WorldWideScience

Sample records for waveguide raman laser

  1. Modelling of a DBR laser based on Raman effect in a silicon-on-insulator rib waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Leonardis, Francesco; Dimastrodonato, Valeria; Passaro, Vittorio M N

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, third-order nonlinearities in silicon-on-insulator rib waveguides are investigated to obtain complete modelling, describing the behaviour of a stimulated Raman scattering based laser. The simulations of a distributed Bragg reflector laser operation in a time domain allow for the first time to study in detail the dependence of threshold and output powers on different device parameters. Both continuous wave and pulsed laser operations are theoretically demonstrated, as well as their dependence on device parameters

  2. Ring cavity for a Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnit, N.A.

    1981-01-27

    A regenerative ring amplifier and regenerative ring oscillator are described which function to feed back a portion of the Stokes signal to complete the ring cavity. The ring cavity configuration allows the CO/sub 2/ laser pump signal and Stokes signal to copropagate through the Raman capillary waveguide amplifier. A Raman capillary waveguide amplifier is also provided in the return leg of the ring cavity to increase gain without increasing the round trip time. Additionally, the ring cavity can be designed such that the amplified Stokes signal is synchronous with the mode-locked spikes of the incoming CO/sub 2/ laser pump signal.

  3. Ring cavity for a Raman capillary waveguide amplifir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnit, N.A.

    1981-01-27

    A regenerative ring amplifier and regenerative ring oscillator are described which function to feed back a portion of the Stokes signal to complete the ring cavity. The ring cavity configuration allows the CO/sub 2/ laser pump signal and Stokes signal to copropagate through the Raman capillary waveguide amplifier. A Raman capillary waveguide amplifier is also provided in the return leg of the ring cavity to increase gain without increasing the round trip time. Additionally, the ring cavity can be designed such that the amplified Stokes signal is synchronous with the mode-locked spikes of the incoming CO/sub 2/ laser pump signal.

  4. Raman fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book serves as a comprehensive, up-to-date reference about this cutting-edge laser technology and its many new and interesting developments. Various aspects and trends of Raman fiber lasers are described in detail by experts in their fields. Raman fiber lasers have progressed quickly in the past decade, and have emerged as a versatile laser technology for generating high power light sources covering a spectral range from visible to mid-infrared. The technology is already being applied in the fields of telecommunication, astronomy, cold atom physics, laser spectroscopy, environmental sensing, and laser medicine. This book covers various topics relating to Raman fiber laser research, including power scaling, cladding and diode pumping, cascade Raman shifting, single frequency operation and power amplification, mid-infrared laser generation, specialty optical fibers, and random distributed feedback Raman fiber lasers. The book will appeal to scientists, students, and technicians seeking to understand the re...

  5. Surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopic waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascola, Robert J; McWhorter, Christopher S; Murph, Simona H

    2015-04-14

    A waveguide for use with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is provided that includes a base structure with an inner surface that defines a cavity and that has an axis. Multiple molecules of an analyte are capable of being located within the cavity at the same time. A base layer is located on the inner surface of the base structure. The base layer extends in an axial direction along an axial length of an excitation section. Nanoparticles are carried by the base layer and may be uniformly distributed along the entire axial length of the excitation section. A flow cell for introducing analyte and excitation light into the waveguide and a method of applying nanoparticles may also be provided.

  6. Evanescent fields of laser written waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukić, Dario; Pohl, Thomas; Götte, Jörg B.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the evanescent field at the surface of laser written waveguides. The waveguides are written by a direct femtosecond laser writing process into fused silica, which is then sanded down to expose the guiding layer. These waveguides support eigenmodes which have an evanescent field reaching into the vacuum above the waveguide. We study the governing wave equations and present solution for the fundamental eigenmodes of the modified waveguides.

  7. Dielectric waveguide amplifiers and lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnau, Markus

    The performance of semiconductor amplifiers and lasers has made them the preferred choice for optical gain on a micro-chip. In the past few years, we have demonstrated that also rare-earth-ion-doped dielectric waveguides show remarkable performance, ranging from a small-signal gain per unit length

  8. Designing of Raman laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, M. D.; Al-Awad, F.; Alsous, M. B.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we describe the design of the Raman laser pumped by Frequency doubled Nd-YAG laser (λ=532 nm) to generate new laser wavelengths by shifting the frequency of the Nd-YAG laser to Stokes region (λ 1 =683 nm, λ 2 =953.6 nm, λ 3 =1579.5 nm) and Antistokes region (λ ' 1 =435 nm, λ ' 2 =369.9 nm, λ ' 3=319.8 nm). Laser resonator has been designed to increase the laser gain. It consists of two mirrors, the back mirror transmits the pump laser beam (λ=532 nm) through the Raman tube and reflects all other generated Raman laser lines. Four special front mirrors were made to be used for the four laser lines λ 1 =683 nm, λ 2 =953.6 nm and λ ' 1 = 435 nm, λ ' 2 =369.9 nm. The output energy for the lines υ 1 s, υ 2 s, υ 1 as,υ 2 as was measured. The output energy of the Raman laser was characterized for different H 2 pressure inside the tube. (Author)

  9. Femtosecond laser writing of waveguides in zinc phosphate glasses [Invited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fletcher, L.B.; Witcher, J.J.; Troy, N.; Reis, S.T.; Brow, R.K.; Martinez Vazquez, R.; Osellame, R.; Krol, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the relationship between the initial glass composition and the structural changes associated with laser-induced refractive index modification in a series of Er-Yb doped and undoped zinc phosphate glasses. White light microscopy and waveguide experiments are used together with Raman

  10. Pulsed Laser Deposition: passive and active waveguides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Flory, F.; Escoubas, L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 4 (2009), s. 438-449 ISSN 0268-1900 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/06/0216 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : PLD * pulsed laser deposition * laser ablation * passive waveguides * active waveguides * waveguide laser * sensors * thin films * butane detection Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.384, year: 2009

  11. Waveguide based external cavity semiconductor lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenbeuving, Ruud; Klein, E.J.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Lee, Christopher James; Verhaegen, M.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on progress of the project waveguide based external cavity semiconductor laser (WECSL) arrays. Here we present the latest results on our efforts to mode lock an array of tunable, external cavity semiconductor lasers.

  12. High-power planar dielectric waveguide lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, D.P.; Hettrick, S.J.; Li, C.; Mackenzie, J.I.; Beach, R.J.; Mitchell, S.C.; Meissner, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    The advantages and potential hazards of using a planar waveguide as the host in a high-power diode-pumped laser system are described. The techniques discussed include the use of proximity-coupled diodes, double-clad waveguides, unstable resonators, tapers, and integrated passive Q switches. Laser devices are described based on Yb 3+ -, Nd 3+ -, and Tm 3+ -doped YAG, and monolithic and highly compact waveguide lasers with outputs greater than 10 W are demonstrated. The prospects for scaling to the 100 W level and for further integration of devices for added functionality in a monolithic laser system are discussed. (author)

  13. Silicon Nitride Background in Nanophotonic Waveguide Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashim Dhakal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that evanescent Raman spectroscopy using a silicon nitride (SiN nanophotonic waveguide platform has higher signal enhancement when compared to free-space systems. However, signal-to-noise ratio from the waveguide at a low analyte concentration is constrained by the shot-noise from the background light originating from the waveguide itself. Hence, understanding the origin and properties of this waveguide background luminescence (WGBL is essential to developing mitigation strategies. Here, we identify the dominating component of the WGBL spectrum composed of a broad Raman scattering due to momentum selection-rule breaking in amorphous materials, and several peaks specific to molecules embedded in the core. We determine the maximum of the Raman scattering efficiency of the WGBL at room temperature for 785 nm excitation to be 4.5 ± 1 × 10−9 cm−1·sr−1, at a Stokes shift of 200 cm−1. This efficiency decreases monotonically for higher Stokes shifts. Additionally, we also demonstrate the use of slotted waveguides and quasi-transverse magnetic polarization as some mitigation strategies.

  14. Stimulated Raman gain scattering in thin planar dielectric waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanger, Johannes S.; Otto, Cornelis; Greve, Jan

    1995-01-01

    The stimulated Raman gain effect in planar dielectric waveguides is analyzed for the study of thin layers. Calculations show high gain factors and predict the possibility of detecting monolayers. Compared with those for methods based on ref lection, the gain can be 4 orders of magnitude higher for a

  15. The waveguide Free-Electron Laser. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    The general characteristics of free-electron lasers (FELs) which employ a waveguiding structure to confine electromagnetic fields and to couple them to the electron beam is discussed. The mode structure of the basic parallel plate waveguide and its adaptation via quasi-optical techniques to FEL resonator design are considered in detail. A summary of the theory of FEL systems which depend intrinsically on a guide structure (micro-undulator, Cerenkov and metal-grating FELs) and a review of progress on waveguide FEL experiments are also presented. (author). 44 refs.; 16 figs

  16. Enhanced Raman scattering assisted by ultrahigh order modes of the double metal cladding waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tian; Huang, Liming; Jin, Yonglong; Fang, Jinghuai, E-mail: cyin.phys@gmail.com, E-mail: fjhuai@ntu.edu.cn [Physics Department, Nantong University, No. 9, Seyuan Road, Nantong, Jiangsu 226007 (China); Yin, Cheng, E-mail: cyin.phys@gmail.com, E-mail: fjhuai@ntu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Power Transmission and Distribution Equipment Technology, Hohai University, Changzhou 213022 (China); Huang, Meizhen [Department of Instrument Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, No. 800, DongChuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2014-10-20

    Distinguished from the usual strategy to enhance the Raman scattering such as creating hot spots in the surface-enhanced Raman scattering, this paper takes a quite different approach based on the double metal cladding waveguide. The target analyte is located in the guiding layer of sub-millimeter scale, where several ultrahigh order modes with high intensity are simultaneously excited via a focused laser beam. The experimental setup is simple, and both simulation and experimental results confirm the enhancement mechanism of these oscillating modes. Other appealing features include the large detection area and the ability to excite guided modes via both polarizations. This scheme can be applied to large molecules detection and readily integrated with other Raman enhancement techniques.

  17. Ultrafast Laser Fabrication of Bragg Waveguides in GLS Chalcogenide Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillen Ben

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present work on the fabrication of Bragg waveguides in gallium-lanthanum-sulfide chalcogenide glass using an ultrafast laser. Waveguides were written with a single pass while modulating the writing beam. The spatial and temporal profile of the writing beam was ontrolled during waveguide fabrication in order to control the shape and size of the waveguide cross-section.

  18. Raman fiber distributed feedback lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Paul S; Abedin, Kazi S; Nicholson, Jeffrey W; Kremp, Tristan; Porque, Jerome

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate fiber distributed feedback (DFB) lasers using Raman gain in two germanosilicate fibers. Our DFB cavities were 124 mm uniform fiber Bragg gratings with a π phase shift offset from the grating center. Our pump was at 1480 nm and the DFB lasers operated on a single longitudinal mode near 1584 nm. In a commercial Raman gain fiber, the maximum output power, linewidth, and threshold were 150 mW, 7.5 MHz, and 39 W, respectively. In a commercial highly nonlinear fiber, these figures improved to 350 mW, 4 MHz, and 4.3 W, respectively. In both lasers, more than 75% of pump power was transmitted, allowing for the possibility of substantial amplification in subsequent Raman gain fiber. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  19. Dynamics of long ring Raman fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, Sergey V.; Melnikov, Leonid A.; Mazhirina, Yulia A.

    2016-04-01

    The numerical model for dynamics of long fiber ring Raman laser is proposed. The model is based on the transport equations and Courant-Isaacson-Rees numerical method. Different regimes of a long ring fiber Raman laser are investigated.

  20. Laser generated soliton waveguides in photorefractive crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, V.I.; Fazio, E.; Bertolotti, M.; Bosco, A.; Petris, A.

    2005-01-01

    Non-linear photo-excited processes using the photorefractive effect are revisited with emphasis on spatial soliton generation in special laser beam propagation conditions. The soliton beams can create reversible or irreversible single-mode waveguides in the propagating materials. The important features are the 3D orientation and graded index profile matched to the laser fundamental mode. Bright spatial solitons are theoretically demonstrated and experimentally observed for the propagation of c.w. and pulsed femtosecond laser beams in photorefractive materials such as Bi 12 SiO 20 (BSO) and lithium niobate crystals. Applications in high coupling efficiency, adaptive optical interconnections and photonic crystal production are possible

  1. Femtosecond laser written waveguides deep inside silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, I; Tokel, O; Pavlova, S; Kadan, V; Makey, G; Turnali, A; Yavuz, Ö; Ilday, F Ö

    2017-08-01

    Photonic devices that can guide, transfer, or modulate light are highly desired in electronics and integrated silicon (Si) photonics. Here, we demonstrate for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the creation of optical waveguides deep inside Si using femtosecond pulses at a central wavelength of 1.5 μm. To this end, we use 350 fs long, 2 μJ pulses with a repetition rate of 250 kHz from an Er-doped fiber laser, which we focused inside Si to create permanent modifications of the crystal. The position of the beam is accurately controlled with pump-probe imaging during fabrication. Waveguides that were 5.5 mm in length and 20 μm in diameter were created by scanning the focal position along the beam propagation axis. The fabricated waveguides were characterized with a continuous-wave laser operating at 1.5 μm. The refractive index change inside the waveguide was measured with optical shadowgraphy, yielding a value of 6×10 -4 , and by direct light coupling and far-field imaging, yielding a value of 3.5×10 -4 . The formation mechanism of the modification is discussed.

  2. Production and characterization of femtosecond laser-written double line waveguides in heavy metal oxide glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Diego Silvério; Wetter, Niklaus Ursus; de Rossi, Wagner; Kassab, Luciana Reyes Pires; Samad, Ricardo Elgul

    2018-01-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of double line waveguides directly written in tellurite and germanate glasses using a femtosecond laser delivering 30 μJ, 80 fs pulses at 4 kHz repetition rate. The double line waveguides produced presented internal losses inferior to 2.0 dB/cm. The output mode profile and the M2 measurements indicate multimodal guiding behavior. A better beam quality for the GeO2 - PbO waveguide was observed when compared with TeO2 - ZnO glass. Raman spectroscopy of the waveguides showed structural modification of the glassy network and indicates that a negative refractive index modification occurs at the focus of the laser beam, therefore allowing for light guiding in between two closely spaced laser written lines. The refractive index change at 632 nm is around 10-4, and the structural changes in the laser focal region of the writing, evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, corroborated our findings that these materials are potential candidates for optical waveguides and passive components. To the best of our knowledge, the two double line configuration demonstrated in the present work was not reported before for germanate or tellurite glasses.

  3. Ti:Sapphire waveguide lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnau, Markus; Pashinin, P.P.; Grivas, C.; Laversenne, L.; Wilkinson, J.S.; Eason, R.W.; Shepherd, D.P.

    2007-01-01

    Titanium-doped sapphire is one of the most prominent laser materials and is appreciated for its excellent heat conductivity and broadband gain spectrum, allowing for a wide wavelength tunability and generation of ultrashort pulses. As one of the hardest materials, it can also serve as a model system

  4. Femtosecond laser-written double line waveguides in germanate and tellurite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. da Silva, Diego; Wetter, Niklaus U.; de Rossi, Wagner; Samad, Ricardo E.; Kassab, Luciana R. P.

    2018-02-01

    The authors report the fabrication and characterization of passive waveguides in GeO2-PbO and TeO2-ZnO glasses written with a femtosecond laser delivering pulses with 3μJ, 30μJ and 80fs at 4kHz repetition rate. Permanent refractive index change at the focus of the laser beam was obtained and waveguides were formed by two closely spaced laser written lines, where the light guiding occurs between them. The refractive index change at 632 nm is around 10-4 . The value of the propagation losses was around 2.0 dB/cm. The output mode profiles indicate multimodal guiding behavior. Raman measurements show structural modification of the glassy network. The results show that these materials are potential candidates for passive waveguides applications as low-loss optical components.

  5. PM Raman fiber laser at 1679 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a PM Raman fiber laser emitting light at 1679 nm. The laser has an slope efficiency of 67 % and an output power of more than 275mWwith a 27 pm linewidth.......We demonstrate a PM Raman fiber laser emitting light at 1679 nm. The laser has an slope efficiency of 67 % and an output power of more than 275mWwith a 27 pm linewidth....

  6. Femtosecond laser inscribed cladding waveguide lasers in Nd:LiYF4 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Ling; Huang, Ze-Ping; Ye, Yong-Kai; Wang, Hai-Long

    2018-06-01

    Depressed circular cladding, buried waveguides were fabricated in Nd:LiYF4 crystals with an ultrafast Yb-doped fiber master-oscillator power amplifier laser. Waveguides were optimized by varying the laser writing conditions, such as pulse energy, focus depth, femtosecond laser polarization and scanning velocity. Under optical pump at 799 nm, cladding waveguides showed continuous-wave laser oscillation at 1047 nm. Single- and multi-transverse modes waveguide laser were realized by varying the waveguide diameter. The maximum output power in the 40 μm waveguide is ∼195 mW with a slope efficiency of 34.3%. The waveguide lasers with hexagonal and cubic cladding geometry were also realized.

  7. Mixture analysis with laser raman spctroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.S.; Bark, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    Trace amount of methyl orange was determined in colored medium by resonance Raman spectrometry. Without major modification of a commercial laser Raman spectrometer, the resonance Raman active molecule could be determined satisfactorily in 10sup(-5)M range when the background fluorescence was more than 20 times stronger than the signal. Use of fluorescence quenching agent was found helpful to improve the Raman signal. Suggestions for the improvement of analytical method is presented. (Author)

  8. Optimizing laser crater enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V N; Sdvizhenskii, P A; Grishin, M Ya; Filichkina, V A; Shchegolikhin, A N; Pershin, S M

    2018-03-20

    Raman signal enhancement by laser crater production was systematically studied for 785 nm continuous wave laser pumping. Laser craters were produced in L-aspartic acid powder by a nanosecond pulsed solid state neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser (532 nm, 8 ns, 1 mJ/pulse), while Raman spectra were then acquired by using a commercial spectrometer with 785 nm laser beam pumping. The Raman signal enhancement effect was studied in terms of the number of ablating pulses used, the lens-to-sample distance, and the crater-center-laser-spot offset. The influence of the experiment parameters on Raman signal enhancement was studied for different powder materials. Maximum Raman signal enhancement reached 11 fold for loose powders but decreased twice for pressed tablets. Raman signal enhancement was demonstrated for several diverse powder materials like gypsum or ammonium nitrate with better results achieved for the samples tending to give narrow and deep craters upon the laser ablation stage. Alternative ways of cavity production (steel needle tapping and hole drilling) were compared with the laser cratering technique in terms of Raman signal enhancement. Drilling was found to give the poorest enhancement of the Raman signal, while both laser ablation and steel needle tapping provided comparable results. Here, we have demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that a Raman signal can be enhanced 10 fold with the aid of simple cavity production by steel needle tapping in rough highly reflective materials. Though laser crater enhancement Raman spectroscopy requires an additional pulsed laser, this technique is more appropriate for automatization compared to the needle tapping approach.

  9. ytterbium- & erbium-doped silica for planar waveguide lasers & amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyndgaard, Morten Glarborg

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate ytterbium doped planar components and investigate the possibilities of making erbium/ytterbium codoped planar waveguides in germano-silica glass. Furthermore, tools for modelling lasers and erbium/ytterbium doped amplifiers. The planar waveguides were...

  10. Single-transverse-mode Ti:sapphire rib waveguide laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grivas, C.; Shepherd, D.P.; May-Smith, T.C.; Eason, R.W.; Pollnau, Markus

    2005-01-01

    Laser operation of Ti:sapphire rib waveguides fabricated using photolithography and ion beam etching in pulsed laser deposited layers is reported. Polarized laser emission was observed at 792.5 nm with an absorbed pump power threshold of 265 mW, which is more than a factor of 2 lower in comparison

  11. Optically amplifying planar glass waveguides: Laser on a chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldberg-Kjær, Søren Andreas

    with UV-light and that permanent Bragg-gratings can be induced. Planar waveguide lasers with integrated Bragg-gratings are manufactured and characterised. It is shown that linewidths below 125 kHz and output powers around 0.5 mW can be obtained, and that the manufactured lasers are resistant to mechanical...... lightwave circuits, as well as provide the gain medium for integrated planar waveguide lasers. The work and the obtained results are presented in this thesis: The manufacturing of silica thin films is described and it is shown that the refractive index of the films can be controlled by germanium co...... as well as thermal influence. A simple method for producing an array of planar waveguide lasers is presented and it is shown that the difference in output wavelength of the individual lasers can be controlled with great accuracy....

  12. Planar waveguide amplifiers and laser in erbium doped silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldberg-Kjær, Søren Andreas; Kristensen, Martin

    1999-01-01

    with UV-light and that permanent Bragg-gratings can be induced. Planar waveguide lasers with integrated Bragg-gratings are manufactured and characterised. It is shown that linewidths below 125 kHz and output powers around 0.5 mW can be obtained, and that the manufactured lasers are resistant to mechanical...... lightwave circuits, as well as provide the gain medium for integrated planar waveguide lasers. The work and the obtained results are presented in this thesis: The manufacturing of silica thin films is described and it is shown that the refractive index o fthe films can be controlled by germanium co...... as well as thermal influence. A simple method for producing an array of planar waveguide lasers is presented and it is shown that the difference in output wavelength of the individual lasers can be controlled with great accuracy....

  13. Ultrafast laser writing of optical waveguides in ceramic Yb:YAG: a study of thermal and non-thermal regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benayas, A.; Jaque, D. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Madrid (Spain); Silva, W.F.; Jacinto, C. [Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Grupo de Fotonica e Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Fisica, Maceio, Alagoas (Brazil); Rodenas, A.; Thomsom, R.R.; Psaila, N.D.; Reid, D.T.; Kar, A.K. [Heriot-Watt University, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Vazquez de Aldana, J. [Universidad de Salamanca, Grupo de Optica, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Salamanca (Spain); Chen, F.; Tan, Y. [Shandong University, School of Physics, Jinan (China); Torchia, G.A. [CONICET-CIC, Centro de Investigaciones Opticas, La Plata (Argentina)

    2011-07-15

    We report the improvement of ultrafast laser written optical waveguides in Yb:YAG ceramics by tailoring the presence of heat accumulation effects. From a combination of ytterbium micro-luminescence and micro-Raman structural analysis, maps of lattice defects and stress fields have been obtained. We show how laser annealing can strongly reduce the concentration of defects and also reduce compressive stress, leading to an effective 50% reduction in the propagation losses and to more extended and symmetric propagation modes. (orig.)

  14. Femtosecond laser inscribed cladding waveguides in Nd:YAG ceramics: fabrication, fluorescence imaging and laser performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongliang; Jia, Yuechen; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier Rodríguez; Jaque, Daniel; Chen, Feng

    2012-08-13

    We report on the fabrication of depressed cladding waveguide lasers in Nd:YAG (neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet, Nd:Y3Al5O12) ceramics microstructured by femtosecond laser pulses. Full control over the confined light spatial distribution is demonstrated by the fabrication of high contrast waveguides with hexagonal, circular and trapezoidal configurations. The confocal fluorescence measurements of the waveguides reveal that the original luminescence features of Nd3+ ions are well-preserved in the waveguide regions. Under optical pump at 808 nm, cladding waveguides showed continuous wave efficient laser oscillation. The maximum output power obtained at 1064.5 nm is ~181 mW with a slope efficiency as high as 44%, which suggests that the fabricated Nd:YAG ceramic waveguides are promising candidates for efficient integrated laser sources.

  15. Detection of laser damage by Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauchet, P.M.; Campbell, I.H.; Adar, F.

    1988-01-01

    The authors demonstrate that Raman miroscopy is a sensitive and quantitative tool to detect and characterize laser-induced damage in solids. After damage is induced with single or multiple high power laser pulses, a Raman microprobe maps the surface of the sample with one micron spatial resolution. By performing accurate measurements of the Stokes line, the authors have been able to measure stress, strain and crystallinity in various samples which had been exposed to high intensity pulses. These results are compared to those obtained using conventional tools such as Nomarski microscopy. Major advantages of Raman microscopy include sensitivity to subtle structural modifications and the fact that it gives quantitative measurements

  16. Fabrication, operation, and applications of efficient dielectric waveguide lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnau, Markus; van Dalfsen, Koop; Bernhardi, Edward; Geskus, D.; Worhoff, Kerstin; de Ridder, R.M.; García Blanco, Sonia Maria

    This paper reviews our recent results on rare-earth-ion-doped integrated lasers. We have concentrated our efforts on crystalline potassium double tungstates and amorphous aluminum oxide. In the former material class we have demonstrated channel waveguide lasers based on Yb3+ doping, operating near 1

  17. Investigation of SOI Raman Lasers for Mid-Infrared Gas Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Vittorio M.N.; De Leonardis, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the investigation and detailed modeling of a cascaded Raman laser, operating in the midwave infrared region, is described. The device is based on silicon-on-insulator optical waveguides and a coupled resonant microcavity. Theoretical results are compared with recent experiments, demonstrating a very good agreement. Design criteria are derived for cascaded Raman lasers working as continuous wave light sources to simultaneously sense two types of gases, namely C2H6 and CO2, at a moderate power level of 130 mW. PMID:22408481

  18. Nd:Ta2O5 rib waveguide lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, Bayram; Tai, C.-Y.; Shepherd, David P.; Wilkinson, James S.; Perney, Nicolas M.B.; Netti, M. Caterina; Parker, Gregory J.

    2005-01-01

    Ta 2 O 5 waveguides offer great potential for high-density active photonic crystal circuits and their combination with rare-earth dopants for active devices is of interest for increasing their potential functionality. To this end, neodymium-doped Ta 2 O 5 rib waveguide lasers have been fabricated on an oxidized silicon wafer by rf sputtering and argon ion-beam milling and laser action in this material has been demonstrated. Lasing was observed at wavelenghts between 1060 and 1080 nm and an absorbed pump power threshold of 87 mW was obtained

  19. Planar waveguide laser in Er/Al-doped germanosilicate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldberg-Kjær, Søren Andreas; Hübner, Jörg; Kristensen, Martin

    1999-01-01

    A singlemode DBR laser is demonstrated in an Er/Al-doped germanosilicate planar waveguide. 0.4 mW of output power has been obtained at 1.553 mu m using internal Bragg reflectors produced by UV-induced index modulations.......A singlemode DBR laser is demonstrated in an Er/Al-doped germanosilicate planar waveguide. 0.4 mW of output power has been obtained at 1.553 mu m using internal Bragg reflectors produced by UV-induced index modulations....

  20. Raman beam combining for laser brightness enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Jay W.; Allen, Graham S.; Pax, Paul H.; Heebner, John E.; Sridharan, Arun K.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Barty, Chrisopher B. J.

    2015-10-27

    An optical source capable of enhanced scaling of pulse energy and brightness utilizes an ensemble of single-aperture fiber lasers as pump sources, with each such fiber laser operating at acceptable pulse energy levels. Beam combining involves stimulated Raman scattering using a Stokes' shifted seed beam, the latter of which is optimized in terms of its temporal and spectral properties. Beams from fiber lasers can thus be combined to attain pulses with peak energies in excess of the fiber laser self-focusing limit of 4 MW while retaining the advantages of a fiber laser system of high average power with good beam quality.

  1. Laser-Raman spectroscopy of living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    Investigations into the laser-Raman shift spectra of bacterial and mammalian cells have revealed that many Raman lines observed at 4-6 K, do not appear in the spectra of cells held at 300 K. At 300 K, Raman activity, at set frequencies, is observed only when the cells are metabolically active; however, the actual live cell spectrum, between 0 and 3400 cm -1 , has been found to alter in a specific way with time as the cells' progress through their life cycles. Lines above 300 cm -1 , from in vivo Raman active states, appear to shift to higher wave numbers whereas those below 300 cm -1 seem to shift to lower ones. The transient nature of many shift lines observed and the intensity of them when present in the spectrum indicates that, in, vivo, a metabolically induced condensation of closely related states occurs at a set time in the life of a living cell. In addition, the calculated ratio between the intensities of Stokes and anti-Stokes lines observed suggests that the metabolically induced 'collective' Raman active states are produced, in vivo, by non thermal means. It appears, therefore, that the energetics of the well established cell 'time clock' may be studied by laser-Raman spectroscopy; moreover, Raman spectroscopy may yield a new type of information regarding the physics of such biological phenomena as nutrition, virus infection and oncogenesis. (orig.)

  2. Stimulated Raman backscattering at high laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoric, M M [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Tajima, Toshiki; Sasaki, Akira; Maluckov, A; Jovanovic, M

    1998-03-01

    Signatures of Stimulated Raman backscattering of a short-pulse high-intensity laser interacting with an underdense plasma are discussed. We introduce a nonlinear three-wave interaction model that accounts for laser pump depletion and relativistic detuning. A mechanism is revealed based on a generic route to chaos, that predicts a progressive increase of the backscatter complexity with a growing laser intensity. Importance of kinetic effects is outlined and demonstrated in fluid-hybrid and particle simulations. As an application, we show that spectral anomalies of the backscatter, predicted by the above model, are consistent with recent sub-picosecond, high-intensity laser gas-target measurements at Livermore and elsewhere. Finally, a recently proposed scheme for generation of ultra-short, low-prepulse laser pulses by Raman backscattering in a thin foil target, is shown. (author)

  3. Laser-induced nonlinear crystalline waveguide on glass fiber format and diode-pumped second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jindan; Feng, Xian

    2018-03-01

    We report a diode pumped self-frequency-doubled nonlinear crystalline waveguide on glass fiber. A ribbon fiber has been drawn on the glass composition of 50GeO2-25B2O3-25(La,Yb)2O3. Surface channel waveguides have been written on the surface of the ribbon fiber, using space-selective laser heating method with the assistance of a 244 nm CW UV laser. The Raman spectrum of the written area indicates that the waveguide is composed of structure-deformed nonlinear (La,Yb)BGeO5 crystal. The laser-induced surface wavy cracks have also been observed and the forming mechanism of the wavy cracks has been discussed. Efficient second harmonic generation has been observed from the laser-induced crystalline waveguide, using a 976 nm diode pump. 13 μW of 488 nm output has been observed from a 17 mm long waveguide with 26.0 mW of launched diode pump power, corresponding to a normalized conversion efficiency of 4.4%W-1.

  4. Near-infrared lasers and self-frequency-doubling in Nd:YCOB cladding waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yingying; Chen, Feng; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R

    2013-05-06

    A design of cladding waveguides in Nd:YCOB nonlinear crystals is demonstrated in this work. Compact Fabry-Perot oscillation cavities are employed for waveguide laser generation at 1062 nm and self-frequency-doubling at 531 nm, under optical pump at 810 nm. The waveguide laser shows slope efficiency as high as 55% at 1062 nm. The SFD green waveguide laser emits at 531 nm with a maximum power of 100 μW.

  5. Optimizing laser crater enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V. N.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A.; Grishin, M. Ya.; Fedorov, A. N.; Khokhlova, O. V.; Oshurko, V. B.; Pershin, S. M.

    2018-05-01

    The laser crater enhanced Raman scattering (LCERS) spectroscopy technique has been systematically studied for chosen sampling strategy and influence of powder material properties on spectra intensity enhancement. The same nanosecond pulsed solid state Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 10 ns, 0.1-1.5 mJ/pulse) was used for laser crater production and Raman scattering experiments for L-aspartic acid powder. Increased sampling area inside crater cavity is the key factor for Raman signal improvement for the LCERS technique, thus Raman signal enhancement was studied as a function of numerous experimental parameters including lens-to-sample distance, wavelength (532 and 1064 nm) and laser pulse energy utilized for crater production. Combining laser pulses of 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths for crater ablation was shown to be an effective way for additional LCERS signal improvement. Powder material properties (particle size distribution, powder compactness) were demonstrated to affect LCERS measurements with better results achieved for smaller particles and lower compactness.

  6. Graphene Q-switched Yb:KYW planar waveguide laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Jun Wan; Choi, Sun Young; Aravazhi, S.; Pollnau, Markus; Griebner, Uwe; Petrov, Valentin; Bae, Sukang; Ahn, Kwang Jun; Yeom, Dong-Il; Rotermund, Fabian

    A diode-pumped Yb:KYW planar waveguide laser, single-mode Q-switched by evanescent-field interaction with graphene, is demonstrated for the first time. Few-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition is transferred onto the top of a guiding layer, which initiates stable Q-switched operation in

  7. A hybrid plasmonic waveguide terahertz quantum cascade laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degl' Innocenti, Riccardo, E-mail: rd448@cam.ac.uk; Shah, Yash D.; Wallis, Robert; Klimont, Adam; Ren, Yuan; Jessop, David S.; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-23

    We present the realization of a quantum cascade laser emitting at around 2.85 THz, based on a hybrid plasmonic waveguide with a low refractive index dielectric cladding. This hybrid waveguide design allows the performance of a double-metal waveguide to be retained, while improving the emission far-field. A set of lasers based on the same active region material were fabricated with different metal layer thicknesses. A detailed characterization of the performance of these lasers revealed that there is an optimal trade-off that yields the best far-field emission and the maximum temperature of operation. By exploiting the pure plasmonic mode of these waveguides, the standard operation conditions of a double-metal quantum cascade laser were retrieved, such that the maximum operating temperature of these devices is not affected by the process. These results pave the way to realizing a class of integrated devices working in the terahertz range which could be further exploited to fabricate terahertz on-chip circuitry.

  8. Guiding of laser pulses in plasma waveguides created by linearly-polarized femtosecond laser pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Lemos, N.; Cardoso, L.; Geada, J.; Figueira, G.; Albert, F.; Dias, J. M.

    2018-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that plasma waveguides produced with ultra-short laser pulses (sub-picosecond) in gas jets are capable of guiding high intensity laser pulses. This scheme has the unique ability of guiding a high-intensity laser pulse in a plasma waveguide created by the same laser system in the very simple and stable experimental setup. A hot plasma column was created by a femtosecond class laser that expands into an on-axis parabolic low density profile suitable to act as a wav...

  9. Monolithic micro-laser with KTP ridge waveguides for injection seeding high power lasers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will develop a technique to greatly improve the direct coupling of a diode laser to an optical waveguide...

  10. Extracting interface locations in multilayer polymer waveguide films using scanning angle Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobbitt, Jonathan M.; Smith, Emily A.

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for nondestructive in situ techniques that measure chemical content, total thickness, and interface locations for multilayer polymer films, and SA Raman spectroscopy in combination with appropriate data models can provide this information. A scanning angle (SA) Raman spectroscopy method was developed to measure the chemical composition of multilayer polymer waveguide films and to extract the location of buried interfaces between polymer layers with 7–80-nm axial spatial resolution. The SA Raman method measures Raman spectra as the incident angle of light upon a prism-coupled thin film is scanned. Six multilayer films consisting of poly(methyl methacrylate)/polystyrene or poly(methyl methacrylate)/polystyrene/poly(methyl methacrylate) were prepared with total thicknesses ranging from 330-1260 nm. The interface locations were varied by altering the individual layer thicknesses between 140-680 nm. The Raman amplitude ratio of the 1605 cm -1 peak for PS and 812 cm -1 peak for PMMA was used in calculations of the electric field intensity within the polymer layers to model the SA Raman data and extract the total thickness and interface locations. There is an average 8% and 7% difference in the measured thickness between the SA Raman and profilometry measurements for bilayer and trilayer films, respectively.

  11. Microscope Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction study of near-stoichiometric Ti:LiNbO3 waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, De-Long; Siu, G.G.; Pun, E.Y.B.

    2005-01-01

    The crystalline phase within guiding layers of near-stoichiometric strip and planar Ti:LiNbO 3 wave-guides, prepared by the method of simultaneous work of vapour transport equilibration (VTE) treatment and indiffusion of Ti film, was studied by combined confocal microscope Raman scattering and X-ray powder diffraction. The results show that the strip and planar waveguide layers still retain the LiNbO 3 phase and no other non-LiNbO 3 phases can be identified within the guiding layer. Li/Nb ratios inside and outside the strip and planar waveguide layers were determined from the microscope Raman scattering results and compared to those obtained from the measured optical absorption edge. It is shown that the Li/Nb ratios are homogeneous within the waveguide layer and are close inside and outside the waveguide layer. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. 40-fs hydrogen Raman laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didenko, N V; Konyashchenko, A V; Kostryukov, P V; Losev, L L; Pazyuk, V S [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tenyakov, S Yu [Avesta Ltd., Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Molchanov, V Ya; Chizhikov, S I; Yushkov, K B [National University of Science and Technology ' MISIS' , Acoustooptical Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-31

    40-fs first Stokes pulses at a wavelength of 1.2 μm were generated in a hydrogen SRS-converter pumped by orthogonally polarised double chirped pulses of a Ti : sapphire laser. To obtain a Stokes pulse close to a transform-limited one, a programmed acousto-optic dispersive delay line was placed between the master oscillator and regenerative amplifier. The energy efficiency of Stokes radiation conversion reached 22%. (lasers)

  13. 40-fs hydrogen Raman laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didenko, N V; Konyashchenko, A V; Kostryukov, P V; Losev, L L; Pazyuk, V S; Tenyakov, S Yu; Molchanov, V Ya; Chizhikov, S I; Yushkov, K B

    2015-01-01

    40-fs first Stokes pulses at a wavelength of 1.2 μm were generated in a hydrogen SRS-converter pumped by orthogonally polarised double chirped pulses of a Ti : sapphire laser. To obtain a Stokes pulse close to a transform-limited one, a programmed acousto-optic dispersive delay line was placed between the master oscillator and regenerative amplifier. The energy efficiency of Stokes radiation conversion reached 22%. (lasers)

  14. Fluorescence imaging of lattice re-distribution on step-index direct laser written Nd:YAG waveguide lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez de Mendívil, Jon; Pérez Delgado, Alberto; Lifante, Ginés; Jaque, Daniel [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Ródenas, Airán [Departament de Química Física i Inorgànica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona 43007 (Spain); Institute of Photonics and Quantum Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Benayas, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.benayas@emt.inrs.ca [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre – Énergie Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650, Boul. Lionel Boulet Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Aguiló, Magdalena; Diaz, Francesc [Departament de Química Física i Inorgànica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona 43007 (Spain); Kar, Ajoy K. [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-14

    The laser performance and crystalline micro-structural properties of near-infrared step-index channel waveguides fabricated inside Neodymium doped YAG laser ceramics by means of three-dimensional sub-picosecond pulse laser direct writing are reported. Fluorescence micro-mapping of the waveguide cross-sections reveals that an essential crystal lattice re-distribution has been induced after short pulse irradiation. Such lattice re-distribution is evidenced at the waveguide core corresponding to the laser written refractive index increased volume. The waveguides core surroundings also present diverse changes including slight lattice disorder and bi-axial strain fields. The step-index waveguide laser performance is compared with previous laser fabricated waveguides with a stress-optic guiding mechanism in absence of laser induced lattice re-distribution.

  15. Index-antiguided planar waveguide lasers with large mode area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanye

    The on-going research and application interests with high power large-mode-area (LMA) waveguide lasers, especially in fiber geometry, at the beginning of this century drive the development of many novel waveguide designs. Index antiguiding, proposed by Siegman in 2003, is among one of them. The goal for index antiguiding is to introduce transversal modal loss with the relative simple waveguide design while maintain single transverse mode operation for good beam quality. The idea which is selectively support of fundamental mode is facilitated by involving certain level of signal regeneration inside the waveguide core. Since the modal loss is closed associated with waveguide design parameters such as core size and refractive index, the amount of gain inside the core provides active control of transverse modes inside index-antiguiding waveguide. For example, fundamental transverse mode inside such waveguide can be excited and propagate lossless when sufficient optical gain is provided. This often requires doped waveguide core and optical pumping at corresponding absorption band. However, the involvement of optical pumping also has its consequences. Phenomena such as thermal-optic effect and gain spatial hole-burning which are commonly found in bulk lasers request attention when scaling up output power with LMA index-antiguided waveguide amplifiers and resonators. In response, three key challenges of index-antiguided planar waveguide lasers, namely, guiding mechanism, power efficiency and transverse mode discrimination, are analyzed theoretically and experimentally in this dissertation. Experiments are based on two index-antiguided planar waveguide chips, whose core thickness are 220 microm and 400 microm respectively. The material of waveguide core is 1% Neodymium-doped Yttrium Aluminium garnet, or Nd:YAG while the cladding is made from Terbium Gallium garnet, or TGG. Due to the face pumping and limited pump power, it is found, with 220 microm-thick-core chip, that

  16. Laser cutting technology using water jet waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Miyuki; Shiihara, Katsunori; Chida, Itaru

    2013-01-01

    Laser with water jet is examined to cut in-vessel structure. However, it is necessary to increase the break-up length of water jet to cut a thick plate. Therefore, the effects of the water jet parameter (water pressure, assist gas, laser power) on break-up length were investigated. It was found from observation results of water jet that the longest break-up length is about 135mm under condition of water pressure 40 MPa, laser power 30W and helium assist gas 1L/min. (author)

  17. Semiconductor ring lasers coupled by a single waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomans, W.; Gelens, L.; Van der Sande, G.; Mezosi, G.; Sorel, M.; Danckaert, J.; Verschaffelt, G.

    2012-06-01

    We experimentally and theoretically study the characteristics of semiconductor ring lasers bidirectionally coupled by a single bus waveguide. This configuration has, e.g., been suggested for use as an optical memory and as an optical neural network motif. The main results are that the coupling can destabilize the state in which both rings lase in the same direction, and it brings to life a state with equal powers at both outputs. These are both undesirable for optical memory operation. Although the coupling between the rings is bidirectional, the destabilization occurs due to behavior similar to an optically injected laser system.

  18. Plasmonic Waveguide-Integrated Nanowire Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bermudez-Urena, Esteban; Tutuncuoglu, Gozde; Cuerda, Javier

    2017-01-01

    technologies. Despite significant advances in their fundamental aspects, the integration within scalable photonic circuitry remains challenging. Here we report on the realization of hybrid photonic devices consisting of nanowire lasers integrated with wafer-scale lithographically designed V-groove plasmonic......Next-generation optoelectronic devices and photonic circuitry will have to incorporate on-chip compatible nanolaser sources. Semiconductor nanowire lasers have emerged as strong candidates for integrated systems with applications ranging from ultrasensitive sensing to data communication...

  19. Continuous anti-Stokes Raman laser operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feitisch, A.; Muller, T.; Welling, H.; Wellegehausen, B.

    1988-01-01

    The anti-Stokes Raman laser (ASRL) process has proved to be a method that works well for frequency upconversion and for the generation of powerful tunable narrowband (pulsed) laser radiation in the UV and VUV spectral range. This conversion process allows large-frequency shifts in single step, high output energies, and high efficiencies. A basic requirement is population inversion on a two-photon transition, where, in general, the upper level of the transition should be metastable. Up to now the ASRL technique has only been demonstrated for the pulsed regime, where the necessary population inversion was generated by photodissociation or inner shell photoionization. These inversion techniques, however, cannot be transferred to cw operation of an ASRL, and, therefore, other inversion techniques have to be developed. Here a novel approach for the creation of the necessary population inversion is proposed, that uses well-known cw gas lasers as the active material for the conversion process. The basic idea is to use either existing two-photon population inversions in a cw laser material or to generate the necessary population inversion by applying a suitable population transfer process to the material. A natural two-photon inversion situation in a laser material is evident whenever a cascade laser can be operated. Cascade laser-based anti-Stokes schemes are possible in a He-Ne laser discharge, and investigations of these schemes are discussed

  20. Efficient Raman generation in a waveguide: A route to ultrafast quantum random number generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    England, D. G.; Bustard, P. J.; Moffatt, D. J.; Nunn, J.; Lausten, R.; Sussman, B. J., E-mail: ben.sussman@nrc.ca [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2014-02-03

    The inherent uncertainty in quantum mechanics offers a source of true randomness which can be used to produce unbreakable cryptographic keys. We discuss the development of a high-speed random number generator based on the quantum phase fluctuations in spontaneously initiated stimulated Raman scattering (SISRS). We utilize the tight confinement and long interaction length available in a Potassium Titanyl Phosphate waveguide to generate highly efficient SISRS using nanojoule pulse energies, reducing the high pump power requirements of the previous approaches. We measure the random phase of the Stokes output using a simple interferometric setup to yield quantum random numbers at 145 Mbps.

  1. Plasmonic Waveguide-Integrated Nanowire Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bermudez-Urena, Esteban; Tutuncuoglu, Gozde; Cuerda, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation optoelectronic devices and photonic circuitry will have to incorporate on-chip compatible nanolaser sources. Semiconductor nanowire lasers have emerged as strong candidates for integrated systems with applications ranging from ultrasensitive sensing to data communication technolog......Next-generation optoelectronic devices and photonic circuitry will have to incorporate on-chip compatible nanolaser sources. Semiconductor nanowire lasers have emerged as strong candidates for integrated systems with applications ranging from ultrasensitive sensing to data communication...... technologies. Despite significant advances in their fundamental aspects, the integration within scalable photonic circuitry remains challenging. Here we report on the realization of hybrid photonic devices consisting of nanowire lasers integrated with wafer-scale lithographically designed V-groove plasmonic...

  2. Investigations of a Dual Seeded 1178 nm Raman Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-14

    was obtained by Raman amplification of a distributed feedback diode laser in a variably strained polarization- maintaining fiber with a record-high...Calia, D.B., “50W CW visible laser source at 589 nm obtained via frequency doubling of three coherently combined narrow-band Raman fiber amplifiers...AFRL-RD-PS- TP-2016-0009 AFRL-RD-PS- TP-2016-0009 INVESTIGATIONS OF A DUAL SEEDED 1178 NM RAMAN LASER SYSTEM Leanne Henry, et al. 14 January

  3. Integration of quantum cascade lasers and passive waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, Juan, E-mail: juan.montoya@ll.mit.edu; Wang, Christine; Goyal, Anish; Creedon, Kevin; Connors, Michael; Daulton, Jeffrey; Donnelly, Joseph; Missaggia, Leo; Aleshire, Chris; Sanchez-Rubio, Antonio; Herzog, William [MIT Lincoln Laboratory, 244 Wood St, Lexington, Massachusetts 02420 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    We report on monolithic integration of active quantum cascade laser (QCL) materials with passive waveguides formed by using proton implantation. Proton implantation reduces the electron concentration in the QCL layers by creating deep levels that trap carriers. This strongly reduces the intersubband absorption and the free-carrier absorption in the gain region and surrounding layers, thus significantly reducing optical loss. We have measured loss as low as α = 0.33 cm{sup −1} in λ = 9.6 μm wavelength proton-implanted QCL material. We have also demonstrated lasing in active-passive integrated waveguides. This simple integration technique is anticipated to enable low-cost fabrication in infrared photonic integrated circuits in the mid-infrared (λ ∼ 3–16 μm)

  4. Integration of quantum cascade lasers and passive waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, Juan; Wang, Christine; Goyal, Anish; Creedon, Kevin; Connors, Michael; Daulton, Jeffrey; Donnelly, Joseph; Missaggia, Leo; Aleshire, Chris; Sanchez-Rubio, Antonio; Herzog, William

    2015-01-01

    We report on monolithic integration of active quantum cascade laser (QCL) materials with passive waveguides formed by using proton implantation. Proton implantation reduces the electron concentration in the QCL layers by creating deep levels that trap carriers. This strongly reduces the intersubband absorption and the free-carrier absorption in the gain region and surrounding layers, thus significantly reducing optical loss. We have measured loss as low as α = 0.33 cm −1 in λ = 9.6 μm wavelength proton-implanted QCL material. We have also demonstrated lasing in active-passive integrated waveguides. This simple integration technique is anticipated to enable low-cost fabrication in infrared photonic integrated circuits in the mid-infrared (λ ∼ 3–16 μm)

  5. Characterization of Bragg gratings in Al2O3 waveguides fabricated by focused ion beam milling and laser interference lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ay, F.; Bernhardi, Edward; Agazzi, L.; Bradley, J.; Worhoff, Kerstin; Pollnau, Markus; de Ridder, R.M.

    Optical grating cavities in Al2O3 channel waveguides were successfully defined by focused ion beam milling and laser interference lithography. Both methods are shown to be suitable for realizing resonant structures for on-chip waveguide lasers.

  6. Laser plant "Iguana" for transmyocardial revascularization based on kW-level waveguide CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, Vladislav Y.; Bockeria, L. A.; Berishvili, I. I.; Vasiltsov, Victor V.; Golubev, Vladimir S.; Ul'yanov, Valery A.

    2001-05-01

    For many years the Institute on Laser and Information Technologies RAN has been developing a concept of high-power industrial CO2 lasers with diffusion cooling of the working medium. The paper gives a description of the laser medical system Iguana for transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMLR) as an example of various applications of high-power waveguide CO2 lasers. The clinical results of the TMLR method application in surgical treatment are presented. The methods of determination of the time, when the laser beam passes through the demarcation line between myocardium tissue and blood, are discussed.

  7. UV laser-assisted fabrication of ridge waveguides in lithium niobate crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Sones, C.L.; Ying, C.Y.J.; Eason, R.W.; Mailis, S.; Ganguly, P.; Soergel, E.

    2010-01-01

    We present a UV laser-assisted method for the fabrication of ridge waveguides in lithium niobate. The UV laser irradiation step provides the refractive index change required for the vertical light confinement in the waveguide and also defines the ferroelectric domain pattern which produces the ridge structures after chemical etching.

  8. Infrared plasmonic nano-lasers based on Metal Insulator Metal waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hill, M.T.

    2010-01-01

    We will present our latest results on metal-insulator-metal waveguide devices, in particular reducing the dimensions of devices and distributed feedback lasers. Also we will examine potential useful applications for metal nano-lasers.

  9. Concept of infrared laser particle accelerators with oversized DBR and HFB waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnesson, J.; Gnepf, S.; Nessi, M.; Woelfli, W.; Kneubuehl, F.K.

    1986-01-01

    We present an infrared-laser accelerator scheme which makes use of hollow oversized linear periodic and helical waveguide structures originally designed for distributed feedback (DFB) and helical feedback (HFB) lasers

  10. Low-loss optical waveguides in β-BBO crystal fabricated by femtosecond-laser writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziqi; Cheng, Chen; Romero, Carolina; Lu, Qingming; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier Rodríguez; Chen, Feng

    2017-11-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of β-BBO depressed cladding waveguides fabricated by femtosecond-laser writing with no significant changes in the waveguide lattice microstructure. The waveguiding properties and the propagation losses of the cladding structures are investigated, showing good transmission properties at wavelengths of 400 and 800 nm along TM polarization. The minimum propagation losses are measured to be as low as 0.19 dB/cm at wavelength of 800 nm. The well-preserved waveguide lattice microstructure and good guiding performances with low propagation losses suggest the potential applications of the cladding waveguides in β-BBO crystal as novel integrated photonic devices.

  11. Tubular depressed cladding waveguide laser realized in Yb: YAG by direct inscription of femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Wenlong; Zhang, Wenfu; Liu, Xin; Liu, Shuang; Cheng, Guanghua; Stoian, Razvan

    2015-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of tubular depressed cladding waveguides in single crystalline Yb:YAG by the direct femtosecond laser writing technique. Full control over the confined light spatial distribution is demonstrated by the photoinscription of high index contrast waveguides with tubular configuration. Under optical pumping, highly efficient laser oscillation in depressed cladding waveguide at 1030 nm is demonstrated. The maximum output power obtained is 68 mW with a slope efficiency of 35% for an outcoupling transmission of 50%. A slope efficiency as high as 44% is realized when the coupling output ratio is 91% and a low lasing threshold of 70 mW is achieved with the output coupling mirror of 10%. (paper)

  12. Wavelength-tunable laser based on nonlinear dispersive-wave generation in a tapered optical waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and a wavelength tunable laser comprising a first laser source configured to emit a first optical pulse having a pump wavelength, the first optical pulse being emitted in a first longitudinal direction. Furthermore, the wavelength tunable laser comprises...... a waveguide extending in the first longitudinal direction, the waveguide having longitudinally varying phase matching conditions, the waveguide being configured to generate a second optical pulse with a centre wavelength upon receiving the first optical pulse, wherein the wavelength tunable laser...... is configured to tune the centre wavelength of the second optical pulse by varying at least one pulse property of the first optical pulse....

  13. Para-hydrogen raman laser and its application to laser induced chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Hideo

    1988-01-01

    The report outlines the mechanism of the para-hydrogen Raman laser as a infrared light source, and its application to laser induced chemistry. The Stoke's wave number after a Raman shift is equal to the difference between the wave number of the CO 2 laser used for excitation and the rotation Raman wave number of the hydrogen molecule. A Raman laser can serve as an infrared source. CO 2 laser oscillation beam in the range of 9∼11 micrometers is selected and the frequency of infrared beam is varied by changing the wave number of the CO 2 laser beam. A problem with the Raman laser is that the Raman scatterring gain is small due to a large wavelength. In developing equipment, a special mechanism is required to solve this problem. A Raman laser comprises a CO 2 laser for excitation and multi-pulse Raman cells. The combination of a TEA oscillator and amplifiers gives CO 2 pulses with a peak power of about several tens of MW. Many heavy metal compounds including fluorides, carbonyl compounds and other organic compounds, absorb light with wavelengths in the same range as those of the Raman laser. Such compounds can be dissociated directly by applying Raman laser beams. The laser will be helpful for separation of isotopes, etc. (Nogami, K.)

  14. Waveguides fabricated by femtosecond laser exploiting both depressed cladding and stress-induced guiding core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ming-Ming; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Wu, Zheng-Xiang; Zhang, Yang; Pan, Huai-Hai; Zhao, Quan-Zhong

    2013-07-01

    We report on the fabrication of stress-induced optical channel waveguides and waveguide splitters with laser-depressed cladding by femtosecond laser. The laser beam was focused into neodymium doped phosphate glass by an objective producing a destructive filament. By moving the sample along an enclosed routine in the horizontal plane followed by a minor descent less than the filament length in the vertical direction, a cylinder with rarified periphery and densified center region was fabricated. Lining up the segments in partially overlapping sequence enabled waveguiding therein. The refractive-index contrast, near- and far-field mode distribution and confocal microscope fluorescence image of the waveguide were obtained. 1-to-2, 1-to-3 and 1-to-4 splitters were also machined with adjustable splitting ratio. Compared with traditional femtosecond laser writing methods, waveguides prepared by this approach showed controllable mode conduction, strong field confinement, large numerical aperture, low propagation loss and intact core region.

  15. UV Resonant Raman Spectrometer with Multi-Line Laser Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, James L.; Kohel, James M.; Kirby, James P.; Morookian, John Michael; Pelletier, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    A Raman spectrometer employs two or more UV (ultraviolet) laser wavel engths to generate UV resonant Raman (UVRR) spectra in organic sampl es. Resonant Raman scattering results when the laser excitation is n ear an electronic transition of a molecule, and the enhancement of R aman signals can be several orders of magnitude. In addition, the Ra man cross-section is inversely proportional to the fourth power of t he wavelength, so the UV Raman emission is increased by another fact or of 16, or greater, over visible Raman emissions. The Raman-scatter ed light is collected using a high-resolution broadband spectrograph . Further suppression of the Rayleigh-scattered laser light is provi ded by custom UV notch filters.

  16. Laser ablation surface-enhanced Raman microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londero, Pablo S; Lombardi, John R; Leona, Marco

    2013-06-04

    Improved identification of trace organic compounds in complex matrixes is critical for a variety of fields such as material science, heritage science, and forensics. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a vibrational spectroscopy technique that can attain single-molecule sensitivity and has been shown to complement mass spectrometry, but lacks widespread application without a robust method that utilizes the effect. We demonstrate a new, highly sensitive, and widely applicable approach to SERS analysis based on laser ablation in the presence of a tailored plasmonic substrate. We analyze several challenging compounds, including non-water-soluble pigments and dyed leather from an ancient Egyptian chariot, achieving sensitivity as high as 120 amol for a 1:1 signal-to-noise ratio and 5 μm spatial resolution. This represents orders of magnitude improvement in spatial resolution and sensitivity compared to those of other SERS approaches intended for widespread application, greatly increasing the applicability of SERS.

  17. Low loss depressed cladding waveguide inscribed in YAG:Nd single crystal by femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhrimchuk, Andrey; Mezentsev, Vladimir; Shestakov, Alexander; Bennion, Ian

    2012-02-13

    A depressed cladding waveguide with record low loss of 0.12 dB/cm is inscribed in YAG:Nd(0.3at.%) crystal by femtosecond laser pulses with an elliptical beam waist. The waveguide is formed by a set of parallel tracks which constitute the depressed cladding. It is a key element for compact and efficient CW waveguide laser operating at 1064 nm and pumped by a multimode laser diode. Special attention is paid to mechanical stress resulting from the inscription process. Numerical calculation of mode distribution and propagation loss with the elasto-optical effect taken into account leads to the conclusion that the depressed cladding is a dominating factor in waveguide mode formation, while the mechanical stress only slightly distorts waveguide modes.

