WorldWideScience

Sample records for wave-dominated shallow sea

  1. Hydro-morphological modelling of small, wave-dominated estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slinger, Jill H.

    2017-11-01

    Small, intermittently open or closed estuaries are characteristic of the coasts of South Africa, Australia, California, Mexico and many other areas of the world. However, modelling attention has tended to focus on big estuaries that drain large catchments and serve a wide diversity of interests e.g. agriculture, urban settlement, recreation, commercial fishing. In this study, the development of a simple, parametric, system dynamics model to simulate the opening and closure of the mouths of small, wave-dominated estuaries is reported. In the model, the estuary is conceived as a basin with a specific water volume to water level relationship, connected to the sea by a channel of fixed width, but variable sill height. Changes in the form of the basin are not treated in the model, while the dynamics of the mouth channel are central to the model. The magnitude and direction of the flow through the mouth determines whether erosion or deposition of sediment occurs in the mouth channel, influencing the sill height. The model is implemented on the Great Brak Estuary in South Africa and simulations reveal that the raised low water levels in the estuary during spring tide relative to neap tide, are occasioned by the constriction of the tidal flow through the shallow mouth. Freshwater inflows to the estuary are shown to be significant in determining the behaviour of the inlet mouth, a factor often ignored in studies on tidal inlets. Further it is the balance between freshwater inflows and wave events that determines the opening or closure of the mouth of a particular estuary.

  2. Geomorphology and anthropogenic impact including military constraints in a microtidal wave-dominated embayment in south western Sardinia (Porto Pino beach, SCI ITB040025, Mediterranean Sea). Implications for beach management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Muro, Sandro; Buosi, Carla; Pusceddu, Nicola; Frongia, Paolo; Passarella, Marinella; Ibba, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    The coastal zones of the Mediterranean have undergone increasing pressure over the last century. The intensifying coastal development and the increasing tourist impact have led to an intense transformation of the coastlines and adjacent marine areas. The beach and the coastal dune play an important role in protecting the coastline. Thus, the study of its geomorphological evolution and of its anthropic modification is fundamental in order to adopt the best management practices. In this regard, the LIFE Project (LIFE13NAT/IT/001013) SOSS DUNES (Safeguard and management Of South-western Sardinian Dunes) aims to safeguard the dune habitats and the beach system in a site belonging to the Natura 2000 network, an EUwide network of nature protection areas established under the 1992 Habitats Directive. This project is focused on a microtidal wave-dominated embayment located in south western Sardinia (Italy, Mediterranean Sea) called Porto Pino beach comprised in the SCI (Site of Community Importance) "Promontory, dunes and wetland of Porto Pino (ITB040025)". This research aims to investigate the geomorphological processes, the evolution and the main human impacts on Porto Pino beach as an useful tool for both conservation and coastal management. The coastal area of Porto Pino is represented by sandy shorelines extending for a total length of 5 km characterized by a wide primary and secondary dune systems, a backshore wetland lagoon and marsh area arranged parallel to the coastline. This littoral area can be ideally divided into three parts: the first, about 600 m long, in the north-west part characterized by the highest human pressure due to touristic activity on the foredunes and deposition of beach wrack; the second part in the south-east, about 1100 m long, characterized by a complex dune system (primary and secondary foredunes); and the third southernmost part included in a military area, about 3300 m long, characterized by transgressive dune system with low human

  3. The use of radar for bathymetry in shallow seas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greidanus, H.

    1997-01-01

    The bottom topography in shallow seas can be observed by air- and space borne radar. The paper reviews the radar imaging mechanism, and discusses the possibilities and limitations for practical use of radar in bathymetric applications, including the types of radar instruments available for this

  4. Expressions of shallow gas in the Netherlands North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroot, B.M.; Schüttenhelm, R.T.E.

    2003-01-01

    Surface and sub-surface expressions of shallow gas in the Netherlands part of the southern North Sea are described, using standard E&P 2D and 3D seismic surveys, as well as higher frequency acoustic surveys. Surface expressions observed are pockmarks, which are geomorphologic features at the seabed

  5. Modeling of low-frequency seismic waves in a shallow sea using the staggered grid difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zaihua; Zhang, Zhihong; Gu, Jiannong

    2017-09-01

    Elastic waves in the seabed generated by low-frequency noise radiating from ships are known as ship seismic waves and can be used to detect and identify ships. To obtain the propagation characteristics of ship seismic waves, an algorithm for calculating seismic waves at the seafloor is presented based on the staggered-grid finite difference method. The accuracy of the algorithm was tested by comparison with analytical solutions. Numerical simulation of seismic waves generated by a low-frequency point sound source in a typical shallow sea environment was carried out. Using various source frequencies and locations in the numerical simulation, we show that the seismic waves in the near field are composed mostly of transmitted S-waves and interface waves while transmitted P-waves are weak near the seafloor. However, in the far field, the wave components of the seismic wave are mainly normal modes and interface waves, with the latter being relatively strong in the waveforms. As the source frequency decreases, the normal modes become smaller and the interface waves dominate the time series of the seismic waves.

  6. From Offshore to Onshore: Multiple Origins of Shallow-Water Corals from Deep-Sea Ancestors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Alberto; Cairns, Stephen D.; Cunningham, Clifford W.

    2008-01-01

    Shallow-water tropical reefs and the deep sea represent the two most diverse marine environments. Understanding the origin and diversification of this biodiversity is a major quest in ecology and evolution. The most prominent and well-supported explanation, articulated since the first explorations of the deep sea, holds that benthic marine fauna originated in shallow, onshore environments, and diversified into deeper waters. In contrast, evidence that groups of marine organisms originated in the deep sea is limited, and the possibility that deep-water taxa have contributed to the formation of shallow-water communities remains untested with phylogenetic methods. Here we show that stylasterid corals (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa: Stylasteridae)—the second most diverse group of hard corals—originated and diversified extensively in the deep sea, and subsequently invaded shallow waters. Our phylogenetic results show that deep-water stylasterid corals have invaded the shallow-water tropics three times, with one additional invasion of the shallow-water temperate zone. Our results also show that anti-predatory innovations arose in the deep sea, but were not involved in the shallow-water invasions. These findings are the first robust evidence that an important group of tropical shallow-water marine animals evolved from deep-water ancestors. PMID:18560569

  7. Air–Sea CO2 Gas Transfer Velocity in a Shallow Estuary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Eva Thorborg; Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Jensen, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    The air–sea transfer velocity of CO2(kCO2) was investigated in a shallow estuary in March to July 2012, using eddy-covariance measurements of CO2 fluxes and measured air–sea CO2 partial-pressure differences. A data evaluation method that eliminates data by nine rejection criteria in order to heig...

  8. The Roles of Sea-Ice, Light and Sedimentation in Structuring Shallow Antarctic Benthic Communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme F Clark

    Full Text Available On polar coasts, seasonal sea-ice duration strongly influences shallow marine environments by affecting environmental conditions, such as light, sedimentation, and physical disturbance. Sea-ice dynamics are changing in response to climate, but there is limited understanding of how this might affect shallow marine environments and benthos. Here we present a unique set of physical and biological data from a single region of Antarctic coast, and use it to gain insights into factors shaping polar benthic communities. At sites encompassing a gradient of sea-ice duration, we measured temporal and spatial variation in light and sedimentation and hard-substrate communities at different depths and substrate orientations. Biological trends were highly correlated with sea-ice duration, and appear to be driven by opposing gradients in light and sedimentation. As sea-ice duration decreased, there was increased light and reduced sedimentation, and concurrent shifts in community structure from invertebrate to algal dominance. Trends were strongest on shallower, horizontal surfaces, which are most exposed to light and sedimentation. Depth and substrate orientation appear to mediate exposure of benthos to these factors, thereby tempering effects of sea-ice and increasing biological heterogeneity. However, while light and sedimentation both varied spatially with sea-ice, their dynamics differed temporally. Light was sensitive to the site-specific date of sea-ice breakout, whereas sedimentation fluctuated at a regional scale coincident with the summer phytoplankton bloom. Sea-ice duration is clearly the overarching force structuring these shallow Antarctic benthic communities, but direct effects are imposed via light and sedimentation, and mediated by habitat characteristics.

  9. The Roles of Sea-Ice, Light and Sedimentation in Structuring Shallow Antarctic Benthic Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Graeme F; Stark, Jonathan S; Palmer, Anne S; Riddle, Martin J; Johnston, Emma L

    2017-01-01

    On polar coasts, seasonal sea-ice duration strongly influences shallow marine environments by affecting environmental conditions, such as light, sedimentation, and physical disturbance. Sea-ice dynamics are changing in response to climate, but there is limited understanding of how this might affect shallow marine environments and benthos. Here we present a unique set of physical and biological data from a single region of Antarctic coast, and use it to gain insights into factors shaping polar benthic communities. At sites encompassing a gradient of sea-ice duration, we measured temporal and spatial variation in light and sedimentation and hard-substrate communities at different depths and substrate orientations. Biological trends were highly correlated with sea-ice duration, and appear to be driven by opposing gradients in light and sedimentation. As sea-ice duration decreased, there was increased light and reduced sedimentation, and concurrent shifts in community structure from invertebrate to algal dominance. Trends were strongest on shallower, horizontal surfaces, which are most exposed to light and sedimentation. Depth and substrate orientation appear to mediate exposure of benthos to these factors, thereby tempering effects of sea-ice and increasing biological heterogeneity. However, while light and sedimentation both varied spatially with sea-ice, their dynamics differed temporally. Light was sensitive to the site-specific date of sea-ice breakout, whereas sedimentation fluctuated at a regional scale coincident with the summer phytoplankton bloom. Sea-ice duration is clearly the overarching force structuring these shallow Antarctic benthic communities, but direct effects are imposed via light and sedimentation, and mediated by habitat characteristics.

  10. The Roles of Sea-Ice, Light and Sedimentation in Structuring Shallow Antarctic Benthic Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Graeme F.; Stark, Jonathan S.; Palmer, Anne S.; Riddle, Martin J.; Johnston, Emma L.

    2017-01-01

    On polar coasts, seasonal sea-ice duration strongly influences shallow marine environments by affecting environmental conditions, such as light, sedimentation, and physical disturbance. Sea-ice dynamics are changing in response to climate, but there is limited understanding of how this might affect shallow marine environments and benthos. Here we present a unique set of physical and biological data from a single region of Antarctic coast, and use it to gain insights into factors shaping polar benthic communities. At sites encompassing a gradient of sea-ice duration, we measured temporal and spatial variation in light and sedimentation and hard-substrate communities at different depths and substrate orientations. Biological trends were highly correlated with sea-ice duration, and appear to be driven by opposing gradients in light and sedimentation. As sea-ice duration decreased, there was increased light and reduced sedimentation, and concurrent shifts in community structure from invertebrate to algal dominance. Trends were strongest on shallower, horizontal surfaces, which are most exposed to light and sedimentation. Depth and substrate orientation appear to mediate exposure of benthos to these factors, thereby tempering effects of sea-ice and increasing biological heterogeneity. However, while light and sedimentation both varied spatially with sea-ice, their dynamics differed temporally. Light was sensitive to the site-specific date of sea-ice breakout, whereas sedimentation fluctuated at a regional scale coincident with the summer phytoplankton bloom. Sea-ice duration is clearly the overarching force structuring these shallow Antarctic benthic communities, but direct effects are imposed via light and sedimentation, and mediated by habitat characteristics. PMID:28076438

  11. A Three Dimensional Sea Facility for Deep and Shallow Water Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Schaarup-Jensen, Kjeld

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes a low-cost wave tank for the testing of structures in short crested seas and current. The paddle system is of the snake type and used for the generation of both deep and shallow water waves. The quality of the waves and scale problems related to small scale tests are discussed...

  12. Spatial and temporal variation of surface waves in shallow waters along the eastern Arabian Sea.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anoop, T.R.; SanilKumar, V.; Shanas, P.R.

    We studied the spatial and temporal variation of surface waves along the eastern Arabian Sea during 2011 and 2012. Measured directional wave data at two shallow water locations and re-analysis datasets (ERA-Interim) at 0.751 intervals at four...

  13. Unraveling the shallow geology of the western Wadden Sea using high resolution seismics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paap, B.F.; Dubelaar, C.W.; Gunnink, J.L.; Post, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    Modelling of the shallow subsurface of the Dutch Wadden Sea is merely based on lithological information extracted from a limited amount of core samples. In order to improve the subsurface model and to provide a better basis for engineering purposes, seismic data have recently been acquired,

  14. Shallow water bathymetry correction using sea bottom classification with multispectral satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Yoriko; Yamamoto, Tomonori

    2017-10-01

    Bathymetry at shallow water especially shallower than 15m is an important area for environmental monitoring and national defense. Because the depth of shallow water is changeable by the sediment deposition and the ocean waves, the periodic monitoring at shoe area is needed. Utilization of satellite images are well matched for widely and repeatedly monitoring at sea area. Sea bottom terrain model using by remote sensing data have been developed and these methods based on the radiative transfer model of the sun irradiance which is affected by the atmosphere, water, and sea bottom. We adopted that general method of the sea depth extraction to the satellite imagery, WorldView-2; which has very fine spatial resolution (50cm/pix) and eight bands at visible to near-infrared wavelengths. From high-spatial resolution satellite images, there is possibility to know the coral reefs and the rock area's detail terrain model which offers important information for the amphibious landing. In addition, the WorldView-2 satellite sensor has the band at near the ultraviolet wavelength that is transmitted through the water. On the other hand, the previous study showed that the estimation error by the satellite imagery was related to the sea bottom materials such as sand, coral reef, sea alga, and rocks. Therefore, in this study, we focused on sea bottom materials, and tried to improve the depth estimation accuracy. First, we classified the sea bottom materials by the SVM method, which used the depth data acquired by multi-beam sonar as supervised data. Then correction values in the depth estimation equation were calculated applying the classification results. As a result, the classification accuracy of sea bottom materials was 93%, and the depth estimation error using the correction by the classification result was within 1.2m.

  15. Preliminary numerical simulation for shallow strata stability of coral reef in South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qinqin; Zhan, Wenhuan; Zhang, Jinchang

    2017-04-01

    Coral reefs are the geologic material and special rock and soil, which live in shallow water of the tropic ocean and are formed through biological and geological action. Since infrastructure construction is being increasingly developed on coral reefs during recent years, it is necessary to evaluate the shallow strata stability of coral reefs in the South China Sea. The paper is to study the borehole profiles for shallow strata of coral reefs in the South China Sea, especially in the hydrodynamic marine environment?, and to establish a geological model for numerical simulation with Geo-Studio software. Five drilling holes show a six-layer shallow structure of South China Sea, including filling layer, mid-coarse sand, coral sand gravel, fine sand, limestone debris and reef limestone. The shallow coral reef profile next to lagoon is similar to "layers cake", in which the right side close to the sea is analogous to "block cake". The simulation results show that coral reef stability depends on wave loads and earthquake strength, as well as the physical properties of coral reefs themselves. The safety factor of the outer reef is greater than 10.0 in the static condition, indicating that outer reefs are less affected by the wave and earthquake. However, the safety factor next to lagoon is ranging from 0.1 to 4.9. The main reason for the variations that the strata of coral reefs close to the sea are thick. For example, the thickness of reef limestone is more than 10 m and equivalent to the block. When the thickness of inside strata is less than 10 m, they show weak engineering geological characteristics. These findings can provide useful information for coral reef constructions in future. This work was funded by National Basic Research Program of China (contract: 2013CB956104) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (contract: 41376063).

  16. Shallow water wave spectral characteristics along the eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Shanas, P.R.; Dubhashi, K.K.

    pools’’ in the tropics where the probability of swell was more than 95%. The highest wave conditions occur in the Southern Ocean with average Hm0 more than 4 m (Hanley et al. 2010). Wolf et al. (2011) found that waves in Liverpool Bay were mainly... for wind-sea (Wolf et al. 2011). Significant steepness [=2π Hm0/(g Tm02 Tm02)] varied from 1:18 to 1:283 with higher steepness values (mean steepness 1:48) at Ratnagiri and lower values (mean steepness 1:65) at Honnavar. The higher steepness values...

  17. Environmental Acoustics and Intensity Vector Acoustics with Emphasis on Shallow Water Effects and the Sea Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    environment such as the time -varying sea surface and sloping bathymetry. The objective necessarily involves measurements from Targets and... Reverberation Experiment (TREX13) conducted in spring 2013. APPROACH Our approach revolves around the field measurement geometry we used for TREX13 which is...shown (Fig. 1) for reference. TREX13 consisted of a series of shallow water reverberation measurements made of over a 5 km long track, detailed

  18. Finite amplitude sand waves in shallow seas : modelling of spatial and temporal variations in offshorre sandwaves [Powerpoint Presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemeth, Attila

    2004-01-01

    Sand waves form a prominent regular pattern in the offshore seabeds of sandy shallow seas. A two dimensional vertical (2DV) flow and morphological simulation model describing the behaviour of these sand waves has been developed. The model contains the 2DV shallow water equations, with a free water

  19. Difference of nitrogen-cycling microbes between shallow bay and deep-sea sediments in the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tiantian; Li, Meng; Niu, Mingyang; Fan, Xibei; Liang, Wenyue; Wang, Fengping

    2018-01-01

    In marine sediments, microorganisms are known to play important roles in nitrogen cycling; however, the composition and quantity of microbes taking part in each process of nitrogen cycling are currently unclear. In this study, two different types of marine sediment samples (shallow bay and deep-sea sediments) in the South China Sea (SCS) were selected to investigate the microbial community involved in nitrogen cycling. The abundance and composition of prokaryotes and seven key functional genes involved in five processes of the nitrogen cycle [nitrogen fixation, nitrification, denitrification, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), and anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox)] were presented. The results showed that a higher abundance of denitrifiers was detected in shallow bay sediments, while a higher abundance of microbes involved in ammonia oxidation, anammox, and DNRA was found in the deep-sea sediments. Moreover, phylogenetic differentiation of bacterial amoA, nirS, nosZ, and nrfA sequences between the two types of sediments was also presented, suggesting environmental selection of microbes with the same geochemical functions but varying physiological properties.

  20. Subtidal sea level variability in a shallow Mississippi River deltaic estuary, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snedden, G.A.; Cable, J.E.; Wiseman, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    The relative roles of river, atmospheric, and tidal forcings on estuarine sea level variability are examined in Breton Sound, a shallow (0.7 m) deltaic estuary situated in an interdistributary basin on the Mississippi River deltaic plain. The deltaic landscape contains vegetated marshes, tidal flats, circuitous channels, and other features that frictionally dissipate waves propagating through the system. Direct forcing by local wind stress over the surface of the estuary is minimal, owing to the lack of significant fetch due to landscape features of the estuary. Atmospheric forcing occurs almost entirely through remote forcing, where alongshore winds facilitate estuary-shelf exchange through coastal Ekman convergence. The highly frictional nature of the deltaic landscape causes the estuary to act as a low-pass filter to remote atmospheric forcing, where high-frequency, coastally-induced fluctuations are significantly damped, and the damping increases with distance from the estuary mouth. During spring, when substantial quantities of controlled Mississippi River inputs (q?? = 62 m3 s-1) are discharged into the estuary, upper estuary subtidal sea levels are forced by a combination of river and remote atmospheric forcings, while river effects are less clear downestuary. During autumn (q?? = 7 m3 s-1) sea level variability throughout the estuary is governed entirely by coastal variations at the marine boundary. A frequency-dependent analytical model, previously used to describe sea level dynamics forced by local wind stress and coastal forcing in deeper, less frictional systems, is applied in the shallow Breton Sound estuary. In contrast to deeper systems where coastally-induced fluctuations exhibit little or no frictional attenuation inside the estuary, these fluctuations in the shallow Breton Sound estuary show strong frequency-dependent amplitude reductions that extend well into the subtidal frequency spectrum. ?? 2007 Estuarine Research Federation.

  1. A review of contemporary patterns of endemism for shallow water reef fauna in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    DiBattista, Joseph

    2015-11-03

    Aim The Red Sea is characterised by a unique fauna and historical periods of desiccation, hypersalinity and intermittent isolation. The origin and contemporary composition of reef-associated taxa in this region can illuminate biogeographical principles about vicariance and the establishment (or local extirpation) of existing species. Here we aim to: (1) outline the distribution of shallow water fauna between the Red Sea and adjacent regions, (2) explore mechanisms for maintaining these distributions and (3) propose hypotheses to test these mechanisms. Location Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Arabian Sea, Arabian Gulf and Indian Ocean. Methods Updated checklists for scleractinian corals, fishes and non-coral invertebrates were used to determine species richness in the Red Sea and the rest of the Arabian Peninsula and assess levels of endemism. Fine-scale diversity and abundance of reef fishes within the Red Sea were explored using ecological survey data. Results Within the Red Sea, we recorded 346 zooxanthellate and azooxanthellate scleractinian coral species of which 19 are endemic (5.5%). Currently 635 species of polychaetes, 211 echinoderms and 79 ascidians have been documented, with endemism rates of 12.6%, 8.1% and 16.5% respectively. A preliminary compilation of 231 species of crustaceans and 137 species of molluscs include 10.0% and 6.6% endemism respectively. We documented 1071 shallow fish species, with 12.9% endemic in the entire Red Sea and 14.1% endemic in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. Based on ecological survey data of endemic fishes, there were no major changes in species richness or abundance across 1100 km of Saudi Arabian coastline. Main conclusions The Red Sea biota appears resilient to major environmental fluctuations and is characterized by high rates of endemism with variable degrees of incursion into the Gulf of Aden. The nearby Omani and Arabian Gulfs also have variable environments and high levels of endemism, but these are not consistently distinct

  2. Residence times in shallow waters help explain regional differences in Wadden Sea eutrophication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwichtenberg, Fabian; Callies, Ulrich; van Beusekom, Justus E. E.

    2017-04-01

    Regional variations in eutrophication levels of tidal basins in the Wadden Sea can be caused by external factors, like organic matter import, and internal factors like the morphology and hydrodynamics of the receiving tidal basin. For instance, benthic nutrients from remineralized organic matter may be more concentrated in shallow basins or diluted in basins with high exchange rates. In addition, the location of a monitoring station may determine which basin-specific water masses are actually observed. In the present paper a hydrodynamic intertidal imprint (IMP) is estimated for ten stations in various tidal basins of the Wadden Sea. The fraction of time water masses spent in intertidal areas prior to observation is calculated by linking the Lagrangian transport module PELETS to already existing hourly reconstructions of currents between 1959 and 2003. Irrespective of water depth, additional calculations of mean residence times (MRT) in the Wadden Sea indicate whether, in the case of low IMP values, water masses originate from coastal areas or tidal channels. Results show distinct regional differences, with highest values in the eastern part of the Dutch sector of the southern Wadden Sea (IMP=77%, MRT=99%) and lowest values in the German/Danish sector of the northern Wadden Sea (IMP=1.1%, MRT=21%). The IMP correlates positively with observed nutrient levels (R2=0.83). Evidently, this residence time-based intertidal signal is pivotal in explaining regional variations in eutrophication levels revealed by long-term comparative data from different monitoring stations.

  3. Sulfur metabolizing microbes dominate microbial communities in Andesite-hosted shallow-sea hydrothermal systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Zhang

    Full Text Available To determine microbial community composition, community spatial structure and possible key microbial processes in the shallow-sea hydrothermal vent systems off NE Taiwan's coast, we examined the bacterial and archaeal communities of four samples collected from the water column extending over a redoxocline gradient of a yellow and four from a white hydrothermal vent. Ribosomal tag pyrosequencing based on DNA and RNA showed statistically significant differences between the bacterial and archaeal communities of the different hydrothermal plumes. The bacterial and archaeal communities from the white hydrothermal plume were dominated by sulfur-reducing Nautilia and Thermococcus, whereas the yellow hydrothermal plume and the surface water were dominated by sulfide-oxidizing Thiomicrospira and Euryarchaeota Marine Group II, respectively. Canonical correspondence analyses indicate that methane (CH(4 concentration was the only statistically significant variable that explains all community cluster patterns. However, the results of pyrosequencing showed an essential absence of methanogens and methanotrophs at the two vent fields, suggesting that CH(4 was less tied to microbial processes in this shallow-sea hydrothermal system. We speculated that mixing between hydrothermal fluids and the sea or meteoric water leads to distinctly different CH(4 concentrations and redox niches between the yellow and white vents, consequently influencing the distribution patterns of the free-living Bacteria and Archaea. We concluded that sulfur-reducing and sulfide-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs accounted for most of the primary biomass synthesis and that microbial sulfur metabolism fueled microbial energy flow and element cycling in the shallow hydrothermal systems off the coast of NE Taiwan.

  4. Multimission empirical ocean tide modeling for shallow waters and polar seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Yongcun; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2011-01-01

    A new global ocean tide model named DTU10 (developed at Technical University of Denmark) representing all major diurnal and semidiurnal tidal constituents is proposed based on an empirical correction to the global tide model FES2004 (Finite Element Solutions), with residual tides determined using...... to recover twice the spatial variations of the tidal signal which is particularly important in shallow waters where the spatial scale of the tidal signal is scaled down. Outside the +/- 66 degrees parallel combined Envisat, GEOSAT Follow-On, and ERS-2, data sets have been included to solve for the tides up...... to the +/- 82 degrees parallel. A new approach to removing the annual sea level variations prior to estimating the residual tides significantly improved tidal determination of diurnal constituents from the Sun-synchronous satellites (e. g., ERS-2 and Envisat) in the polar seas. Extensive evaluations with six...

  5. Fluid Leakage Pathways and Shallow Gas Accumulation in Peon field, northern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadakkepuliyambatta, S.; Planke, S.; Bunz, S.

    2012-12-01

    Shallow gas accumulations are well known as a hazard for drilling activities as well as future prospective reservoirs. The Peon field is a huge shallow gas accumulation located in the northern North Sea discovered by Statoil in 2005. The Peon sandstone reservoir is formed as a sub-aquatic, ice-contact glaciomarine fan in Pleistocene (0.01-1.8 Ma) and is located 574m below sea level. The reservoir covers a large area of 250 km2 and contains approximately 35GSm3 gas in place. We use high-resolution P-Cable 3D seismic data to characterize the shallow gas reservoir, fluid leakage pathways and geological features in the Pleistocene sediments. The survey was acquired in 2009 and covers an area of 210 km2. The seismic data has a vertical resolution of 4.5m and provide significantly improved details of the internal structure of shallow gas reservoir and associated fluid flow. The P-Cable data provide high-resolution seismic images up to one second two-way travel time. Conventional 3D seismic data is used to analyze deeper features. In addition, well logs from exploration wells in the area are integrated with the seismic interpretation. The top of Peon sandstone reservoir is marked by a strong, polarity-reversed reflection at ~165m below seafloor. The neutron porosity log and density log distinguish gas-water contact at ~184m below seafloor. The upper regional unconformity (URU) marks the base of the sandstone body at ~198m below seafloor and separates it from westward dipping Late Pliocene sequences. Unconsolidated Pleistocene sediment sequences overlying the reservoir exhibits glacial plough marks indicating periodic glacial activity. High-amplitude reflections in the glacially deposited, unconsolidated formations above the reservoir and pull-down in reflections indicate presence of gas. Chaotic, low-amplitude reflections below the high-amplitude reflections could be due to upward migrating gas. Pockmark-like depressions, varying in width from ~200m to ~400m occur at

  6. A comparative experimental approach to ecotoxicology in shallow-water and deep-sea holothurians suggests similar behavioural responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alastair; Wright, Roseanna; Mevenkamp, Lisa; Hauton, Chris

    2017-10-01

    Exploration of deep-sea mineral resources is burgeoning, raising concerns regarding ecotoxicological impacts on deep-sea fauna. Assessing toxicity in deep-sea species is technologically challenging, which promotes interest in establishing shallow-water ecotoxicological proxy species. However, the effects of temperature and hydrostatic pressure on toxicity, and how adaptation to deep-sea environmental conditions might moderate these effects, are unknown. To address these uncertainties we assessed behavioural and physiological (antioxidant enzyme activity) responses to exposure to copper-spiked artificial sediments in a laboratory experiment using a shallow-water holothurian (Holothuria forskali), and in an in situ experiment using a deep-sea holothurian (Amperima sp.). Both species demonstrated sustained avoidance behaviour, evading contact with contaminated artificial sediment. However, A. sp. demonstrated sustained avoidance of 5mgl -1 copper-contaminated artificial sediment whereas H. forskali demonstrated only temporary avoidance of 5mgl -1 copper-contaminated artificial sediment, suggesting that H. forskali may be more tolerant of metal exposure over 96h. Nonetheless, the acute behavioural response appears consistent between the shallow-water species and the deep-sea species, suggesting that H. forskali may be a suitable ecotoxicological proxy for A. sp. in acute (≤24h) exposures, which may be representative of deep-sea mining impacts. No antioxidant response was observed in either species, which was interpreted to be the consequence of avoiding copper exposure. Although these data suggest that shallow-water taxa may be suitable ecotoxicological proxies for deep-sea taxa, differences in methodological and analytical approaches, and in sex and reproductive stage of experimental subjects, require caution in assessing the suitability of H. forskali as an ecotoxicological proxy for A. sp. Nonetheless, avoidance behaviour may have bioenergetic consequences that

  7. Metagenomic Analysis of Genes Encoding Nutrient Cycling Pathways in the Microbiota of Deep-Sea and Shallow-Water Sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyong; Wang, Yuezhu; Li, Jinlong; Liu, Fang; He, Liming; He, Ying; Wang, Shenyue

    2016-12-01

    Sponges host complex symbiotic communities, but to date, the whole picture of the metabolic potential of sponge microbiota remains unclear, particularly the difference between the shallow-water and deep-sea sponge holobionts. In this study, two completely different sponges, shallow-water sponge Theonella swinhoei from the South China Sea and deep-sea sponge Neamphius huxleyi from the Indian Ocean, were selected to compare their whole symbiotic communities and metabolic potential, particularly in element transformation. Phylogenetically diverse bacteria, archaea, fungi, and algae were detected in both shallow-water sponge T. swinhoei and deep-sea sponge N. huxleyi, and different microbial community structures were indicated between these two sponges. Metagenome-based gene abundance analysis indicated that, though the two sponge microbiota have similar core functions, they showed different potential strategies in detailed metabolic processes, e.g., in the transformation and utilization of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur by corresponding microbial symbionts. This study provides insight into the putative metabolic potentials of the microbiota associated with the shallow-water and deep-sea sponges at the whole community level, extending our knowledge of the sponge microbiota's functions, the association of sponge- microbes, as well as the adaption of sponge microbiota to the marine environment.

  8. The origin of gas seeps and shallow gas in northern part of South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Jin, X.

    2003-04-01

    The northern part of South China Sea is of passive continental margin, which geologic units include shelf, slope and deep sea basin. There are rifting basins forming during Paleogene (or Cretaceous ?) to Quaternary developed on shelf and slope, which sediments are dominated by fluvial and lake clastic rock of Paleogene, and marine clastic rock and carbonate of Neogene - Quaternary. The main basins include the Pearl River Mouth Basin, Beibu Gulf basin, Qiongdongnan Basin and Yinggehai basin. They contain rich oil and gas resources, and have become important industrial oil and gas producing region in South China Sea. With the increasing of petroleum exploration actives and marine petroleum engineering, it has been paid more attention to the investigation and research of gas seeps and shallow gas, for they become a potential threaten to the marine engineering while they are regarded as the indicators of industrial oil and gas. By study the distribution and geochemical characteristics of gas seeps in northeast part of Yinggehai basin and shallow gas in sediments on slope, combined with their regional geologic background, this paper deals with the origin, migration pathway and emission mechanism of gas seeps and shallow gas in northern part of South China Sea, for providing a base knowledge for the evaluation of marine engineering geology. In northeast part of Yinggehai basin gas seeps have been found and recorded for near 100 years. During 1990s, as a part of petroleum exploration, the gas seeps in the basin have been investigated and research by oil companies (Baojia Huang et al., 1992; Jiaqiong He et al., 2000). Gas seeps were found in shallow water area along southwest coast of Hainan Island, water depth usually less than 50 m. The occurrence of gas seeps can be divided into two types: (1) gas continuously emission, continuous gas bubbles groups can be detected by sonar underwater and observed on water surface. (2) gas intermittently emission, the time intervals

  9. Cruise observation of shallow water response to typhoon Damrey 2012 in the Yellow Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang-Bing; Lü, Lian-Gang; Zhuang, Zhan-Peng; Xiong, Xue-Jun; Wang, Guan-Suo; Guo, Yan-Liang; Yu, Long; Ma, De-Jing

    2017-09-01

    Typhoon Damrey 2012 has been the strongest typhoon to strike the area north of the Yangtze River since 1949. Two cruise observations to examine the shallow water response to typhoon were carried out just before and after the passage of Damrey in the shallow water near the Jiaozhou Bay on 1 and 5 August 2012. The observation results indicate that, after the passage of Damrey, the thermocline was deepened and weakened significantly. The water temperature below the surface increased by about 4-10 °C. A significant temperature gradient was generated at the bottom of the water column. The salinity decreased throughout the water column. The surface heat flux and precipitation data indicate that the temperature increase and salinity decrease of the bottom water were mainly caused by the intrusion of warm, low-salinity water from the surface (depth salinity surface water was driven by wind and flowed onshore, accumulated and sank as it encountered the coast, which forced the cold bottom water of the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM) to flow offshore.

  10. Inundation and erosion susceptibility in wave dominated beaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Trindade

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic forces over the beach sediments are the main driving factors affecting the frequency and magnitude of morphological changes in beach systems. Most of the time, these driving factors act in a foreseeable way and do not represent any danger either to the coastal systems or to their population. However, hydrodynamic forces are also capable of inducing high morphodynamic behaviour on the beach profiles and very often in a short period of time; this endangers people and property and leads to system retreat. The most common consequences of the occurrence of this type of phenomena over the landforms are costal inundation and erosion. Still, many coastal systems, especially beach systems, have recovery mechanisms. Resilience levels have a very important role in the beach morphodynamic status and exposure to potential damaging event assessments. The Portuguese West coast has a high wave energetic environment during winter, where waves with 5 year recurrence period can reach 9.2m and storms are frequent. This research aims to access beach hazard and susceptibility to inundation and erosion. Three beach systems were selected and monitored applying sequential profiling methodology over a four year period (2004 -2007. Sta. Rita, Azul and Foz do Lizandro beaches are representative systems of the coastal stretch between Peniche and Cascais, which is a cliff dominated coast. Results from the monitoring campaigns are presented, including volume budgets, beach face slope changes, berm occurrence and heights and planimetric coastline dynamics. A hazard and susceptibility assessment diagram and zonation are proposed, including the parameterization of local flood (i.e. mean sea level, maximum spring tides, and surge and run -up levels and erosion potentials (i.e. volume budget and beach planimetric dynamics.

  11. Shallow Gas Migration along Hydrocarbon Wells-An Unconsidered, Anthropogenic Source of Biogenic Methane in the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielstädte, Lisa; Haeckel, Matthias; Karstens, Jens; Linke, Peter; Schmidt, Mark; Steinle, Lea; Wallmann, Klaus

    2017-09-05

    Shallow gas migration along hydrocarbon wells constitutes a potential methane emission pathway that currently is not recognized in any regulatory framework or greenhouse gas inventory. Recently, the first methane emission measurements at three abandoned offshore wells in the Central North Sea (CNS) were conducted showing that considerable amounts of biogenic methane originating from shallow gas accumulations in the overburden of deep reservoirs were released by the boreholes. Here, we identify numerous wells poking through shallow gas pockets in 3-D seismic data of the CNS indicating that about one-third of the wells may leak, potentially releasing a total of 3-17 kt of methane per year into the North Sea. This poses a significant contribution to the North Sea methane budget. A large fraction of this gas (∼42%) may reach the atmosphere via direct bubble transport (0-2 kt yr(-1)) and via diffusive exchange of methane dissolving in the surface mixed layer (1-5 kt yr(-1)), as indicated by numerical modeling. In the North Sea and in other hydrocarbon-prolific provinces of the world shallow gas pockets are frequently observed in the sedimentary overburden and aggregate leakages along the numerous wells drilled in those areas may be significant.

  12. Wave-free floating body forms for a shallow sea area; Senkaiiki no naminashi futai keijo ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyozuka, Y.; Nariai, Y. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    In column footing or semi-submergible type marine structures, a vertical wave force vanishes at a specific period of waves. This phenomenon is called wave-free characteristics. This wave-free characteristics make it possible to design marine structures superior in oscillation performance in waves. Since Bessho`s wave-free theory is useful only for an infinite water depth, this paper studied the wave-free theory for a shallow sea area. On a wave-free singularity and required floating body form, 2-D and 3-D axisymmetric floating body forms were determined, and vertical wave force characteristics of the obtained body forms were calculated and verified experimentally. Since the source term of the wave-free singularity was weaker in a shallow sea area than an infinite deep water area, resulting in the narrow width of the obtained wave-free body forms in a shallow sea area. The wave-free theory for a shallow sea area was verified by both numerical calculation based on a singularity distribution method and model experiment for these floating body forms. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  13. Microbial heterotrophy coupled to Fe-S-As cycling in a shallow-sea hydrothermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G.; Amend, J.

    2013-12-01

    To date, there are only a few known heterotrophic arsenite oxidizers and arsenate reducers. They utilize organic compounds as their carbon source and/or as important electron donors in the transfer arsenic in high temperature environments. Arsenic in hydrothermal vent systems can be immobilized at low temperatures through (ad)sorption on iron oxide and other iron-bearing minerals. Interactions with sulfur species can also affect the redox state of arsenic species. A better understanding of microbially-catalyzed reactions involving carbon, arsenic, iron and sulfur would provide constraints on the mobility of arsenic in a wide variety of natural and engineered systems. The aim of this study is to establish links between microbial distribution and in situ Fe-S-As cycling processes in a shallow-sea hydrothermal vent system. We investigated three shallow-sea hydrothermal vents, Champagne Hot Spring (CHS), Soufriere Spring (SOU) and Portsmouth Spring (PM), located off the western coast of Dominica, Lesser Antilles. CHS and SOU are characterized by moderate temperatures (46oC and 55oC, respectively), and PM is substantially hotter (~90-111 oC). Two sediment cores (one close to and one far from the thermal source) were collected from CHS and from SOU. Porewaters in both background cores had low concentrations of arsenic (mostly As3+, to a lesser extent As5+, DMA, MMA) and ferrous iron. The arsenic concentrations (predominantly As3+) in the CHS high temperature core were 30-90 nM, tracking with dissolved iron. Similar to CHS, the arsenic concentration in the SOU high temperature core was dominated by As3+ and controlled by ferrous iron. However, the arsenic concentration at SOU is comparatively higher, up to 1.9 mM. At the hotter and deeper PM site, highly elevated arsenic levels (1-2.5 mM) were measured, values that are among the highest arsenic concentrations ever reported in a marine hydrothermal system. Several autotrophic and heterotrophic media at two pHs (5.5 and 8

  14. Diurnal warming in shallow coastal seas: Observations from the Caribbean and Great Barrier Reef regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X.; Minnett, P. J.; Berkelmans, R.; Hendee, J.; Manfrino, C.

    2014-07-01

    A good understanding of diurnal warming in the upper ocean is important for the validation of satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) against in-situ buoy data and for merging satellite SSTs taken at different times of the same day. For shallow coastal regions, better understanding of diurnal heating could also help improve monitoring and prediction of ecosystem health, such as coral reef bleaching. Compared to its open ocean counterpart which has been studied extensively and modeled with good success, coastal diurnal warming has complicating localized characteristics, including coastline geometry, bathymetry, water types, tidal and wave mixing. Our goal is to characterize coastal diurnal warming using two extensive in-situ temperature and weather datasets from the Caribbean and Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia. Results showed clear daily warming patterns in most stations from both datasets. For the three Caribbean stations where solar radiation is the main cause of daily warming, the mean diurnal warming amplitudes were about 0.4 K at depths of 4-7 m and 0.6-0.7 K at shallower depths of 1-2 m; the largest warming value was 2.1 K. For coral top temperatures of the GBR, 20% of days had warming amplitudes >1 K, with the largest >4 K. The bottom warming at shallower sites has higher daily maximum temperatures and lower daily minimum temperatures than deeper sites nearby. The averaged daily warming amplitudes were shown to be closely related to daily average wind speed and maximum insolation, as found in the open ocean. Diurnal heating also depends on local features including water depth, location on different sections of the reef (reef flat vs. reef slope), the relative distance from the barrier reef chain (coast vs. lagoon stations vs. inner barrier reef sites vs. outer rim sites); and the proximity to the tidal inlets. In addition, the influence of tides on daily temperature changes and its relative importance compared to solar radiation was quantified by

  15. AVO Analysis of a Shallow Gas Accumulation in the Marmara Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, M.; Dondurur, D.; Çifçi, G.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, Amplitude versus Offset-AVO analysis is widely used in determination and classification of gas anomalies from wide-offset seismic data. Bright spots which are among the significant factors in determining the hydrocarbon accumulations, can also be determined sucessfully using AVO analysis. A bright spot anomaly were identified on the multi-channel seismic data collected by R/V K. Piri Reis research vessel in the Marmara Sea in 2008. On prestack seismic data, the associated AVO anomalies are clearly identified on the supergathers. Near- and far-offset stack sections are plotted to show the amplitudes changes at different offsets and the bright amplitudes were observed on the far-offset stack. AVO analysis was applied to the observed bright spot anomaly following the standart data processing steps. The analysis includes the preparation of Intercept, Gradient and Fluid Factor sections of AVO attribues. Top and base boundaries of gas bearing sediment were shown by intercept - gradient crossplot method. 1D modelling was also performed to show AVO classes and models were compared with the analysis results. It is interpreted that the bright spot anomaly arises from a shallow gas accumulation. In addition, the gas saturation from P-wave velocity was also estimated by the analysis. AVO analysis indicated Class 3 and Class 4 AVO anomalies observed on the bright spot anomaly.

  16. Virioplankton and bacterioplankton in a shallow CO 2-dominated hydrothermal vent (Panarea Island, Tyrrhenian Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuza, Ana; Celussi, Mauro; Cibic, Tamara; Del Negro, Paola; De Vittor, Cinzia

    2012-01-01

    Gas hydrothermal vents are used as a natural analogue for studying the effects of CO 2 leakage from hypothetical shallow marine storage sites on benthic and pelagic systems. This study investigated the interrelationships between planktonic prokaryotes and viruses in the Panarea Islands hydrothermal system (southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy), especially their abundance, distribution and diversity. No difference in prokaryotic abundance was shown between high-CO 2 and control sites. The community structure displayed differences between fumarolic field and the control, and between surface and bottom waters, the latter likely due to the presence of different water masses. Bacterial assemblages were qualitatively dominated by chemo- and photoautotrophic organisms, able to utilise both CO 2 and H 2S for their metabolic requirements. From significantly lower virioplankton abundance in the proximity of the exhalative area together with particularly low Virus-to-Prokaryotes Ratio, we inferred a reduced impact on prokaryotic abundance and proliferation. Even if the fate of viruses in this particular condition remains still unknown, we consider that lower viral abundance could reflect in enhancing the energy flow to higher trophic levels, thus largely influencing the overall functioning of the system.

  17. Microplastics in the Mediterranean Sea: Deposition in coastal shallow sediments, spatial variation and preferential grain size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomar, Carme; Estarellas, Fernando; Deudero, Salud

    2016-04-01

    Marine litter loads in sea compartments are an emergent issue due to their ecological and biological consequences. This study addresses microplastic quantification and morphological description to test spatial differences along an anthropogenic gradient of coastal shallow sediments and further on to evaluate the preferential deposition of microplastics in a given sediment grain fraction. Sediments from Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) contained the highest concentrations of microplastics (MPs): up to 0.90 ± 0.10 MPs/g suggesting the transfer of microplastics from source areas to endpoint areas. In addition, a high proportion of microplastic filaments were found close to populated areas whereas fragment type microplastics were more common in MPAs. There was no clear trend between sediment grain size and microplastic deposition in sediments, although microplastics were always present in two grain size fractions: 2 mm > x > 1 mm and 1 mm > x 0.5 mm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Untold muddy tales: Paleoenvironmental dynamics of a ``barren'' mudrock succession from a shallow Permian epeiric sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, M. G.; Matos, S. A.; Warren, L. V.; Assine, M. L.; Riccomini, C.; Bondioli, J. G.

    2016-11-01

    During the late Paleozoic, the intracratonic Paraná Basin, Brazil, in central Gondwanaland, was covered by a huge (>1.600.000 km2), shallow and isolated epeiric sea. Within the Permian succession, oxygen-deficient facies are commonly recorded in the Mesosaurus-bearing Irati Formation (Cisuralian, Artinskian/Kungurian) and the overlaying Serra Alta Formation (Guadalupian, Wordian/Capitanian). Barren, dark-grey mudstones are the main facies preserved in this last unit, which has usually discouraged extensive and detailed stratigraphical and paleontological investigations. However, exhaustive sedimentological, taphonomic and paleontological surveys in those deposits reveal a dynamic and complex depositonal history. Based on sedimentary fabric, autochthonous to parautochthonous occurrences of shelly benthic invertebrates (bivalves) and the presence/absence of concretion-bearing and phosphate-rich layers, we report variations in the oxygen levels of bottom and pore waters, in bathymetry, sedimentation rates, and changes in benthic colonization. Our data indicate that the deposition of this ;apparently barren; mudstone-dominated succession was driven by a complex interplay of variations in sedimentation rate and oxygen pulses tied to tectonic and climate changes. Three distinct populations or invertebrate paleocommunities were recorded, which were adapted to (a) normal background low-oxygen (dysoxic) conditions (i.e., minute infaunal suspension-feeding bivalves associated with the trace fossil Planolites), (b) chemically toxic (anoxic/extreme dysoxic) substrates, including gigantic burrowing bivalves (probable chemosymbiotic taxa), and (c) oxic/dysoxic substrates following short-term bottom disruptions.

  19. Effect of tidal stream power generation on the region-wide circulation in a shallow sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Shapiro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper quantifies the backward effect on the ocean currents caused by a tidal stream farm located in the open shallow sea. Recent studies in channels with 1-D models have indicated that the power potential is not given purely by the flux of kinetic energy, as has been commonly assumed. In this study, a 3-D ocean circulation model is used to estimate (i practically extractable energy resource at different levels of rated generation capacity of the farm, (ii changes in the strength of currents due to energy extraction, and (iii alterations in the pattern of residual currents and the pathways of passive tracers. As well as tidal streams, the model also takes into account the wind-driven and density-driven ocean currents. Numerical modelling has been carried out for a hypothetical tidal farm located in the Celtic Sea north of Cornwall, an area known for its high level of tidal energy. Modelling results clearly indicate that the extracted power does not grow linearly with the increase in the rated capacity of the farm. For the case study covered in this paper, a 100-fold increase in the rated generation capacity of the farm results in only 7-fold increase in extracted power. In the case of a high power farm, kinetic energy of currents is altered significantly as far as 10–20 km away from the farm. At high levels of extracted energy the currents tend to avoid flowing through the farm, an effect which is not captured with 1-D models. Residual currents are altered as far as a hundred kilometres away. The magnitude of changes in the dispersion of tracers is highly sensitive to the location. Some of the passive drifters analysed in this study experience significant variations in the end-to-start distance due to energy extraction ranging from 13% to 238% while others are practically unaffected. This study shows that both energy extraction estimates and effects on region wide circulation depend on a complex combination of factors, and the specific

  20. Effect of tidal stream power generation on the region-wide circulation in a shallow sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, G. I.

    2011-02-01

    This paper quantifies the backward effect on the ocean currents caused by a tidal stream farm located in the open shallow sea. Recent studies in channels with 1-D models have indicated that the power potential is not given purely by the flux of kinetic energy, as has been commonly assumed. In this study, a 3-D ocean circulation model is used to estimate (i) practically extractable energy resource at different levels of rated generation capacity of the farm, (ii) changes in the strength of currents due to energy extraction, and (iii) alterations in the pattern of residual currents and the pathways of passive tracers. As well as tidal streams, the model also takes into account the wind-driven and density-driven ocean currents. Numerical modelling has been carried out for a hypothetical tidal farm located in the Celtic Sea north of Cornwall, an area known for its high level of tidal energy. Modelling results clearly indicate that the extracted power does not grow linearly with the increase in the rated capacity of the farm. For the case study covered in this paper, a 100-fold increase in the rated generation capacity of the farm results in only 7-fold increase in extracted power. In the case of a high power farm, kinetic energy of currents is altered significantly as far as 10-20 km away from the farm. At high levels of extracted energy the currents tend to avoid flowing through the farm, an effect which is not captured with 1-D models. Residual currents are altered as far as a hundred kilometres away. The magnitude of changes in the dispersion of tracers is highly sensitive to the location. Some of the passive drifters analysed in this study experience significant variations in the end-to-start distance due to energy extraction ranging from 13% to 238% while others are practically unaffected. This study shows that both energy extraction estimates and effects on region wide circulation depend on a complex combination of factors, and the specific figures given in the

  1. Gas hydrates in shallow deposits of the Amsterdam mud volcano, Anaximander Mountains, Northeastern Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, Thomas; Kasten, Sabine; Zabel, Matthias; Bahr, André; Abegg, Friedrich; Hohnberg, Hans-Jürgen; Bohrmann, Gerhard

    2010-06-01

    We investigated gas hydrate in situ inventories as well as the composition and principal transport mechanisms of fluids expelled at the Amsterdam mud volcano (AMV; 2,025 m water depth) in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Pressure coring (the only technique preventing hydrates from decomposition during recovery) was used for the quantification of light hydrocarbons in near-surface deposits. The cores (up to 2.5 m in length) were retrieved with an autoclave piston corer, and served for analyses of gas quantities and compositions, and pore-water chemistry. For comparison, gravity cores from sites at the summit and beyond the AMV were analyzed. A prevalence of thermogenic light hydrocarbons was inferred from average C1/C2+ ratios <35 and δ13C-CH4 values of -50.6‰. Gas venting from the seafloor indicated methane oversaturation, and volumetric gas-sediment ratios of up to 17.0 in pressure cores taken from the center demonstrated hydrate presence at the time of sampling. Relative enrichments in ethane, propane, and iso-butane in gas released from pressure cores, and from an intact hydrate piece compared to venting gas suggest incipient crystallization of hydrate structure II (sII). Nonetheless, the co-existence of sI hydrate can not be excluded from our dataset. Hydrates fill up to 16.7% of pore volume within the sediment interval between the base of the sulfate zone and the maximum sampling depth at the summit. The concave-down shapes of pore-water concentration profiles recorded in the center indicate the influence of upward-directed advection of low-salinity fluids/fluidized mud. Furthermore, the SO{4/2-} and Ba2+ pore-water profiles in the central part of the AMV demonstrate that sulfate reduction driven by the anaerobic oxidation of methane is complete at depths between 30 cm and 70 cm below seafloor. Our results indicate that methane oversaturation, high hydrostatic pressure, and elevated pore-water activity caused by low salinity promote fixing of considerable

  2. Curie isotherm depth from aeromagnetic data constraining shallow heat source depths in the central Aeolian Ridge (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ritis, R.; Ravat, D.; Ventura, G.; Chiappini, M.

    2013-04-01

    The Salina, Lipari, and Vulcano volcanic ridge and the surrounding sea sectors (Aeolian Archipelago, Southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy) are characterized by vents responsible for a recent (Salina volcanic ridge allows us to constrain the Curie isotherm depth. The elevated portion of the isotherm is between 2 and 3 km below Salina and Vulcano and about 1 km below Lipari. The Curie depth results in the context of other geological and geophysical evidence suggest that the rise of the Curie isotherm is mainly due to the occurrence of shallow heat sources such as magma ponds and associated hydrothermal systems. The short-wavelength magnetic anomaly field reflects magnetic contrasts from highly magnetized volcanic bodies, low-magnetization sediments, and hydrothermally altered rocks. Borehole temperature data verify the Curie temperature derived from the magnetic methods on the island of Vulcano. We conclude that the whole Vulcano, Lipari, and Salina volcanic ridge is active and should be monitored.

  3. Geological characterization of the Dutch Wadden Sea using shallow reflection seismics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paap, B.F.; Dubelaar, C.W.; Gunnink, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Mapping of the Dutch Wadden Sea is a major challenge as it is an intertidal zone and therefore has limited accessibility by surveying vessels. Hence, the current subsurface model of the Dutch Wadden Sea is based on a sparse density of lithological information derived from core samples and seismic

  4. Shallow water sea slugs (Gastropoda: Heterobranchia) from the northwestern coast of the Sea of Japan, north of Peter the Great Bay, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichvarkhin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    The coast of northern Primorye region, north of Peter the Great Bay has been sparsely studied in regards to its molluscan fauna, with just a few works reviewing the distribution of local mollusks. This work presents a survey of the shallow water heterobranch sea slugs currently occurring around Kievka Bay to Oprichnik Bay, Russia. Thirty-nine species of sea slugs were found in this study and the new species Cadlina olgae sp. nov., described herein. Most (24) of the species occurring in the area have widespread ranges in the northern Pacific Ocean. The eight species are endemic for the Sea of Japan and adjacent part of the Sea of Okhotsk. Seven other occur also in northern Atlantic and Arctic waters. Thirteen found species are not known from Peter the Great Bay but known from adjacent northern Pacific waters. The finding of a previously undescribed species emphasizes the need of further surveys, particularly in subtidal and deeper waters, in order to improve the knowledge on this neglected fauna in Primorye.

  5. Sea Level and Shallow Water Current Variability in Pagasa Island, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Villanoy

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Significant wave height, sea level, and currents at 0, 2, 4, and 6m were measured using a doppler current meter deployed at the northern reef of Pagasa Island from 16 October 1997 to 3 March 1998. Tidal components of sea level and current data were extracted using harmonic analysis and subtracted from the original series to obtain residuals. These were then correlated with each other and with atmospheric variables (wind speed and atmospheric pressure. The tidal components accounted for about 98% of the variance in sea level but only 4-5% of the variance in the currents. Power spectral density correlations indicate that residual sea level variations may be due to set-up by wave action. Strong non-tidal residual components of the flow suggest conditions favorable for offshore transport which may promote long-distance dispersal of propagules.

  6. Exploring the genetic diversity of shallow-water Agariciidae (Cnidaria: Anthozoa) from the Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Terraneo, Tullia Isotta

    2017-05-19

    Scleractinian corals ascribed to the family Agariciidae represent an important component of Red Sea coral reef fauna, though little genetic data are currently available for this group, and existing information shows polyphyly in the examined mesophotic taxa from the Pacific Ocean. In this work, we provide a first genetic survey of Agariciidae from the Saudi Arabian Red Sea, based on a collection of shallow-water material (<30 m) from the Gulf of Aqaba to the Farasan Islands. Two molecular markers were sequenced to infer morphospecies monophyly and relationships, the intergenic region between COI and 16S rRNA from mitochondrial DNA and the ribosomal ITS1 region from nuclear DNA. A total of 20 morphospecies were identified based on classical macromorphological characters. Six, namely Gardineroseris planulata, Pavona maldivensis, Pavona clavus, Pavona decussata, Leptoseris fragilis, and Leptoseris yabei, were resolved with both DNA loci. The molecular boundaries among the remaining 14 species remain unclear. Our results further confirm that the morphology-based taxonomy of most agariciid species is in disagreement with genetics. In order to disentangle the systematics of these taxa, the inclusion of more sampling locations, additional variable loci, and a micromophological approach are likely needed. Our genetic data represent a first step towards the comparison of biodiversity and connectivity between the Red Sea and the rest of the Indo-Pacific.

  7. Developing Benthic Class Specific, Chlorophyll-a Retrieving Algorithms for Optically-Shallow Water Using SeaWiFS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakey, Tara; Melesse, Assefa; Sukop, Michael C; Tachiev, Georgio; Whitman, Dean; Miralles-Wilhelm, Fernando

    2016-10-20

    This study evaluated the ability to improve Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) chl-a retrieval from optically shallow coastal waters by applying algorithms specific to the pixels' benthic class. The form of the Ocean Color (OC) algorithm was assumed for this study. The operational atmospheric correction producing Level 2 SeaWiFS data was retained since the focus of this study was on establishing the benefit from the alternative specification of the bio-optical algorithm. Benthic class was determined through satellite image-based classification methods. Accuracy of the chl-a algorithms evaluated was determined through comparison with coincident in situ measurements of chl-a. The regionally-tuned models that were allowed to vary by benthic class produced more accurate estimates of chl-a than the single, unified regionally-tuned model. Mean absolute percent difference was approximately 70% for the regionally-tuned, benthic class-specific algorithms. Evaluation of the residuals indicated the potential for further improvement to chl-a estimation through finer characterization of benthic environments. Atmospheric correction procedures specialized to coastal environments were recognized as areas for future improvement as these procedures would improve both classification and algorithm tuning.

  8. Developing Benthic Class Specific, Chlorophyll-a Retrieving Algorithms for Optically-Shallow Water Using SeaWiFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Blakey

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the ability to improve Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS chl-a retrieval from optically shallow coastal waters by applying algorithms specific to the pixels’ benthic class. The form of the Ocean Color (OC algorithm was assumed for this study. The operational atmospheric correction producing Level 2 SeaWiFS data was retained since the focus of this study was on establishing the benefit from the alternative specification of the bio-optical algorithm. Benthic class was determined through satellite image-based classification methods. Accuracy of the chl-a algorithms evaluated was determined through comparison with coincident in situ measurements of chl-a. The regionally-tuned models that were allowed to vary by benthic class produced more accurate estimates of chl-a than the single, unified regionally-tuned model. Mean absolute percent difference was approximately 70% for the regionally-tuned, benthic class-specific algorithms. Evaluation of the residuals indicated the potential for further improvement to chl-a estimation through finer characterization of benthic environments. Atmospheric correction procedures specialized to coastal environments were recognized as areas for future improvement as these procedures would improve both classification and algorithm tuning.

  9. Analysis of humpback whale sounds in shallow waters of the Southeastern Arabian Sea: An indication of breeding habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanty, Madan M; Latha, G; Thirunavukkarasu, A

    2015-06-01

    The primary objective of this work was to present the acoustical identification of humpback whales, detected by using an autonomous ambient noise measurement system, deployed in the shallow waters of the Southeastern Arabian Sea (SEAS) during the period January to May 2011. Seven types of sounds were detected. These were characteristically upsweeps and downsweeps along with harmonics. Sounds produced repeatedly in a specific pattern were referred to as phrases (PQRS and ABC). Repeated phrases in a particular pattern were referred to as themes, and from the spectrographic analysis, two themes (I and II) were identified. The variation in the acoustic characteristics such as fundamental frequency, range, duration of the sound unit, and the structure of the phrases and themes are discussed. Sound units were recorded from mid-January to mid-March, with a peak in February, when the mean SST is approx. 28 degree C, and no presence was recorded after mid-March. The temporal and thematic structures strongly determine the functions of the humpback whale song form. Given the use of song in the SEAS, this area is possibly used as an active breeding habitat by humpback whales during the winter season.

  10. Baseline evaluation of sediment contamination in the shallow coastal areas of Saudi Arabian Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Compean, Pedro; Ellis, Joanne; Cúrdia, João; Payumo, Richard; Langner, Ute; Jones, Burton; Carvalho, Susana

    2017-10-15

    Despite the growing recognition of the importance of water and sediment quality there is still limited information on contamination levels in many regions globally including the Red Sea. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of three classes of contaminants (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - PAH; metals; plastics) in coastal sediments along the Saudi Arabian Red Sea mainly collected using grabs. Background concentrations are provided for metals in the region. Concentrations of metals and PAH were generally low in comparison to international guidelines. A clear relationship between the concentration of metals and anthropogenic sources was not always apparent and dust and vegetation may be relevant players in the region. Microplastic items (mainly polyethylene) were abundant (reaching up to 1gm -2 and 160piecesm -2 ) and in general associated with areas of high human activity. This study provides critical information for future monitoring and the development of national policies within the Red Sea region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Baseline evaluation of sediment contamination in the shallow coastal areas of Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Ruiz Compean, Pedro Javier

    2017-09-12

    Despite the growing recognition of the importance of water and sediment quality there is still limited information on contamination levels in many regions globally including the Red Sea. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of three classes of contaminants (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - PAH; metals; plastics) in coastal sediments along the Saudi Arabian Red Sea mainly collected using grabs. Background concentrations are provided for metals in the region. Concentrations of metals and PAH were generally low in comparison to international guidelines. A clear relationship between the concentration of metals and anthropogenic sources was not always apparent and dust and vegetation may be relevant players in the region. Microplastic items (mainly polyethylene) were abundant (reaching up to 1gm−2 and 160piecesm−2) and in general associated with areas of high human activity. This study provides critical information for future monitoring and the development of national policies within the Red Sea region.

