days led to a noticeable reduction in skin dryness, wrinkles, and nasolabial fold depth. In addition, a significant increase in collagen density and skin firmness was observed after 12 weeks. The data from this study suggest that Pure Gold Collagen can counteract signs of natural aging. Keywords: hydrolyzed collagen, antiaging, wrinkles, firmness, skin

  20. Probing the influence of SIBLING proteins on collagen-I fibrillogenesis and denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chengyu; Zurick, Kevin; Qin, Chunlin; Bernards, Matthew T

    2017-09-14

    Bone tissue is comprised of collagen, non-collagenous proteins, and hydroxyapatite and the SIBLING (small integrin binding, N-linked glycoprotein) family of proteins is the primary group of non-collagenous proteins. By replicating the native interactions between collagen and the SIBLING proteins at the interface of an implant, it is believed that a bone scaffold will more easily integrate with the surrounding tissue. In this work, bone sialoprotein, osteopontin (OPN), dentin sialoprotein (DSP), dentin phosphoprotein (DPP), C-terminal fragment of dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1-C), and proteoglycan versions of DSP (DSP-PG) and DMP1 (DMP1-PG) were tested individually to determine their roles in collagen fibrillogenesis and the prevention of denaturation. It was shown that DSP and DPP slowed down fibrillogenesis, while other SIBLINGs had limited impact. In addition, the denaturation time was faster in the presence of DSP and OPN, indicating a negative impact. The role of calcium ions in these processes was also investigated. The presence of calcium ions sped up fibrillogenesis in all scenarios tested, but it had a negative impact by reducing the extent. Calcium also sped up the denaturation in most cases, with the exception of DMP1-C and DSP where the opposite was seen. Calcium had a similar effect on the proteoglycan variants in the fibrillogenesis process, but had no impact on the denaturation process in the presence of these two. It is believed that incorporating DMP1-C or DSP on the surface of a bone implant may improve the collagen interactions with the implant, thereby facilitating improved osteointegration.

  1. An Algebra for Program Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bent Bruun; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Møller-Pedersen, Birger

    1985-01-01

    Program fragments are described either by strings in the concrete syntax or by constructor applications in the abstract syntax. By defining conversions between these forms, both may be intermixed. Program fragments are constructed by terminal and nonterminal symbols from the grammar and by variab......Program fragments are described either by strings in the concrete syntax or by constructor applications in the abstract syntax. By defining conversions between these forms, both may be intermixed. Program fragments are constructed by terminal and nonterminal symbols from the grammar...

  2. Organization of fibrillar collagen in the human and bovine cornea: collagen types V and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J; Werkmeister, J A; Ramshaw, J A; Birk, D E

    1997-01-01

    The localization and fibrillar organization of collagen types V and III in the human and bovine corneal stromas were studied. In the chicken cornea, type V co-assembles with type I collagen as heterotypic fibrils and this interaction is involved in the regulation of fibril diameter necessary for corneal transparency. To determine whether this is a regulatory mechanism common to the corneas of different species the human and bovine corneal stroma were studied. Collagen type V was found in the epithelium and Bowman's membrane in the untreated adult human and bovine cornea using immunofluorescence microscopy. In the absence of any treatment, there was no type V reactivity within the stroma. However, type V collagen was detected homogeneously throughout the corneal stroma after treatments that partially disrupt fibril structure. The reactivity was strongest in the cornea, weaker in the limbus and weakest in the sclera. Fetal corneas showed similar reactivity for type V collagen, but unlike the adult, the stroma was slightly reactive. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that type V collagen was associated with disrupted, but not with intact, fibrils in both human and bovine corneal stroma. Type III collagen reactivity was not detected in the cornea, but was present subepithelially in the limbus and in the scleral stroma. These data indicate that type V collagen is a component of striated collagen fibrils throughout the human and bovine corneal stromas. The interaction of type I and V collagen as heterotypic fibrils masks the helical epitope recognized by the monoclonal antibody against type V collagen. The heterotypic interactions of collagen type V indicate a role in the regulation of fibril diameter analogous to that described in the avian cornea.

  3. Type III collagen can be present on banded collagen fibrils regardless of fibril diameter

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that recognize an epitope within the triple helix of type III collagen have been used to examine the distribution of that collagen type in human skin, cornea, amnion, aorta, and tendon. Ultrastructural examination of those tissues indicates antibody binding to collagen fibrils in skin, amnion, aorta, and tendon regardless of the diameter of the fibril. The antibody distribution is unchanged with donor age, site of biopsy, or region of tissue examined. In contrast, antibo...

  4. A continuum mechanics framework and a constitutive model for remodelling of collagen gels and collagenous tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Martin

    2010-06-01

    Collagen is a very important protein of the human body and is responsible for the structural stability of many body components. Furthermore, collagen fibre networks are able to grow and remodel themselves, which enables them to adjust to varying physiological conditions. This remodelling is accomplished by fibre-producing cells, such as fibroblasts. The ability to adjust to new physiological conditions is very important, for example in wound healing. In the present paper, a theoretical framework for modelling collagenous tissues and collagen gels is proposed. Continuum mechanics is employed to describe the kinematics of the collagen, and affine deformations of fibres are assumed. Biological soft tissues can be approximated as being hyperelastic, and the constitutive model for the collagen fabric is therefore formulated in terms of a strain energy function. This strain energy function includes a density function that describes the distribution of the collagen fibre orientation. The density function evolves according to an evolution law, where fibres tend to reorient towards the direction of maximum Cauchy stress. The remodelling of the collagen network is also assumed to include a pre-stretching of collagen fibres, accomplished by fibroblasts. The theoretical framework is applied to experiments performed on collagen gels, where gels were exposed to remodelling under both biaxial and uniaxial constraints. The proposed model was able to predict both the resulting collagen distribution and the resulting stress-strain relationships obtained for the remodelled collagen gels. The influence of the most important model parameters is demonstrated, and it appears that there is a fairly unique set of model parameters that gives an optimal fit to the experimental data.

  5. Collagen based Biomaterials from CLRI: An Inspiration from the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In 1950's, Collagen attracted Prof GN Ramachandran. He had a neighbor (CLRI) for whom collagen formed the substrate. He sought a sample of pure collagen from CLRI. This was provided. What followed later is history. Triple helical structure of collagen was reported on 7 August 1954. A tall scientific contribution emerged ...

  6. Mechanical connections between elastin and collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R E; Butler, J P; Rogers, R A; Leith, D E

    1994-01-01

    The ligament supporting the leading edge of birds' wings is a connective tissue structure with unusual morphologic and elastic features. Its center section is made of a highly extensible composite of elastin and collagen fibers and its two end sections of nearly inextensible pure collagen; these are joined end-to-end in short interdigitating junctions. Substantial forces are transmitted through the junctions showing that collagen and elastin are mechanically connected. The junctions and elastic segment are sufficiently strong that when the intact ligament is maximally strained, the point of failure is commonly in the collagenous segments or their attachments to the tissues of origin or insertion. Here we outline the morphology and describe static force-length properties of this ligament.

  7. The minor collagens in articular cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yunyun

    2017-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a connective tissue consisting of a specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) that dominates the bulk of its wet and dry weight. Type II collagen and aggrecan are the main ECM proteins in cartilage. However, little attention has been paid to less abundant molecular components......, especially minor collagens, including type IV, VI, IX, X, XI, XII, XIII, and XIV, etc. Although accounting for only a small fraction of the mature matrix, these minor collagens not only play essential structural roles in the mechanical properties, organization, and shape of articular cartilage, but also...... fulfil specific biological functions. Genetic studies of these minor collagens have revealed that they are associated with multiple connective tissue diseases, especially degenerative joint disease. The progressive destruction of cartilage involves the degradation of matrix constituents including...

  8. Properties of Chitosan-Laminated Collagen Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lazić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine physical, mechanical and barrier properties of chitosan-laminated collagen film. Commercial collagen film, which is used for making collagen casings for dry fermented sausage production, was laminated with chitosan film layer in order to improve the collagen film barrier properties. Different volumes of oregano essential oil per 100 mL of filmogenic solution were added to chitosan film layer: 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 mL to optimize water vapour barrier properties. Chitosan layer with 0.6 or 0.8 % of oregano essential oil lowered the water vapour transmission rate to (1.85±0.10·10–6 and (1.78±0.03·10–6 g/(m2·s·Pa respectively, compared to collagen film ((2.51±0.05·10–6 g/(m2·s·Pa. However, chitosan-laminated collagen film did not show improved mechanical properties compared to the collagen one. Tensile strength decreased from (54.0±3.8 MPa of the uncoated collagen film to (36.3±4.0 MPa when the film was laminated with 0.8 % oregano essential oil chitosan layer. Elongation at break values of laminated films did not differ from those of collagen film ((18.4±2.7 %. Oxygen barrier properties were considerably improved by lamination. Oxygen permeability of collagen film was (1806.8±628.0·10–14 cm3/(m·s·Pa and values of laminated films were below 35·10–14 cm3/(m·s·Pa. Regarding film appearance and colour, lamination with chitosan reduced lightness (L and yellowness (+b of collagen film, while film redness (+a increased. These changes were not visible to the naked eye.

  9. Oriented collagen fibers direct tumor cell intravasation

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Weijing

    2016-09-24

    In this work, we constructed a Collagen I-Matrigel composite extracellular matrix (ECM). The composite ECM was used to determine the influence of the local collagen fiber orientation on the collective intravasation ability of tumor cells. We found that the local fiber alignment enhanced cell-ECM interactions. Specifically, metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells followed the local fiber alignment direction during the intravasation into rigid Matrigel (∼10 mg/mL protein concentration).

  10. Interactions between bovine cornea proteoglycans and collagen.

    OpenAIRE

    Speziale, P.; Bardoni, A; Balduini, C.

    1980-01-01

    Two types of proteoglycan subunits were obtained from bovine cornea, the first mainly composed of proteochondroitin sulphate and the second of proteokeratan sulphate. These two fractions can be obtained from the tissue as an aggregate, and are able to recombine each other after separation, to re-form the original structure. In order to investigate collagen-proteoglycan interactions, type-I collagen was isolated from bovine cornea by pepsin digestion followed by 3.5% (w/v) NaCl precipitation, ...

  11. CREATION OF COLLAGEN PRODUCTS FISH RAW MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Antipova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purposeful use of proteins of connecting fabrics is based first of all on structural and mechanical and physical and chemical properties of collagen, his physiology to a human body. Traditional source of collagen is the split of skins of the cattle, but in view of the objective reasons (spongy encephalopathy, reduction of a livestock of cattle, there was a need for search of alternative sources. The particular interest and popularity represent collagenic proteins in biomedical technologies, when receiving surgical sutural materials, wound healing means, prolongator of medicines, artificial organs and fabrics, implatant. New data on use the collagen containing of sources are directly connected with expansion of a source of raw materials of processing industries of agrarian and industrial complex on the basis of deep processing of biological resources and their maximum involvement in the main and special production with significant growth in an exit of useful products from raw materials unit. In this regard, researches of a microstructure of skins and fractional composition of proteins of objects of research are conducted; data on the general chemical composition and the content of collagen in them are received. Experimental data showed that the most perspective source of collagen from the studied fishes of internal reservoirs is the skin of a silver carp that is caused by the high content of target substance collagen, the low content of fat. The technology of receiving collagenic substances with the high technical characteristics allowing to apply them in production of medical materials is proved and realized in vitro. The comparative analysis showed that substances from a split of skins of cattle and a silver carp have an identical set of amino acids, but are characterized by the different content of separate amino acid s.

  12. Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by Collagen Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    transconjugated dye-labeled serum proteins . 13   Future Plans The PCa imaging in animal model was mainly conducted in the lab of Dr. Pomper at the Johns...the dye can transfer from CMP onto serum proteins (e.g. albumin) resulting in an unexpected drop in signal during serum stability assays and off...specifically target digested collagens with unfolded and partially denatured collagen triple helices. 2. Demonstration of ex vivo and in vivo targeting

  13. Crosslinking of collagen gels by transglutaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Janine M; Wilson, Lorri B; Kofroth, Jessica A; El-Kurdi, Mohammed S; Maul, Timothy M; Vorp, David A

    2004-03-15

    Collagen is commonly used as a tissue-engineering scaffold, yet its in vivo applications are limited by a deficiency in mechanical strength. The purpose of this work was to explore the utilization of a unique enzymatic crosslinking procedure aimed at improving the mechanical properties of collagen-based scaffold materials. Type I bovine collagen gel was crosslinked by transglutaminase, which selectively mediates the chemical reaction between glutamine and lysine residues on adjacent protein fibers, thus providing covalent amide bonds that serve to reinforce the three-dimensional matrix. The degree of crosslinking was verified by thermal analysis and amine group content. The denaturation temperature of crosslinked collagen reached a maximum of 66 +/- 1 degrees C. The chemical reaction was confirmed to be noncytotoxic with respect to bone marrow stromal cells acquired from New Zealand White rabbits. Tube-shaped cellular constructs fashioned from crosslinked collagen and bone marrow stromal cells were found to have burst pressures significantly higher than their noncrosslinked analogs (71 +/- 4 mmHg vs. 46 +/- 3 mmHg; p collagen gels while remaining benign toward cells. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 68A: 756-762, 2004

  14. Cardiopulmonary Manifestations of Collagen Vascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Hamza; McWilliams, Sebastian R; Bhalla, Sanjeev

    2017-10-09

    The study aimed to illustrate the cardiopulmonary findings of the following collagen vascular diseases on cross-sectional imaging: rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma (progressive systemic sclerosis), systemic lupus erythematosus, the inflammatory myopathies (polymyositis/dermatomyositis), and Sjögren's syndrome. Although collagen vascular diseases can affect any part of the body, interstitial lung disease and pulmonary hypertension are the two most important cardiopulmonary complications and are responsible for the majority of morbidity and mortality in this patient population. Interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features (IPAF) is a newly described entity that encompasses interstitial lung disease in patients with clinical, serologic, or morphologic features suggestive of but not diagnostic of collagen vascular disease; these patients are thought to have better outcomes than idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. Interstitial lung disease and pulmonary hypertension determine the prognosis in collagen vascular disease patients. IPAF is a new term to label patients with possible collagen vascular disease-related interstitial lung disease. Collagen vascular disease patients are at increased risk for various malignancies.

  15. Thermodynamical string fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nadine; Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    2017-01-01

    The observation of heavy-ion-like behaviour in pp collisions at the LHC suggests that more physics mechanisms are at play than traditionally assumed. The introduction e.g. of quark-gluon plasma or colour rope formation can describe several of the observations, but as of yet there is no established paradigm. In this article we study a few possible modifications to the Pythia event generator, which describes a wealth of data but fails for a number of recent observations. Firstly, we present a new model for generating the transverse momentum of hadrons during the string fragmentation process, inspired by thermodynamics, where heavier hadrons naturally are suppressed in rate but obtain a higher average transverse momentum. Secondly, close-packing of strings is taken into account by making the temperature or string tension environment-dependent. Thirdly, a simple model for hadron rescattering is added. The effect of these modifications is studied, individually and taken together, and compared with data mainly from the LHC. While some improvements can be noted, it turns out to be nontrivial to obtain effects as big as required, and further work is called for.

  16. Quantifying degradation of collagen in ancient manuscripts: the case of the Dead Sea Temple Scroll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, R; Bertinetti, L; Rabin, I; Fratzl, P; Masic, A

    2013-10-07

    Since their discovery in the late 1940s, the Dead Sea Scrolls, some 900 ancient Jewish texts, have never stopped attracting the attention of scholars and the broad public alike, because they were created towards the end of the Second Temple period and the "time of Christ". Most of the work on them has been dedicated to the information contained in the scrolls' text, leaving physical aspects of the writing materials unexamined. They are, however, crucial for both historical insight and preservation of the scrolls. Although scientific analysis requires handling, it is essential to establish the state of degradation of these valued documents. Polarized Raman Spectroscopy (PRS) is a powerful tool for obtaining information on both the composition and the level of disorder of molecular units. In this study, we developed a non-invasive and non-destructive methodology that allows a quantification of the disorder (that can be related to the degradation) of protein molecular units in collagen fibers. Not restricted to collagen, this method can be applied also to other protein-based fibrous materials such as ancient silk, wool or hair. We used PRS to quantify the degradation of the collagen fibers in a number of fragments of the Temple Scroll (11Q19a). We found that collagen fibers degrade heterogeneously, with the ones on the surface more degraded than those in the core.

  17. Quantitative evaluation of collagen fibers in country chicken muscle (Label Rouge and Pedres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Karaccas de Carvalho

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to quantify collagen fibers in different lineages of country chicken at different ages and anatomical regions. The collection of material was carried out in both lineages (five poultries/treatment at two different times: 42 and 72 days of age. At each moment, a fragment of the pectoralis thoracic (PT and lateral iliotibial (LIT muscles was collected, which were fixed in 10% formaldehyde for 48 hours; they underwent a conventional histological approach, they were stained with picrosirius, and they were measured through the morphometry software KS-400 ZEISS®. The quantity of collagen fibers found in the muscles collected at 42 and 72 days, regardless of the region under study, was, respectively, 2.32±2.31% and 4.56±2.94%, for the Label Rouge lineage, and 2.26±1.61% and 4.92±2.12%, for the Pedres lineage. The quantity of collagen fibers in the different lineages and anatomical regions showed no significant statistical difference. However, when age (42 and 72 days was taken into account, a significant statistical difference was observed. The increased amount of collagen fibers found in the lineages under study is influenced by age and it’s probably one of the factors which can influence meat texture.

  18. Fragmentation of exotic oxygen isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leistenschneider, A.; Elze, Th.W.; Gruenschloss, A.; Palit, R. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Univ., Frankfurt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Aumann, T.; Cortina, D.; Datta Pramanik, U.; Emling, H.; Geissel, H.; Helariutta, K.; Hellstroem, M.; Ilievski, S.; Jones, K.; Muenzenberg, G.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Suemmerer, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Boretzky, K.; Kratz, J.V.; Le Hong, Khiem [Johannes Gutenberg-Univ., Mainz (Germany). Inst. fue Kernchemie; Canto, L.F. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Carlson, B.V. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA). Dept. de Fisica; Hussein, M.S. [Sao Paulo Univ. (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Kulessa, R.; Lubkiewicz, E.; Wajda, E.; Walus, W. [Uniwersytet Jagellonski, Krakow (Poland). Instytut Fizyki; Reiter, P. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ., Garching (Germany). Sektion Physik; Simon, H. [Technische Univ., Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2003-06-01

    Abrasion-ablation models and the empirical EPAX parametrization of projectile fragmentation are described. Their cross section predictions are compared to recent data of the fragmentation of secondary beams of neutron-rich, unstable {sup 19,20,21} O isotopes at beam energies near 600 MeV/nucleon as well as data for stable {sup 17,18} O beams. (author)

  19. Polymer fragmentation in extensional flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroja, Armando M.; Oliveira, Fernando A.; Ciesla, Michal; Longa, Lech

    2001-06-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of fragmentation of dilute polymer solutions in extensional flow. The transition rate is investigated both from theoretical and computational approaches, where the existence of a Gaussian distribution for the breaking bonds has been controversial. We give as well an explanation for the low fragmentation frequency found in DNA experiments.

  20. Mass spectrometry for fragment screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Whitehouse, Andrew J; Coyne, Anthony G; Abell, Chris

    2017-11-08

    Fragment-based approaches in chemical biology and drug discovery have been widely adopted worldwide in both academia and industry. Fragment hits tend to interact weakly with their targets, necessitating the use of sensitive biophysical techniques to detect their binding. Common fragment screening techniques include differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) and ligand-observed NMR. Validation and characterization of hits is usually performed using a combination of protein-observed NMR, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and X-ray crystallography. In this context, MS is a relatively underutilized technique in fragment screening for drug discovery. MS-based techniques have the advantage of high sensitivity, low sample consumption and being label-free. This review highlights recent examples of the emerging use of MS-based techniques in fragment screening. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  1. Matrix metalloproteinase-9-mediated type III collagen degradation as a novel serological biochemical marker for liver fibrogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veidal, Sanne S; Vassiliadis, Efstathios; Barascuk, Natasha

    2010-01-01

    During fibrogenesis in the liver, in which excessive remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) occurs, both the quantity of type III collagen (CO3) and levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-9, increase significantly. MMPs play major roles in ECM remodelling, via their acti......During fibrogenesis in the liver, in which excessive remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) occurs, both the quantity of type III collagen (CO3) and levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-9, increase significantly. MMPs play major roles in ECM remodelling, via...... their activity in the proteolytic degradation of extracellular macromolecules such as collagens, resulting in the generation of specific cleavage fragments. These neo-epitopes may be used as markers of fibrosis....

  2. Urinary Collagen Fragments Are Significantly Altered in Diabetes : A Link to Pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maahs, David M.; Siwy, Justyna; Argiles, Angel; Cerna, Marie; Delles, Christian; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Gayrard, Nathalie; Iphoefer, Alexander; Jaensch, Lothar; Jerums, George; Medek, Karel; Mischak, Harald; Navis, Gerjan J.; Roob, Johannes M.; Rossing, Kasper; Rossing, Peter; Rychlik, Ivan; Schiffer, Eric; Schmieder, Roland E.; Wascher, Thomas C.; Winklhofer-Roob, Brigitte M.; Zimmerli, Lukas U.; Zuerbig, Petra; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM) is variable, comprising different inflammatory and immune responses. Proteome analysis holds the promise of delivering insight into the pathophysiological changes associated with diabetes. Recently, we identified and validated urinary proteomics

  3. Wavelength-Dependent Extinction and Grain Sizes in "Dippers"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitko, Michael; Russell, Ray W.; Long, Zachary; Bayyari, Ammar; Assani, Korash; Grady, Carol; Lisse, Carey Michael; Marengo, Massimo; Wisniewski, John

    2018-01-01

    We have examined inter-night variability of K2-discovered "Dippers" that are not close to being viewed edge-on (as determined from previously-reported ALMA images) using the SpeX spectrograph on NASA's Infrared Telescope facility (IRTF). The three objects observed were EPIC 203850058, EPIC 205151387, and EPIC 204638512 ( = 2MASS J16042165-2130284). Using the ratio of the fluxes from 0.7-2.4 microns between two successive nights, we find that in at least two cases, the extinction increased toward shorter wavelengths. In the case of EPIC 204638512, we find that the properties of the dust differ from that seen in the diffuse interstellar medium and denser molecular clouds. However, the grain properties needed to explain the extinction does resemble those used to model the disks of many young stellar objects. The best fit to the data on EPIC 204638512 includes grains at least 500 microns in size, but lacks grains smaller than 0.25 microns. Since EPIC 204638512 is seen nearly face-on, it is possible the grains are entrained in an accretion flow that preferentially destroys the smallest grains. However, we have no indication of significant gas accretion onto the star in the form of emission lines observed in young low-mass stars. But the He I line at 1.083 microns was seen to change from night to night, and showed a P Cygni profile on one night, suggesting the gas might be outflowing from regions near the star.

  4. Non-invasive quantification of collagen turnover in renal transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stribos, Elisabeth G D; Nielsen, Signe Holm; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    2017-01-01

    Kidney allograft failure due to chronic injury/rejection remains the main cause of graft loss in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Here, we investigated whether specific biomarkers of extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover are associated with allograft function and chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage...... in RTR. Seventy-eight patients who attended the University Medical Center Groningen for a routine check-up after kidney transplantation were enrolled in the study. Plasma and/or 24h-urine samples were collected and specific matrix-metalloproteinase-generated neo-epitope fragments of collagens were......, plasma levels of Pro-C6, a marker for collagen type VI formation, significantly increased with disease progression and correlated with eGFR (r = -0.72, prenal function. We identified two neo-epitope biomarkers of tissue...

  5. Markers of Collagen Remodeling Detect Clinically Significant Fibrosis in Chronic Hepatitis C Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette J; Kazankov, Konstantin; Leeming, Diana J

    2015-01-01

    as potential biomarkers for clinically significant and advanced fibrosis. METHODS: Specific protein fragments of matrix metalloprotease degraded type I, III, IV and VI collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M, C6M) and type III and IV collagen formation (Pro-C3 and P4NP7S) were assessed in plasma from 403 chronic hepatitis C...... patients by specific ELISAs. Patients were stratified according to Metavir Fibrosis stage; F0 (n = 46), F1 (n = 161), F2 (n = 95), F3 (n = 44) and F4 (n = 33) based on liver biopsy. RESULTS: Pro-C3 was significantly elevated in patients with significant fibrosis (≥F2) compared to F0-F1 (p... the markers C3M, C4M, C6M and P4NP7S were significantly elevated in patients with advanced fibrosis (≥F3) compared to F0-F2 (p

  6. Characterization of collagen gel solutions and collagen matrices for cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, M T; Huang, J C; Yeh, G C; Ho, H O

    2001-07-01

    The influence of glutaraldehyde as a crosslinking agent to increase the strength of collagen matrices for cell culture was examined in this study. Collagen solutions of 1% were treated with different concentrations (0-0.2%) of glutaraldehyde for 24 h. The viscoelasticity of the resulting collagen gel solution was measured using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), which demonstrated that all collagen gel solutions examined followed the same model pattern. The creep compliance model of Voigt-Kelvin satisfactorily described the change of viscoelasticity expressed by these collagen gel solutions. These crosslinked collagen gel solutions were freeze-dried to form a matrix with a thickness of about 0.2-0.3 mm. The break modulus of these collagen matrices measured by DMA revealed that the higher the degree of crosslinking. the higher the break modulus. The compatibility of fibroblasts isolated from nude mouse skin with these collagen matrices was found to be acceptable at a cell density of 3 x 10(5) cells/cm2 with no contraction, even when using a concentration of glutaraldehyde of up to 0.2%.

  7. Collagen-binding peptidoglycans inhibit MMP mediated collagen degradation and reduce dermal scarring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Stuart

    Full Text Available Scarring of the skin is a large unmet clinical problem that is of high patient concern and impact. Wound healing is complex and involves numerous pathways that are highly orchestrated, leaving the skin sealed, but with abnormal organization and composition of tissue components, namely collagen and proteoglycans, that are then remodeled over time. To improve healing and reduce or eliminate scarring, more rapid restoration of healthy tissue composition and organization offers a unique approach for development of new therapeutics. A synthetic collagen-binding peptidoglycan has been developed that inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-1 and 13 (MMP-1 and MMP-13 mediated collagen degradation. We investigated the synthetic peptidoglycan in a rat incisional model in which a single dose was delivered in a hyaluronic acid (HA vehicle at the time of surgery prior to wound closure. The peptidoglycan treatment resulted in a significant reduction in scar tissue at 21 days as measured by histology and visual analysis. Improved collagen architecture of the treated wounds was demonstrated by increased tensile strength and transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis of collagen fibril diameters compared to untreated and HA controls. The peptidoglycan's mechanism of action includes masking existing collagen and inhibiting MMP-mediated collagen degradation while modulating collagen organization. The peptidoglycan can be synthesized at low cost with unique design control, and together with demonstrated preclinical efficacy in reducing scarring, warrants further investigation for dermal wound healing.

  8. Adherence, proliferation and collagen turnover by human fibroblasts seeded into different types of collagen sponges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelkoop, E.; de Vries, H. J.; Ruuls, L.; Everts, V.; Wildevuur, C. H.; Westerhof, W.

    1995-01-01

    We describe an in vitro model that we have used to evaluate dermal substitutes and to obtain data on cell proliferation, the rate of degradation of the dermal equivalent, contractibility and de novo synthesis of collagen. We tested three classes of collagenous materials: (1) reconstituted

  9. ADHERENCE, PROLIFERATION AND COLLAGEN TURNOVER BY HUMAN FIBROBLASTS SEEDED INTO DIFFERENT TYPES OF COLLAGEN SPONGES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MIDDELKOOP, E; DEVRIES, HJC; RUULS, L; EVERTS, [No Value; WILDEVUUR, CHR; WESTERHOF, W

    We describe an in vitro model that we have used to evaluate dermal substitutes and to obtain data on cell proliferation, the rate of degradation of the dermal equivalent, contractibility and de novo synthesis of collagen. We tested three classes of collagenous materials: (1) reconstituted

  10. In-situ Damage Assessment of Collagen within Ancient Manuscripts Written on Parchment: A Polarized Raman Spectroscopy Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, R.; Rabin, I.; Hahn, O.; Fratzl, P.; Masic, A.

    2010-08-01

    The collection generally known as Qumran scrolls or Dead Sea Scrolls (DSS) comprises some 900 highly fragmented manuscripts (mainly written on parchment) from the Second Temple period. In the years since their manufacture the writing materials have undergone serious deterioration due to a combination of natural ageing and environmental effects. Therefore, understanding quantitatively state of conservation of such manuscripts is a challenging task and a deep knowledge of damage pathways on all hierarchical levels (from molecular up to macroscopic) results of fundamental importance for a correct protection and conservation strategy. However, the degradation of parchments is very complex and not well understood process. Parchment is a final product of processing of animal skin and consist mainly of type I collagen, which is the most abundant constituent of the dermal matrix. Collagen molecule is built by folding of three polypeptide α-chains into a right-handed triple helix. Every α-chain is made by a repetitive sequence of (Gly-X-Y)n, where X and Y are often proline and hydroxyproline. Parallel and staggered collagen triple helices associate into fibrils, which than assemble into fibers. Deterioration of parchment is caused by chemical changes due to gelatinization, oxidation and hydrolysis of the collagen chains, promoted by several factors, summarized as biological and microbiological (bacteria, fungi etc.), heat, light, humidity and pollutants (1, 2). In this work we have focused on studying the collagen within parchments on two different levels of organization (molecular and fibrilar) by applying polarized Raman spectroscopic technique. Beside spectral information related to chemical bonding, polarization anisotropy of some collagen bands (i.e. amide I) has been used to explore organization of collagen on higher levels (three-dimensional arrangement of the triple-helix molecules and their alignment within a fibril of collagen). To this aim we have compared

  11. Immunostimulatory effects of collagen from jellyfish in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishige, Hitoshi; Sugahara, Takuya; Nishimoto, Sogo; Muranaka, Ayako; Ohno, Fumi; Shiraishi, Ryusuke; Doi, Mikiharu

    2011-10-01

    We focused on the biological activity of the collagen extracts obtained from the giant edible jellyfish, Nemopilema nomurai. Jellyfish collagen extracts stimulates the production of immunoglobulins (Igs) and cytokines by human hybridoma cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Therefore, we examined the immunoregulatory function of jellyfish collagen extracts in mice. Intake of jellyfish collagen extracts facilitated the Ig production activity of lymphocytes from spleen and Peyer's patch. Furthermore, the levels of Igs in the serum clearly increased after the administration of jellyfish collagen extracts. Intake of bovine collagen from Achilles' tendon also activated lymphocytes activity in mice. The activity of total and antigen-specific Ig production in splenocytes from OVA-challenged mice was also enhanced by collagen intake. However, the total and OVA-specific IgE levels in the serum were not affected by the collagen intake. These results suggested that jellyfish collagen extracts stimulates an immune response in vivo, without inducing allergic complications.

  12. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, W.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    High-resolution measurements on {gamma} rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author) 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. In vitro collagen fibril assembly: thermodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, G C; Phillips, L J; Freire, E I

    1989-09-05

    The in vitro fibril assembly of calf skin collagen was examined as a function of ionic strength and temperature. In a 0.03 M NaPi, pH 7.0, buffer, fibril assembly required a minimum critical concentration of collagen. At nearly physiological ionic strengths and temperatures, the critical concentration was less than 1 microgram/mL and required a very sensitive method for measurement. Raising the ionic strength of the buffer resulted first in higher and then lower critical concentrations. Raising the temperature led to lower critical concentrations. A van't Hoff plot of the fibril growth constant calculated from the critical concentration gave positive enthalpy changes and positive heat capacity changes which indicate that the fibril growth is driven by both hydrophobic and ionic inter-collagen interactions. Sedimentation equilibrium studies showed the collagen to be monomeric at subcritical concentrations. Differential scanning microcalorimetric studies showed only one very sharp heat absorption peak for the fibril assembly which coincided with the appearance of solution turbidity. Within experimental error, the enthalpy changes of the fibril assembly measured with the microcalorimeter were of the same magnitude as the van't Hoff enthalpy changes. These results are discussed in light of a cooperative nucleation-growth mechanism of collagen fibril assembly proposed earlier.

  14. Collagenous hydrolysates from untraditional sources of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmaier, F; Mladek, M; Kolomaznik, K; Sukop, S

    2001-08-01

    Sufficiently pure collagenous hydrolysates, suitable for application in skin and hair care cosmetics, have been prepared through biotechnological methods with the use of commercially available enzymatic preparations from short cattle tendons (musculus extensor communis, musculus flexor digitorum, musculus flexor digitorum profundis). These hydrolysates contain neither lipoid nor aminosaccharide components, content of primary amino groups reaches around 1.1 mmol g(-1) and the average molecular weight of the resulting collagenous hydrolysates does not exceed 2000 g mol(-1) (2.0 kDa). Short cattle tendons represent a relatively pure and easily available source of collagens and are, despite their generally known low nutritional value, used only as a feeding mixture component.

