WorldWideScience

Sample records for wave vector kinetic

  1. Vector financial rogue waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-01-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black–Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields. -- Highlights: ► We investigate the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model. ► We analytically present vector financial rogue waves. ► The vector financial rogue waves may be used to describe the extreme events in financial markets. ► This results may excite the relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves.

  2. Electric field vector measurements in a surface ionization wave discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin M; Adamovich, Igor V; Lempert, Walter R; Böhm, Patrick S; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the results of time-resolved electric field vector measurements in a short pulse duration (60 ns full width at half maximum), surface ionization wave discharge in hydrogen using a picosecond four-wave mixing technique. Electric field vector components are measured separately, using pump and Stokes beams linearly polarized in the horizontal and vertical planes, and a polarizer placed in front of the infrared detector. The time-resolved electric field vector is measured at three different locations across the discharge gap, and for three different heights above the alumina ceramic dielectric surface, ∼100, 600, and 1100 μm (total of nine different locations). The results show that after breakdown, the discharge develops as an ionization wave propagating along the dielectric surface at an average speed of 1 mm ns −1 . The surface ionization wave forms near the high voltage electrode, close to the dielectric surface (∼100 μm). The wave front is characterized by significant overshoot of both vertical and horizontal electric field vector components. Behind the wave front, the vertical field component is rapidly reduced. As the wave propagates along the dielectric surface, it also extends further away from the dielectric surface, up to ∼1 mm near the grounded electrode. The horizontal field component behind the wave front remains quite significant, to sustain the electron current toward the high voltage electrode. After the wave reaches the grounded electrode, the horizontal field component experiences a secondary rise in the quasi-dc discharge, where it sustains the current along the near-surface plasma sheet. The measurement results indicate presence of a cathode layer formed near the grounded electrode with significant cathode voltage fall, ≈3 kV, due to high current density in the discharge. The peak reduced electric field in the surface ionization wave is 85–95 Td, consistent with dc breakdown field estimated from the Paschen

  3. Plasma heating by kinetic Alfven wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assis, A.S. de.

    1982-01-01

    The heating of a nonuniform plasma (electron-ion) due to the resonant excitation of the shear Alfven wave in the low β regime is studied using initially the ideal MHD model and posteriorly using the kinetic model. The Vlasov equation for ions and the drift kinetic equation for electrons have been used. Through the ideal MHD model, it is concluded that the energy absorption is due to the continuous spectrum (phase mixing) which the shear Alfven wave has in a nonuniform plasma. An explicit expression for the energy absorption is derived. Through the kinetic model it is concluded that the energy absorption is due to a resonant mode convertion of the incident wave into the kinetic Alfven wave which propagates away from the resonant region. Its electron Landau damping has been observed. There has been a concordance with the MHD calculations. (Author) [pt

  4. Vlasov simulations of Kinetic Alfven Waves at proton kinetic scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Vasconez; F. Valentini (Francesco); E. Camporeale (Enrico); P. Veltri

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractKinetic Alfv ́en waves represent an important subject in space plasma physics, since they are thought to play a crucial role in the development of the turbulent energy cascade in the solar wind plasma at short wavelengths (of the order of the proton inertial length d p and beyond). A

  5. Nonlocal nonlinear coupling of kinetic sound waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Lyubchyk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We study three-wave resonant interactions among kinetic-scale oblique sound waves in the low-frequency range below the ion cyclotron frequency. The nonlinear eigenmode equation is derived in the framework of a two-fluid plasma model. Because of dispersive modifications at small wavelengths perpendicular to the background magnetic field, these waves become a decay-type mode. We found two decay channels, one into co-propagating product waves (forward decay, and another into counter-propagating product waves (reverse decay. All wavenumbers in the forward decay are similar and hence this decay is local in wavenumber space. On the contrary, the reverse decay generates waves with wavenumbers that are much larger than in the original pump waves and is therefore intrinsically nonlocal. In general, the reverse decay is significantly faster than the forward one, suggesting a nonlocal spectral transport induced by oblique sound waves. Even with low-amplitude sound waves the nonlinear interaction rate is larger than the collisionless dissipation rate. Possible applications regarding acoustic waves observed in the solar corona, solar wind, and topside ionosphere are briefly discussed.

  6. Kinetic theory of drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, G.

    1988-01-01

    The linear stability of the electrostatic drift waves in slab geometry has been studied analytically and numerically. The effects of magnetic field with shear, of the finite Larmor radius, of an electron streaming, of a temperature gradient and of collisions have been retained. The analytical solution has been obtained using the matched asymptotic expansion technique, and an expression for the critical streaming parameter has been derived. Finally, assuming that the transport in the Reversed Field Pinches is dominated by this instability, a scaling law for the temperature in such machine is derived

  7. Vector potential quantization and the photon wave-particle representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meis, C; Dahoo, P R

    2016-01-01

    The quantization procedure of the vector potential is enhanced at a single photon state revealing the possibility for a simultaneous representation of the wave-particle nature of the photon. Its relationship to the quantum vacuum results naturally. A vector potential amplitude operator is defined showing the parallelism with the Hamiltonian of a massless particle. It is further shown that the quantized vector potential satisfies both the wave propagation equation and a linear time-dependent Schrödinger-like equation. (paper)

  8. Polarization speckles and generalized Stokes vector wave: a review [invited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeda, Mitsuo; Wang, Wei; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2010-01-01

    We review some of the statistical properties of polarization-related speckle phenomena, with an introduction of a less known concept of polarization speckles and their spatial degree of polarization. As a useful means to characterize twopoint vector field correlations, we review the generalized...... Stokes parameters proposed by Korotkova and Wolf, and introduce its time-domain representation to describe the space-time evolution of the correlation between random electric vector fields at two different space-time points. This time-domain generalized Stokes vector, with components similar to those...... of the beam coherence polarization matrix proposed by Gori, is shown to obey the wave equation in exact analogy to a coherence function of scalar fields. Because of this wave nature, the time-domain generalized Stokes vector is referred to as generalized Stokes vector wave in this paper....

  9. Kinetic treatment of magnetosonic wave reflection by minority gyroresonant ballistic waves in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, A.N.; Brizard, A.J.; Cook, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of the minority-ion gyroresonant heating process by a magnetosonic wave in a general magnetic field geometry with one ignorable spatial coordinate can be divided into several steps, each defined in terms of a precise mathematical problem to be solved. In this work, the authors focus their attention on the magnetosonic wave reflection problem in axisymmetric tokamak geometry; the conversion and absorption of the minority-ion gyroresonant ballistic waves are treated elsewhere. In contrast to their previous work, they employ a kinetic model based on the perturbation generating function S for the gyroresonant minority-ions. The bulk plasma response is represented by the perturbation magnetic vector potential A, corresponding to a shielded magnetosonic wave. The set of coupled equations for S and A can be derived from an action principle, which can also be used to derive explicit wave-action conservation laws in ray phase space. The reflection problem is solved in ray phase space by considering three separate steps. In the first step, the incident magnetosonic ray propagates towards the first linear mode conversion region, where action is transferred to the minority-ion gyroresonant ballistic waves. In the second step, the continuum of excited gyroresonant ballistic rays propagate towards the second linear mode conversion region. In the third step, the reflected magnetosonic wave field is excited by linear mode conversion from the minority gyroresonant ballistic rays

  10. Poynting vector and wave vector directions of equatorial chorus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taubenschuss, Ulrich; Santolík, Ondřej; Breuillard, H.; Li, W.; Le Contel, O.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 12 (2016), s. 11912-11928 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31899S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH15304 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1401 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : whistler-mode waves * Earth 's inner magnetosphere * Van Allen probes * plasmaspheric hiss * magnetic reconnection * outer magnetosphere * source region * emissions * propagation * THEMIS Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.733, year: 2016

  11. SCALAR AND VECTOR NONLINEAR DECAYS OF LOW-FREQUENCY ALFVÉN WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, J. S.; Wu, D. J. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Voitenko, Y.; De Keyser, J., E-mail: js_zhao@pmo.ac.cn [Solar-Terrestrial Centre of Excellence, Space Physics Division, Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Ringlaan 3 Avenue Circulaire, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-02-01

    We found several efficient nonlinear decays for Alfvén waves in the solar wind conditions. Depending on the wavelength, the dominant decay is controlled by the nonlinearities proportional to either scalar or vector products of wavevectors. The two-mode decays of the pump MHD Alfvén wave into co- and counter-propagating product Alfvén and slow waves are controlled by the scalar nonlinearities at long wavelengths ρ{sub i}{sup 2}k{sub 0⊥}{sup 2}<ω{sub 0}/ω{sub ci} (k {sub 0} is wavenumber perpendicular to the background magnetic field, ω{sub 0} is frequency of the pump Alfvén wave, ρ {sub i} is ion gyroradius, and ω {sub ci} is ion-cyclotron frequency). The scalar decays exhibit both local and nonlocal properties and can generate not only MHD-scale but also kinetic-scale Alfvén and slow waves, which can strongly accelerate spectral transport. All waves in the scalar decays propagate in the same plane, hence these decays are two-dimensional. At shorter wavelengths, ρ{sub i}{sup 2}k{sub 0⊥}{sup 2}>ω{sub 0}/ω{sub ci}, three-dimensional vector decays dominate generating out-of-plane product waves. The two-mode decays dominate from MHD up to ion scales ρ {sub i} k {sub 0} ≅ 0.3; at shorter scales the one-mode vector decays become stronger and generate only Alfvén product waves. In the solar wind the two-mode decays have high growth rates >0.1ω{sub 0} and can explain the origin of slow waves observed at kinetic scales.

  12. Iterative Addition of Kinetic Effects to Cold Plasma RF Wave Solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David; Berry, Lee; RF-SciDAC Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The hot nature of fusion plasmas requires a wave vector dependent conductivity tensor for accurate calculation of wave heating and current drive. Traditional methods for calculating the linear, kinetic full-wave plasma response rely on a spectral method such that the wave vector dependent conductivity fits naturally within the numerical method. These methods have seen much success for application to the well-confined core plasma of tokamaks. However, quantitative prediction of high power RF antenna designs for fusion applications has meant a requirement of resolving the geometric details of the antenna and other plasma facing surfaces for which the Fourier spectral method is ill-suited. An approach to enabling the addition of kinetic effects to the more versatile finite-difference and finite-element cold-plasma full-wave solvers was presented by where an operator-split iterative method was outlined. Here we expand on this approach, examine convergence and present a simplified kinetic current estimator for rapidly updating the right-hand side of the wave equation with kinetic corrections. This research used resources of the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  13. Energy flow characteristics of vector X-Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed; Bagci, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    The vector form of X-Waves is obtained as a superposition of transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarized field components. It is shown that the signs of all components of the Poynting vector can be locally changed using carefully chosen complex amplitudes of the transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarization components. Negative energy flux density in the longitudinal direction can be observed in a bounded region around the centroid; in this region the local behavior of the wave field is similar to that of wave field with negative energy flow. This peculiar energy flux phenomenon is of essential importance for electromagnetic and optical traps and tweezers, where the location and momenta of microand nanoparticles are manipulated by changing the Poynting vector, and in detection of invisibility cloaks. © 2011 Optical Society of America.

  14. Dislocation kinetics and the acoustic-wave approximation for liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.

    1983-03-01

    A dislocation-dependent model for liquids describes the lattice deformation and the fluidity deformation as additive deformations. The lattice deformation represents distortions of an atom's potential energy structure and is a recoverable deformation response. The fluidity deformation represents discontinuous repositioning of atoms by dislocation kinetics in the lattice structure and is a nonrecoverable deformation response. From this model, one concludes that in liquids the acoustic-wave approximation is a description of a recoverable oscillation deformation that has dissipation because of dislocation kinetics. Other more-complex waves may exist, but such waves would rapidly disappear because of the small thermodynamic potential for dislocation kinetics in liquids

  15. Three-dimensional stability of solitary kinetic Alfven waves and ion-acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, G.; Das, K.P.

    1994-01-01

    Starting from a set of equations that lead to a linear dispersion relation coupling kinetic Alfven waves and ion-acoustic waves, three-dimensional KdV equations are derived for these waves. These equations are then used to investigate the three-dimensional stability of solitary kinetic Alfven waves and ion-acoustic waves by the small-k perturbation expansion method of Rowlands and Infeld. For kinetic Alfven waves it is found that there is instability if the direction of the plane-wave perturbation lies inside a cone, and the growth rate of the instability attains a maximum when the direction of the perturbation lies in the plane containing the external magnetic field and the direction of propagation of the solitary wave. For ion-acoustic waves the growth rate of instability attains a maximum when the direction of the perturbation lies in a plane perpendicular to the direction of propagation of the solitary wave. (Author)

  16. Variational formulation of covariant eikonal theory for vector waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, A.N.; Ye, H.; Hui, Y.

    1986-10-01

    The eikonal theory of wave propagation is developed by means of a Lorentz-covariant variational principle, involving functions defined on the natural eight-dimensional phase space of rays. The wave field is a four-vector representing the electromagnetic potential, while the medium is represented by an anisotropic, dispersive nonuniform dielectric tensor D/sup μν/(k,x). The eikonal expansion yields, to lowest order, the Hamiltonian ray equations, which define the Lagrangian manifold k(x), and the wave-action conservation law, which determines the wave-amplitude transport along the rays. The first-order contribution to the variational principle yields a concise expression for the transport of the polarization phase. The symmetry between k-space and x-space allows for a simple implementation of the Maslov transform, which avoids the difficulties of caustic singularities

  17. Nonlinear generation of kinetic-scale waves by magnetohydrodynamic Alfvén waves and nonlocal spectral transport in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, J. S.; Wu, D. J. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China); Voitenko, Y.; De Keyser, J., E-mail: js_zhao@pmo.ac.cn [Solar-Terrestrial Centre of Excellence, Space Physics Division, Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Ringlaan-3-Avenue Circulaire, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-04-20

    We study the nonlocal nonlinear coupling and generation of kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) and kinetic slow waves (KSWs) by magnetohydrodynamic Alfvén waves (MHD AWs) in conditions typical for the solar wind in the inner heliosphere. This cross-scale process provides an alternative to the turbulent energy cascade passing through many intermediate scales. The nonlinearities we study are proportional to the scalar products of wave vectors and hence are called 'scalar' ones. Despite the strong Landau damping of kinetic waves, we found fast growing KAWs and KSWs at perpendicular wavelengths close to the ion gyroradius. Using the parametric decay formalism, we investigate two independent decay channels for the pump AW: forward decay (involving co-propagating product waves) and backward decay (involving counter-propagating product waves). The growth rate of the forward decay is typically 0.05 but can exceed 0.1 of the pump wave frequency. The resulting spectral transport is nonlocal and anisotropic, sharply increasing perpendicular wavenumbers but not parallel ones. AWs and KAWs propagating against the pump AW grow with about the same rate and contribute to the sunward wave flux in the solar wind. Our results suggest that the nonlocal decay of MHD AWs into KAWs and KSWs is a robust mechanism for the cross-scale spectral transport of the wave energy from MHD to dissipative kinetic scales in the solar wind and similar media.

  18. Kinetic Scale Structure of Low-frequency Waves and Fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, Rodrigo A.; Yoon, Peter H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Viñas, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Araneda, Jaime A., E-mail: rlopezh@umd.edu, E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción (Chile)

    2017-08-10

    The dissipation of solar wind turbulence at kinetic scales is believed to be important for the heating of the corona and for accelerating the wind. The linear Vlasov kinetic theory is a useful tool for identifying various wave modes, including kinetic Alfvén, fast magnetosonic/whistler, and ion-acoustic (or kinetic slow), and their possible roles in the dissipation. However, the kinetic mode structure in the vicinity of ion-cyclotron modes is not clearly understood. The present paper aims to further elucidate the structure of these low-frequency waves by introducing discrete particle effects through hybrid simulations and Klimontovich formalism of spontaneous emission theory. The theory and simulation of spontaneously emitted low-frequency fluctuations are employed to identify and distinguish the detailed mode structures associated with ion-Bernstein modes versus quasi-modes. The spontaneous emission theory and simulation also confirm the findings of the Vlasov theory in that the kinetic Alfvén waves can be defined over a wide range of frequencies, including the proton cyclotron frequency and its harmonics, especially for high-beta plasmas. This implies that these low-frequency modes may play predominant roles even in the fully kinetic description of kinetic scale turbulence and dissipation despite the fact that cyclotron harmonic and Bernstein modes may also play important roles in wave–particle interactions.

  19. Wave-vector and polarization dependence of conical refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, A; Loiko, Yu V; Kalkandjiev, T K; Tomizawa, H; Mompart, J

    2013-02-25

    We experimentally address the wave-vector and polarization dependence of the internal conical refraction phenomenon by demonstrating that an input light beam of elliptical transverse profile refracts into two beams after passing along one of the optic axes of a biaxial crystal, i.e. it exhibits double refraction instead of refracting conically. Such double refraction is investigated by the independent rotation of a linear polarizer and a cylindrical lens. Expressions to describe the position and the intensity pattern of the refracted beams are presented and applied to predict the intensity pattern for an axicon beam propagating along the optic axis of a biaxial crystal.

  20. Dispersion-Engineered Traveling Wave Kinetic Inductance Parametric Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas (Inventor); Day, Peter K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A traveling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifier comprises a superconducting transmission line and a dispersion control element. The transmission line can include periodic variations of its dimension along its length. The superconducting material can include a high normal state resistivity material. In some instances the high normal state resistivity material includes nitrogen and a metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, niobium and vanadium. The traveling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifier is expected to exhibit a noise temperature below 100 mK/GHz.

  1. Spin waves in terbium. III. Magnetic anisotropy at zero wave vector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden; Jensen, J.; Touborg, P.

    1975-01-01

    The energy gap at zero wave vector in the spin-wave dispersion relation of ferromagnetic. Tb has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. The energy was measured as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field, and the dynamic anisotropy parameters were deduced from the results...... the effects of zero-point deviations from the fully aligned ground state, and we tentatively propose polarization-dependent two-ion couplings as their origin........ The axial anisotropy is found to depend sensitively on the orientation of the magnetic moments in the basal plane. This behavior is shown to be a convincing indication of considerable two-ion contributions to the magnetic anisotropy at zero wave vector. With the exception of the sixfold basal...

  2. Statistical approach to LHCD modeling using the wave kinetic equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupfer, K.; Moreau, D.; Litaudon, X.

    1993-04-01

    Recent work has shown that for parameter regimes typical of many present day current drive experiments, the orbits of the launched LH rays are chaotic (in the Hamiltonian sense), so that wave energy diffuses through the stochastic layer and fills the spectral gap. We have analyzed this problem using a statistical approach, by solving the wave kinetic equation for the coarse-grained spectral energy density. An interesting result is that the LH absorption profile is essentially independent of both the total injected power and the level of wave stochastic diffusion

  3. Kinetic theory of surface waves in plasma jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokri, B.

    2002-01-01

    The kinetic theory analysis of surface waves propagating along a semi-bounded plasma jet is presented. The frequency spectra and their damping rate are obtained in both the high and low frequency regions. Finally, the penetration of the static field in the plasma jet under the condition that the plasma jet velocity is smaller than the sound velocity is studied

  4. Vlasov simulations of kinetic Alfvén waves at proton kinetic scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vásconez, C. L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, I-87036 Cosenza (Italy); Observatorio Astronómico de Quito, Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Quito (Ecuador); Valentini, F.; Veltri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, I-87036 Cosenza (Italy); Camporeale, E. [Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    Kinetic Alfvén waves represent an important subject in space plasma physics, since they are thought to play a crucial role in the development of the turbulent energy cascade in the solar wind plasma at short wavelengths (of the order of the proton gyro radius ρ{sub p} and/or inertial length d{sub p} and beyond). A full understanding of the physical mechanisms which govern the kinetic plasma dynamics at these scales can provide important clues on the problem of the turbulent dissipation and heating in collisionless systems. In this paper, hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell simulations are employed to analyze in detail the features of the kinetic Alfvén waves at proton kinetic scales, in typical conditions of the solar wind environment (proton plasma beta β{sub p} = 1). In particular, linear and nonlinear regimes of propagation of these fluctuations have been investigated in a single-wave situation, focusing on the physical processes of collisionless Landau damping and wave-particle resonant interaction. Interestingly, since for wavelengths close to d{sub p} and β{sub p} ≃ 1 (for which ρ{sub p} ≃ d{sub p}) the kinetic Alfvén waves have small phase speed compared to the proton thermal velocity, wave-particle interaction processes produce significant deformations in the core of the particle velocity distribution, appearing as phase space vortices and resulting in flat-top velocity profiles. Moreover, as the Eulerian hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell algorithm allows for a clean almost noise-free description of the velocity space, three-dimensional plots of the proton velocity distribution help to emphasize how the plasma departs from the Maxwellian configuration of thermodynamic equilibrium due to nonlinear kinetic effects.

  5. Wave-particle energy exchange directly observed in a kinetic Alfvén-branch wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Daniel J; F-Viñas, Adolfo; Dorelli, John C; Boardsen, Scott A; Avanov, Levon A; Bellan, Paul M; Schwartz, Steven J; Lavraud, Benoit; Coffey, Victoria N; Chandler, Michael O; Saito, Yoshifumi; Paterson, William R; Fuselier, Stephen A; Ergun, Robert E; Strangeway, Robert J; Russell, Christopher T; Giles, Barbara L; Pollock, Craig J; Torbert, Roy B; Burch, James L

    2017-03-31

    Alfvén waves are fundamental plasma wave modes that permeate the universe. At small kinetic scales, they provide a critical mechanism for the transfer of energy between electromagnetic fields and charged particles. These waves are important not only in planetary magnetospheres, heliospheres and astrophysical systems but also in laboratory plasma experiments and fusion reactors. Through measurement of charged particles and electromagnetic fields with NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, we utilize Earth's magnetosphere as a plasma physics laboratory. Here we confirm the conservative energy exchange between the electromagnetic field fluctuations and the charged particles that comprise an undamped kinetic Alfvén wave. Electrons confined between adjacent wave peaks may have contributed to saturation of damping effects via nonlinear particle trapping. The investigation of these detailed wave dynamics has been unexplored territory in experimental plasma physics and is only recently enabled by high-resolution MMS observations.

  6. Wave-Particle Energy Exchange Directly Observed in a Kinetic Alfven-Branch Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Daniel J.; F-Vinas, Adolfo; Dorelli, John C.; Boardsen, Scott A. (Inventor); Avanov, Levon A.; Bellan, Paul M.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Lavraud, Benoit; Coffey, Victoria N.; Chandler, Michael O.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Alfven waves are fundamental plasma wave modes that permeate the universe. At small kinetic scales they provide a critical mechanism for the transfer of energy between electromagnetic fields and charged particles. These waves are important not only in planetary magnetospheres, heliospheres, and astrophysical systems, but also in laboratory plasma experiments and fusion reactors. Through measurement of charged particles and electromagnetic fields with NASAs Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, we utilize Earths magnetosphere as a plasma physics laboratory. Here we confirm the conservative energy exchange between the electromagnetic field fluctuations and the charged particles that comprise an undamped kinetic Alfven wave. Electrons confined between adjacent wave peaks may have contributed to saturation of damping effects via non-linear particle trapping. The investigation of these detailed wave dynamics has been unexplored territory in experimental plasma physics and is only recently enabled by high-resolution MMS observations.

  7. Wave-Kinetic Simulations of the Nonlinear Generation of Electromagnetic VLF Waves through Velocity Ring Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, G.; Crabtree, C. E.; Rudakov, L.; Mithaiwala, M.

    2014-12-01

    Velocity ring instabilities are a common naturally occuring magnetospheric phenomenon that can also be generated by man made ionospheric experiments. These instabilities are known to generate lower-hybrid waves, which generally cannot propagte out of the source region. However, nonlinear wave physics can convert these linearly driven electrostatic lower-hybrid waves into electromagnetic waves that can escape the source region. These nonlinearly generated waves can be an important source of VLF turbulence that controls the trapped electron lifetime in the radiation belts. We develop numerical solutions to the wave-kinetic equation in a periodic box including the effects of nonlinear (NL) scattering (nonlinear Landau damping) of Lower-hybrid waves giving the evolution of the wave-spectra in wavenumber space. Simultaneously we solve the particle diffusion equation of both the background plasma particles and the ring ions, due to both linear and nonlinear Landau resonances. At initial times for cold ring ions, an electrostatic beam mode is excited, while the kinetic mode is stable. As the instability progresses the ring ions heat, the beam mode is stabilized, and the kinetic mode destabilizes. When the amplitude of the waves becomes sufficient the lower-hybrid waves are scattered (by either nearly unmagnetized ions or magnetized electrons) into electromagnetic magnetosonic waves [Ganguli et al 2010]. The effect of NL scattering is to limit the amplitude of the waves, slowing down the quasilinear relaxation time and ultimately allowing more energy from the ring to be liberated into waves [Mithaiwala et al. 2011]. The effects of convection out of the instability region are modeled, additionally limiting the amplitude of the waves, allowing further energy to be liberated from the ring [Scales et al., 2012]. Results are compared to recent 3D PIC simulations [Winske and Duaghton 2012].

  8. Rigorous vector wave propagation for arbitrary flat media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Steven P.; Haffert, Sebastiaan Y.; Keller, Christoph U.

    2017-08-01

    Precise modelling of the (off-axis) point spread function (PSF) to identify geometrical and polarization aberrations is important for many optical systems. In order to characterise the PSF of the system in all Stokes parameters, an end-to-end simulation of the system has to be performed in which Maxwell's equations are rigorously solved. We present the first results of a python code that we are developing to perform multiscale end-to-end wave propagation simulations that include all relevant physics. Currently we can handle plane-parallel near- and far-field vector diffraction effects of propagating waves in homogeneous isotropic and anisotropic materials, refraction and reflection of flat parallel surfaces, interference effects in thin films and unpolarized light. We show that the code has a numerical precision on the order of 10-16 for non-absorbing isotropic and anisotropic materials. For absorbing materials the precision is on the order of 10-8. The capabilities of the code are demonstrated by simulating a converging beam reflecting from a flat aluminium mirror at normal incidence.

  9. Screw-vector bond graphs for kinetic-static modelling and analysis of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidard, Catherine

    1994-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the kinetic-static modelling and analysis of spatial mechanisms used in robotics systems. A framework is proposed, which embodies a geometrical and a network approach for kinetic-static modelling. For this purpose we use screw theory and bond graphs. A new form of bond graphs is introduced: the screw-vector bond graph, whose power variables are defined to be wrenches and twists expressed as intrinsic screw-vectors. The mechanism is then identified as a network, whose components are kinematic pairs and whose topology is described by a directed graph. A screw-vector Simple Junction Structure represents the topological constraints. Kinematic pairs are represented by one-port elements, defined by two reciprocal screw-vector spaces. Using dual bases of screw-vectors, a generic decomposition of kinematic pair elements is given. The reduction of kinetic-static models of series and parallel kinematic chains is used in order to derive kinetic-static functional models in geometric form. Thereupon, the computational causality assignment is adapted for the graphical analysis of the mobility and the functioning of spatial mechanisms, based on completely or incompletely specified models. (author) [fr

  10. Wave Vector Dependent Susceptibility at T>Tc in a Dipolar Ising Ferromagnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Holmes, L. M:; Guggenheim, H. J.

    1974-01-01

    The wave-vector-dependent susceptibility of LiTbF4 has been investigated by means of neutron scattering. The observations show a singularity of the susceptibility near wave vector Q=0 which is characteristic of the dipolar Coulomb interaction and good agreement with theory is obtained...

  11. Reflection and transmission of normally incident full-vector X waves on planar interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed; Bagci, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    The reflection and transmission of full-vector X waves normally incident on planar half-spaces and slabs are studied. For this purpose, X waves are expanded in terms of weighted vector Bessel beams; this new decomposition and reconstruction method

  12. Kinetic computer modeling of microwave surface-wave plasma production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganachev, Ivan P.

    2004-01-01

    Kinetic computer plasma modeling occupies an intermediate position between the time consuming rigorous particle dynamic simulation and the fast but rather rough cold- or warm-plasma fluid models. The present paper reviews the kinetic modeling of microwave surface-wave discharges with accent on recent kinetic self-consistent models, where the external input parameters are reduced to the necessary minimum (frequency and intensity of the applied microwave field and pressure and geometry of the discharge vessel). The presentation is limited to low pressures, so that Boltzmann equation is solved in non-local approximation and collisional electron heating is neglected. The numerical results reproduce correctly the bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution functions observed experimentally. (author)

  13. Electric control of wave vector filtering in a hybrid magnetic-electric-barrier nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong-Hong; Lu, Ke-Yu; He, Ya-Ping; Liu, Xu-Hui; Fu, Xi; Li, Ai-Hua

    2018-06-01

    We theoretically investigate how to manipulate the wave vector filtering effect by a traverse electric field for electrons across a hybrid magnetic-electric-barrier nanostructure, which can be experimentally realized by depositing a ferromagnetic stripe and a Schottky-metal stripe on top and bottom of a GaAs/Al x Ga1- x As heterostructure, respectively. The wave vector filtering effect is found to be related closely to the applied electric field. Moreover, the wave vector filtering efficiency can be manipulated by changing direction or adjusting strength of the traverse electric field. Therefore, such a nanostructure can be employed as an electrically controllable electron-momentum filter for nanoelectronics applications.

  14. Kinetic Alfven wave with density variation and loss-cone distribution function of multi-ions in PSBL region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamrakar, Radha; Varma, P.; Tiwari, M. S.

    2018-05-01

    Kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) generation due to variation of loss-cone index J and density of multi-ions (H+, He+ and O+) in the plasma sheet boundary layer region (PSBL) is investigated. Kinetic approach is used to derive dispersion relation of wave using Vlasov equation. Variation of frequency with respect to wide range of k⊥ρi (where k⊥ is wave vector across the magnetic field, ρi is gyroradius of ions and i denotes H+, He+ and O+ ions) is analyzed. It is found that each ion gyroradius and number density shows different effect on wave generation with varying width of loss-cone. KAW is generated with multi-ions (H+, He+ and O+) over wide regime for J=1 and shows dissimilar effect for J=2. Frequency is reduced with increasing density of gyrating He+ and O+ ions. Wave frequency is obtained within the reported range which strongly supports generation of kinetic Alfven waves. A sudden drop of frequency is also observed for H+ and He+ ion which may be due to heavy penetration of these ions through the loss-cone. The parameters of PSBL region are used for numerical calculation. The application of these results are in understanding the effect of gyrating multi-ions in transfer of energy and Poynting flux losses from PSBL region towards ionosphere and also describing the generation of aurora.

  15. Rethinking wave-kinetic theory applied to zonal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeffrey

    2017-10-01

    Over the past two decades, a number of studies have employed a wave-kinetic theory to describe fluctuations interacting with zonal flows. Recent work has uncovered a defect in this wave-kinetic formulation: the system is dominated by the growth of (arbitrarily) small-scale zonal structures. Theoretical calculations of linear growth rates suggest, and nonlinear simulations confirm, that this system leads to the concentration of zonal flow energy in the smallest resolved scales, irrespective of the numerical resolution. This behavior results from the assumption that zonal flows are extremely long wavelength, leading to the neglect of key terms responsible for conservation of enstrophy. A corrected theory, CE2-GO, is presented; it is free of these errors yet preserves the intuitive phase-space mathematical structure. CE2-GO properly conserves enstrophy as well as energy, and yields accurate growth rates of zonal flow. Numerical simulations are shown to be well-behaved and not dependent on box size. The steady-state limit simplifies into an exact wave-kinetic form which offers the promise of deeper insight into the behavior of wavepackets. The CE2-GO theory takes its place in a hierarchy of models as the geometrical-optics reduction of the more complete cumulant-expansion statistical theory CE2. The new theory represents the minimal statistical description, enabling an intuitive phase-space formulation and an accurate description of turbulence-zonal flow dynamics. This work was supported by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, a US DOE Fusion Energy Sciences Fellowship, and US DOE Contract Nos. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Kinetic theory of plasma waves, homogeneous plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porkolab, Miklos

    1998-11-01

    The linear theory of plasma waves in homogeneous plasma is arguably the most mature and best understood branch of plasma physics. Given the recently revised version of Stix's excellent Waves in Plasmas (1992), one might ask whether another book on this subject is necessary only a few years later. The answer lies in the scope of this volume; it is somewhat more detailed in certain topics than, and complementary in many fusion research relevant areas to, Stix's book. (I am restricting these comments to the homogeneous plasma theory only, since the author promises a second volume on wave propagation in inhomogeneous plasmas.) This book is also much more of a theorist's approach to waves in plasmas, with the aim of developing the subject within the logical framework of kinetic theory. This may indeed be pleasing to the expert and to the specialist, but may be too difficult to the graduate student as an `introduction' to the subject (which the author explicitly states in the Preface). On the other hand, it may be entirely appropriate for a second course on plasma waves, after the student has mastered fluid theory and an introductory kinetic treatment of waves in a hot magnetized `Vlasov' plasma. For teaching purposes, my personal preference is to review the cold plasma wave treatment using the unified Stix formalism and notation (which the author wisely adopts in the present book, but only in Chapter 5). Such an approach allows one to deal with CMA diagrams early on, as well as to provide a framework to discuss electromagnetic wave propagation and accessibility in inhomogeneous plasmas (for which the cold plasma wave treatment is perfectly adequate). Such an approach does lack some of the rigour, however, that the author achieves with the present approach. As the author correctly shows, the fluid theory treatment of waves follows logically from kinetic theory in the cold plasma limit. I only question the pedagogical value of this approach. Otherwise, I welcome this

  17. Reflection and transmission of full-vector X-waves normally incident on dielectric half spaces

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    The reflection and transmission of full-vector X-Waves incident normally on a planar interface between two lossless dielectric half-spaces are investigated. Full-vector X-Waves are obtained by superimposing transverse electric and magnetic polarization components, which are derived from the scalar X-Wave solution. The analysis of transmission and reflection is carried out via a straightforward but yet effective method: First, the X-Wave is decomposed into vector Bessel beams via the Bessel-Fourier transform. Then, the reflection and transmission coefficients of the beams are obtained in the spectral domain. Finally, the transmitted and reflected X-Waves are obtained via the inverse Bessel-Fourier transform carried out on the X-wave spectrum weighted with the corresponding coefficient. © 2011 IEEE.

  18. Analysis and classification of ECG-waves and rhythms using circular statistics and vector strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janßen Jan-Dirk

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The most common way to analyse heart rhythm is to calculate the RR-interval and the heart rate variability. For further evaluation, descriptive statistics are often used. Here we introduce a new and more natural heart rhythm analysis tool that is based on circular statistics and vector strength. Vector strength is a tool to measure the periodicity or lack of periodicity of a signal. We divide the signal into non-overlapping window segments and project the detected R-waves around the unit circle using the complex exponential function and the median RR-interval. In addition, we calculate the vector strength and apply circular statistics as wells as an angular histogram on the R-wave vectors. This approach enables an intuitive visualization and analysis of rhythmicity. Our results show that ECG-waves and rhythms can be easily visualized, analysed and classified by circular statistics and vector strength.

  19. Reflection and transmission of normally incident full-vector X waves on planar interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-12-23

    The reflection and transmission of full-vector X waves normally incident on planar half-spaces and slabs are studied. For this purpose, X waves are expanded in terms of weighted vector Bessel beams; this new decomposition and reconstruction method offers a more lucid and intuitive interpretation of the physical phenomena observed upon the reflection or transmission of X waves when compared to the conventional plane-wave decomposition technique. Using the Bessel beam expansion approach, we have characterized changes in the field shape and the intensity distribution of the transmitted and reflected full-vector X waves. We have also identified a novel longitudinal shift, which is observed when a full-vector X wave is transmitted through a dielectric slab under frustrated total reflection condition. The results of our studies presented here are valuable in understanding the behavior of full-vector X waves when they are utilized in practical applications in electromagnetics, optics, and photonics, such as trap and tweezer setups, optical lithography, and immaterial probing. © 2011 Optical Society of America.

  20. Reflection and transmission of full-vector X-waves normally incident on dielectric half spaces

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed; Bagci, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    polarization components, which are derived from the scalar X-Wave solution. The analysis of transmission and reflection is carried out via a straightforward but yet effective method: First, the X-Wave is decomposed into vector Bessel beams via the Bessel-Fourier

  1. Kinetic Alfven waves and electron physics. II. Oblique slow shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Winske, D.; Daughton, W.

    2007-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) particle-in-cell (PIC; kinetic ions and electrons) and hybrid (kinetic ions; adiabatic and massless fluid electrons) simulations of highly oblique slow shocks (θ Bn =84 deg. and β=0.1) [Yin et al., J. Geophys. Res., 110, A09217 (2005)] have shown that the dissipation from the ions is too weak to form a shock and that kinetic electron physics is required. The PIC simulations also showed that the downstream electron temperature becomes anisotropic (T e parallel )>T e perpendicular ), as observed in slow shocks in space. The electron anisotropy results, in part, from the electron acceleration/heating by parallel electric fields of obliquely propagating kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) excited by ion-ion streaming, which cannot be modeled accurately in hybrid simulations. In the shock ramp, spiky structures occur in density and electron parallel temperature, where the ion parallel temperature decreases due to the reduction of the ion backstreaming speed. In this paper, KAW and electron physics in oblique slow shocks are further examined under lower electron beta conditions. It is found that as the electron beta is reduced, the resonant interaction between electrons and the wave parallel electric fields shifts to the tail of the electron velocity distribution, providing more efficient parallel heating. As a consequence, for β e =0.02, the electron physics is shown to influence the formation of a θ Bn =75 deg. shock. Electron effects are further enhanced at a more oblique shock angle (θ Bn =84 deg.) when both the growth rate and the range of unstable modes on the KAW branch increase. Small-scale electron and ion phase-space vortices in the shock ramp formed by electron-KAW interactions and the reduction of the ion backstreaming speed, respectively, are observed in the simulations and confirmed in homogeneous geometries in one and two spatial dimensions in the accompanying paper [Yin et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 062104 (2007)]. Results from this study

  2. Transition, coexistence, and interaction of vector localized waves arising from higher-order effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chong; Yang, Zhan-Ying; Zhao, Li-Chen; Yang, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    We study vector localized waves on continuous wave background with higher-order effects in a two-mode optical fiber. The striking properties of transition, coexistence, and interaction of these localized waves arising from higher-order effects are revealed in combination with corresponding modulation instability (MI) characteristics. It shows that these vector localized wave properties have no analogues in the case without higher-order effects. Specifically, compared to the scalar case, an intriguing transition between bright–dark rogue waves and w-shaped–anti-w-shaped solitons, which occurs as a result of the attenuation of MI growth rate to vanishing in the zero-frequency perturbation region, is exhibited with the relative background frequency. In particular, our results show that the w-shaped–anti-w-shaped solitons can coexist with breathers, coinciding with the MI analysis where the coexistence condition is a mixture of a modulation stability and MI region. It is interesting that their interaction is inelastic and describes a fusion process. In addition, we demonstrate an annihilation phenomenon for the interaction of two w-shaped solitons which is identified essentially as an inelastic collision in this system. -- Highlights: •Vector rogue wave properties induced by higher-order effects are studied. •A transition between vector rogue waves and solitons is obtained. •The link between the transition and modulation instability (MI) is demonstrated. •The coexistence of vector solitons and breathers coincides with the MI features. •An annihilation phenomenon for the vector two w-shaped solitons is presented.

  3. Transition, coexistence, and interaction of vector localized waves arising from higher-order effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chong [School of Physics, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Yang, Zhan-Ying, E-mail: zyyang@nwu.edu.cn [School of Physics, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Zhao, Li-Chen, E-mail: zhaolichen3@163.com [School of Physics, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Yang, Wen-Li [Institute of Modern Physics, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China)

    2015-11-15

    We study vector localized waves on continuous wave background with higher-order effects in a two-mode optical fiber. The striking properties of transition, coexistence, and interaction of these localized waves arising from higher-order effects are revealed in combination with corresponding modulation instability (MI) characteristics. It shows that these vector localized wave properties have no analogues in the case without higher-order effects. Specifically, compared to the scalar case, an intriguing transition between bright–dark rogue waves and w-shaped–anti-w-shaped solitons, which occurs as a result of the attenuation of MI growth rate to vanishing in the zero-frequency perturbation region, is exhibited with the relative background frequency. In particular, our results show that the w-shaped–anti-w-shaped solitons can coexist with breathers, coinciding with the MI analysis where the coexistence condition is a mixture of a modulation stability and MI region. It is interesting that their interaction is inelastic and describes a fusion process. In addition, we demonstrate an annihilation phenomenon for the interaction of two w-shaped solitons which is identified essentially as an inelastic collision in this system. -- Highlights: •Vector rogue wave properties induced by higher-order effects are studied. •A transition between vector rogue waves and solitons is obtained. •The link between the transition and modulation instability (MI) is demonstrated. •The coexistence of vector solitons and breathers coincides with the MI features. •An annihilation phenomenon for the vector two w-shaped solitons is presented.

  4. Wave vector modification of the infinite order sudden approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, J.G.; Bowman, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A simple method is proposed to modify the infinite order sudden approximation (IOS) in order to extend its region of quantitative validity. The method involves modifying the phase of the IOS scattering matrix to include a part calculated at the outgoing relative kinetic energy as well as a part calculated at the incoming kinetic energy. An immediate advantage of this modification is that the resulting S matrix is symmetric. We also present a closely related method in which the relative kinetic energies used in the calculation of the phase are determined from quasiclassical trajectory calculations. A set of trajectories is run with the initial state being the incoming state, and another set is run with the initial state being the outgoing state, and the average final relative kinetic energy of each set is obtained. One part of the S-operator phase is then calculated at each of these kinetic energies. We apply these methods to vibrationally inelastic collinear collisions of an atom and a harmonic oscillator, and calculate transition probabilities P/sub n/1→nf for three model systems. For systems which are sudden, or nearly so, the agreement with exact quantum close-coupling calculations is substantially improved over standard IOS ones when Δn=such thatub f/-n/sub i/ is large, and the corresponding transition probability is small, i.e., less than 0.1. However, the modifications we propose will not improve the accuracy of the IOS transition probabilities for any collisional system unless the standard form of IOS already gives at least qualitative agreement with exact quantal calculations. We also suggest comparisons between some classical quantities and sudden predictions which should help in determining the validity of the sudden approximation. This is useful when exact quantal data is not available for comparison

  5. Wave vector modification of the infinite order sudden approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Judith Grobe; Bowman, Joel M.

    1980-10-01

    A simple method is proposed to modify the infinite order sudden approximation (IOS) in order to extend its region of quantitative validity. The method involves modifying the phase of the IOS scattering matrix to include a part calculated at the outgoing relative kinetic energy as well as a part calculated at the incoming kinetic energy. An immediate advantage of this modification is that the resulting S matrix is symmetric. We also present a closely related method in which the relative kinetic energies used in the calculation of the phase are determined from quasiclassical trajectory calculations. A set of trajectories is run with the initial state being the incoming state, and another set is run with the initial state being the outgoing state, and the average final relative kinetic energy of each set is obtained. One part of the S-operator phase is then calculated at each of these kinetic energies. We apply these methods to vibrationally inelastic collinear collisions of an atom and a harmonic oscillator, and calculate transition probabilities Pn1→nf for three model systems. For systems which are sudden, or nearly so, the agreement with exact quantum close-coupling calculations is substantially improved over standard IOS ones when Δn=‖nf-ni‖ is large, and the corresponding transition probability is small, i.e., less than 0.1. However, the modifications we propose will not improve the accuracy of the IOS transition probabilities for any collisional system unless the standard form of IOS already gives at least qualitative agreement with exact quantal calculations. We also suggest comparisons between some classical quantities and sudden predictions which should help in determining the validity of the sudden approximation. This is useful when exact quantal data is not available for comparison.

  6. Analytic solution of vector model kinetic equations with constant kernel and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latyshev, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    For the first time exact solutions the heif-space boundary value problems for model kinetic equations is obtained. Here x > 0, μ is an element of (-∞, 0) union (0, +∞), Σ = diag {σ 1 , σ 2 }, C = [c ij ] - 2 x 2-matrix, Ψ (x, μ) is vector-column with elements ψ 1 and ψ 2 . Exact solution of the diffusion slip flow of the binary gas mixture as a application for the model Boltzmann equation with collision operator in the McCormack's form is found. 18 refs

  7. Non-overlapped P- and S-wave Poynting vectors and its solution on Grid Method

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Yong Ming; Liu, Qiancheng

    2017-01-01

    Poynting vector represents the local directional energy flux density of seismic waves in geophysics. It is widely used in elastic reverse time migration (RTM) to analyze source illumination, suppress low-wavenumber noise, correct for image polarity and extract angle-domain common imaging gather (ADCIG). However, the P and S waves are mixed together during wavefield propagation such that the P and S energy fluxes are not clean everywhere, especially at the overlapped points. In this paper, we use a modified elastic wave equation in which the P and S vector wavefields are naturally separated. Then, we develop an efficient method to evaluate the separable P and S poynting vectors, respectively, based on the view that the group velocity and phase velocity have the same direction in isotropic elastic media. We furthermore formulate our method using an unstructured mesh based modeling method named the grid method. Finally, we verify our method using two numerical examples.

  8. Non-overlapped P- and S-wave Poynting vectors and its solution on Grid Method

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Yong Ming

    2017-12-12

    Poynting vector represents the local directional energy flux density of seismic waves in geophysics. It is widely used in elastic reverse time migration (RTM) to analyze source illumination, suppress low-wavenumber noise, correct for image polarity and extract angle-domain common imaging gather (ADCIG). However, the P and S waves are mixed together during wavefield propagation such that the P and S energy fluxes are not clean everywhere, especially at the overlapped points. In this paper, we use a modified elastic wave equation in which the P and S vector wavefields are naturally separated. Then, we develop an efficient method to evaluate the separable P and S poynting vectors, respectively, based on the view that the group velocity and phase velocity have the same direction in isotropic elastic media. We furthermore formulate our method using an unstructured mesh based modeling method named the grid method. Finally, we verify our method using two numerical examples.

  9. Kinetic effects in the conversion of fast waves in pre-heated, low aspect ratio tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kommoshvili, K [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Cuperman, S [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Bruma, C [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2003-03-01

    Kinetic effects in the conversion of fast waves to Alfven waves and their subsequent deposition in low aspect ratio (spherical) tokamaks (LARTs) have been investigated theoretically. More specifically, we have considered the consequences of incorporation of kinetic effects in the electron parallel (to the ambient magnetic field) dynamics derived by following the drift-tearing mode analysis of Chen et al (Chen L, Rutherford P H and Tang W M 1977 Phys. Rev. Lett. 39 460), and particle-conserving Krook collision operator for the passing electrons involved (Mett R R and Mahajan S M 1992 Phys. Fluids B 4 2885). The perpendicular plasma dynamics is described by a quite general resistive two-fluid (2F) model based dielectric tensor-operator (Cuperman S, Bruma C and Komoshvili K 2002 Solution of the resistive 2F wave equations for Alfvenic modes in spherical tokamak plasmas J. Plasma Phys. accepted for publication). The full-wave electromagnetic equations, formulated in terms of the vector and scalar potentials, have been solved by the aid of an advanced finite elements numerical code (Sewell G 1993 Adv. Eng. Software 17 105). Detailed solutions of the full-wave equations are obtained and compared with those corresponding to a pure resistive 2F model, this, for the illustrative pre-heated START-type device (Sykes 1994). Our results quantitatively confirm the general theory of the conversion of fast waves with subsequent power dissipation for the conditions of spherical tokamaks thus providing the required auxiliary energy source for the successful operation of LARTs. Moreover, these results indicate the absolute necessity of using a full model for the parallel electron dynamics, i.e. including both kinetic and collisional effects.

  10. Kinetic effects in the conversion of fast waves in pre-heated, low aspect ratio tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kommoshvili, K; Cuperman, S; Bruma, C

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic effects in the conversion of fast waves to Alfven waves and their subsequent deposition in low aspect ratio (spherical) tokamaks (LARTs) have been investigated theoretically. More specifically, we have considered the consequences of incorporation of kinetic effects in the electron parallel (to the ambient magnetic field) dynamics derived by following the drift-tearing mode analysis of Chen et al (Chen L, Rutherford P H and Tang W M 1977 Phys. Rev. Lett. 39 460), and particle-conserving Krook collision operator for the passing electrons involved (Mett R R and Mahajan S M 1992 Phys. Fluids B 4 2885). The perpendicular plasma dynamics is described by a quite general resistive two-fluid (2F) model based dielectric tensor-operator (Cuperman S, Bruma C and Komoshvili K 2002 Solution of the resistive 2F wave equations for Alfvenic modes in spherical tokamak plasmas J. Plasma Phys. accepted for publication). The full-wave electromagnetic equations, formulated in terms of the vector and scalar potentials, have been solved by the aid of an advanced finite elements numerical code (Sewell G 1993 Adv. Eng. Software 17 105). Detailed solutions of the full-wave equations are obtained and compared with those corresponding to a pure resistive 2F model, this, for the illustrative pre-heated START-type device (Sykes 1994). Our results quantitatively confirm the general theory of the conversion of fast waves with subsequent power dissipation for the conditions of spherical tokamaks thus providing the required auxiliary energy source for the successful operation of LARTs. Moreover, these results indicate the absolute necessity of using a full model for the parallel electron dynamics, i.e. including both kinetic and collisional effects

  11. Kinetic effects in the conversion of fast waves in pre-heated, low aspect ratio tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommoshvili, K.; Cuperman, S.; Bruma, C.

    2003-03-01

    Kinetic effects in the conversion of fast waves to Alfvèn waves and their subsequent deposition in low aspect ratio (spherical) tokamaks (LARTs) have been investigated theoretically. More specifically, we have considered the consequences of incorporation of kinetic effects in the electron parallel (to the ambient magnetic field) dynamics derived by following the drift-tearing mode analysis of Chen et al (Chen L, Rutherford P H and Tang W M 1977 Phys. Rev. Lett. 39 460), and particle-conserving Krook collision operator for the passing electrons involved (Mett R R and Mahajan S M 1992 Phys. Fluids B 4 2885). The perpendicular plasma dynamics is described by a quite general resistive two-fluid (2F) model based dielectric tensor-operator (Cuperman S, Bruma C and Komoshvili K 2002 Solution of the resistive 2F wave equations for Alfvènic modes in spherical tokamak plasmas J. Plasma Phys. accepted for publication). The full-wave electromagnetic equations, formulated in terms of the vector and scalar potentials, have been solved by the aid of an advanced finite elements numerical code (Sewell G 1993 Adv. Eng. Software 17 105). Detailed solutions of the full-wave equations are obtained and compared with those corresponding to a pure resistive 2F model, this, for the illustrative pre-heated START-type device (Sykes 1994). Our results quantitatively confirm the general theory of the conversion of fast waves with subsequent power dissipation for the conditions of spherical tokamaks thus providing the required auxilliary energy source for the succesful operation of LARTs. Moreover, these results indicate the absolute necessity of using a full model for the parallel electron dynamics, i.e. including both kinetic and collisional effects.