  12. Deep divers in shallow seas: Southern elephant seals on the Patagonian shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Claudio; Piola, Alberto R.; Marin, Maria Rosa; Lewis, Mirtha; Zajaczkovski, Uriel; Fernández, Teresita

    2007-10-01

    Elephant seals are wide-ranging, pelagic, deep-diving (average of 400-600 m) predators that typically travel to open waters and continental shelf edges thousands of kilometers from their land breeding colonies. We report a less common pattern of foraging in the shallow waters of a continental shelf. Southern elephant seals, Mirounga leonina, that breed at Península Valdés (Argentina), face an extended (˜1,000,000 km 2; 400-700 km-wide, depending on track), shallow (Adults of both sexes usually cross it in rapid transit to other potential foraging grounds on the shelf edge or in the Argentine Basin, but 2-4 year-old juveniles spread over the plateau and spent months in shallow waters. This behavior was recorded for 9 seals (5 males and 4 females) of 23 satellite-tracked juveniles (springs of 2004 and 2005) and for 2 subadult males studied in previous seasons. Trips included travel trajectories and time spent in areas where swim speed decreased, suggesting foraging. Preferred locations of juvenile females were in the proximity of the shelf break, where stratified waters had relatively high phytoplankton concentrations, but young and subadult males used the relatively cold (7-8 °C), low-salinity (˜33.3) mid-shelf waters, with depths of 105-120 m and a poorly stratified water column. Three of the latter seals, instrumented with time-depth recorders, showed dives compatible with benthic feeding and no diel pattern of depths distribution. Regions of the mid-shelf were used in different seasons and were associated with low chlorophyll- a concentration at the time of the visit, suggesting that surface productivity does not overlap with putative quality habitat for benthic foragers. Benthic diving on the shallow mid-shelf would be a resource partitioning strategy advantageous for young males prior to greater energetic demands of a high growth rate and a large body size. Later in life, the more predictable, bathymetry-forced, shelf-break front may offer the food

  13. Eukaryotic diversity in late Pleistocene marine sediments around a shallow methane hydrate deposit in the Japan Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouduka, M; Tanabe, A S; Yamamoto, S; Yanagawa, K; Nakamura, Y; Akiba, F; Tomaru, H; Toju, H; Suzuki, Y

    2017-09-01

    Marine sediments contain eukaryotic DNA deposited from overlying water columns. However, a large proportion of deposited eukaryotic DNA is aerobically biodegraded in shallow marine sediments. Cold seep sediments are often anaerobic near the sediment-water interface, so eukaryotic DNA in such sediments is expected to be preserved. We investigated deeply buried marine sediments in the Japan Sea, where a methane hydrate deposit is associated with cold seeps. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed the reproducible recovery of eukaryotic DNA in marine sediments at depths up to 31.0 m in the vicinity of the methane hydrate deposit. In contrast, the reproducible recovery of eukaryotic DNA was limited to a shallow depth (8.3 m) in marine sediments not adjacent to the methane hydrate deposit in the same area. Pyrosequencing of an 18S rRNA gene variable region generated 1,276-3,307 reads per sample, which was sufficient to cover the biodiversity based on rarefaction curves. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most of the eukaryotic DNA originated from radiolarian genera of the class Chaunacanthida, which have SrSO4 skeletons, the sea grass genus Zostera, and the seaweed genus Sargassum. Eukaryotic DNA originating from other planktonic fauna and land plants was also detected. Diatom sequences closely related to Thalassiosira spp., indicative of cold climates, were obtained from sediments deposited during the last glacial period (MIS-2). Plant sequences of the genera Alnus, Micromonas, and Ulmus were found in sediments deposited during the warm interstadial period (MIS-3). These results suggest the long-term persistence of eukaryotic DNA from terrestrial and aquatic sources in marine sediments associated with cold seeps, and that the genetic information from eukaryotic DNA from deeply buried marine sediments associated with cold seeps can be used to reconstruct environments and ecosystems from the past. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Nannastacidae (Crustacea: Cumacea) from the Malayan shallow waters (South China Sea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrescu, Iorgu

    1997-01-01

    Four new species from the South China Sea are described: Nannastacus muelleri n.sp., Nannastacus wisseni n.sp., Scherocumella fagei n.sp. and Scherocumella malayensis n.sp. The descriptions of further 15 known species are complemented with new information ( Campylaspis amblyoda Gamo, 1960, Cumella

  15. Seasonal patterns of biomass, growth and reproduction in Dictyota cervicornis and Stoechospermum polypodioides (Dictyotales, Phaeophyta) on a shallow reef flat in the southern Red Sea (Eritrea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ateweberhan, M; Bruggemann, JH; Breeman, AM

    2005-01-01

    Seasonal patterns in thallus length, biomass, reproduction, total biomass m(-2) and size structure were monitored in populations of Dictyota cervicomis and Stoechospermum polypodioides on a shallow reef flat in the southern Red Sea. These tropical reef flats are exposed to extreme temperatures of

  16. Seasonal patterns of biomass, growth and reproduction in Dictyota cervicornis and Stoechospermum polypodioides (Dictyotales, Phaeophyta) on a shallow reef flat in the southern Red Sea (Eritrea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ateweberhan, M.; Bruggemann, J.H.; Breeman, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Seasonal patterns in thallus length, biomass, reproduction, total biomass m-2 and size structure were monitored in populations of Dictyota cervicornis and Stoechospermum polypodioides on a shallow reef flat in the southern Red Sea. These tropical reef flats are exposed to extreme temperatures of

  17. Thermal adaptations in deep-sea hydrothermal vent and shallow-water shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Felix; Brown, Alastair; Mestre, Nélia C.; Reed, Adam J.; Thatje, Sven

    2013-08-01

    The hydrothermal vent shrimp Mirocaris fortunata is commonly exposed to acute thermal gradients and rapid fluctuations in water temperature. The shallow-water shrimp Palaemonetes varians experiences less acute but similar magnitude fluctuations in its thermal regime. Acute respiratory response to temperature shock, and temperature preference was assessed for both species. Oxygen consumption rates were assessed across the natural temperature range reported for M. fortunata. Rates increased with temperature for both species. P. varians had a significantly higher rate of oxygen consumption than M. fortunata at all temperatures except 4 °C. The rate of increase in oxygen consumption with increasing temperature was also significantly greater for P. varians. M. fortunata selected a significantly higher temperature than P. varians. Mirocaris fortunata maintains its metabolism at a more stable rate, which is likely an adaptation to acute changes in temperatures occurring at hydrothermal vents.

  18. Local validation of MODIS sensor sea surface temperature on western Mediterranean shallow waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Durá

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The sea surface temperature (SST estimated from MODIS Aqua products (daytime and nighttime 11 μm and night 4 μm has been correlated with field data taken at three depths (15, 50, 100 cm in a Western Mediterranean coastal area. The comparison has allowed us to analyze the uncertainty in the estimation of this parameter in coastal waters using low spatial resolution satellite images. The results show that the daytime SST_11 μm product obtains fittest statistical values: RMSE (root mean square error and r2 (Pearson’s correlation coefficient of 1°C and 0.96, respectively, for 50 cm depth.

  19. Dodecaceria carolinae n. sp. (Polychaeta: Cirratulidae, a shallow-water species from the northwestern Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Maria Aguilar-Camacho

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The cirratulid genus Dodecaceria Örsted, 1843 is well characterized by having palps inserted dorsally or laterally and branchial filaments restricted to some anterior chaetigers. The genus has species recorded from many marine environments worldwide and species are differentiated mainly by the number of branchial filaments. In this contribution, D. carolinae n. sp. is described based upon extensive materials collected in the northwestern Caribbean Sea. This species is distinguished by having 12 pairs of branchiae in two distinctive sizes, the first three four times longer than the remaining ones, and by having spoon-shaped hooks from notopodia 14-19 and from neuropodia 13-18. An analysis of the intra-specific variability, together with a table of diagnostic features and a key to all known species, is also included.

  20. Postglacial sedimentary regime around northern Sylt, South-eastern North Sea, based on shallow seismic evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldreel, Lars Ole; Kuijpers, Antoon; Madsen, Emil B

    2010-01-01

    by the presence of minor dunes, indicative of flood-current control, apart from a central zone where ebb-tide is responsible for northward-directed sediment transport. Sparker seismic and Chirp III data are consistent with processes having been persistent throughout the Holocene. Based on the study a model......-shore (tidal) currents heading towards the Lister Tief. The southern part of Lister Tief is characterized by the presence of a major dune field with up to 8 m high compound dunes with wavelengths up to 350 m indicative of easterly-directed sediment transport (flood dominated). Further to the northwest......During the past 5 years the coastal zone offshore the northern part of the island of Sylt, has been investigated by sparker seismics and high-resolution subbottom profiling. The North Sea sector of the area is characterized by northward-directed sediment bypass as a result of strong long...

  1. Shallow lithological structure across the Dead Sea Transform derived from geophysical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankiewicz, J.; Munoz, G.; Ritter, O.; Bedrosian, P.A.; Ryberg, T.; Weckmann, U.; Weber, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the DEad SEa Rift Transect (DESERT) project a 150 km magnetotelluric profile consisting of 154 sites was carried out across the Dead Sea Transform. The resistivity model presented shows conductive structures in the western section of the study area terminating abruptly at the Arava Fault. For a more detailed analysis we performed a joint interpretation of the resistivity model with a P wave velocity model from a partially coincident seismic experiment. The technique used is a statistical correlation of resistivity and velocity values in parameter space. Regions of high probability of a coexisting pair of values for the two parameters are mapped back into the spatial domain, illustrating the geographical location of lithological classes. In this study, four regions of enhanced probability have been identified, and are remapped as four lithological classes. This technique confirms the Arava Fault marks the boundary of a highly conductive lithological class down to a depth of ???3 km. That the fault acts as an impermeable barrier to fluid flow is unusual for large fault zone, which often exhibit a fault zone characterized by high conductivity and low seismic velocity. At greater depths it is possible to resolve the Precambrian basement into two classes characterized by vastly different resistivity values but similar seismic velocities. The boundary between these classes is approximately coincident with the Al Quweira Fault, with higher resistivities observed east of the fault. This is interpreted as evidence for the original deformation along the DST originally taking place at the Al Quweira Fault, before being shifted to the Arava Fault. 

  2. Surface sediment properties and heavy metal pollution assessment in the Shallow Sea Wetland of the Liaodong Bay, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Ye, Siyuan; Laws, Edward A; Yuan, Hongming; Ding, Xigui; Zhao, Guangming

    2017-07-15

    Liaodong Bay, a semi-enclosed bay located in northeastern China, is impacted by the discharges of five rivers. We analyzed 100 surface sediment samples from the Shallow Sea Wetland of Liaodong Bay for grain size and concentrations of organic carbon (Corg) and heavy metals. The ranges of the heavy metal concentrations were 2.32-17μg/g (As), 0.025-1.03μg/g (Cd), 18.9-131μg/g (Cr), 4.6-36.1μg/g (Cu), 0.012-0.29μg/g (Hg), 13.7-33.9μg/g (Pb), and 17.4-159μg/g (Zn). Pollution assessments revealed that some stations were moderately to highly polluted with As, Cd, and Hg. Severe pollution was apparent in the Xiaoling River estuary; lower concentrations of heavy metals were observed in other river mouths, where the sediments were more coarse. The distributions of the heavy metals were closely associated with Corg and grain size. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Classifying the Baltic Sea Shallow Water Habitats Using Image-Based and Spectral Library Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiit Kutser

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure of benthic macrophyte habitats is known to indicate the quality of coastal water. Thus, a large-scale analysis of the spatial patterns of coastal marine habitats enables us to adequately estimate the status of valuable coastal marine habitats, provide better evidence for environmental changes and describe processes that are behind the changes. Knowing the spatial distribution of benthic habitats is also important from the coastal management point of view. A big challenge in remote sensing mapping of benthic habitats is to define appropriate mapping classes that are also meaningful from the ecological point of view. In this study, the benthic habitat classification scheme was defined for the study areas in the relatively turbid north-eastern Baltic Sea coastal environment. Two different classification methods—image-based and the spectral library—method were used for image classification. The image-based classification method can provide benthic habitat maps from coastal areas, but requires extensive field studies. An alternative approach in image classification is to use measured and/or modelled spectral libraries. This method does not require fieldwork at the time of image collection if preliminary information about the potential benthic habitats and their spectral properties, as well as variability in optical water properties exists from earlier studies. A spectral library was generated through radiative transfer model HydroLight computations using measured reflectance spectra from representative benthic substrates and water quality measurements. Our previous results have shown that benthic habitat mapping should be done at high spatial resolution, owing to the small-scale heterogeneity of such habitats in the Estonian coastal waters. In this study, the capability of high spatial resolution hyperspectral airborne a Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI sensor and a high spatial resolution multispectral WorldView-2

  4. Adaptation and evolution of deep-sea scale worms (Annelida: Polynoidae): insights from transcriptome comparison with a shallow-water species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanjie; Sun, Jin; Chen, Chong; Watanabe, Hiromi K.; Feng, Dong; Zhang, Yu; Chiu, Jill M. Y.; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2017-04-01

    Polynoid scale worms (Polynoidae, Annelida) invaded deep-sea chemosynthesis-based ecosystems approximately 60 million years ago, but little is known about their genetic adaptation to the extreme deep-sea environment. In this study, we reported the first two transcriptomes of deep-sea polynoids (Branchipolynoe pettiboneae, Lepidonotopodium sp.) and compared them with the transcriptome of a shallow-water polynoid (Harmothoe imbricata). We determined codon and amino acid usage, positive selected genes, highly expressed genes and putative duplicated genes. Transcriptome assembly produced 98,806 to 225,709 contigs in the three species. There were more positively charged amino acids (i.e., histidine and arginine) and less negatively charged amino acids (i.e., aspartic acid and glutamic acid) in the deep-sea species. There were 120 genes showing clear evidence of positive selection. Among the 10% most highly expressed genes, there were more hemoglobin genes with high expression levels in both deep-sea species. The duplicated genes related to DNA recombination and metabolism, and gene expression were only enriched in deep-sea species. Deep-sea scale worms adopted two strategies of adaptation to hypoxia in the chemosynthesis-based habitats (i.e., rapid evolution of tetra-domain hemoglobin in Branchipolynoe or high expression of single-domain hemoglobin in Lepidonotopodium sp.).

  5. Shallow seismic reflectors and upper Quaternary sea levei changes in the Ubatuba region, São Paulo State, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Michaelovitch de Mahiques

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between shallow seismic Wlits and Quaternary sea level changes in Southeastern Brazil is based on boomer profiles and core data ftom the Ubatuba region, northern São Paulo coast. In Flamengo and Palmas bays, the intecpretation of seismic lines revealed the occurrence of four sedimentary units, separated by regionally correlated reflectors. The upper two Wlits correspond to Late Pleistocene and Holocene deposits. The lowermost sedimentary units were correlated to the older Quaternary transgressive events. These deposits, which have not yet been described for this area, can presently be fOWld on the Rio Grande do Sul coastal plain. In the Boqueirão Strait, two erosional events in the sedimentary strata have been associated with the Cananéia (maximum at 120,000 yr. B.P. and Santos (maximum at 5,100 yr. B.P. sea-level rise events.A partir de registros sísmicos, obtidos por "OOomer" e dados de um testemunho, foi estabelecida uma relação entre Wlidades sísmicas rasas e variações relativas do nível do mar no Quaternário, na região de Ubatuba, litoral norte do Estado de São Paulo. A intecpretação das linhas sísmicas revelou a ocorrência de quatro Wlidades sísmicas, associadas a seqüências sedimentares, separadas por refletores sísmicos de expressão regional. As duas unidades superiores correspondem a depósitos do Pleistoceno Superior e Holoceno, e encontram correspondência em outras áreas do planeta. Na região do Boqueirão, dois eventos erosivos são associados com os últimos eventos de subida do nível do mar. As unidades sedimentares inferiores são correlacionáveis a eventos transgressivos mais antigos, que não haviam sido ainda referidos para a área.

  6. Perfluorinated contaminants in sediments and aquatic organisms collected from shallow water and tidal flat areas of the Ariake Sea, Japan: environmental fate of perfluorooctane sulfonate in aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Haruhiko; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Nasu, Tetsuya; Cho, Hyeon-Seo; Sinclair, Ewan; Takemurai, Akira

    2006-08-15

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorononanoate (PFNA), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHS), and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA) are widely distributed in aquatic ecosystems. Despite studies reporting the occurrence of PFCs in aquatic organisms, the fate of PFCs in tidal flat and marine coastal ecosystems is not known. In this study, we determined concentrations of PFOS, PFOA, PFNA, PFHS, and PFOSA in sediments; benthic organisms, including lugworm, mussel, crab, clam, oyster, and mudskipper fish from tidal flat; and shallow water species, such as filefish, bream, flounder, shark, finless porpoise, gull, and mallard collected from the Ariake Sea, Japan. PFOS and PFOA were detected in most of the samples analyzed, followed by PFNA, PFOSA, and PFHS. In shallow water species, PFOS was the dominant contaminant, and elevated concentrations were found in higher trophic level species, such as marine mammals and omnivorous birds. These results suggest biomagnification of PFOS through the coastal food chain. In contrast, PFOA was the most abundant compound in tidal flat organisms and sediments. PFOA concentrations in sediments, lugworms, and omnivorous mudskippers in tidal flat were approximately 1 order of magnitude greater than the levels of PFOS. This indicates differences in exposure pattern and bioavailability of PFOS and PFOA between shallow water and tidal flat organisms. The accumulation profiles of PFCs were compared with those of organochlorines (polychlorinated biphenyls, PCB), organotin (tributyltin,TBT), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in tidal flat and shallow water samples collected from the Ariake Sea. Concentrations of PFCs in sediments and in tidal flat organisms were significantly lower than that found for PCBs, TBT, and PAHs. Nevertheless, PFOS concentrations in shallow water species were comparable to and/or significantly greater than those of other classes of

  7. Sedimentary architecture and depositional controls of a Holocene wave-dominated barrier-island system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Johannessen, Peter N.; Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    2018-01-01

    -term progradation was, however, interrupted by a transgression between 4000 years and 1700 years ago. These results demonstrate that the large-scale morphology of the Danish Wadden Sea shoreline influence the longshore sediment transport flux and the millennial-scale dispersal of sediment along the shoreline...

  8. Seawater Temperature and Wind Speed Dependences and Diurnal Variation of Ambient Noise at the Snapping Shrimp Colony in Shallow Water of Southern Sea of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seom-Kyu; Choi, Bok Kyoung; Kim, Bong-Chae; Kim, Byoung-Nam; Kim, Seong Hyeon; Park, Yosup; Lee, Yong-Kuk

    2012-07-01

    The seawater temperature and wind dependences and diurnal variation of the ambient noise at the snapping shrimp colony in shallow water of the southern sea of Korea were investigated. The ambient noise levels are significantly affected by the snapping shrimp sound, when the bottom seawater temperature increases and the wind speed decreases. However, they are not exceptively almost affected by the snapping shrimp sound when the wind speed decreases at low seawater temperatures (shrimp sound in the morning and night time zones. This study shows that the activity of the snapping shrimp affecting the variation in ambient noise level in shallow water can be related to the wind speed as well as the seawater temperature. This study also shows that the snapping shrimp in diurnal activity can be more active in the morning and night time zones.

  9. A new method to assess long term small sea-bottom vertical displacement in shallow water from bottom pressure sensor: the case of Campi Flegrei, Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malservisi, R.; Chierici, F.; Iannaccone, G.; Guardato, S.; Pignagnoli, L.; Locritani, M.; Embriaco, D.; Donnarumma, G. P.; Rodgers, M.; Beranzoli, L.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new methodology aimed at assessing long term small vertical seafloor deformation in shallow water environments by using Bottom Pressure Recorder (BPR) measurements jointly with ancillary sea level, water column and barometric data. These measurements are presently acquired only in areas where the amount of vertical deformation is large and in deep water environment, where the noise induced by the sea state and other near surface disturbances is low. We applied the method to the data acquired in 2011 by a BPR deployed at about 96 m depth in the marine sector of the Campi Flegrei Caldera, during a quasi-symmetric seafloor uplift episode of a few centimeters amplitude. The method provides an estimation of the vertical uplift of the caldera of 2.5 +/- 1.3 cm achieving an unprecedented level of precision in the measurement of the seafloor vertical deformation in shallow water. We reached this result by taking into account the contribution of the BPR instrumental drift and the contribution of the sea water density variations, which can affect the measurement on the order of tens of centimeters. The estimation of the vertical deformation obtained in this way compares favorably with data acquired by a land based GPS station, which is located at the same distance from the area of maximum deformation as the BPR

  10. The pH and pCO2 dependence of sulfate reduction in shallow-sea hydrothermal CO2 – venting sediments (Milos Island, Greece)

    OpenAIRE

    Bayraktarov, Elisa; Price, Roy E.; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Finster, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction (SR) is a dominant process of organic matter mineralization in sulfate-rich anoxic environments at neutral pH. Recent studies have demonstrated SR in low pH environments, but investigations on the microbial activity at variable pH and CO2 partial pressure are still lacking. In this study, the effect of pH and pCO2 on microbial activity was investigated by incubation experiments with radioactive 35S targeting SR in sediments from the shallow-sea hydrothermal vent sy...

  11. Polychate distribution, diversity and seasonality related to seagrass cover in shallow bottoms of the Tyrrenian Sea (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Gambi

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Polychaete distribution, diversity and seasonality were studied in relation to covering of the small phanerogams Cymodocea nodosa and Zostera noltii in shallow soft-bottoms off the island of Ischia (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy. Samples were collected bimonthly from July 1988 to May 1989 from four stations, selected for seagrass meadows of different physiognomy and shoot density, and in a bare sandy bottom nearby, selected as a non-vegetated reference habitat. Two meadow compartments were considered: the leaf stratum and the sediment. A hand-towed net was used to sample vagile organisms living in the leaf stratum, while PVC corers were utilized for the sediment fauna. Stratification within the sediment was studied considering three layers (0-5 cm, 5-10 cm and > 10 cm deep. On the whole a total of 4640 individuals of polychaetes, belonging to 119 species, were collected; 4061 individuals and 115 taxa were found in the core-samples, and 579 individuals and 35 taxa in the net-samples. Polychaete diversity and abundance was higher in both meadow compartments and in all seasons in the station located in the meadow where more sheltered conditions occurred, high silt-clay and organic matter content in the sediment were observed. In addition, this is where higher shoot density, plant Leaf Area Index (LAI and Leaf Standing Crop (LSC were recorded. Whereas, lower diversity and higher patchiness (differences among core replicates were always recorded in the less vegetated stations, and on the bare sandy bottom. The polychaete populations of the sediment layers showed their lowest diversity and abundances in summer. Whereas, the populations associated with the leaf stratum showed an opposite trend with higher development (number of species and individuals in summer (July-September, consistent with the higher values of all the plant phenological parameters recorded (shoot density, LAI and LSC. In all stations and seasons, the polychaetes were concentrated (84% of

  12. Sustained hydrostatic pressure tolerance of the shallow water shrimp Palaemonetes varians at different temperatures: insights into the colonisation of the deep sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottin, Delphine; Brown, Alastair; Oliphant, Andrew; Mestre, Nélia C; Ravaux, Juliette; Shillito, Bruce; Thatje, Sven

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the tolerance of adult specimens of the shallow-water shrimp Palaemonetes varians to sustained high hydrostatic pressure (10 MPa) across its thermal tolerance window (from 5 to 27 °C) using both behavioural (survival and activity) and molecular (hsp70 gene expression) approaches. To our knowledge, this paper reports the longest elevated hydrostatic pressure exposures ever performed on a shallow-water marine organism. Behavioural analysis showed a 100% survival rate of P. varians after 7 days at 10 MPa and 5 or 10 °C, whilst cannibalism was observed at elevated temperature (27 °C), suggesting no impairment of specific dynamic action. A significant interaction of pressure and temperature was observed for both behavioural and molecular responses. Elevated pressure was found to exacerbate the effect of temperature on the behaviour of the animals by reducing activity at low temperature and by increasing activity at high temperature. In contrast, only high pressure combined with low temperature increased the expression of hsp70 genes. We suggest that the impressive tolerance of P. varians to sustained elevated pressure may reflect the physiological capability of an ancestral species to colonise the deep sea. Our results also support the hypothesis that deep-sea colonisation may have occurred during geological periods of time when the oceanic water column was warm and vertically homogenous. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Metal pollution across the upper delta plain wetlands and its adjacent shallow sea wetland, northeast of China: implications for the filtration functions of wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Ye, Siyuan; Yuan, Hongming; Ding, Xigui; Zhao, Guangming; Yang, Shixiong; He, Lei; Wang, Jin; Pei, Shaofeng; Huang, Xiaoyu

    2017-12-12

    Grain size and concentrations of organic carbon (Corg) and particulate metals (PMs) As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, Zn, Al, Fe, and Mn of 373 surface sediment samples, salinities in 67 surface water samples, were analyzed in various environments, including the upper delta plain wetlands (UDPW), its adjacent shallow sea wetland (SSW) in the Liaodong Bay, and river channels that are running through the Liaohe Delta, to evaluate the spatial distribution, transportation environmental dynamics of metals, and the provenance of metal pollution and assess the filtration functions of wetlands. The concentrations of PMs for UDPW were generally higher by a factor of ~ 10-22% compared with its analogues in SSW, suggesting the accumulation of PMs within the UDPW indicates that the UDPW systems are efficiently physical and chemical traps for PMs of anthropogenic sources by retaining and storing pollutants flowing into the sea. However, there was sever sewage irrigation-induced Cd pollution with a geo-accumulation index of 0.62-3.11 in an area of ~ 86 km2 of the adjacent shallow sea wetland, where large amount wetlands were historically moved for agriculture in the UDPW. Remarkably, the distributions of PMs were controlled by salinity-induced desorption and re-adsorption mechanisms and significantly dispersed the contamination coverage by the three-dimensional hydrodynamic and sedimentation processes that dominated by inputs of freshwater and ocean dynamics including NE-SW tidal currents and NE-E longshore drifts in the SSW of the Liaodong Bay. A high agreement between the UDPW and the SSW datasets in principal component analysis essentially reflects that the characteristics of PM sources in the SSW were actually inherited from that in the UDPW, with a much closer relationship among metals, organic matter, and fine particulates in SSW than that of UDPW, which was judged by their correlation coefficient range of 0.406-0.919 in SSW against those of 0.042-0.654 in UDPW.

  14. Analysis of the possibilities of using aerial photographs to determine the bathymetry in shallow coastal zone of the selected section of the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieszynski, Lukasz; Furmanczyk, Kazimierz

    2017-04-01

    Bathymetry data for the coastal zone of the Baltic Sea are usually created in profiles based on echo sounding measurements. However, in the shallow coastal zone (up to 4 m depth), the quality and accuracy of data is insufficient because of the spatial variability of the seabed. The green laser - LIDAR - can comprise a solution for studies of such shallow areas. However, this method is still an expensive one and that is why we have decided to use the RGB digital aerial photographs to create a model for mapping the seabed of the shallow coastal zone. So far, in the 60's, researchers in the USA (Musgrove, 1969) and Russia (Zdanowicz, 1963) developed the first method of bathymetry determining from aerial panchromatic (black-white) photographs. This method was adapted for the polish conditions by Furmanczyk in 1975 and in 2014 we have returned to his concept using more advanced techniques of recording and image processing. In our study, we propose to determine the bathymetry in shallow coastal zone of the Baltic Sea by using the digital vertical aerial photographs (both single and multi-channel spectral). These photos are the high-resolution matrix (10 cm per pixel) containing values of the grey level in the individual spectral bands (RGB). This gives great possibilities to determine the bathymetry in order to analyze the changes in the marine coastal zone. Comparing the digital bathymetry maps - obtained by proposed method - in the following periods, you can develop differential maps, which reflect the movements of sea-bottom sediments. This can be used to indicate the most dynamic regions in the examined area. The model is based on the image pixel values and relative depths measured in situ (in selected checkpoints). As a result, the relation of the pixel brightness and sea depth (the algorithm) was defined. Using the algorithm, depth calculations for the whole scene were done and high resolution bathymetric map created. However, the algorithm requires numbers of

  15. Trace elements and stable isotopes ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N) in shallow and deep-water organisms from the East China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asante, Kwadwo Ansong [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); CSIR Water Research Institute, P. O. Box AH 38, Achimota, Accra (Ghana); Agusa, Tetsuro [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Department of Legal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Shimane University, Enya 89-1, Izumo 693-8501 (Japan); Mochizuki, Hiroko; Ramu, Karri; Inoue, Suguru [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Kubodera, Tsunemi [Department of Zoology, National Science Museum, 3-23-1 Hyakunincho, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0073 (Japan); Takahashi, Shin; Subramanian, Annamalai [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Tanabe, Shinsuke [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan)], E-mail: shinsuke@agr.ehime-u.ac.jp

    2008-12-15

    Trace elements (22) and stable isotope ratios ({delta}{sup 15}N and {delta}{sup 13}C) were analyzed in marine organisms from shallow (SW) and deep-water (DW) of the East China Sea to understand biomagnification and prey source of trace elements. In the benthic marine organisms from DW, {delta}{sup 15}N values were negatively correlated with Ba, Cu, Ag, Mo, Sr, As, and Co concentrations. This may be due to the specific accumulation in lower trophic animals and/or the biodilution through the food web in DW. Relationships between {delta}{sup 15}N and concentrations of Co, Cr, Bi, and Tl in fish and Ag, Bi, V, Hg, and Tl in crustaceans showed positive correlations, suggesting that trophic position was affecting the concentrations of those elements in phyla, with higher trophic animals retaining higher concentrations than the lower trophic animals. Positive correlations between {delta}{sup 13}C and Rb were observed in marine organisms. Therefore, Rb may be a possible substitute of {delta}{sup 13}C as tracer of prey source in the East China Sea although further investigation is required. - This is the first study on trophic transfer and prey source of trace elements in marine organisms from the East China Sea.

  16. Seasonal dynamics of Sargassum ilicifolium (Phaeophyta) on a shallow reef flat in the southern Red Sea (Eritrea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ateweberhan, M; Bruggemann, JH; Breeman, AM

    2005-01-01

    The seasonality of Sargassum ilicifolium was studied in the southern Red Sea by monitoring thallus density, thallus size and the initiation, growth, reproduction and survivorship of primary laterals. Thallus density showed slight but significant seasonal variation; it was highest at the end of the

  17. The Roles of Spinochromes in Four Shallow Water Tropical Sea Urchins and Their Potential as Bioactive Pharmacological Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, Lola; Hennebert, Elise; Fievez, Laurence; Caulier, Guillaume; Bureau, Fabrice; Tafforeau, Lionel; Flammang, Patrick; Gerbaux, Pascal; Eeckhaut, Igor

    2017-06-16

    Spinochromes are principally known to be involved in sea urchin pigmentation as well as for their potentially interesting pharmacological properties. To assess their biological role in sea urchin physiology, experiments are undertaken on crude extracts from four species and on four isolated spinochromes in order to test their antibacterial, antioxidant, inflammatory and cytotoxic activities. First, the antibacterial assays show that the use of crude extracts as representatives of antibacterial effects of spinochromes are inaccurate. The assays on purified spinochromes showed a decrease in the growth of four strains with an intensity depending on the spinochromes/bacteria system, revealing the participation of spinochromes in the defense system against microorganisms. Secondly, in the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl antioxidant assays, spinochromes show an enhanced activity compared to the positive control. This latter observation suggests their involvement in ultraviolet radiation protection. Third, spinochromes present a pro-inflammatory effect on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages, highlighting their possible implication in the sea urchin immune system. Finally, cytotoxicity assays based on Trypan blue exclusion, performed in view of their possible future applications as drugs, show a weak cytotoxicity of these compounds against human cells. In conclusion, all results confirm the implication of spinochromes in sea urchin defense mechanisms against their external environment and reveal their potential for pharmacological and agronomical industries.

  18. Distinct trends in the speciation of iron between the shallow shelf seas and the deep basins of the Arctic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuroczy, C-E.; Gerringa, L. J. A.; Klunder, M.; Laan, P.; Le Guitton, M.; de Baar, H. J. W.

    2011-01-01

    The speciation of iron was investigated in three shelf seas and three deep basins of the Arctic Ocean in 2007. The dissolved fraction ( 3 nM on the shelves and [TDFe] <2 nM in the Makarov Basin). A relative enrichment of particulate Fe toward the bottom was revealed at all stations, indicating Fe

  19. Distinct trends in the speciation of iron between the shallow shelf seas and the deep basins of the Arctic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuróczy, C.-E.; Gerringa, L.J.A.; Klunder, M.; Laan, P.; Le Guitton, M.; de Baar, H.J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The speciation of iron was investigated in three shelf seas and three deep basins of the Arctic Ocean in 2007. The dissolved fraction (<0.2 mu m) and a fraction < 1000 kDa were considered here. In addition, unfiltered samples were analyzed. Between 74 and 83% of dissolved iron was present in the

  20. Long-term observations on salinity dynamics in a tideless shallow coastal lagoon of the Southern Baltic Sea coast and their biological relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, R.; Baudler, H.; Glass, Ä.; Dümcke, K.; Karsten, U.

    2006-05-01

    The Darß-Zingst Bodden Chain (DZBC) is a tideless shallow inner coastal water of the Southern Baltic Sea. Important water volumes are exchanged with the Baltic Sea in dependence of wind direction and strength, water levels and coastal water currents. The Bodden chain is a system of 4 consecutive water basins which are connected via narrow streams with the opening to the Baltic Sea in the west. The innermost Bodden basins are predominantly influenced by freshwater and the outermost basins receive more Baltic Sea water. The whole Bodden chain was subject to a substantial eutrophication for decades until 1990. Macrophytes vanished, phytoplankton formed dense blooms throughout the growing season and organic matter accumulated in the system. The water mixing varies in time and is very different for the separate water basins what obscures trends of biological parameters, e.g. phytoplankton composition, primary production and benthic organisms. Thus, the process of 30 years' eutrophication and especially of re-mesotrophication for the last 15 years is difficult to describe and verify without an indicator for the portion of mesotrophic Baltic Sea water at the monitoring locations. Therefore, variability of salinity was described on short-term, seasonal and long-term ranges as well as spatial gradients. The data set is based on 29 years of daily measurements for the central part of the Bodden chain. In contrast to deep fjords of the northern Baltic Sea, maximum salinity changes were ca. 1 psu per day not for more than consecutive 5 days in the same direction. In contrast to the outer coastal waters of the Baltic Sea, lowest salinities occurred always in early spring and highest in autumn indicating a completely different set of meteorological and hydrological parameters affecting seasonality. Annual averages of Bodden salinity correlated with values of the Baltic Sea, but deviations from the mean were twice as high. The long-term mean at the central Bodden chain (Zingster

  1. The sedimentary regime around northern Sylt, South-eastern North Sea, based on shallow seismic (sparker and Chirp III) information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldreel, Lars Ole; Kuijpers, Antoon; Madsen, Emil B

    2010-01-01

    The coastal off-shore zone of the northern part of the island of Sylt was investigated by sparker seismics and high-resolution subbottom profiling during the period 2005-2009. The data was acquired in the North Sea sector as well as in the Lister Tief, Lister Ley, Højer Dyb and Rømø Dyb. During t....... The sparker seismic and Chirp III data show that the processes responsible for the bedforms have been persistent throughout the Holocene. Based on the study, a model for the current and sedimentation regime is proposed.......The coastal off-shore zone of the northern part of the island of Sylt was investigated by sparker seismics and high-resolution subbottom profiling during the period 2005-2009. The data was acquired in the North Sea sector as well as in the Lister Tief, Lister Ley, Højer Dyb and Rømø Dyb. During...

  2. Temporary expansion to shelf depths rather than an onshore-offshore trend: the shallow-water rise and demise of the modern deep-sea brittle star family Ophiacanthidae (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Thuy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypotheses on the age and possible antiquity of the modern deep-sea fauna put forward to date almost all agree on the assumption that the deep-sea fauna is largely the result of colonisation from shallow-water environments. Here, the fossil record of the Ophiacanthidae, a modern deep-sea brittle star family with extensive fossil occurrences at shelf depths, is systematically traced against a calibrated phylogeny. Several lines of evidence suggest that the Ophiacanthidae originated and greatly diversified in the deep sea, with most extant clades having diverged by the end of the Triassic at the latest. During the Jurassic, the family temporarily invaded shelf environments, attaining relative abundances and diversities comparable to those found in coeval and modern deep-sea settings, and gradually declined in abundance subsequently, to become largely restricted to the deep-sea again. The pattern of temporary expansion to shelf environments suggested here underpins the potential of deep-sea environments to contribute significantly to shallow-water biodiversity; an aspect that has mostly been neglected so far. It is speculated that the large-scale ophiacanthid invasion of shelf environments around the Triassic-Jurassic boundary was initiated by a change from thermohaline to halothermal circulation, attenuating the thermal stratification of the water column and thus providing opportunities for enhanced vertical migration of marine taxa.

  3. Exploring the ecosystem engineering ability of Red Sea shallow benthic habitats using stocks and fluxes in carbon biogeochemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Baldry, Kimberlee

    2017-12-01

    The coastal ocean is a marginal region of the global ocean, but is home to metabolically intense ecosystems which increase the structural complexity of the benthos. These ecosystems have the ability to alter the carbon chemistry of surrounding waters through their metabolism, mainly through processes which directly release or consume carbon dioxide. In this way, coastal habitats can engineer their environment by acting as sources or sinks of carbon dioxide and altering their environmental chemistry from the regional norm. In most coastal water masses, it is difficult to resolve the ecosystem effect on coastal carbon biogeochemistry due to the mixing of multiple offshore end members, complex geography or the influence of variable freshwater inputs. The Red Sea provides a simple environment for the study of ecosystem processes at a coastal scale as it contains only one offshore end-member and negligible freshwater inputs due to the arid climate of adjacent land. This work explores the ability of three Red Sea benthic coastal habitats (coral reefs, seagrass meadows and mangrove forests) to create characteristic ecosystem end-members, which deviate from the biogeochemistry of offshore source waters. This is done by both calculating non-conservative deviations in carbonate stocks collected over each ecosystem, and by quantifying net carbonate fluxes (in seagrass meadows and mangrove forests only) using 24 hour incubations. Results illustrate that carbonate stocks over ecosystems conform to broad ecosystem trends, which are different to the offshore end-member, and are influenced by inherited properties from surrounding ecosystems. Carbonate fluxes also show ecosystem dependent trends and further illustrate the importance of sediment processes in influencing CaCO3 fluxes in blue carbon benthic habitats, which warrants further attention. These findings show the respective advantages of studying both carbonate stocks and fluxes of coastal benthic ecosystems in order to

  4. Confronting the vicinity of the surface water and sea shore in a shallow glaciogenic aquifer in southern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, S.; Okkonen, J.; Korkka-Niemi, K.; Hendriksson, N.; Backman, B.

    2015-03-01

    The groundwater in a shallow, unconfined, low-lying coastal aquifer in Santala, southern Finland, was chemically characterised by integrating multivariate statistical approaches, principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), based on the stable isotopes δ2H and δ18O, hydrogeochemistry and field monitoring data. PCA and HCA yielded similar results and classified groundwater samples into six distinct groups that revealed the factors controlling temporal and spatial variations in the groundwater geochemistry, such as the geology, anthropogenic sources from human activities, climate and surface water. High temporal variation in groundwater chemistry directly corresponded to precipitation. With an increase in precipitation, KMnO4 consumption, EC, alkalinity and Ca concentrations also increased in most wells, while Fe, Al, Mn and SO4 were occasionally increased during spring after the snowmelt under specific geological conditions. The continued increase in NO3 and metal concentrations in groundwater indicates the potential contamination risk to the aquifer. Stable isotopes of δ18O and δ2H indicate groundwater recharge directly from meteoric water, with an insignificant contribution from lake water, and no seawater intrusion into the aquifer. Groundwater geochemistry suggests that local seawater intrusion is temporarily able to take place in the sulfate reduction zone along the freshwater and seawater mixed zone in the low-lying coastal area, but the contribution of seawater was found to be very low. The influence of lake water could be observed from higher levels of KMnO4 consumption in wells near the lake. The integration of PCA and HCA with conventional classification of groundwater types, as well as with the hydrogeochemical data, provided useful tools to identify the vulnerable groundwater areas representing the impacts of both natural and human activities on water quality and the understanding of complex groundwater flow system for

  5. Spatial variability of the shallow groundwater level and its chemistry characteristics in the low plain around the Bohai Sea, North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zaiming; Zhang, Guanghui; Yan, Mingjiang; Wang, Jinzhe

    2012-06-01

    To characterize the spatial distribution of groundwater level (GWL) and its chemistry characteristics in the low plain around the Bohai Sea, shallow groundwater depth of 130 wells were determined. Water soluble ions composition, total dissolved solid (TDS), electric conductivity (EC), total hardness (TH), total alkalinity (TA), and total salt content (TS) of 128 representative groundwater samples were also measured. Classical statistics, geostatistical method combined with GIS technique were then used to analyze the spatial variability and distribution of GWL and groundwater chemical properties. Results show that GWL, TDS, EC, TH, TA, and TS all presented a lognormal distribution and could be fitted by different semivariogram models (spherical, exponential, and Gaussian). Spatial structure of GWL, TDS, EC, TH, TA, and TS changed obviously. GWL decreased from west inland plain to the east coastal plain, however, TDS, EC, and TS increased from west to east, TH and TA were higher in the middle and coastal plain area. Groundwater chemical type in the coastal plain was SO (4) (2-) ·Cl(-)-Na(+) while chemical types in the inland plain were SO (4) (2-) ·Cl(-)-Ca(2+)·Mg(2+) and HCO (3) (-) -Ca(2+)·Mg(2+).

  6. Rolling stones; fast weathering of olivine in shallow seas for cost-effective CO2 capture and mitigation of global warming and ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuiling, R. D.; de Boer, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    Human CO2 emissions may drive the Earth into a next greenhouse state. They can be mitigated by accelerating weathering of natural rock under the uptake of CO2. We disprove the paradigm that olivine weathering in nature would be a slow process, and show that it is not needed to mill olivine to very fine, 10 μm-size grains in order to arrive at a complete dissolution within 1-2 year. In high-energy shallow marine environments olivine grains and reaction products on the grain surfaces, that otherwise would greatly retard the reaction, are abraded so that the chemical reaction is much accelerated. When kept in motion even large olivine grains rubbing and bumping against each other quickly produce fine clay- and silt-sized olivine particles that show a fast chemical reaction. Spreading of olivine in the world's 2% most energetic shelf seas can compensate a year's global CO2 emissions and counteract ocean acidification against a price well below that of carbon credits.

  7. Polar zoobenthos blue carbon storage increases with sea ice losses, because across-shelf growth gains from longer algal blooms outweigh ice scour mortality in the shallows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, David K A

    2017-06-23

    One of the major climate-forced global changes has been white to blue to green; losses of sea ice extent in time and space around Arctic and West Antarctic seas has increased open water and the duration (though not magnitude) of phytoplankton blooms. Blueing of the poles has increases potential for heat absorption for positive feedback but conversely the longer phytoplankton blooms have increased carbon export to storage and sequestration by shelf benthos. However, ice shelf collapses and glacier retreat can calve more icebergs, and the increased open water allows icebergs more opportunities to scour the seabed, reducing zoobenthic blue carbon capture and storage. Here the size and variability in benthic blue carbon in mega and macrobenthos was assessed in time and space at Ryder and Marguerite bays of the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP). In particular the influence of the duration of primary productivity and ice scour are investigated from the shallows to typical shelf depths of 500 m. Ice scour frequency dominated influence on benthic blue carbon at 5 m, to comparable with phytoplankton duration by 25 m depth. At 500 m only phytoplankton duration was significant and influential. WAP zoobenthos was calculated to generate ~10(7) , 4.5 × 10(6) and 1.6 × 10(6) tonnes per year (between 2002 and 2015) in terms of production, immobilization and sequestration of carbon respectively. Thus about 1% of annual primary productivity has sequestration potential at the end of the trophic cascade. Polar zoobenthic blue carbon capture and storage responses to sea ice losses, the largest negative feedback on climate change, has been underestimated despite some offsetting of gain by increased ice scouring with more open water. Equivalent survey of Arctic and sub-Antarctic shelves, for which new projects have started, should reveal the true extent of this feedback and how much its variability contributes to uncertainty in climate models. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Shallow water reverberation measurement and prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Muggleworth, Charles E.

    1994-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Low frequency active sonar performance in shallow water is often limited by reverberation. Reverberation modeling in shallow water has been difficult due to the complexity of the multipath acoustic propagation problem inherent in shallow environments. In August 1992, a shallow water, low-frequency reverberation measurement was made in the Barents Sea utilizing explosive signal, underwater sound (SUS) charges as sound sources and a 16-e...

  9. Fundamentals of Shallow Water Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Katsnelson, Boris; Lynch, James

    2012-01-01

    Shallow water acoustics (SWA), the study of how low and medium frequency sound propagates and scatters on the continental shelves of the world's oceans, has both technical interest and a large number of practical applications. Technically, shallow water poses an interesting medium for the study of acoustic scattering, inverse theory, and propagation physics in a complicated oceanic waveguide. Practically, shallow water acoustics has interest for geophysical exploration, marine mammal studies, and naval applications. Additionally, one notes the very interdisciplinary nature of shallow water acoustics, including acoustical physics, physical oceanography, marine geology, and marine biology. In this specialized volume, the authors, all of whom have extensive at-sea experience in U.S. and Russian research efforts, have tried to summarize the main experimental, theoretical, and computational results in shallow water acoustics, with an emphasis on providing physical insight into the topics presented.

  10. Characterization of a subtropical hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmocheyles imbricata assemblage utilizing shallow water natural and artificial habitats in the Florida Keys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C Gorham

    Full Text Available In order to provide information to better inform management decisions and direct further research, vessel-based visual transects, snorkel transects, and in-water capture techniques were used to characterize hawksbill sea turtles in the shallow marine habitats of a Marine Protected Area (MPA, the Key West National Wildlife Refuge in the Florida Keys. Hawksbills were found in hardbottom and seagrass dominated habitats throughout the Refuge, and on man-made rubble structures in the Northwest Channel near Cottrell Key. Hawksbills captured (N = 82 were exclusively juveniles and subadults with a straight standard carapace length (SSCL ranging from 21.4 to 69.0cm with a mean of 44.1 cm (SD = 10.8. Somatic growth rates were calculated from 15 recaptured turtles with periods at large ranging from 51 to 1188 days. Mean SSCL growth rate was 7.7 cm/year (SD = 4.6. Juvenile hawksbills (<50 cm SSCL showed a significantly higher growth rate (9.2 cm/year, SD = 4.5, N = 11 than subadult hawksbills (50-70 cm SSCL, 3.6 cm/year, SD = 0.9, N = 4. Analysis of 740 base pair mitochondrial control region sequences from 50 sampled turtles yielded 12 haplotypes. Haplotype frequencies were significantly different compared to four other Caribbean juvenile foraging aggregations, including one off the Atlantic coast of Florida. Many-to-one mixed stock analysis indicated Mexico as the primary source of juveniles in the region and also suggested that the Refuge may serve as important developmental habitat for the Cuban nesting aggregation. Serum testosterone radioimmunoassay results from 33 individuals indicated a female biased sex ratio of 3.3 females: 1 male for hawksbills in the Refuge. This assemblage of hawksbills is near the northern limit of the species range, and is one of only two such assemblages described in the waters of the continental United States. Since this assemblage resides in an MPA with intensive human use, basic information on

  11. Pockmarks on either side of the Strait of Gibraltar: formation from overpressured shallow contourite gas reservoirs and internal wave action during the last glacial sea-level lowstand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Ricardo; Somoza, Luis; Medialdea, Teresa; González, Francisco Javier; Gimenez-Moreno, Carmen Julia; Pérez-López, Raúl

    2014-06-01

    Integrating novel and published swath bathymetry (3,980 km2), as well as chirp and high-resolution 2D seismic reflection profiles (2,190 km), this study presents the mapping of 436 pockmarks at water depths varying widely between 370 and 1,020 m on either side of the Strait of Gibraltar. On the Atlantic side in the south-eastern Gulf of Cádiz near the Camarinal Sill, 198 newly discovered pockmarks occur in three well localized and separated fields: on the upper slope ( n=14), in the main channel of the Mediterranean outflow water (MOW, n=160), and on the huge contourite levee of the MOW main channel ( n=24) near the well-known TASYO field. These pockmarks vary in diameter from 60 to 919 m, and are sub-circular to irregularly elongated or lobate in shape. Their slope angles on average range from 3° to 25°. On the Mediterranean side of the strait on the Ceuta Drift of the western Alborán Basin, where pockmarks were already known to occur, 238 pockmarks were identified and grouped into three interconnected fields, i.e. a northern ( n=34), a central ( n=61) and a southern field ( n=143). In the latter two fields the pockmarks are mainly sub-circular, ranging from 130 to 400 m in diameter with slope angles averaging 1.5° to 15°. In the northern sector, by contrast, they are elongated up to 1,430 m, probably reflecting MOW activity. Based on seismo-stratigraphic interpretation, it is inferred that most pockmarks formed during and shortly after the last glacial sea-level lowstand, as they are related to the final erosional discontinuity sealed by Holocene transgressive deposits. Combining these findings with other existing knowledge, it is proposed that pockmark formation on either side of the Strait of Gibraltar resulted from gas and/or sediment pore-water venting from overpressured shallow gas reservoirs entrapped in coarse-grained contourites of levee deposits and Pleistocene palaeochannel infillings. Venting was either triggered or promoted by hydraulic pumping

  12. Shipboard magnetic field "noise" reveals shallow heavy mineral sediment concentrations in Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anjana K.; Vogt, Peter R.; Rosenbaum, Joseph G.; Newell, Wayne; Cronin, Thomas M.; Willard, Debra A.; Hagen, Rick A.; Brozena, John; Hofstra, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Shipboard magnetic field data collected over Chesapeake Bay exhibit low-amplitude, short-wavelength anomalies that most likely indicate shallow concentrations of heavy mineral sediments. Piston core layers and black sand beach samples exhibit enhanced magnetic susceptibilities and carry remanent magnetization, with mineralogical analyses indicating ilmenite and trace magnetite and/or maghemite and hematite. The anomalies are subtle and would be filtered as noise using traditional approaches, but can instead be highlighted using spectral methods, thus providing nearly continuous coverage along survey tracks. The distribution of the anomalies provides constraints on relevant sorting mechanisms. Comparisons to sonar data and previous grab samples show that two of three areas surveyed exhibit short-wavelength anomalies that are clustered over sand-covered areas, suggesting initial sorting through settling mechanisms. This is supported by a correlation between core magnetic susceptibility and grain size. Near the Choptank River, where sediment resuspension is wave-dominated, anomalies show a sharp decrease with seafloor depth that cannot be explained by signal attenuation alone. In Pocomoke Sound, where both tidal currents and wave-action impact sediment resuspension, anomalies show a more gradual decrease with depth. Near the mouth of the bay, where there is a higher influx of sediments from the continental shelf, short-wavelength anomalies are isolated and do not appear to represent heavy mineral sand concentrations. These combined observations suggest the importance of further sorting by erosional processes in certain parts of the bay. Additionally, comparisons of these data to cores sampling pre-Holocene sediments suggest that the sorting of heavy minerals in higher energy, shallow water environments provides a mechanism for correlations between core magnetic susceptibility and sea-level changes.

  13. Gamma-ray dose rate surveys help investigating century-scale beach ridge progradation in the wave-dominated Catumbela delta (Angola)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis, Pedro A.; Pereira, Alcides C.; Quinzeca, Domingos; Jombi, Domingos

    2017-10-01

    A strandplain at the downdrift side of the wave-dominated Catumbela delta (Angola) includes distinguishable deposits with very high natural radioactivity (up to 0.44 microSv/hour). In order to establish the geometry of these sedimentary units and understand their genetic processes, dose rate surveys were performed with the portable equipment Rados RDS-40WE. In addition, grain-size distribution, heavy-mineral composition and gamma-ray mass spectra of the high dose rate deposits were analysed. High dose rate values are found in ribbon units aligned parallel to the shoreline, which are a few tens of meters wide and up to approximately 3 km long. These units reflect the concentration of Th-bearing grains in coastal deposits enriched in heavy minerals. An integrated analysis of the high dose rate ribbons in GIS environment with aerial photography and topographic maps suggests that parts of the high dose rate units formed during the last two centuries may be related with the erosion of older shoreline deposits, due to updrift displacements of the Catumbela river outlet and recycling of shoreline accumulations with downdrift deposition. Simple gamma-ray surveys carried out with a portable detector can unravel depositional units characterised by significant enrichment in heavy-mineral grains that are likely to correspond to key events in the evolution of wave-dominated accumulations. The location of such deposits should be taken into account when planning future work using more expensive or time-consuming techniques.

  14. Floating offshore wind turbines for shallow waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulder, B.H.; Henderson, A.; Huijsmans, R.H.M.; Peeringa, J.M.; Pierik, J.T.G.; Snijders, E.J.B.; Hees, M.Th. van; Wijnants, G.H.; Wolf, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Bottom mounted Offshore wind turbines seem to have a promising future but they are restricted to shallow waters of Northern Europe. Many projects are planned or are in the phase of construction on the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. All projects that are planned have a water depth up to approximately

  15. Natural gas sources, migration and accumulation in the shallow water area of the Panyu lower uplift: An insight into the deep water prospects of the Pearl River Mouth Basin, South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.H.; Chen, C.M.; Pang, X.; Jiahao, W.H.; Shi, W.Z. [China University of Geoscience, Wuhan (China)

    2006-04-15

    Although no drilling has been carried out in the deep water area of the Baiyun sag in the Pearl River Mouth Basin, South China Sea, the successful exploration for natural gas in the shallow water area of the Panyu lower uplift allows an insight into the prospectivity of the adjacent deep water fan system of the Baiyun sag. The Paleogene gas kitchen in the Baiyun sag provided both oil-derived gas and coal-derived gas. Fluid inclusion measurements and 2D numeric modelling of formation pressure indicate four episodes of hydrocarbon charge since the third release of the overpressure system. Seismic wipeout zones manifest several types of gas chimney which could play a role in vertical migration conduits to feed the natural gases into the deep water fan system. There would be, therefore, a low risk for hydrocarbon exploration in the deep water fan system.

  16. Gas Hydrate Occurrence Inferred from Dissolved Cl− Concentrations and δ18O Values of Pore Water and Dissolved Sulfate in the Shallow Sediments of the Pockmark Field in Southwestern Xisha Uplift, Northern South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Luo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep-water pockmarks are frequently accompanied by the occurrence of massive gas hydrates in shallow sediments. A decline in pore-water Cl− concentration and rise in δ18O value provide compelling evidence for the gas hydrate dissociation. Mega-pockmarks are widely scattered in the southwestern Xisha Uplift, northern South China Sea (SCS. Pore water collected from a gravity-core inside of a mega-pockmark exhibits a downward Cl− concentration decrease concomitant with an increase in δ18O value at the interval of 5.7–6.7 mbsf. Concentrations of Cl−, Na+, and K+ mainly cluster along the seawater freshening line without distinct Na+ enrichment and K+ depletion. Thus, we infer that the pore water anomalies of Cl− concentrations and δ18O values are attributed to gas hydrate dissociation instead of clay mineral dehydration. Moreover, the lower δ18O values of sulfate in the target core (C14 than those in the reference core (C9 may be associated with the equilibrium oxygen fractionation during sulfate reduction between sulfate and the relatively 18O-depleted ambient water resulting from gas hydrate formation. The gas hydrate contents are estimated to be 6%–10% and 7%–15%, respectively, according to the offset of Cl− concentrations and δ18O values from the baselines. This pockmark field in southwestern Xisha Uplift is likely to be a good prospective area for the occurrence of gas hydrate in shallow sediments.

  17. The pH and pCO2 dependence of sulfate reduction in shallow-sea hydrothermal CO2 – venting sediments (Milos Island, Greece)

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa eBayraktarov; Price, Roy E.; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Kai eFinster

    2013-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is a dominant process of organic matter mineralization in sulfate-rich anoxic environments at neutral pH. Recent studies have demonstrated sulfate reduction in low pH environments, but investigations on the microbial activity at variable pH and CO2 partial pressure are still lacking. In this study, the effect of pH and pCO2 on microbial activity was investigated by incubation experiments with radioactive 35S targeting sulfate reduction in sediments from the shallow...

  18. Distribution patterns of Chilean shallow-water sea anemones (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Actiniaria, Corallimorpharia; with a discussion of the taxonomic and zoogeographic relationships between the actinofauna of the South East Pacific, the South West Atlantic and the Antarctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Häussermann

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The first complete zoogeographical analysis of Chilean shallow water sea anemones (Actiniaria and Corallimorpharia and their taxonomic relations with neighbouring faunas is provided, based on extensive recent sampling in combination with a literature review. Between 1994 and 2004, we collected more than 1000 specimens of 32 distinct species of Actiniaria and Corallimorpharia at more than 100 sites along the Chilean coast between Arica (18°30’S; 70°19’W and the Straits of Magellan (53°36’S 70°56’W. Sampling was done in the intertidal during low tides and in the subtidal by means of SCUBA diving down to depths of 40 m. The northern part of the Chilean fjord region showed the highest number of species (23. Our results contradict an abrupt general change in the marine faunal composition at 42°S, instead showing the continuation of species of the exposed coast and the joining of fjord species due to the availability of additional habitats in the richly structured fjord region south of 42°S, and also to eurybathy. The southern distribution limits of the species we found in northern and central Chile show only one significant concentration around the Peninsula Taitao (approx. 48°S. This either indicates a zoogeographic barrier for shallow water species at the Peninsula Taitao, or is a sampling artifact caused by poor data from the region between the Peninsula Taitao and the Straits of Magellan. According to the literature, 18 of the 63 described Chilean sea anemones (Pacific Ocean can also be found in Argentina (Atlantic Ocean and 13 in the Antarctic. However, many records and statuses of the common species of the South East Pacific and the South West Atlantic/Antarctic are uncertain or doubtful and need revision or confirmation.

  19. Punctuated sediment record resulting from channel migration in a shallow sand-dominated micro-tidal lagoon, Northern Wadden Sea, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Facies analysis of five sediment cores and a detailed absolute chronology, consisting of 35 optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages, form the basis for reconstruction of the paleoenvironmental evolution of the coastal lagoon behind the barrier island of Fanø, in the Northern Wadden Sea, SW D...

  20. Integrated sedimentological and ichnological characteristics of a wave-dominated, macrotidal coast: a case study from the intertidal shoreface of the Dongho coast, southwest Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Byong Cheon; Chang, Tae Soo

    2017-08-01

    Generalized coastal facies models invariably assume that tidal flats and intertidally exposed shorefaces along macrotidal coasts are tide-dominated. Recent advances in coastal sedimentology, however, have revealed that wave-dominated macrotidal flats also occur in a wide range of coastal settings, in particular where tidal modulation forces the lateral translation of the wave-affected zone across the tidally exposed shoreface with the rising tide. Despite tidal modulation, the depositional character in the latter case (abundant storm deposits) exhibits a high degree of similarity with conventional subtidal shorefaces, implying that it is inherently difficult to distinguish between the two coastal systems in the rock record. In the present study, integrated sedimentological and ichnological data from the Dongho coast, which is located along the southwest coast of Korea, provide valuable information for the establishment of facies criteria that can assist in the recognition of such coastal deposits. In fact, the sedimentary character of the study area, which is dominated by an abundance of wave-formed structures, resembles that generally associated with subtidal shorefaces. In addition, the depositional processes responsible for sediment accumulation are, in the present case, also strongly influenced by pronounced seasonal variations in wave energy. In this context, the study has revealed a number of major features that appear to be characteristic of wave-dominated intertidal flats and shorefaces: (1) firmground muds may be encountered on the beach face, where intense swash-backwash motions are dominant; (2) the thickness of storm deposits decreases landward, reflecting the progressive decrease in wave energy; (3) ichnologically, there is an offshore shift in the dominance of trace fossils from the Skolithos ichnofacies, including Ophiomorpha, Thalassinoides and Psilonichnus, to a proximal expression of the Cruziana ichnofacies, which includes Siphonichnus and

  1. On the performance of topobathymetric LiDAR in shallow water environments: the Ribe Vesterå river and the Knudedyb tidal inlet in the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gergely, Aron; Andersen, Mikkel S.; Teglbrænder-Bjergkvist, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    on an app. 7 km reach of the Ribe Vesterå river and in a 5 km x 10 km section of the Knudedyb tidal inlet in the Danish Wadden Sea using the airborne hydrographic laser scanner RIEGL® VQR-820-G. Prior to the surveys three geometrically defined objects (steel frames with dimensions of 0.8 m x 0.8 m x 0.25 m...

  2. On the performance of topobathymetric LiDAR in shallow water environments: the Ribe Vesterå river and the Knudedyb tidal inlet in the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gergely, Aron; Andersen, Mikkel S.; Teglbrænder-Bjergkvist, Mathias

    on an app. 7 km reach of the Ribe Vesterå river and in a 5 km x 10 km section of the Knudedyb tidal inlet in the Danish Wadden Sea using the airborne hydrographic laser scanner RIEGL® VQR-820-G. Prior to the surveys three geometrically defined objects (steel frames with dimensions of 0.8 m x 0.8 m x 0.25 m...