  15. Light quark fragmentations into pions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edemskaya, A. K.; Naumov, D. V.; Samoylov, O. B.

    2011-12-01

    We discuss a process of hadronization of light quarks into charged pions in e + e - annihilations and in deep inelastic scatering of charged leptons and neutrino off nucleons. The corresponding semi-inclusive cross-sections of pions production we write in terms of quark fragmentation functions and fracture functions. We suggest a new method of measurements of fragmentation and fracture functions based on analysis of semiinclusive data.

  16. QGP and Modified Jet Fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-04-18

    Recent progresses in the study of jet modification in hotmedium and their consequences in high-energy heavy-ion collisions are reviewed. In particular, I will discuss energy loss for propagating heavy quarks and the resulting modified fragmentation function. Medium modification of the parton fragmentation function due to quark recombination are formulated within finite temperature field theory and their implication on the search for deconfined quark-gluon plasma is also discussed.

  17. Abnormal deposition of laminin and type IV collagen at corneal epithelial basement membrane during wound healing in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, N; Nakamura, M; Chikama, T; Nishida, T

    1999-01-01

    To understand the pathophysiology of the corneal basement membrane in diabetes, we compared the localization of laminin and type IV collagen in the epithelial basement membrane during corneal epithelial wound healing in diabetic and nondiabetic rats. Streptozotocin was used to induce diabetes in half the rats. Two weeks later, the whole corneal epithelium was debrided. Diabetic and healthy rats (3-5 per group) were sacrificed before debridement and 1, 3, and 7 days and 1 month afterwards. The localization of laminin and type IV collagen was observed in cryosections by epifluorescence microscopy. In unwounded corneas of both diabetic and normal rats, laminin and type IV collagen were localized in the corneal epithelial basement. The intensity of fluorescence, however, was clearly stronger in the diabetic rats. In normal rats, wounding initially removed laminin and type IV collagen, but during healing these two proteins reappeared beneath the resurfacing corneal epithelium. Although similar results were observed in diabetic rats, the expression of laminin and type IV collagen was delayed, and their deposition was fragmented and irregular. These results suggest that delayed corneal epithelial wound healing in diabetes might involve delayed reappearance and abnormal reformation of epithelial basement membrane proteins.

  18. Water structuring and collagen adsorption at hydrophilic and hydrophobic silicon surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Daniel J; Payne, Mike C; Ciacchi, Lucio Colombi

    2009-12-28

    The adsorption of a collagen fragment on both a hydrophobic, hydrogen-terminated and a hydrophilic, natively oxidised Si surface is investigated using all-atom molecular dynamics. While favourable direct protein-surface interactions via localised contact points characterise adhesion to the hydrophilic surface, evenly spread surface/molecule contacts and stabilisation of the helical structure occurs upon adsorption on the hydrophobic surface. In the latter case, we find that adhesion is accompanied by a mutual fit between the hydrophilic/hydrophobic pattern within the protein and the layered water structure at the solid/liquid interface, which may provide an additional driving force to the classic hydrophobic effect.

  19. Loss of types XV and XIX collagen precedes basement membrane invasion in ductal carcinoma of the female breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenta, Peter S; Hadad, Salim; Lee, Maria T; Barnard, Nicola; Li, Deqin; Myers, Jeanne C

    2003-03-01

    Ductal and lobular carcinomas comprise most malignancies of the female breast and the morbidity and mortality associated with breast cancer. During the progression from in situ to invasive stages, tumour cells penetrate the epithelial and vascular basement membranes (BM) to realize full metastatic potential. While the definition of these structures has primarily resulted from analysis of laminin and type IV collagen, characterization of newly discovered BM/BM zone (BMZ) proteins will further elucidate the interactions between tumour cells and the host stroma. We have studied the expression of two non-fibrillar BMZ collagens, the type XV proteoglycan and collagen XIX, in breast cancer where a linear, well-formed BM becomes fragmented and even lost in the progression of epithelial malignancy. In the normal breast, types XV and XIX were found in all BMZ: epithelial, muscle, neural, endothelial, and fat. In in situ lesions, these two collagens, and particularly type XV, were often absent from the BM/BMZ displaying a continuous or just focally disrupted type IV/laminin staining pattern. In contrast, infiltrating ductal carcinomas showed only rare traces of laminin and collagen IV reactivity adjacent to the glands and tumour nests, and similarly there was little if any evidence of types XV and XIX collagen. All four molecules were, however, detected in the interstitium associated with some of the invasive carcinomas. The data suggest that types XV and XIX collagen are lost early in the development of invasive tumours, prior to penetration and eventual dissolution of the epithelial BM. Disappearance of these proteins from the BM/BMZ may signal remodelling of the extracellular matrix to promote tumour cell infiltration. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Type XV collagen exhibits a widespread distribution in human tissues but a distinct localization in basement membrane zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J C; Dion, A S; Abraham, V; Amenta, P S

    1996-12-01

    The collagen family of proteins consists of 19 types encoded by 33 genes. One of the more recently discovered collagens is the alpha1 chain of type XV. Type XV collagen is comprised of a 577-amino-acid, highly interrupted, triple-helical region that is flanked by amino and carboxy noncollagenous domains of 555 and 256 residues, respectively. To address questions of where this collagen is localized and what its function may entail, we produced a bacteria-expressed recombinant protein representing the first half of the type XV collagen carboxy-terminal domain in order to generate highly specific polyclonal antisera. Immunoscreening of an expression library with the affinity-purified antibody revealed three clones coding for part of the type XV triple-helical region and the entire noncollagenous carboxy-terminus. Western blot analysis of human tissue homogenates identified a 116-kDa collagenase-sensitive protein and a 27-kDa collagenase-resistant fragment, whose electrophoretic mobilities were unchanged in the presence and absence of reductant. Northern blot hybridization to human tissue RNAs indicated that type XV has a prevalent and widespread distribution. To determine the precise localization of type XV collagen, immunohistochemical analyses at the light- and electron-microscopic levels were performed. Type XV exhibited a surprisingly restricted and uniform presence in many human tissues as evidenced by a strong association with vascular, neuronal, mesenchymal, and some epithelial basement membrane zones. These data suggest that type XV collagen may function in some manner to adhere basement membrane to the underlying connective tissue stroma.

  1. Effect of collagen crosslinking on collagen-water interactions (a DSC investigation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, J; Bonnet, M; Renou, J P

    1989-01-01

    The effect of collagen cross-linking state on the collagen-water interaction was studied, using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) which allows the determination of unfreezable water, the variation of enthalpy (delta H) and temperatures of denaturation of collagen to gelatin transition. DSC was performed on intramuscular connective tissue purified with trypsin (control C), depolymerized with penicillamin (P), and reduced with borohydride (B); samples were adjusted with different water contents. For the three tissues, unfreezable water (Wu) and denaturation enthalpy change (delta H) increased with increasing moisture level (Wt); whereas, maximum denaturation temperature (phi M) decreased. The ability of this calorimetric method of investigation to characterize the collagen crosslink state is discussed: maximum limit values of delta H and of Wu decreased significantly with increasing collagen cross-linking degree. Minimum Wt necessary to reach the maximum delta H decreased with crosslinking degree. Likewise significantly different limit values of unfreezable water Wu were reached for smaller Wt the greater the crosslinking of collagen. These results show that the less connective tissues were cross-linked, the more they could bind water. They also demonstrated that the water of collagen hydration can be classified into four states, whose limits vary according to the degree of crosslinking.

  2. Distinct Characteristics of Mandibular Bone Collagen Relative to Long Bone Collagen: Relevance to Clinical Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Matsuura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone undergoes constant remodeling throughout life. The cellular and biochemical mechanisms of bone remodeling vary in a region-specific manner. There are a number of notable differences between the mandible and long bones, including developmental origin, osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells, and the rate of bone turnover. Collagen, the most abundant matrix protein in bone, is responsible for determining the relative strength of particular bones. Posttranslational modifications of collagen, such as intermolecular crosslinking and lysine hydroxylation, are the most essential determinants of bone strength, although the amount of collagen is also important. In comparison to long bones, the mandible has greater collagen content, a lower amount of mature crosslinks, and a lower extent of lysine hydroxylation. The great abundance of immature crosslinks in mandibular collagen suggests that there is a lower rate of cross-link maturation. This means that mandibular collagen is relatively immature and thus more readily undergoes degradation and turnover. The greater rate of remodeling in mandibular collagen likely renders more flexibility to the bone and leaves it more suited to constant exercise. As reviewed here, it is important in clinical dentistry to understand the distinctive features of the bones of the jaw.

  3. Suppression of MMP activity in bovine cartilage explants cultures has little if any effect on the release of aggrecanase-derived aggrecan fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Bijue; Chen, Pingping; Jensen, Anne-Christine Bay

    2009-01-01

    -epitope specific immunoassays; (1) sandwich (342)FFGVG-G2 ELISA, (2) competition NITEGE(373)ELISA (3) sandwich G1-NITEGE(373 )ELISA (4) competition (374)ARGSV ELISA, and (5) sandwich (374)ARGSV-G2 ELISA all detecting aggrecan fragments, and (6) sandwich CTX-II ELISA, detecting C-telopeptides of type II collagen......- and aggrecanase-derived fragments of aggrecan and type II collagen into the supernatant of bovine cartilage explants cultures using neo-epitope specific immunoassays, and to associate the release of these fragments with the activity of proteolytic enzymes using inhibitors. FINDINGS: Bovine cartilage explants were....... We found that (1) aggrecanase-derived aggrecan fragments are released in the early (day 2-7) and mid phase (day 9-14) into the supernatant from bovine explants cultures stimulated with catabolic cytokines, (2) the release of NITEGE(373 )neo-epitopes are delayed compared to the corresponding (374...

  4. Reprogramming cellular phenotype by soft collagen gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M Yakut; Chuang, Chih-Yuan; Saif, M Taher A

    2014-11-28

    A variety of cell types exhibit phenotype changes in response to the mechanical stiffness of the substrate. Many cells excluding neurons display an increase in the spread area, actin stress fiber formation and larger focal adhesion complexes as substrate stiffness increases in a sparsely populated culture. Cell proliferation is also known to directly correlate with these phenotype changes/changes in substrate stiffness. Augmented spreading and proliferation on stiffer substrates require nuclear transcriptional regulator YAP (Yes associated protein) localization in the cell nucleus and is tightly coupled to larger traction force generation. In this study, we show that different types of fibroblasts can exhibit spread morphology, well defined actin stress fibers, and larger focal adhesions even on very soft collagen gels (modulus in hundreds of Pascals) as if they are on hard glass substrates (modulus in GPa, several orders of magnitude higher). Strikingly, we show, for the first time, that augmented spreading and other hard substrate cytoskeleton architectures on soft collagen gels are not correlated with the cell proliferation pattern and do not require YAP localization in the cell nucleus. Finally, we examine the response of human colon carcinoma (HCT-8) cells on soft collagen gels. Recent studies show that human colon carcinoma (HCT-8) cells form multicellular clusters by 2-3 days when cultured on soft polyacrylamide (PA) gels with a wide range of stiffness (0.5-50 kPa) and coated with an extracellular matrix, ECM (collagen monomer/fibronectin). These clusters show limited spreading/wetting on PA gels, form 3D structures at the edges, and eventually display a remarkable, dissociative metastasis like phenotype (MLP), i.e., epithelial to rounded morphological transition after a week of culture on PA gels only, but not on collagen monomer coated stiff polystyrene/glass where they exhibit enhanced wetting and form confluent monolayers. Here, we show that HCT-8 cell

  5. Cerebral demyelination in children with collagenous colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sankararaman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Collagenous colitis (CC is a form of microscopic colitis characterized by the presence of inflammatory infiltrate and subepithelial deposition of collagen in the colon and it is a rare condition with a predominant prevalence in the adult population. Only few cases have been reported in children. We report two children with the CC with concomitant neurological manifestations. Both cases demonstrated variable neurological symptoms clinically and significant cerebral demyelination. In both patients, the gastrointestinal manifestations drastically improved with a short course of prednisolone. However, the neurological symptoms were persistent and progressive. To the best of our knowledge, similar association has not been reported in children.

  6. Collagen markers in peritoneal dialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Joffe, P; Fugleberg, S

    1995-01-01

    (PICP), aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP), and carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP)] were studied in 19 nondiabetic peritoneal dialysis patients. The absence of correlation between the mass appearance rates of the markers and the duration of dialysis treatment...... as well as the number of peritonitis episodes supports the concept that peritoneal dialysis does not cause persistent changes in the deposition and degradation rates of collagen. A correlation between the D/Pcreatinine 4 hr and the PICP mass appearance rates was found. Since it is unlikely...

  7. Crosslinked collagen/chitosan matrix for artificial livers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.H.; Li, D.P.; Wang, W.J.; Feng, Q.L.; Cui, F.Z.; Xu, Y.X.; Song, X.H.; van der Werf, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Matrices composed of collagen and chitosan may create an appropriate environment for the regeneration of livers. In this study, we have prepared, characterized and evaluated a new collagen/chitosan matrix (CCM). The CCM was made by using crosslinking agent

  8. Changes in scleral collagen organization in murine chronic experimental glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijanka, Jacek K; Kimball, Elizabeth C; Pease, Mary E; Abass, Ahmed; Sorensen, Thomas; Nguyen, Thao D; Quigley, Harry A; Boote, Craig

    2014-09-16

    The organization of scleral collagen helps to determine the eye's biomechanical response to intraocular pressure (IOP), and may therefore be important in glaucoma. This study provides a quantitative assessment of changes in scleral collagen fibril organization in bead-induced murine experimental glaucoma. Wide-angle X-ray scattering was used to study the effect of bead-induced glaucoma on posterior scleral collagen organization in one eye of 12 CD1 mice, with untreated fellow eyes serving as controls. Three collagen parameters were measured: the local preferred fibril directions, the degree of collagen anisotropy, and the total fibrillar collagen content. The mouse sclera featured a largely circumferential orientation of fibrillar collagen with respect to the optic nerve head canal. Localized alteration to fibril orientations was evident in the inferior peripapillary sclera of bead-treated eyes. Collagen anisotropy was significantly (Pglaucoma in mice, and potentially in human glaucoma. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  9. Mechanical qualification of collagen membranes used in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Emanuela Ortolani; Fabrizio Quadrini; Denise Bellisario; Loredana Santo; Antonella Polimeni; Anna Santarsiero

    2015-01-01

    AIM. The aim of this work is the qualification of commercially available collagen membranes in a comparative manner. The natural origin of collagen makes standardization difficult. Nevertheless, through dimensional and mechanical measures it is possible to mechanically qualify collagen membranes, and compare them. METHODS. Three commercially available collagen membranes used in Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR) and in Guided Tissue Regeneration (GTR) techniques, namely Bio-Gide, Collprotect and ...

  10. Imaging Cells in Three-Dimensional Collagen Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Artym, Vira V.; Matsumoto, Kazue

    2010-01-01

    The use of in vitro three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrices to mimic an in vivo cellular environment has become increasingly popular and is broadening our understanding of cellular processes and cell - ECM interactions. To study cells in in vitro 3D collagen matrices, both cellular proteins and the collagen matrix must be visualized. In this unit, the authors describe the protocol and provide troubleshooting for immuno-labeling of cells in 3D collagen gels to localize and visualize cellular ...

  11. Glycine functionalized alumina nanoparticles stabilize collagen in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Al2O3) was then dried under vac- uum for overnight. The products were stored in clean vial and characterized. 2.3 Interaction of Gly@Al2O3 with collagen. In a typical procedure, 10 mg (10 wt%) of Gly@Al2O3 nanoparticles were sonicated in 5 ...

  12. Collagen contribution to meat toughness: Theoretical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, Jacques

    2008-12-01

    One of the major changes in connective tissues during heating is the transformation of the quasi-crystalline structure of collagen into a random-like structure. This molecular change induces a shortening of these tissues and gives them a rubber-like behaviour. In this state, their mechanical properties are dependent on the total number of cross-linked chains present per volume, which can be estimated from the number and the functionality of each cross-link present in the sample. The number of cross-linked chains per volume of meat explains a large amount of the tenderness variation, produced by muscle type, animal age, type, and sex in different species. During heating collagen fibres and fibrils shortening produces a pressure which is also dependent on the total amount of cross-linked chains present per volume, but also on the morphology of endomysial and perimysial envelopes. In meat, during heating, collagen fibres and fibrils thermal shortening is restricted by muscle fibres and muscle fibre bundles. This restriction, which depends on several muscle fibre characteristics, has a strong effect on the final elastic modulus of connective tissues, by changing the respective amount of crystalline and rubber-like fractions in collagen fibres and fibrils after heating. The implications of this phenomenon in tenderness variations are discussed.

  13. Collagen fibril diameter and leather strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Hannah C; Edmonds, Richard L; Kirby, Nigel; Hawley, Adrian; Mudie, Stephen T; Haverkamp, Richard G

    2013-11-27

    The main structural component of leather and skin is type I collagen in the form of strong fibrils. Strength is an important property of leather, and the way in which collagen contributes to the strength is not fully understood. Synchrotron-based small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to measure the collagen fibril diameter of leather from a range of animals, including sheep and cattle, that had a range of tear strengths. SAXS data were fit to a cylinder model. The collagen fibril diameter and tear strength were found to be correlated in bovine leather (r(2) = 0.59; P = 0.009), with stronger leather having thicker fibrils. There was no correlation between orientation index, i.e., fibril alignment, and fibril diameter for this data set. Ovine leather showed no correlation between tear strength and fibril diameter, nor was there a correlation across a selection of other animal leathers. The findings presented here suggest that there may be a different structural motif in skin compared with tendon, particularly ovine skin or leather, in which the diameter of the individual fibrils contributes less to strength than fibril alignment does.

  14. Reduced collagen accumulation after major surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, L N; Kallehave, F; Karlsmark, T

    1996-01-01

    .01)). This decline was significantly higher in the six patients who had a postoperative infection (median 3.02 (range -0.06 to 6.14) versus 0.36 (range -1.56 to 12.60) micrograms/cm, P = 0.02). This study shows that major surgery is associated with impairment of subcutaneous collagen accumulation in a test wound...

  15. Controlled self assembly of collagen nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papi, Massimiliano; Palmieri, Valentina; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Arcovito, Giuseppe; Greco, Emanuela; Quintiliani, Gianluca; Fraziano, Maurizio; De Spirito, Marco

    2011-11-01

    In recent years carrier-mediated drug delivery has emerged as a powerful methodology for the treatment of various pathologies. The therapeutic index of traditional and novel drugs is enhanced via the increase of specificity due to targeting of drugs to a particular tissue, cell or intracellular compartment, the control over release kinetics, the protection of the active agent, or a combination of the above. Collagen is an important biomaterial in medical applications and ideal as protein-based drug delivery platform due to its special characteristics, such as biocompatibility, low toxicity, biodegradability, and weak antigenicity. While some many attempts have been made, further work is needed to produce fully biocompatible collagen hydrogels of desired size and able to release drugs on a specific target. In this article we propose a novel method to obtain spherical particles made of polymerized collagen surrounded by DMPC liposomes. The liposomes allow to control both the particles dimension and the gelling environment during the collagen polymerization. Furthermore, an optical based method to visualize and quantify each step of the proposed protocol is detailed and discussed.

  16. Evaluation of biodegradation and biocompatibility of collagen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Evaluation of biodegradation and biocompatibility of collagen/chitosan/alkaline phosphatase biopolymeric membranes. E BERTEANU1, D IONITA2,∗, M SIMOIU3, M PARASCHIV1, R TATIA1, A APATEAN1,. M SIDOROFF1 and L TCACENCO1. 1National Institute of Research and Development for Biological Sciences, ...

  17. Biological Safety of Fish (Tilapia Collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Yamamoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine collagen derived from fish scales, skin, and bone has been widely investigated for application as a scaffold and carrier due to its bioactive properties, including excellent biocompatibility, low antigenicity, and high biodegradability and cell growth potential. Fish type I collagen is an effective material as a biodegradable scaffold or spacer replicating the natural extracellular matrix, which serves to spatially organize cells, providing them with environmental signals and directing site-specific cellular regulation. This study was conducted to confirm the safety of fish (tilapia atelocollagen for use in clinical application. We performed in vitro and in vivo biological studies of medical materials to investigate the safety of fish collagen. The extract of fish collagen gel was examined to clarify its sterility. All present sterility tests concerning bacteria and viruses (including endotoxin yielded negative results, and all evaluations of cell toxicity, sensitization, chromosomal aberrations, intracutaneous reactions, acute systemic toxicity, pyrogenic reactions, and hemolysis were negative according to the criteria of the ISO and the http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100003478 Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The present study demonstrated that atelocollagen prepared from tilapia is a promising biomaterial for use as a scaffold in regenerative medicine.

  18. Biological safety of fish (tilapia) collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kohei; Igawa, Kazunari; Sugimoto, Kouji; Yoshizawa, Yuu; Yanagiguchi, Kajiro; Ikeda, Takeshi; Yamada, Shizuka; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Marine collagen derived from fish scales, skin, and bone has been widely investigated for application as a scaffold and carrier due to its bioactive properties, including excellent biocompatibility, low antigenicity, and high biodegradability and cell growth potential. Fish type I collagen is an effective material as a biodegradable scaffold or spacer replicating the natural extracellular matrix, which serves to spatially organize cells, providing them with environmental signals and directing site-specific cellular regulation. This study was conducted to confirm the safety of fish (tilapia) atelocollagen for use in clinical application. We performed in vitro and in vivo biological studies of medical materials to investigate the safety of fish collagen. The extract of fish collagen gel was examined to clarify its sterility. All present sterility tests concerning bacteria and viruses (including endotoxin) yielded negative results, and all evaluations of cell toxicity, sensitization, chromosomal aberrations, intracutaneous reactions, acute systemic toxicity, pyrogenic reactions, and hemolysis were negative according to the criteria of the ISO and the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan. The present study demonstrated that atelocollagen prepared from tilapia is a promising biomaterial for use as a scaffold in regenerative medicine.

  19. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  20. Dynamic viscoelastic properties of collagen gels in the presence and absence of collagen fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Hideki; Shimizu, Kousuke; Hara, Masayuki, E-mail: hara@b.s.osakafu-u.ac.jp

    2012-10-01

    We measured the dynamic viscoelasticities of collagen gels prepared and modified by four different methods: i) collagen gels cross-linked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) after their preparation, ii) collagen gels cross-linked simultaneously with their preparation, iii) collagen gels irradiated with gamma rays after their preparation, and iv) collagen gels directly formed from an acidic collagen solution by gamma-cross-linking. Dynamic viscoelasticities of all samples were measured using a rheometer before and after heating for 30 min at 80 Degree-Sign C. The collagen gels sequentially cross-linked by 125 mM EDC after preparation and then heated exhibited mechanically strong properties (storage modulus G Prime , 7010 Pa; loss modulus G Double-Prime , 288 Pa; Young's modulus E, 0.012 in the rapidly-increasing phase and 0.095 in the moderately-increasing phase; tensile strain, 5.29; tensile stress {sigma}, 0.053). We generally conclude that the G Prime value decreases when gels without fibrils are heated. On the other hand, well cross-linked collagen gels with thick fibrils, such as gels sequentially cross-linked with 125 mM EDC after preparation or gamma-cross-linked conventional gels irradiated at 40 kGy, exhibit a distinct increase in G Prime value after heating. Those gels also have thick, twisted, or fused fibrils of collagen. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic viscoelasticities of collagen gels prepared and modified by various methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical cross-linking with EDC and gamma-cross-linking were used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic viscoelasticities of those samples were measured before and after the heating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The gels sequentially cross-linked with 125 mM EDC exhibit a distinct increase in G' value after heating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Those gels also have thick, twisted, or fused fibrils of collagen.

  1. The decorin sequence SYIRIADTNIT binds collagen type I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Aspberg, Anders; Oldberg, Ake

    2007-01-01

    -directed mutagenesis of this 54-residue-long collagen-binding sequence identifies Arg-207 and Asp-210 in leucine-rich repeat 6 as crucial for the binding to collagen. The synthetic peptide SYIRIADTNIT, which includes Arg-207 and Asp-210, inhibits the binding of full-length recombinant decorin to collagen in vitro...

  2. Automated image analysis in the study of collagenous colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiehn, Anne-Marie Kanstrup; Kristensson, Martin; Engel, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to develop an automated image analysis software to measure the thickness of the subepithelial collagenous band in colon biopsies with collagenous colitis (CC) and incomplete CC (CCi). The software measures the thickness of the collagenous band on microscopic...

  3. Collagen derived serum markers in carcinoma of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudnicki, M; Jensen, L T; Iversen, P

    1995-01-01

    Three new collagen markers deriving from the collagenous matrix, e.g. carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP), carboxy-terminal pyridinoline cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), and aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) were used for the diagnose...

  4. Comparison of the properties of collagen extracted from dried ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The properties of these proteins have been studied and a comparison made of the protein patterns of collagen extracted from marine organisms with those from other organisms, to determine which collagen subtypes are present, and in what proportions. Pepsin-soluble collagen (PSC) from dried jellyfish and dried squid ...

  5. Directed 2-dimensional organisation of collagen: Role of cross ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    –20°C by acetic acid extraction and salting-out with. NaCl. 13. The purity of the collagen preparation was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate–poly- acrylamide gel electrophoresis; the bands appearing in the gel corresponded only to type 1 collagen. The collagen concentration in the solutions was deter- mined from the ...

  6. Collagen based Biomaterials from CLRI: An Inspiration from the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Treatment Modality · Slide 41 · Collagen: Benefits in wound Healing · Chitosan Cross-linked Reconstituted Amniotic Collagen Membrane – An Excellent Cell Substratum · Slide 44 · Some products from CLRI under clinical use and evaluation · Applying Knowledge on Collagen of CLRI: In Human Health Care · Slide 47.

  7. Spontaneous Gastric Perforation in a Case of Collagenous Gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelman, Marly H; de Meij, Tim G J; Neefjes-Borst, E Andra; Kneepkens, C M F

    2016-01-01

    Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, both in children and adults. Symptoms vary depending on the extent of collagenous changes in the bowel. In most of the children, iron deficiency anemia and abdominal pain are the presenting symptoms. We present a 15-year-old boy with acute abdomen due to gastric perforation the cause of which was collagenous gastritis.

  8. Dense fibrillar collagen is a master activator of invadopodia

    OpenAIRE

    Artym, Vira V.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor stroma is characterized by abnormal accumulation of dense fibrillar collagen, which promotes tumor progression and metastasis. However, the effect of desmoplastic collagen on cells has been unclear. Our recent findings demonstrate that dense fibrillar collagen activates a novel phosphosignaling mechanism for robust induction of invadopodia in tumor cells and normal fibroblasts.

  9. Dense fibrillar collagen is a master activator of invadopodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artym, Vira V

    2016-05-01

    Tumor stroma is characterized by abnormal accumulation of dense fibrillar collagen, which promotes tumor progression and metastasis. However, the effect of desmoplastic collagen on cells has been unclear. Our recent findings demonstrate that dense fibrillar collagen activates a novel phosphosignaling mechanism for robust induction of invadopodia in tumor cells and normal fibroblasts.

  10. Collagens and collagen-related matrix components in the human and mouse eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihanamäki, Tapio; Pelliniemi, Lauri J; Vuorio, Eero

    2004-07-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the eye plays an important role in providing a correct optical environment for vision. Much of this function is dependent on the unique structural features of ocular connective tissue, especially of the collagen types and their supramolecular structures. For example, the organization of collagen fibrils is largely responsible for transparency and refraction of cornea, lens and vitreous body, and collagens present in the sclera are largely responsible for the structural strength of the eye. Phylogenetically, most of the collagens are highly conserved between different species, which suggests that collagens also share similar functions in mice and men. Despite considerable differences between the mouse and the human eye, particularly in the proportion of the different tissue components, the difficulty of performing systematic histologic and molecular studies on the human eye has made mouse an appealing alternative to studies addressing the role of individual genes and their mutations in ocular diseases. From a genetic standpoint, the mouse has major advantages over other experimental animals as its genome is better known than that of other species and it can be manipulated by the modern techniques of genetic engineering. Furthermore, it is easy, quick and relatively cheap to produce large quantities of mice for systematic studies. Thus, transgenic techniques have made it possible to study consequences of specific mutations in genes coding for structural components of ocular connective tissues in mice. As these changes in mice have been shown to resemble those in human diseases, mouse models are likely to provide efficient tools for pathogenetic studies on human disorders affecting the extracellular matrix. This review is aimed to clarify the role of collagenous components in the mouse and human eye with a closer look at the new findings of the collagens in the cartilage and the eye, the so-called "cartilage collagens".

  11. Stabilization of Collagen Fibrils by Gelatin Addition: A Study of Collagen/Gelatin Dense Phases

    OpenAIRE

    Portier, François; Teulon, Claire; Nowacka-Perrin, Agnieszka; Guenneau, Flavien; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Mosser, Gervaise

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Collagen and its denatured form, gelatin, are biopolymers of fundamental interest in numerous fields ranging from living tissues to biomaterials, food, and cosmetics. This study aims at characterizing mixtures of those biopolymers at high concentrations (up to 100 mg·mL–1) at which collagen has mesogenic properties. We use a structural approach combining polarization-resolved multiphoton microscopy, polarized light microscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, and transmissi...

  12. Fragment-Based Discovery of Potent and Selective DDR1/2 Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christopher W; Berdini, Valerio; Buck, Ildiko M; Carr, Maria E; Cleasby, Anne; Coyle, Joseph E; Curry, Jayne E; Day, James E H; Day, Phillip J; Hearn, Keisha; Iqbal, Aman; Lee, Lydia Y W; Martins, Vanessa; Mortenson, Paul N; Munck, Joanne M; Page, Lee W; Patel, Sahil; Roomans, Susan; Smith, Kirsten; Tamanini, Emiliano; Saxty, Gordon

    2015-07-09

    The DDR1 and DDR2 receptor tyrosine kinases are activated by extracellular collagen and have been implicated in a number of human diseases including cancer. We performed a fragment-based screen against DDR1 and identified fragments that bound either at the hinge or in the back pocket associated with the DFG-out conformation of the kinase. Modeling based on crystal structures of potent kinase inhibitors facilitated the "back-to-front" design of potent DDR1/2 inhibitors that incorporated one of the DFG-out fragments. Further optimization led to low nanomolar, orally bioavailable inhibitors that were selective for DDR1 and DDR2. The inhibitors were shown to potently inhibit DDR2 activity in cells but in contrast to unselective inhibitors such as dasatinib, they did not inhibit proliferation of mutant DDR2 lung SCC cell lines.

  13. Non-invasive quantification of collagen turnover in renal transplant recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth G D Stribos

    Full Text Available Kidney allograft failure due to chronic injury/rejection remains the main cause of graft loss in renal transplant recipients (RTR. Here, we investigated whether specific biomarkers of extracellular matrix (ECM turnover are associated with allograft function and chronic kidney disease (CKD stage in RTR. Seventy-eight patients who attended the University Medical Center Groningen for a routine check-up after kidney transplantation were enrolled in the study. Plasma and/or 24h-urine samples were collected and specific matrix-metalloproteinase-generated neo-epitope fragments of collagens were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results demonstrated that urinary levels of C3M, a marker for collagen type III degradation, correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; r = 0.58, p<0.0001, with lower levels detected in the urine of patients with advanced CKD. In addition, plasma levels of Pro-C6, a marker for collagen type VI formation, significantly increased with disease progression and correlated with eGFR (r = -0.72, p<0.0001. Conversely, plasma C3M and urinary Pro-C6 levels showed no correlation with renal function. We identified two neo-epitope biomarkers of tissue turnover associated with ECM remodeling and fibrosis that can stratify patients by CKD stage. This is as promising first step towards non-invasive monitoring of ECM turnover in the kidneys.

  14. A thermodynamic theory of dynamic fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yew, Ching H. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Taylor, P.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01

    We present a theory of dynamic fragmentation of brittle materials based on thermodynamic arguments. We recover the expressions for average fragment size and number as originally derived by Grady. We extend the previous work by obtaining descriptions of fragment size distribution and compressibility change due to the fragmentation process. The size distribution is assumed to be proportional to the spectral power of the strain history and a sample distribution is presented for a fragmentation process corresponding to a constant rate strain history. The description of compressibility change should be useful in computational studies of fragmentation. These results should provide insight into the process of fragmentation of brittle materials from hypervelocity impact.

