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Sample records for wave splitting study

  1. A study on crustal shear wave splitting in the western part of the Banda arc-continent collision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syuhada, E-mail: hadda9@gmail.com [Graduate Research on Earthquake and Active Tectonics-ITB, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Research Centre for Physics - Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), Puspiptek Serpong 15314,Indonesia (Indonesia); Hananto, Nugroho D. [Research Centre for Geotechnology -LIPI, Jl. Sangkuriang (Kompleks LIPI) Bandung 40135 (Indonesia); Puspito, Nanang T.; Yudistira, Tedi [Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering ITB, Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Anggono, Titi [Research Centre for Physics - Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), Puspiptek Serpong 15314,Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    We analyzed shear wave splitting parameters from local shallow (< 30 km) earthquakes recorded at six seismic stations in the western part of the Banda arc-continent collision. We determined fast polarization and delay time for 195 event-stations pairs calculated from good signal-to-noise ratio waveforms. We observed that there is evidence for shear wave splitting at all stations with dominant fast polarization directions oriented about NE-SW, which are parallel to the collision direction of the Australian plate. However, minor fast polarization directions are oriented around NW-SE being perpendicular to the strike of Timor through. Furthermore, the changes in fast azimuths with the earthquake-station back azimuth suggest that the crustal anisotropy in the study area is not uniform. Splitting delay times are within the range of 0.05 s to 0.8 s, with a mean value of 0.29±0.18 s. Major seismic stations exhibit a weak tendency increasing of delay times with increasing hypocentral distance suggesting the main anisotropy contribution of the shallow crust. In addition, these variations in fast azimuths and delay times indicate that the crustal anisotropy in this region might not only be caused by extensive dilatancy anisotropy (EDA), but also by heterogeneity shallow structure such as the presence of foliations in the rock fabric and the fracture zones associated with active faults.

  2. M-Split: A Graphical User Interface to Analyze Multilayered Anisotropy from Shear Wave Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abgarmi, Bizhan; Ozacar, A. Arda

    2017-04-01

    Shear wave splitting analysis are commonly used to infer deep anisotropic structure. For simple cases, obtained delay times and fast-axis orientations are averaged from reliable results to define anisotropy beneath recording seismic stations. However, splitting parameters show systematic variations with back azimuth in the presence of complex anisotropy and cannot be represented by average time delay and fast axis orientation. Previous researchers had identified anisotropic complexities at different tectonic settings and applied various approaches to model them. Most commonly, such complexities are modeled by using multiple anisotropic layers with priori constraints from geologic data. In this study, a graphical user interface called M-Split is developed to easily process and model multilayered anisotropy with capabilities to properly address the inherited non-uniqueness. M-Split program runs user defined grid searches through the model parameter space for two-layer anisotropy using formulation of Silver and Savage (1994) and creates sensitivity contour plots to locate local maximas and analyze all possible models with parameter tradeoffs. In order to minimize model ambiguity and identify the robust model parameters, various misfit calculation procedures are also developed and embedded to M-Split which can be used depending on the quality of the observations and their back-azimuthal coverage. Case studies carried out to evaluate the reliability of the program using real noisy data and for this purpose stations from two different networks are utilized. First seismic network is the Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake research institute (KOERI) which includes long term running permanent stations and second network comprises seismic stations deployed temporary as part of the "Continental Dynamics-Central Anatolian Tectonics (CD-CAT)" project funded by NSF. It is also worth to note that M-Split is designed as open source program which can be modified by users for

  3. Gravitational waves from phase transition in split NMSSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, S. V.; Gorbunov, D. S.; Kirpichnikov, D. V.

    2018-04-01

    We discuss gravitational wave signal from the strongly first order electroweak phase transition in the split NMSSM. We find that for sets of parameters predicting successful electroweak baryogenesis the gravitational wave signal can be within the reach of future experiments LISA, BBO and Ultimate DECIGO.

  4. SplitRacer - a semi-automatic tool for the analysis and interpretation of teleseismic shear-wave splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Miriam Christina; Rümpker, Georg

    2017-04-01

    We present a semi-automatic, graphical user interface tool for the analysis and interpretation of teleseismic shear-wave splitting in MATLAB. Shear wave splitting analysis is a standard tool to infer seismic anisotropy, which is often interpreted as due to lattice-preferred orientation of e.g. mantle minerals or shape-preferred orientation caused by cracks or alternating layers in the lithosphere and hence provides a direct link to the earth's kinematic processes. The increasing number of permanent stations and temporary experiments result in comprehensive studies of seismic anisotropy world-wide. Their successive comparison with a growing number of global models of mantle flow further advances our understanding the earth's interior. However, increasingly large data sets pose the inevitable question as to how to process them. Well-established routines and programs are accurate but often slow and impractical for analyzing a large amount of data. Additionally, shear wave splitting results are seldom evaluated using the same quality criteria which complicates a straight-forward comparison. SplitRacer consists of several processing steps: i) download of data per FDSNWS, ii) direct reading of miniSEED-files and an initial screening and categorizing of XKS-waveforms using a pre-set SNR-threshold. iii) an analysis of the particle motion of selected phases and successive correction of the sensor miss-alignment based on the long-axis of the particle motion. iv) splitting analysis of selected events: seismograms are first rotated into radial and transverse components, then the energy-minimization method is applied, which provides the polarization and delay time of the phase. To estimate errors, the analysis is done for different randomly-chosen time windows. v) joint-splitting analysis for all events for one station, where the energy content of all phases is inverted simultaneously. This allows to decrease the influence of noise and to increase robustness of the measurement

  5. Modelling shear wave splitting observations from Wellington, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marson-Pidgeon, Katrina; Savage, Martha K.

    2004-05-01

    Frequency-dependent anisotropy was previously observed at the permanent broad-band station SNZO, South Karori, Wellington, New Zealand. This has important implications for the interpretation of measurements in other subduction zones and hence for our understanding of mantle flow. This motivated us to make further splitting measurements using events recorded since the previous study and to develop a new modelling technique. Thus, in this study we have made 67 high-quality shear wave splitting measurements using events recorded at the SNZO station spanning a 10-yr period. This station is the only one operating in New Zealand for longer than 2 yr. Using a combination of teleseismic SKS and S phases and regional ScS phases provides good azimuthal coverage, allowing us to undertake detailed modelling. The splitting measurements indicate that in addition to the frequency dependence observed previously at this station, there are also variations with propagation and initial polarization directions. The fast polarization directions range between 2° and 103°, and the delay times range between 0.75 s and 3.05 s. These ranges are much larger than observed previously at SNZO or elsewhere in New Zealand. Because of the observed frequency dependence we measure the dominant frequency of the phase used to make the splitting measurement, and take this into account in the modelling. We fit the fast polarization directions fairly well with a two-layer anisotropic model with horizontal axes of symmetry. However, such a model does not fit the delay times or explain the frequency dependence. We have developed a new inversion method which allows for an inclined axis of symmetry in each of the two layers. However, applying this method to SNZO does not significantly improve the fit over a two-layer model with horizontal symmetry axes. We are therefore unable to explain the frequency dependence or large variation in delay time values with multiple horizontal layers of anisotropy, even

  6. SplitRacer - a new Semi-Automatic Tool to Quantify And Interpret Teleseismic Shear-Wave Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, M. C.; Rumpker, G.

    2017-12-01

    We have developed a semi-automatic, MATLAB-based GUI to combine standard seismological tasks such as the analysis and interpretation of teleseismic shear-wave splitting. Shear-wave splitting analysis is widely used to infer seismic anisotropy, which can be interpreted in terms of lattice-preferred orientation of mantle minerals, shape-preferred orientation caused by fluid-filled cracks or alternating layers. Seismic anisotropy provides a unique link between directly observable surface structures and the more elusive dynamic processes in the mantle below. Thus, resolving the seismic anisotropy of the lithosphere/asthenosphere is of particular importance for geodynamic modeling and interpretations. The increasing number of seismic stations from temporary experiments and permanent installations creates a new basis for comprehensive studies of seismic anisotropy world-wide. However, the increasingly large data sets pose new challenges for the rapid and reliably analysis of teleseismic waveforms and for the interpretation of the measurements. Well-established routines and programs are available but are often impractical for analyzing large data sets from hundreds of stations. Additionally, shear wave splitting results are seldom evaluated using the same well-defined quality criteria which may complicate comparison with results from different studies. SplitRacer has been designed to overcome these challenges by incorporation of the following processing steps: i) downloading of waveform data from multiple stations in mseed-format using FDSNWS tools; ii) automated initial screening and categorizing of XKS-waveforms using a pre-set SNR-threshold; iii) particle-motion analysis of selected phases at longer periods to detect and correct for sensor misalignment; iv) splitting analysis of selected phases based on transverse-energy minimization for multiple, randomly-selected, relevant time windows; v) one and two-layer joint-splitting analysis for all phases at one station by

  7. Shear-wave splitting measurements – Problems and solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vecsey, Luděk; Plomerová, Jaroslava; Babuška, Vladislav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 462, č. 1-4 (2008), s. 178-196 ISSN 0040-1951 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB300120605; GA AV ČR IAA3012405; GA AV ČR IAA300120709 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : seismic anisotropy * shear-wave splitting * comparison of cross- correlation * eigenvalue * transverse minimization methods Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.677, year: 2008

  8. A Decade of Shear-Wave Splitting Observations in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellesiles, A. K.; Christensen, D. H.; Abers, G. A.; Hansen, R. A.; Pavlis, G. L.; Song, X.

    2010-12-01

    Over the last decade four PASSCAL experiments have been conducted in different regions of Alaska. ARCTIC, BEAAR and MOOS form a north-south transect across the state, from the Arctic Ocean to Price Williams Sound, while the STEEP experiment is currently deployed to the east of that line in the St Elias Mountains of Southeastern Alaska. Shear-wave splitting observations from these networks in addition to several permanent stations of the Alaska Earthquake Information Center were determined in an attempt to understand mantle flow under Alaska in a variety of different geologic settings. Results show two dominant splitting patterns in Alaska, separated by the subducted Pacific Plate. North of the subducted Pacific Plate fast directions are parallel to the trench (along strike of the subducted Pacific Plate) indicating large scale mantle flow in the northeast-southwest direction with higher anisotropy (splitting times) within the mantle wedge. Within or below the Pacific Plate fast directions are normal to the trench in the direction of Pacific Plate convergence. In addition to these two prominent splitting patterns there are several regions that do not match either of these trends. These more complex regions which include the results from STEEP could be due to several factors including effects from the edge of the Pacific Plate. The increase of station coverage that Earthscope will bring to Alaska will aid in developing a more complete model for anisotropy and mantle flow in Alaska.

  9. An Improved Split-Step Wavelet Transform Method for Anomalous Radio Wave Propagation Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Iqbal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous tropospheric propagation caused by ducting phenomenon is a major problem in wireless communication. Thus, it is important to study the behavior of radio wave propagation in tropospheric ducts. The Parabolic Wave Equation (PWE method is considered most reliable to model anomalous radio wave propagation. In this work, an improved Split Step Wavelet transform Method (SSWM is presented to solve PWE for the modeling of tropospheric propagation over finite and infinite conductive surfaces. A large number of numerical experiments are carried out to validate the performance of the proposed algorithm. Developed algorithm is compared with previously published techniques; Wavelet Galerkin Method (WGM and Split-Step Fourier transform Method (SSFM. A very good agreement is found between SSWM and published techniques. It is also observed that the proposed algorithm is about 18 times faster than WGM and provide more details of propagation effects as compared to SSFM.

  10. Shear wave splitting and crustal anisotropy in the Eastern Ladakh-Karakoram zone, northwest Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Arpita; Hazarika, Devajit; Wadhawan, Monika

    2017-06-01

    Seismic anisotropy of the crust beneath the eastern Ladakh-Karakoram zone has been studied by shear wave splitting analysis of S-waves of local earthquakes and P-to-S or Ps converted phases originated at the crust-mantle boundary. The splitting parameters (Φ and δt), derived from S-wave of local earthquakes with shallow focal depths, reveal complex nature of anisotropy with NW-SE and NE oriented Fast Polarization directions (FPD) in the upper ∼22 km of the crust. The observed anisotropy in the upper crust may be attributed to combined effects of existing tectonic features as well as regional tectonic stress. The maximum delay time of fast and slow waves in the upper crust is ∼0.3 s. The Ps splitting analysis shows more consistent FPDs compared to S-wave splitting. The FPDs are parallel or sub parallel to the Karakoram fault (KF) and other NW-SE trending tectonic features existing in the region. The strength of anisotropy estimated for the whole crust is higher (maximum delay time δt: 0.75 s) in comparison to the upper crust. This indicates that the dominant source of anisotropy in the trans-Himalayan crust is confined within the middle and lower crustal depths. The predominant NW-SE trending FPDs consistently observed in the upper crust as well as in the middle and lower crust near the KF zone support the fact that the KF is a crustal-scale fault which extends at least up to the lower crust. Dextral shearing of the KF creates shear fabric and preferential alignment of mineral grains along the strike of the fault, resulting in the observed FPDs. A Similar observation in the Indus Suture Zone (ISZ) also suggests crustal scale deformation owing to the India-Asia collision.

  11. Finite frequency shear wave splitting tomography: a model space search approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, P.; Long, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    Observations of seismic anisotropy provide key constraints on past and present mantle deformation. A common method for upper mantle anisotropy is to measure shear wave splitting parameters (delay time and fast direction). However, the interpretation is not straightforward, because splitting measurements represent an integration of structure along the ray path. A tomographic approach that allows for localization of anisotropy is desirable; however, tomographic inversion for anisotropic structure is a daunting task, since 21 parameters are needed to describe general anisotropy. Such a large parameter space does not allow a straightforward application of tomographic inversion. Building on previous work on finite frequency shear wave splitting tomography, this study aims to develop a framework for SKS splitting tomography with a new parameterization of anisotropy and a model space search approach. We reparameterize the full elastic tensor, reducing the number of parameters to three (a measure of strength based on symmetry considerations for olivine, plus the dip and azimuth of the fast symmetry axis). We compute Born-approximation finite frequency sensitivity kernels relating model perturbations to splitting intensity observations. The strong dependence of the sensitivity kernels on the starting anisotropic model, and thus the strong non-linearity of the inverse problem, makes a linearized inversion infeasible. Therefore, we implement a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique in the inversion procedure. We have performed tests with synthetic data sets to evaluate computational costs and infer the resolving power of our algorithm for synthetic models with multiple anisotropic layers. Our technique can resolve anisotropic parameters on length scales of ˜50 km for realistic station and event configurations for dense broadband experiments. We are proceeding towards applications to real data sets, with an initial focus on the High Lava Plains of Oregon.

  12. Shear-wave splitting observations of mantle anisotropy beneath Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellesiles, A. K.; Christensen, D. H.; Entwistle, E.; Litherland, M.; Abers, G. A.; Song, X.

    2009-12-01

    Observations of seismic anisotropy were obtained from three different PASSCAL broadband experiments throughout Alaska, using shear-wave splitting from teleseismic SKS phases. The MOOS (Multidisciplinary Observations Of Subduction), BEAAR (Broadband Experiment Across the Alaska Range), and ARCTIC (Alaska Receiving Cross-Transects for the Inner Core) networks were used along with selected permanent broadband stations operated by AEIC (Alaska Earthquake Information Center) to produce seismic anisotropy results for the state of Alaska along a north south transect from the active subduction zone in the south, through continental Alaska, to the passive margin in the north. The BEAAR network is in-between the ARCTIC and MOOS networks above the subducting Pacific Plate and mantle wedge and shows a tight ~90 degree rotation of anisotropy above the 70km contour of the subducting plate. The southern stations in BEAAR yield anisotropy results that are subparallel to the Pacific Plate motion as it subducts under North America. These stations have an average fast direction of -45 degrees and 1.03 seconds of delay on average. The MOOS network in south central Alaska yielded similar results with an average fast direction of -30 degrees and delay times of .9 seconds. In the north portion of the BEAAR network the anisotropy is along strike of the subduction zone and has an average fast direction of 27 degrees with an average delay time of 1.4 seconds, although the delay times above the mantle wedge range from 1 to 2.5 seconds and are directly correlated to the length of ray path in the mantle wedge. This general trend NE/SW is seen in the ARCTIC stations to the north although the furthest north stations are oriented more NNE compared to those in BEAAR. The average fast direction for the ARCTIC network is 40 degrees with an average delay time of 1.05 seconds. These results show two distinct orientations of anisotropy in Alaska separated by the subducting Pacific Plate.

  13. Characterising hydrothermal fluid pathways beneath Aluto volcano, Main Ethiopian Rift, using shear wave splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Andy; Wilks, Matthew; Kendall, J.-Michael; Biggs, Juliet; Ayele, Atalay

    2018-05-01

    Geothermal resources are frequently associated with silicic calderas which show evidence of geologically-recent activity. Hence development of geothermal sites requires both an understanding of the hydrothermal system of these volcanoes, as well as the deeper magmatic processes which drive them. Here we use shear wave splitting to investigate the hydrothermal system at the silicic peralkaline volcano Aluto in the Main Ethiopian Rift, which has experienced repeated uplift and subsidence since at least 2004. We make over 370 robust observations of splitting, showing that anisotropy is confined mainly to the top ∼3 km of the volcanic edifice. We find up to 10% shear wave anisotropy (SWA) is present with a maximum centred at the geothermal reservoir. Fast shear wave orientations away from the reservoir align NNE-SSW, parallel to the present-day minimum compressive stress. Orientations on the edifice, however, are rotated NE-SW in a manner we predict from field observations of faults at the surface, providing fluid pressures are sufficient to hold two fracture sets open. These fracture sets may be due to the repeated deformation experienced at Aluto and initiated in caldera formation. We therefore attribute the observed anisotropy to aligned cracks held open by over-pressurised gas-rich fluids within and above the reservoir. This study demonstrates that shear wave splitting can be used to map the extent and style of fracturing in volcanic hydrothermal systems. It also lends support to the hypothesis that deformation at Aluto arises from variations of fluid pressures in the hydrothermal system. These constraints will be crucial for future characterisation of other volcanic and geothermal systems, in rift systems and elsewhere.

  14. Changes in shear-wave splitting before volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sha; Crampin, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    We have shown that observations of shear-wave splitting (SWS) monitor stress-accumulation and stress-relaxation before earthquakes which allows the time, magnitude, and in some circumstances fault-plane of impending earthquakes to be stress-forecast. (We call this procedure stress-forecasting rather than predicting or forecasting to emphasise the different formalism.) We have stress-forecast these parameters successfully three-days before a 1988 M5 earthquake in SW Iceland, and identified characteristic anomalies retrospectively before ~16 other earthquakes in Iceland and elsewhere. SWS monitors microcrack geometry and shows that microcracks are so closely spaced that they verge on fracturing and earthquakes. Phenomena verging on failure in this way are critical-systems with 'butterfly wings' sensitivity. Such critical-systems are very common. The Earth is an archetypal complex heterogeneous interactive phenomenon and must be expected to be a critical-system. We claim this critical system as a New Geophysics of a critically-microcracked rock mass. Such critical systems impose a range of fundamentally-new properties on conventional sub-critical physics/geophysics, one of which is universality. Consequently it is expected that we observe similar stress-accumulation and stress-relaxation before volcanic eruptions to those before earthquakes. There are three eruptions where appropriate changes in SWS have been observed similar to those observed before earthquakes. These are: the 1996 Gjálp fissure eruption, Vatnajökull, Iceland; a 2001 flank eruption on Mount Etna, Sicily (reported by Francesca Bianco, INGV, Naples); and the 2010 Eyjafjajökull ash-cloud eruption, SW Iceland. These will be presented in the same normalised format as is used before earthquakes. The 1996 Gjálp eruption showed a 2½-month stress-accumulation, and a ~1-year stress-relaxation (attributed to the North Atlantic Ridge adjusting to the magma injection beneath the Vatnajökull Ice Cap). The

  15. Security of subcarrier wave quantum key distribution against the collective beam-splitting attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnichenko, G P; Kozubov, A V; Gaidash, A A; Gleim, A V; Horoshko, D B

    2018-04-30

    We consider a subcarrier wave quantum key distribution (QKD) system, where quantum encoding is carried out at weak sidebands generated around a coherent optical beam as a result of electro-optical phase modulation. We study security of two protocols, B92 and BB84, against one of the most powerful attacks for this class of systems, the collective beam-splitting attack. Our analysis includes the case of high modulation index, where the sidebands are essentially multimode. We demonstrate numerically and experimentally that a subcarrier wave QKD system with realistic parameters is capable of distributing cryptographic keys over large distances in presence of collective attacks. We also show that BB84 protocol modification with discrimination of only one state in each basis performs not worse than the original BB84 protocol in this class of QKD systems, thus significantly simplifying the development of cryptographic networks using the considered QKD technique.

  16. Upper Mantle Dynamics of Bangladesh by Splitting Analyzes of Core Refracted SKS and SKKS Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, A. K.; Bhushan, K.; Eken, T.; Singh, A.

    2017-12-01

    New shear wave splitting measurements are obtained from hitherto less studied Bengal Basin using core refracted SKS and SKKS phases. Splitting parameters, time delays (δt) and fast polarization directions (Φ) were estimated through analysis of 64 high-quality waveforms (≥ 2.5 signal to noise ratio) from 29 earthquakes with magnitude ≥5.5 recorded at eight seismic stations deployed over Bangladesh. We found no evidence of splitting which indicates azimuthal isotropy beneath the region. Null measurements can be explained by near vertical axis of anisotropy or by the presence of multiple anisotropic layers with different fast polarization directions, where combined effect results in null. We consider that the presence of partial melts within the upper mantle due to Kerguelen mantle plume activities may be the potential geodynamic cause for observed null measurements. It locally perturbed mantle convection flow beneath the region and reoriented the lattice preferred orientation of the upper mantle mineral mainly olivine as this disabled the core refracted SKS and SKKS phases to scan the anisotropic characteristics of the region, and hence null measurements are obtained.

  17. Ray splitting in the reflection and refraction of surface acoustic waves in anisotropic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Every, A G; Maznev, A A

    2010-05-01

    This paper examines the conditions for, and provides examples of, ray splitting in the reflection and refraction of surface acoustic waves (SAW) in elastically anisotropic solids at straight obstacles such as edges, surface breaking cracks, and interfaces between different solids. The concern here is not with the partial scattering of an incident SAW's energy into bulk waves, but with the occurrence of more than one SAW ray in the reflected and/or transmitted wave fields, by analogy with birefringence in optics and mode conversion of bulk elastic waves at interfaces. SAW ray splitting is dependent on the SAW slowness curve possessing concave regions, which within the constraint of wave vector conservation parallel to the obstacle allows multiple outgoing SAW modes for certain directions of incidence and orientation of obstacle. The existence of pseudo-SAW for a given surface provides a further channel for ray splitting. This paper discusses some typical material configurations for which SAW ray splitting occurs. An example is provided of mode conversion entailing backward reflection or negative refraction. Experimental demonstration of ray splitting in the reflection of a laser generated SAW in GaAs(111) is provided. The calculation of SAW mode conversion amplitudes lies outside the scope of this paper.

  18. Millimeter wave detection via Autler-Townes splitting in rubidium Rydberg atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Joshua A., E-mail: josh.gordon@nist.gov; Holloway, Christopher L. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Electromagnetics Division, U.S. Department of Commerce, Boulder Laboratories, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Schwarzkopf, Andrew; Anderson, Dave A.; Miller, Stephanie; Thaicharoen, Nithiwadee; Raithel, Georg [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, we demonstrate the detection of millimeter waves via Autler-Townes splitting in {sup 85}Rb Rydberg atoms. This method may provide an independent, atom-based, SI-traceable method for measuring mm-wave electric fields, which addresses a gap in current calibration techniques in the mm-wave regime. The electric-field amplitude within a rubidium vapor cell in the WR-10 wave guide band is measured for frequencies of 93.71 GHz and 104.77 GHz. Relevant aspects of Autler-Townes splitting originating from a four-level electromagnetically induced transparency scheme are discussed. We measured the E-field generated by an open-ended waveguide using this technique. Experimental results are compared to a full-wave finite element simulation.

  19. S-wave spectroscopy and Hyperne splitting of Bc meson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Manan; Bhavsar, Tanvi; Vinodkumar, P.C.

    2017-01-01

    B c meson is the only heavy meson with two open flavours. This system is also interesting because they cannot annihilate into gluons. The mass spectra and hyperfine splitting of the B c meson are investigated in the Dirac framework with the help of linear + constant potential. The spin-spin interactions are also included in the calculation of the pseudoscalar and vector meson masses. Our computed result for the B c meson are in very good agreement with experimental results as well as other available theoretical result. Decay properties are also interesting because it is expected that decay of B c meson occur in to neutral meson. We hope our theoretical results are helpful for future experimental observations

  20. Shear-Wave Splitting and Crustal Anisotropy in the Shillong-Mikir Plateau of Northeast India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Dipok K.; Hazarika, Devajit; Paul, Arpita; Borah, Kajaljyoti; Borgohain, Jayanta Madhab

    2018-01-01

    Seismic anisotropy of crust beneath the Shillong-Mikir Plateau and the surrounding regions of northeast India have been investigated with the help of splitting analysis of S-wave of local earthquakes. We estimate a total 83 pairs of splitting parameters ( Φ and δt) from 67 local shallow focus earthquakes (depth ≤ 32 km) recorded by the 10 broadband seismological stations operated in the study region. The results show delay times ranging from 0.02 to 0.2 s, which correspond to anisotropy up to 4%, suggesting significant strength of anisotropy in the study region. Fast polarization direction ( Φ) in the Shillong Plateau shows mostly NW-SE trend in the western part and NE-SW trend in the northern part. Φs near Kopili fault (KF) follows NW-SE trend. Φ at most of the stations in the study region is consistent with the local stress orientation, suggesting that the anisotropy is mainly caused by preferentially aligned cracks responding to the stress field. On the other hand, anisotropy observed near the KF is due to aligned macroscopic fracture related to strike-slip movement in the fault zone.

  1. Apparent splitting of S waves propagating through an isotropic lowermost mantle

    KAUST Repository

    Parisi, Laura

    2018-03-24

    Observations of shear‐wave anisotropy are key for understanding the mineralogical structure and flow in the mantle. Several researchers have reported the presence of seismic anisotropy in the lowermost 150–250 km of the mantle (i.e., D” layer), based on differences in the arrival times of vertically (SV) and horizontally (SH) polarized shear waves. By computing waveforms at period > 6 s for a wide range of 1‐D and 3‐D Earth structures we illustrate that a time shift (i.e., apparent splitting) between SV and SH may appear in purely isotropic simulations. This may be misinterpreted as shear wave anisotropy. For near‐surface earthquakes, apparent shear wave splitting can result from the interference of S with the surface reflection sS. For deep earthquakes, apparent splitting can be due to the S‐wave triplication in D”, reflections off discontinuities in the upper mantle and 3‐D heterogeneity. The wave effects due to anomalous isotropic structure may not be easily distinguished from purely anisotropic effects if the analysis does not involve full waveform simulations.

  2. Apparent splitting of S waves propagating through an isotropic lowermost mantle

    KAUST Repository

    Parisi, Laura; Ferreira, Ana M. G.; Ritsema, Jeroen

    2018-01-01

    Observations of shear‐wave anisotropy are key for understanding the mineralogical structure and flow in the mantle. Several researchers have reported the presence of seismic anisotropy in the lowermost 150–250 km of the mantle (i.e., D” layer), based on differences in the arrival times of vertically (SV) and horizontally (SH) polarized shear waves. By computing waveforms at period > 6 s for a wide range of 1‐D and 3‐D Earth structures we illustrate that a time shift (i.e., apparent splitting) between SV and SH may appear in purely isotropic simulations. This may be misinterpreted as shear wave anisotropy. For near‐surface earthquakes, apparent shear wave splitting can result from the interference of S with the surface reflection sS. For deep earthquakes, apparent splitting can be due to the S‐wave triplication in D”, reflections off discontinuities in the upper mantle and 3‐D heterogeneity. The wave effects due to anomalous isotropic structure may not be easily distinguished from purely anisotropic effects if the analysis does not involve full waveform simulations.

  3. Longitudinal elliptically polarized electromagnetic waves in off-diagonal magnetoelectric split-ring composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, S T; Wang, Weihua; Zhou, L; Lin, Z F

    2009-07-22

    We study the propagation of plane electromagnetic waves through different systems consisting of arrays of split rings of different orientations. Many extraordinary EM phenomena were discovered in such systems, contributed by the off-diagonal magnetoelectric susceptibilities. We find a mode such that the electric field becomes elliptically polarized with a component in the longitudinal direction (i.e. parallel to the wavevector). Even though the group velocity [Formula: see text] and the wavevector k are parallel, in the presence of damping, the Poynting vector does not just get 'broadened', but can possess a component perpendicular to the wavevector. The speed of light can be real even when the product ϵμ is negative. Other novel properties are explored.

  4. Mantle Flow Implications across Easter and Southern Africa from Shear Wave Splitting Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, C.; Nyblade, A.; Bagley, B. C.; Mulibo, G. D.; Tugume, F.; Wysession, M. E.; Wiens, D.; van der Meijde, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present new shear wave splitting results from broadband seismic stations in Botswana and Namibia, and combine them with previous results from stations in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia, South Africa, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, and Angola to further examine the pattern of seismic anisotropy across southern Africa. The new results come from stations in northern Namibia and Botswana, which help to fill in large gaps in data coverage. Our preliminary results show that fast polarization directions overall trend in a NE orientation. The most noticeable measurements that deviate from this pattern are located around the Archean Tanzania Craton in eastern Africa. The general NE pattern of fast polarization directions is attributed to mantle flow linked to the African superplume. Smaller scale variations from this general direction can be explained by shape anisotropy in the lithosphere in magmatic regions in the East African rift system and to fossil anisotropy in the Precambrian lithosphere.

  5. The Formation of Laurentia: Evidence from Shear Wave Splitting and Seismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, M. V.; Bastow, I. D.; Rawlinson, N.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Gilligan, A.

    2017-12-01

    The northern Hudson Bay region of Canada comprises several Archean cratonic nuclei, assembled by Paleoproterozoic orogenies including the 1.8 Ga Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO) and Rinkian-Nagssugtoqidian Orogen (NO). Questions remain about how similar in scale and nature these orogens were compared to modern orogens like the Himalayas. Also in question is whether the thick Laurentian cratonic root below Hudson Bay is stratified, with a seismically-fast Archean core underlain by a lower, younger, thermal layer. We investigate these problems via shear-wave splitting and teleseismic tomography using up to 25 years of data from 65 broadband seismic stations across northern Hudson Bay. The results of the complementary studies comprise the most comprehensive study to date of mantle seismic velocity and anisotropy in northern Laurentia. Splitting parameter patterns are used to interpret multiple layers, lithospheric boundaries, dipping anisotropy, and deformation zone limits for the THO and NO. Source-side waveguide effects from Japan and the Aleutian trench are observed despite the tomographic data being exclusively relative arrival time. Mitigating steps to ensure data quality are explained and enforced. In the Hudson Strait, anisotropic fast directions (φ) generally parallel the THO, which appears in tomographic images as a strong low velocity feature relative to the neighbouring Archean cratons. Several islands in northern Hudson Bay show short length-scale changes in φ coincident with strong velocity contrasts. These are interpreted as distinct lithospheric blocks with unique deformational histories, and point to a complex, rather than simple 2-plate, collisional history for the THO. Strong evidence is presented for multiple anisotropic layers beneath Archean zones, consistent with the episodic development model of cratonic keels (e.g., Yuan & Romanowicz 2010). We show via both tomographic inversion models and SKS splitting patterns that southern Baffin Island was

  6. Splitting of quantum information in travelling wave fields using only linear optical elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, W B; De Almeida, N G; Avelar, A T; Baseia, B [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Goias, 74.001-970, Goiania-GO (Brazil)

    2011-02-28

    In this paper we present a feasible post-selection scheme to split quantum information in the realm of travelling waves with success probability of 50%. Taking advantage of this scheme we have also proposed the generation of a class of W states useful for perfect teleportation and superdense coding. The scheme employs only linear optical elements as beam splitters (BS) and phase shifters, plus two photon counters and a source of two spontaneous parametric down-conversion photons. It is shown that splitting of quantum information with high fidelity is possible, even when using inefficient detectors and photoabsorption BS.

  7. Frequency splitting in stria bursts: Possible roles of low-frequency waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melrose, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    The kinematics of the process L+-F->L' are explored where L represents a parallel Langmuir wave, F represents a low frequency fluctuation and L' represents a secondary Langmuir wave, and the results are used to discuss (a) a possible interpretation of the frequency splitting in stria bursts in terms of the processes L+-F->L', L'+-F'->t, where t represents a transverse wave, and (b) second harmonic emission due to the processes L+-s->L', L+L'->t, where s represents an ion sound wave. The following results are obtained: (1) The processes L+-s->L' are allowed only for ksub(s) 0 , respectively, with k 0 =ωsub(p)/65 Vsub(e). (2) The inclusion of a magnetic field does not alter the result (1) and adds further kinematic restrictions related to angles of propagation; the kinematic restriction Tsub(e)>5x10 5 K for second harmonic emission through process (b) above is also unchanged by inclusion of the magnetic field. The effect of a spread in the wavevectors of the Langmuir waves on this restriction is discussed in the Appendix. (3) For parallel Langmuir waves the process L-f->L' is forbidden for lower hybrid waves and for nearly perpendicular resonant whistlers, and the process L+F->L' is allowed only for resonant whistlers at ωsub(F)> or approx.1/2ωsub(p)(Ωsub(e)/ωsub(p)) 2 . (4) The sequential three waves processes L+-s->L', L'+-s->t and L+F->L', L'+-F'->t encounter difficulties when applied to the interpretation of the splitting in split pair and triple bursts. (5) The four-wave process L+-F+-F'->t is kinematically allowed and provides a favourable qualitative interpretation of the splitting when F denotes a resonant whistler near the frequency mentioned in (3) above. The four wave processes should saturate under conditions which are not extreme and produce fundamental plasma emission with brightness temperature Tsub(t) equal to the effective temperature Tsub(L) of the Langmuir waves. (orig.)

  8. Effects of Drift-Shell Splitting by Chorus Waves on Radiation Belt Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, A. A.; Zheng, L.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Elkington, S. R.; Albert, J.

    2015-12-01

    Drift shell splitting in the radiation belts breaks all three adiabatic invariants of charged particle motion via pitch angle scattering, and produces new diffusion terms that fully populate the diffusion tensor in the Fokker-Planck equation. Based on the stochastic differential equation method, the Radbelt Electron Model (REM) simulation code allows us to solve such a fully three-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation, and to elucidate the sources and transport mechanisms behind the phase space density variations. REM has been used to perform simulations with an empirical initial phase space density followed by a seed electron injection, with a Tsyganenko 1989 magnetic field model, and with chorus wave and ULF wave diffusion models. Our simulation results show that adding drift shell splitting changes the phase space location of the source to smaller L shells, which typically reduces local electron energization (compared to neglecting drift-shell splitting effects). Simulation results with and without drift-shell splitting effects are compared with Van Allen Probe measurements.

  9. Shear-Wave Splitting Within the Southeastern Carpathian Arc, Transylvanian Basin, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanciu, A. C.; Russo, R. M.; Mocanu, V. I.; Munteanu, L.

    2012-12-01

    We present 75 new measurements of shear wave splitting at 4 temporary broadband seismic stations that we deployed in the Transylvanian Basin within the Carpathian Arc, Romania. The Tisza-Dacia terranes, which form the basement of this basin, were accommodated in the space between the thick, old, rigid and cold East European Platform and the Moesian Platform during the Miocene. This movement was driven by the subduction of a part of the Tethys Ocean, which led to the formation of Carpathian orogen system. In Romania, the mountains are divided into the Eastern Carpathians, at the limit of Transylvanian Basin and the East European Platform along the Tornquist-Teisseyre Suture Zone, and the Southern Carpathians, at the limit with Moesian Platform. They connect to the West of the Carpathian Bend Zone where a very active high velocity seismic body generates intermediate depth earthquakes between 70 and 200 km beneath the Vrancea seismogenic zone. We analyzed splitting of SKS and SKKS phases recorded at epicentral distances between 87 and 150 degrees using the method of Silver and Chan (1991). We estimated splitting parameters, fast shear polarization azimuth and delay time, using both weighted averages of individual splitting measurements (Helffrich et al., 1994) and simultaneous linearization of all clearly recorded SK(K)S waves (Wolfe and Silver, 1998). For COMD, located at the contact of the Carpathian Bend Zone and Transylvanian Basin, we obtained a fast shear polarization azimuth trending NE-SW, parallel to the contact and to the strike of the Vrancea seismic body. For 10 suitable events recorded at IACB, at the contact of the Neogene Volcanic zone with the Eastern Carpathians, we did not observe any splitting; we consider the station splitting to be null. The fast shear polarization azimuth for PMAR, at the limit between Tisza-Dacia block and Southern Carpathians thrust belt, and at CHDM, within the Transylvanian Basin, is NW-SE similar to a regional splitting

  10. Bending and splitting of spoof surface acoustic waves through structured rigid surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujun Xie

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrated that a 90°-bended imaging of spoof surface acoustic waves with subwavelength resolution of 0.316λ can be realized by a 45° prism-shaped surface phononic crystal (SPC, which is composed of borehole arrays with square lattice in a rigid plate. Furthermore, by combining two identical prism-shaped phononic crystal to form an interface (to form a line-defect, the excited spoof surface acoustic waves can be split into bended and transmitted parts. The power ratio between the bended and transmitted surface waves can be tuned arbitrarily by adjusting the defect size. This acoustic system is believed to have potential applications in various multifunctional acoustic solutions integrated by different acoustical devices.

  11. Zero Field Splitting of the chalcogen diatomics using relativistic correlated wave-function methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rota, Jean-Baptiste; Knecht, Stefan; Fleig, Timo

    2011-01-01

    The spectrum arising from the (π*)2 configuration of the chalcogen dimers, namely the X21, a2 and b0+ states, is calculated using Wave-Function Theory (WFT) based methods. Two-component (2c) and four-component (4c) MultiReference Configuration Interaction (MRCI) and Fock-Space Coupled Cluster (FSCC......) methods are used as well as two-step methods Spin-Orbit Complete Active Space Perturbation Theory at 2nd order (SO-CASPT2) and Spin-Orbit Difference Dedicated Configuration Interaction (SODDCI). The energy of the X21 state corresponds to the Zero-Field Splitting (ZFS) of the ground state spin triplet...

  12. Effect of single-particle splitting in the exact wave function of the isovectorial pairing Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerma H, S.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of the exact wave function of the isovectorial pairing Hamiltonian with nondegenerate single-particle levels is discussed. The way that the single-particle splittings break the quartet condensate solution found for N=Z nuclei in a single degenerate level is established. After a brief review of the exact solution, the structure of the wave function is analyzed and some particular cases are considered where a clear interpretation of the wave function emerges. An expression for the exact wave function in terms of the isospin triplet of pair creators is given. The ground-state wave function is analyzed as a function of pairing strength, for a system of four protons and four neutrons. For small and large values of the pairing strength a dominance of two-pair (quartets) scalar couplings is found, whereas for intermediate values enhancements of the nonscalar couplings are obtained. A correlation of these enhancements with the creation of Cooper-like pairs is observed.

  13. A review of shear wave splitting in the crack-critical crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampin, Stuart; Chastin, Sebastien

    2003-10-01

    Over the last 15 years, it has become established that crack-induced stress-aligned shear wave splitting, with azimuthal anisotropy, is an inherent characteristic of almost all rocks in the crust. This means that most in situ rocks are pervaded by fluid-saturated microcracks and consequently are highly compliant. The evolution of such stress-aligned fluid-saturated grain-boundary cracks and pore throats in response to changing conditions can be calculated, in some cases with great accuracy, using anisotropic poro-elasticity (APE). APE is tightly constrained with no free parameters, yet dynamic modelling with APE currently matches a wide range of phenomena concerning anisotropy, stress, shear waves and cracks. In particular, APE has allowed the anisotropic response of a reservoir to injection to be calculated (predicted with hindsight), and the time and magnitude of an earthquake to be correctly stress-forecast. The reason for this calculability and predictability is that the microcracks in the crust are so closely spaced that they form critical systems. This crack-critical crust leads to a new style of geophysics that has profound implications for almost all aspects of pre-fracturing deformation of the crust and for solid-earth geophysics and geology. We review past, present and speculate about the future of shear wave splitting in the crack-critical crust. Shear wave splitting is seen to be a dynamic measure of the deformation of the rock mass. There is some good news and some bad news for conventional geophysics. Many accepted phenomena are no longer valid at high spatial and temporal resolution. A major effect is that the detailed crack geometry changes with time and varies from place to place in response to very small previously negligible changes. However, at least in some circumstances, the behaviour of the rock in the highly complex inhomogeneous Earth may be calculated and the response predicted, opening the way to possible control by feedback. The need is

  14. Upper Mantle Seismic Anisotropy Beneath West Antarctica from Shear Wave Splitting Analysis of POLENET/ANET Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, N.; Wiens, D. A.; Hernandez, S.; Aster, R. C.; Nyblade, A.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Huerta, A. D.; Wilson, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    We constrain azimuthal anisotropy in the Antarctic upper mantle using shear wave splitting parameters obtained from teleseismic SKS, SKKS, and PKS phases recorded at 30 broad-band seismometers deployed in West Antarctica, and the Transantarctic Mountains as a part of POLENET/ANET. The first seismometers were deployed in late 2007 and additional seismometers were deployed in 2008 and 2009. The seismometers generally operate year-round using solar power, insulated boxes, and either rechargeable AGM or primary lithium batteries. We used an eigenvalue technique to linearize the rotated and shifted shear wave particle motions and determine the best splitting parameters. Robust windows around the individual phases were chosen using the Teanby cluster-analysis algorithm. We visually inspected all results and assigned a quality rating based on factors including signal-to-noise ratios, particle motions, and error contours. The best results for each station were then stacked to get an average splitting direction and delay time. The delay times range from 0.33 to 1.33 s, but generally average about 1 s. We conclude that the splitting results from anisotropy in the upper mantle, since the large splitting times cannot be accumulated in the relatively thin crust (20-30 km) of the region. Overall, fast directions in West Antarctica are at large angles to the direction of Antarctic absolute plate motion in either hotspot or no-net rotation frameworks, showing that the anisotropic fabric does not result from shear associated with the motion of Antarctica over the mantle. The West Antarctic fast directions are also much different than those found in East Antarctica by previous studies. We suggest that the East Antarctic splitting results from anisotropy frozen into the cold cratonic continental lithosphere, whereas West Antarctic splitting is related to Cenozoic tectonism. Stations within the West Antarctic Rift System (WARS), a region of Cenozoic extension, show fast directions

  15. Bad split during bilateral sagittal split osteotomy of the mandible with separators: a retrospective study of 427 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensink, Gertjan; Verweij, Jop P; Frank, Michael D; Eelco Bergsma, J; Richard van Merkesteyn, J P

    2013-09-01

    An unfavourable fracture, known as a bad split, is a common operative complication in bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO). The reported incidence ranges from 0.5 to 5.5%/site. Since 1994 we have used sagittal splitters and separators instead of chisels for BSSO in our clinic in an attempt to prevent postoperative hypoaesthesia. Theoretically an increased percentage of bad splits could be expected with this technique. In this retrospective study we aimed to find out the incidence of bad splits associated with BSSO done with splitters and separators. We also assessed the risk factors for bad splits. The study group comprised 427 consecutive patients among whom the incidence of bad splits was 2.0%/site, which is well within the reported range. The only predictive factor for a bad split was the removal of third molars at the same time as BSSO. There was no significant association between bad splits and age, sex, class of occlusion, or the experience of the surgeon. We think that doing a BSSO with splitters and separators instead of chisels does not increase the risk of a bad split, and is therefore safe with predictable results. Copyright © 2012 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Crustal seismic anisotropy beneath Shillong plateau - Assam valley in North East India: Shear-wave splitting analysis using local earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Antara; Baruah, Santanu; Piccinini, Davide; Saikia, Sowrav; Phukan, Manoj K.; Chetia, Monisha; Kayal, J. R.

    2017-10-01

    We present crustal anisotropy estimates constrained by shear wave splitting (SWS) analysis using local earthquakes in the Shillong plateau and Assam valley area, North East India (NE India) region. Splitting parameters are determined using an automated cross-correlation (CC) method. We located 330 earthquakes recorded by 17 broadband seismic stations during 2001-2014 in the study area. Out of these 330 events, seismograms of 163 events are selected for the SWS analysis. Relatively small average delay times (0.039-0.084 s) indicate existence of moderate crack density in the crust below the study area. It is found that fast polarization directions vary from station to station depending on the regional stress system as well as geological conditions. The spatial pattern of crustal anisotropy in the area is controlled mostly by tectonic movement of the Indian plate towards NE. Presence of several E-W and N-S trending active faults in the area also play an important role on the observed pattern of crustal anisotropy.

  17. Mantle upwelling beneath Madagascar: evidence from receiver function analysis and shear wave splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jonathan D.; Eakin, Caroline M.

    2017-07-01

    Crustal receiver functions have been calculated from 128 events for two three-component broadband seismomenters located on the south coast (FOMA) and in the central High Plateaux (ABPO) of Madagascar. For each station, crustal thickness and V p / V s ratio were estimated from H- κ plots. Self-consistent receiver functions from a smaller back-azimuthal range were then selected, stacked and inverted to determine shear wave velocity structure as a function of depth. These results were corroborated by guided forward modeling and by Monte Carlo error analysis. The crust is found to be thinner (39 ± 0.7 km) beneath the highland center of Madagascar compared to the coast (44 ± 1.6 km), which is the opposite of what would be expected for crustal isostasy, suggesting that present-day long wavelength topography is maintained, at least in part, dynamically. This inference of dynamic support is corroborated by shear wave splitting analyses at the same stations, which produce an overwhelming majority of null results (>96 %), as expected for vertical mantle flow or asthenospheric upwelling beneath the island. These findings suggest a sub-plate origin for dynamic support.

  18. Spatial Splitting and Intensity Suppression of Four-Wave Mixing in V-Type Three-Level Atomic System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang-She, Li; Wei-Tao, Yin; Chen-Zhi, Yuan; Mei-Zhen, Shi; Yan, Zhao; Yan-Peng, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    We illustrate our experimental observation of coexisting the controllable spatial splitting and intensity suppression of four-wave mixing (FWM) beam in a V-type three-level atomic system. The peak number and separation distance of the FWM beam are controlled by the intensities and frequencies of the laser beams, as well as atomic density

  19. Tensile Split Hopkinson Bar Technique: Numerical Analysis of the Problem of Wave Disturbance and Specimen Geometry Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panowicz Robert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A method of tensile testing of materials in dynamic conditions based on a slightly modified compressive split Hopkinson bar system using a shoulder is described in this paper. The main goal was to solve, with the use of numerical modelling, the problem of wave disturbance resulting from application of a shoulder, as well as the problem of selecting a specimen geometry that enables to study the phenomenon of high strain-rate failure in tension. It is shown that, in order to prevent any interference of disturbance with the required strain signals at a given recording moment, the positions of the strain gages on the bars have to be correctly chosen for a given experimental setup. Besides, it is demonstrated that - on the basis of simplified numerical analysis - an appropriate gage length and diameter of a material specimen for failure testing in tension can be estimated.

  20. Exchange splitting of the interaction energy and the multipole expansion of the wave function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gniewek, Piotr, E-mail: pgniewek@tiger.chem.uw.edu.pl; Jeziorski, Bogumił, E-mail: jeziorsk@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-10-21

    The exchange splitting J of the interaction energy of the hydrogen atom with a proton is calculated using the conventional surface-integral formula J{sub surf}[Φ], the volume-integral formula of the symmetry-adapted perturbation theory J{sub SAPT}[Φ], and a variational volume-integral formula J{sub var}[Φ]. The calculations are based on the multipole expansion of the wave function Φ, which is divergent for any internuclear distance R. Nevertheless, the resulting approximations to the leading coefficient j{sub 0} in the large-R asymptotic series J(R) = 2e{sup −R−1}R(j{sub 0} + j{sub 1}R{sup −1} + j{sub 2}R{sup −2} + ⋯) converge with the rate corresponding to the convergence radii equal to 4, 2, and 1 when the J{sub var}[Φ], J{sub surf}[Φ], and J{sub SAPT}[Φ] formulas are used, respectively. Additionally, we observe that also the higher j{sub k} coefficients are predicted correctly when the multipole expansion is used in the J{sub var}[Φ] and J{sub surf}[Φ] formulas. The symmetry adapted perturbation theory formula J{sub SAPT}[Φ] predicts correctly only the first two coefficients, j{sub 0} and j{sub 1}, gives a wrong value of j{sub 2}, and diverges for higher j{sub n}. Since the variational volume-integral formula can be easily generalized to many-electron systems and evaluated with standard basis-set techniques of quantum chemistry, it provides an alternative for the determination of the exchange splitting and the exchange contribution of the interaction potential in general.

  1. Heat split imbalance study for annular fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiaojun; Ji Songtao; Zhang Yingchao

    2014-01-01

    Annular fuel rod has two gaps at inner and outer side. Under irradiation condition, the dimensional change of pellets is always larger than claddings' due to thermal expansion, swelling and densification, and this tends to enlarge the inner gap and reduce the outer gap. The gap size asymmetry must induce heat split imbalance problem that the heat flux will be larger at outer side of the rod. In this work, computer code AFPAC l.0 is used to simulate this heat split imbalance phenomena. The effect of initial gap size, rod inner pressure, roughness of pellets and cladding is studied, the results reveal that: l) Adjusting initial size of both gaps, reducing inner gap and enlarging outer gap could effectively alleviate heat split imbalance problem; 2) Adjusting the initial roughness of pellets and cladding is another effective approach to reducing heat split imbalance; 3) It seems that changing the rod inner pressure has a little effect on solving the heat flux asymmetry problem. (authors)

  2. Crack Features and Shear-Wave Splitting Associated with Fracture Extension during Hydraulic Stimulation of the Geothermal Reservoir in Soultz-sous-Forêts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelinet M.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent tomography results obtained within the scope of the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS European Soultz project led us to revisit the meso-fracturing properties of Soultz test site. In this paper, we develop a novel approach coupling effective medium modeling and shear-wave splitting to characterize the evolution of crack properties throughout the hydraulic stimulation process. The stimulation experiment performed in 2000 consisted of 3 successive injection steps spanning over 6 days. An accurate 4-D tomographic image was first carried out based upon the travel-times measured for the induced seismicity [Calò M., Dorbath C., Cornet F.H., Cuenot N. (2011 Large-scale aseismic motion identified through 4-D P-wave tomography, Geophys. J. Int. 186, 1295-1314]. The current study shows how to take advantage of the resulting compressional wave (Calò et al., 2011 and shear-wave velocity models. These are given as input data to an anisotropic effective medium model and converted into crack properties. In short, the effective medium model aims to estimate the impact of cracks on velocities. It refers to a crack-free matrix and 2 families of penny-shaped cracks with orientations in agreement with the main observed geological features: North-South strike and dip of 65°East and 65°West [Genter A., Traineau H. (1996 Analysis of macroscopic fractures in granite in the HDR geothermal well EPS-1, Soultz-sous-Forêts, France, J. Vol. Geoth. Res. 72, 121-141], respectively. The resulting output data are the spatial distributions of crack features (lengths and apertures within the 3-D geological formation. We point out that a flow rate increase results in a crack shortening in the area imaged by both compressional and shear waves, especially in the upper part of the reservoir. Conversely, the crack length, estimated during continuous injection rate phases, is higher than during the increasing injection rate phases. A possible explanation for this is that

  3. Splitting of standing spin-wave modes in circular submicron ferromagnetic dot under axial symmetry violation

    OpenAIRE

    Bunyaev, S. A.; Golub, V. O.; Salyuk, O. Yu.; Tartakovskaya, E. V.; Santos, N. M.; Timopheev, A. A.; Sobolev, N. A.; Serga, A. A.; Chumak, A. V.; Hillebrands, B.; Kakazei, G. N.

    2015-01-01

    The spin wave dynamics in patterned magnetic nanostructures is under intensive study during the last two decades. On the one hand, this interest is generated by new physics that can be explored in such structures. On the other hand, with the development of nanolithography, patterned nanoelements and their arrays can be used in many practical applications (magnetic recording systems both as media and read-write heads, magnetic random access memory, and spin-torque oscillators just to name a fe...

  4. Splitting of the Ti-3d bands of TiSe{sub 2} in the charge-density wave phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghafari, A., E-mail: aa.ghafari@gmail.com [Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14 km 163.5, I-34149, Trieste (Italy); Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109, Berlin (Germany); Petaccia, L. [Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14 km 163.5, I-34149, Trieste (Italy); Janowitz, C. [Institute of Physics, Humboldt-University of Berlin, Newtonst. 15, D-12489, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). • Charge density wave (CDW). • TiSe{sub 2}- Splitting of the conduction bands. Horizontal and vertical polarizations. Temperature dependence. - Abstract: Very high resolution angular resolved photoemission (ARPES) spectra on TiSe{sub 2} in two distinct polarization geometries (vertical and horizontal) at temperatures between 300 K and 22 K enabled the observation of details of bands near the Fermi level not reported so far. Calculations of the electronic band structure based on density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP hybrid functional and MBJ potential (with and without spin-orbit coupling) were performed to obtain the orbital symmetry and dispersion. Two degenerate conduction bands (CB’s) were observed at the Γ-point, a weak CB- emission at the A-point, and two non degenerate CB’s (i.e. splitting of CB) at the M/L-point of the Brillouin Zone (BZ). The splitting was detected at L for both polarizations, while at M remarkably only for horizontal polarization. These results cannot be fully accounted for by current theories for the charge density wave (CDW) and point to a reduced symmetry of the electronic states, possibly due to the chiral CDW.

  5. Time-lapse changes of P- and S-wave velocities and shear wave splitting in the first year after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, Japan: shallow subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawazaki, Kaoru; Snieder, Roel

    2013-04-01

    We detect time-lapse changes in P- and S-wave velocities (hereafter, VP and VS, respectively) and shear wave splitting parameters associated with the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, Japan, at depths between 0 and 504 m. We estimate not only medium parameters but also the 95 per cent confidence interval of the estimated velocity change by applying a new least squares inversion scheme to the deconvolution analysis of KiK-net vertical array records. Up to 6 per cent VS reduction is observed at more than half of the analysed KiK-net stations in northeastern Japan with over 95 per cent confidence in the first month after the main shock. There is a considerable correlation between the S-wave traveltime delay and the maximum horizontal dynamic strain (MDS) by the main shock motion when the strain exceeds 5 × 10- 4 on the ground surface. This correlation is not clearly observed for MDS at the borehole bottom. On the contrary, VP and shear wave splitting parameters do not show systematic changes after the Tohoku earthquake. These results indicate that the time-lapse change is concentrated near the ground surface, especially in loosely packed soil layers. We conclude that the behaviour of VP, VS and shear wave splitting parameters are explained by the generation of omnidirectional cracks near the ground surface and by the diffusion of water in the porous subsurface. Recovery of VS should be related to healing of the crack which is proportional to the logarithm of the lapse time after the main shock and/or to decompaction after shaking.

  6. Density-functional study of photoinduced water splitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez Mesa, Aliezer; Rodríguez Hernández, Fermín; Seifert, Gotthard; Tranca, Diana

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of water splitting on dye-sensitized metal (Ti, Cu) oxide surfaces, induced by direct sunlight excitation. In this study, we will consider the typical photoexcitation-followed-by-injection scheme, treating electron-injection and water splitting dynamics as independent events. The simultaneous modeling of the molecular motion and the quantum nonadiabatic transitions is achieved via the computation of the low-lying electronic states along several alternative reaction paths. Electronic structure calculations are based on a B3LYP-DFT Hamiltonian. The proposed approach combines an atomistic description of the reactants and of the immediate region of the surface, while the vibrational dynamics of the substrate is modeled as an effective bath leading to dissipation effects. The use of density-functional theory to solve the many- body electronic problem allows investigating the atomic motion of the water molecules and of a representative part of the substrate, thereby providing a theoretical and computational model capable to account simultaneously for the molecular character of the dye molecule and for the bulk properties of the surface. Furthermore, the insight emerging from this fundamental modeling can be used to optimize the chemical composition of the system to attain high incident-photon-flux-to-hydrogen-yield ratios. (full text)

  7. Environmental stability study of holographic solar spectrum splitting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysler, Benjamin D.; Ayala Pelaez, Silvana; Wu, Yuechen; Vorndran, Shelby D.; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    2016-09-01

    In this study the impact of outdoor temperature variations and solar illumination exposure on spectral filter material and holographic optical elements is examined. Although holographic components have been shown to be useful for solar spectrum splitting designs, relatively little quantitative data exist to demonstrate the extent to which these materials can withstand outdoor conditions. As researchers seek to investigate practical spectrum splitting designs, the environmental stability of holographic materials should be considered as an important factor. In the experiment presented, two holographic materials, Covestro Bayfol HX photopolymer and dichromated gelatin, and 3M reflective polymer filter materials are exposed to outdoor conditions for a period of several months. The environmental effect on absorption, spectral and angular bandwidth, peak efficiency, and Bragg matching conditions for the holograms are examined. Spectral bandwidth and transmittance of the 3M reflective filter material are also monitored. Holographic gratings are recorded, measured, and mounted on glass substrates and then sealed with a glass cover plate. The test samples are then mounted on a photovoltaic panel to simulate realistic temperature conditions and placed at an outdoor test facility in Tucson, Arizona. A duplicate set of holograms and 3M filter material is stored as a control group and periodically compared over the test period.

  8. A New Method of Assessing Uncertainty of the Cross-Convolution Method of Shear Wave Splitting Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutt, D.; Breidt, J.; Corbalan Castejon, A.; Witt, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    Shear wave splitting is a commonly used and powerful method for constraining such phenomena as lithospheric strain history or asthenospheric flow. However, a number of challenges with the statistics of shear wave splitting have been noted. This creates difficulties in assessing whether two separate measurements are statistically similar or are indicating real differences in anisotropic structure, as well as for created proper station averaged sets of parameters for more complex situations such as multiple or dipping layers of anisotropy. We present a new method for calculating the most likely splitting parameters using the Menke and Levin [2003] method of cross-convolution. The Menke and Levin method is used because it can more readily be applied to a wider range of anisotropic scenarios than the commonly used Silver and Chan [1991] technique. In our approach, we derive a formula for the spectral density of a function of the microseismic noise and the impulse response of the correct anisotropic model that holds for the true anisotropic model parameters. This is compared to the spectral density of the observed signal convolved with the impulse response for an estimated set of anisotropic parameters. The most likely parameters are found when the former and latter spectral densities are the same. By using the Whittle likelihood to compare the two spectral densities, a likelihood grid for all possible anisotropic parameter values is generated. Using bootstrapping, the uncertainty and covariance between the various anisotropic parameters can be evaluated. We will show this works with a single layer of anisotropy and a vertically incident ray, and discuss the usefulness for a more complex case. The method shows great promise for calculating multiple layer anisotropy parameters with proper assessment of uncertainty. References: Menke, W., and Levin, V. 2003. The cross-convolution method for interpreting SKS splitting observations, with application to one and two

  9. Length-scales of Slab-induced Asthenospheric Deformation from Geodynamic Modeling, Mantle Deformation Fabric, and Synthetic Shear Wave Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadamec, M. A.; MacDougall, J.; Fischer, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    The viscosity structure of the Earth's interior is critically important, because it places a first order constraint on plate motion and mantle flow rates. Geodynamic models using a composite viscosity based on experimentally derived flow laws for olivine aggregates show that lateral viscosity variations emerge in the upper mantle due to the subduction dynamics. However, the length-scale of this transition is still not well understood. Two-dimensional numerical models of subduction are presented that investigate the effect of initial slab dip, maximum yield stress (slab strength), and viscosity formulation (Newtonian versus composite) on the emergent lateral viscosity variations in the upper-mantle and magnitude of slab-driven mantle flow velocity. Significant viscosity reductions occur in regions of large flow velocity gradients due to the weakening effect of the dislocation creep deformation mechanism. The dynamic reductions in asthenospheric viscosity (less than 1018 Pa s) occur within approximately 500 km from driving force of the slab, with peak flow velocities occurring in models with a lower yield stress (weaker slab) and higher stress exponent. This leads to a sharper definition of the rheological base of the lithosphere and implies lateral variability in tractions along the base of the lithosphere. As the dislocation creep mechanism also leads to mantle deformation fabric, we then examine the spatial variation in the LPO development in the asthenosphere and calculate synthetic shear wave splitting. The models show that olivine LPO fabric in the asthenosphere generally increases in alignment strength with increased proximity to the slab, but can be transient and spatially variable on small length scales. The vertical flow fields surrounding the slab tip can produce shear-wave splitting variations with back-azimuth that deviate from the predictions of uniform trench-normal anisotropy, a result that bears on the interpretation of complexity in shear-wave

  10. Time-splitting combined with exponential wave integrator fourier pseudospectral method for Schrödinger-Boussinesq system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Feng; Zhang, Luming; Wang, Shanshan

    2018-02-01

    In this article, we formulate an efficient and accurate numerical method for approximations of the coupled Schrödinger-Boussinesq (SBq) system. The main features of our method are based on: (i) the applications of a time-splitting Fourier spectral method for Schrödinger-like equation in SBq system, (ii) the utilizations of exponential wave integrator Fourier pseudospectral for spatial derivatives in the Boussinesq-like equation. The scheme is fully explicit and efficient due to fast Fourier transform. The numerical examples are presented to show the efficiency and accuracy of our method.

