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Sample records for wave-sensitive lws opsins

  1. The molecular basis of color vision in colorful fish: Four Long Wave-Sensitive (LWS opsins in guppies (Poecilia reticulata are defined by amino acid substitutions at key functional sites

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    Ward Pam R

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparisons of functionally important changes at the molecular level in model systems have identified key adaptations driving isolation and speciation. In cichlids, for example, long wavelength-sensitive (LWS opsins appear to play a role in mate choice and male color variation within and among species. To test the hypothesis that the evolution of elaborate coloration in male guppies (Poecilia reticulata is also associated with opsin gene diversity, we sequenced long wavelength-sensitive (LWS opsin genes in six species of the family Poeciliidae. Results Sequences of four LWS opsin genes were amplified from the guppy genome and from mRNA isolated from adult guppy eyes. Variation in expression was quantified using qPCR. Three of the four genes encode opsins predicted to be most sensitive to different wavelengths of light because they vary at key amino acid positions. This family of LWS opsin genes was produced by a diversity of duplication events. One, an intronless gene, was produced prior to the divergence of families Fundulidae and Poeciliidae. Between-gene PCR and DNA sequencing show that two of the guppy LWS opsins are linked in an inverted orientation. This inverted tandem duplication event occurred near the base of the poeciliid tree in the common ancestor of Poecilia and Xiphophorus. The fourth sequence has been uncovered only in the genus Poecilia. In the guppies surveyed here, this sequence is a hybrid, with the 5' end most similar to one of the tandem duplicates and the 3' end identical to the other. Conclusion Enhanced wavelength discrimination, a possible consequence of opsin gene duplication and divergence, might have been an evolutionary prerequisite for color-based sexual selection and have led to the extraordinary coloration now observed in male guppies and in many other poeciliids.

  2. A single enhancer regulating the differential expression of duplicated red-sensitive opsin genes in zebrafish.

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    Taro Tsujimura

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental step in the evolution of the visual system is the gene duplication of visual opsins and differentiation between the duplicates in absorption spectra and expression pattern in the retina. However, our understanding of the mechanism of expression differentiation is far behind that of spectral tuning of opsins. Zebrafish (Danio rerio have two red-sensitive cone opsin genes, LWS-1 and LWS-2. These genes are arrayed in a tail-to-head manner, in this order, and are both expressed in the long member of double cones (LDCs in the retina. Expression of the longer-wave sensitive LWS-1 occurs later in development and is thus confined to the peripheral, especially ventral-nasal region of the adult retina, whereas expression of LWS-2 occurs earlier and is confined to the central region of the adult retina, shifted slightly to the dorsal-temporal region. In this study, we employed a transgenic reporter assay using fluorescent proteins and P1-artificial chromosome (PAC clones encompassing the two genes and identified a 0.6-kb "LWS-activating region" (LAR upstream of LWS-1, which regulates expression of both genes. Under the 2.6-kb flanking upstream region containing the LAR, the expression pattern of LWS-1 was recapitulated by the fluorescent reporter. On the other hand, when LAR was directly conjugated to the LWS-2 upstream region, the reporter was expressed in the LDCs but also across the entire outer nuclear layer. Deletion of LAR from the PAC clones drastically lowered the reporter expression of the two genes. These results suggest that LAR regulates both LWS-1 and LWS-2 by enhancing their expression and that interaction of LAR with the promoters is competitive between the two genes in a developmentally restricted manner. Sharing a regulatory region between duplicated genes could be a general way to facilitate the expression differentiation in duplicated visual opsins.

  3. The opsin repertoire of Jenynsia onca: a new perspective on gene duplication and divergence in livebearers

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    Owens Gregory L

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Jenynsia onca, commonly known as the one sided livebearer, is a member of the family Anablepidae. The opsin gene repertoires of J. onca's close relatives, the four-eyed fish (Anableps anableps and the guppy (Poecilia reticulata, have been characterized and each found to include one unique LWS opsin. Currently, the relationship among LWS paralogs and orthologs in these species are unclear, making it difficult to test the hypotheses that link vision to morphology or life history traits. The phylogenetic signal appears to have been disrupted by gene conversion. Here we have sequenced the opsin genes of J. onca in order to resolve these relationships. Findings We identified nine visual opsins; LWS S180r, LWS S180, LWS P180, SWS1, SWS2A, SWS2B, RH1, RH2-1, and RH2-2. Key site analysis revealed only one unique haplotype, RH2-2, although this is unlikely to shift λmax significantly. LWS P180 was found to be a product of a gene conversion event with LWS S180, followed by convergence to a proline residue at the 180 site. Conclusion Jenynsia onca has at least 9 visual opsins: three LWS, one RH1, two RH2, one SWS1 and two SWS2. The presence of LWS P180 moves the location of the LWS P180-S180 tandem duplication event back to the base of the Poeciliidae-Anablepidae clade, expanding the number of species possessing this unusual blue shifted LWS opsin. The presence of the LWS P180 gene also confirms that gene conversion events have homogenized opsin paralogs in fish, just as they have in humans.

  4. Gene duplication and divergence of long wavelength-sensitive opsin genes in the guppy, Poecilia reticulata.

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    Watson, Corey T; Gray, Suzanne M; Hoffmann, Margarete; Lubieniecki, Krzysztof P; Joy, Jeffrey B; Sandkam, Ben A; Weigel, Detlef; Loew, Ellis; Dreyer, Christine; Davidson, William S; Breden, Felix

    2011-02-01

    Female preference for male orange coloration in the genus Poecilia suggests a role for duplicated long wavelength-sensitive (LWS) opsin genes in facilitating behaviors related to mate choice in these species. Previous work has shown that LWS gene duplication in this genus has resulted in expansion of long wavelength visual capacity as determined by microspectrophotometry (MSP). However, the relationship between LWS genomic repertoires and expression of LWS retinal cone classes within a given species is unclear. Our previous study in the related species, Xiphophorus helleri, was the first characterization of the complete LWS opsin genomic repertoire in conjunction with MSP expression data in the family Poeciliidae, and revealed the presence of four LWS loci and two distinct LWS cone classes. In this study we characterized the genomic organization of LWS opsin genes by BAC clone sequencing, and described the full range of cone cell types in the retina of the colorful Cumaná guppy, Poecilia reticulata. In contrast to X. helleri, MSP data from the Cumaná guppy revealed three LWS cone classes. Comparisons of LWS genomic organization described here for Cumaná to that of X. helleri indicate that gene divergence and not duplication was responsible for the evolution of a novel LWS haplotype in the Cumaná guppy. This lineage-specific divergence is likely responsible for a third additional retinal cone class not present in X. helleri, and may have facilitated the strong sexual selection driven by female preference for orange color patterns associated with the genus Poecilia.

  5. Divergent selection for opsin gene variation in guppy (Poecilia reticulata) populations of Trinidad and Tobago.

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    Tezuka, A; Kasagi, S; van Oosterhout, C; McMullan, M; Iwasaki, W M; Kasai, D; Yamamichi, M; Innan, H; Kawamura, S; Kawata, M

    2014-11-01

    The guppy is known to exhibit remarkable interindividual variations in spectral sensitivity of middle to long wavelength-sensitive (M/LWS) cone photoreceptor cells. The guppy has four M/LWS-type opsin genes (LWS-1, LWS-2, LWS-3 and LWS-4) that are considered to be responsible for this sensory variation. However, the allelic variation of the opsin genes, particularly in terms of their absorption spectrum, has not been explored in wild populations. Thus, we examined nucleotide variations in the four M/LWS opsin genes as well as blue-sensitive SWS2-B and ultraviolet-sensitive SWS1 opsin genes for comparison and seven non-opsin nuclear loci as reference genes in 10 guppy populations from various light environments in Trinidad and Tobago. For the first time, we discovered a potential spectral variation (180 Ser/Ala) in LWS-1 that differed at an amino acid site known to affect the absorption spectra of opsins. Based on a coalescent simulation of the nucleotide variation of the reference genes, we showed that the interpopulation genetic differentiation of two opsin genes was significantly larger than the neutral expectation. Furthermore, this genetic differentiation was significantly related to differences in dissolved oxygen (DO) level, and it was not explained by the spatial distance between populations. The DO levels are correlated with eutrophication that possibly affects the color of aquatic environments. These results suggest that the population diversity of opsin genes is significantly driven by natural selection and that the guppy could adapt to various light environments through color vision changes.

  6. Euarchontan Opsin Variation Brings New Focus to Primate Origins

    OpenAIRE

    Melin, Amanda D.; Wells, Konstans; Moritz, Gillian L.; Kistler, Logan; Orkin, Joseph D.; Timm, Robert M.; Bernard, Henry; Lakim, Maklarin B.; Perry, George H.; Kawamura, Shoji; Dominy, Nathaniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Debate on the adaptive origins of primates has long focused on the functional ecology of the primate visual system. For example, it is hypothesized that variable expression of short- (SWS1) and middle-to-long-wavelength sensitive (M/LWS) opsins, which confer color vision, can be used to infer ancestral activity patterns and therefore selective ecological pressures. A problem with this approach is that opsin gene variation is incompletely known in the grandorder Euarchonta, that is, the orders...

  7. Rod monochromacy and the coevolution of cetacean retinal opsins.

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    Meredith, Robert W; Gatesy, John; Emerling, Christopher A; York, Vincent M; Springer, Mark S

    2013-04-01

    Cetaceans have a long history of commitment to a fully aquatic lifestyle that extends back to the Eocene. Extant species have evolved a spectacular array of adaptations in conjunction with their deployment into a diverse array of aquatic habitats. Sensory systems are among those that have experienced radical transformations in the evolutionary history of this clade. In the case of vision, previous studies have demonstrated important changes in the genes encoding rod opsin (RH1), short-wavelength sensitive opsin 1 (SWS1), and long-wavelength sensitive opsin (LWS) in selected cetaceans, but have not examined the full complement of opsin genes across the complete range of cetacean families. Here, we report protein-coding sequences for RH1 and both color opsin genes (SWS1, LWS) from representatives of all extant cetacean families. We examine competing hypotheses pertaining to the timing of blue shifts in RH1 relative to SWS1 inactivation in the early history of Cetacea, and we test the hypothesis that some cetaceans are rod monochomats. Molecular evolutionary analyses contradict the "coastal" hypothesis, wherein SWS1 was pseudogenized in the common ancestor of Cetacea, and instead suggest that RH1 was blue-shifted in the common ancestor of Cetacea before SWS1 was independently knocked out in baleen whales (Mysticeti) and in toothed whales (Odontoceti). Further, molecular evidence implies that LWS was inactivated convergently on at least five occasions in Cetacea: (1) Balaenidae (bowhead and right whales), (2) Balaenopteroidea (rorquals plus gray whale), (3) Mesoplodon bidens (Sowerby's beaked whale), (4) Physeter macrocephalus (giant sperm whale), and (5) Kogia breviceps (pygmy sperm whale). All of these cetaceans are known to dive to depths of at least 100 m where the underwater light field is dim and dominated by blue light. The knockout of both SWS1 and LWS in multiple cetacean lineages renders these taxa rod monochromats, a condition previously unknown among

  8. Rod monochromacy and the coevolution of cetacean retinal opsins.

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    Robert W Meredith

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cetaceans have a long history of commitment to a fully aquatic lifestyle that extends back to the Eocene. Extant species have evolved a spectacular array of adaptations in conjunction with their deployment into a diverse array of aquatic habitats. Sensory systems are among those that have experienced radical transformations in the evolutionary history of this clade. In the case of vision, previous studies have demonstrated important changes in the genes encoding rod opsin (RH1, short-wavelength sensitive opsin 1 (SWS1, and long-wavelength sensitive opsin (LWS in selected cetaceans, but have not examined the full complement of opsin genes across the complete range of cetacean families. Here, we report protein-coding sequences for RH1 and both color opsin genes (SWS1, LWS from representatives of all extant cetacean families. We examine competing hypotheses pertaining to the timing of blue shifts in RH1 relative to SWS1 inactivation in the early history of Cetacea, and we test the hypothesis that some cetaceans are rod monochomats. Molecular evolutionary analyses contradict the "coastal" hypothesis, wherein SWS1 was pseudogenized in the common ancestor of Cetacea, and instead suggest that RH1 was blue-shifted in the common ancestor of Cetacea before SWS1 was independently knocked out in baleen whales (Mysticeti and in toothed whales (Odontoceti. Further, molecular evidence implies that LWS was inactivated convergently on at least five occasions in Cetacea: (1 Balaenidae (bowhead and right whales, (2 Balaenopteroidea (rorquals plus gray whale, (3 Mesoplodon bidens (Sowerby's beaked whale, (4 Physeter macrocephalus (giant sperm whale, and (5 Kogia breviceps (pygmy sperm whale. All of these cetaceans are known to dive to depths of at least 100 m where the underwater light field is dim and dominated by blue light. The knockout of both SWS1 and LWS in multiple cetacean lineages renders these taxa rod monochromats, a condition previously unknown among

  9. Intra-retinal variation of opsin gene expression in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

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    Rennison, Diana J; Owens, Gregory L; Allison, W Ted; Taylor, John S

    2011-10-01

    Although behavioural experiments demonstrate that colouration influences mate choice in many species, a complete understanding of this form of signalling requires information about colour vision in the species under investigation. The guppy (Poecilia reticulata) has become a model species for the study of colour-based sexual selection. To investigate the role of opsin gene duplication and divergence in the evolution of colour-based mate choice, we used in situ hybridization to determine where the guppy's nine cone opsins are expressed in the retina. Long wavelength-sensitive (LWS) opsins were more abundant in the dorsal retina than in the ventral retina. One of the middle wavelength-sensitive opsins (RH2-1) exhibited the opposite pattern, while the other middle wavelength-sensitive opsin (RH2-2) and the short wavelength-sensitive opsins (SWS1, SWS2A and SWS2B) were expressed throughout the retina. We also found variation in LWS opsin expression among individuals. These observations suggest that regions of the guppy retina are specialized with respect to wavelength discrimination and/or sensitivity. Intra-retinal variability in opsin expression, which has been observed in several fish species, might be an adaptation to variation in the strength and spectral composition of light entering the eye from above and below. The discovery that opsin expression varies in the guppy retina may motivate new behavioural experiments designed to study its role in mate choice.

  10. Opsins have evolved under the permanent heterozygote model: insights from phylotranscriptomics of Odonata.

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    Suvorov, Anton; Jensen, Nicholas O; Sharkey, Camilla R; Fujimoto, M Stanley; Bodily, Paul; Wightman, Haley M Cahill; Ogden, T Heath; Clement, Mark J; Bybee, Seth M

    2017-03-01

    Gene duplication plays a central role in adaptation to novel environments by providing new genetic material for functional divergence and evolution of biological complexity. Several evolutionary models have been proposed for gene duplication to explain how new gene copies are preserved by natural selection, but these models have rarely been tested using empirical data. Opsin proteins, when combined with a chromophore, form a photopigment that is responsible for the absorption of light, the first step in the phototransduction cascade. Adaptive gene duplications have occurred many times within the animal opsins' gene family, leading to novel wavelength sensitivities. Consequently, opsins are an attractive choice for the study of gene duplication evolutionary models. Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) have the largest opsin repertoire of any insect currently known. Additionally, there is tremendous variation in opsin copy number between species, particularly in the long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) class. Using comprehensive phylotranscriptomic and statistical approaches, we tested various evolutionary models of gene duplication. Our results suggest that both the blue-sensitive (BS) and LWS opsin classes were subjected to strong positive selection that greatly weakens after multiple duplication events, a pattern that is consistent with the permanent heterozygote model. Due to the immense interspecific variation and duplicability potential of opsin genes among odonates, they represent a unique model system to test hypotheses regarding opsin gene duplication and diversification at the molecular level.

  11. Visual adaptation in Lake Victoria cichlid fishes: depth-related variation of color and scotopic opsins in species from sand/mud bottoms.

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    Terai, Yohey; Miyagi, Ryutaro; Aibara, Mitsuto; Mizoiri, Shinji; Imai, Hiroo; Okitsu, Takashi; Wada, Akimori; Takahashi-Kariyazono, Shiho; Sato, Akie; Tichy, Herbert; Mrosso, Hillary D J; Mzighani, Semvua I; Okada, Norihiro

    2017-08-22

    For Lake Victoria cichlid species inhabiting rocky substrates with differing light regimes, it has been proposed that adaptation of the long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) opsin gene triggered speciation by sensory drive through color signal divergence. The extensive and continuous sand/mud substrates are also species-rich, and a correlation between male nuptial coloration and the absorption of LWS pigments has been reported. However, the factors driving genetic and functional diversity of LWS pigments in sand/mud habitats are still unresolved. To address this issue, nucleotide sequences of eight opsin genes were compared in ten Lake Victoria cichlid species collected from sand/mud bottoms. Among eight opsins, the LWS and rod-opsin (RH1) alleles were diversified and one particular allele was dominant or fixed in each species. Natural selection has acted on and fixed LWS alleles in each species. The functions of LWS and RH1 alleles were measured by absorption of reconstituted A1- and A2-derived visual pigments. The absorption of pigments from RH1 alleles most common in deep water were largely shifted toward red, whereas those of LWS alleles were largely shifted toward blue in both A1 and A2 pigments. In both RH1 and LWS pigments, A2-derived pigments were closer to the dominant light in deep water, suggesting the possibility of the adaptation of A2-derived pigments to depth-dependent light regimes. The RH1 and LWS sequences may be diversified for adaptation of A2-derived pigments to different light environments in sand/mud substrates. Diversification of the LWS alleles may have originally taken place in riverine environments, with a new mutation occurring subsequently in Lake Victoria.

  12. Euarchontan Opsin Variation Brings New Focus to Primate Origins.

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    Melin, Amanda D; Wells, Konstans; Moritz, Gillian L; Kistler, Logan; Orkin, Joseph D; Timm, Robert M; Bernard, Henry; Lakim, Maklarin B; Perry, George H; Kawamura, Shoji; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2016-04-01

    Debate on the adaptive origins of primates has long focused on the functional ecology of the primate visual system. For example, it is hypothesized that variable expression of short- (SWS1) and middle-to-long-wavelength sensitive (M/LWS) opsins, which confer color vision, can be used to infer ancestral activity patterns and therefore selective ecological pressures. A problem with this approach is that opsin gene variation is incompletely known in the grandorder Euarchonta, that is, the orders Scandentia (treeshrews), Dermoptera (colugos), and Primates. The ancestral state of primate color vision is therefore uncertain. Here, we report on the genes (OPN1SW and OPN1LW) that encode SWS1 and M/LWS opsins in seven species of treeshrew, including the sole nocturnal scandentian Ptilocercus lowii. In addition, we examined the opsin genes of the Central American woolly opossum (Caluromys derbianus), an enduring ecological analogue in the debate on primate origins. Our results indicate: 1) retention of ultraviolet (UV) visual sensitivity in C. derbianus and a shift from UV to blue spectral sensitivities at the base of Euarchonta; 2) ancient pseudogenization of OPN1SW in the ancestors of P. lowii, but a signature of purifying selection in those of C. derbianus; and, 3) the absence of OPN1LW polymorphism among diurnal treeshrews. These findings suggest functional variation in the color vision of nocturnal mammals and a distinctive visual ecology of early primates, perhaps one that demanded greater spatial resolution under light levels that could support cone-mediated color discrimination.

  13. RT-qPCR reveals opsin gene upregulation associated with age and sex in guppies (Poecilia reticulata - a species with color-based sexual selection and 11 visual-opsin genes

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    Taylor John S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PCR-based surveys have shown that guppies (Poecilia reticulata have an unusually large visual-opsin gene repertoire. This has led to speculation that opsin duplication and divergence has enhanced the evolution of elaborate male coloration because it improves spectral sensitivity and/or discrimination in females. However, this conjecture on evolutionary connections between opsin repertoire, vision, mate choice, and male coloration was generated with little data on gene expression. Here, we used RT-qPCR to survey visual-opsin gene expression in the eyes of males, females, and juveniles in order to further understand color-based sexual selection from the perspective of the visual system. Results Juvenile and adult (male and female guppies express 10 visual opsins at varying levels in the eye. Two opsin genes in juveniles, SWS2B and RH2-2, accounted for >85% of all visual-opsin transcripts in the eye, excluding RH1. This relative abundance (RA value dropped to about 65% in adults, as LWS-A180 expression increased from approximately 3% to 20% RA. The juvenile-to-female transition also showed LWS-S180 upregulation from about 1.5% to 7% RA. Finally, we found that expression in guppies' SWS2-LWS gene cluster is negatively correlated with distance from a candidate locus control region (LCR. Conclusions Selective pressures influencing visual-opsin gene expression appear to differ among age and sex. LWS upregulation in females is implicated in augmenting spectral discrimination of male coloration and courtship displays. In males, enhanced discrimination of carotenoid-rich food and possibly rival males are strong candidate selective pressures driving LWS upregulation. These developmental changes in expression suggest that adults possess better wavelength discrimination than juveniles. Opsin expression within the SWS2-LWS gene cluster appears to be regulated, in part, by a common LCR. Finally, by comparing our RT-qPCR data to MSP data, we

  14. Catalogue of ISO LWS observations of asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Hormuth, Felix

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) The Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) observed the four large main-belt asteroids (1) Ceres, (2) Pallas, (4) Vesta, and (10) Hygiea multiple times. The photometric and spectroscopic data cover the wavelength range between 43 and 197 um, and are a unique dataset for future investigations and detailed characterisations of these bodies. The standard ISO archive products, produced through the last post-mission LWS pipeline, were still affected by instrument artefacts. Our goal was to provide the best possible data products to exploit the full scientific potential of these observations. We performed a refined reduction of all measurements, corrected for various instrumental effects, and re-calibrated the data. We outline the data reduction process and give an overview of the available data and the quality of the observations. We apply a thermophysical model to the flux measurements to derive far-IR based diameter and albedo values of the asteroids. The measu...

  15. Divergence in cis-regulatory sequences surrounding the opsin gene arrays of African cichlid fishes

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    Streelman J Todd

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Divergence within cis-regulatory sequences may contribute to the adaptive evolution of gene expression, but functional alleles in these regions are difficult to identify without abundant genomic resources. Among African cichlid fishes, the differential expression of seven opsin genes has produced adaptive differences in visual sensitivity. Quantitative genetic analysis suggests that cis-regulatory alleles near the SWS2-LWS opsins may contribute to this variation. Here, we sequence BACs containing the opsin genes of two cichlids, Oreochromis niloticus and Metriaclima zebra. We use phylogenetic footprinting and shadowing to examine divergence in conserved non-coding elements, promoter sequences, and 3'-UTRs surrounding each opsin in search of candidate cis-regulatory sequences that influence cichlid opsin expression. Results We identified 20 conserved non-coding elements surrounding the opsins of cichlids and other teleosts, including one known enhancer and a retinal microRNA. Most conserved elements contained computationally-predicted binding sites that correspond to transcription factors that function in vertebrate opsin expression; O. niloticus and M. zebra were significantly divergent in two of these. Similarly, we found a large number of relevant transcription factor binding sites within each opsin's proximal promoter, and identified five opsins that were considerably divergent in both expression and the number of transcription factor binding sites shared between O. niloticus and M. zebra. We also found several microRNA target sites within the 3'-UTR of each opsin, including two 3'-UTRs that differ significantly between O. niloticus and M. zebra. Finally, we examined interspecific divergence among 18 phenotypically diverse cichlids from Lake Malawi for one conserved non-coding element, two 3'-UTRs, and five opsin proximal promoters. We found that all regions were highly conserved with some evidence of CRX transcription

  16. LWS/SET Technology Experiment Carrier

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    Sherman, Barry; Giffin, Geoff

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines the approach taken to building a low-cost, modular spacecraft bus that can be used to support a variety of technology experiments in different space environments. It describes the techniques used and design drivers considered to ensure experiment independence from as yet selected host spacecraft. It describes the technology experiment carriers that will support NASA's Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed space missions. NASA has initiated the Living With a Star (LWS) Program to develop a better scientific understanding to address the aspects of the connected Sun-Earth system that affect life and society. A principal goal of the program is to bridge the gap between science, engineering, and user application communities. The Space Environment Testbed (SET) Project is one element of LWS. The Project will enable future science, operational, and commercial objectives in space and atmospheric environments by improving engineering approaches to the accommodation and/or mitigation of the effects of solar variability on technological systems. The SET Project is highly budget constrained and must seek to take advantage of as yet undetermined partnering opportunities for access to space. SET will conduct technology validation experiments hosted on available flight opportunities. The SET Testbeds will be developed in a manner that minimizes the requirements for accommodation, and will be flown as flight opportunities become available. To access the widest range of flight opportunities, two key development requirements are to maintain flexibility with respect to accommodation constraints and to have the capability to respond quickly to flight opportunities. Experiments, already developed to the technology readiness level of needing flight validation in the variable Sun-Earth environment, will be selected on the basis of the need for the subject technology, readiness for flight, need for flight resources and particular orbit. Experiments will be

  17. Spectral sensitivity of cone photoreceptors and opsin expression in two colour-divergent lineages of the lizard Ctenophorus decresii.

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    Yewers, Madeleine S; McLean, Claire A; Moussalli, Adnan; Stuart-Fox, Devi; Bennett, Andrew T D; Knott, Ben

    2015-05-15

    Intraspecific differences in sensory perception are rarely reported but may occur when a species range extends across varying sensory environments, or there is coevolution between the sensory system and a varying signal. Examples in colour vision and colour signals are rare in terrestrial systems. The tawny dragon lizard Ctenophorus decresii is a promising candidate for such intraspecific variation, because the species comprises two geographically and genetically distinct lineages in which throat colour (a social signal used in intra- and inter-specific interactions) is locally adapted to the habitat and differs between lineages. Male lizards from the southern lineage have UV-blue throats, whereas males from the northern lineage are polymorphic with four discrete throat colours that all show minimal UV reflectance. Here, we determine the cone photoreceptor spectral sensitivities and opsin expression of the two lineages, to test whether they differ, particularly in the UV wavelengths. Using microspectrophotometry on retinal cone photoreceptors, we identified a long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) visual pigment, a 'short' and 'long' medium-wavelength-sensitive (MWS) pigment and a short-wavelength-sensitive (SWS) pigment, all of which did not differ in λmax between lineages. Through transcriptome analysis of opsin genes we found that both lineages express four cone opsin genes, including the SWS1 opsin with peak sensitivity in the UV range, and that amino acid sequences did not differ between lineages with the exception of a single leucine to valine substitution in the RH2 opsin. Counts of yellow and transparent oil droplets associated with LWS+MWS and SWS+UVS cones, respectively, showed no difference in relative cone proportions between lineages. Therefore, contrary to predictions, we find no evidence of differences between lineages in single cone photoreceptor spectral sensitivity or opsin expression. However, we confirm the presence of four single cone classes

  18. Vision for the Future of Lws TR&T

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    Schwadron, N.; Mannucci, A. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Gombosi, T. I.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kamalabadi, F.; Linker, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Spence, H. E.; Tobiska, W. K.; Weimer, D. R.; Withers, P.; Bisi, M. M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Miller, K. L.; Moretto, T.; Onsager, T. G.; Roussev, I. I.; Viereck, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Living With a Star (LWS) program addresses acute societal needs for understanding the effects of space weather and developing scientific knowledge to support predictive capabilities. Our society's heavy reliance on technologies affected by the space environment, an enormous number of airline customers, interest in space tourism, and the developing plans for long-duration human exploration space missions are clear examples that demonstrate urgent needs for space weather models and detailed understanding of space weather effects and risks. Since its inception, the LWS program has provided a vehicle to innovate new mechanisms for conducting research, building highly effective interdisciplinary teams, and ultimately in developing the scientific understanding needed to transition research tools into operational models that support the predictive needs of our increasingly space-reliant society. The advances needed require broad-based observations that cannot be obtained by large missions alone. The Decadal Survey (HDS, 2012) outlines the nation's needs for scientific development that will build the foundation for tomorrow's space weather services. Addressing these goals, LWS must develop flexible pathways to space utilizing smaller, more diverse and rapid development of observational platforms. Expanding utilization of ground-based assets and shared launches will also significantly enhance opportunities to fulfill the growing LWS data needs. Partnerships between NASA divisions, national/international agencies, and with industry will be essential for leveraging resources to address increasing societal demand for space weather advances. Strengthened connections to user communities will enhance the quality and impact of deliverables from LWS programs. Thus, we outline the developing vision for the future of LWS, stressing the need for deeper scientific understanding to improve forecasting capabilities, for more diverse data resources, and for project deliverables that

  19. Variable light environments induce plastic spectral tuning by regional opsin coexpression in the African cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra.

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    Dalton, Brian E; Lu, Jessica; Leips, Jeff; Cronin, Thomas W; Carleton, Karen L

    2015-08-01

    Critical behaviours such as predation and mate choice often depend on vision. Visual systems are sensitive to the spectrum of light in their environment, which can vary extensively both within and among habitats. Evolutionary changes in spectral sensitivity contribute to divergence and speciation. Spectral sensitivity of the retina is primarily determined by visual pigments, which are opsin proteins bound to a chromophore. We recently discovered that photoreceptors in different regions of the retina, which view objects against distinct environmental backgrounds, coexpress different pairs of opsins in an African cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra. This coexpression tunes the sensitivity of the retinal regions to the corresponding backgrounds and may aid in detection of dark objects, such as predators. Although intraretinal regionalization of spectral sensitivity in many animals correlates with their light environments, it is unknown whether variation in the light environment induces developmentally plastic alterations of intraretinal sensitivity regions. Here, we demonstrate with fluorescent in situ hybridization and qPCR that the spectrum and angle of environmental light both influence the development of spectral sensitivity regions by altering the distribution and level of opsins across the retina. Normally, M. zebra coexpresses LWS opsin with RH2Aα opsin in double cones of the ventral but not the dorsal retina. However, when illuminated from below throughout development, adult M. zebra coexpressed LWS and RH2Aα in double cones both dorsally and ventrally. Thus, environmental background spectra alter the spectral sensitivity pattern that develops across the retina, potentially influencing behaviours and related evolutionary processes such as courtship and speciation.

  20. Variable light environments induce plastic spectral tuning by regional opsin coexpression in the African cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Brian E.; Lu, Jessica; Leips, Jeff; Cronin, Thomas W.; Carleton, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    Critical behaviors such as predation and mate choice often depend on vision. Visual systems are sensitive to the spectrum of light in their environment, which can vary extensively both within and among habitats. Evolutionary changes in spectral sensitivity contribute to divergence and speciation. Spectral sensitivity of the retina is primarily determined by visual pigments, which are opsin proteins bound to a chromophore. We recently discovered that photoreceptors in different regions of the retina, which view objects against distinct environmental backgrounds, coexpress different pairs of opsins in an African cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra. This coexpression tunes the sensitivity of the retinal regions to the corresponding backgrounds and may aid detection of dark objects, such as predators. Although intraretinal regionalization of spectral sensitivity in many animals correlates with their light environments, it is unknown whether variation in the light environment induces developmentally plastic alterations of intraretinal sensitivity regions. Here, we demonstrate with fluorescent in situ hybridization and qPCR that the spectrum and angle of environmental light both influence the development of spectral sensitivity regions by altering the distribution and level of opsins across the retina. Normally M. zebra coexpresses LWS opsin with RH2Aα opsin in double cones of the ventral but not the dorsal retina. However, when illuminated from below throughout development, adult M. zebra coexpressed LWS and RH2Aα in double cones both dorsally and ventrally. Thus, environmental background spectra alter the spectral sensitivity pattern that develops across the retina, potentially influencing behaviors and related evolutionary processes such as courtship and speciation. PMID:26175094

  1. Characterisation and localisation of the opsin protein repertoire in the brain and retinas of a spider and an onychophoran

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eriksson, Bo Joakim; Fredman, David; Steiner, Gerhard; Schmid, Axel

    2013-01-01

    .... Opsins can be divided into three main groups: rhabdomeric opsins (r-opsins), ciliary opsins (c-opsins) and group 4 opsins. In arthropods, the main focus has been on the r-opsins involved in vision...

  2. Opsin vs opsin: New materials for biotechnological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfinito, Eleonora; Reggiani, Lino

    2014-08-01

    The need of new diagnostic methods satisfying, as an early detection, a low invasive procedure and a cost-efficient value, is orienting the technological research toward the use of bio-integrated devices, in particular, bio-sensors. The set of know-why necessary to achieve this goal is wide, from biochemistry to electronics and is summarized in an emerging branch of electronics, called proteotronics. Proteotronics is here applied to state a comparative analysis of the electrical responses coming from type-1 and type-2 opsins. In particular, the procedure is used as an early investigation of a recently discovered family of opsins, the proteorhodopsins activated by blue light, BPRs. The results reveal some interesting and unexpected similarities between proteins of the two families, suggesting the global electrical response are not strictly linked to the class identity.

  3. Optogenetics: opsins and optical interfaces in neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamantidis, Antoine R; Zhang, Feng; de Lecea, Luis; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-08-01

    Optogenetics is defined as the integration of optics and genetics to control well-defined events within specified cells of living tissue. In this introduction, we focus on the basic techniques necessary for employing microbial opsins as optogenetic tools in mammalian brains. We provide a guide for the fundamentals of optogenetic application-selecting an opsin, implementing expression of opsins based on the neuroscientific experimental requirements, and adapting the corresponding optical hardware for delivery of light into mammalian brains.

  4. Diversity of Active States in TMT Opsins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumi Sakai

    Full Text Available Opn3/TMT opsins belong to one of the opsin groups with vertebrate visual and non-visual opsins, and are widely distributed in eyes, brains and other internal organs in various vertebrates and invertebrates. Vertebrate Opn3/TMT opsins are further classified into four groups on the basis of their amino acid identities. However, there is limited information about molecular properties of these groups, due to the difficulty in preparing the recombinant proteins. Here, we successfully expressed recombinant proteins of TMT1 and TMT2 opsins of medaka fish (Oryzias latipes in cultured cells and characterized their molecular properties. Spectroscopic and biochemical studies demonstrated that TMT1 and TMT2 opsins functioned as blue light-sensitive Gi/Go-coupled receptors, but exhibited spectral properties and photo-convertibility of the active state different from each other. TMT1 opsin forms a visible light-absorbing active state containing all-trans-retinal, which can be photo-converted to 7-cis- and 9-cis-retinal states in addition to the original 11-cis-retinal state. In contrast, the active state of TMT2 opsin is a UV light-absorbing state having all-trans-retinal and does not photo-convert to any other state, including the original 11-cis-retinal state. Thus, TMT opsins are diversified so as to form a different type of active state, which may be responsible for their different functions.

  5. H2O from R Cas : ISO LWS-SWS observations and detailed modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truong-Bach, [No Value; Sylvester, RJ; Barlow, MJ; Nguyen-Q-Rieu, [No Value; Lim, T; Liu, XW; Baluteau, JP; Deguchi, S; Justtanont, K; Tielens, AGGM

    1999-01-01

    We present 29-197 mu m spectra of the oxygen-rich Mira variable star, R Cas, obtained with the Long- and Short-Wavelength Spectrometers (LWS and SWS) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). The LWS grating observations were made during two pulsational stellar phases, phi similar to 0.5 and 0.

  6. Palmitoylation stabilizes unliganded rod opsin

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    S-palmitoylation is a conserved feature in many G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) involved in a broad array of signaling processes. The prototypical GPCR, rhodopsin, is S-palmitoylated on two adjacent C-terminal Cys residues at its cytoplasmic surface. Surprisingly, absence of palmitoylation has only a modest effect on in vitro or in vivo signaling. Here, we report that palmitoylation-deficient (Palm−/−) mice carrying two Cys to Thr and Ser mutations in the opsin gene displayed profound lig...

  7. Analysis of the opsin repertoire in the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini provides insights into the evolution of opsin genes in panarthropoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Lars; Mayer, Georg

    2014-09-04

    Screening of a deeply sequenced transcriptome using Illumina sequencing as well as the genome of the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini revealed a set of five opsin genes. To clarify the phylogenetic position of these genes and to elucidate the evolutionary history of opsins in Panarthropoda (Onychophora + Tardigrada + Arthropoda), we reconstructed the phylogeny of broadly sampled metazoan opsin genes using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods in conjunction with carefully selected substitution models. According to our findings, the opsin repertoire of H. dujardini comprises representatives of all three major bilaterian opsin clades, including one r-opsin, three c-opsins, and a Group 4 opsin (neuropsin/opsin-5). The identification of the tardigrade ortholog of neuropsin/opsin-5 is the first record of this opsin type in a protostome, but our screening of available metazoan genomes revealed that it is also present in other protostomes. Our opsin phylogeny further suggests that two r-opsins, including an "arthropsin," were present in the last common ancestor of Panarthropoda. Although both r-opsin lineages were retained in Onychophora and Arthropoda, the arthropsin was lost in Tardigrada. The single (most likely visual) r-opsin found in H. dujardini supports the hypothesis of monochromatic vision in the panarthropod ancestor, whereas two duplications of the ancestral panarthropod c-opsin have led to three c-opsins in tardigrades. Although the early-branching nodes are unstable within the metazoans, our findings suggest that the last common ancestor of Bilateria possessed six opsins: Two r-opsins, one c-opsin, and three Group 4 opsins, one of which (Go opsin) was lost in the ecdysozoan lineage.

  8. Convergent evolution of SWS2 opsin facilitates adaptive radiation of threespine stickleback into different light environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, David A; Taylor, John S; Jones, Felicity C; Di Palma, Federica; Kingsley, David M; Reimchen, Thomas E

    2017-04-01

    Repeated adaptation to a new environment often leads to convergent phenotypic changes whose underlying genetic mechanisms are rarely known. Here, we study adaptation of color vision in threespine stickleback during the repeated postglacial colonization of clearwater and blackwater lakes in the Haida Gwaii archipelago. We use whole genomes from 16 clearwater and 12 blackwater populations, and a selection experiment, in which stickleback were transplanted from a blackwater lake into an uninhabited clearwater pond and resampled after 19 y to test for selection on cone opsin genes. Patterns of haplotype homozygosity, genetic diversity, site frequency spectra, and allele-frequency change support a selective sweep centered on the adjacent blue- and red-light sensitive opsins SWS2 and LWS. The haplotype under selection carries seven amino acid changes in SWS2, including two changes known to cause a red-shift in light absorption, and is favored in blackwater lakes but disfavored in the clearwater habitat of the transplant population. Remarkably, the same red-shifting amino acid changes occurred after the duplication of SWS2 198 million years ago, in the ancestor of most spiny-rayed fish. Two distantly related fish species, bluefin killifish and black bream, express these old paralogs divergently in black- and clearwater habitats, while sticklebacks lost one paralog. Our study thus shows that convergent adaptation to the same environment can involve the same genetic changes on very different evolutionary time scales by reevolving lost mutations and reusing them repeatedly from standing genetic variation.

  9. The Microbial Opsin Family of Optogenetic Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Feng; Vierock, Johannes; Yizhar, Ofer; Fenno, Lief E.; Tsunoda, Satoshi; Kianianmomeni, Arash; Prigge, Matthias; Berndt, Andre; Cushman, John C.; Polle, Juergen E.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Hegemann, Peter; Deisseroth, Karl

    2011-12-23

    The capture and utilization of light is an exquisitely evolved process. The single-component microbial opsins, although more limited than multicomponent cascades in processing, display unparalleled compactness and speed. Recent advances in understanding microbial opsins have been driven by molecular engineering for optogenetics and by comparative genomics. Here we provide a Primer on these light-activated ion channels and pumps, describe a group of opsins bridging prior categories, and explore the convergence of molecular engineering and genomic discovery for the utilization and understanding of these remarkable molecular machines.

  10. C-opsin expressing photoreceptors in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich-Lüter, Esther M; D'Aniello, Salvatore; Arnone, Maria I

    2013-07-01

    Today's progress in molecular analysis and, in particular, the increased availability of genome sequences have enabled us to investigate photoreceptor cells (PRCs) in organisms that were formerly inaccessible to experimental manipulation. Our studies of marine non-chordate deuterostomes thus aim to bridge a gap of knowledge regarding the evolution of deuterostome PRCs prior to the emergence of vertebrates' eyes. In this contribution, we will show evidence for expression of a c-opsin photopigment, which, according to our phylogenetic analysis, is closely related to an assemblage of chordate visual c-opsins. An antibody raised against sea urchins' c-opsin protein (Sp-Opsin1) recognizes epitopes in a variety of tissues of different echinoderms. While in sea urchins this c-opsin is expressed in locomotory and buccal tube feet, spines, pedicellaria, and epidermis, in brittlestars and starfish we found the immuno-reaction to be located exclusively in cells within the animals' spines. Structural characteristics of these c-opsin+ PRC types include the close vicinity/connection to nerve strands and a, so far unexplored, conspicuous association with the animals' calcite skeleton, which previously has been hypothesized to play a role in echinoderm photobiology. These features are discussed within the context of the evolution of photoreceptors in echinoderms and in deuterostomes generally.

  11. The vertebrate ancestral repertoire of visual opsins, transducin alpha subunits and oxytocin/vasopressin receptors was established by duplication of their shared genomic region in the two rounds of early vertebrate genome duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, David; Ocampo Daza, Daniel; Widmark, Jenny; Abalo, Xesús M; Sundström, Görel; Larhammar, Dan

    2013-11-02

    Vertebrate color vision is dependent on four major color opsin subtypes: RH2 (green opsin), SWS1 (ultraviolet opsin), SWS2 (blue opsin), and LWS (red opsin). Together with the dim-light receptor rhodopsin (RH1), these form the family of vertebrate visual opsins. Vertebrate genomes contain many multi-membered gene families that can largely be explained by the two rounds of whole genome duplication (WGD) in the vertebrate ancestor (2R) followed by a third round in the teleost ancestor (3R). Related chromosome regions resulting from WGD or block duplications are said to form a paralogon. We describe here a paralogon containing the genes for visual opsins, the G-protein alpha subunit families for transducin (GNAT) and adenylyl cyclase inhibition (GNAI), the oxytocin and vasopressin receptors (OT/VP-R), and the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CACNA1-L). Sequence-based phylogenies and analyses of conserved synteny show that the above-mentioned gene families, and many neighboring gene families, expanded in the early vertebrate WGDs. This allows us to deduce the following evolutionary scenario: The vertebrate ancestor had a chromosome containing the genes for two visual opsins, one GNAT, one GNAI, two OT/VP-Rs and one CACNA1-L gene. This chromosome was quadrupled in 2R. Subsequent gene losses resulted in a set of five visual opsin genes, three GNAT and GNAI genes, six OT/VP-R genes and four CACNA1-L genes. These regions were duplicated again in 3R resulting in additional teleost genes for some of the families. Major chromosomal rearrangements have taken place in the teleost genomes. By comparison with the corresponding chromosomal regions in the spotted gar, which diverged prior to 3R, we could time these rearrangements to post-3R. We present an extensive analysis of the paralogon housing the visual opsin, GNAT and GNAI, OT/VP-R, and CACNA1-L gene families. The combined data imply that the early vertebrate WGD events contributed to the evolution of vision and the

  12. Losses of functional opsin genes, short-wavelength cone photopigments, and color vision--a significant trend in the evolution of mammalian vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gerald H

    2013-03-01

    All mammalian cone photopigments are derived from the operation of representatives from two opsin gene families (SWS1 and LWS in marsupial and eutherian mammals; SWS2 and LWS in monotremes), a process that produces cone pigments with respective peak sensitivities in the short and middle-to-long wavelengths. With the exception of a number of primate taxa, the modal pattern for mammals is to have two types of cone photopigment, one drawn from each of the gene families. In recent years, it has been discovered that the SWS1 opsin genes of a widely divergent collection of eutherian mammals have accumulated mutational changes that render them nonfunctional. This alteration reduces the retinal complements of these species to a single cone type, thus rendering ordinary color vision impossible. At present, several dozen species from five mammalian orders have been identified as falling into this category, but the total number of mammalian species that have lost short-wavelength cones in this way is certain to be much larger, perhaps reaching as high as 10% of all species. A number of circumstances that might be used to explain this widespread cone loss can be identified. Among these, the single consistent fact is that the species so affected are nocturnal or, if they are not technically nocturnal, they at least feature retinal organizations that are typically associated with that lifestyle. At the same time, however, there are many nocturnal mammals that retain functional short-wavelength cones. Nocturnality thus appears to set the stage for loss of functional SWS1 opsin genes in mammals, but it cannot be the sole circumstance.

  13. Multiple rod-cone and cone-rod photoreceptor transmutations in snakes: evidence from visual opsin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Bruno F; Sampaio, Filipa L; Loew, Ellis R; Sanders, Kate L; Fisher, Robert N; Hart, Nathan S; Hunt, David M; Partridge, Julian C; Gower, David J

    2016-01-27

    In 1934, Gordon Walls forwarded his radical theory of retinal photoreceptor 'transmutation'. This proposed that rods and cones used for scotopic and photopic vision, respectively, were not fixed but could evolve into each other via a series of morphologically distinguishable intermediates. Walls' prime evidence came from series of diurnal and nocturnal geckos and snakes that appeared to have pure-cone or pure-rod retinas (in forms that Walls believed evolved from ancestors with the reverse complement) or which possessed intermediate photoreceptor cells. Walls was limited in testing his theory because the precise identity of visual pigments present in photoreceptors was then unknown. Subsequent molecular research has hitherto neglected this topic but presents new opportunities. We identify three visual opsin genes, rh1, sws1 and lws, in retinal mRNA of an ecologically and taxonomically diverse sample of snakes central to Walls' theory. We conclude that photoreceptors with superficially rod- or cone-like morphology are not limited to containing scotopic or photopic opsins, respectively. Walls' theory is essentially correct, and more research is needed to identify the patterns, processes and functional implications of transmutation. Future research will help to clarify the fundamental properties and physiology of photoreceptors adapted to function in different light levels.

  14. Multiple rod–cone and cone–rod photoreceptor transmutations in snakes: Evidence from visual opsin gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoe, Bruno F; Sampaio, Filipa L.; Loew, Ellis R.; Sanders, Kate L.; Fisher, Robert N.; Hart, Nathan S.; Hunt, David M.; Partridge, Julian C.; Gower, David J.

    2016-01-01

    In 1934, Gordon Walls forwarded his radical theory of retinal photoreceptor ‘transmutation’. This proposed that rods and cones used for scotopic and photopic vision, respectively, were not fixed but could evolve into each other via a series of morphologically distinguishable intermediates. Walls' prime evidence came from series of diurnal and nocturnal geckos and snakes that appeared to have pure-cone or pure-rod retinas (in forms that Walls believed evolved from ancestors with the reverse complement) or which possessed intermediate photoreceptor cells. Walls was limited in testing his theory because the precise identity of visual pigments present in photoreceptors was then unknown. Subsequent molecular research has hitherto neglected this topic but presents new opportunities. We identify three visual opsin genes, rh1, sws1 and lws, in retinal mRNA of an ecologically and taxonomically diverse sample of snakes central to Walls' theory. We conclude that photoreceptors with superficially rod- or cone-like morphology are not limited to containing scotopic or photopic opsins, respectively. Walls' theory is essentially correct, and more research is needed to identify the patterns, processes and functional implications of transmutation. Future research will help to clarify the fundamental properties and physiology of photoreceptors adapted to function in different light levels.

  15. Analysis of the Opsin Repertoire in the Tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini Provides Insights into the Evolution of Opsin Genes in Panarthropoda

    OpenAIRE

    Hering, Lars; Mayer, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Screening of a deeply sequenced transcriptome using Illumina sequencing as well as the genome of the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini revealed a set of five opsin genes. To clarify the phylogenetic position of these genes and to elucidate the evolutionary history of opsins in Panarthropoda (Onychophora + Tardigrada + Arthropoda), we reconstructed the phylogeny of broadly sampled metazoan opsin genes using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods in conjunction with carefully selected s...

  16. Opsin clines in butterflies suggest novel roles for insect photopigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentiu, Francesca D; Yuan, Furong; Savage, Wesley K; Bernard, Gary D; Mullen, Sean P; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2015-02-01

    Opsins are ancient molecules that enable animal vision by coupling to a vitamin-derived chromophore to form light-sensitive photopigments. The primary drivers of evolutionary diversification in opsins are thought to be visual tasks related to spectral sensitivity and color vision. Typically, only a few opsin amino acid sites affect photopigment spectral sensitivity. We show that opsin genes of the North American butterfly Limenitis arthemis have diversified along a latitudinal cline, consistent with natural selection due to environmental factors. We sequenced single nucleotide (SNP) polymorphisms in the coding regions of the ultraviolet (UVRh), blue (BRh), and long-wavelength (LWRh) opsin genes from ten butterfly populations along the eastern United States and found that a majority of opsin SNPs showed significant clinal variation. Outlier detection and analysis of molecular variance indicated that many SNPs are under balancing selection and show significant population structure. This contrasts with what we found by analysing SNPs in the wingless and EF-1 alpha loci, and from neutral amplified fragment length polymorphisms, which show no evidence of significant locus-specific or genome-wide structure among populations. Using a combination of functional genetic and physiological approaches, including expression in cell culture, transgenic Drosophila, UV-visible spectroscopy, and optophysiology, we show that key BRh opsin SNPs that vary clinally have almost no effect on spectral sensitivity. Our results suggest that opsin diversification in this butterfly is more consistent with natural selection unrelated to spectral tuning. Some of the clinally varying SNPs may instead play a role in regulating opsin gene expression levels or the thermostability of the opsin protein. Lastly, we discuss the possibility that insect opsins might have important, yet-to-be elucidated, adaptive functions in mediating animal responses to abiotic factors, such as temperature or photoperiod.

  17. ASTROD, ASTROD I and their gravitational-wave sensitivities

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, W T; Liao, A C; Ni, Wei-Tou; Shiomi, Sachie; Liao, An-Chi

    2004-01-01

    ASTROD (Astrodynamical Space Test of Relativity using Optical Devices) is a mission concept with three spacecraft -- one near L1/L2 point, one with an inner solar orbit and one with an outer solar orbit, ranging coherently with one another using lasers to test relativistic gravity, to measure the solar system and to detect gravitational waves. ASTROD I with one spacecraft ranging optically with ground stations is the first step toward the ASTROD mission. In this paper, we present the ASTROD I payload and accelerometer requirements, discuss the gravitational-wave sensitivities for ASTROD and ASTROD I, and compare them with LISA and radio-wave PDoppler-tracking of spacecraft.

  18. Model systems for understanding absorption tuning by opsin proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted

    2009-01-01

    This tutorial review reports on model systems that have been synthesised and investigated for elucidating how opsin proteins tune the absorption of the protonated retinal Schiff base chromophore. In particular, the importance of the counteranion is highlighted. In addition, the review advocates...... is avoided, and it becomes clear that opsin proteins induce blueshifts in the chromophore absorption rather than redshifts....

  19. Multi-characteristic opsin enabled vision restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Weldon; Pradhan, Sanjay; Bhattacharya, Sulgana; Mahapatra, Vasu; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Gajjeraman, Sivakumar; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2017-02-01

    Photodegenerative retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and dry age related macular degeneration (dry- AMD) lead to loss of vision in millions of individuals. Currently, no surgical or medical treatment is available though optogenetic therapies are in clinical development. Here, we demonstrate vision restoration using Multi- Characteristics Opsin (MCO1) in animal models with photo-degenerated retina. MCO1 is reliably delivered to specific retinal cells via intravitreal injection of Adeno-Associated Virus, leading to significant improvement in visually guided behavior conducted using a radial-arm water maze. The time to reach platform significantly reduced after delivery of MCO1. Notably, the improvement in visually guided behavior was observed even at light intensity levels orders of magnitude lower than that required for Channelrhodopsin-2 opsin. Chronic light exposure study showed that chronic light exposure did not compromise viability of vMCO1-treated retina. Safe virus-mediated MCO1-delivery has potential for effective gene therapy of diverse retinal degenerations in patients.

  20. Reconstructing the ancestral butterfly eye: focus on the opsins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Adriana D

    2008-06-01

    The eyes of butterflies are remarkable, because they are nearly as diverse as the colors of wings. Much of eye diversity can be traced to alterations in the number, spectral properties and spatial distribution of the visual pigments. Visual pigments are light-sensitive molecules composed of an opsin protein and a chromophore. Most butterflies have eyes that contain visual pigments with a wavelength of peak absorbance, lambda(max), in the ultraviolet (UV, 300-400 nm), blue (B, 400-500 nm) and long wavelength (LW, 500-600 nm) part of the visible light spectrum, respectively, encoded by distinct UV, B and LW opsin genes. In the compound eye of butterflies, each individual ommatidium is composed of nine photoreceptor cells (R1-9) that generally express only one opsin mRNA per cell, although in some butterfly eyes there are ommatidial subtypes in which two opsins are co-expressed in the same photoreceptor cell. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of opsin cDNAs from the five butterfly families, Papilionidae, Pieridae, Nymphalidae, Lycaenidae and Riodinidae, and comparative analysis of opsin gene expression patterns from four of the five families, I propose a model for the patterning of the ancestral butterfly eye that is most closely aligned with the nymphalid eye. The R1 and R2 cells of the main retina expressed UV-UV-, UV-B- or B-B-absorbing visual pigments while the R3-9 cells expressed a LW-absorbing visual pigment. Visual systems of existing butterflies then underwent an adaptive expansion based on lineage-specific B and LW opsin gene multiplications and on alterations in the spatial expression of opsins within the eye. Understanding the molecular sophistication of butterfly eye complexity is a challenge that, if met, has broad biological implications.

  1. Extraordinary diversity of visual opsin genes in dragonflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futahashi, Ryo; Kawahara-Miki, Ryouka; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Yoshitake, Kazutoshi; Yajima, Shunsuke; Arikawa, Kentaro; Fukatsu, Takema

    2015-03-17

    Dragonflies are colorful and large-eyed animals strongly dependent on color vision. Here we report an extraordinary large number of opsin genes in dragonflies and their characteristic spatiotemporal expression patterns. Exhaustive transcriptomic and genomic surveys of three dragonflies of the family Libellulidae consistently identified 20 opsin genes, consisting of 4 nonvisual opsin genes and 16 visual opsin genes of 1 UV, 5 short-wavelength (SW), and 10 long-wavelength (LW) type. Comprehensive transcriptomic survey of the other dragonflies representing an additional 10 families also identified as many as 15-33 opsin genes. Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed dynamic multiplications and losses of the opsin genes in the course of evolution. In contrast to many SW and LW genes expressed in adults, only one SW gene and several LW genes were expressed in larvae, reflecting less visual dependence and LW-skewed light conditions for their lifestyle under water. In this context, notably, the sand-burrowing or pit-dwelling species tended to lack SW gene expression in larvae. In adult visual organs: (i) many SW genes and a few LW genes were expressed in the dorsal region of compound eyes, presumably for processing SW-skewed light from the sky; (ii) a few SW genes and many LW genes were expressed in the ventral region of compound eyes, probably for perceiving terrestrial objects; and (iii) expression of a specific LW gene was associated with ocelli. Our findings suggest that the stage- and region-specific expressions of the diverse opsin genes underlie the behavior, ecology, and adaptation of dragonflies.

  2. Ant opsins: sequences from the Saharan silver ant and the carpenter ant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, M P; Grisshammer, R; Hargrave, P A; Smith, W C

    1996-03-01

    cDNA clones encoding opsins from compound eyes of carpenter ant, Camponotus abdominalis, and Saharan silver ant, Cataglyphis bombycina, were isolated from cDNA libraries. The opsin cDNAs from each species code for deduced proteins with 378 amino acids which are 92% identical. Of the 30 amino acid differences between the two proteins, 13 are non-conservative. Eight of these non-conservative substitutions are within the membrane spanning domain. The presence of a potential Schiff-base counterion in helix III in both species suggests that these opsins are the protein moiety of the visible range pigments. When compared to all known opsins, these opsins are most similar to the opsin from preying mantis (76% identity at the amino acid level). Phyletic comparisons group the two ant opsins with the other arthropod long wavelength opsins.

  3. The Evolution and Expression of the Moth Visual Opsin Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaowei; Murphy, Robert W.; Wu, Kongming

    2013-01-01

    Because visual genes likely evolved in response to their ambient photic environment, the dichotomy between closely related nocturnal moths and diurnal butterflies forms an ideal basis for investigating their evolution. To investigate whether the visual genes of moths are associated with nocturnal dim-light environments or not, we cloned long-wavelength (R), blue (B) and ultraviolet (UV) opsin genes from 12 species of wild-captured moths and examined their evolutionary functions. Strong purifying selection appeared to constrain the functions of the genes. Dark-treatment altered the levels of mRNA expression in Helicoverpa armigera such that R and UV opsins were up-regulated after dark-treatment, the latter faster than the former. In contrast, B opsins were not significantly up-regulated. Diel changes of opsin mRNA levels in both wild-captured and lab-reared individuals showed no significant fluctuation within the same group. However, the former group had significantly elevated levels of expression compared with the latter. Consequently, environmental conditions appeared to affect the patterns of expression. These findings and the proportional expression of opsins suggested that moths potentially possessed color vision and the visual system played a more important role in the ecology of moths than previously appreciated. This aspect did not differ much from that of diurnal butterflies. PMID:24205129

  4. The evolution and expression of the moth visual opsin family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengjun Xu

    Full Text Available Because visual genes likely evolved in response to their ambient photic environment, the dichotomy between closely related nocturnal moths and diurnal butterflies forms an ideal basis for investigating their evolution. To investigate whether the visual genes of moths are associated with nocturnal dim-light environments or not, we cloned long-wavelength (R, blue (B and ultraviolet (UV opsin genes from 12 species of wild-captured moths and examined their evolutionary functions. Strong purifying selection appeared to constrain the functions of the genes. Dark-treatment altered the levels of mRNA expression in Helicoverpa armigera such that R and UV opsins were up-regulated after dark-treatment, the latter faster than the former. In contrast, B opsins were not significantly up-regulated. Diel changes of opsin mRNA levels in both wild-captured and lab-reared individuals showed no significant fluctuation within the same group. However, the former group had significantly elevated levels of expression compared with the latter. Consequently, environmental conditions appeared to affect the patterns of expression. These findings and the proportional expression of opsins suggested that moths potentially possessed color vision and the visual system played a more important role in the ecology of moths than previously appreciated. This aspect did not differ much from that of diurnal butterflies.

  5. Evolutionary Dynamics of Rhodopsin Type 2 Opsins in Vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Tada, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Among the five groups of visual pigments in vertebrates, the rhodopsin type 2 (RH2) group shows the largest number of gene duplication events. We have isolated three intact and one nonfunctional RH2 opsin genes each from Northern lampfish (Stenobrachius leucopsarus) and scabbardfish (Lepidopus fitchi). Using the deduced amino acid sequences of these and other representative RH2 opsin genes in vertebrates, we have estimated the divergence times and evolutionary rates of amino acid substitution at various stages of RH2 opsin evolution. The results show that the duplications of the lampfish and scabbardfish RH2 opsins have occurred ∼60 and ∼30 million years ago (Ma), respectively. The evolutionary rates of RH2 opsins in the early vertebrate ancestors were ∼0.25 × 10−9/site/year, which increased to ∼1 × 10−9 to 3 × 10−9/site/year in euteleost lineages and to ∼0.3 × 10−9 to 0.5 × 10−9/site/year in coelacanth and tetrapods. PMID:19759234

  6. Opsin stability and folding: modulation by phospholipid bicelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibbin, Craig; Farmer, Nicola A; Jeans, Chris; Reeves, Philip J; Khorana, H Gobind; Wallace, B A; Edwards, Patricia C; Villa, Claudio; Booth, Paula J

    2007-12-14

    Integral membrane proteins do not fare well when extracted from biological membranes and are unstable or lose activity in detergents commonly used for structure and function investigations. We show that phospholipid bicelles provide a valuable means of preserving alpha-helical membrane proteins in vitro by supplying a soluble lipid bilayer fragment. Both 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)/3-[(cholamidopropyl)dimethyl-ammonio]-1-propane sulfonate (Chaps) and DMPC/l-alpha-1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC) bicelles dramatically increase the stability of the mammalian vision receptor rhodopsin as well as its apoprotein, opsin. Opsin is particularly unstable in detergent solution but can be directly purified into DMPC/Chaps. We show that opsin can also be directly purified in DMPC/DHPC bicelles to give correctly folded functional opsin, as shown by the ability to regenerate rhodopsin to approximately 70% yield. These well-characterised DMPC/DHPC bicelles enable us to probe the influence of bicelle properties on opsin stability. These bicelles are thought to provide DMPC bilayer fragments with most DHPC capping the bilayer edge, giving a soluble bilayer disc. Opsin stability is shown to be modulated by the q value, the ratio of DMPC to DHPC, which reflects changes in the bicelle size and, thus, proportion of DMPC bilayer present. The observed changes in stability also correlate with loss of opsin secondary structure as determined by synchrotron far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy; the most stable bicelle results in the least helix loss. The inclusion of Chaps rather than DHPC in the DMPC/Chaps bicelles, however, imparts the greatest stability. This suggests that it is not just the DMPC bilayer fragment in the bicelles that stabilises the protein, but that Chaps provides additional stability either through direct interaction with the protein or by altering the DMPC/Chaps bilayer properties within the bicelle. The significant stability

  7. In silico characterisation and chromosomal localisation of human RRH (peropsin – implications for opsin evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster Russell G

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vertebrate opsins are proteins which utilise a retinaldehyde chromophore in their photosensory or photoisomerase roles in the visual/irradiance detection cycle. The majority of the opsins, such as rod and cone opsins, have a very highly conserved gene structure suggesting a common lineage. Exceptions to this are RGR-opsin and melanopsin, whose genes have very different intron insertion positions. The gene structure of another opsin, peropsin (retinal pigment epithelium-derived rhodopsin homologue, RRH is unknown. Results By in silico analysis of the GenBank database we have determined that the human RRH comprises 7 exons spanning approximately 16.5 kb and is localised to chromosome 4q25 in the following gene sequence: cen-EGF-RRH-IF-qter – a position that excludes this gene as a candidate for the RP29 autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa locus. A comparison of opsin gene structures reveals that RRH and RGR share two common intron (introns 1 and 4 insertion positions which may reflect a shared ancestral gene. Conclusion The opsins comprise a diverse group of genes which appear to have arisen from three different lineages. These lineages comprise the "classical opsin superfamily" which includes the rod and cone opsins, pinopsin, VA-opsin, parapinopsin and encephalopsin; the RRH and RGR group; and the melanopsin line. A common lineage for RRH and RGR, together with their sites of expression in the RPE, indicates that peropsin may act as a retinal isomerase.

  8. The circumstellar environment of IRAS 16293-2422. ISO-LWS and SCUBA observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, J. C.; Griffin, M.; Saraceno, P.

    2004-05-01

    We present far-infrared (FIR) continuum observations of the deeply embedded source IRAS 16293-2422 performed with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) on-board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). We also report 450 and 850 μm mapping observations done with the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). We combined these observations with IRAS and other JCMT data available in the literature to construct a complete spectral energy distribution (SED) of the source. A spherically symmetric dusty envelope model was used to reproduce the SED and to characterize the circumstellar matter around the object. We call attention to the fact that when using models such as the one presented here, one needs spatial information about the object to distinguish between different possible fits to the SED. A comparison between the intensity profiles at 450 and 850 μm obtained from the SCUBA observations and the profiles predicted by the model allowed us to constrain the size of the envelope and its density distribution. The SED and the 850 μm intensity profile of the source are consistent with a centrally peaked power law dust density distribution of the form ρ(r) ∝ r-p with p = 1.5-2, with a radius Renv = 3000-3250 AU, defining a very compact circumstellar envelope. We estimate a bolometric luminosity Lbol = 36 L⊙, an envelope mass Menv = 3.4 M⊙, and a submillimetre to bolometric luminosity ratio Lsubmm/Lbol = 1.9%, confirming that the source shows a submillimetre excess characteristic of Class 0 sources.