  15. [Effect of procyanidolic oligomers on corneal collagen fibrillogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, A M; Robert, L; Renard, G

    2005-12-01

    We showed in a previous study that procyanidolic oligomers (PCOs) from grape seeds effectively protect corneal stroma against degradation by bacterial collagenase. Here we report the study of the effect of PCOs on protein and collagen composition of cornea and on the biosynthesis of corneal collagens. Bovine corneas were used in explant cultures. We quantitatively determined total proteins and collagen as well as the incorporation of 3H-proline in separated collagen types. Collagens type I, V, and VI were separated and quantitated. In order to understand some of the results obtained, we studied the interaction of PCO with collagen type I separately. In the absence of PCOs, collagen typing and 3H-proline incorporation yielded the expected results for a normal cornea, with the usual proportion of the three major types of collagens. In presence of PCOs at 1 mg/ml and after 24 h incubation, total proteins and collagens decreased, as did papain-extractable collagens. Proteins in the final residue solubilized in 1 M KOH-80% v/v aqueous ethanol increased. The proportion of the three principal collagens was also modified: type I became preponderant, and the proportions of the two others (type V and VI) decreased. The study of the interaction of collagen type I with PCOs showed that 30% of total PCOs do not interact with collagen, 20% interact reversibly, and 50% of PCOs are strongly and irreversibly fixed. This strongly fixed fraction could not be separated from collagen by either column chromatography or collagenase or KOH in aqueous ethanol. Bovine corneas in explant cultures in presence of PCOs undergo a modification of their protein and collagen content, with a concurrent modification of the proportion of collagens types I, V, and VI. Collagen type I predominates, and the two other types decrease. Study of the collagen type I-PCO interaction showed that roughly 50% of PCOs become irreversibly fixed to collagen, resisting collagenase or other methods of separation. This

  16. Full-Length Fibronectin Drives Fibroblast Accumulation at the Surface of Collagen Microtissues during Cell-Induced Tissue Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper Foolen

    Full Text Available Generating and maintaining gradients of cell density and extracellular matrix (ECM components is a prerequisite for the development of functionality of healthy tissue. Therefore, gaining insights into the drivers of spatial organization of cells and the role of ECM during tissue morphogenesis is vital. In a 3D model system of tissue morphogenesis, a fibronectin-FRET sensor recently revealed the existence of two separate fibronectin populations with different conformations in microtissues, i.e. 'compact and adsorbed to collagen' versus 'extended and fibrillar' fibronectin that does not colocalize with the collagen scaffold. Here we asked how the presence of fibronectin might drive this cell-induced tissue morphogenesis, more specifically the formation of gradients in cell density and ECM composition. Microtissues were engineered in a high-throughput model system containing rectangular microarrays of 12 posts, which constrained fibroblast-populated collagen gels, remodeled by the contractile cells into trampoline-shaped microtissues. Fibronectin's contribution during the tissue maturation process was assessed using fibronectin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (Fn-/- MEFs and floxed equivalents (Fnf/f MEFs, in fibronectin-depleted growth medium with and without exogenously added plasma fibronectin (full-length, or various fragments. In the absence of full-length fibronectin, Fn-/- MEFs remained homogenously distributed throughout the cell-contracted collagen gels. In contrast, in the presence of full-length fibronectin, both cell types produced shell-like tissues with a predominantly cell-free compacted collagen core and a peripheral surface layer rich in cells. Single cell assays then revealed that Fn-/- MEFs applied lower total strain energy on nanopillar arrays coated with either fibronectin or vitronectin when compared to Fnf/f MEFs, but that the presence of exogenously added plasma fibronectin rescued their contractility. While collagen

  17. Population pressure and farm fragmentation:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Small farmers play a dominant role in rural area in Rwanda according to many researchers. These farmers have some particular characteristics: most of them have tiny farms, while purchasing and borrowing of land are frequent. In addition, the size of farms is not only very small but farms are further fragmented into ...

  18. Fragmentation of stretched liquid ligaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marmottant, P.G.M.; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics and fragmentation of stretched liquid ligaments is investigated. The ligaments are produced by the withdrawal of a tube initially dipping at a free surface. Time resolved high speed motion experiments reveal two different elongation behaviors, depending on the nondimensional number t,

  19. Fragmented nature: consequences for biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, H.; Ritchie, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how fragmentation of resources and habitat operate differently on species diversity across spatial scales, ranging from positive effects on local species coexistence to negative effect on intermediate spatial scales, to again positive effects on large spatial and temporal scales. Species

  20. Fragmented nature : consequences for biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, Han; Ritchie, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how fragmentation of resources and habitat operate differently on species diversity across spatial scales, ranging from positive effects on local species coexistence to negative effect on intermediate spatial scales, to again positive effects on large spatial and temporal scales. Species

  1. Expression of type XXIII collagen mRNA and protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Manuel; Veit, Guido; Stricker, Sigmar; Bhatt, Pinaki; Kutsch, Stefanie; Zhou, Peihong; Reinders, Elina; Hahn, Rita A; Song, Rich; Burgeson, Robert E; Gerecke, Donald R; Mundlos, Stefan; Gordon, Marion K

    2006-07-28

    Collagen XXIII is a member of the transmembranous subfamily of collagens containing a cytoplasmic domain, a membrane-spanning hydrophobic domain, and three extracellular triple helical collagenous domains interspersed with non-collagenous domains. We cloned mouse, chicken, and humanalpha1(XXIII) collagen cDNAs and showed that this non-abundant collagen has a limited tissue distribution in non-tumor tissues. Lung, cornea, brain, skin, tendon, and kidney are the major sites of expression. In contrast, five transformed cell lines were tested for collagen XXIII expression, and all expressed the mRNA. In vivo the alpha1(XXIII) mRNA is found in mature and developing organs, the latter demonstrated using stages of embryonic chick cornea and mouse embryos. Polyclonal antibodies were generated in guinea pig and rabbit and showed that collagen XXIII has a transmembranous form and a shed form. Comparison of collagen XXIII with its closest relatives in the transmembranous subfamily of collagens, types XIII and XXV, which have the same number of triple helical and non-collagenous regions, showed that there is a discontinuity in the alignment of domains but that striking similarities remain despite this.

  2. Preparation of (3H)collagen for studies of the biologic fate of xenogenic collagen implants in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, J.M.; Sawamura, S.J.; Conti, A.

    1986-06-01

    Reduction of a commercially available, pepsin-solubilized, bovine dermal collagen (Vitrogen 100) with sodium (3H)borohydride provided radiolabeled collagen preparations with specific activities ranging from 7.1-12.0 muCi/mg collagen. These specific activities were 2-3 times greater than those obtained by reduction of intact rat tail tendon collagen under similar conditions. The alpha, beta, and higher aggregate components of type I collagen were radiolabeled as well as the alpha component of a small amount of type III collagen present in the samples. Fractionation of cyanogen bromide peptides showed that alpha 1(I)CB7, alpha 1(I)CB8, and alpha 2(I)CB3,5 were the predominant peptides labeled by this procedure. Amino acid analysis indicated that the majority of the radioactivity was in reducible cross-links, precursors of these cross-links, and in hexosyllysine residues. Reconstitution experiments comparing this radiolabeled collagen with nonlabeled collagen showed them to be indistinguishable. Bacterial collagenase digestion of this reconstituted fibrillar collagen in both a lightly cross-linked (glutaraldehyde 0.0075%) and noncross-linked form provided evidence that digestion of labeled and nonlabeled collagens proceeded at similar rates. Thus, labeling did not change the properties of the collagen. Cross-linking made the preparation refractory to proteolytic degradation. Injection of fibrillar collagen preparations, spiked with radiolabeled collagen, into the guinea pig dermis followed by quantitation of the amount of radioactivity recovered from implant sites as a function of time, indicated that the lightly cross-linked samples also were more resistant to degradation in vivo than the noncross-linked preparation. The half-life of noncross-linked collagen was about 4 days while that of the cross-linked collagen was about 25 days.

  3. Increased collagen synthesis rate during wound healing in muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobo Zhou

    Full Text Available Wound healing in muscle involves the deposition of collagen, but it is not known whether this is achieved by changes in the synthesis or the degradation of collagen. We have used a reliable flooding dose method to measure collagen synthesis rate in vivo in rat abdominal muscle following a surgical incision. Collagen synthesis rate was increased by 480% and 860% on days 2 and 7 respectively after surgery in the wounded muscle compared with an undamaged area of the same muscle. Collagen content was increased by approximately 100% at both day 2 and day 7. These results demonstrate that collagen deposition during wound healing in muscle is achieved entirely by an increase in the rate of collagen synthesis.

  4. [Effect on keratocyte-mediated collagen degradation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, J; Lu, Y; Jia, H; Liu, J; Xu, J; Zhang, R

    2000-01-01

    To study the pathogenesis of cornea melting (ulceration) by pseudomona (P) aeruginosa for instruction of clinical treatment. Type I collagen gels with or without suspended keratocytes were incubated for 24 hours under medium containing sterile P. aeruginosa culture broth. Native collagen fibrils were removed from the media by ultrafiltration. The ultrafiltrates were then hydrolyzed, and the amount of hydroxyproline was measured spectrophotometrically. The effect of a synthetic matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor, Galardin, on collagen degradation was also examined. P. aeruginosa broth induced type I collagen gel degradation directly. In the presence of keratocytes, degradation by P. aeruginosa broth was enhanced. Galardin significantly reduced the amount of collagen degraded by P. aeruginosa culture broth, no matter keratocytes were present or not. P. aeruginosa culture broth directly degrades type I collagen and also increases keratocyte-mediated collagen degradation. The result is helpful to the clinical treatment of cornea melting caused by P. aeruginosa, and the mechanism should be further studied.

  5. Transdermal Delivery of Functional Collagen Via Polyvinylpyrrolidone Microneedles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenchao; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Manoukian, Martin A. C.; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Manickam, Sathish; Marinkovich, M. Peter; Lane, Alfred T.; Tayebi, Lobat; Seifalian, Alexander M.; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2017-01-01

    Collagen makes up a large proportion of the human body, particularly the skin. As the body ages, collagen content decreases, resulting in wrinkled skin and decreased wound healing capabilities. This paper presents a method of delivering type I collagen into porcine and human skin utilizing a polyvinylpyrrolidone microneedle delivery system. The microneedle patches were made with concentrations of 1, 2, 4, and 8% type I collagen (w/w). Microneedle structures and the distribution of collagen were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. Patches were then applied on the porcine and human skin, and their effectiveness was examined using fluorescence microscopy. The results illustrate that this microneedle delivery system is effective in delivering collagen I into the epidermis and dermis of porcine and human skin. Since the technique presented in this paper is quick, safe, effective and easy, it can be considered as a new collagen delivery method for cosmetic and therapeutic applications. PMID:26066056

  6. Transdermal Delivery of Functional Collagen Via Polyvinylpyrrolidone Microneedles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenchao; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Manoukian, Martin A C; Malkovskiy, Andrey V; Manickam, Sathish; Marinkovich, M Peter; Lane, Alfred T; Tayebi, Lobat; Seifalian, Alexander M; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2015-12-01

    Collagen makes up a large proportion of the human body, particularly the skin. As the body ages, collagen content decreases, resulting in wrinkled skin and decreased wound healing capabilities. This paper presents a method of delivering type I collagen into porcine and human skin utilizing a polyvinylpyrrolidone microneedle delivery system. The microneedle patches were made with concentrations of 1, 2, 4, and 8% type I collagen (w/w). Microneedle structures and the distribution of collagen were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. Patches were then applied on the porcine and human skin, and their effectiveness was examined using fluorescence microscopy. The results illustrate that this microneedle delivery system is effective in delivering collagen I into the epidermis and dermis of porcine and human skin. Since the technique presented in this paper is quick, safe, effective and easy, it can be considered as a new collagen delivery method for cosmetic and therapeutic applications.

  7. LARP6 Meets Collagen mRNA: Specific Regulation of Type I Collagen Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Type I collagen is the most abundant structural protein in all vertebrates, but its constitutive rate of synthesis is low due to long half-life of the protein (60–70 days. However, several hundred fold increased production of type I collagen is often seen in reparative or reactive fibrosis. The mechanism which is responsible for this dramatic upregulation is complex, including multiple levels of regulation. However, posttranscriptional regulation evidently plays a predominant role. Posttranscriptional regulation comprises processing, transport, stabilization and translation of mRNAs and is executed by RNA binding proteins. There are about 800 RNA binding proteins, but only one, La ribonucleoprotein domain family member 6 (LARP6, is specifically involved in type I collagen regulation. In the 5′untranslated region (5’UTR of mRNAs encoding for type I and type III collagens there is an evolutionally conserved stem-loop (SL structure; this structure is not found in any other mRNA, including any other collagen mRNA. LARP6 binds to the 5′SL in sequence specific manner to regulate stability of collagen mRNAs and their translatability. Here, we will review current understanding of how is LARP6 involved in posttranscriptional regulation of collagen mRNAs. We will also discuss how other proteins recruited by LARP6, including nonmuscle myosin, vimentin, serine threonine kinase receptor associated protein (STRAP, 25 kD FK506 binding protein (FKBP25 and RNA helicase A (RHA, contribute to this process.

  8. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frégeau M.O.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  9. Live Imaging of Type I Collagen Assembly Dynamics in Osteoblasts Stably Expressing GFP and mCherry-tagged Collagen Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yongbo; Sayed, Suzan A Kamel-El; Wang, Kun; Tiede-Lewis, LeAnn M; Grillo, Michael A; Veno, Patricia A; Dusevich, Vladimir; Phillips, Charlotte L; Bonewald, Lynda F; Dallas, Sarah L

    2018-02-20

    Type I collagen is the most abundant extracellular matrix protein in bone and other connective tissues and plays key roles in normal and pathological bone formation as well as in connective tissue disorders and fibrosis. Although much is known about the collagen biosynthetic pathway and its regulatory steps, the mechanisms by which it is assembled extracellularly are less clear. We have generated GFPtpz and mCherry-tagged collagen fusion constructs for live imaging of type I collagen assembly by replacing the α2(I)-procollagen N-terminal propeptide with GFPtpz or mCherry. These novel imaging probes were stably transfected into MLO-A5 osteoblast-like cells and fibronectin-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (FN-null-MEFs) and used for imaging type I collagen assembly dynamics and its dependence on fibronectin. Both fusion proteins co-precipitated with α1(I)-collagen and remained intracellular without ascorbate but were assembled into α1(I) collagen-containing extracellular fibrils in the presence of ascorbate. Immunogold-EM confirmed their ultrastuctural localization in banded collagen fibrils. Live cell imaging in stably-transfected MLO-A5 cells revealed the highly dynamic nature of collagen assembly and showed that during assembly the fibril networks are continually stretched and contracted due to the underlying cell motion. We also observed that cell-generated forces can physically reshape the collagen fibrils. Using co-cultures of mCherry- and GFPtpz-collagen expressing cells we show that multiple cells contribute collagen to form collagen fiber bundles. ImmunoEM further showed that individual collagen fibrils can receive contributions of collagen from more than one cell. Live cell imaging in FN-null-MEFs expressing GFPtpz-collagen showed that collagen assembly was both dependent upon and dynamically integrated with fibronectin assembly. These GFP-collagen fusion constructs provide a powerful tool for imaging collagen in living cells and have revealed novel and

  10. Collagen-collagen interactions mediated by plant-derived proanthocyanidins: A spectroscopic and atomic force microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Cristina M P; Zhu, Weiying; Manohar, Suresh; Aydin, Berdan; Keiderling, Timothy A; Messersmith, Phillip B; Bedran-Russo, Ana K

    2016-09-01

    Collagen cross-linkings are determinant of biological tissue stability and function. Plant-derived proanthocyanidins (PACs) mimic different hierarchical levels of collagen cross-links by non-enzymatic interactions resulting in the enhancement to the biomechanics and biostability of collagen-rich tissues such as dentin. This study investigated the interaction of PACs from Vitis vinifera grape seed extract with type I collagen in solubilized form and in the demineralized dentin matrix (DDM) by fluorescence spectral analysis; collagen-collagen binding forces in presence of cross-linking solutions by atomic force microscopy (AFM); and spectroscopic analysis of the DDM using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Glutaraldehyde (GA) and carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) with known cross-linking mechanisms were selected for comparative analyses. Changes in fluorescence upon interaction of solubilized type I collagen with PACs, EDC and GA reflected pronounced modifications in collagen conformation. PACs also promoted stronger collagen-collagen fibrils interaction than EDC and GA. A new feature was observed using ATR-FTIR spectroscopic analysis in PACs-treated collagen and DDM. The findings suggest covalent interactions between collagen and PACs. The mechanisms of interaction between PACs-collagen hold attractive and promising tissue-tailored biomedical applications and the binding forces that potentially drive such interaction were characterized. Connective tissues such as skin, bone and dentin are mainly composed of type I collagen, which is cross-linked to promote tissue stability, strength and function. Novel therapies using substances that mimic cross-links have been proposed to promote repair of collagen-based-tissues. In dentistry, naturally occurring proanthocyanidins (PACs) have the potential to enhance dentin mechanical properties and reduce its enzymatic degradation, but their mechanisms of cross-linking are unclear. The

  11. Strain stiffening in collagen I networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motte, Stéphanie; Kaufman, Laura J

    2013-01-01

    Biopolymer gels exhibit strain stiffening that is generally not seen in synthetic gels. Here, we investigate the strain-stiffening behavior in collagen I gels that demonstrate elasticity derived from a variety of sources including crosslinking through telopeptides, bundling through low-temperature gelation, and exogenous crosslinking with genipin. In all cases, it is found that these gels exhibit strain stiffening; in general, onset of strain stiffening occurs earlier, yield strain is lower, and degree of strain stiffening is smaller in higher concentration gels and in those displaying thick fibril bundles. Recovery after exposure to high strains is substantial and similar in all gels, suggesting that much of the stiffening comes from reversible network deformations. A key finding of this study is that collagen I gels of identical storage and loss moduli may display different nonlinear responses and different capacities to recover from high strain. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Corneal collagen cross-linking for keratoconus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotov, V V; Pashtaev, N P; Pozdeeva, N A

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) has become a conventional treatment method for progressive keratoconus. Laboratory studies have shown that CXL increases the diameter of collagen fibers and also the number of intra- and interfibrillar cross-links, thus, increasing biomechanical strength of the irradiated cornea. As confirmed by a series of clinical and randomized controlled trials, CXL is able to slow down and, perhaps, to stop the progression of keratoconus. In most post-CXL patients visual acuity improves, while keratometric readings, spherical equivalent, and higher order aberrations reduce. Although published results prove CXL effective in the treatment of progressive keratoconus, its late consequences are yet unknown. This article reviews the stages of CXL development and results of published experimental and clinical studies. Prospects for CXL modifications that do not require epithelial debridement are discussed.

  13. Collagen markers in peritoneal dialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Joffe, P; Fugleberg, S

    1995-01-01

    Possible relationships between the dialysate-to-plasma creatinine equilibration ratio (D/Pcreatinine 4 hour), duration of peritoneal dialysis treatment, number of peritonitis episodes, and mass appearance rates of three connective tissue markers [carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen...... (PICP), aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP), and carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP)] were studied in 19 nondiabetic peritoneal dialysis patients. The absence of correlation between the mass appearance rates of the markers and the duration of dialysis treatment...... as well as the number of peritonitis episodes supports the concept that peritoneal dialysis does not cause persistent changes in the deposition and degradation rates of collagen. A correlation between the D/Pcreatinine 4 hr and the PICP mass appearance rates was found. Since it is unlikely...

  14. Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking Outcomes: Review

    OpenAIRE

    Jankov II,Mirko R.; Jovanovic,Vesna; Delevic, Sladjana; Coskunseven, Efekan

    2011-01-01

    Keratoconus is a condition characterized by biomechanical instability of the cornea, presenting in a progressive, asymmetric and bilateral way. Corneal collagen cross-linking with riboflavin and UVA (CXL) is a new technique of corneal tissue strengthening that combines the use of riboflavin as a photo sensitizer and UVA irradiation. The studies showed that CXL was effective in halting the progression of keratoconus over a period of up to four years. The published studies also revealed a reduc...

  15. Mechanical Behavior of Collagen-Fibrin Co-Gels Reflects Transition From Series to Parallel Interactions With Increasing Collagen Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Victor K.; Lake, Spencer P.; Frey, Christina R.; Tranquillo, Robert T.; Barocas, Victor H.

    2012-01-01

    Fibrin and collagen, biopolymers occurring naturally in the body, are biomaterials commonly-used as scaffolds for tissue engineering. How collagen and fibrin interact to confer macroscopic mechanical properties in collagen-fibrin composite systems remains poorly understood. In this study, we formulated collagen-fibrin co-gels at different collagen-tofibrin ratios to observe changes in the overall mechanical behavior and microstructure. A modeling framework of a two-network system was developed by modifying our micro-scale model, considering two forms of interaction between the networks: (a) two interpenetrating but noninteracting networks (“parallel”), and (b) a single network consisting of randomly alternating collagen and fibrin fibrils (“series”). Mechanical testing of our gels show that collagen-fibrin co-gels exhibit intermediate properties (UTS, strain at failure, tangent modulus) compared to those of pure collagen and fibrin. The comparison with model predictions show that the parallel and series model cases provide upper and lower bounds, respectively, for the experimental data, suggesting that a combination of such interactions exists between the collagen and fibrin in co-gels. A transition from the series model to the parallel model occurs with increasing collagen content, with the series model best describing predominantly fibrin co-gels, and the parallel model best describing predominantly collagen co-gels. PMID:22482659

  16. Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.H. Riitters

    2009-01-01

    Effective resource management takes into account the administrative and biophysical settings within which natural resources occur. A setting may be described in many ways; for example, by forest land ownership, by reserved and roadless designation, or by the distribution of human populations in relation to forest (chapter 3). The physical arrangement of forest in a...

  17. Effects of fish collagen peptides on collagen post-translational modifications and mineralization in an osteoblastic cell culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shizuka; Nagaoka, Hideaki; Terajima, Masahiko; Tsuda, Nobuaki; Hayashi, Yoshihiko; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    Collagen is one of the most widely used biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Fish collagen peptides (FCP) have been used as a dietary supplement, but their effects on the cellular function are still poorly understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of FCP on collagen synthesis, quality and mineralization using an osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell culture system. Cells treated with FCP significantly upregulated the gene expression of several collagen modifying enzymes and more collagen was deposited in the cultures. Collagen in the treated group showed a greater extent of lysine hydroxylation, higher levels of hydroxylysine-aldehyde derived cross-links and accelerated cross-link maturation compared with the untreated group. Furthermore, the treated group showed accelerated matrix mineralization. These results indicate that FCP exerts a positive effect on osteoblastic cells in terms of collagen synthesis, quality and mineralization, thereby suggesting the potential utility of FCP for bone tissue engineering.

  18. Chemical Stabilisation of Collagen as a Biomimetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gordon Paul

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals and because of its high mechanical strength and good resistance to degradation has been utilized in a wide range of products in industry whilst its low antigenicity has resulted in its widespread use in medicine. Collagen products can be purified from fibres, molecules reconstituted as fibres or from specific recombinant polypeptides with preferred properties. A common feature of all these biomaterials is the need for stable chemical cross-linking to control the mechanical properties and the residence time in the body, and to some extent the immunogenicity of the device. This can be achieved by a number of different cross-linking agents that react with specific amino acid residues on the collagen molecule imparting individual biochemical, thermal and mechanical characteristics to the biomaterial. In this review we have summarised the major techniques for testing these characteristics and the mechanisms involved in the variety of cross-linking reactions to achieve particular properties..

  19. Fc fragments of immunoglobulin G are an inductor of regulatory rheumatoid factor and a promising therapeutic agent for rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, Alexandr; Beduleva, Liubov; Menshikov, Igor; Terentiev, Alexey; Stolyarova, Elena; Abisheva, Nadezhda

    2017-02-01

    We recently identified rheumatoid factor, the production of which neither predicts nor exacerbates experimental autoimmune disease, but the opposite, namely it is associated with autoimmune disease resistance and remission. We have named it regulatory rheumatoid factor (regRF). The aim of this study was to determine whether rat Fc fragments and human Fc fragments are an antigen for regRF, and to determine the conditions for obtaining them. The presence of an antigenic determinant for regRF on IgG fragments was inferred from the fragments' ability to inhibit the agglutination caused by regRF and to induce regRF production in vivo. It was found that antigenic determinants for both human regRF and rat regRF are absent from native IgG and can be induced in the hinge region of Fc fragments of homologous IgG by papain digestion. The rat Fc fragments are susceptible to spontaneous reconfiguration, which results in loss of the antigenic determinants for regRF. Reconfiguration can be observed by SDS-PAGE. Immunization of arthritic rats with Fc fragments of rat IgG that carry antigenic determinants for rat regRF reduces the symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis. The Fc fragments can be viewed as the basis for a therapeutic vaccine to suppress autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Partial characterization of cell-type X collagen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckman, Steven P; Rees, Elaine; Kwan, Alvin P L

    2003-06-01

    Type X collagen is a short-chain non-fibrillar collagen that is deposited exclusively at sites of new bone formation. Although this collagen has been implicated in chondrocyte hypertrophy and endochondral ossification, its precise function remains unclear. One possible function could be to regulate the processes of chondrocyte hypertrophy through direct cell-type X collagen interactions. Adhesions of embryonic chick chondrocytes, and cell lines with known expression of collagen-binding integrins (MG63 and HOS), were assayed on chick type X collagen substrates, including the native, heat-denatured and pepsin-digested collagen, and the isolated C-terminal non-collagenous (NC1) domain. Type X collagen supported the greatest level of adhesion for all cell types tested. The involvement of the alpha2beta1 integrin in type X collagen-cell interaction was demonstrated by adhesion studies in the presence of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) ions and integrin-function-blocking antibodies. Cells expressing alpha2beta1 integrin (chick chondrocytes and MG63 cells) also adhered to heat-denatured type X collagen and the isolated NC1 domain; however, removal of the non-collagenous domains by limited pepsinization of type X collagen resulted in very low levels of adhesion. Both focal contacts and actin stress-fibre formation were apparent in cells plated on type X collagen. The presence of alpha2 and beta1 integrin subunits in isolated chondrocytes and epiphyseal cartilage was also confirmed by immunolocalization. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that type X collagen is capable of interacting directly with chondrocytes and other cells, primarily via alpha2beta1 integrin. These findings are atypical from the fibrillar collagen-cell interactions via collagen binding integrins in that: (1) the triple-helical conformation is not strictly required for cell adhesion; (2) the NC1 domain is also involved in the adhesion of alpha2beta1-expressing cells. These data form the basis for further

  1. Crucial role of the CB3-region of collagen IV in PARF-induced acute rheumatic fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Dinkla

    Full Text Available Acute rheumatic fever (ARF and rheumatic heart disease are serious autoimmune sequelae to infections with Streptococcus pyogenes. Streptococcal M-proteins have been implicated in ARF pathogenesis. Their interaction with collagen type IV (CIV is a triggering step that induces generation of collagen-specific auto-antibodies. Electron microscopy of the protein complex between M-protein type 3 (M3-protein and CIV identified two prominent binding sites of which one is situated in the CB3-region of CIV. In a radioactive binding assay, M3-protein expressing S. pyogenes and S. gordonii bound the CB3-fragment. Detailed analysis of the interactions by surface plasmon resonance measurements and site directed mutagenesis revealed high affinity interactions with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range that depend on the recently described collagen binding motif of streptococcal M-proteins. Because of its role in the induction of disease-related collagen autoimmunity the motif is referred to as "peptide associated with rheumatic fever" (PARF. Both, sera of mice immunized with M3-protein as well as sera from patients with ARF contained anti-CB3 auto-antibodies, indicating their contribution to ARF pathogenesis. The identification of the CB3-region as a binding partner for PARF directs the further approaches to understand the unusual autoimmune pathogenesis of PARF-dependent ARF and forms a molecular basis for a diagnostic test that detects rheumatogenic streptococci.

  2. Solid-state and unilateral NMR study of deterioration of a Dead Sea Scroll fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, A; Chierotti, M R; Gobetto, R; Martra, G; Rabin, I; Coluccia, S

    2012-02-01

    Unilateral and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses were performed on a parchment fragment of the Dead Sea Scroll (DSS). The analyzed sample belongs to the collection of non-inscribed and nontreated fragments of known archaeological provenance from the John Rylands University Library in Manchester. Therefore, it can be considered as original DSS material free from any contamination related to the post-discovery period. Considering the paramount significance of the DSS, noninvasive approaches and portable in situ nondestructive methods are of fundamental importance for the determination of composition, structure, and chemical-physical properties of the materials under study. NMR studies reveal low amounts of water content associated with very short proton relaxation times, T(1), indicating a high level of deterioration of collagen molecules within scroll fragments. In addition, (13)C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy shows characteristic peaks of lipids whose presence we attribute to the production technology that did not involve liming. Extraction with chloroform led to the reduction of both lipid and protein signals in the (13)C CPMAS spectrum indicating probable involvement of lipids in parchment degradation processes. NMR absorption and relaxation measurements provide nondestructive, discriminative, and sensitive tools for studying the deterioration effects on the organization and properties of water and collagen within ancient manuscripts.

  3. Cross-Linked Collagen Triple Helices by Oxime Ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentzen, Nina B; Smeenk, Linde E J; Witek, Jagna; Riniker, Sereina; Wennemers, Helma

    2017-09-13

    Covalent cross-links are crucial for the folding and stability of triple-helical collagen, the most abundant protein in nature. Cross-linking is also an attractive strategy for the development of synthetic collagen-based biocompatible materials. Nature uses interchain disulfide bridges to stabilize collagen trimers. However, their implementation into synthetic collagen is difficult and requires the replacement of the canonical amino acids (4R)-hydroxyproline and proline by cysteine or homocysteine, which reduces the preorganization and thereby stability of collagen triple helices. We therefore explored alternative covalent cross-links that allow for connecting triple-helical collagen via proline residues. Here, we present collagen model peptides that are cross-linked by oxime bonds between 4-aminooxyproline (Aop) and 4-oxoacetamidoproline placed in coplanar Xaa and Yaa positions of neighboring strands. The covalently connected strands folded into hyperstable collagen triple helices (Tm ≈ 80 °C). The design of the cross-links was guided by an analysis of the conformational properties of Aop, studies on the stability and functionalization of Aop-containing collagen triple helices, and molecular dynamics simulations. The studies also show that the aminooxy group exerts a stereoelectronic effect comparable to fluorine and introduce oxime ligation as a tool for the functionalization of synthetic collagen.

  4. Collagen immobilization on polyethylene terephthalate surface after helium plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aflori, Magdalena, E-mail: maflori@icmpp.ro [Department of Polymers Physics and Polymeric Materials, “Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Gr. Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Drobota, Mioara [Department of Polymers Physics and Polymeric Materials, “Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Gr. Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Dimitriu, Dan Gh. [Faculty of Physics, “Alexandru Ioan Cuza” University, 20A Bulevardul Carol I, 700505 Iasi (Romania); Stoica, Iuliana [Department of Polymers Physics and Polymeric Materials, “Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Gr. Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Simionescu, Bogdana [Department of Polymers Physics and Polymeric Materials, “Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Gr. Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); “Costin D. Nenitescu” Centre of Organic Chemistry, 202B Splaiul Independentei, 71141 Bucharest (Romania); Harabagiu, Valeria [Department of Polymers Physics and Polymeric Materials, “Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Gr. Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania)

    2013-11-20

    An attractive alternative to add new functionalities such as biocompatibility due to the micro- and nano-scaled modification of polymer surfaces is offered by plasma processing. Many vital processes of tissue repair and growth following injuries depend on the rate of adsorption and self-assembling of the collagen molecules at the interfaces. Consequently, besides the amount of protein, it is necessary to investigate the form in which the collagen molecules are organizing on the polymer surface. In this study, direct current (DC) helium plasma treatment was used in order to obtain poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films with different amounts of collagen and different shapes of aggregates formed from the collagen molecules. The immobilization of collagen on PET surface was confirmed by XPS measurements, an increase of the nitrogen content by increasing the plasma exposure time being recorded. The SEM and AFM measurements revealed the presence of grains and dendrites of collagen formed on the polymer surface. At 15 min plasma treatment time, the polymer surface after collagen immobilization has a homogenous topography. Usually, one can find fibrils, coil or dendrimers of collagen formed in buffer solutions and immobilized on different polymer surfaces. On the other hand, in this particular configuration, the combination of DC plasma and helium gas as a PET functionalization tool is an original one. As the collagen is not covalently immobilized on the surfaces, it may interact with the cell culture medium proteins, part of the collagen might being replaced by other serum proteins.

  5. Collagens and proteoglycans of the corneal extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.M. Michelacci

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The cornea is a curved and transparent structure that provides the initial focusing of a light image into the eye. It consists of a central stroma that constitutes 90% of the corneal depth, covered anteriorly with epithelium and posteriorly with endothelium. Its transparency is the result of the regular spacing of collagen fibers with remarkably uniform diameter and interfibrillar space. Corneal collagen is composed of heterotypic fibrils consisting of type I and type V collagen molecules. The cornea also contains unusually high amounts of type VI collagen, which form microfibrillar structures, FACIT collagens (XII and XIV, and other nonfibrillar collagens (XIII and XVIII. FACIT collagens and other molecules, such as leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans, play important roles in modifying the structure and function of collagen fibrils.Proteoglycans are macromolecules composed of a protein core with covalently linked glycosaminoglycan side chains. Four leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans are present in the extracellular matrix of corneal stroma: decorin, lumican, mimecan and keratocan. The first is a dermatan sulfate proteoglycan, and the other three are keratan sulfate proteoglycans. Experimental evidence indicates that the keratan sulfate proteoglycans are involved in the regulation of collagen fibril diameter, and dermatan sulfate proteoglycan participates in the control of interfibrillar spacing and in the lamellar adhesion properties of corneal collagens. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are minor components of the cornea, and are synthesized mainly by epithelial cells. The effect of injuries on proteoglycan synthesis is discussed.