  11. Guiding, bending, and splitting of coupled defect surface modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Zhang, Baile, E-mail: blzhang@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2016-01-25

    We experimentally demonstrate a type of waveguiding mechanism for coupled surface-wave defect modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal. Unlike conventional spoof surface plasmon waveguides, waveguiding of coupled surface-wave defect modes is achieved through weak coupling between tightly localized defect cavities in an otherwise gapped surface-wave photonic crystal, as a classical wave analogue of tight-binding electronic wavefunctions in solid state lattices. Wave patterns associated with the high transmission of coupled defect surface modes are directly mapped with a near-field microwave scanning probe for various structures including a straight waveguide, a sharp corner, and a T-shaped splitter. These results may find use in the design of integrated surface-wave devices with suppressed crosstalk.

  12. Guiding, bending, and splitting of coupled defect surface modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a type of waveguiding mechanism for coupled surface-wave defect modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal. Unlike conventional spoof surface plasmon waveguides, waveguiding of coupled surface-wave defect modes is achieved through weak coupling between tightly localized defect cavities in an otherwise gapped surface-wave photonic crystal, as a classical wave analogue of tight-binding electronic wavefunctions in solid state lattices. Wave patterns associated with the high transmission of coupled defect surface modes are directly mapped with a near-field microwave scanning probe for various structures including a straight waveguide, a sharp corner, and a T-shaped splitter. These results may find use in the design of integrated surface-wave devices with suppressed crosstalk

  13. Paired split-plot designs of multireader multicase studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijie; Gong, Qi; Gallas, Brandon D

    2018-07-01

    The widely used multireader multicase ROC study design for comparing imaging modalities is the fully crossed (FC) design: every reader reads every case of both modalities. We investigate paired split-plot (PSP) designs that may allow for reduced cost and increased flexibility compared with the FC design. In the PSP design, case images from two modalities are read by the same readers, thereby the readings are paired across modalities. However, within each modality, not every reader reads every case. Instead, both the readers and the cases are partitioned into a fixed number of groups and each group of readers reads its own group of cases-a split-plot design. Using a [Formula: see text]-statistic based variance analysis for AUC (i.e., area under the ROC curve), we show analytically that precision can be gained by the PSP design as compared with the FC design with the same number of readers and readings. Equivalently, we show that the PSP design can achieve the same statistical power as the FC design with a reduced number of readings. The trade-off for the increased precision in the PSP design is the cost of collecting a larger number of truth-verified patient cases than the FC design. This means that one can trade-off between different sources of cost and choose a least burdensome design. We provide a validation study to show the iMRMC software can be reliably used for analyzing data from both FC and PSP designs. Finally, we demonstrate the advantages of the PSP design with a reader study comparing full-field digital mammography with screen-film mammography.

  14. Split-face vitamin C consumer preference study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Leslie; Duque, Deysi K; Schirripa, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    Vitamin C is commonly used to treat aged skin. It has shown regenerative effects on skin wrinkles, texture, strength, and evenness of tone through its roles as an antioxidant, tyrosinase inhibitor, and inducer of collagen synthesis. Available vitamin C formulations on the anti-aging skin care market vary by their pH, packaging, and vehicle, which may decrease absorption, and therefore, the efficacy of the product. The purpose of this study was to assess the subjective efficacy, wearability, tolerance and overall preference of two professional vitamin C topical serums and sunscreens in Caucasian females using a split face method. A virtual split-face study of 39 Caucasian women compared two popular vitamin C and SPF product combinations - C-ESTA® Face Serum and Marini Physical Protectant SPF 45 (Jan Marini Skin, San Jose, CA; Products A) and CE Ferulic® and Physical Fusion UV Defense SPF 50 (Products B; SkinCeuticals Inc, Garland, TX). The products were assigned to each subject's left or right side of the face, and subjects rated and compared products through 5 online surveys at baseline, 24 hours, days 3, 7, and 14. Over 86% of the 35 subjects who completed the study preferred the smell and 83% preferred the feel and application of vitamin C Serum A over Serum B. Seventy-one percent of subjects preferred the feel and application of Sunscreen A over Sunscreen B. Results also showed a significant skin texture improvement and skin tone with Products A vs Product B. Products A trended higher for multiple additional categories. Products A exhibited superior anti-aging benefits than Products B. Subjects preferred the smell, feel, and application of Products A and experienced significantly less irritation than Products B. Overall, Products A were preferred over Products B with subjects willing to pay more for Products A over Products B.

  15. Wave Dragon Buoyancy Regulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jens; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    Wave Dragon is a wave energy converter, which was deployed offshore at Nissum Bredning in Denmark in 2003. The experience gained from operating Wave Dragon during 2003 and 2004 has shown that the buoyancy regulation system can be improved in a number of ways. This study describes the current...

  16. Dynamical control of matter-wave splitting using time-dependent optical lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Sung Jong; Andersen, Henrik Kjær; Mai, Sune

    2012-01-01

    We report on measurements of splitting Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) by using a time-dependent optical lattice potential. First, we demonstrate the division of a BEC into a set of equally populated components by means of time-dependent control of Landau-Zener tunneling in a vertical lattice....... Finally, a combination of multiple Bragg reflections and Landau-Zener tunneling allows for the generation of macroscopic arrays of condensates with potential applications in atom optics and atom interferometry....

  17. Tunable THz wave absorption by graphene-assisted plasmonic metasurfaces based on metallic split ring resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadivand, Arash; Sinha, Raju; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Gerislioglu, Burak; Kaya, Serkan; Pala, Nezih

    2017-01-01

    Graphene plasmonics has been introduced as a novel platform to design various nano- and microstructures to function in a wide range of spectrum from optical to THz frequencies. Herein, we propose a tunable plasmonic metamaterial in the THz regime by using metallic (silver) concentric microscale split ring resonator arrays on a multilayer metasurface composed of silica and silicon layers. We obtained an absorption percentage of 47.9% including two strong Fano resonant dips in THz regime for the purely plasmonic metamaterial without graphene layer. Considering the data of an atomic graphene sheet (with the thickness of ~0.35 nm) in both analytical and experimental regimes obtained by prior works, we employed a graphene layer under concentric split ring resonator arrays and above the multilayer metasurface to enhance the absorption ratio in THz bandwidth. Our numerical and analytical results proved that the presence of a thin graphene layer enhances the absorption coefficient of MM to 64.35%, at the highest peak in absorption profile that corresponds to the Fano dip position. We also have shown that changing the intrinsic characteristics of graphene sheet leads to shifts in the position of Fano dips and variations in the absorption efficiency. The maximum percentage of absorption (~67%) was obtained for graphene-based MM with graphene layer with dissipative loss factor of 1477 Ω. Employing the antisymmetric feature of the split ring resonators, the proposed graphene-based metamaterial with strong polarization dependency is highly sensitive to the polarization angle of the incident THz beam.

  18. Mini-Split Heat Pumps Multifamily Retrofit Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dentz, Jordan [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Podorson, David [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Varshney, Kapil [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Mini-split heat pumps can provide space heating and cooling in many climates and are relatively affordable. These and other features make them potentially suitable for retrofitting into multifamily buildings in cold climates to replace electric resistance heating or other outmoded heating systems. This report investigates the suitability of mini-split heat pumps for multifamily retrofits. Various technical and regulatory barriers are discussed and modeling was performed to compare long-term costs of substituting mini-splits for a variety of other heating and cooling options. A number of utility programs have retrofit mini-splits in both single family and multifamily residences. Two such multifamily programs are discussed in detail.

  19. Studies on spin waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prets, A.

    1998-07-01

    In the present Ph. D. thesis we are considering a special form of scaling limits, namely the hydrodynamic limit. Such limits are considered to explain macroscopic behavior of matter by means of microscopic dynamic laws. In this procedure a rescaling of space and time plays a central role. The limit will be formulated in a quantum mechanical way. Within this framework we study derivations of the Landau Lifshitz equation for ferromagnets. This equation is a macroscopic equation of motion for the magnetization vector and results into the theory of spin waves. Since we have no exact knowledge of the Heisenberg operator's time evolution no definitive statement an how to regain the Landau Lifshitz equation from the microscopic dynamics can be given. In contrast to the Heisenberg operator, for an Ising type interaction inside a ferromagnet one is able to recover macroscopically a solution of a linearized Landau Lifschitz equation. (author)

  20. Study on Mechanical Features of Brazilian Splitting Fatigue Tests of Salt Rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weichao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The microtest, SEM, was carried out to study the fracture surface of salt rock after the Brazilian splitting test and splitting fatigue test were carried out with a servo-controlled test machine RMT-150B. The results indicate that the deviation of using the tablet splitting method is larger than that of using steel wire splitting method, in Brazilian splitting test of salt rock, when the conventional data processing method is adopted. There are similar deformation features in both the conventional splitting tests and uniaxial compression tests. The stress-strain curves include compaction, elasticity, yielding, and failure stage. Both the vertical deformation and horizontal deformation of splitting fatigue tests under constant average loading can be divided into three stages of “loosening-tightness-loosening.” The failure modes of splitting fatigue tests under the variational average loading are not controlled by the fracturing process curve of the conventional splitting tests. The deformation extent of fatigue tests under variational average loading is even greater than that of conventional splitting test. The tensile strength of salt rock has a relationship with crystallization conditions. Tensile strength of thick crystal salt rock is lower than the bonded strength of fine-grain crystals.

  1. Study of Rare Events at the Split Field Magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the experiment is the study of full events associated with special, rare triggers using the almost 4 @p geometry of the improved Split Field Magnet (SFM) detector. Two triggers are used: a) a trigger on an electron produced around 90|0 with a transverse momentum p^t @$>$ 0.5 GeV/c; b) a trigger on very high p^t hadrons (p^t $>$ 5 GeV/c) at @Q @C 45|0, using the SFM chambers to define roads pointing to the interaction region. In the first case, the associated event will be studied to determine the origin of direct electron production in charmed particle production. In the second case, the production of jets or jet-like objects when a high p^t particle is produced in pp collisions will be investigated. To carry out this program, the detection system consists of : \\item a) An improved SFM detector chamber system and layout to detect more of the produced particles and to simplify the pattern recognition problem in multiparticle events. \\item b) An improved program chain for the analysis of SFM events, ...

  2. Fee Splitting among General Practitioners: A Cross-Sectional Study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Mojtaba; Larijani, Bagher; Aramesh, Kiarash; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Fotouhi, Akbar; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Ebrahimian, Nejatollah; Kandi, Mohamad Jafar

    2016-12-01

    Fee splitting is a process whereby a physician refers a patient to another physician or a healthcare facility and receives a portion of the charge in return. This survey was conducted to study general practitioners' (GPs) attitudes toward fee splitting as well as the prevalence, causes, and consequences of this process. This is a cross-sectional study on 223 general practitioners in 2013. Concerning the causes and consequences of fee splitting, an unpublished qualitative study was conducted by interviewing a number of GPs and specialists and the questionnaire options were the results of the information obtained from this study. Of the total 320 GPs, 247 returned the questionnaires. The response rate was 77.18%. Of the 247 returned questionnaires, 223 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Among the participants, 69.1% considered fee splitting completely wrong and 23.2% (frequently or rarely) practiced fee splitting. The present study showed that the prevalence of fee splitting among physicians who had positive attitudes toward fee splitting was 4.63 times higher than those who had negative attitudes. In addition, this study showed that, compared to private hospitals, fee splitting is less practiced in public hospitals. The major cause of fee splitting was found to be unrealistic/unfair tariffs and the main consequence of fee splitting was thought to be an increase in the number of unnecessary patient referrals. Fee splitting is an unethical act, contradicts the goals of the medical profession, and undermines patient's best interest. In Iran, there is no code of ethics on fee splitting, but in this study, it was found that the majority of GPs considered it unethical. However, among those who had negative attitudes toward fee splitting, there were physicians who did practice fee splitting. The results of the study showed that physicians who had a positive attitude toward fee splitting practiced it more than others. Therefore, if physicians consider fee splitting unethical

  3. Introducing an experimental split-cylinder to study flows with geophysical interest: First steps and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Jesus O.; Burguete, Javier

    2017-11-01

    A new experimental setup has been developed in order to study rotating flows. Our research is derived from the experiments carried out in our group relating to this kind of flows, and the setup is inspired by the simulations performed by Lopez & Gutierrez-Castillo using a split-cylinder flow. In their work they study the different bifurcations taking place into the flow, among others, finding inertial waves in different configurations of the movement of the split-cylinder. Our setup consists in a split-cylinder in which each half can move in co-rotation or in counter-rotation. Moreover, we can set the rotation velocity of each half independently in order to study these different configurations of the flow. The aspect ratio defined as Γ = H / R can be modified, where H is the internal length of the cylinder and R is its radius. With this setup, we study the flow developed inside the split-cylinder depending on the Reynolds number like the different symmetry-breaking that should appear according to Lopez & Gutierrez-Castillo. To obtain the experimental data we use both laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques. The firsts results got are in the co-rotation case rotating one half faster than the other. We acknowledge support from Spanish Government Grant FIS 2014-54101-P. Jesús O. Rodríguez-García acknowledge research Grant from Asociación de Amigos de la Universidad de Navarra.

  4. Dominant phonon wave vectors and strain-induced splitting of the 2D Raman mode of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Rohit; Bonini, Nicola; Marzari, Nicola; Reich, Stephanie

    2012-03-01

    The dominant phonon wave vectors q* probed by the 2D Raman mode of pristine and uniaxially strained graphene are determined via a combination of ab initio calculations and a full two-dimensional integration of the transition matrix. We show that q* are highly anisotropic and rotate about K with the polarizer and analyzer condition relative to the lattice. The corresponding phonon-mediated electronic transitions show a finite component along K-Γ that sensitively determines q*. We invalidate the notion of “inner” and “outer” processes. The characteristic splitting of the 2D mode of graphene under uniaxial tensile strain and given polarizer and analyzer setting is correctly predicted only if the strain-induced distortion and red-shift of the in-plane transverse optical (iTO) phonon dispersion as well as the changes in the electronic band structure are taken into account.

  5. Splitting and oscillation of Majorana zero modes in the p-wave BCS-BEC evolution with plural vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizushima, T.; Machida, K.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate how the vortex-vortex separation changes Majorana zero modes in the vicinity of the BCS-BEC (Bose-Einstein condensation) topological phase transition of p-wave resonant Fermi gases. By analytically and numerically solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation for spinless p-wave superfluids with plural vortices, it is demonstrated that the quasiparticle tunneling between neighboring vortices gives rise to the quantum oscillation of the low-lying spectra on the scale of the Fermi wavelength in addition to the exponential splitting. This rapid oscillation, which appears in the weak-coupling regime as a consequence of quantum oscillations of quasiparticle wave functions, disappears in the vicinity of the BCS-BEC topological phase transition. This is understandable from that the wave function of the Majorana zero modes is described by the modified Bessel function in the strong-coupling regime, and thus it becomes spread over the vortex core region. Due to the exponential divergence of the modified Bessel function, the concrete realization of the Majorana zero modes near the topological phase transition requires the neighboring vortices to be separated beyond the length scale defined by the coherence length and the dimensionless coupling constant. All these behaviors are also confirmed by carrying out the full numerical diagonalization of the nonlocal Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation in a two-dimensional geometry. Furthermore, this argument is expanded into the case of three-vortex systems, where a pair of core-bound and edge-bound Majorana states survive at zero-energy state regardless of the vortex separation.

  6. Split-step scheme for photon-pair generation through spontaneous four-wave mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Jacob Gade; Christensen, Jesper Bjerge; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The rapid development of quantum information technology requires the ability to reliably create and distribute single photons [1]. Photon-pair production through spontaneous four-wave mixing (SpFWM) allows heralded single photons to be generated at communication wavelengths and in fiber, compatible...... with conventional communication systems, with small losses. Creating single photons in desired quantum states require careful design of waveguide structures. This is greatly facilitated by a general numerical approach as presented here. Additionally, such a numerical approach allows detailed analysis of real...... systems where all relevent effects are included....

  7. New Resolution Strategy for Multi-scale Reaction Waves using Time Operator Splitting and Space Adaptive Multiresolution: Application to Human Ischemic Stroke*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louvet Violaine

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We tackle the numerical simulation of reaction-diffusion equations modeling multi-scale reaction waves. This type of problems induces peculiar difficulties and potentially large stiffness which stem from the broad spectrum of temporal scales in the nonlinear chemical source term as well as from the presence of large spatial gradients in the reactive fronts, spatially very localized. A new resolution strategy was recently introduced ? that combines a performing time operator splitting with high oder dedicated time integration methods and space adaptive multiresolution. Based on recent theoretical studies of numerical analysis, such a strategy leads to a splitting time step which is not restricted neither by the fastest scales in the source term nor by stability limits related to the diffusion problem, but only by the physics of the phenomenon. In this paper, the efficiency of the method is evaluated through 2D and 3D numerical simulations of a human ischemic stroke model, conducted on a simplified brain geometry, for which a simple parallelization strategy for shared memory architectures was implemented, in order to reduce computing costs related to “detailed chemistry” features of the model.

  8. Shear wave splitting and upper mantle deformation in French Polynesia: Evidence for small-scale heterogeneity related to the Society hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, R. M.; Okal, E. A.

    1998-07-01

    We determined shear wave splitting parameters at four island sites in French Polynesia: Tiputa (TPT) on Rangiroa in the Tuamotu archipelago; Papeete (PPT) on Tahiti in the Society Islands; Tubuai (TBI) in the Cook-Austral island chain; and Rikitea (RKT) on Mangareva in the Gambier Islands. We also examined splitting at Pitcairn (PTCN) on Pitcairn Island; because of the short time of operation of PTCN, our results there are preliminary. We find substantial differences in splitting, most likely caused by variable upper mantle deformation beneath the five stations. At TPT the fast split shear wave (ϕ) direction is N66°W±4°, parallel to the current Pacific-hotspots relative motion (APM) vector; the delay time between fast and slow waves is 1.3±0.2 s. At PPT, on Tahiti, we could detect no splitting despite many clear SKS observations. At TBI, on Tubuai we detected splitting with a delay time of 1.1±0.1 s and a ϕ direction midway between the local APM direction and the fossil spreading direction (N86°W±2°), as locally indicated by the nearby Austral Fracture Zone. At RKT in the Gambier Islands, ϕ trends N53°W±6°, 16° clockwise of the local APM azimuth, and delay time at RKT is 1.1±0.1 s. Results at PTCN include ϕ near N38°W±9° and a delay time of 1.1±0.3 s. These different results imply variable upper mantle deformation beneath the five sites. We interpret splitting at TPT and, possibly, RKT as indicative of asthenospheric flow or shear in the APM direction beneath the stations. At PPT, azimuthal isotropy indicates deformed upper mantle with a vertical symmetry axis, or absence of strong or consistently oriented mantle deformation fabric beneath Tahiti. Either effect could be related to recent hotspot magmatism on Tahiti. At TBI, splitting may be complicated by juxtaposition of different lithospheric thicknesses along the nearby Austral Fracture Zone, resulting in perturbation of asthenospheric flow. The absence of splitting related to fossil

  9. Experimental Study on the WavePiston Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecher, Arthur; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Angelelli, E.

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the power performance of the WavePiston wave energy converter. It focuses mainly on evaluating the power generating capabilities of the device and the effect of the following issues: Scaling ratios PTO loading Wave height and wave period...... dependency Oblique incoming waves Distance between plates During the study, the model supplied by the client, WavePiston, has been rigorously tested as all the anticipated tests have been done thoroughly and during all tests, good quality data has been obtained from all the sensors....

  10. Unraveling the tectonic history of northwest Africa: Insights from shear-wave splitting, receiver functions, and geodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. S.; Becker, T. W.; Allam, A. A.; Alpert, L. A.; Di Leo, J. F.; Wookey, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The complex tectonic history and orogenesis in the westernmost Mediterranean are primarily due to Cenozoic convergence of Africa with Eurasia. The Gibraltar system, which includes the Rif Mountains of Morocco and the Betics in Spain, forms a tight arc around the Alboran Basin. Further to the south the Atlas Mountains of Morocco, an example of an intracontinental fold and thrust belt, display only modest tectonic shortening, yet have unusually high topography. To the south of the Atlas, the anti-Atlas is the oldest mountain range in the region, has the lowest relief, and extends toward the northern extent of the West African Craton. To help unravel the regional tectonics, we use new broadband seismic data from 105 stations across the Gibraltar arc into southern Morocco. We use shear wave splitting analysis for a deep (617 km) local S event and over 230 SKS events to infer azimuthal seismic anisotropy and we image the lithospheric structure with receiver functions. One of the most striking discoveries from these methods is evidence for localized, near vertical-offset deformation of both crust-mantle and lithosphere-asthenosphere interfaces at the flanks of the High Atlas. These offsets coincide with the locations of Jurassic-aged normal faults that were reactivated during the Cenozoic. This suggests that these lithospheric-scale discontinuities were involved in the formation of the Atlas and are still active. Shear wave splitting results show that the inferred stretching axes are aligned with the highest topography in the Atlas, suggesting asthenospheric shearing in mantle flow guided by lithospheric topography. Geodynamic modeling shows that the inferred seismic anisotropy may be produced by the interaction of mantle flow with the subducted slab beneath the Alboran, the West African Craton, and the thinned lithosphere beneath the Atlas. Isostatic modeling based on these lithospheric structure estimates indicates that lithospheric thinning alone does not explain the

  11. Preliminary Magnetostratigraphic Study of the Split Mountain and Lower Imperial Groups, Split Mountain Gorge, Western Salton Trough, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluette, A. L.; Housen, B. A.; Dorsey, R. J.

    2004-12-01

    We present preliminary results of a magnetostratigraphic study of Miocene-Pliocene sedimentary rocks of the Split Mt. and lower Imperial Groups exposed in Split Mt. Gorge and eastern Fish Creek-Vallecito basin, western Salton Trough. Precise age control for the base of this thick section is needed to improve our understanding of the early history of extension-related subsidence in this region. The geologic setting and stratigraphic framework are known from previous work by Dibblee (1954, 1996), Woodard (1963), Kerr (1982), Winker (1987), Kerr and Kidwell (1991), Winker and Kidwell (1986; 1996), and others. We have analyzed Upper Miocene to lower Pliocene strata exposed in a conformable section in Split Mt. Gorge, including (in order from the base; nomenclature of Winker and Kidwell, 1996): (1) Split Mt. Group: Red Rock Fm alluvial sandstone; Elephant Trees alluvial conglomerate; and lower megabreccia unit; and (2) lower part of Imperial Group, including: Fish Creek Gypsum; proximal to distal turbidites of the Latrania Fm and Wind Caves Mbr of Deguynos Fm; upper megabreccia unit; marine mudstone and rhythmites of the Mud Hills Mbr (Deguynos Fm); and the basal part of the Yuha Mbr (Deguynos Fm). Measured thickness from the base of the Elephant Trees Cgl to the base of the Yuha Mbr is about 1050 m, consistent with previous measurements of Winker (1987). Paleomagnetic samples were collected at approximately 10 m intervals throughout this section. The upper portion of our sampled section overlaps with the lower part of the section sampled for magnetostratigraphic study by Opdyke et al. (1977) and Johnson et al. (1983). They interpreted the base of their section to be about 4.3 Ma, and calculated an average sedimentation rate of approximately 5.5 mm/yr for the lower part of their section. Good-quality preliminary results from 15 paleomagnetic sites distributed throughout our sampled section permit preliminary identification of 6 polarity zones. Based on regional mapping

  12. Study of flow behaviors of droplet merging and splitting in microchannels using Micro-PIV measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Liu, Zhaomiao

    2017-01-01

    Droplet merging and splitting are important droplet manipulations in droplet-based microfluidics. However, the fundamental flow behaviors of droplets were not systematically studied. Hence, we designed two different microstructures to achieve droplet merging and splitting respectively, and quantitatively compared different flow dynamics in different microstructures for droplet merging and splitting via micro-particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) experiments. Some flow phenomena of droplets different from previous studies were observed during merging and splitting using a high-speed microscope. It was also found the obtained instantaneous velocity vector fields of droplets have significant influence on the droplets merging and splitting. For droplet merging, the probability of droplets coalescence (η) in a microgroove is higher (50% T-junction microchannel (15% < η < 50%), and the highest coalescence efficiency (η = 92%) comes at the two-phase flow ratio e of 0.42 in the microgroove. Moreover, compared with a cylinder obstacle, Y-junction bifurcation can split droplets more effectively and the droplet flow during splitting is steadier. The results can provide better understanding of droplet behaviors and are useful for the design and applications of droplet-based microfluidics. PMID:28890680

  13. Study of flow behaviors of droplet merging and splitting in microchannels using Micro-PIV measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Feng; Li, Yi; Liu, Zhaomiao; Li, XiuJun

    2017-04-01

    Droplet merging and splitting are important droplet manipulations in droplet-based microfluidics. However, the fundamental flow behaviors of droplets were not systematically studied. Hence, we designed two different microstructures to achieve droplet merging and splitting respectively, and quantitatively compared different flow dynamics in different microstructures for droplet merging and splitting via micro-particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) experiments. Some flow phenomena of droplets different from previous studies were observed during merging and splitting using a high-speed microscope. It was also found the obtained instantaneous velocity vector fields of droplets have significant influence on the droplets merging and splitting. For droplet merging, the probability of droplets coalescence ( η ) in a microgroove is higher (50% < η < 92%) than that in a T-junction microchannel (15% < η < 50%), and the highest coalescence efficiency ( η = 92%) comes at the two-phase flow ratio e of 0.42 in the microgroove. Moreover, compared with a cylinder obstacle, Y-junction bifurcation can split droplets more effectively and the droplet flow during splitting is steadier. The results can provide better understanding of droplet behaviors and are useful for the design and applications of droplet-based microfluidics.

  14. Wave Tank Studies of Phase Velocities of Short Wind Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, S.; Sergievskaya, I.; Shchegolkov, Yu.

    Wave tank studies of phase velocities of short wind waves have been carried out using Ka-band radar and an Optical Spectrum Analyser. The phase velocities were retrieved from measured radar and optical Doppler shifts, taking into account measurements of surface drift velocities. The dispersion relationship was studied in centimetre (cm)- and millimetre(mm)-scale wavelength ranges at different fetches and wind speeds, both for a clean water surface and for water covered with surfactant films. It is ob- tained that the phase velocities do not follow the dispersion relation of linear capillary- gravity waves, increasing with fetch and, therefore, depending on phase velocities of dominant decimetre (dm)-centimetre-scale wind waves. One thus can conclude that nonlinear cm-mm-scale harmonics bound to the dominant wind waves and propagat- ing with the phase velocities of the decimetric waves are present in the wind wave spectrum. The resulting phase velocities of short wind waves are determined by re- lation between free and bound waves. The relative intensity of the bound waves in the spectrum of short wind waves is estimated. It is shown that this relation depends strongly on the surfactant concentration, because the damping effect due to films is different for free and bound waves; this results to changes of phase velocities of wind waves in the presence of surfactant films. This work was supported by MOD, UK via DERA Winfrith (Project ISTC 1774P) and by RFBR (Project 02-05-65102).

  15. Stress- and Structure-Induced Anisotropy in Southern California From Two Decades of Shear Wave Splitting Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zefeng; Peng, Zhigang

    2017-10-01

    We measure shear wave splitting (SWS) parameters (i.e., fast direction and delay time) using 330,000 local earthquakes recorded by more than 400 stations of the Southern California Seismic Network (1995-2014). The resulting 232,000 SWS measurements (90,000 high-quality ones) provide a uniform and comprehensive database of local SWS measurements in Southern California. The fast directions at many stations are consistent with regional maximum compressional stress σHmax. However, several regions show clear deviations from the σHmax directions. These include linear sections along the San Andreas Fault and the Santa Ynez Fault, geological blocks NW to the Los Angeles Basin, regions around the San Jacinto Fault, the Peninsular Ranges near San Diego, and the Coso volcanic field. These complex patterns show that regional stresses and active faults cannot adequately explain the upper crustal anisotropy in Southern California. Other types of local structures, such as local rock types or tectonic features, also play significant roles.

  16. Systematic theoretical investigation of the zero-field splitting in Gd(III) complexes: Wave function and density functional approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Shehryar, E-mail: sherkhan@fysik.su.se; Odelius, Michael, E-mail: odelius@fysik.su.se [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Center, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kubica-Misztal, Aleksandra [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland); Kruk, Danuta [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Sloneczna 54, Olsztyn PL-10710 (Poland); Kowalewski, Jozef [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-01-21

    The zero-field splitting (ZFS) of the electronic ground state in paramagnetic ions is a sensitive probe of the variations in the electronic and molecular structure with an impact on fields ranging from fundamental physical chemistry to medical applications. A detailed analysis of the ZFS in a series of symmetric Gd(III) complexes is presented in order to establish the applicability and accuracy of computational methods using multiconfigurational complete-active-space self-consistent field wave functions and of density functional theory calculations. The various computational schemes are then applied to larger complexes Gd(III)DOTA(H{sub 2}O){sup −}, Gd(III)DTPA(H{sub 2}O){sup 2−}, and Gd(III)(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}{sup 3+} in order to analyze how the theoretical results compare to experimentally derived parameters. In contrast to approximations based on density functional theory, the multiconfigurational methods produce results for the ZFS of Gd(III) complexes on the correct order of magnitude.

  17. Shear Wave Splitting analysis of borehole microseismic reveals weak azimuthal anisotropy hidden behind strong VTI fabric of Lower Paleozoic shales in northern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Wojciech; Verdon, James; Malinowski, Michał; Trojanowski, Jacek

    2017-04-01

    Azimuthal anisotropy plays a key-role in hydraulic fracturing experiments, since it provides information on stress orientation and pre-existing fracture system presence. The Lower Paleozoic shale plays in northern Poland are characterized by a strong (15-18%) Vertical Transverse Isotropy (VTI) fabric which dominates weak azimuthal anisotropy being of order of 1-2%. A shear wave travelling in the subsurface after entering an anisotropic medium splits into two orthogonally polarized waves travelling with different velocities. Splitting parameters which can be assessed using a microseismic array are polarization of the fast shear wave and time delay between two modes. Polarization of the fast wave characterizes the anisotropic system on the wave path while the time delay is proportional to the magnitude of anisotropy. We employ Shear Wave Splitting (SWS) technique using a borehole microseismic dataset collected during a hydraulic stimulation treatment located in northern Poland, to image fracture strike masked by a strong VTI signature. During the inversion part, the VTI background parameters were kept constant using information from 3D seismic (VTI model used for pre-stack depth migration). Obtained fracture azimuths averaged over fracturing stages are consistent with the available XRMI imager logs from the nearby vertical well, however they are different from the large-scale maximum stress direction (by 40-45 degrees). Inverted Hudson's crack density (ca. 2%) are compatible with the low shear-wave anisotropy observed in the cross-dipole sonic logs (1-2%). This work has been funded by the Polish National Centre for Research and Development within the Blue Gas project (No BG2/SHALEMECH/14). Data were provided by the PGNiG SA. Collaboration with University of Bristol was supported within TIDES COST Action ES1401.

  18. Permanently split capacitor motor-study of the design parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarac, Vasilija; Stefanov, Goce

    2017-09-01

    Paper analyzes the influence of various design parameters on torque of permanently split capacitor motor. Motor analytical model is derived and it is used for calculating the performance characteristics of basic motor model. The acquired analytical model is applied in optimization software that uses genetic algorithms (GA) as an optimization method. Optimized motor model with increased torque is derived by varying three motor parameters in GA program: winding turns ratio, average air gap flux density and motor stack length. Increase of torque has been achieved for nominal operation but also at motor starting. Accuracy of the derived models is verified by Simulink. The acquired values of several motor parameters from transient characteristics of Simulink models are compared with the corresponding values obtained from analytical models of both motors, basic and optimized. Numerical analysis, based on finite element method (FEM), is also performed for both motor models. As a result of the FEM analysis, magnetic flux density in motor cross-section is calculated and adequate conclusions are derived in relation to core saturation and air gap flux density in both motor models.

  19. Use of 99mTc-bicisate in activation studies by split-dose technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, S; Madsen, P L; Sperling, B

    1994-01-01

    The properties of the brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracer 99mTc-bicisate (ethyl cysteinate dimer) were examined in regard to its use in test-retest studies with short-interval, split-dose studies. The stimulus applied in these tests was a visual activation by a "flicke......The properties of the brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracer 99mTc-bicisate (ethyl cysteinate dimer) were examined in regard to its use in test-retest studies with short-interval, split-dose studies. The stimulus applied in these tests was a visual activation...

  20. A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

    1998-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil, rock, and ice penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact of 125 fps. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these more sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reaches the electronics contained in the various mechanical systems. As part of the investigation of packaging techniques, a two phase study of shock mitigating materials is being conducted. The purpose of the first phase reported here is to examine the performance of a joint that consists of shock mitigating material sandwiched in between steel and to compare the performance of the shock mitigating materials. A split Hopkinson bar experimental configuration simulates this joint and has been used to study the shock mitigating characteristics of seventeen, unconfined materials. The nominal input for these tests is an incident compressive wave with 50 fps peak (1,500 micro var-epsilon peak) amplitude and a 100 micros duration (measured at 10% amplitude)

  1. Seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle beneath the MAGIC array, mid-Atlantic Appalachians: Constraints from SKS splitting and quasi-Love wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, J. C.; Long, M. D.; Benoit, M. H.; Servali, A.

    2016-12-01

    North America's eastern passive continental margin has been modified by several cycles of supercontinent assembly. Its complex surface geology and distinct topography provide evidence of these events, while also raising questions about the extent of deformation in the continental crust, lithosphere, and mantle during past episodes of rifting and mountain building. The Mid-Atlantic Geophysical Integrative Collaboration (MAGIC) is an EarthScope and GeoPRISMS-funded project that involves a collaborative effort among seismologists, geodynamicists, and geomorphologists. One component of the project is a broadband seismic array consisting of 28 instruments in a linear path from coastal Virginia to western Ohio, which operated between October 2013 and October 2016. A key science question addressed by the MAGIC project is the geometry of past lithospheric deformation and present-day mantle flow beneath the Appalachians, which can be probed using observations of seismic anisotropy Here we present observations of SKS splitting and quasi-Love wave arrivals from stations of the MAGIC array, which together constrain seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle. SKS splitting along the array reveals distinct regions of upper mantle anisotropy, with stations in and to the west of the range exhibiting fast directions parallel to the strike of the mountains. In contrast, weak splitting and null SKS arrivals dominate eastern stations in the coastal plain. Documented Love-to-Rayleigh wave scattering for surface waves originating the magnitude 8.3 Illapel, Chile earthquakes in September 2015 provides complementary constraints on anisotropy. These quasi-Love wave arrivals suggest a pronounced change in upper mantle anisotropy at the eastern edge of present-day Appalachian topography. Together, these observations increase our understanding of the extent of lithospheric deformation beneath North America associated with Appalachian orogenesis, as well as the pattern of present-day mantle flow

  2. Embryo splitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Illmensee

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian embryo splitting has successfully been established in farm animals. Embryo splitting is safely and efficiently used for assisted reproduction in several livestock species. In the mouse, efficient embryo splitting as well as single blastomere cloning have been developed in this animal system. In nonhuman primates embryo splitting has resulted in several pregnancies. Human embryo splitting has been reported recently. Microsurgical embryo splitting under Institutional Review Board approval has been carried out to determine its efficiency for blastocyst development. Embryo splitting at the 6–8 cell stage provided a much higher developmental efficiency compared to splitting at the 2–5 cell stage. Embryo splitting may be advantageous for providing additional embryos to be cryopreserved and for patients with low response to hormonal stimulation in assisted reproduction programs. Social and ethical issues concerning embryo splitting are included regarding ethics committee guidelines. Prognostic perspectives are presented for human embryo splitting in reproductive medicine.

  3. "Split" Character Studies in "Crime and Punishment." [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Mary

    Based on Fyodor Dostoevsky's novel "Crime and Punishment," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that: a close study of the characters of a literary classic will yield important clues to an understanding of the work as a whole; an effective analysis of stylistic devices depends upon selection and interpretation…

  4. 57Fe quadrupole splitting and isomer shift in various oxyhemoglobins: study using Mössbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Berkovsky, A. L.; Kumar, A.; Kundu, S.; Vinogradov, A. V.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Semionkin, V. A.

    2010-01-01

    A comparative study of normal human, rabbit and pig oxyhemoglobins and oxyhemoglobin from patients with chronic myeloleukemia and multiple myeloma using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution demonstrated small variations of the 57 Fe quadrupole splitting and isomer shift. These variations may be a result of small structural differences in the heme iron stereochemistry of various hemoglobins.

  5. {sup 57}Fe quadrupole splitting and isomer shift in various oxyhemoglobins: study using Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshtrakh, M. I., E-mail: oshtrakh@mail.utnet.ru [Ural Federal University (The former Ural State Technical University-UPI), Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation); Berkovsky, A. L. [Hematological Scientific Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Kumar, A.; Kundu, S., E-mail: sumankundu@south.du.ac.in [University of Delhi South Campus, Department of Biochemistry (India); Vinogradov, A. V.; Konstantinova, T. S. [Ural State Medical Academy, Faculty of Internal Diseases Propedeutics (Russian Federation); Semionkin, V. A. [Ural Federal University (The former Ural State Technical University-UPI), Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation)

    2010-04-15

    A comparative study of normal human, rabbit and pig oxyhemoglobins and oxyhemoglobin from patients with chronic myeloleukemia and multiple myeloma using Moessbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution demonstrated small variations of the {sup 57}Fe quadrupole splitting and isomer shift. These variations may be a result of small structural differences in the heme iron stereochemistry of various hemoglobins.

  6. High-resolution wave-theory-based ultrasound reflection imaging using the split-step fourier and globally optimized fourier finite-difference methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lianjie

    2013-10-29

    Methods for enhancing ultrasonic reflection imaging are taught utilizing a split-step Fourier propagator in which the reconstruction is based on recursive inward continuation of ultrasonic wavefields in the frequency-space and frequency-wave number domains. The inward continuation within each extrapolation interval consists of two steps. In the first step, a phase-shift term is applied to the data in the frequency-wave number domain for propagation in a reference medium. The second step consists of applying another phase-shift term to data in the frequency-space domain to approximately compensate for ultrasonic scattering effects of heterogeneities within the tissue being imaged (e.g., breast tissue). Results from various data input to the method indicate significant improvements are provided in both image quality and resolution.

  7. Split-illumination electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Aizawa, Shinji; Suzuki, Takahiro; Park, Hyun Soon [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Inada, Yoshikatsu [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Matsuda, Tsuyoshi [Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Taniyama, Akira [Corporate Research and Development Laboratories, Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Amagasaki, Hyogo 660-0891 (Japan); Shindo, Daisuke [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Tonomura, Akira [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Graduate University, Onna-son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan)

    2012-07-23

    We developed a split-illumination electron holography that uses an electron biprism in the illuminating system and two biprisms (applicable to one biprism) in the imaging system, enabling holographic interference micrographs of regions far from the sample edge to be obtained. Using a condenser biprism, we split an electron wave into two coherent electron waves: one wave is to illuminate an observation area far from the sample edge in the sample plane and the other wave to pass through a vacuum space outside the sample. The split-illumination holography has the potential to greatly expand the breadth of applications of electron holography.

  8. Split-illumination electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Aizawa, Shinji; Suzuki, Takahiro; Park, Hyun Soon; Inada, Yoshikatsu; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Taniyama, Akira; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira

    2012-01-01

    We developed a split-illumination electron holography that uses an electron biprism in the illuminating system and two biprisms (applicable to one biprism) in the imaging system, enabling holographic interference micrographs of regions far from the sample edge to be obtained. Using a condenser biprism, we split an electron wave into two coherent electron waves: one wave is to illuminate an observation area far from the sample edge in the sample plane and the other wave to pass through a vacuum space outside the sample. The split-illumination holography has the potential to greatly expand the breadth of applications of electron holography.

  9. Crustal anisotropy from Moho converted Ps wave splitting and geodynamic implications in Northeastern margin of Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Z.; Wu, Q.; Zhang, R.

    2017-12-01

    Collision between Indian and Eurasian result in intense deformation and crustal shortening in the Tibetan Plateau. NE margin of Tibetan Plateau experienced complex deformation between Qilian orogen and its adjacent blocks, Alxa Block in the north and Ordos Block in the east. We focus on if there any evidences exist in the NE margin of Tibetan Plateau, which can support crustal channel flow model. China Earthquake Administration had deployed temporary seismic array which is called ChinaArray Phase Ⅱ, dense seismic stations covered NE margin of Tibetan Plateau. Seismic data recorded by 81 seismic stations is applied in this research. We calculated receiver functions with time-domain deconvolution. We selected RFs which have clear Ps phase both in radial and transverse components to measure Ps splitting owing to crustal anisotropy, and 130 pairs of anisotropy parameters of 51 seismic stations were obtained. We would like to discuss about dynamic mechanism of this area using crustal anisotropy associated with the result of SKS-splitting and surface constrains like GPS velocity. The result can be summarized as follows. The large scale of delay time imply that the crustal anisotropy mainly derives from middle to lower crust rather than upper crust. In the southeastern part of the research area, crustal anisotropy is well agree with the result computed form SKS-splitting and GPS velocity directions trending NWW-SEE or E-W direction. This result imply a vertically coherent deformation in the area as the directions of crustal anisotropy trend to be perpendicular to the direction of normal stress. In the middle and north part of the research area, the fast polarization direction of crustal anisotropy is NEE-SWW or E-W direction, parallels with direction of GPS velocity, but differ to the direction of the result of SKS-splitting. This result may imply that decoupled deformation in this area associated with middle to lower crustal flow.

  10. Reminiscences on the study of wind waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    MITSUYASU, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    The wind blowing over sea surface generates tiny wind waves. They develop with time and space absorbing wind energy, and become huge wind waves usually referred to ocean surface waves. The wind waves cause not only serious sea disasters but also take important roles in the local and global climate changes by affecting the fluxes of momentum, heat and gases (e.g. CO2) through the air-sea boundary. The present paper reviews the selected studies on wind waves conducted by our group in the Research Institute for Applied Mechanics (RIAM), Kyushu University. The themes discussed are interactions between water waves and winds, the energy spectrum of wind waves, nonlinear properties of wind waves, and the effects of surfactant on some air-sea interaction phenomena. PMID:25864467

  11. Comparative Study of Skeletal Stability between Postoperative Skeletal Intermaxillary Fixation and No Skeletal Fixation after Bilateral Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartlev, Jens; Godtfredsen, Erik; Andersen, Niels Trolle

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate skeletal stability after mandibular advancement with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-six patients underwent single-jaw bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) to correct skeletal Class II malocclusion....

  12. Multi-reader ROC studies with split-plot designs: a comparison of statistical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuchowski, Nancy A; Gallas, Brandon D; Hillis, Stephen L

    2012-12-01

    Multireader imaging trials often use a factorial design, in which study patients undergo testing with all imaging modalities and readers interpret the results of all tests for all patients. A drawback of this design is the large number of interpretations required of each reader. Split-plot designs have been proposed as an alternative, in which one or a subset of readers interprets all images of a sample of patients, while other readers interpret the images of other samples of patients. In this paper, the authors compare three methods of analysis for the split-plot design. Three statistical methods are presented: the Obuchowski-Rockette method modified for the split-plot design, a newly proposed marginal-mean analysis-of-variance approach, and an extension of the three-sample U-statistic method. A simulation study using the Roe-Metz model was performed to compare the type I error rate, power, and confidence interval coverage of the three test statistics. The type I error rates for all three methods are close to the nominal level but tend to be slightly conservative. The statistical power is nearly identical for the three methods. The coverage of 95% confidence intervals falls close to the nominal coverage for small and large sample sizes. The split-plot multireader, multicase study design can be statistically efficient compared to the factorial design, reducing the number of interpretations required per reader. Three methods of analysis, shown to have nominal type I error rates, similar power, and nominal confidence interval coverage, are available for this study design. Copyright © 2012 AUR. All rights reserved.

  13. p -wave superconductivity in weakly repulsive 2D Hubbard model with Zeeman splitting and weak Rashba spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugdal, Henning G.; Sudbø, Asle

    2018-01-01

    We study the superconducting order in a two-dimensional square lattice Hubbard model with weak repulsive interactions, subject to a Zeeman field and weak Rashba spin-orbit interactions. Diagonalizing the noninteracting Hamiltonian leads to two separate bands, and by deriving an effective low-energy interaction we find the mean field gap equations for the superconducting order parameter on the bands. Solving the gap equations just below the critical temperature, we find that superconductivity is caused by Kohn-Luttinger-type interaction, while the pairing symmetry of the bands is indirectly affected by the spin-orbit coupling. The dominating attractive momentum channel of the Kohn-Luttinger term depends on the filling fraction n of the system, and it is therefore possible to change the momentum dependence of the order parameter by tuning n . Moreover, n also determines which band has the highest critical temperature. Rotating the magnetic field changes the momentum dependence from states that for small momenta reduce to a chiral px±i py type state for out-of-plane fields, to a nodal p -wave-type state for purely in-plane fields.

  14. Study on guided waves in semiconductor lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudensi, M.A.A.

    1980-01-01

    In This work we studied the guided waves in semiconductor lasers. In the first part we carried on the experimental measurements on lasers with stripe nonorthogonal to the mirrors. In the second part we developed a matrix method for the study of propagation and reflection of guided waves in lasers. (author) [pt

  15. Substantial reduction of inappropriate tablet splitting with computerised decision support: a prospective intervention study assessing potential benefit and harm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinzler Renate

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently ambulatory patients break one in four tablets before ingestion. Roughly 10% of them are not suitable for splitting because they lack score lines or because enteric or modified release coating is destroyed impairing safety and effectiveness of the medication. We assessed impact and safety of computerised decision support on the inappropriate prescription of split tablets. Methods We performed a prospective intervention study in a 1680-bed university hospital. Over a 15-week period we evaluated all electronically composed medication regimens and determined the fraction of tablets and capsules that demanded inappropriate splitting. In a subsequent intervention phase of 15 weeks duration for 10553 oral drugs divisibility characteristics were indicated in the system. In addition, an alert was generated and displayed during the prescription process whenever the entered dosage regimen demanded inappropriate splitting (splitting of capsules, unscored tablets, or scored tablets unsuitable for the intended fragmentation. Results During the baseline period 12.5% of all drugs required splitting and 2.7% of all drugs (257/9545 required inappropriate splitting. During the intervention period the frequency of inappropriate splitting was significantly reduced (1.4% of all drugs (146/10486; p = 0.0008. In response to half of the alerts (69/136 physicians adjusted the medication regimen. In the other half (67/136 no corrections were made although a switch to more suitable drugs (scored tablets, tablets with lower strength, liquid formulation was possible in 82% (55/67. Conclusion This study revealed that computerised decision support can immediately reduce the frequency of inappropriate splitting without introducing new safety hazards.

  16. A pre- and postoperative study of split isotope clearance in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faerber, D.; Czempiel, H.; Muehle, P.; Schick, F.; Wenzl, H.; Technische Univ. Muenchen; Technische Univ. Muenchen

    1979-01-01

    In 1978 43 patients have been operated in the Department of Pediatric Surgery, Krankenhaus Muenchen-Schwabing, because of recurrent urinary-tract infections with ureterovesical reflux or obstructive urinary-tract diseases. In all patients a split whole body clearance-study with a method modified after the method of Muehle with 131 J-Hippuran was carried out pre- or postoperatively, respectively. In 78,5% of these cases the clearance-results were corresponding to the results of X-ray examination; 6 of the remaining patients had a worse clearance result and 3 had a better result than the X-ray findings would have suggested. (orig.) [de

  17. Experimental study of broadband unidirectional splitting in photonic crystal gratings with broken structural symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colak, Evrim; Serebryannikov, Andriy E.; Ozgur Cakmak, A.; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2013-04-01

    It is experimentally demonstrated that the combination of diode and splitter functions can be realized in one broadband reciprocal device. The suggested performance is based on the dielectric photonic crystal grating whose structural symmetry is broken owing to non-deep corrugations placed at one of the two interfaces. The study has been performed at a normally incident beam-type illumination obtained from a microwave horn antenna. The two unidirectionally transmitted, deflected beams can show large magnitude and high contrast, while the angular distance between their maxima is 90° and larger. The dual-band unidirectional splitting is possible when using TM and TE polarizations.

  18. Study of Events with Identified Forward Particles at the Split Field Magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment will study two aspects of particle production in the forward region : \\item 1) In the recent discovery of charm production in hadronic interactions at the Split Field Magnet, the triggering on strange particles at medium p^t has proven to be a very effective tool for the study of heavy resonances, especially those carrying new flavours like charm and beauty. We want to carry out a more detailed investigation of the production-dynamics of charmed particles, together with a search for beauty mesons and baryons. \\item 2) A trigger on forward particles at high p^t ($>$ 5GeV/c) provides unique features to determine the properties of the parton-parton subprocesses. We want to study the relative contributions of quark, diquark and gluon scattering.\\\\ \\\\ This experimental programme will be carried out, using the improved Split Field Magnet spectrometer (SFM). The different detection systems provide : \\item a) Detection and momentum analysis of charged particles in 4@p solid angle. An improved programm...

  19. A Study on the Performance of the Split Reaction Water Turbine with Guide Ribs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Deuel H.; Villanueva, Eliseo P.

    2015-09-01

    The development of technologies that make use of renewable energy is of great significance presently. A new kind of turbine called Split Reaction Water Turbine (SRWT) using PVC pipes as material is a major contribution towards harnessing the energy potentials of small stream low head water resources. SRWTs of diameter to height ratio (D/H = 110 cm/160 cm) were tested at the MSU-IIT College of Engineering Fluid Engineering Laboratory. Data on volumetric flow and pressure head at the turbine inlet of the SRWT were recorded using National Instrument Data Processing System using LabView software. In later experiments, guide ribs were installed at the vane of the exit nozzles in order to determine the difference in the performance of the ribbed and the non-ribbed SRWT. Simulations of the running SRWT were conducted using SOLIDWORKS software. Results of the simulations aided in the thorough analyses of the data from the experimental runs. A comparison of data from the ribbed and non-ribbed SRWT shows that guide ribs were effective in directing the momentum of the exiting water to improve the speed of rotation. In this study, the increase in the speed of the Split Reaction Water Turbine was as much as 46%.

  20. Studies on cycle characteristics and application of split heat pipe adsorption ice maker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.J.; Wang, R.Z.; Wang, L.W.; Lu, Z.S.

    2007-01-01

    A split heat pipe adsorption ice maker, which uses a solidified compound adsorbent (calcium chloride and activated carbon)-ammonia as working pair, is studied. The application of split heat pipe technology in this system (ice maker for fishing boat powered by waste heat of exhaust gases from diesel engine) solves the corrosion problem caused by using seawater to cool the adsorber directly. Therefore, the adsorbers can be cooled or heated by the working substance of the heat pipe in the adsorption or desorption state, respectively. There are two adsorbers in the adsorption ice maker, and each adsorber contains 2.35 kg compound adsorbent in which the mass of calcium chloride is 1.88 kg. The mass transfer performance and volume cooling density of the chemical adsorbent are greatly improved by the use of the compound adsorbent. Water is chosen as the working substance of the heat pipe due to its high cooling power in comparison with the experiments performed using acetone as working substance. When the cycle time is 70 min, the average SCP of ice making is about 329.8-712.8 W/kg calcium chloride with heat and mass recovery, which is approximately 1.6-3.5 times that of the best results of a conventional chemical adsorption ice maker

  1. Study of ln s Physics in $\\bar{p}p$ Interactions at the Split Field Magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment uses the Split Field Magnet detector to investigate the low p^t, ``ln~s'', type of interactions that dominate the @*p cross-section. Systematic comparisons will be made to pp interactions. \\\\ \\\\ Specific areas to be studied include elastic scattering in the regions 0.05 $<$ !t! $<$ 0.8 GeV|2 and 0.8 $<$ !t! $<$ 4.0 GeV|2, and the use of a minimum bias trigger to study topological cross-sections, inclusive spectra, and two-body correlations. Some specialized triggers, run simultaneously with the high t elastic scattering trigger, are being studied. Examples are a trigger requiring Cerenkov identification in a limited region of phase space, and a trigger to select diffractively produced events.

  2. A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, V.I.; Bell, R.G. III; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

    1996-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil, rock, and ice penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact of 125-fps. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these more sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reaches the electronics contained in the various mechanical system. As part of the investigation of packaging techniques, a two part study of shock mitigating materials is being conducted. This paper reports the first part of the shock mitigating materials study. A study to compare three thicknesses (0.125, 0.250, and 0.500 in.) of seventeen, unconfined materials for their shock mitigating characteristics has been completed with a split Hopkinson bar configuration. The nominal input as measured by strain gages on the incident Hopkinson bar is 50 fps at sign 100 micros for these tests. It is hypothesized that a shock mitigating material has four purposes: to lengthen the shock pulse, to attenuate the shock pulse, to mitigate high frequency content in the shock pulse, and to absorb energy. Both time domain and frequency domain analyses of the split Hopkinson bar data have been performed to compare the materials' achievement of these purposes

  3. A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration. Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

    1997-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil and rock penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reached the electronics contained in the various mechanical systems. Here, a study to compare two thickness values, 0.125 and 0.250 in. of five materials, GE RTV 630, HS II Silicone, Polysulfide Rubber, Sylgard 184, and Teflon for their shock mitigating characteristics with a split Hopkinson bar configuration has been completed. The five materials have been tested in both unconfined and confined conditions at ambient temperature and with two applied loads of 750 με peak (25 fps peak) with a 100 micros duration, measured at 10% amplitude, and 1500 με peak (50 fps peak) with a 100 micros duration, measured at 10% amplitude. The five materials have been tested at ambient, cold (-65 F), and hot (+165 F) for the unconfined condition with the 750 με peak (25 fps peak) applied load. Time domain and frequency domain analyses of the split Hopkinson bar data have been performed to compare how these materials lengthen the shock pulse, attenuate the shock pulse, reflect high

  4. Progresses in the studies of adiabatic splitting of charged particle beams by crossing nonlinear resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Franchi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiturn extraction from a circular particle accelerator is performed by trapping the beam inside stable islands of the horizontal phase space. In general, by crossing a resonance of order n, n+1 beamlets are created whenever the resonance is stable, whereas if the resonance is unstable the beam is split in n parts. Islands are generated by nonlinear magnetic fields, whereas the trapping is realized by means of a given tune variation so to cross adiabatically a resonance. Experiments at the CERN Proton Synchrotron carried out in 2007 gave the evidence of protons trapped in stable islands while crossing the one-third and one-fifth resonances. Dedicated experiments were also carried out to study the trapping process and its reversibility properties. The results of these measurement campaigns are presented and discussed in this paper.

  5. Split delivery vehicle routing problem with time windows: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latiffianti, E.; Siswanto, N.; Firmandani, R. A.

    2018-04-01

    This paper aims to implement an extension of VRP so called split delivery vehicle routing problem (SDVRP) with time windows in a case study involving pickups and deliveries of workers from several points of origin and several destinations. Each origin represents a bus stop and the destination represents either site or office location. An integer linear programming of the SDVRP problem is presented. The solution was generated using three stages of defining the starting points, assigning busses, and solving the SDVRP with time windows using an exact method. Although the overall computational time was relatively lengthy, the results indicated that the produced solution was better than the existing routing and scheduling that the firm used. The produced solution was also capable of reducing fuel cost by 9% that was obtained from shorter total distance travelled by the shuttle buses.

  6. Progresses in the Studies of Adiabatic Splitting of Charged Particles Beams by Crossing Nonlinear Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Franchi, A; Giovannozzi, M; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2009-01-01

    The multi-turn extraction from a circular particle accelerator is performed by trapping the beam inside stable islands of the horizontal phase space. In general, by crossing a resonance of order n, n+1 beamlets are created whenever the resonance is stable, whereas if the resonance is unstable the beam is split in n parts. Islands are generated by non-linear magnetic fields, whereas the trapping is realized by means of a given tune variation so to cross adiabatically a resonance. Experiments at the CERN Proton Synchrotron carried out in 2007 gave the evidence of protons trapped in stable islands while crossing the one-third and one-fifth resonances. Dedicated experiments were also carried out to study the trapping process and its reversibility properties. The results of these measurement campaigns are presented and discussed in this paper.

  7. Study of leading strange meson resonances and spin-orbit splittings in K-p → K-π+n at 11 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, A.K.

    1980-11-01

    The results from a high-statistics study of Kπ elastic scattering in the reaction K - p → K - π + n are presented. The data for this analysis are taken from an 11-GeV/c K - p experiment performed on the Large Aperture Solenoidal Spectrometer (LASS) facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). By selecting the very forward produced K - π + events, a sample consisting of data for the Kπ → Kπ elastic scattering reaction was extracted. The angular distribution for this meson-meson scattering is studied by use of both a spherical harmonic moments analysis and a partial-wave analysis (PWA). The previously established leading natural spin-parity strange meson resonances (the J/sup P/ = 1 - K*(895), the 2 + K*(1430), and the 3 - K*(1780)) are observed in the results from both the moments analysis and the PWA. In addition, evidence for a new spin 4 - K* resonance with a mass of 2080 MeV and a width of about 225 MeV is presented. The results from the PWA confirm the existence of a 0 + kappa (1490) and propose the existence of a second scalar meson resonance, the 0 + kappa' (1900). Structure in the P-wave amplitude indicates resonance behavior in the mass region near 1700 MeV. In two of the four ambiguous solutions for the mass region above 1800 MeV, there is strong evidence for another P-wave resonant structure near 2100 MeV. The observed strange meson resonances are found to have a natural interpretation in terms of states predicted by the quark model. In particular, the mass splittings of the leading trajectory natural spin-parity strange meson states and the mass splittings between the spin-orbit triplet states are discussed. 59 figures, 17 tables

  8. Study of leading strange meson resonances and spin-orbit splittings in K/sup -/p. -->. K/sup -/. pi. /sup +/n at 11 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honma, A.K.

    1980-11-01

    The results from a high-statistics study of K..pi.. elastic scattering in the reaction K/sup -/p ..-->.. K/sup -/..pi../sup +/n are presented. The data for this analysis are taken from an 11-GeV/c K/sup -/p experiment performed on the Large Aperture Solenoidal Spectrometer (LASS) facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). By selecting the very forward produced K/sup -/..pi../sup +/ events, a sample consisting of data for the K..pi.. ..-->.. K..pi.. elastic scattering reaction was extracted. The angular distribution for this meson-meson scattering is studied by use of both a spherical harmonic moments analysis and a partial-wave analysis (PWA). The previously established leading natural spin-parity strange meson resonances (the J/sup P/ = 1/sup -/ K*(895), the 2/sup +/ K*(1430), and the 3/sup -/ K*(1780)) are observed in the results from both the moments analysis and the PWA. In addition, evidence for a new spin 4/sup -/ K* resonance with a mass of 2080 MeV and a width of about 225 MeV is presented. The results from the PWA confirm the existence of a 0/sup +/ kappa (1490) and propose the existence of a second scalar meson resonance, the 0/sup +/ kappa' (1900). Structure in the P-wave amplitude indicates resonance behavior in the mass region near 1700 MeV. In two of the four ambiguous solutions for the mass region above 1800 MeV, there is strong evidence for another P-wave resonant structure near 2100 MeV. The observed strange meson resonances are found to have a natural interpretation in terms of states predicted by the quark model. In particular, the mass splittings of the leading trajectory natural spin-parity strange meson states and the mass splittings between the spin-orbit triplet states are discussed. 59 figures, 17 tables.