  18. Hybrid Coupling of Laser Light sources to Silicon (Oxy)Nitride Based Waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijger, A.J.T. de; Bekman, H.H.P.T.

    1997-01-01

    An efficient method was developed to couple a diode laser to a high contrast waveguides. The laserdiodes were mounted with sub-micron precision using a thermocompression mounting technique. An AlGaAs (λ = 850 nm) laserdiode was coupled to a SiON based slab waveguide (efficiency η EQ 25 - 30%) and to

  19. Bragg Grating Waveguide Array Ultrafast Laser Inscribed into the Cladding of a Flat Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beecher Stephen J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the fabrication and initial characterization of a waveguide sensor array in the cladding of a flat fiber. The sensor, designed to independently measure the strain on three Bragg grating waveguides, exploits the true three dimensional fabrication technology of ultrafast laser inscription by placing these gratings in a non-planar configuration.

  20. Light propagation studies on laser modified waveguides using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrise, X.; Berini, Abadal Gabriel; Jimenez, D.

    2001-01-01

    By means of direct laser writing on Al, a new method to locally modify optical waveguides is proposed. This technique has been applied to silicon nitride waveguides, allowing modifications of the optical propagation along the guide. To study the formed structures, a scanning near-held optical mic...

  1. Cladding-like waveguide fabricated by cooperation of ultrafast laser writing and ion irradiation: characterization and laser generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jinman; Shang, Zhen; Tan, Yang; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier Rodríguez; Chen, Feng

    2017-08-07

    We report the surface cladding-like waveguide fabricated by the cooperation of the ultrafast laser writing and the ion irradiation. The ultrafast laser writes tracks near the surface of the Nd:YAG crystal, constructing a semi-circle columnar structure with a decreased refractive index of - 0.00208. Then, the Nd:YAG crystal is irradiated by the Carbon ion beam, forming an enhanced-well in the semi-circle columnar with an increased refractive index of + 0.0024. Tracks and the enhanced-well consisted a surface cladding-like waveguide. Utilizing this cladding-like waveguide as the gain medium for the waveguide lasing, optimized characterizations were observed compared with the monolayer waveguide. This work demonstrates the refractive index of the Nd:YAG crystal can be well tailored by the cooperation of the ultrafast laser writing and the ion irradiation, which provides an convenient way to fabricate the complex and multilayered photonics devices.

  2. Optical study of planar waveguides based on oxidized porous silicon impregnated with laser dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouket, A. [Unite de recherche de Spectroscopie Raman, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Elmanar 2092, Tunis (Tunisia); Charrier, J. [Laboratoire d' Optronique CNRS-UMR FOTON 6082, Universite de Rennes 1, ENSSAT-6 rue de Kerampont, BP 80518, 22305 Lannion Cedex (France); Elhouichet, H. [Unite de recherche de Spectroscopie Raman, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Elmanar 2092, Tunis (Tunisia)], E-mail: habib.elhouichet@fst.rnu.tn; Oueslati, M. [Unite de recherche de Spectroscopie Raman, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Elmanar 2092, Tunis (Tunisia)

    2009-05-15

    Oxidized porous silicon optical planar waveguides were elaborated and impregnated with rhodamine B and rhodamine 6G. The waveguiding, absorption, and photoluminescence properties of these impregnated waveguides were studied. Successful impregnation of the structure with laser dyes is shown from photoluminescence and reflectivity measurements. Furthermore, the reflectivity spectra prove the homogenous incorporation of both dye molecules inside the pores of the matrices. The refractive indices of waveguide layers were determined before and after dye impregnation to indicate the conservation of guiding conditions. The optical losses in the visible wavelengths are studied as a function of dye concentration. The dye absorption is the main reason for these losses.

  3. Transverse Writing of Multimode Interference Waveguides inside Silica Glass by Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da-Yong, Liu; Yan, Li; Yan-Ping, Dou; Heng-Chang, Guo; Hong, Yang; Qi-Huang, Gong

    2008-01-01

    Multi-mode interference waveguides are fabricated inside silica glass by transverse writing geometry with femtosecond laser pulses. The influences of several writing and reading factors on the output mode are systematically studied. The experimental results of straight waveguides are in good agreement with the simulations by the beam propagation method. By integrating a straight waveguide with a bent waveguide, a 1 × 2 multi-mode splitter is formed and 2 × 3 lobes are observed in the output mode. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  4. Development of cryo-cell for infrared Raman laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Tetsuro; Ohmori, Takao; Saito, Hideaki

    1984-01-01

    Laser isotope separation (LIS) for uranium enrichment is remarkable for its higher efficiency and cost effectiveness over the gaseous diffusion process. A prototype Raman Laser apparatus for uranium enrichment was developed and manufactured by IHI for the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research. This apparatus is capable of emitting tunable infrared Laser beam of a wave length from 13 μm to 17 μm from its multiple pass resonator by injecting a highly coherent CO 2 Laser beam into the para-hydrogen gas vessel (kept at 100 K) to induce Raman scattering. This paper describes the Laser oscillation mechanism and the structure of the multiple pass cell; it also discusses the technical aspects that are essential for a Raman Laser apparatus. Moreover, the cooling characteristics of the present apparatus are reported by analyzing the results of tests conducted in actual service thermal conditions. (author)

  5. Diode Laser Raman Scattering Prototype Gas-Phase Environmental Monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benner, Robert

    1999-01-01

    We proposed developing a diode-laser-based, full spectrum Raman scattering instrument incorporating a multipass, external cavity enhancement cell for full spectrum, gas phase analysis of environmental pollutants...

  6. Hybrid vertical-cavity laser with lateral emission into a silicon waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Gyeong Cheol; Xue, Weiqi; Taghizadeh, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    into the waveguide integrated with the laser. This laser has the advantages of long-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, such as low threshold and high side-mode suppression ratio, while allowing integration with silicon photonic circuits, and is fabricated using CMOS compatible processes. It has......We experimentally demonstrate an optically-pumped III-V/Si vertical-cavity laser with lateral emission into a silicon waveguide. This on-chip hybrid laser comprises a distributed Bragg reflector, a III-V active layer, and a high-contrast grating reflector, which simultaneously funnels light...

  7. Hollow core waveguide as mid-infrared laser modal beam filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patimisco, P.; Giglio, M.; Spagnolo, V. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Università e Politecnico di Bari, CNR-IFN UOS BARI, Via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Sampaolo, A. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Università e Politecnico di Bari, CNR-IFN UOS BARI, Via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Kriesel, J. M. [Opto-Knowledge Systems, Inc. (OKSI), 19805 Hamilton Ave., Torrance, California 90502-1341 (United States); Tittel, F. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    A novel method for mid-IR laser beam mode cleaning employing hollow core waveguide as a modal filter element is reported. The influence of the input laser beam quality on fiber optical losses and output beam profile using a hollow core waveguide with 200 μm-bore size was investigated. Our results demonstrate that even when using a laser with a poor spatial profile, there will exist a minimum fiber length that allows transmission of only the Gaussian-like fundamental waveguide mode from the fiber, filtering out all the higher order modes. This essentially single mode output is preserved also when the waveguide is bent to a radius of curvature of 7.5 cm, which demonstrates that laser mode filtering can be realized even if a curved light path is required.

  8. Laser Raman Spectroscopy with Different Excitation Sources and Extension to Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Wahadoszamen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dispersive Raman spectrometer was used with three different excitation sources (Argon-ion, He-Ne, and Diode lasers operating at 514.5 nm, 633 nm, and 782 nm, resp.. The system was employed to a variety of Raman active compounds. Many of the compounds exhibit very strong fluorescence while being excited with a laser emitting at UV-VIS region, hereby imposing severe limitation to the detection efficiency of the particular Raman system. The Raman system with variable excitation laser sources provided us with a desired flexibility toward the suppression of unwanted fluorescence signal. With this Raman system, we could detect and specify the different vibrational modes of various hazardous organic compounds and some typical dyes (both fluorescent and nonfluorescent. We then compared those results with the ones reported in literature and found the deviation within the range of ±2 cm−1, which indicates reasonable accuracy and usability of the Raman system. Then, the surface enhancement technique of Raman spectrum was employed to the present system. To this end, we used chemically prepared colloidal suspension of silver nanoparticles as substrate and Rhodamine 6G as probe. We could observe significant enhancement of Raman signal from Rhodamine 6G using the colloidal solution of silver nanoparticles the average magnitude of which is estimated to be 103.

  9. Q-switched pulse laser generation from double-cladding Nd:YAG ceramics waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yang; Luan, Qingfang; Liu, Fengqin; Chen, Feng; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier Rodríguez

    2013-08-12

    This work reports on the Q-switched pulsed laser generation from double-cladding Nd:YAG ceramic waveguides. Double-cladding waveguides with different combination of diameters were inscribed into a sample of Nd:YAG ceramic. With an additional semiconductor saturable absorber, stable pulsed laser emission at the wavelength of 1064 nm was achieved with pulses of 21 ns temporal duration and ~14 μJ pulse energy at a repetition rate of 3.65 MHz.

  10. Stressed waveguides with tubular depressed-cladding inscribed in phosphate glasses by femtosecond hollow laser beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xuewen; Bai, Jing; Zhao, Wei; Stoian, Razvan; Hui, Rongqing; Cheng, Guanghua

    2012-08-01

    We report on the single-step fabrication of stressed optical waveguides with tubular depressed-refractive-index cladding in phosphate glasses by the use of focused femtosecond hollow laser beams. Tubelike low index regions appear under direct exposure due to material rarefaction following expansion. Strained compacted zones emerged in domains neighboring the tubular track of lower refractive index, and waveguiding occurs mainly within the tube core fabricated by the engineered femtosecond laser beam. The refractive index profile of the optical waveguide was reconstructed from the measured transmitted near-field intensity.

  11. Combined raman spectrometer/laser-induced breakdown spectrometer design concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalgette Courrèges-Lacoste, Gregory; Ahlers, Berit; Boslooper, Erik; Rull-Perez, Fernando; Maurice, Sylvestre

    2017-11-01

    Amongst the different instruments that have been preselected to be on-board the Pasteur payload on ExoMars is the Raman/ Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument. Raman spectroscopy and LIBS will be integrated into a single instrument sharing many hardware commonalities. An international team under the lead of TNO has been gathered to produce a design concept for a combined Raman Spectrometer/ LIBS Elegant Bread-Board (EBB). The instrument is based on a specifically designed extremely compact spectrometer with high resolution over a large wavelength range, suitable for both Raman spectroscopy and LIBS measurements. Low mass, size and resources are the main drivers of the instrument's design concept. The proposed design concept, realization and testing programme for the combined Raman/ LIBS EBB is presented as well as background information on Raman and LIBS.

  12. Heat accumulation during high repetition rate ultrafast laser interaction: Waveguide writing in borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Eaton, Shane M; Li, Jianzhao; Herman, Peter R

    2007-01-01

    During high repetition rate (>200 kHz) ultrafast laser waveguide writing, visible heat modified zones surrounding the formed waveguide occur as a result of heat accumulation. The radii of the heat-modified zones increase with the laser net fluence, and were found to correlate with the formation of low-loss and cylindrically symmetric optical waveguides. A numerical thermal model based on the finite difference method is applied here to account for cumulative heating and diffusion effects. The model successfully shows that heat propagation and accumulation accurately predict the radius of the 'heat modified' zones observed in borosilicate glass waveguides formed across a wide range of laser exposure conditions. Such modelling promises better control of thermal effects for optimizing the fabrication and performance of three-dimensional optical devices in transparent materials

  13. Inscription of type I and depressed cladding waveguides in lithium niobate using a femtosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, S; Mittholiya, K; Bhatnagar, A; Bernard, R; Dharmadhikari, J A; Mathur, D; Dharmadhikari, A K

    2017-07-10

    We describe two types of waveguides (type I and depressed cladding) inscribed in lithium niobate using a variable repetition rate (200 kHz-25 MHz), 270 fs duration fiber laser. The type I modification-based waveguides have propagation losses in the range from 1.2 to 10 dB/cm at 1550 nm, depending on experimental parameters. These waveguides are not permanent; they deteriorate over time. Such deterioration of waveguides can be slowed down from 30 days to 100 days by pre-annealing the samples and by writing at a 720 kHz laser repetition rate. The propagation losses measured at 1550 nm show significant improvement for pre-annealed samples. The depressed cladding-inscribed waveguides are permanent, but the propagation loss depends on the number of damage tracks. A track separation of ∼1  μm between adjacent damage tracks yields the lowest propagation loss of 0.5 dB/cm at 1550 nm for a 40 μm diameter waveguide. We observe multimode guidance for sizes in the range of 20-80 μm in these waveguide structures at 1550 nm. Their crystalline nature is found to remain intact, as inferred from second-harmonic generation within the waveguide region.

  14. Optical lattice-like cladding waveguides by direct laser writing: fabrication, luminescence, and lasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Weijie; He, Ruiyun; Cheng, Chen; Rocha, Uéslen; Rodríguez Vázquez de Aldana, Javier; Jaque, Daniel; Chen, Feng

    2016-05-15

    We report on the fabrication of optical lattice-like waveguide structures in an Nd:YAP laser crystal by using direct femtosecond laser writing. With periodically arrayed laser-induced tracks, the waveguiding cores can be located in either the regions between the neighbored tracks or the central zone surrounded by a number of tracks as outer cladding. The polarization of the femtosecond laser pulses for the inscription has been found to play a critical role in the anisotropic guiding behaviors of the structures. The confocal photoluminescence investigations reveal different stress-induced modifications of the structures inscribed by different polarization of the femtosecond laser beam, which are considered to be responsible for the refractive index changes of the structures. Under optical pump at 808 nm, efficient waveguide lasing at ∼1  μm wavelength has been realized from the optical lattice-like structure, which exhibits potential applications as novel miniature light sources.

  15. Beam shaping of laser diode radiation by waveguides with arbitrary cladding geometry written with fs-laser radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Dennis; Schnitzler, Daniel; Schaefer, Dagmar; Gottmann, Jens; Kelbassa, Ingomar

    2011-12-05

    Waveguides with arbitrary cross sections are written in the volume of Al(2)O(3)-crystals using tightly focused femtosecond laser radiation. Utilizing a scanning system with large numerical aperture, complex cladding geometries are realized with a precision around 0.5 µm and a scanning speed up to 100 mm/s. Individual beam and mode shaping of laser diode radiation is demonstrated by varying the design of the waveguide cladding. The influence of the writing parameters on the waveguide properties are investigated resulting in a numerical aperture of the waveguides in the range of 0.1. This direct laser writing technique enables optical devices which could possibly replace bulky beam shaping setups with an integrated solution.

  16. Numerical modelling of passively Q-switched intracavity Raman lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Shuanghong; Zhang Xingyu; Wang Qingpu; Zhang Jun; Wang Shumei; Liu Yuru; Zhang Xuehui

    2007-01-01

    Assuming intracavity photon densities to be of Gaussian spatial distributions, the space-dependent rate equations of passively Q-switched intracavity Raman lasers are deduced for the first time for the pumping beams of Gaussian and top-head spatial distributions, respectively. The new rate equations are normalized and solved numerically to investigate the influences of the normalized initial population inversion density, normalized Raman gain coefficient, saturable absorber parameter, beam size ratio of pump to fundamental laser and loss ratio of the first Stokes to fundamental laser on the pulse parameters of the first Stokes. The results of the Gaussian and top-head pumpings show similar trends despite some discrepancies. The new theories and numerical results will help design passively Q-switched intracavity Raman lasers of high performance

  17. A microwave FEL [free electron laser] code using waveguide modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byers, J.A.; Cohen, R.H.

    1987-08-01

    A free electron laser code, GFEL, is being developed for application to the LLNL tokamak current drive experiment, MTX. This single frequency code solves for the slowly varying complex field amplitude using the usual wiggler-averaged equations of existing codes, in particular FRED, except that it describes the fields by a 2D expansion in the rectangular waveguide modes, using coupling coefficients similar to those developed by Wurtele, which include effects of spatial variations in the fields seen by the wiggler motion of the particles. Our coefficients differ from those of Wurtele in two respects. First, we have found a missing √2γ/a/sub w/ factor in his C/sub z/; when corrected this increases the effect of the E/sub z/ field component and this in turn reduces the amplitude of the TM mode. Second, we have consistently retained all terms of second order in the wiggle amplitude. Both corrections are necessary for accurate computation. GFEL has the capability of following the TE/sub 0n/ and TE(M)/sub m1/ modes simultaneously. GFEL produces results nearly identical to those from FRED if the coupling coefficients are adjusted to equal those implied by the algorithm in FRED. Normally, the two codes produce results that are similar but different in detail due to the different treatment of modes higher than TE/sub 01/. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  18. Free-electron laser system with Raman amplifier outcoupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, G.J.

    1988-05-03

    A free-electron laser system is described comprising: a free-electron laser pump beam generator producing a high-power optical output beam in a vacuum environement; a Raman amplifier cell located in the path of the output beam from the pump beam generator; means for generating and introducing a Stokes seed beam into the Raman amplifier cell, a pair of gaseous windows through which the output beam enters and leaves the Raman amplifier cell, each window having a stream of gas moving continuously in a direction generally perpendicular to the beam; and a mirror positioned in the path of the output beam from the Raman amplifier, the mirror functioning to reflect and further direct the output beam, but not the unwanted spectral components.

  19. Selection of transverse modes in laser cavities containing waveguides and open parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurin, O V; Degtyarev, A V; Maslov, Vyacheslav A; Svich, V A; Tkachenko, V M; Topkov, A N

    2001-01-01

    The transverse modes of a submillimetre laser cavity that contains waveguides and open parts were studied theoretically and experimentally with the purpose of finding methods for mode selection. Two methods based on the filtering of the Fourier spectra of the waveguide modes and the use of their interference were substantiated numerically and realised in experiment. Special attention was paid to the mode selection in tunable lasers. Scaling laws allowing one to use the obtained results in a wide range of the cavity parameters and wavelengths are presented. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  20. Femtosecond-laser inscribed double-cladding waveguides in Nd:YAG crystal: a promising prototype for integrated lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongliang; Chen, Feng; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Jaque, D

    2013-09-01

    We report on the design and implementation of a prototype of optical waveguides fabricated in Nd:YAG crystals by using femtosecond-laser irradiation. In this prototype, two concentric tubular structures with nearly circular cross sections of different diameters have been inscribed in the Nd:YAG crystals, generating double-cladding waveguides. Under 808 nm optical pumping, waveguide lasers have been realized in the double-cladding structures. Compared with single-cladding waveguides, the concentric tubular structures, benefiting from the large pump area of the outermost cladding, possess both superior laser performance and nearly single-mode beam profile in the inner cladding. Double-cladding waveguides of the same size were fabricated and coated by a thin optical film, and a maximum output power of 384 mW and a slope efficiency of 46.1% were obtained. Since the large diameters of the outer claddings are comparable with those of the optical fibers, this prototype paves a way to construct an integrated single-mode laser system with a direct fiber-waveguide configuration.

  1. [Laser Raman Spectroscopy and Its Application in Gas Hydrate Studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Juan; Wu, Neng-you; Lu, Hai-long; Wu, Dai-dai; Su, Qiu-cheng

    2015-11-01

    Gas hydrates are important potential energy resources. Microstructural characterization of gas hydrate can provide information to study the mechanism of gas hydrate formation and to support the exploitation and application of gas hydrate technology. This article systemly introduces the basic principle of laser Raman spectroscopy and summarizes its application in gas hydrate studies. Based on Raman results, not only can the information about gas composition and structural type be deduced, but also the occupancies of large and small cages and even hydration number can be calculated from the relative intensities of Raman peaks. By using the in-situ analytical technology, laser Raman specstropy can be applied to characterize the formation and decomposition processes of gas hydrate at microscale, for example the enclathration and leaving of gas molecules into/from its cages, to monitor the changes in gas concentration and gas solubility during hydrate formation and decomposition, and to identify phase changes in the study system. Laser Raman in-situ analytical technology has also been used in determination of hydrate structure and understanding its changing process under the conditions of ultra high pressure. Deep-sea in-situ Raman spectrometer can be employed for the in-situ analysis of the structures of natural gas hydrate and their formation environment. Raman imaging technology can be applied to specify the characteristics of crystallization and gas distribution over hydrate surface. With the development of laser Raman technology and its combination with other instruments, it will become more powerful and play a more significant role in the microscopic study of gas hydrate.

  2. Dramatic enhancement of XUV laser output using a multi-mode, gas-filled capillary waveguide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mocek, Tomáš; McKenna, C.M.; Cros, B.; Sebban, S.; Spence, D.J.; Maynard, G.; Bettaibi, I.; Vorontsov, V.; Gonsavles, A.J.; Hooker, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 71, 01 (2005), 013804/1-013804/5 ISSN 1050-2947 Grant - others:EU(XE) HPRI-1999-CT-00086; EU(XE) HPMF-CT-2002-01554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : waveguiding * x-ray laser Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.997, year: 2005

  3. On-chip microparticle detection and sizing using a dual-wavelength waveguide laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernhardi, Edward H.; van der Werf, Kees O; Hollink, Anton J F; Worhoff, Kerstin; De Ridder, Rene M.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Pollnau, Markus

    2013-01-01

    An integrated intra-laser-cavity microparticle sensor based on a dual-phase-shift, dual-wavelength distributed-feedback channel waveguide laser in Al2O3:Yb3+ is presented. Real-time detection and accurate size measurement of single microparticles with diameters ranging between 1 μm and 20 μm are

  4. On-chip microparticle detection and sizing using a dual-wavelength waveguide laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernhardi, Edward; van der Werf, Kees; Hollink, Anton; Worhoff, Kerstin; de Ridder, R.M.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Pollnau, Markus

    An integrated intra-laser-cavity microparticle sensor based on a dual-phase-shift, dual-wavelength distributed-feedback channel waveguide laser in ytterbium-doped aluminium oxide is presented. Single micro-particles with diameters ranging between 1 μm and 20 μm are detected.

  5. Integration of a terahertz quantum cascade laser with a hollow waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanke, Michael C [Albuquerque, NM; Nordquist, Christopher D [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    The present invention is directed to the integration of a quantum cascade laser with a hollow waveguide on a chip to improve both the beam pattern and manufacturability. By coupling the QCL output into a single-mode rectangular waveguide the radiation mode structure can be known and the propagation, manipulation, and broadcast of the QCL radiation can then be entirely controlled by well-established rectangular waveguide techniques. By controlling the impedance of the interface, enhanced functions, such as creating amplifiers, efficient coupling to external cavities, and increasing power output from metal-metal THz QCLs, are also enabled.

  6. Optical Cladding Waveguides in Dielectric Crystals Produced by Femtosecond Laser Inscription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Feng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the recent progress of our research on optical cladding waveguides in dielectric crystals produced by femtosecond laser inscription has been overviewed. With different scales at cross sections, the cladding waveguides support guidance from single mode to highly multi-modes, and work for wavelength till mid-infrared regimes. Applications of the fabricated cladding structures as new integrated light sources are introduced.

  7. Efficient laser emission from cladding waveguide inscribed in Nd:GdVO(4) crystal by direct femtosecond laser writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongliang; Tan, Yang; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Chen, Feng

    2014-08-01

    We report on the fabrication of depressed cladding waveguides in Nd:GdVO(4) laser crystal by using femtosecond laser inscription. The cross section of the structure is a circular shape with a diameter of 150 μm. Under the optical pump at 808 nm, the continuous wave (cw) as well as pulsed (Q-switched by graphene saturable absorber) waveguide lasing at 1064 nm has been realized, supporting guidance of both TE and TM polarizations. The maximum output power of 0.57 W was obtained in the cw regime, while the maximum pulse energy of the pulsed laser emissions was up to 19 nJ (corresponding to a maximum average output power of 0.33 W, at a resonant frequency of 18 MHz). The slope efficiencies achieved for the cw and pulsed Nd:GdVO(4) waveguide lasers were as high as 68% and 52%, respectively.

  8. Monolithic PM Raman fiber laser at 1679 nm for Raman amplification at 1810 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) has been subject to much attention within the field of fiber lasers and amplifiers as it provides an extended wavelength coverage in comparison to rare-earth based devices. Motivated by the projected capacity crunch [1], different approaches are being explored...... demonstrate a monolithic RM Raman fiber laser (RFL), which acts as a pump for a Raman amplifier (RA) at 1810 nm. The lasing wavelength of a RFL, thus also for a RA, can in principle be designed arbitrarily within the entire wavelength range from the Erbium band up to the Thulium/Holmium band...... of OFS PM Raman fiber, with an estimated propagation loss of 0.42/0.46/1.3 dB/km at 1564/1679/1810 nm. The Raman gain coefficient was measured to be gR=2.66/2.35 W-1km-1 at 1679/1810 nm. The laser curve of the RFL is depicted in Fig. 1b, with a slope efficiency of 67 %. The high slope efficiency...

  9. Diffusion-cooled high-power single-mode waveguide CO2 laser for transmyocardial revascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berishvili, I. I.; Bockeria, L. A.; Egorov, E. N.; Golubev, Vladimir S.; Galushkin, Michail G.; Kheliminsky, A. A.; Panchenko, Vladislav Y.; Roshin, A. P.; Sigaev, I. Y.; Vachromeeva, M. N.; Vasiltsov, Victor V.; Yoshina, V. I.; Zabelin, Alexandre M.; Zelenov, Evgenii V.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the results on investigations and development of multichannel waveguide CO2 laser with diffusion cooling of active medium excited by discharge of audio-frequency alternating current. The description of high-power single-mode CO2 laser with average beam power up to 1 kW is presented. The result of measurement of the laser basic parameters are offered, as well as the outcomes of performances of the laser head with long active zone, operating in waveguide mode. As an example of application of these laser, various capabilities a description of the developed medical system 'Genom' used in the transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMLR) procedure and clinical results of the possibilities of the TMLR in the surgical treatment are presented.

  10. Specific features of waveguide recombination in laser structures with asymmetric barrier layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polubavkina, Yu. S., E-mail: polubavkina@mail.ru; Zubov, F. I.; Moiseev, E. I.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Maximov, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg National Research Academic University (Russian Federation); Semenova, E. S.; Yvind, K. [Technical University of Denmark, DTU Fotonik (Denmark); Asryan, L. V. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (United States); Zhukov, A. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg National Research Academic University (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The spatial distribution of the intensity of the emission caused by recombination appearing at a high injection level (up to 30 kA/cm{sup 2}) in the waveguide layer of a GaAs/AlGaAs laser structure with GaInP and AlGaInAs asymmetric barrier layers is studied by means of near-field scanning optical microscopy. It is found that the waveguide luminescence in such a laser, which is on the whole less intense as compared to that observed in a similar laser without asymmetric barriers, is non-uniformly distributed in the waveguide, so that the distribution maximum is shifted closer to the p-type cladding layer. This can be attributed to the ability of the GaInP barrier adjoining the quantum well on the side of the n-type cladding layer to suppress the hole transport.

  11. Specific features of waveguide recombination in laser structures with asymmetric barrier layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polubavkina, Yu; Zubov, F. I.; Moiseev, E.

    2017-01-01

    microscopy. It is found that the waveguide luminescence in such a laser, which is on the whole less intense as compared to that observed in a similar laser without asymmetric barriers, is non-uniformly distributed in the waveguide, so that the distribution maximum is shifted closer to the p-type cladding......The spatial distribution of the intensity of the emission caused by recombination appearing at a high injection level (up to 30 kA/cm2) in the waveguide layer of a GaAs/AlGaAs laser structure with GaInP and AlGaInAs asymmetric barrier layers is studied by means of near-field scanning optical...... layer. This can be attributed to the ability of the GaInP barrier adjoining the quantum well on the side of the n-type cladding layer to suppress the hole transport....

  12. Coherent beam combination of fiber lasers with a strongly confined waveguide: numerical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Rumao; Si, Lei; Ma, Yanxing; Zhou, Pu; Liu, Zejin

    2012-08-20

    Self-imaging properties of fiber lasers in a strongly confined waveguide (SCW) and their application in coherent beam combination (CBC) are studied theoretically. Analytical formulas are derived for the positions, amplitudes, and phases of the N images at the end of an SCW, which is important for quantitative analysis of waveguide CBC. The formulas are verified with experimental results and numerical simulation of a finite difference beam propagation method (BPM). The error of our analytical formulas is less than 6%, which can be reduced to less than 1.5% with Goos-Hahnchen penetration depth considered. Based on the theoretical model and BPM, we studied the combination of two laser beams based on an SCW. The effects of the waveguide refractive index and Gaussian beam waist are studied. We also simulated the CBC of nine and 16 fiber lasers, and a single beam without side lobes was achieved.

  13. Propagation of a laser beam in a time-varying waveguide. [plasma heating for controlled fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J. M.; Kevorkian, J.

    1978-01-01

    The propagation of an axisymmetric laser beam in a plasma column having a radially parabolic electron density distribution is reported. For the case of an axially uniform waveguide it is found that the basic characteristics of alternating focusing and defocusing beams are maintained. However, the intensity distribution is changed at the foci and outer-beam regions. The features of paraxial beam propagation are discussed with reference to axially varying waveguides. Laser plasma coupling is considered noting the case where laser heating produces a density distribution radially parabolic near the axis and the energy absorbed over the focal length of the plasma is small. It is found that: (1) beam-propagation stability is governed by the relative magnitude of the density fluctuations existing in the axial variation of the waveguides due to laser heating, and (2) for beam propagation in a time-varying waveguide, the global instability of the propagation is a function of the initial fluctuation growth rate as compared to the initial time rate of change in the radial curvature of the waveguide.

  14. Propagation of a laser beam in a time-varying waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.M.; Kevorkian, J.

    1978-01-01

    The propagation of an axisymmetric laser beam in a plasma column having a radially parabolic electron density distribution is examined. First, an extended paraxial procedure is developed for the case of an axially uniform waveguide. It is shown that the essential feature of an alternate focusing and defocusing beam is retained, but that the intensity distribution is cumulatively modified at the foci and at the outer portions of the beam as compared to that of the paraxial case. Second, some general features of paraxial beam propagation are examined for the case of axially varying waveguides. Finally, laser plasma coupling is examined for the case when laser heating generates a density distribution that is radially parabolic near the axis and when the energy absorbed over a focal length of a plasma lens is small. It is shown that stable or unstable beam propagation depends upon the relative magnitude of the density fluctuations which exist in the axial variation of the waveguides as a result of laser heating. When the fluctuations are small, the propagation is stable, and a simple algebraic expression is obtained which relates the beam diameter to the axially slow averaged variation in the waveguide. When the fluctuations are large, the propagation stability can be determined only by consistently combining plasma dynamics and beam propagation to interrelate the axial variation of the beam to that of the waveguide. In this case of beam propagation in a time-varying waveguide, it is shown that the global stability of the propagation depends upon the initial fluctuation growth rate compared to the initial time rate of change in the radial curvature of the waveguide

  15. Development of a high power HCN waveguide laser for plasma diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Zhongchao; Zhou Yan; Tang Yiwu; Yi Jiang; Gao Bingyi; Tian Chongli

    2007-06-01

    Both design and development of a high power cw HCN waveguide laser is described for multichannel FIR laser interferometer on the HL-2A divertor tokamak. The geometry parameters of stracture of the HCN laser are calculated according to scaling laws for cw 337 μm HCN waveguide laser offered by P. Belland et al. The designed value of output power of the laser that is more than 400 mW with discharge length of 5.6 m and 6.3 cm inner diameter of tube have been chosen in case of external loss of the cavity of 2%. At the same time, in order to get a laser system of stable output both of configuration and operating condition is discussed. In developed laser a hot LaB 6 cathode is employed to en- sure a stable discharge, the cavity mirrors are spaced using four invar rod of φ25 mm in diameter and an structure of adjusting machine for axially movable flat mirror in cavity has been also designed, and that it can be taken down many times without badly destroying alignment of the cavity etc.. A suit of pipes sys- tem of cw HCN laser is schemed out so that some experiments of operating parameter optimization can be done. The results of primary test of operating waveguide HCN laser are briefly showed. (authors)

  16. Low-Loss Hollow Waveguide Fibers for Mid-Infrared Quantum Cascade Laser Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Harrington

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on single mode optical transmission of hollow core glass waveguides (HWG coupled with an external cavity mid-IR quantum cascade lasers (QCLs. The QCL mode results perfectly matched to the hybrid HE11 waveguide mode and the higher losses TE-like modes have efficiently suppressed by the deposited inner dielectric coating. Optical losses down to 0.44 dB/m and output beam divergence of ~5 mrad were measured. Using a HGW fiber with internal core size of 300 µm we obtained single mode laser transmission at 10.54 µm and successful employed it in a quartz enhanced photoacoustic gas sensor setup.

  17. UV waveguides light fabricated in fluoropolymer CYTOP by femtosecond laser direct writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Yasutaka; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2010-01-18

    We have fabricated optical waveguides inside the UV-transparent polymer, CYTOP, by femtosecond laser direct writing for propagating UV light in biochip applications. Femtosecond laser irradiation is estimated to increase the refractive index of CYTOP by 1.7 x 10(-3) due to partial bond breaking in CYTOP. The waveguide in CYTOP has propagation losses of 0.49, 0.77, and 0.91 dB/cm at wavelengths of 632.8, 355, and 266 nm, respectively.

  18. On Surface Losses in Direct Metal Laser Sintering Printed Millimeter and Submillimeter Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Max; Dancila, Dragos; Rydberg, Anders; Hjörvarsson, Björgvin; Jansson, Ulf; Marattukalam, Jithin James; Johansson, Niklas; Andersson, Joakim

    2018-06-01

    Different lengths of WR3 (220-330 GHz) and WR10 (75-110 GHz) waveguides are fabricated through direct metal laser sintering (DMLS). The losses in these waveguides are measured and modelled using the Huray surface roughness model. The losses in WR3 are around 0.3 dB/mm and in WR10 0.05 dB/mm. The Huray equation model is accounting relatively good for the attenuation in the WR10 waveguide but deviates more in the WR3 waveguide. The model is compared to finite element simulations of the losses assuming an approximate surface structure similar to the resulting one from the DMLS process.

  19. Laser pulses for coherent xuv Raman excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Loren; Koch, Christiane P.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-07-01

    We combine multichannel electronic structure theory with quantum optimal control to derive femtosecond-time-scale Raman pulse sequences that coherently populate a valence excited state. For a neon atom, Raman target populations of up to 13% are obtained. Superpositions of the ground and valence Raman states with a controllable relative phase are found to be reachable with up to 4.5% population and arbitrary phase control facilitated by the pump pulse carrier-envelope phase. Analysis of the optimized pulse structure reveals a sequential mechanism in which the valence excitation is reached via a fast (femtosecond) population transfer through an intermediate resonance state in the continuum rather than avoiding intermediate-state population with simultaneous or counterintuitive (stimulated Raman adiabatic passage) pulse sequences. Our results open a route to coupling valence excitations and core-hole excitations in molecules and aggregates that locally address specific atoms and represent an initial step towards realization of multidimensional spectroscopy in the xuv and x-ray regimes.

  20. Absorption Spectroscopy in Hollow-Glass Waveguides Using Infrared Diode Lasers[4817-25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, Thomas A.; Kelly, James F.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Hartman, John S.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Alan Fried

    2002-01-01

    Near- and mid-infrared diode lasers combined with flexible, hollow waveguides hold the promise of light weight, field portable, fast response gas sensors. The advantages of using the waveguides compared to White or Herriott multireflection cells include a small gas volume, a high photon fill factor in the waveguide, which increases molecule-light interactions, and reduction or elimination of optical fringing, which usually sets the practical limit of detectivity in absorption spectroscopy. Though hollow waveguides have been commercially available for several years, relatively few results have been reported in the literature. We present here results from our laboratory where we have injected infrared laser light into straight and coiled lengths of hollow waveguides and performed direct and wavelength modulated absorption spectroscopy on nitrous oxide, ethylene, and nitric oxide. Using a 1 mm bore, 3 meter long coiled waveguide coated for the near infrared, nitrous oxide transitions near 6595 cm-1 were observed under flowing conditions. Signal-to-noise ratios on the order of 1500:1 with RMS noise equal to 2 X 10-5 were measured. In the mid-infrared light from either a 10.1 or 5.3 micron lead salt diode laser was injected into a three meter length of 1 mm bore hollow waveguide coated for the mid-infrared. The waveguide was coiled with one loop at a diameter of 52 cm. Ethylene transitions were observed in the vicinity of 985 cm-1 with a static fill of 0.2 Torr of pure ethylene in the waveguide and nitric oxide transitions were observed in the vicinity of 1906 cm-1 using either a flow or a static fill of 1 ppm NO in nitrogen. In direct absorption the NO transitions are observed to have a signal-to-noise of approximately 5:1 for transitions with absorbances on the order of 10-3. Using wavelength modulated techniques the signal-to-noise ratio improves at least an order of magnitude. These encouraging results indicate that waveguides can be used for in situ gas monitoring

  1. Integration of Quantum Cascade Lasers and Passive Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    convenience, we can de - fine an effective mirror loss eαmLA = R referenced to the active region such that αm = ln(R) LA . This definition al- lows us to...the waveguide loss. The current density threshold de - pendence in a QCL may be expressed in terms of a mirror loss αm and waveguide loss αw as in Jth...M. Licht - ensteiger, C. Gatos, and H. Gatos, J. Appl. Phys. 51, 2659 (1980). 15O. Kim and W. Bonner, J. Electron. Mater. 12, 827 (1983). 16J

  2. Raman-laser spectroscopy of Wannier-Stark states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tackmann, G.; Pelle, B.; Hilico, A.; Beaufils, Q.; Pereira dos Santos, F.

    2011-01-01

    Raman lasers are used as a spectroscopic probe of the state of atoms confined in a shallow one-dimensional (1D) vertical lattice. For sufficiently long laser pulses, resolved transitions in the bottom band of the lattice between Wannier Stark states corresponding to neighboring wells are observed. Couplings between such states are measured as a function of the lattice laser intensity and compared to theoretical predictions, from which the lattice depth can be extracted. Limits to the linewidth of these transitions are investigated. Transitions to higher bands can also be induced, as well as between transverse states for tilted Raman beams. All these features allow for a precise characterization of the trapping potential and for an efficient control of the atomic external degrees of freedom.

  3. Design and construction of single path Raman laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavaddat, M.; Soltanolkotabi, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the stimulated Raman effect has been reported.The pumping laser in this setup is He-Ne with wavelength of 632.8 nm. The first order Stokes line has been observed, to be at 776 nm. The pressure of methane gas in this setup has been increased to 20 bar. The diagram of the effect of the intensity of first order Stokes line as a function of pressure has been plotted. Also, two different pumping laser powers have been used in these investigations. Intensity of first order Stokes line has been increased with increasing gas pressure or laser power.

  4. Raman laser amplification in preformed and ionizing plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D S; Fisch, N J

    2004-01-01

    The recently proposed backward Raman laser amplification scheme utilizes the stimulated Raman backscattering in plasma of a long pumping laser pulse to amplify a short, frequency downshifted seed pulse. The output intensity for this scheme is limited by the development of forward Raman scattering (FRS) or modulational instabilities of the highly amplified seed. Theoretically, focused output intensities as high as 1025 W/cm 2 and pulse lengths of less than 100 fs could be accessible by this technique for 1 (micro)m lasers--an improvement of 10 4 -10 5 in focused intensity over current techniques. Simulations with the particle-in-cell (PIC) code Zohar are presented which investigate the effects of FRS and modulational instabilities and of Langmuir wave breaking on the output intensity for Raman amplification. Using the intense seed pulse to photoionize the plasma simultaneous with its amplification (and hence avoid plasmas-based instabilities of the pump) is also investigated by PIC simulations. It is shown that both approaches can access focused intensities in the 1025 W/cm 2 range

  5. The use of lasers as sources for Raman spectrometry, resonance Raman spectrometry, and light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capitini, R.; Ceccaldi, M.; Leicknam, J.P.; Plus, R.

    1975-01-01

    The activity of the laboratory is principally centred on the determination of molecular structures and the study of molecular interactions in solution by infrared and Raman spectrometry. With the development of work on relatively large molecules, particularly biological molecules, it became necessary to complete information on the molecular weight and on the intra and intermolecular geometry and interactions of these bodies. In order to obtain these informations Rayleigh scattering and resonance Raman spectrometry were used. The advantages of using vibrational spectrometry, particularly Raman, in conjunction with the diffusion of light for these structural and molecular interaction studies is emphasized. It is shown that these two techniques could not have developed as they have done in the last few years without the use of lasers as light source [fr

  6. Excitation of transversely excited CO2 waveguide lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood II, O.R.; Smith, P.W.; Adams, C.R.; Maloney, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Using a preionization scheme based on the Malter effect, small-signal gains >5%/cm at 10.6 μm have been produced in a 1-mm 2 -cross-section waveguide CO 2 amplifier at total operating pressures of 100--760 Torr. Comparisons are made between this preionization scheme and those using electron beams

  7. Optical spectroscopy in channel waveguides made in Nd:YAG crystals by femtosecond laser writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torchia, G.A.; Mendez, C.; Roso, L.; Tocho, J.O.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we present an optical characterization of channel waveguides fabricated by means of femtosecond laser writing on Nd:YAG substrates. These guiding structures show a refractive index increment of about 1x10 -3 which allows TE propagation. By pumping with a CW solid-state laser at 532 nm reaching the 2 G 9/2 and 4 G 7/2 manifolds of Nd 3+ ions, we have explored the emission band corresponding to 4 F 3/2 → 4 I 9/2 optical transitions (peaked at 890 nm). From data, we have found that emission showed similar characteristics for waveguide and bulk. On the other hand, the lifetime corresponding to the 4 F 3/2 metaestable level was determined to be 240 μs for bulk and waveguide. Summarizing, we have made suitable channel waveguides in Nd:YAG crystals, by fs interaction, with similar spectroscopic properties to those of the bulk, a fact that boosters the photonics application of these devices. For the first time to our knowledge, a direct index increment waveguide made by interaction with ultra-short intense pulses in YAG crystals has been performed. This fabrication procedure can be an efficient tool to make several optical circuits in active materials by means of the one-step, fast and low-cost processing

  8. Emission characteristics of laser and superluminescent diodes with a gradient-index waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazarov, A.E.; Garmash, I.A.; Goldobin, I.S.; Eliukhin, V.A.; Pak, G.T.

    1987-05-01

    A study is made of the emission characteristics of laser and superluminescent diodes with gradient-index waveguides based on Al(x)Ga(1-x)As solid solutions, operating in the CW mode at room temperature. The coupling coefficients for a single-mode fiber are 25 and 18 percent for laser and superluminescent diodes, respectively, when an interface device consisting of three microlenses is used. 6 references.

  9. Laser acceleration in vacuum with an open iris-loaded waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Ming

    1997-05-01

    An open iris-loaded waveguide structure is considered for laser acceleration of highly relativistic particle in vacuum. Complete characterization of all eigenmodes are given in analytical form for the structure. In particular the dominant radially polarized TM mode is evaluated in detail for laser acceleration. The entire parameter space is searched and it is found that below the laser damage threshold of the structure an acceleration gradient around 1 GV/m can be obtained over a phase slippage length of 10s of cm with TWs laser in the wavelength range from 1 to 10 μm

  10. Regime for a Self-ionizing Raman Laser Amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.S.; Fisch, N.J.

    2001-01-01

    Backward Raman amplification and compression at high power might occur if a long pumping laser pulse is passed through a plasma to interact resonantly with a counter-propagating short seed pulse [V.M. Malkin, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 4448-4451]. One critical issue, however, is that the pump may be unacceptably depleted due to spontaneous Raman backscatter from intrinsic fluctuations in the amplifying plasma medium prior to its useful interaction with the seed. Premature backscatter may be avoided, however, by employing a gaseous medium with pump intensities too low to ionize the medium, and using the intense seed to produce the plasma by rapid photoionization as it is being amplified [V.M. Malkin, et al., Phys. Plasmas (2001)]. In addition to allowing that only rather low power pumps be used, photoionization introduces a damping of the short pulse which must be overcome by the Raman growth rate for net amplification to occur. The parameter space of gas densities, laser wavelengths, and laser intensities is surveyed to identify favorable regimes for this effect. Output laser intensities of 10(superscript ''17'') W/cm(superscript ''2'') for 0.5 mm radiation are found to be feasible for such a scheme using a pump of 10(superscript ''13'') W/cm(superscript ''2'') and an initial seed of 5 x 10(superscript ''14'') W/cm(superscript ''2'') over an amplification length of 5.6 cm in hydrogen gas

  11. Creating large second-order optical nonlinearity in optical waveguides written by femtosecond laser pulses in boro-aluminosilicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hong-Lin; Arriola, Alexander; Gross, Simon; Fuerbach, Alexander; Withford, Michael J.; Fleming, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The thermal poling technique was applied to optical waveguides embedded in a commercial boro-aluminosilicate glass, resulting in high levels of induced second-order optical nonlinearity. The waveguides were fabricated using the femtosecond laser direct-write technique, and thermally poled samples were characterized with second harmonic optical microscopy to reveal the distribution profile of the induced nonlinearity. It was found that, in contrast to fused silica, the presence of waveguides in boro-aluminosilicate glass led to an enhancement of the creation of the second-order nonlinearity, which is larger in the laser written waveguiding regions when compared to the un-modified substrate. The magnitude of the nonlinear coefficient d33 achieved in the core of the laser-written waveguides, up to 0.2 pm/V, was comparable to that in thermally poled fused silica, enabling the realization of compact integrated electro-optic devices in boro-aluminosilicate glasses.

  12. Laser Raman Spectroscopy in studies of corrosion and electrocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melendres, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Laser Raman Spectroscopy (LRS) has become an important tool for the in-situ structural study of electrochemical systems and processes in recent years. Following a brief introduction of the experimental techniques involved in applying LRS to electrochemical systems, we survey the literature for examples of studies in the inhibition of electrode reactions by surface films (e.g., corrosion and passivation phenomena) as well as the acceleration of reactions by electro-sorbates (electrocatalysis). We deal mostly with both normal and resonance Raman effects on fairly thick surface films in contrast to surface-enhanced Raman investigations of monolayer adsorbates, which is covered in another lecture. Laser Raman spectroelectrochemical studies of corrosion and film formation on such metals as Pb, Ag, Fe, Ni, Co, Cr, Au, stainless steel, etc. in various solution conditions are discussed. Further extension of the technique to studies in high-temperature and high-pressure aqueous environments is demonstrated. Results of studies of the structure of corrosion inhibitors are also presented. As applications of the LRS technique in the area of electrocatalysis, we cite studies of the structure of transition metal macrocyclic compounds, i.e., phthalocyanines and porphyrins, used for catalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. 104 refs., 20 figs

  13. Spontaneous emission and gain in a waveguide free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golightly, W.J.; Ride, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    A free-electron laser enclosed in a waveguide of narrowly spaced parallel plates has been proposed as a compact, coherent source of far-infrared radiation. In this paper, the spontaneous emission and small-signal gain of such a device are analyzed. Maxwell's equations are solved for the fields of a relativistic electron beam passing through a linearly polarized undulator in the presence of a parallel-plane waveguide. The radiation intensity is resolved into its component waveguide modes for the fundamental frequency and for all harmonics. The intensity profile in a given harmonic mode is altered significantly when a parameter involving the undulator period, beam energy, and transverse dimension of the guide is such that the radiation group velocity is close to the electrons' axial velocity. The small-signal gain in the waveguide free-electron laser is calculated and related to the spontaneous emission. Near zero slip, the gain curve is significantly different from that of a free-space free-electron laser with the same parameters

  14. Yb:KYW planar waveguide laser Q-switched by evanescent-field interaction with carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Jun Wan; Choi, Sun Young; Yeom, Dong-Il; Aravazhi, S.; Pollnau, Markus; Griebner, Uwe; Petrov, Valentin; Rotermund, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    We report Q-switched operation of a planar waveguide laser by evanescent-field interaction with single-walled carbon nanotubes deposited on top of the waveguide. The saturable-absorber-integrated gain medium, which operates based on evanescent-field interaction, enables the realization of a

  15. Single-step fabrication of stressed waveguides with tubular depressed-cladding in phosphate glasses using ultrafast vortex laser beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Guanghua

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the fabrication of the stressed optical waveguide with tubular depressed-refractive-index cladding in phosphate glasses by use of femtosecond vortex beam. Strained regions were emerged in domains surrounding the tubular track. Waveguiding occurs mainly within the tube induced by femtosecond laser.

  16. Broadband single-transverse-mode fluorescence sources based on ribs fabricated in pulsed laser deposited Ti: sapphire waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grivas, C.; May-Smith, T.C.; Shepherd, D.P.; Eason, R.W.; Pollnau, Markus; Jelinek, M.

    2004-01-01

    Active rib waveguides with depths and widths varying from 3 to 5 μm and from 9 to 24 μm, respectively, have been structured by $Ar^{+}$-beam etching in pulsed laser deposited Ti:sapphire layers. Losses in the channel structures were essentially at the same levels as the unstructured planar waveguide

  17. Laser Raman spectroscopy in heat and flow technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leipertz, A.

    1981-01-01

    The laser Raman spectroscopy based on the inelastic scattering of incident laser photons on the molecules of the fluid to be investigated, has advantages which partly reach beyond the usual scattered light methods: The signales are molecule-specific, the vibration line of various gases can be spectrally well recognized, the field of application is wide, the energy state of the molecules is hardly influenced. By measuring the line intensity, one obtains the concentration of the observed gas components via the molecule number, the temperature and total pressure; from the uptake of the partial density of the single components one can obtain the density of the gas mixture; vibration temperature and rotation temperature can be measured independently. Measuring methods and construction of a Raman probe are given. (WB) [de

  18. Laser annealing effects of the Raman laser on nitrogen implanted glassy carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbara, D.; Prawer, S.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Raman analysis is a popular method of investigating crystallite sizes, ordering and the types of bonds that exist in ion irradiated carbon materials, namely graphite, diamond and glassy carbon (G.C.). In particular Raman spectroscopy is used in determining the tetrahedral bonding required for the elusive and potentially important new material called carbon nitride. Carbon nitride, {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, is predicted to exist in several forms. Forming the tetrahedral bond between C and N has proved troublesome bain of many experimenters. A proven method for synthesizing novel materials is ion implantation. Thus G.C. was implanted with N at low temperatures so that diffusion of the implanted N would be hindered. G.C. is a relatively hard, chemically inert, graphitic material. The opaque property of G.C. means that Raman spectroscopy will only give information about the structures that exist at the surface and near surface layers. It was decided, after observing conflicting Raman spectra at different laser powers, that an investigation of the laser annealing effects of the Raman laser on the N implanted G.C. was warranted. The results of the preliminary investigation of the effects of increasing the Raman laser power and determining a power density threshold for high dose N implanted G.C. are discussed. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Laser annealing effects of the Raman laser on nitrogen implanted glassy carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbara, D; Prawer, S; Jamieson, D N [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-12-31

    Raman analysis is a popular method of investigating crystallite sizes, ordering and the types of bonds that exist in ion irradiated carbon materials, namely graphite, diamond and glassy carbon (G.C.). In particular Raman spectroscopy is used in determining the tetrahedral bonding required for the elusive and potentially important new material called carbon nitride. Carbon nitride, {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, is predicted to exist in several forms. Forming the tetrahedral bond between C and N has proved troublesome bain of many experimenters. A proven method for synthesizing novel materials is ion implantation. Thus G.C. was implanted with N at low temperatures so that diffusion of the implanted N would be hindered. G.C. is a relatively hard, chemically inert, graphitic material. The opaque property of G.C. means that Raman spectroscopy will only give information about the structures that exist at the surface and near surface layers. It was decided, after observing conflicting Raman spectra at different laser powers, that an investigation of the laser annealing effects of the Raman laser on the N implanted G.C. was warranted. The results of the preliminary investigation of the effects of increasing the Raman laser power and determining a power density threshold for high dose N implanted G.C. are discussed. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Laser annealing effects of the Raman laser on nitrogen implanted glassy carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbara, D.; Prawer, S.; Jamieson, D.N.

    1996-01-01

    Raman analysis is a popular method of investigating crystallite sizes, ordering and the types of bonds that exist in ion irradiated carbon materials, namely graphite, diamond and glassy carbon (G.C.). In particular Raman spectroscopy is used in determining the tetrahedral bonding required for the elusive and potentially important new material called carbon nitride. Carbon nitride, β-C 3 N 4 , is predicted to exist in several forms. Forming the tetrahedral bond between C and N has proved troublesome bain of many experimenters. A proven method for synthesizing novel materials is ion implantation. Thus G.C. was implanted with N at low temperatures so that diffusion of the implanted N would be hindered. G.C. is a relatively hard, chemically inert, graphitic material. The opaque property of G.C. means that Raman spectroscopy will only give information about the structures that exist at the surface and near surface layers. It was decided, after observing conflicting Raman spectra at different laser powers, that an investigation of the laser annealing effects of the Raman laser on the N implanted G.C. was warranted. The results of the preliminary investigation of the effects of increasing the Raman laser power and determining a power density threshold for high dose N implanted G.C. are discussed. 4 refs., 4 figs

  1. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO2 laser in a curved plasma waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Longqing; Shen, Baifei

    2016-01-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO 2 laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energy greater than 1 GeV with narrow slice energy spread (~1%) and high overall efficiency. The acceleration gradient is 26 GV/m for a 1.3 TW CO2 laser system. The micro-bunching of a long electron beam leads to the generation of a chain of ultrashort electron bunches with the duration roughly equal to half-laser-cycle. These results open a way for developing a compact and economic electron source for diverse applications.

  2. 11-GHz waveguide Nd:YAG laser CW mode-locked with single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhrimchuk, Andrey G; Obraztsov, Petr A

    2015-06-08

    We report stable, passive, continuous-wave (CW) mode-locking of a compact diode-pumped waveguide Nd:YAG laser with a single-layer graphene saturable absorber. The depressed cladding waveguide in the Nd:YAG crystal is fabricated with an ultrafast laser inscription method. The saturable absorber is formed by direct deposition of CVD single-layer graphene on the output coupler. The few millimeter-long cavity provides generation of 16-ps pulses with repetition rates in the GHz range (up to 11.3 GHz) and 12 mW average power. Stable CW mode-locking operation is achieved by controlling the group delay dispersion in the laser cavity with a Gires-Tournois interferometer.

  3. Heuristic modelling of laser written mid-infrared LiNbO3 stressed-cladding waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huu-Dat; Ródenas, Airán; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Martínez, Javier; Chen, Feng; Aguiló, Magdalena; Pujol, Maria Cinta; Díaz, Francesc

    2016-04-04

    Mid-infrared lithium niobate cladding waveguides have great potential in low-loss on-chip non-linear optical instruments such as mid-infrared spectrometers and frequency converters, but their three-dimensional femtosecond-laser fabrication is currently not well understood due to the complex interplay between achievable depressed index values and the stress-optic refractive index changes arising as a function of both laser fabrication parameters, and cladding arrangement. Moreover, both the stress-field anisotropy and the asymmetric shape of low-index tracks yield highly birefringent waveguides not useful for most applications where controlling and manipulating the polarization state of a light beam is crucial. To achieve true high performance devices a fundamental understanding on how these waveguides behave and how they can be ultimately optimized is required. In this work we employ a heuristic modelling approach based on the use of standard optical characterization data along with standard computational numerical methods to obtain a satisfactory approximate solution to the problem of designing realistic laser-written circuit building-blocks, such as straight waveguides, bends and evanescent splitters. We infer basic waveguide design parameters such as the complex index of refraction of laser-written tracks at 3.68 µm mid-infrared wavelengths, as well as the cross-sectional stress-optic index maps, obtaining an overall waveguide simulation that closely matches the measured mid-infrared waveguide properties in terms of anisotropy, mode field distributions and propagation losses. We then explore experimentally feasible waveguide designs in the search of a single-mode low-loss behaviour for both ordinary and extraordinary polarizations. We evaluate the overall losses of s-bend components unveiling the expected radiation bend losses of this type of waveguides, and finally showcase a prototype design of a low-loss evanescent splitter. Developing a realistic waveguide

  4. Preliminary detection of explosive standard components with Laser Raman Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botti, S.; Ciardi, R.

    2008-01-01

    Presently, our section is leader of the ISOTREX project (Integrated System for On-line TRace EXplosives detection in solid, liquid and vapour state), funded in the frame of the PASR 2006 action (Preparatory Action on the enhancement of the European industrial potential in the field of Security Research Preparatory Action) of the 6. EC framework. ISOTREX project will exploit the capabilities of different laser techniques as LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy), LPA (Laser Photo Acustic) and CRDS (Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy) to monitor explosive traces. In this frame, we extended our investigation also to the laser induced Raman effect spectroscopy, in order to investigate its capabilities and possible future integration. We analysed explosive samples in bulk solid phase, diluted liquid phase and as evaporated films over suitable substrate. In the following, we present the main results obtained, outlining preliminary conclusions [it

  5. Improved Laser performance through Planar Waveguide Technology Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a laser technology development to improve efficiency and performance for a variety of science applications including: Lunar Ice, 2-Step Laser Tandem Mass...