  6. Collagen tissue engineering: development of novel biomaterials and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Lian; Liu, Wei; Cui, Lei; Zhang, Wenjie; Cao, Yilin

    2008-05-01

    Scientific investigations involving collagen have inspired tissue engineering and design of biomaterials since collagen fibrils and their networks primarily regulate and define most tissues. The collagen networks form a highly organized, three-dimensional architecture to entrap other ingredients. Biomaterials are expected to function as cell scaffolds to replace native collagen-based extracellular matrix. The composition and properties of biomaterials used as scaffold for tissue engineering significantly affect the regeneration of neo-tissues and influence the conditions of collagen engineering. The complex scenario of collagen characteristics, types, fibril arrangement, and collagen structure-related functions (in a variety of connective tissues including bone, cartilage, tendon, skin and cornea) are addressed in this review. Discussion will focus on nanofibrillar assemblies and artificial synthetic peptides that mimic either the fibrillar structure or the elemental components of type I collagen as illustrated by their preliminary applications in tissue engineering. Conventional biomaterials used as scaffolds in engineering collagen-containing tissues are also discussed. The design of novel biomaterials and application of conventional biomaterials will facilitate development of additional novel tissue engineering bioproducts by refining the currently available techniques. The field of tissue engineering will ultimately be advanced by increasing control of collagen in native tissue and by continual manipulation of biomaterials.

  7. Fragment separator momentum compression schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandura, Laura, E-mail: bandura@anl.gov [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab, Michigan State University, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Erdelyi, Bela [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States); Hausmann, Marc [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Kubo, Toshiyuki [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako (Japan); Nolen, Jerry [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Portillo, Mauricio [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Sherrill, Bradley M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab, Michigan State University, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)

    2011-07-21

    We present a scheme to use a fragment separator and profiled energy degraders to transfer longitudinal phase space into transverse phase space while maintaining achromatic beam transport. The first order beam optics theory of the method is presented and the consequent enlargement of the transverse phase space is discussed. An interesting consequence of the technique is that the first order mass resolving power of the system is determined by the first dispersive section up to the energy degrader, independent of whether or not momentum compression is used. The fragment separator at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams is a specific application of this technique and is described along with simulations by the code COSY INFINITY.

  8. Fragment separator momentum compression schemes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandura, L.; Erdelyi, B.; Hausmann, M.; Kubo, T.; Nolen, J.; Portillo, M.; Sherrill, B.M. (Physics); (MSU); (Northern Illinois Univ.); (RIKEN)

    2011-07-21

    We present a scheme to use a fragment separator and profiled energy degraders to transfer longitudinal phase space into transverse phase space while maintaining achromatic beam transport. The first order beam optics theory of the method is presented and the consequent enlargement of the transverse phase space is discussed. An interesting consequence of the technique is that the first order mass resolving power of the system is determined by the first dispersive section up to the energy degrader, independent of whether or not momentum compression is used. The fragment separator at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams is a specific application of this technique and is described along with simulations by the code COSY INFINITY.

  9. Fragment separator momentum compression schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Laura; Erdelyi, Bela; Hausmann, Marc; Kubo, Toshiyuki; Nolen, Jerry; Portillo, Mauricio; Sherrill, Bradley M.

    2011-07-01

    We present a scheme to use a fragment separator and profiled energy degraders to transfer longitudinal phase space into transverse phase space while maintaining achromatic beam transport. The first order beam optics theory of the method is presented and the consequent enlargement of the transverse phase space is discussed. An interesting consequence of the technique is that the first order mass resolving power of the system is determined by the first dispersive section up to the energy degrader, independent of whether or not momentum compression is used. The fragment separator at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams is a specific application of this technique and is described along with simulations by the code COSY INFINITY.

  10. Fragmentering og korridorer i landskabet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammershøj, M.; Madsen, A. B.

    , at fragmentering af habitater resulterer i en reduktion og isolering af mange plante- og dyrepopulationer. Det er desuden vist, at korridorer har en funktion som habitater, hvilket er medvirkende til, at et område med korridorer kan huse flere arter og individer end et tilsvarende område uden korridorer. Der......Rapporten indeholder en litteraturudredning, der er baseret på en bearbejdning af den tilgængelige nationale og internationale litteratur omhandlende fragmentering og korridorer på det botaniske og zoologiske område. I alt 1.063 titler ligger til grund for udredningen. Udredningen har vist...... mangler dog entydige beviser for, at korridorer kan være af afgørende betydning for rekolonisering af habitater, i hvilke en given art er forsvundet. Afslutningsvis gives en liste med forskningsbehov samt en række anbefalinger....

  11. Fragmentation in the biopharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Andrew D; Varela, Francisco E

    2017-02-01

    The large number of biopharmaceutical mergers and acquisitions (M&A) that occurred over the past decade has generated questions about whether the industry is consolidating around too-few players, negatively impacting both the number of medicines developed and overall innovation. However, closer examination of the level of biopharmaceutical consolidation by prescription sales shows that the industry was more fragmented in 2015 than in 2003. The trend towards increasing fragmentation is also observed across noncommercial and independent metrics over the same time period. The number and size of M&A deals has masked an active and competitive marketplace in which market growth and the number of companies entering the market exceeded the apparent reduction in the number of players caused by acquisitions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Carcinogenesis of Depleted Uranium Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-02-01

    29 of 54 Chinese hamsters injected intravenously with a relatively high dose of Thorotrast (> 0.4 Bq/g) developed fibrosarcomas from perivascular...leakage of some injections (Guilmette et al., 1989). Plutonium fragments have been injected into the footpads of dogs to simulate the plutonium...extensively studied in animals, particularly in rats (Haley, 1982; Haley et al., 1982; Diamond et al., 1987; Morrow et al., 1982) and dogs (Morrow et al

  13. Modeling of Fragmentation of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Parul; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Carlozzi, Alexander; Hart, Kenneth; Bryson, Katie; Sears, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand fragmentation and fracture of a given asteroid and mechanisms of break-up. The focus of the present work is to develop modeling techniques for stony asteroids in 10m-100m range to answer two questions: 1) What is the role of material makeup of an asteroid in the stress distribution? 2)How is stress distribution altered in the presence of pre-existing defects?

  14. Structure, fragmentation and fracture functions

    CERN Document Server

    Canal-Garcia, C A

    2000-01-01

    We address the partonic description of the proton, the photon and the "color singlet, " as seen in inclusive and semi-inclusive DIS, in e /sup +/e/sup $/collisions, and in diffractive processes, respectively. Their formal treatment using structure, fragmentation, and fracture functions is outlined giving an insight into the perturbative QCD framework for these functions. Examples and comparisons with experimental data from LEP, HERA, and Tevatron are also covered. (52 refs).

  15. ISOCT study of collagen crosslinking of collagen in cancer models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Graham; Young, Scott T.; Yi, Ji; Shea, Lonnie D.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    The role of extracellular matrix modification and signaling in cancer progression is an increasingly recognized avenue for the progression of the disease. Previous study of field effect carcinogenesis with Inverse Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (ISOCT) has revealed pronounced changes in the nanoscale-sensitive mass fractal dimension D measured from field effect tissue when compared to healthy tissue. However, the origin of this difference in tissue ultrastructure in field effect carcinogenesis has remained poorly understood. Here, we present findings supporting the idea that enzymatic crosslinking of the extracellular matrix is an effect that presents at the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. We use a model of collagen gel with crosslinking induced by lysyl oxidase (LOXL4) to recapitulate the difference in D previously reported from healthy and cancerous tissue biopsies. Furthermore, STORM imaging of this collagen gel model verifies the morphologic effects of enzymatic crosslinking at length scales as small as 40 nm, close to the previously reported lower length scale sensitivity threshold of 35 nm for ISOCT. Analysis of the autocorrelation function from STORM images of collagen gels and subsequent fitting to the Whittle-Matérn correlation function shows a similar effect of LOXL4 on D from collagen measured with ISOCT and STORM. We extend this to mass spectrometric study of tissue to directly measure concentrations of collagen crosslink residues. The validation of ISOCT as a viable tool for non-invasive rapid quantification of collagen ultrastructure lends it to study other physiological phenomena involving ECM restructuring such as atherosclerotic plaque screening or cervical ripening during pregnancy.

  16. Fibril fragmentation enhances amyloid cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wei-Feng; Hellewell, Andrew L; Gosal, Walraj S; Homans, Steve W; Hewitt, Eric W; Radford, Sheena E

    2009-12-04

    Fibrils associated with amyloid disease are molecular assemblies of key biological importance, yet how cells respond to the presence of amyloid remains unclear. Cellular responses may not only depend on the chemical composition or molecular properties of the amyloid fibrils, but their physical attributes such as length, width, or surface area may also play important roles. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the effect of fragmentation on the structural and biological properties of amyloid fibrils. In addition to the expected relationship between fragmentation and the ability to seed, we show a striking finding that fibril length correlates with the ability to disrupt membranes and to reduce cell viability. Thus, despite otherwise unchanged molecular architecture, shorter fibrillar samples show enhanced cytotoxic potential than their longer counterparts. The results highlight the importance of fibril length in amyloid disease, with fragmentation not only providing a mechanism by which fibril load can be rapidly increased but also creating fibrillar species of different dimensions that can endow new or enhanced biological properties such as amyloid cytotoxicity.

  17. Residual Fragments after Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaan Özdedeli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinically insignificant residual fragments (CIRFs are described as asymptomatic, noninfectious and nonobstructive stone fragments (≤4 mm remaining in the urinary system after the last session of any intervention (ESWL, URS or PCNL for urinary stones. Their insignificance is questionable since CIRFs could eventually become significant, as their presence may result in recurrent stone growth and they may cause pain and infection due to urinary obstruction. They may become the source of persistent infections and a significant portion of the patients will have a stone-related event, requiring auxilliary interventions. CT seems to be the ultimate choice of assessment. Although there is no concensus about the timing, recent data suggests that it may be performed one month after the procedure. However, imaging can be done in the immediate postoperative period, if there are no tubes blurring the assessment. There is some evidence indicating that selective medical therapy may have an impact on decreasing stone formation rates. Retrograde intrarenal surgery, with its minimally invasive nature, seems to be the best way to deal with residual fragments.

  18. A Method for Predicting Fragmentation Characteristics of Natural and Performed Explosive Fragmentation Munitions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gold, Vladimir

    2001-01-01

    New methodology for simulating performance of explosive fragmentation munitions presented in this work integrates three-dimensional axisymmetric hydrocode analyses with analytical fragmentation modeling...

  19. Design and synthesis of collagen mimetic peptide derivatives for studying triple helix assembly and collagen mimetic peptide-collagen binding interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiao

    2008-10-01

    Collagen is the principal tensile clement of the extra-cellular matrix in mammals and is the basic scaffold for cells and tissues. Collagen molecules are comprised of homo-trimeric helices (e.g. collagen type II and type III), ABB type hetero-trimeric helices (e.g. collagen type I, type IV, and type V), or ABC type hetero-trimeric helices (e.g. type V). Mimicry of collagen structures can help elucidate collagen triple helical conformation and provide insights into making novel collagen-like biomaterials. Our group previously reported a new physical collagen modification method, which was based on non-covalent interaction between collagen mimetic peptide (CMP: -(Pro-Hyp-Gly) x-) and natural collagen. We hypothesized that CMP binds to collagen through a process involving both strand invasion and triple helix assembly. The aim of this dissertation is to study structural formation and stability of collagen triple helix, and to investigate CMP-collagen binding interactions using two types of CMP derivatives: covalently templated CMP trimer and CMP-nanoparticle conjugates. We demonstrated that covalently templated ABB type CMP hetero-trimers could be prepared by a versatile synthetic strategy involving both solid phase and solution peptide coupling. Our thermal melting studies showed that the templated CMP hetero-trimers formed collagen-like triple helices and their folding kinetics correlated with the amino acid compositions of the individual CMP strands. We also studied the thermal melting behavior and folding kinetics of a templated hetero-trimer complex comprised of CMP and a peptide derived from collagen. This synthetic strategy can be readily extended to synthesize other ABB type hetero-trimers to investigate their local melting behavior and biological activity. We also prepared colloidally stable CMP functionalized gold nanoparticles (Au-CMPs) as a TEM marker for investigating the CMP-collagen interaction. Au-CMP showed preferential binding to collagen fiber's gap

  20. Fragmentation of small carbon clusters, a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beroff, K. [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud, batiment 351, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)], E-mail: karine.beroff@u-psud.fr; Chabot, M. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS-IN2P3 and Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Mezdari, F. [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud, batiment 351, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Martinet, G.; Tuna, T. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS-IN2P3 and Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Desesquelles, P. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et Spectrometrie de Masse, Universite Paris-Sud and CNRS-IN2P3, batiment 104, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); LePadellec, A. [Institut de Recherche sur les Systemes Atomiques et Moleculaires Complexes, Universite Paul Sabatier and CNRS, batiment 3R1B4, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Barat, M. [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud, batiment 351, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2009-03-15

    An overview of the works devoted to fragmentation of small carbon clusters is given in a first part. Fragmentation of swift neutral and (multi) charged carbon clusters studied with the AGAT spectrometer is presented and discussed in a second part.

  1. Fragmentation of small carbon clusters, a review

    OpenAIRE

    Béroff, K.; Chabot, M.; Mezdari, F.; Martinet, G.; Tuna, T.; Désesquelles, P.; Le Padellec, Arnaud; Barat, M.

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the works devoted to fragmentation of small carbon clusters is given in a first part. Fragmentation of swift neutral and (multi) charged carbon clusters studied with the AGAT spectrometer is presented and discussed in a second part.

  2. Identification of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fragments linked to soybean mosaic virus resistance gene in Glycine soja and conversion to a sequence characterized amplified regions (SCAR) marker for rapid selection.

  3. Identification of a new hominin bone from Denisova Cave, Siberia using collagen fingerprinting and mitochondrial DNA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Samantha; Higham, Thomas; Slon, Viviane; Pääbo, Svante; Meyer, Matthias; Douka, Katerina; Brock, Fiona; Comeskey, Daniel; Procopio, Noemi; Shunkov, Michael; Derevianko, Anatoly; Buckley, Michael

    2016-03-01

    DNA sequencing has revolutionised our understanding of archaic humans during the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic. Unfortunately, while many Palaeolithic sites contain large numbers of bones, the majority of these lack the diagnostic features necessary for traditional morphological identification. As a result the recovery of Pleistocene-age human remains is extremely rare. To circumvent this problem we have applied a method of collagen fingerprinting to more than 2000 fragmented bones from the site of Denisova Cave, Russia, in order to facilitate the discovery of human remains. As a result of our analysis a single hominin bone (Denisova 11) was identified, supported through in-depth peptide sequencing analysis, and found to carry mitochondrial DNA of the Neandertal type. Subsequent radiocarbon dating revealed the bone to be >50,000 years old. Here we demonstrate the huge potential collagen fingerprinting has for identifying hominin remains in highly fragmentary archaeological assemblages, improving the resources available for wider studies into human evolution.

  4. [Clinicopathologic features of collagenous spherulosis of the breast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Yang, Guang-zhi; Jin, Hua; Ding, Hua-ye

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the morphological features, immunohistochemical phenotype, diagnosis and differential diagnosis of collagenous spherulosis of the breast. Clinicopathologic observation, immunohistochemistry using EnVision method and histochemical staining were applied in 33 cases of collagenous spherulosis of the breast. Collagenous spherulosis of the breast was a benign lesion, consisting of proliferative myoepithelial and ductal epithelial cells. These cells were arranged in a cribriform pattern with esinophilic, round, oval or star-shaped fibrillary spherules in the lumen.SMA, calponin and p63 by immunohistochemistry identified the proliferative myoepithelium, while E-cadherin identified the proliferative ductal epithelial cells. The esinophilic spherules were stained with collagen type IV, AB-PAS and reticulin. Collagenous spherulosis was often found in sclerosing adenosis. Collagenous spherulosis of the breast is often associated with other diseases. It has special morphological presentation and is easily confused with malignant tumors such as adenoid cystic carcinoma or cribriform carcinoma in situ, and needs to be differentiated from these disease entities.

  5. Collagen-silica xerogel nanohybrid membrane for guided bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Jung; Jun, Shin-Hee; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Koh, Young-Hag

    2012-04-01

    A collagen-silica xerogel hybrid membrane was fabricated by a sol-gel process for guided bone regeneration (GBR). The silica xerogel synthesized by the sol-gel method was distributed uniformly within the collagen matrix in the form of nanoparticles. The hybridization of the silica xerogel with collagen improved the biological properties of the membrane significantly. Preosteoblast cells were observed to adhere well and grow much more actively on the hybrid membrane than on the pure collagen membrane. In particular, the hybrid membrane containing 30% of the silica xerogel showed the highest level of osteoblast differentiation. Moreover, the GBR ability, as assessed by the in vivo animal test, was superior to that of the pure collagen membrane. These findings suggest that the collagen-silica xerogel hybrid can be used as a GBR membrane. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Mineralized Collagen: Rationale, Current Status, and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ye Qiu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of the rationale for the in vitro mineralization process, preparation methods, and clinical applications of mineralized collagen. The rationale for natural mineralized collagen and the related mineralization process has been investigated for decades. Based on the understanding of natural mineralized collagen and its formation process, many attempts have been made to prepare biomimetic materials that resemble natural mineralized collagen in both composition and structure. To date, a number of bone substitute materials have been developed based on the principles of mineralized collagen, and some of them have been commercialized and approved by regulatory agencies. The clinical outcomes of mineralized collagen are of significance to advance the evaluation and improvement of related medical device products. Some representative clinical cases have been reported, and there are more clinical applications and long-term follow-ups that currently being performed by many research groups.

  7. Effect of dietary avocado oils on hepatic collagen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermam, M J; Mokady, S; Neeman, I

    1991-01-01

    The effect of various avocado and soybean oils on collagen metabolism in the liver was studied in growing female rats for 8 weeks and in day-old chicks for 1 week. In comparison with rats fed either refined avocado oil, refined or unrefined soybean oils, rats fed unrefined avocado oil showed a significant decrease in total collagen solubility in the liver, while there were no changes in total collagen, protein and moisture content. Chicks fed unrefined avocado oil as compared to those fed refined avocado oil also showed a decrease in hepatic total soluble collagen while hepatic total collagen remained unaffected. Electron micrographs and light-microscope examinations of rats' liver revealed collagen accumulation in the periportal location. This is suggestive of the early stages of fibrosis.

  8. Collagen synthesis in human musculoskeletal tissues and skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babraj, J A; Cuthbertson, D J R; Smith, K

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a direct method for the measurement of human musculoskeletal collagen synthesis on the basis of the incorporation of stable isotope-labeled proline or leucine into protein and have used it to measure the rate of synthesis of collagen in tendon, ligament, muscle, and skin....... In postabsorptive, healthy young men (28 +/- 6 yr) synthetic rates for tendon, ligament, muscle, and skin collagen were 0.046 +/- 0.005, 0.040 +/- 0.006, 0.016 +/- 0.002, and 0.037 +/- 0.003%/h, respectively (means +/- SD). In postabsorptive, healthy elderly men (70 +/- 6 yr) the rate of skeletal muscle collagen...... synthesis is greater than in the young (0.023 +/- 0.002%/h, P collagen are similar to those of mixed skeletal muscle protein in the postabsorptive state, whereas the rate for muscle collagen synthesis is much lower in both young and elderly men...

  9. Collagen: a potential factor involved in the pathogenesis of glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenbin; Fan, Qian; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Minwen; Laties, Alan M; Zhang, Xiulan

    2013-09-04

    Numerous studies have been completed on glaucoma pathogenesis. However, the potential and controversial interaction between ocular biomechanical properties and the glaucomatous diseases process has received much more attention recently. Previous studies have found that collagen tissues gain mutation change in glaucoma patients. This study was conducted to determine the role of collagen in the biomechanics of glaucoma in humans. Its changes may be the result of mechanical modifications brought on by intraocular pressure (IOP) fluctuations. More importantly, biomechanics and genetic evidence indicate that the mutation of collagen may play a role in the process of glaucoma. Alteration of collagen in the outflow pathway may alter mechanical tissue characteristics and a concomitant increase of aqueous humor outflow resistance and elevation of IOP. The variations of collagen, leading to inter-individual differences in scleral and lamina cribrosa properties, result in different susceptibility of individuals to elevated IOP. Therefore, this study hypothesized that collagen mutations may be an original cause of glaucoma.

  10. Fragment Kinetic Energies and Modes of Fragment Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeh, T.; Bassini, R.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Fritz, S.; Gaff-Ejakov, S. J.; Gourio, D.; Groß, C.; Immé, G.; Iori, I.; Kleinevoß, U.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunze, W. D.; Lynen, U.; Maddalena, V.; Mahi, M.; Möhlenkamp, T.; Moroni, A.; Müller, W. F.; Nociforo, C.; Ocker, B.; Petruzzelli, F.; Pochodzalla, J.; Raciti, G.; Riccobene, G.; Romano, F. P.; Saija, A.; Schnittker, M.; Schüttauf, A.; Schwarz, C.; Seidel, W.; Serfling, V.; Sfienti, C.; Trautmann, W.; Trzcinski, A.; Verde, G.; Wörner, A.; Xi, Hongfei; Zwieglinski, B.

    2000-05-01

    Kinetic energies of light fragments ( A<=10) from the decay of target spectators in 197Au+197Au collisions at 1000 MeV per nucleon have been measured with high-resolution telescopes at backward angles. Except for protons and apart from the observed evaporation components, the kinetic-energy spectra exhibit slope temperatures of about 17 MeV, independent of the particle species, but not corresponding to the thermal or chemical degrees of freedom at breakup. It is suggested that these slope temperatures may reflect the intrinsic Fermi motion and thus the bulk density of the spectator system at the instant of becoming unstable.

  11. Optimal Economic Landscapes with Habitat Fragmentation Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, David J.; Wu, JunJie

    2005-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation is widely considered a primary threat to biodiversity. This paper develops a theoretical model of land use to analyze the optimal conservation of landscapes when land quality is spatially heterogeneous and wildlife habitat is fragmented and socially valuable. When agriculture is the primary cause of fragmentation, we show that reforestation efforts should be targeted to the most fragmented landscapes with an aggregate share of forest equal to a threshold, defined by the ...

  12. Regulation of collagen biosynthesis by ascorbic acid: a review.

    OpenAIRE

    Pinnell, S R

    1985-01-01

    L-ascorbic acid is an essential cofactor for lysyl hydroxylase and prolyl hydroxylase, enzymes essential for collagen biosynthesis. In addition, L-ascorbic acid preferentially stimulates collagen synthesis in a manner which appears unrelated to the effect of L-ascorbic acid on hydroxylation reactions. This reaction is stereospecific and unrelated to intracellular degradation of collagen. The effect apparently occurs at a transcriptional or translational level, since L-ascorbic acid preferenti...

  13. Enhancing collagen stability through nanostructures containing chromium(III) oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, Selvam; Ramamoorthy, Usha; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2012-12-01

    Stabilization of collagen for various applications employs chemicals such as aldehydes, metal ions, polyphenols, etc. Stability against enzymatic, thermal and mechanical degradation is required for a range of biomedical applications. The premise of this research is to explore the use of nanoparticles with suitable functionalization/encapsulation to crosslink with collagen, such that the three dimensional architecture had the desired stability. Collagen solution prepared as per standard protocols is treated with chromium(III) oxide nanoparticules encapsulated within a polymeric matrix (polystyrene-block-polyacrylic acid copolymer). Selectivity towards encapsulation was ensured by the reaction in dimethyl sulfoxide, where the PS groups popped out and encapsulated the Cr(2)O(3). Subsequently when immersed in aqueous solution, PAA units popped up to react with functional groups of collagen. The interaction with collagen was monitored through techniques such as CD, FTIR, viscosity measurements, stress analysis. CD studies and FTIR showed no degradation of collagen. Thermal stability was enhanced upon interaction of nanostructures with collagen. Self-assembly of collagen was delayed but not inhibited, indicating a compete binding of the metal oxide encapsulated polymer to collagen. Metal oxide nanoparticles encapsulated within a polymeric matrix could provide thermal and mechanical stability to collagen. The formed fibrils of collagen could serve as ideal material for various smart applications such as slow/sustained drug release. The study is also relevant to the leather industry in that the nanostructures can diffuse through the highly networked collagen fibre bundles in skin matrix easily, thus overcoming the rate limiting step of diffusion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Crosslinking of collagen scaffolds promotes blood and lymphatic vascular stability

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Kelvin L.S.; Khankhel, Aimal H.; Thompson, Rebecca L.; Coisman, Brent J.; Wong, Keith H.K.; Truslow, James G.; Tien, Joe

    2013-01-01

    The low stiffness of reconstituted collagen hydrogels has limited their use as scaffolds for engineering implantable tissues. Although chemical crosslinking has been used to stiffen collagen and protect it against enzymatic degradation in vivo, it remains unclear how crosslinking alters the vascularization of collagen hydrogels. In this study, we examine how the crosslinking agents genipin and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) alter vascular stability and function in microf...

  15. Collagenous gastritis: a morphologic and immunohistochemical study of 40 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, Thomas; Brown, Ian S; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D; Anderson, William; O'Brien, Blake H; Wilson, Claire; Winter, Harland; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2015-04-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare condition defined histologically by a superficial subepithelial collagen layer. This study further characterizes the morphologic spectrum of collagenous gastritis by evaluating a multi-institutional series of 40 patients (26 female and 14 male). The median age at onset was 16 years (range 3-89 years), including 24 patients (60%) under age 18. Twelve patients (30%) had associated celiac disease, collagenous sprue, or collagenous colitis. Hematoxylin and eosin slides were reviewed in biopsies from all patients and tenascin, gastrin, eotaxin, and IgG4/IgG immunohistochemical stains were applied to a subset. The distribution of subepithelial collagen favored the body/fundus in pediatric patients and the antrum in adults. There were increased surface intraepithelial lymphocytes (>25 lymphocytes/100 epithelial cells) in five patients. Three of these patients had associated celiac and/or collagenous sprue/colitis, while the remaining two had increased duodenal lymphocytosis without specific etiology. An eosinophil-rich pattern (>30 eosinophils/high power field) was seen in 21/40 (52%) patients. Seven patients' biopsies demonstrated atrophy of the gastric corpus mucosa. Tenascin immunohistochemistry highlighted the subepithelial collagen in all 21 specimens evaluated and was a more sensitive method of collagen detection in biopsies from two patients with subtle subepithelial collagen. No increased eotaxin expression was identified in 16 specimens evaluated. One of the twenty-three biopsies tested had increased IgG4-positive cells (100/high power field) with an IgG4/IgG ratio of 55%. In summary, collagenous gastritis presents three distinct histologic patterns including a lymphocytic gastritis-like pattern, an eosinophil-rich pattern, and an atrophic pattern. Eotaxin and IgG4 were not elevated enough to implicate these pathways in the pathogenesis. Tenascin immunohistochemistry can be used as a sensitive method of collagen detection.

  16. Macromolecular organization of chicken type X collagen in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The macromolecular structure of type X collagen in the matrices of primary cultures of chick hypertrophic chondrocytes was initially investigated using immunoelectron microscopy. Type X collagen was observed to assemble into a matlike structure with-in the matrix elaborated by hypertrophic chondrocytes. The process of self assembly was investigated at the molecular level using purified chick type X collagen and rotary-shadowing EM. It was shown that under neutral conditions at 34 degrees C, i...

  17. Vision Restoration with a Collagen Crosslinked Boston Keratoprosthesis Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-2-0044 TITLE: Vision Restoration with a Collagen Crosslinked Boston Keratoprosthesis Unit PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Joseph B...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Vision Restoration with a Collagen Cross-linked Boston Keratoprosthesis Unit 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-2-0044...the incidence or potentially eliminate corneal melts by strengthening the keratoprosthesis carrier tissue by collagen -crosslinking the cornea graft

  18. Self-organized criticality in fragmenting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, L.; Dimon, P.; Bohr, J.

    1993-01-01

    The measured mass distributions of fragments from 26 fractured objects of gypsum, soap, stearic paraffin, and potato show evidence of obeying scaling laws; this suggests the possibility of self-organized criticality in fragmenting. The probability of finding a fragment scales inversely to a power...

  19. Scaling and four-quark fragmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.; Bosveld, G. D.

    1991-01-01

    The conditions for a scaling behaviour from the fragmentation process leading to slow protons are discussed. The scaling referred to implies that the fragmentation functions depend on the light-cone momentum fraction only. It is shown that differences in the fragmentation functions for valence- and

  20. Population pressure and farm fragmentation: Challenges facing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition, the size of farms is not only very small but farms are further fragmented into diminutive size fields due to increasing population pressure. The magnitude of fragmentation has increased overtime. Effects of population pressure and farm fragmentation are studied based on a survey of 200 households from Rusatira ...

  1. Release of antibiotics from collagen dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, J; Antos-Bielska, M; Ołdak, E; Trafny, E A

    1997-01-01

    Our new collagen dressing has been developed recently. Three types (A, B, and C) of the dressing were prepared in this study. Each type contained bacitracin, neomycin or colistin. The antibiotic was input into: i. collagen sponge (CS)--type A, ii. layer of limited hydrophobicity (LLH)--type B, and iii. into both CS and LLH layers--type C. The final concentration of the antibiotic that resulted from the loading level was 2 mg/cm2 for the dressings of type A and B and 4 mg/cm2 for the dressing of type C. The antibiotics were then extracted from the pieces of dressings for two days through dialysis membrane. Susceptibility of 54 bacterial strains (S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter) isolated from burn wounds were tested to the three antibiotics used for preparation of the dressings. The results of the study evidenced that efficiency of released of antibiotics into the extracts depended on the kind of antibiotic and on the type of dressing. The concentration of the antibiotics proved to be much higher than MIC90 values of the bacterial isolates tested in respect to their susceptibility. The dressing containing mixture of the three antibiotics in two layers--CS and LLH is now considered as potentially effective for care of infected wounds. It may be useful for the treatment of infected wounds or for profilaxis of contaminated wounds, ensuring: i. sufficient antimicrobial activity in wound, and ii. optimal wound environment for the presence of collagenic biomaterial on the damaged tissue.

  2. Marine-derived collagen biomaterials from echinoderm connective tissues

    KAUST Repository

    Ferrario, Cinzia

    2016-03-31

    The use of marine collagens is a hot topic in the field of tissue engineering. Echinoderms possess unique connective tissues (Mutable Collagenous Tissues, MCTs) which can represent an innovative source of collagen to develop collagen barrier-membranes for Guided Tissue Regeneration (GTR). In the present work we used MCTs from different echinoderm models (sea urchin, starfish and sea cucumber) to produce echinoderm-derived collagen membranes (EDCMs). Commercial membranes for GTR or soluble/reassembled (fibrillar) bovine collagen substrates were used as controls. The three EDCMs were similar among each other in terms of structure and mechanical performances and were much thinner and mechanically more resistant than the commercial membranes. Number of fibroblasts seeded on sea-urchin membranes were comparable to the bovine collagen substrates. Cell morphology on all EDCMs was similar to that of structurally comparable (reassembled) bovine collagen substrates. Overall, echinoderms, and sea urchins particularly, are alternative collagen sources to produce efficient GTR membranes. Sea urchins display a further advantage in terms of eco-sustainability by recycling tissues from food wastes.

  3. Fibrillar Collagen Organization Associated with Broiler Wooden Breast Fibrotic Myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velleman, Sandra G; Clark, Daniel L; Tonniges, Jeffrey R

    2017-12-01

    Wooden breast (WB) is a fibrotic myopathy affecting the pectoralis major (p. major) muscle in fast-growing commercial broiler lines. Birds with WB are phenotypically detected by the palpation of a hard p. major muscle. A primary feature of WB is the fibrosis of muscle with the replacement of muscle fibers with extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen. The ability of a tissue to be pliable and stretch is associated with the organization of collagen fibrils in the connective tissue areas surrounding muscle fiber bundles (perimysium) and around individual muscle fibers (endomysium). The objective of this study was to compare the structure and organization of fibrillar collagen by using transmission electron microscopy in two fast-growing broiler lines (Lines A and B) with incidence of WB to a slower growing broiler Line C with no phenotypically detectable WB. In Line A, the collagen fibrils were tightly packed in a parallel organization, whereas in Line B, the collagen fibrils were randomly aligned. Tightly packed collagen fibrils arranged in parallel are associated with nonpliable collagen that is highly cross-linked. This will lead to a phenotypically hard p. major muscle. In Line C, the fibrillar collagen was sparse in its distribution. Furthermore, the average collagen fibril diameter and banding D-period length were altered in Line A p. major muscles affected with WB. Taken together, these data are suggestive of different fibrotic myopathies beyond just what is classified as WB in fast-growing broiler lines.