  12. Effect of Dust Grains on Solitary Kinetic Alfven Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yangfang; Wu, D. J.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-01-01

    Solitary kinetic Alfven wave has been studied in dusty plasmas. The effect of the dust charge-to-mass ratio is considered. We derive the Sagdeev potential for the soliton solutions based on the hydrodynamic equations. A singularity in the Sagdeev potential is found and this singularity results in a bell-shaped soliton. The soliton solutions comprise two branches. One branch is sub-Alfvenic and the soliton velocities are much smaller than the Alfven speed. The other branch is super-Alfvenic and the soliton velocities are very close to or greater than the Alfven speed. Both compressive and rarefactive solitons can exist in each branch. For the sub-Alfvenic branch, the rarefactive soliton is a bell shape curve which is much narrower than the compressive one. In the super-Alfvenic branch, however, the compressive soliton is bell-shaped and the rarefactive one is broadened. We also found that the super-Alfvenic solitons can develop to other structures. When the charge-to-mass ratio of the dust grains is sufficiently high, the width of the rarefactive soliton will increase extremely and an electron density depletion will be observed. When the velocity is much higher than the Alfven speed, the bell-shaped soliton will transit to a cusped structure.

  13. Search for Tensor, Vector, and Scalar Polarizations in the Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Afrough, M; Agarwal, B; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Amato, A; Ananyeva, A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Angelova, S V; Antier, S; Appert, S; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atallah, D V; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; AultONeal, K; Austin, C; Avila-Alvarez, A; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Bae, S; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Banagiri, S; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barkett, K; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bawaj, M; Bayley, J C; Bazzan, M; Bécsy, B; Beer, C; Bejger, M; Belahcene, I; Bell, A S; Berger, B K; Bergmann, G; Bero, J J; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Billman, C R; Birch, J; Birney, R; Birnholtz, O; Biscans, S; Biscoveanu, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blackman, J; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bode, N; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bohe, A; Bondu, F; Bonilla, E; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bossie, K; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Broida, J E; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brunett, S; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Calderón Bustillo, J; Callister, T A; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Canepa, M; Canizares, P; Cannon, K C; Cao, H; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Carney, M F; Diaz, J Casanueva; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Cerdá-Durán, P; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chase, E; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chatterjee, D; Cheeseboro, B D; Chen, H Y; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Cheng, H-P; Chia, H; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Chmiel, T; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, A J K; Chua, S; Chung, A K W; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Ciolfi, R; Cirelli, C E; Cirone, A; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Clearwater, P; Cleva, F; Cocchieri, C; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Cohen, D; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L R; Constancio, M; Conti, L; Cooper, S J; Corban, P; Corbitt, T R; Cordero-Carrión, I; Corley, K R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, E; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Covas, P B; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cullen, T J; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; Dálya, G; Danilishin, S L; 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    2018-05-18

    The detection of gravitational waves with Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo has enabled novel tests of general relativity, including direct study of the polarization of gravitational waves. While general relativity allows for only two tensor gravitational-wave polarizations, general metric theories can additionally predict two vector and two scalar polarizations. The polarization of gravitational waves is encoded in the spectral shape of the stochastic gravitational-wave background, formed by the superposition of cosmological and individually unresolved astrophysical sources. Using data recorded by Advanced LIGO during its first observing run, we search for a stochastic background of generically polarized gravitational waves. We find no evidence for a background of any polarization, and place the first direct bounds on the contributions of vector and scalar polarizations to the stochastic background. Under log-uniform priors for the energy in each polarization, we limit the energy densities of tensor, vector, and scalar modes at 95% credibility to Ω_{0}^{T}<5.58×10^{-8}, Ω_{0}^{V}<6.35×10^{-8}, and Ω_{0}^{S}<1.08×10^{-7} at a reference frequency f_{0}=25  Hz.

  14. Search for Tensor, Vector, and Scalar Polarizations in the Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Angelova, S. V.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atallah, D. V.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Austin, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barkett, K.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bawaj, M.; Bayley, J. C.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bero, J. J.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonilla, E.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bossie, K.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chase, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H.-P.; Chia, H.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Clearwater, P.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Cohen, D.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordero-Carrión, I.; Corley, K. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, E.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Canton, T. Dal; Dálya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Demos, N.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; De Pietri, R.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rossi, C.; DeSalvo, R.; de Varona, O.; Devenson, J.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Dovale Álvarez, M.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Dreissigacker, C.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dupej, P.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Estevez, D.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fee, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finstad, D.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fishbach, M.; Fisher, R. P.; Fitz-Axen, M.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Font, J. A.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garcia-Quiros, C.; Garufi, F.; Gateley, B.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glover, L.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gomes, S.; Goncharov, B.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Gretarsson, E. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Halim, O.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, E. Z.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hinderer, T.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hreibi, A.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kamai, B.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinley-Hanlon, M.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knowles, T. D.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Krämer, C.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Linker, S. D.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lo, R. K. L.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macas, R.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña Hernandez, I.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Markowitz, A.; Maros, E.; Marquina, A.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Massera, E.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McNeill, L.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Milovich-Goff, M. C.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moffa, D.; Moggi, A.; Mogushi, K.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muñiz, E. A.; Muratore, M.; Murray, P. G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Neilson, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Nevin, L.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; North, C.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; O'Dea, G. D.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Okada, M. A.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ossokine, S.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, Howard; Pan, Huang-Wei; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Parida, A.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patil, M.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pirello, M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Pratten, G.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rajbhandari, B.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Ramos-Buades, A.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ren, W.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Rutins, G.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sanchis-Gual, N.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheel, M.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaner, M. B.; Shao, L.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somala, S.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staats, K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Stops, D. J.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Strunk, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Suresh, J.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Tait, S. C.; Talbot, C.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tao, D.; Tápai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Tasson, J. D.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Tewari, S. V.; Theeg, T.; Thies, F.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres-Forné, A.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tsukada, L.; Tsuna, D.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Wang, Y. F.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Weßels, P.; Westerweck, J.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Wilken, D.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wysocki, D. M.; Xiao, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yap, M. J.; Yazback, M.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2018-05-01

    The detection of gravitational waves with Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo has enabled novel tests of general relativity, including direct study of the polarization of gravitational waves. While general relativity allows for only two tensor gravitational-wave polarizations, general metric theories can additionally predict two vector and two scalar polarizations. The polarization of gravitational waves is encoded in the spectral shape of the stochastic gravitational-wave background, formed by the superposition of cosmological and individually unresolved astrophysical sources. Using data recorded by Advanced LIGO during its first observing run, we search for a stochastic background of generically polarized gravitational waves. We find no evidence for a background of any polarization, and place the first direct bounds on the contributions of vector and scalar polarizations to the stochastic background. Under log-uniform priors for the energy in each polarization, we limit the energy densities of tensor, vector, and scalar modes at 95% credibility to Ω0T<5.58 ×10-8 , Ω0V<6.35 ×10-8 , and Ω0S<1.08 ×10-7 at a reference frequency f0=25 Hz .

  15. Low-noise kinetic inductance traveling-wave amplifier using three-wave mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vissers, M. R.; Erickson, R. P.; Ku, H.-S.; Vale, Leila; Wu, Xian; Hilton, G. C.; Pappas, D. P., E-mail: David.Pappas@NIST.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2016-01-04

    We have fabricated a wide-bandwidth, high dynamic range, low-noise cryogenic amplifier based on a superconducting kinetic inductance traveling-wave device. The device was made from NbTiN and consisted of a long, coplanar waveguide on a silicon chip. By adding a DC current and an RF pump tone, we are able to generate parametric amplification using three-wave mixing (3WM). The devices exhibit gain of more than 15 dB across an instantaneous bandwidth from 4 to 8 GHz. The total usable gain bandwidth, including both sides of the signal-idler gain region, is more than 6 GHz. The noise referred to the input of the devices approaches the quantum limit, with less than 1 photon excess noise. We compare these results directly to the four-wave mixing amplification mode, i.e., without DC-biasing. We find that the 3WM mode allows operation with the pump at lower RF power and at frequencies far from the signal. We have used this knowledge to redesign the amplifiers to utilize primarily 3WM amplification, thereby allowing for direct integration into large scale qubit and detector applications.

  16. Low-noise kinetic inductance traveling-wave amplifier using three-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissers, M. R.; Erickson, R. P.; Ku, H.-S.; Vale, Leila; Wu, Xian; Hilton, G. C.; Pappas, D. P.

    2016-01-01

    We have fabricated a wide-bandwidth, high dynamic range, low-noise cryogenic amplifier based on a superconducting kinetic inductance traveling-wave device. The device was made from NbTiN and consisted of a long, coplanar waveguide on a silicon chip. By adding a DC current and an RF pump tone, we are able to generate parametric amplification using three-wave mixing (3WM). The devices exhibit gain of more than 15 dB across an instantaneous bandwidth from 4 to 8 GHz. The total usable gain bandwidth, including both sides of the signal-idler gain region, is more than 6 GHz. The noise referred to the input of the devices approaches the quantum limit, with less than 1 photon excess noise. We compare these results directly to the four-wave mixing amplification mode, i.e., without DC-biasing. We find that the 3WM mode allows operation with the pump at lower RF power and at frequencies far from the signal. We have used this knowledge to redesign the amplifiers to utilize primarily 3WM amplification, thereby allowing for direct integration into large scale qubit and detector applications.

  17. Wave-Vector Dependence of the Jahn-Teller Interactions in TmVO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Jørgen; Hayes, W.; Smith, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    The resonant Jahn-Teller coupling of the B2g acoustic phonon and the Zeeman-split ground doublet in TmVO4 has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. Tuning of the magnetic field provides a means for investigating the wave-vector dependence of the interactions. We find that the coupling...

  18. Electromagnetic power flow between opposite sides of a lossy dielectric sphere using spherical vector wave expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nour, Baqer; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the problem of communication in near field region. The proposed example is the communication between two small antennas, which are modelled as an electric dipole antenna (transmitter) and a small box (receiver), near a sphere that models a head. Spherical vector wave...

  19. KINETIC THEORY OF PLASMA WAVES: Part II: Homogeneous Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2010-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  20. Kinetic theory of plasma waves: Part II homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2000-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  1. Kinetic theory of plasma waves - Part II: Homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves axe discussed in the limit of the cold

  2. Constrained reaction volume approach for studying chemical kinetics behind reflected shock waves

    KAUST Repository

    Hanson, Ronald K.; Pang, Genny A.; Chakraborty, Sreyashi; Ren, Wei; Wang, Shengkai; Davidson, David Frank

    2013-01-01

    We report a constrained-reaction-volume strategy for conducting kinetics experiments behind reflected shock waves, achieved in the present work by staged filling in a shock tube. Using hydrogen-oxygen ignition experiments as an example, we

  3. Instantaneous local wave vector estimation from multi-spacecraft measurements using few spatial points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. Carozzi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a technique to determine instantaneous local properties of waves based on discrete-time sampled, real-valued measurements from 4 or more spatial points. The technique is a generalisation to the spatial domain of the notion of instantaneous frequency used in signal processing. The quantities derived by our technique are closely related to those used in geometrical optics, namely the local wave vector and instantaneous phase velocity. Thus, this experimental technique complements ray-tracing. We provide example applications of the technique to electric field and potential data from the EFW instrument on Cluster. Cluster is the first space mission for which direct determination of the full 3-dimensional local wave vector is possible, as described here.

  4. Kinetic Alfven Waves at the Magnetopause-Mode Conversion, Transport and Formation of LLBL; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jay R. Johnson; C.Z. Cheng

    2002-01-01

    At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in the Alfven velocity[Johnson and Cheng, Geophys. Res. Lett. 24 (1997) 1423]. The mode-conversion process can explain the following wave observations typically found during satellite crossings of the magnetopause: (1) a dramatic change in wave polarization from compressional in the magnetosheath to transverse at the magnetopause, (2) an amplification of wave amplitude at the magnetopause, (3) a change in Poynting flux from cross-field in the magnetosheath to field-aligned at the magnetopause, and (4) a steepening in the wave power spectrum at the magnetopause. We examine magnetic field data from a set of ISEE1, ISEE2, and WIND magnetopause crossings and compare with the predictions of theoretical wave solutions based on the kinetic-fluid model with particular attention to the role of magnetic field rotation across the magnetopause. The results of the study suggest a good qualitative agreement between the observations and the theory of mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. Because mode-converted kinetic Alfven waves readily decouple particles from the magnetic field lines, efficient quasilinear transport (D(approx) 109m2/s) can occur. Moreover, if the wave amplitude is sufficiently large (Bwave/B0 and gt; 0.2) stochastic particle transport also occurs. This wave-induced transport can lead to significant heating and particle entry into the low latitude boundary layer across closed field lines.At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in

  5. Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeriis, Morten; van Leeuwen, Theo

    2017-01-01

    should be taken into account in discussing ‘reactions’, which Kress and van Leeuwen link only to eyeline vectors. Finally, the question can be raised as to whether actions are always realized by vectors. Drawing on a re-reading of Rudolf Arnheim’s account of vectors, these issues are outlined......This article revisits the concept of vectors, which, in Kress and van Leeuwen’s Reading Images (2006), plays a crucial role in distinguishing between ‘narrative’, action-oriented processes and ‘conceptual’, state-oriented processes. The use of this concept in image analysis has usually focused...

  6. Self-trapping of scalar and vector dipole solitary waves in Kerr media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Weiping; Belic, Milivoj R.; Assanto, Gaetano; Malomed, Boris A.; Huang Tingwen

    2011-01-01

    We report solutions for expanding dipole-type optical solitary waves in two-dimensional Kerr media with the self-focusing nonlinearity, using exact analytical (Hirota) and numerical methods. Such localized beams carry intrinsic vorticity and exhibit symmetric shapes for both scalar and vector solitary modes. When vector beams are close to the scalar limit, simulations demonstrate their stability over propagation distances exceeding 50 diffraction lengths. In fact, the continuous expansion helps the vortical beams avoid the instability against the splitting, collapse, or decay, making them 'convectively stable' patterns.

  7. Temperature waves and the Boltzmann kinetic equation for phonons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urushev, D.; Borisov, M.; Vavrek, A.

    1988-01-01

    The ordinary parabolic equation for thermal conduction based on the Fourier empiric law as well as the generalized thermal conduction equation based on the Maxwell law have been derived from the Boltzmann equation for the phonons within the relaxation time approximation. The temperature waves of the so-called second sound in crystals at low temperatures are transformed into Fourier waves at low frequencies with respect to the characteristic frequency of the U-processes. These waves are transformed into temperature waves similar to the second sound waves in He II at frequences higher than the U-processes characteristic. 1 fig., 19 refs

  8. The influence of waves on the tidal kinetic energy resource at a tidal stream energy site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillou, Nicolas; Chapalain, Georges; Neill, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We model the influence of waves on tidal kinetic energy in the Fromveur Strait. • Numerical results are compared with field data of waves and currents. • The introduction of waves improve predictions of tidal stream power during storm. • Mean spring tidal stream potential is reduced by 12% during extreme wave conditions. • Potential is reduced by 7.8% with waves forces and 5.3% with enhanced friction. - Abstract: Successful deployment of tidal energy converters relies on access to accurate and high resolution numerical assessments of available tidal stream power. However, since suitable tidal stream sites are located in relatively shallow waters of the continental shelf where tidal currents are enhanced, tidal energy converters may experience effects of wind-generated surface-gravity waves. Waves may thus influence tidal currents, and associated kinetic energy, through two non-linear processes: the interaction of wave and current bottom boundary layers, and the generation of wave-induced currents. Here, we develop a three-dimensional tidal circulation model coupled with a phase-averaged wave model to quantify the impact of the waves on the tidal kinetic energy resource of the Fromveur Strait (western Brittany) - a region that has been identified with strong potential for tidal array development. Numerical results are compared with in situ observations of wave parameters (significant wave height, peak period and mean wave direction) and current amplitude and direction 10 m above the seabed (the assumed technology hub height for this region). The introduction of waves is found to improve predictions of tidal stream power at 10 m above the seabed at the measurement site in the Strait, reducing kinetic energy by up to 9% during storm conditions. Synoptic effects of wave radiation stresses and enhanced bottom friction are more specifically identified at the scale of the Strait. Waves contribute to a slight increase in the spatial gradient of

  9. The choice of optimal Discrete Interaction Approximation to the kinetic integral for ocean waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Polnikov

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A lot of discrete configurations for the four-wave nonlinear interaction processes have been calculated and tested by the method proposed earlier in the frame of the concept of Fast Discrete Interaction Approximation to the Hasselmann's kinetic integral (Polnikov and Farina, 2002. It was found that there are several simple configurations, which are more efficient than the one proposed originally in Hasselmann et al. (1985. Finally, the optimal multiple Discrete Interaction Approximation (DIA to the kinetic integral for deep-water waves was found. Wave spectrum features have been intercompared for a number of different configurations of DIA, applied to a long-time solution of kinetic equation. On the basis of this intercomparison the better efficiency of the configurations proposed was confirmed. Certain recommendations were given for implementation of new approximations to the wave forecast practice.

  10. Two dimensional kinetic analysis of electrostatic harmonic plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca-Pongutá, E. C.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R. [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Yoon, P. H. [IPST, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); SSR, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Electrostatic harmonic Langmuir waves are virtual modes excited in weakly turbulent plasmas, first observed in early laboratory beam-plasma experiments as well as in rocket-borne active experiments in space. However, their unequivocal presence was confirmed through computer simulated experiments and subsequently theoretically explained. The peculiarity of harmonic Langmuir waves is that while their existence requires nonlinear response, their excitation mechanism and subsequent early time evolution are governed by essentially linear process. One of the unresolved theoretical issues regards the role of nonlinear wave-particle interaction process over longer evolution time period. Another outstanding issue is that existing theories for these modes are limited to one-dimensional space. The present paper carries out two dimensional theoretical analysis of fundamental and (first) harmonic Langmuir waves for the first time. The result shows that harmonic Langmuir wave is essentially governed by (quasi)linear process and that nonlinear wave-particle interaction plays no significant role in the time evolution of the wave spectrum. The numerical solutions of the two-dimensional wave spectra for fundamental and harmonic Langmuir waves are also found to be consistent with those obtained by direct particle-in-cell simulation method reported in the literature.

  11. Fermi wave vector for the partially spin-polarized composite-fermion Fermi sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balram, Ajit C.; Jain, J. K.

    2017-12-01

    The fully spin-polarized composite-fermion (CF) Fermi sea at the half-filled lowest Landau level has a Fermi wave vector kF*=√{4 π ρe } , where ρe is the density of electrons or composite fermions, supporting the notion that the interaction between composite fermions can be treated perturbatively. Away from ν =1 /2 , the area is seen to be consistent with kF*=√{4 π ρe } for ν 1 /2 , where ρh is the density of holes in the lowest Landau level. This result is consistent with particle-hole symmetry in the lowest Landau level. We investigate in this article the Fermi wave vector of the spin-singlet CF Fermi sea (CFFS) at ν =1 /2 , for which particle-hole symmetry is not a consideration. Using the microscopic CF theory, we find that for the spin-singlet CFFS the Fermi wave vectors for up- and down-spin CFFSs at ν =1 /2 are consistent with kF*↑,↓=√{4 π ρe↑,↓ } , where ρe↑=ρe↓=ρe/2 , which implies that the residual interactions between composite fermions do not cause a nonperturbative correction for spin-singlet CFFS either. Our results suggest the natural conjecture that for arbitrary spin polarization the CF Fermi wave vectors are given by kF*↑=√{4 π ρe↑ } and kF*↓=√{4 π ρe↓ } .

  12. Signatures of mode conversion and kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Jay R.; Cheng, C. Z.

    2000-01-01

    It has been suggested that resonant mode conversion of compressional MHD waves into kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause can explain the abrupt transition in wave polarization from compressional to transverse commonly observed during magnetopause crossings. The authors analyze magnetic field data for magnetopause crossings as a function of magnetic shear angle (defined as the angle between the magnetic fields in the magnetosheath and magnetosphere) and compare with the theory of resonant mode conversion. The data suggest that amplification in the transverse magnetic field component at the magnetopause is not significant up to a threshold magnetic shear angle. Above the threshold angle significant amplification results, but with weak dependence on magnetic shear angle. Waves with higher frequency are less amplified and have a higher threshold angle. These observations are qualitatively consistent with theoretical results obtained from the kinetic-fluid wave equations

  13. T-wave end detection using neural networks and Support Vector Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-León, Alexander Alexeis; Varon, Carolina; Willems, Rik; Van Huffel, Sabine; Vázquez-Seisdedos, Carlos Román

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we propose a new approach for detecting the end of the T-wave in the electrocardiogram (ECG) using Neural Networks and Support Vector Machines. Both, Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) neural networks and Fixed-Size Least-Squares Support Vector Machines (FS-LSSVM) were used as regression algorithms to determine the end of the T-wave. Different strategies for selecting the training set such as random selection, k-means, robust clustering and maximum quadratic (Rényi) entropy were evaluated. Individual parameters were tuned for each method during training and the results are given for the evaluation set. A comparison between MLP and FS-LSSVM approaches was performed. Finally, a fair comparison of the FS-LSSVM method with other state-of-the-art algorithms for detecting the end of the T-wave was included. The experimental results show that FS-LSSVM approaches are more suitable as regression algorithms than MLP neural networks. Despite the small training sets used, the FS-LSSVM methods outperformed the state-of-the-art techniques. FS-LSSVM can be successfully used as a T-wave end detection algorithm in ECG even with small training set sizes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Propagation of gravitational waves in the generalized tensor-vector-scalar theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagi, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Efforts are underway to improve the design and sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors, with the hope that the next generation of these detectors will observe a gravitational wave signal. Such a signal will not only provide information on dynamics in the strong gravity regime that characterizes potential sources of gravitational waves, but will also serve as a decisive test for alternative theories of gravitation that are consistent with all other current experimental observations. We study the linearized theory of the tensor-vector-scalar theory of gravity with generalized vector action, an alternative theory of gravitation designed to explain the apparent deficit of visible matter in galaxies and clusters of galaxies without postulating yet-undetected dark matter. We find the polarization states and propagation speeds for gravitational waves in vacuum, and show that in addition to the usual transverse-traceless propagation modes, there are two more mixed longitudinal-transverse modes and two trace modes, of which at least one has longitudinal polarization. Additionally, the propagation speeds are different from the speed of light.

  15. The shock tube as wave reactor for kinetic studies and material systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskaran, K.A. [Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai (India). Department of Mechanical Engineering; Roth, P. [Gerhard Mercator Universitat, Duisberg (Germany). Institut fur Verbrennung und Gasdynamik

    2002-07-01

    Several important reviews of shock tube kinetics have appeared earlier, prominent among them being 'Shock Tube Technique in Chemical Kinetics' by Belford and Strehlow (Ann Rev Phys Chem 20 (1969) 247), 'Chemical Reaction of Shock Waves' by Wagner (Proceedings of the Eighth International Shock Tube Symposium (1971) 4/1), 'Shock Tube and Shock Wave Research' by Bauer and Lewis (Proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on Shock Tubes and Waves (1977) 269), 'Shock Waves in Chemistry' edited by Assa Lifshitz (Shock Waves in Chemistry, 1981) and 'Shock Tube Techniques in Chemical Kinetics' by Wing Tsang and Assa Lifshitz (Annu Rev Phys Chem 41 (1990) 559). A critical analysis of the different shock tube techniques, their limitations and suggestions to improve the accuracy of the data produced are contained in these reviews. The purpose of this article is to present the current status of kinetic research with emphasis on the diagnostic techniques. Selected studies on homogeneous and dispersed systems are presented to bring out the versatility of the shock tube technique. The use of the shock tube as high temperature wave reactor for gas phase material synthesis is also highlighted. (author)

  16. Nonlinear optimization method of ship floating condition calculation in wave based on vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ning; Yu, Jian-xing

    2014-08-01

    Ship floating condition in regular waves is calculated. New equations controlling any ship's floating condition are proposed by use of the vector operation. This form is a nonlinear optimization problem which can be solved using the penalty function method with constant coefficients. And the solving process is accelerated by dichotomy. During the solving process, the ship's displacement and buoyant centre have been calculated by the integration of the ship surface according to the waterline. The ship surface is described using an accumulative chord length theory in order to determine the displacement, the buoyancy center and the waterline. The draught forming the waterline at each station can be found out by calculating the intersection of the ship surface and the wave surface. The results of an example indicate that this method is exact and efficient. It can calculate the ship floating condition in regular waves as well as simplify the calculation and improve the computational efficiency and the precision of results.

  17. Nonlinear particle-wave kinetics in weakly unstable plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breizman, B.N.; Berk, H.L.; Pekker, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    With the motivation to address the behavior of the fusion produced alpha particles in a thermonuclear reactor, a theory is developed for predicting the wave saturation levels and particle transport in weakly unstable systems with a discrete number of modes in the presence of energetic particle sources and sinks. Conditions are established for either steady state or bursting nonlinear scenarios when several modes are excited for cases where there is and there is not resonance overlap. Depending on parameters, the particles can undergo benign relaxation, with only a small fraction of the available free energy released to waves and with no global transport, or the particles can experience rapid global transport caused by a substantial conversion of their free energy into wave energy. When the resonance condition of the particle-wave interaction is varied adiabatically, the particles trapped in a wave are found to form phase space holes or clumps that enhance the particle-wave energy exchange. This mechanism, which has been experimentally observed when there is frequency chirping, causes increased saturation levels of instabilities. If resonance sweeping is imposed externally, the particle free energy can even be tapped in stable systems where background dissipation suppresses linear instability. Externally applied resonance sweeping can be important for alpha particle energy channeling, as well as for understanding fishbone and some Alfven wave instability experiments. Near instability threshold, that is when the destabilizing drive just exceeds the background dissipation, a more sophisticated analysis is developed to predict the correct saturation. To leading order, this problem reduces to an integral equation for the wave amplitude with a temporally non local cubic term. This equation has a self-similar solution that blows-up in a finite time

  18. Simulation studies of plasma waves in the electron foreshock - The transition from reactive to kinetic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dum, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    Particle simulation experiments were used to analyze the electron beam-plasma instability. It is shown that there is a transition from the reactive state of the electron beam-plasma instability to the kinetic instability of Langmuir waves. Quantitative tests, which include an evaluation of the dispersion relation for the evolving non-Maxwellian beam distribution, show that a quasi-linear theory describes the onset of this transition and applies again fully to the kinetic stage. This stage is practically identical to the late stage seen in simulations of plasma waves in the electron foreshock described by Dum (1990).

  19. Kinetic effects on the propagation of surface waves and their relevance to the heating of the solar corona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuperus, M.; Heyvaerts, J.

    1980-01-01

    The MHD oscillations of the Alfven type running along surfaces of discontinuity generate motions in the discontinuity region which come rapidly out of phase. It is shown how the mathematical theory of this phase detuning predicts that surface wave should suffer dissipationless damping. Real damping is actually achieved by viscosity or kinetic effects. When detuning has grown to a large enough level, however, oscillations must be described by kinetic theory. Kinetic Alfven waves differ from perfect MHD Alfven waves in that they are able to propagate across the field. A theory of kinetic type oscillations in a finite thickness boundary is described, which predicts that surface waves generate intense kinetic Alfven waves in this boundary. The subsequent dissipation of these waves may be a powerful heating mechanism [fr

  20. A KINETIC ALFVEN WAVE AND THE PROTON DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION IN THE FAST SOLAR WIND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xing; Lu Quanming; Chen Yao; Li Bo; Xia Lidong

    2010-01-01

    Using one-dimensional test particle simulations, the effect of a kinetic Alfven wave on the velocity distribution function (VDF) of protons in the collisionless solar wind is investigated. We first use linear Vlasov theory to numerically obtain the property of a kinetic Alfven wave (the wave propagates in the direction almost perpendicular to the background magnetic field). We then numerically simulate how the wave will shape the proton VDF. It is found that Landau resonance may be able to generate two components in the initially Maxwellian proton VDF: a tenuous beam component along the direction of the background magnetic field and a core component. The streaming speed of the beam relative to the core proton component is about 1.2-1.3 Alfven speed.

  1. KINETIC-J: A computational kernel for solving the linearized Vlasov equation applied to calculations of the kinetic, configuration space plasma current for time harmonic wave electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David L.; Berry, Lee A.; Simpson, Adam B.; Younkin, Timothy R.

    2018-04-01

    We present the KINETIC-J code, a computational kernel for evaluating the linearized Vlasov equation with application to calculating the kinetic plasma response (current) to an applied time harmonic wave electric field. This code addresses the need for a configuration space evaluation of the plasma current to enable kinetic full-wave solvers for waves in hot plasmas to move beyond the limitations of the traditional Fourier spectral methods. We benchmark the kernel via comparison with the standard k →-space forms of the hot plasma conductivity tensor.

  2. Accelerating finite-rate chemical kinetics with coprocessors: Comparing vectorization methods on GPUs, MICs, and CPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Christopher P.; Alferman, Andrew T.; Niemeyer, Kyle E.

    2018-05-01

    Accurate and efficient methods for solving stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are a critical component of turbulent combustion simulations with finite-rate chemistry. The ODEs governing the chemical kinetics at each mesh point are decoupled by operator-splitting allowing each to be solved concurrently. An efficient ODE solver must then take into account the available thread and instruction-level parallelism of the underlying hardware, especially on many-core coprocessors, as well as the numerical efficiency. A stiff Rosenbrock and a nonstiff Runge-Kutta ODE solver are both implemented using the single instruction, multiple thread (SIMT) and single instruction, multiple data (SIMD) paradigms within OpenCL. Both methods solve multiple ODEs concurrently within the same instruction stream. The performance of these parallel implementations was measured on three chemical kinetic models of increasing size across several multicore and many-core platforms. Two separate benchmarks were conducted to clearly determine any performance advantage offered by either method. The first benchmark measured the run-time of evaluating the right-hand-side source terms in parallel and the second benchmark integrated a series of constant-pressure, homogeneous reactors using the Rosenbrock and Runge-Kutta solvers. The right-hand-side evaluations with SIMD parallelism on the host multicore Xeon CPU and many-core Xeon Phi co-processor performed approximately three times faster than the baseline multithreaded C++ code. The SIMT parallel model on the host and Phi was 13%-35% slower than the baseline while the SIMT model on the NVIDIA Kepler GPU provided approximately the same performance as the SIMD model on the Phi. The runtimes for both ODE solvers decreased significantly with the SIMD implementations on the host CPU (2.5-2.7 ×) and Xeon Phi coprocessor (4.7-4.9 ×) compared to the baseline parallel code. The SIMT implementations on the GPU ran 1.5-1.6 times faster than the baseline

  3. Maxima of the scattering cross section, the wave vector being quasi orthogonal to the confining magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.-L.

    1975-01-01

    The evolution of the scattering cross section maximas of an electromagnetic wave by a magnetoplasma, the angle between the wave vector and the confining magnetic field approaching π/2 were computed. It is shown that the maximas are shifted toward the roots of the electrostatic dispersion relation in perpendicular propagation. These roots are not exactly the electron cyclotron harmonics [fr

  4. Kinetic Alfvén wave turbulence and formation of localized structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R. P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India); Modi, K. V. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India); Mechanical Engineering Department, Government Engineering College Valsad, Gujarat 396001 (India)

    2013-08-15

    This work presents non-linear interaction of magnetosonic wave with kinetic Alfvén wave for intermediate β-plasma (m{sub e}/m{sub i}≪β≪1). A set of dimensionless equations have been developed for analysis by considering ponderomotive force due to pump kinetic Alfvén wave in the dynamics of magnetosonic wave. Stability analysis has been done to study modulational instability or linear growth rate. Further, numerical simulation has been carried out to study the nonlinear stage of instability and resulting power spectrum applicable to solar wind around 1 AU. Due to the nonlinearity, background density of magnetosonic wave gets modified which results in localization of kinetic Alfvén wave. From the obtained results, we observed that spectral index follows k{sup −3.0}, consistent with observation received by Cluster spacecraft for the solar wind around 1 AU. The result shows the steepening of power spectrum which may be responsible for heating and acceleration of plasma particles in solar wind.

  5. Nonlinear wave-beam kinetic equilibrium in decelerating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishin, V.K.; Shaposhnikova, E.N.

    1981-01-01

    The equilibrium state of the wave-beam system arising during the interaction of a particle beam and excited electromagnetic wave has been investigated on the basis of the analysis of the exact polution of a non-linear self-consistent linear equation using the complete system of conservation laws. A waveguide with a dielectric filler, into which a monoenergetic particle beam magnetized in a transverse plane is continuously injected, is used as a model of an decelerating system. A dispersion equation describing the system state and expression for the evaluation of efficiency of the beam energy conversion to the field energy have been obtained. It is concluded that larae fields and high efficiency of energy conversion are achieved during the marked beam reconstruction. States with different values of current and beam velocity but similar amplitudes of a longitudinal field are possible in the system considered [ru

  6. An upwind, kinetic flux-vector splitting method for flows in chemical and thermal non-equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppard, W. M.; Grossman, B.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed new upwind kinetic difference schemes for flows with non-equilibrium thermodynamics and chemistry. These schemes are derived from the Boltzmann equation with the resulting Euler schemes developed as moments of the discretized Boltzmann scheme with a locally Maxwellian velocity distribution. Splitting the velocity distribution at the Boltzmann level is seen to result in a flux-split Euler scheme and is called Kinetic Flux Vector Splitting (KFVS). Extensions to flows with finite-rate chemistry and vibrational relaxation is accomplished utilizing nonequilibrium kinetic theory. Computational examples are presented comparing KFVS with the schemes of Van Leer and Roe for a quasi-one-dimensional flow through a supersonic diffuser, inviscid flow through two-dimensional inlet, and viscous flow over a cone at zero angle-of-attack. Calculations are also shown for the transonic flow over a bump in a channel and the transonic flow over an NACA 0012 airfoil. The results show that even though the KFVS scheme is a Riemann solver at the kinetic level, its behavior at the Euler level is more similar to the existing flux-vector splitting algorithms than to the flux-difference splitting scheme of Roe.

  7. Accuracy and Precision of Plane Wave Vector Flow Imaging for Laminar and Complex Flow In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Traberg, Marie Sand; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a comparison between velocity fields for a plane wave 2-D vector flow imaging (VFI) method and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation is made. VFI estimates are obtained from the scan of a flow phantom, which mimics the complex flow conditions in the carotid artery....... Furthermore, the precision of the VFI method is investigated under laminar and complex flow conditions in vivo. The carotid bifurcation of a healthy volunteer was scanned using both fast plane wave ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The acquired MRI geometry of the bifurcation was used...... difference within 15 %, however, it was 23 % in the external branch. For the in vivo scan, the precision in terms of mean standard deviation (SD) of estimates aligned to the cardiac cycle was highest in the center of the common carotid artery (SD 4.7◦ for angles) and lowest in the external branch and close...

  8. On the tunneling of full-vector X-Waves through a slab under frustrated total reflection condition

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed; Bagci, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    Tunneling of full-vector X-Waves through a dielectric slab under frustrated total reflection condition is investigated. Full-vector X-Waves are obtained by superimposing transverse electric and magnetic polarization components, which are derived from the scalar X-Wave solution. The analysis of reflection and transmission at the dielectric interfaces is carried out analytically in a straightforward fashion using vector Bessel beam expansion. Investigation of the fields propagating away from the farther end of the slab (transmitted fields) shows an advanced (superluminal) transmission of the X-Wave peak. Additionally, a similar advanced reflection is also observed. The apparent tunneling of the peak is shown to be due to the phase shift in the fields' spectra and not to be causally related to the incident peak. © 2012 IEEE.

  9. On the tunneling of full-vector X-Waves through a slab under frustrated total reflection condition

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2012-07-01

    Tunneling of full-vector X-Waves through a dielectric slab under frustrated total reflection condition is investigated. Full-vector X-Waves are obtained by superimposing transverse electric and magnetic polarization components, which are derived from the scalar X-Wave solution. The analysis of reflection and transmission at the dielectric interfaces is carried out analytically in a straightforward fashion using vector Bessel beam expansion. Investigation of the fields propagating away from the farther end of the slab (transmitted fields) shows an advanced (superluminal) transmission of the X-Wave peak. Additionally, a similar advanced reflection is also observed. The apparent tunneling of the peak is shown to be due to the phase shift in the fields\\' spectra and not to be causally related to the incident peak. © 2012 IEEE.

  10. Kinetic Alfven wave in the presence of kappa distribution function in plasma sheet boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, G., E-mail: geetphy9@gmail.com; Ahirwar, G. [School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University, Ujjain India (India); Shrivastava, J., E-mail: jayashrivastava2007@gmail.com [Dronacharya Group of Institutions, Greater Noida-India (India)

    2015-07-31

    The particle aspect approach is adopted to investigate the trajectories of charged particles in the electromagnetic field of kinetic Alfven wave. Expressions are found for the dispersion relation, damping/growth rate and associated currents in the presence of kappa distribution function. Kinetic effect of electrons and ions are included to study kinetic Alfven wave because both are important in the transition region. It is found that the ratio β of electron thermal energy density to magnetic field energy density and the ratio of ion to electron thermal temperature (T{sub i}/T{sub e}), and kappa distribution function affect the dispersion relation, damping/growth rate and associated currents in both cases(warm and cold electron limit).The treatment of kinetic Alfven wave instability is based on assumption that the plasma consist of resonant and non resonant particles. The resonant particles participate in an energy exchange process, whereas the non resonant particles support the oscillatory motion of the wave.

  11. Numerical Simulations of Kinetic Alfvén Waves to Study Spectral ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Numerical Simulations of Kinetic Alfvén Waves to Study Spectral. Index in Solar Wind Turbulence and Particle Heating. R. P. Sharma. ∗. & H. D. Singh. Center for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi 110 016, India. ∗ e-mail: rpsharma@ces.iitd.ernet.in. Abstract. We present numerical simulations of the ...

  12. Shock wave, fluid instability and implosion studies with a kinetic particle approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagert, Irina; Even, Wesley P.; Strother, Terrance T.

    2016-10-01

    Many problems in laboratory plasma physics are subject to flows that move between the continuum and the kinetic regime. The correct description of these flows is crucial in order to capture their impact on the system's dynamical evolution. Examples are capsule implosions in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Although their dynamics is predominantly shaped by shock waves and fluid instabilities, non-equilibrium flows in form of deuterium/tritium ions have been shown to play a significant role. We present recent studies with our Monte Carlo kinetic particle code that is designed to capture continuum and kinetic flows in large physical systems with possible applications in ICF studies. Discussed results will include standard shock wave and fluid instability tests and simulations that are adapted towards future ICF studies with comparisons to hydrodynamic simulations. This work used the Wolf TriLAB Capacity Cluster at LANL. I.S. acknowledges support through a Director's fellowship (20150741PRD3) from Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  13. The relative importance of fluid and kinetic frequency shifts of an electron plasma wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winjum, B. J.; Fahlen, J.; Mori, W. B.

    2007-01-01

    The total nonlinear frequency shift of a plasma wave including both fluid and kinetic effects is estimated when the phase velocity of the wave is much less than the speed of light. Using a waterbag or fluid model, the nonlinear frequency shift due to harmonic generation is calculated for an arbitrary shift in the wavenumber. In the limit where the wavenumber does not shift, the result is in agreement with previously published work [R. L. Dewar and J. Lindl, Phys. Fluids 15, 820 (1972); T. P. Coffey, ibid. 14, 1402 (1971)]. This shift is compared to the kinetic shift of Morales and O'Neil [G. J. Morales and T. M. O'Neil, Phys. Rev. Lett. 28, 417 (1972)] for wave amplitudes and values of kλ D of interest to Raman backscatter of a laser driver in inertial confinement fusion

  14. The relative importance of fluid and kinetic frequency shifts of an electron plasma wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winjum, B. J.; Fahlen, J.; Mori, W. B.

    2007-10-01

    The total nonlinear frequency shift of a plasma wave including both fluid and kinetic effects is estimated when the phase velocity of the wave is much less than the speed of light. Using a waterbag or fluid model, the nonlinear frequency shift due to harmonic generation is calculated for an arbitrary shift in the wavenumber. In the limit where the wavenumber does not shift, the result is in agreement with previously published work [R. L. Dewar and J. Lindl, Phys. Fluids 15, 820 (1972); T. P. Coffey, Phys. Fluids 14, 1402 (1971)]. This shift is compared to the kinetic shift of Morales and O'Neil [G. J. Morales and T. M. O'Neil, Phys. Rev. Lett. 28, 417 (1972)] for wave amplitudes and values of kλD of interest to Raman backscatter of a laser driver in inertial confinement fusion.

  15. Small amplitude Kinetic Alfven waves in a superthermal electron-positron-ion plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Muhammad; Mahmood, Sahahzad; Qamar, Anisa; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2016-11-01

    We are investigating the propagating properties of coupled Kinetic Alfven-acoustic waves in a low beta plasma having superthermal electrons and positrons. Using the standard reductive perturbation method, a nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) type equation is derived which describes the evolution of Kinetic Alfven waves. It is found that nonlinearity and Larmor radius effects can compromise and give rise to solitary structures. The parametric role of superthermality and positron content on the characteristics of solitary wave structures is also investigated. It is found that only sub-Alfvenic and compressive solitons are supported in the present model. The present study may find applications in a low β electron-positron-ion plasma having superthermal electrons and positrons.

  16. Transverse acoustic phonon anomalies at intermediate wave vectors in MgV2O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T.; Roessli, B.; Stock, C.; Keller, T.; Schmalzl, K.; Bourdarot, F.; Georgii, R.; Ewings, R. A.; Perry, R. S.; Böni, P.

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic spinels (with chemical formula A X2O4 , with X a 3 d transition metal ion) that also have an orbital degeneracy are Jahn-Teller active and hence possess a coupling between spin and lattice degrees of freedom. At high temperatures, MgV2O4 is a cubic spinel based on V3 + ions with a spin S =1 and a triply degenerate orbital ground state. A structural transition occurs at TOO=63 K to an orbitally ordered phase with a tetragonal unit cell followed by an antiferromagnetic transition of TN=42 K on cooling. We apply neutron spectroscopy in single crystals of MgV2O4 to show an anomaly for intermediate wave vectors at TOO associated with the acoustic phonon sensitive to the shear elastic modulus (C11-C12)/2 . On warming, the shear mode softens for momentum transfers near close to half the Brillouin zone boundary, but recovers near the zone center. High resolution spin-echo measurements further illustrate a temporal broadening with increased temperature over this intermediate range of wave vectors, indicative of a reduction in phonon lifetime. A subtle shift in phonon frequencies over the same range of momentum transfers is observed with magnetic fields. We discuss this acoustic anomaly in context of coupling to orbital and charge fluctuations.

  17. Can really the electromagnetic transverse waves with E-vector parallel to B-vector and finite energy exist?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowski, S.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that the total field energy for general solutions of the sourceless Maxwell's equations with E-vector parallel to B-vector is infinite. Moreover the action and/or the ''pseudoscalar charge'' must be infinite too in this case. Therefore the expected similarity to the instanton or meron solutions of nonabelian gauge theories is illusory. 5 refs. (author)

  18. Interplanetary shocks, Plasma waves and turbulence, Kinetic waves and instabilities, STEREO spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Z.; Breneman, A. W.; Cattell, C. A.; Davis, L.; Grul, P.; Kersten, K.; Wilson, L. B., III

    2017-12-01

    Determining the role of plasma waves in providing energy dissipation at shock waves is of long-standing interest. Interplanetary (IP) shocks serve as a large database of low Mach number shocks. We examine electric field waveforms captured by the Time Domain Sampler (TDS) on the STEREO spacecraft during the ramps of IP shocks, with emphasis on captures lasting 2.1 seconds. Previous work has used captures of shorter duration (66 and 131 ms on STEREO, and 17 ms on WIND), which allowed for observation of waves with maximum (minimum) frequencies of 125 kHz (15 Hz), 62.5 kHz (8 Hz), and 60 kHz (59 Hz), respectively. The maximum frequencies are comparable to 2-8 times the plasma frequency in the solar wind, enabling observation of Langmuir waves, ion acoustic, and some whistler-mode waves. The 2 second captures resolve lower frequencies ( few Hz), which allows us to analyze packet structure of the whistler-mode waves and some ion acoustic waves. The longer capture time also improves the resolvability of simultaneous wave modes and of waves with frequencies on the order of 10s of Hz. Langmuir waves, however, cannot be identified at this sampling rate, since the plasma frequency is usually higher than 3.9 kHz. IP shocks are identified from multiple databases (Helsinki heliospheric shock database at http://ipshocks.fi, and the STEREO level 3 shock database at ftp://stereoftp.nascom.nasa.gov/pub/ins_data/impact/level3/). Our analysis focuses on TDS captures in shock ramp regions, with ramp durations determined from magnetic field data taken at 8 Hz. Software is used to identify multiple wave modes in any given capture and classify waves as Langmuir, ion acoustic, whistler, lower hybrid, electron cyclotron drift instability, or electrostatic solitary waves. Relevant frequencies are determined from density and magnetic field data collected in situ. Preliminary results suggest that large amplitude (∼ 5 mV/m) ion acoustic waves are most prevalent in the ramp, in agreement with

  19. Experimental study of strain prediction on wave induced structures using modal decomposition and quasi static Ritz vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte, Anders; Kristoffersen, Julie; Vestermark, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    into two parts using complementary filters: Low frequency response caused by the quasi-static effect of the waves acting on the structure, and the high frequency response given by the modal properties of the structure. The high frequency response is then decomposed into modal coordinates using...... the experimental mode shapes. Strain histories are predicted by multiplying the modal coordinates with the expanded strain mode shapes. The low frequency response is decomposed using Ritz-vectors corresponding to the shapes that the structure vibrates with due to the wave loading. Strain Ritz......-vectors are then extracted from the finite element model by applying a load corresponding to a representative wave and the strain history for the low frequency response is found by multiplying the decomposed signal with the strain Ritz-vectors. Finally the combined strain history is found by adding the strain histories from...

  20. Fully kinetic simulation of ion acoustic and dust-ion acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini Jenab, S. M.; Kourakis, I.; Abbasi, H.

    2011-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations is presented, based on a recurrence-free Vlasov kinetic model using kinetic phase point trajectories. All plasma components are modeled kinetically via a Vlasov evolution equation, then coupled through Poisson's equation. The dynamics of ion acoustic waves in an electron-ion and in a dusty (electron-ion-dust) plasma configuration are investigated, focusing on wave decay due to Landau damping and, in particular, on the parametric dependence of the damping rate on the dust concentration and on the electron-to-ion temperature ratio. In the absence of dust, the occurrence of damping was observed, as expected, and its dependence to the relative magnitude of the electron vs ion temperature(s) was investigated. When present, the dust component influences the charge balance, enabling dust-ion acoustic waves to survive Landau damping even in the extreme regime where T e ≅ T i . The Landau damping rate is shown to be minimized for a strong dust concentration or/and for a high value of the electron-to-ion temperature ratio. Our results confirm earlier theoretical considerations and contribute to the interpretation of experimental observations of dust-ion acoustic wave characteristics.

  1. Cluster observations in the magnetosheath – Part 1: Anisotropies of the wave vector distribution of the turbulence at electron scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mangeney

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the power spectral density δB2 and δE2 of the magnetic and electric fluctuations measured by Cluster 1 (Rumba in the magnetosheath during 23 h, on four different days. The frequency range of the STAFF Spectral Analyser (f=8 Hz to 4 kHz extends from about the lower hybrid frequency, i.e. the electromagnetic (e.m. range, up to about 10 times the proton plasma frequency, i.e. the electrostatic (e.s. range. In the e.m. range, we do not consider the whistler waves, which are not always observed, but rather the underlying, more permanent fluctuations. In this e.m. range, δB2 (at 10 Hz increases strongly while the local angle ΘBV between the magnetic field B and the flow velocity V increases from 0° to 90°. This behaviour, also observed in the solar wind at lower frequencies, is due to the Doppler effect. It can be modelled if we assume that, for the scales ranging from kc/ωpe≃0.3 to 30 (c/ωpe is the electron inertial length, the intensity of the e.m. fluctuations for a wave number k (i varies like k−ν with ν>≃3, (ii peaks for wave vectors k perpendicular to B like |sinθkB|µ with µ>≃100. The shape of the observed variations of δB2 with f and with ΘBV implies that the permanent fluctuations, at these scales, statistically do not obey the dispersion relation for fast/whistler waves or for kinetic Alfvén waves: the fluctuations have a vanishing frequency in the plasma frame, i.e. their phase velocity is negligible with respect to V (Taylor hypothesis. The electrostatic waves around 1 kHz behave differently: δE2 is minimum for ΘBV>≃90°. This can be modelled, still with the Doppler effect, if we assume that, for the scales ranging from k λDe>≃0.1 to 1 (λDe is the Debye length, the intensity of the e.s. fluctuations (i varies like k−ν with ν>≃4, (ii peaks for k parallel to B like |cosθkB|µ with µ>≃100. These e.s. fluctuations may have a vanishing frequency in the plasma frame, or may be ion acoustic

  2. Simulation studies of plasma waves in the electron foreshock: The transition from reactive to kinetic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dum, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    The electron beam-plasma instability is analyzed in particle simulation experiments, starting with a beam of small velocity spread. The dispersion relation is solved for snapshots of the actual evolving electron distribution function, rather than for the usual models consisting of Maxwellians. As the beam broadens, the analysis shows a transition from reactive beam modes, with frequencies extending much below the plasma frequency ω e , to kinetic instability of Langmuir waves, ω∼ω e , which is in agreement with the frequencies and growth rates observed in the simulation. Beam evolution is also in agreement with quasi-linear theory, except at the end of the reactive phase when trapping of beam electrons is seen. Although the spectrum temporarily narrows at this stage, there are, in contrast to previous simulations, still many modes present. the system then can proceed to a kinetic phase in which quasi-linear theory is again applicable. This stage is identical with the evolution starting from a gentle broad beam, except that wave levels are several times higher. With higher wave levels, mode coupling effects are also more prominent, but are still unable to prevent plateau formation. In contrast to the Langmuir wave regime, the reactive broadband wave regime lasts only for a relatively short period. In the electron foreshock it could only persist if a narrow beam or a sharp cutoff feature were maintained by continued beam injection and the time-of-flight mechanism

  3. High-efficiency toroidal current drive using low-phase-velocity kinetic Alfven waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, S.

    1991-09-01

    A method for obtaining efficient current drive in Tokamaks using low-phase-velocity (v ρ = ω/K parallel ∝ 0.1v te ) kinetic Alfen wave is proposed. The wave momentum, imparted primarily to the trapped electrons by Landau damping, is stored as the canonical angular momentum via the Ware pinch. In steady state, collisions restore the pinched electrons to their original phase-space configuration, in the process releasing the stored canonical angular momentum to the background ions and electrons in proportion to the respective collision frequencies. Despite the loss of a part of the original impulse to the plasma ions, well over half the wave momentum is ultimately delivered to the bulk-plasma electrons, resulting in an efficient current drive. A normalized current-drive efficiency γ = R 0 20 > I/P ∝ 2 would be feasible using the subthermal kinetic-Alfen-wave current drive in a Tokamak of reactor parameters. Optimum antenna loading conditions are described. The problem of accessibility is discussed. In an elongated, high-β plasma with a density dependence n e ∝ (1-ρ 2 ) Χn , accessibility is restricted to ρ > or approx. 3/(4A Χn ), where A is the aspect ratio. For current drive at still lower values of ρ, operation in conjunction with fast-wave current drive is suggested. (orig.)

  4. Accuracy and Precision of a Plane Wave Vector Flow Imaging Method in the Healthy Carotid Artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Traberg, Marie Sand

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the study described here was to investigate the accuracy and precision of a plane wave 2-D vector flow imaging (VFI) method in laminar and complex blood flow conditions in the healthy carotid artery. The approach was to study (i) the accuracy for complex flow by comparing...... of laminar flow in vivo. The precision in vivo was calculated as the mean standard deviation (SD) of estimates aligned to the heart cycle and was highest in the center of the common carotid artery (SD = 3.6% for velocity magnitudes and 4.5° for angles) and lowest in the external branch and for vortices (SD...... the velocity field from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation to VFI estimates obtained from the scan of an anthropomorphic flow phantom and from an in vivo scan; (ii) the accuracy for laminar unidirectional flow in vivo by comparing peak systolic velocities from VFI with magnetic resonance...