  6. Molecular gas analysis by Raman scattering in intracavity laser configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benner, R.E.; Andrade, J.D.; Van Wagenen, R.A.; Westenskow, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    A system is described for the near simultaneous analysis and quantitation of selected multiple polyatomic gases in a gas sample by Raman light scattering comprising in combination: (a) laser means capable of producing a polarized laser beam of a selected wavelength containing a laser cavity the laser cavity containing a plasma tube and wherein one end of the laser cavity contains a high reflectivity output coupler mirror; (b) a gas sampling cell located within the laser cavity between the plasma tube and the output coupler mirror, the cell having opposing parallel end windows interconnected by a continuous sidewall. The end windows and sidewall define a longitudinal gas chamber oriented such that, when the laser beam is activated, the laser beam is coincident with and traverses the axis of the longitudinal gas chamber, the end windows being positioned to be substantially normal to the axis of the longitudinal gas cell chamber. The cell also has opposing, aligned side windows in the sidewall parallel to and on either side of the axis of the longitudinal gas chamber. The gas cell further contains inlet and outlet means communicating with the chamber to pass a sample gas through the cell

  7. Development of a diamond waveguide sensor for sensitive protein analysis using IR quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piron, P.; Vargas Catalan, E.; Haas, J.; Österlund, L.; Nikolajeff, F.; Andersson, P. O.; Bergström, J.; Mizaikoff, B.; Karlsson, M.

    2018-02-01

    Microfabricated diamond waveguides, between 5 and 20 μm thick, manufactured by chemical vapor deposition of diamond, followed by standard lithographic techniques and inductively coupled plasma etching of diamond, are used as bio-chemical sensors in the mid infrared domain: 5-11 μm. Infrared light, emitted from a broadly tunable quantum cascade laser with a wavelength resolution smaller than 20 nm, is coupled through the diamond waveguides for attenuated total reflection spectroscopy. The expected advantages of these waveguides are a high sensitivity due to the high number of internal reflections along the propagation direction, a high transmittance in the mid-IR domain, the bio-compatibility of diamond and the possibility of functionalizing the surface layer. The sensor will be used for analyzing different forms of proteins such as α-synuclein which is relevant in understanding the mechanism behind Parkinson's disease. The fabrication process of the waveguide, its characteristics and several geometries are introduced. The optical setup of the biosensor is described and our first measurements on two analytes to demonstrate the principle of the sensing method will be presented. Future use of this sensor includes the functionalization of the diamond waveguide sensor surface to be able to fish out alpha-synuclein from cerebrospinal fluid.

  8. Multilayer Slab Waveguide Distributed Feedback Dye Laser Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannahme, Christoph; Smith, Cameron; Leung, M.

    2013-01-01

    of DFB lasers. Here, we present a simple yet precise model for calculating the emission wavelength of multilayer DFB lasers. We ¯nd that experimental and calculated wavelength values are in compelling agreement for hybrid nanoimprinted Ormocomp-TiO2 (doped with Pyrromethene 597) ¯rst order DFB lasers [2...

  9. Ge22As20Se58 glass ultrafast laser inscribed waveguides for mid-IR integrated optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, James M.; Mackenzie, Mark D.; Petersen, Christian Rosenberg

    2018-01-01

    Ultrafast laser inscription has been used to produce channel waveguides in Ge22As20Se58 glass (GASIR-1, Umicore N.V). The mode field diameter and waveguide losses at 2.94 mu m were measured along with the waveguide dispersion in the 1 to 4.5 mu m range, which is used to estimate the zero-dispersi...... ultrafast laser inscribed waveguide devices in GASIR-1 for mid-IR integrated optics applications. Published by The Optical Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.......Ultrafast laser inscription has been used to produce channel waveguides in Ge22As20Se58 glass (GASIR-1, Umicore N.V). The mode field diameter and waveguide losses at 2.94 mu m were measured along with the waveguide dispersion in the 1 to 4.5 mu m range, which is used to estimate the zero......-dispersion wavelength. Z-scan measurements of bulk samples have also been performed to determine the nonlinear refractive index. Finally, midIR supercontinuum generation has been shown when pumping the waveguides with femtosecond pulses centered at 4.6 mu m. Supercontinuum spanning approximately 4 mu m from 2.5 to 6...

  10. Barium Nitrate Raman Laser Development for Remote Sensing of Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCray, Christopher L.; Chyba, Thomas H.

    1997-01-01

    In order to understand the impact of anthropogenic emissions upon the earth's environment, scientists require remote sensing techniques which are capable of providing range-resolved measurements of clouds, aerosols, and the concentrations of several chemical constituents of the atmosphere. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique is a very promising method to measure concentration profiles of chemical species such as ozone and water vapor as well as detect the presence of aerosols and clouds. If a suitable DIAL system could be deployed in space, it would provide a global data set of tremendous value. Such systems, however, need to be compact, reliable, and very efficient. In order to measure atmospheric gases with the DIAL technique, the laser transmitter must generate suitable on-line and off-line wavelength pulse pairs. The on-line pulse is resonant with an absorption feature of the species of interest. The off-line pulse is tuned so that it encounters significantly less absorption. The relative backscattered power for the two pulses enables the range-resolved concentration to be computed. Preliminary experiments at NASA LaRC suggested that the solid state Raman shifting material, Ba(NO3)2, could be utilized to produce these pulse pairs. A Raman oscillator pumped at 532 nm by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser can create first Stokes laser output at 563 nm and second Stokes output at 599 nm. With frequency doublers, UV output at 281 nm and 299 nm can be subsequently obtained. This all-solid state system has the potential to be very efficient, compact, and reliable. Raman shifting in Ba(NO3)2, has previously been performed in both the visible and the infrared. The first Raman oscillator in the visible region was investigated in 1986 with the configurations of plane-plane and unstable telescopic resonators. However, most of the recent research has focused on the development of infrared sources for eye-safe lidar applications.

  11. Investigation of single lateral mode for 852nm diode lasers with ridge waveguide design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chu; Guan, Baolu; Mi, Guoxin; Liao, Yiru; Liu, Zhenyang; Li, Jianjun; Xu, Chen

    2016-11-01

    852nm Narrow linewidth lasers can be widely used in the field of ultra-fine spectrum measurement, Cs atomic clock control, satellite and optical fiber communication and so on. Furthermore, the stability of the single lateral mode is a very important condition to guarantee the narrow linewidth lasers. Here we investigate experimentally the influence of the narrow ridge structure and asymmetrical waveguide design on the stability single lateral mode of an 852nm diode laser. According to the waveguide theoretical analysis, ridge mesa etch depth (Δη , related to the refractive index difference of parallel to the junction) and ridge mesa width (the narrower the more control force to low order mode) are the main elements for lateral modes. In this paper, we designed different structures to investigate and verify major factors for lateral mode by experiment, and to confirm our thought. Finally, the 5μm mesa ridge laser, 800nm etch depth, with groove structure obtains excellent steady single lateral mode output by 150mA operating current and 30°C temperature. The optical spectrum FWHM is 0.5nm and side mode suppression ratio is 27dBm with uncoated. The laser with 1mm cavity length showed the threshold current of 50mA, a lasing wavelength of λ = 852.6nm, slope efficiency of above 0.7mW/mA. We accomplished single lateral mode of ridge waveguide edge-emitting lasers which can also be used as a laser source in the ultra-narrow linewidth external cavity laser system.

  12. Generation of Raman lasers from nitrogen molecular ions driven by ultraintense laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jinping; Chu, Wei; Liu, Zhaoxiang; Xu, Bo; Chen, Jinming; Cheng, Ya

    2018-03-01

    Atmospheric lasing has aroused much interest in the past few years. The ‘air–laser’ opens promising potential for remote chemical sensing of trace gases with high sensitivity and specificity. At present, several approaches have been successfully implemented for generating highly coherent laser beams in atmospheric condition, including both amplified-spontaneous emission, and narrow-bandwidth stimulated emission in the forward direction in the presence of self-generated or externally injected seed pulses. Here, we report on generation of multiple-wavelength Raman lasers from nitrogen molecular ions ({{{N}}}2+), driven by intense mid-infrared laser fields. Intuitively, the approach appears problematic for the small nonlinear susceptibility of {{{N}}}2+ ions, whereas the efficiency of Raman laser can be significantly promoted in near-resonant condition. More surprisingly, a Raman laser consisting of a supercontinuum spanning from ∼310 to ∼392 nm has been observed resulting from a series near-resonant nonlinear processes including four-wave mixing, stimulated Raman scattering and cross phase modulation. To date, extreme nonlinear optics in molecular ions remains largely unexplored, which provides an alternative means for air–laser-based remote sensing applications.

  13. Selection of modes in transverse-mode waveguides for semiconductor lasers based on asymmetric heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slipchenko, S. O.; Bondarev, A. D.; Vinokurov, D. A.; Nikolaev, D. N.; Fetisova, N. V.; Sokolova, Z. N.; Pikhtin, N. A.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric Al 0.3 Ga 0.7 As/GaAs/InGaAs heterostructures with a broadened waveguide produced by the method of MOCVD epitaxy are studied. It is established that the precision shift of the active region to one of the cladding layers ensures the generation of the chosen mode of high order in the transverse broadened waveguide. It is experimentally established that this shift brings about an increase in internal optical losses and a decrease in the internal quantum efficiency of stimulated emission. It is shown experimentally that the shift of the active region to the n-type cladding layer governs the sublinear form of the power-current characteristic for semiconductor lasers; in the case of a shift of the active region towards the p-type cladding layer, the laser diodes demonstrated a linear dependence of optical power on the pump current in the entire range of pump currents.

  14. Cascaded-focus laser writing of low-loss waveguides in polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pätzold, Welm M; Reinhardt, Carsten; Demircan, Ayhan; Morgner, Uwe

    2016-03-15

    Waveguide writing in poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) with femtosecond laser radiation is presented. An adequate refractive index change is induced in the border area below the irradiated focal volume. It supports an almost symmetric fundamental mode with propagation losses down to 0.5  dB/cm, the lowest losses observed so far in this class of materials. The writing process with a cascaded focus is demonstrated to be highly reliable over a large parameter range.

  15. Pulsed Raman fiber laser and multispectral imaging in three dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Joachim F.; Busck, Jens; Heiselberg, Henning

    2006-01-01

    Raman scattering in single-mode optical fibers is exploited to generate multispectral light from a green nanolaser with high pulse repetition rate. Each pulse triggers a picosecond camera and measures the distance by time-of-flight in each of the 0.5 Mpixels. Three-dimensional images...... are then constructed with submillimeter accuracy for all visible colors. The generation of a series of Stokes peaks by Raman scattering in a Si fiber is discussed in detail and the laser radar technique is demonstrated. The data recording takes only a few seconds, and the high accuracy 3D color imaging works at ranges...... up to ∼200 m. Applications for optical tomography in highly scattering media such as water and human tissue are mentioned. © 2006 Optical Society of America....

  16. 970-nm ridge waveguide diode laser bars for high power DWBC systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Martin; Erbert, Götz; Wenzel, Hans; Knigge, Andrea; Crump, Paul; Maaßdorf, Andre; Fricke, Jörg; Ressel, Peter; Strohmaier, Stephan; Schmidt, Berthold; Tränkle, Günther

    2018-02-01

    de lasers are key components in material processing laser systems. While mostly used as pump sources for solid state or fiber lasers, direct diode laser systems using dense wavelength multiplexing have come on the market in recent years. These systems are realized with broad area lasers typically, resulting in beam quality inferior to disk or fiber lasers. We will present recent results of highly efficient ridge waveguide (RW) lasers, developed for dense-wavelength-beamcombining (DWBC) laser systems expecting beam qualities comparable to solid state laser systems and higher power conversion efficiencies (PCE). The newly developed RW lasers are based on vertical structures with an extreme double asymmetric large optical cavity. Besides a low vertical divergence these structures are suitable for RW-lasers with (10 μm) broad ridges, emitting in a single mode with a good beam quality. The large stripe width enables a lateral divergence below 10° (95 % power content) and a high PCE by a comparably low series resistance. We present results of single emitters and small test arrays under different external feedback conditions. Single emitters can be tuned from 950 nm to 975 nm and reach 1 W optical power with more than 55 % PCE and a beam quality of M2 < 2 over the full wavelength range. The spectral width is below 30 pm FWHM. 5 emitter arrays were stabilized using the same setup. Up to now we reached 3 W optical power, limited by power supply, with 5 narrow spectral lines.

  17. Propagation of highly aberrated laser beams in nonquadratic plasma waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feit, M.D.; Fleck, J.A. Jr.; Morris, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The propagation of a laser beam in a plasma column several meters long with a realistic electron density distribution is examined. The electron density distribution is based on laser-beam heating at z=0, but is otherwise uncoupled to the laser beam. The aberrated nature of the resulting lenslike medium leads to essentially aperiodic beam properties, which contrast with the completely periodic properties of Gaussian beams propagating in quadratic lenslike media. The beam is nonetheless stably trapped. These aberrated-beam properties also help to stabilize the beam against axial variations in refractive index

  18. Optimization of an intracavity Q-switched solid-state second order Raman laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiqiong; Fu, Xihong; Peng, Hangyu; Zhang, Jun; Qin, Li; Ning, Yongqiang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the model of an intracavity Q-switched second order Raman laser is established, the characteristics of the output 2nd Stokes are simulated. The dynamic balance mechanism among intracavity conversion rates of stimulated emission, first order Raman and second order Raman is obtained. Finally, optimization solutions for increasing output 2nd Stokes pulse energy are proposed.

  19. Combining Raman and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy by double pulse lasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, Vasily N; Pershin, Sergey M; Sdvizhenskii, Pavel A; Grishin, Mikhail Ya; Fedorov, Alexander N; Bukin, Vladimir V; Oshurko, Vadim B; Shchegolikhin, Alexander N

    2018-01-01

    A new approach combining Raman spectrometry and laser induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) within a single laser event was suggested. A pulsed solid state Nd:YAG laser running in double pulse mode (two frequency-doubled sequential nanosecond laser pulses with dozens microseconds delay) was used to combine two spectrometry methods within a single instrument (Raman/LIBS spectrometer). First, a low-energy laser pulse (power density far below ablation threshold) was used for Raman measurements while a second powerful laser pulse created the plasma suitable for LIBS analysis. A short time delay between two successive pulses allows measuring LIBS and Raman spectra at different moments but within a single laser flash-lamp pumping. Principal advantages of the developed instrument include high quality Raman/LIBS spectra acquisition (due to optimal gating for Raman/LIBS independently) and absence of target thermal alteration during Raman measurements. A series of high quality Raman and LIBS spectra were acquired for inorganic salts (gypsum, anhydrite) as well as for pharmaceutical samples (acetylsalicylic acid). To the best of our knowledge, the quantitative analysis feasibility by combined Raman/LIBS instrument was demonstrated for the first time by calibration curves construction for acetylsalicylic acid (Raman) and copper (LIBS) in gypsum matrix. Combining ablation pulses and Raman measurements (LIBS/Raman measurements) within a single instrument makes it an efficient tool for identification of samples hidden by non-transparent covering or performing depth profiling analysis including remote sensing. Graphical abstract Combining Raman and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy by double pulse lasing.

  20. Experimental studies with a stimulated Raman backscatter probe beam in laser-irradiated plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Z.M.; Meng, S.X.; Xu, Z.Z.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports on the optical diagnostic experiments accomplished with a stimulated Raman backscatter probe beam set up recently in the sixbeam Nd:glass laser facility for laser fusion research at the Shanghai Insitute of Optics and Fine Mechanics

  1. Modeling of mode-locked coupled-resonator optical waveguide lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Christian; Skovgård, Troels Suhr; Gregersen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Coupled-resonator optical waveguides made from coupled high-Q photonic crystal nanocavities are investigated for use as cavities in mode-locked lasers. Such devices show great potential in slowing down light and can serve to reduce the cavity length of a mode-locked laser. An explicit expression...... of the emerging pulse train. A range of tuning around this frequency allows for effective mode locking. Finally, noise is added to the generalized single-cavity eigenfrequencies in order to evaluate the effects of fabrication imperfections on the cold-cavity transmission properties and consequently on the locking...

  2. Waveguide formation by laser backwriting ablation of metals unto glass substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangel-Rojo, R.; Castelo, A.; Flores-Arias, M. T.; Gomez-Reino, C.; Lopez-Gascon, C.; Fuente, G. F. de la

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present experimental results for the generation of channel waveguides by a laser backwriting technique using a nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser working at 1064 nm. We present a characterization of the resulting refractive index profile, using the refracted near-field technique, together with a spatially resolved chemical analysis based on energy dispersive x-ray analysis(EDX). The EDX results confirm that metal ions are embedded in a region close to the substrate interface, up to about a 5 μm depth. We also present a discussion of the physical mechanisms that produce the profiles measured

  3. Waveguide formation by laser backwriting ablation of metals unto glass substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel-Rojo, R [Departamento de Optica, Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Apartado Postal 2732, Ensenada BC 22860 (Mexico); Castelo, A; Flores-Arias, M T; Gomez-Reino, C [GRIN Optics Group. Applied Physics Department, Escola Universitaria de Optica e Optometria, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur s/n, E15782 Santiago de Compostela, Espana (Spain); Lopez-Gascon, C; Fuente, G F. de la [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (U. Zaragoza-CSIC), Ma. de Luna 3, E50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2008-04-15

    In this work we present experimental results for the generation of channel waveguides by a laser backwriting technique using a nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser working at 1064 nm. We present a characterization of the resulting refractive index profile, using the refracted near-field technique, together with a spatially resolved chemical analysis based on energy dispersive x-ray analysis(EDX). The EDX results confirm that metal ions are embedded in a region close to the substrate interface, up to about a 5 {mu}m depth. We also present a discussion of the physical mechanisms that produce the profiles measured.

  4. Broadband Optical Active Waveguides Written by Femtosecond Laser Pulses in Lithium Fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiamenti, Ismael; Costa, Larissa N. da; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.; Bonfigli, Francesca; Montereali, Rosa Maria; Gomes Anderson, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Broadband waveguiding through light-emitting strips directly written in a blank lithium fluoride crystal with a femtosecond laser is reported. Light guiding was observed at several optical wavelengths, from blue, 458 nm, to near-infrared, at 1550 nm. Visible photoluminescence spectra of the optically active F 2 and F 3 + color centers produced by the fs laser writing process were measured. The wavelength-dependent refractive index increase was estimated to be in the order of 10 −3 −10 −4 in the visible and near-infrared spectral intervals, which is consistent with the stable formation of point defects in LiF

  5. Broadband Optical Active Waveguides Written by Femtosecond Laser Pulses in Lithium Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismael, Chiamenti; Francesca, Bonfigli; Anderson, S. L. Gomes; Rosa, Maria Montereali; Larissa, N. da Costa; Hypolito, J. Kalinowski

    2014-01-01

    Broadband waveguiding through light-emitting strips directly written in a blank lithium fluoride crystal with a femtosecond laser is reported. Light guiding was observed at several optical wavelengths, from blue, 458 nm, to near-infrared, at 1550 nm. Visible photoluminescence spectra of the optically active F2 and F3+ color centers produced by the fs laser writing process were measured. The wavelength-dependent refractive index increase was estimated to be in the order of 10-3-10-4 in the visible and near-infrared spectral intervals, which is consistent with the stable formation of point defects in LiF.

  6. A Helical Undulator Wave-guide Inverse Free-Electron Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.; Bodzin, N.; Frigola, P.; Musumeci, P.; Pellegrini, C.; Travish, G.; Joshi, C.; Tochitsky, S.

    2004-01-01

    With recent success in high gradient, high-energy gain IFEL experiments at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory, future experiments are now being contemplated. The Neptune IFEL was designed to use a tightly focused, highly diffracting, near-TW peak power 10 micron laser. This choice of laser focusing, driven by power-handling limitations of the optics near the interaction region, led to design and use of a very complex undulator, and to sensitivity to both laser misalignment and focusing errors. As these effects limited the performance of the IFEL experiment, a next generation experiment at Neptune has been studied which avoids the use of a highly diffractive laser beam through use of a waveguide. We discuss here the choice of low-loss waveguide, guided mode characteristics and likely power limitations. We also examine a preferred undulator design, which is chosen to be helical in order to maximize the acceleration achieved for a given power. With the limitations of these laser and undulator choices in mind, we show the expected performance of the IFEL using 1D simulations. Three-dimensional effects are examined, in the context of use of a solenoid for focusing and acceleration enhancement

  7. Numerical Modelling of a Bidirectional Long Ring Raman Fiber Laser Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, S. V.; Melnikov, L. A.; Mazhirina, Yu A.

    2017-11-01

    The numerical model for the simulation of the dynamics of a bidirectional long ring Raman fiber laser is proposed. The model is based on the transport equations and Courant-Isaacson-Rees method. Different regimes of a bidirectional long ring Raman fiber laser and long time-domain realizations are investigated.

  8. Fiber-Type Random Laser Based on a Cylindrical Waveguide with a Disordered Cladding Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei Li; Zheng, Meng Ya; Ma, Rui; Gong, Chao Yang; Yang, Zhao Ji; Peng, Gang Ding; Rao, Yun Jiang

    2016-05-25

    This letter reports a fiber-type random laser (RL) which is made from a capillary coated with a disordered layer at its internal surface and filled with a gain (laser dye) solution in the core region. This fiber-type optical structure, with the disordered layer providing randomly scattered light into the gain region and the cylindrical waveguide providing confinement of light, assists the formation of random lasing modes and enables a flexible and efficient way of making random lasers. We found that the RL is sensitive to laser dye concentration in the core region and there exists a fine exponential relationship between the lasing intensity and particle concentration in the gain solution. The proposed structure could be a fine platform of realizing random lasing and random lasing based sensing.

  9. Control of waveguide properties by tuning femtosecond laser induced compositional changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyo, Jesús; Fernandez, Toney Teddy del; Siegel, Jan; Solis, Javier; Vazquez, Rebeca Martinez; Osellame, Roberto; Sotillo, Belén; Fernández, Paloma

    2014-01-01

    Local compositional changes induced by high repetition rate fs-laser irradiation can be used to produce high performance optical waveguides in phosphate-based glasses. The waveguide refractive index contrast is determined by the local concentration of La, which can be changed by the action of the writing laser pulses. In this work, we have investigated the degree of control that can be exerted using this waveguide writing mechanism over the cross-section of the guiding region, and the local refractive index and compositional changes induced. These variables can be smoothly controlled via processing parameters using the slit shaping technique with moderate Numerical Aperture (NA 0.68) writing optics. The combined use of X-ray microanalysis and near field refractive index profilometry evidences a neat linear correlation between local La content and refractive index increase over a broad Δn interval (>3 × 10 −2 ). This result further confirms the feasibility of generating efficient, integrated optics elements via spatially selective modification of the glass composition.

  10. Control of waveguide properties by tuning femtosecond laser induced compositional changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyo, Jesús; Fernandez, Toney Teddy del; Siegel, Jan; Solis, Javier, E-mail: j.solis@io.cfmac.csic.es [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Vazquez, Rebeca Martinez; Osellame, Roberto [Instituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Sotillo, Belén; Fernández, Paloma [Depto. de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Físicas, Univ. Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-29

    Local compositional changes induced by high repetition rate fs-laser irradiation can be used to produce high performance optical waveguides in phosphate-based glasses. The waveguide refractive index contrast is determined by the local concentration of La, which can be changed by the action of the writing laser pulses. In this work, we have investigated the degree of control that can be exerted using this waveguide writing mechanism over the cross-section of the guiding region, and the local refractive index and compositional changes induced. These variables can be smoothly controlled via processing parameters using the slit shaping technique with moderate Numerical Aperture (NA 0.68) writing optics. The combined use of X-ray microanalysis and near field refractive index profilometry evidences a neat linear correlation between local La content and refractive index increase over a broad Δn interval (>3 × 10{sup −2}). This result further confirms the feasibility of generating efficient, integrated optics elements via spatially selective modification of the glass composition.

  11. Multi-wavelength laser based on an arrayed waveguide grating and Sagnac loop reflectors monolithically integrated on InP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muñoz, P.; García-Olcina, R.; Doménech, J.D.; Rius, M.; Capmany, J.; Chen, L.R.; Habib, C.; Leijtens, X.J.M.; Vries, de T.; Heck, M.J.R.; Augustin, L.M.; Nötzel, R.; Robbins, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a multi-wavelength laser monolithically integrated on InP is presented. A linear laser cavity is built between two integrated Sagnac loop reflectors, with an Arrayed Waveguide Grating (AWG) as frequency selective device, and Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers (SOA) as gain sections. The

  12. Combined laser ultrasonics, laser heating, and Raman scattering in diamond anvil cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Burgess, Katherine; Odake, Shoko; Chigarev, Nikolay; Sharma, Shiv K.

    2016-12-01

    We developed a multi-functional in situ measurement system under high pressure equipped with a laser ultrasonics (LU) system, Raman device, and laser heating system (LU-LH) in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). The system consists of four components: (1) a LU-DAC system (probe and pump lasers, photodetector, and oscilloscope) and DAC; (2) a fiber laser, which is designed to allow precise control of the total power in the range from 2 to 100 W by changing the diode current, for heating samples; (3) a spectrometer for measuring the temperature of the sample (using black body radiation), fluorescence spectrum (spectrum of the ruby for pressure measurement), and Raman scattering measurements inside a DAC under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions; and (4) an optical system to focus laser beams on the sample and image it in the DAC. The system is unique and allows us to do the following: (a) measure the shear and longitudinal velocities of non-transparent materials under HPHT; (b) measure temperature in a DAC under HPHT conditions using Planck's law; (c) measure pressure in a DAC using a Raman signal; and (d) measure acoustical properties of small flat specimens removed from the DAC after HPHT treatment. In this report, we demonstrate that the LU-LH-DAC system allows measurements of velocities of the skimming waves in iron at 2580 K and 22 GPa.

  13. Raman mediated all-optical cascadable inverter using silicon-on-insulator waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Mrinal; Das, Mukul K

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we propose an all-optical circuit for a cascadable and integrable logic inverter based on stimulated Raman scattering. A maximum product criteria for noise margin is taken to analyze the cascadability of the inverter. Variation of noise margin for different model parameters is also studied. Finally, the time domain response of the inverter is analyzed for different widths of input pulses.

  14. Direct femtosecond laser writing of buried infrared waveguides in chalcogenide glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Coq, D.; Bychkov, E.; Masselin, P.

    2016-02-01

    Direct laser writing technique is now widely used in particular in glass, to produce both passive and active photonic devices. This technique offers a real scientific opportunity to generate three-dimensional optical components and since chalcogenide glasses possess transparency properties from the visible up to mid-infrared range, they are of great interest. Moreover, they also have high optical non-linearity and high photo-sensitivity that make easy the inscription of refractive index modification. The understanding of the fundamental and physical processes induced by the laser pulses is the key to well-control the laser writing and consequently to realize integrated photonic devices. In this paper, we will focus on two different ways allowing infrared buried waveguide to be obtained. The first part will be devoted to a very original writing process based on a helical translation of the sample through the laser beam. In the second part, we will report on another original method based on both a filamentation phenomenon and a point by point technique. Finally, we will demonstrate that these two writing techniques are suitable for the design of single mode waveguide for wavelength ranging from the visible up to the infrared but also to fabricate optical components.

  15. Single scan femtosecond laser transverse writing of depressed cladding waveguides enabled by three-dimensional focal field engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Dong; Qi, Jia; Cheng, Ya; Gong, Qihuang; Li, Yan

    2017-06-12

    We report single scan transverse writing of depressed cladding waveguides inside ZBLAN glass with the longitudinally oriented annular ring-shaped focal intensity distribution of the femtosecond laser. The entire region of depressed cladding at the cross section, where a negative change of refraction index is induced, can be modified simultaneously with the ring-shaped focal intensity profile. The fabricated waveguides exhibit good single guided mode.

  16. Waveguide embedded plasmon laser with multiplexing and electrical modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ren-min; Zhang, Xiang

    2017-08-29

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to nanometer scale lasers. In one aspect, a device includes a substrate, a line of metal disposed on the substrate, an insulating material disposed on the line of metal, and a line of semiconductor material disposed on the substrate and the insulating material. The line of semiconductor material overlaying the line of metal, disposed on the insulating material, forms a plasmonic cavity.

  17. Bright X-ray source from a laser-driven micro-plasma-waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Longqing

    2016-01-01

    Bright tunable x-ray sources have a number of applications in basic science, medicine and industry. The most powerful sources are synchrotrons, where relativistic electrons are circling in giant storage rings. In parallel, compact laser-plasma x-ray sources are being developed. Owing to the rapid progress in laser technology, very high-contrast femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities become available. These pulses allow for interaction with micro-structured solid-density plasma without destroying the structure by parasitic pre-pulses. The high-contrast laser pulses as well as the manufacturing of materials at micro- and nano-scales open a new realm of possibilities for laser interaction with photonic materials at the relativistic intensities. Here we demonstrate, via numerical simulations, that when coupling with a readily available 1.8 Joule laser, a micro-plasma-waveguide (MPW) may serve as a novel compact x-ray source. Electrons are extracted from the walls by the laser field and form a dense ...

  18. Improving the beam quality of high-power laser diodes by introducing lateral periodicity into waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, Grzegorz; DÄ browska, ElŻbieta; Teodorczyk, Marian; Kalbarczyk, Joanna; MalÄ g, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Low quality of the optical beam emitted by high-power laser diodes is the main disadvantage of these devices. The two most important reasons are highly non-Gaussian beam profile with relatively wide divergence in the junction plane and the filamentation effect. Designing laser diode as an array of narrow, close to each other single-mode waveguides is one of the solutions to this problem. In such devices called phase locked arrays (PLA) there is no room for filaments formation. The consequence of optical coupling of many single-mode waveguides is the device emission in the form of few almost diffraction limited beams. Because of losses in regions between active stripes the PLA devices have, however, somewhat higher threshold current and lower slope efficiencies compared to wide-stripe devices of similar geometry. In this work the concept of the high-power laser diode resonator consisted of joined PLA and wide stripe segments is proposed. Resulting changes of electro-optical characteristics of PLA are discussed. The devices are based on the asymmetric heterostructure designed for improvement of the catastrophic optical damage threshold as well as thermal and electrical resistances. Due to reduced distance from the active layer to surface in this heterostructure, better stability of current (and gain) distribution with changing drive level is expected. This could lead to better stability of optical field distribution and supermodes control. The beam divergence reduction in the direction perpendicular of the junction plane has been also achieved.

  19. UV Raman spectroscopy of H2-air flames excited with a narrowband KrF laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, John A.

    1990-01-01

    Raman spectra of H2 and H2O in flames excited by a narrowband KrF excimer laser are reported. Observations are made over a porous-plug, flat-flame burner reacting H2 in air, fuel-rich with nitrogen dilution to control the temperature, and with an H2 diffusion flame. Measurements made from UV Raman spectra show good agreement with measurements made by other means, both for gas temperature and relative major species concentrations. Laser-induced fluorescence interferences arising from OH and O2 are observed in emission near the Raman spectra. These interferences do not preclude Raman measurements, however.

  20. Tapered waveguide InGaAs/InGaAsP multiple-quantum-well lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, T.L.; Koren, U.; Eisentein, G.; Young, M.G.; Oron, M.; Giles, C.R.; Miller, B.I.

    1990-01-01

    The authors propose and demonstrate the application of ultra-thin etch-stop fabrication techniques to adiabatically expand the vertical optical mode size in 1.5 μm InGaAs/InGaAsP MQW lasers using a tapered-core passive intracavity waveguide structure. They achieve 30% differential quantum efficiency out the tapered facet, far-field FWHM of ∼ 12 degrees, and a butt-coupling efficiency into a cleaved fiber of - 4.2 dB, with - 1 dB alignment tolerances of ∼ ± 3 μM

  1. In situ TEM Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, F.I., E-mail: fiallen@lbl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kim, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Andresen, N.C. [Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grigoropoulos, C.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Minor, A.M., E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    We present a modular assembly that enables both in situ Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing to be performed in a transmission electron microscope. The system comprises a lensed Raman probe mounted inside the microscope column in the specimen plane and a custom specimen holder with a vacuum feedthrough for a tapered optical fiber. The Raman probe incorporates both excitation and collection optics, and localized laser processing is performed using pulsed laser light delivered to the specimen via the tapered optical fiber. Precise positioning of the fiber is achieved using a nanomanipulation stage in combination with simultaneous electron-beam imaging of the tip-to-sample distance. Materials modification is monitored in real time by transmission electron microscopy. First results obtained using the assembly are presented for in situ pulsed laser ablation of MoS{sub 2} combined with Raman spectroscopy, complimented by electron-beam diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing in a TEM are demonstrated. • A lensed Raman probe is mounted in the sample chamber for close approach. • Localized laser processing is achieved using a tapered optical fiber. • Raman spectroscopy and pulsed laser ablation of MoS{sub 2} are performed in situ.

  2. In situ TEM Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, F.I.; Kim, E.; Andresen, N.C.; Grigoropoulos, C.P.; Minor, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a modular assembly that enables both in situ Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing to be performed in a transmission electron microscope. The system comprises a lensed Raman probe mounted inside the microscope column in the specimen plane and a custom specimen holder with a vacuum feedthrough for a tapered optical fiber. The Raman probe incorporates both excitation and collection optics, and localized laser processing is performed using pulsed laser light delivered to the specimen via the tapered optical fiber. Precise positioning of the fiber is achieved using a nanomanipulation stage in combination with simultaneous electron-beam imaging of the tip-to-sample distance. Materials modification is monitored in real time by transmission electron microscopy. First results obtained using the assembly are presented for in situ pulsed laser ablation of MoS_2 combined with Raman spectroscopy, complimented by electron-beam diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing in a TEM are demonstrated. • A lensed Raman probe is mounted in the sample chamber for close approach. • Localized laser processing is achieved using a tapered optical fiber. • Raman spectroscopy and pulsed laser ablation of MoS_2 are performed in situ.

  3. Laser Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopies of natural semiconductor mineral cinnabar, α-HgS, from various mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoshia, Sergo V; Gotoshia, Lamara V

    2008-01-01

    Natural minerals α-HgS from various mines have been studied by laser Raman spectroscopy and resonance Raman spectroscopy. The crystals differ from each other in the content of selenium impurity, included in samples from some mines. Based on the Raman spectra and the factor-group analysis the classification of the first order phonons and then the comparison of the results with the results from other works were carried out. The Raman spectra analysis of minerals from various mines show the selenium impurity gap vibration at 203 cm -1 and 226 cm -1 frequencies, respectively. On the basis of statistical measurements of the Raman spectra one can conclude that impurity frequencies of α-HgS may be generally used for the identification of the mine. Resonance Raman scattering for pure minerals has been studied by a dye laser. Phonon resonance in the indirect semiconductor α-HgS is found to be far more intense than the indirect resonance detected until now in various semiconductors in the proximity of the first indirect band E g , for instance, in GaP. In our opinion, this may be conditioned by cinnabar band structure peculiarities. Low resonance has also been fixed in 'dirty' minerals at the spectral band frequency of 203 cm -1 characterizing gap vibration of isomorphic impurity Se in cinnabar

  4. A combined remote Raman and LIBS instrument for characterizing minerals with 532 nm laser excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shiv K; Misra, Anupam K; Lucey, Paul G; Lentz, Rachel C F

    2009-08-01

    The authors have developed an integrated remote Raman and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system for measuring both the Raman and LIBS spectra of minerals with a single 532 nm laser line of 35 mJ/pulse and 20 Hz. The instrument has been used for analyzing both Raman and LIBS spectra of carbonates, sulfates, hydrous and anhydrous silicates, and iron oxide minerals in air. These experiments demonstrate that by focusing a frequency-doubled 532 nm Nd:YAG pulsed laser beam with a 10x beam expander to a 529-microm diameter spot on a mineral surface located at 9 m, it is possible to measure simultaneously both the remote Raman and LIBS spectra of calcite, gypsum and olivine by adjusting the laser power electronically. The spectra of calcite, gypsum, and olivine contain fingerprint Raman lines; however, it was not possible to measure the remote Raman spectra of magnetite and hematite at 9 m because of strong absorption of 532 nm laser radiation and low intensities of Raman lines from these minerals. The remote LIBS spectra of both magnetite and hematite contain common iron emission lines but show difference in the minor amount of Li present in these two minerals. Remote Raman and LIBS spectra of a number of carbonates, sulfates, feldspars and phyllosilicates at a distance of 9 m were measured with a 532-nm laser operating at 35 mJ/pulse and by changing photon flux density at the sample by varying the spot diameter from 10 mm for Raman to 530 microm for LIBS measurements. The complementary nature of these spectra is highlighted and discussed. The combined Raman and LIBS system can also be re-configured to perform micro-Raman and micro-LIBS analyses, which have applications in trace/residue analysis and analysis of very small samples in the nano-gram range.

  5. Femtosecond laser direct writing of gratings and waveguides in high quantum efficiency erbium-doped Baccarat glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnubhatla, K C; Kumar, R Sai Santosh; Rao, D Narayana; Rao, S Venugopal; Osellame, R; Ramponi, R; Bhaktha, S N B; Mattarelli, M; Montagna, M; Turrell, S; Chiappini, A; Chiasera, A; Ferrari, M; Righini, G C

    2009-01-01

    The femtosecond laser direct writing technique was employed to inscribe gratings and waveguides in high quantum efficiency erbium-doped Baccarat glass. Using the butt coupling technique, a systematic study of waveguide loss with respect to input pulse energy and writing speed was performed to achieve the best waveguide with low propagation loss (PL). By pumping at 980 nm, we observed signal enhancement in these active waveguides in the telecom spectral region. The refractive index change was smooth and we estimated it to be ∼10 -3 . The high quantum efficiency (∼80%) and a best PL of ∼0.9 dB cm -1 combined with signal enhancement makes Baccarat glass a potential candidate for application in photonics.

  6. High slope efficiency and high refractive index change in direct-written Yb-doped waveguide lasers with depressed claddings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Guido; Gross, Simon; Fuerbach, Alexander; Lancaster, David G; Withford, Michael J

    2013-07-15

    We report the first Yb:ZBLAN and Yb:IOG10 waveguide lasers fabricated by the fs-laser direct-writing technique. Pulses from a Titanium-Sapphire laser oscillator with 5.1 MHz repetition rate were utilized to generate negative refractive index modifications in both glasses. Multiple modifications were aligned in a depressed cladding geometry to create a waveguide. For Yb:ZBLAN we demonstrate high laser slope efficiency of 84% with a maximum output power of 170 mW. By using Yb:IOG10 a laser performance of 25% slope efficiency and 72 mW output power was achieved and we measured a remarkably high refractive index change exceeding Δn = 2.3 × 10(-2).

  7. 1.5  kW efficient CW Nd:YAG planar waveguide MOPA laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juntao; Wu, Zhenhai; Su, Hua; Zhou, Tangjian; Lei, Jun; Lv, Wenqiang; He, Jing; Xu, Liu; Chen, Yuejian; Wang, Dan; Tong, Lixin; Hu, Hao; Gao, Qingsong; Tang, Chun

    2017-08-15

    In this Letter, we report a 1064 nm continuous wave Nd:YAG planar waveguide laser with an output power of 1544 W based on the structure of the master oscillator power amplification. A fiber laser is used as the master oscillator, and diode laser arrays are used as the pump source of the waveguide laser amplifier. The dimension of the waveguide is 1  mm (T)×10  mm (W)×60  mm (L), and the dual end oblique pumping is adopted with different angles. After a single-pass amplification, the power is scaled from 323 to 1544 W with the pump power of 2480 W, leading to an optical-to-optical efficiency of 49%. At the maximum output, the beam quality M 2 are measured to be 2.8 and 7.0 in the guided direction and the unguided direction, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power of a Nd:YAG planar waveguide laser to date.

  8. Laser performance and modeling of RE3+:YAG double-clad crystalline fiber waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da; Lee, Huai-Chuan; Meissner, Stephanie K.; Meissner, Helmuth E.

    2018-02-01

    We report on laser performance of ceramic Yb:YAG and single crystal Tm:YAG double-clad crystalline fiber waveguide (CFW) lasers towards the goal of demonstrating the design and manufacturing strategy of scaling to high output power. The laser component is a double-clad CFW, with RE3+:YAG (RE = Yb, Tm respectively) core, un-doped YAG inner cladding, and ceramic spinel or sapphire outer cladding. Laser performance of the CFW has been demonstrated with 53.6% slope efficiency and 27.5-W stable output power at 1030-nm for Yb:YAG CFW, and 31.6% slope efficiency and 46.7-W stable output power at 2019-nm for Tm:YAG CFW, respectively. Adhesive-Free Bond (AFB®) technology enables a designable refractive index difference between core and inner cladding, and designable core and inner cladding sizes, which are essential for single transverse mode CFW propagation. To guide further development of CFW designs, we present thermal modeling, power scaling and design of single transverse mode operation of double-clad CFWs and redefine the single-mode operation criterion for the double-clad structure design. The power scaling modeling of double-clad CFW shows that in order to achieve the maximum possible output power limited by the physical properties, including diode brightness, thermal lens effect, and simulated Brillion scattering, the length of waveguide is in the range of 0.5 2 meters. The length of an individual CFW is limited by single crystal growth and doping uniformity to about 100 to 200 mm lengths, and also by availability of starting crystals and manufacturing complexity. To overcome the limitation of CFW lengths, end-to-end proximity-coupling of CFWs is introduced.

  9. TE modes of UV-laser generated waveguides in a planar polymer chip of parabolic refractive index profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams El-Din, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    The UV-laser lithographic method is used for the preparation of Polymeric integrated-optical waveguides in a planar polymer chip. The waveguide samples are irradiated by an excimer laser of wavelength 248 nm with different doses and with the same fluencies. The refractive index depth profile for the waveguides, in the first zone is found to have a parabolic shape and Gaussian shape in the second one that can be determined by Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Both the mode field distribution and the effective mode indices for the first zone only are determined by making use of the theoretical mode and the experimental data. It is found that the model field distribution is strongly dependent on the refractive indices for each zone.

  10. Generation of fast electrons in the external corona of laser plasma by the Raman scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašek, Martin; Rohlena, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 163, 4-6 (2008), 551-558 ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2475 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : Vlasov equation * stimulated Raman scattering * Raman cascade Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.415, year: 2008

  11. A pulsed single-frequency Nd:GGG/BaWO4 Raman laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaojun; Men, Shaojie; Cong, Zhenhua; Qin, Zengguang; Zhang, Xingyu; Zhang, Huaijin

    2018-04-01

    A single-frequency pulsed laser at 1178.3 nm was demonstrated in a crystalline Raman laser. A crystal combination of Nd:GGG and BaWO4 was selected to realize Raman conversion from a 1062.5 nm fundamental wave to a 1178.3 nm Stokes wave. An entangled cavity was specially designed to form an intracavity Raman configuration. Single-longitudinal-mode operation was realized by introducing two Fabry-Perot etalons into the Raman laser cavity. This laser operated at a pulse repetition rate of 50 Hz with 2 ms long envelopes containing micro pulses at a 30 kHz repetition rate. The highest output power was 41 mW with the micro pulse duration of 15 ns. The linewidth was measured to be less than 130 MHz.

  12. Ultraviolet Raman Spectral Signatures in Support of Lisa (Laser Interrogation of Surface Agents)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sedlacek, III, Arthur J; Finfrock, Charles C; Christesen, Steve; Chyba, Tom; Higdon, Scott

    2003-01-01

    ... (Laser Interrogation of Surface Agents). This engineering, testing and evaluation effort uses a novel mini-Raman lidar technique for on-the-move, short-range, non-contact detection and identification of chemical agents on the battlefield...

  13. Characterization of redeposited carbon layers on TEXTOR limiter by Laser Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egashira, K.; Tanabe, T.; Yoshida, M.; Nakazato, H.; Philipps, V.; Brezinsek, S.; Kreter, A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Laser Raman technique has applied to analyze the deposited carbon layers on TEXTOR test limiters of C and W. ► The carbon deposited layers showed the Raman spectra composed of G-peak and D-peak. ► For W limiter, hydrogen concentrations in the deposited carbon layers and their thicknesses correlated to the two peaks. ► The Laser Raman spectroscopy is a promising tool for in situ analysis of carbon redeposit layers on plasma facing W materials. - Abstract: Laser Raman spectroscopy is quite sensitive to detect the changes of graphite structure. In this study, the Laser Raman technique was applied to analyze the deposited carbon layers on TEXTOR test limiters of carbon (C) and tungsten (W) produced by intentional carbon deposition experiments by methane gas puffing. The carbon deposited layers showed the Raman spectra composed of two broad peaks, G-peak and D-peak, centered at around 1580 and 1355 cm −1 respectively. For W limiter, the G-peak position and the integrated intensity of the two peaks well correlate to hydrogen concentrations in the deposited carbon layers and their thicknesses, respectively. Hence Laser Raman spectroscopy is a promising tool for the in situ analysis of carbon redeposit layers on plasma facing W materials and probably on Be materials.

  14. Ultra-photo-stable coherent random laser based on liquid waveguide gain channels doped with boehmite nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Chao; Dai, Jiangyun; Yin, Jiajia; Xue, Hongyan; Feng, Guoying; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2018-02-01

    Construction of ultra-photo-stable coherent random laser based on liquid waveguide gain channels doped with boehmite nanosheets has been demonstrated. An Al plate uniformly coated with boehmite nanosheets was prepared by an alkali-treatment method and used as a scattering surface for the coherent random laser. Microcavity may be formed between these boehmite nanosheets owing to the strong optical feedback induced by the multiple light scattering. Many sharp peaks are observed in the emission spectra, and their laser thresholds are different, which confirms the feedback mechanism is coherent. The linewidth of the main peak at 571.74 nm is 0.28 nm, and the threshold of the main peak is about 4.96 mJ/cm2. Due to the fluidity of liquid waveguide gain medium, the photostability of this coherent random laser is better than the conventional solid state dye random lasers. The emission direction is well constrained by the waveguide effect within a certain angular range (±30°). This kind of coherent random laser can be applied in optical fluid lasers and photonic devices.

  15. End-pumped continuous-wave intracavity yellow Raman laser at 590 nm with SrWO4 Raman crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F. G.; You, Z. Y.; Zhu, Z. J.; Wang, Y.; Li, J. F.; Tu, C. Y.

    2010-01-01

    We present an end-pumped continuous-wave intra-cavity yellow Raman laser at 590 nm with a 60 mm long pure crystal SrWO4 and an intra-cavity LiB3O5 frequency doubling crystal. The highest output power of yellow laser at 590 nm was 230 mW and the output power and threshold were found to be correlative with the polarized directions of pure single crystal SrWO4 deeply. Along different directions, the minimum and maximum thresholds of yellow Raman laser at 590 nm were measured to be 2.8 W and 14.3 W with respect to 808 nm LD pump power, respectively.

  16. End-pumped continuous-wave intracavity yellow Raman laser at 590 nm with SrWO4 Raman crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, F G; You, Z Y; Zhu, Z J; Wang, Y; Li, J F; Tu, C Y

    2010-01-01

    We present an end-pumped continuous-wave intra-cavity yellow Raman laser at 590 nm with a 60 mm long pure crystal SrWO 4 and an intra-cavity LiB 3 O 5 frequency doubling crystal. The highest output power of yellow laser at 590 nm was 230 mW and the output power and threshold were found to be correlative with the polarized directions of pure single crystal SrWO 4 deeply. Along different directions, the minimum and maximum thresholds of yellow Raman laser at 590 nm were measured to be 2.8 W and 14.3 W with respect to 808 nm LD pump power, respectively

  17. Femtosecond laser writing of new type of waveguides in silver containing glasses (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Khalil, Alain; Bérubé, Jean-Philippe; Danto, Sylvain; Desmoulin, Jean-Charles; Cardinal, Thierry; Petit, Yannick G.; Canioni, Lionel; Vallée, Réal

    2017-03-01

    Femtosecond laser writing in glasses is a growing field of research and development in photonics, since it provides a versatile, robust and efficient approach to directly address 3D material structuring. Laser-glass interaction process has been studied for many years, especially the local changes of the refractive index that have been classified by three distinct types (types I, II and III, respectively). These refractive index modifications are widely used for the creation of photonics devices such as waveguides [1], couplers, photonic crystals to fabricate integrated optical functions in glasses for photonic applications as optical circuits or integrated sensors. Femtosecond laser writing in a home-developed silver containing zinc phosphate glasses induces the creation of fluorescent silver clusters distributed around the laser-glass interaction voxel [2]. In this paper, we introduce a new type of refractive index modification in glasses. It is based on the creation of these photo-induced silver clusters allowing a local change in the refractive index Δn = 5×10-3, which is sufficient for the creation of waveguides and photonics devices. The wave guiding process in our glasses along these structures with original geometry is demonstrated for wavelengths from visible to NIR [3], giving a promising access to integrated optical circuits in these silver containing glasses. Moreover, the characterization of the waveguides is presented, including their original geometry, the refractive index change, the mode profile, the estimation of propagation losses and a comparison with simulation results. 1. K. M. Davis, K. Miura, N. Sugimoto, and K. Hirao, Opt. Lett. 21, 1729-1731 (1996). 2. M. Bellec, A. Royon, K. Bourhis, J. Choi, B. Bousquet, M. Treguer, T. Cardinal, J.-J. Videau, M. Richardson, and L. Canioni, The Journal of Physical Chemistry C 114, 15584-15588 (2010). 3. S. Danto, F. Désévédavy, Y. Petit, J.-C. Desmoulin, A. Abou Khalil, C. Strutynski, M. Dussauze, F

  18. Controlling Stimulated Brillouin/Raman Scattering in High Power Fiber Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-09

    AFRL-RD-PS- AFRL-RD-PS- TR-2017-0043 TR-2017-0043 CONTROLLING STIMULATED BRILLOUIN/RAMAN SCATTERING IN HIGH POWER FIBER LASERS Cody Mart Ben...average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This research addressed suppression of stimulated Brillouin/Raman scattering in high power fiber lasers

  19. Influence of the electric field frequency on the performance of a RF excited CO2 waveguide laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ochkin, V.N.; Witteman, W.J.; Ilukhin, B.I.; Kochetov, I.V.; Peters, P.J.M.; Udalov, Yu.B.; Tskhai, S.N.

    1996-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the effect of the RF frequency on the active media of CO2 waveguide lasers. It is found that the characteristics are improved with increasing RF frequency because the space charge sheath width decreases with increasing excitation frequency. We also found that the sheath

  20. The formation and optical properties of planar waveguide in laser crystal Nd:YGG by carbon ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jin-Hua; Qin, Xi-Feng; Wang, Feng-Xiang; Jiao, Yang; Guan, Jing; Fu, Gang

    2017-10-01

    As one kind of prominent laser crystal, Nd:Y3Ga5O12 (Nd:YGG) crystal has outstanding performance on laser excitation at multi-wavelength which have shown promising applications in optical communication field. In addition, Nd:YGG crystal has potential applications in medical field due to its ability of emit the laser at 1110 nm. Optical waveguide structure with high quality could improve the efficiency of laser emission. In this work, we fabricated the optical planar waveguide on Nd:YGG crystal by medium mass ion implantation which was convinced an effective method to realize a waveguide structure with superior optical properties. The sample is implanted by C ions at energy of 5.0 MeV with the fluence of 1 × 1015 ions/cm2. We researched the optical propagation properties in the Nd:YGG waveguide by end-face coupling and prism coupling method. The Nd ions fluorescent properties are obtained by a confocal micro-luminescence measurement. The fluorescent properties of Nd ions obtained good reservation after C ion implantation. Our work has reference value for the application of Nd:YGG crystal in the field of optical communication.

  1. Polarized Raman study on the lattice structure of BiFeO3 films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yang; Yao, Yingbang; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, Xixiang

    2014-01-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice structure of BiFeO3 films on different substrates prepared by pulsed laser deposition. Interestingly, the Raman spectra of BiFeO3 films exhibit distinct polarization dependences

  2. Competition of Faraday rotation and birefringence in femtosecond laser direct written waveguides in magneto-optical glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Gross, S; Dekker, P; Withford, M J; Steel, M J

    2014-11-17

    We consider the process of Faraday rotation in femtosecond laser direct-write waveguides. The birefringence commonly associated with such waveguides may be expected to impact the observable Faraday rotation. Here, we theoretically calculate and experimentally verify the competition between Faraday rotation and birefringence in two waveguides created by laser writing in a commercial magneto-optic glass. The magnetic field applied to induce Faraday rotation is nonuniform, and as a result, we find that the two effects can be clearly separated and used to accurately determine even weak birefringence. The birefringence in the waveguides was determined to be on the scale of Δn = 10(-6) to 10(-5). The reduction in Faraday rotation caused by birefringence of order Δn = 10(-6) was moderate and we obtained approximately 9° rotation in an 11 mm waveguide. In contrast, for birefringence of order 10(-5), a significant reduction in the polarization azimuth change was found and only 6° rotation was observed.

  3. Second Harmonic Generation of Violet Light in Femtosecond-Laser-Inscribed BiB3O6 Cladding Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Yuechen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the second harmonic generation of violet light of a nonlinear cladding waveguide in BiB3O6 crystal produced by femtosecond laser inscription. Under continuous-wave pump laser at 800 nm, the guided second harmonic wave at 400 nm with a conversion efficiency of ~0.32% has been realized through the Type I birefringence phase matching configuration.

  4. Highly efficient single-pass frequency doubling of a continuous-wave distributed feedback laser diode using a PPLN waveguide crystal at 488 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jechow, Andreas; Schedel, Marco; Stry, Sandra; Sacher, Joachim; Menzel, Ralf

    2007-10-15

    A continuous-wave distributed feedback diode laser emitting at 976 nm was frequency doubled by the use of a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide crystal with a channel size of 3 microm x 5 microm and an interaction length of 10 mm. A laser to waveguide coupling efficiency of 75% could be achieved resulting in 304 mW of incident infrared light inside the waveguide. Blue laser light emission of 159 mW at 488 nm has been generated, which equals to a conversion efficiency of 52%. The resulting wall plug efficiency was 7.4%.

  5. Polarization of eigenmodes in laser diode waveguides on semipolar and nonpolar GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rass, Jens; Vogt, Patrick [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Wernicke, Tim; Einfeldt, Sven; Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany); Scheibenzuber, Wolfgang G.; Schwarz, Ulrich T. [Department of Physics, Regensburg University (Germany); Kupec, Jan [Integrated Systems Laboratory, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Witzigmann, Bernd [Computational Electronics and Photonics Group, University of Kassel (Germany); Kneissl, Michael [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Recent calculations of the eigenmodes in waveguides grown on semipolar GaN suggest that the optical polarization of the emitted light as well as the optical gain depends on the orientation of the resonator. Our measurements on separate confinement heterostructures on semipolar (11 anti 22) and (10 anti 12) GaN show that for laser resonators along the semipolar [11 anti 2 anti 3 ] and [0 anti 111] directions (i.e. the projection of the c-axis onto the plane of growth) the threshold for amplified spontaneous emission is lower than for the nonpolar direction and that the stimulated emission is linearly polarized as TE mode. For the waveguide structures along the nonpolar [1 anti 100] or [11 anti 20] direction on the other hand, birefringence and anisotropy of the optical gain in the plane of growth leads not only to a higher threshold but also to a rotation of the optical polarization which is not any more TE- or TM-polarized but influenced by the ordinary and extraordinary refractive index of the material. We observe stimulated emission into a mode which is linearly polarized in extraordinarydirection nearly parallel to the c-axis. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Laser Thomson Scattering, Raman Scattering and laser-absorption diagnostics of high pressure microdischarges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, Vincent M; Belostotskiy, Sergey G; Economou, Demetre J; Sadeghi, Nader

    2010-01-01

    Laser scattering experiments were performed in high pressure (100s of Torr) parallel-plate, slot-type DC microdischarges operating in argon or nitrogen. Laser Thomson Scattering (LTS) and Rotational Raman Scattering were employed in a novel, backscattering, confocal configuration. LTS allows direct and simultaneous measurement of both electron density (n e ) and electron temperature (T e ). For 50 mA current and over the pressure range of 300 - 700 Torr, LTS yielded T e = 0.9 ± 0.3 eV and n e = (6 ± 3)·10 13 cm -3 , in reasonable agreement with the predictions of a mathematical model. Rotational Raman spectroscopy (RRS) was employed for absolute calibration of the LTS signal. RRS was also applied to measure the 3D gas temperature (T g ) in nitrogen DC microdischarges. In addition, diode laser absorption spectroscopy was employed to measure the density of argon metastables (1s5 in Paschen notations) in argon microdischarges. The gas temperature, extracted from the width of the absorption profile, was compared with T g values obtained by optical emission spectroscopy.