  4. Photo-active collagen systems with controlled triple helix architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronci, Giuseppe; Russell, Stephen J.; Wood, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The design of photo-active collagen systems is presented as a basis for establishing biomimetic materials with varied network architecture and programmable macroscopic properties. Following in-house isolation of type I collagen, reaction with vinyl-bearing compounds of varied backbone rigidity, i.e. 4-vinylbenzyl chloride (4VBC) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), was carried out. TNBS colorimetric assay, 1H-NMR and ATR-FTIR confirmed covalent and tunable functionalization of collagen lysines. Depending on the type and extent of functionalization, controlled stability and thermal denaturation of triple helices were observed via circular dichroism (CD), whereby the hydrogen-bonding capability of introduced moieties was shown to play a major role. Full gel formation was observed following photo-activation of functionalized collagen solutions. The presence of a covalent network only slightly affected collagen triple helix conformation (as observed by WAXS and ATR-FTIR), confirming the structural organization of functionalized collagen precursors. Photo-activated hydrogels demonstrated an increased denaturation temperature (DSC) with respect to native collagen, suggesting that the formation of the covalent network successfully stabilized collagen triple helices. Moreover, biocompatibility and mechanical competence of obtained hydrogels were successfully demonstrated under physiologically-relevant conditions. These results demonstrate that this novel synthetic approach enabled the formation of biocompatible collagen systems with defined network architecture and programmable macroscopic properties, which can only partially be obtained with current synthetic methods. PMID:27398214

  5. Resolution of Paraneoplastic Collagenous Enterocolitis after Resection of Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A 52-year-old woman developed severe watery diarrhea, weight loss, anemia and hypoalbuminemia. A localized colon cancer was detected. Subsequently, extensive collagenous mucosal involvement of the small and large intestine was discovered. After resection of the colon cancer, her symptoms resolved. In addition, resolution of the inflammatory process occurred, including the subepithelial collagen deposits. Despite extensive small and large intestinal involvement, both clinical and histological resolution of collagenous inflammatory disease was evident. Collagenous enterocolitis is an inflammatory process that may represent a distinctive and reversible paraneoplastic phenomenon.

  6. Utilization of Chicken By-Products to Form Collagen Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumudini A. Munasinghe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chicken collagen casings could be an alternate source of collagen casings that are manufactured for sausages. The overall objective of this project was to extract chicken collagen from by-products of the broiler processing industries and to explore the possibility of making films. Chicken skin was washed, ground, and pretreated to remove the noncollagenous compounds. Collagen was extracted using acetic acid and pepsin. Solubilized collagen was salted-out and centrifuged at 20,000 ×g at 4°C for one hour. The precipitates were dissolved in 0.5 M acetic acid and dialyzed against 0.1 M acetic acid and distilled water before freeze-drying. Molecular weight, collagen solubility at different pH values, and NaCl concentrations were determined. TA-XT2 texture analyzer was used to characterize mechanical properties of collagen films. The highest collagen solubility was obtained at pH 2 and 2% NaCl. Hand-homogenized, nonfiltered, and conditioned samples had the highest hardness (3,262 g and the least brittleness (30.5 mm. These results demonstrate that chicken collagen extracted from chicken by-products has the ability to form films and could be considered for making casings or be used in various other industries.

  7. The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelholm, Lars H; Ingvarsen, Signe; Jürgensen, Henrik J

    2009-01-01

    The uPAR-associated protein (uPARAP/Endo180), a type-1 membrane protein belonging to the mannose receptor family, is an endocytic receptor for collagen. Through this endocytic function, the protein takes part in a previously unrecognized mechanism of collagen turnover. uPARAP/Endo180 can bind...... and internalize both intact and partially degraded collagens. In some turnover pathways, the function of the receptor probably involves an interplay with certain matrix-degrading proteases whereas, in other physiological processes, redundant mechanisms involving both endocytic and pericellular collagenolysis seem...... in collagen breakdown seems to be involved in invasive tumor growth....

  8. Tendon collagen synthesis declines with immobilization in elderly humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Kasper; Boesen, Anders P; Reitelseder, Søren

    2017-01-01

    -80 yr) were randomly assigned to NSAIDs (ibuprofen 1,200 mg/day; Ibu) or placebo (Plc). One lower limb was immobilized in a cast for 2 wk and retrained for 6 wk. Tendon collagen protein synthesis, mechanical properties, size, expression of genes related to collagen turnover and remodeling, and signal...... intensity (from magnetic resonance imaging) were investigated. Tendon collagen synthesis decreased (P ... immobilization in both groups, whereas scleraxis mRNA decreased with inactivity in the Plc group only (P collagen protein synthesis decreased after 2 wk of immobilization, whereas tendon stiffness and modulus were only marginally reduced, and NSAIDs had no influence upon this...

  9. The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelholm, Lars H; Ingvarsen, Signe; Jürgensen, Henrik J

    2009-01-01

    The uPAR-associated protein (uPARAP/Endo180), a type-1 membrane protein belonging to the mannose receptor family, is an endocytic receptor for collagen. Through this endocytic function, the protein takes part in a previously unrecognized mechanism of collagen turnover. uPARAP/Endo180 can bind...... and internalize both intact and partially degraded collagens. In some turnover pathways, the function of the receptor probably involves an interplay with certain matrix-degrading proteases whereas, in other physiological processes, redundant mechanisms involving both endocytic and pericellular collagenolysis seem...... in collagen breakdown seems to be involved in invasive tumor growth Udgivelsesdato: 2009...

  10. Stabilization and anomalous hydration of collagen fibril under heating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasun G Gevorkian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type I collagen is the most common protein among higher vertebrates. It forms the basis of fibrous connective tissues (tendon, chord, skin, bones and ensures mechanical stability and strength of these tissues. It is known, however, that separate triple-helical collagen macromolecules are unstable at physiological temperatures. We want to understand the mechanism of collagen stability at the intermolecular level. To this end, we study the collagen fibril, an intermediate level in the collagen hierarchy between triple-helical macromolecule and tendon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: When heating a native fibril sample, its Young's modulus decreases in temperature range 20-58°C due to partial denaturation of triple-helices, but it is approximately constant at 58-75°C, because of stabilization by inter-molecular interactions. The stabilization temperature range 58-75°C has two further important features: here the fibril absorbs water under heating and the internal friction displays a peak. We relate these experimental findings to restructuring of collagen triple-helices in fibril. A theoretical description of the experimental results is provided via a generalization of the standard Zimm-Bragg model for the helix-coil transition. It takes into account intermolecular interactions of collagen triple-helices in fibril and describes water adsorption via the Langmuir mechanism. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We uncovered an inter-molecular mechanism that stabilizes the fibril made of unstable collagen macromolecules. This mechanism can be relevant for explaining stability of collagen.

  11. Collagen metabolism in obesity: the effect of weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M H; Jensen, L T; Andersen, T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of obesity, fat distribution and weight loss on collagen turnover using serum concentrations of the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (S-PICP) and the aminoterminal propeptide of type III pro-collagen (S-PIIINP) as markers for collagen turnover...... restriction (P weight loss (r = 0.32; P obesity and associated with body fat distribution, suggesting...... an increased turnover of type III collagen related to obesity in general and to abdominal obesity in particular. S-PIIINP levels decreases during weight loss in obese subjects, whereas S-PICP levels seems un-related to obesity and weight loss....

  12. ELECTRICAL AND THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF A COLLAGEN SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaromír Štancl

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on measurements of the electrical properties, the specific heat capacity and the thermal conductivity of a collagen solution (7.19% mass fraction of native bovine collagen in water. The results of our experiments show that specific electrical conductivity of collagen solution is strongly dependent on temperature. The transition region of collagen to gelatin has been observed from the measured temperature dependence of specific electrical conductivity, and has been confirmed by specific heat capacity measurements by a differential scanning calorimetry.

  13. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Mediates Myosin-Dependent Collagen Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno M. Coelho

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1 is a tyrosine kinase collagen adhesion receptor that mediates cell migration through association with non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA. Because DDR1 is implicated in cancer fibrosis, we hypothesized that DDR1 interacts with NMIIA to enable collagen compaction by traction forces. Mechanical splinting of rat dermal wounds increased DDR1 expression and collagen alignment. In periodontal ligament of DDR1 knockout mice, collagen mechanical reorganization was reduced >30%. Similarly, cultured cells with DDR1 knockdown or expressing kinase-deficient DDR1d showed 50% reduction of aligned collagen. Tractional remodeling of collagen was dependent on DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction of the DDR1 C-terminal kinase domain with NMIIA filaments. Collagen remodeling by traction forces, DDR1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and myosin light chain phosphorylation were increased on stiff versus soft substrates. Thus, DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction with NMIIA filaments enhance the collagen tractional remodeling that is important for collagen compaction in fibrosis.

  14. Small-bowel permeability in collagenous colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Madsen, Jan L; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    Collagenous colitis (CC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that affects the colon. However, some patients with CC present with accompanying pathologic small-bowel manifestations such as coeliac disease, defects in bile acid absorption and histopathologic changes in small-intestinal biopsies......, indicating that CC is a pan-intestinal disease. In small-intestinal disease, the intestinal barrier function may be impaired, and the permeability of the small intestine altered. The purpose of this research was to study small-bowel function in patients with CC as expressed by intestinal permeability....

  15. Injured fingertip remodeling through percutaneous collagen induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Krezdorn

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Scarring at the level of the fingertip can cause major problems and discomfort. We report a case of a professional bass player who suffered impaired functionality of his middle finger after surgical treatment of a felon. We performed a collagen induction therapy after plastic reconstruction of the middle finger’s fingertip with an adipofascial turnover flap and two lateral VY flaps. This resulted in a long-term improvement of the previous symptoms and full functional rehabilitation as musician with an esthetically pleasing result.

  16. Plasma Pro-C3 (N-terminal type III collagen propeptide) predicts fibrosis progression in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette J.; Veidal, Sanne S.; Karsdal, Morten A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Fibrogenesis results in release of certain extracellular matrix protein fragments into the circulation. We evaluated the diagnostic and prognostic performance of two novel serological markers, the precisely cleaved N-terminal propeptide of type III collagen (Pro-C3) and a pepti......, it could differentiate mild from moderate disease. Pro-C3 may become a promising blood parameter be included in future studies for monitoring disease progression and eventually for evaluation of potential antifibrotic therapies....

  17. Fragmentation in massive star formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuther, Henrik; Schilke, Peter

    2004-02-20

    Studies of evolved massive stars indicate that they form in a clustered mode. During the earliest evolutionary stages, these regions are embedded within their natal cores. Here we present high-spatial-resolution interferometric dust continuum observations disentangling the cluster-like structure of a young massive star-forming region. The derived protocluster mass distribution is consistent with the stellar initial mass function. Thus, fragmentation of the initial massive cores may determine the initial mass function and the masses of the final stars. This implies that stars of all masses can form via accretion processes, and coalescence of intermediate-mass protostars appears not to be necessary.

  18. DRAG COEFFICIENTS FOR IRREGULAR FRAGMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    regular fragments.were studied In the report, I.e., a sphere, a c-ibe and a bar. Th.a bar length, 1530) 77= pp. P width and thickness were. in the ratio...measurements for the 96 fragmento are contained in Tables A-1, A-2 and A-3 of Appendix A. The esiential aspects of the vertical wind tunnel are shown...THICKNESS L’ MAXIMUM LENGTH P ..UPS AVERAGE LENGTH W’ M AXIMUM WIDTH PLUS AVERAGE WIDTH T’ M I’XIX1MUM THICKNESS PLUS AVERAIE THICKNESS i -- STANDARO DEVIATION

  19. Effects of fish collagen peptides on collagen post-translational modifications and mineralization in an osteoblastic cell culture system

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Shizuka; Nagaoka, Hideaki; Terajima, Masahiko; Tsuda, Nobuaki; Hayashi, Yoshihiko; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    Collagen is one of the most widely used biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Fish collagen peptides (FCP) have been used as a dietary supplement, but their effects on the cellular function are still poorly understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of FCP on collagen synthesis, quality and mineralization using an osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell culture system. Cells treated with FCP significantly upregulated the gene expression of several colla...

  20. Dihadron fragmentation functions for large invariant mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J; Metz, A

    2011-04-29

    Using perturbative quantum chromodynamics, we compute dihadron fragmentation functions for a large invariant mass of the dihadron pair. The main focus is on the interference fragmentation function H(1)(∢), which plays an important role in spin physics of the nucleon. Our calculation also reveals that H(1)(∢) and the Collins fragmentation function have closely related underlying dynamics. By considering semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, we further show that collinear factorization in terms of dihadron fragmentation functions and collinear factorization in terms of single-hadron fragmentation functions provide the same result in the region of intermediate invariant mass.

  1. Optimal bovine collagen concentration to achieve tracheal epithelial coverage of collagen sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Nakaegawa, Yuta; Nomoto, Yukio; Fujimoto, Ichiro; Semura, Kayoko; Hazama, Akihiro; Omori, Koichi

    2016-12-01

    Artificial tracheas prepared using a collagen sponge and polypropylene mesh have been implanted in patients who received tracheal resections, but epithelialization in the reconstructed area is slow. We determined the optimal bovine atelocollagen concentration necessary for the rapid and complete tracheal epithelial coverage of collagen sponge implants. Preliminary animal experiment. Collagen sponges were prepared using lyophilizing 0.5%, 0.7%, and 1.0% atelocollagen solutions (0.5%, 0.7%, and 1.0% sponges) and were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Partial tracheal defects were prepared in rabbits and reconstructed using sponges. Epithelial regeneration in the reconstructed area was evaluated by endoscopic, histological, and scanning electron microscope analyses. All sponges had a membranous structural framework, and numerous fibrous structures filled the spaces within the framework in the 0.5% sponges. The membranous structure in the 0.7% sponges branched at many points, and intermembrane spaces were frequently observed. Conversely, the membranous structure in the 1.0% sponges was relatively continuous, thick, and closely arranged. Two weeks after implantation, tracheal defects were entirely covered with epithelium in two of the four and three of the four of the 0.5% and 0.7% sponge-implanted rabbits, respectively. The collagen sponges remained exposed to the tracheal lumen in four of the four rabbits in the 1.0% sponge group. Ciliogenesis in the center of the epithelialized region was detected only in the 0.7% sponge group. Collagen sponges prepared from various concentrations of bovine atelocollagen have different structures. Complete epithelial coverage was achieved in more rabbits implanted with sponges prepared using the 0.7% bovine atelocollagen solution than in those implanted with sponges prepared from the 0.5% and 1.0% solutions. NA Laryngoscope, 126:E396-E403, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Exacerbation of collagen induced arthritis by Fcγ receptor targeted collagen peptide due to enhanced inflammatory chemokine and cytokine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szarka E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Eszter Szarka1*, Zsuzsa Neer1*, Péter Balogh2, Monika Ádori1, Adrienn Angyal1, József Prechl3, Endre Kiss1,3, Dorottya Kövesdi1, Gabriella Sármay11Department of Immunology, Eötvös Loránd University, 1117 Budapest, 2Department of Immunology and Biotechnology, University of Pécs, Pécs, 3Immunology Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Science at Eötvös Loránd University, 1117 Budapest, Hungary*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Antibodies specific for bovine type II collagen (CII and Fcγ receptors play a major role in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Our aim was to clarify the mechanism of immune complex-mediated inflammation and modulation of the disease. CII pre-immunized DBA/1 mice were intravenously boosted with extravidin coupled biotinylated monomeric CII-peptide epitope (ARGLTGRPGDA and its complexes with biotinylated FcγRII/III specific single chain Fv (scFv fragment. Disease scores were monitored, antibody titers and cytokines were determined by ELISA, and binding of complexes was detected by flow cytometry and immune histochemistry. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was monitored by protein profiler microarray. When intravenously administered into collagen-primed DBA/1 mice, both CII-peptide and its complex with 2.4G2 scFv significantly accelerated CIA and increased the severity of the disease, whereas the monomeric peptide and monomeric 2.4G2 scFv had no effect. FcγRII/III targeted CII-peptide complexes bound to marginal zone macrophages and dendritic cells, and significantly elevated the synthesis of peptide-specific IgG2a. Furthermore, CII-peptide containing complexes augmented the in vivo secretion of cytokines, including IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, IL-23, and chemokines (CXCL13, MIP-1, MIP-2. These data indicate that complexes formed by the CII-peptide epitope aggravate CIA by inducing the secretion of chemokines and the IL-12/23 family of pro

  3. Microstructural and Mechanical Differences Between Digested Collagen-Fibrin Co-Gels and Pure Collagen and Fibrin Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Victor K.; Frey, Christina R.; Kerandi, Allan M.; Lake, Spencer P.; Tranquillo, Robert T.; Barocas, Victor H.

    2012-01-01

    Collagen and fibrin are important extra-cellular matrix (ECM) components in the body, providing structural integrity to various tissues. These biopolymers are also common scaffolds used in tissue engineering. This study investigated how co-gelation of collagen and fibrin affected the properties of each individual protein network. Collagen-fibrin co-gels were cast and subsequently digested using either plasmin or collagenase; the microstructure and mechanical behavior of the resulting networks were then compared with respective pure collagen or fibrin gels of the same protein concentration. The morphologies of the collagen networks were further analyzed via 3-D network reconstruction from confocal image z-stacks. Both collagen and fibrin exhibited a decrease in mean fiber diameter when formed in the co-gels compared to the pure gels; this microstructural change was accompanied by increased failure strain and decreased tangent modulus for both collagen and fibrin following selected digestion of the co-gels. In addition, analysis of the reconstructed collagen networks indicated presence of very long fibers and clustering of fibrils, resulting in very high connectivities for collagen networks formed in co-gels. PMID:22828381

  4. Ameloblasts express type I collagen during amelogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaraf-Weill, N; Gasse, B; Silvent, J; Bardet, C; Sire, J Y; Davit-Béal, T

    2014-05-01

    Enamel and enameloid, the highly mineralized tooth-covering tissues in living vertebrates, are different in their matrix composition. Enamel, a unique product of ameloblasts, principally contains enamel matrix proteins (EMPs), while enameloid possesses collagen fibrils and probably receives contributions from both odontoblasts and ameloblasts. Here we focused on type I collagen (COL1A1) and amelogenin (AMEL) gene expression during enameloid and enamel formation throughout ontogeny in the caudate amphibian, Pleurodeles waltl. In this model, pre-metamorphic teeth possess enameloid and enamel, while post-metamorphic teeth possess enamel only. In first-generation teeth, qPCR and in situ hybridization (ISH) on sections revealed that ameloblasts weakly expressed AMEL during late-stage enameloid formation, while expression strongly increased during enamel deposition. Using ISH, we identified COL1A1 transcripts in ameloblasts and odontoblasts during enameloid formation. COL1A1 expression in ameloblasts gradually decreased and was no longer detected after metamorphosis. The transition from enameloid-rich to enamel-rich teeth could be related to a switch in ameloblast activity from COL1A1 to AMEL synthesis. P. waltl therefore appears to be an appropriate animal model for the study of the processes involved during enameloid-to-enamel transition, especially because similar events probably occurred in various lineages during vertebrate evolution.

  5. Platelet affinity for burro aorta collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.D.

    1977-10-01

    Despite ingenious concepts, there are no unequivocal clues as to what, when, and how some undefined biochemical factor(s) or constituent(s) that localizes in the arterial wall can precipitate a thromboatheromatous lesion or arterial disease. The present study focused on the extraction, partial purification, and characterization of a collagen-active platelet stimulator from the aortas of aged burros. The aggregator moiety in the aorta extracts invariably had a higher affinity for platelets in citrated platelet-rich plasma of human beings than for platelets of homologous burros. The platelet-aggregating factor(s) in the aorta extract was retained by incubation with ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin. Platelet-aggregating activity was rapidly abolished after incubation with collagenase, as determined by platelet-aggregometry tests. Evidence based on light microscope and polysaccharide histochemical reactions indicates a probability that the intracellular amorphous matrix (PAS-positive) and filamentous components (PTAH-positive) expelled from smooth muscle cells disrupted during homogenization of the aorta may be a principal source of a precursor collagen species which is a potent inducer of platelet aggregation.

  6. Optimal management of collagenous colitis: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Toole A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aoibhlinn O’TooleDepartment of Gastroenterology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland Abstract: Collagenous colitis (CC is an increasingly recognized cause of chronic inflammatory bowel disease characterized by watery non-bloody diarrhea. As a lesser studied inflammatory bowel disease, many aspects of the CC's natural history are poorly understood. This review discusses strategies to optimally manage CC. The goal of therapy is to induce clinical remission, <3 stools a day or <1 watery stool a day with subsequent improved quality of life (QOL. Antidiarrheal can be used as monotherapy or with other medications to control diarrhea. Budesonide therapy has revolutionized treatment and is superior to prednisone, however, the treatment is associated with high-relapse rates and the management of refractory disease is challenging. Ongoing trials will address the safety and efficacy of low-dose maintenance therapy. For those with refractory disease, case reports and case series support the role of biologic agents. Diversion of the fecal stream normalizes colonic mucosal changes and ileostomy may be considered where anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α agents are contraindicated. Underlying celiac disease, bile salt diarrhea, and associated thyroid dysfunction should be ruled out. The author recommends smoking cessation as well as avoidance of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories as well as other associated medications. Keywords: microscopic, collagenous, lymphocytic, colitis, diarrhea, budesonide, inflammatory bowel disease

  7. Reframing landscape fragmentation's effects on ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Matthew G E; Suarez-Castro, Andrés F; Martinez-Harms, Maria; Maron, Martine; McAlpine, Clive; Gaston, Kevin J; Johansen, Kasper; Rhodes, Jonathan R

    2015-04-01

    Landscape structure and fragmentation have important effects on ecosystem services, with a common assumption being that fragmentation reduces service provision. This is based on fragmentation's expected effects on ecosystem service supply, but ignores how fragmentation influences the flow of services to people. Here we develop a new conceptual framework that explicitly considers the links between landscape fragmentation, the supply of services, and the flow of services to people. We argue that fragmentation's effects on ecosystem service flow can be positive or negative, and use our framework to construct testable hypotheses about the effects of fragmentation on final ecosystem service provision. Empirical efforts to apply and test this framework are critical to improving landscape management for multiple ecosystem services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The formation of planets by disc fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatellos Dimitris

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available I discuss the role that disc fragmentation plays in the formation of gas giant and terrestrial planets, and how this relates to the formation of brown dwarfs and low-mass stars, and ultimately to the process of star formation. Protostellar discs may fragment, if they are massive enough and can cool fast enough, but most of the objects that form by fragmentation are brown dwarfs. It may be possible that planets also form, if the mass growth of a proto-fragment is stopped (e.g. if this fragment is ejected from the disc, or suppressed and even reversed (e.g by tidal stripping. I will discuss if it is possible to distinguish whether a planet has formed by disc fragmentation or core accretion, and mention of a few examples of observed exoplanets that are suggestive of formation by disc fragmentation.

  9. Comparison between the collagen intensity and mast cell density in the lingual muscles and myocardium of autopsied chronic chagasic and nonchagasic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldão, José A; Beghini, Marcela; Ramalho, Luciana S; Porto, Carla Souza; Rodrigues, Denise B R; Teixeira, Vicente P A; de Lima Pereira, Sanívia A

    2012-08-01

    In chronic Chagas' disease (CD), an increase in collagen intensity and mast cell density has been described individually in the myocardium and tongue muscles. The aim of this study was to compare the percentage of collagen, mast cell tryptase (MCT) density, and mast cell chymase (MCH) density in the lingual muscles and myocardium from autopsied chagasic (CP) and nonchagasic patients (NCP). The selected cases were divided into two groups: (1) CP (n = 10) and (2) NCP (n = 10). Fragments were removed from the tongue and heart. After histological processing, the slices were stained with picrosirius, and immunohistochemistry was performed for MCH and MCT. The CP group showed the highest MCH and MCT densities and the highest percentage of collagen in the lingual muscles and myocardium when compared with the NCP group (p myocardium of the CP group. Although there are no reports in the literature of MCT and MCH in CD, its higher densities as well as higher percentage of collagen were found in the lingual muscles and myocardium in the CP group, suggesting that tryptase and chymase are associated with the pathogenesis of CD in these organs. Furthermore, the positive and significant correlation between the percentage of collagen and MCH density in the myocardium of the CP group suggests that the chymase is associated with fibrosis in CD, as demonstrated in other diseases.

  10. Sleep fragmentation in canine narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaitin, K I; Kilduff, T S; Dement, W C

    1986-01-01

    Genetically narcoleptic dogs were recorded continuously for 24 h to examine their sleep-wake patterns and to evaluate the extent of sleep fragmentation. Three narcoleptic and three control dogs from each of two affected breeds (Labrador retrievers and Doberman pinschers) were surgically implanted with electrodes for recording standard sleep parameters. Recordings were scored in 30-s epochs for the states of active waking, drowsiness, light sleep, deep slow wave sleep, REM sleep, and cataplexy. All affected dogs displayed marked fragmentation and disruption of the sleep-wake cycle characterized by repeated awakenings, frequent shifts in sleep stages, numerous attacks of cataplexy occurring from active waking, and a disturbance of the normal REM-NREM periodicity. This sleep disruption was reflected in significantly greater numbers of episodes of each behavioral state as well as in a 38% increase in the total number of all states. These results demonstrate a severe disturbance of the normal sleep pattern in canine narcoleptics. The possibility of a general dysfunction of circadian organization is discussed.

  11. Preparation and characterization of porous crosslinked collagenous matrices containing bioavailable chondroitin sulphate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, J.S.; Oosterhof, A.; Dijkstra, Pieter J.; Veerkamp, J.H.; van Kuppevelt, T.H.

    1999-01-01

    Porous collagen matrices with defined physical, chemical and biological characteristics are interesting materials for tissue engineering. Attachment of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) may add to these characteristics and valorize collagen. In this study, porous type I collagen matrices were crosslinked

  12. Collagen-curcumin interaction-A physico-chemical study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results suggest that significant changes in viscosity and surface tension occur on collagen interacting with curcumin. Secondary structure analysis using circular dichroism shows that curcumin does not alter the triple helical structure of collagen. Increasing concentration of curcumin resulted in aggregation of the protein.

  13. Fish collagen is an important panallergen in the Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Y; Akiyama, H; Huge, J; Kubota, H; Chikazawa, S; Satoh, T; Miyake, T; Uhara, H; Okuyama, R; Nakagawara, R; Aihara, M; Hamada-Sato, N

    2016-05-01

    Collagen was identified as a fish allergen in early 2000s. Although its allergenic potential has been suggested to be low, risks associated with collagen as a fish allergen have not been evaluated to a greater extent. In this study, we aimed to clarify the importance of collagen as a fish allergen. Our results showed that 50% of Japanese patients with fish allergy had immunoglobulin E (IgE) against mackerel collagen, whereas 44% had IgE against mackerel parvalbumin. IgE inhibition assay revealed high cross-reactivity of mackerel collagen to 22 fish species (inhibition rates: 87-98%). Furthermore, a recently developed allergy test demonstrated that collagen triggered IgE cross-linking on mast cells. These data indicate that fish collagen is an important and very common panallergen in fish consumed in Japan. The high rate of individuals' collagen allergy may be attributable to the traditional Japanese custom of raw fish consumption. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Pyridinium cross-links in heritable disorders of collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquali, M.; Still, M.J.; Dembure, P.P. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders of collagen that is characterized by skin fragility, skin hyperextensibility, and joint hypermobility. EDS type VI is caused by impaired collagen lysyl hydroxylase (procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase; E.C.1.14.11.4), the ascorbate-dependent enzyme that hydroxylates lysyl residues on collagen neopeptides. Different alterations in the gene for collagen lysyl hydroxylase have been reported in families with EDS type VI. In EDS type VI, impairment of collagen lysyl hydroxylase results in a low hydroxylysine content in mature collagen. Hydroxylysine is a precursor of the stable, covalent, intermolecular cross-links of collagen, pyridinoline (Pyr), and deoxypyridinoline (Dpyr). Elsewhere we reported in preliminary form that patients with EDS type VI had a distinctive alteration in the urinary excretion of Pyr and Dpyr. In the present study, we confirm that the increased Dpyr/Pyr ratio is specific for EDS type VI and is not observed in other inherited or acquired collagen disorders. In addition, we find that skin from patients with EDS type VI has reduced Pyr and increased Dpyr, which could account for the organ pathology. 19 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Metabolic and inflammatory faecal markers in collagenous colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Nordgaard-Lassen, Inge; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the excretion of the inflammatory and metabolic faecal markers calprotectin, lactoferrin, and short-chain fatty acids in symptomatic and quiescent collagenous colitis.......To evaluate the excretion of the inflammatory and metabolic faecal markers calprotectin, lactoferrin, and short-chain fatty acids in symptomatic and quiescent collagenous colitis....

  16. Effect of Mechanical Stretching of the Skin on Collagen Fibril ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stabilization of collagen fibres during development and through growth to maturation has now become fairly documented. In vitro effect of mechanical stretching of ratsf skin on oxidative deamination of ε-NH2-groups of lysine and hydroxylysine, and functional properties of its type . collagen were studied. Experiments were ...

  17. The role of collagen in determining bone mechanical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.; Bank, R.A.; teKoppele, J.M.; Mauli Agrawal, C.

    2001-01-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that collagen denaturation would lead to a significant decrease in the toughness of bone, but has little effect on the stiffness of bone. Using a heating model, effects of collagen denaturation on the biomechanical properties of human cadaveric bone were examined.

  18. Collagenous colitis as a possible cause of toxic megacolon.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, S C

    2009-03-01

    Collagenous colitis is a microscopic colitis characterized by normal appearing colonic mucosa on endoscopy. It is regarded as a clinically benign disease which rarely results in serious complications. We report a case of toxic megacolon occurring in a patient with collagenous colitis. This is the first reported case of toxic megacolon occurring in this subset of patients.

  19. Enhanced physicochemical properties of collagen by using EDC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. The necessity of bone substitutes for wound healing has promoted development of the biomimetic bone biomateri- als. Collagen, therefore, becomes a popular biomaterial for this purpose due to its compatibility. The desired properties of collagen which facilitates wound-healing processes are stimulation of cell ...

  20. Human cornea modeling using artificial collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Bukanina, V.; Khokhlov, A.; Lovetskiy, K.

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on spectrophotometric analysis of thin films of synthetic collagen with subsequent use of the received data to recover the optical properties of collagen and modeling a multilayer optical structure similar to the properties of human cornea.

  1. Arrangement of collagen fibers in human placental stem villi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sati, Leyla; Demir, Ayse Yasemin; Sarikcioglu, Levent; Demir, Ramazan

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the arrangements and related localization patterns of different collagen types in the stroma of placental stem villi by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. A total of 14 normal human term placental tissue samples were studied. Immunohistochemistry was performed in order to localize collagen types I, III, IV, V and cytokeratin 7 on tissue sections. Parallel tissue samples were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Semi-quantitative analysis of immunolabeling intensities was also performed to determine the distribution of fibers in stem villi stroma. All collagen types, especially collagen type V, were strongly immunopositive in the triangular areas of the stem villi stroma. However, there was no collagen type I or type III immunolabeling in the sub-trophoblastic regions. Membrane collagen type IV immunolabeling was also observed in the stroma of stem villi. Ultrastructurally, collagen fibers showed different configurations in cross, longitudinal, circular, oblique and parallel directions compared to the villous axis. We conclude that the organization of collagen fiber bundles in stem villi shows a very specific arrangement: a compact coat formed by fibrillar bundles between the vascular wall and extravascular stroma of stem villi correlated with the functional activity.

  2. Distribution of different collagen types and fibronectin in neurofibromatosis tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, J; Aho, H; Halme, T; Näntö-Salonen, K; Lehto, M; Foidart, J M; Duance, V; Vaheri, A; Penttinen, R

    1984-09-01

    Collagen types I, III, IV and V and fibronectin were localized in neurofibromas from six patients with von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis (NF) using indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and peroxidase anti-peroxidase (PAP) techniques. Type I and III collagens were abundantly and rather evenly present in the tumours and formed a continuous network, but were absent from the capillary endothelial walls and were sparse in the perineurium of the occasional nerve fascicles. The type III/type I + type III collagen ratio in neurofibromas varied from 17.4% to 37.3% when estimated with cyanogen bromide peptide analysis. Fibronectin was detected in areas where type I and III collagens were present but was most intensively stained in the vascular walls and perineurium. Type IV collagen was detected at the dermo-epidermal junction of the skin overlying the tumours, in the endothelial cells of the capillaries, the perineurium and endoneurium. Furthermore, in the tumourous stroma there was plenty of type IV collagen appearing as a discontinuous patchy pattern suggesting abundant basement membrane material associated with cells forming the tumours. Type V collagen distribution was very similar to that of type IV collagen.

  3. Extraction, structural and physical characterization of type I collagen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The acid soluble collagen (ASC) and pepsin soluble collagen (PSC) were extracted from the outer skin of Sepiella inermis and further characterized partially. The yield of ASC was low (0.58% on dry weight basis); whereas the yield of PSC was comparatively more (16.23% on dry weight basis). The protein content in ASC ...