  5. Kinetic effects in Alfven wave heating Part 2 propagation and absorption with a single minority species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wann-Quan; Ross, D.W.; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    1989-06-01

    Kinetic effects of Alfven wave spatial resonances near the plasma edge are investigated numerically and analytically in a cylindrical tokamak model. In Part 1, cold plasma surface Alfven eigenmodes (SAE's) in a pure plasma are examined. Numerical calculations of antenna-driven waves exhibiting absorption resonances at certain discrete frequencies are first reviewed. From a simplified kinetic equation, an analytical dispersion relation is then obtained with the antenna current set equal to zero. The real and imaginary parts of its roots, which are the complex eigenfrequencies, agree with the central frequencies and widths, respectively, of the numerical antenna-driven resonances. These results serve as an introduction to the companion paper, in which it is shown that, in the presence of a minority species, certain SAE's, instead of heating the plasma exterior, can dissipate substantial energy in the two-ion hybrid layer near the plasma center. 11 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  6. Constrained reaction volume approach for studying chemical kinetics behind reflected shock waves

    KAUST Repository

    Hanson, Ronald K.

    2013-09-01

    We report a constrained-reaction-volume strategy for conducting kinetics experiments behind reflected shock waves, achieved in the present work by staged filling in a shock tube. Using hydrogen-oxygen ignition experiments as an example, we demonstrate that this strategy eliminates the possibility of non-localized (remote) ignition in shock tubes. Furthermore, we show that this same strategy can also effectively eliminate or minimize pressure changes due to combustion heat release, thereby enabling quantitative modeling of the kinetics throughout the combustion event using a simple assumption of specified pressure and enthalpy. We measure temperature and OH radical time-histories during ethylene-oxygen combustion behind reflected shock waves in a constrained reaction volume and verify that the results can be accurately modeled using a detailed mechanism and a specified pressure and enthalpy constraint. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  7. TJ-II wave forms analysis with wavelets and support vector machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormido-Canto, S.; Farias, G.; Dormido, R.; Vega, J.; Sanchez, J.; Santos, M.

    2004-01-01

    Since the fusion plasma experiment generates hundreds of signals, it is essential to have automatic mechanisms for searching similarities and retrieving of specific data in the wave form database. Wavelet transform (WT) is a transformation that allows one to map signals to spaces of lower dimensionality. Support vector machine (SVM) is a very effective method for general purpose pattern recognition. Given a set of input vectors which belong to two different classes, the SVM maps the inputs into a high-dimensional feature space through some nonlinear mapping, where an optimal separating hyperplane is constructed. In this work, the combined use of WT and SVM is proposed for searching and retrieving similar wave forms in the TJ-II database. In a first stage, plasma signals will be preprocessed by WT to reduce their dimensionality and to extract their main features. In the next stage, and using the smoothed signals produced by the WT, SVM will be applied to show up the efficiency of the proposed method to deal with the problem of sorting out thousands of fusion plasma signals.From observation of several experiments, our WT+SVM method is very viable, and the results seems promising. However, we have further work to do. We have to finish the development of a Matlab toolbox for WT+SVM processing and to include new relevant features in the SVM inputs to improve the technique. We have also to make a better preprocessing of the input signals and to study the performance of other generic and self custom kernels. To reach it, and since the preprocessing stages are very time consuming, we are going to study the viability of using DSPs, RPGAs or parallel programming techniques to reduce the execution time

  8. A vector field method on the distorted Fourier side and decay for wave equations with potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Donninger, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The authors study the Cauchy problem for the one-dimensional wave equation \\partial_t^2 u(t,x)-\\partial_x^2 u(t,x)+V(x)u(t,x)=0. The potential V is assumed to be smooth with asymptotic behavior V(x)\\sim -\\tfrac14 |x|^{-2}\\mbox{ as } |x|\\to \\infty. They derive dispersive estimates, energy estimates, and estimates involving the scaling vector field t\\partial_t+x\\partial_x, where the latter are obtained by employing a vector field method on the âeoedistortedâe Fourier side. In addition, they prove local energy decay estimates. Their results have immediate applications in the context of geometric evolution problems. The theory developed in this paper is fundamental for the proof of the co-dimension 1 stability of the catenoid under the vanishing mean curvature flow in Minkowski space; see Donninger, Krieger, Szeftel, and Wong, âeoeCodimension one stability of the catenoid under the vanishing mean curvature flow in Minkowski spaceâe, preprint arXiv:1310.5606 (2013).

  9. Spatial aliasing and distortion of energy distribution in the wave vector domain under multi-spacecraft measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Narita

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Aliasing is a general problem in the analysis of any measurements that make sampling at discrete points. Sampling in the spatial domain results in a periodic pattern of spectra in the wave vector domain. This effect is called spatial aliasing, and it is of particular importance for multi-spacecraft measurements in space. We first present the theoretical background of aliasing problems in the frequency domain and generalize it to the wave vector domain, and then present model calculations of spatial aliasing. The model calculations are performed for various configurations of the reciprocal vectors and energy spectra or distribution that are placed at different positions in the wave vector domain, and exhibit two effects on aliasing. One is weak aliasing, in which the true spectrum is distorted because of non-uniform aliasing contributions in the Brillouin zone. It is demonstrated that the energy distribution becomes elongated in the shortest reciprocal lattice vector direction in the wave vector domain. The other effect is strong aliasing, in which aliases have a significant contribution in the Brillouin zone and the energy distribution shows a false peak. These results give a caveat in multi-spacecraft data analysis in that spectral anisotropy obtained by a measurement has in general two origins: (1 natural and physical origins like anisotropy imposed by a mean magnetic field or a flow direction; and (2 aliasing effects that are imposed by the configuration of the measurement array (or the set of reciprocal vectors. This manuscript also discusses a possible method to estimate aliasing contributions in the Brillouin zone based on the measured spectrum and to correct the spectra for aliasing.

  10. Kinetic theory for radiation interacting with sound waves in ultrarelativistic pair plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, Mattias; Shukla, Padma K.; Stenflo, Lennart

    2006-01-01

    A kinetic theory for radiation interacting with sound waves in an ultrarelativistic electron-positron plasma is developed. It is shown that the effect of a spatial spectral broadening of the electromagnetic pulse is to introduce a reduction of the growth rates for the decay and modulational instabilities. Such spectral broadening could be due to a finite pulse coherence length, or through the use of random phase filters, and would stabilize the propagation of electromagnetic pulses

  11. Kinetic treatment of nonlinear ion-acoustic waves in multi-ion plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Qamar, A.

    2017-09-01

    By applying the kinetic theory of the Valsove-Poisson model and the reductive perturbation technique, a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived for small but finite amplitude ion acoustic waves in multi-ion plasma composed of positive and negative ions along with the fraction of electrons. A correspondent equation is also derived from the basic set of fluid equations of adiabatic ions and isothermal electrons. Both kinetic and fluid KdV equations are stationary solved with different nature of coefficients. Their differences are discussed both analytically and numerically. The criteria of the fluid approach as a limiting case of kinetic theory are also discussed. The presence of negative ion makes some modification in the solitary structure that has also been discussed with its implication at the laboratory level.

  12. Kinetic-energy matrix elements for atomic Hylleraas-CI wave functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Frank E., E-mail: harris@qtp.ufl.edu [Department of Physics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA and Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118435, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2016-05-28

    Hylleraas-CI is a superposition-of-configurations method in which each configuration is constructed from a Slater-type orbital (STO) product to which is appended (linearly) at most one interelectron distance r{sub ij}. Computations of the kinetic energy for atoms by this method have been difficult due to the lack of formulas expressing these matrix elements for general angular momentum in terms of overlap and potential-energy integrals. It is shown here that a strategic application of angular-momentum theory, including the use of vector spherical harmonics, enables the reduction of all atomic kinetic-energy integrals to overlap and potential-energy matrix elements. The new formulas are validated by showing that they yield correct results for a large number of integrals published by other investigators.

  13. Acquisition of Xyllela fastidiosa causes changes to the inoculation behavior (EPG X wave) of an efficient sharpshooter vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) is a foregut-borne bacterium that is inoculated into xylem cells of a healthy plant during feeding by sharpshooter vectors. Inoculation occurs during salivation and egestion behaviors that are likely represented by the sharpshooter X wave. The objective of this study was to t...

  14. Validity of the Taylor hypothesis for linear kinetic waves in the weakly collisional solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howes, G. G.; Klein, K. G.; TenBarge, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The interpretation of single-point spacecraft measurements of solar wind turbulence is complicated by the fact that the measurements are made in a frame of reference in relative motion with respect to the turbulent plasma. The Taylor hypothesis—that temporal fluctuations measured by a stationary probe in a rapidly flowing fluid are dominated by the advection of spatial structures in the fluid rest frame—is often assumed to simplify the analysis. But measurements of turbulence in upcoming missions, such as Solar Probe Plus, threaten to violate the Taylor hypothesis, either due to slow flow of the plasma with respect to the spacecraft or to the dispersive nature of the plasma fluctuations at small scales. Assuming that the frequency of the turbulent fluctuations is characterized by the frequency of the linear waves supported by the plasma, we evaluate the validity of the Taylor hypothesis for the linear kinetic wave modes in the weakly collisional solar wind. The analysis predicts that a dissipation range of solar wind turbulence supported by whistler waves is likely to violate the Taylor hypothesis, while one supported by kinetic Alfvén waves is not.

  15. The Role of Kinetic Alfven Waves in Plasma Transport in an Ion-scale Flux Rope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, B.; Li, W.; Wang, C.; Dai, L.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic flux ropes, if generated by multiply X-line reconnections, would be born as a crater type one, meaning the plasma density within is relatively high. They will then evolve into typical flux ropes as plasma are transported away along the magnetic field lines [Zhang et al., 2010]. In this study, we report an ion-scale flux rope observed by MMS on November 28, 2016, which is accompanied by strong kinetic Alfven waves (KAW). The related wave parallel electric field can effectively accelerate electrons inside the flux rope by Landau resonance, resulting into a significant decrease of the electron at 90° pitch angle. The change of electron pitch angle distribution would cause the rapid plasma transport along the magnetic field lines, and help the flux rope evolve into a strong magnetic core in a short time. This wave-particle interaction would be a candidate mechanism to explain the rareness of crater flux ropes in reality.

  16. Structure of Kinetic Alfvén Waves of Small Transverse Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.

    1996-11-01

    This analytical study illustrates the spatial pattern of kinetic Alfvén waves excited by a current-modulating disk whose dimension R transverse to the confining magnetic field is comparable to cs / Ω_i. The radial structure of the wave azimuthal magnetic field consists of 3 regions: a Bessel function behavior for r > R. The pattern spreads at an angle given by tan θ = (ω/Ω_i)(c_s/V_A)/(2 \\cdot 6), where ω is the modulation frequency and VA the Alfvén speed. This arises because there is a maximum value at finite k_⊥ for the ratio of the perpendicular to parallel group velocity, which differs from the cone spreading(G.J. Morales, R.S. Loritsch, and J.E. Maggs, Phys. Plasmas) 1, 3765 (1994) associated with inertial Alfvén waves. Sponsored by ONR

  17. Synthetic spectral analysis of a kinetic model for slow-magnetosonic waves in solar corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan, Wenzhi; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua [School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China, E-mail: jshept@gmail.com (China); Zhang, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Vocks, Christian [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, 14482, Potsdam (Germany); Marsch, Eckart [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Peter, Hardi [Max Plank Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-03-25

    We propose a kinetic model of slow-magnetosonic waves to explain various observational features associated with the propagating intensity disturbances (PIDs) occurring in the solar corona. The characteristics of slow mode waves, e.g, inphase oscillations of density, velocity, and thermal speed, are reproduced in this kinetic model. Moreover, the red-blue (R-B) asymmetry of the velocity distribution as self-consistently generated in the model is found to be contributed from the beam component, as a result of the competition between Landau resonance and Coulomb collisions. Furthermore, we synthesize the spectral lines and make the spectral analysis, based on the kinetic simulation data of the flux tube plasmas and the hypothesis of the surrounding background plasmas. It is found that the fluctuations of parameters of the synthetic spectral lines are basically consistent with the observations: (1) the line intensity, Doppler shift, and line width are fluctuating in phase; (2) the R-B asymmetry usually oscillate out of phase with the former three parameters; (3) the blueward asymmetry is more evident than the redward asymmetry in the R-B fluctuations. The oscillations of line parameters become weakened for the case with denser surrounding background plasmas. Similar to the observations, there is no doubled-frequency oscillation of the line width for the case with flux-tube plasmas flowing bulkly upward among the static background plasmas. Therefore, we suggest that the “wave + beam flow” kinetic model may be a viable interpretation for the PIDs observed in the solar corona.

  18. Optimal Design of a Traveling-Wave Kinetic Inductance Amplifier Operated in Three-Wave Mixing Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Robert; Bal, Mustafa; Ku, Ksiang-Sheng; Wu, Xian; Pappas, David

    In the presence of a DC bias, an injected pump, of frequency fP, and a signal, of frequency fS, undergo parametric three-way mixing (3WM) within a traveling-wave kinetic inductance (KIT) amplifier, producing an idler product of frequency fI =fP -fS . Periodic frequency stops are engineered into the coplanar waveguide of the device to enhance signal amplification. With fP placed just above the first frequency stop gap, 3WM broadband signal gain is achieved with maximum gain at fS =fP / 2 . Within a theory of the dispersion of traveling waves in the presence of these engineered loadings, which accounts for this broadband signal gain, we show how an optimal frequency-stop design may be constructed to achieve maximum signal amplification. The optimization approach we describe can be applied to the design of other nonlinear traveling-wave parametric amplifiers. This work was supported by the Army Research Office and the Laboratory for Physical Sciences under EAO221146, EAO241777, and the NIST Quantum Initiative. RPE acknowledges Grant 60NANB14D024 from the US Department of Commerce, NIST.

  19. Advancements in Kinetic Inductance Detector, Spectrometer, and Amplifier Technologies for Millimeter-Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, George

    The inductance of a conductor expresses its tendency to oppose a change in current flowing through it. For superconductors, in addition to the familiar magnetic inductance due to energy stored in the magnetic field generated by this current, kinetic inductance due to inertia of charge carriers is a significant and often dominant contribution to total inductance. Devices based on modifying the kinetic inductance of thin film superconductors have widespread application to millimeter-wave astronomy. Lithographically patterning such a film into a high quality factor resonator produces a high sensitivity photodetector known as a kinetic inductance detector (KID), which is sensitive to frequencies above the superconducting energy gap of the chosen material. Inherently multiplexable in the frequency domain and relatively simple to fabricate, KIDs pave the way to the large format focal plane array instruments necessary to conduct the next generation of cosmic microwave background (CMB), star formation, and galaxy evolution studies. In addition, non-linear kinetic inductance can be exploited to develop traveling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifiers (TKIPs) based on superconducting delay lines to read out these instruments. I present my contributions to both large and small scale collaborative efforts to develop KID arrays, spectrometers integrated with KIDs, and TKIPs. I optimize a dual polarization TiN KID absorber for the next generation Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry, which is designed to investigate the role magnetic fields play in star formation. As part of an effort to demonstrate aluminum KIDs on sky for CMB polarimetry, I fabricate devices for three design variants. SuperSpec and WSpec are respectively the on-chip and waveguide implementations of a filter bank spectrometer concept designed for survey spectroscopy of high redshift galaxies. I provide a robust tool for characterizing the performance of all Super

  20. KINETIC ALFVÉN WAVE GENERATION BY LARGE-SCALE PHASE MIXING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vásconez, C. L.; Pucci, F.; Valentini, F.; Servidio, S.; Malara, F.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2015-01-01

    One view of the solar wind turbulence is that the observed highly anisotropic fluctuations at spatial scales near the proton inertial length d p may be considered as kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs). In the present paper, we show how phase mixing of large-scale parallel-propagating Alfvén waves is an efficient mechanism for the production of KAWs at wavelengths close to d p and at a large propagation angle with respect to the magnetic field. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), Hall magnetohydrodynamic (HMHD), and hybrid Vlasov–Maxwell (HVM) simulations modeling the propagation of Alfvén waves in inhomogeneous plasmas are performed. In the linear regime, the role of dispersive effects is singled out by comparing MHD and HMHD results. Fluctuations produced by phase mixing are identified as KAWs through a comparison of polarization of magnetic fluctuations and wave-group velocity with analytical linear predictions. In the nonlinear regime, a comparison of HMHD and HVM simulations allows us to point out the role of kinetic effects in shaping the proton-distribution function. We observe the generation of temperature anisotropy with respect to the local magnetic field and the production of field-aligned beams. The regions where the proton-distribution function highly departs from thermal equilibrium are located inside the shear layers, where the KAWs are excited, this suggesting that the distortions of the proton distribution are driven by a resonant interaction of protons with KAW fluctuations. Our results are relevant in configurations where magnetic-field inhomogeneities are present, as, for example, in the solar corona, where the presence of Alfvén waves has been ascertained

  1. KINETIC ALFVÉN WAVE GENERATION BY LARGE-SCALE PHASE MIXING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vásconez, C. L.; Pucci, F.; Valentini, F.; Servidio, S.; Malara, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, I-87036, Rende (CS) (Italy); Matthaeus, W. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, DE 19716 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    One view of the solar wind turbulence is that the observed highly anisotropic fluctuations at spatial scales near the proton inertial length d{sub p} may be considered as kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs). In the present paper, we show how phase mixing of large-scale parallel-propagating Alfvén waves is an efficient mechanism for the production of KAWs at wavelengths close to d{sub p} and at a large propagation angle with respect to the magnetic field. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), Hall magnetohydrodynamic (HMHD), and hybrid Vlasov–Maxwell (HVM) simulations modeling the propagation of Alfvén waves in inhomogeneous plasmas are performed. In the linear regime, the role of dispersive effects is singled out by comparing MHD and HMHD results. Fluctuations produced by phase mixing are identified as KAWs through a comparison of polarization of magnetic fluctuations and wave-group velocity with analytical linear predictions. In the nonlinear regime, a comparison of HMHD and HVM simulations allows us to point out the role of kinetic effects in shaping the proton-distribution function. We observe the generation of temperature anisotropy with respect to the local magnetic field and the production of field-aligned beams. The regions where the proton-distribution function highly departs from thermal equilibrium are located inside the shear layers, where the KAWs are excited, this suggesting that the distortions of the proton distribution are driven by a resonant interaction of protons with KAW fluctuations. Our results are relevant in configurations where magnetic-field inhomogeneities are present, as, for example, in the solar corona, where the presence of Alfvén waves has been ascertained.

  2. Identification of low-frequency kinetic wave modes in the Earth's ion foreshock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Blanco-Cano

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we use ion and magnetic field data from the AMPTE-UKS mission to study the characteristics of low frequency (ωr « Ωp waves observed upstream of the Earth's bow shock. We test the application of various plasma-field correlations and magnetic ratios derived from linear Vlasov theory to identify the modes in this region. We evaluate (for a parameter space consistent with the ion foreshock the Alfvén ratio, the parallel compressibility, the cross-helicity, the noncoplanar ratio, the magnetic compression and the polarization for the two kinetic instabilities that can be generated in the foreshock by the interaction of hot diffuse ions with the solar wind: the left-hand resonant and the right-hand resonant ion beam instabilities. Comparison of these quantities with the observed plasma-field correlations and various magnetic properties of the waves observed during 10 intervals on 30 October 1984, where the waves are associated with diffuse ions, allows us to identify regions with Alfvénic waves and regions where the predominant mode is the right-hand resonant instability. In all the cases the waves are transverse, propagating at angles ≤ 33° and are elliptically polarized. Our results suggest that while the observed Alfvén waves are generated locally by hot diffuse ions, the right-handed waves may result from the superposition of waves generated by two different types of beam distribution (i.e. cold beam and diffuse ions. Even when there was good agreement between the values of observed transport ratios and the values given by the theory, some discrepancies were found. This shows that the observed waves are different from the theoretical modes and that mode identification based only on polarization quantities does not give a complete picture of the waves' characteristics and can lead to mode identification of waves whose polarization may agree with theoretical predictions even when other properties can diverge from those of the

  3. Identification of low-frequency kinetic wave modes in the Earth's ion foreshock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Blanco-Cano

    Full Text Available In this work we use ion and magnetic field data from the AMPTE-UKS mission to study the characteristics of low frequency (ωr « Ωp waves observed upstream of the Earth's bow shock. We test the application of various plasma-field correlations and magnetic ratios derived from linear Vlasov theory to identify the modes in this region. We evaluate (for a parameter space consistent with the ion foreshock the Alfvén ratio, the parallel compressibility, the cross-helicity, the noncoplanar ratio, the magnetic compression and the polarization for the two kinetic instabilities that can be generated in the foreshock by the interaction of hot diffuse ions with the solar wind: the left-hand resonant and the right-hand resonant ion beam instabilities. Comparison of these quantities with the observed plasma-field correlations and various magnetic properties of the waves observed during 10 intervals on 30 October 1984, where the waves are associated with diffuse ions, allows us to identify regions with Alfvénic waves and regions where the predominant mode is the right-hand resonant instability. In all the cases the waves are transverse, propagating at angles ≤ 33° and are elliptically polarized. Our results suggest that while the observed Alfvén waves are generated locally by hot diffuse ions, the right-handed waves may result from the superposition of waves generated by two different types of beam distribution (i.e. cold beam and diffuse ions. Even when there was good agreement between the values of observed transport ratios and the values given by the theory, some discrepancies were found. This shows that the observed waves are different from the theoretical modes and that mode identification based only on polarization quantities does not give a complete picture of the waves' characteristics and can lead to mode identification of waves whose polarization may agree with theoretical predictions even when

  4. Budget of Turbulent Kinetic Energy in a Shock Wave Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Manan A.; Waindim, Mbu; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2016-01-01

    Implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) of a shock wave/boundary-layer interaction (SBLI) was performed. Quantities present in the exact equation of the turbulent kinetic energy transport were accumulated and used to calculate terms like production, dissipation, molecular diffusion, and turbulent transport. The present results for a turbulent boundary layer were validated by comparison with direct numerical simulation data. It was found that a longer development domain was necessary for the boundary layer to reach an equilibrium state and a finer mesh resolution would improve the predictions. In spite of these findings, trends of the present budget match closely with that of the direct numerical simulation. Budgets for the SBLI region are presented at key axial stations. These budgets showed interesting dynamics as the incoming boundary layer transforms and the terms of the turbulent kinetic energy budget change behavior within the interaction region.

  5. Unidirectional Wave Vector Manipulation in Two-Dimensional Space with an All Passive Acoustic Parity-Time-Symmetric Metamaterials Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tuo; Zhu, Xuefeng; Chen, Fei; Liang, Shanjun; Zhu, Jie

    2018-03-01

    Exploring the concept of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians respecting parity-time symmetry with classical wave systems is of great interest as it enables the experimental investigation of parity-time-symmetric systems through the quantum-classical analogue. Here, we demonstrate unidirectional wave vector manipulation in two-dimensional space, with an all passive acoustic parity-time-symmetric metamaterials crystal. The metamaterials crystal is constructed through interleaving groove- and holey-structured acoustic metamaterials to provide an intrinsic parity-time-symmetric potential that is two-dimensionally extended and curved, which allows the flexible manipulation of unpaired wave vectors. At the transition point from the unbroken to broken parity-time symmetry phase, the unidirectional sound focusing effect (along with reflectionless acoustic transparency in the opposite direction) is experimentally realized over the spectrum. This demonstration confirms the capability of passive acoustic systems to carry the experimental studies on general parity-time symmetry physics and further reveals the unique functionalities enabled by the judiciously tailored unidirectional wave vectors in space.

  6. Single-chain statistics and the upper wave-vector cutoff in polymer blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holyst, R.; Vilgis, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    We derive the equation for the single-chain correlation function in polymer blends. The chains in the incompressible blend have a radius of gyration smaller than the radius of gyration for ideal chains. The chains shrink progressively as we approach the critical temperature T c . The correction responsible for shrinking is proportional to 1/ √N , where N is the polymerization index. At T=T c and for N=1000, the size of the chain has been estimated to be 10% smaller than the size of the ideal coil. The estimate relies on the appropriate cutoff. In the limit of N→∞ the chains approach the random walk limit. Additionally, we propose in this paper a self-consistent determination of the radius of gyration and the upper wave-vector cutoff. Our model is free from any divergences such as were encountered in the previous mean-field studies; we make an estimate of the chain size at the true critical temperature and not the mean-field one

  7. Current driven instabilities of the kinetic shear Alfven wave: application to reversed field pinches and spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhofer, D.D.; Perkins, F.W.

    1984-04-01

    The kinetic Alfven wave is studied in a cylindrical force-free plasma with self-consistent magnetic fields. This equilibrium represents a reversed field pinch or a spheromak. The stability of the wave is found to depend on the ratio of the electron drift velocity to the Alfven velocity. This ratio varies inversely with the square root of the plasma line density. The critical line density using the Spitzer-Harm electron distribution function is found for reversed field pinches with deuterium plasmas to be approximately 2 x 10 18 m -1 and is 5 x 10 17 m -1 in spheromaks with hydrogen plasmas. The critical line density is in reasonable agreement with experimental data for reversed field pinches

  8. Theory of multiwave mixing within the superconducting kinetic-inductance traveling-wave amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, R. P.; Pappas, D. P.

    2017-03-01

    We present a theory of parametric mixing within the coplanar waveguide (CPW) of a superconducting nonlinear kinetic-inductance traveling-wave (KIT) amplifier engineered with periodic dispersion loadings. This is done by first developing a metamaterial band theory of the dispersion-engineered KIT using a Floquet-Bloch construction and then applying it to the description of mixing of the nonlinear RF traveling waves. Our theory allows us to calculate signal gain versus signal frequency in the presence of a frequency stop gap, based solely on loading design. We present results for both three-wave mixing (3WM), with applied dc bias, and four-wave mixing (4WM), without dc. Our theory predicts an intrinsic and deterministic origin to undulations of 4WM signal gain with signal frequency, apart from extrinsic sources, such as impedance mismatch, and shows that such undulations are absent from 3WM signal gain achievable with dc. Our theory is extensible to amplifiers based on Josephson junctions in a lumped LC-ladder transmission line (TWPA).

  9. Crystals with an Open Wave-Vector Surface: Peculiarities of Reflection and Possibilities of Designing Flat Lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eritsyan, O. S.; Lalayan, A. A.; Arakelyan, O. M.; Papoyan, A. A.; Kostanyan, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    The frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient of MgF 2 crystal in the frequency range of 200-800 cm -1 at different orientations of the optical axis has been investigated. The experimental data are compared with the calculation results. This comparison confirms that the wave vectors for the extraordinary wave have an open surface. This makes it possible to focus a divergent beam refracted at a flat boundary ori- ented perpendicularly to the optical crystal axis. The focusing effect of a plane-parallel MgF 2 crystal plate is calculated.

  10. Classical reconstruction of interference patterns of position-wave-vector-entangled photon pairs by the time-reversal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kazuhisa; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Tomita, Akihisa

    2018-02-01

    The quantum interference of entangled photons forms a key phenomenon underlying various quantum-optical technologies. It is known that the quantum interference patterns of entangled photon pairs can be reconstructed classically by the time-reversal method; however, the time-reversal method has been applied only to time-frequency-entangled two-photon systems in previous experiments. Here, we apply the time-reversal method to the position-wave-vector-entangled two-photon systems: the two-photon Young interferometer and the two-photon beam focusing system. We experimentally demonstrate that the time-reversed systems classically reconstruct the same interference patterns as the position-wave-vector-entangled two-photon systems.

  11. Phonon Self-Energy Corrections to Nonzero Wave-Vector Phonon Modes in Single-Layer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, P. T.; Mafra, D. L.; Sato, K.; Saito, R.; Kong, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    Phonon self-energy corrections have mostly been studied theoretically and experimentally for phonon modes with zone-center (q=0) wave vectors. Here, gate-modulated Raman scattering is used to study phonons of a single layer of graphene originating from a double-resonant Raman process with q≠0. The observed phonon renormalization effects are different from what is observed for the zone-center q=0 case. To explain our experimental findings, we explored the phonon self-energy for the phonons with nonzero wave vectors (q≠0) in single-layer graphene in which the frequencies and decay widths are expected to behave oppositely to the behavior observed in the corresponding zone-center q=0 processes. Within this framework, we resolve the identification of the phonon modes contributing to the G⋆ Raman feature at 2450cm-1 to include the iTO+LA combination modes with q≠0 and also the 2iTO overtone modes with q=0, showing both to be associated with wave vectors near the high symmetry point K in the Brillouin zone.

  12. Equi-frequency contour of photonic crystals with the extended Dirichlet-to-Neumann wave vector eigenvalue equation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Bin; Zhang Yejing; Wang Yufei; Liu Anjin; Zheng Wanhua

    2012-01-01

    We present the extended Dirichlet-to-Neumann wave vector eigenvalue equation (DtN-WVEE) method to calculate the equi-frequency contour (EFC) of square lattice photonic crystals (PhCs). With the extended DtN-WVEE method and Snell's law, the effective refractive index of the mode with a circular EFC can be obtained, which is further validated with the refractive index weighted by the electric field or magnetic field. To further verify the EFC calculated by the DtN-WVEE method, the finite-difference time-domain method is also used. Compared with other wave vector eigenvalue equation methods that calculate EFC directly, the size of the eigenmatrix used in the DtN-WVEE method is much smaller, and the computation time is significantly reduced. Since the DtN-WVEE method solves wave vectors for given arbitrary frequencies, it can also find applications in studying the optical properties of a PhC with dispersive, lossy and magnetic materials. (paper)

  13. Structure of kinetic Alfvacute en waves with small transverse scale length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, G.J.; Maggs, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    This analytical study illustrates the spatial pattern of kinetic Alfvacute en waves excited by a current-modulating disk whose dimension a, transverse to the confining magnetic field, is comparable to the ion sound gyroradius c s /Ω i , where c s is the sound speed and Ω i the ion cyclotron frequency. The radial structure of the wave azimuthal magnetic field is found to consist of four regions: a Bessel function behavior for r a which merges onto the 1/r asymptotic region. The pattern spreads at an angle given by tanθ=(ω/Ω i )(c s /v A )/2.6, where ω is the modulation frequency and v A is the Alfvacute en speed. This behavior arises because there is a maximum value at finite k perpendicular for the ratio of the perpendicular to parallel group velocity, which differs from the cone spreading [G. J. Morales et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 3765 (1994)] associated with inertial Alfvacute en waves. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  14. Comparison of detailed and reduced kinetics mechanisms of silane oxidation in the basis of detonation wave structure problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Tropin, D. A.; Fomin, P. A.

    2018-03-01

    The paper deals with the problem of the structure of detonation waves in the silane-air mixture within the framework of mathematical model of a nonequilibrium gas dynamics. Detailed kinetic scheme of silane oxidation as well as the newly developed reduced kinetic model of detonation combustion of silane are used. On its basis the detonation wave (DW) structure in stoichiometric silane - air mixture and dependences of Chapman-Jouguet parameters of mixture on stoichiometric ratio between the fuel (silane) and an oxidizer (air) were obtained.

  15. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of travelling pulses and spiral waves in the lattice Lotka-Volterra model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeev, Alexei G; Kurkina, Elena S; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G

    2012-06-01

    Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations are used to study the stochastic two-species Lotka-Volterra model on a square lattice. For certain values of the model parameters, the system constitutes an excitable medium: travelling pulses and rotating spiral waves can be excited. Stable solitary pulses travel with constant (modulo stochastic fluctuations) shape and speed along a periodic lattice. The spiral waves observed persist sometimes for hundreds of rotations, but they are ultimately unstable and break-up (because of fluctuations and interactions between neighboring fronts) giving rise to complex dynamic behavior in which numerous small spiral waves rotate and interact with each other. It is interesting that travelling pulses and spiral waves can be exhibited by the model even for completely immobile species, due to the non-local reaction kinetics.

  16. Kinetic energy and angular momentum of free particles in the gyratonic pp-waves space-times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, J. W.; da Rocha-Neto, J. F.; Ulhoa, S. C.; Carneiro, F. L.

    2018-06-01

    Gyratonic pp-waves are exact solutions of Einstein’s equations that represent non-linear gravitational waves endowed with angular momentum. We consider gyratonic pp-waves that travel in the z direction and whose time dependence on the variable is given by Gaussians, so that the waves represent short bursts of gravitational radiation propagating in the z direction. We evaluate numerically the geodesics and velocities of free particles in the space-time of these waves, and find that after the passage of the waves both the kinetic energy and the angular momentum per unit mass of the particles are changed. Therefore there is a transfer of energy and angular momentum between the gravitational field and the free particles, so that the final values of the energy and angular momentum of the free particles may be smaller or larger in magnitude than the initial values.

  17. Application of kinetic flux vector splitting scheme for solving multi-dimensional hydrodynamical models of semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Ubaid Ahmed; Ashraf, Waqas; Qamar, Shamsul

    In this article, one and two-dimensional hydrodynamical models of semiconductor devices are numerically investigated. The models treat the propagation of electrons in a semiconductor device as the flow of a charged compressible fluid. It plays an important role in predicting the behavior of electron flow in semiconductor devices. Mathematically, the governing equations form a convection-diffusion type system with a right hand side describing the relaxation effects and interaction with a self consistent electric field. The proposed numerical scheme is a splitting scheme based on the kinetic flux-vector splitting (KFVS) method for the hyperbolic step, and a semi-implicit Runge-Kutta method for the relaxation step. The KFVS method is based on the direct splitting of macroscopic flux functions of the system on the cell interfaces. The second order accuracy of the scheme is achieved by using MUSCL-type initial reconstruction and Runge-Kutta time stepping method. Several case studies are considered. For validation, the results of current scheme are compared with those obtained from the splitting scheme based on the NT central scheme. The effects of various parameters such as low field mobility, device length, lattice temperature and voltage are analyzed. The accuracy, efficiency and simplicity of the proposed KFVS scheme validates its generic applicability to the given model equations. A two dimensional simulation is also performed by KFVS method for a MESFET device, producing results in good agreement with those obtained by NT-central scheme.

  18. Suppression of Gain Ripples in Superconducting Traveling-Wave Kinetic Inductance Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Mustafa; Erickson, Robert P.; Ku, Hsiang Sheng; Wu, Xian; Pappas, David P.

    Superconducting traveling-wave kinetic inductance (KIT) amplifiers demonstrated gain over a wide bandwidth with high dynamic range and low noise. However, the gain curve exhibits ripples. Impedance mismatch at the input and output ports of the KIT amplifier as wells as split ground planes of the coplanar waveguide (CPW) geometry are potential contributors to the ripple in the gain curve. Here we study the origin of these ripples in KIT amplifiers configured in CPW geometry using approximately 20 nm thick NbTiN films grown by reactive co-sputtering of NbN and TiN. Our NbTiN films have non-linear kinetic inductance as a function of current, described by L =L0 (1 +(I /I*) 2) , where I* = 15 . 96 +/- 0 . 11 mA measured by time domain reflectometry. We report the results of implementing an impedance taper that takes into account a significantly reduced phase velocity as it narrows, adding Au onto the CPW split grounds, as well as employing different designs of dispersion engineering. Qubit Measurements using KIT amplifiers will also be reported.

  19. Estimating transmitted waves of floating breakwater using support vector regression model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.; Hegde, A.V.; Kumar, V.; Patil, S.G.

    is first mapped onto an m-dimensional feature space using some fixed (nonlinear) mapping, and then a linear model is constructed in this feature space (Ivanciuc Ovidiu 2007). Using mathematical notation, the linear model in the feature space f(x, w... regressive vector machines, Ocean Engineering Journal, Vol – 36, pp 339 – 347, 2009. 3. Ivanciuc Ovidiu, Applications of support vector machines in chemistry, Review in Computational Chemistry, Eds K. B. Lipkouitz and T. R. Cundari, Vol – 23...

  20. Ion beam generation at the plasma sheet boundary layer by kinetic Alfven waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Goertz, C.K.; Smith, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    The kinetic Alfven wave, an Alfven wave with a perpendicular wavelength comparable to the ion gyroradius, can diffuse ions both in velocity and coordinate spaces with comparable transport rates. This may lead to the generation of ion beams in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL). To investigate the ion beam generation process numerically, a two-dimensional quasi-linear code was constructed. Assuming that the plasma β (the ratio of plasma pressure to the magnetic pressure) varies from β = 1 to β << 1 across the magnetic field, the dynamics of the ion beam generation in the PSBL was studied. It was found that if your start with an ion distribution function which monotonically decreases with velocity along the magnetic field and a density gradient across the magnetic field, ions diffuse in velocity-coordinate space until nearly a plateau is established along the diffusion path. Depending on the topology of the magnetic field at the lobe side of the simulation system, i.e., open or closed field lines, the ion distribution function may or may not reach a steady state. If the field lines are open there, i.e., if the diffusion extends into the lobe, the double diffusion process may provide a mechanism for continuously transferring the ions from the central plasma sheet to the lobe. The authors comment on the effect of the particle loss on the establishment of the pressure balance in the plasma sheet

  1. Continuum kinetic methods for analyzing wave physics and distribution function dynamics in the turbulence dissipation challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juno, J.; Hakim, A.; TenBarge, J.; Dorland, W.

    2015-12-01

    We present for the first time results for the turbulence dissipation challenge, with specific focus on the linear wave portion of the challenge, using a variety of continuum kinetic models: hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell, gyrokinetic, and full Vlasov-Maxwell. As one of the goals of the wave problem as it is outlined is to identify how well various models capture linear physics, we compare our results to linear Vlasov and gyrokinetic theory. Preliminary gyrokinetic results match linear theory extremely well due to the geometry of the problem, which eliminates the dominant nonlinearity. With the non-reduced models, we explore how the subdominant nonlinearities manifest and affect the evolution of the turbulence and the energy budget. We also take advantage of employing continuum methods to study the dynamics of the distribution function, with particular emphasis on the full Vlasov results where a basic collision operator has been implemented. As the community prepares for the next stage of the turbulence dissipation challenge, where we hope to do large 3D simulations to inform the next generation of observational missions such as THOR (Turbulence Heating ObserveR), we argue for the consideration of hybrid Vlasov and full Vlasov as candidate models for these critical simulations. With the use of modern numerical algorithms, we demonstrate the competitiveness of our code with traditional particle-in-cell algorithms, with a clear plan for continued improvements and optimizations to further strengthen the code's viability as an option for the next stage of the challenge.

  2. Kinetic Theory of quasi-electrostatic waves in non-gyrotropic plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, K.; Poedts, S.; Lazar, M.

    2017-12-01

    The orbital angular momentum (OAM) is a trait of helically phased light or helical (twisted) electric field. Lasers carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) revolutionized many scientific and technological paradigms like microscopy, imaging and ionospheric radar facility to analyze three dimensional plasma dynamics in ionosphere, ultra-intense twisted laser pulses, twisted gravitational waves and astrophysics. This trend has also been investigated in plasma physics. Laguerre-Gaussian type solutions are predicted for magnetic tornadoes and Alfvénic tornadoes which exhibit spiral, split and ring-like morphologies. The ring shape morphology is ideal to fit the observed solar corona, solar atmosphere and Earth's ionosphere. The orbital angular momentum indicates the mediation of electrostatic and electromagnetic waves in new phenomena like Raman and Brillouin scattering. A few years ago, some new effects have been included in studies of orbital angular momentum in plasma regimes such as wave-particle interaction in the presence of helical electric field. Therefore, kinetic studies are carried out to investigate the Landau damping of the waves and growth of the instabilities in the presence helical electric field carrying orbital angular momentum for the Maxwellian distributed plasmas. Recently, a well suited approach involving a kappa distribution function has been adopted to model the twisted space plasmas. This leads to the development of new theoretical grounds for the study of Lorentzian or kappa distributed twisted Langmuir, ion acoustic, dust ion acoustic and dust acoustic modes. The quasi-electrostatic twisted waves have been studied now for the non-gyrotropic dusty plasmas in the presence of the orbital angular momentum of the helical electric field using Generalized Lorentzian or kappa distribution function. The Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) mode function is employed to decompose the perturbed distribution function and electric field into planar (longitudinal) and

  3. Kinetic theory of twisted waves: Application to space plasmas having superthermal population of species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Kashif; Poedts, Stefaan; Lazar, Marian

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays electromagnetic (EM) fields have various applications in fundamental research, communication, and home appliances. Even though, there are still some subtle features of electromagnetic field known to us a century ago, yet to be utilized. It is because of the technical complexities to sense three dimensional electromagnetic field. An important characteristic of electromagnetic field is its orbital angular momentum (OAM). The angular momentum consists of two distinct parts; intrinsic part associated with the wave polarization or spin, and the extrinsic part associated with the orbital angular momentum (OAM). The orbital angular momentum (OAM) is inherited by helically phased light or helical (twisted) electric field. The investigations of Allen on lasers carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM), has initiated a new scientific and technological advancement in various growing fields, such as microscopy and imaging, atomic and nano-particle manipulation, ultra-fast optical communications, quantum computing, ionospheric radar facility to observe 3D plasma dynamics in ionosphere, photonic crystal fibre, OAM entanglement of two photons, twisted gravitational waves, ultra-intense twisted laser pulses and astrophysics. Recently, the plasma modes are also investigated with orbital angular momentum. The production of electron vortex beams and its applications are indicated by Verbeeck et al. The magnetic tornadoes (rotating magnetic field structures) exhibit three types of morphology i.e., spiral, ring and split. Leyser pumped helical radio beam carrying OAM into the Ionospheric plasma under High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) and characteristic ring shaped morphology is obtained by the optical emission spectrum of pumped plasma turbulence. The scattering phenomenon like (stimulated Raman and Brillouin backscattering) is observed to be responsible for the interaction between electrostatic and electromagnetic waves through orbital angular momentum. The

  4. Millimeter-Wave Polarimeters Using Kinetic Inductance Detectors for TolTEC and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austermann, J. E.; Beall, J. A.; Bryan, S. A.; Dober, B.; Gao, J.; Hilton, G.; Hubmayr, J.; Mauskopf, P.; McKenney, C. M.; Simon, S. M.; Ullom, J. N.; Vissers, M. R.; Wilson, G. W.

    2018-05-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) provide a compelling path forward to the large-format polarimeter, imaging, and spectrometer arrays needed for next-generation experiments in millimeter-wave cosmology and astronomy. We describe the development of feedhorn-coupled MKID detectors for the TolTEC millimeter-wave imaging polarimeter being constructed for the 50-m Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT). Observations with TolTEC are planned to begin in early 2019. TolTEC will comprise ˜ 7000 polarization-sensitive MKIDs and will represent the first MKID arrays fabricated and deployed on monolithic 150 mm diameter silicon wafers—a critical step toward future large-scale experiments with over 10^5 detectors. TolTEC will operate in observational bands at 1.1, 1.4, and 2.0 mm and will use dichroic filters to define a physically independent focal plane for each passband, thus allowing the polarimeters to use simple, direct-absorption inductive structures that are impedance matched to incident radiation. This work is part of a larger program at NIST-Boulder to develop MKID-based detector technologies for use over a wide range of photon energies spanning millimeter-waves to X-rays. We present the detailed pixel layout and describe the methods, tools, and flexible design parameters that allow this solution to be optimized for use anywhere in the millimeter and sub-millimeter bands. We also present measurements of prototype devices operating in the 1.1 mm band and compare the observed optical performance to that predicted from models and simulations.

  5. Measurement of Dielectric Properties at 75 - 325 GHz using a Vector Network Analyzer and Full Wave Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Khanal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fast and easy to use method to determine permittivity and loss tangent in the frequency range of 75 to 325 GHz. To obtain the permittivity and the loss tangent of the test material, the reflection and transmission S-parameters of a waveguide section filled with the test material are measured using a vector network analyzer and then compared with the simulated plots from a full wave simulator (HFSS, or alternatively the measurement results are used in mathematical formulas. The results are coherent over multiple waveguide bands.

  6. Dependence of Whistler-mode Wave Induced Electron Precipitation on k-vector Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, P.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.; Bortnik, J.

    2007-12-01

    Whistler-mode waves that are either spontaneously generated in-situ (i.e., chorus), or externally injected (lightning, VLF transmitters) are known to be responsible for the loss of radiation belt electrons. An important determinant in the quantification of this loss is the dependence of the cyclotron resonant pitch angle scattering on the initial wave normal angles of the driving waves. Inan et al. (U.S. Inan et al., Controlled precipitation of radiation belt electrons, Journal of Geophysical Research-Space Physics, 108 (A5), 1186, doi: 10.1029/2002JA009580, 2003.) suggested that the lifetime of > 1 MeV electrons in the inner radiation belts might be moderated by in situ injection of VLF whistler mode waves at frequencies of a few kHz. The formulation of Wang and Bell (T.N.C. Wang and T.F. Bell, Radiation resisitance of a short dipole immersed in a cold magnetoionic medium, Radio Science, 4(2), 167-177, February 1969) for an electric dipole antenna located in the inner magnetosphere established that most of the radiated power is concentrated in waves whose wave normal angles lie near the local resonance cone. Such waves, compared to those injected at less oblique initial wave normal angles, undergo several more magnetospheric reflections, persist in the magnetospheric cavity for longer periods of time, and resonate with electrons of higher energies. Accordingly, such waves may be highly effective in contributing to the loss of electrons from the inner belt and slot regions [Inan et al., 2006]. Nevertheless, it has been noted (Inan et al. [2006], Inan and Bell [1991] and Albert [1999]) that > 1 MeV electrons may not be effectively scattered by waves propagating with very high wave normal angles, due to the generally reduced gyroresonant diffusion coefficients for wave normals near the resonance cone. We use the Stanford 2D VLF raytracing program to determine the energetic electron pitch angle scattering and the precipitated flux signatures that would be detected for

  7. Measurement of guided mode wave vectors by analysis of the transfer matrix obtained with multi-emitters and multi-receivers in contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minonzio, Jean-Gabriel; Talmant, Maryline; Laugier, Pascal, E-mail: jean-gabriel.minonzio@upmc.fr [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7623, LIP, 15 rue de l' ecole de medecine F-75005, Paris (France)

    2011-01-01

    Different quantitative ultrasound techniques are currently developed for clinical assessment of human bone status. This paper is dedicated to axial transmission: emitters and receivers are linearly arranged on the same side of the skeletal site, preferentially the forearm. In several clinical studies, the signal velocity of the earliest temporal event has been shown to discriminate osteoporotic patients from healthy subjects. However, a multi parameter approach might be relevant to improve bone diagnosis and this be could be achieved by accurate measurement of guided waves wave vectors. For clinical purposes and easy access to the measurement site, the length probe is limited to about 10 mm. The limited number of acquisition scan points on such a short distance reduces the efficiency of conventional signal processing techniques, such as spatio-temporal Fourier transform. The performance of time-frequency techniques was shown to be moderate in other studies. Thus, optimised signal processing is a critical point for a reliable estimate of guided mode wave vectors. Toward this end, a technique, taking benefit of using both multiple emitters and multiple receivers, is proposed. The guided mode wave vectors are obtained using a projection in the singular vectors basis. Those are determined by the singular values decomposition of the transmission matrix between the two arrays at different frequencies. This technique enables us to recover accurately guided waves wave vectors for moderately large array.

  8. High Frame-Rate Blood Vector Velocity Imaging Using Plane Waves: Simulations and Preliminary Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    2008-01-01

    ) The ultrasound is not focused during the transmissions of the ultrasound signals; 2) A 13-bit Barker code is transmitted simultaneously from each transducer element; and 3) The 2-D vector velocity of the blood is estimated using 2-D cross-correlation. A parameter study was performed using the Field II program......, and performance of the method was investigated when a virtual blood vessel was scanned by a linear array transducer. An improved parameter set for the method was identified from the parameter study, and a flow rig measurement was performed using the same improved setup as in the simulations. Finally, the common...... carotid artery of a healthy male was scanned with a scan sequence that satisfies the limits set by the Food and Drug Administration. Vector velocity images were obtained with a frame-rate of 100 Hz where 40 speckle images are used for each vector velocity image. It was found that the blood flow...

  9. Modelling the effect of acoustic waves on the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformation in a solution: Including mass transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqshenas, S R; Ford, I J; Saffari, N

    2018-01-14

    Effects of acoustic waves on a phase transformation in a metastable phase were investigated in our previous work [S. R. Haqshenas, I. J. Ford, and N. Saffari, "Modelling the effect of acoustic waves on nucleation," J. Chem. Phys. 145, 024315 (2016)]. We developed a non-equimolar dividing surface cluster model and employed it to determine the thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallisation induced by an acoustic field in a mass-conserved system. In the present work, we developed a master equation based on a hybrid Szilard-Fokker-Planck model, which accounts for mass transportation due to acoustic waves. This model can determine the kinetics of nucleation and the early stage of growth of clusters including the Ostwald ripening phenomenon. It was solved numerically to calculate the kinetics of an isothermal sonocrystallisation process in a system with mass transportation. The simulation results show that the effect of mass transportation for different excitations depends on the waveform as well as the imposed boundary conditions and tends to be noticeable in the case of shock waves. The derivations are generic and can be used with any acoustic source and waveform.

  10. Steady bound electromagnetic eigenstate arises in a homogeneous isotropic linear metamaterial with zero-real-part-of-impedance and nonzero-imaginary-part-of-wave-vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiangwei; Dai, Yuyao; Yan, Lin; Zhao, Huimin

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we shall demonstrate theoretically that steady bound electromagnetic eigenstate can arise in an infinite homogeneous isotropic linear metamaterial with zero-real-part-of-impedance and nonzero-imaginary-part-of-wave-vector, which is partly attributed to that, here, nonzero-imaginary-part-of-wave-vector is not involved with energy losses or gain. Altering value of real-part-of-impedance of the metamaterial, the bound electromagnetic eigenstate may become to be a progressive wave. Our work may be useful to further understand energy conversion and conservation properties of electromagnetic wave in the dispersive and absorptive medium and provides a feasible route to stop, store and release electromagnetic wave (light) conveniently by using metamaterial with near-zero-real-part-of-impedance.

  11. Effects of heavy ion temperature on low-frequency kinetic Alfven waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L.; Wu, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    Heavy ion-electron (or proton) temperature ratio varies in a wide range in the solar and space environment. In this paper, proton and heavy ion temperatures are included in a three-fluid plasma model. For the specified parameters, low-frequency (<< heavy ion gyrofrequency) kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) with sub- and super-Alfvenic speeds are found to coexist in the same plasma environment. Our results show that the temperature ratio of heavy ions to electrons can considerably affect the dispersion, propagation, and electromagnetic polarizations of the KAWs. In particular, the temperature ratio can increase the ratio of parallel to perpendicular electric fields and the normalized electric to magnetic field ratio, the variations of which are greatly different in regions with a high heavy ion temperature and with a low one. The results may help to understand the physical mechanism of some energization processes of heavy ions in the solar and space plasma environment. Effects of the ratio of electron thermal to Alfven speeds and the heavy ion abundance on these parameters are also discussed.

  12. The Newton constant and gravitational waves in some vector field adjusting mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santillán, Osvaldo P. [IMAS (UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Scornavacche, Marina, E-mail: firenzecita@hotmail.com, E-mail: marina.scorna@hotmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina)

    2017-10-01

    At the present, there exist some Lorentz breaking scenarios which explain the smallness of the cosmological constant at the present era [1]–[2]. An important aspect to analyze is the propagation of gravitational waves and the screening or enhancement of the Newton constant G {sub N} in these models. The problem is that the Lorentz symmetry breaking terms may induce an unacceptable value of the Newton constant G {sub N} or introduce longitudinal modes in the gravitational wave propagation. Furthermore this breaking may spoil the standard dispersion relation ω= ck . In [3] the authors have presented a model suggesting that the behavior of the gravitational constant is correct for asymptotic times. In the present work, an explicit checking is made and we finally agree with these claims. Furthermore, it is suggested that the gravitational waves are also well behaved for large times. In the process, some new models with the same behavior are obtained, thus enlarging the list of possible adjustment mechanisms.