  3. Coordinated motility of cyanobacteria favor mat formation, photosynthesis and carbon burial in low-oxygen, high-sulfur shallow sinkholes of Lake Huron; whereas deep-water aphotic sinkholes are analogs of deep-sea seep and vent ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddanda, B. A.; McMillan, A. C.; Long, S. A.; Snider, M. J.; Weinke, A. D.; Dick, G.; Ruberg, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    Microbial life in submerged sinkhole ecosystems of the Laurentian Great Lakes is relatively understudied in comparison to seeps and vents of the deep-sea. We studied the filamentous benthic mat-forming cyanobacteria consisting primarily of Oscillatoria-like cells growing under low-light, low-oxygen and high-sulfur conditions in Lake Huron's submerged sinkholes using in situ observations, in vitro measurements and time-lapse microscopy. Gliding movement of the cyanobacterial trichomes revealed individual as well as group-coordinated motility. When placed in a petri dish and dispersed in ground water from the sinkhole, filaments re-aggregated into defined colonies within minutes. Measured speed of individual filaments ranged from 50 µm minute-1 or 15 body lengths minute-1 to 215 µm minute-1 or 70 body lengths minute-1 - rates that are rapid relative to non-flagellated/ciliated microbes. Filaments exhibited precise and coordinated positive phototaxis towards pinpoints of light and congregated under the light of foil cutouts. Such light-responsive clusters showed an increase in photosynthetic yield - suggesting phototactic motility aids in light acquisition as well as photosynthesis. Pebbles and pieces of broken shells placed upon the mat in intact sediemnt cores were quickly covered by vertically motile filaments within hours and became fully buried in the anoxic sediments over 3-4 diurnal cycles - likely facilitating the preservation of falling plankton debris. Coordinated horizontal and vertical filament motility optimize mat cohesion and dynamics, photosynthetic efficiency and sedimentary carbon burial in modern-day sinkhole habitats where life operates across sharp redox gradients. Analogous cyanobacterial motility in the shallow seas during Earth's early history, may have played a key role in the oxygenation of the planet by optimizing photosynthesis while favoring carbon burial. We are now eagerly mapping and exploring life in deep-water aphotic sinkholes of

  4. Millennial-scale variations of late Pleistocene radiolarian assemblages in the Bering Sea related to environments in shallow and deep waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itaki, Takuya; Kim, Sunghan; Rella, Stephan F.; Uchida, Masao; Tada, Ryuji; Khim, Boo-Keun

    2012-02-01

    A high-resolution record of the radiolarian assemblage from 60 to 10 ka was investigated using a piston core (PC-23A) obtained from the northern slope of the Bering Sea. Faunal changes based on the 29 major radiolarian taxa demonstrated that the surface and deep water conditions in the Bering Sea were related to the orbital and millennial-scale climatic variations known as glacial-interglacial and Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) cycles, respectively. During interstadial periods of the D-O cycles, the assemblage was characterized by increases in the high-latitude coastal species Rhizoplegma boreale and the upper-intermediate water species Cycladophora davisiana, while the sea-ice related species Actinomma boreale and A. leptodermum and many deep-water species such as Dictyophimus crisiae and D. hirundo tended to be reduced. This trend was more apparent in two laminated intervals at 15-13.5 and 11.5-11 ka, which were correlated with well-known ice-sheet collapse events that occurred during the last deglaciation: melt-water pulse (MWP)-1A and MWP-1B, respectively. The radiolarian faunal composition in these periods suggests that oceanic conditions were different from today: (1) surface water was affected by increased melt-water discharge from continental ice-sheet, occurring at the same time as an abrupt increase in atmospheric temperature, (2) upper-intermediate water (ca. 200-500 m) was well-ventilated and organic-rich, and (3) lower-intermediate water (ca. 500-1000 m) was oxygen-poor. Conversely, the sea-ice season might have been longer during stadial periods of the D-O cycles and the last glacial maximum (LGM) compared to the interstadial periods and the earliest Holocene. In these colder periods, deep-water species were very abundant, and this corresponded to increases in the oxygen isotope value of benthic foraminifera. Our findings suggest that the oxygen-rich water was present in the lower-intermediate layer resulting from intensified ventilation.

  5. Shallow and deep-sea chitons of the genus Leptochiton Gray, 1847 (Mollusca: Polyplacophora: Lepidopleurida) from Peruvian and Chilean waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirenko, Boris

    2015-10-22

    The Southeast region off Chile and Peru has yielded a very rich diverse fauna of basal chitons of the genus Leptochiton. The present contribution is based on the study of 1055 specimens of chitons. Thirteen leptochitonid species are reported of which seven species are new, namely Leptochiton lascrusesi n. sp., L. linseae n. sp., L. longibranchiae n. sp., L. peruvianus n. sp., L. macleani n. sp., L. sigwartae n. sp., and L. mutschkeae n. sp. Five species were found on the shelf, but only one of those is limited to this zone. The other eight species live in bathyal or abyssal depths. Thus, 12 of 13 species were found deeper than 200 m. The genus Leptochiton originated in the late Palaeozoic in shallow waters. It probably shifted to deep-waters because of competition by more advanced genera of chitons. The leptochitonid fauna of the Peru-Chile Trench turned out to be rich. Five species were studied from this trench system. Two of them-L. longibranchiae n. sp. and L. peruvianus n. sp.-are characterized by an unusually high number of gills and an accordingly wider distribution in the mantle cavity, reaching in an anterior direction to valves V and III. This morphological peculiarity is unusual for Lepidopleurida and resembles the conditions found in the order Chitonida.

  6. Earth's partial pressure of CO2 over the past 100-500 Ma; evidence from Ce anomalies in mostly shallow seas (less than 200 m) as recorded in carbonate sediments, 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.-G.; Reinhardt, J. W.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    We reported the direct relationship of Ce anomalies recorded in 0.2-119 Ma CaCO3 sediments (Ce(sup A*)) to the Ce anomalies in the parental Pacific deep seawater (Ce(sup A)) and their relationship to atmospheric P(CO2) relative to present P(CO2). We have analyzed continental CaCO3 samples that were deposited in ancient oceans and shallow sea platforms less than 200 m over central USA, central Europe, China, and Saudi-Arabia/Oman. We have plotted Ce(sup A*) over the 75-470 Ma interval. For P(CO2) calculations, we assumed as a reference standard the less than 200 m mixed Pacific Ocean with a Ce(sup A) geometric mean of 0.22 and a range of 0.10-0.43. Because P(CO2) values obtained from reliable deep Pacific Ocean carbonates in the 67-119 Ma interval were similar to the present P(CO2) values, we have drawn a 1.0 ratio for that interval. Although there is considerable scatter among the approximately 150 Ma carbonates, the average Ce(sup A*) value suggests that P(CO2) increased during the early Cretaceous, from 1.0X at approximately 120 Ma to about 1.4X at approximately 150 Ma. At approximately 250 Ma, the average Ce(sup A*) in 13 shallow sea China carbonates agrees well with the single and more reliable approximately 250 Ma China carbonate deposited in deeper open platform. We suggest that P(CO2) ranged from 1.4-1.7X over the Jurassic and Triassic periods. At approximately 280 Ma, three China carbonates deposited in deeper open platforms and therefore considered more reliable are consistent with a European carbonate, which indicate Ce(sup A) and P(CO2) values similar to the present. The minimum at this time corresponds to the great Permo-Carboniferous glaciation. From 280 Ma to 470 Ma, the trend favors increasing Ce(sup A*) and corresponding P(CO2) values between 1.9-2.7X, with a more reliable value closer to 2.7X at 430 Ma because of the unknown higher temperature in the less than 100 m seawater over continental USA which was located just south of the equator at

  7. Reservoir engineering optimized techniques and applications research in initial development stage of a super shallow sea marginal oil field : Development case of Chengdao Oil Field in Bohai Bay, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, D.; Ren, Y.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, D. [Shengli Oil field Inc. (China). SINOPEC Corp.

    2002-06-01

    One of the greatest Chinese neritic marginal oil fields is the Chengdao oil field, located north of Dongying City, Shandong Province, China in the southern part of Bohai Bay. The depth of the seawater is less than 15 metres, even though the field lies 5 kilometres from shore. It falls in the category of super shallow sea marginal oil field, due to a number of reasons: peculiar geographical location, abominable environment and climate, complex reservoir characteristics and high economic risk of exploration and development. The major oil-bearing series of the Chengdao oil field is upper Guantao sandstones. The establishment of a three-dimensional conceptual model and static model in initial development stage were completed using Log-Constrained Seismic Inversion technique combined with three-dimensional visual geological model establishment technique. The optimization and determination of reservoir engineering technical limits, namely development scheme, well pattern and spacing, timing of water injection, water injection scheme and injection-to-production ratio was accomplished with the application of geostatistics, numerical simulation and economic evaluation techniques. For the period 1996-2001, the cumulative oil productivity of upper Guantao reservoir in pure natural energy development increased substantially. The results were presented in this paper. 3 refs., 6 tabs., 13 figs.

  8. Seasonal and diel changes in the structure of a crustacean decapod assemblage associated to a shallow Cymodocea nodosa meadow in northern Tunisia (Mediterranean Sea. An overview of the Mediterranean decapod taxocoenoses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. DAOULATI

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A study on the decapod assemblage inhabiting a shallow meadow of Cymodocea nodosa from the bay of La Goulette (Tunisia was carried from February 2009 to February 2010. Monthly samples (with replicates were taken in the morning and at night, with a small Agassiz trawl. In total 11699 specimens belonging to 41 species were caught. Significant day-night and seasonal changes are mainly related to movements (feeding and recruitments. Higher abundance and richness were reported at night. Analyses rendered no significant relationships between the plant phenology and abundances and richness; neither between the total abundance and temperature, but significant correlations with a time lag of 3 - 4 months between these factors exist, which could be related with hatching and larval development period. The nocturnal and diurnal values in the diversity and equitability indexes are quite similar along the year (peaks in spring - early summer, minimum in autumn - early winter. This pattern is mainly due to the strong dominance of a few species, with maximum abundances during their recruitment events, whose seasonal and day-night changes have been determined. Besides, an overview of the decapods assemblage associated to this seagrass for the Mediterranean Sea has been carried out. The species can be divided into two groups (linked to the leaves and to the sediment. The differences in species composition between areas must be related to different sampling methodologies, feeding and reproductive strategies, but also to the layout and influence of the surrounding habitats.

  9. Exceptional discovery of a shallow-water hydrothermal site in the SW area of Basiluzzo islet (Aeolian archipelago, South Tyrrhenian Sea): An environment to preserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andaloro, Franco; Canese, Simonepietro; Bo, Marzia; Di Bella, Marcella; Italiano, Francesco; Sabatino, Giuseppe; Battaglia, Pietro; Consoli, Pierpaolo; Giordano, Patrizia; Spagnoli, Federico; La Cono, Violetta; Yakimov, Michail M.; Scotti, Gianfranco; Romeo, Teresa

    2018-01-01

    The geological, biological and geochemical features of a particular field of hydrothermal vents, discovered in the Panarea Volcanic Complex during a research survey carried out in 2015, are described for the first time. The site, located at 70–80 m depth off the South-western coast of the islet of Basiluzzo, was named Smoking Land for the presence of a large number of wide and high active chimneys and was characterized in terms of dissolved benthic fluxes, associated macrofauna and megafauna communities and preliminary mineralogy and geochemistry of chimney structures. On the whole field, a total of 39 chimneys, different in size and shape, were closely observed and described; 14 of them showed emission of low temperature hydrothermal fluids of marine origin characterized by acidified chemical conditions. The CTD and benthic chamber measurements highlighted that the Smoking Land is able to form a sea water bottom layer characterized by variable acidity and high DIC and trace elements concentrations; these characteristics weaken moving away from the chimney mouths. The SEM-EDS analysis of the collected solid samples revealed a chimney structure principally composed by amorphous and low crystalline Fe-oxyhydroxides of hydrothermal origins. The ROV explorations revealed a wide coverage of red algae (Peyssonnelia spp.) colonized by the green algae Flabiella petiolata and by suspension feeders, mainly sponges, but also bryozoans, and tubicolous polychaetes. Although novent-exclusive species were identified, the benthic communities found in association to the chimneys included more taxa than those observed in the surrounding no-vent rocky areas. These first findings evidence a submarine dynamic habitat where geological, chemical and biological processes are intimately connected, making the Smoking Land an important site in terms of marine heritage that should be safeguarded and protected. PMID:29300784

  10. Exceptional discovery of a shallow-water hydrothermal site in the SW area of Basiluzzo islet (Aeolian archipelago, South Tyrrhenian Sea: An environment to preserve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Esposito

    Full Text Available The geological, biological and geochemical features of a particular field of hydrothermal vents, discovered in the Panarea Volcanic Complex during a research survey carried out in 2015, are described for the first time. The site, located at 70-80 m depth off the South-western coast of the islet of Basiluzzo, was named Smoking Land for the presence of a large number of wide and high active chimneys and was characterized in terms of dissolved benthic fluxes, associated macrofauna and megafauna communities and preliminary mineralogy and geochemistry of chimney structures. On the whole field, a total of 39 chimneys, different in size and shape, were closely observed and described; 14 of them showed emission of low temperature hydrothermal fluids of marine origin characterized by acidified chemical conditions. The CTD and benthic chamber measurements highlighted that the Smoking Land is able to form a sea water bottom layer characterized by variable acidity and high DIC and trace elements concentrations; these characteristics weaken moving away from the chimney mouths. The SEM-EDS analysis of the collected solid samples revealed a chimney structure principally composed by amorphous and low crystalline Fe-oxyhydroxides of hydrothermal origins. The ROV explorations revealed a wide coverage of red algae (Peyssonnelia spp. colonized by the green algae Flabiella petiolata and by suspension feeders, mainly sponges, but also bryozoans, and tubicolous polychaetes. Although novent-exclusive species were identified, the benthic communities found in association to the chimneys included more taxa than those observed in the surrounding no-vent rocky areas. These first findings evidence a submarine dynamic habitat where geological, chemical and biological processes are intimately connected, making the Smoking Land an important site in terms of marine heritage that should be safeguarded and protected.

  11. Instrumentation Suite for Acoustic Propagation Measurements in Complex Shallow Water Environments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Obtain at-sea measurements to test theoretical and modeling predictions of acoustic propagation in dynamic, inhomogeneous, and nonisotropic shallow water...

  12. Analysis of humpback whale sounds in shallow waters of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The primary objective of this work was to present the acoustical identification of humpback whales, detected by using an autonomous ambient noise measurement system, deployed in the shallow waters of the Southeastern Arabian Sea (SEAS) during the period January to May 2011. Seven types of sounds were detected.

  13. Rapid shallow breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the smallest air passages of the lungs in children ( bronchiolitis ) Pneumonia or other lung infection Transient tachypnea of the newborn Anxiety and panic Other serious lung disease Home Care Rapid, shallow breathing should not be treated at home. It is ...

  14. Shallow Junction Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Teyin Mark

    Shallow junction technology is a necessity to maintain the performance of the scaled integrated devices in VLSL. In this work, various approaches to the process design of shallow junctions in implantation/diffusion technology are explored. The high concentration shallow arsenic implant/diffusion profile is described by the Chebyshev polynomial model. Based on the model, the inter-relationships of four design parameters: sheet resistance, junction depth, effective surface concentration, and thermal cycle are analytically derived. A general design graph for shallow arsenic junctions is developed. A similar methodology is applied to describe the high concentration boron shallow junctions design. At very high concentration, arsenic clustering and boron precipitation limit the achievable lower bound of sheet resistance. The sheet resistance is experimentally characterized and modeled. The ultimate limitations on sheet resistance due to these effects are defined. Unintentional channeling in low energy ion-implantation of boron into silicon results in much deeper junctions than predicted by LSS theory, even for wafers tilted well off the channeling directions. The channeling tail imposes an unexpected limitation on the achievable shallow junction depth. This partial channeling effect caused by boron ions being randomly scattered into crystal channels is examined by a calculation of the angular spreading for boron ions in silicon. An empirical formula is found to describe the enhancement of junction depth. To prevent the boron channeling, two methods of dechanneling are explored. Dechanneling by surface oxide layers is found to be ineffective. As-implanted junction depths much deeper than the predictions of LSS theory cannot be avoided. Based on a "lucky" ion model, the as-implanted junction depth with the surface oxide can be predicted. Silicon pre-implantation is found very effective in reducing the junction depth. The amorphization process by the silicon pre

  15. Mode Colouration in Shallow-Water Ambient Noise,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spectrum of ambient noise observed in the shallow waters of the Bristol Channel shows a series of characteristic peaks, e.g. at 10, 28, 47 Hz etc...and the presence of gas at the sea-bed. The significance is discussed for theories of ambient noise, microseisms and acoustic transmission. (Author)

  16. Model Based Predictive Control of AUVs for Station Keeping in a Shallow Water Wave Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riedel, Jeffery s; Healey, Anthony J

    2005-01-01

    .... In shallow water AUV operations, where large hydrodynamic forces are developed due to waves, knowledge of the sea is critical to allow for the design of a control system that will enable the vehicle...

  17. First steps toward maturing the shallow gas play - Results of an integrated exploration workflow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, J.H. ten; Verweij, J.M.; Bruin, G. de; Donders, T.

    2014-01-01

    Recent exploration activities in two of the largest deltas in the world, the still active Nile delta and the Cenozoic Southern North Sea (SNS) deltas, proved the potential of shallow gas resources. Although, previously seen as a hazard or an exploration tool for deeper hydrocarbons, the shallow gas

  18. Changes in extreme sea levels in the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Christian; Gröger, Matthias; Andersson, Helén; Nerheim, Signild; Jönsson, Anette

    2016-04-01

    A newly developed shallow water model for the Baltic Sea and North Sea is presented. The model is validated by means of a comparison with hindcast simulations with observational data sets. The aim of the development is to provide and apply a modelling tool to model extreme sea levels in the Baltic Sea, Kattegat and Skagerrak. The model approach will support the direct analysis of extreme sea level observations in the past and provide the possibility to extend the statistical data base by producing very long time series or very large ensembles of coastal sea levels. This effort is intended to contribute to an assessment of risks due to storm surges and coastal flooding in the 21st century along the coast of Sweden. By using different RCP climate scenarios downscaled with a regional, coupled climate model atmospheric forcing is available to project possible changes in extreme sea levels into the future. Projected sea level rise, changes in dynamical sea level in the North East Atlantic and tidal forcing in the northern North Sea are applied as boundary condition which allows to investigate their impact on the dynamics of regional sea level variability. Initial experiments focus on the impact of model resolution, resolution in the atmospheric forcing and the amount of details necessary in the bathymetry to faithfully model coastal sea level in the Baltic Sea and North Sea.

  19. Properties of underwater acoustic communication channels in shallow water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T C

    2012-01-01

    Underwater acoustic channels are band-limited and reverberant, posing many obstacles to reliable, phase-coherent acoustic communications. While many high frequency communication experiments have been conducted in shallow water, few have carried out systematic studies on the channel properties at a time scale relevant for communications. To aid communication system design, this paper analyzes at-sea data collected in shallow water under various conditions to illustrate how the ocean environments (sea surface waves and random ocean medium) can affect the signal properties. Channel properties studied include amplitude and phase variations, and temporal coherence of individual paths as well as the temporal and spatial coherence of multipaths at different time scales. Reasons for the coherence loss are hypothesized. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.

  20. Shallow-Water Mud Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Shallow-Water Mud Acoustics William L. Siegmann...models and methods that explain observed material and acoustic properties of different physical types of shallow-ocean mud sediments. Other goals...are to assess prior data relating to the acoustic properties of mud and to provide guidance in the development and interpretation of experiments. A

  1. Deep-sea fungi

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.; Damare, S.

    pressure of 10 MPa (73). Several species of Aspergillus showed abnonnal morphology immediately afterisola~ tion. These showed extremely long conidiophores with vesicles that were covered with long hyphae, instead of phialides or metulae or conidia... at SoC and pH 9.0 (17). In contrast, out of 22 fungi isolated from shallow \\vater, only 14% showed Iow-temperature-active protease production. The deep-sea fungi when grown under elevated pressure synthesized extracellular protease, albeit in very low...

  2. Floating offshore wind turbines for shallow waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulder, B.H.; Peeringa, J.M.; Pierik, J.T.G. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Henderson, A. [Section Wind Energy, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Huijsmans, R.H.M.; Van Hees, M.Th. [Maritime Research Institute Netherlands, MARIN, Wageningen (Netherlands); Snijders, E.J.B. [Marine Structure Consultants MSC, Schiedam (Netherlands); Wijnants, G.H.; Wolf, M.J. [TNO, Delft (Netherlands)

    2003-06-01

    Bottom mounted Offshore wind turbines seem to have a promising future but they are restricted to shallow waters such as in Northern Europe. Many projects are planned or are in the phase of construction in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. All projects planned to date are in water depths of up to approximately 25 m. The research project reported in this paper investigated the technical and economical feasibility of floating wind energy systems in deeper waters, of approximately 50 m and deeper. It is assumed that at a certain water depth floating wind turbines will have better economics than bottom mounted wind turbines. Floating wind energy systems seem to have some advantages over bottom mounted wind energy systems, such as: lower cost installation (in a harbour); lower maintenance cost; lower removal cost. But floating wind energy systems have their own technical challenges, such as dynamic interactions between floater and wind turbine; floater conceptual design including mooring system, taking into account restriction w.rt. stability of floater and wind turbine, minimizing wave induced motion, water depth, etc. This paper summarises the activities undertaken within the FloatWind feasibility study carried out during 2001-2002. Full details are to be found in the Final Report, also available from ECN or any of the authors.

  3. Wave and sediment dynamics along a shallow subtidal sandy beach inhabited by modern stromatolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, J E; Andres, M S; Marinelli, R L; Bowlin, E; Reid, R P; Aspden, R J; Paterson, D M

    2008-01-01

    To help define the habitat of modern marine stromatolites, wave-dominated flow and sediment transport were studied in the shallow subtidal region (1-2 m depth) along the slightly concave, windward face of Highborne Cay, Exuma, Bahamas - the only face of the cay that includes a population of stromatolites concentrated near the region of highest curvature of the beach. Wave energy impacting this island's most exposed beach was driven by local wind forcing which increases largely in response to the passage of atmospheric disturbances that typically affect the region for periods of a few days. Although some wave energy is almost always noted (maximum horizontal orbital speeds at the bottom are rarely Stromatolites, which are largely restricted to the shoreward side of a shallow platform reef, are sheltered by the reef beyond which wave speeds are one to four times higher (depending on tidal stage). Moreover, stromatolite populations are predominantly found along a region of this wave-exposed beach that experiences comparatively reduced wave energy because of the curved morphology of the island's face. Maximum wave speeds are 1.4 to 2 times higher along more northern sections of the beach just beyond the locus of stromatolite populations. A quantitative model of sediment transport was developed that accurately predicted accumulation of suspended sediment in sediment traps deployed in the shallow subtidal zone along this beach. This model, coupled with in situ wave records, indicates that gross rates of suspended sediment deposition should be two to three times higher northward of the main stromatolite populations. Regions of the beach containing stromatolites nevertheless should experience significant rates of gross suspended sediment deposition averaging 7-10 g cm(-2) day(-1) ( approximately 4-6 cm day(-1)). Results suggest that one axis of the habitat of modern marine stromatolites may be defined by a comparatively narrow range of flow energy and sediment transport

  4. Seagrass-sediment feedbacks in shallow coastal lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, J. A.; D'Odorico, P.; McGlathery, K.; Wiberg, P.

    2009-12-01

    Shallow coastal lagoons are environments where a delicate equilibrium exists between water quality and sea grass cover. Seagrass cover limits the resuspension of bed sediments thereby favoring a clearer water column. These conditions allow for the penetration of adequate levels of light, which in turn, is fundamental for the survival of seagrass. It is still unclear what role this positive feedback may play in the dynamics and restoration of seagrass communities. Positive feedbacks are often associated with the existence of bistable dynamics in ecosystems. In this specific case a bare and a fully vegetated sediment bed could be both stable states of the system. This study develops a one dimensional hydrodynamic model of vegetation-sediment-water flow interactions to investigate the strengths of positive feedbacks between sea grass cover, stabilization of bed sediments, turbidity of the water column, and the existence of a favorable light environment for seagrasses. The model is applied to Hog Island Bay, a shallow coastal lagoon on the eastern shore of Virginia. The effects of temperature, eutrophication, and bed grain size on bistability of seagrass ecosystems in the lagoon are explored. The results indicate that under typical conditions, seagrass is stable in water depths sustain seagrass. Decreases in sediment size and increases in water temperature and degree of eutrophication shift the bistable range to shallower depths, with more of the bay bottom unable to sustain seagrass.

  5. Theoretical Model of Acoustic Wave Propagation in Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozaczka Eugeniusz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the propagation of low frequency waves in a shallow sea. As a source of acoustic waves, underwater disturbances generated by ships were adopted. A specific feature of the propagation of acoustic waves in shallow water is the proximity of boundaries of the limiting media characterised by different impedance properties, which affects the acoustic field coming from a source situated in the water layer “deformed” by different phenomena. The acoustic field distribution in the real shallow sea is affected not only by multiple reflections, but also by stochastic changes in the free surface shape, and statistical changes in the seabed shape and impedance. The paper discusses fundamental problems of modal sound propagation in the water layer over different types of bottom sediments. The basic task in this case was to determine the acoustic pressure level as a function of distance and depth. The results of the conducted investigation can be useful in indirect determination of the type of bottom.

  6. Shallow water sponges of Jamaica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehnert, Helmut; Soest, van Rob W.M.

    1998-01-01

    An annotated comprehensive list is provided of all shallow-water sponges (down to 60 m) recently collected and previously recorded from Jamaica. Five new species are described, Plakina jamaicensis, Melophlus ruber, Agelas repens, Stylissa caribica and Hyrtios tubulatus, two of which belong to genera

  7. Edge wave response on a barred beach with wind-sea and swell forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contardo, Stephanie; Symonds, Graham; Segura, Laura

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence of short period wind-sea associated with a diurnal sea breeze, superimposed on longer period swell in South West Western Australia provides an opportunity to observe the response of infragravity (0.01-0.05 Hz) waves, in the nearshore, to both wind-sea and swell forcing. An alongshore array of pressure sensors and a cross-shore array of current velocity and pressure sensors are deployed at Secret Harbour, a barred beach near Perth. The observations show a stronger infragravity response to longer period incident swell than to short period wind-sea. Infragravity waves at Secret Harbour are generated by two mechanisms: breakpoint forcing and bound wave release. Breakpoint forcing is observed with both swell and wind-sea forcing while bound wave release is only observed in the presence of swell. Two mechanisms generate free infragravity waves during swell periods while only one mechanism is in place during wind-sea periods, providing an explanation for the stronger response to swell than wind-sea. Free infragravity waves propagating offshore after reflection at the shoreline are called leaky waves; those which are trapped to the shoreline by refraction are called edge waves. At Secret Harbour, both edge waves and leaky waves are detected. Leaky waves dominate with swell forcing while edge waves dominate with wind-sea forcing. Amongst edge waves, mode 0 waves are found to dominate in the absence of wind-sea, while higher mode edge waves dominate when wind-sea is present. We calculate the expected wavenumber-frequency distribution of edge wave and leaky wave energy, based on resonance conditions, using wave period, incidence angle and directional spreading, as proposed by Bowen and Guza (1978). Observations and predictions are in good agreement. However the model can be improved by quantifying the infragravity energy generated by both infragravity wave generation mechanisms. Bowen, A. J., and R. T. Guza (1978), Edge waves and surf beat, Journal of

  8. Shallowing-upward cycles in the Middle Proterozoic Altyn Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Brian

    1981-11-12

    Phanerozoic carbonate rocks commonly contain cycles, a few metres thick, which were deposited during progressive shallowing of their oceanic environment 1 . Each cycle represents a deepening of water in a nearshore area, followed by the accumulation of sediments up to sea level. The causes of the water deepening which begins each cycle are rarely known. Possibilities include tectonic activity that affected the depositional basin and changes in ocean volume due to the expansion and contraction of ice sheets. I report here that similar cycles occur in the Middle Proterozoic Altyn Formation, part of the Belt Supergroup 2 . The cycles are probably related to vertical tectonic activity which influenced sedimentation in the Belt basin. The presence of shallowing-upward cycles in the Altyn Formation shows that such cycles are not confined to the Phanerozoic. Other Precambrian sequences should be examined to see if they too contain cycles. Where such cycles are found they may give important information about Precambrian tectonism and glaciation.

  9. 2010 Hudson River Shallow Water Sediment Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hudson River Shallow Water Mapping project characterizes the bottom of the Hudson River Estuary in shallow water (<3 m). The characterization includes...

  10. 2010 Hudson River Shallow Water Sediment Grabs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hudson River Shallow Water Mapping project characterizes the bottom of the Hudson River Estuary in shallow water (<3 m). The characterization includes...

  11. Holocene sea levels of Visakhapatnam shelf, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.M.; Rao, T.C.S.

    The Holocene sea level changes in the shelf areas off Visakhapatnam was studied from sediment distribution pattern and shallow seismic profiling. Morphological features on the shelf indicate a Late Pleistocene regression down to about -130 m below...

  12. Electrostatically Tunable Nanomechanical Shallow Arches

    KAUST Repository

    Kazmi, Syed N. R.

    2017-11-03

    We report an analytical and experimental study on the tunability of in-plane doubly-clamped nanomechanical arches under varied DC bias conditions at room temperature. For this purpose, silicon based shallow arches are fabricated using standard e-beam lithography and surface nanomachining of a highly conductive device layer on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The experimental results show good agreement with the analytical results with a maximum tunability of 108.14% for 180 nm thick arch with a transduction gap of 1 μm between the beam and the driving/sensing electrodes. The high tunability of shallow arches paves the ways for highly tunable band pass filtering applications in high frequency range.

  13. Sede Boqer shallow pond project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudish, A.

    1981-03-01

    The use of shallow solar ponds for the conversion of solar energy into low grade thermal energy is examined at Sede Boqer, Israel with an emphasis placed upon the utilization of locally manufactured components. The daily performance of four small-module shallow solar ponds was monitored almost continuously between Aug 1978 and May 1979. The ponds all used PVC lower film but differed in the type of transparent upper film, glazing material or glazing angle. The daily performance is characterized by the maximum daily water temperature achieved, the total daily thermal energy collected, and the daily efficiency. The results indicate that the SSP system can supply approximately 3 GJ per square meter of thermal energy a year under semi-arid climatic conditions. The economic feasibility of the system is analyzed in comparison with oil (heavy fraction), natural gas, and electrical sources of energy.

  14. Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Hereman, Willy

    2013-01-01

    Encyclopedic article covering shallow water wave models used in oceanography and atmospheric science. Sections: Definition of the Subject; Introduction and Historical Perspective; Completely Integrable Shallow Water Wave Equations; Shallow Water Wave Equations of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics; Computation of Solitary Wave Solutions; Numerical Methods; Water Wave Experiments and Observations; Future Directions, and Bibliography.

  15. Alternative Attractors of Shallow Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marten Scheffer

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ponds and shallow lakes can be very clear with abundant submerged plants, or very turbid due to a high concentration of phytoplankton and suspended sediment particles. These strongly contrasting ecosystem states have been found to represent alternative attractors with distinct stabilizing feedback mechanisms. In the turbid state, the development of submerged vegetation is prevented by low underwater light levels. The unprotected sediment frequently is resuspended by wave action and by fish searching for food causing a further decrease of transparency. Since there are no plants that could serve as refuges, zooplankton is grazed down by fish to densities insufficient to control algal blooms. In contrast, the clear state in eutrophic shallow lakes is dominated by aquatic macrophytes. The submerged macrophytes prevent sediment resuspension, take up nutrients from the water, and provide a refuge for zooplankton against fish predation. These processes buffer the impacts of increased nutrient loads until they become too high. Consequently, the response of shallow lakes to eutrophication tends to be catastrophic rather than smooth, and various lakes switch back and forth abruptly between a clear and a turbid state repeatedly without obvious external forcing. Importantly, a switch from a turbid to a stable clear state often can be invoked by means of biomanipulation in the form of a temporary reduction of the fish stock.

  16. Observations of shallow water marine ambient sound: the low frequency underwater soundscape of the central Oregon coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxel, Joseph H; Dziak, Robert P; Matsumoto, Haru

    2013-05-01

    A year-long experiment (March 2010 to April 2011) measuring ambient sound at a shallow water site (50 m) on the central OR coast near the Port of Newport provides important baseline information for comparisons with future measurements associated with resource development along the inner continental shelf of the Pacific Northwest. Ambient levels in frequencies affected by surf-generated noise (f < 100 Hz) characterize the site as a high-energy end member within the spectrum of shallow water coastal areas influenced by breaking waves. Dominant sound sources include locally generated ship noise (66% of total hours contain local ship noise), breaking surf, wind induced wave breaking and baleen whale vocalizations. Additionally, an increase in spectral levels for frequencies ranging from 35 to 100 Hz is attributed to noise radiated from distant commercial ship commerce. One-second root mean square (rms) sound pressure level (SPLrms) estimates calculated across the 10-840 Hz frequency band for the entire year long deployment show minimum, mean, and maximum values of 84 dB, 101 dB, and 152 dB re 1 μPa.

  17. Multipeakedness and groupiness of shallow water waves along Indian coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Anand, N.M.; AshokKumar, K.; Mandal, S.

    and amplitudes of sea waves. JDurnal of GeDphysical Re search, 80(18), 2688-2694. MASSON, D. and CHAro.lJLER, P., 1993. Wave groups, a closer look at spectral methods. CDastal Engineering, 20, 249-275. MATHEW, J.; BABA. M., and KURIAN, N.P., 1995. Mudbanks... Research 1052-1065 West Palm Beach, Florida Fall 2003 Multipeakedness a,nd Groupiness of Shallow Water Waves Along Indian Coast v. Sanil Kumar, N.M. Anand, K. Ashok Kumar, and S. MandaI Ocean Engineering Division National Institute of Oceanography Goa-403...

  18. Marine geoscientific surveys in ports and nearshore regions of the Arabian Sea off central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SubbaRaju, L.V.; Naidu, P.D.; Almeida, F.

    Bathymetric, side scan sonar and shallow seismic surveys were carried out in ports and adjacent nearshore regions of the Arabian Sea off the central west coast of India. It is observed that in the regions of rivers confluencing the sea...

  19. Deep-sea geohazards in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shiguo; Wang, Dawei; Völker, David

    2018-02-01

    Various geological processes and features that might inflict hazards identified in the South China Sea by using new technologies and methods. These features include submarine landslides, pockmark fields, shallow free gas, gas hydrates, mud diapirs and earthquake tsunami, which are widely distributed in the continental slope and reefal islands of the South China Sea. Although the study and assessment of geohazards in the South China Sea came into operation only recently, advances in various aspects are evolving at full speed to comply with National Marine Strategy and `the Belt and Road' Policy. The characteristics of geohazards in deep-water seafloor of the South China Sea are summarized based on new scientific advances. This progress is aimed to aid ongoing deep-water drilling activities and decrease geological risks in ocean development.

  20. An Oil Fate Model for Shallow-Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Restrepo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a model for the dynamics of oil in suspension, appropriate for shallow waters, including the nearshore environment. This model is capable of oil mass conservation and does so by evolving the oil on the sea surface as well as the oil in the subsurface. The shallower portion of the continental shelf poses compounding unique modeling challenges. Many of these relate to the complex nature of advection and dispersion of oil in an environment in which wind, waves, as well as currents all play a role, as does the complex bathymetry and the nearshore geography. In this study we present an overview of the model as well as derive the most fundamental of processes, namely, the shallow water advectiion and dispersion processes. With regard to this basic transport, we superate several fundamental challenges associated with creating a transport model for oil and other buoyant pollutants, capable of capturing the dynamics at the large spatio-temporal scales demanded by environmental and hazard mitigation studies. Some of the strategies are related to dimension reduction and upscaling, and leave discussion of these to companion papers. Here we focus on wave-filtering, ensemble and depth-averaging. Integral to the model is the proposal of an ocean dynamics model that is consistent with the transport. This ocean dynamics model is detailed here. The ocean/oil transport model is applied to a couple of physically-inspired oil-spill problems in demonstrate its specialized capabilities.

  1. Marine Microphytobenthic Assemblage Shift along a Natural Shallow-Water CO2 Gradient Subjected to Multiple Environmental Stressors

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Vivienne R.; Colin Brownlee; Marco Milazzo; Hall-Spencer, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the effects of anthropogenic CO2 emissions on coastal ecosystems requires an understanding of the responses of algae, since these are a vital functional component of shallow-water habitats. We investigated microphytobenthic assemblages on rock and sandy habitats along a shallow subtidal pCO2 gradient near volcanic seeps in the Mediterranean Sea. Field studies of natural pCO2 gradients help us understand the likely effects of ocean acidification because entire communities are subjec...

  2. Progress in the development of shallow-water mapping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, E.; Worley, C.R.; O'Brien, T.

    2007-01-01

    The USGS (US Geological Survey) Coastal and Marine Geology has deployed an advance autonomous shallow-draft robotic vehicle, Iris, for shallow-water mapping in Apalachicola Bay, Florida. The vehicle incorporates a side scan sonar system, seismic-reflection profiler, single-beam echosounder, and global positioning system (GPS) navigation. It is equipped with an onboard microprocessor-based motor controller, delivering signals for speed and steering to hull-mounted brushless direct-current thrusters. An onboard motion sensor in the Sea Robotics vehicle control system enclosure has been integrated in the vehicle to measure the vehicle heave, pitch, roll, and heading. Three water-tight enclosures are mounted along the vehicle axis for the Edgetech computer and electronics system including the Sea Robotics computer, a control and wireless communications system, and a Thales ZXW real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS receiver. The vehicle has resulted in producing high-quality seismic reflection and side scan sonar data, which will help in developing the baseline oyster habitat maps.

  3. South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, B; Blackmore, G

    2001-12-01

    The South China Sea is poorly understood in terms of its marine biota, ecology and the human impacts upon it. What is known is most often contained in reports and workshop and conference documents that are not available to the wider scientific community. The South China Sea has an area of some 3.3 million km2 and depths range from the shallowest coastal fringe to 5377 m in the Manila Trench. It is also studded with numerous islets, atolls and reefs many of which are just awash at low tide. It is largely confined within the Tropic of Cancer and, therefore, experiences a monsoonal climate being influenced by the Southwest Monsoon in summer and the Northeast Monsoon in winter. The South China Sea is a marginal sea and, therefore, largely surrounded by land. Countries that have a major influence on and claims to the sea include China, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam, although Thailand, Indonesia and Taiwan have some too. The coastal fringes of the South China Sea are home to about 270 million people that have had some of the fastest developing and most vibrant economies on the globe. Consequently, anthropogenic impacts, such as over-exploitation of resources and pollution, are anticipated to be huge although, in reality, relatively little is known about them. The Indo-West Pacific biogeographic province, at the centre of which the South China Sea lies, is probably the world's most diverse shallow-water marine area. Of three major nearshore habitat types, i.e., coral reefs, mangroves and seagrasses, 45 mangrove species out of a global total of 51, most of the currently recognised 70 coral genera and 20 of 50 known seagrass species have been recorded from the South China Sea. The island groups of the South China Sea are all disputed and sovereignty is claimed over them by a number of countries. Conflicts have in recent decades arisen over them because of perceived national rights. It is perhaps because of this that so little research has been undertaken on the

  4. South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, Brian [Hong Kong Univ., Swire Inst. of Marine Science, Hong Kong (China); Hong Kong Univ., Dept. of Ecology and Biodiversity, Hong Kong (China); Blackmore, Graham [Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology, Dept. of Biology, Hong Kong (China)

    2001-07-01

    The South China Sea is poorly understood in terms of its marine biota, ecology and the human impacts upon it. What is known is most often contained in reports and workshops and conference documents that are not available to the wider scientific community. The South China Sea has an area of some 3.3 million km{sup 2} and depths range from the shallowest coastal fringe to 5377m in the Manila Trench. It is also studded with numerous islets, atolls and reefs many of which are just awash at low tide. It is largely confined within the Tropic of Cancer and, therefore, experiences a monsoonal climate being influenced by the Southwest Monsoon in summer and the Northeast Monsoon in winter. The South China Sea is a marginal sea and, therefore, largely surrounded by land. Countries that have a major influence on and claims to the sea include China, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam, although Thailand, Indonesia and Taiwan have some too. The coastal fringes of the South China Sea are home to about 270 million people that have had some of the fastest developing and most vibrant economics on the globe. Consequently, anthropogenic impacts, such as over-exploitation of resources and pollution, are anticipated to be huge although, in reality, relatively little is known about them. The Indo-West Pacific biogeographic province, at the centre of which the South China Sea lies, is probably the world's most diverse shallow-water marine area. Of three major nearshore habitat types, i.e., coral reefs, mangroves and seagrasses, 45 mangrove species out of a global total of 51, most of the currently recognised 70 coral genera and 20 of 50 known seagrass species have been recorded from the South China Sea. The island groups of the South China Sea are all disputed and sovereignty is claimed over them by a number of countries. Conflicts have in recent decades arisen over them because of perceived national rights. It is perhaps because of this that so little research has been undertaken

  5. South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Brian; Blackmore, Graham

    2001-01-01

    The South China Sea is poorly understood in terms of its marine biota, ecology and the human impacts upon it. What is known is most often contained in reports and workshop and conference documents that are not available to the wider scientific community. The South China Sea has an area of some 3.3 million km2 and depths range from the shallowest coastal fringe to 5377 m in the Manila Trench. It is also studded with numerous islets, atolls and reefs many of which are just awash at low tide. It is largely confined within the Tropic of Cancer and, therefore, experiences a monsoonal climate being influenced by the Southwest Monsoon in summer and the Northeast Monsoon in winter. The South China Sea is a marginal sea and, therefore, largely surrounded by land. Countries that have a major influence on and claims to the sea include China, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam, although Thailand, Indonesia and Taiwan have some too. The coastal fringes of the South China Sea are home to about 270 million people that have had some of the fastest developing and most vibrant economies on the globe. Consequently, anthropogenic impacts, such as over-exploitation of resources and pollution, are anticipated to be huge although, in reality, relatively little is known about them. The Indo-West Pacific biogeographic province, at the centre of which the South China Sea lies, is probably the world's most diverse shallow-water marine area. Of the three major nearshore habitat types, i.e., coral reefs, mangroves and seagrasses, 45 mangrove species out of a global of 51, most of the currently recognised 70 coral genera and 20 of 50 known seagrass species have been recorded from the South China Sea. The island groups of the South China Sea are all disputed and sovereignty is claimed over them by a number of countries. Conflicts have in recent decades arisen over them because of perceived national rights. It is perhaps because of this that so little research has been undertaken on the South

  6. Highly tunable NEMS shallow arches

    KAUST Repository

    Kazmi, Syed N. R.

    2017-11-30

    We report highly tunable nanoelectromechanical systems NEMS shallow arches under dc excitation voltages. Silicon based in-plane doubly clamped bridges, slightly curved as shallow arches, are fabricated using standard electron beam lithography and surface nanomachining of a highly conductive device layer on a silicon-on-insulator wafer. By designing the structures to have gap to thickness ratio of more than four, the mid-plane stretching of the nano arches is maximized such that an increase in the dc bias voltage will result into continuous increase in the resonance frequency of the resonators to wide ranges. This is confirmed analytically based on a nonlinear beam model. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with that of the results from developed analytical model. A maximum tunability of 108.14% for a 180 nm thick arch with an initially designed gap of 1 μm between the beam and the driving/sensing electrodes is achieved. Furthermore, a tunable narrow bandpass filter is demonstrated, which opens up opportunities for designing such structures as filtering elements in high frequency ranges.

  7. Evaluation of Surface Ducts in Shallow Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-29

    to determine optimum freouency domains for sound propagation at those sites. 1.2 Background Ten shallow water stations were occupied during the FASOR ...selected two of the FASOR shallow water stations for an optimum frequency study. Results for a downward refraction profile were compared to optimum...and Reverberation from the Shallow-Water FASOR Areas with Comparisons to Propagation Loss Models, J. A. Whitney, Naval Ocean Systems Center TR 400

  8. Shallow water cnoidal wave interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Osborne

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear dynamics of cnoidal waves, within the context of the general N-cnoidal wave solutions of the periodic Korteweg-de Vries (KdV and Kadomtsev-Petvishvilli (KP equations, are considered. These equations are important for describing the propagation of small-but-finite amplitude waves in shallow water; the solutions to KdV are unidirectional while those of KP are directionally spread. Herein solutions are constructed from the 0-function representation of their appropriate inverse scattering transform formulations. To this end a general theorem is employed in the construction process: All solutions to the KdV and KP equations can be written as the linear superposition of cnoidal waves plus their nonlinear interactions. The approach presented here is viewed as significant because it allows the exact construction of N degree-of-freedom cnoidal wave trains under rather general conditions.

  9. Long-term changes in Wadden Sea nutrient cycles : importance of organic matter import from the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beusekom, J.E.E.; de Jonge, V.N.

    The Wadden Sea is a shallow tidal area along the North Sea coast of The Netherlands, Germany and Denmark. The area is strongly influenced by rivers, the most important of which are the rivers Rhine, Meuse and Elbe. Due to the increased nutrient load into the coastal zone the primary production in

  10. 77 FR 34334 - Western Pacific Pelagic Fisheries; Revised Limits on Sea Turtle Interactions in the Hawaii...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... Fisheries; Revised Limits on Sea Turtle Interactions in the Hawaii Shallow-Set Longline Fishery AGENCY... fishery and leatherback and loggerhead sea turtles. NMFS also proposes administrative housekeeping changes... Pacific loggerhead sea turtles. Pelagic fisheries in the U.S. western Pacific are managed under the...

  11. Characterization of the Geology of Subsurface Shallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    ABSTRACT: The 2D electrical resistivity imaging study is the rising tool used for characterization of the geology of subsurface diamondiferous shallow conglomerate and geological condition at Baragadi, Panna District,. Madhya Pradesh, India. In the present study, the 2D electrical resistivity imaging of subsurface shallow ...

  12. Shallow Carbon Sequestration Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendergrass, Gary; Fraley, David; Alter, William; Bodenhamer, Steven

    2013-09-30

    The potential for carbon sequestration at relatively shallow depths was investigated at four power plant sites in Missouri. Exploratory boreholes were cored through the Davis Shale confining layer into the St. Francois aquifer (Lamotte Sandstone and Bonneterre Formation). Precambrian basement contact ranged from 654.4 meters at the John Twitty Energy Center in Southwest Missouri to over 1100 meters near the Sioux Power Plant in St. Charles County. Investigations at the John Twitty Energy Center included 3D seismic reflection surveys, downhole geophysical logging and pressure testing, and laboratory analysis of rock core and water samples. Plans to perform injectivity tests at the John Twitty Energy Center, using food grade CO{sub 2}, had to be abandoned when the isolated aquifer was found to have very low dissolved solids content. Investigations at the Sioux Plant and Thomas Hill Energy Center in Randolph County found suitably saline conditions in the St. Francois. A fourth borehole in Platte County was discontinued before reaching the aquifer. Laboratory analyses of rock core and water samples indicate that the St. Charles and Randolph County sites could have storage potentials worthy of further study. The report suggests additional Missouri areas for further investigation as well.

  13. On the Simulation of Shallow Water Tides in the Vicinity of the Taiwan Banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Da Chiou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Taiwan Banks (Formosa Shoals, a large NE-SW oriented bathymetric feature near the southern end (23°N, 118 - 119°E of the Taiwan Strait, is a region of extremely shallow water that exerts a profound effect on the propagation of tidal waves. As such waves propagate over the Taiwan Banks, they become distorted and asymmetric due to bottom friction and contribute to the generation of shallow water tides. The POM model was used in present study to simulate the tides in the Taiwan Strait region. Shallow water tidal dynamics in the area of Taiwan Banks are focused. The numerical model was validated against sea level observations from 34 tidal stations located on the coast of Mainland China and Taiwan. Trajectory records from two SVP drifters are used to be compared with the simulations using wavelet-based rotary spectral analysis.

  14. The "shallow-waterness" of the wave climate in European coastal regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkon Christensen, Kai; Carrasco, Ana; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Breivik, Øyvind

    2017-07-01

    In contrast to deep water waves, shallow water waves are influenced by bottom topography, which has consequences for the propagation of wave energy as well as for the energy and momentum exchange between the waves and the mean flow. The ERA-Interim reanalysis is used to assess the fraction of wave energy associated with shallow water waves in coastal regions in Europe. We show maps of the distribution of this fraction as well as time series statistics from eight selected stations. There is a strong seasonal dependence and high values are typically associated with winter storms, indicating that shallow water wave effects can occasionally be important even in the deeper parts of the shelf seas otherwise dominated by deep water waves.

  15. The “shallow-waterness” of the wave climate in European coastal regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. H. Christensen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to deep water waves, shallow water waves are influenced by bottom topography, which has consequences for the propagation of wave energy as well as for the energy and momentum exchange between the waves and the mean flow. The ERA-Interim reanalysis is used to assess the fraction of wave energy associated with shallow water waves in coastal regions in Europe. We show maps of the distribution of this fraction as well as time series statistics from eight selected stations. There is a strong seasonal dependence and high values are typically associated with winter storms, indicating that shallow water wave effects can occasionally be important even in the deeper parts of the shelf seas otherwise dominated by deep water waves.

  16. Relic carbonate deposits along the western margin of India: Sea level and environmental changes during the Late Quaternary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    precisely be used as proxy indicators of sea level. Other shallow water deposits if not useful as a proxy indicators for sea level may otherwise indicate environmental conditions at the time of their formation. Using age and depth of occurrence... nodules, the others were formed in shallow marine conditions and serve as sea level indicators (Vander Plache., 1986). Radiocarbon dates were measured for 62 relic deposits covering the entire margin (Fig. 1). The age versus depth plot of the samples...

  17. Unconventional shallow biogenic gas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurr, G.W.; Ridgley, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Unconventional shallow biogenic gas falls into two distinct systems that have different attributes. Early-generation systems have blanketlike geometries, and gas generation begins soon after deposition of reservoir and source rocks. Late-generation systems have ringlike geometries, and long time intervals separate deposition of reservoir and source rocks from gas generation. For both types of systems, the gas is dominantly methane and is associated with source rocks that are not thermally mature. Early-generation biogenic gas systems are typified by production from low-permeability Cretaceous rocks in the northern Great Plains of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Montana. The main area of production is on the southeastern margin of the Alberta basin and the northwestern margin of the Williston basin. The huge volume of Cretaceous rocks has a generalized regional pattern of thick, non-marine, coarse clastics to the west and thinner, finer grained marine lithologies to the east. Reservoir rocks in the lower part tend to be finer grained and have lower porosity and permeability than those in the upper part. Similarly, source beds in the units have higher values of total organic carbon. Patterns of erosion, deposition, deformation, and production in both the upper and lower units are related to the geometry of lineament-bounded basement blocks. Geochemical studies show that gas and coproduced water are in equilibrium and that the fluids are relatively old, namely, as much as 66 Ma. Other examples of early-generation systems include Cretaceous clastic reservoirs on the southwestern margin of Williston basin and chalks on the eastern margin of the Denver basin. Late-generation biogenic gas systems have as an archetype the Devonian Antrim Shale on the northern margin of the Michigan basin. Reservoir rocks are fractured, organic-rich black shales that also serve as source rocks. Although fractures are important for production, the relationships to specific geologic structures are

  18. Shallow cumulus rooted in photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Guerau Arellano, J.; Ouwersloot, H.; Horn, G.; Sikma, M.; Jacobs, C. M.; Baldocchi, D.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the interaction between plant evapotranspiration, controlled by photosynthesis (for a low vegetation cover by C3 and C4 grasses), and the moist thermals that are responsible for the formation and development of shallow cumulus clouds (SCu). We perform systematic numerical experiments at fine spatial scales using large-eddy simulations explicitly coupled to a plant-physiology model. To break down the complexity of the vegetation-atmospheric system at the diurnal scales, we design the following experiments with increasing complexity: (a) clouds that are transparent to radiation, (b) clouds that shade the surface from the incoming shortwave radiation and (c) plant stomata whose apertures react with an adjustment in time to cloud perturbations. The shading by SCu leads to a strong spatial variability in photosynthesis and the surface energy balance. As a result, experiment (b) simulates SCu that are characterized by less extreme and less skewed values of the liquid water path and cloud-base height. These findings are corroborated by the calculation of characteristics lengths scales of the thermals and clouds using autocorrelation and spectral analysis methods. We find that experiments (a) and (b) are characterized by similar cloud cover evolution, but different cloud population characteristics. Experiment (b), including cloud shading, is characterized by smaller clouds, but closer to each other. By performing a sensitivity analysis on the exchange of water vapor and carbon dioxide at the canopy level, we show that the larger water-use efficiency of C4 grass leads to two opposing effects that directly influence boundary-layer clouds: the thermals below the clouds are more vigorous and deeper driven by a larger buoyancy surface flux (positive effect), but are characterized by less moisture content (negative effect). We conclude that under the investigated mid-latitude atmospheric and well-watered soil conditions, SCu over C4 grass fields is characterized

  19. Modeling of SAR signatures of shallow water ocean topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuchman, R. A.; Kozma, A.; Kasischke, E. S.; Lyzenga, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    A hydrodynamic/electromagnetic model was developed to explain and quantify the relationship between the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observed signatures and the bottom topography of the ocean in the English Channel region of the North Sea. The model uses environmental data and radar system parameters as inputs and predicts SAR-observed backscatter changes over topographic changes in the ocean floor. The model results compare favorably with the actual SEASAT SAR observed backscatter values. The developed model is valid for only relatively shallow water areas (i.e., less than 50 meters in depth) and suggests that for bottom features to be visible on SAR imagery, a moderate to high velocity current and a moderate wind must be present.

  20. Shallow system rejuvenation and magma discharge trends at Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion Island)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Diego; Di Muro, Andrea; Peltier, Aline; Villeneuve, Nicolas; Ferrazzini, Valerie; Favalli, Massimiliano; Bachèlery, Patrick; Gurioli, Lucia; Harris, Andrew; Moune, Séverine; Vlastélic, Ivan; Galle, Bo; Arellano, Santiago; Aiuppa, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    During April 2007, the largest historical eruption of Piton de la Fournaise (Île de La Réunion, France) drained the shallow plumbing system and resulted in collapse of the summit crater. Following the 2007 eruption, Piton de la Fournaise entered a seven-year long period of near-continuous deflation interrupted, in June 2014, by a new phase of significant inflation. By integrating multiple datasets (lava discharge rates, deformation, seismicity, gas flux, gas composition, and lava chemistry), we here show that the progressive migration of magma from a deeper (below sea level) storage zone gradually rejuvenated and pressurized the above-sea-level portion of the magmatic system to provoke four small (paroxysm" that emptied the main shallow reservoir and terminated the cycle. Such an unloading process may characterize the evolution of shallow magmatic systems at other persistently active effusive centers.

  1. The shallow magma chamber of Stromboli Volcano (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, D.; Barberi, G.; De Gori, P.; Cocina, O.; Zuccarello, L.; Garcia-Yeguas, A.; Castellano, M.; D'Alessandro, A.; Sgroi, T.

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we integrate artificial and natural seismic sources data to obtain high-resolution images of the shallow inner structure of Stromboli Volcano. Overall, we used a total of 21,953 P readings from an active seismic experiment and an additional 2731 P and 992 S readings deriving from 269 local events. The well-defined Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs tomograms have highlighted the following: (i) the region where magma cumulates at shallow depths (2-4 km below sea level (bsl)), forming an elongated NE-SW high-velocity body (Vp ≥ 6.0 km/s and Vs ≥ 3.5 km/s), with a very fast velocity core (6.5 ≤ Vp vertical pipe-like structures, characterized by relatively high P velocities values, mainly linked to past activity (e.g., Strombolicchio); and (iii) a near-vertical pipe-like volume with high Vp/Vs (1.78 ÷ 1.85), located beneath to the craters (down to 1.0 km bsl), overlying a deeper region (1.0 to 3.0 km bsl) with low Vp/Vs (1.64 ÷ 1.69), interpreted as the actual and preferential pathway of magma toward the surface. Our results demonstrate the importance of combining passive and active seismic data to improve, in a tomographic inversion, the resolution of the volcanic structures and to discover where magma may be stored.

  2. Phylogenetic Relationships among Deep-Sea and Chemosynthetic Sea Anemones: Actinoscyphiidae and Actinostolidae (Actiniaria: Mesomyaria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Estefanía; Daly, Marymegan

    2010-01-01

    Sea anemones (Cnidaria, Actiniaria) are present in all marine ecosystems, including chemosynthetic environments. The high level of endemicity of sea anemones in chemosynthetic environments and the taxonomic confusion in many of the groups to which these animals belong makes their systematic relationships obscure. We use five molecular markers to explore the phylogenetic relationships of the superfamily Mesomyaria, which includes most of the species that live in chemosynthetic, deep-sea, and polar sea habitats and to test the monophyly of the recently defined clades Actinostolina and Chemosynthina. We found that sea anemones of chemosynthetic environments derive from at least two different lineages: one lineage including acontiate deep-sea taxa and the other primarily encompassing shallow-water taxa. PMID:20532040

  3. Phylogenetic relationships among deep-sea and chemosynthetic sea anemones: actinoscyphiidae and actinostolidae (Actiniaria: Mesomyaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Sea anemones (Cnidaria, Actiniaria are present in all marine ecosystems, including chemosynthetic environments. The high level of endemicity of sea anemones in chemosynthetic environments and the taxonomic confusion in many of the groups to which these animals belong makes their systematic relationships obscure. We use five molecular markers to explore the phylogenetic relationships of the superfamily Mesomyaria, which includes most of the species that live in chemosynthetic, deep-sea, and polar sea habitats and to test the monophyly of the recently defined clades Actinostolina and Chemosynthina. We found that sea anemones of chemosynthetic environments derive from at least two different lineages: one lineage including acontiate deep-sea taxa and the other primarily encompassing shallow-water taxa.

  4. REX XML shallow parsing with regular expressions

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, R D

    1999-01-01

    The syntax of XML is simple enough that it is possible to parse an XML document into a list of its markup and text items using a single regular expression. Such a shallow parse of an XML document can be very useful for the construction of a variety of lightweight XML processing tools. However, complex regular expressions can be difficult to construct and even more difficult to read. Using a form of literate programming for regular expressions, this paper documents a set of XML shallow parsing expressions that can be used a basis for simple, correct, efficient, robust and language-independent XML shallow parsing. Complete shallow parser implementations of less than 50 lines each in Perl, JavaScript and Lex/Flex are also given. (0 refs).

  5. Acoustics of Shallow Water: A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-13

    loss tend to have high reverberation. Figure 11, based on data from the four shallow water stations of FASOR 1 (25], shows the general correlation...derived from the FASOR program [241. Values of scattering strength for various angles are shown 24 ’% . .% % - . *.. ’ . ... ~. .. . - a...34.-. ..% . . -.. ’ 24. J. A. Whitney, "Propagation Losses and Reverberation from the Shallow- Water Fasor Areas with Comparisons to Propagation Loss

  6. A quantitative catalogue of intertidal and near shore birds habitats of Eastern Bering Sea

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bering Sea waterbird habitats include four types; the shallow usually near shore waters where diving birds can feed on the bottom, the sheltered waters of lagoons...

  7. Shallow seismicity at open-vent volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girona, T.; Caudron, C.; Huber, C.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the origin of the shallow seismicity detected at active volcanoes is fundamental to interpret geophysical and geochemical signals in terms of sub-surface magmatic processes. One of the most intriguing seismic signals is shallow tremor, which is long-lasting (from minutes to months), is usually sourced at shallow levels ( 100's of meters), has dominant frequencies in the range 0.1-20 Hz, and is common to many open-vent and hydrothermal systems. Here, we present a viable mechanism to explain the origin of shallow tremor and its correlation with magma degassing. In particular, we show from basic principles (mass and momentum balance) that shallow tremor can emerge spontaneously as a result of three coupled processes: (1) the formation of gas pockets beneath rheological or geometrical barriers; (2) the intermittent supply of volatiles from depth, e.g., through a bubbly magma column; and (3) the permeable transfer of these gases through a porous lava dome, conduit, or volcanic edifice. Our model, which can be solved analytically at first order, reproduces and provides an explanation for the main features of shallow tremor, including frequency gliding, changes of seismic amplitude when volcanoes enter a period of unrest, and the different types of amplitude spectra observed (i.e., monochromatic, harmonic, and broadband). A crucial conclusion of our study is that different processes (e.g., magma ascent and sealing of gas pathways) cause distinguishable variations in the tremor properties, which could be used by monitoring agencies to improve volcanic forecasting.

  8. Geophysical characterization of shallow karst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzbach, Cedric; Jordi, Claudio; Sollberger, David; Doetsch, Joseph; Kaufmann, Manuela; Robertsson, Johan; Maurer, Hansruedi; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2015-04-01

    -wave velocity tomograms and resistivity images exhibit significant parameter variations in both the horizontal and vertical directions; the P-wave tomograms, for example, indicate velocity changes from a few hundred to a few thousand m/s over short distances for carbonate rocks close to the surface. These variations in physical parameters are likely caused by changes in the lithology and in the degree of karstification, with the latter seeming to be the dominating factor. With respect to the karst impact on seismic wave propagation, we observe pronounced lateral changes in the characteristics of the densely sampled wavefield. For example, distinct changes in the surface-wavetrain characteristics can be related to strong lateral seismic-velocity changes observed in the tomograms. ERT-derived resistivity models show sub-horizontal layering at the 10-meter scale with an orientation (dip, strike) that agrees with the geological model of the area. The complementary EM soundings largely concur with the shallow ERT models, but ERT and EM results show only moderate correlation with the P-wave tomograms indicating that seismic and electric/electromagnetic properties of the karstified carbonates are only weakly linked. The GPR images show shallowly dipping reflectors with dips that are in overall agreement with observed dips of the surface-exposed bedding.

  9. Correlating Mediterranean shallow water deposits with global Oligocene-Miocene stratigraphy and oceanic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Markus; Piller, Werner E; Brandano, Marco; Harzhauser, Mathias

    2013-12-01

    Shallow-marine sediment records have the strong potential to display sensitive environmental changes in sedimentary geometries and skeletal content. However, the time resolution of most neritic carbonate records is not high enough to be compared with climatic events as recorded in the deep-sea sediment archives. In order to resolve the paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic changes during the Oligocene-Miocene transition in the Mediterranean shallow water carbonate systems with the best possible time resolution, we re-evaluated the Decontra section on the Maiella Platform (central Apennines, Italy), which acts as a reference for the correlation of Oligocene-Miocene shallow water deposits in the Mediterranean region. The 120-m-thick late Oligocene-late Miocene carbonate succession is composed of larger foraminiferal, bryozoan and corallinacean limestones interlayered with distinct planktonic foraminiferal carbonates representing a mostly outer neritic setting. Integrated multi-proxy and facies analyses indicate that CaCO3 and total organic carbon contents as well as gamma-ray display only local to regional processes on the carbonate platform and are not suited for stratigraphic correlation on a wider scale. In contrast, new biostratigraphic data correlate the Decontra stable carbon isotope record to the global deep-sea carbon isotope record. This links relative sea level fluctuations, which are reflected by facies and magnetic susceptibility changes, to third-order eustatic cycles. The new integrated bio-, chemo-, and sequence stratigraphic framework enables a more precise timing of environmental changes within the studied time interval and identifies Decontra as an important locality for correlating not only shallow and deep water sediments of the Mediterranean region but also on a global scale.