  7. Near-field microscopy of waveguide architectures of InGaN/GaN diode lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friede, Sebastian; Tomm, Jens W.; Kühn, Sergei; Hoffmann, Veit; Wenzel, Hans; Weyers, Markus

    2016-11-01

    Waveguide (WG) architectures of 420 nm emitting InGaN/GaN diode lasers are analyzed by photoluminescence and photocurrent spectroscopy using a nearfield scanning optical microscope that scans along their front facets. The components of the ‘optical active cavity’, quantum wells, WGs, and cladding layers are individually inspected with a spatial resolution of ∼100 nm. Separate analysis of the p- and n-sections of the WG was achieved, and reveals defect levels in the p-part. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the homogeneity of the n-WG section directly affects the quantum wells that are grown on top of this layer. Substantially increased carrier capture efficiencies into InGaN/GaN-WGs compared to GaN-WGs are demonstrated.

  8. Novel O-band tunable fiber laser using an array waveguide grating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, H; Zulkifli, M Z; Latif, A A; Harun, S W

    2010-01-01

    A novel tunable fibre laser (TFL) operating in the ordinary band (O-band) of 1310 nm is proposed and demonstrated. The proposed TFL is developed using a 1×16 arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) as a slicing mechanism for the broadband amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source and an optical channel selector (OCS) to provide the tunability. A semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) with a centre wavelength of 1310 nm serves as the compact gain medium for the TFL and also as a broadband ASE source. The TFL has a tuning range of 1301.26 nm to 1311.18 nm with 9.92 nm span and a channel spacing of 0.7 nm. The measured output power is about –4 and –8 dBm and with a side node suppression ratio (SMSR) of 29 to 33 dB

  9. Device geometry considerations for ridge waveguide quantum dot mode-locked lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mee, J K; Raghunathan, R; Lester, L F; Wright, J B

    2014-01-01

    Quantum dot mode-locked lasers have emerged as a leading source for the efficient generation of high-quality optical pulses from a compact package, attracting considerable attention for support of multiple high-speed applications, owing to characteristics such as low noise operation and high pulse peak power, in addition to the ability to multiplex the output pulse train in temporal and frequency domains in order to obtain hundreds of GHz pulse repetition rates potentially operating at 1 Tbps. This topical review provides a detailed explanation into the primary advantages of quantum dots, identifying the key features that have made them superior to other material systems for passive mode-locking in semiconductor lasers. Following this account, the impact of the device's cavity geometry on the operational range of two-section, monolithic passively mode-locked lasers is investigated both experimentally and analytically. A model is described that predicts regimes of pulsed operation as a function of absorber length to gain length ratio. Experimental measurements of the pulse time-domain characteristics over a wide range of operating temperatures are found to be in excellent agreement with analytical predictions. The impact of ridge waveguide design on the operational range is also examined and the key dimensions that most strongly impact efficient operation are identified. (topical review)

  10. Heterogeneous integration of thin film compound semiconductor lasers and SU8 waveguides on SiO2/Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palit, Sabarni; Kirch, Jeremy; Mawst, Luke; Kuech, Thomas; Jokerst, Nan Marie

    2010-02-01

    We present the heterogeneous integration of a 3.8 μm thick InGaAs/GaAs edge emitting laser that was metal-metal bonded to SiO2/Si and end-fire coupled into a 2.8 μm thick tapered SU8 polymer waveguide integrated on the same substrate. The system was driven in pulsed mode and the waveguide output was captured on an IR imaging array to characterize the mode. The waveguide output was also coupled into a multimode fiber, and into an optical head and spectrum analyzer, indicating lasing at ~997 nm and a threshold current density of 250 A/cm2.

  11. Reducing Threshold of Multi Quantum Wells InGaN Laser Diode by Using InGaN/GaN Waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Rafid A.; Ibrahim, Kamarulazizi

    2010-07-01

    ISE TCAD (Integrated System Engineering Technology Computer Aided Design) software simulation program has been utilized to help study the effect of using InGaN/GaN as a waveguide instead of conventional GaN waveguide for multi quantum wells violet InGaN laser diode (LD). Simulation results indicate that the threshold of the LD has been reduced by using InGaN/GaN waveguide where InGaN/GaN waveguide increases the optical confinement factor which leads to increase the confinement carriers at the active region of the LD.

  12. All-solid-state, synchronously pumped, ultrafast BaWO4 Raman laser with long and short Raman shifts generating at 1180, 1225, and 1323 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Milan; Jelínek, Michal; Kubeček, Václav; Ivleva, Lyudmila I.; Zverev, Petr G.; Smetanin, Sergei

    2017-12-01

    A lot of attention is currently focused on synchronously pumped, extra-cavity crystalline Raman lasers generating one or two Stokes Raman components in KGW or diamond Raman-active crystals, and also generating additional components of stimulated polariton scattering in lithium niobate crystal having both cubic and quadratic nonlinearities. In this contribution we report on generation of more than two Stokes components of stimulated Raman scattering with different Raman shifts in the all-solid-state, synchronously pumped, extra-cavity Raman laser based on the Raman-active a-cut BaWO4 crystal excited by a mode-locked, 220 nJ, 36 ps, 150 MHz diode sidepumped Nd:GdVO4 laser generating at the wavelength of 1063 nm. Excitation by the pumping radiation polarized along the BaWO4 crystal optical axis resulted in the Raman generation with not only usual (925cm - 1), but also additional (332cm - 1) Raman shift. Besides the 1180-nm first and 1323 nm second Stokes components with the Raman shift of 925cm - 1 from the 1063nm fundamental laser wavelength, we have achieved generation of the additional 1227 nm Raman component with different Raman shift of 332cm - 1 from the 1180nm component. At the 1227 nm component the strongest 12-times pulse shortening from 36ps down to 3ps was obtained due to shorter dephasing time of this additional Raman line (3ps for the 332-cm - 1 line instead of 6.5ps for the 925cm - 1 line). It has to be also noted that the 1225 nm generation is intracavity pumped by the 1179 nm first Stokes component resulting in the strongest pulse shortening close to the 332cm -1 line dephasing time (3ps). Slope efficiency of three Stokes components generation exceeded 20%.

  13. QUANTITATIVE DETECTION OF ENVIRONMENTALLY IMPORTANT DYES USING DIODE LASER/FIBER-OPTIC RAMAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    A compact diode laser/fiber-optic Raman spectrometer is used for quantitative detection of environmentally important dyes. This system is based on diode laser excitation at 782 mm, fiber optic probe technology, an imaging spectrometer, and state-of-the-art scientific CCD camera. ...

  14. High Average Power Raman Conversion in Diamond: ’Eyesafe’ Output and Fiber Laser Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-19

    Kitzler and RP. Mildren, Laser & Photon. Reviews, vol. 8, L37 -L41 (2014) 5 Distribution Code A: Approved for public release, distribution is... L37 -L41 (2014) O. Kitzler, A. McKay, D.J. Spence and R.P. Mildren, "Modelling and Optimization of Continuous-Wave External Cavity Raman Lasers

  15. Electron Raman scattering in a double quantum well tuned by an external nonresonant intense laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiutiunnyk, A.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Morales, A. L.; Duque, C. M.; Restrepo, R. L.; Ungan, F.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Kasapoglu, E.; Duque, C. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we shall present a study of inelastic light scattering involving inter-subband electron transitions in coupled GaAs-(Ga,Al)As quantum wells. Calculations include the electron related Raman differential cross section and Raman gain. The effects of an external nonresonant intense laser field are used in order to tune these output properties. The confined electron states will be described by means of a diagonalization procedure within the effective mass and parabolic band approximations. It is shown that the application of the intense laser field can produce values of the intersubband electron Raman gain above 400 cm-1. The system proposed here is an alternative choice for the development of AlxGa1-xAs semiconductor laser diodes that can be tuned via an external nonresonant intense laser field.

  16. Room-temperature subnanosecond waveguide lasers in Nd:YVO4 Q-switched by phase-change VO2: A comparison with 2D materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Weijie; Li, Rang; Cheng, Chen; Chen, Yanxue; Lu, Qingming; Romero, Carolina; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Hao, Xiaotao; Chen, Feng

    2017-04-06

    We report on room-temperature subnanosecond waveguide laser operation at 1064 nm in a Nd:YVO 4 crystal waveguide through Q-switching of phase-change nanomaterial vanadium dioxide (VO 2 ). The unique feature of VO 2 nanomaterial from the insulating to metallic phases offers low-saturation-intensity nonlinear absorptions of light for subnanosecond pulse generation. The low-loss waveguide is fabricated by using the femtosecond laser writing with depressed cladding geometry. Under optical pump at 808 nm, efficient pulsed laser has been achieved in the Nd:YVO 4 waveguide, reaching minimum pulse duration of 690 ps and maximum output average power of 66.7 mW. To compare the Q-switched laser performances by VO 2 saturable absorber with those based on two-dimensional materials, the 1064-nm laser pulses have been realized in the same waveguide platform with either graphene or transition metal dichalcogenide (in this work, WS 2 ) coated mirror. The results on 2D material Q-switched waveguide lasers have shown that the shortest pulses are with 22-ns duration, whilst the maximum output average powers reach ~161.9 mW. This work shows the obvious difference on the lasing properties based on phase-change material and 2D materials, and suggests potential applications of VO 2 as low-cost saturable absorber for subnanosecond laser generation.

  17. Effect of Laser Irradiation on Cell Function and Its Implications in Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaofei; Song, Yanqing; Song, Yizhi; Xu, Jiabao; Wu, Yinhu; Glidle, Andrew; Cusack, Maggie; Ijaz, Umer Z; Cooper, Jonathan M; Huang, Wei E; Yin, Huabing

    2018-04-15

    Lasers are instrumental in advanced bioimaging and Raman spectroscopy. However, they are also well known for their destructive effects on living organisms, leading to concerns about the adverse effects of laser technologies. To implement Raman spectroscopy for cell analysis and manipulation, such as Raman-activated cell sorting, it is crucial to identify nondestructive conditions for living cells. Here, we evaluated quantitatively the effect of 532-nm laser irradiation on bacterial cell fate and growth at the single-cell level. Using a purpose-built microfluidic platform, we were able to quantify the growth characteristics, i.e., specific growth rates and lag times of individual cells, as well as the survival rate of a population in conjunction with Raman spectroscopy. Representative Gram-negative and Gram-positive species show similar trends in response to a laser irradiation dose. Laser irradiation could compromise the physiological function of cells, and the degree of destruction is both dose and strain dependent, ranging from reduced cell growth to a complete loss of cell metabolic activity and finally to physical disintegration. Gram-positive bacterial cells are more susceptible than Gram-negative bacterial strains to irradiation-induced damage. By directly correlating Raman acquisition with single-cell growth characteristics, we provide evidence of nondestructive characteristics of Raman spectroscopy on individual bacterial cells. However, while strong Raman signals can be obtained without causing cell death, the variety of responses from different strains and from individual cells justifies careful evaluation of Raman acquisition conditions if cell viability is critical. IMPORTANCE In Raman spectroscopy, the use of powerful monochromatic light in laser-based systems facilitates the detection of inherently weak signals. This allows environmentally and clinically relevant microorganisms to be measured at the single-cell level. The significance of being able to

  18. Waveguide and active region structure optimization for low-divergence InAs/InGaAs quantum dot comb lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenev, Vladimir V.; Savelyev, Artem V.; Zhukov, Alexey E.; Maximov, Mikhail V.; Omelchenko, Alexander V.

    2015-05-01

    Ways to improve beam divergence and energy consumption of quantum dot lasers emitting via the ground-state optical transitions by optimization of the key parameters of laser active region are discussed. It is shown that there exist an optimal cavity length, dispersion of inhomogeneous broadening and number of QD layers in active region allowing to obtain lasing spectrum of a given width at minimum injection current. The planar dielectric waveguide of the laser is optimized by analytical means for a better trade-off between high Γ-factor and low beam divergence.

  19. Characteristics of the Single-Longitudinal-Mode Planar-Waveguide External Cavity Diode Laser at 1064 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Kenji; Alalusi, Mazin; Stolpner, Lew; Margaritis, Georgios; Camp, Jordan; Krainak, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We describe the characteristics of the planar-waveguide external cavity diode laser (PW-ECL). To the best of our knowledge, it is the first butterfly-packaged 1064 nm semiconductor laser that is stable enough to be locked to an external frequency reference. We evaluated its performance from the viewpoint of precision experiments. Using a hyperfine absorption line of iodine, we suppressed its frequency noise by a factor of up to 104 at 10 mHz. The PWECL's compactness and low cost make it a candidate to replace traditional Nd:YAG nonplanar ring oscillators and fiber lasers in applications that require a single longitudinal mode.

  20. Dual-wavelength external cavity laser device for fluorescence suppression in Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuting; Cai, Zhijian; Wu, Jianhong

    2017-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been widely used in the detection of drugs, pesticides, explosives, food additives and environmental pollutants, for its characteristics of fast measurement, easy sample preparation, and molecular structure analyzing capability. However, fluorescence disturbance brings a big trouble to these applications, with strong fluorescence background covering up the weak Raman signals. Recently shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) not only can completely remove the fluorescence background, but also can be easily integrated into portable Raman spectrometers. Usually, SERDS uses two lasers with small wavelength gap to excite the sample, then acquires two spectra, and subtracts one to the other to get the difference spectrum, where the fluorescence background will be rejected. So, one key aspects of successfully applying SERDS method is to obtain a dual-wavelength laser source. In this paper, a dual-wavelength laser device design based on the principles of external cavity diode laser (ECDL) is proposed, which is low-cost and compact. In addition, it has good mechanical stability because of no moving parts. These features make it an ideal laser source for SERDS technique. The experiment results showed that the device can emit narrow-spectral-width lasers of two wavelengths, with the gap smaller than 2 nanometers. The laser power corresponding to each wavelength can be up to 100mW.

  1. Efficient Second Harmonic Generation in 3D Nonlinear Optical-Lattice-Like Cladding Waveguide Splitters by Femtosecond Laser Inscription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Weijie; Jia, Yuechen; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Chen, Feng

    2016-02-29

    Integrated photonic devices with beam splitting function are intriguing for a broad range of photonic applications. Through optical-lattice-like cladding waveguide structures fabricated by direct femtosecond laser writing, the light propagation can be engineered via the track-confined refractive index profiles, achieving tailored output beam distributions. In this work, we report on the fabrication of 3D laser-written optical-lattice-like structures in a nonlinear KTP crystal to implement 1 × 4 beam splitting. Second harmonic generation (SHG) of green light through these nonlinear waveguide beam splitter structures provides the capability for the compact visible laser emitting devices. With Type II phase matching of the fundamental wavelength (@ 1064 nm) to second harmonic waves (@ 532 nm), the frequency doubling has been achieved through this three-dimensional beam splitter. Under 1064-nm continuous-wave fundamental-wavelength pump beam, guided-wave SHG at 532 nm are measured with the maximum power of 0.65 mW and 0.48 mW for waveguide splitters (0.67 mW and 0.51 mW for corresponding straight channel waveguides), corresponding to a SH conversion efficiency of approximately ~14.3%/W and 13.9%/W (11.2%/W, 11.3%/W for corresponding straight channel waveguides), respectively. This work paves a way to fabricate compact integrated nonlinear photonic devices in a single chip with beam dividing functions.

  2. Diode-pumped Tm:YAP/YVO4 intracavity Raman laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jiaqun; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Wang, Guodong; Cheng, Ping; Xu, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The laser performance based on YVO 4 Raman conversion in a diode-pumped actively Q-switched Tm:YAP laser is demonstrated for the first time. With an incident diode power of 10.9 W and a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz, the average output powers for the first Stokes laser at 2.4 μm is about 270 mW. (paper)

  3. Laser light triggers increased Raman amplification in the regime of nonlinear Landau damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depierreux, S.; Goyon, C.; Masson-Laborde, P.E.; Yahia, V.; Loisel, G.; Labaune, C.

    2014-01-01

    Stimulated Raman backscattering (SRS) has many unwanted effects in megajoule-scale inertially confined fusion (ICF) plasmas. Moreover, attempts to harness SRS to amplify short laser pulses through backward Raman amplification have achieved limited success. In high temperature fusion plasmas, SRS usually occurs in a kinetic regime where the nonlinear response of the Langmuir wave to the laser drive and its host of complicating factors make it difficult to predict the degree of amplification that can be achieved under given experimental conditions. Here we present experimental evidence of reduced Landau damping with increasing Langmuir wave amplitude and determine its effects on Raman amplification. The threshold for trapping effects to influence the amplification is shown to be very low. Above threshold, the complex SRS dynamics results in increased amplification factors, which partly explains previous ICF experiments. These insights could aid the development of more efficient backward Raman amplification schemes in this regime. (authors)

  4. Picosecond transient backward stimulated Raman scattering and pumping of femtosecond dye lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrivo, Steven M.; Spears, Kenneth G.; Sipior, Jeffrey

    1995-02-01

    We report studies of transient, backward stimulated, Raman scattering (TBSRS) in solvents with a 10 Hz, 27 ps, 532 nm pump laser. The TBSRS effect was used to create pulses at 545 nm and 630 nm with durations of 2-3 ps and 5-10 μJ of energy. The duration, energy and fluctuations of the Raman pulse were studied as a function of pump energy and focal parameters. A 5 μJ Raman pulse was amplified in either a Raman amplifier or two stage dye amplifier to 1 mJ levels. A 545 nm pulse of 3 ps duration was generated in CCl 4 and was then used to pump a short cavity dye laser (SCDL). The SCDL oscillator and a 5 stage dye amplifier provided a pulse of 700 fs and 400 μJ that was tunable near 590 nm.

  5. Research of high power and stable laser in portable Raman spectrometer based on SHINERS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yongsheng; Yin, Yu; Wu, Yulin; Ni, Xuxiang; Zhang, Xiuda; Yan, Huimin

    2013-08-01

    The intensity of Raman light is very weak, which is only from 10-12 to 10-6 of the incident light. In order to obtain the required sensitivity, the traditional Raman spectrometer tends to be heavy weight and large volume, so it is often used as indoor test device. Based on the Shell-Isolated Nanoparticle-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SHINERS) method, Raman optical spectrum signal can be enhanced significantly and the portable Raman spectrometer combined with SHINERS method will be widely used in various fields. The laser source must be stable enough and able to output monochromatic narrow band laser with stable power in the portable Raman spectrometer based on the SHINERS method. When the laser is working, the change of temperature can induce wavelength drift, thus the power stability of excitation light will be affected, so we need to strictly control the working temperature of the laser, In order to ensure the stability of laser power and output current, this paper adopts the WLD3343 laser constant current driver chip of Wavelength Electronics company and MCU P89LPC935 to drive LML - 785.0 BF - XX laser diode(LD). Using this scheme, the Raman spectrometer can be small in size and the drive current can be constant. At the same time, we can achieve functions such as slow start, over-current protection, over-voltage protection, etc. Continuous adjustable output can be realized under control, and the requirement of high power output can be satisfied. Max1968 chip is adopted to realize the accurate control of the laser's temperature. In this way, it can meet the demand of miniaturization. In term of temperature control, integral truncation effect of traditional PID algorithm is big, which is easy to cause static difference. Each output of incremental PID algorithm has nothing to do with the current position, and we can control the output coefficients to avoid full dose output and immoderate adjustment, then the speed of balance will be improved observably. Variable

  6. Surface-Emitting Distributed Feedback Terahertz Quantum-Cascade Lasers in Metal-Metal Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sushil; Williams, Benjamin S.; Qin, Qi; Lee, Alan W. M.; Hu, Qing; Reno, John L.

    2007-01-01

    Single-mode surface-emitting distributed feedback terahertz quantumcascade lasers operating around 2.9 THz are developed in metal-metal waveguides. A combination of techniques including precise control of phase of reflection at the facets, and u e of metal on the sidewalls to eliminate higher-order lateral modes allow robust single-mode operation over a range of approximately 0.35 THz. Single-lobed far-field radiation pattern is obtained using a pi phase-shift in center of the second-order Bragg grating. A grating device operating at 2.93 THz lased up to 149 K in pulsed mode and a temperature tuning of 19 .7 GHz was observed from 5 K to 147 K. The same device lased up to 78 K in continuous-wave (cw) mode emitting more than 6 m W of cw power at 5 K. ln general, maximum temperature of pulsed operation for grating devices was within a few Kelvin of that of multi-mode Fabry-Perot ridge lasers

  7. Raman spectroscopy measurement of CH4 gas and CH4 dissolved in water for laser remote sensing in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somekawa, Toshihiro; Fujita, Masayuki

    2018-04-01

    We examined the applicability of Raman spectroscopy as a laser remote sensing tool for monitoring CH4 in water. The Raman technique has already been used successfully for measurements of CO2 gas in water. In this paper, considering the spectral transmittance of water, third harmonics of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm (UV region) was used for detection of CH4 Raman signals. The Raman signal at 2892 cm-1 from CH4 dissolved in water was detected at a tail of water Raman signal.

  8. Theoretical study of annealed proton-exchanged Nd $LiNbO_{3}$ channel waveguide lasers with variational method

    CERN Document Server

    De Long Zhang; Yuan Guo Xie; Guilan, Ding; Yuming, Cui; Cai He Chen

    2001-01-01

    The controllable fabrication parameters, including anneal time, initial exchange time, channel width, dependences of TM/sub 00/ mode size, corresponding effective refractive index, effective pump area, and coupling efficiency between pump and laser modes in z-cut annealed proton-exchanged (APE) Nd:LiNbO/sub 3/ channel waveguide lasers were studied by using variational method. The effect of channel width on the surface index increment and the waveguide depth was taken into account. The features of mode size and effective refractive index were summarized, discussed, and compared with previously published experimental results. The effective pump area, which is directly proportional to threshold pump power, increases strongly, slightly, and very slightly with the increase of anneal time, channel width, and initial exchange time, respectively. However, the coupling efficiency, which is directly proportional to slope efficiency, remains constant (around 0.82) no matter what changes made to these parameters. The var...

  9. Sum-Frequency-Generation-Based Laser Sidebands for Tunable Femtosecond Raman Spectroscopy in the Ultraviolet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangdong Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS is an emerging molecular structural dynamics technique for functional materials characterization typically in the visible to near-IR range. To expand its applications we have developed a versatile FSRS setup in the ultraviolet region. We use the combination of a narrowband, ~400 nm Raman pump from a home-built second harmonic bandwidth compressor and a tunable broadband probe pulse from sum-frequency-generation-based cascaded four-wave mixing (SFG-CFWM laser sidebands in a thin BBO crystal. The ground state Raman spectrum of a laser dye Quinolon 390 in methanol that strongly absorbs at ~355 nm is systematically studied as a standard sample to provide previously unavailable spectroscopic characterization in the vibrational domain. Both the Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra can be collected by selecting different orders of SFG-CFWM sidebands as the probe pulse. The stimulated Raman gain with the 402 nm Raman pump is >21 times larger than that with the 550 nm Raman pump when measured at the 1317 cm−1 peak for the aromatic ring deformation and ring-H rocking mode of the dye molecule, demonstrating that pre-resonance enhancement is effectively achieved in the unique UV-FSRS setup. This added tunability in the versatile and compact optical setup enables FSRS to better capture transient conformational snapshots of photosensitive molecules that absorb in the UV range.

  10. XPS, AES and laser raman spectroscopy: A fingerprint for a materials surface characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi Embong

    2011-01-01

    This review briefly describes some of the techniques available for analysing surfaces and illustrates their usefulness with a few examples such as a metal and alloy. In particular, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and laser Raman spectroscopy are all described as advanced surface analytical techniques. In analysing a surface, AES and XPS would normally be considered first, with AES being applied where high spatial resolution is required and XPS where chemical state information is needed. Laser Raman spectroscopy is useful for determining molecular bonding. A combination of XPS, AES and Laser Raman spectroscopy can give quantitative analysis from the top few atomic layers with a lateral spatial resolution of < 10 nm. (author)

  11. Diode pumped actively Q-switched Nd:YVO4 self-Raman laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Fufang; Zhang Xingyu; Wang Qingpu; Ding Shuanghong; Jia Peng; Li Shutao; Fan Shuzhen; Zhang Chen; Liu Bo

    2006-01-01

    By using Nd:YVO 4 as the gain medium and the Raman medium simultaneously, the actively Q-switched operation of the self-Raman Nd:YVO 4 laser at 1176 nm was realized. The output characteristics including the average power, pulse energy and pulse width versus the incident pump power and pulse repetition rate were investigated. At a pulse repetition rate of 20 kHz an average power up to 0.57 W was obtained with the incident pump power of 10.2 W, corresponding to a conversion efficiency of 5.6% with respect to the diode laser input power. Meanwhile, an analysis of the self-Raman Nd:YVO 4 laser was carried out by using the rate equations. The obtained theoretical results were in agreement with the experimental results on the whole

  12. GHz modulation enabled using large extinction ratio waveguide-modulator integrated with 404 nm GaN laser diode

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao; Lee, Changmin; Ng, Tien Khee; Speck, James S.; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; Eldesouki, Munir M.; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    A 404-nm emitting InGaN-based laser diode with integrated-waveguide-modulator showing a large extinction ratio of 11.3 dB was demonstrated on semipolar (2021) plane GaN substrate. The device shows a low modulation voltage of −2.5 V and ∼ GHz −3 dB bandwidth, enabling 1.7 Gbps data transmission.

  13. GHz modulation enabled using large extinction ratio waveguide-modulator integrated with 404 nm GaN laser diode

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2017-01-30

    A 404-nm emitting InGaN-based laser diode with integrated-waveguide-modulator showing a large extinction ratio of 11.3 dB was demonstrated on semipolar (2021) plane GaN substrate. The device shows a low modulation voltage of −2.5 V and ∼ GHz −3 dB bandwidth, enabling 1.7 Gbps data transmission.

  14. Laser remote sensing of water vapor: Raman lidar development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, J.E.M.; Lapp, M.; Bisson, S.E.; Melfi, S.H.; Whiteman, D.N.; Ferrare, R.A.; Evans, K.D.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this research is the development of a critical design for a Raman lidar system optimized to match ARM Program needs for profiling atmospheric water vapor at CART sites. This work has emphasized the development of enhanced daytime capabilities using Raman lidar techniques. This abstract touches briefly on the main components of the research program, summarizing results of the efforts. A detailed Raman lidar instrument model has been developed to predict the daytime and nighttime performance capabilities of Raman lidar systems. The model simulates key characteristics of the lidar system, using realistic atmospheric profiles, modeled background sky radiance, and lidar system parameters based on current instrument capabilities. The model is used to guide development of lidar systems based on both the solar-blind concept and the narrowband, narrow field-of-view concept for daytime optimization

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of solitary and optically injected two-element laser arrays with four different waveguide structures: a numerical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nianqiang; Susanto, H; Cemlyn, B R; Henning, I D; Adams, M J

    2018-02-19

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of solitary and optically injected two-element laser arrays with a range of waveguide structures. The analysis is performed with a detailed direct numerical simulation, where high-resolution dynamic maps are generated to identify regions of dynamic instability in the parameter space of interest. Our combined one- and two-parameter bifurcation analysis uncovers globally diverse dynamical regimes (steady-state, oscillation, and chaos) in the solitary laser arrays, which are greatly influenced by static design waveguiding structures, the amplitude-phase coupling factor of the electric field, i.e. the linewidth-enhancement factor, as well as the control parameter, e.g. the pump rate. When external optical injection is introduced to one element of the arrays, we show that the whole system can be either injection-locked simultaneously or display rich, different dynamics outside the locking region. The effect of optical injection is to significantly modify the nature and the regions of nonlinear dynamics from those found in the solitary case. We also show similarities and differences (asymmetry) between the oscillation amplitude of the two elements of the array in specific well-defined regions, which hold for all the waveguiding structures considered. Our findings pave the way to a better understanding of dynamic instability in large arrays of lasers.

  16. Development of fiber lasers and devices for coherent Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Erin Stranford

    As ultrafast laser technology has found expanding application in machining, spectroscopy, microscopy, surgery, and numerous other areas, the desire for inexpensive and robust laser sources has grown. Until recently, nonlinear effects in fiber systems due to the tight confinement of the light in the core have limited their performance. However, with advances in managing nonlinearity through pulse propagation physics and the use of large core fibers, the performance of fiber lasers can compete with that of their solid-state counterparts. As specific applications, such as coherent Raman scattering microscopy, emerge that stand to benefit from fiber technology, new performance challenges in areas such as laser noise are anticipated. This thesis studies nonlinear pulse propagation in fiber lasers and fiber parametric devices. Applications of dissipative solitons and self-similar pulse propagation to low-repetition rate oscillators that have the potential to simplify short-pulse amplification schemes will be examined. The rest of this thesis focuses on topics relevant to fiber laser development for coherent Raman scattering microscopy sources. Coherent pulse division and recombination inside the laser cavity will be introduced as an energy-scaling mechanism and demonstrated for a fiber soliton laser. The relative intensity noise properties of mode-locked fiber lasers, with a particular emphasis on normal dispersion lasers, will be explored in simulation and experiment. A fiber optical parametric oscillator will be studied in detail for low noise frequency conversion of picosecond pulses, and its utility for coherent Raman imaging will be demonstrated. Spectral compression of femtosecond pulses is used to generate picosecond pulses to pump this device, and this technique provides a route to future noise reduction in the system. Furthermore, this device forms a multimodal source capable of providing the picosecond pulses for coherent Raman scattering microscopy and the

  17. Time resolved Raman studies of laser induced damage in TiO2 optical coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exarhos, G.J.; Morse, P.L.

    1984-10-01

    Molecular information available from Raman scattering measurements of sputter deposited TiO 2 on silica substrates has been used to characterize crystalline phases, thickness, and surface homogeneity. A two laser technique is described for investigating transient molecular changes in both coating and substrate which result from pulsed 532 nm laser irradiation. Single layer and multilayer coatings of both anatase and rutile phases of TiO 2 have been probed by Raman spectroscopy immediately following the damage pulse (nanoseconds) and at longer times. Transient measurements are designed to follow surface transformation/relaxation phenomena; measurements at longer times characterize the equilibrium damage state

  18. Dual-Comb Coherent Raman Spectroscopy with Lasers of 1-GHz Pulse Repetition Frequency

    OpenAIRE

    Mohler, Kathrin J.; Bohn, Bernhard J.; Yan, Ming; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    We extend the technique of multiplex coherent Raman spectroscopy with two femtosecond mode-locked lasers to oscillators of a pulse repetition frequency of 1 GHz. We demonstrate spectra of liquids, which span 1100 cm$^{-1}$ of Raman shifts. At a resolution of 6 cm$^{-1}$, their measurement time may be as short as 5 microseconds for a refresh rate of 2 kHz. The waiting period between acquisitions is improved ten-fold compared to previous experiments with two lasers of 100-MHz repetition frequen...

  19. Dual-comb coherent Raman spectroscopy with lasers of 1-GHz pulse repetition frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, Kathrin J; Bohn, Bernhard J; Yan, Ming; Mélen, Gwénaëlle; Hänsch, Theodor W; Picqué, Nathalie

    2017-01-15

    We extend the technique of multiplex coherent Raman spectroscopy with two femtosecond mode-locked lasers to oscillators of a pulse repetition frequency of 1 GHz. We demonstrate a spectra of liquids, which span 1100  cm-1 of Raman shifts. At a resolution of 6  cm-1, their measurement time may be as short as 5 μs for a refresh rate of 2 kHz. The waiting period between acquisitions is improved 10-fold compared to previous experiments with two lasers of 100-MHz repetition frequencies.

  20. Analysis of pigments in polychromes by use of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillejo, M.; Martín, M.; Silva, D.; Stratoudaki, T.; Anglos, D.; Burgio, L.; Clark, R. J. H.

    2000-09-01

    Two laser-based analytical techniques, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman microscopy, have been used for the identification of pigments on a polychrome from the Rococo period. Detailed spectral data are presented from analyses performed on a fragment of a gilded altarpiece from the church of Escatrón, Zaragoza, Spain. LIBS measurements yielded elemental analytical data which suggest the presence of certain pigments and, in addition, provide information on the stratigraphy of the paint layers. Identification of most pigments and of the materials used in the preparation layer was performed by Raman microscopy.

  1. All-Fiber Raman Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara

    by means of fiber components. Assuming the possibility to use a fiber laser with a fundamental radiation at 1064nm, in-fiber efficient second harmonic generation is achieved by optically poling the core of the waveguide delivering the excitation light to the sample. In this way, Raman spectroscopy...... in the visible range can be performed. The simultaneous delivery of the excitation light and collection of the Raman signal from the sample are achieved by means of a doubleclad fiber, whose core and inner cladding act as \\independent" transmission channels. A double-clad fiber coupler allows for the recovery...... of the collected Raman scattering from the inner-cladding region of the double-clad fiber, thus replacing the bulk dichroic component normally used to demultiplex the pump and Raman signal. A tunable Rayleigh-rejection filter based on a liquid filled-photonic bandgap fiber is also demonstrated in this work...

  2. A field-deployable compound-specific isotope analyzer based on quantum cascade laser and hollow waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng; Deev, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    A field deployable Compound Specific Isotope Analyzer (CSIA) coupled with capillary chromatogrpahy based on Quantum Cascade (QC) lasers and Hollow Waveguide (HWG) with precision and chemical resolution matching mature Mass Spectroscopy has been achieved in our laboratory. The system could realize 0.3 per mil accuracy for 12C/13C for a Gas Chromatography (GC) peak lasting as short as 5 seconds with carbon molar concentration in the GC peak less than 0.5%. Spectroscopic advantages of HWG when working with QC lasers, i.e. single mode transmission, noiseless measurement and small sample volume, are compared with traditional free space and multipass spectroscopy methods.

  3. Engineering design of the interaction waveguide for high-power accelerator-driven microwave free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, D.B.; Clay, H.W.; Stallard, B.W.; Throop, A.L.; Listvinsky, G.; Makowski, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Linear induction accelerators (LIAs) operating at beam energies of a few million electron volts and currents of a few thousand amperes are suitable drivers for free-electron lasers (FELs). Such lasers are capable of producing gigawatts of peak power and megawatts of average power at microwave frequencies. Such devices are being studied as possible power sources for future high-gradient accelerators and are being constructed for plasma heating applications. At high power levels, the engineering design of the interaction waveguide presents a challenge. This paper discusses several concerns, including electrical breakdown and metal fatigue limits, choice of material, and choice of operating propagation mode. 13 refs., 3 figs

  4. Studies on 16 μm spin-flip raman lasers in Tottori University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Kazuhiko

    1986-01-01

    This report outlines the studies on 16 μm spin-flip Raman lasers which have been carried out in Tottori University, Japan. Following the introductory section, the second section of the report deals with performance of infrared lasers for molecular laser isotope separation of UF 6 . It is stressed that the wavelength of the oscillation line should be accurately controlled in the vicinity of 628 cm -1 . The third section addresses 16 μm infrared lasers. Semiconductor diode lasers of Pb 1-x Sn x Te or Pb 1-x Sn x Se are available for the infrared region around 16 μm. Though the wavelength resolution is high and the oscillation wavelength is adjustable in these lasers, their oscillation outputs are not sufficient for the purpose of uranium separation. On the other hand, there are active studies on light-excited infrared gas lasers. It seems very difficult, however, to adjust the wavelength of their oscillation lines to the infrared absorption wavelength of 235 U. Thus, attention is currently focused on Raman lasers in the region around 16 μm. The fourth section briefly summarizes studies conducted in the University during these ten-odd years and the research facilities currently used. In particular, the major part is devoted to research and development of infrared NH 3 lasers and studies on InSb SFR (spin-flip Raman) lasers pumped with an NH 3 laser. A 12.97 μm and a 13.27 μm oscillation line have been obtained with a high output, which is hoped to serve for increasing the output of the 15.9 μm line of InSb SFR lasers. (Nogami, K.)

  5. Raman laser spectrometer optical head: qualification model assembly and integration verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, G.; Sanz-Palomino, M.; Moral, A. G.; Canora, C. P.; Belenguer, T.; Canchal, R.; Prieto, J. A. R.; Santiago, A.; Gordillo, C.; Escribano, D.; Lopez-Reyes, G.; Rull, F.

    2017-08-01

    Raman Laser Spectrometer (RLS) is the Pasteur Payload instrument of the ExoMars mission, within the ESA's Aurora Exploration Programme, that will perform for the first time in an out planetary mission Raman spectroscopy. RLS is composed by SPU (Spectrometer Unit), iOH (Internal Optical Head), and ICEU (Instrument Control and Excitation Unit). iOH focuses the excitation laser on the samples (excitation path), and collects the Raman emission from the sample (collection path, composed on collimation system and filtering system). Its original design presented a high laser trace reaching to the detector, and although a certain level of laser trace was required for calibration purposes, the high level degrades the Signal to Noise Ratio confounding some Raman peaks. So, after the bread board campaign, some light design modifications were implemented in order to fix the desired amount of laser trace, and after the fabrication and the commitment of the commercial elements, the assembly and integration verification process was carried out. A brief description of the iOH design update for the engineering and qualification model (iOH EQM) as well as the assembly process are briefly described in this papers. In addition, the integration verification and the first functional tests, carried out with the RLS calibration target (CT), results are reported on.

  6. Stimulated resonance Raman spectroscopy: An alternative to laser-rf double resonance for ion spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.; Dinneen, T.; Mansour, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    Stimulated resonance Raman spectroscopy is presented as an alternative to laser-rf double resonance for obtaining high-precision measurements in ion beams. By use of a single-phase modulated laser beam to derive the two required fields, the laser--ion-beam alignment is significantly simplified. In addition, this method is especially useful in the low-frequency regime where the laser-rf double-resonance method encounters difficulties due to modifications of the ion-beam velocity distribution. These modifications, which result from interaction with the traveling rf wave used to induce magnetic dipole transitions, are observed and quantitatively modeled

  7. Observation and investigation of narrow optical transitions of 167Er3+ ions in femtosecond laser printed waveguides in 7LiYF4 crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnegaliev, M. M.; Dyakonov, I. V.; Gerasimov, K. I.; Kalinkin, A. A.; Kulik, S. P.; Moiseev, S. A.; Saygin, M. Yu; Urmancheev, R. V.

    2018-04-01

    We produced optical waveguides in the 167Er3+:7 LiYF4 crystal with diameters ranging from 30 to 100 μm by using the depressed-cladding approach with femtosecond laser. Stationary and coherent spectroscopy was performed on the 809 nm optical transitions between the hyperfine sublevels of 4I15/2 and 4I9/2 multiplets of 167Er3+ ions both inside and outside of waveguides. It was found that the spectra of 167Er3+ were slightly broadened and shifted inside the waveguides compared to the bulk crystal spectra. We managed to observe a two-pulse photon echo on this transition and determined phase relaxation times for each waveguide. The experimental results show that the created crystal waveguides doped by rare-earth ions can be used in optical quantum memory and integrated quantum schemes.

  8. Quantitative analysis of essential oils of Thymus daenensis using laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshroo, H; Khadem, H; Bahreini, M; Tavassoli, S H; Hadian, J

    2015-11-10

    Laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy are used for the investigation of different genotypes of Thymus daenensis native to the Ilam province of Iran. Different genotypes of T. daenensis essential oils, labeled T1 through T7, possess slight differences with regard to the composition of the thymol. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method is performed to determine the concentration of each constituent as a reference method. The Raman spectra of different concentrations of pure thymol dissolved in hexane as standard samples are obtained via a laboratory prototype Raman spectroscopy setup for the calculation of the calibration curve. The regression coefficient and limit of detection are calculated. The possibility of the differentiation of different genotypes of T. daenensis is also examined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, although we do not know the exact amounts of their components. All the fluorescence spectral information is used jointly by cluster analysis to differentiate between 7 genotypes. Our results demonstrate the acceptable precision of Raman spectroscopy with GC-MS and corroborate the capacity of Raman spectroscopy in applications in the quantitative analysis field. Furthermore, the cluster analysis results show that laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy is an acceptable technique for the rapid classification of different genotypes of T. daenensis without having any previous information of their exact amount of constituents. So, the ability to rapidly and nondestructively differentiate between genotypes makes it possible to efficiently select high-quality herbs from many samples.

  9. Detection of diamond in ore using pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lamprecht, GH

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available is necessary for correcting for fluorescence of minerals and diamond itself. Various pulsed laser wavelengths from 266 to 1064 nm were used, as well as cw lasers for comparison. Wavelength scans of the regions of interest, indicated that pulsed lasers at 532...

  10. Changes in nail keratin observed by Raman spectroscopy after Nd:YAG laser treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min Kyung; Kim, Tae In; Kim, Wan Sun; Park, Hun-Kuk; Kim, Kyung Sook

    2017-04-01

    Lasers and photodynamic therapy have been considered a convergence treatment for onychomycosis, which is a fungal infection on the nail bed and nail plate. Laser therapies have shown satisfactory results without significant complications for onychomycosis; however, the mechanism of clearing remains unknown. In this work, we investigated changes in the chemical structure of nail keratin induced by Nd:YAG laser using Raman spectroscopy. Toe nails with onychomycosis were treated with 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser. After laser treatment, the disulfide band (490-590 cm -1 ) of nail keratin was rarely observed or was reduced in intensity. The amide I band (1500-1700 cm -1 ) also showed changes induced by the laser. The α-helical (1652 cm -1 ) structures dominated the β-sheet (1673 cm -1 ) in nontreated nail, but the opposite phenomenon was observed after laser treatment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. High-modulation-efficiency, integrated waveguide modulator-laser diode at 448 nm

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao; Ng, Tien Khee; Leonard, John T.; Pourhashemi, Arash; Oubei, Hassan M.; Alias, Mohd Sharizal; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Speck, James S.; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; Eldesouki, Munir M.; Ooi, Boon S.

    2016-01-01

    To date, solid-state lighting (SSL), visible light communication (VLC) and optical clock generation functionalities in the blue-green color regime have been demonstrated based on discrete devices, including light-emitting diodes, laser diodes, and transverse-transmission modulators. This work presents the first integrated waveguide modulator-laser diode (IWM-LD) at 448 nm, offering the advantages of small-footprint, high-speed, and low power-consumption. A high modulation efficiency of 2.68 dB/V, deriving from a large extinction ratio of 9.4 dB and a low operating voltage range of 3.5 V, was measured. The electroabsorption characteristics revealed that the modulation effect, as observed from the red-shifting of the absorption edge, was resulted from the external-field-induced quantum-confined-Stark-effect (QCSE). A comparative analysis of the photocurrent versus wavelength spectra in semipolar- and polar-plane InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs) confirmed that the IWM-LD based on semipolar (20¯2 ¯1) QWs was able to operate in a manner similar to other III-V materials typically used in optical telecommunications, due to the reduced piezoelectric field. Utilizing the integrated modulator, a -3dB bandwidth of ~1 GHz was measured, and a data rate of 1 Gbit/s was demonstrated using on-off keying (OOK) modulation. Our experimental investigation highlighted the advantage of implementing the IWM-LD on the same semipolar QW epitaxy in enabling a high-efficiency platform for SSL-VLC dual-functionalities.

  12. High-modulation-efficiency, integrated waveguide modulator-laser diode at 448 nm

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2016-01-25

    To date, solid-state lighting (SSL), visible light communication (VLC) and optical clock generation functionalities in the blue-green color regime have been demonstrated based on discrete devices, including light-emitting diodes, laser diodes, and transverse-transmission modulators. This work presents the first integrated waveguide modulator-laser diode (IWM-LD) at 448 nm, offering the advantages of small-footprint, high-speed, and low power-consumption. A high modulation efficiency of 2.68 dB/V, deriving from a large extinction ratio of 9.4 dB and a low operating voltage range of 3.5 V, was measured. The electroabsorption characteristics revealed that the modulation effect, as observed from the red-shifting of the absorption edge, was resulted from the external-field-induced quantum-confined-Stark-effect (QCSE). A comparative analysis of the photocurrent versus wavelength spectra in semipolar- and polar-plane InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs) confirmed that the IWM-LD based on semipolar (20¯2 ¯1) QWs was able to operate in a manner similar to other III-V materials typically used in optical telecommunications, due to the reduced piezoelectric field. Utilizing the integrated modulator, a -3dB bandwidth of ~1 GHz was measured, and a data rate of 1 Gbit/s was demonstrated using on-off keying (OOK) modulation. Our experimental investigation highlighted the advantage of implementing the IWM-LD on the same semipolar QW epitaxy in enabling a high-efficiency platform for SSL-VLC dual-functionalities.

  13. Passive Q-switching of femtosecond-laser-written Tm:KLu(WO4)2 waveguide lasers by graphene and MoS2 saturable absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kifle, Esrom; Mateos, Xavier; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier Rodríguez; Ródenas, Airan; Loiko, Pavel; Zakharov, Viktor; Veniaminov, Andrey; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Chen, Yanxue; Aguiló, Magdalena; Díaz, Francesc; Griebner, Uwe; Petrov, Valentin

    2018-02-01

    A buried depressed-index channel waveguide with a circular cladding and a core diameter of 40 μm is fabricated in a bulk monoclinic 3 at.% Tm:KLu(WO4)2 crystal by femtosecond direct laser writing. In the continuous-wave regime, the Tm waveguide laser generates 210 mW at 1849.6 nm with a slope efficiency η of 40.8%. Passively Q-switched operation is achieved by inserting transmission-type 2D saturable absorbers (SAs) based on few-layer graphene and MoS2. Using the graphene-SA, a maximum average output power of 25 mW is generated at 1844.8 nm. The pulse characteristics (duration/energy) are 88 ns/18 nJ at a repetition rate of 1.39 MHz.

  14. Detection and Implications of Laser-Induced Raman Scattering at Astronomical Observatories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric P. A. Vogt

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Laser guide stars employed at astronomical observatories provide artificial wavefront reference sources to help correct (in part the impact of atmospheric turbulence on astrophysical observations. Following the recent commissioning of the 4 Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF on Unit Telescope 4 (UT4 of the Very Large Telescope (VLT, we characterize the spectral signature of the uplink beams from the 22-W lasers to assess the impact of laser scattering from the 4LGSF on science observations. We use the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE optical integral field spectrograph mounted on the Nasmyth B focus of UT4 to acquire spectra at a resolution of R≅3000 of the uplink laser beams over the wavelength range of 4750 Å–9350 Å. We report the first detection of laser-induced Raman scattering by N_{2}, O_{2}, CO_{2}, H_{2}O, and (tentatively CH_{4} molecules in the atmosphere above the astronomical observatory of Cerro Paranal. In particular, our observations reveal the characteristic spectral signature of laser photons—but 480 Å to 2210 Å redder than the original laser wavelength of 5889.959 Å—landing on the 8.2-m primary mirror of UT4 after being Raman-scattered on their way up to the sodium layer. Laser-induced Raman scattering, a phenomenon not usually discussed in the astronomical context, is not unique to the observatory of Cerro Paranal, but it is common to any astronomical telescope employing a laser guide star (LGS system. It is thus essential for any optical spectrograph coupled to a LGS system to thoroughly handle the possibility of a Raman spectral contamination via a proper baffling of the instrument and suitable calibrations procedures. These considerations are particularly applicable for the HARMONI optical spectrograph on the upcoming Extremely Large Telescope (ELT. At sites hosting multiple telescopes, laser-collision-prediction tools should also account for the presence of Raman emission from the uplink laser beam

  15. Novel features of non-linear Raman instability in a laser plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašek, Martin; Rohlena, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 1 (2010), s. 79-90 ISSN 1434-6060 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E08099; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA ČR GA202/05/2475 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser plasma * non-linear Raman instability Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.513, year: 2010

  16. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscope/microscope based on a widely tunable laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dementjev, A.; Gulbinas, V.; Serbenta, A.; Kaucikas, M.; Niaura, G.

    2010-03-01

    We present a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope based on a robust and simple laser source. A picosecond laser operating in a cavity dumping regime at the 1 MHz repetition rate was used to pump a traveling wave optical parametric generator, which serves as a two-color excitation light source for the CARS microscope. We demonstrate the ability of the presented CARS microscope to measure CARS spectra and images by using several detection schemes.

  17. Multi-wavelength Brillouin Raman erbium-doped fiber laser generation in a linear cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirazi, M R; Harun, S W; Ahmad, H

    2014-01-01

    A multi-wavelength Brillouin Raman erbium-doped fiber laser is proposed and demonstrated. The setup uses a 7.7 km dispersion compensating fiber simultaneously as the Brillouin and Raman nonlinear gain media and operates in conjunction with a 3 m erbium-doped fiber as the linear gain medium. At a Brillouin pump (BP) wavelength of 1530 nm, where Raman and erbium gains overlap each other, 34 Brillouin Stokes lines having line spacing of 0.075 nm are created by using a Raman pump power of only 24.1 dBm, an erbium pump power of about 22.1 dBm, and a BP power of 6.5 dBm in the proposed linear cavity. The system is highly efficient and is able to generate many comparable peak-power lines at a low pump power. (paper)

  18. Near-infrared Raman spectroscopy using a diode laser and CCD detector for tissue diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, U.

    1993-09-01

    This paper surveys the possibility to observe high-quality NIR Raman spectra of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent samples with the use of a diode laser, a fibre optic sample, a single spectrometer and a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. A shifted excitation difference technique was implemented for removing the broad-band fluorescence emission from Raman spectra of the highly fluorescent samples. Raman spectra of 1.4-dioxane, toluene, rhodamine 6G, and HITCI in the 640 to 1840 cm -1 spectral region and 1.4-dioxane and toluene in the 400 to 3400 cm -1 spectral region have been recorded. The results open the field of sensitive tissue characterisation and the possibility of optical biopsy in vivo by using NIR Raman spectroscopy with fibre optic sampling, a single spectrometer, and a CCD detector

  19. Operating Regime for a Backward Raman Laser Amplifier in Preformed Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Daniel S.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2003-01-01

    A critical issue in the generation of ultra-intense, ultra-short laser pulses by backward Raman scattering in plasma is the stability of the pumping pulse to premature backscatter from thermal fluctuations in the preformed plasma. Malkin et al. [V.M. Malkin, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 (6):1208-1211, 2000] demonstrated that density gradients may be used to detune the Raman resonance in such a way that backscatter of the pump from thermal noise can be stabilized while useful Raman amplification persists. Here plasma conditions for which the pump is stable to thermal Raman backscatter in a homogeneous plasma and the density gradients necessary to stabilize the pump for other plasma conditions are quantified. Other ancillary constraints on a Raman amplifier are also considered to determine a specific region in the Te-he plane where Raman amplification is feasible. By determining an operability region, the degree of uncertainty in density or temperature tolerable for an experimental Raman amplifier is thus also identified. The fluid code F3D, which includes the effects of thermal fluctuations, is used to verify these analytic estimates

  20. Operating regime for a backward Raman laser amplifier in preformed plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Daniel S.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2003-01-01

    A critical issue in the generation of ultraintense, ultrashort laser pulses by backward Raman scattering in plasma is the stability of the pumping pulse to premature backscatter from thermal fluctuations in the preformed plasma. Malkin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1208 (2000)] demonstrated that density gradients may be used to detune the Raman resonance in such a way that backscatter of the pump from thermal noise can be stabilized while useful Raman amplification persists. Here plasma conditions for which the pump is stable to thermal Raman backscatter in a homogeneous plasma and the density gradients necessary to stabilize the pump for other plasma conditions are quantified. Other ancillary constraints on a Raman amplifier are also considered to determine a specific region in the T e -n e plane where Raman amplification is feasible. By determining an operability region, the degree of uncertainty in density or temperature tolerable for an experimental Raman amplifier is thus also identified. The fluid code F3D [R. L. Berger et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 4337 (1998)], which includes the effects of thermal fluctuations, is used to verify these analytic estimates

  1. Operating Regime for a Backward Raman Laser Amplifier in Preformed Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel S. Clark; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2003-02-06

    A critical issue in the generation of ultra-intense, ultra-short laser pulses by backward Raman scattering in plasma is the stability of the pumping pulse to premature backscatter from thermal fluctuations in the preformed plasma. Malkin et al. [V.M. Malkin, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 (6):1208-1211, 2000] demonstrated that density gradients may be used to detune the Raman resonance in such a way that backscatter of the pump from thermal noise can be stabilized while useful Raman amplification persists. Here plasma conditions for which the pump is stable to thermal Raman backscatter in a homogeneous plasma and the density gradients necessary to stabilize the pump for other plasma conditions are quantified. Other ancillary constraints on a Raman amplifier are also considered to determine a specific region in the Te-he plane where Raman amplification is feasible. By determining an operability region, the degree of uncertainty in density or temperature tolerable for an experimental Raman amplifier is thus also identified. The fluid code F3D, which includes the effects of thermal fluctuations, is used to verify these analytic estimates.

  2. The Raman Laser Spectrometer for the ExoMars Rover Mission to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rull, Fernando; Maurice, Sylvestre; Hutchinson, Ian; Moral, Andoni; Perez, Carlos; Diaz, Carlos; Colombo, Maria; Belenguer, Tomas; Lopez-Reyes, Guillermo; Sansano, Antonio; Forni, Olivier; Parot, Yann; Striebig, Nicolas; Woodward, Simon; Howe, Chris; Tarcea, Nicolau; Rodriguez, Pablo; Seoane, Laura; Santiago, Amaia; Rodriguez-Prieto, Jose A.; Medina, Jesús; Gallego, Paloma; Canchal, Rosario; Santamaría, Pilar; Ramos, Gonzalo; Vago, Jorge L.; RLS Team

    2017-07-01

    The Raman Laser Spectrometer (RLS) on board the ESA/Roscosmos ExoMars 2020 mission will provide precise identification of the mineral phases and the possibility to detect organics on the Red Planet. The RLS will work on the powdered samples prepared inside the Pasteur analytical suite and collected on the surface and subsurface by a drill system. Raman spectroscopy is a well-known analytical technique based on the inelastic scattering by matter of incident monochromatic light (the Raman effect) that has many applications in laboratory and industry, yet to be used in space applications. Raman spectrometers will be included in two Mars rovers scheduled to be launched in 2020. The Raman instrument for ExoMars 2020 consists of three main units: (1) a transmission spectrograph coupled to a CCD detector; (2) an electronics box, including the excitation laser that controls the instrument functions; and (3) an optical head with an autofocus mechanism illuminating and collecting the scattered light from the spot under investigation. The optical head is connected to the excitation laser and the spectrometer by optical fibers. The instrument also has two targets positioned inside the rover analytical laboratory for onboard Raman spectral calibration. The aim of this article was to present a detailed description of the RLS instrument, including its operation on Mars. To verify RLS operation before launch and to prepare science scenarios for the mission, a simulator of the sample analysis chain has been developed by the team. The results obtained are also discussed. Finally, the potential of the Raman instrument for use in field conditions is addressed. By using a ruggedized prototype, also developed by our team, a wide range of terrestrial analog sites across the world have been studied. These investigations allowed preparing a large collection of real, in situ spectra of samples from different geological processes and periods of Earth evolution. On this basis, we are working

  3. Infrared, Raman and laser fluorescence studies on large molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswaran, Sugandhi

    2000-01-01

    In the present thesis, infrared and Raman spectroscopic studies on large molecules, molecular assemblies and crystalline solids, as a function of temperature, pressure and added materials have been carried out. Spectral changes observed in our studies are interpreted in terms of intermolecular interaction, phase transition and conformational changes taking place in the molecules studied

  4. Generation of Bright, Spatially Coherent Soft X-Ray High Harmonics in a Hollow Waveguide Using Two-Color Synthesized Laser Pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Cheng; Stein, Gregory J; Hong, Kyung-Han; Lin, C D

    2015-07-24

    We investigate the efficient generation of low-divergence high-order harmonics driven by waveform-optimized laser pulses in a gas-filled hollow waveguide. The drive waveform is obtained by synthesizing two-color laser pulses, optimized such that highest harmonic yields are emitted from each atom. Optimization of the gas pressure and waveguide configuration has enabled us to produce bright and spatially coherent harmonics extending from the extreme ultraviolet to soft x rays. Our study on the interplay among waveguide mode, atomic dispersion, and plasma effect uncovers how dynamic phase matching is accomplished and how an optimized waveform is maintained when optimal waveguide parameters (radius and length) and gas pressure are identified. Our analysis should help laboratory development in the generation of high-flux bright coherent soft x rays as tabletop light sources for applications.

  5. Nanoparticle detection in aqueous solutions using Raman and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sovago, M.; Buis, E.-J.; Sandtke, M.

    2013-01-01

    We show the chemical identification and quantification of the concentration and size of nanoparticle (NP) dispersions in aqueous solutions by using a combination of Raman Spectroscopy and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). The two spectroscopic techniques are applied to demonstrate the NP

  6. Combined raman/laser-induced breakdown spectrometer: space and non-space applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandtke, M.; Laan, E.C.; Ahlers, B.

    2010-01-01

    TNO has developed the combination of two spectroscopic analysis methods in one instrument. Raman spectroscopy and Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) were brought together for an instrument to be flown on the ExoMars mission from the European Space Agency (ESA) to investigate the Martian

  7. Short-cavity DBR laser using an InP/InGaAsP deep-ridge waveguide with vertical-groove gratings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segawa, T.; Docter, B.; Kakitsuka, T.; Matsuo, S.; Ishii, T.; Kawaguchi, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Karouta, F.; Smit, M.K.; Suzuki, H.

    2007-01-01

    A compact distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser was fabricated using an InP/InGaAsP deep-ridge waveguide with vertical-groove gratings. We achieved stable single-mode laser operation with an active length of only 25-µm with low threshold current.