  9. Comparing Different Approaches to Visualizing Light Waves: An Experimental Study on Teaching Wave Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mešic, Vanes; Hajder, Erna; Neumann, Knut; Erceg, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that students have tremendous difficulties developing a qualitative understanding of wave optics, at all educational levels. In this study, we investigate how three different approaches to visualizing light waves affect students' understanding of wave optics. In the first, the conventional, approach light waves are represented…

  10. Directional nonlinear guided wave mixing: Case study of counter-propagating shear horizontal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanian, Mostafa; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2018-04-01

    While much nonlinear ultrasonics research has been conducted on higher harmonic generation, wave mixing provides the potential for sensitive measurements of incipient damage unencumbered by instrumentation nonlinearity. Studies of nonlinear ultrasonic wave mixing, both collinear and noncollinear, for bulk waves have shown the robust capability of wave mixing for early damage detection. One merit of bulk wave mixing lies in their non-dispersive nature, but guided waves enable inspection of otherwise inaccessible material and a variety of mixing options. Co-directional guided wave mixing was studied previously, but arbitrary direction guided wave mixing has not been addressed until recently. Wave vector analysis is applied to study variable mixing angles to find wave mode triplets (two primary waves and a secondary wave) resulting in the phase matching condition. As a case study, counter-propagating Shear Horizontal (SH) guided wave mixing is analyzed. SH wave interactions generate a secondary Lamb wave mode that is readily receivable. Reception of the secondary Lamb wave mode is compared for an angle beam transducer, an air coupled transducer, and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). Results from the angle beam and air coupled transducers are quite consistent, while the LDV measurement is plagued by variability issues.

  11. Alfven wave studies on a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kortbawi, D.

    1987-10-01

    The continuum modes of the shear Alfven resonance are studied on the Tokapole II device, a small tokamak operated in a four node poloidal divertor configuration. A variety of antenna designs and the efficiency with which they deliver energy to the resonant layer are discussed. The spatial structure of the driven waves is studied by means of magnetic probes inserted into the current channel. In an attempt to optimize the coupling of energy in to the resonant layer, the angle of antenna currents with respect to the equilibrium field, antenna size, and plasma-to-antenna distance are varied. The usefulness of Faraday shields, particle shields, and local limiters are investigated. Antennas should be well shielded, either a dense Faraday shield or particle shield being satisfactory. The antenna should be large and very near to the plasma. The wave magnetic fields measured show a spatial resonance, the position of which varies with the value of the equilibrium field and mass density. They are polarized perpendicular to the equilibrium field. A wave propagates radially in to the resonant surface where it is converted to the shear Alfven wave. The signal has a short risetime and does not propagate far toroidally. These points are all consistent with a strongly damped shear Alfven wave. Comparisons of this work to theoretical predictions and results from other tokamaks are made

  12. Experimental study on split air conditioner with new hybrid equipment of energy storage and water heater all year round

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shaowei; Liu Zhenyan; Li Yuan; Zhao Keke; Wang Zhigang

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a split air conditioner with a new hybrid equipment of energy storage and water heater all year round (ACWES). The authors made a special design on the storage tank to adjust the refrigerant capacity in the storage coils under different functions, instead of adding an accumulator to the system. An ACWES prototype, rebuilt from an original split air conditioner, has been finished, and experimental study of the operation processes of the prototype was done from which some important conclusions and suggestions have been made, which were helpful in the primary design and improvement of an ACWES system for potential users

  13. An experimental study on the alteration of thermal enhancement ratio by combination of split dose hyperthermia irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun Ok; Kim, Hee Seup [Ewha Womens University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-06-15

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the alteration of thermal enhancement ratio as a function of time intervals between two split dose hyperthermias followed by irradiation. For the experiments, 330 mice were divided into 3 groups; the first, 72 mice were used to evaluate the heat reaction by single dose hyperthermia and heat resistance by split dose hyperthermia, the second, 36 mice were used to evaluate the radiation reaction by irradiation only, and the third, 222 mice were used for TER observation by combination of single dose hyperthermia and irradiation, and TER alteration by combination of split dose hyperthermia and irradiation. For each group the skin reaction score of mouse tail was used for observation and evaluation of the result of heat and irradiation. The results obtained are summarized as follows: 1. The heating time resulting 50% necrosis (ND{sub 5}0) Was 101 minutes in 43 .deg. C and 24 minutes in 45 .deg. C hyperthermia, which indicated that three is reciprocal proportion between temperature and heating time. 2. Development of heat resistance was observed by split dose hyperthermia. 3. The degree of skin reaction by irradiation only was increased proportionally as a function of radiation dose, and calculated radiation dose corresponding to skin score 1.5 (D{sub 1}.5) was 4,137 rads. 4. Obtained thermal enhancement ratio by combination of single dose hyperthermia and irradiation was increased proportionally as a function of heating time. 5. Thermal enhancement ratio was decreased by combination of split dose hyperthermia and irradiation, which was less intense and lasted longer than development of heat resistance. In summary, these studies indicate that the alteration of thermal enhancement ratio has influence on heat resistance by split dose hyperthermia and irradiation.

  14. Efficient solar hydrogen production by photocatalytic water splitting: From fundamental study to pilot demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Dengwei; Guo, Liejin; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Ximin; Liu, Huan; Li, Mingtao; Shen, Shaohua; Liu, Guanjie; Hu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Xianghui; Zhang, Kai; Ma, Lijin; Guo, Penghui [State Key Lab of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 28 Xianning West Road, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2010-07-15

    Photocatalytic water splitting with solar light is one of the most promising technologies for solar hydrogen production. From a systematic point of view, whether it is photocatalyst and reaction system development or the reactor-related design, the essentials could be summarized as: photon transfer limitations and mass transfer limitations (in the case of liquid phase reactions). Optimization of these two issues are therefore given special attention throughout our study. In this review, the state of the art for the research of photocatalytic hydrogen production, both outcomes and challenges in this field, were briefly reviewed. Research progress of our lab, from fundamental study of photocatalyst preparation to reactor configuration and pilot level demonstration, were introduced, showing the complete process of our effort for this technology to be economic viable in the near future. Our systematic and continuous study in this field lead to the development of a Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) based photocatalytic hydrogen production solar rector for the first time. We have demonstrated the feasibility for efficient photocatalytic hydrogen production under direct solar light. The exiting challenges and difficulties for this technology to proceed from successful laboratory photocatalysis set-up up to an industrially relevant scale are also proposed. These issues have been the object of our research and would also be the direction of our study in future. (author)

  15. Split dose recovery studies using homologous recombination deficient gene knockout chicken B lymphocyte cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, B.S.S.; Tano, Kaori; Utsumi, Hiroshi; Takeda, Shunichi

    2007-01-01

    To understand the role of proteins involved in double strand breaks (DSB) repair modulating sublethal damage (SLD) recovery, chicken B lymphoma (DT 40) cell lines either proficient or deficient in RAD52, XRCC2, XRCC3, RAD51C and RAD51D were subjected to fractionated irradiation and their survival curves charted. Survival curves of both WT DT40 and RAD52 -/- cells had a big shoulder while all the other cells exhibited small shoulders. However, at the higher doses of radiation, RAD51C -/- cells displayed hypersensitivity comparable to the data obtained for the homologous recombination deficient RAD54 -/- cells. Repair of SLD was measured as an increase in survival after a split dose irradiation with an interval of incubation between the radiation doses. All the cell lines (parental DT40 and genetic knockout cell lines viz., RAD52 -/- , XRCC2 -/- XRCC3 -/- RAD51C -/- and RAD51D -/- ) used in this study demonstrated a typical split-dose recovery capacity with a specific peak, which varied depending on the cell type. The maximum survival of WT DT40 and RAD52 -/- was reached at about 1-2 hours after the first dose of radiation and then decreased to a minimum thereafter (5 h). The increase in the survival peaked once again by about 8 hours. The survival trends observed in XRCC2 -/- , XRCC3 -/- , RAD51C -/- and RAD51D -/- knockout cells were also similar, except for the difference in the initial delay of a peak survival for RAD51D -/- and lower survival ratios. The second phase of increase in the survival in these cell lines was much slower in XRCC2 -/- , XRCC3 -/- , RAD51C -/- nd RAD51D -/- and further delayed when compared with that of RAD52 -/- and parental DT40 cells suggesting a dependence on their cell cycle kinetics. This study demonstrates that the participation of RAD52, XRCC2, XRCC3, RAD51C and RAD51D in the DSB repair via homologous recombination is of less importance in comparison to RAD54, as RAD54 deficient cells demonstrated complete absence of SLD recovery

  16. Splitting Descartes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schilhab, Theresa

    2007-01-01

    Kognition og Pædagogik vol. 48:10-18. 2003 Short description : The cognitivistic paradigm and Descartes' view of embodied knowledge. Abstract: That the philosopher Descartes separated the mind from the body is hardly news: He did it so effectively that his name is forever tied to that division....... But what exactly is Descartes' point? How does the Kartesian split hold up to recent biologically based learning theories?...

  17. A Proposal for the Time Domain Modeling of Split Air Conditioners for Consumer Reimbursement Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Paulo Henrique Oliveira; Almeida Junior, Afonso Bernardino; Gondim, Isaque Nogueira; Oliveira, José Carlos

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with computer application procedures for the evaluation of the causal consistency between anomalous phenomena manifested in electrical networks, along with the physical damage associated with electrical equipment and possible reimbursement requests. The focus is on the development of an air conditioner appliance model of the type known as split founded upon a representation, in the time domain, in accordance with the Alternative Transients Program (ATP) simulator requirements. This approach permits investigations concerning the performance of the product when submitted to ideal and non-ideal supply conditions. Once the equipment model is implemented in the program, a set of investigative studies are carried out to show the device performance under specific energy quality disturbance conditions. In addition, there are still the results for the validation of the process established through the correlation between computational performance of the air conditioner with corresponding studies carried out experimentally, which are presented herein. Moreover, once the effectiveness of the developed model is verified, it is implemented into the Requests for Reimbursement Software. Investigations related to the correlation between disturbances and the levels of thermal and dielectric tolerance are then performed aiming at illustrating the use of the research results for the reimbursement analyzes purposes.

  18. Split-field FDTD method for oblique incidence study of periodic dispersive metallic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baida, F I; Belkhir, A

    2009-08-15

    The study of periodic structures illuminated by a normally incident plane wave is a simple task that can be numerically simulated by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. On the contrary, for off-normal incidence, a widely modified algorithm must be developed in order to bypass the frequency dependence appearing in the periodic boundary conditions. After recently implementing this FDTD algorithm for pure dielectric materials, we here extend it to the study of metallic structures where dispersion can be described by analytical models. The accuracy of our code is demonstrated through comparisons with already-published results in the case of 1D and 3D structures.

  19. External wave-launcher study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The rationale for liquid dielectrically-loaded external wave-guide launchers is discussed. The arguments are strongly indicative that a liquid dielectric-filled waveguide system could be a practical technique for launching ICRH power into a fusion reactor. A detailed summary of the work performed in the study is presented

  20. Atom Wave Interferometers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pritchard, David

    1999-01-01

    Matter wave interferometers, in which de Broglie waves are coherently split and then recombined to produce interference fringes, have opened exciting new possibilities for precision and fundamental...

  1. Effects of split-dose irradiation of the rabbit's eye - a histopathological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabenbauer, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-six rabbits were included in a study investigating into the effects of split-dose 300 KV X-irradiation on the cornea, ciliary body, nictitating membrane and lacrimal gland. In each animal, soly the right the eye was irradiated using total doses of 21 Gy, 30 Gy, 36 Gy and 45 Gy that were administered according to a fixed schedule in fractions of 3 Gy five times per week. After latency periods of six weeks, three months and six months the animals receiving 21 Gy, 30 Gy and 36 Gy showed no changes of the bulbi, eye lids and lacrimal glands that could be ascertained by histopathological evaluation. In the animals exposed to the 45 Gy dose, changes of the cornea and conjunctiva caused by radiation injuries to the lacrimal glands and conjunctival goblet cells started to appear after a minimum period of 3 months. This dose level was also the threshold for the occurrence of corneal damage or even ulceration as a result of secondary reduction or qualitative change of lacrimal secretions. (ECB) [de

  2. Periodontal health and lateral lower lip piercings: a split-mouth cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilchez-Perez, Miguel Angel; Fuster-Torres, Ma Angeles; Figueiredo, Rui; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2009-07-01

    To assess periodontal health of individuals with a lateral lower lip piercing and describe associated periodontal, dental and mucosal complications. A split-mouth study was performed in a sample of 50 patients with a lateral lower lip piercing who attended the Periodontal Pathology and Surgery Unit of the Dental School of the University of Barcelona. The patients underwent periodontal, dental and mucosal examination on both the piercing and the control sides. Piercing users were predominantly women (78%), with a mean age of 21.3 years (SD=4.4). The amounts of keratinized and attached gingiva were significantly lower on the piercing side, and the prevalence of gingival recession was higher (p=0.012). The canine and first bicuspid teeth were the most affected. Tooth fractures and cracks were more frequent on the piercing side (20%) when compared with the control (4%). Mucosal alterations were found in seven patients. The use of lateral lower lip piercings enhances gingival recession and reduces the amounts of keratinized and attached gingiva. These ornaments are also associated with tooth fractures and cracks.

  3. Study of photon–magnon coupling in a YIG-film split-ring resonant system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhoi, B.; Aiyar, R. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); CRNTS, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Cliff, T.; Maksymov, I. S.; Kostylev, M., E-mail: mikhail.kostylev@uwa.edu.au [School of Physics M013, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009 (Australia); Venkataramani, N. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Prasad, S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Stamps, R. L. [School of Physics M013, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009 (Australia); SUPA, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-28

    By using the stripline Microwave Vector–Network Analyser Ferromagnetic Resonance and Time Domain spectroscopy techniques, we study a strong coupling regime of magnons to microwave photons in the planar geometry of a lithographically formed split-ring resonator (SRR) loaded by a single-crystal epitaxial yttrium–iron–garnet (YIG) film. Strong anti-crossing of the photon modes of SRR and of the magnon modes of the YIG film is observed in the applied-magnetic-field resolved measurements. The coupling strength extracted from the experimental data reaches 9% at 3 GHz. Theoretically, we propose an equivalent circuit model of the SRR loaded by a magnetic film. This model follows from the results of our numerical simulations of the microwave field structure of the SRR and of the magnetisation dynamics in the YIG film driven by the microwave currents in the SRR. The results obtained with the equivalent-circuit model are in good agreement with the experiment. This model provides a simple physical explanation of the process of mode anti-crossing. Our findings are important for future applications in microwave quantum photonic devices as well as in nonlinear and magnetically tuneable metamaterials exploiting the strong coupling of magnons to microwave photons.

  4. Traffic dispersion through a series of signals with irregular split

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We study the traffic behavior of a group of vehicles moving through a sequence of signals with irregular splits on a roadway. We present the stochastic model of vehicular traffic controlled by signals. The dynamic behavior of vehicular traffic is clarified by analyzing traffic pattern and travel time numerically. The group of vehicles breaks up more and more by the irregularity of signal's split. The traffic dispersion is induced by the irregular split. We show that the traffic dispersion depends highly on the cycle time and the strength of split's irregularity. Also, we study the traffic behavior through the series of signals at the green-wave strategy. The dependence of the travel time on offset time is derived for various values of cycle time. The region map of the traffic dispersion is shown in (cycle time, offset time)-space.

  5. Split bolus technique in polytrauma: a prospective study on scan protocols for trauma analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beenen, Ludo F. M.; Sierink, Joanne C.; Kolkman, Saskia; Nio, C. Yung; Saltzherr, Teun Peter; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Goslings, J. Carel

    2015-01-01

    For the evaluation of severely injured trauma patients a variety of total body computed tomography (CT) scanning protocols exist. Frequently multiple pass protocols are used. A split bolus contrast protocol can reduce the number of passes through the body, and thereby radiation exposure, in this

  6. Titanium alloy vs. stainless steel miniscrews: an in vivo split-mouth study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollero, P; Di Fazio, V; Pavoni, C; Cordaro, M; Cozza, P; Lione, R

    2018-04-01

    To compare in vivo Titanium Alloy (TiA) with Stainless Steel (SS) miniscrews Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs) using removal torque and Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) analysis. 15 subjects (6 males and 9 females) who required maximum anchorage were recruited. For each patient, a TiA TAD and a SS TAD with same length and width were implanted following a randomized split-mouth study design. Retraction was carried out with nickel-titanium spring ligated directly from the anterior hooks of the archwire to the TADs to produce 90 to 100 g of force. When no further anchorage supplementation was needed, the TADs were removed. The removal torque values were registered with a digital screwdriver. After removal, the TADs were collected in a fixed solution and examined using SEM and X-ray microanalysis. All TADs remained intact, with a 100% success rate. There was no difference in removal torque between TiA and SS miniscrews (4.4 ± 1.3 N-cm and 5.1 ± 0.7 N-cm, respectively). All specimens' loss of gloss with signs of biological contaminations resulted in a dull implant surface. SEM photomicrographs of TiA miniscrews showed predominantly blood cells while SS miniscrews showed the precipitation of an amorphous layer with low cellular component. There was no difference in spectroscopic analysis between TiA and SS miniscrews. TiA and SS miniscrews had comparable removal torque values. SEM photomicrographs showed no evidence of osseointegration with both TADs having similar biological responses.

  7. Study of split-ring resonators for use on a pharmaceutical drug capsule for microwave activated drug release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónasson, Sævar Þór; Jensen, Brian Sveistrup; Johansen, Tom Keinicke

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a novel method for externally activating a pharmaceutical drug capsule by use of split-ring resonators (SRR) is introduced. To this end, the effect of the orientation of the SRRs on the ability to activate the capsules is examined. A coplanar waveguide is used to excite an identical...... pair of SRRs fabricated on a substrate, representing an enlarged lid for a pharmaceutical drug capsule. Orientations where the electric field component of a quasi-TEM wave lies across the gap of the SRRs provides the largest response. The optimal case is when the electric field component lies across...... the gap simultaneously with the magnetic field component normal to the SRRs. Furthermore, an analysis of the optimal conductivity and relative permittivity for enhanced temperature rise in the lid is performed. Conductivity of 0.09 S/m and relative permittivity of 12 shows the highest temperature rise....

  8. Study of a condition for the mode conversion from purely perpendicular electrostatic waves to electromagnetic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalaee, Mohammad Javad, E-mail: mjkalaee@ut.ac.ir [Space Physics Group, Institute of Geophysics, University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Katoh, Yuto, E-mail: yuto@stpp.gp.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Geophysics, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    One of the mechanisms for generating electromagnetic plasma waves (Z-mode and LO-mode) is mode conversion from electrostatic waves into electromagnetic waves in inhomogeneous plasma. Herein, we study a condition required for mode conversion of electrostatic waves propagating purely perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, by numerically solving the full dispersion relation. An approximate model is derived describing the coupling between electrostatic waves (hot plasma Bernstein mode) and Z-mode waves at the upper hybrid frequency. The model is used to study conditions required for mode conversion from electrostatic waves (electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves, including Bernstein mode) into electromagnetic plasma waves (LO-mode). It is shown that for mode conversion to occur in inhomogeneous plasma, the angle between the boundary surface and the magnetic field vector should be within a specific range. The range of the angle depends on the norm of the k vector of waves at the site of mode conversion in the inhomogeneous region. The present study reveals that inhomogeneity alone is not a sufficient condition for mode conversion from electrostatic waves to electromagnetic plasma waves and that the angle between the magnetic field and the density gradient plays an important role in the conversion process.

  9. Analytical study of dissipative solitary waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dini, Fatemeh [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Emamzadeh, Mehdi Molaie [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorasani, Sina [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bobin, Jean Louis [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Amrollahi, Reza [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sodagar, Majid [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoshnegar, Milad [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    In this paper, the analytical solution to a new class of nonlinear solitons is presented with cubic nonlinearity, subject to a dissipation term arising as a result of a first-order derivative with respect to time, in the weakly nonlinear regime. Exact solutions are found using the combination of the perturbation and Green's function methods up to the third order. We present an example and discuss the asymptotic behavior of the Green's function. The dissipative solitary equation is also studied in the phase space in the non-dissipative and dissipative forms. Bounded and unbounded solutions of this equation are characterized, yielding an energy conversation law for non-dissipative waves. Applications of the model include weakly nonlinear solutions of terahertz Josephson plasma waves in layered superconductors and ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  10. Is the Lingual Fracture Line Influenced by the Mandibular Canal or the Mylohyoid Groove During a Bilateral Sagittal Split Osteotomy? A Human Cadaveric Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensink, Gertjan; Gooris, Peter J. J.; Bergsma, Eelco J.; Frank, Michael H.; van Gemert, Jan T. M.; van Merkesteyn, J. P. Richard

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although the bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) is a routinely performed procedure, exact control of the lingual fracture line remains problematic. The purpose of this study was to determine the various lingual splitting patterns in cadaveric human mandibles after a BSSO and the

  11. Wave Tank Studies of Strong Modulation of Wind Ripples Due To Long Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, S.; Sergievskaya, I.; Shchegolkov, Yu.

    Modulation of wind capillary-gravity ripples due to long waves has been studied in wave tank experiment at low wind speeds using Ka-band radar. The experiments were carried out both for clean water and the water surface covered with surfactant films. It is obtained that the modulation of radar signals is quite strong and can increase with surfactant concentration and fetch. It is shown that the hydrodynamic Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) calculated for free wind ripples and taking into account the kinematic (straining) effect, variations of the wind stress and variations of surfactant concentration strongly underestimates experimental MTF-values. The effect of strong modulation is assumed to be connected with nonlinear harmonics of longer dm-cm- scale waves - bound waves ("parasitic ripples"). The intensity of bound waves depends strongly on the amplitude of decimetre-scale waves, therefore even weak modulation of the dm-scale waves due to long waves results to strong ("cascade") modulation of bound waves. Modulation of the system of "free/bound waves" is estimated using results of wave tank studies of bound waves generation and is shown to be in quali- tative agreement with experiment. This work was supported by MOD, UK via DERA Winfrith (Project ISTC 1774P) and by RFBR (Project 02-05-65102).

  12. Theoretical study of AlH+: spin splitting, core polarization, and interstellar chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, D.L.; Black, J.H.; Everard, M.A.L.; Richards, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    The spin splitting constant for the X 2 μ + state of AlH + is calculated to be ν 0 = 0.058 cm - 1 . The favorable comparison of this result with experiment indicates that the uncertainty in the previously calculated spin splitting in MgH is likely to be of the order of a few percent. Calculations are presented of the so-called core polarization contribution to the spin-orbit coupling constant in the A 2 Pi/sub r/ state of AlH + . Results are also given for MgH and SiH. Astronomical applications of such calculations are discussed and the abundances of aluminum-bearing molecules in interstellar clouds are estimated

  13. Iterative Splitting Methods for Differential Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Geiser, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    Iterative Splitting Methods for Differential Equations explains how to solve evolution equations via novel iterative-based splitting methods that efficiently use computational and memory resources. It focuses on systems of parabolic and hyperbolic equations, including convection-diffusion-reaction equations, heat equations, and wave equations. In the theoretical part of the book, the author discusses the main theorems and results of the stability and consistency analysis for ordinary differential equations. He then presents extensions of the iterative splitting methods to partial differential

  14. Design study of a 25.5-MHz split coaxial RFQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Shigeaki; Imanishi, Akira; Morimoto, Teruhisa; Shibuya, Shinji; Tojyo, Eiki; Tokuda, Noboru.

    1989-08-01

    A 25.5-MHz split coaxial RFQ with modulated vanes is now being fabricated. The RFQ, 2.1 m in length and 0.9 m in diameter, will accelerate ions with a charge-to-mass ratio greater than 1/30 from 1 keV/n up to 45.4 keV/n. The design works on beam dynamics and cavity fabrication are reported. (author)

  15. Polarization Insensitivity in Double-Split Ring and Triple-Split Ring Terahertz Resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qian-Nan; Lan Feng; Tang Xiao-Pin; Yang Zi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    A modified double-split ring resonator and a modified triple-split ring resonator, which offer polarization-insensitive performance, are investigated, designed and fabricated. By displacing the two gaps of the conventional double-split ring resonator away from the center, the second resonant frequency for the 0° polarized wave and the resonant frequency for the 90° polarized wave become increasingly close to each other until they are finally identical. Theoretical and experimental results show that the modified double-split ring resonator and the modified triple-split ring resonator are insensitive to different polarized waves and show strong resonant frequency dips near 433 and 444 GHz, respectively. The results of this work suggest new opportunities for the investigation and design of polarization-dependent terahertz devices based on split ring resonators. (paper)

  16. Systematic Expansion of Active Spaces beyond the CASSCF Limit: A GASSCF/SplitGAS Benchmark Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzis, Konstantinos D; Li Manni, Giovanni; Stoneburner, Samuel J; Ma, Dongxia; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-07-14

    The applicability and accuracy of the generalized active space self-consistent field, (GASSCF), and (SplitGAS) methods are presented. The GASSCF method enables the exploration of larger active spaces than with the conventional complete active space SCF, (CASSCF), by fragmentation of a large space into subspaces and by controlling the interspace excitations. In the SplitGAS method, the GAS configuration interaction, CI, expansion is further partitioned in two parts: the principal, which includes the most important configuration state functions, and an extended, containing less relevant but not negligible ones. An effective Hamiltonian is then generated, with the extended part acting as a perturbation to the principal space. Excitation energies of ozone, furan, pyrrole, nickel dioxide, and copper tetrachloride dianion are reported. Various partitioning schemes of the GASSCF and SplitGAS CI expansions are considered and compared with the complete active space followed by second-order perturbation theory, (CASPT2), and multireference CI method, (MRCI), or available experimental data. General guidelines for the optimum applicability of these methods are discussed together with their current limitations.

  17. A study on Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench response to split application of herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaczmarek Sylwia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments to evaluate the split application of mesotrione + s-metolachlor, mesotrione + terbuthylazine, dicamba + prosulfuron, terbuthylazine + mesotrione + s-metolachlor, and sulcotrione in the cultivation of sorghum var. Rona 1 were carried out in 2012 and 2013. The field tests were conducted at the field experimental station in Winna Góra, Poznań, Poland. Treatments with the herbicides were performed directly after sowing (PE and at leaf stage 1–2 (AE1 or at leaf stage 3–4 (AE2 of sorghum. The treatments were carried out in a laid randomized block design with 4 replications. The results showed that the tested herbicides applied at split doses were effective in weed control. After the herbicide application weed density and weed biomass were significantly reduced compared to the infested control. The best results were achieved after the application of mesotrione tank mixture with s-metolachlor and terbuthylazine. Application of split doses of herbicides was also correlated with the density, biomass, and height of sorghum.

  18. Experimental Study on the Langlee Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecher, Arthur; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Weisz, A.

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the wave energy converting abilities of the Langlee wave energy converter (WEC). It focused mainly on evaluating the power generating capabilities of the device, including investigations of the following issues: Scaling ratiosPTO loadingWave...... height and wave period dependencyOblique incoming waves and directional spreading of waves (3D waves)Damping platesMooring forces and fixed structure setupPitch, surge and heave motion During the study the model supplied by the client (Langlee Wave Power AS) has been heavily instrumented - up to 23...... different instruments was deployed to measure and record data. Tests were performed at scales of 1:30 and 1:20 based on the realized reference wave states....

  19. Numerical Study of an Ejector as an Expansion Device in Split-type Air Conditioners for Energy Savings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasni Sumeru

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes a numerical approach for determining both the motive nozzle and constant-area diameters of an ejector as an expansion device, based on the cooling capacity of a split-type air-conditioner using R290 as refrigerant. Previous studies have shown that replacement of HCFC R22 with HC290 (propane in the air conditioner can improve the coefficient of performance (COP. The purpose of replacing the capillary tube with an ejector as an expansion device in a split-type air conditioner using HC290 is to further improve the COP. In developing the model, conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy equations were applied to each part of the ejector. The numerical results show that the motive nozzle diameter remains constant (1.03 mm under varying condenser temperatures, whereas the diameter of the constant-area decreases as the condenser temperature increases. It was also found that improvement of the COP can reach 32.90% at a condenser temperature of 55 °C. From the results mentioned above, it can be concluded that the use of an ejector can further improve the COP of a split-type air conditioner using HC290 as working fluid.

  20. Experimental Studies on Wave Interactions of Partially Perforated Wall under Obliquely Incident Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-In Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents wave height distribution in terms of stem wave evolution phenomena on partially perforated wall structures through three-dimensional laboratory experiments. The plain and partially perforated walls were tested to understand their effects on the stem wave evolution under the monochromatic and random wave cases with the various wave conditions, incident angle (from 10 to 40 degrees, and configurations of front and side walls. The partially perforated wall reduced the relative wave heights more effectively compared to the plain wall structure. Partially perforated walls with side walls showed a better performance in terms of wave height reduction compared to the structure without the side wall. Moreover, the relative wave heights along the wall were relatively small when the relative chamber width is large, within the range of the chamber width in this study. The wave spectra showed a frequency dependency of the wave energy dissipation. In most cases, the existence of side wall is a more important factor than the porosity of the front wall in terms of the wave height reduction even if the partially perforated wall was still effective compared to the plain wall.

  1. Supplementary report: millimeter wave study program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jory, H.R.; Symons, R.S.

    1976-02-01

    This report describes work done during the months of December 1975 and January 1976, following the writing of the final report on the millimeter wave study program for generation of 100 kW or more power at 120 GHz. The work has been directed to three areas for application to gyrotron devices, small signal analysis, electron beam simulation, and microwave measurements on cavity coupling. A small signal analysis is presented, which allows determination of beam loading in cavities. The results are similar to previous published work, but contain a higher order relativistic correction. The electron beam simulations include two magnetron type guns and one based on electrostatic lenses

  2. Splitting of high power, cw proton beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Facco

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple method for splitting a high power, continuous wave (cw proton beam in two or more branches with low losses has been developed in the framework of the EURISOL (European Isotope Separation On-Line Radioactive Ion Beam Facility design study. The aim of the system is to deliver up to 4 MW of H^{-} beam to the main radioactive ion beam production target, and up to 100 kW of proton beams to three more targets, simultaneously. A three-step method is used, which includes magnetic neutralization of a fraction of the main H^{-} beam, magnetic splitting of H^{-} and H^{0}, and stripping of H^{0} to H^{+}. The method allows slow raising and individual fine adjustment of the beam intensity in each branch.

  3. A wave model test bed study for wave energy resource characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Neary, Vincent S.; Wang, Taiping; Gunawan, Budi; Dallman, Annie R.; Wu, Wei-Cheng

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a test bed study conducted to evaluate best practices in wave modeling to characterize energy resources. The model test bed off the central Oregon Coast was selected because of the high wave energy and available measured data at the site. Two third-generation spectral wave models, SWAN and WWIII, were evaluated. A four-level nested-grid approach—from global to test bed scale—was employed. Model skills were assessed using a set of model performance metrics based on comparing six simulated wave resource parameters to observations from a wave buoy inside the test bed. Both WWIII and SWAN performed well at the test bed site and exhibited similar modeling skills. The ST4 package with WWIII, which represents better physics for wave growth and dissipation, out-performed ST2 physics and improved wave power density and significant wave height predictions. However, ST4 physics tended to overpredict the wave energy period. The newly developed ST6 physics did not improve the overall model skill for predicting the six wave resource parameters. Sensitivity analysis using different wave frequencies and direction resolutions indicated the model results were not sensitive to spectral resolutions at the test bed site, likely due to the absence of complex bathymetric and geometric features.

  4. Wave number determination of Pc 1-2 mantle waves considering He++ ions: A Cluster study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, B.; Escoubet, C. P.; Santolík, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Khotyaintsev, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The present case study concerns narrowband electromagnetic emission detected in the distant cusp region simultaneously with upgoing plasma flows. The wave properties match the usual properties of the Pc 1-2 mantle waves: small angle between the wave vector and the magnetic field line, left-hand polarization, and propagation toward the ionosphere. We report here the first direct wave vector measurement of these waves (about 1.2 × 10- 2 rad/km) through multi spacecraft analysis using the three magnetic components and, at the same time, through single spacecraft analysis based on the refractive index analysis using the three magnetic components and two electric components. The refractive index analysis offers a simple way to estimate wave numbers in this frequency range. Numerical calculations are performed under the observed plasma conditions. The obtained results show that the ion distribution functions are unstable to ion cyclotron instability at the observed wave vector value, due to the large ion temperature anisotropy. We thus show that these electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are amplified in the distant cusp region. The Poynting flux of the waves is counterstreaming with respect to the plasma flow. This sense of propagation is consistent with the time necessary to amplify the emissions to the observed level. We point out the role of the wave damping at the He++ gyrofrequency to explain that such waves cannot be observed from the ground at the cusp foot print location.

  5. A case study of gravity waves in noctilucent clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dalin

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a case study of a noctilucent cloud (NLC display appearing on 10-11 August 2000 over Northern Sweden. Clear wave structures were visible in the clouds and time-lapse photography was used to derive the parameters characterising the gravity waves which could account for the observed NLC modulation. Using two nearby atmospheric radars, the Esrange MST Radar data and Andoya MF radar, we have identified gravity waves propagating upward from the upper stratosphere to NLC altitudes. The wave parameters derived from the radar measurements support the suggestion that gravity waves are responsible for the observed complex wave dynamics in the NLC.

  6. Experimental Study on the Langlee Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavelle, John; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    This report concerns the experimental study of the 1:20 scale model of the Langlee Wave Energy Converter (WEC) carried out at Aalborg University’s wave basin during the summer of 2010.......This report concerns the experimental study of the 1:20 scale model of the Langlee Wave Energy Converter (WEC) carried out at Aalborg University’s wave basin during the summer of 2010....

  7. Simultaneous surgeries in a split forward surgical team: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanfosson, Christopher A; Seery, Jason M

    2011-12-01

    The 541st Forward Surgical Team performed split-based operations, with one site in the city of Pol-e-Khumri. One evening, the 10-person team received two pediatric patients simultaneously and conducted simultaneous surgeries. The 3-year-old female sustained severe injuries to bilateral lower extremities and a puncture wound to her right forearm. The 13-year-old sustained fragmentary wounds to her left hand, left foot, right medial calf, and evisceration to her left lower quadrant. The patients presented in extremis after being taken to a civilian hospital initially, spending approximately 1.5 hours receiving no resuscitative therapy. The 3-year-old underwent amputations of bilateral lower extremities and a fasciotomy of the right forearm. The 13-year-old survived an exploratory laparotomy and irrigation and debridement of intra-abdominal wounds. The successful completion of simultaneous surgeries, by a split forward surgical team at a remote location, for two critically ill patients is possible. It should not become the standard of care. Prior planning made this occurrence feasible and safer, but such situations put the patients at risk for complications.

  8. A study on hybrid split-spectrum processing technique for enhanced reliability in ultrasonic signal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Hyung; Koo, Kil Mo; Cheong, Yong Moo; Kim, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    Many signal-processing techniques have been found to be useful in ultrasonic and nondestructive evaluation. Among the most popular techniques are signal averaging, spatial compounding, matched filters, and homomorphic processing. One of the significant new process is split-spectrum processing(SSP), which can be equally useful in signal-to-noise ratio(SNR) improvement and grain characterization in several engineering materials. The purpose of this paper is to explore the utility of SSP in ultrasonic NDE. A wide variety of engineering problems are reviewed and suggestions for implementation of the technique are provided. SSP uses the frequency-dependent response of the interfering coherent noise produced by unresolvable scatters in the resolution range cell of a transducer. It is implemented by splitting the Sequency spectrum of the received signal by using Gaussian bandpass filters. The theoretical basis for the potential of SSP for grain characterization in SUS 304 material is discussed, and some experimental-evidence for the feasibility of the approach is presented. Results of SNR enhancement in signals obtained from real four samples of SUS 304. The influence of various processing parameters on the performance of the processing technique is also discussed. The minimization algorithm. which provides an excellent SNR enhancement when used either in conjunction with other SSP algorithms like polarity-check or by itself, is also presented.

  9. A Study on Hybrid Split-Spectrum Processing Technique for Enhanced Reliability in Ultrasonic Signal Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, H.; Koo, K. M.; Kim, G. J.

    1996-01-01

    Many signal-processing techniques have been found to be useful in ultrasonic and nondestructive evaluation. Among the most popular techniques are signal averaging, spatial compounding, matched filters and homomorphic processing. One of the significant new process is split-spectrum processing(SSP), which can be equally useful in signal-to-noise ratio(SNR) improvement and grain characterization in several specimens. The purpose of this paper is to explore the utility of SSP in ultrasonic NDE. A wide variety of engineering problems are reviewed, and suggestions for implementation of the technique are provided. SSP uses the frequency-dependent response of the interfering coherent noise produced by unresolvable scatters in the resolution range cell of a transducer. It is implemented by splitting the frequency spectrum of the received signal by using gaussian bandpass filter. The theoretical basis for the potential of SSP for grain characterization in SUS 304 material is discussed, and some experimental evidence for the feasibility of the approach is presented. Results of SNR enhancement in signals obtained from real four samples of SUS 304. The influence of various processing parameters on the performance of the processing technique is also discussed. The minimization algorithm, which provides an excellent SNR enhancement when used either in conjunction with other SSP algorithms like polarity-check or by itself, is also presented

  10. Computational and theoretical study of the wave-particle interaction of protons and waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Moya

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the wave-particle interaction and the evolution of electromagnetic waves propagating through a plasma composed of electrons and protons, using two approaches. First, a quasilinear kinetic theory has been developed to study the energy transfer between waves and particles, with the subsequent acceleration and heating of protons. Second, a one-dimensional hybrid numerical simulation has been performed, with and without including an expanding-box model that emulates the spherical expansion of the solar wind, to investigate the fully nonlinear evolution of this wave-particle interaction. Numerical results of both approaches show that there is an anisotropic evolution of proton temperature.

  11. A test-bed modeling study for wave resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Neary, V. S.; Wang, T.; Gunawan, B.; Dallman, A.

    2016-02-01

    Hindcasts from phase-averaged wave models are commonly used to estimate standard statistics used in wave energy resource assessments. However, the research community and wave energy converter industry is lacking a well-documented and consistent modeling approach for conducting these resource assessments at different phases of WEC project development, and at different spatial scales, e.g., from small-scale pilot study to large-scale commercial deployment. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate current wave model codes, as well as limitations and knowledge gaps for predicting sea states, in order to establish best wave modeling practices, and to identify future research needs to improve wave prediction for resource assessment. This paper presents the first phase of an on-going modeling study to address these concerns. The modeling study is being conducted at a test-bed site off the Central Oregon Coast using two of the most widely-used third-generation wave models - WaveWatchIII and SWAN. A nested-grid modeling approach, with domain dimension ranging from global to regional scales, was used to provide wave spectral boundary condition to a local scale model domain, which has a spatial dimension around 60km by 60km and a grid resolution of 250m - 300m. Model results simulated by WaveWatchIII and SWAN in a structured-grid framework are compared to NOAA wave buoy data for the six wave parameters, including omnidirectional wave power, significant wave height, energy period, spectral width, direction of maximum directionally resolved wave power, and directionality coefficient. Model performance and computational efficiency are evaluated, and the best practices for wave resource assessments are discussed, based on a set of standard error statistics and model run times.

  12. First-Principles View on Photoelectrochemistry: Water-Splitting as Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Hellman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Photoelectrochemistry is truly an interdisciplinary field; a natural nexus between chemistry and physics. In short, photoelectrochemistry can be divided into three sub-processes, namely (i the creation of electron-hole pairs by light absorption; (ii separation/transport on the charge carriers and finally (iii the water splitting reaction. The challenge is to understand all three processes on a microscopic scale and, perhaps even more importantly, how to combine the processes in an optimal way. This review will highlight some first-principles insights to the above sub-processes, in~particular as they occur using metal oxides. Based on these insights, challenges and future directions of first-principles methods in the field of photoelectrochemistry will be discussed.

  13. Plane shock wave studies of geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, G.D.; Larson, D.B.

    1977-01-01

    Plane shock wave experiments have been conducted on eight geologic materials in an effort to determine the importance of time-dependent mechanical behavior. Of the eight rocks studied, only Westerly granite and nugget sandstone appear to show time independence. In the slightly porous materials (1-5 percent), Blair dolomite and sodium chloride, and in the highly porous (15 to 40 percent) rock, Mt. Helen tuff and Indiana limestone, time-dependent behavior is associated with the time required to close the available porosity. In water-saturated rocks the time dependence arises because the water that is present shows no indication of transformation to the higher pressure ice phases, thus suggesting the possibility that a metastable form of water exists under dynamic conditions

  14. First observations of intensity-dependent effects for transversely split beams during multiturn extraction studies at the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Gilardoni

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available During the commissioning of the CERN Proton Synchrotron multiturn extraction, tests with different beam intensities were performed in order to probe the behavior of resonance crossing in the presence of possible space charge effects. The initial beam intensity before transverse splitting was varied and the properties of the five beamlets obtained by crossing the fourth-order horizontal resonance were studied. A clear dependence of the beamlets’ parameters on the total beam intensity was found, which is the first direct observation of intensity-dependent effects for such a peculiar beam type. The experimental results are presented and discussed in detail in this paper.

  15. An experimental study on Γ(2) modular symmetry in the quantum Hall system with a small spin splitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C F; Chang, Y H; Cheng, H H; Yang, Z P; Yeh, H D; Hsu, C H; Liang, C-T; Hang, D R; Lin, H H

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic-field-induced phase transitions were studied with a two-dimensional electron AlGaAs/GaAs system. The temperature-driven flow diagram shows features of the Γ(2) modular symmetry, which includes distorted flowlines and a shifted critical point. The deviation of the critical conductivities is attributed to a small but resolved spin splitting, which reduces the symmetry in Landau quantization (Dolan 2000 Phys. Rev. B 62 10278). Universal scaling is found under the reduction of the modular symmetry. It is also shown that the Hall conductivity can still be governed by the scaling law when the semicircle law and the scaling on the longitudinal conductivity are invalid

  16. Piezosurgery for the Lingual Split Technique in Lingual Positioned Impacted Mandibular Third Molar Removal: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jing; Yang, Chi; Zheng, Jiawei; Qian, Wentao

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect and safety of lingual split technique using piezosurgery for the extraction of lingual positioned impacted mandibular 3rd molars with the goal of proposing a more minimally invasive choice for this common surgery.Eighty-nine consecutive patients with 110 lingual positioned impacted mandibular 3rd molars requiring extraction were performed the lingual split technique using piezosurgery. One sagittal osteotomy line and 2 transverse osteotomy line were designed for lingual and occlusal bone removal. The success rate, operative time, postoperative outcome, and major complications (including nerve injury, mandible fracture, severe hematoma or edema, and severe pyogenic infection) were documented and analyzed.All impacted mandibular 3rd molars were successfully removed (110/110). The average time of operation was 14.6 minutes (ranged from 7 to 28 minutes). One hundred and seven extraction sites (97.3%) were primary healing. Pain, mouth opening, swelling, and PoSSe scores on postoperative 7-day were 0.34 ± 0.63, 3.88 ± 0.66(cm), 2.4 ± 0.2(cm), and 23.7 ± 5.9, respectively. There were 6 cases (5.5%) had lingual nerve disturbance and 3 cases (2.7%) developed inferior alveolar nerve impairment, and achieved full recovery within 2 months by neurotrophic drug treatment.Our study suggested piezosurgery for lingual split technique provided an effective way for the extraction of lingual positioned and deeply impacted mandibular 3rd molar.

  17. Wave refraction studies off Agonda beach (Goa)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnakumar, V.; Pathak, M.C.; Kotnala, K.L.

    Analysis of wave refraction and longshore current has been carried out for a narrow strip off the shores of Agonda (Goa, India). Zones with high wave energy and rip currents have been demarcated. It is found from the analysis that the southern part...

  18. Asymmetry of wind waves studied in a laboratory tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Leykin

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetry of wind waves was studied in laboratory tank tinder varied wind and fetch conditions using both bispectral analysis of wave records and third-order statistics of the surface elevation. It is found skewness S (the normalized third-order moment of surface elevation describing the horizontal asymmetry waves varies only slightly with the inverse wave u*/Cm (where u* is the air friction velocity and Cm is phase speed of the dominant waves. At the same time asymmetry A, which is determined from the Hilbert transform of the wave record and characterizes the skewness of the rate of change of surface elevation, increase consistently in magnitude with the ratio u*/Cm. This suggests that nonlinear distortion of the wave profile determined by the degree of wind forcing and is a sensitive indicator of wind-wave interaction processes. It is shown that the asymmetric profile of waves can described within the frameworks of the nonlinear nonspectral concept (Plate, 1972; Lake and Yuen, 197 according to which the wind-wave field can be represented as a coherent bound-wave system consisting mainly of dominant component w. and its harmonics propagating with the same speed C. , as observed by Ramamonjiaris and Coantic (1976. The phase shift between o. harmonics is found and shown to increase with the asymmetry of the waves.

  19. Asymmetry of wind waves studied in a laboratory tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ileykin, L. A.; Donelan, M. A.; Mellen, R. H.; McLaughlin, D. J.

    1995-03-01

    Asymmetry of wind waves was studied in laboratory tank tinder varied wind and fetch conditions using both bispectral analysis of wave records and third-order statistics of the surface elevation. It is found skewness S (the normalized third-order moment of surface elevation describing the horizontal asymmetry waves) varies only slightly with the inverse wave u*/Cm (where u* is the air friction velocity and Cm is phase speed of the dominant waves). At the same time asymmetry A, which is determined from the Hilbert transform of the wave record and characterizes the skewness of the rate of change of surface elevation, increase consistently in magnitude with the ratio u*/Cm. This suggests that nonlinear distortion of the wave profile determined by the degree of wind forcing and is a sensitive indicator of wind-wave interaction processes. It is shown that the asymmetric profile of waves can described within the frameworks of the nonlinear nonspectral concept (Plate, 1972; Lake and Yuen, 197 according to which the wind-wave field can be represented as a coherent bound-wave system consisting mainly of dominant component w. and its harmonics propagating with the same speed C. , as observed by Ramamonjiaris and Coantic (1976). The phase shift between o). harmonics is found and shown to increase with the asymmetry of the waves.

  20. Electric-dipole moment of CaF by molecular-beam, laser-rf, double-resonance study of Stark splittings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, W.J.; Goodman, L.S.; Nielsen, U.; Pfeufer, V.

    1984-01-01

    The electronic structure of diatomic molecules is much more complex for open-shell sytems (radicals) than for the normal closed-shell systems, and the development of an adequate theoretical understanding will require a substantial upgrading of experimental knowledge in both quality and quantity. The alkaline-earth monohalide family of radicals, with only a single electron outside closed-shell cores, would appear to be a logical starting point for such studies, and there has been a great increase in work in this area in the last few years in spite of the special difficulties of working with free radicals. As the work of measuring the vibrational and rotational structure of the electronic states has become more complete, attention has turned to study of the much weaker spin-rotation and hyperfine interactions. Within the last three years, these interactions have been studied systematically at high precision in the calcium monohalide family with the molecular-beam, laser-rf double-resonance technique. The same method has now been modified and extended to make possible measurement of the electric-dipole moments of these molecules through observation of the Stark splittings of radiofrequency transitions. It is hoped that when considered together, the several types of data will make it possible to understand the ground-state electronic wave functions of these molecules at least qualitatively. 2 figures

  1. Wave farm impact on the beach profile: A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Abanades, J; Greaves, D; Iglesias, G

    2014-01-01

    If wave energy is to become a fully-fledged renewable, its environmental impacts must be fully understood. The objective of the present work is to examine the impact of a wave farm on the beach profile through a case study. The methodology is based on two coupled numerical models: a nearshore wave propagation model and a morphodynamic model, which are run in two scenarios, both with and without the wave farm. Wave data from a nearby coastal buoy are used to prescribe the boundary conditions. ...

  2. Experimental Study of the Weptos Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecher, Arthur; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Larsen, Tommy

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the power performance results of the experimental study of the WEPTOS wave energy converter (WEC). This novel device combines an established and efficient wave energy absorbing mechanism with an adjustable structure that can regulate the amount of incoming wave energy and reduce...... loads in extreme wave conditions. This A-shaped floating structure absorbs the energy in the waves through a multitude of rotors, the shape of which is based on the renowned Salter’s Duck. These rotors pivot around a common axle, one for each leg of the structure, to which the rotors transfer...... the absorbed wave energy and which is connected to a common power take off system (one for each leg). The study investigates the performance of the device in a large range of wave states and estimates the performance in terms of mechanical power available to the power take off system of the WEPTOS WEC for two...

  3. Experimental and Numerical Studies on Wave Breaking Characteristics over a Fringing Reef under Monochromatic Wave Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-In Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fringing reefs play an important role in protecting the coastal area by inducing wave breaking and wave energy dissipation. However, modeling of wave transformation and energy dissipation on this topography is still difficult due to the unique structure. In the present study, two-dimensional laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the cross-shore variations of wave transformation, setup, and breaking phenomena over an idealized fringing reef with the 1/40 reef slope and to verify the Boussinesq model under monochromatic wave conditions. One-layer and two-layer model configurations of the Boussinesq model were used to figure out the model capability. Both models predicted well (r2>0.8 the cross-shore variation of the wave heights, crests, troughs, and setups when the nonlinearity is not too high (A0/h0<0.07 in this study. However, as the wave nonlinearity and steepness increase, the one-layer model showed problems in prediction and stability due to the error on the vertical profile of fluid velocity. The results in this study revealed that one-layer model is not suitable in the highly nonlinear wave condition over a fringing reef bathymetry. This data set can contribute to the numerical model verification.

  4. Reliability Study of Energy Harvesting from Sea Waves by Piezoelectric Patches Consideraing Random JONSWAP Wave Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ettefagh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the new methods for powering low-power electronic devices employed in the sea, is using of mechanical energies of sea waves. In this method, piezoelectric material is employed to convert the mechanical energy of sea waves into electrical energy. The advantage of this method is based on not implementing the battery charging system. Although, many studies have been done about energy harvesting from sea waves, energy harvesting with considering random JONWSAP wave theory is not fully studied up to now. The random JONSWAP wave model is a more realistic approximation of sea waves in comparison of Airy wave model. Therefore, in this paper a vertical beam with the piezoelectric patches, which is fixed to the seabed, is considered as energy harvester system. The energy harvesting system is simulated by MATLAB software, and then the vibration response of the beam and consequently the generated power is obtained considering the JONWSAP wave theory. In addition, the reliability of the system and the effect of piezoelectric patches uncertainties on the generated power are studied by statistical method. Furthermore, the failure possibility of harvester based on violation criteria is investigated.  

  5. NASA's Gravitational - Wave Mission Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Robin; Jennrich, Oliver; McNamara, Paul

    2012-01-01

    With the conclusion of the NASA/ESA partnership on the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Project, NASA initiated a study to explore mission concepts that will accomplish some or all of the LISA science objectives at lower cost. The Gravitational-Wave Mission Concept Study consisted of a public Request for Information (RFI), a Core Team of NASA engineers and scientists, a Community Science Team, a Science Task Force, and an open workshop. The RFI yielded were 12 mission concepts, 3 instrument concepts and 2 technologies. The responses ranged from concepts that eliminated the drag-free test mass of LISA to concepts that replace the test mass with an atom interferometer. The Core Team reviewed the noise budgets and sensitivity curves, the payload and spacecraft designs and requirements, orbits and trajectories and technical readiness and risk. The Science Task Force assessed the science performance by calculating the horizons. the detection rates and the accuracy of astrophysical parameter estimation for massive black hole mergers, stellar-mass compact objects inspiraling into central engines. and close compact binary systems. Three mission concepts have been studied by Team-X, JPL's concurrent design facility. to define a conceptual design evaluate kt,y performance parameters. assess risk and estimate cost and schedule. The Study results are summarized.

  6. Building America Case Study: Occupant Comfort from a Mini-Split Heat Pump, San Antonio, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-03

    IBACOS worked with builder Imagine Homes to evaluate the performance of an occupied new construction test house following construction of the house in the hot, humid climate of San Antonio, Texas. The project measures the effectiveness of a space conditioning strategy using a multihead mini-split heat pump (MSHP) system in a reduced-load home to achieve acceptable comfort levels (temperature and humidity) and energy performance. IBACOS collected long-term data and analyzed the energy consumption and comfort conditions of the occupied house after one year of operation. Although measured results indicate that the test system provides comfort both inside and outside the ASHRAE Standard 55-2010 range, the occupants of the house claimed both adequate comfort and appreciation of the ease of use and flexibility of the installed MSHP system. IBACOS also assisted the builder to evaluate design and specification changes necessary to comply with Zero Energy Ready Home, but the builder chose to not move forward with it because of concerns about the 'solar ready' requirements of the program.

  7. In vitro study on the disinfectability of two split-septum needle-free connection devices using different disinfection procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engelhart, Steffen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study investigated the external disinfection of two needle-free connection devices (NFC using Octeniderm (spraying and wiping technique vs. Descoderm pads (wiping technique. The split-septum membrane of the NFC was contaminated with >10 CFU . The efficacy of the disinfection at 30 sec. exposure time was controlled by taking a swab sample and by flushing the NFC with sterile 0.9% sodium chloride solution. Disinfection with octenidine dihydrochloride 0.1 g, 1-Propanol 30.0 g, and 2-Propanol 45.0 g in solution was highly effective (CFU reduction ≥4 log against both microorganisms, whereas the use of 63.1 g 2-Propanol in 100 ml solution led to residual contamination with . Our investigation underlines that (i in clinical practice disinfection of NFCs before use is mandatory, and that (ii details of disinfection technique are of utmost importance regarding their efficacy. Our investigation revealed no significant differences between both split-septum NFC types. Clinical studies are needed to confirm a possible superiority of disinfectants with long-lasting residual antimicrobial activity.

  8. Studies on the parametric decay of waves in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paettikangas, T.

    1992-08-01

    Parametric instabilities of large-amplitude electromagnetic waves are investigated in fusion applications. In laser fusion, the electromegnetic wave reflected from the overdense plasma can act as a secondary pump wave and exite parametric instabilities. In double simulated Brilloun scattering (DSBS), both the incoming and the reflected pump wave scatter from a common ion sound wave. The stationary states and the dynamics of DSBS are investigated by using a simple envelope model. The ion sound wave that is exited in DSBS is shown to have soliton-like properties. The simulated Raman scattering (SRS) of free-electron-laser radiation can be applied to current drive in tokamaks. SRS generates fast longitudinal electron plasma waves which accelerate electrons to relativistic energies. Since the energetic current-carrying electrons are almost collisionless, the current decays very slowly. The feasibility of the Raman current drive in tokamaks is investigated theoretically. The current drive efficiency and the optimum free-electron-laser parameters are determined. The energy transfer to the fast electrons from the electrostatic wave is studied with relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell simulations. The parametric decay of a wave to half-harmonics is investigated. It is shown that the growth rate of the decay vanishes in the limit of a long wavelenght of the pump wave even for general electromagnetic or electrostatic decay models. The results are applied to the decay of a fast magnetosonic waves in tokamak plasmas. (orig.)

  9. Neutron wave optics studied with ultracold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steyerl, A.

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses experiments demonstrating or utilizing the wave properties of neutrons with wavelengths of about 100 nm. In particular the 'UCN gravity diffractometer' and the gravity spectrometer NESSIE (Neutronen-Schwerkraft-Spectrometrie) are illustrated. (Auth.)

  10. Telecom Big Data for Urban Transport Analysis - a Case Study of Split-Dalmatia County in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baučić, M.; Jajac, N.; Bućan, M.

    2017-09-01

    Today, big data has become widely available and the new technologies are being developed for big data storage architecture and big data analytics. An ongoing challenge is how to incorporate big data into GIS applications supporting the various domains. International Transport Forum explains how the arrival of big data and real-time data, together with new data processing algorithms lead to new insights and operational improvements of transport. Based on the telecom customer data, the Study of Tourist Movement and Traffic in Split-Dalmatia County in Croatia is carried out as a part of the "IPA Adriatic CBC//N.0086/INTERMODAL" project. This paper briefly explains the big data used in the study and the results of the study. Furthermore, this paper investigates the main considerations when using telecom customer big data: data privacy and data quality. The paper concludes with GIS visualisation and proposes the further use of big data used in the study.

  11. TELECOM BIG DATA FOR URBAN TRANSPORT ANALYSIS – A CASE STUDY OF SPLIT-DALMATIA COUNTY IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Baučić

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, big data has become widely available and the new technologies are being developed for big data storage architecture and big data analytics. An ongoing challenge is how to incorporate big data into GIS applications supporting the various domains. International Transport Forum explains how the arrival of big data and real-time data, together with new data processing algorithms lead to new insights and operational improvements of transport. Based on the telecom customer data, the Study of Tourist Movement and Traffic in Split-Dalmatia County in Croatia is carried out as a part of the “IPA Adriatic CBC//N.0086/INTERMODAL” project. This paper briefly explains the big data used in the study and the results of the study. Furthermore, this paper investigates the main considerations when using telecom customer big data: data privacy and data quality. The paper concludes with GIS visualisation and proposes the further use of big data used in the study.

  12. Photoelectrochemical study of nanostructured ZnO thin films for hydrogen generation from water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolcott, Abraham; Zhang, Jin Z. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Cruz 1156 High St. Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Smith, Wilson A.; Zhao, Yiping [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Kuykendall, Tevye R. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2009-06-23

    Photoelectrochemical cells based on traditional and nanostructured ZnO thin films are investigated for hydrogen generation from water splitting. The ZnO thin films are fabricated using three different deposition geometries: normal pulsed laser deposition, pulsed laser oblique-angle deposition, and electron-beam glancing-angle deposition. The nanostructured films are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis spectroscopy and photoelectrochemical techniques. Normal pulsed laser deposition produces dense thin films with ca. 200 nm grain sizes, while oblique-angle deposition produces nanoplatelets with a fishscale morphology and individual features measuring ca. 900 by 450 nm on average. In contrast, glancing-angle deposition generates a highly porous, interconnected network of spherical nanoparticles of 15-40 nm diameter. Mott-Schottky plots show the flat band potential of pulsed laser deposition, oblique-angle deposition, and glancing-angle deposition samples to be -0.29, -0.28 and +0.20 V, respectively. Generation of photocurrent is observed at anodic potentials and no limiting photocurrents were observed with applied potentials up to 1.3 V for all photoelectrochemical cells. The effective photon-to-hydrogen efficiency is found to be 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.6% for pulsed laser deposition, oblique-angle deposition and glancing-angle deposition samples, respectively. The photoelectrochemical properties of the three types of films are understood to be a function of porosity, crystal defect concentration, charge transport properties and space charge layer characteristics. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Studies of African wave disturbances with the GISS GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druyan, Leonard M.; Hall, Timothy M.

    1994-01-01

    Simulations made with the general circulation model of the NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS GCM) run at 4 deg latitude by 5 deg longitude horizontal resolution are analyzed to determine the model's representation of African wave disturbances. Waves detected in the model's lower troposphere over northern Africa during the summer monsoon season exhibit realistic wavelengths of about 2200 km. However, power spectra of the meridional wind show that the waves propagate westward too slowly, with periods of 5-10 days, about twice the observed values. This sluggishness is most pronounced during August, consistent with simulated 600-mb zonal winds that are only about half the observed speeds of the midtropospheric jet. The modeled wave amplitudes are strongest over West Africa during the first half of the summer but decrease dramatically by September, contrary to observational evidence. Maximum amplitudes occur at realistic latitudes, 12 deg - 20 deg N, but not as observed near the Atlantic coast. Spectral analyses suggest some wave modulation of precipitation in the 5-8 day band, and compositing shows that precipitation is slightly enhanced east of the wave trough, coincident with southerly winds. Extrema of low-level convergence west of the wave troughs, coinciding with northerly winds, were not preferred areas for simulated precipitation, probably because of the drying effect of this advection, as waves were generally north of the humid zone. The documentation of African wave disturbances in the GISS GCM is a first step toward considering wave influences in future GCM studies of Sahel drought.

  14. Wave energy converter effects on wave propagation: A sensitivity study in Monterey Bay, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, G.; Jones, C. A.; Roberts, J.; Magalen, J.; Ruehl, K.; Chartrand, C.

    2014-12-01

    The development of renewable offshore energy in the United States is growing rapidly and wave energy is one of the largest resources currently being evaluated. The deployment of wave energy converter (WEC) arrays required to harness this resource could feasibly number in the hundreds of individual devices. The WEC arrays have the potential to alter nearshore wave propagation and circulation patterns and ecosystem processes. As the industry progresses from pilot- to commercial-scale it is important to understand and quantify the effects of WECs on the natural nearshore processes that support a local, healthy ecosystem. To help accelerate the realization of commercial-scale wave power, predictive modeling tools have been developed and utilized to evaluate the likelihood of environmental impact. At present, direct measurements of the effects of different types of WEC arrays on nearshore wave propagation are not available; therefore wave model simulations provide the groundwork for investigations of the sensitivity of model results to prescribed WEC characteristics over a range of anticipated wave conditions. The present study incorporates a modified version of an industry standard wave modeling tool, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore), to simulate wave propagation through a hypothetical WEC array deployment site on the California coast. The modified SWAN, referred to as SNL-SWAN, incorporates device-specific WEC power take-off characteristics to more accurately evaluate a WEC device's effects on wave propagation. The primary objectives were to investigate the effects of a range of WEC devices and device and array characteristics (e.g., device spacing, number of WECs in an array) on nearshore wave propagation using SNL-SWAN model simulations. Results showed that significant wave height was most sensitive to variations in WEC device type and size and the number of WEC devices in an array. Locations in the lee centerline of the arrays in each modeled scenario showed the

  15. First observation of the splittings of the E1 p-wave amplitudes in low energy deuteron photodisintegration and its implications for the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn Sum Rule integrand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackston, M. A.; Ahmed, M. A.; Perdue, B. A.; Weller, H. R.; Bewer, B.; Pywell, R. E.; Wurtz, W. A.; Igarashi, R.; Kucuker, S.; Norum, B.; Wang, K.; Li, J.; Mikhailov, S. F.; Popov, V. G.; Wu, Y. K.; Sawatzky, B. D.