  13. Generation of two-temporal-mode photon states by vector four-wave mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mckinstrie, C. J.; Christensen, J. B.; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Photon pair states and multiple-photon squeezed states have many applications in quantum information science. In this paper, Green functions are derived for spontaneous four-wave mixing in the low-and high-gain regimes. Nondegenerate four-wave mixing in a strongly-birefringent medium generates...... signal and idler photons that are associated with only one pair of temporal (Schmidt) modes, for a wide range of pump powers and arbitrary pump shapes. The Schmidt coefficients (expected photon numbers) depend sensitively on the pump powers, and the Schmidt functions (shapes of the photon wavepackets...

  14. Near-Bed Turbulent Kinetic Energy Budget Under a Large-Scale Plunging Breaking Wave Over a Fixed Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zanden, Joep; van der A, Dominic A.; Cáceres, Iván.; Hurther, David; McLelland, Stuart J.; Ribberink, Jan S.; O'Donoghue, Tom

    2018-02-01

    Hydrodynamics under regular plunging breaking waves over a fixed breaker bar were studied in a large-scale wave flume. A previous paper reported on the outer flow hydrodynamics; the present paper focuses on the turbulence dynamics near the bed (up to 0.10 m from the bed). Velocities were measured with high spatial and temporal resolution using a two component laser Doppler anemometer. The results show that even at close distance from the bed (1 mm), the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) increases by a factor five between the shoaling, and breaking regions because of invasion of wave breaking turbulence. The sign and phase behavior of the time-dependent Reynolds shear stresses at elevations up to approximately 0.02 m from the bed (roughly twice the elevation of the boundary layer overshoot) are mainly controlled by local bed-shear-generated turbulence, but at higher elevations Reynolds stresses are controlled by wave breaking turbulence. The measurements are subsequently analyzed to investigate the TKE budget at wave-averaged and intrawave time scales. Horizontal and vertical turbulence advection, production, and dissipation are the major terms. A two-dimensional wave-averaged circulation drives advection of wave breaking turbulence through the near-bed layer, resulting in a net downward influx in the bar trough region, followed by seaward advection along the bar's shoreward slope, and an upward outflux above the bar crest. The strongly nonuniform flow across the bar combined with the presence of anisotropic turbulence enhances turbulent production rates near the bed.

  15. Coherent search of continuous gravitational wave signals: extension of the 5-vectors method to a network of detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astone, P; Colla, A; Frasca, S; Palomba, C; D'Antonio, S

    2012-01-01

    We describe the extension to multiple datasets of a coherent method for the search of continuous gravitational wave signals, based on the computation of 5-vectors. In particular, we show how to coherently combine different datasets belonging to the same detector or to different detectors. In the latter case the coherent combination is the way to have the maximum increase in signal-to-noise ratio. If the datasets belong to the same detector the advantage comes mainly from the properties of a quantity called coherence which is helpful (in both cases, in fact) in rejecting false candidates. The method has been tested searching for simulated signals injected in Gaussian noise and the results of the simulations are discussed.

  16. Dominant phonon wave vectors and strain-induced splitting of the 2D Raman mode of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Rohit; Bonini, Nicola; Marzari, Nicola; Reich, Stephanie

    2012-03-01

    The dominant phonon wave vectors q* probed by the 2D Raman mode of pristine and uniaxially strained graphene are determined via a combination of ab initio calculations and a full two-dimensional integration of the transition matrix. We show that q* are highly anisotropic and rotate about K with the polarizer and analyzer condition relative to the lattice. The corresponding phonon-mediated electronic transitions show a finite component along K-Γ that sensitively determines q*. We invalidate the notion of “inner” and “outer” processes. The characteristic splitting of the 2D mode of graphene under uniaxial tensile strain and given polarizer and analyzer setting is correctly predicted only if the strain-induced distortion and red-shift of the in-plane transverse optical (iTO) phonon dispersion as well as the changes in the electronic band structure are taken into account.

  17. Kinetic Alfven Waves and the Depletion of the Thermal Population in Extragalactic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafelice, L. C.; Opher, R.

    1990-11-01

    evident that both problems are intimately related to one another. Jafe- lice and Opher (1987a)(Astrophys. Space Sci. 137, 303)showed that an abundant generation of kinetic Alfven waves (KAw) within EJ and ERS is expected. In the present work we study the chain of processes: a) KAW accelerate thermal electrons along the background magnetic field producing suprathermal runaway electrons; b) which generate Langmuir waves and c) which in turn further accelerate a fraction of the runaway electrons to moderately relativistic energies. We show that assuming that there is no other source of a thermal population but the original one, the above sequence of processes can account for the consumption of thermal electrons in a time scale the source lifetime. Key o : GALAXIES-JETS - HYDROMAGNETICS

  18. A DUAL-BAND MILLIMETER-WAVE KINETIC INDUCTANCE CAMERA FOR THE IRAM 30 m TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monfardini, A.; Benoit, A.; Bideaud, A.; Swenson, L.; Cruciani, A.; Camus, P.; Hoffmann, C.; Desert, F. X.; Doyle, S.; Ade, P.; Mauskopf, P.; Tucker, C.; Roesch, M.; Leclercq, S.; Schuster, K. F.; Endo, A.; Baryshev, A.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Ferrari, L.; Yates, S. J. C

    2011-01-01

    The Neel IRAM KIDs Array (NIKA) is a fully integrated measurement system based on kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) currently being developed for millimeter wave astronomy. The instrument includes dual-band optics allowing simultaneous imaging at 150 GHz and 220 GHz. The imaging sensors consist of two spatially separated arrays of KIDs. The first array, mounted on the 150 GHz branch, is composed of 144 lumped-element KIDs. The second array (220 GHz) consists of 256 antenna-coupled KIDs. Each of the arrays is sensitive to a single polarization; the band splitting is achieved by using a grid polarizer. The optics and sensors are mounted in a custom dilution cryostat, with an operating temperature of ∼70 mK. Electronic readout is realized using frequency multiplexing and a transmission line geometry consisting of a coaxial cable connected in series with the sensor array and a low-noise 4 K amplifier. The dual-band NIKA was successfully tested in 2010 October at the Institute for Millimetric Radio Astronomy (IRAM) 30 m telescope at Pico Veleta, Spain, performing in-line with laboratory predictions. An optical NEP was then calculated to be around 2 x 10 -16 W Hz -1/2 (at 1 Hz) while under a background loading of approximately 4 pW pixel -1 . This improvement in comparison with a preliminary run (2009) verifies that NIKA is approaching the target sensitivity for photon-noise limited ground-based detectors. Taking advantage of the larger arrays and increased sensitivity, a number of scientifically relevant faint and extended objects were then imaged including the Galactic Center SgrB2 (FIR1), the radio galaxy Cygnus A, and the NGC1068 Seyfert galaxy. These targets were all observed simultaneously in the 150 GHz and 220 GHz atmospheric windows.

  19. Solar Plasma Radio Emission in the Presence of Imbalanced Turbulence of Kinetic-Scale Alfvén Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubchyk, O.; Kontar, E. P.; Voitenko, Y. M.; Bian, N. H.; Melrose, D. B.

    2017-09-01

    We study the influence of kinetic-scale Alfvénic turbulence on the generation of plasma radio emission in the solar coronal regions where the ratio β of plasma to magnetic pressure is lower than the electron-to-ion mass ratio me/mi. The present study is motivated by the phenomenon of solar type I radio storms that are associated with the strong magnetic field of active regions. The measured brightness temperature of the type I storms can be up to 10^{10} K for continuum emission, and can exceed 10^{11} K for type I bursts. At present, there is no generally accepted theory explaining such high brightness temperatures and some other properties of the type I storms. We propose a model with an imbalanced turbulence of kinetic-scale Alfvén waves that produce an asymmetric quasi-linear plateau on the upper half of the electron velocity distribution. The Landau damping of resonant Langmuir waves is suppressed and their amplitudes grow spontaneously above the thermal level. The estimated saturation level of Langmuir waves is high enough to generate observed type I radio emission at the fundamental plasma frequency. Harmonic emission does not appear in our model because the backward-propagating Langmuir waves undergo strong Landau damping. Our model predicts 100% polarization in the sense of the ordinary (o-) mode of type I emission.

  20. A Maxwell-vector p-wave holographic superconductor in a particular background AdS black hole metric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We study the p-wave holographic superconductor for AdS black holes with planar event horizon topology for a particular Lovelock gravity, in which the action is characterized by a self-interacting scalar field nonminimally coupled to the gravity theory which is labeled by an integer k. As the Lovelock theory of gravity is the most general metric theory of gravity based on the fundamental assumptions of general relativity, it is a desirable theory to describe the higher dimensional spacetime geometry. The present work is devoted to studying the properties of the p-wave holographic superconductor by including a Maxwell field which nonminimally couples to a complex vector field in a higher dimensional background metric. In the probe limit, we find that the critical temperature decreases with the increase of the index k of the background black hole metric, which shows that a larger k makes it harder for the condensation to form. We also observe that the index k affects the conductivity and the gap frequency of the holographic superconductors.

  1. Towards an ab initio evaluation of the wave - vector- and frequency-dependent dielectric response function for crystalline water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaider, M [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA). Radiological Research Labs.; Fry, J L; Orr, D E [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (USA)

    1990-01-01

    We describe an ab initio calculation of the properties of energy loss by electrons in crystalline water using its dielectric response function, {epsilon}(q,{omega}), where q and {omega} are, respectively, the wave vector and frequency. The calculation was performed on a model system (cubic ice) in order to take advantage of its ordered structure (i.e. Block's theorem), but also because of evidence that liquid water in biological systems ('structured' water) contains residues with tetrahedral structure (i.e. ice) over time scales of at least 10{sup -11} s. The main features of the calculation are (a) {epsilon}(q,{omega}) is evaluated in the random phase approximation (we used the expression given by Ehrenreich and Cohen), (b) the crystal potential is expressed as a sum of water-molecule self-consistent potentials, and (c) wave functions are expanded using tight binding functions (ultimately employing a Gaussian base set). A total of seven states (bands), five occupied and two conduction, are considered. We report the band structure and the density of states of the crystal, as well as values of {epsilon}(q,{omega}) at selected values of q and {omega}. Results are compared with energy loss measurements and with absorption spectra (XPS, UPS, and VUV data). The possibility of using an empirical combination of molecular potentials as a phenomenological Hamiltonian is also examined. (author).

  2. A Maxwell-vector p-wave holographic superconductor in a particular background AdS black hole metric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Dan; Yu, Hongwei; Pan, Qiyuan; Lin, Kai; Qian, Wei-Liang

    2018-05-01

    We study the p-wave holographic superconductor for AdS black holes with planar event horizon topology for a particular Lovelock gravity, in which the action is characterized by a self-interacting scalar field nonminimally coupled to the gravity theory which is labeled by an integer k. As the Lovelock theory of gravity is the most general metric theory of gravity based on the fundamental assumptions of general relativity, it is a desirable theory to describe the higher dimensional spacetime geometry. The present work is devoted to studying the properties of the p-wave holographic superconductor by including a Maxwell field which nonminimally couples to a complex vector field in a higher dimensional background metric. In the probe limit, we find that the critical temperature decreases with the increase of the index k of the background black hole metric, which shows that a larger k makes it harder for the condensation to form. We also observe that the index k affects the conductivity and the gap frequency of the holographic superconductors.

  3. Electromagnetic fluctuation spectra of collective oscillations in magnetized Maxwellian plasmas for parallel wave vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafin, S.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-05-01

    The general electromagnetic fluctuation theory for magnetized plasmas is used to calculate the steady-state wave number spectra and total electromagnetic field strength of low-frequency collective weakly damped eigenmodes with parallel wavevectors in a Maxwellian electron-proton plasma. These result from the equilibrium of spontaneous emission and collisionless damping, and they represent the minimum electromagnetic fluctuations guaranteed in quiet thermal space plasmas, including the interstellar and interplanetary medium. Depending on the plasma beta, the ratio of |δB |/B0 can be as high as 10-12 .

  4. Renninger's Gedankenexperiment, the collapse of the wave function in a rigid quantum metamaterial and the reality of the quantum state vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savel'ev, Sergey E; Zagoskin, Alexandre M

    2018-06-25

    A popular interpretation of the "collapse" of the wave function is as being the result of a local interaction ("measurement") of the quantum system with a macroscopic system ("detector"), with the ensuing loss of phase coherence between macroscopically distinct components of its quantum state vector. Nevetheless as early as in 1953 Renninger suggested a Gedankenexperiment, in which the collapse is triggered by non-observation of one of two mutually exclusive outcomes of the measurement, i.e., in the absence of interaction of the quantum system with the detector. This provided a powerful argument in favour of "physical reality" of (nonlocal) quantum state vector. In this paper we consider a possible version of Renninger's experiment using the light propagation through a birefringent quantum metamaterial. Its realization would provide a clear visualization of a wave function collapse produced by a "non-measurement", and make the concept of a physically real quantum state vector more acceptable.

  5. Condition Assessment of Foundation Piles and Utility Poles Based on Guided Wave Propagation Using a Network of Tactile Transducers and Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Dackermann

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel non-destructive testing and health monitoring system using a network of tactile transducers and accelerometers for the condition assessment and damage classification of foundation piles and utility poles. While in traditional pile integrity testing an impact hammer with broadband frequency excitation is typically used, the proposed testing system utilizes an innovative excitation system based on a network of tactile transducers to induce controlled narrow-band frequency stress waves. Thereby, the simultaneous excitation of multiple stress wave types and modes is avoided (or at least reduced, and targeted wave forms can be generated. The new testing system enables the testing and monitoring of foundation piles and utility poles where the top is inaccessible, making the new testing system suitable, for example, for the condition assessment of pile structures with obstructed heads and of poles with live wires. For system validation, the new system was experimentally tested on nine timber and concrete poles that were inflicted with several types of damage. The tactile transducers were excited with continuous sine wave signals of 1 kHz frequency. Support vector machines were employed together with advanced signal processing algorithms to distinguish recorded stress wave signals from pole structures with different types of damage. The results show that using fast Fourier transform signals, combined with principal component analysis as the input feature vector for support vector machine (SVM classifiers with different kernel functions, can achieve damage classification with accuracies of 92.5% ± 7.5%.

  6. Fast Plane Wave 2-D Vector Flow Imaging Using Transverse Oscillation and Directional Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2017-01-01

    load, which is 4.6 times larger than for TO and seven times smaller than for conventional DB. Steered plane wave transmissions are employed for high frame rate imaging, and parabolic flow with a peak velocity of 0.5 m/s is simulated in straight vessels at beamto- flow angles from 45 to 90. The TO......-DB method estimates the angle with a bias and standard deviation (SD) less than 2, and the SD of the velocity magnitude is less than 2%. When using only TO, the SD of the angle ranges from 2 to 17 and for the velocity magnitude up to 7%. Bias of the velocity magnitude is within 2% for TO and slightly larger...

  7. Effect of Landau damping on kinetic Alfven and ion-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized nonthermal plasma with warm ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Anup; Das, K.P.

    2002-01-01

    The evolution equations describing both kinetic Alfven wave and ion-acoustic wave in a nonthermal magnetized plasma with warm ions including weak nonlinearity and weak dispersion with the effect of Landau damping have been derived. These equations reduce to two coupled equations constituting the KdV-ZK (Korteweg-de Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov) equation for both kinetic Alfven wave and ion-acoustic wave, including an extra term accounting for the effect of Landau damping. When the coefficient of the nonlinear term of the evolution equation for ion-acoustic wave vanishes, the nonlinear behavior of ion-acoustic wave, including the effect of Landau damping, is described by two coupled equations constituting the modified KdV-ZK (MKdV-ZK) equation, including an extra term accounting for the effect of Landau damping. It is found that there is no effect of Landau damping on the solitary structures of the kinetic Alfven wave. Both the macroscopic evolution equations for the ion-acoustic wave admits solitary wave solutions, the former having a sech 2 profile and the latter having a sech profile. In either case, it is found that the amplitude of the ion-acoustic solitary wave decreases slowly with time

  8. Structural changes of small amplitude kinetic Alfvén solitary waves due to second-order corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Cheong R.

    2015-01-01

    The structural changes of kinetic Alfvén solitary waves (KASWs) due to higher-order terms are investigated. While the first-order differential equation for KASWs provides the dispersion relation for kinetic Alfvén waves, the second-order differential equation describes the structural changes of the solitary waves due to higher-order nonlinearity. The reductive perturbation method is used to obtain the second-order and third-order partial differential equations; then, Kodama and Taniuti's technique [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 45, 298 (1978)] is applied in order to remove the secularities in the third-order differential equations and derive a linear second-order inhomogeneous differential equation. The solution to this new second-order equation indicates that, as the amplitude increases, the hump-type Korteweg-de Vries solution is concentrated more around the center position of the soliton and that dip-type structures form near the two edges of the soliton. This result has a close relationship with the interpretation of the complex KASW structures observed in space with satellites

  9. Satellite and Ground Signatures of Kinetic and Inertial Scale ULF Alfven Waves Propagating in Warm Plasma in Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, R.; Sydorenko, D.

    2015-12-01

    Results from a 3D global numerical model of Alfven wave propagation in a warm multi-species plasma in Earth's magnetosphere are presented. The model uses spherical coordinates, accounts for a non-dipole magnetic field, vertical structure of the ionosphere, and an air gap below the ionosphere. A realistic density model is used. Below the exobase altitude (2000 km) the densities and the temperatures of electrons, ions, and neutrals are obtained from the IRI and MSIS models. Above the exobase, ballistic (originating from the ionosphere and returning to ionosphere) and trapped (bouncing between two reflection points above the ionosphere) electron populations are considered similar to [Pierrard and Stegen (2008), JGR, v.113, A10209]. Plasma parameters at the exobase provided by the IRI are the boundary conditions for the ballistic electrons while the [Carpenter and Anderson (1992), JGR, v.97, p.1097] model of equatorial electron density defines parameters of the trapped electron population. In the simulations that are presented, Alfven waves with frequencies from 1 Hz to 0.01 Hz and finite azimuthal wavenumbers are excited in the magnetosphere and compared with Van Allen Probes data and ground-based observations from the CARISMA array of ground magnetometers. When short perpendicular scale waves reflect form the ionosphere, compressional Alfven waves are observed to propagate across the geomagnetic field in the ionospheric waveguide [e.g., Lysak (1999), JGR, v.104, p.10017]. Signals produced by the waves on the ground are discussed. The wave model is also applied to interpret recent Van Allen Probes observations of kinetic scale ULF waves that are associated with radiation belt electron dynamics and energetic particle injections.

  10. Propagation of electro-kinetic waves in magnetized GaN semiconductor with nano-sized ion colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Ajay [Government College, Garoth, Dist. Mandsaur (M P) (India); Sharma, Giriraj, E-mail: grsharma@gmail.com [SRJ Government Girls’ College, Neemuch (M P) (India); Jat, K. L. [Swami Vivekanand Government P G College, Neemuch (M P) (India); Rishi, M. P. [Shahid Bhagat Singh Government P G College, Jaora, Dist Ratlam (M P) (India)

    2015-07-31

    Based on hydrodynamic model of multi-component plasma, an analytical study on propagation of longitudinal electro-kinetic (LEK) waves in wurtzite and zincblende structures of GaN is carried out. Nano-sized ion colloids (NICs) are embedded in the sample by the technique of ion-implantation. The implanted NICs are considered massive by an order as compared to the host lattice points and do not participate in Based LEK perturbations. Though, the NICs are continuously bombarded by the electrons as well as the holes yet, the former acquires a net negative charge owing to relatively higher mobility of electrons and consequently results into depletion of electron density in the medium. It i s found that the presence of charged NICs significantly modifies the dispersion and amplification characteristics of LEK waves in magnetized GaN semiconductor plasma and their role becomes increasingly effective as the fraction of charge on them increases.

  11. Dispersion and absorption of longitudinal electro-kinetic wave in ion-implanted GaN semiconductor plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, Dilip [Government P G Madhav Science College, Ujjain (M P) (India); Sharma, Giriraj, E-mail: grsharma@gmail.com [SRJ Government Girls’ College, Neemuch (M P) (India); Saxena, Ajay [Government College, Garoth, Dist. Mandsaur (M P) (India); Jadhav, Akhilesh [Government J Yoganandam Chhattisgarh College, Raipur (C G) (India)

    2015-07-31

    An analytical study on propagation characteristics of longitudinal electro-kinetic (LEK) waves is presented. Based on multi-fluid model of plasma, we have derived a dispersion relation for LEK waves in colloid laden GaN semiconductor plasmas. It is assumed that ions are implanted to form colloids in the GaN sample. The colloids are continuously bombarded by the plasma particles and stick on them, but they acquire a net negative charge due to relatively higher mobility of electrons. It is found from the dispersion relation that the presence of charged colloids not only modifies the existing modes but also supports new novel modes of LEKWs. It is hoped that the study would enhance understanding on dispersion and absorption of LEKWs and help in singling out the appropriate configurations in which GaN crystal would be better suited for fabrication of microwave devices.

  12. Propagation of electro-kinetic waves in magnetized GaN semiconductor with nano-sized ion colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Ajay; Sharma, Giriraj; Jat, K. L.; Rishi, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    Based on hydrodynamic model of multi-component plasma, an analytical study on propagation of longitudinal electro-kinetic (LEK) waves in wurtzite and zincblende structures of GaN is carried out. Nano-sized ion colloids (NICs) are embedded in the sample by the technique of ion-implantation. The implanted NICs are considered massive by an order as compared to the host lattice points and do not participate in Based LEK perturbations. Though, the NICs are continuously bombarded by the electrons as well as the holes yet, the former acquires a net negative charge owing to relatively higher mobility of electrons and consequently results into depletion of electron density in the medium. It i s found that the presence of charged NICs significantly modifies the dispersion and amplification characteristics of LEK waves in magnetized GaN semiconductor plasma and their role becomes increasingly effective as the fraction of charge on them increases

  13. Current-driven instabilities of the kinetic shear Alfven wave: Application to reversed field pinches and spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhofer, D.D.; Perkins, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetic Alfven wave is studied in a cylindrical force-free plasma with self-consistent magnetic fields. This equilibrium represents a reversed field pinch or a spheromak. The stability of the wave is found to depend on the ratio of the electron drift velocity to the Alfven velocity. This ratio varies inversely with the square root of the plasma line density. The critical line density using the Spitzer--Harm electron distribution function is found for reversed field pinches with deuterium plasmas to be approximately 2 x 10 18 and is 5 x 10 17 m -1 in spheromaks with hydrogen plasmas. The critical line density is in reasonable agreement with experimental data for reversed field pinches

  14. A maximally informative version of inelastic scattering of electromagnetic waves by Langmuir waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erofeev, V. I.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of informativeness of nonlinear plasma physics scenarios is explained. Natural ideas of developing highly informative models of plasma kinetics are spelled out. A maximally informative version of inelastic scattering of electromagnetic waves by Langmuir waves in a weakly turbulent inhomogeneous plasma is developed with consideration of possible changes in wave polarization. In addition, a new formula for wave drift in spatial positions and wave vectors is derived. New scenarios of the respective wave drift and inelastic scattering are compared with the previous visions. The results indicate the need for further revision of the traditional understanding of nonlinear plasma phenomena

  15. Computation and analysis of the transverse current autocorrelation function, Ct(k,t), for small wave vectors: A molecular-dynamics study for a Lennard-Jones fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsang, R.; Hoheisel, C.

    1987-02-01

    Molecular-dynamics (MD) calculations are reported for three thermodynamic states of a Lennard-Jones fluid. Systems of 2048 particles and 105 integration steps were used. The transverse current autocorrelation function, Ct(k,t), has been determined for wave vectors of the range 0.5viscosities which showed a systematic behavior as a function of k. Extrapolation to the hydrodynamic region at k=0 gave shear viscosity coefficients in good agreement with direct Green-Kubo results obtained in previous work. The two-exponential model fit for the memory function proposed by other authors does not provide a reasonable description of the MD results, as the fit parameters show no systematic wave-vector dependence, although the Ct(k,t) functions are somewhat better fitted. Similarly, the semiempirical interpolation formula for the decay time based on the viscoelastic concept proposed by Akcasu and Daniels fails to reproduce the correct k dependence for the wavelength range investigated herein.

  16. Modified spin-wave theory with ordering vector optimization: frustrated bosons on the spatially anisotropic triangular lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauke, Philipp [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Meditarranean Technology Park, E-08860 Castelldefels, Barcelona (Spain); Roscilde, Tommaso [Laboratoire de Physique, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, 46 Allee d' Italie, F-69007 Lyon (France); Murg, Valentin; Ignacio Cirac, J; Schmied, Roman, E-mail: Philipp.Hauke@icfo.e [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    We investigate a system of frustrated hardcore bosons, modeled by an XY antiferromagnet on the spatially anisotropic triangular lattice, using Takahashi's modified spin-wave (MSW) theory. In particular, we implement ordering vector optimization on the ordered reference state of MSW theory, which leads to significant improvement of the theory and accounts for quantum corrections to the classically ordered state. The MSW results at zero temperature compare favorably to exact diagonalization (ED) and projected entangled-pair state (PEPS) calculations. The resulting zero-temperature phase diagram includes a one-dimensional (1D) quasi-ordered phase, a 2D Neel ordered phase and a 2D spiraling ordered phase. Strong indications coming from the ED and PEPS calculations, as well as from the breakdown of MSW theory, suggest that the various ordered or quasi-ordered phases are separated by spin-liquid phases with short-range correlations, in analogy to what has been predicted for the Heisenberg model on the same lattice. Within MSW theory, we also explore the finite-temperature phase diagram. In agreement with the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) theory, we find that zero-temperature long-range-ordered phases turn into quasi-ordered phases (up to a BKT transition temperature), while zero-temperature quasi-ordered phases become short-range correlated at finite temperature. These results show that, despite its simplicity, MSW theory is very well suited to describing ordered and quasi-ordered phases of frustrated XY spins (or, equivalently, of frustrated lattice bosons) both at zero and finite temperatures. While MSW theory, just as other theoretical methods, cannot describe spin-liquid phases, its breakdown provides a fast and reliable method for singling out Hamiltonians that may feature these intriguing quantum phases. We thus suggest a tool for guiding our search for interesting systems whose properties are necessarily studied with a physical quantum simulator

  17. Two-dimensional kinetic analysis on the ionization waves in a low current discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Fujii, Masaharu; Noda, Shozou; Miura, Kousuke; Imazu, Shingo.

    1982-01-01

    In the research on the ionization waves produced in the positive column in a low pressure discharge, theoretical analyses have been made since long ago using mainly the fluid theory. However, the experimental properties that cannot be explained with the fluid theory have been found lately. For example, it has been shown experimentally that the product of longitudinal electric field E and the wavelength lambda of ionization waves becomes some specific values depending on the kinds of gas as one of the characteristics of the ionization waves produced in the positive column plasma in rare gas glow discharge, but these specific values of E-lambda cannot be explained with the fluid theory. In this paper, the perturbation component of electron energy distribution function accompanying ionization waves was derived from a two-dimensional Boltzmann equation which takes the radial non-uniformity into account, to consider the E-lambda values of ionization waves from the relative equation between electron density and the perturbation component of an electric field. The following results were obtained. The relative equation between electron density and the perturbation component of an electric field, which cannot be derived from the fluid theory, was able to be obtained; the values of E-lambda product agreed with the experimental results better than one-dimensional analysis; The steeper the shape of radial potential distribution, the more likely the resonance occurrence and the larger the E-lambda product; and so forth. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Kinetic theory of interaction of high frequency waves with a rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, S. C.; Chan, V. S.; Chu, M. S.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.

    2000-01-01

    The equations of motion of charged particles of a strongly magnetized flowing plasma under the influence of high frequency waves are derived in the guiding center approximation. A quasilinear theory of the interactions of waves with rotating plasmas is formulated. This is applied to investigate the effect of radio frequency waves on a rotating tokamak plasma with a heated minority species. The angular momentum drive is mainly due to the rf-induced radial minority current. The return current by the bulk plasma gives an equal and opposite rotation drive on the bulk. Using moment equations and a small banana width approximation, the JxB drive was evaluated for the bulk plasma. Quite remarkably, although collisions are included, the net rotation drive is due to a term which can be obtained by neglecting collisions. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  19. Making waves: Kinetic processes controlling surface evolution during low energy ion sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, W.L.; Chason, Eric

    2007-01-01

    When collimated beams of low energy ions are used to bombard materials, the surface often develops a periodic pattern or ''ripple'' structure. Different types of patterns are observed to develop under different conditions, with characteristic features that depend on the substrate material, the ion beam parameters, and the processing conditions. Because the patterns develop spontaneously, without applying any external mask or template, their formation is the expression of a dynamic balance among fundamental surface kinetic processes, e.g., erosion of material from the surface, ion-induced defect creation, and defect-mediated evolution of the surface morphology. In recent years, a comprehensive picture of the different kinetic mechanisms that control the different types of patterns that form has begun to emerge. In this article, we provide a review of different mechanisms that have been proposed and how they fit together in terms of the kinetic regimes in which they dominate. These are grouped into regions of behavior dominated by the directionality of the ion beam, the crystallinity of the surface, the barriers to surface roughening, and nonlinear effects. In sections devoted to each type of behavior, we relate experimental observations of patterning in these regimes to predictions of continuum models and to computer simulations. A comparison between theory and experiment is used to highlight strengths and weaknesses in our understanding. We also discuss the patterning behavior that falls outside the scope of the current understanding and opportunities for advancement

  20. Dynamical influence of gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains in Antarctica: radar observations, fine-scale modelling and kinetic energy budget analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Arnault

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains (in western Droning Maud Land, Antarctica, southwest of the Finnish/Swedish Aboa/Wasa station have been observed with the Moveable atmospheric radar for Antarctica (MARA during the SWEDish Antarctic Research Programme (SWEDARP in December 2007/January 2008. These radar observations are compared with a 2-month Weather Research Forecast (WRF model experiment operated at 2 km horizontal resolution. A control simulation without orography is also operated in order to separate unambiguously the contribution of the mountain waves on the simulated atmospheric flow. This contribution is then quantified with a kinetic energy budget analysis computed in the two simulations. The results of this study confirm that mountain waves reaching lower-stratospheric heights break through convective overturning and generate inertia gravity waves with a smaller vertical wavelength, in association with a brief depletion of kinetic energy through frictional dissipation and negative vertical advection. The kinetic energy budget also shows that gravity waves have a strong influence on the other terms of the budget, i.e. horizontal advection and horizontal work of pressure forces, so evaluating the influence of gravity waves on the mean-flow with the vertical advection term alone is not sufficient, at least in this case. We finally obtain that gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains reaching lower stratospheric heights generally deplete (create kinetic energy in the lower troposphere (upper troposphere–lower stratosphere, in contradiction with the usual decelerating effect attributed to gravity waves on the zonal circulation in the upper troposphere–lower stratosphere.

  1. Analysis of Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in a Magnetized Re-Entry Plasma Sheath Via the Kinetic Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Based on a theoretical model of the propagation of electromagnetic waves through a hypersonically induced plasma, it has been demonstrated that the classical radiofrequency communications blackout that is experienced during atmospheric reentry can be mitigated through the appropriate control of an external magnetic field of nominal magnitude. The model is based on the kinetic equation treatment of Vlasov and involves an analytical solution for the electric and magnetic fields within the plasma allowing for a description of the attendant transmission, reflection and absorption coefficients. The ability to transmit through the magnetized plasma is due to the magnetic windows that are created within the plasma via the well-known whistler modes of propagation. The case of 2 GHz transmission through a re-entry plasma is considered. The coefficients are found to be highly sensitive to the prevailing electron density and will thus require a dynamic control mechanism to vary the magnetic field as the plasma evolves through the re-entry phase.

  2. First experimental results on the kinetic processes in a surface-wave-sustained argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzada, M.D.; Gamero, A.; Sola, A.

    1995-01-01

    This communication presents an advance of the results of an experimental study of the kinetic processes in a surface-wave-sustained argon discharge at atmospheric pressure. We utilize the study developed by Fujimoto on the population and depopulation processes of the excited levels of atoms and ions. This theory has been applied by S. Daviaud and A. Hirabayashi to explain the kinetic processes in helium plasma at low pressure. Fujimoto has studied the ionization and recombination mechanisms of the plasma under various conditions and its relation to the population density distributions. This study establishes, for an hydrogenic ion with a core charge z, different zones in the atomic system (level map). Each zone is characterized by the dominant mechanisms of the population and depopulation of their excited levels, A level is characterized for the effective principal quantum number p, where p = z (E H /|E p |) 1/2 , E H is the hydrogen ionization energy and |E p | is the energy required to ionize the atom from the level considered. The population of each level p can be expressed in terms of the parameter b(p) defined as n(p)/n SB (p), n(p) and n SB (p) being the actual population and the Saha-Boltzmann equilibrium population of the level, respectively. Figure I shows the population and depopulation processes of a level p, which are both collisional and radiative that are characterized by their respective coefficients

  3. Evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) as a probe of macromolecule adsorption kinetics at functionalized interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Michael A; de Cuendias, Anne; Gayet, Florence; Shirley, Ian M; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Haddleton, David M; Unwin, Patrick R

    2012-05-01

    Evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) has been employed to study the interfacial adsorption kinetics of coumarin-tagged macromolecules onto a range of functionalized planar surfaces. Such studies are valuable in designing polymers for complex systems where the degree of interaction between the polymer and surface needs to be tailored. Three tagged synthetic polymers with different functionalities are examined: poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate, potassium salt) (PSPMA), and a mannose-modified glycopolymer. Adsorption transients at the silica/water interface are found to be characteristic for each polymer, and kinetics are deduced from the initial rates. The chemistry of the adsorption interfaces has been varied by, first, manipulation of silica surface chemistry via the bulk pH, followed by surfaces modified by poly(L-glutamic acid) (PGA) and cellulose, giving five chemically different surfaces. Complementary atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging has been used for additional surface characterization of adsorbed layers and functionalized interfaces to allow adsorption rates to be interpreted more fully. Adsorption rates for PSPMA and the glycopolymer are seen to be highly surface sensitive, with significantly higher rates on cellulose-modified surfaces, whereas PAA shows a much smaller rate dependence on the nature of the adsorption surface.

  4. Low-frequency linear waves and instabilities in uniform and stratified plasmas: the role of kinetic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Ferrière

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the basic approximations underlying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD theory, with special emphasis on the closure approximations, i.e. the approximations used in any fluid approach to close the hierarchy of moment equations. We then present the main closure models that have been constructed for collisionless plasmas in the large-scale regime, and we describe our own mixed MHD-kinetic model, which is designed to study low-frequency linear waves and instabilities in collisionless plasmas. We write down the full dispersion relation in a new, general form, which gathers all the specific features of our MHD-kinetic model into four polytropic indices, and which can be applied to standard adiabatic MHD and to double-adiabatic MHD through a simple change in the expressions of the polytropic indices. We study the mode solutions and the stability properties of the full dispersion relation in each of these three theories, first in the case of a uniform plasma, and then in the case of a stratified plasma. In both cases, we show how the results are affected by the collisionless nature of the plasma.

  5. Phase field theory of proper displacive phase transformations: Structural anisotropy and directional flexibility, a vector model, and the transformation kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao Weifeng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rutgers University, 607 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Khachaturyan, Armen G., E-mail: khach@jove.rutgers.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rutgers University, 607 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    A phase field theory of proper displacive transformations is developed to address the microstructure evolution and its response to applied fields in decomposing and martensitic systems. The theory is based on the explicit equation for the non-equilibrium free energy function of the transformation strain obtained by a consistent separation of the total strain into transformation and elastic strains. The transformation strain is considered to be a relaxing long-range order parameter evolving in accordance with the system energetics rather than as a fixed material constant used in the conventional Eshelby theory of coherent inclusions. The elastic strain is defined as a coherency strain recovering the crystal lattice compatibility. The obtained free energy function of the transformation strain leads to the concepts of structural anisotropy and directional flexibility of low symmetry phases. The formulated vector model of displacive transformation makes apparent a similarity between proper displacive transformation and ferromagnetic/ferroelectric transformation and, in particular, a similarity between the structural anisotropy and magnetic/polar anisotropy of ferromagnetic/ferroelectric materials. It even predicts the feasibility of a glass-like structural state with unlimited directional flexibility of the transformation strain that is conceptually similar to a ferromagnetic glass. The thermodynamics of the equilibrium between low symmetry phases and the thermodynamic conditions leading to the formation of adaptive states are formulated.

  6. Chemical Kinetics in the expansion flow field of a rotating detonation-wave engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Schwer, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    Rotating detonation-wave engines (RDE) are a form of continuous detonation-wave engines. They potentially provide further gains in performance than an intermittent or pulsed detonation-wave engine (PDE). The overall flow field in an idealized RDE, primarily consisting of two concentric cylinders, has been discussed in previous meetings. Because of the high pressures involved and the lack of adequate reaction mechanisms for this regime, previous simulations have typically used simplified chemistry models. However, understanding the exhaust species concentrations in propulsion devices is important for both performance considerations as well as estimating pollutant emissions. A key step towards addressing this need will be discussed in this talk. In this approach, an induction parameter model is used for simulating the detonation but a more detailed finite-chemistry model is used in the expansion flow region, where the pressures are lower and the uncertainties in the chemistry model are greatly reduced. Results show that overall radical concentrations in the exhaust flow are substantially lower than from earlier predictions with simplified models. The performance of a baseline hydrogen/air RDE increased from 4940 s to 5000 s with the expansion flow chemistry, due to recombination of radicals and more production of H2O, resulting in additional heat release.

  7. Effect of ultrasonic waves on the stability of all-trans lutein and its degradation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiang-Feng; Li, Da-Jing; Pang, Hui-Li; Liu, Chun-Quan

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasound treatment has been widely applied in the extraction of biologically active compounds including carotenoids. However, there are few reports on their effects on the stability of these compounds. In the present study, the stability of all-trans lutein, one of the carotenoids, was investigated under the action of ultrasound. Results showed that ultrasound induced the isomerization of all-trans lutein to its isomers, namely to 13-cis lutein, 13'-cis lutein, 9-cis lutein and 9'-cis lutein as analyzed by HPLC coupled with DAD and LC-MS; and the percentage of the isomerization increased with increasing both ultrasonic frequency and power. The stability of all-trans lutein in dichloromethane was worst among multiple kinds of solvents. Interestingly, the retention rate of all-trans lutein improved as the temperature increased, which runs counter to the Arrhenius law. Under ultrasound irradiation, the degradation mechanism might be different with various temperatures, the degradation of all-trans lutein followed first-order kinetics at 20°C, while second-order kinetics was followed at 30-50°C. As the ultrasonic reaction time prolonged, lutein epoxidation nearly occurred. Those results presented here emphasized that UAE techniques should be carefully used in the extraction of all-trans lutein. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. PLASMA EFFECTS ON FAST PAIR BEAMS. II. REACTIVE VERSUS KINETIC INSTABILITY OF PARALLEL ELECTROSTATIC WAVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Krakau, S.; Supsar, M.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of TeV gamma-rays from distant blazars with the extragalactic background light produces relativistic electron-positron pair beams by the photon-photon annihilation process. Using the linear instability analysis in the kinetic limit, which properly accounts for the longitudinal and the small but finite perpendicular momentum spread in the pair momentum distribution function, the growth rate of parallel propagating electrostatic oscillations in the intergalactic medium is calculated. Contrary to the claims of Miniati and Elyiv, we find that neither the longitudinal nor the perpendicular spread in the relativistic pair distribution function significantly affect the electrostatic growth rates. The maximum kinetic growth rate for no perpendicular spread is even about an order of magnitude greater than the corresponding reactive maximum growth rate. The reduction factors in the maximum growth rate due to the finite perpendicular spread in the pair distribution function are tiny and always less than 10 –4 . We confirm earlier conclusions by Broderick et al. and our group that the created pair beam distribution function is quickly unstable in the unmagnetized intergalactic medium. Therefore, there is no need to require the existence of small intergalactic magnetic fields to scatter the produced pairs, so that the explanation (made by several authors) for the Fermi non-detection of the inverse Compton scattered GeV gamma-rays by a finite deflecting intergalactic magnetic field is not necessary. In particular, the various derived lower bounds for the intergalactic magnetic fields are invalid due to the pair beam instability argument

  9. Measurement of the topological charge and index of vortex vector optical fields with a space-variant half-wave plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gui-Geng; Wang, Ke; Lee, Yun-Han; Wang, Dan; Li, Ping-Ping; Gou, Fangwang; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wu, Shin-Tson; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2018-02-15

    Vortex vector optical fields (VVOFs) refer to a kind of vector optical field with an azimuth-variant polarization and a helical phase, simultaneously. Such a VVOF is defined by the topological index of the polarization singularity and the topological charge of the phase vortex. We present a simple method to measure the topological charge and index of VVOFs by using a space-variant half-wave plate (SV-HWP). The geometric phase grating of the SV-HWP diffracts a VVOF into ±1 orders with orthogonally left- and right-handed circular polarizations. By inserting a polarizer behind the SV-HWP, the two circular polarization states project into the linear polarization and then interfere with each other to form the interference pattern, which enables the direct measurement of the topological charge and index of VVOFs.

  10. Hybrid genetic algorithm tuned support vector machine regression for wave transmission prediction of horizontally interlaced multilayer moored floating pipe breakwater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, S.G.; Mandal, S.; Hegde, A.V.; Muruganandam, A.

    Support Vector Machine (SVM) works on structural risk minimization principle that has greater generalization ability and is superior to the empirical risk minimization principle as adopted in conventional neural network models. However...

  11. Kinetic Simulations of the Self-Focusing and Dissipation of Finite-Width Electron Plasma Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winjum, B. J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Berger, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chapman, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Banks, J. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brunner, S. [Federal Inst. of Technology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-09-01

    Two-dimensional simulations, both Vlasov and particle-in-cell, are presented that show the evolution of the field and electron distribution of finite-width, nonlinear electron plasma waves. The intrinsically intertwined effects of self-focusing and dissipation of field energy caused by electron trapping are studied in simulated systems that are hundreds of wavelengths long in the transverse direction but only one wavelength long and periodic in the propagation direction. From various initial wave states, both the width at focus Δm relative to the initial width Δ0 and the maximum field amplitude at focus are shown to be a function of the growth rate of the transverse modulational instability γTPMI divided by the loss rate of field energy νE to electrons escaping the trapping region. With dissipation included, an amplitude threshold for self-focusing γTPMIE~1 is found that supports the analysis of Rose [Phys. Plasmas 12, 012318 (2005)].

  12. Covariant kinetic dispersion theory of linear transverse waves parallel propagating in magnetized plasmas with thermal anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazar, M.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2006-01-01

    The properties of transverse waves parallel propagating in magnetized plasmas with arbitrary composition and thermally anisotropic, are investigated on the basis of relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The transverse dispersion relations for plasmas with arbitrary distribution functions are derived. These dispersion relations describe the linear response of the system to the initial perturbations and thus define all existing linear (transverse) plasma modes in the system. By analytic continuation the dispersion relations in the whole complex frequency plane are constructed. Further analysis is restricted to the important case of anisotropic bi-Maxwellian equilibrium plasma distribution functions. Explicit forms of the relativistically correct transverse dispersion relations are derived that hold for any values of the plasma temperatures and the temperature anisotropy. In the limit of nonrelativistic plasma temperatures the dispersion relations are expressed in terms of plasma dispersion function, however, the dependence on frequency and wave numbers is markedly different from the standard noncovariant nonrelativistic analysis. Only in the strictly unphysical formal limit of an infinitely large speed of light, c→∞, does the nonrelativistic dispersion relations reduce to the standard noncovariant dispersion relations

  13. Kinetic theory of electromagnetic plane wave obliquely incident on bounded plasma slab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angus, J. R.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Smolyakov, A. I.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of electromagnetic plane waves obliquely incident on a warm bounded plasma slab of finite length L are studied by solving the coupled Vlasov-Maxwell set of equations. It is shown that the solution can be greatly simplified in the limit where thermal effects are most important by expanding in small parameters and introducing self-similar variables. These solutions reveal that the coupling of thermal effects with the angle of incidence is negligible in the region of bounce resonance and anomalous skin effect. In the region of the anomalous skin effect, the heating is shown to scale linearly with the anomalous skin depth δ a when δ a a >>L, the heating is shown to decay with 1/δ a 3 . The transmission is found to be exponentially larger than that predicted from a local theory in the appropriate region of the anomalous skin effect.

  14. Supergravity inspired vector curvaton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2007-01-01

    It is investigated whether a massive Abelian vector field, whose gauge kinetic function is growing during inflation, can be responsible for the generation of the curvature perturbation in the Universe. Particle production is studied and it is shown that the vector field can obtain a scale-invariant superhorizon spectrum of perturbations with a reasonable choice of kinetic function. After inflation the vector field begins coherent oscillations, during which it corresponds to pressureless isotropic matter. When the vector field dominates the Universe, its perturbations give rise to the observed curvature perturbation following the curvaton scenario. It is found that this is possible if, after the end of inflation, the mass of the vector field increases at a phase transition at temperature of order 1 TeV or lower. Inhomogeneous reheating, whereby the vector field modulates the decay rate of the inflaton, is also studied

  15. Kinetic instability of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in inter-penetrating plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, M. F.; Ilie, R.; Murtaza, G.

    2018-05-01

    The Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron (EIC) instability that includes the effect of wave-particle interaction is studied owing to the free energy source through the flowing velocity of the inter-penetrating plasmas. It is shown that the origin of this current-less instability is different from the classical current driven EIC instability. The threshold conditions applicable to a wide range of plasma parameters and the estimate of the growth rate are determined as a function of the normalized flowing velocity ( u0/vt f e ), the temperature ( Tf/Ts ) and the density ratios ( nf 0/ns 0 ) of flowing component to static one. The EIC instability is driven by either flowing electrons or flowing ions, depending upon the different Doppler shifted frequency domains. It is found that the growth rate for electron-driven instability is higher than the ion-driven one. However, in both cases, the denser (hotter) is the flowing plasma, the lesser (greater) is the growth rate. The possible applications related to the terrestrial solar plasma environment are also discussed.

  16. Effect of spin-orbit coupling on the wave vector and spin dependent transmission probability for the GaN/AlGaN/GaN heterostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M; Zhao, Z B; Fan, L B

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin–orbit coupling (SOC) on the transmission of electrons through the GaN/AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is studied. It is found that the Dresselhaus SOC causes the evident dependence of the transmission probability on the spin polarization and the in-plane wave vector of electrons, and also induces evident spin splitting of the resonant peaks in the (E z -k) plane. Because the magnitude of the Rashba SOC is relatively small, its effect on the transmission of electrons is much less. As k increases, the peaks of transmission probability for spin-up electrons (T + ) shift to a higher energy region and increase in magnitude, while the peaks of transmission probability for spin-down electrons (T − ) shift to a lower energy region and decrease in magnitude. The polarization efficiency (P) is found to peak at the resonant energies and increases with the in-plane wave vector. Moreover, the built-in electric field caused by the spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization can increase the amplitude of P. Results obtained here are helpful for the efficient spin injection into the III-nitride heterostructures by nonmagnetic means from the device point of view. (paper)

  17. Complete wave-vector directions of electromagnetic emissions: Application to INTERBALL-2 measurements in the nightside auroral zone

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Santolík, Ondřej; Lefeuvre, F.; Parrot, M.; Rauch, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 106, - (2001), s. 13,191-13,201 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/01/1064 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Keywords : auroral kilometric radiation * wave propagation * analysis techniques Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.609, year: 2001

  18. LATIHAN CLOSED KINETIC CHAIN LEBIH BAIK DARIPADA OPEN KINETIC CHAIN UNTUK MENINGKATKAN KEMAMPUAN FUNGSIONAL PADA OSTEOARTHRITIS LUTUT SETELAH PEMBERIAN MICRO WAVE DIATHERMY (MWD DAN TRANSCUTANEUS ELECTRICAL NERVE STIMULATION (TENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indri Susilawati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Knee osteoarthritis is a disease caused by degenerative factors that mostly found in musculoskeletal and knee osteoarthritis has the most common cause to limited motion and body function. People with osteoarthritis usually complain of pain, stifftess and limitation of function. This study aimed to determine closed kinetic chain exercise was better than open kinetic chain to increase functional capability of knee osteoarthritis after giving treatment micro wave diathermy (MWD and transcutaneus electrical nerve stimulation (TENS. The design of this research was true experimental pre-test and post-test with control group design, which the population was taken by purposively sampling. Division of the sample into two groups, group one consisted of 6 people. The first group was given MWD, TENS and Closed Kinetic Chain exercise and group two was given MWD, TENS and Open Kinetic Chain exercise. The frequency of exercise are 3 times a week for 4 weeks. Subjects were all patients with knee osteoarthritis who had been diagnosed through assesment procedures conducted in General Hospital of Mataram–Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara. Analysis of significance with Paired t-test (paired showed that in each group resulted in an increase in functional ability after treatment of knee osteoarthritis is significantly different (p<0.05. While a difference test in both groups after treatment using analysis test of Independent t-test (unpaired showed that the value of t = 2.748 and p = 0.021. So thah there was an increase functional capabilities of knee osteoarthritis after treatment (p<0.05. In conclution the treatment conducted in group one which was MWD, TENS and Closed Kinetic Chain proved improvement of the functional capabilities of  knee osteoarthritis better than treatment conducted in group two, namely the MWD, TENS and Open Kinetic Chain.

  19. High-resolution resonant magnetic x-ray scattering on TbNi2B2C: Determination of the modulation wave vector in the orthorhombic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, C.; Wermeille, D.; Goldman, A. I.; Canfield, P. C.; Rhee, J. Y.; Harmon, B. N.

    2001-01-01

    Resonant magnetic x-ray scattering measurements have been performed on a single crystal of TbNi 2 B 2 C to uniquely determine the modulation wave vector in the low-temperature orthorhombic phase. Below the transition temperature of 14.4(±0.1)K, two magnetic satellite peaks develop, centered on (h00) orth charge reflections. Our study shows that the longitudinal modulation of the magnetic moment is along the longer basal plane axes of the orthorhombic phase. Power law fits to the temperature dependence of the structural distortion, a/b-1, and the magnetic scattering intensity result in the same exponent, β, and transition temperature evidencing explicitly that the structural phase transition is magneto-elastic in origin

  20. Dual-tone optical vector millimeter wave signal generated by frequency-nonupling the radio frequency 16-star quadrature-amplitude-modulation signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tonggen; Ma, Jianxin

    2017-12-01

    This paper proposes an original scheme to generate the photonic dual-tone optical millimeter wave (MMW) carrying the 16-star quadrature-amplitude-modulation (QAM) signal via an optical phase modulator (PM) and an interleaver with adaptive photonic frequency-nonupling without phase precoding. To enable the generated optical vector MMW signal to resist the power fading effect caused by the fiber chromatic dispersion, the modulated -5th- and +4th-order sidebands are selected from the output of the PM, which is driven by the precoding 16-star QAM signal. The modulation index of the PM is optimized to gain the maximum opto-electrical conversion efficiency. A radio over fiber link is built by simulation, and the simulated constellations and the bit error rate graph demonstrate that the frequency-nonupling 16-star QAM MMW signal has good transmission performance. The simulation results agree well with our theoretical results.

