WorldWideScience

Sample records for wave spectroscopy fews

  1. Numerous applications of fiber optic evanescent wave Fourier transform infrared (FEW-FTIR) spectroscopy for subsurface structural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasyeva, Natalia I.; Welser, Leslie; Bruch, Reinhard F.; Kano, Angelique; Makhine, Volodymyr

    1999-10-01

    A new infrared (IR) interferometric method has been developed in conjunction with low-loss, flexible optical fibers, sensors, and probes. This combination of fiber optical sensors and Fourier Transform (FT) spectrometers can be applied to many fields, including (1) noninvasive medical diagnostics of cancer and other different diseases in vivo, (2) minimally invasive bulk diagnostics of tissue, (3) remote monitoring of tissue, chemical processes, and environment, (4) surface analysis of polymers and other materials, (5) characterization of the quality of food, pharmacological products, cosmetics, paper, and other wood-related products, as well as (6) agricultural, forensic, geological, mining, and archeological field measurements. In particular, our nondestructive, fast, compact, portable, remote and highly sensitive diagnostics tools are very promising for subsurface analysis at the molecular level without sample preparation. For example, this technique is ideal for different types of soft porous foams, rough polymers, and rock surfaces. Such surfaces, as well as living tissue, are very difficult to investigate by traditional FTIR methods. We present here FEW-FTIR spectra of polymers, banana and grapefruit peels, and living tissues detected directly at surfaces. In addition, results on the vibrational spectral analysis of normal and pathological skin tissue in the region of 850 - 4000 cm-1 are discussed.

  2. Contrast and Raman spectroscopy study of single- and few-layered charge density wave material: 2H-TaSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiyev, Parviz; Cong, Chunxiao; Qiu, Caiyu; Yu, Ting

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report the first successful preparation of single- and few-layers of tantalum diselenide (2H-TaSe2) by mechanical exfoliation technique. Number of layers is confirmed by white light contrast spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Vibrational properties of the atomically thin layers of 2H-TaSe2 are characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Room temperature Raman measurements demonstrate MoS2-like spectral features, which are reliable for thickness determination. E1g mode, usually forbidden in backscattering Raman configuration is observed in the supported TaSe2 layers while disappears in the suspended layers, suggesting that this mode may be enabled because of the symmetry breaking induced by the interaction with the substrate. A systematic in-situ low temperature Raman study, for the first time, reveals the existence of incommensurate charge density wave phase transition in single and double-layered 2H-TaSe2 as reflected by a sudden softening of the second-order broad Raman mode resulted from the strong electron-phonon coupling (Kohn anomaly). PMID:24005335

  3. Spectroscopy of heavy few-electron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokler, P.H.

    1986-07-01

    In this paper we ask first, why is it interesting to investigate heavy-few electron ions. Then the various accelerator-based methods to produce heavy few-electron ions are discussed. In the main part an overview on available heavy few-electron ion data and current experiments is given. The summary will end up with future aspects in this field. (orig.)

  4. Wave mixing spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.W.

    1980-08-01

    Several new aspects of nonlinear or wave mixing spectroscopy were investigated utilizing the polarization properties of the nonlinear output field and the dependence of this field upon the occurrence of multiple resonances in the nonlinear susceptibility. First, it is shown theoretically that polarization-sensitive detection may be used to either eliminate or controllably reduce the nonresonant background in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, allowing weaker Raman resonances to be studied. The features of multi-resonant four-wave mixing are examined in the case of an inhomogeneously broadened medium. It is found that the linewidth of the nonlinear output narrows considerably (approaching the homogeneous width) when the quantum mechanical expressions for the doubly- and triply-resonant susceptibilities are averaged over a Doppler or strain broadened profile. Experimental studies of nonlinear processes in Pr +3 :LaF 3 verify this linewidth narrowing, but indicate that this strain broadened system cannot be treated with a single broadening parameter as in the case of Doppler broadening in a gas. Several susceptibilities are measured from which are deduced dipole matrix elements and Raman polarizabilities related to the 3 H 4 , 3 H 6 , and 3 P 0 levels of the praseodymium ions

  5. Approximate scattering wave functions for few-particle continua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    An operator identity which allows the wave operator for N particles interacting pairwise to be expanded as products of operators in which fewer than N particles interact is given. This identity is used to derive appproximate scattering wave functions for N-particle continua that avoid certain difficulties associated with Faddeev-type expansions. For example, a derivation is given of a scattering wave function used successfully recently to describe the three-particle continuum occurring in the electron impact ionization of the hydrogen atom

  6. Electronic structure and correlated wave functions of a few electron quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Tokuei [Laboratory of Physics, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 7-24-1 Narashinodai, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8501 (Japan); Ishida, Hiroshi [College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Fujikawa, Kazuo [Institute of Quantum Science, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan)

    2015-01-22

    The energy spectra and wave functions of a few electrons confined by a quasi-one-dimensional harmonic and anharmonic potentials have been studied by using a full configuration interaction method employing a Cartesian anisotropic Gaussian basis set. The energy spectra are classified into three regimes of the strength of confinement, namely, large, medium and small. The polyad quantum number defined by a total number of nodes in the wave functions is shown to be a key ingredient to interpret the energy spectra for the whole range of the confinement strength. The nodal pattern of the wave functions exhibits normal modes for the harmonic confining potential, indicating collective motions of electrons. These normal modes are shown to undergo a transition to local modes for an anharmonic potential with large anharmonicity.

  7. Two-nucleon Hulthen-type interactions for few higher partial waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Hamiltonian hierarchy problems in SQM lead to the addition of appropriate centrifugal barriers and consequently, higher partial wave potentials are ... the partial waves l > 0 one needs to improve the parameters involved in calculations. The present paper addresses itself to compute higher partial wave scattering phase ...

  8. An artificial generation of a few specific wave conditions: New simulator design and experimental performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, A.; Mohamed, M.H.; Marzok, S.Y.; Montasser, O.A.; El Feky, A.; El Baz, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, an amplified global awareness has led to a reawakening of interest in renewable energy technology. In an effort to reduce the worldwide dependence on fossil fuels, cleaner power generation methods are being sought in the field of solar, biomass, wind and wave energy. The importance of wave energy is increased in particular in some countries like UK, Portugal, Spain and Japan. A considerable progress has already been achieved in this field but the available technical designs are not adequate to develop reliable wave energy converters. Wave energy is the most available energy associated in water seas and oceans. Simultaneously, the wave energy has consisted of two types of energies: potential and kinetic energy. Therefore, many attempts have been applied to capture these energies. In the present work, a wave generator device has been designed and manufactured to simulate and generate the heaving motion of sea waves with different specification. A PC based electro-pneumatic control system was designed and implemented to individually control wave height, these heights are 3, 8, 16, 18 and 20 cm and different frequencies to generate these regular and irregular waves. - Highlights: • Wave energy is one of the most promising sources of renewable energy. • Most researchers built huge flume to simulate waves with large size and high budget. • A new simulator design for the direct and indirect wave energy is introduced. • The regular and irregular wave can be obtained for the new wave simulator. • This design is compact, flexible in terms amplitude, frequencies and high accuracy

  9. Wave power potential at a few shallow-water locations around Indian coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Dubhashi, K.K.; Nair, T.M.B.; Singh, J.

    less with maximum value of 31.8 kW m sup(-1). The average wave power during the summer monsoon is high (15.5-19.3 kW m sup(-1)) along the west coast of India. The study shows that the annual average wave power (1.8-7.6 kW m sup(-1)) along the locations...

  10. A comparative study on defect estimation using XPS and Raman spectroscopy in few layer nanographitic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, K; Ghosh, Subrata; Gopala Krishna, Nanda; Ilango, S; Kamruddin, M; Tyagi, A K

    2016-08-10

    Defects in planar and vertically oriented nanographitic structures (NGSs) synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) have been investigated using Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. While Raman spectra reveal the dominance of vacancy and boundary type defects respectively in vertical and planar NGSs, XPS provides additional information on vacancy related defect peaks in the C 1s spectrum, which originate from non-conjugated carbon atoms in the hexagonal lattice. Although an excellent correlation prevails between these two techniques, our results show that estimation of surface defects by XPS is more accurate than Raman analysis. Nuances of these techniques are discussed in the context of assessing defects in nanographitic structures.

  11. Photon-Pair Sources Based on Intermodal Four-Wave Mixing in Few-Mode Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Rottwitt

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Four-wave mixing in optical fibers has been proven to have many applications within processing of classical optical signals. In addition, recent developments in multimode fibers have made it possible to achieve the necessary phase-matching for efficient four-wave mixing over a very wide bandwidth. Thus, the combination of multimode fiber optics and four-wave mixing is very attractive for various applications. This is especially the case for applications in quantum communication, for example in photon-pair generation. This is the subject of this work, where we discuss the impact of fluctuations in core radius on the quality of the heralded single-photon states and demonstrate experimental results of intermodal spontaneous four-wave mixing for photon-pair generation.

  12. Study of inter-modal four wave mixing in two few-mode fibres with different phase matching properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmigiani, F.; Jung, Y.; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally study inter-modal four-wave mixing (FWM) in few-mode fibres with different phase matching properties. The possibility of transmitting two spatial modes without intermodal FWM cross-talk in the C-band is presented....

  13. Instantaneous local wave vector estimation from multi-spacecraft measurements using few spatial points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. Carozzi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a technique to determine instantaneous local properties of waves based on discrete-time sampled, real-valued measurements from 4 or more spatial points. The technique is a generalisation to the spatial domain of the notion of instantaneous frequency used in signal processing. The quantities derived by our technique are closely related to those used in geometrical optics, namely the local wave vector and instantaneous phase velocity. Thus, this experimental technique complements ray-tracing. We provide example applications of the technique to electric field and potential data from the EFW instrument on Cluster. Cluster is the first space mission for which direct determination of the full 3-dimensional local wave vector is possible, as described here.

  14. Tracking nuclear wave-packet dynamics in molecular oxygen ions with few-cycle infrared laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, S.; Bocharova, I. A.; Magrakvelidze, M.; Ray, D.; Cao, W.; Thumm, U.; Cocke, C. L.; Bergues, B.; Kling, M. F.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2010-01-01

    We have tracked nuclear wave-packet dynamics in doubly charged states of molecular oxygen using few-cycle infrared laser pulses. Bound and dissociating wave packets were launched and subsequently probed via a pair of 8-fs pulses of 790 nm radiation. Ionic fragments from the dissociating molecules were monitored by velocity-map imaging. Pronounced oscillations in the delay-dependent kinetic energy release spectra were observed. The occurrence of vibrational revivals permits us to identify the potential curves of the O 2 dication which are most relevant to the molecular dynamics. These studies show the accessibility to the dynamics of such higher-charged molecules.

  15. NIR Imaging Spectroscopy of the Inner Few Arcseconds of NGC 4151 with OSIRIS at Keck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserlohe, Christof; Krabbe, Alfred; Larkin, James E.; Barczys, Matthew; McElwain, Michael W.; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Weiss, Jason; Wright, Shelley A.

    2013-01-01

    We present H- and K-band data from the inner arcsecond of the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151 obtained with the adaptive optics assisted near-infrared imaging field spectrograph OSIRIS at the Keck Observatory. The angular resolution is about a few parsecs on-site and thus competes easily with optical images taken previously with the Hubble Space Telescope. We present the morphology and dynamics of most species detected but focus on the morphology and dynamics of the narrow line region (as traced by emission of [FeII]?1.644 µm), the interplay between plasma ejected from the nucleus (as traced by 21 cm continuum radio data) and hot H2 gas and characterize the detected nuclear HeI?2.058 µm absorption feature as a narrow absorption line (NAL) phenomenon. Emission from the narrow line region (NLR) as traced by [FeII] reveals a biconical morphology and we compare the measured dynamics in the [FeII] emission line with models proposing acceleration of gas in the NLR and simple ejection of gas into the NLR. In the inner 2.5 arcseconds the acceleration model reveals a better fit to our data than the ejection model.We also see evidence that the jet very locally enhances emission in [FeII] at certain positions in our field-of-view such that we were able to distinct the kinematics of these clouds from clouds generally accelerated in the NLR. Further, the radio jet is aligned with the bicone surface rather than the bicone axis such that we assume that the jet is not the dominant mechanism responsible for driving the kinematics of clouds in the NLR. The hot H2 gas is thermal with a temperature of about 1700 K. We observe a remarkable correlation between individual H2 clouds at systemic velocity with the 21 cm continuum radio jet. We propose that the radio jet is at least partially embedded in the galactic disk of NGC 4151 such that deviations from a linear radio structure are invoked by interactions of jet plasma with H2 clouds that are moving into the path of the jet because of

  16. Spectroscopy of few-particle nuclei around magic 132Sn from fission product γ-ray studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, C. T.

    1998-01-01

    We are studying the yrast structure of very neutron-rich nuclei around doubly magic 132 Sn by analyzing fission product γ-ray data from a 248 Cm source at Eurogam II. Yrast cascades in several few-valence-particle nuclei have been identified through γγ cross coincidences with their complementary fission partners. Results for two-valence-particle nuclei 132 Sb, 134 Te, 134 Sb and 134 Sn provide empirical nucleon-nucleon interactions which, combined with single-particle energies already known in the one-particle nuclei, are essential for shell-model analysis in this region. Findings for the N = 82 nuclei 134 Te and 135 I have now been extended to the four-proton nucleus 136 Xe. Results for the two-neutron nucleus 134 Sn and the N = 83 isotones 134 Sb, 135 Te and 135 I open up the spectroscopy of nuclei in the northeast quadrant above 132 Sn

  17. Raman spectroscopy of few-layer graphene prepared by C2–C6 cluster ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.S.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, Z.D.; Huang, Z.H.; Liu, C.S.; Fu, D.J.; Liu, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Few-layer graphene has been prepared on 300 nm-thick Ni films by C 2 –C 6 cluster ion implantation at 20 keV/cluster. Raman spectroscopy reveals significant influence of the number of atoms in the cluster, the implantation dose, and thermal treatment on the structure of the graphene layers. In particular, the graphene samples exhibit a sharp G peak at 1584 cm −1 and 2D peaks at 2711–2717 cm −1 . The I G /I 2D ratios higher than 1.70 and I G /I D ratio as high as 1.95 confirm that graphene sheets with low density of defects have been synthesized with much improved quality by ion implantation with larger clusters of C 4 –C 6

  18. Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet

    2014-01-01

    A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing

  19. Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet [Terahertz Systems Laboratory (TeSLa) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing.

  20. Infrared fiber optic evanescent wave spectroscopy: applications in biology and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasyeva, Natalia I.; Bruch, Reinhard F.; Katzir, Abraham

    1999-04-01

    A new powerful and highly sensitive technique for non-invasive biomedical diagnostics in vivo has been developed using Infrared Fiberoptic Evanescent Wave Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FEW-FTIR). This compact and portable method allows to detect functional chemical groups and bonds via vibrational spectroscopy directly from surfaces including living tissue. Such differences and similarities in molecular structure of tissue and materials can be evaluated online. Operating in the attenuated total reflection (ATR) regime in the middle-infrared (MIR) range, the FEW-FTIR technique provides direct contact between the fiber probe and tissue for non-destructive, non-invasive, fast and remote (few meters) diagnostics and quality control of materials. This method utilizes highly flexible and extremely low loss unclad fibers, for example silver halide fibers. Applications of this method include investigations of normal skin, precancerous and cancerous conditions, monitoring of the process of aging, allergic reactions and radiation damage to the skin. This setup is suitable as well for the detection of the influence of environmental factors (sun, water, pollution, and weather) on skin surfaces. The FEW-FTIR technique is very promising also for fast histological examinations in vitro. In this review, we present recent investigations of skin, breast, lung, stomach, kidney tissues in vivo and ex vivo (during surgery) to define the areas of tumor localization. The main advantages of the FEW-FTIR technique for biomedical, clinical, and environmental applications are discussed.

  1. Spectroscopy of bulk and few-layer superconducting NbSe2 with van der Waals tunnel junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir, T; Massee, F; Attias, L; Khodas, M; Aprili, M; Quay, C H L; Steinberg, H

    2018-02-09

    Tunnel junctions, an established platform for high resolution spectroscopy of superconductors, require defect-free insulating barriers; however, oxides, the most common barrier, can only grow on a limited selection of materials. We show that van der Waals tunnel barriers, fabricated by exfoliation and transfer of layered semiconductors, sustain stable currents with strong suppression of sub-gap tunneling. This allows us to measure the spectra of bulk (20 nm) and ultrathin (3- and 4-layer) NbSe 2 devices at 70 mK. These exhibit two distinct superconducting gaps, the larger of which decreases monotonically with thickness and critical temperature. The spectra are analyzed using a two-band model incorporating depairing. In the bulk, the smaller gap exhibits strong depairing in in-plane magnetic fields, consistent with high out-of-plane Fermi velocity. In the few-layer devices, the large gap exhibits negligible depairing, consistent with out-of-plane spin locking due to Ising spin-orbit coupling. In the 3-layer device, the large gap persists beyond the Pauli limit.

  2. Fractional conductance oscillations in quantum rings: wave packet picture of transport in a few-electron system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chwiej, T; Szafran, B

    2013-01-01

    We study electron transfer across a two-terminal quantum ring using a time-dependent description of the scattering process. For the considered scattering event the quantum ring is initially charged with one or two electrons, with another electron incident to the ring from the input channel. We study the electron transfer probability (T) as a function of the external magnetic field. We determine the periodicity of T for a varied number of electrons confined within the ring. For that purpose we develop a method to describe the wave packet dynamics for a few electrons participating in the scattering process, taking into full account the electron–electron correlations. We find that electron transfer across the quantum ring initially charged by a single electron acquires a distinct periodicity of half of the magnetic flux quantum (Φ 0 /2), corresponding to the formation of a transient two-electron state inside the ring. In the case of a three-electron scattering problem with two electrons initially occupying the ring, a period of Φ 0 /3 for T is formed in the limit of thin channels. The effect of disorder present in the confinement potential of the ring is also discussed. (paper)

  3. Fractional conductance oscillations in quantum rings: wave packet picture of transport in a few-electron system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwiej, T; Szafran, B

    2013-04-17

    We study electron transfer across a two-terminal quantum ring using a time-dependent description of the scattering process. For the considered scattering event the quantum ring is initially charged with one or two electrons, with another electron incident to the ring from the input channel. We study the electron transfer probability (T) as a function of the external magnetic field. We determine the periodicity of T for a varied number of electrons confined within the ring. For that purpose we develop a method to describe the wave packet dynamics for a few electrons participating in the scattering process, taking into full account the electron-electron correlations. We find that electron transfer across the quantum ring initially charged by a single electron acquires a distinct periodicity of half of the magnetic flux quantum (Φ0/2), corresponding to the formation of a transient two-electron state inside the ring. In the case of a three-electron scattering problem with two electrons initially occupying the ring, a period of Φ0/3 for T is formed in the limit of thin channels. The effect of disorder present in the confinement potential of the ring is also discussed.

  4. Baryon Spectroscopy Through Partial-Wave Analysis and Meson Photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, D. Mark

    2016-01-01

    The principal goal of this project is the experimental and phenomenological study of baryon spectroscopy. The PI's group consists of himself and three graduate students. This final report summarizes research activities by the PI's group during the period 03/01/2015 to 08/14/2016. During this period, the PI co-authored 11 published journal papers and one proceedings article and presented three invited talks. The PI's general interest is the investigation of the baryon resonance spectrum up to masses of ~ 2 GeV. More detail is given on two research projects: Neutral Kaon Photoproduction and Partial-Wave Analyses of γp → η p, γn → η n, and γp → K"+ Λ.

  5. Baryon Spectroscopy Through Partial-Wave Analysis and Meson Photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manley, D. Mark [Kent State Univ., Kent, OH (United States)

    2016-09-08

    The principal goal of this project is the experimental and phenomenological study of baryon spectroscopy. The PI's group consists of himself and three graduate students. This final report summarizes research activities by the PI's group during the period 03/01/2015 to 08/14/2016. During this period, the PI co-authored 11 published journal papers and one proceedings article and presented three invited talks. The PI's general interest is the investigation of the baryon resonance spectrum up to masses of ~ 2 GeV. More detail is given on two research projects: Neutral Kaon Photoproduction and Partial-Wave Analyses of γp → η p, γn → η n, and γp → K⁺ Λ.

  6. Fatigue crack localization using laser nonliner wave modulation spectroscopy (LNWMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Peipei; Sohn, Hoon [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kundu, Tribikram [Dept. of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Arizona, Tucson (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Nonlinear features of ultrasonic waves are more sensitive to the presence of a fatigue crack than their linear counterparts are. For this reason, the use of nonlinear ultrasonic techniques to detect a fatigue crack at its early stage has been widely investigated. Of the different proposed techniques, laser nonlinear wave modulation spectroscopy (LNWMS) is unique because a pulse laser is used to exert a single broadband input and a noncontact measurement can be performed. Broadband excitation causes a nonlinear source to exhibit modulation at multiple spectral peaks owing to interactions among various input frequency components. A feature called maximum sideband peak count difference(MSPCD), which is extracted from the spectral plot, measures the degree of crack- induced material nonlinearity. First, the ratios of spectral peaks whose amplitudes are above a moving threshold to the total number of peaks are computed for spectral signals obtained from the pristine and the current state of a target structure. Then, the difference of these ratios are computed as a function of the moving threshold. Finally, the MSPCD is defined as the maximum difference between these ratios. The basic premise is that the MSPCD will increase as the nonlinearity of the material increases. This technique has been used successfully for localizing fatigue cracks in metallic plates.

  7. Fatigue crack localization using laser nonlinear wave modulation spectroscopy (LNWMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Peipei; Sohn, Hoon [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kundu, Tribikram [Dept. of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Arizona, Tucson (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear features of ultrasonic waves are more sensitive to the presence of a fatigue crack than their linear counterparts are. For this reason, the use of nonlinear ultrasonic techniques to detect a fatigue crack at its early stage has been widely investigated. Of the different proposed techniques, laser nonlinear wave modulation spectroscopy (LNWMS) is unique because a pulse laser is used to exert a single broadband input and a noncontact measurement can be performed. Broadband excitation causes a nonlinear source to exhibit modulation at multiple spectral peaks owing to interactions among various input frequency components. A feature called maximum sideband peak count difference (MSPCD), which is extracted from the spectral plot, measures the degree of crack-induced material nonlinearity. First, the ratios of spectral peaks whose amplitudes are above a moving threshold to the total number of peaks are computed for spectral signals obtained from the pristine and the current state of a target structure. Then, the difference of these ratios are computed as a function of the moving threshold. Finally, the MSPCD is defined as the maximum difference between these ratios. The basic premise is that the MSPCD will increase as the nonlinearity of the material increases. This technique has been used successfully for localizing fatigue cracks in metallic plates.

  8. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-ying; He, Lin; Chen, Gui-hua; Yang, Guang; Li, Yong-qing

    2017-08-01

    Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped micro-particle, but is generally less effective for individual nano-sized objects in the 10-100 nm range. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap (SWOT) with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus is more stable and sensitive in measuring nanoparticles in liquid with 4-8 fold increase in the Raman signals. It can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, polystyrene beads (100 nm), SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles with a low laser power of a few milliwatts. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints.

  9. Millimeter and submillimeter wave spectroscopy: molecules of astrophysical interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plummer, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    Species of three general types of molecular ions were studied by means of millimeter-submillimeter (mm/sub-mm) wave spectroscopy. Because of their highly reactive nature, it has been possible to study ionic species in the microwave region for only the past ten is presented here. A new method is presented here for production of such molecular ions in concentrations greater by one to two orders of magnitude than possible with previous techniques, and the subsequent first mm/sub/mm/ detections of two isotopic forms of HCO + , three isotopic forms of ArD + , and the molecular ion H 3 O + . Simple neutral species, which are generally less reactive than ions, are also present in relatively large concentrations in the interstellar medium and in the atmospheres of cool stars themselves. Presented here is the first laboratory microwave detection of two isotopic species of LiH 2 , a solid at normal temperatures and pressures. In addition, a combined analysis of these data, additional data collected on the related species LiD, and existing data on LiD is presented. Finally, a large fraction of the mm/sub/mm/ emissions observed toward the interstellar medium were shown to belong to a small number of relatively heavy, stable, but spectroscopically complicated molecules, many of them internal rotors

  10. Following dynamic nuclear wave packets in N2,O2, and CO with few-cycle infrared pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, S.; Magrakvelidze, M.; Bocharova, I. A.; Ray, D.; Cao, W.; Li, H.; Wang, Z.; Laurent, G.; Thumm, U.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Cocke, C. L.; Znakovskaya, I.; Kling, M. F.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2011-01-01

    We study the evolution of nuclear wave packets launched in molecular nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon monoxide by intense 8-fs infrared pulses. We use velocity map imaging to measure the momentum of the ion fragments when these wave packets are interrogated by a second such pulse after a variable time delay. Both quasibound and dissociative wave packets are observed. For the former, measurements of bound-state oscillations are used to identify the participating states and, in some cases, extract properties of the relevant potential-energy surfaces. Vibrational structure is resolved in both energy and oscillation frequencies for the cations of oxygen and carbon monoxide, displaying the same quantum wave-packet motion in both energy and time domains. In addition, vibrational structure is seen in the dication of carbon monoxide in a situation where the energy resolution by itself is inadequate to resolve the structure.

  11. Following dynamic nuclear wave packets in N2,O2, and CO with few-cycle infrared pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, S.; Magrakvelidze, M.; Bocharova, I. A.; Ray, D.; Cao, W.; Znakovskaya, I.; Li, H.; Wang, Z.; Laurent, G.; Thumm, U.; Kling, M. F.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Cocke, C. L.

    2011-10-01

    We study the evolution of nuclear wave packets launched in molecular nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon monoxide by intense 8-fs infrared pulses. We use velocity map imaging to measure the momentum of the ion fragments when these wave packets are interrogated by a second such pulse after a variable time delay. Both quasibound and dissociative wave packets are observed. For the former, measurements of bound-state oscillations are used to identify the participating states and, in some cases, extract properties of the relevant potential-energy surfaces. Vibrational structure is resolved in both energy and oscillation frequencies for the cations of oxygen and carbon monoxide, displaying the same quantum wave-packet motion in both energy and time domains. In addition, vibrational structure is seen in the dication of carbon monoxide in a situation where the energy resolution by itself is inadequate to resolve the structure.

  12. High-resolution inverse Raman and resonant-wave-mixing spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahn, L.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    These research activities consist of high-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy (IRS) and resonant wave-mixing spectroscopy to support the development of nonlinear-optical techniques for temperature and concentration measurements in combustion research. Objectives of this work include development of spectral models of important molecular species needed to perform coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements and the investigation of new nonlinear-optical processes as potential diagnostic techniques. Some of the techniques being investigated include frequency-degenerate and nearly frequency-degenerate resonant four-wave-mixing (DFWM and NDFWM), and resonant multi-wave mixing (RMWM).

  13. Evaluation of few-view reconstruction parameters for illicit substance detection using fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, C.L.; Humm, P.G.; Martin, M.M.; Micklich, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have evaluated the performance of an illicit substance detection system that performs image reconstruction using the Maximum Likelihood algebraic reconstruction algorithm, a fe number of projections, and relatively coarse projection and pixel resolution. This evaluation was done using receiver operator curves and simulated data from the fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy system operated in a mode to detect explosives in luggage. The results show that increasing the number of projection angles is more important than increasing the projection resolution, the reconstructed pixel resolution, of the number of iterations in the Maximum Likelihood algorithm. A 100% detection efficiency with essentially no false positives is possible for a square block of RDX explosive, a projection resolution of 2 cm, a reconstructed pixel size of 2x2 cm, and five projection angles. For rectangular shaped explosives more angles are required to obtain the same system performance

  14. Transitions in Structure in Oil-in-Water Emulsions As Studied by Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruis, H.G.M.; Gruijthuijsen, van K.; Venema, P.; Linden, van der E.

    2007-01-01

    Transitions in structure of sodium caseinate stabilized emulsions were studied using conventional rheometry as well as diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS). Structural differences were induced by different amounts of stabilizer, and transitions in structure were induced by acidification. Special

  15. Quantitative x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Simple algorithm to determine the amount of atoms in the outermost few nanometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tougaard, Sven

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that due to inelastic electron scattering, the measured x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy peak intensity depends strongly on the in-depth atom distribution. Quantification based only on the peak intensity can therefore give large errors. The problem was basically solved by developing algorithms for the detailed analysis of the energy distribution of emitted electrons. These algorithms have been extensively tested experimentally and found to be able to determine the depth distribution of atoms with nanometer resolution. Practical application of these algorithms has increased after ready-to-use software packages were made available and they are now being used in laboratories worldwide. These software packages are easy to use but they need operator interaction. They are not well suited for automatic data processing and there is an additional need for simplified quantification strategies that can be automated. In this article we report on a very simple algorithm. It is a slightly more accurate version of our previous algorithm. The algorithm gives the amount of atoms within the outermost three inelastic mean free paths and it also gives a rough estimate for the in-depth distribution. An experimental example of its application is also presented

  16. Diffusing wave spectroscopy applied to material analysis and process control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, Christopher James

    1997-01-01

    Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy (DWS) was studied as a method of laboratory analysis of sub-micron particles, and developed as a prospective in-line, industrial, process control sensor, capable of near real-time feedback. No sample pre-treatment was required and measurement was via a non-invasive, flexible, dip in probe. DWS relies on the concept of the diffusive migration of light, as opposed to the ballistic scatter model used in conventional dynamic light scattering. The specific requirements of the optoelectronic hardware, data analysis methods and light scattering model were studied experimentally and, where practical, theoretically resulting in a novel technique of analysis of particle suspensions and emulsions of volume fractions between 0.01 and 0.4. Operation at high concentrations made the technique oblivious to dust and contamination. A pure homodyne (autodyne) experimental arrangement described was resilient to environmental disturbances, unlike many other systems which utilise optical fibres or heterodyne operation. Pilot and subsequent prototype development led to a highly accurate method of size ranking, suitable for analysis of a wide range of suspensions and emulsions. The technique was shown to operate on real industrial samples with statistical variance as low as 0.3% with minimal software processing. Whilst the application studied was the analysis of TiO 2 suspensions, a diverse range of materials including polystyrene beads, cell pastes and industrial cutting fluid emulsions were tested. Results suggest that, whilst all sizing should be comparative to suitable standards, concentration effects may be minimised and even completely modelled-out in many applications. Adhesion to the optical probe was initially a significant problem but was minimised after the evaluation and use of suitable non stick coating materials. Unexpected behaviour in the correlation in the region of short decay times led to consideration of the effects of rotational diffusion

  17. Four-Wave Mixing Spectroscopy of Quantum Dot Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, A.; Machnikowski, P.

    2007-08-01

    We study theoretically the nonlinear four-wave mixing response of an ensemble of coupled pairs of quantum dots (quantum dot molecules). We discuss the shape of the echo signal depending on the parameters of the ensemble: the statistics of transition energies and the degree of size correlations between the dots forming the molecules.

  18. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votava, Ondrej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, Alexander E; Jain, Chaithania; Fittschen, Christa

    2012-04-01

    We present in this work a new tracking servoloop electronics for continuous wave cavity-ringdown absorption spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) and its application to time resolved cw-CRDS measurements by coupling the system with a pulsed laser photolysis set-up. The tracking unit significantly increases the repetition rate of the CRDS events and thus improves effective time resolution (and/or the signal-to-noise ratio) in kinetics studies with cw-CRDS in given data acquisition time. The tracking servoloop uses novel strategy to track the cavity resonances that result in a fast relocking (few ms) after the loss of tracking due to an external disturbance. The microcontroller based design is highly flexible and thus advanced tracking strategies are easy to implement by the firmware modification without the need to modify the hardware. We believe that the performance of many existing cw-CRDS experiments, not only time-resolved, can be improved with such tracking unit without any additional modification to the experiment. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  19. SUBMILLIMETER-WAVE ROTATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY OF H2F+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimori, R.; Kawaguchi, K.; Amano, T.

    2011-01-01

    Five pure rotational transitions of H 2 F + generated by a discharge in an HF/H 2 /Ar mixture were observed in the range 473-774 GHz with a backward-wave oscillator based submillimeter-wave spectrometer. A simultaneous analysis of the rotational lines with 120 combination differences for the ground state derived from the infrared spectra was carried out to determine the precise molecular constants for the ground state. The rotational transition frequencies that lie below 2 THz were calculated, together with their estimated uncertainties, to facilitate future astronomical identifications. The chemistry for H 2 F + formation in interstellar space is discussed in comparison with a case for recently detected H 2 Cl + .

  20. Comb-Resolved Dual-Comb Spectroscopy Stabilized by Free-Running Continuous-Wave Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuse, Naoya; Ozawa, Akira; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate dual-comb spectroscopy with relatively phase-locked two frequency combs, instead of frequency combs firmly fixed to the absolute frequency references. By stabilizing two beat frequencies between two mode-locked lasers at different wavelengths observed via free-running continuous-wave (CW) lasers, two combs are tightly phase locked to each other. The frequency noise of the CW lasers barely affects the performance of dual-comb spectroscopy because of the extremely fast common-mode noise rejection. Transform-limited comb-resolved dual-comb spectroscopy with a 6 Hz radio frequency linewidth is demonstrated by the use of Yb-fiber oscillators.

  1. Saturated evanescent-wave absorption of few-layer graphene-covered side-polished single-mode fiber for all-optical switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kaung-Jay; Wu, Chun-Lung; Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Wang, Hwai-Yung; Cheng, Chih-Hsien; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2018-01-01

    Using the evanescent-wave saturation effect of hydrogen-free low-temperature synthesized few-layer graphene covered on the cladding region of a side-polished single-mode fiber, a blue pump/infrared probe-based all-optical switch is demonstrated with specific wavelength-dependent probe modulation efficiency. Under the illumination of a blue laser diode at 405 nm, the few-layer graphene exhibits cross-gain modulation at different wavelengths covering the C- and L-bands. At a probe power of 0.5 mW, the L-band switching throughput power variant of 16 μW results in a probe modulation depth of 3.2%. Blue shifting the probe wavelength from 1580 to 1520 nm further enlarges the switching throughput power variant to 24 mW and enhances the probe modulation depth to 5%. Enlarging the probe power from 0.5 to 1 mW further enlarges the switching throughput power variant from 25 to 58 μW to promote its probe modulation depth of up to 5.8% at 1520 nm. In contrast, the probe modulation depth degrades from 5.1% to 1.2% as the pumping power reduces from 85 to 24 mW, which is attributed to the saturable absorption of the few-layer graphene-based evanescent-wave absorber. The modulation depth at wavelength of 1550 nm under a probe power of 1 mW increases from 1.2% to 5.1%, as more carriers can be excited when increasing the blue laser power from 24 to 85 mW, whereas it decreases from 5.1% to 3.3% by increasing the input probe power from 1 to 2 mW to show an easier saturated condition at longer wavelength.

  2. Brillouin-Mandelstam spectroscopy of standing spin waves in a ferrite waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balinskiy, Michael; Kargar, Fariborz; Chiang, Howard; Balandin, Alexander A.; Khitun, Alexander G.

    2018-05-01

    This article reports results of experimental investigation of the spin wave interference over large distances in the Y3Fe2(FeO4)3 waveguide using Brillouin-Mandelstam spectroscopy. Two coherent spin waves are excited by the micro-antennas fabricated at the edges of the waveguide. The amplitudes of the input spin waves are adjusted to provide approximately the same intensity in the central region of the waveguide. The relative phase between the excited spin waves is controlled by the phase shifter. The change of the local intensity distribution in the standing spin wave is monitored using Brillouin-Mandelstam light scattering spectroscopy. Experimental data demonstrate the oscillation of the scattered light intensity depending on the relative phase of the interfering spin waves. The oscillations of the intensity, tunable via the relative phase shift, are observed as far as 7.5 mm away from the spin-wave generating antennas at room temperature. The obtained results are important for developing techniques for remote control of spin currents, with potential applications in spin-based memory and logic devices.

  3. Surface-enhanced chiroptical spectroscopy with superchiral surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Giovanni; Finazzi, Marco; Celebrano, Michele; Duò, Lamberto; Biagioni, Paolo

    2018-07-01

    We study the chiroptical properties of one-dimensional photonic crystals supporting superchiral surface waves by introducing a simple formalism based on the Fresnel reflection matrix. We show that the proposed framework provides useful insights on the behavior of all the relevant chiroptical quantities, allowing for a deeper understanding of surface-enhanced chiral sensing platforms based on one-dimensional photonic crystals. Finally, we analyze and discuss the limitations of such platforms as the surface concentration of the target chiral analytes is gradually increased. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Dynamical behavior of the wave packets on adiabatic potential surfaces observed by femtosecond luminescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suemoto, Tohru; Nakajima, Makoto; Matsuoka, Taira; Yasukawa, Keizo; Koyama, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    The wave packet dynamics on adiabatic potential surfaces studied by means of time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy is reviewed and the advantages of this method are discussed. In quasi-one-dimensional bromine-bridged platinum complexes, a movie representing the time evolution of the wave packet motion and shape was constructed. A two-dimensional Lissajous-like motion of the wave packet was suggested in the same material at low temperature. In F-centers in KI, evidence for tunneling of the wave packet between the adjacent adiabatic potential surfaces was found. Selective observation of the wave packet motion on the excited state was demonstrated for F-centers in KBr and compared with the results from pump-and-probe experiments in literature

  5. Low-pressure degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy with flam atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, T.G.; Koutny, L.B.; Blazewicz, P.R.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    A combination of degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy and a low-pressure sampling technique has been studied for isotopic analysis in an air-acetylene flame. Hyperfine spectra of D lines of sodium and several mixtures of lithium isotopes obtained in this way are presented

  6. Terahertz transmission properties of silicon wafers using continuous-wave terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chihoon; Ahn, Jae Sung; Ji, Taeksoo; Eom, Joo Beom

    2017-04-01

    We present the spectral properties of Si wafers using continuous-wave terahertz (CW-THz) spectroscopy. By using a tunable laser source and a fixed distributed-feedback laser diode (DFB-LD), a stably tunable beat source for CW-THz spectroscopy system can be implemented. THz radiation is generated in the frequency range of 100 GHz-800 GHz by photomixing in a photoconductive antenna. We also measured CW-THz waveforms by changing the beat frequency and confirmed repeatability through repeated measurement. We calculated the peaks of the THz frequency by taking fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) of measured THz waveforms. The feasibility of CW-THz spectroscopy is demonstrated by the THz spectra of Si wafers with different resistivities, mobilities, and carrier concentrations. The results show that Si wafers with a lower resistivity absorb more THz waves. Thus, we expect our CW-THz system to have the advantage of being able to perform fast non-destructive analysis.

  7. Terahertz transmission properties of silicon wafers using continuous-wave terahertz spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chihoon; Ahn, Jae Sung; Eom, Joo Beom; Ji, Taeksoo

    2017-01-01

    We present the spectral properties of Si wafers using continuous-wave terahertz (CW-THz) spectroscopy. By using a tunable laser source and a fixed distributed-feedback laser diode (DFB-LD), a stably tunable beat source for CW-THz spectroscopy system can be implemented. THz radiation is generated in the frequency range of 100 GHz–800 GHz by photomixing in a photoconductive antenna. We also measured CW-THz waveforms by changing the beat frequency and confirmed repeatability through repeated measurement. We calculated the peaks of the THz frequency by taking fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) of measured THz waveforms. The feasibility of CW-THz spectroscopy is demonstrated by the THz spectra of Si wafers with different resistivities, mobilities, and carrier concentrations. The results show that Si wafers with a lower resistivity absorb more THz waves. Thus, we expect our CW-THz system to have the advantage of being able to perform fast non-destructive analysis. (paper)

  8. The electric field standing wave effect in infrared transflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerhöfer, Thomas G.; Popp, Jürgen

    2018-02-01

    We show that an electric field standing wave effect is responsible for the oscillations and the non-linear dependence of the absorbance on the layer thickness in thin layers on a reflective surface. This effect is connected to the occurrence of interference inside these layers. Consequently, the absorptance undergoes a maximum electric field intensity enhancement at spectral positions close to those where corresponding non-absorbing layers on a metal show minima in the reflectance. The effect leads to changes of peak maxima ratios with layer thickness and shows the same periodicity as oscillations in the peak positions. These peculiarities are fully based on and described by Maxwell's equations but cannot be understood and described if the strongly simplifying model centered on reflectance absorbance is employed.

  9. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy by six-wave mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molesky, Brian P.; Guo, Zhenkun; Moran, Andrew M., E-mail: ammoran@email.unc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy (FSRS) is motivated by the knowledge of the molecular geometry changes that accompany sub-picosecond chemical reactions. The detection of vibrational resonances throughout the entire fingerprint region of the spectrum with sub-100-fs delay precision is fairly straightforward to accomplish with the FSRS technique. Despite its utility, FSRS must contend with substantial technical challenges that stem from a large background of residual laser light and lower-order nonlinearities when all laser pulses are electronically resonant with the equilibrium system. In this work, a geometry based on five incident laser beams is used to eliminate much of this undesired background in experiments conducted on metmyoglobin. Compared to a three-beam FSRS geometry with all electronically resonant laser pulses, the five-beam approach described here offers major improvements in the data acquisition rate, sensitivity, and background suppression. The susceptibility of the five-beam geometry to experimental artifacts is investigated using control experiments and model calculations. Of particular concern are undesired cascades of third-order nonlinearities, which are known to challenge FSRS measurements carried out on electronically off-resonant systems. It is generally understood that “forbidden” steps in the desired nonlinear optical processes are the origin of the problems encountered under off-resonant conditions. In contrast, the present experiments are carried out under electronically resonant conditions, where such unfortunate selection rules do not apply. Nonetheless, control experiments based on spectroscopic line shapes, signal phases, and sample concentrations are conducted to rule out significant contributions from cascades of third-order processes. Theoretical calculations are further used to estimate the relative intensities of the direct and cascaded responses. Overall, the control experiments and model calculations presented in

  10. 100 years of X-rays, 20 years of absorption spectroscopy with the synchrotron radiation: history, principles and a few examples of applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalowicz, A.; Moscovici, J.; Mimouni, A.

    1995-01-01

    The centenary of the discovery of X-rays is the occasion to summarize the history of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and its development on synchrotron radiation sources, to give the underlying principles and to illustrate the possible uses of this spectroscopy by three examples: (a) the structural characterization of disordered spin transition coordination compounds by EXAFS spectroscopy; (b) the ligand binding to vitamin B 12 by XANES spectroscopy; and (c) the chemical analysis of sulfur compounds included in fly-ashes by low-energy XANES spectroscopy. (authors). 23 refs., 8 figs

  11. STELLAR COLOR REGRESSION: A SPECTROSCOPY-BASED METHOD FOR COLOR CALIBRATION TO A FEW MILLIMAGNITUDE ACCURACY AND THE RECALIBRATION OF STRIPE 82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Haibo; Liu, Xiaowei; Xiang, Maosheng; Huang, Yang; Zhang, Huihua; Chen, Bingqiu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose a spectroscopy-based stellar color regression (SCR) method to perform accurate color calibration for modern imaging surveys, taking advantage of millions of stellar spectra now available. The method is straightforward, insensitive to systematic errors in the spectroscopically determined stellar atmospheric parameters, applicable to regions that are effectively covered by spectroscopic surveys, and capable of delivering an accuracy of a few millimagnitudes for color calibration. As an illustration, we have applied the method to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 data. With a total number of 23,759 spectroscopically targeted stars, we have mapped out the small but strongly correlated color zero-point errors present in the photometric catalog of Stripe 82, and we improve the color calibration by a factor of two to three. Our study also reveals some small but significant magnitude dependence errors in the z band for some charge-coupled devices (CCDs). Such errors are likely to be present in all the SDSS photometric data. Our results are compared with those from a completely independent test based on the intrinsic colors of red galaxies presented by Ivezić et al. The comparison, as well as other tests, shows that the SCR method has achieved a color calibration internally consistent at a level of about 5 mmag in u – g, 3 mmag in g – r, and 2 mmag in r – i and i – z. Given the power of the SCR method, we discuss briefly the potential benefits by applying the method to existing, ongoing, and upcoming imaging surveys

  12. Nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy in symbiosis with time reversal for localization of defects: TR-NEWS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dos Santos, S.; Vejvodová, Šárka; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2009), s. 14-14 ISSN 1213-3825. [NDT in PROGRESS. 12.11.2009-14.11.2009, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/07/1393; GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/274 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) * ESAM * time reversal (TR) * TR-NEWS imaging * tomography * DORT Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  13. Neutron resonance spectroscopy on 113Cd: The p-wave levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankle, C.M.; Bowman, C.D.; Bowman, J.D.; Seestrom, S.J.; Sharapov, E.I.; Popov, Y.P.; Roberson, N.R.

    1992-01-01

    Weak levels in the compound nucleus 114 Cd were located by neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy techniques. Neutron capture measurements were performed with both a natural cadmium target and a highly enriched 113 Cd target. A total of 22 new resonances were located in the neutron energy interval 20-500 eV and were assumed to be p-wave. Resonance parameters, E 0 and gΓ n , are given for the newly identified levels. The p-wave strength function was determined to be 10 4 S 1 =2.8±0.8 and the average level spacing left-angle D 1 right-angle=14 eV. Comparison of the reduced widths with a Porter-Thomas distribution is consistent with having missed 15% of the p-wave levels

  14. SIMULATION OF FORWARD AND BACKWARD WAVES EVOLUTION OF FEW-CYCLE PULSES PROPAGATING IN AN OPTICAL WAVEGUIDE WITH DISPERSION AND CUBIC NONLINEARITY OF ELECTRONIC AND ELECTRONIC-VIBRATION NATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Konev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical method for calculation of forward and backward waves of intense few-cycle laser pulses propagating in an optical waveguide with dispersion and cubic nonlinearity of electronic and electronic-vibration nature is described. Simulations made with the implemented algorithm show that accounting for Raman nonlinearity does not lead to qualitative changes in behavior of the backward wave. Speaking about quantitative changes, the increase of efficiency of energy transfer from the forward wave to the backward wave is observed. Presented method can be also used to simulate interaction of counterpropagating pulses.

  15. K2 photometry and HERMES spectroscopy of the blue supergiant ρ Leo: rotational wind modulation and low-frequency waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, C.; Bowman, D. M.; Símon-Díaz, S.; Buysschaert, B.; Johnston, C.; Moravveji, E.; Beck, P. G.; De Cat, P.; Triana, S.; Aigrain, S.; Castro, N.; Huber, D.; White, T.

    2018-05-01

    We present an 80-d long uninterrupted high-cadence K2 light curve of the B1Iab supergiant ρ Leo (HD 91316), deduced with the method of halo photometry. This light curve reveals a dominant frequency of frot = 0.0373 d-1 and its harmonics. This dominant frequency corresponds with a rotation period of 26.8 d and is subject to amplitude and phase modulation. The K2 photometry additionally reveals multiperiodic low-frequency variability (<1.5 d-1) and is in full agreement with low-cadence high-resolution spectroscopy assembled during 1800 d. The spectroscopy reveals rotational modulation by a dynamic aspherical wind with an amplitude of about 20 km s-1 in the H α line, as well as photospheric velocity variations of a few km s-1 at frequencies in the range 0.2-0.6 d-1 in the Si III 4567 Å line. Given the large macroturbulence needed to explain the spectral line broadening of the star, we interpret the detected photospheric velocity as due to travelling superinertial low-degree large-scale gravity waves with dominant tangential amplitudes and discuss why ρ Leo is an excellent target to study how the observed photospheric variability propagates into the wind.

  16. Fourier Transform Ultrasound Spectroscopy for the determination of wave propagation parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Barnana

    2017-01-01

    The reported results for ultrasonic wave attenuation constant (α) in pure water show noticeable inconsistency in magnitude. A "Propagating-Wave" model analysis of the most popular pulse-echo technique indicates that this is a consequence of the inherent wave propagation characteristics in a bounded medium. In the present work Fourier Transform Ultrasound Spectroscopy (FTUS) is adopted to determine ultrasonic wave propagation parameters, the wave number (k) and attenuation constant (α) at 1MHz frequency in tri-distilled water at room temperature (25°C). Pulse-echo signals obtained under same experimental conditions regarding the exciting input signal and reflecting boundary wall of the water container for various lengths of water columns are captured. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) components of the echo signals are taken to compute k, α and r, the reflection constant at the boundary, using Oak Ridge and Oxford method. The results are compared with existing literature values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy for enhanced detection of surface binding under flow injection analysis conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Sneppen, L.; Ariese, F.; Gooijer, C.; Ubachs, W.

    2008-01-01

    In evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy, one (or more) of the re°ections inside the cavity is a total internal re°ection (TIR) event. Only the evanescent wave associated with this TIR is being used for prob-ing the sample. This technique is therefore highly surface-speci-c and attractive

  18. Variety identification of brown sugar using short-wave near infrared spectroscopy and multivariate calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiqing; Wu, Di; He, Yong

    2007-11-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with the characteristics of high speed, non-destructiveness, high precision and reliable detection data, etc. is a pollution-free, rapid, quantitative and qualitative analysis method. A new approach for variety discrimination of brown sugars using short-wave NIR spectroscopy (800-1050nm) was developed in this work. The relationship between the absorbance spectra and brown sugar varieties was established. The spectral data were compressed by the principal component analysis (PCA). The resulting features can be visualized in principal component (PC) space, which can lead to discovery of structures correlative with the different class of spectral samples. It appears to provide a reasonable variety clustering of brown sugars. The 2-D PCs plot obtained using the first two PCs can be used for the pattern recognition. Least-squares support vector machines (LS-SVM) was applied to solve the multivariate calibration problems in a relatively fast way. The work has shown that short-wave NIR spectroscopy technique is available for the brand identification of brown sugar, and LS-SVM has the better identification ability than PLS when the calibration set is small.

  19. Passive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy system for terrestrial remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Liao, Shaolin; Koehl, Eugene R.; Elmer, Thomas W.; Heifetz, Alexander; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2010-04-01

    We have built a passive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy system with a 15-channel filter bank in the 146-154 GHz band for terrestrial remote sensing. We had built the spectroscopy system first and have now retrofitted an imaging element to it as a single pixel imager. The imaging element consisted of a 15-cm-diameter imaging lens fed to a corrugated scalar horn. Image acquisition is carried out by scanning the lens with a 2-axis translation stage. A LabVIEW-based software program integrates the imaging and spectroscopy systems with online display of spectroscopic information while the system scans each pixel position. The software also allows for integrating the image intensity of all 15 channels to increase the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of ~4 relative to single channel image. The integrated imaging and spectroscopy system produces essentially 4-D data in which spatial data are along 2 dimensions, spectral data are in the 3rd dimension, and time is the 4th dimension. The system performance was tested by collecting imaging and spectral data with a 7.5-cm-diameter and 1m long gas cell in which test chemicals were introduced against a liquid nitrogen background.

  20. Probing near-normally propagating bulk acoustic waves using pseudo-reflection geometry Brillouin spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, L. C.; Andrews, G. T.

    2012-09-01

    Pseudo-reflection geometry Brillouin spectroscopy can be used to probe acoustic wave dispersion approximately along the surface normal of a material system while avoiding the difficulties associated with specularly reflected light encountered in an ideal reflection configuration. As an example of its application, we show analytically that it can be used to determine both the refractive index and bulk acoustic mode velocities of optically-isotropic non-metallic materials and confirm the utility of the approach via a series of experiments on fused quartz, gallium phosphide, water, and porous silicon films.

  1. Miniature Chemical Sensor Combining Molecular Recognition with Evanescent Wave Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipino, Andrew C. R.; Meuse, Curtis W.