    2008-01-01

    Angular distributions of the cross section and linear analyzing powers have been measured for the d(γ-vector,n)p reaction at the High Intensity γ-ray Source with linearly polarized beams of 14 and 16 MeV. The outgoing neutrons were detected using the Blowfish detector array, consisting of 88 liquid scintillator detectors with large solid angle coverage. The amplitudes of the reduced transition matrix elements were extracted by means of fits to the data and good agreement was found with a recent potential model calculation of the splittings of the triplet p-wave amplitudes. The extracted amplitudes are used to reconstruct the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule integrand for the deuteron and are compared to theory

  16. Spin-valley splitting of electron beam in graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Song

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We study spatial separation of the four degenerate spin-valley components of an electron beam in a EuO-induced and top-gated ferromagnetic/pristine/strained graphene structure. We show that, in a full resonant tunneling regime for all beam components, the formation of standing waves can lead sudden phase jumps ∼−π and giant lateral Goos-Hänchen shifts as large as the transverse beam width, while the interplay of the spin and valley imaginary wave vectors in the modulated regions can lead differences of resonant angles for the four spin-valley flavors, manifesting a spin-valley beam splitting effect. The splitting effect is found to be controllable by the gating and strain.

  17. Study of the potential of wave energy in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wan Ching; Chan, Keng Wai; Ooi, Heivin

    2017-07-01

    Renewable energy is generally defined as energy harnessed from resources which are naturally replenished. It is an alternative to the current conventional energy sources such as natural gas, oil and coal, which are nonrenewable. Besides being nonrenewable, the harnessing of these resources generally produce by-products which could be potentially harmful to the environment. On the contrary, the generation from renewable energy does not pose environmental degradation. Some examples of renewable energy sources are sunlight, wind, tides, waves and geothermal heat. Wave energy is considered as one of the most promising marine renewable resources and is becoming commercially viable quicker than other renewable technologies at an astonishing growth rate. This paper illustrates the working principle of wave energy converter (WEC) and the availability of wave energy in Malaysia oceans. A good understanding of the behaviour of ocean waves is important for designing an efficient WEC as the characteristics of the waves in shallow and deep water are different. Consequently, wave energy converters are categorized into three categories on shore, near shore and offshore. Therefore, the objectives of this study is ought to be carried out by focusing on the formation of waves and wave characteristics in shallow as well as in deep water. The potential sites for implementation of wave energy harvesting technology in Malaysia and the wave energy available in the respective area were analysed. The potential of wave energy in Malaysia were tabulated and presented with theoretical data. The interaction between motion of waves and heave buoys for optimum phase condition by using the mass and diameter as the variables were investigated.

  18. Algebraic techniques for diagonalization of a split quaternion matrix in split quaternionic mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Tongsong; Jiang, Ziwu; Zhang, Zhaozhong

    2015-01-01

    In the study of the relation between complexified classical and non-Hermitian quantum mechanics, physicists found that there are links to quaternionic and split quaternionic mechanics, and this leads to the possibility of employing algebraic techniques of split quaternions to tackle some problems in complexified classical and quantum mechanics. This paper, by means of real representation of a split quaternion matrix, studies the problem of diagonalization of a split quaternion matrix and gives algebraic techniques for diagonalization of split quaternion matrices in split quaternionic mechanics

  19. (O)Mega split

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benakli, Karim; Darmé, Luc; Goodsell, Mark D. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7589,LPTHE, F-75005, Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7589,LPTHE, F-75005, Paris (France)

    2015-11-16

    We study two realisations of the Fake Split Supersymmetry Model (FSSM), the simplest model that can easily reproduce the experimental value of the Higgs mass for an arbitrarily high supersymmetry scale M{sub S}, as a consequence of swapping higgsinos for equivalent states, fake higgsinos, with suppressed Yukawa couplings. If the LSP is identified as the main Dark matter component, then a standard thermal history of the Universe implies upper bounds on M{sub S}, which we derive. On the other hand, we show that renormalisation group running of soft masses aboveM{sub S} barely constrains the model — in stark contrast to Split Supersymmetry — and hence we can have a “Mega Split” spectrum even with all of these assumptions and constraints, which include the requirements of a correct relic abundance, a gluino life-time compatible with Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and absence of signals in present direct detection experiments of inelastic dark matter. In an appendix we describe a related scenario, Fake Split Extended Supersymmetry, which enjoys similar properties.

  20. Nanosized TiO[subscript 2] for Photocatalytic Water Splitting Studied by Oxygen Sensor and Data Logger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruinan; Liu, Song; Yuan, Hongyan; Xiao, Dan; Choi, Martin M. F.

    2012-01-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting by semiconductor photocatalysts has attracted considerable attention in the past few decades. In this experiment, nanosized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO[subscript 2]) particles are used to photocatalytically split water, which is then monitored by an oxygen sensor. Sacrificial reagents such as organics (EDTA) and metal…

  1. High order three part split symplectic integrators: Efficient techniques for the long time simulation of the disordered discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skokos, Ch., E-mail: haris.skokos@uct.ac.za [Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Gerlach, E. [Lohrmann Observatory, Technical University Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Bodyfelt, J.D., E-mail: J.Bodyfelt@massey.ac.nz [Centre for Theoretical Chemistry and Physics, The New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study, Massey University, Albany, Private Bag 102904, North Shore City, Auckland 0745 (New Zealand); Papamikos, G. [School of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science, University of Kent, Canterbury, CT2 7NF (United Kingdom); Eggl, S. [IMCCE, Observatoire de Paris, 77 Avenue Denfert-Rochereau, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-05-01

    While symplectic integration methods based on operator splitting are well established in many branches of science, high order methods for Hamiltonian systems that split in more than two parts have not been studied in great detail. Here, we present several high order symplectic integrators for Hamiltonian systems that can be split in exactly three integrable parts. We apply these techniques, as a practical case, for the integration of the disordered, discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation (DDNLS) and compare their efficiencies. Three part split algorithms provide effective means to numerically study the asymptotic behavior of wave packet spreading in the DDNLS – a hotly debated subject in current scientific literature.

  2. High order three part split symplectic integrators: Efficient techniques for the long time simulation of the disordered discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skokos, Ch.; Gerlach, E.; Bodyfelt, J.D.; Papamikos, G.; Eggl, S.

    2014-01-01

    While symplectic integration methods based on operator splitting are well established in many branches of science, high order methods for Hamiltonian systems that split in more than two parts have not been studied in great detail. Here, we present several high order symplectic integrators for Hamiltonian systems that can be split in exactly three integrable parts. We apply these techniques, as a practical case, for the integration of the disordered, discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation (DDNLS) and compare their efficiencies. Three part split algorithms provide effective means to numerically study the asymptotic behavior of wave packet spreading in the DDNLS – a hotly debated subject in current scientific literature.

  3. Data quality studies of enhanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIver, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Data quality assessment plays an essential role in the quest to detect gravitational wave signals in data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Interferometer data contain a high rate of noise transients from the environment, the detector hardware and the detector control systems. These transients severely limit the statistical significance of gravitational wave candidates of short duration and/or poorly modeled waveforms. This paper describes the data quality studies that have been performed in recent LIGO and Virgo observing runs to mitigate the impact of transient detector artifacts on the gravitational wave searches. (paper)

  4. Millimeter wave studies of circumstellar chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Emily Dale

    2010-06-01

    Millimeter wave studies of molecules in circumstellar envelopes and a planetary nebula have been conducted. Using the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) on Mt. Graham, a comparative spectral survey from 215-285 GHz was carried out of the carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch star IRC +10216 and the oxygen-rich supergiant VY Canis Majoris. A total of 858 emission lines were observed in both objects, arising from 40 different molecules. In VY Canis Majoris, AlO, AlOH, and PO were detected for the first time in interstellar space. In IRC +10216, PH3 was detected for the first time beyond the solar system, and C3O, and CH2NH were found for the first time in a circumstellar envelope. Additionally, in the evolved planetary nebula, the Helix, H2CO, C2H, and cyclic-C3H2 were observed using the SMT and the Kitt Peak 12 m telescopes. The presence of these three molecules in the Helix suggests that relatively complex chemistry occurs in planetary nebulae, despite the harsh ultraviolet field. Overall, the research on molecules in circumstellar and planetary nebulae furthers our understanding of the nature of the material that is fed back into the interstellar medium from evolved stars. Besides telescope work, laboratory research was also conducted -- the rotational spectrum of ZnCl was measured and its bond length and rotational constants were determined. Lastly, in partial fulfillment of a graduate certificate in entrepreneurial chemistry, the commercial applications of terahertz spectroscopy were explored through literature research.

  5. Study of the enhancement-mode AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor with split floating gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Ning; Jiang, Ling-Li; Zhao, Hai-Yue; Lin, Xin-Peng; Yu, Hong-Yu

    2017-11-01

    In this work, the charge storage based split floating gates (FGs) enhancement mode (E-mode) AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) are studied. The simulation results reveal that under certain density of two dimensional electron gas, the variation tendency of the threshold voltage (Vth) with the variation of the blocking dielectric thickness depends on the FG charge density. It is found that when the length sum and isolating spacing sum of the FGs both remain unchanged, the Vth shall decrease with the increasing FGs number but maintaining the device as E-mode. It is also reported that for the FGs HEMT, the failure of a FG will lead to the decrease of Vth as well as the increase of drain current, and the failure probability can be improved significantly with the increase of FGs number.

  6. Efficacy and safety of a new microneedle patch for skin brightening: A Randomized, split-face, single-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kui Young; Kwon, Hyun Jung; Lee, Changjin; Kim, Daegun; Yoon, Jun Jin; Kim, Myeong Nam; Kim, Beom Joon

    2017-09-01

    Although microneedles are one of the best transdermal drug delivery systems for active compounds, few clinical trials have examined the safety and efficacy of brightening microneedle patches. To determine the efficacy and safety of a newly developed whitening microneedle patch. A split-face study was designed for efficacy assessment with 34 Korean women applying the tested product (a whitening microneedle patch) on one cheek and a control whitening essence on the other. We objectively measured changes in melanin index values and skin brightness by mexameter and chromameter. Each participant also used global assessment to determine skin whitening. In addition, 55 participants were selected for primary skin irritation tests and repeated insult patch tests for safety assessments. Mean skin brightness and melanin indexes improved (Pmicroneedle patch was effective and safe for skin brightening and would be a promising functional cosmetic product. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Light Driven Energy Research at LCLS: Planned Pump-Probe X-ray Spectroscopy Studies on Photosynthetic Water Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2010-02-01

    Arguably the most important chemical reaction on earth is the photosynthetic splitting of water to molecular oxygen by the Mn-containing oxygen-evolving complex (Mn-OEC) in the protein known as photosystem II (PSII). It is this reaction which has, over the course of some 3.8 billion years, gradually filled our atmosphere with O2 and consequently enabled and sustained the evolution of complex aerobic life. Coupled to the reduction of carbon dioxide, biological photosynthesis contributes foodstuffs for nutrition while recycling CO2 from the atmosphere and replacing it with O2. By utilizing sunlight to power these energy-requiring reactions, photosynthesis also serves as a model for addressing societal energy needs as we enter an era of diminishing fossil hydrocarbon resources. Understanding, at the molecular level, the dynamics and mechanism of how nature has solved this problem is of fundamental importance and could be critical to aid in the design of manufactured devices to accomplish the conversion of sunlight into useful electrochemical energy and transportable fuel in the foreseeable future. In order to understand the photosynthetic splitting of water by the Mn-OEC we need to be able to follow the reaction in real time at an atomic level. A powerful probe to study the electronic and molecular structure of the Mn-OEC is x-ray spectroscopy. Here, in particular x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has two crucial qualities for LCLS based time-dependent pump-probe studies of the Mn-OEC: a) it directly probes the Mn oxidation state and ligation, b) it can be performed with wavelength dispersive optics to avoid the necessity of scanning in pump probe experiments. Recent results and the planned time dependent experiments at LCLS will be discussed. )

  8. How heavy can the fermions in split supersymmetry be? A study on the gravitino and the extradimensional lightest supersymmetric partner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    In recently introduced split supersymmetry (SUSY) theories, in which the scale of SUSY breaking is very high, the requirement that the relic abundance of the lightest superpartner (LSP) provides the dark matter of the Universe leads to the prediction of fermionic superpartners around the weak scale. This is no longer obviously the case if the LSP is a hidden sector field, such as a gravitino or another hidden sector fermion, so it is interesting to study this scenario. We consider the case in which the next-lightest superpartner (NLSP) freezes out with its thermal relic abundance, and then it decays to the LSP. We use the constraints from big bang nucleosynthesis and cosmic microwave background, together with the requirement of attaining gauge coupling unification and that the LSP abundance provides the dark matter of the Universe, to infer the allowed superpartner spectrum. As very good news for detection of split SUSY at LHC, we find that if the gravitino is the LSP, then the only allowed NLSP has to be very purely photinolike. In this case, a photino from 700 GeV to 5 TeV is allowed, which is difficult to test at LHC. We also study the case where the LSP is given by a light fermion in the hidden sector which is naturally present in SUSY breaking in extra dimensions. We find that, in this case, a generic NLSP is allowed to be in the range 1-20 TeV, while a bino NLSP can be as light as tens of GeV

  9. Computational study of nonlinear plasma waves. I. Simulation model and monochromatic wave propagtion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matda, Y.; Crawford, F.W.

    1974-12-01

    An economical low noise plasma simulation model is applied to a series of problems associated with electrostatic wave propagation in a one-dimensional, collisionless, Maxwellian plasma, in the absence of magnetic field. The model is described and tested, first in the absence of an applied signal, and then with a small amplitude perturbation, to establish the low noise features and to verify the theoretical linear dispersion relation at wave energy levels as low as 0.000,001 of the plasma thermal energy. The method is then used to study propagation of an essentially monochromatic plane wave. Results on amplitude oscillation and nonlinear frequency shift are compared with available theories. The additional phenomena of sideband instability and satellite growth, stimulated by large amplitude wave propagation and the resulting particle trapping, are described. (auth)

  10. Sea Bed Sand Waves Studied To Help Pipeline Planners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mark, C.F.; de Koning, M.F.; Blom, Astrid; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Stolk, A.

    2008-01-01

    The article cites a study that offers information on the variability of sand wave characteristics in the North Sea. The sand waves variability includes a statement that pipelines may start vibrating due to turbulence generated under the free span and navigational channels often need to be dredged

  11. Tidal and gravity waves study from the airglow measurements at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E) during the period 2004–2007 are analyzed to study the dominant waves present in the 80–100 km altitude region of the atmosphere. The nocturnal intensity variations of different airglow emissions are observed using scanning temperature controlled filter photometers. Waves having period lying between 2 and 12 hours ...

  12. Wave Analysis Study for the Punta Catalina Jetty, Dominican Republic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røge, Mads Sønderstrup; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Burcharth, Hans Falk

    This report deals with a two-dimensional test study to identify the largest significant wave height, the maximum wave height and the largest crest level along the Punta Catalina jetty in the Dominican Republic. The scale used for the model tests was 1:50. Unless otherwise specified all values given...

  13. Innovative wedge axe in making split firewood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutikainen, A.

    1998-01-01

    Interteam Oy, a company located in Espoo, has developed a new method for making split firewood. The tools on which the patented System Logmatic are based are wedge axe and cylindrical splitting-carrying frame. The equipment costs about 495 FIM. The block of wood to be split is placed inside the upright carrying frame and split in a series of splitting actions using the innovative wedge axe. The finished split firewood remains in the carrying frame, which (as its name indicates) also serves as the means for carrying the firewood. This innovative wedge-axe method was compared with the conventional splitting of wood using an axe (Fiskars -handy 1400 splitting axe costing about 200 FIM) in a study conducted at TTS-Institute. There were eight test subjects involved in the study. In the case of the wedge-axe method, handling of the blocks to be split and of the finished firewood was a little quicker, but in actual splitting it was a little slower than the conventional axe method. The average productivity of splitting the wood and of the work stages related to it was about 0.4 m 3 per effective hour in both methods. The methods were also equivalent of one another in terms of the load imposed by the work when measured in terms of the heart rate. As regards work safety, the wedge-axe method was superior to the conventional method, but the continuous striking action and jolting transmitted to the arms were unpleasant (orig.)

  14. Experimental Study of the WEPTOS Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecher, Arthur; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Marchalot, Tanguy

    This report presents the results of an experimental study on the power conversion capabilities and structural loads of the WEPTOS wave energy converter. The investigation focuses mainly at identifying the performance of the WEPTOS prototype in a wide range of production wave states...... and at the mooring forces and structural bending moments in extreme wave conditions, in order to estimate the performance and structural loads of larger WEPTOS machines being located at various offshore locations of interest. The following aspects were the main subjects of investigation: Performance of the prototype...... under a constant and linear PTO loading, the opening angle of the device, the effect of alterations to the wave conditions, and mooring forces and structural bending moments in production and extreme wave states. During the study, a highly realistic scale model was supplied by the client, WEPTOS, which...

  15. Research Centre for the Study of the Rogue Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamin, Roman

    2013-04-01

    In 2012, in Sakhalin (Russia) was established Research Center for the Study of the Rogue Waves. This center unites many known scientists, who study rogue waves. The center is founded by the following scientific organizations: - The Institute of Marine Geology and Geophysics of FEB RAS - The Far Eastern Federal University - Special Research Bureau for Automation of Marine Researches of FEB RAS - The Institute of Applied Physics of RAS - Shirshov Institute of Oceanology of RAS Heads this center Dr. Roman V. Shamin (Russia). Topics projects: - Probability of emergence of rogue waves - Finding of the sites of the Ocean most dangerous from the point of view of rogue waves - Assessment of risk of dangerous impact of rogue waves - and many others... Our Center is open for new participants from all countries. Our Centre have web-site: roguewaves.ru For contacts: center@roguewaves.ru (Dr. Roman Shamin)

  16. Reusable split-aptamer-based biosensor for rapid detection of cocaine in serum by using an all-fiber evanescent wave optical biosensing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yunfei; Long, Feng; Gu, Chunmei; Wang, Cheng; Han, Shitong; He, Miao

    2016-08-24

    A rapid, facile, and sensitive assay of cocaine in biological fluids is important to prevent illegal abuse of drugs. A two-step structure-switching aptasensor has been developed for cocaine detection based on evanescent wave optical biosensing platform. In the proposed biosensing platform, two tailored aptamer probes were used to construct the molecular structure switching. In the existence of cocaine, two fragments of cocaine aptamer formed a three-way junction quickly, and the fluorophore group of one fragment was effectively quenched by the quencher group of the other one. The tail of the three-way junction hybridized with the cDNA sequences immobilized on the optical fiber biosensor. Fluorescence was excited by evanescent wave, and the fluorescence signal was proportional to cocaine concentration. Cocaine was detected in 450 s (300 s for incubation and 150 s for detection and regeneration) with a limit of detection (LOD) of 165.2 nM. The proposed aptasensor was evaluated in human serum samples, and it exhibited good recovery, precision, and accuracy without complicated sample pretreatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Shear-Wave Splitting in a Critical Crust: the Next Step Biréfringence des ondes transversales dans les croûtes critiques : la prochaine étape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crampin S.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Arguably, shear-wave splitting displaying azimuthal anisotropy has not lived up to its initial promise of opening a new window for understanding cracks and stress in the crust. This paper reviews two recent related developments which appear to renew these initial hopes and provide new opportunities for monitoring, modelling, and even predicting, the (pre-fracturing deformation of fluid-saturated microcracked rock. A recently developed model of anisotropic poro-elasticity (APE for the stress-induced evolution of fluid-saturated microcracked rock matches a wide range of otherwise inexplicable or dissociated phenomena and appears to be a good first-order approximation to the evolution of fluid-saturated microcracked rock. Since the parameters that control small-scale (pre-fracturing deformation also control shear-wave splitting, it appears that the evolution of fluid-saturated microcracked rock can be directly monitored by shear-wave splitting, and the response to future changes predicted by APE. The success of APE-modelling and observations of shear-wave splitting imply that almost all rock is close to a state of fracture criticality associated with the percolation threshold, when shear-strength is lost and through-going fractures can propagate. This confirms other evidence for the self-organized criticality of in situ rock. The significance of this identification is that the small-scale physics that controls the whole phenomena can now be identified as the stress-induced manipulation of fluids around intergranular microcracks. This has the possibly unique advantage amongst critical systems that details of the pre-fracturing deformation and the approach to the criticality threshold (in this case the proximity to fracturing can be monitored at each locality by appropriate observations of shear-wave splitting. This paper reviews the these developments and discusses their implications and applications, particularly the implications of self

  18. Study of the ultrasonic waves action on the preparation of calcium aluminates cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lourenco, R.R.; Exposito, C.C.D.; Rodrigues, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Calcium aluminates cements were prepared through a route that uses the sonochemical process. In this process, calcia and alumina in an aqueous suspension are put under an ultrasonic bath during some time. After that, the water is evaporated and the material is heat treated. In this work, the action of ultrasonic waves were studied on initials molar compositions calcia:alumina of 1:1. It was also verified the influence of the water on the reactivity of initial solids. SEM and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the obtained materials. In addition, mechanical strength of the products was evaluated through splitting tensile tests. The X-ray diffractograms showed that the presence of the water was enough to form hydrated compounds. However the material subjected to the sonochemical process presented the highest mechanical strength, indicating the potential of this route of synthesis. (author)

  19. Influence of postoperative low-level laser therapy on the osseointegration of self-tapping implants in the posterior maxilla: a 6-week split-mouth clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandić, Borka; Lazić, Zoran; Marković, Aleksa; Mandić, Bojan; Mandić, Miška; Djinić, Ana; Miličić, Biljana

    2015-03-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been proven to stimulate bone repair, affecting cellular proliferation, differentiation and adhesion, and has shown a potential to reduce the healing time following implant placement. The aim of this clinical study was to investigate the influence of postoperative LLLT osseointegration and early success of self-tapping implants placed into low-density bone. Following the split-mouth design, self-tapping implants n = 44) were inserted in the posterior maxilla of 12 patients. One jaw side randomly received LLLT (test group), while the other side was placebo (control group). For LLLT, a 637 nm gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) laser (Medicolaser 637, Technoline, Belgrade, Serbia) with an output power of 40 mW and continuous wave was used. Low-level laser treatment was performed immediately after the surgery and then repeated every day in the following 7 days. The total irradiation dose per treatment was 6.26 J/cm2 per implant. The study outcomes were: implant stability, alkaline-phosphatase (ALP) activity and early implant success rate. The follow-up took 6 weeks. Irradiated implants achieved a higher stability compared with controls during the entire follow-up and the difference reached significance in the 5th postoperative week (paired t-test, p = 0.030). The difference in ALP activity between the groups was insignificant in any observation point (paired t-test, p > 0.05). The early implant success rate was 100%, regardless of LLLT usage. LLLT applied daily during the first postoperative week expressed no significant influence on the osseointegration of self-tapping implants placed into low density bone of the posterior maxilla. Placement of self-tapping macro-designed implants into low density bone could be a predictable therapeutic procedure with a high early success rate regardless of LLLT usage.

  20. Influence of postoperative low-level laser therapy on the osseointegration of self-tapping implants in the posterior maxilla: A 6-week split-mouth clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić Borka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT has been proven to stimulate bone repair, affecting cellular proliferation, differentiation and adhesion, and has shown a potential to reduce the healing time following implant placement. The aim of this clinical study was to investigate the influence of postoperative LLLT osseointegration and early success of self-tapping implants placed into low-density bone. Methods. Following the split-mouth design, self-tapping implants (n = 44 were inserted in the posterior maxilla of 12 patients. One jaw side randomly received LLLT (test group, while the other side was placebo (control group. For LLLT, a 637 nm gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs laser (Medicolaser 637, Technoline, Belgrade, Serbia with an output power of 40 mW and continuous wave was used. Low-level laser treatment was performed immediately after the surgery and then repeated every day in the following 7 days. The total irradiation dose per treatment was 6.26 J/cm² per implant. The study outcomes were: implant stability, alkaline-phosphatase (ALP activity and early implant success rate. The follow-up took 6 weeks. Results. Irradiated implants achieved a higher stability compared with controls during the entire follow-up and the difference reached significance in the 5th postoperative week (paired t-test, p = 0.030. The difference in ALP activity between the groups was insignificant in any observation point (paired t-test, p > 0.05. The early implant success rate was 100%, regardless of LLLT usage. Conclusion. LLLT applied daily during the first postoperative week expressed no significant influence on the osseointegration of selftapping implants placed into low density bone of the posterior maxilla. Placement of self-tapping macro-designed implants into low density bone could be a predictable therapeutic procedure with a high early success rate regardless of LLLT usage.

  1. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SHOCK WAVE DYNAMICS IN MAGNETIZED PLASMAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podder, Nirmol K.

    2009-01-01

    In this four-year project (including one-year extension), the project director and his research team built a shock-wave-plasma apparatus to study shock wave dynamics in glow discharge plasmas in nitrogen and argon at medium pressure (1-20 Torr), carried out various plasma and shock diagnostics and measurements that lead to increased understanding of the shock wave acceleration phenomena in plasmas. The measurements clearly show that in the steady-state dc glow discharge plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave velocity increases, its amplitude decreases, and the shock wave disperses non-linearly as a function of the plasma current. In the pulsed discharge plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave dispersion width and velocity increase as a function of the delay between the switch-on of the plasma and shock-launch. In the afterglow plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave dispersion width and velocity decrease as a function of the delay between the plasma switch-off and shock-launch. These changes are found to be opposite and reversing towards the room temperature value which is the initial condition for plasma ignition case. The observed shock wave properties in both igniting and afterglow plasmas correlate well with the inferred temperature changes in the two plasmas

  2. Atom Wave Interferometers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pritchard, David

    2000-01-01

    Long-term research objective: Matter wave interferometers, in which de Broglie waves are coherently split and then recombined to produce interference fringes, have opened exciting new possibilities for precision and fundamental...

  3. Study of Magnetohydrodynamic Surface Waves on Liquid Gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantao Ji; William Fox; David Pace; H.L. Rappaport

    2004-05-13

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) surface waves on liquid gallium are studied theoretically and experimentally in the small magnetic Reynolds number limit. A linear dispersion relation is derived when a horizontal magnetic field and a horizontal electric current is imposed. No wave damping is found in the shallow liquid limit while waves always damp in the deep liquid limit with a magnetic field parallel to the propagation direction. When the magnetic field is weak, waves are weakly damped and the real part of the dispersion is unaffected, while in the opposite limit waves are strongly damped with shortened wavelengths. In a table-top experiment, planar MHD surface waves on liquid gallium are studied in detail in the regime of weak magnetic field and deep liquid. A non-invasive diagnostic accurately measures surface waves at multiple locations by reflecting an array of lasers off the surface onto a screen, which is recorded by an Intensified-CCD camera. The measured dispersion relation is consistent with the linear theory with a reduced surface tension likely due to surface oxidation. In excellent agreement with linear theory, it is observed that surface waves are damped only when a horizontal magnetic field is imposed parallel to the propagation direction. No damping is observed under a perpendicular magnetic field. The existence of strong wave damping even without magnetic field suggests the importance of the surface oxide layer. Implications to the liquid metal wall concept in fusion reactors, especially on the wave damping and a Rayleigh-Taylor instability when the Lorentz force is used to support liquid metal layer against gravity, are discussed.

  4. Study of Magnetohydrodynamic Surface Waves on Liquid Gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hantao Ji; William Fox; David Pace; Rappaport, H.L.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) surface waves on liquid gallium are studied theoretically and experimentally in the small magnetic Reynolds number limit. A linear dispersion relation is derived when a horizontal magnetic field and a horizontal electric current is imposed. No wave damping is found in the shallow liquid limit while waves always damp in the deep liquid limit with a magnetic field parallel to the propagation direction. When the magnetic field is weak, waves are weakly damped and the real part of the dispersion is unaffected, while in the opposite limit waves are strongly damped with shortened wavelengths. In a table-top experiment, planar MHD surface waves on liquid gallium are studied in detail in the regime of weak magnetic field and deep liquid. A non-invasive diagnostic accurately measures surface waves at multiple locations by reflecting an array of lasers off the surface onto a screen, which is recorded by an Intensified-CCD camera. The measured dispersion relation is consistent with the linear theory with a reduced surface tension likely due to surface oxidation. In excellent agreement with linear theory, it is observed that surface waves are damped only when a horizontal magnetic field is imposed parallel to the propagation direction. No damping is observed under a perpendicular magnetic field. The existence of strong wave damping even without magnetic field suggests the importance of the surface oxide layer. Implications to the liquid metal wall concept in fusion reactors, especially on the wave damping and a Rayleigh-Taylor instability when the Lorentz force is used to support liquid metal layer against gravity, are discussed

  5. Time-dependent wave front propagation simulation of a hard x-ray split-and-delay unit: Towards a measurement of the temporal coherence properties of x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Roling

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For the European x-ray free electron laser (XFEL a split-and-delay unit based on geometrical wavefront beam splitting and multilayer mirrors is built which covers the range of photon energies from 5 keV up to 20 keV. Maximum delays between Δτ=±2.5  ps at hν=20  keV and up to Δτ=±23  ps at hν=5  keV will be possible. Time-dependent wave-optics simulations have been performed by means of Synchrotron Radiation Workshop software for XFEL pulses at hν=5  keV. The XFEL radiation was simulated using results of time-dependent simulations applying the self-amplified spontaneous emission code FAST. Main features of the optical layout, including diffraction on the beam splitter edge and optics imperfections measured with a nanometer optic component measuring machine slope measuring profiler, were taken into account. The impact of these effects on the characterization of the temporal properties of XFEL pulses is analyzed. An approach based on fast Fourier transformation allows for the evaluation of the temporal coherence despite large wavefront distortions caused by the optics imperfections. In this way, the fringes resulting from time-dependent two-beam interference can be filtered and evaluated yielding a coherence time of τ_{c}=0.187  fs (HWHM for real, nonperfect mirrors, while for ideal mirrors a coherence time of τ_{c}=0.191  fs (HWHM is expected.

  6. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  7. Studies on fast wave current drive in the JAERI tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Fujii, T.; Kawashima, H.; Tamai, H.; Saigusa, M.; Imai, T.; Hamamatsu, K.; Fukuyama, A.

    1991-01-01

    Fast wave electron heating experiment (FWEH) on JFT-2M and JT-60 and analysis of fast wave current drive (FWCD) ability on JT-60U are presented. In the JFT-2M, absorption of fast waves have been investigated by using a phased four-loop antenna array. The absorption of the fast waves has been studied for various plasma parameters by using combination of other additional heating methods such as electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and ion cyclotron heating. It is shown that the absorption efficiency estimated from various methods well correlates with one calculated theoretically in single pass damping. Interaction of the fast waves with fast electrons in combination with ECH has been examined through the measurement of non-thermal electron cyclotron emission (ECE). The observed ECE during FWEH is well explained by the theoretical model, which indicates generation of the appreciable energetic fast electrons by the fast waves. New four-loop array antennas have been employed to improve the absorption of unidirectionally-propagating waves. Characteristics of antenna loading resistance can be reproduced by a coupling calculation code. In JT-60, FWEH experiment in combination with lower hybrid current drive was performed. Power absorption efficiency of fast wave is substantially improved in combination with LHCD of relatively low power for both phasing modes. Bulk electron heating is observed with high-k // mode and coupling with fast electron is confirmed in hard X-ray emission with low-k // mode. The results are consistent with theoretical prediction based on 1.D full wave code. Synergetic effects between FWEH and LHCD are found. Coupling calculation indicates that eight-loop antenna is favourable for keeping high directivity in the required N // -range. Current drive efficiency is calculated with 1-D full wave code including trapped particle effects and higher harmonic ion cyclotron damping

  8. Inferior alveolar nerve function after sagittal split osteotomy by reciprocating saw or piezosurgery instrument: prospective double-blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnazzi, Marcelo Silva; Real Gabrielli, Mario Francisco; Passeri, Luis Augusto; Cabrini Gabrielli, Marisa Aparecida; Spin-Neto, Rubens; Pereira-Filho, Valfrido Antonio

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to objectively evaluate inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) sensory disturbances in patients who underwent sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) by comparing 1 side treated with a reciprocating saw with the other side treated with a piezosurgery device. Clinical evaluation of IAN sensory disturbance was undertaken preoperatively and at 1 week, 4 weeks, 2 months, and 6 months postoperatively in 20 patients who underwent SSRO at the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Araraquara Dental School, São Paulo State University. The 20 patients were examined at all periods for IAN functionality by Semmes-Weinstein testing; neither the patients nor the examiner knew which side was treated using piezosurgery or a reciprocating saw. The mean age of the patients was 28.4 years (range, 20 to 48 yr). Before surgery, no patient had impaired function of the IAN in any of the 8 zones in the mental and inferior lip areas. All patients reported feeling the first monofilament at the time of the preoperative test. Seven days postoperatively, all patients reported some kind of altered sensitivity in at least 1 zone evaluated. The results of this study suggest there was no statistically significant difference in the sensitivity of the labiomental area regarding the instrument used to perform the osteotomy. Future studies will focus on enlarging the sample and evaluating the results. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dose escalation without split-course chemoradiation for anal cancer: results of a phase II RTOG study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Madhu; Pajak, Thomas; Kreig, Richard; Pinover, Wayne H.; Myerson, Robert

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: An attempt at radiotherapy (RT) dose escalation (from 45 Gy to 59.6 Gy) in a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) chemoradiation protocol for advanced anal cancers had resulted in an unexpectedly high 1-year colostomy rate (23%) and local failure (The Cancer Journal from Scientific American 2 (4):205-211, 1996). This was felt to be probably secondary to the split course chemoradiation (CR) that was mandated in the protocol. A second phase of this dose escalation study was therefore undertaken without a mandatory split and with an identical RT dose (59.6 Gy) and chemotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty patients with anal cancers ≥2 cms were treated with a concurrent combination of 59.6 Gy to the pelvis and perineum (1.8 Gy daily, 5 times per week in 33 fractions over 6 (1(2)) weeks) and two cycles of 5 fluorouracil infusion (1000 mg/m 2 over 24 hours for 4 days) and mitomycin C (10 mg/m 2 bolus). A 10 day rest period was allowed only for severe skin reactions. A comparative analysis was made with the 47 patients in the earlier phase of this study who were treated with the identical chemoradiation course but with a mandatory 2-week break at the 36.00 Gy level. RESULTS: Predominant Grade 3 and 4 toxicities in 18 evaluable patients with dermatitis ((14(18)) or 78%), hematologic ((14(18)) or 78%), infection ((3(18)) or 17%) and gastrointestinal ((5(18)) or 28%). There were no fatalities. Nine patients (50%) completed the planned course without a break; 9 others (50%) had their treatments interrupted for a median of 11 days (range 7-19 days) at a median dose of 41.4 Gy (range 32.4 to 48.6 Gy). This compared to (40(47)) patients (85%) who had a 12 day treatment interruption at 36 Gy total dose in a planned break group. One patient had an abdomino-perineal resection (APR) for persistent disease and another for an anal fissure for (2(18)) or 11% 1-year colostomy rate. This was again favorably comparable to 23% 1-year colostomy rate for the earlier group of

  10. Rugby: injury epidemiology. Only case study in readaptation and retraining after maissoneuve split-dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Blasco Herraiz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Rugby is a sport widely studied in the physical and technical-tactical injury area with a high injury rate, it shows a relationship between anthropometric data and role playing. In this sport, injury incidence varies depending on the play role, being higher in the forward position. Besides these injuries are characterized by being predominantly muscular and more common in the lower limb. Therefore, the objectives of the study were to synthesize all the information about the sport and its injury epidemiology, to make an intervention after fracture-dislocation Maissoneuve - only case -in which he attempted to recover from an unusual injury. The results showed an improvement of the measured variables, both objective (travel articular, strength and borders, and subjective (Borg scale as the intervention advanced, which verified the importance of monitoring and of quantification of the recovery for the reset and optimization.

  11. External apical root resorption in maxillary root-filled incisors after orthodontic treatment: a split-mouth design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas-Carreras, José María; Amarilla, Almudena; Espinar-Escalona, Eduardo; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Sánchez-Domínguez, Benito; López-Frías, Francisco Javier

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare, in a split mouth design, the external apical root resorption (EARR) associated with orthodontic treatment in root-filled maxillary incisors and their contralateral teeth with vital pulps. The study sample consisted of 38 patients (14 males and 24 females), who had one root-filled incisor before completion of multiband/bracket orthodontic therapy for at least 1 year. For each patient, digital panoramic radiographs taken before and after orthodontic treatment were used to determine the root resortion and the proportion of external root resorption (PRR), defined as the ratio between the root resorption in the endodontically treated incisor and that in its contralateral incisor with a vital pulp. The student's t-test, chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were used to determine statistical significance. There was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) between EARR in vital teeth (1.1 ± 1.0 mm) and endodontically treated incisors (1.1 ± 0.8 mm). Twenty-six patients (68.4%) showed greater resorption of the endodontically treated incisor than its homolog vital tooth (p > 0.05). The mean and standard deviation of PPR were 1.0 ± 0.2. Multivariate logistic regression suggested that PRR does not correlate with any of the variables analyzed. There was no significant difference in the amount or severity of external root resorption during orthodontic movement between root-filled incisors and their contralateral teeth with vital pulps.

  12. The pedicled omentoplasty and split skin graft (POSSG) for reconstruction of large chest wall defects. A validity study of 34 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M.E. Contant; A.N. van Geel (Albert); B. van der Holt (Bronno); T. Wiggers (Theo)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the results of pedicled omentoplasty and split skin graft (POSSG) in reconstructing (full thickness) chest wall defects, and to define its role as a palliative procedure for local symptom control. Thirty-four patients with recurrent

  13. Stabilisation of sagittal split advancement osteotomies with miniplates: a prospective, multicentre study with two-year follow-up. Part I. Clinical parameters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borstlap, W.A.; Stoelinga, P.J.W.; Hoppenreijs, T.J.M.; Hof, M.A. van 't

    2004-01-01

    The principal aim of this study was to assess the postoperative stability of bilateral sagittal split osteotomies (BSSO) using two miniplates. Part I reports on the clinical results including treatment characteristics, nerve functions, TMJ function, occlusional relapse and patient satisfaction. This

  14. Computational study of nonlinear plasma waves. I. Simulation model and monochromatic wave propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Crawford, F.W.

    1975-01-01

    An economical low-noise plasma simulation model originated by Denavit is applied to a series of problems associated with electrostatic wave propagation in a one-dimensional, collisionless, Maxwellian plasma, in the absence of magnetic field. The model is described and tested, first in the absence of an applied signal, and then with a small amplitude perturbation. These tests serve to establish the low-noise features of the model, and to verify the theoretical linear dispersion relation at wave energy levels as low as 10 -6 of the plasma thermal energy: Better quantitative results are obtained, for comparable computing time, than can be obtained by conventional particle simulation models, or direct solution of the Vlasov equation. The method is then used to study propagation of an essentially monochromatic plane wave. Results on amplitude oscillation and nonlinear frequency shift are compared with available theories

  15. Tidal and gravity waves study from the airglow measurements at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The other waves may be the upward propagating gravity waves or waves resulting from the interaction of inter-mode tidal oscillations, interaction of tidal waves with planetary waves and gravity waves. Some times, the second harmonic wave has higher vertical velocity than the corresponding fundamental wave. Application ...

  16. Radiographic characteristics in congenital scoliosis associated with split cord malformation: a retrospective study of 266 surgical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Fan; Tan, Haining; Li, Xingye; Chen, Chong; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Jianguo; Shen, Jianxiong

    2017-10-23

    Vertebrae, ribs, and spinal cord are anatomically adjacent structures, and their close relationships are clinically important for planning better corrective surgical approach. The objective is to identify the radiographic characteristics in surgical patients with congenital scoliosis (CS) and coexisting split cord malformation (SCM). A total of 266 patients with CS and SCM underwent surgical treatment at our hospital between May 2000 and December 2015 was retrospectively identified. The demographic distribution and radiographic data were collected to investigate the characteristics of spine curve, vertebral, rib, and intraspinal anomalies. According to Pang's classification, all patients were divided into two groups: type I group is defined as two hemicords, each within a separate dural tube separated by a bony or cartilaginous medial spur, while type II group is defined as two hemicords within a single dural tube separated by a nonrigid fibrous septum. There were 104 patients (39.1%) in Type I group and 162 patients (60.9%) in Type II group. SCM was most commonly found in the lower thoracic and lumbar regions. The mean length of the septum in Type I SCM was significantly shorter than Type II SCM (2.7 vs. 5.2 segments). Patients in Type I group had a higher proportion of kyphotic deformity (22.1%). The vertebral deformities were simple in only 16.5% and multiple in 83.5% of 266 cases. Patients in Type I group presented higher prevalence of multiple (90.4%) and extensive (5.1 segments) malformation of vertebrae. In addition, hypertrophic lamina and bulbous spinous processes were more frequent in Type I group (29.7%), even developing into the "volcano-shape" deformities. Rib anomalies occurred in 62.8% of all patients and 46.1% of them were complex anomalies. The overall prevalence of other intraspinal anomalies was 42.9%. The most common coexisting intraspinal anomalies was syringomyelia (30.5%). The current study, with the largest cohort to date, demonstrated that

  17. Clinical study of GFR and split renal GFR in evaluating the glomerular function in patients with type 2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Hongliang; Li Jinsong; Li Jianing; Wu Jingchuan; Yang Shurong; Gu Zhenhui; Zou Renjian; Shi Haihong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess glomerular filtration function in patients with type 2 diabetes by glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and split GFR, namely left GFR (LGFR) and right GFR (RGFR). Methods: Fifty-one patients with type 2 diabetes were classified by urine albumin analysis into three groups, normalalbuminuria group (NA), microalbuminuria group(MA) and macroalbuminuria group (MAA) . Twelve patients without diabetes were included into control group. 99 Tc m -DTPA renography was performed on all these cases. GFR and split GFR were calculated by Gates formula. Results: 1) GFR, LGFR and RGFR of NA group were lower than that of the control group. 2) GFR, LGFR and RGFR were significantly correlated with the urine albumin level (r=-0.457, -0.412, -0.424, respectively, P all < 0.01). 3) In all 51 cases, there were 5 cases whose GFR were normal while split GFR were abnormal. Conclusions: 1) GFR and split GFR measurement can detect the incipient damage of glomerular function more sensitively than urine albumin analysis and show the degree of the damage correctly. 2) Split GFR measurement can improve the evaluation of the glomerular function in type 2 diabetes patients

  18. Retrospective radiographic study of marginal bone changes of 88 implants placed with split crest technique in the maxillary latero-posterior area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Longoni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim This article presents a retrospective study on the behavior of implants placed with split crest technique in lateroposterior maxillary class IV atrophy. Materials and Methods Subjects who underwent implant placement following split crest technique in the maxillary latero-posterior area were enrolled in the present retrospective study. After a mean period of 6.2 years of function implant survival and success rates were assessed. Moreover, radiographic examination was made on digital periapical radiographs and by means of a specific software. Bone level changes were measured as the difference between the peri-implants crestal bone level and the implants shoulder during the last patient’s visit recall examination. Results A total of 30 patients satisfied the inclusion criteria and were included in the study; the subjects were treated with 88 implants (64 transmucosal and 24 submerged. The observation period for all patients treated with split crest technique varied between 4 and 8 years (mean 6.2 years. The implants survival rate was 96.6% and the prostheses survival rate was 100%. Bone resorption ranged between 2.3 mm and 2.7 mm. Conclusion Implants inserted in conjunction with split crest technique seems to be a promising therapy with similar results as conventional implant surgery.

  19. Comparison of foam swabs and toothbrushes as oral hygiene interventions in mechanically ventilated patients: a randomised split mouth study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Paola J; Hannigan, Ailish; Haywood, Sean; Cole, Jade M; Palmer, Nicki; Emanuel, Charlotte; Kinsella, Tracey; Lewis, Michael A O; Wise, Matt P; Williams, David W

    2016-01-01

    During critical illness, dental plaque may serve as a reservoir of respiratory pathogens. This study compared the effectiveness of toothbrushing with a small-headed toothbrush or a foam-headed swab in mechanically ventilated patients. This was a randomised, assessor-blinded, split-mouth trial, performed at a single critical care unit. Adult, orally intubated patients with >20 teeth, where >24 hours of mechanical ventilation was expected were included. Teeth were cleaned 12-hourly using a foam swab or toothbrush (each randomly assigned to one side of the mouth). Cleaning efficacy was based on plaque scores, gingival index and microbial plaque counts. High initial plaque (mean=2.1 (SD 0.45)) and gingival (mean=2.0 (SD 0.54)) scores were recorded for 21 patients. A significant reduction compared with initial plaque index occurred using both toothbrushes (mean change=-1.26, 95% CI -1.57 to -0.95; poral health, which improved after brushing with a toothbrush or foam swab. Both interventions were equally effective at removing plaque and reducing gingival inflammation. NCT01154257; Pre-results.

  20. Effect of piston profile on performance and emission characteristics of a GDI engine with split injection strategy - A CFD study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaya, Y.; Mallikarjuna, J. M.

    2017-09-01

    Gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines have gained popularity in the recent times because of lower fuel consumption and exhaust emissions. But in these engines, the mixture preparation plays an important role which affects combustion, performance and emission characteristics. The mixture preparation in turn depends mainly upon combustion chamber geometry. Therefore, in this study, an attempt has been made to understand the effect of piston profile on the performance and emission characteristics in a GDI engine. The analysis is carried out on a four-stroke wall guided GDI engine using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The spray breakup model used is validated with the available experimental results from the literature to the extent possible. The analysis is carried out for four piston profiles viz., offset pentroof with offset bowl (OPOB), flat piston with offset bowl (FPOB), offset pentroof with offset scoop (OPOS) and inclined piston with offset bowl (IPOB) fitted in an engine equipped with a six-hole injector with the split injection ratio of 30:70. All the CFD simulations are carried out at the engine speed of 2000 rev/min., with the overall equivalence ratio of about 0.65±0.05. The performance and emission characteristics of the engine are compared while using the above piston profiles. It is found that, the OPOB piston is preferred compared to that of the other pistons because it has better in-cylinder flow, IMEP and lower HC emissions compared to that of other pistons.

  1. Split-root systems applied to the study of the legume-rhizobial symbiosis: what have we learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; Gil-Quintana, Erena; Arrese-Igor, Cesar; González, Esther M; Marino, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Split-root system (SRS) approaches allow the differential treatment of separate and independent root systems, while sharing a common aerial part. As such, SRS is a useful tool for the discrimination of systemic (shoot origin) versus local (root/nodule origin) regulation mechanisms. This type of approach is particularly useful when studying the complex regulatory mechanisms governing the symbiosis established between legumes and Rhizobium bacteria. The current work provides an overview of the main insights gained from the application of SRS approaches to understand how nodule number (nodulation autoregulation) and nitrogen fixation are controlled both under non-stressful conditions and in response to a variety of stresses. Nodule number appears to be mainly controlled at the systemic level through a signal which is produced by nodule/root tissue, translocated to the shoot, and transmitted back to the root system, involving shoot Leu-rich repeat receptor-like kinases. In contrast, both local and systemic mechanisms have been shown to operate for the regulation of nitrogenase activity in nodules. Under drought and heavy metal stress, the regulation is mostly local, whereas the application of exogenous nitrogen seems to exert a regulation of nitrogen fixation both at the local and systemic levels. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  2. Wave-Structure Interactions on Point Absorbers - an experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Morten Møller

    used in the case studies is a pitching point absorber (Wavestar). The central part of the thesis deals with the challenges, choices, and experi- ences gained during the Ph.D. The more in-depth technical details and results are presented in peer-reviewed publications and technical reports. The chal...... that combines waves and current in a meaningful way. The method needs to be inexpensive, easy to implement and reduce the turbulence without distorting the incident waves in a detrimental way....

  3. Coded Splitting Tree Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Stefanovic, Cedomir; Popovski, Petar

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to multiple access control called coded splitting tree protocol. The approach builds on the known tree splitting protocols, code structure and successive interference cancellation (SIC). Several instances of the tree splitting protocol are initiated, each...... instance is terminated prematurely and subsequently iterated. The combined set of leaves from all the tree instances can then be viewed as a graph code, which is decodable using belief propagation. The main design problem is determining the order of splitting, which enables successful decoding as early...

  4. Maslov shear-waveforms in highly anisotropic shales and implications for shear-wave splitting analyses; Formes d`onde transversales de Maslov dans les argiles fortement anisotropes et implications dans les analyses de birefringence des ondes transversales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caddick, J. [Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Kendall, J.M.; Raymer, D.G. [Western Geophysical, Middlesex (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    1998-09-01

    Shales are the most common sedimentary rocks in hydrocarbon environments often forming the source rock and trapping rock for a reservoir. Due to the platy nature of the constituent grains, shales are commonly anisotropic. In this paper we calculate seismic waveforms for highly anisotropic shales using Maslow asymptotic theory (MAT). This theory is an extension of classical ray theory which provides valid waveforms in regions of caustics (wavefront folding) where ray theory amplitudes are unstable. Asymptotic ray theory (ART) is based on the Fermat or geometrical ray which connects the source and receiver. In contrast, the Maslov solution integrates the contributions from neighbouring non-Fermat rays. Ray-paths, travel-times, amplitudes and synthetic seismograms are presented for three highly anisotropic shales using a very simple 1D model comprised of an anisotropic shale overlying an isotropic shale. The ART waveforms fail to account for complex waveform effects due to triplications. In comparison, the MAT waveforms predict nonsingular amplitudes at wavefront cusps and it predicts the diffracted signals from these cusps. A Maslov solution which integrates ray contributions over a single slowness component will break down when rays focus in 3D (at a point rather than along a line). One of the tested shales shows such a point caustic and integration over 2 slowness components is required to remove the amplitude singularity. Finally, we examine the effects of wavefront triplications on Alford rotations which are used to estimate shear-wave splitting. In such cases, the rotation successfully finds the fast shear-wave polarization, but it can be unreliable in its estimate of the time separation. (authors) 21 refs.

  5. The split hypoglossal nerve versus the cross-face nerve graft to supply the free functional muscle transfer for facial reanimation: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Tarek A; El Kholy, Mohamed S

    2018-05-01

    Long-standing cases of facial paralysis are currently treated with free functional muscle transfer. Several nerves are mentioned in the literature to supply the free muscle transfer. The aim of this study is to compare the split hypoglossal nerve and the cross-face nerve graft to supply the free functional muscle transfer in facial reanimation. Of 94 patients with long-standing, unilateral facial palsy, 49 were treated using the latissimus dorsi muscle supplied by the split hypoglossal nerve, and 45 patients were treated using the latissmus dorsi muscle supplied by healthy contralateral buccal branch of the facial nerve. The excursion gained by the free muscle transfer supplied by the split hypoglossal nerve (mean 19.20 ± 6.321) was significantly higher (P value 0.001) than that obtained by the contralateral buccal branch of the facial nerve (mean 14.59 ± 6.245). The split hypoglossal nerve appears to be a good possible option to supply the free vascularised muscle transfer in facial reanimation. It yields a stronger excursion in less time than the contralateral cross-face nerve graft. Copyright © 2018 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The role of intraoperative positioning of the inferior alveolar nerve on postoperative paresthesia after bilateral sagittal split osteotomy of the mandible: prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzelka, T; Foltán, R; Pavlíková, G; Horká, E; Sedý, J

    2011-09-01

    Bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) aims to correct congenital or acquired mandibular abnormities. Temporary or permanent neurosensory disturbance is the most frequent complication of BSSO. To evaluate the influence of IAN handling during osteotomy, the authors undertook a prospective study in 290 patients who underwent BSSO. The occurrence and duration of paresthesia was evaluated 4 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. Paresthesia developed immediately after surgery in almost half of the patients. Most cases of paresthesia resolved within 1 year after surgery. A significantly higher prevalence of paresthesia was observed on the left side. The authors found a correlation between the type of IAN position between the left and right side. The type of split (and IAN exposure) did not have a significant effect on the occurrence or duration of neurosensory disturbance of the IAN. The authors did not find a correlation between the occurrence and duration of paresthesia and the direction of BSSO. Mandibular hypoplasia or mandibular progenia did not represent a predisposition for the development of paresthesia. In the development of IAN paresthesia, the type of IAN exposure and the split is less important than the side on which the split is carried out. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. COMPARISON STUDY OF EXPERIMENTS AND PREDICTIONS OF WAVE KINEMATICS FOR ROGUE WAVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Jin Choi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the wave kinematics under the rogue wave crest, a series of experiments were performed in 2-D wave tank with the application of PIV technique to measure the velocities under the free surface. Three different prediction methods of linear extrapolation, Wheeler stretching, and modified stretching were applied to estimate water wave kinematics and compared with PIV experimental results under the highest wave crest of irregular wave trains satisfying with rogue wave criteria. Also, the cut-off frequency dependence for three prediction methods was investigated with varying spectral peak frequencies to estimate wave kinematics including velocities and accelerations in horizontal and vertical directions. It was suggested that the cut-off frequency for the reasonable prediction of the wave kinematics under the rogue wave crest could be chosen three times of spectral peak wave frequency for the linear extrapolation and higher frequency than four times of spectral peak wave frequency for Wheeler stretching and modified stretching method.

  8. Spin Splitting in Different Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Yafei

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the spin splitting in four undoped asymmetric quantum wells in the absence of external electric field and magnetic field. The quantum well geometry dependence of spin splitting is studied with the Rashba and the Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling included. The results show that the structure of quantum well plays an important role in spin splitting. The Rashba and the Dresselhaus spin splitting in four asymmetric quantum wells are quite different. The origin of the distinction is discussed in this work. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  9. Evaluation of a low-cost liquid-based Pap test in rural El Salvador: a split-sample study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jin; Cremer, Miriam; Maza, Mauricio; Alfaro, Karla; Felix, Juan C

    2014-04-01

    We sought to test the diagnostic efficacy of a low-cost, liquid-based cervical cytology that could be implemented in low-resource settings. A prospective, split-sample Pap study was performed in 595 women attending a cervical cancer screening clinic in rural El Salvador. Collected cervical samples were used to make a conventional Pap (cell sample directly to glass slide), whereas residual material was used to make the liquid-based sample using the ClearPrep method. Selected samples were tested from the residual sample of the liquid-based collection for the presence of high-risk Human papillomaviruses. Of 595 patients, 570 were interpreted with the same diagnosis between the 2 methods (95.8% agreement). There were comparable numbers of unsatisfactory cases; however, ClearPrep significantly increased detection of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and decreased the diagnoses of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance. ClearPrep identified an equivalent number of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion cases as the conventional Pap. High-risk human papillomavirus was identified in all cases of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, adenocarcinoma in situ, and cancer as well as in 78% of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions out of the residual fluid of the ClearPrep vials. The low-cost ClearPrep Pap test demonstrated equivalent detection of squamous intraepithelial lesions when compared with the conventional Pap smear and demonstrated the potential for ancillary molecular testing. The test seems a viable option for implementation in low-resource settings.

  10. VBSCan Split 2017 Workshop Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Christoph Falk; et al.

    2018-01-12

    This document summarises the talks and discussions happened during the VBSCan Split17 workshop, the first general meeting of the VBSCan COST Action network. This collaboration is aiming at a consistent and coordinated study of vector-boson scattering from the phenomenological and experimental point of view, for the best exploitation of the data that will be delivered by existing and future particle colliders.

  11. Numerical study and pilot evaluation of experimental data measured on specimen loaded by bending and wedge splitting forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Seitl

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The fracture mechanical properties of silicate based materials are determined from various fracture mechanicals tests, e.g. three- or four- point bending test, wedge splitting test, modified compact tension test etc. For evaluation of the parameters, knowledge about the calibration and compliance functions is required. Therefore, in this paper, the compliance and calibration curves for a novel test geometry based on combination of the wedge splitting test and three-point bending test are introduced. These selected variants exhibit significantly various stress state conditions at the crack tip, or, more generally, in the whole specimen ligament. The calibration and compliance curves are compared and used for evaluation of the data from pilot experimental measurement.

  12. Studies of hydromagnetic waves and oscillations in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawley, M.L.

    1980-10-01

    Small amplitude magnetoacoustic oscillations in a partially ionized, non-uniform, current carrying plasma column of finite beta are considered. The linearized magnetohydrodynamic equations are used to develop a theory describing both free and forced magnetoacoustic oscillations. The results of numerical calculations are given for the specific case of diffuse pinch equilibrium configurations. In an experimental study the amplitude of the oscillating axial magnetic flux is determined for several frequencies in the vicinity of the first magnetoacoustic resonance. Accurate determination of the plasma density profile is shown to be possible. Finite-amplitude effects on the propagation of axisymmetric hydromagnetic waves are examined. A nonlinear theory is developed which describes the second-order perturbation that accompanies the primary wave. The influence of Hall currents and the presence of neutral atoms on the second-order fields is treated. In an investigation on the propagation of torsional waves the observed second-order fields are shown to exhibit good quantitative agreement with theoretical calculations for moderate primary wave amplitudes. The re-ionization of the plasma by a torsional wave is investigated. A theoretical description is given of the nonlinear excitation of magnetoacoustic oscillations by means of an oscillating axial current

  13. Project of experimental study on plasma waves and plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, J.L.

    1990-09-01

    The objective of this project is to perform experiments with wave phenomena on plasmas. Particular attention will be given to Langmuir and whistler waves due to its relations with several phenomena occuring on space and laboratory plasmas. The new concepts of particle acceleration with electromagnetic waves, the auroral phenomena on the polar regions and the charged particle precipitation to the atmosphere through anomalies of the earth magnetic field are examples where these waves have an important role. In this project we intend to study the propagation of these waves in a quiescent plasma machine. This machine is able to produce a plasma with density and temperature with values similar to what is met in the ionosphere. This project will be a part of the activities of the basic plasma group of the INPE's Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP). It will have the collaboration of the departments of Aeronomy and Geophysics also from INPE, and the collaboration of the Plasma and Gas Physics Laboratory from University of Paris - South, in France. (author)

  14. Study of nonlinear waves described by the cubic Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walstead, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    The cubic Schroedinger equation (CSE) is ubiquitous as a model equation for the long-time evolution of finite-amplitude near-monochromatic dispersive waves. It incorporates the effects of the radiation field pressure on the constitutive properties of the supporting medium in a self-consistent manner. The properties of the uniformly transiating periodic wave solutions of the one-dimensional CSE are studied here. These (so-called cnoidal) waves are characterized by the values of four parameters. Whitham's averaged variational principle is used to derive a system of quasilinear evolution equations (the modulational equations) for the values of these parameters when they are slowly varying in space and time. Explicit expressions for the characteristic velocities of the modulational equations are obtained for the full set of cnoidal waves. Riemann invariants are obtained for several limits for the stable case, and growth rates are obtained for several limits, including the solitary wave chain, for the unstable case. The results for several nontrivial limiting cases agree with those obtained by independent methods by others. The dynamics of the CSE generalized to two spatial dimensions are studied for the unstable case. A large class of similarity solutions with cylindrical symmetry are obtained systematically using infinitesimal transformation group techniques. The methods are adapted to obtain the symmetries of the action functional of the CSE and to deduce nine integral invariants. A numerical study of the self-similar solutions reveals that they are modulationally unstable and that singularities dominate the dynamics of the CSE in two dimensions. The CSE is derived using perturbation theory for a specific problem in plasma physics: the evolution of the envelope of a near-monochromatic electromagnetic wave in a cold magnetized plasma. 13 figures, 2 tables

  15. Study of nonlinear waves described by the cubic Schroedinger equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walstead, A.E.

    1980-03-12

    The cubic Schroedinger equation (CSE) is ubiquitous as a model equation for the long-time evolution of finite-amplitude near-monochromatic dispersive waves. It incorporates the effects of the radiation field pressure on the constitutive properties of the supporting medium in a self-consistent manner. The properties of the uniformly transiating periodic wave solutions of the one-dimensional CSE are studied here. These (so-called cnoidal) waves are characterized by the values of four parameters. Whitham's averaged variational principle is used to derive a system of quasilinear evolution equations (the modulational equations) for the values of these parameters when they are slowly varying in space and time. Explicit expressions for the characteristic velocities of the modulational equations are obtained for the full set of cnoidal waves. Riemann invariants are obtained for several limits for the stable case, and growth rates are obtained for several limits, including the solitary wave chain, for the unstable case. The results for several nontrivial limiting cases agree with those obtained by independent methods by others. The dynamics of the CSE generalized to two spatial dimensions are studied for the unstable case. A large class of similarity solutions with cylindrical symmetry are obtained systematically using infinitesimal transformation group techniques. The methods are adapted to obtain the symmetries of the action functional of the CSE and to deduce nine integral invariants. A numerical study of the self-similar solutions reveals that they are modulationally unstable and that singularities dominate the dynamics of the CSE in two dimensions. The CSE is derived using perturbation theory for a specific problem in plasma physics: the evolution of the envelope of a near-monochromatic electromagnetic wave in a cold magnetized plasma. 13 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Influence of postoperative low-level laser therapy on the osseointegration of self-tapping implants in the posterior maxilla: A 6-week split-mouth clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    Mandić Borka; Lazić Zoran; Marković Aleksa; Mandić Bojan; Mandić Miška; Đinić Ana; Miličić Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been proven to stimulate bone repair, affecting cellular proliferation, differentiation and adhesion, and has shown a potential to reduce the healing time following implant placement. The aim of this clinical study was to investigate the influence of postoperative LLLT osseointegration and early success of self-tapping implants placed into low-density bone. Methods. Following the split-mouth design, self-ta...