  4. Collagen a natural scaffold for biology and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collagen, the most abundant protein in mammals, constitutes a quarter of the animal's total weight. The unique structure of fibrous collagens, a long triple helix that further associates into fibers, provides an insoluble scaffold that gives strength and form to the skin, tendons, bones, cornea and...

  5. Collagen levels are normalized after decompression of experimentally obstructed colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehn, Martin; Ågren, Sven Per Magnus; Syk, I

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to define the dynamics in collagen concentrations in the large bowel wall following decompression of experimental obstruction.......Our aim was to define the dynamics in collagen concentrations in the large bowel wall following decompression of experimental obstruction....

  6. Regional Mechanics Determine Collagen Fiber Structure in Healing Myocardial Infarcts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomovsky, Gregory M.; Rouillard, Andrew D.; Holmes, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction, the mechanical properties of the healing infarct are an important determinant of heart function and the risk of progression to heart failure. In particular, mechanical anisotropy (having different mechanical properties in different directions) in the healing infarct can preserve pump function of the heart. Based on reports of different collagen structures and mechanical properties in various animal models, we hypothesized that differences in infarct size, shape, and/or location produce different patterns of mechanical stretch that guide evolving collagen fiber structure. We tested the effects of infarct shape and location using a combined experimental and computational approach. We studied mechanics and collagen fiber structure in cryoinfarcts in 53 Sprague-Dawley rats and found that regardless of shape or orientation, cryoinfarcts near the equator of the left ventricle stretched primarily in the circumferential direction and developed circumferentially aligned collagen, while infarcts at the apex stretched similarly in the circumferential and longitudinal direction and developed randomly oriented collagen. In a computational model of infarct healing, an effect of mechanical stretch on fibroblast and collagen alignment was required to reproduce the experimental results. We conclude that mechanical environment determines collagen fiber structure in healing myocardial infarcts. Our results suggest that emerging post-infarction therapies that alter regional mechanics will also alter infarct collagen structure, offering both potential risks and novel therapeutic opportunities. PMID:22418281

  7. The collagen microfibril model, a tool for biomaterials scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animal hides, a major byproduct of the meat industry, are a rich source of collagen, a structural protein of the extracellular matrix that gives strength and form to the skin, tendons and bones of mammals. The structure of fibrous collagen, a long triple helix that self-associates in a staggered arr...

  8. Enzymatic Breakdown of Type II Collagen in the Human Vitreous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deemter, Marielle; Pas, Hendri H.; Kuijer, Roel; van der Worp, Roelofje J.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.; Los, Leonoor I.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE. To investigate whether enzymatic collagen breakdown is an active process in the human vitreous. METHODS. Human donor eyes were used for immunohistochemistry to detect the possible presence of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-induced type II collagen breakdown product col2-3/4C-short in

  9. Colorful protein-based fluorescent probes for collagen imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stijn J A Aper

    Full Text Available Real-time visualization of collagen is important in studies on tissue formation and remodeling in the research fields of developmental biology and tissue engineering. Our group has previously reported on a fluorescent probe for the specific imaging of collagen in live tissue in situ, consisting of the native collagen binding protein CNA35 labeled with fluorescent dye Oregon Green 488 (CNA35-OG488. The CNA35-OG488 probe has become widely used for collagen imaging. To allow for the use of CNA35-based probes in a broader range of applications, we here present a toolbox of six genetically-encoded collagen probes which are fusions of CNA35 to fluorescent proteins that span the visible spectrum: mTurquoise2, EGFP, mAmetrine, LSSmOrange, tdTomato and mCherry. While CNA35-OG488 requires a chemical conjugation step for labeling with the fluorescent dye, these protein-based probes can be easily produced in high yields by expression in E. coli and purified in one step using Ni2+-affinity chromatography. The probes all bind specifically to collagen, both in vitro and in porcine pericardial tissue. Some first applications of the probes are shown in multicolor imaging of engineered tissue and two-photon imaging of collagen in human skin. The fully-genetic encoding of the new probes makes them easily accessible to all scientists interested in collagen formation and remodeling.

  10. Effect of UV irradiation on type I collagen fibril formation in neutral collagen solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menter, J M; Patta, A M; Sayre, R M; Dowdy, J; Willis, I

    2001-06-01

    Collagens have the well-known ability to spontaneously self-associate to form fibrils at physiological temperature and neutral pH in vitro and in vivo. Because solar UV may photochemically alter collagen, the kinetics of fibril formation may be modified. Thus, we have begun a systematic study of the effect of various UV wavebands on fibril formation. Citrate-soluble calf skin collagen (Elastin Products) was dissolved at 0.05% in 0.5 M HOAc, dialyzed over 2 days into two changes of 0.0327 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.0 at 4 degrees C, and centrifuged at 48,000 x g. Photolysis was carried out at 4 degrees C with either (a) UVC (UVG-11 lamp), (b) filtered solar-simulating radiation (SSR) or UVA (SSR or UVL-21 lamp filtered with a 2.0 mm Schott WG 345 filter). Gelation was commenced by rapidly raising the temperature from 8 degrees C to 33 degrees C. Nucleation and growth were followed by turbidimetric measurements at 400 nm. UVC radiation (0-17.3 J/cm2) resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the rate of fibril growth. Under these conditions, concomitant collagen crosslinking and degradation occurred. Fibril nucleation, a prerequisite for growth, was rapid (threshold approximately 2 min) and was not affected by UVC, UVA or SSR. SSR (0-1,320 J/cm2) caused a small decrease in growth rate and in the degree of fibril formation. UVA radiation (0-1,080 J/cm2) had a similar effect. "Direct" photochemical damage thus paralleled absorption via various collagen chromophores, with UVC>SSR approximately UVA. The presence of riboflavin (RF) resulted in groundstate interactions that markedly altered both nucleation and growth kinetics. Irradiation with 29.6 J/ cm2 UVA in the presence of RF photosensitizer caused relatively minor additional changes in fibrillation kinetics. These results collectively indicate that fibril formation is markedly dependent on specific ground state interactions and relatively insensitive to nonspecific UV damage. On the other hand, fibrils thus formed from

  11. Helicase-like transcription factor (Hltf regulates G2/M transition, Wt1/Gata4/Hif-1a cardiac transcription networks, and collagen biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Helmer

    fragmented. Thus, silencing Hltf during heart organogenesis compromised DNA double-strand break repair, and caused aberrant collagen biogenesis altering the structural network that transmits cardiomyocyte force into muscle contraction.

  12. Single chain Fab (scFab fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Mariam

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The connection of the variable part of the heavy chain (VH and and the variable part of the light chain (VL by a peptide linker to form a consecutive polypeptide chain (single chain antibody, scFv was a breakthrough for the functional production of antibody fragments in Escherichia coli. Being double the size of fragment variable (Fv fragments and requiring assembly of two independent polypeptide chains, functional Fab fragments are usually produced with significantly lower yields in E. coli. An antibody design combining stability and assay compatibility of the fragment antigen binding (Fab with high level bacterial expression of single chain Fv fragments would be desirable. The desired antibody fragment should be both suitable for expression as soluble antibody in E. coli and antibody phage display. Results Here, we demonstrate that the introduction of a polypeptide linker between the fragment difficult (Fd and the light chain (LC, resulting in the formation of a single chain Fab fragment (scFab, can lead to improved production of functional molecules. We tested the impact of various linker designs and modifications of the constant regions on both phage display efficiency and the yield of soluble antibody fragments. A scFab variant without cysteins (scFabΔC connecting the constant part 1 of the heavy chain (CH1 and the constant part of the light chain (CL were best suited for phage display and production of soluble antibody fragments. Beside the expression system E. coli, the new antibody format was also expressed in Pichia pastoris. Monovalent and divalent fragments (DiFabodies as well as multimers were characterised. Conclusion A new antibody design offers the generation of bivalent Fab derivates for antibody phage display and production of soluble antibody fragments. This antibody format is of particular value for high throughput proteome binder generation projects, due to the avidity effect and the possible use of

  13. Collagen-derived markers of bone metabolism in osteogenesis imperfecta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, A M; Hansen, M; Kollerup, Gina Birgitte

    1998-01-01

    Markers of bone formation [C-terminal and N-terminal propeptides of procollagen I (PICP, PINP), osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase] and bone resorption [C-terminal cross-linked telopeptide of collagen I (ICTP) and hydroxypyridinium cross-links, pyridinoline (Pyr) and deoxypyridinoline (Dpyr......)] were measured in 78 osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) patients to investigate bone metabolism in vivo and relate marker concentrations to phenotype and in vitro collagen I defects, as shown by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). PICP and PINP were generally low......, and the serum levels were lower in all children and adults with mild OI and a quantitative collagen defect than in patients with severe OI and a qualitative collagen I defect. ICTP, Pyr and Dpyr were generally normal or reduced, but elevated in severely affected adults with a qualitative collagen I defect...

  14. Self assembled silicon nanowire Schottky junction assisted by collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stievenard, Didier; Sahli, Billel; Coffinier, Yannick; Boukherroub, Rabah; Melnyk, Oleg

    2008-03-01

    We present results on self assembled silicon nanowire Schottky junction assisted by collagen fibrous. The collagen is the principle protein of connective human tissues. It presents the double interest to be a low cost biological material with the possibility to be combed as the DNA molecule. First, the collagen was combed on OTS modified surface with gold electrodes. Second, silicon nanowires were grown on silicon substrate by CVD of silane gas (SiH4) at high temperature (500 C) using a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process and gold particles as catalysts. In order to increase electrostatic interaction between the collagen and the nanowires, these latters were chemically modified by mercaptopropylmethoxysilane (MPTS), then chemically oxidized. Therefore, the nanowires were transferred from their substrate into water and a drop of it deposited on the surface. Nanowires are only bound to collagen and in particular, in electrode gaps. The formation of spontaneous Schotkty junction is demonstrated by current-voltage characteristics.

  15. Photo-active collagen systems with controlled triple helix architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Tronci, Giuseppe; Wood, David J

    2013-01-01

    The design of photo-active collagen systems is presented as a basis for establishing biomimetic materials with varied network architecture and programmable macroscopic properties. Following in-house isolation of type I collagen, reaction with vinyl-bearing compounds of varied backbone rigidity, i.e. 4-vinylbenzyl chloride (4VBC) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), was carried out. TNBS colorimetric assay, 1H-NMR and ATR-FTIR confirmed covalent and tunable functionalization of collagen lysines. Depending on the type and extent of functionalization, controlled stability and thermal denaturation of triple helices were observed via circular dichroism (CD), whereby the hydrogen-bonding capability of introduced moieties was shown to play a major role. Full gel formation was observed following photo-activation of functionalized collagen solutions. The presence of a covalent network only slightly affected collagen triple helix conformation (as observed by WAXS and ATR-FTIR), confirming the structural organization of fun...

  16. New analysis of the phylogenetic change of collagen thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burjanadze, T V

    2000-05-01

    Recent data concerning the thermostability and the primary structure of type IV collagens, some invertebrate collagens, and for the stability of synthetic collagen-like polypeptides, show that our earlier analysis of the phylogenetic change of thermostability has some shortcomings. The results of the analysis were corrected and it has been shown that the dependence of denaturation temperature Td on 4-hydroxyproline content is hyperbolic and the total Gly-Pro-Hyp sequence content is a main, but not exclusive, factor influencing the change of collagen thermostability. It appears possible that the same mechanism underlies the thermostability of fibril-forming collagens of all animal life, ranging from Antarctic ice fish to at least one annelid (Alvinella pompejana) living at very high temperatures at the bottom of the ocean near thermal vents.

  17. The effect of various avocado oils on skin collagen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werman, M J; Mokady, S; Nimni, M E; Neeman, I

    1991-01-01

    The effects of various avocado oils on collagen metabolism in skin were studied in growing rats fed diets containing 10% (w/w) of the tested oils. Rats fed the unrefined avocado oil extracted with hexane from the intact fruit, its unsaponifiables or the avocado seed oil, showed significant increases in soluble collagen content in skin, though total collagen content was not affected. The increased soluble collagen content appears to be a consequence of the inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity. The active factor was found to be present in the unrefined avocado oil and probably originated from the avocado seed, since collagen metabolism was affected only by fractions which contained lipids fraction from the seed. In comparison rats fed the refined or unrefined soybean oils showed no effects.

  18. Expression and distribution of type VI collagen in gynecomastia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzafame, S; Magro, G; Colombatti, A

    1994-06-01

    We investigated the distribution of type VI collagen in 36 cases of routinely fixed and paraffin-embedded gynecomastia using an immunoperoxidase method for light microscopic visualization. Four samples of normal male mammary gland tissue were also included as controls. A protease predigestion was essential for the visualization of this extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoprotein. In normal male breast, no immunoreaction for type VI collagen was detected in the stroma surrounding the ducts. Gynecomastia was classified into three histological types: florid (type I), fibrous (type II), and intermediate (type III). Type VI collagen was differentially expressed in the periductal stroma of all types. This collagen was markedly expressed at the early disease stage (type I) when the periductal stroma is highly cellular and vascular. Its expression decreased when periductal stroma undergoing fibrotic transformation (type III) and completely disappeared from the dense periductal stroma of fibrous stage (type II). These findings suggest that type VI collagen is involved in the ECM remodelling occurring in gynecomastia.

  19. Collagen matrix as a tool in studying fibroblastic cell behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanta, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is a fibrillar protein, a member of a large family of collagen proteins. It is present in most body tissues, usually in combination with other collagens and other components of extracellular matrix. Its synthesis is increased in various pathological situations, in healing wounds, in fibrotic tissues and in many tumors. After extraction from collagen-rich tissues it is widely used in studies of cell behavior, especially those of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Cells cultured in a classical way, on planar plastic dishes, lack the third dimension that is characteristic of body tissues. Collagen I forms gel at neutral pH and may become a basis of a 3D matrix that better mimics conditions in tissue than plastic dishes. PMID:25734486

  20. Cervical Collagen Concentration within Fifteen Months after Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundtoft, Iben; Uldbjerg, Niels; Sommer, Steffe

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cervical collagen concentration decreases during pregnancy. The increased risk of preterm birth following a short interpregnancy interval may be explained by an incomplete remodeling of the cervix. The objective of this study was to describe the changes in cervical collagen concentration...... over 15 months following delivery. METHODS: The collagen concentrations were determined in cervical biopsies obtained from 15 women at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 months after delivery. RESULTS: The mean cervical collagen concentrations were 50, 59, 63, 65, and 65 % of dry weight (SD 4.2 – 6.5). This increase...... was statistically significant until month 9, but not between months 9 and 12. CONCLUSIONS: Low collagen concentrations in the uterine cervix may contribute to the association between a short interpregnancy interval and preterm birth....

  1. Second-harmonic generation imaging of collagen in ancient bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Second-harmonic generation imaging (SHG captures triple helical collagen molecules near tissue surfaces. Biomedical research routinely utilizes various imaging software packages to quantify SHG signals for collagen content and distribution estimates in modern tissue samples including bone. For the first time using SHG, samples of modern, medieval, and ice age bones were imaged to test the applicability of SHG to ancient bone from a variety of ages, settings, and taxa. Four independent techniques including Raman spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, radiocarbon dating protocols, and mass spectrometry-based protein sequencing, confirm the presence of protein, consistent with the hypothesis that SHG imaging detects ancient bone collagen. These results suggest that future studies have the potential to use SHG imaging to provide new insights into the composition of ancient bone, to characterize ancient bone disorders, to investigate collagen preservation within and between various taxa, and to monitor collagen decay regimes in different depositional environments.

  2. [Moisture sorption of gelatin powder and collagen fibers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boki, K; Kawasaki, N; Minami, K

    1994-09-01

    Moisture sorption properties of gelatin powder and collagen fibers were investigated on the basis of the moisture sorption isotherm, the differential heat of moisture sorption, the decrease in entropy of moisture sorption and the parameter constants of the applicable isotherm equation. The amount of moisture sorbed on collagen fibers was larger than that on gelatin powder. The water molecules were absorbed on gelatin itself rather than on the active sites of gelatin. They were adsorbed on the polar groups of constitutive amino acids at amounts of moisture sorbed up to one or two monolayers and then were absorbed into collagen fibers at higher monolayers. They were kept loosely in gelatin and tightly in collagen. The structural stability of collagen to moisture was higher than that of gelatin.

  3. Fragmentation in Carbon Therapy Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Charara, Y M

    2010-01-01

    The state of the art Monte Carlo code HETC-HEDS was used to simulate spallation products, secondary neutron, and secondary proton production in A-150 Tissue Equivalent Plastic phantoms to investigate fragmentation of carbon therapy beams. For a 356 MeV/Nucleon carbon ion beam, production of charged particles heavier than protons was 0.24 spallation products per incident carbon ion with atomic numbers ranging from 1 through 5 (hydrogen to boron). In addition, there were 4.73 neutrons and 2.95 protons produced per incident carbon ion. Furthermore, as the incident energy increases, the neutron production rate increases at a rate of 20% per 10 MeV/nucleon. Secondary protons were created at a rate between 2.62-2.87 per carbon ion, while spallation products were created at a rate between 0.20-0.24 per carbon ion.

  4. Fluid fragmentation from hospital toilets

    CERN Document Server

    Traverso, G; Lu, C -C; Maa, R; Langer, R; Bourouiba, L

    2013-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections represent significant health and financial burdens to society. Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a particularly challenging bacteria with the potential to cause severe diarrhea and death. One mode of transmission for C. difficile, as well as other pathogens, which has received little attention is the potential air contamination by pathogen-bearing droplets emanating from toilets. In the fluid dynamics video submitted to the APS DFD Gallery of Fluid Motion 2013, we present flow visualizations via high-speed recordings showing the capture of the product of the fluid fragmentation generated by hospital toilet high-pressure flushes. Important quantities of both large and small droplets are observed. We illustrate how high-pressure flushes and cleaning products currently used in hospital toilets result in aggravating, rather than alleviating, the suspension and recirculation of tenacious airborne pathogen-bearing droplets.

  5. High yield DNA fragmentation using cyclical hydrodynamic shearing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shui, Lingling; Sparreboom, Wouter; Spang, Peter; Roeser, Tina; Nieto, Benjamin; Guasch, Francesc; Corbera, Antoni Homs; van den Berg, Albert; Carlen, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    We report a new DNA fragmentation technique that significantly simplifies conventional hydrodynamic shearing fragmentation by eliminating the need for sample recirculation while maintaining high fragmentation yield and low fragment length variation, and therefore, reduces instrument complexity and

  6. Incorporation of Collagen in Calcium Phosphate Cements for Controlling Osseointegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsien Hu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effect of supplementing a non-dispersive dicalcium phosphate-rich calcium phosphate bone cement (DCP-rich CPC with type I collagen on in vitro cellular activities and its performance as a bone graft material. Varying amounts of type I collagen were added during the preparation of the DCP-rich CPC. In vitro cell adhesion, morphology, viability, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity were evaluated using progenitor bone cells. Bone graft performance was evaluated via a rat posterolateral lumbar fusion model and osteointegration of the implant. New bone formations in the restorative sites were assessed by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT and histological analysis. We found that the incorporation of collagen into the DCP-rich CPC was associated with increased cell adhesion, cell viability, and ALP activity in vitro. The spinal fusion model revealed a significant increase in bone regeneration. Additionally, better osseointegration was observed between the host bone and graft with the DCP-rich CPC supplemented with collagen than with the collagen-free DCP-rich CPC control graft. Furthermore, compared to the control graft, the results of micro-CT showed that a smaller amount of residual material was observed with the collagen-containing DCP-rich CPC graft compared with the control graft, which suggests the collagen supplement enhanced new bone formation. Of the different mixtures evaluated in this study (0.8 g DCP-rich CPC supplemented with 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mL type I collagen, respectively, DCP-rich CPC supplemented with 0.4 mL collagen led to the highest level of osteogenesis. Our results suggest that the DCP-rich CPC supplemented with collagen has potential to be used as an effective bone graft material in spinal surgery.

  7. Compression therapy affects collagen type balance in hypertrophic scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejiram, Shawn; Zhang, Jenny; Travis, Taryn E; Carney, Bonnie C; Alkhalil, Abdulnaser; Moffatt, Lauren T; Johnson, Laura S; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    2016-04-01

    The effects of pressure on hypertrophic scar are poorly understood. Decreased extracellular matrix deposition is hypothesized to contribute to changes observed after pressure therapy. To examine this further, collagen composition was analyzed in a model of pressure therapy in hypertrophic scar. Hypertrophic scars created on red Duroc swine (n = 8) received pressure treatment (pressure device mounting and delivery at 30 mm Hg), sham treatment (device mounting and no delivery), or no treatment for 2 wk. Scars were assessed weekly and biopsied for histology, hydroxyproline quantification, and gene expression analysis. Transcription levels of collagen precursors COL1A2 and COL3A1 were quantified using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Masson trichrome was used for general collagen quantification, whereas immunofluorescence was used for collagen types I and III specific quantification. Total collagen quantification using hydroxyproline assay showed a 51.9% decrease after pressure initiation. Masson trichrome staining showed less collagen after 1 (P < 0.03) and 2 wk (P < 0.002) of pressure application compared with sham and untreated scars. Collagen 1A2 and 3A1 transcript decreased by 41.9- and 42.3-fold, respectively, compared with uninjured skin after pressure treatment, whereas a 2.3- and 1.3-fold increase was seen in untreated scars. This decrease was seen in immunofluorescence staining for collagen types I (P < 0.001) and III (P < 0.04) compared with pretreated levels. Pressure-treated scars also had lower levels of collagen I and III after pressure treatment (P < 0.05) compared with sham and untreated scars. These results demonstrate the modulation of collagen after pressure therapy and further characterize its role in scar formation and therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Lysyl oxidases regulate fibrillar collagen remodelling in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive scarring disease of the lung with few effective therapeutic options. Structural remodelling of the extracellular matrix [i.e. collagen cross-linking mediated by the lysyl oxidase (LO) family of enzymes (LOX, LOXL1-4)] might contribute to disease pathogenesis and represent a therapeutic target. This study aimed to further our understanding of the mechanisms by which LO inhibitors might improve lung fibrosis. Lung tissues from IPF and non-IPF subjects were examined for collagen structure (second harmonic generation imaging) and LO gene (microarray analysis) and protein (immunohistochemistry and western blotting) levels. Functional effects (collagen structure and tissue stiffness using atomic force microscopy) of LO inhibitors on collagen remodelling were examined in two models, collagen hydrogels and decellularized human lung matrices. LOXL1/LOXL2 gene expression and protein levels were increased in IPF versus non-IPF. Increased collagen fibril thickness in IPF versus non-IPF lung tissues correlated with increased LOXL1/LOXL2, and decreased LOX, protein expression. β-Aminoproprionitrile (β-APN; pan-LO inhibitor) but not Compound A (LOXL2-specific inhibitor) interfered with transforming growth factor-β-induced collagen remodelling in both models. The β-APN treatment group was tested further, and β-APN was found to interfere with stiffening in the decellularized matrix model. LOXL1 activity might drive collagen remodelling in IPF lungs. The interrelationship between collagen structural remodelling and LOs is disrupted in IPF lungs. Inhibition of LO activity alleviates fibrosis by limiting fibrillar collagen cross-linking, thereby potentially impeding the formation of a pathological microenvironment in IPF. PMID:29125826

  9. Lysyl oxidases regulate fibrillar collagen remodelling in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjin, Gavin; White, Eric S; Faiz, Alen; Sicard, Delphine; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Mahar, Annabelle; Kable, Eleanor P W; Burgess, Janette K

    2017-11-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive scarring disease of the lung with few effective therapeutic options. Structural remodelling of the extracellular matrix [i.e. collagen cross-linking mediated by the lysyl oxidase (LO) family of enzymes (LOX, LOXL1-4)] might contribute to disease pathogenesis and represent a therapeutic target. This study aimed to further our understanding of the mechanisms by which LO inhibitors might improve lung fibrosis. Lung tissues from IPF and non-IPF subjects were examined for collagen structure (second harmonic generation imaging) and LO gene (microarray analysis) and protein (immunohistochemistry and western blotting) levels. Functional effects (collagen structure and tissue stiffness using atomic force microscopy) of LO inhibitors on collagen remodelling were examined in two models, collagen hydrogels and decellularized human lung matrices. LOXL1/LOXL2 gene expression and protein levels were increased in IPF versus non-IPF. Increased collagen fibril thickness in IPF versus non-IPF lung tissues correlated with increased LOXL1/LOXL2, and decreased LOX, protein expression. β-Aminoproprionitrile (β-APN; pan-LO inhibitor) but not Compound A (LOXL2-specific inhibitor) interfered with transforming growth factor-β-induced collagen remodelling in both models. The β-APN treatment group was tested further, and β-APN was found to interfere with stiffening in the decellularized matrix model. LOXL1 activity might drive collagen remodelling in IPF lungs. The interrelationship between collagen structural remodelling and LOs is disrupted in IPF lungs. Inhibition of LO activity alleviates fibrosis by limiting fibrillar collagen cross-linking, thereby potentially impeding the formation of a pathological microenvironment in IPF. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Hydroxyl radical modification of collagen type II increases its arthritogenicity and immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahab, Uzma; Ahmad, Saheem; Moinuddin; Dixit, Kiran; Habib, Safia; Alam, Khursheed; Ali, Asif

    2012-01-01

    The oxidation of proteins by endogenously generated free radicals causes structural modifications in the molecules that lead to generation of neo-antigenic epitopes that have implications in various autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in rodents (rats and mice) is an accepted experimental model for RA. Hydroxyl radicals were generated by the Fenton reaction. Collagen type II (CII) was modified by •OH radical (CII-OH) and analysed by ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS), fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The immunogenicity of native and modified CII was checked in female Lewis rats and specificity of the induced antibodies was ascertained by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The extent of CIA was evaluated by visual inspection. We also estimated the oxidative and inflammatory markers in the sera of immunized rats. A slight change in the triple helical structure of CII as well as fragmentation was observed after hydroxyl radical modification. The modified CII was found to be highly arthritogenic and immunogenic as compared to the native form. The CII-OH immunized rats exhibited increased oxidative stress and inflammation as compared to the CII immunized rats in the control group. Neo-antigenic epitopes were generated on (•)OH modified CII which rendered it highly immunogenic and arthritogenic as compared to the unmodified form. Since the rodent CIA model shares many features with human RA, these results illuminate the role of free radicals in human RA.

  11. Electrospun Collagen: A Tissue Engineering Scaffold with Unique Functional Properties in a Wide Variety of Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balendu Shekhar Jha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type I collagen and gelatin, a derivative of Type I collagen that has been denatured, can each be electrospun into tissue engineering scaffolds composed of nano- to micron-scale diameter fibers. We characterize the biological activity of these materials in a variety of tissue engineering applications, including endothelial cell-scaffold interactions, the onset of bone mineralization, dermal reconstruction, and the fabrication of skeletal muscle prosthetics. Electrospun collgen (esC consistently exhibited unique biological properties in these functional assays. Even though gelatin can be spun into fibrillar scaffolds that resemble scaffolds of esC, our assays reveal that electrospun gelatin (esG lacks intact α chains and is composed of proinflammatory peptide fragments. In contrast, esC retains intact α chains and is enriched in the α 2(I subunit. The distinct fundamental properties of the constituent subunits that make up esC and esG appear to define their biological and functional properties.

  12. Hydroxyl radical modification of collagen type II increases its arthritogenicity and immunogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzma Shahab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The oxidation of proteins by endogenously generated free radicals causes structural modifications in the molecules that lead to generation of neo-antigenic epitopes that have implications in various autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA in rodents (rats and mice is an accepted experimental model for RA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hydroxyl radicals were generated by the Fenton reaction. Collagen type II (CII was modified by •OH radical (CII-OH and analysed by ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy. The immunogenicity of native and modified CII was checked in female Lewis rats and specificity of the induced antibodies was ascertained by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The extent of CIA was evaluated by visual inspection. We also estimated the oxidative and inflammatory markers in the sera of immunized rats. A slight change in the triple helical structure of CII as well as fragmentation was observed after hydroxyl radical modification. The modified CII was found to be highly arthritogenic and immunogenic as compared to the native form. The CII-OH immunized rats exhibited increased oxidative stress and inflammation as compared to the CII immunized rats in the control group. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Neo-antigenic epitopes were generated on (•OH modified CII which rendered it highly immunogenic and arthritogenic as compared to the unmodified form. Since the rodent CIA model shares many features with human RA, these results illuminate the role of free radicals in human RA.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibits collagen synthesis independent of collagen-modifying enzymes in different chondrocyte populations and dermal fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, Lucienne A.; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Huang, Chun-Ling; Helder, Marco N.; Everts, Vincent; Bank, Ruud A.

    Chondrocytes respond to glucose deprivation with a decreased collagen synthesis due to disruption of a proper functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER): ER stress. Since the mechanisms involved in the decreased synthesis are unknown, we have investigated whether chaperones and collagen-modifying

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibits collagen synthesis independent of collagen-modifying enzymes in different chondrocyte populations and dermal fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, L.A.; Doulabi, B.Z.; Huang, C.L.; Helder, M.N.; Everts, V.; Bank, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Chondrocytes respond to glucose deprivation with a decreased collagen synthesis due to disruption of a proper functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER): ER stress. Since the mechanisms involved in the decreased synthesis are unknown, we have investigated whether chaperones and collagen-modifying

  15. Picrosirius red staining assessment of collagen after dermal roller application: A minimally invasive percutaneous collagen induction therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma El-Zahraa Salah El-Deen Yassin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Percutaneous collagen induction (PCI through dermal roller breaks old collagen strands, promotes removal of damaged collagen and induces more collagen formation. Collagen fibers can be assessed by traditional stains or by polarized light assessment of Picrosirius red stain. Objective: The purpose of the current study is the clinical and histopathological evaluation of percutaneous collagen formation in atrophic acne scars after dermal roller application. Patients and Methods: Total study duration was 26 weeks in which 12 patients received seven sessions of PCI at 3-weeks interval, 3 mm punch biopsy specimens of scars were obtained before and after treatment (at 18 and 26 weeks. Microscopic examination of pre and post operative biopsies were done, using routine stains and Picrosirius red stain. Results: PCI induced notable improvement in the appearance of acne scars with significant reduction in the score from 123.3 ± 24.5 to 74.16 ± 16.49 (P = 0.00 after 26 weeks. Polarized light assessment of Picrosirius red stain clarified the gradual replacement of old thick orange-red birefringent collagen fibers by newly synthesized thin green-yellow birefringent ones postoperatively. Conclusion: Skin needling is a simple and minimally invasive procedure. The polarized light assessment of Picrosirius red stain clarified the change of the optical properties of collagen fibers according to the maturation process.

  16. Small-bowel permeability in collagenous colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Madsen, Jan L; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Collagenous colitis (CC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that affects the colon. However, some patients with CC present with accompanying pathologic small-bowel manifestations such as coeliac disease, defects in bile acid absorption and histopathologic changes in small...... permeability. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten patients with CC and chronic diarrhoea participated in the study. Coeliac disease was excluded by small-bowel biopsy and/or serology. Intestinal permeability was assessed as urinary excretion (ratios) 2, 4 and 6 h after ingestion of 14C-labelled mannitol (14C......-intestinal biopsies, indicating that CC is a pan-intestinal disease. In small-intestinal disease, the intestinal barrier function may be impaired, and the permeability of the small intestine altered. The purpose of this research was to study small-bowel function in patients with CC as expressed by intestinal...

  17. [Treatment of keratoconus by collagen cross linking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollensak, G; Spörl, E; Seiler, T

    2003-01-01

    We were able to show a significant increase in corneal stiffness of rabbit and porcine eyes after combined riboflavin/UVA-induced collagen cross-linking. In this study,we tried to treat keratoconus patients with this method to stop the progression of corneal ectasia. We treated 16 eyes of 15 patients with progressive keratoconus and mostly moderate keratectasia (48-56 dpt). After removal of the epithelium (7 mm X), riboflavin solution was applied on the cornea, which was irradiated with UVA (370 nm,3 mW/cm(2)) at a distance of 1 cm for 30 min.Post-operative follow-up controls were conducted every 3 months in the first year and then every 6 months, always including visual acuity testing, corneal topography and measurements of endothelial cell density. The follow-up time was between 1 and 3 years. Progression of keratectasia was stopped in all patients. Best corrected visual acuity and the maximal keratometry values improved slightly in about 50% of the cases. In all patients corneal transparency, the degree of keratectasia registered by corneal topography and the density of endothelial cells remained unchanged within the follow-up time. No negative side-effects were observed. Our results show that collagen cross linking might be a useful conservative treatment modality to stop the progression of keratoconus. By this means the need for keratoplasty might be significantly reduced. Given the simplicity of the technique and minimal costs of the treatment it might also be well suited for developing countries.Further studies are envisaged to exclude long-term side effects and to evaluate the long term durability of the mechanical stiffness effect.