    2002-01-01

    To address the chemical sensing needs of DOE, a new class of chemical sensors is being developed that enables qualitative and quantitative, remote, real-time, optical diagnostics of chemical species in hazardous gas, liquid, and semi-solid phases by employing evanescent wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy (EW-CRDS). The sensitivity of EW-CRDS was demonstrated previously under Project No.60231. The objective of this project is to enhance the range of application and selectivity of the technique by combining EW-CRDS with refractive-index-sensitive nanoparticle optics, molecular recognition (MR) chemistry, and by utilizing the polarization-dependence of EW-CRDS. Research Progress and Implications

  2. Development of laser-induced grating spectroscopy for underwater temperature measurement in shock wave focusing regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojani, Ardian B.; Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.; Saito, Tsutomu; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2004-02-01

    In Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) underwater shock wave focusing generates high pressures at very short duration of time inside human body. However, it is not yet clear how high temperatures are enhanced at the spot where a shock wave is focused. The estimation of such dynamic temperature enhancements is critical for the evaluation of tissue damages upon shock loading. For this purpose in the Interdisciplinary Shock Wave Research Center a technique is developed which employs laser induced thermal acoustics or Laser Induced Grating Spectroscopy. Unlike most of gas-dynamic methods of measuring physical quantities this provides a non-invasive one having spatial and temporal resolutions of the order of magnitude of 1.0 mm 3 and 400 ns, respectively. Preliminary experiments in still water demonstrated that this method detected sound speed and hence temperature in water ranging 283 K to 333 K with errors of 0.5%. These results are used to empirically establish the equation of states of water, gelatin or agar cell which will work as alternatives of human tissues.

  3. Miniature chemical sensor combining molecular recognition with evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipino, Andrew C. R.

    2004-01-01

    A new chemical detection technology has been realized that addresses DOE environmental management needs. The new technology is based on a variant of the sensitive optical absorption technique, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). Termed evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS), the technology employs a miniature solid-state optical resonator having an extremely high Q-factor as the sensing element, where the high-Q is achieved by using ultra-low-attenuation optical materials, ultra-smooth surfaces, and ultra-high reflectivity coatings, as well as low-diffraction-loss designs. At least one total-internal reflection (TIR) mirror is integral to the resonator permitting the concomitant evanescent wave to probe the ambient environment. Several prototypes have been designed, fabricated, characterized, and applied to chemical detection. Moreover, extensions of the sensing concept have been explored to enhance selectivity, sensitivity, and range of application. Operating primarily in the visible and near IR regions, the technology inherently enables remote detection by optical fiber. Producing 11 archival publications, 5 patents, 19 invited talks, 4 conference proceedings, a CRADA, and a patent-license agreement, the project has realized a new chemical detection technology providing >100 times more sensitivity than comparable technologies, while also providing practical advantages

  4. Detecting Damage in Composite Material Using Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, Michele; Polimeno, Umberto; Zumpano, Giuseppe

    2008-05-01

    Modern aerospace structures make increasing use of fibre reinforced plastic composites, due to their high specific mechanical properties. However, due to their brittleness, low velocity impact can cause delaminations beneath the surface, while the surface may appear to be undamaged upon visual inspection. Such damage is called barely visible impact damage (BVID). Such internal damages lead to significant reduction in local strengths and ultimately could lead to catastrophic failures. It is therefore important to detect and monitor damages in high loaded composite components to receive an early warning for a well timed maintenance of the aircraft. Non-linear ultrasonic spectroscopy methods are promising damage detection and material characterization tools. In this paper, two different non-linear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) methods are presented: single mode nonlinear resonance ultrasound (NRUS) and nonlinear wave modulation technique (NWMS). The NEWS methods were applied to detect delamination damage due to low velocity impact (<12 J) on various composite plates. The results showed that the proposed methodology appear to be highly sensitive to the presence of damage with very promising future NDT and structural health monitoring applications.

  5. Angle-dependent spin-wave resonance spectroscopy of (Ga,Mn)As films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, L.; Bihler, C.; Peiner, E.; Waag, A.; Schoch, W.; Limmer, W.; Goennenwein, S. T. B.; Brandt, M. S.

    2013-06-01

    A modeling approach for standing spin-wave resonances based on a finite-difference formulation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation is presented. In contrast to a previous study [C. Bihler , Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.79.045205 79, 045205 (2009)], this formalism accounts for elliptical magnetization precession and magnetic properties arbitrarily varying across the layer thickness, including the magnetic anisotropy parameters, the exchange stiffness, the Gilbert damping, and the saturation magnetization. To demonstrate the usefulness of our modeling approach, we experimentally study a set of (Ga,Mn)As samples grown by low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy by means of angle-dependent standing spin-wave resonance spectroscopy and electrochemical capacitance-voltage measurements. By applying our modeling approach, the angle dependence of the spin-wave resonance data can be reproduced in a simulation with one set of simulation parameters for all external field orientations. We find that the approximately linear gradient in the out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy is related to a linear gradient in the hole concentrations of the samples.

  6. Dimensional Crossover in a Charge Density Wave Material Probed by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, C. W.; Berthod, C.; Puppin, M.; Berger, H.; Wolf, M.; Hoesch, M.; Monney, C.

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data reveal evidence of a crossover from one-dimensional (1D) to three-dimensional (3D) behavior in the prototypical charge density wave (CDW) material NbSe3 . In the low-temperature 3D regime, gaps in the electronic structure are observed due to two incommensurate CDWs, in agreement with x-ray diffraction and electronic-structure calculations. At higher temperatures we observe a spectral weight depletion that approaches the power-law behavior expected in one dimension. From the warping of the quasi-1D Fermi surface at low temperatures, we extract the energy scale of the dimensional crossover. This is corroborated by a detailed analysis of the density of states, which reveals a change in dimensional behavior dependent on binding energy. Our results offer an important insight into the dimensionality of excitations in quasi-1D materials.

  7. Wavelength dependence four-wave mixing spectroscopy in a micrometric atomic vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan-Yuan, Li; Li, Li; Yan-Peng, Zhang; Si-Wen, Bi

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of wavelength dependence four-wave-mixing (FWM) spectroscopy in a micrometric thin atomic vapour. It compares three cases termed as mismatched case I, matched case and mismatched case II for the probe wavelength less, equal and greater than the pump wavelength respectively. It finds that Dicke-narrowing can overcome width broadening induced by Doppler effects and polarisation interference of thermal atoms, and high resolution FWM spectra can be achieved both in matched and mismatched wavelength for many cases. It also finds that the magnitude of the FWM signal can be dramatically modified to be suppressed or to be enhanced in comparison with that of matched wavelength in mismatched case I or II. The width narrowing and the magnitude suppression or enhancement can be demonstrated by considering enhanced contribution of slow atoms induced by atom-wall collision and transient effect of atom-light interaction in a micrometric thin vapour. (general)

  8. Dynamics of normal and superfluid fogs using diffusing-wave spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Heetae; Lemieux, Pierre-Anthony; Durian, Douglas J.; Williams, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics of normal and superfluid fogs are studied using the technique of diffusing-wave spectroscopy. For a water fog generated with a 1.75 MHz piezoelectric driver below the liquid surface, the 7 μm diameter droplets are found to have diffusive dynamics for correlation times long compared to the viscous time. For a fog of 10 μm diameter superfluid helium droplets in helium vapor at 1.5 K the motion appears to be ballistic for correlation times short compared to the viscous time. The velocity correlations between the helium droplets are found to depend on the initial velocity with which the droplets are injected from the helium surface into the fog

  9. Coherent Two-Dimensional Terahertz Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Collective Spin Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian; Li, Xian; Hwang, Harold Y; Ofori-Okai, Benjamin K; Kurihara, Takayuki; Suemoto, Tohru; Nelson, Keith A

    2017-05-19

    We report a demonstration of two-dimensional (2D) terahertz (THz) magnetic resonance spectroscopy using the magnetic fields of two time-delayed THz pulses. We apply the methodology to directly reveal the nonlinear responses of collective spin waves (magnons) in a canted antiferromagnetic crystal. The 2D THz spectra show all of the third-order nonlinear magnon signals including magnon spin echoes, and 2-quantum signals that reveal pairwise correlations between magnons at the Brillouin zone center. We also observe second-order nonlinear magnon signals showing resonance-enhanced second-harmonic and difference-frequency generation. Numerical simulations of the spin dynamics reproduce all of the spectral features in excellent agreement with the experimental 2D THz spectra.

  10. Long-wave, infrared laser-induced breakdown (LIBS) spectroscopy emissions from energetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Clayton S-C; Brown, Ei E; Hommerich, Uwe; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B; Samuels, Alan C; Snyder, A Peter

    2012-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has shown great promise for applications in chemical, biological, and explosives sensing and has significant potential for real-time standoff detection and analysis. In this study, LIBS emissions were obtained in the mid-infrared (MIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) spectral regions for potential applications in explosive material sensing. The IR spectroscopy region revealed vibrational and rotational signatures of functional groups in molecules and fragments thereof. The silicon-based detector for conventional ultraviolet-visible LIBS operations was replaced with a mercury-cadmium-telluride detector for MIR-LWIR spectral detection. The IR spectral signature region between 4 and 12 μm was mined for the appearance of MIR and LWIR-LIBS emissions directly indicative of oxygenated breakdown products as well as dissociated, and/or recombined sample molecular fragments. Distinct LWIR-LIBS emission signatures from dissociated-recombination sample molecular fragments between 4 and 12 μm are observed for the first time.

  11. Towards Breath Gas Analysis Based on Millimeter-Wave Molecular Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothbart, Nick; Hübers, Heinz-Wilhelm; Schmalz, Klaus; Borngräber, Johannes; Kissinger, Dietmar

    2018-03-01

    Breath gas analysis is a promising non-invasive tool for medical diagnosis as there are thousands of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in human breath that can be used as health monitoring markers. Millimeter-wave/terahertz molecular spectroscopy is highly suitable for breath gas analysis due to unique fingerprint spectra of many VOCs in that frequency range. We present our recent work on sensor systems for gas spectroscopy based on integrated transmitters (TX) and receivers (RX) fabricated in IHP's 0.13 μm SiGe BiCMOS technology. For a single-band system, spectroscopic measurements and beam profiles are presented. The frequency is tuned by direct voltage-frequency tuning and by a fractional-n PLL, respectively. The spectroscopic system includes a folded gas absorption cell with gas pre-concentration abilities demonstrating the detection of a 50 ppm mixture of ethanol in ambient air corresponding to a minimum detectable concentration of 260 ppb. Finally, the design of a 3-band system covering frequencies from 225 to 273 GHz is introduced.

  12. Optical Spectroscopy Measurements of Shock Waves Driven by Intense Z-Pinch Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asay, J.; Bernard, M.; Bailey, J.E.; Carlson, A.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Hall, C.A.; Hanson, D.; Johnston, R.; Lake, P.; Lawrence, J.

    1999-01-01

    Z-pinches created using the Z accelerator generate approximately220 TW, 1.7 MJ radiation pulses that heat large (approximately10 cm 3 ) hohlraums to 100-150 eV temperatures for times of order 10 nsec. We are performing experiments exploiting this intense radiation to drive shock waves for equation of state studies. The shock pressures are typically 1-10 Mbar with 10 nsec duration in 6-mm-diameter samples. In this paper we demonstrate the ability to perform optical spectroscopy measurements on shocked samples located in close proximity to the z-pinch. These experiments are particularly well suited to optical spectroscopy measurements because of the relatively large sample size and long duration. The optical emission is collected using fiber optics and recorded with a streaked spectrograph. Other diagnostics include VISAR and active shock breakout measurements of the shocked sample and a suite of diagnostics that characterize the radiation drive. Our near term goal is to use the spectral emission to obtain the temperature of the shocked material. Longer term objectives include the examination of deviations of the spectrum from blackbody, line emission from lower density regions, determination of kinetic processes in molecular systems, evaluation of phase transitions such as the onset of metalization in transparent materials, and characterization of the plasma formed when the shock exits the rear surface. An initial set of data illustrating both the potential and the challenge of these measurements is described

  13. Development of a wireless nonlinear wave modulation spectroscopy (NWMS) sensor node for fatigue crack detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peipei; Yang, Suyoung; Lim, Hyung Jin; Park, Hyung Chul; Ko, In Chang; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-03-01

    Fatigue crack is one of the main culprits for the failure of metallic structures. Recently, it has been shown that nonlinear wave modulation spectroscopy (NWMS) is effective in detecting nonlinear mechanisms produced by fatigue crack. In this study, an active wireless sensor node for fatigue crack detection is developed based on NWMS. Using PZT transducers attached to a target structure, ultrasonic waves at two distinctive frequencies are generated, and their modulation due to fatigue crack formation is detected using another PZT transducer. Furthermore, a reference-free NWMS algorithm is developed so that fatigue crack can be detected without relying on history data of the structure with minimal parameter adjustment by the end users. The algorithm is embedded into FPGA, and the diagnosis is transmitted to a base station using a commercial wireless communication system. The whole design of the sensor node is fulfilled in a low power working strategy. Finally, an experimental verification has been performed using aluminum plate specimens to show the feasibility of the developed active wireless NWMS sensor node.

  14. Feasibility Study of Using Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (SWIR-CRDS) for Biological Agent Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aker, Pam M.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Williams, Richard M.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2007-10-01

    This project focused on determining the feasibility of using short wave infrared (SWIR) cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) as a means for real-time detection of biological aerosols. The first part of the project involved identifying biological agent signatures that could be detected with SWIR CRDS. After an exhaustive search of the open literature it was determined that whole biological spores and/or cells would not be good candidates for direct SWIR CRDS probing because they have no unique SWIR signatures. It was postulated that while whole cells or spores are not good candidates for SWIR CRDS detection, their pyrolysis break-down products might be. A literature search was then conducted to find biological pyrolysis products with low molecular weights and high symmetry since these species most likely would have overtone and combination vibrational bands that can be detected in the SWIR. It was determined that pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide were good candidates for evaluation. These molecules are formed when proteins and porphyrins, proteins and dipicolinic acid, and dipicolinic acid are pyrolyzed, respectively. The second part of the project involved measuring quantitative SWIR spectra of pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide in PNNL’s FTIR Spectroscopy Laboratory. Spectral information about these molecules, in the vapor phase is sparse – there were only a few prior studies that measured line positions and no information on absorption cross sections. Absorption cross sections are needed in order to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity, and line position determines what type of laser will be needed for the sensor. The results of the spectroscopy studies allowed us to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity for pyrrole to be 3 x 1012 molec cm-3 or 0.1 ppmv, and for pyridine it was 1.5 x 1015 molec cm-3 or 0.6 ppmv. These detection sensitivity limits are close what we have measured for ammonia. Given these detection limits we then estimated the

  15. Rapid and sensitive trace gas detection with continuous wave Optical Parametric Oscillator-based Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arslanov, D.D.; Spunei, M.; Ngai, A.K.Y.; Cristescu, S.M.; Lindsay, I.D.; Lindsay, I.D.; Boller, Klaus J.; Persijn, S.T.; Harren, F.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    A fiber-amplified Distributed Bragg Reflector diode laser is used to pump a continuous wave, singly resonant Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO). The output radiation covers the 3–4 μm with ability of rapid (100 THz/s) and broad mode-hop-free tuning (5 cm−1). Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy is

  16. Four-wave-mixing spectroscopy of peridinin in solution and in the peridinin-chlorophyll-a protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Christensson, N.; Chábera, P.; Hiller, R.G.; Pullerits, T.; Polívka, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 373, 1-2 (2010), s. 15-22 ISSN 0301-0104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : peridinin * four-wave mixing spectroscopy * excited-state dynamics Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.017, year: 2010

  17. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  18. Study of Raman-free photon pair generation using inter-modal four-wave mixing in a few-mode silica fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Christensen, Jesper Bjerge; Koefoed, Jacob Gade

    2017-01-01

    Single-photon sources are key components in applications of photonic quantum technologies such as quantum key distribution (QKD) [1]. One way of realizing single-photon sources is generation of photon pairs (PP) using spontaneous four-wave mixing (FWM): two photons from a pump p annihilate...... and create two side-band photons at frequencies determined partly by the energy conservation 2ωρ = ω1 + ω2, where ωp,ω1,ω2 are the frequencies of the pump and the two side-bands, respectively, and partly by the phase-matching condition. PP generated spontaneously arrive at indeterministic times but even so......, they are useful for QKD because one of the photons can be heralded by detecting the other. The heralded photons are then used for transmitting the quantum key....

  19. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  20. Collisional Processes Probed by using Resonant Four-Wave Mixing Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, E. F.; Stampanoni, A.; Hemmerling, B.

    2000-06-01

    Collisionally-induced decay processes in excited-state nitric oxide (NO) have been measured by using time-resolved two-color, resonant four-wave mixing (TC-RFWM) spectroscopy and polarization spectroscopy (PS). Markedly different time dependencies were observed in the data obtained by using TC-RFWM when compared to PS. Oscillations in the PS signal as a function of delay between the pump and probe laser pulses were observed and it was determined that their characteristics depend very sensitively on laser polarization. Analysis reveals that the oscillations in the decay curves are due to coherent excitation of unresolved hyperfine structure in the A state of NO. A comparison of beat frequencies obtained by taking Fourier transforms of the time data to the predicted hyperfine structure of the A state support this explanation. Further, based on a time-dependent model of PS as a FWM process, the signal’s dependence as a function of time on polarization configuration and excitation scheme can be predicted. By using the beat frequency values, fits of the model results to experimental decay curves for different pressures allows a study of the quenching rate in the A state due to collisional processes. A comparison of the PS data to laser-induced fluorescence decay measurements reveals different decay rates which suggests that the PS signal decay depends on the orientation and alignment of the excited molecules. The different behavior of the decay curves obtained by using TC-RFWM and PS can be understood in terms of the various contributions to the decay as described by the model and this has a direct bearing on which technique is preferable for a given set of experimental parameters.

  1. Vibrational Spectroscopy on Photoexcited Dye-Sensitized Films via Pump-Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Baxter; Fan, Hao; Galoppini, Elena; Gundlach, Lars

    2018-03-01

    Molecular sensitization of semiconductor films is an important technology for energy and environmental applications including solar energy conversion, photocatalytic hydrogen production, and water purification. Dye-sensitized films are also scientifically complex and interesting systems with a long history of research. In most applications, photoinduced heterogeneous electron transfer (HET) at the molecule/semiconductor interface is of critical importance, and while great progress has been made in understanding HET, many open questions remain. Of particular interest is the role of combined electronic and vibrational effects and coherence of the dye during HET. The ultrafast nature of the process, the rapid intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution, and vibrational cooling present complications in the study of vibronic coupling in HET. We present the application of a time domain vibrational spectroscopy-pump-degenerate four-wave mixing (pump-DFWM)-to dye-sensitized solid-state semiconductor films. Pump-DFWM can measure Raman-active vibrational modes that are triggered by excitation of the sample with an actinic pump pulse. Modifications to the instrument for solid-state samples and its application to an anatase TiO 2 film sensitized by a Zn-porphyrin dye are discussed. We show an effective combination of experimental techniques to overcome typical challenges in measuring solid-state samples with laser spectroscopy and observe molecular vibrations following HET in a picosecond time window. The cation spectrum of the dye shows modes that can be assigned to the linker group and a mode that is localized on the Zn-phorphyrin chromophore and that is connected to photoexcitation.

  2. Partial wave spectroscopy based nanoscale structural disorder analysis for cancer diagnosis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almabadi, Huda; Sahay, Peeyush; Nagesh, Prashanth K. B.; Yallapu, Murali M.; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.; Pradhan, Prabhakar

    Mesoscopic physics based partial wave spectroscopy (PWS) was recently introduced to quantify nanoscale structural disorder in weakly disordered optical media such as biological cells. The degree of structural disorder (Ld) , defined as Ld = 〈 dn2 〉 ×lc is quantified in terms of strength of refractive index fluctuation (〈 dn2 〉) in the system and its correlation length (lc) .With nanoscale sensitivity,Ldhas been shown to have potential to be used in cancer diagnostics. In this work, we analyze the hierarchy of different stages of prostate cancer cells by quantifying their intracellular refractive index fluctuations in terms of Ld parameter. We observe that the increase in tumorigenicity levels inside these prostate cancer cells results in proportionally higherLdvalues. For a weakly disordered optical media like biological cells, this result suggests that the progression of carcinogenesis or the increase in the tumorigenicity level is associated with increased 〈 dn2 〉 and/or lcvalues for the samples. Furthermore, we also examined the applicability of Ld parameter in analyzing the effect of drug on these prostate cancer cells. In accordance with the hypothesis that the cancer cells which survives the drug, becomes more aggressive, we found increased Ldvalues for all the drug resistant prostate cells studied.

  3. Correlation analysis between surface electromyography and continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy parameters during isometric exercise to volitional fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    ŞAYLİ, Ömer; AKIN, Ata; ÇOTUK, Hasan Birol

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the process of muscular fatigue was examined using surface electromyography (sEMG) and continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (cw-NIRS) simultaneously during an isometric hand grip exercise at 50% and 75% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), sustained until volitional fatigue. The mean frequency of the sEMG decreased during the whole exercise, whereas the root mean square had a tendency to increase. Oxyhemoglobin/deoxyhemoglobin concentration changes computed ...

  4. Rotational spectroscopy and three-wave mixing of 4-carvomenthenol: A technical guide to measuring chirality in the microwave regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shubert, V. Alvin; Schmitz, David; Medcraft, Chris; Krin, Anna; Patterson, David; Doyle, John M.; Schnell, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    We apply chirality sensitive microwave three-wave mixing to 4-carvomenthenol, a molecule previously uncharacterized with rotational spectroscopy. We measure its rotational spectrum in the 2-8.5 GHz range and observe three molecular conformers. We describe our method in detail, from the initial step of spectral acquisition and assignment to the final step of determining absolute configuration and enantiomeric excess. Combining fitted rotational constants with dipole moment components derived from quantum chemical calculations, we identify candidate three-wave mixing cycles which were further tested using a double resonance method. Initial optimization of the three-wave mixing signal is done by varying the duration of the second excitation pulse. With known transition dipole matrix elements, absolute configuration can be directly determined from a single measurement

  5. Application of short-wave infrared (SWIR) spectroscopy in quantitative estimation of clay mineral contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Jinfeng; Xing, Lixin; Pan, Jun; Meng, Tao; Liang, Liheng

    2014-01-01

    Clay minerals are significant constituents of soil which are necessary for life. This paper studied three types of clay minerals, kaolinite, illite, and montmorillonite, for they are not only the most common soil forming materials, but also important indicators of soil expansion and shrinkage potential. These clay minerals showed diagnostic absorption bands resulting from vibrations of hydroxyl groups and structural water molecules in the SWIR wavelength region. The short-wave infrared reflectance spectra of the soil was obtained from a Portable Near Infrared Spectrometer (PNIS, spectrum range: 1300∼2500 nm, interval: 2 nm). Due to the simplicity, quickness, and the non-destructiveness analysis, SWIR spectroscopy has been widely used in geological prospecting, chemical engineering and many other fields. The aim of this study was to use multiple linear regression (MLR) and partial least squares (PLS) regression to establish the optimizing quantitative estimation models of the kaolinite, illite and montmorillonite contents from soil reflectance spectra. Here, the soil reflectance spectra mainly refers to the spectral reflectivity of soil (SRS) corresponding to the absorption-band position (AP) of kaolinite, illite, and montmorillonite representative spectra from USGS spectral library, the SRS corresponding to the AP of soil spectral and soil overall spectrum reflectance values. The optimal estimation models of three kinds of clay mineral contents showed that the retrieval accuracy was satisfactory (Kaolinite content: a Root Mean Square Error of Calibration (RMSEC) of 1.671 with a coefficient of determination (R 2 ) of 0.791; Illite content: a RMSEC of 1.126 with a R 2 of 0.616; Montmorillonite content: a RMSEC of 1.814 with a R 2 of 0.707). Thus, the reflectance spectra of soil obtained form PNIS could be used for quantitative estimation of kaolinite, illite and montmorillonite contents in soil

  6. Diffusing-wave spectroscopy in a standard dynamic light scattering setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahimi, Zahra; Aangenendt, Frank J.; Voudouris, Panayiotis; Mattsson, Johan; Wyss, Hans M.

    2017-12-01

    Diffusing-wave spectroscopy (DWS) extends dynamic light scattering measurements to samples with strong multiple scattering. DWS treats the transport of photons through turbid samples as a diffusion process, thereby making it possible to extract the dynamics of scatterers from measured correlation functions. The analysis of DWS data requires knowledge of the path length distribution of photons traveling through the sample. While for flat sample cells this path length distribution can be readily calculated and expressed in analytical form; no such expression is available for cylindrical sample cells. DWS measurements have therefore typically relied on dedicated setups that use flat sample cells. Here we show how DWS measurements, in particular DWS-based microrheology measurements, can be performed in standard dynamic light scattering setups that use cylindrical sample cells. To do so we perform simple random-walk simulations that yield numerical predictions of the path length distribution as a function of both the transport mean free path and the detection angle. This information is used in experiments to extract the mean-square displacement of tracer particles in the material, as well as the corresponding frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. An important advantage of our approach is that by performing measurements at different detection angles, the average path length through the sample can be varied. For measurements performed on a single sample cell, this gives access to a wider range of length and time scales than obtained in a conventional DWS setup. Such angle-dependent measurements also offer an important consistency check, as for all detection angles the DWS analysis should yield the same tracer dynamics, even though the respective path length distributions are very different. We validate our approach by performing measurements both on aqueous suspensions of tracer particles and on solidlike gelatin samples, for which we find our DWS-based microrheology

  7. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  8. spectroscopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-10-14

    Oct 14, 2015 ... characterized by using phenotypic, API and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods. One hundred and fifty-seven (157) strains were isolated from 13 cheese samples, and identification test was performed for 83 strains. At the end of the study, a total of 22 Lactococcus sp., 36 Enterecoccus ...

  9. Detecting strain wave propagation through quantum dots by pump-probe spectroscopy: A theoretical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huneke, J; Kuhn, T; Axt, V M

    2010-01-01

    The influence of strain waves traveling across a quantum dot structure on its optical response is studied for two different situations: First, a strain wave is created by the optical excitation of a single quantum dot near a surface which, after reflection at the surface, reenters the dot; second, a phonon wave packet is emitted by the excitation of a nearby second dot and then travels across the quantum dot. Pump-probe type excitations are simulated for quantum dots in the strong confinement limit. We show that the optical signals allow us to monitor crossing strain waves for both structures in the real-time response as well as in the corresponding pump-probe spectra. In the time-derivative of the phase of the polarization a distinct trace reflects the instantaneous shifts of the transition energy during the passage while in the spectra pronounced oscillations reveal the passage of the strain waves.

  10. Investigations of the cathode region of an argon arc plasma by degenerate four-wave mixing laser spectroscopy and optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzierzega, K; Pokrzywka, B; Pellerin, S

    2004-01-01

    Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) laser spectroscopy was used in local studies of atmospheric pressure argon plasma generated in a free-burning arc. The results of plasma diagnostics using the DFWM method were compared to the results obtained with optical emission measurements. In the cathode region of the arc the maxima of both the DFWM signal and the emission coefficient for the 696.5 nm Ar I line depend on the distance from the cathode tip. This effect proves the departure of the plasma state from local thermal equilibrium (LTE) as it has been reported by many authors. On the other hand the Stark shifts of the 696.5 nm Ar I line determined by the DFWM method in relation to plasma diagnostic results show no deviations from LTE on the arc axis down to 1.0 mm from the cathode tip

  11. Few body systems at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    I review the progresses which have been made in our understanding of the high momentum components of the wave functions of the few-body systems, the three-body mechanisms and the short range correlations

  12. s- and p-wave neutron spectroscopy. Xc. Intermediate structure: 88Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malan, J.G.; Pineo, W.F.E.; Divadeenam, M.; Choi, B.H.; Bilpuch, E.G.; Newson, H.W.

    1975-01-01

    Neutron total cross section measurements of natural Sr were made from 50-875 keV using a high resolution proton beam and the 7 Li(p,n) reaction as a neutron source. These data were analyzed with the help of an R-Matrix code to extract resonance (energies and other) parameters up to about 850 keV. 2p-1h and particle-vibration doorway interpretation of the s-,p- and d-wave resonances is attempted in terms of the sum rule Σγ/subn/ 2 =γ/subd/ 2 . Predictions based on both of these models agree with the experimental results. As expected the p-wave resonances are stronger than either s- and d-wave structure. Theory accounts for the p-wave strength remarkably well. Possible location of the p-wave s.p. resonance is reproduced with a real potential and its damping due to the imaginary potential is calculated. More fragmentation of the strong p-wave doorways is observed than was expected for a compound nucleus so near 90 Zr, but a larger strength function is observed, apparently due to the p-wave giant resonance. (U.S.)

  13. Optical/Millimeter-Wave Double-Resonance Spectroscopy of Rydberg Atoms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gallagher, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    AFOSR grant F49620-03-1-0287 is a DUlUP grant providing laser and millimeter wave instrumentation for the AFOSR sponsored research programs of Robert Jones and Thomas Gallagher at the University of Virginia...

  14. Observation of neutron standing waves at total reflection by precision gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.L.; Gundorin, N.A.; Nikitenko, Yu.V.; Popov, Yu.P.; Cser, L.

    1998-01-01

    Total reflection of polarized neutrons from the layered structure glass/Fe (1000 A Angstrom)/Gd (50 A Angstrom) is investigated by registering neutrons and gamma-quanta from thermal neutron capture. The polarization ratio of gamma counts of neutron beams polarized in and opposite the direction of the magnetic field is measured. The polarization ratio is larger than unity for the neutron wavelengths λ 2.2 A Angstrom. Such behaviour of the wavelength dependence of the gamma-quanta polarization ratio points to the fact that over the surface of the Fe Layer a neutron standing wave caused by the interference of the incident neutron wave and the wave refracted from the magnetized Fe layer is formed

  15. Phase modulation spectroscopy of space-charge wave resonances in Bi12SiO20

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasnetsov, M.; Buchhave, Preben; Lyuksyutov, S.

    1997-01-01

    A new experimental method for the study of resonance effects and space-charge wave excitation in photorefractive Bi12SiO20 crystals by using a combination of frequency detuning and phase modulation technique has been developed. The accuracy of the method allows a detection of resonance peaks...... of diffraction efficiency within 0.5 Hz. Numerical simulations of the nonlinear differential equations describing the behaviour of the space-charge waves in photorefractive crystals have been performed and found to be in a good agreement with experiment. We have measured the photocurrent through the crystal...

  16. Wave-length-modulated femtosecond stimulated raman spectroscopy-approach towards automatic data processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloz, M.; van Grondelle, R.; Kennis, J.T.M.

    2011-01-01

    A new wavelength modulator based on a custom-made chopper blade and a slit placed in the Fourier plane of a pulse shaper was used to detect explicitly the first derivative of the time-resolved femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) signals. This approach resulted in an unprecedented

  17. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votava, Ondřej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, A. E.; Jain, Ch.; Fittschen, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 4 (2012), 043110 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0422 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : CW-DIODE-LASER * DOWN SPECTROSCOPY * KINETICS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.602, year: 2012

  18. Non-invasive optical monitoring of the newborn piglet brain using continuous-wave and frequency-domain spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantini, S.; Franceschini, M.A.; Gratton, E.; Hueber, D.; Rosenfeld, W.; Maulik, D.; Stubblefield, P.G.; Stankovic, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    We have used continuous-wave (CW) and frequency-domain spectroscopy to investigate the optical properties of the newborn piglet brain in vivo and non-invasively. Three anaesthetized, intubated, ventilated and instrumented newborn piglets were placed into a stereotaxic instrument for optimal experimental stability, reproducible probe-to-scalp optical contact and 3D adjustment of the optical probe. By measuring the absolute values of the brain absorption and reduced scattering coefficients at two wavelengths (758 and 830 nm), frequency-domain spectroscopy provided absolute readings (in contrast to the relative readings of CW spectroscopy) of cerebral haemoglobin concentration and saturation during experimentally induced perturbations in cerebral haemodynamics and oxygenation. Such perturbations included a modulation of the inspired oxygen concentration, transient brain asphyxia, carotid artery occlusion and terminal brain asphyxia. The baseline cerebral haemoglobin saturation and concentration, measured with frequency-domain spectroscopy, were about 60% and 42 μM respectively. The cerebral saturation values ranged from a minimum of 17% (during transient brain asphyxia) to a maximum of 80% (during recovery from transient brain asphyxia). To analyse the CW optical data, we have (a) derived a mathematical relationship between the cerebral optical properties and the differential pathlength factor and (b) introduced a method based on the spatial dependence of the detected intensity (dc slope method). The analysis of the cerebral optical signals associated with the arterial pulse and with respiration demonstrates that motion artefacts can significantly affect the intensity recorded from a single optode pair. Motion artefacts can be strongly reduced by combining data from multiple optodes to provide relative readings in the dc slope method. We also report significant biphasic changes (initial decrease and successive increase) in the reduced scattering coefficient measured

  19. Evaluation of interlayer interfacial stiffness and layer wave velocity of multilayered structures by ultrasonic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yosuke; Biwa, Shiro

    2014-07-01

    An ultrasonic evaluation procedure for the interlayer interfacial normal stiffness and the intralayer longitudinal wave velocity of multilayered plate-like structures is proposed. Based on the characteristics of the amplitude reflection spectrum of ultrasonic wave at normal incidence to a layered structure with spring-type interlayer interfaces, it is shown that the interfacial normal stiffness and the longitudinal wave velocity in the layers can be simultaneously evaluated from the frequencies of local maxima and minima of the spectrum provided that all interfaces and layers have the same properties. The effectiveness of the proposed procedure is investigated from the perspective of the sensitivity of local extremal frequencies of the reflection spectrum. The feasibility of the proposed procedure is also investigated when the stiffness of each interface is subjected to small random fluctuations about a certain average value. The proposed procedure is applied to a 16-layered cross-ply carbon-fiber-reinforced composite laminate. The normal stiffness of resin-rich interfaces and the longitudinal wave velocity of plies in the thickness direction evaluated from the experimental reflection spectrum are shown to be consistent with simple theoretical estimations.

  20. Rapid long-wave infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements using a mercury-cadmium-telluride linear array detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Clayton S-C; Brown, Eiei; Kumi-Barimah, Eric; Hommerich, Uwe; Jin, Feng; Jia, Yingqing; Trivedi, Sudhir; D'souza, Arvind I; Decuir, Eric A; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S; Samuels, Alan C

    2015-11-20

    In this work, we develop a mercury-cadmium-telluride linear array detection system that is capable of rapidly capturing (∼1-5  s) a broad spectrum of atomic and molecular laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emissions in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) region (∼5.6-10  μm). Similar to the conventional UV-Vis LIBS, a broadband emission spectrum of condensed phase samples covering the whole 5.6-10 μm region can be acquired from just a single laser-induced microplasma or averaging a few single laser-induced microplasmas. Atomic and molecular signature emission spectra of solid inorganic and organic tablets and thin liquid films deposited on a rough asphalt surface are observed. This setup is capable of rapidly probing samples "as is" without the need of elaborate sample preparation and also offers the possibility of a simultaneous UV-Vis and LWIR LIBS measurement.

  1. Physics in few dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, V.J.

    1981-03-01

    This article is a qualitative account of some aspects of physics in few dimensions, and its relationship to nonlinear field theories. After a survey of materials and some of the models that have been used to describe them, the various methods of solution are compared and contrasted. The roles of exact results, operator representations and the renormalization group transformation are described, and a uniform picture of the behavior of low-dimensional systems is presented

  2. Hidden-sector Spectroscopy with Gravitational Waves from Binary Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croon, Djuna; Nelson, Ann E.; Sun, Chen; Walker, Devin G. E.; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi

    2018-05-01

    We show that neutron star (NS) binaries can be ideal laboratories to probe hidden sectors with a long-range force. In particular, it is possible for gravitational wave (GW) detectors such as LIGO and Virgo to resolve the correction of waveforms from ultralight dark gauge bosons coupled to NSs. We observe that the interaction of the hidden sector affects both the GW frequency and amplitude in a way that cannot be fitted by pure gravity.

  3. Transitional analysis of organic thin color filter layers in displays during baking process using multi-speckle diffusing wave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Baek Sung; Hyung, Kyung Hee; Oh, Gwi Jeong; Jung, Hyun Wook

    2018-02-01

    The color filter (CF) is one of the key components for improving the performance of TV displays such as liquid crystal display (LCD) and white organic light emitting diodes (WOLED). The profile defects like undercut during the fine fabrication processes for CF layers are inevitably generated through the UV exposure and development processes, however, these can be controlled through the baking process. In order to resolve the profile defects of CF layers, in this study, the real-time dynamic changes of CF layers are monitored during the baking process by changing components such as polymeric binder and acrylate. The motion of pigment particles in CF layers during baking is quantitatively interpreted using multi-speckle diffusing wave spectroscopy (MSDWS), in terms of the autocorrelation function and the characteristic time of α-relaxation.

  4. Full conformational landscape of 3-Methoxyphenol revealed by room temperature mm-wave rotational spectroscopy supported by quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roucou, Anthony; Fontanari, Daniele; Dhont, Guillaume; Jabri, Atef; Bray, Cédric; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gaël; Bocquet, Robin; Cuisset, Arnaud

    2018-03-30

    Room temperature millimeter-wave rotational spectroscopy supported by high level of theory calculations have been employed to fully characterise the conformational landscape of 3-Methoxyphenol, a semi-volatile polar oxygenated aromatic compound precursor of secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere arising from biomass combustion. While previous rotationally-resolved spectroscopic studies in the microwave and in the UV domains failed to observe the complete conformational landscape, the 70 - 330 GHz rotational spectrum measured in this study reveals the ground state rotational signatures of the four stable conformations theoretically predicted. Moreover, rotational transitions in the lowest energy vibrationally excited states were assigned for two conformers. While the inertial defect of methoxyphenol does not signicantly change between conformers and isomers, the excitation of the methoxy out-of-plane bending is the main contribution to the non-planarity of the molecule. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Black-hole spectroscopy: testing general relativity through gravitational-wave observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyer, Olaf [Perimeter Institute of Theoretical Physics, 35 King Street North, Waterloo, Ontario, N2J 2G9 (Canada); Kelly, Bernard [Center for Gravitational Wave Physics, Center for Gravitational Physics and Geometry and Department of Physics, 104 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Krishnan, Badri [Max Planck Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Finn, Lee Samuel [Center for Gravitational Wave Physics, Center for Gravitational Physics and Geometry, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 104 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Garrison, David [University of Houston, Clear Lake, 2700 Bay Area Bvd, Room 3531-2, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Lopez-Aleman, Ramon [Physical Sciences Department, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 00931 (Puerto Rico)

    2004-02-21

    Assuming that general relativity is the correct theory of gravity in the strong-field limit, can gravitational-wave observations distinguish between black holes and other compact object sources? Alternatively, can gravitational-wave observations provide a test of one of the fundamental predictions of general relativity: the no-hair theorem? Here we describe a definitive test of the hypothesis that observations of damped, sinusoidal gravitational waves originate from a black hole or, alternatively, that nature respects the general relativistic no-hair theorem. For astrophysical black holes, which have a negligible charge-to-mass ratio, the black-hole quasi-normal mode spectrum is characterized entirely by the black-hole mass and angular momentum and is unique to black holes. In a different theory of gravity, or if the observed radiation arises from a different source (e.g., a neutron star, strange matter or boson star), the spectrum will be inconsistent with that predicted for general relativistic black holes. We give a statistical characterization of the consistency between the noisy observation and the theoretical predictions of general relativity and a demonstration, through simulation, of the effectiveness of the test for strong sources.

  6. Black-hole spectroscopy: testing general relativity through gravitational-wave observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyer, Olaf; Kelly, Bernard; Krishnan, Badri; Finn, Lee Samuel; Garrison, David; Lopez-Aleman, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Assuming that general relativity is the correct theory of gravity in the strong-field limit, can gravitational-wave observations distinguish between black holes and other compact object sources? Alternatively, can gravitational-wave observations provide a test of one of the fundamental predictions of general relativity: the no-hair theorem? Here we describe a definitive test of the hypothesis that observations of damped, sinusoidal gravitational waves originate from a black hole or, alternatively, that nature respects the general relativistic no-hair theorem. For astrophysical black holes, which have a negligible charge-to-mass ratio, the black-hole quasi-normal mode spectrum is characterized entirely by the black-hole mass and angular momentum and is unique to black holes. In a different theory of gravity, or if the observed radiation arises from a different source (e.g., a neutron star, strange matter or boson star), the spectrum will be inconsistent with that predicted for general relativistic black holes. We give a statistical characterization of the consistency between the noisy observation and the theoretical predictions of general relativity and a demonstration, through simulation, of the effectiveness of the test for strong sources

  7. Measurement of the Arctic UTLS composition in presence of clouds using millimetre-wave heterodyne spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Castelli

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available MARSCHALS (Millimetre-wave Airborne Receivers for Spectroscopic CHaracterisation in Atmospheric Limb Sounding is a limb viewing instrument working in the millimetre and sub-millimetre spectral regions (from 294 to 349 GHz. The scientific rationale of MARSCHALS is the study of the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere region. In March 2010 MARSCHALS was deployed on-board the M-55 Geophysica stratospheric aircraft during the PREMIER(PRocess Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and millimetre-wave Emitted Radiation-Ex field campaign. From the campaign base at Kiruna, Sweden, a research flight to investigate the Arctic atmosphere was conducted. For the first time the instrument fully exploited the three spectral bands. In this paper, we present results of the analysis of MARSCHALS measurements acquired during the PREMIER-Ex flight as processed by the Millimetre-wave Atmospheric Retrieval Code. For the second time after the SCOUT-O3 flight in 2005, MARSCHALS measured vertical distributions of temperature, water vapour, ozone and nitric acid over an altitude range of 4 to 24 km. In addition, vertical profiles of carbon monoxide and nitrous oxide were obtained for the first time. The measurements were performed in clear sky conditions and in presence of low and high altitude clouds (that were able to obscure measurements in the middle infrared spectroscopic region and some information about thick clouds were extracted from the data. The capabilities to derive information on upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric vertical profiles of temperature and minor constituents from millimetre-wave limb sounding observations in the northern polar region are presented and discussed for each of the individual targets. The results of MARSCHALS data analysis contributed to demonstrate the scientific relevance and technical feasibility of millimetre-wave limb-sounding of the UTLS proposed for the ESA Earth Explorer 7 candidate Core Mission PREMIER

  8. Noninvasive observation of skeletal muscle contraction using near-infrared time-resolved reflectance and diffusing-wave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belau, Markus; Ninck, Markus; Hering, Gernot; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Contini, Davide; Torricelli, Alessandro; Gisler, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    We introduce a method for noninvasively measuring muscle contraction in vivo, based on near-infrared diffusing-wave spectroscopy (DWS). The method exploits the information about time-dependent shear motions within the contracting muscle that are contained in the temporal autocorrelation function g(1)(τ,t) of the multiply scattered light field measured as a function of lag time, τ, and time after stimulus, t. The analysis of g(1)(τ,t) measured on the human M. biceps brachii during repetitive electrical stimulation, using optical properties measured with time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, shows that the tissue dynamics giving rise to the speckle fluctuations can be described by a combination of diffusion and shearing. The evolution of the tissue Cauchy strain e(t) shows a strong correlation with the force, indicating that a significant part of the shear observed with DWS is due to muscle contraction. The evolution of the DWS decay time shows quantitative differences between the M. biceps brachii and the M. gastrocnemius, suggesting that DWS allows to discriminate contraction of fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers.

  9. The use of laser-induced shock wave plasma spectroscopy (LISPS) for examining physical characteristics of pharmaceutical products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur, E-mail: syahrun-madjid@yahoo.com; Lahna, Kurnia, E-mail: kurnialahna@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh 23111, Aceh (Indonesia); Desiyana, Lydia Septa, E-mail: lydia-septa@yahoo.com [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh 23111, Aceh (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    An experimental study has been performed to examine the physical characteristics of pharmaceutical products, such as tablet, by employing an emission plasma induced by Nd-YAG laser at a low pressure of Helium gas. The hardness of tablet is one of the parameters that examined during the production process for standard quality of pharmaceutical products. In the Laser-Induced Shock Wave Plasma Spectroscopy (LISPS), the shock wave has a significant role in inducing atomic excitation. It was known that, the speed of the shock wavefront depends on the hardness of the sample, and it correlates with the ionization rate of the ablated atoms. The hardness of the tablet is examined using the intensity ratio between the ion of Mg (II) 275.2 nm and the neutral of Mg (I) 285.2 nm emission lines detected from the laser-induced plasma. It was observed that the ratio changes with respect to the change in the tablet hardness, namely the ratio is higher for the hard tablet. Besides the ratio measurements, we also measured the depth profile of a tablet by focusing 60 shots of irradiation of laser light at a fixed position on the surface of the tablet. It was found that the depth profile varies differently with the hardness of the tablet. These experiment results show that the technique of LISPS can be applied to examine the quality of pharmaceutical products.

  10. The use of laser-induced shock wave plasma spectroscopy (LISPS) for examining physical characteristics of pharmaceutical products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Lahna, Kurnia; Desiyana, Lydia Septa

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study has been performed to examine the physical characteristics of pharmaceutical products, such as tablet, by employing an emission plasma induced by Nd-YAG laser at a low pressure of Helium gas. The hardness of tablet is one of the parameters that examined during the production process for standard quality of pharmaceutical products. In the Laser-Induced Shock Wave Plasma Spectroscopy (LISPS), the shock wave has a significant role in inducing atomic excitation. It was known that, the speed of the shock wavefront depends on the hardness of the sample, and it correlates with the ionization rate of the ablated atoms. The hardness of the tablet is examined using the intensity ratio between the ion of Mg (II) 275.2 nm and the neutral of Mg (I) 285.2 nm emission lines detected from the laser-induced plasma. It was observed that the ratio changes with respect to the change in the tablet hardness, namely the ratio is higher for the hard tablet. Besides the ratio measurements, we also measured the depth profile of a tablet by focusing 60 shots of irradiation of laser light at a fixed position on the surface of the tablet. It was found that the depth profile varies differently with the hardness of the tablet. These experiment results show that the technique of LISPS can be applied to examine the quality of pharmaceutical products.

  11. Superconductor (Nb)-charge density wave (NbSe sub 3) point-contact spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sinchenko, A A

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of differential current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of point contacts between Nb and the charge density wave (CDW) conductor NbSe sub 3 formed along the conducting chain direction are reported. Below the superconducting transition of Nb, we have clearly observed Andreev reflection of the gapless electrons of NbSe sub 3. Analysis of the spectra obtained indicates that when the energy of injected particles exceeds the superconducting energy gap, the superconductivity near the S-CDW interface is suppressed because of non-equilibrium effects.

  12. Fourier Deconvolution Methods for Resolution Enhancement in Continuous-Wave EPR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, George H; Poyner, Russell R

    2015-01-01

    An overview of resolution enhancement of conventional, field-swept, continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance spectra using Fourier transform-based deconvolution methods is presented. Basic steps that are involved in resolution enhancement of calculated spectra using an implementation based on complex discrete Fourier transform algorithms are illustrated. Advantages and limitations of the method are discussed. An application to an experimentally obtained spectrum is provided to illustrate the power of the method for resolving overlapped transitions. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Brillouin spectroscopy with surface acoustic waves on intermediate valent, doped SmS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaerer, U.; Jung, A.; Wachter, P.

    1998-01-01

    Brillouin scattering on surface acoustic waves is a very powerful tool to determine the elastic constants of intermediate valent crystals, since the method is non-destructive and no mechanical contact is needed. A strong evidence for intermediate valence is a negative value of Poisson's ratio, which describes the behavior of the volume under uniaxial pressure. SmS by itself makes a semiconductor-metal transition at a pressure of more than 6.5 kbar. When substituting the divalent Sm by a trivalent cation, like Y, La or Tm, SmS can become - depending on the doping concentration - intermediate valent without any applied, external pressure. In this work, we will present measurements of the velocities of the surface acoustic waves and the calculation of the elastic constants of La- and Tm-doped SmS compounds. We found a clear dependence of Poisson's ratio on the doping concentration and on the valence of the materials. Furthermore, we will discuss the mechanism leading to intermediate valence when substituting Sm. Besides the internal, chemical pressure, which is produced by the built in trivalent cations with their smaller ionic radii, we have clear evidence, that the free electrons in the 5d band, induced by the substituting atoms, also play an important role in making doped SmS intermediate valent. (orig.)

  14. Gravitational wave spectroscopy of binary neutron star merger remnants with mode stacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Yagi, Kent; Lehner, Luis; Pretorius, Frans; Yunes, Nicolás

    2018-01-01

    A binary neutron star coalescence event has recently been observed for the first time in gravitational waves, and many more detections are expected once current ground-based detectors begin operating at design sensitivity. As in the case of binary black holes, gravitational waves generated by binary neutron stars consist of inspiral, merger, and postmerger components. Detecting the latter is important because it encodes information about the nuclear equation of state in a regime that cannot be probed prior to merger. The postmerger signal, however, can only be expected to be measurable by current detectors for events closer than roughly ten megaparsecs, which given merger rate estimates implies a low probability of observation within the expected lifetime of these detectors. We carry out Monte Carlo simulations showing that the dominant postmerger signal (the ℓ=m =2 mode) from individual binary neutron star mergers may not have a good chance of observation even with the most sensitive future ground-based gravitational wave detectors proposed so far (the Einstein Telescope and Cosmic Explorer, for certain equations of state, assuming a full year of operation, the latest merger rates, and a detection threshold corresponding to a signal-to-noise ratio of 5). For this reason, we propose two methods that stack the postmerger signal from multiple binary neutron star observations to boost the postmerger detection probability. The first method follows a commonly used practice of multiplying the Bayes factors of individual events. The second method relies on an assumption that the mode phase can be determined from the inspiral waveform, so that coherent mode stacking of the data from different events becomes possible. We find that both methods significantly improve the chances of detecting the dominant postmerger signal, making a detection very likely after a year of observation with Cosmic Explorer for certain equations of state. We also show that in terms of detection

  15. Quantitative degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy: Probes for molecular species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrow, R.; Rakestraw, D.; Paul, P.; Lucht, R.; Danehy, P.; Friedman-Hill, E.; Germann, G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Resonant degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) is currently the subject of intensive investigation as a sensitive diagnostic tool for molecular species. DFWM has the advantage of generating a coherent (beam-like) signal which results in null-background detection and provides excellent immunity to background-light interference. Since multiple one-photon resonances are involved in the signal generation process, the DFWM technique can allow sensitive detection of molecules via electronic, vibrational or rotational transitions. These properties combine to make DFWM a widely applicable diagnostic technique for the probing of molecular species. The authors are conducting fundamental and applied investigations of DFWM for quantitative measurements of trace species in reacting gases. During the past year, efforts have been focussed in two areas: (1) understanding the effects of collisional processes on the DFWM signal generation process, and (2) exploring the applicability of infrared DFWM to detect polyatomic molecules via rovibrational transitions.

  16. Relativistic few body calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, F.

    1988-01-01

    A modern treatment of the nuclear few-body problem must take into account both the quark structure of baryons and mesons, which should be important at short range, and the relativistic exchange of mesons, which describes the long range, peripheral interactions. A way to model both of these aspects is described. The long range, peripheral interactions are calculated using the spectator model, a general approach in which the spectators to nucleon interactions are put on their mass-shell. Recent numerical results for a relativistic OBE model of the NN interaction, obtained by solving a relativistic equation with one-particle on mass-shell, will be presented and discussed. Two meson exchange models, one with only four mesons (π,σ,/rho/,ω) but with a 25% admixture of γ 5 coupling for the pion, and a second with six mesons (π,σ,/rho/,ω,δ,/eta/) but pure γ 5 γ/sup μ/ pion coupling, are shown to give very good quantitative fits to the NN scattering phase shifts below 400 MeV, and also a good description of the /rvec p/ 40 Ca elastic scattering observables. Applications of this model to electromagnetic interactions of the two body system, with emphasis on the determination of relativistic current operators consistent with the dynamics and the exact treatment of current conservation in the presence of phenomenological form factors, will be described. 18 refs., 8 figs

  17. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  18. Precise equilibrium structure determination of hydrazoic acid (HN3) by millimeter-wave spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amberger, Brent K.; Esselman, Brian J.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.; Stanton, John F.