  1. Closure of multi-fluid and kinetic equations for cyclotron-resonant interactions of solar wind ions with Alfvén waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marsch

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on quasilinear theory, a closure scheme for anisotropic multi-component fluid equations is developed for the wave-particle interactions of ions with electromagnetic Alfvén and ion-cyclotron waves propagating along the mean magnetic field. Acceleration and heating rates are calculated. They may be used in the multi-fluid momentum and energy equations as anomalous transport terms. The corresponding evolution equation for the average wave spectrum is established, and the effective growth/damping rate for the spectrum is calculated. Given a simple power-law spectrum, an anomalous collision frequency can be derived which depends on the slope and average intensity of the spectrum, and on the gyrofrequency and the differential motion (with respect to the wave frame of the actual ion species considered. The wave-particle interaction terms attain simple forms resembling the ones for collisional friction and temperature anisotropy relaxation (due to pitch angle scattering with collision rates that are proportional to the gyrofrequency but diminished substantially by the relative wave energy or the fluctuation level with respect the background field. In addition, a set of quasilinear diffusion equations is derived for the reduced (with respect to the perpendicular velocity component velocity distribution functions (VDFs, as they occur in the wave dispersion equation and the related dielectric function for parallel propagation. These reduced VDFs allow one to describe adequately the most prominent observed features, such as an ion beam and temperature anisotropy, in association with the resonant interactions of the particles with the waves on a kinetic level, yet have the advantage of being only dependent upon the parallel velocity component.

  2. Hydrodynamic and kinetic models for spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas: Annihilation interaction, helicity conservation, and wave dispersion in magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the complete theory of spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas, when electrons and positrons move with velocities mach smaller than the speed of light. We derive a set of two fluid quantum hydrodynamic equations consisting of the continuity, Euler, spin (magnetic moment) evolution equations for each species. We explicitly include the Coulomb, spin-spin, Darwin and annihilation interactions. The annihilation interaction is the main topic of the paper. We consider the contribution of the annihilation interaction in the quantum hydrodynamic equations and in the spectrum of waves in magnetized electron-positron plasmas. We consider the propagation of waves parallel and perpendicular to an external magnetic field. We also consider the oblique propagation of longitudinal waves. We derive the set of quantum kinetic equations for electron-positron plasmas with the Darwin and annihilation interactions. We apply the kinetic theory to the linear wave behavior in absence of external fields. We calculate the contribution of the Darwin and annihilation interactions in the Landau damping of the Langmuir waves. We should mention that the annihilation interaction does not change number of particles in the system. It does not related to annihilation itself, but it exists as a result of interaction of an electron-positron pair via conversion of the pair into virtual photon. A pair of the non-linear Schrodinger equations for the electron-positron plasmas including the Darwin and annihilation interactions is derived. Existence of the conserving helicity in electron-positron quantum plasmas of spinning particles with the Darwin and annihilation interactions is demonstrated. We show that the annihilation interaction plays an important role in the quantum electron-positron plasmas giving the contribution of the same magnitude as the spin-spin interaction

  3. Generation of 1.024-Tb/s Nyquist-WDM phase-conjugated twin vector waves by a polarization-insensitive optical parametric amplifier for fiber-nonlinearity-tolerant transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiang; Hu, Hao; Chandrasekhar, S.

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the generation of 1.024-Tb/s Nyquist-WDM phase-conjugated vector twin waves (PCTWs), consisting of eight 128-Gb/s polarization-division-multiplexed QPSK signals and their idlers, by a broadband polarization-insensitive fiber optic parametric amplifier. This novel all...

  4. Saturation of backward stimulated scattering of laser in kinetic regime: Wavefront bowing, trapped particle modulational instability, and trapped particle self-focusing of plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Daughton, W.; Rose, H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Backward stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering (SRS and SBS) of laser are examined in the kinetic regime using particle-in-cell simulations. The SRS reflectivity measured as a function of the laser intensity in a single hot spot from two-dimensional (2D) simulations shows a sharp onset at a threshold laser intensity and a saturated level at higher intensities, as obtained previously in Trident experiments [D. S. Montgomery et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2311 (2002)]. In these simulations, wavefront bowing of electron plasma waves (ion acoustic waves) due to the trapped particle nonlinear frequency shift, which increases with laser intensity, is observed in the SRS (SBS) regime for the first time. Self-focusing from trapped particle modulational instability (TPMI) [H. A. Rose, Phys. Plasmas 12, 12318 (2005)] is shown to occur in both two- and three-dimensional SRS simulations. The key physics underlying nonlinear saturation of SRS is identified as a combination of wavefront bowing, TPMI, and self-focusing of electron plasma waves. The wavefront bowing marks the beginning of SRS saturation and self-focusing alone is sufficient to terminate the SRS reflectivity, both effects resulting from cancellation of the source term for SRS and from greatly increased dissipation rate of the electron plasm waves. Ion acoustic wave bowing also contributes to the SBS saturation. Velocity diffusion by transverse modes and rapid loss of hot electrons in regions of small transverse extent formed from self-focusing lead to dissipation of the wave energy and an increase in the Landau damping rate in spite of strong electron trapping that reduces Landau damping initially. The ranges of wavelength and growth rate associated with transverse breakup of the electron-plasma wave are also examined in 2D speckle simulations as well as in 2D periodic systems from Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal equilibrium and are compared with theory predictions

  5. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  6. Numerical study of alfvénic wave activity in the solar wind as a cause for pitch angle scattering with focus on kinetic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilbach, D.; Berger, L.; Drews, C.; Marsch, E.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies, that determined the inflow longitude of the local interstellar medium from the anisotropy of interstellar pickup ion (PUI) radial velocity, have once again raised the question, how transport effects and especially wave activity in the solar wind modifies the velocity distribution function of PUIs.This study investigates the modification of an oxygen PUI torus distribution by alfvénic waves qualitatively with a numerical approach. The focus of this study is to understand this modification kinetically, which means, that instead of describing the PUI transport through diffusion approaches, we trace the trajectories of test particles in pitch angle space with a time resolution of at least 100 time steps per gyro orbit in order to find first principles of wave particle interactions on the most basic scale.Therefore we have implemented a Leapfrog solver of the Lorentz-Newton equations of motion for a charged test particle in a electro-magnetic field. The alfvénic waves were represented through a continuous circularly polarized wave superimposed to a constant 5 nT background magnetic field. In addition an electric field arising from induction has been added to the simulation's boundary conditions. The simulation code computes the particles' trajectories in the solar wind bulk system.Upon interaction with mono frequent single-frequency waves, the particles are found to perform stationary trajectories in pitch angle space, so that the pitch angle distribution of a conglomerate of test particles does not experience a systematic broadening over time. Also the particles do not react most strongly with waves at resonant frequencies, since the pitch angle modification by the waves sweeps their parallel velocity out of resonance quickly. However, within frequencies close to first order resonance, strong interactions between waves and particles are observed.Altogether the framework of our simulation is readily expandable to simulate additional effects, which may

  7. Wave Telescope Technique for MMS Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Y.; Plaschke, F.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjojann, W.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Voros, Z.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Multipoint measurements are a powerful method in studying wavefields in space plasmas.The wave telescope technique is tested against magnetic field fluctuations in the terrestrial magnetosheath measured by the four Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft on a spatial scale of about 20 km.The dispersion relation diagram and the wave vector distribution are determined for the first time in the ion-kinetic range. Moreover, the dispersion relation diagram is determined in a proxy plasma restframe by regarding the low-frequency dispersion relation as a Doppler relation and compensating for the apparent phase velocity. Fluctuations are highly compressible, and the wave vectors have an angle of about 60 from the mean magnetic field. We interpret that the measured fluctuations represent akinetic-drift mirror mode in the magnetosheath which is dispersive and in a turbulent state accompanied by a sideband formation.

  8. The Large Vector Multiplet Action

    OpenAIRE

    Ryb, Itai

    2007-01-01

    We discuss possible actions for the d=2, N=(2,2) large vector multiplet that gauges isometries of generalized Kahler geometries. We explore two scenarios that allow us to write kinetic and superpotential terms for the scalar field-strengths, and write kinetic terms for the spinor invariants that can introduce topological terms for the connections.

  9. Plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, DG

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Waves discusses the basic development and equations for the many aspects of plasma waves. The book is organized into two major parts, examining both linear and nonlinear plasma waves in the eight chapters it encompasses. After briefly discussing the properties and applications of plasma wave, the book goes on examining the wave types in a cold, magnetized plasma and the general forms of the dispersion relation that characterize the waves and label the various types of solutions. Chapters 3 and 4 analyze the acoustic phenomena through the fluid model of plasma and the kinetic effects. Th

  10. Kinetics of the Thermal Decomposition of Tetramethylsilane behind the Reflected Shock Waves in a Single Pulse Shock Tube (SPST) and Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parandaman, A.; Sudhakar, G.; Rajakumar, B.

    Thermal reactions of Tetramethylsilane (TMS) diluted in argon were studied behind the reflected shock waves in a single-pulse shock tube (SPST) over the temperature range of 1085-1221 K and pressures varied between 10.6 and 22.8 atm. The stable products resulting from the decomposition of TMS were identified and quantified using gas chromatography and also verified with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The major reaction products are methane (CH4) and ethylene (C2H4). The minor reaction products are ethane (C2H6) and propylene (C3H6). The initiation of mechanism in the decomposition of TMS takes plays via the Si-C bond scission by ejecting the methyl radicals (CH3) and trimethylsilyl radicals ((CH3)3Si). The measured temperature dependent rate coefficient for the total decomposition of TMS was to be ktotal = 1.66 ×1015 exp (-64.46/RT) s-1 and for the formation of CH4 reaction channel was to be k = 2.20 × 1014 exp (-60.15/RT) s-1, where the activation energies are given in kcal mol-1. A kinetic scheme containing 17 species and 28 elementary reactions was used for the simulation using chemical kinetic simulator over the temperature range of 1085-1221 K. The agreement between the experimental and simulated results was satisfactory.

  11. Vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Newell, Homer E

    2006-01-01

    When employed with skill and understanding, vector analysis can be a practical and powerful tool. This text develops the algebra and calculus of vectors in a manner useful to physicists and engineers. Numerous exercises (with answers) not only provide practice in manipulation but also help establish students' physical and geometric intuition in regard to vectors and vector concepts.Part I, the basic portion of the text, consists of a thorough treatment of vector algebra and the vector calculus. Part II presents the illustrative matter, demonstrating applications to kinematics, mechanics, and e

  12. About vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, Banesh

    1975-01-01

    From his unusual beginning in ""Defining a vector"" to his final comments on ""What then is a vector?"" author Banesh Hoffmann has written a book that is provocative and unconventional. In his emphasis on the unresolved issue of defining a vector, Hoffmann mixes pure and applied mathematics without using calculus. The result is a treatment that can serve as a supplement and corrective to textbooks, as well as collateral reading in all courses that deal with vectors. Major topics include vectors and the parallelogram law; algebraic notation and basic ideas; vector algebra; scalars and scalar p

  13. Comparative study of cellular kinetics of reporter probe [{sup 131}I]FIAU in neonatal cardiac myocytes after transfer of HSV1-tk reporter gene with two vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan Xiaoli [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022 (China)], E-mail: lxl730724@hotmail.com; Yin Xiaohua; Wang Ruihua; Liu Ying [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022 (China); Zhang Yongxue [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China) and Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022 (China)], E-mail: zhyx1229@163.com

    2009-02-15

    Aim: Reporter gene imaging is a promising approach for noninvasive monitoring of cardiac gene therapy. In this study, HSV1-tk (herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase) and FIAU (2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil) were used as the reporter gene and probe, respectively. Cellular uptakes of radiolabeled FIAU of neonatal rat cardiac myocytes transferred with HSV1-tk were compared between two vectors, adenovirus and liposome. The aims of this study were to choose the better vector and to provide a theoretical basis for good nuclide images. Methods: Neonatal cardiac myocytes were obtained from rat heart by single collagenase digestion. HSV1-tk inserted into adenovirus vector (recombinant adenovirus type 5, Ad5-tk) and plasmid (pDC316-tk) coated with Lipofectamine 2000 (pDC316-tk/lipoplex) were developed; thus, HSV1-tk could be transferred into neonatal cardiac myocytes. FAU (2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyluracil) was labeled with {sup 131}I, and the product was assessed after purification with reversed-phase Sep-Pak C-18 column. The uptake rates of [{sup 131}I]FIAU in the transferred cardiac myocytes at different times (0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 h) were detected. Furthermore, mRNA expression and protein expression of HSV1-tk were detected by semiquantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. Results: FAU could be labeled with {sup 131}I, and the labeling efficiency and radiochemical purity rates were 53.82{+-}2.05% and 94.85{+-}1.76%, respectively. Time-dependent increase of the accumulation of [{sup 131}I]FIAU was observed in both the Ad5-tk group and the pDC316/lipoplex group, and the highest uptake rate occurred at 5 h, with peak values of 12.55{+-}0.37% and 2.09{+-}0.34%, respectively. Greater uptakes of [{sup 131}I]FIAU in Ad5-tk-infected cells compared with pDC316/lipoplex-transfected ones occurred at all the time points (t=12.978-38.253, P<.01). The exogenous gene

  14. Local NMR relaxation rates T1-1 and T2-1 depending on the d -vector symmetry in the vortex state of chiral and helical p -wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenta K.; Ichioka, Masanori; Onari, Seiichiro

    2018-04-01

    Local NMR relaxation rates in the vortex state of chiral and helical p -wave superconductors are investigated by the quasiclassical Eilenberger theory. We calculate the spatial and resonance frequency dependences of the local NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate T1-1 and spin-spin relaxation rate T2-1. Depending on the relation between the NMR relaxation direction and the d -vector symmetry, the local T1-1 and T2-1 in the vortex core region show different behaviors. When the NMR relaxation direction is parallel to the d -vector component, the local NMR relaxation rate is anomalously suppressed by the negative coherence effect due to the spin dependence of the odd-frequency s -wave spin-triplet Cooper pairs. The difference between the local T1-1 and T2-1 in the site-selective NMR measurement is expected to be a method to examine the d -vector symmetry of candidate materials for spin-triplet superconductors.

  15. Elementary vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wolstenholme, E Œ

    1978-01-01

    Elementary Vectors, Third Edition serves as an introductory course in vector analysis and is intended to present the theoretical and application aspects of vectors. The book covers topics that rigorously explain and provide definitions, principles, equations, and methods in vector analysis. Applications of vector methods to simple kinematical and dynamical problems; central forces and orbits; and solutions to geometrical problems are discussed as well. This edition of the text also provides an appendix, intended for students, which the author hopes to bridge the gap between theory and appl

  16. Vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Brand, Louis

    2006-01-01

    The use of vectors not only simplifies treatments of differential geometry, mechanics, hydrodynamics, and electrodynamics, but also makes mathematical and physical concepts more tangible and easy to grasp. This text for undergraduates was designed as a short introductory course to give students the tools of vector algebra and calculus, as well as a brief glimpse into these subjects' manifold applications. The applications are developed to the extent that the uses of the potential function, both scalar and vector, are fully illustrated. Moreover, the basic postulates of vector analysis are brou

  17. 3D-full wave and kinetics numerical modelling of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources plasma: steps towards self-consistency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascali, D.; Neri, L.; Castro, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Torrisi, G.; Sorbello, G.

    2015-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion Sources are the most performing machines for the production of intense beams of multi-charged ions in fundamental science, applied physics and industry. Investigation of plasma dynamics in ECRIS still remains a challenge. A better comprehension of electron heating, ionization and diffusion processes, ion confinement and ion beam formation is mandatory in order to increase ECRIS performances both in terms of output beams currents, charge states, beam quality (emittance minimization, beam halos suppression, etc.). Numerical solution of Vlasov equation via kinetic codes coupled to FEM solvers is ongoing at INFN-LNS, based on a PIC strategy. Preliminary results of the modeling will be shown about wave-plasma interaction and electron-ion confinement: the obtained results are very helpful to better understand the influence of the different parameters (especially RF frequency and power) on the ion beam formation mechanism. The most important clues coming out from the simulations are that although vacuum field RF field distribution (that is a cavity, modal field distribution) is perturbed by the plasma medium, the non-uniformity in the electric field amplitude still persists in the plasma filled cavity. This non-uniformity can be correlated with non-uniform plasma distribution, explaining a number of experimental observations

  18. Vector velocimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a compact, reliable and low-cost vector velocimeter for example for determining velocities of particles suspended in a gas or fluid flow, or for determining velocity, displacement, rotation, or vibration of a solid surface, the vector velocimeter comprising a laser...

  19. Full-wave analysis using a tangential vector finite-element formulation of arbitrary cross-section transmission lines for millimeter and microwave applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, M.; Legier, J. F.; Pribetich, P.; Kennis, P.

    1994-06-01

    A tangential vector finite-element formulation is implemented to deal with arbitrary cross section and metallic strip shape. Classical planar transmission lines as well as nonconventional cross-section waveguides such as the new microshield line are treated. Effects on propagation characteristics for these lines are studied when the metallization shape is approximated by a lossy trapezoid area.

  20. Genetic algorithm based support vector machine regression in predicting wave transmission of horizontally interlaced multi-layer moored floating pipe breakwater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, S.G.; Mandal, S.; Hegde, A.V.

    studies on floating breakwaters in the past but failed to give a simple mathematical model to predict the wave transmission through floating breakwaters by considering all the boundary conditions. Computational intelligence techniques, such as, Artificial...

  1. A conservative scheme of drift kinetic electrons for gyrokinetic simulation of kinetic-MHD processes in toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, J.; Liu, D.; Lin, Z.

    2017-10-01

    A conservative scheme of drift kinetic electrons for gyrokinetic simulations of kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic processes in toroidal plasmas has been formulated and verified. Both vector potential and electron perturbed distribution function are decomposed into adiabatic part with analytic solution and non-adiabatic part solved numerically. The adiabatic parallel electric field is solved directly from the electron adiabatic response, resulting in a high degree of accuracy. The consistency between electrostatic potential and parallel vector potential is enforced by using the electron continuity equation. Since particles are only used to calculate the non-adiabatic response, which is used to calculate the non-adiabatic vector potential through Ohm's law, the conservative scheme minimizes the electron particle noise and mitigates the cancellation problem. Linear dispersion relations of the kinetic Alfvén wave and the collisionless tearing mode in cylindrical geometry have been verified in gyrokinetic toroidal code simulations, which show that the perpendicular grid size can be larger than the electron collisionless skin depth when the mode wavelength is longer than the electron skin depth.

  2. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  3. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  4. Equivalent Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The cross-product is a mathematical operation that is performed between two 3-dimensional vectors. The result is a vector that is orthogonal or perpendicular to both of them. Learning about this for the first time while taking Calculus-III, the class was taught that if AxB = AxC, it does not necessarily follow that B = C. This seemed baffling. The…

  5. Probing deformed orbitals with vector A( vector e, e' N)B reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido, E.; Caballero, J.A.; Moya de Guerra, E.; Sarriguren, P.; Udias, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    We present results for response functions and asymmetries in the nuclear reactions 37 vector Ar( vector e, e' n) 36 Ar and 37 vector K( vector e,e' p) 36 Ar at quasifree kinematics. We compare PWIA results obtained using deformed HF wave functions with PWIA and DWIA results obtained assuming a spherical mean field. We show that the complex structure of the deformed orbitals can be probed by coincidence measurements with polarized beam and targets. ((orig.))

  6. Vector geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Gilbert de B

    2011-01-01

    This brief undergraduate-level text by a prominent Cambridge-educated mathematician explores the relationship between algebra and geometry. An elementary course in plane geometry is the sole requirement for Gilbert de B. Robinson's text, which is the result of several years of teaching and learning the most effective methods from discussions with students. Topics include lines and planes, determinants and linear equations, matrices, groups and linear transformations, and vectors and vector spaces. Additional subjects range from conics and quadrics to homogeneous coordinates and projective geom

  7. VECTOR INTEGRATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, E. G. F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of integration of scalar functions with respect to a measure with values in a, not necessarily locally convex, topological vector space. It focuses on the extension of such integrals from bounded measurable functions to the class of integrable functions, proving

  8. Benney's long wave equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, D.R.

    1979-01-01

    Benney's equations of motion of incompressible nonviscous fluid with free surface in the approximation of long waves are analyzed. The connection between the Lie algebra of Hamilton plane vector fields and the Benney's momentum equations is shown

  9. An introduction to vectors, vector operators and vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Joag, Pramod S

    2016-01-01

    Ideal for undergraduate and graduate students of science and engineering, this book covers fundamental concepts of vectors and their applications in a single volume. The first unit deals with basic formulation, both conceptual and theoretical. It discusses applications of algebraic operations, Levi-Civita notation, and curvilinear coordinate systems like spherical polar and parabolic systems and structures, and analytical geometry of curves and surfaces. The second unit delves into the algebra of operators and their types and also explains the equivalence between the algebra of vector operators and the algebra of matrices. Formulation of eigen vectors and eigen values of a linear vector operator are elaborated using vector algebra. The third unit deals with vector analysis, discussing vector valued functions of a scalar variable and functions of vector argument (both scalar valued and vector valued), thus covering both the scalar vector fields and vector integration.

  10. Nonlinear interaction of an intense radio wave with ionospheric D/E layer plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh; Agarwal, Sujeet Kumar

    2018-05-01

    This paper considers the nonlinear interaction of an intense electromagnetic wave with the D/E layer plasma in the ionosphere. A simultaneous solution of the electromagnetic wave equation and the equations describing the kinetics of D/E layer plasma is obtained; the phenomenon of ohmic heating of electrons by the electric field of the wave causes enhanced collision frequency and ionization of neutral species. Electron temperature dependent recombination of electrons with ions, electron attachment to O 2 molecules, and detachment of electrons from O2 - ions has also been taken into account. The dependence of the plasma parameters on the square of the electric vector of the wave E0 2 has been evaluated for three ionospheric heights (viz., 90, 100, and 110 km) corresponding to the mid-latitude mid-day ionosphere and discussed; these results are used to investigate the horizontal propagation of an intense radio wave at these heights.

  11. Kinetic analysis of spin current contribution to spectrum of electromagnetic waves in spin-1/2 plasma. I. Dielectric permeability tensor for magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2017-02-01

    The dielectric permeability tensor for spin polarized plasmas is derived in terms of the spin-1/2 quantum kinetic model in six-dimensional phase space. Expressions for the distribution function and spin distribution function are derived in linear approximations on the path of dielectric permeability tensor derivation. The dielectric permeability tensor is derived for the spin-polarized degenerate electron gas. It is also discussed at the finite temperature regime, where the equilibrium distribution function is presented by the spin-polarized Fermi-Dirac distribution. Consideration of the spin-polarized equilibrium states opens possibilities for the kinetic modeling of the thermal spin current contribution in the plasma dynamics.

  12. Vector-Tensor and Vector-Vector Decay Amplitude Analysis of B0→φK*0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.

    2007-01-01

    We perform an amplitude analysis of the decays B 0 →φK 2 * (1430) 0 , φK * (892) 0 , and φ(Kπ) S-wave 0 with a sample of about 384x10 6 BB pairs recorded with the BABAR detector. The fractions of longitudinal polarization f L of the vector-tensor and vector-vector decay modes are measured to be 0.853 -0.069 +0.061 ±0.036 and 0.506±0.040±0.015, respectively. Overall, twelve parameters are measured for the vector-vector decay and seven parameters for the vector-tensor decay, including the branching fractions and parameters sensitive to CP violation

  13. Hamiltonian kinetic theory of plasma ponderomotive processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, S.W.; Kaufman, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    The nonlinear nonresonant interaction of plasma waves and particles is formulated in Hamiltonian kinetic theory which treats the wave-action and particle distributions on an equal footing, thereby displaying reciprocity relations. In the quasistatic limit, a nonlinear wave-kinetic equation is obtained. The generality of the formalism allows for applications to arbitrary geometry, with the nonlinear effects expressed in terms of the linear susceptibility

  14. Hamiltonian kinetic theory of plasma ponderomotive processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, S.W.; Kaufman, A.N.

    1981-12-01

    The nonlinear nonresonant interaction of plasma waves and particles is formulated in a Hamiltonian kinetic theory which treats the wave-action and particle distributions on an equal footing, thereby displaying reciprocity relations. In the quasistatic limit, a nonlinear wave-kinetic equation is obtained. The generality of the formalism allows for applications to arbitrary geometry, with the nonlinear effects expressed in terms of the linear susceptibility

  15. Relativistic Kinetic Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereshchagin, Gregory V.; Aksenov, Alexey G.

    2017-02-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Acronyms and definitions; Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Foundations: 1. Basic concepts; 2. Kinetic equation; 3. Averaging; 4. Conservation laws and equilibrium; 5. Relativistic BBGKY hierarchy; 6. Basic parameters in gases and plasmas; Part II. Numerical Methods: 7. The basics of computational physics; 8. Direct integration of Boltzmann equations; 9. Multidimensional hydrodynamics; Part III. Applications: 10. Wave dispersion in relativistic plasma; 11. Thermalization in relativistic plasma; 12. Kinetics of particles in strong fields; 13. Compton scattering in astrophysics and cosmology; 14. Self-gravitating systems; 15. Neutrinos, gravitational collapse and supernovae; Appendices; Bibliography; Index.

  16. Kinetic Typography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Djonov, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images.......After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images....

  17. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2014-09-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity.

  18. Waves and instabilities in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Plasma as a Dielectric Medium; Nyquist Technique; Absolute and Convective Instabilities; Landau Damping and Phase Mixing; Particle Trapping and Breakdown of Linear Theory; Solution of Viasov Equation via Guilding-Center Transformation; Kinetic Theory of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves; Geometric Optics; Wave-Kinetic Equation; Cutoff and Resonance; Resonant Absorption; Mode Conversion; Gyrokinetic Equation; Drift Waves; Quasi-Linear Theory; Ponderomotive Force; Parametric Instabilities; Problem Sets for Homework, Midterm and Final Examinations

  19. Conceptual Design of Wave Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Trewers, Andrew; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    The Wave Plane is a patented Wave Energy device of the overtopping type, designed to capture potential as well as kinetic energy. This is as such different to other overtopping devices, who usually only focus on potential energy. If Wave Plane A/S can deliver the turbine technology to utilize both...

  20. DYE-SENSITIZED PHOTOLYSIS OF o-Cl-HEXAARYLBIIMIDAZOLE AND PHOTOPOLYMERIZATION KINETICS STUDY OF THE LONG WAVE-LENGTH DYE/HEXAARYLBIIMIDAZOLE SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Gao; Chun-ying Zhao; Li-dong Li; Shu-jing Feng; Yong-yuan Yang

    2000-01-01

    o-Chloro-hexaarylbiimidazole (o-Cl-HABI) can be sensitized efficiently by the dyes 1-ethyl-3'-methyl thiacyanine bromide (C1), 3,3'-diethyl thiacarbocyanine iodide (C2), and cyclopentanone 2,5-bis[2-(1,3-dihydro-1,3,3-trimethyl-2H-indol-2-ylidene)ethylidene] (C3) through electron transfer proceses. When exposed to a xenon lamp (filtered by Pyrex glass),the photosensitive systems composed of o-Cl-HABI and the above dyes can produce free radicals which initiate the polymerization of MMA. The photopolymerization kinetics equation was obtained for the o-Cl-HABI/C2 system, Rp =K [C2]0.75[o-Cl-HABI]0.44[MTA]0.12[MMA]1.0. A comparison of the influence of different dyes on the conversion of MMA photopolymerization was conducted.

  1. Slow wave cyclotron maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kho, T.H.; Lin, A.T.

    1988-01-01

    Cyclotron masers such as Gyrotrons and the Autoresonance Masers, are fast wave devices: the electromagnetic wave's phase velocity v rho , is greater than the electron beam velocity, v b . To be able to convert the beam kinetic energy into radiation in these devices the beam must have an initial transverse momentum, usually obtained by propagating the beam through a transverse wiggler magnet, or along a nonuniform guide magnetic field before entry into the interaction region. Either process introduces a significant amount of thermal spread in the beam which degrades the performance of the maser. However, if the wave phase velocity v rho v b , the beam kinetic energy can be converted directly into radiation without the requirement of an initial transverse beam momentum, making a slow wave cyclotron maser a potentially simpler and more compact device. The authors present the linear and nonlinear physics of the slow wave cyclotron maser and examine its potential for practical application

  2. Physical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifschitz, E.M.; Pitajewski, L.P.

    1983-01-01

    The textbook covers the subject under the following headings: kinetic gas theory, diffusion approximation, collisionless plasma, collisions within the plasma, plasma in the magnetic field, theory of instabilities, dielectrics, quantum fluids, metals, diagram technique for nonequilibrium systems, superconductors, and kinetics of phase transformations

  3. Heparin kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swart, C.A.M. de.

    1983-01-01

    The author has studied the kinetics of heparin and heparin fractions after intravenous administration in humans and in this thesis the results of this study are reported. Basic knowledge about the physico-chemical properties of heparin and its interactions with proteins resulting in anticoagulant and lipolytic effects are discussed in a review (chapter II), which also comprises some clinical aspects of heparin therapy. In chapter III the kinetics of the anticoagulant effect are described after intravenous administration of five commercial heparin preparations. A mathematical model is presented that fits best to these kinetics. The kinetics of the anticoagulant and lipolytic effects after intravenous injection of various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions and their relationship with the disappearance of the radiolabel are described in chapter IV. Chapter V gives a description of the kinetics of two radiolabels after injection of in vitro formed complexes consisting of purified, 125 I-radiolabelled antithrombin III and various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions. (Auth.)

  4. Raster images vectorization system

    OpenAIRE

    Genytė, Jurgita

    2006-01-01

    The problem of raster images vectorization was analyzed and researched in this work. Existing vectorization systems are quite expensive, the results are inaccurate, and the manual vectorization of a large number of drafts is impossible. That‘s why our goal was to design and develop a new raster images vectorization system using our suggested automatic vectorization algorithm and the way to record results in a new universal vectorial file format. The work consists of these main parts: analysis...

  5. Electromagnetic waves in gravitational wave spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haney, M.; Bini, D.; Ortolan, A.; Fortini, P.

    2013-01-01

    We have considered the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a space-time representing an exact gravitational plane wave and calculated the induced changes on the four-potential field Aμ of a plane electromagnetic wave. By choosing a suitable photon round-trip in a Michelson interferometer, we have been able to identify the physical effects of the exact gravitational wave on the electromagnetic field, i.e. phase shift, change of the polarization vector, angular deflection and delay. These results have been exploited to study the response of an interferometric gravitational wave detector beyond the linear approximation of the general theory of relativity. A much more detailed examination of this problem can be found in our paper recently published in Classical and Quantum Gravity (28 (2011) 235007).

  6. Kochen-Specker vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavicic, Mladen; Merlet, Jean-Pierre; McKay, Brendan; Megill, Norman D

    2005-01-01

    We give a constructive and exhaustive definition of Kochen-Specker (KS) vectors in a Hilbert space of any dimension as well as of all the remaining vectors of the space. KS vectors are elements of any set of orthonormal states, i.e., vectors in an n-dimensional Hilbert space, H n , n≥3, to which it is impossible to assign 1s and 0s in such a way that no two mutually orthogonal vectors from the set are both assigned 1 and that not all mutually orthogonal vectors are assigned 0. Our constructive definition of such KS vectors is based on algorithms that generate MMP diagrams corresponding to blocks of orthogonal vectors in R n , on algorithms that single out those diagrams on which algebraic (0)-(1) states cannot be defined, and on algorithms that solve nonlinear equations describing the orthogonalities of the vectors by means of statistically polynomially complex interval analysis and self-teaching programs. The algorithms are limited neither by the number of dimensions nor by the number of vectors. To demonstrate the power of the algorithms, all four-dimensional KS vector systems containing up to 24 vectors were generated and described, all three-dimensional vector systems containing up to 30 vectors were scanned, and several general properties of KS vectors were found

  7. Measurements of electromagnetic waves in Phaedrus-B: Bench-mark test of ANTENA wave field calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intrator, T.; Meassick, S.; Browning, J.; Majeski, R.; Ferron, J.R.; Hershkowitz, N.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the predictions of a numerical code (ANTENA) and the data of wave field measurements in the Phaedrus-B tandem mirror are consistent (±25%) for right-handed (B-vector - ) wave fields and less so (±40%) for left-handed (B-vector + ) wave fields in the plasma core, and that they disagree for B-vector + fields near the column edge. Shorting out or reduction of the wave azimuthal electric fields by limiters is the probable cause of this discrepancy. The ICRF fluctuating wave B-vector fields are shown as |B-vector| contour maps in the r-z plane, where the B-vector + data peak at a smaller radius than predicted. The waves are characterized by different dominant axial wave numbers for the left- and right-handed circularly polarized fields. (author). 28 refs, 20 figs, 1 tab

  8. Vector regression introduced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mok Tik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study formulates regression of vector data that will enable statistical analysis of various geodetic phenomena such as, polar motion, ocean currents, typhoon/hurricane tracking, crustal deformations, and precursory earthquake signals. The observed vector variable of an event (dependent vector variable is expressed as a function of a number of hypothesized phenomena realized also as vector variables (independent vector variables and/or scalar variables that are likely to impact the dependent vector variable. The proposed representation has the unique property of solving the coefficients of independent vector variables (explanatory variables also as vectors, hence it supersedes multivariate multiple regression models, in which the unknown coefficients are scalar quantities. For the solution, complex numbers are used to rep- resent vector information, and the method of least squares is deployed to estimate the vector model parameters after transforming the complex vector regression model into a real vector regression model through isomorphism. Various operational statistics for testing the predictive significance of the estimated vector parameter coefficients are also derived. A simple numerical example demonstrates the use of the proposed vector regression analysis in modeling typhoon paths.

  9. Concepts of radial and angular kinetic energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens Peder; Schleich, W.P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider a general central-field system in D dimensions and show that the division of the kinetic energy into radial and angular parts proceeds differently in the wave-function picture and the Weyl-Wigner phase-space picture, Thus, the radial and angular kinetic energies are different quantities...

  10. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  11. Superconductor Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors: System Model of the Readout Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Alimenti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the readout electronics needed by superconductor Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs. MKIDs are typically implemented in the form of cryogenic-cooled high quality factor microwave resonator. The natural frequency of these resonators changes as a millimeter or sub-millimeter wave radiation impinges on the resonator itself. A quantitative system model of the readout electronics (very similar to that of a vector network analyzer has been implemented under ADS environment and tested by several simulation experiments. The developed model is a tool to further optimize the readout electronic and to design the frequency allocation of parallel-connected MKIDs resonators. The applications of MKIDs will be in microwave and millimeter-wave radiometric imaging as well as in radio-astronomy focal plane arrays.

  12. Vascular aging processes accelerate following a cubic kinetic: pulse wave velocity as an objective counterpart that time, as we age, goes by faster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabutti L

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Luca Gabutti, Rosaria Del Giorno Department of Internal Medicine and Nephrology, Bellinzona Regional Hospital, Bellinzona, SwitzerlandArterial stiffness is a marker of vascular aging and is considered to be the most reliable parameter expressing, like an integral in mathematics, the cumulative consequences, on the vascular wall, of degenerative and adaptive changes occurring throughout life.1 The efficiency of the reparative processes, the cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF, and early life and genetic determinants, all play a relevant role.1 Among CVRF, the acceleration in arterial stiffness progression related to age is mainly influenced by hypertension.1 A pathological acceleration translates into the concept of early vascular aging, a concept that can be quantified calculating the gap between the subject’s chronological (estimated on the basis of the epidemiological data obtained in the normal population and effective vascular age.2 Data of subpopulations without active risk factors for accelerated vascular aging can be found mainly in three large epidemiological studies, performed respectively in Portugal,3 Argentina,4 and seven different European countries (Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, and UK gathered in a collaborative investigation.5 Those doing this secondary analysis were aware of the limitation related to the use of cross-sectional data to extrapolate longitudinal changes, and their aims were combining the abovementioned epidemiological data concerning the normal population to calculate with the highest possible accuracy 1 the age-related increase in acceleration of the pulse wave velocity (PWV and to estimate both 2 the age-specific relative amount of time equivalent to that necessary to progress 1 year in vascular age at 20, and 3 the cumulative relative age calculated in year equivalents. 

  13. Vector boson excitations near deconfined quantum critical points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yejin; Strack, Philipp; Sachdev, Subir

    2013-10-18

    We show that the Néel states of two-dimensional antiferromagnets have low energy vector boson excitations in the vicinity of deconfined quantum critical points. We compute the universal damping of these excitations arising from spin-wave emission. Detection of such a vector boson will demonstrate the existence of emergent topological gauge excitations in a quantum spin system.

  14. Wave calculus based upon wave logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, Y.F.

    1978-01-01

    A number operator has been introduced based upon the binary (p-nary) presentation of numbers. This operator acts upon a numerical state vector. Generally the numerical state vector describes numbers that are not precise but smeared in a quantum sense. These states are interrupted in wave logic terms, according to which concepts may exist within the inner language of a phenomenon that in principle cannot be translated into the language of the investigator. In particular, states may exist where mean values of a quantity, continuous in classical limits, take only discrete values. Operators for differentiation and integration of operator functions are defined, which take the usual form in the classical limit. (author)

  15. Perturbations of ultralight vector field dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cembranos, J.A.R.; Maroto, A.L.; Jareño, S.J. Núñez [Departamento de Física Teórica I, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-02-13

    We study the dynamics of cosmological perturbations in models of dark matter based on ultralight coherent vector fields. Very much as for scalar field dark matter, we find two different regimes in the evolution: for modes with k{sup 2}≪Hma, we have a particle-like behaviour indistinguishable from cold dark matter, whereas for modes with k{sup 2}≫Hma, we get a wave-like behaviour in which the sound speed is non-vanishing and of order c{sub s}{sup 2}≃k{sup 2}/m{sup 2}a{sup 2}. This implies that, also in these models, structure formation could be suppressed on small scales. However, unlike the scalar case, the fact that the background evolution contains a non-vanishing homogeneous vector field implies that, in general, the evolution of the three kinds of perturbations (scalar, vector and tensor) can no longer be decoupled at the linear level. More specifically, in the particle regime, the three types of perturbations are actually decoupled, whereas in the wave regime, the three vector field perturbations generate one scalar-tensor and two vector-tensor perturbations in the metric. Also in the wave regime, we find that a non-vanishing anisotropic stress is present in the perturbed energy-momentum tensor giving rise to a gravitational slip of order (Φ−Ψ)/Φ∼c{sub s}{sup 2}. Moreover in this regime the amplitude of the tensor to scalar ratio of the scalar-tensor modes is also h/Φ∼c{sub s}{sup 2}. This implies that small-scale density perturbations are necessarily associated to the presence of gravity waves in this model. We compare their spectrum with the sensitivity of present and future gravity waves detectors.

  16. VectorBase

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — VectorBase is a Bioinformatics Resource Center for invertebrate vectors. It is one of four Bioinformatics Resource Centers funded by NIAID to provide web-based...

  17. Drift wave stabilized by an additional streaming ion or plasma population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, M. F.; Vranjes, J.

    2015-03-01

    It is shown that the universally unstable kinetic drift wave in an electron-ion plasma can very effectively be suppressed by adding an extra flowing ion (or plasma) population. The effect of the flow of the added ions is essential, their response is of the type (vp h-vf 0) exp[-(vph-vf 0) 2] , where vf 0 is the flow speed and vp h is the phase speed parallel to the magnetic field vector. The damping is strong and it is mainly due to this ion exponential term, and this remains so for vf 0

  18. Linear Water Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, N.; Maz'ya, V.; Vainberg, B.

    2002-08-01

    This book gives a self-contained and up-to-date account of mathematical results in the linear theory of water waves. The study of waves has many applications, including the prediction of behavior of floating bodies (ships, submarines, tension-leg platforms etc.), the calculation of wave-making resistance in naval architecture, and the description of wave patterns over bottom topography in geophysical hydrodynamics. The first section deals with time-harmonic waves. Three linear boundary value problems serve as the approximate mathematical models for these types of water waves. The next section uses a plethora of mathematical techniques in the investigation of these three problems. The techniques used in the book include integral equations based on Green's functions, various inequalities between the kinetic and potential energy and integral identities which are indispensable for proving the uniqueness theorems. The so-called inverse procedure is applied to constructing examples of non-uniqueness, usually referred to as 'trapped nodes.'

  19. Generalization of concurrence vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Changshui; Song Heshan

    2004-01-01

    In this Letter, based on the generalization of concurrence vectors for bipartite pure state with respect to employing tensor product of generators of the corresponding rotation groups, we generalize concurrence vectors to the case of mixed states; a new criterion of separability of multipartite pure states is given out, for which we define a concurrence vector; we generalize the vector to the case of multipartite mixed state and give out a good measure of free entanglement

  20. Vector Network Coding

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimi, Javad; Fragouli, Christina

    2010-01-01

    We develop new algebraic algorithms for scalar and vector network coding. In vector network coding, the source multicasts information by transmitting vectors of length L, while intermediate nodes process and combine their incoming packets by multiplying them with L X L coding matrices that play a similar role as coding coefficients in scalar coding. Our algorithms for scalar network jointly optimize the employed field size while selecting the coding coefficients. Similarly, for vector co...

  1. Vector Network Coding Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimi, Javad; Fragouli, Christina

    2010-01-01

    We develop new algebraic algorithms for scalar and vector network coding. In vector network coding, the source multicasts information by transmitting vectors of length L, while intermediate nodes process and combine their incoming packets by multiplying them with L x L coding matrices that play a similar role as coding c in scalar coding. Our algorithms for scalar network jointly optimize the employed field size while selecting the coding coefficients. Similarly, for vector coding, our algori...

  2. Convexity and Marginal Vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, S.; Hamers, H.J.M.; Norde, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we construct sets of marginal vectors of a TU game with the property that if the marginal vectors from these sets are core elements, then the game is convex.This approach leads to new upperbounds on the number of marginal vectors needed to characterize convexity.An other result is that

  3. Custodial vector model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becciolini, Diego; Franzosi, Diogo Buarque; Foadi, Roshan

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) phenomenology of heavy vector resonances with a $SU(2)_L\\times SU(2)_R$ spectral global symmetry. This symmetry partially protects the electroweak S-parameter from large contributions of the vector resonances. The resulting custodial vector model spectrum...

  4. Kinetic theory of weakly ionized dilute gas of hydrogen-like atoms of the first principles of quantum statistics and dispersion laws of eigenwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyusarenko, Yurii V.; Sliusarenko, Oleksii Yu.

    2017-11-01

    We develop a microscopic approach to the construction of the kinetic theory of dilute weakly ionized gas of hydrogen-like atoms. The approach is based on the statements of the second quantization method in the presence of bound states of particles. The basis of the derivation of kinetic equations is the method of reduced description of relaxation processes. Within the framework of the proposed approach, a system of common kinetic equations for the Wigner distribution functions of free oppositely charged fermions of two kinds (electrons and cores) and their bound states—hydrogen-like atoms— is obtained. Kinetic equations are used to study the spectra of elementary excitations in the system when all its components are non-degenerate. It is shown that in such a system, in addition to the typical plasma waves, there are longitudinal waves of matter polarization and the transverse ones with a behavior characteristic of plasmon polaritons. The expressions for the dependence of the frequencies and Landau damping coefficients on the wave vector for all branches of the oscillations discovered are obtained. Numerical evaluation of the elementary perturbation parameters in the system on an example of a weakly ionized dilute gas of the 23Na atoms using the D2-line characteristics of the natrium atom is given. We note the possibility of using the results of the developed theory to describe the properties of a Bose condensate of photons in the diluted weakly ionized gas of hydrogen-like atoms.

  5. Kinetics and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ahmadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous degradation of Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84 by potassium peroxydisulfate (K2S2O8 has been studied in laboratory scale experiments. The effect of the initial concentrations of potassium peroxydisulfate and RY84, pH and temperature on RY84 degradation were also examined. Experimental data were analyzed using first and second-order kinetics. The degradation kinetics of RY84 of the potassium peroxydisulfate process followed the second-order reaction kinetics. These rate constants have an extreme values similar to of 9.493 mM−1min−1 at a peroxydisulfate dose of 4 mmol/L. Thermodynamic parameters such as activation (Ea and Gibbs free energy (ΔG° were also evaluated. The negative value of ΔGo and Ea shows the spontaneous reaction natural conditions and exothermic nature.

  6. Waves in plasmas (part 1 - wave-plasma interaction general background)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, R.

    2004-01-01

    This document gathers a series of transparencies presented in the framework of the week-long lectures 'hot plasmas 2004' and dedicated to the physics of wave-plasma interaction. The structure of this document is as follows: 1) wave and diverse plasmas, 2) basic equations (Maxwell equations), 3) waves in a fluid plasma, and 4) waves in a kinetic plasma (collisionless plasma)

  7. Granulocyte kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, A.M.; Lavender, J.P.; Saverymuttu, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    By using density gradient materials enriched with autologous plasma, the authors have been able to isolate granulocutes from other cellular elements and label them with In-111 without separation from a plasma environment. The kinetic behavior of these cells suggests that phenomena attributed to granulocyte activation are greatly reduced by this labeling. Here, they review their study of granulocyte kinetics in health and disease in hope of quantifying sites of margination and identifying principal sites of destruction. The three principle headings of the paper are distribution, life-span, and destruction

  8. Attenuated Vector Tomography -- An Approach to Image Flow Vector Fields with Doppler Ultrasonic Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Qiu; Peng, Qiyu; Huang, Bin; Cheryauka, Arvi; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of flow obtained using continuous wave Doppler ultrasound is formulated as a directional projection of a flow vector field. When a continuous ultrasound wave bounces against a flowing particle, a signal is backscattered. This signal obtains a Doppler frequency shift proportional to the speed of the particle along the ultrasound beam. This occurs for each particle along the beam, giving rise to a Doppler velocity spectrum. The first moment of the spectrum provides the directional projection of the flow along the ultrasound beam. Signals reflected from points further away from the detector will have lower amplitude than signals reflected from points closer to the detector. The effect is very much akin to that modeled by the attenuated Radon transform in emission computed tomography.A least-squares method was adopted to reconstruct a 2D vector field from directional projection measurements. Attenuated projections of only the longitudinal projections of the vector field were simulated. The components of the vector field were reconstructed using the gradient algorithm to minimize a least-squares criterion. This result was compared with the reconstruction of longitudinal projections of the vector field without attenuation. If attenuation is known, the algorithm was able to accurately reconstruct both components of the full vector field from only one set of directional projection measurements. A better reconstruction was obtained with attenuation than without attenuation implying that attenuation provides important information for the reconstruction of flow vector fields.This confirms previous work where we showed that knowledge of the attenuation distribution helps in the reconstruction of MRI diffusion tensor fields from fewer than the required measurements. In the application of ultrasound the attenuation distribution is obtained with pulse wave transmission computed tomography and flow information is obtained with continuous wave Doppler

  9. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E

    2014-01-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity. (papers)

  10. Rotations with Rodrigues' vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, E

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears to be a fundamental matrix that is used to express the components of the angular velocity, the rotation matrix and the angular momentum vector. The Hamiltonian formalism of rotational dynamics in terms of this vector uses the same matrix. The quantization of the rotational dynamics is performed with simple rules if one uses Rodrigues' vector and similar formal expressions for the quantum operators that mimic the Hamiltonian classical dynamics.

  11. Gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, H.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    2000-01-01

    Gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory is developed as an extension of the existing gyrokinetic theories. In essence, the formalism introduced here is a kinetic description of magnetized plasmas in the gyrocenter coordinates which is fully equivalent to the Vlasov-Maxwell system in the particle coordinates. In particular, provided the gyroradius is smaller than the scale-length of the magnetic field, it can treat high frequency range as well as the usual low frequency range normally associated with gyrokinetic approaches. A significant advantage of this formalism is that it enables the direct particle-in-cell simulations of compressional Alfven waves for MHD applications and of RF waves relevant to plasma heating in space and laboratory plasmas. The gyrocenter-gauge kinetic susceptibility for arbitrary wavelength and arbitrary frequency electromagnetic perturbations in a homogeneous magnetized plasma is shown to recover exactly the classical result obtained by integrating the Vlasov-Maxwell system in the particle coordinates. This demonstrates that all the waves supported by the Vlasov-Maxwell system can be studied using the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic model in the gyrocenter coordinates. This theoretical approach is so named to distinguish it from the existing gyrokinetic theory, which has been successfully developed and applied to many important low-frequency and long parallel wavelength problems, where the conventional meaning of gyrokinetic has been standardized. Besides the usual gyrokinetic distribution function, the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory emphasizes as well the gyrocenter-gauge distribution function, which sometimes contains all the physics of the problems being studied, and whose importance has not been realized previously. The gyrocenter-gauge distribution function enters Maxwell's equations through the pull-back transformation of the gyrocenter transformation, which depends on the perturbed fields. The efficacy of the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic approach is

  12. Filamentation instability of lower hybrid waves in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaw, P.K.

    1976-02-01

    It is shown that a strong lower hybrid wave is modulationally unstable to perturbations propagating along its own wave vector. The instability relies critically on the finite thermal corrections to the lower hybrid dispersion relation

  13. The evaporative vector: Homogeneous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klots, C.E.

    1987-05-01

    Molecular beams of van der Waals molecules are the subject of much current research. Among the methods used to form these beams, three-sputtering, laser ablation, and the sonic nozzle expansion of neat gases - yield what are now recognized to be ''warm clusters.'' They contain enough internal energy to undergo a number of first-order processes, in particular that of evaporation. Because of this evaporation and its attendant cooling, the properties of such clusters are time-dependent. The states of matter which can be arrived at via an evaporative vector on a typical laboratory time-scale are discussed. Topics include the (1) temperatures, (2) metastability, (3) phase transitions, (4) kinetic energies of fragmentation, and (5) the expression of magical properties, all for evaporating homogeneous clusters

  14. Nonlocal theory of electromagnetic wave decay into two electromagnetic waves in a rippled density plasma channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sati, Priti; Tripathi, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    Parametric decay of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave into two electromagnetic modes in a rippled density plasma channel is investigated. The channel is taken to possess step density profile besides a density ripple of axial wave vector. The density ripple accounts for the momentum mismatch between the interacting waves and facilitates nonlinear coupling. For a given pump wave frequency, the requisite ripple wave number varies only a little w.r.t. the frequency of the low frequency decay wave. The radial localization of electromagnetic wave reduces the growth rate of the parametric instability. The growth rate decreases with the frequency of low frequency electromagnetic wave.

  15. Custodial vector model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becciolini, Diego; Franzosi, Diogo Buarque; Foadi, Roshan; Frandsen, Mads T.; Hapola, Tuomas; Sannino, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    We analyze the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) phenomenology of heavy vector resonances with a S U (2 )L×S U (2 )R spectral global symmetry. This symmetry partially protects the electroweak S parameter from large contributions of the vector resonances. The resulting custodial vector model spectrum and interactions with the standard model fields lead to distinct signatures at the LHC in the diboson, dilepton, and associated Higgs channels.

  16. Vector Differential Calculus

    OpenAIRE

    HITZER, Eckhard MS

    2002-01-01

    This paper treats the fundamentals of the vector differential calculus part of universal geometric calculus. Geometric calculus simplifies and unifies the structure and notation of mathematics for all of science and engineering, and for technological applications. In order to make the treatment self-contained, I first compile all important geometric algebra relationships,which are necesssary for vector differential calculus. Then differentiation by vectors is introduced and a host of major ve...