  18. High-strength mineralized collagen artificial bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Tao, Chun-Sheng; Cui, Helen; Wang, Chang-Ming; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2014-03-01

    Mineralized collagen (MC) is a biomimetic material that mimics natural bone matrix in terms of both chemical composition and microstructure. The biomimetic MC possesses good biocompatibility and osteogenic activity, and is capable of guiding bone regeneration as being used for bone defect repair. However, mechanical strength of existing MC artificial bone is too low to provide effective support at human load-bearing sites, so it can only be used for the repair at non-load-bearing sites, such as bone defect filling, bone graft augmentation, and so on. In the present study, a high strength MC artificial bone material was developed by using collagen as the template for the biomimetic mineralization of the calcium phosphate, and then followed by a cold compression molding process with a certain pressure. The appearance and density of the dense MC were similar to those of natural cortical bone, and the phase composition was in conformity with that of animal's cortical bone demonstrated by XRD. Mechanical properties were tested and results showed that the compressive strength was comparable to human cortical bone, while the compressive modulus was as low as human cancellous bone. Such high strength was able to provide effective mechanical support for bone defect repair at human load-bearing sites, and the low compressive modulus can help avoid stress shielding in the application of bone regeneration. Both in vitro cell experiments and in vivo implantation assay demonstrated good biocompatibility of the material, and in vivo stability evaluation indicated that this high-strength MC artificial bone could provide long-term effective mechanical support at human load-bearing sites.

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Collagen and Antioxidant Collagen Peptides from Scales of Croceine Croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Acid soluble collagen (ASC from scales of croceine croaker (ASC-C was successfully isolated with the yield of 0.37% ± 0.08% (dry weight basis, and characterized as type I collagen on the basis of amino acid analysis and electrophoretic pattern. The antioxidant hydrolysate of ASC-C (ACH was prepared through a two-stage in vitro digestion (4-h trypsin followed by 4-h pepsin, and three antioxidant peptides (ACH-P1, ACH-P2, and ACH-P3 were further isolated from ACH using ultrafiltration, gel chromatography, and RP-HPLC, and their amino acid sequences were identified as GFRGTIGLVG (ACH-P1, GPAGPAG (ACH-P2, and GFPSG (ACH-P3. ACH-P1, ACH-P2, and ACH-P3 showed good scavenging activities on hydroxyl radical (IC50 0.293, 0.240, and 0.107 mg/mL, respectively, DPPH radical (IC50 1.271, 0.675, and 0.283 mg/mL, respectively, superoxide radical (IC50 0.463, 0.099, and 0.151 mg/mL, respectively, and ABTS radical (IC50 0.421, 0.309, and 0.210 mg/mL, respectively. ACH-P3 was also effectively against lipid peroxidation in the model system. The antioxidant activities of three collagen peptides were due to the presence of hydrophobic amino acid residues within the peptide sequences. The collagen peptides might be used as antioxidant for the therapy of diseases associated with oxidative stress, or reducing oxidative changes during storage.

  20. Visualisation of Collagen in fixed skeletal muscle tissue using fluorescently tagged Collagen binding protein CNA35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadkhah, Melika; Simms, Ciaran K; Murphy, Paula

    2017-02-01

    Detection and visualisation of Collagen structure are important to understand the relationship between mechanical behaviour and microstructure in skeletal muscle since Collagen is the main structural protein in animal connective tissues, and is primarily responsible for their passive load-bearing properties. In the current study, the direct detection and visualization of Collagen using fluorescently tagged CNA35 binding protein (fused to EGFP or tdTomato) is reported for the first time on fixed skeletal muscle tissue. This Technical Note also establishes a working protocol by examining tissue preparation, dilution factor, exposure time etc. for sensitivity and specificity. Penetration of the binding protein into intact mature skeletal muscle was found to be very limited, but detection works well on tissue sections with higher sensitivity on wax embedded sections compared to frozen sections. CNA35 fused to tdTomato has a higher sensitivity than CNA35 fused to EGFP but both show specific detection. Best results were obtained with 15μm wax embedded sections, with blocking of non-specific binding in 1% BSA and antigen retrieval in Sodium Citrate. There was a play-off between dilution of the binding protein and time of incubation but both CNA35-tdTomato and CNA35-EGFP worked well with approximately 100μg/ml of purified protein with overnight incubation, while CNA35-tdTomato could be utilized at 5 fold less concentration. This approach can be applied to study the relationship between skeletal muscle micro-structure and to observe mechanical response to applied deformation. It can be used more broadly to detect Collagen in a variety of fixed tissues, useful for structure-functions studies, constitutive modelling, tissue engineering and assessment of muscle tissue pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Filter for interpretation of fragmentation during entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-10-01

    Objects that fragment cascade and decelerate abruptly, producing short, bright, signatures which can be used to estimate object diameter and speed. Other objects can be incorporated into a generalized fragmentation filter. This note summarizes the results of previous reports on the prediction and inversion of signatures from objects that radiate, ablate, and fragment during entry and uses them to produce models for the parameters of entering objects.

  2. Interaction of three fission fragments and yields of various ternary fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, V. Yu.; Pilipenko, N. A.; Sedykh, I. Yu.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction potential energy of the three deformed fragments formed in fission of 252Cf is studied for various combinations of three-fragment fission. The lowest height of the potential energy ridge between three touching and separated deformed fragments is sought. The excitation energies of various three-deformed-fragment configurations, at the lowest barrier heights related to the yield of the corresponding configuration, are considered in detail. The most probable three-fragment fission configurations are discussed. The yields of various ternary fragments in fission of 250Cf agree well with available experimental data.

  3. Electronic Predetermination of Ethylene Fragmentation Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Xie

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally investigate the dependence of the fragmentation behavior of the ethylene dication on the intensity and duration of the laser pulses that initiate the fragmentation dynamics by strong-field double ionization. Using coincidence momentum imaging for the detection of ionic fragments, we disentangle the different contributions of ionization from lower-valence orbitals and field-driven excitation dynamics to the population of certain dissociative excited ionic states that are connected to one of several possible fragmentation pathways towards a given set of fragment ions. We find that the excitation probability to a particular excited state and therewith the outcome of the fragmentation reaction strongly depend on the parameters of the laser pulse. This, in turn, opens up new possibilities for controlling the outcome of fragmentation reactions of polyatomic molecules in that it may allow one to selectively enhance or suppress individual fragmentation channels, which was not possible in previous attempts of controlling fragmentation processes of polyatomic molecules with strong laser fields.

  4. Molecular energies from an incremental fragmentation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitei, Oinam Romesh; Heßelmann, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    The systematic molecular fragmentation method by Collins and Deev [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 104104 (2006)] has been used to calculate total energies and relative conformational energies for a number of small and extended molecular systems. In contrast to the original approach by Collins, we have tested the accuracy of the fragmentation method by utilising an incremental scheme in which the energies at the lowest level of the fragmentation are calculated on an accurate quantum chemistry level while lower-cost methods are used to correct the low-level energies through a high-level fragmentation. In this work, the fragment energies at the lowest level of fragmentation were calculated using the random-phase approximation (RPA) and two recently developed extensions to the RPA while the incremental corrections at higher levels of the fragmentation were calculated using standard density functional theory (DFT) methods. The complete incremental fragmentation method has been shown to reproduce the supermolecule results with a very good accuracy, almost independent on the molecular type, size, or type of decomposition. The fragmentation method has also been used in conjunction with the DFT-SAPT (symmetry-adapted perturbation theory) method which enables a breakdown of the total nonbonding energy contributions into individual interaction energy terms. Finally, the potential problems of the method connected with the use of capping hydrogen atoms are analysed and two possible solutions are supplied.

  5. Collagen/Polypropylene composite mesh biocompatibility in abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasiewicz, Aleksander; Skopinska-Wisniewska, Joanna; Marszalek, Andrzej; Molski, Stanislaw; Drewa, Tomasz

    2013-05-01

    Intraperitoneal placement of polypropylene mesh leads to extensive visceral adhesions and is contraindicated. Different coatings are used to improve polypropylene mesh properties. Collagen is a protein with unique biocompatibility and cell ingrowth enhancement potential. A novel acetic acid extracted collagen coating was developed to allow placement of polypropylene mesh in direct contact with viscera. The authors' aim was to evaluate the long-term influence of acetic acid extracted collagen coating on surgical aspects and biomechanical properties of polypropylene mesh implanted in direct contact with viscera, including complications, adhesions with viscera, strength of incorporation, and microscopic inflammatory reaction. Forty adult Wistar rats were divided into two groups: experimental (polypropylene mesh/acetic acid extracted collagen coating) and control (polypropylene mesh only). Astandardized procedure of mesh implantation was performed. Animals were killed 3 months after surgery and analyzed for complications, mesh area covered by adhesions, type of adhesions, strength of incorporation, and intensity of inflammatory response. The mean adhesion area was lower for polypropylene mesh/acetic acid extracted collagen coating (14.5 percent versus 69.9 percent, p polypropylene mesh are significantly reduced because of acetic acid extracted collagen coating. The collagen coating does not increase complications or induce alterations of polypropylene mesh incorporation.

  6. Extraction and Characterization of Collagen from Sea Cucumber Flesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sea cucumber (Stichopus variegatus is one of the Echinodermata phylum that grows along Indonesian coastal. Sea cucumber is potential source of collagen. The purposes of this research were to determine the optimal concentration of NaOH and CH3COOH solution in collagen production and analyze the physicochemical characteristics of collagen from S. variegatus. Yield of the collagen was 1.5% (based on wet weight basis, produced by pretreatment with NaOH 0,30%, hydrolysis with CH3COOH 0.10% and extracted using distilled water. Protein, moisture, and ash content of the collagen was 67.68%, 13.64%, and 4.15%, respectively. Collagen was extracted using distilled water at 45°C during 2h and still had triple helix structure ; pH 7.37 ; melting temperature 163.67°C and whiteness 69.25%. The major amino acid content of collagen were glycine, alanine, proline and glutamic acid.

  7. Imaging cells in three-dimensional collagen matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artym, Vira V; Matsumoto, Kazue

    2010-09-01

    The use of in vitro three-dimensional (3-D) collagen matrices to mimic an in vivo cellular environment has become increasingly popular and is broadening our understanding of cellular processes and cell-ECM interactions. To study cells in in vitro 3-D collagen matrices, both cellular proteins and the collagen matrix must be visualized. In this unit, the authors describe the protocol and provide troubleshooting for immunolabeling of cells in 3-D collagen gels to localize and visualize cellular proteins with high-resolution fluorescence confocal microscopy. The authors then describe confocal reflection microscopy as a technique for direct imaging of 3-D fibrillar collagen matrices by discussing the advantages and disadvantages of the technique. They also provide instrument settings required for simultaneous imaging of cellular proteins with fluorescence confocal imaging and 3-D collagen fibrils with confocal reflection microscopy. Additionally, the authors provide protocols for a "cell sandwiching" technique to prepare cell cultures in 3-D collagen matrices required for high-resolution confocal imaging. © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Osteocalcin/fibronectin-functionalized collagen matrices for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S G; Lee, D S; Lee, S; Jang, J-H

    2015-06-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein found in the extracellular matrix and is widely used to build scaffolds for biomedical applications which are the result of its biocompatibility and biodegradability. In the present study, we constructed a rhOCN/FNIII9-10 fusion protein and rhOCN/FNIII9-10-functionalized collagen matrices and investigated the potential value for bone tissue engineering. In vitro studies carried out with preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells showed that rhOCN/FNIII9-10 fusion protein promoted cell adhesion and the mRNA levels of osteogenic markers including osteocalcin, runt-related transcription factor 2, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and collagen type I. In addition, rhOCN/FNIII9-10-functionalized collagen matrices showed significant induction of the ALP activity more than rhFNIII9-10-functionalized collagen matrices or collagen matrices alone. These results suggested that rhOCN/FNIII9-10-functionalized collagen matrices have potential for bone tissue engineering. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Distribution of types I, II, III, IV and V collagen in normal and keratoconus corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayasu, K; Tanaka, M; Konomi, H; Hayashi, T

    1986-01-01

    By using type-specific antibodies to types I, II, III, IV and V collagens, distribution of distinct types of collagen in normal human cornea as well as keratoconus cornea were examined by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. In normal human cornea, immunohistochemical evidence supported the previous biochemical finding that type I collagen was the major type of collagen in human corneal stroma. No reaction was observed to anti-type II collagen antibody in the whole cornea. Anti-type III collagen antibody reacted with the corneal stroma in a similar fashion as that of anti-type I collagen antibody. Type IV collagen was observed in the basement membrane of the corneal epithelium and in Descemet's membrane. Anti-type V collagen antibody also reacted with the corneal stroma diffusely. Bowman's membrane was strongly stained only with he anti-type V collagen antibody. For further details of the distribution of type I, type III and V collagens in human corneal stroma, immunoelectron microscopic study was undertaken. The positive reaction products of anti-type I and anti-type III collagen antibodies were located on the collagen fibrils, while that of anti-type V collagen antibody was either on or close to collagen fibrils. In keratoconus cornea, no difference was observed in terms of the distribution of type I, III and V collagens, while the disruptive and excrescent distribution of type IV collagen was noted in the basement membrane of the corneal epithelium.

  10. Collagen-like proteins in pathogenic E. coli strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelanjana Ghosh

    Full Text Available The genome sequences of enterohaemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 strains show multiple open-reading frames with collagen-like sequences that are absent from the common laboratory strain K-12. These putative collagens are included in prophages embedded in O157:H7 genomes. These prophages carry numerous genes related to strain virulence and have been shown to be inducible and capable of disseminating virulence factors by horizontal gene transfer. We have cloned two collagen-like proteins from E. coli O157:H7 into a laboratory strain and analysed the structure and conformation of the recombinant proteins and several of their constituting domains by a variety of spectroscopic, biophysical, and electron microscopy techniques. We show that these molecules exhibit many of the characteristics of vertebrate collagens, including trimer formation and the presence of a collagen triple helical domain. They also contain a C-terminal trimerization domain, and a trimeric α-helical coiled-coil domain with an unusual amino acid sequence almost completely lacking leucine, valine or isoleucine residues. Intriguingly, these molecules show high thermal stability, with the collagen domain being more stable than those of vertebrate fibrillar collagens, which are much longer and post-translationally modified. Under the electron microscope, collagen-like proteins from E. coli O157:H7 show a dumbbell shape, with two globular domains joined by a hinged stalk. This morphology is consistent with their likely role as trimeric phage side-tail proteins that participate in the attachment of phage particles to E. coli target cells, either directly or through assembly with other phage tail proteins. Thus, collagen-like proteins in enterohaemorrhagic E. coli genomes may have a direct role in the dissemination of virulence-related genes through infection of harmless strains by induced bacteriophages.

  11. Collagen synthesized in fluorocarbon polymer implant in the rabbit cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drubaix, I; Legeais, J M; Malek-Chehire, N; Savoldelli, M; Ménasche, M; Robert, L; Renard, G; Pouliquen, Y

    1996-04-01

    The integration of microporous polymer into tissues is of great interest for the production of keratoprosthetic devices. Our previous studies showed functional differentiated cells and collagen synthesis in the pore of an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene implant. This study identifies and quantifies collagen types synthesized in the implant. Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene polymers were implanted in the rabbit corneas. The collagen extracted from the polymer and implanted stroma after 1, 3 and 6 months was quantified by measuring hydroxyproline. The relative proportions of collagen types were determined by densitometric analysis after SDS-PAGE. The collagen-to-protein ratio in the polymer increased from 0.22 to 0.70 between the first and third month after implantation becoming similar to control cornea. So that of the protein and collagen densities in the polymer and implanted stroma were similar to the control from the third month. The collagen synthesized in the polymer was mainly type I (87%) plus a small amount of type III (8%) 1 month after implantation. The collagen distribution from the third month after implantation was similar to that of the controls and remained constant thereafter in the polymer implant and in the implanted stroma. Immunogold labelling techniques confirmed these results. Implantation of this PTFE disc induced no obvious modification of the corneal stroma, confirming that this polymer is a good interface that is compatible with the native corneal stroma. The keratocytes in this polymer rapidly adopted a corneal phenotype, distinct from the dermal or scaring phenotype as shown by the collagen types produced in the implant.

  12. Collagen: A review on its sources and potential cosmetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila Rodríguez, María Isabela; Rodríguez Barroso, Laura G; Sánchez, Mirna Lorena

    2018-02-01

    Collagen is a fibrillar protein that conforms the conjunctive and connective tissues in the human body, essentially skin, joints, and bones. This molecule is one of the most abundant in many of the living organisms due to its connective role in biological structures. Due to its abundance, strength and its directly proportional relation with skin aging, collagen has gained great interest in the cosmetic industry. It has been established that the collagen fibers are damaged with the pass of time, losing thickness and strength which has been strongly related with skin aging phenomena [Colágeno para todo. 60 y más. 2016. http://www.revista60ymas.es/InterPresent1/groups/revistas/documents/binario/ses330informe.pdf.]. As a solution, the cosmetic industry incorporated collagen as an ingredient of different treatments to enhance the user youth and well-being, and some common presentations are creams, nutritional supplement for bone and cartilage regeneration, vascular and cardiac reconstruction, skin replacement, and augmentation of soft skin among others [J App Pharm Sci. 2015;5:123-127]. Nowadays, the biomolecule can be obtained by extraction from natural sources such as plants and animals or by recombinant protein production systems including yeast, bacteria, mammalian cells, insects or plants, or artificial fibrils that mimic collagen characteristics like the artificial polymer commercially named as KOD. Because of its increased use, its market size is valued over USD 6.63 billion by 2025 [Collagen Market By Source (Bovine, Porcine, Poultry, Marine), Product (Gelatin, Hydrolyzed Collagen), Application (Food & Beverages, Healthcare, Cosmetics), By Region, And Segment Forecasts, 2014 - 2025. Grand View Research. http://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/collagen-market. Published 2017.]. Nevertheless, there has been little effort on identifying which collagen types are the most suitable for cosmetic purposes, for which the present review will try to enlighten

  13. Decoupling habitat fragmentation from habitat loss: butterfly species mobility obscures fragmentation effects in a naturally fragmented landscape of lake islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Zachary G; Anderson, Iraleigh D; Acorn, John H; Nielsen, Scott E

    2018-01-01

    Since the publication of the theory of island biogeography, ecologists have postulated that fragmentation of continuous habitat presents a prominent threat to species diversity. However, negative fragmentation effects may be artifacts; the result of species diversity declining with habitat loss, and habitat loss correlating positively with degree of fragmentation. In this study, we used butterfly assemblages on islands of Lake of the Woods, Ontario, Canada to decouple habitat fragmentation from habitat loss and test two competing hypotheses: (1) the island effect hypothesis, which predicts that decreasing fragment size and increasing fragment isolation reduces species diversity beyond the effects of habitat loss, and (2) the habitat amount hypothesis, which negates fragmentation effects and predicts that only total habitat area determines the diversity of species persisting on fragmented landscapes. Using eight independent size classes of islands (ranging from 0.1 to 8.0 ha) that varied in number of islands while holding total area constant, species diversity comparisons, species accumulation curves, and species-area relationship extrapolations demonstrated that smaller insular habitats contained at least as many butterfly species as continuous habitat. However, when highly mobile species occurring on islands without their larval food plants were excluded from analyses, island effects on potentially reproducing species became apparent. Similarily, generalized linear models suggested that effects of island isolation and vascular plant richness on insular butterfly richness were confounded by species of high mobility. We conclude that inter-fragment movements of highly mobile species may obscure important fragmentation effects on potentially reproducing populations, questioning support for the habitat amount hypothesis.

  14. Measurement of skeletal muscle collagen breakdown by microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, B F; Ellis, D; Robinson, M M

    2011-01-01

    Exercise increases the synthesis of collagen in the extracellular matrix of skeletal muscle. Breakdown of skeletal muscle collagen has not yet been determined because of technical limitations. The purpose of the present study was to use local sampling to determine skeletal muscle collagen breakdown......, healthy male subjects performed a bout of resistance exercise with one leg, followed 17–21 h later by in vivo skeletal muscle sampling by microdialysis in exercised (EX) and control (CON) legs. Microdialysis reliably predicted [OHP] in vitro (R2=0.90). Analysis with GC–MS was strongly correlated...... to traditional analysis methods (CON: slope=1.03, R2=0.896, and Pskeletal muscle...

  15. FRAGMENTATION OF CONTINENTAL UNITES STATES FORESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report a multiple-scale analysis of forest fragmentation based on 30-m land-cover maps for the conterminous United States. Each 0.09-ha unit of forest was classified according to fragmentation indices measured within the surrounding landscape, for five landscape sizes from 2....

  16. Generalized Fragmentation Functions for Fractal Jet Observables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elder, B.T.; Procura, M.; Thaler, J.; Waalewijn, W.J.; Zhou, K.

    We introduce a broad class of fractal jet observables that recursively probe the collective properties of hadrons produced in jet fragmentation. To describe these collinear-unsafe observables, we generalize the formalism of fragmentation functions, which are important objects in QCD for calculating

  17. INTERMITTENCY, A TEST FOR STRING FRAGMENTATION PROCESSES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHOLTEN, O

    The Artru-Mennessier and the string fragmentation procedure as implemented in the code VENUS have been compared. The two fragmentation prescriptions predict a similar rapidity spectrum including its energy dependence and event multiplicities, but give rise to very different intermittency results.

  18. Fragmentation of eastern United States forest types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt H. Riitters; John W. Coulston

    2013-01-01

    Fragmentation is a continuing threat to the sustainability of forests in the Eastern United States, where land use changes supporting a growing human population are the primary driver of forest fragmentation (Stein and others 2009). While once mostly forested, approximately 40 percent of the original forest area has been converted to other land uses, and most of the...

  19. Pollen and gene flow in fragmented habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwak, Manja M.; Velterop, Odilia; van Andel, Jelte

    . Habitat fragmentation affects both plants and pollinators. Habitat fragmentation leads to changes in species richness, population number and size, density, and shape, thus to changes in the spatial arrangement of flowers. These changes influence the amount of food for flower-visiting insects and

  20. Long-term effects of fragmentation and fragment properties on bird species richness in Hawaiian forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Flaspohler; Christian P. Giardina; Gregory P. Asner; Patrick Hart; Jonathan Price; Cassie Ka’apu Lyons; Xeronimo. Castaneda

    2010-01-01

    Forest fragmentation is a common disturbance affecting biological diversity, yet the impacts of fragmentation on many forest processes remain poorly understood. Forest restoration is likely to be more successful when it proceeds with an understanding of how native and exotic vertebrates utilize forest patches of different size. We used a system of forest fragments...

  1. Simulation analysis of effects of single fragment size on air-blast wave and fragment propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHENG Hongwei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] This paper involves the propagation and attenuation of the velocity and energy of air-blast waves and high-velocity fragments while taking their combined effects into account.[Methods] With ANSYS/LS-DYNA software, a simulation model of a columnar TNT air blast is built with prefabricated fragments affixed to its end. When the total quality of fragments is constant, the effects of a single fragment's size on the propagation of the air-blast wave and fragments are studied by changing the size of the single fragment.[Results] The results show that fragments greatly reduce the intensity and velocity of a shockwave, and block the air-blast waves behind them. When the total quality of the fragments remains constant, the effects of single fragment size on blast shockwave propagation characteristics show little difference. The smaller the single fragment, the more kinetic energy the fragments will have and the faster that energy will dissipate.[Conclusions] As a result, more attention should be paid to the combined effects of air-blast waves and high-velocity fragments. Such research can provide reference points for the deeper study of blast loads and their interaction.

  2. Diquark Fragmentation Contribution in Λ b Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osati, T.; Movlanaei, M.

    2017-05-01

    In the framework of the quark-diquark model of baryons, Λ b can be considered as b constituent quark an ud constituent diquark. In this study, we investigate the effect ud scalar diquark fragmentation into Λ b , therefor we calculate frgmentation functions of b quark and ud diquark into Λ b baryon through the use of perturbative QCD. In the next stage, throuth the use of the obtained fragmentation functions, we calculate the total fragmentation probabilities and average fragmentation parameters for b→Λ b and u d→Λ b . Finally, the inclusive cross section of Λ b baryon in electron-positron annihilation in ALEPH experiment is calculated with regard to ud diquark fragmentation contribution.

  3. SPARC and the N-propeptide of collagen I influence fibroblast proliferation and collagen assembly in the periodontal ligament.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Moore Rosset

    Full Text Available The periodontal ligament (PDL is a fibrous connective tissue that anchors tooth cementum into alveolar bone. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC is a collagen-binding matricellular protein known to influence collagen fiber assembly in the PDL. In contrast, functional properties of the N-propeptide of collagen I, encoded in exon 2 of the COL1A1 gene, are poorly understood. In this study, the PDL of collagen I exon 2-deleted (wt/ko, SPARC-null (ko/wt, and double transgenic (ko/ko mice were evaluated in terms of cellularity, collagen area, fiber morphology, and extraction force and compared to WT (wt/wt mice. Picro sirius red staining indicated a decrease in total PDL collagen content in each of the transgenic mice compared to WT at 1 and 3 month age points. At 12 months, only SPARC-null (ko/wt and double-null PDL demonstrated less total collagen versus WT. Likewise, an increase in thin PDL collagen fibers was observed at 1 and 3 months in each transgenic, with increases only in SPARC-null and double-null mice at 12 months. The force required for tooth extraction was significantly reduced in SPARC-null versus exon 2-deleted and WT mice, whereas double-null mice demonstrated further decreases in force required for tooth extraction. The number of proliferating fibroblasts and number and size of epithelial rests of Malassez were increased in each transgenic versus WT with double-null PDL exhibiting highest levels of proliferation and rests of Malassez at 1 month of age. Consistent with increases in PDL collagen in exon-2 deleted mice, with age, numbers of rests decreased at 12 months in this genotype. These results demonstrate for the first time a functional role of the N-propeptide in regulating collagen fiber assembly and cell behavior and suggest that SPARC and the N-propeptide of collagen I have distinct activities in regulating collagen fiber assembly and fibroblast function.

  4. Oxidative damage to collagen and related substrates by metal ion/hydrogen peroxide systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawkins, C L; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1997-01-01

    (II)-H2O2, evidence has been obtained for: i) altered sites of attack and fragmentation, ii) C-terminal decarboxylation, and iii) hydrogen abstraction at N-terminal alpha-carbon sites. This altered behaviour is believed to be due to the binding of copper ions to some substrates and hence site......'R"), and alpha-carbon[.C(R)(NH-)CO-,R = side-chain]radicals. Reaction with collagen gave both broad anisotropic signals, from high-molecular-weight protein-derived radicals, and isotropic signals from mobile species. The latter may be low-molecular-weight fragments, or mobile side-chain species; these signals...... are similar to those from the alpha-carbon site of peptides and the side-chain of lysine. Enzymatic digestion of the large, protein-derived, species releases similar low-molecular-weight adducts. The metal ion employed has a dramatic effect on the species observed. With Cu(I)-H2O2 or Cu(II)-H2O2 instead of Fe...

  5. Suppression of MMP activity in bovine cartilage explants cultures has little if any effect on the release of aggrecanase-derived aggrecan fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sondergaard Bodil-Cecilie

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progressive loss of articular cartilage is a central hallmark in many joint disease, however, the relative importance of individual proteolytic pathways leading to cartilage erosion is at present unknown. We therefore investigated the time-dependant release ex vivo of MMP- and aggrecanase-derived fragments of aggrecan and type II collagen into the supernatant of bovine cartilage explants cultures using neo-epitope specific immunoassays, and to associate the release of these fragments with the activity of proteolytic enzymes using inhibitors. Findings Bovine cartilage explants were cultured in the presence or absence of the catabolic cytokines oncostatin M (OSM and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα. In parallel, explants were co-cultured with protease inhibitors such as GM6001, TIMP1, TIMP2 and TIMP3. Fragments released into the supernatant were determined using a range of neo-epitope specific immunoassays; (1 sandwich 342FFGVG-G2 ELISA, (2 competition NITEGE373ELISA (3 sandwich G1-NITEGE373 ELISA (4 competition 374ARGSV ELISA, and (5 sandwich 374ARGSV-G2 ELISA all detecting aggrecan fragments, and (6 sandwich CTX-II ELISA, detecting C-telopeptides of type II collagen. We found that (1 aggrecanase-derived aggrecan fragments are released in the early (day 2-7 and mid phase (day 9-14 into the supernatant from bovine explants cultures stimulated with catabolic cytokines, (2 the release of NITEGE373 neo-epitopes are delayed compared to the corresponding 374ARGSV fragments, (3 the MMP inhibitor GM6001 did not reduce the release of aggrecanase-derived fragment, but induced a further delay in the release of these fragments, and finally (4 the MMP-derived aggrecan and type II collagen fragments were released in the late phase (day 16-21 only. Conclusion Our data support the model, that aggrecanases and MMPs act independently in the processing of the aggrecan molecules, and furthermore that suppression of MMP-activity had little if

  6. Extraction of collagen from fish skins and its use in manufacture of biopolymer films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Sullivan, A.; Shaw, N.B.; Murphy, S.C.; Vis, van de J.W.; Pelt-Heerschap, van H.M.L.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to extract collagen from fish skins and investigate the physical properties of the biodegradable films formed from the extracted fish collagen. Extraction of collagen using hydrogen peroxide or enzymatic methods proved to be unsuccessful. A white collagen substance was

  7. Collagen degradation in the abdominal aneurysm: A conspiracy of matrix metalloproteinase and cysteine collagenases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdul-Hussien, H.; Soekhoe, R.G.V.; Weber, E.; Thüsen, J.H. von der; Kleemann, R.; Mulder, A.; Hajo Van Bockel, J.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Lindeman, J.H.N.

    2007-01-01

    Growth and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) result from increased collagen turnover. Collagen turnover critically depends on specific collagenases that cleave the triple helical region of fibrillar collagen. As yet, the collagenases responsible for collagen degradation in AAAs have not

  8. Achilles tendinosis - Changes in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mos, Marieke; van El, Benno; DeGroot, Jeroen; Jahr, Holger; van Schie, Hans T. M.; van Arkel, Ewoud R.; Tol, Hans; Heijboer, Rien; van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; Verhaar, Jan A. N.

    Background: Understanding biochemical and structural changes of the extracellular matrix in Achilles tendinosis might be important for developing mechanism-based therapies. Hypothesis: In Achilles tendinosis, changes occur in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate. Study Design:

  9. Effect of collagen shields on corneal epithelialization following penetrating keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, J J; Aquavella, J V; LoCascio, J A

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of collagen shields on corneal epithelial healing following keratoplasty, we conducted a prospective study of 89 consecutive penetrating keratoplasty patients over a 9-month period, applying collagen shields in alternate cases. Eyes were evaluated on the first and on the eighth postoperative day. The appearance of the epithelium was graded on a scale from 0 to 4. Independent variables, such as donor age, patient age, patient and donor sex, death to preservation time, and donor time in K-Sol media prior to surgery, were also evaluated. Donor corneas treated with collagen demonstrated less epithelial staining and smaller epithelial defects on the first day following surgery. The results were evaluated with a Student's t test and were found to be significant (P less than 0.001). We conclude that the application of porcine collagen shields following keratoplasty is an effective means of encouraging reepithelialization of the graft.

  10. Collagenous Tissues upon Lithium Treatment: A Quantitative Ultrastructural Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Tzaphlidou

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the influence of lithium treatment in mouse, rat, and rabbit skin, liver, bone, and aorta, as well as arachnoid and dura mater collagen fibrils, is examined using electron microscopy and image processing. Structural changes (fibril architecture and diameter are detected at the ultrastructural level in specimens from all lithium-treated tissues. The overall collagen fibril architecture is disturbed as compared with specimens from normal species. The mean diameter values of treated collagen fibrils are significantly smaller than those from controls in all tissues examined. The banding patterns of fibrils are normal in all cases. Measurements by a computerized method of measuring axial periodicity of fibrils indicate no effect of lithium on this parameter. Computer analysis shows no differences in charged amino acid composition between lithium-treated and -untreated samples. Under the present experimental conditions, lithium can induce permanent structural collagen alterations.

  11. Osmotic pressure induced tensile forces in tendon collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Schuetz, Roman; Chang, Shu-Wei; Metzger, Till Hartmut; Buehler, Markus J.; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water is an important component of collagen in tendons, but its role for the function of this load-carrying protein structure is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of multi-scale experimentation and computation to show that water is an integral part of the collagen molecule, which changes conformation upon water removal. The consequence is a shortening of the molecule that translates into tensile stresses in the range of several to almost 100 MPa, largely surpassing those of about 0.3 MPa generated by contractile muscles. Although a complete drying of collagen would be relevant for technical applications, such as the fabrication of leather or parchment, stresses comparable to muscle contraction already occur at small osmotic pressures common in biological environments. We suggest, therefore, that water-generated tensile stresses may play a role in living collagen-based materials such as tendon or bone.