    2015-01-01

    The millimeter-wave spectrum of hydrazoic acid (HN 3 ) was analyzed in the frequency region of 235-450 GHz. Transitions from a total of 14 isotopologues were observed and fit using the A-reduced or S-reduced Hamiltonian. Coupled-cluster calculations were performed to obtain a theoretical geometry, as well as rotation-vibration interaction corrections. These calculated vibration-rotation correction terms were applied to the experimental rotational constants to obtain mixed theoretical/experimental equilibrium rotational constants (A e , B e , and C e ). These equilibrium rotational constants were then used to obtain an equilibrium (R e ) structure using a least-squares fitting routine. The R e structural parameters are consistent with a previously published R s structure, largely falling within the uncertainty limits of that R s structure. The present R e geometric parameters of HN 3 are determined with exceptionally high accuracy, as a consequence of the large number of isotopologues measured experimentally and the sophisticated (coupled-cluster theoretical treatment (CCSD(T))/ANO2) of the vibration-rotation interactions. The R e structure exhibits remarkable agreement with the CCSD(T)/cc-pCV5Z predicted structure, validating both the accuracy of the ab initio method and the claimed uncertainties of the theoretical/experimental structure determination

  19. Submillimeter wave spectroscopy of ethyl isocyanide and its searches in Orion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulès, L.; Tercero, B.; Guillemin, J. C.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Cernicharo, J.

    2018-02-01

    Context. About 40 cyanide compounds have been detected in the interstellar medium, but only 3 examples of organic isocyanide compounds were observed in this medium. Ethyl isocyanide is one of the best candidates for possible detection. Aim. To date, measurements of rotational spectra are limited to 40 GHz. The extrapolation of the prediction in the millimeter wave domain is inaccurate and does not permit an unambiguous detection. Methods: The rotational spectra were reinvestigated from 0.15 to 1 THz. Using the new prediction, we searched for the compound ethyl isocyanide in Orion KL and Sgr B2. Results: We newly assigned 2906 transitions and fitted these new data with those from previous studies, reaching quantum numbers up to J = 103 and Ka = 30. The asymmetric top Hamiltonian proposed by Watson in the Ir representation was used for the analysis, and both reductions A and S were tested. The search for CH3CH2NC in Sgr B2 (IRAM 30m) and Orion KL (IRAM 30m, ALMA Science Verification) result in a non-detection; upper limits to the column density were derived. Tables S1-S4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/610/A44

  20. Millimeter and Submillimeter Wave Spectroscopy of Higher Energy Conformers of 1,2-PROPANEDIOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharenko, Olena; Bossa, Jean-Baptiste; Lewen, Frank; Schlemmer, Stephan; Müller, Holger S. P.

    2017-06-01

    We have performed a study of the millimeter/submillimeter wave spectrum of four higher energy conformers of 1,2-propanediol (continuation of the previous study on the three lowest energy conformers. The present analysis of rotational transitions carried out in the frequency range 38 - 400 GHz represents a significant extension of previous microwave work. The new data were combined with previously-measured microwave transitions and fitted using a Watson's S-reduced Hamiltonian. The final fits were within experimental accuracy, and included spectroscopic parameters up to sixth order of angular momentum, for the ground states of the four higher energy conformers following previously studied ones: g'Ga, gG'g', aGg' and g'Gg. The present analysis provides reliable frequency predictions for astrophysical detection of 1,2-propanediol by radio telescope arrays at millimeter wavelengths. J.-B. Bossa, M.H. Ordu, H.S.P. Müller, F. Lewen, S. Schlemmer, A&A 570 (2014) A12)

  1. Continuous-wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy based on the control of cavity reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixin; Ma, Weiguang; Fu, Xiaofang; Tan, Wei; Zhao, Gang; Dong, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang

    2013-07-29

    A new type of continuous-wave cavity ringdown spectrometer based on the control of cavity reflection for trace gas detection was designed and evaluated. The technique separated the acquisitions of the ringdown event and the trigger signal to optical switch by detecting the cavity reflection and transmission, respectively. A detailed description of the time sequence of the measurement process was presented. In order to avoid the wrong extraction of ringdown time encountered accidentally in fitting procedure, the laser frequency and cavity length were scanned synchronously. Based on the statistical analysis of measured ringdown times, the frequency normalized minimum detectable absorption in the reflection control mode was 1.7 × 10(-9)cm(-1)Hz(-1/2), which was 5.4 times smaller than that in the transmission control mode. However the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption spectrum was only 3 times improved since the etalon effect existed. Finally, the peak absorption coefficients of the C(2)H(2) transition near 1530.9nm under different pressures showed a good agreement with the theoretical values.

  2. Dissection of Rovibronic Structure by Polarization-Resolved Two-Color Resonant Four-Wave Mixing Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Daniel; Burns, Lori A.; Vaccaro, Patrick H.

    2009-08-01

    A synergistic theoretical and experimental investigation of stimulated emission pumping (SEP) as implemented in the coherent framework of two-color resonant four-wave mixing (TC-RFWM) spectroscopy is presented, with special emphasis directed toward the identification of polarization geometries that can distinguish spectral features according to their attendant changes in rotational quantum numbers. A vector-recoupling formalism built upon a perturbative treatment of matter-field interactions and a state-multipole expansion of the density operator allowed the weak-field signal intensity to be cast in terms of a TC-RFWM response tensor, RQ(K)(ɛ4*ɛ3ɛ2*ɛ1;Jg,Je,Jh,Jf), which separates the transverse characteristics of the incident and generated electromagnetic waves (ɛ4*ɛ3ɛ2*ɛ1) from the angular momentum properties of the PUMP and DUMP resonances (Jg,Je,Jh,Jf). For an isolated SEP process induced in an isotropic medium, the criteria needed to discriminate against subsets of rovibronic structure were encoded in the roots of a single tensor element, R0(0)(ɛ4*ɛ3ɛ2*ɛ1;Jg,Je,Jh,Je). By assuming all optical fields to be polarized linearly and invoking the limit of high quantum numbers, specific angles of polarization for the detected signal field were found to suppress DUMP resonances selectively according to the nature of their rotational branch and the rotational branch of the meshing PUMP line. These predictions were corroborated by performing SEP measurements on the ground electronic potential energy surface of tropolone in two distinct regimes of vibrational excitation, with the near-ultraviolet Ã1B2-X˜1A1 (π* ← π) absorption system affording the requisite PUMP and DUMP transitions.

  3. Differential photoacoustic spectroscopy with continuous wave lasers for non-invasive blood glucose monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y.; Tajima, T.; Seyama, M.

    2018-02-01

    We propose a differential photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), wherein two wavelengths of light with the same absorbance are selected, and differential signal is linearized by one of the two signals for a non-invasive blood glucose monitoring. PAS has the possibility to overcome the strong optical scattering in tissue, but there are still remaining issues: the water background and instability due to the variation in acoustic resonance conditions. A change in sample solution temperature is one of the causes of the variation in acoustic resonance conditions. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the sensitivity against glucose concentration under the condition where the temperature of the sample water solution ranges 30 to 40 °C. The glucose concentration change is simulated by shifting the wavelength of irradiated laser light, which can effectively change optical absorption. The temperature also affects optical absorption and the acoustic resonance condition (acoustic velocity). A distributed-feedback (DFB) laser, tunable wavelength laser (TWL) and an acoustic sensor were used to obtain the differential PAS signal. The wavelength of the DFB laser was 1.382 μm, and that of TWL was switched from 1.600 to 1.610 μm to simulate the glucose concentration change. Optical absorption by glucose occurs at around 1.600 μm. The sensitivities against temperature are almost the same: 1.9 and 1.8 %/°C for 1.600 and 1.610 μm. That is, the glucose dependence across the whole temperature range remains constant. This implies that temperature correction is available.

  4. Fluctuation spectroscopy: From Rayleigh-Jeans waves to Abrikosov vortex clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlamov, A. A.; Galda, A.; Glatz, A.

    2018-01-01

    Superconducting (SC) fluctuations, discovered in the late 1960s, have constituted an important research area in superconductivity as they are manifest in a variety of phenomena. Indeed, the underlying physics of SC fluctuations makes it possible to elucidate the fundamental properties of the superconducting state. The interest in SC fluctuation phenomena was further enhanced with the discovery of cuprate high-temperature superconductors (HTSs). In these materials, superconducting fluctuations appear over a wide range of temperatures due to the superconductors extremely short coherence lengths and low effective dimensionality of the electron systems. These strong fluctuations lead to anomalous properties of the normal state in some HTS materials. Within the framework of the phenomenological Ginzburg-Landau theory, and more extensively in the diagrammatic microscopic approach based on BCS theory, SC fluctuations as well as other quantum contributions (weak localization, etc.) enabled a new way to investigate and characterize disordered electron systems, granular metals, Josephson structures, artificial superlattices, and others. The characteristic feature of SC fluctuations is its strong dependence on temperature and magnetic field in the vicinity of the superconducting phase transition. This dependence allows the separation of fluctuation effects from other contributions and provides information about the microscopic parameters of a material, in particular, the critical temperature and the zero-temperature critical magnetic field. As such, SC fluctuations are very sensitive to the relaxation processes that break phase coherence and can be used as a versatile characterization instrument for SCs: Fluctuation spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the properties of superconducting systems on a quantitative level. Here the physics of SC fluctuations is reviewed, commencing from a qualitative description of thermodynamic fluctuations close to the

  5. A continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator around 5-μm wavelength for high-resolution spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, J; Klemann, A; Gottbehüt, I; Thorwirth, S; Giesen, T F; Schlemmer, S

    2011-06-01

    We present a continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator (OPO) capable of high resolution spectroscopy at wavelengths between 4.8 μm and 5.4 μm. It is based on periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) and is singly resonant for the signal radiation around 1.35 μm. Because of the strong absorption of PPLN at wavelengths longer than 4.5 μm, the OPO threshold rises to the scale of several watts, while it produces idler powers of more than 1 mW and offers continuous tuning over 15 GHz. A supersonic jet spectrometer is used in combination with the OPO to perform measurements of the transient linear molecule Si(2)C(3) at 1968.2 cm(-1). Fifty rovibrational transition frequencies of the ν(3) antisymmetric stretching mode have been determined with an accuracy on the order of 10(-4) cm(-1), and molecular parameters for the ground and the v(3) = 1 state have been determined most precisely. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  6. Evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) as a probe of macromolecule adsorption kinetics at functionalized interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Michael A; de Cuendias, Anne; Gayet, Florence; Shirley, Ian M; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Haddleton, David M; Unwin, Patrick R

    2012-05-01

    Evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) has been employed to study the interfacial adsorption kinetics of coumarin-tagged macromolecules onto a range of functionalized planar surfaces. Such studies are valuable in designing polymers for complex systems where the degree of interaction between the polymer and surface needs to be tailored. Three tagged synthetic polymers with different functionalities are examined: poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate, potassium salt) (PSPMA), and a mannose-modified glycopolymer. Adsorption transients at the silica/water interface are found to be characteristic for each polymer, and kinetics are deduced from the initial rates. The chemistry of the adsorption interfaces has been varied by, first, manipulation of silica surface chemistry via the bulk pH, followed by surfaces modified by poly(L-glutamic acid) (PGA) and cellulose, giving five chemically different surfaces. Complementary atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging has been used for additional surface characterization of adsorbed layers and functionalized interfaces to allow adsorption rates to be interpreted more fully. Adsorption rates for PSPMA and the glycopolymer are seen to be highly surface sensitive, with significantly higher rates on cellulose-modified surfaces, whereas PAA shows a much smaller rate dependence on the nature of the adsorption surface.

  7. Few body physics with CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.P. Gilfoyle for the CLAS Collaboration

    2011-02-01

    The study of few-body, nuclear systems with electromagnetic probes is an essential piece of the scientific program at Jefferson Lab. Reactions using real photons and electrons (up to energies of 6 GeV) are measured using the CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer (CLAS) detector in Hall B, a nearly 4π magnetic spectrometer. We focus here on three areas. (1) Short-range correlations (SRCs) probe the high-momentum components of the nuclear wave function. Recent CLAS experiments map out their isospin character and reveal the importance of the tensor part of the nuclear force. (2) Three-body forces are an essential feature of nuclei. We will show results using real photons and 3He and 4He targets that remain largely unexplained. (3) Evidence for the transition to a quark-gluon description of nuclei has been observed with photon beams in CLAS on deuterium and 3-He targets. Alternative explanations reveal the geography of the transition is complex.

  8. Mid-infrared, long wave infrared (4-12 μm) molecular emission signatures from pharmaceuticals using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Clayton S-C; Brown, Ei E; Kumi-Barimah, Eric; Hommerich, Uwe H; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B; Samuels, Alan C; Snyder, A Peter

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to augment the atomic emission spectra of conventional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and to provide an increase in selectivity, mid-wave to long-wave infrared (IR), LIBS studies were performed on several organic pharmaceuticals. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy signature molecular emissions of target organic compounds are observed for the first time in the IR fingerprint spectral region between 4-12 μm. The IR emission spectra of select organic pharmaceuticals closely correlate with their respective standard Fourier transform infrared spectra. Intact and/or fragment sample molecular species evidently survive the LIBS event. The combination of atomic emission signatures derived from conventional ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared LIBS with fingerprints of intact molecular entities determined from IR LIBS promises to be a powerful tool for chemical detection.

  9. Cyclic voltammetry, square wave voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and colorimetric method for hydrogen peroxide detection based on chitosan/silver nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang V. Tran

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate a promising method to fabricate a non-enzymatic stable, highly sensitive and selective hydrogen peroxide sensor based on a chitosan/silver nanoparticles (CS/AgNPs hybrid. Using this composite, we elaborated both electrochemical and colorimetric sensors for hydrogen peroxide detection. The colorimetric sensor is based on a homogenous reaction which fades the color of CS/AgNPs solutions from red-orange to colorless depending on hydrogen peroxide concentration. For the electrochemical sensor, CS/AgNPs were immobilized on glassy carbon electrodes and hydrogen peroxide was measured using cyclic voltammetry, square wave voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The response time is less than 10 s and the detection limit is 5 μM. Keywords: Spectrophotometric detection, Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, Square wave voltammetry, Cyclic voltammetry, Chitosan/silver nanoparticles (CS/AgNPs hybrid, Hydrogen peroxide

  10. Few-layer black phosphorus nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, Zdenek; Bouša, Daniel; Luxa, Jan; Mazanek, Vlastimil; Pumera, Martin

    2016-01-28

    Herein, black phosphorus quantum dots and nanoparticles of a few layer thickness were prepared and characterized using STEM, AFM, dynamic light scattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence. Impact electrochemistry of the induvidual black phosphorus nanoparticles allows their size determination. The centrifugation of colloidal black phosphorus nanoparticles allowed separation of quantum dots with sizes up to 15 nm. These black phosphorus nanoparticles exhibit a large band gap and are expected to find a wide range of applications from semiconductors to biomolecule tags. The use of black phosphorus nanoparticles for vapour sensing was successfully demonstrated.

  11. Characterization of free-standing InAs quantum membranes by standing wave hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, G.; Nemšák, S.; Kuo, C.-T.; Gehlmann, M.; Conlon, C.; Keqi, A.; Rattanachata, A.; Karslıoǧlu, O.; Mueller, J.; Sethian, J.; Bluhm, H.; Rault, J. E.; Rueff, J. P.; Fang, H.; Javey, A.; Fadley, C. S.

    2018-05-01

    Free-standing nanoribbons of InAs quantum membranes (QMs) transferred onto a (Si/Mo) multilayer mirror substrate are characterized by hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HXPS) and by standing-wave HXPS (SW-HXPS). Information on the chemical composition and on the chemical states of the elements within the nanoribbons was obtained by HXPS and on the quantitative depth profiles by SW-HXPS. By comparing the experimental SW-HXPS rocking curves to x-ray optical calculations, the chemical depth profile of the InAs(QM) and its interfaces were quantitatively derived with ångström precision. We determined that (i) the exposure to air induced the formation of an InAsO4 layer on top of the stoichiometric InAs(QM); (ii) the top interface between the air-side InAsO4 and the InAs(QM) is not sharp, indicating that interdiffusion occurs between these two layers; (iii) the bottom interface between the InAs(QM) and the native oxide SiO2 on top of the (Si/Mo) substrate is abrupt. In addition, the valence band offset (VBO) between the InAs(QM) and the SiO2/(Si/Mo) substrate was determined by HXPS. The value of VBO = 0.2 ± 0.04 eV is in good agreement with literature results obtained by electrical characterization, giving a clear indication of the formation of a well-defined and abrupt InAs/SiO2 heterojunction. We have demonstrated that HXPS and SW-HXPS are non-destructive, powerful methods for characterizing interfaces and for providing chemical depth profiles of nanostructures, quantum membranes, and 2D layered materials.

  12. Characterization of free-standing InAs quantum membranes by standing wave hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Conti

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Free-standing nanoribbons of InAs quantum membranes (QMs transferred onto a (Si/Mo multilayer mirror substrate are characterized by hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HXPS and by standing-wave HXPS (SW-HXPS. Information on the chemical composition and on the chemical states of the elements within the nanoribbons was obtained by HXPS and on the quantitative depth profiles by SW-HXPS. By comparing the experimental SW-HXPS rocking curves to x-ray optical calculations, the chemical depth profile of the InAs(QM and its interfaces were quantitatively derived with ångström precision. We determined that (i the exposure to air induced the formation of an InAsO4 layer on top of the stoichiometric InAs(QM; (ii the top interface between the air-side InAsO4 and the InAs(QM is not sharp, indicating that interdiffusion occurs between these two layers; (iii the bottom interface between the InAs(QM and the native oxide SiO2 on top of the (Si/Mo substrate is abrupt. In addition, the valence band offset (VBO between the InAs(QM and the SiO2/(Si/Mo substrate was determined by HXPS. The value of VBO = 0.2 ± 0.04 eV is in good agreement with literature results obtained by electrical characterization, giving a clear indication of the formation of a well-defined and abrupt InAs/SiO2 heterojunction. We have demonstrated that HXPS and SW-HXPS are non-destructive, powerful methods for characterizing interfaces and for providing chemical depth profiles of nanostructures, quantum membranes, and 2D layered materials.

  13. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., ultrafast lasers (atto- and femto-second lasers) and parametric oscillators, coherent matter waves, Doppler-free Fourier spectroscopy with optical frequency combs, interference spectroscopy, quantum optics, the interferometric detection of gravitational waves and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  14. Symmetry Breaking in Few Layer Graphene Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostwick, A.; Ohta, T.; McChesney, J.L.; Emtsev, K.; Seyller,Th.; Horn, K.; Rotenberg, E.

    2007-05-25

    Recently, it was demonstrated that the quasiparticledynamics, the layer-dependent charge and potential, and the c-axisscreening coefficient could be extracted from measurements of thespectral function of few layer graphene films grown epitaxially on SiCusing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In this articlewe review these findings, and present detailed methodology for extractingsuch parameters from ARPES. We also present detailed arguments againstthe possibility of an energy gap at the Dirac crossing ED.

  15. Ultrasonic standing wave preparation of a liquid cell for glucose measurements in urine by midinfrared spectroscopy and potential application to smart toilets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Kawashima, Natsumi; Kitazaki, Tomoya; Mori, Keita; Kang, Hanyue; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2018-05-01

    Smart toilets could be used to monitor different components of urine in daily life for early detection of lifestyle-related diseases and prompt provision of treatment. For analysis of biological samples such as urine by midinfrared spectroscopy, thin-film samples like liquid cells are needed because of the strong absorption of midinfrared light by water. Conventional liquid cells or fixed cells are prepared based on the liquid membrane method and solution technique, but these are not quantitative and are difficult to set up and clean. We generated an ultrasonic standing wave reflection plane in a sample and produced an ultrasonic liquid cell. In this cell, the thickness of the optical path length was adjustable, as in the conventional method. The reflection plane could be generated at an arbitrary depth and internal reflected light could be detected by changing the frequency of the ultrasonic wave. We could generate refractive index boundaries using the density difference created by the ultrasonic standing wave. Creation of the reflection plane in the sample was confirmed by optical coherence tomography. Using the proposed method and midinfrared spectroscopy, we discriminated between normal urine samples spiked with glucose at different concentrations and obtained a high correlation coefficient. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  16. Observation of the exciton and Urbach band tail in low-temperature-grown GaAs using four-wave mixing spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, D.; Yildirim, M.; Hacquebard, L.; March, S.; Mathew, R.; Gamouras, A.; Hall, K. C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Liu, X.; Dobrowolska, M.; Furdyna, J. K. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2014-11-03

    Four-wave mixing (FWM) spectroscopy reveals clear signatures associated with the exciton, free carrier inter-band transitions, and the Urbach band tail in low-temperature-grown GaAs, providing a direct measure of the effective band gap as well as insight into the influence of disorder on the electronic structure. The ability to detect (and resolve) these contributions, in contrast to linear spectroscopy, is due to an enhanced sensitivity of FWM to the optical joint density of states and to many-body effects. Our experiments demonstrate the power of FWM for studying the near-band-edge optical properties and coherent carrier dynamics in low-temperature-grown semiconductors.

  17. Few-nucleon systems (theory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwamb, M.

    2006-01-01

    An overview over present achievements and future challenges in the field of few-nucleon systems is presented. Special emphasis is laid on the construction of a unified approach to hadronic and electromagnetic reactions on few-nucleon systems, necessary for studying the borderline between quark-gluon and effective descriptions. (orig.) (orig.)

  18. Superconductivity in few-layer stanene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Menghan; Zang, Yunyi; Guan, Zhaoyong; Li, Haiwei; Gong, Yan; Zhu, Kejing; Hu, Xiao-Peng; Zhang, Ding; Xu, Yong; Wang, Ya-Yu; He, Ke; Ma, Xu-Cun; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2018-04-01

    A single atomic slice of α-tin—stanene—has been predicted to host the quantum spin Hall effect at room temperature, offering an ideal platform to study low-dimensional and topological physics. Although recent research has focused on monolayer stanene, the quantum size effect in few-layer stanene could profoundly change material properties, but remains unexplored. By exploring the layer degree of freedom, we discover superconductivity in few-layer stanene down to a bilayer grown on PbTe, while bulk α-tin is not superconductive. Through substrate engineering, we further realize a transition from a single-band to a two-band superconductor with a doubling of the transition temperature. In situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) together with first-principles calculations elucidate the corresponding band structure. The theory also indicates the existence of a topologically non-trivial band. Our experimental findings open up novel strategies for constructing two-dimensional topological superconductors.

  19. Dynamics in few body Coulomb problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovchinnikov, S.Y.; Macek, J.H.; Tantawi, R.S.; Sabbah, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    We develop the 'positive energy Sturmian technique' for the solution of time-dependent Schroedinger equations which describe few Coulomb centers with scattering initial conditions. The 'positive energy Sturmian technique' is based on the following main steps: (i) time-dependent scaled transformation; (ii) Fourier transformation into the frequency domain; (iii) outgoing wave Sturmian expansions; and (iv) solution of coupled equations. The technique has been applied in electron-atom and ion-atom collisions for calculations of energy and angular distributions of emitted electrons and excitations of atoms. Refs. 2 (author)

  20. Simultaneous multi-laser, multi-species trace-level sensing of gas mixtures by rapidly swept continuous-wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yabai; Kan, Ruifeng; Englich, Florian V; Liu, Wenqing; Orr, Brian J

    2010-09-13

    The greenhouse-gas molecules CO(2), CH(4), and H(2)O are detected in air within a few ms by a novel cavity-ringdown laser-absorption spectroscopy technique using a rapidly swept optical cavity and multi-wavelength coherent radiation from a set of pre-tuned near-infrared diode lasers. The performance of various types of tunable diode laser, on which this technique depends, is evaluated. Our instrument is both sensitive and compact, as needed for reliable environmental monitoring with high absolute accuracy to detect trace concentrations of greenhouse gases in outdoor air.

  1. Few-body strange systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, B.F.

    1985-01-01

    Three fascinating aspects of few-body Λ-hypernuclei are discussed: 3-body forces, charge symmetry breaking, and ΛN-ΣN coupling. The need for improved data on hyperon-nucleon scattering is emphasized. 29 refs., 3 tabs

  2. A few Smarandache Integer Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Ibstedt, Henry

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of a few Smarandache Integer Sequences which first appeared in Properties or the Numbers, F. Smarandache, University or Craiova Archives, 1975. The first four sequences are recurrence generated sequences while the last three are concatenation sequences.

  3. A study of the hydrothermal alteration in Paleoproterozoic volcanic centers, São Félix do Xingu region, Amazonian Craton, Brazil, using short-wave infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Raquel Souza; Fernandes, Carlos Marcello Dias; Villas, Raimundo Netuno Nobre; Juliani, Caetano; Monteiro, Lena Virgínia Soares; de Almeida, Teodoro Isnard Ribeiro; Lagler, Bruno; de Carvalho Carneiro, Cleyton; Misas, Carlos Mario Echeverri

    2015-10-01

    Hypogene hydrothermal minerals have been identified by short-wave infrared spectroscopy in hydrothermally altered rocks from the Sobreiro and Santa Rosa formations, which belong to a Paleoproterozoic volcano-plutonic system in Amazonian craton. Three clay minerals are spectrally recognized: montmorillonite, kaolinite, and illite. The integration of these data with those available in the literature, including gold occurrences, suggests that those rocks are hydrothermal products of both volcanic thermal sources and later crustal intrusions, as evidenced by variable styles of propylitic, sericitic, potassic, and intermediate argillic alteration. The influence of meteoric fluids is emphasized. This low cost exploratory technique, which can be applied to hand samples, seems to be promising in the separation of hydrothermally altered volcano-plutonic centers in regions submitted to severe weathering conditions, in addition to aid elaborating models for prospecting mineral deposits.

  4. Towards the Detection of Explosive Taggants: Microwave and Millimetre-Wave Gas-Phase Spectroscopies of 3-Nitrotoluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roucou, Anthony; Kleiner, Isabelle; Goubet, Manuel; Bteich, Sabath; Mouret, Gael; Bocquet, Robin; Hindle, Francis; Meerts, W Leo; Cuisset, Arnaud

    2018-01-12

    The monitoring of gas-phase mononitrotoluenes is crucial for defence, civil security and environmental interests because they are used as taggant for TNT detection and in the manufacturing of industrial compounds such as dyestuffs. In this study, we have succeeded to measure and analyse at high-resolution a room temperature rotationally resolved millimetre-wave spectrum of meta-nitrotoluene (3-NT). Experimental and theoretical difficulties have been overcome, in particular, those related to the low vapour pressure of 3-NT and to the presence of a CH 3 internal rotation in an almost free rotation regime (V 3 =6.7659(24) cm -1 ). Rotational spectra have been recorded in the microwave and millimetre-wave ranges using a supersonic jet Fourier Transform microwave spectrometer (T rot <10 K) and a millimetre-wave frequency multiplication chain (T=293 K), respectively. Spectral analysis of pure rotation lines in the vibrational ground state and in the first torsional excited state supported by quantum chemistry calculations permits the rotational energy of the molecule, the hyperfine structure due to the 14 N nucleus, and the internal rotation of the methyl group to be characterised. A line list is provided for future in situ detection. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Probing buried solid-solid interfaces in magnetic multilayer structures and other nanostructures using spectroscopy excited by soft x-ray standing waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, S.-H.; Mun, B.S.; Mannella, N.; Sell, B.; Ritchey, S.B.; Fadley, C.S.; Pham, L.; Nambu, A.; Watanabe, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Buried solid-solid interfaces are becoming increasingly more important in all aspects of nanoscience, and we here dis- cuss the st applications of a new method for selectively studying them with the vuv/soft x-ray spectroscopies. As specific examples, magnetic multilayer structures represent key elements of current developments in spintronics, including giant magnetoresistance, exchange bias, and magnetic tunnel resistance. The buried interfaces in such structures are of key importance to their performance, but have up to now been difficult to study selectively with these spectroscopies. This novel method involves excitation of photoelectrons or fluorescent x-rays with soft x-ray standing waves created by Bragg reflection from a multilayer mirror substrate on which the sample is grown. We will discuss core and valence photoemission, as well soft x-ray emission, results from applying this method to multilayer structures relevant to both giant magnetoresistance (Fe/Cr-[2]) and magnetic tunnel junctions (Al 2 O 3 /FeCo) , including magnetic dichroism measurements. Work supported by the Director, Of e of Science, Of e of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division, U.S. Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF000

  6. In-vivo quantitative measurement of tissue oxygen saturation of human webbing using a transmission type continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizimu, Tuerxun; Adachi, Makoto; Nakano, Kazuya; Ohnishi, Takashi; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Takahashi, Nozomi; Nakada, Taka-aki; Oda, Shigeto; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2018-02-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive method for monitoring tissue oxygen saturation (StO2). Many commercial NIRS devices are presently available. However, the precision of those devices is relatively poor because they are using the reflectance-model with which it is difficult to obtain the blood volume and other unchanged components of the tissue. Human webbing is a thin part of the hand and suitable to measure spectral transmittance. In this paper, we present a method for measuring StO2 of human webbing from a transmissive continuous-wave nearinfrared spectroscopy (CW-NIRS) data. The method is based on the modified Beer-Lambert law (MBL) and it consists of two steps. In the first step, we give a pressure to the upstream region of the measurement point to perturb the concentration of deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin as remaining the other components and measure the spectral signals. From the measured data, spectral absorbance due to the components other than hemoglobin is calculated. In the second step, spectral measurement is performed at arbitrary time instance and the spectral absorbance obtained in the step 1 is subtracted from the measured absorbance. The tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) is estimated from the remained data. The method was evaluated on an arterial occlusion test (AOT) and a venous occlusion test (VOT). In the evaluation experiment, we confirmed that reasonable values of StO2 were obtained by the proposed method.

  7. Few-photon optical diode

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Dibyendu

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme of realizing an optical diode at the few-photon level. The system consists of a one-dimensional waveguide coupled asymmetrically to a two-level system. The two or multi-photon transport in this system is strongly correlated. We derive exactly the single and two-photon current and show that the two-photon current is asymmetric for the asymmetric coupling. Thus the system serves as an optical diode which allows transmission of photons in one direction much more efficie...

  8. The Tragedy of the Few

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scavenius, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    In this article I elaborate and defend a rights-based understanding of climate politics, that is, one that takes climate politics to concern the rights to access of natural resources as opposed to people’s economic incentives. The argument contains two parts. The first is negative: to demonstrate...... that the tragedy of the commons as a story of climate change is inadequate. The second is positive: to suggest a more satisfactory framework, which I call thetragedy of the few. In this view, climate politics is neither primarily mitigation nor economic incentive politics, but one of distributing rights to access...

  9. Few-body hypernuclear constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first hyperfragment in a balloon flown emulsion stack some two score years ago, physicists have worked to understand how the addition of the strangeness degree of freedom alters the picture of nuclei and the baryon-baryon force. Because the Λ and Σ masses differ markedly from that of the proton and neutron, SU (3) symmetry is broken. How it is broken is a question of importance to the fundamental understanding of the baryon-baryon interaction. New dynamical symmetries, forbidden by the Pauli principle in conventional nuclei, appear. Three-body forces play a more significant role. A binding anomaly in A = 5 as well as a possible spin inversion between ground and excited states in A = 4 appear. Surprisingly narrow structure near the threshold for Σ production has been reported in the 4 He (K - , π - ) spectrum while no corresponding structure is observed in the companion 4 He(K - , π + ) spectrum; this has been interpreted as evidence for a Σ 4 He bound state. Finally, the reported observation of ΛΛ-hypernuclei, in particular ΛΛ 6 He, bears directly upon the possibilities for the prediction of a bound H particle--the S = -2 dibaryon. Although it is not feasible to invert the analysis and determine the interaction from the data on few-body systems, it is possible to utilize these data to constrain the models, provided one is careful. The author will explore briefly the constraints which the few-body data impose and the level of understanding that has been achieved

  10. Technical Note: Measurement of the tropical UTLS composition in presence of clouds using millimetre-wave heterodyne spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Dinelli

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The MARSCHALS (Millimetre-wave Airborne Receiver for Spectroscopic CHaracterisation of Atmospheric Limb-Sounding project has the general objectives of demonstrating the measurement capabilities of a limb viewing instrument working in the millimetre and sub-millimetre spectral regions (from 294 to 349 GHz for the study of the Upper Troposphere – Lower Stratosphere (UTLS. MARSCHALS has flown on board the M-55 stratospheric aircraft (Geophysica in two measurements campaigns. Here we report the results of the analysis of MARSCHALS measurements during the SCOUT-O3 campaign held in Darwin (Australia in December 2005 obtained with MARC (Millimetre-wave Atmospheric-Retrieval Code. MARSCHALS measured vertical distributions of temperature, water vapour, ozone and nitric acid in the altitude range from 10 to 20 km in presence of clouds that obscure measurements in the middle infrared spectroscopic region. The minimum altitude at which the retrieval has been possible is determined by the high water concentration typical of the tropical region rather than the extensive cloud coverage experienced during the flight. Water has been measured from 10 km to flight altitude (~18 km with a 10% accuracy, ozone from 14 km to flight altitude with accuracy ranging from 10% to 60%, while the retrieval of nitric acid has been possible with an accuracy not better than 40% only from 16 km to flight altitude due to the low signal to noise ratio of its emission in the analysed spectral region. The results have been validated using measurement made in a less cloudy region by MIPAS-STR, an infrared limb-viewing instrument on board the M-55, during the same flight.

  11. Few-cycle isolated attosecond pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansone, G.; Benedetti, E.; Calegari, F.; Stagira, S.; Vozzi, C.; Silvestri De, S.; Nisoli, M.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. In the last few years the field of attosecond science has shown impressive and rapid progress, mainly due to the introduction of novel experimental methods for the characterization of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses and attosecond electron wave packets. This development has been also triggered by significant improvements in the control of the electric field of the driving infrared pulses. Particularly interesting for the applications is the generation of isolated attosecond XUV pulses using few-cycle driving pulses. In this case significant progresses have been achieved thanks to the stabilization of the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of amplified light pulses. In this work we demonstrate that the polarization gating (PG) method with few-cycle phase-stabilized driving pulses allows one to generate few-cycle isolated attosecond pulses tunable on a very broad spectral region. The PG method is based on temporal modulation of the ellipticity of a light pulse, which confines the XUV emission in the temporal gate where the polarization is close to linear. The time-dependent polarization of phase-stabilized sub-6-fs pulses, generated by the hollow fiber technique, has been obtained using two birefringent plates. It is possible to create a linear polarization gate, whose position is imposed by the intensity profile of the pulse whilst the emission time is linked to the CEP of the electric field. The pulses have been analyzed by using a flat-field spectrometer. Continuous XUV spectra, corresponding to the production of isolated attosecond pulses, have been generated for particular CEP values. Upon changing the rotation of the first plate it was possible to tune the XUV emission in a broad spectra range. We have then achieved a complete temporal characterization of the generated isolated attosecond pulses using frequency-resolved optical gating for complete reconstruction of attosecond bursts (FROG CRAB). The measured parabolic phase

  12. a Few Lines about Volodya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Dominique

    I would like to write a few words, in memory of Volodya, for the occasion of this workshop which is organized under his name and will start by publicly remembering his essential presence in our theoretical physics world. We had in Orsay (LPT, theoretical physics laboratory) the incredible luck to meet him in 1992 for the first time when we could finally invite this famous and celebrated figure of modern particle physics. He gave a series of lectures this year: Orsay lectures on confinement-in which he mainly developed the picture of confinement based on light quarks that led to many discussions which contributed to open the road of the search actually still going on...The way he was giving his talks nobody will forget. He always started by describing the field he would talk about in a very passionate and extraordinary way: he would say: "I have a picture" which would force even the most far away spectators to participate in an actively engaged vision of the problem he was talking about. He was building with enthusiasm the theoretical image which led to the result he wanted to show. He will remain in our memory as a rare model of intellectual passion. This led him to formulate in a unique way precious theoretical results. Thank you Volodya... Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  13. A DAQ-Device-Based Continuous Wave Near-Infrared Spectroscopy System for Measuring Human Functional Brain Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS is getting more and more popular as a neuroimaging technique. The fNIRS instrument can be used to measure local hemodynamic response, which indirectly reflects the functional neural activities in human brain. In this study, an easily implemented way to establish DAQ-device-based fNIRS system was proposed. Basic instrumentation components (light sources driving, signal conditioning, sensors, and optical fiber of the fNIRS system were described. The digital in-phase and quadrature demodulation method was applied in LabVIEW software to distinguish light sources from different emitters. The effectiveness of the custom-made system was verified by simultaneous measurement with a commercial instrument ETG-4000 during Valsalva maneuver experiment. The light intensity data acquired from two systems were highly correlated for lower wavelength (Pearson’s correlation coefficient r = 0.92, P < 0.01 and higher wavelength (r = 0.84, P < 0.01. Further, another mental arithmetic experiment was implemented to detect neural activation in the prefrontal cortex. For 9 participants, significant cerebral activation was detected in 6 subjects (P < 0.05 for oxyhemoglobin and in 8 subjects (P < 0.01 for deoxyhemoglobin.

  14. Continuous wave and time resolved spectroscopy of InAsN/GaAsN based quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taliercio, T.; Valvin, P.; Intartaglia, R.; Guillet, T.; Lefebvre, P.; Bretagnon, T.; Gil, B.; Sallet, V.; Harmand, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    We present a study of the optical properties of quantum dots based on a new family of semiconductors: III-V dilute nitrides such as (In,Ga)(N,As). Continuous wave and time resolved photoluminescence (PL) experiments allowed us to evaluate the impact of N incorporation during the growth of InAs/GaAs quantum dots. Previous work [V. Sallet et al., to be submitted to J. Cryst. Growth (2005); O. Schumann et al., J. Appl. Phys. 96, 2832 (2004)] showed that increasing the flux of N atoms into the growth chamber modifies drastically the size of the dots which leads to a bimodal growth. Two populations of dots with different sizes appear. The quantum dot PL line broadens and a second PL line appears at higher energy. Time resolved PL allows us to identify the nature of this second PL line: second population of quantum dots. A second decay time is observed which we interpret as being the consequence of the perturbation of the electronic states of the quantum dots. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Isomer-specific detection in the UV photodissociation of the propargyl radical by chirped-pulse mm-wave spectroscopy in a pulsed quasi-uniform flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Bernadette M; Suas-David, Nicolas; Dias, Nureshan; Suits, Arthur G

    2018-02-21

    Isomer-specific detection and product branching fractions in the UV photodissociation of the propargyl radical is achieved through the use of chirped-pulse Fourier-transform mm-wave spectroscopy in a pulsed quasi-uniform flow (CPUF). Propargyl radicals are produced in the 193 nm photodissociation of 1,2-butadiene. Absorption of a second photon leads to H atom elimination giving three possible C 3 H 2 isomers: singlets cyclopropenylidene (c-C 3 H 2 ) and propadienylidene (l-C 3 H 2 ), and triplet propargylene ( 3 HCCCH). The singlet products and their appearance kinetics in the flow are directly determined by rotational spectroscopy, but due to the negligible dipole moment of propargylene, it is not directly monitored. However, we exploit the time-dependent kinetics of H-atom catalyzed isomerization to infer the branching to propargylene as well. We obtain the overall branching among H loss channels to be 2.9% (+1.1/-0.5) l-C 3 H 2 + H, 16.8% (+3.2/-1.3) c-C 3 H 2 + H, and 80.2 (+1.8/-4.2) 3 HCCCH + H. Our findings are qualitatively consistent with earlier RRKM calculations in that the major channel in the photodissociation of the propargyl radical at 193 nm is to 3 HCCCH + H; however, a greater contribution to the energetically most favorable isomer, c-C 3 H 2 + H is observed in this work. We do not detect the predicted HCCC + H 2 channel, but place an upper bound on its yield of 1%.

  16. Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) Molecular Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Emissions of Thin Solid Explosive Powder Films Deposited on Aluminum Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Clayton S-C; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B; Brown, Ei E; Hommerich, Uwe; Tripathi, Ashish; Samuels, Alan C

    2017-04-01

    Thin solid films made of high nitro (NO 2 )/nitrate (NO 3 ) content explosives were deposited on sand-blasted aluminum substrates and then studied using a mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT) linear array detection system that is capable of rapidly capturing a broad spectrum of atomic and molecular laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emissions in the long-wave infrared region (LWIR; ∼5.6-10 µm). Despite the similarities of their chemical compositions and structures, thin films of three commonly used explosives (RDX, HMX, and PETN) studied in this work can be rapidly identified in the ambient air by their molecular LIBS emission signatures in the LWIR region. A preliminary assessment of the detection limit for a thin film of RDX on aluminum appears to be much lower than 60 µg/cm 2 . This LWIR LIBS setup is capable of rapidly probing and charactering samples without the need for elaborate sample preparation and also offers the possibility of a simultaneous ultraviolet visible and LWIR LIBS measurement.

  17. Electronic structure of charge-density-wave state in quasi-2D KMo6O17 purple bronze characterized by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, M. A.; Avila, J.; Drouard, S.; Guyot, H.; Asensio, M. C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on an angle-resolved-photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) investigation of layered quasi-two dimensional (2D) Molybdenum purple bronze KMo6O17 in order to study and characterizes the transition to a charge-density-wave (CDW) state. We have performed photoemission temperature dependent measurements cooling down from room temperature (RT) to 32 K, well below the Peierls transition for this material, with CDW transition temperature Tc =110 K. The spectra have been taken at a selected kF point of the Fermi surface (FS) that satisfies the nesting condition of the FS, looking for the characteristic pseudo-gap opening in this kind of materials. The pseudogap has been estimated and it result to be in agreement with our previous works. The shift to lower binding energy of crossing Fermi level ARPES feature have been also confirmed and studied as a function of temperature, showing a rough like BCS behaviour. Finally we have also focused on ARPES measurements along ΓM¯ high symmetry direction for both room and low temperature states finding some insight for ‘shadow’ or back folded bands indicating the new periodicity of real lattice after the CDW lattice distortion.

  18. Phase synchronization of oxygenation waves in the frontal areas of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder detected by optical diffusion spectroscopy correlates with medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigal, Sharon B.; Polzonetti, Chiara M.; Stehli, Annamarie; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-12-01

    The beneficial effects of pharmacotherapy on children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are well documented. We use near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) methodology to determine reorganization of brain neurovascular properties following the medication treatment. Twenty-six children with ADHD (ages six through 12) participated in a modified laboratory school protocol to monitor treatment response with lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX; Vyvanse, Shire US Inc.). All children refrained from taking medication for at least two weeks (washout period). To detect neurovascular reorganization, we measured changes in synchronization of oxy (HbO2) and deoxy (HHb) hemoglobin waves between the two frontal lobes. Participants without medication displayed average baseline HbO2 phase difference at about -7-deg. and HHb differences at about 240-deg.. This phase synchronization index changed after pharmacological intervention. Medication induced an average phase changes of HbO2 after first medication to 280-deg. and after medication optimization to 242-deg.. Instead first medication changed of the average HHb phase difference at 186-deg. and then after medication optimization to 120-deg. In agreement with findings of White et al., and Varela et al., we associated the phase synchronization differences of brain hemodynamics in children with ADHD with lobe specific hemodynamic reorganization of HbO2- and HHB oscillations following medication status.

  19. Mode and polarization state selected guided wave spectroscopy of orientational anisotrophy in model membrane cellulosic polymer films: relevance to lab-on-a-chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Mark P.; Kanigan, Tanya

    2007-06-01

    Orientation anisotropies in structural properties relevant to the use of cellulosic polymers as membranes for lab-on-chips were investigated for cellulose acetate (CA) and regenerated cellulose (RC) films deposited as slab waveguides. Anisotropy was probed with mode and polarization state selected guided wave Raman spectroscopy. CA exhibits partial chain orientation in the plane of the film, and this orientation is independent of sample substrate and film preparation conditions. RC films also show in-plane anisotropy, where the hexose sugar rings lie roughly in the plane of the film. Explanations are given of the role of artifacts in interpreting waveguide Raman spectra, including anomalous contributions to Raman spectra that arise from deviations from right angle scattering geometry, mode-dependent contributions to longitudinal electric field components and TETM mode conversion. We explore diffusion profiles of small molecules in cellulosic films by adaptations of an inverse-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (iWKB) recursive, noninteger virtual mode index algorithm. Perturbations in the refractive index distribution, n(z), are recovered from the measured relative propagation constants, neffective,m, of the planar waveguide. The refractive index distribution then yields the diffusion profile.

  20. Sub-Doppler spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansch, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy, tunable cw sources, and Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy. Discusses saturation spectroscopy; continuous wave saturation spectroscopy in the ultraviolet; and two-photon spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen 1S-2S. Focuses on Doppler-free laser spectroscopy of gaseous samples. Explains that in saturation spectroscopy, a monochromatic laser beam ''labels'' a group of atoms within a narrow range of axial velocities through excitation or optical pumping, and a Doppler-free spectrum of these selected atoms is observed with a second, counterpropagating beam. Notes that in two-photon spectroscopy it is possible to record Doppler-free spectra without any need for velocity selection by excitation with two counterpropagating laser beams whose first order Doppler shifts cancel

  1. Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonser, U.

    1975-01-01

    This book is addressed to persons interested in learning about what has been done and what can be done with Moessbauer spectroscopy. In an introductory chapter the basic principle is explained and the general parameters governing Moessbauer spectroscopy are tabulated. For the following chapters various disciplines are chosen and the wide applicability of this measuring technique is demonstrated. The second chapter discusses a few representative examples of chemical interesting information being reflected by isomer shifts and quadrupole splittings, particularly with respect to bonding and structural properties. The third chapter deals with some applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy for characterizing magnetic compounds and its use for magnetic structure investigations, particularly by making use of polarized radiation. The fourth chapter describes the use of the Moessbauer spectroscopy for studying iron in biological molecules. As an example of recent applications to mineralogy and geology the results of the studies of lunar samples are reviewed in the fifth chapter. Finally, in the last chapter, work is described on the use of Moessbauer spectroscopy in physical metallurgy, particularly quantitative analyses which have enabled metallurgists to solve many old problems. (orig./FW) [de

  2. Environmental Synthesis of Few Layers Graphene Sheets Using Ultrasonic Exfoliation with Enhanced Electrical and Thermal Properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monir Noroozi

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report how few layers graphene that can be produced in large quantity with low defect ratio from exfoliation of graphite by using a high intensity probe sonication in water containing liquid hand soap and PVP. It was founded that the graphene powder obtained by this simple exfoliation method after the heat treatment had an excellent exfoliation into a single or layered graphene sheets. The UV-visible spectroscopy, FESEM, TEM, X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy was used to analyse the graphene product. The thermal diffusivity of the samples was analysed using a highly accurate thermal-wave cavity photothermal technique. The data obtained showed excellent enhancement in the thermal diffusivity of the graphene dispersion. This well-dispersed graphene was then used to fabricate an electrically conductive polymer-graphene film composite. The results demonstrated that this low cost and environmental friendly technique allowed to the production of high quality layered graphene sheets, improved the thermal and electrical properties. This may find use in the wide range of applications based on graphene.

  3. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., frequency doubling in external cavities, reliable cw-parametric oscillators, tunable narrow-band UV sources, more sensitive detection techniques, tunable femtosecond and sub-femtosecond lasers (X-ray region and the attosecond range), control of atomic and molecular excitations, frequency combs able to synchronize independent femtosecond lasers, coherent matter waves, and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  4. S = -1 and S = -2 few-body hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, B.F.

    1997-01-01

    The S = -1 and S = -2 few-body bound states are the focus of this discussion. Implications for the understanding of the baryon-baryon interaction are examined. Octet-octet coupling effects not found in conventional, non-strange nuclei are highlighted. TJNAF wave function tests for the S = -1 sector are noted. The need to identify S = -2 hypernuclei to explore the S = -2 strong interaction and to test model predictions is emphasized

  5. Charge-transfer collisions involving few-electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, T.

    2016-01-01

    Ion-atom collision systems that involve more than one electron constitute nonseparable few-body problems, whose full solution is difficult to say the least. At impact energies well below 1 keV/amu an expansion of the stationary scattering wave function in terms of a limited number of products of nuclear and molecular state wave functions (amended to satisfy scattering boundary conditions) is feasible and usually sufficient to obtain accurate charge-transfer cross sections provided the electronic wave functions include configuration interaction. At energies above 1 keV/amu this approach becomes inefficient and close-coupling methods within the semi classical approximation are better suited to treat the problem. For bare-ion collisions from helium target atoms explicit solutions of the two-electron time-dependent Schrödinger equation can be achieved, but are computationally costly and cannot be extended to problems which involve more than two electrons.

  6. ON THE PAPER BY L.S. KONEV ET AL. “SIMULATING EVOLUTION OF FORWARD AND BACKWARD WAVES OF FEW-CYCLE PULSES PROPAGATING IN AN OPTICAL WAVEGUIDE WITH DISPERSION AND CUBIC NONLINEARITY OF ELECTRONIC AND ELECTRONIC-VIBRATION NATURE”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Rosanov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement ill-posedness in the paper by L.S. Konev et al. devoted to formation of backward wave at short laser pulse propagation in nonlinear media or fibers is specified. It is inconceivable in the correct problem statement to consider the radiation field at the medium entrance as a given function of time due to generation of backward wave in the medium, when the backward wave characteristics are target values. The proper evolution variable is time, and it is convenient to use the adopted finite-difference time-domain (FDTD method for backward wave calculation.

  7. Capillary waves in slow motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seydel, Tilo; Tolan, Metin; Press, Werner; Madsen, Anders; Gruebel, Gerhard

    2001-01-01

    Capillary wave dynamics on glycerol surfaces has been investigated by means of x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy performed at grazing angles. The measurements show that thermally activated capillary wave motion is slowed down exponentially when the sample is cooled below 273 K. This finding directly reflects the freezing of the surface waves. The wave-number dependence of the measured time constants is in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions for overdamped capillary waves

  8. Nanofabrication of SERS Substrates for Single/Few Molecules Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Melino, Gianluca

    2015-05-04

    Raman spectroscopy is among the most widely employed methods to investigate the properties of materials in several fields of study. Evolution in materials science allowed us to fabricate suitable substrates, at the nanoscale, capable to enhance the electromagnetic field of the signals coming from the samples which at this range turn out to be in most cases singles or a few molecules. This particular variation of the classical technique is called SERS (Surface Enanched Raman Spectroscopy). In this work, the enhancement of the electromagnetic field is obtained by manipulation of the optical properties of metals with respect to their size. By using electroless deposition (bottom up technique), gold and silver nanoparticles were deposited in nanostructured patterns obtained on silicon wafers by means of electron beam lithography (top down technique). Rhodamine 6G in aqueous solution at extremely low concentration (10-8 M) was absorbed on the resultant dimers and the collection of the Raman spectra demonstrated the high efficiency of the substrates.