  17. Cheating More when the Spoils Are Split

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltermuth, Scott S.

    2011-01-01

    Four experiments demonstrated that people are more likely to cheat when the benefits of doing so are split with another person, even an anonymous stranger, than when the actor alone captures all of the benefits. In three of the studies, splitting the benefits of over-reporting one's performance on a task made such over-reporting seem less…

  18. Split Scheduling with Uniform Setup Times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalekamp, F.; Sitters, R.A.; van der Ster, S.L.; Stougie, L.; Verdugo, V.; van Zuylen, A.

    2015-01-01

    We study a scheduling problem in which jobs may be split into parts, where the parts of a split job may be processed simultaneously on more than one machine. Each part of a job requires a setup time, however, on the machine where the job part is processed. During setup, a machine cannot process or

  19. Split scheduling with uniform setup times.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Schalekamp; R.A. Sitters (René); S.L. van der Ster; L. Stougie (Leen); V. Verdugo; A. van Zuylen

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractWe study a scheduling problem in which jobs may be split into parts, where the parts of a split job may be processed simultaneously on more than one machine. Each part of a job requires a setup time, however, on the machine where the job part is processed. During setup, a

  20. Cryogenic on-chip multiplexer for the study of quantum transport in 256 split-gate devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Taie, H.; Kelly, M. J.; Smith, L. W.; Xu, B.; Griffiths, J. P.; Beere, H. E.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Smith, C. G.; See, P.

    2013-01-01

    We present a multiplexing scheme for the measurement of large numbers of mesoscopic devices in cryogenic systems. The multiplexer is used to contact an array of 256 split gates on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure, in which each split gate can be measured individually. The low-temperature conductance of split-gate devices is governed by quantum mechanics, leading to the appearance of conductance plateaux at intervals of 2e 2 /h. A fabrication-limited yield of 94% is achieved for the array, and a “quantum yield” is also defined, to account for disorder affecting the quantum behaviour of the devices. The quantum yield rose from 55% to 86% after illuminating the sample, explained by the corresponding increase in carrier density and mobility of the two-dimensional electron gas. The multiplexer is a scalable architecture, and can be extended to other forms of mesoscopic devices. It overcomes previous limits on the number of devices that can be fabricated on a single chip due to the number of electrical contacts available, without the need to alter existing experimental set ups

  1. Continuing studies of the plasma beat wave accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, C.

    1990-01-01

    This is a proposal for the release of third year funds for the ''Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator'' program (PBWA) at UCLA under the direction of Professor C. Joshi. This report is also a summary of progress on this project since March 1990; i.e., the date of the last report to the DOE. Once again we note that although the program is for historical reasons called the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator Program, our group is active in all areas of applications of lasers and plasmas in future high energy accelerators. These are as follows: heat gradient plasma structures; excited by plasma beat wave technique; laser wake field technique; and plasma wake field technique. Development of a photoinjector-driven, 20 MeV linac; and theoretical studies of the plasma lens and use of plasmas at the final focus

  2. Market Structure and Stock Splits

    OpenAIRE

    David Michayluk; Paul Kofman

    2001-01-01

    Enhanced liquidity is one possible motivation for stock splits but empirical research frequently documents declines in liquidity following stock splits. Despite almost thirty years of inquiry, little is known about all the changes in a stock's trading activity following a stock split. We examine how liquidity measures change around more than 2,500 stock splits and find a pervasive decline in most measures. Large stock splits exhibit a more severe liquidity decline than small stock splits, esp...

  3. Report on feasibility study of the Clam Wave Energy Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    The main emphasis of the feasibility study has been towards producing an acceptable spine design for the Clam wave energy converter. Concrete and steel designs based on a mathematical model of the waveloading have been produced. Progress is also reported in the design of a bellows for a low-pressure air power transmission system. A narrow wave tank and scale model have been constructed in order to carry out a test programme on various aspects of the device's construction and performance.

  4. Concentric Split Flow Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A concentric split flow filter may be configured to remove odor and/or bacteria from pumped air used to collect urine and fecal waste products. For instance, filter may be designed to effectively fill the volume that was previously considered wasted surrounding the transport tube of a waste management system. The concentric split flow filter may be configured to split the air flow, with substantially half of the air flow to be treated traveling through a first bed of filter media and substantially the other half of the air flow to be treated traveling through the second bed of filter media. This split flow design reduces the air velocity by 50%. In this way, the pressure drop of filter may be reduced by as much as a factor of 4 as compare to the conventional design.

  5. Experimental study on a wide range of wave and current conditions of the WEPTOS Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecher, Arthur; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    This report presents the results of an experimental study that was performed on small scale model that was a replication of the full-scale Weptos WEC intended for DanWEC. The tests were performed in the circular basin at FloWave at Edinburgh University in October 2014. The laboratory facilities h...... the capabilities to have simultaneously currents and waves from any possible direction and also to produce advanced wave specifications....

  6. Comparison Spatial Pattern of Land Surface Temperature with Mono Window Algorithm and Split Window Algorithm: A Case Study in South Tangerang, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunai, Tasya; Rokhmatuloh; Wibowo, Adi

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, two methods to retrieve the Land Surface Temperature (LST) from thermal infrared data supplied by band 10 and 11 of the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) onboard the Landsat 8 is compared. The first is mono window algorithm developed by Qin et al. and the second is split window algorithm by Rozenstein et al. The purpose of this study is to perform the spatial distribution of land surface temperature, as well as to determine more accurate algorithm for retrieving land surface temperature by calculated root mean square error (RMSE). Finally, we present comparison the spatial distribution of land surface temperature by both of algorithm, and more accurate algorithm is split window algorithm refers to the root mean square error (RMSE) is 7.69° C.

  7. Experimental Study on a Rotor for WEPTOS Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecher, Arthur; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Marchalot, Tanguy

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the power conversion capabilities of one single rotor of the WEPTOS wave energy converter. The investigation focuses mainly on defining the optimal weight distribution in the rotor in order to improve the hydraulic performance through...

  8. Beat-wave accelerator studies at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The study carried out in 1982-83 at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory to examine how one might use the beat-wave principle to construct a useful high energy accelerator is reviewed, and comments are made on later developments. A number of problems are evident to which solutions cannot at present be foreseen. (author)

  9. Exploratory laser-driven shock wave studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solem, J.C.; Veeser, L.R.

    1977-11-01

    We show the results of a feasibility study for investigating shock structure and for measuring equation-of-state parameters using high-energy, short-pulse lasers. We discuss the temporal and spatial structure of the luminosity from laser-driven shock unloading in aluminum foils. We demonstrate that shock velocity can be measured by observing the time interval between shock emergence across two thicknesses and show data for shocks of 1.3 and 2.1 Mbar. The fact that we observe shock fronts cleanly breaking through steps as small as 3 μm indicates that the shock front thickness is very small in the few megabar region; this is the first experimental verification that these fronts are not more than a few micrometers thick. We present approximate measurements of free-surface velocity. Finally, we speculate on the use of these techniques to obtain detailed equation-of-state data

  10. Split Malcev algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    project of the Spanish Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia MTM2007-60333. References. [1] Calderón A J, On split Lie algebras with symmetric root systems, Proc. Indian. Acad. Sci (Math. Sci.) 118(2008) 351–356. [2] Calderón A J, On split Lie triple systems, Proc. Indian. Acad. Sci (Math. Sci.) 119(2009). 165–177.

  11. Stochastic split determinant algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvatha, Ivan

    2000-01-01

    I propose a large class of stochastic Markov processes associated with probability distributions analogous to that of lattice gauge theory with dynamical fermions. The construction incorporates the idea of approximate spectral split of the determinant through local loop action, and the idea of treating the infrared part of the split through explicit diagonalizations. I suggest that exact algorithms of practical relevance might be based on Markov processes so constructed

  12. Assessment of Temperature Rise and Time of Alveolar Ridge Splitting by Means of Er:YAG Laser, Piezosurgery, and Surgical Saw: An Ex Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matys, Jacek; Flieger, Rafał; Dominiak, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    The most common adverse effect after bone cutting is a thermal damage. The aim of our study was to evaluate the bone temperature rise during an alveolar ridge splitting, rating the time needed to perform this procedure and the time to raise the temperature of a bone by 10°C, as well as to evaluate the bone carbonization occurrence. The research included 60 mandibles ( n = 60) of adult pigs, divided into 4 groups ( n = 15). Two vertical and one horizontal cut have been done in an alveolar ridge using Er:YAG laser with set power of 200 mJ (G1), 400 mJ (G2), piezosurgery unit (G3), and a saw (G4). The temperature was measured by K-type thermocouple. The highest temperature gradient was noted for piezosurgery on the buccal and lingual side of mandible. The temperature rises on the bone surface along with the increase of laser power. The lower time needed to perform ridge splitting was measured for a saw, piezosurgery, and Er:YAG laser with power of 400 mJ and 200 mJ, respectively. The temperature rise measured on the bone over 10°C and bone carbonization occurrence was not reported in all study groups. Piezosurgery, Er:YAG laser (200 mJ and 400 mJ), and surgical saw are useful and safe tools in ridge splitting surgery.

  13. Assessment of Temperature Rise and Time of Alveolar Ridge Splitting by Means of Er:YAG Laser, Piezosurgery, and Surgical Saw: An Ex Vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Matys

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common adverse effect after bone cutting is a thermal damage. The aim of our study was to evaluate the bone temperature rise during an alveolar ridge splitting, rating the time needed to perform this procedure and the time to raise the temperature of a bone by 10°C, as well as to evaluate the bone carbonization occurrence. The research included 60 mandibles (n=60 of adult pigs, divided into 4 groups (n=15. Two vertical and one horizontal cut have been done in an alveolar ridge using Er:YAG laser with set power of 200 mJ (G1, 400 mJ (G2, piezosurgery unit (G3, and a saw (G4. The temperature was measured by K-type thermocouple. The highest temperature gradient was noted for piezosurgery on the buccal and lingual side of mandible. The temperature rises on the bone surface along with the increase of laser power. The lower time needed to perform ridge splitting was measured for a saw, piezosurgery, and Er:YAG laser with power of 400 mJ and 200 mJ, respectively. The temperature rise measured on the bone over 10°C and bone carbonization occurrence was not reported in all study groups. Piezosurgery, Er:YAG laser (200 mJ and 400 mJ, and surgical saw are useful and safe tools in ridge splitting surgery.

  14. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: A Modeling Sensitivity Study in Monterey Bay CA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Grace Chang; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

    2014-08-01

    A n indust ry standard wave modeling tool was utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters and wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deploym ent scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that b oth wave height and near - bottom orbital velocity we re subject to the largest pote ntial variations, each decreas ed in sensitivity as transmission coefficient increase d , as number and spacing of WEC devices decrease d , and as the deployment location move d offshore. Wave direction wa s affected consistently for all parameters and wave perio d was not affected (or negligibly affected) by varying model parameters or WEC configuration .

  15. Study of a Novel Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tom, Nathan M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Choiniere, Michael [University of Maine; Thiagarajan, Krish P. [University of Maine

    2017-08-01

    This study investigates the performance of an oscillating surge wave energy converter (OSWEC) that utilizes adjustable geometry as a means of controlling the hydrodynamic coefficients, a concept originally proposed by [1]. The body of the device consists of a bottom-hinged solid rectangular frame with five horizontal flaps spanning the interior of the frame. The flaps can rotate independently about their center of rotation within the frame like a large window shutter. Changing the orientation of the flaps alters the hydrodynamic coefficients and natural frequency of the device as well as the ability to shed or absorb structural loads accordingly. This ability may allow the device to operate in a wider range of sea states than other current wave energy converter designs. This paper presents and compares the results of numerical simulations and experimental testing of the OSWEC's response to regular waves with all five of the horizontal fin configurations sharing the same orientation of 0 degrees (fully closed interior) and 90 degrees (fully open). The numerical simulations were performed using WAMIT, which calculates hydrodynamic coefficients using a boundary element method code to solve the linear potential flow problem, and WEC-Sim, a MATLAB-based tool that simulates multibody devices in the time domain by solving the governing equations of motion. A 1:14 scale model of the device was built for experimental evaluation in an 8-m-long, 1-m wide wave tank, which supports a water depth of 0.7 m. The OSWEC motion in different wave conditions was measured with displacement sensors while nonlinear wave-structure interaction effects like slamming and overtopping were captured using a high-speed camera and used to understand differences between the simulation and experiments.

  16. Quantitative analysis on electric dipole energy in Rashba band splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jisook; Rhim, Jun-Won; Kim, Changyoung; Ryong Park, Seung; Hoon Shim, Ji

    2015-09-01

    We report on quantitative comparison between the electric dipole energy and the Rashba band splitting in model systems of Bi and Sb triangular monolayers under a perpendicular electric field. We used both first-principles and tight binding calculations on p-orbitals with spin-orbit coupling. First-principles calculation shows Rashba band splitting in both systems. It also shows asymmetric charge distributions in the Rashba split bands which are induced by the orbital angular momentum. We calculated the electric dipole energies from coupling of the asymmetric charge distribution and external electric field, and compared it to the Rashba splitting. Remarkably, the total split energy is found to come mostly from the difference in the electric dipole energy for both Bi and Sb systems. A perturbative approach for long wave length limit starting from tight binding calculation also supports that the Rashba band splitting originates mostly from the electric dipole energy difference in the strong atomic spin-orbit coupling regime.

  17. Remote pipeline assessment and condition monitoring using low-frequency axisymmetric waves: a theoretical study of torsional wave motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggleton, J. M.; Rustighi, E.; Gao, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Waves that propagate at low frequencies in buried pipes are of considerable interest in a variety of practical scenarios, for example leak detection, remote pipe detection, and pipeline condition assessment and monitoring. Particularly useful are the n = 0, or axisymmetric, modes in which there is no displacement (or pressure) variation over the pipe cross section. Previous work has focused on two of the three axisymmetric wavetypes that can propagate: the s = 1, fluid- dominated wave; and the s = 2, shell-dominated wave. In this paper, the third axisymmetric wavetype, the s = 0 torsional wave, is studied. Whilst there is a large body of research devoted to the study of torsional waves and their use for defect detection in pipes at ultrasonic frequencies, little is known about their behaviour and possible exploitation at lower frequencies. Here, a low- frequency analytical dispersion relationship is derived for the torsional wavenumber for a buried pipe from which both the wavespeed and wave attenuation can be obtained. How the torsional waves subsequently radiate to the ground surface is then investigated, with analytical expressions being presented for the ground surface displacement above the pipe resulting from torsional wave motion within the pipe wall. Example results are presented and, finally, how such waves might be exploited in practice is discussed.

  18. A Shandon PapSpin liquid-based gynecological test: A split-sample and direct-to-vial test with histology follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimiene J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies for liquid-based Papanicolaou (Pap tests reveal that liquid-based cytology (LBC is a safe and effective alternative to the conventional Pap smear. Although there is research on ThinPrep and SurePath systems, information is lacking to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of systems based on cytocentrifugation. This study is designed to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the Shandon PapSpin (ThermoShandon, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA liquid-based gynecological system. We used split-sample and direct-to-vial study design. Materials and Methods: 2,945 women referred to prophylactic check-up were enrolled in this study. Split sample design was used in 1,500 women and residual cervical cytology specimen from all these cases was placed in fluid for PapSpin preparation after performing conventional smear. The direct-to-vial study was carried out in another cohort of 1,445 women in whom the entire cervical material was investigated using only the PapSpin technique. Follow up histological diagnoses for 141 women were obtained from both study arms following 189 abnormal cytology cases. 80 LBC cases from the split sample group and 61 LBC cases in the direct-to-vial group were correlated with the histology results. The sensitivity and secificity of the conventional smear and PapSpin tests in both study arms were compared. Results: In the split sample group, conventional smears showed a higher proportion of ASC-US (atypical cells undetermined significance: 31 (2.1% vs 10 (0.7% in PapSpin (P = 0.001. A higher proportion of unsatisfactory samples was found in the conventional smear group: 25 (1.7% vs 6 (0.4% cases (P = 0.001. In the split sample group, the sensitivity of the conventional and PapSpin tests was 68.7% vs 78.1%, and the specificity 93.8% vs 91.8%, respectively. In the direct to vial group PapSpin sensitivity was 75.9% and specificity 96.5%. The differences in sensitivity and specificity were not significant. The

  19. A Regularized Algorithm for the Proximal Split Feasibility Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhangsong Yao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The proximal split feasibility problem has been studied. A regularized method has been presented for solving the proximal split feasibility problem. Strong convergence theorem is given.

  20. Multi-band circular polarizer based on a twisted triple split-ring resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Song; Huang Xiao-Jun; Yang He-Lin; Xiao Bo-Xun; Jin Yan

    2014-01-01

    A multi-band circular polarizer using a twisted triple split-ring resonator (TSRR) is presented and studied numerically and experimentally. At four distinct resonant frequencies, the incident linearly polarized wave can be transformed into left/right-handed circularly polarized waves. Numerical simulation results show that a y-polarized wave can be converted into a right-handed circularly polarized wave at 5.738 GHz and 9.218 GHz, while a left-handed circularly polarized wave is produced at 7.292 GHz and 10.118 GHz. The experimental results are in agreement with the numerical results. The surface current distributions are investigated to illustrate the polarization transformation mechanism. Furthermore, the influences of the structure parameters of the circular polarizer on transmission spectra are discussed as well. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  1. A Wave Glider for Studies of Biofouling and Ocean Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-07

    Report: A Wave Glider for Studies of Biofouling and Ocean Productivity The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the...Biofouling and Ocean Productivity Report Term: 0-Other Email: john.breier@utrgv.edu Distribution Statement: 1-Approved for public release; distribution is...sensors, and engineered test surfaces was procured to study controls on ocean productivity , plankton distribution, larval settling, and biofouling. We

  2. Study of elastic waves with a camouflage explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunin, S.Z.; Nagornov, O.V.; Popov, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    Examination is made of the problem concerning the study of elastic waves with an explosion in a porous medium with consideration given to the effect of dilation. Investigation is made of the character of the study of elastic energy at various moments. An analysis is made of the spectral properties of the investigated seismic signal, the effect of strong parameters of the medium, porosity, and the coefficient of dilation on the magnitude of elastic energy, which is emitted during an explosion.

  3. Experimental study on the wave loads on a rotor of the WEPTOS Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecher, Arthur; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    Experimental tests have been performed to investigate the wave load on the rotor in design wave conditions. These wave loads should give an indication of the required structural strength around the rotors as well as for other equipment such as the bearings. During the lab tests, the wave loads have...... been measured for the following configurations: • Head and beam seas (wave coming from the front and the side) • For three different submergence levels • For three different dispositions of the rotor (free to rotate, and fixed at 50° and 90°) Based on this results, an estimation of the maximum wave...... loads has been made on the maximum wave loads at the DanWEC test site....

  4. Computational study on full-wave inversion based on the acoustic wave-equation; Onkyoha hado hoteishiki full wave inversion no model keisan ni yoru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T; Sassa, K [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Uesaka, S [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    The effect of initial models on full-wave inversion (FWI) analysis based on acoustic wave-equation was studied for elastic wave tomography of underground structures. At present, travel time inversion using initial motion travel time is generally used, and inverse analysis is conducted using the concept `ray,` assuming very high wave frequency. Although this method can derive stable solutions relatively unaffected by initial model, it uses only the data of initial motion travel time. FWI calculates theoretical waveform at each receiver using all of observed waveforms as data by wave equation modeling where 2-D underground structure is calculated by difference calculus under the assumption that wave propagation is described by wave equation of P wave. Although it is a weak point that FWI is easily affected by noises in an initial model and data, it is featured by high resolution of solutions. This method offers very excellent convergence as a proper initial model is used, resulting in sufficient performance, however, it is strongly affected by initial model. 2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Quiescent plasma machine for beam-plasma interaction and wave studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    A quiescent double plasma machine for beam-plasma interaction wave studies is described. A detailed description of several plasma diagnostics used for plasma and wave excitation detection is given. A beam-plasma wave dispersion relation is used to compare theoretical values with the experimentally measured Langmuir wave frequencies and wavelengths. (author). 14 refs, 10 figs

  6. Assimilation of radar altimeter data in numerical wave models: an impact study in two different wave climate regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Emmanouil

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available An operational assimilation system incorporating significant wave height observations in high resolution numerical wave models is studied and evaluated. In particular, altimeter satellite data provided by the European Space Agency (ESA-ENVISAT are assimilated in the wave model WAM which operates in two different wave climate areas: the Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean. The first is a wind-sea dominated area while in the second, swell is the principal part of the sea state, a fact that seriously affects the performance of the assimilation scheme. A detailed study of the different impact is presented and the resulting forecasts are evaluated against available buoy and satellite observations. The corresponding results show a considerable improvement in wave forecasting for the Indian Ocean while in the Mediterranean Sea the assimilation impact is restricted to isolated areas.

  7. Experimental Study of Irregular Waves on a Gravel Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Nai-Ren; Wu, Yun-Ta; Hwung, Hwung-Hweng; Yang, Ray-Yeng

    2017-04-01

    In the east coast of Taiwan, the sort grain size more belongs to cobble or gravel, which is physically distinct compared to the sandy beach in the west coast of Taiwan. Although gravel beaches can dissipate more of wave energy, gravel beaches were eroded and coastal road were damaged especially during typhoons. The purpose of this study is to investigate the geomorphological response of gravel beach due to irregular waves. This experiment was carry out in a 21m long, 50 cm wide, 70 cm high wave tank at Tainan Hydraulics Laboratory, National Cheng-Kung University, Taiwan. To simulate of the geometry in the east coast of Taiwan, a physical model with 1/36 scale-down was used, in which the seawall was 10cm built upon a 1:10 slope and gravel grains with D50 being 3.87 mm was nourished in front of the seawall. In terms of typhoon-scale wave condition, irregular waves with scale-down conditions were generated for 600 s for each scenarios and, three different water levels with respect to the gravel beach are designed. Application of laser combined with image processing to produce 3D topographic map, the erosion zone and accretion zone would be found. The resulting morphological change of gravel beach will be measured using an integrated laser and image processing tool to have 3D topographic maps. It is expected to have more understanding about under what conditions the gravel coasts suffer the least damage. In particular, the relation between erosion rates of gravel beach, the angle of gravel slope and the length of the plane on the gravel slope will be achieved

  8. Mathematical preliminaries for a study of waves in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trocheris, M.

    1965-01-01

    This report contains the detailed proofs of mathematical results which are used in a study of the linear and 'quasi-linear' approximation for 'electrostatic' waves in a uniform plasma. Certain classes of functions of a complex variable, which are analytic in a strip parallel to the real axis, are defined and studied. In particular, properties of convergence of a sequence and of continuity with respect to a parameter are established for functions remaining inside one such class. The results are used to prove an existence theorem for the simplest equation in the quasi-linear theory of plasma waves. A number of elementary lemmas are used in the text and proved in an appendix. (author) [fr

  9. Advanced split-illumination electron holography without Fresnel fringes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki, E-mail: tanigaki-toshiaki@riken.jp [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Aizawa, Shinji; Park, Hyun Soon [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Matsuda, Tsuyoshi [Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Harada, Ken [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan); Shindo, Daisuke [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-02-01

    Advanced split-illumination electron holography was developed by employing two biprisms in the illuminating system to split an electron wave into two coherent waves and two biprisms in the imaging system to overlap them. A focused image of an upper condenser-biprism filament was formed on the sample plane, and all other filaments were placed in its shadow. This developed system makes it possible to obtain precise reconstructed object waves without modulations due to Fresnel fringes, in addition to holograms of distant objects from reference waves. - Highlights: • Advanced split-illumination electron holography without Fresnel fringes is developed. • Two biprisms are installed in illuminating system of microscope. • High-precision holographic observations of an area locating far from the sample edge become possible.

  10. Advanced split-illumination electron holography without Fresnel fringes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Aizawa, Shinji; Park, Hyun Soon; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Harada, Ken; Shindo, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Advanced split-illumination electron holography was developed by employing two biprisms in the illuminating system to split an electron wave into two coherent waves and two biprisms in the imaging system to overlap them. A focused image of an upper condenser-biprism filament was formed on the sample plane, and all other filaments were placed in its shadow. This developed system makes it possible to obtain precise reconstructed object waves without modulations due to Fresnel fringes, in addition to holograms of distant objects from reference waves. - Highlights: • Advanced split-illumination electron holography without Fresnel fringes is developed. • Two biprisms are installed in illuminating system of microscope. • High-precision holographic observations of an area locating far from the sample edge become possible

  11. A numerical study of the wave shoaling effect on wind-wave momentum flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xuanting; Shen, Lian

    2017-11-01

    Momentum transfer between wind and waves is crucial to many physical processes in air-sea interactions. For decades, there has been a number of observational evidence that the surface roughness in the nearshore region is notably higher than in the open sea. In order to explain the mechanism behind this important phenomenon, in particular the wave shoaling effect on surface roughness, we conduct a series of numerical experiments using the wind-wave module of WOW (Wave-Ocean-Wind), a high-fidelity computational framework developed in house. We use prescribed monochromatic waves with linear shoaling effect incorporated, while the wind field is simulated using wall-resolved large-eddy simulation. A comparison between a shallow water wave case and deep water wave cases shows remarkably stronger wave effects on the wind for the former. Detailed analyses show that the increased surface roughness is closely associated with the increased form drag that is mainly due to the reduced wave age in wave shoaling.

  12. Success rate of split-thickness skin grafting of chronic venous leg ulcers depends on the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a retrospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgsberg, Trine; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Thomsen, Jens Schiersing

    2011-01-01

    that once chronic venous leg ulcers were colonized (weeks or months preoperatively) by P. aeruginosa, the success rate of skin grafting deteriorated despite aggressive treatment. To investigate this, a retrospective study was performed on the clinical outcome of 82 consecutive patients with chronic venous...... regression analysis was carried out leaving P. aeruginosa as the only predictor left in the model (p¿=¿0.001). This study supports our hypothesis that P. aeruginosa in chronic venous leg ulcers, despite treatment, has considerable impact on partial take or rejection of split-thickness skin grafts....

  13. Theoretical study on the first kind of density wave instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuying, Gao; Jincai, Li; Baocheng, Xu; Zuoyi, Zhang; Cheng, Gao [Institute of Nuclear Energy and Technology, Tsingua Univ., Beijing (China)

    1997-09-01

    The present paper summarizes the theoretical studies carried out by INET (Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology) of Tsinghua University on the first kind of density wave instabilities (DWIs) of natural circulation systems. The analysis methods of DWI and mathematical models of drift flux are presented. Based on the general excess entropy production criterion of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, an energy principle of DWI is established. (author). 10 refs, 16 figs.

  14. An algorithm for the split-feasibility problems with application to the split-equality problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chih-Sheng; Chen, Chi-Ming

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we study the split-feasibility problem in Hilbert spaces by using the projected reflected gradient algorithm. As applications, we study the convex linear inverse problem and the split-equality problem in Hilbert spaces, and we give new algorithms for these problems. Finally, numerical results are given for our main results.

  15. Splitting Ward identity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, Mahmoud [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Within the background-field framework we present a path integral derivation of the splitting Ward identity for the one-particle irreducible effective action in the presence of an infrared regulator, and make connection with earlier works on the subject. The approach is general in the sense that it does not rely on how the splitting is performed. This identity is then used to address the problem of background dependence of the effective action at an arbitrary energy scale. We next introduce the modified master equation and emphasize its role in constraining the effective action. Finally, application to general gauge theories within the geometric approach is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Splitting Ward identity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safari, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Within the background-field framework we present a path integral derivation of the splitting Ward identity for the one-particle irreducible effective action in the presence of an infrared regulator, and make connection with earlier works on the subject. The approach is general in the sense that it does not rely on how the splitting is performed. This identity is then used to address the problem of background dependence of the effective action at an arbitrary energy scale. We next introduce the modified master equation and emphasize its role in constraining the effective action. Finally, application to general gauge theories within the geometric approach is discussed. (orig.)

  17. Experimental study of blockage of monochromatic waves by counter currents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suastika, I.K.

    1999-01-01

    Blockage of waves by a current can occur if waves are propagating on a spatially varying opposing current in which the velocity is increasing in the wave propagation direction. The ongoing waves become shorter and steeper while they are propagating against the current. Blocking occurs at the

  18. Study of Ion Acoustic Wave Damping through Green's Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsuan, H.C.S.; Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1973-01-01

    Green's function analyses of ion acoustic waves in streaming plasmas show that, in general, the waves damp algebraically rather than exponentially with distance from exciter.......Green's function analyses of ion acoustic waves in streaming plasmas show that, in general, the waves damp algebraically rather than exponentially with distance from exciter....

  19. On the additive splitting procedures and their computer realization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farago, I.; Thomsen, Per Grove; Zlatev, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Two additive splitting procedures are defined and studied in this paper. It is shown that these splitting procedures have good stability properties. Some other splitting procedures, which are traditionally used in mathematical models used in many scientific and engineering fields, are sketched. All...

  20. Study on evaluation methods for Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, L.; Tao, X.; Kayen, R.; Shi, H.; Yan, S.

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation of Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic is the key step for detecting S-wave velocity structure. By comparing the dispersion curves directly with the spectra analysis of surface waves (SASW) method, rather than comparing the S-wave velocity structure, the validity and precision of microtremor-array method (MAM) can be evaluated more objectively. The results from the China - US joint surface wave investigation in 26 sites in Tangshan, China, show that the MAM has the same precision with SASW method in 83% of the 26 sites. The MAM is valid for Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic testing and has great application potentiality for site S-wave velocity structure detection.

  1. Baryons electromagnetic mass splittings in potential models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genovese, M.; Richard, J.-M.; Silvestre-Brac, B.; Varga, K.

    1998-01-01

    We study electromagnetic mass splittings of charmed baryons. We point out discrepancies among theoretical predictions in non-relativistic potential models; none of these predictions seems supported by experimental data. A new calculation is presented

  2. The Splitting Loope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Jesse L. M.; Norton, Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Teaching experiments have generated several hypotheses concerning the construction of fraction schemes and operations and relationships among them. In particular, researchers have hypothesized that children's construction of splitting operations is crucial to their construction of more advanced fractions concepts (Steffe, 2002). The authors…

  3. The Splitting Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Anderson; Wilkins, Jesse L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Piagetian theory describes mathematical development as the construction and organization of mental operations within psychological structures. Research on student learning has identified the vital roles of two particular operations--splitting and units coordination--play in students' development of advanced fractions knowledge. Whereas Steffe and…

  4. Communication: Tunnelling splitting in the phosphine molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Silva, Clara; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergey N.

    2016-09-01

    Splitting due to tunnelling via the potential energy barrier has played a significant role in the study of molecular spectra since the early days of spectroscopy. The observation of the ammonia doublet led to attempts to find a phosphine analogous, but these have so far failed due to its considerably higher barrier. Full dimensional, variational nuclear motion calculations are used to predict splittings as a function of excitation energy. Simulated spectra suggest that such splittings should be observable in the near infrared via overtones of the ν2 bending mode starting with 4ν2.

  5. Communication: Tunnelling splitting in the phosphine molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa-Silva, Clara; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergey N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-07

    Splitting due to tunnelling via the potential energy barrier has played a significant role in the study of molecular spectra since the early days of spectroscopy. The observation of the ammonia doublet led to attempts to find a phosphine analogous, but these have so far failed due to its considerably higher barrier. Full dimensional, variational nuclear motion calculations are used to predict splittings as a function of excitation energy. Simulated spectra suggest that such splittings should be observable in the near infrared via overtones of the ν{sub 2} bending mode starting with 4ν{sub 2}.

  6. Revisiting the thermal effect on shock wave propagation in weakly ionized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Qianhong; Dong, Zhiwei; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Many researchers have investigated shock propagation in weakly ionized plasmas and observed the following anomalous effects: shock acceleration, shock recovery, shock weakening, shock spreading, and splitting. It was generally accepted that the thermal effect can explain most of the experimental results. However, little attention was paid to the shock recovery. In this paper, the shock wave propagation in weakly ionized plasmas is studied by fluid simulation. It is found that the shock acceleration, weakening, and splitting appear after it enters the plasma (thermal) region. The shock splits into two parts right after it leaves the thermal region. The distance between the splitted shocks keeps decreasing until they recover to one. This paper can explain a whole set of features of the shock wave propagation in weakly ionized plasmas. It is also found that both the shock curvature and the splitting present the same photoacoustic deflection (PAD) signals, so they cannot be distinguished by the PAD experiments.

  7. Optimal preparation-to-colonoscopy interval in split-dose PEG bowel preparation determines satisfactory bowel preparation quality: an observational prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Eun Hee; Kim, Tae Oh; Park, Min Jae; Joo, Hee Rin; Heo, Nae Yun; Park, Jongha; Park, Seung Ha; Yang, Sung Yeon; Moon, Young Soo

    2012-03-01

    Several factors influence bowel preparation quality. Recent studies have indicated that the time interval between bowel preparation and the start of colonoscopy is also important in determining bowel preparation quality. To evaluate the influence of the preparation-to-colonoscopy (PC) interval (the interval of time between the last polyethylene glycol dose ingestion and the start of the colonoscopy) on bowel preparation quality in the split-dose method for colonoscopy. Prospective observational study. University medical center. A total of 366 consecutive outpatients undergoing colonoscopy. Split-dose bowel preparation and colonoscopy. The quality of bowel preparation was assessed by using the Ottawa Bowel Preparation Scale according to the PC interval, and other factors that might influence bowel preparation quality were analyzed. Colonoscopies with a PC interval of 3 to 5 hours had the best bowel preparation quality score in the whole, right, mid, and rectosigmoid colon according to the Ottawa Bowel Preparation Scale. In multivariate analysis, the PC interval (odds ratio [OR] 1.85; 95% CI, 1.18-2.86), the amount of PEG ingested (OR 4.34; 95% CI, 1.08-16.66), and compliance with diet instructions (OR 2.22l 95% CI, 1.33-3.70) were significant contributors to satisfactory bowel preparation. Nonrandomized controlled, single-center trial. The optimal time interval between the last dose of the agent and the start of colonoscopy is one of the important factors to determine satisfactory bowel preparation quality in split-dose polyethylene glycol bowel preparation. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimental study of the fast wave propagation in TFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    Several experiments (PLT, DIVA, ERASMUS, TFR) have shown that the heating mechanism of ICRF is dominated in Tokamaks by the presence of the ion-ion hybrid layer. The first experimental evidence of this effect came from propagation studies: a very strong damping was observed on magnetic probes since the hybrid layer was inside the plasma. Comparison with simple models which do not take into account boundary conditions have been undertaken. Recently a new theoretical model has been developped. Based on a plane, inhomogeneous, bounded plasma, it shows that the radial structure of the fast wave and hence the loading impedance of the launching coil depends on the position of the hybrid layer with respect to the plasma boundaries. This result is obtained by solving the wave equation, in the cold plasma approximation. We present here, a serie of experiments, performed in TFR. It confirms the validity of that model underlining thus the importance of radial eigenmodes, when the wave conversion layer is inside the plasma

  9. Wave study of compound eyes for efficient infrared detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, Takiyettin Oytun; Hayran, Zeki; Kocer, Hasan; Kurt, Hamza

    2017-08-01

    Improving sensitivity in the infrared spectrum is a challenging task. Detecting infrared light over a wide bandwidth and at low power consumption is very important. Novel solutions can be acquired by mimicking biological eyes such as compound eye with many individual lenses inspired from the nature. The nature provides many ingenious approaches of sensing and detecting the surrounding environment. Even though compound eye consists of small optical units, it can detect wide-angle electromagnetic waves and it has high transmission and low reflection loss. Insects have eyes that are superior compared to human eyes (single-aperture eyes) in terms of compactness, robustness, wider field of view, higher sensitivity of light intensity and being cheap vision systems. All these desired properties are accompanied by an important drawback: lower spatial resolution. The first step to investigate the feasibility of bio-inspired optics in photodetectors is to perform light interaction with the optical system that gather light and detect it. The most common method used in natural vision systems is the ray analysis. Light wave characteristics are not taken into consideration in such analyses, such as the amount of energy at the focal point or photoreceptor site, the losses caused by reflection at the interfaces and absorption cannot be investigated. In this study, we present a bio-inspired optical detection system investigated by wave analysis. We numerically model the wave analysis based on Maxwell equations from the viewpoint of efficient light detection and revealing the light propagation after intercepting the first interface of the eye towards the photoreceptor site.

  10. Mort Rainey's Split Personality in Secret Window

    OpenAIRE

    Sandjaya, Cynthya; Limanta, Liem Satya

    2013-01-01

    Psychological issue is the main issue discussed in David Koepp's Secret Window through its main character, Mort Rainey. Rainey's psychological struggle will be the main theme in this research. This thesis examines Rainey's split personality. Furthermore, in this study, we want to analyze the process of how Mort Rainey's personality splits into two different personalities. To meet the answer of this study, we will use the theory of Dissociative Identity Disorder with a support from Sigmund Fre...

  11. Study on Rayleigh Wave Inversion for Estimating Shear-wave Velocity Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Sanny

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Rayleigh wave or ground roll is a noise in seismic body waves. However, how to use this noise for soil characterization is very interesting since Rayleigh wave phase velocity is a function of compression-wave velocity, shear-wave velocity, density and layer thickness. In layered-medium Rayleigh wave velocity also depends on wavelength or frequency, and this phenomenon is called dispersion. Inversion procedure to get shear-wave velocity profile needs a priori information about the solution of the problem to limit the unknown parameters. The Lagrange multiplier method was used to solve the constrained optimization problems or well known as a smoothing parameter in inversion problems. The advantage of our inversion procedure is that it can guarantee the convergence of solution even though the field data is incomplete, insufficient, and inconsistent. The addition of smoothing parameter can reduce the time to converge. Beside numerical stability, the statistical stability is also involved in inversion procedure. In field experiment we extracted ground roll data from seismic refraction record. The dispersion curves had been constructed by applying f-k analysis and f-k dip filtering. The dispersion curves show the dependence of Rayleigh wave phase velocities in layered media to frequency. The synthetic models also demonstrate the stability and the speed of inversion procedure.

  12. CFD study of the overtopping discharge of the Wave Dragon wave energy converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskilsson, K.; Palm, J.; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2015-01-01

    incompressible Euler/Navier-Stokes solver in the OpenFOAM® framework. We present simulations of: (i) a complete sea state for different crest heights, and (ii) regular waves for different wave conditions and crest heights. The simulations compare reasonably well with the experimental data, albeit the irregular...

  13. Steering elastic SH waves in an anomalous way by metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liyun; Yang, Zhichun; Xu, Yanlong

    2018-03-01

    Metasurface, which does not exist in nature, has exhibited exotic essence on the manipulation of both electromagnetic and acoustic waves. In this paper, the concept of metasurface is extended to the field of elastic SH waves, and the anomalous refractions of SH waves across the designed elastic SH wave metasurfaces (SHWMs) are demonstrated numerically. Firstly, a SHWM is designed with supercells, each supercell is composed of four subunits. It is demonstrated that this configuration has the ability of deflecting the vertical and oblique incident waves in an arbitrary desired direction. Then, a unique SHWM with supercell composed of only two subunits is designed. Numerical simulation shows its ability of splitting the vertical and oblique incident waves into two tunable transmitted wave beams, respectively. In the process of steering SH waves, it is also found that two kinds of leakages of transmitted waves across the designed SHWM will occur in some particular situations, which will affect the desired transmitted wave. The mechanisms of the leakages, which are different from that of the common high-order diffraction mentioned in existing literatures, are revealed. The current study can offer theoretical guidance not only for designing devices of directional ultrasonic detection and splitting SH waves but also for steering other kinds of classical waves.

  14. Experimental and Computational Studies on the Design of Dyes for Water-splitting Dye-sensitized Photoelectrochemical Tandem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez-Hernandez, Dalvin D.

    Solar energy is a promising alternative for addressing the world's current and future energy requirements in a sustainable way. Because solar irradiation is intermittent, it is necessary to store this energy in the form of a fuel so it can be used when required. The light-driven splitting of water into oxygen and hydrogen (a useful chemical fuel) is a fascinating theoretical and experimental challenge that is worth pursuing because the advance of the knowledge that it implies and the availability of water and sunlight. Inspired by natural photosynthesis and building on previous work from our laboratory, this dissertation focuses on the development of water-splitting dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical tandem cells (WSDSPETCs). The design, synthesis, and characterization of high-potential porphyrins and metal-free phthalocyanines with phosphonic anchoring groups are reported. Photocurrents measured for WSDSPETCs made with some of these dyes co-adsorbed with molecular or colloidal catalysts on TiO2 electrodes are reported as well. To guide in the design of new molecules we have used computational quantum chemistry extensively. Linear correlations between calculated frontier molecular orbital energies and redox potentials were built and tested at multiple levels of theory (from semi-empirical methods to density functional theory). Strong correlations (with r2 values > 0.99) with very good predictive abilities (rmsd mV) were found when using density functional theory (DFT) combined with a continuum solvent model. DFT was also used to aid in the elucidation of the mechanism of the thermal relaxation observed for the charge-separated state of a molecular triad that mimics the photo-induced proton coupled electron transfer of the tyrosine-histidine redox relay in the reaction center of Photosystem II. It was found that the inclusion of explicit solvent molecules, hydrogen bonded to specific sites within the molecular triad, was essential to explain the observed thermal

  15. Studies on the propagation of relativistic plasma waves in high density plasmas produced by hypersonic ionizing shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.L.; Johnson, J.A. III

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of using an ionizing shock wave to produce high density plasmas suitable for the propagation large amplitude relativistic plasma waves is being investigated. A 20 kv arc driven shock tube of coaxial geometry produces a hypersonic shock wave (10 p > 10 17 cm -3 ). The shock can be made to reflect off the end of the tube, collide with its wake, and thus increase the plasma density further. After reflecting, the plasma is at rest. The shock speed is measured using piezoelectric pressure probes and the ion density is measured using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques on argon 488.0 nm and 422.8 nm lines. The future plans are to excite large amplitude relativistic plasma waves in this plasma by either injecting a short pulse laser (Laser Wake Field Scheme), two beating lasers (Plasma Beat Wave Scheme), or a short bunch of relativistic electrons (Plasma Wake Field Scheme). Results of recent computational and theoretical studies, as well as initial experimental measurements on the plasma using LIF, are reported. Implications for the application of high density plasmas produced in this way to such novel schemes as the plasma wave accelerator, photon accelerator, plasma wave undulator, and also plasma lens, are discussed. The effect of plasma turbulence is also discussed

  16. Evaluation of Mandibular Anatomy Associated With Bad Splits in Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy of Mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tongyue; Han, Jeong Joon; Oh, Hee-Kyun; Park, Hong-Ju; Jung, Seunggon; Park, Yeong-Joon; Kook, Min-Suk

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to identify risk factors associated with bad splits during sagittal split ramus osteotomy by using three-dimensional computed tomography. This study included 8 bad splits and 47 normal patients without bad splits. Mandibular anatomic parameters related to osteotomy line were measured. These included anteroposterior width of the ramus at level of lingula, distance between external oblique ridge and lingula, distance between sigmoid notch and inferior border of mandible, mandibular angle, distance between inferior outer surface of mandibular canal and inferior border of mandible under distal root of second molar (MCEM), buccolingual thickness of the ramus at level of lingula, and buccolingual thickness of the area just distal to first molar (BTM1) and second molar (BTM2). The incidence of bad splits in 625 sagittal split osteotomies was 1.28%. Compared with normal group, bad split group exhibited significantly thinner BTM2 and shorter sigmoid notch and inferior border of mandible (P bad splits. These anatomic data may help surgeons to choose the safest surgical techniques and best osteotomy sites.

  17. Combined Brillouin light scattering and microwave absorption study of magnon-photon coupling in a split-ring resonator/YIG film system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingler, S., E-mail: stefan.klingler@wmi.badw.de; Maier-Flaig, H.; Weiler, M. [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Walther-Meißner-Straße 8, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gross, R.; Huebl, H.; Goennenwein, S. T. B. [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Walther-Meißner-Straße 8, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), 80799 Munich (Germany); Hu, C.-M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T2N2 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Microfocused Brillouin light scattering (BLS) and microwave absorption (MA) are used to study magnon-photon coupling in a system consisting of a split-ring microwave resonator and an yttrium iron garnet (YIG) film. The split-ring resonator is defined by optical lithography and loaded with a 1 μm-thick YIG film grown by liquid phase epitaxy. BLS and MA spectra of the hybrid system are simultaneously recorded as a function of the applied magnetic field magnitude and microwave excitation frequency. Strong coupling of the magnon and microwave resonator modes is found with a coupling strength of g{sub eff} /2π = 63 MHz. The combined BLS and MA data allow us to study the continuous transition of the hybridized modes from a purely magnonic to a purely photonic mode by varying the applied magnetic field and microwave frequency. Furthermore, the BLS data represent an up-conversion of the microwave frequency coupling to optical frequencies.

  18. Curative effects of microneedle fractional radiofrequency system on skin laxity in Asian patients: A prospective, double-blind, randomized, controlled face-split study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenli; Wu, Pinru; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Jinan; Chen, Xiangdong; Ewelina, Biskup

    2017-04-01

    To date, no studies compared curative effects of thermal lesions in deep and superficial dermal layers in the same patient (face-split study). To evaluate skin laxity effects of microneedle fractional radiofrequency induced thermal lesions in different dermal layers. 13 patients underwent three sessions of a randomized face-split microneedle fractional radiofrequency system (MFRS) treatment of deep dermal and superficial dermal layer. Skin laxity changes were evaluated objectively (digital images, 2 independent experts) and subjectively (patients' satisfaction numerical rating). 12 of 13 subjects completed a course of 3 treatments and a 1-year follow-up. Improvement of nasolabial folds in deep dermal approach was significantly better than that in superficial approach at three months (P=.0002) and 12 months (P=.0057) follow-up. Effects on infraorbital rhytides were only slightly better (P=.3531). MFRS is an effective method to improve skin laxity. Thermal lesion approach seems to provide better outcomes when applied to deep dermal layers. It is necessary to consider the skin thickness of different facial regions when choosing the treatment depth.

  19. Split warhead simultaneous impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Singh Dhari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A projectile system is proposed to improve efficiency and effectiveness of damage done by anti-tank weapon system on its target by designing a ballistic projectile that can split into multiple warheads and engage a target at the same time. This idea has been developed in interest of saving time consumed from the process of reloading and additional number of rounds wasted on target during an attack. The proposed system is achieved in three steps: Firstly, a mathematical model is prepared using the basic equations of motion. Second, An Ejection Mechanism of proposed warhead is explained with the help of schematics. Third, a part of numerical simulation which is done using the MATLAB software. The final result shows various ranges and times when split can be effectively achieved. With the new system, impact points are increased and hence it has a better probability of hitting a target.

  20. Comparative study on spreading function for directional wave spectra

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.S.; Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.

    -dimensional wave energy S(f) and the directional spreading function D(f, theta). This paper reviews various spreading functions proposed in the past for estimating the directional wave energy and presents their application to the Indian wave condition. It is found...

  1. Isospin splittings of baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, Kalman; Genovese, Marco; Richard, Jean-Marc; Silvestre-Brac, Bernard

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the isospin-breaking mass differences among baryons, with particular attention in the charm sector to the Σ c + -Σ c 0 , Σ c ++ -Σ c 0 , and Ξ c + -Ξ c 0 splittings. Simple potential models cannot accommodate the trend of the available data on charm baryons. More precise measurements would offer the possibility of testing how well potential models describe the non-perturbative limit of QCD

  2. A systematic study of wave conditions and sediment transport near Mormugao harbour

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reddy, M.P.M.

    Wave conditions and the nature of sediment transport in the Mormugao Harbour area have been evaluated in view of the proposed development project of this harbour It has been found from this study that generally high waves will be experienced...

  3. Quantification of rat retinal growth and vascular population changes after single and split doses of proton irradiation: translational study using stereology methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiao W.; Archambeau, John O.; Kubinova, Lucie; Boyle, Soames; Petersen, Georgia; Grove, Roger; Nelson, G. A. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    This study quantified architectural and population changes in the rat retinal vasculature after proton irradiation using stereology. A 100 MeV conformal proton beam delivered 8, 14, 20 and 28 Gy as single and split doses to the whole eye. The vascular networks were prepared from retinal digests. Stereological methods were used to obtain the area of the retina and unbiased estimates of microvessel/artery/vein endothelial, pericyte and smooth muscle population, and vessel length. The retinal area increased progressively in the unirradiated, age-matched controls and in the retinas irradiated with 8 and 14 Gy, indicating uniform progressive retinal growth. No growth occurred after 20 and 28 Gy. Regression analysis of total endothelial cell number in all vessels (arteries, veins and capillaries) after irradiation documented a progressive time- and dose-dependent cell loss occurring over 15 to 24 months. The difference from controls was significant (Ppopulations after split doses. At 10 Gy, the rate of endothelial cell loss, a dose parameter used to characterize the time- and dose-dependent loss of the endothelial population, was doubled.

  4. Buoy and Generator Interaction with Ocean Waves: Studies of a Wave Energy Conversion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindroth, Simon

    2011-07-01

    On March 13th, 2006, the Div. of Electricity at Uppsala Univ. deployed its first wave energy converter, L1, in the ocean southwest of Lysekil. L1 consisted of a buoy at the surface, connected through a line to a linear generator on the seabed. Since the deployment, continuous investigations of how L1 works in the waves have been conducted, and several additional wave energy converters have been deployed. This thesis is based on ten publications, which focus on different aspects of the interaction between wave, buoy, and generator. In order to evaluate different measurement systems, the motion of the buoy was measured optically and using accelerometers, and compared to measurements of the motion of the movable part of the generator - the translator. These measurements were found to correlate well. Simulations of buoy and translator motion were found to match the measured values. The variation of performance of L1 with changing water levels, wave heights, and spectral shapes was also investigated. Performance is here defined as the ratio of absorbed power to incoming power. It was found that the performance decreases for large wave heights. This is in accordance with the theoretical predictions, since the area for which the stator and the translator overlap decreases for large translator motions. Shifting water levels were predicted to have the same effect, but this could not be seen as clearly. The width of the wave energy spectrum has been proposed by some as a factor that also affects the performance of a wave energy converter, for a set wave height and period. Therefore the relation between performance and several different parameters for spectral width was investigated. It was found that some of the parameters were in fact correlated to performance, but that the correlation was not very strong. As a background on ocean measurements in wave energy, a thorough literature review was conducted. It turns out that the Lysekil project is one of quite few projects that

  5. A typology of split conjunction

    OpenAIRE

    Palancar , Enrique L.

    2012-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, I study instances of noun phrase conjunction where the conjoined noun phrase is subject and the referents of the conjuncts are human, of the type ‘John and Mary are having lunch’. More specifically, I study different, possible splits that occur in such structures, which involve the disruption of the phrasal continuity of the conjuncts, resulting in structures roughly equivalent to ‘they are having lunch with Mary’ and ‘John are having lunch with Mary’. I...

  6. Studying Lorentz-violating electromagnetic waves in confined media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, Davidson R.; Gomes, Andre H.; Fonseca, Jakson M.; Moura-Melo, Winder A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text. Planck energy scale is still far beyond current possibilities. A question of interest is whether the Lorentz symmetry remains valid at these extremely high energies, whose answer certainly would be useful whenever building grand unified theories, in which general relativity is consistently accommodated. Here, we study a reminiscent of this possible symmetry violation, incorporated in the body of the so-called Standard Model Extension (SME). More precisely, we deal with the pure (Abelian) gauge sector, so that we have a modified classical electromagnetism in (3+1) dimensions, whose Lagrangian include a term proportional to a (constant) background tensor that breaks the Lorentz symmetry, but respecting CPT. Our attention is devoted to the wave-like solutions constrained to propagate inside confined media, like waveguides and resonant cavities. Our preliminary findings indicate that Lorentz-breaking implies in modifications of the standard results which are proportional to the (very small) violating parameters, but could be largely enhanced by diminishing the size of the confined media. Under study is the case of a toroidal cavity where the electromagnetic field should respect the additional requirement of being single-valued in the (toroidal) angular variable. Perhaps, such an extra feature combined with the usual boundary conditions could lead us to large effects of this violation, somewhat similar to those predicted for CPT- and Lorentz-odd electromagnetic waves constrained to propagate along a hollow conductor waveguide. (author)

  7. Study on the electromagnetic waves propagation characteristics in partially ionized plasma slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Bin Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Propagation characteristics of electromagnetic (EM waves in partially ionized plasma slabs are studied in this paper. Such features are significant to applications in plasma antennas, blackout of re-entry flying vehicles, wave energy injection to plasmas, and etc. We in this paper developed a theoretical model of EM wave propagation perpendicular to a plasma slab with a one-dimensional density inhomogeneity along propagation direction to investigate essential characteristics of EM wave propagation in nonuniform plasmas. Particularly, the EM wave propagation in sub-wavelength plasma slabs, where the geometric optics approximation fails, is studied and in comparison with thicker slabs where the geometric optics approximation applies. The influences of both plasma and collisional frequencies, as well as the width of the plasma slab, on the EM wave propagation characteristics are discussed. The results can help the further understanding of propagation behaviours of EM waves in nonuniform plasma, and applications of the interactions between EM waves and plasmas.

  8. Comparative study of postoperative stability between conventional orthognathic surgery and a surgery-first orthognathic approach after bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy for skeletal class III correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Deuk-Hyun; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Jung, Seo-Yun; Kim, Won-Gi; Yu, Kyung-Hwan

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the postoperative stability of conventional orthognathic surgery to a surgery-first orthognathic approach after bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (BSSRO). The study included 20 patients who underwent BSSRO for skeletal class III conventional orthognathic surgery and 20 patients who underwent a surgery-first orthognathic approach. Serial lateral cephalograms were analyzed to identify skeletal changes before surgery (T0), immediately after surgery (T1), and after surgery (T2, after 1 year or at debonding). The amount of relapse of the mandible in the conventional orthognathic surgery group from T1 to T2 was 2.23±0.92 mm ( P surgery-first orthognathic approach group from T1 to T2 was 3.49±1.71 mm ( P surgery-first orthognathic approach. Therefore, careful planning and skeletal stability should be considered in orthognathic surgery.

  9. Beach steepness effects on nonlinear infragravity-wave interactions : A numerical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bakker, A. T M; Tissier, M.F.S.; Ruessink, B. G.

    2016-01-01

    The numerical model SWASH is used to investigate nonlinear energy transfers between waves for a diverse set of beach profiles and wave conditions, with a specific focus on infragravity waves. We use bispectral analysis to study the nonlinear triad interactions, and estimate energy transfers to

  10. Beach steepness effects on nonlinear infragravity-wave interactions : A numerical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bakker, A. T M; Tissier, M. F S; Ruessink, B. G.

    2016-01-01

    The numerical model SWASH is used to investigate nonlinear energy transfers between waves for a diverse set of beach profiles and wave conditions, with a specific focus on infragravity waves. We use bispectral analysis to study the nonlinear triad interactions, and estimate energy transfers to

  11. Infragravity-wave dynamics in a barred coastal region, a numerical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnsdorp, Dirk P.; Ruessink, Gerben; Zijlema, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive numerical study into the infragravity-wave dynamics at a field site, characterized by a gently sloping barred beach. The nonhydrostatic wave-flow model SWASH was used to simulate the local wavefield for a range of wave conditions (including mild and storm

  12. Numerical study of traveling-wave solutions for the Camassa-Holm equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalisch, Henrik; Lenells, Jonatan

    2005-01-01

    We explore numerically different aspects of periodic traveling-wave solutions of the Camassa-Holm equation. In particular, the time evolution of some recently found new traveling-wave solutions and the interaction of peaked and cusped waves is studied

  13. Studies on Charge Variation and Waves in Dusty Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausik, Siddhartha Sankar

    Plasma and dust grains are both ubiquitous ingredients of the universe. The interplay between them has opened up a new and fascinating research domain, that of dusty plasmas, which contain macroscopic particles of solid matter besides the usual plasma constituents. The research in dusty plasmas received a major boost in the early eighties with Voyager spacecraft observation on the formation of Saturn rings. Dusty plasmas are defined as partially or fully-ionized gases that contain micron-sized particles of electrically charged solid material, either dielectric or conducting. The physics of dusty plasmas has recently been studied intensively because of its importance for a number of applications in space and laboratory plasmas. This thesis presents the experimental studies on charge variation and waves in dusty plasmas. The experimental observations are carried out in two different experimental devices. Three different sets of experiments are carried out in two different experimental devices. Three different sets of experiments are carried out to study the dust charge variation in a filament discharge argon plasma. The dust grains used in these experiments are grains of silver. In another get of experiment, dust acoustic waves are studied in a de glow discharge argon plasma. Alumina dust grains are sprinkled in this experiment. The diagnostic tools used in these experiments are Langmuir probe and Faraday cup. The instruments used in these experiments are electrometer, He-Ne laser and charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Langmuir probe is used to measure plasma parameters, while Faraday cup and electrometer are used to measure very low current (~pA) carried by a collimated dust beam. He-Ne laser illuminates the dust grains and CCD camera is used to capture the images of dust acoustic waves. Silver dust grains are produced in the dust chamber by gas-evaporation technique. Due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers, the dust grains move

  14. Studies on anti-tumor effect of electromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadota, Ikuhito; Wakabayashi, Toshio; Ogoshi, Kyoji; Kamijo, Akemi

    1995-01-01

    Hyperthermia have treated cancer with thermal effect of electromagnetic waves for biological systems, but the expected effect is not shown. Also non-thermal effect of electromagnetic waves is out of consideration. If irradiation conditions of electromagnetic waves with non-thermal anti-tumor effect are obtained, we can expect newly spread in cancer therapy. We had in vivo experiments that electromagnetic waves were irradiated to mice. In some irradiation conditions, the non-thermal anti-tumor effect of electromagnetic waves showed. In order to specify the irradiation conditions, we had in vitro experiments. We found that activity ratio of tumor cells which was measured by MTT method depended on irradiation time and power of electromagnetic waves. These results are useful for the cancer therapy. (author)

  15. Wave number determination of Pc 1–2 mantle waves considering He++ ions: A Cluster study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grison, Benjamin; Escoubet, C. P.; Santolík, Ondřej; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Khotyaintsev, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 9 (2014), s. 7601-7614 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E12026; GA ČR(CZ) GPP209/11/P848; GA MŠk LH12231 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : EMIC * refractive index * wave number * k-filtering * Pc 1–2 mantle wave * distant cusp Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.426, year: 2014 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2013JA019719/abstract

  16. A comparative study of spray keratinocytes and autologous meshed split-thickness skin graft in the treatment of acute burn injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Rajiv; Roggy, David Edward; Zieger, Madeline Jane; Nazim, Muhammad; Hartman, Brett Colby; Gibbs, Jeff Thomas

    2015-02-01

    ReCell (Avita Medical, Northridge, CA) is an autologous cell harvesting (ACH) device that enables a thin split-thickness skin biopsy to be processed to produce a cell population that includes a mixed population of keratinocytes, melanocytes, Langerhans cells, and papillary dermal fibroblasts for immediate delivery via a spray applicator onto a prepared skin surface. In this Institutional Review Board-approved US Food and Drug Administration phase 2 study, the authors prospectively evaluated the treatment of partial-thickness burns in patients with two 320 cm2 areas, 1 area treated with the ACH device and the other with a meshed split-thickness skin graft (MSTSG) as a control. The authors compared the treatment areas for graft take, pigmentation, and color match to surrounding healthy tissue, scarring, and pain. In this preliminary study, 10 patients were treated with this protocol. Eight patients had 100% take to both treatment areas and 2 patients had significant non-take and graft loss attributable to underexcised wound beds and difficulty with the spray applicator. Pigmentation and color match ratings were identical at week 52 and the Modified Vancouver Scar Scale scores were comparable. One subject rated the autologous cell harvesting site as having a better appearance, while the remaining subjects rated their ACH and MSTSG sites' appearances as being comparable. In early follow-up visits, pain ratings were slightly elevated in the ACH group due to graft healing; however, in visits following week 2, pain ratings at the ACH and MSTSG sites were rated similarly by all patients. This preliminary report describes an early experience with the ACH device and the treatment of partial-thickness burn injuries. In this 10-patient series, patients benefitted from having a decreased donor site size and comparable outcomes with MSTSG treatment. While this preliminary underpowered study has provided positive results, there is a learning curve with choosing the proper wound

  17. A field ion microscope study of the surface reaction of tungsten with n-octanol under an applied positive voltage: reaction conditions for the 'splitting' of (110) plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, T.; Iwatsu, F.; Morikawa, H.