  17. Implicit Real Vector Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Degbomont

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the symbolic representation of non-convex real polyhedra, i.e., sets of real vectors satisfying arbitrary Boolean combinations of linear constraints. We develop an original data structure for representing such sets, based on an implicit and concise encoding of a known structure, the Real Vector Automaton. The resulting formalism provides a canonical representation of polyhedra, is closed under Boolean operators, and admits an efficient decision procedure for testing the membership of a vector.

  18. Black holes in vector-tensor theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heisenberg, Lavinia [Institute for Theoretical Studies, ETH Zurich, Clausiusstrasse 47, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Kase, Ryotaro; Tsujikawa, Shinji [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3, Kagurazaka, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); Minamitsuji, Masato, E-mail: lavinia.heisenberg@eth-its.ethz.ch, E-mail: r.kase@rs.tus.ac.jp, E-mail: masato.minamitsuji@tecnico.ulisboa.pt, E-mail: shinji@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica—CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico—IST, Universidade de Lisboa—UL, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2017-08-01

    We study static and spherically symmetric black hole (BH) solutions in second-order generalized Proca theories with nonminimal vector field derivative couplings to the Ricci scalar, the Einstein tensor, and the double dual Riemann tensor. We find concrete Lagrangians which give rise to exact BH solutions by imposing two conditions of the two identical metric components and the constant norm of the vector field. These exact solutions are described by either Reissner-Nordström (RN), stealth Schwarzschild, or extremal RN solutions with a non-trivial longitudinal mode of the vector field. We then numerically construct BH solutions without imposing these conditions. For cubic and quartic Lagrangians with power-law couplings which encompass vector Galileons as the specific cases, we show the existence of BH solutions with the difference between two non-trivial metric components. The quintic-order power-law couplings do not give rise to non-trivial BH solutions regular throughout the horizon exterior. The sixth-order and intrinsic vector-mode couplings can lead to BH solutions with a secondary hair. For all the solutions, the vector field is regular at least at the future or past horizon. The deviation from General Relativity induced by the Proca hair can be potentially tested by future measurements of gravitational waves in the nonlinear regime of gravity.

  19. Physisorption kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    1986-01-01

    This monograph deals with the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of molecules physisorbed on solid surfaces. Although frequent and detailed reference is made to experiment, it is mainly concerned with the theory of the subject. In this, we have attempted to present a unified picture based on the master equation approach. Physisorption kinetics is by no means a closed and mature subject; rather, in writing this monograph we intended to survey a field very much in flux, to assess its achievements so far, and to give a reasonable basis from which further developments can take off. For this reason we have included many papers in the bibliography that are not referred to in the text but are of relevance to physisorption. To keep this monograph to a reasonable size, and also to allow for some unity in the presentation of the material, we had to omit a number of topics related to physisorption kinetics. We have not covered to any extent the equilibrium properties of physisorbed layers such as structures, phase tr...

  20. Vectorized Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    Examination of the global algorithms and local kernels of conventional general-purpose Monte Carlo codes shows that multigroup Monte Carlo methods have sufficient structure to permit efficient vectorization. A structured multigroup Monte Carlo algorithm for vector computers is developed in which many particle events are treated at once on a cell-by-cell basis. Vectorization of kernels for tracking and variance reduction is described, and a new method for discrete sampling is developed to facilitate the vectorization of collision analysis. To demonstrate the potential of the new method, a vectorized Monte Carlo code for multigroup radiation transport analysis was developed. This code incorporates many features of conventional general-purpose production codes, including general geometry, splitting and Russian roulette, survival biasing, variance estimation via batching, a number of cutoffs, and generalized tallies of collision, tracklength, and surface crossing estimators with response functions. Predictions of vectorized performance characteristics for the CYBER-205 were made using emulated coding and a dynamic model of vector instruction timing. Computation rates were examined for a variety of test problems to determine sensitivities to batch size and vector lengths. Significant speedups are predicted for even a few hundred particles per batch, and asymptotic speedups by about 40 over equivalent Amdahl 470V/8 scalar codes arepredicted for a few thousand particles per batch. The principal conclusion is that vectorization of a general-purpose multigroup Monte Carlo code is well worth the significant effort required for stylized coding and major algorithmic changes

  1. Vectors and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pettofrezzo, Anthony J

    2005-01-01

    Geared toward undergraduate students, this text illustrates the use of vectors as a mathematical tool in plane synthetic geometry, plane and spherical trigonometry, and analytic geometry of two- and three-dimensional space. Its rigorous development includes a complete treatment of the algebra of vectors in the first two chapters.Among the text's outstanding features are numbered definitions and theorems in the development of vector algebra, which appear in italics for easy reference. Most of the theorems include proofs, and coordinate position vectors receive an in-depth treatment. Key concept

  2. Symbolic computer vector analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoutemyer, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    A MACSYMA program is described which performs symbolic vector algebra and vector calculus. The program can combine and simplify symbolic expressions including dot products and cross products, together with the gradient, divergence, curl, and Laplacian operators. The distribution of these operators over sums or products is under user control, as are various other expansions, including expansion into components in any specific orthogonal coordinate system. There is also a capability for deriving the scalar or vector potential of a vector field. Examples include derivation of the partial differential equations describing fluid flow and magnetohydrodynamics, for 12 different classic orthogonal curvilinear coordinate systems.

  3. Identification of the propagation mode of a solar wind wave associated with Pc5 pulsations in the magnetosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, A.D.M.; Stephenson, J.A.E. [KwaZulu-Natal Univ., Durban (South Africa). School of Chemistry and Physics

    2014-07-01

    A case study of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave in the solar wind that is strongly correlated with a magnetospheric field line resonance observed by the SuperDARN (Super Dual Auroral Radar Network) radar at Sanae, Antarctica is presented. The data from the ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) satellite at the solar libration point are analysed. The data time series are bandpass filtered at the pulsation frequency and the analytic signal deduced. From these data the partition of energy between the field components is computed. It is shown that energy is equally partitioned between the kinetic energy and transverse magnetic potential energy densities. The energy flux vector is closely aligned with the background magnetic field. The transverse magnetic and velocity components are in antiphase. This is the first identification of the triggering wave as a transverse Alfven wave which originates upstream from the space craft and is propagated to the magnetosphere to trigger the pulsation.

  4. Dependence of the electron Langmuir wave damping on the angle of propagation in weakly ionized neon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zigman, V.J.; Milic, B.S.

    1995-01-01

    The dependence of the attenuation of the longitudinal electron Langmuir waves (ω ∼ ω pe ), in collisional weakly ionized, non-magnetized, uniform and steady-state plasmas placed in external d.c. electric field, on the angle θ between the wave vector and the electron drift rvec u is studied on the ground of the kinetic theory and the linear perturbation technique. The collisionless and collisional contributions to the overall attenuation were evaluated separately, as it was shown previously that in certain instances the elastic e - n encounters (with collision frequency ν en , ν en much-lt ω pe ) may attenuate the Langmuir waves more efficiently than the Landau mechanism. More precisely, it was found that, for any fixed value of E 0 /n n , there exists a critical value of the ratio n n /X above which the collisional attenuation prevails

  5. Velocity-space diffusion due to resonant wave-wave scattering of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugaya, Reija

    1991-01-01

    The velocity-space diffusion equation describing distortion of the velocity distribution function due to resonant wave-wave scattering of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves in an unmagnetized plasma is derived from the Vlasov-Maxwell equations by perturbation theory. The conservation laws for total energy and momentum densities of waves and particles are verified, and the time evolutions of the energy and momentum densities of particles are given in terms of the nonlinear wave-wave coupling coefficient in the kinetic wave equation. (author)

  6. Vector pulsing soliton of self-induced transparency in waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamashvili, G.T.

    2015-01-01

    A theory of an optical resonance vector pulsing soliton in waveguide is developed. A thin transition layer containing semiconductor quantum dots forms the boundary between the waveguide and one of the connected media. Analytical and numerical solutions for the optical vector pulsing soliton in waveguide are obtained. The vector pulsing soliton in the presence of excitonic and bi-excitonic excitations is compared with the soliton for waveguide TM-modes with parameters that can be used in modern optical experiments. It is shown that these nonlinear waves have significantly different parameters and shapes. - Highlights: • An optical vector pulsing soliton in a planar waveguide is presented. • Explicit form of the optical vector pulsing soliton are obtained. • The vector pulsing soliton and the soliton have different parameters and profiles

  7. Unusual energy properties of leaky backward Lamb waves in a submerged plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedospasov, I A; Mozhaev, V G; Kuznetsova, I E

    2017-05-01

    It is found that leaky backward Lamb waves, i.e. waves with negative energy-flux velocity, propagating in a plate submerged in a liquid possess extraordinary energy properties distinguishing them from any other type of waves in isotropic media. Namely, the total time-averaged energy flux along the waveguide axis is equal to zero for these waves due to opposite directions of the longitudinal energy fluxes in the adjacent media. This property gives rise to the fundamental question of how to define and calculate correctly the energy velocity in such an unusual case. The procedure of calculation based on incomplete integration of the energy flux density over the plate thickness alone is applied. The derivative of the angular frequency with respect to the wave vector, usually referred to as the group velocity, happens to be close to the energy velocity defined by this mean in that part of the frequency range where the backward mode exists in the free plate. The existence region of the backward mode is formally increased for the submerged plate in comparison to the free plate as a result of the liquid-induced hybridization of propagating and nonpropagating (evanescent) Lamb modes. It is shown that the Rayleigh's principle (i.e. equipartition of total time-averaged kinetic and potential energies for time-harmonic acoustic fields) is violated due to the leakage of Lamb waves, in spite of considering nondissipative media. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Phase-space description of plasma waves. Linear and nonlinear theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, T.

    1992-11-01

    We develop an (r,k) phase space description of waves in plasmas by introducing Gaussian window functions to separate short scale oscillations from long scale modulations of the wave fields and variations in the plasma parameters. To obtain a wave equation that unambiguously separates conservative dynamics from dissipation also in an inhomogeneous and time varying background plasma, we first discuss the proper form of the current response function. On the analogy of the particle distribution function f(v,r,t), we introduce a wave density N(k,r,t) on phase space. This function is proven to satisfy a simple continuity equation. Dissipation is also included, and this allows us to describe the damping or growth of wave density' along rays. Problems involving geometric optics of continuous media often appear simpler when viewed in phase space, since the flow of N in phase space is incompressible. Within the phase space representation, we obtain a very general formula for the second order nonlinear current in terms of the vector potential. This formula is a convenient starting point for studies of coherent as well as turbulent nonlinear processes. We derive kinetic equations for weakly inhomogeneous and turbulent plasma, including the effects of inhomogeneous turbulence, wave convection and refraction. (author)

  9. Vector-Vector Scattering on the Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-López, Fernando; Urbach, Carsten; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2018-03-01

    In this work we present an extension of the LüScher formalism to include the interaction of particles with spin, focusing on the scattering of two vector particles. The derived formalism will be applied to Scalar QED in the Higgs Phase, where the U(1) gauge boson acquires mass.

  10. Selection vector filter framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukac, Rastislav; Plataniotis, Konstantinos N.; Smolka, Bogdan; Venetsanopoulos, Anastasios N.

    2003-10-01

    We provide a unified framework of nonlinear vector techniques outputting the lowest ranked vector. The proposed framework constitutes a generalized filter class for multichannel signal processing. A new class of nonlinear selection filters are based on the robust order-statistic theory and the minimization of the weighted distance function to other input samples. The proposed method can be designed to perform a variety of filtering operations including previously developed filtering techniques such as vector median, basic vector directional filter, directional distance filter, weighted vector median filters and weighted directional filters. A wide range of filtering operations is guaranteed by the filter structure with two independent weight vectors for angular and distance domains of the vector space. In order to adapt the filter parameters to varying signal and noise statistics, we provide also the generalized optimization algorithms taking the advantage of the weighted median filters and the relationship between standard median filter and vector median filter. Thus, we can deal with both statistical and deterministic aspects of the filter design process. It will be shown that the proposed method holds the required properties such as the capability of modelling the underlying system in the application at hand, the robustness with respect to errors in the model of underlying system, the availability of the training procedure and finally, the simplicity of filter representation, analysis, design and implementation. Simulation studies also indicate that the new filters are computationally attractive and have excellent performance in environments corrupted by bit errors and impulsive noise.

  11. Brane vector phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.E.; Love, S.T.; Nitta, Muneto; Veldhuis, T. ter; Xiong, C.

    2009-01-01

    Local oscillations of the brane world are manifested as massive vector fields. Their coupling to the Standard Model can be obtained using the method of nonlinear realizations of the spontaneously broken higher-dimensional space-time symmetries, and to an extent, are model independent. Phenomenological limits on these vector field parameters are obtained using LEP collider data and dark matter constraints

  12. Two-color walking Peregrine solitary waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronio, Fabio; Chen, Shihua; Mihalache, Dumitru

    2017-09-15

    We study the extreme localization of light, evolving upon a non-zero background, in two-color parametric wave interaction in nonlinear quadratic media. We report the existence of quadratic Peregrine solitary waves, in the presence of significant group-velocity mismatch between the waves (or Poynting vector beam walk-off), in the regime of cascading second-harmonic generation. This finding opens a novel path for the experimental demonstration of extreme rogue waves in ultrafast quadratic nonlinear optics.

  13. Wigner functions of s waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, J. P.; Varro, S.; Wolf, A.; Schleich, W. P.

    2007-01-01

    We derive explicit expressions for the Wigner function of wave functions in D dimensions which depend on the hyperradius--that is, of s waves. They are based either on the position or the momentum representation of the s wave. The corresponding Wigner function depends on three variables: the absolute value of the D-dimensional position and momentum vectors and the angle between them. We illustrate these expressions by calculating and discussing the Wigner functions of an elementary s wave and the energy eigenfunction of a free particle

  14. Wigner functions of s waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens Peder; Varro, S.; Wolf, A.

    2007-01-01

    We derive explicit expressions for the Wigner function of wave functions in D dimensions which depend on the hyperradius-that is, of s waves. They are based either on the position or the momentum representation of the s wave. The corresponding Wigner function depends on three variables......: the absolute value of the D-dimensional position and momentum vectors and the angle between them. We illustrate these expressions by calculating and discussing the Wigner functions of an elementary s wave and the energy eigenfunction of a free particle....

  15. Stochastic kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombino, A.; Mosiello, R.; Norelli, F.; Jorio, V.M.; Pacilio, N.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear system kinetics is formulated according to a stochastic approach. The detailed probability balance equations are written for the probability of finding the mixed population of neutrons and detected neutrons, i.e. detectrons, at a given level for a given instant of time. Equations are integrated in search of a probability profile: a series of cases is analyzed through a progressive criterium. It tends to take into account an increasing number of physical processes within the chosen model. The most important contribution is that solutions interpret analytically experimental conditions of equilibrium (moise analysis) and non equilibrium (pulsed neutron measurements, source drop technique, start up procedures)

  16. Complex Polynomial Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The two branches of dynamical systems, continuous and discrete, correspond to the study of differential equations (vector fields) and iteration of mappings respectively. In holomorphic dynamics, the systems studied are restricted to those described by holomorphic (complex analytic) functions...... or meromorphic (allowing poles as singularities) functions. There already exists a well-developed theory for iterative holomorphic dynamical systems, and successful relations found between iteration theory and flows of vector fields have been one of the main motivations for the recent interest in holomorphic...... vector fields. Since the class of complex polynomial vector fields in the plane is natural to consider, it is remarkable that its study has only begun very recently. There are numerous fundamental questions that are still open, both in the general classification of these vector fields, the decomposition...

  17. Complex Polynomial Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Kealey

    vector fields. Since the class of complex polynomial vector fields in the plane is natural to consider, it is remarkable that its study has only begun very recently. There are numerous fundamental questions that are still open, both in the general classification of these vector fields, the decomposition...... of parameter spaces into structurally stable domains, and a description of the bifurcations. For this reason, the talk will focus on these questions for complex polynomial vector fields.......The two branches of dynamical systems, continuous and discrete, correspond to the study of differential equations (vector fields) and iteration of mappings respectively. In holomorphic dynamics, the systems studied are restricted to those described by holomorphic (complex analytic) functions...

  18. Black hole superradiance signatures of ultralight vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryakhtar, Masha; Lasenby, Robert; Teo, Mae

    2017-08-01

    The process of superradiance can extract angular momentum and energy from astrophysical black holes (BHs) to populate gravitationally bound states with an exponentially large number of light bosons. We analytically calculate superradiant growth rates for vectors around rotating BHs in the regime where the vector Compton wavelength is much larger than the BH size. Spin-1 bound states have superradiance times as short as a second around stellar BHs, growing up to a thousand times faster than their spin-0 counterparts. The fast rates allow us to use measurements of rapidly spinning BHs in x-ray binaries to exclude a wide range of masses for weakly coupled spin-1 particles, 5 ×10-14-2 ×10-11 eV ; lighter masses in the range 6 ×10-20-2 ×10-17 eV start to be constrained by supermassive BH spin measurements at a lower level of confidence. We also explore routes to detection of new vector particles possible with the advent of gravitational wave (GW) astronomy. The LIGO-Virgo Collaboration could discover hints of a new light vector particle in statistical analyses of masses and spins of merging BHs. Vector annihilations source continuous monochromatic gravitational radiation which could be observed by current GW observatories. At design sensitivity, Advanced LIGO may measure up to thousands of annihilation signals from within the Milky Way, while hundreds of BHs born in binary mergers across the observable Universe may superradiate vector bound states and become new beacons of monochromatic gravitational waves.

  19. Projector augmented wave method: ab initio molecular dynamics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    kinetic energy is small and the wave function is smooth. However, the wave ... and various strategies have been developed. ... methods let us briefly review the history of augmented ..... alleviated by adding an intelligent zero: If an operator B.

  20. Kinetic Theory of the Inner Magnetospheric Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Khazanov, George V

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a broad introduction to the kinetic theory of space plasma physics with the major focus on the inner magnetospheric plasma. It is designed to provide a comprehensive description of the different kinds of transport equations for both plasma particles and waves with an emphasis on the applicability and limitations of each set of equations. The major topics are: Kinetic Theory of Superthermal Electrons, Kinetic Foundation of the Hydrodynamic Description of Space Plasmas (including wave-particle interaction processes), and Kinetic Theory of the Terrestrial Ring Current. Distinguishable features of this book are the analytical solutions of simplified transport equations. Approximate analytic solutions of transport phenomena are very useful because they help us gain physical insight into how the system responds to varying sources of mass, momentum and energy and also to various external boundary conditions. They also provide us a convenient method to test the validity of complicated numerical mod...

  1. Generation of 1.024-Tb/s Nyquist-WDM phase-conjugated twin vector waves through polarization-insensitive optical parametric amplification enabling transmission over 4000-km dispersion-managed TWRS fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiang; Hu, Hao; Chandrasekhar, S.

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the first Tb/s Nyquist-WDM phase-conjugated twin waves, consisting of eight 128-Gb/s PDM-QPSK signals and their idlers, by a broadband polarization-insensitive fiber optical parametric amplifier, enabling more than doubled reach in dispersion-managed transmission. © ...

  2. Tolrestat kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.R.; Kraml, M.; Cayen, M.N.; Dubuc, J.; Ryder, S.; Dvornik, D.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of tolrestat, a potent inhibitor of aldose reductase, were examined. Serum concentrations of tolrestat and of total 14 C were measured after dosing normal subjects and subjects with diabetes with 14 C-labeled tolrestat. In normal subjects, tolrestat was rapidly absorbed and disappearance from serum was biphasic. Distribution and elimination t 1/2s were approximately 2 and 10 to 12 hr, respectively, after single and multiple doses. Unchanged tolrestat accounted for the major portion of 14 C in serum. Radioactivity was rapidly and completely excreted in urine and feces in an approximate ratio of 2:1. Findings were much the same in subjects with diabetes. In normal subjects, the kinetics of oral tolrestat were independent of dose in the 10 to 800 mg range. Repetitive dosing did not result in unexpected cumulation. Tolrestat was more than 99% bound to serum protein; it did not compete with warfarin for binding sites but was displaced to some extent by high concentrations of tolbutamide or salicylate

  3. 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Sadot, Oren; Igra, Ozer

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings collect the papers presented at the 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW30), which was held in Tel-Aviv Israel from July 19 to July 24, 2015. The Symposium was organized by Ortra Ltd. The ISSW30 focused on the state of knowledge of the following areas: Nozzle Flow, Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows with Shocks, Supersonic Jets, Chemical Kinetics, Chemical Reacting Flows, Detonation, Combustion, Ignition, Shock Wave Reflection and Interaction, Shock Wave Interaction with Obstacles, Shock Wave Interaction with Porous Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Granular Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Dusty Media, Plasma, Magnetohyrdrodynamics, Re-entry to Earth Atmosphere, Shock Waves in Rarefied Gases, Shock Waves in Condensed Matter (Solids and Liquids), Shock Waves in Dense Gases, Shock Wave Focusing, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Shock Boundary Layer Interaction, Multiphase Flow, Blast Waves, Facilities, Flow Visualization, and Numerical Methods. The two volumes serve as a reference ...

  4. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  5. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, A.; Fisch, N.J.

    2010-01-01

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  6. Alfven Waves in Gyrokinetic Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.; Qin, H.

    2003-01-01

    A brief comparison of the properties of Alfven waves that are based on the gyrokinetic description with those derived from the MHD equations is presented. The critical differences between these two approaches are the treatment of the ion polarization effects. As such, the compressional Alfven waves in a gyrokinetic plasma can be eliminated through frequency ordering, whereas geometric simplifications are needed to decouple the shear Alfven waves from the compressional Alfven waves within the context of MHD. Theoretical and numerical procedures of using gyrokinetic particle simulation for studying microturbulence and kinetic-MHD physics including finite Larmor radius effects are also presented

  7. Fractal vector optical fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-07-15

    We introduce the concept of a fractal, which provides an alternative approach for flexibly engineering the optical fields and their focal fields. We propose, design, and create a new family of optical fields-fractal vector optical fields, which build a bridge between the fractal and vector optical fields. The fractal vector optical fields have polarization states exhibiting fractal geometry, and may also involve the phase and/or amplitude simultaneously. The results reveal that the focal fields exhibit self-similarity, and the hierarchy of the fractal has the "weeding" role. The fractal can be used to engineer the focal field.

  8. Quantum theory of single events: Localized de Broglie-wavelets, Schroedinger waves and classical trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barut, A.O.

    1990-06-01

    For an arbitrary potential V with classical trajectories x-vector=g-vector(t) we construct localized oscillating three-dimensional wave lumps ψ(x-vector,t,g-vector) representing a single quantum particle. The crest of the envelope of the ripple follows the classical orbit g-vector(t) slightly modified due to potential V and ψ(x-vector,t;g-vector) satisfies the Schroedinger equation. The field energy, momentum and angular momentum calculated as integrals over all space are equal to particle energy, momentum and angular momentum. The relation to coherent states and to Schroedinger waves are also discussed. (author). 6 refs

  9. Noncausal Bayesian Vector Autoregression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanne, Markku; Luoto, Jani

    We propose a Bayesian inferential procedure for the noncausal vector autoregressive (VAR) model that is capable of capturing nonlinearities and incorporating effects of missing variables. In particular, we devise a fast and reliable posterior simulator that yields the predictive distribution...

  10. Understanding Vector Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curjel, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are activities that help students understand the idea of a vector field. Included are definitions, flow lines, tangential and normal components along curves, flux and work, field conservation, and differential equations. (KR)

  11. GAP Land Cover - Vector

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This vector dataset is a detailed (1-acre minimum), hierarchically organized vegetation cover map produced by computer classification of combined two-season pairs of...

  12. Sesquilinear uniform vector integral

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    theory, together with his integral, dominate contemporary mathematics. ... directions belonging to Bartle and Dinculeanu (see [1], [6], [7] and [2]). ... in this manner, namely he integrated vector functions with respect to measures of bounded.

  13. Tagged Vector Contour (TVC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Tagged Vector Contour (TVC) dataset consists of digitized contours from the 7.5 minute topographic quadrangle maps. Coverage for the state is incomplete....

  14. Vector hysteresis models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, Pavel

    1991-01-01

    Roč. 2, - (1991), s. 281-292 ISSN 0956-7925 Keywords : vector hysteresis operator * hysteresis potential * differential inequality Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.math.cas.cz/~krejci/b15p.pdf

  15. Alfven wave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stix, H.

    1981-01-01

    The physics of Alfven-wave heating is particularly sensitive to the character of the linear mode conversion which occurs at the Alfven resonance layer. Parameter changes can profoundly affect both the location within the plasma and the mechanism for the power absorption. Under optimal conditions the heating power may be absorbed by electron Landau damping and by electron transit-time magnetic pumping in the plasma interior, or by the same processes acting near the resonance layer on the mode-converted kinetic Alfven wave. The method is outlined for computing the coefficients for reflection, transmission and absorption at the resonance layer and some representative results are offered

  16. Mechanics, Waves and Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan Jain, Sudhir

    2016-05-01

    Figures; Preface; Acknowledgement; 1. Energy, mass, momentum; 2. Kinematics, Newton's laws of motion; 3. Circular motion; 4. The principle of least action; 5. Work and energy; 6. Mechanics of a system of particles; 7. Friction; 8. Impulse and collisions; 9. Central forces; 10. Dimensional analysis; 11. Oscillations; 12. Waves; 13. Sound of music; 14. Fluid mechanics; 15. Water waves; 16. The kinetic theory of gases; 17. Concepts and laws of thermodynamics; 18. Some applications of thermodynamics; 19. Basic ideas of statistical mechanics; Bibliography; Index.

  17. Support vector machines applications

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Guodong

    2014-01-01

    Support vector machines (SVM) have both a solid mathematical background and good performance in practical applications. This book focuses on the recent advances and applications of the SVM in different areas, such as image processing, medical practice, computer vision, pattern recognition, machine learning, applied statistics, business intelligence, and artificial intelligence. The aim of this book is to create a comprehensive source on support vector machine applications, especially some recent advances.

  18. Exotic composite vector boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akama, K.; Hattori, T.; Yasue, M.

    1991-01-01

    An exotic composite vector boson V is introduced in two dynamical models of composite quarks, leptons, W, and Z. One is based on four-Fermi interactions, in which composite vector bosons are regarded as fermion-antifermion bound states and the other is based on the confining SU(2) L gauge model, in which they are given by scalar-antiscalar bound states. Both approaches describe the same effective interactions for the sector of composite quarks, leptons, W, Z, γ, and V

  19. Vector borne diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Melillo Fenech, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    A vector-borne disease is one in which the pathogenic microorganism is transmitted from an infected individual to another individual by an arthropod or other agent. The transmission depends upon the attributes and requirements of at least three different Iiving organisms : the pathologic agent which is either a virus, protozoa, bacteria or helminth (worm); the vector, which is commonly an arthropod such as ticks or mosquitoes; and the human host.

  20. Material parameters and vector scaling in transformation acoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummer, Steven A; Rahm, Marco; Schurig, David

    2008-01-01

    The degree to which the coordinate transformation concept first demonstrated for electromagnetic waves can be applied to other classes of waves remains an open question. In this work, we thoroughly examine the coordinate transformation invariance of acoustic waves. We employ a purely physical argument to show how the acoustic velocity vector must transform differently than the E and H fields in Maxwell's equations, which explains why acoustic coordinate transformation invariance was not found in some previous analyses. A first principles analysis of the acoustic equations under arbitrary coordinate transformations confirms that the divergence operator is preserved only if velocity transforms in this physically correct way. This analysis also yields closed-form expressions for the bulk modulus and mass density tensor of the material required to realize an arbitrary coordinate transformation on the acoustic fields, which we show are equivalent to forms presented elsewhere. We demonstrate the computation of these material parameters in two specific cases and show that the change in velocity and pressure gradient vectors under a nonorthogonal coordinate transformation is precisely how these vectors must change from purely physical arguments. This analysis confirms that all of the electromagnetic devices and materials that have been conceived using the coordinate transformation approach are also in principle realizable for acoustic waves. Together with previous work, this analysis also shows how the curl, divergence and gradient operators maintain form under arbitrary coordinate transformations, opening the door to analyzing other wave systems built on these three vector operators.

  1. Vector properties in molecular photodissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, J.

    1999-12-01

    The technique of resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) of atomic and molecular species produced from a photofragmentation event combined with time-of flight (TOF) detection is used to examine scalar and vector properties following photodissociation. This technique is applied to the study of methyl bromide dissociation in a product state specific manner. We report measurements of the angular distributions and kinetic energy releases of the resulting bromine atoms in the ground and first spin-orbit excited state. Additionally we report measurements of the angular distributions and kinetic energy releases of the methyl fragment in the ground vibrational state, and also the excited state with one quanta in the ν 2 vibrational modes. These studies were carried out in the red wing of the absorption band at several wavelengths. For these measurements we were able to resolve the spin orbit state of the partner bromine fragment. From our observations we find new evidence for enhanced nonadiabatic curve crossing active in methyl bromide dissociation in comparison with earlier studies of methyl iodide. The atomic polarization produced following photodissociation of a diatomic molecule was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. We develop theoretical expressions relating the lab frame and molecular frame atomic polarization to the photoexcitation and subsequent dissociation of a diatomic molecule. This treatment includes both incoherent, coherent and non-adiabatic processes which may be active in the photodissociation process. We treat the general case of a polarized diatomic molecule yielding two fragments with non zero angular momentum. Experimentally, an investigation of the polarization of atomic Cl( 2 P 3/2 ) photofragments from the ∼330 nm photolysis of molecular chlorine using the REMPI-TOF technique is reported. We present a theoretical framework in which to treat such experiments allowing the extraction of parameters with direct physical

  2. Nonlinear Electrostatic Wave Equations for Magnetized Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dysthe, K.B.; Mjølhus, E.; Pécseli, Hans

    1984-01-01

    The lowest order kinetic effects are included in the equations for nonlinear electrostatic electron waves in a magnetized plasma. The modifications of the authors' previous analysis based on a fluid model are discussed.......The lowest order kinetic effects are included in the equations for nonlinear electrostatic electron waves in a magnetized plasma. The modifications of the authors' previous analysis based on a fluid model are discussed....

  3. Test of a new heat-flow equation for dense-fluid shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holian, Brad Lee; Mareschal, Michel; Ravelo, Ramon

    2010-09-21

    Using a recently proposed equation for the heat-flux vector that goes beyond Fourier's Law of heat conduction, we model shockwave propagation in the dense Lennard-Jones fluid. Disequilibrium among the three components of temperature, namely, the difference between the kinetic temperature in the direction of a planar shock wave and those in the transverse directions, particularly in the region near the shock front, gives rise to a new transport (equilibration) mechanism not seen in usual one-dimensional heat-flow situations. The modification of the heat-flow equation was tested earlier for the case of strong shock waves in the ideal gas, which had been studied in the past and compared to Navier-Stokes-Fourier solutions. Now, the Lennard-Jones fluid, whose equation of state and transport properties have been determined from independent calculations, allows us to study the case where potential, as well as kinetic contributions are important. The new heat-flow treatment improves the agreement with nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations under strong shock wave conditions, compared to Navier-Stokes.

  4. Vectorization in quantum chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, V.R.

    1987-01-01

    It is argued that the optimal vectorization algorithm for many steps (and sub-steps) in a typical ab initio calculation of molecular electronic structure is quite strongly dependent on the target vector machine. Details such as the availability (or lack) of a given vector construct in the hardware, vector startup times and asymptotic rates must all be considered when selecting the optimal algorithm. Illustrations are drawn from: gaussian integral evaluation, fock matrix construction, 4-index transformation of molecular integrals, direct-CI methods, the matrix multiply operation. A cross comparison of practical implementations on the CDC Cyber 205, the Cray-IS and Cray-XMP machines is presented. To achieve portability while remaining optimal on a wide range of machines it is necessary to code all available algorithms in a machine independent manner, and to select the appropriate algorithm using a procedure which is based on machine dependent parameters. Most such parameters concern the timing of certain vector loop kernals, which can usually be derived from a 'bench-marking' routine executed prior to the calculation proper

  5. ULF waves in the foreshock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstadt, E. W.; Le, G.; Strangeway, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    We review our current knowledge of ULF waves in planetary foreshocks. Most of this knowledge comes from observations taken within a few Earth radii of the terrestrial bow shock. Terrestrial foreshock ULF waves can be divided into three types, large amplitude low frequency waves (approximately 30-s period), upstream propagating whistlers (1-Hz waves), and 3-s waves. The 30-s waves are apparently generated by back-streaming ion beams, while the 1-Hz waves are generated at the bow shock. The source of the 3-s waves has yet to be determined. In addition to issues concerning the source of ULF waves in the foreshock, the waves present a number of challenges, both in terms of data acquisition, and comparison with theory. The various waves have different coherence scales, from approximately 100 km to approximately 1 Earth radius. Thus multi-spacecraft separation strategies must be tailored to the phenomenon of interest. From a theoretical point of view, the ULF waves are observed in a plasma in which the thermal pressure is comparable to the magnetic pressure, and the rest-frame wave frequency can be moderate fraction of the proton gyro-frequency. This requires the use of kinetic plasma wave dispersion relations, rather than multi-fluid MHD. Lastly, and perhaps most significantly, ULF waves are used to probe the ambient plasma, with inferences being drawn concerning the types of energetic ion distributions within the foreshock. However, since most of the data were acquired close to the bow shock, the properties of the more distant foreshock have to be deduced mainly through extrapolation of the near-shock results. A general understanding of the wave and plasma populations within the foreshock, their interrelation, and evolution, requires additional data from the more distant foreshock.

  6. Vector Fields on Product Manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Kurz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    This short report establishes some basic properties of smooth vector fields on product manifolds. The main results are: (i) On a product manifold there always exists a direct sum decomposition into horizontal and vertical vector fields. (ii) Horizontal and vertical vector fields are naturally isomorphic to smooth families of vector fields defined on the factors. Vector fields are regarded as derivations of the algebra of smooth functions.

  7. Penetration of an ordinary wave into a weakly inhomogeneous magnetoplasma at oblique incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preinhaelter, J.

    1973-12-01

    The propagation was studied of high-frequency electromagnetic waves in a plane-stratified weakly inhomogeneous plasma. The density gradient was assumed to be perpendicular to the external magnetic field and the wave vector was not considered to be generally parallel to the plane given by the two former vectors. The analysis shows that an ordinary wave may penetrate the plasma resonance region if the orientation of the vacuum wave vector is appropriately chosen. Analytical expressions for the reflexion and transmission coefficients were obtained and their dependence on the direction cosines of the wave vector of the incident wave was studied. It is also briefly shown that after the transmission through plasma resonance the ordinary wave was transformed into an extraordinary wave and the latter was reflected back to the region of hybrid resonance. In this region the extraordinary wave was fully transformed into the Bernstein modes. (author)

  8. An alternative to the plasma emission model: Particle-in-cell, self-consistent electromagnetic wave emission simulations of solar type III radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiklauri, David

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution (sub-Debye length grid size and 10 000 particle species per cell), 1.5D particle-in-cell, relativistic, fully electromagnetic simulations are used to model electromagnetic wave emission generation in the context of solar type III radio bursts. The model studies generation of electromagnetic waves by a super-thermal, hot beam of electrons injected into a plasma thread that contains uniform longitudinal magnetic field and a parabolic density gradient. In effect, a single magnetic line connecting Sun to Earth is considered, for which five cases are studied. (i) We find that the physical system without a beam is stable and only low amplitude level electromagnetic drift waves (noise) are excited. (ii) The beam injection direction is controlled by setting either longitudinal or oblique electron initial drift speed, i.e., by setting the beam pitch angle (the angle between the beam velocity vector and the direction of background magnetic field). In the case of zero pitch angle, i.e., when v-vector b ·E-vector perpendicular =0, the beam excites only electrostatic, standing waves, oscillating at local plasma frequency, in the beam injection spatial location, and only low level electromagnetic drift wave noise is also generated. (iii) In the case of oblique beam pitch angles, i.e., when v-vector b ·E-vector perpendicular =0, again electrostatic waves with same properties are excited. However, now the beam also generates the electromagnetic waves with the properties commensurate to type III radio bursts. The latter is evidenced by the wavelet analysis of transverse electric field component, which shows that as the beam moves to the regions of lower density and hence lower plasma frequency, frequency of the electromagnetic waves drops accordingly. (iv) When the density gradient is removed, an electron beam with an oblique pitch angle still generates the electromagnetic radiation. However, in the latter case no frequency decrease is seen. (v) Since in most of

  9. Bunyavirus-Vector Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate McElroy Horne

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Bunyaviridae family is comprised of more than 350 viruses, of which many within the Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The viruses within the Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods, such as mosquitoes, midges, flies, and ticks, and their associated arthropods not only serve as vectors but also as virus reservoirs in many cases. This review presents an overview of several important emerging or re-emerging bunyaviruses and describes what is known about bunyavirus-vector interactions based on epidemiological, ultrastructural, and genetic studies of members of this virus family.

  10. Sums and Gaussian vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Yurinsky, Vadim Vladimirovich

    1995-01-01

    Surveys the methods currently applied to study sums of infinite-dimensional independent random vectors in situations where their distributions resemble Gaussian laws. Covers probabilities of large deviations, Chebyshev-type inequalities for seminorms of sums, a method of constructing Edgeworth-type expansions, estimates of characteristic functions for random vectors obtained by smooth mappings of infinite-dimensional sums to Euclidean spaces. A self-contained exposition of the modern research apparatus around CLT, the book is accessible to new graduate students, and can be a useful reference for researchers and teachers of the subject.

  11. Duality in vector optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Bot, Radu Ioan

    2009-01-01

    This book presents fundamentals and comprehensive results regarding duality for scalar, vector and set-valued optimization problems in a general setting. After a preliminary chapter dedicated to convex analysis and minimality notions of sets with respect to partial orderings induced by convex cones a chapter on scalar conjugate duality follows. Then investigations on vector duality based on scalar conjugacy are made. Weak, strong and converse duality statements are delivered and connections to classical results from the literature are emphasized. One chapter is exclusively consecrated to the s

  12. Multithreading in vector processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelinos, Constantinos; Kim, Changhoan; Nair, Ravi

    2018-01-16

    In one embodiment, a system includes a processor having a vector processing mode and a multithreading mode. The processor is configured to operate on one thread per cycle in the multithreading mode. The processor includes a program counter register having a plurality of program counters, and the program counter register is vectorized. Each program counter in the program counter register represents a distinct corresponding thread of a plurality of threads. The processor is configured to execute the plurality of threads by activating the plurality of program counters in a round robin cycle.

  13. Matrix vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenman, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    This outstanding text and reference applies matrix ideas to vector methods, using physical ideas to illustrate and motivate mathematical concepts but employing a mathematical continuity of development rather than a physical approach. The author, who taught at the U.S. Air Force Academy, dispenses with the artificial barrier between vectors and matrices--and more generally, between pure and applied mathematics.Motivated examples introduce each idea, with interpretations of physical, algebraic, and geometric contexts, in addition to generalizations to theorems that reflect the essential structur

  14. Free topological vector spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriyelyan, Saak S.; Morris, Sidney A.

    2016-01-01

    We define and study the free topological vector space $\\mathbb{V}(X)$ over a Tychonoff space $X$. We prove that $\\mathbb{V}(X)$ is a $k_\\omega$-space if and only if $X$ is a $k_\\omega$-space. If $X$ is infinite, then $\\mathbb{V}(X)$ contains a closed vector subspace which is topologically isomorphic to $\\mathbb{V}(\\mathbb{N})$. It is proved that if $X$ is a $k$-space, then $\\mathbb{V}(X)$ is locally convex if and only if $X$ is discrete and countable. If $X$ is a metrizable space it is shown ...

  15. Scalar-vector bootstrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rejon-Barrera, Fernando [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam,Science Park 904, Postbus 94485, 1090 GL, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Robbins, Daniel [Department of Physics, Texas A& M University,TAMU 4242, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2016-01-22

    We work out all of the details required for implementation of the conformal bootstrap program applied to the four-point function of two scalars and two vectors in an abstract conformal field theory in arbitrary dimension. This includes a review of which tensor structures make appearances, a construction of the projectors onto the required mixed symmetry representations, and a computation of the conformal blocks for all possible operators which can be exchanged. These blocks are presented as differential operators acting upon the previously known scalar conformal blocks. Finally, we set up the bootstrap equations which implement crossing symmetry. Special attention is given to the case of conserved vectors, where several simplifications occur.

  16. Kinetic theory of tearing instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.; Dobrott, D.; Wang, T.S.

    1975-01-01

    The guiding-center kinetic equation with Fokker-Planck collision term is used to study, in cylindrical geometry, a class of dissipative instabilities of which the classical tearing mode is an archetype. Variational solution of the kinetic equation obviates the use of an approximate Ohm's law or adiabatic assumption, as used in previous studies, and it provides a dispersive relation which is uniformly valid for any ratio of wave frequency to collision frequency. One result of using the rigorous collision operator is the prediction of a new instability. This instability, driven by the electron temperature gradient, is predicted to occur under the long mean-free path conditions of present tokamak experiments, and has significant features in common with the kink-like oscillations observed in such experiments

  17. Complex space source theory of partially coherent light wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, S R

    2010-07-01

    The complex space source theory is used to derive a general integral expression for the vector potential that generates the extended full Gaussian wave in terms of the input value of the vector potential of the corresponding paraxial beam. The vector potential and the fields are assumed to fluctuate on a time scale that is large compared to the wave period. The Poynting vector in the propagation direction averaged over a wave period is expressed in terms of the cross-spectral density of the fluctuating vector potential across the input plane. The Schell model is assumed for the cross-spectral density. The radiation intensity distribution and the power radiated are determined. The effect of spatial coherence on the radiation intensity distribution and the radiated power are investigated for different values of the physical parameters. Illustrative numerical results are provided to bring out the effect of spatial coherence on the propagation characteristics of the fluctuating light wave.

  18. Wave number determination of Pc 1-2 mantle waves considering He++ ions: A Cluster study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, B.; Escoubet, C. P.; Santolík, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Khotyaintsev, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The present case study concerns narrowband electromagnetic emission detected in the distant cusp region simultaneously with upgoing plasma flows. The wave properties match the usual properties of the Pc 1-2 mantle waves: small angle between the wave vector and the magnetic field line, left-hand polarization, and propagation toward the ionosphere. We report here the first direct wave vector measurement of these waves (about 1.2 × 10- 2 rad/km) through multi spacecraft analysis using the three magnetic components and, at the same time, through single spacecraft analysis based on the refractive index analysis using the three magnetic components and two electric components. The refractive index analysis offers a simple way to estimate wave numbers in this frequency range. Numerical calculations are performed under the observed plasma conditions. The obtained results show that the ion distribution functions are unstable to ion cyclotron instability at the observed wave vector value, due to the large ion temperature anisotropy. We thus show that these electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are amplified in the distant cusp region. The Poynting flux of the waves is counterstreaming with respect to the plasma flow. This sense of propagation is consistent with the time necessary to amplify the emissions to the observed level. We point out the role of the wave damping at the He++ gyrofrequency to explain that such waves cannot be observed from the ground at the cusp foot print location.

  19. Permutation entropy with vector embedding delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Douglas J.; Kane, Deb M.

    2017-12-01

    Permutation entropy (PE) is a statistic used widely for the detection of structure within a time series. Embedding delay times at which the PE is reduced are characteristic timescales for which such structure exists. Here, a generalized scheme is investigated where embedding delays are represented by vectors rather than scalars, permitting PE to be calculated over a (D -1 ) -dimensional space, where D is the embedding dimension. This scheme is applied to numerically generated noise, sine wave and logistic map series, and experimental data sets taken from a vertical-cavity surface emitting laser exhibiting temporally localized pulse structures within the round-trip time of the laser cavity. Results are visualized as PE maps as a function of embedding delay, with low PE values indicating combinations of embedding delays where correlation structure is present. It is demonstrated that vector embedding delays enable identification of structure that is ambiguous or masked, when the embedding delay is constrained to scalar form.

  20. Fractional vector calculus and fractional Maxwell's equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of derivatives and integrals of non-integer order goes back to Leibniz, Liouville, Grunwald, Letnikov and Riemann. The history of fractional vector calculus (FVC) has only 10 years. The main approaches to formulate a FVC, which are used in the physics during the past few years, will be briefly described in this paper. We solve some problems of consistent formulations of FVC by using a fractional generalization of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We define the differential and integral vector operations. The fractional Green's, Stokes' and Gauss's theorems are formulated. The proofs of these theorems are realized for simplest regions. A fractional generalization of exterior differential calculus of differential forms is discussed. Fractional nonlocal Maxwell's equations and the corresponding fractional wave equations are considered

  1. In-vivo studies of new vector velocity and adaptive spectral estimators in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    2010-01-01

    New ultrasound techniques for blood flow estimation have been investigated in-vivo. These are vector velocity estimators (Transverse Oscillation, Synthetic Transmit Aperture, Directional Beamforming and Plane Wave Excitation) and adaptive spectral estimators (Blood spectral Power Capon and Blood...

  2. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  3. Production of lentiviral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto-Wilhelm Merten

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lentiviral vectors (LV have seen considerably increase in use as gene therapy vectors for the treatment of acquired and inherited diseases. This review presents the state of the art of the production of these vectors with particular emphasis on their large-scale production for clinical purposes. In contrast to oncoretroviral vectors, which are produced using stable producer cell lines, clinical-grade LV are in most of the cases produced by transient transfection of 293 or 293T cells grown in cell factories. However, more recent developments, also, tend to use hollow fiber reactor, suspension culture processes, and the implementation of stable producer cell lines. As is customary for the biotech industry, rather sophisticated downstream processing protocols have been established to remove any undesirable process-derived contaminant, such as plasmid or host cell DNA or host cell proteins. This review compares published large-scale production and purification processes of LV and presents their process performances. Furthermore, developments in the domain of stable cell lines and their way to the use of production vehicles of clinical material will be presented.

  4. Orthogonalisation of Vectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Gram-Schmidt process is one of the first things one learns in a course ... We might want to stay as close to the experimental data as possible when converting these vectors to orthonormal ones demanded by the model. The process of finding the closest or- thonormal .... is obtained by writing the matrix A = [aI, an], then.

  5. From vectors to mnesors

    OpenAIRE

    Champenois, Gilles

    2007-01-01

    The mnesor theory is the adaptation of vectors to artificial intelligence. The scalar field is replaced by a lattice. Addition becomes idempotent and multiplication is interpreted as a selection operation. We also show that mnesors can be the foundation for a linear calculus.

  6. Calculus with vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Treiman, Jay S

    2014-01-01

    Calculus with Vectors grew out of a strong need for a beginning calculus textbook for undergraduates who intend to pursue careers in STEM. fields. The approach introduces vector-valued functions from the start, emphasizing the connections between one-variable and multi-variable calculus. The text includes early vectors and early transcendentals and includes a rigorous but informal approach to vectors. Examples and focused applications are well presented along with an abundance of motivating exercises. All three-dimensional graphs have rotatable versions included as extra source materials and may be freely downloaded and manipulated with Maple Player; a free Maple Player App is available for the iPad on iTunes. The approaches taken to topics such as the derivation of the derivatives of sine and cosine, the approach to limits, and the use of "tables" of integration have been modified from the standards seen in other textbooks in order to maximize the ease with which students may comprehend the material. Additio...

  7. On vector equilibrium problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [G] Giannessi F, Theorems of alternative, quadratic programs and complementarity problems, in: Variational Inequalities and Complementarity Problems (eds) R W Cottle, F Giannessi and J L Lions (New York: Wiley) (1980) pp. 151±186. [K1] Kazmi K R, Existence of solutions for vector optimization, Appl. Math. Lett. 9 (1996).

  8. Vector-borne Infections

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-18

    This podcast discusses emerging vector-borne pathogens, their role as prominent contributors to emerging infectious diseases, how they're spread, and the ineffectiveness of mosquito control methods.  Created: 4/18/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/27/2011.

  9. Maximization of wave motion within a hydrocarbon reservoir for wave-based enhanced oil recovery

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, C.; Kallivokas, L.F.; Kucukcoban, S.; Deng, W.; Fathi, A.

    2015-01-01

    the mathematical framework necessary for identifying optimal wave source signals that can maximize a desired motion metric (kinetic energy, particle acceleration, etc.) at the target region of interest. We use the apparatus of partial-differential-equation (PDE

  10. Warm ion effects on kinetic drift cyclotron loss cone instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Shichong; Shen Jiewu; Cai Shidong

    1988-01-01

    The effects of adding warm plasmas on the kinetic DCLC mode in high β loss cone plasmas are investigated in detail. It is found that when the fluid DCLC mode is stabilized by a small amount of warm plasma, the kinetic excitation still remains due to two different mechanisms, namely, (1) magnetic drift resonance dissipation excites the negative energy wave; (2) a new type of positive energy wave can become unstable as the resonance condition is met. Comparing with fluid approximation theory, more warm plasmas are needed to suppress the kinetic DCLC instabilities

  11. Is a charmed axial-vector meson already found

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, S.

    1976-12-01

    A calculation is presented of the production rate via e + e - annihilation for a charmed p-wave meson of Jsup(P) = 1 + , based on a non-relativistic quark model of charmed hadrons. The results strongly suggest that the charmed axial-vector meson should be found copiously in association with a ground-state charmed meson. (author)

  12. Test particle method for incorporation of the kinetic effects into the envelope simulations of Raman backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Min Sup; Suk, Hyyong

    2007-01-01

    A new test particle method is presented for self-consistent incorporation of the kinetic effects into the fluid three-wave model. One of the most important kinetic effects is the electron trapping and it has been found that the trapping affects significantly the behavior of Raman backscatter and Raman backward laser amplification. The conventional fluid three-wave model cannot reproduce the kinetic simulations in the trapping regime. The test particle scheme utilizes the same equations for the laser evolution as in the three-wave model. However, the plasma wave is treated by the envelope-kinetic equation, which consists of envelope evolution and the kinetic term. The core of the new scheme is employing test particles to compute the kinetic term self-consistently. The benchmarking results against the averaged particle-in-cell (aPIC) code show excellent agreements, and the computation speed gain over the aPIC is from 2 to 20 depending on parameters

  13. Helicons in uniform fields. I. Wave diagnostics with hodograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, J. M.; Stenzel, R. L.

    2018-03-01

    The wave equation for whistler waves is well known and has been solved in Cartesian and cylindrical coordinates, yielding plane waves and cylindrical waves. In space plasmas, waves are usually assumed to be plane waves; in small laboratory plasmas, they are often assumed to be cylindrical "helicon" eigenmodes. Experimental observations fall in between both models. Real waves are usually bounded and may rotate like helicons. Such helicons are studied experimentally in a large laboratory plasma which is essentially a uniform, unbounded plasma. The waves are excited by loop antennas whose properties determine the field rotation and transverse dimensions. Both m = 0 and m = 1 helicon modes are produced and analyzed by measuring the wave magnetic field in three dimensional space and time. From Ampère's law and Ohm's law, the current density and electric field vectors are obtained. Hodograms for these vectors are produced. The sign ambiguity of the hodogram normal with respect to the direction of wave propagation is demonstrated. In general, electric and magnetic hodograms differ but both together yield the wave vector direction unambiguously. Vector fields of the hodogram normal yield the phase flow including phase rotation for helicons. Some helicons can have locally a linear polarization which is identified by the hodogram ellipticity. Alternatively the amplitude oscillation in time yields a measure for the wave polarization. It is shown that wave interference produces linear polarization. These observations emphasize that single point hodogram measurements are inadequate to determine the wave topology unless assuming plane waves. Observations of linear polarization indicate wave packets but not plane waves. A simple qualitative diagnostics for the wave polarization is the measurement of the magnetic field magnitude in time. Circular polarization has a constant amplitude; linear polarization results in amplitude modulations.