  8. Extremely wide lasing bandwidth from InAs/InP quantumdash ridge-waveguide laser near 1.6 μm

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa; Ng, Tien Khee; Lee, Chisen; Bhattacharya, Pallab K.; Ooi, Boon S.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate an ultra-broad lasing bandwidth (-3dB) of > 50 nm utilizing InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum-dash ridge-waveguide laser using chirped AlGaInAs barrier layer thickness. Our device exhibits a recorded bandwidth and significant improvement of laser characteristics

  9. Efficient and ultra-narrow-linewidth integrated waveguide lasers in Al2O3:Yb and Al2O3:Er

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernhardi, Edward; van Wolferen, Hendricus A.G.M.; Worhoff, Kerstin; de Ridder, R.M.; Pollnau, Markus

    The ability to integrate Bragg grating structures with optical waveguides provides the opportunity to realize a variety of compact monolithic optical devices, such as distributed feedback (DFB) lasers, and distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) lasers. In this work, we report passive DBR cavities with

  10. Optically controlled seeding of Raman forward scattering and injection of electrons in a self-modulated laser-wakefield accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.-T.; Chien, T.-Y.; Lee, C.-H.; Lin, J.-Y.; Wang, J.; Chen, S.-Y.

    2004-01-01

    Optical seeding of plasma waves and the injection of electrons are key issues in self-modulated laser-wakefield accelerators. By implementing a copropagating laser prepulse with proper timing, we are able to control the growth of Raman forward scattering and the production of accelerated electrons. The dependence of the Raman intensity on prepulse timing indicates that the seeding of Raman forward scattering is dominated by the ionization-induced wakefield, and the dependence of the divergence and number of accelerated electrons further reveals that the stimulated Raman backward scattering of the prepulse plays the essential role of injecting hot electrons into the fast plasma wave driven by the main pulse

  11. An experimental analysis of the waveguide modes in a high-gain free-electron laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    The presence, growth, and interaction of transverse waveguide modes in high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) amplifiers has been observed and studied. Using the Electron Laser Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a 3 MeV, 800 A electron beam generated by the Experimental Test Accelerator was injected into a planar wiggler. Power was then extracted and measured in the fundamental (TE 01 ) an higher-order modes (Te 21 and TM 21 ) under various sets of operating conditions. Horizontal focusing through the wiggler was provided by external quadrupole magnets. There was no axial guide field. The input microwave signal for amplification was generated by a 100 kW magnetron operating at 34.6 Ghz. Power measurements were taken for both flat and tapered wigglers, for two sizes of waveguide, and for both flat and tapered wigglers, for two sizes of waveguide, and for both fundamental and higher mode injection. Mode content was determined by sampling the radiated signal at specific points in the radiation patter. For the flat wiggler and with the large waveguide (2.9 cm x 9.8 cm) the power in the higher modes was comparable to power in the fundamental. both exhibited gains greater than 30 dB/m prior to saturation and both reached powers in excess of 80 MW. Choice of injection mode had little effect on the operation of the system. Operation with the smaller guide (WR-229) provided much better mode selectivity. The fundamental mode continued to show optimum gain in excess of 30 dB/m while the higher-mode gain was of order 20 dB/m. As expected, power output increased significantly with the tapered wigglers. The relative mode content depended on the specific taper used

  12. Laser-Induced, Local Oxidation of Copper Nanoparticle Films During Raman Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hight Walker, Angela R.; Cheng, Guangjun; Calizo, Irene

    2011-03-01

    The optical properties of gold and silver nanoparticles and their films have been thoroughly investigated as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates and chemical reaction promoters. Similar to gold and silver nanoparticles, copper nanoparticles exhibit distinct plasmon absorptions in the visible region. The work on copper nanoparticles and their films is limited due to their oxidization in air. However, their high reactivity actually provides an opportunity to exploit the laser-induced thermal effect and chemical reactions of these nanoparticles. Here, we present our investigation of the local oxidation of a copper nanoparticle film induced by a visible laser source during Raman spectroscopic measurements. The copper nanoparticle film is prepared by drop-casting chemically synthesized copper colloid onto silicon oxide/silicon substrate. The local oxidation induced by visible lasers in Raman spectroscopy is monitored with the distinct scattering peaks for copper oxides. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy have been used to characterize the laser-induced morphological changes in the film. The results of this oxidation process with different excitation wavelengths and different laser powers will be presented.

  13. Ps laser pulse induced stimulated Raman scattering of ammonium nitrate dissolved in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V. Rakesh; Kiran, P. Prem

    2018-04-01

    An intense picosecond laser pulse focused into a liquid medium generates a shock wave in the focal region. This shock wave while propagating into the medium varies the pressure and temperature of the liquid locally leading to the appearance of novel phases which are manifested by the appearance of Raman peaks. We present the phase changes of ammonium nitrate (AN) dissolved in water by studying the forward and backward stimulated Raman Scattering (FSRS and BSRS) signals due to propagation of 30 ps laser pulse induced shockwaves. The dominant peak corresponding to the NO3- symmetric stretching mode is observed with a Raman shift of 1045 cm-1 which represents phase IV of AN with an orthogonal crystalline structure. Apart from this peak, the dominant mode of liquid phase of water with a Raman shift of 3400 cm-1 and an ice VII peak at a Raman shift of 3050 cm-1 confirming the pressure of 10 GPa is observed. The effect of the concentration and input energy on the appearance of the phases will be presented.

  14. Distributed feedback multimode Brillouin–Raman random fiber laser in the S-band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, H; Zulkifli, M Z; Jemangin, M H; Harun, S W

    2013-01-01

    A novel S-band multimode Brillouin–Raman random fiber laser based on distributed feedback of Rayleigh scattered light is demonstrated. It relies on a short length, 7.7 km long angle-cleaved dispersion compensating fiber in a mirror-less open cavity. Two 1425 nm laser diodes at a modest operating power amplify a Brillouin pump (BP) signal, which in turn generates a multi-wavelength laser output through the stimulated Brillouin scattering. Eleven Brillouin Stokes lines, spanning from 1515.15 to 1516.00 nm, were obtained at a Raman pump power of 361.66 mW. Out of these, five odd Brillouin Stokes lines were generated with a flat peak power of about 0 dBm. (letter)

  15. Raman spectroscopy of carbon nano-particles synthesized by laser ablation of graphite in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, J. F.; Cadenbach, T.; Costa V, C.; Paz, J. L. [Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Departamento de Fisica, Apdo. 17-12-866, Ladron de Guevara E11-253, EC 170109, Quito (Ecuador); Zhang, Z. B.; Zhang, S. L. [Institutionen for teknikvetenskaper, Fasta tillstandets elektronik, Angstromlaboratoriet, Lagerhyddsvagen, 1 Box 534, 751-21 Uppsala (Sweden); Debut, A.; Vaca, A. V., E-mail: cardenas9291@gmail.com [Centro de Nanociencia y Nanotecnologia, Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas ESPE, Sangolqui (Ecuador)

    2017-11-01

    Carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) have been synthesized by laser ablation of polycrystalline graphite in water using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) with a width of 8 ns. Structural and mesoscopic characterization of the CNPs in the supernatant by Raman spectroscopy provide evidence for the presence of mainly two ranges of particle sizes: 1-5 nm and 10-50 nm corresponding to amorphous carbon and graphite Nps, respectively. These results are corroborated by complementary characterization using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (Tem). In addition, large (10-100 μm) graphite particles removed from the surface are essentially unmodified (in structure and topology) by the laser as confirmed by Raman analysis. (Author)

  16. Compact and portable multiline UV and visible Raman lasers in hydrogen-filled HC-PCF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Y; Couny, F; Light, P S; Mangan, B J; Benabid, F

    2010-04-15

    We report on the realization of compact UV visible multiline Raman lasers based on two types of hydrogen-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The first, with a large pitch Kagome lattice structure, offers a broad spectral coverage from near IR through to the much sought after yellow, deep-blue and UV, whereas the other, based on photonic bandgap guidance, presents a pump conversion concentrated in the visible region. The high Raman efficiency achieved through these fibers allows for compact, portable diode-pumped solid-state lasers to be used as pumps. Each discrete component of this laser system exhibits a spectral density several orders of magnitude larger than what is achieved with supercontinuum sources and a narrow linewidth, making it an ideal candidate for forensics and biomedical applications.

  17. Experimental and theoretical analysis of the dominant lateral waveguiding mechanism in 975 nm high power broad area diode lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crump, P; Böldicke, S; Schultz, C M; Ekhteraei, H; Wenzel, H; Erbert, G

    2012-01-01

    For maximum fibre-coupled power, high power broad area diode lasers must operate with small lateral far field angles at high continuous wave (CW) powers. However, these structures are laterally multi-moded, with low beam quality and wide emission angles. In order to experimentally determine the origin of the low beam quality, spectrally resolved near and far field measurements were performed for a diode laser with 50 µm stripe width. Within the range measured (CW optical output powers to 1.5 W) the laser is shown to operate in just six stable lateral modes, with spatially periodic profiles. Comparisons of the measured profiles with the results of two-dimensional modal simulation demonstrate that current-induced thermal lensing dominates the lateral waveguiding, in spite of the presence of both strong built-in index guiding and gain guiding. No evidence is seen for filamentation. Building on the diagnosis, proposals are presented for improvements to beam quality. (paper)

  18. Combined Raman spectrometer/laser-induced breakdown spectrometer for the next ESA mission to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalgette Courrèges-Lacoste, Grégory; Ahlers, Berit; Pérez, Fernando Rull

    2007-12-01

    Among the different instruments that have been pre-selected to be on-board the Pasteur payload on ExoMars is the Raman/ laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument. Raman spectroscopy and LIBS will be integrated into a single instrument sharing many hardware commonalities. An international team under the lead of TNO has been gathered to produce a design concept for a combined Raman spectrometer/LIBS elegant bread-board (EBB). The instrument is based on a specially designed, extremely compact, spectrometer with high resolution over a large wavelength range, suitable for both Raman spectroscopy and LIBS measurements. Low mass, size and power consumption are the main drivers of the instrument's design concept. In this paper, science objectives for the combined instrument are detailed. Background information on Raman spectroscopy and LIBS are presented, focussing on the synergy of these two techniques. In the last section, the instrument concept resulting from the assessment of the feasibility of the combined Raman/LIBS EBB is presented.

  19. Micro spatial analysis of seashell surface using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yuan; Li, Yuandong; Li, Ying [Optics and Optoelectronics Lab, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Wang, Yangfan; Wang, Shi; Bao, Zhenmin [Life Science College, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003 (China); Zheng, Ronger, E-mail: rzheng@ouc.edu.cn [Optics and Optoelectronics Lab, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2015-08-01

    The seashell has been studied as a proxy for the marine researches since it is the biomineralization product recording the growth development and the ocean ecosystem evolution. In this work a hybrid of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman spectroscopy was introduced to the composition analysis of seashell (scallop, bivalve, Zhikong). Without any sample treatment, the compositional distribution of the shell was obtained using LIBS for the element detection and Raman for the molecule recognition respectively. The elements Ca, K, Li, Mg, Mn and Sr were recognized by LIBS; the molecule carotene and carbonate were identified with Raman. It was found that the LIBS detection result was more related to the shell growth than the detection result of Raman. The obtained result suggested the shell growth might be developing in both horizontal and vertical directions. It was indicated that the LIBS–Raman combination could be an alternative way for the shell researches. - Highlights: • A LIBS–Raman hybrid system was developed. • A seashell has been analyzed for the elementary and molecular distribution with a system. • The shell growth development was studied on the surface and in the depth.

  20. Relativistic treatment of Raman free-electro laser in beam frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korbacheh, A.; Maraghechi, B.; Aghahosseni, H.

    2004-01-01

    A relativistic theory for Raman backscattering in the beam frame of electrons is used to find the growth rate of free- electron laser in Raman regime. The electromagnetic effects of the space-charge wave are taken into account by using the electrostatic approximation in the beam frame. The wiggler effects on the linear dispersion relations of the space- charge wave and radiation are included in the analysis. A numerical computation is conducted to compare the growth rate of the excited waves with nonrelativistic treatment

  1. Laser-induced gratings in the gas phase excited via Raman-active transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, D N [General Physics Inst., Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bombach, R; Hemmerling, B; Hubschmid, W [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    We report on a new time resolved coherent Raman technique that is based on the generation of thermal gratings following a population change among molecular levels induced by stimulated Raman pumping. This is achieved by spatially and temporally overlapping intensity interference patterns generated independently by two lasers. When this technique is used in carbon dioxide, employing transitions which belong to the Q-branches of the {nu}{sub 1}/2{nu}{sub 2} Fermi dyad, it is possible to investigate molecular energy transfer processes. (author) 2 figs., 10 refs.

  2. UV laser-induced high resolution cleaving of Si wafers for micro-nano devices and polymeric waveguide characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casquel, R.; Holgado, M.; Garcia-Ballesteros, J.J.; Zinoviev, K.; Fernandez-Sanchez, C.; Sanza, F.J.; Molpeceres, C.; Laguna, M.F.; Llobera, A.; Ocana, J.L.; Dominguez, C.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we propose a method for cleaving silicon-based photonic chips by using a laser based micromachining system, consisting of a ND:YVO 4 laser emitting at 355 nm in nanosecond pulse regime and a micropositioning system. The laser makes grooved marks placed at the desired locations and directions where cleaves have to be initiated, and after several processing steps, a crack appears and propagate along the crystallographic planes of the silicon wafer. This allows cleavage of the chips automatically and with high positioning accuracy, and provides polished vertical facets with better quality than the obtained with other cleaving process, which eases the optical characterization of photonic devices. This method has been found to be particularly useful when cleaving small-sized chips, where manual cleaving is hard to perform; and also for polymeric waveguides, whose facets get damaged or even destroyed with polishing or manual cleaving processing. Influence of length of the grooved line and speed of processing is studied for a variety of silicon chips. An application for cleaving and characterizing sol-gel waveguides is presented. The total amount of light coupled is higher than when using any other procedure.

  3. UV laser-induced high resolution cleaving of Si wafers for micro-nano devices and polymeric waveguide characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casquel, R., E-mail: rafael.casquel@upm.es [Centro Laser UPM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Campus Sur UPM, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Holgado, M.; Garcia-Ballesteros, J.J. [Centro Laser UPM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Campus Sur UPM, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Zinoviev, K.; Fernandez-Sanchez, C. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, Centro Nacional de Microelectronica - CSIC, Campus Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Sanza, F.J.; Molpeceres, C.; Laguna, M.F. [Centro Laser UPM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Campus Sur UPM, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Llobera, A. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, Centro Nacional de Microelectronica - CSIC, Campus Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Ocana, J.L. [Centro Laser UPM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Campus Sur UPM, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Dominguez, C. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, Centro Nacional de Microelectronica - CSIC, Campus Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-04-01

    In this work we propose a method for cleaving silicon-based photonic chips by using a laser based micromachining system, consisting of a ND:YVO{sub 4} laser emitting at 355 nm in nanosecond pulse regime and a micropositioning system. The laser makes grooved marks placed at the desired locations and directions where cleaves have to be initiated, and after several processing steps, a crack appears and propagate along the crystallographic planes of the silicon wafer. This allows cleavage of the chips automatically and with high positioning accuracy, and provides polished vertical facets with better quality than the obtained with other cleaving process, which eases the optical characterization of photonic devices. This method has been found to be particularly useful when cleaving small-sized chips, where manual cleaving is hard to perform; and also for polymeric waveguides, whose facets get damaged or even destroyed with polishing or manual cleaving processing. Influence of length of the grooved line and speed of processing is studied for a variety of silicon chips. An application for cleaving and characterizing sol-gel waveguides is presented. The total amount of light coupled is higher than when using any other procedure.

  4. Bismuth telluride topological insulator nanosheet saturable absorbers for q-switched mode-locked Tm:ZBLAN waveguide lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xiantao; Gross, Simon; Withford, Michael J.; Fuerbach, Alexander [Centre for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) and MQ Photonics Research Centre, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie Univ., NSW (Australia); Zhang, Han; Guo, Zhinan [SZU-NUS Collaborative Innovation Centre for Optoelectronic Science and Technology, Key Lab. of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen Univ. (China)

    2016-08-15

    Nanosheets of bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}), a topological insulator material that exhibits broadband saturable absorption due to its non-trivial Dirac-cone like energy structure, are utilized to generate short pulses from Tm:ZBLAN waveguide lasers. By depositing multiple layers of a carefully prepared Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} solution onto a glass substrate, the modulation depth and the saturation intensity of the fabricated devices can be controlled and optimized. This approach enables the realization of saturable absorbers that feature a modulation depth of 13% and a saturation intensity of 997 kW/cm{sup 2}. For the first time to our knowledge, Q-switched mode-locked operation of a linearly polarized mid-IR ZBLAN waveguide chip laser was realized in an extended cavity configuration using the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The maximum average output power of the laser is 16.3 mW and the Q-switched and mode-locked repetition rates are 44 kHz and 436 MHz, respectively. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Direct laser writing of a low-loss waveguide with independent control over the transverse dimension and the refractive index contrast between the core and the cladding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masselin, Pascal; Bychkov, Eugène; Coq, David Le

    2016-08-01

    In this Letter, we present the realization of a low-loss waveguide in a chalcogenide glass by direct laser writing technique in a particular configuration that allows the independent control over the diameter of the core and the magnitude of the refractive index contrast with the cladding. The waveguide is of multicore type and composed of 19 channels arranged on a hexagonal lattice. Each channel is obtained by stacking voxels of refractive index variation obtained by static exposure to femtosecond laser pulse burst. The distance between the channels can be used to vary the diameter of the waveguide, while the duration of laser burst controls the magnitude of the effective index and the propagation loss. We demonstrate that it can be reduced down to 0.11 dB/cm.

  6. Raman-Assisted Passively Mode-Locked Fiber Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Yao, Pei-Jun; Gu, Chun; Xu, Li-Xin

    2018-04-01

    Not Available Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No 61675188, and the Open Fund of Key Laboratory Pulse Power Laser Technology of China under Grant No SKL2016KF03.

  7. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Raman Laser Amplification in Ionizing Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Daniel S.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2003-01-01

    By using the amplifying laser pulse in a plasma-based backward Raman laser amplifier to generate the plasma by photo-ionization of a gas simultaneous with the amplification process, possible instabilities of the pumping laser pulse can be avoided. Particle-in-cell simulations are used to study this amplification mechanism, and earlier results using more elementary models of the Raman interaction are verified [D.S. Clark and N.J. Fisch, Phys. Plasmas, 9 (6): 2772-2780, 2002]. The effects (unique to amplification in ionizing plasmas and not included in previous simulations) of blue-shifting of the pump and seed laser pulses and the generation of a wake are observed not significantly to impact the amplification process. As expected theoretically, the peak output intensity is found to be limited to I ∼ 10 17 W/cm 2 by forward Raman scattering of the amplifying seed. The integrity of the ionization front of the seed pulse against the development of a possible transverse modulation instability is also demonstrated

  8. High-efficiency, 154  W CW, diode-pumped Raman fiber laser with brightness enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Yaakov; Fromzel, Viktor; Zhang, Jun; Ter-Gabrielyan, Nikolay; Dubinskii, Mark

    2017-01-20

    We demonstrate a high-power, high-efficiency Raman fiber laser pumped directly by laser diode modules at 978 nm. 154 W of CW power were obtained at a wavelength of 1023 nm with an optical to optical efficiency of 65%. A commercial graded-index (GRIN) core fiber acts as the Raman fiber in a power oscillator configuration, which includes spectral selection to prevent generation of the second Stokes. In addition, brightness enhancement of the pump beam by a factor of 8.4 is attained due to the Raman gain distribution profile in the GRIN fiber. To the best of our knowledge this is the highest power and highest efficiency Raman fiber laser demonstrated in any configuration allowing brightness enhancement (i.e., in either cladding-pumped configuration or with GRIN fibers, excluding step-index core pumped), regardless of pumping scheme (i.e., either diode pumped or fiber laser pumped).

  9. Effect of laser beam filamentation on plasma wave localization and stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, Gunjan; Sharma, R. P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the effect of laser beam filamentation on the localization of electron plasma wave (EPW) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in unmagnitized plasma when both relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities are operative. The filamentary dynamics of laser beam is studied and the splitted profile of the laser beam is obtained due to uneven focusing of the off-axial rays. The localization of electron plasma wave takes place due to nonlinear coupling between the laser beam and EPW. Stimulated Raman scattering of this EPW is studied and backreflectivity has been calculated. The localization of EPW also affects the eigenfrequency and damping of plasma wave; consequently, mismatch and modified enhanced Landau damping lead to the disruption of SRS process and a substantial reduction in the backreflectivity. The new enhanced damping of the plasma wave has been calculated and it is found that the SRS process gets suppressed due to the localization of plasma wave in laser beam filamentary structures. For typical laser beam and plasma parameters with wavelength λ (=1064 nm), power flux (=10 16 W/cm 2 ) and plasma density (n/n cr ) = 0.2; the SRS back reflectivity is found to be suppressed by a factor of around 5%. (author)

  10. In-situ characterization of meat aging with diode-laser Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Heinar; Blum, Jenny; Sowoidnich, Kay; Sumpf, Bernd; Schwägele, Fredi; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2009-05-01

    Due to the narrow linewidth signals and its fingerprinting nature, Raman spectra provide information about the molecular structure and composition of the samples. In this paper, the applicability of Raman spectroscopy is shown for the in-situ characterization of the aging of meat. Miniaturized diode lasers are utilized as light sources with excitation wavelengths of 671 nm and 785 nm with a view to the development of a portable field device for meat. As test sample, musculus longissimus dorsi from pork was taken. The chops were stored refrigerated at 5 °C and Raman spectra were measured daily from slaughter up to three weeks. Throughout the entire period of one month, the Raman spectra preserve the basic spectral features identifying the samples as meat. More specific, the spectra exhibit gradual changes of the Raman signals and they show a time-dependent modification of the background signal which arises from a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). To analyze the time-correlation of the complex spectra, multivariate statistical methods are employed. By means of principal components analysis (PCA) a distinction of spectra is found on the time scale between day 8 and 10. This corresponds to the transition from ripened meat to meat at and beyond the limit of inedibility. After ca. 10 days of storage at 5 °C the microbial load is overwhelming and LIF increases. The results of the Raman measurements depending on the storage time of meat are discussed in the context of reference analyses which have been performed in parallel.

  11. Wavelength Selection For Laser Raman Spectroscopy of Putative Martian Habitats and Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn-Williams, D. D.; Newton, E. M. G.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    Pigments are key potential biomarkers for any former life on Mars because of the selective pressure of solar radiation on any biological system that could have evolved at its surface. We have found that the near -Infrared laser Raman spectrometer available to use was eminently suitable for diagnostic analysis of pigments because of their minimal autofluorescence at its 1064 nm excitation wav elength. However, we have now evaluated a diverse range of excitation wavelengths to confirm this choice, to ensure that we have the best technique to seek for pigments and their derivatives from any former surface life on Mars. The Raman is weak relative to fluorescence, which results in elevated baseline and concurrent swamping of Raman bands. We confirm the molecular information available from near-IR FT Raman spectra for two highly pigmented UV-tolerant epilithic Antarctic lichens (Acarospora chlorop hana and Caloplaca saxicola) from Victoria Land, a whole endolithic microbial community and endolithic cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis from within translucent sandstone of the Trans -Antarctic Mountains, and the free- living cyanobacterium Nostoc commune from Alexander Island, Antarctic Peninsula region. We also show that much of the information we require on biomolecules is not evident from lasers of shorter wavelengths. A miniature 1064 nm Raman spectrometer with an In-Ga-As detector sensitive to IR is being developed by Montana State University (now existing as a prototype) as the prime instrument for a proposed UK-led Mars rover mission (Vanguard). Preliminary spectra from this system confirm the suitability of the near-IR laser.

  12. Average Power and Brightness Scaling of Diamond Raman Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-07

    J. Appl. Phys. 92(2), 649–653 (2002). 26. J. Smedley , C. Jaye, J. Bohon, T. Rao, and D. A. Fischer, “Laser patterning of diamond. Part II. Surface...nondiamond carbon formation and its removal,” J. Appl. Phys. 105(12), 123108 (2009). 27. J. Smedley , J. Bohon, Q. Wu, and T. Rao, “Laser patterning...Singh, Dianyuan Fan, Jianquan Yao, Robert F. Walter, Proc. of SPIE Vol. 8551, 85510U · © 2012 SPIE CCC code: 0277-786/12/$18 · doi: 10.1117/12.999857 Proc

  13. Raman spectroscopic differentiation of beef and horse meat using a 671 nm microsystem diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Halah Al; Sowoidnich, Kay; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2013-11-01

    A non-invasive Raman spectroscopic approach for meat species identification and quality detection was successfully demonstrated for the two closely related species beef and horse. Fresh beef and horse muscles were cut and ice-stored at 5 °C, and time-dependent Raman measurements were performed daily up to 12 days postmortem. Applying a 671 nm microsystem diode laser and a laser power of 50 mW, spectra were recorded with integration times of 1-4 s. A pronounced offset of the Raman spectra was observed between horse and beef, with high fluorescence background for horse compared to beef for all days of storage. Principal components analysis was applied for data evaluation revealing a clear distinction between beef and horse meat which can be attributed to differences in the myoglobin content of both species. Furthermore, separations according to aging and spoilage for the two species could be identified simultaneously. Therefore, Raman spectroscopy might be an efficient test method for meat species identification in combination with spoilage detection.

  14. Densification behavior, doping profile and planar waveguide laser performance of the tape casting YAG/Nd:YAG/YAG ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Lin; Li, Jiang; Qu, Haiyun; Wang, Juntao; Liu, Jiao; Dai, Jiawei; Zhou, Zhiwei; Liu, Binglong; Kou, Huamin; Shi, Yun; Wang, Zheng; Pan, Yubai; Gao, Qingsong; Guo, Jingkun

    2016-10-01

    The sintering behavior and doping concentration profile of the planar waveguide YAG/Nd:YAG/YAG ceramics by the tape casting and solid-state reaction method were investigated on the basis of densification trajectory, microstructure evolution, and Nd3+ ions diffusion. The porosity of the green body by tape casting and cold isostatic pressing is about 38.6%. And the green bodies were consolidated from 1100 °C to 1800 °C for 0.5-20 h to study the densification and the doping diffusion behaviors. At the temperature higher than 1500 °C, pure YAG phase is formed, followed by the densification and grain growth process. With the increase of temperature, two sintering stages occur, corresponding to remarkable densification and significant grain growth, respectively. The mechanism controlling densification at 1550 °C is grain boundary diffusion. The diffusion of Nd3+ ions is more sensitive to temperature than the sintering time, and the minimum temperature required for the obvious diffusion of Nd3+ ions is higher than 1700 °C. Finally, planar waveguide YAG/1.5 at.%Nd:YAG/YAG transparent ceramics with in-line transmittance of 84.8% at 1064 nm were obtained by vacuum-sintering at 1780 °C for 30 h. The fluorescence lifetime of 4F3/2 state of Nd3+ in the specimen is about 259 μs. The prepared ceramic waveguide was tested in a laser amplifier and the laser pulse was amplificated from 87 mJ to 238 mJ, with the pump energy of 680 mJ.

  15. Mitigation of stimulated Raman scattering in high power fiber lasers using transmission gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Maximilian; Bock, Victor; Krämer, Ria G.; Richter, Daniel; Goebel, Thorsten A.; Matzdorf, Christian; Liem, Andreas; Schreiber, Thomas; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2018-02-01

    The average output power of fiber lasers have been scaled deep into the kW regime within the recent years. However a further scaling is limited due to nonlinear effects like stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). Using the special characteristics of femtosecond laser pulse written transmission fiber gratings, it is possible to realize a notch filter that mitigates efficiently this negative effect by coupling the Raman wavelength from the core into the cladding of the fiber. To the best of our knowledge, we realized for the first time highly efficient gratings in large mode area (LMA) fibers with cladding diameters up to 400 μm. The resonances show strong attenuation at design wavelength and simultaneously low out of band losses. A high power fiber amplifier with an implemented passive fiber grating is shown and its performance is carefully investigated.

  16. Time evolution studies of laser induced chemical changes in InAs nanowire using Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Suparna; Aggarwal, R.; Kumari Gupta, Vandna; Ingale, Alka [Laser Physics Application Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, MP (India)

    2014-07-07

    We report the study of time evolution of chemical changes on the surface of an InAs nanowire (NW) on laser irradiation in different power density regime, using Raman spectroscopy for a time span of 8–16 min. Mixture of metastable oxides like InAsO{sub 4,} As{sub 2}O{sub 3} are formed upon oxidation, which are reflected as sharp Raman peaks at ∼240–254 and 180–200 cm{sup −1}. Evidence of removal of arsenic layer by layer is also observed at higher power density. Position controlled laser induced chemical modification on a nanometer scale, without changing the core of the NW, can be useful for NW based device fabrication.

  17. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using Ag nanoparticle films produced by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, C.A., E-mail: smythc2@tcd.ie [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Mirza, I.; Lunney, J.G.; McCabe, E.M. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) produces silver nanoparticle films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These films can be used for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Commercial film shows good SERS reproducibility but poor signal intensity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PLD shows a good SERS response coupled with good reproducibility. - Abstract: Thin silver nanoparticle films, of thickness 7 nm, were deposited onto glass microslides using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The films were then characterised using UV-vis spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy before Rhodamine 6G was deposited onto them for investigation using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The sensitivity obtained using SERS was compared to that obtained using a colloidal silver suspension and also to a commercial SERS substrate. The reproducibility of the films is also examined using statistical analysis.

  18. Investigation of germanium implanted with aluminum by multi-laser micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanson, A., E-mail: andrea.sanson@unipd.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Napolitani, E. [MATIS IMM-CNR at Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Impellizzeri, G. [MATIS IMM-CNR and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Giarola, M. [Dipartimento di Informatica, Università di Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, I-37134 Verona (Italy); De Salvador, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Privitera, V.; Priolo, F. [MATIS IMM-CNR and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Mariotto, G. [Dipartimento di Informatica, Università di Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, I-37134 Verona (Italy); Carnera, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2013-08-31

    Germanium samples, implanted with aluminum and annealed, have been investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy using different excitation lines with the aim of gaining insights about the Al distribution at different depths beneath the sample surface and to correlate the Raman spectra with the electrical and chemical profiles, obtained by Spreading Resistance Profiling (SRP) and Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) measurements, respectively. The intensity of the Al–Ge Raman peak at about 370 cm{sup −1}, due to the local vibrational mode of the substitutional Al atoms in the Ge matrix, has been directly related to the SRP behavior, while no correlation has been observed with SIMS profiles. These findings show that the electrically active content is entirely due to the substitutional Al atoms. Finally, a clear down shift is observed for the Ge–Ge Raman peak at ∼ 300 cm{sup −1}, which also seems to be directly related to the active content of Al dopant atoms. This work shows that micro-Raman spectroscopy can be a suitable tool for the study of doping profiles in Ge. - Highlights: ► Al-implanted Ge and annealed were studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy. ► Using different laser lines we have investigated the implants at different depths. ► The Al–Ge Raman peak at about 370 cm{sup −1} is directly related to the SRP behavior. ► The electrically active content is entirely due to the substitutional Al atoms. ► Carrier effects are observed on the Ge–Ge peak at ∼ 300 cm{sup −1}.

  19. Investigation of germanium implanted with aluminum by multi-laser micro-Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanson, A.; Napolitani, E.; Impellizzeri, G.; Giarola, M.; De Salvador, D.; Privitera, V.; Priolo, F.; Mariotto, G.; Carnera, A.

    2013-01-01

    Germanium samples, implanted with aluminum and annealed, have been investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy using different excitation lines with the aim of gaining insights about the Al distribution at different depths beneath the sample surface and to correlate the Raman spectra with the electrical and chemical profiles, obtained by Spreading Resistance Profiling (SRP) and Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) measurements, respectively. The intensity of the Al–Ge Raman peak at about 370 cm −1 , due to the local vibrational mode of the substitutional Al atoms in the Ge matrix, has been directly related to the SRP behavior, while no correlation has been observed with SIMS profiles. These findings show that the electrically active content is entirely due to the substitutional Al atoms. Finally, a clear down shift is observed for the Ge–Ge Raman peak at ∼ 300 cm −1 , which also seems to be directly related to the active content of Al dopant atoms. This work shows that micro-Raman spectroscopy can be a suitable tool for the study of doping profiles in Ge. - Highlights: ► Al-implanted Ge and annealed were studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy. ► Using different laser lines we have investigated the implants at different depths. ► The Al–Ge Raman peak at about 370 cm −1 is directly related to the SRP behavior. ► The electrically active content is entirely due to the substitutional Al atoms. ► Carrier effects are observed on the Ge–Ge peak at ∼ 300 cm −1

  20. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Raman Laser Amplification in Preformed Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Daniel S.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2003-01-01

    Two critical issues in the amplification of laser pulses by backward Raman scattering in plasma slabs are the saturation mechanism of the amplification effect (which determines the maximum attainable output intensity of a Raman amplifier) and the optimal plasma density for amplification. Previous investigations [V.M. Malkin, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 82 (22):4448-4451, 1999] identified forward Raman scattering and modulational instabilities of the amplifying seed as the likely saturation mechanisms and lead to an estimated unfocused output intensities of 10 17 W/cm 2 . The optimal density for amplification is determined by the competing constraints of minimizing the plasma density so as to minimize the growth rate of the instabilities leading to saturation but also maintaining the plasma sufficiently dense that the driven Langmuir wave responsible for backscattering does not break prematurely. Here, particle-in-cell code are simulations presented which verify that saturation of backward Raman amplification does occur at intensities of ∼10 17 W/cm 2 by forward Raman scattering and modulational instabilities. The optimal density for amplification in a plasma with the representative temperature of T(sub)e = 200 eV is also shown in these simulations to be intermediate between the cold plasma wave-breaking density and the density limit found by assuming a water bag electron distribution function

  1. Development of Raman-shifted probe laser beam for plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    laser chain that works on master oscillator-power amplifier configuration. It is .... beam is the same as that of the green beam and hence is matched to the input ... and Ramesh Chandra for the electronics support and wiring the power supply of.

  2. Low-loss 3D-laser-written mid-infrared LiNbO3 depressed-index cladding waveguides for both TE and TM polarizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huu-Dat; Ródenas, Airán; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Martín, Guillermo; Martínez, Javier; Aguiló, Magdalena; Pujol, Maria Cinta; Díaz, Francesc

    2017-02-20

    We report mid-infrared LiNbO3 depressed-index microstructured cladding waveguides fabricated by three-dimensional laser writing showing low propagation losses (~1.5 dB/cm) at 3.68 µm wavelength for both the transverse electric and magnetic polarized modes, a feature previously unachieved due to the strong anisotropic properties of this type of laser microstructured waveguides and which is of fundamental importance for many photonic applications. Using a heuristic modeling-testing iteration design approach which takes into account cladding induced stress-optic index changes, the fabricated cladding microstructure provides low-loss single mode operation for the mid-IR for both orthogonal polarizations. The dependence of the localized refractive index changes within the cladding microstructure with post-fabrication thermal annealing processes was also investigated, revealing its complex dependence of the laser induced refractive index changes on laser fabrication conditions and thermal post-processing steps. The waveguide modes properties and their dependence on thermal post-processing were numerically modeled and fitted to the experimental values by systematically varying three fundamental parameters of this type of waveguides: depressed refractive index values at sub-micron laser-written tracks, track size changes, and piezo-optic induced refractive index changes.

  3. Interpreting coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectra measured with multimode Nd:YAG pump lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrow, R.L.; Rahn, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    We report comparisons of coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements using single-axial-and multiaxial-mode Nd:YAG lasers. Our results demonstrate the validity of a recently proposed convolution expression for unresolved CARS spectra. The results also support the use of a relative delay of several coherence lengths between pump-beam paths for reducing the effects of pump-field statistics on the CARS spectral profile

  4. Combination of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy for multivariate classification of bacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházka, D.; Mazura, M.; Samek, Ota; Rebrošová, K.; Pořízka, P.; Klus, J.; Procházková, P.; Novotný, J.; Novotný, K.; Kaiser, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 139 (2018), s. 6-12 ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-20645S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-12477S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy * Raman spectroscopy * chemometrics * bacteria Impact factor: 3.241, year: 2016

  5. A compact O-plus C-band switchable quad-wavelength fiber laser using arrayed waveguide grating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif, A A; Zulkifli, M Z; Hassan, N A; Ahmad, H; Harun, S W; Ghani, Z A

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a design of a quad-wavelength fiber laser (QWFL) operating in two different regions namely the O-band covering from 1302 nm to1317.4 nm and C-band from 1530.5 nm to 1548.0 nm is presented. Two different ASE sources from semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) are used, one at 1310 nm and the other at1550 nm. By using a 1×24 channels arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) with 100 GHz interchannel spacing, the system is capable of generating 24 different wavelengths in more than 24 ways of quad-wavelength fiber laser with 0.6 nm and 0.8 nm of interval channel for O-band and C-band regions, respectively

  6. Active Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Sara

    This thesis deals with the fabrication and characterization of active photonic crystal waveguides, realized in III-V semiconductor material with embedded active layers. The platform offering active photonic crystal waveguides has many potential applications. One of these is a compact photonic...... due to photonic crystal dispersion. The observations are explained by the enhancement of net gain by light slow down. Another application based on active photonic crystal waveguides is micro lasers. Measurements on quantum dot micro laser cavities with different mirror configurations and photonic...

  7. Revealing silent vibration modes of nanomaterials by detecting anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianhua; Chen, Lei; Dai, Qiaofeng; Lan, Sheng; Tie, Shaolong

    2016-01-21

    We proposed a scheme in which normal Raman scattering is coupled with hyper-Raman scattering for generating a strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering in nanomaterials by using femtosecond laser pulses. The proposal was experimentally demonstrated by using a single-layer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate, a 17 nm-thick MoS2 on an Au/SiO2 substrate and a 9 nm-thick MoS2 on a SiO2-SnO2/Ag/SiO2 substrate which were confirmed to be highly efficient for second harmonic generation. A strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering was also observed in other nanomaterials possessing large second-order susceptibilities, such as silicon quantum dots self-assembled into "coffee" rings and tubular Cu-doped ZnO nanorods. In all the cases, many Raman inactive vibration modes were clearly revealed in the anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering. Apart from the strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering, Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with small Raman shifts was detected during the ablation process of thick MoS2 layers. It was also observed by slightly defocusing the excitation light. The detection of anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering may serve as a new technique for studying the Raman inactive vibration modes in nanomaterials.

  8. Effect of Rayleigh-scattering distributed feedback on multiwavelength Raman fiber laser generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Taher, A E; Harper, P; Babin, S A; Churkin, D V; Podivilov, E V; Ania-Castanon, J D; Turitsyn, S K

    2011-01-15

    We experimentally demonstrate a Raman fiber laser based on multiple point-action fiber Bragg grating reflectors and distributed feedback via Rayleigh scattering in an ~22-km-long optical fiber. Twenty-two lasing lines with spacing of ~100 GHz (close to International Telecommunication Union grid) in the C band are generated at the watt level. In contrast to the normal cavity with competition between laser lines, the random distributed feedback cavity exhibits highly stable multiwavelength generation with a power-equalized uniform distribution, which is almost independent on power.

  9. Cavity-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Natural Gas with Optical Feedback cw-Diode Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippler, Michael

    2015-08-04

    We report on improvements made on our previously introduced technique of cavity-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (CERS) with optical feedback cw-diode lasers in the gas phase, including a new mode-matching procedure which keeps the laser in resonance with the optical cavity without inducing long-term frequency shifts of the laser, and using a new CCD camera with improved noise performance. With 10 mW of 636.2 nm diode laser excitation and 30 s integration time, cavity enhancement achieves noise-equivalent detection limits below 1 mbar at 1 bar total pressure, depending on Raman cross sections. Detection limits can be easily improved using higher power diodes. We further demonstrate a relevant analytical application of CERS, the multicomponent analysis of natural gas samples. Several spectroscopic features have been identified and characterized. CERS with low power diode lasers is suitable for online monitoring of natural gas mixtures with sensitivity and spectroscopic selectivity, including monitoring H2, H2S, N2, CO2, and alkanes.

  10. Resonance Raman scattering of β-carotene solution excited by visible laser beams into second singlet state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Luyao; Shi, Lingyan; Secor, Jeff; Alfano, Robert

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to use self-absorption correction to determine the Raman enhancement of β-carotene. The Raman spectra of β-carotene solutions were measured using 488nm, 514nm, 532nm and 633nm laser beams, which exhibited significant resonance Raman (RR) enhancement when the laser energy approaches the electronic transition energy from S 0 to S 2 state. The Raman intensity and the actual resonance Raman gain without self-absorption from S 2 state by β-carotene were also obtained to evaluate the effect of self-absorption on RR scattering. Moreover, we observed the Raman intensity strength followed the absorption spectra. Our study found that, although 488nm and 514nm pumps seemed better for stronger RR enhancement, 532nm would be the optimum Raman pump laser with moderate RR enhancement due to reduced fluorescence and self-absorption. The 532nm excitation will be helpful for applying resonance Raman spectroscopy to investigate biological molecules in tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Laser Raman spectra of mono-, oligo- and polysaccharides in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, T. W.

    We examined the Raman spectra of thirteen sugars—seven monosaccharides, two disaccharides, one trisaccharide and three polysaccharides—in the wavelength range 200—1700 cm -1 and (i) varied the phosphate buffered solution from pH 6.0 to 8.5 at constant ionic strength of 0.1 and (ii) varied HCl solutions from pH 0.8 to 5.0. As is to be expected with molecules containing COH groupings, all the molecular spectra are distinct. Of the thirteen sugars examined, only D-fructose 1,6-diphosphate (FDP) demonstrated spectral changes for the pH range 6.0—8.5 in phosphate buffer; but all exhibited band intensity enhancement in HCl at the lower pHs, but not band wavenumber changes. The results indicate that: (i) changes in the pH of the major intracellular buffer, phosphate, toward acidity, are able to hydrolyze the 1-phosphate group of FDP and the relative concentration of fructose 1-phosphate to fructose 6-phosphate is indicated by the intensity ratio of the 982 and 1080 cm -1 bands; (ii) it appears that all phosphate groups of FDP are hydrolyzed at pH 0.8 in HCl; and (iii) although conditions of extreme acidity are able to hydrolyze other sugars examined, there is no major degradation.

  12. Combination of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy for multivariate classification of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, D.; Mazura, M.; Samek, O.; Rebrošová, K.; Pořízka, P.; Klus, J.; Prochazková, P.; Novotný, J.; Novotný, K.; Kaiser, J.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the impact of data provided by complementary laser-based spectroscopic methods on multivariate classification accuracy. Discrimination and classification of five Staphylococcus bacterial strains and one strain of Escherichia coli is presented. The technique that we used for measurements is a combination of Raman spectroscopy and Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). Obtained spectroscopic data were then processed using Multivariate Data Analysis algorithms. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was selected as the most suitable technique for visualization of bacterial strains data. To classify the bacterial strains, we used Neural Networks, namely a supervised version of Kohonen's self-organizing maps (SOM). We were processing results in three different ways - separately from LIBS measurements, from Raman measurements, and we also merged data from both mentioned methods. The three types of results were then compared. By applying the PCA to Raman spectroscopy data, we observed that two bacterial strains were fully distinguished from the rest of the data set. In the case of LIBS data, three bacterial strains were fully discriminated. Using a combination of data from both methods, we achieved the complete discrimination of all bacterial strains. All the data were classified with a high success rate using SOM algorithm. The most accurate classification was obtained using a combination of data from both techniques. The classification accuracy varied, depending on specific samples and techniques. As for LIBS, the classification accuracy ranged from 45% to 100%, as for Raman Spectroscopy from 50% to 100% and in case of merged data, all samples were classified correctly. Based on the results of the experiments presented in this work, we can assume that the combination of Raman spectroscopy and LIBS significantly enhances discrimination and classification accuracy of bacterial species and strains. The reason is the complementarity in

  13. [Influence of cations on the laser Raman spectra of silicate glasses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yi; Zhao, Hong-xia; Gan, Fu-xi

    2012-04-01

    Na2O(K2O)-CaO(MgO)-SiO2, Na2O(K2O)-Al2O3-SiO2, Na2O(K2O)-B2O3-SiO2, Na2O(K2O)-PbO-SiO2 and PbO-BaO-SiO2 glass systems were investigated using laser Raman spectroscopic technique. The modification of short-range structure of glass caused by network modifier cations will influence Raman signature. Alkali and alkali-earth ions can weaken the bridging oxygen bond, thus lower the frequency of Si-O(b)-Si anti-symmetric stretching vibration. When coordina ted by oxygen ions, B3+ can form [BO4] tetrahedron and enter the silicon-oxygen network, but this effect had little impact on the frequency of Raman peaks located in the high-frequency region. Al3+ can also be coordinated by oxygen ions to form [AlO4] tetrahedron. [AlO4] will increase the disorder degree of network while entering network. Ba2+ can increase the density of electron cloud along the Si-O(nb) bond when it bonds with non-bridging oxygen, which will lead to a higher peak intensity of O-Si-O stretching vibration. The Raman peaks of alkli- and alkali-earth silicate glasses are mainly distributed in the region of 400 - 1 200 cm(-1), while in the spectrum of Na2O(K2O)-PbO-SiO2 glass system a 131 cm(-1) peak existed. The authors assigned it to the Pb-O symmetric stretching vibration. Some of the samples were produced in the laboratory according to the average compositions of ancient glasses, so this research is very significant to discriminating ancient silicate glasses of different systems by Laser Raman spectroscopic technique.

  14. Screening and staging for non-small cell lung cancer by serum laser Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Zhang, Shaohong; Wan, Limei; Sun, Hong; Tan, Jie; Su, Qiucheng

    2018-08-05

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Current clinical screening methods to detect lung cancer are expensive and associated with many complications. Raman spectroscopy is a spectroscopic technique that offers a convenient method to gain molecular information about biological samples. In this study, we measured the serum Raman spectral intensity of healthy volunteers and patients with different stages of non-small cell lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the application of serum laser Raman spectroscopy as a low cost alternative method in the screening and staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The Raman spectra of the sera of peripheral venous blood were measured with a LabRAM HR 800 confocal Micro Raman spectrometer for individuals from five groups including 14 healthy volunteers (control group), 23 patients with stage I NSCLC (stage I group), 24 patients with stage II NSCLC (stage II group), 19 patients with stage III NSCLC (stage III group), 11 patients with stage IV NSCLC (stage IV group). Each serum sample was measured 3 times at different spots and the average spectra represented the signal of Raman spectra in each case. The Raman spectrum signal data of the five groups were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA), principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and cross-validation. Raman spectral intensity was sequentially reduced in serum samples from control group, stage I group, stage II group and stage III/IV group. The strongest peak intensity was observed in the control group, and the weakest one was found in the stage III/IV group at bands of 848 cm -1 , 999 cm -1 , 1152 cm -1 , 1446 cm -1 and 1658 cm -1 (P Raman spectroscopy can effectively identify patients with stage I, stage II or stage III/IV Non-Small Cell Lung cancer using patient serum samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Femtosecond laser microfabrication of optical waveguides in commercial microfluidic lab-on-a-chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osellame, R.; Martinez-Vazquez, R.; Ramponi, R.; Cerullo, G.; Dongre, C.; Dekker, R.; Hoekstra, Hugo; Pollnau, Markus

    One of the main challenges of lab-on-a-chip technology is the on-chip integration of photonic functionalities by manufacturing optical waveguides for sensing biomolecules flowing in the microchannels. Such integrated approach has many advantages over traditional free-space optical sensing, such as

  16. Bragg-grating-based rare-earth-ion-doped channel waveguide lasers and their applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernhardi, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis concerns the investigation and development of Bragggrating-based integrated cavities for the rare-earth-ion-doped Al2O3 (aluminium oxide) waveguide platform, both from a theoretical and an experimental point of view, with the primary purpose of realizing

  17. XPS and μ-Raman study of nanosecond-laser processing of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armyanov, S., E-mail: armyanov@ipc.bas.bg [Rostislaw Kaischew Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Block 11, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Stankova, N.E.; Atanasov, P.A. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsarigradsko Shose, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Valova, E.; Kolev, K.; Georgieva, J. [Rostislaw Kaischew Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Block 11, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Steenhaut, O.; Baert, K.; Hubin, A. [Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Faculty of Engineering, Research Group, SURF “Electrochemical and Surface Engineering” (Belgium)

    2015-10-01

    Data about the chemical status of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) after nanosecond Q-switched Nd:YAG laser treatment with near infrared, visible and ultraviolet radiation are presented. The μ-Raman spectroscopy analyses reveal as irradiation result a new sharp peak of crystalline silicon. In addition, broad bands appear assigned to D band of amorphous carbon and G band of microcrystalline and polycrystalline graphite. The μ-Raman spectra are variable taken in different inspected points in the trenches formed by laser treatment. The XPS surface survey spectra indicate the constituent elements of PDMS: carbon, oxygen and silicon. The spectra of detail XPS scans illustrate the influence of the laser treatment. The position of Si 2p peaks of the treated samples is close to the value of non-treated except that irradiated by 1064 nm 66 pulses, which is shifted by 0.9 eV. Accordingly, a shift by 0.4 eV is noticed of the O 1s peak, which reflects again a stronger oxidation of silicon. The curve fitting of Si 2p and O 1s peaks after this particular laser treatment shows the degree of conversion of organic to inorganic silicon that takes place during the irradiation.

  18. Laser Raman Spectroscopic Characterization of Shocked Plagioclase from the Lonar Impact Crater, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, R.; Basu, A. R.; Peterson, J.; Misra, S.

    2004-12-01

    We report Raman spectra of shocked plagioclase grains from the Lonar impact Crater of India. The Lonar Crater, located in the Buldana district of Maharashtra, India (19° 58'N, 76° 31'E), is an almost circular depression in the 65Ma old basalt flows of the Deccan Traps. Age estimates of this impact crater range from 10-50ka. Tektite and basalt samples were collected for this study from the rim of the crater, which is raised about 20 meters above the surrounding plains. For comparison, a Manicouagan maskelynite and an unaltered mid-oceanic ridge basalt with plagioclase laths were also analyzed. Polished thin sections of all these samples were first petrographically studied. The MORB plagioglase as well as the plagioclase from Lonar host-basalts show first order interference colors and distinct multiple lamellar twinning. The Manicouagan maskelynite is isotropic under crossed-polars. The Lonar tektite samples characteristically demonstrate spherules which are identified by their perfectly circular cross-section and isotropic nature. The spherules also contain fragments of the host basalt with plagioclase laths showing lamellar twinning. The groundmass within the spherules shows lath shaped plagioclase grains, most of which show varying degrees of isotropism due to maskelynitization. Raman scattering measurements were performed using the 514.5 nm line of an argon ion laser at an intensity of 40 kW/cm2. An inverted microscope (Nikon TE3000) with 50x objective (NA 0.55) was used for confocal imaging. A holographic notch filter removed residual laser scatter and the Raman scattering was detected by a silicon CCD at -90° C (Princeton Instruments Spec10-400R). Raman spectra were collected from ~250 cm-1 through 2000 cm-1. Raman spectra of crystalline unshocked plagioclase feldspars from the MORB and the Lonar host basalt show strongest peaks at 265 cm-1, 410 cm-1, 510 cm-1 and 1110 cm-1. The results remain the same for different points in a single grain but vary slightly

  19. Apparatus and method for enabling quantum-defect-limited conversion efficiency in cladding-pumped Raman fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heebner, John E.; Sridharan, Arun K.; Dawson, Jay Walter; Messerly, Michael J.; Pax, Paul H.

    2016-09-20

    Cladding-pumped Raman fiber lasers and amplifiers provide high-efficiency conversion efficiency at high brightness enhancement. Differential loss is applied to both single-pass configurations appropriate for pulsed amplification and laser oscillator configurations applied to high average power cw source generation.

  20. New techniques of time-resolved infrared and Raman spectroscopy using ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laubereau, A.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in the field of spectroscopic applications of ultrashort laser pulses. This paper examines two approaches toward studying ultrafast relaxation processes in condensed matter: an IR technique which complements coherent Raman scattering; and a Fourier Raman method with high frequency resolution. The time domain IR spectroscopy technique has been applied to various vibration-rotation transitions of pure HCl gas and in mixtures with Ar buffer gas. The advantage of the time domain measurements instead of frequency spectroscopy is readily visualized when one recalls that a frequency resolution of 10 -3 cm -1 corresponds to time observations over 10 -8 , which are readily feasible. As a first demonstration of the FT-Raman technique the author presents experimental data on the Q-branch of the v 1 -vibrational mode of methane. An example for the experimental data obtained approximately 2 mm behind the nozzle is presented; the coherent anti-Stokes Raman signal is plotted versus delay time. A complicated beating structure and the decay of the signal envelope are readily seen. The desired spectroscopic information is obtained by numerical Fourier transformation of the experimental points presented

  1. Raman microspectrometry of laser-reshaped rabbit auricular cartilage: preliminary study on laser-induced cartilage mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heger, Michal; Mordon, Serge R.; Leroy, Gérard; Fleurisse, Laurence; Creusy, Collette

    2006-03-01

    Laser-assisted cartilage reshaping (LACR) is a relatively novel technique designed to noninvasively and permanently restructure cartilaginous tissue. It is believed that heat-induced stress relaxation, in which a temperature-mediated disruption of H2O binding is associated with conformational alterations in the proteoglycan and collagen-rich matrix, constitutes the underlying mechanism of LACR. Several reports have suggested that laser-mediated cartilage mineralization may contribute to the permanent shape change of laser-reshaped cartilage. In an effort to validate these results in the context of Er:glass LACR, we performed a preliminary Raman microspectrometric study to characterize the crystal deposits in laser-irradiated chondrocytes and extracellular matrix. For the first time, we identified intracellular calcium sulfate deposits and extracellular calcium phosphate (apatite) crystals in laser-reshaped rabbit auricular cartilage. Calcium carbonate deposits are localized in both irradiated and nonirradiated samples, suggesting that this mineral plays no role in conformational retention. In our discussion, we elaborate on the possible molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for intra- and extracellular crystallization, and propose a novel hypothesis on the formation of apatite, inasmuch as the biological function of this mineral (providing structure and rigidity in bones and dental enamel) may be extrapolated to the permanent shape change of laser-irradiated cartilage.

  2. Third-order optical nonlinearities in bulk and fs-laser inscribed waveguides in strengthened alkali aluminosilcate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Almeida, Juliana M. P.; Martins, Renato J.; De Boni, Leonardo; Arnold, Craig B.; Mendonca, Cleber R.

    2018-01-01

    The development of advanced photonics devices requires materials with large optical nonlinearities, fast response times and high optical transparency, while at the same time allowing for the micro/nano-processing needed for integrated photonics. In this context, glasses have been receiving considerable attention given their relevant optical properties which can be specifically tailored by compositional control. Corning Gorilla® Glass (strengthened alkali aluminosilicate glass) is well-known for its use as a protective screen in mobile devices, and has attracted interest as a potential candidate for optical devices. Therefore, it is crucial not only to expand the knowledge on the fabrication of waveguides in Gorilla Glass under different regimes, but also to determine its nonlinear optical response, both using fs-laser pulses. Thus, this paper reports, for the first time, characterization of the third-order optical nonlinearities of Gorilla Glass, as well as linear and nonlinear characterization of waveguide written with femtosecond pulses under the low repetition rate regime (1 kHz).

  3. Changes induced in a ZnS:Cr-based electroluminescent waveguide structure by intrinsic near-infrared laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasenko, N. A.; Oleksenko, P. F.; Mukhlyo, M. A.; Veligura, L. I.

    2013-01-01

    The causes of changes that occur in a thin-film electroluminescent metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal waveguide structure based on ZnS:Cr (Cr concentration of ∼4 × 10 20 cm −3 ) upon lasing (λ ≈ 2.6 μm) and that induce lasing cessation are studied. It is established that lasing ceases because of light-scattering inhomogeneities formed in the structure and, hence, optical losses enhance. The origin of the inhomogeneities and the causes of their formation are clarified by studying the surface topology and the crystal structure of constituent layers of the samples before and after lasing. The studies are performed by means of atomic force microscopy and X-ray radiography. It is shown that a substantial increase in the sizes of grains on the surface of the structure is the manifestation of changes induced in the ZnS:Cr film by recrystallization. Recrystallization is initiated by local heating by absorbed laser radiation in existing Cr clusters and quickened by a strong electric field (>1 MV cm −1 ). The changes observed in the ZnS:Cr film are as follows: the textured growth of ZnS crystallites, an increase in the content of Cr clusters, and the appearance of some CrS and a rather high ZnO content. Some ways for improving the stability of lasing in the ZnS:Cr-based waveguide structures are proposed

  4. Quantitative measurement of carbon isotopic composition in CO2 gas reservoir by Micro-Laser Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiajia; Li, Rongxi; Zhao, Bangsheng; Guo, Hui; Zhang, Shuan; Cheng, Jinghua; Wu, Xiaoli

    2018-04-15

    The use of Micro-Laser Raman spectroscopy technology for quantitatively determining gas carbon isotope composition is presented. In this study, 12 CO 2 and 13 CO 2 were mixed with N 2 at various molar fraction ratios to obtain Raman quantification factors (F 12CO2 and F 13CO2 ), which provide a theoretical basis for calculating the δ 13 C value. And the corresponding values were 0.523 (0Raman peak area can be used for the determination of δ 13 C values within the relative errors range of 0.076% to 1.154% in 13 CO 2 / 12 CO 2 binary mixtures when F 12CO2 /F 13CO2 is 0.466972625. In addition, measurement of δ 13 C values by Micro-Laser Raman analysis were carried out on natural CO 2 gas from Shengli Oil-field at room temperature under different pressures. The δ 13 C values obtained by Micro-Laser Raman spectroscopy technology and Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) technology are in good agreement with each other, and the relative errors range of δ 13 C values is 1.232%-6.964%. This research provides a fundamental analysis tool for determining gas carbon isotope composition (δ 13 C values) quantitatively by using Micro-Laser Raman spectroscopy. Experiment of results demonstrates that this method has the potential for obtaining δ 13 C values in natural CO 2 gas reservoirs. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Impact of Raman scattering on pulse dynamics in a fiber laser with narrow gain bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthayakumar, T.; Alsaleh, M.; Igbonacho, J.; Tchomgo Felenou, E.; Tchofo Dinda, P.; Grelu, Ph; Porsezian, K.