  9. The co-chaperone and reductase ERdj5 facilitates rod opsin biogenesis and quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Dimitra; Bevilacqua, Dalila; Aguila, Monica; McCulley, Caroline; Kanuga, Naheed; Iwawaki, Takao; Chapple, J Paul; Cheetham, Michael E

    2014-12-15

    Mutations in rhodopsin, the light-sensitive protein of rod cells, are the most common cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). Many rod opsin mutations, such as P23H, lead to misfolding of rod opsin with detrimental effects on photoreceptor function and viability. Misfolded P23H rod opsin and other mutations in the intradiscal domain are characterized by the formation of an incorrect disulphide bond between C185 and C187, as opposed to the correct and highly conserved C110-C187 disulphide bond. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that incorrect disulphide bond formation might be a factor that affects the biogenesis of rod opsin by studying wild-type (WT) or P23H rod opsin in combination with amino acid substitutions that prevent the formation of incorrect disulphide bonds involving C185. These mutants had altered traffic dynamics, suggesting a requirement for regulation of disulphide bond formation/reduction during rod opsin biogenesis. Here, we show that the BiP co-chaperone and reductase protein ERdj5 (DNAJC10) regulates this process. ERdj5 overexpression promoted the degradation, improved the endoplasmic reticulum mobility and prevented the aggregation of P23H rod opsin. ERdj5 reduction by shRNA delayed rod opsin degradation and promoted aggregation. The reductase and co-chaperone activity of ERdj5 were both required for these effects on P23H rod opsin. Furthermore, mutations in these functional domains acted as dominant negatives that affected WT rod opsin biogenesis. Collectively, these data identify ERdj5 as a member of the proteostasis network that regulates rod opsin biogenesis and supports a role for disulphide bond formation/reduction in rod opsin biogenesis and disease.

  10. Visual sensitivities tuned by heterochronic shifts in opsin gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McFarland William N

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cichlid fishes have radiated into hundreds of species in the Great Lakes of Africa. Brightly colored males display on leks and vie to be chosen by females as mates. Strong discrimination by females causes differential male mating success, rapid evolution of male color patterns and, possibly, speciation. In addition to differences in color pattern, Lake Malawi cichlids also show some of the largest known shifts in visual sensitivity among closely related species. These shifts result from modulated expression of seven cone opsin genes. However, the mechanisms for this modulated expression are unknown. Results In this work, we ask whether these differences might result from changes in developmental patterning of cone opsin genes. To test this, we compared the developmental pattern of cone opsin gene expression of the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, with that of several cichlid species from Lake Malawi. In tilapia, quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that opsin gene expression changes dynamically from a larval gene set through a juvenile set to a final adult set. In contrast, Lake Malawi species showed one of two developmental patterns. In some species, the expressed gene set changes slowly, either retaining the larval pattern or progressing only from larval to juvenile gene sets (neoteny. In the other species, the same genes are expressed in both larvae and adults but correspond to the tilapia adult genes (direct development. Conclusion Differences in visual sensitivities among species of Lake Malawi cichlids arise through heterochronic shifts relative to the ontogenetic pattern of the tilapia outgroup. Heterochrony has previously been shown to be a powerful mechanism for change in morphological evolution. We found that altering developmental expression patterns is also an important mechanism for altering sensory systems. These resulting sensory shifts will have major impacts on visual communication and could help

  11. Visual sensitivities tuned by heterochronic shifts in opsin gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carleton, Karen L; Spady, Tyrone C; Streelman, J Todd; Kidd, Michael R; McFarland, William N; Loew, Ellis R

    2008-01-01

    Background Cichlid fishes have radiated into hundreds of species in the Great Lakes of Africa. Brightly colored males display on leks and vie to be chosen by females as mates. Strong discrimination by females causes differential male mating success, rapid evolution of male color patterns and, possibly, speciation. In addition to differences in color pattern, Lake Malawi cichlids also show some of the largest known shifts in visual sensitivity among closely related species. These shifts result from modulated expression of seven cone opsin genes. However, the mechanisms for this modulated expression are unknown. Results In this work, we ask whether these differences might result from changes in developmental patterning of cone opsin genes. To test this, we compared the developmental pattern of cone opsin gene expression of the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, with that of several cichlid species from Lake Malawi. In tilapia, quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that opsin gene expression changes dynamically from a larval gene set through a juvenile set to a final adult set. In contrast, Lake Malawi species showed one of two developmental patterns. In some species, the expressed gene set changes slowly, either retaining the larval pattern or progressing only from larval to juvenile gene sets (neoteny). In the other species, the same genes are expressed in both larvae and adults but correspond to the tilapia adult genes (direct development). Conclusion Differences in visual sensitivities among species of Lake Malawi cichlids arise through heterochronic shifts relative to the ontogenetic pattern of the tilapia outgroup. Heterochrony has previously been shown to be a powerful mechanism for change in morphological evolution. We found that altering developmental expression patterns is also an important mechanism for altering sensory systems. These resulting sensory shifts will have major impacts on visual communication and could help drive cichlid speciation

  12. Short wavelength-sensitive opsins from the Saharan silver and carpenter ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W C; Ayers, D M; Popp, M P; Hargrave, P A

    1997-06-01

    We have previously cloned the opsins coding for the long-wavelength visual pigments from the Saharan silver ant and carpenter ant. Here we report two new cDNA clones isolated from cDNA libraries which also code for opsin proteins. These cDNAs code for deduced proteins with 369 amino acids which are 91% identical to each other, but only 38% identical to the previously cloned opsins. Phyletic comparisons suggest that these opsins are likely the ultraviolet sensitive visual pigments, a conclusion that is supported by the presence of a phenylalanine at the counterion position in the third transmembrane segment.

  13. The ISO-LWS map of the Serpens cloud core I. The SEDs of the IR\\/SMM sources

    CERN Document Server

    Larsson, B; Menshikov, A B; Olofsson, G; Caux, E; Ceccarelli, C; Lorenzetti, D; Molinari, S; Nisini, B; Nordh, L H; Saraceno, P; Sibille, F; Spinoglio, L; White, G J

    2000-01-01

    ISO-LWS mapping observations of the Serpens molecular cloud core are presented. The spectral range is 50 - 200 micron and the map size is 8' X 8'. These observations suffer from severe source confusion at FIR wavelengths and we employ a Maximum Likelihood Method for the spectro-spatial deconvolution. The strong and fairly isolated source SMM1 FIRS1 presented a test case, whose modelled spectral energy distribution (SED), within observational errors, is identical to the observed one. The model results for the other infrared and submillimetre sources are therefore likely to represent their correct SEDs. Simulations demonstrating the reliability and potential of the developed method support this view. For the majority of sources the peak of the SEDs is found within the spectral range of the LWS and derived temperatures are generally higher (>30K) than have been found by earlier deconvolution attempts using IRAS data. SMM sizes are found to be only a few arcsec in diameter. In addition, the SMMs are generally opt...

  14. Retention of duplicated long-wavelength opsins in mosquito lineages by positive selection and differential expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo-Calderón, Gloria I; Zanis, Michael J; Hill, Catherine A

    2017-03-21

    Opsins are light sensitive receptors associated with visual processes. Insects typically possess opsins that are stimulated by ultraviolet, short and long wavelength (LW) radiation. Six putative LW-sensitive opsins predicted in the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti and malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, and eight in the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, suggest gene expansion in the Family Culicidae (mosquitoes) relative to other insects. Here we report the first detailed molecular and evolutionary analyses of LW opsins in three mosquito vectors, with a goal to understanding the molecular basis of opsin-mediated visual processes that could be exploited for mosquito control. Time of divergence estimates suggest that the mosquito LW opsins originated from 18 or 19 duplication events between 166.9/197.5 to 1.07/0.94 million years ago (MY) and that these likely occurred following the predicted divergence of the lineages Anophelinae and Culicinae 145-226 MY. Fitmodel analyses identified nine amino acid residues in the LW opsins that may be under positive selection. Of these, eight amino acids occur in the N and C termini and are shared among all three species, and one residue in TMIII was unique to culicine species. Alignment of 5' non-coding regions revealed potential Conserved Non-coding Sequences (CNS) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in seven pairs of LW opsin paralogs. Our analyses suggest opsin gene duplication and residues possibly associated with spectral tuning of LW-sensitive photoreceptors. We explore two mechanisms - positive selection and differential expression mediated by regulatory units in CNS - that may have contributed to the retention of LW opsin genes in Culicinae and Anophelinae. We discuss the evolution of mosquito LW opsins in the context of major Earth events and possible adaptation of mosquitoes to LW-dominated photo environments, and implications for mosquito control strategies based on disrupting vision

  15. Opsin evolution and expression in Arthropod compound Eyes and Ocelli: Insights from the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henze Miriam J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opsins are key proteins in animal photoreception. Together with a light-sensitive group, the chromophore, they form visual pigments which initiate the visual transduction cascade when photoactivated. The spectral absorption properties of visual pigments are mainly determined by their opsins, and thus opsins are crucial for understanding the adaptations of animal eyes. Studies on the phylogeny and expression pattern of opsins have received considerable attention, but our knowledge about insect visual opsins is still limited. Up to now, researchers have focused on holometabolous insects, while general conclusions require sampling from a broader range of taxa. We have therefore investigated visual opsins in the ocelli and compound eyes of the two-spotted cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, a hemimetabolous insect. Results Phylogenetic analyses place all identified cricket sequences within the three main visual opsin clades of insects. We assign three of these opsins to visual pigments found in the compound eyes with peak absorbances in the green (515 nm, blue (445 nm and UV (332 nm spectral range. Their expression pattern divides the retina into distinct regions: (1 the polarization-sensitive dorsal rim area with blue- and UV-opsin, (2 a newly-discovered ventral band of ommatidia with blue- and green-opsin and (3 the remainder of the compound eye with UV- and green-opsin. In addition, we provide evidence for two ocellar photopigments with peak absorbances in the green (511 nm and UV (350 nm spectral range, and with opsins that differ from those expressed in the compound eyes. Conclusions Our data show that cricket eyes are spectrally more specialized than has previously been assumed, suggesting that similar adaptations in other insect species might have been overlooked. The arrangement of spectral receptor types within some ommatidia of the cricket compound eyes differs from the generally accepted pattern found in holometabolous insect

  16. The Verriest Lecture: Short-wave-sensitive cone pathways across the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, John S

    2016-03-01

    Structurally and functionally, the short-wave-sensitive (S) cone pathways are thought to decline more rapidly with normal aging than the middle- and long-wave-sensitive cone pathways. This would explain the celebrated results by Verriest and others demonstrating that the largest age-related color discrimination losses occur for stimuli on a tritan axis. Here, we challenge convention, arguing from psychophysical data that selective S-cone pathway losses do not cause declines in color discrimination. We show substantial declines in chromatic detection and discrimination, as well as in temporal and spatial vision tasks, that are mediated by S-cone pathways. These functional losses are not, however, unique to S-cone pathways. Finally, despite reduced photon capture by S cones, their postreceptoral pathways provide robust signals for the visual system to renormalize itself to maintain nearly stable color perception across the life span.

  17. Opsin-mediated inhibition of bacterioruberin synthesis in halophilic Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Ronald F; Pleşa, Alexandru M; Graham, Serena M; Angelini, David R; Shaw, Emily L

    2017-08-07

    Halophilic Archaea often inhabit environments with limited oxygen, and many produce ion-pumping rhodopsin complexes that allow them to maintain electrochemical gradients when aerobic respiration is inhibited. Rhodopsins require a protein, opsin, and an organic cofactor, retinal. We have previously demonstrated that, in Halobacterium salinarum, bacterioopsin (BO), when not bound by retinal, inhibits the production of bacterioruberin, a biochemical pathway that shares intermediates with retinal biosynthesis. In this work, we use heterologous expression in a related halophilic Archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, to demonstrate that BO is sufficient to inhibit bacterioruberin synthesis catalyzed by the H. salinarum lycopene elongase (Lye) enzyme. This inhibition was observed both in liquid cultures and in a novel colorimetric assay to quantify bacterioruberin abundance based on the colony color. Addition of retinal to convert BO to the bacteriorhodopsin complex resulted in a partial rescue of bacterioruberin production. To explore if this regulatory mechanism occurs in other organisms, we expressed a Lye homolog and an opsin from Haloarcula vallismortis in H. volcaniiH. vallismortis cruxopsin expression inhibited bacterioruberin synthesis catalyzed by H. vallismortis Lye, but had no effect when bacterioruberin synthesis was catalyzed by H. salinarum or H. volcanii Lye. Conversely, H. salinarum BO did not inhibit H. vallismortis Lye activity. Together, our data suggest that opsin-mediated inhibition of Lye is potentially widespread and represents an elegant regulatory mechanism that allows organisms to efficiently utilize ion-pumping rhodopsins obtained through lateral gene transfer.Importance Many enzymes are complexes of proteins and non-protein organic molecules called cofactors. To ensure efficient formation of functional complexes, organisms must regulate the production of proteins and cofactors. To study this regulation, we use bacteriorhodopsin from the Archaeon

  18. Molecular Basis of Spectral Tuning in the Red- and Green-Sensitive (M/LWS) Pigments in Vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Yang, Hui; Starmer, William T.

    2008-01-01

    Vertebrate vision is mediated by five groups of visual pigments, each absorbing a specific wavelength of light between ultraviolet and red. Despite extensive mutagenesis analyses, the mechanisms by which contemporary pigments absorb variable wavelengths of light are poorly understood. We show that the molecular basis of the spectral tuning of contemporary visual pigments can be illuminated only by mutagenesis analyses using ancestral pigments. Following this new principle, we derive the “five-sites” rule that explains the absorption spectra of red and green (M/LWS) pigments that range from 510 to 560 nm. Our findings demonstrate that the evolutionary method should be used in elucidating the mechanisms of spectral tuning of four other pigment groups and, for that matter, functional differentiations of any other proteins. PMID:18660543

  19. Spectral tuning by opsin coexpression in retinal regions that view different parts of the visual field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Brian E.; Loew, Ellis R.; Cronin, Thomas W.; Carleton, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Vision frequently mediates critical behaviours, and photoreceptors must respond to the light available to accomplish these tasks. Most photoreceptors are thought to contain a single visual pigment, an opsin protein bound to a chromophore, which together determine spectral sensitivity. Mechanisms of spectral tuning include altering the opsin, changing the chromophore and incorporating pre-receptor filtering. A few exceptions to the use of a single visual pigment have been documented in which a single mature photoreceptor coexpresses opsins that form spectrally distinct visual pigments, and in these exceptions the functional significance of coexpression is unclear. Here we document for the first time photoreceptors coexpressing spectrally distinct opsin genes in a manner that tunes sensitivity to the light environment. Photoreceptors of the cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra, mix different pairs of opsins in retinal regions that view distinct backgrounds. The mixing of visual pigments increases absorbance of the corresponding background, potentially aiding the detection of dark objects. Thus, opsin coexpression may be a novel mechanism of spectral tuning that could be useful for detecting prey, predators and mates. However, our calculations show that coexpression of some opsins can hinder colour discrimination, creating a trade-off between visual functions. PMID:25377457

  20. A ligand channel through the G protein coupled receptor opsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W Hildebrand

    Full Text Available The G protein coupled receptor rhodopsin contains a pocket within its seven-transmembrane helix (TM structure, which bears the inactivating 11-cis-retinal bound by a protonated Schiff-base to Lys296 in TM7. Light-induced 11-cis-/all-trans-isomerization leads to the Schiff-base deprotonated active Meta II intermediate. With Meta II decay, the Schiff-base bond is hydrolyzed, all-trans-retinal is released from the pocket, and the apoprotein opsin reloaded with new 11-cis-retinal. The crystal structure of opsin in its active Ops* conformation provides the basis for computational modeling of retinal release and uptake. The ligand-free 7TM bundle of opsin opens into the hydrophobic membrane layer through openings A (between TM1 and 7, and B (between TM5 and 6, respectively. Using skeleton search and molecular docking, we find a continuous channel through the protein that connects these two openings and comprises in its central part the retinal binding pocket. The channel traverses the receptor over a distance of ca. 70 A and is between 11.6 and 3.2 A wide. Both openings are lined with aromatic residues, while the central part is highly polar. Four constrictions within the channel are so narrow that they must stretch to allow passage of the retinal beta-ionone-ring. Constrictions are at openings A and B, respectively, and at Trp265 and Lys296 within the retinal pocket. The lysine enforces a 90 degrees elbow-like kink in the channel which limits retinal passage. With a favorable Lys side chain conformation, 11-cis-retinal can take the turn, whereas passage of the all-trans isomer would require more global conformational changes. We discuss possible scenarios for the uptake of 11-cis- and release of all-trans-retinal. If the uptake gate of 11-cis-retinal is assigned to opening B, all-trans is likely to leave through the same gate. The unidirectional passage proposed previously requires uptake of 11-cis-retinal through A and release of photolyzed all

  1. Optogenetics: 10 years of microbial opsins in neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-09-01

    Over the past 10 years, the development and convergence of microbial opsin engineering, modular genetic methods for cell-type targeting and optical strategies for guiding light through tissue have enabled versatile optical control of defined cells in living systems, defining modern optogenetics. Despite widespread recognition of the importance of spatiotemporally precise causal control over cellular signaling, for nearly the first half (2005-2009) of this 10-year period, as optogenetics was being created, there were difficulties in implementation, few publications and limited biological findings. In contrast, the ensuing years have witnessed a substantial acceleration in the application domain, with the publication of thousands of discoveries and insights into the function of nervous systems and beyond. This Historical Commentary reflects on the scientific landscape of this decade-long transition.

  2. The photochemical determinants of color vision: revealing how opsins tune their chromophore's absorption wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjing; Geiger, James H; Borhan, Babak

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of a variety of important chromophore-dependent biological processes, including microbial light sensing and mammalian color vision, relies on protein modifications that alter the spectral characteristics of a bound chromophore. Three different color opsins share the same chromophore, but have three distinct absorptions that together cover the entire visible spectrum, giving rise to trichromatic vision. The influence of opsins on the absorbance of the chromophore has been studied through methods such as model compounds, opsin mutagenesis, and computational modeling. The recent development of rhodopsin mimic that uses small soluble proteins to recapitulate the binding and wavelength tuning of the native opsins provides a new platform for studying protein-regulated spectral tuning. The ability to achieve far-red shifted absorption in the rhodopsin mimic system was attributed to a combination of the lack of a counteranion proximal to the iminium, and a uniformly neutral electrostatic environment surrounding the chromophore.

  3. Divergence in cis-regulatory sequences surrounding the opsin gene arrays of African cichlid fishes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Quin, Kelly E; Smith, Daniel; Naseer, Zan; Schulte, Jane; Engel, Samuel D; Loh, Yong-Hwee E; Streelman, J Todd; Boore, Jeffrey L; Carleton, Karen L

    2011-01-01

    .... We use phylogenetic footprinting and shadowing to examine divergence in conserved non-coding elements, promoter sequences, and 3'-UTRs surrounding each opsin in search of candidate cis-regulatory...

  4. Overcoming the loss of blue sensitivity through opsin duplication in the largest animal group, beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Camilla R; Fujimoto, M Stanley; Lord, Nathan P; Shin, Seunggwan; McKenna, Duane D; Suvorov, Anton; Martin, Gavin J; Bybee, Seth M

    2017-12-01

    Opsin proteins are fundamental components of animal vision whose structure largely determines the sensitivity of visual pigments to different wavelengths of light. Surprisingly little is known about opsin evolution in beetles, even though they are the most species rich animal group on Earth and exhibit considerable variation in visual system sensitivities. We reveal the patterns of opsin evolution across 62 beetle species and relatives. Our results show that the major insect opsin class (SW) that typically confers sensitivity to "blue" wavelengths was lost ~300 million years ago, before the origin of modern beetles. We propose that UV and LW opsin gene duplications have restored the potential for trichromacy (three separate channels for colour vision) in beetles up to 12 times and more specifically, duplications within the UV opsin class have likely led to the restoration of "blue" sensitivity up to 10 times. This finding reveals unexpected plasticity within the insect visual system and highlights its remarkable ability to evolve and adapt to the available light and visual cues present in the environment.

  5. Chemical and radiative transfer modeling of the ISO-LWS Fabry-Perot spectra of Orion-KL water line

    CERN Document Server

    Lerate, M R; Barlow, M J; Viti, S; Swinyard, B M

    2010-01-01

    We present chemical and radiative transfer models for the many far-IR ortho- and para-H$_{2}$O lines that were observed from the Orion-KL region in high resolution Fabry-Perot (FP) mode by the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). The chemistry of the region was first studied by simulating the conditions in the different known components of Orion-KL: chemical models for a hot core, a plateau and a ridge were coupled with an accelerated Lambda$-iteration (ALI) radiative transfer model to predict H$_2$O line fluxes and profiles. Our models include the first 45 energy levels of ortho- and para-H$_{2}$O. We find that lines arising from energy levels below 560 K were best reproduced by a gas of density 3$\\times10^{5}$ cm$^{-3}$ at a temperature of 70-90 K, expanding at a velocity of 30 km s$^{-1}$ and with a H$_{2}$O/H$_{2}$ abundance ratio of the order of 2 - 3 $\\times$ 10$^{-5}$, similar to the abundance derived by Cernicharo et al. (2006). However, the model that best...

  6. Opsin Repertoire and Expression Patterns in Horseshoe Crabs: Evidence from the Genome of Limulus polyphemus (Arthropoda: Chelicerata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelle, Barbara-Anne; Ryan, Joseph F; Kempler, Karen E; Saraf, Spencer R; Marten, Catherine E; Warren, Wesley C; Minx, Patrick J; Montague, Michael J; Green, Pamela J; Schmidt, Skye A; Fulton, Lucinda; Patel, Nipam H; Protas, Meredith E; Wilson, Richard K; Porter, Megan L

    2016-06-03

    Horseshoe crabs are xiphosuran chelicerates, the sister group to arachnids. As such, they are important for understanding the most recent common ancestor of Euchelicerata and the evolution and diversification of Arthropoda. Limulus polyphemus is the most investigated of the four extant species of horseshoe crabs, and the structure and function of its visual system have long been a major focus of studies critical for understanding the evolution of visual systems in arthropods. Likewise, studies of genes encoding Limulus opsins, the protein component of the visual pigments, are critical for understanding opsin evolution and diversification among chelicerates, where knowledge of opsins is limited, and more broadly among arthropods. In the present study, we sequenced and assembled a high quality nuclear genomic sequence of L. polyphemus and used these data to annotate the full repertoire of Limulus opsins. We conducted a detailed phylogenetic analysis of Limulus opsins, including using gene structure and synteny information to identify relationships among different opsin classes. We used our phylogeny to identify significant genomic events that shaped opsin evolution and therefore the visual system of Limulus We also describe the tissue expression patterns of the 18 opsins identified and show that transcripts encoding a number, including a peropsin, are present throughout the central nervous system. In addition to significantly extending our understanding of photosensitivity in Limulus and providing critical insight into the genomic evolution of horseshoe crab opsins, this work provides a valuable genomic resource for addressing myriad questions related to xiphosuran physiology and arthropod evolution.

  7. The human Müller cell line MIO-M1 expresses opsins.

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    Hollborn, Margrit; Ulbricht, Elke; Rillich, Katja; Dukic-Stefanovic, Sladjana; Wurm, Antje; Wagner, Lysann; Reichenbach, Andreas; Wiedemann, Peter; Limb, Gloria Astrid; Bringmann, Andreas; Kohen, Leon

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether the human Müller cell line Moorfields/Institute of Ophthalmology-Müller 1 (MIO-M1) expresses opsins. The gene expression of opsins was determined by reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR). The presence of opsin proteins was determined by western blotting and immunocytochemistry. The light sensitivity of the cells was examined with imaging experiments using the calcium-sensitive dye Fluo-4. MIO-M1 cells express glial (glutamine synthase [GLUL], vimentin [VIM], glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP], cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein [RLBP1], glial high-affinity glutamate transporter [SLCA1], aquaporin-4 [AQP4], inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir4.1 [Kir4.1]), neuronal (Thy-1 cell surface antigen [THY1], heavy neurofilament polypeptide [NEFH], microtubule-associated protein 2 [MAP2], neurogenic differentiation 1 [NEUROD1], neuronal nuclei [NEUN]), and neural progenitor markers (Nestin [NES], paired-type homeobox transcription factor [PAX6], neurogenic locus notch homolog 1 [NOTCH1]). The cells contain mRNA for the following opsins: blue opsin (OPN1SW), rhodopsin (OPN2), panopsin (OPN3), melanopsin (OPN4), neuropsin (OPN5), and peropsin (RRH), as well as for the transducins (guanine nucleotide binding protein [GNAZ], alpha transducing activity polypeptide 1 [GNAT1], alpha transducing activity polypeptide 2 [GNAT2]). The presence of blue opsin and melanopsin was confirmed with immunocytochemistry and western blotting. The immunoreactivity and mRNA of red-green opsin were found in some but not all cultures, while the immunoreactivity for rhodopsin was absent in all cultures investigated. Repetitive stimulation with 480 nm light evoked slow and fast transient calcium responses in the majority of cells investigated, while irradiation with 600 nm light was ineffective. The human Müller cell line MIO-M1 expresses opsins. This suggests immortalized Müller cells could be used as a cellular source to produce human opsins for their potential

  8. Spectral sensitivity in Onychophora (velvet worms) revealed by electroretinograms, phototactic behaviour and opsin gene expression.

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    Beckmann, Holger; Hering, Lars; Henze, Miriam J; Kelber, Almut; Stevenson, Paul A; Mayer, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Onychophorans typically possess a pair of simple eyes, inherited from the last common ancestor of Panarthropoda (Onychophora+Tardigrada+Arthropoda). These visual organs are thought to be homologous to the arthropod median ocelli, whereas the compound eyes probably evolved in the arthropod lineage. To gain insights into the ancestral function and evolution of the visual system in panarthropods, we investigated phototactic behaviour, opsin gene expression and the spectral sensitivity of the eyes in two representative species of Onychophora: Euperipatoides rowelli (Peripatopsidae) and Principapillatus hitoyensis (Peripatidae). Our behavioural analyses, in conjunction with previous data, demonstrate that both species exhibit photonegative responses to wavelengths ranging from ultraviolet to green light (370-530 nm), and electroretinograms reveal that the onychophoran eye is maximally sensitive to blue light (peak sensitivity ∼480 nm). Template fits to these sensitivities suggest that the onychophoran eye is monochromatic. To clarify which type of opsin the single visual pigment is based on, we localised the corresponding mRNA in the onychophoran eye and brain using in situ hybridization. Our data show that the r-opsin gene (onychopsin) is expressed exclusively in the photoreceptor cells of the eye, whereas c-opsin mRNA is confined to the optic ganglion cells and the brain. Together, our findings suggest that the onychopsin is involved in vision, whereas c-opsin might have a photoreceptive, non-visual function in onychophorans.

  9. The hypothalamic photoreceptors regulating seasonal reproduction in birds: a prime role for VA opsin.

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    García-Fernández, José M; Cernuda-Cernuda, Rafael; Davies, Wayne I L; Rodgers, Jessica; Turton, Michael; Peirson, Stuart N; Follett, Brian K; Halford, Stephanie; Hughes, Steven; Hankins, Mark W; Foster, Russell G

    2015-04-01

    Extraretinal photoreceptors located within the medio-basal hypothalamus regulate the photoperiodic control of seasonal reproduction in birds. An action spectrum for this response describes an opsin photopigment with a λmax of ∼ 492 nm. Beyond this however, the specific identity of the photopigment remains unresolved. Several candidates have emerged including rod-opsin; melanopsin (OPN4); neuropsin (OPN5); and vertebrate ancient (VA) opsin. These contenders are evaluated against key criteria used routinely in photobiology to link orphan photopigments to specific biological responses. To date, only VA opsin can easily satisfy all criteria and we propose that this photopigment represents the prime candidate for encoding daylength and driving seasonal breeding in birds. We also show that VA opsin is co-expressed with both gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and arginine-vasotocin (AVT) neurons. These new data suggest that GnRH and AVT neurosecretory pathways are endogenously photosensitive and that our current understanding of how these systems are regulated will require substantial revision.

  10. Simple Eyes, Extraocular Photoreceptors and Opsins in the American Horseshoe Crab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelle, Barbara-Anne

    2016-11-01

    The eyes and photoreceptors of the American horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus have been studied since the 1930s, and this work has been critical for understanding basic mechanisms of vision. One of the attractions of Limulus as a preparation for studies of vision is that it has three different types of eyes-a pair of later compound, image-forming eyes and two types of simple eyes, a pair of median ocelli, and three pair of larval eyes. Each eye type is tractable for experimentation. Limulus also has extraocular photoreceptors in its segmental ganglia and tail. The current contribution focuses on photoreceptors in Limulus larval eyes and ocelli and its extraocular photoreceptors with the goal of summarizing what is currently known and not known about their physiology and function and the opsins they express. The Limulus genome encodes a surprisingly large number of opsins (18), and studies of their expression pattern have raised new questions about the role of opsin co-expression, the functions of peropsins expressed outside of eyes, and the physiological relevance of opsins with apparently very low expression levels. Studies of opsin expression in Limulus lead one to wonder whether photoreceptors yet to be discovered might be present throughout its central nervous system. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Opsin expression in Limulus eyes: a UV opsin is expressed in each eye type and co-expressed with a visible light-sensitive opsin in ventral larval eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelle, Barbara-Anne; Kempler, Karen E; Harrison, Alexandra; Dugger, Donald R; Payne, Richard

    2014-09-01

    The eyes of the horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, are a model for studies of visual function and the visual systems of euarthropods. Much is known about the structure and function of L. polyphemus photoreceptors, much less about their photopigments. Three visible-light-sensitive L. polyphemus opsins were characterized previously (LpOps1, 2 and 5). Here we characterize a UV opsin (LpUVOps1) that is expressed in all three types of L. polyphemus eyes. It is expressed in most photoreceptors in median ocelli, the only L. polyphemus eyes in which UV sensitivity was previously detected, and in the dendrite of eccentric cells in lateral compound eyes. Therefore, eccentric cells, previously thought to be non-photosensitive second-order neurons, may actually be UV-sensitive photoreceptors. LpUVOps1 is also expressed in small photoreceptors in L. polyphemus ventral larval eyes, and intracellular recordings from these photoreceptors confirm that LpUVOps1 is an active, UV-sensitive photopigment. These photoreceptors also express LpOps5, which we demonstrate is an active, long-wavelength-sensitive photopigment. Thus small photoreceptors in ventral larval eyes, and probably those of the other larval eyes, have dual sensitivity to UV and visible light. Interestingly, the spectral tuning of small ventral photoreceptors may change day to night, because the level of LpOps5 in their rhabdoms is lower during the day than during the night, whereas LpUVOps1 levels show no diurnal change. These and previous findings show that opsin co-expression and the differential regulation of co-expressed opsins in rhabdoms is a common feature of L. polyphemus photoreceptors.

  12. The microbial opsin homologue sop1 is involved in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum development and environmental stress response

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    Xueliang eLyu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial opsins play a crucial role in responses to various environmental signals. Here, we report that the microbial opsin gene sop1 in the necrotrophic phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was dramatically up-regulated during infection and sclerotial development compared with the vegetative growth stage. Further study showed sop1 was essential for growth, sclerotial development and full virulence of S. sclerotiorum. Sop1-silenced transformants were more sensitive to high salt stress, fungicides and high osmotic stress. However, they were more tolerant to oxidative stress compared with the wild-type strain, suggesting that sop1 is involved in different stress responses and fungicide resistance, which plays a role in the environmental adaptability of S. sclerotiorum. Furthermore, a Delta blast search showed that microbial opsins are not present in animals and almost all higher plants, indicating that as a predicted transmembrane protein, sop1 is a potential drug target for disease control of S. sclerotiorum.

  13. Maps of cone opsin input to mouse V1 and higher visual areas.

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    Rhim, Issac; Coello-Reyes, Gabriela; Ko, Hee-Kyoung; Nauhaus, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Studies in the mouse retina have characterized the spatial distribution of an anisotropic ganglion cell and photoreceptor mosaic, which provides a solid foundation to study how the cortex pools from afferent parallel color channels. In particular, the mouse's retinal mosaic exhibits a gradient of wavelength sensitivity along its dorsoventral axis. Cones at the ventral extreme mainly express S opsin, which is sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. Then, moving toward the retina's dorsal extreme, there is a transition to M-opsin dominance. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the retina's opsin gradient is recapitulated in cortical visual areas as a functional map of wavelength sensitivity. We first identified visual areas in each mouse by mapping retinotopy with intrinsic signal imaging (ISI). Next, we measured ISI responses to stimuli along different directions of the S- and M-color plane to quantify the magnitude of S and M input to each location of the retinotopic maps in five visual cortical areas (V1, AL, LM, PM, and RL). The results illustrate a significant change in the S:M-opsin input ratio along the axis of vertical retinotopy that is consistent with the gradient along the dorsoventral axis of the retina. In particular, V1 populations encoding the upper visual field responded to S-opsin contrast with 6.1-fold greater amplitude than to M-opsin contrast. V1 neurons encoding lower fields responded with 4.6-fold greater amplitude to M- than S-opsin contrast. The maps in V1 and higher visual areas (HVAs) underscore the significance of a wavelength sensitivity gradient for guiding the mouse's behavior.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Two elements of this study are particularly novel. For one, it is the first to quantify cone inputs to mouse visual cortex; we have measured cone input in five visual areas. Next, it is the first study to identify a feature map in the mouse visual cortex that is based on well-characterized anisotropy of cones in the retina; we have identified

  14. Genomic and gene regulatory signatures of cryptozoic adaptation: Loss of blue sensitive photoreceptors through expansion of long wavelength-opsin expression in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum

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    Cook Tiffany A

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent genome sequence analysis in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum indicated that this highly crepuscular animal encodes only two single opsin paralogs: a UV-opsin and a long wavelength (LW-opsin; however, these animals do not encode a blue (B-opsin as most other insects. Here, we studied the spatial regulation of the Tribolium single LW- and UV-opsin gene paralogs in comparison to that of the five opsin paralogs in the retina of Drosophila melanogaster. Results In situ hybridization analysis reveals that the Tribolium retina, in contrast with other insect retinas, constitutes a homogenous field of ommatidia that have seven LW-opsin expressing photoreceptors and one UV-/LW-opsin co-expressing photoreceptor per eye unit. This pattern is consistent with the loss of photoreceptors sensitive to blue wavelengths. It also identifies Tribolium as the first example of a species in insects that co-expresses two different opsins across the entire retina in violation of the widely observed "one receptor rule" of sensory cells. Conclusion Broader studies of opsin evolution in darkling beetles and other coleopteran groups have the potential to pinpoint the permissive and adaptive forces that played a role in the evolution of vision in Tribolium castaneum.

  15. Opsins in Limulus eyes: characterization of three visible light-sensitive opsins unique to and co-expressed in median eye photoreceptors and a peropsin/RGR that is expressed in all eyes.

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    Battelle, Barbara-Anne; Kempler, Karen E; Saraf, Spencer R; Marten, Catherine E; Dugger, Donald R; Speiser, Daniel I; Oakley, Todd H

    2015-02-01

    The eyes of the horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus have long been used for studies of basic mechanisms of vision, and the structure and physiology of Limulus photoreceptors have been examined in detail. Less is known about the opsins Limulus photoreceptors express. We previously characterized a UV opsin (LpUVOps1) that is expressed in all three types of Limulus eyes (lateral compound eyes, median ocelli and larval eyes) and three visible light-sensitive rhabdomeric opsins (LpOps1, -2 and -5) that are expressed in Limulus lateral compound and larval eyes. Physiological studies showed that visible light-sensitive photoreceptors are also present in median ocelli, but the visible light-sensitive opsins they express were unknown. In the current study we characterize three newly identified, visible light-sensitive rhabdomeric opsins (LpOps6, -7 and -8) that are expressed in median ocelli. We show that they are ocellar specific and that all three are co-expressed in photoreceptors distinct from those expressing LpUVOps1. Our current findings show that the pattern of opsin expression in Limulus eyes is much more complex than previously thought and extend our previous observations of opsin co-expression in visible light-sensitive Limulus photoreceptors. We also characterize a Limulus peropsin/RGR (LpPerOps1). We examine the phylogenetic relationship of LpPerOps1 with other peropsins and RGRs, demonstrate that LpPerOps1 transcripts are expressed in each of the three types of Limulus eyes and show that the encoded protein is expressed in membranes of cells closely associated with photoreceptors in each eye type. These finding suggest that peropsin was in the opsin repertoire of euchelicerates.

  16. Transcriptome analysis and RNA interference of cockroach phototransduction indicate three opsins and suggest a major role for TRPL channels

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    Andrew S French

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of insect phototransduction is based on a small number of species, but insects occupy many different visual environments. We created the retinal transcriptome of a nocturnal insect, the cockroach, Periplaneta americana to identify proteins involved in the earliest stages of compound eye phototransduction, and test the hypothesis that different visual environments are reflected in different molecular contributions to function. We assembled five novel mRNAs: two green opsins, one UV opsin, and one each TRP and TRPL ion channel homologs. One green opsin mRNA (pGO1 was 100-1000 times more abundant than the other opsins (pGO2 and pUVO, while pTRPL mRNA was 10 times more abundant than pTRP, estimated by transcriptome analysis or quantitative PCR (qPCR. Electroretinograms were used to record photoreceptor responses. Gene-specific in vivo RNA interference (RNAi was achieved by injecting long (596-708 bp double-stranded RNA into head hemolymph, and verified by qPCR. RNAi of the most abundant green opsin reduced both green opsins by more than 97% without affecting UV opsin, and gave a maximal reduction of 75% in ERG amplitude seven days after injection that persisted for at least 19 days. RNAi of pTRP and pTRPL genes each specifically reduced the corresponding mRNA by 90%. Electroretinogram reduction by pTRPL RNAi was slower than for opsin, reaching 75% attenuation by 21 days, without recovery at 29 days. pTRP RNAi attenuated ERG much less; only 30% after 21 days. Combined pTRP plus pTRPL RNAi gave only weak evidence of any cooperative interactions. We conclude that silencing retinal genes by in vivo RNAi using long dsRNA is effective, that visible light transduction in Periplaneta is dominated by pGO1, and that pTRPL plays a major role in cockroach phototransduction.

  17. Exploring the binding properties and structural stability of an opsin in the chytrid Spizellomyces punctatus using comparative and molecular modeling

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    Steven R. Ahrendt

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Opsin proteins are seven transmembrane receptor proteins which detect light. Opsins can be classified into two types and share little sequence identity: type 1, typically found in bacteria, and type 2, primarily characterized in metazoa. The type 2 opsins (Rhodopsins are a subfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, a large and diverse class of seven transmembrane proteins and are generally restricted to metazoan lineages. Fungi use light receptors including opsins to sense the environment and transduce signals for developmental or metabolic changes. Opsins characterized in the Dikarya (Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes are of the type 1 bacteriorhodopsin family but the early diverging fungal lineages have not been as well surveyed. We identified by sequence similarity a rhodopsin-like GPCR in genomes of early diverging chytrids and examined the structural characteristics of this protein to assess its likelihood to be homologous to animal rhodopsins and bind similar chromophores. Methods We used template-based structure modeling, automated ligand docking, and molecular modeling to assess the structural and binding properties of an identified opsin-like protein found in Spizellomyces punctatus, a unicellular, flagellated species belonging to Chytridiomycota, one of the earliest diverging fungal lineages. We tested if the sequence and inferred structure were consistent with a solved crystal structure of a type 2 rhodopsin from the squid Todarodes pacificus. Results Our results indicate that the Spizellomyces opsin has structural characteristics consistent with functional animal type 2 rhodopsins and is capable of maintaining a stable structure when associated with the retinaldehyde chromophore, specifically the 9-cis-retinal isomer. Together, these results support further the homology of Spizellomyces opsins to animal type 2 rhodopsins. Discussion This represents the first test of structure/function relationship of a type 2 rhodopsin

  18. De Novo Adult Transcriptomes of Two European Brittle Stars: Spotlight on Opsin-Based Photoreception.

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    Jérôme Delroisse

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS technology allows to obtain a deeper and more complete view of transcriptomes. For non-model or emerging model marine organisms, NGS technologies offer a great opportunity for rapid access to genetic information. In this study, paired-end Illumina HiSeqTM technology has been employed to analyse transcriptomes from the arm tissues of two European brittle star species, Amphiura filiformis and Ophiopsila aranea. About 48 million Illumina reads were generated and 136,387 total unigenes were predicted from A. filiformis arm tissues. For O. aranea arm tissues, about 47 million reads were generated and 123,324 total unigenes were obtained. Twenty-four percent of the total unigenes from A. filiformis show significant matches with sequences present in reference online databases, whereas, for O. aranea, this percentage amounts to 23%. In both species, around 50% of the predicted annotated unigenes were significantly similar to transcripts from the purple sea urchin, the closest species to date that has undergone complete genome sequencing and annotation. GO, COG and KEGG analyses were performed on predicted brittle star unigenes. We focused our analyses on the phototransduction actors involved in light perception. Firstly, two new echinoderm opsins were identified in O. aranea: one rhabdomeric opsin (homologous to vertebrate melanopsin and one RGR opsin. The RGR-opsin is supposed to be involved in retinal regeneration while the r-opsin is suspected to play a role in visual-like behaviour. Secondly, potential phototransduction actors were identified in both transcriptomes using the fly (rhabdomeric and mammal (ciliary classical phototransduction pathways as references. Finally, the sensitivity of O.aranea to monochromatic light was investigated to complement data available for A. filiformis. The presence of microlens-like structures at the surface of dorsal arm plate of O. aranea could potentially explain phototactic

  19. Signatures of functional constraint at aye-aye opsin genes: the potential of adaptive color vision in a nocturnal primate.

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    Perry, George H; Martin, Robert D; Verrelli, Brian C

    2007-09-01

    While color vision perception is thought to be adaptively correlated with foraging efficiency for diurnal mammals, those that forage exclusively at night may not need color vision nor have the capacity for it. Indeed, although the basic condition for mammals is dichromacy, diverse nocturnal mammals have only monochromatic vision, resulting from functional loss of the short-wavelength sensitive opsin gene. However, many nocturnal primates maintain intact two opsin genes and thus have dichromatic capacity. The evolutionary significance of this surprising observation has not yet been elucidated. We used a molecular population genetics approach to test evolutionary hypotheses for the two intact opsin genes of the fully nocturnal aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis), a highly unusual and endangered Madagascar primate. No evidence of gene degradation in either opsin gene was observed for any of 8 aye-aye individuals examined. Furthermore, levels of nucleotide diversity for opsin gene functional sites were lower than those for 15 neutrally evolving intergenic regions (>25 kb in total), which is consistent with a history of purifying selection on aye-aye opsin genes. The most likely explanation for these findings is that dichromacy is advantageous for aye-ayes despite their nocturnal activity pattern. We speculate that dichromatic nocturnal primates may be able to perceive color while foraging under moonlight conditions, and suggest that behavioral and ecological comparisons among dichromatic and monochromatic nocturnal primates will help to elucidate the specific activities for which color vision perception is advantageous.

  20. Light-controlled inhibition of malignant glioma by opsin gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F; Tu, J; Pan, J-Q; Luo, H-L; Liu, Y-H; Wan, J; Zhang, J; Wei, P-F; Jiang, T; Chen, Y-H; Wang, L-P

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastomas are aggressive cancers with low survival rates and poor prognosis because of their highly proliferative and invasive capacity. In the current study, we describe a new optogenetic strategy that selectively inhibits glioma cells through light-controlled membrane depolarization and cell death. Transfer of the engineered opsin ChETA (engineered Channelrhodopsin-2 variant) gene into primary human glioma cells or cell lines, but not normal astrocytes, unexpectedly decreased cell proliferation and increased mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, upon light stimulation. These optogenetic effects were mediated by membrane depolarization-induced reductions in cyclin expression and mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Importantly, the ChETA gene transfer and light illumination in mice significantly inhibited subcutaneous and intracranial glioma growth and increased the survival of the animals bearing the glioma. These results uncover an unexpected effect of opsin ion channels on glioma cells and offer the opportunity for the first time to treat glioma using a light-controllable optogenetic approach. PMID:24176851

  1. Nonvisual Opsins and the Regulation of Peripheral Clocks by Light and Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletini, Maristela O; Ramos, Bruno C; Moraes, Maria Nathalia; Castrucci, Ana Maria L

    2015-01-01

    The molecular clock machinery is conserved throughout evolution. However, how environmental cues are perceived has evolved in such a way that peripheral clocks in mammals require a variety of signals, including hormones. On the other hand, in nonmammalian cells able to directly detect light, light seems to play a major role in the synchronization of the clock. The interaction between perception of circadian light by nonvisual opsins and hormones will be discussed under the perspective of clock synchronization at the molecular level.

  2. Mutational changes in S-cone opsin genes common to both nocturnal and cathemeral Aotus monkeys.

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    Levenson, David H; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Evans, Sian; Jacobs, Gerald H

    2007-07-01

    Aotus is a platyrrhine primate that has been classically considered to be nocturnal. Earlier research revealed that this animal lacks a color vision capacity because, unlike all other platyrrhine monkeys, Aotus has a defect in the opsin gene that is required to produce short-wavelength sensitive (S) cone photopigment. Consequently, Aotus retains only a single type of cone photopigment. Other mammals have since been found to show similar losses and it has often been speculated that such change is in some fashion tied to nocturnality. Although most species of Aotus are indeed nocturnal, recent observations show that Aotus azarai, an owl monkey species native to portions of Argentina and Paraguay, displays a cathemeral activity pattern being active during daylight hours as frequently as during nighttime hours. We have sequenced portions of the S-cone opsin gene in A. azarai and Aotus nancymaae, the latter a typically nocturnal species. The S-cone opsin genes in both species contain the same fatal defects earlier detected for Aotus trivirgatus. On the basis of the phylogenetic relationships of these three species these results imply that Aotus must have lost a capacity for color vision early in its history and they also suggest that the absence of color vision is not compulsively linked to a nocturnal lifestyle.

  3. Cardiac optogenetic pacing in drosophila melanogaster using red-shifted opsins (Conference Presentation)

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    Men, Jing; Li, Airong; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Electrical pacing is the current gold standard for investigation of mammalian cardiac electrical conduction systems as well as for treatment of certain cardiac pathologies. However, this method requires an invasive surgical procedure to implant the pacing electrodes. Recently, optogenetic pacing has been developed as an alternative, non-invasive method for heartbeat pacing in animals. It induces heartbeats by shining pulsed light on transgene-generated microbial opsins which in turn activate light gated ion channels in animal hearts. However, commonly used opsins, such as channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), require short light wavelength stimulation (475 nm), which is strongly absorbed and scattered by tissue. Here, we expressed recently engineered red-shifted opsins, ReaChR and CsChrimson, in the heart of a well-developed animal model, Drosophila melanogaster, for the first time. Optogenetic pacing was successfully conducted in both ReaChR and CsChrimson flies at their larval, pupal, and adult stages using 617 nm excitation light pulse, enabling a much deeper tissue penetration compared to blue stimulation light. A customized high speed and ultrahigh resolution OCM system was used to non-invasively monitor the heartbeat pacing in Drosophila. Compared to previous studies on optogenetic pacing of Drosophila, higher penetration depth of optogenetic excitation light was achieved in opaque late pupal flies. Lower stimulating power density is needed for excitation at each developmental stage of both groups, which improves the safety of this technique for heart rhythm studies.

  4. Atomistic design of microbial opsin-based blue-shifted optogenetics tools

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    Kato, Hideaki E.; Kamiya, Motoshi; Sugo, Seiya; Ito, Jumpei; Taniguchi, Reiya; Orito, Ayaka; Hirata, Kunio; Inutsuka, Ayumu; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Maturana, Andrés D.; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Sudo, Yuki; Hayashi, Shigehiko; Nureki, Osamu

    2015-05-01

    Microbial opsins with a bound chromophore function as photosensitive ion transporters and have been employed in optogenetics for the optical control of neuronal activity. Molecular engineering has been utilized to create colour variants for the functional augmentation of optogenetics tools, but was limited by the complexity of the protein-chromophore interactions. Here we report the development of blue-shifted colour variants by rational design at atomic resolution, achieved through accurate hybrid molecular simulations, electrophysiology and X-ray crystallography. The molecular simulation models and the crystal structure reveal the precisely designed conformational changes of the chromophore induced by combinatory mutations that shrink its π-conjugated system which, together with electrostatic tuning, produce large blue shifts of the absorption spectra by maximally 100 nm, while maintaining photosensitive ion transport activities. The design principle we elaborate is applicable to other microbial opsins, and clarifies the underlying molecular mechanism of the blue-shifted action spectra of microbial opsins recently isolated from natural sources.

  5. Structural and functional alterations associated with deutan N94K and R330Q mutations of green cone opsin.

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    Srinivasan, Sundaramoorthy; Fernández-Sampedro, Miguel A; Ramon, Eva; Garriga, Pere

    2017-07-01

    Deuteranopia is an X-linked congenital dichromatic condition in which single point mutations in green cone opsin lead to defective non-functional cone photoreceptor cells. Green cone opsin belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily and consists of a seven transmembrane helical apoprotein covalently bound to 11-cis-retinal, by means of a protonated Schiff base linkage, in its inactive dark state. Several point mutations in green cone opsin have been reported to cause deuteranopia, but the structural details underlying the molecular mechanisms behind the malfunction of mutated opsins have not been clearly established. Here, deutan N94K and R330Q mutants were studied by introducing these substitutions into the native green cone opsin gene by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant proteins were purified and analyzed using UV-vis spectroscopy and transducin activation assay. We find that the N94K mutant binds the retinal chromophore by means of an unprotonated Schiff base linkage in contrast to previous studies that reported no chromophore regeneration. The other mutant studied, R330Q, showed impaired functionality as measured by its reduced transducin activation ability when compared to wild-type green cone opsin. A double Cys mutant that could form a stabilizing disulfide bond was used in an attempt to address the instability of the green opsin mutants. Our results suggest the presence of key intramolecular networks which may be disrupted in deuteranopia, and these findings could help in finding therapeutic solutions for treating color blindness. Furthermore, our results can also have implications for the study of other visual pigments and other rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Constraints on the Bulk Composition of Uranus from Herschel PACS and ISO LWS Photometry, SOFIA FORCAST Photometry and Spectroscopy, and Ground-Based Photometry of its Thermal Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Glenn; Mueller, Thomas; Burgdorf, Martin; Fletcher, Leigh; de Pater, Imke; Atreya, Sushil; Adams, Joseph; Herter, Terry; Keller, Luke; Sidher, Sunil; Sinclair, James; Fujiyoshi, Takuya

    2016-04-01

    We present thermal infrared observations of the disk of Uranus at 17-200 μm to deduce its global thermal structure and bulk composition. We combine 17-200 μm filtered photometric measurements by the Herschel PACS and ISO LWS instruments and 19-35 μm filtered photometry and spectroscopy by the SOFIA FORCAST instrument, supplemented by 17-25 μm ground-based photometric filtered imaging of Uranus. Previous analysis of infrared spectroscopic measurements of the disk of Uranus made by the Spitzer IRS instrument yielded a model for the disk-averaged temperature profile and stratospheric composition (Orton et al. 2014a Icarus 243,494; 2014b Icarus 243, 471) that were consistent with submillimeter spectroscopy by the Herschel SPIRE instrument (Swinyard et al. 2014, MNRAS 440, 3658). Our motivation to observe the 17-35 μm spectrum was to place more stringent constraints on the global para-H2 / ortho-H2 ratio in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere than the ISO SWS results of Fouchet et al. (2003, Icarus 161, 127), who examined H2 quadrupole lines. We will discuss the consistency of these observations with a higher para-H2 fraction than implied by local thermal equilibrium, which would resolve a discrepancy between the Spitzer-based model and observations of HD lines by the Herschel PACS experiment (Feuchtgruber et al. 2013 Astron. & Astrophys. 551, A126). Constraints on the global para-H2 fraction allow for more precise analysis of the far-infrared spectrum, which is sensitive to the He:H2 ratio, a quantity that was not constrained by the Spitzer IRS spectra. The derived model, which assumed the ratio derived by the Voyager-2 IRIS/radio-science occultation experiment (Conrath et al. 1987 J. Geophys. Res. 92, 15003), is inconsistent with 70-200 μm PACS photometry (Mueller et al. 2016 Astron. & Astrophys. submittted) and ISO LWS photometric measurements. However, the model can be made consistent with the observations if the fraction of He relative to H2 were

  7. Opsins in onychophora (velvet worms) suggest a single origin and subsequent diversification of visual pigments in arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Lars; Henze, Miriam J; Kohler, Martin; Kelber, Almut; Bleidorn, Christoph; Leschke, Maren; Nickel, Birgit; Meyer, Matthias; Kircher, Martin; Sunnucks, Paul; Mayer, Georg

    2012-11-01

    Multiple visual pigments, prerequisites for color vision, are found in arthropods, but the evolutionary origin of their diversity remains obscure. In this study, we explore the opsin genes in five distantly related species of Onychophora, using deep transcriptome sequencing and screening approaches. Surprisingly, our data reveal the presence of only one opsin gene (onychopsin) in each onychophoran species, and our behavioral experiments indicate a maximum sensitivity of onychopsin to blue-green light. In our phylogenetic analyses, the onychopsins represent the sister group to the monophyletic clade of visual r-opsins of arthropods. These results concur with phylogenomic support for the sister-group status of the Onychophora and Arthropoda and provide evidence for monochromatic vision in velvet worms and in the last common ancestor of Onychophora and Arthropoda. We conclude that the diversification of visual pigments and color vision evolved in arthropods, along with the evolution of compound eyes-one of the most sophisticated visual systems known.

  8. Effects of light-emitting diode spectra on the vertebrate ancient long opsin and gonadotropin hormone in the goldfish Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jin Ah; Kim, Na Na; Choi, Young Jae; Choi, Ji Yong; Kim, Bong-Seok; Choi, Cheol Young

    2016-08-05

    We determined the molecular mechanism underlying the environmental (photoperiodic) regulation of sexual maturation in fish, we examined the expression of sexual maturation-related hormones and vertebrate ancient long opsin (VAL-opsin) in goldfish (Carassius auratus) exposed to different light spectra (red and green light-emitting diodes). We further evaluated the effect of exogenous gonadotropin hormone (GTH) on the expression of VAL-opsin under different light conditions. Our results demonstrated that the expression of GTHs was higher in the fish exposed to green light, and VAL-opsin levels were increased in the fish receiving GTH injection. Therefore, we have uncovered a molecular mechanism underlying the environmental (light)-induced trigger for sexual maturation: VAL-opsin is activated by green light and GTH, which promotes the expression of sexual maturation genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gas and dust cooling along the major axis of M33 (HerM33es): ISO/LWS CII observations

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, C; Garcia-Burillo, S; Relano, M; Aalto, S; Boquien, M; Braine, J; Buchbender, C; Gratier, P; Israel, F P; Nikola, T; Roellig, M; Verley, S; van der Werf, P; Xilouris, E M

    2013-01-01

    We aim to better understand the heating of the gas by observing the prominent gas cooling line [CII] at 158um in the low-metallicity environment of the Local Group spiral galaxy M33 at scales of 280pc. In particular, we aim at describing the variation of the photoelectric heating efficiency with galactic environment. In this unbiased study, we used ISO/LWS [CII] observations along the major axis of M33, in combination with Herschel PACS and SPIRE continuum maps, IRAM 30m CO 2-1 and VLA HI data to study the variation of velocity integrated intensities. The ratio of [CII] emission over the far-infrared continuum is used as a proxy for the heating efficiency, and models of photon-dominated regions are used to study the local physical densities, FUV radiation fields, and average column densities of the molecular clouds. The heating efficiency stays constant at 0.8% in the inner 4.5kpc radius of the galaxy where it starts to increase to reach values of ~3% in the outskirts at about 6kpc radial distance. The rise o...

  10. Differentially-expressed opsin genes identified in Sinocyclocheilus cavefish endemic to China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fanwei MENG; Yahui ZHAO; John H.POSTLETHWAIT; Chunguang ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Eye degeneration is a common troglomorphic character of cave-dwelling organisms.Comparing the morphology and molecular biology of cave species and their close surface relatives is a powerful tool for studying regressive eye evolution and other adaptive phenotypes.We compared two co-occurring and closely-related species of the fish genus Sinocyclocheilus,which is endemic to China and includes both surface-and cave-dwelling species.Sinocyclocheilus tileihornes,a cave species,had smaller eyes than Sinocyclocheilus angustiporus,a surface species.Histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the cavefish had shorter cones and more disorderly rods than did the surface-dwelling species.Using quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization,we found that rhodopsin and a long-wavelength sensitive opsin had significantly lower expression levels in the cavefish.Furthermore,one of two short-wavelength-sensitive opsins was expressed at significantly higher levels in the cavefish.Changes in the expression ofopsin genes may have played a role in the degeneration of cavefish eyes.

  11. The biological mechanisms and behavioral functions of opsin-based light detection by the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Kelley

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Light detection not only forms the basis of vision (via visual retinal photoreceptors, but can also occur in other parts of the body, including many non-rod/non-cone ocular cells, the pineal complex, the deep brain, and the skin. Indeed, many of the photopigments (an opsin linked to a light-sensitive 11-cis retinal chromophore that mediate color vision in the eyes of vertebrates are also present in the skin of animals such as reptiles, amphibians, crustaceans and fishes (with related photoreceptive molecules present in cephalopods, providing a localized mechanism for light detection across the surface of the body. This form of non-visual photosensitivity may be particularly important for animals that can change their coloration by altering the dispersion of pigments within the chromatophores (pigment containing cells of the skin. Thus, skin coloration may be directly color matched or tuned to both the luminance and spectral properties of the local background environment, thereby facilitating behavioral functions such as camouflage, thermoregulation, and social signaling. This review examines the diversity and sensitivity of opsin-based photopigments present in the skin and considers their putative functional roles in mediating animal behavior. Furthermore, it discusses the potential underlying biochemical and molecular pathways that link shifts in environmental light to both photopigment expression and chromatophore photoresponses. Although photoreception that occurs independently of image formation remains poorly understood, this review highlights the important role of non-visual light detection in facilitating the multiple functions of animal coloration.

  12. The evolution of irradiance detection: melanopsin and the non-visual opsins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirson, Stuart N; Halford, Stephanie; Foster, Russell G

    2009-10-12

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous 24 h cycles that persist in the absence of external time cues. These rhythms provide an internal representation of day length and optimize physiology and behaviour to the varying demands of the solar cycle. These clocks require daily adjustment to local time and the primary time cue (zeitgeber) used by most vertebrates is the daily change in the amount of environmental light (irradiance) at dawn and dusk, a process termed photoentrainment. Attempts to understand the photoreceptor mechanisms mediating non-image-forming responses to light, such as photoentrainment, have resulted in the discovery of a remarkable array of different photoreceptors and photopigment families, all of which appear to use a basic opsin/vitamin A-based photopigment biochemistry. In non-mammalian vertebrates, specialized photoreceptors are located within the pineal complex, deep brain and dermal melanophores. There is also strong evidence in fish and amphibians for the direct photic regulation of circadian clocks in multiple tissues. By contrast, mammals possess only ocular photoreceptors. However, in addition to the image-forming rods and cones of the retina, there exists a third photoreceptor system based on a subset of melanopsin-expressing photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (pRGCs). In this review, we discuss the range of vertebrate photoreceptors and their opsin photopigments, describe the melanopsin/pRGC system in some detail and then finally consider the molecular evolution and sensory ecology of these non-image-forming photoreceptor systems.

  13. Vertebrate cone opsins enable sustained and highly sensitive rapid control of Gi/o signaling in anxiety circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseck, Olivia A; Spoida, Katharina; Dalkara, Deniz; Maejima, Takashi; Rubelowski, Johanna M; Wallhorn, Lutz; Deneris, Evan S; Herlitze, Stefan

    2014-03-19

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) coupling to Gi/o signaling pathways are involved in the control of important physiological functions, which are difficult to investigate because of the limitation of tools to control the signaling pathway with precise kinetics and specificity. We established two vertebrate cone opsins, short- and long-wavelength opsin, for long-lasting and repetitive activation of Gi/o signaling pathways in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate for both opsins the repetitive fast, membrane-delimited, ultra light-sensitive, and wavelength-dependent activation of the Gi/o pathway in HEK cells. We also show repetitive control of Gi/o pathway activation in 5-HT1A receptor domains in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in brain slices and in vivo, which is sufficient to modulate anxiety behavior in mice. Thus, vertebrate cone opsins represent a class of tools for understanding the role of Gi/o-coupled GPCRs in health and disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reproducible and sustained regulation of Gαs signalling using a metazoan opsin as an optogenetic tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena J Bailes

    Full Text Available Originally developed to regulate neuronal excitability, optogenetics is increasingly also used to control other cellular processes with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution. Optogenetic modulation of all major G-protein signalling pathways (Gq, Gi and Gs has been achieved using variants of mammalian rod opsin. We show here that the light response driven by such rod opsin-based tools dissipates under repeated exposure, consistent with the known bleaching characteristics of this photopigment. We continue to show that replacing rod opsin with a bleach resistant opsin from Carybdea rastonii, the box jellyfish, (JellyOp overcomes this limitation. Visible light induced high amplitude, reversible, and reproducible increases in cAMP in mammalian cells expressing JellyOp. While single flashes produced a brief cAMP spike, repeated stimulation could sustain elevated levels for 10s of minutes. JellyOp was more photosensitive than currently available optogenetic tools, responding to white light at irradiances ≥1 µW/cm(2. We conclude that JellyOp is a promising new tool for mimicking the activity of Gs-coupled G protein coupled receptors with fine spatiotemporal resolution.

  15. Genomic organization, evolution, and expression of photoprotein and opsin genes in Mnemiopsis leidyi: a new view of ctenophore photocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnitzler Christine E

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcium-activated photoproteins are luciferase variants found in photocyte cells of bioluminescent jellyfish (Phylum Cnidaria and comb jellies (Phylum Ctenophora. The complete genomic sequence from the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, a representative of the earliest branch of animals that emit light, provided an opportunity to examine the genome of an organism that uses this class of luciferase for bioluminescence and to look for genes involved in light reception. To determine when photoprotein genes first arose, we examined the genomic sequence from other early-branching taxa. We combined our genomic survey with gene trees, developmental expression patterns, and functional protein assays of photoproteins and opsins to provide a comprehensive view of light production and light reception in Mnemiopsis. Results The Mnemiopsis genome has 10 full-length photoprotein genes situated within two genomic clusters with high sequence conservation that are maintained due to strong purifying selection and concerted evolution. Photoprotein-like genes were also identified in the genomes of the non-luminescent sponge Amphimedon queenslandica and the non-luminescent cnidarian Nematostella vectensis, and phylogenomic analysis demonstrated that photoprotein genes arose at the base of all animals. Photoprotein gene expression in Mnemiopsis embryos begins during gastrulation in migrating precursors to photocytes and persists throughout development in the canals where photocytes reside. We identified three putative opsin genes in the Mnemiopsis genome and show that they do not group with well-known bilaterian opsin subfamilies. Interestingly, photoprotein transcripts are co-expressed with two of the putative opsins in developing photocytes. Opsin expression is also seen in the apical sensory organ. We present evidence that one opsin functions as a photopigment in vitro, absorbing light at wavelengths that overlap with peak photoprotein light

  16. Genomic organization, evolution, and expression of photoprotein and opsin genes in Mnemiopsis leidyi: a new view of ctenophore photocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, Christine E; Pang, Kevin; Powers, Meghan L; Reitzel, Adam M; Ryan, Joseph F; Simmons, David; Tada, Takashi; Park, Morgan; Gupta, Jyoti; Brooks, Shelise Y; Blakesley, Robert W; Yokoyama, Shozo; Haddock, Steven Hd; Martindale, Mark Q; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2012-12-21

    Calcium-activated photoproteins are luciferase variants found in photocyte cells of bioluminescent jellyfish (Phylum Cnidaria) and comb jellies (Phylum Ctenophora). The complete genomic sequence from the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, a representative of the earliest branch of animals that emit light, provided an opportunity to examine the genome of an organism that uses this class of luciferase for bioluminescence and to look for genes involved in light reception. To determine when photoprotein genes first arose, we examined the genomic sequence from other early-branching taxa. We combined our genomic survey with gene trees, developmental expression patterns, and functional protein assays of photoproteins and opsins to provide a comprehensive view of light production and light reception in Mnemiopsis. The Mnemiopsis genome has 10 full-length photoprotein genes situated within two genomic clusters with high sequence conservation that are maintained due to strong purifying selection and concerted evolution. Photoprotein-like genes were also identified in the genomes of the non-luminescent sponge Amphimedon queenslandica and the non-luminescent cnidarian Nematostella vectensis, and phylogenomic analysis demonstrated that photoprotein genes arose at the base of all animals. Photoprotein gene expression in Mnemiopsis embryos begins during gastrulation in migrating precursors to photocytes and persists throughout development in the canals where photocytes reside. We identified three putative opsin genes in the Mnemiopsis genome and show that they do not group with well-known bilaterian opsin subfamilies. Interestingly, photoprotein transcripts are co-expressed with two of the putative opsins in developing photocytes. Opsin expression is also seen in the apical sensory organ. We present evidence that one opsin functions as a photopigment in vitro, absorbing light at wavelengths that overlap with peak photoprotein light emission, raising the hypothesis that light

  17. Extraordinarily low evolutionary rates of short wavelength-sensitive opsin pseudogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Starmer, William T.; Liu, Yang; Tada, Takashi; Britt, Lyle

    2013-01-01

    Aquatic organisms such as cichlids, coelacanths, seals, and cetaceans are active in UV-blue color environments, but many of them mysteriously lost their abilities to detect these colors. The loss of these functions is a consequence of the pseudogenization of their short wavelength-sensitive (SWS1) opsin genes without gene duplication. We show that the SWS1 gene (BdenS1ψ) of the deep-sea fish, pearleye (Benthalbella dentata), became a pseudogene in a similar fashion about 130 million years ago (Mya) yet it is still transcribed. The rates of nucleotide substitution (~1.4 × 10−9 /site/year) of the pseudogenes of these aquatic species as well as some prosimian and bat species are much smaller than the previous estimates for the globin and immunoglobulin pseudogenes. PMID:24125953

  18. The expression of three opsin genes from the compound eye of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is regulated by a circadian clock, light conditions and nutritional status

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yan, Shuo; Zhu, Jialin; Zhu, Weilong; Zhang, Xinfang; Li, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Qingwen

    2014-01-01

    .... In this study, we cloned the ultraviolet (UV), blue (BL) and long-wavelength-sensitive (LW) opsin genes from the compound eye of the cotton bollworm and then measured their mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR...