  14. Compactness and robustness: Applications in the solution of integral equations for chemical kinetics and electromagnetic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yajun

    This thesis employs the topological concept of compactness to deduce robust solutions to two integral equations arising from chemistry and physics: the inverse Laplace problem in chemical kinetics and the vector wave scattering problem in dielectric optics. The inverse Laplace problem occurs in the quantitative understanding of biological processes that exhibit complex kinetic behavior: different subpopulations of transition events from the "reactant" state to the "product" state follow distinct reaction rate constants, which results in a weighted superposition of exponential decay modes. Reconstruction of the rate constant distribution from kinetic data is often critical for mechanistic understandings of chemical reactions related to biological macromolecules. We devise a "phase function approach" to recover the probability distribution of rate constants from decay data in the time domain. The robustness (numerical stability) of this reconstruction algorithm builds upon the continuity of the transformations connecting the relevant function spaces that are compact metric spaces. The robust "phase function approach" not only is useful for the analysis of heterogeneous subpopulations of exponential decays within a single transition step, but also is generalizable to the kinetic analysis of complex chemical reactions that involve multiple intermediate steps. A quantitative characterization of the light scattering is central to many meteoro-logical, optical, and medical applications. We give a rigorous treatment to electromagnetic scattering on arbitrarily shaped dielectric media via the Born equation: an integral equation with a strongly singular convolution kernel that corresponds to a non-compact Green operator. By constructing a quadratic polynomial of the Green operator that cancels out the kernel singularity and satisfies the compactness criterion, we reveal the universality of a real resonance mode in dielectric optics. Meanwhile, exploiting the properties of

  15. Energy in one-dimensional linear waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repetto, C E; Roatta, A; Welti, R J

    2011-01-01

    This work is based on propagation phenomena that conform to the classical wave equation. General expressions of power, the energy conservation equation in continuous media and densities of the kinetic and potential energies are presented. As an example, we study the waves in a string and focused attention on the case of standing waves. The treatment is applicable to introductory science textbooks. (letters and comment)

  16. Vector grammars and PN machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋昌俊

    1996-01-01

    The concept of vector grammars under the string semantic is introduced.The dass of vector grammars is given,which is similar to the dass of Chomsky grammars.The regular vector grammar is divided further.The strong and weak relation between the vector grammar and scalar grammar is discussed,so the spectrum system graph of scalar and vector grammars is made.The equivalent relation between the regular vector grammar and Petri nets (also called PN machine) is pointed.The hybrid PN machine is introduced,and its language is proved equivalent to the language of the context-free vector grammar.So the perfect relation structure between vector grammars and PN machines is formed.

  17. Cluster as a wave telescope – first results from the fluxgate magnetometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-H. Glassmeier

    Full Text Available The four Cluster spacecraft provide an excellent opportunity to study spatial structures in the magnetosphere and adjacent regions. Propagating waves are amongst the interesting structures and for the first time, Cluster will allow one to measure the wave vector of low-frequency fluctuations in a space plasma. Based on a generalized minimum variance analysis wave vector estimates will be determined in the terrestrial magnetosheath and the near-Earth solar wind. The virtue and weakness of the wave telescope technique used is discussed in detail.

    Key words. Electromagnetics (wave propagation – Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities; plasma waves and instabilities

  18. Cluster as a wave telescope – first results from the fluxgate magnetometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-H. Glassmeier

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The four Cluster spacecraft provide an excellent opportunity to study spatial structures in the magnetosphere and adjacent regions. Propagating waves are amongst the interesting structures and for the first time, Cluster will allow one to measure the wave vector of low-frequency fluctuations in a space plasma. Based on a generalized minimum variance analysis wave vector estimates will be determined in the terrestrial magnetosheath and the near-Earth solar wind. The virtue and weakness of the wave telescope technique used is discussed in detail.Key words. Electromagnetics (wave propagation – Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities; plasma waves and instabilities

  19. Vehicle Based Vector Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    buoyant underwater vehicle with an interior space in which a length of said underwater vehicle is equal to one tenth of the acoustic wavelength...underwater vehicle with an interior space in which a length of said underwater vehicle is equal to one tenth of the acoustic wavelength; an...unmanned underwater vehicle that can function as an acoustic vector sensor. (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004] It is known that a propagating

  20. Reciprocity in Vector Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Green’s Theorem to the left hand side of Equation (3.2) converts it to a surface integral that vanishes for the impedance boundary conditions one...There are situations where this assumption does not hold, such as at boundaries between layers or in an inhomogeneous layer , because the density gradient...instead of requiring one model run for each source location. Application of the vector-scalar reciprocity principle is demonstrated with analytic

  1. Tensor Calculus: Unlearning Vector Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wha-Suck; Engelbrecht, Johann; Moller, Rita

    2018-01-01

    Tensor calculus is critical in the study of the vector calculus of the surface of a body. Indeed, tensor calculus is a natural step-up for vector calculus. This paper presents some pitfalls of a traditional course in vector calculus in transitioning to tensor calculus. We show how a deeper emphasis on traditional topics such as the Jacobian can…

  2. Cesium removal and kinetics equilibrium: Precipitation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    This task consisted of both non-radioactive and radioactive (tracer) tests examining the influence of potentially significant variables on cesium tetraphenylborate precipitation kinetics. The work investigated the time required to reach cesium decontamination and the conditions that affect the cesium precipitation kinetics

  3. Discrete and mesoscopic regimes of finite-size wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'vov, V. S.; Nazarenko, S.

    2010-01-01

    Bounding volume results in discreteness of eigenmodes in wave systems. This leads to a depletion or complete loss of wave resonances (three-wave, four-wave, etc.), which has a strong effect on wave turbulence (WT) i.e., on the statistical behavior of broadband sets of weakly nonlinear waves. This paper describes three different regimes of WT realizable for different levels of the wave excitations: discrete, mesoscopic and kinetic WT. Discrete WT comprises chaotic dynamics of interacting wave 'clusters' consisting of discrete (often finite) number of connected resonant wave triads (or quarters). Kinetic WT refers to the infinite-box theory, described by well-known wave-kinetic equations. Mesoscopic WT is a regime in which either the discrete and the kinetic evolutions alternate or when none of these two types is purely realized. We argue that in mesoscopic systems the wave spectrum experiences a sandpile behavior. Importantly, the mesoscopic regime is realized for a broad range of wave amplitudes which typically spans over several orders on magnitude, and not just for a particular intermediate level.

  4. Testing resonating vector strength: Auditory system, electric fish, and noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo van Hemmen, J.; Longtin, André; Vollmayr, Andreas N.

    2011-12-01

    Quite often a response to some input with a specific frequency ν○ can be described through a sequence of discrete events. Here, we study the synchrony vector, whose length stands for the vector strength, and in doing so focus on neuronal response in terms of spike times. The latter are supposed to be given by experiment. Instead of singling out the stimulus frequency ν○ we study the synchrony vector as a function of the real frequency variable ν. Its length turns out to be a resonating vector strength in that it shows clear maxima in the neighborhood of ν○ and multiples thereof, hence, allowing an easy way of determining response frequencies. We study this "resonating" vector strength for two concrete but rather different cases, viz., a specific midbrain neuron in the auditory system of cat and a primary detector neuron belonging to the electric sense of the wave-type electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. We show that the resonating vector strength always performs a clear resonance correlated with the phase locking that it quantifies. We analyze the influence of noise and demonstrate how well the resonance associated with maximal vector strength indicates the dominant stimulus frequency. Furthermore, we exhibit how one can obtain a specific phase associated with, for instance, a delay in auditory analysis.

  5. Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and spasms due ... that the body is having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - ...

  6. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  7. The transmission factor of a bloch wall for spin waves whose wave vector is perpendicular to the wall (1961); Facteur de transmission d'une paroi de bloch pour des ondes de spin de vecteur d'onde normal a la paroi (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutron, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    When, for a ferromagnetic, the anisotropic energy takes the form E= K sin{sup 2} {alpha}, the study of the propagation of spin waves of low energy across a Bloch wall leads to a one-dimensional Schrodinger equation in which is found a potential well which has the remarkable property of being completely transparent for all values of the incident wave energy. (author) [French] Dans un ferromagnetique, lorsque la densite d'energie d'anisotropie est de la forme E= K sin{sup 2} {alpha}, l'etude de la propagation des ondes de spin de faible energie a travers une paroi de Bloch, conduit a une equation de Schrodinger a une dimension, dans laquelle figure un puits de potentiel qui a la propriete remarquable d'etre completement transparent quelle que soit l'energie de l'onde incidente. (auteur)

  8. Directional nonlinear guided wave mixing: Case study of counter-propagating shear horizontal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanian, Mostafa; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2018-04-01

    While much nonlinear ultrasonics research has been conducted on higher harmonic generation, wave mixing provides the potential for sensitive measurements of incipient damage unencumbered by instrumentation nonlinearity. Studies of nonlinear ultrasonic wave mixing, both collinear and noncollinear, for bulk waves have shown the robust capability of wave mixing for early damage detection. One merit of bulk wave mixing lies in their non-dispersive nature, but guided waves enable inspection of otherwise inaccessible material and a variety of mixing options. Co-directional guided wave mixing was studied previously, but arbitrary direction guided wave mixing has not been addressed until recently. Wave vector analysis is applied to study variable mixing angles to find wave mode triplets (two primary waves and a secondary wave) resulting in the phase matching condition. As a case study, counter-propagating Shear Horizontal (SH) guided wave mixing is analyzed. SH wave interactions generate a secondary Lamb wave mode that is readily receivable. Reception of the secondary Lamb wave mode is compared for an angle beam transducer, an air coupled transducer, and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). Results from the angle beam and air coupled transducers are quite consistent, while the LDV measurement is plagued by variability issues.

  9. NESTLE: A nodal kinetics code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Chalabi, R.M.; Turinsky, P.J.; Faure, F.-X.; Sarsour, H.N.; Engrand, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    The NESTLE nodal kinetics code has been developed for utilization as a stand-alone code for steady-state and transient reactor neutronic analysis and for incorporation into system transient codes, such as TRAC and RELAP. The latter is desirable to increase the simulation fidelity over that obtained from currently employed zero- and one-dimensional neutronic models and now feasible due to advances in computer performance and efficiency of nodal methods. As a stand-alone code, requirements are that it operate on a range of computing platforms from memory-limited personal computers (PCs) to supercomputers with vector processors. This paper summarizes the features of NESTLE that reflect the utilization and requirements just noted

  10. Study of a condition for the mode conversion from purely perpendicular electrostatic waves to electromagnetic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalaee, Mohammad Javad, E-mail: mjkalaee@ut.ac.ir [Space Physics Group, Institute of Geophysics, University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Katoh, Yuto, E-mail: yuto@stpp.gp.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Geophysics, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    One of the mechanisms for generating electromagnetic plasma waves (Z-mode and LO-mode) is mode conversion from electrostatic waves into electromagnetic waves in inhomogeneous plasma. Herein, we study a condition required for mode conversion of electrostatic waves propagating purely perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, by numerically solving the full dispersion relation. An approximate model is derived describing the coupling between electrostatic waves (hot plasma Bernstein mode) and Z-mode waves at the upper hybrid frequency. The model is used to study conditions required for mode conversion from electrostatic waves (electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves, including Bernstein mode) into electromagnetic plasma waves (LO-mode). It is shown that for mode conversion to occur in inhomogeneous plasma, the angle between the boundary surface and the magnetic field vector should be within a specific range. The range of the angle depends on the norm of the k vector of waves at the site of mode conversion in the inhomogeneous region. The present study reveals that inhomogeneity alone is not a sufficient condition for mode conversion from electrostatic waves to electromagnetic plasma waves and that the angle between the magnetic field and the density gradient plays an important role in the conversion process.

  11. Gravitational Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Jonah Maxwell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-18

    This report has slides on Gravitational Waves; Pound and Rebka: A Shocking Fact; Light is a Ruler; Gravity is the Curvature of Spacetime; Gravitational Waves Made Simple; How a Gravitational Wave Affects Stuff Here; LIGO; This Detection: Neutron Stars; What the Gravitational Wave Looks Like; The Sound of Merging Neutron Stars; Neutron Star Mergers: More than GWs; The Radioactive Cloud; The Kilonova; and finally Summary, Multimessenger Astronomy.

  12. Plasma kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma kinetic theory is discussed and a comparison made with the kinetic theory of gases. The plasma is described by a modified set of fluid equations and it is shown how these fluid equations can be derived. (UK)

  13. Statistical wave function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    Statistical considerations are applied to quantum mechanical amplitudes. The physical motivation is the progress in the spectroscopy of highly excited states. The corresponding wave functions are strongly mixed. In terms of a basis set of eigenfunctions of a zeroth-order Hamiltonian with good quantum numbers, such wave functions have contributions from many basis states. The vector x is considered whose components are the expansion coefficients in that basis. Any amplitude can be written as a dagger x x. It is argued that the components of x and hence other amplitudes can be regarded as random variables. The maximum entropy formalism is applied to determine the corresponding distribution function. Two amplitudes a dagger x x and b dagger x x are independently distributed if b dagger x a = 0. It is suggested that the theory of quantal measurements implies that, in general, one can one determine the distribution of amplitudes and not the amplitudes themselves

  14. Wave phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Towne, Dudley H

    1988-01-01

    This excellent undergraduate-level text emphasizes optics and acoustics, covering inductive derivation of the equation for transverse waves on a string, acoustic plane waves, boundary-value problems, polarization, three-dimensional waves and more. With numerous problems (solutions for about half). ""The material is superbly chosen and brilliantly written"" - Physics Today. Problems. Appendices.

  15. Electromagnetic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book is dedicated to various aspects of electromagnetic wave theory and its applications in science and technology. The covered topics include the fundamental physics of electromagnetic waves, theory of electromagnetic wave propagation and scattering, methods of computational analysis......, material characterization, electromagnetic properties of plasma, analysis and applications of periodic structures and waveguide components, etc....

  16. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter; Sørensen, H. C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper concerns with the development of the wave energy converter (WEC) Wave Dragon. This WEC is based on the overtopping principle. An overview of the performed research done concerning the Wave Dragon over the past years is given, and the results of one of the more comprehensive studies, co...

  17. Hierarchal scalar and vector tetrahedra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, J.P.; Forghani, B.

    1993-01-01

    A new set of scalar and vector tetrahedral finite elements are presented. The elements are hierarchal, allowing mixing of polynomial orders; scalar orders up to 3 and vector orders up to 2 are defined. The vector elements impose tangential continuity on the field but not normal continuity, making them suitable for representing the vector electric or magnetic field. Further, the scalar and vector elements are such that they can easily be used in the same mesh, a requirement of many quasi-static formulations. Results are presented for two 50 Hz problems: the Bath Cube, and TEAM Problem 7

  18. Leishmaniasis vector behaviour in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutinga, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Leishmaniasis in Kenya exists in two forms: cutaneous and visceral. The vectors of visceral leishmaniasis have been the subject of investigation by various researchers since World War II, when the outbreak of the disease was first noticed. The vectors of cutaneous leishmaniasis were first worked on only a decade ago after the discovery of the disease focus in Mt. Elgon. The vector behaviour of these diseases, namely Phlebotomus pedifer, the vector of cutaneous leishmaniasis, and Phlebotomus martini, the vector of visceral leishmaniasis, are discussed in detail. P. pedifer has been found to breed and bite inside caves, whereas P. martini mainly bites inside houses. (author)

  19. Einstein’s quadrupole formula from the kinetic-conformal Hořava theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellorín, Jorge; Restuccia, Alvaro

    We analyze the radiative and nonradiative linearized variables in a gravity theory within the family of the nonprojectable Hořava theories, the Hořava theory at the kinetic-conformal point. There is no extra mode in this formulation, the theory shares the same number of degrees of freedom with general relativity. The large-distance effective action, which is the one we consider, can be given in a generally-covariant form under asymptotically flat boundary conditions, the Einstein-aether theory under the condition of hypersurface orthogonality on the aether vector. In the linearized theory, we find that only the transverse-traceless tensorial modes obey a sourced wave equation, as in general relativity. The rest of variables are nonradiative. The result is gauge-independent at the level of the linearized theory. For the case of a weak source, we find that the leading mode in the far zone is exactly Einstein’s quadrupole formula of general relativity, if some coupling constants are properly identified. There are no monopoles nor dipoles in this formulation, in distinction to the nonprojectable Horava theory outside the kinetic-conformal point. We also discuss some constraints on the theory arising from the observational bounds on Lorentz-violating theories.

  20. ``Massless'' vector field in de Sitter universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garidi, T.; Gazeau, J.-P.; Rouhani, S.; Takook, M. V.

    2008-03-01

    We proceed to the quantization of the massless vector field in the de Sitter (dS) space. This work is the natural continuation of a previous article devoted to the quantization of the dS massive vector field [J. P. Gazeau and M. V. Takook, J. Math. Phys. 41, 5920 (2000); T. Garidi et al., ibid. 43, 6379 (2002).] The term ``massless'' is used by reference to conformal invariance and propagation on the dS lightcone whereas ``massive'' refers to those dS fields which unambiguously contract to Minkowskian massive fields at zero curvature. Due to the combined occurrences of gauge invariance and indefinite metric, the covariant quantization of the massless vector field requires an indecomposable representation of the de Sitter group. We work with the gauge fixing corresponding to the simplest Gupta-Bleuler structure. The field operator is defined with the help of coordinate-independent de Sitter waves (the modes). The latter are simple to manipulate and most adapted to group theoretical approaches. The physical states characterized by the divergencelessness condition are, for instance, easy to identify. The whole construction is based on analyticity requirements in the complexified pseudo-Riemannian manifold for the modes and the two-point function.

  1. ''Massless'' vector field in de Sitter universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garidi, T.; Gazeau, J.-P.; Rouhani, S.; Takook, M. V.

    2008-01-01

    We proceed to the quantization of the massless vector field in the de Sitter (dS) space. This work is the natural continuation of a previous article devoted to the quantization of the dS massive vector field [J. P. Gazeau and M. V. Takook, J. Math. Phys. 41, 5920 (2000); T. Garidi et al., ibid. 43, 6379 (2002).] The term ''massless'' is used by reference to conformal invariance and propagation on the dS lightcone whereas ''massive'' refers to those dS fields which unambiguously contract to Minkowskian massive fields at zero curvature. Due to the combined occurrences of gauge invariance and indefinite metric, the covariant quantization of the massless vector field requires an indecomposable representation of the de Sitter group. We work with the gauge fixing corresponding to the simplest Gupta-Bleuler structure. The field operator is defined with the help of coordinate-independent de Sitter waves (the modes). The latter are simple to manipulate and most adapted to group theoretical approaches. The physical states characterized by the divergencelessness condition are, for instance, easy to identify. The whole construction is based on analyticity requirements in the complexified pseudo-Riemannian manifold for the modes and the two-point function

  2. Enhancing propagation characteristics of truncated localized waves in silica

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-07-01

    The spectral characteristics of truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica are analyzed. Numerical experiments show that the immunity of the truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica to decay and distortion is enhanced as the non-linearity of the relation between the transverse spatial spectral components and the wave vector gets stronger, in contrast to free-space propagating waves, which suffer from early decay and distortion. © 2011 IEEE.

  3. Resonant Alfven waves on auroral field lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Y.T.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that resonant Alfven waves on dipole magnetic field geometry and plasma distributions suitable for auroral field lines can be conveniently treated in the theory of Mathieu functions. Resurgent interest in invoking large-scale Alfven waves to structure some elements of auroral electrodynamics calls for interpretation of measured perpendicular electric and magnetic disturbance fields in terms of Alfven waves. The ability to express the resonant eigenmodes in closed form in terms of Mathieu functions allows for convenient tests of the Alfven wave structuring hypothesis. Implications for current vector electric and magnetic disturbance measurements are discussed

  4. THE EFFECTS OF WAVE ESCAPE ON FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVE TURBULENCE IN SOLAR FLARES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2012-01-01

    One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ( f ast waves ) . In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term. We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region. We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

  5. Calcium waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Lionel F

    2008-04-12

    Waves through living systems are best characterized by their speeds at 20 degrees C. These speeds vary from those of calcium action potentials to those of ultraslow ones which move at 1-10 and/or 10-20 nm s(-1). All such waves are known or inferred to be calcium waves. The two classes of calcium waves which include ones with important morphogenetic effects are slow waves that move at 0.2-2 microm s(-1) and ultraslow ones. Both may be propagated by cycles in which the entry of calcium through the plasma membrane induces subsurface contraction. This contraction opens nearby stretch-sensitive calcium channels. Calcium entry through these channels propagates the calcium wave. Many slow waves are seen as waves of indentation. Some are considered to act via cellular peristalsis; for example, those which seem to drive the germ plasm to the vegetal pole of the Xenopus egg. Other good examples of morphogenetic slow waves are ones through fertilizing maize eggs, through developing barnacle eggs and through axolotl embryos during neural induction. Good examples of ultraslow morphogenetic waves are ones during inversion in developing Volvox embryos and across developing Drosophila eye discs. Morphogenetic waves may be best pursued by imaging their calcium with aequorins.

  6. Wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarenko, Sergey [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Mathematics Inst.

    2011-07-01

    Wave Turbulence refers to the statistical theory of weakly nonlinear dispersive waves. There is a wide and growing spectrum of physical applications, ranging from sea waves, to plasma waves, to superfluid turbulence, to nonlinear optics and Bose-Einstein condensates. Beyond the fundamentals the book thus also covers new developments such as the interaction of random waves with coherent structures (vortices, solitons, wave breaks), inverse cascades leading to condensation and the transitions between weak and strong turbulence, turbulence intermittency as well as finite system size effects, such as ''frozen'' turbulence, discrete wave resonances and avalanche-type energy cascades. This book is an outgrow of several lectures courses held by the author and, as a result, written and structured rather as a graduate text than a monograph, with many exercises and solutions offered along the way. The present compact description primarily addresses students and non-specialist researchers wishing to enter and work in this field. (orig.)

  7. Vector-borne diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    More, Simon J.; Bicout, Dominique; Bøtner, Anette

    2017-01-01

    After a request from the Europea n Commission, EFSA’s Panel on Animal Health and Welfaresummarised the main characteristics of 36 vector-borne disease s (VBDs) in 36 web-based storymaps.The risk of introduction in the EU through movement of livestock or pets was assessed for eac h of the36 VBDs......-agents for which the rate of introduction wasestimated to be very low, no further asse ssments were made. Due to the uncertainty related to someparameters used for the risk assessment or the instable or unpredictability disease situation in some ofthe source regions, it is recommended to update the assessment when...

  8. Scalar and vector Galileons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez, Yeinzon; Navarro, Andrés A.

    2017-01-01

    An alternative for the construction of fundamental theories is the introduction of Galileons. These are fields whose action leads to non higher than second-order equations of motion. As this is a necessary but not sufficient condition to make the Hamiltonian bounded from below, as long as the action is not degenerate, the Galileon construction is a way to avoid pathologies both at the classical and quantum levels. Galileon actions are, therefore, of great interest in many branches of physics, specially in high energy physics and cosmology. This proceedings contribution presents the generalities of the construction of both scalar and vector Galileons following two different but complimentary routes. (paper)

  9. Vectors to success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsason, J.

    1998-01-01

    The Vector Pipeline project linking the Chicago supply hub to markets in eastern Canada, the northeastern U.S. and the Mid-Atlantic states, is described. Subsidiary objectives of the promoters are to match market timing to upstream pipelines and market requirements, and to provide low cost expandability to complement upstream expandability. The presentation includes description of the project, costs, leased facilities, rates and tariffs, right of way considerations, storage facilities and a project schedule. Construction is to begin in March 1999 and the line should be in service in November 1999

  10. Launching transverse-electric Localized Waves from a circular waveguide

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed; Niver, Edip

    2011-01-01

    Axially symmetric transverse electric (TE) modes of a circular waveguide section are used to synthesize the vector TE Localized Wave (LW) field at the open end of the waveguide section. The necessary excitation coefficients of these modes

  11. On the interaction of small-scale linear waves with nonlinear solitary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chengzhu; Stastna, Marek

    2017-04-01

    In the study of environmental and geophysical fluid flows, linear wave theory is well developed and its application has been considered for phenomena of various length and time scales. However, due to the nonlinear nature of fluid flows, in many cases results predicted by linear theory do not agree with observations. One of such cases is internal wave dynamics. While small-amplitude wave motion may be approximated by linear theory, large amplitude waves tend to be solitary-like. In some cases, when the wave is highly nonlinear, even weakly nonlinear theories fail to predict the wave properties correctly. We study the interaction of small-scale linear waves with nonlinear solitary waves using highly accurate pseudo spectral simulations that begin with a fully nonlinear solitary wave and a train of small-amplitude waves initialized from linear waves. The solitary wave then interacts with the linear waves through either an overtaking collision or a head-on collision. During the collision, there is a net energy transfer from the linear wave train to the solitary wave, resulting in an increase in the kinetic energy carried by the solitary wave and a phase shift of the solitary wave with respect to a freely propagating solitary wave. At the same time the linear waves are greatly reduced in amplitude. The percentage of energy transferred depends primarily on the wavelength of the linear waves. We found that after one full collision cycle, the longest waves may retain as much as 90% of the kinetic energy they had initially, while the shortest waves lose almost all of their initial energy. We also found that a head-on collision is more efficient in destroying the linear waves than an overtaking collision. On the other hand, the initial amplitude of the linear waves has very little impact on the percentage of energy that can be transferred to the solitary wave. Because of the nonlinearity of the solitary wave, these results provide us some insight into wave-mean flow

  12. On the non-Gaussian correlation of the primordial curvature perturbation with vector fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar Jain, Rajeev; Sloth, Martin Snoager

    2013-01-01

    We compute the three-point cross-correlation function of the primordial curvature perturbation generated during inflation with two powers of a vector field in a model where conformal invariance is broken by a direct coupling of the vector field with the inflaton. If the vector field is identified...... with the electromagnetic field, this correlation would be a non-Gaussian signature of primordial magnetic fields generated during inflation. We find that the signal is maximized for the flattened configuration where the wave number of the curvature perturbation is twice that of the vector field and in this limit...

  13. Transverse spin in the scattering of focused radially and azimuthally polarized vector beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ankit Kumar; Saha, Sudipta; Gupta, Subhasish Dutta; Ghosh, Nirmalya

    2018-04-01

    We study the effect of focusing of the radially and azimuthally polarized vector beams on the spin angular momentum (SAM) density and Poynting vector of scattered waves from a Mie particle. Remarkably, the study reveals that the SAM density of the scattered field is solely transverse in nature for radially and azimuthally polarized incident vector beams; however, the Poynting vector shows the usual longitudinal character. We also demonstrate that the transverse SAM density can further be tuned with wavelength and focusing of the incident beam by exploiting the interference of different scattering modes. These results may stimulate further experimental techniques to detect the transverse spin and Belinfante's spin-momentum densities.

  14. Chiral heat wave and mixing of magnetic, vortical and heat waves in chiral media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernodub, M.N.

    2016-01-01

    We show that a hot rotating fluid of relativistic chiral fermions possesses a new gapless collective mode associated with coherent propagation of energy density and chiral density waves along the axis of rotation. This mode, which we call the Chiral Heat Wave, emerges due to a mixed gauge-gravitational anomaly. At finite density the Chiral Heat Wave couples to the Chiral Vortical Wave while in the presence of an external magnetic field it mixes with the Chiral Magnetic Wave. The coupling of the Chiral Magnetic and Chiral Vortical Waves is also demonstrated. We find that the coupled waves — which are coherent fluctuations of the vector, axial and energy currents — have generally different velocities compared to the velocities of the individual waves.

  15. Vector-vector production in photon-photon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronan, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of exclusive untagged /rho/ 0 /rho/ 0 , /rho//phi/, K/sup *//bar K//sup */, and /rho/ω production and tagged /rho/ 0 /rho/ 0 production in photon-photon interactions by the TPC/Two-Gamma experiment are reviewed. Comparisons to the results of other experiments and to models of vector-vector production are made. Fits to the data following a four quark model prescription for vector meson pair production are also presented. 10 refs., 9 figs

  16. Vertical vector face lift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoano, Brian; Chan, Joanna; Morganroth, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Facial rejuvenation using local anesthesia has evolved in the past decade as a safer option for patients seeking fewer complications and minimal downtime. Mini- and short-scar face lifts using more conservative incision lengths and extent of undermining can be effective in the younger patient with lower face laxity and minimal loose, elastotic neck skin. By incorporating both an anterior and posterior approach and using an incision length between the mini and more traditional face lift, the Vertical Vector Face Lift can achieve longer-lasting and natural results with lesser cost and risk. Submentoplasty and liposuction of the neck and jawline, fundamental components of the vertical vector face lift, act synergistically with superficial musculoaponeurotic system plication to reestablish a more youthful, sculpted cervicomental angle, even in patients with prominent jowls. Dramatic results can be achieved in the right patient by combining with other procedures such as injectable fillers, chin implants, laser resurfacing, or upper and lower blepharoplasties. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Vector control in leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, K; Kumar, V; Kesari, S; Dinesh, D S; Kumar, A J; Das, P; Bhattacharya, S K

    2006-03-01

    Indoor residual spraying is a simple and cost effective method of controlling endophilic vectors and DDT remains the insecticide of choice for the control of leishmaniasis. However resistance to insecticide is likely to become more widespread in the population especially in those areas in which insecticide has been used for years. In this context use of slow release emulsified suspension (SRES) may be the best substitute. In this review spraying frequencies of DDT and new schedule of spray have been discussed. Role of biological control and environment management in the control of leishmaniasis has been emphasized. Allethrin (coil) 0.1 and 1.6 per cent prallethrin (liquid) have been found to be effective repellents against Phlebotomus argentipes, the vector of Indian kalaazar. Insecticide impregnated bednets is another area which requires further research on priority basis for the control of leishmaniasis. Role of satellite remote sensing for early prediction of disease by identifying the sandflygenic conditions cannot be undermined. In future synthetic pheromons can be exploited in the control of leishmaniasis.

  18. Compressional wave events in the dawn plasma sheet observed by Interball-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Verkhoglyadova

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Compressional waves with periods greater than 2 min (about 10-30 min at low geomagnetic latitudes, namely compressional Pc5 waves, are studied. The data set obtained with magnetometer MIF-M and plasma analyzer instrument CORALL on board the Interball-1 are analyzed. Measurements performed in October 1995 and October 1996 in the dawn plasma sheet at -30 RE ≤ XGSM and |ZGSM| ≤ 10 RE are considered. Anti-phase variations of magnetic field and ion plasma pressures are analyzed by searching for morphological similarities in the two time series. It is found that longitudinal and transverse magnetic field variations with respect to the background magnetic field are of the same order of magnitude. Plasma velocities are processed for each time period of the local dissimilarity in the pressure time series. Velocity disturbances occur mainly transversely to the local field line. The data reveal the rotation of the velocity vector. Because of the field line curvature, there is no fixed position of the rotational plane in the space. These vortices are localized in the regions of anti-phase variations of the magnetic field and plasma pressures, and the vortical flows are associated with the compressional Pc5 wave process. A theoretical model is proposed to explain the main features of the nonlinear wave processes. Our main goal is to study coupling of drift Alfven wave and magnetosonic wave in a warm inhomogeneous plasma. A vortex is the partial solution of the set of the equations when the compression is neglected. A compression effect gives rise to a nonlinear soliton-like solution.Key words. Magnetosphere physics (magnetotail · Space plasma physics (kinetic and MHD theory; non-linear phenomena

  19. Experimental demonstration of vector E x vector B plasma divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strait, E.J.; Kerst, D.W.; Sprott, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    The vector E x vector B drift due to an applied radial electric field in a tokamak with poloidal divertor can speed the flow of plasma out of the scrape-off region, and provide a means of externally controlling the flow rate and thus the width of the density fall-off. An experiment in the Wisconsin levitated toroidal octupole, using vector E x vector B drifts alone, demonstrates divertor-like behavior, including 70% reduction of plasma density near the wall and 40% reduction of plasma flux to the wall, with no adverse effects on confinement of the main plasma

  20. Transverse spin and transverse momentum in scattering of plane waves

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Sudipta; Singh, Ankit K.; Ray, Subir K.; Banerjee, Ayan; Gupta, Subhasish Dutta; Ghosh, Nirmalya

    2016-01-01

    We study the near field to the far field evolution of spin angular momentum (SAM) density and the Poynting vector of the scattered waves from spherical scatterers. The results show that at the near field, the SAM density and the Poynting vector are dominated by their transverse components. While the former (transverse SAM) is independent of the helicity of the incident circular polarization state, the latter (transverse Poynting vector) depends upon the polarization state. It is further demon...

  1. Wave anisotropy of shear viscosity and elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Sarvazyan, A. P.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents the theory of shear wave propagation in a "soft solid" material possessing anisotropy of elastic and dissipative properties. The theory is developed mainly for understanding the nature of the low-frequency acoustic characteristics of skeletal muscles, which carry important diagnostic information on the functional state of muscles and their pathologies. It is shown that the shear elasticity of muscles is determined by two independent moduli. The dissipative properties are determined by the fourth-rank viscosity tensor, which also has two independent components. The propagation velocity and attenuation of shear waves in muscle depend on the relative orientation of three vectors: the wave vector, the polarization vector, and the direction of muscle fiber. For one of the many experiments where attention was distinctly focused on the vector character of the wave process, it was possible to make a comparison with the theory, estimate the elasticity moduli, and obtain agreement with the angular dependence of the wave propagation velocity predicted by the theory.

  2. Video Vectorization via Tetrahedral Remeshing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuan; Zhu, Jie; Guo, Yanwen; Wang, Wenping

    2017-02-09

    We present a video vectorization method that generates a video in vector representation from an input video in raster representation. A vector-based video representation offers the benefits of vector graphics, such as compactness and scalability. The vector video we generate is represented by a simplified tetrahedral control mesh over the spatial-temporal video volume, with color attributes defined at the mesh vertices. We present novel techniques for simplification and subdivision of a tetrahedral mesh to achieve high simplification ratio while preserving features and ensuring color fidelity. From an input raster video, our method is capable of generating a compact video in vector representation that allows a faithful reconstruction with low reconstruction errors.

  3. Hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xu-Zhen; Pan, Yue; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2015-12-14

    We present and construct a new kind of orthogonal coordinate system, hyperbolic coordinate system. We present and design a new kind of local linearly polarized vector fields, which is defined as the hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields because the points with the same polarization form a series of hyperbolae. We experimentally demonstrate the generation of such a kind of hyperbolic-symmetry vector optical fields. In particular, we also study the modified hyperbolic-symmetry vector optical fields with the twofold and fourfold symmetric states of polarization when introducing the mirror symmetry. The tight focusing behaviors of these vector fields are also investigated. In addition, we also fabricate micro-structures on the K9 glass surfaces by several tightly focused (modified) hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields patterns, which demonstrate that the simulated tightly focused fields are in good agreement with the fabricated micro-structures.

  4. Extended vector-tensor theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Rampei; Naruko, Atsushi; Yoshida, Daisuke, E-mail: rampei@th.phys.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: naruko@th.phys.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: yoshida@th.phys.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2017-01-01

    Recently, several extensions of massive vector theory in curved space-time have been proposed in many literatures. In this paper, we consider the most general vector-tensor theories that contain up to two derivatives with respect to metric and vector field. By imposing a degeneracy condition of the Lagrangian in the context of ADM decomposition of space-time to eliminate an unwanted mode, we construct a new class of massive vector theories where five degrees of freedom can propagate, corresponding to three for massive vector modes and two for massless tensor modes. We find that the generalized Proca and the beyond generalized Proca theories up to the quartic Lagrangian, which should be included in this formulation, are degenerate theories even in curved space-time. Finally, introducing new metric and vector field transformations, we investigate the properties of thus obtained theories under such transformations.

  5. Evolution of wave turbulence under "gusty" forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenkov, S Y; Shrira, V I

    2011-09-09

    We consider nonlinear evolution of a random wave field under gusty forcing, fluctuating around a constant mean. Here the classical wave turbulence theory that assumes a proximity to stationarity is not applicable. We show by direct numerical simulation that the self-similarity of wave field evolution survives under fluctuating forcing. The wave field statistical characteristics averaged over fluctuations of forcing evolve as if there were a certain constant "effective wind." The results justify the use of the kinetic equations with forcing averaged over gusts as a good first approximation.

  6. Optimality Conditions in Vector Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, Manuel Arana; Lizana, Antonio Rufián

    2011-01-01

    Vector optimization is continuously needed in several science fields, particularly in economy, business, engineering, physics and mathematics. The evolution of these fields depends, in part, on the improvements in vector optimization in mathematical programming. The aim of this Ebook is to present the latest developments in vector optimization. The contributions have been written by some of the most eminent researchers in this field of mathematical programming. The Ebook is considered essential for researchers and students in this field.

  7. Symmetric vectors and algebraic classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibowitz, E.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of symmetric vector field in Riemannian manifolds, which arises in the study of relativistic cosmological models, is analyzed. Symmetric vectors are tied up with the algebraic properties of the manifold curvature. A procedure for generating a congruence of symmetric fields out of a given pair is outlined. The case of a three-dimensional manifold of constant curvature (''isotropic universe'') is studied in detail, with all its symmetric vector fields being explicitly constructed

  8. Vector continued fractions using a generalized inverse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydock, Roger; Nex, C M M; Wexler, Geoffrey

    2004-01-01

    A real vector space combined with an inverse (involution) for vectors is sufficient to define a vector continued fraction whose parameters consist of vector shifts and changes of scale. The choice of sign for different components of the vector inverse permits construction of vector analogues of the Jacobi continued fraction. These vector Jacobi fractions are related to vector and scalar-valued polynomial functions of the vectors, which satisfy recurrence relations similar to those of orthogonal polynomials. The vector Jacobi fraction has strong convergence properties which are demonstrated analytically, and illustrated numerically

  9. Gravitation Waves

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    We will present a brief introduction to the physics of gravitational waves and their properties. We will review potential astrophysical sources of gravitational waves, and the physics and astrophysics that can be learned from their study. We will survey the techniques and technologies for detecting gravitational waves for the first time, including bar detectors and broadband interferometers, and give a brief status report on the international search effort, with special emphasis on the LIGO detectors and search results.

  10. Shear-wave dynamic behavior using two different orientations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghassem Alaskari, M. K.; Hashemi, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    For laterally complex media, it may be more suitable to take a different orientation of the displacement vector of Shear-waves. This may change the sign of several imaginary reflections and conversion coefficients to be used in reservoir characterization and Amplitude Versus Offset analysis or modeling. In this new convention the positive direction of the displacement vector of reflected Shear-waves is chosen to the left of ray tangent (in the direction of wave propagation). Therefore, the definition of the displacement vector of shear-waves can be used properly even for very complicated media. Finally the shear-wave dynamic behavior of a reservoir zone can be illustrated for laterally varying structures in terms of the amplitude variation and phase behavior using this new orientation

  11. Plasma wave and second harmonic generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodha, M.S.; Sharma, J.K.; Tewari, D.P.; Sharma, R.P.; Kaushik, S.C.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation is made of a plasma wave at pump wave frequency and second harmonic generation caused by a self induced transverse inhomogeneity introduced by a Gaussian electromagnetic beam in a hot collisionless plasma. In the presence of a Gaussian beam the carriers get redistributed from the high field region to the low field region by ponderomative force and a transverse density gradient is established in the plasma. When the electric vector of the main beam is parallel to this density gradient, a plasma wave at the pump wave frequency is generated. In addition to this the transverse intensity gradient of the electromagnetic wave also contributes significantly to the plasma wave generation. The power of the plasma wave exhibits a maximum and minimum with the power of the pump wave (at z = 0). The generated plasma wave interacts with the electromagnetic wave and leads to the generation of a second harmonic. Furthermore, if the initial power of the pump wave is more than the critical power for self-focusing, the beam gets self-focused and hence the generated plasma wave and second harmonic which depend upon the background electron concentration and power of the main beam also get accordingly modified. (author)

  12. Chameleon vector bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Ann E.; Walsh, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    We show that for a force mediated by a vector particle coupled to a conserved U(1) charge, the apparent range and strength can depend on the size and density of the source, and the proximity to other sources. This chameleon effect is due to screening from a light charged scalar. Such screening can weaken astrophysical constraints on new gauge bosons. As an example we consider the constraints on chameleonic gauged B-L. We show that although Casimir measurements greatly constrain any B-L force much stronger than gravity with range longer than 0.1 μm, there remains an experimental window for a long-range chameleonic B-L force. Such a force could be much stronger than gravity, and long or infinite range in vacuum, but have an effective range near the surface of the earth which is less than a micron.

  13. Architecture and Vector Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Seidlein, Lorenz; Knols, Bart GJ; Kirby, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    , closing of eaves and insecticide treated bednets. All of these interventions have an effect on the indoor climate. Temperature, humidity and airflow are critical for a comfortable climate. Air-conditioning and fans allow us to control indoor climate, but many people in Africa and Asia who carry the brunt...... of vector-borne diseases have no access to electricity. Many houses in the hot, humid regions of Asia have adapted to the environment, they are built of porous materials and are elevated on stilts features which allow a comfortable climate even in the presence of bednets and screens. In contrast, many...... buildings in Africa and Asia in respect to their indoor climate characteristics and finally, show how state-of-the-art 3D modelling can predict climate characteristics and help to optimize buildings....

  14. Covariant Lyapunov vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginelli, Francesco; Politi, Antonio; Chaté, Hugues; Livi, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in covariant Lyapunov vectors (CLVs) which span local intrinsic directions in the phase space of chaotic systems. Here, we review the basic results of ergodic theory, with a specific reference to the implications of Oseledets’ theorem for the properties of the CLVs. We then present a detailed description of a ‘dynamical’ algorithm to compute the CLVs and show that it generically converges exponentially in time. We also discuss its numerical performance and compare it with other algorithms presented in the literature. We finally illustrate how CLVs can be used to quantify deviations from hyperbolicity with reference to a dissipative system (a chain of Hénon maps) and a Hamiltonian model (a Fermi–Pasta–Ulam chain). This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Lyapunov analysis: from dynamical systems theory to applications’. (paper)

  15. Sediment transport under breaking waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Hjelmager Jensen, Jacob; Mayer, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    The sediment transport in the surf zone is modelled by combining a Navier-Stokes solver, a free surface model, a turbulence model, and a sediment transport model. The flow solver is based on the finite volume technique for non-orthogonal grids. The model is capable of simulating the turbulence...... generated at the surface where the wave breaks as well as the turbulence generated near the bed due to the wave-motion and the undertow. In general, the levels of turbulent kinetic energy are found to be higher than experiments show. This results in an over prediction of the sediment transport. Nevertheless...

  16. Quantifying the Role of Atmospheric Forcing in Ice Edge Retreat and Advance Including Wind-Wave Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Low-Level Profiles, Pressure, Temperature, Humidity Rawinsonde (Kite, Tethered Balloon , Unmanned Aerial vehicle) Wave Characteristics, Wind wave and...Thermistor, Ship intake, Manual Bucket Tropospheric Profiles, 4/day – Pressure, Temperature, Humidity, Wind Vector Rawinsonde (Weather Balloon

  17. Bidirectional Energy Cascades and the Origin of Kinetic Alfvenic and Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L.; Vinas, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    The observed steep kinetic scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quiet time suggest them as a possible source of free energy to drive kinetic turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how the free energy released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfvénic and whistler turbulence are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  18. Vector condensate and AdS soliton instability induced by a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Li, Li; Li, Li-Fang; Wu, You

    2014-01-01

    We continue to study the holographic p-wave superconductor model in the Einstein-Maxwell-complex vector field theory with a non-minimal coupling between the complex vector field and the Maxwell field. In this paper we work in the AdS soliton background which describes a conformal field theory in the confined phase and focus on the probe approximation. We find that an applied magnetic field can lead to the condensate of the vector field and the AdS soliton instability. As a result, a vortex lattice structure forms in the spatial directions perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. As a comparison, we also discuss the vector condensate in the Einstein-SU(2) Yang-Mills theory and find that in the setup of the present paper, the Einstein-Maxwell-complex vector field model is a generalization of the SU(2) model in the sense that the vector field has a general mass and gyromagnetic ratio

  19. Vector wave diffraction pattern of slits masked by polarizing devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This calls for a systematic study of diffraction properties of different apertures using polarization-sensitive devices. In the present paper, we have studied the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of slits masked by different kinds of polarizing devices which introduce a phase difference between the two orthogonal components of the ...

  20. Non-Abelian plasmons and their kinetics equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Xiaoping; Li Jiarong

    1998-01-01

    After the fluctuated modes in QGP are treated as plasmons, the kinetics equation for the plasmons in linear approximation is established starting from Yang-Mills fields equation. The kinetics equation can be considered as the balance equation for the number of plasmons, which indicates the balance of the number variation (growth or damping) in space and time because of their motion with velocities that equal to the wave's group velocity and the emission or absorption of plasmons by plasma particles

  1. Principles of chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    House, James E

    2007-01-01

    James House's revised Principles of Chemical Kinetics provides a clear and logical description of chemical kinetics in a manner unlike any other book of its kind. Clearly written with detailed derivations, the text allows students to move rapidly from theoretical concepts of rates of reaction to concrete applications. Unlike other texts, House presents a balanced treatment of kinetic reactions in gas, solution, and solid states. The entire text has been revised and includes many new sections and an additional chapter on applications of kinetics. The topics covered include quantitative rela

  2. Introduction to chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Soustelle, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This book is a progressive presentation of kinetics of the chemical reactions. It provides complete coverage of the domain of chemical kinetics, which is necessary for the various future users in the fields of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Materials Science, Chemical Engineering, Macromolecular Chemistry and Combustion. It will help them to understand the most sophisticated knowledge of their future job area. Over 15 chapters, this book present the fundamentals of chemical kinetics, its relations with reaction mechanisms and kinetic properties. Two chapters are then devoted to experimental re

  3. Propagation and scattering of waves in dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, S.V.

    1994-01-01

    Wave propagation and scattering in dusty plasmas with variable charges on dust particles are considered. New kinetic theory including instant charge of a dust particle as a new independent variable is further developed. (author). 9 refs

  4. Plasma waves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swanson, D. G

    1989-01-01

    ... Swanson, D.G. (Donald Gary), D a t e - Plasma waves. Bibliography: p. Includes index. 1. Plasma waves. QC718.5.W3S43 1989 ISBN 0-12-678955-X I. Title. 530.4'4 88-34388 Printed in the United Sta...

  5. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Friis-Madsen, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Since March 2003 a prototype of Wave Dragon has been tested in an inland sea in Denmark. This has been a great success with all subsystems tested and improved through working in an offshore environment. The project has proved the Wave Dragon device and has enabled the next stage, a production sized...

  6. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  7. Spectrum of perturbations in anisotropic inflationary universe with vector hair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himmetoglu, Burak, E-mail: burak@physics.umn.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    We study both the background evolution and cosmological perturbations of anisotropic inflationary models supported by coupled scalar and vector fields. The models we study preserve the U(1) gauge symmetry associated with the vector field, and therefore do not possess instabilities associated with longitudinal modes (which instead plague some recently proposed models of vector inflation and curvaton). We first intoduce a model in which the background anisotropy slowly decreases during inflation; we then confirm the stability of the background solution by studying the quadratic action for all the perturbations of the model. We then compute the spectrum of the h{sub ×} gravitational wave polarization. The spectrum we find breaks statistical isotropy at the largest scales and reduces to the standard nearly scale invariant form at small scales. We finally discuss the possible relevance of our results to the large scale CMB anomalies.

  8. Simplified Representation of Vector Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, Alexandru; Wijk, Jarke J. van

    1999-01-01

    Vector field visualization remains a difficult task. Although many local and global visualization methods for vector fields such as flow data exist, they usually require extensive user experience on setting the visualization parameters in order to produce images communicating the desired insight. We

  9. Estimation of Motion Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the estimation of 2-D motion vector fields from time varying image sequences. We use a piecewise smooth model based on coupled vector/binary Markov random fields. We find the maximum a posteriori solution by simulated annealing. The algorithm generate sample...... fields by means of stochastic relaxation implemented via the Gibbs sampler....

  10. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  11. Archimedeanization of ordered vector spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Emelyanov, Eduard Yu.

    2014-01-01

    In the case of an ordered vector space with an order unit, the Archimedeanization method has been developed recently by V.I Paulsen and M. Tomforde. We present a general version of the Archimedeanization which covers arbitrary ordered vector spaces.

  12. The 7Li(d-vector,n0)8Be and 7Li(d-vector,n1)8Be reactions below 160 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabourov, A.; Ahmed, M. W.; Blackston, M. A.; Crowell, A. S.; Howell, C. R.; Joshi, K.; Nelson, S. O.; Perdue, B. A.; Sabourov, K.; Tonchev, A.; Weller, H. R.; Prior, R. M.; Spraker, M. C.; Braizinha, B.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.

    2006-01-01

    The polarization observables have been determined for the 7 Li(d-vector,n 0 ) 8 Be and 7 Li(d-vector ,n 1 ) 8 Be reactions at beam energies between 80 and 160 keV. A Transition Matrix Element (TME) analysis revealed unique, dominant p-wave solutions for both neutron channels. The polarization observables were compared with distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) and coupled reaction channels (CRC) calculations. The general features of the data can be reproduced by the CRC calculations when a large target spin-orbit interaction is included. However, serious discrepancies are observed when the TMEs of the theory and experiment are compared

  13. Kinetic equation solution by inverse kinetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, G.

    1983-01-01

    We propose a computer program (CAMU) which permits to solve the inverse kinetic equation. The CAMU code is written in HPL language for a HP 982 A microcomputer with a peripheral interface HP 9876 A ''thermal graphic printer''. The CAMU code solves the inverse kinetic equation by taking as data entry the output of the ionization chambers and integrating the equation with the help of the Simpson method. With this program we calculate the evolution of the reactivity in time for a given disturbance

  14. Vector superconductivity in cosmic strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvali, G.R.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1992-03-01

    We argue that in most realistic cases, the usual Witten-type bosonic superconductivity of the cosmic string is automatically (independent of the existence of superconducting currents) accompanied by the condensation of charged gauge vector bosons in the core giving rise to a new vector type superconductivity. The value of the charged vector condensate is related with the charged scalar expectation value, and vanishes only if the latter goes to zero. The mechanism for the proposed vector superconductivity, differing fundamentally from those in the literature, is delineated using the simplest realistic example of the two Higgs doublet standard model interacting with the extra cosmic string. It is shown that for a wide range of parameters, for which the string becomes scalarly superconducting, W boson condensates (the sources of vector superconductivity) are necessarily excited. (author). 14 refs

  15. Kinetic Profiles in NSTX Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R.E.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Bourdelle, C.; Ernst, D.R.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Gates, D.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Kaye, S.M.; Maingi, R.; Medley, S.; Menard, J.E.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Peng, M.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D.W.; Synakowski, E.J.; Wilson, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a low aspect ratio (R/a approximately 1.3) device with auxiliary heating from neutral-beam injection (NBI) and high-harmonic fast-wave heating (HHFW). Typical NSTX parameters are R(subscript ''0'') = 85 cm, a = 67 cm, I(subscript ''p'') = 0.7-1.4 MA, B(subscript ''phi'') = 0.25-0.45 T. Three co-directed deuterium neutral-beam sources have injected P(subscript ''NB'') less than or equal to 4.7 MW. HHFW plasmas typically have delivered P(subscript ''RF'') less than or equal to 3 MW. Important to the understanding of NSTX confinement are the new kinetic profile diagnostics: a multi-pulse Thomson scattering system (MPTS) and a charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) system. The MPTS diagnostic currently measures electron density and temperature profiles at 30 Hz at ten spatial locations. The CHERS system has recently become available to measure carbon ion temperature and toroidal flow at 17 radial positions spanning the outer half of the minor radius with 20 msec time resolution during NBI. Experiments conducted during the last year have produced a wide range of kinetic profiles in NSTX. Some interesting examples are presented below

  16. Kinetic Simulations of Type II Radio Burst Emission Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganse, U.; Spanier, F. A.; Vainio, R. O.