  10. Correlating Mediterranean shallow water deposits with global Oligocene–Miocene stratigraphy and oceanic events☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Markus; Piller, Werner E.; Brandano, Marco; Harzhauser, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Shallow-marine sediment records have the strong potential to display sensitive environmental changes in sedimentary geometries and skeletal content. However, the time resolution of most neritic carbonate records is not high enough to be compared with climatic events as recorded in the deep-sea sediment archives. In order to resolve the paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic changes during the Oligocene–Miocene transition in the Mediterranean shallow water carbonate systems with the best possible time resolution, we re-evaluated the Decontra section on the Maiella Platform (central Apennines, Italy), which acts as a reference for the correlation of Oligocene–Miocene shallow water deposits in the Mediterranean region. The 120-m-thick late Oligocene–late Miocene carbonate succession is composed of larger foraminiferal, bryozoan and corallinacean limestones interlayered with distinct planktonic foraminiferal carbonates representing a mostly outer neritic setting. Integrated multi-proxy and facies analyses indicate that CaCO3 and total organic carbon contents as well as gamma-ray display only local to regional processes on the carbonate platform and are not suited for stratigraphic correlation on a wider scale. In contrast, new biostratigraphic data correlate the Decontra stable carbon isotope record to the global deep-sea carbon isotope record. This links relative sea level fluctuations, which are reflected by facies and magnetic susceptibility changes, to third-order eustatic cycles. The new integrated bio-, chemo-, and sequence stratigraphic framework enables a more precise timing of environmental changes within the studied time interval and identifies Decontra as an important locality for correlating not only shallow and deep water sediments of the Mediterranean region but also on a global scale. PMID:25844021

  11. Enhanced CO2 uptake at a shallow Arctic Ocean seep field overwhelms the positive warming potential of emitted methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, John W.; Greinert, Jens; Ruppel, Carolyn; Silyakova, Anna; Vielstädte, Lisa; Casso, Michael; Mienert, Jürgen; Bünz, Stefan

    2017-05-01

    Continued warming of the Arctic Ocean in coming decades is projected to trigger the release of teragrams (1 Tg = 106 tons) of methane from thawing subsea permafrost on shallow continental shelves and dissociation of methane hydrate on upper continental slopes. On the shallow shelves (biological uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2) has the potential to offset the positive warming potential of emitted methane, a process that has not received detailed consideration for these settings. Continuous sea-air gas flux data collected over a shallow ebullitive methane seep field on the Svalbard margin reveal atmospheric CO2 uptake rates (-33,300 ± 7,900 μmol m-2ṡd-1) twice that of surrounding waters and ˜1,900 times greater than the diffusive sea-air methane efflux (17.3 ± 4.8 μmol m-2ṡd-1). The negative radiative forcing expected from this CO2 uptake is up to 231 times greater than the positive radiative forcing from the methane emissions. Surface water characteristics (e.g., high dissolved oxygen, high pH, and enrichment of 13C in CO2) indicate that upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich water from near the seafloor accompanies methane emissions and stimulates CO2 consumption by photosynthesizing phytoplankton. These findings challenge the widely held perception that areas characterized by shallow-water methane seeps and/or strongly elevated sea-air methane flux always increase the global atmospheric greenhouse gas burden.

  12. Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    13-1-0026 entitled "Three- Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustics ," Principal Investigator Dr. Ying-Tsong Lin. Sincerely, ;l1,J-Ju1𔃻 ~{hjM1...30/03/2016 01/01/2013-12/31/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBERS Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustics 5b, GRANT NUMBER N0001 4-13-1...effects. The long-term goals of this project are targeted on understanding the 3-D acoustic effects, and their temporal and spatial variability, caused

  13. Computational modeling of shallow geothermal systems

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khoury, Rafid

    2011-01-01

    A Step-by-step Guide to Developing Innovative Computational Tools for Shallow Geothermal Systems Geothermal heat is a viable source of energy and its environmental impact in terms of CO2 emissions is significantly lower than conventional fossil fuels. Shallow geothermal systems are increasingly utilized for heating and cooling of buildings and greenhouses. However, their utilization is inconsistent with the enormous amount of energy available underneath the surface of the earth. Projects of this nature are not getting the public support they deserve because of the uncertainties associated with

  14. Shallow water sound propagation with surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindle, Chris T; Deane, Grant B

    2005-05-01

    The theory of wavefront modeling in underwater acoustics is extended to allow rapid range dependence of the boundaries such as occurs in shallow water with surface waves. The theory allows for multiple reflections at surface and bottom as well as focusing and defocusing due to reflection from surface waves. The phase and amplitude of the field are calculated directly and used to model pulse propagation in the time domain. Pulse waveforms are obtained directly for all wavefront arrivals including both insonified and shadow regions near caustics. Calculated waveforms agree well with a reference solution and data obtained in a near-shore shallow water experiment with surface waves over a sloping bottom.

  15. Wave-induced bottom shear stress estimation in shallow water exemplified by using deep water wind statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag Myrhaug

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides a simple and analytical method which can be used to give estimates of the wave-induced bottom shear stress for very rough beds and mud beds in shallow water based on wind statistics in deep water. This is exemplified by using long-term wind statistics from the northern North Sea, and by providing examples representing realistic field conditions. Based on, for example, global wind statistics, the present results can be used to make estimates of the bottom shear stress in shallow water.

  16. Underwater Noise Modeling in Lithuanian Area of the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatas Bagočius

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Along with rising awareness of public and scientific societies about environmental and ecological impacts of underwater noise, the need for underwater noise modelling in the shallow Lithuanian area of Baltic Sea emerged. Marine Strategy Framework Directive issues regarding underwater noise indicators refers to possibility of evaluation of Good Environmental State using underwater noise measurements as well as possibility to model underwater noise. Main anthropogenic underwater noise contributor in the Seas is the shipping lanes as known due to date, with no exclusion of Lithuanian Baltic Sea area. In this manuscript, it is presented the methods of development of simplistic underwater ambient noise model purposed for computation of underwater soundscape in shallow area of the Lithuanian Baltic Sea.

  17. Characterization of the Geology of Subsurface Shallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study, the 2D electrical resistivity imaging of subsurface shallow conglomerate has been generated using through Computerized Resistivity Meter (CRM -500) and the Wenner electrode configuration has been used for 2D electrical resistivity imaging studies. The measured apparent resistivity values have ...

  18. Approximate factorization in shallow water applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van der Houwen; B.P. Sommeijer (Ben)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractWe consider the numerical integration of problems modelling phenomena in shallow water in 3 spatial dimensions. If the governing partial differential equations for such problems are spatially discretized, then the righthand side of the resulting system of ordinary differential equations

  19. Viral ecology of a shallow eutrophic lake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdens, M.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis aims to give an insight into the ecology of the viral community in a shallow eutrophic lake. To achieve this, the population dynamics, diversity and control of the viral community in Lake Loosdrecht were studied, as well as the impact of the viral community on plankton mortality and

  20. Grain transport mechanics in shallow overland flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    A physical model based on continuum multiphase flow is described to represent saltating transport of grains in shallow overland flow. The two phase continuum flow of water and sediment considers coupled St.Venant type equations. The interactive cumulative effect of grains is incorporated by a disper...

  1. Grain transport mechanics in shallow flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    A physical model based on continuum multiphase flow is described to represent saltating transport of grains in shallow overland flows. The two-phase continuum flow of water and sediment considers coupled St.Venant type equations. The interactive cumulative effect of grains is incorporated by a dispe...

  2. A checklist of the deep sea fishes of the Levant Sea, Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, Menachem; Galil, Bella S

    2015-08-04

    We list sixty five fish species collected at depths greater than 500 m in the Levant Basin, including 10 depth records. The Levantine bathyal ichthyofauna is characterized by its eurybathy, with an upper bathymetric boundary that permitted penetration of the shallow Gibraltar and Siculo-Tunisian sills, and a much lower bathymetric boundary than recorded for conspecifics elsewhere. The opportunistic and resilient ichthyofauna re-colonized recently the deep-sea following the last anoxic event (~ 6 kyr), forming assemblages notably distinct from those in the western Mediterranean. The exploration and production of deep seabed hydrocarbons have raised the specter of severe direct impacts to the deep habitats. There is an urgent need for documenting the full extent of deep-sea biodiversity, and for providing information for the development of competent and pragmatic management plans and effective conservation policies.

  3. Probing Shallow Aquifers in Northern Kuwait Using Airborne Sounding Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggy, E.; Fadlelmawla, A.; Farr, T. G.; Al-Rashed, M.

    2011-12-01

    Most of the global warming observations, scientific interest and data analyses have concentrated on the earth Polar Regions and forested areas, as they provide direct measurable impacts of large scale environmental changes. Unfortunately, the arid environments, which represent ~20% of the earth surface, have remained poorly studied. Yet water rarity and freshness, drastic changes in rainfall, flash floods, high rates of aquifer discharge and an accelerated large-scale desertification process are all alarming signs that suggest a substantial large-scale climatic variation in those areas that can be correlated to the global change that is affecting the volatile dynamic in arid zones. Unfortunately the correlations, forcings and feedbacks between the relevant processes (precipitation, surface fresh water, aquifer discharge, sea water rise and desertification) in these zones remain poorly observed, modeled, let alone understood. Currently, local studies are often oriented toward understanding small-scale or regional water resources and neither benefit from nor feedback to the global monitoring of water vapor, precipitation and soil moisture in arid and semi-arid areas. Furthermore techniques to explore deep subsurface water on a large scale in desertic environments remain poorly developed making current understanding of earth paleo-environment, water assessment and exploration efforts poorly productive and out-phased with current and future needs to quantitatively understand the evolution of earth water balance. To address those deficiencies we performed a comprehensive test mapping of shallow subsurface hydro-geological structures in the western Arabic peninsula in Kuwait, using airborne low frequency sounding radars with the main objectives to characterize shallow fossil aquifers in term of depth, sizes and water freshness. In May 2011, an experimental airborne radar sounder operating at 50 MHz was deployed in Kuwait and demonstrated an ability to penetrate down to

  4. Stickleback increase in the Baltic Sea : A thorny issue for coastal predatory fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstrom, Ulf; Olsson, Jens; Casini, Michele; Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Fredriksson, Ronny; Wennhage, Hakan; Appelberg, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    In the Baltic Sea, the mesopredator three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) spends a large part of its life cycle in the open sea, but reproduces in shallow coastal habitats. In coastal waters, it may occur in high abundances, is a potent predator on eggs and larvae of fish, and has been

  5. Late Eocene sea retreat from the Tarim Basin (west China) and concomitant Asian paleoenvironmental change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosboom, R.E.; Dupont-Nivet, G.; Houben, A.J.P.; Brinkhuis, H.; Villa, G.; Mandic, O.; Stoica, M.; Zachariasse, W.J.; Guo, ZJ.; Li, CX.; Krijgsman, W.

    2011-01-01

    The Paleogene sediments of the southwest Tarim Basin along the West Kunlun Shan in western China include the remnants of the easternmost extent of a large epicontinental sea. This shallow sea once extended across the Eurasian continent before it retreated westward and eventually separated as the

  6. Linking Tarim Basin sea retreat (west China) and Asian aridification in the late Eocene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosboom, R.; Dupont-Nivet, G.; Grothe, A.; Brinkhuis, H.; Villa, G.; Mandic, O.; Stoica, M.; Huang, W.; Yang, W.; Guo, Z.; Krijgsman, W.

    2014-01-01

    The Tarim Basin in western China formed the easternmost margin of a shallow epicontinental sea that extended across Eurasia and was well connected to the western Tethys during the Paleogene. Climate modelling studies suggest that the westward retreat of this sea from Central Asia may have been as

  7. Ancient Origin of the Modern Deep-Sea Fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuy, Ben; Gale, Andy S.; Kroh, Andreas; Kucera, Michal; Numberger-Thuy, Lea D.; Reich, Mike; Stöhr, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    The origin and possible antiquity of the spectacularly diverse modern deep-sea fauna has been debated since the beginning of deep-sea research in the mid-nineteenth century. Recent hypotheses, based on biogeographic patterns and molecular clock estimates, support a latest Mesozoic or early Cenozoic date for the origin of key groups of the present deep-sea fauna (echinoids, octopods). This relatively young age is consistent with hypotheses that argue for extensive extinction during Jurassic and Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs) and the mid-Cenozoic cooling of deep-water masses, implying repeated re-colonization by immigration of taxa from shallow-water habitats. Here we report on a well-preserved echinoderm assemblage from deep-sea (1000–1500 m paleodepth) sediments of the NE-Atlantic of Early Cretaceous age (114 Ma). The assemblage is strikingly similar to that of extant bathyal echinoderm communities in composition, including families and genera found exclusively in modern deep-sea habitats. A number of taxa found in the assemblage have no fossil record at shelf depths postdating the assemblage, which precludes the possibility of deep-sea recolonization from shallow habitats following episodic extinction at least for those groups. Our discovery provides the first key fossil evidence that a significant part of the modern deep-sea fauna is considerably older than previously assumed. As a consequence, most major paleoceanographic events had far less impact on the diversity of deep-sea faunas than has been implied. It also suggests that deep-sea biota are more resilient to extinction events than shallow-water forms, and that the unusual deep-sea environment, indeed, provides evolutionary stability which is very rarely punctuated on macroevolutionary time scales. PMID:23071660

  8. Calculations of Asteroid Impacts into Deep and Shallow Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisler, Galen; Weaver, Robert; Gittings, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Contrary to received opinion, ocean impacts of small (dangerous features of ocean impacts, just as for land impacts, are the atmospheric effects. We present illustrative hydrodynamic calculations of impacts into both deep and shallow seas, and draw conclusions from a parameter study in which the size of the impactor and the depth of the sea are varied independently. For vertical impacts at 20 km/s, craters in the seafloor are produced when the water depth is less than about 5-7 times the asteroid diameter. Both the depth and the diameter of the transient crater scale with the asteroid diameter, so the volume of water excavated scales with the asteroid volume. About a third of the crater volume is vaporised, because the kinetic energy per unit mass of the asteroid is much larger than the latent heat of vaporisation of water. The vaporised water carries away a considerable fraction of the impact energy in an explosively expanding blast wave which is responsible for devastating local effects and may affect worldwide climate. Of the remaining energy, a substantial portion is used in the crown splash and the rebound jet that forms as the transient crater collapses. The collapse and rebound cycle leads to a propagating wave with a wavelength considerably shorter than classical tsunamis, being only about twice the diameter of the transient crater. Propagation of this wave is hindered somewhat because its amplitude is so large that it breaks in deep water and is strongly affected by the blast wave's perturbation of the atmosphere. Even if propagation were perfect, however, the volume of water delivered per metre of shoreline is less than was delivered by the Boxing Day 2004 tsunami for any impactor smaller than 500 m diameter in an ocean of 5 km depth or less. Near-field effects are dangerous for impactors of diameter 200 m or greater; hurricane-force winds can extend tens of kilometers from the impact point, and fallout from the initial splash can be extremely violent

  9. DEEP-SEA FISHERY IN THE COLOMBIAN CARIBBEAN SEA: MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION STRATEGIES FOR AN ECOSYSTEM APPROACH TO FISHERIES

    OpenAIRE

    Paramo, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research was to identify the potential of new deep-sea fisheries in the Colombian Caribbean Sea determining their biomass and spatial distribution in order to advice management and conservation strategies, based on ecosystem approach to fisheries management. First, I examine morphological characteristics of the shallow water pink shrimp Farfantepenaeus notialis to investigate stock differentiation, presenting biological data such as size at 50% sexual maturity. The data onF. n...

  10. Shallow gas incident in 3-ELPS-15D-SPS well; Incidente com shallow gas no poco 3-ELPS-15D-SPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Rubens Fausto [Agencia Nacional do Petroleo, Gas Natural e Biocombustiveis (ANP), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    One of the concerns during the planning phase of an exploratory offshore well drilling is the possibility of occurrence of a shallow gas accumulation. In spite of being a rare event, taking into account that an event like this can have disastrous consequences, the cares to work with that type of incident cannot be despised. As example, in 2003, during the operations in the extension well 3-ELPS-15D-SPS, it happened the uncontrolled influx of water and gas to the bottom of the sea: the annular space between the 30'' and 13 3/8'' casings was not filled out with cement, allowing the flow from a shallow permeable interval to the bottom of the sea through the wellhead's cement return orifices, generating the need of an corrective action to make the abandonment of the well in accordance with the Regulation of Abandonment of Wells existent in Brazil. This work presents the mechanical conditions of the interval close to the wet wellhead of the 3-ELPS-15D-SPS, enumerating the sequence of operations accomplished to solve the problem. (author)

  11. Guidance Index for Shallow Landslide Hazard Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheila Avalon Cullen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall-induced shallow landslides are one of the most frequent hazards on slanted terrains. Intense storms with high-intensity and long-duration rainfall have high potential to trigger rapidly moving soil masses due to changes in pore water pressure and seepage forces. Nevertheless, regardless of the intensity and/or duration of the rainfall, shallow landslides are influenced by antecedent soil moisture conditions. As of this day, no system exists that dynamically interrelates these two factors on large scales. This work introduces a Shallow Landslide Index (SLI as the first implementation of antecedent soil moisture conditions for the hazard analysis of shallow rainfall-induced landslides. The proposed mathematical algorithm is built using a logistic regression method that systematically learns from a comprehensive landslide inventory. Initially, root-soil moisture and rainfall measurements modeled from AMSR-E and TRMM respectively, are used as proxies to develop the index. The input dataset is randomly divided into training and verification sets using the Hold-Out method. Validation results indicate that the best-fit model predicts the highest number of cases correctly at 93.2% accuracy. Consecutively, as AMSR-E and TRMM stopped working in October 2011 and April 2015 respectively, root-soil moisture and rainfall measurements modeled by SMAP and GPM are used to develop models that calculate the SLI for 10, 7, and 3 days. The resulting models indicate a strong relationship (78.7%, 79.6%, and 76.8% respectively between the predictors and the predicted value. The results also highlight important remaining challenges such as adequate information for algorithm functionality and satellite based data reliability. Nevertheless, the experimental system can potentially be used as a dynamic indicator of the total amount of antecedent moisture and rainfall (for a given duration of time needed to trigger a shallow landslide in a susceptible area. It is

  12. Examining the interplay of climate and low amplitude sea-level change on the distribution and volume of massive dolomitization: Zebbag Formation, Cretaceous, Southern Tunisia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newport, Richard; Hollis, Cathy; Bodin, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    During the Cretaceous, a humid global climate, calcitic seas, high relative sea-level and low amplitude changes in relative sea-level largely prevented large-scale dolomitization in many carbonate successions. However, the well-exposed shallow-water carbonate sediments of the Upper Albian–Lower T...

  13. Internal wave-turbulence pressure above sloping sea bottoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haren, H.

    2011-01-01

    An accurate bottom pressure sensor has been moored at different sites varying from a shallow sea strait via open ocean guyots to a 1900 m deep Gulf of Mexico. All sites show more or less sloping bottom topography. Focusing on frequencies (sigma) higher than tidal, the pressure records are remarkably

  14. Carbon dioxide uptake by a temperate tidal sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Wim

    2007-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange between the atmosphere and the Wadden Sea, a shallow coastal region along the northern Netherlands, has been measured from April 2006 onwards on a tidal flat and over open water. Tidal flat measurements were done using a flux chamber, and ship borne measurements using

  15. Multimission satellite altimetric data validation in the Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Yongcun; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per

    2014-01-01

    altimetric measurements increases of 96% by replacing the radiometer wet troposphere correction with model based correction. The results indicate the high quality of the along-track altimetry measurements in the semi-closed sea, which shows good agreement with tide gauge data except in the shallow waters...

  16. Simulation of global ocean acidification and chemical habitats of shallow- and cold-water coral reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Di Zheng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the UVic Earth System Model, this study simulated the change of seawater chemistry and analyzed the chemical habitat surrounding shallow- and cold-water coral reefs from the year 1800 to 2300 employing RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6.0, and RCP8.5 scenarios. The model results showed that the global ocean will continue to absorb atmospheric CO2. Global mean surface ocean temperature will rise 1.1–2.8 K at the end of the 21st century across RCP scenarios. Meanwhile, the global mean surface ocean pH will drop 0.14–0.42 and the ocean surface mean concentration of carbonate will decrease 20%–51% across the RCP scenarios. The saturated state of sea water with respect to calcite carbonate minerals (Ω will decrease rapidly. During the pre-industrial period, 99% of the shallow-water coral reefs were surrounded by seawater with Ω > 3.5 and 87% of the deep-sea coral reefs were surrounded by seawater with aragonite supersaturation. Within the 21st century, except for the high mitigation scenario of RCP2.6, almost none shallow-water coral reefs will be surrounded by seawater with Ω > 3.5. Under the intensive emission scenario of RCP8.5, by the year 2100, the aragonite saturation horizon will rise to 308 m under the sea surface from 1138 m at the pre-industrial period, thus 73% of the cold-water coral reefs will be surrounded by seawater with aragonite undersaturation. By the year 2300, only 5% of the cold-water coral reefs will be surrounded by seawater with aragonite supersaturation.

  17. Higher species richness of octocorals in the upper mesophotic zone in Eilat (Gulf of Aqaba) compared to shallower reef zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoham, Erez; Benayahu, Yehuda

    2017-03-01

    Mesophotic coral-reef ecosystems (MCEs), which comprise the light-dependent communities of corals and other organisms found at depths between 30 and 150 m, have received very little study to date. However, current technological advances, such as remotely operated vehicles and closed-circuit rebreather diving, now enable their thorough investigation. Following the reef-building stony corals, octocorals are the second most common benthic component on many shallow reefs and a major component on deep reefs, the Red Sea included. This study is the first to examine octocoral community features on upper MCEs based on species-level identification and to compare them with the shallower reef zones. The study was carried out at Eilat (Gulf of Aqaba, northern Red Sea), comparing octocoral communities at two mesophotic reefs (30-45 m) and two shallow reef zones (reef flat and upper fore-reef) by belt transects. A total of 30 octocoral species were identified, with higher species richness on the upper MCEs compared to the shallower reefs. Although the MCEs were found to host a higher number of species than the shallower reefs, both featured a similar diversity. Each reef zone revealed a unique octocoral species composition and distinct community structure, with only 16% of the species shared by both the MCEs and the shallower reefs. This study has revealed an almost exclusive dominance of zooxanthellate species at the studied upper MCE reefs, thus indicating an adequate light regime for photosynthesis there. The findings should encourage similar studies on other reefs, aimed at understanding the spatiotemporal features and ecological role of octocorals in reef ecosystems down to the deepest limit of the MCEs.

  18. Cooperative Error Handling and Shallow Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Bowden, Tanya

    1995-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the detection and correction of sub-sentential English text errors. Previous spelling programs, unless restricted to a very small set of words, have operated as post-processors. And to date, grammar checkers and other programs which deal with ill-formed input usually step directly from spelling considerations to a full-scale parse, assuming a complete sentence. Work described below is aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of shallow (sub-sentential) processing and...

  19. Sea-Floor Character and Sedimentary Processes in the Vicinity of Woods Hole, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; McMullen, Katherine Y.; Foster, David S.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Ackerman, Seth D.; Barnum, Steven R.; Brennan, Rick T.

    2008-01-01

    Continuous-coverage multibeam bathymetric models and sidescan-sonar imagery have been verified with high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, sediment sampling, and bottom photography. Together these data layers provide detailed base maps that yield topographic, compositional, and environmental perspectives of the sea floor in the vicinity of Woods Hole, an important harbor and major passage between the Elizabeth Islands and Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Tidally dominated high-energy environments within Woods Hole have prevented deposition of Holocene marine sediments, exposed underlying glacial drift of the Buzzards Bay moraine, and winnowed finer grained sediments, leaving lag deposits of boulders and gravel. These conditions have also enlarged and preserved depressions in the moraine surface that were originally kettle holes and formed ebb-tidal deltas at the entrances to passages. Fields of transverse and barchanoid sand waves dominate across the southern part of the study area in Vineyard Sound, where benthic environments are characterized by processes associated with coarse-bedload transport. Transverse sand waves dominate near shoals where sediment supply is greater and have asymmetries that indicate that the shoals are shaped and maintained by clockwise gyres of net sediment transport. Barchanoid sand waves, which are most common where Holocene sediments are thinner, commonly align into elongate fields that have smaller isolated waves concentrated at the eastern ends and that progressively widen and have waveforms that increase in amplitude, wavelength, and complexity westward. The northern, protected parts of the Little and Inner Harbors are characterized by muddy sediment and processes associated with deposition. A pockmark field in Little Harbor and the muddy, organic-rich sediments that form a scarp along the edge of Parker Flat are evidence for the presence of submerged marsh deposits formed during the Holocene rise in sea level.

  20. Impact of wind gusts on sea surface height in storm surge modelling, application to the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grinten, R.M. van der; Vries, J.W. de; Swart, H.E. de

    2012-01-01

    Storm surge models usually do not take into account the explicit effect of wind gusts on the sea surface height. However, as the wind speed enters quadratically into the shallow water equations, short-term fluctuations around the mean value do not average out. We investigate the impact of

  1. Bottom Backscattering Strengths Measured in Shallow and Deep Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-18

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/7160--17-9701 Bottom Backscattering Strengths Measured in Shallow and Deep Water January...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Bottom Backscattering Strengths Measured in Shallow and Deep Water Roger C. Gauss,1 Edward L. Kunz,1 Joseph M. Fialkowski...2 3 B2001 (SHALLOW WATER − NEW JERSEY SHELF) .............................. 4

  2. A memory-based shallow parser for spoken Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canisius, S.V.M.; van den Bosch, A.; Decadt, B.; Hoste, V.; De Pauw, G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the development of a Dutch memory-based shallow parser. The availability of large treebanks for Dutch, such as the one provided by the Spoken Dutch Corpus, allows memory-based learners to be trained on examples of shallow parsing taken from the treebank, and act as a shallow parser after

  3. Tracking Bottom Waters in the Southern Adriatic Sea Applying Seismic Oceanography Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    profile so the weak thermohaline reflections can be visualized 3. The Adriatic context The general circulation of the Adriatic Sea is characterized by...Reflectivity Thermohaline structures Southern Adriatic Sea ABSTRACT We present the first results from the seismic oceanography (SO) cruise ADRIASE1SMIC...where we successfully imaged thermohaline fine structures in the shallow water environment (50-150 m) of the southern Adriatic Sea during March

  4. Channel Shallowing as Mitigation of Coastal Flooding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M. Orton

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we demonstrate that reductions in the depth of inlets or estuary channels can be used to reduce or prevent coastal flooding. A validated hydrodynamic model of Jamaica Bay, New York City (NYC, is used to test nature-based adaptation measures in ameliorating flooding for NYC's two largest historical coastal flood events. In addition to control runs with modern bathymetry, three altered landscape scenarios are tested: (1 increasing the area of wetlands to their 1879 footprint and bathymetry, but leaving deep shipping channels unaltered; (2 shallowing all areas deeper than 2 m in the bay to be 2 m below Mean Low Water; (3 shallowing only the narrowest part of the inlet to the bay. These three scenarios are deliberately extreme and designed to evaluate the leverage each approach exerts on water levels. They result in peak water level reductions of 0.3%, 15%, and 6.8% for Hurricane Sandy, and 2.4%, 46% and 30% for the Category-3 hurricane of 1821, respectively (bay-wide averages. These results suggest that shallowing can provide greater flood protection than wetland restoration, and it is particularly effective at reducing "fast-pulse" storm surges that rise and fall quickly over several hours, like that of the 1821 storm. Nonetheless, the goal of flood mitigation must be weighed against economic, navigation, and ecological needs, and practical concerns such as the availability of sediment.

  5. Measuring Body Wave Amplitudes of Shallow Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigloch, K.; Nolet, G.

    2004-05-01

    We present and evaluate a method to measure body wave amplitudes of shallow earthquakes. Compared to deep events the measurement is complicated by crustal echoes and more complex source time functions, but the effort of processing this data is very worthwhile since shallow events are far more abundant than deep ones. We use a linear model that inverts for source time function, moment tensor and amplitudes in an iterative least squares procedure. The waveform fitting is tested on digital broadband seismograms from the temporary PASSCAL line array LA RISTRA and on global GSN data. We find that robust and reproducible amplitude measurements can be obtained. Signal-to-noise ratios are adequate for fitting waveforms of shallow earthquakes with magnitude of 5.9 and higher. Waveform fits to seismograms from the same event routinely achieve a coherence of 90%-98%. Observed amplitude anomalies are on the order of ± 20%, with outliers being as large as ± 60%. The accuracy is estimated from a limited set of doublet eartquakes and was ± 3% in the best case, for time series lowpassed at 16 second period. Along the 1000-km-long RISTRA array we find several smooth amplitude trends on the scale of hundreds of kilometers. At least one of these trends changes sign depending on the event azimuth, which may indicate that the effect is caused by refraction in the mantle.

  6. Fate of internal waves on a shallow shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kristen; Arthur, Robert; Reid, Emma; Decarlo, Thomas; Cohen, Anne

    2017-11-01

    Internal waves strongly influence the physical and chemical environment of coastal ecosystems worldwide. We report novel observations from a distributed temperature sensing (DTS) system that tracked the transformation of internal waves from the shelf break to the surf zone over a shelf-slope region of a coral atoll in the South China Sea. The spatially-continuous view of the near-bottom temperature field provided by the DTS offers a perspective of physical processes previously available only in laboratory settings or numerical models. These processes include internal wave reflection off a natural slope, shoreward transport of dense fluid within trapped cores, internal ``tide pools'' (dense water left behind after the retreat of an internal wave), and internal run-down (near-bottom, offshore-directed jets of water preceding a breaking internal wave). Analysis shows that the fate of internal waves on this shelf - whether they are transmitted into shallow waters or reflected back offshore - is mediated by local water column density and shear structure, with important implications for nearshore distributions of energy, heat, and nutrients. We acknowledge the US Army Research Laboratory DoD Supercomputing Resource Center for computer time on Excalibur, which was used for the numerical simulations in this work. Funding for field work supported by Academia Sinica and for K.D. and E.R. from NSF.

  7. Surface Chloride Concentration of Concrete under Shallow Immersion Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of chloride ions in the surface layer of concrete is investigated in this study. In real concrete structure, chloride ions from the service environment can penetrate into concrete and deposit in the surface layer, to form the boundary condition for further diffusion towards the interior. The deposit amount of chloride ions in the surface layer is normally a function of time, rather than a constant. In the experimental investigation, concrete specimens with different mix proportions are immersed in NaCl solution with a mass concentration of 5%, to simulate the shallow immersion condition in sea water, and the surface chloride concentrations are measured at different ages. It is found that the surface chloride concentration increases following the increasing immersion durations, and varies from a weight percentage of 0.161%–0.781% in concretes with different mix proportions. The w/c (water-to-cement ratio influences the surface chloride concentration significantly, and the higher the w/c is, the higher the surface chloride concentration will be, at the same age. However, following the prolonging of immersion duration, the difference in surface chloride concentration induced by w/c becomes smaller and smaller. The incorporation of fly ash leads to higher surface chloride concentration. The phenomena are explained based on pore structure analyses.

  8. High Resolution Marine Magnetic Survey of Shallow Water Littoral Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Sharvit

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a system developed for detection andaccurate mapping of ferro-metallic objects buried below the seabed in shallow waters. Thesystem comprises a precise magnetic gradiometer and navigation subsystem, both installedon a non-magnetic catamaran towed by a low-magnetic interfering boat. In addition wepresent the results of a marine survey of a near-shore area in the vicinity of Atlit, a townsituated on the Mediterranean coast of Israel, about 15 km south of Haifa. The primarypurpose of the survey was to search for a Harvard airplane that crashed into the sea in 1960.A magnetic map of the survey area (3.5 km2 on a 0.5 m grid was created revealing theanomalies at sub-meter accuracy. For each investigated target location a correspondingferro-metallic item was dug out, one of which turned to be very similar to a part of thecrashed airplane. The accuracy of location was confirmed by matching the position of theactual dug artifacts with the magnetic map within a range of ± 1 m, in a water depth of 9 m.

  9. Investigation of Dense Sand Properties in Shallow Depth using CPT and DMT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaydadzhiew, Dimitar Todorov; Puscasu, Ionut; Vaitkunaite, Evelina

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The present paper is an investigation of the soil parameters of the given Aalborg University Sand No. 1 using the Flat Dilatometer Test (DMT) and the Cone Penetration Test (CPT). This clean sand type is considered to be similar to the sands found in the North Sea area. The research...... is mainly based on experimental laboratory testing, followed by computer assisted data interpretation. The mentioned tools are used in testing the sand properties in shallow depth and examining any occurrence of an effect induced by the limited size of the laboratory set-up....

  10. The North Atlantic surface layer and the shallow overturning circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busecke, Julius; Gordon, Arnold L.

    2014-05-01

    The sea surface salinity maximum (SSS-max) is an integral part of the shallow overturning (SOC) circulation in the North Atlantic. The temperature and salinity of the SSS-max set the density of the subducted water thus are important for the transport properties of the SOC, which has been shown to be important for the large-scale climate. The region requires a net influx of freshwater at near surface level to balance net evaporation. The processes that achieve this task likely influence the variability of SSS-max properties on various time scales in addition to the surface forcing. We are testing the hypothesis that changes in the large-scale wind field in the North Atlantic drive variability of freshwater import by ocean processes into the SSS-max, resulting in seasonal and interannual variability as previously documented. To evaluate the role of said processes for the variability of the upper limb of the SOC, AQUARIUS sea surface salinity (SSS), eddy kinetic energy (EKE) derived from altimetry data (AVISO), sea surface temperature (SST, NOAA OI SST V2) and wind fields (NCEP reanalysis) are used. Previous studies point out the importance of mesoscale dynamics for the freshwater flux into the region which seems to be enhanced by an increased density gradient at the southern edge of the SSS-max as seen from 2012 to 2013. The interannual comparison of meridional density gradient and EKE underline the importance of baroclinic instability for the formation of mesoscale turbulence in the SSS-max in accordance with previous studies. Further analysis, using the SST gradient (extending further back in time than the SSS satellite record) reveals significant seasonal cycles of zonal wind, SST gradient and EKE within the SSS-max region. Spatial correlations between aforementioned variables within the SSS-max region are found, with the EKE peaking about 2-4 months after the large-scale temperature gradient and the zonal wind. Ekman induced set up of the meridional density

  11. Shallow Aquifer Methane Gas Source Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, R. B.; Murgulet, D.; Rose, P. S.; Hay, R.

    2014-12-01

    Shale gas can contribute significantly to the world's energy demand. Hydraulic fracturing (fracking) on horizontal drill lines developed over the last 15 years makes formerly inaccessible hydrocarbons economically available. From 2000 to 2035 shale gas is predicted to rise from 1% to 46% of the total natural gas for the US. A vast energy resource is available in the United States. While there is a strong financial advantage to the application of fracking there is emerging concern about environmental impacts to groundwater and air quality from improper shale fracking operations. Elevated methane (CH4) concentrations have been observed in drinking water throughout the United States where there is active horizontal drilling. Horizontal drilling and hydraulic-fracturing can increase CH4 transport to aquifers, soil and the vadose zone. Seepage can also result from casing failure in older wells. However, there is strong evidence that elevated CH4 concentrations can be associated with topographic and hydrogeologic features, rather than shale-gas extraction processes. Carbon isotope geochemistry can be applied to study CH4source(s) in shallow vadose zone and groundwater systems. A preliminary TAMU-CC isotope data set from samples taken at different locations in southern Texas shows a wide range of CH4 signatures suggesting multiple sources of methane and carbon dioxide. These data are interpreted to distinguish regions with methane contributions from deep-sourced horizontal drilling versus shallow system microbial production. Development of a thorough environmental assessment using light isotope analysis can provide understanding of shallow anthropogenic versus natural CH4sources and assist in identifying regions that require remedial actions.

  12. NUEVOS APORTES A LA TECNOLOGÍA ÓSEA DE LA CUENCA INFERIOR DEL RÍO PARANÁ (BAJÍOS RIBEREÑOS MERIDIONALES, ARGENTINA (New contributions to our understanding of the bone technology of the lower basin Parana River (southern Coastal Shallows, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Buc

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo se ocupa de la tecnología ósea de un sector del humedal que se desarrolla en la cuenca inferior del río Paraná, el de los Bajíos Ribereños meridionales. El objetivo general es evaluar la variabilidad que dichas estrategias muestran en seis sitios de cazadores-recolectores datados en el tramo final del Holoceno tardío (~ 1100-700 años 14C AP. Para ello, se toman como unidad analítica los grupos morfo-funcionales y se ponderan, en cada caso, su distribución, estructuras morfológica, física, métrica y de rastros microscópicos. Como resultado, se nota, por un lado, cierta variabilidad, fundamentalmente en el sitio más tardío, que podría estar respondiendo a una situación de la economía cazadora-recolectora particular. Pero, principalmente, se ve que las sociedades bajo estudio compartían conocimientos generales sobre la materia prima ósea que llevó al desarrollo de grupos morfo-funcionales relativamente estandarizados a nivel inter-sitio. ENGLISH: This paper deals with bone technology in a sector of the lower Paraná wetland: the northern floodplain. The general aim is to assess the variability demonstrated in bone reduction strategies in six hunter-gatherer sites dated to the Late Holocene (~ 1100-700 years 14C BP. For that purpose I employ morpho-functional groups as the analytic unit, evaluating, in each case, distributional aspects and morphological, physical, metric and microscopic variation. As a result I note, on the one hand, little variability, and that which is present is concentrated at the latest site, indicating that this variation may represent a response to a specific hunter-gatherer situation. But, for the most part, the societies studied shared general knowledge about osseous raw materials that led to the development of relatively standardized morpho-functional groups at the inter-site level.

  13. Spatiotemporal dynamics of a shallow fluidized bed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aranson, I. S.; Tsimring, L. S.; Clark, D. K.

    2000-12-05

    An experimental and theoretical study of the dynamics of an air-fluidized thin granular layer is presented. Near the threshold of instability, the system exhibits critical behavior with remarkably long transient dynamics. Above the threshold of fluidization the system undergoes a Hopf bifurcation as the layer starts to oscillate at a certain frequency due to a feedback between the layer dilation and the airflow rate. Based on our experimental data, we formulate a the simple dynamical model which describes the transition in a shallow fluidized bed.

  14. The Influence of Wind and Basin Eddies in Controlling Sea Level Variations in the Coastal Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Abualnaja, Yasser

    2015-04-01

    Sea level variations in the central Red Sea coastal zone span a range of roughly 1.2 m. Though relatively small, these water level changes can significantly impact the environment over the shallow reef tops prevalent in the central Red Sea, altering the water depth by a factor or two or more. Roughly half of the coastal sea level variance in central Red Sea is due to elevation changes in an \\'intermediate\\' frequency band, with periods between 2 days and 1 month. We examined the sea level signal in this band using the data from pressure sensors maintained for more than five years at a number of locations in Saudi Arabian coastal waters between 20.1 and 23.5 oN. We find that the intermediate-band sea level variations are strongly correlated with the local wind stress measured at a meteorological buoy. The maximum pressure-wind correlation occurs at wind direction closely aligned with the alongshore orientation and at a lag (wind leading) of 45 hr, which is consistent with the expected response of the coastal sea level to local wind forcing. However, less than half of the sea level variance in the intermediate band is related, through linear correlation, with local wind forcing. Our analysis indicates that the residual coastal sea level signal, not associated with wind forcing, is largely driven remotely by the passage of mesoscale eddies, revealed by satellite altimeter-derived sea level anomaly fields of the central Red Sea. These eddy-driven coastal sea level changes occur on time scales of 10-30 days. They span a range of 0.5 m, and thus constitute an import component of the sea level signal in the coastal Red Sea.

  15. The deep-sea under global change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovaro, Roberto; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Snelgrove, Paul V R

    2017-06-05

    The deep ocean encompasses 95% of the oceans' volume and is the largest and least explored biome of Earth's Biosphere. New life forms are continuously being discovered. The physiological mechanisms allowing organisms to adapt to extreme conditions of the deep ocean (high pressures, from very low to very high temperatures, food shortage, lack of solar light) are still largely unknown. Some deep-sea species have very long life-spans, whereas others can tolerate toxic compounds at high concentrations; these characteristics offer an opportunity to explore the specialized biochemical and physiological mechanisms associated with these responses. Widespread symbiotic relationships play fundamental roles in driving host functions, nutrition, health, and evolution. Deep-sea organisms communicate and interact through sound emissions, chemical signals and bioluminescence. Several giants of the oceans hunt exclusively at depth, and new studies reveal a tight connection between processes in the shallow water and some deep-sea species. Limited biological knowledge of the deep-sea limits our capacity to predict future response of deep-sea organisms subject to increasing human pressure and changing global environmental conditions. Molecular tools, sensor-tagged animals, in situ and laboratory experiments, and new technologies can enable unprecedented advancement of deep-sea biology, and facilitate the sustainable management of deep ocean use under global change. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Phylogeographic data revealed shallow genetic structure in the kelp Saccharina japonica (Laminariales, Phaeophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Yao, Jian-Ting; Sun, Zhong-Min; Fu, Gang; Galanin, Dmitry A; Nagasato, Chikako; Motomura, Taizo; Hu, Zi-Min; Duan, De-Lin

    2015-11-02

    Population structure and genetic diversity of marine organisms in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean exhibited complex patterns. Saccharina japonica is a commercially and ecologically important kelp species widely distributed along the coast of Japan Sea. However, it is still poorly known about population genetics and phylogeographic patterns of wild S. japonica populations on a large geographic scale, which is an important contribution to breeding and conservation of this marine crop. We collected 612 mitochondrial COI and trnW-trnL sequences. Diversity indices suggested that S. japonica populations along the coast of Hokkaido exhibited the highest genetic diversity. Bayesian Analysis of Population Structure (BAPS) revealed four clusters in the kelp species (cluster 1: Hokkaido and South Korea; cluster 2: northwestern Hokkaido; cluster 3: Far Eastern Russia; cluster 4: China). The network inferred from concatenated data exhibited two shallow genealogies corresponding to two BAPS groups (cluster 2 and cluster 3). We did not detect gene flow between the two shallow genealogies, but populations within genealogy have asymmetric gene exchange. Bayesian skyline plots and neutrality tests suggested that S. japonica experienced postglacial expansion around 10.45 ka. The coast of Hokkaido might be the origin and diversification center of S. japonica. Gene exchange among S. japonica populations could be caused by anthropogenic interference and oceanographic regimes. Postglacial expansions and gene exchange apparently led to more shared haplotypes and less differentiation that in turn led to the present shallow phylogeographical patterns in S. japonica.

  17. Prediction of calcite Cement Distribution in Shallow Marine Sandstone Reservoirs using Seismic Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakke, N.E.

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis investigates how calcite cemented layers can be detected by reflection seismic data and how seismic data combined with other methods can be used to predict lateral variation in calcite cementation in shallow marine sandstone reservoirs. Focus is on the geophysical aspects. Sequence stratigraphy and stochastic modelling aspects are only covered superficially. Possible sources of calcite in shallow marine sandstone are grouped into internal and external sources depending on their location relative to the presently cemented rock. Well data and seismic data from the Troll Field in the Norwegian North Sea have been analysed. Tuning amplitudes from stacks of thin calcite cemented layers are analysed. Tuning effects are constructive or destructive interference of pulses resulting from two or more closely spaced reflectors. The zero-offset tuning amplitude is shown to depend on calcite content in the stack and vertical stack size. The relationship is found by regression analysis based on extensive seismic modelling. The results are used to predict calcite distribution in a synthetic and a real data example. It is found that describing calcite cemented beds in shallow marine sandstone reservoirs is not a deterministic problem. Hence seismic inversion and sequence stratigraphy interpretation of well data have been combined in a probabilistic approach to produce models of calcite cemented barriers constrained by a maximum amount of information. It is concluded that seismic data can provide valuable information on distribution of calcite cemented beds in reservoirs where the background sandstones are relatively homogeneous. 63 refs., 78 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. Massive marine methane emissions from near-shore shallow coastal areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alberto V; Champenois, Willy; Gypens, Nathalie; Delille, Bruno; Harlay, Jérôme

    2016-06-10

    Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas contributing to climate warming. The open ocean is a minor source of methane to the atmosphere. We report intense methane emissions from the near-shore southern region of the North Sea characterized by the presence of extensive areas with gassy sediments. The average flux intensities (~130 μmol m(-2) d(-1)) are one order of magnitude higher than values characteristic of continental shelves (~30 μmol m(-2) d(-1)) and three orders of magnitude higher than values characteristic of the open ocean (~0.4 μmol m(-2) d(-1)). The high methane concentrations (up to 1,128 nmol L(-1)) that sustain these fluxes are related to the shallow and well-mixed water column that allows an efficient transfer of methane from the seafloor to surface waters. This differs from deeper and stratified seep areas where there is a large decrease of methane between bottom and surface by microbial oxidation or physical transport. Shallow well-mixed continental shelves represent about 33% of the total continental shelf area, so that marine coastal methane emissions are probably under-estimated. Near-shore and shallow seep areas are hot spots of methane emission, and our data also suggest that emissions could increase in response to warming of surface waters.

  19. Mineralogy, early marine diagenesis, and the chemistry of shallow-water carbonate sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, J. A.; Blättler, C. L.; Lundstrom, E. A.; Santiago-Ramos, D. P.; Akhtar, A. A.; Crüger Ahm, A.-S.; Bialik, O.; Holmden, C.; Bradbury, H.; Murray, S. T.; Swart, P. K.

    2018-01-01

    Shallow-water carbonate sediments constitute the bulk of sedimentary carbonates in the geologic record and are widely used archives of Earth's chemical and climatic history. One of the main limitations in interpreting the geochemistry of ancient carbonate sediments is the potential for post-depositional diagenetic alteration. In this study, we use paired measurements of calcium (44Ca/40Ca or δ44Ca) and magnesium (26Mg/24Mg or δ26Mg) isotope ratios in sedimentary carbonates and associated pore-fluids as a tool to understand the mineralogical and diagenetic history of Neogene shallow-water carbonate sediments from the Bahamas and southwest Australia. We find that the Ca and Mg isotopic composition of bulk carbonate sediments at these sites exhibits systematic stratigraphic variability that is related to both mineralogy and early marine diagenesis. The observed variability in bulk sediment Ca isotopes is best explained by changes in the extent and style of early marine diagenesis from one where the composition of the diagenetic carbonate mineral is determined by the chemistry of the fluid (fluid-buffered) to one where the composition of the diagenetic carbonate mineral is determined by the chemistry of the precursor sediment (sediment-buffered). Our results indicate that this process, together with variations in carbonate mineralogy (aragonite, calcite, and dolomite), plays a fundamental and underappreciated role in determining the regional and global stratigraphic expressions of geochemical tracers (δ13C, δ18O, major, minor, and trace elements) in shallow-water carbonate sediments in the geologic record. Our results also provide evidence that a large shallow-water carbonate sink that is enriched in 44Ca can explain the mismatch between the δ44/40Ca value of rivers and deep-sea carbonate sediments and call into question the hypothesis that the δ44/40Ca value of seawater depends on the mineralogy of primary carbonate precipitations (e.g. 'aragonite seas' and

  20. Coherent reverberation model based on adiabatic normal mode theory in a range dependent shallow water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenglin; Zhang, Renhe; Li, Fenghua

    2010-09-01

    Ocean reverberation in shallow water is often the predominant background interference in active sonar applications. It is still an open problem in underwater acoustics. In recent years, an oscillation phenomenon of the reverberation intensity, due to the interference of the normal modes, has been observed in many experiments. A coherent reverberation theory has been developed and used to explain this oscillation phenomenon [F. Li et al., Journal of Sound and Vibration, 252(3), 457-468, 2002]. However, the published coherent reverberation theory is for the range independent environment. Following the derivations by F. Li and Ellis [D. D. Ellis, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 97(5), 2804-2814, 1995], a general reverberation model based on the adiabatic normal mode theory in a range dependent shallow water environment is presented. From this theory the coherent or incoherent reverberation field caused by sediment inhomogeneity and surface roughness can be predicted. Observations of reverberation from the 2001 Asian Sea International Acoustic Experiment (ASIAEX) in the East China Sea are used to test the model. Model/data comparison shows that the coherent reverberation model can predict the experimental oscillation phenomenon of reverberation intensity and the vertical correlation of reverberation very well.

  1. The diversity and distribution of Holothuroidea in shallow waters of Baluran National Park, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARIF MOHAMMAD SIDDIQ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Siddiq AM, Atmowidi T, Qayim I. 2015. The diversity and distribution of Holothuroidea in shallow waters of Baluran National Park, Indonesia. Biodiversitas 17: 55-60. A study of the diversity and distribution of sea cucumber (Holothuroidea in shallow waters at Baluran National Park, East Java, Indonesia was carried out from July until September 2015. The method used in this study was systematic transect in low tide condition. Samples were collected by hands at intertidal sites. Identification of sea cucumber species based on morphological ossicles. Twenty one species of Holothuroidea belonging two orders and four families were found in this study. The most dominant family found was Holothuriidae (16 species, followed by Stichopodidae (2 species, Synaptidae (2 species, and Chiridotidae (1 spesies. Four species (Holothuria olivacea, H. verrucosa, Labidodemas rugosum, and Chiridota smirnovi are new record for Java waters and one species (H. papillifera is a new record for Indonesian waters. Two morphospecies (H. aff. macroperona and Stichopus cf. monotuberculatus need reconfirmation to species level. The highest abundance species of Holothuroidea was found at under rock with 15 species. Whereas, the highest number of individuals was found in seagrass areas with 5457 individuals. H. atra has extensive habitat distribution, such as seagrass, macroalgae, coral reef, dead coral, sand, and under rock.

  2. The influence of environmental parameters on the optimal frequency in a shallow underwater acoustic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnescu, George

    2015-02-01

    In a shallow underwater acoustic channel the delayed replicas of a transmitted signal are mainly due to the interactions with the sea surface and the bottom layer. If a specific underwater region on the globe is considered, for which the sedimentary layer structure is constant across the transmission distance, then the variability of the amplitude-delay profile is determined by daily and seasonal changes of the sound speed profile (SSP) and by weather changes, such as variations of the wind speed. Such a parameter will influence the attenuation at the surface, the noise level and the profile of the sea surface. The temporal variation of the impulse response in a shallow underwater acoustic channel determines the variability of the optimal transmission frequency. If the ways in which the optimal frequency changes can be predicted, then an adaptive analog transceiver can be easily designed for an underwater acoustic modem or it can be found when a communication link has high throughput. In this article it will be highlighted the way in which the amplitude-delay profile is affected by the sound speed profile, wind speed and channel depth and also will be emphasized the changes of the optimal transmission frequency in a configuration, where the transmitter and receiver are placed on the seafloor and the bathymetry profile will be considered flat, having a given composition.

  3. Timing, cause and impact of the late Eocene stepwise sea retreat from the Tarim Basin (west China)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosboom, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/322947359; Dupont-Nivet, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313092559; Grothe, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338017712; Brinkhuis, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/095046097; Villa, G.; Mandic, O.; Stoica, M.; Kouwenhoven, T.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/191377406; Huang, W.; Yang, W.; Guo, Z.

    2014-01-01

    A vast shallow epicontinental sea extended across Eurasia and was well-connected to the Western Tethys before it retreated westward and became isolated as the Paratethys Sea. However, the palaeogeography and the timing of this westward retreat are too poorly constrained to determine potential wider

  4. Marine Fog over the Western Pacific Marginal Seas Based Upon Ship Observations for 1950 - 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, C. E.; Koracin, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    An analysis is presented of the marine fog distribution over the western Pacific marginal seas based upon the International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) ship observations taken during 1950-2007. Fog occurrence is reported in routine weather reports that are encoded in an ICOADS ship observation. This includes the marginal seas of Okhotsk Sea, Japan Sea, Yellow Sea and South China Sea which have significant fog occurrences with values much greater than in the surrounding ocean with distinct seasonal trends but different generation mechanisms. The greatest occurrence is 55 % in Jun-Jul-Aug over the Okhotsk Sea followed by 28 % over the Japan Sea. This is seasonally controlled by the sea level pressure gradient moving air over a negative sea surface temperature gradient. During Dec-Jan-Feb, the SLP gradient reverses, moving cold, dry continental air over the Okhotsk and Japan Seas, eliminating any fog. The maximum fog over the Okhotsk Sea is over isolated locations with shallow water. In the Japan Sea, the most frequent fog occurs along the north side of the sea over a narrow shelf with the lowest SST of the entire Sea. In the Yellow Sea, the fog frequency peak is from Dec through May. In Mar-Apr-May the highest value is 18 % which is centered at 33 N 122 W while elevated values extend along the China coast to Taiwan. In Jun-Jul-Aug, highest values are mostly confined to the Yellow Sea. In Dec-Jan-Feb, decreased but significant fog occurrences extend along the entire China coast when the highest value in the Yellow Sea is 5 % and in South China Sea it is 6 %. The only other world marine fog occurrence analysis discovered by us is a US Department of Agriculture Jun-Jul-Aug marine fog frequency chart published in 1938 that does not show any fog in the Okhotsk Sea and misses most of the fog occurrence reported by ships in the Yellow Sea.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of the Nip7 proteins from the marine deep- and shallow-water Pyrococcus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Kirill E; Alemasov, Nikolay A; Vorobjev, Yuri N; Boldyreva, Elena V; Kolchanov, Nikolay A; Afonnikov, Dmitry A

    2014-10-15

    The identification of the mechanisms of adaptation of protein structures to extreme environmental conditions is a challenging task of structural biology. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the Nip7 protein involved in RNA processing from the shallow-water (P. furiosus) and the deep-water (P. abyssi) marine hyperthermophylic archaea at different temperatures (300 and 373 K) and pressures (0.1, 50 and 100 MPa). The aim was to disclose similarities and differences between the deep- and shallow-sea protein models at different temperatures and pressures. The current results demonstrate that the 3D models of the two proteins at all the examined values of pressures and temperatures are compact, stable and similar to the known crystal structure of the P. abyssi Nip7. The structural deviations and fluctuations in the polypeptide chain during the MD simulations were the most pronounced in the loop regions, their magnitude being larger for the C-terminal domain in both proteins. A number of highly mobile segments the protein globule presumably involved in protein-protein interactions were identified. Regions of the polypeptide chain with significant difference in conformational dynamics between the deep- and shallow-water proteins were identified. The results of our analysis demonstrated that in the examined ranges of temperatures and pressures, increase in temperature has a stronger effect on change in the dynamic properties of the protein globule than the increase in pressure. The conformational changes of both the deep- and shallow-sea protein models under increasing temperature and pressure are non-uniform. Our current results indicate that amino acid substitutions between shallow- and deep-water proteins only slightly affect overall stability of two proteins. Rather, they may affect the interactions of the Nip7 protein with its protein or RNA partners.

  6. AIRBORNE LASER BATHYMETRY FOR DOCUMENTATION OF SUBMERGED ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES IN SHALLOW WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Doneus

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of underwater topography is essential to the understanding of the organisation and distribution of archaeological sites along and in water bodies. Special attention has to be paid to intertidal and inshore zones where, due to sea-level rise, coastlines have changed and many former coastal sites are now submerged in shallow water. Mapping the detailed inshore topography is therefore important to reconstruct former coastlines, identify sunken archaeological structures and locate potential former harbour sites. However, until recently archaeology has lacked suitable methods to provide the required topographical data of shallow underwater bodies. Our research shows that airborne topo-bathymetric laser scanner systems are able to measure surfaces above and below the water table over large areas in high detail using very short and narrow green laser pulses, even revealing sunken archaeological structures in shallow water. Using an airborne laser scanner operating at a wavelength in the green visible spectrum (532 nm two case study areas in different environmental settings (Kolone, Croatia, with clear sea water; Lake Keutschach, Austria, with turbid water were scanned. In both cases, a digital model of the underwater topography with a planimetric resolution of a few decimeters was measured. While in the clear waters of Kolone penetration depth was up to 11 meters, turbid Lake Keutschach allowed only to document the upper 1.6 meters of its underwater topography. Our results demonstrate the potential of this technique to map submerged archaeological structures over large areas in high detail providing the possibility for systematic, large scale archaeological investigation of this environment.

  7. Rare earth elements in Holocene reefal microbialites: a new shallow seawater proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Gregory E.; Kamber, Balz S.

    2000-05-01

    The concentration of rare earth elements and yttrium (REE + Y) was determined in Holocene Mg-calcite microbialites from shallow reef framework cavities at Heron Reef, Great Barrier Reef. Shale-normalized REE + Y patterns of 52 microbialite samples show: (1) uniform heavy REE enrichment (Nd SN/Yb SN = 0.236, SD = 0.026); (2) consistent negative Ce and positive La anomalies; (3) marine Y/Ho ratios (56.17, SD = 2.66); and (4) slightly positive Gd anomalies. All of these features are consistent with the geochemistry of well-oxygenated, shallow ambient seawater. REE partition coefficients were calculated relative to shallow Coral Sea seawater. They are uniform (relative SD = 10.2%) across the entire mass range and almost two orders of magnitude higher than those between coral and seawater. Hence, terrigenous detritus-free, modern microbialites are a more reliable proxy for seawater REE chemistry than are skeletal carbonates. Ancient limestones have been considered largely problematic as sources for REE proxies owing to perceived problems with diagenesis, partly on the basis of relatively high REE concentrations in some limestones compared to modern skeletal carbonates. However, high REE concentrations in modern microbialites suggest that ancient limestones with relatively high REE concentrations, if not contaminated by terrigenous detritus, may reflect original seawater chemistry. Terrigenous contamination, if present, is readily detectable on the basis of co-occurring trace element concentrations (Sc, Hf, Th) and Y/Ho ratio. Hence, ancient, particularly reefal, limestones may provide reliable seawater REE proxies. The occurrence of microbialites in clean limestones as old as 3.5 Ga suggests the possibility of reconstructing shallow marine REE chemistry over most of Earth history with important implications for paleogeography and paleoredox studies.

  8. Relationship between rainfall and shallow landslides in the southern Apuan Alps (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Giannecchini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Apuan Alps region is one of the rainiest areas in Italy (more than 3000 mm/year, in which frequently heavy and concentrated rainfall occurs. This is particularly due to its geographical position and conformation: the Apuan chain is located along the northern Tuscan coast, close to the Ligurian Sea, and the main peaks reach almost 2000 m. In several cases, the storms that hit the area have triggered many shallow landslides (soil slip-debris flows, which exposed the population to serious risks (during the 19 June 1996 rainstorm about 1000 landslides were triggered and 14 people died. The assessment of the rainfall thresholds is very important in order to prepare efficient alarm systems in a region particularly dedicated to tourism and marble activities. With the aim of contributing to the landslide hazard evaluation of the southern Apuan Alps territory (upper Versilia area, a detailed analysis of the main pluviometric events was carried out. The data recorded at the main rain gauge of the area from 1975 to 2002 were analysed and compared with the occurrence of soil slips, in order to examine the relationship between soil slip initiation and rainfall. The most important rainstorms which triggered shallow landslides occurred in 1984, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998 and 2000. Many attempts were made to obtain a possible correlation between rainfall parameters and the occurrence of soil slip phenomena and to identify the local rainfall threshold for triggering shallow landslides. A threshold for soil slip activity in terms of mean intensity, duration and mean annual precipitation (MAP was defined for the study area. The thresholds obtained for the southern Apuan Alps were also compared with those proposed by other authors for several regions in the world. This emphasized the high value of the rain threshold for shallow landslide activity in the Apuan area. The high threshold is probably also linked to the high mean annual precipitation and to the high

  9. Anuga Software for Numerical Simulations of Shallow Water Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Mungkasi, Sudi; Roberts, Stephen Gwyn

    2012-01-01

    Shallow water flows are governed by the shallow water wave equations, also known as the Saint-Venant system. This paper presents a finite volume method used to solve the two-dimensional shallow water wave equations and how the finite volume method is implemented in ANUGA software. This finite volume method is the numerical method underlying the software. ANUGA is open source software developed by Australian National University (ANU) and Geoscience Australia (GA). This software uses the finite...

  10. ANUGA SOFTWARE FOR NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF SHALLOW WATER FLOWS

    OpenAIRE

    Sudi Mungkasi; Stephen Gwyn Roberts

    2012-01-01

    Shallow water flows are governed by the shallow water wave equations, also known as the Saint-Venant system. This paper presents a finite volume method used to solve the two-dimensional shallow water wave equations and how the finite volume method is implemented in ANUGA software. This finite volume method is the numerical method underlying the software. ANUGA is open source software developed by Australian National University (ANU) and Geoscience Australia (GA). This software uses the finite...

  11. Acoustic gravity microseismic pressure signal at shallow stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peureux, Charles; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Royer, Jean-Yves

    2017-04-01

    It has been known for decades that the background permanent seismic noise, the so-called microseimic signal, is generated by the nonlinear interaction of oppositely travelling ocean surface waves [Longuet-Higgins 1951]. It can especially be used to infer the time variability of short ocean waves statistics [Peureux and Ardhuin 2016]. However, better quantitative estimates of the latter are made difficult due to a poor knowledge of the Earth's crust characteristics, whose coupling with acoustic modes can affect large uncertainties to the frequency response at the bottom of the ocean. The pressure field at depths less than an acoustic wave length to the surface is made of evanescent acoustic-gravity modes [Cox and Jacobs 1989]. For this reason, they are less affected by the ocean bottom composition. This near field is recorded and analyzed in the frequency range 0.1 to 0.5 Hz approximately, at two locations : at a shallow site in the North-East Atlantic continental shelf and a deep water site in the Southern Indian ocean, at the ocean bottom and 100 m below sea-surface and in the upper part of the water column respectively. Evanescent and propagating Rayleigh modes are compared against theoretical predictions. Comparisons against surface waves hindcast based on WAVEWATCH(R) III modelling framework help assessing its performances and can be used to help future model improvements. References Longuet-Higgins, M. S., A Theory of the Origin of Microseisms, Philos. Trans. Royal Soc. A, The Royal Society, 1950, 243, 1-3. Peureux, C. and Ardhuin, F., Ocean bottom pressure records from the Cascadia array and short surface gravity waves, J. Geophys. Res. Oceans, 2016, 121, 2862-2873. Cox, C. S. & Jacobs, D. C., Cartesian diver observations of double frequency pressure fluctuations in the upper levels of the ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett., 1989, 16, 807-810.