  19. Biochemical Measurements of Free Opsin in Macular Degeneration Eyes: Examining the 11-CIS Retinal Deficiency Hypothesis of Delayed Dark Adaptation (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanneken, Anne; Neikirk, Thomas; Johnson, Jennifer; Kono, Masahiro

    2017-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that delayed dark adaptation in patients with macular degeneration is due to an excess of free unliganded opsin (apo-opsin) and a deficiency of the visual chromophore, 11-cis retinal, in rod outer segments. A total of 50 human autopsy eyes were harvested from donors with and without macular degeneration within 2-24 hrs. postmortem. Protocols were developed which permitted dark adaptation of normal human eyes after death and enucleation. Biochemical methods of purifying rod outer segments were optimized and the concentration of rhodopsin and apo-opsin was measured with UV-visible scanning spectroscopy. The presence of apo-opsin was calculated by measuring the difference in the rhodopsin absorption spectra before and after the addition of 11-cis retinal. A total of 20 normal eyes and 16 eyes from donors with early, intermediate and advanced stages of macular degeneration were included in the final analysis. Dark adaptation was achieved by harvesting whole globes in low light, transferring into dark (light-proof) canisters and dissecting the globes using infrared light and image converters for visualization. Apo-opsin was readily detected in positive controls after the addition of 11-cis retinal. Normal autopsy eyes showed no evidence of apo-opsin. Eyes with macular degeneration also showed no evidence of apo-opsin, regardless of the severity of disease. Methods have been developed to study dark adaptation in human autopsy eyes. Eyes with age-related macular degeneration do not show a deficiency of 11-cis retinal or an excess of apo-opsin within rod outer segments.

  20. The expression of three opsin genes from the compound eye of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae is regulated by a circadian clock, light conditions and nutritional status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Yan

    Full Text Available Visual genes may become inactive in species that inhabit poor light environments, and the function and regulation of opsin components in nocturnal moths are interesting topics. In this study, we cloned the ultraviolet (UV, blue (BL and long-wavelength-sensitive (LW opsin genes from the compound eye of the cotton bollworm and then measured their mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR. The mRNA levels fluctuated over a daily cycle, which might be an adaptation of a nocturnal lifestyle, and were dependent on a circadian clock. Cycling of opsin mRNA levels was disturbed by constant light or constant darkness, and the UV opsin gene was up-regulated after light exposure. Furthermore, the opsin genes tended to be down-regulated upon starvation. Thus, this study illustrates that opsin gene expression is determined by multiple endogenous and exogenous factors and is adapted to the need for nocturnal vision, suggesting that color vision may play an important role in the sensory ecology of nocturnal moths.

  1. 千年笛鲷早期发育及视蛋白基因表达规律分析%PRELIMINARY STUDIES ON THE EARLY DEVELOPMENT AND THE EXPRESSION PATTERN OF OPSIN GENES OF EMPEROR RED SNAPPER(LUTJANUS SEBAE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢子强; 王中铎; 郭昱嵩; 刘楚吾

    2015-01-01

    初步观察千年笛鲷早期发育各个时期的形态特征,同时使用实时荧光定量 PCR 方法对4种视蛋白基因在早期发育中的表达规律进行分析。研究观察到千年笛鲷卵为圆球形,属浮性卵,中心有一明显的油球。在水温(24.5±0.5)℃的条件下,千年笛鲷胚胎发育共经历6个发育阶段18个时期,从受精卵到孵化一共经历24h。仔鱼经历12—15d发育为稚鱼,30d—35d发育为幼鱼。同时对7个胚胎发育时期和2个仔鱼发育时期4种视蛋白(LWS、SWS1、SWS2、RH)基因的表达情况进行检测,在下包1/2、胚孔封闭、视囊这3个时期有显著性表达(P<0.05),尤其在胚孔封闭时期,表达量达到最高。其余时期4种基因的表达水平显著下降,但在2个仔鱼时期表达量比孵化期略有增加。结果表明千年笛鲷4种视蛋白基因在早期表达过程中与神经胚的形成有密切的联系。%In this study, we observed the morphological characteristics and used qRT-PCR to analyze the expression pattern of four opsin genes during the early development of Emperor red snapper. The eggs of Emperor red snapper were a type of buoyancy that had spherical shape and one oil globule. Fertilized eggs hatched in 24 hours at the temperature of (24.5±0.5)℃, and there were 6 phases and 18 stages in the development of the embryo. After 12—15 days, the larvae developed into juvenile. After 30—35 days, the juvenile developed into young fish. We detected the expression of four opsin genes (LWS,SWS1,SWS2 andRH) at 7 embryo stages and 2 larvae stages. All four genes were markedly ex-pressed at the 1/2 epiboly stage, the closure of blastopore stage and the optic capsule stage (P<0.05). The expression level of the four genes was the highest at the closure of blastopore stage. At other stages the expression was largely de-creased. However, the expression was slightly increased at 2 larvae stages compared to the hatching stage. Our results suggested that

  2. The effect of white light on normal and malignant murine melanocytes: A link between opsins, clock genes, and melanogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis, L V M; Moraes, M N; da Silveira Cruz-Machado, S; Castrucci, A M L

    2016-06-01

    The skin possesses a photosensitive system comprised of opsins whose function is not fully understood, and clock genes which exert an important regulatory role in skin biology. Here, we evaluated the presence of opsins in normal (Melan-a cells) and malignant (B16-F10 cells) murine melanocytes. Both cell lines express Opn2, Opn4--for the first time reported in these cell types--as well as S-opsin. OPN4 protein was found in a small area capping the cell nuclei of B16-F10 cells kept in constant dark (DD); twenty-four hours after the white light pulse (WLP), OPN4 was found in the cell membrane. Despite the fact that B16-F10 cells expressed less Opn2 and Opn4 than Melan-a cells, our data indicate that the malignant melanocytes exhibited increased photoresponsiveness. The clock gene machinery is also severely downregulated in B16-F10 cells as compared to Melan-a cells. Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 expression increased in B16-F10 cells in response to WLP. Although no response in clock gene expression to WLP was observed in Melan-a cells, gene correlational data suggest a minor effect of WLP. In contrast to opsins and clock genes, melanogenesis is significantly upregulated in malignant melanocytes in comparison to Melan-a cells. Tyrosinase expression increased after WLP only in B16-F10 cells; however no increase in melanin content after WLP was seen in either cell line. Our findings may prove useful in the treatment and the development of new pharmacological approaches of depigmentation diseases and skin cancer.

  3. Using electroretinograms and multi-model inference to identify spectral classes of photoreceptors and relative opsin expression levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lessios

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how individual photoreceptor cells factor in the spectral sensitivity of a visual system is essential to explain how they contribute to the visual ecology of the animal in question. Existing methods that model the absorption of visual pigments use templates which correspond closely to data from thin cross-sections of photoreceptor cells. However, few modeling approaches use a single framework to incorporate physical parameters of real photoreceptors, which can be fused, and can form vertical tiers. Akaike’s information criterion (AICc was used here to select absorptance models of multiple classes of photoreceptor cells that maximize information, given visual system spectral sensitivity data obtained using extracellular electroretinograms and structural parameters obtained by histological methods. This framework was first used to select among alternative hypotheses of photoreceptor number. It identified spectral classes from a range of dark-adapted visual systems which have between one and four spectral photoreceptor classes. These were the velvet worm, Principapillatus hitoyensis, the branchiopod water flea, Daphnia magna, normal humans, and humans with enhanced S-cone syndrome, a condition in which S-cone frequency is increased due to mutations in a transcription factor that controls photoreceptor expression. Data from the Asian swallowtail, Papilio xuthus, which has at least five main spectral photoreceptor classes in its compound eyes, were included to illustrate potential effects of model over-simplification on multi-model inference. The multi-model framework was then used with parameters of spectral photoreceptor classes and the structural photoreceptor array kept constant. The goal was to map relative opsin expression to visual pigment concentration. It identified relative opsin expression differences for two populations of the bluefin killifish, Lucania goodei. The modeling approach presented here will be useful in

  4. First Insights into the Subterranean Crustacean Bathynellacea Transcriptome: Transcriptionally Reduced Opsin Repertoire and Evidence of Conserved Homeostasis Regulatory Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Kang, Seunghyun; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Kim, Jin-Hyoung; Ahn, Inhye; Lee, Chi-Woo; Cho, Joo-Lae; Min, Gi-Sik; Park, Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Bathynellacea (Crustacea, Syncarida, Parabathynellidae) are subterranean aquatic crustaceans that typically inhabit freshwater interstitial spaces (e.g., groundwater) and are occasionally found in caves and even hot springs. In this study, we sequenced the whole transcriptome of Allobathynella bangokensis using RNA-seq. De novo sequence assembly produced 74,866 contigs including 28,934 BLAST hits. Overall, the gene sequences were most similar to those of the waterflea Daphnia pulex. In the A. bangokensis transcriptome, no opsin or related sequences were identified, and no contig aligned to the crustacean visual opsins and non-visual opsins (i.e. arthropsins, peropsins, and melaopsins), suggesting potential regressive adaptation to the dark environment. However, A. bangokensis expressed conserved gene family sets, such as heat shock proteins and those related to key innate immunity pathways and antioxidant defense systems, at the transcriptional level, suggesting that this species has evolved adaptations involving molecular mechanisms of homeostasis. The transcriptomic information of A. bangokensis will be useful for investigating molecular adaptations and response mechanisms to subterranean environmental conditions. PMID:28107438

  5. Characterization of Opsin Gene Alleles Affecting Color Vision in a Wild Population of Titi Monkeys (Callicebus brunneus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, John A.; Isbell, Lynne A.; Neitz, Maureen; Bonci, Daniela; Surridge, Alison K.; Jacobs, Gerald H.; Smith, David Glenn

    2011-01-01

    The color vision of most platyrrhine primates is determined by alleles at the polymorphic X-linked locus coding for the opsin responsible for the middle- to long-wavelength (M/L) cone photopigment. Females who are heterozygous at the locus have trichromatic vision while homozygous females and all males are dichromatic. This study characterized the opsin alleles in a wild population of the socially monogamous platyrrhine monkey Callicebus brunneus (the brown titi monkey), a primate that an earlier study suggests may possess an unusual number of alleles at this locus and thus may be a subject of special interest in the study of primate color vision. Direct sequencing of regions of the M/L opsin gene using feces-, blood-, and saliva-derived DNA obtained from 14 individuals yielded evidence for the presence of three functionally distinct alleles, corresponding to the most common M/L photopigment variants inferred from a physiological study of cone spectral sensitivity in captive Callicebus. PMID:20938927

  6. Photoreceptors of Nrl -/- mice coexpress functional S- and M-cone opsins having distinct inactivation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonov, Sergei S; Daniele, Lauren L; Zhu, Xuemei; Craft, Cheryl M; Swaroop, Anand; Pugh, Edward N

    2005-03-01

    normal inactivation of both S- and M-mouse cone opsins, but S-opsin has access to a relatively effective, Grk1-independent inactivation pathway.

  7. Possible involvement of cone opsins in distinct photoresponses of intrinsically photosensitive dermal chromatophores in tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyh-Chi Chen

    Full Text Available Dermal specialized pigment cells (chromatophores are thought to be one type of extraretinal photoreceptors responsible for a wide variety of sensory tasks, including adjusting body coloration. Unlike the well-studied image-forming function in retinal photoreceptors, direct evidence characterizing the mechanism of chromatophore photoresponses is less understood, particularly at the molecular and cellular levels. In the present study, cone opsin expression was detected in tilapia caudal fin where photosensitive chromatophores exist. Single-cell RT-PCR revealed co-existence of different cone opsins within melanophores and erythrophores. By stimulating cells with six wavelengths ranging from 380 to 580 nm, we found melanophores and erythrophores showed distinct photoresponses. After exposed to light, regardless of wavelength presentation, melanophores dispersed and maintained cell shape in an expansion stage by shuttling pigment granules. Conversely, erythrophores aggregated or dispersed pigment granules when exposed to short- or middle/long-wavelength light, respectively. These results suggest that diverse molecular mechanisms and light-detecting strategies may be employed by different types of tilapia chromatophores, which are instrumental in pigment pattern formation.

  8. Deep Brain Photoreceptor (val-opsin) Gene Knockout Using CRISPR/Cas Affects Chorion Formation and Embryonic Hatching in the Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Chong Yee; Moriya, Shogo; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2016-01-01

    Non-rod non-cone photopigments in the eyes and the brain can directly mediate non-visual functions of light in non-mammals. This was supported by our recent findings on vertebrate ancient long (VAL)-opsin photopigments encoded by the val-opsinA (valopa) and val-opsinB (valopb) genes in zebrafish. However, the physiological functions of valop isoforms remain unknown. Here, we generated valop-mutant zebrafish using CRISPR/Cas genome editing, and examined the phenotypes of loss-of-function mutants. F0 mosaic mutations and germline transmission were confirmed via targeted insertions and/or deletions in the valopa or valopb gene in F1 mutants. Based on in silico analysis, frameshift mutations converted VAL-opsin proteins to non-functional truncated forms with pre-mature stop codons. Most F1 eggs or embryos from F0 female valopa/b mutants showed either no or only partial chorion elevation, and the eggs or embryos died within 26 hour-post-fertilization. However, most F1 embryos from F0 male valopa mutant developed but hatched late compared to wild-type embryos, which hatched at 4 day-post-fertilization. Late-hatched F1 offspring included wild-type and mutants, indicating the parental effects of valop knockout. This study shows valop gene knockout affects chorion formation and embryonic hatching in the zebrafish. PMID:27792783

  9. Myopia and Late-Onset Progressive Cone Dystrophy Associate to LVAVA/MVAVA Exon 3 Interchange Haplotypes of Opsin Genes on Chromosome X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosz, Orsolya; Rajta, István; Vajas, Attila; Takács, Lili; Csutak, Adrienne; Fodor, Mariann; Kolozsvári, Bence; Resch, Miklós; Sényi, Katalin; Lesch, Balázs; Szabó, Viktória; Berta, András; Balogh, István; Losonczy, Gergely

    2017-03-01

    Rare interchange haplotypes in exon 3 of the OPN1LW and OPN1MW opsin genes cause X-linked myopia, color vision defect, and cone dysfunction. The severity of the disease varies on a broad scale from nonsyndromic high myopia to blue cone monochromatism. Here, we describe a new genotype-phenotype correlation attributed to rare exon 3 interchange haplotypes simultaneously present in the long- and middle-wavelength sensitive opsin genes (L- and M-opsin genes). A multigenerational family with X-linked high myopia and cone dystrophy was investigated. Affected male patients had infantile onset myopia with normal visual acuity and color vision until their forties. Visual acuity decreased thereafter, along with the development of severe protan and deutan color vision defects. A mild decrease in electroretinography response of cone photoreceptors was detected in childhood, which further deteriorated in middle-aged patients. Rods were also affected, however, to a lesser extent than cones. Clinical exome sequencing identified the LVAVA and MVAVA toxic haplotypes in the OPN1LW and OPN1MW opsin genes, respectively. Here, we show that LVAVA haplotype of the OPN1LW gene and MVAVA haplotype of the OPN1MW gene cause apparently nonsyndromic high myopia in young patients but lead to progressive cone-rod dystrophy with deuteranopia and protanopia in middle-aged patients corresponding to a previously unknown disease course. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the joint effect of these toxic haplotypes in the two opsin genes on chromosome X.

  10. Photoreceptors for a light biotransducer: a comparative study of the electrical responses of two (type-1)-opsins

    CERN Document Server

    Alfinito, E; Reggiani, L; Lee, K

    2013-01-01

    The increasing interest in photoactivated proteins as natural replacement of standard inorganic materials in photocells drives to the compared analysis of bacteriorhodopsin and proteorhodopsin, two widely diffused proteins belonging to the family of \\textit{type-1} opsins. These proteins share similar behaviours but exhibit relevant differences in the sequential chain of the amino acids constituting their tertiary structure. The use of an impedance network analogue to model the protein main features provides a microscopic interpretation of a set of experiments on their photoconductance properties. In particular, this model links the protein electrical responses to the tertiary structure and to the interactions among neighbouring amino acids. The same model is also used to predict the small-signal response in terms of the Nyquist plot. Interesting enough, these rhodopsins are found to behave like a wide gap semiconductor with intrinsic conductivities of the order of $10^{-7}$ S/cm.

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-04-0022 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-04-0022 sp|Q9W6A9|OP1S1_BRARE Opsin-1, short-wave-sensitive 1 (Ultraviolet...-sensitive opsin) (Ultraviolet cone photoreceptor pigment) (Opsin SWS-1) dbj|BAC24134.1| ultraviolet sensitive cone opsin [Danio rerio] Q9W6A9 0.0 99% ...

  12. 传爆药冲击波感度试验方法的简化研究%Simplified Shock Wave Sensitivity Test Method of Booster Explosives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严家佳; 王建灵; 张哲; 李鸿宾; 杨斐

    2015-01-01

    A new type of small scale gap test method ( SSGT) , in which RDX was substitutedby A-IX-I [ m( RDX)︰m(insensitive agent) =95︰5]as donor casts, wasintroduced to study thesensitivity of shock wave. The explosion energy output performance of donor explosives was tested by a group of none gap tests. Result shows that the average mass of donor explosives is 1 195. 5 mg, and the relatively error is 0. 495%;the average pitting depth of identification slab is 1. 769mm, and relatively error is 0. 96%. It indicates that donor explosive has a good performance. This method was used to study the shock wave sensitivity of JH-14 before or after aging testsathigh temperatures. It shows that the aged explosives tend to have higher shock wave sensitivity, and the sensitivity increases with the increase of age time of accepters.%尝试了一种用压装A-IX-I(RDX与钝感剂质量比为95︰5)药柱替代纯RDX作为施主药柱进行冲击波感度试验( SSGT)的方法,通过零隔板试验,检验了施主药柱的爆炸能量输出性能。所得施主药柱的平均质量为1195.5 mg,相对误差0.495%;鉴定块的平均凹痕深度1.769 mm,相对误差0.96%,说明压装法得到的施主药柱性能较好。利用该方法研究了JH-14传爆药经过高温加速老化前后的冲击波感度,结果显示,老化后的样品冲击波感度具有增加的趋势。

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGOR-01-0729 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGOR-01-0729 gb|AAI43791.1| Opsin 1 (cone pigments), medium-wave-sensitive [Ho...mo sapiens] gb|AAI71755.1| Opsin 1 (cone pigments), medium-wave-sensitive [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI71754.1| Opsi...n 1 (cone pigments), medium-wave-sensitive [Homo sapiens] AAI43791.1 1e-176 85% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PHAM-01-0154 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PHAM-01-0154 gb|AAI43791.1| Opsin 1 (cone pigments), medium-wave-sensitive [Ho...mo sapiens] gb|AAI71755.1| Opsin 1 (cone pigments), medium-wave-sensitive [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI71754.1| Opsi...n 1 (cone pigments), medium-wave-sensitive [Homo sapiens] AAI43791.1 4e-51 98% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TSYR-01-0863 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TSYR-01-0863 gb|AAI43791.1| Opsin 1 (cone pigments), medium-wave-sensitive [Ho...mo sapiens] gb|AAI71755.1| Opsin 1 (cone pigments), medium-wave-sensitive [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI71754.1| Opsi...n 1 (cone pigments), medium-wave-sensitive [Homo sapiens] AAI43791.1 5e-49 91% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PHAM-01-0058 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PHAM-01-0058 gb|AAI43791.1| Opsin 1 (cone pigments), medium-wave-sensitive [Ho...mo sapiens] gb|AAI71755.1| Opsin 1 (cone pigments), medium-wave-sensitive [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI71754.1| Opsi...n 1 (cone pigments), medium-wave-sensitive [Homo sapiens] AAI43791.1 3e-63 89% ...

  17. Full-Quantum chemical calculation of the absorption maximum of bacteriorhodopsin: a comprehensive analysis of the amino acid residues contributing to the opsin shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomohiko; Matsuura, Azuma; Sato, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    Herein, the absorption maximum of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is calculated using our recently developed method in which the whole protein can be treated quantum mechanically at the level of INDO/S-CIS//ONIOM (B3LYP/6-31G(d,p): AMBER). The full quantum mechanical calculation is shown to reproduce the so-called opsin shift of bR with an error of less than 0.04 eV. We also apply the same calculation for 226 different bR mutants, each of which was constructed by replacing any one of the amino acid residues of the wild-type bR with Gly. This substitution makes it possible to elucidate the extent to which each amino acid contributes to the opsin shift and to estimate the inter-residue synergistic effect. It was found that one of the most important contributions to the opsin shift is the electron transfer from Tyr185 to the chromophore upon excitation. We also indicate that some aromatic (Trp86, Trp182) and polar (Ser141, Thr142) residues, located in the vicinity of the retinal polyene chain and the β-ionone ring, respectively, play an important role in compensating for the large blue-shift induced by both the counterion residues (Asp85, Asp212) and an internal water molecule (W402) located near the Schiff base linkage. In particular, the effect of Trp86 is comparable to that of Tyr185. In addition, Ser141 and Thr142 were found to contribute to an increase in the dipole moment of bR in the excited state. Finally, we provide a complete energy diagram for the opsin shift together with the contribution of the chromophore-protein steric interaction. PMID:27493528

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-06-0047 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-06-0047 ref|NP_571328.2| opsin 1 (cone pigments), medium-wave-sensitive, ...1 [Danio rerio] sp|Q9W6A5|OPSG1_BRARE Green-sensitive opsin-1 (Green cone photoreceptor pigment 1) (Opsin-1, medium-wave...2.1| opsin 1 (cone pigments) medium-wave-sensitive 1 [Danio rerio] gb|AAH60896.1|... Opsin 1 (cone pigments), medium-wave-sensitive, 1 [Danio rerio] NP_571328.2 0.0 92% ...

  19. Gene : CBRC-PABE-08-0043 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-08-0043 7 A Opsins OPSB_PANTR 0.0 99% ref|NP_001699.1| opsin 1 (cone pigments), short-wave-...sensitive (color blindness, tritan) [Homo sapiens] ref|NP_001009127.1| opsin 1 (cone pigments), short-wave-...sensitive (color blindness, tritan) [Pan troglodytes] sp|P03999|OPSB_HUMAN Blue-sensitive o...psin (BOP) (Blue cone photoreceptor pigment) sp|P60015|OPSB_PANTR Blue-sensitive ...opsin (BOP) (Blue cone photoreceptor pigment) sp|P60573|OPSB_PANPA Blue-sensitive opsin (BOP) (Blue cone pho

  20. Estimating neural background input with controlled and fast perturbations: A bandwidth comparison between inhibitory opsins and neural circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Eriksson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To test the importance of a certain cell type or brain area it is common to make a lack of function experiment in which the neuronal population of interest is inhibited. Here we review physiological and methodological constraints for making controlled perturbations using the corticothalamic circuit as an example. The brain with its many types of cells and rich interconnectivity offers many paths through which a perturbation can spread within a short time. To understand the side effects of the perturbation one should record from those paths. We find that ephaptic effects, gap-junctions, and fast chemical synapses are so fast that they can react to the perturbation during the few milliseconds it takes for an opsin to change the membrane potential. The slow chemical synapses, astrocytes, extracellular ions and vascular signals, will continue to give their physiological input for around 20 milliseconds before they also react to the perturbation. Although we show that some pathways can react within milliseconds the strength/speed reported in this review should be seen as an upper bound since we have omitted how polysynaptic signals are attenuated. Thus the number of additional recordings that has to be made to control for the perturbation side effects is expected to be fewer than proposed here. To summarize, the reviewed literature not only suggests that it is possible to make controlled lack of function experiments, but, it also suggests that such a lack of function experiment can be used to measure the context of local neural computations.

  1. Temporal Resolution of ChR2 and Chronos in an Optogenetic-based Auditory Brainstem Implant Model: Implications for the Development and Application of Auditory Opsins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hight, A. E.; Kozin, Elliott D.; Darrow, Keith; Lehmann, Ashton; Boyden, Edward; Brown, M. Christian; Lee, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The contemporary auditory brainstem implant (ABI) performance is limited by reliance on electrical stimulation with its accompanying channel cross talk and current spread to non-auditory neurons. A new generation ABI based on optogenetic-technology may ameliorate limitations fundamental to electrical neurostimulation. The most widely studied opsin is channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2); however, its relatively slow kinetic properties may prevent the encoding of auditory information at high stimulation rates. In the present study, we compare the temporal resolution of light-evoked responses of a recently developed fast opsin, Chronos, to ChR2 in a murine ABI model. Viral mediated gene transfer via a posterolateral craniotomy was used to express Chronos or ChR2 in the mouse nucleus (CN). Following a four to six week incubation period, blue light (473 nm) was delivered via an optical fiber placed directly on the surface of the infected CN, and neural activity was recorded in the contralateral inferior colliculus (IC). Both ChR2 and Chronos evoked sustained responses to all stimuli, even at high driven rates. In addition, optical stimulation evoked excitatory responses throughout the tonotopic axis of the IC. Synchrony of the light-evoked response to stimulus rates of 14–448 pulses/s was higher in Chronos compared to ChR2 mice (p<0.05 at 56, 168, and 224 pulses/s). Our results demonstrate that Chronos has the ability to drive the auditory system at higher stimulation rates than ChR2 and may be a more ideal opsin for manipulation of auditory pathways in future optogenetic-based neuroprostheses. PMID:25598479

  2. Expression of novel opsins and intrinsic light responses in the mammalian retinal ganglion cell line RGC-5. Presence of OPN5 in the rat retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula S Nieto

    Full Text Available The vertebrate retina is known to contain three classes of photoreceptor cells: cones and rods responsible for vision, and intrinsically photoresponsive retinal ganglion cells (RGCs involved in diverse non-visual functions such as photic entrainment of daily rhythms and pupillary light responses. In this paper we investigated the potential intrinsic photoresponsiveness of the rat RGC line, RGC-5, by testing for the presence of visual and non-visual opsins and assessing expression of the immediate-early gene protein c-Fos and changes in intracellular Ca(2+ mobilization in response to brief light pulses. Cultured RGC-5 cells express a number of photopigment mRNAs such as retinal G protein coupled receptor (RGR, encephalopsin/panopsin (Opn3, neuropsin (Opn5 and cone opsin (Opn1mw but not melanopsin (Opn4 or rhodopsin. Opn5 immunoreactivity was observed in RGC-5 cells and in the inner retina of rat, mainly localized in the ganglion cell layer (GCL. Furthermore, white light pulses of different intensities and durations elicited changes both in intracellular Ca(2+ levels and in the induction of c-Fos protein in RGC-5 cell cultures. The results demonstrate that RGC-5 cells expressing diverse putative functional photopigments display intrinsic photosensitivity which accounts for the photic induction of c-Fos protein and changes in intracellular Ca(2+ mobilization. The presence of Opn5 in the GCL of the rat retina suggests the existence of a novel type of photoreceptor cell.

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-11-0024 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-11-0024 ref|NP_001002443.1| opsin 1 (cone pigments), long-wave-sensitive,... 2 [Danio rerio] gb|AAH76120.1| Opsin 1 (cone pigments), long-wave-sensitive, 2 [Danio rerio] NP_001002443.1 0.0 92% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MEUG-01-1551 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MEUG-01-1551 ref|NP_001138553.1| opsin 1 (cone pigments), long-wave-sensitive ...[Monodelphis domestica] gb|ABC75816.1| long-wave sensitive opsin [Monodelphis domestica] NP_001138553.1 0.0 92% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-11-0025 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-11-0025 ref|NP_001002443.1| opsin 1 (cone pigments), long-wave-sensitive,... 2 [Danio rerio] gb|AAH76120.1| Opsin 1 (cone pigments), long-wave-sensitive, 2 [Danio rerio] NP_001002443.1 0.0 99% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MEUG-01-2797 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MEUG-01-2797 ref|NP_001138556.1| opsin 1 (cone pigments), short-wave-sensitive... [Monodelphis domestica] gb|ABC75818.1| short-wave sensitive type 1 opsin [Monodelphis domestica] NP_001138556.1 0.0 94% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-08-0120 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-08-0120 ref|NP_001138556.1| opsin 1 (cone pigments), short-wave-sensitive... [Monodelphis domestica] gb|ABC75818.1| short-wave sensitive type 1 opsin [Monodelphis domestica] NP_001138556.1 0.0 98% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-09-0015 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-09-0015 ref|NP_001138553.1| opsin 1 (cone pigments), long-wave-sensitive ...[Monodelphis domestica] gb|ABC75816.1| long-wave sensitive opsin [Monodelphis domestica] NP_001138553.1 0.0 98% ...

  9. Spectral shifts of mammalian ultraviolet-sensitive pigments (short wavelength-sensitive opsin 1) are associated with eye length and photic niche evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerling, Christopher A; Huynh, Hieu T; Nguyen, Minh A; Meredith, Robert W; Springer, Mark S

    2015-11-22

    Retinal opsin photopigments initiate mammalian vision when stimulated by light. Most mammals possess a short wavelength-sensitive opsin 1 (SWS1) pigment that is primarily sensitive to either ultraviolet or violet light, leading to variation in colour perception across species. Despite knowledge of both ultraviolet- and violet-sensitive SWS1 classes in mammals for 25 years, the adaptive significance of this variation has not been subjected to hypothesis testing, resulting in minimal understanding of the basis for mammalian SWS1 spectral tuning evolution. Here, we gathered data on SWS1 for 403 mammal species, including novel SWS1 sequences for 97 species. Ancestral sequence reconstructions suggest that the most recent common ancestor of Theria possessed an ultraviolet SWS1 pigment, and that violet-sensitive pigments evolved at least 12 times in mammalian history. We also observed that ultraviolet pigments, previously considered to be a rarity, are common in mammals. We then used phylogenetic comparative methods to test the hypotheses that the evolution of violet-sensitive SWS1 is associated with increased light exposure, extended longevity and longer eye length. We discovered that diurnal mammals and species with longer eyes are more likely to have violet-sensitive pigments and less likely to possess UV-sensitive pigments. We hypothesize that (i) as mammals evolved larger body sizes, they evolved longer eyes, which limited transmittance of ultraviolet light to the retina due to an increase in Rayleigh scattering, and (ii) as mammals began to invade diurnal temporal niches, they evolved lenses with low UV transmittance to reduce chromatic aberration and/or photo-oxidative damage. © 2015 The Author(s).

  10. Opsin1-2, G(q)α and arrestin levels at Limulus rhabdoms are controlled by diurnal light and a circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelle, Barbara-Anne; Kempler, Karen E; Parker, Alexander K; Gaddie, Cristina D

    2013-05-15

    Dark and light adaptation in photoreceptors involve multiple processes including those that change protein concentrations at photosensitive membranes. Light- and dark-adaptive changes in protein levels at rhabdoms have been described in detail in white-eyed Drosophila maintained under artificial light. Here we tested whether protein levels at rhabdoms change significantly in the highly pigmented lateral eyes of wild-caught Limulus polyphemus maintained in natural diurnal illumination and whether these changes are under circadian control. We found that rhabdomeral levels of opsins (Ops1-2), the G protein activated by rhodopsin (G(q)α) and arrestin change significantly from day to night and that nighttime levels of each protein at rhabdoms are significantly influenced by signals from the animal's central circadian clock. Clock input at night increases Ops1-2 and G(q)α and decreases arrestin levels at rhabdoms. Clock input is also required for a rapid decrease in rhabdomeral Ops1-2 beginning at sunrise. We found further that dark adaptation during the day and the night are not equivalent. During daytime dark adaptation, when clock input is silent, the increase of Ops1-2 at rhabdoms is small and G(q)α levels do not increase. However, increases in Ops1-2 and G(q)α at rhabdoms are enhanced during daytime dark adaptation by treatments that elevate cAMP in photoreceptors, suggesting that the clock influences dark-adaptive increases in Ops1-2 and G(q)α at Limulus rhabdoms by activating cAMP-dependent processes. The circadian regulation of Ops1-2 and G(q)α levels at rhabdoms probably has a dual role: to increase retinal sensitivity at night and to protect photoreceptors from light damage during the day.

  11. Opsin1-2, Gqα and arrestin levels at Limulus rhabdoms are controlled by diurnal light and a circadian clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelle, Barbara-Anne; Kempler, Karen E.; Parker, Alexander K.; Gaddie, Cristina D.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Dark and light adaptation in photoreceptors involve multiple processes including those that change protein concentrations at photosensitive membranes. Light- and dark-adaptive changes in protein levels at rhabdoms have been described in detail in white-eyed Drosophila maintained under artificial light. Here we tested whether protein levels at rhabdoms change significantly in the highly pigmented lateral eyes of wild-caught Limulus polyphemus maintained in natural diurnal illumination and whether these changes are under circadian control. We found that rhabdomeral levels of opsins (Ops1-2), the G protein activated by rhodopsin (Gqα) and arrestin change significantly from day to night and that nighttime levels of each protein at rhabdoms are significantly influenced by signals from the animal's central circadian clock. Clock input at night increases Ops1-2 and Gqα and decreases arrestin levels at rhabdoms. Clock input is also required for a rapid decrease in rhabdomeral Ops1-2 beginning at sunrise. We found further that dark adaptation during the day and the night are not equivalent. During daytime dark adaptation, when clock input is silent, the increase of Ops1-2 at rhabdoms is small and Gqα levels do not increase. However, increases in Ops1-2 and Gqα at rhabdoms are enhanced during daytime dark adaptation by treatments that elevate cAMP in photoreceptors, suggesting that the clock influences dark-adaptive increases in Ops1-2 and Gqα at Limulus rhabdoms by activating cAMP-dependent processes. The circadian regulation of Ops1-2 and Gqα levels at rhabdoms probably has a dual role: to increase retinal sensitivity at night and to protect photoreceptors from light damage during the day. PMID:23393287

  12. 小地老虎UV视蛋白基因的克隆及序列分析%Molecular Cloning and Sequence Analysis of UV Opsin in Agrotis ypsilon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫硕; 张青文; 熊晓菲; 韩娜娜; 王琼; 张璟; 刘小侠

    2012-01-01

    视蛋白是感光物质的重要组成成分,是动物感知周围光环境的重要途径之一.本文以小地老虎(Agrotis ypsilon)3日龄成虫为材料,利用RT-PCR和RACE末端扩增技术克隆得到小地老虎UV视蛋白基因的cDNA序列.序列分析表明,小地老虎视蛋白基因的cDNA序列1 632 bp,包括一个1 140 bp的完整开放阅读框架,编码379个氨基酸,理论蛋白分子量(Mw) 41.50 ku,等电点(pI) 7.56.GenBank登录号为JN185654.UV视蛋白包括7个跨膜拓扑结构和一个G蛋白偶联受体家族,第107位赖氨酸与UV视蛋白的紫外敏感性有重要关系.同源性分析显示,小地老虎UV视蛋白基因与其他昆虫的UV视蛋白基因具有较高同源性.本研究对深入探究UV视蛋白在动物夜行生活中的作用具有重要意义.%Opsin is the main content of photoactive substances, and it is important for the light perception of animals. Total RNA was isolated from the third day adult of the Agrotis ypsilon. The cDNA sequence was cloned by RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). UV opsin cDNA sequence is 1 632 bp in length, containing an open reading frame of 1 140 bp, which encodes a polypeptide of 379 amino acids residues. The predicted molecular weight of the amino acid is about 41. 50 ku,with an isoelectric point of 7. 56. GenBank accession number; JN185654. The analysis of phylogenetic relationship showed that the cloned gene had high amino acid sequences homology with other insect UV opsins. The molecular cloning of UV opsin gene may play an important role in the study of nocturnal insect vision in the night.

  13. South American Weakly Electric Fish (Gymnotiformes) Are Long-Wavelength-Sensitive Cone Monochromats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da-Wei; Lu, Ying; Yan, Hong Young; Zakon, Harold H

    2016-01-01

    Losses of cone opsin genes are noted in animals that are nocturnal or rely on senses other than vision. We investigated the cone opsin repertoire of night-active South American weakly electric fish. We obtained opsin gene sequences from genomic DNA of 3 gymnotiforms (Eigenmannia virescens, Sternopygus macrurus, Apteronotus albifrons) and the assembled genome of the electric eel (Electrophorus electricus). We identified genes for long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) and medium-wavelength-sensitive cone opsins (RH2) and rod opsins (RH1). Neither of the 2 short-wavelength-sensitive cone opsin genes were found and are presumed lost. The fact that Electrophorus has a complete repertoire of extraretinal opsin genes and conservation of synteny with the zebrafish (Danio rerio) for genes flanking the 2 short-wavelength-sensitive opsin genes supports the supposition of gene loss. With microspectrophotometry and electroretinograms we observed absorption spectra consistent with RH1 and LWS but not RH2 opsins in the retinal photoreceptors of E. virescens. This profile of opsin genes and their retinal expression is identical to the gymnotiform's sister group, the catfish, which are also nocturnally active and bear ampullary electroreceptors, suggesting that this pattern likely occurred in the common ancestor of gymnotiforms and catfish. Finally, we noted an unusual N-terminal motif lacking a conserved glycosylation consensus site in the RH2 opsin of gymnotiforms, a catfish and a characin (Astyanax mexicanus). Mutations at this site influence rhodopsin trafficking in mammalian photoreceptors and cause retinitis pigmentosa. We speculate that this unusual N terminus may be related to the absence of the RH2 opsin in the cones of gymnotiforms and catfish. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-1263 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PCAP-01-1263 gb|AAC25655.1| X-linked visual pigment protein P556 [Callithrix j...acchus] dbj|BAB58963.1| P553 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] dbj|BAB58967.1| P553 cone opsin [Callithrix jac...chus] gb|ABZ10484.1| opsin 1, medium-wave-sensitive 2 (predicted) [Callithrix jacchus] AAC25655.1 0.0 90% ...

  15. ISO Guest Observer Data Analysis and LWS Instrument Team Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Smith, Howard A.

    2003-01-01

    We have designed and fabricated infrared filters for use at wavelengths greater than or equal to 15 microns. Unlike conventional dielectric filters used at the short wavelengths, ours are made from stacked metal grids, spaced at a very small fraction of the performance wavelengths. The individual lattice layers are gold, the spacers are polyimide, and they are assembled using integrated circuit processing techniques; they resemble some metallic photonic band-gap structures. We simulate the filter performance accurately, including the coupling of the propagating, near-field electromagnetic modes, using computer aided design codes. We find no anomalous absorption. The geometrical parameters of the grids are easily altered in practice, allowing for the production of tuned filters with predictable useful transmission characteristics. Although developed for astronomical instrumentation, the filters are broadly applicable in systems across infrared and terahertz bands.

  16. Cold stepping drive for the ISO/LWS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, T. J.; Sidey, R. C.; Towlson, W. A.

    Development work has begun on an interchange mechanism for the pair of Fabry-Perot interferometers proposed for the Long Wavelength Spectrometer planned as one of the focal plane instruments for the Infrared Space Observatory. The two Fabry-Perot assemblies will be mounted on a balanced wheel which is to be carried on a shaft mounted in ball bearings which have been MoS 2 treated at the European Space Tribology Laboratory. Cryogenic testing is in hand at the Institute of Cryogenics, University of Southampton, UK. A ring gear on the wheel will be driven from the output pinion of a stepping motor. At a later stage in the project a choice will be made among all available cold motors with suitable performance. In the meantime, a prototype has been built of a special cryogenic permanent magnet stepping motor intended to operate on a current of a few milliamperes. The Paper describes constructional features of the drive, together with early results for the motor prototype.

  17. ISO LWS Spectroscopy of M82 A Unified Evolutionary Model

    CERN Document Server

    Colbert, J W; Clegg, P E; Cox, P; Fischer, J; Lord, S D; Luhman, M L; Satyapal, S; Smith, H A; Spinoglio, L; Stacey, G J; Unger, S J

    1999-01-01

    We present the first complete far-infrared spectrum (43 to 197 um) of M82, the brightest infrared galaxy in the sky, taken with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). We detected seven fine structure emission lines, [OI] 63 and 145 um, [OIII] 52 and 88 um, [NII] 122 um, [NIII] 57 um and [CII] 158 um, and fit their ratios to a combination starburst and photo-dissociation region (PDR) model. The best fit is obtained with HII regions with n = 250 cm^{-3} and an ionization parameter of 10^{-3.5} and PDRs with n = 10^{3.3} cm^{-3} and a far-ultraviolet flux of G_o = 10^{2.8}. We applied both continuous and instantaneous starburst models, with our best fit being a 3-5 Myr old instantaneous burst model with a 100 M_o cut-off. We also detected the ground state rotational line of OH in absorption at 119.4 um. No excited level OH transitions are apparent, indicating that the OH is almost entirely in its ground state with a column density ~ 4x10^{14} cm^{-2}. The spectral energy distri...

  18. ISO Guest Observer Data Analysis and LWS Instrument Team Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard

    2001-01-01

    The following is an interim annual report. Dr. Smith is currently on an extended TDY to the Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (IFSI) at the Consilio Nazionale delle Richerche (CNR) in Rome, Italy, where he has been working on a related NASA grant in support of analysis of Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) data on star formation in Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies and our galaxy. Work emphasizes development of metal mesh grids for use in spacecraft, and the design and fabrication of test elements by the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington D.C. Work has progressed well, but slowly, on that program due to the departure of a key engineer. NASA has been advised of the delay, and granted a no-cost extension, whereby SAO has authorized a delay in the final report from NRL. Nevertheless NRL has continued to make progress. Two papers have been submitted to refereed journals related to this program, and a new design for mesh operating in the 20-40 micron region has been developed. Meetings continue through the summer on these items. A new technical scientist has been made a job offer and hopefully will be on board NRL shortly, although most of the present grant work is already completed. A more complete report, with copies of the submitted papers, designs, and other measures of progress, will be submitted to NASA in September when Dr. Smith returns from his current TDY.

  19. A novel molecular marker for the study of Neotropical cichlid phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrin, T M C; Gasques, L S; Prioli, S M A P; Prioli, A J

    2015-12-22

    The use of molecular markers has contributed to phylogeny and to the reconstruction of species' evolutionary history. Each region of the genome has different evolution rates, which may or may not identify phylogenetic signal at different levels. Therefore, it is important to assess new molecular markers that can be used for phylogenetic reconstruction. Regions that may be associated with species characteristics and are subject to selective pressure, such as opsin genes, which encode proteins related to the visual system and are widely expressed by Cichlidae family members, are interesting. Our aim was to identify a new nuclear molecular marker that could establish the phylogeny of Neotropical cichlids and is potentially correlated with the visual system. We used Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood analysis to support the use of the nuclear opsin LWS gene in the phylogeny of eight Neotropical cichlid species. Their use concatenated to the mitochondrial gene COI was also tested. The LWS gene fragment comprised the exon 2-4 region, including the introns. The LWS gene provided good support for both analyses up to the genus level, distinguishing the studied species, and when concatenated to the COI gene, there was a good support up to the species level. Another benefit of utilizing this region, is that some polymorphisms are associated with changes in spectral properties of the LWS opsin protein, which constitutes the visual pigment that absorbs red light. Thus, utilization of this gene as a molecular marker to study the phylogeny of Neotropical cichlids is promising.

  20. Effects of circadian rhythm changes on expression of opsin photopigment melanopsin in mouse retina%昼夜节律的改变对视网膜感光视蛋白melanopsin表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武静; 周晓东; 刘丽芸; 周国民; 肖虹蕾

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究昼夜节律的改变对视网膜感光视蛋白melanopsin表达的影响.方法 出生14 d (P14)C57BL/6J小鼠随机分为实验组和正常对照组,实验组每天给予24 h持续光照,对照组模拟正常昼夜节律每天给予12 h光照、12 h黑暗环境,运用免疫荧光染色结合RT-PCR技术,分别检测实验组和对照组小鼠在光照1周后和8周后视网膜感光视蛋白melanopsin的表达情况.结果 免疫荧光染色结果显示感光视蛋白melanopsin主要位于视网膜神经节细胞层,少部分位于内核层.小鼠光照1周后melanopsin阳性细胞的表达数目实验组少于对照组;RT-PCR结果示小鼠光照1周和8周时melanopsin的mRNA含量实验组均少于各自的对照组,两者具有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论 持续光照可以减少视网膜感光视蛋白melanopsin的表达,提示melanopsin阳性神经节细胞为光敏感性细胞,其表达可能对维持正常的昼夜节律有重要作用.%Objective To investigate the effects of circadian rhythm changes on the expression of opsin photopigment melanopsin in the retinsa. Methods 14-day old C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into experimental group and control group. The experimental group was maintained in continuous light. The control group was maintained in a 12:12 h light: dark cycle. Fluorescence immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR assays were used to detect the expressions of melanopsin at 1 week and 8 weeks after the light exposure. Results The results of fluorescence immunocytochemistry showed that opsin melanopsin mainly expressed in the retinal ganglion cell layer and little in the inner nuclear layer. The total amount of melanopsin cells in the experimental group were less than that in the control group 1 week later. RT-PCR indicated that the total amount of melanopsin mRNA in the experimental group was less than that in the control group (P <0.01). Conclusions Constant lighting down-regulates the expression of melanopsin. Melanopsin

  1. Non-image Forming Light Detection by Melanopsin, Rhodopsin, and Long-Middlewave (L/W) Cone Opsin in the Subterranean Blind Mole Rat, Spalax Ehrenbergi: Immunohistochemical Characterization, Distribution, and Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquiva, Gema; Avivi, Aaron; Hannibal, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The blind mole rat, Spalax ehrenbergi, can, despite severely degenerated eyes covered by fur, entrain to the daily light/dark cycle and adapt to seasonal changes due to an intact circadian timing system. The present study demonstrates that the Spalax retina contains a photoreceptor layer, an outer nuclear layer (ONL), an outer plexiform layer (OPL), an inner nuclear layer (INL), an inner plexiform layer (IPL), and a ganglion cell layer (GCL). By immunohistochemistry, the number of melanopsin (mRGCs) and non-melanopsin bearing retinal ganglion cells was analyzed in detail. Using the ganglion cell marker RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS) it was shown that the Spalax eye contains 890 ± 62 RGCs. Of these, 87% (752 ± 40) contain melanopsin (cell density 788 melanopsin RGCs/mm(2)). The remaining RGCs were shown to co-store Brn3a and calretinin. The melanopsin cells were located mainly in the GCL with projections forming two dendritic plexuses located in the inner part of the IPL and in the OPL. Few melanopsin dendrites were also found in the ONL. The Spalax retina is rich in rhodopsin and long/middle wave (L/M) cone opsin bearing photoreceptor cells. By using Ctbp2 as a marker for ribbon synapses, both rods and L/M cone ribbons containing pedicles in the OPL were found in close apposition with melanopsin dendrites in the outer plexus suggesting direct synaptic contact. A subset of cone bipolar cells and all photoreceptor cells contain recoverin while a subset of bipolar and amacrine cells contain calretinin. The calretinin expressing amacrine cells seemed to form synaptic contacts with rhodopsin containing photoreceptor cells in the OPL and contacts with melanopsin cell bodies and dendrites in the IPL. The study demonstrates the complex retinal circuitry used by the Spalax to detect light, and provides evidence for both melanopsin and non-melanopsin projecting pathways to the brain.

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-14-0051 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-14-0051 ref|NP_776992.1| opsin 1 (cone pigments), short-wave-sensitive (c...olor blindness, tritan) [Bos taurus] sp|P51490|OPSB_BOVIN Blue-sensitive opsin (BOP) (Blue cone photoreceptor pigment...) gb|AAA93189.1| visual pigment gb|AAB50158.1| blue cone pigment protein [Bos taurus] NP_776992.1 0.0 91% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TBEL-01-1714 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TBEL-01-1714 ref|NP_776992.1| opsin 1 (cone pigments), short-wave-sensitive (c...olor blindness, tritan) [Bos taurus] sp|P51490|OPSB_BOVIN Blue-sensitive opsin (BOP) (Blue cone photoreceptor pigment...) gb|AAA93189.1| visual pigment gb|AAB50158.1| blue cone pigment protein [Bos taurus] NP_776992.1 1e-147 73% ...

  4. Visual Pigments, Ocular Filters and the Evolution of Snake Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Bruno F; Sampaio, Filipa L; Douglas, Ronald H; Kodandaramaiah, Ullasa; Casewell, Nicholas R; Harrison, Robert A; Hart, Nathan S; Partridge, Julian C; Hunt, David M; Gower, David J

    2016-10-01

    Much of what is known about the molecular evolution of vertebrate vision comes from studies of mammals, birds and fish. Reptiles (especially snakes) have barely been sampled in previous studies despite their exceptional diversity of retinal photoreceptor complements. Here, we analyze opsin gene sequences and ocular media transmission for up to 69 species to investigate snake visual evolution. Most snakes express three visual opsin genes (rh1, sws1, and lws). These opsin genes (especially rh1 and sws1) have undergone much evolutionary change, including modifications of amino acid residues at sites of known importance for spectral tuning, with several tuning site combinations unknown elsewhere among vertebrates. These changes are particularly common among dipsadine and colubrine "higher" snakes. All three opsin genes are inferred to be under purifying selection, though dN/dS varies with respect to some lineages, ecologies, and retinal anatomy. Positive selection was inferred at multiple sites in all three opsins, these being concentrated in transmembrane domains and thus likely to have a substantial effect on spectral tuning and other aspects of opsin function. Snake lenses vary substantially in their spectral transmission. Snakes active at night and some of those active by day have very transmissive lenses, whereas some primarily diurnal species cut out shorter wavelengths (including UVA). In terms of retinal anatomy, lens transmission, visual pigment spectral tuning and opsin gene evolution the visual system of snakes is exceptionally diverse compared with all other extant tetrapod orders.

  5. Visual system evolution and the nature of the ancestral snake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, B F; Sampaio, F L; Jared, C; Antoniazzi, M M; Loew, E R; Bowmaker, J K; Rodriguez, A; Hart, N S; Hunt, D M; Partridge, J C; Gower, D J

    2015-07-01

    The dominant hypothesis for the evolutionary origin of snakes from 'lizards' (non-snake squamates) is that stem snakes acquired many snake features while passing through a profound burrowing (fossorial) phase. To investigate this, we examined the visual pigments and their encoding opsin genes in a range of squamate reptiles, focusing on fossorial lizards and snakes. We sequenced opsin transcripts isolated from retinal cDNA and used microspectrophotometry to measure directly the spectral absorbance of the photoreceptor visual pigments in a subset of samples. In snakes, but not lizards, dedicated fossoriality (as in Scolecophidia and the alethinophidian Anilius scytale) corresponds with loss of all visual opsins other than RH1 (λmax 490-497 nm); all other snakes (including less dedicated burrowers) also have functional sws1 and lws opsin genes. In contrast, the retinas of all lizards sampled, even highly fossorial amphisbaenians with reduced eyes, express functional lws, sws1, sws2 and rh1 genes, and most also express rh2 (i.e. they express all five of the visual opsin genes present in the ancestral vertebrate). Our evidence of visual pigment complements suggests that the visual system of stem snakes was partly reduced, with two (RH2 and SWS2) of the ancestral vertebrate visual pigments being eliminated, but that this did not extend to the extreme additional loss of SWS1 and LWS that subsequently occurred (probably independently) in highly fossorial extant scolecophidians and A. scytale. We therefore consider it unlikely that the ancestral snake was as fossorial as extant scolecophidians, whether or not the latter are para- or monophyletic.

  6. Beauty in the eyes of the beholders: colour vision is tuned to mate preference in the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandkam, Benjamin; Young, C Megan; Breden, Felix

    2015-02-01

    A broad range of animals use visual signals to assess potential mates, and the theory of sensory exploitation suggests variation in visual systems drives mate preference variation due to sensory bias. Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata), a classic system for studies of the evolution of female mate choice, provide a unique opportunity to test this theory by looking for covariation in visual tuning, light environment and mate preferences. Female preference co-evolves with male coloration, such that guppy females from 'low-predation' environments have stronger preferences for males with more orange/red coloration than do females from 'high-predation' environments. Here, we show that colour vision also varies across populations, with 'low'-predation guppies investing more of their colour vision to detect red/orange coloration. In independently colonized watersheds, guppies expressed higher levels of both LWS-1 and LWS-3 (the most abundant LWS opsins) in 'low-predation' populations than 'high-predation' populations at a time that corresponds to differences in cone cell abundance. We also observed that the frequency of a coding polymorphism differed between high- and low-predation populations. Together, this shows that the variation underlying preference could be explained by simple changes in expression and coding of opsins, providing important candidate genes to investigate the genetic basis of female preference variation in this model system.

  7. The Genetic and Evolutionary Drives behind Primate Color Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Hunt

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Primate color vision is based on two to three cone types in the retina, each expressing a different class of visual pigment, making them the only mammals that possess trichromacy. These pigment classes are the short wavelength-sensitive (SWS1 pigment and the long wavelength-sensitive (LWS pigment, orthologues of the same pigments found in many other vertebrates, as well as the middle wavelength-sensitive (MWS pigment, a paralogue to the LWS pigment. Trichromacy was achieved differently in Old World and New World primates. In Old World primates, a duplication of the LWS opsin gene occurred giving rise to a “red-sensitive” or L pigment and a “green-sensitive” or M pigment. Their corresponding L and M genes are adjacent on the X chromosome which, together with their high sequence homology, is the underlying cause for the high frequency of red-green color blindness seen in humans. In New World primates and prosimians, however, the mechanism leading to trichromacy, with one exception, is based on a single polymorphic LWS gene, from which different allelic variants encode pigments with differing spectral peaks. X chromosome inactivation limits expression to just one gene per photoreceptor meaning that trichromacy is only seen in females; while all male are red-green color blind. Despite several leading hypotheses, the reasons for the different evolutionary paths taken by Old and New World primates for trichromacy are still unclear and remain to be confirmed.

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OPRI-01-1437 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OPRI-01-1437 ref|NP_776992.1| opsin 1 (cone pigments), short-wave-sensitive [B...os taurus] sp|P51490|OPSB_BOVIN RecName: Full=Blue-sensitive opsin; Short=BOP; AltName: Full=Blue cone photoreceptor pigment... gb|AAA93189.1| visual pigment [Bos taurus] gb|AAB50158.1| blue cone pigment protein [Bos taurus] NP_776992.1 1e-162 80% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-VPAC-01-1432 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-VPAC-01-1432 ref|NP_776992.1| opsin 1 (cone pigments), short-wave-sensitive [B...os taurus] sp|P51490|OPSB_BOVIN RecName: Full=Blue-sensitive opsin; Short=BOP; AltName: Full=Blue cone photoreceptor pigment... gb|AAA93189.1| visual pigment [Bos taurus] gb|AAB50158.1| blue cone pigment protein [Bos taurus] NP_776992.1 0.0 92% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0695 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0695 ref|NP_776992.1| opsin 1 (cone pigments), short-wave-sensitive [B...os taurus] sp|P51490|OPSB_BOVIN RecName: Full=Blue-sensitive opsin; Short=BOP; AltName: Full=Blue cone photoreceptor pigment... gb|AAA93189.1| visual pigment [Bos taurus] gb|AAB50158.1| blue cone pigment protein [Bos taurus] NP_776992.1 1e-155 88% ...

  11. Bridging particle and wave sensitivity in a configurable detector of positive operator-valued measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, Graciana; Lundeen, Jeff S; Branderhorst, Matthijs P A; Coldenstrodt-Ronge, Hendrik B; Smith, Brian J; Walmsley, Ian A

    2009-02-27

    We report an optical detector with tunable positive operator-valued measures. The device is based on a combination of weak-field homodyne techniques and photon-number-resolving detection. The resulting positive operator-valued measures can be continuously tuned from Fock-state projectors to a variety of phase-dependent quantum-state measurements by adjusting different system parameters such as local oscillator coupling, amplitude, and phase, allowing thus not only detection but also preparation of exotic quantum states. Experimental tomographic reconstructions of classical benchmark states are presented as a demonstration of the detector capabilities.

  12. Opsin gene analysis in the cultured kawakawa Euthynnus affinis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    松本, 太朗; 阿川, 泰夫; 岡田, 貴彦; 澤田, 好史; 石橋, 泰典

    2015-01-01

    スマはインド洋から西太平洋の亜熱帯海域に分布する回遊性資源の一種である。本種は水産資源としての商業的価値が高いにもかかわらず,生理・生態学的特性に不明な点が多い。そこで本研究は,生態学的特性や養殖時の光環境等に関係する網膜の視物質オプシン遺伝子を解析した。その結果,11種類[Rh1(桿体); Rh2A1,...

  13. Visual sensitivities tuned by heterochronic shifts in opsin gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    McFarland William N; Kidd Michael R; Streelman J Todd; Spady Tyrone C; Carleton Karen L; Loew Ellis R

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Cichlid fishes have radiated into hundreds of species in the Great Lakes of Africa. Brightly colored males display on leks and vie to be chosen by females as mates. Strong discrimination by females causes differential male mating success, rapid evolution of male color patterns and, possibly, speciation. In addition to differences in color pattern, Lake Malawi cichlids also show some of the largest known shifts in visual sensitivity among closely related species. These shif...

  14. Parallel and convergent evolution of the dim-light vision gene RH1 in bats (Order: Chiroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yong-Yi; Liu, Jie; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2010-01-21

    Rhodopsin, encoded by the gene Rhodopsin (RH1), is extremely sensitive to light, and is responsible for dim-light vision. Bats are nocturnal mammals that inhabit poor light environments. Megabats (Old-World fruit bats) generally have well-developed eyes, while microbats (insectivorous bats) have developed echolocation and in general their eyes were degraded, however, dramatic differences in the eyes, and their reliance on vision, exist in this group. In this study, we examined the rod opsin gene (RH1), and compared its evolution to that of two cone opsin genes (SWS1 and M/LWS). While phylogenetic reconstruction with the cone opsin genes SWS1 and M/LWS generated a species tree in accord with expectations, the RH1 gene tree united Pteropodidae (Old-World fruit bats) and Yangochiroptera, with very high bootstrap values, suggesting the possibility of convergent evolution. The hypothesis of convergent evolution was further supported when nonsynonymous sites or amino acid sequences were used to construct phylogenies. Reconstructed RH1 sequences at internal nodes of the bat species phylogeny showed that: (1) Old-World fruit bats share an amino acid change (S270G) with the tomb bat; (2) Miniopterus share two amino acid changes (V104I, M183L) with Rhinolophoidea; (3) the amino acid replacement I123V occurred independently on four branches, and the replacements L99M, L266V and I286V occurred each on two branches. The multiple parallel amino acid replacements that occurred in the evolution of bat RH1 suggest the possibility of multiple convergences of their ecological specialization (i.e., various photic environments) during adaptation for the nocturnal lifestyle, and suggest that further attention is needed on the study of the ecology and behavior of bats.

  15. Evolutionary loss of cone photoreception in balaenid whales reveals circuit stability in the mammalian retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweikert, Lorian E; Fasick, Jeffry I; Grace, Michael S

    2016-10-01

    The classical understanding of mammalian vision is that it occurs through "duplex" retinae containing both rod and cone photoreceptors, the signals from which are processed through rod- and/or cone-specific signaling pathways. The recent discovery of rod monochromacy in some cetacean lineages provides a novel opportunity to investigate the effects of an evolutionary loss of cone photoreception on retinal organization. Sequence analysis of right whale (Eubalaena glacialis; family Balaenidae) cDNA derived from long-wavelength sensitive (LWS) cone opsin mRNA identified several mutations in the opsin coding sequence, suggesting the loss of cone cell function, but maintenance of non-photosensitive, cone opsin mRNA-expressing cells in the retina. Subsequently, we investigated the retina of the closely related bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus; family Balaenidae) to determine how the loss of cone-mediated photoreception affects light signaling pathways in the retina. Anti-opsin immunofluorescence demonstrated the total loss of cone opsin expression in B. mysticetus, whereas light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and bipolar cell (protein kinase C-α [PKC-α] and recoverin) immunofluorescence revealed the maintenance of cone soma, putative cone pedicles, and both rod and cone bipolar cell types. These findings represent the first immunological and anatomical evidence of a naturally occurring rod-monochromatic mammalian retina, and suggest that despite the loss of cone-mediated photoreception, the associated cone signaling structures (i.e., cone synapses and cone bipolar cells) may be maintained for multichannel rod-based signaling in balaenid whales. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2873-2885, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The activation of directional stem cell motility by green light-emitting diode irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wei-Kee; Chen, How-Foo; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Fu, Yun-Ju; Wong, Yi-Shan; Yen, Da-Jen; Chang, Tzu-Hao; Huang, Hsien-Da; Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng; Chien, Shu; Ho, Jennifer Hui-Chun

    2013-03-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) irradiation is potentially a photostimulator to manipulate cell behavior by opsin-triggered phototransduction and thermal energy supply in living cells. Directional stem cell motility is critical for the efficiency and specificity of stem cells in tissue repair. We explored that green LED (530 nm) irradiation directed the human orbital fat stem cells (OFSCs) to migrate away from the LED light source through activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)/MAP kinase/p38 signaling pathway. ERK inhibitor selectively abrogated light-driven OFSC migration. Phosphorylation of these kinases as well as green LED irradiation-induced cell migration was facilitated by increasing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in OFSCs after green LED exposure, and which was thermal stress-independent mechanism. OFSCs, which are multi-potent mesenchymal stem cells isolated from human orbital fat tissue, constitutionally express three opsins, i.e. retinal pigment epithelium-derived rhodopsin homolog (RRH), encephalopsin (OPN3) and short-wave-sensitive opsin 1 (OPN1SW). However, only two non-visual opsins, i.e. RRH and OPN3, served as photoreceptors response to green LED irradiation-induced OFSC migration. In conclusion, stem cells are sensitive to green LED irradiation-induced directional cell migration through activation of ERK signaling pathway via a wavelength-dependent phototransduction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cone-like rhodopsin expressed in the all-cone retina of the colubrid pine snake as a potential adaptation to diurnality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Darren, Benedict; Schott, Ryan K; Tropepe, Vincent; Chang, Belinda S W

    2017-07-01

    Colubridae is the largest and most diverse family of snakes, with visual systems that reflect this diversity, encompassing a variety of retinal photoreceptor organizations. The transmutation theory proposed by Walls postulates that photoreceptors could evolutionarily transition between cell types in squamates, but few studies have tested this theory. Recently, evidence for transmutation and rod-like machinery in an all-cone retina has been identified in a diurnal garter snake (Thamnophis), and it appears that the rhodopsin gene at least may be widespread among colubrid snakes. However, functional evidence supporting transmutation beyond the existence of the rhodopsin gene remains rare. We examined the all-cone retina of another colubrid, Pituophis melanoleucus, thought to be more secretive/burrowing than Thamnophis We found that P. melanoleucus expresses two cone opsins (SWS1, LWS) and rhodopsin (RH1) within the eye. Immunohistochemistry localized rhodopsin to the outer segment of photoreceptors in the all-cone retina of the snake and all opsin genes produced functional visual pigments when expressed in vitro Consistent with other studies, we found that P. melanoleucus rhodopsin is extremely blue-shifted. Surprisingly, P. melanoleucus rhodopsin reacted with hydroxylamine, a typical cone opsin characteristic. These results support the idea that the rhodopsin-containing photoreceptors of P. melanoleucus are the products of evolutionary transmutation from rod ancestors, and suggest that this phenomenon may be widespread in colubrid snakes. We hypothesize that transmutation may be an adaptation for diurnal, brighter-light vision, which could result in increased spectral sensitivity and chromatic discrimination with the potential for colour vision. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Gene conversion between red and defective green opsin gene in blue cone monochromacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyniers, E.; Van Thienen, M.N.; De Boulle, K.; Willems, P.J. [Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium)] [and others

    1995-09-20

    Blue cone monochromacy is an X-linked condition in which the function of both the red pigment gene (RCP) and the green pigment gene (GCP) is impaired. Blue cone monochromacy can be due to a red/green gene array rearrangement existing of a single red/green hybrid gene and an inactivating C203R point mutation in both RCP and GCP. The flanking sequences of the C230R mutation in exon 4 of RCP were characteristic for GCP, indicating that this mutation was transferred from GCP into RCP by gene conversion. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Short-wavelength sensitive opsin (SWS1 as a new marker for vertebrate phylogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Johannes

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vertebrate SWS1 visual pigments mediate visual transduction in response to light at short wavelengths. Due to their importance in vision, SWS1 genes have been isolated from a surprisingly wide range of vertebrates, including lampreys, teleosts, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. The SWS1 genes exhibit many of the characteristics of genes typically targeted for phylogenetic analyses. This study investigates both the utility of SWS1 as a marker for inferring vertebrate phylogenetic relationships, and the characteristics of the gene that contribute to its phylogenetic utility. Results Phylogenetic analyses of vertebrate SWS1 genes produced topologies that were remarkably congruent with generally accepted hypotheses of vertebrate evolution at both higher and lower taxonomic levels. The few exceptions were generally associated with areas of poor taxonomic sampling, or relationships that have been difficult to resolve using other molecular markers. The SWS1 data set was characterized by a substantial amount of among-site rate variation, and a relatively unskewed substitution rate matrix, even when the data were partitioned into different codon sites and individual taxonomic groups. Although there were nucleotide biases in some groups at third positions, these biases were not convergent across different taxonomic groups. Conclusion Our results suggest that SWS1 may be a good marker for vertebrate phylogenetics due to the variable yet consistent patterns of sequence evolution exhibited across fairly wide taxonomic groups. This may result from constraints imposed by the functional role of SWS1 pigments in visual transduction.