    2011-12-01

    The fundamental emission process of Type II Radio Bursts has been under discussion for many decades. While analytic deliberations point to three wave interaction as the source for fundamental and harmonic radio emissions, sparse in-situ observational data and high computational demands for kinetic simulations have not allowed for a definite conclusion to be reached. A popular model puts the radio emission into the foreshock region of a coronal mass ejection's shock front, where shock drift acceleration can create eletrcon beam populations in the otherwise quiescent foreshock plasma. Beam-driven instabilities are then assumed to create waves, forming the starting point of three wave interaction processes. Using our kinetic particle-in-cell code, we have studied a number of emission scenarios based on electron beam populations in a CME foreshock, with focus on wave-interaction microphysics on kinetic scales. The self-consistent, fully kinetic simulations with completely physical mass-ratio show fundamental and harmonic emission of transverse electromagnetic waves and allow for detailled statistical analysis of all contributing wavemodes and their couplings.

  17. Emerging vector borne diseases – incidence through vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara eSavic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vector borne diseases use to be a major public health concern only in tropical and subtropical areas, but today they are an emerging threat for the continental and developed countries also. Nowdays, in intercontinetal countries, there is a struggle with emerging diseases which have found their way to appear through vectors. Vector borne zoonotic diseases occur when vectors, animal hosts, climate conditions, pathogens and susceptible human population exist at the same time, at the same place. Global climate change is predicted to lead to an increase in vector borne infectious diseases and disease outbreaks. It could affect the range and popultion of pathogens, host and vectors, transmission season, etc. Reliable surveilance for diseases that are most likely to emerge is required. Canine vector borne diseases represent a complex group of diseases including anaplasmosis, babesiosis, bartonellosis, borreliosis, dirofilariosis, erlichiosis, leishmaniosis. Some of these diseases cause serious clinical symptoms in dogs and some of them have a zoonotic potential with an effect to public health. It is expected from veterinarians in coordination with medical doctors to play a fudamental role at primeraly prevention and then treatment of vector borne diseases in dogs. The One Health concept has to be integrated into the struggle against emerging diseases.During a four year period, from 2009-2013, a total number of 551 dog samples were analysed for vector borne diseases (borreliosis, babesiosis, erlichiosis, anaplasmosis, dirofilariosis and leishmaniasis in routine laboratory work. The analysis were done by serological tests – ELISA for borreliosis, dirofilariosis and leishmaniasis, modified Knott test for dirofilariosis and blood smear for babesiosis, erlichiosis and anaplasmosis. This number of samples represented 75% of total number of samples that were sent for analysis for different diseases in dogs. Annually, on avarege more then half of the samples

  18. Analysis of wave equation in electromagnetic field by Proca equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pamungkas, Oky Rio; Soeparmi; Cari

    2017-01-01

    This research is aimed to analyze wave equation for the electric and magnetic field, vector and scalar potential, and continuity equation using Proca equation. Then, also analyze comparison of the solution on Maxwell and Proca equation for scalar potential and electric field, both as a function of distance and constant wave number. (paper)

  19. A differentiated plane wave as an electromagnetic vortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannay, J H; Nye, J F

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating a complex scalar plane wave with respect to its direction produces an isolated straight vortex line and has a natural extension, described in earlier papers, to the vector waves of electromagnetism—a differentiated plane wave (DPW). It epitomizes destructive interference and will be shown to have the local structure of an electromagnetic vortex. In this paper its polarization structure and Poynting vector field are compared and contrasted with that of the family of linear polynomial waves, of which it is a special member. By definition this wider family has a general linear complex vector function of position multiplying a plane wave, but the function must be such that the combination satisfies Maxwell’s equations. This forces translational invariance of the function along the wavevector direction—in other words the wave is ‘non-diffracting’. In a natural sense all possible polarizations are exhibited once only. But the DPW has a distinctive polarization structure only partly explored previously. Both classes of waves share similar Poynting vector fields, which can be ‘elliptic’ (helix-like flow lines) or ‘hyperbolic’, of a repulsive nature, unexpected for a vortex. Both classes can be considered as a limit in the superposition of three closely parallel ordinary plane waves in destructive interference, and this derivation is supplied in full here. (paper)

  20. Curvature collineations for the field of gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, K.P.; Singh, Gulab

    1981-01-01

    It has been shown that the space-times formed from a plane-fronted gravity wave and from a plane sandwich wave with constant polarisation admit proper curvature collineation in general. The curvature collineation vectors have been determined explicitly. (author)

  1. Theory of inertial waves in rotating fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelash, Andrey; L'vov, Victor; Zakharov, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    The inertial waves emerge in the geophysical and astrophysical flows as a result of Earth rotation [1]. The linear theory of inertial waves is known well [2] while the influence of nonlinear effects of wave interactions are subject of many recent theoretical and experimental studies. The three-wave interactions which are allowed by inertial waves dispersion law (frequency is proportional to cosine of the angle between wave direction and axes of rotation) play an exceptional role. The recent studies on similar type of waves - internal waves, have demonstrated the possibility of formation of natural wave attractors in the ocean (see [3] and references herein). This wave focusing leads to the emergence of strong three-wave interactions and subsequent flows mixing. We believe that similar phenomena can take place for inertial waves in rotating flows. In this work we present theoretical study of three-wave and four-wave interactions for inertial waves. As the main theoretical tool we suggest the complete Hamiltonian formalism for inertial waves in rotating incompressible fluids [4]. We study three-wave decay instability and then present statistical description of inertial waves in the frame of Hamiltonian formalism. We obtain kinetic equation, anisotropic wave turbulence spectra and study the problem of parametric wave turbulence. These spectra were previously found in [5] by helicity decomposition method. Taking this into account we discuss the advantages of suggested Hamiltonian formalism and its future applications. Andrey Gelash thanks support of the RFBR (Grant No.16-31-60086 mol_a_dk) and Dr. E. Ermanyuk, Dr. I. Sibgatullin for the fruitful discussions. [1] Le Gal, P. Waves and instabilities in rotating and stratified flows, Fluid Dynamics in Physics, Engineering and Environmental Applications. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 25-40, 2013. [2] Greenspan, H. P. The theory of rotating fluids. CUP Archive, 1968. [3] Brouzet, C., Sibgatullin, I. N., Scolan, H., Ermanyuk, E

  2. Quasitravelling waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beklaryan, Leva A

    2011-01-01

    A finite difference analogue of the wave equation with potential perturbation is investigated, which simulates the behaviour of an infinite rod under the action of an external longitudinal force field. For a homogeneous rod, describing solutions of travelling wave type is equivalent to describing the full space of classical solutions to an induced one-parameter family of functional differential equations of point type, with the characteristic of the travelling wave as parameter. For an inhomogeneous rod, the space of solutions of travelling wave type is trivial, and their 'proper' extension is defined as solutions of 'quasitravelling' wave type. By contrast to the case of a homogeneous rod, describing the solutions of quasitravelling wave type is equivalent to describing the quotient of the full space of impulsive solutions to an induced one-parameter family of point-type functional differential equations by an equivalence relation connected with the definition of solutions of quasitravelling wave type. Stability of stationary solutions is analyzed. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  3. Possibility of neutron electric form factor etermination in the d-vector(e,e'p-vector)n reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gakh, G.I.

    1990-01-01

    The polarization of protons produced in the vector-polarized deuteron disintegration by unpolarized electrons has been analyzed. The sensitivities of the polarization observation to the neutron electric form factor G en and also to different parametrizations of the deuteron wave functions (DWF) have been investigated in the framework of the relativistic impulse approximation. The present method of the G en determination does not require the use of the longitudinally polarized electron beams. 34 refs.; 9 figs

  4. Strange Attractors in Drift Wave Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewandowski, J.L.V.

    2003-01-01

    A multi-grid part-in-cell algorithm for a shearless slab drift wave model with kinetic electrons is presented. The algorithm, which is based on an exact separation of adiabatic and nonadiabatic electron responses, is used to investigate the presence of strange attractors in drift wave turbulence. Although the simulation model has a large number of degrees of freedom, it is found that the strange attractor is low-dimensional and that it is strongly affected by dissipative (collisional) effects

  5. Discrete Alfven waves in the TORTUS tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amagishi, Y.; Ballico, M.J.; Cross, R.C.; Donnely, I.J.

    1989-01-01

    Discrete Alfven Waves (DAWs) have been observed as antenna resistance peaks and as enhanced edge fields in the TORTUS tokamak during Alfven wave heating experiments. A kinetic theory code has been used to calculate the antenna loading and the structure of the DAW fields for a range of plasma current and density profiles. There is fair agreement between the measured and predicted amplitude of the DAW fields in the plasma edge when both are normalized to the same antenna power

  6. Numerical simulation of electrostatic waves in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erz, U.

    1981-08-01

    In this paper the propagation of electrostatic waves in plasmas and the non-linear interactions, which occur in the case of large wave amplitudes, are studied using a new numerical method for plasma simulation. This mathematical description is based on the Vlasov-model. Changes in the distribution-function are taken into account and thus plasma kinetic effects can be treated. (orig./HT) [de

  7. Alfven wave. DOE Critical Review Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, A.; Uberoi, C.

    1982-01-01

    This monograph deals with the properties of Alfven waves and with their application to fusion. The book is divided into 7 chapters dealing with linear properties in homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas. Absorption is treated by means of kinetic theory. Instabilities and nonlinear processes are treated in Chapters 1 to 6, and the closing chapter is devoted to theory and experiments in plasma heating by Alfven waves

  8. Chemotactic waves of bacteria at the mesoscale

    OpenAIRE

    Calvez, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The existence of travelling waves for a model of concentration waves of bacteria is investigated. The model consists in a kinetic equation for the biased motion of cells following a run-and-tumble process, coupled with two reaction-diffusion equations for the chemical signals. Strong mathematical difficulties arise in comparison with the diffusive regime which was studied in a previous work. The cornerstone of the proof consists in establishing monotonicity properties of the spatial density o...

  9. Wave induced supersonic rotation in mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, Abraham

    2010-11-01

    Wave-particle interactions in ExB supersonically rotating plasmas feature an unusual effect: particles are diffused by waves in both potential energy and kinetic energy [1]. This wave-particle interaction generalizes the alpha channeling effect, in which radio frequency waves are used to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. In rotating plasmas, the alpha particles may be removed at low energy through the loss cone, and the energy lost may be transferred to the radial electric field. This eliminates the need for electrodes in the mirror throat, which have presented serious technical issues in past rotating plasma devices. A particularly simple way to achieve this effect is to use a high azimuthal mode number perturbation on the magnetic field [2]. In the rotating frame, this perturbation is seen as a wave near the alpha particle cyclotron harmonic, and can break the azimuthal symmetry and magnetic moment conservation without changing the particle's total energy. The particle may exit if it reduces its kinetic energy and becomes more trapped if it gains kinetic energy, leading to a steady state current that maintains the field. Simulations of single particles in rotating mirrors show that a stationary wave can extract enough energy from alpha particles for a reactor to be self-sustaining. Rotation can also be sustained by waves in plasmas without a kinetic energy source. This type of wave has been considered for plasma centrifuges used for isotope separation [3]. [4pt] [1] A. J. Fetterman and N. J. Fisch, Phys Rev Lett 101, 205003 (2008). [0pt] [2] A. J. Fetterman and N. J. Fisch, Phys. Plasmas 17, 042112 (2010). [0pt] [3] A. J. Fetterman and N. J. Fisch, Plasma Sources Sci. Tech. 18, 045003 (2009).

  10. Kinetics in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, A.

    1987-01-01

    In this chapter the authors first briefly review the kinetics of first- and second-order processes for continuous and pulsed irradiation, without taking the effects of nonhomogeneous formation of the species into consideration. They also discuss diffusion controlled reactions under conditions where interactions of more than two particles can be neglected, first the kinetics of the diffusion-controlled reaction of randomly generated species (homogeneous reaction) and then that of isolated pairs of reactants. The latter is often called geminate kinetics when dealing with pairs of oppositely charged species; they shall use this term for the kinetics of isolated pairs in general. In the last section they discuss briefly the kinetics of groups of more than two reactants

  11. Current generation by monochromatic electromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belikov, V.S.; Kolesnichenko, Ya.I.; Plotnik, I.S.

    1983-01-01

    The generation of longitudinal currents in a magnetically confined plasma with travelling monochromatic electromagnetic waves of finite amplitude propagating at some angle to the external magnetic field is considered. By averaging over the particle cyclotron gyration period, the kinetic equation for the distribution function of electrons interacting with an electromagnetic wave is derived. This equation is solved for the case of low-frequency waves, on the assumption that the bounce period of electrons trapped by the wave field is small compared to the typical times of Coulomb collisions (in which case, the driving current is largest). From the solution obtained, analytic expressions for the driving current and the absorbed power, which are valid for a wide range of wave phase velocities, are found. The current drive method considered and the method using the wave packet are compared. (author)

  12. Holographic picture of heavy vector meson melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Nelson R.F.; Diles, Saulo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Martin Contreras, Miguel Angel [Universidad de los Andes, High Energy Group, Department of Physics, Bogota (Colombia)

    2016-11-15

    The fraction of heavy vector mesons produced in a heavy ion collision, as compared to a proton-proton collision, serves as an important indication of the formation of a thermal medium, the quark-gluon plasma. This sort of analysis strongly depends on understanding the thermal effects of a medium like the plasma on the states of heavy mesons. In particular, it is crucial to know the temperature ranges where they undergo a thermal dissociation, or melting. AdS/QCD models are know to provide an important tool for the calculation of hadronic masses, but in general are not consistent with the observation that decay constants of heavy vector mesons decrease with excitation level. It has recently been shown that this problem can be overcome using a soft wall background and introducing an extra energy parameter, through the calculation of correlation functions at a finite position of anti-de Sitter space. This approach leads to the evaluation of masses and decay constants of S wave quarkonium states with just one flavor dependent and one flavor independent parameter. Here we extend this more realistic model to finite temperatures and analyze the thermal behavior of the states 1S, 2S and 3S of bottomonium and charmonium. The corresponding spectral function exhibits a consistent picture for the melting of the states where, for each flavor, the higher excitations melt at lower temperatures. We estimate for these six states the energy ranges in which the heavy vector mesons undergo a transition from a well-defined peak in the spectral function to complete melting in the thermal medium. A very clear distinction between the heavy flavors emerges, with the bottomonium state Υ(1S) surviving a deconfinement transition at temperatures much larger than the critical deconfinement temperature of the medium. (orig.)

  13. Non-kinetic capabilities: complementing the kinetic prevalence to targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Ducheine, P.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting is used in military doctrine to describe a military operational way, using (military) means to influence a target (or addressee) in order to achieve designated political and/or military goals. The four factors italicized are used to analyse non-kinetic targeting, complementing our knowledge and understanding of the kinetic prevalence. Paradoxically, non-kinetic targeting is not recognized as a separate concept: kinetic and non-kinetic are intertwined facets of targeting. Kinetic tar...

  14. Two-dimensional electroacoustic waves in silicene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, Alexander V.; Bouffanais, Roland; Konobeeva, Natalia N.; Belonenko, Mikhail B.

    2018-01-01

    In this letter, we investigate the propagation of two-dimensional electromagnetic waves in a piezoelectric medium built upon silicene. Ultrashort optical pulses of Gaussian form are considered to probe this medium. On the basis of Maxwell's equations supplemented with the wave equation for the medium's displacement vector, we obtain the effective governing equation for the vector potential associated with the electromagnetic field, as well as the component of the displacement vector. The dependence of the pulse shape on the bandgap in silicene and the piezoelectric coefficient of the medium was analyzed, thereby revealing a nontrivial triadic interplay between the characteristics of the pulse dynamics, the electronic properties of silicene, and the electrically induced mechanical vibrations of the medium. In particular, we uncovered the possibility for an amplification of the pulse amplitude through the tuning of the piezoelectric coefficient. This property could potentially offer promising prospects for the development of amplification devices for the optoelectronics industry.

  15. Enhancing poxvirus vectors vaccine immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Esteban, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Attenuated recombinant poxvirus vectors expressing heterologous antigens from pathogens are currently at various stages in clinical trials with the aim to establish their efficacy. This is because these vectors have shown excellent safety profiles, significant immunogenicity against foreign expressed antigens and are able to induce protective immune responses. In view of the limited efficacy triggered by some poxvirus strains used in clinical trials (i.e, ALVAC in the RV144 phase III clinical trial for HIV), and of the restrictive replication capacity of the highly attenuated vectors like MVA and NYVAC, there is a consensus that further improvements of these vectors should be pursuit. In this review we considered several strategies that are currently being implemented, as well as new approaches, to improve the immunogenicity of the poxvirus vectors. This includes heterologous prime/boost protocols, use of co-stimulatory molecules, deletion of viral immunomodulatory genes still present in the poxvirus genome, enhancing virus promoter strength, enhancing vector replication capacity, optimizing expression of foreign heterologous sequences, and the combined use of adjuvants. An optimized poxvirus vector triggering long-lasting immunity with a high protective efficacy against a selective disease should be sought.

  16. Stable piecewise polynomial vector fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Pessoa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Let $N={y>0}$ and $S={y<0}$ be the semi-planes of $mathbb{R}^2$ having as common boundary the line $D={y=0}$. Let $X$ and $Y$ be polynomial vector fields defined in $N$ and $S$, respectively, leading to a discontinuous piecewise polynomial vector field $Z=(X,Y$. This work pursues the stability and the transition analysis of solutions of $Z$ between $N$ and $S$, started by Filippov (1988 and Kozlova (1984 and reformulated by Sotomayor-Teixeira (1995 in terms of the regularization method. This method consists in analyzing a one parameter family of continuous vector fields $Z_{epsilon}$, defined by averaging $X$ and $Y$. This family approaches $Z$ when the parameter goes to zero. The results of Sotomayor-Teixeira and Sotomayor-Machado (2002 providing conditions on $(X,Y$ for the regularized vector fields to be structurally stable on planar compact connected regions are extended to discontinuous piecewise polynomial vector fields on $mathbb{R}^2$. Pertinent genericity results for vector fields satisfying the above stability conditions are also extended to the present case. A procedure for the study of discontinuous piecewise vector fields at infinity through a compactification is proposed here.

  17. Chikungunya Virus–Vector Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lark L. Coffey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever, a severe, debilitating disease that often produces chronic arthralgia. Since 2004, CHIKV has emerged in Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, causing millions of human infections. Central to understanding CHIKV emergence is knowledge of the natural ecology of transmission and vector infection dynamics. This review presents current understanding of CHIKV infection dynamics in mosquito vectors and its relationship to human disease emergence. The following topics are reviewed: CHIKV infection and vector life history traits including transmission cycles, genetic origins, distribution, emergence and spread, dispersal, vector competence, vector immunity and microbial interactions, and co-infection by CHIKV and other arboviruses. The genetics of vector susceptibility and host range changes, population heterogeneity and selection for the fittest viral genomes, dual host cycling and its impact on CHIKV adaptation, viral bottlenecks and intrahost diversity, and adaptive constraints on CHIKV evolution are also discussed. The potential for CHIKV re-emergence and expansion into new areas and prospects for prevention via vector control are also briefly reviewed.

  18. Local Tensor Radiation Conditions For Elastic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2001-01-01

    A local boundary condition is formulated, representing radiation of elastic waves from an arbitrary point source. The boundary condition takes the form of a tensor relation between the stress at a point on an arbitrarily oriented section and the velocity and displacement vectors at the point....... The tensor relation generalizes the traditional normal incidence impedance condition by accounting for the angle between wave propagation and the surface normal and by including a generalized stiffness term due to spreading of the waves. The effectiveness of the local tensor radiation condition...

  19. Violation of vector dominance in the vector manifestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Chihiro

    2003-01-01

    The vector manifestation (VM) is a new pattern for realizing the chiral symmetry in QCD. In the VM, the massless vector meson becomes the chiral partner of pion at the critical point, in contrast with the restoration based on the linear sigma model. Including the intrinsic temperature dependences of the parameters of the hidden local symmetry (HLS) Lagrangian determined from the underlying QCD through the Wilsonian matching together with the hadronic thermal corrections, we present a new prediction of the VM on the direct photon-π-π coupling which measures the validity of the vector dominance (VD) of the electromagnetic form factor of the pion. We find that the VD is largely violated at the critical temperature, which indicates that the assumption of the VD made in several analysis on the dilepton spectra in hot matter may need to be weakened for consistently including the effect of the dropping mass of the vector meson. (author)

  20. Computational and theoretical study of the wave-particle interaction of protons and waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Moya

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the wave-particle interaction and the evolution of electromagnetic waves propagating through a plasma composed of electrons and protons, using two approaches. First, a quasilinear kinetic theory has been developed to study the energy transfer between waves and particles, with the subsequent acceleration and heating of protons. Second, a one-dimensional hybrid numerical simulation has been performed, with and without including an expanding-box model that emulates the spherical expansion of the solar wind, to investigate the fully nonlinear evolution of this wave-particle interaction. Numerical results of both approaches show that there is an anisotropic evolution of proton temperature.

  1. Electromagnetic Cyclotron Waves in the Solar Wind: Wind Observation and Wave Dispersion Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, L. K.; Moya, P. S.; Vinas, A. F.; Stevens, M.

    2016-01-01

    Wind observed long-lasting electromagnetic cyclotron waves near the proton cyclotron frequency on 11 March 2005, in the descending part of a fast wind stream. Bi-Maxwellian velocity distributions are fitted for core protons, beam protons, and alpha-particles. Using the fitted plasma parameters we conduct kinetic linear dispersion analysis and find ion cyclotron and/or firehose instabilities grow in six of 10 wave intervals. After Doppler shift, some of the waves have frequency and polarization consistent with observation, thus may be correspondence to the cyclotron waves observed.

  2. Emerging Vector-Borne Diseases - Incidence through Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savić, Sara; Vidić, Branka; Grgić, Zivoslav; Potkonjak, Aleksandar; Spasojevic, Ljubica

    2014-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases use to be a major public health concern only in tropical and subtropical areas, but today they are an emerging threat for the continental and developed countries also. Nowadays, in intercontinental countries, there is a struggle with emerging diseases, which have found their way to appear through vectors. Vector-borne zoonotic diseases occur when vectors, animal hosts, climate conditions, pathogens, and susceptible human population exist at the same time, at the same place. Global climate change is predicted to lead to an increase in vector-borne infectious diseases and disease outbreaks. It could affect the range and population of pathogens, host and vectors, transmission season, etc. Reliable surveillance for diseases that are most likely to emerge is required. Canine vector-borne diseases represent a complex group of diseases including anaplasmosis, babesiosis, bartonellosis, borreliosis, dirofilariosis, ehrlichiosis, and leishmaniosis. Some of these diseases cause serious clinical symptoms in dogs and some of them have a zoonotic potential with an effect to public health. It is expected from veterinarians in coordination with medical doctors to play a fundamental role at primarily prevention and then treatment of vector-borne diseases in dogs. The One Health concept has to be integrated into the struggle against emerging diseases. During a 4-year period, from 2009 to 2013, a total number of 551 dog samples were analyzed for vector-borne diseases (borreliosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis) in routine laboratory work. The analysis was done by serological tests - ELISA for borreliosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis, modified Knott test for dirofilariosis, and blood smear for babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, and anaplasmosis. This number of samples represented 75% of total number of samples that were sent for analysis for different diseases in dogs. Annually, on average more then half of the samples

  3. Do electromagnetic waves always propagate along null geodesics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asenjo, Felipe A; Hojman, Sergio A

    2017-01-01

    We find exact solutions to Maxwell equations written in terms of four-vector potentials in non–rotating, as well as in Gödel and Kerr spacetimes. We show that Maxwell equations can be reduced to two uncoupled second-order differential equations for combinations of the components of the four-vector potential. Exact electromagnetic waves solutions are written on given gravitational field backgrounds where they evolve. We find that in non–rotating spherical symmetric spacetimes, electromagnetic waves travel along null geodesics. However, electromagnetic waves on Gödel and Kerr spacetimes do not exhibit that behavior. (paper)

  4. On the Witt vector Frobenius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher James; Kedlaya, Kiran

    2014-01-01

    We study the kernel and cokernel of the Frobenius map on the p-typical Witt vectors of a commutative ring, not necessarily of characteristic p. We give many equivalent conditions to surjectivity of the Frobenius map on both finite and infinite length Witt vectors. In particular, surjectivity...... on finite Witt vectors turns out to be stable under certain integral extensions; this provides a clean formulation of a strong generalization of Faltings’s almost purity theorem from p-adic Hodge theory, incorporating recent improvements by Kedlaya–Liu and by Scholze....

  5. Vector boson scattering at CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, Wolfgang; Fleper, Christian [Department Physik, Universitaet Siegen, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Reuter, Juergen [DESY Theory Group, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Sekulla, Marco [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Linear colliders operating in a range of multiple TeV are able to investigate the details of vector boson scattering and electroweak symmetry breaking. We calculate cross sections with the Monte Carlo generator WHIZARD for vector boson scattering processes at the future linear e{sup +} e{sup -} collider CLIC. By finding suitable cuts, the vector boson scattering signal processes are isolated from the background. Finally, we are able to determine exclusion sensitivities on the non-Standard Model parameters of the relevant dimension eight operators.

  6. Vector control of induction machines

    CERN Document Server

    Robyns, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    After a brief introduction to the main law of physics and fundamental concepts inherent in electromechanical conversion, ""Vector Control of Induction Machines"" introduces the standard mathematical models for induction machines - whichever rotor technology is used - as well as several squirrel-cage induction machine vector-control strategies. The use of causal ordering graphs allows systematization of the design stage, as well as standardization of the structure of control devices. ""Vector Control of Induction Machines"" suggests a unique approach aimed at reducing parameter sensitivity for

  7. Vectors of rickettsiae in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitam, Idir

    2012-12-01

    Vector-borne diseases are caused by parasites, bacteria, or viruses transmitted by the bites of hematophagous arthropods. In Africa, there has been a recent emergence of new diseases and the re-emergence of existing diseases, usually with changes in disease epidemiology (e.g., geographical distribution, prevalence, and pathogenicity). In Africa, rickettsioses are recognized as important emerging vector-borne infections in humans. Rickettsial diseases are transmitted by different types of arthropods, ticks, fleas, lice, and mites. This review will examine the roles of these different arthropod vectors and their geographical distributions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Recommendation on vectors and vector-transmitted diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority

    2009-01-01

    In view of their increasing risk of introduction and their possible implications in causing major disease outbreaks, vectors, as well as vector-transmitted diseases like dengue, West Nile disease, Lyme disease and bluetongue need to be recognised as a threat to public and animal health and to the economy, also in the Netherlands. There has been an increase in the incidence of these diseases in the past two to three decades. Climate changes and changes in the use of land, water managemen...

  9. Experimental and Chemical Kinetic Modeling Study of Dimethylcyclohexane Oxidation and Pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Eldeeb, Mazen A.; Jouzdani, Shirin; Wang, Zhandong; Sarathy, Mani; Akih-Kumgeh, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    A combined experimental and chemical kinetic modeling study of the high-temperature ignition and pyrolysis of 1,3-dimethylcyclohexane (13DMCH) is presented. Ignition delay times are measured behind reflected shock waves over a temperature range

  10. SUNWARD PROPAGATING ALFVÉN WAVES IN ASSOCIATION WITH SUNWARD DRIFTING PROTON BEAMS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jiansen; Pei, Zhongtian; Wang, Linghua; Tu, Chuanyi; Zhang, Lei [School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China); Marsch, Eckart [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Salem, Chadi, E-mail: jshept@gmail.com [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Using measurements from the WIND spacecraft, here we report the observation of sunward propagating Alfvén waves (AWs) in solar wind that is magnetically disconnected from the Earth's bow shock. In the sunward magnetic field sector, we find a period lasting for more than three days in which there existed (during most time intervals) a negative correlation between the flow velocity and magnetic field fluctuations, thus indicating that the related AWs are mainly propagating sunward. Simultaneous observations of counter-streaming suprathermal electrons suggest that these sunward AWs may not simply be due to the deflection of an open magnetic field line. Moreover, no interplanetary coronal mass ejection appears to be associated with the counter-streaming suprathermal electrons. As the scale goes from the magnetohydrodynamic down to the ion kinetic regime, the wave vector of magnetic fluctuations usually becomes more orthogonal to the mean magnetic field direction, and the fluctuations become increasingly compressible, which are both features consistent with quasi-perpendicular kinetic AWs. However, in the case studied here, we find clear signatures of quasi-parallel sunward propagating ion-cyclotron waves. Concurrently, the solar wind proton velocity distribution reveals a sunward field-aligned beam that drifts at about the local Alfvén speed. This beam is found to run in the opposite direction of the normally observed (anti-sunward) proton beam, and is apparently associated with sunward propagating Alfvén/ion-cyclotron waves. The results and conclusions of this study enrich our knowledge of solar wind turbulence and foster our understanding of proton heating and acceleration within a complex magnetic field geometry.

  11. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  12. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  13. Vector manifestation and violation of vector dominance in hot matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Masayasu; Sasaki, Chihiro

    2004-01-01

    We show the details of the calculation of the hadronic thermal corrections to the two-point functions in the effective field theory of QCD for pions and vector mesons based on the hidden local symmetry (HLS) in hot matter using the background field gauge. We study the temperature dependence of the pion velocity in the low-temperature region determined from the hadronic thermal corrections, and show that, due to the presence of the dynamical vector meson, the pion velocity is smaller than the speed of the light already at one-loop level, in contrast to the result obtained in the ordinary chiral perturbation theory including only the pion at one-loop. Including the intrinsic temperature dependences of the parameters of the HLS Lagrangian determined from the underlying QCD through the Wilsonian matching, we show how the vector manifestation (VM), in which the massless vector meson becomes the chiral partner of pion, is realized at the critical temperature. We present a new prediction of the VM on the direct photon-π-π coupling which measures the validity of the vector dominance (VD) of the electromagnetic form factor of the pion: we find that the VD is largely violated at the critical temperature, which indicates that the assumption of the VD made in several analyses on the dilepton spectra in hot matter may need to be weakened for consistently including the effect of the dropping mass of the vector meson

  14. Vector independent transmission of the vector-borne bluetongue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sluijs, Mirjam Tineke Willemijn; de Smit, Abraham J; Moormann, Rob J M

    2016-01-01

    Bluetongue is an economically important disease of ruminants. The causative agent, Bluetongue virus (BTV), is mainly transmitted by insect vectors. This review focuses on vector-free BTV transmission, and its epizootic and economic consequences. Vector-free transmission can either be vertical, from dam to fetus, or horizontal via direct contract. For several BTV-serotypes, vertical (transplacental) transmission has been described, resulting in severe congenital malformations. Transplacental transmission had been mainly associated with live vaccine strains. Yet, the European BTV-8 strain demonstrated a high incidence of transplacental transmission in natural circumstances. The relevance of transplacental transmission for the epizootiology is considered limited, especially in enzootic areas. However, transplacental transmission can have a substantial economic impact due to the loss of progeny. Inactivated vaccines have demonstrated to prevent transplacental transmission. Vector-free horizontal transmission has also been demonstrated. Since direct horizontal transmission requires close contact of animals, it is considered only relevant for within-farm spreading of BTV. The genetic determinants which enable vector-free transmission are present in virus strains circulating in the field. More research into the genetic changes which enable vector-free transmission is essential to better evaluate the risks associated with outbreaks of new BTV serotypes and to design more appropriate control measures.

  15. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Knapp, W.

    2006-01-01

    Wave Dragon is a floating wave energy converter working by extracting energy principally by means of overtopping of waves into a reservoir. A 1:4.5 scale prototype has been sea tested for 20 months. This paper presents results from testing, experiences gained and developments made during this ext......Wave Dragon is a floating wave energy converter working by extracting energy principally by means of overtopping of waves into a reservoir. A 1:4.5 scale prototype has been sea tested for 20 months. This paper presents results from testing, experiences gained and developments made during...... this extended period. The prototype is highly instrumented. The overtopping characteristic and the power produced are presented here. This has enabled comparison between the prototype and earlier results from both laboratory model and computer simulation. This gives the optimal operating point and the expected...... power of the device. The project development team has gained much soft experience from working in the harsh offshore environment. In particular the effect of marine growth in the draft tubes of the turbines has been investigated. The control of the device has been a focus for development as is operates...

  16. Studies on spin waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prets, A.

    1998-07-01

    In the present Ph. D. thesis we are considering a special form of scaling limits, namely the hydrodynamic limit. Such limits are considered to explain macroscopic behavior of matter by means of microscopic dynamic laws. In this procedure a rescaling of space and time plays a central role. The limit will be formulated in a quantum mechanical way. Within this framework we study derivations of the Landau Lifshitz equation for ferromagnets. This equation is a macroscopic equation of motion for the magnetization vector and results into the theory of spin waves. Since we have no exact knowledge of the Heisenberg operator's time evolution no definitive statement an how to regain the Landau Lifshitz equation from the microscopic dynamics can be given. In contrast to the Heisenberg operator, for an Ising type interaction inside a ferromagnet one is able to recover macroscopically a solution of a linearized Landau Lifschitz equation. (author)

  17. Kinetics of phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, M.O.; Aziz, M.J.; Stephenson, G.B.

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the Materials Research Society symposium on Kinetics of Phase Transformations held in Boston, Massachusetts from November 26-29, 1990. The symposium provided a forum for research results in an exceptionally broad and interdisciplinary field. Presentations covered nearly every major class of transformations including solid-solid, liquid-solid, transport phenomena and kinetics modeling. Papers involving amorphous Si, a dominant topic at the symposium, are collected in the first section followed by sections on four major areas of transformation kinetics. The symposium opened with joint sessions on ion and electron beam induced transformations in conjunction with the Surface Chemistry and Beam-Solid Interactions: symposium. Subsequent sessions focused on the areas of ordering and nonlinear diffusion kinetics, solid state reactions and amorphization, kinetics and defects of amorphous silicon, and kinetics of melting and solidification. Seven internationally recognized invited speakers reviewed many of the important problems and recent results in these areas, including defects in amorphous Si, crystal to glass transformations, ordering kinetics, solid-state amorphization, computer modeling, and liquid/solid transformations

  18. Rigid Body Time Integration by Convected Base Vectors with Implicit Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Nielsen, Martin Bjerre

    2013-01-01

    of the kinetic energy used in the present formulation is deliberately chosen to correspond to a rigid body rotation, and the orthonormality constraints are introduced via the equivalent Green strain components of the base vectors. The particular form of the extended inertia tensor used here implies a set...

  19. Spin-wave wavelength down-conversion at thickness steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigloher, Johannes; Taniguchi, Takuya; Madami, Marco; Decker, Martin; Körner, Helmut S.; Moriyama, Takahiro; Gubbiotti, Gianluca; Ono, Teruo; Back, Christian H.

    2018-05-01

    We report a systematic experimental study on the refraction and reflection of magnetostatic spin-waves at a thickness step between two Permalloy films of different thickness. The transmitted spin-waves for the transition from a thick film to a thin film have a higher wave vector compared to the incoming waves. Consequently, such systems may find use as passive wavelength transformers in magnonic networks. We investigate the spin-wave transmission behavior by studying the influence of the external magnetic field, incident angle, and thickness ratio of the films using time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy and micro-focused Brillouin light scattering.

  20. Uniqueness of thermodynamic projector and kinetic basis of molecular individualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorban, Alexander N.; Karlin, Iliya V.

    2004-05-01

    Three results are presented: First, we solve the problem of persistence of dissipation for reduction of kinetic models. Kinetic equations with thermodynamic Lyapunov functions are studied. Uniqueness of the thermodynamic projector is proven: There exists only one projector which transforms any vector field equipped with the given Lyapunov function into a vector field with the same Lyapunov function for a given anzatz manifold which is not tangent to the Lyapunov function levels. Second, we use the thermodynamic projector for developing the short memory approximation and coarse-graining for general nonlinear dynamic systems. We prove that in this approximation the entropy production increases. ( The theorem about entropy overproduction.) In example, we apply the thermodynamic projector to derive the equations of reduced kinetics for the Fokker-Planck equation. A new class of closures is developed, the kinetic multipeak polyhedra. Distributions of this type are expected in kinetic models with multidimensional instability as universally as the Gaussian distribution appears for stable systems. The number of possible relatively stable states of a nonequilibrium system grows as 2 m, and the number of macroscopic parameters is in order mn, where n is the dimension of configuration space, and m is the number of independent unstable directions in this space. The elaborated class of closures and equations pretends to describe the effects of “molecular individualism”. This is the third result.

  1. Vectorization at the KENO-IV code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asai, K.; Higuchi, K.; Katakura, J.

    1986-01-01

    The multigroup criticality safety code KENO-IV has been vectorized and tested on the FACOM VP-100 vector processor. At first, the vectorized KENO-IV on a scalar processor was slower than the original one by a factor of 1.4 because of the overhead introduced by vectorization. Making modifications of algorithms and techniques for vectorization, the vectorized version has become faster than the original one by a factor of 1.4 on the vector processor. For further speedup of the code, some improvements on compiler and hardware, especially on addition of Monte Carlo pipelines to the vector processor, are discussed

  2. Irreversible processes kinetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Brush, Stephen G

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic Theory, Volume 2: Irreversible Processes deals with the kinetic theory of gases and the irreversible processes they undergo. It includes the two papers by James Clerk Maxwell and Ludwig Boltzmann in which the basic equations for transport processes in gases are formulated, together with the first derivation of Boltzmann's ""H-theorem"" and a discussion of this theorem, along with the problem of irreversibility.Comprised of 10 chapters, this volume begins with an introduction to the fundamental nature of heat and of gases, along with Boltzmann's work on the kinetic theory of gases and s

  3. The relationship between the Wigner-Weyl kinetic formalism and the complex geometrical optics method

    OpenAIRE

    Maj, Omar

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between two different asymptotic techniques developed in order to describe the propagation of waves beyond the standard geometrical optics approximation, namely, the Wigner-Weyl kinetic formalism and the complex geometrical optics method, is addressed. More specifically, a solution of the wave kinetic equation, relevant to the Wigner-Weyl formalism, is obtained which yields the same wavefield intensity as the complex geometrical optics method. Such a relationship is also disc...

  4. Introduction to matrices and vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Jacob T

    2001-01-01

    In this concise undergraduate text, the first three chapters present the basics of matrices - in later chapters the author shows how to use vectors and matrices to solve systems of linear equations. 1961 edition.

  5. GRE Enzymes for Vector Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microbial enzyme data that were collected during the 2004-2006 EMAP-GRE program. These data were then used by Moorhead et al (2016) in their ecoenzyme vector...

  6. Scanning vector Hall probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambel, V.; Gregusova, D.; Fedor, J.; Kudela, R.; Bending, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a scanning vector Hall probe microscope for mapping magnetic field vector over magnetic samples. The microscope is based on a micromachined Hall sensor and the cryostat with scanning system. The vector Hall sensor active area is ∼5x5 μm 2 . It is realized by patterning three Hall probes on the tilted faces of GaAs pyramids. Data from these 'tilted' Hall probes are used to reconstruct the full magnetic field vector. The scanning area of the microscope is 5x5 mm 2 , space resolution 2.5 μm, field resolution ∼1 μT Hz -1/2 at temperatures 10-300 K

  7. 3D vector flow imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for 3D vector flow imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of velocity estimation in ultrasound, which plays an important role in the clinic. The velocity of blood has components in all three spatial dimensions, yet...... are (vx, vy, vz) = (-0.03, 95, 1.0) ± (9, 6, 1) cm/s compared with the expected (0, 96, 0) cm/s. Afterwards, 3D vector flow images from a cross-sectional plane of the vessel are presented. The out of plane velocities exhibit the expected 2D circular-symmetric parabolic shape. The experimental results...... verify that the 3D TO method estimates the complete 3D velocity vectors, and that the method is suitable for 3D vector flow imaging....

  8. 3-D Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon

    , if this significant reduction in the element count can still provide precise and robust 3-D vector flow estimates in a plane. The study concludes that the RC array is capable of estimating precise 3-D vector flow both in a plane and in a volume, despite the low channel count. However, some inherent new challenges...... ultrasonic vector flow estimation and bring it a step closer to a clinical application. A method for high frame rate 3-D vector flow estimation in a plane using the transverse oscillation method combined with a 1024 channel 2-D matrix array is presented. The proposed method is validated both through phantom...... hampers the task of real-time processing. In a second study, some of the issue with the 2-D matrix array are solved by introducing a 2-D row-column (RC) addressing array with only 62 + 62 elements. It is investigated both through simulations and via experimental setups in various flow conditions...

  9. Transcriptional Silencing of Retroviral Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M.; Pedersen, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    . Extinction of long-term vector expression has been observed after implantation of transduced hematopoietic cells as well as fibroblasts, myoblasts and hepatocytes. Here we review the influence of vector structure, integration site and cell type on transcriptional silencing. While down-regulation of proviral...... transcription is known from a number of cellular and animal models, major insight has been gained from studies in the germ line and embryonal cells of the mouse. Key elements for the transfer and expression of retroviral vectors, such as the viral transcriptional enhancer and the binding site for the t......RNA primer for reverse transcription may have a major influence on transcriptional silencing. Alterations of these elements of the vector backbone as well as the use of internal promoter elements from housekeeping genes may contribute to reduce transcriptional silencing. The use of cell culture and animal...

  10. High Accuracy Vector Helium Magnetometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed HAVHM instrument is a laser-pumped helium magnetometer with both triaxial vector and omnidirectional scalar measurement capabilities in a single...

  11. Scattering of vector mesons off nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, M.F.M.; Friman, B.; Wolf, G.

    2001-12-01

    We construct a relativistic and unitary approach to 'high' energy pion- and photon-nucleon reactions taking the πN, πΔ, ρN, ωN, ηN, K Λ, KΣ final states into account. Our scheme dynamically generates the s- and d-wave nucleon resonances N(1535), N(1650) and N(1520) and isobar resonances Δ(1620) and δ(1700) in terms of quasi-local interaction vertices. The description of photon-induced processes is based on a generalized vector-meson dominance assumption which directly relates the electromagnetic quasi-local 4-point interaction vertices to the corresponding vertices involving the ρ and ω fields. We obtain a satisfactory description of the elastic and inelastic pion- and photon-nucleon scattering data in the channels considered. The resulting s-wave ρ- and ω-nucleon scattering amplitudes are presented. Using these amplitudes we compute the leading density modification of the ρ and ω mass distributions in nuclear matter. We find a repulsive mass shift for the ω meson at small nuclear density but predict considerable strength in resonance-hole like ω-meson modes. Compared to previous calculations our result for the ρ-meson spectral function shows a significantly smaller in-medium effect. This reflects a not too large coupling strength of the N(1520) resonance to the ρN channel. (orig.)

  12. O Electromagnetic Power Waves and Power Density Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Donald Wayne

    1980-12-01

    On January 10, 1884 Lord Rayleigh presented a paper entitled "On the Transfer of Energy in the Electromagnetic Field" to the Royal Society of London. This paper had been authored by the late Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, Professor J. H. Poynting and in it he claimed that there was a general law for the transfer of electromagnetic energy. He argued that associated with each point in space is a quantity, that has since been called the Poynting vector, that is a measure of the rate of energy flow per unit area. His analysis was concerned with the integration of this power density vector at all points over an enclosing surface of a specific volume. The interpretation of this Poynting vector as a true measure of the local power density was viewed with great skepticism unless the vector was integrated over a closed surface, as the development of the concept required. However, within the last decade or so Shadowitz indicates that a number of prominent authors have argued that the criticism of the interpretation of Poynting's vector as a local power density vector is unjustified. The present paper is not concerned with these arguments but instead is concerned with a decomposition of Poynting's power density vector into two and only two components: one vector which has the same direction as Poynting's vector and which is called the forward power density vector, and another vector, directed opposite to the Poynting vector and called the reverse power density vector. These new local forward and reverse power density vectors will be shown to be dependent upon forward and reverse power wave vectors and these vectors in turn will be related to newly defined forward and reverse components of the electric and magnetic fields. The sum of these forward and reverse power density vectors, which is simply the original Poynting vector, is associated with the total electromagnetic energy traveling past the local point. Another vector which is the difference between the forward

  13. An exotic composite vector boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akama, Keiichi; Hattori, Takashi; Yasue, Masaki.

    1990-08-01

    An exotic composite vector boson, V, is introduced in two dynamical models of composite quarks, leptons, W and Z. One is based on four Fermi interactions, in which composite vector bosons are regarded as fermion-antifermion bound states and the other is based on the confining SU(2) L gauge model, in which they are given by scalar-antiscalar bound states. Both approaches describe the same effective interactions for the sector of composite quarks, leptons, W, Z, γ and V. (author)

  14. Vector correlations in rotationally inelastic molecular collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    The thesis presents an analytic model that describes scalar and vector properties of molecular collisions, both field-free and in fields. The model is based on the sudden approximation and treats molecular scattering as the Fraunhofer diffraction of matter waves from the hard-core part of the interaction potential. The theory has no fitting parameters and is inherently quantum, rendering fully state- and energy-resolved scattering amplitudes and all the quantities that unfold from them in analytic form. This allows to obtain complex polarization moments inherent to quantum stereodynamics, and to account for interference and other non-classical effects. The simplicity and analyticity of the model paves a way to understanding the origin of the features observed in experiment and exact computations, such as the angular oscillations in the state-to-state differential cross sections and the polarization moments, the rotational-state dependent variation of the integral cross sections, and change of these quantities as a function of the applied field. The theory was applied to study the k - k ' vector correlation (differential cross section) for the following collision systems: Ar-NO(X 2 Π) and Ne-OCS(X 1 Σ) in an electrostatic field, Na + -N 2 (X 1 Σ) in a laser field, and He-CaH( 2 Σ), He-O 2 (X 3 Σ), and He-OH(X 2 Π) in a magnetic field. The model was able to reproduce the behavior of the differential cross sections and their variation with field strength. Combining the Fraunhofer model with the quantum theory of vector correlations made it possible to study three- and four-vector properties. The model results for the k-k ' -j ' vector correlation in Ar-NO(X 2 Π) and He-NO(X 2 Π) scattering were found to be in good agreement with experiment and exact computations. This allowed to demonstrate that the stereodynamics of such collisions is contained solely in the diffractive part of the scattering amplitude which is governed by a single Legendre moment

  15. Vector correlations in rotationally inelastic molecular collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2011-04-13

    The thesis presents an analytic model that describes scalar and vector properties of molecular collisions, both field-free and in fields. The model is based on the sudden approximation and treats molecular scattering as the Fraunhofer diffraction of matter waves from the hard-core part of the interaction potential. The theory has no fitting parameters and is inherently quantum, rendering fully state- and energy-resolved scattering amplitudes and all the quantities that unfold from them in analytic form. This allows to obtain complex polarization moments inherent to quantum stereodynamics, and to account for interference and other non-classical effects. The simplicity and analyticity of the model paves a way to understanding the origin of the features observed in experiment and exact computations, such as the angular oscillations in the state-to-state differential cross sections and the polarization moments, the rotational-state dependent variation of the integral cross sections, and change of these quantities as a function of the applied field. The theory was applied to study the k - k{sup '} vector correlation (differential cross section) for the following collision systems: Ar-NO(X{sup 2}{pi}) and Ne-OCS(X{sup 1}{sigma}) in an electrostatic field, Na{sup +}-N{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{sigma}) in a laser field, and He-CaH({sup 2}{sigma}), He-O{sub 2}(X{sup 3}{sigma}), and He-OH(X{sup 2}{pi}) in a magnetic field. The model was able to reproduce the behavior of the differential cross sections and their variation with field strength. Combining the Fraunhofer model with the quantum theory of vector correlations made it possible to study three- and four-vector properties. The model results for the k-k{sup '}-j{sup '} vector correlation in Ar-NO(X{sup 2}{pi}) and He-NO(X{sup 2}{pi}) scattering were found to be in good agreement with experiment and exact computations. This allowed to demonstrate that the stereodynamics of such collisions is contained solely in the

  16. Resonance energy transfer: The unified theory via vector spherical harmonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinter, Roger, E-mail: r.grinter@uea.ac.uk; Jones, Garth A., E-mail: garth.jones@uea.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-21

    In this work, we derive the well-established expression for the quantum amplitude associated with the resonance energy transfer (RET) process between a pair of molecules that are beyond wavefunction overlap. The novelty of this work is that the field of the mediating photon is described in terms of a spherical wave rather than a plane wave. The angular components of the field are constructed in terms of vector spherical harmonics while Hankel functions are used to define the radial component. This approach alleviates the problem of having to select physically correct solution from non-physical solutions, which seems to be inherent in plane wave derivations. The spherical coordinate system allows one to easily decompose the photon’s fields into longitudinal and transverse components and offers a natural way to analyse near-, intermediate-, and far-zone RET within the context of the relative orientation of the transition dipole moments for the two molecules.

  17. Helicons in uniform fields. II. Poynting vector and angular momenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2018-03-01

    The orbital and spin angular momenta of helicon modes have been determined quantitatively from laboratory experiments. The current density is obtained unambiguously from three dimensional magnetic field measurements. The only approximation made is to obtain the electric field from Hall Ohm's law which is usually the case for low frequency whistler modes. This allows the evaluation of the Poynting vector from which the angular momentum is obtained. Comparing two helicon modes (m = 0 and m = 1), one can separate the contribution of angular momentum of a rotating and non-rotating wave field. The orbital angular momentum is important to assess the wave-particle interaction by the transverse Doppler shift of rotating waves which has not been considered so far.

  18. Vectoring of parallel synthetic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Tim; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram; Gomit, Guillaume

    2015-11-01

    A pair of parallel synthetic jets can be vectored by applying a phase difference between the two driving signals. The resulting jet can be merged or bifurcated and either vectored towards the actuator leading in phase or the actuator lagging in phase. In the present study, the influence of phase difference and Strouhal number on the vectoring behaviour is examined experimentally. Phase-locked vorticity fields, measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), are used to track vortex pairs. The physical mechanisms that explain the diversity in vectoring behaviour are observed based on the vortex trajectories. For a fixed phase difference, the vectoring behaviour is shown to be primarily influenced by pinch-off time of vortex rings generated by the synthetic jets. Beyond a certain formation number, the pinch-off timescale becomes invariant. In this region, the vectoring behaviour is determined by the distance between subsequent vortex rings. We acknowledge the financial support from the European Research Council (ERC grant agreement no. 277472).

  19. Temperature maxima in stable two-dimensional shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kum, O.; Hoover, W.G.; Hoover, C.G.

    1997-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics to study the structure of moderately strong shock waves in dense two-dimensional fluids, using Lucy pair potential. The stationary profiles show relatively broad temperature maxima, for both the longitudinal and the average kinetic temperatures, just as does Mott-Smith model for strong shock waves in dilute three-dimensional gases. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  20. Nonlinear propagation of short wavelength drift-Alfven waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P. K.; Pecseli, H. L.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    Making use of a kinetic ion and a hydrodynamic electron description together with the Maxwell equation, the authors derive a set of nonlinear equations which governs the dynamics of short wavelength ion drift-Alfven waves. It is shown that the nonlinear drift-Alfven waves can propagate as two-dim...