    2018-06-01

    We examine theoretically the multi-pulse dynamics in a dispersion-managed fiber laser, in which the pulse’s spectral width is controlled by a pass-band filter. We show that in the domain of stable states with very narrow spectral width, i.e. which is one order of magnitude smaller than the bandwidth of the Raman gain of the intra-cavity fiber system, the Raman scattering (RS) significantly alters the multi-pulse dynamics. RS is found to have a greater impact in the immediate vicinity of some critical values of the pump power of the intra-cavity gain medium, where processes of pulse fragmentation occur. As a result, all the borders between the zones of stability of the multi-pulse states are altered, i.e. either shifted or suppressed.

  6. Raman spectroscopy of ZnMnO thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, S.; Riascos, H.; Duque, S.

    2016-02-01

    ZnMnO thin films were grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique onto Silicon (100) substrates at different growth conditions. Thin films were deposited varying Mn concentration, substrate temperature and oxygen pressure. ZnMnO samples were analysed by using Raman Spectroscopy that shows a red shift for all vibration modes. Raman spectra revealed that nanostructure of thin films was the same of ZnO bulk, wurzite hexagonal structure. The structural disorder was manifested in the line width and shape variations of E2(high) and E2(low) modes located in 99 and 434cm-1 respectively, which may be due to the incorporation of Mn ions inside the ZnO crystal lattice. Around 570cm-1 was found a peak associated to E1(LO) vibration mode of ZnO. 272cm-1 suggest intrinsic host lattice defects. Additional mode centred at about 520cm-1 can be overlap of Si and Mn modes.

  7. The dynamics of pulse compression in synchronously pumped fiber Raman lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Band, Y.B.; Ackerhalt, J.R.; Heller, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamical equations describing the amplification and propagation of an initial Stokes seed pulse in a synchronously pumped fiber Raman laser configuration are formulated and analytic solutions are derived. A train of Stokes shifted pulses are produced, whose individual characteristics eventually evolve on successive round-trips through the fiber into subpicosecond pulses having constant fluence and decreasing temporal duration. Raman pulse compression stops when it is counterbalanced by the effects of group velocity dispersion and phase modulation in the normal dispersion regime. Pulse breakup due to soliton formation can occur in the anomalous dispersion regime. Simple expressions for the rate of pulse compression, steady-state pulse fluence, and for the minimum steady-state pulse duration are obtained

  8. The role of the gas/plasma plume and self-focusing in a gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide for high-power laser-plasma applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ciocarlan, C.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Abuazoum, S.; Wilson, R.; Aniculaesei, C.; Welsh, G. H.; Vieux, G.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; 10.1063/1.4822333

    2013-01-01

    The role of the gas/plasma plume at the entrance of a gas-filled capillary discharge plasma waveguide in increasing the laser intensity has been investigated. Distinction is made between neutral gas and hot plasma plumes that, respectively, develop before and after discharge breakdown. Time-averaged measurements show that the on-axis plasma density of a fully expanded plasma plume over this region is similar to that inside the waveguide. Above the critical power, relativistic and ponderomotive selffocusing lead to an increase in the intensity, which can be nearly a factor of 2 compared with the case without a plume. When used as a laser plasma wakefield accelerator, the enhancement of intensity can lead to prompt electron injection very close to the entrance of the waveguide. Self-focusing occurs within two Rayleigh lengths of the waveguide entrance plane in the region, where the laser beam is converging. Analytical theory and numerical simulations show that, for a density of 3.01018 cm3, the peak normalized...

  9. Semipolar III–nitride quantum well waveguide photodetector integrated with laser diode for on-chip photonic system

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2017-02-28

    A high-performance waveguide photodetector (WPD) integrated with a laser diode (LD) sharing the single InGaN/GaN quantum well active region is demonstrated on a semipolar GaN substrate. The photocurrent of the integrated WPD is effectively tuned by the emitted optical power from the LD. The responsivity ranges from 0.018 to 0.051 A/W with increasing reverse bias from 0 to 10 V. The WPD shows a large 3 dB modulation bandwidth of 230 MHz. The integrated device, being used for power monitoring and on-chip communication, paves the way towards the eventual realization of a III–nitride on-chip photonic system.

  10. Semipolar III–nitride quantum well waveguide photodetector integrated with laser diode for on-chip photonic system

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao; Lee, Changmin; Stegenburgs, Edgars; Lerma, Jorge Holguin; Ng, Tien Khee; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; El-Desouki, Munir M.; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    A high-performance waveguide photodetector (WPD) integrated with a laser diode (LD) sharing the single InGaN/GaN quantum well active region is demonstrated on a semipolar GaN substrate. The photocurrent of the integrated WPD is effectively tuned by the emitted optical power from the LD. The responsivity ranges from 0.018 to 0.051 A/W with increasing reverse bias from 0 to 10 V. The WPD shows a large 3 dB modulation bandwidth of 230 MHz. The integrated device, being used for power monitoring and on-chip communication, paves the way towards the eventual realization of a III–nitride on-chip photonic system.

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy on laser-engineered ruthenium dye-functionalized nanoporous gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, Lina; Franzka, Steffen; Biener, Monika; Biener, Jürgen; Hartmann, Nils

    2016-06-01

    Photothermal processing of nanoporous gold with a microfocused continuous-wave laser at λ = 532 nm provides a facile means in order engineer the pore and ligament size of nanoporous gold. In this report we take advantage of this approach in order to investigate the size-dependence of enhancement effects in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Surface structures with laterally varying pore sizes from 25 nm to ≥200 nm are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and then functionalized with N719, a commercial ruthenium complex, which is widely used in dye-sensitized solar cells. Raman spectroscopy reveals the characteristic spectral features of N719. Peak intensities strongly depend on the pore size. Highest intensities are observed on the native support, i.e. on nanoporous gold with pore sizes around 25 nm. These results demonstrate the particular perspectives of laser-fabricated nanoporous gold structures in fundamental SERS studies. In particular, it is emphasized that laser-engineered porous gold substrates represent a very well defined platform in order to study size-dependent effects with high reproducibility and precision and resolve conflicting results in previous studies.

  12. Fragmentation of neutral van der Waals clusters with visible laser light: A new variant of the Raman effect?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamatovic, A.; Howorka, F.; Scheier, P.; Maerk, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    We have observed strong photodissociation (using visible laser light) of neutral van der Waals clusters (Ar, N 2 , O 2 , CO 2 , SO 2 , NH 3 ) produced by supersonic expansion and detected by electron ionization/mass spectrometer. Several tests were performed, all of them supporting this surprising discovery. We suggest that Raman induced photodissociation (RIP) is responsible for this phenomenon. This first observation of Raman induced photodissociation provides a new technique for the study of neutral van der Waals clusters. (orig.)

  13. Laser sheet dropsizing based on two-dimensional Raman and Mie scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarski, Anna; Schürer, Benedikt; Schmitz, Ingo; Zigan, Lars; Flügel, Alexandre; Leipertz, Alfred

    2009-04-01

    The imaging and quantification of droplet sizes in sprays is a challenging task for optical scientists and engineers. Laser sheet dropsizing (LSDS) combines the two-dimensional information of two different optical processes, one that is proportional to the droplet volume and one that depends on the droplet surface, e.g., Mie scattering. Besides Mie scattering, here we use two-dimensional Raman scattering as the volume-dependent measurement technique. Two different calibration strategies are presented and discussed. Two-dimensional droplet size distributions in a spray have been validated in comparison with the results of point-resolved phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) measurements.

  14. Laser sheet dropsizing based on two-dimensional Raman and Mie scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malarski, Anna; Schuerer, Benedikt; Schmitz, Ingo; Zigan, Lars; Fluegel, Alexandre; Leipertz, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    The imaging and quantification of droplet sizes in sprays is a challenging task for optical scientists and engineers. Laser sheet dropsizing (LSDS) combines the two-dimensional information of two different optical processes, one that is proportional to the droplet volume and one that depends on the droplet surface, e.g., Mie scattering. Besides Mie scattering, here we use two-dimensional Raman scattering as the volume-dependent measurement technique. Two different calibration strategies are presented and discussed. Two-dimensional droplet size distributions in a spray have been validated in comparison with the results of point-resolved phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) measurements

  15. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Sensor on an Optical Fiber Probe Fabricated with a Femtosecond Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Xiaodong; Huo, Haibin; Wang, Wenhui; Tian, Ye; Wu, Nan; Guthy, Charles; Shen, Mengyan; Wang, Xingwei

    2010-01-01

    A novel fabrication method for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors that used a fast femtosecond (fs) laser scanning process to etch uniform patterns and structures on the endface of a fused silica optical fiber, which is then coated with a thin layer of silver through thermal evaporation is presented. A high quality SERS signal was detected on the patterned surface using a Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) solution. The uniform SERS sensor built on the tip of the optical fiber tip was small, l...

  16. Limiting effects on laser compression by resonant backward Raman scattering in modern experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yampolsky, Nikolai A.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Through resonant backward Raman scattering, the plasma wave mediates the energy transfer between long pump and short seed laser pulses. These mediations can result in pulse compression at extraordinarily high powers. However, both the overall efficiency of the energy transfer and the duration of the amplified pulse depend upon the persistence of the plasma wave excitation. At least with respect to the recent state-of-the-art experiments, it is possible to deduce that at present the experimentally realized efficiency of the amplifier is likely constrained mainly by two effects, namely, the pump chirp and the plasma wave wavebreaking.

  17. LASER RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS (BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS): Conversion of KrCl and XeCl laser radiation to the visible spectral range by stimulated Raman scattering in lead vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evtushenko, Gennadii S.; Mel'chenko, S. V.; Panchenko, Aleksei N.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.

    1990-04-01

    Conversion of KrCl and XeCl laser radiation by stimulated Raman scattering was achieved in lead vapor. The KrCl laser radiation was converted into three lines in the visible region at λ = 406, 590, and 723 nm by transitions from both the ground and first excited levels of the lead atom. The conversion efficiency of XeCl laser radiation of low spatial coherence was found to be limited by the activation of a competing nonlinear process.

  18. Normal Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic experiments with thin layer chromatography spots of essential amino acids using different laser excitation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    István, Krisztina; Keresztury, Gábor; Szép, Andrea

    2003-06-01

    A comparative study of the feasibility and efficiency of Raman spectroscopic detection of thin layer chromatography (TLC) spots of some weak Raman scatterers (essential amino acids, namely, glycine and L-forms of alanine, serine, valine, proline, hydroxyproline, and phenylalanine) was carried out using four different visible and near-infrared (NIR) laser radiations with wavelengths of 532, 633, 785, and 1064 nm. Three types of commercial TLC plates were tested and the possibility of inducing surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by means of Ag-sol was also investigated. The spectra obtained from spotted analytes adsorbed on TLC plates were of very different quality strongly depending on the excitation wavelength, the wetness of the samples, and the compounds examined. The best results were obtained with the simple silica TLC plate, and it has been established that the longest wavelength (lowest energy) NIR excitation of a Nd:YAG laser is definitely more suitable for generating normal Raman scattering of analyte spots than any of the visible radiations. Concerning SERS with application of Ag-sol to the TLC spots, 1-3 orders of magnitude enhancement was observed with wet samples, the greatest with the 532 nm radiation and gradually smaller with the longer wavelength excitations. It is shown, however, that due to severe adsorption-induced spectral distortions and increased sensitivity to microscopic inhomogeneity of the sample, none of the SERS spectra obtained with the dispersive Raman microscope operating in the visible region were superior to the best NIR normal FT-Raman spectra, as far as sample identification is concerned.

  19. Laser-excited luminescence of trace Nd3+ impurity in LaBr3 revealed by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinqiu; Cui, Lei; He, Huaqiang; Hu, Yunsheng; Wu, Hao; Zeng, Jia; Liu, Yuzhu

    2012-10-01

    Unexpected additional bands with obvious non-vibrational features were observed in Raman spectra of LaBr3. Extensive study was carried out to reveal the origin of these bands. Results indicate that the additional bands correspond to laser-excited luminescence of trace Nd3+ impurity unintentionally introduced from the La2O3 raw material, which was further confirmed by Raman spectra of specially prepared Nd3+-doped LaBr3 and LaOBr samples. The luminescence properties of Nd3+ in different matrix were compared and discussed. The ultrasensitivity of Raman spectroscopy in detecting trace luminescent lanthanide ions shows good potential for analytical applications.

  20. Quantitative measurement of carbon isotopic composition in CO2 gas reservoir by Micro-Laser Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiajia; Li, Rongxi; Zhao, Bangsheng; Guo, Hui; Zhang, Shuan; Cheng, Jinghua; Wu, Xiaoli

    2018-04-01

    The use of Micro-Laser Raman spectroscopy technology for quantitatively determining gas carbon isotope composition is presented. In this study, 12CO2 and 13CO2 were mixed with N2 at various molar fraction ratios to obtain Raman quantification factors (F12CO2 and F13CO2), which provide a theoretical basis for calculating the δ13C value. And the corresponding values were 0.523 (0 Laser Raman analysis were carried out on natural CO2 gas from Shengli Oil-field at room temperature under different pressures. The δ13C values obtained by Micro-Laser Raman spectroscopy technology and Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) technology are in good agreement with each other, and the relative errors range of δ13C values is 1.232%-6.964%. This research provides a fundamental analysis tool for determining gas carbon isotope composition (δ13C values) quantitatively by using Micro-Laser Raman spectroscopy. Experiment of results demonstrates that this method has the potential for obtaining δ13C values in natural CO2 gas reservoirs.

  1. Practical aspects of quantitative laser Raman microprobe spectroscopy for the study of fluid inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasteris, J.D.; Wopenka, B.; Seitz, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is addressed to both geologists who use laser Raman microprobe (LRM) spectroscopy to analyze fluid inclusions and to those who want to evaluate analyses done by this technique. Emphasis is on how to obtain quantitative analyses of fluid inclusions. The authors discuss the basic method of fluid inclusion analysis by LRM spectroscopy and the levels of accuracy and precision attainable with this technique. They evaluate which kinds of fluid inclusions and host mineral matrices will yield the most reliable compositional data. Necessary sample preparations, detection limits, problems with fluorescence, dependence of Raman scattering efficiencies on density, and many other questions asked at the workshop on Raman spectroscopy during the 1987 ACROFI meeting also are addressed. The complementary nature, advantages, and disadvantages of both LRM spectroscopy and microthermometry, the two techniques most frequently used for the analysis of individual fluid inclusions, are emphasized. Some discussions are intended to held LRM users calibrate, and evaluate the optical characteristics of, their particular instruments. It is hoped that this paper will further LRM users in finding a common ground on which to discuss the differences and similarities among different LRM instruments, and that it will encourage a future consensus on efficient means of calibration and on interlaboratory standards

  2. Accuracy Enhancement of Raman Spectroscopy Using Complementary Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) with Geologically Mixed Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soojin; Kim, Dongyoung; Yang, Junho; Yoh, Jack J

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative Raman analysis was carried out with geologically mixed samples that have various matrices. In order to compensate the matrix effect in Raman shift, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis was performed. Raman spectroscopy revealed the geological materials contained in the mixed samples. However, the analysis of a mixture containing different matrices was inaccurate due to the weak signal of the Raman shift, interference, and the strong matrix effect. On the other hand, the LIBS quantitative analysis of atomic carbon and calcium in mixed samples showed high accuracy. In the case of the calcite and gypsum mixture, the coefficient of determination of atomic carbon using LIBS was 0.99, while the signal using Raman was less than 0.9. Therefore, the geological composition of the mixed samples is first obtained using Raman and the LIBS-based quantitative analysis is then applied to the Raman outcome in order to construct highly accurate univariate calibration curves. The study also focuses on a method to overcome matrix effects through the two complementary spectroscopic techniques of Raman spectroscopy and LIBS.

  3. Characteristics of laser irradiated Hg sub 0 ,835 Cd sub 0 ,165 Te analysed by resonant Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scepanovic, M.; Jevtic, M.

    1998-01-01

    The characteristics of Hg sub 0 ,835 Cd sub 0 ,165 Te sample irradiated by a nanosecond Nd: YAG laser pulse are investigated using a resonant Raman spectroscopy. The pulse energy density of 100 mJ/cm sup 2 is close to the energy threshold of material melting under the irradiated conditions. The presented Raman spectra of the unirradiated and irradiated sample parts point out that the laser irradiation induced a little concentration change in the surface sample layers without the essential structural changes (author)

  4. Remote Raman - laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) geochemical investigation under Venus atmospheric conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clegg, Sanuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barefield, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Humphries, Seth D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vaniman, D. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sharma, S. K. [UNIV OF HAWAII; Misra, A. K. [UNIV OF HAWAII; Dyar, M. D. [MT. HOLYOKE COLLEGE; Smrekar, S. E. [JET PROPULSION LAB.

    2010-12-13

    The extreme Venus surface temperatures ({approx}740 K) and atmospheric pressures ({approx}93 atm) create a challenging environment for surface missions. Scientific investigations capable of Venus geochemical observations must be completed within hours of landing before the lander will be overcome by the harsh atmosphere. A combined remote Raman - LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) instrument is capable of accomplishing the geochemical science goals without the risks associated with collecting samples and bringing them into the lander. Wiens et al. and Sharma et al. demonstrated that both analytical techniques can be integrated into a single instrument capable of planetary missions. The focus of this paper is to explore the capability to probe geologic samples with Raman - LIBS and demonstrate quantitative analysis under Venus surface conditions. Raman and LIBS are highly complementary analytical techniques capable of detecting both the mineralogical and geochemical composition of Venus surface materials. These techniques have the potential to profoundly increase our knowledge of the Venus surface composition, which is currently limited to geochemical data from Soviet Venera and VEGA landers that collectively suggest a surface composition that is primarily tholeiitic basaltic with some potentially more evolved compositions and, in some locations, K-rich trachyandesite. These landers were not equipped to probe the surface mineralogy as can be accomplished with Raman spectroscopy. Based on the observed compositional differences and recognizing the imprecise nature of the existing data, 15 samples were chosen to constitute a Venus-analog suite for this study, including five basalts, two each of andesites, dacites, and sulfates, and single samples of a foidite, trachyandesite, rhyolite, and basaltic trachyandesite under Venus conditions. LIBS data reduction involved generating a partial least squares (PLS) model with a subset of the rock powder standards to

  5. Fully relativistic free-electron laser in a completely filled waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farokhi, B.; Abdykian, A.

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of the azimuthally symmetrical, high frequency eigenmodes of a cylindrical metallic waveguide completely filled with a relativistic magnetized plasma is presented. A relativistic nonlinear wave equation is derived in a form which includes the coupling of EH and HE modes due to the finite axial magnetic field. Relativistic equations that permit calculation of the dispersion curves for four families of electromagnetic and electrostatic modes are derived. Numerical analysis is conducted to study the relativistic dispersion curves of various modes as a function of axial magnetic field B 0 . This treatment is shown that the dispersion curves dependent to γ in low frequency which is ignored in previous work. It is found that in drawn figures shown difference between relativistic and non-relativistic cases. The former each figure is treated for two orbit groups. This study is benefiting to facilities the development of devices for generation of high-power electromagnetic radiation, charged particle acceleration, and other applications of plasma waveguide. (author)

  6. Turnable Semiconductor Laser Spectroscopy in Hollow Optical Waveguides, Phase II SBIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory J. Fetzer, Ph.D.

    2001-12-24

    In this study a novel optical trace gas sensor based on a perforated hollow waveguide (PHW) was proposed. The sensor has been given the acronym ESHOW for Environmental Sensor using Hollow Optical Waveguides. Realizations of the sensor have demonstrated rapid response time (<2s), low minimum detection limits (typically around 3 x 10-5 absorbance). Operation of the PHW technology has been demonstrated in the near-infrared (NIR) and mid0infrared (MIR) regions of the spectrum. Simulation of sensor performance provided in depth understanding of the signals and signal processing required to provide high sensitivity yet retain rapid response to gas changes. A dedicated sensor electronics and software foundation were developed during the course of the Phase II effort. Commercial applications of the sensor are ambient air and continuous emissions monitoring, industrial process control and hazardous waste site monitoring. There are numerous other applications for such a sensor including medical diagnosis and treatment, breath analysis for legal purposes, water quality assessment, combustion diagnostics, and chemical process control. The successful completion of Phase II resulted in additional funding of instrument development by the Nations Institute of Heath through a Phase I SBIR grant and a strategic teaming relationship with a commercial manufacture of medical instrumentation. The purpose of the NIH grant and teaming relationship is to further develop the sensor to monitor NO in exhaled breath for the purposes of asthma diagnosis.

  7. Raman study of localized recrystallization of amorphous silicon induced by laser beam

    KAUST Repository

    Tabet, Nouar A.

    2012-06-01

    The adoption of amorphous silicon based solar cells has been drastically hindered by the low efficiency of these devices, which is mainly due to a low hole mobility. It has been shown that using both crystallized and amorphous silicon layers in solar cells leads to an enhancement of the device performance. In this study the crystallization of a-Si prepared by PECVD under various growth conditions has been investigated. The growth stresses in the films are determined by measuring the curvature change of the silicon substrate before and after film deposition. Localized crystallization is induced by exposing a-Si films to focused 532 nm laser beam of power ranging from 0.08 to 8 mW. The crystallization process is monitored by recording the Raman spectra after various exposures. The results suggest that growth stresses in the films affect the minimum laser power (threshold power). In addition, a detailed analysis of the width and position of the Raman signal indicates that the silicon grains in the crystallized regions are of few nm diameter. © 2012 IEEE.

  8. Infrared and laser-Raman spectroscopic studies of thermally-induced globular protein gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A H; Saunderson, D H; Suggett, A

    1981-03-01

    Infrared and laser-Raman spectroscopy have been used to follow secondary structure changes during the heat-set gelation of a number of aqueous (D2O) globular protein solutions. Measurements of the infrared Amide I' absorption band around 1650 cm-1, for BSA gels of varying clarity and texture, have shown that the very considerable variations in network structure underlying these materials are not reflected in obvious differences in secondary structure. In all cases aggregation is accompanied by development of beta-sheet of a kind common in fibrous protein systems, but for BSA at least this does not appear to vary significantly in amount from one gel type to another. Infrared studies of gels formed from other protein systems have confirmed this tendency for beta-sheet to develop during aggregation, and the tendency is further substantiated by laser-Raman evidence which provides the extra information that in most of the examples studied alpha-helix content simultaneously falls. From these, and other observations, some generalisations are made about the thermally-induced sol-to-gel transformations of globular proteins.

  9. Application of laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy techniques to the monitoring of single cell response to stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, James W.; Liu, Rui; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2012-06-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) combines optical trapping with micro-Raman spectroscopy to enable label-free biochemical analysis of individual cells and small biological particles in suspension. The integration of the two technologies greatly simplifies the sample preparation and handling of suspension cells for spectroscopic analysis in physiologically meaningful conditions. In our group, LTRS has been used to study the effects of external perturbations, both chemical and mechanical, on the biochemistry of the cell. Single cell dynamics can be studied by performing longitudinal studies to continuously monitor the response of the cell as it interacts with its environment. The ability to carry out these measurements in-vitro makes LTRS an attractive tool for many biomedical applications. Here, we discuss the use of LTRS to study the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutics and bacteria cells to antibiotics and show that the life cycle and apoptosis of the cells can be detected. These results show the promise of LTRS for drug discovery/screening, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and chemotherapy response monitoring applications. In separate experiments, we study the response of red blood cells to the mechanical forces imposed on the cell by the optical tweezers. A laser power dependent deoxygenation of the red blood cell in the single beam trap is reported. Normal, sickle cell, and fetal red blood cells have a different behavior that enables the discrimination of the cell types based on this mechanochemical response. These results show the potential utility of LTRS for diagnosing and studying red blood cell diseases.

  10. Raman study of localized recrystallization of amorphous silicon induced by laser beam

    KAUST Repository

    Tabet, Nouar A.; Al-Sayoud, Abduljabar; Said, Seyed; Yang, Xiaoming; Yang, Yang; Syed, Ahad A.; Diallo, Elhadj; Wang, Zhihong; Wang, Xianbin; Johlin, Eric; Simmons, Christine; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2012-01-01

    The adoption of amorphous silicon based solar cells has been drastically hindered by the low efficiency of these devices, which is mainly due to a low hole mobility. It has been shown that using both crystallized and amorphous silicon layers in solar cells leads to an enhancement of the device performance. In this study the crystallization of a-Si prepared by PECVD under various growth conditions has been investigated. The growth stresses in the films are determined by measuring the curvature change of the silicon substrate before and after film deposition. Localized crystallization is induced by exposing a-Si films to focused 532 nm laser beam of power ranging from 0.08 to 8 mW. The crystallization process is monitored by recording the Raman spectra after various exposures. The results suggest that growth stresses in the films affect the minimum laser power (threshold power). In addition, a detailed analysis of the width and position of the Raman signal indicates that the silicon grains in the crystallized regions are of few nm diameter. © 2012 IEEE.

  11. Raman probes based on optically-poled double-clad fiber and coupler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara; Margulis, Walter; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    of a sample of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), when illuminating the waveguide with 1064nm laser light. The Raman signal is collected in the inner cladding, from which it is retrieved with either a bulk dichroic mirror or a double-clad fiber coupler. The coupler allows for a substantial reduction of the fiber......Two fiber Raman probes are presented, one based on an optically-poled double-clad fiber and the second based on an optically-poled double-clad fiber coupler respectively. Optical poling of the core of the fiber allows for the generation of enough 532nm light to perform Raman spectroscopy...

  12. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  13. Airborne detection of oceanic turbidity cell structure using depth-resolved laser-induced water Raman backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne laser-induced, depth-resolved water Raman backscatter is useful in the detection and mapping of water optical transmission variations. This test, together with other field experiments, has identified the need for additional field experiments to resolve the degree of the contribution to the depth-resolved, Raman-backscattered signal waveform that is due to (1) sea surface height or elevation probability density; (2) off-nadir laser beam angle relative to the mean sea surface; and (3) the Gelbstoff fluorescence background, and the analytical techniques required to remove it. When converted to along-track profiles, the waveforms obtained reveal cells of a decreased Raman backscatter superimposed on an overall trend of monotonically decreasing water column optical transmission.

  14. FT-Raman spectroscopic characterization of enamel surfaces irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Shahabi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite recent advances in dental caries prevention, caries is common and remains a serious health problem. Laser irradiation is one of the most common methods in preventive measures in recent years. Raman spectroscopy technique is utilized to study the microcrystalline structure of dental enamel. In this study, FT-Raman spectroscopy was used to evaluate chemical changes in enamel structure irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers. Methods. We used 15 freshly-extracted, non-carious, human molars that were treated as follows: No treatment was carried out in group A (control group; Group B was irradiated with Er:YAG laser for 10 seconds under air and water spray; and Group C was irradiated with Nd:YAG laser for 10 seconds under air and water spray. After treatment, the samples were analyzed by FT-Raman spectroscopy. Results. The carbonate content evaluation with regard to the integrated area under the curve (1065/960 cm–1 exhibited a significant reduction in its ratio in groups B and C. The organic content (2935/960 cm-1 area exhibited a significant decrease after laser irradiation in group B and C. Conclusion. The results showed that the mineral and organic matrices of enamel structure were affected by laser irradiation; therefore, it might be a suitable method for caries prevention.

  15. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Activity of Ag/graphene/polymer Nanocomposite Films Synthesized by Laser Ablation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Siljanovska Petreska, G.; Blazevska-Gilev, J.; Fajgar, Radek; Tomovska, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 564, AUG 1 (2014), s. 115-120 ISSN 0040-6090 Grant - others:NATO SfP(US) 984399 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : laser ablation * surface-enhanced raman scattering * nanocomposite s * graphene * rhodamine 6G Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry Impact factor: 1.759, year: 2014

  16. New CO2 laser waveguide systems: advances in surgery of tracheal stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasche, Norbert; Bernecker, Frank; Hoermann, Karl

    1996-01-01

    The carbon dioxide laser is a well established tool in the surgical treatment of laryngeal and tracheal stenosis. Usually the laser beam is applied by a microscope/micromanipulator device. Different types of rigid laryngoscopes and bronchoscopes provide access to nearly every area of larynx, trachea and main bronchi. In order to be treated with this equipment the target tissue has to be in a straight optical axis with the laser beam output at the micromanipulator. We report about one patient who presented with severe dyspnea due to granulation tissue directly below his left vocal cord. He was suffering from tracheomalacia for several years and was successfully treated by tracheostomy and a Montgomery's silicone T-tube as a stent. Then granulation tissue blocked the upper orifice of the Montgomery's T-tube. First removal by a carbon dioxide laser beam through the laryngoscope would have required sacrificing his intact left vocal cord. We removed the obstructing tissue by using the ArthroLaseTM System: the carbon dioxide laser beam was conducted through a 90 degree bent rigid probe, using the tracheostomy as an access. This ArthroLaseTM System was originally designed for arthroscopic surgery. In this special case however it successfully extends the use of the carbon dioxide laser in otolaryngology.

  17. Cw hyper-Raman laser and four-wave mixing in atomic sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, M.; Kablukov, S. I.; Wellegehausen, B.

    2005-01-01

    Continuous wave hyper-Raman (HR) generation in a ring cavity on the 6s → 4p transition at 1640 nm in sodium is realized for the first time by two-photon excitation of atomic sodium on the 3s → 6s transition with a continuous wave (cw) dye laser at 590 nm and a single frequency argon ion laser at 514 nm. It is shown, that the direction and efficiency of HR lasing depends on the propagation direction of the pump waves and their frequencies. More than 30% HR gain is measured at 250 mW of pump laser powers for counter-propagating pump waves and a medium length of 90 mm. For much shorter interaction lengths and corresponding focussing of the pump waves a dramatic increase of the gain is predicted. For co-propagating pump waves, in addition, generation of 330 nm radiation on the 4p → 3s transition by a four-wave mixing (FWM) process is observed. Dependencies of HR and parametric four-wave generation have been investigated and will be discussed.

  18. Preliminary investigation of an atmospheric microplasma using Raman and Thomson laser scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Bradley; Adams, Steven

    2014-10-01

    A triple grating spectrometer system has been coupled with an ultraviolet laser at 266 nm for the purpose of investigating Rayleigh, Raman, and Thomson scattering within atmospheric plasma sources. Such laser interactions present a non-invasive diagnostic to investigate small scale atmospheric plasma sources, which have recently garnered interest for applications in remote optical sensing, materials processing, and environmental decontamination. In this work, the laser scatter and temperature relationship were calibrated with a heated nitrogen cell held at atmospheric pressure while subsequent scattering measurements were made in atmospheric discharges composed of nitrogen and air. An adjustable electrode configuration and dc circuit were assembled to produce a microdischarge operating in normal glow mode, thus providing a non-thermal plasma in which the translational, rotational, vibrational and electron temperatures are not in equilibrium. Preliminary results include measurements of these temperatures, which were calculated by fitting simulated scattering spectra to the experimental data obtained using the triple grating spectrometer. Measured temperatures were also compared with those obtained using standard optical emission spectroscopy methods. Special thanks to the NRC Research Associateship Program.

  19. Diode-laser pumping into the emitting level for efficient lasing of depressed cladding waveguides realized in Nd:YVO4 by the direct femtosecond-laser writing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, Nicolaie; Salamu, Gabriela; Jipa, Florin; Zamfirescu, Marian

    2014-09-22

    Depressed cladding waveguides have been realized in Nd:YVO(4) employing direct writing technique with a femtosecond-laser beam. It was shown that the output performances of such laser devices are improved by the reduction of the quantum defect between the pump wavelength and the laser wavelength. Thus, under the classical pump at 808 nm (i.e. into the (4)F(5/2) level), a 100-μm diameter circular waveguide inscribed in a 0.7-at.% Nd:YVO(4) outputted 1.06-μm laser pulses with 3.0-mJ energy, at 0.30 optical efficiency and slope efficiency of 0.32. The pump at 880 nm (i.e.directly into the (4)F(3/2) emitting level) increased the pulse energy at 3.8 mJ and improved both optical efficiency and slope efficiency at 0.36 and 0.39, respectively. The same waveguide yielded continuous-wave 1.5-W output power at 1.06 μm under the pump at 880 nm. Laser emission at 1.34 μm was also improved using the pump into the (4)F(3/2) emitting level of Nd:YVO(4).

  20. Dynamics of a gain-switched distributed feedback ridge waveguide laser in nanoseconds time scale under very high current injection conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klehr, A; Wenzel, H; Brox, O; Schwertfeger, S; Staske, R; Erbert, G

    2013-02-11

    We present detailed experimental investigations of the temporal, spectral and spatial behavior of a gain-switched distributed feedback (DFB) laser emitting at a wavelength of 1064 nm. Gain-switching is achieved by injecting nearly rectangular shaped current pulses having a length of 50 ns and a very high amplitude up to 2.5 A. The repetition frequency is 200 kHz. The laser has a ridge waveguide (RW) for lateral waveguiding with a ridge width of 3 µm and a cavity length of 1.5 mm. Time resolved investigations show, depending on the amplitude of the current pulses, that the optical power exhibits different types of oscillatory behavior during the pulses, accompanied by changes in the lateral near field intensity profiles and optical spectra. Three different types of instabilities can be distinguished: mode beating with frequencies between 25 GHz and 30 GHz, switching between different lateral intensity profiles with a frequency of 0.4 GHz and self-sustained oscillations with a frequency of 4 GHz. The investigations are of great relevance for the utilization of gain-switched DFB-RW lasers as seed lasers for fiber laser systems and in other applications, which require a high optical power.

  1. Self-Raman Nd:YVO4 Laser and Electro-Optic Technology for Space-Based Sodium Lidar Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yu, Anthony W.; Janches, Diego; Jones, Sarah L.; Blagojevic, Branimir; Chen, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    We are developing a laser and electro-optic technology to remotely measure Sodium (Na) by adapting existing lidar technology with space flight heritage. The developed instrumentation will serve as the core for the planning of an Heliophysics mission targeted to study the composition and dynamics of Earth's mesosphere based on a spaceborne lidar that will measure the mesospheric Na layer. We present performance results from our diode-pumped tunable Q-switched self-Raman c-cut Nd:YVO4 laser with intra-cavity frequency doubling that produces multi-watt 589 nm wavelength output. The c-cut Nd:YVO4 laser has a fundamental wavelength that is tunable from 1063-1067 nanometers. A CW (Continuous Wave) External Cavity diode laser is used as a injection seeder to provide single-frequency grating tunable output around 1066 nanometers. The injection-seeded self-Raman shifted Nd:VO4 laser is tuned across the sodium vapor D2 line at 589 nanometers. We will review technologies that provide strong leverage for the sodium lidar laser system with strong heritage from the Ice Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS). These include a space-qualified frequency-doubled 9 watts-at-532-nanometer wavelength Nd:YVO4 laser, a tandem interference filter temperature-stabilized fused-silica-etalon receiver and high-bandwidth photon-counting detectors.

  2. Ammonia detection using hollow waveguide enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy based on a 9.56 μm quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinyi; Yang, Sen; Wang, Ruixue; Du, Zhenhui; Wei, Yingying

    2017-10-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is the most abundant alkalescency trace gas in the atmosphere having a foul odor, which is produced by both natural and anthropogenic sources. Chinese Emission Standard for Odor Pollutants has listed NH3 as one of the eight malodorous pollutants since 1993, specifying the emission concentration less than 1 mg/m3 (1.44ppmv). NH3 detection continuously from ppb to ppm levels is significant for protection of environmental atmosphere and safety of industrial and agricultural production. Tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TLAS) is an increasingly important optical method for trace gas detection. TLAS do not require pretreatment and accumulation of the concentration of the analyzed sample, unlike, for example, more conventional methods such as mass spectrometry or gas chromatography. In addition, TLAS can provide high precision remote sensing capabilities, high sensitivities and fast response. Hollow waveguide (HWG) has recently emerged as a novel concept serving as an efficient optical waveguide and as a highly miniaturized gas cell. Among the main advantages of HWG gas cell compared with conventional multi-pass gas cells is the considerably decreased sample which facilitates gas exchanging. An ammonia sensor based on TLAS using a 5m HWG as the gas cell is report here. A 9.56μm, continuous-wave, distributed feed-back (DFB), room temperature quantum cascade laser (QCL), is employed as the optical source. The interference-free NH3 absorption line located at 1046.4cm-1 (λ 9556.6nm) is selected for detection by analyzing absorption spectrum from 1045-1047 cm-1 within the ν2 fundamental absorption band of ammonia. Direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) technique is utilized and the measured spectral line is fitted by a simulation model by HITRAN database to obtain the NH3 concentration. The sensor performance is tested with standard gas and the result shows a 1σ minimum detectable concentration of ammonia is about 200 ppb with 1 sec time resolution

  3. Raman, Infrared, and Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Identification of Particles in Raw Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathryn; Lankers, Markus; Valet, Oliver

    2018-02-01

    Raw materials need to be of a certain quality with respect to physical and chemical composition. They also need to have no contaminants, including particles, because these could indicate raw material impurities or contaminate the product. Particle identification allows determination of process conditions that caused them and whether the quality of the final product is acceptable. Particles may appear to the eye to be very different things than they actually are. They may be coated with the raw material and may consist of several components; therefore, chemical and elemental analyses are required for accuracy in proper identification and definitive information about their source. Thus, microscope versions of Raman spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are excellent tools for identifying particles in materials. Those tools are fast and accurate, and can provide chemical and elemental composition as well as images that can aid identification. The micro-analysis capabilities allow for easy analysis of different portions of samples so that multiple components can be identified and sample preparation can be reduced or eliminated. The differences in sensitivities of Raman and IR spectroscopies to different functional groups as well as the elemental analysis provided by LIBS and the image analysis provided by the microscopy makes these complementary techniques and provides the advantage of identifying various chemical components. Proper spectral searching techniques and interpretation of the results are important for interpretation and identification of trace contaminants.

  4. A comparison of crud phases appearing on some Swedish BWR fuel rods using Laser Raman Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansson, H.P. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)]|[Lulea Univ. of Technology (Sweden)

    2002-07-01

    Previous investigations showed that laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) can be used as a phase specific analytical tool for radioactive fuel crud samples and also for details in the underlying layer of zirconium dioxide. It is relatively easy to record Raman spectra that discriminate between chemical phases for all crud oxides of interest. The method has therefore been recommended for crud investigations within the Swedish program. At ideal conditions the resolution is about 1 {mu}m, permitting detailed position determination of crud phases in the sample. Therefore LRS is a very good complement to X-ray diffraction (XRD). The methods for sample preparation and handling of radioactive crud samples for LRS turn out to be relatively simple. A detailed LRS study on fuel crud samples from Barsebaeck 2, Forsmark 2, Forsmark 3 and Ringhals 1 was performed in this work. All of those Swedish BWRs were operated at different conditions at the time of sampling. The chemistry regimes covered NWC, HWC and other variable conditions. Also different types of fuel, exposure times and sampling positions were selected. (authors)

  5. Silicon microphotonic waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ta'eed, V.; Steel, M.J.; Grillet, C.; Eggleton, B.; Du, J.; Glasscock, J.; Savvides, N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Silicon microphotonic devices have been drawing increasing attention in the past few years. The high index-difference between silicon and its oxide (Δn = 2) suggests a potential for high-density integration of optical functions on to a photonic chip. Additionally, it has been shown that silicon exhibits strong Raman nonlinearity, a necessary property as light interaction can occur only by means of nonlinearities in the propagation medium. The small dimensions of silicon waveguides require the design of efficient tapers to couple light to them. We have used the beam propagation method (RSoft BeamPROP) to understand the principles and design of an inverse-taper mode-converter as implemented in several recent papers. We report on progress in the design and fabrication of silicon-based waveguides. Preliminary work has been conducted by patterning silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers using optical lithography and reactive ion etching. Thus far, only rib waveguides have been designed, as single-mode ridge-waveguides are beyond the capabilities of conventional optical lithography. We have recently moved to electron beam lithography as the higher resolutions permitted will provide the flexibility to begin fabricating sub-micron waveguides

  6. Volume Bragg grating narrowed high-power and highly efficient cladding-pumped Raman fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Yao, Weichao; Zhao, Chujun; Shen, Deyuan; Fan, Dianyuan

    2014-12-10

    High-power and highly efficient operation of a single-mode cladding-pumped Raman fiber laser with narrow lasing bandwidth is demonstrated. The spectral narrowing was realized by an external cavity containing a volume Bragg grating with a center wavelength of 1658 nm. A maximum output power of 10.4 W at 1658.3 nm with a spectral linewidth (FWHM) of ∼0.1  nm was obtained for the launched pump power of 18.4 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 109% with respect to the launched pump power. Lasing characteristics of free-running operation are also evaluated and discussed.

  7. Laser writing of single-crystalline gold substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Astha; Sharma, Geeta; Ranjan, Neeraj; Mittholiya, Kshitij; Bhatnagar, Anuj; Singh, B. P.; Mathur, Deepak; Vasa, Parinda

    2017-07-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy, a powerful contemporary tool for studying low-concentration analytes via surface plasmon induced enhancement of local electric field, is of utility in biochemistry, material science, threat detection, and environmental studies. We have developed a simple, fast, scalable, and relatively low-cost optical method of fabricating and characterizing large-area, reusable and broadband SERS substrates with long storage lifetime. We use tightly focused, intense infra-red laser pulses to write gratings on single-crystalline, Au (1 1 1) gold films on mica which act as SERS substrates. Our single-crystalline SERS substrates compare favourably, in terms of surface quality and roughness, to those fabricated in poly-crystalline Au films. Tests show that our SERS substrates have the potential of detecting urea and 1,10-phenantroline adulterants in milk and water, respectively, at 0.01 ppm (or lower) concentrations.

  8. Effect of optical waveguiding mechanism on the lasing action of chirped InAs/AlGaInAs/InP quantum dash lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa

    2013-03-04

    We report on the atypical emission dynamics of InAs/AlGaInAs/InP quantum dash (Qdash) lasers employing varying AlGaInAs barrier thickness (multilayer-chirped structure). The analysis is carried out via fabry-perot (FP) ridge (RW) and stripe waveguide (SW) laser characterization corresponding to the index and gain guided waveguiding mechanisms, respectively, and at different current pulse width operations. The laser emissions are found to emerge from the size dispersion of the Qdash ensembles across the four Qdash-barrier stacks, and governed by their overlapping quasi-zero dimensional density of states (DOS). The spectral characteristics demonstrated prominent dependence on the waveguiding mechanism at quasi-continuous wave (QCW) operation (long pulse width). The RW geometry showed unusual spectral split in the emission spectra on increasing current injection while the SW geometry showed typical broadening of lasing spectra. These effects were attributed to the highly inhomogeneous active region, the nonequilibrium carrier distribution and the energy exchange between Qdash groups across the Qdash-barrier stacks. Furthermore, QCW operation showed a progressive red shift of emission spectra with injection current, resulted from active region heating and carrier depopulation, which was observed to be minimal in the short pulse width (SPW) operation. Our investigation sheds light on the device physics of chirped Qdash laser structure and provides guidelines for further optimization in obtaining broad-gain laser diodes. © (2013) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  9. Analysis of waveguide architectures of InGaN/GaN diode lasers by nearfield optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friede, Sebastian; Tomm, Jens W.; Kühn, Sergei; Hoffmann, Veit; Wenzel, Hans

    2017-02-01

    Waveguide (WG) architectures of 420-nm emitting InAlGaN/GaN diode lasers are analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and photocurrent (PC) spectroscopy using a nearfield scanning optical microscope (NSOM) for excitation and detection. The measurements with a spatial resolution of 100 nm are implemented by scanning the fiber tip along the unprepared front facets of standard devices. PL is collected by the fiber tip, whereas PCs are extracted from the contacts that are anyway present for power supply. The mechanisms of signal generation are addressed in detail. The components of the `optical active region', multiple quantum wells (MQW), WGs, and cladding layers are separately inspected. Even separate analysis of p- and n-sections of the WG become possible. Defect levels are detected in the p-part of the WG. Their presence is consistent with the doping by Mg. An increased efficiency of carrier capture into InGaN/GaN WGs compared to GaN WGs is observed. Thus, beyond the improved optical confinement, the electrical confinement is improved, as well. NSOM PL and PC at GaN based devices do not reach the clarity and spatial resolution for WG mode analysis as seen before for GaAs based devices. This is due to higher modal absorption and higher WG losses. NSOM based optical analysis turns out to be an efficient tool for analysis of single layers grown into InAlGaN/GaN diode laser structures, even if this analysis is done at a packaged ready-to-work device.

  10. Unstable propagation of a Gaussian laser beam in a plasma waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feit, M.D.; Maiden, D.E.

    1976-01-01

    Laser heating of long magnetically confined plasma columns to fusion temperatures requires propagation of a trapped laser beam over considerable distances. The present paper employs the parabolic approximation to the wave equation to analyze the propagation of a Gaussian beam through a plasma with a parabolic transverse density profile. Although propagation is stable in the axially uniform case, exhibiting alternate focusing and defocusing of the beam, it is unstable to small axial perturbations of certain wavelengths. In particular, an exponentially growing beam radius results from perturbations at wavelengths near that associated with the alternate focusing and defocusing mentioned above

  11. Fiber‐free coupling between bulk laser beams and on‐chip polymer‐based multimode waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Glasdam; Nielsen, Lars Bue; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2011-01-01

    light from a bulk beam to on‐chip waveguides and back into a bulk beam again. Using this setup, as much as 20% of the light coming from the source can be retrieved after passing through the on‐chip waveguides. The proposed setup is based on a pin‐aided alignment system that makes it possible to change...

  12. The Theory for the Dielectric Slab Waveguide with Complex Refractive Index Applied to GaAs Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Jens

    1977-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the homogeneous dielectric slab waveguide in the case of complex dielectric constants. A method for calculating the field distribution in a dielectric waveguide with an arbitrary symmetrical variation in the refractive index is developed, and some of the results are p...

  13. Progress in metal-insulator-metal waveguide lasers at near-infrared wavelengths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marell, M.J.H.; Hill, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    Strong light con¯nement can be achieved in metallic cavities which can con¯ne light to volumes with dimensions considerably smaller than the wavelength of light. It was commonly believed, however, that the high losses in metals are prohibitive for laser peration in metallic nano-cavities. Recently

  14. The effect of asymmetric barrier layers in the waveguide region on power characteristics of QW lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zubov, F. I.; Zhukov, A. E.; Shernyakov, Yu M.

    2015-01-01

    Current-voltage and light-current characteristics of quantum-well lasers have been studied at high drive currents. The introduction of asymmetric barrier layers adjacent to the active region caused a significant suppression of the nonlinearity in the light-current characteristic and an increase...

  15. A DC excited waveguide multibeam CO2 laser using high frequency ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High power industrial multibeam CO2 lasers consist of a large number of closely packed ... by producing pre-ionization using an auxiliary high frequency pulsed ... of few kilowatts output power, multibeam technique is used [2]. .... gas mixture of CO2, N2 and He enters in each discharge tube individually from .... Commercial.

  16. Polarized Raman study on the lattice structure of BiFeO3 films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yang

    2014-11-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice structure of BiFeO3 films on different substrates prepared by pulsed laser deposition. Interestingly, the Raman spectra of BiFeO3 films exhibit distinct polarization dependences. The symmetries of the fundamental Raman modes in 50-700 cm-1 were identified based on group theory. The symmetries of the high order Raman modes in 900-1500 cm-1 of BiFeO3 are determined for the first time, which can provide strong clarifications to the symmetry of the fundamental peaks in 400-700 cm-1 in return. Moreover, the lattice structures of BiFeO3 films are identified consequently on the basis of Raman spectroscopy. BiFeO3 films on SrRuO3 coated SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrate, CaRuO3 coated SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrate and tin-doped indium oxide substrate are found to be in the rhombohedral structure, while BiFeO3 film on SrRuO3 coated Nb: SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrate is in the monoclinic structure. Our results suggest that polarized Raman spectroscopy would be a feasible tool to study the lattice structure of BiFeO3 films.

  17. Managing SRS competition in a miniature visible Nd:YVO4/BaWO4 Raman laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoli; Lee, Andrew J; Huo, Yujing; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Jiyang; Piper, James A; Pask, Helen M; Spence, David J

    2012-08-13

    We demonstrate the operation of a compact and efficient continuous wave (CW) self-Raman laser utilizing a Nd:YVO4 gain crystal and BaWO4 Raman crystal, generating yellow emission at 590 nm. We investigate the competition that occurs between Stokes lines in the Nd:YVO4 and BaWO4 crystals, and within the BaWO4 crystal itself. Through careful consideration of crystal length and orientation, we are able to suppress competition between Stokes lines, and generate pure yellow emission at 590 nm with output power of 194 mW for just 3.8 W pump power.

  18. Parametric Raman crystalline anti-Stokes laser at 503 nm with collinear beam interaction at tangential phase matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetanin, S. N.; Jelínek, M.; Kubeček, V.

    2017-07-01

    Stimulated-Raman-scattering in crystals can be used for the single-pass frequency-conversion to the Stokes-shifted wavelengths. The anti-Stokes shift can also be achieved but the phase-matching condition has to be fulfilled because of the parametric four-wave mixing process. To widen the angular-tolerance of four-wave mixing and to obtain high-conversion-efficiency into the anti-Stokes, we developed a new scheme of the parametric Raman anti-Stokes laser at 503 nm with phase-matched collinear beam interaction of orthogonally-polarized Raman components in calcite oriented at the phase-matched angle under 532 nm 20 ps laser excitation. The excitation laser beam was split into two orthogonally-polarized components entering the calcite at the certain incidence angles to fulfill the nearly collinear phase-matching and also to compensate walk-off of extraordinary waves for collinear beam interaction. The phase matching of parametric Raman interaction is tangential and insensitive to the angular mismatch if the Poynting vectors of the biharmonic pump and parametrically generated (anti-Stokes) waves are collinear. For the first time it allows to achieve experimentally the highest conversion efficiency into the anti-Stokes wave (503 nm) up to 30% from the probe wave and up to 3.5% from both pump and probe waves in the single-pass picosecond parametric calcite Raman laser. The highest anti-Stokes pulse energy was 1.4 μJ.

  19. High-power Yb- and Tm-doped double tungstate channel waveguide lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalfsen, Koop; Geskus, D.; Ay, F.; Worhoff, Kerstin; Aravazhi, S.; Pollnau, Markus

    The potassium double tungstates KGd(WO4)2, KY(WO4)2, and KLu(WO4)2 are excellent candidates for solid-state lasers because of their high refractive index of ~2.0-2.1, the large transition cross-sections of rare-earth (RE3+) ions doped into these hosts, and a reasonably large thermal conductivity of

  20. Self-focusing and Raman scattering of laser pulses in tenuous plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Mora, P.

    1993-01-01

    The propagation and self-focusing of short, intense laser pulses in a tenuous plasma is studied both analytically and numerically. Specifically, pulses of length of the order of a few plasma wavelengths and of intensity, which is large enough for relativistic self-focusing to occur, are considered. Such pulses are of interest in various laser plasma acceleration schemes. It is found that these pulses are likely to be strongly affected by Raman instabilities. Two different regimes of instability, corresponding to large and small scattering angles, are found to be important. Small-angle scattering is perhaps the most severe since it couples strongly with relativistic self-focusing, leading the pulses to acquire significant axial and transverse structure in a time of the order of the self-focusing time. Thus it will be difficult to propagate smooth self-focused pulses through tenuous plasmas for distances longer than the Rayleigh length, except for pulse duration of the order of the plasma period

  1. Ultrafast direct laser writing of cladding waveguides in the 0.8CaSiO{sub 3}-0.2Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} eutectic glass doped with Nd{sup 3+} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez de Mendívil, J., E-mail: jon.martinez@uam.es; Lifante, G. [Departamento de Física de Materiales, C-04, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28.049 Madrid (Spain); Sola, D.; Peña, J. I. [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales y Fluidos, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza-CSIC, 50.018 Zaragoza (Spain); Vázquez de Aldana, J. R. [Grupo de Investigación en Microprocesado de Materiales con Láser, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, 37.008 Salamanca (Spain); Aza, A. H. de; Pena, P. [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio-CSIC, 28.049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-01-28

    We report on tubular cladding optical waveguides fabricated in Neodymium doped Wollastonite-Tricalcium Phosphate glass in the eutectic composition. The glass samples were prepared by melting the eutectic powder mixture in a Pt-Rh crucible at 1600 °C and pouring it in a preheated brass mould. Afterwards, the glass was annealed to relieve the inner stresses. Cladding waveguides were fabricated by focusing beneath the sample surface using a pulsed Ti:sapphire laser with a pulsewidth of 120 fs working at 1 kHz. The optical properties of these waveguides have been assessed in terms of near-field intensity distribution and transmitted power, and these results have been compared to previously reported waveguides with double-line configuration. Optical properties have also been studied as function of the temperature. Heat treatments up to 700 °C were carried out to diminish colour centre losses where waveguide's modes and transmitted power were compared in order to establish the annealing temperature at which the optimal optical properties were reached. Laser experiments are in progress to evaluate the ability of the waveguides for 1064 nm laser light generation under 800 nm optical pumping.

  2. Spectral and far-field broadening due to stimulated rotational Raman scattering driven by the Nike krypton fluoride laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, James; Lehmberg, Robert; Obenschain, Stephen; Kehne, David; Wolford, Matthew

    2017-11-01

    Stimulated rotational Raman scattering (SRRS) in the ultraviolet region (λ=248  nm) has been observed at the Nike laser over extended propagation paths in air during high power operation. Although this phenomenon is not significant for standard operating configurations at Nike, broadening of the laser spectrum and far-field focal profiles has been observed once the intensity-path length product exceeds a threshold of approximately 1  TW/cm. This paper presents experimental results and a new theoretical evaluation of these effects. The observations suggest that significantly broader spectra can be achieved with modest degradation of the final focal distribution. These results point to a possible path for enhanced laser-target coupling with the reduction of laser-plasma instabilities due to broad laser bandwidth produced by the SRRS.

  3. Cavity-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with optical feedback cw diode lasers for gas phase analysis and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Robert; Chu, Johnny; Hippler, Michael

    2012-10-21

    A variant of cavity-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (CERS) is introduced, in which diode laser radiation at 635 nm is coupled into an external linear optical cavity composed of two highly reflective mirrors. Using optical feedback stabilisation, build-up of circulating laser power by 3 orders of magnitude occurs. Strong Raman signals are collected in forward scattering geometry. Gas phase CERS spectra of H(2), air, CH(4) and benzene are recorded to demonstrate the potential for analytical applications and fundamental molecular studies. Noise equivalent limits of detection in the ppm by volume range (1 bar sample) can be achieved with excellent linearity with a 10 mW excitation laser, with sensitivity increasing with laser power and integration time. The apparatus can be operated with battery powered components and can thus be very compact and portable. Possible applications include safety monitoring of hydrogen gas levels, isotope tracer studies (e.g., (14)N/(15)N ratios), observing isotopomers of hydrogen (e.g., radioactive tritium), and simultaneous multi-component gas analysis. CERS has the potential to become a standard method for sensitive gas phase Raman spectroscopy.

  4. Aspects of Raman scattering and other effects on laser propagation through the atmosphere. Summary of work for the period, May 5, 1986-June 13, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipser, J.R.