  20. THE EVOLUTION OF OPSINS AND COLOR VISION: CONNECTING GENOTYPE TO A COMPLEX PHENOTYPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha I. BLOCH

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Entender la base genética de los rasgos adaptativos es un paso crítico en el estudio de los procesos evolutivos. Para estudiar la conexión entre genotipo y fenotipo es importante definir el fenotipo a diferentes niveles: desde las proteínas que se construyen con base en un gen, hasta las características finales presentes en un organismo. Las opsinas y los fotopigmentos son elementos primordiales de la visión y entender cómo han evolucionado es fundamental en el estudio de la visión en los animales como un caracter derivado de selección natural o sexual. Este artículo se enfoca en este sistema, en el que se pueden conectar genotipo y fenotipo, como ejemplo de fenotipo complejo para ilustrar las dificultades de establecer una relación clara entre genotipo y fenotipo. Adicionalmente, este artículo tiene como objetivo discutir el funcionamiento del sistema de fotorrecepción, con énfasis particular en las aves, con el fin de enumerar varios factores que deben ser tenidos en cuenta para predecir cambios en la visión a partir del estudio de los fotopigmentos. Dado que los modelos basados en la visión de aves son cada vez más usados en diversas áreas de la biología evolutiva tales como: selección de pareja, depredación y camuflaje; se hace relevante entender los fundamentos y limitaciones de estos modelos. Por esta razón, en este artículo discuto los detalles y aspectos prácticos del uso de los modelos de visión existentes para aves, con el fin de facilitar su uso en futuras investigaciones en diversas áreas de evolución.

  1. Of Mice, Men, and Microbial Opsins: How Optogenetics Can Help Hone Mouse Models of Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Tobias F; Sohal, Vikaas S

    2016-01-01

    Genetic, pharmacologic, and behavioral manipulations have long been powerful tools for generating rodent models to study the neural substrates underlying psychiatric disease. Recent advances in the use of optogenetics in awake behaving rodents has added an additional valuable methodology to this experimental toolkit. Here, we review several recent studies that leverage optogenetic technologies to elucidate neural mechanisms possibly related to depression, anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. We use a few illustrative examples to highlight key emergent principles about how optogenetics, in conjunction with more established modalities, can help to organize our understanding of how disease-related states, specific neuronal circuits, and various behavioral assays fit into hierarchical frameworks such as the National Institute of Mental Health Research Domain Criteria matrix.

  2. Gene : CBRC-ACAR-01-0922 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ve opsin (Blue photoreceptor pigment) (RH2 opsin) gb|AAB35062.1| RH2 opsin [Anolis carolinensis] gb|AAD32620.1| RH2 opsin [Anolis car...olinensis] 0.0 100% MNGTEGINFYVPLSNKTGLVRSPFEYPQYYLAEPWKYKVVCCYIFFLIFTGLPINILTLLVTF

  3. Cell-specific DNA methylation patterns of retina-specific genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannath L Merbs

    Full Text Available Many studies have demonstrated that epigenetic mechanisms are important in the regulation of gene expression during embryogenesis, gametogenesis, and other forms of tissue-specific gene regulation. We sought to explore the possible role of epigenetics, specifically DNA methylation, in the establishment and maintenance of cell type-restricted gene expression in the retina. To assess the relationship between DNA methylation status and expression level of retinal genes, bisulfite sequence analysis of the 1000 bp region around the transcription start sites (TSS of representative rod and cone photoreceptor-specific genes and gene expression analysis were performed in the WERI and Y79 human retinoblastoma cell lines. Next, the homologous genes in mouse were bisulfite sequenced in the retina and in non-expressing tissues. Finally, bisulfite sequencing was performed on isolated photoreceptor and non-photoreceptor retinal cells isolated by laser capture microdissection. Differential methylation of rhodopsin (RHO, retinal binding protein 3 (RBP3, IRBP cone opsin, short-wave-sensitive (OPN1SW, cone opsin, middle-wave-sensitive (OPN1MW, and cone opsin, long-wave-sensitive (OPN1LW was found in the retinoblastoma cell lines that inversely correlated with gene expression levels. Similarly, we found tissue-specific hypomethylation of the promoter region of Rho and Rbp3 in mouse retina as compared to non-expressing tissues, and also observed hypomethylation of retinal-expressed microRNAs. The Rho and Rbp3 promoter regions were unmethylated in expressing photoreceptor cells and methylated in non-expressing, non-photoreceptor cells from the inner nuclear layer. A third regional hypomethylation pattern of photoreceptor-specific genes was seen in a subpopulation of non-expressing photoreceptors (Rho in cones from the Nrl -/- mouse and Opn1sw in rods. These results demonstrate that a number of photoreceptor-specific genes have cell-specific differential DNA

  4. From CIE 2006 physiological model to improved age-dependent and average colorimetric observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Autrusseau, Florent; Viénot, Françoise; Le Callet, Patrick; Blondé, Laurent

    2011-10-01

    In the context of color perception on modern wide-gamut displays with narrowband spectral primaries, we performed a theoretical analysis on various aspects of physiological observers proposed by CIE TC 1-36 (CIEPO06). We allowed certain physiological factors to vary, which was not considered in the CIEPO06 framework. For example, we analyzed that the long-wave-sensitive (LWS) or medium-wave-sensitive (MWS) peak wavelength shift in the photopigment absorption spectra, a factor not modeled in CIEPO06, contributed more toward observer variability than some of the factors considered in the model. Further, we compared the color-matching functions derived from the CIEPO06 model and the CIE 10° standard colorimetric observer to the average observer data from three distinct subgroups of Stiles-Burch observers, formed on the basis of observer ages (22-23 years, 27-29 years, and 49-50 years). The errors in predicting the x(λ) and y(λ) color-matching functions of the intragroup average observers in the long-wave range and in the medium-wave range, respectively, were generally more in the case of the CIEPO06 model compared to the 10° standard colorimetric observer and manifested in both spectral and chromaticity space. In contrast, the short-wave-sensitive z₁₀(λ) function of the 10° standard colorimetric observer performed poorly compared to the CIEPO06 model for all three subgroups. Finally, a constrained nonlinear optimization on the CIEPO06 model outputs showed that a peak wavelength shift of photopigment density alone could not improve the model prediction errors at higher wavelengths. As an alternative, two optimized weighting functions for each of the LWS and MWS cone photopigment densities led to significant improvement in the prediction of intra-age-group average data for both the 22-23 year and 49-50 year age groups. We hypothesize that the assumption in the CIEPO06 model that the peak optical density of visual pigments does not vary with age is false and is

  5. Eye spectral sensitivity in fresh- and brackish-water populations of three glacial-relict Mysis species (Crustacea): physiology and genetics of differential tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Kristian; Zak, Pavel; Viljanen, Martta; Lindström, Magnus; Feldman, Tatiana; Ostrovsky, Mikhail

    2016-04-01

    Absorbance spectra of single rhabdoms were studied by microspectrophotometry (MSP) and spectral sensitivities of whole eyes by electroretinography (ERG) in three glacial-relict species of opossum shrimps (Mysis). Among eight populations from Fennoscandian fresh-water lakes (L) and seven populations from the brackish-water Baltic Sea (S), L spectra were systematically red-shifted by 20-30 nm compared with S spectra, save for one L and one S population. The difference holds across species and bears no consistent adaptive relation to the current light environments. In the most extensively studied L-S pair, two populations of M. relicta (L(p) and S(p)) separated for less than 10,000 years, no differences translating into amino acid substitutions have been found in the opsin genes, and the chromophore of the visual pigments as analyzed by HPLC is pure A1. However, MSP experiments with spectrally selective bleaching show the presence of two rhodopsins (λ(max) ≈ 525-530 nm, MWS, and 565-570 nm, LWS) expressed in different proportions. ERG recordings of responses to "red" and "blue" light linearly polarized at orthogonal angles indicate segregation of the pigments into different cells differing in polarization sensitivity. We propose that the pattern of development of LWS and MWS photoreceptors is governed by an ontogenetic switch responsive to some environmental signal(s) other than light that generally differ(s) between lakes and sea, and that this reaction norm is conserved from a common ancestor of all three species.

  6. The two-step development of a duplex retina involves distinct events of cone and rod neurogenesis and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valen, Ragnhild; Eilertsen, Mariann; Edvardsen, Rolf Brudvik; Furmanek, Tomasz; Rønnestad, Ivar; van der Meeren, Terje; Karlsen, Ørjan; Nilsen, Tom Ole; Helvik, Jon Vidar

    2016-08-15

    Unlike in mammals, persistent postembryonic retinal growth is a characteristic feature of fish, which includes major remodeling events that affect all cell types including photoreceptors. Consequently, visual capabilities change during development, where retinal sensitivity to different wavelengths of light (photopic vision), -and to limited photons (scotopic vision) are central capabilities for survival. Differently from well-established model fish, Atlantic cod has a prolonged larval stage where only cone photoreceptors are present. Rods do not appear until juvenile transition (metamorphosis), a hallmark of indirect developing species. Previously we showed that whole gene families of lws (red-sensitive) and sws1 (UV-sensitive) opsins have been lost in cod, while rh2a (green-sensitive) and sws2 (blue-sensitive) genes have tandem duplicated. Here, we provide a comprehensive characterization of a two-step developing duplex retina in Atlantic cod. The study focuses on cone subtype dynamics and delayed rod neurogenesis and differentiation in all cod life stages. Using transcriptomic and histological approaches we show that different opsins disappear in a topographic manner during development where central to peripheral retina is a key axis of expressional change. Early cone differentiation was initiated in dorso-temporal retina different from previously described in fish. Rods first appeared during initiation of metamorphosis and expression of the nuclear receptor transcription factor nr2e3-1, suggest involvement in rod specification. The indirect developmental strategy thus allows for separate studies of cones and rods development, which in nature correlates with visual changes linked to habitat shifts. The clustering of key retinal genes according to life stage, suggests that Atlantic cod with its sequenced genome may be an important resource for identification of underlying factors required for development and function of photopic and scotopic vision.

  7. Effects of Different Wave-length Illumination on the Reproduction Rate of Paramecium aureli and the Cloning of Potential Photosensitive Genes%不同波长光照对草履虫增殖的影响及其感光蛋白基因克隆的初步探究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭铎; 张博钧

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of different wavelengths of light on the reproduction rate of Paramecium aureli. To clone genes encoding possible photosensitive receptor proteins. Methods Reproduction of Paramecium aureli was studied under different illumination conditions: yellow light (wave length 578~592 nm), blue light (wave length 446~464 nm), red light (wave length 620~760 nm), white light, and shaded sunlight. Samples were extracted randomly from each group every hour and the the quantity counted under a microscope. RT-PCR was employed to clone genes encoding possible photosensitive receptor proteins. Results Under light of different wavelengths, paramecium in the yellow light group propagated fastest and showed great discrepancy compared to other groups (P0.05). cDNA fragments of about 500 bp were cloned from RNA templates from the yellow and white groups, cDNA fragments of long wave sensitive opsin-like gene, about 195 bp in length, were cloned from 5 different groups. Conclusions Yellow light promoted reproduction of paramecium while red and blue light suppressed reproduction; yellow and white light may up-regulate the expression of gene encoding rhodopsin-like protein in Paramecium aureli; long wave sensitive opsin-like gene might be expressed in paramecium%目的研究不同波长光照对草履虫增殖的影响,克隆草履虫感光蛋白基因.方法以双小核草履虫 Paramecium aureli为研究对象,分别置于黄色光(578~592 nm)、蓝色光(446~464 nm)、红色光(620~760 nm)、白光和自然光下,每隔1 h随机抽样法显微观察并计数;RT-PCR克隆草履虫感光蛋白基因.结果不同波长光的照射下,与自然光比较,第1天黄光组草履虫增殖显著上升(P0.05);第2天,蓝光组、红光组和白光组草履虫增殖仍受到抑制(P0.05).黄光组和白光组草履虫总RNA作为模板,克隆出大小约500 bp的rhodopsin-like基因cDNA片段, 5个不同光照组均克隆出大小约195 bp的Long wave

  8. From the ultrasonic to the infrared: molecular evolution and the sensory biology of bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth; Teeling, Emma C; Rossiter, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Great advances have been made recently in understanding the genetic basis of the sensory biology of bats. Research has focused on the molecular evolution of candidate sensory genes, genes with known functions [e.g., olfactory receptor (OR) genes] and genes identified from mutations associated with sensory deficits (e.g., blindness and deafness). For example, the FoxP2 gene, underpinning vocal behavior and sensorimotor coordination, has undergone diversification in bats, while several genes associated with audition show parallel amino acid substitutions in unrelated lineages of echolocating bats and, in some cases, in echolocating dolphins, representing a classic case of convergent molecular evolution. Vision genes encoding the photopigments rhodopsin and the long-wave sensitive opsin are functional in bats, while that encoding the short-wave sensitive opsin has lost functionality in rhinolophoid bats using high-duty cycle laryngeal echolocation, suggesting a sensory trade-off between investment in vision and echolocation. In terms of olfaction, bats appear to have a distinctive OR repertoire compared with other mammals, and a gene involved in signal transduction in the vomeronasal system has become non-functional in most bat species. Bitter taste receptors appear to have undergone a "birth-and death" evolution involving extensive gene duplication and loss, unlike genes coding for sweet and umami tastes that show conservation across most lineages but loss in vampire bats. Common vampire bats have also undergone adaptations for thermoperception, via alternative splicing resulting in the evolution of a novel heat-sensitive channel. The future for understanding the molecular basis of sensory biology is promising, with great potential for comparative genomic analyses, studies on gene regulation and expression, exploration of the role of alternative splicing in the generation of proteomic diversity, and linking genetic mechanisms to behavioral consequences.

  9. From the ultrasonic to the infrared: molecular evolution and the sensory biology of bats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth eJones

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Great advances have been made recently in understanding the genetic basis of the sensory biology of bats. Research has focused on the molecular evolution of candidate sensory genes, genes with known functions (e.g. olfactory receptor genes and genes identified from mutations associated with sensory deficits (e.g. blindness and deafness. For example, the FoxP2 gene, underpinning vocal behaviour and sensorimotor coordination, has undergone diversification in bats, while several genes associated with audition show parallel amino acid substitutions in unrelated lineages of echolocating bats and, in some cases, in echolocating dolphins, representing a classic case of convergent molecular evolution. Vision genes encoding the photopigments rhodopsin and the long-wave sensitive opsin are functional in bats, while that encoding the short-wave sensitive opsin has lost functionality in rhinolophoid bats using high-duty cycle laryngeal echolocation, suggesting a sensory trade-off between investment in vision and echolocation. In terms of olfaction, bats appear to have a distinctive olfactory receptor repertoire compared with other mammals, and a gene involved in signal transduction in the vomeronasal system has become non-functional in most bat species. Bitter taste receptors appear to have undergone a ‘birth-and death’ evolution involving extensive gene duplication and loss, unlike genes coding for sweet and umami tastes that show conservation across most lineages but loss in vampire bats. Common vampire bats have also undergone adaptations for thermoperception, via alternative splicing resulting in the evolution of a novel heat-sensitive channel. The future for understanding the molecular basis of sensory biology is promising, with great potential for comparative genomic analyses, studies on gene regulation and expression, exploration of the role of alternative splicing in the generation of proteomic diversity, and linking genetic mechanisms to

  10. Gene : CBRC-TGUT-22-0004 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TGUT-22-0004 Novel 19 A Opsins OPSP_COLLI 1e-177 85% sp|P51476|OPSP_COLLI Pinopsin (Pineal... opsin) (P-opsin) (Pineal gland-specific opsin) gb|AAB40945.1| pineal gland-specific opsin 1e-17

  11. Genomic organization, evolution, and expression of photoprotein and opsin genes in Mnemiopsis leidyi: a new view of ctenophore photocytes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schnitzler, Christine E; Pang, Kevin; Powers, Meghan L; Reitzel, Adam M; Ryan, Joseph F; Simmons, David; Tada, Takashi; Park, Morgan; Gupta, Jyoti; Brooks, Shelise Y; Blakesley, Robert W; Yokoyama, Shozo; Haddock, Steven Hd; Martindale, Mark Q; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2012-01-01

    ...). The complete genomic sequence from the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, a representative of the earliest branch of animals that emit light, provided an opportunity to examine the genome of an organism...

  12. Opsin cDNA sequences of a UV and green rhodopsin of the satyrine butterfly Bicyclus anynana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhoutte, Kürt; Eggen, BJL; Janssen, JJM; Stavenga, DG

    2002-01-01

    The cDNAs of an ultraviolet (UV) and long-wavelength (LW) (green) absorbing rhodopsin of the bush brown Bicyclus anynana were partially identified. The UV sequence, encoding 377 amino acids, is 76-79% identical to the UV sequences of the papilionids Papilio glaucus and Papilio xuthus and the moth Ma

  13. Advantage of dichromats over trichromats in discrimination of color-camouflaged stimuli in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Atsuko; Mikami, Akichika; Kawamura, Shoji; Ueno, Yoshikazu; Hiramatsu, Chihiro; Widayati, Kanthi A; Suryobroto, Bambang; Teramoto, Migaku; Mori, Yusuke; Nagano, Kunitoshi; Fujita, Kazuo; Kuroshima, Hika; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2005-12-01

    Due to a middle- to long-wavelength-sensitive (M/LWS) cone opsin polymorphism, there is considerable phenotypic variation in the color vision of New World monkeys. Many females have trichromatic vision, whereas some females and all males have dichromatic vision. The selective pressures that maintain this polymorphism are unclear. In the present study we compared the performance of dichromats and trichromats in a discrimination task. We examined tri- and dichromatic individuals of two species: brown capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis). We also examined one protanomalous chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes). The subjects' task was to discriminate a circular pattern from other patterns in which textural elements differed in orientation and thickness from the background. After they were trained with stimuli of a single color, the subjects were presented with color-camouflaged stimuli with a green/red mosaic overlaid onto the pattern. The dichromatic monkeys and the protanomalous chimpanzee selected the correct stimulus under camouflaged conditions at rates significantly above chance levels, while the trichromats did not. These findings demonstrate that dichromatic nonhuman primates possess a superior visual ability to discriminate color-camouflaged stimuli, and that such an ability may confer selective advantages with respect to the detection of cryptic foods and/or predators.

  14. Visual pigments in a living fossil, the Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Wayne L

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the greatest challenges facing the early land vertebrates was the need to effectively interpret a terrestrial environment. Interpretation was based on ocular adaptations evolved for an aquatic environment millions of years earlier. The Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri is thought to be the closest living relative to the first terrestrial vertebrate, and yet nothing is known about the visual pigments present in lungfish or the early tetrapods. Results Here we identify and characterise five visual pigments (rh1, rh2, lws, sws1 and sws2 expressed in the retina of N. forsteri. Phylogenetic analysis of the molecular evolution of lungfish and other vertebrate visual pigment genes indicates a closer relationship between lungfish and amphibian pigments than to pigments in teleost fishes. However, the relationship between lungfish, the coelacanth and tetrapods could not be absolutely determined from opsin phylogeny, supporting an unresolved trichotomy between the three groups. Conclusion The presence of four cone pigments in Australian lungfish suggests that the earliest tetrapods would have had a colorful view of their terrestrial environment.

  15. How parrots see their colours: novelty in the visual pigments of Platycercus elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Ben; Davies, Wayne I L; Carvalho, Livia S; Berg, Mathew L; Buchanan, Katherine L; Bowmaker, James K; Bennett, Andrew T D; Hunt, David M

    2013-12-01

    Intraspecific differences in retinal physiology have been demonstrated in several vertebrate taxa and are often subject to adaptive evolution. Nonetheless, such differences are currently unknown in birds, despite variations in habitat, behaviour and visual stimuli that might influence spectral sensitivity. The parrot Platycercus elegans is a species complex with extreme plumage colour differences between (and sometimes within) subspecies, making it an ideal candidate for intraspecific differences in spectral sensitivity. Here, the visual pigments of P. elegans were fully characterised through molecular sequencing of five visual opsin genes and measurement of their absorbance spectra using microspectrophotometry. Three of the genes, LWS, SW1 and SWS2, encode for proteins similar to those found in other birds; however, both the RH1 and RH2 pigments had polypeptides with carboxyl termini of different lengths and unusual properties that are unknown previously for any vertebrate visual pigment. Specifically, multiple RH2 transcripts and protein variants (short, medium and long) were identified for the first time that are generated by alternative splicing of downstream coding and non-coding exons. Our work provides the first complete characterisation of the visual pigments of a parrot, perhaps the most colourful order of birds, and moreover suggests more variability in avian eyes than hitherto considered.

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GACU-17-0025 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available greenwoodi] dbj|BAF33698.1| long wavelength-sensitive opsin [Neochromis greenwoodi] dbj|BAF33700.1| long wave...length-sensitive opsin [Neochromis greenwoodi] dbj|BAF33701.1| long wavelength-sensitive opsin [Neochromis ...greenwoodi] dbj|BAF33702.1| long wavelength-sensitive opsin [Neochromis greenwood...i] dbj|BAF33703.1| long wavelength-sensitive opsin [Neochromis greenwoodi] dbj|BAF33704.1| long wavelength-s...ensitive opsin [Neochromis greenwoodi] dbj|BAF33705.1| long wavelength-sensitive opsin [Neochromis greenwoodi] AAV93251.1 0.0 93% ...

  17. Molecular evidence that only two opsin subfamilies, the blue light- (SWS2) and green light-sensitive (RH2), drive color vision in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valen, Ragnhild; Edvardsen, Rolf Brudvik; Søviknes, Anne Mette; Drivenes, Øyvind; Helvik, Jon Vidar

    2014-01-01

    ... spectra representing UV and red light. Furthermore, we find that Atlantic cod has duplicated paralogs of both blue-sensitive SWS2 and green-sensitive RH2 subfamilies, with members belonging to each subfamily linked in tandem within the genome...

  18. Non-image Forming Light Detection by Melanopsin, Rhodopsin, and Long-Middlewave (L/W) Cone Opsin in the Subterranean Blind Mole Rat, Spalax Ehrenbergi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esquiva, Gema; Avivi, Aaron; Hannibal, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The blind mole rat, Spalax ehrenbergi, can, despite severely degenerated eyes covered by fur, entrain to the daily light/dark cycle and adapt to seasonal changes due to an intact circadian timing system. The present study demonstrates that the Spalax retina contains a photoreceptor layer, an outer...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUR-01-1631 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUR-01-1631 gb|ABR53744.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubent...onia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53745.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensi...s] gb|ABR53746.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53747.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53748.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53749.1| opsin 1 short-wave

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-3136 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-3136 gb|ABR53744.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubent...onia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53745.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensi...s] gb|ABR53746.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53747.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53748.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53749.1| opsin 1 short-wave

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0695 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0695 gb|ABR53744.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubent...onia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53745.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensi...s] gb|ABR53746.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53747.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53748.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53749.1| opsin 1 short-wave

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGOR-01-1128 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGOR-01-1128 gb|ABR53744.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubent...onia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53745.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensi...s] gb|ABR53746.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53747.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53748.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53749.1| opsin 1 short-wave

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MLUC-01-1042 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MLUC-01-1042 gb|ABR53744.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubent...onia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53745.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensi...s] gb|ABR53746.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53747.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53748.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53749.1| opsin 1 short-wave

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TSYR-01-1358 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TSYR-01-1358 gb|ABR53744.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubent...onia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53745.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensi...s] gb|ABR53746.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53747.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53748.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53749.1| opsin 1 short-wave

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OGAR-01-1096 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OGAR-01-1096 gb|ABR53744.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubent...onia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53745.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensi...s] gb|ABR53746.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53747.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53748.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53749.1| opsin 1 short-wave

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PHAM-01-1260 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PHAM-01-1260 gb|ABR53744.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubent...onia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53745.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensi...s] gb|ABR53746.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53747.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53748.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53749.1| opsin 1 short-wave

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1750 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1750 gb|ABR53744.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubent...onia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53745.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensi...s] gb|ABR53746.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53747.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53748.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53749.1| opsin 1 short-wave

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUR-01-1629 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUR-01-1629 gb|ABR53744.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubent...onia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53745.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensi...s] gb|ABR53746.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53747.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53748.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53749.1| opsin 1 short-wave

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-EEUR-01-0670 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-EEUR-01-0670 gb|ABR53744.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubent...onia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53745.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensi...s] gb|ABR53746.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53747.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53748.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53749.1| opsin 1 short-wave

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RMAC-03-0051 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RMAC-03-0051 gb|ABR53744.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubent...onia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53745.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensi...s] gb|ABR53746.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53747.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53748.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53749.1| opsin 1 short-wave

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-08-0043 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-08-0043 gb|ABR53744.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubent...onia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53745.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensi...s] gb|ABR53746.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53747.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53748.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53749.1| opsin 1 short-wave

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-08-0066 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-08-0066 gb|ABR53744.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubent...onia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53745.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensi...s] gb|ABR53746.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53747.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53748.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53749.1| opsin 1 short-wave

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PVAM-01-1068 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PVAM-01-1068 gb|ABR53744.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubent...onia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53745.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensi...s] gb|ABR53746.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53747.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53748.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53749.1| opsin 1 short-wave

  14. Gene : CBRC-CELE-02-0099 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eptor, class O (opsin) family member (sro-1) [Caenorhabditis elegans] gb|AAB93339.2| Serpentine receptor, cl...ine Receptor, class O (opsin) family member (sro-1) (sro-1) mRNA, complete cds /c

  15. GPCR Interaction: 376 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Vertebrate short wavelength opsin by using the SCD with th...e alignment provided in GPCRDB A Rhodopsin Vertebrate Vertebrate short wavelength opsin Vertebrate short wave

  16. Evidence for distributed light sensing in the skin of cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis

    OpenAIRE

    Mäthger, Lydia M.; Roberts, Steven B.; Hanlon, Roger T.

    2010-01-01

    We report that the skin of cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, contains opsin transcripts suggesting a possible role of distributed light sensing for dynamic camouflage and signalling. The mRNA coding for opsin from various body regions was amplified and sequenced, and gene expression was detected in fin and ventral skin samples. The amino acid sequence of the opsin polypeptide that these transcripts would produce was identical in retina and fin tissue samples, but the ventral skin opsin transcrip...

  17. Gene : CBRC-DSIM-04-0021 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DSIM-04-0021 3R A Opsins OPS1_DROME 0.0 98% ref|NP_524407.1| neither inactivat...toreceptor cells opsin) (Neither inactivation nor afterpotential E protein) gb|AAA28733.1| opsin gb|AAF55712

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGAL-06-0012 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGAL-06-0012 ref|NP_571661.1| vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] dbj|...BAA94288.1| VAL-opsin [Danio rerio] gb|AAI28816.1| Vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] NP_571661.1 1e-139 67% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-3175 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-3175 ref|NP_571661.1| vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] dbj|...BAA94288.1| VAL-opsin [Danio rerio] gb|AAI28816.1| Vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] NP_571661.1 1e-127 72% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OLAT-15-0001 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OLAT-15-0001 ref|NP_571661.1| vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] dbj|...BAA94288.1| VAL-opsin [Danio rerio] gb|AAI28816.1| Vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] NP_571661.1 2e-81 75% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-1114 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-1114 ref|NP_571661.1| vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] dbj|...BAA94288.1| VAL-opsin [Danio rerio] gb|AAI28816.1| Vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] NP_571661.1 1e-66 42% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TNIG-22-0312 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TNIG-22-0312 ref|NP_571661.1| vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] dbj|...BAA94288.1| VAL-opsin [Danio rerio] gb|AAI28816.1| Vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] NP_571661.1 5e-80 72% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0327 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0327 ref|NP_571661.1| vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] dbj|...BAA94288.1| VAL-opsin [Danio rerio] gb|AAI28816.1| Vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] NP_571661.1 5e-85 66% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GACU-06-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GACU-06-0002 ref|NP_571661.1| vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] dbj|...BAA94288.1| VAL-opsin [Danio rerio] gb|AAI28816.1| Vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] NP_571661.1 1e-154 70% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TGUT-09-0018 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TGUT-09-0018 ref|NP_571661.1| vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] dbj|...BAA94288.1| VAL-opsin [Danio rerio] gb|AAI28816.1| Vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] NP_571661.1 1e-138 66% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-26-0241 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-26-0241 ref|NP_571661.1| vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] dbj|...BAA94288.1| VAL-opsin [Danio rerio] gb|AAI28816.1| Vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] NP_571661.1 1e-174 100% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FRUB-02-0014 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FRUB-02-0014 ref|NP_571661.1| vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] dbj|...BAA94288.1| VAL-opsin [Danio rerio] gb|AAI28816.1| Vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] NP_571661.1 3e-66 39% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FRUB-02-0223 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FRUB-02-0223 ref|NP_571661.1| vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] dbj|...BAA94288.1| VAL-opsin [Danio rerio] gb|AAI28816.1| Vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] NP_571661.1 1e-154 68% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-12-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-12-0035 ref|NP_571661.1| vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] dbj|...BAA94288.1| VAL-opsin [Danio rerio] gb|AAI28816.1| Vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] NP_571661.1 1e-152 68% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0797 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0797 ref|NP_571661.1| vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] dbj|...BAA94288.1| VAL-opsin [Danio rerio] gb|AAI28816.1| Vertebrate ancient long opsin [Danio rerio] NP_571661.1 1e-146 68% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DMEL-03-0055 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DMEL-03-0055 ref|XP_001653866.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] gb|ABF18478.1| ultraviolet...-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT38511.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] XP_001653866.1 2e-60 35% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DYAK-03-0062 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DYAK-03-0062 ref|XP_001653866.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] gb|ABF18478.1| ultraviolet...-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT38511.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] XP_001653866.1 3e-60 35% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DSIM-03-0050 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DSIM-03-0050 ref|XP_001653866.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] gb|ABF18478.1| ultraviolet...-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT38511.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] XP_001653866.1 3e-60 35% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0040 ref|XP_001653866.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] gb|ABF18478.1| ultraviolet...-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT38511.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] XP_001653866.1 1e-178 80% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0100 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0100 ref|XP_001653866.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] gb|ABF18478.1| ultraviolet...-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] gb|EAT38511.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Aedes aegypti] XP_001653866.1 2e-60 37% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1895 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-1895 ref|NP_990848.1| blue sensitive cone opsin [Gallus gallus] sp|P28...682|OPSB_CHICK Blue-sensitive opsin (Blue cone photoreceptor pigment) gb|AAA48633.1| blue sensitive cone opsin NP_990848.1 1e-170 78% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MLUC-01-1042 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MLUC-01-1042 sp|Q63652|OPSB_RAT RecName: Full=Blue-sensitive opsin; Short=BOP;... AltName: Full=Blue cone photoreceptor pigment; AltName: Full=Short wavelength-sensitive cone opsin; Short=S opsin Q63652 0.0 91% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PVAM-01-1068 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PVAM-01-1068 sp|Q63652|OPSB_RAT RecName: Full=Blue-sensitive opsin; Short=BOP;... AltName: Full=Blue cone photoreceptor pigment; AltName: Full=Short wavelength-sensitive cone opsin; Short=S opsin Q63652 0.0 90% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FRUB-02-0290 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AAV93315.1| putative red sensitive visual pigment [Lithochromis sp. 'orange'] dbj|BAF33689.1| long wave...length-sensitive opsin [Neochromis omnicaeruleus] dbj|BAF33690.1| long wavelength-sens...itive opsin [Neochromis omnicaeruleus] dbj|BAF33691.1| long wavelength-sensitive opsin [Neochromis omnicaeru...leus] dbj|BAF33692.1| long wavelength-sensitive opsin [Neochromis omnicaeruleus] dbj|BAF33693.1| long wave...length-sensitive opsin [Neochromis omnicaeruleus] dbj|BAF33694.1| long wavelength-s

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TNIG-11-0029 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AAV93315.1| putative red sensitive visual pigment [Lithochromis sp. 'orange'] dbj|BAF33689.1| long wave...length-sensitive opsin [Neochromis omnicaeruleus] dbj|BAF33690.1| long wavelength-sens...itive opsin [Neochromis omnicaeruleus] dbj|BAF33691.1| long wavelength-sensitive opsin [Neochromis omnicaeru...leus] dbj|BAF33692.1| long wavelength-sensitive opsin [Neochromis omnicaeruleus] dbj|BAF33693.1| long wave...length-sensitive opsin [Neochromis omnicaeruleus] dbj|BAF33694.1| long wavelength-s

  1. Differences in alarm events between disposable and reusable electrocardiography lead wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nancy M; Murray, Terri; Bena, James F; Slifcak, Ellen; Roach, Joel D; Spence, Jackie; Burkle, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Disposable electrocardiographic lead wires (ECG-LWs) may not be as durable as reusable ones. To examine differences in alarm events between disposable and reusable ECG-LWs. Two cardiac telemetry units were randomized to reusable ECG-LWs, and 2 units alternated between disposable and reusable ECG-LWs for 4 months. A remote monitoring team, blinded to ECG-LW type, assessed frequency and type of alarm events by using total counts and rates per 100 patient days. Event rates were compared by using generalized linear mixed-effect models for differences and noninferiority between wire types. In 1611 patients and 9385.5 patient days of ECG monitoring, patient characteristics were similar between groups. Rates of alarms for no telemetry, leads fail, or leads off were lower in disposable ECG-LWs (adjusted relative risk [95% CI], 0.71 [0.53-0.96]; noninferiority P monitoring (artifact) alarms were significantly noninferior (adjusted relative risk [95% CI]: 0.88, [0.62-1.24], P = .02; superiority P = .44). No between-group differences existed in false or true crisis alarms. Disposable ECG-LWs were noninferior to reusable ECG-LWs for all false-alarm events (N [rate per 100 patient days], disposable 2029 [79.1] vs reusable 6673 [97.9]; adjusted relative risk [95% CI]: 0.81 [0.63-1.06], P = .002; superiority P = .12.) Disposable ECG-LWs with patented push-button design had superior performance in reducing alarms created by no telemetry, leads fail, or leads off and significant noninferiority in all false-alarm rates compared with reusable ECG-LWs. Fewer ECG alarms may save nurses time, decrease alarm fatigue, and improve patient safety. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  2. Molecular Evidence that Only Two Opsin Subfamilies, the Blue Light- (SWS2) and Green Light-Sensitive (RH2), Drive Color Vision in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua): e115436

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ragnhild Valen; Rolf Brudvik Edvardsen; Anne Mette Søviknes; Øyvind Drivenes; Jon Vidar Helvik

    2014-01-01

    ... spectra representing UV and red light. Furthermore, we find that Atlantic cod has duplicated paralogs of both blue-sensitive SWS2 and green-sensitive RH2 subfamilies, with members belonging to each subfamily linked in tandem within the genome...

  3. Langmuir wave filamentation in the kinetic regime. II. Weak and strong pumping of nonlinear electron plasma waves as the route to filamentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silantyev, Denis A.; Lushnikov, Pavel M.; Rose, Harvey A.

    2017-04-01

    We consider two kinds of pumped Langmuir waves (LWs) in the kinetic regime, k λ D ≳ 0.2 , where k is the LW wavenumber and λD is the Debye length, driven to finite amplitude by a coherent external potential whose amplitude is either weak or strong. These dynamically prepared nonlinear LWs develop a transverse (filamentation) instability whose nonlinear evolution destroys the LW's transverse coherence. Instability growth rates in the weakly pumped regime are the same as those of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal modes considered in Part I (D. A. Silantyev et al., Phys. Plasmas 24, 042104 (2017)), while strongly pumped LWs have higher filamentation grow rates.

  4. Using 2-D arrays for sensing multimodal Lamb waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engholm, Marcus; Stepinski, Tadeusz

    2010-04-01

    Monitoring structural integrity of large planar structures requires normally a relatively dense network of uniformly distributed ultrasonic sensors. A 2-D ultrasonic phased array with all azimuth angle coverage would be extremely useful for the structural health monitoring (SHM) of such structures. Known techniques for estimating direction of arriving (DOA) waves cannot efficiently cope with dispersive and multimodal Lamb waves (LWs). In the paper we propose an adaptive spectral estimation technique capable of handling broadband LWs sensed by 2-D arrays, the modified Capon method. Performance of the technique is evaluated using simulated multiple-mode LWs, and verified using experimental data.

  5. Langmuir wave filamentation in the kinetic regime. II. Weak and Strong Pumping of Nonlinear Electron Plasma Waves as the Route to Filamentation

    CERN Document Server

    Silantyev, Denis A; Rose, Harvey A

    2016-01-01

    We consider two kinds of pumped Langmuir waves (LWs) in the kinetic regime, $k\\lambda_D\\gtrsim0.2,$ where $k$ is the LW wavenumber and $\\lambda_D$ is the Debye length. They are driven to finite amplitude by a coherent external potential whose amplitude is either weak or strong. These dynamically prepared nonlinear LWs develop a transverse (filamentation) instability whose nonlinear evolution destroys the LW's transverse coherence. Instability growth rates in the weakly pumped regime are the same as those of BGK modes considered in Part I, while strongly pumped LWs have higher filamentation grow rates.

  6. TARGETED RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY WITHIN NASA'S LIVING WITH A STAR PROGRAM.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosling, J. T.; Antiochos, Spiro; Baker, Kile; Bellaire, Paul; Blake, Bern; Crowley, Geoff; Eddy, Jack; Goodrich, Charles; Gopalswamy, Nat; Hesse, Michael; Hurlburt, Neal; Jackman, Charles; Kozyra, Janet; Labonte, Barry; Lean, Judith; Linker, Jon; Mazur, Joe; Onsager, Terry; Sibeck, David

    2003-07-10

    NASA’s Living With a Star (LWS) initiative is a systematic, goal-oriented research program targeting those aspects of the Sun-Earth system that affect society. The Targeted Research and Technology (TR&T) component of LWS provides the theory, modeling, and data analysis necessary to enable an integrated, system-wide picture of Sun-Earth connection science with societal relevance. Recognizing the central and essential role that TR&T would have for the success of the LWS initiative, the LWS Science Architecture Team (SAT) recommended that a Science Definition Team (SDT), with the same status as a flight mission definition team, be formed to design and coordinate a TR&T program having prioritized goals and objectives that focused on practical societal benefits. This report details the SDT recommendations for the TR&T program.

  7. Phenotypic variation and genetic heterogeneity in Léri-Weill syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schiller, S; Spranger, S; Schechinger, B; Fukami, M; Merker, S; Drop, S L; Tröger, J; Knoblauch, H; Kunze, J; Seidel, J; Rappold, G A

    2000-01-01

    Léri-Weill syndrome (LWS) or dyschondrosteosis represents a short stature syndrome characterised by the mesomelic shortening of the forearms and lower legs and by bilateral Madelung deformity of the wrists...

  8. Comparative visual ecology of cephalopods from different habitats

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Wen-Sung; Marshall, N. Justin

    2016-01-01

    Previous investigations of vision and visual pigment evolution in aquatic predators have focused on fish and crustaceans, generally ignoring the cephalopods. Since the first cephalopod opsin was sequenced in late 1980s, we now have data on over 50 cephalopod opsins, prompting this functional and phylogenetic examination. Much of this data does not specifically examine the visual pigment spectral absorbance position (λ max) relative to environment or lifestyle, and cephalopod opsin functional ...

  9. Gene : CBRC-CJAC-01-0050 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0050 UN A Opsins OPSL_CALJA 0.0 100% gb|AAC25654.1| X-linked visual pi...gment protein P561 [Callithrix jacchus] dbj|BAB58962.1| P561 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] dbj|BAB58966.1|... P561 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] 0.0 100% MGKAGGTEPIAKARAVGRRGGGEGGGPDGTGRGPFEGPNYHIAPRWVYHLTSVWMLFVVVA

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OLAT-26-0097 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OLAT-26-0097 gb|AAF05731.1| putative ultraviolet sensitive opsin [Dimidiochrom...is compressiceps] gb|AAF05733.1| putative ultraviolet sensitive opsin [Metriaclima zebra] gb|AAF05734.1| putative ultraviolet... sensitive opsin [Labeotropheus fuelleborni] gb|AAZ53204.1| putative ultraviolet sensitive visual pigment [Tramitichromis intermedius] AAF05731.1 1e-171 85% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OLAT-05-0026 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OLAT-05-0026 gb|AAF63529.1|AF247118_1 putative blue sensitive opsin SWS-2B [Me...triaclima zebra] gb|AAF63530.1|AF247119_1 putative blue sensitive opsin SWS-2B [Labeotropheus fuelleborni] g...b|AAK06661.1|AF317674_1 putative blue sensitive opsin SWS-2B [Metriaclima zebra] AAF63529.1 1e-176 82% ...

  12. Developmental dynamics of cone photoreceptors in the eel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semo Ma'ayan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many fish alter their expressed visual pigments during development. The number of retinal opsins expressed and their type is normally related to the environment in which they live. Eels are known to change the expression of their rod opsins as they mature, but might they also change the expression of their cone opsins? Results The Rh2 and Sws2 opsin sequences from the European Eel were isolated, sequenced and expressed in vitro for an accurate measurement of their λmax values. In situ hybridisation revealed that glass eels express only rh2 opsin in their cone photoreceptors, while larger yellow eels continue to express rh2 opsin in the majority of their cones, but also have Conclusions Larger yellow and silver European eels express two different cone opsins, rh2 and sws2. This work demonstrates that only the Rh2 cone opsin is present in younger fish (smaller yellow and glass, the sws2 opsin being expressed additionally only by older fish and only in

  13. Bat eyes have ultraviolet-sensitive cone photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Müller

    Full Text Available Mammalian retinae have rod photoreceptors for night vision and cone photoreceptors for daylight and colour vision. For colour discrimination, most mammals possess two cone populations with two visual pigments (opsins that have absorption maxima at short wavelengths (blue or ultraviolet light and long wavelengths (green or red light. Microchiropteran bats, which use echolocation to navigate and forage in complete darkness, have long been considered to have pure rod retinae. Here we use opsin immunohistochemistry to show that two phyllostomid microbats, Glossophaga soricina and Carollia perspicillata, possess a significant population of cones and express two cone opsins, a shortwave-sensitive (S opsin and a longwave-sensitive (L opsin. A substantial population of cones expresses S opsin exclusively, whereas the other cones mostly coexpress L and S opsin. S opsin gene analysis suggests ultraviolet (UV, wavelengths <400 nm sensitivity, and corneal electroretinogram recordings reveal an elevated sensitivity to UV light which is mediated by an S cone visual pigment. Therefore bats have retained the ancestral UV tuning of the S cone pigment. We conclude that bats have the prerequisite for daylight vision, dichromatic colour vision, and UV vision. For bats, the UV-sensitive cones may be advantageous for visual orientation at twilight, predator avoidance, and detection of UV-reflecting flowers for those that feed on nectar.

  14. Evolution and Mechanism of Spectral Tuning of Blue-Absorbing Visual Pigments in Butterflies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakakuwa, Motohiro; Terakita, Akihisa; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Stavenga, Doekele G.; Shichida, Yoshinori; Arikawa, Kentaro; Warrant, Eric James

    2010-01-01

    The eyes of flower-visiting butterflies are often spectrally highly complex with multiple opsin genes generated by gene duplication, providing an interesting system for a comparative study of color vision. The Small White butterfly, Pieris rapae, has duplicated blue opsins, PrB and PrV, which are

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DSIM-04-0021 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DSIM-04-0021 ref|NP_524407.1| neither inactivation nor afterpotential E CG4550...-PA [Drosophila melanogaster] sp|P06002|OPS1_DROME Opsin Rh1 (Outer R1-R6 photoreceptor cells opsin) (Neithe

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DMEL-04-0054 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DMEL-04-0054 ref|NP_524407.1| neither inactivation nor afterpotential E CG4550...-PA [Drosophila melanogaster] sp|P06002|OPS1_DROME Opsin Rh1 (Outer R1-R6 photoreceptor cells opsin) (Neithe

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DYAK-04-0015 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DYAK-04-0015 ref|NP_524407.1| neither inactivation nor afterpotential E CG4550...-PA [Drosophila melanogaster] sp|P06002|OPS1_DROME Opsin Rh1 (Outer R1-R6 photoreceptor cells opsin) (Neithe

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TBEL-01-2598 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TBEL-01-2598 gb|AAC25655.1| X-linked visual pigment protein P556 [Callithrix j...acchus] dbj|BAB58963.1| P553 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] dbj|BAB58967.1| P553 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] AAC25655.1 0.0 91% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OGAR-01-0185 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OGAR-01-0185 gb|AAC25656.1| X-linked visual pigment protein P543 [Callithrix j...acchus] dbj|BAB58964.1| P539 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] dbj|BAB58968.1| P539 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] AAC25656.1 1e-140 71% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TBEL-01-2598 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TBEL-01-2598 gb|AAC25656.1| X-linked visual pigment protein P543 [Callithrix j...acchus] dbj|BAB58964.1| P539 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] dbj|BAB58968.1| P539 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] AAC25656.1 0.0 92% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-23-0071 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-23-0071 gb|AAC25654.1| X-linked visual pigment protein P561 [Callithrix j...acchus] dbj|BAB58962.1| P561 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] dbj|BAB58966.1| P561 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] AAC25654.1 0.0 96% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0050 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0050 gb|AAC25655.1| X-linked visual pigment protein P556 [Callithrix j...acchus] dbj|BAB58963.1| P553 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] dbj|BAB58967.1| P553 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] AAC25655.1 0.0 98% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-23-0072 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-23-0072 gb|AAC25656.1| X-linked visual pigment protein P543 [Callithrix j...acchus] dbj|BAB58964.1| P539 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] dbj|BAB58968.1| P539 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] AAC25656.1 0.0 95% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-24-0050 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-24-0050 gb|AAC25654.1| X-linked visual pigment protein P561 [Callithrix j...acchus] dbj|BAB58962.1| P561 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] dbj|BAB58966.1| P561 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] AAC25654.1 0.0 96% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0050 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0050 gb|AAC25654.1| X-linked visual pigment protein P561 [Callithrix j...acchus] dbj|BAB58962.1| P561 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] dbj|BAB58966.1| P561 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] AAC25654.1 0.0 100% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-1263 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PCAP-01-1263 gb|AAC25656.1| X-linked visual pigment protein P543 [Callithrix j...acchus] dbj|BAB58964.1| P539 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] dbj|BAB58968.1| P539 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] AAC25656.1 0.0 90% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-23-0073 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-23-0073 gb|AAC25656.1| X-linked visual pigment protein P543 [Callithrix j...acchus] dbj|BAB58964.1| P539 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] dbj|BAB58968.1| P539 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] AAC25656.1 0.0 95% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGOR-01-0729 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGOR-01-0729 gb|AAC25656.1| X-linked visual pigment protein P543 [Callithrix j...acchus] dbj|BAB58964.1| P539 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] dbj|BAB58968.1| P539 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] AAC25656.1 1e-171 82% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-24-0067 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-24-0067 gb|AAC25656.1| X-linked visual pigment protein P543 [Callithrix j...acchus] dbj|BAB58964.1| P539 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] dbj|BAB58968.1| P539 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] AAC25656.1 1e-127 90% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RMAC-21-0052 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RMAC-21-0052 gb|AAC25654.1| X-linked visual pigment protein P561 [Callithrix j...acchus] dbj|BAB58962.1| P561 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] dbj|BAB58966.1| P561 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] AAC25654.1 1e-174 82% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0050 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0050 gb|AAC25656.1| X-linked visual pigment protein P543 [Callithrix j...acchus] dbj|BAB58964.1| P539 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] dbj|BAB58968.1| P539 cone opsin [Callithrix jacchus] AAC25656.1 0.0 97% ...

  12. Evolution and Mechanism of Spectral Tuning of Blue-Absorbing Visual Pigments in Butterflies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakakuwa, Motohiro; Terakita, Akihisa; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Stavenga, Doekele G.; Shichida, Yoshinori; Arikawa, Kentaro; Warrant, Eric James

    2010-01-01

    The eyes of flower-visiting butterflies are often spectrally highly complex with multiple opsin genes generated by gene duplication, providing an interesting system for a comparative study of color vision. The Small White butterfly, Pieris rapae, has duplicated blue opsins, PrB and PrV, which are ex

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DSIM-03-0050 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DSIM-03-0050 ref|NP_001011605.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Apis mellifera] ...sp|O61303|OPSUV_APIME Opsin, ultraviolet-sensitive (AMUVOP) (BUVOPS) gb|AAC13418.1| ultraviolet-sensitive op

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DMEL-03-0055 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DMEL-03-0055 ref|NP_001011605.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Apis mellifera] ...sp|O61303|OPSUV_APIME Opsin, ultraviolet-sensitive (AMUVOP) (BUVOPS) gb|AAC13418.1| ultraviolet-sensitive op

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DYAK-03-0062 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DYAK-03-0062 ref|NP_001011605.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Apis mellifera] ...sp|O61303|OPSUV_APIME Opsin, ultraviolet-sensitive (AMUVOP) (BUVOPS) gb|AAC13418.1| ultraviolet-sensitive op

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0040 ref|NP_001011605.1| ultraviolet-sensitive opsin [Apis mellifera] ...sp|O61303|OPSUV_APIME Opsin, ultraviolet-sensitive (AMUVOP) (BUVOPS) gb|AAC13418.1| ultraviolet-sensitive op

  17. AcEST: DK951622 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available inding protein, cytoplasmic ... 33 1.3 sp|P35358|OPSG_GECGE Green-sensitive opsin P521 OS=Gecko gecko P... 3...---RGPVPAQGRP 544 >sp|P35358|OPSG_GECGE Green-sensitive opsin P521 OS=Gecko gecko PE=1 SV=1 Length = 365 Sco

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GACU-17-0024 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GACU-17-0024 gb|AAF63524.1|AF247113_1 putative blue sensitive opsin SWS-2A [Di...midiochromis compressiceps] gb|AAF63540.1|AF247129_1 putative blue sensitive opsin SWS-2A [Dimidiochromis compressiceps] AAF63524.1 3e-56 54% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0202 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0202 dbj|BAF33699.1| long wavelength-sensitive opsin [Neochromis green...woodi] dbj|BAF33706.1| long wavelength-sensitive opsin [Neochromis greenwoodi] BAF33699.1 2e-45 82% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GACU-17-0025 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GACU-17-0025 dbj|BAF33699.1| long wavelength-sensitive opsin [Neochromis green...woodi] dbj|BAF33706.1| long wavelength-sensitive opsin [Neochromis greenwoodi] BAF33699.1 0.0 92% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0490 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0490 dbj|BAC21728.1| long wavelength-sensitive opsin [Yssichromis pyrr...hocephalus] dbj|BAC21729.1| long wavelength-sensitive opsin [Yssichromis pyrrhocephalus] BAC21728.1 4e-36 87% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TNIG-11-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TNIG-11-0028 gb|AAF63529.1|AF247118_1 putative blue sensitive opsin SWS-2B [Metriaclima...b|AAK06661.1|AF317674_1 putative blue sensitive opsin SWS-2B [Metriaclima zebra] AAF63529.1 1e-166 78% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FRUB-02-0289 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FRUB-02-0289 gb|AAF63529.1|AF247118_1 putative blue sensitive opsin SWS-2B [Metriaclima...b|AAK06661.1|AF317674_1 putative blue sensitive opsin SWS-2B [Metriaclima zebra] AAF63529.1 1e-168 79% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGAL-26-0008 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGAL-26-0008 ref|NP_990821.1| rhodopsin [Gallus gallus] sp|P28683|OPSG_CHICK Green-sensitive opsin (Gre...en cone photoreceptor pigment) gb|AAA48786.1| green sensitive cone opsin gb|AAA49036.1| PRA1 NP_990821.1 0.0 100% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TGUT-29-0011 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TGUT-29-0011 ref|NP_990821.1| rhodopsin [Gallus gallus] sp|P28683|OPSG_CHICK Green-sensitive opsin (Gre...en cone photoreceptor pigment) gb|AAA48786.1| green sensitive cone opsin gb|AAA49036.1| PRA1 NP_990821.1 0.0 95% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0922 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0922 ref|NP_990821.1| rhodopsin [Gallus gallus] sp|P28683|OPSG_CHICK Green-sensitive opsin (Gre...en cone photoreceptor pigment) gb|AAA48786.1| green sensitive cone opsin gb|AAA49036.1| PRA1 NP_990821.1 0.0 92% ...

  7. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia associations with gene expression changes in liver and hypothalamus of chickens from lines selected for low or high body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Brittany B; Zhang, Wei; Bai, Shiping; Siegel, Paul B; Cline, Mark A; Gilbert, Elizabeth R

    2014-11-01

    Chickens selected for low (LWS) or high (HWS) body weight for more than 56 generations now have a 10-fold difference in body weight at 56 days of age and correlated responses in appetite and glucose regulation. The LWS chickens are lean and some are anorexic, while the HWS are compulsive feeders and have a different threshold sensitivity of food intake and blood glucose to both central and peripheral insulin, respectively. We previously demonstrated that at 90-days of age, insulin-induced hypoglycemia was associated with reduced glucose transporter expression in the liver of both lines, and differences in expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and NPY receptor sub-type genes between LWS and HWS in the hypothalamus. The objective of this study was to determine effects of insulin-induced hypoglycemia on gene expression in the hypothalamus and liver of early post-hatch LWS and HWS chicks. On day 5 post-hatch chicks from each line were fasted for 3h and injected intraperitoneally with insulin or vehicle. At 1h post-injection, chicks were euthanized, blood glucose was measured, and hypothalamus and liver were removed. Total RNA was isolated and real time PCR performed. Insulin injection was associated with a more pronounced reduction in blood glucose in HWS compared with LWS chicks (two-way interaction; Phypothalamus (Phypothalamus of HWS than LWS (Phypothalamus of both lines (P=0.02). In the liver of both lines, insulin treatment was associated with decreased (P=0.01) GLUT2 mRNA and increased (P=0.01) GLUT1 mRNA, compared to vehicle-treated chicks. Results suggest that NPY-associated factors and glucose transporters are differentially-expressed between LWS and HWS chickens and that HWS chicks display greater sensitivity to exogenous insulin during the early post-hatch period. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evolution under pressure and the adaptation of visual pigment compressibility in deep-sea environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Megan L; Roberts, Nicholas W; Partridge, Julian C

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the link between how proteins function in animals that live in extreme environments and selection on specific properties of amino acids has proved extremely challenging. Here we present the discovery of how the compressibility of opsin proteins in two evolutionarily distinct animal groups, teleosts and cephalopods, appears to be adapted to the high-pressure environment of the deep-sea. We report how in both groups, opsins in deeper living species are calculated to be less compressible. This is largely due to a common set of amino acid sites (bovRH# 159, 196, 213, 275) undergoing positive destabilizing selection in six of the twelve amino acid physiochemical properties that determine protein compressibility. This suggests a common evolutionary mechanism to reduce the adiabatic compressibility of opsin proteins. Intriguingly, the sites under selection are on the proteins' outer faces at locations known to be involved in opsin-opsin dimer interactions.

  9. Living With a Star, the Geospace Mission Definition Team and Aeronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, Paul M., Jr.; Meier, R. R.; Spann, Jim; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To gain an understanding of the Sun-Earth system, including how and why the sun varies, how the earth responds, and the impacts on humanity, research is needed that has a integrated and systematic approach. The Living With a Star (LWS) program represents an important element in this regard both to continued progress in space science in general and in Aeronomy in particular. A fundamental question in Aeronomy is how the variable sun affects the ionosphere, thermosphere, and mesosphere. The LWS program focuses on those areas of scientific understanding that promote progress in areas that have human impact and can be investigated with space borne instruments. The Geospace Mission Definition Team is charged with investigating the science priorities identified by the LWS Science Architecture Team and developing an approach to making the necessary measurements in concert with other missions and programs. An important aspect of this approach is that all LWS measurement programs are operating simultaneously for several years. We will review some of the areas that the LWS SAT have emphasized in Aeronomy, including understanding the effects of solar variability on ionospheric density and irregularities, the effects of solar variability on the mass density of the atmosphere at LEO altitudes, and the effects of solar variability on near-surface temperatures and on ozone distribution.

  10. Dichromatic vision in a fruit bat with diurnal proclivities: the Samoan flying fox (Pteropus samoensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Amanda D; Danosi, Christina F; McCracken, Gary F; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2014-12-01

    A nocturnal bottleneck during mammalian evolution left a majority of species with two cone opsins, or dichromatic color vision. Primate trichromatic vision arose from the duplication and divergence of an X-linked opsin gene, and is long attributed to tandem shifts from nocturnality to diurnality and from insectivory to frugivory. Opsin gene variation and at least one duplication event exist in the order Chiroptera, suggesting that trichromatic vision could evolve under favorable ecological conditions. The natural history of the Samoan flying fox (Pteropus samoensis) meets these conditions--it is a large bat that consumes nectar and fruit and demonstrates strong diurnal proclivities. It also possesses a visual system that is strikingly similar to that of primates. To explore the potential for opsin gene duplication and divergence in this species, we sequenced the opsin genes of 11 individuals (19 X-chromosomes) from three South Pacific islands. Our results indicate the uniform presence of two opsins with predicted peak sensitivities of ca. 360 and 553 nm. This result fails to support a causal link between diurnal frugivory and trichromatic vision, although it remains plausible that the diurnal activities of P. samoensis have insufficient antiquity to favor opsin gene renovation.

  11. Modulation of propagation-invariant Localized Waves for FSO communication systems

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    The novel concept of spatio-Temporal modulation of Nyquist pulses is introduced, and the resulting wave-packets are termed Nyquist Localized Waves (LWs). Ideal Nyquist LWs belong to the generic family of LW solutions and can propagate indefinitely in unbounded media without attenuation or chromatic dispersion. The possibility of modulating Nyquist LWs for free-space optical (FSO) communication systems is demonstrated using two different modulation techniques. The first technique is on-off keying (OOK) with alternate mark inversion (AMI) coding for 1-bit per symbol transmission, and the second one is 16-Ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) for 4-bits per symbol transmission. Aspects related to the performance, detection and generation of the spatio-Temporally coupled wave-packets are discussed and future research directions are outlined. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  12. Experimental comparison of 2D arrays topologies for SHM of planar structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrozinski, Lukasz; Packo, Pawel; Stepinski, Tadeusz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2012-04-01

    In this paper we present a new methodology for theoretical, numerical and experimental investigations of various 2D arrays' topologies. The theoretical evaluation is performed using frequency-dependent structure transfer function that affects propagation of Lamb waves (LWs) through the dispersive medium and enables investigation of the arrays' performance for a defined excitation signal. The numerical simulations are conducted using local interaction simulation approach (LISA) implemented on the NVIDIA R CUDA R graphical processing unit (GPU), which considerably accelerates 3D simulations of LWs propagation in a short time period. Finally, scanning laser vibrometer is used to sense the LWs excited by PZT transducers, in multiple points corresponding to the locations of the 2D array elements. In this way performance of various array architectures in the reception mode can be evaluated experimentally without the need of physical prototype - a change of topology requires only straightforward modification of the measurement points' distribution at the tested plate.

  13. Tunable interdigital transducers made of piezoelectric macro-fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mańka, Michał; Martowicz, Adam; Rosiek, Mateusz; Stepinski, Tadeusz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2016-11-01

    The number of applications of Lamb waves (LWs) based structural health monitoring (SHM) has significantly increased in recent decades. The growth of interest results from several advantages of this diagnostic technique, that is, considerable mode selectivity and directivity that allow for the assessment of the technical condition of a monitored structure. Successful applications of LWs in the field of SHM stimulate continuous improvement of the transducers’ design to enable capturing more reliable diagnostic data. The paper introduces a new type of transducer that may be used in the LWs based SHM systems, namely tunable-interdigital transducer (T-IDT) based on macro-fiber composites (MFC). The authors provide a short overview on different types of transducers that may be used in SHM applications, followed by a detailed description of the structure of proposed T-IDT. Finally, the results of numerical and experimental tests carried out employing the proposed transducer are discussed and compared to those obtained with a traditional IDT.

  14. Immunolocalization of arthropsin in the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli (Peripatopsidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell Schumann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Opsins are light-sensitive proteins that play a key role in animal vision and are related to the ancient photoreceptive molecule rhodopsin found in unicellular organisms. In general, opsins involved in vision comprise two major groups: the rhabdomeric (r-opsins and the ciliary opsins (c-opsins. The functionality of opsins, which is dependent on their protein structure, may have changed during evolution. In arthropods, typically r-opsins are responsible for vision, whereas in vertebrates c-opsins are components of visual photoreceptors. Recently, an enigmatic r-opsin-like protein called arthropsin has been identified in various bilaterian taxa, including arthropods, lophotrochozoans and chordates, by performing transcriptomic and genomic analyses. Since the role of arthropsin and its distribution within the body are unknown, we immunolocalized this protein in a representative of Onychophora – Euperipatoides rowelli – an ecdysozoan taxon which is regarded as one of the closest relatives of Arthropoda. Our data show that arthropsin is expressed in the central nervous system of E. rowelli, including the brain and the ventral nerve cords, but not in the eyes. These findings are consistent with previous results based on reverse transcription PCR in a closely related onychophoran species and suggest that arthropsin is a non-visual protein. Based on its distribution in the central brain region and the mushroom bodies, we speculate that the onychophoran arthropsin might be either a photosensitive molecule playing a role in the circadian clock, or a non-photosensitive protein involved in olfactory pathways, or both.