  9. Few-body system and particle resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubarak, Ahmad.

    1979-01-01

    Techniques of few-body system in nuclear physics are exploited to analyze the spectrum of the T resonance and its family. Their relation to nuclear resonances are established so as to apply few-body dynamical techniques in the dynamical structure of particles carrying the truth quantum number. (author)

  10. New Hadronic Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faccini, R.

    2010-01-01

    In the past few years the field of hadron spectroscopy has seen renewed interest due to the publication, initially mostly from B-Factories, of evidences of states that do not match regular spectroscopy, but are rather candidates for bound states with additional quarks or gluons (four quarks for tetraquarks and molecules and two quarks and gluons for hybrids). A huge effort in understanding the nature of this new states and in building a new spectroscopy is ongoing. This paper reviews the experimental and theoretical state of the art on heavy quarkonium exotic spectroscopy, with particular attention on the steps towards a global picture.

  11. Femtosecond few-cycle mid-infrared laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xing

    The few-cycle pulses of mid-infrared (mid-IR, wavelength 2-10 microns) have attracted increasing attention owing to their great potentials for high order harmonic generation, time-resolved spectroscopy, precision of cutting and biomedical science.In this thesis, mid-IR frequency conversion.......2 - 5.5 μm with only one fixed pump wavelength, a feature absent in Kerr media. Finally, we experimentally observe supercontinuum generation spanning 1.5 octaves, generated in a 10 mm long silicon-rich nitride waveguide pumped by 100 pJ femtosecond pulses from an erbium fiber laser. The waveguide has...

  12. A few thoughts on the history ofepilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A few thoughts on the history ofepilepsy. J. C. DE ... Abstract The history of epilepsy is a saga ofthe struggle by ..... great detail in Germany using faradic stimulation and .... Holmes G. Evolution of clinical medicine as illustrated by rhe his-.

  13. Polarized few-nucleon targets: new developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeusser, O

    1992-09-01

    We discuss recent improvements in producing polarized few-nucleon targets for nuclear and particle physics experiments. The emphasis is on progress with polarized gas targets intended for experiments at electron and proton storage rings. (author) 54 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Polarized few-nucleon targets: new developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusser, O.

    1992-09-01

    We discuss recent improvements in producing polarized few-nucleon targets for nuclear and particle physics experiments. The emphasis is on progress with polarized gas targets intended for experiments at electron and proton storage rings. (author) 54 refs., 1 tab

  15. Detection of entanglement with few local measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guehne, O.; Hyllus, P.; Bruss, D.; Lewenstein, M.; Sanpera, A.; Ekert, A.; Macchiavello, C.

    2002-01-01

    We introduce a general method for the experimental detection of entanglement by performing only few local measurements, assuming some prior knowledge of the density matrix. The idea is based on the minimal decomposition of witness operators into a pseudomixture of local operators. We discuss an experimentally relevant case of two qubits, and show an example how bound entanglement can be detected with few local measurements

  16. Detection of entanglement with few local measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Guehne, O.; Hyllus, P.; Bruss, D.; Ekert, A.; Lewenstein, M.; Macchiavello, C.; Sanpera, A.

    2002-01-01

    We introduce a general method for the experimental detection of entanglement by performing only few local measurements, assuming some prior knowledge of the density matrix. The idea is based on the minimal decomposition of witness operators into a pseudo-mixture of local operators. We discuss an experimentally relevant case of two qubits, and show an example how bound entanglement can be detected with few local measurements.

  17. Detection of entanglement with few local measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gühne, O.; Hyllus, P.; Bruß, D.; Ekert, A.; Lewenstein, M.; Macchiavello, C.; Sanpera, A.

    2002-12-01

    We introduce a general method for the experimental detection of entanglement by performing only few local measurements, assuming some prior knowledge of the density matrix. The idea is based on the minimal decomposition of witness operators into a pseudomixture of local operators. We discuss an experimentally relevant case of two qubits, and show an example how bound entanglement can be detected with few local measurements.

  18. A Few Expanding Integrable Models, Hamiltonian Structures and Constrained Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yufeng

    2011-01-01

    Two kinds of higher-dimensional Lie algebras and their loop algebras are introduced, for which a few expanding integrable models including the coupling integrable couplings of the Broer-Kaup (BK) hierarchy and the dispersive long wave (DLW) hierarchy as well as the TB hierarchy are obtained. From the reductions of the coupling integrable couplings, the corresponding coupled integrable couplings of the BK equation, the DLW equation, and the TB equation are obtained, respectively. Especially, the coupling integrable coupling of the TB equation reduces to a few integrable couplings of the well-known mKdV equation. The Hamiltonian structures of the coupling integrable couplings of the three kinds of soliton hierarchies are worked out, respectively, by employing the variational identity. Finally, we decompose the BK hierarchy of evolution equations into x-constrained flows and t n -constrained flows whose adjoint representations and the Lax pairs are given. (general)

  19. Polarization-sensitive electro-optic detection of terahertz wave using three different types of crystal symmetry: Toward broadband polarization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguchi, Kenichi; Iwasaki, Hotsumi; Okano, Makoto; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    We investigated polarization-sensitive electro-optic (EO) detection of terahertz (THz) waves by using two uniaxial crystals: a c-cut gallium selenide and a c-cut lithium niobate crystals. We formulated a general frequency-domain description of EO detection by in-plane isotropic EO crystals, which holds regardless of the frequency. Based on this description, the polarization of THz waves can be derived by analyzing EO sampling signals measured with two orthogonal configurations of the in-plane isotropic EO crystals as well as typical (111) zinc-blende EO crystals. In addition, we experimentally demonstrated that the frequency-dependent polarization of THz waves can be reproducibly retrieved using three EO crystals with different crystal symmetries and with different phase matching conditions. Our description provides essential information for practical polarization sensing in the THz frequency range as well as in the mid-infrared range

  20. Review of FEWS NET Biophysical Monitoring Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, K. W.; Brown, Molly E.; Verdin, J.; Underwood, L. W.

    2009-01-01

    The Famine Early Warning System Network (FEWS NET) provides monitoring and early warning support to decision makers responsible for responding to famine and food insecurity. FEWS NET transforms satellite remote sensing data into rainfall and vegetation information that can be used by these decision makers. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has recently funded activities to enhance remote sensing inputs to FEWS NET. To elicit Earth observation requirements, a professional review questionnaire was disseminated to FEWS NET expert end-users: it focused upon operational requirements to determine additional useful remote sensing data and; subsequently, beneficial FEWS NET biophysical supplementary inputs. The review was completed by over 40 experts from around the world, enabling a robust set of professional perspectives to be gathered and analyzed rapidly. Reviewers were asked to evaluate the relative importance of environmental variables and spatio-temporal requirements for Earth science data products, in particular for rainfall and vegetation products. The results showed that spatio-temporal resolution requirements are complex and need to vary according to place, time, and hazard: that high resolution remote sensing products continue to be in demand, and that rainfall and vegetation products were valued as data that provide actionable food security information.

  1. Electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    An introduction to the various techniques in electron spectroscopy is presented. These techniques include: (1) UV Photoelectron spectroscopy, (2) X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy, (3) Auger electron spectroscopy, (4) Electron energy loss spectroscopy, (5) Penning ionization spectroscopy and (6) Ion neutralization spectroscopy. The radiations used in each technique, the basis of the technique and the special information obtained in structure determination in atoms and molecules by each technique are summarised. (A.K.)

  2. Relativistic Theory of Few Body Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz Gross

    2002-11-01

    Very significant advances have been made in the relativistic theory of few body systems since I visited Peter Sauer and his group in Hannover in 1983. This talk provides an opportunity to review the progress in this field since then. Different methods for the relativistic calculation of few nucleon systems are briefly described. As an example, seven relativistic calculations of the deuteron elastic structure functions, A, B, and T{sub 20}, are compared. The covariant SPECTATOR {copyright} theory, among the more successful and complete of these methods, is described in more detail.

  3. Few-body problem in celestial mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dermott, S F [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA). Center for Radiophysics and Space Research

    1984-03-26

    The approaches taken by solar system dynamicists to various outstanding problems has changed considerably in recent years. Some problems for which few-body approaches have been tried in the past are now thought to involve collective phenomena. Observed features in Saturn's rings associated with resonances are examples. On the other hand, the problem of the origin of the Kirkwood gaps in the asteroid belt, for which a number of a many-body approaches (involving collisions or gas friction) have been tried, probably has a few-body solution and may involve chaos.

  4. Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos-Vollebregt, M.T.C. de.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of background correction in atomic absorption spectroscopy has recently been introduced, based on the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in a magnetic field. A theoretical analysis of the background correction capability observed in such instruments is presented. A Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer utilizing a 50 Hz sine wave modulated magnetic field is described. (Auth.)

  5. Spectroscopy, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the "Understanding the Atom" Series. The science of spectroscopy is presented by a number of topics dealing with (1) the uses of spectroscopy, (2) its origin and background, (3) the basic optical systems of spectroscopes, spectrometers, and spectrophotometers, (4) the characteristics of wave motion, (5) the…

  6. Nuclear aspects of few-baryon systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the bound state properties of the trinucleons and the alpha particle in terms of a hadron picture of the nucleus is reviewed. The role of three-body forces and meson exchange currents is examined. novel aspects of few-body hypernuclei as well as unresolved issues in this S ≠ O sector are summarized

  7. Photonuclear studies in the few nucleon system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, M.S.

    1975-02-01

    A brief review of photonuclear reactions in few nucleon systems is presented with comparison of theory with experiment. Discrepancies are examined and recent and current research aimed at resolving these problems are discussed. Emphasis is placed on two and three body photodisintegration. (33 figures) (U.S.)

  8. Few-body physics: Then and now

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friar, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    This review describes past progress in selected topics of few-body nuclear physics, as well as calculations and experiments that the author believes necessary for further orderly progress. Review also gives specific data on binding energies and nuclear radii. 36 references

  9. The Delft-FEWS flow forecasting system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, M.; Schellekens, J.; Gijsbers, P.; van Dijk, M.; van den Akker, O.; Heynert, K.

    2013-01-01

    Since its introduction in 2002/2003, the current generation of the Delft-FEWS operational forecasting platform has found application in over forty operational centres. In these it is used to link data and models in real time, producing forecasts on a daily basis. In some cases it forms a building

  10. Relativistic Few-Body Hadronic Physics Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyzou, Wayne [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-06-20

    The goal of this research proposal was to use ``few-body'' methods to understand the structure and reactions of systems of interacting hadrons (neutrons, protons, mesons, quarks) over a broad range of energy scales. Realistic mathematical models of few-hadron systems have the advantage that they are sufficiently simple that they can be solved with mathematically controlled errors. These systems are also simple enough that it is possible to perform complete accurate experimental measurements on these systems. Comparison between theory and experiment puts strong constraints on the structure of the models. Even though these systems are ``simple'', both the experiments and computations push the limits of technology. The important property of ``few-body'' systems is that the ``cluster property'' implies that the interactions that appear in few-body systems are identical to the interactions that appear in complicated many-body systems. Of particular interest are models that correctly describe physics at distance scales that are sensitive to the internal structure of the individual nucleons. The Heisenberg uncertainty principle implies that in order to be sensitive to physics on distance scales that are a fraction of the proton or neutron radius, a relativistic treatment of quantum mechanics is necessary. The research supported by this grant involved 30 years of effort devoted to studying all aspects of interacting two and three-body systems. Realistic interactions were used to compute bound states of two- and three-nucleon, and two- and three-quark systems. Scattering observables for these systems were computed for a broad range of energies - from zero energy scattering to few GeV scattering, where experimental evidence of sub-nucleon degrees of freedom is beginning to appear. Benchmark calculations were produced, which when compared with calculations of other groups provided an essential check on these complicated calculations. In

  11. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of CdSe Nanocrystals in the Gas Phase: A Direct Measure of the Evanescent Electron Wave Function of Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    researchers have used ultrafast transient absorption spectros - copy to show that the charge separation rate of Type II core− shell QDs depends on the extent...the first direct measurement of the evanescent electron density of the QD exciton. We use ultrafast two-photon photoelectron spectros - copy (2PPE) to...clusters are well preserved after the aerosol system, as observed using UV − visible spectroscopy (Supporting Information Figure S1). The isolation of the

  12. Gamma Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemantsverdriet, J.W.; Butz, Tilman; Ertl, G.; Knözinger, H.; Schüth, F.

    2008-01-01

    No abstract. The sections in this article are 1 Introduction 2 Mössbauer Spectroscopy 3 Time-Differential Perturbed Angular Correlations (TDPAC) 4 Conclusions and Outlook Keywords: Mössbauer spectroscopy; gamma spectroscopy; perturbed angular correlation; TDPAC

  13. Determining the nature of excitonic dephasing in high-quality GaN/AlGaN quantum wells through time-resolved and spectrally resolved four-wave mixing spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallart, M.; Ziegler, M.; Crégut, O.; Feltin, E.; Carlin, J.-F.; Butté, R.; Grandjean, N.; Hönerlage, B.; Gilliot, P.

    2017-07-01

    Applying four-wave mixing spectroscopy to a high-quality GaN/AlGaN single quantum well, we report on the experimental determination of excitonic dephasing times at different temperatures and exciton densities in III-nitride heterostructures. By comparing the evolution with the temperature of the dephasing and the spin-relaxation rate, we conclude that both processes are related to the rate of excitonic collisions. When spin relaxation occurs in the motional-narrowing regime, it remains constant over a large temperature range as the spin-precession frequency increases linearly with temperature, hence compensating for the observed decrease in the dephasing time. From those measurements, a value of the electron-hole exchange interaction strength of 0.45 meV at T =10 K is inferred.

  14. Relativistic Descriptions of Few-Body Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmanov, V. A.

    2011-01-01

    A brief review of relativistic effects in few-body systems, of theoretical approaches, recent developments and applications is given. Manifestations of relativistic effects in the binding energies, in the electromagnetic form factors and in three-body observables are demonstrated. The three-body forces of relativistic origin are also discussed. We conclude that relativistic effects in nuclei can be important in spite of small binding energy. At high momenta they clearly manifest themselves and are necessary to describe the deuteron e.m. form factors. At the same time, there is still a discrepancy in three-body observables which might be a result of less clarity in understanding the corresponding relativistic effects, the relativistic NN kernel and the three-body forces. Relativistic few-body physics remains to be a field of very intensive and fruitful researches. (author)

  15. Recent Experiments Involving Few-Nucleon Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornow, W.

    2014-08-01

    Recent experimental results are presented for reactions involving A = 3 to A = 6 nuclear systems. The emphasis is on unique data obtained at new experimental facilities. It is shown that the inertial confinement fusion facilities OMEGA and NIF provide a largely unexpected opportunity for experimental few-body physics to both obtain data of unprecedented quality and extend previous measurements to energies not accessible in the past. Whenever possible, data are compared to state-of-the-art theoretical calculations.

  16. Multihadron Production and a few other Topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haissinski, J.

    1988-09-01

    What follows is the written version of the concluding talk of the XIX th Symposium on Multiparticle Dynamics. It draws most of its material from the contributions to this Conference. A few questions related to the electroweak interaction are touched upon, but the emphasis is put on key issues of multihadron production. Some aspects of nucleus-nucleus collisions are also discussed, not only in this context, but also as a means of producing a quark-gluon plasma

  17. FAIR - from a few-body perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stöhlker Th.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In the next years the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR will be constructed at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. This new accelerator complex will allow for unprecedented and pathbreaking research in hadronic, nuclear, and atomic physics as well as in applied sciences. This manuscript will discuss some of these research opportunities, with a focus on few-body physics.

  18. Recent Experiments Involving Few-Nucleon Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tornow, W.

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental results are presented for reactions involving A = 3 to A = 6 nuclear systems. The emphasis is on unique data obtained at new experimental facilities. It is shown that the inertial confinement fusion facilities OMEGA and NIF provide a largely unexpected opportunity for experimental few-body physics to both obtain data of unprecedented quality and extend previous measurements to energies not accessible in the past. Whenever possible, data are compared to state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. (author)

  19. Spurious solutions in few-body equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.K.; Gloeckle, W.

    1979-01-01

    After Faddeev and Yakubovskii showed how to write connected few-body equations which are free from discrete spurious solutions various authors have proposed different connected few-body scattering equations. Federbush first pointed out that Weinberg's formulation admits the existence of discrete spurious solutions. In this paper we investigate the possibility and consequence of the existence of spurious solutions in some of the few-body formulations. Contrary to a proof by Hahn, Kouri, and Levin and by Bencze and Tandy the channel coupling array scheme of Kouri, Levin, and Tobocman which is also the starting point of a formulation by Hahn is shown to admit spurious solutions. We can show that the set of six coupled four-body equations proposed independently by Mitra, Gillespie, Sugar, and Panchapakesan, by Rosenberg, by Alessandrini, and by Takahashi and Mishima and the seven coupled four-body equations proposed by Sloan and related by matrix multipliers to basic sets which correspond uniquely to the Schroedinger equation. These multipliers are likely to give spurious solutions to these equations. In all these cases spuriosities are shown to have no hazardous consequence if one is interested in studying the scattering problem

  20. Characterization of few-layered graphene grown by carbon implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kin Kiong; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Jamieson, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene is considered to be a very promising material for applications in nanotechnology. The properties of graphene are strongly dependent on defects that occur during growth and processing. These defects can be either detrimental or beneficial to device performance depending on defect type, location and device application. Here we present experimental results on formation of few-layered graphene by carbon ion implantation into nickel films and characteristics of graphene devices formed by graphene transfer and lithographic patterning. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the number of graphene layers formed and identify defects arising from the device processing. The graphene films were cleaned by annealing in vacuum. Transport properties of cleaned graphene films were investigated by fabrication of back-gated field-effect transistors, which exhibited high hole and electron mobility of 1935 and 1905 cm2/Vs, respectively

  1. Characterization of few-layered graphene grown by carbon implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kin Kiong; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Jamieson, David N.

    2014-02-01

    Graphene is considered to be a very promising material for applications in nanotechnology. The properties of graphene are strongly dependent on defects that occur during growth and processing. These defects can be either detrimental or beneficial to device performance depending on defect type, location and device application. Here we present experimental results on formation of few-layered graphene by carbon ion implantation into nickel films and characteristics of graphene devices formed by graphene transfer and lithographic patterning. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the number of graphene layers formed and identify defects arising from the device processing. The graphene films were cleaned by annealing in vacuum. Transport properties of cleaned graphene films were investigated by fabrication of back-gated field-effect transistors, which exhibited high hole and electron mobility of 1935 and 1905 cm2/Vs, respectively.

  2. Electron scattering and few nucleon systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frois, B.

    1983-08-01

    Recent result obtained by electron scattering in the few-nucleon systems (A 3 He charge and magnetic form factors are discussed. New theoretical results indicate that three body forces improve considerably the saturation properties of 3 He, 4 He and nuclear matter, but are not able to reconcile experiment and theory for the charge form factors of 3 He and 4 He. Calculations of meson exchange effects with different theoretical approaches bring the theory into reasonable agreement with the experimental charge and magnetic form factor fo 3 He. Recent results of the measurements of the two and three body break-up of 3 He are discussed

  3. Physics of few-body λ hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, B.F.

    1987-01-01

    The energies of the particle-stable states in few-body Λ hypernuclei are summarized. Other topics reviewed include: the role of the hypertriton in determining the spin dependence of the ΛN force, the role of the hypertriton in three-body force investigations, the effect of medium modifications upon ΛN-ΣN coupling in the Λ-4 isodoublet and the spin dependence of the ΛN force, the importance of exact equation formalisms in interpreting precision data, and the need for a renewed effort to identify and measure the masses of ΛΛ hyperfragments. 40 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  4. SIMP spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochberg, Yonit [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kuflik, Eric [Department of Physics, LEPP, Cornell University,Ithaca NY 14853 (United States); Murayama, Hitoshi [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI),University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Center for Japanese Studies, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-16

    We study the interactions between strongly interacting massive particle dark matter and the Standard Model via a massive vector boson that is kinetically mixed with the hypercharge gauge boson. The relic abundance is set by 3→2 self-interactions of the dark matter, while the interactions with the vector mediator enable kinetic equilibrium between the dark and visible sectors. We show that a wide range of parameters is phenomenologically viable and can be probed in various ways. Astrophysical and cosmological constraints are evaded due to the p-wave nature of dark matter annihilation into visible particles, while direct detection methods using electron recoils can be sensitive to parts of the parameter space. In addition, we propose performing spectroscopy of the strongly coupled dark sector at e{sup +}e{sup −} colliders, where the energy of a mono-photon can track the resonance structure of the dark sector. Alternatively, some resonances may decay back into Standard Model leptons or jets, realizing ‘hidden valley’ phenomenology at the LHC and ILC in a concrete fashion.

  5. SIMP spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We study the interactions between strongly interacting massive particle dark matter and the Standard Model via a massive vector boson that is kinetically mixed with the hypercharge gauge boson. The relic abundance is set by 3→2 self-interactions of the dark matter, while the interactions with the vector mediator enable kinetic equilibrium between the dark and visible sectors. We show that a wide range of parameters is phenomenologically viable and can be probed in various ways. Astrophysical and cosmological constraints are evaded due to the p-wave nature of dark matter annihilation into visible particles, while direct detection methods using electron recoils can be sensitive to parts of the parameter space. In addition, we propose performing spectroscopy of the strongly coupled dark sector at e + e − colliders, where the energy of a mono-photon can track the resonance structure of the dark sector. Alternatively, some resonances may decay back into Standard Model leptons or jets, realizing ‘hidden valley’ phenomenology at the LHC and ILC in a concrete fashion.

  6. Quantum chromodynamics in few-nucleon systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1983-10-01

    One of the most important implications of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is that nuclear systems and forces can be described at a fundamental level. The theory provides natural explanations for the basic features of hadronic physics: the meson and baryon spectra, quark statistics, the structure of the weak and electromagnetic currents of hadrons, the scale-invariance of hadronic interactions at short distances, and evidently, color (i.e., quark and gluon) confinement at large distances. Many different and diverse tests have confirmed the basic predictions of QCD; however, since tests of quark and gluon interactions must be done within the confines of hadrons there have been few truly quantitative checks. Nevertheless, it appears likely that QCD is the fundamental theory of hadronic and nuclear interactions in the same sense that QED gives a precise description of electrodynamic interctions. Topics discussed include exclusive processes in QCD, the deuteron in QCD, reduced nuclear amplitudes, and limitations of traditional nuclear physics. 32 references

  7. Relativistic few quark dynamics for hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, A.N.

    1983-07-01

    A microscopic confinement approach is presented to a few quarks systems through an effective (harmonic) kernel inserted at the level of q-q-bar and q-q pairs, using the vehicle of the Bethe-Salpeter equation for each such system. The formalism, which is realistic for light quark systems (which require an intrinsically relativistic treatment), has been developed in a simple enough form so as to be applicable in practice to a large class of phenomena amenable to experimental test. The comparison over a wide range of hadronic properties (from mass spectra to current matrix elements), all within a single integrated framework, would seem to strongly support the ansatz of universality of the reduced spring constant (ω-tilde) which plays a role analogous to the bag radius, but at a far more microscopic level

  8. Few-body models for nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descouvemont, P., E-mail: pdesc@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucléaire Théorique et Physique Mathématique, C.P. 229, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Baye, D., E-mail: dbaye@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucléaire Théorique et Physique Mathématique, C.P. 229, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Physique Quantique, C.P. 165/82, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Suzuki, Y., E-mail: suzuki@nt.sc.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Aoyama, S., E-mail: aoyama@cc.niigata-u.ac.jp [Center for Academic Information Service, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Arai, K., E-mail: arai@nagaoka-ct.ac.jp [Division of General Education, Nagaoka National College of Technology, 888 Nishikatakai, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-8532 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    We present applications of microscopic models to nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest, and we essentially focus on few-body systems. The calculation of radiative-capture and transfer cross sections is outlined, and we discuss the corresponding reaction rates. Microscopic theories are briefly presented, and we emphasize on the matrix elements of four-body systems. The microscopic extension of the R-matrix theory to nuclear reactions is described. Applications to the {sup 2}H(d, γ){sup 4}He, {sup 2}H(d, p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d, n){sup 3}He reactions are presented. We show the importance of the tensor force to reproduce the low-energy behaviour of the cross sections.

  9. Defect Engineering in Few-Layer Phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ankur; Wen, Bo; Liu, Boqing; Myint, Ye Win; Zhang, Han; Lu, Yuerui

    2018-04-01

    Defect engineering in 2D phosphorene samples is becoming an important and powerful technique to alter their properties, enabling new optoelectronic applications, particularly at the infrared wavelength region. Defect engineering in a few-layer phosphorene sample via introduction of substrate trapping centers is realized. In a three-layer (3L) phosphorene sample, a strong photoluminescence (PL) emission peak from localized excitons at ≈1430 nm is observed, a much lower energy level than free excitonic emissions. An activation energy of ≈77 meV for the localized excitons is determined in temperature-dependent PL measurements. The relatively high activation energy supports the strong stability of the localized excitons even at elevated temperature. The quantum efficiency of localized exciton emission in 3L phosphorene is measured to be approximately three times higher than that of free excitons. These results could enable exciting applications in infrared optoelectronics. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Chemical waves in the O2 + H2 reaction on a Rh(111) surface alloyed with nickel. II. Photoelectron spectroscopy and microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinsky, Tim; Homann, Mathias; von Boehn, Bernhard; Gregoratti, Luca; Amati, Matteo; Al-Hada, Mohamed; Sezen, Hikmet; Imbihl, Ronald

    2018-04-01

    Chemical waves in the H2 + O2 reaction on a Rh(111) surface alloyed with Ni [ΘNi chemical attraction between O and Ni, has been explained with a phase separation of the oxygen covered Rh(111)/Ni surface into a 3D-Ni oxide and into a Ni poor metallic phase. Macroscopic NiO islands (≈1 μm size) formed under reaction conditions have been identified as 2D-Ni oxide. Titration experiments of the oxygen covered Rh(111)/Ni surface with H2 demonstrated that the reactivity of oxygen is decreased by an order of magnitude through the addition of 0.6 ML Ni. An excitation mechanism is proposed in which the periodic formation and reduction of NiO modulate the catalytic activity.

  11. Strong correlations in few-fermion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergschneider, Andrea

    2017-07-26

    In this thesis, I report on the deterministic preparation and the observation of strongly correlated few-fermion systems in single and double-well potentials. In a first experiment, we studied a system of one impurity interacting with a number of majority atoms which we prepared in a single potential well in the one-dimensional limit. With increasing number of majority particles, we observed a decrease in the quasi-particle residue which is in agreement with expectations from the Anderson orthogonality catastrophe. In a second experiment, we prepared two fermions in a double-well potential which represents the fundamental building block of the Fermi-Hubbard model. By increasing the repulsion between the two fermions, we observed the crossover into the antiferromagnetic Mott-insulator regime. Furthermore, I describe a new imaging technique, which allows spin-resolved single-atom detection both in in-situ and in time-of-flight. We use this technique to investigate the emergence of momentum correlations of two repulsive fermions in the ground state of the double well. With the methods developed in this thesis, we have established a framework for quantum simulation of strongly correlated many-body systems in tunable potentials.

  12. Development of wave length-dispersive soft x-ray emission spectrometers for transmission electron microscopes - an introduction of valence electron spectroscopy for transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terauchi, Masami; Koike, Masato; Fukushima, Kurio; Kimura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Two types of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray spectrometers, a high-dispersion type and a conventional one, for transmission electron microscopes were constructed. Those spectrometers were used to study the electronic states of valence electrons (bonding electrons). Both spectrometers extended the acceptable energy regions to higher than 2000 eV. The best energy resolution of 0.08 eV was obtained for an Al L-emission spectrum by using the high-dispersion type spectrometer. By using the spectrometer, C K-emission of carbon allotropes, Cu L-emission of Cu 1-x Zn x alloys and Pt M-emission spectra were presented. The FWHM value of 12 eV was obtained for the Pt Mα-emission peak. The performance of the conventional one was also presented for ZnS and a section specimen of a multilayer device. W-M and Si-K emissions were clearly resolved. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has an advantage for obtaining spectra from a single crystalline specimen with a defined crystal setting. As an example of anisotropic soft X-ray emission, C K-emission spectra of single crystalline graphite with different crystal settings were presented. From the spectra, density of states of π- and σ-bondings were separately derived. These results demonstrated a method to analyse the electronic states of valence electrons of materials in the nanometre scale based on TEM. (author)

  13. The automated sample preparation system MixMaster for investigation of volatile organic compounds with mid-infrared evanescent wave spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, F; Karlowatz, M; Jakusch, M; Mizaikoff, B

    2003-04-01

    For efficient development assessment, and calibration of new chemical analyzers a large number of independently prepared samples of target analytes is necessary. Whereas mixing units for gas analysis are readily available, there is a lack of instrumentation for accurate preparation of liquid samples containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Manual preparation of liquid samples containing VOCs at trace concentration levels is a particularly challenging and time consuming task. Furthermore, regularly scheduled calibration of sensors and analyzer systems demands for computer controlled automated sample preparation systems. In this paper we present a novel liquid mixing device enabling extensive measurement series with focus on volatile organic compounds, facilitating analysis of water polluted by traces of volatile hydrocarbons. After discussing the mixing system and control software, first results obtained by coupling with an FT-IR spectrometer are reported. Properties of the mixing system are assessed by mid-infrared attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy of methanol-acetone mixtures and by investigation of multicomponent samples containing volatile hydrocarbons such as 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene and tetrachloroethylene. Obtained ATR spectra are evaluated by principal component regression (PCR) algorithms. It is demonstrated that the presented sample mixing device provides reliable multicomponent mixtures with sufficient accuracy and reproducibility at trace concentration levels.

  14. High power and spectral purity continuous-wave photonic THz source tunable from 1 to 4.5 THz for nonlinear molecular spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, J.; Breunig, I.; Schunemann, P. G.; Buse, K.; Vodopyanov, K. L.

    2013-10-01

    We report a diffraction-limited photonic terahertz (THz) source with linewidth OP) gallium arsenide (GaAs) via intracavity frequency mixing between the two closely spaced resonating signal and idler waves of an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) operating near λ = 2 μm. The doubly resonant type II OPO is based on a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) pumped by a single-frequency Yb:YAG disc laser at 1030 nm. We take advantage of the enhancement of both optical fields inside a high-finesse OPO cavity: with 10 W of 1030 nm pump, 100 W of intracavity power near 2 μm was attained with GaAs inside cavity. This allows dramatic improvement in terms of generated THz power, as compared to the state-of-the art CW methods. We achieved >25 μW of single-frequency tunable CW THz output power scalable to >1 mW with proper choice of pump laser wavelength.

  15. Charge-density-wave partial gap opening in quasi-2D KMo 6O 17 purple bronze studied by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, M. A.; Avila, J.; Pantin, V.; Drouard, S.; Guyot, H.; Asensio, M. C.

    2006-05-01

    Low dimensional (LD) metallic oxides have been a subject of continuous interest in the last two decades, mainly due to the electronic instabilities that they present at low temperatures. In particular, charge density waves (CDW) instabilities associated with a strong electron-phonon interaction have been found in Molybdenum metallic oxides such as KMo 6O 17 purple bronze. We report an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study from room temperature (RT) to T ˜40 K well below the Peierls transition temperature for this material, with CDW transition temperature TCDW ˜120 K. We have focused on photoemission spectra along ΓM high symmetry direction as well as photoemission measurements were taken as a function of temperature at one representative kF point in the Brillouin zone in order to look for the characteristic gap opening after the phase transition. We found out a pseudogap opening and a decrease in the density of states near the Fermi energy, EF, consistent with the partial removal of the nested portions of the Fermi surface (FS) at temperature below the CDW transition. In order to elucidate possible Fermi liquid (FL) or non-Fermi liquid (NFL) behaviour we have compared the ARPES data with that one reported on quasi-1D K 0.3MoO 3 blue bronze.

  16. Charge-density-wave partial gap opening in quasi-2D KMo6O17 purple bronze studied by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valbuena, M.A.; Avila, J.; Pantin, V.; Drouard, S.; Guyot, H.; Asensio, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    Low dimensional (LD) metallic oxides have been a subject of continuous interest in the last two decades, mainly due to the electronic instabilities that they present at low temperatures. In particular, charge density waves (CDW) instabilities associated with a strong electron-phonon interaction have been found in Molybdenum metallic oxides such as KMo 6 O 17 purple bronze. We report an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study from room temperature (RT) to T ∼40 K well below the Peierls transition temperature for this material, with CDW transition temperature T CDW ∼120 K. We have focused on photoemission spectra along ΓM high symmetry direction as well as photoemission measurements were taken as a function of temperature at one representative k F point in the Brillouin zone in order to look for the characteristic gap opening after the phase transition. We found out a pseudogap opening and a decrease in the density of states near the Fermi energy, E F , consistent with the partial removal of the nested portions of the Fermi surface (FS) at temperature below the CDW transition. In order to elucidate possible Fermi liquid (FL) or non-Fermi liquid (NFL) behaviour we have compared the ARPES data with that one reported on quasi-1D K 0.3 MoO 3 blue bronze

  17. Charge-density-wave partial gap opening in quasi-2D KMo{sub 6}O{sub 17} purple bronze studied by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valbuena, M.A. [LURE, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, Bat. 209D, B.P. 34, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Avila, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM - CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin - B.P. 48, 91192 GIF-SUR-YVETTE Cedex (France); Pantin, V. [LURE, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, Bat. 209D, B.P. 34, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Drouard, S. [LEPES-CENES, B.P. 166x, 38042 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Guyot, H. [LEPES-CENES, B.P. 166x, 38042 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Asensio, M.C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM - CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain) and Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin - B.P. 48, 91192 GIF-SUR-YVETTE Cedex (France)]. E-mail: asensio@synchrotron-soleil.fr

    2006-05-30

    Low dimensional (LD) metallic oxides have been a subject of continuous interest in the last two decades, mainly due to the electronic instabilities that they present at low temperatures. In particular, charge density waves (CDW) instabilities associated with a strong electron-phonon interaction have been found in Molybdenum metallic oxides such as KMo{sub 6}O{sub 17} purple bronze. We report an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study from room temperature (RT) to T {approx}40 K well below the Peierls transition temperature for this material, with CDW transition temperature T {sub CDW} {approx}120 K. We have focused on photoemission spectra along {gamma}M high symmetry direction as well as photoemission measurements were taken as a function of temperature at one representative k {sub F} point in the Brillouin zone in order to look for the characteristic gap opening after the phase transition. We found out a pseudogap opening and a decrease in the density of states near the Fermi energy, E {sub F}, consistent with the partial removal of the nested portions of the Fermi surface (FS) at temperature below the CDW transition. In order to elucidate possible Fermi liquid (FL) or non-Fermi liquid (NFL) behaviour we have compared the ARPES data with that one reported on quasi-1D K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3} blue bronze.

  18. Monte Carlo wave-packet approach to trace nuclear dynamics in molecular excited states by XUV-pump-IR-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Qingli; Bello, Roger Y.; Martín, Fernando; Palacios, Alicia; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2018-04-01

    Recent research interests have been raised in uncovering and controlling ultrafast dynamics in excited neutral molecules. In this work we generalize the Monte Carlo wave packet (MCWP) approach to XUV-pump-IR-probe schemes to simulate the process of dissociative double ionization of H2 where singly excited states in H2 are involved. The XUV pulse is chosen to resonantly excite the initial ground state of H2 to the lowest excited electronic state of 1Σu + symmetry in H2 within the Franck-Condon region. The delayed intense IR pulse couples the excited states of 1Σu + symmetry with the nearby excited states of 1Σg + symmetry. It also induces the first ionization from H2 to H2 + and the second ionization from H2 + to H++H+. To reduce the computational costs in the MCWP approach, a sampling method is proposed to determine in time the dominant ionization events from H2 to H2+. By conducting a trajectory analysis, which is a unique possibility within the MCWP approach, the origins of the characteristic features in the nuclear kinetic energy release spectra are identified for delays ranging from 0 to 140 fs and the nuclear dynamics in the singly excited states in H2 is mapped out.

  19. Few quantum particles on one dimensional lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiente Cifuentes, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    There is currently a great interest in the physics of degenerate quantum gases and low-energy few-body scattering due to the recent experimental advances in manipulation of ultracold atoms by light. In particular, almost perfect periodic potentials, called optical lattices, can be generated. The lattice spacing is fixed by the wavelength of the laser field employed and the angle betwen the pair of laser beams; the lattice depth, defining the magnitude of the different band gaps, is tunable within a large interval of values. This flexibility permits the exploration of different regimes, ranging from the ''free-electron'' picture, modified by the effective mass for shallow optical lattices, to the tight-binding regime of a very deep periodic potential. In the latter case, effective single-band theories, widely used in condensed matter physics, can be implemented with unprecedent accuracy. The tunability of the lattice depth is nowadays complemented by the use of magnetic Feshbach resonances which, at very low temperatures, can vary the relevant atom-atom scattering properties at will. Moreover, optical lattices loaded with gases of effectively reduced dimensionality are experimentally accessible. This is especially important for one spatial dimension, since most of the exactly solvable models in many-body quantum mechanics deal with particles on a line; therefore, experiments with one-dimensional gases serve as a testing ground for many old and new theories which were regarded as purely academic not so long ago. The physics of few quantum particles on a one-dimensional lattice is the topic of this thesis. Most of the results are obtained in the tight-binding approximation, which is amenable to exact numerical or analytical treatment. For the two-body problem, theoretical methods for calculating the stationary scattering and bound states are developed. These are used to obtain, in closed form, the two-particle solutions of both the Hubbard and extended Hubbard models

  20. Few quantum particles on one dimensional lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valiente Cifuentes, Manuel

    2010-06-18

    There is currently a great interest in the physics of degenerate quantum gases and low-energy few-body scattering due to the recent experimental advances in manipulation of ultracold atoms by light. In particular, almost perfect periodic potentials, called optical lattices, can be generated. The lattice spacing is fixed by the wavelength of the laser field employed and the angle betwen the pair of laser beams; the lattice depth, defining the magnitude of the different band gaps, is tunable within a large interval of values. This flexibility permits the exploration of different regimes, ranging from the ''free-electron'' picture, modified by the effective mass for shallow optical lattices, to the tight-binding regime of a very deep periodic potential. In the latter case, effective single-band theories, widely used in condensed matter physics, can be implemented with unprecedent accuracy. The tunability of the lattice depth is nowadays complemented by the use of magnetic Feshbach resonances which, at very low temperatures, can vary the relevant atom-atom scattering properties at will. Moreover, optical lattices loaded with gases of effectively reduced dimensionality are experimentally accessible. This is especially important for one spatial dimension, since most of the exactly solvable models in many-body quantum mechanics deal with particles on a line; therefore, experiments with one-dimensional gases serve as a testing ground for many old and new theories which were regarded as purely academic not so long ago. The physics of few quantum particles on a one-dimensional lattice is the topic of this thesis. Most of the results are obtained in the tight-binding approximation, which is amenable to exact numerical or analytical treatment. For the two-body problem, theoretical methods for calculating the stationary scattering and bound states are developed. These are used to obtain, in closed form, the two-particle solutions of both the Hubbard and

  1. Renormalization in few body nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomio, L.; Biswas, R. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, UNESP, 01405-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Delfino, A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminenese, Niteroi (Brazil); Frederico, T. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, CTA 12228-900 Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil)

    2001-09-01

    Full text: Renormalized fixed-point Hamiltonians are formulated for systems described by interactions that originally contain point-like singularities (as the Dirac delta and/or its derivatives). The approach was developed considering a renormalization scheme for a few-nucleon interaction, that relies on a subtracted T-matrix equation. The fixed-point Hamiltonian contains the renormalized coefficients/operators that carry the physical information of the quantum mechanical system, as well as all the necessary counterterms that make finite the scattering amplitude. It is also behind the renormalization group invariance of quantum mechanics. The renormalization procedure, via subtracted kernel, was first applied to the one-pion-exchange potential supplemented by contact interactions. The singlet and triplet scattering lengths are given to fix the renormalized strengths of the contact interactions. Considering only one scaling parameter, the results that were obtained show an overall very good agreement with neutron-proton data, particularly for the observables related to the triplet channel. In this example, we noticed that the mixing parameter of the {sup 3}S{sub l} -{sup 3} D{sub 1} states is the most sensible observable related to the renormalization scale. The above approach, where the nonrelativistic scattering equation with singular interaction is renormalized through a subtraction procedure at a given energy scale, lead us to propose a scheme to formulate renormalized (fixed- point) Hamiltonians in quantum mechanics. We illustrate the numerical diagonalization of the regularized form of the fixed-point Hamiltonian for a two-body system with a Yukawa plus a Dirac-delta interaction. The eigenvalues for the system are shown to be stable in the infinite momentum cutoff. In another example, we also derive the explicit form of the renormalized potential for an example of four-term singular bare interaction. Application of this renormalization scheme to three

  2. Renormalization in few body nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomio, L.; Biswas, R.; Delfino, A.; Frederico, T.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Renormalized fixed-point Hamiltonians are formulated for systems described by interactions that originally contain point-like singularities (as the Dirac delta and/or its derivatives). The approach was developed considering a renormalization scheme for a few-nucleon interaction, that relies on a subtracted T-matrix equation. The fixed-point Hamiltonian contains the renormalized coefficients/operators that carry the physical information of the quantum mechanical system, as well as all the necessary counterterms that make finite the scattering amplitude. It is also behind the renormalization group invariance of quantum mechanics. The renormalization procedure, via subtracted kernel, was first applied to the one-pion-exchange potential supplemented by contact interactions. The singlet and triplet scattering lengths are given to fix the renormalized strengths of the contact interactions. Considering only one scaling parameter, the results that were obtained show an overall very good agreement with neutron-proton data, particularly for the observables related to the triplet channel. In this example, we noticed that the mixing parameter of the 3 S l - 3 D 1 states is the most sensible observable related to the renormalization scale. The above approach, where the nonrelativistic scattering equation with singular interaction is renormalized through a subtraction procedure at a given energy scale, lead us to propose a scheme to formulate renormalized (fixed- point) Hamiltonians in quantum mechanics. We illustrate the numerical diagonalization of the regularized form of the fixed-point Hamiltonian for a two-body system with a Yukawa plus a Dirac-delta interaction. The eigenvalues for the system are shown to be stable in the infinite momentum cutoff. In another example, we also derive the explicit form of the renormalized potential for an example of four-term singular bare interaction. Application of this renormalization scheme to three-body halo nuclei is also

  3. Measurement of fluorescence emission spectrum of few strongly driven atoms using an optical nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manoj; Shirasaki, A; Nayak, K P; Morinaga, M; Le Kien, Fam; Hakuta, K

    2010-08-02

    We show that the fluorescence emission spectrum of few atoms can be measured by using an optical nanofiber combined with the optical heterodyne and photon correlation spectroscopy. The observed fluorescence spectrum of the atoms near the nanofiber shows negligible effects of the atom-surface interaction and agrees well with the Mollow triplet spectrum of free-space atoms at high excitation intensity.

  4. Millimeter-wave spectroscopy of CrC (X(3)Σ(-)) and CrCCH (X̃ (6)Σ(+)): Examining the chromium-carbon bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, J; Ziurys, L M

    2016-05-14

    Pure rotational spectroscopy of the CrC (X(3)Σ(-)) and CrCCH (X̃ (6)Σ(+)) radicals has been conducted using millimeter/sub-millimeter direct absorption methods in the frequency range 225-585 GHz. These species were created in an AC discharge of Cr(CO)6 and either methane or acetylene, diluted in argon. Spectra of the CrCCD were also recorded for the first time using deuterated acetylene as the carbon precursor. Seven rotational transitions of CrC were measured, each consisting of three widely spaced, fine structure components, arising from spin-spin and spin-rotation interactions. Eleven rotational transitions were recorded for CrCCH and five for CrCCD; each transition in these cases was composed of a distinct fine structure sextet. These measurements confirm the respective (3)Σ(-) and (6)Σ(+) ground electronic states of these radicals, as indicated from optical studies. The data were analyzed using a Hund's case (b) Hamiltonian, and rotational, spin-spin, and spin-rotation constants have been accurately determined for all three species. The spectroscopic parameters for CrC were significantly revised from previous optical work, while those for CrCCH are in excellent agreement; completely new constants were established for CrCCD. The chromium-carbon bond length for CrC was calculated to be 1.631 Å, while that in CrCCH was found to be rCr-C = 1.993 Å - significantly longer. This result suggests that a single Cr-C bond is present in CrCCH, preserving the acetylenic structure of the ligand, while a triple bond exists in CrC. Analysis of the spin constants suggests that CrC has a nearby excited (1)Σ(+) state lying ∼16 900 cm(-1) higher in energy, and CrCCH has a (6)Π excited state with E ∼ 4800 cm(-1).

  5. Optical imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, David J

    2009-01-01

    An essential reference for optical sensor system design This is the first text to present an integrated view of the optical and mathematical analysis tools necessary to understand computational optical system design. It presents the foundations of computational optical sensor design with a focus entirely on digital imaging and spectroscopy. It systematically covers: Coded aperture and tomographic imaging Sampling and transformations in optical systems, including wavelets and generalized sampling techniques essential to digital system analysis Geometric, wave, and statis

  6. Molecular spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokh, Eh.; Zonntag, B.

    1981-01-01

    The latest investigation results on molecular spectroscopy with application of synchrotron radiation in the region of vacuum ultraviolet are generalized. Some results on investigation of excited, superexcited and ionized molecule states with the use of adsorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, by fluorescent and mass-spectrometric methods are considered [ru

  7. Atom spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodling, K.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on atom photoabsorption spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation in the 10-1000 eV range are reviewed. Properties of the necessary synchrotron radiation and the experiment on absorption spectroscopy are briefly described. Comparison with other spectroscopy methods is conducted. Some data on measuring photoabsorption, photoelectron emission and atom mass spectra are presented [ru

  8. Vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Rajai Atalla

    2010-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is an important tool in modern chemistry. In the past two decades, thanks to significant improvements in instrumentation and the development of new interpretive tools, it has become increasingly important for studies of lignin. This chapter presents the three important instrumental methods-Raman spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and...

  9. Submillimeter-wave and far-infrared spectroscopy of high-J transitions of the ground and ν2 = 1 states of ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shanshan; Pearson, John C; Drouin, Brian J; Sung, Keeyoon; Pirali, Olivier; Vervloet, Michel; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Endres, Christian P; Shiraishi, Tetsuro; Kobayashi, Kaori; Matsushima, Fusakazu

    2010-11-07

    Complete and reliable knowledge of the ammonia spectrum is needed to enable the analysis and interpretation of astrophysical and planetary observations. Ammonia has been observed in the interstellar medium up to J=18 and more highly excited transitions are expected to appear in hot exoplanets and brown dwarfs. As a result, there is considerable interest in observing and assigning the high J (rovibrational) spectrum. In this work, numerous spectroscopic techniques were employed to study its high J transitions in the ground and ν(2)=1 states. Measurements were carried out using a frequency multiplied submillimeter spectrometer at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), a tunable far-infrared spectrometer at University of Toyama, and a high-resolution Bruker IFS 125 Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at Synchrotron SOLEIL. Highly excited ammonia was created with a radiofrequency discharge and a dc discharge, which allowed assignments of transitions with J up to 35. One hundred and seventy seven ground state and ν(2)=1 inversion transitions were observed with microwave accuracy in the 0.3-4.7 THz region. Of these, 125 were observed for the first time, including 26 ΔK=3 transitions. Over 2000 far-infrared transitions were assigned to the ground state and ν(2)=1 inversion bands as well as the ν(2) fundamental band. Of these, 1912 were assigned using the FTS data for the first time, including 222 ΔK=3 transitions. The accuracy of these measurements has been estimated to be 0.0003-0.0006 cm(-1). A reduced root mean square error of 0.9 was obtained for a global fit of the ground and ν(2)=1 states, which includes the lines assigned in this work and all previously available microwave, terahertz, far-infrared, and mid-infrared data. The new measurements and predictions reported here will support the analyses of astronomical observations by high-resolution spectroscopy telescopes such as Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA. The comprehensive experimental rovibrational energy levels

  10. Terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation I will review methods for spectroscopy in the THz range, with special emphasis on the practical implementation of the technique known ad THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). THz-TDS has revived the old field of far-infrared spectroscopy, and enabled a wealth of new...... activities that promise commercial potential for spectroscopic applications in the THz range. This will be illustrated with examples of spectroscopy of liquids inside their bottles as well as sensitive, quantitative spectroscopy in waveguides....

  11. PAH features within few hundred parsecs of active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J. J.; Hönig, S. F.; Rakshit, S.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Asmus, D.; Gandhi, P.; Kishimoto, M.; Smette, A.; Tristram, K. R. W.

    2017-09-01

    Spectral features from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules observed in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) range are typically used to infer the amount of recent and ongoing star formation on kiloparsec scales around active galactic nuclei (AGN) where more traditional methods fail. This method assumes that the observed PAH features are excited predominantly by star formation. With current ground-based telescopes and the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope, much smaller spatial scales can be probed and we aim at testing if this assumption still holds in the range of few tens to few hundreds of parsecs. For that, we spatially map the emitted 11.3 μm PAH surface flux as a function of distance from 0.4-4 arcsec from the centre in 28 nearby AGN using ground-based high-angular-resolution mid-IR spectroscopy. We detect and extract the 11.3 μm PAH feature in 13 AGN. The fluxes within each aperture are scaled to a luminosity-normalized distance from the nucleus to be able to compare intrinsic spatial scales of AGN radiation spanning about two orders of magnitude in luminosity. For this, we establish an empirical relation between the absorption-corrected X-ray luminosity and the sublimation radius in these sources. Once normalized, the radial profiles of the emitted PAH surface flux show similar radial slopes, with a power-law index of approximately -1.1, and similar absolute values, consistent within a factor of a few of each other as expected from the uncertainty in the intrinsic scale estimate. We interpret this as evidence that the profiles are caused by a common compact central physical process, either the AGN itself or circumnuclear star formation linked in strength to the AGN power. A photoionization-based model of an AGN exciting dense clouds in its environment can reproduce the observed radial slope and confirms that the AGN radiation field is strong enough to explain the observed PAH surface fluxes within ∼10-500 pc of the nucleus. Our results advice caution

  12. Parsimonious Surface Wave Interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2017-10-24

    To decrease the recording time of a 2D seismic survey from a few days to one hour or less, we present a parsimonious surface-wave interferometry method. Interferometry allows for the creation of a large number of virtual shot gathers from just two reciprocal shot gathers by crosscoherence of trace pairs, where the virtual surface waves can be inverted for the S-wave velocity model by wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD). Synthetic and field data tests suggest that parsimonious wave-equation dispersion inversion (PWD) gives S-velocity tomograms that are comparable to those obtained from a full survey with a shot at each receiver. The limitation of PWD is that the virtual data lose some information so that the resolution of the S-velocity tomogram can be modestly lower than that of the S-velocity tomogram inverted from a conventional survey.

  13. Parsimonious Surface Wave Interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing; Hanafy, Sherif; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-01-01

    To decrease the recording time of a 2D seismic survey from a few days to one hour or less, we present a parsimonious surface-wave interferometry method. Interferometry allows for the creation of a large number of virtual shot gathers from just two reciprocal shot gathers by crosscoherence of trace pairs, where the virtual surface waves can be inverted for the S-wave velocity model by wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD). Synthetic and field data tests suggest that parsimonious wave-equation dispersion inversion (PWD) gives S-velocity tomograms that are comparable to those obtained from a full survey with a shot at each receiver. The limitation of PWD is that the virtual data lose some information so that the resolution of the S-velocity tomogram can be modestly lower than that of the S-velocity tomogram inverted from a conventional survey.