    1993-01-01

    Field ion microscopy is a powerful tool for the study of surface phenomena on an atomic scale, especially when they are crystal plane dependent, because the microscope shows many crystal planes of the sample tip simultaneously. Although a large number of FIM studies on vapor deposition, surface diffusion and surface reactions at a metal-gas interface have been reported, those on reactions at a metal-liquid interface are few. The authors have studied the corrosion or tungsten with aqueous solutions and found that water corroded the tungsten tips very severely to reduce the radius of curvature of the tip cap drastically. The reaction was so severe that it was not possible to trace it back to the very initial stages. They adopted, as a weaker reagent, one of the higher alcohols, n-octanol(C 8 H 17 OH), and found that it reacted with tungsten tips when an electrical pulse with a positive voltage between 5 and 10V was applied to the tip, giving very interesting field ion images in which the central (110) plane was divided into two parts located side by side across the [001] zone line. This means that some anisotropic surface reaction occurred which made a groove along the [001] zone line going through the (110) plane, usually the most stable plane chemically for bcc metals. They named this phenomenon 'splitting'. This reaction was less severe than that with water and some results on the morphology of the groove and on the reaction sequence have been reported. In the present paper more detailed reaction conditions which give rise to the splitting are described

  18. Studies for the electro-magnetic calorimeter {\\em SplitCal} for the SHiP experiment at CERN with shower direction reconstruction capability

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the basic ideas and the first simulation results of a new electro-magnetic calorimeter concept, named {\\it SplitCal}, aimed at optimising the measurement of photon direction in fixed-target experiment configuration, with high photon detection efficiency. This calorimeter was designed for the invariant mass reconstruction of axion-like particles decaying into two photons in the mass range 200~MeV to 1~GeV for the proposed proton beam dump experiment SHiP at CERN. Preliminary results indicate that angular resolutions better than obtained by past experiments can be achieved with this design. An implementation of this concept with real technologies is under study.

  19. Studies for the electro-magnetic calorimeter SplitCal for the SHiP experiment at CERN with shower direction reconstruction capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonivento, Walter M.

    2018-02-01

    This paper describes the basic ideas and the first simulation results of a new electro-magnetic calorimeter concept, named SplitCal, aimed at optimising the measurement of photon direction in fixed-target experiment configuration, with high photon detection efficiency. This calorimeter was designed for the invariant mass reconstruction of axion-like particles decaying into two photons in the mass range 200 MeV to 1 GeV for the proposed proton beam dump experiment SHiP at CERN. Preliminary results indicate that angular resolutions better than obtained by past experiments can be achieved with this design. An implementation of this concept with real technologies is under study.

  20. Improving Transportation Services for the University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce: A Case Study on Solving the Mixed-Fleet Vehicle Routing Problem with Split Deliveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthikarnnarunai, N.; Olinick, E.

    2009-01-01

    We present a case study on the application of techniques for solving the Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP) to improve the transportation service provided by the University of The Thai Chamber of Commerce to its staff. The problem is modeled as VRP with time windows, split deliveries, and a mixed fleet. An exact algorithm and a heuristic solution procedure are developed to solve the problem and implemented in the AMPL modeling language and CPLEX Integer Programming solver. Empirical results indicate that the heuristic can find relatively good solutions in a small fraction of the time required by the exact method. We also perform sensitivity analysis and find that a savings in outsourcing cost can be achieved with a small increase in vehicle capacity.

  1. A switchable spin-wave signal splitter for magnonic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heussner, F.; Serga, A. A.; Brächer, T.; Hillebrands, B.; Pirro, P.

    2017-09-01

    The influence of an inhomogeneous magnetization distribution on the propagation of caustic-like spin-wave beams in unpatterned magnetic films has been investigated by utilizing micromagnetic simulations. Our study reveals a locally controllable and reconfigurable tractability of the beam directions. This feature is used to design a device combining split and switch functionalities for spin-wave signals on the micrometer scale. A coherent transmission of spin-wave signals through the device is verified. This attests the applicability in magnonic networks where the information is encoded in the phase of the spin waves.

  2. Studies on split heat pipe type adsorption ice-making test unit for fishing boats: Choice of heat pipe medium and experiments under unsteady heating sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.W.; Wang, R.Z.; Lu, Z.S.; Chen, C.J.

    2006-01-01

    The split heat pipe type compound adsorption ice maker for fishing boats not only has the advantage of large volume cooling density but also has the advantage of less power consumption and high heat transfer performance. The available heat pipe media for the split heat pipe type compound adsorption ice maker, which are methanol, acetone and water are studied and compared in this paper, and the heat pipe medium of water shows the better performance for the reason of its stable heating and cooling process and high heat transfer performance. Considering the waste heat recovered from the diesel engine on fishing boats varies when the velocity of the fishing boat changes, the refrigeration performances at the condition of different values of heating power are studied while water is used as the heat pipe medium. Results show that the cooling power, as while as COP and SCP decrease when the heating power decreases. The highest COP and SCP are 0.41 and 731 W/kg, respectively, at the highest heating power of 4.2 kW, and the values decrease by 22% and 33%, respectively, when the heating power decreases by 15%. The values decrease by 32% and 51%, respectively, when the heating power decreases by 30%. The performance of the adsorption ice maker for the fishing boat with the 6160A type diesel engine is estimated, and the results show that the cooling power and ice productivity are as high as 5.44 kW and 1032 kg ice per day, respectively, even if the recovered waste heat decreases by 30% compared with the normal value. It can satisfy the ice requirements of such a fishing boat

  3. Assessing the first wave of epidemiological studies of nanomaterial workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liou, Saou-Hsing; Tsai, Candace S. J.; Pelclova, Daniela; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K.; Schulte, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The results of early animal studies of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and air pollution epidemiology suggest that it is important to assess the health of ENM workers. Initial epidemiological studies of workers’ exposure to ENMs (<100 nm) are reviewed and characterized for their study designs, findings, and limitations. Of the 15 studies, 11 were cross-sectional, 4 were longitudinal (1 was both cross-sectional and longitudinal in design), and 1 was a descriptive pilot study. Generally, the studies used biologic markers as the dependent variables. All 11 cross-sectional studies showed a positive relationship between various biomarkers and ENM exposures. Three of the four longitudinal studies showed a negative relationship; the fourth showed positive findings after a 1-year follow-up. Each study considered exposure to ENMs as the independent variable. Exposure was assessed by mass concentration in 10 studies and by particle count in six studies. Six of them assessed both mass and particle concentrations. Some of the studies had limited exposure data because of inadequate exposure assessment. Generally, exposure levels were not very high in comparison to those in human inhalation chamber studies, but there were some exceptions. Most studies involved a small sample size, from 2 to 258 exposed workers. These studies represent the first wave of epidemiological studies of ENM workers. They are limited by small numbers of participants, inconsistent (and in some cases inadequate) exposure assessments, generally low exposures, and short intervals between exposure and effect. Still, these studies are a foundation for future work; they provide insight into where ENM workers are experiencing potentially adverse effects that might be related to ENM exposures

  4. Assessing the first wave of epidemiological studies of nanomaterial workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, Saou-Hsing, E-mail: shliou@nhri.org.tw [National Health Research Institutes, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (China); Tsai, Candace S. J. [Colorado State University, Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Science (United States); Pelclova, Daniela [Charles University in Prague, Department of Occupational Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine (Czech Republic); Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K.; Schulte, Paul A. [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The results of early animal studies of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and air pollution epidemiology suggest that it is important to assess the health of ENM workers. Initial epidemiological studies of workers’ exposure to ENMs (<100 nm) are reviewed and characterized for their study designs, findings, and limitations. Of the 15 studies, 11 were cross-sectional, 4 were longitudinal (1 was both cross-sectional and longitudinal in design), and 1 was a descriptive pilot study. Generally, the studies used biologic markers as the dependent variables. All 11 cross-sectional studies showed a positive relationship between various biomarkers and ENM exposures. Three of the four longitudinal studies showed a negative relationship; the fourth showed positive findings after a 1-year follow-up. Each study considered exposure to ENMs as the independent variable. Exposure was assessed by mass concentration in 10 studies and by particle count in six studies. Six of them assessed both mass and particle concentrations. Some of the studies had limited exposure data because of inadequate exposure assessment. Generally, exposure levels were not very high in comparison to those in human inhalation chamber studies, but there were some exceptions. Most studies involved a small sample size, from 2 to 258 exposed workers. These studies represent the first wave of epidemiological studies of ENM workers. They are limited by small numbers of participants, inconsistent (and in some cases inadequate) exposure assessments, generally low exposures, and short intervals between exposure and effect. Still, these studies are a foundation for future work; they provide insight into where ENM workers are experiencing potentially adverse effects that might be related to ENM exposures.

  5. Study of a coronagraphic mask using evanescent waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisset, Christophe; Rabbia, Yves; Lepine, Thierry; Alagao, Mary-Angelie; Ducrot, Elsa; Poshyachinda, Saran; Soonthornthum, Boonrucksar

    2017-04-03

    The evanescent wave coronagraph (EvWaCo) is a specific kind of band-limited coronagraph using the frustrated total internal reflection phenomenon to produce the coronagraphic effect (removing starlight from the image plane in order to make the stellar environment detectable). In this paper, we present a theoretical and experimental study of the EvWaCo coronagraphic mask. First, we calculate the theoretical transmission and we show that this mask is partially achromatic. Then, we present the experimental results obtained in unpolarized light at the wavelength λ≈900 nm and relative spectral bandwidth Δλ/λ≈6%. In particular, we show that the coronagraph provides a contrast down to a few 10-6 at an angular distance of about ten Airy radii.

  6. Studies of drift waves in a toroidal heliac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, X.H.; Blackwell, B.D.; Hamberger, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Low frequency, coherent density fluctuations have been studied for three typical magnetic configurations in the helical axis stellarator SHEILA using Langmuir probe techniques. The parametric dependence, the threshold magnetic field, the frequency spectrum and the spatial structure of the fluctuations are measured experimentally. Mode analyses are made in a magnetic coordinate system. Both the mode numbers thus obtained and the smallness of the directly measured values of the wavenumber along the magnetic field lines indicate a close correspondence between the helicity of the fluctuations and the field lines. These experimental results are consistent with a collisional drift wave model, derived from a linearized two-fluid theory, related to the heliac geometry. Density reduction associated with the fluctuations is clearly observed and is consistent with rough estimates of the cross-filed particle flux due to the fluctuations. 17 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab

  7. Quantum wave packet study of D+OF reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurban, M.; Karabulut, E.; Tutuk, R.; Goektas, F.

    2010-01-01

    The quantum dynamics of the D+OF reaction on the adiabatic potential energy surface of the ground 1 3 A ' state has been studied by using a time-dependent quantum real wave packet method. The state-to-state and state-to-all reaction probabilities for total angular momentum J = 0 have been calculated. The probabilities for J > 0 have been calculated by J-shifting the J = 0 results by means of capture model. Then, the integral cross sections and initial state selected rate constants have been calculated. The initial state-selected reaction probabilities and reaction cross section show threshold but not manifest any resonances and the initial state selected rate constants are sensitive to the temperature.

  8. Bad splits in bilateral sagittal split osteotomy: systematic review of fracture patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenen, S A; Becking, A G

    2016-07-01

    An unfavourable and unanticipated pattern of the mandibular sagittal split osteotomy is generally referred to as a 'bad split'. Few restorative techniques to manage the situation have been described. In this article, a classification of reported bad split pattern types is proposed and appropriate salvage procedures to manage the different types of undesired fracture are presented. A systematic review was undertaken, yielding a total of 33 studies published between 1971 and 2015. These reported a total of 458 cases of bad splits among 19,527 sagittal ramus osteotomies in 10,271 patients. The total reported incidence of bad split was 2.3% of sagittal splits. The most frequently encountered were buccal plate fractures of the proximal segment (types 1A-F) and lingual fractures of the distal segment (types 2A and 2B). Coronoid fractures (type 3) and condylar neck fractures (type 4) have seldom been reported. The various types of bad split may require different salvage approaches. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Wave analysis at frictional interface: A case wise study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Akanksha; Chattopadhyay, Amares; Singh, Pooja; Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    2018-03-01

    The present article deals with the propagation of a Stoneley wave and with the reflection as well as refraction of an incident P -wave at the frictional bonded interface between an initially stressed isotropic viscoelastic semi-infinite superstratum and an initially stressed isotropic substratum as case I and case II, respectively. The complex form of the velocity equation has been derived in closed form for the propagation of a Stoneley wave in the said structure. The real and imaginary parts of the complex form of the velocity equation correspond to the phase velocity and damped velocity of the Stoneley wave. Phase and damped velocity have been analysed against the angular frequency. The expressions of the amplitude ratios of the reflected and refracted waves are deduced analytically. The variation of the amplitude ratios is examined against the angle of incidence of the P -wave. The influence of frictional boundary parameters, initial stress, viscoelastic parameters on the phase and damped velocities of the Stoneley wave and the amplitude ratios of the reflected as well as refracted P - and SV -wave have been revealed graphically through numerical results.

  10. TIPS Evaluation Project Retrospective Study: Wave 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Susan M.; Mulvey, Kevin P.

    2003-01-01

    Measured substance abuse treatment professionals' knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding the Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) series and the 28 TIPs. Results for 3,267 respondents in wave 1 and 1,028 in wave 2 indicate that almost half of all professionals were aware of the TIPs. Attitudes toward TIPs were positive, but professionals…

  11. Efficacy of split hours part-time patching versus continuous hours part-time patching for treatment of anisometropic amblyopia in children: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Virender; Mittal, Vaibhev; Kekunnaya, Ramesh; Gupta, Amit; Rao, Harsha L; Mollah, Joseph; Sontha, Anand; Gunturu, Rekha; Rao, B Venkateshwar

    2013-07-01

    To compare efficacy of 'split hours part-time patching' and 'continuous hours part-time patching' for the treatment of anisometropic amblyopia. We designed a prospective, interventional, non-randomised, comparative pilot study involving children between 4 and 11 years of age with anisometropic amblyopia who were treated with either continuous wear (Group A) or split hours part-time patching (Group B) as per parents wish, after appropriate discussion with the parents. Children were followed-up for the improvement in visual acuity and the compliance at each follow-up visit. 44 and 24 children were recruited in Group A and Group B, respectively (mean ± SD baseline BCVA of the amblyopic eye: 0.99 ± 0.32 and 0.95 ± 0.23 logMAR, respectively). BCVA (adjusted for baseline BCVA and age) at 3 months in Group A (0.59 ± 0.24) was comparable (p=0.08) with that in Group B (0.71 ± 0.24). This was same even at 6 months (0.51 ± 0.25 in Group A and 0.59 ± 0.25 in Group B, p=0.25). The improvement in BCVA at 3 months was also comparable (p=0.06) in Group A (0.39 ± 0.23) and Group B (0.26 ± 0.23). The improvement in BCVA at 6 months was also comparable (p=0.14) in Group A (0.47 ± 0.26) and Group B (0.37 ± 0.26). Both patching regimens lead to significant and comparable improvement in BCVA in anisometropic amblyopia up to 6 months of follow-up.

  12. Alteration of split renal function during Captopril treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aburano, Tamio; Takayama, Teruhiko; Nakajima, Kenichi; Tonami, Norihisa; Hisada, Kinichi; Yasuhara, Shuichirou; Miyamori, Isamu; Takeda, Ryoyu

    1987-01-01

    Two different methods to evaluate the alteration of split renal function following continued Captopril treatment were studied in a total of 21 patients with hypertension. Eight patients with renovascular hypertension (five with unilateral renal artery stenosis and three with bilateral renal artery stenoses), three patients with diabetic nephropathy, one patient with primary aldosteronism, and nine patients with essential hypertension were included. The studies were performed the day prior to receiving Captopril (baseline), and 6th or 7th day following continued Captopril treatment (37.5 mg or 75 mg/day). Split effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) after injections of I-131 hippuran and Tc-99m DTPA were measured using kidney counting corrected for depth and dose, described by Schlegel and Gates. In the patients with renovascular hypertension, split GFR in the stenotic kidney was significantly decreased 6th or 7th day following continued Captopril treatment compared to a baseline value. And split ERPF in the stenotic kidney was slightly increased although significant increase of split ERPF was not shown. In the patients with diabetic nephropathy, primary aldosteronism or essential hypertension, on the other hand, split GFR was not changed and split ERPF was slightly increased. These findings suggest that the Captopril induced alterations of split renal function may be of importance for the diagnosis of renovascular hypertension. For this purpose, split GFR determination is more useful than split ERPF determination. (author)

  13. Study of blast wave overpressures using the computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. COSTA NETO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The threats of bomb attacks by criminal organizations and accidental events involving chemical explosives are a danger to the people and buildings. Due the severity of these issues and the need of data required for a safety design, more research is required about explosions and shock waves. This paper presents an assessment of blast wave overpressures using a computational fluid dynamics software. Analyses of phenomena as reflection of shock waves and channeling effects were done and a comparison between numerical results and analytical predictions has been executed, based on the simulation on several models. The results suggest that the common analytical predictions aren’t accurate enough for an overpressure analysis in small stand-off distances and that poorly designed buildings may increase the shock wave overpressures due multiple blast wave reflections, increasing the destructive potential of the explosions.

  14. Pc5 waves generated by substorm injection: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Zolotukhina

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the spectral-polarized characteristics of Pc5 ULF waves observed on 17 September 2000 after the 03:20:25 UT substorm onset with the satellites GOES 8 and 10 located east and west of the onset location. In the course of the event, the wave polarization changed from mixed (between toroidal and poloidal to poloidal, and then to mixed again. The hodogram of magnetic field oscillations rotated counterclockwise at GOES 8, and clockwise at GOES 10. It is suggested that the satellites detected the waves generated by the substorm injected clouds of the charged particles drifting in the magnetosphere in the opposite azimuthal directions: GOES 8 (located east of the substorm onset detected the wave generated by an electron cloud, and GOES 10 (west of the onset detected the wave generated by a positive ion cloud. This interpretation is confirmed by the energetic particles data recorded by LANL satellites.

  15. Geometrical splitting in Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubi, A.; Elperin, T.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    A statistical model is presented by which a direct statistical approach yielded an analytic expression for the second moment, the variance ratio, and the benefit function in a model of an n surface-splitting Monte Carlo game. In addition to the insight into the dependence of the second moment on the splitting parameters the main importance of the expressions developed lies in their potential to become a basis for in-code optimization of splitting through a general algorithm. Refs

  16. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the blue copper site: Metal and ligand K-edge studies to probe the origin of the EPR hyperfine splitting in plastocyanin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadle, S.E.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Schugar, H.J.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Solomon, E.I.

    1993-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectra for the oxidized blue copper protein plastocyanin and several Cu(II) model complexes have been measured at both the Cu K-edge and the ligand K-edges (Cl and S) in order to elucidate the source of the small parallel hyperfine splitting in the EPR spectra of blue copper centers. Assignment and analysis of a feature in the Cu K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum at ∼8,987 eV as the Cu 1s → 4p + ligand-to-metal charge-transfer shakedown transition has allowed for quantitation of 4p mixing into the ground-state wave function as reflected in the 1s →3d (+4p) intensity at ∼8,979 eV. The results show that distorted tetrahedral (D 2d )CuCl 4 2- is characterized by z mixing, while plastocyanin has only Cu 4p xy mixing. Thus, the small parallel hyperfine splitting in the EPR spectra of D 2d CuCl 4 2- and of oxidized plastocyanin cannot be explained by 12% 4p z mixing into the 3d x 2 -y 2 orbital as had been previously postulated. Data collected at the Cl K-edge for CuCl 4 2- show that the intensity of the ligand pre-edge feature at ∼2,820 eV reflects the degree of covalency between the metal half-occupied orbital and the ligands. The data show that D 2d CuCl 4 2- is not unusually covalent. The source of the small parallel splitting in the EPR of D 2d CuCl 4 2- is discussed. Experiments at the S K-edge (∼2,470 eV) show that plastocyanin is characterized by a highly covalent Cu-S(cysteine) bond relative to the cupric-thiolate model complex [Cu(tet b)(o-SC 6 H 4 CO 2 )]·H 2 O. The XAS results demonstrate that the small parallel hyperfine splitting in the EPR spectra of blue copper sites reflects the high degree of covalency of the copper-thiolate bond. 34 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Numerical study of wave disturbance in liquid cooling film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R. Shine

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transient numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the liquid-gas interface characteristics associated with liquid film cooling flows. A two-dimensional axisymmetric multi-phase numerical model using finite volume formulation is developed. The model has been validated against available experimental data for liquid-film cooling flows inside tubes. The model has been used to predict the interface characteristics for a variety of imposed parameters and momentum flux ratios under cold flow conditions wherein both the coolant and mainstream are maintained at the same temperature. Disturbance waves are observed at the liquid-gas interface for coolant flows above a critical value and after a finite distance from the inlet. The distance toward the wave inception point increased with the increase of momentum flux ratio. However, at higher momentum flux ratios, the properties of the disturbance waves did not vary significantly. The parameters related to the liquid-gas interface waves, namely, wave velocity, frequency, amplitude and wave length have been analyzed in detail. Analysis indicates that the liquid entrainment is due to the shearing of the disturbance wave crest.

  18. Experimental study of the formation of steep waves and breakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanis³aw R. Massel

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Breaking waves (whitecaps are one of the most important and least understood processes associated with the evolution of the surface gravity wave field in the open sea. This process is the principal means by which energy and momentum are transferred away from a developing sea. However, an estimation of the frequency of breaking waves or the fraction of sea surface covered by whitecaps and the amount of dissipated energy induced by breaking is very difficult to carry out under real sea conditions. A controlled experiment, funded by the European Commission under the Improving Human Potential Access Infrastructures programme, was carried out in the Ocean Basin Laboratory at MARINTEK, Trondheim (Norway. Simulation of random waves of the prescribed spectra by wave makers provided a very realistic pattern of the sea surface. The number of breaking waves was estimated by photographing the sea surface and recording the noise caused by the breaking waves. The experimental data will serve for calibration of the theoretical models of the sea surface fraction related to the whitecaps.

  19. Wave Energy, Lever Operated Pivoting Float LOPF Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margheritini, Lucia

    The fully instrumented Resen Waves Lever Operated Pivoting Float LOPF wave energy buoy model has gone through the first stage of testing in regular waves in scale 1:25 of the North Sea wave conditions, in the 3D deep wave basin at the Hydraulic and Coastal Engineering Laboratory of Aalborg...... University in Denmark. The model size was 60cm W x 90cm L x 21cm H. The 60 cm width pointed towards the wave front. The LOPF buoy is characterized by a simple mechanical design with few moving parts and direct electrical output and it is taut moored to the sea bed, so all forces are referenced to the seabed...... for maximum energy output in regular as well as irregular waves. During storms the buoy pivots and streamlines itself to minimize loads on the mooring line. A conservative estimate shows that a full scale system for North Sea conditions has a float size width of 15 m that will, with 60% generator efficiency...

  20. Experiments and simulation of split Hopkinson Bar tests on sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, P D; Gould, P J; Wood, A D; Tyas, A

    2014-01-01

    Static triaxial cell data and Split Hopkinson Bar data has been generated for well controlled dry and wet sand under confined and unconfined conditions. This has demonstrated that the dry sand is rate independent in its behaviour, whereas the wet sand exhibits a strain rate dependency in its behaviour. Simulations have been performed with the Lagrangian hydrocode DYNA using a Porter-Gould equation of state (EOS) and Johnson-Holmquist type constitutive model. Comparison with the raw strain gauge data is qualitatively reasonable, although some of the details of the trace are not reproduced. Sensitivity studies have also been performed, which has demonstrated some deficiencies in the constitutive model, relating to wave-speed and definition of moduli in a granular material. This has given some insights into how the constitutive model should be improved and which future experimental tests will be required.

  1. Comparative Study between Slow Shock Wave Lithotripsy and Fast Shock Wave Lithotripsy in the Management of Renal Stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AKM Zamanul Islam Bhuiyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Renal calculi are frequent causes of ureteric colic. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the most common treatment of these stones. It uses focused sound waves to break up stones externally. Objective: To compare the efficiency of slow and fast delivery rate of shock waves on stone fragmentation and treatment outcome in patients with renal calculi. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was done in the department of Urology, National Institute of Kidney diseases and Urology, Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka from July 2006 to June 2007. Total 90 patients were treated using the Storz Medical Modulith ® SLX lithotripter. Patients were divided into Group A, Group B and Group C – each group having 30 subjects. Group A was selected for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL by 60 shock waves per minute, Group B by 90 shock waves per minute and Group C by 120 shock waves per minute. Results: Complete clearance of stone was observed in 24 patients in Group A and 13 patients in both Group B and Group C in first session. In Group A only 3 patients needed second session but in Group B and Group C, 12 and 8 patients needed second session. In Group A only one patient needed third session but third session was required for 3 patients in Group B and 5 patients in Group C for complete clearance of stone. In Group A, subsequent sessions were performed under spinal anesthesia and in Group B under sedation and analgesia (p>0.001. Mean number of sessions for full clearance of stones in group A was 1.37 ± 0.85, in Group B was 1.8 ± 0.887 and in Group C was 2.0 ± 1.083. Significant difference was observed in term of sessions among groups (p>0.05. In first follow-up, complete clearance of stones was seen in 24 patients in Group A and 13 in both Group B and Group C. In second follow-up, 3 patients in Group A, 12 in Group B and 8 in Group C showed complete clearance of stones. It was observed that rate of stone clearance was higher in Group A

  2. One-loop triple collinear splitting amplitudes in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badger, Simon; Buciuni, Francesco; Peraro, Tiziano [Higgs Centre for Theoretical Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh,Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-28

    We study the factorisation properties of one-loop scattering amplitudes in the triple collinear limit and extract the universal splitting amplitudes for processes initiated by a gluon. The splitting amplitudes are derived from the analytic Higgs plus four partons amplitudes. We present compact results for primitive helicity splitting amplitudes making use of super-symmetric decompositions. The universality of the collinear factorisation is checked numerically against the full colour six parton squared matrix elements.

  3. Concept Study of Foundation Systems for Wave Energy Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Salvador Devant; Vaitkunaite, Evelina; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    Analysis of possible foundation solution for Wave Energy Converters (WEC) is presented by investigating and optimizing novel foundation systems recently developed for offshore wind turbines. Gravity based, pile and bucket foundations are innovative foundation systems that are analyzed. Concept...

  4. The study of waves, instabilities, and turbulence using Thomson scattering in laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    Much basic work in plasma physics has been devoted to the study of wave properties in plasmas, one of the nonlinear development of driven waves, and of the instabilities in which such waves may participate. The use of laser-plasma techniques has allowed one to extend such studies into new regimes. Such techniques and their results are the subject here. Once one chooses a physical problem within this subject area, it is now possible to design a laser-plasma experiment that is optimized for the study of that problem. The plasma can be designed to have a variety of density and flow-velocity profiles, the damping of ion acoustic waves and of electron plasma waves can be independently controlled, and the waves can be driven weakly or strongly. By using Nd-glass lasers and their harmonics one can non-invasively drive and diagnose the waves, using separate laser beams to produce the plasma, drive the waves, and diagnose their properties. The author uses as examples some recent work with his collaborators, including the first experimental detection of ion plasma waves and the first direct observation of the plasma wave driven by the acoustic decay of laser light

  5. Bad splits in bilateral sagittal split osteotomy: systematic review and meta-analysis of reported risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenen, S A; van Wijk, A J; Becking, A G

    2016-08-01

    An unfavourable and unanticipated pattern of the bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) is generally referred to as a 'bad split'. Patient factors predictive of a bad split reported in the literature are controversial. Suggested risk factors are reviewed in this article. A systematic review was undertaken, yielding a total of 30 studies published between 1971 and 2015 reporting the incidence of bad split and patient age, and/or surgical technique employed, and/or the presence of third molars. These included 22 retrospective cohort studies, six prospective cohort studies, one matched-pair analysis, and one case series. Spearman's rank correlation showed a statistically significant but weak correlation between increasing average age and increasing occurrence of bad splits in 18 studies (ρ=0.229; Pbad split among the different splitting techniques. A meta-analysis pooling the effect sizes of seven cohort studies showed no significant difference in the incidence of bad split between cohorts of patients with third molars present and concomitantly removed during surgery, and patients in whom third molars were removed at least 6 months preoperatively (odds ratio 1.16, 95% confidence interval 0.73-1.85, Z=0.64, P=0.52). In summary, there is no robust evidence to date to show that any risk factor influences the incidence of bad split. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Numerical study of primordial magnetic field amplification by inflation-produced gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2010-01-01

    We numerically study the interaction of inflation-produced magnetic fields with gravitational waves, both of which originate from quantum fluctuations during inflation. The resonance between the magnetic field perturbations and the gravitational waves has been suggested as a possible mechanism for magnetic field amplification. However, some analytical studies suggest that the effect of the inflationary gravitational waves is too small to provide significant amplification. Our numerical study shows more clearly how the interaction affects the magnetic fields and confirms the weakness of the influence of the gravitational waves. We present an investigation based on the magnetohydrodynamic approximation and take into account the differences of the Alfven speed.

  7. A photoelastic study of the effects of an impulsive seismic wave on a nuclear containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, C.P.

    1981-01-01

    A dynamic photoelastic study of the progressive movement of a dilatational P-wave into a model of a nuclear containment vessel,is studied. The reflections at the dome abutments are observed and the strong flexural wave that deforms the dome itself is studied with photoelasticity and with dynamic strain gage procedures. (E.G.) [pt

  8. Study to improve the precision of calculation of split renal clearance by gamma camera method using 99mTc-MAG3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimura, Hiroaki; Tomomitsu, Tatsushi; Yanagimoto, Shinichi

    1999-01-01

    Both fundamental and clinical studies were performed to improve the precision with which split renal clearance is calculated from the relation between renal clearance and the total renal uptake rate by using 99m Tc-MAG 3 , which is mainly excreted into the proximal renal tubules. In the fundamental study, the most suitable kidney phantom threshold values for the extracted renal outline were investigated with regard to size, radioactivity, depth of the kidney phantom, and radioactivity in the background. In the clinical study, suitable timing to obtain additional images for making the ROI and the standard point for calculation of renal uptake rate were investigated. The results indicated that, although suitable threshold values were distributed from 25% to 45%, differences in size, solution activity, and the position of the phantom or BG activity did not have significant effects. Comparing 1-3 min with 2-5 min as the time for additional images for ROI, we found that renal areas using the former time showed higher values, and the correlation coefficient of the regression formula improved significantly. Comparison of the timing for the start of data acquisition with the end of the arterial phase as a standard point of calculating renal uptake rate showed improvement in the latter. (author)

  9. Randomized, controlled trial split-faced study of 595-nm pulsed dye laser in the treatment of acne vulgaris and acne erythema in adolescents and early adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekwuttikarn, Ramrada; Tempark, Therdpong; Chatproedprai, Susheera; Wananukul, Siriwan

    2017-08-01

    The high prevalence of acne vulgaris in teenagers has increased comorbidities. Lasers offer alternative options for acne treatment because they have rapid action, low systemic adverse effects, and do not require everyday treatment. To study the efficacy and patients' satisfaction of 595-nm pulse dye laser (PDL) treatment of acne vulgaris and acne erythema in adolescents and early adulthood, we designed a blocked-randomized, split-faced 595-nm PDL (fluence 8 J/cm 3 pulse duration 10 ms, spot size 7 mm, 2 session every 2 weeks) study in patients with mild to moderate acne by comparing the laser-treated and non-treated side. The acne lesion counts, acne erythema grading, and acne severity grading were evaluated at baseline and 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Thirty patients were recruited. The results showed no statistically significant difference except the papule count at week 4 which was -1.828 on the treated side and 0.103 on the non-treated side of the face, P-value 0.0018. There was no statistically significant difference of acne severity grading and acne erythema grading between both sides of the face. The mean scores of patients' satisfaction on the laser-treated side were 75, 81, and 81%, respectively. The PDL treatment in this study reveals no significant improvement in acne therapy; however, the patients were satisfied with this laser treatment. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  10. Wave energy, lever operated pivoting float LOPF study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margheritini, L.

    2012-11-01

    The fully instrumented Resen Waves Lever Operated Pivoting Float LOPF wave energy buoy model has gone through the first stage of testing in regular waves in scale 1:25 of the North Sea wave conditions, in the 3D deep wave basin at the Hydraulic and Coastal Engineering Laboratory of Aalborg University in Denmark. The model size was 60cm W x 90cm L x 21cm H. The 60 cm width pointed towards the wave front. The LOPF buoy is characterized by a simple mechanical design with few moving parts and direct electrical output and it is taut moored to the sea bed, so all forces are referenced to the seabed for maximum energy output in regular as well as irregular waves. During storms the buoy pivots and streamlines itself to minimize loads on the mooring line. A conservative estimate shows that a full scale system for North Sea conditions has a float size width of 15 m that will, with 60% generator efficiency, produce 610 MWh/y (609.497 kWh/y) with an average power output of 69.6 kW, which requires a generator capacity of 700 kW. It is expected the generator efficiency can be increased to 90% in the future. More specific calculations (from EnergiNet) show that with one generator of 695 kW the expected power production is 585 MWh/y; with a generator of 250 kW and 100 kW, the expected power production is 481 MWh/y and 182 MWh/y respectively. In addition there are several areas for future improvements for increased power production. (Author)

  11. Numerical and experimental study of Lamb wave propagation in a two-dimensional acoustic black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Shiling; Shen, Zhonghua, E-mail: shenzh@njust.edu.cn [Faculty of Science, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Lomonosov, Alexey M. [Faculty of Science, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-07

    The propagation of laser-generated Lamb waves in a two-dimensional acoustic black-hole structure was studied numerically and experimentally. The geometrical acoustic theory has been applied to calculate the beam trajectories in the region of the acoustic black hole. The finite element method was also used to study the time evolution of propagating waves. An optical system based on the laser-Doppler vibration method was assembled. The effect of the focusing wave and the reduction in wave speed of the acoustic black hole has been validated.

  12. Spin flip statistics and spin wave interference patterns in Ising ferromagnetic films: A Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharyya, Muktish

    2017-07-01

    The spin wave interference is studied in two dimensional Ising ferromagnet driven by two coherent spherical magnetic field waves by Monte Carlo simulation. The spin waves are found to propagate and interfere according to the classic rule of interference pattern generated by two point sources. The interference pattern of spin wave is observed in one boundary of the lattice. The interference pattern is detected and studied by spin flip statistics at high and low temperatures. The destructive interference is manifested as the large number of spin flips and vice versa.

  13. Experimental Study of a Multi Level Overtopping Wave Power Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Hald, Tue; Frigaard, Peter Bak

    2002-01-01

    Results of experimental investigations of a floating wave energy device called Power Pyramid is presented. The Power Pyramid utilizes reservoirs in multiple levels when capturing wave overtopping and converting it into electrical energy. The effect of capturing the overtopping in multiple levels,......, using 5 levels introduces practical problems, and is most probably not economically feasible. It is concluded that it is reasonable to use 2 levels (maybe 3), which can increase the efficiency by 25-40 % compared to using a single level.......Results of experimental investigations of a floating wave energy device called Power Pyramid is presented. The Power Pyramid utilizes reservoirs in multiple levels when capturing wave overtopping and converting it into electrical energy. The effect of capturing the overtopping in multiple levels......, compared to only one level, has been evaluated experimentally. From the experimental results, and the performed optimizations based on these, it has been found that the efficiency of a wave power device of the overtopping type can be increased by as much as 76 % by using 5 levels instead of 1. However...

  14. Which route of antibiotic administration should be used for third molar surgery? A split-mouth study to compare intramuscular and oral intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crincoli, V; Di Comite, M; Di Bisceglie, M B; Petruzzi, M; Fatone, L; De Biase, C; Tecco, S; Festa, F

    2014-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of two different routes of antibiotic administration in preventing septic complications in patients undergoing third molar extraction. Twenty-four healthy patients requiring bilateral surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars were successfully enrolled for this study. Depth of impaction, angulation, and relationship of the lower third molars with the mandibular branch had to be overlapping on both sides. A split-mouth design was chosen, so each patient underwent both the first and second surgeries, having for each extraction a different antibiotic route of administration. The second extraction was carried out 1 month later. To compare the effects of the two routes of antibiotic administration, inflammatory parameters, such as edema, trismus, pain, fever, dysphagia and lymphadenopathy were evaluated 2 and 7 days after surgery. Side effects of each therapy were evaluated 48 h after surgery. Oral and intramuscular antibiotic therapies overlap in preventing post-operative complications in dental surgery (p>0.05), even if the oral intake, seems to promote the onset of significant gastrointestinal disorders (p=0.003). This study could help dentists in their ordinary practice to choose the right route of antibiotic administration in the third molar surgery. At the same effectiveness, the higher cost and the minor compliance of the patient seem not to justify a routine antibiotic intramuscular therapy, reserving it for patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

  15. Generalized field-splitting algorithms for optimal IMRT delivery efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, Srijit [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sahni, Sartaj [Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Li, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Ranka, Sanjay [Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Palta, Jatinder [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2007-09-21

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) uses radiation beams of varying intensities to deliver varying doses of radiation to different areas of the tissue. The use of IMRT has allowed the delivery of higher doses of radiation to the tumor and lower doses to the surrounding healthy tissue. It is not uncommon for head and neck tumors, for example, to have large treatment widths that are not deliverable using a single field. In such cases, the intensity matrix generated by the optimizer needs to be split into two or three matrices, each of which may be delivered using a single field. Existing field-splitting algorithms used the pre-specified arbitrary split line or region where the intensity matrix is split along a column, i.e., all rows of the matrix are split along the same column (with or without the overlapping of split fields, i.e., feathering). If three fields result, then the two splits are along the same two columns for all rows. In this paper we study the problem of splitting a large field into two or three subfields with the field width as the only constraint, allowing for an arbitrary overlap of the split fields, so that the total MU efficiency of delivering the split fields is maximized. Proof of optimality is provided for the proposed algorithm. An average decrease of 18.8% is found in the total MUs when compared to the split generated by a commercial treatment planning system and that of 10% is found in the total MUs when compared to the split generated by our previously published algorithm. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org.

  16. Vacuum Rabi Splitting and Dynamics of the Jaynes—Cummings Model for Arbitrary Coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yu-Yu; Chen Qing-Hu; Zhu Shi-Yao

    2013-01-01

    The effects of counter-rotating terms (CRTs) on Rabi splitting and the dynamic evolution of atomic population in the Jaynes—Cummings model are studied with a coherent-state approach. When the coupling strength increases, the Rabi splitting becomes of multi-Rabi frequencies for the initial state of an excited atom in a vacuum field, and the collapses and revivals gradually disappear, and then reappear with quite good periodicity. Without the rotating-wave approximation (RWA), the initial excited state contains many eigenstates rather than two eigenstates under the RWA, which results in the multi-peak emission spectrum. An analytical approximate solution for the strong coupling regime is obtained, which gives a new oscillation frequency and explains the recovery of collapses and revivals due to the equal energy spacing

  17. Attitudes towards tuberculosis and sources of tuberculosis-related information: study on patients in outpatient settings in Split, Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurcev-Savicević, Anamarija

    2011-03-01

    Attitudes towards tuberculosis may have severe impact on individuals and their families as well as on the effectiveness of tuberculosis control programs. The purpose of this study was to describe these attitudes and explore the sources of tuberculosis information available to the general population in Croatia through a cross-sectional survey based on structured questionnaire using convenience sampling among 386 subjects aged 18 years and over. Data were stratified by sex, age groups, educational background, personal monthly income and contact with tuberculosis patient. Being near to a tuberculosis patient would be uncomfortable for 39.9% of respondents and 26.4% of subjects would avoid any contact. If they were sick of tuberculosis, 9.6% of respondents would keep it from the society. Less than 10% of study subjects would be ashamed of their own or potential tuberculosis in their family. Almost twice less subjects with high education would hide the disease (P=0.049), or be ashamed if sick in comparison with less educated respondents (P=0.036). The subjects who were not in contact were less likely to feel uncomfortable about being near to a tuberculosis patient (P=0.042). As the source of tuberculosis information, 61% of the subjects reported TV, radio and journals. Internet was the least used source (13.2%). The subjects in contact received information from the family or friends (P=0.025), while those without contact were informed through mass media (P<0.001). Study results revealed high stigma-generating attitudes towards tuberculosis. The strong potential of mass media capable of reaching different population groups should be used as part of the stigma-reduction strategies.

  18. Electroweak splitting functions and high energy showering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junmou; Han, Tao; Tweedie, Brock

    2017-11-01

    We derive the electroweak (EW) collinear splitting functions for the Standard Model, including the massive fermions, gauge bosons and the Higgs boson. We first present the splitting functions in the limit of unbroken SU(2) L × U(1) Y and discuss their general features in the collinear and soft-collinear regimes. These are the leading contributions at a splitting scale ( k T ) far above the EW scale ( v). We then systematically incorporate EW symmetry breaking (EWSB), which leads to the emergence of additional "ultra-collinear" splitting phenomena and naive violations of the Goldstone-boson Equivalence Theorem. We suggest a particularly convenient choice of non-covariant gauge (dubbed "Goldstone Equivalence Gauge") that disentangles the effects of Goldstone bosons and gauge fields in the presence of EWSB, and allows trivial book-keeping of leading power corrections in v/ k T . We implement a comprehensive, practical EW showering scheme based on these splitting functions using a Sudakov evolution formalism. Novel features in the implementation include a complete accounting of ultra-collinear effects, matching between shower and decay, kinematic back-reaction corrections in multi-stage showers, and mixed-state evolution of neutral bosons ( γ/ Z/ h) using density-matrices. We employ the EW showering formalism to study a number of important physical processes at O (1-10 TeV) energies. They include (a) electroweak partons in the initial state as the basis for vector-boson-fusion; (b) the emergence of "weak jets" such as those initiated by transverse gauge bosons, with individual splitting probabilities as large as O (35%); (c) EW showers initiated by top quarks, including Higgs bosons in the final state; (d) the occurrence of O (1) interference effects within EW showers involving the neutral bosons; and (e) EW corrections to new physics processes, as illustrated by production of a heavy vector boson ( W ') and the subsequent showering of its decay products.

  19. Studying Electromechanical Wave Propagation and Transport Delays in Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Kalyan; Kulkarni, A. M.; Soman, Shreevardhan

    2013-05-01

    Abstract: In this paper, we make an attempt to describe the phenomenon of wave propagation when a disturbance is introduced in an electromechanical system. The focus is mainly on generator trips in a power system. Ordering of the generators is first done using a sensitivity matrix. Thereafter, orthogonal decomposition of the ordered generators is done to group them based on their participation in different modes. Finally, we find the velocity of propagation of the wave and the transport delay associated with it using the ESPRIT method. The analysis done on generators from the eastern and western regions of India.1

  20. Evaluation Statistics Computed for the Wave Information Studies (WIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    the numerical wave model ( SWAN ) for wave simulation in the Black Sea. Continental Shelf Research 50–51: 80–99. Alves, J.-H. G. M., S...York Harbor Entrance. The time series plots, shown in the left column of Figure 1, compare time series of the modeled ( black line) and observed (red...Hmo on the horizontal axis. Within these plots, the diagonal black line is the best fit line, and the closer a dot lies to the best fit line,

  1. Use of TCO as splitter in the optical splitting system for solar cells combination: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Mató, F.; Seuret-Jiménez, D.; Vigil-Galán, O.; Escobedo Alatorre, J. J.

    2017-10-01

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) are evaluated as optical splitters in combined single thin film solar cells by using theoretical considerations. The optical properties of TCOs (transmittance and reflectance) are calculated using the Drude theory for free carriers. To improve the overall efficiency of the combined solar cells, the optical properties of the TCOs are studied as a function of the electron concentration and thickness, to obtain the best fit with the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the solar cells in each case. The optimum values of the above parameters are obtained by applying a modified version of the Hooke-Jeeves method. To validate the proposal of the use of a TCO as the splitter, the short circuit current is calculated for several combined solar cell systems and the results are compared with those obtained using more sophisticated and expensive splitters, reported in the literature. The experimental results using a commercial TCO are presented, to verify the validity and feasibility of the novel concept.

  2. A prospective, split-mouth study comparing tilted implants with angulated connection versus conventional implants with angulated abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Weehaeghe, Manú; De Bruyn, Hugo; Vandeweghe, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    An angulation of the implant connection could overcome the problems related to angulated abutments. This study compares conventional implants with angulated abutment to tilted implants with an angulated connection. Twenty patients were treated in the edentulous mandible. In the posterior jaw locations, one conventional tilted implant with angulated abutment and one angulated implant without abutment were placed. In the anterior jaw, two conventional implants were placed, one with and one without abutment. Implants were immediately loaded and 3 months later, the final bridge (PFM or monolithic zirconia) was placed. After a follow-up of 48 months, 17 patients were available for clinical examination. The mean overall marginal bone loss (MBL) was 1.26 mm. No significant differences in implant survival, MBL, periodontal indices, patients' satisfaction, or complications was found between implants restored on abutment or implant level, between the posteriorly located angulated implant nor angulated abutment, and between both anterior implants with or without abutment. The posterior implants demonstrated less MBL compared to the anterior implants (P abutment were replaced and four loose bridge screws connected to the angulated abutments had to be tightened. Patients were overall satisfied (4.74/5). An implant with angulated connection may results in a stronger connection but does not affect the marginal bone loss. No difference in MBL was seen between implants restored on abutment or implant level. Zirconia seems to reduce the amount of plaque. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Computational study on full-wave inversion based on the elastic wave-equation; Dansei hado hoteishiki full wave inversion no model keisan ni yoru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uesaka, S [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Watanabe, T; Sassa, K [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    Algorithm is constructed and a program developed for a full-wave inversion (FWI) method utilizing the elastic wave equation in seismic exploration. The FWI method is a method for obtaining a physical property distribution using the whole observed waveforms as the data. It is capable of high resolution which is several times smaller than the wavelength since it can handle such phenomena as wave reflection and dispersion. The method for determining the P-wave velocity structure by use of the acoustic wave equation does not provide information about the S-wave velocity since it does not consider S-waves or converted waves. In an analysis using the elastic wave equation, on the other hand, not only P-wave data but also S-wave data can be utilized. In this report, under such circumstances, an inverse analysis algorithm is constructed on the basis of the elastic wave equation, and a basic program is developed. On the basis of the methods of Mora and of Luo and Schuster, the correction factors for P-wave and S-wave velocities are formulated directly from the elastic wave equation. Computations are performed and the effects of the hypocenter frequency and vibration transmission direction are examined. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Imaging 'top-down' mobilization of visual information: a case study in a posterior split-brain patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccache, Lionel; Sportiche, Sarah; Strauss, Mélanie; El Karoui, Imen; Sitt, Jacobo; Cohen, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    During visual perception, automatic bottom-up and controlled top-down processes occur simultaneously and interact in a complex way, making them difficult to isolate and characterize. In rare neurological conditions, such a dissociation can be achieved more easily. In the present work, we studied a patient (AC) with a posterior lesion of the corpus callosum (CC), using a combination of behavioural, structural MRI and high-density scalp EEG measures. Given the complete disruption of the posterior half of the CC, we speculated that inter-hemispheric transfer of visual information was only possible through top-down mobilization across the preserved anterior segment of the CC. We designed a matching-to-sample visual task during which this patient was randomly presented with two successive numerical targets (T1 and T2) flashed with either a short or a long stimulus-onset asynchrony (SOA), each presented within one visual hemifield (HF). Intra-hemispheric processing of visual stimuli was essentially preserved. In sharp contrast, patient's performance was massively impaired during inter-HFs trials with a short-SOA, confirming the lack of fast inter-hemispheric transfer. Crucially, patient AC spontaneously improved his performance in inter-HFs trials with a long-SOA. This behavioral improvement was correlated with a mid-frontal ERP effect occurring during the T1-T2 interval, concomitant with an increase of functional connectivity of this region with distant areas including occipital regions. These results put to light a slow, non-automatic, and frontally mediated route of inter-hemispheric transfer dependent on top-down control. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Split face comparative study of microneedling with PRP versus microneedling with vitamin C in treating atrophic post acne scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simran Chawla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acne scars are largely preventable complications of acne. 95% of the scars occur over the face thus impacting the quality of life. Correction of scars is the priority for acne patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with post acne atrophic facial scars attending the OPD during the period from April to October 2013 were offered four sittings of microneedling with PRP on one side and microneedling with vitamin C on other side of the face at an interval of 1 month. Results: Twenty-seven out of the total 30 patients completed the treatment schedule. Two patients were lost to follow up and one dropped out of the study due to severe PIH. Mean age of the patients was 27.5 years. Out of 30 patients, 23 achieved reduction in scarring by one or two grades. Excellent response was seen in five (18.5% patients with platelet-rich plasma (PRP as compared to two (7% patients who received treatment with vitamin C according to physician′s assessment. As far as up gradation by 1 score is considered, i.e., good response, it was similar in both cases. Vitamin C did not prove to be as efficacious as PRP since 10 (37% patients had poor response in vitamin C-treated area compared to only 6 (22.2% patients who underwent PRP therapy, but vitamin C proved to be efficacious in dealing with post inflammatory hyper-pigmentation secondary to acne. Patients were more satisfied with PRP as compared to vitamin C. The results were evaluated and statistical analysis was done using SPSS 16.0.2. Conclusions: Overall results were better with microneedling and PRP. Vitamin C combined with microneedling also showed improvement with respect to firmness and smoothness of skin; as well as post inflammatory hyper-pigmentation. Microneedling combined with PRP proved to be good in treating boxcar and rolling scars but had limited efficacy in dealing with ice pick scars.

  6. Angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of square antidot lattices studied by Brillouin light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubbiotti, G.; Tacchi, S. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IOM-CNR), Sede di Perugia, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Montoncello, F.; Giovannini, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Ferrara, Via G. Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Madami, M.; Carlotti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Ding, J.; Adeyeye, A. O. [Information Storage Materials Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2015-06-29

    The Brillouin light scattering technique has been exploited to study the angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of squared Permalloy antidot lattice. Frequency dispersion of spin waves has been measured for a set of fixed wave vector magnitudes, while varying the wave vector in-plane orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field. The magnonic band gap between the two most dispersive modes exhibits a minimum value at an angular position, which exclusively depends on the product between the selected wave vector magnitude and the lattice constant of the array. The experimental data are in very good agreement with predictions obtained by dynamical matrix method calculations. The presented results are relevant for magnonic devices where the antidot lattice, acting as a diffraction grating, is exploited to achieve multidirectional spin wave emission.

  7. Experimental Study on Corrosion Detection of Aluminum Alloy Using Lamb Wave Mixing Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Heeung; Lee, Jaesun; Cho, Younho [Pusan Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    In this study, the Lamb wave mixing technique, which is basised on advanced research on the nonlinear bulk wave mixing technique, is applied for corrosion detection. To demonstrate the validity of the Lamb wave mixing technique, an experiment was performed with normal and corroded specimens. Comparison group in an experimentation are selected to mode and frequency with dominant in-plane displacement and out-of-plane displacement of Lamb waves. The results showed that the Lamb wave mixing technique can monitor corrosion defects, and it has a trend similar to that of the conventional Lamb wave technique. It was confirmed that the dominant displacement and mode matching the theory were generated. Flaw detectability is determined depending on displacement ratio instead of using the measurement method and mode selection.

  8. A Study on Techniques for Focusing Circumferential Array Guided Waves for Long Range Inspection of Pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, To; Kim, Hak Joon; Song, Sung Jin; Cho, Young Do; Lee, Dong Hoon; Cho, Hyun Joon

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have been widely utilized for long range inspection of structures. Especially, development of array guided waves techniques and its application for long range gas pipe lines(length of from hundreds meters to few km) were getting increased. In this study, focusing algorithm for array guided waves was developed in order to improve long range inspectability and accuracy of the array guided waves techniques for long range inspection of gas pipes, and performance of the developed techniques was verified by experiments using the developed array guided wave system. As a result, S/N ratio of array guided wave signals obtained with the focusing algorithm was increased higher than that of signals without focusing algorithm

  9. Numerical studies of nonlinear ultrasonic guided waves in uniform waveguides with arbitrary cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Peng; Fan, Zheng, E-mail: ZFAN@ntu.edu.sg [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Zhou, Yu [Advanced Remanufacturing and Technology Center (ARTC), 3 Clean Tech Loop, CleanTech Two, Singapore 637143 (Singapore)

    2016-07-15

    Nonlinear guided waves have been investigated widely in simple geometries, such as plates, pipe and shells, where analytical solutions have been developed. This paper extends the application of nonlinear guided waves to waveguides with arbitrary cross sections. The criteria for the existence of nonlinear guided waves were summarized based on the finite deformation theory and nonlinear material properties. Numerical models were developed for the analysis of nonlinear guided waves in complex geometries, including nonlinear Semi-Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method to identify internal resonant modes in complex waveguides, and Finite Element (FE) models to simulate the nonlinear wave propagation at resonant frequencies. Two examples, an aluminum plate and a steel rectangular bar, were studied using the proposed numerical model, demonstrating the existence of nonlinear guided waves in such structures and the energy transfer from primary to secondary modes.

  10. Comparison of a fractional microplasma radio frequency technology and carbon dioxide fractional laser for the treatment of atrophic acne scars: a randomized split-face clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Fei, Ye; Chen, Xiangdong; Lu, Wenli; Chen, Jinan

    2013-04-01

    No studies have compared fractional microplasma radio frequency (RF) technology with the carbon dioxide fractional laser system (CO2 FS) in the treatment of atrophic acne scars in the same patient. To compare the efficacy and safety of fractional microplasma RF with CO2 FS in the treatment of atrophic acne scars. Thirty-three Asian patients received three sessions of a randomized split-face treatment of fractional microplasma RF or CO2 FS. Both modalities had a roughly equivalent effect. Échelle d'Évaluation Clinique Des Cicatrices d'Acné scores were significantly lower after fractional microplasma RF (from 51.1 ± 14.2 to 22.3 ± 8.6, 56.4% improvement) and CO2 FS (from 48.8 ± 15.1 to 19.9 ± 7.9, 59.2% improvement) treatments. There was no statistically significant difference between the two therapies. Twelve subjects (36.4%) experienced postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) after 30 of 99 treatment sessions (30.3%) on the CO2 FS side and no PIH was observed on the fractional microplasma RF sides. Both modalities have good effects on treating atrophic scars. PIH was not seen with the fractional microplasma RF, which might make it a better choice for patients with darker skin. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Influence of Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Fibrin (L-PRF) in the Healing of Simple Postextraction Sockets: A Split-Mouth Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccitiello, Francesco; Tia, Mariano; di Lauro, Alessandro; Sammartino, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) on the pain and soft tissue healing after tooth extractions. Twenty-six patients (9 males and 17 females) were treated with multiple extractions (2 to 8), with a total of 108 extractions. This was an exploratory single blinded randomized clinical trial with a split-mouth design. The pain after the surgery was assessed in each patient by the VAS scale (1 to 10) at intervals of 24-48-72-96 hours. The soft tissue healing was clinically evaluated at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days after surgery by the same examiner surgeon, using the modified Healing Index (4 to 12). The mean value of postextraction pain was 3.2 ± 0.3 in the experimental sides and 4.1 ± 0.1 in the control sides. After 7 days from the extractions, the values of modified Healing Index in the experimental and control groups were, respectively, 4.8 ± 0.6 and 5.1 ± 0.9. The use of L-PRF in postextraction sockets filling can be proposed as a useful procedure in order to manage the postoperative pain and to promote the soft tissue healing process, reducing the early adverse effects of the inflammation. PMID:26273612

  12. Chemical vapour deposition of graphene on Nk(111) and Co(0001) and intercalation with Au to study Dirac Cone Formation and Rashba splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Barriga, J.; Vescovo, E.; Varykhalov, A.; Scholz, M.R.; Rader, O.; Marchenko, D.; Rybkin, A.

    2010-01-01

    We show in detail monitoring by photoelectron spectroscopy how graphene can be grown by chemical vapor deposition on the transition-metal surfaces Ni(111) and Co(0001) and intercalated by a monoatomic layer of Au. For both systems, a linear E(k) dispersion of massless Dirac fermions appears in the graphene {pi}-band in the vicinity of the Fermi energy. In order to study ferromagnetism and spin-orbit effects by spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, the sample must be magnetized in remanence. To this end, a W(110) substrate is prepared, its cleanliness verified by photoemission from W(110) surface states and surface core levels, and epitaxial Ni(111) and Co(0001) thin films are grown on top. Spin-resolved photoemission from the {pi}-band shows that the ferromagnetic polarization of graphene/Ni(111) and graphene/Co(0001) is negligible and that graphene on Ni(111) is after intercalation of Au spin-orbit split by the Rashba effect.

  13. Influence of Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Fibrin (L-PRF) in the Healing of Simple Postextraction Sockets: A Split-Mouth Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenzi, Gaetano; Riccitiello, Francesco; Tia, Mariano; di Lauro, Alessandro; Sammartino, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) on the pain and soft tissue healing after tooth extractions. Twenty-six patients (9 males and 17 females) were treated with multiple extractions (2 to 8), with a total of 108 extractions. This was an exploratory single blinded randomized clinical trial with a split-mouth design. The pain after the surgery was assessed in each patient by the VAS scale (1 to 10) at intervals of 24-48-72-96 hours. The soft tissue healing was clinically evaluated at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days after surgery by the same examiner surgeon, using the modified Healing Index (4 to 12). The mean value of postextraction pain was 3.2 ± 0.3 in the experimental sides and 4.1 ± 0.1 in the control sides. After 7 days from the extractions, the values of modified Healing Index in the experimental and control groups were, respectively, 4.8 ± 0.6 and 5.1 ± 0.9. The use of L-PRF in postextraction sockets filling can be proposed as a useful procedure in order to manage the postoperative pain and to promote the soft tissue healing process, reducing the early adverse effects of the inflammation.

  14. Tunneling Splittings in Vibronic Structure of CH_3F^+ ( X^2E): Studied by High Resolution Photoelectron Spectra and AB Initio Theoretical Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yuxiang; Gao, Shuming; Dai, Zuyang; Li, Hua

    2013-06-01

    We report a combined experimental and theoretical study on the vibronic structure of CH_3F^+. The results show that the tunneling splittings of vibrational energy levels occur in CH_3F^+ due to the Jahn-Teller effect. Experimentally, we have measured a high resolution ZEKE spectrum of CH_3F up to 3500 cm^-^1 above the ground state. Theoretically, we performed an ab initio calculation based on the diabatic model. The adiabatic potential energy surfaces (APES) of CH_3F^+ have been calculated at the MRCI/CAS/avq(t)z level and expressed by Taylor expansions with normal coordinates as variables. The energy gradients for the lower and upper APES, the derivative couplings between them and also the energies of the APES have been used to determine the coefficients in the Taylor expansion. The spin-vibronic energy levels have been calculated by accounting all six vibrational modes and their couplings. The experimental ZEKE spectra were assigned based on the theoretical calculations. W. Domcke, D. R. Yarkony, and H. Köpple (Eds.), Conical Intersections: Eletronic Structure, Dynamics and Spectroscopy (World Scientific, Singapore, 2004). M. S. Schuurman, D. E. Weinberg, and D. R. Yarkony, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 104309 (2007).

  15. The split delivery capacitated team orienteering problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archetti, C.; Bianchessi, N.; Speranza, M. G.; Hertz, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we study the capacitated team orienteering problem where split deliveries are allowed. A set of potential customers is given, each associated with a demand and a profit. The set of customers to be served by a fleet of capacitated vehicles has to be identified in such a way that the

  16. Split heat pipe heat recovery system

    OpenAIRE

    E. Azad

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a theoretical analysis of a split heat pipe heat recovery system. The analysis is based on an Effectiveness-NTU approach to deduce its heat transfer characteristics. In this study the variation of overall effectiveness of heat recovery with the number of transfer units are presented. Copyright , Manchester University Press.

  17. Split brain : Divided perception but undivided consciousness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinto, Y.; Neville, D.A.; Otten, M.; Corballis, P.M.; Lamme, V.A.F.; de Haan, E.H.F.; Foschi, N.; Fabri, M.

    In extensive studies with two split-brain patients we replicate the standard finding that stimuli cannot be compared across visual half-fields, indicating that each hemisphere processes information independently of the other. Yet, crucially, we show that the canonical textbook findings that a

  18. Helioseismic Solar Cycle Changes and Splitting Coefficients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Abstract. Using the GONG data for a period over four years, we have studied the variation of frequencies and splitting coefficients with solar cycle. Frequencies and even-order coefficients are found to change signi- ficantly with rising phase of the solar cycle. We also find temporal varia- tions in the rotation rate near the solar ...