  15. Evolution of cichlid vision via trans-regulatory divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Quin Kelly E

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenotypic evolution may occur through mutations that affect either the structure or expression of protein-coding genes. Although the evolution of color vision has historically been attributed to structural mutations within the opsin genes, recent research has shown that opsin regulatory mutations can also tune photoreceptor sensitivity and color vision. Visual sensitivity in African cichlid fishes varies as a result of the differential expression of seven opsin genes. We crossed cichlid species that express different opsin gene sets and scanned their genome for expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL responsible for these differences. Our results shed light on the role that different structural, cis-, and trans-regulatory mutations play in the evolution of color vision. Results We identified 11 eQTL that contribute to the divergent expression of five opsin genes. On three linkage groups, several eQTL formed regulatory “hotspots” associated with the expression of multiple opsins. Importantly, however, the majority of the eQTL we identified (8/11 or 73% occur on linkage groups located trans to the opsin genes, suggesting that cichlid color vision has evolved primarily via trans-regulatory divergence. By modeling the impact of just two of these trans-regulatory eQTL, we show that opsin regulatory mutations can alter cichlid photoreceptor sensitivity and color vision at least as much as opsin structural mutations can. Conclusions Combined with previous work, we demonstrate that the evolution of cichlid color vision results from the interplay of structural, cis-, and especially trans-regulatory loci. Although there are numerous examples of structural and cis-regulatory mutations that contribute to phenotypic evolution, our results suggest that trans-regulatory mutations could contribute to phenotypic divergence more commonly than previously expected, especially in systems like color vision, where compensatory changes in the

  16. Total Land Water Storage Change over 2003 - 2013 Estimated from a Global Mass Budget Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieng, H. B.; Champollion, N.; Cazenave, A.; Wada, Y.; Schrama, E.; Meyssignac, B.

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the total land water storage (LWS) change between 2003 and 2013 using a global water mass budget approach. Hereby we compare the ocean mass change (estimated from GRACE space gravimetry on the one hand, and from the satellite altimetry-based global mean sea level corrected for steric effects on the other hand) to the sum of the main water mass components of the climate system: glaciers, Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets, atmospheric water and LWS (the latter being the unknown quantity to be estimated). For glaciers and ice sheets, we use published estimates of ice mass trends based on various types of observations covering different time spans between 2003 and 2013. From the mass budget equation, we derive a net LWS trend over the study period. The mean trend amounts to +0.30 +/- 0.18 mm/yr in sea level equivalent. This corresponds to a net decrease of -108 +/- 64 cu km/yr in LWS over the 2003-2013 decade. We also estimate the rate of change in LWS and find no significant acceleration over the study period. The computed mean global LWS trend over the study period is shown to be explained mainly by direct anthropogenic effects on land hydrology, i.e. the net effect of groundwater depletion and impoundment of water in man-made reservoirs, and to a lesser extent the effect of naturally-forced land hydrology variability. Our results compare well with independent estimates of human-induced changes in global land hydrology.

  17. A systematic literature review of psychological factors and the development of late whiplash syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Esther; Williams, Mark; Gates, Simon; Lamb, Sarah E

    2008-03-01

    This systematic literature review aims to assess the prognostic value of psychological factors in the development of late whiplash syndrome (LWS). We included prospective cohort studies that provided a baseline measure of at least one psychological variable and used outcome measures relating to LWS (i.e. pain or disability persisting 6 months post injury). A search of electronic databases (Pubmed, Medline, Cinahl, Embase and Psychinfo) up to August 2006 was done using a predetermined search strategy. Methodological quality was assessed independently by two assessors. Data extraction were carried out using a standardised data extraction form. Twenty-five articles representing data from 17 cohorts were included. Fourteen articles were rated as low quality with 11 rated as adequate quality. Meta-analysis was not undertaken due to the heterogeneity of prognostic factors, outcome measures and methods used. Results were tabulated and predefined criterion applied to rate the overall strength of evidence for associations between psychological factors and LWS. Data on 21 possible psychological risk factors were included. The majority of findings were inconclusive. Limited evidence was found to support an association between lower self-efficacy and greater post-traumatic stress with the development of LWS. No association was found between the development of LWS and personality traits, general psychological distress, wellbeing, social support, life control and psychosocial work factors. The lack of conclusive findings and poor methodological quality of the studies reviewed highlights the need for better quality research. Self-efficacy and post-traumatic distress may be associated with the development of LWS but this needs further investigation.

  18. The far-IR spectrum of Sagittarius B2 region: Extended molecular absorption, photodissociation and photoionization

    OpenAIRE

    Goicoechea, J. R.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, N. J.; Cernicharo, J.

    2003-01-01

    We present large scale 9'x 27'(25 pc x 70 pc) far-IR observations around Sgr B2 using the Long-wavelength spectrometer (LWS) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). The spectra are dominated by the strong continuum emission of dust, the widespread molecular absorption of light hydrides (OH, CH and H2O) and the fine structure lines of [NII], [NIII], [OIII], [CII] and [OI]. The molecular richness in the outer layers of Sgr B2 is probed by the ISO-LWS Fabry-Perot (35 km s^-1) detections t...

  19. The Far‐Infrared Spectrum of the Sagittarius B2 Region: Extended Molecular Absorption, Photodissociation, and Photoionization

    OpenAIRE

    Goicoechea, Javier R.; Nemesio J. Rodríguez-Fernández; Cernicharo, José

    2003-01-01

    We present large scale 9'x 27'(25 pc x 70 pc) far-IR observations around Sgr B2 using the Long-wavelength spectrometer (LWS) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). The spectra are dominated by the strong continuum emission of dust, the widespread molecular absorption of light hydrides (OH, CH and H2O) and the fine structure lines of [NII], [NIII], [OIII], [CII] and [OI]. The molecular richness in the outer layers of Sgr B2 is probed by the ISO-LWS Fabry-Perot (35 km s^-1) detections t...

  20. Gene : CBRC-DNOV-01-0624 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available | PREDICTED: similar to neuropsin [Equus caballus] 1e-131 92% XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX...CBRC-DNOV-01-0624 pseudo Novel UN A Opsins OPN5_HUMAN 1e-131 92% ref|XP_001502825.1

  1. Untersuchung der Rolle von Rhodopsin 7 und Cryptochrom im Sehprozess von Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Grebler, Rudi

    2015-01-01

    Ausgangspunkt für die Detektion von Licht ist im gesamten Tierreich die Absorption von Photonen durch photorezeptive Proteine, die sogenannten Opsine und in geringerem Ausmaß die Typ 1 Cryptochrome. Die Taufliege Drosophila melanogaster besitzt sechs eingehend charakterisierte, auch als Rhodopsine bezeichnete Opsine (Rh1-Rh6) und ein Cryptochrom (CRY). Neben den Ocellen und den Hofbauer-Buchner Äuglein werden die Rhodopsine in erster Linie in den Photorezeptorzellen der Komplexaugen, den Haup...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-01-0008 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-01-0008 sp|Q2KNE5|OPN4A_DANRE RecName: Full=Melanopsin-A; AltName: Full=Opsin-4-A; AltName: Full...=Mammalian-like melanopsin; AltName: Full=Melanopsin-M; AltName: Full=Opsin-4M Q2KNE5 1e-169 63% ...

  3. Optogenetik bringer neurale mekanismer frem i lyset og kan blive en ny terapiform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Tobias Melton; Navntoft, Charlotte Amalie Emdal; Christiansen, Søren Hofman;

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emergent technology that combines light-sensitive proteins derived from algae, so-called opsins, with genetics. Viral vectors encoding opsins are injected into selective brain regions whereby specific cell populations can be controlled with high precision light pulses delivered...... via implanted optical fibres. This review focuses on explaining basic principles of optogenetics and describes important insights into neuropsychiatric mechanisms provided by the technology....

  4. Sensory Drive, Color, and Color Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Trevor D

    2017-08-01

    Colors often appear to differ in arbitrary ways among related species. However, a fraction of color diversity may be explained because some signals are more easily perceived in one environment rather than another. Models show that not only signals but also the perception of signals should regularly evolve in response to different environments, whether these primarily involve detection of conspecifics or detection of predators and prey. Thus, a deeper understanding of how perception of color correlates with environmental attributes should help generate more predictive models of color divergence. Here, I briefly review our understanding of color vision in vertebrates. Then I focus on opsin spectral tuning and opsin expression, two traits involved in color perception that have become amenable to study. I ask how opsin tuning is correlated with ecological differences, notably the light environment, and how this potentially affects perception of conspecific colors. Although opsin tuning appears to evolve slowly, opsin expression levels are more evolutionarily labile but have been difficult to connect to color perception. The challenge going forward will be to identify how physiological differences involved in color vision, such as opsin expression levels, translate into perceptual differences, the selection pressures that have driven those differences, and ultimately how this may drive evolution of conspecific colors.

  5. ISO spectroscopy of young intermediate-mass stars in the BD+40 degrees 4124 group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Ancker, ME; Wesselius, PR; Tielens, AGGM

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of ISO SWS and LWS grating scans towards the three brightest members of the BD+40 degrees 4124 group in the infrared: BD+40 degrees 4124 (B2Ve), LkH alpha 224 (A7e) and the embedded source LkH alpha 225. Emission from the pure rotational lines of H(2). from re-vibrational tran

  6. Submm/FIR CO line emission from the disk of the Class I protostar EL 29

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceccarelli, C; Boogert, ACA; Tielens, AGGM; Caux, E; Hogerheijde, MR; Parise, B

    2002-01-01

    We present observations towards the Class I protostar EL 29 of the CO J = 6 --> 5 and J greater than or equal to 15 transitions obtained with JCMT and ISO LWS respectively, and of five H-2 rotational lines obtained with ISO SWS. The simultaneous analysis of these observations reveals the presence of

  7. The contribution of IFSI (Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario) to the ISO project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfei, R.; Baldetti, P.; Ceccarelli, C.; Cerulli, P.; Lorenzetti, D.

    1990-02-01

    IFSI efforts in the development of the long-wavelength spectrometer (LWS) for the IR Space Observatory (ISO), scheduled for launch in 1993, are briefly reviewed. The LWS operates at 45-200 microns with resolution of about 200 (using a grating alone) or about 10,000 (using a grating with one of two Fabry-Perot etalons). Other LWS parameters include FOV 1.5 arcmin, sensitivity 1 x 10 to the -16th W/sq m, and SNR = 10 for a 10-sec high-resolution observation. Particular attention is given to the LWS data-processing unit (DPU), based on an 80C86 CPU and providing telecommand reception at 80 bps, data telemetry at 32,000 bps, detector sampling once every 0.5 msec, control of gratings and etalons, and continuous self-maintenance. Since the orbit of ISO exposes it to the earth radiation belts for about 2 h/day, the DPU is doubled, and the software is completely relocatable. An overview of the software design and a description of the low-noise dc-dc converter are included.

  8. OPUS: Optimal Projection for Uncertain Systems. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    coupled Riccati equations, and shown *Asslstsa Profesor , Department of Mechanial and Asoepece Eng n eing, Flodda Institute of Technolog, Melbourne...discrete-time and sampled- data Related Problems - Solution via Decision Methods," L=E TAO. AC-20, contol lws icludng bth ingl andmultrate568. 1075.coto as

  9. Fermentation of liquid coproducts and liquid compound diets: Part 2. Effects on pH, acid-binding capacity, organic acids and ethanol during a 6-day period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, R.H.J.; Rijnen, M.M.J.A.; Schrama, J.W.; Boer, H.; Peet-Schwering, van der C.M.C.; Hartog, den L.A.; Vesseur, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of a 6-day storage period on changes in pH, acid-binding capacity, level of organic acids and ethanol of three liquid coproducts [liquid wheat starch (LWS), mashed potato steam peel (PSP) and cheese whey (CW)] and two liquid compound diets [liquid grower diet (LGD) and liquid finisher

  10. Low-excitation atomic gas around evolved stars I. ISO observations of C-rich nebulae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fong, D; Meixner, M; Castro-Carrizo, A; Bujarrabal, [No Value; Latter, WB; Tielens, AGGM; Kelly, DM; Sutton, EC

    2001-01-01

    We present ISO LWS and SWS spectra of far-infrared (FIR) atomic fine structure lines in 12 carbon-rich evolved stars including asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe) and planetary nebulae (PNe). The spectra include grating and Fabry-Perot measurements of the line emissio

  11. Low-excitation atomic gas around evolved stars II. ISO observations of O-rich nebulae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro-Carrizo, A; Bujarrabal, [No Value; Fong, D; Meixner, M; Tielens, AGGM; Latter, WB; Barlow, MJ

    2001-01-01

    We have observed atomic fine-structure lines in the far-infrared (FIR) from 12 oxygen-rich evolved stars. The sample is composed of mostly proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe) and some planetary nebulae (PNe) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. ISO LWS and SWS observations of [O I]. [C II], [N II], [

  12. Instream wood in a steep headwater channel: geomorphic significance of large and small wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galia, Tomáš; Šilhán, Karel; Ruiz-Villanueva, Virginia; Tichavský, Radek

    2016-04-01

    Besides the well-known significance of large wood (LW), also small woody pieces (SW; here defined as pieces with dimensions at least 0.5 m length and 0.05 m diameter), can play an important role in steep narrow headwaters. We inventoried instream wood in the 0.4 km long Mazák headwater channel, Moravskoslezské Beskydy Mts, Czech Republic (2Fagus sylvatica L.); only two pieces were Norway spruces (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). First results showed an increase in the number of LWs in channel-reaches confined by the steepest adjacent hillslopes (especially at 0.15-0.20 km). Increasing downstream amount of SW most likely reflected transport processes in the stream, and the later deposition of SWs on the lowest channel gradients. Also LWs and SWs in the downstream channel-reaches were more decayed than wood presented in the upper reaches. The orientation of instream wood was connected with its length and stability, and LWs longer than 5 m were usually attached to adjacent hillslopes. Pieces longer than 2 m, which were unattached or were somehow stabilized in the channel bed, had often orientation of 0° or 337°. LWs were mostly unattached in the upstream channel-reaches, while often stabilized by adjacent hillslopes in the middle part. At 0.05-0.10 km, there were also many logs stabilized by bed sediments. By contrast, SWs were mostly unattached in the whole longitudinal profile. We observed higher % of influenced channel width by SWs than LWs. Also, SWs were usually entirely located in the channel, which was significantly different when compared to LWs. Nine small steps (step height ~0.5 m) were created by instream wood; six of them were formed by SWs. Dendrogeomorphic cross dating supported the observed decay status for LW/SW within the longitudinal profile: at the lowest channel gradients with wider higher active channels, the potential for storage of instream wood increased. In these downstream reaches we observed older LW and SW, with pieces from the 1960s and 1970s

  13. A cluster randomized trial to evaluate a health education programme "Living with Sun at School".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho-Garnier, Hélène; Pereira, Bruno; Césarini, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    Over-exposure to sunlight increases the risk of skin cancers, particularly when exposure occurs during childhood. School teachers can play an active role in providing an education programme that can help prevent this. "Living with the Sun," (LWS) is a sun safety education program for school children based on a handy guide for classroom activities designed to improve children's knowledge, but moreover to positively modify their sun safety attitudes and behaviours. The goal of our study was to determine the effectiveness of this programme by examining children's knowledge, attitude and sun exposure behaviours prior to and after the completion of the programme. We carried out a cluster randomised trial in which the classes were randomly assigned to one of two groups; one using the LWS programme and another that didn't, serving as the control. Data was collected before completion of the programme and an additional three times in the year after completion. The 70 participating classes (1,365 schoolchildren) were distributed throughout France. Statistical analysis confirmed that knowledge of sun risk increased significantly in the LWS classes (p < 0.001). Both groups positively changed their attitudes when considering the best sun protection, but the LWS group proved to consistently be more convinced (p = 0.04). After the summer holidays, differences between the two groups decreased throughout the year but stayed globally significant. We also observed some significant behaviour modification during the holidays. For instance, the LWS group applied sunscreen more frequently than the control group, and were more likely to wear a hat (72% versus 59%) and use a sun umbrella on the beach (75% versus 64%).

  14. A Cluster Randomized Trial to Evaluate a Health Education Programme “Living with Sun at School”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Pereira

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Over-exposure to sunlight increases the risk of skin cancers, particularly when exposure occurs during childhood. School teachers can play an active role in providing an education programme that can help prevent this. “Living with the Sun,” (LWS is a sun safety education program for school children based on a handy guide for classroom activities designed to improve children’s knowledge, but moreover to positively modify their sun safety attitudes and behaviours. The goal of our study was to determine the effectiveness of this programme by examining children’s knowledge, attitude and sun exposure behaviours prior to and after the completion of the programme. We carried out a cluster randomised trial in which the classes were randomly assigned to one of two groups; one using the LWS programme and another that didn’t, serving as the control. Data was collected before completion of the programme and an additional three times in the year after completion. The 70 participating classes (1,365 schoolchildren were distributed throughout France. Statistical analysis confirmed that knowledge of sun risk increased significantly in the LWS classes (p < 0.001. Both groups positively changed their attitudes when considering the best sun protection, but the LWS group proved to consistently be more convinced (p = 0.04. After the summer holidays, differences between the two groups decreased throughout the year but stayed globally significant. We also observed some significant behaviour modification during the holidays. For instance, the LWS group applied sunscreen more frequently than the control group, and were more likely to wear a hat (72% versus 59% and use a sun umbrella on the beach (75% versus 64%.

  15. Quantitative and Topographical Analysis of the Losses of Cone Photoreceptors and Retinal Ganglion Cells Under Taurine Depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadj-Saïd, Wahiba; Froger, Nicolas; Ivkovic, Ivana; Jiménez-López, Manuel; Dubus, Élisabeth; Dégardin-Chicaud, Julie; Simonutti, Manuel; Quénol, César; Neveux, Nathalie; Villegas-Pérez, María Paz; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Sahel, Jose-Alain; Picaud, Serge; García-Ayuso, Diego

    2016-09-01

    Taurine depletion is known to induce photoreceptor degeneration and was recently found to also trigger retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss similar to the retinal toxicity of vigabatrin. Our objective was to study the topographical loss of RGCs and cone photoreceptors, with a distinction between the two cone types (S- and L- cones) in an animal model of induced taurine depletion. We used the taurine transporter (Tau-T) inhibitor, guanidoethane sulfonate (GES), to induce taurine depletion at a concentration of 1% in the drinking water. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and electroretinograms (ERG) were performed on animals after 2 months of GES treatment administered through the drinking water. Retinas were dissected as wholemounts and immunodetection of Brn3a (RGC), S-opsin (S-cones), and L-opsin (L-cones) was performed. The number of Brn3a+ RGCs, and L- and S-opsin+ cones was automatically quantified and their retinal distribution studied using isodensity maps. The treatment resulted in a significant reduction in plasma taurine levels and a profound dysfunction of visual performance as shown by ERG recordings. Optical coherence tomography analysis revealed that the retina was thinner in the taurine-depleted group. S-opsin+cones were more affected (36%) than L-opsin+cones (27%) with greater cone cell loss in the dorsal area whereas RGC loss (12%) was uniformly distributed. This study confirms that taurine depletion causes RGC and cone loss. Electroretinograms results show that taurine depletion induces retinal dysfunction in photoreceptors and in the inner retina. It establishes a gradient of cell loss depending on the cell type from S-opsin+cones, L-opsin+cones, to RGCs. The greater cell loss in the dorsal retina and of the S-cone population may underline different cellular mechanisms of cellular degeneration and suggests that S-cones may be more sensitive to light-induced retinal toxicity enhanced by the taurine depletion.

  16. Primate genotyping via high resolution melt analysis: rapid and reliable identification of color vision status in wild lemurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Rachel L; Spriggs, Amanda N; MacFie, Tammie S; Baden, Andrea L; Irwin, Mitchell T; Wright, Patricia C; Louis, Edward E; Lawler, Richard R; Mundy, Nicholas I; Bradley, Brenda J

    2016-10-01

    Analyses of genetic polymorphisms can aid our understanding of intra- and interspecific variation in primate sociality, ecology, and behavior. Studies of primate opsin genes are prime examples of this, as single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the X-linked opsin gene underlie variation in color vision. For primate species with polymorphic trichromacy, genotyping opsin SNVs can generally indicate whether individual primates are red-green color-blind (denoted homozygous M or homozygous L) or have full trichromatic color vision (heterozygous ML). Given the potential influence of color vision on behavior and fitness, characterizing the color vision status of study subjects is becoming commonplace for many primate field projects. Such studies traditionally involve a multi-step sequencing-based method that can be costly and time-consuming. Here we present a new reliable, rapid, and relatively inexpensive method for characterizing color vision in primate populations using high resolution melt analysis (HRMA). Using lemurs as a case study, we characterized variation at exons 3 and/or 5 of the X-linked opsin gene for 87 individuals representing nine species. We scored opsin genotypes and color vision status using both traditional sequencing-based methods as well as our novel melting-curve based HRMA protocol. For each species, the melting curves of varying genotypes (homozygous M, homozygous L, heterozygous ML) differed in melting temperature and/or shape. Melting curves for each sample were consistent across replicates, and genotype-specific melting curves were consistent across DNA sources (blood vs. feces). We show that opsin genotypes can be quickly and reliably scored using HRMA once lab-specific reference curves have been developed based on known genotypes. Although the protocol presented here focuses on genotyping lemur opsin loci, we also consider the larger potential for applying this approach to various types of genetic studies of primate populations.

  17. Eye-independent, light-activated chromatophore expansion (LACE) and expression of phototransduction genes in the skin of Octopus bimaculoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, M Desmond; Oakley, Todd H

    2015-05-15

    Cephalopods are renowned for changing the color and pattern of their skin for both camouflage and communication. Yet, we do not fully understand how cephalopods control the pigmented chromatophore organs in their skin and change their body pattern. Although these changes primarily rely on eyesight, we found that light causes chromatophores to expand in excised pieces of Octopus bimaculoides skin. We call this behavior light-activated chromatophore expansion (or LACE). To uncover how octopus skin senses light, we used antibodies against r-opsin phototransduction proteins to identify sensory neurons that express r-opsin in the skin. We hypothesized that octopus LACE relies on the same r-opsin phototransduction cascade found in octopus eyes. By creating an action spectrum for the latency to LACE, we found that LACE occurred most quickly in response to blue light. We fit our action spectrum data to a standard opsin curve template and estimated the λmax of LACE to be 480 nm. Consistent with our hypothesis, the maximum sensitivity of the light sensors underlying LACE closely matches the known spectral sensitivity of opsin from octopus eyes. LACE in isolated preparations suggests that octopus skin is intrinsically light sensitive and that this dispersed light sense might contribute to their unique and novel patterning abilities. Finally, our data suggest that a common molecular mechanism for light detection in eyes may have been co-opted for light sensing in octopus skin and then used for LACE.

  18. Rheological aspects of dense lignite-water suspensions; structure development on consecutive flow loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudoulas, Thomas B.; Kastrinakis, Eleftherios G.; Nychas, Stavros G. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Chemical Engineering, Univ. Box 453, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2007-01-15

    Aspects of dense lignite-water slurries (LWS) rheology were investigated using controlled stress and controlled strain rheometers with parallel disks and Couette geometries. During the preparation of the slurries, the achieved solids volume fractions were up to 0.425 and the particle size distributions were polydispersed with sizes up to 300 {mu}m. In the ascending parts of consecutive flow loops, a slope transition of the flow curve was observed and studied in relation to the solids volume fraction. The obtained results with the different geometries and rheometers were qualitatively the same. By following the model proposed by Cheng (Rheol Acta 42:372-382, 2003) for thixotropic fluids, and taking into account the yield stress appearance, a suitable correlation for LWS is proposed, which is consistent with the experimental flow curves. (orig.)

  19. NASA's Living with a Star Program: The Geospace Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Janet L.; Giles, Barbara; Zanetti, Lawrence; Spann, James; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA has initiated the Living with a Star Program (LWS) to develop the scientific understanding to address the aspects of the Connected Sun-Earth system that affect life and society. A goal of the program is to bridge the gap between science, engineering, and user application communities. This will enable future science, operational, and commercial objectives in space and atmospheric environments by improving engineering approaches to the accommodation and/or mitigation of the effects of solar variability on technological systems. Three program elements are the Science Missions; a Theory, Modeling, and Data Analysis program; and a Space Environment Testbeds program. Because many of the effects of solar variability on humanity are observed in Geospace regions of space, the science research for all three elements of the LWS Program have significant components in Geospace regions.

  20. PyRhO: A Multiscale Optogenetics Simulation Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Benjamin D; Jarvis, Sarah; Schultz, Simon R; Nikolic, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics has become a key tool for understanding the function of neural circuits and controlling their behavior. An array of directly light driven opsins have been genetically isolated from several families of organisms, with a wide range of temporal and spectral properties. In order to characterize, understand and apply these opsins, we present an integrated suite of open-source, multi-scale computational tools called PyRhO. The purpose of developing PyRhO is three-fold: (i) to characterize new (and existing) opsins by automatically fitting a minimal set of experimental data to three-, four-, or six-state kinetic models, (ii) to simulate these models at the channel, neuron and network levels, and (iii) provide functional insights through model selection and virtual experiments in silico. The module is written in Python with an additional IPython/Jupyter notebook based GUI, allowing models to be fit, simulations to be run and results to be shared through simply interacting with a webpage. The seamless integration of model fitting algorithms with simulation environments (including NEURON and Brian2) for these virtual opsins will enable neuroscientists to gain a comprehensive understanding of their behavior and rapidly identify the most suitable variant for application in a particular biological system. This process may thereby guide not only experimental design and opsin choice but also alterations of the opsin genetic code in a neuro-engineering feed-back loop. In this way, we expect PyRhO will help to significantly advance optogenetics as a tool for transforming biological sciences.

  1. PyRhO: A Multiscale Optogenetics Simulation Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D. Evans

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Optogenetics has become a key tool for understanding the function of neural circuits and controlling their behaviour. An array of directly light driven opsins have been genetically isolated from several families of organisms, with a wide range of temporal and spectral properties. In order to characterise, understand and apply these opsins, we present an integrated suite of open-source, multi-scale computational tools called PyRhO. The purpose of developing PyRhO is threefold: (i to characterise new (and existing opsins by automatically fitting a minimal set of experimental data to three, four or six-state kinetic models, (ii to simulate these models at the channel, neuron & network levels and (iii provide functional insights through model selection and virtual experiments in silico. The module is written in Python with an additional IPython/Jupyter notebook based GUI, allowing models to be fit, simulations to be run and results to be shared through simply interacting with a webpage. The seamless integration of model fitting algorithms with simulation environments (including NEURON and Brian2 for these virtual opsins will enable neuroscientists to gain a comprehensive understanding of their behaviour and rapidly identify the most suitable variant for application in a particular biological system. This process may thereby guide not only experimental design and opsin choice but also alterations of the opsin genetic code in a neuro-engineering feed-back loop. In this way, we expect PyRhO will help to significantly advance optogenetics as a tool for transforming biological sciences.

  2. Cone outer segment morphology and cone function in the Rpe65-/- Nrl-/- mouse retina are amenable to retinoid replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Coughlin, Beth; Crouch, Rosalie K; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2009-10-01

    RPE65, a major retinal pigment epithelium protein, is essential in generating 11-cis retinal, the chromophore for all opsins. Without chromophore, cone opsins are mislocalized and cones degenerate rapidly (e.g., Rpe65(-/-) mouse). Function, survival, and correct targeting of opsins is increased in Rpe65(-/-) cones on supplying 11-cis retinal. Here, we determine the consequences of 11-cis retinal withdrawal and supplementation on cone development in the all-cone Nrl(-/-) retina. Rpe65(-/-) Nrl(-/-), Nrl(-/-), and wild-type mice were examined. Cone structure was analyzed by using TUNEL assay, electron microscopy, and cone-specific antibodies. Cone function was assessed with light-adapted single-flash ERGs. Rpe65(-/-)Nrl(-/-) mice had an increased number of TUNEL-positive photoreceptors during programmed cell death compared with Nrl(-/-) mice, in addition to accelerated age-related degeneration. Cone function in Rpe65(-/-)Nrl(-/-) mice was minimal, and opsins were mislocalized. Treatment with 11-cis retinal restored cone function, promoted outer segment formation, and enabled opsin trafficking to outer segments. Eliminating Rpe65 prevented rosette formation in Nrl(-/-) retinas; supplementation of Rpe65(-/-)Nrl(-/-) mice with 11-cis retinal resulted in their reoccurrence. Taken together, function and opsin trafficking in Nrl(-/-) and wild-type cones are comparable, confirming and extending our findings that cone maturation and outer segment development are dependent on the presence of chromophore. The data on age-related cone death in Rpe65(-/-)Nrl(-/-) mice and the reintroduction of rosettes after 11-cis retinal injections confirm that outer segments, which for steric reasons appear to introduce rosettes in an all-cone retina, are essential for cell survival. These results are important for understanding and treating chromophore-related cone dystrophies.

  3. Spatial Organization of Chromatic Pathways in the Mouse Dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman, Daniel J; Siegle, Joshua H; Koch, Christof; Reid, R Clay; Blanche, Timothy J

    2017-02-01

    In both dichromats and trichromats, cone opsin signals are maintained independently in cones and combined at the bipolar and retinal ganglion cell level, creating parallel color opponent pathways to the central visual system. Like other dichromats, the mouse retina expresses a short-wavelength (S) and a medium-wavelength (M) opsin, with the S-opsin shifted to peak sensitivity in the ultraviolet (UV) range. Unlike in primates, nonuniform opsin expression across the retina and coexpression in single cones creates a mostly mixed chromatic signal. Here, we describe the visuotopic and chromatic organization of spiking responses in the dorsal lateral geniculate and of the local field potentials in their recipient zone in primary visual cortex (V1). We used an immersive visual stimulus dome that allowed us to present spatiotemporally modulated UV and green luminance in any region of the visual field of an awake, head-fixed mouse. Consistent with retinal expression of opsins, we observed graded UV-to-green dominated responses from the upper to lower visual fields, with a smaller difference across azimuth. In addition, we identified a subpopulation of cells (environments, color information is useful for guiding behavior. How small terrestrial mammals such as mice use graded expression of cone opsins to extract visual information from their environments is not clear, even as the use of mice for studying visually guided behavior grows. In this study, we examined the color signals that the retina sends to the visual cortex via the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus. We found that green dominated responses in the lower and nasal visual field and ultraviolet dominated responses in the upper visual field. We describe a subset of cells that exhibit color opponent responses. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/371102-15$15.00/0.

  4. Proviral integrations and expression of endogenous Avian leucosis virus during long term selection for high and low body weight in two chicken lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bornold Lina

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term selection (> 45 generations for low or high juvenile body weight from a common founder population of White Plymouth Rock chickens has generated two extremely divergent lines, the LWS and HWS lines. In addition to a > 9-fold difference between lines for the selected trait, large behavioural and metabolic differences between the two lines evolved during the course of the selection. We recently compared gene expression in brain tissue from birds representing these lines using a global cDNA array analysis and the results showed multiple but small expression differences in protein coding genes. The main differentially expressed transcripts were endogenous retroviral sequences identified as avian leucosis virus subgroup-E (ALVE. Results In this work we confirm the differential ALVE expression and analysed expression and number of proviral integrations in the two parental lines as well as in F9 individuals from an advanced intercross of the lines. Correlation analysis between expression, proviral integrations and body weight showed that high ALVE levels in the LWS line were inherited and that more ALVE integrations were detected in LWS than HWS birds. Conclusion We conclude that only a few of the integrations contribute to the high expression levels seen in the LWS line and that high ALVE expression was significantly correlated with lower body weights for the females but not males. The conserved correlation between high expression and low body weight in females after 9 generations of intercrosses, indicated that ALVE loci conferring high expression directly affects growth or are very closely linked to loci regulating growth.

  5. Evaluation of mercury in liquid waste processing facilities - Phase I report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Occhipinti, J. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Shah, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Wilmarth, W. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, R. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  6. Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste Processing Facilities - Phase I Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Occhipinti, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Shah, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Wilmarth, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  7. Evaluation of mercury in the liquid waste processing facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Vijay [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shah, Hasmukh [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Occhipinti, John E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, William R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, Richard E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-13

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  8. Are Care Takers of Link WorkerAND#8217;s Scheme of HIV/AIDS Knowledgeable Enouth? Assessment Study of Link Workers Scheme in Surat District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmar Rohit

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gujarat State AIDS Control Society with support from UNICEF Gujarat has initiated as unique project for prevention of HIV /AIDS at rural set up since 2008, which is known as Link Workers’ scheme. Link Workers (LWs are working in each cluster of villages around a 5,000+ population village which will serve as the node for intervention. They are supported in their work by village level volunteers selected from the available groups in the community. Methodology: 140 Link workers and 70 volunteers from 70 villages of 14 blocks of district Surat were invited for the study. Due to few vacant posts, total 183 participants took part in the study; out of these 117 were link workers (LWs while 66 were volunteers. Their Knowledge regarding HIV/AIDS and STI were assessed on a predesigned pretested semi structured study tool. Result: 96.59% link workers and 93.44% volunteers had knowledge about condom use as a method of preventing HIV infection. The concern issue is that only 11.11% LWs and 13.64% volunteers revealed that HIV testing during ANC check up can also prevent HIV transmission from mother to child, inspite of receiving induction training. Only 74.36% LWs and 68.31% volunteers were able to tell about three or more HIV preventive methods. Recommendations: Refresher training and exposure visit to HIV care centres are needed for these workers to strengthen their knowledge. [National J of Med Res 2012; 2(2.000: 173-175

  9. Gclust Server: 40322 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 40322 CEL_D1022.6_71984662 Cluster Sequences Related Sequences(288) 425 sro-1: Serp...entine Receptor, class O (opsin) family member (sro-1) 2 1.00e-19 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 25.0 Show 40322 Cluste...ences Related Sequences(288) Sequence length 425 Representative annotation sro-1:... Serpentine Receptor, class O (opsin) family member (sro-1) Number of Sequences 2 Homologs 2 Clustering thre

  10. CRYPTOCHROME mediates behavioral executive choice in response to UV light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Lisa S.; Fogle, Keri J.; Roberts, Logan; Galschiodt, Alexis M.; Chevez, Joshua A.; Recinos, Yocelyn; Nguy, Vinh; Holmes, Todd C.

    2017-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster CRYPTOCHROME (CRY) mediates behavioral and electrophysiological responses to blue light coded by circadian and arousal neurons. However, spectroscopic and biochemical assays of heterologously expressed CRY suggest that CRY may mediate functional responses to UV-A (ultraviolet A) light as well. To determine the relative contributions of distinct phototransduction systems, we tested mutants lacking CRY and mutants with disrupted opsin-based phototransduction for behavioral and electrophysiological responses to UV light. CRY and opsin-based external photoreceptor systems cooperate for UV light-evoked acute responses. CRY mediates behavioral avoidance responses related to executive choice, consistent with its expression in central brain neurons. PMID:28062690

  11. Linear response, fluctuation-dissipation, and finite-system-size effects in superdiffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2013-07-01

    Lévy walks (LWs) are a popular stochastic tool to model anomalous diffusion and have recently been used to describe a variety of phenomena. We study the linear response behavior of this generic model of superdiffusive LWs in finite systems to an external force field under both stationary and nonstationary conditions. These finite-size LWs are based on power-law waiting time distributions with a finite-time regularization at τ(c), such that the physical requirements are met to apply linear response theory and derive the power spectrum with the correct short frequency limit, without the introduction of artificial cutoffs. We obtain the generalized Einstein relation for both ensemble and time averages over the entire process time and determine the turnover to normal Brownian motion when the full system is explored. In particular, we obtain an exact expression for the long time diffusion constant as a function of the scaling exponent of the waiting time density and the characteristic time scale τ(c).

  12. Statistical and molecular analyses of evolutionary significance of red-green color vision and color blindness in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Takenaka, Naomi

    2005-04-01

    Red-green color vision is strongly suspected to enhance the survival of its possessors. Despite being red-green color blind, however, many species have successfully competed in nature, which brings into question the evolutionary advantage of achieving red-green color vision. Here, we propose a new method of identifying positive selection at individual amino acid sites with the premise that if positive Darwinian selection has driven the evolution of the protein under consideration, then it should be found mostly at the branches in the phylogenetic tree where its function had changed. The statistical and molecular methods have been applied to 29 visual pigments with the wavelengths of maximal absorption at approximately 510-540 nm (green- or middle wavelength-sensitive [MWS] pigments) and at approximately 560 nm (red- or long wavelength-sensitive [LWS] pigments), which are sampled from a diverse range of vertebrate species. The results show that the MWS pigments are positively selected through amino acid replacements S180A, Y277F, and T285A and that the LWS pigments have been subjected to strong evolutionary conservation. The fact that these positively selected M/LWS pigments are found not only in animals with red-green color vision but also in those with red-green color blindness strongly suggests that both red-green color vision and color blindness have undergone adaptive evolution independently in different species.

  13. A Particle-in-Cell Simulation Study on Harmonic Waves Excited by Electron Beams in Unmagnetized Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Guo

    2016-01-01

    The excitation of harmonic waves by an electron beam is studied with electrostatic simulations.The results suggest that the harmonic waves are excited during the linear stage of the simulation and are developed in the nonlinear stage.First,the Langmuir waves (LWs) are excited by the beam electrons.Then the coupling of the forward propagating LWs and beam modes will excite the second harmonic waves.The third harmonic waves will be produced if the lower velocity side of the beam still has a positive velocity gradient.The beam velocity decreases at the same time,which provides the energy for wave excitation.We find that it is difficult to excite the harmonic waves with the increase of the thermal velocity of the beam electrons.The beam electrons will be heated after waves are excited,and then the part of the forward propagating LWs will turn into electron acoustic waves under the condition with a large enough intensity of beam electrons.Moreover,the action of ions hardly affects the formation of harmonic waves.

  14. Solar Sentinels: Report of the Science and Technology Definition Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The goal of NASA s Living With a Star (LWS) program is to develop the scientific understanding necessary to effectively address those aspects of the connected Sun Earth system that directly affect life and society. Along with the other elements of LWS, Solar Sentinels aims to discover, understand, and model the heliospheric initiation, propagation, and solar connection of those energetic phenomena that adversely affect space exploration and life and society here on Earth. The Solar Sentinels mission will address the following questions: (1) How, where, and under what circumstances are solar energetic particles (SEPs) accelerated to high energies and how do they propagate through the heliosphere? And (2) How are solar wind structures associated with these SEPs, like CMEs, shocks, and high-speed streams, initiated, propagate, evolve, and interact in the inner heliosphere? The Sentinels STDT recommends implementing this mission in two portions, one optimized for inner heliospheric in-situ measurements and the other for solar remote observations. Sentinels will greatly enhance the overall LWS science return.

  15. Multi-Mode Electromagnetic Ultrasonic Lamb Wave Tomography Imaging for Variable-Depth Defects in Metal Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songling Huang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new cross-hole tomography imaging (CTI method for variable-depth defects in metal plates based on multi-mode electromagnetic ultrasonic Lamb waves (LWs. The dispersion characteristics determine that different modes of LWs are sensitive to different thicknesses of metal plates. In this work, the sensitivities to thickness variation of A0- and S0-mode LWs are theoretically studied. The principles and procedures for the cooperation of A0- and S0-mode LW CTI are proposed. Moreover, the experimental LW imaging system on an aluminum plate with a variable-depth defect is set up, based on A0- and S0-mode EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer arrays. For comparison, the traditional single-mode LW CTI method is used in the same experimental platform. The imaging results show that the computed thickness distribution by the proposed multi-mode method more accurately reflects the actual thickness variation of the defect, while neither the S0 nor the A0 single-mode method was able to distinguish thickness variation in the defect region. Moreover, the quantification of the defect’s thickness variation is more accurate with the multi-mode method. Therefore, theoretical and practical results prove that the variable-depth defect in metal plates can be successfully quantified and visualized by the proposed multi-mode electromagnetic ultrasonic LW CTI method.

  16. Multi-Mode Electromagnetic Ultrasonic Lamb Wave Tomography Imaging for Variable-Depth Defects in Metal Plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Songling; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Shen; Zhao, Wei

    2016-05-02

    This paper proposes a new cross-hole tomography imaging (CTI) method for variable-depth defects in metal plates based on multi-mode electromagnetic ultrasonic Lamb waves (LWs). The dispersion characteristics determine that different modes of LWs are sensitive to different thicknesses of metal plates. In this work, the sensitivities to thickness variation of A0- and S0-mode LWs are theoretically studied. The principles and procedures for the cooperation of A0- and S0-mode LW CTI are proposed. Moreover, the experimental LW imaging system on an aluminum plate with a variable-depth defect is set up, based on A0- and S0-mode EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) arrays. For comparison, the traditional single-mode LW CTI method is used in the same experimental platform. The imaging results show that the computed thickness distribution by the proposed multi-mode method more accurately reflects the actual thickness variation of the defect, while neither the S0 nor the A0 single-mode method was able to distinguish thickness variation in the defect region. Moreover, the quantification of the defect's thickness variation is more accurate with the multi-mode method. Therefore, theoretical and practical results prove that the variable-depth defect in metal plates can be successfully quantified and visualized by the proposed multi-mode electromagnetic ultrasonic LW CTI method.

  17. Mercury Phase II Study - Mercury Behavior in Salt Processing Flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Shah, H. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States). Sludge and Salt Planning; Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, W. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-07-25

    Mercury (Hg) in the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste System (LWS) originated from decades of canyon processing where it was used as a catalyst for dissolving the aluminum cladding of reactor fuel. Approximately 60 metric tons of mercury is currently present throughout the LWS. Mercury has long been a consideration in the LWS, from both hazard and processing perspectives. In February 2015, a Mercury Program Team was established at the request of the Department of Energy to develop a comprehensive action plan for long-term management and removal of mercury. Evaluation was focused in two Phases. Phase I activities assessed the Liquid Waste inventory and chemical processing behavior using a system-by-system review methodology, and determined the speciation of the different mercury forms (Hg+, Hg++, elemental Hg, organomercury, and soluble versus insoluble mercury) within the LWS. Phase II activities are building on the Phase I activities, and results of the LWS flowsheet evaluations will be summarized in three reports: Mercury Behavior in the Salt Processing Flowsheet (i.e. this report); Mercury Behavior in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Flowsheet; and Mercury behavior in the Tank Farm Flowsheet (Evaporator Operations). The evaluation of the mercury behavior in the salt processing flowsheet indicates, inter alia, the following: (1) In the assembled Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 in Tank 21, the total mercury is mostly soluble with methylmercury (MHg) contributing over 50% of the total mercury. Based on the analyses of samples from 2H Evaporator feed and drop tanks (Tanks 38/43), the source of MHg in Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 can be attributed to the 2H evaporator concentrate used in assembling the salt batches. The 2H Evaporator is used to evaporate DWPF recycle water. (2) Comparison of data between Tank 21/49, Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Tank 50 samples suggests that the total mercury as well as speciated

  18. 非充分灌溉对屋顶绿化大叶黄杨生长及水碳通量的影响%Effects of deficit irrigation on growth, water and carbon fluxes of Euonymus japonicas for green roof

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王材源; 杨培岭; 李云开; 任树梅; 路璐; 赵鲁

    2012-01-01

    北京市绿地大面积发展,加剧了水资源和可用于绿化的土地资源短缺的紧张局面,为此,实施屋顶绿化对缓解北京市资源与能源紧缺的严重局面有重要意义.该文以典型的屋项绿化植物大叶黄杨为研究对象,采用盆栽试验,研究在充分灌溉(CK) (90%~100%FC)、低度水分胁迫(LWS) (75%~85%FC)、中度水分胁迫(MWS) (65%~75%FC)、高度水分胁迫(SWS) (50%~60%FC)4种不同土壤水分控制水平下,大叶黄杨的生理响应、景观功能及生态服务功能.研究发现,大叶黄杨的光合速率、蒸腾速率、气孔导度及水分利用效率在水分胁迫的三个处理中LWS>MWS>SWS,LWS处理与CK处理相比,光合速率、蒸腾速率、气孔导度及水分利用效率仅相差1.55%、3.3%、4.13%、7.1%,叶面积大7.8%,叶绿素含量高3.1%;在生态服务功能方面,固碳释氧与降温增湿量在不同水分条件下相差并不明显.低度水分胁迫(LWS) (75%~85%FC)刺激了大叶黄杨的生长,有效地调节了同化物在叶片生长及叶绿素上的分配,同时在生态环境上发挥了巨大作用,是一种切实可行的节水灌溉模式.%To solve the contradiction between the development of large areas of urban Greenland and scarcity of land and water resources for Greenland in Beijing, the implementation of green-roof vegetation is important. In this paper, the typical green-roof plant (E.japonicus) as the research object, the physiological response, landscape function and ecological serves function of E.japonicus were analyzed with the pot experiments in 4 different treatments of full irrigation (CK) (90%-100%FC), low water stress (LWS) (75%-85%FC), moderate water stress (MWS) (65%-75%FC), and serious water stress (SWS) (50%-60%FC) treatments. The results showed that the photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance and water use efBciency of E.japonicus was LWS>MWS>SWS respectively in three

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GACU-05-0001 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GACU-05-0001 ref|NP_001026387.1| retinal G-protein coupled receptor [Gallus gallus] gb|AAR02099.1| reti...nal g-protein receptor opsin [Gallus gallus] NP_001026387.1 3e-64 52% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OLAT-19-0009 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OLAT-19-0009 ref|NP_001026387.1| retinal G-protein coupled receptor [Gallus gallus] gb|AAR02099.1| reti...nal g-protein receptor opsin [Gallus gallus] NP_001026387.1 4e-69 53% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TGUT-09-0005 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TGUT-09-0005 ref|NP_001026387.1| retinal G-protein coupled receptor [Gallus gallus] gb|AAR02099.1| reti...nal g-protein receptor opsin [Gallus gallus] NP_001026387.1 1e-165 92% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0467 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-0467 ref|NP_001026387.1| retinal G-protein coupled receptor [Gallus gallus] gb|AAR02099.1| reti...nal g-protein receptor opsin [Gallus gallus] NP_001026387.1 3e-88 61% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FRUB-02-0312 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FRUB-02-0312 ref|NP_001026387.1| retinal G-protein coupled receptor [Gallus gallus] gb|AAR02099.1| reti...nal g-protein receptor opsin [Gallus gallus] NP_001026387.1 1e-123 66% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TNIG-17-0008 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TNIG-17-0008 ref|NP_001026387.1| retinal G-protein coupled receptor [Gallus gallus] gb|AAR02099.1| reti...nal g-protein receptor opsin [Gallus gallus] NP_001026387.1 1e-123 66% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TNIG-22-0013 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TNIG-22-0013 ref|NP_001026387.1| retinal G-protein coupled receptor [Gallus gallus] gb|AAR02099.1| reti...nal g-protein receptor opsin [Gallus gallus] NP_001026387.1 7e-66 51% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-1006 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-1006 ref|NP_001026387.1| retinal G-protein coupled receptor [Gallus gallus] gb|AAR02099.1| reti...nal g-protein receptor opsin [Gallus gallus] NP_001026387.1 1e-137 75% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GACU-06-0016 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GACU-06-0016 ref|NP_001026387.1| retinal G-protein coupled receptor [Gallus gallus] gb|AAR02099.1| reti...nal g-protein receptor opsin [Gallus gallus] NP_001026387.1 1e-120 65% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-13-0034 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-13-0034 ref|NP_001026387.1| retinal G-protein coupled receptor [Gallus gallus] gb|AAR02099.1| reti...nal g-protein receptor opsin [Gallus gallus] NP_001026387.1 1e-124 68% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-04-0022 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-04-0022 sp|Q90309|OPSUV_CARAU Ultraviolet-sensitive opsin (Ultraviolet co...ne photoreceptor pigment) dbj|BAA12889.1| ultraviolet-sensitive visual pigment [Carassius auratus] Q90309 1e-173 87% ...

  10. G protein- and agonist-bound serotonin 5-HT2A receptor model activated by steered molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ísberg, Vignir; Balle, Thomas; Sander, Tommy

    2011-01-01

    A 5-HT(2A) receptor model was constructed by homology modeling based on the ß(2)-adrenergic receptor and the G protein-bound opsin crystal structures. The 5-HT(2A) receptor model was transferred into an active conformation by an agonist ligand and a G(aq) peptide in four subsequent steered...

  11. Comparative visual ecology of cephalopods from different habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, N. Justin

    2016-01-01

    Previous investigations of vision and visual pigment evolution in aquatic predators have focused on fish and crustaceans, generally ignoring the cephalopods. Since the first cephalopod opsin was sequenced in late 1980s, we now have data on over 50 cephalopod opsins, prompting this functional and phylogenetic examination. Much of this data does not specifically examine the visual pigment spectral absorbance position (λmax) relative to environment or lifestyle, and cephalopod opsin functional adaptation and visual ecology remain largely unknown. Here we introduce a new protocol for photoreceptor microspectrophotometry (MSP) that overcomes the difficulty of bleaching the bistable visual pigment and that reveals eight coastal coleoid cephalopods to be monochromatic with λmax varying from 484 to 505 nm. A combination of current MSP results, the λmax values previously characterized using cephalopod retinal extracts (467–500 nm) and the corresponding opsin phylogenetic tree were used for systematic comparisons with an end goal of examining the adaptations of coleoid visual pigments to different light environments. Spectral tuning shifts are described in response to different modes of life and light conditions. A new spectral tuning model suggests that nine amino acid substitution sites may determine the direction and the magnitude of spectral shifts. PMID:27629028

  12. Cone Photoreceptor Structure in Patients With X-Linked Cone Dysfunction and Red-Green Color Vision Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patterson, Emily J; Wilk, Melissa; Langlo, Christopher S;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Mutations in the coding sequence of the L and M opsin genes are often associated with X-linked cone dysfunction (such as Bornholm Eye Disease, BED), though the exact color vision phenotype associated with these disorders is variable. We examined individuals with L/M opsin gene mutations ...... tested, the color vision defect can be caused either by the same mutation or a gene rearrangement at the same locus.......PURPOSE: Mutations in the coding sequence of the L and M opsin genes are often associated with X-linked cone dysfunction (such as Bornholm Eye Disease, BED), though the exact color vision phenotype associated with these disorders is variable. We examined individuals with L/M opsin gene mutations...... to clarify the link between color vision deficiency and cone dysfunction. METHODS: We recruited 17 males for imaging. The thickness and integrity of the photoreceptor layers were evaluated using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Cone density was measured using high-resolution images of the cone...

  13. Direct Measurement of the Isomerization Barrier of the Isolated Retinal Chromophore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dilger, Jonathan; Musbat, Lihi; Sheves, Mordechai;

    2015-01-01

    Isomerizations of the retinal chromophore were investigated using the IMS-IMS technique. Four different structural features of the chromophore were observed, isolated, excited collisionally, and the resulting isomer and fragment distributions were measured. By establishing the threshold activatio......V, which is significantly lower than that observed for the reaction within opsin proteins....

  14. Non-invasive red light optogenetic pacing and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) imaging for drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Jing; Li, Airong; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac pacing could be a powerful tool for investigating mammalian cardiac electrical conduction systems as well as for treatment of certain cardiac pathologies. However, traditional electrical pacing using pacemaker requires an invasive surgical procedure. Electrical currents from the implanted electrodes can also cause damage to heart tissue, further restricting its utility. Optogenetic pacing has been developed as a promising, non-invasive alternative to electrical stimulation for controlling animal heart rhythms. It induces heart contractions by shining pulsed light on transgene-generated microbial opsins, which in turn activate the light gated ion channels in animal hearts. However, commonly used opsins in optogenetic pacing, such as channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), require short light wavelength stimulation (475 nm), which is strongly absorbed and scattered by tissue. Here, we performed optogenetic pacing by expression of recently engineered red-shifted microbial opsins, ReaChR and CsChrimson, in a well-established animal model, Drosophila melanogaster, using the 617 nm stimulation light pulses. The OCM technique enables non-invasive optical imaging of animal hearts with high speed and ultrahigh axial and transverse resolutions. We integrated a customized OCM system with the optical stimulation system to monitor the optogenetic pacing noninvasively. The use of red-sifted opsins enabled deeper penetration of simulating light at lower power, which is promising for applications of optogenetic pacing in mammalian cardiac pathology studies or clinical treatments in the future.

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FRUB-02-0230 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FRUB-02-0230 ref|NP_001098125.1| KFH-G protein [Oryzias latipes] sp|P87366|OPSG_ORYLA Green...-sensitive opsin (Green cone photoreceptor pigment) (KFH-G) dbj|BAA19420.1| KFH-G [Oryzias latipes] NP_001098125.1 1e-123 87% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OLAT-26-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OLAT-26-0002 ref|NP_001098125.1| KFH-G protein [Oryzias latipes] sp|P87366|OPSG_ORYLA Green...-sensitive opsin (Green cone photoreceptor pigment) (KFH-G) dbj|BAA19420.1| KFH-G [Oryzias latipes] NP_001098125.1 0.0 100% ...

  17. Alouatta trichromatic color vision: cone spectra and physiological responses studied with microspectrophotometry and single unit retinal electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Luiz Carlos L; Saito, Cézar A; da Silva Filho, Manoel; Kremers, Jan; Bowmaker, James K; Lee, Barry B

    2014-01-01

    The howler monkeys (Alouatta sp.) are the only New World primates to exhibit routine trichromacy. Both males and females have three cone photopigments. However, in contrast to Old World monkeys, Alouatta has a locus control region upstream of each opsin gene on the X-chromosome and this might influence the retinal organization underlying its color vision. Post-mortem microspectrophotometry (MSP) was performed on the retinae of two male Alouatta to obtain rod and cone spectral sensitivities. The MSP data were consistent with only a single opsin being expressed in each cone and electrophysiological data were consistent with this primate expressing full trichromacy. To study the physiological organization of the retina underlying Alouatta trichromacy, we recorded from retinal ganglion cells of the same animals used for MSP measurements with a variety of achromatic and chromatic stimulus protocols. We found MC cells and PC cells in the Alouatta retina with similar properties to those previously found in the retina of other trichromatic primates. MC cells showed strong phasic responses to luminance changes and little response to chromatic pulses. PC cells showed strong tonic response to chromatic changes and small tonic response to luminance changes. Responses to other stimulus protocols (flicker photometry; changing the relative phase of red and green modulated lights; temporal modulation transfer functions) were also similar to those recorded in other trichromatic primates. MC cells also showed a pronounced frequency double response to chromatic modulation, and with luminance modulation response saturation accompanied by a phase advance between 10-20 Hz, characteristic of a contrast gain mechanism. This indicates a very similar retinal organization to Old-World monkeys. Cone-specific opsin expression in the presence of a locus control region for each opsin may call into question the hypothesis that this region exclusively controls opsin expression.

  18. Alouatta trichromatic color vision: cone spectra and physiological responses studied with microspectrophotometry and single unit retinal electrophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos L Silveira

    Full Text Available The howler monkeys (Alouatta sp. are the only New World primates to exhibit routine trichromacy. Both males and females have three cone photopigments. However, in contrast to Old World monkeys, Alouatta has a locus control region upstream of each opsin gene on the X-chromosome and this might influence the retinal organization underlying its color vision. Post-mortem microspectrophotometry (MSP was performed on the retinae of two male Alouatta to obtain rod and cone spectral sensitivities. The MSP data were consistent with only a single opsin being expressed in each cone and electrophysiological data were consistent with this primate expressing full trichromacy. To study the physiological organization of the retina underlying Alouatta trichromacy, we recorded from retinal ganglion cells of the same animals used for MSP measurements with a variety of achromatic and chromatic stimulus protocols. We found MC cells and PC cells in the Alouatta retina with similar properties to those previously found in the retina of other trichromatic primates. MC cells showed strong phasic responses to luminance changes and little response to chromatic pulses. PC cells showed strong tonic response to chromatic changes and small tonic response to luminance changes. Responses to other stimulus protocols (flicker photometry; changing the relative phase of red and green modulated lights; temporal modulation transfer functions were also similar to those recorded in other trichromatic primates. MC cells also showed a pronounced frequency double response to chromatic modulation, and with luminance modulation response saturation accompanied by a phase advance between 10-20 Hz, characteristic of a contrast gain mechanism. This indicates a very similar retinal organization to Old-World monkeys. Cone-specific opsin expression in the presence of a locus control region for each opsin may call into question the hypothesis that this region exclusively controls opsin expression.

  19. Ustilago maydis accumulates beta-carotene at levels determined by a retinal-forming carotenoid oxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Alejandro F; Brefort, Thomas; Mengel, Carina; Díaz-Sánchez, Violeta; Alder, Adrian; Al-Babili, Salim; Avalos, Javier

    2009-10-01

    The basidiomycete Ustilago maydis, the causative agent of corn smut disease, has emerged as a model organism for dimorphism and fungal phytopathogenicity. In this work, we line out the key conserved enzymes for beta-carotene biosynthesis encoded by the U. maydis genome and show that this biotrophic fungus accumulates beta-carotene. The amount of this pigment depended on culture pH and aeration but was not affected by light and was not increased by oxidative stress. Moreover, we identified the U. maydis gene, cco1, encoding a putative beta-carotene cleavage oxygenase. Heterologous overexpression and in vitro analyses of purified enzyme demonstrated that Cco1 catalyzes the symmetrical cleavage of beta-carotene to yield two molecules of retinal. Analyses of beta-carotene and retinal contents in U. maydiscco1 deletion and over-expression strains confirmed the enzymatic function of Cco1, and revealed that Cco1 determines the beta-carotene content. Our data indicate that carotenoid biosynthesis in U. maydis is carried out to provide retinal rather than to deliver protective pigments. The U. maydis genome also encodes three potential opsins, a family of photoactive proteins that use retinal as chromophore. Two opsin genes showed different light-regulated expression patterns, suggesting specialized roles in photobiology, while no mRNA was detected for the third opsin gene in the same experiments. However, deletion of the cco1 gene, which should abolish function of all the retinal-dependent opsins, did not affect growth, morphology or pathogenicity, suggesting that retinal and opsin proteins play no relevant role in U. maydis under the tested conditions.

  20. Gene therapy rescues cone structure and function in the 3-month-old rd12 mouse: a model for midcourse RPE65 leber congenital amaurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Li, Wensheng; Dai, Xufeng; Kong, Fansheng; Zheng, Qinxiang; Zhou, Xiangtian; Lü, Fan; Chang, Bo; Rohrer, Bärbel; Hauswirth, William W; Qu, Jia; Pang, Ji-jing

    2011-01-01

    RPE65 function is necessary in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) to generate chromophore for all opsins. Its absence results in vision loss and rapid cone degeneration. Recent Leber congenital amaurosis type 2 (LCA with RPE65 mutations) phase I clinical trials demonstrated restoration of vision on RPE65 gene transfer into RPE cells overlying cones. In the rd12 mouse, a naturally occurring model of RPE65-LCA early cone degeneration was observed; however, some peripheral M-cones remained. A prior study showed that AAV-mediated RPE65 expression can prevent early cone degeneration. The present study was conducted to test whether the remaining cones in older rd12 mice can be rescued. Subretinal treatment with the scAAV5-smCBA-hRPE65 vector was initiated at postnatal day (P)14 and P90. After 2 months, electroretinograms were recorded, and cone morphology was analyzed by using cone-specific peanut agglutinin and cone opsin-specific antibodies. Cone degeneration started centrally and spread ventrally, with cells losing cone-opsin staining before that for the PNA-lectin-positive cone sheath. Gene therapy starting at P14 resulted in almost wild-type M- and S-cone function and morphology. Delaying gene-replacement rescued the remaining M-cones, and most important, more M-cone opsin-positive cells were identified than were present at the onset of gene therapy, suggesting that opsin expression could be reinitiated in cells with cone sheaths. The results support and extend those of the previous study that gene therapy can stop early cone degeneration, and, more important, they provide proof that delayed treatment can restore the function and morphology of the remaining cones. These results have important implications for the ongoing LCA2 clinical trials.

  1. Aggregation of frog rhodopsin to oligomers and their dissociation to monomer: application of BN- and SDS-PAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukolyukov, S A

    2009-06-01

    After solubilization of frog rod outer segments (ROS) with mild detergents (digitonin, n-dodecyl-beta-D-maltoside, Chaps, Triton X-100) and subsequent one-dimensional blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (1D BN-PAGE), the position of rhodopsin (Rh) on the gradient gel does not match the monomer with molecular weight of 40 kDa but appears self-associated into aggregate of Rh (RhA) with molecular mass varying in different detergents from 85 to 125 kDa. Short-term treatment (~2 h) of the excised BN-PAGE strip containing RhA by denaturing detergent mixture (10% SDS + 1 mM dithiothreitol (DTT)) followed by 2D SDS-PAGE revealed dissociation of the RhA into opsin monomer and unidentified proteins. Long-term treatment (approximately 2 days) of RhA that included extraction, denaturation, concentration, and electrophoresis induced, along with dissociation of RhA into opsin monomer + unidentified proteins, also formation of opsin dimers, trimers, and higher oligomers owing to a secondary aggregation of opsin. Direct solubilization of the ROS by harsh SDS + DTT detergent mixture followed by 1D SDS-PAGE revealed only opsin monomer that upon heating disappeared, transforming into higher oligomers owing to secondary aggregation. The data show that degree of Rh oligomerization depends on specific conditions in which it stays. In the native state in the photoreceptor membrane as well as in mild detergents frog Rh exists mainly as dimers or higher oligomers. After solubilization with denaturing detergents, RhA can dissociate into monomers that then spontaneously self-associate into higher oligomers under the influence of various factors (for example, heating).

  2. The Living with a Star Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission and Related Missions of Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibeck, David G.; Mauk, Barry H.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Fox, Nicola J.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the Living With a Star (LWS) Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission in the context of the broader Geospace program. Missions to Geospace offer an opportunity to observe in situ the fundamental processes that operate throughout the solar system and in particular those that generate hazardous space weather effects in the vicinity of Earth. The recently selected investigations on NASA's LWS program's RBSP will provide the measurements needed to characterize and quantify the processes that supply and remove energetic particles from the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. Instruments on the RBSP spacecraft will observe charged particles that comprise the Earth's radiation belts over the full energy range from 1 eV to more than 10 MeV (including composition), the plasma waves which energize them, the electric fields which transport them, and the magnetic fields which guide their motion. The two-point measurements by the RBSP spacecraft will enable researchers to discriminate between spatial and temporal effects, and therefore between the various proposed mechanisms for particle acceleration and loss. The measurements taken by the RBSP spacecraft will be used in data modeling projects in order to improve the understanding of these fundamental processes and allow better predictions to be made. NASA's LWS program has also recently selected three teams to study concepts for Missions of Opportunity that will augment the RBSP program, by (1) providing an instrument for a Canadian spacecraft in the Earth's radiation belts, (2) quantifying the flux of particles precipitating into the Earth's atmosphere from the Earth's radiation belts, and (3) remotely sensing both spatial and temporal variations in the Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere.

  3. Impedance-matching analysis in IR leaky-wave antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, Navaneeth; Xu, Yuancheng; Lail, Brian A.

    2015-08-01

    Planar leaky-wave antennas (LWA) that are capable of full-space scanning have long since been the pursuit for applications including, but not limited to, integration onto vehicles and into cameras for wide-angle of view beam-steering. Such a leaky-wave surface (LWS) was designed for long-wave infrared frequencies with frequency scanning capability. The LWS is based on a microstrip patch array design of a leaky-wave impedance surface and is made up of gold microstrip patches on a grounded zinc sulphide substrate. A 1D composite right/left-handed (CRLH) metamaterial made by periodically stacking a unit cell of the LWS in the longitudinal direction to form a LWA was designed. This paper deals with loading the LWA with a nickel bolometer to collect leaky-wave signals. The LWA radiates a backward leaking wave at 30 degrees at 28.3THz and scans through broadside for frequencies 20THz through 40THz. The paper deals with effectively placing the bolometer in order for the collected signal to exhibit the designed frequency regime. An effective way to maximize the power coupling into the load from the antenna is also explored. The benefit of such a metamaterial/holographic antennacoupled detector is its ability to provide appreciable capture cross-sections while delivering smart signals to subwavelength sized detectors. Due to their high-gain, low-profile, fast response time of the detector and ease of fabrication, this IR LWA-coupled bolometer harbors great potential in the areas of high resolution, uncooled, infrared imaging.