  12. Wave attenuation by oyster reefs in a shallow coastal bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, P.; Taube, S. R.; Reidenbach, M.; Kremer, M.

    2016-02-01

    Oyster reefs influence local waves and sediment transport in estuarine environments. Because of their potential for attenuating wave energy, building oyster reefs close to eroding intertidal marshes has been considered as a means of slowing or reversing shoreline erosion. Our study was designed to address the effectiveness of fringing oyster reefs to attenuate wave energy in shallow coastal bays. Our primary focus was on 2 well established reefs constructed of shell material and a newly emplaced reef constructed of cement "oyster castles" that were all located near marshes. We measured wave conditions on both sides of the study reefs and at a control site for periods of 3-4 weeks. Differences in wave heights across the reefs were used to quantify the effects of reefs on waves under varying tidal and wind conditions. The reefs reduced wave heights by an average of up to 17% but the reductions were largest at intermediate water depths. At low water depths, waves were small regardless of wind speed and were completely interrupted by the emergent reef. At water depths greater than about 0.3 m above the reef, the reefs in our study area had significantly less impact on wave heights. The pattern of wave height change as a function of water depth and wind speed was very consistent for the three study reefs, despite differences in the material comprising the reefs, their orientation relative to the shoreline, and wind conditions. The waves most likely to drive marsh retreat are those that reach the marsh when the elevation of the water surface is close to the elevation of the marsh edge, therefore marshes with an edge elevation near mean sea level are most likely to benefit from reductions in wave energy associated with oyster reefs like those in our study area. Marshes with a high edge scarp may not experience significant reduction in the wave energy driving marsh retreat from the presence of a fringing oyster reef.

  13. 100 Myr record of sequences, sedimentary facies and sea level change from Ocean Drilling Program onshore coreholes, US Mid-Atlantic coastal plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, J.V.; Miller, K.G.; Sugarman, P.J.; Kominz, M.A.; McLaughlin, P.P.; Kulpecz, A.A.; Feigenson, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed the latest Early Cretaceous to Miocene sections (???110-7Ma) in 11 New Jersey and Delaware onshore coreholes (Ocean Drilling Program Legs 150X and 174AX). Fifteen to seventeen Late Cretaceous and 39-40 Cenozoic sequence boundaries were identified on the basis of physical and temporal breaks. Within-sequence changes follow predictable patterns with thin transgressive and thick regressive highstand systems tracts. The few lowstands encountered provide critical constraints on the range of sea-level fall. We estimated paleowater depths by integrating lithofacies and biofacies analyses and determined ages using integrated biostratigraphy and strontium isotopic stratigraphy. These datasets were backstripped to provide a sea-level estimate for the past ???100 Myr. Large river systems affected New Jersey during the Cretaceous and latest Oligocene-Miocene. Facies evolved through eight depositional phases controlled by changes in accommodation, long-term sea level, and sediment supply: (1) the Barremian-earliest Cenomanian consisted of anastomosing riverine environments associated with warm climates, high sediment supply, and high accommodation; (2) the Cenomanian-early Turonian was dominated by marine sediments with minor deltaic influence associated with long-term (107 year) sea-level rise; (3) the late Turonian through Coniacian was dominated by alluvial and delta plain systems associated with long-term sea-level fall; (4) the Santonian-Campanian consisted of marine deposition under the influence of a wave-dominated delta associated with a long-term sea-level rise and increased sediment supply; (5) Maastrichtian-Eocene deposition consisted primarily of starved siliciclastic, carbonate ramp shelf environments associated with very high long-term sea level and low sediment supply; (6) the late Eocene-Oligocene was a starved siliciclastic shelf associated with moderately high sea-level and low sediment supply; (7) late early-middle Miocene consisted of a

  14. Past and present Aral Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukhovniy, Viktor; Stulina, Galina; Eshchanov, Odylbek

    2013-04-01

    any more (1980-1990). Kokaral was the first of the large islands becoming a peninsula, separating the Small Aral Sea in the north-east by joining the shoreline in the west. By 1986, the peninsula practically detached the small Aral Sea from the large Aral Sea, leaving only a narrow flow passage in the east. Since that time, the hydrological regimes of the Small and Large Seas have become separated. The construction of Kokaral dam in Kazakhstan, 12 km long and 8 m high, then completely separated the small Aral Sea from the large Aral Sea and changed the hydrological regimes of the water bodies. Level of this part of Sea became from this moment permanently higher than in the large Aral Sea on 42 m a.s.l. The eastern part of the sea, where the bed is much shallower and the slope is gentler is more subjected to shrinking then the western part. 2005 year became threshold, from which Eastern Aral Sea began new story - deviation from almost empty water body to almost 4 meters depth. Present assessment of water balance of Aral Sea and delta at whole dependent from delivery water river and drainage flow through control section of Samanbay on the Amudarya and some cross sections on the enter main collectors to the delta boundary. These hydrological characteristics accepted on the base of information from BWO Amudarya and our monitoring of allocation of different waters on the delta. Water volume and water surface area of Eastern and Western Aral Sea bowls were definite on the result RS data from Landsat. Bathymetric curves gave ability to assess dynamic levels of Seas. After series of enough water years 2002 - 2005 with average water income to south Priaralie 12.5 km3 period of water scarce years lead to sharp decrease of surface water area of the Eastern bowl from 1010,5 th.ha on average on two time with failure of level from 31,1 m up to average 28,5 m. But phase of permanent reducing all indicators water body changed in 2008 on deviation in range from 26.3 m to 29.5 m. Some

  15. Shallow Water Propagation and Surface Reverberation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-29

    Callaghan, A. H., G. B. Deane and M. D. Stokes, "Two regimes of laboratory whitecap foam decay: Bubble -plume controlled and surfactant stabilized," J...interest are scattering from surface gravity waves and the effect of whitecaps and bubble clouds on underwater acoustic communications. Secondary long...term goals were to 1. exploit measurements of breaking wave noise and photographic images of whitecaps to infer bubble cloud populations at the sea

  16. Tree-root control of shallow landslides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cohen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Tree roots have long been recognized to increase slope stability by reinforcing the strength of soils. Slope stability models usually include the effects of roots by adding an apparent cohesion to the soil to simulate root strength. No model includes the combined effects of root distribution heterogeneity, stress-strain behavior of root reinforcement, or root strength in compression. Recent field observations, however, indicate that shallow landslide triggering mechanisms are characterized by differential deformation that indicates localized activation of zones in tension, compression, and shear in the soil. Here we describe a new model for slope stability that specifically considers these effects. The model is a strain-step discrete element model that reproduces the self-organized redistribution of forces on a slope during rainfall-triggered shallow landslides. We use a conceptual sigmoidal-shaped hillslope with a clearing in its center to explore the effects of tree size, spacing, weak zones, maximum root-size diameter, and different root strength configurations. Simulation results indicate that tree roots can stabilize slopes that would otherwise fail without them and, in general, higher root density with higher root reinforcement results in a more stable slope. The variation in root stiffness with diameter can, in some cases, invert this relationship. Root tension provides more resistance to failure than root compression but roots with both tension and compression offer the best resistance to failure. Lateral (slope-parallel tension can be important in cases when the magnitude of this force is comparable to the slope-perpendicular tensile force. In this case, lateral forces can bring to failure tree-covered areas with high root reinforcement. Slope failure occurs when downslope soil compression reaches the soil maximum strength. When this occurs depends on the amount of root tension upslope in both the slope-perpendicular and slope

  17. Tree-root control of shallow landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Denis; Schwarz, Massimiliano

    2017-08-01

    Tree roots have long been recognized to increase slope stability by reinforcing the strength of soils. Slope stability models usually include the effects of roots by adding an apparent cohesion to the soil to simulate root strength. No model includes the combined effects of root distribution heterogeneity, stress-strain behavior of root reinforcement, or root strength in compression. Recent field observations, however, indicate that shallow landslide triggering mechanisms are characterized by differential deformation that indicates localized activation of zones in tension, compression, and shear in the soil. Here we describe a new model for slope stability that specifically considers these effects. The model is a strain-step discrete element model that reproduces the self-organized redistribution of forces on a slope during rainfall-triggered shallow landslides. We use a conceptual sigmoidal-shaped hillslope with a clearing in its center to explore the effects of tree size, spacing, weak zones, maximum root-size diameter, and different root strength configurations. Simulation results indicate that tree roots can stabilize slopes that would otherwise fail without them and, in general, higher root density with higher root reinforcement results in a more stable slope. The variation in root stiffness with diameter can, in some cases, invert this relationship. Root tension provides more resistance to failure than root compression but roots with both tension and compression offer the best resistance to failure. Lateral (slope-parallel) tension can be important in cases when the magnitude of this force is comparable to the slope-perpendicular tensile force. In this case, lateral forces can bring to failure tree-covered areas with high root reinforcement. Slope failure occurs when downslope soil compression reaches the soil maximum strength. When this occurs depends on the amount of root tension upslope in both the slope-perpendicular and slope-parallel directions. Roots

  18. Shallow flows over surfaces of patterned wettability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivel, Morgane; Jeon, David; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    Our previous work showed that surfaces with spatially patterned wetting properties induce passive displacements of shallow flows. Polycarbonate plates were patterned with hydrophobic and hydrophilic stripes, and a thin, rectangular water jet impinged on the patterned surface. We reported development of intriguing roller structures at the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces. In our present work, we study the effect of varying the stripes' width, spacing, and orientation on the dynamics of these roller structures. Specifically, we are interested in the vortex generation and air entrainment by the rollers. We report quantitative results to this effect. We will also discuss potential uses of this technique for modifying contact line dynamics and bow waves near ships. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research (Grant # ONR-N00014-11-1-0031) and by NSF-GRFP.

  19. Induced Seismicity in Oklahoma Affects Shallow Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. Y.; Manga, M.; Shirzaei, M.; Weingarten, M.

    2016-12-01

    Natural earthquakes are known to cause a wide spectrum of hydrologic responses. Here we show that these responses also occurred following some of the recent M>5 earthquakes likely induced by wastewater injection in Oklahoma. Following the 3 September 2016 Mw 5.8 earthquake near Pawnee, for example, increased discharge in a stream near the epicentre and some injection wells was documented by a USGS stream gauge. Sand blows and ground cracks that may reflect subsurface liquefaction and lateral spreading were also observed near Pawnee. As another example, following the 13 February 2016 Mw 5.1 earthquake near Fairview, changes of groundwater level were documented in several wells of the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Some of the observed changes are consistent with increased permeability produced by seismic waves. Fluid injection may thus influence the hydrogeological properties of shallow groundwater systems and aquifers by inducing seismicity, if the induced events are large enough.

  20. Stable Isotopes and Hydrochemistry Approach for Determining the Salinization Pattern of Shallow Groundwater in Alluvium Deposit Semarang, Central Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satrio Satrio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.1.1-10A groundwater study has been conducted in the Semarang City in August 2014, aiming to determine the source of shallow groundwater salinization using stable isotopes (18O, 2H and water chemistry approach, and supported by local hydrogeological data. A number of shallow groundwater samples were taken at several locations with a depth of 0 - 35 m. Based on geological data, shallow groundwater of Semarang alluvium is dominated by insertion of sand-gravel and sandy-clay with average porosity of around 56.0 %. This layer is thinning towards the south and then increasingly thickening to the north and north-east of the studied area. The results of the analyses show that the characteristics of shallow groundwater, i.e. approximately 51% of groundwater, still have the original composition as meteoric water and the remaining approximately 49% obtained a shift in the isotopic composition as caused by interaction with seawater and the little influence of evaporation. The results of chemical analysis of water indicates that in dry seasons, shallow groundwater aquifers in the Semarang City is dominated by chloride (Cl- with NaCl of water type. While the parameters of bicarbonate, chloride, and Na/Cl ratio, shallow groundwater can be classified into two groups, namely unintruded groundwater around 51% spread from the foot hills to the south towards the hills with elevations of 9 - 142 m above sea level and intruded groundwater around 49% spread from the coastline to the urban direction.

  1. Low endemism, continued deep-shallow interchanges, and evidence for cosmopolitan distributions in free-living marine nematodes (order Enoplida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Kelley

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nematodes represent the most abundant benthic metazoa in one of the largest habitats on earth, the deep sea. Characterizing major patterns of biodiversity within this dominant group is a critical step towards understanding evolutionary patterns across this vast ecosystem. The present study has aimed to place deep-sea nematode species into a phylogenetic framework, investigate relationships between shallow water and deep-sea taxa, and elucidate phylogeographic patterns amongst the deep-sea fauna. Results Molecular data (18 S and 28 S rRNA confirms a high diversity amongst deep-sea Enoplids. There is no evidence for endemic deep-sea lineages in Maximum Likelihood or Bayesian phylogenies, and Enoplids do not cluster according to depth or geographic location. Tree topologies suggest frequent interchanges between deep-sea and shallow water habitats, as well as a mixture of early radiations and more recently derived lineages amongst deep-sea taxa. This study also provides convincing evidence of cosmopolitan marine species, recovering a subset of Oncholaimid nematodes with identical gene sequences (18 S, 28 S and cox1 at trans-Atlantic sample sites. Conclusions The complex clade structures recovered within the Enoplida support a high global species richness for marine nematodes, with phylogeographic patterns suggesting the existence of closely related, globally distributed species complexes in the deep sea. True cosmopolitan species may additionally exist within this group, potentially driven by specific life history traits of Enoplids. Although this investigation aimed to intensively sample nematodes from the order Enoplida, specimens were only identified down to genus (at best and our sampling regime focused on an infinitesimal small fraction of the deep-sea floor. Future nematode studies should incorporate an extended sample set covering a wide depth range (shelf, bathyal, and abyssal sites, utilize additional genetic loci (e

  2. Sea ice dynamics influence halogen deposition to Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Spolaor

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice is an important parameter in the climate system and its changes impact upon the polar albedo and atmospheric and oceanic circulation. Iodine (I and bromine (Br have been measured in a shallow firn core drilled at the summit of the Holtedahlfonna glacier (Northwest Spitsbergen, Svalbard. Changing I concentrations can be linked to the March–May maximum sea ice extension. Bromine enrichment, indexed to the Br / Na sea water mass ratio, appears to be influenced by changes in the seasonal sea ice area. I is emitted from marine biota and so the retreat of March–May sea ice coincides with enlargement of the open-ocean surface which enhances marine primary production and consequent I emission. The observed Br enrichment could be explained by greater Br emissions during the Br explosions that have been observed to occur mainly above first year sea ice during the early springtime. In this work we present the first comparison between halogens in surface snow and Arctic sea ice extension. Although further investigation is required to characterize potential depositional and post-depositional processes, these preliminary findings suggest that I and Br can be linked to variability in the spring maximum sea ice extension and seasonal sea ice surface area.

  3. Shallow groundwater subsidies to terrestrial ecosystems (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R. B.; Jayawickreme, D.; Nosetto, M.; Jobbagy, E. G.

    2010-12-01

    Throughout the world, shallow groundwater systems subsidize much higher net primary productivity (NPP) than would be expected based solely on local rainfall. Such subsidies are far more prevalent and less recognized in upland systems than in more commonly studied riparian ones. We present a quantitative framework for examining and quantifying groundwater subsidies globally, illustrating subsidies to NPP across rainfall gradients in Argentina and the southern United States, including Texas and California. In the Argentine Pampas, we determined that the presence of relatively shallow ground water increased the transpiration of forest plantations by 300 to 400 mm. Farther west, the presence of well developed Prosopis flexuosa woodlands in the Monte desert region east of the Andes has puzzled scientists for decades. We explored the vulnerability and importance of phreatic ground water for the productivity of the region, comparing the contributions of local rainfall to that of remote mountain recharge that is increasingly being diverted for irrigated agriculture before it reaches the desert. The isotopic composition of phreatic ground waters (δ2H; -137±5 ‰) closely matched the signature of water brought to the region by the Mendoza River (-137±6 ‰), suggesting that mountain river infiltration rather than in-situ rainfall deep drainage (-39±19 ‰) was the dominant mechanism of recharge. Vegetation in woodland ecosystems there relied on regionally derived ground water from Andean snowmelt located from 6.5 to 9.5 m underground. Understanding the ecohydrological coupling of surface and ground waters is vital for estimating net primary productivity and for balancing the demands of managed ecosystems with the conservation of unique natural systems.

  4. Rapid formation of a sea ice barrier east of Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; van Woert, M. L.; Neumann, G.

    2005-11-01

    Daily SeaWinds scatterometer images acquired by the QuikSCAT satellite show an elongated sea ice feature that formed very rapidly (˜1-2 days) in November 2001 east of Svalbard over the Barents Sea. This sea ice structure, called "the Svalbard sea ice barrier," spanning approximately 10° in longitude and 2° in latitude, restricts the sea route and poses a significant navigation hazard. The secret of its formation appears to lie in the bottom of the sea: A comparison between bathymetry from the International Bathymetric Chart of the Arctic Ocean data and the pattern of sea ice formation from scatterometer data reveals that the sea ice barrier conforms well with and stretches above a deep elongated channel connecting the Franz Josef-Victoria Trough to the Hinlopen Basin between Svalbard and Franz Josef Land. Historic hydrographic data from this area indicate that this sea channel contains cold Arctic water less than 50 m below the surface. Strong and persistent cold northerly winds force strong heat loss from this shallow surface layer, leading to the rapid formation of the sea ice barrier. Heat transfer rates estimated from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts temperature and wind data over this region suggest that the surface water along the deep channel can be rapidly cooled to the freezing point. Scatterometer results in 1999-2003 show that sea ice forms in this area between October and December. Understanding the ice formation mechanisms helps to select appropriate locations for deployment of buoys measuring wind and air-sea temperature profile and to facilitate ice monitoring, modeling, and forecasting.

  5. Bathyal sea urchins of the Bahamas, with notes on covering behavior in deep sea echinoids (Echinodermata: Echinoidea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawson, David L.; Pawson, Doris J.

    2013-08-01

    In a survey of the bathyal echinoderms of the Bahama Islands region using manned submersibles, approximately 200 species of echinoderms were encountered and documented; 33 species were echinoids, most of them widespread in the general Caribbean area. Three species were found to exhibit covering behavior, the piling of debris on the upper surface of the body. Active covering is common in at least 20 species of shallow-water echinoids, but it has been reliably documented previously only once in deep-sea habitats. Images of covered deep-sea species, and other species of related interest, are provided. Some of the reasons adduced in the past for covering in shallow-water species, such as reduction of incident light intensity, physical camouflage, ballast in turbulent water, protection from desiccation, presumably do not apply in bathyal species. The main reasons for covering in deep, dark, environments are as yet unknown. Some covering behavior in the deep sea may be related to protection of the genital pores, ocular plates, or madreporite. Covering in some deep-sea species may also be merely a tactile reflex action, as some authors have suggested for shallow-water species.

  6. Mammals of the Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents information on sea mammals, including definitions and characteristics of cetaceans, pinnipeds, and sirenians. Contains descriptions of the teaching activities "Whale Music,""Draw A Whale to Scale,""Adopt a Sea Mammal," and "Sea Mammal Sleuths." (TW)

  7. Food web structure and vulnerability of a deep-sea ecosystem in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecchio, Samuele; Coll, Marta; Christensen, Villy; Company, Joan B.; Ramírez-Llodra, Eva; Sardà, Francisco

    2013-05-01

    There is increasing fishing pressure on the continental margins of the oceans, and this raises concerns about the vulnerability of the ecosystems thriving there. The current knowledge of the biology of deep-water fish species identifies potential reduced resilience to anthropogenic disturbance. However, there are extreme difficulties in sampling the deep sea, resulting in poorly resolved and indirectly obtained food-web relationships. Here, we modelled the flows and biomasses of a Mediterranean deep-sea ecosystem, the Catalan Sea continental slope at depths of 1000-1400 m. This is the first model of a deep-water ecosystem in the Mediterranean Sea. The objectives were to (a) quantitatively describe the food web structure of the ecosystem, (b) examine the role of key species in the ecosystem, and (c) explore the vulnerability of this deep-sea ecosystem to potential future fishing exploitation. We used the Ecopath with Ecosim (EwE) modelling approach and software to model the ecosystem. The trophic model included 18 consumers, a marine snow group, and a sediment detritus group. Trophic network analysis identified low levels of consumer biomass cycling and low system omnivory index when compared with expected values of marine ecosystems, and higher cycling and omnivory when compared with available EwE models of shallower areas of the Mediterranean Sea. The majority of flows in the ecosystem were concentrated at the trophic level of first-order consumers (TL 2). Benthic invertebrates and demersal sharks were identified to have key ecological roles in the ecosystem. We used the dynamic temporal model Ecosim to simulate expansion of the red-shrimp benthic trawl fishery that currently operates at shallower depths, down to 800 m depth. The simulations showed reductions in fish biomass and that the state of the deep continental slope ecosystem in the western Mediterranean seems to be the result of a long-term succession process, which has reached ecological stability, and is

  8. The impact of fish predation on shallow soft bottoms in brackish waters (SW Finland); an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, J.; Bonsdorff, E.

    The impact of fish predation on shallow soft bottoms was studied by field and laboratory experiments. The field manipulations (caging experiments) were carried out in 2 shallow (1.5 m) bays in the northern Baltic Sea. An a priori hypothesis that fish do not structure macrozoobenthic communities in shallow soft-bottom areas was tested. Short-term aquarium experiments clearly showed that perch ( Perca fluviatilis L.), roach ( Rutilus rutilus L.) and ruffe ( Acerina cernua (L.)) are all effective predators on benthic macroinvertebrates ( Corophium volutator) Pallas and Nereis diversicolor O.F. Müller) under laboratory conditions. Thus fish can be considered a potential structuring force on benthic communities in shallow soft-bottom areas. Caging experiments of one to two month's duration (partial and total exclosure of fish and enclosure with perch) induced only minor changes in the benthic community. These results support the a priori hypothesis. One of our main conclusions is, however, that fish predation and other biotic interactions (competition, disturbance, etc.) together with abiotic factors play some role in the structuring processes. Multilevel testing is needed in studies on biotic interactions in the marine environment. Results from a specific environment should not automatically be applied to other kinds of habitats.

  9. Polar bear and walrus response to the rapid decline in Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, K.; Whalen, M.; Douglas, D.; Udevitz, M.; Atwood, T.; Jay, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic is warming faster than other regions of the world due to positive climate feedbacks associated with loss of snow and ice. One highly visible consequence has been a rapid decline in Arctic sea ice over the past 3 decades - a decline projected to continue and result in ice-free summers likely as soon as 2030. The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) and the Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) are dependent on sea ice over the continental shelves of the Arctic Ocean's marginal seas. The continental shelves are shallow regions with high biological productivity, supporting abundant marine life within the water column and on the sea floor. Polar bears use sea ice as a platform for hunting ice seals; walruses use sea ice as a resting platform between dives to forage for clams and other bottom-dwelling invertebrates. How have sea ice changes affected polar bears and walruses? How will anticipated changes affect them in the future?

  10. Time-Resolved Dynamics of Shallow Acceptor Transitions in Silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinh, N. Q.; Redlich, B.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Pidgeon, C. R.; Greenland, P. T.; Lynch, S. A.; Aeppli, G.; Murdin, B. N.

    2013-01-01

    Shallow group-V donors in silicon may be thought of as hydrogenlike, and shallow acceptors are similarly described by effective-mass theory with similar energy scales, which implies that donor and acceptor excitations should be just as long-lived. Yet, spectral widths of acceptors are considerably

  11. Saltwater Intrusion Appraisal of Shallow Aquifer in Burutu Area of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: The area is faced with endemic groundwater quality problems arising from abandoned shallow and deep boreholes. The abandonment of shallow boreholes is ... profiling, as well as small loop electromagnetic survey are veritable tools for the delineation of saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers (Hwang et al.,.

  12. Probing the transition from shallow to deep convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, Zhiming [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Gentine, Pierre [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2016-05-01

    In this funded project we highlighted the components necessary for the transition from shallow to deep convection. In particular we defined a prototype of shallow to deep convection, which is currently being implemented in the NASA GISS model. We also tried to highlight differences between land and oceanic convection.

  13. Shallow bias in Mediterranean paleomagnetic directions caused by inclination error

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijgsman, W.; Tauxe, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    A variety of paleomagnetic data from the Mediterranean region show a strong bias toward shallow inclinations. This pattern of shallow inclinations has been interpreted to be the result of (1) major northward terrane displacement, (2) large nondipole components in the Earth’s magnetic field, and

  14. Shallow-water spinal injuries – devastating but preventable | Vlok ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shallow-water spinal injuries – devastating but preventable. AJ Vlok, I Petersen, RN Dunn, J Stander. Abstract. Background. Shallow-water diving injuries have devastating consequences for patients and their families, requiring intensive use of resources in both the acute and rehabilitative phases of injury. With the final ...

  15. Systematic study of shallow junction formation on germanium substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellings, Geert; Rosseel, Erik; Clarysse, Trudo

    2011-01-01

    Published results on Ge junctions are benchmarked systematically using RS–XJ plots. The electrical activation level required to meet the ITRS targets is calculated. Additionally, new results are presented on shallow furnace-annealed B junctions and shallow laser-annealed As junctions. Co-implanti...

  16. Three-dimensional structures in a shallow flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cieslik, A.R.; Kamp, L.P.J.; Clercx, H.J.H.; van Heijst, G.J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Contrary to two-dimensional turbulence, decaying turbulence in a shallow fluid layer is characterized by the presence of long-lived meandering currents. This paper investigates the structure of vertical motion present inside the free-surface shallow-fluid layer and its relation with these currents.

  17. Hydrochemistry of shallow groundwater and surface water in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted on the hydrochemistry of shallow groundwater and surface water in the Ndop plain, North West Cameroon. The objectives were to determine the physico-chemical characteristics of water, controls on water chemistry and suitability for drinking and irrigation. Forty-six shallow groundwater and 26 ...

  18. Shallow-water loading tides in Japan from superconducting gravimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Hoyer, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Gravity observations from superconducting gravimeters are used to observe loading effects from shallow-water tides on the Japanese cast and west coasts. Non-linear third-diurnal and higher-frequency shallow-water tides are identified in the tide-gauge observations from these coastal areas. The mo...

  19. Model studies on the eutrophication of shallow lakes and ditches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, J.H.

    2005-01-01

    This study concentrates on eutrophication effects in shallow lakes and ponds on the one hand and in ditches (small water channels in agricultural areas) on the other. In shallow lakes (up to ca 4 m of depth), ihe clear-water community characterized by macrophytes is generally replaced by a dominance

  20. Saltwater Intrusion Appraisal of Shallow Aquifer in Burutu Area of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The area is faced with endemic groundwater quality problems arising from abandoned shallow and deep boreholes. The abandonment of shallow boreholes is presumed to have been caused by saltwater intrusion from the ocean. The objective of this paper is to examine if saltwater is responsible for groundwater ...

  1. Sea Level Acceleration in the China Seas

    OpenAIRE

    Yongcun Cheng; Tal Ezer; Hamlington, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    While global mean sea level rise (SLR) and acceleration (SLA) are indicators of climate change and are informative regarding the current state of the climate, assessments of regional and local SLR are essential for policy makers responding to, and preparing for, changes in sea level. In this work, three acceleration detection techniques are used to demonstrate the robust SLA in the China Seas. Interannual to multidecadal sea level variations (periods >2 years), which are mainly related to ...

  2. Shallow landslides: lessons from Sachseln 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Frank; Grunder, Karl

    2017-04-01

    A retrospective analysis of the heavy rainstorm in 1997 in Sachseln with almost 500 shallow landslides - half of them within forests, the other half in open land - reveals interesting perspectives. A total of 218 of these landslides were comprehensively documented, including 107 events triggered in forests that have been subjected to a more accurate analysis. A preliminary statistical approach based on distribution functions applied to slope inclination α and shear angle Φ' gives rise to the assumption that optimally managed forests have high protection potential - optimally managed in this context means the NaiS standard improved by findings of our project SOSTANAH. NaiS: www.bafu.admin.ch/publikationen/publikation/00732/index.html?lang=de SOSTANAH: www.slf.ch/ueber/organisation/oekologie/gebirgsoekosysteme/projekte/SOSTANH/index_EN Thus, it can be speculated that up to about four-fifths of these landslides could have been prevented, provided the forests fit the corresponding requirements. In an exemplary calculation, only about 80 ha of the investigated forest area (˜400 ha) would have been affected or roughly 20 landslides triggered of the 107 analysed. Given the specific characteristics for sites and improvement in Sachseln, the approximate costs for forest management, starting from an almost uncovered landslide area up to a mature protection forest (120 years), are estimated at about 35'000 CHF ha-1, yielding yearly 300 CHF ha-1 (price basis: 2016). The expected average annual expenditure to sustainably ensure continued existence of optimal protection forests is slightly lower. In the case of Sachseln, this amounts to about 12 Mio CHF for the whole area of 400 ha and a 100-year period (cost estimate by oeko-b, Stans: www.oeko-b.ch). The total damage of the 1997 event in Sachseln, with an estimated return period of 100 years, exceeded 120 Mio CHF. Of course, destruction was not merely caused by or obviously linked to shallow landslides. Nevertheless, from a

  3. Shallow Water Optical Water Quality Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostater, Charles

    1998-01-01

    This NASA grant was funded as a result of an unsolicited proposal submission to Kennedy Space Center. The proposal proposed the development and testing of a shallow water optical water quality buoy. The buoy is meant to work in shallow aquatic systems (ponds, rivers, lagoons, and semi-enclosed water areas where strong wind wave action is not a major environmental During the project period of three years, a demonstration of the buoy was conducted. The last demonstration during the project period was held in November, 1996 when the buoy was demonstrated as being totally operational with no tethered communications line. During the last year of the project the buoy was made to be solar operated by large gel cell batteries. Fund limitations did not permit the batteries in metal enclosures as hoped for higher wind conditions, however the system used to date has worked continuously for in- situ operation of over 18 months continuous deployment. The system needs to have maintenance and somewhat continuous operational attention since various components have limited lifetime ages. For example, within the last six months the onboard computer has had to be repaired as it did approximately 6 months after deployment. The spectrograph had to be repaired and costs for repairs was covered by KB Science since no ftmds were available for this purpose after the grant expired. Most recently the computer web page server failed and it is currently being repaired by KB Science. In addition, the cell phone operation is currently being ftmded by Dr. Bostater in order to maintain the system's operation. The above points need to be made to allow NASA to understand that like any sophisticated measuring system in a lab or in the field, necessary funding and maintenance is needed to insure the system's operational state and to obtain quality factor. The proposal stated that the project was based upon the integration of a proprietary and confidential sensor and probe design that was developed by

  4. Coast-to-Coast Record of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum in Shallow Marine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, C. M.; Bohaty, S. M.; Sluijs, A.; Brinkhuis, H.; Zachos, J. C.

    2005-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is characterized by rapid global warming, as much as 8° C, and a negative excursion in carbon isotopes (CIE). The magnitude of the CIE indicates rapid transfer of a large mass of carbon to the atmosphere. The rise in temperature associated with the addition of this greenhouse gas appears to have also altered global humidity and precipitation patterns, a feature often best expressed in near shore depositional facies. One goal of this study is to complement the deep-sea climate record with near shore, shallow-water records of regional climate change. We present sedimentologic, fossil, and geochemical data from three shallow-marine sections, one from the U.S. Pacific margin (Lodo formation, now exposed in the mountains of Central California), and two from the U.S. Atlantic Coastal Plain in New Jersey (drill sites at Bass River and Wilson Lake). Stable isotope analyses of foraminifera indicate that the magnitude of the isotopic excursion is globally similar to that in the deep-sea, although detail observations suggest that the excursion in bulk carbonate values in NJ sections is somewhat larger at the base of the CIE (Δδ13C=~4-6‰), particularly inshore, than what is typically measured in the deep sea (Δδ13C=~3‰). Carbonate dissolution may be truncating the excursion recorded in pelagic records. However, given the discrepancy between bulk and the foraminiferal data, we suspect that either diagenesis and/or vital effects and/or season-dependent intensification of the hydrological cycle and nutrient input may be contributing to more negative values in the bulk δ13C in shallow marine sections. We also find that δ13C of marine organic matter in each of these sections records the CIE, a particularly useful feature in sections containing few calcareous microfossils (due to dissolution or dilution). The magnitude of the excursion in these records is similar to the bulk carbonate record. Finally, clay mineral analysis

  5. Habitat preferences among three top predators inhabiting a degraded ecosystem, the Black Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Sánchez-Cabanes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether there is evidence of widespread niche partitioning based on environmental factors in the Black Sea and tested the hypothesis that physiographic factors may be employed as predictors. It addresses poorly researched areas with good habitat potential for the only three cetacean subspecies living in this area: the Black Sea short-beaked common dolphin (Delphinus delphis spp. ponticus, the Black Sea bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus spp. ponticus and the Black Sea harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena spp. relicta. Generalized additive models (GAMs were used to analyse data collected from multiple sources. In total, 745 sightings of the three species between 1998 and 2010 throughout the Black Sea were included. The analysis found depth and sea surface temperature to be the most important variables for separating the occurrence of the three species. Common dolphins occurred mainly in deep waters and in areas where the sea surface temperature was low, bottlenose dolphins were distributed primarily in shallower and warmer waters than common dolphins, and harbour porpoises were distributed in shallower waters with lower sea surface temperature than bottlenose dolphins. This study suggests strong niche segregation among the three cetacean species. The study is also the first contribution to the basic information of cetacean species distribution and habitat preferences in the Black Sea as a whole. Knowledge of the distribution of the three dolphin species in the study area is essential to establish conservation measures for these populations.

  6. The palaeogeographic outlines of the Caucasus in the Jurassic: The Caucasian Sea and the Neotethys Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruban Dmitry A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Caucasian Sea, fringing the northern margin of the Jurassic Neotethys Ocean, largely covered the Caucasus. Continental, shallow-marine and deep-marine palaeoenvironments delineate palaeogeographic outlines for three significant time slices: the Late Toarcian, the Early Bajocian and the Middle Oxfordian. These new palaeogeographic outlines of the Caucasus and adjacent territories match the Neotethys Ocean reconstructions. In the Late Toarcian the Caucasian Sea embraced the Greater Caucasus Basin and the Black Sea Caspian Sea Basin, which were divided by the Northern Transcaucasian Arc; it opened to the Neotethys Ocean which covered the Exterior Caucasian Basin. In the Early Bajocian, the Caucasian Sea only embraced the Greater Caucasus Basin; it opened the epicontinental seas of the Russian Platform, connecting them with the Neotethys Ocean by straits between islands of the Transcaucasian Arc. In the Middle Oxfordian, the Caucasian Sea which further embraced the Greater Caucasus Basin had its outer shelf fringed by carbonate build-ups. The connection between the Russian Platform shallow sea and the Neotethys Ocean was maintained. In the course of the Jurassic, a seaway developed along the northern margin of the Neotethys, of which the Caucasian Sea became a significant part.

  7. Transports on the Shelf of the Southeastern Bering Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, D. D.; Stabeno, P. J.; Hermann, A. J.

    2002-12-01

    The eastern half of the Bering Sea basin is composed of a wide (>500 kilometer) continental shelf (Unimak Pass. Unimak Pass (relatively shallow, Unimak Pass, the current splits, with part forming a weak, but persistent current to the northeast along the Alaskan peninsula and the 50-meter isobath, and part flowing northward along the 100-meter isobath toward the Pribilof Islands. It is conjectured that these flows eventually rejoin at the Bering Straits, accounting for a third of the transport there. To track the fate of water entering the southeastern Bering Sea through Unimak Pass, we will present simulated drifter trajectories from a regional circulation model of the northeastern Pacific and Bering Sea. These simulated trajectories will be compared with the large data set of real drifters that have been released in the Bering Sea. We will also compare transport results to hydrographic data collected along transects off Unimak Island, Port Moller, Cape Newenham and Nunivak Island.

  8. Shallow water currents during Hurricane Andrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Timothy R.; Glenn, Scott M.

    1999-10-01

    Oceanographic measurements are used in combination with a numerical model to examine the influence of stratification on shallow water currents during the directly forced stage of a tropical cyclone (Hurricane Andrew) on the continental shelf. The following stratification-dependent coastal processes are examined: (1) turbulent mixing, (2) coastally trapped waves, (3) near-inertial oscillations, and (4) upwelling and downwelling. Turbulent mixing was strong within 1 Rw (radius of maximum winds) of the storm track, and stratification was nearly destroyed. Turbulent mixing was weak at distances greater than 2 Rw. The dominant coastal wave was a barotropic Kelvin wave generated as the storm surge relaxed after landfall. Baroclinic near-inertial oscillations were dominant at the shelf break and occurred along with a barotropic response on the middle shelf. Downwelling-favorable flow developed east of the track prior to the storm peak, and upwelling-favorable flow evolved west of the track as the eye crossed the shelf. The idealized storm flow was modified by local barotropic and baroclinic pressure gradients on the shelf. Ocean circulation during Hurricane Andrew was hindcast using both stratified and unstratified three-dimensional numerical models. For areas within 1 Rw of the storm track, the unstratified model matched the observed currents better than the stratified model, partly because of errors in the initial stratification. At distances greater than 2 Rw the influence of stratification increases, and the unstratified model does not reproduce the observed upwelling-favorable flow.

  9. Separating steric sea level and ocean bottom pressure in the Tropical Asian Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinherenbrink, M.; Riva, R.; Frederikse, T.

    2016-12-01

    Direct observations of Ocean Bottom Pressure (OBP) in the Tropical Asian Seas (TAS) are normally avoided due to a cut-off of typically 300 km in GRACE gravity fields from the coast to limit hydrological leakage.The limited number of temperature and salinity observations lead to interpolation problems and make it difficult to infer steric changes in the region.To close the sea level budget in the tropical ocean using Argo, GRACE and altimetry, the TAS area is therefore omitted (Von Schuckmann et al., 2014).However, due to its large sea level trends, the omission of the TAS in global sea level budgets leads to an underestimation of 0.5 mm/yr between 2005-2011 (Von Schuckmann et al., 2014).Furthermore, no studies exist to date that separate total sea level into the steric and OBP components, which in combination with large bathymetry fluctuations, hampers the understanding of the dynamics causing interannual variability in sea level in the area. We separate the steric and OBP components in the TAS, using altimetry, optimally filtered ITSG-Grace2016 gravity fields and temperature and salinity grids from various ocean reanalyses.By combining the observations from the three sources in a statistically optimal way, we aim to get the best separation of OBP and steric sea level.The sum of the OBP and steric sea level trends is statistically equal to trend differences caused by omitting the TAS, which makes it possible to correct global sea level budgets.Secondly, the interannual variability is mostly captured by regression with the El-Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) 3.4 index.In the deeper regions of the TAS this is primarily a steric signal, however in the shallow areas the interannual signal is of OBP origin.Finally, a large fraction of the OBP trends in the TAS region is explained by trends derived from fingerprints of Greenland, Anarctic, and glacier melt as well as dam retention and land hydrology plus a contribution of the nodal cycle.However, especially in the

  10. Simulation of high concentration of iron in dense shelf water in the Okhotsk Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Uchimoto, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Nishioka, Jun; MITSUDERA, Humio; MISUMI, Kazuhiro; Tsumune, Daisuke; WAKATSUCHI, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    An ocean general circulation model coupled with a simple biogeochemical model was developed to simulate iron circulation in and around the Sea of Okhotsk. The model has two external sources of iron: dust iron at the sea surface and sedimentary iron at the seabed shallower than 300 m. The model represented characteristic features reasonably well, such as high iron concentration in the dense shelf water (DSW) and its mixing, which extends southward in the intermediate layer from the northwester...

  11. The use of sea ice habitat by female polar bears in the Beaufort Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durner, George M.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Nielson, Ryan M.; McDonald, Trent

    2003-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) depend on ice-covered seas to satisfy life history requirements. Modern threats to polar bears include oil spills in the marine environment and changes in ice composition resulting from climate change. Managers need practical models that explain the distribution of bears in order to assess the impacts of these threats. We used stepwise procedures to create resource selection models of habitat use for radio-collared female polar bears in the Beaufort Sea. Sea ice characteristics and ocean depths at known polar bear locations were compared to the same features at randomly selected locations. Models generated for each of four seasons confirmed complexities of habitat use by polar bears and their response to numerous factors. Bears preferred shallow water areas where ice concentrations were > 80 % and different ice types intersected. Variation among seasons was reflected mainly in differential selection of ice stages, floe sizes, and their interactions. Water depth, total ice concentration and distance to the nearest interface between different ice types were significant terms in models for most seasons. Variation in ice stage and form also appeared in three models, and several interaction effects were identified. Habitat selection by polar bears is likely related to prey abundance and availability. Use of habitats in shallow water possibly reflects higher productivity in those areas. Habitat use in close proximity to ice edges is probably related to greater access of prey in those habitats.

  12. High Attenuation Rate for Shallow, Small Earthquakes in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Hongjun; Koketsu, Kazuki; Miyake, Hiroe

    2017-09-01

    We compared the attenuation characteristics of peak ground accelerations (PGAs) and velocities (PGVs) of strong motion from shallow, small earthquakes that occurred in Japan with those predicted by the equations of Si and Midorikawa (J Struct Constr Eng 523:63-70, 1999). The observed PGAs and PGVs at stations far from the seismic source decayed more rapidly than the predicted ones. The same tendencies have been reported for deep, moderate, and large earthquakes, but not for shallow, moderate, and large earthquakes. This indicates that the peak values of ground motion from shallow, small earthquakes attenuate more steeply than those from shallow, moderate or large earthquakes. To investigate the reason for this difference, we numerically simulated strong ground motion for point sources of M w 4 and 6 earthquakes using a 2D finite difference method. The analyses of the synthetic waveforms suggested that the above differences are caused by surface waves, which are predominant at stations far from the seismic source for shallow, moderate earthquakes but not for shallow, small earthquakes. Thus, although loss due to reflection at the boundaries of the discontinuous Earth structure occurs in all shallow earthquakes, the apparent attenuation rate for a moderate or large earthquake is essentially the same as that of body waves propagating in a homogeneous medium due to the dominance of surface waves.

  13. Pressure/temperature/salinity profiler measurements collected in the Sea of Japan, 2001-06 to July 2001, under the sponsorship of the Office of Naval Research (NODC Accession 0002416)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pressure/temperature/salinty profiles collected in support of a study to investigate the shallow and deep current variability in the southwest Japan/East Sea....

  14. Inverted echo sounder measurements collected in the Japan/East Sea, between 1999-06 to July 2001, under the sponsorship of the Office of Naval Research (NODC Accession 0002331)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observations were conducted from June 1999 to July 2001 to study the shallow and deep current variability in the southwest Japan/East Sea. Data were collected during...

  15. Recent trends in the abundance of plaice Pleuronectes platessa and cod Gadus morhua in shallow coastal waters of the Northeastern Atlantic continental shelf – a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutz, Jörg; Støttrup, Josianne Gatt; Stenberg, Claus

    2016-01-01

    responsible for any trends. At present, only a few studies exist on the trends of abundance of plaice or cod, namely from the Bay of Biscay, the North Sea and the Skagerrak/Kattegat. They suggest a declining abundance in coastal, shallow areas and – at least for plaice – a latitudinal gradient with an erosion...... of juveniles and adult fish to increasing seawater temperature are the main hypotheses for changes in distribution and abundance of both fish species in the North Sea/Bay of Biscay. However, temperature alone cannot explain the observed decline of fish in coastal areas, and the causes may be more complex...

  16. Characteristics and habitat of deep vs. shallow slow slip events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, L. M.; Saffer, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    It is well-known that slow slip events (SSEs) occur over a large depths range at subduction zones, from near the trench to 40-50 km depth. We review the characteristics and in situ conditions of shallow vs. deep SSEs, including duration, magnitude, seismic signatures, and inferences about the rock properties and stress state in their source regions. Deep SSEs (>15 km depth) exhibit a range of durations (days to years), while shallow SSEs (Mexico, Cascadia), although shallow SSEs offshore Costa Rica and Nankai have also been linked to tremor and/or very low frequency earthquakes. Shallow SSEs in central Japan (Boso), Hikurangi, and Ecuador are associated with bursts of microseismicity. Deep SSEs occur at the inferred down-dip limit of the locked seismogenic zone, whereas many shallow SSEs occur at mostly creeping plate boundaries (Hikurangi, Ecuador), or updip of the seismogenic zone (Nankai, Costa Rica). Despite the differences, there are many similarities between deep and shallow SSEs, suggesting that common physical mechanisms may be responsible for slow slip in these vastly different environments. Deep and shallow SSEs span a range of temperature and pressure conditions, implying that the physical conditions hosting SSEs are broad. Seismic imaging of shallow and deep SSE regions indicate likely fluid overpressure, supporting the idea that low effective normal stress may be a common factor promoting SSE behavior. High fluid pressure in shallow SSE zones is largely from disequilibrium compaction of low permeability marine sediments, while fluids in deep SSE regions are likely sourced from metamorphic dehydration reactions. That all shallow SSEs observed thus far are shorter in duration than many deep SSEs may be due to a number of factors, including higher effective stress on the plate boundary in deep vs. shallow regions, and differing degrees of subduction interface heterogeneity. Tremor vs. microseismicity may be related to the scale and distribution of

  17. Practical Soil-Shallow Foundation Model for Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa Leblouba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil-shallow foundation interaction models that are incorporated into most structural analysis programs generally lack accuracy and efficiency or neglect some aspects of foundation behavior. For instance, soil-shallow foundation systems have been observed to show both small and large loops under increasing amplitude load reversals. This paper presents a practical macroelement model for soil-shallow foundation system and its stability under simultaneous horizontal and vertical loads. The model comprises three spring elements: nonlinear horizontal, nonlinear rotational, and linear vertical springs. The proposed macroelement model was verified using experimental test results from large-scale model foundations subjected to small and large cyclic loading cases.

  18. Diversity of Total Bacterial Communities and Chemoautotrophic Populations in Sulfur-Rich Sediments of Shallow-Water Hydrothermal Vents off Kueishan Island, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Cheung, Man Kit; Liu, Rulong; Wong, Chong Kim; Kwan, Hoi Shan; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou

    2017-04-01

    Shallow-water hydrothermal vents (HTVs) are an ecologically important habitat with a geographic origin similar to that of deep-sea HTVs. Studies on shallow-water HTVs have not only facilitated understanding of the influences of vents on local ecosystems but also helped to extend the knowledge on deep-sea vents. In this study, the diversity of bacterial communities in the sediments of shallow-water HTVs off Kueishan Island, Taiwan, was investigated by examining the 16S ribosomal RNA gene as well as key functional genes involved in chemoautotrophic carbon fixation (aclB, cbbL and cbbM). In the vent area, Sulfurovum and Sulfurimonas of Epsilonproteobacteria appeared to dominate the benthic bacterial community. Results of aclB gene analysis also suggested involvement of these bacteria in carbon fixation using the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle. Analysis of the cbbM gene showed that Alphaproteobacterial members such as the purple non-sulfur bacteria were the major chemoautotrophic bacteria involving in carbon fixation via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle. However, they only accounted for cycle is the major chemoautotrophic carbon fixation pathway in sediments of the shallow-water HTVs off Kueishan Island.

  19. Even Shallower Exploration with Airborne Electromagnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auken, E.; Christiansen, A. V.; Kirkegaard, C.; Nyboe, N. S.; Sørensen, K.

    2015-12-01

    Airborne electromagnetics (EM) is in many ways undergoing the same type rapid technological development as seen in the telecommunication industry. These developments are driven by a steadily increasing demand for exploration of minerals, groundwater and geotechnical targets. The latter two areas demand shallow and accurate resolution of the near surface geology in terms of both resistivity and spatial delineation of the sedimentary layers. Airborne EM systems measure the grounds electromagnetic response when subject to either a continuous discrete sinusoidal transmitter signal (frequency domain) or by measuring the decay of currents induced in the ground by rapid transmission of transient pulses (time domain). In the last decade almost all new developments of both instrument hardware and data processing techniques has focused around time domain systems. Here we present a concept for measuring the time domain response even before the transient transmitter current has been turned off. Our approach relies on a combination of new instrument hardware and novel modeling algorithms. The newly developed hardware allows for measuring the instruments complete transfer function which is convolved with the synthetic earth response in the inversion algorithm. The effect is that earth response data measured while the transmitter current is turned off can be included in the inversion, significantly increasing the amount of available information. We demonstrate the technique using both synthetic and field data. The synthetic examples provide insight on the physics during the turn off process and the field examples document the robustness of the method. Geological near surface structures can now be resolved to a degree that is unprecedented to the best of our knowledge, making airborne EM even more attractive and cost-effective for exploration of water and minerals that are crucial for the function of our societies.

  20. On the origin of endemic species in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    DiBattista, Joseph

    2015-10-19

    Aim The geological and palaeo-climatic forces that produced the unique biodiversity in the Red Sea are a subject of vigorous debate. Here, we review evidence for and against the hypotheses that: (1) Red Sea fauna was extirpated during glacial cycles of the Pleistocene and (2) coral reef fauna found refuge within or just outside the Red Sea during low sea level stands when conditions were inhospitable. Location Red Sea and Western Indian Ocean. Methods We review the literature on palaeontological, geological, biological and genetic evidence that allow us to explore competing hypotheses on the origins and maintenance of shallow-water reef fauna in the Red Sea. Results Palaeontological (microfossil) evidence indicates that some areas of the central Red Sea were devoid of most plankton during low sea level stands due to hypersaline conditions caused by almost complete isolation from the Indian Ocean. However, two areas may have retained conditions adequate for survival: the Gulf of Aqaba and the southern Red Sea. In addition to isolation within the Red Sea, which separated the northern and southern faunas, a strong barrier may also operate in the region: the cold, nutrient-rich water upwelling at the boundary of the Gulf of Aden and the Arabian Sea. Biological data are either inconclusive or support these putative barriers and refugia, but no data set, that we know of rejects them. Genetic evidence suggests that many endemic lineages diverged from their Indian Ocean counterparts long before the most recent glaciations and/or are restricted to narrow areas, especially in the northern Red Sea. Main conclusions High endemism observed in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden appears to have multiple origins. A cold, nutrient-rich water barrier separates the Gulf of Aden from the rest of the Arabian Sea, whereas a narrow strait separates the Red Sea from the Gulf of Aden, each providing potential isolating barriers. Additional barriers may arise from environmental gradients

  1. The structure and evolution of sea breezes during the qingdao olympics sailing test event in 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Chunyan; Xue, Ming; Gao, Shouting

    2009-01-01

    Using data from automatic surface weather stations, buoys, lidar and Doppler, the diurnal variation and the three-dimensional structure of the sea breezes near the sailing sites of the Good Luck Beijing—2006 Qingdao International Regatta from 18 to 31 August 2006 are analyzed. Results show that excluding rainy days and days affected by typhoon, the sea breezes occur nearly every day during this period. When Qingdao is located at the edge of the subtropical high at 500 hPa, the sea breeze is usually stronger, around 3-4 m s-1. It starts at around 1100 to 1300 LST and lasts about 6 hours. The direction of the sea breeze tends to be southeasterly. When Qingdao is under the control of the subtropical high, the sea breeze is usually weaker, less than 2.5 m s-1 throughout the day, and begins later, between 1300 and 1500 LST. In this case, the direction of the sea breeze is variable from easterly to southeasterly. Most sea breezes in Qingdao are very shallow, up to 300 meters deep. Strong sea breezes can reach 1.5 km in depth and can push as far as 100 km inland. If the Huanghai sea breeze moves inland and meets the sea breeze of the Jiaozhou Bay in the western part of Qingdao, the sea breeze will strengthen and form three boundaries due to the interaction of the two sea breezes.

  2. Eelgrass re-establishment in shallow estuaries is affected by drifting macroalgae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canal-Verges, Paula; Potthoff, M.; Hansen, F. T.

    2014-01-01

    surface sediment. Furthermore, drifting macroalgae ballistically damage eelgrass beds and increase seedling mortality. The frequency and impact of drifting macroalgae in Odense Fjord was evaluated with an agent-based model. The aims of this model were to understand and predict the mobility......(-2). The simulated pattern of drift distribution and hot spots for both brown and green algae fitted the geographical locations in which the algae community was observed on the field. Such high values for sea bed disturbances will have a major impact on the light availability due to sediment......It has been suggested that bedload transport of macroalgae in shallow lagoons and estuaries may negatively impact eelgrass through increased turbidity and physical stress. Increased turbidity and reduced benthic light availability for eelgrass occur when bedload transport of macroalgae erode...

  3. The effects of sewage discharge on shallow hard substrate sessile assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlizzi, A; Fraschetti, S; Guidetti, P; Boero, F

    2002-06-01

    On rocky shores, sewage discharges can modify natural distribution patterns of sessile organisms. The impact of sewage on shallow hard substrate assemblages has been assessed along SW Apulian coast (Ionian Sea, Italy), providing a framework to evaluate the benefits of future sewage displacement to deeper waters. Four locations (three controls and one putatively impacted) were selected and three sites were chosen at each location. Each site was sampled by 10 replicate photographic records. Univariate analyses revealed that the outfall did not affect the spatial distribution of number of taxa, total cover and abundance of some dominant taxa (mostly algae, sponges and bryozoans). The outfall negatively influenced the natural distribution pattern of filamentous green algae, whilst some algae (i.e. Gelidiales and Colpomenia sinuosa) were exclusively present at the impacted location. Multivariate analyses revealed that the outfall heavily modified the natural pattern of variability in the structure of the assemblage.

  4. An enigmatic, diminutive theropod footprint in the shallow marine Pliensbachian Hasle Formation, Bornholm, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milàn, Jesper; Surlyk, Finn

    2015-01-01

    A well-preserved three-toed footprint, measuring 34 mm in length from a very small predatory dinosaur with an estimated hip height of 153 mm and a total body length around 50 cm including tail, is reported from the type section of the marine Lower Jurassic (Pliensbachian), Hasle Formation...... on the Danish island of Bornholm in the Baltic Sea. The morphology of the footprint is similar to the ichnogenus Stenonyx Lull 1904 from the contemporaneous Pliensbachian Szydlowek site in Poland. Apart from the Polish material, footprints from diminutive dinosaurs are rare and reported from few other...... localities around the world. The occurrence of a diminutive dinosaur footprint in a shallow marine sandstone is enigmatic. The well-defined morphology of the footprint, together with the very small size of the trackmaker, excludes the possibility that the track was emplaced by a swimming or wading animal...

  5. Ca Isotopes in Shallow Water Marine Carbonates - How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Embrace Diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, J. A.; Blättler, C. L.; Swart, P. K.; Santiago Ramos, D. P.; Akhtar, A.

    2016-12-01

    The geochemistry of shallow water carbonate sediments has been used to reconstruct the temperature and isotopic composition of seawater as well as the global carbon and oxygen cycles over >3 billion years of Earth history. An underlying and heavily debated assumption in most studies utilizing the chemistry of carbonate minerals is that the chemical composition of the sample accurately preserves a record of the fluid from which it precipitated. Diagenetic or post-depositional alteration of the geochemistry by either meteoric or marine fluids is a widespread phenomenon in modern and recent shallow and deep-sea carbonate sediments. Diagenetic alteration is observed at all scales, from micron, to thin section, to stratigraphic units, making it difficult to quantify its effects on the geochemistry of carbonate sediments in the geologic record. Here we explore the possibility of using the Ca isotopic composition of sedimentary carbonates as a diageneitc tool using a large data set of Neogene carbonate sediments and associated pore fluids from the Bahamas. We find that the δ44/40Ca values of bulk carbonate sediments at these sites exhibits systematic stratigraphic variability that is related to both mineralogy and diagenesis (marine and meteoric). The observed variability in bulk sediment Ca isotopes requires large-scale fluid-dominated early marine diagenesis in significant water depths (up to 650 mbsl) and suggests that fluid-dominated early marine diagenesis plays a fundamental role in determining the geochemistry (δ13C, δ18O, and trace elements) of shallow water carbonate sediments in the geologic record.

  6. Biological response to geochemical and hydrological processes in a shallow submarine cave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. RADOLOVIĆ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Croatian coastal karst abounds in submerged caves that host a variety of environmental conditions depending on the geomorphology, depth and submarine groundwater discharge. One example is the Y-Cave, a shallow, mostly submerged, horizontal cave on Dugi Otok Island, on the eastern Adriatic coast. This study was aimed at examining the temporal and spatial variability of the marine cave environment, including temperature, salinity, light intensity, cave morphology and hydrodynamism, along with the dissolutional effect caused by the mixing of sea and freshwater. The general distribution of organisms in the Y-Cave was positively correlated to the light gradient and reduced water circulation, thus the highest species diversity and abundance were recorded in the front part of the cave. The phylum Porifera was the most dominant group, and the poriferan species diversity in the cave ranks among the ten highest in the Mediterranean. The middle part of the cave, although completely dark, hosts an abundant population of the gastropod Homalopoma sanguineum and clusters of the gregarious brachiopod Novocrania anomala, whose presence could be connected to tidal hydrodynamics. The absence/scarcity of sessile marine organisms and pronounced corrosion marks at shallow depths inside the cave suggest a freshwater impact in the upper layers of the water column. A year long experiment with carbonate tablets revealed three different, independent ongoing processes affected by the position in the cave: bioaccumulation, dissolution and mechanical erosion. The results of long-term temperature readings also revealed water column stratification within the cave, which was not disturbed by either tidal or wave action. The shallow, partly submerged and relatively small Y-Cave is characterised by a suite of complex environmental conditions, which, together with the resulting distribution of organisms, are unique to this cave.

  7. Health status evaluation of shallow coral reefs in Cahuita and Manzanillo, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Araya-Vargas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentation, increased tourism, coral diseases and high ocean temperatures have become a permanent threat to reef areas worldwide. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the health status of the shallow reefs in Cahuita and Manzanillo, Limon, Costa Rica. A database, including species of all colonial sessile cnidarians and their known diseases, was created for the studied area. Subsequently, 15 transects were surveyed along the coast in 1-3 m deep bands of 10 x 1 m following the AGRRA V5.4 protocol. Of the 27 species found, 21 were reported from Cahuita and 23 from Manzanillo. The shallow coral reefs’ health status in both sites was good in terms of diseases, bleaching and mortality due to their low incidence. Sessile cnidarians’ species composition, colonies’ sizes and coverage were dominated by massive and lobate scleractinians such as Pseudodiploria clivosa and Siderastrea siderea. Macroalgal coverage was low (below 20% and mostly represented by brown algae. Sea urchins’ densities were also low (below 1 ind/m2 except for Echinometra viridis in Manzanillo and they trend to continue decreasing as the years go by.

  8. Tools to Perform Local Dense 3D Reconstruction of Shallow Water Seabed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïca Avanthey

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tasks such as distinguishing or identifying individual objects of interest require the production of dense local clouds at the scale of these individual objects of interest. Due to the physical and dynamic properties of an underwater environment, the usual dense matching algorithms must be rethought in order to be adaptive. These properties also imply that the scene must be observed at close range. Classic robotized acquisition systems are oversized for local studies in shallow water while the systematic acquisition of data is not guaranteed with divers. We address these two major issues through a multidisciplinary approach. To efficiently acquire on-demand stereoscopic pairs using simple logistics in small areas of shallow water, we devised an agile light-weight dedicated system which is easy to reproduce. To densely match two views in a reliable way, we devised a reconstruction algorithm that automatically accounts for the dynamics, variability and light absorption of the underwater environment. Field experiments in the Mediterranean Sea were used to assess the results.

  9. Morphological, sediment and soil chemical characteristics of dry tropical shallow reservoirs in the Southern Mexican Highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis ARREDONDO-FIGUEROA

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The morphometry, sediment and soil chemical characteristics of eleven dry tropical shallow reservoirs situated in Southern Mexican Highlands were studied. The reservoirs are located at 1104 to 1183 meters above sea level in a sedimentary area. Seventeen morphometric and eight sediment and soil chemical parameters were measured. The results of the morphometric parameters showed that these reservoirs presented a soft and roughness bottom, with an ellipsoid form and a concave depression that permit the mix up of water and sediments, causing turbidity and broken thermal gradients; their slight slopes allowed the colonization of submerged macrophyte and halophyte plants and improved the incidence of sunlight on water surface increasing evaporation and primary productivity. Dry tropical shallow reservoirs have fluctuations in area, and volume according to the amount of rainfall, the effect of evaporation, temperature, lost volume for irrigation, and other causes. The sand-clay was the most important sediment texture and their values fluctuated with the flooded periods. The concentration-dilution cycle showed a direct relationship in the percentage of organic matter in the soil as well as with pH, soil nitrogen and phosphorus. El Tilzate, El Candelero and El Movil were related by the shore development and high concentrations of organic matter and nitrogen in the soil. Finally, we emphasize the importance of this study, in relation to possible future changes in morphometrical parameters as a consequence of human impact.

  10. Local and remote response of the North Sea dynamics to morphodynamic changes in the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Benjamin; Stanev, Emil Vassilev; Zhang, Yinglong Joseph

    2016-05-01

    The response of the tidal system in the southern North Sea to morphodynamic changes was investigated in a modelling study using fine resolution bathymetric observations available for 1982-2011. The Semi-implicit Cross-scale Hydroscience Integrated System Model (SCHISM) was set up for the different sets of bathymetries. One set of bathymetry was compiled from a large number of bathymetric measurements over many years, while the other two reflected bathymetry state in the area of Wadden Sea during 2000 and 2011, respectively. The temporal and spatial evolution of bathymetry was dominated by migration of tidal channels. The M4 tide showed larger sensitivity to bathymetric change in the Wadden Sea than the M2 tide, whereas the structure of the latter remained rather robust. The largest change of the tidal wave due to the differences in bathymetries was located off the North Frisian Wadden Sea. Traces of changes were also found far away from the regions of their origin because the tidal waves in the North Sea propagate the local disturbances basin-wide. This illustrated an efficient physical mechanism of teleconnectivity, i.e. effecting the local responses to the larger-scale or remote change of ocean bottom caused by erosion and deposition. The tidal distortion resulting from the relatively small bathymetric changes was substantial, particularly in the coastal zone. This is a manifestation of the nonlinear tidal transformation in shallow oceans and is crucial for the sediment transport and the morphodynamic feedback, because of the altered tidal asymmetry.