    1986-08-01

    The propagation of laser beams through the atmosphere is discussed. Processes which are pertinent are Raman scattering, self-focusing of beams, and two-photon absorption. Comments on the subroutine PRAMAN are given in the appendix. This subroutine calculates the effect of stimulated Raman scattering in the atmosphere

  5. 671-nm microsystem diode laser based on portable Raman sensor device for in-situ identification of meat spoilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowoidnich, Kay; Schmidt, Heinar; Schwägele, Fredi; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2011-05-01

    Based on a miniaturized optical bench with attached 671 nm microsystem diode laser we present a portable Raman system for the rapid in-situ characterization of meat spoilage. It consists of a handheld sensor head (dimensions: 210 x 240 x 60 mm3) for Raman signal excitation and collection including the Raman optical bench, a laser driver, and a battery pack. The backscattered Raman radiation from the sample is analyzed by means of a custom-designed miniature spectrometer (dimensions: 200 x 190 x 70 mm3) with a resolution of 8 cm-1 which is fiber-optically coupled to the sensor head. A netbook is used to control the detector and for data recording. Selected cuts from pork (musculus longissimus dorsi and ham) stored refrigerated at 5 °C were investigated in timedependent measurement series up to three weeks to assess the suitability of the system for the rapid detection of meat spoilage. Using a laser power of 100 mW at the sample meat spectra can be obtained with typical integration times of 5 - 10 seconds. The complex spectra were analyzed by the multivariate statistical tool PCA (principal components analysis) to determine the spectral changes occurring during the storage period. Additionally, the Raman data were correlated with reference analyses performed in parallel. In that way, a distinction between fresh and spoiled meat can be found in the time slot of 7 - 8 days after slaughter. The applicability of the system for the rapid spoilage detection of meat and other food products will be discussed.

  6. Graphitic carbon nanospheres: A Raman spectroscopic investigation of thermal conductivity and morphological evolution by pulsed laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Radhe; Sahoo, Satyaprakash, E-mail: satya504@gmail.com, E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu; Chitturi, Venkateswara Rao; Katiyar, Ram S., E-mail: satya504@gmail.com, E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936-8377 (United States)

    2015-12-07

    Graphitic carbon nanospheres (GCNSs) were prepared by a unique acidic treatment of multi-walled nanotubes. Spherical morphology with a narrow size distribution was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy studies. The room temperature Raman spectra showed a clear signature of D- and G-peaks at around 1350 and 1591 cm{sup −1}, respectively. Temperature dependent Raman scattering measurements were performed to understand the phonon dynamics and first order temperature coefficients related to the D- and G-peaks. The temperature dependent Raman spectra in a range of 83–473 K were analysed, where the D-peak was observed to show a red-shift with increasing temperature. The relative intensity ratio of D- to G-peaks also showed a significant rise with increasing temperature. Such a temperature dependent behaviour can be attributed to lengthening of the C-C bond due to thermal expansion in material. The estimated value of the thermal conductivity of GCNSs ∼0.97 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1} was calculated using Raman spectroscopy. In addition, the effect of pulsed laser treatment on the GCNSs was demonstrated by analyzing the Raman spectra of post irradiated samples.

  7. In vivo Molecular Evaluation of Guinea Pig Skin Incisions Healing after Surgical Suture and Laser Tissue Welding Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimova, A.; Chakraverty, R.; Muthukattil, R.; Elder, S.; Katz, A.; Sriramoju, V.; Lipper, Stanley; Alfano, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    The healing process in guinea pig skin following surgical incisions was evaluated at the molecular level, in vivo, by the use of Raman spectroscopy. After the incisions were closed either by suturing or by laser tissue welding (LTW), differences in the respective Raman spectra were identified. The study determined that the ratio of the Raman peaks of the amide III (1247 cm−1) band to a peak at 1326 cm−1 (the superposition of elastin and keratin bands) can be used to evaluate the progression of wound healing. Conformational changes in the amide I band (1633 cm−1 to 1682 cm−1) and spectrum changes in the range of 1450 cm−1 to 1520 cm−1 were observed in LTW and sutured skin. The stages of the healing process of the guinea pig skin following LTW and suturing were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, using histopathology as the gold standard. LTW skin demonstrated better healing than sutured skin, exhibiting minimal hyperkeratosis, minimal collagen deposition, near-normal surface contour, and minimal loss of dermal appendages. A wavelet decomposition-reconstruction baseline correction algorithm was employed to remove the fluorescence wing from the Raman spectra. PMID:19581109

  8. Shifting of infrared radiation using rotational raman resonances in diatomic molecular gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1980-01-01

    A device for shifting the frequency of infrared radiation from a CO.sub.2 laser by stimulated Raman scattering in either H.sub.2 or D.sub.2. The device of the preferred embodiment comprises an H.sub.2 Raman laser having dichroic mirrors which are reflective for 16 .mu.m radiation and transmittive for 10 .mu.m, disposed at opposite ends of an interaction cell. The interaction cell contains a diatomic molecular gas, e.g., H.sub.2, D.sub.2, T.sub.2, HD, HT, DT and a capillary waveguide disposed within the cell. A liquid nitrogen jacket is provided around the capillary waveguide for the purpose of cooling. In another embodiment the input CO.sub.2 radiation is circularly polarized using a Fresnel rhomb .lambda./4 plate and applied to an interaction cell of much longer length for single pass operation.

  9. Differentiation of molecular chain entanglement structure through laser Raman spectrum measurement of High strength PET fibers under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, D.; Takarada, W.; Kikutani, T.

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism for the improvement of mechanical properties of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fibers based on the concept of controlling the state of molecular entanglement. For this purpose, five different PET fibers were prepared through either the conventional melt spinning and drawing/annealing process or the high-speed melt spinning process. In both cases, the melt spinning process was designed so as to realize different Deborah number conditions. The prepared fibers were subjected to the laser Raman spectroscopy measurement and the characteristics of the scattering peak at around 1616 cm-1, which corresponds to the C-C/C=C stretching mode of the aromatic ring in the main chain, were investigated in detail. It was revealed that the fibers drawn and annealed after the melt spinning process of lower Deborah number showed higher tensile strength as well as lower value of full width at half maximum (FWHM) in the laser Raman spectrum. Narrow FWHM was considered to represent the homogeneous state of entanglement structure, which may lead to the higher strength and toughness of fibers because individual molecular chains tend to bare similar level of tensile stress when the fiber is stretched. In case of high-speed spun fibers prepared with a high Deborah number condition, the FWHM was narrow presumably because much lower tensile stress in comparison with the drawing/annealing process was applied when the fiber structure was developed, however the value increased significantly upon applying tensile load to the fibers during the laser Raman spectrum measurement. From these results, it was concluded that the Laser Raman spectroscopy could differentiate molecular chain entanglement structure of various fiber samples, in that low FWHM, which corresponds to either homogeneous state of molecular entanglement or lower level of mean residual stress, and small increase of FWTH upon applying tensile stress are considered to be the key

  10. Laser-induced stimulated Raman scattering in the forward direction of a droplet - Comparison of Mie theory with geometrical optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vandana; Jarzembski, Maurice A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper uses Mie theory to treat electromagnetic scattering and to evaluate field enhancement in the forward direction of a small droplet irradiated by a high-energy beam and compares the results of calculations with the field-enhancement evaluation obtained via geometrical optics treatment. Results of this comparison suggest that the field enhancement located at the critical ring region encircling the axis in the forward direction of the droplet can support laser-induced Raman scattering. The results are supported by experimental observations of the interaction of a 120-micron-diam water droplet with a high-energy Nd:YAG laser beam.

  11. A Spectroscopic Comparison of Femtosecond Laser Modified Fused Silica using kHz and MHz Laser Systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichman, W J; Krol, D M; Shah, L; Yoshino, F; Arai, A; Eaton, S M; Herman, P R

    2005-09-29

    Waveguides were written in fused silica using both a femtosecond fiber laser with a 1 MHz pulse repetition rate and a femtosecond amplified Ti:sapphire laser with a 1 kHz repetition rate. Confocal Raman and fluorescence microscopy were used to study structural changes in the waveguides written with both systems. A broad fluorescence band, centered at 650 nm, associated with non-bridging oxygen hole center (NBOHC) defects was observed after waveguide fabrication with the MHz laser. With the kHz laser system these defects were only observed for pulse energies above 1 {mu}J. Far fewer NBOHC defects were formed with the MHz laser than with kHz writing, possibly due to thermal annealing driven by heat accumulation effects at 1 MHz. When the kHz laser was used with pulse energies below 1 {mu}J, the predominant fluorescence was centered at 550 nm, a band assigned to the presence of silicon clusters (E{prime}{sub {delta}}). We also observed an increase in the intensity of the 605 cm{sup -1} Raman peak relative to the total Raman intensity, corresponding to an increase in the concentration of 3-membered rings in the lines fabricated with both laser systems.

  12. Four-wave-mixing and nonlinear cavity dumping of 280 picosecond 2nd Stokes pulse at 1.3 μm from Nd:SrMoO4 self-Raman laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetanin, S N; Ivleva, L I; Jelínek, M Jr; Kubeček, V; Jelínková, H; Shurygin, A S

    2016-01-01

    The 280 picosecond 2nd Stokes Raman pulses at 1.3 μm were generated directly from the miniature diode-pumped Nd:SrMoO 4 self-Raman laser. Using the 90° phase matching insensitive to the angular mismatch, the self-Raman laser allowed for the achievement of the four-wave-mixing generation of the 2nd Stokes Raman pulse directly in the active Nd:SrMoO 4 crystal at stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) self-conversion of the laser radiation. The passive Cr:YAG Q-switching and nonlinear cavity dumping was used without any phase locking device. (letter)

  13. Propagation of an intense laser pulse in an under-dense plasma: channeling and stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friou, A.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is divided in two parts: i) the laser channeling in hundreds of microns long under-dense plasmas (0.1 nc ≤ n ≤ nc, nc being the critical density) of a laser pulse of intensity 10 18-20 W/cm 2 and duration 1-10 ps; ii) the saturation mechanisms of stimulated Raman back-scattering of a laser pulse of intensity 10 14 to 10 16 W/cm 2 and duration of about 1 ps. A parametric study was performed to study the channeling of a very intense laser pulse, using a 2D PIC (Particle In Cell) code. Various kinds of channels were obtained depending on the laser and plasma parameters, thereby reproducing and enlarging previous studies. Moreover, the channeling velocity was measured and scaling laws were established for homogeneous plasmas. They are then applied to inhomogeneous plasmas, similar to those encountered in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It is then possible to estimate the energy necessary to channel to the critical density, an important step for the fast ignition scheme of ICF. Raman saturation was studied using numerical simulations, in order to determine if it is due to dephasing or to the growth of sidebands, using different approaches. The first is to study Raman simulations (electromagnetic) performed with kinetic PIC and Vlasov codes. The second, is to study the evolution of a plasma initialized with a distribution function after the adiabatic theory, using a Vlasov code (electrostatic). In this case, we observe the growth of a sideband, with dominant wave number and growth rate in good agreement with kinetic simulations. The saturation of the plasma wave can be caused by both saturation mechanisms. [fr

  14. BeZnCdSe quantum-well ridge-waveguide laser diodes under low threshold room-temperature continuous-wave operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Jijun [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Optical System, Engineering Research Center of Optical Instrument and System (Ministry of Education), School of Optical-Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, 516 Jungong Road, Shanghai 200093 (China); Electronics and Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Akimoto, Ryoichi, E-mail: r-akimoto@aist.go.jp [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2015-10-19

    Low threshold current ridge-waveguide BeZnCdSe quantum-well laser diodes (LDs) have been developed by completely etching away the top p-type BeMgZnSe/ZnSe:N short-period superlattice cladding layer, which can suppress the leakage current that flows laterally outside of the electrode. The waveguide LDs are covered with a thick SiO{sub 2} layer and planarized with chemical-mechanical polishing and a reactive ion etching process. Room-temperature lasing under continuous-wave condition is achieved with the laser cavity formed by the cleaved waveguide facets coated with high-reflectivity dielectric films. For a 4 μm-wide green LD lasing around a wavelength of 535 nm, threshold current and voltage of 7.07 mA and 7.89 V are achieved for a cavity length of 300 μm, and the internal differential quantum efficiency, internal absorption loss, gain constant, and nominal transparency current density are estimated to be 27%, 4.09 cm{sup −1}, 29.92 (cm × μm)/kA and 6.35 kA/(cm{sup 2 }× μm), respectively. This compact device can realize a significantly improved performance with much lower threshold power consumption, which would benefit the potential application for ZnSe-based green LDs as light sources in full-color display and projector devices installed in consumer products such as pocket projectors.

  15. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Matthew W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  16. Narrow ridge waveguide high power single mode 1.3-μm InAs/InGaAs ten-layer quantum dot lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Q

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractTen-layer InAs/In0.15Ga0.85As quantum dot (QD laser structures have been grown using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE on GaAs (001 substrate. Using the pulsed anodic oxidation technique, narrow (2 μm ridge waveguide (RWG InAs QD lasers have been fabricated. Under continuous wave operation, the InAs QD laser (2 × 2,000 μm2 delivered total output power of up to 272.6 mW at 10 °C at 1.3 μm. Under pulsed operation, where the device heating is greatly minimized, the InAs QD laser (2 × 2,000 μm2 delivered extremely high output power (both facets of up to 1.22 W at 20 °C, at high external differential quantum efficiency of 96%. Far field pattern measurement of the 2-μm RWG InAs QD lasers showed single lateral mode operation.

  17. Theoretical and numerical simulation of the saturation of the stimulated Raman scattering instability that occurs in laser-plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouquet, T.

    2007-01-01

    In this work we present 2 important results. First, for a relatively moderate laser lighting (I*λ 2 ≅ 10 14 Wμm 2 /cm 2 ), cavitation appears in Langmuir decay instability (LDI) whenever the plasma wavelength is above a certain limit. Secondly, in the case of an inhomogeneous plasma there is an increase of the Raman reflectivity in presence of LDI for a plasma density profile that was initially smooth. This work is divided into 5 chapters. The first chapter is dedicated to parametric instabilities especially Raman instability and Langmuir decay instability. The equations that govern these instabilities as well as their numerical solutions are presented in the second chapter. The third chapter deals with the case of a mono-dimensional plasma with homogenous density. The saturation of the Raman instability in a mono-dimensional plasma with inhomogeneous density is studied in the fourth chapter. The last chapter is dedicated to bi-dimensional simulations for various types of laser beams

  18. Characteristics of 1.9 μm laser emission from hydrogen-filled hollow-core fiber by stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bo; Chen, Yubin; Wang, Zefeng

    2016-11-01

    We report here the detailed characteristics of 1.9 μm laser emission from hydrogen-filled hollow-core fiber by stimulated Raman scattering. A 6.5 m hydrogen-filled Ice-cream negative curvature hollow-core fiber is pumped with a high peak power, narrow linewidth, liner polarized subnanosecond pulsed 1064 nm microchip laser, generating pulsed 1908.5 nm vibrational Stokes wave. The linewidth of the pump laser and the vibrational Stokes wave is about 1 GHz and 2 GHz respectively. And the maximum Raman conversion quantum efficiency is about 48%. We also studied the pulse shapes of the pump laser and the vibrational Stokes wave. The polarization dependence of the vibrational and the rotational stimulated Raman scattering is also investigated. In addition, the beam profile of vibrational Stokes wave shows good quality, which may be taken advantage of in many applications.

  19. Raman spectroscopy and the forensic analysis of black/grey and blue cotton fibres Part 1: investigation of the effects of varying laser wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J; Buzzini, P; Massonnet, G; Reedy, B; Roux, C

    2005-09-10

    Raman spectroscopy was investigated to determine the optimal conditions, mainly laser wavelength/s, for the analysis of the commonly encountered black/grey and blue cotton fibres dyed with reactive dyes. In this first part, a single blue cotton fibre, its three dye components, and an undyed cotton fibre were analysed with five different laser wavelengths from two different Raman microprobe spectrometers. The quality of the spectra, fibre degradation and speed of acquisition were used to determine that, under the conditions used, the 785 and 830 nm lasers gave superior results. The 632.8 nm laser wavelengths provided good results with little acquisition time and no spectral degradation. Results indicate that, at least, the major dye component could be identified using Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Diode-side-pumped continuous wave Nd³⁺ : YVO₄ self-Raman laser at 1176 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kores, Cristine Calil; Jakutis-Neto, Jonas; Geskus, Dimitri; Pask, Helen M; Wetter, Niklaus U

    2015-08-01

    Here we report, to the best of our knowledge, the first diode-side-pumped continuous wave (cw) Nd3+:YVO4 self-Raman laser operating at 1176 nm. The compact cavity design is based on the total internal reflection of the laser beam at the pumped side of the Nd3+:YVO4 crystal. Configurations with a single bounce and a double bounce of the laser beam at the pumped faced have been characterized, providing a quasi-cw peak output power of more than 8 W (multimode) with an optical conversion efficiency of 11.5% and 3.7 W (TEM00) having an optical conversion efficiency of 5.4%, respectively. Cw output power of 1.8 W has been demonstrated.

  1. Redox reactions of cytochrome c in isolated mitochondria exposed to blue or red lasers using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Michael L.; Gonzalez, Cherry C.; Noojin, Gary D.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2018-02-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy of cytochrome c was used to follow reduction/oxidation (redox) states of isolated mitochondria in response to blue or red laser exposure. Mitochondria were isolated from hTERT-RPE1 cells and were kept in a buffer formulation known to be conducive to electron transport chain (ETC) activity. Using either pyruvate or succinate as substrates for ETC, we found differences in the redox responses of cytochrome c for different exposure laser irradiance and excitation wavelength. We anticipate that the proposed new method will be valuable in the study of metabolic processes in mitochondria in response to low level laser exposure, and thus aid in elucidating the mechanism(s) of photobiomodulation.

  2. Cascaded a-cut Nd:YVO4 self-Raman with second-Stokes laser at 1313 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhi; Duan, Yanmin; Guo, Junhong; Huang, Xiaohong; Yan, Lifen; Zhu, Haiyong

    2017-11-01

    A diode-end-pumped, acousto-optic Q-switched second-Stokes self-Raman laser at 1313 nm was demonstrated in a common a-cut Nd:YVO4 crystal, with the primary Raman shift of 890 cm-1. At the incident pump power of 17.1 W, the maximum average output power up to 2.51 W and pulse width of 5 ns for second-Stokes were obtained with the pulse repetition frequency of 50 kHz. The slope efficiency and conversion efficiency with respect to the incident pump power are about 23.7% and 14.7%. The efficient output should be attributed to suitable transmittance of the output coupler used.

  3. Compact Ultraintense Femtosecond Laser via Raman Amplifier and Compressor in Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suckewer, Szymon [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The main objective of this project was to conduct experimental and theoretical research to find conditions leading to higher, than previously obtained efficiency η of transfer the pump energy into the short seed beam in plasma of Stimulated Raman Back-Scattering (SRBS). We have demonstrated very large amplification and compression in our earlier SRBS plasma. However, the efficiency η was much too low to reach very high intensity of the output beam in the focal spot. Recently, by solving a very difficult technical SRBS’ problem, namely, the creation of very reproducible and much larger diameter plasma channels than in our earlier research, we propose a new approach to obtain higher efficiency η. The crucial new result was a very reproducible, low noise amplified seed in the larger diameter of the plasma channel leading to the higher efficiency. Using this new setup and very encouraging results about increase efficiency continuing this approach in the future the efficiency is expect to reach the range of η ≈15 - 20 % required to develop practical SRBS plasma laser. Intellectual Merit: The model for the present project was created by our earlier SRBS experiments. The main objective of those experiments was to amplify and compress the seed pulses in a plasma . The experiments demonstrated an unprecedented large pulse intensity amplification of 20,000 in system of 2-passes in ~2mm long plasma, and the seed pulse compression from 550fsec down to ~50fsec. The pump and seed beams in the present project have diameters of ~0.2–0.25mm each, propagating in ~0.35 - 0.45mm diameter and ~2-2.5mm long plasma channels (optimal length for our SRBS experiment) with input pump and seed intensities of 2x1014 and 3x1013 W/cm2, respectively. Such an SRBS system design was “prescribed” by computer simulations, which predict elimination of the SRBS “ saturation” for a such relatively short plasma channel. Plasma channels has been created by combining shorter (200psec) and

  4. Laser stimulating ST36 with optical fiber induce blood component changes in mice: a Raman spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng; Chen, Zhenyi; Wu, Jiping; Chen, Na; Xu, Wenjie; Li, Taihao; Liu, Shupeng

    2018-02-15

    ST36 is a commonly-used acupoint in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for treatment of inflammations, pains and gastrointestinal disturbs. For decades, the low power laser acupuncture has been widely applied as an alternative therapy to traditional metal needle acupuncture and achieved relatively fine therapeutic effect for ST36-related symptoms with reduction of uncomfortableness and infection risks. However its disadvantages of low penetrativity and lack of manipulation skills limit its potential performance. An optical fiber laser acupuncture introduced by the previous study combines traditional needling acupuncture and the laser stimulation together, making a stronger therapeutic effect and showing a potential value in clinical application. To evaluate its acupunctural effect on blood, mice are taken as experimental model and Raman spectroscopic technique is used to analysis the changes of blood components after stimulating on ST36. The results show that both the traditional needling acupuncture and optical fiber acupuncture could lead to some spectral changes of blood in mice. This study explores the optical fiber acupuncture's effect on blood in mice using Raman spectroscopy technique for mechanism of acupuncture therapy. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Laser-induced emission, fluorescence and Raman hybrid setup: A versatile instrument to analyze materials from cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvilay, D.; Bai, X. S.; Wilkie-Chancellier, N.; Texier, A.; Martinez, L.; Serfaty, S.; Detalle, V.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this research project was the development of a hybrid system in laboratory coupling together three analytical techniques, namely laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman spectroscopy in a single instrument. The rationale for combining these three spectroscopies was to identify a material (molecular and elemental analysis) without any preliminary preparation, regardless of its organic or inorganic nature, on the surface and in depth, without any surrounding light interference thanks to time resolution. Such instrumentation would allow characterizing different materials from cultural heritage. A complete study on LIBS-LIF-Raman hybrid was carried out, from its conception to instrumental achievement, in order to elaborate a strategy of analysis according to the material and to be able to address conservation issues. From an instrumental point of view, condensing the three spectroscopies was achieved by using a single laser for excitation and two spectrometers (time-integrated and not time-integrated) for light collection. A parabolic mirror was used as collecting system, while three excitation sources directed through this optical system ensured the examination of a similar probe area. Two categories of materials were chosen to test the hybrid instrumentation on cultural heritage applications (copper corrosion products and wall paintings). Some examples are reported to illustrate the wealth of information provided by the hybrid, thus demonstrating its great potential to be used for cultural heritage issues. Finally, several considerations are outlined aimed at further improving the hybrid.

  6. Facile synthesis of AgCl/polydopamine/Ag nanoparticles with in-situ laser improving Raman scattering effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Wenqi; Wang, Lin; Wang, Feng, E-mail: wangfeng@shnu.edu.cn; Yang, Haifeng

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • AgCl/PDA/AgNPs (polydopamine (PDA) adlayer covered cubic AgCl core inlaid with Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs)) was fabricated for in-situ SERS detection. • Such SERS substrate shows in-situ laser improving Raman scattering effect due to the generation of more AgNPs. • Enhancement factor could reach 10{sup 7}. • Such SERS substrate shows good reproducibility and long term stability. - Abstract: We reported a simple and fast method to prepare a composite material of polydopamine (PDA) adlayer covered cubic AgCl core, which was inlaid with Ag nanoparticles (NPs), shortly named as AgCl/PDA/AgNPs. The resultant AgCl/PDA/AgNPs could be employed as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate for in-situ detection and the SERS activity could be further greatly improved due to the production of more AgNPs upon laser irradiation. With 4-mercaptopyridine (4-Mpy) as the probe molecule, the enhancement factor could reach 10{sup 7}. Additionally, such SERS substrate shows good reproducibility with relative standard deviation of 7.32% and long term stability (after storage for 100 days under ambient condition, SERS intensity decay is less than 25%). In-situ elevating SERS activity of AgCl/PDA/AgNPs induced by laser may be beneficial to sensitive analysis in practical fields.

  7. Wave-guided optical waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Vizsnyiczai, George

    2012-01-01

    This work primarily aims to fabricate and use two photon polymerization (2PP) microstructures capable of being optically manipulated into any arbitrary orientation. We have integrated optical waveguides into the structures and therefore have freestanding waveguides, which can be positioned anywhe...... bridge the diffraction barrier. This structure-mediated paradigm may be carried forward to open new possibilities for exploiting beams from far-field optics down to the subwavelength domain....

  8. Evaluation of laser photobiomodulation on bone defect in the femur of osteoporotic rats: a Raman spectral study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luiz Guilherme P.; Aciole, Jouber Mateus d. S.; Neves, Bruno Luiz R. C.; Silveira, Landulfo; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2015-03-01

    Phototherapies have shown positive effects on the bone repair process, increasing the blood supply to the injured area. The aim of this study was to assess through Raman spectroscopy, the efficacy of laser phototherapy (λ = 780 nm, P = 70 mW, CW, 20.4 J/cm2 per session, 163.2 J/cm2 per treatment) on the bone repair process of osteoporotic rats. The osteoporosis induction was achieved by ovariectomy surgery. Thirty Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (Basal; OVX, OVX + Clot and OVX + Clot + Laser), then subdivided into 2 subgroups according to the experimental time (15 and 30 days). After the osteoporosis induction time (60 days), a bone defect with 2 mm was created with a trephine drill in the right femur in the animals of groups OVX, Clot and Clot + Laser. After surgery, the irradiation protocol was applied in the same groups on repeated sessions every 48 hours during 15 days. The samples were analyzed by Raman Spectroscopy to assess the inorganic content of phosphate and carbonated hydroxyapatite (~960 and 1070 cm-1, respectively) and organic lipids and proteins (~1454 cm-1). Statistical analysis (ANOVA, Student-T test) showed significant difference between groups Basal, OVX + Clot, and OVX + Clot + Laser for the inorganic content peaks at ~960 (p≤0.001), and ~1070 cm-1 (p≤0.001) in both periods of 15 and 30 days, however on peak at ~1450 cm-1 no differences were detected. It was concluded that the Laser phototherapy increased deposition of HA on bone repair process of osteoporotic rats.

  9. Picosecond laser fabricated Ag, Au and Ag-Au nanoparticles for detecting ammonium perchlorate using a portable Raman spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byram, Chandu; Moram, Sree Sathya Bharathi; Soma, Venugopal Rao

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we present the results from fabrication studies of Ag, Au, and Ag-Au alloy nanoparticles (NPs) using picosecond laser ablation technique in the presence of liquid media. The alloy formation in the NPs was confirmed from UV-Visible measurements. The shape and crystallinity of NPs were investigated by using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), selected area diffraction pattern (SAED) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The SERS effect of fabricated NPs was tested with methylene blue and an explosive molecule (ammonium perchlorate) using a portable Raman spectrometer and achieved EFs of ˜106.

  10. All-solid-state quasi-CW yellow laser with intracavity self-Raman conversion and sum frequency generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kananovich, A; Grabtchikov, A; Orlovich, V; Demidovich, A; Danailov, M

    2010-01-01

    Quasi continuous-wave (qCW) yellow emission (pulse duration 5 ms, repetition rate 20 Hz) at 559 nm is demonstrated through intracavity sum frequency generation (SFG) of Stokes and fundamental fields in Nd:YVO 4 diode pumped self-Raman laser for the first time. Average in pulse output power at 559 nm was 0.47 W for 22 W of pump power, which corresponds to 2.1% of diode-to-yellow efficiency. The pulsed mode of operation was due to diode pump modulation and was used to reduce thermal stress of the crystal

  11. Assessment of argon ion laser dispersive Raman spectroscopy for hot cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    Characterization of high-level waste tank materials at Hanford is conducted to support safety assessments and waste treatment activities. Raman spectroscopy is expected to give chemical species information which may assist in defining layering in tank waste. This report describes the dispersive Raman system used in this year's investigation and the methology used to collect and evaluate data taken on tank waste samples. The current argon-ion Raman system was found not to be suitable for screening of tank cores, owing to silica interference, fluorescence interferences, and the extensive time required to collect and treat the data. Recommendations are given for further development

  12. Hand-held Raman sensor head for in-situ characterization of meat quality applying a microsystem 671 nm diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Heinar; Sowoidnich, Kay; Maiwald, Martin; Sumpf, Bernd; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2009-05-01

    A hand-held Raman sensor head was developed for the in-situ characterization of meat quality. As light source, a microsystem based external cavity diode laser module (ECDL) emitting at 671 nm was integrated in the sensor head and attached to a miniaturized optical bench which contains lens optics for excitation and signal collection as well as a Raman filter stage for Rayleigh rejection. The signal is transported with an optical fiber to the detection unit which was in the initial phase a laboratory spectrometer with CCD detector. All elements of the ECDL are aligned on a micro optical bench with 13 x 4 mm2 footprint. The wavelength stability is provided by a reflection Bragg grating and the laser has an optical power of up to 200 mW. However, for the Raman measurements of meat only 35 mW are needed to obtain Raman spectra within 1 - 5 seconds. Short measuring times are essential for the hand-held device. The laser and the sensor head are characterized in terms of stability and performance for in-situ Raman investigations. The function is demonstrated in a series of measurements with raw and packaged pork meat as samples. The suitability of the Raman sensor head for the quality control of meat and other products will be discussed.

  13. Positioning of Carbon nanostructures on metal surfaces using laser acceleration and the Raman analyses of the patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmenyan, A; Perevedentseva, E; Chiou, A; Cheng, C-L

    2007-01-01

    The laser-induced acceleration of nanoparticles using intense light irradiation was used for positioning and ordering of carbon nanomaterials to form periodical surface structures. Such systems are of interest for different nanotechnology applications. The nanodiamond with averaged size 100 nm, and fullerene (C 60 ) suspended in distilled water were accelerated using high focused laser beam and attached onto metal surface of silver and gold thin films evaporated on Si substrate. The laser was operating both in CW and femtosecond modes with the wavelength of ∼800 nm, pulse duration 150 fs, and average laser power of 300-600 mW. In case of pulse irradiation the repetition rate of 76 MHZ was applied. The nanoparticles were positioned on the metal surface in accordance with a predetermined program to allow patterning of the nanoparticles. The positioning was analyzed for different treatment conditions and compared to the calculated data. To investigate the obtained nanoparticles/metal structures, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was used utilizing its high sensitivity on the local properties of the nanostructures. SERS allows the observing of carbon nanostructures with their characteristic peculiarities, such as blinking effect and selective enhancement. Here we try to explain the spectral and spatial peculiarities occurring during the laser acceleration process and the interaction of attached carbon nanostructures with metal surface

  14. Structured optical vortices with broadband comb-like optical spectra in Yb:Y3Al5O12/YVO4 Raman microchip laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Mingming; Wang, Xiaojie; He, Hongsen

    2018-04-01

    Structured optical vortices with 4 phase singularities have been generated in a laser diode pumped continuous-wave Yb:Y3Al5O12/YVO4 (Yb:YAG/YVO4) Raman microchip laser. The broadband comb-like first order Stokes laser emitting spectrum including 30 longitudinal modes covers from 1072.49 nm to 1080.13 nm with a bandwidth of 7.64 nm, which is generated with the Raman shift 259 cm-1 of the c-cut YVO4 crystal converted from the fundamental laser around 1.05 μm. Pump power dependent optical vortex beams are attributed to overlap of the Stokes laser field with the fundamental laser field caused by dynamically changing the coupling losses of the fundamental laser field. The maximum output power is 1.16 W, and the optical-to-optical efficiency is 18.4%. This work provides a method for generating structured optical vortices with an optical frequency comb in solid-state Raman microchip lasers, which have potential applications in quantum computations, micro-machining, and information processing.

  15. Intense Plasma Waveguide Terahertz Sources for High-Field THz Probe Science with Ultrafast Lasers for Solid State Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a...Summary 2 1. Introduction 2. Two colour excitation of intense terahertz radiation in MOFs 2 3. Terahertz optical nonlinearities in...of 2- colour THz generation and propagation in waveguides that we have developed to evaluate fibre designs before fabrication is only one

  16. Highly efficient channel waveguide lasers at 1 µm and 2 µm in refractive-index-engineered potassium double tungstates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalfsen, Koop; Geskus, D.; García Blanco, Sonia Maria; Pollnau, Markus

    Epitaxial growth of rare-earth-ion-activated KY(1-x-y)Gd(x)Lu(y)(WO4)2 co-doped thin layers onto KY(WO4)2 substrates has enabled lattice-matched waveguides with high refractive-index contract and large variation of the active rare-earth-ion concentration. In Yb3+-activated micro-structured channel

  17. Laser Raman microprobe spectroscopy as a diagnostic for the characterisation of diamond and diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, C.

    1990-10-01

    Invariably when manufacturing an artificial diamond film a mixture of carbon is deposited - tetragonally bonded (diamond), trigonally bonded (graphite) and other allotropic crystalline forms and amorphous carbons. This imposes a need for careful analysis to determine exactly what carbon types constitute the films. Raman spectroscopy is particularly sensitive to crystal and atomic structure and has a number of advantages which make it one of the most useful techniques for interrogating diamond and DLC thin films. Although Raman spectroscopy alone cannot fully characterise the film, it can give more information than simply what particular form of carbon or other impurities are present in the film. It can be used to determine the ratio of sp 2 to sp 3 bonding within the film, and to some extent the crystallite or domain size and the internal stress of the film. The use of laser Raman microprobe spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool in the analysis of diamond and DLC thin films is demonstrated for a variety of carbon films on various substrates and the characterisation of these films is discussed. (author)

  18. Effects of LED or laser phototherapy on bone defects grafted with MTA and irradiated with laser or LED light: a comparative Raman spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Soares, Luiz G. P.; Barbosa, Artur Felipe S.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    We studied peaks of calcium hydroxyapatite - CHA on defects grafted with MTA, treated or not with Light Emitting Diode - LED or IR Laser. 54 rats were divided in 6 groups each subdivided into 3 subgroups (15,21,30d). LED (λ850 +/- 10nm) or IR Laser (λ850 nm) was applied over (LED) or in 4 points around the defect at 48 h intervals for 15 days. Raman readings were taken at the surface of the defect. The smaller overall intensity of the peak was found in Group MTA + Laser (1510.2 +/- 274.1) and the highest on Group LED (2322 +/- 715). There were no statistically significant differences between non-irradiated subjects on regards the CHA peaks. On the other hand, there were statistically significant differences between the Group Clot and LED, Clot and Laser, and Clot and MTA + Laser (p =0.01, p = 0.02, p = 0.003). There were no significant differences between Group MTA and MTA + LED (p=0.2) but significant differences were seen between Groups MTA and MTA + Laser (p=0.01). Significant differences were also observed between Groups LED and Laser (p <0.001) and between Groups MTA + LED and MTA + Laser (p=0.009). MTA, due to its characteristics, seemed to be directly affected by the light. However, the use of either phototherapy positively affected bone healing similarly as observed on different studies using other biomaterials. The overall analysis of our results indicated that the use of either light source resulted in a better, more advanced, and of quality bone repair.

  19. Progress on erbium-doped waveguide components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Berendt, Martin Ole; Broeng, Jes

    1997-01-01

    The recent development in erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, and fiber lasers is reviewed. Also the latest results on planar erbium-doped waveguide amplifiers and high erbium concentration characterisation methods are presented...

  20. Compact Solid-State 213 nm Laser Enables Standoff Deep Ultraviolet Raman Spectrometer: Measurements of Nitrate Photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, Sergei V; Mao, Michael; Gares, Katie L; Asher, Sanford A

    2015-08-01

    We describe a new compact acousto-optically Q-switched diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) intracavity frequency-tripled neodymium-doped yttrium vanadate laser capable of producing ~100 mW of 213 nm power quasi-continuous wave as 15 ns pulses at a 30 kHz repetition rate. We use this new laser in a prototype of a deep ultraviolet (UV) Raman standoff spectrometer. We use a novel high-throughput, high-resolution Echelle Raman spectrograph. We measure the deep UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectra of solid and solution sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) at a standoff distance of ~2.2 m. For this 2.2 m standoff distance and a 1 min spectral accumulation time, where we only monitor the symmetric stretching band, we find a solid state NaNO3 detection limit of ~100 μg/cm(2). We easily detect ~20 μM nitrate water solutions in 1 cm path length cells. As expected, the aqueous solutions UVRR spectra of NaNO3 and NH4NO3 are similar, showing selective resonance enhancement of the nitrate (NO3(-)) vibrations. The aqueous solution photochemistry is also similar, showing facile conversion of NO3(-) to nitrite (NO2(-)). In contrast, the observed UVRR spectra of NaNO3 and NH4NO3 powders significantly differ, because their solid-state photochemistries differ. Whereas solid NaNO3 photoconverts with a very low quantum yield to NaNO2, the NH4NO3 degrades with an apparent quantum yield of ~0.2 to gaseous species.

  1. Ultra-high speed all-optical signal processing using silicon waveguides and a carbon nanotubes based mode-locked laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Hua

    This thesis concerns the use of nano-engineered silicon waveguides for ultra-high speed optical serial data signal processing. The fundamental nonlinear properties of nano-engineered silicon waveguides are characterized. Utilizing the nonlinear effect in nano-engineered silicon waveguides for dem...

  2. A real-time Raman spectroscopy study of the dynamics of laser-thinning of MoS2 flakes to monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Enyao; Wang, Qiyuan; Zhang, Youwei; Cong, Chunxiao; Hu, Laigui; Tian, Pengfei; Liu, Ran; Zhang, Shi-Li; Qiu, Zhi-Jun

    2017-12-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) in monolayer form have attracted a great deal of attention for electronic and optical applications. Compared to mechanical exfoliation and chemical synthesis, laser thinning is a novel and unique "on-demand" approach to fabricate monolayers or pattern desired shapes with high controllability and reproducibility. Its successful demonstration motivates a further exploration of the dynamic behaviour of this local thinning process. Here, we present an in-situ study of void formation by laser irradiation with the assistance of temporal Raman evolution. In the analysis of time-dependent Raman intensity, an empirical formula relating void size to laser power and exposure time is established. Void in thinner MoS2 flakes grows faster than in thicker ones as a result of reduced sublimation temperature in the two-dimensional (2D) materials. Our study provides useful insights into the laser-thinning dynamics of 2D TMDCs and guidelines for an effective control over the void formation.

  3. An apparatus comprising a waveguide-modulator and laser-diode and a method of manufacture thereof

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Boon S.; Shen, Chao; Ng, Tien Khee; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; Eldesouki, Munir M.

    2017-01-01

    Example apparatuses are provided for simultaneous generation of high intensity light and modulated light signals at low modulation bias operating characteristics. An example apparatus includes a semipolar or nonpolar GaN-based substrate, a reverse- biased waveguide modulator section, and a forward-biased gain section based on InGaN/GaN quantum-well active regions, wherein the forward-biased gain section is grown on the semipolar or nonpolar GaN-based substrate. Methods of manufacturing the apparatuses described herein are also contemplated and described herein.

  4. An apparatus comprising a waveguide-modulator and laser-diode and a method of manufacture thereof

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-04-13

    Example apparatuses are provided for simultaneous generation of high intensity light and modulated light signals at low modulation bias operating characteristics. An example apparatus includes a semipolar or nonpolar GaN-based substrate, a reverse- biased waveguide modulator section, and a forward-biased gain section based on InGaN/GaN quantum-well active regions, wherein the forward-biased gain section is grown on the semipolar or nonpolar GaN-based substrate. Methods of manufacturing the apparatuses described herein are also contemplated and described herein.

  5. Optical and structural properties of Pr:GGGcrystalline thin film waveguides grown by pulsed-laser deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lančok, Ján; Garapon, C.; Jelínek, Miroslav; Mugnier, J.; Brenier, R.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 81, - (2005), s. 1477-1483 ISSN 0947-8396 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP106/01/D017 Grant - others:European Community- Marie Curie Fellowhip(XE) HP MF-CT-2001-01492; CLYME(FR) GEMPPM-UMR5510 CNRS-INSA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : Pr: GGG * thin films * waveguide Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.990, year: 2005

  6. Fabrication of ultrafast laser written low-loss waveguides in flexible As₂S₃ chalcogenide glass tape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Jerome; Ledemi, Yannick; Loranger, Sébastien; Iezzi, Victor Lambin; Soares de Lima Filho, Elton; Parent, Francois; Morency, Steeve; Messaddeq, Younes; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-01-15

    As2S3 glass has a unique combination of optical properties, such as wide transparency in the infrared region and a high nonlinear coefficient. Recently, intense research has been conducted to improve photonic devices using thin materials. In this Letter, highly uniform rectangular single-index and 2 dB/m loss step-index optical tapes have been drawn by the crucible technique. Low-loss (writing process in thin glass is also presented to facilitate a repeatable waveguide inscription recipe.

  7. On Sagnac frequency splitting in a solid-state ring Raman laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Griffith, Robert; De Cuir, Edwin; Kim, Steven; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute

    2017-11-15

    We report on an accurate measurement of the frequency splitting of an optical rotating ring microcavity made out of calcium fluoride. By measuring the frequencies of the clockwise and counter-clockwise coherent Raman emissions confined in the cavity modes, we show that the frequency splitting is inversely proportional to the refractive index of the cavity host material. The measurement has an accuracy of 1% and unambiguously confirms the classical theoretical prediction based on special theory of relativity. This Letter also demonstrates the usefulness of the ring Raman microlaser for rotation measurements.

  8. Observation of a rainbow of visible colors in a near infrared cascaded Raman fiber laser and its novel application as a diagnostic tool for length resolved spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparanji, Santosh; Balaswamy, V.; Arun, S.; Supradeepa, V. R.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we report and analyse the surprising observation of a rainbow of visible colors, spanning 390nm to 620nm, in silica-based, Near Infrared, continuous-wave, cascaded Raman fiber lasers. The cascaded Raman laser is pumped at 1117nm at around 200W and at full power we obtain 100 W at 1480nm. With increasing pump power at 1117nm, the fiber constituting the Raman laser glows in various hues along its length. From spectroscopic analysis of the emitted visible light, it was identified to be harmonic and sum-frequency components of various locally propagating wavelength components. In addition to third harmonic components, surprisingly, even 2nd harmonic components were observed. Despite being a continuous-wave laser, we expect the phase-matching occurring between the core-propagating NIR light with the cladding-propagating visible wavelengths and the intensity fluctuations characteristic of Raman lasers to have played a major role in generation of visible light. In addition, this surprising generation of visible light provides us a powerful non-contact method to deduce the spectrum of light propagating in the fiber. Using static images of the fiber captured by a standard visible camera such as a DSLR, we demonstrate novel, image-processing based techniques to deduce the wavelength component propagating in the fiber at any given spatial location. This provides a powerful diagnostic tool for both length and power resolved spectral analysis in Raman fiber lasers. This helps accurate prediction of the optimal length of fiber required for complete and efficient conversion to a given Stokes wavelength.

  9. A new method for detection of the electron temperature in laser-plasma short wave cut off of stimulated Raman scattering spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jiatai

    1994-01-01

    From the theory of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) three wave interaction, a new method of detecting the electron temperature in laser-plasma is obtained. SRS spectrum obtained from Shenguang No. 12 Nd-laser experiments are analysed. Using the wave length of short wave cut off of SRS, the electron temperature in corona plasma region is calculated consistently. These results agree reasonable with X-ray spectrum experiments

  10. Plasma conditions generated by interaction of a high brightness, prepulse free Raman amplified KrF laser pulse with solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, D.; Gizzi, L.A.; Khattak, F.Y.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Viana, S.M.; Willi, O.

    1992-01-01

    A high brightness, Raman amplified KrF laser has been used to irradiate solid targets with 12 ps laser pulses at intensities above 10 15 W/cm 2 without the presence of a preformed plasma caused by low level amplified spontaneous emission prepulse. Time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy of the K-shell emission from aluminum was used to infer electron densities in excess of 10 23 cm -3 at temperatures of several hundred electronvolts

  11. COMPACT ATHERMAL OPTICAL WAVEGUIDE USING THERMAL EXPANSION AMPLIFICATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    A method of temperature stabilising optical waveguides having positive thermal optical path length expansion, in particular fiber Bragg gratings or optical fiber DFB lasers or optical fiber DBR lasers, comprising affixing the optical waveguide to at least two points of a negative expanding fixture...

  12. Focused-ion-beam nano-structured rib channel waveguides in KY(WO4)2 for laser applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardillou, F.; Romanyuk, Y.E.; Pavius, M.; Borca, C.N.; Salathé, R.P.; Pollnau, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Bulk $KY(WO_4)_2$ (hereafter KYW) laser crystals doped with rare-earth ions are recognized to be among the most promising host materials for obtaining novel solid-state lasers. The rare-earth ions $RE^{3+}$ are easily incorporated in the KYW structure by replacing the $Y{3+}$ ions, resulting in a

  13. Laser Raman detection of platelet as a non-invasive approach for early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, P; Wang, X H; Cheng, Y; Peng, J; Shen, A G; Hu, J M; Tian, Q; Shang, X L; Liu, Z C; Yao, X Q; Wang, J Z; Baek, S J; Park, A

    2011-01-01

    Early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a problem that puzzled many doctors. Reliable markers in easy-assembling samples are of considerable clinical diagnostic value. In this work, laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) was developed a new method that potentially allows early and differential diagnosis of AD from the platelet sample. Raman spectra of platelets isolated from different ages of AD transgenic mice and non-transgenic controls were collected and analyzed. Multilayer perceptron networks (MLP) classification method was used to classify spectra and establish the diagnostic models. For differential diagnosis, spectra of platelets isolated from AD, Parkinson's disease (PD) and vascular dementia (VD) mice were also discriminated. Two notable spectral differences at 740 and 1654 cm -1 were revealed in the mean spectrum of platelets isolated from AD transgenic mice and the controls. MLP displayed a powerful ability in the classifying of early, advanced AD and the control group, and in differential diagnosis of PD and advanced AD, as well as VD and advanced AD. The results suggest that platelet detecting by LRS coupled with MLP analysis appears to be an easy and accurate method for early and differential diagnosis of AD. This technique could be rapidly promoted from laboratory to the hospital

  14. [Laser Raman spectral investigations of the carbon structure of LiFePO4/C cathode material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Li, Yong-Mei; Zhao, Quan-Feng; Gan, Xiang-Kun; Yao, Yao-Chun

    2013-10-01

    In the present paper, Laser Raman spectral was used to study the carbon structure of LiFePO4/C positive material. The samples were also been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope(SEM), selected area electron diffraction (SEAD) and resistivity test. The result indicated that compared with the sp2/sp3 peak area ratios the I(D)/I(G) ratios are not only more evenly but also exhibited some similar rules. However, the studies indicated that there exist differences of I(D)/ I(G) ratios and sp2/sp3 peak area ratios among different points in the same sample. And compared with the samples using citric acid or sucrose as carbon source, the sample which was synthetized with mixed carbon source (mixed by citric acid and sucrose) exhibited higher I(D)/I(G) ratios and sp2/sp3 peak area ratios. Also, by contrast, the differences of I(D)/I(G) ratios and sp2/sp3 peak area ratios among different points in the same sample are less than the single carbon source samples' datas. In the scanning electron microscopy (sem) and transmission electron microscopy (sem) images, we can observed the uneven distributions of carbon coating of the primary particles and the secondary particles, this may be the main reason for not being uniform of difference data in the same sample. The obvious discreteness will affect the normal use of Raman spectroscopy in these tests.

  15. Multiwavelength Raman-fiber-laser-based long-distance remote sensor for simultaneous measurement of strain and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Geun; Tran, T V A; Kim, Sang-Hyuck; Lee, Sang Bae

    2005-06-01

    We propose a simple and flexible multiwavelength Raman-fiber-laser-based long-distance remote-sensing scheme for simultaneous measurement of strain and temperature by use of fiber Bragg gratings. By combining two uniform fiber Bragg gratings with a tunable chirped fiber grating, we readily achieve simultaneous two-channel sensing probes with a high extinction ratio of more than approximately 50 dB over a 50-km distance. When strain and temperature are applied, lasing wavelength separation and shift occur, respectively, since the two uniform fiber Bragg gratings have identical material composition and different cladding diameters. This allows simultaneous measurement of strain and temperature for long-distance sensing applications of more than 50 km.

  16. Electric field measurements at near-atmospheric pressure by coherent Raman scattering of laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tsuyohito; Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Mueller, Sarah; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Electric field measurements at near-atmospheric pressure environments based on electric-field induced Raman scattering are applied to repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharges. The results have revealed that the peak electric field near the centre of the gap is almost independent of the applied voltage. Minimum sustainable voltage measurements suggests that, at each discharge pulse, charged particles that remain from the previous pulse serve as discharge seeds and play an important role for generation of uniform glow-like discharges.

  17. Nonlinear optical localization in embedded chalcogenide waveguide arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Mingshan; Huang, Sheng; Wang, Qingqing; Chen, Kevin P.; Petek, Hrvoje

    2014-01-01

    We report the nonlinear optical localization in an embedded waveguide array fabricated in chalcogenide glass. The array, which consists of seven waveguides with circularly symmetric cross sections, is realized by ultrafast laser writing. Light propagation in the chalcogenide waveguide array is studied with near infrared laser pulses centered at 1040 nm. The peak intensity required for nonlinear localization for the 1-cm long waveguide array was 35.1 GW/cm 2 , using 10-nJ pulses with 300-fs pulse width, which is 70 times lower than that reported in fused silica waveguide arrays and with over 7 times shorter interaction distance. Results reported in this paper demonstrated that ultrafast laser writing is a viable tool to produce 3D all-optical switching waveguide circuits in chalcogenide glass

  18. Laser scattering on an atmospheric pressure plasma jet : disentangling Rayleigh, Raman and Thomson scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gessel, van A.F.H.; Carbone, E.A.D.; Bruggeman, P.J.; Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser scattering provides a very direct method for measuring the local densities and temperatures inside a plasma. We present new experimental results of laser scattering on an argon atmospheric pressure microwave plasma jet operating in an air environment. The plasma is very small so a high spatial

  19. High-density volatiles in the system C-O-H-N for the calibration of a laser Raman microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I.-Ming; Pasteris, J.D.; Seitz, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Three methods have been used to produce high-density volatiles in the system C-O-H-N for the calibration of a laser Raman microprobe (LRM): synthetic fluid-inclusion, sealed fused-quartz-tube, and high-pressure-cell methods. Because quantitative interpretation of a Raman spectrum of mixed-volatile fluid inclusions requires accurate knowledge of pressure- and composition-sensitive Raman scattering efficiencies or quantification factors for each species, calibrations of these parameters for mixtures of volatiles of known composition and pressure are necessary. Two advantages of the synthetic fluid-inclusion method are that the inclusions can be used readily in complementary microthermometry (MT) studies and that they have sizes and optical properties like those in natural samples. Some disadvantages are that producing H2O-free volatile mixtures is difficult, the composition may vary from one inclusion to another, the exact composition and density of the inclusions are difficult to obtain, and the experimental procedures are complicated. The primary advantage of the method using sealed fused-quartz tubes is its simplicity. Some disadvantages are that exact compositions for complex volatile mixtures are difficult to predict, densities can be approximated only, and complementary MT studies on the tubes are difficult to conduct. The advantages of the high-pressure-cell method are that specific, known compositions of volatile mixtures can be produced and that their pressures can be varied easily and are monitored during calibration. Some disadvantages are that complementary MT analysis is impossible, and the setup is bulky. Among the three methods for the calibration of an LRM, the high-pressure-cell method is the most reliable and convenient for control of composition and total pressure. We have used the high-pressure cell to obtain preliminary data on 1. (1) the ratio of the Raman quantification factors for CH4 and N2 in an equimolar CH4N2 mixture and 2. (2) the

  20. Onset and saturation of backward stimulated Raman scattering of laser in trapping regime in three spatial dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Rose, H. A.; Bowers, K. J.; Bergen, B.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Fernandez, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    A suite of three-dimensional (3D) VPIC[K. J. Bowers et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 055703 (2008)] particle-in-cell simulations of backward stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in inertial confinement fusion hohlraum plasma has been performed on the heterogeneous multicore supercomputer, Roadrunner, presently the world's most powerful supercomputer. These calculations reveal the complex nonlinear behavior of SRS and point to a new era of 'at scale' 3D modeling of SRS in solitary and multiple laser speckles. The physics governing nonlinear saturation of SRS in a laser speckle in 3D is consistent with that of prior two-dimensional (2D) studies [L. Yin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 265004 (2007)], but with important differences arising from enhanced diffraction and side loss in 3D compared with 2D. In addition to wave front bowing of electron plasma waves (EPWs) due to trapped electron nonlinear frequency shift and amplitude-dependent damping, we find for the first time that EPW self-focusing, which evolved from trapped particle modulational instability [H. A. Rose and L. Yin, Phys. Plasmas 15, 042311 (2008)], also exhibits loss of angular coherence by formation of a filament necklace, a process not available in 2D. These processes in 2D and 3D increase the side-loss rate of trapped electrons, increase wave damping, decrease source coherence for backscattered light, and fundamentally limit how much backscatter can occur from a laser speckle. For both SRS onset and saturation, the nonlinear trapping induced physics is not captured in linear gain modeling of SRS. A simple metric is described for using single-speckle reflectivities obtained from VPIC simulations to infer the total reflectivity from the population of laser speckles of amplitude sufficient for significant trapping-induced nonlinearity to arise.

  1. Measurement of carrier lifetime and linewidth enhancement factor for 1.5- mu m ridge-waveguide laser amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storkfelt, Niels; Mikkelsen, B.; Olesen, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    Semiconductor optical amplifiers are used for investigation of the effective carrier lifetime and the linewidth enhancement factor. Contrary to semiconductor lasers, semiconductor optical amplifiers allow measurement at high levels of injected carrier density. The carrier lifetime and the linewid...

  2. Enhanced high harmonic generation driven by high-intensity laser in argon gas-filled hollow core waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassou, Kevin; Daboussi, Sameh; Hort, Ondrej; Descamps, Dominique; Petit, Stephane; Mevel, Eric; Constant, Eric; Guilbaud, Oilvier; Kazamias, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    We show that a significant enhancement of the photon flux produced by high harmonic generation can be obtained through guided configuration at high laser intensity largely above the saturation intensity. We identify two regimes. At low pressure, we observe an intense second plateau in the high harmonic spectrum in argon. At relatively high pressure, complex interplay between strongly time-dependent ionization processes and propagation effects leads to important spectral broadening without loss of spectral brightness. We show that the relevant parameter for this physical process is the product of laser peak power by gas pressure. We compare source performances with high harmonic generation using a gas jet in loose focusing geometry and conclude that the source developed is a good candidate for injection devices such as seeded soft x-ray lasers or free electron lasers in the soft x-ray range. (authors)

  3. How to improve a critical performance for an ExoMars 2020 Scientific Instrument (RLS). Raman Laser Spectrometer Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canora, C. P.; Moral, A. G.; Rull, F.; Maurice, S.; Hutchinson, I.; Ramos, G.; López-Reyes, G.; Belenguer, T.; Canchal, R.; Prieto, J. A. R.; Rodriguez, P.; Santamaria, P.; Berrocal, A.; Colombo, M.; Gallago, P.; Seoane, L.; Quintana, C.; Ibarmia, S.; Zafra, J.; Saiz, J.; Santiago, A.; Marin, A.; Gordillo, C.; Escribano, D.; Sanz-Palominoa, M.

    2017-09-01

    The Raman Laser Spectrometer (RLS) is one of the Pasteur Payload instruments, within the ESA's Aurora Exploration Programme, ExoMars mission. Raman spectroscopy is based on the analysis of spectral fingerprints due to the inelastic scattering of light when interacting with matter. RLS is composed by Units: SPU (Spectrometer Unit), iOH (Internal Optical Head), and ICEU (Instrument Control and Excitation Unit) and the harnesses (EH and OH). The iOH focuses the excitation laser on the samples and collects the Raman emission from the sample via SPU (CCD) and the video data (analog) is received, digitalizing it and transmiting it to the processor module (ICEU). The main sources of noise arise from the sample, the background, and the instrument (Laser, CCD, focuss, acquisition parameters, operation control). In this last case the sources are mainly perturbations from the optics, dark signal and readout noise. Also flicker noise arising from laser emission fluctuations can be considered as instrument noise. In order to evaluate the SNR of a Raman instrument in a practical manner it is useful to perform end-to-end measurements on given standards samples. These measurements have to be compared with radiometric simulations using Raman efficiency values from literature and taking into account the different instrumental contributions to the SNR. The RLS EQM instrument performances results and its functionalities have been demonstrated in accordance with the science expectations. The Instrument obtained SNR performances in the RLS EQM will be compared experimentally and via analysis, with the Instrument Radiometric Model tool. The characterization process for SNR optimization is still on going. The operational parameters and RLS algorithms (fluorescence removal and acquisition parameters estimation) will be improved in future models (EQM-2) until FM Model delivery.

  4. Shifted excitation resonance Raman difference spectroscopy using a microsystem light source at 488 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiwald, M.; Sowoidnich, K.; Schmidt, H.; Sumpf, B.; Erbert, G.; Kronfeldt, H.-D.