  14. Raman Spectroscopy as a Tool to Address Individual Graphene Layers in Few-Layer Graphene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Kong, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 35 (2012), s. 19046-19050 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400911; GA MŠk ME09060; GA ČR GAP204/10/1677; GA ČR(CZ) GAP208/12/1062 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : chemical vapor deposition * transistor * films Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 4.814, year: 2012

  15. Modern spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hollas, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The latest edition of this highly acclaimed title introduces the reader to a wide range of spectroscopies, and includes both the background theory and applications to structure determination and chemical analysis.  It covers rotational, vibrational, electronic, photoelectron and Auger spectroscopy, as well as EXAFs and the theory of lasers and laser spectroscopy. A  revised and updated edition of a successful, clearly written book Includes the latest developments in modern laser techniques, such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy and femtosecond lasers Provides numerous worked examples, calculations and questions at the end of chapters.

  16. Numerical investigation of freak waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalikov, D.

    2009-04-01

    Paper describes the results of more than 4,000 long-term (up to thousands of peak-wave periods) numerical simulations of nonlinear gravity surface waves performed for investigation of properties and estimation of statistics of extreme (‘freak') waves. The method of solution of 2-D potential wave's equations based on conformal mapping is applied to the simulation of wave behavior assigned by different initial conditions, defined by JONSWAP and Pierson-Moskowitz spectra. It is shown that nonlinear wave evolution sometimes results in appearance of very big waves. The shape of freak waves varies within a wide range: some of them are sharp-crested, others are asymmetric, with a strong forward inclination. Some of them can be very big, but not steep enough to create dangerous conditions for vessels (but not for fixed objects). Initial generation of extreme waves can occur merely as a result of group effects, but in some cases the largest wave suddenly starts to grow. The growth is followed sometimes by strong concentration of wave energy around a peak vertical. It is taking place in the course of a few peak wave periods. The process starts with an individual wave in a physical space without significant exchange of energy with surrounding waves. Sometimes, a crest-to-trough wave height can be as large as nearly three significant wave heights. On the average, only one third of all freak waves come to breaking, creating extreme conditions, however, if a wave height approaches the value of three significant wave heights, all of the freak waves break. The most surprising result was discovery that probability of non-dimensional freak waves (normalized by significant wave height) is actually independent of density of wave energy. It does not mean that statistics of extreme waves does not depend on wave energy. It just proves that normalization of wave heights by significant wave height is so effective, that statistics of non-dimensional extreme waves tends to be independent

  17. Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    The past decade has seen several major technology advances in electronics operating at microwave frequencies making it possible to develop a new generation of spectrometers for molecular rotational spectroscopy. High-speed digital electronics, both arbitrary waveform generators and digitizers, continue on a Moore's Law-like development cycle that started around 1993 with device bandwidth doubling about every 36 months. These enabling technologies were the key to designing chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometers which offer significant sensitivity enhancements for broadband spectrum acquisition in molecular rotational spectroscopy. A special feature of the chirped-pulse spectrometer design is that it is easily implemented at low frequency (below 8 GHz) where Balle-Flygare type spectrometers with Fabry-Perot cavity designs become technologically challenging due to the mirror size requirements. The capabilities of CP-FTMW spectrometers for studies of molecular structure will be illustrated by the collaborative research effort we have been a part of to determine the structures of water clusters - a project which has identified clusters up to the pentadecamer. A second technology trend that impacts molecular rotational spectroscopy is the development of high power, solid state sources in the mm-wave/THz regions. Results from the field of mm-wave chirped-pulse Fourier transform spectroscopy will be described with an emphasis on new problems in chemical dynamics and analytical chemistry that these methods can tackle. The third (and potentially most important) technological trend is the reduction of microwave components to chip level using monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) - a technology driven by an enormous mass market in communications. Some recent advances in rotational spectrometer designs that incorporate low-cost components will be highlighted. The challenge to the high-resolution spectroscopy community - as posed by Frank De

  18. Proceedings of the meeting on few-body problems in high and medium energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, T.

    1985-12-01

    The study meeting on few-body problems in high and medium energy physics was held from October 3 to 5, 1985, at National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. Two meetings were held already concerning few body physics, but most of the participants were theorists. In this meeting, high priority was put on the attendance of experimental physicists. As a bridge between particle and nuclear physics, the few body physics in an intermediate energy region has become important recently. The topics in this meeting were meson spectroscopy, baryonium, kaon physics, muonic fusion, dibaryon, φNN system, quarks and skyrmions, NN correlation, and symmetry test in few-body system. The gists of the papers presented are collected in this book. (Kako, I.)

  19. An ultrahigh pressure homogenization technique for easily exfoliating few-layer phosphorene from bulk black phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Qing-Qing; Zhou, Hua-Jing; Ning, Ping; Lian, Pei-Chao; Wang, Bo; He, Liang; Chai, Xin-Sheng

    2018-05-01

    We have developed an easy and efficient method for exfoliating few-layer sheets of black phosphorus (BP) in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, using ultra-high pressure homogenization (UPH). The BP was first exfoliated into sheets that were a few atomic layers thick, using a homogenizer for only 30 min. Next, a double centrifugation procedure was used to separate the material into few-layer nanosheets that were examined by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The results show that the products are specimens of phosphorene that are only a few-layer thick.

  20. Direct synthesis of few-layer graphene supported platinum nanocatalyst for methanol oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hong; Ma, Xiaohui; Sheng, Leimei; An, Kang; Yu, Liming; Zhao, Hongbin; Xu, Jiaqiang; Ren, Wei; Zhao, Xinluo

    2014-11-01

    High-crystalline few-layer graphene supported Pt nanoparticles have been synthesized by arc discharge evaporation of carbon electrodes containing Pt element. A high-temperature treatment under hydrogen atmosphere has been carried out to obtain a new type of Pt/graphene catalyst for methanol oxidation in direct methanol fuel cell. The morphology and structure characterizations of as-grown few-layer graphene supported Pt nanoparticles and Pt/graphene catalysts have been studied by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Cyclic voltammograms and chronoamperometric curves show that our present Pt/graphene catalysts have larger current density for methanol oxidation, higher tolerance to carbon monoxide poisoning, and better stability during the operating procedure, compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts.

  1. Calculation of electromagnetic observables in few-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, B.F.

    1986-10-01

    An introduction to the calculation of electromagnetic observables in few-body systems is given by studying two examples in the trinucleon system: (1) the elastic electron scattering charge form factor in configuration space and momentum space and (2) the two-body photodisintegration of 3 H leading to a neutron-deuteron final state in a separable potential formalism. In the discussion of charge form factor calculations, a number of related topics are touched upon: the relation of structure in Psi to the properties of simple NN forces, the Faddeev and Schroedinger solution to the harmonic oscillator problem, the Rosenbluth formula for electron scattering from a spin-1/2 nuclear target (e.g., the proton or 3 H), and the charge density operator. Formulae for 3 He and 3 H charge form factors in a central force approximation are given in configuration and momentum space. The physics of these form factors is discussed in light of results from realistic nucleon-nucleon potential model calculations, including the effects of two-pion-exchange three-body force models. Topics covered are the rms charge densities, and the Coulomb energy of 3 He. In the discussion of the 3 H photodisintegration, the Siegert form of the electric dipole operator (in the long wave length limit) is derived as are the separable potential equations which describe the off-shell transition amplitudes which connect nucleon-plus-corrected-pair states. Expressions for the Born amplitudes required to complete the two-body photodisintegration amplitude calculation are given. Numerical results for a model central force problem are discussed and compared with an approximate calculation. Comparisons with 3 H(γ,n)d and 3 He(γ,p)d data are made, and the significant features of the exact theoretical calculation are outlined. 61 refs., 26 figs

  2. Cancer nanomedicines: so many papers and so few drugs!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditto, Vincent J; Szoka, Francis C

    2013-01-01

    This review identifies a timeline to nanomedicine anticancer drug approval using the business model of inventors, innovators and imitators. By evaluating the publication record of nanomedicine cancer therapeutics we identified a trend of very few publications prior to FDA approval. We first enumerated the publications related to cancer involving polymers, liposomes or monoclonal antibodies and determined the number of citations per publication as well as the number of published clinical trials among the publications. Combining these data with the development of specific nanomedicines, we are able to identify an invention phase consisting of seminal papers in basic science necessary for the development of a specific nanomedicine. The innovation phase includes the first report, the development and the clinical trials involving that nanomedicine. Finally, the imitation phase begins after approval when others ride the wave of success by using the same formulation for new drugs or using the same drug to validate other nanomedicines. We then focused our analysis on nanomedicines containing camptothecin derivatives, which are not yet approved including two polymers considered innovations and one liposomal formulation in the imitation phase. The conclusion that may be drawn from the analysis of the camptothecins is that approved drugs reformulated in polymeric and liposomal cancer nanomedicines have a more difficult time navigating through the approval process than the parent molecule. This is probably due to the fact that for most currently approved drugs, reformulating them in a nanocarrier provides a small increase in performance that large pharmaceutical companies do not consider being worth the time, effort and expense of development. It also appears that drug carriers have a more difficult path through the clinic than monoclonal antibodies. The added complexity of nanocarriers also deters their use to deliver new molecular entities. Thus, the new drug candidates that

  3. (e,2e) Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, I.E.; Weigold, E.

    1976-01-01

    We present a detailed treatment of the theoretical and experimental aspects of the symmetric (e,2e) reaction in atoms, molecules and solids. Two experimental arrangements are described for measuring angular correlations and separation energy spectra, the one arrangement employing coplanar and the other noncoplanar symmetric kinematics. The latter arrangement is shown to be particularly suitable for extracting structure information. The basic approximation, the factorized distorted-wave off-shell impulse approximation with fully distorted waves, is shown to correctly describe the reaction in some test cases, as does the phase distortion approximation. At energies of the order of 1200 eV the simple eikonal and plane wave approximations adequately describe the valence shell cross sections for light atoms and molecules containing first row elements. Energy independent structure information is obtained on: (a) shapes and magnitudes of the square of the momentum space wave functions for individual electron orbitals; (b) separation energies for individual ion eigenstates; (c) the characteristic orbital of each state; and (d) spectroscopic factors describing the probability that an eigenstate contains the principal configuration of a hole in the characteristic orbital for each eigenstate. Comparison is made with photoelectron spectroscopy and Compton scattering, since they separately yield some of the information obtained by the (e,2e) method. A brief summary is given of other electron-electron coincidence experiments. (author)

  4. Laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letokhov, V.S.

    1981-01-01

    This article describes recent progress in the application of laser atomic spectroscopy to study parameters of nuclei available in very small quantities; radioactive nuclei, rare isotopes, nuclear isomers, etc, for which study by conventional spectroscopic methods is difficult. (author)

  5. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses the foundati......Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  6. Comparison of Electronic Structure and Magnetic Properties of Few Layer Graphene and Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekhar Chandra Ray

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study has been made for the non-catalyst based few layer graphene (FLG and Fe-catalyst based multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. Magnetic and electronic properties of FLG and MWCNTs were studied using magnetic M-H hysteresis loops and synchrotron radiation based X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy measurements. Structural defects and electronic and bonding properties of FLG/MWCNTs have been studied using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS. The work functions of FLG and MWCNTs are 4.01 eV and 3.79 eV, respectively, obtained from UPS (He-I spectra. UPS (He-II results suggest that the density of states (DOS of MWCNTs is higher than FLG and is consistent with Raman spectroscopy result that shows the defect of MWCNTs is higher than FLG. The magnetic coercivity (Hc of the MWCNTs (~750 Oe is higher than FLG (~85 Oe which could be used for various technological magnetic applications.

  7. Plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, DG

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Waves discusses the basic development and equations for the many aspects of plasma waves. The book is organized into two major parts, examining both linear and nonlinear plasma waves in the eight chapters it encompasses. After briefly discussing the properties and applications of plasma wave, the book goes on examining the wave types in a cold, magnetized plasma and the general forms of the dispersion relation that characterize the waves and label the various types of solutions. Chapters 3 and 4 analyze the acoustic phenomena through the fluid model of plasma and the kinetic effects. Th

  8. ULF waves in the foreshock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstadt, E. W.; Le, G.; Strangeway, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    We review our current knowledge of ULF waves in planetary foreshocks. Most of this knowledge comes from observations taken within a few Earth radii of the terrestrial bow shock. Terrestrial foreshock ULF waves can be divided into three types, large amplitude low frequency waves (approximately 30-s period), upstream propagating whistlers (1-Hz waves), and 3-s waves. The 30-s waves are apparently generated by back-streaming ion beams, while the 1-Hz waves are generated at the bow shock. The source of the 3-s waves has yet to be determined. In addition to issues concerning the source of ULF waves in the foreshock, the waves present a number of challenges, both in terms of data acquisition, and comparison with theory. The various waves have different coherence scales, from approximately 100 km to approximately 1 Earth radius. Thus multi-spacecraft separation strategies must be tailored to the phenomenon of interest. From a theoretical point of view, the ULF waves are observed in a plasma in which the thermal pressure is comparable to the magnetic pressure, and the rest-frame wave frequency can be moderate fraction of the proton gyro-frequency. This requires the use of kinetic plasma wave dispersion relations, rather than multi-fluid MHD. Lastly, and perhaps most significantly, ULF waves are used to probe the ambient plasma, with inferences being drawn concerning the types of energetic ion distributions within the foreshock. However, since most of the data were acquired close to the bow shock, the properties of the more distant foreshock have to be deduced mainly through extrapolation of the near-shock results. A general understanding of the wave and plasma populations within the foreshock, their interrelation, and evolution, requires additional data from the more distant foreshock.

  9. Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and spasms due ... that the body is having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - ...

  10. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  11. Shaping of few-cycle laser pulses via a subwavelength structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Liang; Xie Xiao-Tao; Zhan Zhi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the propagation of few-cycle laser pulses in resonant two-level dense media with a subwavelength structure, which is described by the full Maxwell—Bloch equations without the frame of slowly varying envelope and rotating wave approximations. The input pulses can be shaped into shorter ones with a single or less than one optical cycle. The effect of the parameters of the subwavelength structure and laser pulses is studied. Our study shows that the media with a subwavelength structure can significantly shape the few-cycle pulses into a subcycle pulse, even for the case of chirp pulses as input fields. This suggests that such subwavelength structures have potential application in the shaping of few-cycle laser pulses. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  12. Gravitational Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Jonah Maxwell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-18

    This report has slides on Gravitational Waves; Pound and Rebka: A Shocking Fact; Light is a Ruler; Gravity is the Curvature of Spacetime; Gravitational Waves Made Simple; How a Gravitational Wave Affects Stuff Here; LIGO; This Detection: Neutron Stars; What the Gravitational Wave Looks Like; The Sound of Merging Neutron Stars; Neutron Star Mergers: More than GWs; The Radioactive Cloud; The Kilonova; and finally Summary, Multimessenger Astronomy.

  13. Visible spectroscopy on ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, J.V.

    1991-12-01

    In this report visible spectroscopy and impurity investigations on ASDEX are reviewed and several sets of visible spectra are presented. As a basis for identification of metallic impurity lines during plasma discharges spectra from a stainless steel - Cu arc have been recorded. In a next step a spectrum overview of ASDEX discharges is shown which reveals the dominating role of lines from light impurities like carbon and oxygen throughout the UV and visible range (2000 A ≤ λ ≤ 8000 A). Metallic impurity lines of neutrals or single ionized atoms are observed near localized surfaces. The dramatic effect of impurity reduction by boronization of the vessel walls is demonstrated in a few examples. In extension to some ivesti-gations already published, further diagnostic applications of visible spectroscopy are presented. Finally, the hardware and software system used on ASDEX are described in detail. (orig.)

  14. Towards laser spectroscopy of antihydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walz, J.; Pahl, A.; Eikema, K.S.E.; Hansch, T.W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of the first continuous coherent source at 121.56 nm is described. Radiation at this wavelength of Lyman-alpha can be used for laser-cooling of antihydrogen on the strong 1S-2P transition. It also opens up a possibility for precision spectroscopy that requires just a few antihydrogen

  15. Wave phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Towne, Dudley H

    1988-01-01

    This excellent undergraduate-level text emphasizes optics and acoustics, covering inductive derivation of the equation for transverse waves on a string, acoustic plane waves, boundary-value problems, polarization, three-dimensional waves and more. With numerous problems (solutions for about half). ""The material is superbly chosen and brilliantly written"" - Physics Today. Problems. Appendices.

  16. Electromagnetic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book is dedicated to various aspects of electromagnetic wave theory and its applications in science and technology. The covered topics include the fundamental physics of electromagnetic waves, theory of electromagnetic wave propagation and scattering, methods of computational analysis......, material characterization, electromagnetic properties of plasma, analysis and applications of periodic structures and waveguide components, etc....

  17. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter; Sørensen, H. C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper concerns with the development of the wave energy converter (WEC) Wave Dragon. This WEC is based on the overtopping principle. An overview of the performed research done concerning the Wave Dragon over the past years is given, and the results of one of the more comprehensive studies, co...

  18. Optical Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling

    The work presented in this thesis is broadly concerned with how complexation reactions and molecular motion can be characterized with the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy. The thesis aims to show a relatively broad range of methods for probing physico-chemical properties in fluorophore...... information about chemical equilibria, kinetics and molecular motion by monitoring changes in optical properties of the system. The five presented research projects are largely unrelated to each other both in aim and in what property is probed, however they are all connected in that they are fluorophore...... reactions by optical spectroscopy. In project 1 simple steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy is used to determine the stoichiometries and equilibrium constants in the inclusion complex formation between cyclodextrins and derivatives of the water-insoluble oligo(phenylene vinylene) in aqueous...

  19. Efficient scattering of electrons below few keV by Time Domain Structures around injection fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasko, I.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F.; Artemyev, A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2016-12-01

    Van Allen Probes observations show an abundance of non-linear large-amplitude electrostatic spikes around injection fronts in the outer radiation belt. These spikes referred to as Time Domain Structures (TDS) include electron holes, double layers and more complicated solitary waves. The electron scattering driven by TDS may not be evaluated via the standard quasi-linear theory, since TDS are in principle non-linear plasma modes. In this paper we analyze the scattering of electrons by three-dimensional TDS (with non-negligible perpendicular electric field) around injection fronts. We derive the analytical formulas describing the local scattering by single TDS and show that the most efficiently scattered electrons are those in the first cyclotron resonance (electrons crossing TDS on a time scale comparable with their gyroperiod). The analytical formulas are verified via the test-particle simulation. We compute the bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients and demonstrate their dependence on the TDS spatial distribution, individual TDS parameters and L shell. We show that TDS are able to provide the pitch-angle scattering of <5 keV electrons at rate 10-2-10-4 s-1 and, thus, can be responsible for driving loss of electrons out of injections fronts on a time scale from few minutes to few hours. TDS can be, thus, responsible for driving diffuse aurora precipitations conjugated to injection fronts. We show that the pitch-angle scattering rates driven by TDS are comparable with those due to chorus waves and exceed those due to electron cyclotron harmonics. For injections fronts with no significant wave activity in the frequency range corresponding to chorus waves, TDS can be even dominant mechanism for losses of below few keV electrons.

  20. Optogalvanic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pianarosa, P.; Demers, Y.; Gagne, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Laser induced optogalvanic spectroscopy in a hollow cathode-produced plasma has been used to resolve the isotopic structure of some absorption lines in uranium. We have shown that the optogalvanic signal associated with any isotope can be related to the concentration of that isotope in a multi-isotopic sample. From the results we have obtained, optogalvanic spectroscopy of sputtered samples appears to be an interesting approach to the isotopic analysis of both natural and enriched uranium and could easily be applied to the analysis of other fissile elements, such as the plutonium isotopes

  1. Photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, W.C.

    1974-01-01

    A survey is given of the development of x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Applications of photoelectron spectroscopy to studies of atomic electronic configurations are discussed, including photoelectron spectra of hydrides isoelectronic with the inert gases; photoelectron spectra of the halogen derivatives of methane; photoelectron spectra of multiple bonded diatomic molecules; spectra and structure of some multiple bonded polyatomic molecules; spectra and structure of triatomic molecules; and methods of orbital assignment of bands in photoelectron spectra. Physical aspects are considered, including intensities; selection rules; dependence of cross section on photoelectron energy; autoionization; angular distribution of photoelectrons; electron-molecule interactions; and transient species. (26 figures, 54 references) (U.S.)

  2. Statistical nuclear spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parikh, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of nuclear spectroscopy is to study properties of nuclear energy levels and transitions (electromagnetic, particle transfer, etc.) between these levels. Traditionally, the properties that involve a single level or a few levels have theoretically been investigated using models e.g. shell model, self-consistent field approximation, collective model (RPA, Generator Coordinate) and so on. Basically from these models, one obtains eigenvalues and eigenfunctions (or expectation values and transfer strengths) which can be compared with data. The choice of the model depends upon the properties that one wants to examine and the usefulness of the model depends upon its ability to explain observations and make predictions

  3. Propagation of nonlinear ion acoustic wave with generation of long-wavelength waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsawa, Yukiharu; Kamimura, Tetsuo

    1978-01-01

    The nonlinear propagation of the wave packet of an ion acoustic wave with wavenumber k 0 asymptotically equals k sub(De) (the electron Debye wavenumber) is investigated by computer simulations. From the wave packet of the ion acoustic wave, waves with long wavelengths are observed to be produced within a few periods for the amplitude oscillation of the original wave packet. These waves are generated in the region where the original wave packet exists. Their characteristic wavelength is of the order of the length of the wave packet, and their propagation velocity is almost equal to the ion acoustic speed. The long-wavelength waves thus produced strongly affect the nonlinear evolution of the original wave packet. (auth.)

  4. Calcium waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Lionel F

    2008-04-12

    Waves through living systems are best characterized by their speeds at 20 degrees C. These speeds vary from those of calcium action potentials to those of ultraslow ones which move at 1-10 and/or 10-20 nm s(-1). All such waves are known or inferred to be calcium waves. The two classes of calcium waves which include ones with important morphogenetic effects are slow waves that move at 0.2-2 microm s(-1) and ultraslow ones. Both may be propagated by cycles in which the entry of calcium through the plasma membrane induces subsurface contraction. This contraction opens nearby stretch-sensitive calcium channels. Calcium entry through these channels propagates the calcium wave. Many slow waves are seen as waves of indentation. Some are considered to act via cellular peristalsis; for example, those which seem to drive the germ plasm to the vegetal pole of the Xenopus egg. Other good examples of morphogenetic slow waves are ones through fertilizing maize eggs, through developing barnacle eggs and through axolotl embryos during neural induction. Good examples of ultraslow morphogenetic waves are ones during inversion in developing Volvox embryos and across developing Drosophila eye discs. Morphogenetic waves may be best pursued by imaging their calcium with aequorins.

  5. Models of few optical cycle solitons beyond the slowly varying envelope approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblond, H.; Mihalache, D.

    2013-01-01

    In the past years there was a huge interest in experimental and theoretical studies in the area of few-optical-cycle pulses and in the broader fast growing field of the so-called extreme nonlinear optics. This review concentrates on theoretical studies performed in the past decade concerning the description of few optical cycle solitons beyond the slowly varying envelope approximation (SVEA). Here we systematically use the powerful reductive expansion method (alias multiscale analysis) in order to derive simple integrable and nonintegrable evolution models describing both nonlinear wave propagation and interaction of ultrashort (femtosecond) pulses. To this aim we perform the multiple scale analysis on the Maxwell–Bloch equations and the corresponding Schrödinger–von Neumann equation for the density matrix of two-level atoms. We analyze in detail both long-wave and short-wave propagation models. The propagation of ultrashort few-optical-cycle solitons in quadratic and cubic nonlinear media are adequately described by generic integrable and nonintegrable nonlinear evolution equations such as the Korteweg–de Vries equation, the modified Korteweg–de Vries equation, the complex modified Korteweg–de Vries equation, the sine–Gordon equation, the cubic generalized Kadomtsev–Petviashvili equation, and the two-dimensional sine–Gordon equation. Moreover, we consider the propagation of few-cycle optical solitons in both (1+1)- and (2+1)-dimensional physical settings. A generalized modified Korteweg–de Vries equation is introduced in order to describe robust few-optical-cycle dissipative solitons. We investigate in detail the existence and robustness of both linearly polarized and circularly polarized few-cycle solitons, that is, we also take into account the effect of the vectorial nature of the electric field. Some of these results concerning the systematic use of the reductive expansion method beyond the SVEA can be relatively easily extended to few

  6. Wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarenko, Sergey [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Mathematics Inst.

    2011-07-01

    Wave Turbulence refers to the statistical theory of weakly nonlinear dispersive waves. There is a wide and growing spectrum of physical applications, ranging from sea waves, to plasma waves, to superfluid turbulence, to nonlinear optics and Bose-Einstein condensates. Beyond the fundamentals the book thus also covers new developments such as the interaction of random waves with coherent structures (vortices, solitons, wave breaks), inverse cascades leading to condensation and the transitions between weak and strong turbulence, turbulence intermittency as well as finite system size effects, such as ''frozen'' turbulence, discrete wave resonances and avalanche-type energy cascades. This book is an outgrow of several lectures courses held by the author and, as a result, written and structured rather as a graduate text than a monograph, with many exercises and solutions offered along the way. The present compact description primarily addresses students and non-specialist researchers wishing to enter and work in this field. (orig.)

  7. Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman spectroscopy has gained increased use and importance in recent years for accurate and precise detection of physical and chemical properties of food materials, due to the greater specificity and sensitivity of Raman techniques over other analytical techniques. This book chapter presents Raman s...

  8. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen, Beate; Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    causes relaxation processes with characteristic contributions to the frequency-dependent complex dielectric constant. These dipolar relaxations were initially described by Debye (Polare Molekeln 1929). They are the basis of impedance spectroscopy (K’Owino and Sadik Electroanalysis 17(23):2101–2113, 2005...

  9. Electron momentum spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, I.E.

    1986-03-01

    For electron energies greater than a few hundred eV and recoil momenta less than a few atomic units, the differential cross section for the non-coplanar symmetric (e,2e) reaction on an atom or molecule depends on the target and ion structure only through the target-ion overlap. Experimental criteria for the energy and momentum are that the apparent structure information does not change when the energy and momentum are varied. The plane-wave impulse approximation is a sufficient description of the reaction mechanism for determining spherically-averaged squares of momentum-space orbitals for atoms and molecules and for coefficients describing initial and final state correlations

  10. New approaches to nonlinear waves

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The book details a few of the novel methods developed in the last few years for studying various aspects of nonlinear wave systems. The introductory chapter provides a general overview, thematically linking the objects described in the book. Two chapters are devoted to wave systems possessing resonances with linear frequencies (Chapter 2) and with nonlinear frequencies (Chapter 3). In the next two chapters modulation instability in the KdV-type of equations is studied using rigorous mathematical methods (Chapter 4) and its possible connection to freak waves is investigated (Chapter 5). The book goes on to demonstrate how the choice of the Hamiltonian (Chapter 6) or the Lagrangian (Chapter 7) framework allows us to gain a deeper insight into the properties of a specific wave system. The final chapter discusses problems encountered when attempting to verify the theoretical predictions using numerical or laboratory experiments. All the chapters are illustrated by ample constructive examples demonstrating the app...

  11. PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS OF AN EIT WAVE OBSERVED BY HINODE/EIS AND SDO/AIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronig, A. M.; Kienreich, I. W.; Muhr, N.; Temmer, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Goemoery, P. [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranska Lomnica (Slovakia); Vrsnak, B. [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, Kaciceva 26, 1000 Zagreb (Croatia); Warren, H. P., E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-12-10

    We present plasma diagnostics of an Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) wave observed with high cadence in Hinode/Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) sit-and-stare spectroscopy and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly imagery obtained during the HOP-180 observing campaign on 2011 February 16. At the propagating EIT wave front, we observe downward plasma flows in the EIS Fe XII, Fe XIII, and Fe XVI spectral lines (log T Almost-Equal-To 6.1-6.4) with line-of-sight (LOS) velocities up to 20 km s{sup -1}. These redshifts are followed by blueshifts with upward velocities up to -5 km s{sup -1} indicating relaxation of the plasma behind the wave front. During the wave evolution, the downward velocity pulse steepens from a few km s{sup -1} up to 20 km s{sup -1} and subsequently decays, correlated with the relative changes of the line intensities. The expected increase of the plasma densities at the EIT wave front estimated from the observed intensity increase lies within the noise level of our density diagnostics from EIS Fe XIII 202/203 A line ratios. No significant LOS plasma motions are observed in the He II line, suggesting that the wave pulse was not strong enough to perturb the underlying chromosphere. This is consistent with the finding that no H{alpha} Moreton wave was associated with the event. The EIT wave propagating along the EIS slit reveals a strong deceleration of a Almost-Equal-To -540 m s{sup -2} and a start velocity of v{sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 590 km s{sup -1}. These findings are consistent with the passage of a coronal fast-mode MHD wave, pushing the plasma downward and compressing it at the coronal base.

  12. Harmonically trapped cold atom systems: Few-body dynamics and application to many-body thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, Kevin Michael

    Underlying the many-body effects of ultracold atomic gases are the few-body dynamics and interparticle interactions. Moreover, the study of few-body systems on their own has accelerated due to confining few atoms in each well of a deep optical lattice or in a single microtrap. This thesis studies the microscopic properties of few-body systems under external spherically symmetric harmonic confinement and how the few-body properties translate to the many-body system. Bosonic and fermionic few-body systems are considered and the dependence of the energetics and other quantities are investigated as functions of the s-wave scattering length, the mass ratio and the temperature. It is found that the condensate fraction of a weakly-interacting trapped Bose gas depletes quadratically with the s-wave scattering length. The next order term in the depletion depends not only, as might be expected naively, on the s-wave scattering length and the effective range but additionally on a two-body parameter that is not needed to reproduce the energy of weakly-interacting trapped Bose gases. This finding has important implications for effective field theory treatments of the system. Weakly-interacting atomic and molecular two-component Fermi gases with equal masses are described using perturbative approaches. The energy shifts are tabulated and interpreted, and a measure of the molecular condensate fraction is developed. We develop a measure of the molecular condensate fraction using the two-body density matrix and we develop a model of the spherical component of the momentum distribution that agrees well with stochastic variational calculations. We establish the existence of intersystem degeneracies for equal mass two-component Fermi gases with zero-range interactions, where the eigen energies of the spin-imbalanced system are degenerate with a subset of the eigen energies of the more spin-balanced system and the same total number of fermions. For unequal mass two-component Fermi

  13. Surface structure and analysis with scanning tunneling microscopy and electron tunneling spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, R.V.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: charge-density waves in layer structures; charge-density waves in linear chain compounds; spectroscopy with the STM; STM studies of oxides; and development of atomic force microscopy. (LSP)

  14. Gravitation Waves

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    We will present a brief introduction to the physics of gravitational waves and their properties. We will review potential astrophysical sources of gravitational waves, and the physics and astrophysics that can be learned from their study. We will survey the techniques and technologies for detecting gravitational waves for the first time, including bar detectors and broadband interferometers, and give a brief status report on the international search effort, with special emphasis on the LIGO detectors and search results.

  15. New integrable model of propagation of the few-cycle pulses in an anisotropic microdispersed medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonov, S. V.; Ustinov, N. V.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the propagation of the few-cycle electromagnetic pulses in the anisotropic microdispersed medium. The effects of the anisotropy and spatial dispersion of the medium are created by the two sorts of the two-level atoms. The system of the material equations describing an evolution of the states of the atoms and the wave equations for the ordinary and extraordinary components of the pulses is derived. By applying the approximation of the sudden excitation to exclude the material variables, we reduce this system to the single nonlinear wave equation that generalizes the modified sine-Gordon equation and the Rabelo-Fokas equation. It is shown that this equation is integrable by means of the inverse scattering transformation method if an additional restriction on the parameters is imposed. The multisoliton solutions of this integrable generalization are constructed and investigated.

  16. Raman spectroscopy in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malard, L.M.; Pimenta, M.A.; Dresselhaus, G.; Dresselhaus, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent Raman scattering studies in different types of graphene samples are reviewed here. We first discuss the first-order and the double resonance Raman scattering mechanisms in graphene, which give rise to the most prominent Raman features. The determination of the number of layers in few-layer graphene is discussed, giving special emphasis to the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy to distinguish a monolayer from few-layer graphene stacked in the Bernal (AB) configuration. Different types of graphene samples produced both by exfoliation and using epitaxial methods are described and their Raman spectra are compared with those of 3D crystalline graphite and turbostratic graphite, in which the layers are stacked with rotational disorder. We show that Resonance Raman studies, where the energy of the excitation laser line can be tuned continuously, can be used to probe electrons and phonons near the Dirac point of graphene and, in particular allowing a determination to be made of the tight-binding parameters for bilayer graphene. The special process of electron-phonon interaction that renormalizes the phonon energy giving rise to the Kohn anomaly is discussed, and is illustrated by gated experiments where the position of the Fermi level can be changed experimentally. Finally, we discuss the ability of distinguishing armchair and zig-zag edges by Raman spectroscopy and studies in graphene nanoribbons in which the Raman signal is enhanced due to resonance with singularities in the density of electronic states.

  17. Photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosch, A.

    1982-01-01

    In this work examples of the various aspects of photoelectron spectroscopy are given. The investigation was started with the development of an angle-resolved spectrometer so that the first chapters deal with angle-resolved ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy. To indicate the possibilities and pitfalls of the technique, in chapter II the theory is briefly reviewed. In chapter III the instrument is described. The system is based on the cylindrical mirror deflection analyzer, which is modified and improved for angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. In combination with a position sensitive detector, a spectrometer is developed with which simultaneously several angle-resolved spectra can be recorded. In chapter IV, the results are reported of angle-integrated UPS experiments on dilute alloys. Using the improved energy resolution of the instrument the author was able to study the impurity states more accurately and shows that the photoemission technique has become an important tool in the study of impurities and the interactions involved. XPS and Auger results obtained from dilute alloys are presented in chapter V. It is shown that these systems are especially suited for the study of correlation effects and can provide interesting problems related to the satellite structure and the interaction of the impurity with the host. In chapter VI, the valence bands of ternary alloys are studied with UPS and compared to recent band structure calculation. The core level shifts are analyzed in a simple, thermodynamic scheme. (Auth.)

  18. Fusion spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, N.J.

    1995-09-01

    This article traces developments in the spectroscopy of high temperature laboratory plasma used in controlled fusion research from the early 1960's until the present. These three and a half decades have witnessed many orders of magnitude increase in accessible plasma parameters such as density and temperature as well as particle and energy confinement timescales. Driven by the need to interpret the radiation in terms of the local plasma parameters, the thrust of fusion spectroscopy has been to develop our understanding of (i) the atomic structure of highly ionised atoms, usually of impurities in the hydrogen isotope fuel; (ii) the atomic collision rates and their incorporation into ionization structure and emissivity models that take into account plasma phenomena like plasma-wall interactions, particle transport and radiation patterns; (iii) the diagnostic applications of spectroscopy aided by increasingly sophisticated characterisation of the electron fluid. These topics are discussed in relation to toroidal magnetically confined plasmas, particularly the Tokamak which appears to be the most promising approach to controlled fusion to date. (author)

  19. Optical Cherenkov radiation by cascaded nonlinear interaction: an efficient source of few-cycle energetic near- to mid-IR pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Zhou, Binbin

    2011-01-01

    When ultrafast noncritical cascaded second-harmonic generation of energetic femtosecond pulses occur in a bulk lithium niobate crystal optical Cherenkov waves are formed in the near- to mid-IR. Numerical simulations show that the few-cycle solitons radiate Cherenkov (dispersive) waves in the λ = 2...

  20. Low-Frequency Interlayer Breathing Modes in Few-Layer Black Phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xi; Liang, Liangbo; Huang, Shengxi; Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kong, Jing; Meunier, Vincent; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2015-06-10

    As a new two-dimensional layered material, black phosphorus (BP) is a very promising material for nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. We use Raman spectroscopy and first-principles theory to characterize and understand the low-frequency (LF) interlayer breathing modes (<100 cm(-1)) in few-layer BP for the first time. Using a laser polarization dependence study and group theory analysis, the breathing modes are assigned to Ag symmetry. Compared to the high-frequency (HF) Raman modes, the LF breathing modes are considerably more sensitive to interlayer coupling and, thus, their frequencies show a stronger dependence on the number of layers. Hence, they constitute an effective means to probe both the crystalline orientation and thickness of few-layer BP. Furthermore, the temperature dependence shows that in the temperature range -150 to 30 °C, the breathing modes have a weak anharmonic behavior, in contrast to the HF Raman modes that exhibit strong anharmonicity.

  1. Reliably counting atomic planes of few-layer graphene (n > 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Yee Kan; Bae, Myung-Ho; Cahill, David G; Pop, Eric

    2011-01-25

    We demonstrate a reliable technique for counting atomic planes (n) of few-layer graphene (FLG) on SiO(2)/Si substrates by Raman spectroscopy. Our approach is based on measuring the ratio of the integrated intensity of the G graphene peak and the optical phonon peak of Si, I(G)/I(Si), and is particularly useful in the range n > 4 where few methods exist. We compare our results with atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements and Fresnel equation calculations. Then, we apply our method to unambiguously identify n of FLG devices on SiO(2) and find that the mobility (μ ≈ 2000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) is independent of layer thickness for n > 4. Our findings suggest that electrical transport in gated FLG devices is dominated by carriers near the FLG/SiO(2) interface and is thus limited by the environment, even for n > 4.

  2. Thinning and functionalization of few-layer graphene sheets by CF4 plasma treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2012-05-24

    Structural changes of few-layer graphene sheets induced by CF4 plasma treatment are studied by optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, together with theoretical simulation. Experimental results suggest a thickness reduction of few-layer graphene sheets subjected to prolonged CF4 plasma treatment while plasma treatment with short time only leads to fluorine functionalization on the surface layer by formation of covalent bonds. Raman spectra reveal an increase in disorder by physical disruption of the graphene lattice as well as functionalization during the plasma treatment. The F/CF3 adsorption and the lattice distortion produced are proved by theoretical simulation using density functional theory, which also predicts p-type doping and Dirac cone splitting in CF4 plasma-treated graphene sheets that may have potential in future graphene-based micro/nanodevices.

  3. Few-layer graphene growth from polystyrene as solid carbon source utilizing simple APCVD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Shahrokh; Afzalzadeh, Reza

    2016-07-01

    This research article presents development of an economical, simple, immune and environment friendly process to grow few-layer graphene by controlling evaporation rate of polystyrene on copper foil as catalyst and substrate utilizing atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) method. Evaporation rate of polystyrene depends on molecular structure, amount of used material and temperature. We have found controlling rate of evaporation of polystyrene by controlling the source temperature is easier than controlling the material weight. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as Raman Spectroscopy has been used for characterization of the layers. The frequency of G‧ to G band ratio intensity in some samples varied between 0.8 and 1.6 corresponding to few-layer graphene. Topography characterization by atomic force microscopy confirmed Raman results.

  4. Statistical wave function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    Statistical considerations are applied to quantum mechanical amplitudes. The physical motivation is the progress in the spectroscopy of highly excited states. The corresponding wave functions are strongly mixed. In terms of a basis set of eigenfunctions of a zeroth-order Hamiltonian with good quantum numbers, such wave functions have contributions from many basis states. The vector x is considered whose components are the expansion coefficients in that basis. Any amplitude can be written as a dagger x x. It is argued that the components of x and hence other amplitudes can be regarded as random variables. The maximum entropy formalism is applied to determine the corresponding distribution function. Two amplitudes a dagger x x and b dagger x x are independently distributed if b dagger x a = 0. It is suggested that the theory of quantal measurements implies that, in general, one can one determine the distribution of amplitudes and not the amplitudes themselves

  5. Submillimetre-wave astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, J.E.; Phillips, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    Observations in the 100-1000-micron band and the instruments used to obtain them are discussed in contributions to the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Conference held at Queen Mary College, London, in September 1981. The major subject areas covered are large-scale structure and radiative transfer within interstellar clouds, spectroscopic observations of molecular sources, interstellar chemistry, and submillimeter (SM) instrumentation. Reports are included on the formation of giant cloud complexes, cool molecular clouds, models for hot-centered and externally heated clouds, dust in Bok globules, airborne FIR and SM spectroscopy, rotational transitions of CH3OH and NH2 near 1.2 mm, high-velocity flows and molecular jets, FIR emissions from late-type galaxies, ion-grain collisions as a source of interstellar molecules, bandpass filters for SM astronomy, the SM receiver of the future, HF techniques in heterodyne astronomy, and the mm-wave cosmic background

  6. Wrinkled Few-Layer Graphene as Highly Efficient Load Bearer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Androulidakis, Ch.; Koukaras, E. N.; Řáhová, Jaroslava; Sampathkumar, Krishna; Parthenios, J.; Papagelis, K.; Frank, Otakar; Galiotis, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 31 (2017), s. 26593-26601 ISSN 1944-8244 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-15357S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : graphene * wrinkling * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 7.504, year: 2016

  7. FEWS NET Price Volatility Data 2002-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — This dataset from the Famine Early Warning System Network (FEWS NET) documents ten years, from 2002 to 2012, of cereal price fluctuations across twenty-five African...

  8. Few-photon Non-linearities in Nanophotonic Devices for Quantum Information Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nysteen, Anders

    In this thesis we investigate few-photon non-linearities in all-optical, on-chip circuits, and we discuss their possible applications in devices of interest for quantum information technology, such as conditional two-photon gates and single-photon sources. In order to propose efficient devices...... the scattered photons. Even though the non-linearity also alters the pulse spectrum due to a four-wave mixing process, we demonstrate that input pulses with a Gaussian spectrum can be mapped to the output with up to 80 % fidelity. Using two identical two-level emitters, we propose a setup for a deterministic...... by the capturing process. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are promising for realizing few-photon non-linearities in solid-state implementations, although coupling to phonon modes in the surrounding lattice have significant influence on the dynamics. By accounting for the commonly neglected asymmetry between...

  9. Frequency-agile dual-comb spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Millot, Guy; Pitois, Stéphane; Yan, Ming; Hovannysyan, Tatevik; Bendahmane, Abdelkrim; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new approach to near-infrared molecular spectroscopy, harnessing advanced concepts of optical telecommunications and supercontinuum photonics. We generate, without mode-locked lasers, two frequency combs of slightly different repetition frequencies and moderate, but rapidly tunable, spectral span. The output of a frequency-agile continuous wave laser is split and sent into two electro-optic intensity modulators. Flat-top low-noise frequency combs are produced by wave-breaking in ...

  10. Plasma waves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swanson, D. G

    1989-01-01

    ... Swanson, D.G. (Donald Gary), D a t e - Plasma waves. Bibliography: p. Includes index. 1. Plasma waves. QC718.5.W3S43 1989 ISBN 0-12-678955-X I. Title. 530.4'4 88-34388 Printed in the United Sta...

  11. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Friis-Madsen, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Since March 2003 a prototype of Wave Dragon has been tested in an inland sea in Denmark. This has been a great success with all subsystems tested and improved through working in an offshore environment. The project has proved the Wave Dragon device and has enabled the next stage, a production sized...

  12. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  13. Baryon spectroscopy in COMPASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austregesilo, Alexander; Chung, Suh-Urk; Ketzer, Bernhard; Neubert, Sebastian; Paul, Stephan [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E18, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at CERN SPS which investigates the structure and spectroscopy of hadrons. During in total 9 weeks in 2008 and 2009, a 190 GeV/c proton beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target has been used primarily to study the production of exotic mesons and glueball candidates at central rapidities. As no bias on the rapidity was introduced by the trigger system, the data also yield the unique possibility to study diffractive dissociation of the beam proton while an inert target is assumed. To this end exclusive events with three charged particles including one proton in the final state have been extracted. We report on the status of the event selection studies and discuss the prospect of using partial wave analysis techniques, which have been successfully applied for diffractive dissociation reactions of pions in COMPASS.

  14. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopies of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast ellipsometry and transient absorption spectroscopies are used to measure material dynamics under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, and volumetric compression induced by shock wave loading with a chirped, spectrally clipped shock drive pulse.

  15. NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenert, J.

    1989-01-01

    The book reviews the applications of NMR-spectroscopy in medicine and biology. The first chapter of about 40 pages summarizes the history of development and explains the chemical and physical fundamentals of this new and non-invasive method in an easily comprehensible manner. The other chapters summarize diagnostic results obtained with this method in organs and tissues, so that the reader will find a systematic overview of the available findings obtained in the various organ systems. It must be noted, however, that ongoing research work and new insight quite naturally will necessitate corrections to be done, as is the case here with some biochemical interpretations which would need adjustment to latest research results. NMR-spectroscopy is able to measure very fine energy differences on the molecular level, and thus offers insight into metabolic processes, with the advantage that there is no need of applying ionizing radiation in order to qualitatively or quantitatively analyse the metabolic processes in the various organ systems. (orig./DG) With 40 figs., 4 tabs [de

  16. Hadron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igi, K.

    1979-01-01

    This paper is related to mini-rapporteur talk on baryonium spectroscopy. First of all, the models of baryonium, namely the diquark model, the string picture, the linear baryonium and the bag model, are described. All of these models so far discussed are highly suggestive. In this paper, discussions are confined to the spectroscopy of the string and the bag models. Because of the color degree of freedom, the bag model has mock diquonium and mock mesonium besides true baryonium. It might be possible that the string model takes into account only a part of them. The constraints among baryonium, baryon and boson trajectories using duality and unitarity were proposed as a guide for classifying various spectra. Inequalities were derived as the modest and reliable constraints on baryonium intercepts from baryon and boson intercepts by imposing unitarity and Regge behaviors on scattering amplitudes. As a consequence of residue factorization and duality, the baryonium slopes were derived. The spin of S (1936) was also obtained. The baryonium containing s or c quarks can also be studied. Topics such as the EXD patterns of baryons, linear baryons, linear Regge trajectories for all Q-anti Q families, and the Al and two Q mesons, are presented in this paper. Comments on di-baryon are described. (Kato, T.)

  17. Hadron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Spectra of hadrons show various and complex structures due to the strong coupling constants of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) constituting its fundamental theory. For their understandings, two parameters, i.e., (1) the quark mass and (2) their excitation energies are playing important roles. In low energies, for example, rather simple structures similar to the positronium appear in the heavy quarks such as charms and bottoms. It has been, however, strongly suggested by the recent experiments that the molecular resonant state shows up when the threshold to decay to mesons is exceeded. On the other hand, chiral symmetry and its breaking play important roles in the dynamics of light quarks. Strange quarks are in between and show special behaviors. In the present lecture, the fundamental concept of the hadron spectroscopy based on the QCD is expounded to illustrate the present understandings and problems of the hadron spectroscopy. Sections are composed of 1. Introduction, 2. Fundamental Concepts (hadrons, quarks and QCD), 3. Quark models and exotic hadrons, 4. Lattice QCD and QCD sum rules. For sections 1 to 3, only outline of the concepts is described because of the limited space. Exotic hadrons, many quark pictures of light hadrons and number of quarks in hadrons are described briefly. (S. Funahashi)

  18. Quasitravelling waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beklaryan, Leva A

    2011-01-01

    A finite difference analogue of the wave equation with potential perturbation is investigated, which simulates the behaviour of an infinite rod under the action of an external longitudinal force field. For a homogeneous rod, describing solutions of travelling wave type is equivalent to describing the full space of classical solutions to an induced one-parameter family of functional differential equations of point type, with the characteristic of the travelling wave as parameter. For an inhomogeneous rod, the space of solutions of travelling wave type is trivial, and their 'proper' extension is defined as solutions of 'quasitravelling' wave type. By contrast to the case of a homogeneous rod, describing the solutions of quasitravelling wave type is equivalent to describing the quotient of the full space of impulsive solutions to an induced one-parameter family of point-type functional differential equations by an equivalence relation connected with the definition of solutions of quasitravelling wave type. Stability of stationary solutions is analyzed. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  19. Liquid identification by Hilbert spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyatti, M; Divin, Y; Poppe, U; Urban, K, E-mail: M.Lyatti@fz-juelich.d, E-mail: Y.Divin@fz-juelich.d [Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Fast and reliable identification of liquids is of great importance in, for example, security, biology and the beverage industry. An unambiguous identification of liquids can be made by electromagnetic measurements of their dielectric functions in the frequency range of their main dispersions, but this frequency range, from a few GHz to a few THz, is not covered by any conventional spectroscopy. We have developed a concept of liquid identification based on our new Hilbert spectroscopy and high- T{sub c} Josephson junctions, which can operate at the intermediate range from microwaves to THz frequencies. A demonstration setup has been developed consisting of a polychromatic radiation source and a compact Hilbert spectrometer integrated in a Stirling cryocooler. Reflection polychromatic spectra of various bottled liquids have been measured at the spectral range of 15-300 GHz with total scanning time down to 0.2 s and identification of liquids has been demonstrated.

  20. Liquid identification by Hilbert spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyatti, M.; Divin, Y.; Poppe, U.; Urban, K.

    2009-11-01

    Fast and reliable identification of liquids is of great importance in, for example, security, biology and the beverage industry. An unambiguous identification of liquids can be made by electromagnetic measurements of their dielectric functions in the frequency range of their main dispersions, but this frequency range, from a few GHz to a few THz, is not covered by any conventional spectroscopy. We have developed a concept of liquid identification based on our new Hilbert spectroscopy and high- Tc Josephson junctions, which can operate at the intermediate range from microwaves to THz frequencies. A demonstration setup has been developed consisting of a polychromatic radiation source and a compact Hilbert spectrometer integrated in a Stirling cryocooler. Reflection polychromatic spectra of various bottled liquids have been measured at the spectral range of 15-300 GHz with total scanning time down to 0.2 s and identification of liquids has been demonstrated.

  1. Liquid identification by Hilbert spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyatti, M; Divin, Y; Poppe, U; Urban, K

    2009-01-01

    Fast and reliable identification of liquids is of great importance in, for example, security, biology and the beverage industry. An unambiguous identification of liquids can be made by electromagnetic measurements of their dielectric functions in the frequency range of their main dispersions, but this frequency range, from a few GHz to a few THz, is not covered by any conventional spectroscopy. We have developed a concept of liquid identification based on our new Hilbert spectroscopy and high- T c Josephson junctions, which can operate at the intermediate range from microwaves to THz frequencies. A demonstration setup has been developed consisting of a polychromatic radiation source and a compact Hilbert spectrometer integrated in a Stirling cryocooler. Reflection polychromatic spectra of various bottled liquids have been measured at the spectral range of 15-300 GHz with total scanning time down to 0.2 s and identification of liquids has been demonstrated.

  2. Large eddy simulation of breaking waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Deigaard, Rolf

    2001-01-01

    A numerical model is used to simulate wave breaking, the large scale water motions and turbulence induced by the breaking process. The model consists of a free surface model using the surface markers method combined with a three-dimensional model that solves the flow equations. The turbulence....... The incoming waves are specified by a flux boundary condition. The waves are approaching in the shore-normal direction and are breaking on a plane, constant slope beach. The first few wave periods are simulated by a two-dimensional model in the vertical plane normal to the beach line. The model describes...... the steepening and the overturning of the wave. At a given instant, the model domain is extended to three dimensions, and the two-dimensional flow field develops spontaneously three-dimensional flow features with turbulent eddies. After a few wave periods, stationary (periodic) conditions are achieved...

  3. Few body problems in nuclear and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slobodrian, R.J.; Cujec, B.; Ramavataram, K.

    1975-01-01

    Nucleon-nucleon interactions at all energies, meson-nucleon and meson-deuteron interactions, nuclear bremsstrahlung, on-shell and off-shell interactions, final-state interactions, bound and scattering states, few-body forces, polarization phenomena, short range correlations, quasi-free scattering, composite hadron models, subnucleon structure, multiparticle and coherent production processes, break-up reactions, electrodisintegration, relativistic effects and future resources in nuclear and particle physics are discussed in relation to the state of few-body physics in 1974. (B.F.G.)

  4. Elastic and inelastic pion reactions on few nucleon systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lensky, V.