  4. Mercury Phase II Study - Mercury Behavior in Salt Processing Flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Shah, H. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States). Sludge and Salt Planning; Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, W. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-07-25

    Mercury (Hg) in the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste System (LWS) originated from decades of canyon processing where it was used as a catalyst for dissolving the aluminum cladding of reactor fuel. Approximately 60 metric tons of mercury is currently present throughout the LWS. Mercury has long been a consideration in the LWS, from both hazard and processing perspectives. In February 2015, a Mercury Program Team was established at the request of the Department of Energy to develop a comprehensive action plan for long term management and removal of mercury. Evaluation was focused in two Phases. Phase I activities assessed the Liquid Waste inventory and chemical processing behavior using a system by system review methodology and determined the speciation of the different mercury forms (Hg+, Hg++, elemental Hg, organomercury, and soluble versus insoluble mercury) within the LWS. The evaluation of the mercury behavior in the salt processing flowsheet indicates: • In the assembled Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 in Tank 21, the total mercury is mostly soluble with methylmercury (MHg) contributing over 50% of the total mercury. Based on the analyses of samples from 2H Evaporator feed and drop tanks (Tanks 38/43), the source of MHg in Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 can be attributed to the 2H evaporator concentrate used in assembling the salt batches. The 2H Evaporator is used to evaporate DWPF recycle water. • Comparison of data between Tank 21/49, Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Tank 50 samples suggests that the total mercury as well as speciated forms in the assembled salt batches in Tanks 21/49 pass through the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) / Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) process to Tank 50 with no significant change in the mercury chemistry. • In Tank 50, Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) from ARP/MCU is the major contributor to the total mercury including MHg. More information can be found about what

  5. Designing 2D arrays for SHM of planar structures: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz; Ambrozinski, Lukasz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2013-04-01

    Monitoring structural integrity of large planar structures that aims at detecting and localizing impact or damage at any point of the structure requires normally a relatively dense network of uniformly distributed ultrasonic sensors. 2-D ultrasonic phased arrays, due to their beam-steering capability and all azimuth angle coverage are a very promising tool for structural health monitoring (SHM) of plate-like structures using Lamb waves (LW). Linear phased arrays that have been proposed for that purpose, produce mirrored image characterized by azimuth dependent resolution, which prevents unequivocal damage localization. 2D arrays do not have this drawback and they are even capable of mode selectivity when generating and receiving LWs. Performance of 2D arrays depends on their topology as well as the number of elements (transducers) used and their spacing in terms of wavelength. In this paper we propose a consistent methodology for three-step: theoretical, numerical and experimental investigation of a diversity of 2D array topologies in SHM applications. In the first step, the theoretical evaluation is performed using frequency-dependent structure transfer function (STF). STF that defines linear propagation of different LWs modes through the dispersive medium enables theoretical investigation of the particular array performance for a predefined tone-burst excitation signal. A dedicated software tool has been developed for the numerical evaluation of 2D array directional characteristics (beampattern) in a specific structure. The simulations are performed using local interaction simulation approach (LISA), implemented using NVIDIA CUDA graphical computation unit (GPU), which enables time-efficient 3D simulations of LWs propagation. Beampatterns of a 2D array can be to some extend evaluated analytically and using numerical simulations; in most cases, however, they require experimental verification. Using scanning laser vibrometer is proposed for that purpose, in a setup

  6. Thermal Evolution of Juvenile Subduction Zones ' New Constraints from Lu-Hf Geochronology on HP oceanic rocks (Halilbaǧi, Central Anatolia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourteau, Amaury; Scherer, Erik; Schmidt, Alexander; Bast, Rebecca

    2015-04-01

    The thermal structure of subduction zones plays a key role on mechanical and chemical processes taking place along the slab-mantle interface. Until now, changes through time of this thermal structure have been explored mostly by the means of numerical simulations. However, both "warm" (i.e., epidote-bearing), and "cold" (i.e., lawsonite-bearing) HP oceanic rocks have been reported in some fossil subduction complexes exposed at the Earth's surface (e.g., Franciscan Complex, California; Rio San Juan Complex, Hispañola; Halilbağı Unit, Central Anatolia). These a-priori "incompatible" rocks witness different thermal stages of ancient subduction zones and their study might provide complementary constraints to numerical models. To decipher the meaning of these contrasting metamorphic rocks in the Halilbağı Unit, we are carrying out Lu-Hf geochronology on garnet (grt) and lws from a variety of HP oceanic rocks, as well as the metamorphic sole of the overlying ophiolite. We selected five samples that are representative of the variety of metamorphic evolutions (i.e. peak conditions and P-T paths) encountered in this area. Preliminary analyses yielded 110 Ma (grt-hbl isochron) for a sub-ophiolitic grt amphibolite; 92 Ma (grt-omp) for an eclogite with prograde and retrograde ep; 90 Ma (grt-omp) for an eclogitic metabasite with prograde ep and retrograde ep+lws; 87 Ma (grt-gln) for a lws eclogite with prograde ep; and 86 Ma (grt-gln) for a blueschist with prograde and retrograde lws. These ages are mainly two-point isochrons. Further-refined data will be presented at the EGU General Assembly 2015, in Vienna. The consistent younging trend from "warm" to "cold" metamorphic rocks revealed by these first-order results points to metamorphic-sole formation during the initiation of intra-oceanic subduction at ~110 Ma, and subsequent cooling of the slab-mantle interface between 92 and 86 Ma. Therefore, the contrasting metamorphic evolutions encountered in the Halilbağı Unit

  7. The Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xapsos, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the Living With a Star (LWS) Space Environment Testbed (SET) program is to improve the performance of hardware in the space radiation environment. The program has developed a payload for the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Demonstration and Science Experiments (DSX) spacecraft that is scheduled for launch in August 2015 on the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket. The primary structure of DSX is an Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) Secondary Payload Adapter (ESPA) ring. DSX will be in a Medium Earth Orbit (MEO). This oral presentation will describe the SET payload.

  8. Molecular jets driven by high-mass protostars: a detailed study of the IRAS 20126+4104 jet

    OpenAIRE

    Garatti, A. Caratti o; Froebrich, D.; J. Eisloeffel; Giannini, T.; Nisini, B.

    2008-01-01

    We present here an extensive analysis of the protostellar jet driven by IRAS 20126+4104, deriving the kinematical, dynamical, and physical conditions of the H2 gas along the flow. The jet has been investigated by means of near-IR H2 and [FeII] narrow-band imaging, high resolution spectroscopy of the 1-0S(1) line (2.12 um), NIR (0.9-2.5 um) low resolution spectroscopy, along with ISO-SWS and LWS spectra (from 2.4 to 200 um). The flow shows a complex morphology. In addition to the large-scale j...

  9. The spectral sensitivity of the lens eyes of a box jellyfish, Tripedalia cystophora (Conant)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coates, Melissa M; Garm, Anders; Theobald, Jamie C

    2006-01-01

    Box jellyfish, or cubomedusae (class Cubozoa), are unique among the Cnidaria in possessing lens eyes similar in morphology to those of vertebrates and cephalopods. Although these eyes were described over 100 years ago, there has been no work done on their electrophysiological responses to light. We...... used an electroretinogram (ERG) technique to measure spectral sensitivity of the lens eyes of the Caribbean species Tripedalia cystophora. The cubomedusae have two kinds of lens eyes, the lower and upper lens eyes. We found that both lens eye types have similar spectral sensitivities, which likely...... result from the presence of a single receptor type containing a single opsin. The peak sensitivity is to blue-green light. Visual pigment template fits indicate a vitamin A-1 based opsin with peak sensitivity near 500 nm for both eye types....

  10. Cone photoreceptor structure in patients with x-linked cone dysfunction and red-green color vision deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patterson, Emily J.; Wilk, Melissa; Langlo, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE. Mutations in the coding sequence of the L and M opsin genes are often associated with X-linked cone dysfunction (such as Bornholm Eye Disease, BED), though the exact color vision phenotype associated with these disorders is variable. We examined individuals with L/ M opsin gene mutations...... to clarify the link between color vision deficiency and cone dysfunction.  METHODS. We recruited 17 males for imaging. The thickness and integrity of the photoreceptor layers were evaluated using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Cone density was measured using high-resolution images of the cone...... tested, the color vision defect can be caused either by the same mutation or a gene rearrangement at the same locus....

  11. Immunohistochemical evidence for multiple photosystems in box jellyfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekström, Peter; Garm, Anders Lydik; Pålsson, Jonas

    2008-01-01

    data demonstrate that the lens eyes of box jellyfish utilize a single opsin and are thus color-blind, and that there is probably a different photopigment in the pigment cup eyes. The results support our hypothesis that the lens eyes and the pigment cup eyes of box jellyfish are involved in different......Cubomedusae (box jellyfish) possess a remarkable visual system with 24 eyes distributed in four sensory structures termed rhopalia. Each rhopalium is equipped with six eyes: two pairs of pigment cup eyes and two unpaired lens eyes. Each eye type probably captures specific features of the visual...... environment. To investigate whether multiple types of photoreceptor cells are present in the rhopalium, and whether the different eye types possess different types of photoreceptors, we have used immunohistochemistry with a range of vertebrate opsin antibodies to label the photoreceptors...

  12. Comparative characteristics of two anion-channel rhodopsins and prospects of their use in optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgikh, D A; Malyshev, A Yu; Roshchin, M V; Smirnova, G R; Nekrasova, O V; Petrovskaya, L E; Feldman, T B; Balaban, P M; Kirpichnikov, M P; Ostrovsky, M A

    2016-11-01

    Anion-selective opsins slow ChloC and ACR2 were expressed in rat brain cortical neurons by electroporation in utero. It is shown that the light-activated channel ACR2 has pronounced advantages in terms of both the inactivation kinetics and the neuron inhibition intensity, which is associated with a more negative value of the light-activated current reversal potential compared to the slow ChloC channel. The identified properties of opsin ACR2 indicate that it can be used for strictly controlled suppression of neuronal activity in optogenetic experiments, including the expression in the retinal ganglionic cells for reconstituting the OFF-component of their receptive field, which is essential for optogenetic prosthetics of degenerative retina.

  13. Rhabdom evolution in butterflies: insights from the uniquely tiered and heterogeneous ommatidia of the Glacial Apollo butterfly, Parnassius glacialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Atsuko; Awata, Hiroko; Wakakuwa, Motohiro; Takemura, Shin-ya; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2012-09-01

    The eye of the Glacial Apollo butterfly, Parnassius glacialis, a 'living fossil' species of the family Papilionidae, contains three types of spectrally heterogeneous ommatidia. Electron microscopy reveals that the Apollo rhabdom is tiered. The distal tier is composed exclusively of photoreceptors expressing opsins of ultraviolet or blue-absorbing visual pigments, and the proximal tier consists of photoreceptors expressing opsins of green or red-absorbing visual pigments. This organization is unique because the distal tier of other known butterflies contains two green-sensitive photoreceptors, which probably function in improving spatial and/or motion vision. Interspecific comparison suggests that the Apollo rhabdom retains an ancestral tiered pattern with some modification to enhance its colour vision towards the long-wavelength region of the spectrum.

  14. WP1: transgenic opto-animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    UŻarowska, E.; Czajkowski, Rafał; Konopka, W.

    2014-11-01

    We aim to create a set of genetic tools where permanent opsin expression (ChR or NpHR) is precisely limited to the population of neurons that express immediate early gene c-fos during a specific temporal window of behavioral training. Since the c-fos gene is only expressed in neurons that form experience-dependent ensemble, this approach will result in specific labeling of a small subset of cells that create memory trace for the learned behavior. To this end we employ two alternative inducible gene expression systems: Tet Expression System and Cre/lox System. In both cases, the temporal window for opsin induction is controlled pharmacologically, by doxycycline or tamoxifen, respectively. Both systems will be used for creating lines of transgenic animals.

  15. Inhibiting the Activity of CA1 Hippocampal Neurons Prevents the Recall of Contextual Fear Memory in Inducible ArchT Transgenic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Sakaguchi

    Full Text Available The optogenetic manipulation of light-activated ion-channels/pumps (i.e., opsins can reversibly activate or suppress neuronal activity with precise temporal control. Therefore, optogenetic techniques hold great potential to establish causal relationships between specific neuronal circuits and their function in freely moving animals. Due to the critical role of the hippocampal CA1 region in memory function, we explored the possibility of targeting an inhibitory opsin, ArchT, to CA1 pyramidal neurons in mice. We established a transgenic mouse line in which tetracycline trans-activator induces ArchT expression. By crossing this line with a CaMKIIα-tTA transgenic line, the delivery of light via an implanted optrode inhibits the activity of excitatory CA1 neurons. We found that light delivery to the hippocampus inhibited the recall of a contextual fear memory. Our results demonstrate that this optogenetic mouse line can be used to investigate the neuronal circuits underlying behavior.

  16. Color vision and color formation in dragonflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futahashi, Ryo

    2016-10-01

    Dragonflies including damselflies are colorful and large-eyed insects, which show remarkable sexual dimorphism, color transition, and color polymorphism. Recent comprehensive visual transcriptomics has unveiled an extraordinary diversity of opsin genes within the lineage of dragonflies. These opsin genes are differentially expressed between aquatic larvae and terrestrial adults, as well as between dorsal and ventral regions of adult compound eyes. Recent topics of color formation in dragonflies are also outlined. Non-iridescent blue color is caused by coherent light scattering from the quasiordered nanostructures, whereas iridescent color is produced by multilayer structures. Wrinkles or wax crystals sometimes enhances multilayer structural colors. Sex-specific and stage-specific color differences in red dragonflies is attributed to redox states of ommochrome pigments.

  17. Gene : CBRC-CFAM-32-0001 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-32-0001 32 A Opsins OPSX_HUMAN 0.0 91% ref|XP_853139.1| PREDICTED: similar to Visual... familiaris similar to Visual pigment-like receptor peropsin (LOC610525), mRNA /cds=p(1,1014) /gb=XM_848046 ... pigment-like receptor peropsin [Canis familiaris] 0.0 100% gnl|UG|Cfa#S26550846 PREDICTED: Canis

  18. Evolution of colour vision in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, Gerald H.

    2009-01-01

    Colour vision allows animals to reliably distinguish differences in the distributions of spectral energies reaching the eye. Although not universal, a capacity for colour vision is sufficiently widespread across the animal kingdom to provide prima facie evidence of its importance as a tool for analysing and interpreting the visual environment. The basic biological mechanisms on which vertebrate colour vision ultimately rests, the cone opsin genes and the photopigments they specify, are highly...

  19. Non-Invasive Gene Therapy of Experimental Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    predicted by the “ Rule of 5” (Lipinski et al., 1997). The adverse effect of molecular weight on membrane perme- ation is not observed if the molecular...for the broad spectrum of opsin pro- moter driven gene expression in the eye is that the other ocu- lar structures are embryologically related to the...ciliary body is embryologically related to the photoreceptor cells of the retina. Transfection of iris and ciliary body with the Crx homeobox gene

  20. The giant mottled eel, Anguilla marmorata, uses blue-shifted rod photoreceptors during upstream migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Yu Wang

    Full Text Available Catadromous fishes migrate between ocean and freshwater during particular phases of their life cycle. The dramatic environmental changes shape their physiological features, e.g. visual sensitivity, olfactory ability, and salinity tolerance. Anguilla marmorata, a catadromous eel, migrates upstream on dark nights, following the lunar cycle. Such behavior may be correlated with ontogenetic changes in sensory systems. Therefore, this study was designed to identify changes in spectral sensitivity and opsin gene expression of A. marmorata during upstream migration. Microspectrophotometry analysis revealed that the tropical eel possesses a duplex retina with rod and cone photoreceptors. The λmax of rod cells are 493, 489, and 489 nm in glass, yellow, and wild eels, while those of cone cells are 508, and 517 nm in yellow, and wild eels, respectively. Unlike European and American eels, Asian eels exhibited a blue-shifted pattern of rod photoreceptors during upstream migration. Quantitative gene expression analyses of four cloned opsin genes (Rh1f, Rh1d, Rh2, and SWS2 revealed that Rh1f expression is dominant at all three stages, while Rh1d is expressed only in older yellow eel. Furthermore, sequence comparison and protein modeling studies implied that a blue shift in Rh1d opsin may be induced by two known (N83, S292 and four putative (S124, V189, V286, I290 tuning sites adjacent to the retinal binding sites. Finally, expression of blue-shifted Rh1d opsin resulted in a spectral shift in rod photoreceptors. Our observations indicate that the giant mottled eel is color-blind, and its blue-shifted scotopic vision may influence its upstream migration behavior and habitat choice.

  1. Patterning the Retina of Drosophila Melanogaster for Color and Polarized Light Vision

    OpenAIRE

    Wernet, Mathias F.

    2004-01-01

    Across the animal kingdom, specialized sensory epithelia are used for photoreception, allowing individuals to interact with their environment based on visual cues. Generally, neuronal photoreceptor cells (PRs) are organized in the retina, a specialized part of body tissue exposed to the outside world, and transform the energy of incoming electromagnetic radiation into neuronal excitation. This process depends on the large family of opsin proteins which are required in PRs of all animal specie...

  2. Diversity of color vision: not all Australian marsupials are trichromatic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke Ebeling

    Full Text Available Color vision in marsupials has recently emerged as a particularly interesting case among mammals. It appears that there are both dichromats and trichromats among closely related species. In contrast to primates, marsupials seem to have evolved a different type of trichromacy that is not linked to the X-chromosome. Based on microspectrophotometry and retinal whole-mount immunohistochemistry, four trichromatic marsupial species have been described: quokka, quenda, honey possum, and fat-tailed dunnart. It has, however, been impossible to identify the photopigment of the third cone type, and genetically, all evidence so far suggests that all marsupials are dichromatic. The tammar wallaby is the only Australian marsupial to date for which there is no evidence of a third cone type. To clarify whether the wallaby is indeed a dichromat or trichromatic like other Australian marsupials, we analyzed the number of cone types in the "dichromatic" wallaby and the "trichromatic" dunnart. Employing identical immunohistochemical protocols, we confirmed that the wallaby has only two cone types, whereas 20-25% of cones remained unlabeled by S- and LM-opsin antibodies in the dunnart retina. In addition, we found no evidence to support the hypothesis that the rod photopigment (rod opsin is expressed in cones which would have explained the absence of a third cone opsin gene. Our study is the first comprehensive and quantitative account of color vision in Australian marsupials where we now know that an unexpected diversity of different color vision systems appears to have evolved.

  3. The molecular basis for UV vision in birds: spectral characteristics, cDNA sequence and retinal localization of the UV-sensitive visual pigment of the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, S E; Vissers, P M; Das, D; Degrip, W J; Bowmaker, J K; Hunt, D M

    1998-02-15

    Microspectrophotometric (msp) studies have shown that the colour-vision system of many bird species is based on four pigments with absorption peaks in the red, green, blue and UV regions of the spectrum. The existence of a fourth pigment (UV) is the major difference between the trichromacy of humans and the tetrachromacy of such birds, and recent studies have shown that it may play a determining role in such diverse aspects of behaviour as mate selection and detection of food. Avian visual pigments are composed of an opsin protein covalently bound via a Schiff-base linkage to the chromophore 11-cis-retinal. Here we report the cDNA sequence of a UV opsin isolated from an avian species, Melopsittacus undulatus (budgerigar or small parakeet). This sequence has been expressed using the recombinant baculovirus system; the pigment generated from the expressed protein on addition of 11-cis-retinal yielded an absorption spectrum typical of a UV photopigment, with lambdamax 365+/-3 nm. This is the first UV opsin from an avian species to be sequenced and expressed in a heterologous system. In situ hybridization of this sequence to budgerigar retinas selectively labelled a sub-set of UV cones, representing approx. 9% of the total cone population, that are distributed in a semi-regular pattern across the entire retina.

  4. Beta-ionone activates and bleaches visual pigment in salamander photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isayama, Tomoki; McCabe England, S L; Crouch, R K; Zimmerman, A L; Makino, C L

    2009-01-01

    Vision begins with photoisomerization of 11-cis retinal to the all-trans conformation within the chromophore-binding pocket of opsin, leading to activation of a biochemical cascade. Release of all-trans retinal from the binding pocket curtails but does not fully quench the ability of opsin to activate transducin. All-trans retinal and some other analogs, such as beta-ionone, enhance opsin's activity, presumably on binding the empty chromophore-binding pocket. By recording from isolated salamander photoreceptors and from patches of rod outer segment membrane, we now show that high concentrations of beta-ionone suppressed circulating current in dark-adapted green-sensitive rods by inhibiting the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. There were also decreases in circulating current and flash sensitivity, and accelerated flash response kinetics in dark-adapted blue-sensitive (BS) rods and cones, and in ultraviolet-sensitive cones, at concentrations too low to inhibit the channels. These effects persisted in BS rods even after incubation with 9-cis retinal to ensure complete regeneration of their visual pigment. After long exposures to high concentrations of beta-ionone, recovery was incomplete unless 9-cis retinal was given, indicating that visual pigment had been bleached. Therefore, we propose that beta-ionone activates and bleaches some types of visual pigments, mimicking the effects of light.

  5. AAV delivery of wild-type rhodopsin preserves retinal function in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Haoyu; James, Thomas; Schwein, Alison; Shabashvili, Arseniy E; Hauswirth, William W; Gorbatyuk, Marina S; Lewin, Alfred S

    2011-05-01

    Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) is frequently caused by mutations in RHO, the gene for rod photoreceptor opsin. Earlier, a study on mice carrying mutated rhodopsin transgenes on either RHO + / +  or RHO + /- backgrounds suggested that the amount of wild-type rhodopsin affected survival of photoreceptors. Therefore, we treated P23H RHO transgenic mice with adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) expressing a cDNA clone of the rhodopsin gene (RHO301) that expressed normal opsin from the mouse opsin promoter. Analysis of the electroretinogram (ERG) demonstrated that increased expression of RHO301 slowed the rate of retinal degeneration in P23H mice: at 6 months, a-wave amplitudes were increased by 100% and b-wave amplitudes by 79%. In contrast, nontransgenic mice injected with AAV5 RHO301 demonstrated a decrease in the ERG, confirming the damaging effect of rhodopsin overproduction in normal photoreceptors. In P23H mice, the increase in the ERG amplitudes was correlated with improvement of retinal structure: the thickness of the outer nuclear layer in RHO301-treated eyes was increased by 80% compared with control eyes. These findings suggest that the wild-type RHO gene can be delivered to rescue retinal degeneration in mice carrying a RHO mutation and that increased production of normal rhodopsin can suppress the effect of the mutated protein. These findings make it possible to treat ADRP caused by different mutations of RHO with the expression of wild-type RHO.

  6. Cone-Specific Promoters for Gene Therapy of Achromatopsia and Other Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Guo-Jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Nork, T Michael; Sheibani, Nader; Gurel, Zafer; Boye, Sanford L; Peterson, James J; Boye, Shannon E; Hauswirth, William W; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors containing cone-specific promoters have rescued cone photoreceptor function in mouse and dog models of achromatopsia, but cone-specific promoters have not been optimized for use in primates. Using AAV vectors administered by subretinal injection, we evaluated a series of promoters based on the human L-opsin promoter, or a chimeric human cone transducin promoter, for their ability to drive gene expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in mice and nonhuman primates. Each of these promoters directed high-level GFP expression in mouse photoreceptors. In primates, subretinal injection of an AAV-GFP vector containing a 1.7-kb L-opsin promoter (PR1.7) achieved strong and specific GFP expression in all cone photoreceptors and was more efficient than a vector containing the 2.1-kb L-opsin promoter that was used in AAV vectors that rescued cone function in mouse and dog models of achromatopsia. A chimeric cone transducin promoter that directed strong GFP expression in mouse and dog cone photoreceptors was unable to drive GFP expression in primate cones. An AAV vector expressing a human CNGB3 gene driven by the PR1.7 promoter rescued cone function in the mouse model of achromatopsia. These results have informed the design of an AAV vector for treatment of patients with achromatopsia.

  7. Proximate and ultimate causes of variable visual sensitivities: insights from cichlid fish radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carleton, Karen L.; Dalton, Brian E.; Escobar-Camacho, Daniel; Nandamuri, Sri Pratima

    2016-01-01

    Animals vary in their sensitivities to different wavelengths of light. Sensitivity differences can have fitness implications in terms of animals’ ability to forage, find mates and avoid predators. As a result, visual systems are likely selected to operate in particular lighting environments and for specific visual tasks. This review focuses on cichlid vision, as cichlids have diverse visual sensitivities, and considerable progress has been made in determining the genetic basis for this variation. We describe both the proximate and ultimate mechanisms shaping cichlid visual diversity using the structure of Tinbergen’s four questions. We describe 1) the molecular mechanisms that tune visual sensitivities including changes in opsin sequence and expression; 2) the evolutionary history of visual sensitivity across the African cichlid flocks; 3) the ontological changes in visual sensitivity and how modifying this developmental program alters sensitivities among species; and 4) the fitness benefits of spectral tuning mechanisms with respect to survival and mating success. We further discuss progress to unravel the gene regulatory networks controlling opsin expression and suggest that a simple genetic architecture contributes to the lability of opsin gene expression. Finally, we identify unanswered questions including whether visual sensitivities are experiencing selection, and whether similar spectral tuning mechanisms shape visual sensitivities of other fishes. PMID:27061347

  8. Genetic Testing as a New Standard for Clinical Diagnosis of Color Vision Deficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff, Candice; Neitz, Maureen; Neitz, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The genetics underlying inherited color vision deficiencies is well understood: causative mutations change the copy number or sequence of the long (L), middle (M), or short (S) wavelength sensitive cone opsin genes. This study evaluated the potential of opsin gene analyses for use in clinical diagnosis of color vision defects. Methods We tested 1872 human subjects using direct sequencing of opsin genes and a novel genetic assay that characterizes single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using the MassArray system. Of the subjects, 1074 also were given standard psychophysical color vision tests for a direct comparison with current clinical methods. Results Protan and deutan deficiencies were classified correctly in all subjects identified by MassArray as having red–green defects. Estimates of defect severity based on SNPs that control photopigment spectral tuning correlated with estimates derived from Nagel anomaloscopy. Conclusions The MassArray assay provides genetic information that can be useful in the diagnosis of inherited color vision deficiency including presence versus absence, type, and severity, and it provides information to patients about the underlying pathobiology of their disease. Translational Relevance The MassArray assay provides a method that directly analyzes the molecular substrates of color vision that could be used in combination with, or as an alternative to current clinical diagnosis of color defects. PMID:27622081

  9. The influence of chromatic background on the photosensitivity of tilapia erythrophores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyh-Chi Chen

    2014-01-01

    Non-mammalian vertebrates and invertebrates use extraretinal photoreceptors to detect light and perform diverse non-image-forming functions. Compared to well-studied visual systems, the effect of ambient light conditions on photosensory systems of extraretinal photoreceptors is poorly understood. Chromatophores are photosensitive dermal pigment cells that play an important role in the formation of body color patterns to fit the surrounding environment. Here, we used tilapia erythrophores to investigate the relationship between environmental light and chromatophore photoresponses. All erythrophores from three spectral conditions aggregated their pigment granules in UV/short wavelengths and dispersed in middle/long wavelengths. Unlike retinal visual systems, environmental light did not change the usage of the primary opsins responsible for aggregation and dispersion. In addition, short wavelength-rich and red-shifted background conditions led to an inhibitory effect on erythrophore photoresponses. We suggest that, as extraretinal photoreceptors for non-image-forming functions, chromatophores directly adjust their photoresponse sensitivity via changes in opsin expression levels rather than opsin types when environmental light changes.

  10. The influence of chromatic background on the photosensitivity of tilapia erythrophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shyh-Chi; Hornsby, Mark A W; Robertson, R Meldrum; Hawryshyn, Craig W

    2014-02-15

    Non-mammalian vertebrates and invertebrates use extraretinal photoreceptors to detect light and perform diverse non-image-forming functions. Compared to well-studied visual systems, the effect of ambient light conditions on photosensory systems of extraretinal photoreceptors is poorly understood. Chromatophores are photosensitive dermal pigment cells that play an important role in the formation of body color patterns to fit the surrounding environment. Here, we used tilapia erythrophores to investigate the relationship between environmental light and chromatophore photoresponses. All erythrophores from three spectral conditions aggregated their pigment granules in UV/short wavelengths and dispersed in middle/long wavelengths. Unlike retinal visual systems, environmental light did not change the usage of the primary opsins responsible for aggregation and dispersion. In addition, short wavelength-rich and red-shifted background conditions led to an inhibitory effect on erythrophore photoresponses. We suggest that, as extraretinal photoreceptors for non-image-forming functions, chromatophores directly adjust their photoresponse sensitivity via changes in opsin expression levels rather than opsin types when environmental light changes.

  11. Why aye-ayes see blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Amanda D; Moritz, Gillian L; Fosbury, Robert A E; Kawamura, Shoji; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2012-03-01

    The capacity for cone-mediated color vision varies among nocturnal primates. Some species are colorblind, having lost the functionality of their short-wavelength-sensitive-1 (SWS1) opsin pigment gene. In other species, such as the aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis), the SWS1 gene remains intact. Recent studies focused on aye-ayes indicate that this gene has been maintained by natural selection and that the pigment has a peak sensitivity (lambda(max)) of 406 nm, which is -20 nm closer to the ultraviolet region of the spectrum than in most primates. The functional significance behind the retention and unusual lambda(max) of this opsin pigment is unknown, and it is perplexing given that all mammals are presumed to be colorblind in the dark. Here we comment on this puzzle and discuss recent findings on the color vision intensity thresholds of terrestrial vertebrates with comparable optics to aye-ayes. We draw attention to the twilight activities of aye-ayes and report that twilight is enriched in short-wavelength (bluish) light. We also show that the intensity of twilight and full moonlight is probably sufficient to support cone-mediated color vision. We speculate that the intact SWS1 opsin pigment gene of aye-ayes is a crepuscular adaptation and we report on the blueness of potential visual targets, such as scent marks and the brilliant blue arils of Ravenala madagascariensis.

  12. Non-invasive activation of optogenetic actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkner, Elisabeth; Berglund, Ken; Klein, Marguerita E.; Augustine, George J.; Hochgeschwender, Ute

    2014-03-01

    The manipulation of genetically targeted neurons with light (optogenetics) continues to provide unprecedented avenues into studying the function of the mammalian brain. However, potential translation into the clinical arena faces a number of significant hurdles, foremost among them the need for insertion of optical fibers into the brain to deliver light to opsins expressed on neuronal membranes. In order to overcome these hardware-related problems, we have developed an alternative strategy for delivering light to opsins which does not involve fiber implants. Rather, the light is produced by a protein, luciferase, which oxidizes intravenously applied substrate, thereby emitting bioluminescence. In proof-ofprinciple studies employing a fusion protein of a light-generating luciferase to a light-sensing opsin (luminopsin), we showed that light emitted by Gaussia luciferase is indeed able to activate channelrhodopsin, allowing modulation of neuronal activity when expressed in cultured neurons. Here we assessed applicability of the concept in vivo in mice expressing luminopsins from viral vectors and from genetically engineered transgenes. The experiments demonstrate that intravenously applied substrate reaches neurons in the brain, causing the luciferase to produce bioluminescence which can be imaged in vivo, and that activation of channelrhodopsin by bioluminescence is sufficient to affect behavior. Further developments of such technology based on combining optogenetics with bioluminescence - i.e. combining lightsensing molecules with biologically produced light through luciferases - should bring optogenetics closer to clinical applications.

  13. Extreme spectral richness in the eye of the Common Bluebottle butterfly, Graphium sarpedon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ju eChen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Butterfly eyes are furnished with a variety of photoreceptors of different spectral sensitivities often in species-specific manner. We have conducted an extensive comparative study to address the question of how their spectrally complex retinas evolved. Here we investigated the structure and function of the eye of the common bluebottle butterfly (Graphium sarpedon, using electrophysiological, anatomical and molecular approaches. Intracellular electrophysiology revealed that the eye contains photoreceptors of fifteen distinct spectral sensitivities. These can be divided into six spectral receptor classes: ultraviolet- (UV, violet- (V, blue- (B, blue-green- (BG, green- (G, and red- (R sensitive. The B, G and R classes respectively contain three, four and five subclasses. Fifteen is the record number of spectral receptors so far reported in a single insect eye. We localized these receptors by injecting dye into individual photoreceptors after recording their spectral sensitivities. We thus found that four of them are confined to the dorsal region, eight to the ventral, and three exist throughout the eye; the ventral eye region is spectrally richer than the dorsal region. We also identified mRNAs encoding visual pigment opsins of one ultraviolet, one blue and three long wavelength-absorbing types. Localization of these mRNAs by in situ hybridization revealed that the dorsal photoreceptors each express a single opsin mRNA, but more than half of the ventral photoreceptors coexpress two or three L opsin mRNAs. This expression pattern well explains the spectral organization of the Graphium compound eye.

  14. Making Sense of Optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guru, Akash; Post, Ryan J; Ho, Yi-Yun; Warden, Melissa R

    2015-07-25

    This review, one of a series of articles, tries to make sense of optogenetics, a recently developed technology that can be used to control the activity of genetically-defined neurons with light. Cells are first genetically engineered to express a light-sensitive opsin, which is typically an ion channel, pump, or G protein-coupled receptor. When engineered cells are then illuminated with light of the correct frequency, opsin-bound retinal undergoes a conformational change that leads to channel opening or pump activation, cell depolarization or hyperpolarization, and neural activation or silencing. Since the advent of optogenetics, many different opsin variants have been discovered or engineered, and it is now possible to stimulate or inhibit neuronal activity or intracellular signaling pathways on fast or slow timescales with a variety of different wavelengths of light. Optogenetics has been successfully employed to enhance our understanding of the neural circuit dysfunction underlying mood disorders, addiction, and Parkinson's disease, and has enabled us to achieve a better understanding of the neural circuits mediating normal behavior. It has revolutionized the field of neuroscience, and has enabled a new generation of experiments that probe the causal roles of specific neural circuit components.

  15. Optogenetics in Mice Performing a Visual Discrimination Task: Measurement and Suppression of Retinal Activation and the Resulting Behavioral Artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danskin, Bethanny; Denman, Daniel; Valley, Matthew; Ollerenshaw, Douglas; Williams, Derric; Groblewski, Peter; Reid, Clay; Olsen, Shawn; Blanche, Timothy; Waters, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques are used widely to perturb and interrogate neural circuits in behaving animals, but illumination can have additional effects, such as the activation of endogenous opsins in the retina. We found that illumination, delivered deep into the brain via an optical fiber, evoked a behavioral artifact in mice performing a visually guided discrimination task. Compared with blue (473 nm) and yellow (589 nm) illumination, red (640 nm) illumination evoked a greater behavioral artifact and more activity in the retina, the latter measured with electrical recordings. In the mouse, the sensitivity of retinal opsins declines steeply with wavelength across the visible spectrum, but propagation of light through brain tissue increases with wavelength. Our results suggest that poor retinal sensitivity to red light was overcome by relatively robust propagation of red light through brain tissue and stronger illumination of the retina by red than by blue or yellow light. Light adaptation of the retina, via an external source of illumination, suppressed retinal activation and the behavioral artifact without otherwise impacting behavioral performance. In summary, long wavelength optogenetic stimuli are particularly prone to evoke behavioral artifacts via activation of retinal opsins in the mouse, but light adaptation of the retina can provide a simple and effective mitigation of the artifact.

  16. Lamb Wave-Based Acoustic Radiation Force-Driven Particle Ring Formation Inside a Sessile Droplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Ha, Byunghang; Park, Jinsoo; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-04-05

    We demonstrate an acoustofluidic device using Lamb waves (LWs) to manipulate polystyrene (PS) microparticles suspended in a sessile droplet of water. The LW-based acoustofluidic platform used in this study is advantageous in that the device is actuated over a range of frequencies without changing the device structure or electrode pattern. In addition, the device is simple to operate and cheap to fabricate. The LWs, produced on a piezoelectric substrate, attenuate inside the fluid and create acoustic streaming flow (ASF) in the form of a poloidal flow with toroidal vortices. The PS particles experience direct acoustic radiation force (ARF) in addition to being influenced by the ASF, which drive the concentration of particles to form a ring. This phenomenon was previously attributed to the ASF alone, but the present experimental results confirm that the ARF plays an important role in forming the particle ring, which would not be possible in the presence of only the ASF. We used a range of actuation frequencies (45-280 MHz), PS particle diameters (1-10 μm), and droplet volumes (5, 7.5, and 10 μL) to experimentally demonstrate this phenomenon.

  17. Restoration of AMPTE/CHEM Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegriff, J.

    2006-12-01

    The highest time resolution digital data for the Charge-Energy-Mass (CHEM) Spectrometer instrument on the Active Magnetospheric Particle Explorers (AMPTE) mission has been restored and made available online at http://sd-www.jhuapl.edu/AMPTE. During the period 1984 to the beginning of 1989, CHEM measured the mass and charge-state compositions as well as the energy spectra and pitch-angle distributions of all major ions from H through Fe with energies from 0.3 to 300 keV/charge. The data cadence is less than one minute. With the spacecraft in a low inclination orbit passing through the magnetopause and well into the magnetosphere, many samplings of the ring-current were made. The data itself consist of so-called PHA (pulse height analysis) events, in which the energy per charge, time of flight, and total energy are measured for each particle. The original Fortran software for calculating fluxes from the PHA events has been ported from VMS to modern Unix Fortran compilers. The CHEM data will be very useful in conjunction with the upcoming Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) mission, which is part of NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) initiative, and this restoration effort was funded through the LWS Targeted Research and Technology (TR&T) program.

  18. The Galactic Centre in the Far Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Etxaluze, M; Tolls, V; Stark, A A; Gonzalez-Alfonso, E

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the far infrared dust emission from the Galactic Centre region, including the Circumnuclear Disk (CND) and other structures, using Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric observations. These Herschel data are complemented by unpublished observations by the Infrared Space Observatory Long Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO LWS), which used parallel mode scans to obtain photometric images of the region with a larger beam than Herschel but with a complementary wavelength coverage and more frequent sampling with ten detectors observing at ten different wavelengths in the range from 46 to 180 \\mum, where the emission peaks. We also include data from the MSX at 21.3 \\mum for completeness. We model the combined ISO LWS continuum plus Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric data toward the central 2 pc in Sgr A*, a region that includes the CND. We find that the FIR spectral energy distribution is best represented by a continuum that is the sum of three greybody curves from dust at temperatures of 90, 44.5, and 23 K. We ...

  19. [Current views on vision of mammals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, T V

    2012-01-01

    In the review, research data are presented on mammals' vision including visual pigments, color and contrast vision, and visual behaviour in different species. It is shown that in course of evolution mammals were gradually losing the elements of daylight cone vision system that are typical of other vertebrates. In monotremes, visual pigments SWS2 (cone blue-sensitive 2) and MWS/LWS (green/red-sensitive) are still present, as well as rod RH1. Theria, except some primates, also have two cone visual pigments: SWS1 (ultraviolet/violet or blue-sensitive 1) and MWS/LWS along with rod RH1. Humans and some other higher primates evolved the new visual pigment, MWS, and acquired trichromatic vision. Marine mammals (cetaceans and pinnipeds) and some species of other orders have lost also the visual pigment SWS1, probably due to specificity of processing the information received by these cones. Current view on mammals' vision with two cone pigments and rods is presented. Data on maximum spectral sensitivity of visual pigments in different species and orders are given along with data on spatial contrast sensation. High visual acuity has been acquired by ungulates, artiodactyls, and primates, while the highest one--by humans with their specialized fovea.

  20. Current Status on NASA's Living With a Star Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhathakurta, M.; Stcyr, O. C.

    Living With a Star is a space weather-focused and application-driven research program. Its goal is to develop the scientific understanding necessary to effectively address those aspects of the connected Sun-Earth system that directly affect life and society. This program is part of the Sun-Earth Connection (SEC) theme within the office of Space Science. Living With a Star is a cross-cutting program whose goals and objectives have the following links to each of the four NASA Strategic Enterprises: Space Science: LWS quantifies the physics, dynamics, and behavior of the only stellar/planetary system we can see at a close distance. Earth Science: LWS improves understanding of the effects of solar variability and disturbances on terrestrial climate change. Human Space Flight: LWS provides data and scientific understanding required for advanced warning of energetic particle events that affect the safety of humans in space. Aeronautics and Space Transportation: LWS provides detailed characterization of radiation environments useful in the design of more reliable electronic components for air and space transportation system. LWS Program is implemented by a sequence of inter-related science missions, space environment test bed and targeted research and technology. 1) A space weather research network of spacecraft will provide continuous observations of the Sun-Earth system for interlocking, dual use, scientific and applications research. Flight of a Solar Dynamics Observatory (launch 2008) to: - Probe solar interior, especially region where the dynamo is located, vs time to unravel physics of ``engine'' driving solar variability. -Track, for first time, solar active regions/solar storm regions simultaneously above and below solar surface to understand development and triggering of explosive events (Flares, Coronal Mass Ejections). Flight of Solar Sentinels, launch before and around next solar max to provide global view of the heliosphere, track solar active regions over

  1. Ciliary photoreceptors in the cerebral eyes of a protostome larva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passamaneck Yale J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eyes in bilaterian metazoans have been described as being composed of either ciliary or rhabdomeric photoreceptors. Phylogenetic distribution, as well as distinct morphologies and characteristic deployment of different photopigments (ciliary vs. rhabdomeric opsins and transduction pathways argue for the co-existence of both of these two photoreceptor types in the last common bilaterian ancestor. Both receptor types exist throughout the Bilateria, but only vertebrates are thought to use ciliary photoreceptors for directional light detection in cerebral eyes, while all other invertebrate bilaterians studied utilize rhabdomeric photoreceptors for this purpose. In protostomes, ciliary photoreceptors that express c-opsin have been described only from a non-visual deep-brain photoreceptor. Their homology with vertebrate rods and cones of the human eye has been hypothesized to represent a unique functional transition from non-visual to visual roles in the vertebrate lineage. Results To test the hypothesis that protostome cerebral eyes employ exclusively rhabdomeric photoreceptors, we investigated the ultrastructure of the larval eyes in the brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. We show that these pigment-cup eyes consist of a lens cell and a shading pigment cell, both of which are putative photoreceptors, deploying a modified, enlarged cilium for light perception, and have axonal connections to the larval brain. Our investigation of the gene expression patterns of c-opsin, Pax6 and otx in these eyes confirms that the larval eye spots of brachiopods are cerebral eyes that deploy ciliary type photoreceptors for directional light detection. Interestingly, c-opsin is also expressed during early embryogenesis in all potential apical neural cells, becoming restricted to the anterior neuroectoderm, before expression is initiated in the photoreceptor cells of the eyes. Coincident with the expression of c-opsin in the presumptive neuroectoderm

  2. Rovibrationally-resolved photodissociation of NH and application to the solar UV opacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, G.; Kuri, A.; Fontenla, J. M.; Stancil, P. C.; Wang, J. G.

    2014-05-01

    Rovibrationally-resolved photodissociation cross sections of NH have been evaluated using a combination of ab initio and experimentally derived potential curves and dipole transition moments. Here we present results for the three electronic transitions: 23Σ- interstellar gas, cross sections for X3Σ- (v = 0 , J = 0) to 23Σ- and 23 Π dominate, but for the high density and temperature conditions in stellar atmospheres, the LTE cross section to the A3 Π becomes competitive. Explicit application of the cross sections to the solar UV opacity will be presented. In particular, the NH photodissociation opacity is found to affect the non-LTE behavior of some species such as Cr I and V I. The work at UGA was partially supported by NASA grant HST-AR-11776.01-A. The work of JMF was supported by NASA LWS grant NNX09AJ22G. GS acknowledges travel support by the International Cooperation and Exchange Foundation of CAEP.

  3. Characterizing the Properties of Coronal Magnetic Null Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Graham; DeRosa, Marc; Wagner, Eric

    2015-08-01

    The topology of the coronal magnetic field plays a role in a wide range of phenomena, from Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) through heating of the corona. One fundamental topological feature is the null point, where the magnetic field vanishes. These points are natural sites of magnetic reconnection, and hence the release of energy stored in the magnetic field. We present preliminary results of a study using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory to characterize the properties and evolution of null points in a Potential Field Source Surface model of the coronal field. The main properties considered are the lifetime of the null points, their distribution with height, and how they form and subsequently vanish.This work is supported by NASA/LWS Grant NNX14AD45G, and by NSF/SHINE grant 1357018.

  4. Hydraulic Diagnostic Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-02

    ALL THE LAWPS BY BLOOS, 36 ;FIRST THE P’JfS (5 LfIfS).THEN RESER4OIR 𔃾 LWS)’. 37 ;ETC LAWFS WILL STAY ON FOR V.2 SECOND THEN SEQUENCE 38 TO NEXT...NO CAIRY RERS O W6 238. 152 NOV F6a ,CR.L RUDE LAWP 86F 39 153 OUTL P1,A ;,ft LITE IT 154 5 156 157 158 ;RESERVOIR ROUTINE 159 ;IUE TO SETTING OF POT...SLBTRACT 214 i450 PSI FRO" THE RESULT TO TEST IF OUR PRECHFWGE PrESSURE IS ADEQUATE 215 ;FOR THE SYSTEMN- IF NOT iE LIGHT THE RAT LAWP 216 217 K-6 NADC

  5. Incorporating Risks in Economic Values for Pigs in Smallholder Production Systems in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbuthias, Jackson; Rewe, Thomas; Okeno, Tobias;

    production systems in Kenya. In addition to traditional bio-economic profit model, a risk-rated model was used to derive risk-rated economic values. This model accounted for imperfect knowledge concerning risk attitude of farmers and variance of input and output prices. Positive economic values obtained......This study derived economic values for production traits (dressing percentage, live weight for growers and sow) and functional traits (feed intake for growers and sow, preweaning, postweaning, and sow survival rates, total number of piglets born, and farrowing interval) in different smallholder pig...... for traits DP, LWg, LWs, PoSR, PrSR, SoSR and TNB indicate that targeting them in improvement would positively impact profitability in pig breeding programmes. Accounting for risks in the EVs did not yield errors greater than ±50%. Therefore both traditional and risk-rated models can be satisfactorily used...

  6. Observational evidence of CMEs interacting in the inner heliosphere as inferred from MHD simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Lugaz, N; Roussev, I I; Gombosi, T I

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of multiple Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) has been observed by LASCO coronagraphs and by near-Earth spacecraft, and it is thought to be an important cause of geo-effective storms, large Solar Energetic Particles events and intense Type II radio bursts. New and future missions such as STEREO, the LWS Sentinels, and the Solar Orbiter will provide additional observations of the interaction of multiple CMEs between the Sun and the Earth. We present the results of simulations of two and more CMEs interacting in the inner heliosphere performed with the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF). Based on those simulations, we discuss the observational evidence of the interaction of multiple CMEs, both in situ and from coronagraphs. The clearest evidence of the interaction of the CMEs are the large temperature in the sheath, due to the shocks merging, and the brightness increase in coronagraphic images, associated with the interaction of the leading edges. The importance of having multiple satellites at...

  7. RAD750 SBC Usage for the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the first space weather research mission in the Living with a Star (LWS) Program. The science objective of the mission is to understand the solar variations that influence life on Earth. The mission is developed and managed by NASA/GSFC with a launch date in 2008 on a five-year mission using a geosynchronous inclined orbit. Involved with the mission are three science instruments: a helloseisic and magnetic imagery (HMI), extreme ultraviolet variability experiment (EVE), and solar helispheric activity research prediction program (SHARPP). 6U qualification Vib test has been completed with successful results (no interrupts detected at 1 nanosecond). Other test result to be reported at workshop.

  8. Zuordnung der Schmerzlokalisation bei monosegmentaler Wurzelirritation in der unteren Lendenwirbelsäule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machacek P

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Studienziel: Ziel dieser Studie ist es, zu klären, wie zuverlässig die in der Literatur angegebenen klassischen Dermatommodelle (Darstellung der Schmerzausstrahlung bei Läsion einzelner Nervenwurzeln den entsprechenden Segmenten der Lendenwirbelsäule zugeordnet werden können. Methode: Es werden eigene Ergebnisse und externe Studien, die sich mit bandscheibenbedingten Schmerzprojektionen beschäftigen, verglichen. Die Literatursuche erfolgt EDV-unterstützt. Ergebnisse: Bezüglich der Dermatomverläufe im Bereich der unteren LWS gibt es keine eindeutigen Übereinstimmungen. Es besteht ein Widerspruch zwischen der am häufigsten auftretenden Schmerzprojektion (S1 und dem am häufigsten operierten Segment (L4/L5. Schlußfolgerung: Trotz wissenschaftlich fundierter Modelle ist die Schmerzausstrahlung gegenüber den klassischen Dermatommodellen ein nur bedingt geeigneter Parameter zur Segmentdefinition.

  9. Photoionization model for G29.96-0.02

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Morisset

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos un modelo de fotoionizaci on detallado de la regi on H II ultracompacta (UCH II G29.96{0.02 basado en el espectro combinado de los instrumentos SWS y LWS a bordo del ISO. Las intensidades de la mayor parte de las l neas observadas son reproducidas cuando G29.96{0.02 es descrita como una nebulosa con dos regiones de diferente densidad. Encontramos que la estrella ionizante es m as fr a que el tipo espectral predicho mediante observaciones en el infrarrojo cercano y que su edad es 3 10 6 a~nos, es decir, mayor al tiempo t pico de vida de las regiones UCH II. Las abundancias de los elementos principales son determinadas con precisi on.

  10. Action spectra of zebrafish cone photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duco Endeman

    Full Text Available Zebrafish is becoming an increasingly popular model in the field of visual neuroscience. Although the absorption spectra of its cone photopigments have been described, the cone action spectra were still unknown. In this study we report the action spectra of the four types of zebrafish cone photoreceptors, determined by measuring voltage responses upon light stimulation using whole cell patch clamp recordings. A generic template of photopigment absorption spectra was fit to the resulting action spectra in order to establish the maximum absorption wavelength, the A2-based photopigment contribution and the size of the β-wave of each cone-type. Although in general there is close correspondence between zebrafish cone action- and absorbance spectra, our data suggest that in the case of MWS- and LWS-cones there is appreciable contribution of A2-based photopigments and that the β-wave for these cones is smaller than expected based on the absorption spectra.

  11. Life Cycle Approach to designing, manufacturing and assessing a Living Wall System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Giordano

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent times Life Cycle Approach in building design and construction was set up by means technical standards (e.g. CEN/TC 350 as well as comprehensive impact assessment methods (e.g. LEED® and ITACA. Although standards and methods may be considered as accurate and exhaustive, product and system design needs a further organisation and systematisation of those environmental requirements tricky to take into account in preliminary design. It stands to reason such trickiness becomes more important in industrial research projects. Starting with the assumption that there is an urgent need to overcome the gap between design and production, the paper deals with the outcomes of a research project focused on detailed designing, manufacturing and monitoring of a Living Wall System (LWS aimed at carrying into action a Life Cycle Approach.

  12. Launching transverse-electric Localized Waves from a circular waveguide

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-07-01

    Axially symmetric transverse electric (TE) modes of a circular waveguide section are used to synthesize the vector TE Localized Wave (LW) field at the open end of the waveguide section. The necessary excitation coefficients of these modes are obtained by the method of matching, taking advantage of the modal power orthogonality relations. The necessary excitation of modes provided by a number of coaxial loop antennas inserted inside the waveguide section. The antennas currents are computed from the solution of the waveguide excitation inverse problem. The accuracy of the synthesized wave field (compared to the mathematical model) and the power efficiency of the generation technique are evaluated in order to practically realize a launcher for LWs in the microwave regime. © 2011 IEEE.

  13. Considering the Influence of Nonadaptive Evolution on Primate Color Vision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L Jacobs

    Full Text Available Color vision in primates is variable across species, and it represents a rare trait in which the genetic mechanisms underlying phenotypic variation are fairly well-understood. Research on primate color vision has largely focused on adaptive explanations for observed variation, but it remains unclear why some species have trichromatic or polymorphic color vision while others are red-green color blind. Lemurs, in particular, are highly variable. While some species are polymorphic, many closely-related species are strictly dichromatic. We provide the first characterization of color vision in a wild population of red-bellied lemurs (Eulemur rubriventer, Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar with a sample size (87 individuals; NX chromosomes = 134 large enough to detect even rare variants (0.95 probability of detection at ≥ 3% frequency. By sequencing exon 5 of the X-linked opsin gene we identified opsin spectral sensitivity based on known diagnostic sites and found this population to be dichromatic and monomorphic for a long wavelength allele. Apparent fixation of this long allele is in contrast to previously published accounts of Eulemur species, which exhibit either polymorphic color vision or only the medium wavelength opsin. This unexpected result may represent loss of color vision variation, which could occur through selective processes and/or genetic drift (e.g., genetic bottleneck. To indirectly assess the latter scenario, we genotyped 55 adult red-bellied lemurs at seven variable microsatellite loci and used heterozygosity excess and M-ratio tests to assess if this population may have experienced a recent genetic bottleneck. Results of heterozygosity excess but not M-ratio tests suggest a bottleneck might have occurred in this red-bellied lemur population. Therefore, while selection may also play a role, the unique color vision observed in this population might have been influenced by a recent genetic bottleneck. These results emphasize the

  14. Considering the Influence of Nonadaptive Evolution on Primate Color Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Rachel L; Bradley, Brenda J

    2016-01-01

    Color vision in primates is variable across species, and it represents a rare trait in which the genetic mechanisms underlying phenotypic variation are fairly well-understood. Research on primate color vision has largely focused on adaptive explanations for observed variation, but it remains unclear why some species have trichromatic or polymorphic color vision while others are red-green color blind. Lemurs, in particular, are highly variable. While some species are polymorphic, many closely-related species are strictly dichromatic. We provide the first characterization of color vision in a wild population of red-bellied lemurs (Eulemur rubriventer, Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar) with a sample size (87 individuals; NX chromosomes = 134) large enough to detect even rare variants (0.95 probability of detection at ≥ 3% frequency). By sequencing exon 5 of the X-linked opsin gene we identified opsin spectral sensitivity based on known diagnostic sites and found this population to be dichromatic and monomorphic for a long wavelength allele. Apparent fixation of this long allele is in contrast to previously published accounts of Eulemur species, which exhibit either polymorphic color vision or only the medium wavelength opsin. This unexpected result may represent loss of color vision variation, which could occur through selective processes and/or genetic drift (e.g., genetic bottleneck). To indirectly assess the latter scenario, we genotyped 55 adult red-bellied lemurs at seven variable microsatellite loci and used heterozygosity excess and M-ratio tests to assess if this population may have experienced a recent genetic bottleneck. Results of heterozygosity excess but not M-ratio tests suggest a bottleneck might have occurred in this red-bellied lemur population. Therefore, while selection may also play a role, the unique color vision observed in this population might have been influenced by a recent genetic bottleneck. These results emphasize the need to

  15. On the origins of arrestin and rhodopsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez Carlos E

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are the most numerous proteins in mammalian genomes, and the most common targets of clinical drugs. However, their evolution remains enigmatic. GPCRs are intimately associated with trimeric G proteins, G protein receptor kinases, and arrestins. We conducted phylogenetic studies to reconstruct the history of arrestins. Those findings, in turn, led us to investigate the origin of the photosensory GPCR rhodopsin. Results We found that the arrestin clan is comprised of the Spo0M protein family in archaea and bacteria, and the arrestin and Vps26 families in eukaryotes. The previously known animal arrestins are members of the visual/beta subfamily, which branched from the founding "alpha" arrestins relatively recently. Curiously, we identified both the oldest visual/beta arrestin and opsin genes in Cnidaria (but not in sponges. The arrestin clan has 14 human members: 6 alphas, 4 visual/betas, and 4 Vps26 genes. Others recently showed that the 3D structure of mammalian Vps26 and the biochemical function of the yeast alpha arrestin PalF are similar to those of beta arrestins. We note that only alpha arrestins have PY motifs (known to bind WW domains in their C-terminal tails, and only visual/betas have helix I in the Arrestin N domain. Conclusion We identified ciliary opsins in Cnidaria and propose this subfamily is ancestral to all previously known animal opsins. That finding is consistent with Darwin's theory that eyes evolved once, and lends some support to Parker's hypothesis that vision triggered the Cambrian explosion of life forms. Our arrestin findings have implications on the evolution of GPCR signaling, and on the biological roles of human alpha arrestins.

  16. Expressions of visual pigments and synaptic proteins in neonatal chick retina exposed to light of variable photoperiods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KUMAR ABHIRAM JHA; TAPAS C NAG; SHASHI WADHWA; TARA SANKAR ROY

    2016-12-01

    Light causes damage to the retina, which is one of the supposed factors for age-related macular degeneration inhuman. Some animal species show drastic retinal changes when exposed to intense light (e.g. albino rats). Althoughbirds have a pigmented retina, few reports indicated its susceptibility to light damage. To know how light influences acone-dominated retina (as is the case with human), we examined the effects of moderate light intensity on the retina ofwhite Leghorn chicks (Gallus g. domesticus). The newly hatched chicks were initially acclimatized at 500 lux for 7days in 12 h light: 12 h dark cycles (12L:12D). From posthatch day (PH) 8 until PH 30, they were exposed to 2000 luxat 12L:12D, 18L:6D (prolonged light) and 24L:0D (constant light) conditions. The retinas were processed fortransmission electron microscopy and the level of expressions of rhodopsin, S- and L/M cone opsins, and synapticproteins (Synaptophysin and PSD-95) were determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Rearing in24L:0D condition caused disorganization of photoreceptor outer segments. Consequently, there were significantlydecreased expressions of opsins and synaptic proteins, compared to those seen in 12L:12D and 18L:6D conditions.Also, there were ultrastructural changes in outer and inner plexiform layer (OPL, IPL) of the retinas exposed to24L:0D condition. Our data indicate that the cone-dominated chick retina is affected in constant light condition, withchanges (decreased) in opsin levels. Also, photoreceptor alterations lead to an overall decrease in synaptic proteinexpressions in OPL and IPL and death of degenerated axonal processes in IPL.

  17. QM/MM Structure, Enantioselectivity and Spectroscopy of HydroxyRetinals and Insights into the Evolution of Color Vision in Small White Butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekharan, Sivakumar; Yokoyama, Shozo

    2011-01-01

    Since Vogt’s discovery of A3-retinal or 3-hydroxyretinal in insects in 1983 and Matsui’s discovery of A4-retinal or 4-hydroxyretinal in firefly squid in 1988, hydroxyretinal-protein interactions mediating vision remains largely unexplored. In the present study, A3- and A4-retinals are theoretically incorporated into squid and bovine visual pigments using the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (SORCI+Q//B3LYP/6-31G(d):Amber96) method and insights into the structure, enantioselectivity and spectroscopy are gathered and presented for the first time. Contrary to general perception, our findings rule out the formation of hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl-bearing β-ionone ring part of retinal and opsin. Compared to A1-pigments, A3- and A4-pigments exhibit slightly blue-shifted absorption maxima due to increase in bond-length alternation of the hydroxyretinal. We suggest that, (i) The binding site of firefly squid (Watasenia scintillians) opsin is very similar to that of the Japanese common squid (Todarodes pacificus) opsin, (ii) Molecular mechanism of spectral tuning in the small white butterflies involve sites S116, T185 and breaking of hydrogen bond between sites E180 and T185; and finally, (iii) A3-retinal may have occurred during the conversion of A1- to A2-retinal and insects may have acquired them, in order to absorb light in the blue-green wavelength region and to speed up the G-protein signaling cascade. PMID:22087641

  18. A naturally occurring mouse model of achromatopsia: characterization of the mutation in cone transducin and subsequent retinal phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobling, Andrew I; Vessey, Kirstan A; Waugh, Michelle; Mills, Samuel A; Fletcher, Erica L

    2013-05-09

    This work investigates a novel, naturally occurring mouse model of achromatopsia. The specific missense mutation within the Gnat2 gene was identified and the subsequent retinal phenotype characterized. The Gnat2 sequence was amplified using PCR from BALB/c and Gnat2(c.518A>G) retinae and the product sequenced. Retinal function was assessed at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months using the electroretinogram. Transducin and opsin expression were assessed at 3 and 12 months using immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR. Retinal remodeling and Müller cell gliosis were investigated using immunocytochemistry. An A to G missense mutation at position 518 of the Gnat2 gene was identified that resulted in an aspartic acid to glycine substitution. Gnat2(c.518A>G) animals showed no cone response, while the rod response was normal except for a decrease in the photoreceptor response at 12 months (a-wave, -14%). Gnat2(c.518A>G) retinal sections showed no transducin immunolabeling; however, protein was detected via Western blot. Gnat2 gene expression was only decreased at 12 months of age (-27%). There was reduced cone number at 12 months (-27%) and M-opsin showed evidence of mislocalization. Displaced photoreceptor terminals and altered horizontal cell, cone/rod bipolar cell morphology were evident at 3 months, becoming more extensive at 12 months with the emergence of Müller cell gliosis. The Gnat2(c.518A>G) mouse contains a missense mutation that results in no cone function due to a misfolding of transducin. Cone photoreceptors also show signs of opsin mislocalization, retinal remodeling and degeneration. This naturally occurring model shows all the hallmark signs of achromatopsia.

  19. Specialized photoreceptor composition in the raptor fovea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitkus, Mindaugas; Olsson, Peter; Toomey, Matthew B; Corbo, Joseph C; Kelber, Almut

    2017-02-15

    The retinae of many bird species contain a depression with high photoreceptor density known as the fovea. Many species of raptors have two foveae, a deep central fovea and a shallower temporal fovea. Birds have six types of photoreceptors: rods, active in dim light, double cones that are thought to mediate achromatic discrimination, and four types of single cones mediating color vision. To maximize visual acuity, the fovea should only contain photoreceptors contributing to high-resolution vision. Interestingly, it has been suggested that raptors might lack double cones in the fovea. We used transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry to evaluate this claim in five raptor species: the common buzzard (Buteo buteo), the honey buzzard (Pernis apivorus), the Eurasian sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus), the red kite (Milvus milvus) and the peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus). We found that all species, except the Eurasian sparrowhawk, lack double cones in the center of the central fovea. The size of the double cone-free zone differed between species. Only the common buzzard had a double cone-free zone in the temporal fovea. In three species, we examined opsin expression in the central fovea and found evidence that rod opsin positive cells were absent and violet-sensitive cone and green-sensitive cone opsin positive cells were present. We conclude that not only double cones, but also single cones may contribute to high-resolution vision in birds, and that raptors may in fact possess high-resolution tetrachromatic vision in the central fovea. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Establishing a fiber-optic-based optical neural interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamantidis, Antoine R; Zhang, Feng; de Lecea, Luis; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-08-01

    Selective expression of opsins in genetically defined neurons makes it possible to control a subset of neurons without affecting nearby cells and processes in the intact brain, but light must still be delivered to the target brain structure. Light scattering limits the delivery of light from the surface of the brain. For this reason, we have developed a fiber-optic-based optical neural interface (ONI), which allows optical access to any brain structure in freely moving mammals. The ONI system is constructed by modifying the small animal cannula system from PlasticsOne. The system for bilateral stimulation consists of a bilateral cannula guide that has been stereotactically implanted over the target brain region, a screw cap for securing the optical fiber to the animal's head, a fiber guard modified from the internal cannula adapter, and a bare fiber whose length is customized based on the depth of the target region. For unilateral stimulation, a single-fiber system can be constructed using unilateral cannula parts from PlasticsOne. We describe here the preparation of the bilateral ONI system and its use in optical stimulation of the mouse or rat brain. Delivery of opsin-expressing virus and implantation of the ONI may be conducted in the same surgical session; alternatively, with a transgenic animal no opsin virus is delivered during the surgery. Similar procedures are useful for deep or superficial injections (even for neocortical targets, although in some cases surface light-emitting diodes or cortex-apposed fibers can be used for the most superficial cortical targets).

  1. ISO Key Project: Exploring the Full Range of Quasar/Agn Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Belinda; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    While most of the work on this program has been completed, as previously reported, the portion of the program dealing with the subtopic of ISO LWS data analysis and reduction for the LWS Extragalactic Science Team and its leader, Dr. Howard Smith, is still active. This program in fact continues to generate results, and newly available computer modeling has extended the value of the datasets. As a result the team requests a one-year no-cost extension to this program, through 31 December 2004. The essence of the proposal is to perform ISO spectroscopic studies, including data analysis and modeling, of star-formation regions using an ensemble of archival space-based data from the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer and Short Wavelength Spectrometer, but including as well some other spectroscopic databases. Four kinds of regions are considered in the studies: (1) disks around more evolved objects; (2) young, low or high mass pre-main sequence stars in star-formation regions; (3) star formation in external, bright IR galaxies; and (4) the galactic center. One prime focus of the program is the OH lines in the far infrared. The program has the following goals: 1) Refine the data analysis of ISO observations to obtain deeper and better SNR results on selected sources. The ISO data itself underwent 'pipeline 10' reductions in early 2001, and additional 'hands-on data reduction packages' were supplied by the ISO teams in 2001. The Fabry-Perot database is particularly sensitive to noise and slight calibration errors; 2) Model the atomic and molecular line shapes, in particular the OH lines, using revised Monte-Carlo techniques developed by the SWAS team at the Center for Astrophysics; 3) Attend scientific meetings and workshops; 4) Perform E&PO activities related to infrared astrophysics and/or spectroscopy.