  19. Simulation study on cross polarization scattering of ultrashort-pulse electromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuragawa, Naoki; Hojo, Hitoshi; Mase, Atushi

    1996-11-01

    Simulation study on cross polarization scattering of ultrashort-pulse electromagnetic waves due to magnetic fluctuations is presented. One-dimensional coupled wave equations for the ordinary and extraordinary modes are solved for incident unipolar sub-cycle pulses in an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma. It is shown that the peak frequencies in the frequency-spectral signals of the mode-converted reflected waves are determined from the Bragg resonance condition in the wave numbers of the ordinary mode, the extraordinary mode and the magnetic fluctuations for relatively short-wavelength localized magnetic fluctuations. (author)

  20. Experimental study of electronic electrostatic waves detected in the terrestrial magnetosphere by the satellite GEOS 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canu, P.

    1982-09-01

    After reviewing the general characteristics of electrostator waves a brief resume is given of the observations made up to the present moment. The GEOS satellite and the ''wave'' experiment are described, as well as the method and results of the statistical study of the strong electrostatic wave observed. Creating mechanisms of diffuse auroras are discussed. In a later chapter a new method of using the relaxation probe is presented as well as the results it gives on the mode of propagation of waves in the neighbourhood of the FUH frequency [fr

  1. Model Study of Wave Overtopping of Marine Structure for a Wide Range of Geometric Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study described in this paper is to enable estimation of wave overtopping rates for slopes/ramps given by a wide range of geometric parameters when subjected to varying wave conditions. To achieve this a great number of model tests are carried out in a wave tank using irregul...... 2-D waves. On the basis of the first part of these tests an exponential overtopping expression for a linear slope, including the effect of limited draught and varying slope angle, is presented. The plans for further tests with other slope geometries are described....

  2. Mode splitting effect in FEMs with oversized Bragg resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskov, N. Yu.; Sergeev, A. S. [Institute of Applied Physics Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Kaminsky, A. K.; Perelstein, E. A.; Sedykh, S. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kuzikov, S. V. [Institute of Applied Physics Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Nizhegorodsky State University, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    Splitting of the fundamental mode in an oversized Bragg resonator with a step of the corrugation phase, which operates over the feedback loop involving the waveguide waves of different transverse structures, was found to be the result of mutual influence of the neighboring zones of the Bragg scattering. Theoretical description of this effect was developed within the framework of the advanced (four-wave) coupled-wave approach. It is shown that mode splitting reduces the selective properties, restricts the output power, and decreases the stability of the narrow-band operating regime in the free-electron maser (FEM) oscillators based on such resonators. The results of the theoretical analysis were confirmed by 3D simulations and “cold” microwave tests. Experimental data on Bragg resonators with different parameters in a 30-GHz FEM are presented. The possibility of reducing the mode splitting by profiling the corrugation parameters is shown. The use of the mode splitting effect for the output power enhancement by passive compression of the double-frequency pulse generated in the FEM with such a resonator is discussed.

  3. Wind waves in the Black Sea: results of a hindcast study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipkin, V. S.; Gippius, F. N.; Koltermann, K. P.; Surkova, G. V.

    2014-11-01

    In this study we describe the wind wave fields in the Black Sea. The general aims of the work were the estimation of statistical wave parameters and the assessment of interannual and seasonal wave parameter variability. The domain of this study was the entire Black Sea. Wave parameters were calculated by means of the SWAN wave model on a 5 × 5 km rectangular grid. Initial conditions (wind speed and direction) for the period between 1949 and 2010 were derived from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. According to our calculations the average significant wave height on the Black Sea does not exceed 0.7 m. Areas of most significant heavy sea are the southwestern and the northeastern parts of the sea as expressed in the spatial distribution of significant wave heights, wave lengths and periods. Besides, long-term annual variations of wave parameters were estimated. Thus, linear trends of the annual total duration of storms and of their quantity are nearly stable over the hindcast period. However, an intensification of storm activity is observed in the 1960s-1970s.

  4. Study on thermal wave based on the thermal mass theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The conservation equations for heat conduction are established based on the concept of thermal mass.We obtain a general heat conduction law which takes into account the spatial and temporal inertia of thermal mass.The general law introduces a damped thermal wave equation.It reduces to the well-known CV model when the spatial inertia of heat flux and temperature and the temporal inertia of temperature are neglected,which indicates that the CV model only considers the temporal inertia of heat flux.Numerical simulations on the propagation and superposition of thermal waves show that for small thermal perturbation the CV model agrees with the thermal wave equation based on the thermal mass theory.For larger thermal perturbation,however,the physically impossible phenomenon pre-dicted by CV model,i.e.the negative temperature induced by the thermal wave superposition,is eliminated by the general heat conduction law,which demonstrates that the present heat conduction law based on the thermal mass theory is more reasonable.

  5. Study on thermal wave based on the thermal mass theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU RuiFeng; CAO BingYang

    2009-01-01

    The conservation equations for heat conduction are established based on the concept of thermal mass. We obtain a general heat conduction law which takes into account the spatial and temporal inertia of thermal mass. The general law introduces a damped thermal wave equation. It reduces to the well-known CV model when the spatial inertia of heat flux and temperature and the temporal inertia of temperature are neglected, which indicates that the CV model only considers the temporal inertia of heat flux. Numerical simulations on the propagation and superposition of thermal waves show that for small thermal perturbation the CV model agrees with the thermal wave equation based on the thermal mass theory. For larger thermal perturbation, however, the physically impossible phenomenon pre-dicted by CV model, i.e. the negative temperature induced by the thermal wave superposition, is eliminated by the general heat conduction law, which demonstrates that the present heat conduction law based on the thermal mass theory is more reasonable.

  6. Nonlinear wave propagation studies, dispersion modeling, and signal parameters correction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Převorovský, Zdeněk

    ..: ..., 2004, 00. [European Workshop on FP6-AERONEWS /1./. Naples (IT), 13.09.2004-16.09.2004] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 502927 - AERO-NEWS Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : nodestructive testing * nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  7. Two-Loop Splitting Amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bern, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Splitting amplitudes govern the behavior of scattering amplitudes at the momenta of external legs become collinear. In this talk we outline the calculation of two-loop splitting amplitudes via the unitarity sewing method. This method retains the simple factorization properties of light-cone gauge, but avoids the need for prescriptions such as the principal value or Mandelstam-Leibbrandt ones. The encountered loop momentum integrals are then evaluated using integration-by-parts and Lorentz invariance identities. We outline a variety of applications for these splitting amplitudes

  8. Two-loop splitting amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bern, Z.; Dixon, L.J.; Kosower, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Splitting amplitudes govern the behavior of scattering amplitudes at the momenta of external legs become collinear. In this talk we outline the calculation of two-loop splitting amplitudes via the unitarity sewing method. This method retains the simple factorization properties of light-cone gauge, but avoids the need for prescriptions such as the principal value or Mandelstam-Leibbrandt ones. The encountered loop momentum integrals are then evaluated using integration-by-parts and Lorentz invariance identities. We outline a variety of applications for these splitting amplitudes

  9. Linear expansion of products out of thermal splitting graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tishina, E.A.; Kurnevich, G.I.

    1994-01-01

    Linear expansion of thermally split graphite in the form of foil and pressed items of different density was studied. It is ascertained that the extreme character of temperature dependence of linear expansion factor of pressed samples of thermally split graphite is determined by the formation of closed pores containing air in the course of their production. 3 refs., 2 figs

  10. Study on the Performance of the “Pendulor” Wave Energy Converter in an Array Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudath Prasanna Gunawardane

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For over three decades the “Pendulor” wave energy device has had a significant influence in this field, triggering several research endeavours. It includes a top-hinged flap propelled by the standing waves produced in a caisson with a back wall on the leeward side. However, one of the main disadvantages which impedes its progress is the enormous expense involved in the construction of the custom made typical caisson structure, about a little more than one-quarter of the wave length. In this study, the influence of such design parameters on the performance of the device is investigated, via numerical modelling for a device arranged in an array configuration, for irregular waves. The potential wave theory is applied to derive the frequency-dependent hydrodynamic parameters by making a distinction in the fluid domain into a separate sea side and lee side. The Cummins equation was utilised for the development of the time domain equation of motion while the transfer function estimation methods were used to solve the convolution integrals. Finally, the device was tested numerically for irregular wave conditions for a 50 kW class unit. It was observed that in irregular wave operating conditions, the caisson chamber length could be reduced by 40% of the value estimated for the regular waves. Besides, the device demonstrated around 80% capture efficiency for irregular waves thus allowing provision for avoiding the employment of any active control.

  11. Some studies on wave refraction in relation to beach erosion along the Kerala coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Das, P.K.; Hariharan, V.; Varadachari, V.V.R.

    Using the British admirality bathymetric charts off the west coast of India and employing the graphical method of constructing wave refraction diagrams, an attempt is made to study behaviour of the short-period waves (4, 5 and 6 seconds) which...

  12. Wave Energy Potential in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin. An Integrated 10-year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    SUBTITLE Wave energy potential in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin. An integrated 10-year study 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c... Cardone CV, Ewing JA, et al. The WAM model e a third generation ocean wave prediction model. J Phys Oceanogr 1988;18(12):1775e810. [70] Varinou M

  13. Studies on waves and turbulence in natural plasmas and in laboratory plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, J.L.

    1990-09-01

    The project for studying plasma waves and plasma turbulence submitted to CAPES to be included in the CAPES/COFECUB international cooperation agreement is presented. The project will be carry out in cooperation with Paris University aiming to simulate in laboratory wave-particle interaction phenomena occuring in space plasma. (M.C.K.)

  14. Efficacy of fractionated microneedle radiofrequency with and without adding subcision for the treatment of atrophic facial acne scars: A randomized split-face clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Gita; Poostiyan, Nazila; Asilian, Ali; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Shahbazi, Masoom; Iraji, Fariba; Fatemi Naeini, Farahnaz; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali

    2017-06-01

    There is no gold standard treatment for facial acne scars, and overall, little literature exists about the combination therapy for treatment of acne scar. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of fractionated microneedle radiofrequency (FMR) vs FMR combined with subcision for the treatment of atrophic acne scars. This was a randomized, split-face clinical study of 25 patients with II-IV Fitzpatrick skin types with moderate to severe facial atrophic acne scars. Initially, standard subcision by Nokor needle was performed on one side. Two weeks after subcision, FMR treatment was performed on both cheeks of each participant. Second and third FMR treatment sessions were performed within 4-week intervals. Two-blinded dermatologists performed clinical assessments using a quartile grading scale, and patients were also asked to judge their satisfaction using a visual analog scale (VAS) scoring system. The age of the patients varied from 24 to 40 years (mean: 30.08±4.94 years). Only nine patients (36%) were males. Clinical assessment by two-blinded dermatologists showed statistically significant improvement in the combination (FMR+subcision) group (P=.009). Patient satisfaction was statistically significantly better in the combination group (P=.001). A darkening of skin phototype was associated with a decrease in patient's satisfaction VAS score (P=.07). The combination of subcision and FMR is a safe and effective modality for mixed type acne scars. Additional randomized clinical study with long-term follow-up is necessary for further evaluation of FMR in combination with other procedures. The full trial protocol can be accessed in: http://www.irct.ir/searchresult.php?keyword=%20%20IRCT2016103130597N1&id=30597&number=1&field=a&prt=1&total=1&m=1. The clinical trial registration number is IRCT2016103130597N1. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The toughness of split graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woeginger, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    In this short note we argue that the toughness of split graphs can be computed in polynomial time. This solves an open problem from a recent paper by Kratsch et al. (Discrete Math. 150 (1996) 231–245).

  16. ISR split-field magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1975-01-01

    The experimental apparatus used at intersection 4 around the Split-Field Magnet by the CERN-Bologna Collaboration (experiment R406). The plastic scintillator telescopes are used for precise pulse-height and time-of-flight measurements.

  17. Study of equatorial Kelvin waves using the MST radar and radiosonde observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kishore

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an attempt has been made to study equatorial Kelvin waves using a high power coherent VHF radar located at Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E, a tropical station in the Indian sub-continent. Simultaneous radiosonde observations taken from a nearby meteorological station located in Chennai (13.04° N, 80.17° E were also used to see the coherence in the observed structures. These data sets were analyzed to study the mean winds and equatorial waves in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Equatorial waves with different periodicities were identified. In the present study, particular attention has been given to the fast Kelvin wave (6.5-day and slow Kelvin wave (16-day. Mean zonal wind structures were similar at both locations. The fast Kelvin wave amplitudes were somewhat similar in both observations and the maximum amplitude is about 8m/s. The phase profiles indicated a slow downward progression. The slow Kelvin wave (16-day amplitudes shown by the radiosonde measurements are a little larger than the radar derived amplitudes. The phase profiles showed downward phase progression and it translates into a vertical wavelength of ~10-12km. The radar and radiosonde derived amplitudes of fast and slow Kelvin waves are larger at altitudes near the tropopause (15-17km, where the mean wind attains westward maximum.

  18. A Study on Elastic Guided Wave Modal Characteristics in Multi-Layered Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Youn Ho; Lee, Chong Myoung

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we have developed a program which can calculate phase and group velocities, attenuation and wave structures of each mode in multi-layered plates. The wave structures of each mode are obtained, varying material properties and number of layers. The key in the success of guided wave NDE is how to optimize the mode selection scheme by minimizing energy loss when a structure is in contact with liquid. In this study, the normalized out-of-plane displacements at the surface of a free plate are used to predict the variation of modal attenuation and verily the correlation between attenuation and wave structure. It turns out that the guided wave attenuation can be efficiently obtain from the out-of-plane displacement variation of a free wave guide alleviating such mathematical difficulties in extracting complex roots for the eigenvalue problem of a liquid loaded wave guide. Through this study, the concert to optimize guided wave mode selection is accomplished to enhance sensitivity and efficiency in nondestructive evaluation for multi-layered structures.

  19. Symmetrical analysis of the defect level splitting in two-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkova, N; Kim, S; Gopalan, V

    2003-01-01

    In this paper doubly degenerate defect states in the band gap of the two-dimensional photonic crystal are studied. These states can be split by a convenient distortion of the lattice. Through analogy with the Jahn-Teller effect in solids, we present a group theoretical analysis of the lifting of the degeneracy of doubly degenerate states in a square lattice by different vibronic modes. The effect is supported by the supercell plane-wave model and by the finite difference time domain technique. We suggest ways for using the effect in photonic switching devices and waveguides

  20. Laser-generated acoustic wave studies on tattoo pigment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Lorna M.; Dickinson, Mark R.; King, Terence A.

    1996-01-01

    A Q-switched alexandrite laser (180 ns at 755 nm) was used to irradiate samples of agar embedded with red, black and green tattoo dyes. The acoustic waves generated in the samples were detected using a PVDF membrane hydrophone and compared to theoretical expectations. The laser pulses were found to generate acoustic waves in the black and green samples but not in the red pigment. Pressures of up to 1.4 MPa were produced with irradiances of up to 96 MWcm-2 which is comparable to the irradiances used to clear pigment embedded in skin. The pressure gradient generated across pigment particles was approximately 1.09 X 1010 Pam-1 giving a pressure difference of 1.09 +/- 0.17 MPa over a particle with mean diameter 100 micrometers . This is not sufficient to permanently damage skin which has a tensile strength of 7.4 MPa.

  1. A case study on dune response to infragravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenshan; Wang, Hui; Li, Huan; Wu, Shuangquan; Li, Cheng

    2017-08-01

    A series of numerical simulations were conducted using the process-based model XBeach to investigate dune response under normal and getting rid of infragravity wave conditions with different slopes. Erosion volume upside the dune toe and dune top recession are set as indicators for dune vulnerability as well as defence capacity for its front-beach. Results show that both dune erosion volume and dune top recession decrease with gentler dune slopes. Of all the simulation cases, dune with a face slope of 1/1 lost most sand and supplied most sand for lower-bed. The presence of infragravity waves is validated to be crucial to dune vulnerability. The dune erosion volume is shown to decrease by 44.5%∼61.5% and the dune top recession decreased by 0%∼45.5% correspondingly, in the case that infragravity motion is not taken into account during simulation for different dune slopes.

  2. TRAP-Positive Multinucleated Giant Cells Are Foreign Body Giant Cells Rather Than Osteoclasts: Results From a Split-Mouth Study in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Jonas; Kubesch, Alica; Korzinskas, Tadas; Barbeck, Mike; Landes, Constantin; Sader, Robert A; Kirkpatrick, Charles J; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2015-12-01

    This study compared the material-specific tissue response to the synthetic, hydroxyapatite-based bone substitute material NanoBone (NB) with that of the xenogeneic, bovine-based bone substitute material Bio-Oss (BO). The sinus cavities of 14 human patients were augmented with NB and BO in a split-mouth design. Six months after augmentation, bone biopsies were extracted for histological and histomorphometric investigation prior to dental implant insertion. The following were evaluated: the cellular inflammatory pattern, the induction of multinucleated giant cells, vascularization, the relative amounts of newly formed bone, connective tissue, and the remaining bone substitute material. NB granules were well integrated in the peri-implant tissue and were surrounded by newly formed bone tissue. Multinucleated giant cells were visible on the surfaces of the remaining granules. BO granules were integrated into the newly formed bone tissue, which originated from active osteoblasts on their surface. Histomorphometric analysis showed a significantly higher number of multinucleated giant cells and blood vessels in the NB group compared to the BO group. No statistical differences were observed in regard to connective tissue, remaining bone substitute, and newly formed bone. The results of this study highlight the different cellular reactions to synthetic and xenogeneic bone substitute materials. The significantly higher number of multinucleated giant cells within the NB implantation bed seems to have no effect on its biodegradation. Accordingly, the multinucleated giant cells observed within the NB implantation bed have characteristics more similar to those of foreign body giant cells than to those of osteoclasts.

  3. Fixation of split-thickness skin graft using fast-clotting fibrin glue containing undiluted high-concentration thrombin or sutures: a comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyun Ho; Jun, Daiwon; Moon, Suk-Ho; Kang, In Sook; Kim, Min Cheol

    2016-01-01

    For skin defects caused by full-thickness burns, trauma, or tumor tissue excision, skin grafting is one of the most convenient and useful treatment methods. In this situation, graft fixation is important in skin grafting. This study was performed to compare the effectiveness of skin graft fixation between high-concentration fibrin sealant and sutures. There have been numerous studies using fibrin sealant for graft fixation, but they utilized slow-clotting fibrin sealant containing less than 10 IU/mL thrombin. Twenty-five patients underwent split-thickness skin grafting using fast-clotting fibrin sealant containing 400 IU/mL thrombin, while 30 patients underwent grafting using sutures. Rates of hematoma/seroma formation, graft dislocation, graft necrosis, and graft take were investigated postoperatively. The graft surface area was calculated using Image J software (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA). After 5 days, rates of hematoma/seroma formation and graft dislocation were 7.84 and 1.29% in group I, and 9.55 and 1.45% in group II, respectively. After 30 days, rates of graft necrosis and graft take were 1.86 and 98.14% in group I, and 4.65 and 95.35% in group II. Undiluted fibrin sealant showed significantly superior results for all rates ( p  < 0.05) except graft dislocation. When high-concentration fast-clotting fibrin sealant was applied to skin grafts without dilution, no difficulty was experienced during surgery. Sealant showed superior results compared with sutures and had an excellent graft take rate. II.

  4. Split brain: divided perception but undivided consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Yair; Neville, David A; Otten, Marte; Corballis, Paul M; Lamme, Victor A F; de Haan, Edward H F; Foschi, Nicoletta; Fabri, Mara

    2017-05-01

    In extensive studies with two split-brain patients we replicate the standard finding that stimuli cannot be compared across visual half-fields, indicating that each hemisphere processes information independently of the other. Yet, crucially, we show that the canonical textbook findings that a split-brain patient can only respond to stimuli in the left visual half-field with the left hand, and to stimuli in the right visual half-field with the right hand and verbally, are not universally true. Across a wide variety of tasks, split-brain patients with a complete and radiologically confirmed transection of the corpus callosum showed full awareness of presence, and well above chance-level recognition of location, orientation and identity of stimuli throughout the entire visual field, irrespective of response type (left hand, right hand, or verbally). Crucially, we used confidence ratings to assess conscious awareness. This revealed that also on high confidence trials, indicative of conscious perception, response type did not affect performance. These findings suggest that severing the cortical connections between hemispheres splits visual perception, but does not create two independent conscious perceivers within one brain. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Triadic split-merge sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rossum, Anne C.; Lin, Hai Xiang; Dubbeldam, Johan; van der Herik, H. Jaap

    2018-04-01

    In machine vision typical heuristic methods to extract parameterized objects out of raw data points are the Hough transform and RANSAC. Bayesian models carry the promise to optimally extract such parameterized objects given a correct definition of the model and the type of noise at hand. A category of solvers for Bayesian models are Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. Naive implementations of MCMC methods suffer from slow convergence in machine vision due to the complexity of the parameter space. Towards this blocked Gibbs and split-merge samplers have been developed that assign multiple data points to clusters at once. In this paper we introduce a new split-merge sampler, the triadic split-merge sampler, that perform steps between two and three randomly chosen clusters. This has two advantages. First, it reduces the asymmetry between the split and merge steps. Second, it is able to propose a new cluster that is composed out of data points from two different clusters. Both advantages speed up convergence which we demonstrate on a line extraction problem. We show that the triadic split-merge sampler outperforms the conventional split-merge sampler. Although this new MCMC sampler is demonstrated in this machine vision context, its application extend to the very general domain of statistical inference.

  6. Transient Stress Waves in Study of Coconut Physical Properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnka, Jan; Dvořáková, Pavla

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2010), s. 19-25 ISSN 0732-8818 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA201990701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : stress waves * double-pulse holography * coconut * exploding wires Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 0.505, year: 2010 http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/121567342/PDFSTART

  7. Planar Millimeter-Wave Antennas: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Pitra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the design and the experimental verification of three types of wideband antennas. Attention is turned to the bow-tie antenna, the Vivaldi antenna and the spiral antenna designed for the operation at millimeter waves. Bandwidth, input impedance, gain, and directivity pattern are the investigated parameters. Antennas are compared considering computer simulations in CST Microwave Studio and measured data.

  8. Feasibility study on diagnosis of material damage using bulk wave mixing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jeong Seok; Cho, Youn Ho [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Ultrasonic nonlinear evaluation is generally utilized for detection of not only defects but also microdamage such as corrosion and plastic deformation. Nonlinearity is determined by the amplitude ratio of primary wave second harmonic wave, and the results of its comparison are used for evaluation. Owing to the experimental features, the experimental nonlinearity result contains system nonlinearity and material nonlinearity. System nonlinearity is that which is unwanted by the user; hence, it acts as an error and interrupts analysis. In this study, a bulk wave mixing technique is implemented in order to minimize the system nonlinearity and obtain the reliable analysis results. The biggest advantage of this technique is that experimental nonlinearity contains less system nonlinearity than that for the conventional nonlinear ultrasonic technique. Theoretical and experimental verifications are performed in this study. By comparing the results of the bulk wave mixing technique with those of the conventional technique, the strengths, weaknesses, and application validity of the bulk wave mixing technique are determined.

  9. Evaluation of Certain Pharmaceutical Quality Attributes of Lisinopril Split Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairi M. S. Fahelelbom

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tablet splitting is an accepted practice for the administration of drugs for a variety of reasons, including dose adjustment, ease of swallowing and cost savings. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the physical properties of lisinopril tablets as a result of splitting the tablets either by hand or with a splitting device. The impact of the splitting technique of lisinopril (Zestril® tablets, 20 mg on certain physical parameters such as weight variation, friability, disintegration, dissolution and drug content were studied. Splitting the tablets either by hand or with a splitter resulted in a minute but statistically significant average weight loss of <0.25% of the tablet to the surrounding environment. The variability in the weight of the hand-split tablet halves was more pronounced (37 out of 40 tablet halves varied by more than 10% from the mean weight than when using the tablet splitter (3 out of 40 tablet halves. The dissolution and drug content of the hand-split tablets were therefore affected because of weight differences. However, the pharmacopoeia requirements for friability and disintegration time were met. Hand splitting of tablets can result in an inaccurate dose and may present clinical safety issues, especially for drugs with a narrow therapeutic window in which large fluctuations in drug concentrations are undesirable. It is recommended to use tablets with the exact desired dose, but if this is not an option, then a tablet splitter could be used.

  10. An experimental study on the structural alteration of C3H8-air premixed flame affected by ultrasonic standing waves of various frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Shin; Kim, Jeong Soo; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2015-01-01

    This experimental study scrutinizes the structural variation of a premixed propane-air flame according to the frequency change of ultrasonic standing waves (USWs) at various equivalence ratios. Visualization technique via Schlieren photography is employed in the observation of the flame structure and in the analysis of the flame velocities along the propagation. A distorted flame front and horizontal splitting in the burnt zone result from the USW. The vertical locations of the distortion and horizontal stripes are closely dependent on the frequency of the USW. In addition, the propagation velocity of the flame front floored by the standing wave is greater than that in the case without the excitation by the standing wave. As expected, the influence of the USW on the premixed-flame propagation becomes prominent as the frequency increases. The results suggest that a well-defined USW may be applied to combustion devices, such as gas turbines and chemical rocket engines, to achieve an active control of the instability that frequently intervenes in such systems.

  11. An experimental study on the structural alteration of C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air premixed flame affected by ultrasonic standing waves of various frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Shin [SK E and S, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Soo [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Heuy Dong [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    This experimental study scrutinizes the structural variation of a premixed propane-air flame according to the frequency change of ultrasonic standing waves (USWs) at various equivalence ratios. Visualization technique via Schlieren photography is employed in the observation of the flame structure and in the analysis of the flame velocities along the propagation. A distorted flame front and horizontal splitting in the burnt zone result from the USW. The vertical locations of the distortion and horizontal stripes are closely dependent on the frequency of the USW. In addition, the propagation velocity of the flame front floored by the standing wave is greater than that in the case without the excitation by the standing wave. As expected, the influence of the USW on the premixed-flame propagation becomes prominent as the frequency increases. The results suggest that a well-defined USW may be applied to combustion devices, such as gas turbines and chemical rocket engines, to achieve an active control of the instability that frequently intervenes in such systems.

  12. [Study on preparation of laser micropore porcine acellular dermal matrix combined with split-thickness autograft and its application in wound transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Li-Ming; Chai, Ji-Ke; Yang, Hong-Ming; Feng, Rui; Yin, Hui-Nan; Li, Feng-Yu; Sun, Qiang

    2007-04-01

    To prepare a porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), and to optimize the interpore distance between PADM and co-grafted split-thickness autologous skin. Porcine skin was treated with trypsin/Triton X-100 to prepare an acellular dermal matrix. Micropores were produced on the PADM with a laser punch. The distance between micropores varied as 0.8 mm, 1.0 mm, 1.2 mm and 1.5 mm. Full-thickness defect wounds were created on the back of 144 SD rats. The rats were randomly divided into 6 groups as follows, with 24 rats in each group. Micropore groups I -IV: the wounds were grafted with PADM with micropores in four different intervals respectively, and covered with split-thickness autologous skin graft. Mesh group: the wounds were grafted with meshed PADM and split-thickness autograft. with simple split-thickness autografting. The gross observation of wound healing and histological observation were performed at 2, 4, 6 weeks after surgery. The wound healing rate and contraction rate were calculated. Two and four weeks after surgery, the wound healing rate in micropore groups I and II was lower than that in control group (P micropore groups I , II and mesh group (P > 0.05) until 6 weeks after grafting( P micropore groups I and II ([(16.0 +/- 2.6)%, (15.1 +/- 2.4)%] was remarkably lower than that in control group 4 and 6 weeks after grafting (P micropore PADM (0.8 mm or 1.0 mm in distance) grafting in combination with split-thickness autografting can improve the quality of wound healing. PADM with laser micropores in 1.0 mm distance is the best choice among them.

  13. Statistical study of waves distribution in the inner magnetosphere using geomagnetic indices and solar wind parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, H.; Yearby, K.; Balikhin, M. A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Agapitov, O. V.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction of gyroresonant wave particles with chorus waves largely determine the dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts that effects the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons. The common approach is to present model waves distribution in the inner magnetosphere under different values of geomagnetic activity as expressed by the geomagnetic indices. However it is known that solar wind parameters such as bulk velocity (V) and density (n) are more effective in the control of high energy fluxes at the geostationary orbit. Therefore in the present study the set of parameters of the wave distribution is expanded to include the solar wind parameters in addition to the geomagnetic indices. The present study examines almost four years (01, January, 2004 to 29, September, 2007) of Cluster STAFF-SA, Double Star TC1 and OMNI data in order to present a combined model of wave magnetic field intensities for the chorus waves as a function of magnetic local time (MLT), L-shell (L*), geomagnetic activity, and solar wind velocity and density. Generally, the largest wave intensities are observed during average solar wind velocities (3006cm-3. On the other hand the wave intensity is lower and limited between 06:00 to 18:00 MLT for V700kms-1.

  14. Preliminary study of slow and fast ultrasonic waves using MR images of trabecular bone phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis-Najera, S. E., E-mail: solisnajera@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: lucia.medina@ciencias.unam.mx; Neria-Pérez, J. A., E-mail: solisnajera@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: lucia.medina@ciencias.unam.mx; Medina, L., E-mail: solisnajera@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx, E-mail: lucia.medina@ciencias.unam.mx [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, DF 04510 (Mexico); Garipov, R., E-mail: ruslan.garipov@mrsolutions.co.uk [MR Solutions Ltd, Surrey (United Kingdom); Rodríguez, A. O., E-mail: arog@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento Ingeniería Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, México, DF 09340 (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    Cancellous bone is a complex tissue that performs physiological and biomechanical functions in all vertebrates. It is made up of trabeculae that, from a simplified structural viewpoint, can be considered as plates and beams in a hyperstatic structure that change with time leading to osteoporosis. Several methods has been developed to study the trabecular bone microstructure among them is the Biot’s model which predicts the existence of two longitudinal waves in porous media; the slow and the fast waves, that can be related to porosity of the media. This paper is focused on the experimental detection of the two Biot’s waves of a trabecular bone phantom, consisting of a trabecular network of inorganic hydroxyapatite. Experimental measurements of both waves were performed using through transmission ultrasound. Results had shown clearly that the propagation of two waves propagation is transversal to the trabecular alignment. Otherwise the waves are overlapped and a single wave seems to be propagated. To validate these results, magnetic resonance images were acquired to assess the trabecular direction, and to assure that the pulses correspond to the slow and fast waves. This approach offers a methodology for non-invasive studies of trabecular bones.

  15. Studies of midlatitude mesospheric temperature variability and its relationship to gravity waves, tides, and planetary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beissner, Kenneth C.

    1997-10-01

    Temperature observations of the middle atmosphere have been carried out from September 1993 through July 1995 using a Rayleigh backscatter lidar located at Utah State University (42oN, 111oW). Data have been analyzed to obtain absolute temperature profiles from 40 to 90 km. Various sources of error were reviewed in order to ensure the quality of the measurements. This included conducting a detailed examination of the data reduction procedure, integration methods, and averaging techniques, eliminating errors of 1-3%. The temperature structure climatology has been compared with several other mid-latitude data sets, including those from the French lidars, the SME spacecraft, the sodium lidars at Ft. Collins and Urbana, the MSISe90 model, and a high- latitude composite set from Andenes, Norway. In general, good agreement occurs at mid-latitudes, but areas of disagreement do exist. Among these, the Utah temperatures are significantly warmer than the MSISe90 temperatures above approximately 80 km, they are lower below 80 km than any of the others in summer, they show major year- to-year variability in the winter profiles, and they differ from the sodium lidar data at the altitudes where the temperature profiles should overlap. Also, comparisons between observations and a physics based global circulation model, the TIME-GCM, were conducted for a mid-latitude site. A photo-chemical model was developed to predict airglow intensity of OH based on output from the TIME-GCM. Many discrepancies between the model and observations were found, including a modeled summer mesopause too high, a stronger summer inversion not normally observed by lidar, a fall-spring asymmetry in the OH winds and lidar temperatures but not reproduced in the TIME-GCM equinoctial periods, larger winter seasonal wind tide than observed by the FPI, and a failure of the model to reverse the summertime mesospheric jet. It is our conclusion these discrepancies are due to a gravity wave parameterization in the

  16. Population expanding with the phalanx model and lineages split by environmental heterogeneity: a case study of Primula obconica in subtropical China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Fei Yan

    Full Text Available Current and historical events have both affected the current distribution patterns and intraspecific divergence of plants. While numerous studies have focused on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP, the impacts of such events on the flora of subtropical China remain poorly understood. Subtropical China is famous for its highly complex topography and the limited impact from glaciation during the Pleistocene; this may have resulted in a different genetic legacy for species in this region compared to fully glaciated areas.We used plastid and nuclear DNA sequence data and distribution modeling to analyze the divergence patterns and demographic history of Primula obconica Hance, a widespread herbaceous montane species in subtropical China. The phylogenetic analysis revealed two major lineages (lineage A and lineage B, representing a west-east split into the Yunnan and Eastern groups, and the Sichuan and Central groups, respectively. The Eastern and Central groups comprised relatively new derived haplotypes. Nested Clade Analysis and Bayesian Skyline Plot analyses both indicated that P. obconica mainly experienced a gradual expansion of populations. In addition, the simulated distribution of P. obconica during the Last Glacial Maximum was slightly larger than its present-day distribution.Our results are the first to identify a west-east migration of P. obconica. The gradual expansion pattern and a larger potential distribution range in cold periods detected for P. obconica indicate that the population expansion of this species is consistent with the phalanx model. In addition, the current patterns of genetic differentiation have persisted as a result of the extensive environmental heterogeneity that exists in subtropical China.

  17. Efficacy of Punch Elevation Combined with Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser Resurfacing in Facial Atrophic Acne Scarring: A Randomized Split-face Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Gita; Nouraei, Saeid; Asilian, Ali; Keyvan, Shima; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Rakhshanpour, Mehrdad; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of treatments for reducing the appearance of acne scars are available, but general guidelines for optimizing acne scar treatment do not exist. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness and side effects of fractional carbon dioxide (CO2) laser resurfacing combined with punch elevation with fractional CO2 laser resurfacing alone in the treatment of atrophic acne scars. Materials and Methods: Forty-two Iranian subjects (age range 18–55) with Fitzpatrick skin types III to IV and moderate to severe atrophic acne scars on both cheeks received randomized split-face treatments: One side received fractional CO2 laser treatment and the other received one session of punch elevation combined with two sessions of laser fractional CO2 laser treatment, separated by an interval of 1 month. Two dermatologists independently evaluated improvement in acne scars 4 and 16 weeks after the last treatment. Side effects were also recorded after each treatment. Results: The mean ± SD age of patients was 23.4 ± 2.6 years. Clinical improvement of facial acne scarring was assessed by two dermatologists blinded to treatment conditions. No significant difference in evaluation was observed 1 month after treatment (P = 0.56). Their evaluation found that fractional CO2 laser treatment combined with punch elevation had greater efficacy than that with fractional CO2 laser treatment alone, assessed 4 months after treatment (P = 0.02). Among all side effects, coagulated crust formation and pruritus at day 3 after fractional CO2 laser treatment was significant on both treatment sides (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Concurrent use of fractional laser skin resurfacing with punch elevation offers a safe and effective approach for the treatment of acne scarring. PMID:26538695

  18. Efficacy of punch elevation combined with fractional carbon dioxide laser resurfacing in facial atrophic acne scarring: A randomized split-face clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Faghihi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of treatments for reducing the appearance of acne scars are available, but general guidelines for optimizing acne scar treatment do not exist. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness and side effects of fractional carbon dioxide (CO 2 laser resurfacing combined with punch elevation with fractional CO 2 laser resurfacing alone in the treatment of atrophic acne scars. Materials and Methods: Forty-two Iranian subjects (age range 18-55 with Fitzpatrick skin types III to IV and moderate to severe atrophic acne scars on both cheeks received randomized split-face treatments: One side received fractional CO 2 laser treatment and the other received one session of punch elevation combined with two sessions of laser fractional CO 2 laser treatment, separated by an interval of 1 month. Two dermatologists independently evaluated improvement in acne scars 4 and 16 weeks after the last treatment. Side effects were also recorded after each treatment. Results: The mean ± SD age of patients was 23.4 ± 2.6 years. Clinical improvement of facial acne scarring was assessed by two dermatologists blinded to treatment conditions. No significant difference in evaluation was observed 1 month after treatment (P = 0.56. Their evaluation found that fractional CO 2 laser treatment combined with punch elevation had greater efficacy than that with fractional CO 2 laser treatment alone, assessed 4 months after treatment (P = 0.02. Among all side effects, coagulated crust formation and pruritus at day 3 after fractional CO 2 laser treatment was significant on both treatment sides (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Concurrent use of fractional laser skin resurfacing with punch elevation offers a safe and effective approach for the treatment of acne scarring.

  19. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter; Sørensen, H. C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper concerns with the development of the wave energy converter (WEC) Wave Dragon. This WEC is based on the overtopping principle. An overview of the performed research done concerning the Wave Dragon over the past years is given, and the results of one of the more comprehensive studies, co...

  20. Use of computed tomography assessed kidney length to predict split renal GFR in living kidney donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaillard, Francois; Fournier, Catherine; Leon, Carine; Legendre, Christophe [Paris Descartes University, AP-HP, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Renal Transplantation Department, Paris (France); Pavlov, Patrik [Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Tissier, Anne-Marie; Correas, Jean-Michel [Paris Descartes University, AP-HP, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Radiology Department, Paris (France); Harache, Benoit; Hignette, Chantal; Weinmann, Pierre [Paris Descartes University, AP-HP, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Nuclear Medicine Department, Paris (France); Eladari, Dominique [Paris Descartes University, and INSERM, Unit 970, AP-HP, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Physiology Department, Paris (France); Timsit, Marc-Olivier; Mejean, Arnaud [Paris Descartes University, AP-HP, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Urology Department, Paris (France); Friedlander, Gerard; Courbebaisse, Marie [Paris Descartes University, and INSERM, Unit 1151, AP-HP, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Physiology Department, Paris (France); Houillier, Pascal [Paris Descartes University, INSERM, Unit umrs1138, and CNRS Unit erl8228, AP-HP, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Physiology Department, Paris (France)

    2017-02-15

    Screening of living kidney donors may require scintigraphy to split glomerular filtration rate (GFR). To determine the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) to split GFR, we compared scintigraphy-split GFR to CT-split GFR. We evaluated CT-split GFR as a screening test to detect scintigraphy-split GFR lower than 40 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}/kidney. This was a monocentric retrospective study on 346 potential living donors who had GFR measurement, renal scintigraphy, and CT. We predicted GFR for each kidney by splitting GFR using the following formula: Volume-split GFR for a given kidney = measured GFR*[volume of this kidney/(volume of this kidney + volume of the opposite kidney)]. The same formula was used for length-split GFR. We compared length- and volume-split GFR to scintigraphy-split GFR at donation and with a 4-year follow-up. A better correlation was observed between length-split GFR and scintigraphy-split GFR (r = 0.92) than between volume-split GFR and scintigraphy-split GFR (r = 0.89). A length-split GFR threshold of 45 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}/kidney had a sensitivity of 100 % and a specificity of 75 % to detect scintigraphy-split GFR less than 40 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}/kidney. Both techniques with their respective thresholds detected living donors with similar eGFR evolution during follow-up. Length-split GFR can be used to detect patients requiring scintigraphy. (orig.)

  1. Use of computed tomography assessed kidney length to predict split renal GFR in living kidney donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, Francois; Fournier, Catherine; Leon, Carine; Legendre, Christophe; Pavlov, Patrik; Tissier, Anne-Marie; Correas, Jean-Michel; Harache, Benoit; Hignette, Chantal; Weinmann, Pierre; Eladari, Dominique; Timsit, Marc-Olivier; Mejean, Arnaud; Friedlander, Gerard; Courbebaisse, Marie; Houillier, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Screening of living kidney donors may require scintigraphy to split glomerular filtration rate (GFR). To determine the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) to split GFR, we compared scintigraphy-split GFR to CT-split GFR. We evaluated CT-split GFR as a screening test to detect scintigraphy-split GFR lower than 40 mL/min/1.73 m"2/kidney. This was a monocentric retrospective study on 346 potential living donors who had GFR measurement, renal scintigraphy, and CT. We predicted GFR for each kidney by splitting GFR using the following formula: Volume-split GFR for a given kidney = measured GFR*[volume of this kidney/(volume of this kidney + volume of the opposite kidney)]. The same formula was used for length-split GFR. We compared length- and volume-split GFR to scintigraphy-split GFR at donation and with a 4-year follow-up. A better correlation was observed between length-split GFR and scintigraphy-split GFR (r = 0.92) than between volume-split GFR and scintigraphy-split GFR (r = 0.89). A length-split GFR threshold of 45 mL/min/1.73 m"2/kidney had a sensitivity of 100 % and a specificity of 75 % to detect scintigraphy-split GFR less than 40 mL/min/1.73 m"2/kidney. Both techniques with their respective thresholds detected living donors with similar eGFR evolution during follow-up. Length-split GFR can be used to detect patients requiring scintigraphy. (orig.)

  2. Exposing the QCD Splitting Function with CMS Open Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkoski, Andrew; Marzani, Simone; Thaler, Jesse; Tripathee, Aashish; Xue, Wei

    2017-09-29

    The splitting function is a universal property of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) which describes how energy is shared between partons. Despite its ubiquitous appearance in many QCD calculations, the splitting function cannot be measured directly, since it always appears multiplied by a collinear singularity factor. Recently, however, a new jet substructure observable was introduced which asymptotes to the splitting function for sufficiently high jet energies. This provides a way to expose the splitting function through jet substructure measurements at the Large Hadron Collider. In this Letter, we use public data released by the CMS experiment to study the two-prong substructure of jets and test the 1→2 splitting function of QCD. To our knowledge, this is the first ever physics analysis based on the CMS Open Data.

  3. Various continuum approaches for studying shock wave structure in carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, I. V.; Kosareva, A. A.; Kustova, E. V.; Nagnibeda, E. A.

    2018-05-01

    Shock wave structure in carbon dioxide is studied using different continuum models within the framework of one-temperature thermal equilibrium flow description. Navier-Stokes and Euler equations as well as commonly used Rankine-Hugoniot equations with different specific heat ratios are used to find the gas-dynamic parameters behind the shock wave. The accuracy of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations in polyatomic gases is assessed, and it is shown that they give a considerable error in the predicted values of fluid-dynamic variables. The effect of bulk viscosity on the shock wave structure in CO2 is evaluated. Taking into account bulk viscosity yields a significant increase in the shock wave width; for the complete model, the shock wave thickness varies non-monotonically with the Mach number.

  4. A Study on the Guided Wave Mode Conversion using Self-calibrating Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Chul; Cho, Youn Ho

    2000-01-01

    The guided wave mode conversion phenomena were investigated for the NDE of a plate-like structure with thickness variation. The ratios of reflection and transmission (R/T) were measured via the self-calibrating procedure which allows us to obtain experimental guided wave data in a more reliable way regardless of the coupling uncertainty between transducer and specimen. The results on R/T could be used to determine the thickness reduction of the structure. It was shown that not only the incident modes but also the converted ones need to be considered in the self-calibrating guided wave inspection to extract a reasonable correlation between experimental data and the thickness variation. Through this study, the potential of guided wave inspection as a quantitative NDE technique was explored based on the combined concept of self-calibration and multi-mode conversion in guided wave scattering problems

  5. Numerical Study on Blast Wave Propagation Driven by Unsteady Ionization Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Yousuke; Sawada, Keisuke; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of laser-produced plasma is essential for increasing the available thrust and energy conversion efficiency from a pulsed laser to a blast wave in a gas-driven laser-propulsion system. The performance of a gas-driven laser-propulsion system depends heavily on the laser-driven blast wave dynamics as well as on the ionizing and/or recombining plasma state that sustains the blast wave. In this study, we therefore develop a numerical simulation code for a laser-driven blast wave coupled with time-dependent rate equations to explore the formation of unsteady ionizing plasma produced by laser irradiation. We will also examine the various properties of blast waves and unsteady ionizing plasma for different laser input energies

  6. Splitting methods for split feasibility problems with application to Dantzig selectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Hongjin; Xu, Hong-Kun

    2017-01-01

    The split feasibility problem (SFP), which refers to the task of finding a point that belongs to a given nonempty, closed and convex set, and whose image under a bounded linear operator belongs to another given nonempty, closed and convex set, has promising applicability in modeling a wide range of inverse problems. Motivated by the increasingly data-driven regularization in the areas of signal/image processing and statistical learning, in this paper, we study the regularized split feasibility problem (RSFP), which provides a unified model for treating many real-world problems. By exploiting the split nature of the RSFP, we shall gainfully employ several efficient splitting methods to solve the model under consideration. A remarkable advantage of our methods lies in their easier subproblems in the sense that the resulting subproblems have closed-form representations or can be efficiently solved up to a high precision. As an interesting application, we apply the proposed algorithms for finding Dantzig selectors, in addition to demonstrating the effectiveness of the splitting methods through some computational results on synthetic and real medical data sets. (paper)

  7. Large Blast and Thermal Simulator Reflected Wave Eliminator Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    it delays the passage of this wave through the test section until after the test is complete. The required length of extra duct depends on the strength...tube axis, which acts like an additional contraction effect since Se = Sj/[Cqsin(aj)]. Tii extra area is illustrated best by plotting (Se-Ae)/Ac versus...34Simulation de Choc et de Soaffie. Comimpensateur d’Ondes de Detente de Bouche pour tube a Choc de 2400 mm de diametre de Veine. Description, Compte- Renda

  8. Studies of High-Frequency Seismic Wave Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-29

    e.g., events 88079026 and 881322211). Waveform variation from depth to depth for individual earthquakes is considerably greater in Ssto ,- component...a). Fig. 6. (P, Sfa., Ssto , ) particle motion-based coordinate system, where 0 is the azimuth (E of N) of the P-wave first motion, 0 is the emergence...are aligned on the maximum cross-correlation of 0.05 s (20 samples) of the Sfan com- ponent. Fig. 9. 300-m Sfa t -component (solid) and Ssto -component

  9. Elastic properties of amorphous thin films studied by Rayleigh waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, R.B.; Rubin, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    Physical vapor deposition in ultra-high vacuum was used to co-deposit nickel and zirconium onto quartz single crystals and grow amorphous Ni 1-x Zr x (0.1 < x < 0.87) thin film. A high-resolution surface acoustic wave technique was developed for in situ measurement of film shear moduli. The modulus has narrow maxima at x = 0. 17, 0.22, 0.43, 0.5, 0.63, and 0.72, reflecting short-range ordering and formation of aggregates in amorphous phase. It is proposed that the aggregates correspond to polytetrahedral atom arrangements limited in size by geometrical frustration

  10. Lowermost mantle anisotropy near the eastern edge of the Pacific LLSVP: constraints from SKS-SKKS splitting intensity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jie; Long, Maureen D.; Creasy, Neala; Wagner, Lara; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George; Tavera, Hernando; Minaya, Estela

    2017-08-01

    Seismic anisotropy has been documented in many portions of the lowermost mantle, with particularly strong anisotropy thought to be present along the edges of large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs). The region surrounding the Pacific LLSVP, however, has not yet been studied extensively in terms of its anisotropic structure. In this study, we use seismic data from southern Peru, northern Bolivia and Easter Island to probe lowermost mantle anisotropy beneath the eastern Pacific Ocean, mostly relying on data from the Peru Lithosphere and Slab Experiment and Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography experiments. Differential shear wave splitting measurements from phases that have similar ray paths in the upper mantle but different ray paths in the lowermost mantle, such as SKS and SKKS, are used to constrain anisotropy in D″. We measured splitting for 215 same station-event SKS-SKKS pairs that sample the eastern Pacific LLSVP at the base of the mantle. We used measurements of splitting intensity(SI), a measure of the amount of energy on the transverse component, to objectively and quantitatively analyse any discrepancies between SKS and SKKS phases. While the overall splitting signal is dominated by the upper-mantle anisotropy, a minority of SKS-SKKS pairs (∼10 per cent) exhibit strongly discrepant splitting between the phases (i.e. the waveforms require a difference in SI of at least 0.4), indicating a likely contribution from lowermost mantle anisotropy. In order to enhance lower mantle signals, we also stacked waveforms within individual subregions and applied a waveform differencing technique to isolate the signal from the lowermost mantle. Our stacking procedure yields evidence for substantial splitting due to lowermost mantle anisotropy only for a specific region that likely straddles the edge of Pacific LLSVP. Our observations are consistent with the localization of deformation and anisotropy near the eastern boundary of the Pacific LLSVP

  11. Simulation studies of plasma waves in the electron foreshock - The generation of Langmuir waves by a gentle bump-on-tail electron distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dum, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    Particle simulation experiments were used to study the basic physical ingredients needed for building a global model of foreshock wave phenomena. In particular, the generation of Langmuir waves by a gentle bump-on-tail electron distribution is analyzed. It is shown that, with appropriately designed simulations experiments, quasi-linear theory can be quantitatively verified for parameters corresponding to the electron foreshock.

  12. Split-dose administration of a dual-action, low-volume bowel cleanser for colonoscopy: the SEE CLEAR I study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rex, Douglas K; Katz, Philip O; Bertiger, Gerald; Vanner, Stephen; Hookey, Lawrence C; Alderfer, Vivian; Joseph, Raymond E

    2013-07-01

    New bowel cleansers for colonoscopy that lead to improved efficacy, safety, and tolerability are needed. This study evaluated a nonphosphate, dual-action, low-volume, orange-flavored preparation containing sodium picosulfate and magnesium citrate (P/MC). Multicenter, assessor-blinded, randomized, noninferiority study. University hospitals, academic medical centers, and private clinics across the United States. Adults preparing for colonoscopy. P/MC versus 2 L of polyethylene glycol solution (2L PEG-3350) and two 5-mg bisacodyl tablets. This phase 3 study investigated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of split-dose administration of P/MC versus day-before dosing of 2L PEG-3350 and two 5-mg bisacodyl tablets (SEE CLEAR I study). Efficacy was evaluated by using the Aronchick and Ottawa scales; noninferiority and superiority analyses were performed. Safety was assessed by monitoring adverse events (AEs). Tolerability was measured via a patient questionnaire. The intent-to-treat population consisted of 601 patients who self-administered P/MC (n = 304) or 2L PEG-3350 and bisacodyl tablets (n = 297). P/MC was superior to 2L PEG-3350 and bisacodyl tablets in overall colon cleansing (84.2% vs 74.4%; 1-sided 97.5% confidence interval [CI], 3.4) (Aronchick scores of excellent or good) and in cleansing of the ascending (89.5% vs 78.8%; 1-sided 97.5% CI, 4.9), mid (transverse and descending) (92.4% vs 85.9%; 1-sided 97.5% CI, 1.6), and rectosigmoid (92.4% vs 87.2%; 1-sided 97.5% CI, 0.4) segments of the colon (Ottawa scores of excellent, good, or fair). Commonly reported AEs related to the bowel preparations were nausea, vomiting, headache, and chills. Patient-reported tolerability, including ease of consumption and taste, was significantly higher for P/MC than 2L PEG-3350 and bisacodyl tablets (P PEG-3350 and bisacodyl tablets. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Topical treatment with fresh human milk versus emollient on atopic eczema spots in young children: a small, randomized, split body, controlled, blinded pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berents, Teresa Løvold; Rønnevig, Jørgen; Søyland, Elisabeth; Gaustad, Peter; Nylander, Gro; Løland, Beate Fossum

    2015-05-04

    Public health nurses report on effects of fresh human milk as treatment for conjunctivitis, rhinitis and atopic eczema (AE), the latter being highly prevalent in early childhood. Emollients and topical corticosteroids are first line treatment of AE. As many caregivers have steroid phobia, alternative treatment options for mild AE are of interest. The aim of this small pilot study was to assess the potential effects and risks of applying fresh human milk locally on eczema spots in children with AE. This was a split body, controlled, randomized and physician blinded pilot study, of children with AE with two similar contralateral eczema spots having a mother breastfeeding the child or a sibling. Fresh expressed milk and emollient was applied on the intervention spot and emollient alone on the control area, three times a day for four weeks. The severity and area of the eczema spots was evaluated weekly, and samples from milk and the spots were analysed weekly with respect to bacterial colonisation. Of nine patients included, six completed the study. Mean age at inclusion was 18.5 months. The spots examined were localized on the arms, legs or cheeks. The spots were similar in severity, but differed in area. In one patient the eczema ceased after inclusion. In four patients both control and intervention areas increased during the intervention. The relative change in eczema area compared to baseline showed less increase in the intervention spots in two patients, whereas the opposite was observed in three. In four children Staphylococcus aureus was found in their eczema once or more. In three of the 28 human milk samples, Staphylococcus aureus, alfa haemolytic streptococci or coagulase negative staphylococci were detected. Staphylococcus aureus was found once both in human milk and in the eczema spots, no clinical signs of infection were however observed. No secondary infection due to milk application was detected. In this small pilot study, no effect was found on eczema

  14. Second harmonic generation at fatigue cracks by low-frequency Lamb waves: Experimental and numerical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Ng, Ching-Tai; Kotousov, Andrei; Sohn, Hoon; Lim, Hyung Jin

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents experimental and theoretical analyses of the second harmonic generation due to non-linear interaction of Lamb waves with a fatigue crack. Three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) simulations and experimental studies are carried out to provide physical insight into the mechanism of second harmonic generation. The results demonstrate that the 3D FE simulations can provide a reasonable prediction on the second harmonic generated due to the contact nonlinearity at the fatigue crack. The effect of the wave modes on the second harmonic generation is also investigated in detail. It is found that the magnitude of the second harmonic induced by the interaction of the fundamental symmetric mode (S0) of Lamb wave with the fatigue crack is much higher than that by the fundamental anti-symmetric mode (A0) of Lamb wave. In addition, a series of parametric studies using 3D FE simulations are conducted to investigate the effect of the fatigue crack length to incident wave wavelength ratio, and the influence of the excitation frequency on the second harmonic generation. The outcomes show that the magnitude and directivity pattern of the generated second harmonic depend on the fatigue crack length to incident wave wavelength ratio as well as the ratio of S0 to A0 incident Lamb wave amplitude. In summary, the findings of this study can further advance the use of second harmonic generation in damage detection.

  15. Splitting: The Development of a Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Mary-Joan

    1984-01-01

    Described the development of a scale that measures splitting as a psychological structure. The construct validity of the splitting scale is suggested by the positive relationship between splitting scores and a diagnostic measure of the narcissistic personality disorder, as well as a negative relationship between splitting scores and levels of…

  16. An Experimental Study on the Impact of Different-frequency Elastic Waves on Water Retention Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, J. H.; Dai, J. Y.; Lee, J. W.; Lo, W. C.

    2017-12-01

    ABSTEACTOver the past few decades, theoretical and experimental studies on the connection between elastic wave attributes and the physical properties of a fluid-bearing porous medium have attracted the attention of many scholars in fields of porous medium flow and hydrogeology. It has been previously determined that the transmission of elastic waves in a porous medium containing two immiscible fluids will have an effect on the water retention curve, but it has not been found that the water retention curve will be affected by the frequency of elastic vibration waves or whether the effect on the soil is temporary or permanent. This research is based on a sand box test in which the soil is divided into three layers (a lower, middle, and upper layer). In this case, we discuss different impacts on the water retention curve during the drying process under sound waves (elastic waves) subject to three frequencies (150Hz, 300Hz, and 450Hz), respectively. The change in the water retention curve before and after the effect is then discussed. In addition, how sound waves affect the water retention curve at different depths is also observed. According to the experimental results, we discover that sound waves can cause soil either to expand or to contract. When the soil is induced to expand due to sound waves, it can contract naturally and return to the condition it was in before the influence of the sound waves. On the contrary, when the soil is induced to contract, it is unable to return to its initial condition. Due to the results discussed above, it is suggested that sound waves causing soil to expand have a temporary impact while those causing soil to contract have a permanent impact. In addition, our experimental results show how sound waves affect the water retention curve at different depths. The degree of soil expansion and contraction caused by the sound waves will differ at various soil depths. Nevertheless, the expanding or contracting of soil is only subject to the

  17. Parametric study of guided waves dispersion curves for composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predoi, Mihai Valentin; Petre, Cristian Cǎtǎlin; Kettani, Mounsif Ech Cherif El; Leduc, Damien

    2018-02-01

    Nondestructive testing of composite panels benefit from the relatively long range propagation of guided waves in sandwich structures. The guided waves are sensitive to delamination, air bubbles inclusions and cracks and can thus bring information about hidden defects in the composite panel. The preliminary data in all such inspections is represented by the dispersion curves, representing the dependency of the phase/group velocity on the frequency for the propagating modes. In fact, all modes are more or less attenuated, so it is even more important to compute the dispersion curves, which provide also the modal attenuation as function of frequency. Another important aspect is the sensitivity of the dispersion curves on each of the elastic constant of the composite, which are orthotropic in most cases. All these aspects are investigated in the present work, based on our specially developed finite element numerical model implemented in Comsol, which has several advantages over existing methods. The dispersion curves and modal displacements are computed for an example of composite plate. Comparison with literature data validates the accuracy of our results.

  18. Study on a particle separator using ultrasonic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Seop; Kwon, Jae Hwa; Seo, Dae Chul; Yun, Dong Jin

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the theory, design and evaluation of a smart device for the enhanced separation of particles mixed in fluid. The smart device takes advantage of the ultrasonic standing wave, which was generated by the operation of a piezoceramic PZT patch installed in the smart device. The details of the device design including the electro-acoustical modelling for separation and PZT transducer are described at the first. Based on this design, the separation device was fabricated and evaluated. In the experiments, an optical camera with a zoom lense was used to monitor the position of interested particles within the separation channel layer in the device. The electric impedance of the PZT patch bonded on the separation device was measured. The device shows a strong levitation and separation force against 50m diameter particles mixed with water at the separation channel in the device. Experimental results also showed that the device can work at both heavy and light sand particles mixed with water due to the generated standing wave field in the separation channel.

  19. Ground-satellite study of wave-particle correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C.G.; Lin, C.S.; Parks, G.K.

    1981-01-01

    Very low frequency (VLF) waves recorded at Siple, Antarctica (Lapprox.4; 84 0 W, geographic), are compared with low-energy ( 0 W, near the outer edge of the nominal ''viewing area'' of the Siple VLF receiver, which is estimated to be Lapprox.2-6 and +- 20 0 longitude. The results reveal two distinct types of chorus observed at Siple. One type is closely correlated with enhanced fluxes of >5-keV electrons detected at the synchronous altitude, and its generation region is inferred to be outside the plasmapause. The chorus upper cutoff frequency increases with time in a characteristic manner, consistent with the expected adiabatic motion of injected electrons in cyclotron resonance with the waves. The second type of chorus, which we refer to as ''plasmaspheric chorus,'' occurs inside the plasmapause, has no apparent relationship to particle injection at the synchronous altitude and shows clear evidence of being triggered by whistlers, power line radiation, and other signals. The two different types of chorus are readily distinguishable in frequency-time spectrograms

  20. Transitions in Structure in Oil-in-Water Emulsions As Studied by Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruis, H.G.M.; Gruijthuijsen, van K.; Venema, P.; Linden, van der E.