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, we are studying elastic and inelastic pion reactions on few-body systems within the framework of chiral effective theory. We consider two specific reactions involving pions on few-nucleon systems, namely pion production in nucleon-nucleon collisions, and incoherent pion photoproduction on the deuteron. These two reactions are closely related to the issue of dispersive and absorptive corrections to the pion-deuteron scattering length, which we also consider in our analysis. The incoherent pion photoproduction is also considered as the possible source for a high-precision determination of the neutron-neutron scattering length. (orig.)

  5. Few photon switching with slow light in hollow fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajcsy, Michal; Hofferberth, S.; Balic, Vlatko

    2009-01-01

    Cold atoms confined inside a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber with core diameters of a few photon wavelengths are a promising medium for studying nonlinear optical interactions at extremely low light levels. The high electric field intensity per photon and interaction lengths not limited...... by diffraction are some of the unique features of this system. Here, we present the results of our first nonlinear optics experiments in this system including a demonstration of an all-optical switch that is activated at energies corresponding to few hundred optical photons per pulse....

  6. Chemical storage of hydrogen in few-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, K. S.; Kumar, Prashant; Maitra, Urmimala; Govindaraj, A.; Hembram, K. P. S. S.; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2011-01-01

    Birch reduction of few-layer graphene samples gives rise to hydrogenated samples containing up to 5 wt % of hydrogen. Spectroscopic studies reveal the presence of sp3 C-H bonds in the hydrogenated graphenes. They, however, decompose readily on heating to 500 °C or on irradiation with UV or laser radiation releasing all the hydrogen, thereby demonstrating the possible use of few-layer graphene for chemical storage of hydrogen. First-principles calculations throw light on the mechanism of dehydrogenation that appears to involve a significant reconstruction and relaxation of the lattice. PMID:21282617

  7. Elastic and inelastic pion reactions on few nucleon systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lensky, V.

    2007-09-29

    In the present work, we are studying elastic and inelastic pion reactions on few-body systems within the framework of chiral effective theory. We consider two specific reactions involving pions on few-nucleon systems, namely pion production in nucleon-nucleon collisions, and incoherent pion photoproduction on the deuteron. These two reactions are closely related to the issue of dispersive and absorptive corrections to the pion-deuteron scattering length, which we also consider in our analysis. The incoherent pion photoproduction is also considered as the possible source for a high-precision determination of the neutron-neutron scattering length. (orig.)

  8. R-matrix calculations for few-quark bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalchi, M.A.; Hadizadeh, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    The R-matrix method is implemented to study the heavy charm and bottom diquark, triquark, tetraquark, and pentaquarks in configuration space, as the bound states of quark-antiquark, diquark-quark, diquark-antidiquark, and diquark-antitriquark systems, respectively. The mass spectrum and the size of these systems are calculated for different partial wave channels. The calculated masses are compared with recent theoretical results obtained by other methods in momentum and configuration spaces and also by available experimental data. (orig.)

  9. Tropical Cyclogenesis in a Tropical Wave Critical Layer: Easterly Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkerton, T. J.; Montgomery, M. T.; Wang, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The development of tropical depressions within tropical waves over the Atlantic and eastern Pacific is usually preceded by a "surface low along the wave" as if to suggest a hybrid wave-vortex structure in which flow streamlines not only undulate with the waves, but form a closed circulation in the lower troposphere surrounding the low. This structure, equatorward of the easterly jet axis, is identified herein as the familiar critical layer of waves in shear flow, a flow configuration which arguably provides the simplest conceptual framework for tropical cyclogenesis resulting from tropical waves, their interaction with the mean flow, and with diabatic processes associated with deep moist convection. The recirculating Kelvin cat's eye within the critical layer represents a sweet spot for tropical cyclogenesis in which a proto-vortex may form and grow within its parent wave. A common location for storm development is given by the intersection of the wave's critical latitude and trough axis at the center of the cat's eye, with analyzed vorticity centroid nearby. The wave and vortex live together for a time, and initially propagate at approximately the same speed. In most cases this coupled propagation continues for a few days after a tropical depression is identified. For easterly waves, as the name suggests, the propagation is westward. It is shown that in order to visualize optimally the associated Lagrangian motions, one should view the flow streamlines, or stream function, in a frame of reference translating horizontally with the phase propagation of the parent wave. In this co-moving frame, streamlines are approximately equivalent to particle trajectories. The closed circulation is quasi-stationary, and a dividing streamline separates air within the cat's eye from air outside.

  10. Uncovering molecular relaxation processes with nonlinear spectroscopies in the deep UV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, Brantley A.; Molesky, Brian P.; Giokas, Paul G.; Moran, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We discuss the outlook for multidimensional spectroscopies in the deep UV. • Photophysics are examined in small DNA components at cryogenic temperatures. • Wavepacket motions are detected in ring-opening systems with 2DUV spectroscopy. • Measurements of electronic wavepacket motions in molecules are proposed. - Abstract: Nonlinear laser spectroscopies in the deep UV spectral range are motivated by studies of biological systems and elementary processes in small molecules. This perspective article discusses recent technical advances in this area with a particular emphasis on diffractive optic based approaches to four-wave mixing spectroscopies. Applications to two classes of systems illustrate present experimental capabilities. First, experiments on DNA components at cryogenic temperatures are used to uncover features of excited state potential energy surfaces and vibrational cooling mechanisms. Second, sub-200 fs internal conversion processes and coherent wavepacket motions are investigated in cyclohexadiene and α-terpinene. Finally, we propose new experimental directions that combine methods for producing few-cycle UV laser pulses in noble gases with incoherent detection methods (e.g., photoionization) in experiments with time resolution near a singlefemtosecond. These measurements are motivated by knowledge of extremely fast non-adiabatic dynamics and the resolution of electronic wavepacket motions in molecules

  11. Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemcik, T.

    1984-01-01

    The emission and absorption of photons taking place without changes in the frequency spectrum of the crystal lattice are known as the Moessbauer effect. It takes place in the low energy levels of heavy nuclei in solid lattices at low temperatures. On the basis of the hyperfine structure of Moessbauer spectra the notions are explained of isomer shift, quadrupole splitting and magnetic splitting. The principle and function are explained of Moessbauer spectrometers and the methods of graphical processing of spectra, also the use of the least square fit. Moessbauer spectroscopy is nondestructive, highly sensitive and selective and makes structural resolution possible. It is used for quantitative and qualitative analysis of compounds. Examples are given of the use of this method for mineralogical and crystallo-chemical analysis of lunar minerals and rocks, for analysis of corrosion products of iron and for phase analysis of alloys. (M.D.)

  12. Photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities in photoelectron spectroscopy at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: the orientation of CO on Pt(III) and Ni(III) surfaces from angle-resolved photoemission; photoemission from CO on Pt(III) in the range 40 eV less than or equal to dirac constant ω less than or equal to 150 eV; photoemission studies of electron states at clean surfaces using synchrotron radiation; angle and energy dependent photoemission studies of plasmon loss structure in Al and In; d-orbital directed photoemission from copper; interpretation of angle-resolved x-ray photoemission from valence bands; atomic cross-section effects in soft x-ray photoemission from Ag, Au, and Pt valence bands; x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies of the electronic structure of transition metal difluorides; x-ray photoemission investigation of the density of states of B'-NiAl; the electronic structure of SrTiO 3 and some simple related oxides; fluorescence lifetime measurements of np 5 (n+1)S' states in krypton and xenon; Zeeman beats in the resonance fluorescence of the 3P 1 , states in krypton and xenon; lifetime measurements of rare-gas dimers; configuration interaction effects in the atomic photoelectron spectra of Ba, Sm, Eu, and Yb; glow discharge lamps as electron sources for electron impact excitation; electron impact excitation of electron correlation states in Ca, Sr, and Ba; photoelectron spectroscopy of atomic and molecular bismuth; relativistic effects in the uv photoelectron spectra of group VI diatomic molecules; and relative gas-phase acidities and basicities from a proton potential model

  13. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  14. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  15. Nuclear Astrophysics from View Point of Few-Body Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Bertulani, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Few-body systems provide very useful tools to solve different problems for nuclear astrophysics. This is the case of indirect techniques, developed to overcome some of the limits of direct measurements at astrophysical energies. Here the Coulomb dissociation, the asymptotic normalization coefficient and the Trojan Horse method are discussed. (author)

  16. Study of EUV induced defects on few-layer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, An; Rizo, P.J.; Zoethout, E.; Scaccabarozzi, L.; Lee, Christopher James; Banine, V.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    Defects in graphene greatly affect its properties1-3. Radiation induced-defects may reduce the long-term survivability of graphene-based nano-devices. Here, we expose few-layer graphene to extreme ultraviolet (EUV, 13.5nm) radiation and show there is a power-dependent increase in defect density. We

  17. Breakdown of the few-level approximation in collective systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiffner, M.; Evers, J.; Keitel, C. H.

    2007-01-01

    The validity of the few-level approximation in dipole-dipole interacting collective systems is discussed. As an example system, we study the archetype case of two dipole-dipole interacting atoms, each modeled by two complete sets of angular momentum multiplets. We establish the breakdown of the few-level approximation by first proving the intuitive result that the dipole-dipole induced energy shifts between collective two-atom states depend on the length of the vector connecting the atoms, but not on its orientation, if complete and degenerate multiplets are considered. A careful analysis of our findings reveals that the simplification of the atomic level scheme by artificially omitting Zeeman sublevels in a few-level approximation generally leads to incorrect predictions. We find that this breakdown can be traced back to the dipole-dipole coupling of transitions with orthogonal dipole moments. Our interpretation enables us to identify special geometries in which partial few-level approximations to two- or three-level systems are valid

  18. Optical vortex propagation in few-mode rectangular polymer waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyubopytov, Vladimir S.; Chipouline, Arkadi; Zywietz, Urs

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that rectangular few-mode dielectric waveguides, fabricated with standard lithographic technique, can support on-chip propagation of optical vortices. We show that specific superpositions of waveguide eigenmodes form quasi-degenerate modes carrying light with high purity states...

  19. Field emission from vertically aligned few-layer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malesevic, Alexander; Kemps, Raymond; Vanhulsel, Annick; Chowdhury, Manish Pal; Volodin, Alexander; Van Haesendonck, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The electric field emission behavior of vertically aligned few-layer graphene was studied in a parallel plate-type setup. Few-layer graphene was synthesized in the absence of any metallic catalyst by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition with gas mixtures of methane and hydrogen. The deposit consists of nanostructures that are several micrometers wide, highly crystalline stacks of four to six atomic layers of graphene, aligned vertically to the substrate surface in a high density network. The few-layer graphene is found to be a good field emitter, characterized by turn-on fields as low as 1 V/μm and field amplification factors up to several thousands. We observe a clear dependence of the few-layer graphene field emission behavior on the synthesis parameters: Hydrogen is identified as an efficient etchant to improve field emission, and samples grown on titanium show lower turn-on field values and higher amplification factors when compared to samples grown on silicon

  20. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Knapp, W.

    2006-01-01

    Wave Dragon is a floating wave energy converter working by extracting energy principally by means of overtopping of waves into a reservoir. A 1:4.5 scale prototype has been sea tested for 20 months. This paper presents results from testing, experiences gained and developments made during this ext......Wave Dragon is a floating wave energy converter working by extracting energy principally by means of overtopping of waves into a reservoir. A 1:4.5 scale prototype has been sea tested for 20 months. This paper presents results from testing, experiences gained and developments made during...... this extended period. The prototype is highly instrumented. The overtopping characteristic and the power produced are presented here. This has enabled comparison between the prototype and earlier results from both laboratory model and computer simulation. This gives the optimal operating point and the expected...... power of the device. The project development team has gained much soft experience from working in the harsh offshore environment. In particular the effect of marine growth in the draft tubes of the turbines has been investigated. The control of the device has been a focus for development as is operates...

  1. Some highlights in few-body nuclear physics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, R. J.

    2000-12-07

    During the past five years, there have been tremendous advances in both experiments and theoretical calculations in few-body nuclear systems. Advances in technology have permitted experiments of unprecedented accuracy. Jefferson Laboratory has begun operation and the first round of experimental results have become available. New polarization techniques have been exploited at a number of laboratories, in particular, at Jefferson Lab, IUCF, RIKEN, NIKHEF, Mainz, MIT-Bates and HERMES. Some of these results will be shown here. In addition, there have been tremendous advances in few-body theory. Five modern two-nucleon potentials have which describe the nucleon-nucleon data extremely well have become available. A standard model of nuclear physics based on these two nucleon potentials as well as modern three-nucleon forces has emerged. This standard model has enjoyed tremendous success in the few body systems. Exact three-body calculations have been extended into the continuum in order to take full advantage of scattering data in advancing our understanding of the the few-nucleon system. In addition, the application of chiral symmetry has become an important constraint on nucleon-nucleon as well as three-nucleon forces. As a result of all these efforts, we have seen rapid developments in the three-body force. Despite these advances, there remain some extremely important open issues: (1) What is the role of quarks and gluons in nuclear structure; (2) Can we distinguish meson exchange from quark interchange; (3) Is few-body theory sufficient to describe simultaneously the mass 2, 3 and 4 form factors; (4) What is the isospin and spin dependence of the three-body force; (5) Are there medium modifications for nucleons and mesons in nuclei; (6) Is there an enhancement of antiquarks or pions in nuclei related to the binding; and (7) Are short range correlations observable in nuclei? In this paper the author summarizes the status of our understanding of these issues.

  2. Novel concepts for terahertz waveguide spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2009-01-01

    . With such waveguides we demonstrate that it is possible to perform quantitative spectroscopy on very small volumes of sample material inside the PPWG. Using continuous-wave as well as femtosecond excitation we inject carriers into semiconductor material in the transparent PPWG, and perform static as well as transient...

  3. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy for the advanced undergraduate laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco-Villafañe, J A; Méndez-Sánchez, R A; Flores-Olmedo, E; Báez, G; Gandarilla-Carrillo, O

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple experiment that allows advanced undergraduates to learn the principles and applications of spectroscopy. The technique, known as acoustic resonance spectroscopy, is applied to study a vibrating rod. The setup includes electromagnetic-acoustic transducers, an audio amplifier and a vector network analyzer. Typical results of compressional, torsional and bending waves are analyzed and compared with analytical results. (paper)

  4. Cyclododecane as support material for clean and facile transfer of large-area few-layer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capasso, A.; Leoni, E.; Dikonimos, T.; Buonocore, F.; Lisi, N.; De Francesco, M.; Lancellotti, L.; Bobeico, E.; Sarto, M. S.; Tamburrano, A.; De Bellis, G.

    2014-01-01

    The transfer of chemical vapor deposited graphene is a crucial process, which can affect the quality of the transferred films and compromise their application in devices. Finding a robust and intrinsically clean material capable of easing the transfer of graphene without interfering with its properties remains a challenge. We here propose the use of an organic compound, cyclododecane, as a transfer material. This material can be easily spin coated on graphene and assist the transfer, leaving no residues and requiring no further removal processes. The effectiveness of this transfer method for few-layer graphene on a large area was evaluated and confirmed by microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and four-point probe measurements. Schottky-barrier solar cells with few-layer graphene were fabricated on silicon wafers by using the cyclododecane transfer method and outperformed reference cells made by standard methods.

  5. Jost function description of elastic and few-body resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macri, P.A. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Casilla de Correo 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sanchez Plastic, F. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) and Universidad Nacional de Cuyo (UNC), R8402AGP S. C. de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Barrachina, R.O. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) and Universidad Nacional de Cuyo (UNC), R8402AGP S. C. de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina)]. E-mail: barra@cab.cnea.gov.ar

    2007-03-15

    We discuss how the analysis of the zeros of the functions introduced by Jost in 1946, acting individually or collectively, provides a comprehensive framework for describing resonances in single and multichannel collisions. In particular, we propose a generalization of the Wigner threshold law that copes with some deviations recently observed in opening reaction channels. We also pay special attention to the appearance of zeros of the s-wave Jost function in the fourth quadrant of the complex momentum plane, as analysed by Nussenzveig in 1959 but erroneously ruled out in following studies.

  6. 31-P NMR spectroscopy in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiricuta, I.C.; Schmitt, W.G.H.; Beyer, H.K.

    1987-01-01

    Results suggest 31-P NMR spectroscopy to allow a discrimination between good and bad blood supply to the tumour owing to different metabolic behaviour and to furnish important information on tumour response to radiotherapy just a few hours after the application of a relatively low dose. Spectroscopy showed the radiation-sensitive tumour cells to behave relatively uniformly after radiotherapy suggesting this behaviour to be interpreted as therapeutical effectiveness. (orig./SHA) [de

  7. Wave Generation Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Høgedal, Michael; Christensen, Morten

    The intention of this manual is to provide some formulas and techniques which can be used for generating waves in hydraulic laboratories. Both long crested waves (2-D waves) and short crested waves (3-D waves) are considered.......The intention of this manual is to provide some formulas and techniques which can be used for generating waves in hydraulic laboratories. Both long crested waves (2-D waves) and short crested waves (3-D waves) are considered....

  8. Relevance of few-nucleon problems to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divatia, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    It is well known that the study of few-nucleon problems did not specifically start because they were relevant to nuclear power. However, as the need for power has become more urgent and the systems which may generate nuclear power in the future are likely to be highly complex, it has become necessary to examine the question of relevance of few-nucleon problems to nuclear power. The nuclear data needs for nuclear power have been studied exhaustively by many groups all over the world and The International Atomic Energy Agency, operating through the International Nuclear Data Committee and their Nuclear Data section, have compiled and evaluated these nuclear data needs. It is therefore possible to draw upon the various studies and compilations of the IAEA for examining the question of relevance. The relevant nuclear data needs for fission reactors, fusion reactors and nuclear safeguards programmes are examined. (Auth.)

  9. High stability of few layer graphene nanoplatelets in various solvents

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, X; Zhou, Jian; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Dispersion of few-layer graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) in liquid media is a crucial step for various applications. Here, we highlight a simple, nondestructive method for preparing stable aqueous colloidal solutions with GNP powder quickly dispersed in 5 wt.% sodium–hypochlorite- (NaClO) and sodium-bromide- (NaBr) salted solvent by bath sonication. This method makes it possible to easily prepare a highly concentrated colloidal solution (1 mgcenterdotml−1) of GNPs that can easily be re-dispersed in water (treated GNPs). The aqueous suspension we prepared remained stable for longer than a few weeks. We made similar tests with various solvents and dispersibility appeared to decrease with decreasing polarity. High-concentration suspensions using our facile dispersion method could be of particular interest to the large community using graphene for a diversity of applications.

  10. Few-view image reconstruction with dual dictionaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yang; Zhao Jun; Wang Ge

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate the problem of computed tomography (CT) under sparsity and few-view constraints, and propose a novel algorithm for image reconstruction from few-view data utilizing the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) coupled with dictionary learning, sparse representation and total variation (TV) minimization on two interconnected levels. The main feature of our algorithm is the use of two dictionaries: a transitional dictionary for atom matching and a global dictionary for image updating. The atoms in the global and transitional dictionaries represent the image patches from high-quality and low-quality CT images, respectively. Experiments with simulated and real projections were performed to evaluate and validate the proposed algorithm. The results reconstructed using the proposed approach are significantly better than those using either SART or SART–TV. (paper)

  11. High stability of few layer graphene nanoplatelets in various solvents

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, X

    2017-04-25

    Dispersion of few-layer graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) in liquid media is a crucial step for various applications. Here, we highlight a simple, nondestructive method for preparing stable aqueous colloidal solutions with GNP powder quickly dispersed in 5 wt.% sodium–hypochlorite- (NaClO) and sodium-bromide- (NaBr) salted solvent by bath sonication. This method makes it possible to easily prepare a highly concentrated colloidal solution (1 mgcenterdotml−1) of GNPs that can easily be re-dispersed in water (treated GNPs). The aqueous suspension we prepared remained stable for longer than a few weeks. We made similar tests with various solvents and dispersibility appeared to decrease with decreasing polarity. High-concentration suspensions using our facile dispersion method could be of particular interest to the large community using graphene for a diversity of applications.

  12. Universal few-body physics in a harmonic trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolle, S.; Hammer, H.W.; Metsch, B.Ch.

    2011-01-01

    Few-body systems with resonant short-range interactions display universal properties that do not depend on the details of their structure or their interactions at short distances. In the three-body system, these properties include the existence of a geometric spectrum of three-body Efimov states and a discrete scaling symmetry. Similar universal properties appear in 4-body and possibly higher-body systems as well. We set up an effective theory for few-body systems in a harmonic trap and study the modification of universal physics for 3- and 4-particle systems in external confinement. In particular, we focus on systems where the Efimov effect can occur and investigate the dependence of the 4-body spectrum on the experimental tuning parameters. (authors)

  13. Few-body correlations in many-body physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Marcus

    2015-12-01

    In this thesis, various systems are analyzed in parameter regimes where the few-body aspects are dominant over the many-body behavior. Using the Operator Product Expansion from Quantum Field Theory, exact relations for observables of the electron gas as well as two-dimensional Fermi gases are derived. In addition, properties of both two-dimensional and three-dimensional cold quantum gases at small to moderate degeneracy are determined by means of a diagrammatic virial expansion.

  14. Impact of Social Networking Sites in Bangladesh: Few Possible Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Omar Faruq; Alim-Al-Reza; Md. Mahbubur Rahman; Mohammad Raisul Alam

    2017-01-01

    Bangladesh is a developing country. But in few recent years this country is going to be turned as digitalized. The first condition of being digitalization is the whole communication system of the country have to be developed tremendously. If we notice about the communication system, then Social Networking Sites can be a platform of revolution. This study is based on the perspective of Bangladesh on Social Networking Sites(SNS). In Bangladesh, Social Networking Sites ar...

  15. Few-body problem in terms of correlated Gaussians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre-Brac, Bernard; Mathieu, Vincent

    2007-10-01

    In their textbook, Suzuki and Varga [Stochastic Variational Approach to Quantum-Mechanical Few-Body Problems (Springer, Berlin, 1998)] present the stochastic variational method with the correlated Gaussian basis in a very exhaustive way. However, the Fourier transform of these functions and their application to the management of a relativistic kinetic energy operator are missing and cannot be found in the literature. In this paper we present these interesting formulas. We also give a derivation for formulations concerning central potentials.

  16. USP Marion: A Few Prisoners Summon the Courage to Speak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C. Richards

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available USP Marion is the first supermax federal penitentiary. Marionization refers to the experimental control program used at this prison. The prisoners speaking in this article suffered many years of solitary confinement. This research brief discusses some of what they experienced in their own words. These are the recollections of a few Marion prisoners that have summoned the courage to speak out and share their darkest memories.

  17. USP Marion: A Few Prisoners Summon the Courage to Speak

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen C. Richards

    2015-01-01

    USP Marion is the first supermax federal penitentiary. Marionization refers to the experimental control program used at this prison. The prisoners speaking in this article suffered many years of solitary confinement. This research brief discusses some of what they experienced in their own words. These are the recollections of a few Marion prisoners that have summoned the courage to speak out and share their darkest memories.

  18. From few to many. Ultracold atoms in reduced dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, Andre Niklas

    2013-01-01

    This thesis reports on experimental studies exploring few and many-body physics of ultracold Bose and Fermi gases with reduced dimensionality. These experiments illustrate the versatility and great amount of control over the particle number, the interaction and other degrees of freedom, like the spin, that these generic quantum systems offer. In the first part of this thesis, we use quasi one-dimensional few-particle systems of one to ten fermionic atoms to investigate the crossover from few to many-body physics. This is achieved by measuring the interaction energy between a single impurity atom in a state vertical stroke ↓ right angle which repulsively interacts with an increasing number of majority atoms in a state vertical stroke ↑ right angle. We find that the system quickly approaches the results from the many-body theory, which describes the behavior of a single impurity immersed in a Fermi sea of an infinite number of majority particles. The second part of this thesis presents studies of the time evolution of a bosonic F=1 spinor BEC of 87 Rb atoms. In this system, we investigate the emergence and coarsening of ferromagnetic spin textures from initially unmagnetized samples. While the ferromagnetic domains grow, we observe the development of a spin space anisotropy which is in agreement with the predicted phase-diagram. The last part of this thesis presents our first steps towards the investigation of phase coherence of quasi two-dimensional quantum gases in the crossover from bosonic molecules to fermionic atoms.

  19. Weak localization in few-layer black phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Yuchen; Neal, Adam T; Zhou, Hong; Ye, Peide D

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted a comprehensive investigation into the magneto-transport properties of few-layer black phosphorus in terms of phase coherence length, phase coherence time, and mobility via weak localization measurement and Hall-effect measurement. We present magnetoresistance data showing the weak localization effect in bare p-type few-layer black phosphorus and reveal its strong dependence on temperature and carrier concentration. The measured weak localization agrees well with the Hikami–Larkin–Nagaoka model and the extracted phase coherence length of 104 nm at 350 mK, decreasing as ∼T −0.513+−0.053 with increased temperature. Weak localization measurement allows us to qualitatively probe the temperature-dependent phase coherence time τ ϕ , which is in agreement with the theory of carrier interaction in the diffusive regime. We also observe the universal conductance fluctuation phenomenon in few-layer black phosphorus within moderate magnetic field and low temperature regime. (paper)

  20. Rayleigh scattering in few-mode optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Wu, Hao; Hu, Xiaolong; Zhao, Ningbo; Mo, Qi; Li, Guifang

    2016-10-24

    The extremely low loss of silica fibers has enabled the telecommunication revolution, but single-mode fiber-optic communication systems have been driven to their capacity limits. As a means to overcome this capacity crunch, space-division multiplexing (SDM) using few-mode fibers (FMF) has been proposed and demonstrated. In single-mode optical fibers, Rayleigh scattering serves as the dominant mechanism for optical loss. However, to date, the role of Rayleigh scattering in FMFs remains elusive. Here we establish and experimentally validate a general model for Rayleigh scattering in FMFs. Rayleigh backscattering not only sets the intrinsic loss limit for FMFs but also provides the theoretical foundation for few-mode optical time-domain reflectometry, which can be used to probe perturbation-induced mode-coupling dynamics in FMFs. We also show that forward inter-modal Rayleigh scattering ultimately sets a fundamental limit on inter-modal-crosstalk for FMFs. Therefore, this work not only has implications specifically for SDM systems but also broadly for few-mode fiber optics and its applications in amplifiers, lasers, and sensors in which inter-modal crosstalk imposes a fundamental performance limitation.

  1. Planetary spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, U.

    1988-01-01

    The main goal of the research is charge coupled device (CCD) spectroscopic and imaging studies of the solar system in support of spacecraft investigations. Studies include the physical behavior of comets, the atmosphere of the gaseous planets, and the solid surfaces of satellites and asteroids. The major observing program consisted of approximately 50 nights of photometry of Comet Halley in order to resolve the controversy over this comet's rotation period. This data is presently being analyzed. Additional observing projects included the spectroscopic occultation of Charon by Pluto, reflection spectroscopy of Mercury, and a spectrum of the satellite Oberon. Mercury data does not corroborate the Fe(++) absorption feature reported by McCord and Clark at 8800 A but instead potentially shows a weaker feature at longer wavelengths. This position is in much closer accord with expectations for Mercury since a band center near 8800 A implies too little Fe(++) on Mercury, especially if band shifts with temperature are considered. The Pluto project proved that the deep methane absorptions visible in their combined specta are due soley to Pluto with Charon showing a flat and featureless spectrum. It appears that if Charon ever contained a substantial methane component, the satellite's low surface gravity could not hold it and the methane evaporated and escaped

  2. Intermolecular spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelbart, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    In this article some of the theoretical background is presented for the following papers on 'Intermolecular Spectroscopy and Dynamical Properties of Dense Systems'. In Section 1 we outline a simple semi-classical description of the interaction between optical radiation and matter. The motion of a many-body polarizability is introduced; limiting forms of this complicated quantity lead to the familiar cases of light scattering spectra. In Section 2 we consider the linear response approximation, and the equation of motion for the many-body density matrix is solved to first order in the matter-radiation interaction. The often quoted fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the time-dependent, equilibrium correlation functions are discussed. Section 3 treats the problem of the local field. In Section 4 we consider the special case of collision-induced light scattering by atomic fluids in the low-density limit. This allows us to focus on determining the interaction polarizability for simple gases. Finally, in Section 5 we distinguish between collision-induced and multiple light scattering, and discuss the double-light-scattering analyses which provide new information about critical and thermodynamically unstable fluids. (KBE)

  3. Femtosecond Broadband Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo-Y; Yoon, Sagwoon; Mathies, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is a new technique where a narrow bandwidth picosecond Raman pump pulse and a red-shifted broadband femtosecond Stokes probe pulse (with or without time delay between the pulses) act on a sample to produce a high resolution Raman gain spectrum with high efficiency and speed, free from fluorescence background interference. It can reveal vibrational structural information and dynamics of stationary or transient states. Here, the quantum picture for femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is used to develop the semiclassical coupled wave theory of the phenomenon and to derive an expression for the measurable Raman gain in FSRS. The semiclassical theory is applied to study the dependence of lineshapes in FSRS on the pump-probe time delay and to deduce vibrational dephasing times in cyclohexane in the ground state

  4. Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Lovejoy, Tracy C; Dellby, Niklas; Aoki, Toshihiro; Carpenter, R W; Rez, Peter; Soignard, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiangtao; Batson, Philip E; Lagos, Maureen J; Egerton, Ray F; Crozier, Peter A

    2014-10-09

    Vibrational spectroscopies using infrared radiation, Raman scattering, neutrons, low-energy electrons and inelastic electron tunnelling are powerful techniques that can analyse bonding arrangements, identify chemical compounds and probe many other important properties of materials. The spatial resolution of these spectroscopies is typically one micrometre or more, although it can reach a few tens of nanometres or even a few ångströms when enhanced by the presence of a sharp metallic tip. If vibrational spectroscopy could be combined with the spatial resolution and flexibility of the transmission electron microscope, it would open up the study of vibrational modes in many different types of nanostructures. Unfortunately, the energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy performed in the electron microscope has until now been too poor to allow such a combination. Recent developments that have improved the attainable energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope to around ten millielectronvolts now allow vibrational spectroscopy to be carried out in the electron microscope. Here we describe the innovations responsible for the progress, and present examples of applications in inorganic and organic materials, including the detection of hydrogen. We also demonstrate that the vibrational signal has both high- and low-spatial-resolution components, that the first component can be used to map vibrational features at nanometre-level resolution, and that the second component can be used for analysis carried out with the beam positioned just outside the sample--that is, for 'aloof' spectroscopy that largely avoids radiation damage.

  5. Carrier Lifetime in Exfoliated Few-Layer Graphene Determined from Intersubband Optical Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Thomas; Feldmann, Jochen; Da Como, Enrico

    2013-05-01

    We report a femtosecond transient spectroscopy study in the near to middle infrared range, 0.8-0.35 eV photon energy, on graphene and few layer graphene single flakes. The spectra show an evolving structure of photoinduced absorption bands superimposed on the bleaching caused by Pauli blocking of the interband optically coupled states. Supported by tight-binding model calculations, we assign the photoinduced absorption features to intersubband transitions as the number of layers is increased. Interestingly, the intersubband photoinduced resonances show a longer dynamics than the interband bleaching, because of their independence from the absolute energy of the carriers with respect to the Dirac point. The dynamic of these intersubband transitions reflects the lifetime of the hot carriers and provides an elegant method to access it in this important class of semimetals.

  6. Carrier lifetime in exfoliated few-layer graphene determined from intersubband optical transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Thomas; Feldmann, Jochen; Da Como, Enrico

    2013-05-24

    We report a femtosecond transient spectroscopy study in the near to middle infrared range, 0.8-0.35 eV photon energy, on graphene and few layer graphene single flakes. The spectra show an evolving structure of photoinduced absorption bands superimposed on the bleaching caused by Pauli blocking of the interband optically coupled states. Supported by tight-binding model calculations, we assign the photoinduced absorption features to intersubband transitions as the number of layers is increased. Interestingly, the intersubband photoinduced resonances show a longer dynamics than the interband bleaching, because of their independence from the absolute energy of the carriers with respect to the Dirac point. The dynamic of these intersubband transitions reflects the lifetime of the hot carriers and provides an elegant method to access it in this important class of semimetals.

  7. From few to many. Ultracold atoms in reduced dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenz, Andre Niklas

    2013-12-19

    This thesis reports on experimental studies exploring few and many-body physics of ultracold Bose and Fermi gases with reduced dimensionality. These experiments illustrate the versatility and great amount of control over the particle number, the interaction and other degrees of freedom, like the spin, that these generic quantum systems offer. In the first part of this thesis, we use quasi one-dimensional few-particle systems of one to ten fermionic atoms to investigate the crossover from few to many-body physics. This is achieved by measuring the interaction energy between a single impurity atom in a state vertical stroke ↓ right angle which repulsively interacts with an increasing number of majority atoms in a state vertical stroke ↑ right angle. We find that the system quickly approaches the results from the many-body theory, which describes the behavior of a single impurity immersed in a Fermi sea of an infinite number of majority particles. The second part of this thesis presents studies of the time evolution of a bosonic F=1 spinor BEC of {sup 87}Rb atoms. In this system, we investigate the emergence and coarsening of ferromagnetic spin textures from initially unmagnetized samples. While the ferromagnetic domains grow, we observe the development of a spin space anisotropy which is in agreement with the predicted phase-diagram. The last part of this thesis presents our first steps towards the investigation of phase coherence of quasi two-dimensional quantum gases in the crossover from bosonic molecules to fermionic atoms.

  8. Few helium atoms in quasi two-dimensional space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilic, Srecko; Vranjes, Leandra

    2003-01-01

    Two, three and four 3 He and 4 He atoms in quasi two-dimensional space above graphite and cesium surfaces and in 'harmonic' potential perpendicular to the surface have been studied. Using some previously examined variational wave functions and the Diffusion Monte Carlo procedure, it has been shown that all molecules: dimers, trimers and tetramers, are bound more strongly than in pure two- and three-dimensional space. The enhancement of binding with respect to unrestricted space is more pronounced on cesium than on graphite. Furthermore, for 3 He 3 ( 3 He 4 ) on all studied surfaces, there is an indication that the configuration of a dimer and a 'free' particle (two dimers) may be equivalently established

  9. Questions but precious few answers in renewable energy review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    This article focuses on the slow progress towards the new and strong drive for renewables promised in the UK Labour Party's manifesto, and the tentative proposal for 10% contribution of renewables by the year 2020. Onshore wind power and the planning system, key roles for offshore wind and biomass energy, growth in wave and solar power projects, increased funding for renewable energy research and development, the cost of delivering the 10% contribution of renewables, embedded power generation, and exemptions from the climate levy are discussed. The form that the stimulation of the market for renewable energy sources will take after the Non-Fossil-Fuel Obligation (NFFO) lapses, and the possibility of further NFFO orders are considered. (UK)

  10. Search for few-nucleon correlations in doubly inclusive processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strikman, M.I.; Frankfurt, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    Earlier work showed that the few-nucleon correlation model is useful in calculation of the inclusive production of cumulative particles at high energies. Certain integrated characteristics of doubly inclusive spectra in high-energy processes are investigated and permit direct information to be obtained on the structure of the correlations. Scattering of a high-energy lepton by a light nucleus with production of a cumulative nucleon is studied, with particular attention to the average transverse momentum of the hadrons recorded, and the doubly inclusive cross section averaged over the transverse momenta of the particles emitted in the forward hemisphere. Expressions are obtained for the integrated cross sections

  11. From few- to many-body quantum systems

    OpenAIRE

    Schiulaz, Mauro; Távora, Marco; Santos, Lea F.

    2018-01-01

    How many particles are necessary to make a many-body quantum system? To answer this question, we take as reference for the many-body limit a quantum system at half-filling and compare its properties with those of a system with $N$ particles, gradually increasing $N$ from 1. We show that the convergence of the static properties of the system with few particles to the many-body limit is fast. For $N \\gtrsim 4$, the density of states is already very close to Gaussian and signatures of many-body ...

  12. 2011 Asia Pacific Few-Body Conference Summary Remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, B. F.

    2013-01-01

    These remarks represent the author’s personal perspective regarding ideas presented at this fifth Asia Pacific Conference on Few-Body Problems in Physics. They are not intended as a comprehensive summary of what we witnessed during this week of stimulating presentations and intense discussions. However, these remarks do characterize some of the physics we heard and some of the key questions raised. The ideas presented will hopefully outlive the rapporteurs who brought their work and that of others to our attention here in the International Hall of the Sungkyunkwan University in Seoul, Republic of Korea. (author)

  13. Waves in the seas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J

    , steep nonsymmetric cnoidal waves, solitons and random waves. They have different properties too. Any wave form has a wave period (T), wave height (H) and speed (C) which depends on T. Still another type of waves are breaking waves near a coast...

  14. MBE growth of few-layer 2H-MoTe2 on 3D substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanath, Suresh; Sundar, Aditya; Liu, Xinyu; Azcatl, Angelica; Lochocki, Edward; Woll, Arthur R.; Rouvimov, Sergei; Hwang, Wan Sik; Lu, Ning; Peng, Xin; Lien, Huai-Hsun; Weisenberger, John; McDonnell, Stephen; Kim, Moon J.; Dobrowolska, Margaret; Furdyna, Jacek K.; Shen, Kyle; Wallace, Robert M.; Jena, Debdeep; Xing, Huili Grace

    2018-01-01

    MoTe2 is the least explored material in the Molybdenum-chalcogen family. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) provides a unique opportunity to tackle the small electronegativity difference between Mo and Te while growing layer by layer away from thermodynamic equilibrium. We find that for a few-layer MoTe2 grown at a moderate rate of ∼6 min per monolayer, a narrow window in temperature (above Te cell temperature) and Te:Mo ratio exists, where we can obtain pure phase 2H-MoTe2. This is confirmed using reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). For growth on CaF2, Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD) reveals a grain size of ∼90 Å and presence of twinned grains. In this work, we hypothesis the presence of excess Te incorporation in MBE grown few layer 2H-MoTe2. For film on CaF2, it is based on >2 Te:Mo stoichiometry using XPS as well as 'a' and 'c' lattice spacing greater than bulk 2H-MoTe2. On GaAs, its based on observations of Te crystallite formation on film surface, 2 × 2 superstructure observed in RHEED and low energy electron diffraction, larger than bulk c-lattice spacing as well as the lack of electrical conductivity modulation by field effect. Finally, thermal stability and air sensitivity of MBE 2H-MoTe2 is investigated by temperature dependent XRD and XPS, respectively.

  15. Auger electron spectroscopy, ionization loss spectroscopy, appearance potential spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riwan, R.

    1973-01-01

    The spectroscopy of surfaces using an incident electron beam is studied. The fundamental mechanisms are discussed together with the parameters involved in Auger emission: excitation of the atom, de-excitation by electron emission, and the migration of electrons towards the surface and their ejection. Some examples of applications are given (surface structures, metallurgy, chemical information). Two new techniques for analyzing surfaces are studied: ionization spectroscopy, and appearance potential spectroscopy [fr

  16. Wave fronts of electromagnetic cyclotron harmonic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, T.; Watanabe, T.

    1982-01-01

    In an inhomogeneous high-density magnetized plasma, the spatial properties of the wave fronts and ray trajectories of electromagnetic ordinary and extraordinary cyclotron harmonic waves are investigated. Those waves which are radiated from a local source are found to have wave fronts which are almost parallel to the magnetic field. Also, the reflective properties of the electromagnetic cyclotron harmonic waves are confirmed

  17. Nonresonant decay of lower hybrid waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, M.; Liberman, B.; Pesic, S.S.; Moreau, D.

    1979-01-01

    Parametric decay of Lower Hybrid waves has been extensively studied since a few years. To derive the dispersion relation of the decay waves, two different approaches have been used in the literature. In the first the pump electric field is assumed to be homogeneous in space (dipole approximation) and Vlasov Equation is integrated in the Oscillating Center Coordinates (OCC). In the second approach the parametric decay process is considered as the linear stage of a three wave interaction (pump, sideband and beat wave) and the dispersion relation is obtained from a recursive solution of Vlasov equation

  18. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter

    På foranledning af Löwenmark F.R.I, er der udført numeriske beregninger af Wave Dragons (herefter WD) armes effektivitet for forskellige geometriske udformninger. 5 geometriske modeller, hvor WD's arme er forkortet/forlænget er undersøgt for 3 forskellige drejninger af armene. I alt er 15...

  19. Laser wakefield electron acceleration. A novel approach employing supersonic microjets and few-cycle laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, Karl

    2011-01-01

    This thesis covers the few-cycle laser-driven acceleration of electrons in a laser-generated plasma. This process, known as laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA), relies on strongly driven plasma waves for the generation of accelerating gradients in the vicinity of several 100 GV/m, a value four orders of magnitude larger than that attainable by conventional accelerators. This thesis demonstrates that laser pulses with an ultrashort duration of 8 fs and a peak power of 6 TW allow the production of electron energies up to 50 MeV via LWFA. The special properties of laser accelerated electron pulses, namely the ultrashort pulse duration, the high brilliance, and the high charge density, open up new possibilities in many applications of these electron beams. (orig.)

  20. Quasiparticle energies, excitons, and optical spectra of few-layer black phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Vy; Fei, Ruixiang; Yang, Li

    2015-01-01

    We report first-principles GW–Bethe–Salpeter-equation (BSE) studies of excited-state properties of few-layer black phosphorus (BP) (phosphorene). With improved GW computational methods, we obtained converged quasiparticle band gaps and optical absorption spectra by the single-shot (G 0 W 0 ) procedure. Moreover, we reveal fine structures of anisotropic excitons, including the series of one-dimensional like wave functions, spin singlet–triplet splitting, and electron–hole binding energy spectra by solving BSE. An effective-mass model is employed to describe these electron–hole pairs, shedding light on estimating the exciton binding energy of anisotropic two-dimensional semiconductors without expensive ab initio simulations. Finally, the anisotropic optical response of BP is explained by using optical selection rules based on the projected single-particle density of states at band edges. (paper)

  1. A few proofs for nonexistence of the metastable states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazjevski, Atanas

    2007-01-01

    This paper is the bigger part of one until now unpublished author's work, whose title is 'A few proofs for nonexistence of the metastable states'. Because of a big volume of the work, the problems of supersaturated (metastable) steam which appears at the following of slightly, superheated, saturated or wet steam in the convergent and Laval nozzles will be discussed in the main. This steam is mentioned in the literature as one between of the strongest proofs for existence of metastable states in the substances. In this work the steam is not one -phase gaseous metastable steam, as it was thought until now, but yat it is nonequilibrium wet steam in which during the expanding process in the nozzles extreme small particles condensate, consisted of two, three or only few agglomerated molecules are formed which stay in heat, mechanical and internal nonequilibrium with the rest of the expanding gaseous phase of the steam. It means, that this steam, which is called a supersaturated or metastable steam, in fact does not exist in reality because it is nothing else but only nonequilibrium wet steam consisted of tho phases: the expanding gaseous phase of the steam in the nozzle and the mentioned small and nonequilibrium particles condensate which are formed there...

  2. Synthesis of hexagonal boron nitride graphene-like few layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, S.; Toury, B.; Journet, C.; Brioude, A.

    2014-06-01

    Self-standing highly crystallized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) mono-, bi- and few-layers have been obtained for the first time via the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route by adding lithium nitride (Li3N) micropowders to liquid-state polyborazylene (PBN). Incorporation of Li3N as a crystallization promoter allows the onset of crystallization of h-BN at a lower temperature (1200 °C) than under classical conditions (1800 °C). The hexagonal structure was confirmed by both electron and X-ray diffraction.Self-standing highly crystallized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) mono-, bi- and few-layers have been obtained for the first time via the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route by adding lithium nitride (Li3N) micropowders to liquid-state polyborazylene (PBN). Incorporation of Li3N as a crystallization promoter allows the onset of crystallization of h-BN at a lower temperature (1200 °C) than under classical conditions (1800 °C). The hexagonal structure was confirmed by both electron and X-ray diffraction. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01017e

  3. Few electron quantum dot coupling to donor implanted electron spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Martin; Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Neilson, Erik; Gamble, John; Muller, Richard; Jacobson, Toby; Ten-Eyck, Greg; Wendt, Joel; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Donor-based Si qubits are receiving increased interest because of recent demonstrations of high fidelity electron or nuclear spin qubits and their coupling. Quantum dot (QD) mediated interactions between donors are of interest for future coupling of two donors. We present experiment and modeling of a polysilicon/Si MOS QD, charge-sensed by a neighboring many electron QD, capable of coupling to one or two donor implanted electron spins (D) while tuned to the few electron regime. The unique design employs two neighboring gated wire FETs and self-aligned implants, which supports many configurations of implanted donors. We can access the (0,1) ⇔(1,0) transition between the D and QD, as well as the resonance condition between the few electron QD and two donors ((0,N,1) ⇔(0,N +1,0) ⇔(1,N,0)). We characterize capacitances and tunnel rate behavior combined with semi-classical and full configuration interaction simulations to study the energy landscape and kinetics of D-QD transitions. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Panel Flutter Emulation Using a Few Concentrated Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhital, Kailash; Han, Jae-Hung

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the feasibility of panel flutter emulation using a few concentrated forces. The concentrated forces are considered to be equivalent to aerodynamic forces. The equivalence is carried out using surface spline method and principle of virtual work. The structural modeling of the plate is based on the classical plate theory and the aerodynamic modeling is based on the piston theory. The present approach differs from the linear panel flutter analysis in scheming the modal aerodynamics forces with unchanged structural properties. The solutions for the flutter problem are obtained numerically using the standard eigenvalue procedure. A few concentrated forces were considered with an optimization effort to decide their optimal locations. The optimization process is based on minimizing the error between the flutter bounds from emulated and linear flutter analysis method. The emulated flutter results for the square plate of four different boundary conditions using six concentrated forces are obtained with minimal error to the reference value. The results demonstrated the workability and viability of using concentrated forces in emulating real panel flutter. In addition, the paper includes the parametric studies of linear panel flutter whose proper literatures are not available.

  5. Spurious solutions in few-body equations. II. Numerical investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.K.

    1979-01-01

    A recent analytic study of spurious solutions in few-body equations by Adhikari and Gloeckle is here complemented by numerical investigations. As proposed by Adhikari and Gloeckle we study numerically the spurious solutions in the three-body Weinberg type equations and draw some general conclusions about the existence of spurious solutions in three-body equations with the Weinberg kernel and in other few-body formulations. In particular we conclude that for most of the potentials we encounter in problems of nuclear physics the three-body Weinberg type equation will not have a spurious solution which may interfere with the bound state or scattering calculation. Hence, if proven convenient, the three-body Weinberg type equation can be used in practical calculations. The same conclusion is true for the three-body channel coupling array scheme of Kouri, Levin, and Tobocman. In the case of the set of six coupled four-body equations proposed by Rosenberg et al. and the set of the Bencze-Redish-Sloan equations a careful study of the possible spurious solutions is needed before using these equations in practical calculations

  6. Experiments on few-nucleon systems at MAMI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distler, M.O. . Author

    2008-01-01

    The experimental effort at the Mainz Microtron with respect to few-body physics is focused on a number of selected topics. The structure of 3 He has been studied in the reactions 3 He(ε, εn) and 3 He(ε, ε'p) with large (transversal) missing momenta and in quasi-elastic electron scattering. Experiments to determine the neutron electric form factor G en have been performed - a measurement at a four-momentum transfer Q 2 ∼ 1.5(GeV/c) 2 took place in July 2007. Electromagnetically induced two-nucleon knockout has been investigated in order to study the role of correlated nucleon-nucleon motion in the nucleus. Measurements of the (e,e' pn) reaction on 3 He and 16 O were performed for the first time. A triple-polarization experiment of type 3 He(ε, ε'p)d has been performed in August 2007, where, in addition, the spin of the knocked-out proton is analyzed. This measurement provides information on the spin-dependent momentum distribution of proton-deuteron clusters in the 3 He nucleus. By using this deuteron-tagging method spin-polarized 3 He might also serve as an effective polarized proton target for electron scattering experiments. Presented at the 20th Few-Body Conference, Pisa, Italy, 10-14 September 2007. (author)

  7. Hearing shapes of few electrons quantum drums: A configuration–interaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ţolea, F.; Ţolea, M., E-mail: tzolea@infim.ro

    2015-02-01

    The – highly remarkable – existence of non-congruent yet vibrationally isospectral shapes has been first proved theoretically and then also tested experimentally – by using electromagnetic waves in cavities, vibrating smectic films or electrons in nanostructures. In this context, we address the question whether isospectrality holds if two or more electrons interact electrostatically, using the accurate configuration–interaction method, in a discrete representation of the Bilby and Hawk shapes. Isospectral pairs offer an unique possibility to test how identical sets of single-particle energies may combine differently in the few-electrons eigenmodes, due to different wave functions spatial distributions. Our results point towards the break down of isospectrality in the presence of interactions. Thus one should be able to ”hear” the shapes of few electrons quantum drums. Interestingly however, for the analyzed two and three electrons cases, there exists an interaction strength (which can be tuned by changing the size of the shapes), for which the ground states energies of Bilby and Hawk coincide, but not the excited states as well. Wigner localization is studied and shown to occur at about the same size for both Bilby and Hawk shapes. Next, an exercise is proposed to use the two-electrons charge density of the Bilby and Hawk ground states in the phase extraction scheme as proposed by Moon et al. (2008). Results show that out-of-phase regions appear if the linear size of the shapes exceeds the Bohr radius as occupation of higher Slater determinants becomes significant.

  8. Hearing shapes of few electrons quantum drums: A configuration–interaction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ţolea, F.; Ţolea, M.

    2015-01-01

    The – highly remarkable – existence of non-congruent yet vibrationally isospectral shapes has been first proved theoretically and then also tested experimentally – by using electromagnetic waves in cavities, vibrating smectic films or electrons in nanostructures. In this context, we address the question whether isospectrality holds if two or more electrons interact electrostatically, using the accurate configuration–interaction method, in a discrete representation of the Bilby and Hawk shapes. Isospectral pairs offer an unique possibility to test how identical sets of single-particle energies may combine differently in the few-electrons eigenmodes, due to different wave functions spatial distributions. Our results point towards the break down of isospectrality in the presence of interactions. Thus one should be able to ”hear” the shapes of few electrons quantum drums. Interestingly however, for the analyzed two and three electrons cases, there exists an interaction strength (which can be tuned by changing the size of the shapes), for which the ground states energies of Bilby and Hawk coincide, but not the excited states as well. Wigner localization is studied and shown to occur at about the same size for both Bilby and Hawk shapes. Next, an exercise is proposed to use the two-electrons charge density of the Bilby and Hawk ground states in the phase extraction scheme as proposed by Moon et al. (2008). Results show that out-of-phase regions appear if the linear size of the shapes exceeds the Bohr radius as occupation of higher Slater determinants becomes significant

  9. Invited Article: Terahertz microfluidic chips sensitivity-enhanced with a few arrays of meta-atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serita, Kazunori; Matsuda, Eiki; Okada, Kosuke; Murakami, Hironaru; Kawayama, Iwao; Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2018-05-01

    We present a nonlinear optical crystal (NLOC)-based terahertz (THz) microfluidic chip with a few arrays of split ring resonators (SRRs) for ultra-trace and quantitative measurements of liquid solutions. The proposed chip operates on the basis of near-field coupling between the SRRs and a local emission of point like THz source that is generated in the process of optical rectification in NLOCs on a sub-wavelength scale. The liquid solutions flowing inside the microchannel modify the resonance frequency and peak attenuation in the THz transmission spectra. In contrast to conventional bio-sensing with far/near-field THz waves, our technique can be expected to compactify the chip design as well as realize high sensitive near-field measurement of liquid solutions without any high-power optical/THz source, near-field probes, and prisms. Using this chip, we have succeeded in observing the 31.8 fmol of ion concentration in actual amount of 318 pl water solutions from the shift of the resonance frequency. The technique opens the door to microanalysis of biological samples with THz waves and accelerates development of THz lab-on-chip devices.