    2010-04-01

    Experimental results in shifted excitation resonance Raman difference spectroscopy (SERRDS) at 488 nm will be presented. A novel compact diode laser system was used as excitation light source. The device is based on a distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser as a pump light source and a nonlinear frequency doubling using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide crystal. All elements including micro-optics are fixed on a micro-optical bench with a footprint of 25 mm × 5 mm. An easy temperature management of the DFB laser and the crystal was used for wavelength tuning. The second harmonic generation (SHG) provides an additional suppression of the spontaneous emission. Raman spectra of polystyrene demonstrate that no laser bandpass filter is needed for the Raman experiments. Resonance-Raman spectra of the restricted food colorant Tartrazine (FD&C Yellow 5, E 102) in distilled water excited at 488 nm demonstrate the suitability of this light source for SERRDS. A limit of detection (LOD) of 0.4 μmol.l-1 of E102 enables SERRDS at 488 nm for trace detection in e.g. food safety control as an appropriate contactless spectroscopic technique.

  5. Raman ratios on the repair of grafted surgical bone defects irradiated or not with laser (λ780 nm) or LED (λ850 nm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz B; Soares, Luiz Guilherme P; Marques, Aparecida Maria C; Aciole, Jouber Mateus S; de Souza, Renato Aparecido; Silveira, Landulfo

    2014-09-05

    This work aimed to assess biochemical changes associated to mineralization and remodeling of bone defects filled with Hydroxyapatite+Beta-Beta-tricalcium phosphate irradiated or not with 2 light sources. Ratios of intensities, band position and bandwidth of selected Raman peaks of collagen and apatites were used. Sixty male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups subdivided into 2 subgroups (15th and 30th days). A standard surgical defect was created on one femur of each animal. In 3 groups the defects were filled with blood clot (Clot, Clot+Laser and Clot+LED groups) and in the remaining 3 groups the defects were filled with biomaterial (Biomaterial, Biomaterial+Laser and Biomaterial+LED groups). When indicated, the defects were irradiated with either Laser (λ780 nm, 70 mW, Φ∼0.4 cm(2)) or LED (λ850±10 nm, 150 mW, Φ∼0.5 cm(2)), 20 J/cm(2) each session, at 48 h intervals/2 weeks (140 J/cm(2) treatment). Following sacrifice, bone fragments were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Statistical analysis (ANOVA General Linear Model, pRaman ratios of selected protein matrix and phosphate and carbonate HA indicated that the use of biphasic synthetic micro-granular HA+Beta-TCP graft improved the repair of bone defects, associated or not with Laser or LED light, because of the increasing deposition of HA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Three-pulse multiplex coherent anti-Stokes/Stokes Raman scattering (CARS/CSRS) microspectroscopy using a white-light laser source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bito, Kotatsu; Okuno, Masanari; Kano, Hideaki; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have developed a simultaneous measurement system of CARS and CSRS. ► We can obtain information on the electronic resonance effect with the measurement. ► The simultaneous measurement provides us with more reliable spectral information. - Abstract: We have developed a three-pulse non-degenerate multiplex coherent Raman microspectroscopic system using a white-light laser source. The fundamental output (1064 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser is used for the pump radiation with the white-light laser output (1100–1700 nm) for the Stokes radiation to achieve broadband multiplex excitations of vibrational coherences. The second harmonic (532 nm) of the same Nd:YAG laser is used for the probe radiation. Thanks to the large wavelength difference between the pump and probe radiations, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) can be detected simultaneously. Simultaneous detection of CARS and CSRS enables us to obtain information on the electronic resonance effect that affects differently the CARS and CSRS signals. Simultaneous analysis of the CARS and CSRS signals provides us the imaginary part of χ (3) without introducing any arbitrary parameter in the maximum entropy method (MEM)

  7. Femtosecond pulse laser notch shaping via fiber Bragg grating for the excitation source on the coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Ryeol; Kwon, Won Sik; Kim, Jin Hwan; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2015-03-01

    Single-pulse coherently controlled nonlinear Raman spectroscopy is the simplest method among the coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy systems. In recent research, it has been proven that notch-shaped femtosecond pulse laser can be used to collect the coherent anti-Stokes Raman signals. In this study, we applied a fiber Bragg grating to the notch filtering component on the femtosecond pulse lasers. The experiment was performed incorporating a titanium sapphire femtosecond pulse laser source with a 100 mm length of 780-HP fiber which is inscribed 30 mm of Bragg grating. The fiber Bragg grating has 785 nm Bragg wavelength with 0.9 nm bandwidth. We proved that if the pulse lasers have above a certain level of positive group delay dispersion, it is sufficient to propagate in the fiber Bragg grating without any spectral distortion. After passing through the fiber Bragg grating, the pulse laser is reflected on the chirped mirror for 40 times to make the transform-limited pulse. Finally, the pulse time duration was 37 fs, average power was 50mW, and showed an adequate notch shape. Furthermore, the simulation of third order polarization signal is performed using MATLAB tools and the simulation result shows that spectral characteristic and time duration of the pulse is sufficient to use as an excitation source for single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In conclusion, the proposed method is more simple and cost-effective than the methods of previous research which use grating pairs and resonant photonic crystal slab.

  8. Sm 3+-doped polymer optical waveguide amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lihui; Tsang, Kwokchu; Pun, Edwin Yue-Bun; Xu, Shiqing

    2010-04-01

    Trivalent samarium ion (Sm 3+) doped SU8 polymer materials were synthesized and characterized. Intense red emission at 645 nm was observed under UV laser light excitation. Spectroscopic investigations show that the doped materials are suitable for realizing planar optical waveguide amplifiers. About 100 μm wide multimode Sm 3+-doped SU8 channel waveguides were fabricated using a simple UV exposure process. At 250 mW, 351 nm UV pump power, a signal enhancement of ˜7.4 dB at 645 nm was obtained for a 15 mm long channel waveguide.

  9. FT-Raman spectroscopic analysis of Nd:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiated enamel for preventive purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ana, P. A.; Kauffmann, C. M. F.; Bachmann, L.; Soares, L. E. S.; Martin, A. A.; Gomes, A. S. L.; Zezell, D. M.

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of combining laser irradiation with fluoride on an enamel microstructure and demineralization by FT-Raman spectroscopy (FTRS). Eighty human enamel slabs were divided into eight groups: (G1) untreated; (G2) acidulated phosphate fluoride application (APF—1.23% F- for 4 min) (G3) Nd:YAG irradiation (84.9 J cm-2, 60 mJ/pulse) (G4) Nd:YAG + APF; (G5) APF + Nd:YAG; (G6) Er,Cr:YSGG irradiation (2.8 J cm-2, 12.5 mJ/pulse) (G7) Er,Cr:YSGG + APF; and (G8) APF + Er,Cr:YSGG. After treatment, the samples were submitted to a ten-day pH-cycling model. Chemical changes were determined on the slabs before and after treatment, and also after pH-cycling, by FTRS in the range 400-4000 cm-1. The inorganic bands at 440, 590, 870, 960, 1100 cm-1, and the organic bands at 1270, 1450, 1670, 2945 cm-1 were considered. Demineralization promoted reduction in organic contents; Nd:YAG laser irradiation promoted loss of carbonate and organic content, while Er,Cr:YSGG did not produce significant changes in the relative band intensities of organic and inorganic contents of the enamel. In lased samples, no effects caused by pH-cycling on enamel were observed. In conclusion, laser treatment and its association with fluoride can somehow interfere with the demineralization dynamics, reducing its effects over the enamel.

  10. FT-Raman spectroscopic analysis of Nd:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiated enamel for preventive purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ana, P A; Kauffmann, C M F; Gomes, A S L; Bachmann, L; Soares, L E S; Martin, A A; Zezell, D M

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of combining laser irradiation with fluoride on an enamel microstructure and demineralization by FT-Raman spectroscopy (FTRS). Eighty human enamel slabs were divided into eight groups: (G1) untreated; (G2) acidulated phosphate fluoride application (APF—1.23% F − for 4 min); (G3) Nd:YAG irradiation (84.9 J cm −2 , 60 mJ/pulse); (G4) Nd:YAG + APF; (G5) APF + Nd:YAG; (G6) Er,Cr:YSGG irradiation (2.8 J cm −2 , 12.5 mJ/pulse); (G7) Er,Cr:YSGG + APF; and (G8) APF + Er,Cr:YSGG. After treatment, the samples were submitted to a ten-day pH-cycling model. Chemical changes were determined on the slabs before and after treatment, and also after pH-cycling, by FTRS in the range 400−4000 cm −1 . The inorganic bands at 440, 590, 870, 960, 1100 cm −1 , and the organic bands at 1270, 1450, 1670, 2945 cm −1 were considered. Demineralization promoted reduction in organic contents; Nd:YAG laser irradiation promoted loss of carbonate and organic content, while Er,Cr:YSGG did not produce significant changes in the relative band intensities of organic and inorganic contents of the enamel. In lased samples, no effects caused by pH-cycling on enamel were observed. In conclusion, laser treatment and its association with fluoride can somehow interfere with the demineralization dynamics, reducing its effects over the enamel. (paper)

  11. Optical properties behavior of three optical filters and a mirror used in the internal optical head of a Raman laser spectrometer after exposed to proton radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guembe, V.; Alvarado, C. G.; Fernández-Rodriguez, M.; Gallego, P.; Belenguer, T.; Díaz, E.

    2017-11-01

    The Raman Laser Spectrometer is one of the ExoMars Pasteur Rover's payload instruments that is devoted to the analytical analysis of the geochemistry content and elemental composition of the observed minerals provided by the Rover through Raman spectroscopy technique. One subsystem of the RLS instrument is the Internal Optical Head unit (IOH), which is responsible for focusing the light coming from the laser onto the mineral under analysis and for collecting the Raman signal emitted by the excited mineral. The IOH is composed by 4 commercial elements for Raman spectroscopy application; 2 optical filters provided by Iridian Spectral Technologies Company and 1 optical filter and 1 mirror provided by Semrock Company. They have been exposed to proton radiation in order to analyze their optical behaviour due to this hostile space condition. The proton irradiation test was performed following the protocol of LINES lab (INTA). The optical properties have been studied through transmittance, reflectance and optical density measurements, the final results and its influence on optical performances are presented.

  12. Hyper-Rayleigh scattering and hyper-Raman scattering of dye-adsorbed silver nanoparticles induced by a focused continuous-wave near-infrared laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Tamitake; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Ihama, Takashi; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    We report that hyper-Rayleigh scattering, surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering, and two-photon excited luminescence occur intermittently by focusing a continuous-wave near-infrared (cw-NIR) laser into a colloidal silver solution including rhodamine 6G (R6G) and sodium chloride (NaCl). On the other hand, continuous hyper-Rayleigh scattering is observed from colloidal silver free from R6G and NaCl, demonstrating that hyper-Raman scattering and two-photon excited luminescence are attributed to R6G and their intermittent features are dependent on the colloidal dispersion. These results suggest that the cw-NIR laser has three roles; the source of the nonlinear response, optical trapping of nanoparticles, and making nanoparticle aggregates possessing the high activity for the nonlinear response

  13. An All-Fiber Gas Raman Light Source Based on a Hydrogen-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber Pumped with a Q-Switched Fiber Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiao-Dong; Mao Qing-He; Sun Qing; Zhao Jia-Sheng; Li Pan; Feng Su-Juan

    2011-01-01

    A gas Raman light source based on a H 2 -filled hollow-core photonic-crystal-fiber cell with a Q-switched fiber laser followed by a fiber amplifier as the Raman pump source is demonstrated. The Stokes frequency-shift lasing line is observed at 1135.7 nm with the Q-switched pump pulses at 1064.7 nm. Our experimental results show that the generated Stokes pulse is much narrower than the pump pulse, and the generated Stokes pulse duration is increased with the single pulse energy for the same duration pump pulses. For the 125 ns pump pulses with a repetition rate of 5 kHz, the Raman threshold pump energy and the conversion efficiency at the Raman threshold are 2.13 μJ and 9.82%. Moreover, by choosing narrower pump pulses, the Raman threshold pump energy may be reduced and the conversion efficiency may be improved. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  14. Laser-Raman Measurements in the Muzzle Blast Region of a 20-mm Cannon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    Figs. 5 and 6, the entire spectrometer system was mounted below the laser syste m on the same two-tiered aluminum table which was clamped to the top... Thermometric Measurements of Propellant Gas Temperatures in Guns." AIAA Journal, Vol. 15, No. 2, February 1977, pp. 222-226. 4. Schmidt, E. M., Fansler

  15. Hollow cylindrical plasma filament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan

    2013-01-01

    We have explored here a hollow cylindrical laser plasma multifilament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding, in which the separation between individual filaments is in the range of several millimeters and the waveguide cladding thickness is in the order of the microwave penetration depth. Such parameters give a closer representation of a realistic laser filament waveguide sustained by a long stable propagation of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. We report how the waveguide losses depend on structural parameters like normalized plasma filament spacing, filament to filament distance or pitch, normal spatial frequency, and radius of the plasma filament. We found that for typical plasma parameters, the proposed waveguide can support guided modes of microwaves in extremely high frequency even with a cladding consisting of only one ring of plasma filaments. The loss of the microwave radiation is mainly caused by tunneling through the discontinuous finite cladding, i.e., confinement loss, and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In addition, the analysis indicates that the propagation loss is fairly large compared with the loss of a plasma waveguide with a continuous infinite thickness cladding, while they are comparable when using a cladding contains more than one ring. Compared to free space propagation, this waveguide still presents a superior microwave transmission to some distance in the order of the filamentation length; thus, the laser plasma filaments waveguide may be a potential channel for transporting pulsed-modulated microwaves if ensuring a long and stable propagation of fs laser pulses.

  16. Raman study of the repair of surgical bone defects grafted with biphasic synthetic microgranular HA + β-calcium triphosphate and irradiated or not with λ780 nm laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luiz Guilherme P; Marques, Aparecida Maria C; Barbosa, Artur Felipe S; Santos, Nicole R; Aciole, Jouber Mateus S; Souza, Caroline Mathias C; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz B; Silveira, Landulfo

    2014-09-01

    The treatment of bone loss due to different etiologic factors is difficult, and many techniques aim to improve repair, including a wide range of biomaterials and, recently, photobioengineering. This work aimed to assess, through Raman spectroscopy, the level of bone mineralization using the intensities of the Raman peaks of both inorganic (∼ 960, ∼ 1,070, and ∼ 1,077 cm(-1)) and organic (∼ 1,454 and ∼ 1,666 cm(-1)) contents of bone tissue. Forty rats were divided into four groups each subdivided into two subgroups according to the time of killing (15 and 30 days). Surgical bone defects were made on femur of each animal with a trephine drill. On animals of group Clot, the defect was filled only by blood clot; on group Laser, the defect filled with the clot was further irradiated. On animals of groups Biomaterial and Laser + Biomaterial, the defect was filled by biomaterial and the last one was further irradiated (λ780 nm, 70 mW, Φ ∼ 0.4 cm(2), 20 J/cm(2) session, 140 J/cm(2) treatment) in four points around the defect at 48-h intervals and repeated for 2 weeks. At both 15th and 30th day following killing, samples were taken and analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. At the end of the experimental time, the intensities of both inorganic and organic contents were higher on group Laser + Biomaterial. It is concluded that the use of laser phototherapy associated to biomaterial was effective in improving bone healing on bone defects as a result of the increasing deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite measured by Raman spectroscopy.

  17. Quantum waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Exner, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    This monograph explains the theory of quantum waveguides, that is, dynamics of quantum particles confined to regions in the form of tubes, layers, networks, etc. The focus is on relations between the confinement geometry on the one hand and the spectral and scattering properties of the corresponding quantum Hamiltonians on the other. Perturbations of such operators, in particular, by external fields are also considered. The volume provides a unique summary of twenty five years of research activity in this area and indicates ways in which the theory can develop further. The book is fairly self-contained. While it requires some broader mathematical physics background, all the basic concepts are properly explained and proofs of most theorems are given in detail, so there is no need for additional sources. Without a parallel in the literature, the monograph by Exner and Kovarik guides the reader through this new and exciting field.

  18. LD-pumped actively Q-switched c-cut Nd:GdVO4 self-Raman laser operating at 1166 and 1176 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xinzhi; Zhang, Xihe; Li, Shutao; Dong, Yuan

    2017-12-01

    A laser diode pumped actively Q-switched c-cut Nd:GdVO4 self-Raman laser is experimentally investigated. Simultaneous pulse outputs at 1166 nm and 1176 nm corresponding to the Raman shifts of 807 and 882 cm-1 are acquired. At the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 20 kHz, the maximum output power is 103 mW at 1166 nm with the incident pump power of 2.31 W, while 1176 nm output power reaches 530 mW with the incident pump power of 4.11 W. The maximum output power of Raman laser is 570 mW with the incident pump power of 4.11 W and the PRF of 30 kHz. With the incident pump power of 3.67 W and the PRF of 30 kHz, the highest diode-to-Stokes optical conversion efficiency of 14.9% is obtained with the corresponding average output power of 547 mW.

  19. Structural Changes Induced in Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. DNA by Femtosecond IR Laser Pulses: A Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta E. Dina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, surface-enhanced Raman spectra of ten genomic DNAs extracted from leaf tissues of different grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. varieties, respectively, are analyzed in the wavenumber range 300–1800 cm−1. Furthermore, structural changes induced in grapevine genomic nucleic acids upon femtosecond (170 fs infrared (IR laser pulse irradiation (λ = 1100 nm are discussed in detail for seven genomic DNAs, respectively. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS signatures, vibrational band assignments and structural characterization of genomic DNAs are reported for each case. As a general observation, the wavenumber range between 1500 and 1660 cm−1 of the spectra seems to be modified upon laser treatment. This finding could reflect changes in the base-stacking interactions in DNA. Spectral shifts are mainly attributed to purines (dA, dG and deoxyribose. Pyrimidine residues seem to be less affected by IR femtosecond laser pulse irradiation. Furthermore, changes in the conformational properties of nucleic acid segments are observed after laser treatment. We have found that DNA isolated from Feteasca Neagra grapevine leaf tissues is the most structurally-responsive system to the femtosecond IR laser irradiation process. In addition, using unbiased computational resources by means of principal component analysis (PCA, eight different grapevine varieties were discriminated.

  20. Diode-side-pumped intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YAG/BaWO4 Raman laser generating average output power of 3.14 W at 590 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shutao; Zhang, Xingyu; Wang, Qingpu; Zhang, Xiaolei; Cong, Zhenhua; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Jiyang

    2007-10-15

    We report a linear-cavity high-power all-solid-state Q-switched yellow laser. The laser source comprises a diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG module that produces 1064 nm fundamental radiation, an intracavity BaWO(4) Raman crystal that generates a first-Stokes laser at 1180 nm, and a KTP crystal that frequency doubles the first-Stokes laser to 590 nm. A convex-plane cavity is employed in this configuration to counteract some of the thermal effect caused by high pump power. An average output power of 3.14 W at 590 nm is obtained at a pulse repetition frequency of 10 kHz.

  1. 3.05 kW monolithic fiber laser oscillator with simultaneous optimizations of stimulated Raman scattering and transverse mode instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baolai; Zhang, Hanwei; Shi, Chen; Tao, Rumao; Su, Rongtao; Ma, Pengfei; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Xu, Xiaojun; Lu, Qisheng

    2018-01-01

    We report a high power monolithic ytterbium-doped fiber laser oscillator with an output power of 3.05 kW, which is achieved by simultaneous optimizations of the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and transverse mode instability (TMI). The optimizations of the SRS are designed and utilized in the construction of the fiber laser oscillator, while the TMI threshold is optimized with the study of the dependence of TMI threshold on the pump distribution. In the fiber laser oscillator, the TMI threshold is enhanced by ˜30% when the counter-pump scheme is employed instead of the co-pump scheme. By applying bidirectional-pump scheme and appropriately distributing the pump power, the TMI threshold is further enhanced and the monolithic fiber laser oscillator achieves an output power of 3.05 kW with near diffraction limited beam quality.

  2. Measurement of the surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SECARS) due to the 1574 cm(-1) surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) mode of benzenethiol using low-power (CW diode lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Roshan L; Farrar, Lewis W; Greeneltch, Nathan G; Van Duyne, Richard P; Polla, Dennis L

    2013-02-01

    The surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SECARS) from a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of benzenethiol on a silver-coated surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate has been measured for the 1574 cm(-1) SERS mode. A value of 9.6 ± 1.7×10(-14) W was determined for the resonant component of the SECARS signal using 17.8 mW of 784.9 nm pump laser power and 7.1 mW of 895.5 nm Stokes laser power; the pump and Stokes lasers were polarized parallel to each other but perpendicular to the grooves of the diffraction grating in the spectrometer. The measured value of resonant component of the SECARS signal is in agreement with the calculated value of 9.3×10(-14) W using the measured value of 8.7 ± 0.5 cm(-1) for the SERS linewidth Γ (full width at half-maximum) and the value of 5.7 ± 1.4×10(-7) for the product of the Raman cross section σSERS and the surface concentration Ns of the benzenethiol SAM. The xxxx component of the resonant part of the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility |3 χxxxx((3)R)| for the 1574 cm(-1) SERS mode has been determined to be 4.3 ± 1.1×10(-5) cm·g(-1)·s(2). The SERS enhancement factor for the 1574 cm(-1) mode was determined to be 3.6 ± 0.9×10(7) using the value of 1.8×10(15) molecules/cm(2) for Ns.

  3. New configurations for short-pulses high power solid-state lasers: conception and realization of highly doped waveguide amplifiers/lasers grown by liquid phase epitaxy and demonstration of Y2SiO5: Yb and Lu2SiO5: Yb femtosecond lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thibault, F.

    2006-04-01

    Yb-doped yttrium and lutetium ortho-silicates, Y 2 SiO 5 :Yb and Lu 2 SiO 5 :Yb respectively, exhibit spectroscopic properties favorable to an efficient laser operation in both high power cw and femtosecond regime. Their first diode-pumped femtosecond operation demonstration lead to exceptional performances in terms of output power and efficiency. In order to realize compact and efficient solid-state laser devices using those materials, we chose a configuration with an Yb-doped medium planar waveguide geometry, grown by liquid phase epitaxy, face-pumped by a single laser diode bar. The growth of highly doped Y 2 SiO 5 :Yb layers, within a large range of compositions and thicknesses, was demonstrated. The refractive index increase due to the substitution of the various dopants is analyzed. The layers spectroscopic properties are similar to the bulk ones, with an noticeably higher crystalline quality. The Yb ion lifetime evolution with respect to its doping shows up a particularly low decrease, proof of a low concentration of extrinsic quenching centers. The covered YSO:24%Yb waveguides exhibit lower than 0.3 dB/cm propagation losses, and provided up to 2.9 dB/cm net amplification at 1082 nm with a single mode output. The realization of the first diode-pumped monolithic cw waveguide lasers was also demonstrated. For a 4% output coupler, they provided up to 340 mW at 1082 nm with a 14% slope efficiency. (author)

  4. Raman spectral features of single walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by laser vaporization

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moodley, MK

    2006-07-05

    Full Text Available synthesized boxshadowdwnSemi-conductor tubes were favoured boxshadowdwnImproved crystallinity as indicated by narrower line- widths. Thank You Acknowledgements to the CSIR NLC for support on carbon nanotube research ... www.csir.co.za Experimental……..cont. Experimental parameters • two laser combined and vaporize a composite target • target in a tube furnace in continuous flow of Argon • temperature kept at 1000 OC • Ar flow of 200 sccm • Pressure at 375 Torr...

  5. Advanced Gas Sensors Using SERS-Activated Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascola, Robert; McWhorter, Scott; Murph, Simona Hunyadi

    2010-08-01

    This contribution describes progress towards the development and testing of a functionalized capillary that will provide detection of low-concentration gas-phase analytes through SERS. Measurement inside a waveguide allows interrogation of a large surface area, potentially overcoming the short distance dependence of the SERS effect. The possible use of Raman spectroscopy for gas detection is attractive for IR-inactive molecules or scenarios where infrared technology is inconvenient. However, the weakness of Raman scattering limits the use of the technique to situations where low detection limits are not required or large gas pressures are present. With surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), signal enhancements of 106 are often claimed, and higher values are seen in specific instances. However, most of the examples of SERS analysis are on liquid-phase samples, where the molecular density is high, usually combined with some sort of sample concentration at the surface. Neither of these factors is present in gas-phase samples. Because the laser is focused to a small point in the typical experimental setup, and the spatial extent of the effect above the surface is small (microns), the excitation volume is miniscule. Thus, exceptionally large enhancements are required to generate a signal comparable to that obtained by conventional Raman measurements. A reflective waveguide offers a way to increase the interaction volume of the laser with a SERS-modified surface. The use of a waveguide to enhance classical Raman measurements was recently demonstrated by S.M. Angel and coworkers, who obtained 12- to 30-fold sensitivity improvements for nonabsorbing gases (CO2, CH4) with a silvered capillary (no SERS enhancement). Shi et al.. demonstrated 10-to 100-fold enhancement of aqueous Rhodamine 6G in a capillary coated with silver nanoparticles. They observed enhancements of 10- to 100-fold compared to direct sampling, but this relied on a "double substrate", which required

  6. Generation and characterization of erbium-Raman noise-like pulses from a figure-eight fibre laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago-Hernandez, H; Pottiez, O; Paez-Aguirre, R; Ibarra-Villalon, H E; Tenorio-Torres, A; Duran-Sanchez, M; Ibarra-Escamilla, B; Kuzin, E A; Hernandez-Garcia, J C

    2015-01-01

    We report an experimental study of the noise-like pulses generated by a ∼300 m long passively mode-locked erbium-doped figure-eight fibre laser. Non-self-starting mode locking yields the formation of ns scale bunches of sub-ps pulses. Depending on birefringence adjustments, noise-like pulses with a variety of temporal profiles and optical spectra are obtained. In particular, for some adjustments the Raman-enhanced spectrum reaches a 10 dB bandwidth of ∼130 nm. For the first time to our knowledge, we extract information on the inner structure of the noise-like pulses, using a birefringent Sagnac interferometer as a spectral filter and a nonlinear optical loop mirror as an intensity filter. In particular we show that the different spectral components of the bunch are homogeneously distributed within the temporal envelope of the bunch, whereas the amplitude and/or the density of the sub-pulses present substantial variations along the envelope. In some cases, the analysis reveals the existence of an intermediate level of organization in the structure of the noise-like pulse, between the ns bunch and the sub-ps inner pulses, suggesting that these objects may be even more complex than previously recognized. (paper)

  7. Visible to Infrared Diamond Photonics Enabled by Focused Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Sotillo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Diamond’s nitrogen-vacancy (NV centers show great promise in sensing applications and quantum computing due to their long electron spin coherence time and because they can be found, manipulated, and read out optically. An important step forward for diamond photonics would be connecting multiple diamond NVs together using optical waveguides. However, the inertness of diamond is a significant hurdle for the fabrication of integrated optics similar to those that revolutionized silicon photonics. In this work, we show the fabrication of optical waveguides in diamond, enabled by focused femtosecond high repetition rate laser pulses. By optimizing the geometry of the waveguide, we obtain single mode waveguides from the visible to the infrared. Additionally, we show the laser writing of individual NV centers within the bulk of diamond. We use µ-Raman spectroscopy to gain better insight on the stress and the refractive index profile of the optical waveguides. Using optically detected magnetic resonance and confocal photoluminescence characterization, high quality NV properties are observed in waveguides formed in various grades of diamond, making them promising for applications such as magnetometry, quantum information systems, and evanescent field sensors.

  8. Effect of the laser and light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy on midpalatal suture bone formation after rapid maxilla expansion: a Raman spectroscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Cristiane Becher; Habib, Fernando Antonio Lima; de Araújo, Telma Martins; Aragão, Juliana Silveira; Gomes, Rafael Soares; Barbosa, Artur Felipe Santos; Silveira, Landulfo; Pinheiro, Antonio L B

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of laser or light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy on the bone formation at the midpalatal suture after rapid maxilla expansion. Twenty young adult male rats were divided into four groups with 8 days of experimental time: group 1, no treatment; group 2, expansion; group 3, expansion and laser irradiation; and group 4, expansion and LED irradiation. In groups 3 and 4, light irradiation was in the first, third, and fifth experimental days. In all groups, the expansion was accomplished with a helicoid 0.020" stainless steel orthodontic spring. A diode laser (λ780 nm, 70 mW, spot of 0.04 cm(2), t = 257 s, spatial average energy fluence (SAEF) of 18 J/cm(2)) or a LED (λ850 nm, 150 mW ± 10 mW, spot of 0.5 cm(2), t = 120 s, SAEF of 18 J/cm(2)) were used. The samples were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy carried out at midpalatal suture and at the cortical area close to the suture. Two Raman shifts were analyzed: ∼ 960 (phosphate hydroxyapatite) and ∼ 1,450 cm(-1) (lipids and protein). Data was submitted to statistical analysis. Significant statistical difference (p ≤ 0.05) was found in the hydroxyapatite (CHA) peaks among the expansion group and the expansion and laser or LED groups. The LED group presented higher mean peak values of CHA. No statistical differences were found between the treated groups as for collagen deposition, although LED also presented higher mean peak values. The results of this study using Raman spectral analysis indicate that laser and LED light irradiation improves deposition of CHA in the midpalatal suture after orthopedic expansion.

  9. Laser Raman detection for oral cancer based on a Gaussian process classification method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Zhanwei; Yang, Yongjian; Bai, Yuan; Wang, Lijun; Zhang, Chijun; Chen, He; Luo, Yusheng; Su, Le; Chen, Yong; Li, Xianchang; Zhou, Xiaodong; Shen, Aiguo; Hu, Jiming; Jia, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common neoplasm of the oral cavity. The incidence rate accounts for 80% of total oral cancer and shows an upward trend in recent years. It has a high degree of malignancy and is difficult to detect in terms of differential diagnosis, as a consequence of which the timing of treatment is always delayed. In this work, Raman spectroscopy was adopted to differentially diagnose oral squamous cell carcinoma and oral gland carcinoma. In total, 852 entries of raw spectral data which consisted of 631 items from 36 oral squamous cell carcinoma patients, 87 items from four oral gland carcinoma patients and 134 items from five normal people were collected by utilizing an optical method on oral tissues. The probability distribution of the datasets corresponding to the spectral peaks of the oral squamous cell carcinoma tissue was analyzed and the experimental result showed that the data obeyed a normal distribution. Moreover, the distribution characteristic of the noise was also in compliance with a Gaussian distribution. A Gaussian process (GP) classification method was utilized to distinguish the normal people and the oral gland carcinoma patients from the oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. The experimental results showed that all the normal people could be recognized. 83.33% of the oral squamous cell carcinoma patients could be correctly diagnosed and the remaining ones would be diagnosed as having oral gland carcinoma. For the classification process of oral gland carcinoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma, the correct ratio was 66.67% and the erroneously diagnosed percentage was 33.33%. The total sensitivity was 80% and the specificity was 100% with the Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) set to 0.447 213 595. Considering the numerical results above, the application prospects and clinical value of this technique are significantly impressive. (letter)

  10. Laser Raman detection for oral cancer based on a Gaussian process classification method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhanwei; Yang, Yongjian; Bai, Yuan; Wang, Lijun; Zhang, Chijun; Chen, He; Luo, Yusheng; Su, Le; Chen, Yong; Li, Xianchang; Zhou, Xiaodong; Jia, Jun; Shen, Aiguo; Hu, Jiming

    2013-06-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common neoplasm of the oral cavity. The incidence rate accounts for 80% of total oral cancer and shows an upward trend in recent years. It has a high degree of malignancy and is difficult to detect in terms of differential diagnosis, as a consequence of which the timing of treatment is always delayed. In this work, Raman spectroscopy was adopted to differentially diagnose oral squamous cell carcinoma and oral gland carcinoma. In total, 852 entries of raw spectral data which consisted of 631 items from 36 oral squamous cell carcinoma patients, 87 items from four oral gland carcinoma patients and 134 items from five normal people were collected by utilizing an optical method on oral tissues. The probability distribution of the datasets corresponding to the spectral peaks of the oral squamous cell carcinoma tissue was analyzed and the experimental result showed that the data obeyed a normal distribution. Moreover, the distribution characteristic of the noise was also in compliance with a Gaussian distribution. A Gaussian process (GP) classification method was utilized to distinguish the normal people and the oral gland carcinoma patients from the oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. The experimental results showed that all the normal people could be recognized. 83.33% of the oral squamous cell carcinoma patients could be correctly diagnosed and the remaining ones would be diagnosed as having oral gland carcinoma. For the classification process of oral gland carcinoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma, the correct ratio was 66.67% and the erroneously diagnosed percentage was 33.33%. The total sensitivity was 80% and the specificity was 100% with the Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) set to 0.447 213 595. Considering the numerical results above, the application prospects and clinical value of this technique are significantly impressive.

  11. Silica suspended waveguide splitter-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, M. C.; Hawk, R. M.; Armani, A. M.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, a novel integrated optical waveguide 50/50 splitter was developed. It is fabricated using standard lithographic methods, a pair of etching steps and a laser reflow step. However, unlike other integrated waveguide splitters, the waveguide is elevated off of the silicon substrate, improving its interaction with biomolecules in solution and in a flow field. Additionally, because it is fabricated from silica, it has very low optical loss, resulting in a high signal-to-noise ratio, making it ideal for biosensing. By functionalizing the device using an epoxy-silane method using small samples and confining the protein solutions to the device, we enable highly efficient detection of CREB with only 1 μL of solution. Therefore, the waveguide coupler sensor is representative of the next generation of ultra-sensitive optical biosensors, and, when combined with microfluidic capabilities, it will be an ideal candidate for a more fully-realized lab-on-a-chip device.

  12. Effects of laser photherapy on bone defects grafted with mineral trioxide aggregate, bone morphogenetic proteins, and guided bone regeneration: a Raman spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L B; Aciole, Gilberth T S; Cangussú, Maria Cristina T; Pacheco, Marcos T T; Silveira, Landulfo

    2010-12-15

    We have used Raman analysis to assess bone healing on different models. Benefits on the isolated or combined use of mineral trioxide aggregate, bone morphogenetic proteins, guided bone regeneration and laser on bone repair have been reported, but not their combination. We studied peaks of hydroxyapatite and CH groups on defects grafted with MTA, treated or not with laser, BMPs, and GBR. Ninety rats were divided in 10 groups each, subdivided into three subgroups. Laser (λ850 nm) was applied at every other day for 2 weeks. Raman readings were taken at the surface of the defect. Statistical analysis (CHA) showed significant differences between all groups (p = 0.001) and between Group II and all other (p hydroxyapatite (CHA) that is indicative of greater calcification and resistance of the bone. We conclude that the association of the MTA with laser phototherapy (LPT) and/or not with GBR resulted in a better bone repair. The use of the MTA associated to IR LPT resulted in a more advanced and quality bone repair. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Optical waveguide based on amorphous Er{sup 3+}-doped Ga-Ge-Sb-S(Se) pulsed laser deposited thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazabal, V., E-mail: virginie.nazabal@univ-rennes1.f [Sciences Chimiques de Rennes (SCR), UMR CNRS 6226, Equipe Verres et Ceramiques, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Nemec, P. [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry and Research Center, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Legions Sq. 565, 53210, Pardubice (Czech Republic); Jurdyc, A.M [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents (LPCML), UMR CNRS 5620, Universite Claude Bernard-Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); Zhang, S.; Charpentier, F. [Sciences Chimiques de Rennes (SCR), UMR CNRS 6226, Equipe Verres et Ceramiques, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Lhermite, H. [IETR-Microelectronique, UMR CNRS 6251, Universite de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes (France); Charrier, J. [FOTON, UMR 6082-ENSSAT, UMR CNRS 6251, Universite de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes (France); Guin, J.P. [LARMAUR, UMR CNRS 6251, Universite de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes (France); Moreac, A. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR CNRS 6251, Universite de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes (France); Frumar, M. [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry and Research Center, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Legions Sq. 565, 53210, Pardubice (Czech Republic); Adam, J.-L. [Sciences Chimiques de Rennes (SCR), UMR CNRS 6226, Equipe Verres et Ceramiques, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France)

    2010-06-30

    Amorphous chalcogenide films play a motivating role in the development of integrated planar optical circuits due to their potential functionality in near infrared (IR) and mid-IR spectral regions. More specifically, the photoluminescence of rare earth ions in amorphous chalcogenide films can be used in laser and amplifier devices in the IR spectral domain. The aim of the present investigation was to optimize the deposition conditions for the fabrication of undoped and Er{sup 3+} doped sulphide and selenide thin films with nominal composition Ga{sub 5}Ge{sub 20}Sb{sub 10}S(Se){sub 65} or Ga{sub 5}Ge{sub 23}Sb{sub 5}S{sub 67} by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The study of compositional, morphological and structural characteristics of the layers was realized by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy analyses, respectively. Some optical properties (transmittance, index of refraction, optical band gap, etc.) of prepared chalcogenide films and optical losses were investigated as well. The clear identification of near-IR photoluminescence of Er{sup 3+} ions was obtained for both selenide and sulphide films. The decay of the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} {yields} {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transition at 1.54 {mu}m in Er{sup 3+} doped Ga{sub 5}Ge{sub 20}Sb{sub 10}S{sub 65} PLD sulphide films was studied to assess the effects of film thickness, rare earth concentration and multilayer PLD deposition on their spectroscopic properties.

  14. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of Ag nanoparticles on titanium hydroxide/oxide nanobelt arrays for highly sensitive surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Yuting; Wang, Huanwen; Zhao, Jie; Yi, Huan; Wang, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Silver nanoparticles (NPs) were deposited on Ti(OH) 4 nanobelt by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). • The highest enhancement factor of 10 6 and a maximum relative standard deviation (RSD) of 0.18. • Ag 2 O play important role for the high sensitivity Raman phenomenon. • Charge transfer from Ag NPs is also responsible for the enhancement ability. - Abstract: Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate of Ti(OH) 4 nanobelt arrays (NBAs) was synthesized by a hydrothermal reaction, on which silver nanoparticles (NPs) were deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the effective high specific surface area with silver NPs decorated on three-dimensional NBAs. Using rhodamine 6G (R6G) as an analyte molecule, the highest enhancement factor of 10 6 and a maximum relative standard deviation (RSD) of 0.18 were obtained. It has been found that the specific morphology of these composite nanobelt arrays and the formation of Ag 2 O play important role for the high sensitivity Raman phenomenon. In addition, the surface plasmon resonance wavelength of Ag decorated Ti(OH) 4 NBAs and the charge transfer from Ag NPs are also responsible for the enhancement ability. For comparison SERS was investigated with silver particles decorated on TiO 2 NBAs, which is much less active

  16. Subfemtosecond pulse generation by cascade-stimulated Raman scattering with modulated Raman excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Kun; Wu Jian; Zeng Heping

    2003-01-01

    Subfemtosecond (sub-fs) pulses can be generated by cascade-stimulated Raman scattering in a Raman medium with modulated Raman excitations, driven by two sufficiently intense laser beams, one of which is amplitude modulated. The nonadiabatic Raman interaction establishes a strong modulated Raman coherence, which supports compression of the generated broadband Raman sidebands to a train of sub-fs pulses regardless of whether the carrier frequencies of the driving lasers are tuned above, below or on two-photon Raman resonance. (letter to the editor)

  17. 1.7  μm band narrow-linewidth tunable Raman fiber lasers pumped by spectrum-sliced amplified spontaneous emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Wu, Di; Du, Quanli; Li, Xiaoyan; Han, Kexuan; Zhang, Lizhong; Wang, Tianshu; Jiang, Huilin

    2017-12-10

    A 1.7 μm band tunable narrow-linewidth Raman fiber laser based on spectrally sliced amplified spontaneous emission (SS-ASE) and multiple filter structures is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In this scheme, an SS-ASE source is employed as a pump source in order to avoid stimulated Brillouin scattering. The ring configuration includes a 500 m long high nonlinear optical fiber and a 10 km long dispersion shifted fiber as the gain medium. A segment of un-pumped polarization-maintaining erbium-doped fiber is used to modify the shape of the spectrum. Furthermore, a nonlinear polarization rotation scheme is applied as the wavelength selector to generate lasers. A high-finesse ring filter and a ring filter are used to narrow the linewidth of the laser, respectively. We demonstrate tuning capabilities of a single laser over 28 nm between 1652 nm and 1680 nm by adjusting the polarization controller (PC) and tunable filter. The tunable laser has a 0.023 nm effective linewidth with the high-finesse ring filter. The stable multi-wavelength laser operation of up to four wavelengths can be obtained by adjusting the PC carefully when the pump power increases.

  18. Design of an 1800nm Raman amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    We present the experimental results for a Raman amplifier that operates at 1810 nm and is pumped by a Raman fiber laser at 1680 nm. Both the pump laser and the Raman amplifier is polarization maintaining. A challenge when scaling Raman amplifiers to longer wavelengths is the increase...... in transmission loss, but also the reduction in the Raman gain coefficient as the amplifier wavelength is increased. Both polarization components of the Raman gain is characterized, initially for linearly co-polarized signal and pump, subsequently linearly polarized orthogonal signal and pump. The noise...

  19. Design and Calibration of a Raman Spectrometer for use in a Laser Spectroscopy Instrument Intended to Analyze Martian Surface and Atmospheric Characteristics for NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, John F.; Hornef, James

    2016-01-01

    This project's goal is the design of a Raman spectroscopy instrument to be utilized by NASA in an integrated spectroscopy strategy that will include Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser-Induced Florescence Spectroscopy (LIFS) for molecule and element identification on Mars Europa, and various asteroids. The instrument is to be down scaled from a dedicated rover mounted instrument into a compact unit with the same capabilities and accuracy as the larger instrument. The focus for this design is a spectrometer that utilizes Raman spectroscopy. The spectrometer has a calculated range of 218 nm wavelength spectrum with a resolution of 1.23 nm. To filter out the laser source wavelength of 532 nm the spectrometer design utilizes a 532 nm wavelength dichroic mirror and a 532 nm wavelength notch filter. The remaining scatter signal is concentrated by a 20 x microscopic objective through a 25-micron vertical slit into a 5mm diameter, 1cm focal length double concave focusing lens. The light is then diffracted by a 1600 Lines per Millimeter (L/mm) dual holographic transmission grating. This spectrum signal is captured by a 1-inch diameter double convex 3 cm focal length capture lens. An Intensified Charge Couple Device (ICCD) is placed within the initial focal cone of the capture lens and the Raman signal captured is to be analyzed through spectroscopy imaging software. This combination allows for accurate Raman spectroscopy to be achieved. The components for the spectrometer have been bench tested in a series of prototype developments based on theoretical calculations, alignment, and scaling strategies. The mounting platform is 2.5 cm wide by 8.8 cm long by 7 cm height. This platform has been tested and calibrated with various sources such as a neon light source and ruby crystal. This platform is intended to be enclosed in a ruggedized enclosure for mounting on a rover platform. The size and functionality of the Raman spectrometer allows for the rover to

  20. Comparative studies of laser annealing technique and furnace annealing by X-ray diffraction and Raman analysis of lithium manganese oxide thin films for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pröll, J.; Weidler, P.G.; Kohler, R.; Mangang, A.; Heißler, S.; Seifert, H.J.; Pfleging, W.

    2013-01-01

    The structure and phase formations of radio frequency magnetron sputtered lithium manganese oxide thin films (Li 1.1 Mn 1.9 O 4 ) under ambient air were studied. The influence of laser annealing and furnace annealing, respectively, on the bulk structure and surface phases was compared by using ex-situ X-ray diffraction and Raman analysis. Laser annealing technique formed a dominant (440)-reflection, furnace annealing led to both, (111)- and (440)-reflections within a cubic symmetry (S.G. Fd3m (227)). Additionally, in-situ Raman and in-situ X-ray diffraction were applied for online detection of phase transformation temperatures. In-situ X-ray diffraction measurements clearly identified the starting temperature for the (111)- and (440)-reflections around 525 °C and 400 °C, respectively. The 2θ Bragg peak positions of the characteristic (111)- and (440)-reflections were in good agreement with those obtained through conventional furnace annealing. Laser annealing of lithium manganese oxide films provided a quick and efficient technique and delivered a dominant (440)-reflection which showed the expected electrochemical behavior of the well-known two-step de-/intercalation process of lithium-ions into the cubic spinel structure within galvanostatic testing and cyclic voltammetry. - Highlights: ► Formation of cubic spinel-like phase of Li–Mn–O thin films by rapid laser annealing ► Laser annealing at 680 °C and 100 s was demonstrated as quick crystallization method. ► 400 °C was identified as characteristic onset temperature for (440)-reflex formation

  1. Optical touch screen based on waveguide sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Chresten; Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2011-01-01

    We disclose a simple, optical touch screen technique based on a planar injection molded polymer waveguide, a single laser, and a small linear detector array. The solution significantly reduces the complexity and cost as compared to existing optical touch technologies. Force detection of a touching...

  2. Chaotic waveguide-based resonators for microlasers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Méndez-Bermúdez, J. A.; Luna-Acosta, G. A.; Šeba, Petr; Pichugin, K. N.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 16 (2003), 161104/1-161104/4 ISSN 0163-1829 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : waveguide * laser * resonators Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.962, year: 2003

  3. Laser frequency stabilisation by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using an acousto-optic phase modulator operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshev, Vyacheslav N

    2012-01-01

    Frequency stabilisation of diode laser radiation has been implemented by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using a new acousto-optic phase modulator, operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime. It is experimentally shown that, as in the case of saturated-absorption spectroscopy in atomic vapour, the spatial divergence of the frequency-modulated output spectrum of this modulator does not interfere with obtaining error signals by means of heterodyne frequency-modulation spectroscopy with a frequency discriminator based on a high-Q Fabry - Perot cavity with finesse of several tens of thousands.

  4. Characteristics of 1.9-μm laser emission from hydrogen-filled hollow-core fiber by vibrational stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bo; Chen, Yubin; Wang, Zefeng

    2016-12-01

    We report here the characteristics of 1.9-μm laser emission from a gas-filled hollow-core fiber by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). A 6.5-m hydrogen-filled ice-cream negative curvature hollow-core fiber is pumped with a high peak-power, narrow linewidth, linearly polarized subnanosecond pulsed 1064-nm microchip laser, generating a pulsed vibrational Stokes wave at 1908.5 nm. The maximum quantum efficiency of about 48% is obtained, which is mainly limited by the mode mismatch between the pump laser beam and the Stokes wave in the hollow-core fiber. The linewidths of the pump laser and the first-order vibrational Stokes wave are measured to be about 1 and 2 GHz, respectively, by a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. The pressure selection phenomenon of the vibrational anti-Stokes waves is also investigated. The pulse duration of the vibrational Stokes wave is recorded to be narrower than that of the pump laser. The polarization properties of the hollow-core fiber and the polarization dependence of the vibrational and the rotational SRS are also studied. The beam profile of the vibrational Stokes wave shows good quality.

  5. A Raman spectroscopic study of organic matter in interplanetary dust particles and meteorites using multiple wavelength laser excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Starkey, N. A.; Franchi, I. A.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate insoluble organic matter (IOM) from a range of chondritic meteorites, and a suite of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Three monochromatic excitation wavelengths (473 nm, 514 nm, 632 nm) were applied sequentially to assess variations in meteorite and IDP Raman peak parameters (carbon D and G bands) as a function of excitation wavelength (i.e., dispersion). Greatest dispersion occurs in CVs > OCs > CMs > CRs with type 3 chondrites compared at diff...

  6. Tunable All-Optical Wavelength Conversion Based on Cascaded SHG/DFG in a Ti:PPLN Waveguide Using a Single CW Control Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Hao; Nouroozi, Rahman; Wang, Wenrui

    2012-01-01

    Tunable all-optical wavelength conversion (AOWC) of a 40-Gb/s RZ-OOK data signal based on cascaded second-harmonic generation (SHG) and difference-frequency generation (DFG) in a Ti:PPLN waveguide is demonstrated. Error-free performances with negligible power penalty are achieved for the wavelength...

  7. Raman spectroscopy in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malard, L.M.; Pimenta, M.A.; Dresselhaus, G.; Dresselhaus, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent Raman scattering studies in different types of graphene samples are reviewed here. We first discuss the first-order and the double resonance Raman scattering mechanisms in graphene, which give rise to the most prominent Raman features. The determination of the number of layers in few-layer graphene is discussed, giving special emphasis to the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy to distinguish a monolayer from few-layer graphene stacked in the Bernal (AB) configuration. Different types of graphene samples produced both by exfoliation and using epitaxial methods are described and their Raman spectra are compared with those of 3D crystalline graphite and turbostratic graphite, in which the layers are stacked with rotational disorder. We show that Resonance Raman studies, where the energy of the excitation laser line can be tuned continuously, can be used to probe electrons and phonons near the Dirac point of graphene and, in particular allowing a determination to be made of the tight-binding parameters for bilayer graphene. The special process of electron-phonon interaction that renormalizes the phonon energy giving rise to the Kohn anomaly is discussed, and is illustrated by gated experiments where the position of the Fermi level can be changed experimentally. Finally, we discuss the ability of distinguishing armchair and zig-zag edges by Raman spectroscopy and studies in graphene nanoribbons in which the Raman signal is enhanced due to resonance with singularities in the density of electronic states.

  8. Kinetics of hydrogen-deuterium exchange in guanosine 5'-monophosphate and guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate determined by laser-Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, M J; Thomas, G J

    1979-09-04

    Pseudo-first-order rate constants governing the deuterium exchange of 8-CH groups in guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-rGMP) and guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cGMP) were determined as a function of temperature in the range 30-80 degrees C by means of laser-Raman spectroscopy. For each guanine nucleotide the logarithm of the rate constant exhibits a strictly linear dependence on reciprocal temperature: i.e., k psi = Ae-Ea/RT with A = 8.84 X 10(14) h-1 and Ea = 24.6 kcal/mol for 5'-rGMP and A = 3.33 X 10(13) h-1 and Ea = 22.2 kcal/mol for cGMP. Exchange of the 8-CH groups in guanine nucleotides is generally 2-3 times more rapid than in adenine nucleotides [cf. g. j. thomas, Jr., & J. Livramento (1975) Biochemistry 14, 5210-5218]. As in the case of adenine nucleotides, cyclic and 5' nucleotides of guanine exchange at markedly different rates at lower temperatures, with exchange in the cyclic nucleotide being the more facile. Each of the guanine nucleotides was prepared in four different isotopic modifications for Raman spectral analysis. The Raman frequency shifts resulting from the various isotopic substitutions have been tabulated, and assignments have been given for most of the observed vibrational frequencies.

  9. Parametric resonance in superconducting micron-scale waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomin, N.V.; Shalaev, O.L.; Shantsev, D.V.

    1997-01-01

    A parametric resonance due to temperature oscillations in superconducting micron-scale waveguides is considered. Oscillations of superconductor temperature are assumed to be induced by the irradiation of the waveguide with a laser beam. The laser power and parameters of the waveguide providing a possibility of parametric excitation have been calculated. It is shown that for a waveguide made of a YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 microstrip with resonant frequency of 10 GHz a laser with a power of about 70 W/cm 2 is needed to excite oscillations. The effect can be used for the creation of high-sensitivity tuneable filters and optoelectric transformers on superconducting microstrips in the GHz range. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  10. Interconnect Between a Waveguide and a Dielectric Waveguide Comprising an Impedance Matched Dielectric Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decrossas, Emmanuel (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Chahat, Nacer (Inventor); Tang, Adrian J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A lens for interconnecting a metallic waveguide with a dielectric waveguide is provided. The lens may be coupled a metallic waveguide and a dielectric waveguide, and minimize a signal loss between the metallic waveguide and the dielectric waveguide.

  11. Coherent random lasing from liquid waveguide gain channels with biological scatters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Feng, Guoying; Wang, Shutong; Yang, Chao; Yin, Jiajia; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2014-12-01

    A unidirectional coherent random laser based on liquid waveguide gain channels with biological scatters is demonstrated. The optical feedback of the random laser is provided by both light scattering and waveguide confinement. This waveguide-scattering-feedback scheme not only reduces the pump threshold but also makes the output of random laser directional. The threshold of our random laser is about 11 μJ. The emission spectra can be sensitively tuned by changing pump position due to the micro/nano-scale randomness of butterfly wings. It shows the potential applications of optofluidic random lasers for bio-chemical sensors on-chip.

  12. Distributed Bragg grating frequency control in metallic nano lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marell, M.J.H.; Hill, M.T.

    2010-01-01

    We show that Bragg gratings can be readily incorporated into metallic nano-lasers which exploit waveguides with semiconductor cores, via modulation of the waveguide width. This provides a simple way to implement laser wavelength control.

  13. Resonant Impulsive Stimulated Raman Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, A; Chesnoy, J

    1988-03-15

    Using a femtosecond dye laser, we observe in real-time vibrational oscillations excited by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) close to an electronic resonance. We perform single-beam Raman excitation and probe the driven coherence by a polarization-sensitive detection. We demonstrate for the first time impulsively Raman-induced dichroism, birefringence as well as frequency and time delay shifts. We analyse the characteristics of resonant ISRS on a vibrational mode of a dye molecule (malachite green) in solution.

  14. Resonant Impulsive Stimulated Raman Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, A.; Chesnoy, J.

    1988-01-01

    Using a femtosecond dye laser, we observe in real-time vibrational oscillations excited by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) close to an electronic resonance. We perform single-beam Raman excitation and probe the driven coherence by a polarization-sensitive detection. We demonstrate for the first time impulsively Raman-induced dichroism, birefringence as well as frequency and time delay shifts. We analyse the characteristics of resonant ISRS on a vibrational mode of a dye molecule (malachite green) in solution

  15. Graphene antidot lattice waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels

    2012-01-01

    We introduce graphene antidot lattice waveguides: nanostructured graphene where a region of pristine graphene is sandwiched between regions of graphene antidot lattices. The band gaps in the surrounding antidot lattices enable localized states to emerge in the central waveguide region. We model...... the waveguides via a position-dependent mass term in the Dirac approximation of graphene and arrive at analytical results for the dispersion relation and spinor eigenstates of the localized waveguide modes. To include atomistic details we also use a tight-binding model, which is in excellent agreement...... with the analytical results. The waveguides resemble graphene nanoribbons, but without the particular properties of ribbons that emerge due to the details of the edge. We show that electrons can be guided through kinks without additional resistance and that transport through the waveguides is robust against...

  16. Resonant Photonic States in Coupled Heterostructure Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabarinathan J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors.

  17. Real-Time N2O Gas Detection System for Agricultural Production Using a 4.6-µm-Band Laser Source Based on a Periodically Poled LiNbO3 Ridge Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Yoshihara

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a gas monitoring system for detecting nitrous oxide (N2O gas using a compact mid-infrared laser source based on difference-frequency generation in a quasi-phase-matched LiNbO3 waveguide. We obtained a stable output power of 0.62 mW from a 4.6-μm-band continuous-wave laser source operating at room temperature. This laser source enabled us to detect atmospheric N2O gas at a concentration as low as 35 parts per billion. Using this laser source, we constructed a new real-time in-situ monitoring system for detecting N2O gas emitted from potted plants. A few weeks of monitoring with the developed detection system revealed a strong relationship between nitrogen fertilization and N2O emission. This system is promising for the in-situ long-term monitoring of N2O in agricultural production, and it is also applicable to the detection of other greenhouse gases.

  18. Real-time N2O gas detection system for agricultural production using a 4.6-µm-band laser source based on a periodically poled LiNbO3 ridge waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokura, Akio; Asobe, Masaki; Enbutsu, Koji; Yoshihara, Toshihiro; Hashida, Shin-nosuke; Takenouchi, Hirokazu

    2013-08-05

    This article describes a gas monitoring system for detecting nitrous oxide (N2O) gas using a compact mid-infrared laser source based on difference-frequency generation in a quasi-phase-matched LiNbO3 waveguide. We obtained a stable output power of 0.62 mW from a 4.6-μm-band continuous-wave laser source operating at room temperature. This laser source enabled us to detect atmospheric N2O gas at a concentration as low as 35 parts per billion. Using this laser source, we constructed a new real-time in-situ monitoring system for detecting N2O gas emitted from potted plants. A few weeks of monitoring with the developed detection system revealed a strong relationship between nitrogen fertilization and N2O emission. This system is promising for the in-situ long-term monitoring of N2O in agricultural production, and it is also applicable to the detection of other greenhouse gases.

  19. Optical waveguide demultiplexer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajdaj, Yu.O.; Maslyukyivs'kij, R.M.; Sirota, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    For channels division in fibre-optical networks with wavelength multiplexing, the planar waveguide together with a prism coupler is offered for using. The planar waveguide fulfils a role of a dispersing unit, and prism coupler is the selector of optical channels. The parameters of the planar waveguide which provide maximal space division of adjacent information channels in networks with coarse wavelength multiplexing are calculated

  20. Experiences with rectangular waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, J.; Sepulveda, J. J.; Navarro, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    A simple and didactic experimental arrangement is presented to show wave propagation along a structure with translational symmetry, particularly the rectangular waveguide. Parameters of this waveguide as cutoff frequency, guide wavelength and field distribution of fundamental mode can be measured. For this purpose a large paralelepipedical waveguide structure is designed and built, its dimensions can be varied in order to change its parameters. (Author) 9 refs