  11. Studies on thermophysical properties at New Jersey Shallow Shelf (IODP Expedition 313)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, A.; Pechnig, R.; Inwood, J.; LOFI, J.; Bosch, F. P.; Clauser, C.

    2011-12-01

    The IODP drilling expedition 313 New Jersey Shallow Shelf was proposed for obtaining deep sub-seafloor samples and downhole logging measurements in the crucial inner shelf region.The inner to central shelf off-shore New Jersey is an ideal location for studying the history of sea-level changes and its relationship to sequence stratigraphy and onshore/offshore groundwater flows. The region features rapid depositional rates, tectonic stability, and well-preserved, cosmopolitan age control fossils suitable for characterizing the sediments of this margin throughout the time interval of interest. Past sea-level rise and fall is documented in sedimentary layers deposited during Earth's history. In addition, the inner shelf is characterised by relatively fresh pore water intervals alternating vertically with saltier intervals (Mountain et al., 2010). Therefore, three boreholes were drilled in the so-called New Jersey/Mid-Atlantic transect during IODP Expedition 313 New Jersey Shallow Shelf. Numerous questions have arisen concerning the age and origin of the brackish waters recovered offshore at depth. Here we present an analysis of thermophysical properties to be used as input parameters in constructing numerical models for future groundwater flow simulations. Our study is based mainly on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements for inferring porosity and permeability, and thermal conductivity. We performed NMR measurements on samples from boreholes M0027A, M0028A and M0029A and thermal conductivity measurements on the whole round cores prior to the Onshore Party. These results are compared with data from alternative laboratory measurements and with petrophysical properties inferred from downhole logging data.

  12. Proceedings. NETEC workshop on shallow land disposal technology, 1997. 10. 20 - 10. 21, Taejon, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This proceedings cover the design and operational experience of shallow land disposal facility, and safety assessment and licensing issues of shallow land disposal facility. Ten articles are submitted.

  13. Deglacial meltwater pulse 1B and Younger Dryas sea levels revisited with boreholes at Tahiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, Edouard; Hamelin, Bruno; Delanghe-Sabatier, Doriane

    2010-03-05

    Reconstructing sea-level changes during the last deglaciation provides a way of understanding the ice dynamics that can perturb large continental ice sheets. The resolution of the few sea-level records covering the critical time interval between 14,000 and 9,000 calendar years before the present is still insufficient to draw conclusions about sea-level changes associated with the Younger Dryas cold event and the meltwater pulse 1B (MWP-1B). We used the uranium-thorium method to date shallow-living corals from three new cores drilled onshore in the Tahiti barrier reef. No significant discontinuity can be detected in the sea-level rise during the MWP-1B period. The new Tahiti sea-level record shows that the sea-level rise slowed down during the Younger Dryas before accelerating again during the Holocene.

  14. Shallow-Water Benthic Habitats of Southwest Puerto Rico

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shallow-water (<30m) benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of two areas in Southwest Puerto Rico (PR), including the Guanica Bay/La Parguera...

  15. Biodiversity and spatial distribution of Rotifera in a shallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biodiversity and spatial distribution of Rotifera in a shallow hyperuetrophic tropical Lake (Cameroon). TSH Zebaze, T Njine, N Kemka, D Niyitegeka, M Nola, MS Foto, E Djiukom, G Ajeagah, HJ Dumont ...

  16. Monitoring culvert load with shallow filling under Geofoam areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Geofoam and the "Imperfect Ditch" method can be used effectively on embankment projects to reduce pressures on underground structures when sufficient fill height is available to create an arching effect. When the fill height is too shallow the archin...

  17. Delineating shallow ground water irrigated areas in the Atankwidi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    3International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Ghana. Accepted 28 April, 2010. The major goal of this research was to delineate the shallow groundwater irrigated ..... Catchment, West Africa—A Case Study of Groundwater Recharge in.

  18. Shallow-water Benthic Habitats in Jobos Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shallow-water (<30m) benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico were mapped and characterized using visual interpretation...

  19. The effects of soil suction on shallow slope stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the slope failures associated with clayey soils so engineers can better : understand the problem and better predict shallow slope stability, and implement preventive : measures if necessary. This research also examines the mec...

  20. An exactly soluble model of a shallow double well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz-Vega, R., E-mail: rodrigo.munoz@uacm.edu.mx [Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México, Centro Histórico, Fray Servando Teresa de Mier 92, Col. Centro, Del. Cuauhtémoc, México DF, CP 06080 (Mexico); López-Chávez, E., E-mail: elopezc@hotmail.com [Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México, Centro Histórico, Fray Servando Teresa de Mier 92, Col. Centro, Del. Cuauhtémoc, México DF, CP 06080 (Mexico); Salinas-Hernández, E., E-mail: esalinas@ipn.mx [ESCOM-IPN, Av Juan de Dios Bátiz s/n, Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos, Col Lindavista, Del G A Madero, México DF, CP 07738 (Mexico); Flores-Godoy, J.-J., E-mail: job.flores@ibero.mx [Departamento de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prol. Paseo de la Reforma 880, Col Lomas de Santa Fe, Del A Obregón, México DF, CP 01219 (Mexico); Fernández-Anaya, G., E-mail: guillermo.fernandez@ibero.com [Departamento de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prol. Paseo de la Reforma 880, Col Lomas de Santa Fe, Del A Obregón, México DF, CP 01219 (Mexico)

    2014-06-13

    Shallow one-dimensional double-well potentials appear in atomic and molecular physics and other fields. Unlike the “deep” wells of macroscopic quantum coherent systems, shallow double wells need not present low-lying two-level systems. We argue that this feature, the absence of a low-lying two-level system in certain shallow double wells, may allow the finding of new test grounds for quantum mechanics in mesoscopic systems. We illustrate the above ideas with a family of shallow double wells obtained from reflectionless potentials through the Darboux–Bäcklund transform. - Highlights: • We present double wells not conforming to the low-lying two-state system model. • Models similar to ours appear in atomic and molecular physics. • Here there is no classically prohibited region between wells. • The ground probability is peaked at the position of classical unstable equilibrium in this models.

  1. The Gulf: a young sea in decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Charles; Al-Husiani, Mohsen; Al-Jamali, F; Al-Yamani, Faiza; Baldwin, Rob; Bishop, James; Benzoni, Francesca; Dutrieux, Eric; Dulvy, Nicholas K; Durvasula, Subba Rao V; Jones, David A; Loughland, Ron; Medio, David; Nithyanandan, M; Pilling, Graham M; Polikarpov, Igor; Price, Andrew R G; Purkis, Sam; Riegl, Bernhard; Saburova, Maria; Namin, Kaveh Samimi; Taylor, Oliver; Wilson, Simon; Zainal, Khadija

    2010-01-01

    This review examines the substantial changes that have taken place in marine habitats and resources of the Gulf over the past decade. The habitats are especially interesting because of the naturally high levels of temperature and salinity stress they experience, which is important in a changing world climate. However, the extent of all natural habitats is changing and their condition deteriorating because of the rapid development of the region and, in some cases from severe, episodic warming episodes. Major impacts come from numerous industrial, infrastructure-based, and residential and tourism development activities, which together combine, synergistically in some cases, to cause the observed deterioration in most benthic habitats. Substantial sea bottom dredging for material and its deposition in shallow water to extend land or to form a basis for huge developments, directly removes large areas of shallow, productive habitat, though in some cases the most important effect is the accompanying sedimentation or changes to water flows and conditions. The large scale of the activities compared to the relatively shallow and small size of the water body is a particularly important issue. Important from the perspective of controlling damaging effects is the limited cross-border collaboration and even intra-country collaboration among government agencies and large projects. Along with the accumulative nature of impacts that occur, even where each project receives environmental assessment or attention, each is treated more or less alone, rarely in combination. However, their combination in such a small, biologically interacting sea exacerbates the overall deterioration. Very few similar areas exist which face such a high concentration of disturbance, and the prognosis for the Gulf continuing to provide abundant natural resources is poor. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Hydrogen sulphide poisoning of shallow seas following the end-Triassic extinction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richoz, S.; van de Schootbrugge, B.; Pross, J.; Püttmann, W.; Quan, T.M.; Lindström, S.; Heunisch, C.; Fiebig, J.; Maquil, R.; Schouten, S.; Hauzenberger, C.A.; Wignall, P.B.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of complex life over the past 600 million years was disrupted by at least five mass extinctions, one of which occurred at the close of the Triassic period. The end-Triassic extinction corresponds to a period of high atmospheric-CO2 concentrations caused by massive volcanism and biomass

  3. Hydrogen sulphide poisoning of shallow seas following the end-Triassic extinction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richoz, S.; van de Schootbrugge, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/376758562; Pross, J.; Püttmann, W.; Quan, T.M.; Lindström, S.; Heunisch, C.; Fiebig, J.; Maquil, R.; Schouten, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/137124929; Hauzenberger, C.A.; Wignall, P.B.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of complex life over the past 600 million years was disrupted by at least five mass extinctions, one of which occurred at the close of the Triassic period. The end-Triassic extinction corresponds to a period of high atmospheric-CO 2 concentrations caused by massive volcanism and

  4. Nutrients and primary production in a shallow stratified ecosystem in the Iroise Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Birrien, J.L; Wafar, M.V.M.; LeCorre, P.; Riso, R.

    stream_size 22 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name J_Plankton_Res_13_721.pdf.txt stream_source_info J_Plankton_Res_13_721.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  5. Directionality and spread of shallow water waves along the eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Anoop, T.R.

    are provided with bulk estimates of wave height, pe- riod and direction, and analytic models for wave directional spectra are used to generate representative wave conditions for engineering applications (Lee et al., 2010). The wave energy distribution... will result in the shortcoming inherent to programs. Model- free methods such as maximum likelihood method (MLM), maximum entropy method (MEM) (Borgman, 1982), iter- ated maximum likelihood method (IMLM) (Pawka, 1983), extended maximum entropy method (EMEM...

  6. Performance analysis of passive time reversal communication technique for multipath interference in shallow sea acoustic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Yukihiro; Shimura, Takuya; Deguchi, Mitsuyasu; Watanabe, Yoshitaka; Ochi, Hiroshi; Meguro, Koji

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the performance of passive time reversal (PTR) communication techniques in multipath rich underwater acoustic environments is investigated. It is recognized empirically and qualitatively that a large number of multipath arrivals could generally raise the demodulation result of PTR. However, the relationship between multipath and the demodulation result is hardly evaluated quantitatively. In this study, the efficiency of the PTR acoustic communication techniques for multipath interference cancelation was investigated quantitatively by applying a PTR-DFE (decision feed-back filter) scheme to a synthetic dataset of a horizontal underwater acoustic channel. Mainly, in this study, we focused on the relationship between the signal-to-interference ratio (SIR) of datasets and the output signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) of demodulation results by a parametric study approach. As a result, a proportional relation between SIR and OSNR is confirmed in low-SNR datasets. It was also found that PTR has a performance limitation, that is OSNR converges to a typical value depending on the number of receivers. In conclusion, results indicate that PTR could utilize the multipath efficiently and also withstand the negative effects of multipath interference at a given limitation.

  7. The dispersal of phytoplankton populations by enhanced turbulent mixing in a shallow coastal sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jaimie; Nimmo-Smith, W. Alex M.; Hosegood, Philip J.; Torres, Ricardo

    2014-08-01

    A single tidal cycle survey in a Lagrangian reference frame was conducted in autumn 2010 to evaluate the impact of short-term, episodic and enhanced turbulent mixing on large chain-forming phytoplankton. Observations of turbulence using a free-falling microstructure profiler were undertaken, along with near-simultaneous profiles with an in-line digital holographic camera at station L4 (50° 15‧ N 4° 13‧ W, depth 50 m) in the Western English Channel. Profiles from each instrument were collected hourly whilst following a drogued drifter. Results from an ADCP attached to the drifter showed pronounced vertical shear, indicating that the water column structure consisted of two layers, restricting interpretation of the Lagrangian experiment to the upper ~ 25 m. Atmospheric conditions deteriorated during the mid-point of the survey, resulting in values of turbulent dissipation reaching a maximum of 10- 4 W kg- 1 toward the surface in the upper 10 m. Chain-forming phytoplankton > 200 μm were counted using the data from the holographic camera for the two periods, before and after the enhanced mixing event. As mixing increased phytoplankton underwent chain breakage, were dispersed by advection through their removal from the upper to lower layer and subjected to aggregation with other suspended material. Depth averaged counts of phytoplankton were reduced from a maximum of around 2050 L- 1 before the increased turbulence, to 1070 L- 1 after, with each of these mechanisms contributing to this reduction. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of phytoplantkon populations to moderate increases in turbulent activity, yielding consequences for accurate forecasting of the role played by phytoplankton in climate studies and also for the ecosystem in general in their role as primary producers.

  8. First record of fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus Linnaeus, 1758) in Kotor Bay (South Adriatic Sea)

    OpenAIRE

    Joksimović, Aleksandar; MANDIĆ, Milica; Ðurović, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A single individual of fin whale, Balaenoptera physalus (Linnaeus, 1758) was recorded on 17 December 2011 in Kotor Bay (southeastern Adriatic Sea). The depth was between 5 and 7 meters. The specimen was about 10 meters long and this paper reports the first occurrence of the fin whale in very shallow waters in the most inner part of Boka Kotorska Bay.

  9. First record of the polychaetous annelid Diopatra micrura Pires et al., 2010 in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. ARIAS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Until now the only recognised species of the onuphid genus Diopatra in the Mediterranean Sea was D. neapolitana. This paper reports the presence of another species, D. micrura, in the western Mediterranean, occurring in shallow waters along the coasts of southeastern Spain.

  10. PHYTOPLANKTON OF THE NORTH-SEA AND ITS DYNAMICS - A REVIEW

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    REID, PC; LANCELOT, C; GIESKES, WWC; HAGMEIER, E; WEICHART, G

    1990-01-01

    Phytoplankton is the major contributor to algal biomass and primary production of the North Sea, although crops of macroalgae can locally be up to 2000 g C.m-2 along the coast of the U.K. and Norway, and microphytobenthos dominates production in the shallow tidal flat areas bordering the coasts of

  11. Benthic mineralization rates at two locations in the southern North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osinga, R; Kop, AJ; Duineveld, GCA; Prins, RA; VanDuyl, FC

    1996-01-01

    Benthic oxygen uptake, sulphate reduction and benthic bacterial production were measured at two contrasting locations in the southern North Sea: the shallow and turbulent Broad Fourteens area in the Southern Eight, and the deeper Oyster Grounds, a deposition area, where thermohaline stratification

  12. Ocean Circulation and Exchanges Through the Bering Sea: 1979-2001 Model Results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2005-01-01

    A model has been developed and run with sufficiently high resolution (̂9 km and 45 levels) and a large enough spatial domain to allow for realistic representation of flow through the narrow and shallow straits in the Bering Sea region...

  13. Effects of boating activities on aquatic vegetation in the Stockholm archipelago, Baltic Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksson, Klemens; Sandström, Alfred; Isaeus, M.; Schreiber, H.; Karas, P.

    2004-01-01

    The aquatic vegetation in 44 similar shallow and sheltered inlets exposed to different kinds of disturbances by boating was studied in a rocky archipelago in the Baltic Sea. The results indicate that both recreational boating activities and traffic by medium sized ferryboats may cause significant

  14. Abundance and tidal behaviour of pelagic fish in the gateway to the Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couperus, Bram; Gastauer, Sven; Fässler, Sascha M.M.; Tulp, Ingrid; Veer, van der Henk W.; Poos, Jan Jaap

    2016-01-01

    The shallow coast of The Netherlands is an important habitat for small pelagic fish. They form one of the major links between plankton and the higher trophic levels. Predatory fish, sea mammals and birds rely on small pelagic fish as a major food source. Currently, monitoring of fish in the Dutch

  15. Abundance and tidal behaviour of pelagic fish in the gateway to the Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couperus, B.; Gastauer, S.; Fässler, S.M.M.; Tulp, I.; van der Veer, H.W.; Poos, J.J.

    2016-01-01

    The shallow coast of The Netherlands is an important habitat for small pelagic fish. They form one of the major links between plankton and the higher trophic levels. Predatory fish, sea mammals and birds rely on small pelagic fish as a major food source. Currently, monitoring of fish in the Dutch

  16. New lucinid bivalves from shallow and deeper water of the Indian and West Pacific Oceans (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Lucinidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Taylor

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Four new species and a new genus of lucinid bivalves are described from shallow and deeper waters in the Indian and West Pacific Oceans. The new genus Scabrilucina (subfamily Lucininae includes the little-known S. victorialis (Melvill, 1899 from the Arabian Sea and S. vitrea (Deshayes, 1844 from the Andaman Sea as well as a new species S. melvilli from the Torres Strait off northeastern Australia. Ferrocina brunei new species (Lucininae was recovered from 60 m near oil drilling activities off Borneo; its anatomy confirmed the presence of symbiotic bacteria. Two unusual deeper water species of Leucosphaerinae are described, both species included in on-going molecular analyses; Gonimyrtea ferruginea from 400–650 m in the southwest Pacific and Myrtina reflexa from 200–825 m off Zanzibar and Madagascar.

  17. Benthic solute exchange and carbon mineralization in two shallow subtidal sandy sediments: Effect of advective pore-water exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cook, Perran L. M.; Wenzhofer, Frank; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2007-01-01

    We conducted four field campaigns to evaluate benthic O-2 consumption and the effect of advective pore-water flow in nearshore permeable sediments in the North Sea and Baltic Sea. Advective pore-water transport had a marked effect on the benthic exchange of O-2 and TCO2 in benthic chamber...... of O-2 distribution across ripples, and also deep subsurface O-2 pools, being observed. Mineralization pathways were predominantly aerobic when benthic mineralization rates were low and advective pore-water flow high as a result of well-developed sediment topography. By contrast, mineralization...... proceeded predominantly through sulfate reduction when benthic mineralization rates were high and advective pore-water flow low as a result of poorly developed topography. Previous studies of benthic mineralization in shallow sandy sediments have generally ignored these dynamics and, hence, have overlooked...

  18. Long-term Ocean Bottom Monitoring for Shallow Slow Earthquakes in the Hyuga-nada, Nankai Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Y.; Shinohara, M.; Yamada, T.; Nakahigashi, K.; Shiobara, H.; Mochizuki, K.; Maeda, T.; Obara, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Hyuga-nada region, nearby the western end of the Nankai Trough in Japan, is one of the most active areas of shallow slow earthquakes in the world. Recently, ocean-bottom observation of offshore seismicity near the trench succeeded in detecting shallow tremor. The observed traces contained a complete episode lasting for one month exhibiting similar migration property of deep tremor [Yamashita et al., 2015]. This activity was associated with shallow very-low-frequency earthquake (VLFE) activity documented by land-based broadband seismic network. The coincidence between tremor and VLFE activities and similarity of their migration pattern show strong resemblance with the episodic tremor and slip episodes; this similarity suggests that the tremor activity in the shallow plate boundary may also be coupled with VLFE and short-term slow slip events in this area. It is important clarifying the seismicity including slow earthquakes to understand the slip behavior at a shallow plate boundary, and to improve assessments of the possibility of tsunamigenic megathrust earthquake that is anticipated to occur at the Nankai Trough. Motivated by these issues, we started long-term ocean-bottom monitoring in this area from May 2014 using 3 broadband and 7 short-period seismometers. In January 2015, we replaced the instruments and obtained the first data which includes minor shallow tremor and VLFE activity on June 1-3, 2014. Preliminary results of data processing show that the shallow tremor activity occurred at the northwestern part of the 2013 activity. The location corresponds the point where the tremors stopped migrating to further north direction and turned sharply eastward in the 2013 activity. On the other hand, clear tremor migration was not found in the 2014 activity. This local activity may imply that regional/small-scale heterogeneous structures such as a subducting sea mount affect the activity pattern. During the 2014 observation, many ordinary earthquakes also

  19. Numerical simulation of mechanical compaction of deepwater shallow sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jin; Wu, Shiguo; Deng, Jingen; Lin, Hai; Zhang, Hanyu; Wang, Jiliang; Gao, Jinwei

    2018-02-01

    To study the compaction law and overpressure evolution in deepwater shallow sediments, a large-strain compaction model that considers material nonlinearity and moving boundary is formulated. The model considers the dependence of permeability and material properties on void ratio. The modified Cam-Clay model is selected as the constitutive relations of the sediments, and the deactivation/reactivation method is used to capture the moving top surface during the deposition process. A one-dimensional model is used to study the compaction law of the shallow sediments. Results show that the settlement of the shallow sediments is large under their own weight during compaction. The void ratio decreases strictly with burial depth and decreases more quickly near the seafloor than in the deeper layers. The generation of abnormal pressure in the shallow flow sands is closely related to the compaction law of shallow sediments. The two main factors that affect the generation of overpressure in the sands are deposition rate and permeability of overlying clay sediments. Overpressure increases with an increase in deposition rate and a decrease in the permeability of the overlying clay sediment. Moreover, an upper limit for the overpressure exists. A two-dimensional model is used to study the differential compaction of the shallow sediments. The pore pressure will still increase due to the inflow of the pore fluid from the neighboring clay sediment even though the deposition process is interrupted.

  20. Simulating deep convection with a shallow convection scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hohenegger

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Convective processes profoundly affect the global water and energy balance of our planet but remain a challenge for global climate modeling. Here we develop and investigate the suitability of a unified convection scheme, capable of handling both shallow and deep convection, to simulate cases of tropical oceanic convection, mid-latitude continental convection, and maritime shallow convection. To that aim, we employ large-eddy simulations (LES as a benchmark to test and refine a unified convection scheme implemented in the Single-column Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM. Our approach is motivated by previous cloud-resolving modeling studies, which have documented the gradual transition between shallow and deep convection and its possible importance for the simulated precipitation diurnal cycle.

    Analysis of the LES reveals that differences between shallow and deep convection, regarding cloud-base properties as well as entrainment/detrainment rates, can be related to the evaporation of precipitation. Parameterizing such effects and accordingly modifying the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, it is found that the new unified scheme can represent both shallow and deep convection as well as tropical and mid-latitude continental convection. Compared to the default SCAM version, the new scheme especially improves relative humidity, cloud cover and mass flux profiles. The new unified scheme also removes the well-known too early onset and peak of convective precipitation over mid-latitude continental areas.

  1. Impact of accelerated future global mean sea level rise on hypoxia in the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, H. E. M.; Höglund, A.; Eilola, K.; Almroth-Rosell, E.

    2017-07-01

    Expanding hypoxia is today a major threat for many coastal seas around the world and disentangling its drivers is a large challenge for interdisciplinary research. Using a coupled physical-biogeochemical model we estimate the impact of past and accelerated future global mean sea level rise (GSLR) upon water exchange and oxygen conditions in a semi-enclosed, shallow sea. As a study site, the Baltic Sea was chosen that suffers today from eutrophication and from dead bottom zones due to (1) excessive nutrient loads from land, (2) limited water exchange with the world ocean and (3) perhaps other drivers like global warming. We show from model simulations for the period 1850-2008 that the impacts of past GSLR on the marine ecosystem were relatively small. If we assume for the end of the twenty-first century a GSLR of +0.5 m relative to today's mean sea level, the impact on the marine ecosystem may still be small. Such a GSLR corresponds approximately to the projected ensemble-mean value reported by the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. However, we conclude that GSLR should be considered in future high-end projections (>+1 m) for the Baltic Sea and other coastal seas with similar hydrographical conditions as in the Baltic because GSLR may lead to reinforced saltwater inflows causing higher salinity and increased vertical stratification compared to present-day conditions. Contrary to intuition, reinforced ventilation of the deep water does not lead to overall improved oxygen conditions but causes instead expanded dead bottom areas accompanied with increased internal phosphorus loads from the sediments and increased risk for cyanobacteria blooms.

  2. How propeller suction is the dominant factor for ship accidents at shallow water conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Dursun; Alpar, Bedri; Ozeren, Sinan

    2017-04-01

    The laminar flow comes to the fore with the disappearance of the several other directions in the internal displacements in the water current. Due to the dominant speed direction during the straightforward motion of the ship, the underwater hull is associated with the continuous flow of laminar currents. The open marine environment acts as a compressible liquid medium because of the presence of many variables about water volume overflow boundaries where the ship is associated. Layers of water rising over the sea surface due to ship's body and the propeller's water push provides loss of liquid lifting force for the ship. These situations change the well-known sea-floor morphology and reliable depth limits, and lead to probable accidents. If the ship block coefficient for the front side is 0.7 or higher, the "squat" will be more on the bow, because the associated factor "displacement volume" causes to the low-pressure environment due to large and rapid turbulence. Thus, the bow sinks further, which faced with liquid's weaker lift force. The vessels Gerardus Mercator, Queen Elizabeth and Costa Concordia had accidents because of unified reasons of squat, fast water mass displacement by hull push and propeller suction interaction. In the case of water mass displacement from the bow side away, that accident occurred in 2005 by the vessel Gerardus Mercator with excessive longitudinal trim angularity in the shallow water. The vessel Costa Concordia (2012), voluminous water displaced from the rear left side was an important factor because of the sharp manoeuvre of that the captain made before the accident. Observations before the accident indicate that full-speed sharp turn provided listed position for the ship from left (port side) in the direction of travel before colliding and then strike a rock on the sloping side of the seabed. The reason why the ship drifted to the left depends mainly the water discharge occurred at the left side of the hull during left-hand rudder

  3. Deep-Sea Phylogeographic Structure Shaped by Paleoenvironmental Changes and Ongoing Ocean Currents Around the Sea of Japan in a Crangonid Shrimp, Argis lar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Junta; Drumm, David T; Iguchi, Akira; Ueda, Yuji; Yamashita, Yuho; Ito, Masaki; Tominaga, Osamu; Kai, Yoshiaki; Ueno, Masahiro; Yamashita, Yoh

    2017-10-01

    The deep-sea crangonid shrimp, Argis lar, is a highly abundant species from the northern Pacific Ocean. We investigated its phylogeographic and demographic structure across the species' extensive range, using mitochondrial DNA sequence variation to evaluate the impact of deep-sea paleoenvironmental dynamics in the Sea of Japan on population histories. The haplotype network detected three distinct lineages with allopatric isolation, which roughly corresponded to the Sea of Japan (Lineage A), the northwestern Pacific off the Japanese Archipelago (Lineage B), and the Bering Sea/Gulf of Alaska (Lineage C). Lineage A showed relatively low haplotype and nucleotide diversity, a significantly negative value of Tajima's D, and a star-shaped network, suggesting that anoxic bottom-water in the Sea of Japan over the last glacial period may have brought about a reduction in the Sea of Japan population. Furthermore, unexpectedly, the distributions of Lineage A and B were closely related to the pathways of the two ocean currents, especially along the Sanriku Coast. This result indicated that A. lar could disperse across shallow straits through the ocean current, despite their deep-sea adult habitat. Bayesian inference of divergence time revealed that A. lar separated into three lineages approximately 1 million years before present (BP) in the Pleistocene, and then had been influenced by deep-sea paleoenvironmental change in the Sea of Japan during the last glacial period, followed by a more recent larval dispersal with the ocean current since ca. 6 kilo years BP.

  4. Exploitation of deep-sea resources: the urgent need to understand the role of high pressure in the toxicity of chemical pollutants to deep-sea organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Nélia C; Calado, Ricardo; Soares, Amadeu M V M

    2014-02-01

    The advent of industrial activities in the deep sea will inevitably expose deep-sea organisms to potentially toxic compounds. Although international regulations require environmental risk assessment prior to exploitation activities, toxicity tests remain focused on shallow-water model species. Moreover, current tests overlook potential synergies that may arise from the interaction of chemicals with natural stressors, such as the high pressures prevailing in the deep sea. As pressure affects chemical reactions and the physiology of marine organisms, it will certainly affect the toxicity of pollutants arising from the exploitation of deep-sea resources. We emphasize the need for environmental risk assessments based on information generated from ecotoxicological trials that mimic, as close as possible, the deep-sea environment, with emphasis to a key environmental factor - high hydrostatic pressure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Estimation of freak wave occurrence in shallow water regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashima, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    In the last two decades, freak waves have become an important topic in engineering and science and are sometimes featured by a single and steep crest causing severe damage to offshore structures and vessels. An accurate estimation of maximum wave height and prediction of freak wave occurrence frequency is important for marine safety and ocean developments. According to several studies on freak waves, the deep-water third-order nonlinearity (quasi-resonant four-wave interactions) can lead to a significant enhancement of freak wave occurrence from normality. However, it is not clear the behavior of offshore generated freak waves shoaling to shallow water regions. In general, a numerical simulation based on Boussinesq model has been frequently and widely used to estimate wave transformation in shallow water regions and has high-level performance in the design of coast and harbor structures in Japan. However, it is difficult to describe the freak wave occurrence from deep to shallow water regions by the Boussinesq model because it can express only up to the second-order nonlinear interactions. There is a gap of governing equation between deep and shallow water regions from the extreme wave modeling point of view. It is necessary to investigate the aftereffects of generated freak waves by the third-order nonlinear interactions in deep water regions and their propagation to shallow water regions using the Boussinesq model. In this study, the model experiments in a wave tank and numerical simulations based on the Boussinesq model were conducted to estimate the freak wave occurrence from deep to shallow water regions. In the model experiments, the maximum wave height increases with an increase in kurtosis by the third-order nonlinear interactions in deep water regions. The dependence of kurtosis on freak wave occurrence weakens by the second-order nonlinear interactions associated with wave shoaling if dimensionless water depth kph becomes shallower than 1.363, which kp

  6. Assessment of Marine Mammal Impact Zones for Use of Military Sonar in the Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Mathias H; Johansson, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Military sonars are known to have caused cetaceans to strand. Navies in shallow seas use different frequencies and sonar pulses, commonly frequencies between 25 and 100 kHz, compared with most studied NATO sonar systems that have been evaluated for their environmental impact. These frequencies match the frequencies of best hearing in the harbor porpoises and seals resident in the Baltic Sea. This study uses published temporary and permanent threshold shifts, measured behavioral response thresholds, technical specifications of a sonar system, and environmental parameters affecting sound propagation common for the Baltic Sea to estimate the impact zones for harbor porpoises and seals.

  7. Sea Turtle Interaction Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sea Turtle Interaction Report is a report sent out in pdf format to authorized individuals that summarizes sea turtle interactions in the longline fishery. The...

  8. Sea Lion Diet Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — California sea lions pup and breed at four of the nine Channel Islands in southern California. Since 1981, SWFSC MMTD has been conducting a diet study of sea lions...

  9. Study of dilution, height, and lateral spread of vertical dense jets in marine shallow water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nadeem; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    This study provides information for the design of sea outfalls to dispose of brine from desalination plants into shallow lagoons of the sea. The behavior of vertical dense jets was studied experimentally by discharging cold saline water vertically upward into a tank filled with hot freshwater under stagnant ambient conditions. The minimum return point dilution, μmin, was determined using thermocouples, and the maximum height, Z(m), and the lateral spread, R(sp), of the fountains were determined by observing shadowgraph pictures. The flow was turbulent and the densimetric Froude number Fr(0) varied from 9 to 18.8. Three mixing regimes were identified: deep, intermediate, and impinging mixing regimes. In the intermediate mixing regime, μ(min) and Z(m) were analyzed and compared with the results of deep water studies. The μ(min) and Z(m) values of fountains at an intermediate water depth were found to be higher than those of fountains at deep water depths. In the impinging regime, μ(min) decreases rapidly when a fountain starts to continuously impinge on the water surface, showing a noticeable disturbance in the water surface. Therefore, a good rule of thumb is to reduce the flow through multiport diffusers from desalination plants when the noticeable disturbance is observed from the top water surface.

  10. Distribution patterns of shallow water polychaetes (Annelida along the Alexandria coast, Egypt (eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. DORGHAM

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Shallow hard bottom and intertidal soft bottom polychaete assemblages of the Alexandria coast, southeastern Mediterranean (Levantine Sea, were studied during a complete annual cycle in order to analyze spatial temporal patterns of variation in assemblages, and relevant factors related to polychaete distribution. The present study recorded a total of 73 species, belonging to Syllidae (22 species, Nereididae (9 species, Serpulidae (6 species, Eunicidae (5 species and other 19 families. The assemblages experienced pronounced spatial and temporal variation throughout the study area, but spatial variation appeared more important in determining the observed patterns. Polychaete distribution related to variation of grain size and sessile macrobenthos cover suggesting that these structural variables accounted more than the physical-chemical ones (namely BOD, dissolved oxygen, organic carbon, organic matter, salinity, temperature, pH in influencing the patterns of assemblages’ distribution. The present study is the southeastern-most one dealing with ecology and distribution patterns of hard bottom polychaetes from the Mediterranean Sea, as well as one of the few studies dealing with intertidal soft bottom polychaetes in the Levant Basin.

  11. Trading shallow safety for deep sleep: Juvenile green turtles select deeper resting sites as they grow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Kristen M.; White, Connor F.; Iverson, Autumn R; Whitney, Nick

    2016-01-01

    To better protect endangered green sea turtles Chelonia mydas, a more thorough understanding of the behaviors of each life stage is needed. Although dive profile analyses obtained using time-depth loggers have provided some insights into habitat use, recent work has shown that more fine-scale monitoring of body movements is needed to elucidate physical activity patterns. We monitored 11 juvenile green sea turtles with tri-axial acceleration data loggers in their foraging grounds in Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida, USA, for periods ranging from 43 to 118 h (mean ± SD: 72.8 ± 27.3 h). Approximately half of the individuals (n = 5) remained in shallow (overall mean depth less than 2 m) water throughout the experiment, whereas the remaining individuals (n = 6) made excursions to deeper (4 to 27 m) waters, often at night. Despite these differences in depth use, acceleration data revealed a consistent pattern of diurnal activity and nocturnal resting in most individuals. Nocturnal depth differences thus do not appear to represent differences in behavior, but rather different strategies to achieve the same behavior: rest. We calculated overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA) to assess the relative energetic cost of each behavioral strategy in an attempt to explain the differences between them. Animals in deeper water experienced longer resting dives, more time resting per hour, and lower mean hourly ODBA. These results suggest that resting in deeper water provides energetic benefits that outweigh the costs of transiting to deep water and a potential increased risk of predation.

  12. Wave Glider Monitoring of Sediment Transport and Dredge Plumes in a Shallow Marine Sandbank Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Van Lancker

    Full Text Available As human pressure on the marine environment increases, safeguarding healthy and productive seas increasingly necessitates integrated, time- and cost-effective environmental monitoring. Employment of a Wave Glider proved very useful for the study of sediment transport in a shallow sandbank area in the Belgian part of the North Sea. During 22 days, data on surface and water-column currents and turbidity were recorded along 39 loops around an aggregate-extraction site. Correlation with wave and tidal-amplitude data allowed the quantification of current- and wave-induced advection and resuspension, important background information to assess dredging impacts. Important anomalies in suspended particulate matter concentrations in the water column suggested dredging-induced overflow of sediments in the near field (i.e., dynamic plume, and settling of finer-grained material in the far field (i.e., passive plume. Capturing the latter is a successful outcome to this experiment, since the location of dispersion and settling of a passive plume is highly dependent on the ruling hydro-meteorological conditions and thus difficult to predict. Deposition of the observed sediment plumes may cause habitat changes in the long-term.

  13. Wave Glider Monitoring of Sediment Transport and Dredge Plumes in a Shallow Marine Sandbank Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lancker, Vera; Baeye, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    As human pressure on the marine environment increases, safeguarding healthy and productive seas increasingly necessitates integrated, time- and cost-effective environmental monitoring. Employment of a Wave Glider proved very useful for the study of sediment transport in a shallow sandbank area in the Belgian part of the North Sea. During 22 days, data on surface and water-column currents and turbidity were recorded along 39 loops around an aggregate-extraction site. Correlation with wave and tidal-amplitude data allowed the quantification of current- and wave-induced advection and resuspension, important background information to assess dredging impacts. Important anomalies in suspended particulate matter concentrations in the water column suggested dredging-induced overflow of sediments in the near field (i.e., dynamic plume), and settling of finer-grained material in the far field (i.e., passive plume). Capturing the latter is a successful outcome to this experiment, since the location of dispersion and settling of a passive plume is highly dependent on the ruling hydro-meteorological conditions and thus difficult to predict. Deposition of the observed sediment plumes may cause habitat changes in the long-term.

  14. Regional modeling of the Shirase drainage basin, East Antarctica: full Stokes vs. shallow ice dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddik, Hakime; Greve, Ralf; Zwinger, Thomas; Sugiyama, Shin

    2017-09-01

    A hierarchy of approximations of the force balance for the flow of grounded ice exists, ranging from the most sophisticated full Stokes (FS) formulation to the most simplified shallow ice approximation (SIA). Both are implemented in the ice flow model Elmer/Ice, and we compare them by applying the model to the East Antarctic Shirase drainage basin. First, we apply the control inverse method to infer the distribution of basal friction with FS. We then compare FS and SIA by simulating the flow of the drainage basin under present-day conditions and for three scenarios 100 years into the future defined by the SeaRISE (Sea-level Response to Ice Sheet Evolution) project. FS reproduces the observed flow pattern of the drainage basin well, in particular the zone of fast flow near the grounding line, while SIA generally overpredicts the surface velocities. As for the transient scenarios, the ice volume change (relative to the constant-climate control run) of the surface climate experiment is nearly the same for FS and SIA, while for the basal sliding experiment (halved basal friction), the ice volume change is ˜ 30 % larger for SIA than for FS. This confirms findings of earlier studies that, in order to model ice sheet areas containing ice streams and outlet glaciers with high resolution and precision, careful consideration must be given to the choice of a suitable force balance.

  15. Fluctuations in a quasi-stationary shallow cumulus cloud ensemble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sakradzija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an approach to stochastic parameterisation of shallow cumulus clouds to represent the convective variability and its dependence on the model resolution. To collect information about the individual cloud lifecycles and the cloud ensemble as a whole, we employ a large eddy simulation (LES model and a cloud tracking algorithm, followed by conditional sampling of clouds at the cloud-base level. In the case of a shallow cumulus ensemble, the cloud-base mass flux distribution is bimodal, due to the different shallow cloud subtypes, active and passive clouds. Each distribution mode can be approximated using a Weibull distribution, which is a generalisation of exponential distribution by accounting for the change in distribution shape due to the diversity of cloud lifecycles. The exponential distribution of cloud mass flux previously suggested for deep convection parameterisation is a special case of the Weibull distribution, which opens a way towards unification of the statistical convective ensemble formalism of shallow and deep cumulus clouds. Based on the empirical and theoretical findings, a stochastic model has been developed to simulate a shallow convective cloud ensemble. It is formulated as a compound random process, with the number of convective elements drawn from a Poisson distribution, and the cloud mass flux sampled from a mixed Weibull distribution. Convective memory is accounted for through the explicit cloud lifecycles, making the model formulation consistent with the choice of the Weibull cloud mass flux distribution function. The memory of individual shallow clouds is required to capture the correct convective variability. The resulting distribution of the subgrid convective states in the considered shallow cumulus case is scale-adaptive – the smaller the grid size, the broader the distribution.

  16. Shallow bedrock limits groundwater seepage-based headwater climate refugia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Martin; Lane, John W.; Snyder, Craig D.; White, Eric A.; Johnson, Zachary; Nelms, David L.; Hitt, Nathaniel P.

    2018-01-01

    Groundwater/surface-water exchanges in streams are inexorably linked to adjacent aquifer dynamics. As surface-water temperatures continue to increase with climate warming, refugia created by groundwater connectivity is expected to enable cold water fish species to survive. The shallow alluvial aquifers that source groundwater seepage to headwater streams, however, may also be sensitive to seasonal and long-term air temperature dynamics. Depth to bedrock can directly influence shallow aquifer flow and thermal sensitivity, but is typically ill-defined along the stream corridor in steep mountain catchments. We employ rapid, cost-effective passive seismic measurements to evaluate the variable thickness of the shallow colluvial and alluvial aquifer sediments along a headwater stream supporting cold water-dependent brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in Shenandoah National Park, VA, USA. Using a mean depth to bedrock of 2.6 m, numerical models predicted strong sensitivity of shallow aquifer temperature to the downward propagation of surface heat. The annual temperature dynamics (annual signal amplitude attenuation and phase shift) of potential seepage sourced from the shallow modeled aquifer were compared to several years of paired observed stream and air temperature records. Annual stream water temperature patterns were found to lag local air temperature by ∼8–19 d along the stream corridor, indicating that thermal exchange between the stream and shallow groundwater is spatially variable. Locations with greater annual signal phase lag were also associated with locally increased amplitude attenuation, further suggestion of year-round buffering of channel water temperature by groundwater seepage. Numerical models of shallow groundwater temperature that incorporate regional expected climate warming trends indicate that the summer cooling capacity of this groundwater seepage will be reduced over time, and lower-elevation stream sections may no longer serve as larger

  17. Sea level change

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Church, J.A.; Clark, P.U.; Cazenave, A.; Gregory, J.M.; Jevrejeva, S.; Levermann, A.; Merrifield, M.A.; Milne, G.A.; Nerem, R.S.; Nunn, P.D.; Payne, A.J.; Pfeffer, W.T.; Stammer, D.; Unnikrishnan, A.S.

    .................................. 1143 13.1.4 Models Used to Interpret Past and Project Future Changes in Sea Level .............................................. 1144 13.2 Past Sea Level Change ................................................. 1145 13.2.1 The Geological Record....6.5 Regional Relative Sea Level Changes ...................... 1194 13.6.6 Uncertainties and Sensitivity to Ocean/Climate Model Formulations and Parameterizations ............ 1197 13.7 Projections of 21st Century Sea Level Extremes and Waves...

  18. The North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, K.M.; Westley, K.; Erkens, G.; Hijma, M.P.; Weerts, H.J.T.

    Chapter 7 in the 'SPLASHCOS Taphonomy book', on the landscape-archaeological inventory of the North Sea as a regional sea (covering British, Dutch, Belgian, German and Danish sectors of the southern and central North Sea). Abstract: This chapter gives a general overview of knowledge regarding the

  19. Oceanography of marginal seas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.

    The North Indian Ocean consists of three marginal seas; The Persian Gulf and the Red Sea in the west and the Andaman Sea in the east. Oceanographic features of these semi-enclosed basins have been discussed in this article. While circulation...

  20. Inland-coastal water interaction: Remote sensing application for shallow-water quality and algal blooms modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melesse, Assefa; Hajigholizadeh, Mohammad; Blakey, Tara

    2017-04-01

    In this study, Landsat 8 and Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWIFS) sensors were used to model the spatiotemporal changes of four water quality parameters: Landsat 8 (turbidity, chlorophyll-a (chl-a), total phosphate, and total nitrogen) and Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWIFS) (algal blooms). The study was conducted in Florda bay, south Florida and model outputs were compared with in-situ observed data. The Landsat 8 based study found that, the predictive models to estimate chl-a and turbidity concentrations, developed through the use of stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR), gave high coefficients of determination in dry season (wet season) (R2 = 0.86(0.66) for chl-a and R2 = 0.84(0.63) for turbidity). Total phosphate and TN were estimated using best-fit multiple linear regression models as a function of Landsat TM and OLI,127 and ground data and showed a high coefficient of determination in dry season (wet season) (R2 = 0.74(0.69) for total phosphate and R2 = 0.82(0.82) for TN). Similarly, the ability of SeaWIFS for chl-a retrieval from optically shallow coastal waters by applying algorithms specific to the pixels' benthic class was evaluated. Benthic class was determined through satellite image-based classification methods. It was found that benthic class based chl-a modeling algorithm was better than the existing regionally-tuned approach. Evaluation of the residuals indicated the potential for further improvement to chl-a estimation through finer characterization of benthic environments. Key words: Landsat, SeaWIFS, water quality, Florida bay, Chl-a, turbidity

  1. Latitudinal diversity of sea anemones (Cnidaria: Actiniaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fautin, Daphne Gail; Malarky, Lacey; Soberón, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    We sought to determine if the global distribution of sea anemones (cnidarian order Actiniaria) conforms to the classic pattern of biogeography--taxon richness at the equator with attenuation toward the poles--a pattern that is derived almost entirely from data on terrestrial plants and animals. We plotted the empirical distribution of species occurrences in 10° bands of latitude based on published information, then, using the Chao2 statistic, inferred the completeness of that inventory. We found the greatest species richness of sea anemones at 30-40° N and S, with lower numbers at tropical latitudes and the fewest species in polar areas. The Chao2 statistic allowed us to infer that the richness pattern we found is not due to particularly poor knowledge of tropical sea anemones. No 10° band of latitude has less than 60% of the theoretical number of species known, but for only about half of them could we reject the null hypothesis (P = 0.05) that information is complete; anemone diversity is best documented at high latitudes. We infer that the 1089 valid species currently known constitute about 70% of the theoretical total of about 1500 species of Actiniaria. The distribution pattern of sea anemone species resembles that of planktonic foraminiferans and benthic marine algae, although planktonic bacteria, marine bivalves, and shallow and deep scleractinian corals show the terrestrial pattern of equatorial richness attenuating with latitude. Sea anemone species richness is complementary to that of scleractinian corals at many scales; our findings affirm it at the global scale.

  2. Retrieval of Inherent Optical Property in Optically Shallow Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, R. A.; Lee, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Standard ocean color algorithms for the retrieval of inherent optical properties (IOPs) either utilize spectral band ratios or inversion models tuned for the open ocean. However, such algorithms are known to fail in optically shallow waters, where bottom reflected light can contribute significantly to the water leaving radiance. Recently the SWIM algorithm was developed for improved retrievals of IOPs in optically shallow waters. This algorithm requires as input known bathymetric and substrate reflectance data that are often unknown and temporally variable for a region of interest. Here, we extend the applicability of the HOPE shallow water inversion model for the retrieval of IOPs in optically shallow waters with MODIS Aqua imagery. We investigate two approaches: (1) the use of coincident MERIS-derived bathymetry as a known input parameter to HOPE, and; (2) the inclusion the 469-, 555- and 645-nm MODIS bands without fixing any HOPE parameters to known values. With a MODIS Aqua image of the Great Bahamas Bank as an example, we compare the retrievals of aphy(443), adg(443) and bbp(443) from HOPE, SWIM and the GIOP and show that both aforementioned approaches provide temporal and spatial consistency within optically shallow water regions and between adjacent optically deep waters. Although both methods provide similar results the second approach is favored due to its independence from MERIS data.

  3. Distributed modelling of shallow landslides triggered by intense rainfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. B. Crosta

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hazard assessment of shallow landslides represents an important aspect of land management in mountainous areas. Among all the methods proposed in the literature, physically based methods are the only ones that explicitly includes the dynamic factors that control landslide triggering (rainfall pattern, land-use. For this reason, they allow forecasting both the temporal and the spatial distribution of shallow landslides. Physically based methods for shallow landslides are based on the coupling of the infinite slope stability analysis with hydrological models. Three different grid-based distributed hydrological models are presented in this paper: a steady state model, a transient "piston-flow" wetting front model, and a transient diffusive model. A comparative test of these models was performed to simulate landslide occurred during a rainfall event (27–28 June 1997 that triggered hundreds of shallow landslides within Lecco province (central Southern Alps, Italy. In order to test the potential for a completely distributed model for rainfall-triggered landslides, radar detected rainfall intensity has been used. A new procedure for quantitative evaluation of distributed model performance is presented and used in this paper. The diffusive model results in the best model for the simulation of shallow landslide triggering after a rainfall event like the one that we have analysed. Finally, radar data available for the June 1997 event permitted greatly improving the simulation. In particular, radar data allowed to explain the non-uniform distribution of landslides within the study area.

  4. Flow through a very porous obstacle in a shallow channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, M. J.; Draper, S.; Nishino, T.; Borthwick, A. G. L.

    2017-04-01

    A theoretical model, informed by numerical simulations based on the shallow water equations, is developed to predict the flow passing through and around a uniform porous obstacle in a shallow channel, where background friction is important. This problem is relevant to a number of practical situations, including flow through aquatic vegetation, the performance of arrays of turbines in tidal channels and hydrodynamic forces on offshore structures. To demonstrate this relevance, the theoretical model is used to (i) reinterpret core flow velocities in existing laboratory-based data for an array of emergent cylinders in shallow water emulating aquatic vegetation and (ii) reassess the optimum arrangement of tidal turbines to generate power in a tidal channel. Comparison with laboratory-based data indicates a maximum obstacle resistance (or minimum porosity) for which the present theoretical model is valid. When the obstacle resistance is above this threshold the shallow water equations do not provide an adequate representation of the flow, and the theoretical model over-predicts the core flow passing through the obstacle. The second application of the model confirms that natural bed resistance increases the power extraction potential for a partial tidal fence in a shallow channel and alters the optimum arrangement of turbines within the fence.

  5. Characterisation of weathered clayey soils responsible for shallow landslides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Meisina

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Shallow earth translational slides and earth flows, affecting colluvial soils derived by the weathering of the clayey bedrock, are a recurrent problem causing damage to buildings and roads in many areas of Apennines. The susceptibility assessment, e.g. slope stability models, requires the preliminary characterization of these superficial covers (lithology, geotechnical and hydraulic parameters. The aim of the work is to develop and test a methodology for the identification and mapping of weathered clayey soils responsible for shallow landslides. A test site in Northern Apennines (Province of Pavia was selected. Argillaceous and marly successions characterize the area. Shallow landslides occurred periodically due to high intensity rainfalls. Trench pits were used for the soil profile description (lithology, structure, grade of weathering, thickness and sampling. The main geological, topographic and geomorphologic parameters of shallow landslides were analysed. Field surveys were integrated with some geotechnical laboratory tests (index properties, suction and volumetric characteristic determination, methylene blue adsorption test, linear shrinkage, swell strain. Engineering geological zoning was carried out by grouping the superficial soils on the basis of the following attributes: topographic conditions (slope angle, landslide occurrence, lithology (grain size, geometry (thickness, lithology of the bedrock, hydrogeological and geotechnical characteristics. The resulting engineering-geological units (areas that may be regarded as homogeneous from the geomorphologic and engineering – geological point of view were analysed in terms of shallow slope instability.

  6. Deep-water zooplankton in the Mediterranean Sea: Results from a continuous, synchronous sampling over different regions using sediment traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovaro, R.; Carugati, L.; Boldrin, A.; Calafat, A.; Canals, M.; Fabres, J.; Finlay, K.; Heussner, S.; Miserocchi, S.; Sanchez-Vidal, A.

    2017-08-01

    Information on the dynamics of deep-sea biota is extremely scant particularly for long-term time series on deep-sea zooplankton. Here, we present the results of a deep-sea zooplankton investigation over one annual cycle based on samples from sediment trap moorings in three sub-basins along the Mediterranean Sea. Deep-sea zooplankton assemblages were dominated by copepods, as in shallow waters, only in the Adriatic Sea (>60% of total abundance), but not in the deep Ionian Sea, where ostracods represented >80%, neither in the deep Alboran Sea, where polychaetes were >70%. We found that deep-sea zooplankton assemblages: i) are subjected to changes in their abundance and structure over time, ii) are characterized by different dominant taxa in different basins, and iii) display clear taxonomic segregation between shallow and near-bottom waters. Zooplankton biodiversity decreases with increasing water depth, but the equitability increases. We suggest here that variations of zooplankton abundance and assemblage structure are likely influenced by the trophic condition characterizing the basins. Our findings provide new insights on this largely unknown component of the deep ocean, and suggest that changes in the export of organic matter from the photic zone, such as those expected as a consequence of global change, can significantly influence zooplankton assemblages in the largest biome on Earth.

  7. Nearshore, seasonally persistent fronts in sea surface temperature on Red Sea tropical reefs

    KAUST Repository

    Blythe, J. N.

    2011-07-08

    Temperature variability was studied on tropical reefs off the coast of Saudi Arabia in the Red Sea using remote sensing from Aqua and Terra satellites. Cross-shore gradients in sea surface temperature (SST) were observed, including cold fronts (colder inshore) during winter and warm fronts (warmer inshore) during summer. Fronts persisted over synoptic and seasonal time-scales and had a periodic annual cycle over a 10-year time-series. Measurements of cross-shore SST variability were conducted at the scale of tens of kilometres, which encompassed temperature over shallow tropical reef complexes and the continental slope. Two tropical reefs that had similar reef geomorphology and offshore continental slope topography had identical cold fronts, although they were separated by 100 km along the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia. Satellite SST gradients across contours of topography of tropical reefs can be used as an index to flag areas potentially exposed to temperature stress. © 2011 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea.

  8. Phytoplankton Bloom in North Sea off Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The northern and western highlands of Scotland were still winter-brown and even dusted with snow in places, but the waters of the North Sea were blooming with phytoplankton on May 8, 2008, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the region and captured this image. The tiny, plant-like organisms swirled in the waters off the country's east coast, coloring the shallow coastal waters shades of bright blue and green. Phytoplankton are tiny organisms--many are just a single cell--that use chlorophyll and other pigments to capture light for photosynthesis. Because these pigments absorb sunlight, they change the color of the light reflected from the sea surface back to the satellite. Scientists have used observations of 'ocean color' from satellites for more than 20 years to track worldwide patterns in phytoplankton blooms. Phytoplankton are important to the Earth system for a host of reasons, including their status as the base of the ocean food web. In the North Sea, they are the base of the food web that supports Scotland's commercial fisheries, including monkfish and herring. As photosynthesizers, they also play a crucial role in the carbon cycle, removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Some oceanographers are concerned that rising ocean temperatures will slow phytoplankton growth rates, harming marine ecosystems and causing carbon dioxide to accumulate more rapidly in the atmosphere.

  9. The deep sea is a major sink for microplastic debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Lucy C; Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Canals, Miquel; Paterson, Gordon L J; Coppock, Rachel; Sleight, Victoria; Calafat, Antonio; Rogers, Alex D; Narayanaswamy, Bhavani E; Thompson, Richard C

    2014-12-01

    Marine debris, mostly consisting of plastic, is a global problem, negatively impacting wildlife, tourism and shipping. However, despite the durability of plastic, and the exponential increase in its production, monitoring data show limited evidence of concomitant increasing concentrations in marine habitats. There appears to be a considerable proportion of the manufactured plastic that is unaccounted for in surveys tracking the fate of environmental plastics. Even the discovery of widespread accumulation of microscopic fragments (microplastics) in oceanic gyres and shallow water sediments is unable to explain the missing fraction. Here, we show that deep-sea sediments are a likely sink for microplastics. Microplastic, in the form of fibres, was up to four orders of magnitude more abundant (per unit volume) in deep-sea sediments from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean than in contaminated sea-surface waters. Our results show evidence for a large and hitherto unknown repository of microplastics. The dominance of microfibres points to a previously underreported and unsampled plastic fraction. Given the vastness of the deep sea and the prevalence of microplastics at all sites we investigated, the deep-sea floor appears to provide an answer to the question-where is all the plastic?

  10. The Simulation Of Residual Tidal Phenomena In The White Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, R. I.

    2004-12-01

    Residual tidal phenomena (residual tidal circulation and residual tidal level) in the White Sea play a significant role in energy contribution to the formation of the hydrological regime. Non-linear residual tidal currents and sea level due to energy exchanges from the basic harmonics to the high frequency part of the spectrum have been poorly investigated in the White Sea until now. But residual tidal phenomena play an important role in the general circulation, which affects the temperature distribution and the drift of ice, plankton, pollution and other conservative tracers. We carried out numerical experiments with a non-linear hydrodynamic model to estimate the contributions of (shallow, friction and convective) nonlinearities to the residual tidal phenomena of White Sea's, using a `consecutive realisation' technique. The model grid's spatio-temporal resolution is more detailed than before: the Earth's geoid is approximated by the Krasovskiy rotation ellipsoid. A residual tidal level is observed in the low frequency part of spectrum of model results. In the linear approximation, the spectral density has a dominant peak at the frequencies of the basic harmonics in all parts of the sea, and the residual level was absent; overtones were not expressed. The experiments revealed that the residual circulation was defined by the convective non-linearity. The Earth's rotation does not change the current structure: only the circulation intensity decreases. These results will enhance the knowledge of tidal phenomena in the White Sea, and can be used for navigation, ecology and fisheries research.

  11. Predicting foraging hotspots for Yelkouan Shearwater in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ortega, María; İsfendiyaroğlu, Süreyya

    2017-07-01

    The Yelkouan shearwater (Puffinus yelkouan) is a vulnerable species endemic to the Mediterranean Region, but there is little information of its ecology particularly when at sea. In this study, we assessed the habitat use by Yelkouan shearwater in the Black Sea during the breeding (March-July) and non-breeding (August-February) periods of 2013, using boat-based surveys and shore-based counts. We created a species distribution model (SDM) based on the environmental variables that most accurately reflected the oceanographic habitat of this species in order to delineate foraging hotspots. Our habitat modelling analyses suggest that Yelkouan shearwaters respond to complex bio-physical coupling, as evidenced by their association with oceanographic variables. Foraging Yelkouan shearwaters mainly occurred on the western Black Sea continental shelf, indicating that Yelkouan shearwaters were foraging in shallow, cold and coastal waters. In the non-breeding period, Yelkouan Shearwater occurred beyond the Black Sea continental shelf, a wide pelagic extension of sea, indicating that shearwaters foraged in deep, warm and pelagic waters. These results are consistent with earlier studies, which identified the Black Sea as an important congregation site for Mediterranean Yelkouan shearwater populations outside the breeding season. This study demonstrates how the integration of boat-based survey data, shore-based counts and modelling can provide a wider understanding of the linkage between marine ecosystems that is mediated by marine megafauna such as pelagic seabirds.

  12. The deep sea is a major sink for microplastic debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Lucy C.; Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Canals, Miquel; Paterson, Gordon L.J.; Coppock, Rachel; Sleight, Victoria; Calafat, Antonio; Rogers, Alex D.; Narayanaswamy, Bhavani E.; Thompson, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Marine debris, mostly consisting of plastic, is a global problem, negatively impacting wildlife, tourism and shipping. However, despite the durability of plastic, and the exponential increase in its production, monitoring data show limited evidence of concomitant increasing concentrations in marine habitats. There appears to be a considerable proportion of the manufactured plastic that is unaccounted for in surveys tracking the fate of environmental plastics. Even the discovery of widespread accumulation of microscopic fragments (microplastics) in oceanic gyres and shallow water sediments is unable to explain the missing fraction. Here, we show that deep-sea sediments are a likely sink for microplastics. Microplastic, in the form of fibres, was up to four orders of magnitude more abundant (per unit volume) in deep-sea sediments from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean than in contaminated sea-surface waters. Our results show evidence for a large and hitherto unknown repository of microplastics. The dominance of microfibres points to a previously underreported and unsampled plastic fraction. Given the vastness of the deep sea and the prevalence of microplastics at all sites we investigated, the deep-sea floor appears to provide an answer to the question—where is all the plastic? PMID:26064573

  13. Early arrival waveform inversion of shallow seismic land data

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2013-09-22

    We estimate the near-surface velocity distribution over Wadi Qudaid in Saudi Arabia by applying early arrival waveform inversion (EWI) to shallow seismic land data collected with source-receiver offsets no longer than 232 m. The main purpose is to characterize the shallow subsurface for its water storage and reuse potential. To enhance the accuracy of EWI, we extracted a natural source wavelet from the data, and also corrected for the attenuation effects with an estimated factor Q. Results suggest that, compared to traveltime tomography, EWI can generate a highly resolved velocity tomogram from shallow seismic data. The more accurate EWI tomogram can make an economically important difference in assessing the storage potential of this wadi; in this case we find an increase of 18% of storage potential in the EWI tomogram relative to the traveltime tomogram. This approach suggests that FWI might be a more accurate means for economically characterizing the water storage potential for wadis’ throughout the world.

  14. Geophysical imaging of hydrothermal shallow degassing in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquet, S.; Holbrook, W. S.; Carr, B.; Sims, K. W. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field is the world's largest active hydrothermal system, with over 10,000 thermal features. Yet very little is known about the shallow "plumbing" system connecting hydrothermal reservoirs with the surface features. Here we present the results of geophysical investigations of shallow hydrothermal degassing in Yellowstone. In addition to electrical methods, we combined seismic refraction and surface-wave profiling to estimate pressure and shear wave velocities together with the Poisson's ratio. We find that resistivity data helps identifying hydrothermal areas and fluids flowpaths. Poisson's ratio shows a good sensitivity to saturation variations, highlighting gas saturated areas. Porosity and saturation predicted from rock physics modeling provide critical insight to estimate the depth of fluid phase separation and understand the evolution of hydrothermal systems. Finally, the consistency between Poisson's ratio and predicted saturation illustrates its ability to map shallow "plumbing" systems in hydrothermal areas and constrain gas saturation in depth.