  12. Collagen fibril assembly in the developing avian primary corneal stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, J M; Linsenmayer, C M; Linsenmayer, T F

    1994-03-01

    The primary stroma of the developing avian cornea is a highly organized extracellular matrix composed largely of striated collagen fibrils synthesized by the epithelium. These fibrils are heterotypic structures consisting of at least two different fibrillar collagen types (I and II) and probably a fibril-associated collagen (type IX). The epithelial derivation and vectorial secretion of the components of this matrix provide an advantageous system to study the steps in the assembly of this developmentally regulated matrix, as well as in the assembly and maturation of heterotypic collagen fibrils in general. To ascertain when and where two of the collagens of the primary stroma (collagen types II and IX) are assembled into fibrils, monoclonal antibodies were used that bind to the newly deposited, "immature" (non-cross-linked) forms of these molecules, but not to ones that have been assembled into fibrils and have become cross-linked. The patterns of immunoreactivity for newly deposited versus total collagens were compared by immunofluorescence histochemistry on sections of corneas from developing chicken embryos. Pretreatments that affect collagen cross-linking and enzymatic digestions with collagenase also were used. In early corneas, immunoreactivity for the newly deposited forms of both collagen types II and IX was confined to a narrow subepithelial zone, their epitopes being masked in the deeper layers of the stroma. The masked immunoreactivity could be exposed in these layers by inhibiting cross-link formation with beta-aminopropionitrile. At later developmental stages, after the stroma has swollen and become invaded by mesenchymal cells, type IX collagen is no longer detectable either as an "immature" or as a fibril-associated form. During most of this period, the distribution of "immature" type II collagen is noticeably more restricted to the subepithelial zone than is total type II. Much of the undetectable immunoreactivity for collagen type II could be

  13. Achilles tendinosis: Changes in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mos, M. de; El, B. van; Groot, J. de; Jahr, H.; Schie, H.T.M. van; Arkel, E.R. van; Tol, H.; Heijboer, R.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Verhaar, J.A.N.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Understanding biochemical and structural changes of the extracellular matrix in Achilles tendinosis might be important for developing mechanism-based therapies. Hypothesis: In Achilles tendinosis, changes occur in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate. Study Design:

  14. COLLAGENOUS SPHERULES OF THE BREAST: A DIAGNOSTIC ENIGMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrit Kaur

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Collagenous spherule (CS is an enigmatic finding in a breast lesion involving the lobular acini and ductules and is defined with the presence of eosinophilic intraluminal collagen rich spherules measuring 20-100 microns in diameter, surrounded by flattened myoepithelial cells. 1 It is an uncommon incidental finding in less than 1-2% of biopsies associated with various benign and malignant diseases occurring in isolation or multifocally. 2 A major growing concern surrounding collagenous spherules is that it might be misinterpreted as atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH, cribriform ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS, cribriform carcinoma or adenoid cystic carcinoma of breast. We present a case of mobile cystic mass of the breast reported as fibrocystic disease of the breast with focal areas showing adenosis and hyperplastic changes with multiple ducts displayed a peculiar change with the presence of extracellular concentric hyaline material present within the intraluminal space, diagnostic of collagenous spherules.

  15. Corneal collagen cross-linking outcomes: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankov Ii, Mirko R; Jovanovic, Vesna; Delevic, Sladjana; Coskunseven, Efekan

    2011-02-11

    Keratoconus is a condition characterized by biomechanical instability of the cornea, presenting in a progressive, asymmetric and bilateral way. Corneal collagen cross-linking with riboflavin and UVA (CXL) is a new technique of corneal tissue strengthening that combines the use of riboflavin as a photo sensitizer and UVA irradiation. The studies showed that CXL was effective in halting the progression of keratoconus over a period of up to four years. The published studies also revealed a reduction of max K readings by more than 2 D, while the postoperative SEQ was reduced by an average of more than 1 D, and refractive cylinder decreased by about 1 D. No eyes lost any line of BCDVA. Moreover, there was no significant decrease in endothelial cell density. It was also found that CXL treatment was effective with reducing corneal and total wavefront aberrations. Corneal cross-linking has also led to an arrest and/or even a partial reversal of keratectasia in the treatment of iatrogenic ectasia after excimer laser ablation. A primary intervention such as CXL should be considered to potentially increase the biomechanical stability of the corneal tissue and postpone the need of lamellar or penetrating keratoplasty.

  16. Changes to collagen structure during leather processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizeland, Katie H; Edmonds, Richard L; Basil-Jones, Melissa M; Kirby, Nigel; Hawley, Adrian; Mudie, Stephen; Haverkamp, Richard G

    2015-03-11

    As hides and skins are processed to produce leather, chemical and physical changes take place that affect the strength and other physical properties of the material. The structural basis of these changes at the level of the collagen fibrils is not fully understood and forms the basis of this investigation. Synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to quantify fibril orientation and D-spacing through eight stages of processing from fresh green ovine skins to staked dry crust leather. Both the D-spacing and fibril orientation change with processing. The changes in thickness of the leather during processing affect the fibril orientation index (OI) and account for much of the OI differences between process stages. After thickness is accounted for, the main difference in OI is due to the hydration state of the material, with dry materials being less oriented than wet. Similarly significant differences in D-spacing are found at different process stages. These are due also to the moisture content, with dry samples having a smaller D-spacing. This understanding is useful for relating structural changes that occur during different stages of processing to the development of the final physical characteristics of leather.

  17. Collagen cross-linking in thin corneas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prema Padmanabhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Collagen cross-linking (CXL has become the standard of care for progressive keratoconus, after numerous clinical studies have established its efficacy and safety in suitably selected eyes. The standard protocol is applicable in eyes which have a minimum corneal thickness of 400 μm after epithelial debridement. This prerequisite was stipulated to protect the corneal endothelium and intraocular tissues from the deleterious effect of ultraviolet-A (UVA radiation. However, patients with keratoconus often present with corneal thickness of less than 400 μm and could have otherwise benefited from this procedure. A few modifications of the standard procedure have been suggested to benefit these patients without a compromise in safety. Transepithelial cross-linking, pachymetry-guided epithelial debridement before cross-linking, and the use of hypoosmolar riboflavin are some of the techniques that have been attempted. Although clinical data is limited at the present time, these techniques are worth considering in patients with thin corneas. Further studies are needed to scientifically establish their efficacy and safety.

  18. Collagen cross-linking in thin corneas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Prema; Dave, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    Collagen cross-linking (CXL) has become the standard of care for progressive keratoconus, after numerous clinical studies have established its efficacy and safety in suitably selected eyes. The standard protocol is applicable in eyes which have a minimum corneal thickness of 400 μm after epithelial debridement. This prerequisite was stipulated to protect the corneal endothelium and intraocular tissues from the deleterious effect of ultraviolet-A (UVA) radiation. However, patients with keratoconus often present with corneal thickness of less than 400 μm and could have otherwise benefited from this procedure. A few modifications of the standard procedure have been suggested to benefit these patients without a compromise in safety. Transepithelial cross-linking, pachymetry-guided epithelial debridement before cross-linking, and the use of hypoosmolar riboflavin are some of the techniques that have been attempted. Although clinical data is limited at the present time, these techniques are worth considering in patients with thin corneas. Further studies are needed to scientifically establish their efficacy and safety. PMID:23925328

  19. Optimal management of collagenous colitis: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Toole, Aoibhlinn

    2016-01-01

    Collagenous colitis (CC) is an increasingly recognized cause of chronic inflammatory bowel disease characterized by watery non-bloody diarrhea. As a lesser studied inflammatory bowel disease, many aspects of the CC’s natural history are poorly understood. This review discusses strategies to optimally manage CC. The goal of therapy is to induce clinical remission, <3 stools a day or <1 watery stool a day with subsequent improved quality of life (QOL). Antidiarrheal can be used as monotherapy or with other medications to control diarrhea. Budesonide therapy has revolutionized treatment and is superior to prednisone, however, the treatment is associated with high-relapse rates and the management of refractory disease is challenging. Ongoing trials will address the safety and efficacy of low-dose maintenance therapy. For those with refractory disease, case reports and case series support the role of biologic agents. Diversion of the fecal stream normalizes colonic mucosal changes and ileostomy may be considered where anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α agents are contraindicated. Underlying celiac disease, bile salt diarrhea, and associated thyroid dysfunction should be ruled out. The author recommends smoking cessation as well as avoidance of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories as well as other associated medications. PMID:26929656

  20. An N-terminal glycine to cysteine mutation in the collagen COL1A1 gene produces moderately severe osteogenesis imperfecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, W.; Scott, L.; Cohn, D. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is usually due to mutations in the type I procollagen genes COL1A1 and COL1A2. Point mutations close to the N-terminus are generally milder than those near the C-terminus of the molecule (the gradient hypothesis of collagen mutations). We describe a patient with moderately severe OI due to a mutation in the N-terminal portion of the triple helical domain of the {alpha}1(I) chain. Electrophoretic analysis of collagen isolated from fibroblast cultures suggested the abnormal presence of a cysteine in the N-terminal portion of the {alpha}1(I) chain. Five overlapping DNA fragments amplified from fibroblast RNA were screened for mutations using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and heteroduplex analyses. Direct DNA sequence analysis of the single positive fragment demonstrated a G to T transversion, corresponding to a glycine to cysteine substitution at position 226 of the triple helical domain of the {alpha}1(I) chain. The mutation was confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis of amplified genomic DNA. The mutation was not present in fibroblasts from either phenotypically normal parent. Combining this mutation with other reported mutations, glycine to cysteine substitutions at positions 205, 211, 223, and 226 produce a moderately severe phenotype whereas flanking mutations at positions 175 and 382 produce a mild phenotype. This data supports a regional rather than a gradient model of the relationship between the nature and location of type I collagen mutations and OI phenotype.

  1. Exact Solutions of Fragmentation Equations with General Fragmentation Rates and Separable Particles Distribution Kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Oukouomi Noutchie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We make use of Laplace transform techniques and the method of characteristics to solve fragmentation equations explicitly. Our result is a breakthrough in the analysis of pure fragmentation equations as this is the first instance where an exact solution is provided for the fragmentation evolution equation with general fragmentation rates. This paper is the key for resolving most of the open problems in fragmentation theory including “shattering” and the sudden appearance of infinitely many particles in some systems with initial finite particles number.

  2. Paclitaxel suppresses collagen-induced arthritis: a reevaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yi; Chang, Zhi-Fang; Li, Ru; Li, Zhan-Guo; LI, XIAO-XIA; LI, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To reevaluate the suppressive effect of paclitaxel (PTX) liposome on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and explore its mechanisms. Methods: Female Lewis rats were immunized with bovine type II collagen (CII) to induce arthritis. The rats with CIA were randomly divided into three groups: 5% GS control group, 2.5 mg/kg PTX treatment group and 1 mg/kg methotrexate (MTX) positive control group. The drugs were administered by intraperitoneal injection on the second day after arth...

  3. Cell-instructive starPEG-heparin-collagen composite matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binner, Marcus; Bray, Laura J; Friedrichs, Jens; Freudenberg, Uwe; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Werner, Carsten

    2017-04-15

    Polymer hydrogels can be readily modulated with regard to their physical properties and functionalized to recapitulate molecular cues of the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, they remain structurally different from the hierarchical supramolecular assemblies of natural ECM. Accordingly, we herein report a set of hydrogel composite materials made from starPEG-peptide conjugates, maleimide-functionalized heparin and collagen type I that combine semisynthetic and ECM-derived components. Collagen fibrillogenesis was controlled by temperature and collagen concentration to form collagen microstructures which were then homogeneously distributed within the 3D composite matrix during hydrogel formation. The collagen-laden hydrogel materials showed a heterogeneous local variation of the stiffness and adhesion ligand density. Composite gels functionalized with growth factors and cell adhesive peptides (RGDSP) supported the growth of embedded human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and induced the alignment of embedded bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to the collagen microstructures in vitro. The introduced composite hydrogel material is concluded to faithfully mimic cell-instructive features of the ECM. Cell-instructive materials play an important role in the generation of both regenerative therapies and advanced tissue and disease models. For that purpose, biofunctional polymer hydrogels recapitulating molecular cues of the extracellular matrix (ECM) were successfully applied in various different studies. However, hydrogels generally lack the hierarchical supramolecular structure of natural ECM. We have therefore developed a hydrogel composite material made from starPEG-peptide conjugates, maleimide-functionalized heparin and collagen type I fibrils. The collagen-laden scaffolds showed a heterogeneous local variation in the stiffness of the material. The composite gels were successfully tested in culture experiments with human umbilical

  4. Enhancing amine terminals in an amine-deprived collagen matrix.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tiong, William H C

    2008-10-21

    Collagen, though widely used as a core biomaterial in many clinical applications, is often limited by its rapid degradability which prevents full exploitation of its potential in vivo. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer, a highly branched macromolecule, possesses versatile multiterminal amine surface groups that enable them to be tethered to collagen molecules and enhance their potential. In this study, we hypothesized that incorporation of PAMAM dendrimer in a collagen matrix through cross-linking will result in a durable, cross-linked collagen biomaterial with free -NH 2 groups available for further multi-biomolecular tethering. The aim of this study was to assess the physicochemical properties of a G1 PAMAM cross-linked collagen matrix and its cellular sustainability in vitro. Different amounts of G1 PAMAM dendrimer (5 or 10 mg) were integrated into bovine-derived collagen matrices through a cross-linking process, mediated by 5 or 25 mM 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) in 5 mM N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) and 50 mM 2-morpholinoethane sulfonic acid buffer at pH 5.5. The physicochemical properties of resultant matrices were investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), collagenase degradation assay, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, and ninhydrin assay. Cellular sustainability of the matrices was assessed with Alamar Blue assay and SEM. There was no significant difference in cellular behavior between the treated and nontreated groups. However, the benefit of incorporating PAMAM in the cross-linking reaction was limited when higher concentrations of either agent were used. These results confirm the hypothesis that PAMAM dendrimer can be incorporated in the collagen cross-linking process in order to modulate the properties of the resulting cross-linked collagen biomaterial with free -NH 2 groups available for multi-biomolecular tethering.

  5. Retinal pigment epithelium cell alignment on nanostructured collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Stefan; Friedrichs, Jens; Valtink, Monika; Murovski, Simo; Franz, Clemens M; Müller, Daniel J; Funk, Richard H W; Engelmann, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    We investigated attachment and migration of human retinal pigment epithelial cells (primary, SV40-transfected and ARPE-19) on nanoscopically defined, two-dimensional matrices composed of parallel-aligned collagen type I fibrils. These matrices were used non-cross-linked (native) or after riboflavin/UV-A cross-linking to study cell attachment and migration by time-lapse video microscopy. Expression of collagen type I and IV, MMP-2 and of the collagen-binding integrin subunit α(2) were examined by immunofluorescence and Western blotting. SV40-RPE cells quickly attached to the nanostructured collagen matrices and aligned along the collagen fibrils. However, they disrupted both native and cross-linked collagen matrices within 5 h. Primary RPE cells aligned more slowly without destroying either native or cross-linked substrates. Compared to primary RPE cells, ARPE-19 cells showed reduced alignment but partially disrupted the matrices within 20 h after seeding. Expression of the collagen type I-binding integrin subunit α(2) was highest in SV40-RPE cells, lower in primary RPE cells and almost undetectable in ARPE-19 cells. Thus, integrin α(2) expression levels directly correlated with the degree of cell alignment in all examined RPE cell types. Specific integrin subunit α(2)-mediated matrix binding was verified by preincubation with an α(2)-function-blocking antibody, which impaired cell adhesion and alignment to varying degrees in primary and SV40-RPE cells. Since native matrices supported extended and directed primary RPE cell growth, optimizing the matrix production procedure may in the future yield nanostructured collagen matrices serving as transferable cell sheet carriers. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Corneal collagen crosslinking: from basic research to clinical application

    OpenAIRE

    LUKENDA, ADRIAN; Pavan, Josip; Kaštelan, Snježana; ]URKOVIĆ, MARKO

    2010-01-01

    Corneal collagen crosslinking is a promising new treatment of progressive corneal ectasia. Its clinical use has been rapidly increasing since it was originally introduced in 1997 as the first treatment that can improve biomechanical stability of theweakened cornea. The method is based on the combined action of photosensitizer riboflavin (vitamin B2) and ultraviolet A light, which induce the formation of new covalent bonds between the collagen fibers. Our systematic search of literature...

  7. Concentrated Collagen-Chondroitin Sulfate Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Wan-Hsiang; Kienitz, Brian L.; Penick, Kitsie J.; Welter, Jean F.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Baskaran, Harihara

    2010-01-01

    Collagen-chondroitin sulfate biomaterial scaffolds have been used in a number of tissue engineered products under development or in the clinics. In this paper, we describe a new approach based on centrifugation for obtaining highly concentrated yet porous collagen scaffolds. Water uptake, chondroitin sulfate retention, morphology, mechanical properties and tissue engineering potential of the concentrated scaffolds were investigated. Our results show that the new approach can lead to scaffolds...

  8. Effects of isopropanol on collagen fibrils in new parchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Lee G

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isopropanol is widely used by conservators to relax the creases and folds of parchment artefacts. At present, little is known of the possible side effects of the chemical on parchments main structural component- collagen. This study uses X-ray Diffraction to investigate the effects of a range of isopropanol concentrations on the dimensions of the nanostructure of the collagen component of new parchment. Results It is found in this study that the packing features of the collagen molecules within the collagen fibril are altered by exposure to isopropanol. The results suggest that this chemical treatment can induce a loss of structural water from the collagen within parchment and thus a rearrangement of intermolecular bonding. This study also finds that the effects of isopropanol treatment are permanent to parchment artefacts and cannot be reversed with rehydration using deionised water. Conclusions This study has shown that isopropanol induces permanent changes to the packing features of collagen within parchment artefacts and has provided scientific evidence that its use to remove creases and folds on parchment artefacts will cause structural change that may contribute to long-term deterioration of parchment artefacts. This work provides valuable information that informs conservation practitioners regarding the use of isopropanol on parchment artefacts.

  9. Altered organization of collagen in the apex of keratoconus corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radner, W; Zehetmayer, M; Skorpik, C; Mallinger, R

    1998-01-01

    In 15 keratoconus corneas, the three-dimensional arrangement of collagen lamellae was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. Keratoconus corneas without visible scars were obtained during perforating keratoplasty. The noncollagenous matrix of the stroma was removed with sodium hydroxide. Descemet's membrane was removed mechanically and deeper layers of the stroma were exposed by cutting the tissue tangentially to the corneal surface with an ultramicrotome. The apical and the para-apical regions of keratoconus were compared the central regions of normal corneas. In the apical regions of 11 out of the 15 keratoconus corneas (73%), the arrangement of the collagen lamellae differs from those of the para-apical regions and normal corneas. Their collagen fibrils from uniform layers and no delimited collagen lamellae can be differentiated. Interlacing between adjacent layers in extremely decreased or even absent. In the para-apical region of keratoconus corneas the three-dimensional arrangement of collagen lamellae does not differ from that in normal corneas. Stromal thinning and conical ectasia in the apex of keratoconus corneas alters the organization of collagen. This will certainly affect the biomechanical properties of the cornea and further lead to a progression of keratoconus irrespective of its primary pathogenesis.

  10. A Three-Dimensional Computational Model of Collagen Network Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoungkoo; Zhou, Xin; Riching, Kristin; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Keely, Patricia J.; Guelcher, Scott A.; Weaver, Alissa M.; Jiang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) strongly influences cellular behaviors, including cell proliferation, adhesion, and particularly migration. In cancer, the rigidity of the stromal collagen environment is thought to control tumor aggressiveness, and collagen alignment has been linked to tumor cell invasion. While the mechanical properties of collagen at both the single fiber scale and the bulk gel scale are quite well studied, how the fiber network responds to local stress or deformation, both structurally and mechanically, is poorly understood. This intermediate scale knowledge is important to understanding cell-ECM interactions and is the focus of this study. We have developed a three-dimensional elastic collagen fiber network model (bead-and-spring model) and studied fiber network behaviors for various biophysical conditions: collagen density, crosslinker strength, crosslinker density, and fiber orientation (random vs. prealigned). We found the best-fit crosslinker parameter values using shear simulation tests in a small strain region. Using this calibrated collagen model, we simulated both shear and tensile tests in a large linear strain region for different network geometry conditions. The results suggest that network geometry is a key determinant of the mechanical properties of the fiber network. We further demonstrated how the fiber network structure and mechanics evolves with a local formation, mimicking the effect of pulling by a pseudopod during cell migration. Our computational fiber network model is a step toward a full biomechanical model of cellular behaviors in various ECM conditions. PMID:25386649

  11. A collagen-targeted biomimetic RGD peptide to promote osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Rick; Arrabal, Pilar M; Santos-Ruiz, Leonor; Fernandez-Barranco, Raul; Becerra, Jose; Cifuentes, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis is a complex, multifactorial process in which many different signals interact. The bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are the most potent inducers of osteoblastic differentiation, although very high doses of BMPs in combination with collagen type I formulations have to be used for clinical applications. Although integrin-binding arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) biomimetic peptides have shown some promising abilities to promote the attachment of cells to biomaterials and to direct their differentiation, the linking of these peptides to collagen sponges usually implies chemical manipulation steps. In this study, we describe the design and characterization of a synthetic collagen-targeted RGD biomimetic (CBD-RGD) peptide formed from a collagen-binding domain derived from the von Willebrand factor and the integrin-binding RGD sequence. This peptide was demonstrated to bind to absorbable collagen type I sponges (ACSs) without performing any chemical linking, and to induce the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 mouse preosteoblasts and rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Furthermore, in vivo experiments showed that ACSs functionalized with CBD-RGD and loaded with a subfunctional dose of BMP-2-formed ectopic bone in rats, while nonfunctionalized sponges loaded with the same amount of BMP-2 did not. These results indicate that the combination of this biomimetic peptide with the currently used collagen+BMP system might be a promising approach to improve osteogenesis and to reduce the doses of BMPs needed in clinical orthopedics.

  12. Collagen-binding proteins of Streptococcus mutans and related streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés-Reyes, A; Miller, J H; Lemos, J A; Abranches, J

    2017-04-01

    The ability of Streptococcus mutans to interact with collagen through the expression of collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) bestows this oral pathogen with an alternative to the sucrose-dependent mechanism of colonization classically attributed to caries development. Based on the abundance and distribution of collagen throughout the human body, stringent adherence to this molecule grants S. mutans with the opportunity to establish infection at different host sites. Surface proteins, such as SpaP, WapA, Cnm and Cbm, have been shown to bind collagen in vitro, and it has been suggested that these molecules play a role in colonization of oral and extra-oral tissues. However, robust collagen binding is not achieved by all strains of S. mutans, particularly those that lack Cnm or Cbm. These observations merit careful dissection of the contribution from these different CBPs towards tissue colonization and virulence. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of mechanisms used by S. mutans and related streptococci to colonize collagenous tissues, and the possible contribution of CBPs to infections in different sites of the host. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Regulators of Collagen Fibrillogenesis during Molar Development in the Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Zvackova

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Development of mammalian teeth and surrounding tissues includes time–space changes in the extracellular matrix composition and organization. This requires complex control mechanisms to regulate its synthesis and remodeling. Fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices (FACITs and a group of small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs are involved in the regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis. Recently, collagen type XII and collagen type XIV, members of the FACITs family, were found in the peridental mesenchyme contributing to alveolar bone formation. This study was designed to follow temporospatial expression of collagen types XIIa and XIVa in mouse first molar and adjacent tissues from embryonic day 13, when the alveolar bone becomes morphologically apparent around the molar tooth bud, until postnatal day 22, as the posteruption stage. The patterns of decorin, biglycan, and fibromodulin, all members of the SLRPs family and interacting with collagens XIIa and XIVa, were investigated simultaneously. The situation in the tooth was related to what happens in the alveolar bone, and both were compared to the periodontal ligament. The investigation provided a complex localization of the five antigens in soft tissues, the dental pulp, and periodontal ligaments; in the mineralized tissues, predentin/dentin and alveolar bone; and junction between soft and hard tissues. The results illustrated developmentally regulated and tissue-specific changes in the balance of the two FACITs and three SLRPs.

  14. Hesperidin interaction to collagen detected by physico-chemical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraishi, Noriko; Maruno, Takahiro; Tochio, Naoya; Sono, Ryohei; Otsuki, Masayuki; Takatsuka, Tsutomu; Tagami, Junji; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    Dentin collagen can be modified by some plant-derived flavonoids to improve properties of dentin organic matrix. Hesperidin (HPN), a hesperetin-7-O-rutinoside flavonoid, has a potential of dentin modification for being based on evidence that a treatment with HPN may resist collagenase degradation and arrest demineralization of human dentin. In this study, biophysical and molecular-level information on the interaction of HPN and collagen was investigated. HPN is extracted from citrus fruits. Sample collagenous solution was prepared using atelocollagen (ATCL) as a triple-helical peptide model. We have performed circular dichroism spectroscopic analysis, sedimentation velocity measurement by ultracentrifuge and saturation transfer difference measurement (STD) by NMR on HPN-collagen in solution state. The circular dichroism and sedimentation velocity measurement showed the evidence for the molecular interaction between ATCL and HPN, while HPN did not induce any conformational change of ATCL. The STD-NMR study further confirmed this interaction and suggested that HPN interacted with ATCL through its aromatic part, not through its disaccharide moiety. These findings indicated that HPN is weakly bound to ATCL not causing structural modification of collagen. This interaction may contribute to the preservation of collagen by protecting from collagenase degradation. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Physicochemical and functional characterization of the collagen-polyvinylpyrrolidone copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva-Gómez, Gerardo; Lima, Enrique; Krötzsch, Guillermo; Pacheco-Marín, Rosario; Rodríguez-Fuentes, Nayeli; Quintanar-Guerrero, David; Krötzsch, Edgar

    2014-08-07

    Collagen-polyvinylpyrrolidone (C-PVP) is a copolymer that is generated from the γ irradiation of a mixture of type I collagen and low-molecular-weight PVP. It is characterized by immunomodulatory, fibrolytic, and antifibrotic properties. Here, we used various physicochemical and biological strategies to characterize the structure, biochemical susceptibility, as well as its effects on metabolic activity in fibroblasts. C-PVP contained 16 times more PVP than collagen, but only 55.8% of PVP was bonded. Nevertheless, the remaining PVP exerted strong structural activity due to the existence of weak bonds that provided shielding in the NMR spectra. On SEM and AFM, freeze-dried C-PVP appeared as a film that uniformly covered the collagen fibers. Size analysis revealed the presence of abundant PVP molecules in the solution of the copolymer with a unique dimension related to macromolecular combinations. Calorimetric analysis showed that the copolymer in solution exhibited structural changes at 110 °C, whereas the lyophilized form showed such changes at temperatures below 50 °C. The copolymer presented a rheopectic behavior, with a predominant effect of the collagen. C-PVP had biological effects on the expression of integrin α2 and prolyl-hydroxylase but did not interact with cells through the collagen receptors because it did not inhibit or slow contraction.

  16. Medical-grade collagen peptide in injectables provides antioxidant protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kyo; Maehata, Yojiro; Okada, Yasue; Kusubata, Masashi; Hattori, Shunji; Tanaka, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Yoshino, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Ayaka; Tokutomi, Fumiaki; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Komatsu, Tomoko; Otsuka, Takero; Takahashi, Shun-Suke; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-Il

    2015-03-01

    Medical-grade collagen peptide is used as an additive agent in pharmaceutical formulations; however, it is unknown as to whether the compound exerts antioxidant effects in vitro. In this study, we evaluated the antioxidant effects of medical-grade collagen peptide on reactive oxygen species such as hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion radical and singlet oxygen using electron spin resonance and spin trapping. We confirmed that medical-grade collagen peptide directly inhibited hydroxyl radical generated by the Fenton reaction or by ultraviolet irradiation of hydrogen peroxide, and singlet oxygen. In addition, an antioxidant effect of medical-grade collagen peptide on singlet oxygen was observed in peptide fractions 12-22. The total amount of antioxidant amino acids (Gly, Hyp, Glu, Ala, Cys, Met and His) constituted more than half of the total amino acids in these fractions. These results suggest that the observed antioxidant properties of medical-grade collagen peptide are due to the compound containing antioxidant amino acids. Medical-grade collagen peptide, which is used in pharmaceuticals, and especially in injectables, could provide useful antioxidant properties to protect the active ingredient from oxidation.

  17. Improved chemical shift based fragment selection for CS-Rosetta using Rosetta3 fragment picker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernon, Robert [Hospital for Sick Children, Program in Molecular Structure and Function (Canada); Shen, Yang [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Baker, David [University of Washington, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Lange, Oliver F., E-mail: oliver.lange@tum.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department Chemie, Biomolecular NMR and Munich Center for Integrated Protein Science (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    A new fragment picker has been developed for CS-Rosetta that combines beneficial features of the original fragment picker, MFR, used with CS-Rosetta, and the fragment picker, NNMake, that was used for purely sequence based fragment selection in the context of ROSETTA de-novo structure prediction. Additionally, the new fragment picker has reduced sensitivity to outliers and other difficult to match data points rendering the protocol more robust and less likely to introduce bias towards wrong conformations in cases where data is bad, missing or inconclusive. The fragment picker protocol gives significant improvements on 6 of 23 CS-Rosetta targets. An independent benchmark on 39 protein targets, whose NMR data sets were published only after protocol optimization had been finished, also show significantly improved performance for the new fragment picker (van der Schot et al. in J Biomol NMR, 2013)

  18. Dual Fragment Impact of PBX Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Peter; Briggs, Richard; Leeming, David; White, Nathan; Cheese, Philip; DE&S MoD UK Team; Ordnance Test Solutions Ltd Team

    2017-06-01

    Fragment impact can pose a significant hazard to many systems containing explosives or propellants. Testing for this threat is most commonly carried out using a single fragment. However, it can be argued that an initial fragment strike (or strikes) could sensitise the energetic material to subsequent impacts, which may then lead to a more violent reaction than would have been predicted based upon single fragment studies. To explore this potential hazard we have developed the capability to launch 2 fragments from the same gun at a range of velocities, and achieve impacts on an acceptor charge with good control over the spatial and temporal separation of the strikes. In this paper we will describe in detail the experimental techniques we have used, both to achieve the dual fragment launch and observe the acceptor charge response. In addition, we will describe the results obtained against PBX filled explosive targets; discuss the mechanisms controlling the target response and their significance for vulnerability assessment. Results of these tests have clearly indicated the potential for detonation upon the second strike, at velocities well below those needed for shock initiation by a single fragment.

  19. On Disciplinary Fragmentation and Scientific Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balietti, Stefano; Mäs, Michael; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Why are some scientific disciplines, such as sociology and psychology, more fragmented into conflicting schools of thought than other fields, such as physics and biology? Furthermore, why does high fragmentation tend to coincide with limited scientific progress? We analyzed a formal model where scientists seek to identify the correct answer to a research question. Each scientist is influenced by three forces: (i) signals received from the correct answer to the question; (ii) peer influence; and (iii) noise. We observed the emergence of different macroscopic patterns of collective exploration, and studied how the three forces affect the degree to which disciplines fall apart into divergent fragments, or so-called “schools of thought”. We conducted two simulation experiments where we tested (A) whether the three forces foster or hamper progress, and (B) whether disciplinary fragmentation causally affects scientific progress and vice versa. We found that fragmentation critically limits scientific progress. Strikingly, there is no effect in the opposite causal direction. What is more, our results shows that at the heart of the mechanisms driving scientific progress we find (i) social interactions, and (ii) peer disagreement. In fact, fragmentation is increased and progress limited if the simulated scientists are open to influence only by peers with very similar views, or when within-school diversity is lost. Finally, disciplines where the scientists received strong signals from the correct answer were less fragmented and experienced faster progress. We discuss model’s implications for the design of social institutions fostering interdisciplinarity and participation in science. PMID:25790025

  20. Lysyl Oxidase Is Essential for Normal Development and Function of the Respiratory System and for the Integrity of Elastic and Collagen Fibers in Various Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki, Joni M.; Sormunen, Raija; Lippo, Sari; Kaarteenaho-Wiik, Riitta; Soininen, Raija; Myllyharju, Johanna

    2005-01-01

    Lysyl oxidases, a family comprising LOX and four LOX-like enzymes, catalyze crosslinking of elastin and collagens. Mouse Lox was recently shown to be crucial for development of the cardiovascular system because null mice died perinatally of aortic aneurysms and cardiovascular dysfunction. We show here that Lox is also essential for development of the respiratory system and the integrity of elastic and collagen fibers in the lungs and skin. The lungs of E18.5 Lox−/− embryos showed impaired development of the distal and proximal airways. Elastic fibers in E18.5 Lox−/− lungs were markedly less intensely stained and more disperse than in the wild type, especially in the mesenchyme surrounding the distal airways, bronchioles, bronchi, and trachea, and were fragmented in pulmonary arterial walls. The organization of individual collagen fibers into tight bundles was likewise abnormal. Similar elastic and collagen fiber abnormalities were seen in the skin. Lysyl oxidase activity in cultured Lox−/− skin fibroblasts and aortic smooth muscle cells was reduced by ∼80%, indicating that Lox is the main isoenzyme in these cells. LOX abnormalities may thus be critical for the pathogenesis of several common diseases, including pulmonary, skin, and cardiovascular disorders. PMID:16192629