  2. Wetland treatment of oil and gas well waste waters. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadlec, R.; Srinivasan, K.

    1995-08-01

    Constructed wetlands are small on-site systems that possess three of the most desirable components of an industrial waste water treatment scheme: low cost, low maintenance and upset resistance. The main objective of the present study is to extend the knowledge base of wetland treatment systems to include processes and substances of particular importance to small, on-site systems receiving oil and gas well wastewaters. A list of the most relevant and comprehensive publications on the design of wetlands for water quality improvement was compiled and critically reviewed. Based on our literature search and conversations with researchers in the private sector, toxic organics such as Phenolics and b-naphthoic acid, (NA), and metals such as CU(II) and CR(VI) were selected as target adsorbates. A total of 90 lysimeters equivalent to a laboratory-scale wetland were designed and built to monitor the uptake and transformation of toxic organics and the immobilization of metal ions. Studies on the uptake of toxic organics such as phenol and b-naphthoic acid (NA) and heavy metals such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI), the latter two singly or as non-stoichiometric mixtures by laboratory-type wetlands (LWs) were conducted. These LWs were designed and built during the first year of this study. A road map and guidelines for a field-scale implementation of a wetland system for the treatment of oil and gas wastewaters have been suggested. Two types of wetlands, surface flow (SF) and sub surface flow (SSF), have been considered, and the relative merits of each configuration have been reviewed.

  3. Identification of candidate genes and mutations in QTL regions for chicken growth using bioinformatic analysis of NGS and SNP-chip data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad eAhsan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mapping of chromosomal regions harboring genetic polymorphisms that regulate complex traits is usually followed by a search for the causative mutations underlying the observed effects. This is often a challenging task even after fine mapping, as millions of base pairs including many genes will typically need to be investigated. Thus to trace the causative mutation(s there is a great need for efficient bioinformatic strategies. Here, we searched for genes and mutations regulating growth in the Virginia chicken lines – an experimental population comprising two lines that have been divergently selected for body weight at 56 days for more than 50 generations. Several QTL regions have been mapped in an F2 intercross between the lines, and the regions have subsequently been replicated and fine mapped using an Advanced Intercross Line. We have further analyzed the QTL regions where the largest genetic divergence between the High-Weight selected (HWS and Low-Weight selected (LWS lines was observed. Such regions, covering about 37% of the actual QTL regions, were identified by comparing the allele frequencies of the HWS and LWS lines using both individual 60K SNP chip genotyping of birds and analysis of read proportions from genome resequencing of DNA pools. Based on a combination of criteria including significance of the QTL, allele frequency difference of identified mutations between the selected lines, gene information on relevance for growth, and the predicted functional effects of identified mutations we propose here a subset of candidate mutations of highest priority for further evaluation in functional studies. The candidate mutations were identified within the GCG, IGFBP2, GRB14, CRIM1, FGF16, VEGFR-2, ALG11, EDN1, SNX6 and BIRC7 genes. We believe that the proposed method of combining different types of genomic information increases the probability that the genes underlying the observed QTL effects are represented among the candidate mutations

  4. Pemetaan batimetri sebagai informasi dasar untuk penempatan fish apartment di perairan Bangsring, Kabupaten Banyuwangi, Jawa Timur (Bathymetry mapping as basic information for fish apartment placement in Bangsring waters, Banyuwangi, East Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Arif Zainul Fuad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present research was to map the bathymetry of the Bangsring coastal area, Banyuwangi. Depth data obtained are used to consider the suitable location for fish apartment placement. The depth of the water was measured using a single beam echosounder with a frequency of 50 Hz. The data obtained by sounding process corrected by Tidal data. The tidal data measured during sampling with the observation interval of 30 minutes. The tidal correction was performed to get the depth value relative to lowest Water Surface (LWS. The results showed the depth of the Bangsring coastal area ranged from 2-49 meters. The deepest region is in the southeast of the research area. Based on the depth of the waters, the locations that can be an alternative placement of fish apartment is located by distance of 200- 250 meters in front of Bangsring coastal area with total area  approximately 30 Ha Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk memetakan kedalaman perairan Bangsring, Banyuwangi. Data kedalaman yang didapat dari pemeruman selanjutnya digunakan sebagai pertimbangan untuk mencari alternatif lokasi penempatan fish apartment. Kedalaman perairan di ukur menggunakan Single Beam Echosounder dengan frekuensi 50 Hz. Pemeruman dilakukan selama 2 hari yaitu pada tanggal 17 dan 18 Maret 2016 dengan metode zig zag . Hasil pengukuran kedalaman selanjutnya di koreksi terhadap pasang surut. Pasang surut diukur selama pelaksanaan pemeruman dengan interval pengamatan 30 menit. Koreksi pasang surut dilakukan untuk mendapatkan nilai kedalaman relatif terhadap Lowest Water Surface (LWS. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan kedalaman Perairan Bangsring Berkisar antara 2-49 meter. Wilayah terdalam berada dibagian tenggara area penelitian. Berdasarkan kedalaman perairan tersebut, maka lokasi Perairan di Bangsring yang dapat dijadikan alternatif penempatan fish apartment adalah di perairan depan pantai bagian timur dengan jarak sejauh 200-250 meter dari garis pantai Bangsring dengan

  5. Modeling dichromatic and trichromatic sensitivity to the color properties of fruits eaten by squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Araújo, Mariana F P; Lima, Eldianne M; Pessoa, Valdir F

    2006-12-01

    Most platyrrhines have a visual polymorphism that is characterized by the presence of multiple alleles of the M/LWS gene on the X chromosome. This polymorphism is probably maintained by selection. There are two possible mechanisms by which this can be explained: First, heterozygous females may have perceptual advantages over dichromats, such that trichromacy would be favored via the existence of different visual pigments. This is known as selection by heterosis. Second, dichromacy may be advantageous in some situations, with polymorphism being maintained by frequency-dependent selection. In this study the reflectance spectra of fruits and flowers eaten by a troop of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) in Eastern Amazon were measured using a spectrophotometer. S. sciureus have an SWS cone with a spectral tuning of approximately 430 nm, and three M/LWS alleles with spectral tunings of 535 nm, 550 nm, and 562 nm. Based on the spectral tunings of the different phenotypes and the spectral data obtained from the food items, the responses of the different visual systems to the measured objects were modeled and then compared. The model predicted that trichromatic phenotypes would have an advantage over dichromats in detecting fruits and flowers from background foliage, which suggests that heterosis is the mechanism for maintaining polymorphism in S. sciureus. On the other hand, a large proportion of fruits could not be detected by any of the phenotypes. Additional studies are necessary to determine whether other important aspects of the primates' visual world, such as prey, predator, and conspecific detection, favor tri- or dichromacy.

  6. Solar Cycle Variation and Multipoint Studies of ICME Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the Living With a Star program is to understand the Sun-Earth connection sufficiently well that we can solve problems critical to life and society. This can most effectively be done in the short term using observations from our past and on-going programs. Not only can this approach solve some of the pressing issues but also it can provide ideas for the deployment of future spacecraft in the LWS program. The proposed effort uses data from NEAR, SOHO, Wind, ACE and Pioneer Venus in quadrature, multipoint, and solar cycle studies to study the interplanetary coronal mass ejection and its role in the magnetic flux cycle of the Sun. ICMEs are most important to the LWS objectives because the solar wind conditions associated with these structures are the most geoeffective of any solar wind phenomena. Their ability to produce strong geomagnetic disturbances arises first because of their high speed. This high speed overtakes the ambient solar wind producing a bow shock wave similar to the terrestrial bow shock. In the new techniques we develop as part of this effort we exploit this feature of ICMEs. This shocked plasma has a greater velocity, higher density and stronger magnetic field than the ambient solar wind, conditions that can enhance geomagnetic activity. The driving ICME is a large magnetic structure expanding outward in the solar wind [Gosling, 19961. The ICMEs magnetic field is generally much higher than that in the ambient solar wind and the velocity is high. The twisted nature of the magnetic field in an ICME almost ensures that sometime during the ICME conditions favorable for geomagnetic storm initiation will occur.

  7. High blood pressure and visual sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Alvin; Samples, John R.

    2003-09-01

    The study had two main purposes: (1) to determine whether the foveal visual sensitivities of people treated for high blood pressure (vascular hypertension) differ from the sensitivities of people who have not been diagnosed with high blood pressure and (2) to understand how visual adaptation is related to standard measures of systemic cardiovascular function. Two groups of middle-aged subjects-hypertensive and normotensive-were examined with a series of test/background stimulus combinations. All subjects met rigorous inclusion criteria for excellent ocular health. Although the visual sensitivities of the two subject groups overlapped extensively, the age-related rate of sensitivity loss was, for some measures, greater for the hypertensive subjects, possibly because of adaptation differences between the two groups. Overall, the degree of steady-state sensitivity loss resulting from an increase of background illuminance (for 580-nm backgrounds) was slightly less for the hypertensive subjects. Among normotensive subjects, the ability of a bright (3.8-log-td), long-wavelength (640-nm) adapting background to selectively suppress the flicker response of long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cones was related inversely to the ratio of mean arterial blood pressure to heart rate. The degree of selective suppression was also related to heart rate alone, and there was evidence that short-term changes of cardiovascular response were important. The results suggest that (1) vascular hypertension, or possibly its treatment, subtly affects visual function even in the absence of eye disease and (2) changes in blood flow affect retinal light-adaptation processes involved in the selective suppression of the flicker response from LWS cones caused by bright, long-wavelength backgrounds.

  8. Photoreceptor types, visual pigments, and topographic specializations in the retinas of hydrophiid sea snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Nathan S; Coimbra, João Paulo; Collin, Shaun P; Westhoff, Guido

    2012-04-15

    Sea snakes have evolved numerous anatomical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations to suit their wholly aquatic lifestyle. However, although sea snakes use vision for foraging and mate selection, little is known about their visual abilities. We used microspectrophotometry, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy to characterize the retinal photoreceptors of spine-bellied (Lapemis curtus) and horned (Acalyptophis peronii) sea snakes. Both species have three types of visual pigment sensitive to short (SWS; wavelength of maximum absorbance, λmax 428-430 nm), medium (MWS; λmax 496 nm), and long wavelengths of light (LWS; λmax 555-559 nm) in each of three different subtypes of cone-like single photoreceptor. They also possess a cone-like double photoreceptor subtype, both the principal and accessory member of which contain the LWS visual pigment. Conventional rods were not observed, although the MWS photoreceptor may be a "transmuted" rod. We also used stereology to measure the total number and topographic distribution of neurons in the ganglion cell layer of L. curtus, the olive sea snake (Aipysurus laevis), and the olive-headed sea snake (Disteira major). All species have a horizontal visual streak with specialized areas in the nasal and temporal retina. Both L. curtus and D. major also have a specialized area in the ventral retina, which may reflect differences in habitat usage and/or foraging behavior compared to A. laevis. Maximal spatial resolution was estimated at 1.1, 1.6, and 2.3 cycles deg⁻¹ in D. major, L. curtus, and A. laevis, respectively; the superior value for A. laevis may reflect its specialized crevice-foraging hunting technique.

  9. Osteoporose bei Spondylitis ankylosans - Einfluß von Lebensgewohnheiten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aglas F

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Krankheitsbedingte Artefakte können bei der SpA (Spondylitis ankylosans; Mb. Bechterew die Sensitivität einer Knochendichtemessung im Lumbalbereich beeinträchtigen. Das bei dieser rheumatischen Erkrankung bekannte Osteoporoserisiko ist neben genetischen Faktoren und Entzündungsmechanismen auch von verschiedenen exogenen Einflüssen abhängig. An 47 SpA-Patienten wurde mittels DEXA eine vergleichende Knochendichtemessung (BMD an der Hüfte (Schenkelhals und Ward'sches Dreieck sowie im Bereich der Wirbelsäule (L1-L4 vorgenommen. Zusätzlich erfolgte eine Erhebung der Lebens-Ernährungsgewohnheiten der SpA-Patienten in bezug auf die BMD, um exogene Einflüsse erfassen zu können. Die Knochendichtemessungen ergaben an der LWS wesentlich häufiger eine BMD im Normbereich als am proximalen Femur. Besonders deutliche Unterschiede traten im höheren Lebensalter auf, bei dem aufgrund von Kalzifizierungsvorgängen und Syndesmophyten an der LWS fälschlicherweise eine Dichtezunahme vorgetäuscht wird. Es kann daher bei SpA empfohlen werden, die wesentlich sensitivere Dichtemessung am Schenkelhals durchzuführen. Die über einen Zeitraum von 3 Jahren beobachteten, signifikant erhöhten, medianen CRP-Spiegel zeigen, daß eine permanente Aktivierung von Entzündungsprozessen bei SpA auch einen negativen Faktor betreffend des Knochenmasseverlustes darstellt. Die Analyse der Lebensgewohnheiten ergab, daß SpA-Patienten mit normaler BMD ausnahmslos regelmäßig kalziumreiche Nahrungsmittel zu sich nehmen; bei verminderter BMD wurde in der Mehrheit ein fehlender Konsum an Milchprodukten beobachtet. Leider war auch mit abnehmender BMD eine Verminderung der bei SpA empfohlenen Bewegungsübungen festzustellen. Aufgrund der Resultate ergibt sich eine generelle Empfehlung zu regelmäßigen Bewegungsübungen plus Osteoporosediät bei allen Bechterew-Patienten.

  10. Producing acoustic 'Frozen Waves': simulated experiments with diffraction/attenuation resistant beams in lossy media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prego-Borges, José L; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Recami, Erasmo; Costa, Eduardo Tavares

    2014-08-01

    The so-called Localized Waves (LW), and the "Frozen Waves" (FW), have raised significant attention in the areas of Optics and Ultrasound, because of their surprising energy localization properties. The LWs resist the effects of diffraction for large distances, and possess an interesting self-reconstruction -self-healing- property (after obstacles with size smaller than the antenna's); while the FWs, a sub-class of LWs, offer the possibility of arbitrarily modeling the longitudinal field intensity pattern inside a prefixed interval, for instance 0⩽z⩽L, of the wave propagation axis. More specifically, the FWs are localized fields "at rest", that is, with a static envelope (within which only the carrier wave propagates), and can be endowed moreover with a high transverse localization. In this paper we investigate, by simulated experiments, various cases of generation of ultrasonic FW fields, with the frequency of f0=1 MHz in a water-like medium, taking account of the effects of attenuation. We present results of FWs for distances up to L=80 mm, in attenuating media with absorption coefficient α in the range 70⩽α⩽170 dB/m. Such simulated FW fields are constructed by using a procedure developed by us, via appropriate finite superpositions of monochromatic ultrasonic Bessel beams. We pay due attention to the selection of the FW parameters, constrained by the rather tight restrictions imposed by experimental Acoustics, as well as to some practical implications of the transducer design. The energy localization properties of the Frozen Waves can find application even in many medical apparatus, such as bistouries or acoustic tweezers, as well as for treatment of diseased tissues (in particular, for the destruction of tumor cells, without affecting the surrounding tissues; also for kidney stone shuttering, etc.).

  11. Fog-drip contributions to soil moisture as determined through passive fog collector measurements, leaf wetness data, and soil moisture at Pepperwood Preserve, Sonoma County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, L.; Dodge, C.; Fernandez, D.; Weiss, P. L.; Flint, L. E.; Flint, A. L.; Torregrosa, A.

    2016-12-01

    Summertime coastal fog advects from the ocean and transports water inland in the form of fog droplets to forests and grasslands. The amount of fog water delivered to the soil through fog drip from foliage and other surfaces that have captured and accumulated the droplets is often difficult to quantify due to many challenges including the difficulty of measuring the relatively small variations in soil moisture that accompany fog events. This study details summer season records collected from 4 sites at the Pepperwood Preserve in Santa Rosa, CA. Fog drip volumes were measured using 1 m2 standard fog collectors located at a grassland site for the past three summers. Soil moisture measurements were collected for portions of the three summer seasons from three sites: two oak woodland understory sites and a grassland site on the edge of a forest. One oak woodland site was within 400 m of the standard fog collector grassland site. Leaf wetness sensors (LWS) were co-located at all soil moisture sites. We observe a much higher frequency of wet periods at the grassland site than at the nearby oak woodland site during the summer fog season. One hypothesis is that the oak canopy acts to protect the LWS at the oak woodland site from nocturnal radiative cooling, thereby reducing condensation and dew formation. Another hypothesis is that the oak woodland canopy tends sheltered the understory during light fog events, resulting in edge effects that may tend to reduce fog deposition within the canopy. Leaf and soil moisture measurements both during fog events and during periods without fog but when dew point is reached may provide a more complete picture of non-rain mechanisms of moisture delivery to the foliage and the soil. Investigations are on-going to include corresponding meteorological data (wind speed and direction, relative humidity and temperature) to understand relative contributions to the soil associated with both fog and dew and to better distinguish between fog and

  12. Influence of CRX gene on development of photoreceptors in zebrafish%视锥-视杆同源盒基因对斑马鱼光感受器细胞发育的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳琼; 王跃祥; 徐格致; 宋后燕; 王文吉

    2008-01-01

    目的 观察斑马鱼受精卵CRX基因表达下调后,视网膜光感受器细胞外节盘的发育和视蛋白的表达.方法 实验研究.斑马鱼受精卵内显微注射CRX-寡核苷酸,使CRX基因的表达下降.通过眼球的组织学切片、电镜标本和视蛋白RNA探针的原位杂交观察光感受器细胞以及外节盘的发育和视蛋白的表达.结果 视网膜组织学观察,CRX组与对照组、空白组比较,视网膜和光感受器细胞的发育都没有明显差别.电镜观察,对照组和空白组光感受器细胞都有外节盘形成,但是CRX组未发现明显的外节盘结构.对照组和空白组斑马鱼均可在鼻侧视网膜区域观察到视紫红质(rhodopsin,Rho),视锥细胞蓝色视蛋白(SWS1)和紫外线视蛋白(SWS2)3种视蛋白的表达,CRX组3种视蛋白的表达明显减少.结论 CRX基因影响斑马鱼光感受器细胞外节盘的发育和视蛋白的表达.%Objective To study the development and opsin expression of zebrafish photoreceptors after CRX gene knock-down. Methods It was a experimental study. CRX-Mos was microinjected into the zygote of zebrafish. Seventy-two and 96 hours post fertilization, we prepared the eye histological slides,electron microscope samples and whole mount in-situ hybridizations to study the development and opsin expression, of photoreceptors Results There were no obvious histological changes in optical microscope observation after CRX-Mos microinjection. Outer segments were developed in control and blank groups, but no obvious outer segment was found in CRX group by electron microscope observation. Opsin Rho, SWS1 and SWS2 were expressed in control and blank groups and the expression of these genes was obviously decreased in CRX group. Conclusion CRX gene can influence the development and opsins expression of photoreceptors outer segments in zebrafish.

  13. Energetics of primary processes in visula escitation: photocalorimetry of rhodopsin in rod outer segment membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, A; Converse, C A

    1976-07-13

    A sensitive technique for the direct calorimetric determination of the energetics of photochemical reactions under low levels of illumination, and its application to the study of primary processes in visula excitation, are described. Enthlpies are reported for various steps in the bleaching of rhodopsin in intact rod outer segment membranes, together with the heats of appropriate model reactions. Protonation changes are also determined calorimetrically by use of buffers with differing heats of proton ionization. Bleaching of rhodopsin is accompanied by significant uptake of heat energy, vastly in excess of the energy required for simple isomerization of the retinal chromophore. Metarhodopsin I formation involves the uptake of about 17 kcal/mol and no net change in proton ionization of the system. Formation of metarhodopsin II requires an additional energy of about 10 kcal/mol and involves the uptake on one hydrogen ion from solution. The energetics of the overall photolysis reaction, rhodopsin leads to opsin + all-trans-retinal, are pH dependent and involve the exposure of an additional titrating group on opsin. This group has a heat of proton ionization of about 12 kcal/mal, characteristic of a primary amine, but a pKa in the region of neutrality. We suggest that this group is the Schiff base lysine of the chromophore binding site of rhodopsin which becomes exposed on photolysis. The low pKa for this active lysine would result in a more stable retinal-opsin linkage, and might be induced by a nearby positively charged group on the protein (either arginine or a second lysine residue). This leads to a model involving intramolecular protonation of the Schiff base nitrogen in the retinal-opsin linkage of rhodopsin, which is consistent with the thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties of the system. We further propose that the metarhodopsin I leads to metarhodopsin II step in the bleaching sequence involves reversible hydrolysis of the Schiff base linkage in the

  14. Diversification of non-visual photopigment parapinopsin in spectral sensitivity for diverse pineal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Wada, Seiji; Kawano-Yamashita, Emi; Hara, Yuichiro; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Kosaka, Shigeaki; Kawakami, Koichi; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Tsukamoto, Hisao; Shichida, Yoshinori; Terakita, Akihisa

    2015-09-15

    Recent genome projects of various animals have uncovered an unexpectedly large number of opsin genes, which encode protein moieties of photoreceptor molecules, in most animals. In visual systems, the biological meanings of this diversification are clear; multiple types of visual opsins with different spectral sensitivities are responsible for color vision. However, the significance of the diversification of non-visual opsins remains uncertain, in spite of the importance of understanding the molecular mechanism and evolution of varied non-visual photoreceptions. Here, we investigated the diversification of the pineal photopigment parapinopsin, which serves as the UV-sensitive photopigment for the pineal wavelength discrimination in the lamprey, linking it with other pineal photoreception. Spectroscopic analyses of the recombinant pigments of the two teleost parapinopsins PP1 and PP2 revealed that PP1 is a UV-sensitive pigment, similar to lamprey parapinopsin, but PP2 is a blue-sensitive pigment, with an absorption maximum at 460-480 nm, showing the diversification of non-visual pigment with respect to spectral sensitivity. We also found that PP1 and PP2 exhibit mutually exclusive expressions in the pineal organs of three teleost species. By using transgenic zebrafish in which these parapinopsin-expressing cells are labeled, we found that PP1-expressing cells basically possess neuronal processes, which is consistent with their involvement in wavelength discrimination. Interestingly, however, PP2-expressing cells rarely possess neuronal processes, raising the possibility that PP2 could be involved in non-neural responses rather than neural responses. Furthermore, we found that PP2-expressing cells contain serotonin and aanat2, the key enzyme involved in melatonin synthesis from serotonin, whereas PP1-expressing cells do not contain either, suggesting that blue-sensitive PP2 is instead involved in light-regulation of melatonin secretion. In this paper, we have clearly

  15. Light and the evolution of vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D L

    2016-02-01

    It might seem a little ridiculous to cover the period over which vision evolved, perhaps 1.5 billion years, in only 3000 words. Yet, if we examine the photoreceptor molecules of the most basic eukaryote protists and even before that, in those of prokaryote bacteria and cyanobacteria, we see how similar they are to those of mammalian rod and cone photoreceptor opsins and the photoreceptive molecules of light sensitive ganglion cells. This shows us much with regard the development of vision once these proteins existed, but there is much more to discover about the evolution of even more primitive vision systems.

  16. The ecoresponsive genome of Daphnia pulex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colbourne, John K.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Gilbert, Donald; Thomas, W. Kelley; Tucker, Abraham; Oakley, Todd H.; Tokishita, Shinichi; Aerts, Andrea; Arnold, Georg J.; Basu, Malay Kumar; Bauer, Darren J.; Caceres, Carla E.; Carmel, Liran; Casola, Claudio; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Detter, John C.; Dong, Qunfeng; Dusheyko, Serge; Eads, Brian D.; Frohlich, Thomas; Geiler-Samerotte, Kerry A.; Gerlach, Daniel; Hatcher, Phil; Jogdeo, Sanjuro; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Kriventseva, Evgenia V; Kültz, Dietmar; Laforsch, Christian; Lindquist, Erika; Lopez, Jacqueline; Manak, Robert; Muller, Jean; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Patwardhan, Rupali P.; Pitluck, Samuel; Pritham, Ellen J.; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Rho, Mina; Rogozin, Igor B.; Sakarya, Onur; Salamov, Asaf; Schaack, Sarah; Shapiro, Harris; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Skalitzky, Courtney; Smith, Zachary; Souvorov, Alexander; Sung, Way; Tang, Zuojian; Tsuchiya, Dai; Tu, Hank; Vos, Harmjan; Wang, Mei; Wolf, Yuri I.; Yamagata, Hideo; Yamada, Takuji; Ye, Yuzhen; Shaw, Joseph R.; Andrews, Justen; Crease, Teresa J.; Tang, Haixu; Lucas, Susan M.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Bork, Peer; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lynch, Michael; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2011-02-04

    This document provides supporting material related to the sequencing of the ecoresponsive genome of Daphnia pulex. This material includes information on materials and methods and supporting text, as well as supplemental figures, tables, and references. The coverage of materials and methods addresses genome sequence, assembly, and mapping to chromosomes, gene inventory, attributes of a compact genome, the origin and preservation of Daphnia pulex genes, implications of Daphnia's genome structure, evolutionary diversification of duplicated genes, functional significance of expanded gene families, and ecoresponsive genes. Supporting text covers chromosome studies, gene homology among Daphnia genomes, micro-RNA and transposable elements and the 46 Daphnia pulex opsins. 36 figures, 50 tables, 183 references.

  17. Neuronal Representation of Ultraviolet Visual Stimuli in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Zhongchao Tan; Wenzhi Sun; Tsai-Wen Chen; Douglas Kim; Na Ji

    2015-01-01

    The mouse has become an important model for understanding the neural basis of visual perception. Although it has long been known that mouse lens transmits ultraviolet (UV) light and mouse opsins have absorption in the UV band, little is known about how UV visual information is processed in the mouse brain. Using a custom UV stimulation system and in vivo calcium imaging, we characterized the feature selectivity of layer 2/3 neurons in mouse primary visual cortex (V1). In adult mice, a compara...

  18. Circuit-breakers: optical technologies for probing neural signals and systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Aravanis, Alexander M; Adamantidis, Antoine; de Lecea, Luis; Deisseroth, Karl

    2007-08-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders, which arise from a combination of genetic, epigenetic and environmental influences, epitomize the challenges faced in understanding the mammalian brain. Elucidation and treatment of these diseases will benefit from understanding how specific brain cell types are interconnected and signal in neural circuits. Newly developed neuroengineering tools based on two microbial opsins, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and halorhodopsin (NpHR), enable the investigation of neural circuit function with cell-type-specific, temporally accurate and reversible neuromodulation. These tools could lead to the development of precise neuromodulation technologies for animal models of disease and clinical neuropsychiatry.

  19. Drug: D10118 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D10118 Drug Epelsiban besylate (USAN) C30H38N4O4. C6H6O3S 676.2931 676.8222 D10118....opsin family Oxytocin oxytocin receptor [HSA:5021] [KO:K04229] Epelsiban D10118 Epelsiban besylate (USAN) CA...S: 1159097-48-9 PubChem: 135626836 LigandBox: D10118 ATOM 48 1 N1y N 16.8700 -20.1600 2 C1x C 16.8700 -21.56

  20. Inherited colour vision deficiencies: From Dalton to molecular genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetković Dragana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, great advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular basis of colour vision defects, as well as of the patterns of genetic variation in individuals with normal colour vision. Molecular genetic analyses have explained the diversity of types and degrees of severity in colour vision anomalies, their frequencies, pronounced individual variations in test results, etc. New techniques have even enabled the determination of John Dalton’s real colour vision defect, 150 years after his death. Inherited colour vision deficiencies most often result from the mutations of genes that encode cone opsins. Cone opsin genes are linked to chromosomes 7 (the S or “blue” gene and X (the L or “red” gene and the M or “green” gene. The L and M genes are located on the q arm of the X chromosome in a head-to-tail array, composed of 2 to 6 (typically 3 genes - a single L is followed by one or more M genes. Only the first two genes of the array are expressed and contribute to the colour vision phenotype. The high degree of homology (96% between the L and M genes predisposes them to unequal recombination, leading to gene deletion or the formation of hybrid genes (comprising portions of both the L and M genes, explaining the majority of the common red-green colour vision deficiencies. The severity of any deficiency is influenced by the difference in spectral sensitivity between the opsins encoded by the first two genes of the array. A rare defect, S monochromacy, is caused either by the deletion of the regulatory region of the array or by mutations that inactivate the L and M genes. Most recent research concerns the molecular basis of complete achromatopsia, a rare disorder that involves the complete loss of all cone function. This is not caused by mutations in opsin genes, but in other genes that encode cone-specific proteins, e.g. channel proteins and transducin.

  1. The Low Frequency Sensitivity to Gravitational Waves for ASTROD

    CERN Document Server

    Paton, Antonio Pulido

    2007-01-01

    ASTROD is a relativity mission concept encompassing multi-purposes. One of its main purposes is to detect gravitational waves sensitive to low-frequency band similar to LISA, but shifted to lower frequencies. In this aspect, ASTROD would complement LISA in probing the Universe and study strong-field black hole physics. Since ASTROD will be after LISA, in the Cosmic Vision time-frame 2015-2025, a ten-fold improvement over LISA accelerometer noise goal would be possible, allowing us to test relativistic gravity to 1 ppb and improve the gravitational-wave sensitivity. In this paper, we address to this possible improvement, especially in the frequency range below 0.1 mHz. We look into possible thermal noise improvement, magnetic noise improvement, spurious discharging noise improvement and local gravitational noise improvement. We discuss various possibilities of lower-frequency gravitational-wave responses and their significance to potential astrophysical sources.

  2. Study of Observer Variability in Modern Display Colorimetry: Comparison of CIE 2006 Model and 10° Standard Observer

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Blondé, Laurent; Le Callet, Patrick; Autrusseau, Florent; Stauder, Jürgen; Morvan, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    International audience; This paper compares CIE 2006 model predictions and the 1964 10° standard colorimetric observer with the average observer data from three distinct subgroups of 47 Stiles-Burch observers formed on the basis of observer ages. For two of these subgroups, the long-wave sensitive (x-) color matching functions obtained from the CIE06 model did not accurately predict the intra-group average observer functions. In terms of display color perception, the prediction error is refle...

  3. Damage of photoreceptor-derived cells in culture induced by light emitting diode-derived blue light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuse, Yoshiki; Ogawa, Kenjiro; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2014-06-09

    Our eyes are increasingly exposed to light from the emitting diode (LED) light of video display terminals (VDT) which contain much blue light. VDTs are equipped with televisions, personal computers, and smart phones. The present study aims to clarify the mechanism underlying blue LED light-induced photoreceptor cell damage. Murine cone photoreceptor-derived cells (661 W) were exposed to blue, white, or green LED light (0.38 mW/cm(2)). In the present study, blue LED light increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, altered the protein expression level, induced the aggregation of short-wavelength opsins (S-opsin), resulting in severe cell damage. While, blue LED light damaged the primary retinal cells and the damage was photoreceptor specific. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, protected against the cellular damage induced by blue LED light. Overall, the LED light induced cell damage was wavelength-, but not energy-dependent and may cause more severe retinal photoreceptor cell damage than the other LED light.

  4. Two-Photon Holographic Stimulation of ReaChR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaigneau, Emmanuelle; Ronzitti, Emiliano; Gajowa, Marta A.; Soler-Llavina, Gilberto J.; Tanese, Dimitrii; Brureau, Anthony Y. B.; Papagiakoumou, Eirini; Zeng, Hongkui; Emiliani, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides a unique approach to remotely manipulate brain activity with light. Reaching the degree of spatiotemporal control necessary to dissect the role of individual cells in neuronal networks, some of which reside deep in the brain, requires joint progress in opsin engineering and light sculpting methods. Here we investigate for the first time two-photon stimulation of the red-shifted opsin ReaChR. We use two-photon (2P) holographic illumination to control the activation of individually chosen neurons expressing ReaChR in acute brain slices. We demonstrated reliable action potential generation in ReaChR-expressing neurons and studied holographic 2P-evoked spiking performances depending on illumination power and pulse width using an amplified laser and a standard femtosecond Ti:Sapphire oscillator laser. These findings provide detailed knowledge of ReaChR's behavior under 2P illumination paving the way for achieving in depth remote control of multiple cells with high spatiotemporal resolution deep within scattering tissue. PMID:27803649

  5. Melanopsin and the Non-visual Photochemistry in the Inner Retina of Vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Nicolás M; Morera, Luis P; Guido, Mario E

    2016-01-01

    Melanopsin (Opn4), a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family, is a vitamin A-based opsin in the vertebrate retina that has been shown to be involved in the synchronization of circadian rhythms, pupillary light reflexes, melatonin suppression and other light-regulated tasks. In nonmammalian vertebrates there are two Opn4 genes, Opn4m and Opn4x, the mammalian and Xenopus orthologs respectively. Opn4x is only expressed in nonmammalian vertebrates including reptiles, fish and birds, while Opn4m is found in a subset of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the intrinsically photosensitive (ip) RGCs of the inner retina of both mammals and nonmammalian vertebrates. All opsins described utilize retinaldehyde as chromophore, photoisomerized from 11-cis- to all-trans-retinal upon light exposure. Visual retinal photoreceptor cones and rods, responsible for day and night vision respectively, recycle retinoids through a process called the visual cycle that involves the retinal pigment epithelium or glial Müller cells. Although Opn4 has been characterized as a bistable photopigment, little is known about the mechanism/s involved in its chromophore regeneration. In this review, we will attempt to shed light on the visual cycle taking place in the inner retina and discuss the state of the art in the nonvisual photochemistry of vertebrates.

  6. Evolution and the origin of the visual retinoid cycle in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakabe, Takehiro G; Takimoto, Noriko; Jin, Minghao; Tsuda, Motoyuki

    2009-10-12

    Absorption of a photon by visual pigments induces isomerization of 11-cis-retinaldehyde (RAL) chromophore to all-trans-RAL. Since the opsins lacking 11-cis-RAL lose light sensitivity, sustained vision requires continuous regeneration of 11-cis-RAL via the process called 'visual cycle'. Protostomes and vertebrates use essentially different machinery of visual pigment regeneration, and the origin and early evolution of the vertebrate visual cycle is an unsolved mystery. Here we compare visual retinoid cycles between different photoreceptors of vertebrates, including rods, cones and non-visual photoreceptors, as well as between vertebrates and invertebrates. The visual cycle systems in ascidians, the closest living relatives of vertebrates, show an intermediate state between vertebrates and non-chordate invertebrates. The ascidian larva may use retinochrome-like opsin as the major isomerase. The entire process of the visual cycle can occur inside the photoreceptor cells with distinct subcellular compartmentalization, although the visual cycle components are also present in surrounding non-photoreceptor cells. The adult ascidian probably uses RPE65 isomerase, and trans-to-cis isomerization may occur in distinct cellular compartments, which is similar to the vertebrate situation. The complete transition to the sophisticated retinoid cycle of vertebrates may have required acquisition of new genes, such as interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, and functional evolution of the visual cycle genes.

  7. Identification and functional analysis of the vision-specific BBS3 (ARL6 long isoform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela R Pretorius

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS is a heterogeneous syndromic form of retinal degeneration. We have identified a novel transcript of a known BBS gene, BBS3 (ARL6, which includes an additional exon. This transcript, BBS3L, is evolutionally conserved and is expressed predominantly in the eye, suggesting a specialized role in vision. Using antisense oligonucleotide knockdown in zebrafish, we previously demonstrated that bbs3 knockdown results in the cardinal features of BBS in zebrafish, including defects to the ciliated Kupffer's Vesicle and delayed retrograde melanosome transport. Unlike bbs3, knockdown of bbs3L does not result in Kupffer's Vesicle or melanosome transport defects, rather its knockdown leads to impaired visual function and mislocalization of the photopigment green cone opsin. Moreover, BBS3L RNA, but not BBS3 RNA, is sufficient to rescue both the vision defect as well as green opsin localization in the zebrafish retina. In order to demonstrate a role for Bbs3L function in the mammalian eye, we generated a Bbs3L-null mouse that presents with disruption of the normal photoreceptor architecture. Bbs3L-null mice lack key features of previously published Bbs-null mice, including obesity. These data demonstrate that the BBS3L transcript is required for proper retinal function and organization.

  8. Retinal pigment epithelium protein of 65 kDA gene-linked retinal degeneration is not modulated by chicken acidic leucine-rich epidermal growth factor-like domain containing brain protein/Neuroglycan C/ chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottet, Sandra; Jüttner, René; Voirol, Nathalie; Chambon, Pierre; Rathjen, Fritz G; Schorderet, Daniel F; Escher, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    To analyze in vivo the function of chicken acidic leucine-rich epidermal growth factor-like domain containing brain protein/Neuroglycan C (gene symbol: Cspg5) during retinal degeneration in the Rpe65⁻/⁻ mouse model of Leber congenital amaurosis. We resorted to mice with targeted deletions in the Cspg5 and retinal pigment epithelium protein of 65 kDa (Rpe65) genes (Cspg5⁻/⁻/Rpe65⁻/⁻). Cone degeneration was assessed with cone-specific peanut agglutinin staining. Transcriptional expression of rhodopsin (Rho), S-opsin (Opn1sw), M-opsin (Opn1mw), rod transducin α subunit (Gnat1), and cone transducin α subunit (Gnat2) genes was assessed with quantitative PCR from 2 weeks to 12 months. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) was analyzed at P14 with immunodetection of the retinol-binding protein membrane receptor Stra6. No differences in the progression of retinal degeneration were observed between the Rpe65⁻/⁻ and Cspg5⁻/⁻/Rpe65⁻/⁻ mice. No retinal phenotype was detected in the late postnatal and adult Cspg5⁻/⁻ mice, when compared to the wild-type mice. Despite the previously reported upregulation of Cspg5 during retinal degeneration in Rpe65⁻/⁻ mice, no protective effect or any involvement of Cspg5 in disease progression was identified.

  9. Docosahexaenoic acid phospholipid differentially modulates the conformation of G90V and N55K rhodopsin mutants associated with retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoyun; Herrera-Hernández, María Guadalupe; Ramon, Eva; Garriga, Pere

    2017-05-01

    Rhodopsin is the visual photoreceptor of the retinal rod cells that mediates dim light vision and a prototypical member of the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. The structural stability and functional performance of rhodopsin are modulated by membrane lipids. Docosahexaenoic acid has been shown to interact with native rhodopsin but no direct evidence has been established on the effect of such lipid on the stability and regeneration of rhodopsin mutants associated with retinal diseases. The stability and regeneration of two thermosensitive mutants G90V and N55K, associated with the retinal degenerative disease retinitis pigmentosa, have been analyzed in docosohexaenoic phospholipid (1,2-didocosa-hexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; DDHA-PC) liposomes. G90V mutant reconstituted in DDHA-PC liposomes significantly increased its thermal stability, but N55K mutant showed similar thermal sensitivity both in dodecyl maltoside detergent solution and in DDHA-PC liposomes. The retinal release process, measured by fluorescence spectroscopy, became faster in the lipid system for the two mutants. The opsin conformation was stabilized for the G90V mutant allowing improved retinal uptake whereas no chromophore binding could be detected for N55K opsin after photoactivation. The results emphasize the distinct role of DHA on different phenotypic rhodopsin mutations associated with classical (G90V) and sector (N55K) retinitis pigmentosa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Hybridization leads to sensory repertoire expansion in a gynogenetic fish, the Amazon molly (poecilia formosa): a test of the hybrid-sensory expansion hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandkam, Benjamin A; Joy, Jeffrey B; Watson, Corey T; Gonzalez-Bendiksen, Pablo; Gabor, Caitlin R; Breden, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Expansions in sensory systems usually require processes such as gene duplication and divergence, and thus evolve slowly. We evaluate a novel mechanism leading to rapid sensory repertoire expansion: hybrid-sensory expansion (HSE). HSE occurs when two species with differently tuned sensory systems form a hybrid, bringing together alleles from each of the parental species. In one generation, a sensory repertoire is created that is the sum of the variance between parental species. The Amazon molly presents a unique opportunity to test the HSE hypothesis in a "frozen" hybrid. We compared opsin sequences of the Amazon molly, Poecilia formosa, to those of the parental species. Both parental species are homozygous at the RH2-1 locus and each of the four long wavelength sensitive loci, while P. formosa possess two different alleles at these loci; one matching each parental allele. Gene expression analysis showed P. formosa use the expanded opsin repertoire that was the result of HSE. Additionally, behavioral tests revealed P. formosa respond to colored stimuli in a manner similar or intermediate to the parental species P. mexicana and P. latipinna. Together these results strongly support the HSE hypothesis. Hybrid-sensory repertoire expansion is likely important in other hybrid species and in other sensory systems.

  11. Ultraviolet visual sensitivity in three avian lineages: paleognaths, parrots, and passerines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidala, Zachary; Huynen, Leon; Brennan, Patricia L R; Musser, Jacob; Fidler, Andrew; Chong, Nicola; Machovsky Capuska, Gabriel E; Anderson, Michael G; Talaba, Amanda; Lambert, David; Hauber, Mark E

    2012-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light-transmitted signals play a major role in avian foraging and communication, subserving functional roles in feeding, mate choice, egg recognition, and nestling discrimination. Sequencing functionally relevant regions of the short wavelength sensitive type 1 (SWS1) opsin gene that is responsible for modulating the extent of SWS1 UV sensitivity in birds allows predictions to be made about the visual system's UV sensitivity in species where direct physiological or behavioral measures would be impractical or unethical. Here, we present SWS1 segment sequence data from representative species of three avian lineages for which visually based cues for foraging and communication have been investigated to varying extents. We also present a preliminary phylogenetic analysis and ancestral character state reconstructions of key spectral tuning sites along the SWS1 opsin based on our sequence data. The results suggest ubiquitous ultraviolet SWS1 sensitivity (UVS) in both paleognaths, including extinct moa (Emeidae), and parrots, including the nocturnal and flightless kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), and in most, but not all, songbird (oscine) lineages, and confirmed violet sensitivity (VS) in two suboscine families. Passerine hosts of avian brood parasites were included both UVS and VS taxa, but sensitivity did not co-vary with egg rejection behaviors. The results should stimulate future research into the functional parallels between the roles of visual signals and the genetic basis of visual sensitivity in birds and other taxa.

  12. Range of retinal diseases potentially treatable by AAV-vectored gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswirth, William W; Li, Quihong; Raisler, Brian; Timmers, Adrian M; Berns, Kenneth I; Flannery, John G; LaVail, Matthew M; Lewin, Alfred S

    2004-01-01

    Viable strategies for retinal gene therapy must be designed to cope with the genetic nature of the disease and/or the primary pathologic process responsible for retinal malfunction. For dominant gene defects the aim must be to destroy the presumably toxic gene product, for recessive gene defects the direct approach aims to provide a wild-type copy of the gene to the affected retinal cell type, and for diseases of either complex or unknown genetic origin, more general cell survival strategies that deal with preserving affected retinal cells are often the best and only option. Hence examples of each type of therapy will be briefly discussed in several animal models, including ribozyme therapy for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in the transgenic P23H opsin rat, beta-PDE gene augmentation therapy for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in the rd mouse, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene therapy for autosomal dominant RP in the transgenic S334ter opsin rat and pigment epithelial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (PEDF) gene therapy for neovascular retinal disease in rodents. Each employs a recombinant AAV vectored passenger gene controlled by one of several promoters supporting either photoreceptor-specific expression or more general retinal cell expression depending on the therapeutic requirements.

  13. Isolation and characterization of melanopsin and pinopsin expression within photoreceptive sites of reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigato, Elena; Vallone, Daniela; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Foulkes, Nicholas S.

    2006-08-01

    Non-mammalian vertebrates have multiple extraocular photoreceptors, mainly localised in the pineal complex and the brain, to mediate irradiance detection. In this study, we report the full-length cDNA cloning of ruin lizard melanopsin and pinopsin. The high level of identity with opsins in both the transmembrane regions, where the chromophore binding site is located, and the intracellular loops, where the G-proteins interact, suggests that both melanopsin and pinopsin should be able to generate a stable photopigment, capable of triggering a transduction cascade mediated by G-proteins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that both opsins are located on the expected branches of the corresponding sequences of ortholog proteins. Subsequently, using RT-PCR and RPA analysis, we verified the expression of ruin lizard melanopsin and pinopsin in directly photosensitive organs, such as the lateral eye, brain, pineal gland and parietal eye. Melanopsin expression was detected in the lateral eye and all major regions of the brain. However, different from the situation in Xenopus and chicken, melanopsin is not expressed in the ruin lizard pineal. Pinopsin mRNA expression was only detected in the pineal complex. As a result of their phylogenetic position and ecology, reptiles provide the circadian field with some of the most interesting models for understanding the evolution of the vertebrate circadian timing system and its response to light. This characterization of melanopsin and pinopsin expression in the ruin lizard will be important for future studies aimed at understanding the molecular basis of circadian light detection in reptiles.

  14. Gene therapy rescues cone function in congenital achromatopsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komáromy, András M.; Alexander, John J.; Rowlan, Jessica S.; Garcia, Monique M.; Chiodo, Vince A.; Kaya, Asli; Tanaka, Jacqueline C.; Acland, Gregory M.; Hauswirth, William W.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2010-01-01

    The successful restoration of visual function with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene replacement therapy in animals and humans with an inherited disease of the retinal pigment epithelium has ushered in a new era of retinal therapeutics. For many retinal disorders, however, targeting of therapeutic vectors to mutant rods and/or cones will be required. In this study, the primary cone photoreceptor disorder achromatopsia served as the ideal translational model to develop gene therapy directed to cone photoreceptors. We demonstrate that rAAV-mediated gene replacement therapy with different forms of the human red cone opsin promoter led to the restoration of cone function and day vision in two canine models of CNGB3 achromatopsia, a neuronal channelopathy that is the most common form of achromatopsia in man. The robustness and stability of the observed treatment effect was mutation independent, but promoter and age dependent. Subretinal administration of rAAV5–hCNGB3 with a long version of the red cone opsin promoter in younger animals led to a stable therapeutic effect for at least 33 months. Our results hold promise for future clinical trials of cone-directed gene therapy in achromatopsia and other cone-specific disorders. PMID:20378608

  15. High-resolution microarray analysis unravels complex Xq28 aberrations in patients and carriers affected by X-linked blue cone monochromacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsenko, S A; Bakos, H A; Vitullo, K; Kedrov, M; Kishore, A; Jennings, B J; Surti, U; Wood-Trageser, M A; Cercone, S; Yatsenko, A N; Rajkovic, A; Iannaccone, A

    2016-01-01

    The human X chromosome contains ∼ 1600 genes, about 15% of which have been associated with a specific genetic condition, mainly affecting males. Blue cone monochromacy (BCM) is an X-linked condition caused by a loss-of-function of both the OPN1LW and OPN1MW opsin genes. The cone opsin gene cluster is composed of 2-9 paralogs with 99.8% sequence homology and is susceptible to deletions, duplications, and mutations. Current diagnostic tests employ polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technologies; however, alterations remain undetermined in 10% of patients. Furthermore, carrier testing in females is limited or unavailable. High-resolution X chromosome-targeted CGH microarray was applied to test for rearrangements in males with BCM and female carriers from three unrelated families. Pathogenic alterations were revealed in all probands, characterized by sequencing of the breakpoint junctions and quantitative real-time PCR. In two families, we identified a novel founder mutation that consisted of a complex 3-kb deletion that embraced the cis-regulatory locus control region and insertion of an additional aberrant OPN1MW gene. The application of high-resolution X-chromosome microarray in clinical diagnosis brings significant advantages in detection of small aberrations that are beyond the resolution of clinically available aCGH analysis and which can improve molecular diagnosis of the known conditions and unravel previously unrecognized X-linked diseases.

  16. Evidence for multiple phototransduction pathways in a reef-building coral.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Mason

    Full Text Available Photosensitive behaviors and circadian rhythms are well documented in reef-building corals and their larvae, but the mechanisms responsible for photoreception have not been described in these organisms. Here we report the cloning, immunolocalization, and partial biochemical characterization of three opsins and four G proteins expressed in planulae of the Caribbean elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata. All three opsins (acropsins 1-3 possess conserved seven-pass transmembrane structure, and localize to distinct regions of coral planulae. Acropsin 1 was localized in the larval endoderm, while acropsin 2 was localized in solitary cells of the ectoderm. These rod-like cells displayed a remarkably polarized distribution, concentrated in the aboral end. We also cloned four A. palmata G protein alpha subunits. Three were homologs of vertebrate Gi, Go, and Gq. The fourth is presumably a novel G protein, which displays only 40% identity with the nearest known G protein, and we termed it Gc for "cnidarian". We show that Gc and Gq can be activated by acropsins in a light-dependent manner in vitro. This indicates that at least acropsins 1 and 3 can form functional photoreceptors and potentially may play a role in color preference during settlement, vertical positioning and other light-guided behaviors observed in coral larvae.

  17. Preservation of cone photoreceptors after a rapid yet transient degeneration and remodeling in cone-only Nrl-/- mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Jerome E; Ranganath, Keerthi; Zhao, Lian; Cojocaru, Radu I; Brooks, Matthew; Gotoh, Norimoto; Veleri, Shobi; Hiriyanna, Avinash; Rachel, Rivka A; Campos, Maria Mercedes; Fariss, Robert N; Wong, Wai T; Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-11

    Cone photoreceptors are the primary initiator of visual transduction in the human retina. Dysfunction or death of rod photoreceptors precedes cone loss in many retinal and macular degenerative diseases, suggesting a rod-dependent trophic support for cone survival. Rod differentiation and homeostasis are dependent on the basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor neural retina leucine zipper (NRL). The loss of Nrl (Nrl(-/-)) in mice results in a retina with predominantly S-opsin-containing cones that exhibit molecular and functional characteristics of wild-type cones. Here, we report that Nrl(-/-) retina undergoes a rapid but transient period of degeneration in early adulthood, with cone apoptosis, retinal detachment, alterations in retinal vessel structure, and activation and translocation of retinal microglia. However, cone degeneration stabilizes by 4 months of age, resulting in a thinner but intact outer nuclear layer with residual cones expressing S- and M-opsins and a preserved photopic electroretinogram. At this stage, microglia translocate back to the inner retina and reacquire a quiescent morphology. Gene profiling analysis during the period of transient degeneration reveals misregulation of genes related to stress response and inflammation, implying their involvement in cone death. The Nrl(-/-) mouse illustrates the long-term viability of cones in the absence of rods and retinal pigment epithelium defects in a rodless retina. We propose that Nrl(-/-) retina may serve as a model for elucidating mechanisms of cone homeostasis and degeneration that would be relevant to understanding diseases of the cone-dominant human macula.

  18. Preservation of cone photoreceptors after a rapid yet transient degeneration and remodeling in cone-only Nrl−/− mouse retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Jerome E; Ranganath, Keerthi; Zhao, Lian; Cojocaru, Radu I; Brooks, Matthew; Gotoh, Norimoto; Veleri, Shobi; Hiriyanna, Avinash; Rachel, Rivka A; Campos, Maria Mercedes; Fariss, Robert N; Wong, Wai T; Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Cone photoreceptors are the primary initiator of visual transduction in the human retina. Dysfunction or death of rod photoreceptors precedes cone loss in many retinal and macular degenerative diseases, suggesting a rod-dependent trophic support for cone survival. Rod differentiation and homeostasis are dependent on the basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor NRL. The loss of Nrl (Nrl−/−) in mice results in a retina with predominantly S-opsin containing cones that exhibit molecular and functional characteristics of WT cones. Here we report that Nrl−/− retina undergoes a rapid but transient period of degeneration in early adulthood, with cone apoptosis, retinal detachment, alterations in retinal vessel structure, and activation and translocation of retinal microglia. However, cone degeneration stabilizes by four months of age, resulting in a thinner but intact outer nuclear layer with residual cones expressing S- and M-opsins and a preserved photopic ERG. At this stage, microglia translocate back to the inner retina and reacquire a quiescent morphology. Gene profiling analysis during the period of transient degeneration reveals misregulation of genes related to stress response and inflammation, implying their involvement in cone death. The Nrl−/− mouse illustrates the long-term viability of cones in the absence of rods and RPE defects in a rodless retina. We propose that Nrl−/− retina may serve as a model for elucidating mechanisms of cone homeostasis and degeneration that would be relevant to understanding diseases of the cone-dominant human macula. PMID:22238088

  19. STEREOLOGY AND SOME STRUCTURAL CORRELATES OF RETINAL AND PHOTORECEPTOR CELL FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry M Mayhew

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The retina is the part of the eye which detects light, transduces it into nerve impulses and plays a significant role in visual perception. Sensitivity to light is multi-factorial and depends on the properties of photopigment molecules, their synthesis and incorporation into photoreceptor membranes and the neural circuitry between photoreceptor cells, bipolar neurons and ganglion neurons. In addition, it depends on structural factors such as the absolute and relative numbers of different types of photoreceptor neurons, their subcellular morphology, their distribution across the retina and the physical dimensions (especially surface areas and spatial arrangements of their photoreceptor membranes. At the molecular level, these membranes harbour photosensitive pigment molecules comprising transmembrane glycoproteins (opsins, which vary between photoreceptor cells and a non-protein chromophore. Phototransduction involves a conformational change in the chromophore and activation of an opsin. A transducer G protein, transducin, lowers levels of cGMP and triggers changes in membrane ion permeability including the closure of Na+ channels. This causes the plasmalemma to become less depolarized and the relative hyperpolarization stimulates ganglion cells whose axons form the optic nerve. Phosducin is a light-regulated phosphoprotein located in inner and outer segments of rod photoreceptor cells. It modulates phototransduction by binding to beta and gamma subunits of transducin. This review briefly illustrates ways in which stereology can contribute to our understanding of these processes by providing quantitative data on photoreceptor number, disk membrane surface area and the subcellular immunolocalisation of key molecules.

  20. Illuminating the Undergraduate Behavioral Neuroscience Laboratory: A Guide for the in vivo Application of Optogenetics in Mammalian Model Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Bradley M.; Jarrin, Sarah E.; Mathur, Brian N.; Bailey, Aileen M.

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics is a technology that is growing rapidly in neuroscience, establishing itself as a fundamental investigative tool. As this tool is increasingly utilized across the neuroscience community and is one of the primary research techniques being presented at neuroscience conferences and in journals, we believe that it is important that this technology is introduced into the undergraduate neuroscience research laboratory. While there has been a significant body of work concentrated to deploy optogenetics in invertebrate model organisms, little to no work has focused on brining this technology to mammalian model organisms in undergraduate neuroscience laboratories. The establishment of in vivo optogenetics could provide for high-impact independent research projects for upper-level undergraduate students. Here we review the considerations for establishing in vivo optogenetics with the use of rodents in an undergraduate laboratory setting and provide some cost-saving guidelines to assist in making optogenetic technologies financially accessible. We discuss opsin selection, cell-specific opsin expression strategies, species selection, experimental design, selection of light delivery systems, and the construction of implantable optical fibers for the application of in vivo optogenetics in rodents. PMID:27385919

  1. Evidence for multiple phototransduction pathways in a reef-building coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Benjamin; Schmale, Michael; Gibbs, Patrick; Miller, Margaret W; Wang, Qiang; Levay, Konstantin; Shestopalov, Valery; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2012-01-01

    Photosensitive behaviors and circadian rhythms are well documented in reef-building corals and their larvae, but the mechanisms responsible for photoreception have not been described in these organisms. Here we report the cloning, immunolocalization, and partial biochemical characterization of three opsins and four G proteins expressed in planulae of the Caribbean elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata. All three opsins (acropsins 1-3) possess conserved seven-pass transmembrane structure, and localize to distinct regions of coral planulae. Acropsin 1 was localized in the larval endoderm, while acropsin 2 was localized in solitary cells of the ectoderm. These rod-like cells displayed a remarkably polarized distribution, concentrated in the aboral end. We also cloned four A. palmata G protein alpha subunits. Three were homologs of vertebrate Gi, Go, and Gq. The fourth is presumably a novel G protein, which displays only 40% identity with the nearest known G protein, and we termed it Gc for "cnidarian". We show that Gc and Gq can be activated by acropsins in a light-dependent manner in vitro. This indicates that at least acropsins 1 and 3 can form functional photoreceptors and potentially may play a role in color preference during settlement, vertical positioning and other light-guided behaviors observed in coral larvae.

  2. Archaebacterial rhodopsin sequences: Implications for evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    It was proposed over 10 years ago that the archaebacteria represent a separate kingdom which diverged very early from the eubacteria and eukaryotes. It follows that investigations of archaebacterial characteristics might reveal features of early evolution. So far, two genes, one for bacteriorhodopsin and another for halorhodopsin, both from Halobacterium halobium, have been sequenced. We cloned and sequenced the gene coding for the polypeptide of another one of these rhodopsins, a halorhodopsin in Natronobacterium pharaonis. Peptide sequencing of cyanogen bromide fragments, and immuno-reactions of the protein and synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal gene sequence, confirmed that the open reading frame was the structural gene for the pharaonis halorhodopsin polypeptide. The flanking DNA sequences of this gene, as well as those of other bacterial rhodopsins, were compared to previously proposed archaebacterial consensus sequences. In pairwise comparisons of the open reading frame with DNA sequences for bacterio-opsin and halo-opsin from Halobacterium halobium, silent divergences were calculated. These indicate very considerable evolutionary distance between each pair of genes, even in the dame organism. In spite of this, three protein sequences show extensive similarities, indicating strong selective pressures.

  3. Evolution and the origin of the visual retinoid cycle in vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakabe, Takehiro G.; Takimoto, Noriko; Jin, Minghao; Tsuda, Motoyuki

    2009-01-01

    Absorption of a photon by visual pigments induces isomerization of 11-cis-retinaldehyde (RAL) chromophore to all-trans-RAL. Since the opsins lacking 11-cis-RAL lose light sensitivity, sustained vision requires continuous regeneration of 11-cis-RAL via the process called ‘visual cycle’. Protostomes and vertebrates use essentially different machinery of visual pigment regeneration, and the origin and early evolution of the vertebrate visual cycle is an unsolved mystery. Here we compare visual retinoid cycles between different photoreceptors of vertebrates, including rods, cones and non-visual photoreceptors, as well as between vertebrates and invertebrates. The visual cycle systems in ascidians, the closest living relatives of vertebrates, show an intermediate state between vertebrates and non-chordate invertebrates. The ascidian larva may use retinochrome-like opsin as the major isomerase. The entire process of the visual cycle can occur inside the photoreceptor cells with distinct subcellular compartmentalization, although the visual cycle components are also present in surrounding non-photoreceptor cells. The adult ascidian probably uses RPE65 isomerase, and trans-to-cis isomerization may occur in distinct cellular compartments, which is similar to the vertebrate situation. The complete transition to the sophisticated retinoid cycle of vertebrates may have required acquisition of new genes, such as interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, and functional evolution of the visual cycle genes. PMID:19720652

  4. Heterologous expression of functional G-protein-coupled receptors in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salom, David; Cao, Pengxiu; Sun, Wenyu; Kramp, Kristopher; Jastrzebska, Beata; Jin, Hui; Feng, Zhaoyang; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2012-02-01

    New strategies for expression, purification, functional characterization, and structural determination of membrane-spanning G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are constantly being developed because of their importance to human health. Here, we report a Caenorhabditis elegans heterologous expression system able to produce milligram amounts of functional native and engineered GPCRs. Both bovine opsin [(b)opsin] and human adenosine A(2A) subtype receptor [(h)A(2A)R] expressed in neurons or muscles of C. elegans were localized to cell membranes. Worms expressing these GPCRs manifested changes in motor behavior in response to light and ligands, respectively. With a newly devised protocol, 0.6-1 mg of purified homogenous 9-cis-retinal-bound bovine isorhodopsin [(b)isoRho] and ligand-bound (h)A(2A)R were obtained from C. elegans from one 10-L fermentation at low cost. Purified recombinant (b)isoRho exhibited its signature absorbance spectrum and activated its cognate G-protein transducin in vitro at a rate similar to native rhodopsin (Rho) obtained from bovine retina. Generally high expression levels of 11 native and mutant GPCRs demonstrated the potential of this C. elegans system to produce milligram quantities of high-quality GPCRs and possibly other membrane proteins suitable for detailed characterization.

  5. Patterns of cell proliferation and rod photoreceptor differentiation in shark retinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro-Galve, Susana; Rodríguez-Moldes, Isabel; Anadón, Ramón; Candal, Eva

    2010-01-01

    We studied the pattern of cell proliferation and its relation with photoreceptor differentiation in the embryonic and postembryonic retina of two elasmobranchs, the lesser spotted dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula) and the brown shyshark (Haploblepharus fuscus). Cell proliferation was studied with antibodies raised against proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and phospho-histone-H3, and early photoreceptor differentiation with an antibody raised against rod opsin. As regards the spatiotemporal distribution of PCNA-immunoreactive cells, our results reveal a gradual loss of PCNA that coincides in a spatiotemporal sequence with the gradient of layer maturation. The presence of a peripheral growth zone containing pure-proliferating retinal progenitors (the ciliary marginal zone) in the adult retina matches with the general pattern observed in other groups of gnathostomous fishes. However, in the shark retina the generation of new cells is not restricted to the ciliary marginal zone but also occurs in retinal areas that contain differentiated cells: (1) in a transition zone that lies between the pure-proliferating ciliary marginal zone and the central (layered) retina; (2) in the differentiating central area up to prehatching embryos where large amounts of PCNA-positive cells were observed even in the inner and outer nuclear layers; (3) and in the retinal pigment epithelium of prehatching embryos. Rod opsin immunoreactivity was observed in both species when the outer plexiform layer begins to be recognized in the central retina and, as we previously observed in trout, coincided temporally with the weakening in PCNA labelling.

  6. Evolution of the genetic machinery of the visual cycle: a novelty of the vertebrate eye?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albalat, Ricard

    2012-05-01

    The discovery in invertebrates of ciliary photoreceptor cells and ciliary (c)-opsins established that at least two of the three elements that characterize the vertebrate photoreceptor system were already present before vertebrate evolution. However, the origin of the third element, a series of biochemical reactions known as the "retinoid cycle," remained uncertain. To understand the evolution of the retinoid cycle, I have searched for the genetic machinery of the cycle in invertebrate genomes, with special emphasis on the cephalochordate amphioxus. Amphioxus is closely related to vertebrates, has a fairly prototypical genome, and possesses ciliary photoreceptor cells and c-opsins. Phylogenetic and structural analyses of the amphioxus sequences related with the vertebrate machinery do not support a function of amphioxus proteins in chromophore regeneration but suggest that the genetic machinery of the retinoid cycle arose in vertebrates due to duplications of ancestral nonvisual genes. These results favor the hypothesis that the retinoid cycle machinery was a functional innovation of the primitive vertebrate eye.

  7. Shining new light on optogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ling; Dhakal, Kamal; Li, Ting; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2012-02-01

    Since development of optogenetic stimulation paradigm, there has been several attempts to red shift the excitation maximum of the efficient blue-sensitive opsins. While there has been some success at the cost of altered light-activation kinetics, near-infrared optogenetic probe will be ideal for in-depth cell-specific stimulation of excitable cells in an organ. However, single-photon near-infrared optogenetics based stimulation will still limit precise probing and modulation of in-vivo neural circuits. In contrast, by virtue of non-linear nature of ultrafast light-matter interaction, high spatial precision in optogenetic activation can be achieved in addition to inherent cellular specificity and temporal resolution provided by the opsins. Here, we report use of non-linear optogenetics for stimulation of neurons in-vivo in mouse models. Advantage of using non-linear optogenetics for probing neuronal circuitry is discussed. Further, effectiveness of the non-diffracting optogenetic Bessel beam over classical Gaussian beam in a layered mouse-brain geometry is demonstrated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. This is corroborated by electrophysiological measurements in in-vivo mouse models. The large propagation distance, characteristics of Bessel beam is better suited for in-depth single as well as two-photon optogenetic stimulation.

  8. Illuminating the Undergraduate Behavioral Neuroscience Laboratory: A Guide for the in vivo Application of Optogenetics in Mammalian Model Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Bradley M; Jarrin, Sarah E; Mathur, Brian N; Bailey, Aileen M

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics is a technology that is growing rapidly in neuroscience, establishing itself as a fundamental investigative tool. As this tool is increasingly utilized across the neuroscience community and is one of the primary research techniques being presented at neuroscience conferences and in journals, we believe that it is important that this technology is introduced into the undergraduate neuroscience research laboratory. While there has been a significant body of work concentrated to deploy optogenetics in invertebrate model organisms, little to no work has focused on brining this technology to mammalian model organisms in undergraduate neuroscience laboratories. The establishment of in vivo optogenetics could provide for high-impact independent research projects for upper-level undergraduate students. Here we review the considerations for establishing in vivo optogenetics with the use of rodents in an undergraduate laboratory setting and provide some cost-saving guidelines to assist in making optogenetic technologies financially accessible. We discuss opsin selection, cell-specific opsin expression strategies, species selection, experimental design, selection of light delivery systems, and the construction of implantable optical fibers for the application of in vivo optogenetics in rodents.