  15. The Gulf of Manfredonia: a new neritic foraging area for loggerhead sea turtles in the Adriatic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Casale

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The Adriatic Sea is an important foraging area for the loggerhead sea turtle, Caretta caretta, but neritic habitats for this species along the Italian coast were identified in the northern shallow area only. The Gulf of Manfredonia is a relatively wide shallow area in the south-west Adriatic and its features and preliminary information make it a potential foraging ground for turtles. In order to assess sea turtle occurrence in the area, we monitored seven bottom trawlers based in the port of Manfredonia during the period Oct 2010 – Jul 2011 through a voluntary logbook programme, resulting in a total of 62 turtle captures during 617 fishing days. Since a turtle capture represents a rare event during such sampling, data were analysed by a zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP model. Results indicate that: (i the Gulf is a neritic foraging ground for loggerhead turtles which occur there with a relatively high density comparable to other Mediterranean foraging grounds, (ii it is frequented by a wide range of size classes, including small juveniles as well as adults, (iii the highest occurrence is during the period Jun-Dec, (iv over 1700 turtle captures occur in the Gulf annually. Preliminary findings about recaptured individuals suggest that part of the turtles are resident in the area. The peculiar features of the Gulf of Manfredonia and the collaboration of the fishing fleet, make it a valuable index site for studying current trends of sea turtle populations at sea as well as other aspects of sea turtle biology and conservation.

  16. Geomorphometric analysis of shallow landslides in the Walgau valley (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lützenburg, Gregor; Schmaltz, Elmar; Glade, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Hydrologically triggered shallow landslides are a frequent natural hazard in the Eastern Alps and can cause severe damages to agriculturally used land, houses and infrastructure. Geomorphometric indices allow to estimate the spatial dynamics of shallow landslides based on recurrent landslide inventories. Previous studies found that the morphology of a landslip is closely related to its dominant genetic process. In this study, we focus on the calculation of established geomorphometric indices of the prevailing shallow landslides to assess the spatial landslide distribution in the Walgau valley in Vorarlberg (Austria). Therefore, we compiled a multi-temporal landslide inventory based on eight orthophoto series from 1950 to 2015 and two digital terrain models derived from airborne laser scanning (ALS) data of 2004 and 2011. The 123 mapped landslides and adjacent areas were further distinguished in distinct geomorphic features, such as parent slope, landslide scarp, concave (surface of rupture) and convex (mass material) segments. Lithological settings and anthropogenic impacts such as land use change were also considered in the analysis. A geomorphometric assessment of the mapped landslides, in combination with land cover information yields insights on the spatial dimension of the shallow landslides and the potential fluidity of the materials involved. The geomorphometric analyses revealed that 96 landslides were classified as fluid-flows, 17 landslides were classified as viscous-flows, 8 landslides were classified as slide-flows and 2 landslides were classified as planar slides. Our findings indicate that most of the shallow landslides display a flow-like movement with a rather low material plasticity. This leads to the assumption that the observed landslides in the investigated area might be of low kinetic energy despite their relatively long travel distances. Spatial disparities within the study area were not observable. We conclude that geomorphometric indices are

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF SEA-LEVEL CHANGES ON SEA-BOTTOM MORPHOLOGY OF SINGKAWANG WATERS WEST KALIMANTAN BASED ON ANALYSES OF BATHYMETRIC AND SEISMIC DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hananto Kurnio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the history of Quaternary geology, global climate changes influenced worldwide sea-level variations. On this study, these phenomena are tried to be assessed through sea-bottom morphology changes using bathymetric and seismic strata box data obtained during field survey in Singkawang Waters, West Kalimantan. Sea-level changes in this area are referred to global variations that had been studied by many researchers. Maximal depth attained during bathymetry mapping was -52 meters which take place as a depression between Lemukutan and Penata Besar Islands. General depths are - 30 m; thus, morphology reconstruction was done for sea-level positions - 10 m, - 20 m, and - 30 m from mean sea level. At the study area, sea-level dropped more than -30 m was only occurred in sea bottom morphology of isolated depressions. These isolated depressions are assumed as paleo-lakes which occurred throughout Sunda Land by some authors. The study also shows that sea-level history in Singkawang’s area span from approximately 10,000 years ago or Holocene time to Recent. During low sea-levels, the sea-bottom morphology was characterized by more extension of Singkawang land, formations of narrow straits between islands and developments of paleo-lakes assumed as fresh water lakes in the past. These events, based on Voris’s Diagram, occurred about 10,200 up to 8,300 years ago. On the other hand, marine clays appeared on coastal area of Singkawang. These might be evidence of sea-level rise in this area. About + 5m sea-level rise flooded this area approximately 4,200 years ago. Influences of sea-level changes to subbottom geological conditions were also assessed. The assessment was carried out by analyzing shallow seismic reflection records by using strata box. The records demonstrated that subsurface geology were characterized by truncation reflector configurations interpreted as fluvial environments.

  18. Flexible riser global analysis for very shallow water

    OpenAIRE

    Karegar, Sadjad

    2013-01-01

    Master's thesis in Offshore technology Flexible risers are widely used for a range of water depths and can accommodate large floater motions when using a buoyant system. A wide range of buoyancy solutions have been developed for very shallow water (e.g. 30-50 m), shallow water (e.g. 90-110 m) and semi-deep water (e.g. 300-400 m) and in the ranges between these depths. Flexible risers can have different configurations. These different solutions have different characteristics which influe...

  19. Shallow ground-water conditions, Tom Green County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    Most of the water needs of Tom Green County, Texas, are supplied by ground water; however, the city of San Angelo is supplied by surface water. Groundwater withdrawals during 1980 (latest year for which data are available) in Tom Green County totaled about 15,300 acre-feet, all derived from shallow aquifers. Shallow aquifers in this report refer to the ground-water system generally less than 400 feet deep that contains water with less than a 10,000 milligrams per liter concentration of dissolved solids; aquifers comprising this system include: The Leona, Comanche Peak, Trinity, Blaine, San Angelo, Choza, Bullwagon, Vale, Standpipe, and Arroyo aquifers.

  20. Conditionally invariant solutions of the rotating shallow water wave equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huard, Benoit, E-mail: huard@dms.umontreal.c [Departement de mathematiques et de statistique, CP 6128, Succc. Centre-ville, Montreal, (QC) H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2010-06-11

    This paper is devoted to the extension of the recently proposed conditional symmetry method to first-order nonhomogeneous quasilinear systems which are equivalent to homogeneous systems through a locally invertible point transformation. We perform a systematic analysis of the rank-1 and rank-2 solutions admitted by the shallow water wave equations in (2 + 1) dimensions and construct the corresponding solutions of the rotating shallow water wave equations. These solutions involve in general arbitrary functions depending on Riemann invariants, which allow us to construct new interesting classes of solutions.

  1. Salish Sea Genetics - Salish Sea genetic inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Salish Sea comprises most of the Puget Sound water area. Marine species are generally assemblages of discrete populations occupying various ecological niches....

  2. The record of climatic change in the geological archives of shallow marine, coastal, and adjacent lowland areas of Northern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdes, G.; Petzelberger, B. E. M.; Scholz-Böttcher, B. M.; Streif, H.

    2003-01-01

    The record of climatic change in shallow marine, coastal, and adjacent lowland areas has been investigated by three different approaches. A mass balance study focused on the interaction between sea-level rise and Holocene sediment accumulation in the coastal lowland area between the Ems and Weser rivers on the German North Sea coast. This region, which comprises various sedimentary environments, such as barrier islands, sheltered and open tidal flats, bay flats, and estuaries, is highly suitable for such quantitative studies, which can be used to create a model for general mass transport and accumulation processes connected with transgressions over coastal lowlands. An integrated geochemical and microfacies study was made to assess the response of shallow marine, intertidal, and limnic-semiterrestrial environments to the climate-controlled Holocene sea-level rise. The factors controlling the development of various palaeoenvironments were estimated from the distribution of biomarkers, major and trace elements, diatoms, foraminifera and sedimentary structures observed at high resolution in core sections. These data complement those of conventional geological, lithostratigraphical, archaeological and geobotanical investigations. The extensive raised bogs which occur in the Pleistocene hinterland, adjacent to the coastal zone, provided an excellent opportunity to examine peat formation in response to climatic changes in the past. On the basis of a large number of 14C-age determinations special attention was paid to the onset and regional expansion of raised bogs in this region and to the question of whether or not the formation of raised bog peat started synchronously in one or in a series of different phases.

  3. Hydrogeological effects of dredging navigable canals through lagoon shallows. A case study in Venice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Teatini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available For the first time a comprehensive investigation has been carried out to quantify the possible effects of dredging a navigable canal on the hydrogeological system underlying a coastal lagoon. The study is focused on the Venice Lagoon, Italy, where the port authority is planning to open a new 10 m deep and 3 km long canal to connect the city passenger terminal to the central lagoon inlet, thus avoiding the passage of large cruise ships through the historic center of Venice. A modeling study has been developed to evaluate the short (minutes, medium (months, and long (decades term processes of water and pollutant exchange between the shallow aquifer system and the lagoon, possibly enhanced by the canal excavation, and ship wakes. An in-depth characterization of the lagoon subsurface along the channel has supported the numerical modeling. Piezometer and sea level records, geophysical acquisitions, laboratory analyses of groundwater and sediment samples (chemical analyses and ecotoxicity testing, and the outcome of 3-D hydrodynamic and computational fluid dynamic (CFD models have been used to set up and calibrate the subsurface multi-model approach. The numerical outcomes allow us to quantify the groundwater volume and estimate the mass of anthropogenic contaminants (As, Cd, Cu, Cr, Hg, Pb, Se likely leaked from the nearby industrial area over the past decades, and released into the lagoon from the canal bed by the action of depression waves generated by ships. Moreover, the model outcomes help to understand the effect of the hydrogeological layering on the propagation of the tidal fluctuation and salt concentration into the shallow brackish aquifers underlying the lagoon bottom.

  4. Shallow geological environment of Krishna–Godavari offshore ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recent drilling in this area in search of gas hydrates reveals that the upper ∼300 m thick Quaternary–Recent strata comprised of nannofossil bearing rich clays and, fractures/faults are the suitable zones for gas hydrates accumulation. Therefore, the knowledge about the shallow geological environments and its architecture ...

  5. Direct evidence for positron annihilation from shallow traps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Søren; Hidalgo, C.

    1987-01-01

    For deformed Ag the temperature dependence of the positron lifetime parameters is followed between 12 and 300 K. Clear direct evidence for positron trapping and annihilation at shallow traps, with a positron binding energy of 9±2 meV and annihilation characteristics very similar to those in the p...

  6. investigation of shallow foundation soil bearing capacity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    Physical structures of the proposed Minna City Centre, at Minna the capital of Niger state. The SPT N-values were corrected to the standard average energy of 60% (N60) before the soil properties were evaluated. Using the corrected N- values, allowable bearing pressure and elastic settlement of shallow foundations were ...

  7. Diel vertical migration of zooplankton in a hypertrophic shallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zooplankton as important links in the food web of aquatic ecosystems have been studied extensively. In current literature their diel vertical migration (DVM) is a highly discussed issue. In this investigation DVM by zooplankton is studied in a hypertrophic shallow lake in Germany. The objectives of the study were to see if ...

  8. diel vertical migration of zooplankton in a hypertrophic shallow

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ABSTRACT: Zooplankton as important links in the food web of aquatic ecosystems have been studied extensively. In current literature their diel vertical migration (DVM) is a highly discussed issue. In this investigation DVM by zooplankton is studied in a hypertrophic shallow lake in Germany. The objectives of the study were ...

  9. ANUGA SOFTWARE FOR NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF SHALLOW WATER FLOWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudi Mungkasi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Shallow water flows are governed by the shallow water wave equations, also known as the Saint-Venant system. This paper presents a finite volume method used to solve the two-dimensional shallow water wave equations and how the finite volume method is implemented in ANUGA software. This finite volume method is the numerical method underlying the software. ANUGA is open source software developed by Australian National University (ANU and Geoscience Australia (GA. This software uses the finite volume method with triangular domain discretisation for the computation. Four test cases are considered in order to evaluate the performance of the software. Overall, ANUGA is a robust software to simulate two-dimensional shallow water flows. Arus air dangkal diatur dalam persamaan gelombang air dangkal, dikenal sebagai sistem Saint-Venant. Penelitian ini menyajikan metode finite volumeyang digunakan untuk menyelesaikan persamaan gelombang air dangkal dua dimensi dan bagaimana metode finite volumediimplementasikan dalam perangkat lunak ANUGA. Metode finite volumeadalah metode numerik yang mendasari perangkat lunakANUGA. ANUGA sendiri adalah perangkat lunak open source yang dikembangkan oleh Australian National University(ANU dan Geoscience Australia (GA. Perangkat lunak ini menggunakan metode finite volumedengan diskritisasi domain segitiga dalam proseskomputasi. Empat uji kasus digunakan untuk mengevaluasi kinerja perangkat lunak. Secara keseluruhan, ANUGA adalah perangkat lunak yang robust untuk mensimulasikan dua dimensi aliran arus air dangkal.

  10. Non-linear stochastic response of a shallow cable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper Winther; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2004-01-01

    The paper considers the stochastic response of geometrical non-linear shallow cables. Large rain-wind induced cable oscillations with non-linear interactions have been observed in many large cable stayed bridges during the last decades. The response of the cable is investigated for a reduced two...

  11. Sediment distribution and composition on the shallow water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sediments of the shallow water carbonate basin in Zanzibar channel were investigated for composition and grain size distribution. The surface sediment composition was dominated by carbonate sands (with CaCO3 > 30%), except in the area adjacent to mainland coastline and a thin lobe which projects from Ruvu River to ...

  12. Current injection in an insulator with specially distributed shallow traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Y. K.; Sharma, R. N.; Raghav, V. S.

    1983-07-01

    The approximate current-voltage characteristic has been given for the single injection current in an insulator containing specially distributed shallow traps in carrier density dependent mobility regime. It is shown that a cube power law for current-voltage characteristic is valid in space-charge-limited trap free regime.

  13. Geophysical mapping of the occurrence of shallow oil sands in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ISHIOMA

    Oil sands are known to be an alternate source of energy and of great economic value. To map the occurrence of shallow oil sand deposits in Idiopopo, Okitipupa area in Ondo state southwestern. Nigeria, vertical electric sounding (VES) in 11 stations along 3 profiles were carried out using the. Schlumberger configuration.

  14. Characterizing Groundwater Level and Flow Pattern in a Shallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    This study characterize groundwater yield and flow pattern on a shallow overburden aquifers of a basement complex .... 2.2 Data Analysis. The methods used to analyze the data generated from the field work are the following. 1) Descriptive statistics such as Mean was used to generalize characteristics of the wells collected ...

  15. Ecological status of species on grazing gradients on the shallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grasses on the shallow soils of the western grassland biome of South Africa were classified on their ecological status on the basis of their reaction to grazing. Vegetation data were gathered in such a way that those of different successional stages could be identified. An ordination technique was used to define the grazing ...

  16. Interactions between nutrients and toxicants in shallow freshwater model ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roessink, I.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis investigates the influence of the trophic status of a shallow freshwater system and/or the presence of persistent pollutants in the sediment on the fate and ecological effects of an insecticide and a fungicide/biocide. Additionally, this thesis aims to shed light on the influence of

  17. Numerical evaluation of seismic response of shallow foundation on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dynamic behaviour of loose deposits underlying shallow foundations is evaluated through fully coupled nonlinear effective stress dynamic analyses. Effects of nonlinear soil structure interaction (SSI) were also considered by using interface elements. This parametric study evaluates the effects of soil type, structure weight, ...

  18. Hidden biodiversity in the Iberian Mesovoid Shallow Substratum (MSS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilgado, José D.; Enghoff, Henrik; Tinaut, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Systematic sampling of the Mesovoid Shallow Substratum (MSS) at several sites in three regions of theIberian Peninsula has revealed two new and one very poorly known species of the genus Archipoly-desmus Attems, 1898. These are the first records of Archipolydesmus in the MSS, although the genushad...

  19. Vibrations of thin piezoelectric shallow shells: Two-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we consider the eigenvalue problem for piezoelectric shallow shells and we show that, as the thickness of the shell goes to zero, the eigensolutions of the three-dimensional piezoelectric shells converge to the eigensolutions of a two-dimensional eigenvalue problem.

  20. Vibrations of thin piezoelectric shallow shells: Two-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    of the three-dimensional piezoelectric shells converge to the eigensolutions of a two- dimensional eigenvalue problem. Keywords. Vibrations; piezoelectricity; shallow shells. 1. Introduction. Lower dimensional models of shells are preferred in numerical computations to three- dimensional models when the thickness of the ...

  1. Deep and shallow uncertainty in messaging climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooke, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Deep and shallow uncertainty are defined and contrasted with regard to messaging the uncertainty about climate change. Deep uncertainty is often traced back to the writings of Frank Knight, where in fact it simply meant subjective probability. Although Knight envisioned a scientifically grounded

  2. A method for the detection of shallow buried objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. McGee

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous geophysical techniques have successfully contributed to geotechnical engineering and environmental problems of the shallow subsurface. Geophysical surveys are used to: delineate geologic features, measure in-situ engineering properties, and detect hidden cultural features. Most technologies for the detection of shallow buried objects are electromagnetic methods which measure the contrast in ferrous content, electrical conductivity, or dielectric constant between the object and surrounding soil. Seismic technologies measure the contrast in mechanical properties of the subsurface, however, scaled down versions of conventional seismic methods are not suitable for the detection shallow buried objects. In this paper, we discuss the development of a method based on acoustic to seismic coupling for the detection of shallow buried object. Surface vibrations induced by an impinging acoustic wave from a loudspeaker is referred to as acoustic to seismic coupling. These vibrations can be remotely detected using a laser-Doppler vibrometer (LDV. If an object is present below the surface of the insonified patch, the transmitted wave is back scattered by the target towards the surface. For targets very close to the surface, the scattered field produces anomalous ground vibrational velocities that are indicative of the shape and size of the target.

  3. Two-dimensional analysis of shallow sandwich panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skvortsov, V; Bozhevolnaya, Elena

    2001-01-01

    The shallow singly curved and rectangular in-plane sandwich panels affected by lateral loads are considered. The set of governing equations on the basis of the Timoshenko-Reissner plate theory is derived for these panels in the case of general boundary conditions. Usage of any real boundary...

  4. Geophysical mapping of the occurrence of shallow oil sands in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oil sands are known to be an alternate source of energy and of great economic value. To map the occurrence of shallow oil sand deposits in Idiopopo, Okitipupa area in Ondo state southwestern Nigeria, vertical electric sounding (VES) in 11 stations along 3 profiles were carried out using the Schlumberger configuration.

  5. Estimation of porosity and hydraulic conductivity of shallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, two theoretical methods based respectively on Archie-Kozeny equations and Ohm's-Darcy's laws were used to determine porosity and hydraulic conductivity of shallow aquifer in Yenagoa, Southern Nigeria. Fourteen Vertical Electrical Soundings (VES) using the Schlumberger configuration were carried out ...

  6. High resolution reflection seismic mapping of shallow coal seams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mngadi, SB

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Subsidence and collapse of unmapped shallow coal mine workings poses a risk to the public and hampers the development of valuable property. A high-resolution reflection seismic survey was conducted to determine whether it is possible to map...

  7. The impacts of groundwater heat pumps on urban shallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to assess the impacts of groundwater heat pumps on urban shallow groundwater quality in Shenyang China, the urban groundwater samples from pumping and recharging wells of groundwater heat pumps were collected during heating season in the months of November, September, January, February and March ...

  8. Source of shallow Simpson Group Oil in Murray County, Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemmels, I.; Tappmeyer, D.M.; Walters, C.C. (Sun Exploration and Production Co., Dallas, TX (USA))

    1987-02-01

    Oils produced from the Simpson Group (Middle Ordovician) in three shallow fields located north of the Arbuckle Mountains in Murray County, Oklahoma, have widely differing compositions: SW Sandy Creek, 28.9{degree} API, 0.57% sulfur; Davis NE, 25.9{degree} API, 0.72% sulfur; Sulfur NW, 16.4{degree} API, 1.44% sulfur. From gas chromatography and biomarker analysis, they determined that the oils were derived from the same source and that the differences in composition are due to biodegradation of the oils in the shallow reservoirs. A comparison of the biomarker assemblage of the Simpson Group oils to several other oils produced in the Arbuckle Mountain area showed that the Simpson Group assemblage highly resembled the assemblage of a Woodford Formation oil (Devonian) but had no similarity to a Viola Formation oil (upper Middle Ordovician). The Simpson Group oils also differed markedly from an oil produced from the Arbuckle Group (Lower Ordovician) in the nearby, shallow Southeast Hoover field. Their data suggest that the source of the shallow Simpson Group oils is the Woodford Formation located in the downthrown Mill Creek syncline south and west of these fields. A large vertical migration along faults or within the fault block is implied by this geometry. However, the Arbuckle Group oil from the Southeast Hoover field, south of the syncline, has a different source.

  9. Tactical operations in confined and shallow waters (TOPICS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kos, J.; Vermeulen, J.F.J.

    1996-01-01

    The tasks of navies have shifted towards crisis management and surveillance operations. Searching for a conventional submarine in confined and shallow waters in times of crisis becomes more and more important, The Operations Research model TOPICS should provide the Royal Netherlands Navy (RNLN with

  10. Spatial and temporal distribution of methane in an extensive shallow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Methane emission; spatial and temporal variation; macro-algal zone; estuaries; Pulicat lake. Abstract. Sedimentary methane (CH4) fluxes and oxidation rates were determined over the wet and dry seasons (four measurement campaigns)in Pulicat lake,an extensive shallow estuary in south India. Dissolved CH4 ...

  11. Metastable droplets on shallow-grooved hydrophobic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bliznyuk, O.; Veligura, V.; Kooij, Ernst S.; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Poelsema, Bene

    2011-01-01

    The equilibrium shapes of water droplets on shallow-grooved hydrophobic surfaces are studied experimentally. The dependence of the two final states, notably metastable Cassie-Baxter and Wenzel, on the underlying geometric pattern is analyzed and discussed. Surprisingly, in contrast to theoretical

  12. Yield response and economics of shallow subsurface drip irrigation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field tests were conducted using shallow subsurface drip irrigation (S3DI) on cotton (Gossypium hirsutum, L.), corn (Zea mays, L.), and peanut (Arachis hypogeae, L.) in rotation to investigate yield potential and economic sustainability of this irrigation system technique over a six year period. Dri...

  13. Quantification of Shallow Groundwater Nutrient Dynamics in Septic Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying Ouyang; Jia-En Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Of all groundwater pollution sources, septic systems are the second largest source of groundwater nitrate contamination in USA. This study investigated shallow groundwater (SGW) nutrient dynamics in septic areas at the northern part of the Lower St. Johns River Basin, Florida, USA. Thirty-five SGW-monitoring wells, located at nine different urban areas served by septic...

  14. Structural analysis for shallow tunnels in soft soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vu Minh, N.; Broere, W.; Bosch, J.W.

    2017-01-01

    Generally, studies on structural design for bored tunnels focus on moderate to deep tunnels (cover-to-diameter ratio C/D ≥ 2). Such tunnel design methods cannot be used for shallow-situated bored tunnels because the influence of buoyancy is discounted, and actual loads on the tunnel lining are

  15. Stochastic simulation of acoustic communication in turbulent shallow water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum-Niese, Christian; Lutzen, R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a stochastic model of a turbulent shallow-water acoustic channel. The model utilizes a Monte Carlo realization method to predict signal transmission conditions. The main output from the model are statistical descriptions of the signal-to-multipath ratio (SMR) and signal fading...

  16. The Ecology of Shallow Lakes - Trophic Interactions in the Pelagial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, E.

    in freshwater as well as brackish lakes. Particular importance is paid to the role that fish and submerged macrophytes play in determining the structure and function of shallow lakes . Other points of discussion include factors responsible for resilience when nutrient loading changes.and the potential...

  17. Determining shallow aquifer vulnerability by the DRASTIC model ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shallow aquifer vulnerability has been assessed using GIS-based DRASTIC model by incorporating the major geological and hydrogeological factors that affect and control the groundwater contamination in a granitic terrain. It provides a relative indication of aquifer vulnerability to the contamination. Further, it has been ...

  18. Determining shallow aquifer vulnerability by the DRASTIC model ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N C Mondal

    2017-09-02

    Sep 2, 2017 ... Shallow aquifer vulnerability has been assessed using GIS-based DRASTIC model by incorporating the major geological and hydrogeological factors that affect and control the groundwater contamination in a granitic terrain. It provides a relative indication of aquifer vulnerability to the contamination.

  19. Modal Theory of Transverse Acoustic Coherence in Shallow Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    observed in the 1995 Shallow-Water Acoustics in a Random Medium (SWARM) experiment [23]. Using numerical simulations, Finette and Oba [24] discovered the...randomness include the thermohaline microstructure, linear and nonlinear internal waves, bottom impedance, bottom roughness, and surface waves [40

  20. Design and construction of a resistivity meter for shallow investigation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Beyond this spread, the difference in readings is much. Hence, the use of this system is limited to shallow investigations where the target depth is not more than fifty metres (50m). Efforts are being made to improve on its performance. Keywords: Design and construction, resistivity meter and field testing. Nigerian Journal of ...

  1. Numerical evaluation of seismic response of shallow foundation on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study includes the results of a set of numerical simulations carried out for sands containing plastic/non-plastic fines, and silts with relative densities of approximately 30−40% under different sur- charges on the shallow foundation using FLAC 2D. Each model was subjected to three ground motion events, obtained by ...

  2. Friction dependence of shallow granular flows from discrete particle simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thornton, Anthony Richard; Weinhart, Thomas; Luding, Stefan; Bokhove, Onno

    2011-01-01

    A shallow-layer model for granular flows is completed with a closure relation for the macroscopic bed friction or basal roughness obtained from micro-scale discrete particle simulations of steady flows. We systematically vary the bed friction by changing the contact friction coefficient between

  3. Waves in the seas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    of component waves of various periods and heights. This is the most commonly used theory for practical applications like design of ships, oil rigs and coastal structures such as jetties, ports, and sea walls. This theory also provides sufficient intellectual... of wind waves in the sea is a wide and interesting field with ap- plications in marine exploration ac- tivities, underwater pipe laying, pol- lution control, ports and shipping in- volving billions of dollars worth of transactions. Not all sea waves look...

  4. Lead in Sea Otters

    OpenAIRE

    Simth D.R.; Flegal A.R.; Estes J.A:

    1991-01-01

    As yet there is no direct evidence that environmental pollutants affect sea otter populations. However, this may be from lack of looking. The first steps in these investigations are to measure levels of potential environmental contaminants in sea otters, determine whether these levels vary among populations, and compare the findings with those from other mustelids/otters for which there is a known or suspected impact. Our approach is to compare measurements between Alaska, where sea otter pop...

  5. Behavioral responses of Atlantic cod to sea temperature changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Carla; Olsen, Esben Moland; Moland, Even; Ciannelli, Lorenzo; Knutsen, Halvor

    2015-05-01

    Understanding responses of marine species to temperature variability is essential to predict impacts of future climate change in the oceans. Most ectotherms are expected to adjust their behavior to avoid extreme temperatures and minimize acute changes in body temperature. However, measuring such behavioral plasticity in the wild is challenging. Combining 4 years of telemetry-derived behavioral data on juvenile and adult (30-80 cm) Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), and in situ ocean temperature measurements, we found a significant effect of sea temperature on cod depth use and activity level in coastal Skagerrak. During summer, cod were found in deeper waters when sea surface temperature increased. Further, this effect of temperature was stronger on larger cod. Diel vertical migration, which consists in a nighttime rise to shallow feeding habitats, was stronger among smaller cod. As surface temperature increased beyond ∼15°C, their vertical migration was limited to deeper waters. In addition to larger diel vertical migrations, smaller cod were more active and travelled larger distances compared to larger specimens. Cold temperatures during winter tended, however, to reduce the magnitude of diel vertical migrations, as well as the activity level and distance moved by those smaller individuals. Our findings suggest that future and ongoing rises in sea surface temperature may increasingly deprive cod in this region from shallow feeding areas during summer, which may be detrimental for local populations of the species.

  6. Chlorate origin and fate in shallow groundwater below agricultural landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrocicco, Micòl; Di Giuseppe, Dario; Vincenzi, Fabio; Colombani, Nicolò; Castaldelli, Giuseppe

    2017-09-12

    In agricultural lowland landscapes, intensive agricultural is accompanied by a wide use of agrochemical application, like pesticides and fertilizers. The latter often causes serious environmental threats such as N compounds leaching and surface water eutrophication; additionally, since perchlorate can be present as impurities in many fertilizers, the potential presence of perchlorates and their by-products like chlorates and chlorites in shallow groundwater could be a reason of concern. In this light, the present manuscript reports the first temporal and spatial variation of chlorates, chlorites and major anions concentrations in the shallow unconfined aquifer belonging to Ferrara province (in the Po River plain). The study was made in 56 different locations to obtain insight on groundwater chemical composition and its sediment matrix interactions. During the monitoring period from 2010 to 2011, in June 2011 a nonpoint pollution of chlorates was found in the shallow unconfined aquifer belonging to Ferrara province. Detected chlorates concentrations ranged between 0.01 and 38 mg/l with an average value of 2.9 mg/l. Chlorates were found in 49 wells out of 56 and in all types of lithology constituting the shallow aquifer. Chlorates concentrations appeared to be linked to NO3(-), volatile fatty acids (VFA) and oxygen reduction potential (ORP) variations. Chlorates behaviour was related to the biodegradation of perchlorates, since perchlorates are favourable electron acceptors for the oxidation of labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in groundwater. Further studies must take into consideration to monitor ClO4(-) in pore waters and groundwater to better elucidate the mass flux of ClO4(-) in shallow aquifers belonging to agricultural landscapes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of ERA-Interim waves with buoy data in the eastern Arabian Sea during high waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shanas, P.R.; SanilKumar, V.

    at two locations in eastern Arabian Sea One location is a deep water location and another one is a shallow water location The comparison of significant wave height (SWH) between ERA dataset and buoy data at both the locations shows good correlation...

  8. Pleistocene Rhine-Thames landscapes - a geological background for hominin occupation patterns in the southern North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijma, M.P.; Cohen, K.M.; Roebroeks, W.; Westerhoff, W.; Busschers, F.S.

    2011-01-01

    The relatively shallow southern North Sea is one of the most productive Pleistocene fossils bearing localities. Perhaps the most spectacular find thus far is a fragment of a Neanderthal skull. Unfortunately, it lacked a stratigraphical context and that applies to most of the finds retrieved. The

  9. Climatic Atlas of the Outer Continental Shelf Waters and Coastal Regions of Alaska. Volume 2. Bering Sea. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Water. the north Aleutian coast. Typically, this current wind, tide, estuarian, and thermohaline effects. The current is thought to bifurcate at the...is similar to the stretch The only storm surges discovered in this area shallow, with a gently sloping sea floor that is from the Kuskokwim River to

  10. SEA in Southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Audouin, M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available advocated by SEACAM (Audouin et al, 2003). Some examples of processes broadly reflecting the principles of SEA are provided in Box 9.1. These examples show that SEA tends to be undertaken as part of other processes, such as integrated land-use planning... Development Challenge Rural Development Programme, SEA for the central Namib Uranium Rush and SEA of the Karas Land Use Plan. References Audouin, M., Govender, K. and Ramasar, V. (2003) Guidelines for the Strategic Environmental Assessment, prepared...

  11. SEA and planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoeglehner, G.; Brown, A.L.; Kørnøv, Lone

    2009-01-01

    As the field of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) has matured, the focus has moved from the development of legislation, guidelines and methodologies towards improving the effectiveness of SEA. Measuring and of course achieving effectiveness is both complex and challenging. This paper......, and the relationship of the SEA to the planning activity itself. This paper focuses on the influence that planners have in these implementation processes, postulating the hypothesis that these are key players in achieving effectiveness in SEA. Based upon implementation theory and empirical experience, the paper...

  12. Ocean warming-induced gas hydrate dissociation in the SW Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadakkepuliyambatta, Sunil; Chand, Shyam; Bünz, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The Barents Sea is a major part of the North Atlantic where warm Atlantic water mix with the cold Arctic waters. Abundant shallow gas accumulations, fluid flow features, and gas hydrates occur in the SW Barents Sea owing to hydrocarbon leakage from deep reservoirs. Recent Ocean warming has increased the bottom water temperature in the SW Barents Sea by at least one degree Celsius. We model the gas hydrate stability field in the SW Barents Sea over the last 50 years taking in to account the lateral variations of geothermal gradient, bottom water temperature, and gas composition. The hydrate stability zone thickness is highly sensitive to the gas composition and the geothermal gradient, and show very high local variability. Seismic images show numerous gas hydrate accumulations with well-defined bottom simulating reflectors (BSR) associated with gas chimneys and leaking faults. The shallow geothermal gradient is in equilibrium showing no residual effects of last glaciations, and ceased to affect shallow hydrate stability conditions. Ocean warming primarily affects hydrate stability most likely only in the upper few tens of meters of sediments. Our results show that increasing global ocean temperatures could cause destabilization of hydrates located within 100 meters of the seafloor in approximately 200 years.

  13. Iceberg killing fields limit huge potential for benthic blue carbon in Antarctic shallows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, David K A

    2017-07-01

    Climate-forced ice losses are increasing potential for iceberg-seabed collisions, termed ice scour. At Ryder Bay, West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) sea ice, oceanography, phytoplankton and encrusting zoobenthos have been monitored since 1998. In 2003, grids of seabed markers, covering 225 m 2 , were established, surveyed and replaced annually to measure ice scour frequency. Disturbance history has been recorded for each m 2 of seabed monitored at 5-25 m for ~13 years. Encrusting fauna, collected from impacted and nonimpacted metres each year, show coincident benthos responses in growth, mortality and mass of benthic immobilized carbon. Encrusting benthic growth was mainly determined by microalgal bloom duration; each day, nanophytoplankton exceeded 200 μg L -1 produced ~0.05 mm radial growth of bryozoans, and sea temperature >0 °C added 0.002 mm day -1 . Mortality and persistence of growth, as benthic carbon immobilization, were mainly influenced by ice scour. Nearly 30% of monitored seabed was hit each year, and just 7% of shallows were not hit. Hits in deeper water were more deadly, but less frequent, so mortality decreased with depth. Five-year recovery time doubled benthic carbon stocks. Scour-driven mortality varied annually, with two-thirds of all monitored fauna killed in a single year (2009). Reduced fast ice after 2006 ramped iceberg scouring, killing half the encrusting benthos each year in following years. Ice scour coupled with low phytoplankton biomass drove a phase shift to high mortality and depressed zoobenthic immobilized carbon stocks, which has persevered for 10 years since. Stocks of immobilized benthic carbon averaged nearly 15 g m -2 . WAP ice scouring may be recycling 80 000 tonnes of carbon yr -1 . Without scouring, such carbon would remain immobilized and the 2.3% of shelf which are shallows could be as productive as all the remaining continental shelf. The region's future, when glaciers reach grounding lines and iceberg

  14. Pelagic sea snakes dehydrate at sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, Harvey B; Sheehy, Coleman M; Brischoux, François; Grech, Alana

    2014-05-07

    Secondarily marine vertebrates are thought to live independently of fresh water. Here, we demonstrate a paradigm shift for the widely distributed pelagic sea snake, Hydrophis (Pelamis) platurus, which dehydrates at sea and spends a significant part of its life in a dehydrated state corresponding to seasonal drought. Snakes that are captured following prolonged periods without rainfall have lower body water content, lower body condition and increased tendencies to drink fresh water than do snakes that are captured following seasonal periods of high rainfall. These animals do not drink seawater and must rehydrate by drinking from a freshwater lens that forms on the ocean surface during heavy precipitation. The new data based on field studies indicate unequivocally that this marine vertebrate dehydrates at sea where individuals may live in a dehydrated state for possibly six to seven months at a time. This information provides new insights for understanding water requirements of sea snakes, reasons for recent declines and extinctions of sea snakes and more accurate prediction for how changing patterns of precipitation might affect these and other secondarily marine vertebrates living in tropical oceans.

  15. Pelagic sea snakes dehydrate at sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, Harvey B.; Sheehy, Coleman M.; Brischoux, François; Grech, Alana

    2014-01-01

    Secondarily marine vertebrates are thought to live independently of fresh water. Here, we demonstrate a paradigm shift for the widely distributed pelagic sea snake, Hydrophis (Pelamis) platurus, which dehydrates at sea and spends a significant part of its life in a dehydrated state corresponding to seasonal drought. Snakes that are captured following prolonged periods without rainfall have lower body water content, lower body condition and increased tendencies to drink fresh water than do snakes that are captured following seasonal periods of high rainfall. These animals do not drink seawater and must rehydrate by drinking from a freshwater lens that forms on the ocean surface during heavy precipitation. The new data based on field studies indicate unequivocally that this marine vertebrate dehydrates at sea where individuals may live in a dehydrated state for possibly six to seven months at a time. This information provides new insights for understanding water requirements of sea snakes, reasons for recent declines and extinctions of sea snakes and more accurate prediction for how changing patterns of precipitation might affect these and other secondarily marine vertebrates living in tropical oceans. PMID:24648228

  16. Foraminifera and the ecology of sea grass communities since the late Cretaceous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Malcolm; Smart, Christopher; Jagt, John

    2016-04-01

    Sea grasses are marine angiosperms (plants) that, in the late Cretaceous, migrated from the land into shallow-water marine environments. They represent a distinct, but fragile, marine habitat and sea grass meadows are often regarded as biodiversity hot-spots with a range of species (including fish, sea horses and cuttlefish) using them as nurseries for their young. Foraminifera are often found associated with sea grass meadows, with the associated taxa reflecting both the environment and palaeolatitude. In the tropics and sub-tropics, miliolid foraminifera dominate (e.g., Peneroplis spp.) as do large discoidal taxa such as Marginopora and Calcarina. In temperate to cool latitudes the assemblage changes to one dominated by smaller benthic taxa, including Elphidium spp. One taxon, Elphidium crispum, is geotropic and is often found - in the summer months - to crowd the fronds of the sea grass. In the Gulpen and Maastricht formations of the Maastricht area (The Netherlands and Belgium) sea grass fossils (both fronds and rhizomes) have been recorded in association with assemblages of both larger and smaller benthic foraminifera (Hart et al., 2016). Some of the large discoidal forms (e.g., Omphalocyclus and Orbitoides/Lepidorbitoides) and the distinctive Siderolites are associated with these sea grass fossils and are suggestive of the modern sea grass communities of sub-tropical areas. While earlier records were of relatively isolated sea grasses, in September/October 2015 surfaces with abundant sea grasses were found that are suggestive of complete 'meadows'. Preservation of some silicified rhizomes indicates that silicification must have been very rapid, before any degradation or compaction of the delicate tissues. The presence of sea grass fossils and their associated benthic foraminifera is indicative of a clear, shallow-water seaway, with a maximum depth of 15-20 m. The reported variations in sea level during the latest Cretaceous cannot, therefore, have been very

  17. The impact of surface currents and sea level on the wave field evolution during St. Jude storm in the eastern Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marili Viitak

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A third generation numerical wave model SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore was applied to study the spatio-temporal effect of surface currents and sea level height on significant wave height; and to describe the mechanisms responsible for wave–current interaction in the eastern Baltic Sea. Simulation results were validated by comparison with in situ wave measurements in deep and shallow water, carried out using the directional wave buoy and RDCP respectively, and with TerraSAR-X imagery. A hindcast period from 23 to 31 October 2013 included both a period of calm to moderate weather conditions and a severe North-European windstorm called St. Jude. The prevailing wind directions were southerly to westerly. Four simulations with SWAN were made: a control run with dynamical forcing by wind only; and simulations with additional inputs of surface currents and sea level, both separately and combined. A clear effect of surface currents and sea level on the wave field evolution was found. It manifested itself as an increase or decrease of significant wave height of up to 20%. The strength of the interaction was influenced by the propagation directions of waves and surface currents and the severity of weather conditions. An increase in the wave height was mostly seen in shallower waters and in areas where waves and surface currents were propagating in opposite directions. In deeper parts of the eastern Baltic Sea and in case of waves and surface currents propagating in the same direction a decrease occurred.

  18. Distinct protistan assemblages characterize the euphotic zone and deep sea (2500 m) of the western North Atlantic (Sargasso Sea and Gulf Stream).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Countway, Peter D; Gast, Rebecca J; Dennett, Mark R; Savai, Pratik; Rose, Julie M; Caron, David A

    2007-05-01

    Protistan diversity was characterized at three locations in the western North Atlantic (Sargasso Sea and Gulf Stream) by sequencing 18S rRNA genes in samples from euphotic (< or = 125 m) and bathypelagic depths (2500 m). A total of 923 partial-length protistan sequences were analysed, revealing 324 distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) determined by an automated OTU-calling program set to 95% sequence similarity. Most OTUs were comprised of only one or two sequences suggesting a large but rare pool of protistan diversity. Many OTUs from both depth strata were associated with recently described novel alveolate and stramenopile lineages while many OTUs from the bathypelagic were affiliated with Acantharea, Polycystinea and Euglenozoa and were not observed in euphotic zone libraries. Protistan assemblages from the euphotic zone and the deep sea were largely composed of distinct OTUs; only 28 of the 324 protistan OTUs were detected in both shallow and deep sea clone libraries. The diversity of protistan assemblages in the deep sea was distinctly lower than the diversity of euphotic zone assemblages. Protistan assemblages from the Gulf Stream were the most diverse for either depth strata. Overall, protistan assemblages from different stations but comparable depths were more similar than the assemblages from different depths at the same station. These data suggest that particular groups of protistan OTUs formed distinct 'shallow' and 'deep-sea' assemblages across widely spaced oceanic locales.

  19. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: Shallow marine syn-rift sedimentation: Middle Jurassic Pelion Formation, Jameson Land, East Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engkilde, Michael

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The Middle Jurassic Pelion Formation – Fossilbjerget Formation couplet of Jameson Land, East Greenland, is a well-exposed example of the Middle Jurassic inshore–offshore successions characteristicof the rifted seaways in the Northwest European – North Atlantic region. Early Jurassic deposition took place under relatively quiet tectonic conditions following Late Permian – earliest Triassic and Early Triassic rift phases and the Lower Jurassic stratal package shows an overall layer-cake geometry. A long-term extensional phase was initiated in Middle Jurassic (Late Bajocian time, culminated in the Late Jurassic (Kimmeridgian–Volgian, and petered out in the earliest Cretaceous (Valanginian. The Upper Bajocian – Middle Callovian early-rift succession comprises shallow marine sandstones of the Pelion Formation and correlative offshore siltstones of theFossilbjerget Formation. Deposition was initiated by southwards progradation of shallow marine sands of the Pelion Formation in the Late Bajocian followed by major backstepping in Bathonian–Callovian times and drowning of the sandy depositional system in the Middle–Late Callovian. Six facies associations are recognised in the Pelion–Fossilbjerget couplet, representing estuarine, shoreface, offshore transition zone and offshore environments. The north–southtrendingaxis of the Jameson Land Basin had a low inclination, and deposition was sensitive to even small changes in relative sea level which caused the shorelines to advance or retreat over tens to several hundreds of kilometres. Eight composite sequences, termed P1–P8, are recognised and are subdivided into a total of 28 depositional sequences. The duration of the two orders of sequences was about 1–2 Ma and 360,000 years, respectively. The Upper Bajocian P1–2 sequencesinclude the most basinally positioned shallow marine sandstones, deposited during major sealevel lowstands. The lowstands were terminated by significant marine

  20. Methane seep in shallow-water permeable sediment harbors high diversity of anaerobic methanotrophic communities, Elba, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Emil Ruff

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM is a key biogeochemical process regulating methane emission from marine sediments into the hydrosphere. AOM is largely mediated by consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB, and has mainly been investigated in deep-sea sediments. Here we studied methane seepage at four spots located at 12 m water depth in coastal, organic-carbon depleted permeable sands off the Island of Elba (Italy. We combined biogeochemical measurements, sequencing-based community analyses and in situ hybridization to investigate the microbial communities of this environment. Increased alkalinity, formation of free sulfide and nearly stoichiometric methane oxidation and sulfate reduction rates up to 200 nmol g-1 day-1 indicated the predominance of sulfate-coupled AOM. With up to 40 cm thickness the zones of AOM activity were unusually large and occurred in deeper sediment horizons (20–50 cm below seafloor as compared to diffusion-dominated deep-sea seeps, which is likely caused by advective flow of pore water due to the shallow water depth and permeability of the sands. Hydrodynamic forces also may be responsible for the substantial phylogenetic and unprecedented morphological diversity of AOM consortia inhabiting these sands, including the clades ANME-1a/b, ANME-2a/b/c, ANME-3 and their partner bacteria SEEP-SRB1a and SEEP-SRB2. High microbial dispersal, the availability of diverse energy sources and high habitat heterogeneity might explain that the emission spots shared few microbial taxa, despite their physical proximity. Although the biogeochemistry of this shallow methane seep was very different to that of deep-sea seeps, their key functional taxa were very closely related, which supports the global dispersal of key taxa and underlines strong selection by methane as the predominant energy source. Mesophilic, methane-fueled ecosystems in shallow-water permeable sediments may comprise

  1. Deep-sea pennatulaceans (sea pens) - recent discoveries, morphological adaptations, and responses to benthic oceanographic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Pennatulaceans are sessile, benthic marine organisms that are bathymetrically wide-ranging, from the intertidal to approximately 6300 m in depth, and are conspicuous constituents of deep-sea environments. The vast majority of species are adapted for anchoring in soft sediments by the cylindrical peduncle - a muscular hydrostatic skeleton. However, in the past decade a few species ("Rockpens") have been discovered and described that can attach to hard substratum such as exposed rocky outcrops at depths between 669 and 1969 m, by a plunger-like adaptation of the base of the peduncle. Of the thirty-six known genera, eleven (or 30%) have been recorded from depths greater than 1000 m. The pennatulacean depth record holders are an unidentified species of Umbellula from 6260 m in the Peru-Chile Trench and a recently-discovered and described genus and species, Porcupinella profunda, from 5300 m the Porcupine Abyssal Plain of the northeastern Atlantic. A morphologically-differentiated type of polyp (acrozooid) have recently been discovered and described in two genera of shallow-water coral reef sea pens. Acrozooids apparently represent asexual buds and presumably can detach from the adult to start clonal colonies through asexual budding. Acrozooids are to be expected in deep-sea pennatulaceans, but so far have not been observed below 24 m in depth. Morphological responses at depths greater than 1000 m in deep-sea pennatulaceas include: fewer polyps, larger polyps, elongated stalks, and clustering of polyps along the rachis. Responses to deep-ocean physical parameters and anthropogenic changes that could affect the abundance and distribution of deep-sea pennatulaceans include changes in bottom current flow and food availability, changes in seawater temperature and pH, habitat destruction by fish trawling, and sunken refuse pollution. No evidence of the effects of ocean acidification or other effects of anthropogenic climate change in sea pens of the deep-sea has been

  2. Computation of energy for diapycnal mixing in the Baltic Sea due to internal wave drag acting on wind-driven barotropic currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohr Christian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The pathways of energy supply for mixing the deep waters of the Baltic Sea is largely unknown. In this paper, a parameterization of the internal wave drag forces on barotropic motion is developed and implemented into a two-dimensional shallow water model of the Baltic Sea. The model is validated against observed sea levels. The dissipation of barotropic motion by internal wave drag that is quantified from the model results show that breaking internal waves generated by wind forced barotropic motions can contribute significantly to diapycnal mixing in the deep water of the Baltic Sea.

  3. Sea salts as a potential source of food spoilage fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biango-Daniels, Megan N; Hodge, Kathie T

    2018-02-01

    Production of sea salt begins with evaporation of sea water in shallow pools called salterns, and ends with the harvest and packing of salts. This process provides many opportunities for fungal contamination. This study aimed to determine whether finished salts contain viable fungi that have the potential to cause spoilage when sea salt is used as a food ingredient by isolating fungi on a medium that simulated salted food with a lowered water activity (0.95 aw). The viable filamentous fungi from seven commercial salts were quantified and identified by DNA sequencing, and the fungal communities in different salts were compared. Every sea salt tested contained viable fungi, in concentrations ranging from 0.07 to 1.71 colony-forming units per gram of salt. In total, 85 fungi were isolated representing seven genera. One or more species of the most abundant genera, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, and Penicillium was found in every salt. Many species found in this study have been previously isolated from low water activity environments, including salterns and foods. We conclude that sea salts contain many fungi that have potential to cause food spoilage as well as some that may be mycotoxigenic. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Sea surface temperatures and salinities from platforms in the Barents Sea, Sea of Japan, North Atlantic Ocean, Philippine Sea, Red Sea, and the South China Sea (Nan Hai) from 1896-1950 (NODC Accession 0000506)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface temperatures and salinities were collected in the Barents Sea, Sea of Japan, North Atlantic Ocean, Philippine Sea, Red Sea, and South China Sea (Nan Hai)...

  5. White Sea - Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    At bottom center of this true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from April 13, 2001, the White Sea in western Russia is becoming free of ice in its southern extent. Meanwhile, the blue-green waters along the coast of the peninsula jutting out into the Barents Sea to the northeast could be due to a phytoplankton bloom.

  6. Sea Anemone: Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, John D.

    1982-01-01

    Several investigations can be undertaken with live sea anemones. A sea anemone's feeding response, fighting power, color, and symbiotic relationships to other invertebrates (such as a marine hermit crab) can be investigated in the high school classroom. Background information and laboratory procedures are provided. (Author/JN)

  7. Dilemmas in SEA application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Ivar

    in the implementation of SEA in the sector, and they concern, e.g., strategic choices in transmission network development and ministerial choices on location of energy production units. The paper outlines the roots of the dilemmas as well as their implications for timing and content of SEA. The verdict is that we (in...

  8. Grounding and calving cycle of Mertz Ice Tongue revealed by shallow Mertz Bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A recent study, using remote sensing, provided evidence that a seafloor shoal influenced the 2010 calving event of the Mertz Ice Tongue (MIT, by partially grounding the MIT several years earlier. In this paper, we start by proposing a method to calculate firn air content (FAC around Mertz from seafloor-touching icebergs. Our calculations indicate the FAC around Mertz region as 4.87 ± 1.31 m. We then design an indirect method of using freeboard and sea surface height data extracted from ICESat/GLAS, FAC, and relatively accurate seafloor topography to detect grounding sections of the MIT between 2002 and 2008 and analyze the process of grounding prior to the calving event. By synthesizing remote sensing data, we point out that the grounding position was localized northeast of the Mertz ice front close to the Mertz Bank. The grounding outlines of the tongue caused by the Mertz Bank are extracted as well. From 2002 to 2008, the grounding area increased and the grounding became more pronounced. Additionally, the ice tongue could not effectively climb over the Mertz Bank in following the upstream ice flow direction and that is why MIT rotated clockwise after late 2002. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the area-increasing trend of the MIT changed little after calving (∼  36 km2 a−1, thus allowing us to use remote sensing to estimate the elapsed time until the MIT can reground on and be bent by the shoal. This period is approximately 70 years. Our observations suggest that the calving of the MIT is a cyclical process controlled by the presence of the shallow Mertz Bank location and the flow rate of the tongue. This calving cycle also explains the cyclic variations in sea-surface conditions around the Mertz detected by earlier studies.

  9. Shallow seismic surveys at Dabhol minor port in Maharashtra

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    Detailed surveys comprising of echosounding and subbottom profiling followed by sea bed sampling were carried out in the creek off Dabhol to know the surficial and subsurface geology of the area for suggesting alignment of the approach channel route...

  10. Turbulence in the Shallow Nearshore Environment During SANDYDUCK '97

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fredericks, J

    2001-01-01

    ... 4.5 m off Duck, North Carolina. The sensors were deployed near the sea floor but above the centimeters-thick wave boundary layer, and the sampling scheme was designed to resolve turbulence statistics averaged over tens of minutes...

  11. Black Sea in Bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image shows bright, turquoise-colored swirls across the surface of the Black Sea, signifying the presence of a large phytoplankton bloom. Scientists have observed similar blooms recurring annually, roughly this same time of year. The Sea of Azov, which is the smaller body of water located just north of the Black Sea in this image, also shows a high level of biological activity currently ongoing. The brownish pixels in the Azov are probably sediments carried in from high waters upstream. This scene was acquired by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, on May 4, 2002. According to the Black Sea Environment Programme's Marine Hydrophysical Institute, the Black Sea is 'one of the marine areas of the world most damaged by human activities.' The coastal zone around these Eastern European inland water bodies is densely populated-supporting a permanent population of roughly 16 million people and another 4 million tourists each year. Six countries border with the Black Sea, including Ukraine to the north, Russia and Georgia to the east, Turkey to the south, and Bulgaria and Romania to the west. Because it is isolated from the world's oceans, and because there is an extensive drainage network of rivers that empty into it, the Black Sea has a unique and delicate water balance which is very important for supporting its marine ecosystem. Of particular concern to scientists is the salinity, water level, and nutrient levels of the Black Sea's waters, all of which are, unfortunately, being impacted by human activities. Within the last three decades the combination of increased nutrient loads from human sources together with pollution and over-harvesting of fisheries has resulted in a sharp decline in water quality. Scientists from each of the Black Sea's bordering nations are currently working together to study the issues and formulate a joint, international strategy for saving this unique marine ecosystem

  12. IOMASA SEA ICE DEVELOPMENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren; Tonboe, Rasmus; Heygster, Georg

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity studies show that the radiometer ice concentration estimate can be biased by +10% by anomalous atmospheric emissivity and -20% by anomalous ice surface emissivity. The aim of the sea ice activities in EU 5th FP project IOMASA is to improve sea ice concentration estimates at higher...... spatial resolution. The project is in the process of facilitating an ice concentration observing system through validation and a better understanding of the microwave radiative transfer of the sea ice and overlying snow layers. By use of a novel modelling approach, it is possible to better detect...... and determine the circumstances that may lead to anomalous sea ice concentration retrieval as well as to assess and possibly minimize the sensitivities of the retrieval system. Through an active partnership with the SAF on Ocean and Sea Ice, a prototype system will be implemented as an experimental product...

  13. Shallow acceptor complexes in p-type ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspnes, D. E.

    2015-03-01

    ZnO films grown on sapphire substrates by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy exhibit p-type behavior when sufficient N is properly incorporated and followed by an appropriate annealing sequence. While substitutional N on the O sublattice is a deep acceptor, shallow acceptor complexes involving N, H and VZn can provide useful 1018 cm-3 p-type films. Taking advantage of Raman, SIMS, and Hall-effect data, we establish a two-step growth scheme to form a metastable double donor complex, NZn-VO, then convert it to a single shallow acceptor complex, VZn-NO-H+ during in situ annealing in N2O. The VZn-NO-H+ complex accepts electrons at ionization energies of 134 meV, rendering it an efficient p-type dopant at room temperature. Supported by DARPA through the Extreme Light Sources Project W31P4Q-08-1-0003

  14. Mapping of reed in shallow bays. SFR-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroemgren, Maarten; Lindgren, Fredrik (Umeaa Univ. (Sweden))

    2011-03-15

    The regolith-lake development model (RLDM) describes the development of shallow bays to lakes and the infilling of lakes in the Forsmark area during an interglacial. The sensitivity analysis has shown the need for an update of the infill procedure in the RLDM. Data from the mapping of reed in shallow bays in the Forsmark area will be used to improve the infill procedure of an updated RLDM. The field work was performed in August 26-31, 2010. The mapping of reed was done in 124 points. In these points, coordinates and water depth were mapped using an echo sounder and a DGPS. Quaternary deposits and the thickness of soft sediments were mapped using an earth probe. Measurement points were delivered in ESRI shape format with coordinates in RT90 2.5 gon W and altitudes in the RHB70 system for storage in SKB's GIS data base

  15. Fracturing Pressure of Shallow Sediment in Deep Water Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanliang Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The shallow sediment in deep water has weak strength and easily gets into plastic state under stress concentration induced by oil and gas drilling. During drilling, the formation around a wellbore can be divided into elastic zone and plastic zone. The unified strength theory was used after yielding. The radius of the plastic zone and the theoretical solution of the stress distribution in these two zones were derived in undrained condition. The calculation model of excess pore pressure induced by drilling was obtained with the introduction of Henkel’s excess pore pressure theory. Combined with hydraulic fracturing theory, the fracturing mechanism of shallow sediment was analyzed and the theoretical formula of fracturing pressure was given. Furthermore, the influence of the parameters of unified strength theory on fracturing pressure was analyzed. The theoretical calculation results agreed with measured results approximately, which preliminary verifies the reliability of this theory.

  16. Shallow Circulations: Relevance and Strategies for Satellite Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Gilles; Reitebuch, Oliver; Naumann, Ann Kristin

    2017-11-01

    Shallow circulations are central to many tropical cloud systems. We investigate the potential of existing and upcoming data to document these circulations. Different methods to observe or constrain atmospheric circulations rely on satellite-borne instruments. Direct observations of the wind are currently possible at the ocean surface or using tracer patterns. Satellite-borne wind lidar will soon be available, with a much better coverage and accuracy. Meanwhile, circulations can be constrained using satellite observations of atmospheric diabatic heating. We evaluate the commonalities and discrepancies of these estimates together with reanalysis in systems that include shallow circulations. It appears that existing datasets are in qualitative agreement, but that they still differ too much to provide robust evaluation criteria for general circulation models. This state of affairs highlights the potential of satellite-borne wind lidar and of further work on current satellite retrievals.

  17. What now for shallow water. [Off Louisiana and Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosby, R.C.

    1976-11-01

    Improved prices and technological advances in well productivity prompt a fresh appraisal of bypassed reserves in some 20,000 sq miles of tidelands lying under 20--80 ft of water off the coasts of Louisiana and Texas. The resulting shallow-water drilling could bring new life to the ''obsolete'' submersible rig. The 25 existing drill rigs could drill an average of 175 exploratory wells per year if they were all available. Furthermore, well-designed submersible rigs and jackups can be built economically and are economical to operate and maintain. The new tradeoffs available with shallow-water operations should encourage operators to reevaluate the worked areas and explore the areas still open in water depths to 80 ft.

  18. Typhoon damage on a shallow mesophotic reef in Okinawa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kristine N; Ohara, Taku; Fujii, Takuma; Kawamura, Iori; Mizuyama, Masaru; Montenegro, Javier; Shikiba, Haruka; Naruse, Tohru; McClelland, Ty; Denis, Vianney; Reimer, James D

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about effects of large storm systems on mesophotic reefs. This study reports on how Typhoon 17 (Jelawat) affected Ryugu Reef on Okinawa-jima, Japan in September 2012. Benthic communities were surveyed before and after the typhoon using line intercept transect method. Comparison of the benthic assemblages showed highly significant differences in coral coverage at depths of 25-32 m before and after Typhoon 17. A large deep stand of Pachyseris foliosa was apparently less resistant to the storm than the shallower high diversity area of this reef. Contradictory to common perception, this research shows that large foliose corals at deeper depths are just as susceptible to typhoon damage as shallower branching corals. However, descriptive functional group analyses resulted in only minor changes after the disturbance, suggesting the high likelihood of recovery and the high resilience capacity of this mesophotic reef.

  19. Typhoon damage on a shallow mesophotic reef in Okinawa, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine N. White

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about effects of large storm systems on mesophotic reefs. This study reports on how Typhoon 17 (Jelawat affected Ryugu Reef on Okinawa-jima, Japan in September 2012. Benthic communities were surveyed before and after the typhoon using line intercept transect method. Comparison of the benthic assemblages showed highly significant differences in coral coverage at depths of 25–32 m before and after Typhoon 17. A large deep stand of Pachyseris foliosa was apparently less resistant to the storm than the shallower high diversity area of this reef. Contradictory to common perception, this research shows that large foliose corals at deeper depths are just as susceptible to typhoon damage as shallower branching corals. However, descriptive functional group analyses resulted in only minor changes after the disturbance, suggesting the high likelihood of recovery and the high resilience capacity of this mesophotic reef.

  20. An Introduction to the Black Sea Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Balearic ( Iberian ) Sea, Ligurian Sea, Tyrrhenian Sea, Adriatic Sea, Ionic Sea, Aegean Sea, Sea of Marmara, and Levantine Sea. In its turn, in some...sheep-dog and other domestic dogs belong to one biological species that was raised 10–15,000 years ago from the wild species of wolf (Саnis lupus). The

  1. Generalized Pan-European Geological Database for Shallow Geothermal Installations

    OpenAIRE

    Johannes Müller; Antonio Galgaro; Giorgia Dalla Santa; Matteo Cultrera; Constantine Karytsas; Dimitrios Mendrinos; Sebastian Pera; Rodolfo Perego; Nick O’Neill; Riccardo Pasquali; Jacques Vercruysse; Leonardo Rossi; Adriana Bernardi; David Bertermann

    2018-01-01

    The relatively high installation costs for different types of shallow geothermal energy systems are obstacles that have lowered the impact of geothermal solutions in the renewable energy market. In order to reduce planning costs and obtain a lithological overview of geothermal potentials and drilling conditions, a pan-European geological overview map was created using freely accessible JRC (Joint Research Centre) data and ArcGIS software. JRC data were interpreted and merged together in order...

  2. DTMs Assessment to the Definition of Shallow Landslides Prone Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Tiago D.; Oka-Fiori, Chisato; Carvalho Vieira, Bianca; Montgomery, David R.

    2017-04-01

    Predictive methods have been developed, especially since the 1990s, to identify landslide prone areas. One of the examples it is the physically based model SHALSTAB (Shallow Landsliding Stability Model), that calculate the potential instability for shallow landslides based on topography and physical soil properties. Normally, in such applications in Brazil, the Digital Terrain Model (DTM), is obtained mainly from conventional contour lines. However, recently the LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) system has been largely used in Brazil. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate different DTM's, generated from conventional data and LiDAR, and their influence in generating susceptibility maps to shallow landslides using SHALSTAB model. For that were analyzed the physical properties of soil, the response of the model when applying conventional topographical data and LiDAR's in the generation of DTM, and the shallow landslides susceptibility maps based on different topographical data. The selected area is in the urban perimeter of the municipality of Antonina (PR), affected by widespread landslides in March 2011. Among the results, it was evaluated different LiDAR data interpolation, using GIS tools, wherein the Triangulation/Natural Neighbor presented the best performance. It was also found that in one of evaluation indexes (Scars Concentration), the LiDAR derived DTM presented the best performance when compared with the one originated from contour lines, however, the Landslide Potential index, has presented a small increase. Consequently, it was possible to assess the DTM's, and the one derived from LiDAR improved very little the certitude percentage. It is also noted a gap in researches carried out in Brazil on the use of products generated from LiDAR data on geomorphological analysis.