    2007-01-01

    Transitions in structure of sodium caseinate stabilized emulsions were studied using conventional rheometry as well as diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS). Structural differences were induced by different amounts of stabilizer, and transitions in structure were induced by acidification. Special

  1. Numerical study on the splitting of a vapor bubble in the ultrasonic assisted EDM process with the curved tool and workpiece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervani-Tabar, M T; Seyed-Sadjadi, M H; Shabgard, M R

    2013-01-01

    Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is a powerful and modern method of machining. In the EDM process, a vapor bubble is generated between the tool and the workpiece in the dielectric liquid due to an electrical discharge. In this process dynamic behavior of the vapor bubble affects machining process. Vibration of the tool surface affects bubble behavior and consequently affects material removal rate (MRR). In this paper, dynamic behavior of the vapor bubble in an ultrasonic assisted EDM process after the appearance of the necking phenomenon is investigated. It is noteworthy that necking phenomenon occurs when the bubble takes the shape of an hour-glass. After the appearance of the necking phenomenon, the vapor bubble splits into two parts and two liquid jets are developed on the boundaries of the upper and lower parts of the vapor bubble. The liquid jet developed on the upper part of the bubble impinges to the tool and the liquid jet developed on the lower part of the bubble impinges to the workpiece. These liquid jets cause evacuation of debris from the gap between the tool and the workpiece and also cause erosion of the workpiece and the tool. Curved tool and workpiece affect the shape and the velocity of the liquid jets during splitting of the vapor bubble. In this paper dynamics of the vapor bubble after its splitting near the curved tool and workpiece is investigated in three cases. In the first case surfaces of the tool and the workpiece are flat, in the second case surfaces of the tool and the workpiece are convex and in the third case surfaces of the tool and workpiece are concave. Numerical results show that in the third case, the velocity of liquid jets which are developed on the boundaries of the upper and lower parts of the vapor bubble after its splitting have the highest magnitude and their shape are broader than the other cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Relationship between mandibular anatomy and the occurrence of a bad split upon sagittal split osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarabi, Mohammadali; Tabrizi, Reza; Hekmat, Mina; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Puzesh, Ayatollah

    2014-12-01

    A bad split is a troublesome complication of the sagittal split osteotomy (SSO). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between the occurrence of a bad split and mandibular anatomy in SSO using cone-beam computed tomography. The authors designed a cohort retrospective study. Forty-eight patients (96 SSO sites) were studied. The buccolingual thickness of the retromandibular area (BLR), the buccolingual thickness of the ramus at the level of the lingula (BLTR), the height of the mandible from the alveolar crest to the inferior border of the mandible, (ACIB), the distance between the sigmoid notch and the inferior border of the mandible (SIBM), and the anteroposterior width of the ramus (APWR) were measured. The independent t test was applied to compare anatomic measurements between the group with and the group without bad splits. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) test was used to find a cutoff point in anatomic size for various parts of the mandible related to the occurrence of bad splits. The mean SIBM was 47.05±6.33 mm in group 1 (with bad splits) versus 40.66±2.44 mm in group 2 (without bad splits; P=.01). The mean BLTR was 5.74±1.11 mm in group 1 versus 3.19±0.55 mm in group 2 (P=.04). The mean BLR was 14.98±2.78 mm in group 1 versus 11.21±1.29 mm in group 2 (P=.001). No statistically significant difference was found for APWR and ACIB between the 2 groups. The ROC test showed cutoff points of 10.17 mm for BLR, 36.69 mm for SIBM, and 4.06 mm for BLTR. This study showed that certain mandibular anatomic differences can increase the risk of a bad split during SSO surgery. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. COMPENSATION OF THE IONOSPHERIC EFFECTS ON SAR INTERFEROGRAM BASED ON RANGE SPLIT-SPECTRUM AND AZIMUTH OFFSET METHODS – A CASE STUDY OF YUSHU EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. F. He

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available InSAR technique can measure the surface deformation with the accuracy of centimeter-level or even millimeter and therefore has been widely used in the deformation monitoring associated with earthquakes, volcanoes, and other geologic process. However, ionospheric irregularities can lead to the wavy fringes in the low frequency SAR interferograms, which disturb the actual information of geophysical processes and thus put severe limitations on ground deformations measurements. In this paper, an application of two common methods, the range split-spectrum and azimuth offset methods are exploited to estimate the contributions of the ionosphere, with the aim to correct ionospheric effects in interferograms. Based on the theoretical analysis and experiment, a performance analysis is conducted to evaluate the efficiency of these two methods. The result indicates that both methods can mitigate the ionospheric effect in SAR interferograms and the range split-spectrum method is more precise than the other one. However, it is also found that the range split-spectrum is easily contaminated by the noise, and the achievable accuracy of the azimuth offset method is limited by the ambiguous integral constant, especially with the strong azimuth variations induced by the ionosphere disturbance.

  4. Wind waves on the Black Sea: results of a hindcast study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipkin, V. S.; Gippius, F. N.; Koltermann, K. P.; Surkova, G. V.

    2014-02-01

    In this study we describe the wind waves fields on the Black Sea. The general aims of the work were the estimation of statistical wave parameters and the assessment of interannual and seasonal storm variability. The domain of this study was the entire Black Sea. Wave parameters were calculated by means of the SWAN wave model on a 5 km × 5 km rectangular grid. Initial conditions (wind speed and direction) for the period between 1948 and 2010 were derived from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. In our calculations the average significant wave height on the Black Sea does not exceed 0.7 m. Areas of most significant storminess are the south-western and the north-eastern corners as expressed in the spatial distribution of wave heights, wave lengths and periods. Besides that, long-term annual variations of storminess were estimated. Thus, linear trends of the annual total duration of storms and of their quantity are nearly stable over the reanalysis period. However, an intensification of storm activity is observed in the 1960s-1970s.

  5. Experimental and numerical study of guided wave propagation in a thin metamaterial plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, R.; Huang, G.L.; Huang, H.H.; Sun, C.T.

    2011-01-01

    In this Letter, both in-plane and out-of-plane guided waves in a thin plate with local resonators are studied numerically and experimentally. Through the numerical simulation, a new metamaterial plate design is achieved for a low-frequency bandgap in both in-plane and out-of-plane guided waves. Experiments were conducted to validate the numerical design. In the experiment, piezoelectric transducers were used to generate and receive guided wave signals. The results show that the numerical predictions are in very good agreement with the experimental measurements. Specifically, the connection between the local resonance in the thin plate and its wave attenuation mechanism was discussed. -- Highlights: → Both in-plane and out-of-plane guided waves in a thin plate with local resonators are studied numerically and experimentally. → A new metamaterial plate design is achieved for a low-frequency bandgap in both in-plane and out-of-plane guided waves. → Experiments were conducted to validate the numerical design. → The connection between the local resonance in the thin plate and its wave attenuation mechanism was investigated.

  6. Teleseismic SKS splitting beneath East Antarctica using broad-band stations around Soya Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Y.; Kanao, M.

    2006-12-01

    We observed shear wave splitting of SKS waves from digital seismographs that are recorded at 5 stations around Soya Coast in the Lutzow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica. Their recording systems are composed of a three-component broadband seismometer (CMG-40T), a digital recording unit and a solar power battery supply. The events used were selected from 1999 to 2004 and phase arrival times were calculated using the IASPEI91 earth model (Kennet, 1995). In general, we chose the data from earthquakes with m>6.0 and a distance range 85° < Δ < 130° for the most prominent SKS waves We used the methods of Silver and Chan (1991) for the inversion of anisotropy parameters and estimated the splitting parameters φ (fast polarization direction) and δt (delay time between split waves) assuming a single layer of hexagonal symmetry with a horizontal symmetry axis. The weighted averages of all splitting parameters (φ, δt) for each station are AKR (30±4, 1.30±0.2), LNG (58±6, 1.27±0.2), SKL (67±10, 0.94±0.2), SKV (40±6, 1.28±0.3) and TOT (52±8, 1.26±0.3), where the weights are inversely proportional to the standard deviations for each solution. As compared to typical delay times of SKS waves which show 1.2s (Silver and Chan 1991; Vinnik et al., 1992), the result shows generally the same value. In previous study, Kubo and Hiramatsu (1998) estimate the splitting parameter for Syowa station (SYO), where is located near our using stations in East Antarctica, and the results are (49±3, 0.70±0.1). Although it is consistent with our results for fast polarization direction, δt for our results are large relatively to those of SYO. The difference may be due to either different incident angle or more complex anisotropic structure. We found that fast polarization direction is systematically parallel to coast line in the Lutzow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica, which is consistent with NE-SW paleo compressional stress. The absolute plate motion based on the HS2-NUVEL1 (Gripp and Gordon

  7. Effectiveness evaluation of two volumizing hyaluronic acid dermal fillers in a controlled, randomized, double-blind, split-face clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerscher M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Martina Kerscher,1 Karla Agsten,2 Maria Kravtsov,3 Welf Prager4 1Department of Cosmetic Science, University of Hamburg, 2SCIderm GmbH, Hamburg, Germany; 3Anteis S.A., Geneva, Switzerland; 4Prager & Partner Dermatologische Praxis, Hamburg, Germany Background: Enhancement of the midface can be achieved with volumizing hyaluronic acid (HA fillers.Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the safety and effectiveness of Cohesive Polydensified Matrix® 26 mg/mL HA gel (CPM-26 and Vycross® 20 mg/ml HA gel (VYC-20 in a controlled, randomized, evaluator-blind, split-face clinical study.Patients and methods: Subjects with moderate-to-severe malar volume loss on the Merz Aesthetics Scale (MAS received CPM-26 on one side and VYC-20 on the contralateral side of the face. Effectiveness assessments were performed by blinded evaluators including photographic and live MAS ratings and live Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (GAIS ratings. Calculations of anatomical volume variations at month 3 (M3, month 6 (M6, month 12 (M12 and month 18 (M18 were also performed.Results: Non-inferiority of CPM-26 versus VYC-20 was demonstrated at M3 (primary end point based on MAS. GAIS rating showed that significantly more subjects had better improvement with CPM-26 than with VYC-20 at month 1, M3, M12 and M18 (p=0.0032, p=0.0074, p=0.0384 and p=0.0110, respectively. Standardized evaluation of volume variations from baseline to M3, M12 and M18 showed that CPM-26 created more volume augmentation at all time points, and the difference was significant at M3.Conclusion: CPM-26 was non-inferior to VYC-20 based on MAS ratings at M3 and demonstrated a favorable safety and effectiveness profile for midfacial volume enhancement with results lasting up to M18. Keywords: cohesive polydensified matrix, hyaluronic acid fillers, Belotero® Volume, Modélis® SHAPE, Juvéderm® VOLUMA®, volumizing

  8. Quark potential model of baryon spin-orbit mass splittings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fan; Wong Chunwa

    1987-01-01

    We show that it is possible to make the P-wave spin-orbit mass splittings in Λ baryons consistent with those of nonstrange baryons in a naive quark model, but only by introducing additional terms in the quark-quark effective interaction. These terms might be related to contributions due to pomeron exchange and sea excitations. The implications of our model in meson spectroscopy and nuclear forces are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Model based feasibility study on bidirectional check valves in wave energy converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Hedegaard; Pedersen, Henrik C.; Andersen, Torben Ole

    2014-01-01

    Discrete fluid power force systems have been proposed as the primary stage for Wave Energy Converters (WEC’s) when converting ocean waves into electricity, this to improve the overall efficiency of wave energy devices. This paper presents a model based feasibility study of using bidirectional check....../Off and bidirectional check valves. Based on the analysis it is found that the energy production may be slightly improved by using bidirectional check valves as compared to on/off valves, due to a decrease in switching losses. Furthermore a reduction in high flow peaks are realised. The downside being increased...

  10. Numerical study of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation and dispersive shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grava, T.; Klein, C.; Pitton, G.

    2018-02-01

    A detailed numerical study of the long time behaviour of dispersive shock waves in solutions to the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) I equation is presented. It is shown that modulated lump solutions emerge from the dispersive shock waves. For the description of dispersive shock waves, Whitham modulation equations for KP are obtained. It is shown that the modulation equations near the soliton line are hyperbolic for the KPII equation while they are elliptic for the KPI equation leading to a focusing effect and the formation of lumps. Such a behaviour is similar to the appearance of breathers for the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation in the semiclassical limit.

  11. Alfven wave heating studies in Tokapole II tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kortbawi, D.; Witherspoon, F.D.; Zhu, S.Y.; Casavant, T.; Sprott, J.C.; Prager, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    In earlier experiments at low power on the Tokapole II tokamak using the internal divertor rings as a launching structure the authors have observed a resonance with properties consistent with those expected for a shear Alfven wave. With these encouraging results, a second phase of experiments has begun where, eventually, 4 discrete antennas, located ≅180 0 apart in both the toroidal and poloidal directions and phased to establish proper mode numbers are driven from a 1 MW source. A prototype antenna has been installed and tested. It is a 2 turn Faraday shielded loop extending 54 0 along a toroidal arc. This orientation was chosen for the antenna currents based on the earlier experiments and the simple MHD result that the component of the wage magnetic field perpendicular to the equilibrium field is most strongly divergent. To test this the antenna can be rotated +.45 0 . It can also be inserted radially up to 6 cm

  12. Splitting of turbulent spot in transitional pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz; Adrian, Ronald J.

    2017-11-01

    Recent study (Wu et al., PNAS, 1509451112, 2015) demonstrated the feasibility and accuracy of direct computation of the Osborne Reynolds' pipe transition problem without the unphysical, axially periodic boundary condition. Here we use this approach to study the splitting of turbulent spot in transitional pipe flow, a feature first discovered by E.R. Lindgren (Arkiv Fysik 15, 1959). It has been widely believed that spot splitting is a mysterious stochastic process that has general implications on the lifetime and sustainability of wall turbulence. We address the following two questions: (1) What is the dynamics of turbulent spot splitting in pipe transition? Specifically, we look into any possible connection between the instantaneous strain rate field and the spot splitting. (2) How does the passive scalar field behave during the process of pipe spot splitting. In this study, the turbulent spot is introduced at the inlet plane through a sixty degree wide numerical wedge within which fully-developed turbulent profiles are assigned over a short time interval; and the simulation Reynolds numbers are 2400 for a 500 radii long pipe, and 2300 for a 1000 radii long pipe, respectively. Numerical dye is tagged on the imposed turbulent spot at the inlet. Splitting of the imposed turbulent spot is detected very easily. Preliminary analysis of the DNS results seems to suggest that turbulent spot slitting can be easily understood based on instantaneous strain rate field, and such spot splitting may not be relevant in external flows such as the flat-plate boundary layer.

  13. Split NMSSM with electroweak baryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demidov, S.V.; Gorbunov, D.S. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology,Institutsky per. 9, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation); Kirpichnikov, D.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-24

    In light of the Higgs boson discovery and other results of the LHC we reconsider generation of the baryon asymmetry in the split Supersymmetry model with an additional singlet superfield in the Higgs sector (non-minimal split SUSY). We find that successful baryogenesis during the first order electroweak phase transition is possible within a phenomenologically viable part of the model parameter space. We discuss several phenomenological consequences of this scenario, namely, predictions for the electric dipole moments of electron and neutron and collider signatures of light charginos and neutralinos.

  14. Split ring containment attachment device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammel, A.G.

    1996-01-01

    A containment attachment device is described for operatively connecting a glovebag to plastic sheeting covering hazardous material. The device includes an inner split ring member connected on one end to a middle ring member wherein the free end of the split ring member is inserted through a slit in the plastic sheeting to captively engage a generally circular portion of the plastic sheeting. A collar potion having an outer ring portion is provided with fastening means for securing the device together wherein the glovebag is operatively connected to the collar portion. 5 figs

  15. Splitting strings on integrable backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicedo, Benoit

    2011-05-15

    We use integrability to construct the general classical splitting string solution on R x S{sup 3}. Namely, given any incoming string solution satisfying a necessary self-intersection property at some given instant in time, we use the integrability of the worldsheet {sigma}-model to construct the pair of outgoing strings resulting from a split. The solution for each outgoing string is expressed recursively through a sequence of dressing transformations, the parameters of which are determined by the solutions to Birkhoff factorization problems in an appropriate real form of the loop group of SL{sub 2}(C). (orig.)

  16. Mass splitting induced by gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, M.D.

    1982-08-01

    The exact combination of internal and geometrical symmetries and the associated mass splitting problem is discussed. A 10-parameter geometrical symmetry is defined in a curved space-time in such a way that it is a combination of de Sitter groups. In the flat limit it reproduces the Poincare-group and its Lie algebra has a nilpotent action on the combined symmetry only in that limit. An explicit mass splitting expression is derived and an estimation of the order of magnitude for spin-zero mesons is made. (author)

  17. Electronic, magnetic structure and water splitting reactivity of the iron-sulfur dimers and their hexacarbonyl complexes: A density functional study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzunova, Ellie L., E-mail: ellie@svr.igic.bas.bg [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Mikosch, Hans [Institute for Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/E164-EC, 1060 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-07-28

    The iron sulfide dimers (FeS){sub 2} and their persulfide isomers with S–S bonds are studied with the B3LYP density functional as bare clusters and as hexacarbonyls. The disulfides are more stable than the persulfides as bare clusters and the persulfide ground state lies at 3.2 eV above the global minimum, while in the hexacarbonyl complexes this order is reversed: persulfides are more stable, but the energy gap between disulfides and persulfides becomes much smaller and the activation barrier for the transition persulfide → disulfide is 1.11 eV. Carbonylation also favors a non-planar Fe{sub 2}S{sub 2} ring for both the disulfides and the persulfides and high electron density in the Fe{sub 2}S{sub 2} core is induced. The diamagnetic ordering is preferred in the hexacarbonyls, unlike the bare clusters. The hexacarbonyls possess low-lying triplet excited states. In the persulfide, the lowest singlet-to-triplet state excitation occurs by electron transition from the iron centers to an orbital located predominantly at S{sub 2} via metal-to-ligand charge transfer. In the disulfide this excitation corresponds to ligand-to-metal charge transfer from the sulfur atoms to an orbital located at the iron centers and the Fe–Fe bond. Water splitting occurs on the hexacarbonyls, but not on the bare clusters. The singlet and triplet state reaction paths were examined and activation barriers were determined: 50 kJ mol{sup −1} for HO–H bond dissociation and 210 kJ mol{sup −1} for hydrogen evolution from the intermediate sulfoxyl-hydroxyl complexes Fe{sub 2}S(OH)(SH)(CO){sub 6} formed. The lowest singlet-singlet excitations in the hexacarbonyls, the water adsorption complexes and in the reaction intermediates, formed prior to dihydrogen release, fall in the visible light region. The energy barrier of 210 kJ mol{sup −1} for the release of one hydrogen molecule corresponds to one visible photon of 570 nm. The dissociation of a second water molecule, followed by H{sub 2

  18. Theoretical analysis and experimental study of oxygen transfer under regular and non-breaking waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹则高; 梁丙臣; 王乐

    2013-01-01

    The dissolved oxygen concentration is an important index of water quality, and the atmosphere is one of the important sources of the dissolved oxygen. In this paper, the mass conservation law and the dimensional analysis method are employed to study the oxygen transfer under regular and non-breaking waves, and a unified oxygen transfer coefficient equation is obtained with consi-deration of the effect of kinetic energy and wave period. An oxygen transfer experiment for the intermediate depth water wave is per-formed to measure the wave parameters and the dissolved oxygen concentration. The experimental data and the least squares method are used to determine the constant in the oxygen transfer coefficient equation. The experimental data and the previous reported data are also used to further validate the oxygen transfer coefficient, and the agreement is satisfactory. The unified equation shows that the oxygen transfer coefficient increases with the increase of a parameter coupled with the wave height and the wave length, but it de-creases with the increase of the wave period, which has a much greater influence on the oxygen transfer coefficient than the coupled parameter.

  19. Neutrino masses via the Zee mechanism in the 5D split fermion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, We-Fu; Chen, I-Ting; Liou, Siao-Cing

    2011-01-01

    We study the original version of the Zee model, where both of the SU(2) L Higgs doublets are allowed to couple to the leptons, in the framework of the split fermion model in M 4 xS 1 /Z 2 space-time. The neutrino masses are generated through 1-loop diagrams without introducing the right-handed neutrinos. By assuming an order one anarchical complex 5D Yukawa couplings, all the effective 4D Yukawa couplings are determined by the wave function overlap between the split fermions and the bulk scalars in the fifth dimension. The predictability of the Yukawa couplings is in sharp contrast to the original Zee model in 4D where the Yukawa couplings are unknown free parameters. This setup exhibits a geometrical alternative to the lepton flavor symmetry. By giving four explicit sets of the split fermion locations, we demonstrate that it is possible to simultaneously fit the lepton masses and neutrino oscillation data by just a handful free parameters without much fine tuning. Moreover, we are able to make definite predictions for the mixing angle θ 13 , the absolute neutrino masses, and the lepton flavor violation processes for each configuration.

  20. Studying the Effects of Mobile Phone Waves on Electro Cardiogram Parameters of Students in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Komeili, Gholamreza; Nabizadeh Sarabandi, Sima

    2012-01-01

    Background The increasing use of mobile phones in recent years has caused concerns about the effects of electromagnetic waves of mobile phonesonhuman biological processes. Objectives This study was conducted in order to survey the effects of mobile electromagnetic waves on electro cardiogram parameters as heart rate, TP segment, PR interval, Time of QRS and T waves, and voltage of R wave. Patients and Methods In this quasi experimental study, 40 students, of Zahedan medical science University...

  1. Aligning workload control theory and practice : lot splitting and operation overlapping issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, Nuno O.; Land, Martin J.; Carmo-Silva, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of lot splitting in the context of workload control (WLC). Past studies on WLC assumed that jobs released to the shop floor proceed through the different stages of processing without being split. However, in practice, large jobs are often split into smaller transfer

  2. Parametric study of two-body floating-point wave absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Atena; Panahi, Roozbeh; Radfar, Soheil

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a comprehensive numerical simulation of a point wave absorber in deep water. Analyses are performed in both the frequency and time domains. The converter is a two-body floating-point absorber (FPA) with one degree of freedom in the heave direction. Its two parts are connected by a linear mass-spring-damper system. The commercial ANSYS-AQWA software used in this study performs well in considering validations. The velocity potential is obtained by assuming incompressible and irrotational flow. As such, we investigated the effects of wave characteristics on energy conversion and device efficiency, including wave height and wave period, as well as the device diameter, draft, geometry, and damping coefficient. To validate the model, we compared our numerical results with those from similar experiments. Our study results can clearly help to maximize the converter's efficiency when considering specific conditions.

  3. Study of Lamb Waves for Non-Destructive Testing Behind Screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, P.; Ploix, M.-A.; Chaix, J.-F.; Gueudré, C.; Corneloup, G.; Baqué, F. AF(; )

    2018-01-01

    The inspection and control of sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) is a major issue for the nuclear industry. Ultrasonic solutions are under study because of the opacity of liquid sodium. In this paper, the use of leaky Lamb waves is considered for non-destructive testing (NDT) on parallel and immersed structures assimilated as plates. The first phase of our approach involved studying the propagation properties of leaky Lamb waves. Equations that model the propagation of Lamb waves in an immersed plate were solved numerically. The phase velocity can be experimentally measured using a two dimensional Fourier transform. The group velocity can be experimentally measured using a short-time Fourier transform technique. Attenuation of leaky Lamb waves is mostly due to the re-emission of energy into the surrounding fluid, and it can be measured by these two techniques.

  4. A Study on Parametric Wave Estimation Based on Measured Ship Motions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Iseki, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    The paper studies parametric wave estimation based on the ‘wave buoy analogy’, and data and results obtained from the training ship Shioji-maru are compared with estimates of the sea states obtained from other measurements and observations. Furthermore, the estimating characteristics of the param......The paper studies parametric wave estimation based on the ‘wave buoy analogy’, and data and results obtained from the training ship Shioji-maru are compared with estimates of the sea states obtained from other measurements and observations. Furthermore, the estimating characteristics...... of the parametric model are discussed by considering the results of a similar estimation concept based on Bayesian modelling. The purpose of the latter comparison is not to favour the one estimation approach to the other but rather to highlight some of the advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches....

  5. Study of dense-plasma properties using very high-frequency electromagnetic waves (light waves)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gormezano, C.

    1966-06-01

    A study is made of methods based on the use of lasers for measuring the electronic density and temperature of dense plasmas (N e > 10 15 e/cm 3 ): - an interferometric method using a gas laser, based on the. properties of the Perot-Fabry cavities; - a method making use of the 90 deg C scattering produced by the plasma on light emitted by a ruby laser. These methods have been applied to various dense plasmas: - high-frequency plasma torch; - azimuth compression; - plasma bursts produced by focussing a laser beam on a metal target. The measurements have also been carried out using conventional methods of diagnosis. It has thus been possible to measure densities of between 5.10 15 and 10 19 e/cm 3 and temperatures of between 3 and 10 eV. These different-methods are then compared, (author) [fr

  6. Transonymization as Revitalization: Old Toponyms of Split

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Lozić Knezović

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with ancient toponyms of Split, a city in the centre of the Croatian region of Dalmatia. Along with numerous monuments of spiritual and material culture, toponyms are part of the two-thousand-year-old city’s historical heritage. Split in particular abounds with sources that provide valuable information concerning ancient toponyms. In terms of the study and preservation of toponymy, three basic sources are crucial: the living oral tradition, written records, and old charts — mostly cadastral plans. In addition to researching, recording, documenting, and publishing Split’s ancient place names through toponomastic, geographical, and town planning studies, toponymic heritage preservation is also implemented through the direct use of the names in everyday life. One of the ways of such revitalization of Split’s ancient place names is their transonymization into the category of chrematonyms, i.e. their secondary use as names of institutions, shops, restaurants, schools, sports associations and facilities, bars and coffee shops, cemeteries, and so on. The present paper provides a classification and etymological analysis of detoponymic chrematonyms of Split. The authors propose measures to raise public awareness of the historical information conveyed by the names and raise some issues for consideration regarding further study of transonymization as a means of revitalizing local toponymic tradition.

  7. Final Report Feasibility Study for the California Wave Energy Test Center (CalWavesm)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakeslee, Samuel Norman [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States). Inst. for Advanced Technology and Public Policy; Toman, William I. [Protean Wave Energy Ltd., Los Osos, CA (United States); Williams, Richard B. [Leidos Maritime Solutions, Reston, VA (United States); Davy, Douglas M. [CH2M, Sacramento, CA (United States); West, Anna [Kearns and West, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Connet, Randy M. [Omega Power Engineers, LLC, Anaheim, CA (United States); Thompson, Janet [Kearns and West, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Dolan, Dale [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Baltimore, Craig [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Jacobson, Paul [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States); Hagerman, George [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Potter, Chris [California Natural Resources Agency, Sacramento, CA (United States); Dooher, Brendan [Pacific Gas and Electric Company, San Francisco, CA (United States); Wendt, Dean [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Sheppard, Colin [Humboldt State Univ., Arcata, CA (United States); Harris, Andrew [Humboldt State Univ., Arcata, CA (United States); Lawson, W. Graham [Power Delivery Consultants, Inc., Albany, NY (United States)

    2017-07-31

    The California Wave Energy Test Center (CalWave) Feasibility Study project was funded over multiple phases by the Department of Energy to perform an interdisciplinary feasibility assessment to analyze the engineering, permitting, and stakeholder requirements to establish an open water, fully energetic, grid connected, wave energy test center off the coast of California for the purposes of advancing U.S. wave energy research, development, and testing capabilities. Work under this grant included wave energy resource characterization, grid impact and interconnection requirements, port infrastructure and maritime industry capability/suitability to accommodate the industry at research, demonstration and commercial scale, and macro and micro siting considerations. CalWave Phase I performed a macro-siting and down-selection process focusing on two potential test sites in California: Humboldt Bay and Vandenberg Air Force Base. This work resulted in the Vandenberg Air Force Base site being chosen as the most favorable site based on a peer reviewed criteria matrix. CalWave Phase II focused on four siting location alternatives along the Vandenberg Air Force Base coastline and culminated with a final siting down-selection. Key outcomes from this work include completion of preliminary engineering and systems integration work, a robust turnkey cost estimate, shoreside and subsea hazards assessment, storm wave analysis, lessons learned reports from several maritime disciplines, test center benchmarking as compared to existing international test sites, analysis of existing applicable environmental literature, the completion of a preliminary regulatory, permitting and licensing roadmap, robust interaction and engagement with state and federal regulatory agency personnel and local stakeholders, and the population of a Draft Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Preliminary Application Document (PAD). Analysis of existing offshore oil and gas infrastructure was also performed

  8. The quasi-two-day wave studied using the Northern Hemisphere SuperDARN HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Malinga

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Data from the Super Dual Radar Network (SuperDARN radars for 2002 were used to study the behaviour of the quasi-two-day wave (QTDW in the Northern Hemisphere auroral zone. The period of the QTDW is observed to vary in the range of ~42–56 h, with the most dominant period being ~48 h and secondary peaks at ~42- and ~52-h. The spectral power shows a seasonal variation with a peak power (max~70 in summer. The power shows variations of several days and there is also evidence of changes in wave strength with longitude. The 42-h and the 48-h components tend to be strongly correlated in summer. The onset of enhanced wave activity tends to coincide with the westward acceleration of the zonal mean flow and occurs at a time of strong southward meridional flow. The most frequent instantaneous hourly period is in the 40 to 50 h period band, in line with the simultaneous dominance of the 42-h and the 48-h components. The wave numbers are less variable and are around −2 to −4 during times of strong wave activity. For a period of ~48 h, the zonal wave number is about −3 to −4, using a negative value to indicate westward propagating waves. The 42-h and the 52-h components cover a wider band in the −4 to 1 range. The wide zonal wave number spectrum in our results may account for the observed longitudinal variation in the spectral power of the wave.

  9. A Retrospective Study of the Characteristics and Clinical Significance of A-Waves in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Fang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A-wave was observed in patients with motor neuron disease (1. However, data on the characteristics and clinical significance of A-waves in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS have been scarce. The F-wave studies of 83 patients with ALS and 63 normal participants which were conducted previously at the Department of Neurology in Peking Union Medical College Hospital were retrospectively reviewed to determine the occurrence of A-waves in ALS. A-waves occurred more frequently in ALS patients than in normal controls. For the median and peroneal nerves, the frequencies of nerves with A-waves and frequencies of patients with A-waves were comparable between the ALS patients and normal controls. For the ulnar and tibial nerves, the frequencies of nerves with A-waves and frequencies of patients with A-waves were significantly increased in the ALS patients compared with those of the normal participants. Disease progression rate was slower in the ALS patients with A-waves (0.73 ± 0.99 than that in the ALS patients without A-waves (0.87 ± 0.55, P = 0.007. No correlations were found between the amplitudes of F-waves with A-waves and those of A-waves in the ulnar nerves (r = 0.423, P = 0.149. No correlations were found between the persistence of F-waves with A-waves and the persistence of A-waves in the ulnar nerves as well (r = 0.219, P = 0.473. The occurrence of A-waves may indicate dysfunction of lower motor neurons and possibly imply a relatively slower degenerative process.

  10. Influence of the large-small split effect on strategy choice in complex subtraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yan Hui; Wu, Hao; Shang, Rui Hong; Chao, Xiaomei; Ren, Ting Ting; Zheng, Li Ling; Mo, Lei

    2018-04-01

    Two main theories have been used to explain the arithmetic split effect: decision-making process theory and strategy choice theory. Using the inequality paradigm, previous studies have confirmed that individuals tend to adopt a plausibility-checking strategy and a whole-calculation strategy to solve large and small split problems in complex addition arithmetic, respectively. This supports strategy choice theory, but it is unknown whether this theory also explains performance in solving different split problems in complex subtraction arithmetic. This study used small, intermediate and large split sizes, with each split condition being further divided into problems requiring and not requiring borrowing. The reaction times (RTs) for large and intermediate splits were significantly shorter than those for small splits, while accuracy was significantly higher for large and middle splits than for small splits, reflecting no speed-accuracy trade-off. Further, RTs and accuracy differed significantly between the borrow and no-borrow conditions only for small splits. This study indicates that strategy choice theory is suitable to explain the split effect in complex subtraction arithmetic. That is, individuals tend to choose the plausibility-checking strategy or the whole-calculation strategy according to the split size. © 2016 International Union of Psychological Science.

  11. Wave-Vector Dependence of the Jahn-Teller Interactions in TmVO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Jørgen; Hayes, W.; Smith, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    The resonant Jahn-Teller coupling of the B2g acoustic phonon and the Zeeman-split ground doublet in TmVO4 has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. Tuning of the magnetic field provides a means for investigating the wave-vector dependence of the interactions. We find that the coupling...

  12. Effect of nonaxial and hexadecapole deformation on the hyperfine splitting of energy levels in 238U muonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagaev, V.I.; Mikhajlov, I.N.; Ortlepp, Kh.G.; Fromm, V.D.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of nonaxial and hexadecapole deformation on spectra of moun atoms is considered, the model of rigid nonaxial rotator being used. Experimental data on μ -238 U obtained on the JINR synchrocyclotron are presented. The effect of monopolar, quadrupolar and hexadecapolar parts of potential on muon spectrum is studied using a separated beam of negative 105 MeV/c muons, as the contribution of other harmonics is negligible. Wave functions of 238 U nucleus are determined in the framework of the Davydov-Filipov model. The values of charge distribution parameters obtained for 238 U are compared with available ones. The comparison shows that the effect of nuclear polarization on quadrupolar splitting of n→n-1 transitions decreases with the growth of n. Quadrupolar splitting of 4F→3D transitions is sufficiently large for experimental studies. Besides, vacuum polarization, radial charge distribution etc. produce an insignificant effect on the above transitions

  13. Variability of ULF wave power at the magnetopause: a study at low latitude with Cluster data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Grison, B.; Belmont, G.; Rezeau, L.; Chanteur, G.; Robert, P.; Canu, P.

    2012-04-01

    Strong ULF wave activity has been observed at magnetopause crossings since a long time. Those turbulent-like waves are possible contributors to particle penetration from the Solar Wind to the Magnetosphere through the magnetopause. Statistical studies have been performed to understand under which conditions the ULF wave power is the most intense and thus the waves can be the most efficient for particle transport from one region to the other. Clearly the solar wind pressure organizes the data, the stronger the pressure, the higher the ULF power (Attié et al 2008). Double STAR-Cluster comparison has shown that ULF wave power is stronger at low latitude than at high latitude (Cornilleau-Wehrlin et al, 2008). The different studies performed have not, up to now, shown a stronger power in the vicinity of local noon. Nevertheless under identical activity conditions, the variability of this power, even at a given location in latitude and local time is very high. The present work intends at understanding this variability by means of the multi spacecraft mission Cluster. The data used are from spring 2008, while Cluster was crossing the magnetopause at low latitude, in particularly quite Solar Wind conditions. The first region of interest of this study is the sub-solar point vicinity where the long wavelength surface wave effects are most unlikely.

  14. Studies on the transmission of sub-THz waves in magnetized inhomogeneous plasma sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kai; Shen, Linfang; Yao, Ming; Deng, Xiaohua; Chen, Zhou; Hong, Lujun

    2018-01-01

    There have been many studies on the sub-terahertz (sub-THz) wave transmission in reentry plasma sheaths. However, only some of them have paid attention to the transmission of sub-THz waves in magnetized plasma sheaths. In this paper, the transmission of sub-THz waves in both unmagnetized and magnetized reentry plasma sheaths was investigated. The impacts of temporal evolution of the plasma sheath on the wave transmission were studied. The transmission of "atmospheric window" frequencies in a magnetized plasma sheath was discussed in detail. According to the study, the power transmission rates (Tp) for the left hand circular (LHC) and the right hand circular modes in the magnetized plasma sheath are obviously higher and lower than those in the unmagnetized plasma sheath, respectively. The Tp of LHC mode increases with both wave frequency and external magnetic field strength. Also, the Tp of LHC mode in both magnetized and unmagnetized plasma sheaths varies with time due to the temporal evolution of the plasma sheath. Moreover, the performance of sub-THz waves in magnetized plasma sheath hints at a new approach to the "blackout" problem. The new approach, which is in the capability of modern technology, is to utilize the communication system operating at 140 GHz with an onboard magnet installed near the antenna.

  15. A study on ultrasonic inspection of long steel pipes using lamb waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moon Ho

    1996-02-01

    An ultrasonic inspection technique with use of Lamb waves was evaluated to detect and determine the exact location of flaws present in long steel pipes. Since multiple modes of Lamb waves are generated in the inspected pipes due to their dispersive characteristics, selection of a specific Lamb wave mode is very important for inspection of flaws. Experimental studies of flaw detectability with use of each Lamb wave mode, namely, A 0 , S 0 , A 1 , and S 1 mode and their ultrasonic attenuation characteristics were conducted. Experimental results showed that A 0 mode is the most effective for detection and exact determination of the location of flaws. A lucite wedge containing water column that generates the A 0 Lamb wave mode was developed and used in the present inspection study. It was found that the ultrasonic beam divergence after its wrapping around once the inspected pipe interferes with exact determination of the location of flaws and that maximum reflection signals are obtained when the transducer is located axially offset from the straight line with the position of the flaw. The present study showed feasibility of ultrasonic inspection with use of Lamb waves for detection of flaws in several meters long insulated or inaccessible steel pipes

  16. Split supersymmetry in brane models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Type-I string theory in the presence of internal magnetic fields provides a concrete realization of split ... quantum picture of the Universe. It was then ... where the integers m, n correspond to the respective magnetic and electric charges; m is the ...

  17. Stability of split Stirling refrigerators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waele, de A.T.A.M.; Liang, W.

    2009-01-01

    In many thermal systems spontaneous mechanical oscillations are generated under the influence of large temperature gradients. Well-known examples are Taconis oscillations in liquid-helium cryostats and oscillations in thermoacoustic systems. In split Stirling refrigerators the compressor and the

  18. Numerical and experimental study on atmospheric pressure ionization waves propagating through a U-shape channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Wen; Xia, Yang; Bi, Zhenhua; Song, Ying; Liu, Dongping; Wang, Dezhen; Sosnin, Eduard A; Skakun, Victor S

    2017-01-01

    A 2D computational study of ionization waves propagating in U-shape channels at atmospheric pressure was performed, with emphasis on the effect of voltage polarity and the curvature of the bend. The discharge was ignited by a HV needle electrode inside the channel, and power was applied in the form of a trapezoidal pulse lasting 2 µ s. We have shown that behavior of ionization waves propagating in U-shape channels was quite different with that in straight tubes. For positive polarity of applied voltage, the ionization waves tended to propagate along one side of walls rather than filling the channel. The propagation velocity of ionization waves predicted by the simulation was in good agreement with the experiment results; the velocity was first increasing rapidly in the vicinity of the needle tip and then decreasing with the increment of propagation distance. Then we have studied the influence of voltage polarity on discharge characteristics. For negative polarity, the ionization waves tended to propagate along the opposite side of the wall, while the discharge was more diffusive and volume-filling compared with the positive case. It was found that the propagation velocity for the negative ionization wave was higher than that for the positive one. Meanwhile, the propagation of the negative ionization wave depended less on the pre-ionization level than the positive ionization wave. Finally, the effect of the radius of curvature was studied. Simulations have shown that the propagation speeds were sensitive to the radii of the curvature of the channels for both polarities. Higher radii of curvature tended to have higher speed and longer length of plasma. The simulation results were supported by experimental observations under similar discharge conditions. (paper)

  19. Study on Dissipation of Landslide Generated Waves in Different Shape of Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2017-12-01

    The landslide generated waves are major risks for many reservoirs located in mountainous areas. As the initial wave is often very huge (e.g. 30m of the height in Xiaowan event, 2009, China), the dissipation of the wave, which is closely connected with the shape of the reservoir (e.g. channel type vs. lake type), is a crucial factor in risk estimation and prevention. While even for channel type reservoir, the wave damping also varies a lot due to details of the shape such as branches and turnings. Focusing on the influence of this shape details on the wave damping in channel type reservoir, we numerically studied two landslide generated wave events with both a triangle shape of the cross section but different longitudinal shape configurations (Xiaowan event in 2009 and an assuming event in real topography). The two-dimensional Saint-Venant equation and dry-wet boundary treatment method are used to simulate the wave generation and propagation processes. The simulation is based on an open source code called `Basilisk' and the adaptive mesh refinement technique is used to achieve enough precision with affordable computational resources. The sensitivity of the parameters representing bed drag and the vortex viscosity is discussed. We found that the damping is relatively not sensitive to the bed drag coefficient, which is natural as the water depth is large compared with wave height. While the vortex viscosity needs to be chosen carefully as it is related to cross sectional velocity distribution. It is also found that the longitudinal shape, i.e. the number of turning points and branches, is the key factor influencing the wave damping. The wave height at the far field could be only one seventh comparing with the initial wave in the case with complex longitudinal shape, while the damping is much weaker in the straight channel case. We guess that this phenomenon is due to the increasing sloshing at these abruptly changed positions. This work could provide a deeper

  20. Tune splitting in the presence of linear coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzen, G.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of random skew quadrupole field errors will couple the x and y motions. The x and y motions are then each given by the sum of 2 normal modes with the tunes v 1 and v 2 , which may differ appreciably from v x and v y , the unperturbed tunes. This is often called tune splitting since |v 1 - v 2 | is usually larger than |v x - v y |. This tune splitting may be large in proton accelerators using superconducting magnets, because of the relatively large random skew quadrupole field errors that are expected in these magnets. This effect is also increased by the required insertions in proton colliders which generate large β-functions in the insertion region. This tune splitting has been studied in the RHIC accelerator. For RHIC, a tune splitting as large as 0.2 was found in one worse case. A correction system has been developed for correcting this large tune splitting which uses two families of skew quadrupole correctors. It has been found that this correction system corrects most of the large tune splitting, but a residual tune splitting remains that is still appreciable. This paper discusses the corrections to this residual time

  1. Negative pressure wound therapy, staged excision and definitive closure with split-thickness skin graft for axillary hidradenitis suppurativa: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, F B; Richardson, K A

    2017-01-02

    Bilateral axillary hidradenitis is a chronic, suppurative, and scarring disease that is most effectively treated by complete excision of all hair-bearing tissues. We assessed our staged procedure for excision and placement of a split-thickness skin graft for bilateral axillary hidradenitis in terms of costs, outcomes, and timing of excision. An IRB approved retrospective case analysis was performed on patients that underwent bilateral axillary hidradenitis skin excision with eventual placement of split-thickness skin grafting using the current LSUHSC/University Health hidradenitis surgical treatment protocol. Using ICD-9 codes (705.83) and CPT codes (11041, 11042, 11451, 11600, 11601, 11602, 11603, 11604) we reviewed cases performed at our institution from 1 January 2008 to 24 Febuary 2014 and we selected patients based on bilateral axillary involvement (alone) and >1 year history of active disease. Patients were excluded if resection of tissue encompassed regions outside of the immediately adjacent axillary. A total of seven patients matching criteria for bilateral axillary hidradenitis were selected for analysis. Clinical course, cost and surgical techniques were assessed. Of the seven patients, six required admission throughout their treatment due to lack of funding making use of negative pressure wound therapy at home not possible. These patients stayed an average of 10 days with a mean hospital charge of $35,178 and a mean hospital provider charge of $10,019. No recurrence was demonstrated. All patients attained full range of motion, post grafting. No patient required a further operation due to graft failure. Split-thickness skin grafting without use of bilayer dermal regenerative templates yielded definitive results with acceptable cosmesis and functionality, without the added cost of treatments such as a bilayer dermal regenerative template.

  2. A study of the coherence length of ULF waves in the earth's foreshock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, G.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    High-time-resolution magnetic-field data for different separations of ISEE 1 and 2 in the earth's ion foreshock region are examined to study the coherence length of upstream ULF waves. Examining the correlation coefficients of the low-frequency waves as a function of separation distance shows that the correlation coefficient depends mainly on the separation distance of ISEE 1 and 2 transverse to the solar-wind flow. It drops to about 0.5 when the transverse separation is about 1 earth radius, a distance much larger than the proton thermal gyroradius in the solar wind. Thus the coherence length of the low-frequency waves is about one earth radius, which is of the order of the wavelength, and is consistent with that estimated from the bandwidth of the waves.

  3. Simulation study of localization of electromagnetic waves in two-dimensional random dipolar systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Ye Zhen

    2003-01-01

    We study the propagation and scattering of electromagnetic waves by random arrays of dipolar cylinders in a uniform medium. A set of self-consistent equations, incorporating all orders of multiple scattering of the electromagnetic waves, is derived from first principles and then solved numerically for electromagnetic fields. For certain ranges of frequencies, spatially localized electromagnetic waves appear in such a simple but realistic disordered system. Dependence of localization on the frequency, radiation damping, and filling factor is shown. The spatial behavior of the total, coherent, and diffusive waves is explored in detail, and found to comply with a physical intuitive picture. A phase diagram characterizing localization is presented, in agreement with previous investigations on other systems

  4. Simulation study of localization of electromagnetic waves in two-dimensional random dipolar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Ye, Zhen

    2003-12-01

    We study the propagation and scattering of electromagnetic waves by random arrays of dipolar cylinders in a uniform medium. A set of self-consistent equations, incorporating all orders of multiple scattering of the electromagnetic waves, is derived from first principles and then solved numerically for electromagnetic fields. For certain ranges of frequencies, spatially localized electromagnetic waves appear in such a simple but realistic disordered system. Dependence of localization on the frequency, radiation damping, and filling factor is shown. The spatial behavior of the total, coherent, and diffusive waves is explored in detail, and found to comply with a physical intuitive picture. A phase diagram characterizing localization is presented, in agreement with previous investigations on other systems.

  5. Study on spectral features of terahertz wave propagating in the air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Shengwu

    2018-03-01

    Now, Terahertz technology has been widely used in many fields, which is mainly related to imaging detection. While the frequency range of the terahertz-wave is located between microwave and visible light, whether the existing visible light principle is applicable to terahertz-wave should be studied again. Through experiment, we measure the terahertz-wave field amplitude distribution on the receiving plane perpendicular to the direction of propagation in the air and picture out the energy distribution curve; derive an energy decay formula of terahertz wave based on the results; design a terahertz wavelength apparatus using the F-P interferometer theory; test the wavelength between 1 and 3 THz from the SIFIR-50THz laser of American Corehent company; finally analyze the related factors affecting the measurement precision including the beam incident angle, mechanical vibration, temperature fluctuation and the refractive index fluctuation.

  6. A Proposal on the Geometry Splitting Strategy to Enhance the Calculation Efficiency in Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Gi Yeong; Kim, Song Hyun; Kim, Do Hyun; Shin, Chang Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this study, how the geometry splitting strategy affects the calculation efficiency was analyzed. In this study, a geometry splitting method was proposed to increase the calculation efficiency in Monte Carlo simulation. First, the analysis of the neutron distribution characteristics in a deep penetration problem was performed. Then, considering the neutron population distribution, a geometry splitting method was devised. Using the proposed method, the FOMs with benchmark problems were estimated and compared with the conventional geometry splitting strategy. The results show that the proposed method can considerably increase the calculation efficiency in using geometry splitting method. It is expected that the proposed method will contribute to optimizing the computational cost as well as reducing the human errors in Monte Carlo simulation. Geometry splitting in Monte Carlo (MC) calculation is one of the most popular variance reduction techniques due to its simplicity, reliability and efficiency. For the use of the geometry splitting, the user should determine locations of geometry splitting and assign the relative importance of each region. Generally, the splitting parameters are decided by the user's experience. However, in this process, the splitting parameters can ineffectively or erroneously be selected. In order to prevent it, there is a recommendation to help the user eliminate guesswork, which is to split the geometry evenly. And then, the importance is estimated by a few iterations for preserving population of particle penetrating each region. However, evenly geometry splitting method can make the calculation inefficient due to the change in mean free path (MFP) of particles.

  7. A Proposal on the Geometry Splitting Strategy to Enhance the Calculation Efficiency in Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Gi Yeong; Kim, Song Hyun; Kim, Do Hyun; Shin, Chang Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung

    2014-01-01

    In this study, how the geometry splitting strategy affects the calculation efficiency was analyzed. In this study, a geometry splitting method was proposed to increase the calculation efficiency in Monte Carlo simulation. First, the analysis of the neutron distribution characteristics in a deep penetration problem was performed. Then, considering the neutron population distribution, a geometry splitting method was devised. Using the proposed method, the FOMs with benchmark problems were estimated and compared with the conventional geometry splitting strategy. The results show that the proposed method can considerably increase the calculation efficiency in using geometry splitting method. It is expected that the proposed method will contribute to optimizing the computational cost as well as reducing the human errors in Monte Carlo simulation. Geometry splitting in Monte Carlo (MC) calculation is one of the most popular variance reduction techniques due to its simplicity, reliability and efficiency. For the use of the geometry splitting, the user should determine locations of geometry splitting and assign the relative importance of each region. Generally, the splitting parameters are decided by the user's experience. However, in this process, the splitting parameters can ineffectively or erroneously be selected. In order to prevent it, there is a recommendation to help the user eliminate guesswork, which is to split the geometry evenly. And then, the importance is estimated by a few iterations for preserving population of particle penetrating each region. However, evenly geometry splitting method can make the calculation inefficient due to the change in mean free path (MFP) of particles

  8. The role of intraoperative positioning of the inferior alveolar nerve on postoperative paresthesia after bilateral sagittal split osteotomy of the mandible: prospective clinical study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzelka, T.; Foltán, R.; Pavlíková, G.; Horká, E.; Šedý, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 9 (2011), s. 901-906 ISSN 0901-5027 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR GAP304/10/0320 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0538 Program:1M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : orthognathic surgery * paresthesia * bilateral sagittal split osteotomy Subject RIV: FJ - Surgery incl. Transplants; FH - Neurology (UEM-P) Impact factor: 1.506, year: 2011

  9. Photosynthetic water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, E.

    1981-01-01

    The photosynthetic unit of hydrogen evolution, the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production, and hydrogenic photosynthesis are discussed in the section on previous work. Recent results are given on simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen, kinetic studies, microscopic marine algae-seaweeds, and oxygen profiles.

  10. Splitting Parabolic Manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Kalka, Morris; Patrizio, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    We study the geometric properties of complex manifolds possessing a pair of plurisubharmonic functions satisfying Monge-Amp\\`ere type of condition. The results are applied to characterize complex manifolds biholomorphic to $\\C^{N}$ viewed as a product of lower dimensional complex euclidean spaces.

  11. Cool covered sky-splitting spectrum-splitting FK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohedano, Rubén; Chaves, Julio; Falicoff, Waqidi; Hernandez, Maikel; Sorgato, Simone [LPI, Altadena, CA, USA and Madrid (Spain); Miñano, Juan C.; Benitez, Pablo [LPI, Altadena, CA, USA and Madrid, Spain and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), Madrid (Spain); Buljan, Marina [Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-26

    Placing a plane mirror between the primary lens and the receiver in a Fresnel Köhler (FK) concentrator gives birth to a quite different CPV system where all the high-tech components sit on a common plane, that of the primary lens panels. The idea enables not only a thinner device (a half of the original) but also a low cost 1-step manufacturing process for the optics, automatic alignment of primary and secondary lenses, and cell/wiring protection. The concept is also compatible with two different techniques to increase the module efficiency: spectrum splitting between a 3J and a BPC Silicon cell for better usage of Direct Normal Irradiance DNI, and sky splitting to harvest the energy of the diffuse radiation and higher energy production throughout the year. Simple calculations forecast the module would convert 45% of the DNI into electricity.

  12. A Study of Mesoscale Gravity Waves over the North Atlantic with Satellite Observations and a Mesoscale Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong L.; Zhang, Fuqing

    2004-01-01

    Satellite microwave data are used to study gravity wave properties and variabilities over the northeastern United States and the North Atlantic in the December-January periods. The gravity waves in this region, found in many winters, can reach the stratopause with growing amplitude. The Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) observations show that the wave occurrences are correlated well with the intensity and location of the tropospheric baroclinic jet front systems. To further investigate the cause(s) and properties of the North Atlantic gravity waves, we focus on a series of wave events during 19-21 January 2003 and compare AMSU-A observations to simulations from a mesoscale model (MM5). The simulated gravity waves compare qualitatively well with the satellite observations in terms of wave structures, timing, and overall morphology. Excitation mechanisms of these large-amplitude waves in the troposphere are complex and subject to further investigations.

  13. Clarification of the confusion concerning the crystal-field quantities vs the zero-field splitting quantities in magnetism studies: Part II-Survey of literature dealing with model studies of spin systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudowicz, C.

    2008-01-01

    For respective quantities, i.e., Hamiltonians, parameters, and energy level splittings, related to two physically distinct notions X and Y, various cases of confused terminology have been identified in literature. Referring to a quantity related actually to the notion Y using incorrectly the name of another well-defined notion X constitutes, what may be defined for short as, the type X=Y confusion. An ongoing survey of magnetism literature indicates that quantities related to zero-field splitting (ZFS) or equivalently fine structure (FS) are most often confused with those related to crystal-field (CF) or equivalently ligand field (LF). In this review the CF=ZFS confusion cases, i.e., labelling actual ZFS/FS quantities as purportedly 'CF/LF' ones, appearing in magnetism studies are surveyed and clarified. Part I covers the cases occurring in literature dealing with specific compounds. In this part model studies of spin systems are surveyed. The cases of terminology mixing up actual ZFS/FS quantities with purported CF/LF ones are identified and presented comprehensively in tabular form. To facilitate discussion, problems pertinent for the CF=ZFS confusion are categorized into several groups, including origin of the two notions, physical consequences, usage of specific numerical values, invoking real magnetic spin systems, and properties of spin S=1/2 systems. Physical implications of this confusion for interpretation of model results are also considered. Overall implications of incorrect terminology go beyond simple semantic issues and concern possible misinterpretation of data describing various physical properties of models studied. Such terminology contributes also to misleading keyword classifications of papers in journals and scientific databases. Other types of confusion identified in survey of magnetism literature will be discussed in separate reviews

  14. Study of plasma-based stable and ultra-wideband electromagnetic wave absorption for stealth application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuyang, CHEN; Fangfang, SHEN; Yanming, LIU; Wei, AI; Xiaoping, LI

    2018-06-01

    A plasma-based stable, ultra-wideband electromagnetic (EM) wave absorber structure is studied in this paper for stealth applications. The stability is maintained by a multi-layer structure with several plasma layers and dielectric layers distributed alternately. The plasma in each plasma layer is designed to be uniform, whereas it has a discrete nonuniform distribution from the overall view of the structure. The nonuniform distribution of the plasma is the key to obtaining ultra-wideband wave absorption. A discrete Epstein distribution model is put forward to constrain the nonuniform electron density of the plasma layers, by which the wave absorption range is extended to the ultra-wideband. Then, the scattering matrix method (SMM) is employed to analyze the electromagnetic reflection and absorption of the absorber structure. In the simulation, the validation of the proposed structure and model in ultra-wideband EM wave absorption is first illustrated by comparing the nonuniform plasma model with the uniform case. Then, the influence of various parameters on the EM wave reflection of the plasma are simulated and analyzed in detail, verifying the EM wave absorption performance of the absorber. The proposed structure and model are expected to be superior in some realistic applications, such as supersonic aircraft.

  15. The shock tube as wave reactor for kinetic studies and material systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskaran, K.A. [Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai (India). Department of Mechanical Engineering; Roth, P. [Gerhard Mercator Universitat, Duisberg (Germany). Institut fur Verbrennung und Gasdynamik

    2002-07-01

    Several important reviews of shock tube kinetics have appeared earlier, prominent among them being 'Shock Tube Technique in Chemical Kinetics' by Belford and Strehlow (Ann Rev Phys Chem 20 (1969) 247), 'Chemical Reaction of Shock Waves' by Wagner (Proceedings of the Eighth International Shock Tube Symposium (1971) 4/1), 'Shock Tube and Shock Wave Research' by Bauer and Lewis (Proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on Shock Tubes and Waves (1977) 269), 'Shock Waves in Chemistry' edited by Assa Lifshitz (Shock Waves in Chemistry, 1981) and 'Shock Tube Techniques in Chemical Kinetics' by Wing Tsang and Assa Lifshitz (Annu Rev Phys Chem 41 (1990) 559). A critical analysis of the different shock tube techniques, their limitations and suggestions to improve the accuracy of the data produced are contained in these reviews. The purpose of this article is to present the current status of kinetic research with emphasis on the diagnostic techniques. Selected studies on homogeneous and dispersed systems are presented to bring out the versatility of the shock tube technique. The use of the shock tube as high temperature wave reactor for gas phase material synthesis is also highlighted. (author)

  16. Numerical and experimental study of disturbance wave development in vertical two-phase annular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Geoffrey; Yang, Junfeng; Zhao, Yujie; Markides, Christos; Matar, Omar

    2013-11-01

    The annular flow regime is characterized by the presence of a thin, wavy liquid film driven along the wall by the shear stress exerted by the gas phase. Under certain liquid film Reynolds numbers, large disturbance waves are observed to traverse the interface, whose length is typically on the order of 20 mm and whose height is typically on the order of 5 times the thickness of the thin (substrate) layer between the waves. Experimental wok has been conducted to study the disturbance wave onset by probing the local film thickness for different Reynolds numbers. It is observed the disturbance waves grow gradually from wavy initiation and form the ring-like structure. To predict the wavy flow field observed in the experiment, 3D CFD simulations are performed using different low Reynolds number turbulence models and Large Eddy Simulation. Modeling results confirm that there is recirculation within the waves, and that they as a packet of turbulence traveling over a laminar substrate film. We also predict the coalescence and the break-up of waves leading to liquid droplet entrainment into the gas core. Skolkovo Foundation, UNIHEAT project.

  17. Study of Perturbations on High Mach Number Blast Waves in Various Gasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, A.; Adams, R.; Rambo, P.; Shores, J.; Smith, I.; Atherton, B.; Ditmire, T.

    2006-10-01

    We have performed a series of experiments examining the properties of high Mach number blast waves. Experiments were conducted on the Z-Beamlet^1 laser at Sandia National Laboratories. We created blast waves in the laboratory by using 10 J- 1000 J laser pulses to illuminate millimeter scale solid targets immersed in gas. Our experiments studied the validity of theories forwarded by Vishniac and Ryu^2-4 to explain the dynamics of perturbations on astrophysical blast waves. These experiments consisted of an examination of the evolution of perturbations of known primary mode number induced on the surface of blast waves by means of regularly spaced wire arrays. The temporal evolution of the amplitude of the induced perturbations relative to the mean radius of the blast wave was fit to a power law in time. Measurements were taken for a number of different mode numbers and background gasses and the results show qualitative agreement with previously published theories for the hydrodynamics of thin shell blast wave. The results for perturbations on nitrogen gas have been recently published^5. .^1 P. K. Rambo, I. C. Smith, J. L. Porter, et al., Applied Optics 44, 2421 (2005). ^2 D. Ryu and E. T. Vishniac, Astrophysical Journal 313, 820 (1987). ^3 D. Ryu and E. T. Vishniac, Astrophysical Journal 368, 411 (1991). ^4 E. T. Vishniac, Astrophysical Journal 274, 152 (1983). ^5 A. D. Edens, T. Ditmire, J. F. Hansen, et al., Physical Review Letters 95 (2005).

  18. Seismic shear waves as Foucault pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, Roel; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Ruigrok, Elmer; Shiomi, Katsuhiko

    2016-03-01

    Earth's rotation causes splitting of normal modes. Wave fronts and rays are, however, not affected by Earth's rotation, as we show theoretically and with observations made with USArray. We derive that the Coriolis force causes a small transverse component for P waves and a small longitudinal component for S waves. More importantly, Earth's rotation leads to a slow rotation of the transverse polarization of S waves; during the propagation of S waves the particle motion behaves just like a Foucault pendulum. The polarization plane of shear waves counteracts Earth's rotation and rotates clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere. The rotation rate is independent of the wave frequency and is purely geometric, like the Berry phase. Using the polarization of ScS and ScS2 waves, we show that the Foucault-like rotation of the S wave polarization can be observed. This can affect the determination of source mechanisms and the interpretation of observed SKS splitting.

  19. Properties, propagation, and excitation of EMIC waves observed by MMS: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Boardsen, S. A.; Coffey, V. N.; Chandler, M. O.; Saikin, A.; Mello, E. M.; Russell, C. T.; Torbert, R. B.; Fuselier, S. A.; Giles, B. L.; Gershman, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves (0.1-5 Hz) play an important role in particle dynamics in the Earth's magnetosphere. EMIC waves are preferentially excited in regions where hot anisotropic ions and cold dense plasma populations spatially overlap. While the generation region of EMIC waves is usually on or near the magnetic equatorial plane in the inner magnetosphere, EMIC waves have both equatorial and off-equator source regions on the dayside in the compressed outer magnetosphere. Using field and plasma measurements from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, we perform a case study of EMIC waves and associated local plasma conditions observed on 19 October 2015. From 0315 to 0810 UT, before crossing the magnetopause into the magnetosheath, all four MMS spacecraft detected long-lasting He+-band EMIC wave emissions around local noon (MLT = 12.7 - 14.0) at high L-shells (L = 8.8 - 15.2) and low magnetic latitudes (MLAT = -21.8º - -30.3º). Energetic (> 1 keV) and anisotropic ions were present throughout this event that was in the recovery phase of a weak geomagnetic storm (min. Dst = -48 nT at 1000 UT on 18 October 2015). The testing of linear theory suggests that the EMIC waves were excited locally. Although the wave event is dominated by small normal angles, its polarization is mixed with right- and left-handedness and its propagation is bi-directional with regard to the background magnetic field. The short inter-spacecraft distances (as low as 15 km) of the MMS mission make it possible to accurately determine the k vector of the waves using the phase difference technique. Preliminary analysis finds that the k vector magnitude, phase speed, and wavelength of the 0.3-Hz wave packet at 0453:55 UT are 0.005 km-1, 372.9 km/s, and 1242.9 km, respectively. We will discuss the characteristics of the wave and particle measurements and their significance in this locale.

  20. Dual-Band Split-Ring Antenna Design for WLAN Applications

    OpenAIRE

    BAŞARAN, S. Cumhur; ERDEMLİ, Yunus E.

    2014-01-01

    A dual-band microstrip antenna based on split-ring elements is introduced for WLAN (2.4/5.2 GHz) applications. The proposed split-ring antenna (SRA) has a compact novel design which provides about 2% impedance-bandwidth without a need for additional matching network. Analysis and design of the proposed microstrip antenna is carried out by means of full-wave simulators based on the finite-element method.