  9. A light- and calcium-gated transcription factor for imaging and manipulating activated neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjing; Wildes, Craig P; Pattarabanjird, Tanyaporn; Sanchez, Mateo I; Glober, Gordon F; Matthews, Gillian A; Tye, Kay M; Ting, Alice Y

    2017-09-01

    Activity remodels neurons, altering their molecular, structural, and electrical characteristics. To enable the selective characterization and manipulation of these neurons, we present FLARE, an engineered transcription factor that drives expression of fluorescent proteins, opsins, and other genetically encoded tools only in the subset of neurons that experienced activity during a user-defined time window. FLARE senses the coincidence of elevated cytosolic calcium and externally applied blue light, which together produce translocation of a membrane-anchored transcription factor to the nucleus to drive expression of any transgene. In cultured rat neurons, FLARE gives a light-to-dark signal ratio of 120 and a high- to low-calcium signal ratio of 10 after 10 min of stimulation. Opsin expression permitted functional manipulation of FLARE-marked neurons. In adult mice, FLARE also gave light- and motor-activity-dependent transcription in the cortex. Due to its modular design, minute-scale temporal resolution, and minimal dark-state leak, FLARE should be useful for the study of activity-dependent processes in neurons and other cells that signal with calcium.

  10. Lake Michigan Offshore Wind Feasibility Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boezaart, Arnold [GVSU; Edmonson, James [GVSU; Standridge, Charles [GVSU; Pervez, Nahid [GVSU; Desai, Neel [University of Michigan; Williams, Bruce [University of Delaware; Clark, Aaron [GVSU; Zeitler, David [GVSU; Kendall, Scott [GVSU; Biddanda, Bopi [GVSU; Steinman, Alan [GVSU; Klatt, Brian [Michigan State University; Gehring, J. L. [Michigan State University; Walter, K. [Michigan State University; Nordman, Erik E. [GVSU

    2014-06-30

    The purpose of this project was to conduct the first comprehensive offshore wind assessment over Lake Michigan and to advance the body of knowledge needed to support future commercial wind energy development on the Great Lakes. The project involved evaluation and selection of emerging wind measurement technology and the permitting, installation and operation of the first mid-lake wind assessment meteorological (MET) facilities in Michigan’s Great Lakes. In addition, the project provided the first opportunity to deploy and field test floating LIDAR and Laser Wind Sensor (LWS) technology, and important research related equipment key to the sitting and permitting of future offshore wind energy development in accordance with public participation guidelines established by the Michigan Great Lakes Wind Council (GLOW). The project created opportunities for public dialogue and community education about offshore wind resource management and continued the dialogue to foster Great Lake wind resource utilization consistent with the focus of the GLOW Council. The technology proved to be effective, affordable, mobile, and the methods of data measurement accurate. The public benefited from a substantial increase in knowledge of the wind resources over Lake Michigan and gained insights about the potential environmental impacts of offshore wind turbine placements in the future. The unique first ever hub height wind resource assessment using LWS technology over water and development of related research data along with the permitting, sitting, and deployment of the WindSentinel MET buoy has captured public attention and has helped to increase awareness of the potential of future offshore wind energy development on the Great Lakes. Specifically, this project supported the acquisition and operation of a WindSentinel (WS) MET wind assessment buoy, and associated research for 549 days over multiple years at three locations on Lake Michigan. Four research objectives were defined for the

  11. Bax-induced apoptosis in Leber's congenital amaurosis: a dual role in rod and cone degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séverine Hamann

    Full Text Available Pathogenesis in the Rpe65(-/- mouse model of Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA is characterized by a slow and progressive degeneration of the rod photoreceptors. On the opposite, cones degenerate rapidly at early ages. Retinal degeneration in Rpe65(-/- mice, showing a null mutation in the gene encoding the retinal pigment epithelium 65-kDa protein (Rpe65, was previously reported to depend on continuous activation of a residual transduction cascade by unliganded opsin. However, the mechanisms of apoptotic signals triggered by abnormal phototransduction remain elusive. We previously reported that activation of a Bcl-2-dependent pathway was associated with apoptosis of rod photoreceptors in Rpe65(-/- mice during the course of the disease. In this study we first assessed whether activation of Bcl-2-mediated apoptotic pathway was dependent on constitutive activation of the visual cascade through opsin apoprotein. We then challenged the direct role of pro-apoptotic Bax protein in triggering apoptosis of rod and cone photoreceptors.Quantitative PCR analysis showed that increased expression of pro-apoptotic Bax and decreased level of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 were restored in Rpe65(-/-/Gnat1(-/- mice lacking the Gnat1 gene encoding rod transducin. Moreover, photoreceptor apoptosis was prevented as assessed by TUNEL assay. These data indicate that abnormal activity of opsin apoprotein induces retinal cell apoptosis through the Bcl-2-mediated pathway. Following immunohistological and real-time PCR analyses, we further observed that decreased expression of rod genes in Rpe65-deficient mice was rescued in Rpe65(-/-/Bax(-/- mice. Histological and TUNEL studies confirmed that rod cell demise and apoptosis in diseased Rpe65(-/- mice were dependent on Bax-induced pathway. Surprisingly, early loss of cones was not prevented in Rpe65(-/-/Bax(-/- mice, indicating that pro-apoptotic Bax was not involved in the pathogenesis of cone cell death in Rpe65-deficient mice

  12. Visual ecology of the Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorobyev Misha

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transition from water to land was a key event in the evolution of vertebrates that occurred over a period of 15–20 million years towards the end of the Devonian. Tetrapods, including all land-living vertebrates, are thought to have evolved from lobe-finned (sarcopterygian fish that developed adaptations for an amphibious existence. However, while many of the biomechanical and physiological modifications necessary to achieve this feat have been studied in detail, little is known about the sensory adaptations accompanying this transition. In this study, we investigated the visual system and visual ecology of the Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri, which is the most primitive of all the lungfish and possibly the closest living relative to the ancestors of tetrapods. Results Juvenile Neoceratodus have five spectrally distinct retinal visual pigments. A single type of rod photoreceptor contains a visual pigment with a wavelength of maximum absorbance (λmax at 540 nm. Four spectrally distinct single cone photoreceptors contain visual pigments with λmax at 366 (UVS, 479 (SWS, 558 (MWS and 623 nm (LWS. No double cones were found. Adult lungfish do not possess UVS cones and, unlike juveniles, have ocular media that prevent ultraviolet light from reaching the retina. Yellow ellipsoidal/paraboloidal pigments in the MWS cones and red oil droplets in the LWS cones narrow the spectral sensitivity functions of these photoreceptors and shift their peak sensitivity to 584 nm and 656 nm, respectively. Modelling of the effects of these intracellular spectral filters on the photoreceptor colour space of Neoceratodus suggests that they enhance their ability to discriminate objects, such as plants and other lungfishes, on the basis of colour. Conclusion The presence of a complex colour vision system based on multiple cone types and intracellular spectral filters in lungfishes suggests that many of the ocular characteristics seen in

  13. The Effects of Simulated Live-release Walleye Tournaments on Survival and Blood Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, John H.; Schramm, Harold L.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Gerard, Patrick D.; Chizinski, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of acclimation water temperature,live-well (LW) water temperature,and LW dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on survival of adult WalleyesSander vitreus subjected to simulated tournament conditions (angling,LW confinement,and weigh-in procedures) under controlled laboratory conditions. We tested three acclimation temperatures (12,18,and 24°C),and three LW temperature differentials (ΔT = −4,0,and +4°C) were tested at each acclimation temperature. Survival was monitored after 8 h of LW confinement and during a 5-d retention period in 1,700-L tanks. None of the Walleyes that were acclimated to 24°C and subjected to simulated tournament procedures survived the 5-d retention period; for fish subjected only to simulated angling at 24°C,survival during the 5-d retention period was 29%. Five-day survival was generally over 70% at acclimation temperatures of 12°C and 18°C,and we observed a significant interaction between acclimation temperature and ΔT; survival was greatest in LWs at −4°C ΔT for fish acclimated to 18°C and in LWs at +4°C ΔT for fish acclimated to 12°C. Best survival of Walleyes subjected to the stress of angling and tournament procedures was obtained at temperatures 6–8°C below the optimum temperature for adult Walleyes (i.e.,optimum = 20–22°C). Five-day survival exceeded 70% when LW DO was 5 or 12–15 mg/L (at an acclimation and LW temperature of 18°C),but survival was 0% when DO was 2 mg/L. Anglers may increase survival of Walleyes through careful manipulation of LW temperature and DO when ambient temperature is at or below 18°C,but high mortality of angled and LW-retained Walleyes should be expected when ambient water temperatures are 24°C or greater.

  14. The Galactic Center in the Far-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etxaluze, M.; Smith, Howard A.; Tolls, V.; Stark, A. A.; González-Alfonso, E.

    2011-10-01

    We analyze the far-infrared dust emission from the Galactic center region, including the circumnuclear disk (CND) and other structures, using Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric observations. These Herschel data are complemented by unpublished observations by the Infrared Space Observatory Long Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO-LWS), which used parallel mode scans to obtain photometric images of the region with a larger beam than Herschel but with a complementary wavelength coverage and more frequent sampling with 10 detectors observing at 10 different wavelengths in the range from 46 μm to 180 μm, where the emission peaks. We also include data from the Midcourse Space Experiment at 21.3 μm for completeness. We model the combined ISO-LWS continuum plus Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric data toward the central 2 pc in Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), a region that includes the CND. We find that the far-infrared spectral energy distribution is best represented by a continuum that is the sum of three gray body curves from dust at temperatures of 90, 44.5, and 23 K. We obtain temperature and molecular hydrogen column density maps of the region. We estimate the mass of the inner part of the CND to be ~5.0 × 104 M sun, with luminosities: L cavity ~ 2.2 × 106 L sun and L CND ~ 1.5 × 106 L sun in the central 2 pc radius around Sgr A*. We find from the Herschel and ISO data that the cold component of the dust dominates the total dust mass, with a contribution of ~3.2 × 104 M sun; this important cold material had escaped the notice of earlier studies that relied on shorter wavelength observations. The hotter component disagrees with some earlier estimates, but is consistent with measured gas temperatures and with models that imply shock heating or turbulent effects are at work. We find that the dust grain sizes apparently change widely across the region, perhaps in response to the temperature variations, and we map that distribution.

  15. Supersonic stall flutter of high-speed fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Stevans, W.; Jutras, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical model is proposed for predicting the onset of supersonic stall bending flutter in high-speed rotors. The analysis is based on a modified two-dimensional, compressible, unsteady actuator disk theory. The stability boundary predicted by the analysis is shown to be in good agreement with the measured boundary of a high speed fan. The prediction that the flutter mode would be a forward traveling wave sensitive to wheel speed and aerodynamic loading is confirmed by experimental measurements. In addition, the analysis shows that reduced frequency and dynamic head also play a significant role in establishing the supersonic stall bending flutter boundary of an unshrouded fan.

  16. Montreux Festival 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    CERN gave a cosmic performance at the Montreux Jazz Festival on 9 July at its third annual workshop of ‘The physics of music and the music of physics’. The event kicked off with ‘The physics of music’ demonstration by Robert Kieffer from the CERN Beam Instrumentation Group and Gaëtan Parsihian of the Laboratoire de Mécanique et d’Acoustique, CNRS, Marseille. They explained sound spacialisation using a cutting-edge circular speaker system, then improvised a song from sounds recorded around CERN with an electromagnetic wave sensitive microphone.

  17. Optogenetics, A Futuristic Panacea in Genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dito Anurogo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Optogenetics is the constellation of optics, genetics and bioengineering which unites genetic engineering with optics to notice and manage the function of genetically targeted groups of cells with light, often in the intact animal, via light-sensitive microbial membrane proteins (opsins. Light-sensitive genes specifically including the genetically targeted light-gated channels channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 and halorhodopsin (NpHR result in intracellular ion flow during optical illumination. Afterward, the neurons encounter a series of changes resulting from membrane depolarization or hyperpolarization. Although the rooted origins of optogenetics is from neuroscience, it can be potentially applied in neuropsychocardioncology (neurology, psychiatry, oncology, and cardiology. This critical review will explicate a comprehensive summary of the roles of optogenetics in the field of neuropsychocardioncology. Optogenetics can be potentially developed as neuroprosthetics and direct NpHR in the management of spastic movement disorders. Optogenetics can control of larynx muscle contraction in vivo, using both transgenic ChR2 expressing mice and viral transduction of muscle. In epilepsy, the efficacy of optogenetics is proved. Pyramidal cells in the cortex were transduced with halorhodopsin, and photoinhibition of the neurons decreased electrical seizure activity. Optogenetic and DREADD technologies are in their early stages, particularly with respect to PD research or therapy. In autism and schizophrenia, behavioral deficits may arise from elevation in the cellular balance of excitation/inhibition (E/I balance within neuronal microcircuits. This hypothesis was tested by optogenetically elevating the E/I balance in the medial-prefrontal cortex using a step-function opsin (SSFO, together with red-shifted opsins (C1V1. Increased excitation in excitatory pyramidal neurons, lead to social-cognitive dysfunctioning which are similar to those seen in autism

  18. Brains, genes, and primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Callaway, Edward M; Caddick, Sarah J; Churchland, Patricia; Feng, Guoping; Homanics, Gregg E; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Leopold, David A; Miller, Cory T; Mitchell, Jude F; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Moutri, Alysson R; Movshon, J Anthony; Okano, Hideyuki; Reynolds, John H; Ringach, Dario; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Silva, Afonso C; Strick, Peter L; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2015-05-06

    One of the great strengths of the mouse model is the wide array of genetic tools that have been developed. Striking examples include methods for directed modification of the genome, and for regulated expression or inactivation of genes. Within neuroscience, it is now routine to express reporter genes, neuronal activity indicators, and opsins in specific neuronal types in the mouse. However, there are considerable anatomical, physiological, cognitive, and behavioral differences between the mouse and the human that, in some areas of inquiry, limit the degree to which insights derived from the mouse can be applied to understanding human neurobiology. Several recent advances have now brought into reach the goal of applying these tools to understanding the primate brain. Here we describe these advances, consider their potential to advance our understanding of the human brain and brain disorders, discuss bioethical considerations, and describe what will be needed to move forward.

  19. Evolution of colour vision in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gerald H

    2009-10-12

    Colour vision allows animals to reliably distinguish differences in the distributions of spectral energies reaching the eye. Although not universal, a capacity for colour vision is sufficiently widespread across the animal kingdom to provide prima facie evidence of its importance as a tool for analysing and interpreting the visual environment. The basic biological mechanisms on which vertebrate colour vision ultimately rests, the cone opsin genes and the photopigments they specify, are highly conserved. Within that constraint, however, the utilization of these basic elements varies in striking ways in that they appear, disappear and emerge in altered form during the course of evolution. These changes, along with other alterations in the visual system, have led to profound variations in the nature and salience of colour vision among the vertebrates. This article concerns the evolution of colour vision among the mammals, viewing that process in the context of relevant biological mechanisms, of variations in mammalian colour vision, and of the utility of colour vision.

  20. Implantable optoelectronic probes for in vivo optogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseri, Ege; Kuzum, Duygu

    2017-06-01

    More than a decade has passed since optics and genetics came together and lead to the emerging technologies of optogenetics. The advent of light-sensitive opsins made it possible to optically trigger the neurons into activation or inhibition by using visible light. The importance of spatiotemporally isolating a segment of a neural network and controlling nervous signaling in a precise manner has driven neuroscience researchers and engineers to invest great efforts in designing high precision in vivo implantable devices. These efforts have focused on delivery of sufficient power to deep brain regions, while monitoring neural activity with high resolution and fidelity. In this review, we report the progress made in the field of hybrid optoelectronic neural interfaces that combine optical stimulation with electrophysiological recordings. Different approaches that incorporate optical or electrical components on implantable devices are discussed in detail. Advantages of various different designs as well as practical and fundamental limitations are summarized to illuminate the future of neurotechnology development.

  1. A Photoisomerizing Rhodopsin Mimic Observed at Atomic Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Meisam; Berbasova, Tetyana; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Borhan, Babak; Geiger, James H

    2016-07-20

    The members of the rhodopsin family of proteins are involved in many essential light-dependent processes in biology. Specific photoisomerization of the protein-bound retinylidene PSB at a specified wavelength range of light is at the heart of all of these systems. Nonetheless, it has been difficult to reproduce in an engineered system. We have developed rhodopsin mimics, using intracellular lipid binding protein family members as scaffolds, to study fundamental aspects of protein/chromophore interactions. Herein we describe a system that specifically isomerizes the retinylidene protonated Schiff base both thermally and photochemically. This isomerization has been characterized at atomic resolution by quantitatively interconverting the isomers in the crystal both thermally and photochemically. This event is accompanied by a large pKa change of the imine similar to the pKa changes observed in bacteriorhodopsin and visual opsins during isomerization.

  2. Modeling the role of mid-wavelength cones in circadian responses to light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dkhissi-Benyahya, Ouria; Gronfier, Claude; De Vanssay, Wena; Flamant, Frederic; Cooper, Howard M

    2007-03-01

    Nonvisual responses to light, such as photic entrainment of the circadian clock, involve intrinsically light-sensitive melanopsin-expressing ganglion cells as well as rod and cone photoreceptors. However, previous studies have been unable to demonstrate a specific contribution of cones in the photic control of circadian responses to light. Using a mouse model that specifically lacks mid-wavelength (MW) cones we show that these photoreceptors play a significant role in light entrainment and in phase shifting of the circadian oscillator. The contribution of MW cones is mainly observed for light exposures of short duration and toward the longer wavelength region of the spectrum, consistent with the known properties of this opsin. Modeling the contributions of the various photoreceptors stresses the importance of considering the particular spectral, temporal, and irradiance response domains of the photopigments when assessing their role and contribution in circadian responses to light.

  3. DevOps-kehittäjän osaamisprofiili IT-alalla

    OpenAIRE

    Mård, Pinja

    2015-01-01

    Kandidaatintutkielmassa käsitellään DevOpsia ja sitä, minkälaista osaaamista DevOpsina toimivalta vaaditaan. DevOps on IT-alalla uusi työtehtävä, jossa sama työntekijä hoitaa sekä kehittämiseen että operointiin liittyvät tehtävät. DevOpsin avulla kommunikaatio työntekijöiden välillä paranee ja kaikki työskentelevät paremmin samaa tavoitetta kohti. Tämän uudenalaisen järjestelyn avulla pystytään muun muassa tuottamaan järjestelmiä nopeammin ja parempilaatuisena. Osaamisella t...

  4. A Novel Rhodopsin Gene from Octopus vulgaris for Optobioelectronics Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zhgun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The unique photochromic retinal protein from rhabdomeric octopus membranes – octopus rhodopsin (OctR has emerged as promising material for biomolecular photonic applications due to its unique properties and advantages. Here we report isolation of the novel full length octR gene from retina cDNA of Octopus vulgaris eyes and its sequence comparison with rhodopsins of other cephalopods and vertebrates. The isolated gene can be used to develop various expression systems for production of recombinant OctR for structural studies and novel optobioelectronic applications. The alignment of amino acid (a.a. sequence with different opsins revealed similarity to cephalopoda rhodopsins (Rho and to human melanopsin from intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. The alingment of OctR a.a. sequence with mammalian and cephalopoda Rho with known 3D structures revealed promising substitutions V2C and W292C for developing stable and functionally active recombinant OctR after heterologous expression.

  5. Ancient hybridization fuels rapid cichlid fish adaptive radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Joana I.; Marques, David A.; Mwaiko, Salome; Wagner, Catherine E.; Excoffier, Laurent; Seehausen, Ole

    2017-01-01

    Understanding why some evolutionary lineages generate exceptionally high species diversity is an important goal in evolutionary biology. Haplochromine cichlid fishes of Africa's Lake Victoria region encompass >700 diverse species that all evolved in the last 150,000 years. How this ‘Lake Victoria Region Superflock' could evolve on such rapid timescales is an enduring question. Here, we demonstrate that hybridization between two divergent lineages facilitated this process by providing genetic variation that subsequently became recombined and sorted into many new species. Notably, the hybridization event generated exceptional allelic variation at an opsin gene known to be involved in adaptation and speciation. More generally, differentiation between new species is accentuated around variants that were fixed differences between the parental lineages, and that now appear in many new combinations in the radiation species. We conclude that hybridization between divergent lineages, when coincident with ecological opportunity, may facilitate rapid and extensive adaptive radiation. PMID:28186104

  6. Modeling the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Light and Heat Propagation for In Vivo Optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stujenske, Joseph M; Spellman, Timothy; Gordon, Joshua A

    2015-07-21

    Despite the increasing use of optogenetics in vivo, the effects of direct light exposure to brain tissue are understudied. Of particular concern is the potential for heat induced by prolonged optical stimulation. We demonstrate that high-intensity light, delivered through an optical fiber, is capable of elevating firing rate locally, even in the absence of opsin expression. Predicting the severity and spatial extent of any temperature increase during optogenetic stimulation is therefore of considerable importance. Here, we describe a realistic model that simulates light and heat propagation during optogenetic experiments. We validated the model by comparing predicted and measured temperature changes in vivo. We further demonstrate the utility of this model by comparing predictions for various wavelengths of light and fiber sizes, as well as testing methods for reducing heat effects on neural targets in vivo.

  7. Genetically Encoded Spy Peptide Fusion System to Detect Plasma Membrane-Localized Proteins In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedbrook, Claire N; Kato, Mihoko; Ravindra Kumar, Sripriya; Lakshmanan, Anupama; Nath, Ravi D; Sun, Fei; Sternberg, Paul W; Arnold, Frances H; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2015-08-20

    Membrane proteins are the main gatekeepers of cellular state, especially in neurons, serving either to maintain homeostasis or instruct response to synaptic input or other external signals. Visualization of membrane protein localization and trafficking in live cells facilitates understanding the molecular basis of cellular dynamics. We describe here a method for specifically labeling the plasma membrane-localized fraction of heterologous membrane protein expression using channelrhodopsins as a case study. We show that the genetically encoded, covalent binding SpyTag and SpyCatcher pair from the Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding protein FbaB can selectively label membrane-localized proteins in living cells in culture and in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans. The SpyTag/SpyCatcher covalent labeling method is highly specific, modular, and stable in living cells. We have used the binding pair to develop a channelrhodopsin membrane localization assay that is amenable to high-throughput screening for opsin discovery and engineering.

  8. Neuronal Representation of Ultraviolet Visual Stimuli in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhongchao; Sun, Wenzhi; Chen, Tsai-Wen; Kim, Douglas; Ji, Na

    2015-01-01

    The mouse has become an important model for understanding the neural basis of visual perception. Although it has long been known that mouse lens transmits ultraviolet (UV) light and mouse opsins have absorption in the UV band, little is known about how UV visual information is processed in the mouse brain. Using a custom UV stimulation system and in vivo calcium imaging, we characterized the feature selectivity of layer 2/3 neurons in mouse primary visual cortex (V1). In adult mice, a comparable percentage of the neuronal population responds to UV and visible stimuli, with similar pattern selectivity and receptive field properties. In young mice, the orientation selectivity for UV stimuli increased steadily during development, but not direction selectivity. Our results suggest that, by expanding the spectral window through which the mouse can acquire visual information, UV sensitivity provides an important component for mouse vision. PMID:26219604

  9. Wavepacket splitting and two-pathway deactivation in the photoexcited visual pigment isorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polli, Dario; Weingart, Oliver; Brida, Daniele; Poli, Emiliano; Maiuri, Margherita; Spillane, Katelyn M; Bottoni, Andrea; Kukura, Philipp; Mathies, Richard A; Cerullo, Giulio; Garavelli, Marco

    2014-02-24

    Isorhodopsin is the visual pigment analogue of rhodopsin. It shares the same opsin environment but it embeds 9-cis retinal instead of 11-cis. Its photoisomerization is three times slower and less effective. The mechanistic rationale behind this observation is revealed by combining high-level quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical simulations with ultrafast optical spectroscopy with sub-20 fs time resolution and spectral coverage extended to the near-infrared. Whereas in rhodopsin the photoexcited wavepacket has ballistic motion through a single conical intersection seam region between the ground and excited states, in isorhodopsin it branches into two competitive deactivation pathways involving distinct conical intersection funnels. One is rapidly accessed but unreactive. The other is slower, as it features extended steric interactions with the environment, but it is productive as it follows forward bicycle pedal motion. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Modulation of the Absorption Maximum of Rhodopsin by Amino Acids in the C-terminus†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Tada, Takashi; Yamato, Takahisa

    2008-01-01

    Vision begins when light is absorbed by visual pigments. It is commonly believed that the absorption spectra of visual pigments are modulated by interactions between the retinal and amino acids within or near 4.5 Å of the retinal in the transmembrane (TM) segments. However, this dogma has not been rigorously tested. In this study, we show that the retinal-opsin interactions extend well beyond the retinal binding pocket. We found that, although it is positioned outside of TM segments, the C-terminus of the rhodopsin in the rockfish longspine thornyhead (Sebastolobus altivelis) modulates its λmax by interacting mainly with the last TM segment. Our results illustrate how amino acids in the C-terminus are likely to interact with the retinal. We anticipate our analyses to be a starting point for viewing the spectral tuning of visual pigments as interactions between the retinal and key amino acids that are distributed throughout the entire pigment. PMID:16922606

  11. A novel function for the pineal organ in the control of swim depth in the Atlantic halibut larva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novales Flamarique, Iñigo

    2002-02-01

    The pineal organ of vertebrates is a photo-sensitive structure that conveys photoperiod information to the brain. This information influences circadian rhythm and related metabolic processes such as thermoregulation, hatching time, body growth, and the timing of reproduction. This study demonstrates extra-ocular light responses that control swim depth in the larva of the Atlantic halibut, Hyppoglosus hyppoglosus. Young larvae without a functional eye (=29 days), which possess a functional eye, swim immediately downwards (microsecond delay) following the onset of the light stimulus, but proceed to swim upwards several seconds later. These two response patterns are thus opposite in polarity and have different time kinetics. Because the pineal organ of the Atlantic halibut develops during the embryonic stage, and because it is the only centre in the brain that expresses functional visual pigments (opsins) at early larval stages, it is the only photosensory organ capable of generating the extra-ocular responses observed.

  12. Membrane cholesterol access into a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Albasanz, José L.; Rodriguez-Espigares, Ismael; Pastor, Manuel; Sanz, Ferran; Martí-Solano, Maria; Manna, Moutusi; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Martín, Mairena; Selent, Jana

    2017-02-01

    Cholesterol is a key component of cell membranes with a proven modulatory role on the function and ligand-binding properties of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Crystal structures of prototypical GPCRs such as the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) have confirmed that cholesterol finds stable binding sites at the receptor surface suggesting an allosteric role of this lipid. Here we combine experimental and computational approaches to show that cholesterol can spontaneously enter the A2AR-binding pocket from the membrane milieu using the same portal gate previously suggested for opsin ligands. We confirm the presence of cholesterol inside the receptor by chemical modification of the A2AR interior in a biotinylation assay. Overall, we show that cholesterol's impact on A2AR-binding affinity goes beyond pure allosteric modulation and unveils a new interaction mode between cholesterol and the A2AR that could potentially apply to other GPCRs.

  13. Membrane cholesterol access into a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Albasanz, José L.; Rodriguez-Espigares, Ismael; Pastor, Manuel; Sanz, Ferran; Martí-Solano, Maria; Manna, Moutusi; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Martín, Mairena; Selent, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol is a key component of cell membranes with a proven modulatory role on the function and ligand-binding properties of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Crystal structures of prototypical GPCRs such as the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) have confirmed that cholesterol finds stable binding sites at the receptor surface suggesting an allosteric role of this lipid. Here we combine experimental and computational approaches to show that cholesterol can spontaneously enter the A2AR-binding pocket from the membrane milieu using the same portal gate previously suggested for opsin ligands. We confirm the presence of cholesterol inside the receptor by chemical modification of the A2AR interior in a biotinylation assay. Overall, we show that cholesterol's impact on A2AR-binding affinity goes beyond pure allosteric modulation and unveils a new interaction mode between cholesterol and the A2AR that could potentially apply to other GPCRs. PMID:28220900

  14. Role of carboxyl residues and membrane lipids in cation binding to bacteriorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabeta-Robinson, E; Semadeni, M; Packer, L

    1989-03-01

    To investigate the site specificity of cation binding to bacteriorhodopsin, carboxyl groups were chemically modified in purple membrane preparations from Halobacterium halobium. Cation binding followed by EPR and visible spectroscopy has led us to the conclusion that two cations bind to the surface regions and that at least one cation binds to carboxyl groups in the protein interior. Conformational freedom is necessary for the cooperative conversion of deionized blue species to cation-reconstituted purple species. Studies of white membranes from the JW-5 strain showed that a higher content of charged lipids results in the binding of approximately 100 more color-regulating cations and in negative cooperativity in the blue-to-purple species conversion. A greater dependence of protein structure on these bound cations suggests a role for cations in the modulation of opsin-lipid interaction.

  15. Neuroscience imaging enabled by new highly tunable and high peak power femtosecond lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakulinen, T.; Klein, J.

    2017-02-01

    Neuroscience applications benefit from recent developments in industrial femtosecond laser technology. New laser sources provide several megawatts of peak power at wavelength of 1040 nm, which enables simultaneous optogenetics photoactivation of tens or even hundreds of neurons using red shifted opsins. Another recent imaging trend is to move towards longer wavelengths, which would enable access to deeper layers of tissue due to lower scattering and lower absorption in the tissue. Femtosecond lasers pumping a non-collinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) enable the access to longer wavelengths with high peak powers. High peak powers of >10 MW at 1300 nm and 1700 nm allow effective 3-photon excitation of green and red shifted calcium indicators respectively and access to deeper, sub-cortex layers of the brain. Early results include in vivo detection of spontaneous activity in hippocampus within an intact mouse brain, where neurons express GCaMP6 activated in a 3-photon process at 1320 nm.

  16. All-optical control of neuronal function via optical delivery of light-sensitive proteins and optogenetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Alex; Gu, Ling; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2012-02-01

    While pulsed laser beams have been used for stimulation of neurons, cellular specificity during optical stimulation is achieved by photo-sensitization of genetically-targeted cells by optogenetic means. However, till date, the process of optogenetic-sensitization primarily involves use of viral vectors. In rare occasions, electroporation has been used. Here, we report an all-optical method in which pulsed laser beam is used for delivery of genes, encoding optogenetic probes, to spatially-targeted cells, followed by optogenetic stimulation and optical detection of the activation process. Use of laser microbeam enabled highly precise spatially-patterned delivery of optogenes, as confirmed by expression of conjugated fluorescent protein. Light-activation of opsin-expressing cells was confirmed by calcium-imaging. The laser-assisted expression of optogenetic probes in spatially-targeted regions in combination with light-assisted activation and optical detection of neural activity will help in better understanding of the neuronal circuitry.

  17. Characterisation of the RNA interference response against the long-wavelength receptor of the honeybee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboulle, Gérard; Niggebrügge, Claudia; Roessler, Reinhard; Briscoe, Adriana D; Menzel, Randolf; Hempel de Ibarra, Natalie

    2013-10-01

    Targeted knock-down is the method of choice to advance the study of sensory and brain functions in the honeybee by using molecular techniques. Here we report the results of a first attempt to interfere with the function of a visual receptor, the long-wavelength-sensitive (L-) photoreceptor. RNA interference to inhibit this receptor led to a reduction of the respective mRNA and protein. The interference effect was limited in time and space, and its induction depended on the time of the day most probably because of natural daily variations in opsin levels. The inhibition did not effectively change the physiological properties of the retina. Possible constraints and implications of this method for the study of the bee's visual system are discussed. Overall this study underpins the usefulness and feasibility of RNA interference as manipulation tool in insect brain research.

  18. Light-sensitive coupling of rhodopsin and melanopsin to G(i/o) and G(q) signal transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Pengxiu; Sun, Wenyu; Kramp, Kristopher; Zheng, Maohua; Salom, David; Jastrzebska, Beata; Jin, Hui; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Feng, Zhaoyang

    2012-02-01

    Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) initiates signal transduction cascades that affect many physiological responses. The worm Caenorhabditis elegans expresses >1000 of these receptors along with their cognate heterotrimeric G proteins. Here, we report properties of 9-cis-retinal regenerated bovine opsin [(b)isoRho] and human melanopsin [(h)Mo], two light-activated, heterologously expressed GPCRs in the nervous system of C. elegans with various genetically engineered alterations. Profound transient photoactivation of G(i/o) signaling by (b)isoRho led to a sudden and transient loss of worm motility dependent on cyclic adenosine monophosphate, whereas transient photoactivation of G(q) signaling by (h)Mo enhanced worm locomotion dependent on phospholipase Cβ. These transgenic C. elegans models provide a unique way to study the consequences of G(i/o) and G(q) signaling in vivo with temporal and spatial precision and, by analogy, their relationship to human neuromotor function.

  19. Melanopsin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2002-01-01

    is the environmental light/dark cycle, a process know as photoentrainment. It is well established that the eye contains a separate anatomical and functional system mediating light information to the clock. Until recently, the photopigment responsible for light entrainment of the circadian system has been elusive......The brain's biological clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) generates circadian rhythms of physiology and behaviour of approximately 24 hours. The clock needs, however, like a watch that runs too fast or too slow, daily adjustment and the most important stimulus for this adjustment...... but recent studies have provided evidence that melanopsin, a recently identified opsin, could be the circadian photopigment. This conclusion is based on the observation that melanopsin is expressed exclusively in retinal ganglion cells projecting to the SCN, a projection known as the retinohypothalamic tract...

  20. Recent advances in optogenetics and pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston-Jones, Gary; Deisseroth, Karl

    2013-05-20

    Optogenetics with microbial opsin genes, and pharmacogenetics with designer receptors, represent potent and versatile experimental modalities that can be integrated with each other as well as with a rich diversity of synergistic methods to provide fundamental opportunities in neuroscience research. The 7th Annual Brain Research Meeting in New Orleans in October 2012, Optogenetics and Pharmacogenetics in Neuronal Function and Dysfunction, brought together leading researchers that have developed and used these tools to explore a wide range of questions in nervous system function and dysfunction. This special issue of Brain Research includes articles by speakers in this meeting and others, which together synthesize and summarize the state of the art for optogenetics and designer receptors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Optogenetics (7th BRES).

  1. Optogenetics. Engineering of a light-gated potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Cristian; Alberio, Laura; Gazzarrini, Sabrina; Aquila, Marco; Romano, Edoardo; Cermenati, Solei; Zuccolini, Paolo; Petersen, Jan; Beltrame, Monica; Van Etten, James L; Christie, John M; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2015-05-01

    The present palette of opsin-based optogenetic tools lacks a light-gated potassium (K(+)) channel desirable for silencing of excitable cells. Here, we describe the construction of a blue-light-induced K(+) channel 1 (BLINK1) engineered by fusing the plant LOV2-Jα photosensory module to the small viral K(+) channel Kcv. BLINK1 exhibits biophysical features of Kcv, including K(+) selectivity and high single-channel conductance but reversibly photoactivates in blue light. Opening of BLINK1 channels hyperpolarizes the cell to the K(+) equilibrium potential. Ectopic expression of BLINK1 reversibly inhibits the escape response in light-exposed zebrafish larvae. BLINK1 therefore provides a single-component optogenetic tool that can establish prolonged, physiological hyperpolarization of cells at low light intensities.

  2. How might novel technologies such as optogenetics lead to better treatments in epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krook-Magnuson, Esther; Ledri, Marco; Soltesz, Ivan; Kokaia, Merab

    2014-01-01

    Recent technological advances open exciting avenues for improving the understanding of mechanisms in a broad range of epilepsies. This chapter focuses on the development of optogenetics and on-demand technologies for the study of epilepsy and the control of seizures. Optogenetics is a technique which, through cell-type selective expression of light-sensitive proteins called opsins, allows temporally precise control via light delivery of specific populations of neurons. Therefore, it is now possible not only to record interictal and ictal neuronal activity, but also to test causality and identify potential new therapeutic approaches. We first discuss the benefits and caveats to using optogenetic approaches and recent advances in optogenetics related tools. We then turn to the use of optogenetics, including on-demand optogenetics in the study of epilepsies, which highlights the powerful potential of optogenetics for epilepsy research.

  3. Optogenetics and its Applications in Psychology: Manipulating the Brain Using Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Lamballais

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In a broad sense, optogenetics uses genetically addressable photosensitive tools to monitor and control activity of living cells and tissue. This paper focuses on causal manipulation of neural populations by delivering light to light-sensitive ion channels or other proteins called microbial opsins. This enables refined manipulation of specific types or compartments of neurons with millisecond precision, whereas traditional electrical brain stimulation affects all neurons in a given area. Additionally, intracellular pathways can be studied using opto-XRs which could aid psychopharmacological research. Recent studies have applied optogenetics to psychology, leading to new experiments and yielding interesting results. Thus, this paper attempts to make optogenetics accessible to psychologists to enrich existing psychological research methods.

  4. Multiple switches in G protein-coupled receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Shivani; Smith, Steven O

    2009-09-01

    The activation mechanism of G protein-coupled receptors has presented a puzzle that finally may be close to solution. These receptors have a relatively simple architecture consisting of seven transmembrane helices that contain just a handful of highly conserved amino acids, yet they respond to light and a range of chemically diverse ligands. Recent NMR structural studies on the active metarhodopsin II intermediate of the visual receptor rhodopsin, along with the recent crystal structure of the apoprotein opsin, have revealed multiple structural elements or 'switches' that must be simultaneously triggered to achieve full activation. The confluence of several required structural changes is an example of "coincidence counting", which is often used by nature to regulate biological processes. In ligand-activated G protein-coupled receptors, the presence of multiple switches may provide an explanation for the differences between full, partial and inverse agonists.

  5. Genetic Dissection of Dual Roles for the Transcription Factor six7 in Photoreceptor Development and Patterning in Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mailin Sotolongo-Lopez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The visual system of a particular species is highly adapted to convey detailed ecological and behavioral information essential for survival. The consequences of structural mutations of opsins upon spectral sensitivity and environmental adaptation have been studied in great detail, but lacking is knowledge of the potential influence of alterations in gene regulatory networks upon the diversity of cone subtypes and the variation in the ratio of rods and cones observed in numerous diurnal and nocturnal species. Exploiting photoreceptor patterning in cone-dominated zebrafish, we uncovered two independent mechanisms by which the sine oculis homeobox homolog 7 (six7 regulates photoreceptor development. In a genetic screen, we isolated the lots-of-rods-junior (ljrp23ahub mutation that resulted in an increased number and uniform distribution of rods in otherwise normal appearing larvae. Sequence analysis, genome editing using TALENs and knockdown strategies confirm ljrp23ahub as a hypomorphic allele of six7, a teleost orthologue of six3, with known roles in forebrain patterning and expression of opsins. Based on the lack of predicted protein-coding changes and a deletion of a conserved element upstream of the transcription start site, a cis-regulatory mutation is proposed as the basis of the reduced expression of six7 in ljrp23ahub. Comparison of the phenotypes of the hypomorphic and knock-out alleles provides evidence of two independent roles in photoreceptor development. EdU and PH3 labeling show that the increase in rod number is associated with extended mitosis of photoreceptor progenitors, and TUNEL suggests that the lack of green-sensitive cones is the result of cell death of the cone precursor. These data add six7 to the small but growing list of essential genes for specification and patterning of photoreceptors in non-mammalian vertebrates, and highlight alterations in transcriptional regulation as a potential source of photoreceptor variation

  6. Transcriptome Dynamics of Developing Photoreceptors in Three-Dimensional Retina Cultures Recapitulates Temporal Sequence of Human Cone and Rod Differentiation Revealing Cell Surface Markers and Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewkhaw, Rossukon; Kaya, Koray Dogan; Brooks, Matthew; Homma, Kohei; Zou, Jizhong; Chaitankar, Vijender; Rao, Mahendra; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-12-01

    The derivation of three-dimensional (3D) stratified neural retina from pluripotent stem cells has permitted investigations of human photoreceptors. We have generated a H9 human embryonic stem cell subclone that carries a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter under the control of the promoter of cone-rod homeobox (CRX), an established marker of postmitotic photoreceptor precursors. The CRXp-GFP reporter replicates endogenous CRX expression in vitro when the H9 subclone is induced to form self-organizing 3D retina-like tissue. At day 37, CRX+ photoreceptors appear in the basal or middle part of neural retina and migrate to apical side by day 67. Temporal and spatial patterns of retinal cell type markers recapitulate the predicted sequence of development. Cone gene expression is concomitant with CRX, whereas rod differentiation factor neural retina leucine zipper protein (NRL) is first observed at day 67. At day 90, robust expression of NRL and its target nuclear receptor NR2E3 is evident in many CRX+ cells, while minimal S-opsin and no rhodopsin or L/M-opsin is present. The transcriptome profile, by RNA-seq, of developing human photoreceptors is remarkably concordant with mRNA and immunohistochemistry data available for human fetal retina although many targets of CRX, including phototransduction genes, exhibit a significant delay in expression. We report on temporal changes in gene signatures, including expression of cell surface markers and transcription factors; these expression changes should assist in isolation of photoreceptors at distinct stages of differentiation and in delineating coexpression networks. Our studies establish the first global expression database of developing human photoreceptors, providing a reference map for functional studies in retinal cultures.

  7. Optogenetic techniques for the study of native potassium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Eric Sandoz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Optogenetic tools were originally designed to target specific neurons for remote control of their activity by light and have largely been built around opsin-based channels and pumps. These naturally photosensitive opsins are microbial in origin and are unable to mimic the properties of native neuronal receptors and channels. Over the last 8 years, photoswitchable-tethered ligands (PTLs have enabled fast and reversible control of mammalian ion channels, allowing optical control of neuronal activity. One such PTL, MAQ, contains a maleimide (M to tether the molecule to a genetically engineered cysteine, a photoisomerizable azobenzene (A linker and a pore-blocking quaternary ammonium group (Q. MAQ was originally used to photo-control SPARK, an engineered light-gated potassium channel derived from Shaker. Potassium channel photo-block by MAQ has recently been extended to a diverse set of mammalian potassium channels including channels in the voltage-gated and K2P families. Photoswitchable potassium channels, which maintain native properties, pave the way for the optical control of specific aspects of neuronal function and for high precision probing of a specific channel’s physiological functions. To extend optical control to natively expressed channels, without overexpression, one possibility is to develop a knock-in mouse in which the wild type channel gene is replaced by its light-gated version. Alternatively, the recently developed photoswitchable-conditional-subunit technique (PCS provides photocontrol of the channel of interest by molecular replacement of wild type complexes. Finally, photochromic ligands (PCLs also allow photocontrol of potassium channels without genetic manipulation using soluble compounds. In this review we discuss different techniques for optical control of native potassium channels and their associated advantages and disadvantages.

  8. Evolution of rhodopsin ion pumps in haloarchaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford Doolittle W

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The type 1 (microbial rhodopsins are a diverse group of photochemically reactive proteins that display a broad yet patchy distribution among the three domains of life. Recent work indicates that this pattern is likely the result of lateral gene transfer (LGT of rhodopsin genes between major lineages, and even across domain boundaries. Within the lineage in which the microbial rhodopsins were initially discovered, the haloarchaea, a similar patchy distribution is observed. In this initial study, we assess the roles of LGT and gene loss in the evolution of haloarchaeal rhodopsin ion pump genes, using phylogenetics and comparative genomics approaches. Results Mapping presence/absence of rhodopsins onto the phylogeny of the RNA polymerase B' subunit (RpoB' of the haloarchaea supports previous notions that rhodopsins are patchily distributed. The phylogeny for the bacteriorhodopsin (BR protein revealed two discrepancies in comparison to the RpoB' marker, while the halorhodopsin (HR tree showed incongruence to both markers. Comparative analyses of bacteriorhodopsin-linked regions of five haloarchaeal genomes supported relationships observed in the BR tree, and also identified two open reading frames (ORFs that were more frequently linked to the bacteriorhodopsin gene than those genes previously shown to be important to the function and expression of BR. Conclusion The evidence presented here reveals a complex evolutionary history for the haloarchaeal rhodopsins, with both LGT and gene loss contributing to the patchy distribution of rhodopsins within this group. Similarities between the BR and RpoB' phylogenies provide supportive evidence for the presence of bacteriorhodopsin in the last common ancestor of haloarchaea. Furthermore, two loci that we have designated bacterio-opsin associated chaperone (bac and bacterio-opsin associated protein (bap are inferred to have important roles in BR biogenesis based on frequent linkage and co

  9. Cone inputs to murine striate cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouras Peter

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recorded responses from single neurons in murine visual cortex to determine the effectiveness of the input from the two murine cone photoreceptor mechanisms and whether there is any unique selectivity for cone inputs at this higher region of the visual system that would support the possibility of colour vision in mice. Each eye was stimulated by diffuse light, either 370 (strong stimulus for the ultra-violet (UV cone opsin or 505 nm (exclusively stimulating the middle wavelength sensitive (M cone opsin, obtained from light emitting diodes (LEDs in the presence of a strong adapting light that suppressed the responses of rods. Results Single cells responded to these diffuse stimuli in all areas of striate cortex. Two types of responsive cells were encountered. One type (135/323 – 42% had little to no spontaneous activity and responded at either the on and/or the off phase of the light stimulus with a few impulses often of relatively large amplitude. A second type (166/323 – 51% had spontaneous activity and responded tonically to light stimuli with impulses often of small amplitude. Most of the cells responded similarly to both spectral stimuli. A few (18/323 – 6% responded strongly or exclusively to one or the other spectral stimulus and rarely in a spectrally opponent manner. Conclusion Most cells in murine striate cortex receive excitatory inputs from both UV- and M-cones. A small fraction shows either strong selectivity for one or the other cone mechanism and occasionally cone opponent responses. Cells that could underlie chromatic contrast detection are present but extremely rare in murine striate cortex.

  10. Genetic Dissection of Dual Roles for the Transcription Factor six7 in Photoreceptor Development and Patterning in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotolongo-Lopez, Mailin; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Saade, Carole J; Vera, Daniel L; Fadool, James M

    2016-04-01

    The visual system of a particular species is highly adapted to convey detailed ecological and behavioral information essential for survival. The consequences of structural mutations of opsins upon spectral sensitivity and environmental adaptation have been studied in great detail, but lacking is knowledge of the potential influence of alterations in gene regulatory networks upon the diversity of cone subtypes and the variation in the ratio of rods and cones observed in numerous diurnal and nocturnal species. Exploiting photoreceptor patterning in cone-dominated zebrafish, we uncovered two independent mechanisms by which the sine oculis homeobox homolog 7 (six7) regulates photoreceptor development. In a genetic screen, we isolated the lots-of-rods-junior (ljrp23ahub) mutation that resulted in an increased number and uniform distribution of rods in otherwise normal appearing larvae. Sequence analysis, genome editing using TALENs and knockdown strategies confirm ljrp23ahub as a hypomorphic allele of six7, a teleost orthologue of six3, with known roles in forebrain patterning and expression of opsins. Based on the lack of predicted protein-coding changes and a deletion of a conserved element upstream of the transcription start site, a cis-regulatory mutation is proposed as the basis of the reduced expression of six7 in ljrp23ahub. Comparison of the phenotypes of the hypomorphic and knock-out alleles provides evidence of two independent roles in photoreceptor development. EdU and PH3 labeling show that the increase in rod number is associated with extended mitosis of photoreceptor progenitors, and TUNEL suggests that the lack of green-sensitive cones is the result of cell death of the cone precursor. These data add six7 to the small but growing list of essential genes for specification and patterning of photoreceptors in non-mammalian vertebrates, and highlight alterations in transcriptional regulation as a potential source of photoreceptor variation across species.

  11. Optogenetic techniques for the study of native potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz, Guillaume; Levitz, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetic tools were originally designed to target specific neurons for remote control of their activity by light and have largely been built around opsin-based channels and pumps. These naturally photosensitive opsins are microbial in origin and are unable to mimic the properties of native neuronal receptors and channels. Over the last 8 years, photoswitchable tethered ligands (PTLs) have enabled fast and reversible control of mammalian ion channels, allowing optical control of neuronal activity. One such PTL, maleimide-azobenzene-quaternary ammonium (MAQ), contains a maleimide (M) to tether the molecule to a genetically engineered cysteine, a photoisomerizable azobenzene (A) linker and a pore-blocking quaternary ammonium group (Q). MAQ was originally used to photocontrol SPARK, an engineered light-gated potassium channel derived from Shaker. Potassium channel photoblock by MAQ has recently been extended to a diverse set of mammalian potassium channels including channels in the voltage-gated and K2P families. Photoswitchable potassium channels, which maintain native properties, pave the way for the optical control of specific aspects of neuronal function and for high precision probing of a specific channel's physiological functions. To extend optical control to natively expressed channels, without overexpression, one possibility is to develop a knock-in mouse in which the wild-type channel gene is replaced by its light-gated version. Alternatively, the recently developed photoswitchable conditional subunit technique provides photocontrol of the channel of interest by molecular replacement of wild-type complexes. Finally, photochromic ligands also allow photocontrol of potassium channels without genetic manipulation using soluble compounds. In this review we discuss different techniques for optical control of native potassium channels and their associated advantages and disadvantages.

  12. Conditional and specific cell ablation in the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinoth Babu Veedin-Rajan

    Full Text Available The marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii has become a model system for evo-devo, neurobiology and marine biology. The functional assessment of its cell types, however, has so far been very limited. Here we report on the establishment of a generally applicable, cell type specific ablation technique to overcome this restriction. Using a transgenic strain expressing the bacterial enzyme nitroreductase (ntr under the control of the worm's r-opsin1 locus, we show that the demarcated photoreceptor cells can be specifically ablated by the addition of the prodrug metronidazole (mtz. TUNEL staining indicates that ntr expressing cells undergo apoptotic cell death. As we used a transgenic strain co-expressing ntr with enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp coding sequence, we were able to validate the ablation of photoreceptors not only in fixed tissue, using r-opsin1 riboprobes, but also by monitoring eGFP+ cells in live animals. The specificity of the ablation was demonstrated by the normal presence of the eye pigment cells, as well as of neuronal markers expressed in other cells of the brain, such as phc2, tyrosine hydroxylase and brn1/2/4. Additional analyses of the position of DAPI stained nuclei, the brain's overall neuronal scaffold, as well as the positions and projections of serotonergic neurons further confirmed that mtz treatment did not induce general abnormalities in the worm's brain. As the prodrug is administered by adding it to the water, targeted ablation of specific cell types can be achieved throughout the life of the animal. We show that ablation conditions need to be adjusted to the size of the worms, likely due to differences in the penetration of the prodrug, and establish ablation conditions for worms containing 10 to 55 segments. Our results establish mtz/ntr mediated conditional cell ablation as a powerful functional tool in Platynereis.

  13. Importance of light in temporal organization of photoreceptor proteins and melatonin-producing system in the pineal of carp Catla catla.

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    Seth, Mohua; Maitra, Saumen Kumar

    2010-05-01

    The importance of light in the temporal organization of photoreceptor proteins and melatonin-producing system has been investigated for the first time in the pineal of a tropical fish. In this study, an identical experimental paradigm was followed during the four distinct phases of an annual cycle in adult carps (Catla catla) maintained either under natural photoperiod (NP) or continuous illumination (LL) or darkness (DD) for 30 days. At the end of each experiment, the pineal from fish in each experimental group was collected either at 06:00, 12:00, 18:00, or 24:00 in a daily cycle and assessed by Western blot analysis for pineal rod-like opsin, alpha-transducin, and AANAT. The same animals were also used for measurement of serum melatonin levels, and the serum as well as intra-pineal Ca(++) levels at each timepoint. The study revealed a daily rhythmicity with a peak at 12:00 h and nadir at 24:00 h in the band intensity of pineal rod-like opsin and alpha-transducin in NP fish, while the band intensities of these photo-pigment proteins remained high under LL and low under DD, irrespective of clock hour during the 24 h cycle. The band intensity of pineal AANAT, levels of serum melatonin, and both serum Ca(++) and intra-pineal Ca(++) were maximum at 24:00 h and minimum at 12:00h in NP fish, and they were significantly lower under LL and higher under DD at each point of study. The results showed loss of daily rhythm in each studied variable in both LL and DD carps, suggesting that their circadian organization is dependent on the external light-dark conditions, rather than an endogenous circadian oscillator in the pineal.

  14. Role of LRAT on the retinoid isomerase activity and membrane association of Rpe65.

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    Jin, Minghao; Yuan, Quan; Li, Songhua; Travis, Gabriel H

    2007-07-20

    Absorption of a photon by a vertebrate opsin pigment induces 11-cis to all-trans isomerization of its retinaldehyde chromophore. Restoration of light sensitivity to the bleached opsin requires chemical re-isomerization of the chromophore via an enzyme pathway called the visual cycle. The retinoid isomerase in this pathway is Rpe65, a membrane-associated protein in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with no predicted membrane-spanning segments. It has been suggested that Rpe65 is S-palmitoylated by lecithin:retinol acyl transferase (LRAT) on Cys(231), Cys(329), and Cys(330), and that this palmitoylation is required for isomerase activity and the association of Rpe65 with membranes. Here we show that the affinity of Rpe65 for membranes is similar in wild-type and lrat(-/-) mice. The isomerase activity of Rpe65 is also similar in both strains when all-trans-retinyl palmitate is used as substrate. With all-trans-retinol substrate, isomerase activity is present in wild-type but undetectable in RPE homogenates from lrat(-/-) mice. Substitution of Cys(231), Cys(329), and Cys(330) with Ser or Ala did not affect the affinity of Rpe65 for membranes. Further, these Cys residues are not palmitoylated in Rpe65 by mass spectrometric analysis. Global inhibition of protein palmitoylation by 2-bromopalmitate did not affect the solubility or isomerase activity of Rpe65. Finally, we show that soluble and membrane-associated Rpe65 possesses similar isomerase specific activities. These results indicate that LRAT is not required for isomerase activity beyond synthesis of retinyl-ester substrate, and that the association of Rpe65 with membranes is neither dependent upon LRAT nor the result of S-palmitoylation. The affinity of Rpe65 for membranes is probably an intrinsic feature of this protein.

  15. The heat-shock response co-inducer arimoclomol protects against retinal degeneration in rhodopsin retinitis pigmentosa

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    Parfitt, D A; Aguila, M; McCulley, C H; Bevilacqua, D; Mendes, H F; Athanasiou, D; Novoselov, S S; Kanuga, N; Munro, P M; Coffey, P J; Kalmar, B; Greensmith, L; Cheetham, M E

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited diseases that cause blindness due to the progressive death of rod and cone photoreceptors in the retina. There are currently no effective treatments for RP. Inherited mutations in rhodopsin, the light-sensing protein of rod photoreceptor cells, are the most common cause of autosomal-dominant RP. The majority of mutations in rhodopsin, including the common P23H substitution, lead to protein misfolding, which is a feature in many neurodegenerative disorders. Previous studies have shown that upregulating molecular chaperone expression can delay disease progression in models of neurodegeneration. Here, we have explored the potential of the heat-shock protein co-inducer arimoclomol to ameliorate rhodopsin RP. In a cell model of P23H rod opsin RP, arimoclomol reduced P23H rod opsin aggregation and improved viability of mutant rhodopsin-expressing cells. In P23H rhodopsin transgenic rat models, pharmacological potentiation of the stress response with arimoclomol improved electroretinogram responses and prolonged photoreceptor survival, as assessed by measuring outer nuclear layer thickness in the retina. Furthermore, treated animal retinae showed improved photoreceptor outer segment structure and reduced rhodopsin aggregation compared with vehicle-treated controls. The heat-shock response (HSR) was activated in P23H retinae, and this was enhanced with arimoclomol treatment. Furthermore, the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is induced in P23H transgenic rats, was also enhanced in the retinae of arimoclomol-treated animals, suggesting that arimoclomol can potentiate the UPR as well as the HSR. These data suggest that pharmacological enhancement of cellular stress responses may be a potential treatment for rhodopsin RP and that arimoclomol could benefit diseases where ER stress is a factor. PMID:24853414

  16. Transcriptome-Wide Differential Gene Expression in Bicyclus anynana Butterflies: Female Vision-Related Genes Are More Plastic.

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    Macias-Muñoz, Aide; Smith, Gilbert; Monteiro, Antónia; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2016-01-01

    Vision is energetically costly to maintain. Consequently, over time many cave-adapted species downregulate the expression of vision genes or even lose their eyes and associated eye genes entirely. Alternatively, organisms that live in fluctuating environments, with different requirements for vision at different times, may evolve phenotypic plasticity for expression of vision genes. Here, we use a global transcriptomic and candidate gene approach to compare gene expression in the heads of a polyphenic butterfly. Bicyclus anynana have two seasonal forms that display sexual dimorphism and plasticity in eye morphology, and female-specific plasticity in opsin gene expression. Nonchoosy dry season females downregulate opsin expression, consistent with the high physiological cost of vision. To identify other genes associated with sexually dimorphic and seasonally plastic differences in vision, we analyzed RNA-sequencing data from whole head tissues. We identified two eye development genes (klarsicht and warts homologs) and an eye pigment biosynthesis gene (henna) differentially expressed between seasonal forms. By comparing sex-specific expression across seasonal forms, we found that klarsicht, warts, henna, and another eye development gene (domeless) were plastic in a female-specific manner. In a male-only analysis, white (w) was differentially expressed between seasonal forms. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed that warts and white are expressed in eyes only, whereas klarsicht, henna and domeless are expressed in both eyes and brain. We find that differential expression of eye development and eye pigment genes is associated with divergent eye phenotypes in B. anynana seasonal forms, and that there is a larger effect of season on female vision-related genes.

  17. Nrl-knockout mice deficient in Rpe65 fail to synthesize 11-cis retinal and cone outer segments.

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    Feathers, Kecia L; Lyubarsky, Arkady L; Khan, Naheed W; Teofilo, Karen; Swaroop, Anand; Williams, David S; Pugh, Edward N; Thompson, Debra A

    2008-03-01

    To define rod and cone function further in terms of visual cycle mechanism, the retinal phenotype resulting from Rpe65 (retinoid isomerase I) deficiency in Nrl(-)(/)(-) mice having a single class of photoreceptors resembling wild-type cones was characterized and outcomes of retinoid supplementation evaluated. Rpe65(-)(/)(-)/Nrl(-)(/)(-) mice were generated by breeding Rpe65(-)(/)(-) and Nrl(-)(/)(-) strains. Retinal histology, protein expression, retinoid content, and electroretinographic (ERG) responses were evaluated before and after treatment with 11-cis retinal by intraperitoneal injection. Results Retinas of young Rpe65(-)(/-)/Nrl(-)(/-) mice exhibited normal lamination, but lacked intact photoreceptor outer segments at all ages examined. Rpe65, Nrl, and rhodopsin were not detected, and S-opsin and M/L-opsin levels were reduced. Retinyl esters were the only retinoids present. In contrast, Nrl(-)(/)(-) mice exhibited decreased levels of retinaldehydes and retinyl esters, and elevated levels of retinols. ERG responses were elicited from Rpe65(-)(/-)/Nrl(-)(/-) mice only at the two highest intensities over a 4-log-unit range. Significant retinal thinning and outer nuclear layer loss occurred in Rpe65(-)(/-)/Nrl(-)(/-) mice with aging. Administration of exogenous 11-cis retinal did not rescue retinal morphology or markedly improve ERG responses. The findings provide clarification of reported cone loss of function in Rpe65(-)(/-)/Nrl(-)(/-) mice, now showing that chromophore absence results in destabilized cone outer segments and rapid retinal degeneration. The data support the view that rod-dominant retinas do not have a cone-specific mechanism for 11-cis retinal synthesis and have potential significance for therapeutic strategies for rescue of cone-rich retinal regions affected by disease in the aging human population.

  18. Importance of Achromatic Contrast in Short-Range Fruit Foraging of Primates

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    Hiramatsu, Chihiro; Melin, Amanda D.; Aureli, Filippo; Schaffner, Colleen M.; Vorobyev, Misha; Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Kawamura, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    Trichromatic primates have a ‘red-green’ chromatic channel in addition to luminance and ‘blue-yellow’ channels. It has been argued that the red-green channel evolved in primates as an adaptation for detecting reddish or yellowish objects, such as ripe fruits, against a background of foliage. However, foraging advantages to trichromatic primates remain unverified by behavioral observation of primates in their natural habitats. New World monkeys (platyrrhines) are an excellent model for this evaluation because of the highly polymorphic nature of their color vision due to allelic variation of the L-M opsin gene on the X chromosome. In this study we carried out field observations of a group of wild, frugivorous black-handed spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi frontatus, Gray 1842, Platyrrhini), consisting of both dichromats (n = 12) and trichromats (n = 9) in Santa Rosa National Park, Costa Rica. We determined the color vision types of individuals in this group by genotyping their L-M opsin and measured foraging efficiency of each individual for fruits located at a grasping distance. Contrary to the predicted advantage for trichromats, there was no significant difference between dichromats and trichromats in foraging efficiency and we found that the luminance contrast was the main determinant of the variation of foraging efficiency among red-green, blue-yellow and luminance contrasts. Our results suggest that luminance contrast can serve as an important cue in short-range foraging attempts despite other sensory cues that could be available. Additionally, the advantage of red-green color vision in primates may not be as salient as previously thought and needs to be evaluated in further field observations. PMID:18836576

  19. Lake and sea populations of Mysis relicta (Crustacea, Mysida with different visual-pigment absorbance spectra use the same A1 chromophore.

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    Nikolai Belikov

    Full Text Available Glacial-relict species of the genus Mysis (opossum shrimps inhabiting both fresh-water lakes and brackish sea waters in northern Europe show a consistent lake/sea dichotomy in eye spectral sensitivity. The absorbance peak (λmax recorded by microspectrophotometry in isolated rhabdoms is invariably 20-30 nm red-shifted in "lake" compared with "sea" populations. The dichotomy holds across species, major opsin lineages and light environments. Chromophore exchange from A1 to A2 (retinal → 3,4-didehydroretinal is a well-known mechanism for red-shifting visual pigments depending on environmental conditions or stages of life history, present not only in fishes and amphibians, but in some crustaceans as well. We tested the hypothesis that the lake/sea dichotomy in Mysis is due to the use of different chromophores, focussing on two populations of M. relicta from, respectively, a Finnish lake and the Baltic Sea. They are genetically very similar, having been separated for less than 10 kyr, and their rhabdoms show a typical lake/sea difference in λmax (554 nm vs. 529 nm. Gene sequencing has revealed no differences translating into amino acid substitutions in the transmembrane parts of their opsins. We determined the chromophore identity (A1 or A2 in the eyes of these two populations by HPLC, using as standards pure chromophores A1 and A2 as well as extracts from bovine (A1 and goldfish (A2 retinas. We found that the visual-pigment chromophore in both populations is A1 exclusively. Thus the spectral difference between these two populations of M. relicta is not due to the use of different chromophores. We argue that this conclusion is likely to hold for all populations of M. relicta as well as its European sibling species.

  20. ISO Spectroscopy of the Young Bipolar Nebulae S106 IR and Cep A East

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    Van den Ancker, M E; Wesselius, P R

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of ISO SWS and LWS grating scans towards the embedded Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) S106 IR and Cep A East. Emission from the pure rotational lines of H2 and the infrared fine structure lines of [C II], [O I], [S I], [Si II] and [Fe II], as well as absorption bands due to H2O, CO and CO2 ice were detected toward Cep A. In S106 we detected emission lines of H2, CO, H I, and a large number of ionized species including Fe, O, N, C, Si, S, Ne and Ar. S106 also shows many of the infrared PAH bands in emission. Excitation temperatures and molecular hydrogen masses were derived from the low-lying pure rotational levels of H2 and are 500 and 730 K and 8 and 3 x 10^{-3} solar masses for S106 and Cep A, respectively. Since both objects are expected to have several solar masses of H2 in their environment, we conclude that in both cases the bulk of the H2 is cooler than a few hundred Kelvins. Excitation temperatures and line ratios were compared with those predicted by theoretical models for PDRs an...