  3. Shallow water equations: viscous solutions and inviscid limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gui-Qiang; Perepelitsa, Mikhail

    2012-12-01

    We establish the inviscid limit of the viscous shallow water equations to the Saint-Venant system. For the viscous equations, the viscosity terms are more degenerate when the shallow water is close to the bottom, in comparison with the classical Navier-Stokes equations for barotropic gases; thus, the analysis in our earlier work for the classical Navier-Stokes equations does not apply directly, which require new estimates to deal with the additional degeneracy. We first introduce a notion of entropy solutions to the viscous shallow water equations and develop an approach to establish the global existence of such solutions and their uniform energy-type estimates with respect to the viscosity coefficient. These uniform estimates yield the existence of measure-valued solutions to the Saint-Venant system generated by the viscous solutions. Based on the uniform energy-type estimates and the features of the Saint-Venant system, we further establish that the entropy dissipation measures of the viscous solutions for weak entropy-entropy flux pairs, generated by compactly supported C 2 test-functions, are confined in a compact set in H -1, which yields that the measure-valued solutions are confined by the Tartar-Murat commutator relation. Then, the reduction theorem established in Chen and Perepelitsa [5] for the measure-valued solutions with unbounded support leads to the convergence of the viscous solutions to a finite-energy entropy solution of the Saint-Venant system with finite-energy initial data, which is relative with respect to the different end-states of the bottom topography of the shallow water at infinity. The analysis also applies to the inviscid limit problem for the Saint-Venant system in the presence of friction.

  4. Spatially explicit shallow landslide susceptibility mapping over large areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellugi, Dino; Dietrich, William E.; Stock, Jonathan D.; McKean, Jim; Kazian, Brian; Hargrove, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in downscaling climate model precipitation predictions now yield spatially explicit patterns of rainfall that could be used to estimate shallow landslide susceptibility over large areas. In California, the United States Geological Survey is exploring community emergency response to the possible effects of a very large simulated storm event and to do so it has generated downscaled precipitation maps for the storm. To predict the corresponding pattern of shallow landslide susceptibility across the state, we have used the model Shalstab (a coupled steady state runoff and infinite slope stability model) which susceptibility spatially explicit estimates of relative potential instability. Such slope stability models that include the effects of subsurface runoff on potentially destabilizing pore pressure evolution require water routing and hence the definition of upslope drainage area to each potential cell. To calculate drainage area efficiently over a large area we developed a parallel framework to scale-up Shalstab and specifically introduce a new efficient parallel drainage area algorithm which produces seamless results. The single seamless shallow landslide susceptibility map for all of California was accomplished in a short run time, and indicates that much larger areas can be efficiently modelled. As landslide maps generally over predict the extent of instability for any given storm. Local empirical data on the fraction of predicted unstable cells that failed for observed rainfall intensity can be used to specify the likely extent of hazard for a given storm. This suggests that campaigns to collect local precipitation data and detailed shallow landslide location maps after major storms could be used to calibrate models and improve their use in hazard assessment for individual storms.

  5. Development and evaluation of shallow injection of slurry into ley

    OpenAIRE

    Rodhe, Lena

    2004-01-01

    Shallow injection of slurry on grassland can reduce ammonia emissions compared to surface spreading and increase plant nitrogen utilisation. Other advantages include enhanced silage quality and lower odour. Disadvantages include higher investment costs, increased draught requirements and potential crop damage. The objective of this thesis was to determine appropriate techniques for slurry injection into ley that would minimise ammonia emissions, contamination of crops and energy inputs, while...

  6. Fluctuations of Broadband Acoustic Signals in Shallow Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    C. Development of time-reversal acoustic modem Digital-signal- processor ( DSP ) implementations of a low-complexity high-frequency underwater...shallow water We use model analysis to predict the performance of the time reversal processor . Equivalent to the matched-filtering operation, the...Song, M. Badiey, " DSP Implementation of Time-Reversal Receivers", (In Preparation), Marine Technology Society Journal, 2014. 16

  7. Impact of geochemical stressors on shallow groundwater quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Y.-J.; Kampbell, D.H.; Jeong, S.-W.; Jewell, K.P.; Masoner, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    Groundwater monitoring wells (about 70 wells) were extensively installed in 28 sites surrounding Lake Texoma, located on the border of Oklahoma and Texas, to assess the impact of geochemical stressors to shallow groundwater quality. The monitoring wells were classified into three groups (residential area, agricultural area, and oil field area) depending on their land uses. During a 2-year period from 1999 to 2001 the monitoring wells were sampled every 3 months on a seasonal basis. Water quality assay consisted of 25 parameters including field parameters, nutrients, major ions, and trace elements. Occurrence and level of inorganics in groundwater samples were related to the land use and temporal change. Groundwater of the agricultural area showed lower levels of ferrous iron and nitrate than the residential area. The summer season data revealed more distinct differences in inorganic profiles of the two land use groundwater samples. There is a possible trend that nitrate concentrations in groundwater increased as the proportions of cultivated area increased. Water-soluble ferrous iron occurred primarily in water samples with a low dissolved oxygen concentration and/or a negative redox potential. The presence of brine waste in shallow groundwater was detected by chloride and conductivity in oil field area. Dissolved trace metals and volatile organic carbons were not in a form of concentration to be stressors. This study showed that the quality of shallow ground water could be related to regional geochemical stressors surrounding the lake. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. ON THE SHALLOW PROCESSING (DISADVANTAGE: GRAMMAR AND ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnout eKoornneef

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the psycholinguistic literature it has been proposed that readers and listeners often adopt a ‘good-enough’ processing strategy in which a ‘shallow’ representation of an utterance driven by (top-down extra-grammatical processes has a processing advantage over a ‘deep’ (bottom-up grammatically-driven representation of that same utterance. In the current contribution we claim, both on theoretical and experimental grounds, that this proposal is overly simplistic. Most importantly, in the domain of anaphora there is now an accumulating body of evidence showing that the anaphoric dependencies between (reflexive pronominals and their antecedents are subject to an economy hierarchy. In this economy hierarchy, deriving anaphoric dependencies by deep – grammatical – operations requires less processing costs than doing so by shallow – extra-grammatical– operations. In addition, in case of ambiguity when both a shallow and a deep derivation are available to the parser, the latter is actually preferred. This, we argue, contradicts the basic assumptions of the shallow-deep dichotomy and, hence, a rethinking of the good-enough processing framework is warranted.

  9. How gas buoyancy creates shallow-zone geopressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herkommer, M.A. (Petrospec Computer Corp., Richardson, TX (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Within a buried formation, the difference between pore pressure in the top and the bottom of the zone is less if the formation contains gas than if it is liquid-filled. Consequently, if the zone is sufficiently thick, the driller can encounter gas pressures significantly higher than expected, when drilling into the top of the zone. Because this pressure would exceed that generated by a normal liquid pressure gradient for the well, the upper portion of the zone is thus geopressured. If unexpectedly encountered at shallow depths, such geopressures can create serious well control problems. This phenomenon is due to the lower density of gas, compared to liquid. It is the same principle which makes the surface pressure of a gas well much closer to bottomhole pressure than if the tubing were full of liquid. This article describes it as the buoyancy effect caused by the gas displacing, and thus floating upon, the formation liquid. The following discussion illustrates the effects with depth and formation thickness, and introduces computer-based methods for estimating and preparing for potential well control problems in shallow gas zones. For shallow gas reservoirs, correcting for buoyancy effect in an existing geopressure estimate by analyzing petrophysical and geophysical data can help optimize use of drilling mud, as well as improve casing design. Safety, economic and environmental risks related to loss of control, struck pipe and lost circulation are significant enough to warrant the cost of thorough geopressure estimation.

  10. Dual integral porosity shallow water model for urban flood modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinot, Vincent; Sanders, Brett F.; Schubert, Jochen E.

    2017-05-01

    With CPU times 2 to 3 orders of magnitude smaller than classical shallow water-based models, the shallow water equations with porosity are a promising tool for large-scale modelling of urban floods. In this paper, a new model formulation called the Dual Integral Porosity (DIP) model is presented and examined analytically and computationally with a series of benchmark tests. The DIP model is established from an integral mass and momentum balance whereby both porosity and flow variables are defined separately for control volumes and boundaries, and a closure scheme is introduced to link control volume- and boundary-based flow variables. Previously developed Integral Porosity (IP) models were limited to a single set of flow variables. A new transient momentum dissipation model is also introduced to account for the effects of sub-grid scale wave action on porosity model solutions, effects which are validated by fine-grid solutions of the classical shallow-water equations and shown to be important for achieving similarity in dam-break solutions. One-dimensional numerical test cases show that the proposed DIP model outperforms the IP model, with significantly improved wave propagation speeds, water depths and discharge calculations. A two-dimensional field scale test case shows that the DIP model performs better than the IP model in mapping the floods extent and is slightly better in reproducing the anisotropy of the flow field when momentum dissipation parameters are calibrated.

  11. Three-dimensional shallow water system: A relaxation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Mohammadian, Abdolmajid; Infante Sedano, Julio Ángel; Kurganov, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    We study a three-dimensional shallow water system, which is obtained from the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations after Reynolds averaging and under the simplifying hydrostatic pressure assumption. Since the three-dimensional shallow water system is generically not hyperbolic, it cannot be numerically solved using hyperbolic shock capturing schemes. At the same time, existing simple finite-difference and finite-volume methods may fail in simulations of unsteady flows with sharp gradients, such as dam-break and flood flows. To overcome this limitation, we propose a novel numerical method, which is based on a relaxation approach utilized to ;hyperbolize; the three-dimensional shallow water system. The extended relaxation system is hyperbolic and we develop a second-order semi-discrete central-upwind scheme for it. The proposed numerical method can preserve ;lake at rest; steady states and positivity of water depth over irregular bottom topography. The accuracy, stability and robustness of the developed numerical method is verified on five numerical experiments.

  12. Determinants of Shallow Groundwater As Variability in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radloff, K. A.; Zheng, Y.; Stute, M.; Rahman, M.; Mihajlov, I.; Siu, H.; Huq, M.; Choudhury, I.; Ahmed, K.; van Geen, A.

    2010-12-01

    Manually operated tube wells that tap into shallow aquifers remain a critical source of untreated drinking water in south Asia and an estimated 37 million people are still exposed to elevated levels of As in Bangladesh(1). This field effort sought to address two questions. What mechanisms control the partitioning of As between groundwater and sediment? How does groundwater transport affect the spatial variability of dissolved As? Understanding the source of groundwater variability is essential for understanding how [As] will change with time, especially as Bangladesh and its water demands develop. Arsenic mobility and transport within the shallow aquifer was investigated at a 0.5 km2 site where [As] increases from 50 μg/L in the village within the next few decades. The rapid economic development of Bangladesh could induce similar changes in groundwater flow, and thus As concentrations, elsewhere. This suggests that periodic monitoring of shallow wells low in As within regions of where the As content of groundwater is variable is particularly important. The size of the pool of As adsorbed on the sediment also indicates that current attempts to flush Bangladeshi aquifers “clean” through increased pumping will likely be ineffective. 1. BBS/UNICEF. Bangladesh: Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey, 2009. (Dhaka, Bangladesh, 2009).

  13. Deep-sea diversity patterns are shaped by energy availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Skipton N. C.; Tittensor, Derek P.; Dunstan, Piers K.; Guillera-Arroita, Gurutzeta; Lahoz-Monfort, José J.; Wintle, Brendan A.; Worm, Boris; O'Hara, Timothy D.

    2016-05-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least-explored ecosystem on Earth, and a uniquely energy-poor environment. The distribution, drivers and origins of deep-sea biodiversity remain unknown at global scales. Here we analyse a database of more than 165,000 distribution records of Ophiuroidea (brittle stars), a dominant component of sea-floor fauna, and find patterns of biodiversity unlike known terrestrial or coastal marine realms. Both patterns and environmental predictors of deep-sea (2,000-6,500 m) species richness fundamentally differ from those found in coastal (0-20 m), continental shelf (20-200 m), and upper-slope (200-2,000 m) waters. Continental shelf to upper-slope richness consistently peaks in tropical Indo-west Pacific and Caribbean (0-30°) latitudes, and is well explained by variations in water temperature. In contrast, deep-sea species show maximum richness at higher latitudes (30-50°), concentrated in areas of high carbon export flux and regions close to continental margins. We reconcile this structuring of oceanic biodiversity using a species-energy framework, with kinetic energy predicting shallow-water richness, while chemical energy (export productivity) and proximity to slope habitats drive deep-sea diversity. Our findings provide a global baseline for conservation efforts across the sea floor, and demonstrate that deep-sea ecosystems show a biodiversity pattern consistent with ecological theory, despite being different from other planetary-scale habitats.

  14. Evolutionary process of deep-sea bathymodiolus mussels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ichi Miyazaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since the discovery of deep-sea chemosynthesis-based communities, much work has been done to clarify their organismal and environmental aspects. However, major topics remain to be resolved, including when and how organisms invade and adapt to deep-sea environments; whether strategies for invasion and adaptation are shared by different taxa or unique to each taxon; how organisms extend their distribution and diversity; and how they become isolated to speciate in continuous waters. Deep-sea mussels are one of the dominant organisms in chemosynthesis-based communities, thus investigations of their origin and evolution contribute to resolving questions about life in those communities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We investigated worldwide phylogenetic relationships of deep-sea Bathymodiolus mussels and their mytilid relatives by analyzing nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4 genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the concatenated sequence data showed that mussels of the subfamily Bathymodiolinae from vents and seeps were divided into four groups, and that mussels of the subfamily Modiolinae from sunken wood and whale carcasses assumed the outgroup position and shallow-water modioline mussels were positioned more distantly to the bathymodioline mussels. We provisionally hypothesized the evolutionary history of Bathymodilolus mussels by estimating evolutionary time under a relaxed molecular clock model. Diversification of bathymodioline mussels was initiated in the early Miocene, and subsequently diversification of the groups occurred in the early to middle Miocene. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The phylogenetic relationships support the "Evolutionary stepping stone hypothesis," in which mytilid ancestors exploited sunken wood and whale carcasses in their progressive adaptation to deep-sea environments. This hypothesis is also supported by the evolutionary transition of

  15. Research on characteristics of radiated noise of large cargo ship in shallow water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongdong; Zhang, Liang

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid development of the shipping industry, the number of the world's ship is gradually increasing. The characteristics of the radiated noise of the ship are also of concern. Since the noise source characteristics of multichannel interference, the surface wave and the sea temperature microstructure and other reasons, the sound signal received in the time-frequency domain has varying characteristics. The signal of the radiated noise of the large cargo ship JOCHOH from horizontal hydrophone array in some shallow water of China is processed and analyzed in the summer of 2015, and the results show that a large cargo ship JOCHOH has a number of noise sources in the direction of the ship's bow and stern lines, such as host, auxiliary and propellers. The radiating sound waves generated by these sources do not meet the spherical wave law at lower frequency in the ocean, and its radiated noise has inherent spatial distribution, the variation characteristics of the radiated noise the large cargo ship in time and frequency domain are given. The research method and results are of particular importance.

  16. The narrow, shallow, low-accommodation shelf of central Brazil: Sedimentology, evolution, and human uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, José Maria Landim; da Silva, Rian Pereira; Nunes, Alina Sá; Freire, Antonio Fernando Menezes

    2013-12-01

    The continental shelf off the coast of central Brazil, extending from 10 to 16°S, is unusually narrow (~ 20 km) and rests on the São Francisco craton. The shelf break is located between the 45 and 50 m isobaths and coincides with major hinge-lines of the marginal basins. The shelf was exposed for most of the Quaternary period, particularly during the last 1 my, when the average sea level was - 62 m. Submarine geomorphology is strongly influenced by this extended sub-aerial exposure and reduced subsidence, resulting in widespread incisions on the shelf. During the limited episodes of shelf inundation, as is the case today, a few meters of non-framework grain assemblages dominated by coralline algae accumulated on the outer shelf, while quartz sands were restricted to water depths of less than 10-15 m. Mud accumulation on this unusually shallow shelf is aided by additional accommodation space provided by incisions and canyon heads indenting the shelf. Artisanal fisheries, targeting high-value commercial species associated with hard bottoms located on the outer shelf and shelf break, are the most important human use of this shelf. Data used in this study have been compiled from theses and previously conducted surveys and consist of four piston cores, 509 km of chirp subbottom profiles and side scan recordings, and 711 bottom grab samples that have been analyzed for various textural and compositional aspects.

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Marine Bacterial Symbionts Retrieved from Shallow Water Hydrothermal Vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eythorsdottir, Arnheidur; Omarsdottir, Sesselja; Einarsson, Hjorleifur

    2016-06-01

    Marine sponges and other sessile macro-organisms were collected at a shallow water hydrothermal site in Eyjafjörður, Iceland. Bacteria were isolated from the organisms using selective media for actinomycetes, and the isolates were screened for antimicrobial activity. A total of 111 isolates revealed antimicrobial activity displaying different antimicrobial patterns which indicates production of various compounds. Known test strains were grown in the presence of ethyl acetate extracts from one selected isolate, and a clear growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus was observed down to 0.1 % extract concentration in the medium. Identification of isolates shows different species of Actinobacteria with Streptomyces sp. playing the largest role, but also members of Bacilli, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Sponges have an excellent record regarding production of bioactive compounds, often involving microbial symbionts. At the hydrothermal vents, however, the majority of active isolates originated from other invertebrates such as sea anemones or algae. The results indicate that antimicrobial assays involving isolates in full growth can detect activity not visible by other methods. The macro-organisms inhabiting the Eyjafjörður hydrothermal vent area host diverse microbial species in the phylum Actinobacteria with antimicrobial activity, and the compounds responsible for the activity will be subject to further research.

  18. Applying multibeam sonar and mathematical modeling for mapping seabed substrate and biota of offshore shallows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkül, Kristjan; Peterson, Anneliis; Paekivi, Sander

    2017-06-01

    Both basic science and marine spatial planning are in a need of high resolution spatially continuous data on seabed habitats and biota. As conventional point-wise sampling is unable to cover large spatial extents in high detail, it must be supplemented with remote sensing and modeling in order to fulfill the scientific and management needs. The combined use of in situ sampling, sonar scanning, and mathematical modeling is becoming the main method for mapping both abiotic and biotic seabed features. Further development and testing of the methods in varying locations and environmental settings is essential for moving towards unified and generally accepted methodology. To fill the relevant research gap in the Baltic Sea, we used multibeam sonar and mathematical modeling methods - generalized additive models (GAM) and random forest (RF) - together with underwater video to map seabed substrate and epibenthos of offshore shallows. In addition to testing the general applicability of the proposed complex of techniques, the predictive power of different sonar-based variables and modeling algorithms were tested. Mean depth, followed by mean backscatter, were the most influential variables in most of the models. Generally, mean values of sonar-based variables had higher predictive power than their standard deviations. The predictive accuracy of RF was higher than that of GAM. To conclude, we found the method to be feasible and with predictive accuracy similar to previous studies of sonar-based mapping.

  19. Impact of a harbour construction on the benthic community of two shallow marine caves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepote, Ettore; Bianchi, Carlo Nike; Morri, Carla; Ferrari, Marco; Montefalcone, Monica

    2017-01-15

    Marine caves are unique and vulnerable habitats, threatened by multiple global and local disturbances. Whilst the effects of climate change on marine caves have already been investigated, no information exists about the effects of local human impacts, such as coastal development, on these habitats. This study investigated the impact of the construction of a touristic harbour on two shallow underwater marine caves in the Ligurian Sea (NW Mediterranean). As a standard methodology for monitoring marine caves does not exist yet, changes over time on the benthic community were assessed adopting two different non-taxonomic descriptors: trophic guilds and growth forms. Harbour construction caused an increase of sediment load within the caves, with a consequent decline of filter feeder organisms. Abundance of small organisms, such as encrusting and flattened sponges, was greatly reduced in comparison to organisms with larger and erect growth forms, such as domed mounds and pedunculated sponges. Our study indicated that growth forms and trophic guilds are effective descriptors for evaluating changes over time in marine caves, and could be easily standardised and applied in monitoring plans. In addition, as the harbour construction impacted differently according to the cave topography, the use of a systematic sampling in different zones of an underwater cave is recommended. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The warmer the ocean surface, the shallower the mixed layer. How much of this is true?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somavilla, R.; González-Pola, C.; Fernández-Diaz, J.

    2017-09-01

    Ocean surface warming is commonly associated with a more stratified, less productive, and less oxygenated ocean. Such an assertion is mainly based on consistent projections of increased near-surface stratification and shallower mixed layers under global warming scenarios. However, while the observed sea surface temperature (SST) is rising at midlatitudes, the concurrent ocean record shows that stratification is not unequivocally increasing nor is MLD shoaling. We find that while SST increases at three study areas at midlatitudes, stratification both increases and decreases, and MLD deepens with enhanced deepening of winter MLDs at rates over 10 m decade-1. These results rely on the estimation of several MLD and stratification indexes of different complexity on hydrographic profiles from long-term hydrographic time-series, ocean reanalysis, and Argo floats. Combining this information with estimated MLDs from buoyancy fluxes and the enhanced deepening/attenuation of the winter MLD trends due to changes in the Ekman pumping, MLD variability involves a subtle interplay between circulation and atmospheric forcing at midlatitudes. Besides, it is highlighted that the density difference between the surface and 200 m, the most widely used stratification index, should not be expected to reliably inform about changes in the vertical extent of mixing.

  1. High-Resolution Wave Energy Assessment in Shallow Water Accounting for Tides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The wave energy in a shallow water location is evaluated considering the influence of the local tide and wind on the wave propagation. The target is the coastal area just north of the Portuguese city of Peniche, where a wave energy converter operates on the sea bottom. A wave modelling system based on SWAN has been implemented and focused on this coastal environment in a multilevel computational scheme. The first three SWAN computational belonging to this wave prediction system were defined using the spherical coordinates. In the highest resolution computational domain, Cartesian coordinates have been considered, with a resolution of 25 m in both directions. An in-depth analysis of the main characteristics of the environmental matrix has been performed. This is based on the results of eight-year model system simulations (2005–2012. New simulations have been carried out in the last two computational domains with the most relevant wave and wind patterns, considering also the tide effect. The results show that the tide level, together with the wind intensity and direction, may influence to a significant degree the wave characteristics. This especially concerns the wave power in the location where the wave converter operates.

  2. A condensed succession at the Jurassic/Cretaceous transition in a shallowing basin on the eastern Russian Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorina Svetlana O.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The eastern periphery of the Russian Platform houses an exceptional record of the Jurassic/Cretaceous transition, which is represented by very thin sandstone beds. The presence of glaucony grains, phosphorite concretions and shark teeth indicates that the transitional sediments constitute a condensed succession, although the allochtonous origin of the glaucony grains in itself is not a reliable indicator. The combination with thin ammonite zones and a strongly diminished sedimentation rate, as low as ~0.05 cm/ka are, however, convincing evidence. The Jurassic/Cretaceous transitional deposits accumulated in a basin the depth of which decreased simultaneously with a global eustatic sea-level fall. This coincidence suggests that condensed successions may form in shallowing environments, which contradicts the sequence-stratigraphic concept. Considering the character of the sediments under study, it appears that both stratigraphic and taphonomic condensation patterns occur in this part of the eastern Russian Platform.

  3. Shallow-ocean methane leakage and degassing to the atmosphere: Triggered by offshore oil-gas and methane hydrate explorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong eZHANG

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Both offshore oil-gas exploration and marine methane hydrate recovery can trigger massive CH4 release from seafloor. During upward transportation of CH4 plume through water column, CH4 is subjected to dissolution and microbial consumption despite the protection of hydrate and oil coating on bubbles surface. The ultimate CH4 degassing to the atmosphere appears to be water-depth dependent. In shallow oceans with water depth less than 100 m, the natural or human-induced leakages or both lead to significant sea-to-air CH4 degassing from 3.00 to 1.36 × 105 μmol m-2 d-1. To quantify the human-perturbation induced CH4 degassing, the combination of top-down modeling and bottom-up calculations is essential due to spatial and temporal variability of diffusion and ebullition at water-air interface.

  4. Shallow geology, seafloor texture, and physiographic zones of the Inner Continental Shelf from Nahant to northern Cape Cod Bay, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Barnhardt, Walter A.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Foster, David S.; Andrews, Brian D.; Schwab, William C.

    2013-01-01

    The Massachusetts inner continental shelf between Nahant and northern Cape Cod Bay has been profoundly affected by the occupation and retreat of glacial ice sheets and relative sea-level change during the Quaternary. Marine geologic mapping of this area is a component of a statewide cooperative effort involving the U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management. Interpretation of high-resolution geophysical data (interferometric and multibeam swath bathymetry, lidar, backscatter, and seismic reflection), sediment samples, and bottom photographs was used to produce a series of maps that describe the distribution and texture of seafloor sediments, shallow geologic framework, and physiographic zones of this inner-shelf region. These data and interpretations are intended to aid efforts to inventory and manage coastal and marine resources, and provide baseline information for research focused on coastal evolution and environmental change.

  5. Mitogenome sequencing reveals shallow evolutionary histories and recent divergence time between morphologically and ecologically distinct European whitefish (Coregonus spp.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Magnus W.; Hansen, Michael Møller; Orlando, Ludovic

    2012-01-01

    an alternate use of such data to recover relationships and population history of closely related lineages with a shallow evolutionary history. Using a GS-FLX platform, we sequenced 106 mitogenomes from the Coregonus lavaretus (Europe) and Coregonus clupeaformis (North America) species complexes to investigate...... the evolutionary history of the endangered Danish North Sea houting (NSH) and other closely related Danish and Baltic European lake whitefish (ELW). Two well-supported clades were found within both ELW and NSH, probably reflecting historical introgression via Baltic migrants. Although ELW and NSH......-dependency effects. The estimate of c. 2700 bp was remarkably similar to results obtained using microsatellite markers. Within North American C. clupeaformis, the divergence time between the two lineages (Atlantic and Acadian) was estimated as between 20 000 and 60 000 bp. Under the assumption that NSH and ELW...

  6. Characteristics of shallow water waves off the central west coast of India before, during and after the onset of the Indian summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Amrutha, M.M.; SanilKumar, V.; Sharma, S.; Singh, J.; Gowthaman, R.; Kankara, R.S.

    Eng., vol.107; 2015; 259-270 Characteristics of shallow water waves off the central west coast of India before, during and after the onset of the Indian summer monsoon M.M.Amrutha1, V. Sanil Kumar1*, Sheela Sharma, Jai Singh1, R.Gowthaman1, R..., and Section 4 summarizes the conclusions. 2. Methods 2.1 Study region The study locations are; 1) off Vengurla at a water depth of 15 m in the eastern Arabian Sea (latitude 15.8327° N and longitude 73.5681° E), 2) off Honnavar at water depth of 30 m (14...

  7. Physical Measurements of Sea Bed Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, V. B.; Pawlak, G.

    2004-12-01

    Physical measurements of sea bed roughness were obtained using a boat-mounted acoustic altimetry system combined with diver-based observations with the goal of resolving scales between 10 and 100cm. The surveyed area extends from the wave breaking zone to a depth of 20 m and is characterized by a highly inhomogeneous sea bed. Theory suggests that these roughness scales play an important role in wave energy dissipation, despite the lack of established parameterizations for these high roughness regimes. This study attempts to address this issue by investigating methods for quantifying roughness and examining the relationships between physical and hydrodynamic roughness. Results show a significant variation of roughness over the study area indicating limitations in defining a single scale for the shallow water region. Various statistical estimators are examined as potential candidates for roughness parameterization schemes, including rms, standard deviation and consecutive angle difference in order to characterize bed morphologies. Wave number spectral analysis is used to highlight the dominant roughness scales. The analysis is directed towards merging the various roughness parameters with wave field observations and numerical wave model output, to produce a roughness map that establishes a link between the physical roughness measurements and hydrodynamic wave friction at the study area.

  8. Seagrass on the rocks: Posidonia oceanica settled on shallow-water hard substrata withstands wave stress beyond predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montefalcone, Monica; Vacchi, Matteo; Carbone, Cristina; Cabella, Roberto; Schiaffino, Chiara Francesca; Elter, Franco Marco; Morri, Carla; Bianchi, Carlo Nike; Ferrari, Marco

    2016-10-01

    A multidisciplinary approach was applied to investigate the role of abiotic constraints in the settlement of Posidonia oceanica on shallow rocks in two coastal areas of the Ligurian Sea (Italy, NW Mediterranean). Meadows developed very shallow upper limits, at 1.5 m depth in both areas, and with a distinctive morphology of stripes growing on rocky outcrops orthogonal to the coastline. Application of a predictive model to indicate the reference condition zone for the meadow upper limit, already validated on meadows developing on soft-bottoms, was not adequate for these rocky substrata as the meadow upper limits were found shallower than model predictions (>5 m depth). Geological and geomorphological characteristics of the rocky shores were analysed through geomechanic and petrographic analyses (i.e. thin sections, SEM analyses, rock hardness tests) whilst the shape and the features of the meadows (i.e. shoot density and maximum leaf length) were assessed through scuba diving surveys. Among the different lithotypes occurring at the sites in the alternating and interbedded outcrops, P. oceanica was passively selected (i.e. due to the seedlings survival and settlement there) on the strongest (i.e. less erodible) lithotypes, whilst the comparatively weaker and more erodible rocks remained unvegetated and covered by a layer of soft-sediments. P. oceanica, settling on specific rocky substrata with favourable lithological and geomechanical characteristics, is able to establish outside the theoretical reference zone predicted by the model for soft sediments due to greater attachment strength and possible resistance to hydrodynamic forces. Combining biological, ecological, mineralogical, geological and geomorphological approaches was effective for explaining the primary role of substratum nature in the spatial variability of seagrass meadows, with geomechanical and lithological characteristics of the rocks being equally important abiotic factors than sedimentological

  9. Measurements by Ocean Bottom Gravimeter at Harima-nada in Seto Inland Sea, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshima, Masato; Ishihara, Takemi; Koizumi, Kin-Ichiro; Seama, Nobukazu; Oshida, Atsushi; Fujimoto, Hiromi; Kanazawa, Toshihiko

    Gravity measurements on the sea bottom using an ocean bottom gravimeter(OBG) and a small survey vessel of 8.5 tons were performed at Harima-nada, in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan. Measurements at one bottom station were completed in about 30 minutes including 2 mile transit from the previous station, and 23 new data were obtained during 4 days. The measurement noise on the shallow sea-bottom was reduced considerably by attaching an anchor to the rope between the deployed ocean bottom gravimeter and the ship, and by keeping the ship almost fixed to the deployed anchor. The measurement accuracy is better than 0.005 mgal at the base station and is better than 0.05 mgal for the sea bottom measurements with the anchor. The new measurements combined with old data revealed the presence of high gravity anomaly zone running in Harima-nada sub-parallel to the Median Tectonic Line.

  10. Marine Microphytobenthic Assemblage Shift along a Natural Shallow-Water CO2 Gradient Subjected to Multiple Environmental Stressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivienne R. Johnson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Predicting the effects of anthropogenic CO2 emissions on coastal ecosystems requires an understanding of the responses of algae, since these are a vital functional component of shallow-water habitats. We investigated microphytobenthic assemblages on rock and sandy habitats along a shallow subtidal pCO2 gradient near volcanic seeps in the Mediterranean Sea. Field studies of natural pCO2 gradients help us understand the likely effects of ocean acidification because entire communities are subjected to a realistic suite of environmental stressors such as over-fishing and coastal pollution. Temperature, total alkalinity, salinity, light levels and sediment properties were similar at our study sites. On sand and on rock, benthic diatom abundance and the photosynthetic standing crop of biofilms increased significantly with increasing pCO2. There were also marked shifts in diatom community composition as pCO2 levels increased. Cyanobacterial abundance was only elevated at extremely high levels of pCO2 (>1400 μatm. This is the first demonstration of the tolerance of natural marine benthic microalgae assemblages to elevated CO2 in an ecosystem subjected to multiple environmental stressors. Our observations indicate that Mediterranean coastal systems will alter as pCO2 levels continue to rise, with increased photosynthetic standing crop and taxonomic shifts in microalgal assemblages.

  11. Rising sea levels will reduce extreme temperature variations in tide-dominated reef habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Ryan Joseph; Pivan, Xavier; Falter, James; Symonds, Graham; Gruber, Renee

    2016-01-01

    Temperatures within shallow reefs often differ substantially from those in the surrounding ocean; therefore, predicting future patterns of thermal stresses and bleaching at the scale of reefs depends on accurately predicting reef heat budgets. We present a new framework for quantifying how tidal and solar heating cycles interact with reef morphology to control diurnal temperature extremes within shallow, tidally forced reefs. Using data from northwestern Australia, we construct a heat budget model to investigate how frequency differences between the dominant lunar semidiurnal tide and diurnal solar cycle drive ~15-day modulations in diurnal temperature extremes. The model is extended to show how reefs with tidal amplitudes comparable to their depth, relative to mean sea level, tend to experience the largest temperature extremes globally. As a consequence, we reveal how even a modest sea level rise can substantially reduce temperature extremes within tide-dominated reefs, thereby partially offsetting the local effects of future ocean warming. PMID:27540589

  12. High-resolution record of last post-glacial variations of sea-ice cover and river discharge in the western Laptev Sea (Arctic Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, R. H.; Hörner, T.; Fahl, K.

    2014-12-01

    Here, we provide a high-resolution reconstruction of sea-ice cover variations in the western Laptev Sea, a crucial area in terms of sea-ice production in the Arctic Ocean and a region characterized by huge river discharge. Furthermore, the shallow Laptev Sea was strongly influenced by the post-glacial sea-level rise that should also be reflected in the sedimentary records. The sea Ice Proxy IP25 (Highly-branched mono-isoprenoid produced by sea-ice algae; Belt et al., 2007) was measured in two sediment cores from the western Laptev Sea (PS51/154, PS51/159) that offer a high-resolution composite record over the last 18 ka. In addition, sterols are applied as indicator for marine productivity (brassicasterol, dinosterol) and input of terrigenous organic matter by river discharge into the ocean (campesterol, ß-sitosterol). The sea-ice cover varies distinctly during the whole time period and shows a general increase in the Late Holocene. A maximum in IP25 concentration can be found during the Younger Dryas. This sharp increase can be observed in the whole circumarctic realm (Chukchi Sea, Bering Sea, Fram Strait and Laptev Sea). Interestingly, there is no correlation between elevated numbers of ice-rafted debris (IRD) interpreted as local ice-cap expansions (Taldenkova et al. 2010), and sea ice cover distribution. The transgression and flooding of the shelf sea that occurred over the last 16 ka in this region, is reflected by decreasing terrigenous (riverine) input, reflected in the strong decrease in sterol (ß-sitosterol and campesterol) concentrations. ReferencesBelt, S.T., Massé, G., Rowland, S.J., Poulin, M., Michel, C., LeBlanc, B., 2007. A novel chemical fossil of palaeo sea ice: IP25. Organic Geochemistry 38 (1), 16e27. Taldenkova, E., Bauch, H.A., Gottschalk, J., Nikolaev, S., Rostovtseva, Yu., Pogodina, I., Ya, Ovsepyan, Kandiano, E., 2010. History of ice-rafting and water mass evolution at the northern Siberian continental margin (Laptev Sea) during Late

  13. Post-glacial variations of sea ice cover and river discharge in the western Laptev Sea (Arctic Ocean) - a high-resolution study over the last 18 ka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörner, Tanja; Stein, Ruediger; Fahl, Kirsten

    2015-04-01

    Here, we provide a high-resolution reconstruction of sea-ice cover variations in the western Laptev Sea, a crucial area in terms of sea-ice production in the Arctic Ocean and a region characterized by huge river discharge. Furthermore, the shallow Laptev Sea was strongly influenced by the post-glacial sea-level rise that should also be reflected in the sedimentary records. The sea Ice Proxy IP25 (Highly-branched mono-isoprenoid produced by sea-ice algae; Belt et al., 2007) was measured in two sediment cores from the western Laptev Sea (PS51/154, PS51/159) that offer a high-resolution composite record over the last 18 ka. In addition, sterols are applied as indicator for marine productivity (brassicasterol, dinosterol) and input of terrigenous organic matter by river discharge into the ocean (campesterol, ß-sitosterol). The sea-ice cover varies distinctly during the whole time period and shows a general increase in the Late Holocene. A maximum in IP25 concentration can be found during the Younger Dryas. This sharp increase can be observed in the whole circumarctic realm (Chukchi Sea, Bering Sea, Fram Strait and Laptev Sea). Interestingly, there is no correlation between elevated numbers of ice-rafted debris (IRD) interpreted as local ice-cap expansions (Taldenkova et al. 2010), and sea ice cover distribution. The transgression and flooding of the shelf sea that occurred over the last 16 ka in this region, is reflected by decreasing terrigenous (riverine) input, reflected in the strong decrease in sterol (ß-sitosterol and campesterol) concentrations. References Belt, S.T., Massé, G., Rowland, S.J., Poulin, M., Michel, C., LeBlanc, B., 2007. A novel chemical fossil of palaeo sea ice: IP25. Organic Geochemistry 38 (1), 16e27. Taldenkova, E., Bauch, H.A., Gottschalk, J., Nikolaev, S., Rostovtseva, Yu., Pogodina, I., Ya, Ovsepyan, Kandiano, E., 2010. History of ice-rafting and water mass evolution at the northern Siberian continental margin (Laptev Sea) during Late

  14. Impact of tropical cyclone Matmo on mixed zone of the Yellow and Bohai seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jie; Ji, Diansheng; Hou, Chawei; Guo, Kai; Ji, Ling

    2017-12-01

    The Bohai Sea is a low-lying semi-enclosed sea area that is linked to the Yellow Sea via the Bohai straits (mixed zone). Its off shore seabed is shallow, which makes it vulnerable to serious marine meteorological disasters associated with the northward passage of Pacifi c tropical cyclones. Analyses on data of remote sensing and buoy of the mixed zone of the Yellow and Bohai seas indicate that all the wind speed, signifi cant wave height, and salinity (SAL) increased, sea surface temperature decreased, and wind energy density changed considerably during the passage of tropical cyclone Matmo on July 25, 2014. It was found that the SAL inversion layer in the mixed zone of the Yellow and Bohai Seas was caused by the tropical cyclone. Furthermore, it was found that the tropical cyclone transported the northern Yellow Sea cold water mass (NYSCWM) into the mixed zone of the Yellow and Bohai Seas. The NYSCWM has direct infl uence on both the aquaculture and the ecological environment of the region. Therefore, further research is needed to establish the mechanism behind the formation of the SAL inversion layer in the mixed zone, and to determine the infl uence of tropical cyclones on the NYSCWM.

  15. Impact of sea level rise on tidal range in Chesapeake and Delaware Bays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Serena Blyth; Li, Ming; Zhang, Fan

    2017-05-01

    Coastal inundation is affected not only by rising mean sea level but also by changing tides. A numerical model is developed to investigate how sea level rise and coastline changes may impact tides in two coastal-plain estuaries, Chesapeake Bay and Delaware Bay. Despite their different tidal characteristics, the two estuaries display similar responses to the sea level rise and shoreline management scenarios. When hypothetic sea walls are erected at the present coastline to prevent low-lying land from flooding, tidal range increases, with greater amplification in the upper part of the two estuaries. When low-lying land is allowed to become permanently inundated by higher sea level, however, tidal range in both estuaries decreases. Analyses of the tidal energy budget show that the increased dissipation over the shallow water and newly inundated areas compensates for the reduced dissipation in deep water, leading to smaller tidal range. The changes in the tidal range are not proportional to the changes in the mean sea level, indicating a nonlinear tidal response to sea level rise. The ratio of tidal range change to sea level rise varies between -0.05 and 0.1 in Chesapeake Bay and between -0.2 and 0.25 in Delaware Bay. The model results suggest a potential adaptation strategy that uses inundation over low-lying areas to reduce tidal range at up-estuary locations.

  16. Nematodes from wave-dominated sandy beaches: diversity, zonation patterns and testing of the isocommunities concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheskiere, Tom; Vincx, Magda; Urban-Malinga, Barbara; Rossano, Claudia; Scapini, Felicita; Degraer, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Spatial patterns of nematode community structure from two geographically spaced intermediate, micro-tidal beaches (i.e. Mediterranean and Baltic) were investigated. Differences in the nematode assemblages were found to be significantly different and related to the morphodynamic characteristics of the studied zones (upper beach, swash/breakers and subtidal). Highest nematode densities and species diversities were recorded on the coarse-grained, more physically controlled, Italian beach in contrast to the more chemically controlled Polish beach. This is in contrast to the worldwide patterns of macrofaunal communities. As demonstrated by higher taxonomic distinctness measurements, upper beaches were found to harbour species from both the marine and terrestrial ecosystem and are considered to be important ecotones between these adjacent systems. The swash/breaker zones are characterised by the loss of distinctive species caused by the high water percolation in these zones. The concept of parallel ecological communities 'isocommunities' is only supported for the upper beach zones.

  17. Sand Dispersion from an Ephemeral River Delta on the Wave-Dominated Central California Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    and the tributary Branciforte Creek. -. , .~ - . - I,.,..," • ]S 35 Cr.LL. -J1 00 m a. 0( W 0 U0 U) i-Z <I a: -j c1 0r (~0 W Z (n w .- <- (n Ck:LLZ Li...from there which contribute significantly to the yield at the mouth are the tributary Branciforte Creek and the bed of the San Lorenzo’s floodplain...contained in Appendix C. S.o Branciforte Creek Branciforte Creek, draining an area of 82 km2, joins the San LLorenzo main stem about 1 km upstream from

  18. Experimental Investigation of the Performance of Tilt Current Meters in Wave-Dominated Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Asger Bendix; Carstensen, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, tilt current meters (TCMs) have received renewed attention as they provide an inexpensive method for measuring currents in the coastal zone. However, previous studies focused mainly on current dominated flows or the current component of the flow. This study investigates the perfo...

  19. Surficial sediments of the wave-dominated Orange River Delta and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The textural and compositional characteristics of the surficial shelf sediments north and south of the Orange River Delta are reviewed and compared. Sediments are fractionated and dispersed both north- and southwards of the Orange River mouth by wave action, longshore drift and subsurface currents. The mean grain ...

  20. A rainfall-based warning model for shallow landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yi-Chao; Wang, Ji-Shang; Jan, Chyan-Deng; Yin, Hsiao-Yuan; Lo, Wen-Chun

    2016-04-01

    According to the statistical data of past rainfall events, the climate has changed in recent decades. Rainfall patterns have presented a more concentrated, high-intensity and long-duration trend in Taiwan. The most representative event is Typhoon Morakot which induced a total of 67 enormous landslides by the extreme amount of rain during August 7 to 10 in 2009 and resulted in the heaviest casualties in southern Taiwan. In addition, the nature of vulnerability such as steep mountains and rushing rivers, fragile geology and loose surface soil results in more severe sediment-relative disasters, in which shallow landslides are widespread hazards in mountainous regions. This research aims to develop and evaluate a model for predicting shallow landslides triggered by rainfall in mountainous area. Considering the feasibility of large-scale application and practical operation, the statistical techniques is adopted to form the landslide model based on abundant historical rainfall data and landslide events. The 16 landslide inventory maps and 15 variation results by comparing satellite images taken before and after the rainfall event were interpreted and delineated since 2004 to 2011. Logit model is utilized for interpreting the relationship between rainfall characteristics and landslide events delineated from satellite. Based on the analysis results of logistic regression, the rainfall factors that are highly related to shallow landslide occurrence are selected which are 3 hours rainfall intensity I3 (mm/hr) and the effective cumulative precipitation Rt (mm) including accumulated rainfall at time t and antecedent rainfall. A landslide rainfall triggering index (LRTI) proposed for assessing the occurrence potential of shallow landslides is defined as the product of I3 and Rt. A form of probability of shallow landslide triggered threshold is proposed to offer a measure of the likelihood of landslide occurrence. Two major critical lines which represent the lower and upper

  1. Late-Pleistocene evolution of the East Mediterranean shallow continental shelf of north-central Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtienberg, Gilad; Dix, Justin; Waldmann, Nicolas; Makovsky, Yizhaq; Bookman, Revital; Roskin, Joel; Bialik, Or; Golan, Arik; Sivan, Dorit

    2016-04-01

    . This approach allowed us to investigate the relationship between the lithological units and sea-level change and thus enable the reconstruction of the coastal evolution over the last ˜130 ka. This reconstruction suggests that the stratigraphy is dominated by a sea level lowstand during which aeolian, fluvial and paleosol sediments were deposited in a terrestrial environment. The coastal-terrestrial landscape was flooded by the early to middle Holocene transgression. The results of this study provide a valuable framework for future national strategic shallow-water infrastructure construction and also for the possible locations of past human settlements in relation to coastal evolution through time.

  2. Development and lipid storage in Calanus euxinus from the Black and Marmara seas: Variabilities due to habitat conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlichny, L. S.; Kideys, A. E.; Hubareva, E. S.; Besiktepe, S.; Isinibilir, M.

    2006-01-01

    Oil sac volume, gonad size and moulting patterns were investigated in the copepod Calanus euxinus inhabiting deep and shallow zones of the Black Sea and penetrating into the Marmara Sea. In summer the C. euxinus population in deep layers of the Black Sea was dominated by pre-diapause and diapausing postmoult copepodite stage V (CV) with small sexually undifferentiated gonads and mean lipid content of 14.1 ± 6.0% of body volume. The lipid content of deep-living females was 7.2 ± 4.2% of body volume. At the same time, intermoult and premoult CV with enlarged gonads and low lipid content (7.7 ± 5.1% of body volume) and females with oil sac volume of 1.4 ± 1.0% were found at shallow stations. Premoult CV with oil volume of 0.6 ± 0.8% and mature females with little visual evidence of substantial lipid storage dominated in the Marmara Sea. The differences in moulting patterns and oil sac volumes of C. euxinus from deep zones and shallow regions suggest that vertical migrations to the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) are necessary for formation of large lipid reserves providing high reproductive potential of this species. On the basis of an energy balance model it was shown that under low phytoplankton concentration of about 30 μg C l - 1 preadults and adults migrating to the OMZ could accumulate lipids (up to 5% of body energy content daily), in contrast to copepods constrained to shallow oxic water columns of the Black Sea and from the Marmara Sea.

  3. Observations and modelling of fast ice growth in the Tiksi Bay, Laptev Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogorodsky, Petr; Makshtas, Aleksandr; Grubiy, Andrey; Kustov, Vasiliy

    2016-04-01

    Fast ice is one of the main features of sea ice cover in the Laptev Sea. The formation of this immobile ice which occupies up to 30% of the sea area and significantly affects the intensity of air-sea energy exchange in the coastal zones had been investigated during winter 2014-2015 in the Tiksi Bay (Buor-Khaya Gulf). The temperature measurements within sea ice thickness and under-ice sea layer using GeoPrecision thermistor string of 10 sensors together with measurements of snow and ice thicknesses were carried out at the distance of 0.5 km from the shore at the 3.5 m water depth. According to measurements temperature variations qualitatively repeat air temperature variations and, damping with depth, approach to sea water freezing temperature. Vertical temperature distributions allow to recognize snow, ice and water layers by profile inclination in each layer. The temperature profiles within growing ice were quasi-linear, indicating permanence of heat flux inside ice. The linearity of temperature profiles increased during ice growth. For calculations of fast ice evolution one-dimensional thermodynamic model was used. Besides the empirical formulae, based on frost degree-days, developed in 1930th for the Tiksi Bay was applied. Numerical experiments were carried out with constant values of thermal properties of all media and 10 ppt water salinity, as initial condition. The daily average data from Hydrometeorological Observatory Tiksi, located approximately 1 km from the site of ice observations, were used as atmospheric forcing. For the examined area evolutions of ice cover thickness estimated from direct measurements, the thermodynamic model and the empirical formulae were almost identical. The result indicates stability of hydrological and meteorological conditions, determining fast ice growth in the Tiksi Bay during last 75 years. Model simulations showed that in shallow waters the growth of ice thickness is stabilized due to increase of sub-ice water layer

  4. Impacts on the deep-sea ecosystem by a severe coastal storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Canals, Miquel; Calafat, Antoni M; Lastras, Galderic; Pedrosa-Pàmies, Rut; Menéndez, Melisa; Medina, Raúl; Company, Joan B; Hereu, Bernat; Romero, Javier; Alcoverro, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Major coastal storms, associated with strong winds, high waves and intensified currents, and occasionally with heavy rains and flash floods, are mostly known because of the serious damage they can cause along the shoreline and the threats they pose to navigation. However, there is a profound lack of knowledge on the deep-sea impacts of severe coastal storms. Concurrent measurements of key parameters along the coast and in the deep-sea are extremely rare. Here we present a unique data set showing how one of the most extreme coastal storms of the last decades lashing the Western Mediterranean Sea rapidly impacted the deep-sea ecosystem. The storm peaked the 26(th) of December 2008 leading to the remobilization of a shallow-water reservoir of marine organic carbon associated with fine particles and resulting in its redistribution across the deep basin. The storm also initiated the movement of large amounts of coarse shelf sediment, which abraded and buried benthic communities. Our findings demonstrate, first, that severe coastal storms are highly efficient in transporting organic carbon from shallow water to deep water, thus contributing to its sequestration and, second, that natural, intermittent atmospheric drivers sensitive to global climate change have the potential to tremendously impact the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth, the deep-sea ecosystem.

  5. Ordovician of the Siberian Platform: sea-level and long-term lithological changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dronov, A.

    2012-04-01

    facies into the black shale realm is interpreted as a shallowing event in the deep-water setting, assuming that limestone represents more shallow-water facies than the black shale (Nielsen, 2004). On the other hand, the same episodes in shallow-water areas are characterized by the expansion of the relatively deep-water marine red bed facies into the shallow-water realm, suggesting deepening events. Invasion of limestone facies into the deep-water black shale environment could be explained through the mechanism of "highstand shedding" (Schlager, 2007). According to this view carbonates were transported from a shallow-water environment into a deep-water setting only at the time of maximum carbonate production in the shallow-water environment, i.e. during sea-level highstand. According to this interpretation Ordovician succession of Baltica also follows the Gondwanan sea-level patterns. As a result instead of one global sea-level curve for the Ordovician (Huq and Shatter, 2008) it would be probably more correct to suggest two semi-global curves for two big tectonic regions one of which includes Siberian and North American platforms and the other combine Baltica and Gondwanan platforms. The subdivision probably reflects position of the main Ordovician lithosphere plates. This work is a contribution to IGCP 591 project. It was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant 10-05-00848.

  6. Ecological and evolutionary consequences of benthic community stasis in the very deep sea (>1500 m)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzas, Martin A.; Hayek, Lee-Ann C.; Culver, Stephen J.; Hayward, Bruce W.; Osterman, Lisa E.

    2014-01-01

    An enigma of deep-sea biodiversity research is that the abyss with its low productivity and densities appears to have a biodiversity similar to that of shallower depths. This conceptualization of similarity is based mainly on per-sample estimates (point diversity, within-habitat, or α-diversity). Here, we use a measure of between-sample within-community diversity (β1H) to examine benthic foraminiferal diversity between 333 stations within 49 communties from New Zealand, the South Atlantic, the Gulf of Mexico, the Norwegian Sea, and the Arctic. The communities are grouped into two depth categories: 200–1500 m and >1500 m. β1H diversity exhibits no evidence of regional differences. Instead, higher values at shallower depths are observed worldwide. At depths of >1500 m the average β1H is zero, indicating stasis or no biodiversity gradient. The difference in β1H-diversity explains why, despite species richness often being greater per sample at deeper depths, the total number of species is greater at shallower depths. The greater number of communities and higher rate of evolution resulting in shorter species durations at shallower depths is also consistent with higher β1H values.

  7. First measurements with Argo flots in the Southern Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczowski, Waldemar; Goszczko, Ilona; Wieczorek, Piotr; Merchel, Malgorzata; Rak, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    The Argo programme is one of the most important elements of the ocean observing system. Currently almost 4000 Argo floats profile global oceans and deliver real time data. Originally Argo floats were developed for open ocean observations. Therefore a standard float can dive up to 2000 m and deep Argo floats are under development. However in the last years the shallow shelf seas become also interesting for Argo users. Institute of Oceanology Polish Academy of Sciences (IOPAN) participates in the Euro-Argo research infrastructure, the European contribution to Argo system. A legal and governance framework (Euro-Argo ERIC) was set up in May 2014. For a few years IOPAN has deployed floats mostly in the Nordic Seas and the European Arctic region. In the end of 2016 the first Polish Argo float was deployed in the Southern Baltic Sea. Building on the successful experience with Argo floats deployed by the Finnish oceanographers in the Bothnian Sea and Gotland Basin, the IOPAN float was launched in the Bornholm Deep during the fall cruise of IOPAN research vessel Oceania. The standard APEX float equipped with 2-way Iridium communication was used and different modes of operation, required for the specific conditions in the shallow and low saline Baltic Sea, were tested. Settings for the Baltic float are different than for the oceanic mode and were frequently changed during the mission to find the optimum solution. Changing the float parking depth during the mission allows for the limited control of the float drift direction. Results of a high resolution numerical forecast model for the Baltic Sea proved to be a valuable tool for determining the parking depth of the float in the different flow regimes. Trajectory and drift velocity of the Argo float deployed in the Southern Baltic depended strongly on the atmospheric forcing (in particular wind speed and direction), what was clearly manifested during the 'Axel' storm passing over the deployment area in January 2017. The first

  8. Parascolymia (Scleractinia: Lobophylliidae) in the Central Paratethys Sea (Vienna Basin, Austria) and its possible biogeographic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Markus Reuter; Thomas Wiedl; Piller, Werner E.

    2015-01-01

    Palaeobiogeographical and palaeodiversity patterns of scleractinian reef corals are generally biased due to uncertain taxonomy and a loss of taxonomic characters through dissolution and recrystallization of the skeletal aragonite in shallow marine limestones. Herein, we describe a fossil lobophylliid coral in mouldic preservation from the early middle Miocene Leitha Limestone of the Central Paratethys Sea (Vienna Basin, Austria). By using grey-scale image inversion and silicone rubber casts f...

  9. Hydrochemistry in surface water and shallow groundwater. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troejbom, Mats (Mopelikan, Norrtaelje (SE)); Soederbaeck, Bjoern (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (SE)); Johansson, Per-Olof (Artesia Grundvattenkonsult AB, Taeby (SE))

    2007-10-15

    With a mathematical/statistical approach, a large number of visualisations and models reflect the hydrochemistry in the Forsmark area, with the intention to give an understanding of important processes and factors that affect the hydrochemistry in the surface systems. In order to widen the perspective, all data from the Forsmark 2.2 stage including observations from different levels of the bedrock, as well as hydrological measurements and characterisations of the Quaternary deposits, have been included in the analyses. The purpose of this report is to give a general understanding of the site and to explain observed overall patterns as well as anomalies, and, ultimately, to present a conceptual model that explains the present hydrochemistry in the surface system in the light of the past. The report may also function as a basis for further evaluation and testing of scenarios, and may be regarded as an intermediate step between raw data compilations from the vast SICADA database and specialised expert models. The flat topography and the recent withdrawal of the Baltic Sea due to the isostatic land-uplift are two important factors determining the hydrochemistry in the Forsmark area. Marine remnants in the Quaternary deposits, as well as modern sea water intrusions, are therefore strongly influencing the hydrochemistry, especially in areas at low altitude close to the coast. Large-scale marine gradients in the surface system are consistent with the conceptual model that describes the hydrochemical evolution in a paleo-hydrologic perspective. The Forsmark area is covered by glacial remnants, mostly in the form of a till layer, which was deposited during the Weichselian glaciation and deglaciation. When the ice cover retreated about 11,000 years ago, these deposits were exposed on the sea floor. This till layer is characterized by a rich content of calcite, originating from the sedimentary bedrock of Gaevlebukten about 100 km north of Forsmark. The dissolution of this

  10. Early diagenesis in the sediments of the Congo deep-sea fan dominated by massive terrigenous deposits: Part II - Iron-sulfur coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillefert, Martial; Beckler, Jordon S.; Cathalot, Cécile; Michalopoulos, Panagiotis; Corvaisier, Rudolph; Kiriazis, Nicole; Caprais, Jean-Claude; Pastor, Lucie; Rabouille, Christophe

    2017-08-01

    Deep-sea fans are well known depot centers for organic carbon that should promote sulfate reduction. At the same time, the high rates of deposition of unconsolidated metal oxides from terrigenous origin may also promote metal-reducing microbial activity. To investigate the eventual coupling between the iron and sulfur cycles in these environments, shallow sediment cores (sulfur biogeochemical cycling in this environment is unique and much more similar to a coastal ecosystem than a deep-sea environment.

  11. Mapping Spatial Patterns of Posidonia oceanica Meadows by Means of Daedalus ATM Airborne Sensor in the Coastal Area of Civitavecchia (Central Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Marcelli; Sandro Martini; Alessandro Belmonte; Luigi De Cecco; Selvaggia Cognetti De Martis; Valentina Gnisci; Viviana Piermattei; Filippo Carli; Flavio Borfecchia; Carla Micheli

    2013-01-01

    The spatial distribution of sea bed covers and seagrass in coastal waters is of key importance in monitoring and managing Mediterranean shallow water environments often subject to both increasing anthropogenic impacts and climate change effects. In this context we present a methodology for effective monitoring and mapping of Posidonia oceanica (PO) meadows in turbid waters using remote sensing techniques tested by means of LAI (Leaf Area Index) point sea truth measurements. Preliminary result...

  12. Mississippi State University Center for Air Sea Technology. FY93 and FY 94 Research Program in Navy Ocean Modeling and Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-30

    interaction between shallow and deep water eddies, intermediate and deep water formation, and air-sea-wave interaction. CAST used the DieCAST (Dietrich-Center...for Air Sea Technology) ocean model which evolved from the Sandia Ocean Modeling System. DieCAST is a hydrostatic, incompressible, rigid-lid...partially implicit, fully conservative model that uses an Arakawa "c" staggered grid. Recent tests on DieCAST showed remarkably similar results with validated

  13. Polychaeta (Annelida from Muros de Nalón (Asturias, Cantabrian Sea, with three new records for the coast of Asturias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Cepeda, Patricia Lattig

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The benthic Polychaete fauna associated with shallow water macroalgae assemblages from an Asturian littoral beach (northern Spain, central Cantabrian Sea was studied. Twenty-six species are recorded, including the first records for Myrianida brachycephala and Nudisyllis pulligera for the Asturian coasts and Nerilla mediterranea for the Cantabrian Sea. Relevant taxonomic and ecological remarks are also provided for some of the collected species.

  14. Sea Scallop Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Sea Scallop Survey began in 1980 and has covered an area from Cape Hatteras to Georges Bank. The survey aims to determine the distribution and...

  15. Dead Sea Scrolls

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A consortium of researchers from Jet Propulsion Laboratory and three other organizations used charged coupled devices (CCDs) and other imaging enhancement technology to decipher previously unreadable portions of the Dead Sea Scrolls. The technique has potentially important implications for archeology.

  16. Baltic Sea: Radionuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sven Poul; Lüning, Maria; Ilus, Erkki

    2010-01-01

    The most significant source of anthropogenic radioactivity in the Baltic Sea is fallout from the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986. The second most important source is global fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests carried out during the late 1950s and early 1960s....... Radioactivity inputs into the Baltic Sea from nuclear reprocessing plants in Western Europe have become of minor importance due to significant reduction of discharges in recent years. In terms of input of 137Cs into the Baltic Sea, Chernobyl fallout has contributed about 82% and nuclear weapons test fallout...... about 14%. For 90Sr in the Baltic Sea, input from atmospheric fallout from nuclear weapons tests has contributed about 81%, while the contribution from Chernobyl fallout was about 13%. Cesium-137 is the main indicator of Baltic seawater with respect to anthropogenic radioactivity. The highest...

  17. Baltic Sea: Radionuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sven Poul; Lüning, Maria; Ilus, Erkki

    2011-01-01

    The most significant source of anthropogenic radioactivity in the Baltic Sea is fallout from the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986. The second most important source is global fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests carried out during the late 1950s and early 1960s....... Radioactivity inputs into the Baltic Sea from nuclear reprocessing plants in Western Europe have become of minor importance due to significant reduction of discharges in recent years. In terms of input of 137Cs into the Baltic Sea, Chernobyl fallout has contributed about 82% and nuclear weapons test fallout...... about 14%. For 90Sr in the Baltic Sea, input from atmospheric fallout from nuclear weapons tests has contributed about 81%, while the contribution from Chernobyl fallout was about 13%. Cesium-137 is the main indicator of Baltic seawater with respect to anthropogenic radioactivity. The highest...

  18. Arctic Sea Level Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde

    gauge record and makes the reconstruction much less prone to drifting away over time.Unfortunately, many of the Russian-sector tide gauge records end around 1990,leaving a fairly sparse record after this. This project examines the effect of introducing a subset of the altimetric dataset as “virtual tide......Reconstruction of historical Arctic sea level is very difficult due to the limited coverage and quality of tide gauge and altimetry data in the area. This thesis addresses many of these issues, and discusses strategies to help achieve a stable and plausible reconstruction of Arctic sea level from...... 1950 to today.The primary record of historical sea level, on the order of several decades to a few centuries, is tide gauges. Tide gauge records from around the world are collected in the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) database, and includes data along the Arctic coasts. A reasonable...

  19. Pollution of coastal seas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    Pollution of various environments is a consequence of population growth and industrialisation. Coastal seas form part of marine environment and are very rich in minerals, crude oil fishes etc. They are also being used for disposal of wastes from...

  20. Sea Hero Quest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-07

    Sea Hero Quest has been developed to help fight dementia. The mobile game is a collaboration between Alzheimer's Research UK and scientists from University College London and the University of East Anglia.