  10. Invited Article: Terahertz microfluidic chips sensitivity-enhanced with a few arrays of meta-atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Serita

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a nonlinear optical crystal (NLOC-based terahertz (THz microfluidic chip with a few arrays of split ring resonators (SRRs for ultra-trace and quantitative measurements of liquid solutions. The proposed chip operates on the basis of near-field coupling between the SRRs and a local emission of point like THz source that is generated in the process of optical rectification in NLOCs on a sub-wavelength scale. The liquid solutions flowing inside the microchannel modify the resonance frequency and peak attenuation in the THz transmission spectra. In contrast to conventional bio-sensing with far/near-field THz waves, our technique can be expected to compactify the chip design as well as realize high sensitive near-field measurement of liquid solutions without any high-power optical/THz source, near-field probes, and prisms. Using this chip, we have succeeded in observing the 31.8 fmol of ion concentration in actual amount of 318 pl water solutions from the shift of the resonance frequency. The technique opens the door to microanalysis of biological samples with THz waves and accelerates development of THz lab-on-chip devices.

  11. Finite-size effects in the dynamics of few bosons in a ring potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, G.; Bengtsson, J.; Karabulut, E. Ö.; Kavoulakis, G. M.; Reimann, S. M.

    2018-02-01

    We study the temporal evolution of a small number N of ultra-cold bosonic atoms confined in a ring potential. Assuming that initially the system is in a solitary-wave solution of the corresponding mean-field problem, we identify significant differences in the time evolution of the density distribution of the atoms when it instead is evaluated with the many-body Schrödinger equation. Three characteristic timescales are derived: the first is the period of rotation of the wave around the ring, the second is associated with a ‘decay’ of the density variation, and the third is associated with periodic ‘collapses’ and ‘revivals’ of the density variations, with a factor of \\sqrt{N} separating each of them. The last two timescales tend to infinity in the appropriate limit of large N, in agreement with the mean-field approximation. These findings are based on the assumption of the initial state being a mean-field state. We confirm this behavior by comparison to the exact solutions for a few-body system stirred by an external potential. We find that the exact solutions of the driven system exhibit similar dynamical features.

  12. Ebooks Licensing and Canadian Copyright Legislation: A Few Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony G Horava

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Ebooks have become increasingly common in collection development strategies. The availability and delivery of monographs in digital formats has gained significantly in popularity in many libraries, particularly in the academic sector. Licensing is the common method of acquiring ebooks, whether as a subscription or a purchase. Libraries have had to transform selection and workflow processes in order to acquire ebooks in an efficient manner. Little attention, however, has been paid to the interplay between licensing as a contractual arrangement and the statutory rights available under Canadian copyright law. Fair dealing is a concept of critical importance in Canadian copyright, as it provides the foundation for user rights in support of culture, learning, and innovation. There are other provisions of specific value for libraries, such as interlibrary loans and access by persons with perceptual disabilities. This article will examine these issues and proposes a few strategies that libraries can adopt to ensure that statutory rights are not eroded in licensing agreements

  13. Room Temperature Memory for Few Photon Polarization Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupchak, Connor; Mittiga, Thomas; Jordan, Bertus; Nazami, Mehdi; Nolleke, Christian; Figueroa, Eden

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a room temperature quantum memory device based on Electromagnetically Induced Transparency capable of reliably storing and retrieving polarization qubits on the few photon level. Our system is realized in a vapor of 87Rb atoms utilizing a Λ-type energy level scheme. We create a dual-rail storage scheme mediated by an intense control field to allow storage and retrieval of any arbitrary polarization state. Upon retrieval, we employ a filtering system to sufficiently remove the strong pump field, and subject retrieved light states to polarization tomography. To date, our system has produced signal-to-noise ratios near unity with a memory fidelity of >80 % using coherent state qubits containing four photons on average. Our results thus demonstrate the feasibility of room temperature systems for the storage of single-photon-level photonic qubits. Such room temperature systems will be attractive for future long distance quantum communication schemes.

  14. Exact Monte Carlo for few-fermion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalos, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    The author reconsiders the fundamental difficulties of fermion Monte Carlo as applied to few-body systems. He concludes that necessary ingredients of successful algorithms include the following: there must be equal populations of random walkers that carry positive and negative weights. The positions of positive walkers should be selected from a distribution that uses Green's functions to couple all walkers. The positions of negative walkers should be generated from those of positive walkers by means of odd permutations. The correct importance functions that take into account the global interactions of the populations are different for positive and negative walkers. Use of such important functions breaks the symmetry that otherwise would exist between configurations (of the entire population) and configurations derived by interchanging positive and negative walkers. Based upon these observations, he has constructed a stable and accurate algorithm that solves a fully-polarized, three-dimensional three-body model problem

  15. Universal Behavior of Few-Boson Systems Using Potential Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kievsky, A.; Viviani, M.; Álvarez-Rodríguez, R.; Gattobigio, M.; Deltuva, A.

    2017-01-01

    The universal behavior of a three-boson system close to the unitary limit is encoded in a simple dependence of many observables in terms of few parameters. For example the product of the three-body parameter κ_∗ and the two-body scattering length a, κ_∗a depends on the angle ξ defined by E_3/E_2=tan"2ξ. A similar dependence is observed in the ratio a_A_D/a with a_A_D the boson-dimer scattering length. We use a two-parameter potential to determine this simple behavior and, as an application, to compute a_A_D for the case of three "4He atoms. (author)

  16. Universality in few-body systems with large scattering length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, H.-W.

    2005-01-01

    Effective Field Theory (EFT) provides a powerful framework that exploits a separation of scales in physical systems to perform systematically improvable, model-independent calculations. Particularly interesting are few-body systems with short-range interactions and large two-body scattering length. Such systems display remarkable universal features. In systems with more than two particles, a three-body force with limit cycle behavior is required for consistent renormalization already at leading order. We will review this EFT and some of its applications in the physics of cold atoms and nuclear physics. In particular, we will discuss the possibility of an infrared limit cycle in QCD. Recent extensions of the EFT approach to the four-body system and N-boson droplets in two spatial dimensions will also be addressed

  17. Global optimization for quantum dynamics of few-fermion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xikun; Pecak, Daniel; Sowiński, Tomasz; Sherson, Jacob; Nielsen, Anne E. B.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum state preparation is vital to quantum computation and quantum information processing tasks. In adiabatic state preparation, the target state is theoretically obtained with nearly perfect fidelity if the control parameter is tuned slowly enough. As this, however, leads to slow dynamics, it is often desirable to be able to carry out processes more rapidly. In this work, we employ two global optimization methods to estimate the quantum speed limit for few-fermion systems confined in a one-dimensional harmonic trap. Such systems can be produced experimentally in a well-controlled manner. We determine the optimized control fields and achieve a reduction in the ramping time of more than a factor of four compared to linear ramping. We also investigate how robust the fidelity is to small variations of the control fields away from the optimized shapes.

  18. Career planning and mentorship: a few key considerations for trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Sherif M

    2017-01-01

    Publishing and securing funding are considered our "academic currency", and therefore, both should be emphasized during training, both residency and fellowship. Trainees should make an effort to find funding opportunities at or outside of their institutions and try to identify their short- and long-term goals. Establishing a track record of publications can help trainees get hired, funded, and promoted as junior faculty, and effective networking and mentorship are critical determinants of academic success. Given the positive effects of mentorship, trainees should understand what comprises a good mentor-mentee relationship and how to optimize the mentoring process. The objective of this article is to discuss few key considerations for trainees in residency or fellowship regarding mentorship and career planning in academic medicine.

  19. Research on reconstruction of steel tube section from few projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Shuaijun; Wu Haifeng; Wang Kai

    2007-01-01

    Most parameters of steel tube can be acquired from CT image of the section so as to evaluate its quality. But large numbers of projections are needed in order to reconstruct the section image, so the collection and calculation of the projections consume lots of time. In order to solve the problem, reconstruction algorithms of steel tube from few projections are researched and the results are validated with simulation data in the paper. Three iterative algorithms, ART, MAP and OSEM, are attempted to reconstruct the section of steel tube by using the simulation model. Considering the prior information distributing of steel tube, we improve the algorithms and get better reconstruction images. The results of simulation experiment indicate that ART, MAP and OSEM can reconstruct accurate section images of steel tube from less than 20 projections and approximate images from 10 projections. (authors)

  20. The observation of nonlinear ion cyclotron wave excitation during high-harmonic fast wave heating in the large helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasahara, H.; Seki, T.; Kumazawa, R.; Saito, K.; Mutoh, T.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Igami, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Yamada, I.; Tokuzawa, T.; Ohdachi, S.; Morita, S.; Nomura, G.; Shimpo, F.; Komori, A.; Motojima, O.; Oosako, T.; Takase, Y.

    2008-01-01

    A wave detector, a newly designed magnetic probe, is installed in the large helical device (LHD). This wave detector is a 100-turn loop coil with electrostatic shield. Comparing a one-loop coil to this detector, this detector has roughly constant power coupling in the lower frequency range of 40 MHz, and it can easily detect magnetic wave in the frequency of a few megahertz. During high-harmonic fast wave heating, lower frequency waves (<10 MHz) were observed in the LHD for the first time, and for the power density threshold of lower frequency wave excitation (7.5 MHz) the power density of excited pumped wave (38.47 MHz) was approximately -46 dBm/Hz. These lower frequencies are kept constant for electron density and high energy particle distribution, and these lower frequency waves seem to be ion cyclotron waves caused by nonlinear wave-particle interaction, for example, parametric decay instability.

  1. Heavy quark spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosner, J.L.

    1985-10-01

    New experimental and theoretical developments in heavy quark spectroscopy are reviewed. From studies of J/psi decays, the eta' is found to have some ''glue'' or other inert component, while the iota (a glueball candidate) probably contains some quarks as well. The xi(2.2) persists in new Mark III data, but is not seen by the DM2 collaboration. The production of charmonium states by anti pp reactions is reviewed. First evidence for a P- wave charmed meson, D(2420), has been presented by the ARGUS group. Radiative UPSILON decay studies fail to confirm the zeta(8.3) and begin to place useful limits on Higgs bosons. First results from an experiment at Fermilab on low-background hadronic production of UPSILON states are shown. Accurate measurements of chi/sub b/(1P) masses by the ARGUS collaboration are noted, and interpreted as favoring scalar quark confinement. Studies of t and other heavy quarks will probe the q anti q interaction below 0.05 fm, are likely to be strongly affected by t anti t-Z interference, and can provide varied information on Higgs bosons. 144 refs., 21 figs

  2. Impact of Wave Dragon on Wave Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Tedd, James; Kramer, Morten

    This report is an advisory paper for use in determining the wave dragon effects on hydrography, by considering the effect on the wave climate in the region of a wave dragon. This is to be used in the impact assessment for the Wave Dragon pre-commercial demonstrator.......This report is an advisory paper for use in determining the wave dragon effects on hydrography, by considering the effect on the wave climate in the region of a wave dragon. This is to be used in the impact assessment for the Wave Dragon pre-commercial demonstrator....

  3. Supersonic micro-jets and their application to few-cycle laser-driven electron acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, Karl

    2009-01-01

    This thesis covers the few-cycle laser-driven acceleration of electrons in a laser-generated plasma. The laser system employed in this work is a new development based on optical parametric chirped pulse amplification and is the only multi-TW few-cycle laser in the world. In the experiment, the laser beam is focused onto a supersonic helium gas jet which leads to the formation of a plasma channel. The laser pulse, having an intensity of 10 19 W/cm 2 propagates through the plasma with an electron density of 2 x 10 19 cm -3 and forms via a highly nonlinear interaction a strongly anharmonic plasma wave. The amplitude of the wave is so large that the wave breaks, thereby injecting electrons from the background plasma into the accelerating phase. The energy transfer from the laser pulse to the plasma is so strong that the maximum propagation distance is limited to the 100 m range. Therefore, gas jets specifically tuned to these requirements have to be employed. The properties of microscopic supersonic gas jets are thoroughly analyzed in this work. Based on numeric flow simulation, this study encompasses several extensive parameter studies that illuminate all relevant features of supersonic flows in microscopic gas nozzles. This allowed the optimized design of de Laval nozzles with exit diameters ranging from 150 μm to 3 mm. The employment of these nozzles in the experiment greatly improved the electron beam quality. After these optimizations, the laser-driven electron accelerator now yields monoenergetic electron pulses with energies up to 50 MeV and charges between one and ten pC. The electron beam has a typical divergence of 5 mrad and comprises an energy spectrum that is virtually free from low energetic background. The electron pulse duration could not yet be determined experimentally but simulations point towards values in the range of 1 fs. The acceleration gradient is estimated from simulation and experiment to be approximately 0.5 TV/m. The electron accelerator

  4. Supersonic micro-jets and their application to few-cycle laser-driven electron acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Karl

    2009-07-23

    This thesis covers the few-cycle laser-driven acceleration of electrons in a laser-generated plasma. The laser system employed in this work is a new development based on optical parametric chirped pulse amplification and is the only multi-TW few-cycle laser in the world. In the experiment, the laser beam is focused onto a supersonic helium gas jet which leads to the formation of a plasma channel. The laser pulse, having an intensity of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} propagates through the plasma with an electron density of 2 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} and forms via a highly nonlinear interaction a strongly anharmonic plasma wave. The amplitude of the wave is so large that the wave breaks, thereby injecting electrons from the background plasma into the accelerating phase. The energy transfer from the laser pulse to the plasma is so strong that the maximum propagation distance is limited to the 100 m range. Therefore, gas jets specifically tuned to these requirements have to be employed. The properties of microscopic supersonic gas jets are thoroughly analyzed in this work. Based on numeric flow simulation, this study encompasses several extensive parameter studies that illuminate all relevant features of supersonic flows in microscopic gas nozzles. This allowed the optimized design of de Laval nozzles with exit diameters ranging from 150 {mu}m to 3 mm. The employment of these nozzles in the experiment greatly improved the electron beam quality. After these optimizations, the laser-driven electron accelerator now yields monoenergetic electron pulses with energies up to 50 MeV and charges between one and ten pC. The electron beam has a typical divergence of 5 mrad and comprises an energy spectrum that is virtually free from low energetic background. The electron pulse duration could not yet be determined experimentally but simulations point towards values in the range of 1 fs. The acceleration gradient is estimated from simulation and experiment to be approximately 0.5 TV/m. The

  5. Wave energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittaker, T.J.T. (Queen' s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (UK)); White, P.R.S. (Lanchester Polytechnic, Coventry (UK)); Baker, A.C.J. (Binnie and Partners, London (UK))

    1988-10-01

    An informal discussion on various wave energy converters is reported. These included a prototype oscillating water column (OWC) device being built on the Isle of Islay in Scotland; the SEA Clam; a tapering channel device (Tapchan) raising incoming waves into a lagoon on a Norwegian island and an OWC device on the same island. The Norwegian devices are delivering electricity at about 5.5p/KWh and 4p/KWh respectively with possibilities for reduction to 2.5-3p/KWh and 3p/KWh under favourable circumstances. The discussion ranged over comparisons with progress in wind power, engineering aspects, differences between inshore and offshore devices, tidal range and energy storage. (UK).

  6. Gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, I; Moschella, U; Fre, P

    2001-01-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) are a hot topic and promise to play a central role in astrophysics, cosmology, and theoretical physics. Technological developments have led us to the brink of their direct observation, which could become a reality in the coming years. The direct observation of GWs will open an entirely new field: GW astronomy. This is expected to bring a revolution in our knowledge of the universe by allowing the observation of previously unseen phenomena, such as the coalescence of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes), the fall of stars into supermassive black holes, stellar core collapses, big-bang relics, and the new and unexpected.With a wide range of contributions by leading scientists in the field, Gravitational Waves covers topics such as the basics of GWs, various advanced topics, GW detectors, astrophysics of GW sources, numerical applications, and several recent theoretical developments. The material is written at a level suitable for postgraduate students entering the field.

  7. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter; Brorsen, Michael

    Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004.......Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004....

  8. Features of single and double ionization processes induced by few cycle laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starace, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The advent of laser pulses with attosecond pulse lengths ushers in the regime of few cycle laser pulse interactions with atoms and ions, including the interesting cases of single and half cycle laser pulses. In this talk I will present results of recent studies of single electron ionization/detachment and double electron ionization/detachment produced by a few cycle laser pulse. For the former case, we shall demonstrate that the ionized/detached electron momentum distribution reflects the interference of electron probability wave packets produced by each half cycle of a single cycle pulse. Also, that the ionized/detached electron momentum distribution uniquely characterizes the phase of the single cycle laser pulse within the laser pulse envelope. Regarding double ionization/detachment, our numerical experiments have shown that single cycle and double half cycle pulses produce different electron angular distributions. Some double ionization features that are present only in the single cycle case can only have been produced by electron impact ionization during rescattering of an initially ionized electron and thus represent a sensitive measure of the rescattering process. Refs. 2 (author)

  9. Method of hyperspherical functions in a few-body quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhibuti, R.I.; Krupennikova, N.B.

    1984-01-01

    A new method for solving a few-body problem in quantum mechanics based on the expansion of the wave function of many-particle system in terms of basis hyperspherical functions is outlined in the monograph. This method gives the possibility to obtain important results in nuclear physics. A materials of general character is presented which can be useful when considering a few-body problem in atomic and molecular physics as well as in elementary particle physics. The paper deals with the theory of hyperspherical functions and the method of expansion in terms of hyperspherical functions basis can be formally considered as a certain generalization of the partial expansion method in the two-body problem. The Raynal-Revai theory is stated for the three-body problem and coe-- fficients of unitary transformations for four-particle hyperspherical function coefficients are introduced. Five-particle hyperspherical functions are introduced and an attempt of generalization of the theory for the systems With any number of particles has been made. The rules of plotting symmetrized hyperspherical functions for three and four identical particles are given. Also described is the method of expansion in terms of hyperspherical functions basis in the coordinate and impulse representations for discrete and continuous spectrum, respectively

  10. A generalized Talmi-Moshinsky transformation for few-body and direct interaction matrix elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobocman, W.

    1981-01-01

    A set of basis states for use in evaluating matrix elements of few-body system operators is suggested. These basis states are products of harmonic oscillator wave functions having as arguments a set of Jacobi coordinates for the system. We show that these harmonic oscillator functions can be chosen in a manner that allows such a product to be expanded as a finite sum of the corresponding products for any other set of Jacobi coordinates. This result is a generalization of the Talmi-Moshinsky transformation for two equal-mass particles to a system of any number of particles of arbitrary masses. With the help of our method the multidimensional integral which must be performed to evaluate a few-body matrix element can be transformed into a sum of products of three dimensional integrals. The coefficients in such an expansion are generalized Talmi-Moshinsky coefficients. The method is tested by calculation of a matrix element for knockout scattering for a simple three-body-system. The results indicate that the method is a viable calculational tool. (orig.)

  11. Spectroscopy Division: progress report for 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, A.; Marathe, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarises the work done by members of the Spectroscopy Division both within BARC as well as in scientific institutions elsewhere during the calendar year 1990. Main areas of research activity include atomic spectroscopy for hyperfine structure and isotope shift determination, theoretical and experimental studies of diatomic molecules, infrared and Raman spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules, design and fabrication of beam line optics for INDUS-I synchrotron radiation source, beam foil spectroscopy and laser spectroscopy of various atomic and molecular systems. Major experimental facilities that have been utilised include a fourier transform spectrometer, an excimer laser pumped dye-laser and a continous wave argon-ion laser. The report also includes the spectroscopic analytical service rendered for various DAE units and describes briefly some new analytical facilities like laser enhanced ionization in flames and resonance ionization mass spectroscopy using pulsed lasers which are being set up. The above activites were reported by members of the Spectroscopy Division via invited lectures, papers presented in various national and international conferences and publication in scientific journals. Details of these are given at the end of the report. (author). figs., tabs

  12. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  13. The dawn of X‐ray spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerward, Leif

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a few episodes from the early days of X‐ray spectroscopy. It relies on contemporary publications, especially those by Barkla, Moseley, Siegbahn, and Compton. The paper addresses the subject from the vantage point of physics and should be of interest to the X‐ray spectroscopist...

  14. Wave-function reconstruction in a graded semiconductor superlattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyssenko, V. G.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Meinhold, D.

    2004-01-01

    We reconstruct a test wave function in a strongly coupled, graded well-width superlattice by resolving the spatial extension of the interband polarisation and deducing the wave function employing non-linear optical spectroscopy. The graded gap superlattice allows us to precisely control the dista...

  15. VLF wave injections from the ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliwell, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments on wave-particle interactions using VLF whistler-mode waves injected into the magnetosphere from Antartica are described. The injected signals are single-frequency coherent waves whose amplitudes and frequencies may be changed slowly with time, or else two or more coherent wave trains transmitted simultaneously to determine the nature of the response to multifrequency excitation. The waves may be amplified 30 dB or more and may trigger intense emissions having bandwidths that vary from a few to several hundred Hertz. In most cases significant growth and triggering occur only when the driving signal is essentially monochromatic (bandwidth 10 Hz). If two frequencies are transmitted simultaneously the signal at the lower frequency tends to be suppressed by 20 dB or more. These results are interpreted in terms of a feedback interaction between the waves and counter-streaming cyclotron resonant electrons in a region several hundred wavelengths long, centered on the magnetic equator.

  16. From Selenium- to Tellurium-Based Glass Optical Fibers for Infrared Spectroscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Lucas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chalcogenide glasses are based on sulfur, selenium and tellurium elements, and have been studied for several decades regarding different applications. Among them, selenide glasses exhibit excellent infrared transmission in the 1 to 15 µm region. Due to their good thermo-mechanical properties, these glasses could be easily shaped into optical devices such as lenses and optical fibers. During the past decade of research, selenide glass fibers have been proved to be suitable for infrared sensing in an original spectroscopic method named Fiber Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy (FEWS. FEWS has provided very nice and promising results, for example for medical diagnosis. Then, some sophisticated fibers, also based on selenide glasses, were developed: rare-earth doped fibers and microstructured fibers. In parallel, the study of telluride glasses, which can have transmission up to 28 µm due to its atom heaviness, has been intensified thanks to the DARWIN mission led by the European Space Agency (ESA. The development of telluride glass fiber enables a successful observation of CO2 absorption band located around 15 µm. In this paper we review recent results obtained in the Glass and Ceramics Laboratory at Rennes on the development of selenide to telluride glass optical fibers, and their use for spectroscopy from the mid to the far infrared ranges.

  17. CMS-Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Coastal Inlets Research Program CMS -Wave CMS -Wave is a two-dimensional spectral wind-wave generation and transformation model that employs a forward...marching, finite-difference method to solve the wave action conservation equation. Capabilities of CMS -Wave include wave shoaling, refraction... CMS -Wave can be used in either on a half- or full-plane mode, with primary waves propagating from the seaward boundary toward shore. It can

  18. Selective Coherent Excitation of Charged Density Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsvetkov, A.A.; Sagar, D.M.; Loosdrecht, P.H.M. van; Marel, D. van der

    2003-01-01

    Real time femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study collective and single particle excitations in the charge density wave state of the quasi-1D metal, blue bronze. Along with the previously observed collective amplitudon excitation, the spectra show several additional coherent features.

  19. Cpuf: Chirped-Pulse Microwave Spectroscopy in Pulsed Uniform Supersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suits, Arthur; Abeysekera, Chamara; Zack, Lindsay N.; Joalland, Baptiste; Ariyasingha, Nuwandi M.; Park, Barratt; Field, Robert W.; Sims, Ian

    2015-06-01

    Chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy has stimulated a resurgence of interest in rotational spectroscopy owing to the dramatic reduction in spectral acquisition time it enjoys when compared to cavity-based instruments. This suggests that it might be possible to adapt the method to study chemical reaction dynamics and even chemical kinetics using rotational spectroscopy. The great advantage of this would be clear, quantifiable spectroscopic signatures for polyatomic products as well as the possibility to identify and characterize new radical reaction products and transient intermediates. To achieve this, however, several conditions must be met: 1) products must be thermalized at low temperature to maximize the population difference needed to achieve adequate signal levels and to permit product quantification based on the rotational line strength; 2) a large density and volume of reaction products is also needed to achieve adequate signal levels; and 3) for kinetics studies, a uniform density and temperature is needed throughout the course of the reaction. These conditions are all happily met by the uniform supersonic flow produced from a Laval nozzle expansion. In collaboration with the Field group at MIT we have developed a new instrument we term a CPUF (Chirped-pulse/Uniform Flow) spectrometer in which we can study reaction dynamics, photochemistry and kinetics using broadband microwave and millimeter wave spectroscopy as a product probe. We will illustrate the performance of the system with a few examples of photodissociation and reaction dynamics, and also discuss a number of challenges unique to the application of chirped-pulse microwave spectroscopy in the collisional environment of the flow. Future directions and opportunities for application of CPUF will also be explored.

  20. Biomolecules Electrochemical Sensing Properties of a PMo11V@N-Doped Few Layer Graphene Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana M. Fernandes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel hybrid nanocomposite, PMo11V@N-doped few layer graphene, was prepared by a one-step protocol through direct immobilization of the tetrabutylammonium salt of a vanadium-substituted phosphomolybdate (PMo11V onto N-doped few layer graphene (N-FLG. The nanocomposite characterization by FTIR and XPS confirmed its successful synthesis. Glassy carbon modified electrodes with PMo11V and PMo11V@N-FLG showed cyclic voltammograms consistent with surface-confined redox processes attributed to Mo-centred reductions (MoVI→MoV and a vanadium reduction (VV→VIV. Furthermore, PMo11V@N-FLG modified electrodes showed good stability and well-resolved redox peaks with high current intensities. The observed enhancement of PMo11V electrochemical properties is a consequence of a strong electronic communication between the POM and the N-doped few layer graphene. Additionally, the electro-catalytic and sensing properties towards acetaminophen (AC and theophylline (TP were evaluated by voltammetric techniques using a glassy carbon electrode modified with PMo11V@N-FLG. Under the conditions used, the square wave voltammetric peak current increased linearly with AC concentration in the presence of TP, but showing two linear ranges: 1.2 × 10−6 to 1.2 × 10−4 and 1.2 × 10−4 to 4.8 × 10−4 mol dm−3, with different AC sensitivity values, 0.022 A/mol dm−3 and 0.035 A/mol dm−3, respectively (detection limit, DL = 7.5 × 10−7 mol dm−3.

  1. Astrophysical sources of gravitational waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, G. E-mail: losurdo@galileo.pi.infn.it

    2000-05-01

    The interferometric detectors of gravitational waves (GW) (such as VIRGO and LIGO) will search for events in a frequency band within a few Hz and a few kHz, where several sources are expected to emit. In this talk we outline briefly the current theoretical knowledge on the emission of GW in events such as the coalescence of compact binaries, the gravitational collapse, the spinning of a neutron stars. Expected amplitudes are compared with the target sensitivity of the VIRGO/LIGO interferometric detectors.

  2. Why are there so few fish in the sea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrete Vega, Greta; Wiens, John J

    2012-06-22

    The most dramatic gradient in global biodiversity is between marine and terrestrial environments. Terrestrial environments contain approximately 75-85% of all estimated species, but occupy only 30 per cent of the Earth's surface (and only approx. 1-10% by volume), whereas marine environments occupy a larger area and volume, but have a smaller fraction of Earth's estimated diversity. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain this disparity, but there have been few large-scale quantitative tests. Here, we analyse patterns of diversity in actinopterygian (ray-finned) fishes, the most species-rich clade of marine vertebrates, containing 96 per cent of fish species. Despite the much greater area and productivity of marine environments, actinopterygian richness is similar in freshwater and marine habitats (15 150 versus 14 740 species). Net diversification rates (speciation-extinction) are similar in predominantly freshwater and saltwater clades. Both habitats are dominated by two hyperdiverse but relatively recent clades (Ostariophysi and Percomorpha). Remarkably, trait reconstructions (for both living and fossil taxa) suggest that all extant marine actinopterygians were derived from a freshwater ancestor, indicating a role for ancient extinction in explaining low marine richness. Finally, by analysing an entirely aquatic group, we are able to better sort among potential hypotheses for explaining the paradoxically low diversity of marine environments.

  3. Few-particle quantum magnetism with ultracold atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murmann, Simon

    2015-11-25

    This thesis reports on the deterministic preparation of magnetically ordered states in systems of few fermionic atoms. We follow the concept of quantum simulation and use {sup 6}Li atoms in two different hyperfine states to mimic the behavior of electrons in a solidstate system. In a first experiment, we simulate the two-site Hubbard model by using two atoms in an isolated double-well potential. We prepare the two-particle ground state of this model with a fidelity exceeding 90%. By introducing strong repulsive interactions, we are able to realize a pure spin model and describe the energy spectrum with a two-site Heisenberg Hamiltonian. In a second experiment, we realize Heisenberg spin chains of up to four atoms in a single strongly-elongated trapping potential. Here, the atoms self-align along the potential axis due to strong repulsive interactions. We introduce two novel measurement techniques to identify the state of the spin chains and thereby confirm that we can deterministically prepare antiferromagnetic ground-state systems. This constitutes the first observation of quantum magnetism with fermionic atoms that exceeds nearest-neighbor correlations. Both the double-well system and the spin chains can be seen as building blocks of larger ground-state spin systems. Their deterministic preparation therefore opens up a new bottom-up approach to the experimental realization of quantum many-body systems with ultracold atoms.

  4. Classical behavior of few-electron parabolic quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftja, O.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dots are intricate and fascinating systems to study novel phenomena of great theoretical and practical interest because low dimensionality coupled with the interplay between strong correlations, quantum confinement and magnetic field creates unique conditions for emergence of fundamentally new physics. In this work we consider two-dimensional semiconductor quantum dot systems consisting of few interacting electrons confined in an isotropic parabolic potential. We study the many-electron quantum ground state properties of such systems in presence of a perpendicular magnetic field as the number of electrons is varied using exact numerical diagonalizations and other approaches. The results derived from the calculations of the quantum model are then compared to corresponding results for a classical model of parabolically confined point charges who interact with a Coulomb potential. We find that, for a wide range of parameters and magnetic fields considered in this work, the quantum ground state energy is very close to the classical energy of the most stable classical configuration under the condition that the classical energy is properly adjusted to incorporate the quantum zero point motion.

  5. Few-MeV neutrons incident on yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budtz-Jorgensen, C.; Guenther, P.; Smith, A.; Whalen, J.

    1982-09-01

    Neutron total and scattering cross sections of elemental yttrium are measured in the few-MeV region with broad resolutions. The total-cross section measurements extend from approx. = 0.5 to 4.2 MeV in steps of less than or equal to 0.1 MeV. Neutron elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured from approx. = 1.5 to 4.0 MeV, at incident-neutron energy intervals of less than or equal to 50 keV and at ten or more scattering angles distributed between 20 and 160 deg. Inelastically-scattered neutron groups are observed corresponding to the excitation of levels at 909 +- 23, 1504 +- 20, 1747 +- 16, 2224 +- 16, 2567 +- 26, 2889 +- 12 and 3104 +- 10 keV. The experimental results are discussed in terms of the spherical optical-statistical, coupled-channels and core-coupling models and compared with corresponding quantities given in the evaluated nuclear data file ENDF/B-V

  6. Few-cycle surface plasmon enhanced electron acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racz, P.; Lenner, M.; Kroo, N.; Farkas, Gy.; Dombi, P.; Takao Fuji; Krausz, F.; Irvine, S.E.; Elezzabi, A.Y.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. It is possible to generate high-quality ultrafast electron beams with keV energy based on surface plasmon-enhanced electron acceleration. The beam generated this way can be also used to investigate ultrafast phenomena in the plasmon field. For the better understanding of the temporal behavior of these ultrafast surface processes we carried out time-resolved experiments with 5.5 fs laser pulses for the first time. In this experiment, we executed an autocorrelation measurement with an ultra-broadband interferometer. By generating surface plasmons at the output of the interferometer, we measured the plasmonic photocurrent as a function of the delay between the interferometer arms. Figure (a) shows a typical measured result, and figure (b) shows the fourth order calculated autocorrelation function of the 5.5 fs long laser pulse, corresponding to the fourth order nonlinearity of the electron emission process. According to the correspondence of these two curves, we can also state that the length of the generated surface plasmon pulse is only 2-3 optical cycles. As a further experiment, we executed spectrally resolved measurements of the electron beam at higher intensities. According to these results, it is possible to reach electron beams with keV energy in the few-cycle regime too. It was found that the field strength of the surface plasmons is x 7 to x 30 higher than that of the focused laser pulse.

  7. Force-velocity measurements of a few growing actin filaments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coraline Brangbour

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization of actin in filaments generates forces that play a pivotal role in many cellular processes. We introduce a novel technique to determine the force-velocity relation when a few independent anchored filaments grow between magnetic colloidal particles. When a magnetic field is applied, the colloidal particles assemble into chains under controlled loading or spacing. As the filaments elongate, the beads separate, allowing the force-velocity curve to be precisely measured. In the widely accepted Brownian ratchet model, the transduced force is associated with the slowing down of the on-rate polymerization. Unexpectedly, in our experiments, filaments are shown to grow at the same rate as when they are free in solution. However, as they elongate, filaments are more confined in the interspace between beads. Higher repulsive forces result from this higher confinement, which is associated with a lower entropy. In this mechanism, the production of force is not controlled by the polymerization rate, but is a consequence of the restriction of filaments' orientational fluctuations at their attachment point.

  8. Verifying black hole orbits with gravitational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drasco, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Gravitational waves from test masses bound to geodesic orbits of rotating black holes are simulated, using Teukolsky's black hole perturbation formalism, for about ten thousand generic orbital configurations. Each binary radiates power exclusively in modes with frequencies that are integer-linear combinations of the orbit's three fundamental frequencies. General spectral properties are found with a survey of orbits about a black hole taken to be rotating at 80% of the maximal spin. The orbital eccentricity is varied from 0.1 to 0.9. Inclination ranges from 20 deg. to 160 deg. and comes to within 20 deg. of polar. Semilatus rectum is varied from 1.2 to 3 times the value at the innermost stable circular orbits. The following general spectral properties are found: (i) 99% of the radiated power is typically carried by a few hundred modes, and at most by about a thousand modes, (ii) the dominant frequencies can be grouped into a small number of families defined by fixing two of the three integer frequency multipliers, and (iii) the specifics of these trends can be qualitatively inferred from the geometry of the orbit under consideration. Detections using triperiodic analytic templates modeled on these general properties would constitute a verification of radiation from an adiabatic sequence of black hole orbits and would recover the evolution of the fundamental orbital frequencies. In an analogy with ordinary spectroscopy, this would compare to observing the Bohr model's atomic hydrogen spectrum without being able to rule out alternative atomic theories or nuclei. The suitability of such a detection technique is demonstrated using snapshots computed at 12-hour intervals throughout the last three years before merger of a kludged inspiral. The system chosen is typical of those thought to occur in galactic nuclei and to be observable with space-based gravitational wave detectors like LISA. Because of circularization, the number of excited modes decreases as the binary

  9. Analytical applications of spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creaser, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    This book provides an up to date overview of recent developments in analytical spectroscopy, with a particular emphasis on the common themes of chromatography - spectroscopy combinations, Fourier transform methods, and data handling techniques, which have played an increasingly important part in the development of all spectroscopic techniques. The book contains papers originally presented at a conference entitled 'Spectroscopy Across The Spectrum' held jointly with the first 'International Near Infrared Spectroscopy Conference' at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK, in July 1987, which have been edited and rearranged with some additional material. Each section includes reviews of key areas of current research as well as short reports of new developments. The fields covered are: Near Infrared Spectroscopy; Infrared Spectroscopy; Mass Spectroscopy; NMR Spectroscopy; Atomic and UV/Visible Spectroscopy; Chemometrics and Data Analysis. (author)

  10. Tropical cyclogenesis in a tropical wave critical layer: easterly waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Dunkerton

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of tropical depressions within tropical waves over the Atlantic and eastern Pacific is usually preceded by a "surface low along the wave" as if to suggest a hybrid wave-vortex structure in which flow streamlines not only undulate with the waves, but form a closed circulation in the lower troposphere surrounding the low. This structure, equatorward of the easterly jet axis, is identified herein as the familiar critical layer of waves in shear flow, a flow configuration which arguably provides the simplest conceptual framework for tropical cyclogenesis resulting from tropical waves, their interaction with the mean flow, and with diabatic processes associated with deep moist convection. The recirculating Kelvin cat's eye within the critical layer represents a sweet spot for tropical cyclogenesis in which a proto-vortex may form and grow within its parent wave. A common location for storm development is given by the intersection of the wave's critical latitude and trough axis at the center of the cat's eye, with analyzed vorticity centroid nearby. The wave and vortex live together for a time, and initially propagate at approximately the same speed. In most cases this coupled propagation continues for a few days after a tropical depression is identified. For easterly waves, as the name suggests, the propagation is westward. It is shown that in order to visualize optimally the associated Lagrangian motions, one should view the flow streamlines, or stream function, in a frame of reference translating horizontally with the phase propagation of the parent wave. In this co-moving frame, streamlines are approximately equivalent to particle trajectories. The closed circulation is quasi-stationary, and a dividing streamline separates air within the cat's eye from air outside. The critical layer equatorward of the easterly jet axis is important to tropical cyclogenesis because its cat's eye provides (i a region of

  11. Few atom chemistry of the trans actinide element rutherfordium (Rf)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagame, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Studies of chemical properties of the trans actinide elements - starting with element 104 (Rf) - offer the unique opportunity to obtain information about trends in the Periodic Table at the limits of nuclear stability and to assess the magnitude of the influence of relativistic effects on chemical properties. To explore experimentally the influence of relativistic effects of electron shell structure, we study the chemical properties of the trans actinide elements. So far, we have developed some experimental apparatuses for the study of chemical properties of the trans actinide elements: a beam-line safety system for the usage of the gas-jet coupled radioactive 248 Cm target chamber for the production of trans actinides, a rotating wheel catcher apparatus for the measurement of α particles and spontaneous fission decay of trans actinides and an automated rapid chemical separation apparatus based on high performance liquid chromatography. The trans actinide nuclide, the element 104, 261 Rf (t 1/2 = 78 s) has been successfully produced via the reactions of 248 Cm( 18 O,5n) at the JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) tandem accelerator. The evaluated production cross section was about 10 nb, indicating that the production rate was approximately 2 atoms per min. Because of the short half-life and the low production rate of Rf, each atom produced decays before a new atom is synthesized. It means that any chemistry to be performed must be done on an 'atom-at-a-time' basis. Therefore rapid, very efficient and selective chemical procedures are indispensable to isolate the desired trans actinide 261 Rf. To perform fast and repetitive ion-exchange separation of Rf, we have developed the apparatus AIDA (Automated Ion exchange separation system coupled with the Detection apparatus for Alpha spectroscopy). Recently, ion-exchange behavior of Rf in acidic solutions has been studied with AIDA, and the results indicate that anion-exchange behavior of Rf is quite similar

  12. Why Are There So Few Ethics Consults in Children's Hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Brian; Brockman, Manuel; Garrett, Jeremy; Knackstedt, Angie; Lantos, John

    2017-10-03

    In most children's hospitals, there are very few ethics consultations, even though there are many ethically complex cases. We hypothesize that the reason for this may be that hospitals develop different mechanisms to address ethical issues and that many of these mechanisms are closer in spirit to the goals of the pioneers of clinical ethics than is the mechanism of a formal ethics consultation. To show how this is true, we first review the history of collaboration between philosophers and physicians about clinical dilemmas. Then, as a case-study, we describe the different venues that have developed at one children's hospital to address ethical issues. At our hospital, there are nine different venues in which ethical issues are regularly and explicitly addressed. They are (1) ethics committee meetings, (2) Nursing Ethics Forum, (3) ethics Brown Bag workshops, (4) PICU ethics rounds, (5) Grand Rounds, (6) NICU Comprehensive Care Rounds, (7) Palliative Care Team (PaCT) case conferences, (8) multidisciplinary consults in Fetal Health Center, and (9) ethics consultations. In our hospital, ethics consults account for only a tiny percentage of ethics discussions. We suspect that most hospitals have multiple and varied venues for ethics discussions. We hope this case study will stimulate research in other hospitals analyzing the various ways in which ethicists and ethics committees can build an ethical environment in hospitals. Such research might suggest that ethicists need to develop a different set of "core competencies" than the ones that are needed to do ethics consultations. Instead, they should focus on their skills in creating multiple "moral spaces" in which regular and ongoing discussion of ethical issues would take place. A successful ethicist would empower everyone in the hospital to speak up about the values that they believe are central to respectful, collaborative practice and patient care. Such a role is closer to what the first hospital philosophers set

  13. Few emitters in a cavity: from cooperative emission to individualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffeves, A; Portolan, S; Gerace, D; Drezet, A; Franca Santos, M

    2011-01-01

    We study the temporal correlations of the field emitted by an electromagnetic resonator coupled to a mesoscopic number of two-level emitters that are incoherently pumped by a weak external drive. We solve the master equation of the system for increasing number of emitters and as a function of the cavity quality factor, and we identify three main regimes characterized by well-distinguished statistical properties of the emitted radiation. For small cavity decay rates, the emission events are uncorrelated and the number of photons in the emitted field becomes larger than one, resembling the build-up of a laser field inside the cavity. At intermediate decay rates (as compared with the emitter-cavity coupling) and for a few emitters, the statistics of the emitted radiation is bunched and strikingly dependent on the parity of the number of emitters. The latter property is related to the cooperativity of the emitters mediated by their coupling to the cavity mode, and its connection with steady-state subradiance is discussed. Finally, in the bad cavity regime the typical situation of emission from a collection of individual emitters is recovered. We also analyze how the cooperative behavior evolves as a function of pure dephasing, which allows us to recover the case of a classical source made of an ensemble of independent emitters, similar to what is obtained for a very leaky cavity. State-of-the-art techniques of Q-switch of resonant cavities, allied with the recent capability of tuning single emitters in and out of resonance, suggest this system to be a versatile source of different quantum states of light.

  14. Few emitters in a cavity: from cooperative emission to individualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auffeves, A; Portolan, S [CEA/CNRS/UJF Joint Team ' Nanophysics and Semiconductors' , Institut Neel-CNRS, BP 166, 25 Rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Gerace, D [Dipartimento di Fisica ' Alessandro Volta' and UdR CNISM, Universita di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Drezet, A [Institut Neel-CNRS, BP 166, 25 Rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Franca Santos, M, E-mail: msantos@fisica.ufmg.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, CP 702, 30123-970 (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    We study the temporal correlations of the field emitted by an electromagnetic resonator coupled to a mesoscopic number of two-level emitters that are incoherently pumped by a weak external drive. We solve the master equation of the system for increasing number of emitters and as a function of the cavity quality factor, and we identify three main regimes characterized by well-distinguished statistical properties of the emitted radiation. For small cavity decay rates, the emission events are uncorrelated and the number of photons in the emitted field becomes larger than one, resembling the build-up of a laser field inside the cavity. At intermediate decay rates (as compared with the emitter-cavity coupling) and for a few emitters, the statistics of the emitted radiation is bunched and strikingly dependent on the parity of the number of emitters. The latter property is related to the cooperativity of the emitters mediated by their coupling to the cavity mode, and its connection with steady-state subradiance is discussed. Finally, in the bad cavity regime the typical situation of emission from a collection of individual emitters is recovered. We also analyze how the cooperative behavior evolves as a function of pure dephasing, which allows us to recover the case of a classical source made of an ensemble of independent emitters, similar to what is obtained for a very leaky cavity. State-of-the-art techniques of Q-switch of resonant cavities, allied with the recent capability of tuning single emitters in and out of resonance, suggest this system to be a versatile source of different quantum states of light.

  15. EPR Imaging at a Few Megahertz Using SQUID Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Inseob; Day, Peter; Penanen, Konstantin; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus being developed for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging operates in the resonance-frequency range of about 1 to 2 MHz well below the microwave frequencies used in conventional EPR. Until now, in order to obtain sufficient signal-to-noise radios (SNRs) in conventional EPR, it has been necessary to place both detectors and objects to be imaged inside resonant microwave cavities. EPR imaging has much in common with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is described briefly in the immediately preceding article. In EPR imaging as in MRI, one applies a magnetic pulse to make magnetic moments (in this case, of electrons) precess in an applied magnetic field having a known gradient. The magnetic moments precess at a resonance frequency proportional to the strength of the local magnetic field. One detects the decaying resonance-frequency magnetic- field component associated with the precession. Position is encoded by use of the known relationship between the resonance frequency and the position dependence of the magnetic field. EPR imaging has recently been recognized as an important tool for non-invasive, in vivo imaging of free radicals and reduction/oxidization metabolism. However, for in vivo EPR imaging of humans and large animals, the conventional approach is not suitable because (1) it is difficult to design and construct resonant cavities large enough and having the required shapes; (2) motion, including respiration and heartbeat, can alter the resonance frequency; and (3) most microwave energy is absorbed in the first few centimeters of tissue depth, thereby potentially endangering the subject and making it impossible to obtain adequate signal strength for imaging at greater depth. To obtain greater penetration depth, prevent injury to the subject, and avoid the difficulties associated with resonant cavities, it is necessary to use lower resonance frequencies. An additional advantage of using lower resonance frequencies is that one can use

  16. Introductory Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, John R

    2012-01-01

    Praise for Introductory Raman Spectroscopy Highlights basic theory, which is treated in an introductory fashion Presents state-of-the-art instrumentation Discusses new applications of Raman spectroscopy in industry and research.

  17. Photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalczyk, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The use of photoelectron spectroscopy, primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to obtain information on the electronic structure of a wide variety of solids (especially the bulk electronic structure of solids) is covered. Both valence band and core-level spectra, as well as a few cases of photon excited Auger electron spectroscopy, are employed in the investigations to derive information on N(E). The effect of several modulations inherent in the measured I(E)'s, such as final state band structure, cross section, and relaxation, is discussed. Examples of many-electron interactions in PES are given. Some experimental aspects of PES and AES studies are given with emphasis on sample preparation techniques. Multiple splitting of core levels is examined using the Mn levels in MnF 2 as a detailed case study. Core level splittings in transition metals, rare earth metals, transition metal halides and several alloys are also reported. The application of PES to the study of the chemical bond in some crystalline semiconductors and insulators, A/sup N/B/sup 8-N/ and A/sup N/B/sup 10-N/ compounds is treated, and a spectroscopic scale of ionicity for these compounds is developed from the measured ''s-band'' splitting in the valence band density of states

  18. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  19. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  20. Gravitational waves and antennas

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    Gravitational waves and their detection represent today a hot topic, which promises to play a central role in astrophysics, cosmology and theoretical physics. Technological developments have enabled the construction of such sensitive detectors that the detection of gravitational radiation and the start of a new astronomy could become a reality during the next few years. This is expected to bring a revolution in our knowledge of the universe by allowing the observation of hiterto unseen phenomena such as coalescence of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes) fall of stars into supermassive black holes, stellar core collapses, big bang relics and the new and unexpected. In these lectures I give a brief overview of this challenging field of modern physics. Topics : Basic properties of gravitational radiation. Astrophysical sources. Principle of operation of detectors. Interferometers (both ground based and space-based), bars and spheres. Present status of the experiments, their recent results and their f...

  1. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented. (GHT)

  2. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented

  3. Efficient Wave Energy Amplification with Wave Reflectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten Mejlhede; Frigaard, Peter Bak

    2002-01-01

    Wave Energy Converters (WEC's) extract wave energy from a limited area, often a single point or line even though the wave energy is generally spread out along the wave crest. By the use of wave reflectors (reflecting walls) the wave energy is effectively focused and increased to approximately 130......-140%. In the paper a procedure for calculating the efficiency and optimizing the geometry of wave reflectors are described, this by use of a 3D boundary element method. The calculations are verified by laboratory experiments and a very good agreement is found. The paper gives estimates of possible power benifit...... for different geometries of the wave reflectors and optimal geometrical design parameters are specified. On this basis inventors of WEC's can evaluate whether a specific WEC possible could benefit from wave reflectors....

  4. Probabilistic Forecasting of the Wave Energy Flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinson, Pierre; Reikard, G.; Bidlot, J.-R.

    2012-01-01

    Wave energy will certainly have a significant role to play in the deployment of renewable energy generation capacities. As with wind and solar, probabilistic forecasts of wave power over horizons of a few hours to a few days are required for power system operation as well as trading in electricit......% and 70% in terms of Continuous Rank Probability Score (CRPS), depending upon the test case and the lead time. It is finally shown that the log-Normal assumption can be seen as acceptable, even though it may be refined in the future....

  5. Waves and Tsunami Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frashure, K. M.; Chen, R. F.; Stephen, R. A.; Bolmer, T.; Lavin, M.; Strohschneider, D.; Maichle, R.; Micozzi, N.; Cramer, C.

    2007-01-01

    Demonstrating wave processes quantitatively in the classroom using standard classroom tools (such as Slinkys and wave tanks) can be difficult. For example, waves often travel too fast for students to actually measure amplitude or wavelength. Also, when teaching propagating waves, reflections from the ends set up standing waves, which can confuse…

  6. Early Cambrian wave-formed shoreline deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Lars B; Glad, Aslaug Clemmensen; Pedersen, Gunver Krarup

    2017-01-01

    -preserved subaqueous dunes and wave ripples indicates deposition in a wave-dominated upper shoreface (littoral zone) environment, and the presence of interference ripples indicates that the littoral zone environment experienced water level fluctuations due to tides and/or changing meteorological conditions. Discoidal....... During this period, wave-formed shoreline sediments (the Vik Member, Hardeberga Formation) were deposited on Bornholm and are presently exposed at Strøby quarry. The sediments consist of fine- and medium-grained quartz-cemented arenites in association with a few silt-rich mudstones. The presence of well...

  7. Photonics surface waves on metamaterials interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Bogdanov, Andrey; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2017-01-01

    A surface wave (SW) in optics is a light wave, which is supported at an interface of two dissimilar media and propagates along the interface with its field amplitude exponentially decaying away from the boundary. The research on surface waves has been flourishing in last few decades thanks...... to their unique properties of surface sensitivity and field localization. These features have resulted in applications in nano-guiding, sensing, light-trapping and imaging based on the near-field techniques, contributing to the establishment of the nanophotonics as a field of research. Up to present, a wide...... variety of surface waves has been investigated in numerous material and structure settings. This paper reviews the recent progress and development in the physics of SWs localized at metamaterial interfaces, as well as bulk media in order to provide broader perspectives on optical surface waves in general...

  8. Spectroscopy in catalysis : an introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemantsverdriet, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    Spectroscopy in Catalysis describes the most important modern analytical techniques used to investigate catalytic surfaces. These include electron spectroscopy (XPS, UPS, AES, EELS), ion spectroscopy (SIMS, SNMS, RBS, LEIS), vibrational spectroscopy (infrared, Raman, EELS), temperature-programmed

  9. Forecasting ocean wave energy: A Comparison of the ECMWF wave model with time series methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reikard, Gordon; Pinson, Pierre; Bidlot, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the technology has been developed to make wave farms commercially viable. Since electricity is perishable, utilities will be interested in forecasting ocean wave energy. The horizons involved in short-term management of power grids range from as little as a few hours to as long as several...... days. In selecting a method, the forecaster has a choice between physics-based models and statistical techniques. A further idea is to combine both types of models. This paper analyzes the forecasting properties of a well-known physics-based model, the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts...... (ECMWF) Wave Model, and two statistical techniques, time-varying parameter regressions and neural networks. Thirteen data sets at locations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and the Gulf of Mexico are tested. The quantities to be predicted are the significant wave height, the wave period, and the wave...

  10. Image processing to optimize wave energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kyle Marc-Anthony

    The world is turning to renewable energies as a means of ensuring the planet's future and well-being. There have been a few attempts in the past to utilize wave power as a means of generating electricity through the use of Wave Energy Converters (WEC), but only recently are they becoming a focal point in the renewable energy field. Over the past few years there has been a global drive to advance the efficiency of WEC. Placing a mechanical device either onshore or offshore that captures the energy within ocean surface waves to drive a mechanical device is how wave power is produced. This paper seeks to provide a novel and innovative way to estimate ocean wave frequency through the use of image processing. This will be achieved by applying a complex modulated lapped orthogonal transform filter bank to satellite images of ocean waves. The complex modulated lapped orthogonal transform filterbank provides an equal subband decomposition of the Nyquist bounded discrete time Fourier Transform spectrum. The maximum energy of the 2D complex modulated lapped transform subband is used to determine the horizontal and vertical frequency, which subsequently can be used to determine the wave frequency in the direction of the WEC by a simple trigonometric scaling. The robustness of the proposed method is provided by the applications to simulated and real satellite images where the frequency is known.

  11. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  12. Adaptive Generation and Diagnostics of Linear Few-Cycle Light Bullets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Bock

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently we introduced the class of highly localized wavepackets (HLWs as a generalization of optical Bessel-like needle beams. Here we report on the progress in this field. In contrast to pulsed Bessel beams and Airy beams, ultrashort-pulsed HLWs propagate with high stability in both spatial and temporal domain, are nearly paraxial (supercollimated, have fringe-less spatial profiles and thus represent the best possible approximation to linear “light bullets”. Like Bessel beams and Airy beams, HLWs show self-reconstructing behavior. Adaptive HLWs can be shaped by ultraflat three-dimensional phase profiles (generalized axicons which are programmed via calibrated grayscale maps of liquid-crystal-on-silicon spatial light modulators (LCoS-SLMs. Light bullets of even higher complexity can either be freely formed from quasi-continuous phase maps or discretely composed from addressable arrays of identical nondiffracting beams. The characterization of few-cycle light bullets requires spatially resolved measuring techniques. In our experiments, wavefront, pulse and phase were detected with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, 2D-autocorrelation and spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction (SPIDER. The combination of the unique propagation properties of light bullets with the flexibility of adaptive optics opens new prospects for applications of structured light like optical tweezers, microscopy, data transfer and storage, laser fusion, plasmon control or nonlinear spectroscopy.

  13. Few-layer MoS2 as nitrogen protective barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbali, B.; Yanilmaz, A.; Tomak, A.; Tongay, S.; Çelebi, C.; Sahin, H.

    2017-10-01

    We report experimental and theoretical investigations of the observed barrier behavior of few-layer MoS2 against nitrogenation. Owing to its low-strength shearing, low friction coefficient, and high lubricity, MoS2 exhibits the demeanor of a natural N-resistant coating material. Raman spectroscopy is done to determine the coating capability of MoS2 on graphene. Surface morphology of our MoS2/graphene heterostructure is characterized by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. In addition, density functional theory-based calculations are performed to understand the energy barrier performance of MoS2 against nitrogenation. The penetration of nitrogen atoms through a defect-free MoS2 layer is prevented by a very high vertical diffusion barrier, indicating that MoS2 can serve as a protective layer for the nitrogenation of graphene. Our experimental and theoretical results show that MoS2 material can be used both as an efficient nanocoating material and as a nanoscale mask for selective nitrogenation of graphene layer.

  14. Nucleon many-body problem using quantum-mechanical few-body technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    A nucleus is treated as a quantum-mechanical many-body system consisting of protons and neutrons that interact with each other by nuclear force. This paper explains the variational calculation using the correlated basis function as a powerful technique for obtaining the precise solution of Schroedinger equation of many-body, and tries to understand the nucleon many-body system from the viewpoint of a few-body through the application cases of various nuclear systems. It describes the important correlation that characterizes the nucleon many-body system such as the mean field, cluster, and tensor of bound state, and shows that non-bound state is also describable. Since such precise theory is mantic, it is essential for explaining the nature of unknown unstable nuclei, and for determining the nuclear reaction rate under the environment of the stars difficult for experiment. The method is general and flexible, and can be applied to various quantum-mechanical many-body problems. For example, the multi-body calculation of atoms and molecules, hypernuclei, and hadron spectroscopy can be carried out only by changing the potential and particles. (A.O.)

  15. Ultrafast carrier thermalization and cooling dynamics in few-layer MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Zhaogang; Long, Run; Sun, Linfeng; Huang, Chung-Che; Zhang, Jun; Xiong, Qihua; Hewak, Daniel W; Shen, Zexiang; Prezhdo, Oleg V; Loh, Zhi-Heng

    2014-10-28

    Femtosecond optical pump-probe spectroscopy with 10 fs visible pulses is employed to elucidate the ultrafast carrier dynamics of few-layer MoS2. A nonthermal carrier distribution is observed immediately following the photoexcitation of the A and B excitonic transitions by the ultrashort, broadband laser pulse. Carrier thermalization occurs within 20 fs and proceeds via both carrier-carrier and carrier-phonon scattering, as evidenced by the observed dependence of the thermalization time on the carrier density and the sample temperature. The n(-0.37 ± 0.03) scaling of the thermalization time with carrier density suggests that equilibration of the nonthermal carrier distribution occurs via non-Markovian quantum kinetics. Subsequent cooling of the hot Fermi-Dirac carrier distribution occurs on the ∼ 0.6 ps time scale via carrier-phonon scattering. Temperature- and fluence-dependence studies reveal the involvement of hot phonons in the carrier cooling process. Nonadiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, which predict carrier-carrier and carrier-phonon scattering time scales of 40 fs and 0.5 ps, respectively, lend support to the assignment of the observed carrier dynamics.

  16. Anisotropic in-plane thermal conductivity observed in few-layer black phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhe; Maassen, Jesse; Deng, Yexin; Du, Yuchen; Garrelts, Richard P.; Lundstrom, Mark S; Ye, Peide D.; Xu, Xianfan

    2015-01-01

    Black phosphorus has been revisited recently as a new two-dimensional material showing potential applications in electronics and optoelectronics. Here we report the anisotropic in-plane thermal conductivity of suspended few-layer black phosphorus measured by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The armchair and zigzag thermal conductivities are ∼20 and ∼40 W m−1 K−1 for black phosphorus films thicker than 15 nm, respectively, and decrease to ∼10 and ∼20 W m−1 K−1 as the film thickness is reduced, exhibiting significant anisotropy. The thermal conductivity anisotropic ratio is found to be ∼2 for thick black phosphorus films and drops to ∼1.5 for the thinnest 9.5-nm-thick film. Theoretical modelling reveals that the observed anisotropy is primarily related to the anisotropic phonon dispersion, whereas the intrinsic phonon scattering rates are found to be similar along the armchair and zigzag directions. Surface scattering in the black phosphorus films is shown to strongly suppress the contribution of long mean-free-path acoustic phonons. PMID:26472191

  17. Spectroscopy of light nuclei with realistic NN interaction JISP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirokov, A. M.; Vary, J. P.; Mazur, A. I.; Weber, T. A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent results of our systematic ab initio studies of the spectroscopy of s- and p-shell nuclei in fully microscopic large-scale (up to a few hundred million basis functions) no-core shell-model calculations are presented. A new high-quality realistic nonlocal NN interaction JISP is used. This interaction is obtained in the J-matrix inverse-scattering approach (JISP stands for the J-matrix inverse-scattering potential) and is of the form of a small-rank matrix in the oscillator basis in each of the NN partial waves, providing a very fast convergence in shell-model studies. The current purely two-body JISP model of the nucleon-nucleon interaction JISP16 provides not only an excellent description of two-nucleon data (deuteron properties and np scattering) with χ 2 /datum = 1.05 but also a better description of a wide range of observables (binding energies, spectra, rms radii, quadrupole moments, electromagnetic-transition probabilities, etc.) in all s-and p-shell nuclei than the best modern interaction models combining realistic nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon interactions.

  18. Finite Amplitude Ocean Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    wavelength, they are called shallow water waves. In the ... Deep and intermediate water waves are dispersive as the velocity of these depends on wavelength. This is not the ..... generation processes, the finite amplitude wave theories are very ...

  19. Few-body Studies at the High Intensity γ-Ray Source (HIγS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weller H.R.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The HIγS facility is making it possible to perform studies of few body systems at a new level of accuracy and precision. A study of the photodisintegration of the deuteron using 100% linearly polarized beams at 14 and 16 MeV has determined the splittings of the three p-wave amplitudes involved in this process for the first time. These results show that the relativistic contributions, which when included in the theory lead to a positive value of the GDH integrand above 8 MeV, are valid. The near threshold data on the photodisintegration of the deuteron provide results which are used to extract the forward spin-polarizability of the deuteron for the first time. The experimental value is in good agreement with a recent effective field theory calculation. Measurements of the absolute differential cross section of the 3He(γ,npp reaction have been completed at three γ-ray energies. The measurements were made at incident γ-ray energies of 12.8, 13.5, and 14.7 MeV. It has been found that the shape of the outgoing neutron energy distribution at a given scattering angle at 12.8 MeV disagrees with current theoretical predictions. At these energies, the shape is consistent with a phase-space-only shape. At the higher energies, the measurements agree with theory.

  20. The Prediction of Wave Competitions in Inhomogeneous Brusselator Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Xiao-Hua; Dong Yun-Xia; Huang Xiao-Qing; Li Ning

    2015-01-01

    The competition of waves has remained a hot topic in physics over the past few decades, especially the area of pattern control. Because of improved understanding of various dynamic behaviors, many practical applications have sprung up recently. The prediction of wave competitions is also very important and quite useful in these fields. This paper considers the behaviors of wave competitions in simple, inhomogeneous media which is modeled by Brusselator equations. We present a simple rule to judge the results of wave competitions utilizing the dispersion relation curves and the waves coming from different wave sources. Moreover, this rule can also be used to predict the results of wave propagation. It provides methods of obtaining the desired waves with given frequencies in inhomogeneous media. All our results are concluded and verified by computer simulations. (paper)

  1. Wave and particle evolution downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckean, M. E.; Omidi, N.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Karimabadi, H.

    1995-01-01

    Distributions of ions heated in quasi-perpendicular bow shocks have large perpendicular temperature anisotropies that provide free energy for the growth of Alfven ion cyclotron (AIC) and mirror waves. These modes are often obsreved in the Earth's magnetosheath. Using two-dimensional hybrid simulations, we show that these waves are produced near the shock front and convected downstream rather than being produced locally downstream. The wave activity reduces the proton anisotropy to magnetosheath levels within a few tens of gyroradii of the shock but takes significantly longer to reduce the anisotropy of He(++) ions. The waves are primarily driven by proton anisotropy and the dynamics of the helium ions is controlled by the proton waves. Downstream of high Mach number shocks, mirror waves compete effectively with AIC waves. Downstream of low Mach number shocks, AIC waves dominate.

  2. Nonlinear spin wave coupling in adjacent magnonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadovnikov, A. V., E-mail: sadovnikovav@gmail.com; Nikitov, S. A. [Laboratory “Metamaterials,” Saratov State University, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation); Kotel' nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125009 (Russian Federation); Beginin, E. N.; Morozova, M. A.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.; Grishin, S. V.; Sheshukova, S. E. [Laboratory “Metamaterials,” Saratov State University, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-25

    We have experimentally studied the coupling of spin waves in the adjacent magnonic crystals. Space- and time-resolved Brillouin light-scattering spectroscopy is used to demonstrate the frequency and intensity dependent spin-wave energy exchange between the side-coupled magnonic crystals. The experiments and the numerical simulation of spin wave propagation in the coupled periodic structures show that the nonlinear phase shift of spin wave in the adjacent magnonic crystals leads to the nonlinear switching regime at the frequencies near the forbidden magnonic gap. The proposed side-coupled magnonic crystals represent a significant advance towards the all-magnonic signal processing in the integrated magnonic circuits.

  3. Nonlinear spin wave coupling in adjacent magnonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadovnikov, A. V.; Nikitov, S. A.; Beginin, E. N.; Morozova, M. A.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.; Grishin, S. V.; Sheshukova, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    We have experimentally studied the coupling of spin waves in the adjacent magnonic crystals. Space- and time-resolved Brillouin light-scattering spectroscopy is used to demonstrate the frequency and intensity dependent spin-wave energy exchange between the side-coupled magnonic crystals. The experiments and the numerical simulation of spin wave propagation in the coupled periodic structures show that the nonlinear phase shift of spin wave in the adjacent magnonic crystals leads to the nonlinear switching regime at the frequencies near the forbidden magnonic gap. The proposed side-coupled magnonic crystals represent a significant advance towards the all-magnonic signal processing in the integrated magnonic circuits.

  4. An efficient method for the carboxylation of few-wall carbon nanotubes with little damage to their sidewalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martín, Olga [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Chemical Engineering, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Av. Universidad 30, 28911 Leganés-Madrid (Spain); Gutierrez, Humberto R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 102 Natural Science Building, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Maroto-Valiente, Angel [Departamento de Química Inorgánica y Química Técnica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, C/ Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Terrones, Mauricio [Research Center for Exotic Nanocarbons (JST), Shinshu University, Wakasato 4-17-1, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan); Department of Physics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, 104 Davey Lab., University Park, PA 16802-6300 (United States); Blanco, Tamara [Materials and Processes Department, Airbus Operations S.L., Paseo John Lennon s/n, 28906 Getafe-Madrid (Spain); Baselga, Juan, E-mail: jbaselga@ing.uc3m.es [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Chemical Engineering, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Av. Universidad 30, 28911 Leganés-Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-15

    We report a novel method that is able to efficiently functionalize carbon nanotubes (few-walled: from 1 to 6 layers and multiwalled) with a high yield of carboxyl groups, based on treatments with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the presence of UV light. The amount of carboxylic groups was quantified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and back-titration, showing both measurements reasonable agreement. According to the zeta potential values and to the amount of suspended nanotubes, we demonstrate that the method is able to produce uniform and stable suspensions of carbon nanotubes in water. With the aid of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and Raman spectroscopy, we show that the surfaces of the tubes are not damaged by the treatment and that the functionalized tubes have an enhanced reactivity toward oxygen. This route is efficient and could now be used to fabricate polymer composites using few-walled and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. - Highlights: • We report an efficient method for acid functionalization of carbon nanotubes. • The method produces uniform and stable suspensions of carbon nanotubes in water. • The surfaces of the tubes are not damaged by the treatment.

  5. Atom Wave Interferometers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pritchard, David

    1999-01-01

    Matter wave interferometers, in which de Broglie waves are coherently split and then recombined to produce interference fringes, have opened exciting new possibilities for precision and fundamental...

  6. Local solid phase growth of few-layer graphene on silicon carbide from nickel silicide supersaturated with carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobedo-Cousin, Enrique; Vassilevski, Konstantin; Hopf, Toby; Wright, Nick; O'Neill, Anthony; Horsfall, Alton; Goss, Jonathan; Cumpson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Patterned few-layer graphene (FLG) films were obtained by local solid phase growth from nickel silicide supersaturated with carbon, following a fabrication scheme, which allows the formation of self-aligned ohmic contacts on FLG and is compatible with conventional SiC device processing methods. The process was realised by the deposition and patterning of thin Ni films on semi-insulating 6H-SiC wafers followed by annealing and the selective removal of the resulting nickel silicide by wet chemistry. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to confirm both the formation and subsequent removal of nickel silicide. The impact of process parameters such as the thickness of the initial Ni layer, annealing temperature, and cooling rates on the FLG films was assessed by Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and atomic force microscopy. The thickness of the final FLG film estimated from the Raman spectra varied from 1 to 4 monolayers for initial Ni layers between 3 and 20 nm thick. Self-aligned contacts were formed on these patterned films by contact photolithography and wet etching of nickel silicide, which enabled the fabrication of test structures to measure the carrier concentration and mobility in the FLG films. A simple model of diffusion-driven solid phase chemical reaction was used to explain formation of the FLG film at the interface between nickel silicide and silicon carbide.

  7. Looking towards gravitational wave detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsotti, Lisa

    2009-05-01

    It is an exciting time in gravitational wave research. The first generation ground detectors, which aim to detect gravitational waves in the audio-frequency region, have been successfully operated at their design sensitivity. One integrated year of coincident data from the three LIGO interferometers in United States has been collected between 2005 and 2007, in partial coincidence with the two European detectors, VIRGO and GEO. All the detectors are currently being upgraded, and they will come back on-line in the next few months with a factor 2 better sensitivity. A major upgrade of LIGO and VIRGO, scheduled to happen immediately after their upcoming science runs, will bring on-line second generation detectors 4 years from now. Their sensitivity is designed to be 10 times better than the first generation detectors, resulting in an expected event rate of at least a few per year. Looking farther into the future, space-based detectors such as LISA propose to cover a lower range of frequencies which are inaccessible on Earth, enhancing the opportunity of understanding our Universe trough gravitational waves.

  8. Planetary wave-gravity wave interactions during mesospheric inversion layer events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, K.; Sridharan, S.; Raghunath, K.; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, S.; Bhavani Kumar, Y.

    2013-07-01

    lidar temperature observations over Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E) show a few mesospheric inversion layer (MIL) events during 20-25 January 2007. The zonal mean removed SABER temperature shows warm anomalies around 50°E and 275°E indicating the presence of planetary wave of zonal wave number 2. The MIL amplitudes in SABER temperature averaged for 10°N-15°N and 70°E-90°E show a clear 2 day wave modulation during 20-28 January 2007. Prior to 20 January 2007, a strong 2day wave (zonal wave number 2) is observed in the height region of 80-90 km and it gets largely suppressed during 20-26 January 2007 as the condition for vertical propagation is not favorable, though it prevails at lower heights. The 10 day mean zonal wind over Tirunelveli (8.7°N, 77.8°E) shows deceleration of eastward winds indicating the westward drag due to wave dissipation. The nightly mean MF radar observed zonal winds show the presence of alternating eastward and westward winds during the period of 20-26 January 2007. The two dimensional spectrum of Rayleigh lidar temperature observations available for the nights of 20, 22, and 24 January 2007 shows the presence of gravity wave activity with periods 18 min, 38 min, 38 min, and vertical wavelengths 6.4 km, 4.0 km, 6.4 km respectively. From the dispersion relation of gravity waves, it is inferred that these waves are internal gravity waves rather than inertia gravity waves with the horizontal phase speeds of ~40 m/s, ~37 m/s, and ~50 m/s respectively. Assuming the gravity waves are eastward propagating waves, they get absorbed only in the eastward local wind fields of the planetary wave thereby causing turbulence and eddy diffusion which can be inferred from the estimation of large drag force due to the breaking of gravity wave leading to the formation of large amplitude inversion events in alternate nights. The present study shows that, the mesospheric temperature inversion is caused mainly due to the gravity wave breaking and the inversion

  9. Introduction to experimental infrared spectroscopy fundamentals and practical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Tasumi, Mitsuo; Ochiai, Shukichi

    2014-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is generally understood to mean the science of spectra relating to infrared radiation, namely electromagnetic waves, in the wavelength region occurring intermediately between visible light and microwaves. Measurements of infrared spectra have been providing useful information, for a variety of scientific research and industrial studies, for over half a century; this is set to continue in the foreseeable future. Introduction to Experimental Infrared Spectroscopy is intended to be a handy guide for those who have no, or limited, experience in infrared spectroscopi

  10. Progress in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, H.J.; Kleinpoppen, H.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents reviews by leading experts in the field covering areas of research at the forefront of atomic spectroscopy. Topics considered include the k ordering of atomic structure, multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculations for complex atoms, new methods in high-resolution laser spectroscopy, resonance ionization spectroscopy (inert atom detection), trapped ion spectroscopy, high-magnetic-field atomic physics, the effects of magnetic and electric fields on highly excited atoms, x rays from superheavy collision systems, recoil ion spectroscopy with heavy ions, investigations of superheavy quasi-atoms via spectroscopy of electron rays and positrons, impact ionization by fast projectiles, and amplitudes and state parameters from ion- and atom-atom excitation processes

  11. Observations of exotic inner core waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waszek, Lauren; Deuss, A.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412396610

    2015-01-01

    The seismic structure of Earth’s inner core is highly complex, displaying strong anisotropy and further regional variations. However, few seismic waves are sensitive to the inner core and fundamental questions regarding the origin of the observed seismic features remain unanswered. Thus, new

  12. Advances in DUV spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Mogensen, Claus Tilsted

    The would-be advantages of deep UV (DUV) spectroscopy are well known, but the potential applications have so far not been fully realized due to technological limitations and, perhaps, lack of bright ideas. However, new components and new knowledge about DUV spectra and spectroscopic methods...... combined with increasing needs for solutions to practical problems in environmental protection, medicine and pollution monitoring promise a new era in DUV spectroscopy. Here we shall review the basis for DUV spectroscopy, both DUV fluorescence and DUV Raman spectroscopy, and describe recent advances...

  13. Spectroscopy for Dummies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvold, Lars René

    This presentation will give short introduction to the most pertinent topics of optical spectroscopy. The following topics will be discussed: • The origin of spectra in UV, VIS and IR spectral range • Spectroscopic methods like absorption, luminescence and Raman • Wavelength dispersive optical...... components • Materials for use optical spectroscopy • Spectrometer geometries • Detectors for use in spectrometer • Practical examples of optical spectroscopy The objective of this presentation is to give the audience a good feel for the range of possibilities that optical spectroscopy can provide....

  14. Enhanced asymmetry in few-cycle attosecond pulse ionization of He in the vicinity of autoionizing resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djiokap, J M Ngoko; Starace, Anthony F; Hu, S X; Jiang Weichao; Peng Liangyou

    2012-01-01

    By solving the two-active-electron, time-dependent Schrödinger equation in its full dimensionality, we investigate the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) dependence of single ionization of He to the He + (1s) state triggered by an intense few-cycle attosecond pulse with carrier frequency ω corresponding to the energy ℏω = 36 eV. Effects of electron correlations are probed by comparing projections of the final state of the two-electron wave packet onto field-free highly correlated Jacobi matrix wave functions with projections onto uncorrelated Coulomb wave functions. Significant differences are found in the vicinity of autoionizing resonances. Owing to the broad bandwidths of our 115 and 230 as pulses and their high intensities (1–2 PW cm −2 ), asymmetries are found in the differential probability for ionization of electrons parallel and antiparallel to the linear polarization axis of the laser pulse. These asymmetries stem from interference of the one- and two-photon ionization amplitudes for producing electrons with the same momentum along the linear polarization axis. Whereas these asymmetries generally decrease with increasing ionized electron kinetic energy, we find a large enhancement of the asymmetry in the vicinity of two-electron doubly excited (autoionizing) states on an energy scale comparable to the widths of the autoionizing states. The CEP dependence of the energy-integrated asymmetry agrees very well with the predictions of time-dependent perturbation theory (Pronin et al 2009 Phys. Rev. A 80 063403). (paper)

  15. Electron-probe microanalysis: x-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The main principles on X-ray, energy and wave length dispersive spectroscopy are reviewed. In order to allow the choice of the best operating conditions, the importance of the regulation and control systems is underlined. Emission theory, X-rays nature and its interaction with matter and electrons in the matter is shown. The structure, operating procedures and necessary electronics (single channel - analysis chain) automatic-control system for the threshold-energies discrimination and the energy distribution visualization) associated to the wavelength dispersive spectroscopy are described. The focusing control, resolution, influence of chemical bonds and multilayer-structure monochromators relaled to wavelength dispersive spectroscopy are studied. Concerning the energy-dispersive spectroscopy, the detector, preamplifier, amplifier, analog-digital converter, as well as the utilization and control of the spectrometer are described. Problems and instrumental progress on energy-dispersive spectroscopy related to the electronic-noise control, charge collection and light-elements detection are discussed [fr

  16. Bobby Few

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Emanuel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available  “I love you ALL.” Pain--from his bandaged thumb--said this,then music, his kiss. “My piano aches.”Voiced, old wounds made him look thintill his J-A-AZ jumped in.Copyright © 2008 by James A. Emanuel. All rights reserved.

  17. Nuclear spectroscopy with direct relations II. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throw, F. E.

    1964-01-01

    The Symposium on Nuclear Spectroscopy with Direct Reactions, sponsored and organized by Argonne National Laboratory under the auspices of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission, was held on 9-11 March 1964 at the Center for Continuing Education, University of Chicago. The present volume contains the invited papers along with abstracts or summaries of the few short papers selected for their special relevance to the topics of the invited lecturers . Edited versions of the discussions are also included

  18. Financial Rogue Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Zhenya

    2010-01-01

    We analytically give the financial rogue waves in the nonlinear option pricing model due to Ivancevic, which is nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes model. These rogue wave solutions may he used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for rogue wave phenomenon in financial markets and related fields.

  19. Hierarchical wave functions revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dingping.

    1997-11-01

    We study the hierarchical wave functions on a sphere and on a torus. We simplify some wave functions on a sphere or a torus using the analytic properties of wave functions. The open question, the construction of the wave function for quasi electron excitation on a torus, is also solved in this paper. (author)

  20. A Simple Wave Driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Burak Kagan; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the…

  1. Investigation of attosecond ionization dynamics in gases and solids with intense few-cycle laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrofanov, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of intense light fields with dielectric materials has fascinated scientists since the invention of pulsed lasers in the early sixties. Despite the many decades of research, the interest in the field keeps growing because of the potential technological applications of optical (meta-) materials and the prospects of light-controlled peta-Hertz electronics as well as the improving understanding of the fundamental processes behind light-matter interactions. The progress in the short-pulse laser technology that delivered ever-shorter light pulses was echoed by the discoveries of different progressively shorter time scales in the cycle of excitation and energy/charge relaxation in transparent solids, many parts of which are now well understood. The ultimate challenge lies in recovering the earliest stages of the dynamics which are linked to optical-field-ionization that proceeds within a fraction of an optical cycle. One of the complications of advancing the attosecond science to the bulk media is the problem of inducing and detecting a synchronized attosecond response. The charged particles spectroscopy, well developed in gaseous media during last decade and capable of reaching an attosecond temporal resolution cannot be used as an experimental tool for investigation since direct detection of charged particles is impossible in the volume of a solid material. However, solids are the natural place where electronic processes on the sub-femtosecond or attosecond time scale are expected. Very recently several methods for measuring attosecond dynamics in condensed media have been proposed utilizing optical fields in the transparency range of the material. In this thesis a method, suggested in our scientific group is presented. It is an all-optical method based on the detection of optical harmonics originating from ultrafast modulation of a free electron current due to ionization in the field of intense few-cycle laser pulses. This technique will allow retrieving

  2. Investigations of the structure and electromagnetic interactions of few-body systems. Progress report, September 1, 1983-August 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, E.P.; Lehman, D.R.; Prats, F.

    1984-01-01

    The George Washington University nuclear theory group proposes to conduct investigations of the structure and electromagnetic interactions of few-body systems. The structural properties of the very light nuclei are examined by developing theoretical models that begin from the basic interactions between the constituents and that are solved exactly (numerically), i.e., full three or four-body dynamics. Such models are then used in an attempt to understand the details of the strong and electromagnetic interactions of the few-nucleon nuclei after the basic underlying reaction mechanisms are understood with simpler models. Examples of specific work proposed are the following: (1) From exact four-body dynamics, derive the equations that will permit calculation of the 4 He→ 3 He+n and 4 He→d+d asymptotic normalization constants; (2) Develop a unified picture of the p + d → 3 He = γ, p + d → 3 He = π 0 , p + d → 3 H + π + reactions at intermediate energies; (3) Calculate the elastic and inelastic (1 + →0 + ) form factors for 6 Li with three-body (αNN) wave functions; (4) Calculate static properties (RMS radius, magnetic moment, and quadrupole moment) of 6 Li with three-body wave functions; and (5) Develop the theory for the coincidence reactions 6 Li(p,2p)nα, 6 Li(e,e'p)nα, and 6 Li(e,e'd)α. It is anticipated that these efforts will expand the frontiers of our knowledge about few-body nuclei

  3. Induction-detection electron spin resonance with spin sensitivity of a few tens of spins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artzi, Yaron; Twig, Ygal; Blank, Aharon [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-02-23

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a spectroscopic method that addresses electrons in paramagnetic materials directly through their spin properties. ESR has many applications, ranging from semiconductor characterization to structural biology and even quantum computing. Although it is very powerful and informative, ESR traditionally suffers from low sensitivity, requiring many millions of spins to get a measureable signal with commercial systems using the Faraday induction-detection principle. In view of this disadvantage, significant efforts were made recently to develop alternative detection schemes based, for example, on force, optical, or electrical detection of spins, all of which can reach single electron spin sensitivity. This sensitivity, however, comes at the price of limited applicability and usefulness with regard to real scientific and technological issues facing modern ESR which are currently dealt with conventional induction-detection ESR on a daily basis. Here, we present the most sensitive experimental induction-detection ESR setup and results ever recorded that can detect the signal from just a few tens of spins. They were achieved thanks to the development of an ultra-miniature micrometer-sized microwave resonator that was operated at ∼34 GHz at cryogenic temperatures in conjunction with a unique cryogenically cooled low noise amplifier. The test sample used was isotopically enriched phosphorus-doped silicon, which is of significant relevance to spin-based quantum computing. The sensitivity was experimentally verified with the aid of a unique high-resolution ESR imaging approach. These results represent a paradigm shift with respect to the capabilities and possible applications of induction-detection-based ESR spectroscopy and imaging.

  4. Spectroscopy of Kerr Black Holes with Earth- and Space-Based Interferometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Emanuele; Sesana, Alberto; Barausse, Enrico; Cardoso, Vitor; Belczynski, Krzysztof

    2016-09-02

    We estimate the potential of present and future interferometric gravitational-wave detectors to test the Kerr nature of black holes through "gravitational spectroscopy," i.e., the measurement of multiple quasinormal mode frequencies from the remnant of a black hole merger. Using population synthesis models of the formation and evolution of stellar-mass black hole binaries, we find that Voyager-class interferometers will be necessary to perform these tests. Gravitational spectroscopy in the local Universe may become routine with the Einstein Telescope, but a 40-km facility like Cosmic Explorer is necessary to go beyond z∼3. In contrast, detectors like eLISA (evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) should carry out a few-or even hundreds-of these tests every year, depending on uncertainties in massive black hole formation models. Many space-based spectroscopical measurements will occur at high redshift, testing the strong gravity dynamics of Kerr black holes in domains where cosmological corrections to general relativity (if they occur in nature) must be significant.

  5. Wave disc engine apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Norbert; Piechna, Janusz; Sun, Guangwei; Parraga, Pablo-Francisco

    2018-01-02

    A wave disc engine apparatus is provided. A further aspect employs a constricted nozzle in a wave rotor channel. A further aspect provides a sharp bend between an inlet and an outlet in a fluid pathway of a wave rotor, with the bend being spaced away from a peripheral edge of the wave rotor. A radial wave rotor for generating electricity in an automotive vehicle is disclosed in yet another aspect.

  6. Photon wave function

    OpenAIRE

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo

    2005-01-01

    Photon wave function is a controversial concept. Controversies stem from the fact that photon wave functions can not have all the properties of the Schroedinger wave functions of nonrelativistic wave mechanics. Insistence on those properties that, owing to peculiarities of photon dynamics, cannot be rendered, led some physicists to the extreme opinion that the photon wave function does not exist. I reject such a fundamentalist point of view in favor of a more pragmatic approach. In my view, t...

  7. Strong overtones and combination bands in ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efremov, E.V.; Ariese, F.; Mank, A.J.G.; Gooijer, C.

    2006-01-01

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy is carried out using a continuous wave frequency-doubled argon ion laser operated at 229, 244, and 257 nm in order to characterize the overtones and combination bands for several classes of organic compounds in liquid solutions. Contrary to what is generally

  8. Problems in communication between heavy flavor experiment and hadron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    The implications of hadron spectroscopy are generally overlooked both by experimenters presenting results and theorists making predictions. Two examples are (1) possible effects of nodes in wave functions of final state mesons produced in B decay; (2) dependence of predictions for B decays into final states containing η or ηprime on models and mixing angles for these states

  9. A resonant ultrasound spectroscopy study of the phase transitions in Na0.75CoO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppens, Veerle; Sergienko, Ivan; Jin, Rongying

    2005-03-01

    The layered transition metal oxides NaxCoO2 have attracted much interest in the past few years. Crystals with the x˜0.75 composition undergo an order-disorder transition near 340 K, a spin-density-wave transition near 22 K and other subtle transitions at intermediate temperatures. These phase transitions, likely related to a rearrangement of the Na atoms among the available sites, have been mapped out using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. The results are modeled within the Landau theory for second order phase transitions. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725

  10. CW-THz vector spectroscopy and imaging system based on 1.55-µm fiber-optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Young; Song, Ho-Jin; Yaita, Makoto; Hirata, Akihiko; Ajito, Katsuhiro

    2014-01-27

    We present a continuous-wave terahertz (THz) vector spectroscopy and imaging system based on a 1.5-µm fiber optic uni-traveling-carrier photodiode and InGaAs photo-conductive receiver. Using electro-optic (EO) phase modulators for THz phase control with shortened optical paths, the system achieves fast vector measurement with effective phase stabilization. Dynamic ranges of 100 dB · Hz and 75 dB · Hz at 300 GHz and 1 THz, and phase stability of 1.5° per minute are obtained. With the simultaneous measurement of absorbance and relative permittivity, we demonstrate non-destructive analyses of pharmaceutical cocrystals inside tablets within a few minutes.

  11. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Matulková, Irena

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 4 (2010), s. 408-420 ISSN 1230-3402 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : FTIR spectroscopy * absorption spectroscopy * laser diodes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.027, year: 2010

  12. Acoustic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitters, G.; Kamsma, D.; Thalhammer, G.; Ritsch-Marte, M.; Peterman, E.J.G.; Wuite, G.J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Force spectroscopy has become an indispensable tool to unravel the structural and mechanochemical properties of biomolecules. Here we extend the force spectroscopy toolbox with an acoustic manipulation device that can exert forces from subpiconewtons to hundreds of piconewtons on thousands of

  13. Coherent atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garton, W.R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Argonne Spectroscopy Laboratory, initiated and advanced over several decades by F.S. Tomkins and M. Fred, has been a major international facility. A range of collaborative work in atomic spectroscopy is selected to illustrate advances in experimental physics which have been made possible by combination of the talents of Tomkins and Fred with the unique facilities of the Argonne Laboratory. (orig.)

  14. Balloon and Button Spectroscopy: A Hands-On Approach to Light and Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribaudo, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Without question, one of the most useful tools an astronomer or physicist can employ to study the universe is spectroscopy. However, for students in introductory physics or astronomy classes, spectroscopy is a relatively abstract concept that combines new physics topics such as thermal radiation, atomic physics, and the wave and particle nature of…

  15. Photoelectron wave function in photoionization: plane wave or Coulomb wave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozem, Samer; Gunina, Anastasia O; Ichino, Takatoshi; Osborn, David L; Stanton, John F; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-11-19

    The calculation of absolute total cross sections requires accurate wave functions of the photoelectron and of the initial and final states of the system. The essential information contained in the latter two can be condensed into a Dyson orbital. We employ correlated Dyson orbitals and test approximate treatments of the photoelectron wave function, that is, plane and Coulomb waves, by comparing computed and experimental photoionization and photodetachment spectra. We find that in anions, a plane wave treatment of the photoelectron provides a good description of photodetachment spectra. For photoionization of neutral atoms or molecules with one heavy atom, the photoelectron wave function must be treated as a Coulomb wave to account for the interaction of the photoelectron with the +1 charge of the ionized core. For larger molecules, the best agreement with experiment is often achieved by using a Coulomb wave with a partial (effective) charge smaller than unity. This likely derives from the fact that the effective charge at the centroid of the Dyson orbital, which serves as the origin of the spherical wave expansion, is smaller than the total charge of a polyatomic cation. The results suggest that accurate molecular photoionization cross sections can be computed with a modified central potential model that accounts for the nonspherical charge distribution of the core by adjusting the charge in the center of the expansion.

  16. Gravitational wave emission from oscillating millisecond pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Mark G.; Schwenzer, Kai

    2015-02-01

    Neutron stars undergoing r-mode oscillation emit gravitational radiation that might be detected on the Earth. For known millisecond pulsars the observed spin-down rate imposes an upper limit on the possible gravitational wave signal of these sources. Taking into account the physics of r-mode evolution, we show that only sources spinning at frequencies above a few hundred Hertz can be unstable to r-modes, and we derive a more stringent universal r-mode spin-down limit on their gravitational wave signal. We find that this refined bound limits the gravitational wave strain from millisecond pulsars to values below the detection sensitivity of next generation detectors. Young sources are therefore a more promising option for the detection of gravitational waves emitted by r-modes and to probe the interior composition of compact stars in the near future.

  17. Submillimetre wave spectroscopy of semiconductors in high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maan, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Two types of cyclotron resonance studies with far infrared radiation and at high magnetic fields in semiconductors are discussed. Firstly, the phenomenon of the change in the static conductivity at cyclotron resonance conditions in pure semiconductors, in this case n-GaAs, is investigated. Secondly, the results of cyclotron resonance experiments in an n-InAs-GaSb superlattice are discussed. (Auth.)

  18. Plasma wave detection in laser spectroscopy and gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzke, J.; Irmer, A. von; Veza, D.; Niemax, K.

    1995-01-01

    Frequency changes of plasma oscillations in low-pressure discharges are used for sensitive detection of atomic or molecular trace gases. Analyte selectivity can be either obtained by resonant laser excitation or by gas chromatography

  19. Breathers in Josephson junction ladders: Resonances and electromagnetic wave spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnichenko, A. E.; Flach, S.; Fistul, M.

    2001-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the resonant interaction between dynamical localized states (discrete breathers) and linear electromagnetic excitations (EE's) in Josephson junction ladders. By making use of direct numerical simulations we find that such an interaction manifests itself by resonant...

  20. S-wave spectroscopy and Hyperne splitting of Bc meson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Manan; Bhavsar, Tanvi; Vinodkumar, P.C.

    2017-01-01

    B c meson is the only heavy meson with two open flavours. This system is also interesting because they cannot annihilate into gluons. The mass spectra and hyperfine splitting of the B c meson are investigated in the Dirac framework with the help of linear + constant potential. The spin-spin interactions are also included in the calculation of the pseudoscalar and vector meson masses. Our computed result for the B c meson are in very good agreement with experimental results as well as other available theoretical result. Decay properties are also interesting because it is expected that decay of B c meson occur in to neutral meson. We hope our theoretical results are helpful for future experimental observations

  1. Nonlinear spectroscopy of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlawin, Frank; Gessner, Manuel; Mukamel, Shaul; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Nonlinear spectroscopy employs a series of laser pulses to interrogate dynamics in large interacting many-body systems, and it has become a highly successful method for experiments in chemical physics. Current quantum optical experiments approach system sizes and levels of complexity that require the development of efficient techniques to assess spectral and dynamical features with scalable experimental overhead. However, established methods from optical spectroscopy of macroscopic ensembles cannot be applied straightforwardly to few-atom systems. Based on the ideas proposed in M. Gessner et al., (arXiv:1312.3365), we develop a diagrammatic approach to construct nonlinear measurement protocols for controlled quantum systems, and we discuss experimental implementations with trapped ion technology in detail. These methods, in combination with distinct features of ultracold-matter systems, allow us to monitor and analyze excitation dynamics in both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. They are independent of system size, and they can therefore reliably probe systems in which, e.g., quantum state tomography becomes prohibitively expensive. We propose signals that can probe steady-state currents, detect the influence of anharmonicities on phonon transport, and identify signatures of chaotic dynamics near a quantum phase transition in an Ising-type spin chain.

  2. General Remarks about mossbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzababayev, R.M.

    2001-01-01

    More than forty years have passed since the discovery of Mossbauer effect; one of the most brilliant findings in modern physics. This effect proved itself to be the powerful tool in almost all disciplines of the natural sciences and technology. Its unique feature is that it gives the possibility to get the results which cannot be obtained by any other physical methods. Mossbauer effect has been used as a key to unlock some basic physical, chemical and biological phenomena, as a guide for finding the new ways of solving applied scientific and technical problems of electronics, metallurgy, civil engineering, and even fine arts and archaeology. Very few scientific techniques can claim entry into as many countries as Mossbauer spectroscopy. Due to its wide application in an education and research processes the community of Mossbauer spectroscopists extends to almost 100 different countries. Laboratory equipment necessary for conducting gamma resonance spectroscopy, do not require large investments, premises, personnel. The spectrometer is rather small in size and could be installed on the ordinary laboratory table. That is why Mossbauer effect is widely used at numerous Universities all over the world as an universal instrument for tuition and research

  3. Ultrasonic spectroscopy applications in condensed matter physics and materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Leisure, Robert G

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonic spectroscopy is a technique widely used in solid-state physics, materials science, and geology that utilizes acoustic waves to determine fundamental physical properties of materials, such as their elasticity and mechanical energy dissipation. This book provides complete coverage of the main issues relevant to the design, analysis, and interpretation of ultrasonic experiments. Topics including elasticity, acoustic waves in solids, ultrasonic loss, and the relation of elastic constants to thermodynamic potentials are covered in depth. Modern techniques and experimental methods including resonant ultrasound spectroscopy, digital pulse-echo, and picosecond ultrasound are also introduced and reviewed. This self-contained book includes extensive background theory and is accessible to students new to the field of ultrasonic spectroscopy, as well as to graduate students and researchers in physics, engineering, materials science, and geophysics.

  4. Fourier Transform Photoemission Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinders, M.B.J.; Drabe, K.E.; Jonkman, H.T.; Sawatzky, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that photoemission spectra can be obtained by exciting the electrons with two phase-correlated wave trains. The phase-correlated wave trains are obtained by sending broad-band ultra-violet light, coming from a deuterium lamp, through a Michelson interferometer. It is possible to

  5. Fourier transform photoemission spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinders, M.B J; Drabe, K.E.; Jonkman, H.T.; Sawatzky, G.A

    It is shown that photoemission spectra can be obtained by exciting the electrons with two phase-correlated wave trains. The phase-correlated wave trains are obtained by sending broad-band ultra-violet light, coming from a deuterium lamp, through a Michelson interferometer. It is possible to

  6. Dispersion characteristics of plasmonic waveguides for THz waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markides, Christos; Viphavakit, Charusluk; Themistos, Christos; Komodromos, Michael; Kalli, Kyriacos; Quadir, Anita; Rahman, Azizur

    2013-05-01

    Today there is an increasing surge in Surface Plasmon based research and recent studies have shown that a wide range of plasmon-based optical elements and techniques have led to the development of a variety of active switches, passive waveguides, biosensors, lithography masks, to name just a few. The Terahertz (THz) frequency region of the electromagnetic spectrum is located between the traditional microwave spectrum and the optical frequencies, and offers a significant scientific and technological potential in many fields, such as in sensing, in imaging and in spectroscopy. Waveguiding in this intermediate spectral region is a major challenge. Amongst the various THz waveguides suggested, the metal-clad waveguides supporting surface plasmon modes waves and specifically hollow core structures, coated with insulating material are showing the greatest promise as low-loss waveguides for their use in active components and as well as passive waveguides. The H-field finite element method (FEM) based full-vector formulation is used to study the vectorial modal field properties and the complex propagation characteristics of Surface Plasmon modes of a hollow-core dielectric coated rectangular waveguide structure. Additionally, the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is used to estimate the dispersion parameters and the propagation loss of the rectangular waveguide.

  7. Flow profiling of a surface acoustic wave nanopump

    OpenAIRE

    Guttenberg, Z.; Rathgeber, A.; Keller, S.; Rädler, J. O.; Wixforth, A.; Kostur, M.; Schindler, M.; Talkner, P.

    2004-01-01

    The flow profile in a capillary gap and the pumping efficiency of an acoustic micropump employing Surface Acoustic Waves is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Such ultrasonic surface waves on a piezoelectric substrate strongly couple to a thin liquid layer and generate an internal streaming within the fluid. Such acoustic streaming can be used for controlled agitation during, e.g., microarray hybridization. We use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence microsc...

  8. Ocean Wave Simulation Based on Wind Field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyi Li

    Full Text Available Ocean wave simulation has a wide range of applications in movies, video games and training systems. Wind force is the main energy resource for generating ocean waves, which are the result of the interaction between wind and the ocean surface. While numerous methods to handle simulating oceans and other fluid phenomena have undergone rapid development during the past years in the field of computer graphic, few of them consider to construct ocean surface height field from the perspective of wind force driving ocean waves. We introduce wind force to the construction of the ocean surface height field through applying wind field data and wind-driven wave particles. Continual and realistic ocean waves result from the overlap of wind-driven wave particles, and a strategy was proposed to control these discrete wave particles and simulate an endless ocean surface. The results showed that the new method is capable of obtaining a realistic ocean scene under the influence of wind fields at real time rates.

  9. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  10. Homogeneity spoil spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, J.; Boesch, C.; Martin, E.; Grutter, R.

    1987-01-01

    One of the problems of in vivo MR spectroscopy of P-31 is spectra localization. Surface coil spectroscopy, which is the method of choice for clinical applications, suffers from the high-intensity signal from subcutaneous muscle tissue, which masks the spectrum of interest from deeper structures. In order to suppress this signal while maintaining the simplicity of surface coil spectroscopy, the authors introduced a small sheet of ferromagnetically dotted plastic between the surface coil and the body. This sheet destroys locally the field homogeneity and therefore all signal from structures around the coil. The very high reproducibility of the simple experimental procedure allows long-term studies important for monitoring tumor therapy

  11. Baryon spectroscopy at KAON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comyn, Martin

    1992-07-01

    The unique opportunities for the study of baryon spectroscopy at the TRIUMF KAON Factory are outlined. Related issues in other areas of hadron spectroscopy are discussed. The complex of accelerators that comprise the TRIUMF KAON Factory, and the properties of the separated beams that will be available to experimenters, are described. Initial design considerations for detectors to be used in the study of hadron spectroscopy are presented, along with a proposed detector configuration. The progress towards realization of the TRIUMF KAON Factory is examined, and the timetable for the determination of the initial experimental programme and facilities is explained. 23 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Waves and mobile phones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the methodology used to assess the exposure to radio-frequency of the population. The main radio-frequency emitters are transmitting antennas, mobile phones, Wi-Fi systems, cord-less home phones, and micro-wave ovens. We have to know that the level of exposure is very different depending on the device, for instance a 10 minutes long use of a mobile phone with a DAS (specific absorption dose rate) of 0.04 W/kg is equivalent to a 15 day long exposure to a transmitting antenna at a spot where the field is 0.6 V/m. It appears that for transmitting antennas the exposure levels of the population are always very low and far below the protection standards. As for mobile phones, today's results can not exclude a risk for people having used a phone for more than 10 years. Experts recommend for children a restraint use of mobile phones and for adults to keep a safety distance of a few tens of centimeters between the speaker and his phone. The passage to the new UMTS-3G standard will be favourable. (A.C.)

  13. Piezo-Catalytic Effect on the Enhancement of the Ultra-High Degradation Activity in the Dark by Single- and Few-Layers MoS2 Nanoflowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jyh Ming; Chang, Wei En; Chang, Yu Ting; Chang, Chih-Kai

    2016-05-01

    Single- and few-layer MoS2 nanoflowers are first discovered to have a piezo-catalyst effect, exhibiting an ultra-high degradation activity in the dark by introducing external mechanical strains. The degradation ratio of the Rhodamine-B dye solution reaches 93% within 60 s under ultrasonic-wave assistance in the dark. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Localized instability on the route to disorder in Faraday waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani, Itamar; Cohen, Gil; Fineberg, Jay

    2010-05-07

    We experimentally investigate how disorder comes about in parametrically excited waves on a fluid surface (Faraday waves). We find that the transition from an ordered pattern to disorder corresponding to "defect-mediated turbulence" is mediated by a spatially incoherent oscillatory phase. This phase consists of highly damped waves that propagate through the effectively elastic lattice defined by the pattern. They have a well-defined frequency, velocity, and transverse polarization. As these waves decay within a few lattice spaces, they are spatially and temporally uncorrelated at larger scales.

  15. Using {sup 233}U-doped crystals to access the few-eV isomeric transition in {sup 229}Th

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stellmer, Simon; Schreitl, Matthias; Kazakov, Georgy A.; Sterba, Johannes H.; Schumm, Thorsten [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology (VCQ) and Atominstitut, TU Wien, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-07-01

    The isotope {sup 229}Th possesses an exceptionally low-lying isomeric state at an energy of only a few eV. While direct laser excitation of the isomer is a tantalizing future prospect, the stage is not yet set for nuclear laser spectroscopy: too little is known about the energy, lifetime, and internal conversion pathways of the isomer. Alternative routes to populate the isomer are needed for further investigations. We use the alpha decay {sup 233}U →{sup 229g,m}Th to populate the isomer with a probability of 2%. The {sup 233}U is embedded into VUV-transparent crystals, as the isomer transition is expected around 160 nm. The wavelength of the gamma ray, emitted upon de-excitation of the isomer into the ground state, is measured with a spectrometer. Calculations show that the isomer emission is not obscured by radioluminescence of the crystal. We report on the current status of the experiment.

  16. Spin dependent spectroscopy of heavy quarkonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Pramila; Mehrotra, I.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work mass spectroscopy of charmonium and bottonium systems has been studied using energy dependent quark interquark potential in the framework of non-relativistic Schroedinger wave equation. Energy dependence gives rise to nonlocality in the potential. These authors have used the interquark potential to be of the form of harmonic oscillator with a small linear energy dependent perturbation. Their main conclusion is that energy dependence can account for saturation of the energy levels at higher excitation energies, a feature that is observed experimentally

  17. Electromagnetic waves in gravitational wave spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haney, M.; Bini, D.; Ortolan, A.; Fortini, P.

    2013-01-01

    We have considered the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a space-time representing an exact gravitational plane wave and calculated the induced changes on the four-potential field Aμ of a plane electromagnetic wave. By choosing a suitable photon round-trip in a Michelson interferometer, we have been able to identify the physical effects of the exact gravitational wave on the electromagnetic field, i.e. phase shift, change of the polarization vector, angular deflection and delay. These results have been exploited to study the response of an interferometric gravitational wave detector beyond the linear approximation of the general theory of relativity. A much more detailed examination of this problem can be found in our paper recently published in Classical and Quantum Gravity (28 (2011) 235007).

  18. IR Spectroscopy. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenzler, H.; Gremlich, H.U.

    2002-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: absorption and molecular design, spectrometers, sample preparation, qualitative spectral interpretation and assertions, near-infrared and far-infrared spectroscopy, reference spectra and expert systems

  19. Charmonium spectroscopy, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahn, R.N.

    1987-01-01

    The state of charmonium spectroscopy is reviewed. All analyses proceed from a spin-dependent, non-relativistic Schroedinger equation. Many of the possible branching ratios for charm like states are investigated. 17 refs

  20. Dual THz comb spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Takeshi

    2017-08-01

    Optical frequency combs are innovative tools for broadband spectroscopy because a series of comb modes can serve as frequency markers that are traceable to a microwave frequency standard. However, a mode distribution that is too discrete limits the spectral sampling interval to the mode frequency spacing even though individual mode linewidth is sufficiently narrow. Here, using a combination of a spectral interleaving and dual-comb spectroscopy in the terahertz (THz) region, we achieved a spectral sampling interval equal to the mode linewidth rather than the mode spacing. The spectrally interleaved THz comb was realized by sweeping the laser repetition frequency and interleaving additional frequency marks. In low-pressure gas spectroscopy, we achieved an improved spectral sampling density of 2.5 MHz and enhanced spectral accuracy of 8.39 × 10-7 in the THz region. The proposed method is a powerful tool for simultaneously achieving high resolution, high accuracy, and broad spectral coverage in THz spectroscopy.